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 Tux Paint
version 0.9.16
Frequently Asked Questions
Copyright 2002-2006 by Bill Kendrick and others
New Breed Software
bill@newbreedsoftware.com
http://www.newbreedsoftware.com/tuxpaint/
September 14, 2002 - March 8, 2006
Drawing-related
* Fonts I added to Tux Paint only show squares
The TrueType Font you're using might have the wrong encoding. If it's
'custom' encoded, for example, you can try running it through
FontForge (http://fontforge.sourceforge.net/) to convert it to an
ISO-8859 format. (Email us if you need help with special fonts.)
* The Rubber Stamp tool is greyed out!
This means that Tux Paint either couldn't find any stamp images, or
was asked not to load them.
If you installed Tux Paint, but did not install the separate, optional
"Stamps" collection, quit Tux Paint and install it now. It should be
available from the same place you got the main Tux Paint program.
(Note: As of version 0.9.14, Tux Paint comes with a small collection
of example stamps.)
If you don't want to install the default collection of stamps, you can
just create your own. See the README documentation for more on
creating PNG image files, TXT text description files, WAV sound files,
and DAT text data files that make up stamps.
Finally, if you install the stamps, and think they should be loading,
check to see that the "nostamps" option isn't being set. (Either via a
"--nostamps" option to Tux Paint's command line, or "nostamps=yes" in
the configuration file.)
If so, either change/remove the "nostamps" option, or you can override
it with "--stamps" on the command line or "nostamps=no" or
"stamps=yes" in a configuration file.
* The Magic "Fill" Tool Looks Bad
Tux Paint is probably comparing exact pixel colors when filling.
This is faster, but looks worse. Run the command "tuxpaint
--version" from a command line, and you should see, amongst the
other output: "Low Quality Flood Fill enabled".
To change this, you must rebuild Tux Paint from source. Be sure
to remove or comment out any line that says:
#define LOW_QUALITY_FLOOD_FILL
in the "tuxpaint.c" file in the "src" directory.
* Stamp outlines are always rectangles
Tux Paint was built with low-quality (but faster) stamp outlines.
Rebuild Tux Paint from source. Be sure to remove or comment out
any line that says:
#define LOW_QUALITY_STAMP_OUTLINE
in the "tuxpaint.c" file in the "src" directory.
Interface Problems
* Stamp thumbnails in the Stamp Selector look bad
Tux Paint was probably compiled with the faster, lower quality
thumbnail code enabled. Run the command: "tuxpaint --version" from a
command line. If, amongst the other output, you see the text: "Low
Quality Thumbnails enabled", then this is what's happening.
Rebuild Tux Paint from source. Be sure to remove or comment out any
line that says:
#define LOW_QUALITY_THUMBNAILS
in the "tuxpaint.c" file in the "src" directory.
* Pictures in the 'Open' dialog look bad
"Low Quality Thumbnails" is probably enabled. See: "Stamp thumbnails
in the Stamp Selector look bad", above.
* The color picker buttons are ugly squares, not pretty buttons!
Tux Paint was probably compiled with the nice looking color selector
buttons disabled. Run the command: "tuxpaint --version" from a command
line. If, amongst the other output, you see the text: "Low Quality
Color Selector enabled", then this is what's happening.
Rebuild Tux Paint from source. Be sure to remove or comment out any
line that says:
#define LOW_QUALITY_COLOR_SELECTOR
in the "tuxpaint.c" file in the "src" directory.
* All of the text is in uppercase!
The "uppercase" option is on.
If you're running Tux Paint from a command-line, make sure you're not
giving it an "--uppercase" option.
If you're running Tux Paint by double-clicking an icon, check the
properties of the icon to see if "--uppercase" is listed as a
command-line argument.
If "--uppercase" isn't being sent on the command line, check
Tux Paint's configuration file ("~/.tuxpaintrc" under Linux and Unix,
"tuxpaint.cfg" under Windows) for a line reading: "uppercase=yes".
Either remove that line, or simply run Tux Paint with the command-line
argument: "--mixedcase", which will override the uppercase setting.
Or use Tux Paint Config. and make sure "Show Uppercase Text Only"
(under "Languages") is not checked.
* Tux Paint is in a different language!
Make sure your locale setting is correct. See "Tux Paint won't switch
to my language", below.
* Tux Paint won't switch to my language
* Linux and Unix users: Make sure the locale is available
Make sure the locale you want is available. Check your
"/etc/locale.gen" file. See the README documentation for the
locales Tux Paint uses (especially when using the "--lang"
option).
Note: Debian users can simply run "dpkg-reconfigure locales" if
the locales are managed by "dpkg."
* If you're using the "--lang" command-line option
Try using the "--locale" command-line option, or your
operating system's locale settings (e.g., the "$LANG"
environment variable), and please e-mail us regarding your
trouble.
* If you're using the "--locale" command-line option
If this doesn't work, please e-mail us regarding your
trouble.
* If you're trying to use your Operating System's locale
If this doesn't work, please e-mail us regarding your
trouble.
* Make sure you have the necessary font
Some translations require their own font. Chinese and
Korean, for example, need Chinese and Korean TrueType Fonts
installed and placed in the proper location, respectively.
The appropriate fonts for such locales can be downloaded
from the Tux Paint website:
http://www.newbreedsoftware.com/tuxpaint/download/fonts/
Printing
* Tux Paint won't print, gives an error, or prints garbage (Unix/Linux)
Tux Paint prints by creating a PostScript rendition of the picture and
sending it to an external command. By default, this command is the
"lpr" printing tool.
If that program is not available (for example, you're using CUPS, the
Common Unix Printing System, and do not have "cups-lpr" installed),
you will need to specify an appropriate command using the
"printcommand" option in Tux Paint's configuration file. (See the
OPTIONS documentation.)
Note: Versions of Tux Paint prior to 0.9.15 used a different default
command for printing, "pngtopnm | pnmtops | lpr", as Tux Paint output
PNG format, rather than PostScript.
If you had changed your "printcommand" option prior to Tux Paint
0.9.15, you will need to go back and alter it to accept PostScript.
* I get the message "You can't print yet!" when I go to print!
The "print delay" option is on. You can only print once every
X seconds.
If you're running Tux Paint from a command-line, make sure you're not
giving it a "--printdelay=..." option.
If you're running Tux Paint by double-clicking an icon, check the
properties of the icon to see if "--printdelay=..." is listed as a
command-line argument.
If a "--printdelay=..." option isn't being sent on the command line,
check Tux Paint's configuration file ("~/.tuxpaintrc" under Linux and
Unix, "tuxpaint.cfg" under Windows) for a line reading:
"printdelay=...".
Either remove that line, set the delay value to 0 (no delay), or
decrease the delay to a value you prefer. (See the README
documentation).
Or, you can simply run Tux Paint with the command-line argument:
"--printdelay=0", which will override the configuration file's
setting, and allow unlimited printing. (You won't have to wait between
prints.)
Or use Tux Paint Config. and make sure "Print Delay" (under
"Printing") is set to "0 seconds."
* I simply can't print! The button is greyed out!
The "no print" option is on.
If you're running Tux Paint from a command-line, make sure you're not
giving it a "--noprint" option.
If you're running Tux Paint by double-clicking an icon, check the
properties of the icon to see if "--noprint" is listed as an argument.
If "--noprint" isn't on the command-line, check Tux Paint's
configuration file ("~/.tuxpaintrc" under Linux and Unix,
"tuxpaint.cfg" under Windows) for a line reading: "noprint=yes".
Either remove that line, or simply run Tux Paint with the command-line
argument: "--print", which will override the configuration file's
setting.
Or use Tux Paint Config. and make sure "Allow Printing" (under
"Printing") is checked.
Saving
* Tux Paint always saves over my old picture!
The "save over" option is enabled. (This disables the prompt that
would appear when you click 'Save.')
If you're running Tux Paint from a command-line, make sure you're not
giving it a "--saveover" option.
If you're running Tux Paint by double-clicking an icon, check the
properties of the icon to see if "--saveover" is listed as an
argument.
If "--saveover" isn't on the command-line, check Tux Paint's
configuration file ("~/.tuxpaintrc" under Linux and Unix,
"tuxpaint.cfg" under Windows) for a line reading: "saveover=yes".
Either remove that line, or simply run Tux Paint with the command-line
argument: "--saveoverask", which will override the configuration
file's setting.
Or use Tux Paint Config. and make sure "Ask Before Overwriting" (under
"Saving") is checked.
Also, see "Tux Paint always saves a new picture!", below.
* Tux Paint always saves a new picture!
The "never save over" option is enabled. (This disables the prompt
that would appear when you click 'Save.')
If you're running Tux Paint from a command-line, make sure you're not
giving it a "--saveovernew" option.
If you're running Tux Paint by double-clicking an icon, check the
properties of the icon to see if "--saveovernew" is listed as an
argument.
If "--saveovernew" isn't on the command-line, check Tux Paint's
configuration file ("~/.tuxpaintrc" under Linux and Unix,
"tuxpaint.cfg" under Windows) for a line reading: "saveover=new".
Either remove that line, or simply run Tux Paint with the command-line
argument: "--saveoverask", which will override the configuration
file's setting.
Or use Tux Paint Config. and make sure "Ask Before Overwriting" (under
"Saving") is checked.
Also, see "Tux Paint always saves over my old picture!", above.
Audio Problems
* There's no sound!
* First, check the obvious:
* Are your speakers connected and turned on?
* Is the volume turned up on your speakers?
* Is the volume turned up in your Operating System's "mixer?"
* Are you certain you're using a computer with a sound card?
* Are any other programs running that use sound? (They may be
'blocking' Tux Paint from accessing your sound device)
* (Unix/Linux) Are you using a sound system, such as aRts, ESD
or GStreamer? If so, try setting the "SDL_AUDIODRIVER"
environment variable before running Tux Paint (e.g.,
"export SDL_AUDIODRIVER=arts"). Or, run Tux Paint through
the system's rerouter (e.g., run "artsdsp tuxpaint" or
"esddsp tuxpaint", instead of simply "tuxpaint").
* Is sound disabled in Tux Paint?
If sound seems to work otherwise (and you're sure no other
program is "blocking" the sound device), then Tux Paint may be
running with a "no sound" option.
Make sure you're not running Tux Paint with the "--nosound"
option as a command-line argument. (See the OPTIONS documentation
for details.)
If it's not, then check the configuration file
("/etc/tuxpaint/tuxpaint.conf" and "~/.tuxpaintrc" under Linux
and Unix, and "tuxpaint.cfg" under Windows) for a line reading:
"nosound=yes".
Either remove that line, or simply run Tux Paint with the
command-line argument: "--sound", which will override the
configuration file's setting.
Alternatively, you can use Tux Paint Config. to change the
configuration file. Make sure "Enable Sound Effects" (under
"Video & Sound") is checked, then click "Apply".
* Were sounds temporarily disabled?
Even if sounds are enabled in Tux Paint, it is possible to
disable and re-enable them temporarily using the [Alt] + [S] key
sequence. Try pressing those keys to see if sounds begin working
again.
* Was Tux Paint built without sound support?
Tux Paint may have been compiled with sound support disabled. To
test whether sound support was enabled when Tux Paint was
compiled, run Tux Paint from a command line, like so:
tuxpaint --version
If, amongst the other information, you see "Sound disabled", then
the version of Tux Paint you're running has sound disabled.
Recompile Tux Paint, and be sure NOT to build the "nosound"
target. (i.e., don't run "make nosound") Be sure the SDL_mixer
library and its development headers are available!
* Tux Paint makes too much noise! Can I turn them off?
Yes, there are a number of ways to disable sounds in Tux Paint:
* Press [Alt] + [S] while in Tux Paint to temporarily disable
sounds. (Press that key sequence again to re-enable sounds.)
* Run Tux Paint with the "no sound" option:
* Use Tux Paint Config to uncheck the "Enable Sound Effects"
option (under "Video & Sound").
* Edit Tux Paint's configuration file (see OPTIONS for
details) and add a line containing "nosound=yes".
* Run "tuxpaint --nosound" from the command line or shortcut
or desktop icon.
* Recompile Tux Paint with sound support disabled. (See above
and INSTALL.txt.)
* The sound effects sound strange
This could have to do with how SDL and SDL_mixer were initialized.
(The buffer size chosen.)
Please e-mail us with details about your computer system. (Operating
system and version, sound card, which version of Tux Paint you're
running (run "tuxpaint --version" to verify), and so on.)
Fullscreen Mode Problems
* When I run Tux Paint full-screen and ALT-TAB out, the window turns
black!
This is apparently a bug in the SDL library. Sorry.
* When I run Tux Paint full-screen, it has large borders around it
Linux users - Your X-Window server is probably not set with the
ability to switch to the desired resolution: 800 *600. (or whatever
resolution you have Tux Paint set to run at.) (This is typically done
manually under the X-Window server by pressing [Ctrl]-[Alt]-[KeyPad
Plus] and -[KeyPad Minus].)
For this to work, your monitor must support that resolution, and you
need to have it listed in your X server configuration.
Check the "Display" subsection of the "Screen" section of your XFree86
or X.org configuration file (typically "/etc/X11/XF86Config-4" or
"/etc/X11/XF86Config", depending on the version of XFree86 you're
using; 3.x or 4.x, respectively, or "/etc/X11/xorg.conf" for X.org).
Add "800x600" (or whatever resolution(s) you want) to the appropriate
"Modes" line. (e.g., in the "Display" subsection that contains 24-bit
color depth ("Depth 24"), which is what Tux Paint tries to use.) e.g.:
Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
Note that some Linux distributions have tools that can make these
changes for you. Debian users can run the command "dpkg-reconfigure
xserver-xfree86" as root, for example.
* Tux Paint keeps running in Full Screen mode - I want it windowed!
The "fullscreen" option is set.
If you're running Tux Paint from a command-line, make sure you're not
giving it a "--fullscreen" option.
If you're running Tux Paint by double-clicking an icon, check the
properties of the icon to see if "--fullscreen" is listed as an
argument.
If "--fullscreen" isn't on the command-line, check Tux Paint's
configuration file ("~/.tuxpaintrc" under Linux and Unix,
"tuxpaint.cfg" under Windows) for a line reading: "fullscreen=yes".
Either remove that line, or simply run Tux Paint with the command-line
argument: "--windowed", which will override the configuration file's
setting.
Or use Tux Paint Config. and make sure "Fullscreen" (under "Video &
Sound") is not checked.
Other Probelms
* Tux Paint won't run
If Tux Paint aborts with the message: "You're already running a copy
of Tux Paint!", this means it has been launched in the last 30
seconds. (On Unix/Linux, this message would appear in a terminal
console if you ran Tux Paint from a command-line. On Windows, this
message would appear in a file named "stdout.txt" in the same folder
where TuxPaint.exe resides (e.g., C:\Program Files\TuxPaint).
A lockfile ("~/.tuxpaint/lockfile.dat" on Linux and Unix,
"userdata\lockfile.dat" on Windows) is used to make sure Tux Paint
isn't run too many times at once (e.g., due to a child impatiently
clicking its icon more than once).
Even if the lockfile exists, it contains the 'time' Tux Paint was last
run. If it's been more than 30 seconds, Tux Paint should run fine, and
simply update the lockfile with the current time.
If multiple users are sharing the directory where this file is stored
(e.g., on a shared network drive), then you'll need to disable this
feature.
To disable the lockfile, add the "--nolockfile" argument to
Tux Paint's command-line.
* I can't quit Tux Paint
The "noquit" option is set. This disables the "Quit" button in
Tux Paint's toolbar (greying it out), and prevents Tux Paint from
being quit using the [Escape] key.
If Tux Paint is not in fullscreen mode, simply click the window close
button on Tux Paint's title bar. (i.e., the "(x)" at the upper right.)
If Tux Paint is in fullscreen mode, you will need to use the [Shift] +
[Control] + [Escape] sequence on the keyboard to quit Tux Paint.
(Note: with or without "noquit" set, you can always use the [Alt] +
[F4] combination on your keyboard to quit Tux Paint.)
* I don't want "noquit" mode enabled!
If you're running Tux Paint from a command-line, make sure you're not
giving it a "--noquit" option.
If you're running Tux Paint by double-clicking an icon, check the
properties of the icon to see if "--noquit" is listed as an argument.
If "--noquit" isn't on the command-line, check Tux Paint's
configuration file ("~/.tuxpaintrc" under Linux and Unix,
"tuxpaint.cfg" under Windows) for a line reading: "noquit=yes".
Either remove that line, or simply run Tux Paint with the command-line
argument: "--quit", which will override the configuration file's
setting.
Or use Tux Paint Config. and make sure "Disable Quit Button and
[Escape] Key" (under "Simplification") is not checked.
* Tux Paint keeps writing weird messages to the screen / to a text file
A few messages are normal, but if Tux Paint is being extremely verbose
(like listing the name of every rubber-stamp image it finds while
loading them), then it was probably compiled with debugging output
turned on.
Rebuild Tux Paint from source. Be sure to remove or comment out any
line that says:
#define DEBUG
in the "tuxpaint.c" file in the "src" directory.
* Tux Paint is using options I didn't specify!
By default, Tux Paint first looks at configuration files for options.
* Unix and Linux
Under Unix and Linux, it first examines the system-wide
configuration file, located here:
/etc/tuxpaint/tuxpaint.conf
It then examines the user's personal configuration file:
~/.tuxpaintrc
Finally, any options sent as command-line arguments are used.
* Windows
Under Windows, Tux Paint first examines the configuration file:
tuxpaint.cfg
Then, any options sent as command-line arguments are used.
This means that if anything is set in a configuration file that you
don't want set, you'll need to either change the config. file (if you
can), or override the option on the command-line.
For example, if "/etc/tuxpaint/tuxpaint.conf" includes an option to
disable sound:
nosound=yes
You can reenable sound by either adding this option to your own
".tuxpainrc" file:
sound=yes
Or by using this command-line argument:
--sound
Linux and Unix users can also disable the system-wide configuration
file by including the following command-line argument:
--nosysconfig
Tux Paint will then only look at "~/.tuxpaintrc" and command-line
arguments to determine what options should be set.
Help / Contact
Any questions you don't see answered? Let me know!
bill@newbreedsoftware.com
Or post to our 'tuxpaint-users' mailing list:
http://www.newbreedsoftware.com/tuxpaint/lists/
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Medeyaaa
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