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Louisiana Cookin JulyAugust 2017

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WILLA JEAN’S FROSÉ • GRILLED SUMMER FEAST • CLASSICS FROM CHEF JOHN FOLSE
Louisiana
Authentic Cajun & Creole Cuisine
h
h T HE
eat
Local
issue
Eat light & fresh this summer
July/August 2017 vol 20, issue 4
$5.99US $6.99CAN
7
25274 01055
08
4
DISPLAY UNTIL AUGUST 29, 2017
contents
JULY/AUGUST 2017 | VOLUME 20, ISSUE 4
15
roux.
first, you make a
9
Editor’s Letter
Seafood Paradise
7
Spillin’ the Beans
Hot Nights, Hot Bites
5
by Paul A. Greenberg
Afield & Afloat
Crispy Catfish
by Jay D. Ducote
9
21
Light & Fresh
High Summer Refresher
Life’’s Staff
by Patrick Dunne
25
In Season
Simply Decadent
Culinary Antiques
27
Louisiana Foodways
Fit for the Gods
by Caitlin Watzke
Chef’s Table
Mekong Meets the Mississippi
by Caitlin Watzke
3
louisianacookin.com
contents
entrées
the main course
33
39
Frozen Paradise
Beat the summer heat with frozen cocktails
Fresh Fins
Chef Michael Nelson of GW Fins shares his
favorite summer seafood recipes
457 Magpies & Masterminds
Collecting culinary antiques with Chef John Folse
by Patrick Dunne
57
53
Grilled Summer Feast
Fresh vegetables get the grill treatment in
this bright and flavorful family feast
597 Jackpot: Louisiana’s Best Casino Dining
Bayou State casinos up their game
lagniappe
a little something extra
7 1 Local Pantry
Jam On
751 Sweets
Tarte Nouvelle
77
Quick & Easy
Special Skillet
797 By the Book
Smoke & Sizzle
8 1 Cooking with Chefs to Watch
Love Me Tender
75
5
louisianacookin.com
87
89
95
97
Event Spotlight
Fairs, Festivals & Events
Recipe Index & Resources
Lagniappe
SKILLET-ROASTED
OKRA WITH
SPICY MISO SAUCE
P. 77
July/August 2017
Volume 20, Issue 4
EDITORIAL
DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL OPERATIONS
EDITOR Daniel Schumacher
ASSISTANT EDITOR Caitlin Watzke
RECIPE EDITOR Fran Jensen
COPY EDITOR Marie Baxley
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Jay D. Ducote, Patrick Dunne, Paul A. Greenberg
CREATIVE DIRECTOR/PHOTOGRAPHY
Mac Jamieson
SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS
John O’Hagan, Marcy Black Simpson
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Jim Bathie, William Dickey,
Stephanie Welbourne Steele
ASSISTANT PHOTOGRAPHER Caroline Smith
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Denny Culbert
Brooke Michael Bell
GROUP CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Deanna Rippy Gardner
ART DIRECTOR Lynn Akin Elkins
ST YLISTS
Lucy Herndon, Beth K. Seeley
FOOD ST YLISTS/RECIPE DEVELOPERS
Melissa Gray, Nancy Hughes, Kathleen Kanen,
Janet Lambert, Vanessa Rocchio, Jade Sinacori,
Elizabeth Stringer
ASSISTANT FOOD ST YLIST/RECIPE DEVELOPER
Anita Simpson Spain
CHEFS TO WATCH ADVISORY BOARD
Kristen Essig, Holly Goetting, Jeffrey Hansell,
Chris Lusk, Colt Patin
SENIOR DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST
DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST
Delisa McDaniel
Clark Densmore
FOUNDERS
Romney K. and Charley Richard
D I G I TA L M E D I A
MARKETING DIRECTOR Tricia Wagner Williams
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louisianacookin.com
Louisiana Cookin’ ISSN 1096-4134 is published bimonthly by Hoffman Media, 1900 International Park Drive, Suite 50, Birmingham, AL 35243, 1.888.411.8995. Reproduction in part or in
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E D I TO R ’ S L E T T E R
SEAFOOD
I GREW UP LOVING seafood. Shellfish, finfish, frog
legs, the occasional shark—I would eat just about any
sea creature. How lucky are we that the Gulf and inland
waters of Louisiana have such an incredible bounty?
This time of year, when light, fresh, bright flavors are
key, and farmers’ markets are brimming with perfect
produce, I eat as much of our local seafood as I can find.
In this issue, we cover a terrific variety of techniques and
flavors, from a decadent panko-crusted crab cake (page
19) and gorgeous shrimp-and-watermelon salad (page 18)
to a family-friendly whole grilled fish (page 44) from Chef
Michael Nelson at GW Fins in New Orleans.
One of the things I appreciate most about Chef
Michael’s cooking is that he not only focuses on the
easy-to-love cuts of fish, but he also challenges himself
to cook lesser-known pieces that are equally delicious.
For this issue, he prepared Fish Heads in Curry Broth
(page 42) that is bursting with flavor. The coconut broth,
seasoned with lemongrass, ginger, and kaffir lime leaves
is something you’ll soon be dreaming about. Don’t worry,
though, if you have reservations about cooking with
whole fish heads, simmering shrimp in the broth until
pink and firm will deliver a dish that is just as delightful.
No matter what you put on your family’s table this
summer, remember to help support Louisiana’s farmers
and fishermen. They tirelessly cultivate and catch some of
the best flavors on the planet, and count on us, the eating
public, for their livelihood. EDITOR’S PICKS
WILLA JEAN’S FROSÉ • GRILLED SUMMER FEAST • CLASSICS FROM CHEF JOHN FOLSE
Louisiana
SEAFOOD DISHES
Authentic Cajun & Creole Cuisine
h
h THE
eat
Local
issue
WHOLE GRILLED FISH
PÊCHE SEAFOOD GRILL
New Orleans
TACO DE CAMARON
(CHILE-MARINATED SHRIMP TACO)
KI’ MEXICO
Eat light & fresh this summer
On the Cover
Watermelon-Shrimp
Salad (recipe page 18)
photography by
stephanie welbourne
steele
styling by lucy herndon
recipe development
and food styling by
kathleen kanen
Shreveport
CRAWFISH BREAD
FOLLOW US ON
HOT TAILS
New Roads
VISIT US AT LOUISIANACOOKIN.COM.
9
louisianacookin.com
SPILLIN’
T H E B E AN S
HOT NIGHTS,
HOT BITES
by paul a. greenberg
WELL, HERE WE are again, making it through another hot, sticky
Louisiana summer. There’s really only one thing that can cheer
us up—FOOD! We love to eat, talk about eating, reminisce about
eating, dream, and even argue about it. Fortunately for us, there’s
plenty of food to go around, and more often than not, we don’t
have to go very far to find our heart’s desire, right? Sometimes it’s
as close as our own backyard (think crawfish boils), or right in the
neighborhood (think your favorite restaurant nearby). That made
me start digging around to find the best local dining spots that only
recently made their debut.
NOLA NEWBIES
I didn’t have to look very far. It seems as though the new restaurants
are everywhere statewide. Consider New Orleans: the big news is
that Dunbar’s Creole Cuisine has reopened in a new location with
the same irresistible fried chicken for which it has long been known.
If you’re from New Orleans, you know that Dunbar’s lost its tiny
Uptown space to Hurricane Katrina’s merciless floods. That didn’t keep
proprietor Celestine Dunbar down for long—she fed local university
students from a food court until opening a new spacious place with
mile-high ceilings this past spring. If you’re in New Orleans, what are
11
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you waiting for? If you’re planning a trip here, tune up
your taste buds and get ready for fried chicken that
many consider the best in the city.
Another noteworthy spring entrant in New Orleans
is DTB (Down the Bayou). If Dunbar’s is all about
nostalgia and history, DTB is strictly right now.
Calling his cuisine “modern coastal Cajun,” owner
Carl Schaubhut joins Chef de Cuisine Jacob
Hammel (both Commander’s Palace alums) to
offer up temptations such as boudin balls (YES!),
roasted cauliflower with browned butter and
almonds, and what I consider his pièce de résistance,
fried cornbread with goat cheese, ham hock, and
jalapeños. Very Southern. Very tasty.
On historic St. Charles Avenue, an old furniture
store has morphed into Lula, a new restaurant with
its own still, as in distillery. So, while you are enjoying
such delights as rum-lacquered shrimp or pork loin
with Havarti cheese, after a starter of boudin egg rolls
(again: YES!), a moonlighting medical doctor named
Bear Caffery is nearby creating the house vodka, gin,
and rum. That’s what I call “full service.” Owners Jess
and Erin Bourgeois (Jess is another Commander’s
Palace alum) are cleverly selling full bottles of the
house spirits right there. Who says there’s no such
thing as an original idea?
AND JUST DOWN THE I-10…
“What about Baton Rouge?” you ask. Word on the street
is that popular New Orleans gourmet hot dog joint
Dat Dog is taking its act on the road and opening
three units in Baton Rouge. This is a pretty ambitious
plan, since the company reportedly wants all three new
locations open by the end of this year.
So, if you’re up for probably the biggest
selection of hot dogs and sausages in
town—and the most massive order of
fries ever conceived—get ready.
Meanwhile in Shreveport, if you’ve
waited patiently for a great restaurant
right on the riverfront, get ready for
SALT (which stands for Sea, Air, Land,
and Time) inside the new Shreveport
Aquarium. Since we’re talking about
dining as locally as possible, know that
this place plans to focus on local farmers, ingredients,
and indigenous foods, with an emphasis on seafood and
all-American selections. Could this be the beginning of
a riverfront renaissance in Shreveport? Think about that
while you’re enjoying SALT’s oyster bar or sipping a cool
beverage on the open-air patio. Nice.
The Port Grill is slated to open this August in
Shreveport, featuring what its owners call “new
Southern cuisine.” Sweet potato hummus, anyone?
Hmmm. How about a slow-smoked, glazed pork shank?
I’d go for the smoked Gouda grits and shrimp. This
place has been a longtime coming, having been planned
for at least a year and a half. I haven’t tried it yet, but
it sure sounds like it was worth the wait. I’ll keep you
posted on this one.
Paul A. Greenberg is an inveterate local diner who has been covering the New Orleans restaurant scene in regional and national publications for 25 years.
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
12
k
BITE SIZE
BITS
Iverstine Family
Farms in Baton Rouge has
opened a butcher shop,
Iverstine Farms Butcher.
p by for a sandwich—
ybe The Cuban
dwich Crisis (smoked
, roasted pulled pork,
Swiss cheese), or The
lai Shawarma Wrap
oked chicken, pickled
ons, and roasted garlic
ce). Seriously.
Tiger Deaux-nuts is
dying a new location
its gourmet doughnuts
aton Rouge. How
ut a marshmallow
ff doughnut with
a chocolate pudding
center? Yes, please.
Effervescence, a
champagne bar, has
opened in New Orleans
with 18 sparkling wines by
the glass and 90 by the
bottle. You can even order
half glasses if you want to
try several.
CHEF CHAT:
DICKIE BRENNAN
I caught up with one of New Orleans’ favorite sons, Dickie Brennan, whose
restaurant collection includes Bourbon House, Dickie Brennan’s Steak House,
Palace Café, and Tableau. If there’s a nicer guy in the business, I haven’t met him
yet. We chatted about the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries’ Catch
and Cook Program and some goings on at his restaurants.
Well, here you are in Barataria, the perfect place to ask you about the
Louisiana Catch and Cook program. What’s it all about?
I just caught some trout and redfish and we’re bringing them back to town to
have Chef Eric [Cook] do it up. Right now, in restaurants we’re not allowed to
buy redfish or trout. But if a licensed fisher with a licensed fishing guide catches
it, you can bring it to the restaurant to cook it. The guide fills out a form for the
customer and the restaurant has to keep the forms on file for tracking purposes. It’s
something we really want to promote.
Speaking of your restaurants, what’s really getting your customers’ attention
these days? We’re doing great things at Bourbon House with bottom-raised oysters.
We call some of our oysters “select oysters.” They’re more parallel to the East and
West coast oysters. Don’t get me wrong; we still have our Gulf oysters, of course. We
also have an oyster recycling program where we take the shells and send them out to
help rebuild some of the coast. This time of the year is just a great time for seafood.
People in New Orleans just love some of your happy hours, too. We’re real
happy with our Black Duck Bar upstairs at Palace Café. We’re up to about 150
different aged rums now, and we have some great small plates and charcuterie.
And we’re still doing great with our $5 cocktails and $5 flatbreads.
Any plans to add more restaurants to your collection? Well, never say never,
but right now we’re just working on getting the next generation in the family ready
to run the business. We’ll see. NOW, THAT SHOULD KEEP YOU BUSY AND WELL FED UNTIL NEXT TIME. REMEMBER:
BUY LOCAL, EAT OUT OFTEN, AND CLEAN YOUR PLATE.
13
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AF I E L D & AF LOAT
CRISPY
CATFISH
by jay d. ducote
AT A RECENT planning meeting for my first restaurant, Gov’t Taco, a group of friendly folks started coming up with
names for our signature tacos. The taco shop, which will reside in Baton Rouge’s White Star Market, got its name from
being located on Government Street, being in Louisiana’s capital city, and is a reminder that I’m finally putting my two
Louisiana State University political science degrees to use with something we can all agree on: tacos.
We decided to use governmental puns in our taco names, playing off of historic phrases or parts of American
government rather politicians or political parties. Our tacos will be more modern American than traditional
Mexican, Tex-Mex, or Cali-Mex, so we knew it was important that the names convey that. We wanted to make them
lighthearted and witty, but still descriptive.
Since we wanted a solid Louisiana seafood taco on our menu (and love California-style fish tacos), we came up
with a fried catfish taco with maque choux. We call it: The Catfish are Coming!
THE CATFISH ARE COMING!
MAKES ABOUT 3 SERVINGS
½
2
cup mayonnaise
tablespoons chopped pickled
okra
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon Creole mustard
1 tablespoon Worcestershire
sauce
1 teaspoon minced garlic
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
Peanut oil, for frying
1 cup Jay D’s Louisiana Molasses
Mustard
1 cup whole milk
¼ cup hot sauce
3 cups Slap Ya Mama Cajun
Fish Fry
1 pound catfish fillets, sliced into
2x1-inch strips (about 32 strips)
2 teaspoons Slap Ya Mama Cajun
Seasoning, or to taste (optional)
10 (4½- to 5-inch) corn tortillas
Corn Maque Choux (recipe follows)
Garnish: lime wedges, fresh cilantro,
green onion, purple cabbage
1. In the work bowl of a food
processor, combine mayonnaise, okra,
lemon juice, mustard, Worcestershire,
garlic, and cayenne; pulse until
smooth. Cover and refrigerate.
2. In a large Dutch oven, pour oil
to a depth of 4 inches, and heat
over medium heat until a deep-fry
thermometer registers 350°.
3. In a shallow dish, combine
molasses mustard, milk, and hot
sauce. In another shallow dish, place
fish fry. Dip fish in mustard mixture,
letting excess drip off. Dredge in fish
fry, shaking off excess.
4. Working in batches, gently place
catfish in hot oil. Fry until golden
brown and cooked through, about
3 minutes. Let drain on paper
towels. Season with Cajun
seasoning, if desired.
5. In a large skillet, heat tortillas over
medium heat until browned. Add a
spoonful of Corn Maque Choux to
each tortilla. Add catfish strips. Top
with mayonnaise mixture. Garnish
with lime wedges, cilantro, green
onion, and purple cabbage,
if desired.
Jay Ducote writes the blog Bite and Booze (biteandbooze.com) and hosts the Bite and Booze Radio Show
on Talk 107.3 FM in Baton Rouge. Find him online @biteandbooze on Twitter and Instagram and at
facebook.com/biteandbooze.
15
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CORN MAQUE CHOUX
MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS
2
½
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
¼
¼
tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
pound tasso, diced
medium yellow onion, diced
large red bell pepper, seeded
and diced
jalapeño pepper, diced
cloves garlic, minced
cups fresh corn kernels
bay leaf
cup dry white wine (such as
Jay D’s Blanc du Bois)
tablespoon Jay D’s Spicy and
Sweet Barbecue Rub
teaspoon kosher salt
teaspoon ground black pepper
cup heavy whipping cream
cup unsalted butter
cup chopped green onion
1. In a large Dutch oven over
medium-high heat, add olive oil.
Add tasso, and cook, stirring
often, until browned, about
10 minutes. Remove tasso with a
slotted spoon into a heat-proof bowl.
2. In the same Dutch oven with
remaining grease, add onion, red bell
pepper, jalapeño, and garlic, and cook
until the onion is translucent, stirring
often, about 5 minutes. Add corn and
bay leaf, and stir again. Stir in wine,
and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, scraping
browned bits from bottom of pan with
a wooden spoon.
3. Bring mixture to a boil; reduce
heat and simmer. Add barbecue rub,
salt, and black pepper. Let mixture
simmer until wine is reduced by half.
Add cream, and continue cooking until
slightly thickened; then add the butter
and stir to combine. Mix in green onion
before serving. L I G H T & F R ES H
HIGH SUMMER
REFRESHER
recipe development and food styling by kathleen kanen
IT ISN’T SUMMER without watermelon, is it? We have memories of juicy
watermelon slices from childhood and more recent ones of watermelon margaritas
and aguas frescas. Fruit salads with perfect spheres of sweet, crisp watermelon have
been a warm weather mainstay for decades, but here we give it the savory treatment.
This picturesque watermelon salad is marinated in a lime dressing before getting
topped with tender Louisiana shrimp, spicy jalapeños, and tart crumbles of queso
fresco (though feta would be a fine substitute).
WATERMELON-SHRIMP SALAD
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
4
4
1
⅓
(¾-inch-thick) watermelon wedges
teaspoons sugar
teaspoon lime zest
cup plus 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice,
divided
¼ teaspoon kosher salt, divided
12 peeled and deveined large fresh shrimp,
cooked, whole or coarsely chopped
1 cup diced seedless watermelon
¾ cup grape tomatoes, quartered
½ cup coarsely chopped avocado
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
1 tablespoon chopped seeded jalapeño pepper
⅛ teaspoon ground cumin
¼ cup crumbled queso fresco
Garnish: fresh cilantro sprigs, extra-virgin olive oil
1. In a glass baking dish, place watermelon wedges.
In a small bowl, combine sugar, zest, ⅓ cup lime juice,
and ⅛ teaspoon salt; pour over watermelon wedges.
Refrigerate for 1 hour, turning once.
2. In a medium bowl, combine cooked shrimp, diced watermelon,
tomatoes, avocado, cilantro, jalapeño, cumin, remaining 1 tablespoon
lime juice, and remaining ⅛ teaspoon salt; gently toss. Arrange watermelon
wedges on serving plates. Spoon shrimp mixture over watermelon wedges;
sprinkle with cheese. Garnish with cilantro and olive oil, if desired. I N S E ASO N
SIMPLY DECADENT
recipe development and food styling by kathleen kanen
EVERY ONCE IN a while, you deserve a treat. Some folks will turn to beach weekends or a trip to the spa, but this
time of year, we luxuriate in freshly picked, jumbo lump Louisiana blue crab. Whether it’s stuffed in a Creole tomato,
perched atop a piece of crispy panéed fish (and kissed with a delicate sauce), or gently molded into a crispy crab
cake, we simply can’t get enough. This crab cake is light on fillers and big on flavor. Japanese bread crumbs give it a
delightful crunch, and the Dill-Cucumber Sauce gives the dish an herbaceous zing.
CRISPY CRAB CAKES
MAKES ABOUT 4 SERVINGS
5
⅔
¼
½
¼
1
½
¼
1
tablespoons canola oil, divided
cup fresh corn kernels
cup finely diced red bell pepper
cup mayonnaise
cup chopped green onion
tablespoon Creole mustard
teaspoon kosher salt
teaspoon ground black pepper
large egg
1
pound jumbo lump crabmeat,
drained and picked free of shell
1 cup panko (Japanese bread
crumbs)
Dill-Cucumber Sauce (recipe follows)
Garnish: chopped fresh dill, chopped
fresh chives
1. In a 10-inch cast-iron skillet, heat
1 tablespoon oil over medium heat.
Add corn and bell pepper; cook until
softened, about 3 minutes. Spoon
corn mixture into a large bowl; let
cool slightly. Add mayonnaise, green
onion, mustard, salt, pepper, and
egg; whisk until combined. Add crab
and bread crumbs; gently toss until
moistened. Refrigerate for 10 minutes.
Shape mixture into ⅓-cup patties.
2. Heat remaining 4 tablespoons oil in
same skillet over medium heat. Cook
cakes in batches until golden brown,
about 3 minutes per side, turning
carefully with a spatula. Let drain on a
wire rack. Serve with Dill-Cucumber
Sauce. Garnish with dill and chives,
if desired.
DILL-CUCUMBER SAUCE
MAKES ABOUT 1¼ CUPS
½
2
2
2
2
¼
¼
1
cup plain Greek yogurt
tablespoons chopped fresh dill
tablespoons chopped fresh
chives
tablespoons mayonnaise
teaspoons Creole mustard
teaspoon kosher salt
teaspoon ground black pepper
cup chopped seedless cucumber
1. In a small bowl, whisk together
yogurt, dill, chives, mayonnaise,
mustard, salt, and pepper. Gently
stir in cucumber. Cover and
refrigerate for 30 minutes. C U L I NARY
AN T I Q U ES
LIFE’S
STAFF
BREAD’S UNEVEN RISE
IN NEW ORLEANS
by patrick dunne | styling by kerry moody
SOON AFTER ARRIVING in the Louisiana territory early in
the 18th century, those sweet-tempered filles à la cassette acted up.
It was not over the bugs, unattractive husbands, or batten-board
houses to which they had been misled—it was about food. They
had been promised resettlement in a tropical Paris with grandes
rues, silk dresses, and suave beaux. Being practical orphans, they
might have overlooked these few minor deceptions, but the cuisine
was the final straw! Legend has it that a certain Madame Langlois
had to use all her cunning to teach these high-spirited Europeans
“Creole” culinary survival skills with the greatest challenge getting
them to accept corn bread instead of their “French” wheat bread.
In fact, it was around this time—due to the introduction of new
milling and baking techniques—that Parisians began to be serious
bread snobs, although the iconic long, narrow baguette with its
crisp crust and chewy center was about a century and a half away
from making its appearance.
Fortunately, the young ladies settled down because it would be a
long time before good white bread was purveyed in any Louisiana
town. Decent wheat was hard to come by, and milled flour was
susceptible to vermin and mold, and very often adulterated with
all manner of things, including rice and plaster of Paris. The
humid weather made bread making unpredictable, and the result
was often soggy. In New Orleans, like everywhere, baking was an
arduous task. Water for the dough had to come either from rain
or the river (neither very untainted), and had to be hauled by
enslaved labor back and forth to the bakers. Efforts to regulate and
tax bread led to further complications. It was not until the influx of
sturdy German immigrants in the first half of the 19th century that
serious and successful bakeries began to appear. Later, the Italians
added their talents.
CORN BREAD
LEGEND HAS IT THAT A
CERTAIN MADAME LANGLOIS
HAD TO USE ALL HER
CUNNING TO TEACH THESE
HIGH-SPIRITED EUROPEANS
“CREOLE” CULINARY SURVIVAL
SKILLS WITH THE GREATEST
CHALLENGE GETTING THEM TO
ACCEPT CORN BREAD INSTEAD
OF THEIR “FRENCH” WHEAT
BREAD.
Patrick Dunne is proprietor of Lucullus in New
Orleans, which boasts an international clientele
because of the unique emphasis on antiques, art, and
objects with a culinary connection. He is the author of
The Epicurean Collector and a sought-after lecturer on
table style and food history.
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
22
BREADMAKERS
HAD TO NOT ONLY
BE CONCERNED
WITH RECIPES AND
TEMPERATURES,
BUT INGREDIENT
QUALITY. SIFTING AND
REFINING FLOUR WAS
THE FIRST STEP TO
A BEAUTIFUL LOAF.
THIS 18TH-CENTURY
HANDWROUGHT FLOUR
TROWEL WAS AN
ESSENTIAL TOOL.
23
louisianacookin.com
This was generally the larger American story as well. While the
country became a great wheat producer and industrial milling was
introduced rather early, the quality of bread was generally inferior. From
the beginning in America, there was a preference for baking bread in
pans and using small ovens, which produced a soft white loaf. This
prejudice became entrenched with the invention of a mechanical slicer by
Otto Rohwedde, a Midwesterner. It became so much a part of our culture
that, after the 1930s, the phrase “best thing since sliced bread” became
idiom for anything marvelous.
Human creatures have been at work baking for a very long time
and almost everywhere on the planet. For this to happen two critical
components had to converge: fire and grains. Half a million years ago,
Homo erectus seemed to have kindled the first blazes for cooking, and
actual ovens have been excavated that are at least seven thousand years old.
Even before agriculture, hunter-gatherers began to harvest seeds, toasting
them to make them ready for milling and digestible as gruel. Primitive
cooks were content with “flat” breads fashioned out of this unleavened
mixture that could be cooked on a hot brick or brazier. It is a tradition that
endures to the present, in forms like tortillas, roti, matzo, and markook.
Wheat was first domesticated in the Levant (the modern-day Middle
East), and for climatic reasons, Egypt became the wheat cradle of the
world. It is still uncertain by what accident of fermentation yeast was
discovered, but Egyptians were among the earliest to apply it to bread
making, changing the process forever. That amazing society, pioneers in
so many cultural advances, had the reputation of being fastidious bakers
in the ancient world. The word Greek writers habitually used to identify
Egyptians was artophagi, meaning “bread eaters.” While their bread was
most probably gritty with sand and mica from their crude grinding tools,
the variety of their loaves is impressive even today.
Eventually, it was the Romans who became obsessed with bread. They
preferred products of well-ground wheat that were very white, even if a bit
of chalk was required to achieve the color. They perfected dried yeast as
well, and it is said at the peak of their power, Roman bakers were providing
more than 100,000 loaves a day. Over half the population of the city was
on the dole, receiving a handout of food, and the notion that the only two
things the people desire, “bread and circuses,” was a canny policy for civic
stability. The need for wheat was certainly crucial to Rome’s imperialist
policy, and their preoccupation with Egypt was as a main supplier. The
Roman Empire carried bread culture into every part of Europe, and the
tools and appurtenances changed very little over the millennia.
If not by bread alone did men live, it did remain a fundamental dietary
need, and bread shortages always meant unruly times. Social status was
marked not just by with whom you broke bread, but by the qualitative
refinement of that morsel. Needless to say, peasants ate quite differently
than princes. Then, just as perfect white bread became available to almost
everyone, in the perverse ways of our culinary habits, the fashion for the
most rustic recipes of our ancestors returned. No tranche of bread was
ever wasted, and toasting
day-old slices elicited a
number of implements,
including this wrought iron
hearth toaster and elegant
Georgian silver toast rack.
Toast without confiture was an
unthinkable culinary offense. These
precious 18th-century French
handblown verrines both stored and
presented sweet jellies and jams.
LO U I S IANA
FO O D WAYS
FIT FOR THE GODS
THE STORY BEHIND NEW ORLEANS NECTAR SODA
by caitlin watzke
THERE WAS A TIME when soda fountains could be
found in nearly every drugstore in America, and in the
soda fountains of New Orleans, there was arguably no
flavor more popular than nectar. In Greek mythology,
nectar (from the Greek word nektar) was the drink of
the gods, and anyone who drank it was said to become
immortal. While the soda New Orleanians came to
know and love might not have had life-giving properties,
the heavenly drink that graced soda fountain counters
throughout New Orleans was surely a treat fit for the gods.
Nectar syrup, a bright pink concoction that tastes of
vanilla and almonds, was an instant hit after the I.L. Lyons
and Co. pharmaceutical supply business introduced the
flavor in the late 19th century. The company sold the syrup
to K&B Drugs, who made nectar its signature flavor, and
other local drugstores followed with their own versions
of the sweet beverage, from Walgreen’s to Waterbury’s
to Bradley’s. The flavor is unique to New Orleans, and
outside the area, you’d be hard pressed to find a similarly
flavored product by that name.
“Nectar in that particular flavor is synonymous with
New Orleans,” says Frank Jackson, owner of the Old
Town Soda Shop in Slidell. “I’ve trained people from
Savannah to Washington State, and when they come
here and see the pictures, it’s intriguing to them. It’s a
flavor they’ve never heard of.”
While soda fountains were once ubiquitous, they
began to disappear after the 1950s, due in part to the
introduction of bottled soft drinks. The nectar flavor
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stuck around, though, mostly on the menus of local
snowball stands and ice cream shops. Nectar syrup was
even revived for a time in the 1990s and early 2000s by
local businesswoman Susan Dunham, who produced
and bottled nectar soda syrup after tracking down Lyons’
family members.
Still, the best place to get a taste of this New Orleans
soda fountain classic is at a local snowball stand or ice
cream parlor. At the Old Town Soda Shop, Frank serves a
variety of nectar-flavored items, including old-fashioned
sodas, homemade ice cream, malts, and shakes. In New
Orleans, folks can find it at The Creole Creamery, which
sells nectar cream sodas topped with a scoop of ice cream,
whipped cream, and a cherry.
At Hansen’s Sno-Bliz, nectar cream has been on the
menu since Ernest and Mary Hansen opened the snowball
stand in 1939. To this day, nectar cream is Hansen’s most
popular flavor among locals and adventurous tourists,
and it is the subject of many a cherished childhood
memory. Ashley Hansen Springgate, current owner and
granddaughter of Mary and Ernest, fondly recalls her
grandmother showing up to her birthday parties with
giant pails full of nectar cream snowballs, which were
quickly wiped out by her classmates.
“We celebrate nectar cream here, for sure,” says
Ashley. “I get stopped in the grocery store about our
nectar. I love it. It brings back memories from my
childhood. It’s the first snowball I have every summer—
it has to be nectar cream.” NEW ORLEANS NECTAR
THE CREOLE CREAMERY
4924 PRYTANIA ST.
6260 VICKSBURG ST.
New Orleans
CREOLECREAMERY.COM
HANSEN’S SNO-BLIZ
4801 TCHOUPITOULAS ST.
New Orleans
504.891.9788
SNOBLIZ.COM
OLD TOWN SLIDELL
SODA SHOP
301 COUSIN ST.
Slidell
985.649.4806
SLIDELLSODASHOP.COM
ANTIQUE NECTAR SYRUP AND SODA BOTTLES ON
DISPLAY AT THE SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE
MUSEUM IN NEW ORLEANS.
C H E F ’ S TAB L E
MEKONG
MEETS THE
MISSISSIPPI
by caitlin watzke
WHAT DO YOU get when you combine seasonal Louisiana ingredients with the funky
flavors of Southeast Asia and the smokiness of a grill? Answer: a dining experience unlike
any you’ve ever had. At the recently opened Marjie’s Grill in Mid-City New Orleans,
Marcus Jacobs and Caitlin Carney are inspired by the local bounty and the street food
of Vietnam, Laos, and Thailand.
At Marjie’s, simple, local ingredients are elevated to greatness over the fire of Marcus’s
Santa Maria grill with grates that can be lowered and raised on pulleys. Smokey Charred
Cabbage and Coal Roasted Sweet Potatoes—both standout favorites among customers—
are cooked directly on the coals to achieve a deep, smoky flavor, while items like
the Slow Grilled Pork are cooked above the fire until tender then lowered down to
caramelize the outside.
The couple met while working at Herbsaint in New Orleans, Marcus most recently
as executive sous chef and Caitlin as a server. Originally from Wellesley, Massachusetts,
Caitlin found her way to the Big Easy by way of Brooklyn, where she attended college.
A native of Columbus, Ohio, Marcus came to New Orleans after cooking at Zuni Café
in San Francisco and working in Japan.
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Marjie’s Grill is situated along New
Orleans’ Broad Street corridor, which
has seen a commercial revitalization of
sorts in recent years with the addition
of new businesses. Once-abandoned
buildings have been given new life,
such as the former Schwegmann’s
Super Market that is now a Whole
Foods Market, or the historic
warehouse that has been transformed
into the Broad Theater.
Marjie’s Grill
320 S. Broad St. • New Orleans
504.603.2234 • marjiesgrill.com
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
28
GRATE
EXPECTATIONS
At Marjie’s Grill, Marcus uses a Santa Maria grill
to impart a noticeable but not overpowering
smokiness to ingredients. The grill makes use of a
pulley, which allows Marcus to apply different levels
of heat by raising and lowering the grill grates.
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“We kind of fell in love over Asian food,” Caitlin
says. “That was one of our major common grounds,
and we started cooking what we are doing now at
home. It was the mix of Marcus barbecuing and
us using fish sauce and chile and lemongrass. And
then everyone was loving it, so we were like, ‘We
should do a pop-up.’”
The duo operated their pop-up, Sparklehorse
Grill, for about two years before converting it to
a brick-and-mortar location. In preparation, they
trekked through Southeast Asia for nearly three
months, immersing themselves in the food cultures
of Vietnam, Laos, and Thailand, and taking note of
what they wanted to incorporate into their menu.
Prevalent in many of their dishes are fish sauce,
cane syrup, garlic, chilies, and herbs, all of which
lend vibrant flavor to the menu of grilled meats,
seafood, and vegetables. In addition, the way of
eating is also something Caitlin and Marcus carried
over. At lunch, menu items are presented in a meatand-three format, which is something they saw a lot
of during their trip.
“When we were in Vietnam, they had these
lunch carts that were like meat-and-threes, and
we were like, ‘We should do this! This is genius—
everything great on one plate,’” Caitlin says. Marcus
adds, “That’s what I like about the lunch plates: you
can get a little bit of everything, and all the pieces
complement each other.”
Dinner at Marjie’s is a similarly casual experience,
with a menu divided into shareable plates like Slow
Grilled Half Chicken and Charred Pork Shoulder
Steak. On both menus, you’ll also find uncommon
dishes like fried pig ear sandwiches on white bread
and fried pig tails with green garlic-chile sauce.
“If we put stuff like that on the menu, it’s not for
shock value or anything,” Marcus says. “It’s because
we’re confident that we’re serving this really great
thing, and it happens that it’s something that you’re
not going to get a lot of other places. It’s all stuff
that we love.”
If you’re looking for something out of the
ordinary in New Orleans, you’ll find it at Marjie’s
Grill. The flavor profile is unique and the
ingredients familiar, and the combination makes
for a truly one-of-a-kind menu that will keep you
coming back for more. 5
dishes to try
SMASHED CUCUMBERS
SLOW GRILLED PORK
CORNMEAL FRIED
CHICKEN
COAL ROASTED
SWEET POTATOES
SPRING VEGETABLE
SALAD
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
30
DEADBEAT DAIQUIRI
Frozen PARadise
6 WAYS TO BLENDER BLISS
photography by jim bathie
WE ALL HAVE OUR
ways of making the most of soaring
summer temperatures. South Louisiana
is known for its frozen daiquiris, and
now a new generation of bartenders is
taking the craft to the next level. From
brunch-darling Willa Jean’s Frosé to
chill Bywater joint Cafe Henri’s Frozen
Negroni, options for cooling off your
afternoon abound. While many of these
DEADBEAT DAIQUIRI
MAKES 1 SERVING
Recipe courtesy of Beachbum Berry,
Beachbum Berry’s Latitude 29, New Orleans
1½ cups crushed ice
2 ounces aged Panamanian rum*
4 whole lychee nuts, shelled (drained if canned)
1 ounce fresh lime juice
½ ounce Simple Syrup (recipe on page 35)
½ ounce maraschino liqueur
¼ ounce Clément Mahina Coco coconut liqueur
Dash Fee Brothers Aztec Chocolate Bitters
Garnish: pineapple wedge, plastic monkey, edible
orchid
drinks are original creations, a few of
them show off expert skills of translating
a classic for the modern palate, like the
exotic Rubin “The Hurricane” Carter
from Bourée. Whether you choose one
of those, or a classic like The Palace
Café’s Hemingway Cocktail, you’re in
for a treat.
1. In the container of a blender, place ice, rum,
nuts, lime juice, Simple Syrup, liqueurs, and
bitters; blend at high speed until smooth, up
to 20 seconds. Pour into a 12-ounce Pearl Diver
glass.* Garnish with pineapple wedge on rim,
speared with bamboo pick, plastic monkey, and
edible orchid, if desired.
*We used Caña Brava 7-Year-Old Reserva Añeja
Rum. This Pearl Diver glass is available at Cocktail
Kingdom, cocktailkingdom.com.
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
34
Kirk Estopinal (left) and Neal Bodenheimer at Cafe Henri.
HENRI’S FROZEN NEGRONI
WILLA JEAN’S FROSÉ Y’ALL
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
MAKES 2 SERVINGS
Recipe courtesy of Cafe Henri, New Orleans
Recipe courtesy of Willa Jean, New Orleans
4 ounces Luxardo Bitter liqueur
4 ounces Oryza Gin
4 ounces sweet vermouth*
½ cup sugar
6 cups crushed ice
Garnish: orange peel
4
¾
¼
1. In the container of a blender, place Luxardo
Bitter liqueur, gin, vermouth, and sugar; blend
at high speed until sugar is fully incorporated.
Add ice, and blend until smooth. Garnish with
expressed orange peel, if desired.
*We used Miro Vermut Rojo.
cups ice
cup rosé wine
cup Simple Syrup (recipe follows)
1. In the container of a blender, place all ingredients; blend
at high speed until smooth. Pour into glasses, and serve
with straws.
SIMPLE SYRUP
IN A SMALL SAUCEPAN, BRING 1 CUP WATER AND 1 CUP SUGAR TO
A BOIL, STIRRING UNTIL SUGAR IS DISSOLVED. LET COOL TO ROOM
TEMPERATURE BEFORE USING. REFRIGERATE IN AN AIRTIGHT
CONTAINER FOR UP TO 1 MONTH. MAKES 1½ CUPS.
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WILLA JEAN’S
FROSÉ Y’ALL
RUBIN “THE HURRICANE” CARTER
MAKES 1 SERVING
Recipe courtesy of Bourrée, New Orleans
1½ cups ice
1 ounce Old New Orleans Crystal Rum
1 ounce Jasmine Earl Grey Sweet Tea
Simple Syrup (recipe follows)
½ ounce fresh lemon juice
½ ounce passion fruit purée*
½ teaspoon Peychaud’s bitters
1. In the container of a blender, place all ingredients; blend
at high speed until smooth.
* We used El Sabor frozen passion fruit purée. If fresh passion
fruit is available, process with a juicer, discarding solids.
JASMINE EARL GREY SWEET TEA SIMPLE SYRUP
MAKES 1¾ CUPS
1
2
3
cup water
cups sugar
Jasmine Earl Grey tea bags
1. In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup water and sugar to boil;
stir until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat, and let
stand until cool. Add tea bags; cover and let steep for 12
hours at room temperature. Remove tea bags. Cover and
chill up to 2 weeks.
PALACE CAFÉ’S HEMINGWAY COCKTAIL
MAKES 1 SERVING
Recipe courtesy of Barry Himel, Palace Café,
New Orleans
1 cup crushed ice
1½ ounces white rum*
1½ ounces Simple Syrup (recipe on page 35)
½ ounce Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
1 ounce fresh grapefruit juice
1 ounce fresh lime juice
Garnish: grapefruit twist
1. In the container of a blender, place ice, rum, Simple
Syrup, liqueur, and juices; blend at high speed until
smooth. Pour into a glass, and garnish with a grapefruit
twist, if desired.
*We used Old New Orleans Crystal Rum.
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GEORG A O'KEEFFE DAIQUIRI
GEORGIA
DA QU RI
MAKES 1 SERVING
Recipe courtesy of Abigail Gullo,
Compère Lapin, New Orleans
1
1
1
1½
2
2
cup dried hibiscus
cup hot water
cup sugar
cups crushed ice
ounces rosé wine
ounces brewed hibiscus tea
1
ounce Cathead Honeysuckle
vodka
½ ounce fresh lemon juice
½ ounce fresh lime juice
½ ounce St-Germain
Garnish: fresh sage
1. In a large bowl, combine dried
hibiscus and 1 cup hot water. Let stand
for at least 20 minutes. Strain mixture
through a fine-mesh sieve, discarding
solids. Add sugar, and stir until sugar
is dissolved. Let hibiscus syrup cool
to room temperature before using.
Refrigerate in an airtight container for
up to 1 month.
2. In the container of a blender,
combine ice, wine, 2 ounces hibiscus
syrup, tea, vodka, lemon juice, lime
juice, and St-Germain; blend at high
speed until smooth. Pour into a glass,
and garnish with sage, if desired. Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
38
recipes courtesy of chef michael nelson,
gw fins, new orleans
NOTHING SAYS “SUMMER”
quite like pristine Louisiana seafood. As the weather heats up, we turn to
light, refreshing dishes that highlight the natural flavors of fresh catches
from the Gulf of Mexico. This summer, celebrate the taste of fresh
seafood with these four incredible recipes from Executive Chef Michael
Nelson of GW Fins.
At the French Quarter restaurant known for its wide array of topnotch seafood options, Michael uses seasonal ingredients to enhance the
flavors and textures of the catches of the day. He has dedicated himself
to a sustainable nose-to-tail approach, and encourages diners to try
new and different cuts of fish—including heads, collars, ribs, and fins.
His Fish Heads in Curry Broth (page 42) may look intimidating, but it’s
actually a staff favorite at GW Fins, and Michael insists that the head is
the most delicious part of the fish.
These delectable recipes are guaranteed to impress your family and
friends. From simple Pomegranate-Glazed Shrimp with Mango Salsa
to an adventurous Whole Grilled Fish with Pineapple-Basil Glaze,
these dishes are perfect for a casual meal or elegant party that you’ll be
dreaming about all summer long.
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
40
POMEGRANATE-GLAZED
SHRIMP WITH MANGO SALSA
MAKES ABOUT 4 SERVINGS
2
2
1
1
¼
2
1
2
ripe mangoes, peeled, seeded,
and cut into ½-inch pieces
teaspoons thinly sliced fresh mint
teaspoon honey
ounce white rum
cup pomegranate molasses
tablespoons firmly packed
brown sugar
teaspoon cane vinegar
pounds extra-jumbo fresh Louisiana
shrimp, peeled and deveined
(heads left on)
Salt
Ground black pepper
Extra-virgin olive oil
1. Preheat oven to broil.
2. In a medium bowl, combine mango,
mint, honey, and rum.
3. In a small saucepan, heat molasses
over low heat; stir in brown sugar until
dissolved. Remove from heat; add
vinegar, and set aside.
4. Season shrimp with salt and pepper,
and drizzle with oil. Broil 3 inches from
heat until pink and firm, about 2 minutes
per side. Remove from heat, and brush
with pomegranate glaze, reserving extra
glaze to drizzle on serving plates. Arrange
shrimp on top of mango mixture, and
drizzle with glaze.
GET THERE
GW FINS
808 Bienville St.
New Orleans • 504.581.3467
gwfins.com
41
louisianacookin.com
FISH HEADS IN
CURRY BROTH
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
2
1
1
1
tablespoons canola oil
stalk lemongrass
tablespoon grated fresh ginger
(1-inch) cube fresh peeled
galangal, thinly sliced (optional)
6 kaffir lime leaves
10 stems fresh cilantro
1 stalk celery, chopped
½ carrot, chopped
2 shallots, chopped
2 cups shrimp stock
2 teaspoons red curry paste
1 (13.5-ounce) can coconut
cream
1
tablespoon firmly packed
brown sugar
Juice of 1 lime
1 tablespoon fish sauce
4 fish heads or 4 to 8 fish
collars
Salt
Ground black pepper
Extra-virgin olive oil
Hot cooked jasmine rice
1. In a large Dutch oven, heat
oil over medium heat. Add
lemongrass, ginger, galangal, lime
leaves, cilantro, celery, carrot, and
shallot. Cook, stirring constantly,
until carrot is softened.
2. Add stock and curry paste,
and bring to a boil; reduce heat,
and simmer for 20 minutes.
Carefully transfer mixture to
the container of a blender, and
blend at high speed until smooth.
Strain broth through a finemesh sieve, discarding solids.
Return broth to Dutch oven,
and add coconut cream, brown
sugar, lime juice, and fish sauce.
Bring to a boil, and reduce to a
simmer.
3. Preheat oven to broil.
4. Season fish with salt and
pepper, and drizzle with oil. Broil
until lightly browned on both
sides. Place fish heads in broth,
and simmer gently for 5 minutes.
Divide among serving bowls, and
serve with jasmine rice.
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
42
FIRECRACKER SAUCE
MAKES ABOUT ⅔ CUP
½
½
½
¼
½
3¾
2
tablespoon katsuo mirin furikake
tablespoon white sesame seeds
tablespoon black sesame seeds
teaspoon garlic powder
cup garlic-chile sauce
teaspoons shrimp paste
tablespoons sesame oil
1. In a medium bowl, combine
furikake, sesame seeds, and garlic
powder. Add garlic-chile sauce and
shrimp paste; slowly whisk in
sesame oil. Cover and refrigerate until
ready to serve.
*Katsuo mirin furikake is a Japanese
seasoning mixture of dried bonito and
sesame seed that can be found in wellstocked grocers or Asian markets.
GINGERY SLAW
MAKES ABOUT 4 CUPS
½
½
¾
2
¼
¾
¼
2
½
½
½
¼
¼
FIRECRACKER TUNA TACOS
MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS
1
2
1
avocado, halved and pitted
tablespoons mayonnaise
tablespoon prepared wasabi
(optional)
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
¼ teaspoon salt
1 pound sushi-grade yellowfin
tuna, cut into ¼-inch cubes
Firecracker Sauce (recipe follows)
32 miniature hard taco shells
Gingery Slaw (recipe follows)
Garnish: wasabi tobiko
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1. In the container of a blender,
combine avocado, mayonnaise, wasabi
(if using), lime juice, and salt; blend at
high speed until smooth.
2. In a large bowl, combine tuna and
2½ tablespoons Firecracker Sauce.
Taste, and add additional Firecracker
Sauce, if desired.
3. Place 1 heaping tablespoon tuna
mixture in bottom of each taco shell.
Add avocado mixture and Gingery
Slaw. Garnish with wasabi tobiko, if
desired.
cup hot water
cup sugar
teaspoon salt
tablespoons pickled ginger
cup pickled ginger juice
teaspoon rice vinegar
teaspoon sesame oil
cups thinly sliced Napa cabbage
cup thinly sliced red pepper
cup thinly sliced yellow pepper
cup julienned carrot
cup thinly sliced green onion
cup chopped fresh cilantro
1. In a medium bowl, combine ½ cup
hot water, sugar, and salt, stirring
until dissolved. Let cool slightly.
2. In the container of a blender,
combine sugar mixture, ginger, ginger
juice, vinegar, and sesame oil. Blend
at high speed until ginger is finely
chopped. Cover and refrigerate until
cold, up to 1 week.
3. In a large bowl, combine cabbage,
peppers, carrot, green onion, and
cilantro. Add 1 cup dressing mixture,
and toss to combine.
WHOLE GRILLED FISH
F SH WITH
PINEAPPLE-BASIL GLAZE
MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS
1
3
1
kaffir lime leaf, thinly sliced
tablespoons fresh lime juice
teaspoon thinly sliced fresh
cilantro
1 teaspoon thinly sliced fresh
mint leaves
1 teaspoon sugar
Pinch salt
¼ cup butter, softened
1 cup pineapple juice
2 tablespoons thinly sliced fresh
basil leaves
4 (1- to 2-pound) whole fresh
fish, gutted and scaled
Salt
Ground black pepper
Canola oil
½ cantaloupe, peeled, seeded,
quartered, and thinly sliced
½ honeydew, peeled, seeded,
quartered, and thinly sliced
½ Crenshaw melon, peeled,
seeded, quartered, and
thinly sliced
1. In a small bowl, combine lime leaf,
lime juice, cilantro, mint, sugar, and
salt. Set aside.
2. In another small bowl, place
butter. In a small saucepan, cook
pineapple juice over medium heat
until reduced to ¼ cup, about
10 minutes. Pour over butter;
add basil, and stir until combined.
3. With a sharp knife, carefully score
through skin of fish about ½ inch deep
in a cross-hatch pattern. Season fish
with salt and pepper. Rub outside of
fish with oil.
4. Spray grill rack with nonflammable
cooking spray. Preheat grill to
medium-high heat (350° to 400°).
Cook fish for 7 to 8 minutes per side.
Do not move fish until turning (this
will reduce sticking).
5. On serving plates, overlap melon
slices. Drizzle lime mixture over
melon. Place grilled fish on a platter,
and top with pineapple glaze. Place
whole fish over melon, and serve
immediately. Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
44
M A S T E R M I N D S
CHEF JOHN FOLSE AND HIS PASSION FOR COLLECTING
by patrick dunne | recipes courtesy of chef john folse | photography by jim bathie
c
ollectors, like artists and fishermen, usually start their tales with a recent success. Ask Chef
John Folse what he’s been collecting lately and first you’re likely to hear a guilty guffaw, followed
by a disclaimer about being too busy in his internationally renowned kitchens at R’evolution
(New Orleans) and Seafood R’evolution (Jackson, Mississippi), or with some gigantic new book
he’s planning. Knowing he can’t fib to me for very long, he launches into a confessional narrative that
would dizzy any old padre, leaving even this jaded antiques dealer with vertigo.
The great English collector and art historian Sir Kenneth Clark once claimed there were only two
types of collectors: those looking to complete a series and those longing to possess things that bewitch
them. Having spent most of my life around collectors of one sort or another, I’m fascinated by the inner
wellsprings of the instinct. My father subscribed to only one commandment: a treasure, once acquired,
could never be relinquished. How horrified he would be to see the ease with which, in my professional
life, I buy and sell beautiful things I love.
Talking to Chef Folse, one realizes immediately this passion runs deep, is abiding, and reveals the
heart of a serious and romantic collector. He is that rare critter that combines both instincts: at once
beguiled by a variety of things, but also obsessed with completing series within those enchantments.
When I ask him how often he sells objects off to upgrade or go in new directions, he is horrified.
“Never!” he fires back. Having hit a mark, I use this fidelity to his curated hoard to encourage him to
identify themes in his collecting. Unsurprisingly, he sees the pivot point as food.
Asked to recall exactly when he began collecting, Chef Folse responds with a reverie of being in
London, opening the first Louisiana-referenced restaurant in England, with weekends to explore the
countryside. There he encountered an eccentric shopkeeper in Hungerford at Below Stairs. After
buying his first copper cooking pots, Chef Folse says it felt like a conversion experience, suddenly
realizing the beauty of old domestic utensils, their craftsmanship and unexpected detail, both
utilitarian and lovely. I intuit, however, it was simply an epiphany, because he was already “of the faith.”
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louisianacookin.com
Those first pots have expanded into series of every
imaginable vessel. “You know it took me a while to notice
old jelly pans, then I realized I needed every size,” he says.
Of course, the same is true of frying pans, and daubières
(braising pans), and boudin pots, fish poachers, cream
bowls, long-handled iron pots, and so on. He discovered
a tournebroche (mechanical spit) and went off, filling his
fireplaces with all sorts of automated contraptions.
Hearth cooking then made him realize he needed
firebacks, and iron tools and bellows—not just one, but
one in every size. The wild enthusiasm that makes his
passion so boyish is the verb most often chosen—never “I
want,” but always “I need.” Also, there is a fervor to know
everything about the objects he considers—to know their
histories, their origins, their secrets.
When I try to get him to talk about the true beginnings
of all this, he digresses. “I’ve recently bought a fine old
enamel stove, but here’s the thing: it’s part gas and part
wood-burning. How great is that?” His glee is infectious,
but I see an opening. “Why on earth would you get a stove
like that?” I ask. “It sounds like a lot of work! What kind of
stove did you grow up with, by the way?”
And here a key turns in the lock. He stops dead in the
conversation, the curtain rises, and his grandmother’s
kitchen in St. James Parish resurrects in every detail.
The lovely links between collecting and nostalgia show
how this ardent, joyous pursuit of things somehow yokes
both the beautiful and the melencholy. So when I pose
47
louisianacookin.com
the question as to what Chef Folse first, first, first
collected—as a child, long before the conquests in New
Orleans or London or Paris—he shyly says “tinder.”
“My grandmother Regina Zeringue cooked on a
wood stove, and she sent children out for tinder. We
learned to be careful, and choose only the best—first,
because we wanted our grandmother’s approval, and
second, we had learned the vital connection between
that fire and the morning biscuits!” There is a glow
like that fire in his voice, revealing that new stove is
really an old memory, and the crocks and pans in that
faraway kitchen a model for what he now “needs.”
One recollection leads to another. Remembering
old Mr. Ordoyne, the itinerant grocer who arrived with
his wagon full of provisions and trinkets, becomes an
occasion for a guilty admission. While his grandmother
chanted her orders in Cajun-French across a cypress
table as Mr. Ordoyne showed her enamel spoons
in blue, gray, and black, a small boy made his first
acquisition, slipping one into his pocket unobserved.
It was secreted away in his box of treasures, like the
trebuchets his grandfather built to capture the colorful
teepops that filled the swamps. “I lost that spoon along
the way—I really wish I had it now, I need it!”
His collections include some very significant nonmaterial things as well. Chef Folse embarked on one
of the most significant cultural archeological projects
in Louisiana. He’s traveled the bayous and back roads
of the state, urging people to pull out their recipes
and share the stories of the foods they remember.
His congeries of recollections have been preserved in
print and television, and may be his most spectacular
catalogue of treasures. Most precious for him are the
women who “have made us uniquely what we are—
Alligator Annie at her swamp cabin, Wylma Dusenbery
and her singing family, and so many others!”
And suddenly it is not just the story of John Folse's
pots and pans, or of his Waguespack/Zeringue family,
or of a seemingly vanishing Cajun/Creole world. It’s
not even the story of the Louisiana he so dearly loves.
It is a human story. The story of a man lovingly looking
at yesterday while contributing to tomorrow, whose
unshakable wisdom is that family and faith, history and
passion are all accentuated, validated, and expressed
in the collection of these artifacts, which he knows
are not merely shards of the past, but triumphs and
touchstones that contain parables for lives well lived.
BREAST OF DUCK WITH
BLACKBERRY DEMI-GLACE
2. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat.
Remove duck breasts from marinade, and pat dry. Add to
pan, skin side down, and cook until light brown. Continue
cooking, turning occasionally, until a meat thermometer
inserted in thickest portion registers 165°. Remove, and keep
warm, reserving 1 tablespoon drippings in pan.
3. Add shallot and remaining ½ tablespoon garlic to pan;
cook for 2 minutes. Add blackberries and remaining ¼ cup
port; cook until reduced by half. Add demi-glace; cook until
reduced by a quarter. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
4. Slice duck breasts. To serving plates, add a generous
portion of blackberry sauce. Top with duck, and garnish with
micro greens, if desired.
FRENCH FIRE-ROASTED CH
CHICKEN
CKEN
MAKES ABOUT 8 SERVINGS
1
parables for lives well lived.
BREAST OF DUCK WITH BLACKBERRY
DEMI-GLACE
MAKES ABOUT 6 SERVINGS
6 Long Island or mallard duck breasts
¾ cup port wine, divided
1 tablespoon cane syrup
1 dried bay leaf
1½ tablespoons minced garlic, divided
10 black peppercorns
6 fresh basil leaves, torn
4 sprigs fresh thyme
6 fresh sage leaves, torn
2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
1 teaspoon hot sauce
1 tablespoon minced shallot
½ pint fresh blackberries
1 cup veal demi-glace
Ground black pepper, to taste
Garnish: micro greens
1. In a large bowl, combine duck breasts, ½ cup port, cane
syrup, bay leaf, 1 tablespoon garlic, peppercorns, basil
leaves, thyme, sage leaves, 2 teaspoons salt, and hot sauce.
Toss well to fully coat meat with marinade. Refrigerate for
3 hours. Let stand at room temperature for 1 hour.
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louisianacookin.com
(5- to 6-pound) roasting chicken, giblets reserved,
rinsed and patted dry
Kosher salt
Ground black pepper
Granulated garlic
1 large bunch fresh thyme
1 lemon, halved
1 small head garlic, halved crosswise
1 large yellow onion, peeled and thickly sliced
20 sprigs fresh thyme, divided
4 carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces
8 Yukon Gold or tiny red potatoes, halved
1 fennel bulb, tops removed and cut into wedges
10 cloves garlic
¼ cup olive oil
½ cup butter, melted
1. Preheat oven to 425°.
2. Remove any excess fat and leftover pin feathers from
chicken. Liberally rub inside of chicken with salt, pepper,
and granulated garlic. Stuff cavity with bunch of thyme,
lemon, and garlic head. Season outside of chicken with
salt, pepper, and granulated garlic, rubbing well into skin.
Tie legs together with kitchen string, and tuck wing tips
under body of chicken.
3. Place onion slices and 10 sprigs fresh thyme on bottom
of a roasting pan. Season with salt, pepper, and granulated
garlic. Place chicken on top of onion and thyme.
4. In a large bowl, combine carrot, potato, fennel, garlic
cloves, oil, and remaining 10 thyme sprigs. Season with salt,
pepper, and granulated garlic, tossing to coat well. Arrange
seasoned vegetable mixture around chicken in roasting pan.
Pour melted butter over chicken.
5. Cover and roast 1½ hours. Uncover and cook until skin
turns brown and crispy, and a meat thermometer inserted
in thickest portion registers 165°, 15 to 20 minutes more.
Remove roasting pan from oven, cover with foil, and let rest
for 20 minutes. Slice chicken, transfer to a platter, and serve
with roasted vegetables. Grilled Summer
u F E A S Tu
51
louisianacookin.com
photography by caroline smith | styling by beth k. seeley
recipe development and food styling by elizabeth stringer
WE CELEBRATE SUMMER’S bounty with bright flavors, light sauces,
and lots of fresh, local vegetables. Since the grill is a centerpiece of hotweather cooking, we used it for most of the components in this family
feast, from sourdough toast to the well-seasoned pork steaks. If you
wanted to take it even further, you could halve and grill the lemon for
the Chimichurri Sauce to add a smoky sweetness to the lemon’s zip. This
simple Fresh Blackberry Granita is our idea of the perfect ending on a
warm summer evening.
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
52
CRISPY FETA TOASTS
WITH PANCETTA
MAKES 12 SERVINGS
1
(10-inch) loaf round fresh
sourdough bread, cut into
½-inch-thick slices
Olive oil, for brushing
12 thin round slices pancetta
1 (8-ounce) package feta cheese,
sliced ¼ inch thick
1 bunch fresh basil, chiffonade
Balsamic vinegar glaze, for drizzling
Garnish: basil leaves
1. Preheat grill to medium-high heat
(350° to 400°).
2. Brush bread with oil. Grill bread
until lightly toasted, about 2 minutes
per side. Remove, and let cool.* Cut
each slice in half diagonally.
3. Preheat oven to 450°. Line a
baking sheet with foil.
4. Arrange pancetta slices in a single
layer on prepared pan. Bake until
golden, about 8 minutes. Transfer to
a paper towel-lined wire rack, and let
stand until crisp.
5. Top each slice of bread with feta
and pancetta. Sprinkle with basil, and
drizzle with balsamic glaze. Garnish
with basil, if desired, and serve
immediately.
*Reserve grilled bread ends for croutons
in Summer Tomato Salad (recipe on
page 55).
GRILLED
EGGPLANT WITH
HERBED RICOTTA
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
54
SUMMER TOMATO SALAD
55
louisianacookin.com
1. Spray grill rack with nonflammable
PORK STEAKS WITH
CHIMICHURRI AND
BALSAMIC FIG GLAZE
MAKES 6 SERVINGS
½
3
1
1
1
1
1
6
cup firmly packed brown sugar
tablespoons kosher salt
tablespoon chili powder
teaspoon ground black pepper
teaspoon onion powder
teaspoon garlic powder
teaspoon cayenne pepper
(½-inch-thick) pork sirloin
cutlets (about 2 pounds)
Chimichurri Sauce (recipe follows)
Balsamic Fig Glaze (recipe follows)
cooking spray. Preheat grill to high
heat (400° to 450°).
2. In a small bowl, combine brown
sugar, salt, chili powder, pepper, onion
powder, garlic powder, and cayenne.
3. Pat pork dry with paper towels, and
sprinkle both sides with seasoning.
Grill pork over direct heat, turning
every 5 minutes, until a meat
thermometer registers 145°, about
20 minutes. Let rest for 10 minutes.
Serve with Chimichurri Sauce and
Balsamic Fig Glaze.
CHIMICHURRI SAUCE
MAKES ABOUT 2 CUPS
1
1
½
cup finely chopped fresh parsley
cup extra-virgin olive oil
cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
¼
2
1
1
1
cup fresh lemon juice
tablespoons minced garlic
tablespoon kosher salt
tablespoon dried oregano
tablespoon crushed red pepper
1. In a large bowl, combine all
ingredients. Cover and refrigerate for
1 hour before serving.
BALSAMIC FIG GLAZE
MAKES ABOUT 1 CUP
¾
¼
cup fig preserves
cup balsamic vinegar
1. In a small saucepan, bring preserves
and vinegar to a boil over medium
heat. Serve warm.
FRESH BLACKBERRY GRAN
GRANITA
TA
MAKES 12 SERVINGS
2
(6-ounce) containers fresh
blackberries, rinsed and patted dry
1 cup sugar
5 cups water, divided
¼ cup fresh lemon juice
Garnish: lemon peel
1. In a medium saucepan, bring blackberries,
sugar, and 1 cup water to a boil over
medium-high heat. Reduce heat, and
simmer until blackberries are softened,
10 to 15 minutes. Remove from heat, and
lightly mash until berries are broken down.
2. Pour mixture through a fine-mesh sieve,
discarding solids. Stir in lemon juice and
remaining 4 cups water. Pour mixture into
a metal 13x9-inch baking pan, and place
in freezer. Scrape surface and edges every
45 minutes until mixture is frozen and no
liquid remains, 3 to 4 hours. Garnish with
lemon peel, if desired.
SUMMER TOMATO SALAD
MAKES ABOUT 6 CUPS
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon honey
2 cups fresh grilled sourdough croutons, reserved from
Crispy Feta Toasts with Pancetta (recipe on page 53)
2 pints cherry tomatoes,* halved and whole
1 medium red onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, torn
1. In a small bowl, whisk together oil, vinegar, salt, pepper, and honey.
2. In a large bowl, combine croutons, tomatoes, onion, garlic, and
cilantro. Add dressing, tossing to coat. Season to taste with additional
salt and pepper. Serve immediately.
*We used Sangria Tomato Medley and Heirloom Cherry Tomatoes.
GRILLED EGGPLANT WITH HERBED RICOTTA
MAKES 6 SERVINGS
1 (15-ounce) container whole-milk ricotta cheese
3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives
1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon
1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint
2 teaspoons lemon zest
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 clove garlic, pressed
3 medium eggplant, cut into ½-inch-thick slices (about 3 pounds)
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon soy sauce
Quick Pickled Squash (recipe follows)
Summer
SOUNDTRACK
1. In a medium bowl, combine ricotta, parsley, chives, tarragon, mint,
zest, pepper, and garlic. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
2. Preheat grill to medium-high heat (350° to 400°).
3. Brush both sides of eggplant slices with oil and soy sauce. Grill
until golden brown, 3 to 4 minutes per side.
4. Arrange eggplant on a serving platter. Top with Quick Pickled
Squash and herbed ricotta cheese. Serve immediately.
BLUES MY NAUGHTY
SWEETIE GIVES TO ME
SIDNEY BECHET
MARDI GRAS
IKE QUEBEC
QUICK PICKLED SQUASH
MAKES ABOUT 4 CUPS
2
1½
1
2
2
½
2
medium yellow squash, cut into ¼-inch-thick rounds
teaspoons mustard seed
teaspoon chopped fresh dill
dried bay leaves
cups water
cup distilled white vinegar
tablespoons sugar
1. In a 32-ounce glass jar with a tight-fitting lid, combine squash,
mustard seed, dill, and bay leaves.
2. In a small stockpot, bring 2 cups water, vinegar, and sugar to a boil
over high heat; pour hot liquid into jar. Seal with lid, and let stand
until cool. Refrigerate until cold, and store for up to 2 weeks. WAY DOWN YONDER IN
NEW ORLEANS
ERROLL GARNER
WALKING THROUGH
NEW ORLEANS
PETE FOUNTAIN
RED BEANS AND RICE
LAKE CITY STOMPERS
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
58
Margaritaville Resort
Casino Bossier City
LOUISIANA’S
BEST
JACKPOT
louisiana’s best casino dining
L
ouisiana is a jackpot for food lovers, so it’s
no surprise that some remarkable dining
can be found at casinos. Throughout the
Bayou State, they feature restaurants led by some of
the state's best chefs, who are using their culinary
chops to take casino dining to new levels. Forget
the stale all-you-can-eat buffets of the past—casinos
are upping the ante to bring fresh, exciting dining
options to gamblers and foodies alike.
Whether you’re craving an extraordinary steak
dinner, authentic international cuisine, or a variety
of outstanding items from a buffet, Louisiana’s
casinos have something to offer every budget
and appetite. Not only that, but the quality of
the food being served is impeccable, with
discerning chefs focusing on both locally
sourced ingredients and top-quality products
from around the world.
Whether you’re celebrating a big win or
simply looking to try something new, here are
our top picks for the best casino restaurants from
New Orleans to Lake Charles and beyond. With
an endless array of options, you’re sure to have an
unforgettable dining experience.
7
· OF LOUISIANA'S BEST ·
CASINO
DINING
OPTIONS
L’AUBERGE CASINO &
HOTEL BATON ROUGE
777 L’Auberge Ave.
Baton Rouge
225.224.4142
lbatonrouge.com
HARRAH’S
NEW ORLEANS
228 Poydras St.
New Orleans
504.533.6111
caesars.com/harrahs-new-orleans
L’AUBERGE CASINO
RESORT LAKE CHARLES
777 Avenue L’Auberge
Lake Charles
337.395.7565
llakecharles.com
GOLDEN NUGGET
LAKE CHARLES
3202 Nelson Rd.
Lake Charles
337.508.4103
goldennugget.com/lakecharles
HORSESHOE
BOSSIER
CITY HOTEL
AND CASINO
711 Horseshoe Blvd.
Bossier City
800.895.0711
caesars.com/horseshoebossier-city
MARGARITAVILLE
RESORT
CASINO BOSSIER
CITY
777 Margaritaville Way
Bossier City
855.346.2489
margaritavillebossiercity.com
PARAGON
CASINO RESORT
711 Paragon Place
Marksville
800.946.1946
paragoncasinoresort.com
HIGH ROLLER IN
PARADISE
M
argaritaville Resort Casino
Bossier City is a sure bet for
incredible dining experiences
with beautiful vistas of the Red River.
Whether you’re in the mood for steaks,
seafood, Vietnamese classics, or poolside
tapas, there’s something for every appetite.
Bamboo
Asian
Café,
which
opened last summer, offers some of the
best traditional Vietnamese food in
Shreveport-Bossier. Menu highlights
include favorites like vermicelli bowls and
pho, which is very popular among guests.
“We do our presentation [of pho] a
little bit different,” says Margaritaville’s
Executive Chef Thomas Weisburn. “We
actually pour the broth at the table…and
then we have all the veggies on the side.
You don’t walk away hungry.”
For fine dining in an intimate
riverfront setting, Jimmy’s Seafood &
Steak is an excellent option. The menu
features prime steaks and fresh Gulf
seafood, as well as local ingredients,
including Ruston peaches, Hammond
strawberries, and Louisiana cane syrup.
CAPITAL GEM
L
ocated on a picturesque bend of the Mississippi
River just a few minutes from downtown Baton
Rouge, the newly built L’Auberge Casino & Hotel
Baton Rouge offers sizzling steaks and fine wines at 18 Steak.
Chef Jared Tees, a 2004 Louisiana Cookin’ Chef to Watch,
honors the 18th state of the union by serving up Louisianainspired dishes such as Creole Seafood Cioppino, Redfish
on the Half Shell, and Trout Amandine.
Start your dining experience with one of 18 Steak’s
incredible appetizers, such as Fried Gulf Oysters with
Green Tomato Chow-Chow and Horseradish Sauce
or Louisiana BBQ Shrimp with Lemon, Black Pepper,
Baguette, and Ghost Pepper Caviar. Meat-eaters will enjoy
Cajun-themed charcuterie options like tasso, rillettes, and
andouille. Soups and salads feature Louisiana flavors, too;
the Belle River Crawfish Bisque and Redstick Salad with
sugar cane vinaigrette and pepita pralines are just two
flavor-packed choices.
Classic BBQ Shrimp make an excellent addition to
one of the restaurant’s signature steaks, which include filet
mignon, prime rib eye, prime dry-aged T-bone, cowboy
rib eye, and prime New York strip. Once you’ve tasted the
perfection of these savory steaks or fresh seafood dishes, dig
into one of 18 Steak’s incredible desserts, like crème brûlée
with local honey, 18 Chocolate (a selection of 18 chocolate
varieties), and seasonal berries or Cappucino Cheesecake.
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
62
AVOYELLES
HIDEAWAY
T
ry your luck at Paragon
Casino Resort in Marksville
where you’ll find a wide
variety of exceptional fine dining and
casual cuisine. With options like fresh
seafood, prime steaks, Cajun classics,
and Southern favorites, you’re sure to
have a memorable meal.
Legends Steakhouse features a
variety of excellent cuts of beef and
fresh seafood in an upscale setting.
Crab cakes, fried green tomatoes,
and Shrimp Michael (bacon-wrapped
jumbo Gulf shrimp) are just a few
appetizer highlights, while the steak
menu features favorites like the
Tomahawk Bone-In Rib Eye and
Roast of Prime Rib (which is only
available on Friday and Saturday until
it runs out).
For a casual lunch, you can’t beat
Tamahka Grill, which overlooks the
resort’s golf course, or Big Daddy E’s,
which serves Louisiana favorites like
seafood po’ boys, crawfish étouffée,
and oysters on the half shell. Sample
a little bit of everything with Big
Daddy’s Seafood Combo, which comes
with fried shrimp, oysters, catfish,
and a crawfish cake alongside fries,
hushpuppies, Creole slaw, and corn
maque choux.
The Market Place Buffet keeps
their offerings exciting with specials
each day, like Sunday Cochon de Lait
and Thursday Cajun Crossroads, which
features items like boudin and alligator
sauce piquant.
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louisianacookin.com
LUCKY HORSESHOE
T
here’s no going wrong with any of the amazing dining options at the
Horseshoe Bossier City Hotel and Casino. From Asian cuisine to
steaks to a seriously impressive buffet, the odds are good you’ll find
something you love.
Try the best-selling Mongolian Beef at the upscale Four Winds or
pho from the casual Jasmine’s Noodle Bar for a taste of some of the best
Cantonese and Vietnamese food in the area, or visit The Spread for a
legendary buffet dining experience. The buffet showcases hand-cut steaks,
house-made desserts, and a rotating section that features a different type of
cuisine every three months.
At Jack Binion’s Steak House, customers go crazy for the Surf &
Turf, Lolli-Pop Lamb Chops (blackened and served with smoked tasso
ham and cheddar grits), and the Steak à la Oscar—a 7-ounce fi let topped
with hollandaise sauce and served over au gratin potatoes and colossal
crabmeat—but the service is top notch, too.
“The number one thing that keeps people coming back is the service.
Everyone comes here to dine, but we pride ourselves on service here,” says
Executive Chef Yahya Lockett, adding, “We do a lot of specialty menu
requests. Guests call in ahead of time, and we try our best to go out of our
way for them. If we can get it, we’re going to try our best to do it.”
CRESCENT CITY
JACKPOT
A
t the foot of Canal Street
in New Orleans, Harrah’s
Besh Steak is an oddson favorite for playful, Louisianainspired steakhouse fare. The restaurant
from Chef John Besh features a menu of
starters, mains, and sides created with
Louisiana ingredients and techniques.
Whereas traditional steakhouse
menus typically only offer steaks à
la carte, Besh Steak serves steaks as
composed dishes with sides and sauces.
Even appetizers have the wow
factor at Besh Steak. Spicy Pork-Stuffed
Chicken Wings are smoked under a
glass dome, which is removed tableside
for an impressive start to the meal.
Customer favorites include items like
barbecued shrimp and the Prime New
York strip, dry-aged 30 days and served
with blue cheese butter, bordelaise, and
Abita Amber-battered onion rings.
As for Executive Chef Paul
Robert’s recommendations, he has a
few suggestions for diners. “I’d order
the barbecued shrimp to start, for
sure,” Paul says. “We have a double-cut
pork chop that we brine, and it comes
with corn and crab orzo. It’s jumbo
lump crabmeat, corn, and orzo tossed
in a cream-based sauce with butter
and cheese. That’s definitely the dish
I would choose. Even though we’re
a steakhouse, I’d go with the pork
chop. And then for dessert, the bread
pudding with toffee sauce, pecans, and
Irish whiskey ice cream.”
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
64
GLOWING EMBERS
L
ocated inside L’Auberge
Casino Resort Lake Charles,
Ember Grille & Wine Bar
serves
up
modern
steakhouse
favorites in an upscale lodge-theme
atmosphere. The restaurant, which
debuted at the casino in 2011, offers
a menu of top quality beef and
seafood alongside an impressive list
of more than 200 bottles of wine.
Chef de Cuisine Brock Granger
keeps the menu fresh with stunning
presentations and by making the
most
GOLDEN TICKET
of
seasonal
ingredients.
“We are really trying to focus on
seasonality and change the menu a
ake your winnings to one
of the amazing restaurants
awaiting you at Golden
Nugget Lake Charles, where you
can enjoy everything from authentic
Italian cuisine to the fi nest Gulf
seafood and more in magnificent
prime beef, fresh seafood, and an
extensive wine list. Start your dinner
with classic oysters Rockefeller or
Maple Glazed Quail, then dig into
sumptuous entrées like Gulf Red
Snapper with jumbo lump crab and
sherried lobster sauce, Fried Lobster
few times a year,” Brock says. “That
surroundings.
Transport your taste buds to
Italy as you dig into classic pasta
dishes, pizzas, and other traditional
specialties at Grotto. Spaghetti
Bolognese, Ravioli alla Vodka, and
Shrimp & Crab Capellini are just a
few highlights of the pasta menu.
Gulf seafood makes appearances in
several entrées, such as the Cioppino
and the Snapper Romano.
The award-winning menu at
Vic & Anthony’s Steakhouse offers
Mac & Cheese, or any of the USDA
prime steaks.
With seven different stations
daily, the buffet is hard to beat for the
diner who wants to try something
new. Here, you’ll fi nd Cajun classics
like freshly made boudin, as well as a
carving station with smoked brisket
and cuisine from various areas of the
world. End your meal on a sweet note
with one of the in-house desserts,
including pies, cupcakes, cookies,
and more.
something
T
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louisianacookin.com
keeps us from resting on our laurels,
and it makes us be more creative
and keeps us going with the thought
process behind the menu.”
This is especially exciting for
Ember’s regulars, who can expect
new
and
different
when they come in. In addition
to those seasonal additions, menu
mainstays include a 20-ounce
Bone-In Rib Eye, Bacon-Wrapped
BBQ Shrimp, and Sea Scallops with
Seaweed Salad, Leeks, and Beurre
Noisette. When it’s in season,
Brock recommends his halibut dish
for seafood lovers. “We get halibut
flown in two to three times a week,
so it’s always fresh, and people seem
to really enjoy that dish,” he says.
L’AUBERGE BAKED
OYSTERS
MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS
Recipe courtesy of L’Auberge
Lake Charles
3
4
4
8
¼
2
2
2
tablespoons olive oil
shallots, minced
cloves garlic, minced
cups fresh spinach
cup Pernod
cups butter, room temperature
cups grated Parmesan cheese
cups panko (Japanese bread
crumbs)
Salt
Ground black pepper
24 fresh oysters on the half shell
1. In a large skillet, heat oil over
medium heat. Add shallot and
garlic; cook until fragrant. Add
spinach and Pernod; cook until
spinach is wilted.
2. Line a rimmed baking sheet
with paper towels. Place spinach
on prepared pan, and let cool
completely. Blot with a clean
towel to remove excess moisture.
3. In the work bowl of a food
processor, place butter, cheese,
bread crumbs, and spinach; process
until combined. Season to taste
with salt and pepper.
4. On parchment paper, place ¼ of
mixture, and roll into a log. Repeat
three times with remaining mixture.
Freeze logs until very firm.
5. Preheat broiler. Place rack
3 inches from heating element.
6. Slice seasoned butter into
½-inch-thick pieces. Place one
piece on each oyster. Reserve
remaining butter for another
use. Broil until golden brown.
Serve immediately. Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
66
69
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Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
70
LO CAL PAN T RY
JAM ON
recipe development and food styling by janet lambert
IN LOUISIANA, WE ARE FORTUNATE to have
plenty of superb locally grown ingredients right at
our fingertips, and Baton Rouge resident Ashley
Andermann is making full use of the state’s seasonal
bounty with GrinningJupiter Jammery. Ashley has been
canning her whole life, but it wasn’t until about seven
years ago that she decided to turn her casual canning
hobby into a full-time business.
A photographer by trade, Ashley had an Etsy shop
where she and her husband, a metal sculptor, sold their
artwork. Ashley’s jam business took off when she listed
71
louisianacookin.com
her jams and jellies on the site, so she and her husband
converted a 1963 Avion travel trailer into a kitchen
space for Ashley to make her products.
Today, Ashley creates close to 100 different flavors of
jams, jellies, preserves, pepper jellies, pickles, mustards,
syrups, and fruit butters. She tries to use as much local
produce as possible, showcasing familiar ingredients
like satsumas, pecans, strawberries, and figs.
Ashley picks wild produce from her own garden
in Baton Rouge and from her in-laws’ garden in
Mississippi, where she gets blackberries, muscadines,
scuppernongs, crabapples, and more. During fig season,
Ashley travels to the Eunice-Mamou area to pick
figs from the same tree her grandmother and greatgrandmother used to make their preserves.
“That’s where I first learned to make preserves,”
Ashley says. “I was making fig preserves and strawberry
fig preserves with my dad’s mom, and so it’s pretty sweet
to still be able to get the same figs I got when I was little,
but also use the same recipes I used with her.”
Over time, Ashley has created some new variations
of her grandmother’s recipes, experimenting with
ingredients until she finds flavor combinations
that work.
In addition to fruit, Ashley incorporates products like
balsamic vinegars and teas from Red Stick Spice Co. in
Baton Rouge. She often comes up with new flavors by
thinking about how she can use ingredients in different
ways, and she also takes recommendations from
customers. In fact, GrinningJupiter’s current habanero
pepper jelly came about as a result of customers who
wanted a spicier product.
“Most recipes call for you to use a habanero pepper
and then a mixture between red, yellow, and orange
bell peppers. I don’t. I use just straight up habanero
peppers,” Ashley says. “It definitely has some heat to
it, but I don’t find that it’s so overpowering that you
can’t keep eating it.”
GrinningJupiter’s pepper jellies are the perfect
addition to a variety of dishes, like the sweet and
spicy chicken wings featured here. “Most people put
them over cream cheese, and they’re delicious over
cream cheese with crackers, but there are so many
things you can do cooking-wise with pepper jelly that
I really think people are starting to realize,” Ashley
says. “I always tell people the blueberry pepper jelly
and blackberry pepper jelly are awesome as a glaze on
a pork loin or pork chop, but also with venison, and
it’s really yummy. I like to use the habanero or mango
habanero if I’m doing fish or shrimp tacos. It makes a
nice glaze on the shrimp or fish, and it also gives it a
nice heat.”
WHERE
TO FIND IT
JUPITER
GRINNINGER
JAMM Y
Brew Ha-Ha!
Baton Rouge
Lafayette Farmers & Artisans
Market at the Horse Farm
Red Stick Spice Co.
Baton Rouge
Online
etsy.com/shop/grinning jupiter
SEE RECIPE FOR
SWEET AND SPICY
HABANERO
HOT WINGS
ON NEXT PAGE
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
72
SWEET AND SPICY HABANERO
HOT WINGS
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
1
2
1
½
½
¼
2
teaspoon fennel seeds
tablespoons all-purpose flour
teaspoon salt
teaspoon granulated garlic
teaspoon ground cumin
teaspoon ground black pepper
pounds chicken wingettes and
drumettes
¼ cup unsalted butter, melted
¼ cup hot pepper jelly, melted*
2 tablespoons Cajun hot sauce
Garnish: sliced green onion
1. Preheat oven to 475°. Line a large rimmed
baking sheet with heavy-duty foil, and spray with
cooking spray.
2. Grind fennel seeds in a mortar and pestle
or electric spice grinder. In a large bowl, whisk
together fennel, flour, salt, garlic, cumin, and
pepper. Add chicken, tossing to coat. Arrange
chicken, skin side down, in a single layer on
prepared pan. Lightly spray with cooking spray.
3. Roast for 15 minutes. Turn wings, and roast until
browned and crispy, about 15 minutes more.
4. In a large bowl, combine melted butter, melted
pepper jelly, and hot sauce. Add hot chicken wings,
tossing well to coat. Place chicken in a serving bowl.
Garnish with green onion, if desired. *We used GrinningJupiter Jammery Homemade
Habanero Pepper Jelly.
S W E E TS
TARTE NOUVELLE
photography by stephanie welbourne steele | styling by lucy herndon
recipe development and food styling by elizabeth stringer
THERE IS SOMETHING magical
about cast-iron pans, isn’t there? They’re
full of tasty memories and hold our hopes
for future meals. The same characteristics
that create crispy bacon help turn ripe
summer peaches into a masterpiece. In
this tarte tatin, we swapped apples for
peaches, and the result is sweet, satisfying,
and—with the help of some rich vanilla
ice cream—completely decadent.
PEACH TARTE TATIN
MAKES 6 SERVINGS
5
2
⅔
¼
½
to 6 fresh peaches, sliced into 8 wedges each
tablespoons fresh lemon juice
cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar, divided
cup butter
(17.3-ounce) package frozen puff pastry, thawed
1. In a medium bowl, combine peaches, lemon juice,
and 2 tablespoons sugar.
2. In a 10-inch cast-iron skillet, melt butter over
medium heat, swirling to coat sides of pan. Sprinkle
remaining ⅔ cup sugar over butter. Place peaches in
tight concentric circles on top of sugar. Cook, without
stirring, until butter mixture turns a caramel color,
20 to 30 minutes.
3. Preheat oven to 400°.
4. Remove skillet from heat, and place on a rimmed
baking sheet. Place puff pastry over fruit. Using a
spatula or fork, gently fold edges down between
inside edge of pan and fruit, being careful, as
pan is still very hot.
5. Bake until golden brown, about
30 minutes. Let cool in pan for
5 minutes. Carefully invert onto a
serving plate. Reposition any peach
slices that may have stuck to pan.
Let cool on plate for 10 minutes
before serving. THIS TIME OF YEAR,
THE THOUGHT OF
BASKETS BRIMMING
WITH RUSTON PEACHES
FILLS OUR MINDS WITH
WONDER. TRY AS WE
MIGHT, WE CAN NEVER
GET ENOUGH.
Q U I C K & E ASY
SPECIAL
SKILLET
recipe development and food styling by janet lambert
There aren’t many vegetables that say ‘summer’ quite like okra. These pods find their
way into all sorts of dishes throughout the season—from cornbread to gumbo and
everything in between. This year, we can’t get enough of simply skillet roasting the okra,
and serving it with a spicy and savory sauce.
SKILLET-ROASTED OKRA WITH
SPICY MISO SAUCE
SPICY MISO SAUCE
MAKES ABOUT ½ CUP
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
2
tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil,
divided
1 pound small or medium fresh okra pods,
halved lengthwise
¼ teaspoon salt, divided
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, divided
Spicy Miso Sauce (recipe follows)
1. In a large nonstick skillet, heat 1 tablespoon
oil over high heat. Add half of okra, cut side
down, and cook for 2 minutes. Reduce heat to
medium-low, and cook until browned on the
bottom, 2 to 3 minutes. Turn okra over, and
reduce heat to low; cook until tender, about
2 minutes. Sprinkle with ⅛ teaspoon salt, and
drizzle with 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Repeat
procedure with remaining 1 tablespoon oil,
remaining okra, remaining ⅛ teaspoon salt,
and remaining 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Serve
warm with Spicy Miso Sauce.
¼
2
2
2
2
1
1
cup mayonnaise
tablespoons finely chopped green
onion tops
tablespoons finely chopped fresh
cilantro leaves
tablespoons white miso paste
tablespoons sambal oelek
tablespoon fresh lemon juice
to 2 tablespoons heavy whipping cream
1. In a medium bowl, combine mayonnaise,
green onion, cilantro, white miso paste,
sambal oelek, and lemon juice. Stir
in enough cream until desired flavor
and consistency is reached. Cover and
refrigerate up to 7 days. NeW
BoOk!
SoUtHeRn
This 164 page, hard-cover
book has everything you need
for the ultimate Southern
barbecue. From low-and-slow
smoked meats to quickgrilled favorites like pork
chops and okra, this is the
ultimate guide to Southernstyle barbecue and grilling.
OrDeR YoUr
CoPy ToDaY!
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ON 2 OR MORE BOOKS
OrDeR ToDaY!
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LUCBBQ17D
LUCBBQ17E
EASY WAYS TO ORDER
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Enter or mention discount code LUCBBQ17D
_______________________________________________________________
Address
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P.O. Box 6302 • Harlan, IA 51593
_______________________________________________________________
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E-mail
Phone
800-361-8059
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BY T H E BO O K
SMOKE &
SIZZLE
recipe and photos reprinted, with permission, from southern barbecue
& grilling: the ultimate guide to perfect barbecue and southern essentials
by daniel schumacher (83 press, 2017)
FROM TEXAS BRISKET and dry-rubbed Memphis ribs to
IN RELENTLESS PURSUIT
OF THE TENDEREST
PORK, CHICKEN, AND
BEEF, GENERATIONS
OF HARDWORKING
SOUTHERNERS HAVE
STEWARDED MEAT TO
ITS PERFECT STATE.
—DANIEL SCHUMACHER
ROSEMARY-LEMON
SHRIMP SKEWERS
79
louisianacookin.com
Alabama chicken with white sauce, tender pork butt and everything
in-between, Southern Barbecue & Grilling (83 Press, 2017) by
Louisiana Cookin’ editor and barbecue enthusiast Daniel Schumacher
has a little something for everyone. Barbecue pros will appreciate new
takes on classic preparations, and newcomers will benefit from stepby-step guidance on each of the South’s major barbecue styles.
“Open-fire wood grilling has been around for centuries, and it
has been an alive and evolving art in the South as long as people
have been here,” says Daniel. “There is such a breadth and depth to
Southern barbecue and grilling. It’s a cultural phenomenon.”
More than just barbecue, Southern Barbecue & Grilling boasts
a selection of fixings, sauces, side dishes, cocktails, and desserts
to make unforgettable summer gatherings. Dishes like the BeerMarinated Chicken Drumsticks illustrate how just a few everyday
ingredients, plus a nice char, can elevate a simple protein to a
masterpiece. By starting the meal with Spicy Corn Dip with Bacon
and Smoked Cheddar or Rosemary-Lemon Shrimp Skewers, and
then serving those tender chicken legs with Grilled Cabbage Wedges
(a brilliant take on a classic wedge salad) or Midsummer Succotash,
you’ll have outdone yourself with minimal effort. Classic Southern
Pound Cake or an Easy Lemon Icebox Pie will round out the meal
and have people talking.
In addition to more than 125 recipes, Southern Barbecue & Grilling
is peppered with useful tips and tricks, including a variety of spice
mixes and sauces, wood combinations for smoking, and an easy guide
to convert your charcoal grill into a smoker.
“There are so many regional barbecue and grilling traditions
throughout the South, and I wanted to be able to honor them,” says
Daniel. “I hope readers will get inspired by these recipes and work
them into their tried-and-true family favorites.”
BEER-MARINATED CHICKEN
DRUMSTICKS
MAKES ABOUT 5 SERVINGS
2
2
2
1
1
2
3
1
tablespoons kosher salt
tablespoons firmly packed
light brown sugar
tablespoons paprika
tablespoon ground black pepper
teaspoon ground red pepper
tablespoons olive oil
pounds chicken drumsticks
(12-ounce) can beer
1. In a large resealable plastic bag, combine
salt, brown sugar, paprika, black pepper, and
red pepper. Add oil and chicken. Seal bag,
and shake until chicken is well coated. Pour
beer into bag. Seal bag; refrigerate for at
least 8 hours.
2. Remove chicken from bag; discard
marinade. Let stand at room temperature for
at least 30 minutes.
3. Spray grill rack with nonflammable
cooking spray. Preheat grill to medium-high
heat (350° to 400°).
4. Grill, covered, turning occasionally, until
a meat thermometer inserted in thickest
portion registers 165°, about 30 minutes. CO O K I N G W I T H
C H E FS TO WATC H
LOVE ME
TENDER
BRISKET SECRETS FROM CHEF JUSTIN FERGUSON
photography by jim bathie
THROUGHOUT HIS CAREER,
2011 Chef to Watch Justin Ferguson
has had a diverse experience:
Stroube’s Chophouse in Baton
Rouge, the upscale-casual Superior
Seafood and Oyster Bar in Uptown
New Orleans, and revamping the
menu at The Roosevelt Hotel’s
classy Fountain Lounge. From there,
he moved to Chicago to run the
restaurant concepts for a Chicago
entertainment group.
Now back in his home state
with a myriad of experiences
under his belt, Justin is opening
BRQ Seafood & Barbecue in Baton
Rouge. The menu will touch on
all of the expected barbecue styles
and house-made, locally sourced
fixin’s—baby back ribs, brisket,
pulled pork—and branch out in
a number of other directions.
“You’ll see rabbit, Louisiana frog
legs, and fried chicken,” says
Justin, “but we also have smoked
barbecue octopus, gourmet salads,
and crazy sandwiches.”
With barbecue season in full
swing, we got Justin to share his
thoughts on smoking a perfectly
tender brisket. While it’s a
signature Texas style, he expects
that it will be a hit at BRQ when it
opens this summer.
81
louisianacookin.com
Q What do you like about brisket? It’s the hardest
thing about barbecue to get right. That’s why I like
it. The brisket is the pectoral muscle of the steer, so
it’s got the most sinew and it’s tougher.
Q What should you be looking for in a great piece
of brisket? First, you should always buy the best
quality you can afford. I only buy prime. At BRQ,
we even do wagyu brisket as a special. And that’s
the cream of the crop. There’s so much fat in it; it’s
wonderful.
Q How much does the size of a brisket matter?
If you’re going smaller, it will cook faster. And too
big, it will take too long. For me, my window is 15
to 17 pounds. I’ve found that I can cook a 10- to
12-pound brisket in 10 to 12 hours. I like the
briskets that take between 12 and 14 hours because
I can get more smoke and better flavor into it. If
you can stay between 14 and 16 pounds, you’ll be
really happy with the result.
Q What is the key to great brisket? Slow and low.
And some people will tell you they do their brisket at
250 degrees or 225. I do mine at close to 200 degrees
and try to cook it longer. You don’t get too much of
a char, and it goes for 14 hours with the fat cap up.
Some people trim it off, but don’t do it. The fat is
what’s keeping your brisket from drying out.
Q Let’s talk about the fat cap. You want an even
covering of fat across the top. That fat renders down
into the meat. If you see a brisket where the meat is
mostly showing through the top, that’s not a good
sign because it will probably dry out. The fat is a
protector, especially from the point down to the flat
of the brisket.
The other thing is that you want a nice white fat.
If you’re seeing yellow fat, that’s probably from a grassfed animal, which will be a little leaner. I’m all about
grass-fed beef, but when it comes to brisket, the flavor
won’t match up with what you’re expecting. Go for a
grain-fed brisket. It makes a big difference.
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
82
you have to keep your fire going and keep
the smoke up. If you just initially have your
smoke in the beginning, after a while you won’t
have such a nice smoke ring. What I like to do is
get my smoker just rolling with good clean smoke,
get the firebox going, and when everything is
rolling, then you go in with your brisket. The key
is consistently keeping the smoke as it cooks, all
day or all night. You really want to be able to see
that ring when you cut into your brisket and you
have that bright pink around the outside. That’s
the sign of a good smoked brisket.
Q What about smoking on a gas grill? Don’t do it.
Ever. You’re better off cooking it in your oven. All
you’ll be doing is grilling the outside of it. It will
char and it won’t work. So either go in a smoker,
or rub it and put it in the oven. You need good
indirect heat for smoking.
Q What do you think of the old adage: if you’re
looking, you’re not cooking? If I don’t have to
open the smoker, I don’t. With the briskets, we put
them in there, close the doors, and don’t open them.
And that’s it. They just go. We pay attention to the
temperature and the smoke box.
Q What kind of wood do you like to use for brisket?
Q Talk us through your process. I pull out my aged
brisket and lay it down on a sheet, take my rub and
rub it completely. Then it sits for about 45 minutes
before it goes on the smoker. So the big thing is that
you want to let it smoke for 12 or 14 hours. When
you pull it off, then the brisket rests for 30 minutes.
We usually wrap them and keep them warm, then
it’s ready to slice. If you take it right off the smoker
and cut into it, all the juice is going to run right out
of it and ruin your brisket. The longer you can let it
rest, the better off you’ll be.
Q Two words near and dear to any pitmaster’s heart:
smoke ring. How do you get it, and why would
you want it? Does it matter? The smoke ring
shows the penetration of smoke into the meat, so
83
louisianacookin.com
I love hickory. It gives a great smoke. I usually do
half-and-half hickory and applewood. Down here
in the South, you’ll find a lot of oak and pecan.
I tend to get better smoke off of hickory and pecan
(which is a little lighter). Everybody has their
personal preferences though. It can be hard to find
good seasoned wood. Good dry wood gives the
smoke a cleaner flavor.
Q What do you like to serve with this brisket?
A piece of white bread is really classic! The brisket
should be so good by itself. And if you reserve the
jus, and pour some over [and serve it] with some
white bread, that’s about as classic as it gets. At BRQ
we have a wonderful red bliss potato salad, big slices
of cornbread, or mac and cheese. But when I’m
having brisket, I just want brisket. After 14 hours of
waiting, I just want to enjoy my brisket.
BRQ SMOKED BRISKET
MAKES 16 TO 20 SERVINGS
Seasoned dry hickory and applewood
1 (14- to 16-pound) prime angus
brisket, trimmed of meat and
loose fat
1 cup barbecue rub*
1. Soak wood chips in water for at
least 30 minutes. Preheat smoker to
200° to 220°. Sprinkle soaked wood
chips over coals.
2. Generously rub brisket with
barbecue rub. Place brisket on smoker
rack. Cover with smoker lid, and cook
until tender, 12 to 14 hours.
3. Remove brisket from smoker, wrap
in butcher paper, and let rest for
30 minutes. Slice and serve. * 1 cup kosher salt with 2 teaspoons
ground black pepper may be substituted.
Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
84
New!
Special Issue
ORDER TODAY!
hoffmanmediastore.com/southernpies
800-361-8059
SLAP YA MAMA
PULLED PORK
SANDWICH
This is a delicious and
easy slow cooker recipe
that everyone will enjoy!
INGREDIENTS:
PORK:
4 lbs. pork shoulder roast, boneless
2 tbsp. Slap Ya Mama Original Blend
1 tbsp. butter
1½ yellow onions, sliced
4 cloves garlic, sliced
2 tbsp. dark brown sugar
12 oz. BBQ Sauce (We used Jay D’s
Louisiana Barbecue Sauce)
8 hamburger or brioche buns
COLESLAW:
3 cups shredded green cabbage
3 cups shredded red cabbage
1 large jalapeño, sliced
½ small red onion, sliced
1 carrot, peeled and shredded
¾ cup mayonnaise
2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
1 tsp. Slap Ya Mama Hot
Blend Seasoning
DIRECTIONS FOR PORK
Season the roast with 2 tbsp. of Slap Ya Mama Original
Blend Seasoning, being sure to cover it evenly. In a
large skillet over medium-high heat, add butter and
the roast. Brown all sides and set aside. In the same
skillet, reduce heat to medium; add onions and garlic
and sauté until onions are tender. Add water to cover
the bottom of the skillet, stir in dark brown sugar,
being sure to scrape the bottom of the skillet to help
bring up remnants of the browned pork and onion/
garlic mixture. Bring to a light boil then remove from
heat. Place roast in the slow cooker and pour contents
of the skillet over the roast. Cook on low for 8 hours.
Once cooked, remove from the slow cooker and let
rest for 20 to 30 minutes. Using 2 forks, pull roast apart
into small slices or chunks. Toss with BBQ sauce, serve
on buns and top with Coleslaw.
DIRECTIONS FOR COLESLAW
Combine the cabbage, jalapeño, onion and carrots
in a large bowl. In a small bowl, whisk together the
mayonnaise, vinegar and Slap Ya Mama Hot Blend
Seasoning. Add dressing to cabbage mixture and
toss well.
ADDING A LITTLE SPICE TO LIFE SINCE 2001
slapyamama.com | 800.485.5217
#slapyamama
EVENT
S P OT L I G H T
EVENTS
Destination Downtown
Second & Fourth Saturdays of June–August • Natchitoches
NATCHITOCHES, THE OLDEST settlement in the
Louisiana Purchase, boasts a historic downtown with
charming shops and incredible restaurants. This summer,
the city is hosting Destination Downtown, a series of
events featuring great music and a variety of fun activities
for visitors of all ages. The festivities will take place on the
second and fourth Saturdays in June, July, and August.
Bring your lawn chairs to Front Street for a day of fun.
Kids will love the free inflatables, face painting, caricature
drawings, and lawn games. Other activities scheduled
include a watermelon eating contest and a margarita tasting
event. Music performances from bands like The LaCour Trio,
Katalyst, and The Hardrick Rivers Revue will last throughout
the afternoon, and on July 8 the event will conclude with a
spectacular fireworks show over downtown Natchitoches.
For more information about this summer-long happening,
view the calendar of events at ddnatty.com.
Satchmo Summerfest
August 4–6 • New Orleans
IN 2001, THE FIRST Satchmo Summerfest was held
to commemorate the 100th birthday of one of the most
influential jazz musicians of all time, Louis “Satchmo”
Armstrong. Now in its 17th year, the annual festival
continues to attract crowds with world-famous cuisine and
performances from New Orleans’ top musical acts.
The free, three-day festival made a move last year from
its original location at the Old U.S. Mint to the larger
Jackson Square, an ideal backdrop for listening to live
music, sampling delicious Creole and Cajun dishes, and
cooling off with ice cold beverages. In previous years,
the music lineup has included performances from the
Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Big Sam’s Funky Nation, Kermit
Ruffins, Brass-A-Holics, and many more. Also of note
are the fascinating seminars held with internationally
respected scholars and musicians.
For event information, visit fqfi.org/satchmo. 87
louisianacookin.com
FAI RS , F EST I VALS
& E V E N TS
J U LY
June 10 Aug 26 Destination Downtown Natchitoches
ddnatty.com
June 29 July 2 Essence Festival New Orleans
essence.com
1
Lebeau Zydeco Festival Lebeau | 337.381.0592
lebeauzydecofestival.com
1
Slidell Heritage Festival Slidell
slidellheritagefest.org
4
Go 4th on the River New Orleans
go4thontheriver.com
4
Let Freedom Ring Festival Thibodaux | 985.446.5237
lacajunbayou.com
4
New Iberia Fourth of July Parade New Iberia | 337.344.9397
iberiatravel.com/events
79
San Fermin in Nueva Orleans New Orleans
nolabulls.com
14 15
Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival Natchitoches | 318.357.4332
louisianafolklife.nsula.edu
14 15
Cajun Music and Food Festival Lake Charles | 337.802.4077
cfmalakecharles.com
18 23
Tales of the Cocktail New Orleans | 504.948.0511
talesofthecocktail.com
22
Ponchatoula Christmas in July Ponchatoula | 985.386.2536
tangi-cvb.org
27 28
Louisiana Watermelon Festival Farmerville
fjaycees.wix.com/watermelonfestival
28 29
Marshland Festival Lake Charles | 337.540.3182
marshlandfestival.com
89
louisianacookin.com
FAI RS , F EST I VALS
& E V E N TS
AUGUST
1 31
COOLinary New Orleans
coolinaryneworleans.com
46
Satchmo Summer Fest New Orleans | 504.522.5730
fqfi.org/satchmo
12
New Orleans Red Dress Run New Orleans
nolareddress.com
16 20
Delcambre Shrimp Festival Delcambre
shrimpfestival.net
17 19
Le Cajun Music Awards and Festival | 713.240.5089
cajunfrenchmusic.org/lecajun.html
19
Arts & Crabs Fest Lake Charles | 337.439.2787
visitlakecharles.org
19
Covington White Linen Evening Covington
covla.com
24 25
Fête Rouge Baton Rouge
bresbr.org/fete-rouge
24 27
Gueydan Duck Festival Gueydan | 337.536.6456
duckfestival.org
Aug. 30 Sept. 4 Louisiana Seafood Festival New Orleans
louisianaseafoodfestival.com
Aug. 31 Sept. 4
shrimpandpetroleum.org
Louisiana Shrimp & Petroleum Festival Morgan City | 985.385.0703
COVINGTON WHITE
LINEN EVENING
91
louisianacookin.com
Louisiana
H EART OF THE
C AJUN P RAIRIE
JOIE DE VIVRE—A LITTLE JOY OF LIVING
ACADIA PARISH TOURIST COMMISSION
877.783.2109
aptc@bellsouth.net
www.acadiatourism.org
•Tour Rice and Crawfish Farms
•Visit Kelly’s Landing Agricultural
Museum & Agri-Tour
•Tour The Grand Opera House
of the South
•Visit a Rice Interpretive Center,
J.D. Miller Recording Studio Museum and
Visit Ford Automotive Museum
•Visit a German Heritage Museum
93
louisianacookin.com
From a 106-year Old Landmark comes Steen’s 100% Pure
Cane Syrup, Cane Vinegar, Cane Molasses and Southern-Made
blended syrup. Chefs use our products to create new and exciting
glazes, sauces, dips, desserts and toppings that have a unique
Ŵavor proƓle from the deep south like Grandma used to make.
Begin with the recipes on the bottle or can and then get
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Louisiana Cookin’ | July/August 2017
94
INDEX &
R ESO U RC ES
Recipe Index
Appetizers
Crispy Feta Toasts with
Pancetta, 53
Beverages
Deadbeat Daiquiri, 34
Georgia O’Keeffe Daiquiri, 38
Henri’s Frozen Negroni, 35
Palace Café’s Hemingway
Cocktail, 37
Rubin “The Hurricane” Carter, 37
Willa Jean’s Frosé Y’all, 35
Desserts
Fresh Blackberry Granita, 57
Peach Tarte Tatin, 75
Meat, Poultry, and Game
Beer-Marinated Chicken
Drumsticks, 80
Breast of Duck with Blackberry
Demi-Glace, 49
BRQ Smoked Brisket, 84
French Fire-Roasted Chicken, 49
Pork Steaks with Chimichurri
and Balsamic Fig Glaze, 56
Sweet and Spicy Habanero
Hot Wings, 73
Sauces, Seasonings, and
Condiments
Balsamic Fig Glaze, 56
Chimichurri Sauce, 56
Corn Maque Choux, 16
Dill-Cucumber Sauce, 20
Firecracker Sauce, 43
Gingery Slaw, 43
Jasmine Earl Grey Sweet Tea
Simple Syrup, 37
Quick Pickled Summer Squash, 58
Simple Syrup, 35
Spicy Miso Sauce, 77
95
louisianacookin.com
Seafood
Crispy Crab Cakes, 19
Firecracker Tuna Tacos, 43
Fish Heads in Curry Broth, 42
L'Auberge Baked Oysters, 66
Pomegranate-Glazed Shrimp with
Mango Salsa, 41
The Catfish Are Coming!, 15
Watermelon-Shrimp Salad, 18
Whole Grilled Fish with
Pineapple-Basil Glaze, 44
Vegetables and Side Dishes
Grilled Eggplant with Herbed
Ricotta, 58
Skillet-Roasted Okra with Spicy
Miso Sauce, 77
Summer Tomato Salad, 58
Resources
Spillin the Beans: Pages 11–13:
Photos courtesy of Lula
Restaurant Distillery (page 12),
Max Cusimano (DTB, page 12),
Katie Sikora (Dat Dog, page 12),
Darcy Wilkins (Iverstine Farms,
13), Dickie Brennan Restaurant
Company (redfish, page 13), and
Randy P. Schmidt (portrait,
page 13).
Culinary Antiques: Pages 21–24:
Antiques courtesy of private
collections in Dallas and New York
City, as well as Lucullus,
610 Chartres Street,
New Orleans, Louisiana,
504.528.9620,
lucullusantiques.com.
Foodways: Pages 25–26:
Photo courtesy of
LouisianaNorthshore.com (Old
Slidell Soda Shop, page 26).
Jackpot: Pages 59–66:
Photo courtesy of Margaritaville
Resort Casino Bossier City (59, 61);
and Golden Nugget Lake Charles
(page 65).
Event Spotlight and Calendar:
Pages 87, 89, and 91: Photos
courtesy French Quarter Festivals,
Inc. (Satchmo Fest); Jennifer
Mitchell Photography (Tales of
the Cocktail); and Bobby Gilboy
Photography (Covington White Linen
Evening).
Lagniappe: Page 97: Photography by
Denny Culbert.
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L AG N IAP P E
SOUTH LOUISIANA SOFT SHELL CRABS are a culinary delight. As 2014 Chef to Watch
Jeremy Connor explored the Lafayette area, he found St. Mary’s Seafood & Marina. For more on this
soft shell crab haven and a recipe for Crispy Soft Shell Crab, visit chefstowatch.com/soft-shell-crabs. 
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