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The Boston Globe – February 08, 2018

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Th u r s d a y, Fe b r ua r y 8 , 2 0 1 8
‘I can tell you there is NO excuse big enough to justify this.’
TONY DUNGY, NBC analyst and former Colts coach, on Twitter
For McDaniels, a risk worth taking
His agent dumped him, fellow coaches ripped him,
and the city of Indianapolis trashed him.
For Josh McDaniels’s sake, he better have gotten assurances from the Patriots to make it worth it.
McDaniels’s shocking about-face on the Colts Tuesday night certainly damaged his brand. Already a pariah
in Denver for his disastrous stint as head coach, McDaniels can add Indianapolis to the list of cities that won’t
serve him a free drink any time soon.
“I was absolutely shocked,” former Patriots assistant
coach Charlie Weis said on SiriusXM. “It’s like a slap in
the face.”
McDaniels went back on his word, a mortal sin to
Ben Volin
COMMENTARY
some. He double-crossed a few coaches who had already
signed their contracts in Indianapolis because they
thought they would be working for McDaniels (including defensive coordinator Matt Eberflus and offensive
line coach Dave DeGuglielmo).
McDaniels made his agent look bad, and Bob LaMonte promptly dropped McDaniels on Wednesday.
And McDaniels left the Colts in a pickle, forcing them to
ON FOOTBALL, Page C6
Josh McDaniels left
the Indianapolis Colts
in a pickle.
Lawsuit
reveals
ATF bias
on gender
Agent wins case citing
discrimination against
women by supervisors
By Shelley Murphy
GLOBE STAFF
Special Agent SherryAnn Quindley said she
laughed when her new ATF boss told her, “I’m
going to break you.”
Quindley, who had tackled bombings, shootings, drug trafficking, and organized crime,
thought it must be a joke. Her friends and coworkers at the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives knew her as a fighter, a survivor who beat breast cancer.
Yet, she felt powerless against this new supervisor, who, according to federal documents, sexually harassed or discriminated against her and
other women at the agency.
Even worse, Quindley said, was the feeling of
betrayal when ATF leadership not only protected him but retaliated against her after she filed
internal complaints in 2013 that led to an investigation by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights
Division. It was a pattern that continued, Quindley said, after she won her case against the ATF.
Quindley, a 51-year-old Cape Cod resident
who counseled agents and police officers after
the Boston Marathon bombings, said it can be
particularly humiliating to be sexually harassed
in law enforcement.
“You feel like you can protect others and then
ATF, Page A8
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Senator Harriette Chandler, backed by fellow Democrats, spoke to journalists after the meeting on the presidency.
Chandler remaining Senate president
Lawmakers’ decision means Rosenberg won’t return to top job in 2018
By Joshua Miller
and Michael Levenson
GLOBE STAFF
Senate Democrats decided Wednesday
to keep Senator Harriette L. Chandler as
their leader for the rest of the year, closing off the possibility that former Senate
president Stanley C. Rosenberg could return to power in 2018 after reports that
his husband tried to meddle in Senate
business.
The move is an attempt to end weeks
of intense political jockeying that had disrupted policy making on Beacon Hill. It
also punts the high-stakes election for a
permanent president until a newly elected Senate convenes in 2019.
“I am confident that Senate President
Chandler will serve the Senate and the
Commonwealth with distinction,” said
Rosenberg, who has been laid low by allegations of sexual assault against his husband, Bryon Hefner.
After meeting with her colleagues behind closed doors for several hours, Chandler, an 80-year-old Democrat from
Worcester, announced that the Senate
would remove the word “acting” from her
title at a formal session Thursday — a
board and celebrate their common
ground.
Now this “Common Sense Coalition” — 25 or so senators who were
instrumental in reopening the government after a three-day shutdown last month — is trying to
forge an immigration compromise.
It is proving to be the toughest
challenge yet in their bid to restore
By Liz Goodwin
GLOBE STAFF
WASHINGTON — The Senate
office of Republican Susan Collins
of Maine has emerged in recent
weeks as an oasis of bipartisanship,
a political Switzerland where a
band of Democrats and Republicans have a safe space to scrawl
points of agreement on a white-
Senate leaders struck a farreaching agreement that
MODERATES, Page A6
WYNN, Page B9
By Dugan Arnett
would add hundreds of billions
of dollars to military and domestic programs over the next
two years. A2.
ex-wives accused him in interviews of physical abuse when
they were married to him. A2.
VOL . 293, NO. 39
GLOBE STAFF
Coat tales
Thursday: Cold, but sunny.
High: 30-35. Low: 16-21.
Friday: Still cold, less sunny.
High: 31-36. Low: 28-33.
High tide: 5:14 a.m. 5:48 p.m.
Sunrise: 6:50 Sunset: 5:07
Complete report, B15
*
Suggested retail price
$2.00
GLOBE STAFF
A COMFORT, BUT NOT TO ALL
In the news
Rob Porter, the White House
staff secretary, announced his
resignation a day after his two
By Mark Arsenault
recently the group could “make a
lasting difference in how the Senate of the United States works.”
But the coalition is realizing
that ending a politically unattractive budget shutdown was a lot easier than agreeing on a sweeping immigration compromise that carries
risks for both sides — something
that for decades has eluded far
more experienced negotiating
groups working with more amenable presidents.
SENATE, Page A12
an increasingly rancorous Senate
to its exalted platform as the
world’s greatest deliberative body.
Optimism reigns among this
group, despite big warning signs.
A jubilant Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, dubbed Collins’s office Switzerland and said it’s a place where everyone can “feel good.” Senator
Chris Coons, a Delaware Democrat
who introduced a new immigration
plan with Republican John McCain
of Arizona this week, told reporters
CEO’s ouster does not end
commission’s interest
The resignation of chief executive Steve Wynn
may mark a substantial step toward getting
Wynn Resorts out of the crosshairs of Massachusetts regulators, but the casino giant remains under a cloud of scrutiny.
A day after Wynn stepped down as the head of
the company he founded, the state gaming commission said Wednesday it is aggressively continuing its review of sexual misconduct allegations against Wynn, and how they may affect the
status of the company and its key executives in
regard to holding a Massachusetts casino license.
Investigators want to know whether other executives or board members at Wynn Resorts
knew about the claims against Wynn, and, if so,
what they did, or failed to do, about those allegations.
“Our investigation has to continue,” Gayle
Cameron, a member of the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, said at a commission meeting.
“Finding out exactly what happened (and) when
is . . . critical to any decisions we make.”
Investigators will also focus on what happens
to Wynn’s stake in Wynn Resorts. Wynn, 76,
owns about 12 percent of the company, which he
Senate coalition talks compromise but faces big tests
Meeting in Maine senator’s office (dubbed
Switzerland), group tackles immigration
State review of
Wynn Resorts
will continue
The Boston Public Schools
agreed to recognize sickle cell
disease as a disability that interferes with a student’s education, the Globe has learned.
B1.
PLYMOUTH — By just about any measure, the
rooster known as Little G, a waddling, basketball-sized
burst of white, brown, and gray feathers, seems a fairly
personable and good-natured fellow.
He enjoys apples and the occasional piece of bacon,
is known to come when called, and, if you were to visit
him, he would probably spend much of the evening
clucking softly at your feet and glancing up at you with
curious, ink-black eyes.
Despite his considerable charm, however, Little G
has become the subject of an escalating civic drama,
one that has pitted a local family against the town, left
neighbors at odds, and raised questions about the elasticity of the term “emotional support animal.”
It’s the kind of controversy that seems to be blowing up everywhere these days — most recently over an
emotional support peacock named Dexter that United
Airlines turned away from a flight in Newark. As in
ROOSTER, Page A5
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
Eileen Soule-Freeman spent time with her rooster Gollum, or
Little G, at her home in Plymouth earlier this month.
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Senate leaders
agree to raise
spending over
next two years
Deal could end
repeated threats
of a shutdown
By Thomas Kaplan
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — Senate
leaders, disregarding President Trump’s threats to shut
down the government, struck
a far-reaching agreement on
Wednesday that would add
hundreds of billions of dollars
to military and domestic programs over the next two years,
breaking the cycle of fiscal crises that have bedeviled the
Capitol since last summer.
The accord, between Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky, the
majority leader, and Chuck
Schumer of New York, his
Democratic counterpart,
would raise strict caps on military and domestic spending
that were imposed in 2011 as
part of a deal with President
Barack Obama that was once
seen as a key triumph for Republicans in Congress.
The latest deal also includes an increase in the federal debt limit, said Representative Chris Collins, Republic a n o f Ne w Yo r k , t h o u g h
Senate leaders did not immediately announce that piece of
the agreement.
The spending caps would
increase about $300 billion
over two years, according to a
congressional aide. The limit
on military spending would
be increased by $80 billion in
the current fiscal year and by
$85 billion in the next year,
which begins Oct. 1, the aide
said. The limit on nondefense
spending would increase by
$63 billion this year and $68
billion next year.
The deal would cause budget deficits to grow even larger, on top of the effects of the
sweeping tax overhaul that
lawmakers approved in Dec e m b e r. B u t b e c a u s e t h e
agreement would give both
parties what they want most,
the deficit impact appears to
be of little concern. Defense
Secretary Jim Mattis, White
House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders, and
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
all quickly embraced it.
From the increase in domestic spending, Schumer
said the deal includes $20 billion for infrastructure, $6 billion for the opioid crisis and
mental health, $5.8 billion for
child care, and $4 billion for
Veterans Affairs hospitals and
clinics. It also includes disaster relief for areas hit by hurricanes and wildfires.
The deal also includes $4.9
billion — two years of full federal funding — for Medicaid in
Puerto Rico and the US Virgin
Islands, helping to avoid a
looming Medicaid shortfall.
There is additional money to
repair infrastructure, hospitals, and community health
centers severely damaged by
hurricanes Irma and Maria.
The relief aid also includes
$28 billion in community development block grants, including $11 billion for Puerto
Rico, with $2 billion of that to
repair the power grid. About
30 percent of Puerto Ricans —
more than 400,000 customers
— don’t have electricity more
than four months after Hurricane Maria. Puerto Rico requested $94.4 billion in aid after the storm.
The agreement includes an
additional four-year extension
of funding for the Children’s
Health Insurance Program, on
top of the six-year extension
that Congress approved last
month, Schumer said.
“I hope we can build on
this bipartisan momentum
and make 2018 a year of significant achievement for Congress, for our constituents and
for the country that we all
love,” McConnell said.
“After month of legislative
logjams, this budget deal is a
g e n u i n e b r e a k t h r o u g h ,”
Schumer said. “After months
of fiscal brinkmanship, this
budget deal is the first real
sprout of bipartisanship.”
Ryan urged his members
to vote for it: “America will be
safer and stronger because of
this agreement.” His embrace
boosted its chances in the
House, where conservatives
were cool to it, if not hostile.
“This is a dead-end path
that will cause great hardship
to Americans,” proclaimed
Representative Mo Brooks,
Republican of Alabama. “And
if you really look at it out long
term and see the cascading effects, it is going to cost a lot of
Americans their lives.”
The deal also sparked opposition from the House Democratic leader, Representative
Nancy Pelosi, who said she
can’t agree to any budget deal
not accompanied by a debate
on protecting immigrants
brought here illegally as children, known as Dreamers.
“ Without that commitment . . . this package does not
have my support, nor does it
have the support of a large
number of members of our
caucus,” Pelosi said on the
House floor, where she spoke
at length about Dreamers, referring to a promise by McConnell to begin debate on immigration soon, a commitment not matched by Ryan.
“Speaker Ryan has already
repeatedly stated we intend to
do a DACA and immigration
reform bill — one that the
president supports,” said
spokeswoman AshLee Strong,
referring to the Obama-era
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.
The budget deal would be
paired with a stopgap spending measure that would keep
federal agencies open past
Thursday, when the current
funding measure expires.
For the record
R Correction: Because of an editing error, a story Tuesday about
the killing of two boys in Brockton mischaracterized a statement allegedly made by their mother. Latarsha L. Sanders reportedly vowed to kill someone, but did not specify the two
boys, according to police. The Globe regrets the error.
R Correction: Because of a reporting error, a story in Monday’s
Business section about Gameface Media misstated the company’s prepayment terms for photographers. It offers full prepayment. Because of an editing error, CEO David Lavallee’s name
was misspelled in a display quote. In addition, the story should
have noted that cost cutting is the main reason the company is
on track to be profitable in 2018. After publication, Gameface
told the Globe that three photographers had received partial
payments shortly before the story appeared online and in print.
The Globe regrets the errors.
The Globe welcomes information about errors that call for
corrections. Information may be sent to comments@globe.com
or left in a message at 617-929-8230.
JOHN MOORE/GETTY IMAGES
CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE — Police arrested immigration activists who had gathered in the rotunda of the Russell Senate
Office Building on Wednesday to pressure Congress to pass legislation to protect the DACA program.
White House aide, accused of abuse, resigns
Porter’s ex-wives
describe physical
altercations
By Maggie Haberman
and Katie Rogers
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — As the
White House staff secretary,
Rob Porter is not a public figure, but he is responsible for paper flow to the president, a job
of crucial importance in this
White House. He frequently
travels with President Trump
o n A i r Fo r c e O n e , a n d h e
helped write Trump’s first State
o f t h e Un i o n a d d r e s s l a s t
month.
But on Wednesday, despite
support from John Kelly, the
White House chief of staff, and
other West Wing staff aides,
Porter announced his resignation, a day after his two former
wives accused him in interviews of physical abuse when
they were married to him.
His troubles were not a complete secret at the White House:
Two people close to the White
House said the allegations
against him made by his former
wives, Colbie Holderness and
Jennifer Willoughby, had contributed to a delay in granting him a
permanent security clearance.
In a statement, Porter said
“these allegations are simply
false,” even as details of the alleged abuse and photos of one
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Rob Porter, White House
staff secretary, is a key
assistant to chief of staff
John F. Kelley.
of his former wives with a black
eye that she said he gave her
were widely circulated.
Porter did not mention a departure date from the White
House, and he still has the president’s support. Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House
press secretary, said Wednesday
that Trump retained “full confidence” in Porter’s abilities.
The White House’s response
was consistent with how both
Trump and his aides have handled allegations of harassment
or abuse against the president
or his allies and advisers.
Kelly did say Wednesday
night that he was “shocked” by
the allegations about Porter, revising the statement of support
he issued earlier in the day.
In the White House, Porter,
40, was widely regarded as a
rising star. A Belmont native,
Harvard University graduate,
Rhodes scholar, and former
Senate aide, Porter was an ally
of Kelly and a steady force in a
West Wing populated by aides
vying for face time with — and
influence over — the president.
But, a year into his job, Porter
did not have the permanent security clearance that aides of
his rank always have.
Willoughby, Porter’s second
wife, said in an interview
Wednesday that when the FBI
was conducting research for
Porter’s security clearance, he
asked her if she had told investigators about their marriage.
“He believed that that was
holding up his clearance,” Willoughby said. “I did describe my
marriage in detail.”
Willoughby, who said she divorced Porter in November
2013, decided to go public
about the allegations after facing pressure from Porter to issue a statement that she felt
“minimized” her experiences in
their marriage.
In addition to asking her
about what she said to FBI officials, Porter, she said, had been
in touch several times over the
past year to urge her to take
down a blog post in which she
detailed abuse in their marriage
without naming him.
According to an emergency
protective order she filed in
June 2010 against him in an Arlington, Va., court, Willoughby
accused Porter of growing an-
gry when she said he had violated a private separation agreement. A day later, her complaint said, Porter entered her
apartment with a key he had
not given back.
According to her complaint,
Porter left only after Willoughby had asked him to leave several times. He returned minutes
later and “punched in the glass
on the door,” trying to get in. He
left the property after she read
her name and address aloud to
a 911 dispatcher.
“When he heard me on the
phone with the police,” Willoughby wrote in the complaint, “he apologized and
begged me not to involve them.”
Holderness, Porter’s first wife,
described their relationship as
“verbally, emotionally and physically abusive” in an interview
with The Daily Mail. In photos
she gave to The Intercept, Holderness has a blackened right eye
and a swollen cheekbone.
In his statement, Porter said
the pictures of Holderness were
misleading.
“I took the photos given to
the media nearly 15 years ago,
and the reality behind them is
nowhere close to what is being
described,” he said. “I have been
transparent and truthful about
these vile claims, but I will not
further engage publicly with a
coordinated smear campaign.”
Material from Bloomberg News
was included in this report.
Daily Briefing
Sorority’s expulsion urged over racist post
Judge exempts baker on discrimination
WASHINGTON — George
Washington University student leaders have called for
the expulsion of a sorority
whose members were involved
in a racist Snapchat post.
News outlets reported that
the Student Association Senate unanimously passed a resolution seeking Alpha Phi’s removal and a host of new diversity initiatives.
The Snapchat disseminated last week depicted two Alpha Phi members posing with
a banana peel and featured a
racist caption.
Thomas LeBlanc, the uni-
Forcing a baker to provide
a wedding cake for a same-sex
marriage over her religious
objections violates her right to
free speech, a California judge
has ruled.
‘‘A wedding cake is not just
a cake in a Free Speech analysis,’’ wrote Superior Court
Judge David R. Lampe in a decision late Monday. ‘‘It is an
artistic expression by the person making it that is to be
used traditionally as a centerpiece in the celebration of a
marriage. There could not be a
greater form of expressive
conduct,’’ he said.
versity’s president, told student newspaper The GW
Hatchet that he’s aware of the
resolution, but that sanctions
haven’t been determined,
pending investigation.
The university’s Alpha Phi
chapter said in a statement
that it will terminate the
memberships of the photographer and the students who
were shown.
A 19-year-old woman expelled from the University of
Alabama last month for racist
Instagram posts was also a
member of Alpha Phi.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
As a result, a state antidiscrimination law, which applies
to all kinds of other goods
and services, does not apply to
the baker of the cake in question.
The judge’s reasoning is
similar to that of the ‘‘cake artist’’ currently awaiting a US
Supreme Court ruling.
In that case, Jack C. Phillips, a Colorado baker, is arguing that the First Amendment’s free speech and free exercise of religion clauses give
him the right to refuse wedding services to a same sex
couple.
WASHINGTON POST
Wasted water touches a nerve in Ky.
Settlement reached in gay marriage case
INEZ, Ky. — It was meant
to be a joyful event in eastern
Kentucky, where firefighters
sprayed a plume of blue water
from a truck to announce one
of their own is having a boy.
But the gender reveal isn’t
going down well in Martin
County.
Members of the Facebook
group ‘‘Martin County Water
Warriors’’ are sharing outrage
RALEIGH, N.C. — North
Carolina is paying a $300,000
settlement to a former magistrate who resigned under duress because she said her religious beliefs prevented her
from marrying gay couples.
The settlement includes
about $210,000 in lost pay and
retirement benefits, in addition to attorneys’ fees.
Gayle Myrick was a Union
over a video of the event, at a
time when they face outages,
low pressure, and dirty water.
The local water district says it
can’t afford infrastructure repairs and has proposed a rate
increase of 49.5 percent.
Inez Volunteer Fire Department Chief Lee Gauze said a
firefighter paid $6.70 for 1,000
gallons of water.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
County magistrate who resigned in 2014 after federal
courts made gay marriage legal in North Carolina.
Myrick asked if an accommodation could be made to allow her to work without performing gay marriages.
The judge who oversaw her
said the state guidelines didn’t
allow such flexibility.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
Russian hackers exploit US weakness
Vulnerability
in cyber defenses
reported attacked
By Jeff Donn,
Desmond Butler
and Raphael Satter
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Russian
hackers exploited a key vulnerability in US cyber defenses to
come within reach of stealing
some of the nation’s most secret and advanced defense
technolog y, an Associated
Press investigation has found.
What may have been stolen
is uncertain, but the cyberspies clearly took advantage of
poorly protected e-mail and
scant direct notification of victims.
The hackers known as Fancy Bear, who also intruded in
the US election, went after at
least 87 people working on
military drones, missiles, rockets, stealth fighter jets, cloudcomputing platforms, or other
sensitive activities, the AP
found. Thirty-one agreed to interviews.
Employees at both small
companies and defense giants
s u c h a s L o c k h e e d Ma r t i n
Corp., Raytheon Co., Boeing
Co., Airbus Group, and Gener-
al Atomics were targeted. Contacted by the AP, those companies offered no comment.
‘‘The programs that they
appear to target and the people who work on those programs are some of the most
forward-leaning, advanced
technologies,’’ said Charles
Sowell, a former senior adviser
in the Office of the US Director
of National Intelligence, who
reviewed the list of names for
the AP. ‘‘And if those programs
are compromised in any way,
then our competitive advantage and our defense is compromised.’’
‘‘That’s what’s really scary,’’
added Sowell, who was himself
one of the hacking targets.
The AP identified Fancy
Bear’s prey from about 19,000
lines of the hackers’ email
phishing data collected by the
US-based cybersecurity company Secureworks, which calls
the hackers Iron Twilight. The
data is partial and extends
from March 2015 to May 2016.
Most of the people on the
target list worked on classified
projects. Yet as many as 40
percent clicked on the hackers’
phishing links, the AP analysis
indicates. That’s the first step
in potentially opening their accounts or computer files to
digital theft.
Hackers predominantly targeted personal Gmail, with a
few corporate accounts mixed
in. Personal accounts can convey classified information —
whether through carelessness
or expediency — and lead to
more valuable targets or carry
embarrassing personal details
that can be used for blackmail
or to recruit spies.
Among their interests, the
Russians seemed to be eyeing
the X-37B, an American unmanned space plane that looks
like a miniature shuttle.
Referring to an X-37B flight
in May 2015, Russian Deputy
Prime Minister Dmitry
Rogozin invoked it as evidence
that his country’s space program was faltering. ‘‘The United States is pushing ahead,’’ he
warned Russian lawmakers.
Less than two weeks later,
Fancy Bear tried to penetrate
the Gmail account of a senior
engineer on the X-37B project
at Boeing.
The hackers also chased
people who work on cloudbased services, the off-site
computer networks that enable collaborators to work
with data that is sometimes
classified. For example, the cyberspies tried to get into the
Gmail of an employee at Mellanox Federal Systems, which
helps the government with
high-speed storage networks,
data analysis, and cloud computing. Its clients include the
FBI and other intelligence
agencies.
Ye t o f t h e 3 1 t a r g e t s
reached by AP, just one got any
warning from US officials.
The FBI declined to give onthe-record details of its response to this Russian operation. Agency spokeswoman Jillian Stickels said the FBI does
sometimes notify individual
targets. ‘‘The FBI takes . . . all
potential threats to public and
private sector systems very seriously,’’ she said in an email.
However, three people familiar with the matter — including a current and a former
government official — previously told the AP that the FBI
k n e w t h e d e t a i l s o f Fa n c y
Bear’s phishing campaign for
more than a year.
Pressed about notification
in that case, a senior FBI official, who was not authorized
to publicly discuss the hacking
operation because of its sensitivity, said the bureau was
over whelmed by the sheer
number of attempted hacks.
‘‘It’s a matter of triaging to the
best of our ability the volume
of the targe ts who are out
there,’’ he said.
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Reports of
sex assaults
doubled at
West Point
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The number of sexual assaults reported
at the US Military Academy
roughly doubled during the last
school year, according to data
reviewed by the Associated
Press, in the latest example of
the armed forces’ persistent
struggle to root out such misbehavior.
It’s the fourth year in a row
that sexual assault reports increased at the school in West
Point, N.Y. There were 50 cases
in the school year that ended
last summer, compared with 26
made during the 2015-16
school year. By comparison, the
US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., and the US Air Force
Academy in Colorado Springs,
Colo., saw only slight increases.
Defense Department and
West Point officials said the big
jump at the Military Academy
resulted from a concerted effort
to encourage victims to come
forward. But the dramatic and
consistent increases may suggest more assaults are happening.
‘‘I’m very encouraged by the
reporting,’’ Lieutenant General
Robert Caslen, superintendent
at West Point, said in an interview. ‘‘I recognize that people
are not going to understand’’
the desire for increased reporting, he said. ‘‘I’ve got the steel
stomach to take the criticism.’’
The annual report on sexual
assaults at the three military
academies is due out this
month. The Naval Academy’s
reports increased to 29 last year
from 28. The Air Force Academy’s also edged up by one, to
33.
About 12,000 students are
enrolled across all three institutions. The AP reviewed the data
ahead of its public release.
The report highlights persistent problems within the Air
Force Academy’s sexual assault
prevention office that emerged
late last year. Staffing and management issues led to sweeping
disciplinary actions, the resignation of the director, and an
office restructuring.
Those problems could cast
doubt on a sharp decline in reported sexual assaults at the Air
Force Academy for the 2015-16
school year. Students may have
been reluctant to file reports.
There have been worrying
trends.
An anonymous survey released last year suggested there
were more sexual assaults, unwanted sexual contact, and other bad behavior at all three
academies. It found 12 percent
of women and nearly 2 percent
of men said they experienced
unwanted sexual contact. The
largest increases were at the Army and Navy academies.
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T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
The World
Pence puts pressure on N. Korea
On Asia trip, he
vows toughest
sanctions ever
By Zeke Miller
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOKYO — Vice President
Mike Pence is pouring cold water on the warming ties between North and South Korea
just as the two still-warring
countries are joining up to compete together in the Winter
Olympics.
Making his way to Pyeongchang to lead the US delegation to Friday’s opening ceremonies, Pence has embarked
on a set of symbolic visits designed to draw attention to the
North’s terrible human rights
record and nuclear aggression.
With determined rhetoric —
and the promise of more ‘‘aggressive’’ economic sanctions
against the North — Pence is
looking to refocus American allies on the North Korean threat.
‘‘We will not allow North Korea to hide behind the Olympic
banner the reality that they enslave their people and threaten
the wider region,’’ Pence said
Wednesday after meetings with
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of
Japan in Tokyo.
Pence arrives in Seoul on
Thursday for meetings with
President Moon Jae-in just as
S o u t h Ko r e a s e i z e s o n t h e
games for a diplomatic opening
with the North, including the
first visit of North Korea’s ruling family since the end of the
1950-53 Korean War. Aides say
the vice president is advancing
a counter message, using the
games as an opportunity for the
South and the broader international community to exert what
President Trump has termed
‘‘maximum pressure’’ against
the North.
Before departing for Korea,
Pence announced that the United States would unveil in coming days ‘‘ the toughest and
most aggressive round of economic sanctions on North Korea ever.’’
Pence’s strenuous efforts to
highlight the threat from the
North and its human rights record present a dilemma for
Moon. The South Korean leader
has long advocated engagement with Pyongyang and sees
the Olympics as an opportunity
to quell tensions that have escalated over its nuclear program.
He has limited room to maneuver as his guest from Washington strongly criticizes the North
and emphasizes the need to
crank up the pressure campaign.
US officials declined to offer
details on the expected new
sanctions beyond Pence’s comments, citing concerns that any
additional information could
be used by those trying to skirt
the new measures. They are expected to be implemented before the conclusion of the
games.
North Korea already is facing unprecedented sanctions
after three UN Security Council
restrictions in the past year that
have slashed the pariah nation’s
export revenue and capped fuel
imports. Unilaterally, the United States has also targeted
North Korean shipping companies and Chinese trading networks. A potential escalation of
sanc tions could be the US
blacklisting Chinese banks accused of providing North Korea
access to the international financial system and facilitating
sanctions evasion.
Administration officials said
they had long expected North
Korea would seek to use the
Olympics, taking place just 50
miles from the heavily mined
demilitarized zone, as an opportunity to put a softer face on
the regime, and painted Pence’s
visit as a counterbalance to
those efforts. At the same time,
the vice president has deliberately left the door open to a possible encounter with North Korean officials expected to be in
attendance.
On Wednesday, North Korea
announced that Kim Yo Jong,
the sister of dictator Kim Jongun, would attend the games,
joining the country’s nominal
head of state, Kim Yong Nam.
Pence pledged that his message in any potential interac-
KIYOSHI OTA/POOL PHOTO VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan greeted Vice President
Mike Pence before their meeting in Tokyo on Wednesday.
tion would include the same
point he has been making publicly: that North Korea must renounce its nuclear weapon and
missile programs.
In Washington, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told reporters
Wednesday that Pence is ‘‘quite
capable of making the call’’ on
whether to meet with North
Korean officials. Asked if war
with North Korea is closer than
when Trump took office, Mattis
said US policy is ‘‘firmly in the
diplomatic lane,’’ as shown by
agreement among world powers to increase sanctions.
I n To k y o , A b e e c h o e d
Pence’s comments through a
translator, urging countries
‘‘not to be lured by the charm
offensive of North Korea.’’ Abe
added that the US and Japan
are ‘‘100 percent on the same
page’’ on North Korean policy.
The US, Japan, and South Korea are set to hold trilateral
talks later this week
In South Korea, Pence will
meet Friday morning with
North Korean defectors as he
pays respects at the Cheonan
Memorial in Seoul, which honors the 46 South Korean sailors
killed in a 2010 torpedo attack
attributed to the North.
Daily Briefing
Merkel,
opposition
party reach
coalition deal
By Christopher E. Schuetze
and Katrin Bennhold
NEW YORK TIMES
BERLIN — Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany agreed
on a coalition deal on Wednesday with her previous governing partners, including the Social Democrats, bringing her
within striking distance of
forming a new government after five months of political limbo. But the pact came at a steep
price for her conservative party,
which gave up the powerful Finance Ministry.
Nearly half a million registered members of the centerleft Social Democratic Party,
many of whom oppose joining
another administration led by
Merkel, will get the final say;
the deal is contingent on their
approval in a postal vote that
analysts say is too close to call.
The results of the vote are expected by March 4.
The Social Democrats will
occupy the vice chancellorship
and six other Cabinet posts, including the Finance and Foreign Ministries, an unusually
strong portfolio for a junior coalition partner. The news led
political analysts to agree that
they had done well in negotiations with Merkel’s Christian
Democrats and their sister party in Bavaria, the Christian Social Union.
The coalition deal is “the basis of a good and stable government, which our country needs,
and which many around the
world expect from us,” Merkel
said at a news conference
Wednesday afternoon. “I will
admit here that the question of
who gets which portfolio wasn’t
an easy one.”
The Social Democratic leadership now has to convince party members that got enough
concessions to justify entering
into another coalition government, rather than leading the
opposition.
Martin Schulz, the leader of
the party, said that the deal, for
the most part, had a “Social
Democratic handwriting.”
Hubertus Heil, who until
last year was the secretary-general of the Social Democrats,
told journalists, “I feel like we
negotiated well, if it did drag on
a bit. We made progress in
many areas that will make people’s lives better.”
The parties spent the last
two weeks negotiating a governing pact, but if members of
the Social Democratic Party reject the deal, the country could
face more uncertainty and the
prospect of a snap election.
In fall elections, the Christian Democrats and the Social
Democrats lost ground, while
the far-right Alternative for
Germany surged.
ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
DESTRUCTION IN TAIWAN — Searchers continued to look for survivors on Wednesday in the rubble of the 12-story Yun Men Tsui Ti
building in Hualien after a powerful earthquake hit the east coast of Taiwan overnight. At least eight people were reported dead in the
magnitude-6.4 quake, and several buildings in Hualien were tilting precariously.
European lawmakers oust Polish official
Kenya deports opposition politician
BRUSSELS — The European Parliament voted Wednesday to dismiss one of its vice
presidents, Ryszard
Czarnecki of Poland, after he
compared a rival Polish Parliament member to a Nazi
collaborator.
The European lawmakers
voted 447-196, reaching the
two-thirds hurdle required to
remove him.
Czarnecki, who was one of
14 vice presidents, will continue to be a member of the
Parliament in Strasbourg,
France, representing Poland’s
ruling Law and Justice party.
Last month Czarnecki
called Roza Thun, a European Parliament lawmaker
NAIROBI — Kenya’s government said Wednesday that
it had deported a politician
arrested for witnessing the
mock inauguration of opposition leader Raila Odinga as
the ‘‘people’s president,’’ an
event it calls treason, as fears
grew that East Africa’s most
stable democracy is becoming
increasingly repressive.
Politician Miguna Miguna
renounced his Kenyan citizenship years ago and never
reclaimed it, Interior Ministry spokesman Mwenda Njoka said. The government said
it had deported him to Cana-
from Poland’s opposition Civic Platform party, a ‘‘shmaltsovnik,’’ a derogatory term for
the Poles who blackmailed
Jews, or Poles hiding Jews,
during the Nazi German occupation of Poland.
His words came after
Thun criticized the Polish ruling party in a German TV
broadcast, accusing authorities of moving the country toward ‘‘dictatorship.’’
After Wednesday’s vote,
Czarnecki described the move
against him as ‘‘anti-Polish,’’
and said he does not regret
defending Poland against opposition politicians who criticize Poland abroad.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger in barn is stuff of dreams
LONDON — Police in
Scotland were called by a
farmer who thought a big cat
had invaded his cow shed.
They ended up in a 45-minute standoff with a large
stuffed tiger.
Police thought they had
the tiger by the tail when they
were deployed to a farm in
Peterhead in Aberdeenshire,
sending in a number of units,
including an armed response
team.
The authorities eventually
realized it was a toy.
Police described the incident as a ‘‘false call made
with genuine good intent.’’
The Scottish edition of the
Sun newspaper reported that
the farmer, Bruce Grubb,
went out to check on his cows
while he was having a housewarming party and saw the
“tiger’’ on a ramp.
The paper quoted Grubb
as saying: ‘‘I was stone cold
sober, drink had nothing to
do with me thinking it was
real.’’
ASSOCIATED PRESS
da, where Miguna has said he
was granted political asylum
after he and other Kenyan
student officials in 1987 were
detained, tortured, and released without trial.
Miguna called the government’s latest actions illegal
and said he would challenge
them in court.
Miguna described his arrest last week as a ‘‘violent invasion of my home by more
than 34 hooded criminals’’
using detonators to gain entry without warrants or identifying themselves.
are often enough to provoke
mob violence.
An antiterrorism court on
Wednesday sentenced the
man to death and handed life
sentences to five other people
in connection to the lynching.
Another 25 people were sentenced to four years, and 26
others were acquitted for lack
of evidence.
The trial was held at a
high-security prison in the
northwestern town of
Haripur, in part due to concerns that radical Islamists
might target the hearing or
witnesses.
JERUSALEM — Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu suggested Wednesday night that he could be implicated in a police corruption
investigation but sought to reassure his supporters that the
allegations against him would
amount to nothing.
His Facebook video message came as the Israeli press
reported police would recommend that Netanyahu be indicted on charges including
bribery and breach of trust.
Mickey Rosenfeld, a police
spokesman, said two investigations in which Netanyahu
has been named a suspect
are ‘‘reaching a final conclusion.’’
In the video, Netanyahu
said, ‘‘Many of you are asking,
what will happen? So I want to
reassure you: There will be
nothing, because I know the
truth.’’
The investigations center
on whether Netanyahu accepted lavish gifts in exchange for
political favors, or cut a deal
with a newspaper publisher to
receive favorable coverage.
He says he is innocent.
But pressure has mounted,
and police have recommended
that his wife, Sara, be indicted
on a charge of misuse of funds.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON POST
ASSOCIATED PRESS
1 sentenced to death in Pakistan lynching
HARIPUR, Pakistan — A
Pakistani court on Wednesday sentenced a man to death
and convicted 30 others over
the lynching of a 23-year-old
university student who was
falsely accused of blasphemy,
officials said.
Mohammad Mashal Khan
was killed by a mob on his
university campus in April
2016 over rumors, which later proved to be unfounded,
that he had shared blasphemous content on social media.
Blasphemy against Islam
is punishable by death in Pakistan, and mere allegations
Netanyahu may
face indictment
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
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World/Region
A5
Teen’s comfort rooster ordered out of town
Vatican to talk
with Chile victim
uROOSTER
Continued from Page A1
Sex­crimes expert
coming to US for
in­person meet
By Nicole Winfield
and Eva Vergara
ASSOCIATED PRESS
VATICAN CITY — The Vatic a n’s s e x - c r i m e s e x p e r t i s
changing plans and will fly to
New York to take in-person testimony from a Chilean sex
abuse victim after his pleas to
be heard by Pope Francis were
previously ignored, the victim
told the Associated Press on
Wednesday.
The switch from a planned
Skype interview came after the
AP reported that Francis received a letter in 2015 from
Juan Carlos Cruz, a survivor of
Chile’s most notorious pedophile priest. Cruz wrote the
pope that one of the priest’s
proteges, Bishop Juan Barros,
was present for his abuse and
did nothing, and questioned
Francis’ decision to make him
a diocesan bishop.
Barros has denied seeing or
knowing of any abuse committed by the Rev. Fernando Karadima, a charismatic priest
sanctioned by the Vatican in
2011 for sexually abusing minors.
Francis sparked an outcry
during his recent visit to Chile
by strongly defending Barros,
describing the accusations
against him as slander, and
saying he never heard from
any victims about Barros’ behavior.
The AP report , published
Monday, belied the pope’s
claim that the victims had never come forward.
Even before the report, the
Vatican last week tapped Archbishop Charles Scicluna to go
to Santiago to take testimony
from victims and others with
information about the Barros
affair.
Originally, Scicluna was to
interview Cruz via Skype since
he lives in Philadelphia.
But Scicluna called Cruz on
Tuesday, ‘‘on behalf of the
pope,’’ and asked if they could
meet in person, Cruz told the
AP. Their meeting is scheduled
for Feb. 17 in New York, where
Cruz has to be for work that
day anyway, Cruz said.
From there, Scicluna will
travel onto Santiago as originally planned.
‘ ‘ I t h i n k t h e Va t i c a n ’s
change of attitude is due to the
tremors caused by the Associated Press article,’’ Cruz said.
He said he appreciated Scicluna’s gesture as a sign that the
Vatican was taking his testimony seriously.
‘‘I see a good disposition,
that they’re not only taking my
testimony seriously but also
that of all those who are desperate living with the anguish
of sexual abuse and a church
that does nothing for them,’’ he
told the AP.
Scicluna declined to comment.
For more than a decade, Scicluna was the Vatican’s lead
sex crimes investigator, and famously went up against the
Vatican hierarchy to sanction
serial pedophile the Rev. Marcial Maciel, founder of the Legion of Christ. For decades,
Maciel was protected by the
highest officials of the Catholic
Church who blocked an investigation into his crimes.
Once Scicluna was allowed
to pursue it, he traveled all
over — including to New York
— to interview Maciel’s victims, preferring face-to-face
testimony and to prevent victims already wounded by the
church from having to travel to
c o m e t o h i m . Ma c i e l , w h o
raped and molested his seminarians, was sentenced to the
same sanction as Karadima: a
lifetime of ‘‘penance and
prayer’’ for his crimes, the typical church punishment given
to elderly abusers.
that case, more than a few eyerolls have met the claim that
Little G should qualify as a service animal.
But Laura Ceurvels says
they are wrong about her rooster.
Little G, she said, “is just different.”
Her reasons for saying so
started stacking up a year and a
half ago, when her adolescent
daughter, Eileen Soule-Freeman, went to pick out a couple
chicks from the farm of a family friend and came back with a
little poof of fuzz she promptly
named Gollum — Little G, for
short.
Eileen, now 14, has been diagnosed with psychiatric disorders, which the Globe agreed to
leave unspecified to protect the
girl’s privacy. For years, she had
screaming fits and obsessed
over seemingly meaningless
things. She could become so
angry that she lashed out uncontrollably, to a point that
even the family dogs seemed
afraid. “It was really hard for
me as a parent,” Laura Ceurvels
said.
But the little rooster had an
inexplicable effect on the girl.
Eileen grew increasingly close
to the animal — taking it to 4-H
shows and wheeling it through
the neighborhood in a wagon.
And slowly, the issues with
which she’d struggled for so
long began to subside.
The screaming fits became
less frequent. Things she once
fixated on — like, when dinner
would be ready — became less
important in the company of
her new companion. Perhaps
most notably, Ceurvels said, in
the year after adopting the
rooster, her daughter went
from taking six prescribed
medications to just two.
In a way nothing else
seemed to, Little G helped her
daughter cope.
“She found something
soothing in it,” Ceurvels said.
Little G was far less comforting, however, to neighbors
on the family’s residential
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
Eileen Soule-Freeman’s mother says the rooster has helped
soothe her daughter.
street of roughly 1-acre plots.
Though the family did its
best to limit disturbances — at
night, they kept Little G in a
foam- insulated coop and fit
the bird with a “no-crow” collar
that prevents it from crowing
loudly — complaints rolled in.
In Plymouth, as in many
other Massachusetts towns, it’s
legal to keep chickens, an increasingly popular practice
that has led to a rise in complaints about noisy roosters. In
one instance, an angry resident
threatened to kill a neighbor’s
rooster. In another, a roosterrelated argument led to one
resident allegedly shooting an
arrow at a neighbor’s house.
In response to the complaints, members of the town’s
Board of Health voted last April
to outlaw roosters on properties encompassing less than 5
acres.
Little G, the Ceurvels family
was informed, had to go.
Surely, Laura Ceurvels figured, a compromise could be
reached, and in November, she
appeared before the Board of
Health to argue that the rooster’s effect on her daughter
qualified it as an emotional
support animal and that it
should be exempted from the
law.
She came prepared, bringing letters from three of her
daughter’s doctors — including
one from New Bedford-based
psychologist Andrea MacAulay,
who provided a written pre-
scription for the rooster as a
therapeutic animal.
But the board — citing a federal law that limits service animals to dogs and small horses
— remained unmoved, denying
the family a variance that
would have allowed them to
keep the rooster on their property.
‘There’s something
about a rooster
that really does
have a kind of
caretaking
capability.’
TIA PINNEY
Mass Audubon naturalist
“We afford everybody due
process,” explained Nate Horwitz-Willis, director of public
health for Plymouth. “But
when the decisions have to be
made in a very well-thoughtout, legal manner, sometimes
people don’t like the result.”
Following the meeting with
the Board of Health, Ceurvels
filed a complaint against the
town’s public health department with the Massachusetts
Commission Against Discrimination, arguing it stands in violation of the federal Fair Housing Act. A similar complaint
was filed with the US Depart-
ment of Housing and Urban
Development.
“By denying the variance
without regard to my daughter’s disability,” she wrote in
one complaint, “the town effectively denied her a reasonable
accommodation for her disability.”
HUD said in a letter to Ceurvels that the agency had accepted the complaint and referred
it to the state discrimination
commission, which said last
month it has assigned an investigator to look into the case.
Some experts say the notion
of a rooster and child bonding
is not as outlandish as it may
seem.
Tia Pinney, a naturalist at
Mass Audubon’s Drumlin Farm
Wildlife Sanctuary in Lincoln,
has spent her life around chickens. She knows their habits,
their quirks — and roosters,
she said, possess the kind of
comforting traits that could potentially benefit a child suffering from emotional distress.
“There’s something about a
rooster that really does have a
kind of caretaking capability,”
Pinney said.
As the family awaits an outcome to the case, Little G is
boarding with a family relative
in nearby Carver. His visits
with Eileen are limited to her
once-a-week therapy sessions
and an occasional stop at the
Ceurvels’ home. Laura Ceurvels
said Eileen’s condition has deteriorated and they may have
to consider increasing her medication again.
During a visit last week,
Ceurvels watched as Little G sat
quietly in her daughter’s arms
as she watched TV.
For that night, at least, Eileen played happily with the
bird. The rooster would stay
overnight, stowed out of earshot in the basement, but by
the next morning, it would be
back in the car, bound for Carver.
Dugan Arnett can be reached at
dugan.arnett@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@duganarnett.
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T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Compromise coalition faces big tests
uMODERATES
Continued from Page A1
And two weeks and at least
six Common Sense summits later, the meetings have not altered the reality that members
of both parties face increasing
pressure from their most ardent supporters to oppose compromises, as well as a mercurial
president who may not endorse
their plan.
The group is meeting nearly
every day this week, scrambling
to reach an agreement ahead of
a vote on a potentially doomed
conservative immigration bill
that Senator Mitch McConnell,
the majority leader, could begin
as early as Monday.
“Everything’s on the table,
that’s what’s great about it,”
said Senator Joe Manchin,
Democrat of West Virginia and
a cofounder of the coalition, as
he walked into Monday night’s
meeting.
That’s part of the problem.
The moderate coalition has
“Mom called me 12 times last night.”
Today, I made the right call.
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The office of Senator Susan Collins, a moderate Republican from Maine, has emerged as
the meeting ground for a group of about 25 that’s known as the Common Sense Coalition.
spent hours scribbling down
what members all agree to on
Collins’s whiteboard, but they
are still divided on a fundamental question of strategy.
Some senators want the
group to back a bill the White
House has asked for, including
steep cuts in legal immigration
that most Democrats and many
Republicans find unacceptable.
Others believe the moderates
should buck the president and
endorse a bill they think can get
the most votes in the Senate.
“Some in the meeting say,
‘But yeah, if we do that, the
House will never agree; if we do
that, the president will never
agree,’ ” Democratic Senator
Tim Kaine explained to a few
immigration activists after
Tuesday’s meeting. “Well yeah,
but we’re the Senate. Our job
isn’t to play ‘Mother May I.’ ”
Most senators in the group
agree with providing up to 1.8
million DACA recipients and
other young immigrants a path
to citizenship, in exchange for
billions of dollars for a partial
border wall (or fence) and other
border security measures. But
some in the coalition believe
the group needs to limit DACA
recipients’ ability to sponsor
their parents for citizenship,
and adopt other immigration
restrictions, to have a shot at
winning the president’s favor.
If President Trump rejects
the Senate’s bill, it would likely
die in the more conservative
House, continuing the stalemate and again leaving the fate
of DACA recipients up in the
air.
After the Common Sense
meeting Tuesday, Coons said
the issues were complex and
that the group probably won’t
know what the Senate will support until senators start voting
on amendments on the floor.
He acknowledged that the
“loudest voices” in each party
tend to dominate, making compromise harder.
“It is at least positive that we
keep getting the full complement of members showing up
interested, passing out papers,
pointing out ideas,” Coons said
of the bipartisan group.
Collins, the coalition’s cofounder and a veteran of other
moderate negotiating groups,
said Tuesday that discussions
are still “up in the air,” but she
was hopeful they’d reach a deal.
“I’ve been in enough negotiations to know that sometimes
things fall apart, and whether
we can bring things to conclusion is still up in the air,” she
said. “But I’m optimistic.”
A plan produced by immigration veterans Graham and
Dick Durbin, a Democratic senator from Illinois, attempted to
please the president as well as
Democrats; it was roundly rejected last month by Trump,
who angrily asked why the
United States should accept immigrants from Africa.
‘Well yeah, but
we’re the Senate.
Our job isn’t
to play “Mother
May I.” ’
SENATOR TIM KAINE
Democrat of Virginia, urging
his colleagues to take a bolder
stand on immigration reform
“I’m glad that all these legislators are engaging it with such
good intentions,” said America’s
Voice director Frank Sharry, a
longtime advocate for providing a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants.
“But you know, it’s a little bit
like Michael Jordan playing
baseball,” he said. “It’s hard for
people who haven’t worked on
this in 20 years to hit the curve
ball.”
A plan that includes a large
sum of money for a border wall
would probably alienate Democrats from bright blue states
with strong majorities of liberal
voters, and a bill that doesn’t
sufficiently address Trump’s demand for tighter restrictions
would lose the backing of hardright senators.
“If they’re going to load it up
with border wall funding in
these Common Sense Coalition
[meetings] and expect liberal
Democrats to vote for it, it’s not
going to happen,” Sharry said.
Neither of Massachusetts’
Democratic senators is part of
the Common Sense group, and
both oppose any funding for a
border wall.
Collins and Graham were
part of an earlier group of moderates called the Gang of 14,
which banded together in 2005
to stop Democratic filibusters
of President George W. Bush’s
judicial nominations.
Lincoln Chafee, a former Republican senator from Rhode
Island who was part of the
Gang of 14, said the Common
Sense group’s size makes him
doubtful it will wield real power.
“You just have so much power if you stick together — [Senate leadership] can’t pass anything,” Chafee said. “Once it
gets big, it’s harder to hold anyone together.”
That issue is already apparent, as some senators attending
the Common Sense meetings
don’t even want to be associated with the group, much less
promise to vote as a bloc.
“I’m working with them, but
I don’t consider myself a member,” Senator Mike Rounds, a
Republican from South Dakota,
told the Globe.
Chafee said the group
should “show some muscle”
next week — by replacing McConnell’s bill with a finished immigration product endorsed by
the group — and become a “beacon of sanity” on Capitol Hill.
Such a display of strength
would show whether the group
has a shot at having the transformative effect on the Senate
that its members hoped for in
January.
“I think there’s some staying
power here,” Senator Maggie
Hassan, a freshman Democrat
from New Hampshire and a
member of the group, said this
week.
Liz Goodwin can be reached at
elizabeth.goodwin@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@lizcgoodwin.
Holder says Obama gave him respect
Call to Schedule
617-910-3524
WASHINGTON — Former
Attorney General Eric Holder
said Wednesday that Barack
Obama,
POLITICAL though a perNOTEBOOK sonal friend,
understood
while in office that ‘‘there has
to be a wall between the White
House and the Justice Department.’’
Holder said that he wished
President Trump, who has repeatedly blasted the Justice Department and his attorney general, Jeff Sessions, would treat
the department with the same
respect and independence as
Obama did in office.
‘‘There were things that I
did while I was attorney general, decisions that I had to make,
that were not communicated to
him,’’ Holder said at a breakfast
meeting with reporters sponsored by the Christian Science
Monitor. ‘‘My guess is there
were more than a couple that
he probably did not agree with,
and yet I never heard from him
anything either privately — and
certainly not publicly — that
was critical of any decision that
I made.’’
Holder, who served as attorney general between 2009 and
2015, said that he did not think
the drumbeat of criticism of the
FBI and Justice Department
would affect an ongoing investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller into potential coordination between the Trump
campaign and Russia.
But, he said, it could have
other negative long-term consequences on the public perception of the FBI and Justice Department.
‘‘A case will be tried in Illinois, Mississippi, Missouri,
where a credibility determination has to be made between an
FBI agent saying one thing and
a defendant, a witness, saying
something else,’’ Holder said.
‘‘And having raised questions in
the way that the president has
about the way in the FBI goes
about doing its job ... will raise
doubts in the minds of people
as they listen to that FBI agent
and what she says in a way that
never existed before.’’
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Democrats flip deep red
Missouri House district
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. —
Democrats have picked up a
Missouri House seat previously
held by Republicans in a suburban St. Louis district that voted
overwhelmingly for President
Trump in 2016.
The victory by Democrat
Mike Revis over Republican
David Linton in a close special
election Tuesday continued a
national trend of Democratic
gains since Trump’s election,
though Republicans held on to
three other seats on the Missouri ballot.
In all four races to replace
Republicans who had resigned,
the Democratic legislative candidates garnered a significantly
larger share of the vote than
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton did against
Trump. Democrats hadn’t even
fielded state House candidates
in any of the districts in 2016.
Missouri Democratic Party
Chairman Stephen Webber asserted that the election results
showed ‘‘there’s a new rush of
energy behind Democrats.’’
Since Trump’s election,
Democrats have flipped 35
seats previously held by Republicans in contested races for
state legislatures throughout
the country, according to the
national Democratic Legislative
Campaign Committee. It said
Republicans have flipped three
Democratic seats during that
time.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A7
7
IT E
VIS AT TH LOBE TH 62
G
US TON W BOO
S
BO L SHO
VE
A
R
T
CRUISE FROM BOSTON
TO BERMUDA, CARIBBEAN,
CUBA, CANADA/NEW ENGLAND
& MORE ON A RECORD NUMBER
OF SHIPS
Havana, Cuba
CRUISE SCHEDULE 2018
BOSTON - BERMUDA
Norwegian Cruise Line - Norwegian Dawn (7-day roundtrip)
MONTH
April
May
June
July
August
September
DAY
Friday
Friday
Friday
Friday
Friday
Friday
DATE
13
4
1
6
3
7
20
11
8
13
10
27
18
15
20
17
25
22
27
24
29
31
Holland America Line - Veendam (7-day roundtrip)
MONTH
May
June
DAY
Saturday
Saturday
DATE
12
9
19
16
Royal Caribbean International - Serenade of the Seas (7-day roundtrip)
MONTH
September
October
DAY
Sunday
Sunday
DATE
23
7
21
BOSTON - CARIBBEAN
Norwegian Cruise Line - Norwegian Dawn (14-day roundtrip to Eastern Caribbean)
MONTH
October
DAY
Friday
DATE
26
BOSTON - CUBA
Holland America Line - Veendam (14-day roundtrip to Cuba)
MONTH
June
August
DAY
Saturday
Saturday
DATE
23
4
BOSTON - CANADA/NEW ENGLAND
Holland America Line - Maasdam (7-day roundtrip to Portland, Bay of Fundy, Halifax, Sydney, Bar Harbor)
MONTH
May
DAY
Saturday
DATE
12
Holland America Line - Maasdam (7-day cruise to Montreal or 14-day roundtrip)
MONTH
May
June
July
August
DAY
Saturday
Saturday
Saturday
Saturday
DATE
19
2
14
11
16
28
30
Holland America Line - Veendam (7-day cruise to Montreal or 14-day roundtrip)
MONTH
DAY
May
July
August
September
Saturday
Saturday
Saturday
Saturday
DATE
26
7
18
1
21
15
29
Holland America Line - Rotterdam (7-day cruise to Montreal or 14-day roundtrip)
MONTH
August
September
October
DAY
Saturday
Saturday
Saturday
DATE
25
8
6
22
Royal Caribbean International - Serenade of the Seas
MONTH
September
September
September
October
DAY
Tuesday
Sunday
Sunday
Sunday
DATE
11
16
30
14
(5-night roundtrip to Halifax, St. John, Bar Harbor)
(7-night roundtrip to Portland, Bar Harbor, St. John, Halifax)
(7-night roundtrip to Halifax, St. John, Bar Harbor, Portland)
(7-night roundtrip to Halifax, St. John, Bar Harbor, Rockland, Portland)
Norwegian Cruise Line - Norwegian Dawn (7-day to Quebec City)
MONTH
September
October
DAY
Friday
Friday
DATE
14
12
28
Seabourn - Seabourn Quest (10-day to Montreal)
MONTH
September
October
DAY
Sunday
Thursday
DATE
9
11
Windstar Cruises - Star Pride (12-day to Montreal)
MONTH
September
DAY
Saturday
DATE
29
BOSTON - EUROPE/TRANSATLANTIC
Holland America Line - Rotterdam (19-day to the Netherlands, or 38-day roundtrip Voyage of the Vikings)
MONTH
July
DAY
Wednesday
DATE
18
BOSTON - ONE WAY TRAVEL
Royal Caribbean International - Serenade of the Seas (12-night Boston to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida)
MONTH
October
DAY
Sunday
DATE
28
Norwegian Cruise Line - Norwegian Dawn (9-day Boston to San Juan via Eastern Caribbean)
MONTH
November
DAY
Friday
DATE
9
flynncruiseportboston.com
The Nation
A8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Lawsuit reveals culture of gender discrimination at ATF
uATF
Continued from Page A1
all of a sudden it comes down
to: You can’t even protect yourself,” she said. “And that’s devastating.”
Quindley’s case, which led
to a cascading series of investigations, internal complaints,
and a congressional inquiry,
provides a rare window into
how a federal law enforcement
agency handles complaints of
sexual harassment and gender
discrimination. It also mirrors
the harassment cases that occur nationwide within the very
agencies that are supposed to
protect the rest of society, from
small-town police departments
to the Department of Justice.
The ATF declined to comment on any specific cases, but
Deputy Director Tom Brandon,
who has led the agency since
April 2015, released a statement saying the agency strictly
adheres to federal laws, regulations, and Justice Department
policies prohibiting sexual harassment.
“As the senior executive of
ATF, I am unequivocally committed to zero tolerance of sexual harassment and, as an individual, my deeply held belief is
that such conduct is unacceptable in all forms and morally
reprehensible,” Brandon said.
“ W h e n a ny AT F e m p l o y e e
learns of allegations of sexual
harassment, I expect those al-
legations to be reported, and
demand that they be thoroughly investigated.”
But that was not Quindley’s
experience. After the Justice
Department found in 2015
that one supervisor harassed
her and another supervisor
condoned it , both men received plum assignments. And
she suddenly found herself
subjected to an investigation of
her credit card transactions
and was targeted online with
sexually explicit images falsely
labeled as her.
“I don’t think I’ve endured a
more difficult thing in my life,”
said Quindley, in her first public comments about her ordeal.
“When people come forward,
they become the target.”
Quindley joined the ATF 28
years ago as an agent in the
Boston office. She served on
the Oklahoma City bombing
task force, worked on a tactical
operations and negotiation
team, and spent four years detailed to the FBI Academy
working with its critical incident response group.
For more than 20 years,
Quindley said, she never had a
problem with the men she
worked with. The majority of
the ATF ’s 2,575 agents are
male; only 356 are women. But
in 2012, Quindley, who ran the
national organized crime drug
enforcement task force program from the ATF’s headquar-
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ters in Washington, came under the supervision of Billy
Wright, deputy chief of the
Special Operations Division.
Wright, according to Quindley, said he would break her,
and he proceeded to try, based
on allegations detailed in federal documents.
In complaints filed in 2013
— with ATF’s internal affairs
division and its equal employment opportunity office —
Quindley said Wright excluded
her from meetings about the
program she ran, humiliated
and demeaned her in front of
co-workers, and applied different rules to her than her male
counterparts.
Neither Wright nor his attorney responded to requests
for comment about allegations
raised by Quindley and other
women, including one who, according to a civil suit, accused
him of sexual assault.
“The problem starts with
her working for someone who
really was a serial harasser of
women,” said Quindley’s attorney, David Wachtel of Washington. “He was someone who
had done this over and over in
the agency and the agency
hadn’t taken action against
him.”
The internal affairs investigation into Quindley’s complaint was initially assigned to
ATF agent Lisa Kincaid, who
alleges in a federal suit pending in Washington that she was
retaliated against after she
turned in a 272-page preliminary report in 2014, corroborating allegations of misconduct by Wright and his supervisor, Charlie Smith, chief of the
Special Operations Division.
Beyond verifying Quindley’s
claims, Kincaid’s investigation
“documented credible evidence that Mr. Wright, among
other matters: shoved his hand
up one woman’s skirt; disc ussed oral se x in front of
women; made unwanted advances toward women; yelled
at, belittled, and berated women,” according to the suit.
An ATF attorney, who spoke
to the Globe on the condition
CHRISTINE HOCHKEPPEL FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
SherryAnn Quindley, walking with her dog in Yarmouth, said, “You feel like you can
protect others and then all of a sudden it comes down to: You can’t even protect yourself.”
she not be named, confirmed
that she told Kincaid that
Wright slid his hand up her
skirt when she was seated next
to him at dinner while attending a conference in Chicago in
2011. She said she didn’t report it to ATF at the time because she believed she would
face repercussions and no action would be taken against
him.
“Behind the scenes, boys are
protected for their bad behavior,” she said.
In her preliminary report to
supervisors, Kincaid said in
her suit, she also found that
Smith failed to take action
against Wright in response to
complaints by women.
But, according to Kincaid’s
suit, top-ranking ATF officials,
including Brandon, would not
open an investigation into the
sexual harassment allegations
or refer her findings to the inspector general’s office for a
full-scale investigation.
“In the end they didn’t care
about any of the women,” Kincaid said during a recent telephone interview with her law-
yers by her side. “I was told,
‘They are not victims, they are
complainants.’ ”
John Carpenter, a retired
ATF agent who worked with
Quindley, said he called Brandon in 2014 and urged him to
take action against Wright because he was making the job
intolerable for Quindley and
other women.
Carpenter said he told Brandon, “You’ve got to put an end
to this.”
He said Brandon seemed
“super receptive,” but nothing
happened.
While the ATF declined to
comment on its handling of
Quindley’s case, in his statement to the Globe, Brandon
said: “I am also committed to
accountability; it is essential to
maintaining a workplace free
from harassment and other
forms of discrimination. I hold
all ATF executives, managers,
supervisors, and employees accountable for complying with
anti-harassment policies. Any
violation of these policies will
result in prompt corrective action, including appropriate dis-
ciplinary action that is consistent with the laws and regulations governing the discipline
of federal employees.”
In September 2015, Senator
Charles Grassley, an Iowa Republican and chairman of the
Senate Judiciary Committee,
wrote a letter to Attorney General Loretta Lynch and the inspector general of the Justice
Department, Michael Horowitz, warning that eight whistleblowers, including Quindley,
told his office they had reported allegations of sexual harassment, bullying, gender discrimination, and witness int i m i d a t i o n t o t h e AT F ’s
internal affairs division “largely to no avail.”
He questioned whether the
ATF was following its zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment.
The attorney general’s office
responded that no direct
claims of sexual harassment
have ever been filed against
Wright, and that the ATF had
not substantiated Quindley’s
claim that he sexually harassed
Continued on next page
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
Continued from preceding page
other women.
In a 43-page final decision
on Quindley’s equal employment opportunity complaint,
the Justice Department’s complaint adjudication office
found in September 2015 that
Quindley had been subjected
to a hostile work environment,
primarily perpetuated by
Wr i g h t a n d c o n d o n e d b y
Smith.
Wright displayed “discriminatory animus” toward Quindley and other women at ATF,
according to the decision, noting that some of the male
agents she worked with corroborated her claims and “believed her work environment
was hostile and abusive.”
The decision also said there
was no evidence that the ATF
ever took any corrective action
in response to Quindley’s complaints of harassment. The government was ordered to pay
damages.
Quindley’s resounding victory appeared to have little impact on Wright or Smith, who
both had moved on to prestigious assignments. Wright received a voluntary transfer to
Puerto Rico, where he’s currently serving as a residentagent-in-charge, according to
court filings.
In November 2015, the inspector general’s office concluded that Smith had gambled while on duty, misused his
government travel card to get
cash advances to gamble, and
drove to casinos in his government car, according to a court
filing by the government in
Kincaid’s case and an inspector
general’s investigative summary.
The case was referred to the
ATF for “appropriate action.”
Two months later Smith was
appointed executive assistant
to the director, where he remained until his retirement
last year.
In response to inquiries
from the Globe, Smith’s attorney, Danielle Bess Obiorah, emailed a statement. “Mr. Smith
was a decorated agent of the
ATF and served honorably and
admirably for 30 years before
his voluntary retirement,” the
statement read. “He never con-
US DISTRICT COURT IN BOSTON
A photo of ATF agent Philip Ball, with his pants down to his
knees, standing over agent Eric Kotchian, was included in a
retaliation and discrimination suit filed against the ATF.
doned nor was aware of any
discrimination directed toward
any employee. He never harassed or subjected any employee to discrimination.”
For Quindley, the ruling
didn’t squelch the workplace
harassment. In the wake of the
decision, the ATF asked the inspector general’s office to investigate her government credit card use. Quindley alleged in
federal documents that the
complaint, which proved unfounded, started with Smith.
Also, an anonymous person
posted sexually explicit images
and pornographic videos, falsely linked to her, online, according to a sworn statement
Quindley made to internal affairs. She believed a colleague
was trying to threaten and intimidate her.
John Cooper, who became
Quindley’s boss after Smith
was promoted, said he ordered
an initial threat assessment to
weigh concerns about Quindley’s safety and security, then
asked internal affairs to investigate who posted the images.
“To the best of my knowledge, that was not followed up
on,” said Cooper, now retired
from ATF. “If an employee feels
a legitimate threat and cause
for concern, you have an obligation to put your best foot forward. I don’t believe that was
adequately done.”
After winning her first
claim against the ATF, Quindley filed a second one with the
agency’s equal employment opportunity office alleging more
retaliation. Wachtel said the
government resolved both cases last year by paying Quindley
$533,000, which included
$238,000 in attorneys’ fees.
The ATF settled a different
retaliation and discrimination
suit in Boston in November.
Jennifer Norcross, an ATF intelligence research specialist,
alleged she was suspended in
2014 after complaining that female specialists had to attend a
training session that male
agents were allowed to skip.
According to the suit, Norcross’s female colleague in
ATF’s Boston office told a supervisor: “I guess the penises
don’t have to go to the training
today; only the vaginas have to
go?” The ATF found Norcross
displayed “inappropriate behavior” by laughing and telling
the other woman, “I would give
you a prize if I had one.” Nor-
G l o b e
cross was suspended for one
day, and the other woman for
two days.
Norcross complained of unequal treatment, since just a
month earlier three male
agents went undisciplined for
their role regarding sexually
suggestive photos shared in the
Boston office.
The photos, attached to the
suit, showed agent Philip Ball
with his pants down at his
knees and boxers exposed,
standing over Eric Kotchian,
who was stretched out on the
floor, partially under a desk.
Agent Robert White e-mailed
the photo to women in the office, according to the suit. It
wasn’t until Norcross complained about her suspension
that Ball and White received
reprimands.
The ATF settled the case by
paying Norcross $41,000, reducing her suspension to a reprimand, and transferring her
to another office, according to
her attorney, Kavita Goyal.
In a statement to the Globe,
Grassley said law enforcement
should be “a guiding example
of professionalism and proper
conduct,” but his oversight
work has found that “too often,
inadequate systems to track
and respond to misconduct
claims only add insult to injury
for harassment or discrimination at work.”
He said he’s been working
with the ATF, other Justice Department agencies, and their
inspector General to improve
the work environment, and
some progress has been made,
“but more still needs to be
done to foster a workplace that
respects and protects all of its
employees.”
Quindley said she has seen
positive changes, including in
the leadership at ATF’s internal
affairs division, and noted, “I’m
in a good place right now and
it’s because of some pretty remarkable men that did stand
up and do the right thing.”
The problem, according to
Quindley, was the men who
didn’t.
Shelley Murphy can be reached
at shelley.murphy@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@shelleymurph.
The Nation
A9
Democratic senators
demand recusal from
Pruitt on power plants
By Dino Grandoni
WASHINGTON POST
A group of Democratic senators is demanding that Environmental Protection Agency
chief Scott Pruitt recuse himself from repealing one of
President Barack Obama’s signature environmental rules,
which is intended to curb the
release of greenhouse gases
from the nation’s power plants.
Late Tuesday, the four senators — Sheldon Whitehouse of
Rhode Island, Edward Markey
of Massachusetts, Jeff Merkley
of Oregon, and Brian Schatz of
Hawaii — submitted a comment to the EPA on repealing
the Clean Power Plan, arguing
Pruitt ‘‘must recuse himself
from overseeing any and all
rulemaking with respect to the
Clean Power Plan.’’
Pruitt sued the EPA a total
of 14 times as attorney general
of Oklahoma. Four of those
suits concerned the CPP.
The senators argue Pruitt’s
participation in the repeal process would violate federal regulations ‘‘governing impartiality
in performing official duties’’
since Pruitt is ‘‘inalterably’’
narrow-minded with regard to
the CPP in particular and climate change in general. The
language echoes that of similar
requests for recusal submitted
by four environmental organizations as well as by a coalition
of 19 left-leaning states and
cities.
‘‘A private citizen (or even a
state attorney general) has the
luxury of making up his mind
and never changing course,’’
the states and cities wrote in a
docket submission last month.
‘‘The decision maker in an administrative proceeding, however, does not.’’
As recently as March, the
senators note, Pruitt said carbon dioxide was not the ‘‘primary contributor to the global
warming that we see,’’ in contradiction to EPA scientists.
Three of the four Democrats serve on the Senate Environment and Public Works
Committee, which oversees the
EPA. The submission is the latest salvo from Democrats on
the panel following a contentious meeting last week at
which Pruitt testified.
During the hearing, Whitehouse asked Pruitt if he remembered a 2016 radio interview in which he referred to
then-candidate Trump as ‘‘dangerous’’ and ‘‘a bully.’’
‘‘I don’t, senator,’’ Pruitt replied. ‘‘And I don’t echo that today at all.’’ (“I bet not,’’ Whitehouse said in response.)
When reached for comment
on the Democrats’ move, the
EPA referred The Washington
Post to a January 2017 letter
Kevin Minoli, principal deputy
general counsel at the agency,
sent to Senator Tom Carper of
Delaware, the Environment
Committee’s top Democrat,
spelling out the agreement
Pruitt negotiated with the Office of Government Ethics.
That month, Democrats raised
the issue of recusal at Pruitt’s
confirmation hearing.
Un d e r t h a t a g r e e m e n t ,
Pruitt recused himself from the
CPP litigation in which he was
involved. But the ethics agreement does not bar him from
setting policy going forward.
The Democratic demands
are an amplification of the
hard-edged rhetoric Democrats have deployed against
Pruitt. But Richard Pierce Jr.,
an administrative law professor at George Washington University, said the request ‘‘has
no chance at all’’ of success legally.
‘‘Policy-based differences
can never be the basis for recusal,’’ Pierce said. ‘‘Otherwise
one administration can’t replace another.’’
Material from the Associated
Press was used in this report.
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A10
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
More Ebola, and worse, with a weakened CDC
W
hen the deadly Ebola virus
appeared in the Democratic Republic
of Congo last year, the first reported
outbreak since 2014, a rapid-response
health care team snuffed it out quickly.
While any triumph over the lethal scourge should be
commended, it’s also an early warning sign for the
United States in an era of global travel, when outbreaks
can easily leap across oceans.
In all, the toll from the global Ebola outbreak four
years ago cost US taxpayers $5.4 billion in emergency
assistance, The Washington Post reports, and sowed
terror and disruption here at home, as American cities
scrambled to quarantine travelers and mount
responses of their own. Wisely recognizing the need to
fight disease on a global scale, Congress approved a
five-year, $600 million emergency initiative, led by the
US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to
shore up health systems in other nations.
Unfortunately, that effort is being gutted as money
runs out. The CDC is dramatically scaling back its
epidemic prevention programs in 39 of 49 countries,
The Wall Street Journal reported, and expects to focus
health care efforts in 2019 on just 10 “priority
countries.” That list does not include Congo, site of the
new Ebola outbreak, or Haiti, where cholera rages
unabated, or China, where researchers worry that cases
of bird flu
could
trigger a
wider
pandemic.
But the
CDC’s core
budget is
flat, at
around $60 million, and the agency has been roiled by
strife involving an ill-considered investment in tobacco
stocks and the resignation of the director appointed
last summer by the Trump administration.
A United Nations
Dispatch report put it
bluntly: ‘You should be
freaking out.’
A coalition of some 200 global health organizations
sent a letter to the US Health and Human Services
secretary pleading for a reprieve. Dropping any
pretense of diplomatic sang-froid, a UN Dispatch
report put it this way: “You should be freaking out.”
If the Ebola outbreak in 2014 seems remote, the
widespread flu epidemic rolling across the United
States provides a more urgent picture of the economic
and human costs that come when prevention efforts
lag. Only $150 million of the Obama-era package for
fighting global epidemics remains, which won’t go far.
HHS and the National Security Council reportedly plan
to ask for more funding in President Trump’s fiscal
2019 budget, which is due out next month. Congress
should make global health security a priority and
restore funds for disease prevention on a broader scale.
Even an administration that seems determined to
isolate the United States and narrow its role in the
world should recognize that deadly epidemics can’t be
stopped at the border.
The muck and mud in Washington
— how voters see it
‘I
LESLEY BECKER/ GLOBE STAFF; AP
hated almost everything about Donald
Trump during election season,” said
John from Nevada. “There was only one
exception, and that was his slogan about
draining the swamp. I thought that was
really important.”
In my conversations with diverse and
divided voters, there is one issue that
Americans agree on more than any other: the need to drain the swamp. Politicians from Ronald
Reagan to Nancy Pelosi have used that term to decry the
Washington morass; and both Trump and Senator Bernie
Sanders made fixing the rigged system a central message of
their campaigns. Voters from across the political spectrum
describe Washington as rife with greed, grift, and bureaucracy, reminiscent of a bog full of disease-carrying mosquitoes. They believe it’s time
to drain that swamp, and
they all want pretty much
the same thing when they say that.
“To me, draining the swamp is about taking big money
out of congressional decisions,” said Maria, a Democrat
from South Carolina. “We need to take away this web of deceit, eye-winking, handshaking, and you-scratch-my-back/
I’ll-scratch yours.” Nearly 80 percent of voters in my panel
bemoan the outsize influence of the rich, the NRA, pharmaceutical companies, and especially lobbyists, whose activity
surged to $3.34 billion last year.
Voters also believe that our government is bureaucratic
and wasteful, no longer responsive to the needs of constituents. As Desiree, a millennial Democrat from New Hampshire, told me, “The idea that D.C. has many people that are
just there for power and not for the people rings so true for
By Diane Hessan
abcde
Fo u nd ed 1 87 2
JOHN W. HENRY
Publisher
BRIAN McGRORY
Editor
VINAY MEHRA
President
ELLEN CLEGG
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LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
Most Democratic and
Republican voters
agree that Trump not
only hasn’t drained
the swamp, he may be
making things worse.
me!” Jasmine, a Republican from Maine,
agreed: “The people who are in government should be there for the people, and
not be career politicians that cozy up to
lobbyists, line their pockets, and make
deals to further their careers. They
should do what is really right rather
than what is right for them personally.”
Voters cited dozens of examples. Lisa,
a Republican from Georgia, talked about
the waste and power plays she sees daily
in her government job. Lynn, an Independent from North Carolina, shared stories of FEMA giving
people $500 after a Category One storm, simply because
they claimed they lost a freezer full of groceries. Others cited
Bob Corker, who entered Congress deeply in debt and is now
worth nearly $70 million, allegedly because he traded on inside information while serving on the Senate Banking Committee. Said Robert, a Republican from Mississippi, “I don’t
think our Founding Fathers ever intended anyone to be in
office for 30 or 40 years or to become millionaires in the process.”
And most Democratic and Republican voters also agree
on one other thing: Trump not only hasn’t drained the
swamp, he may be making things worse.
“I am a Trump supporter for sure,” said Jose, a Republican from California, “but on a scale of 1 to 10, I give him a 2
for draining the swamp. It was compelling to me to have an
outsider go in and blow everything up, but the only progress
in that area so far is in sexual harassment and assault, and
we obviously can’t give him credit for that.” Added Joseph, a
Republican from Arizona, “I am happy to have more money
in my paycheck, but the people who are really benefitting
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
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Jennifer Peter
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
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are the rich people. I mean, they didn’t
even change the tax rate on carried interest [in the recently passed tax plan].”
Many perceive Trump’s Cabinet appointments as making the swamp even
more corrupt. “Trump thought that
draining the swamp was about bringing in new blood, and instead we got a
bunch of Goldman Sachs executives
and other rich people who are adding
to the goo,” said Jenny, a Democrat
from Iowa. Voters reminded me of the
stories about expensive flights taken by cabinet secretaries,
and bemoan what they believe is just a new group of cronies
who are beholden to new special interests.
For now, the swamp drama continues. Democrats will decry Trump’s unwillingness to divest his business interests or
implement Congress’s sanctions on Russia. Republicans will
hold up the recently declassified Devin Nunes memo as evidence that even the FBI is tainted. What Trump has shown
voters — at least so far — is that just because he is a blustering outsider, it doesn’t mean he has the competence to take
on the distrust people have for Washington. The hunger for
brave and unsullied candidates with both the guts and the
intelligence to change the system has not died. This is an opportunity for new leaders who, knowing that we are up to
our necks in alligators, can bring back confidence in our democracy.
Diane Hessan is an entrepreneur, author, and chair of C
Space. She has been in conversation with 400 voters across
the political spectrum weekly since December 2016. Follow
her on Twitter @DianeHessan.
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T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
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Corporate conflicts of interest
are a virus plaguing our democracy
GETTY IMAGES
Bill Belichick speaks to the media after the Patriots’ 41-33 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles in the Super Bowl
on Sunday.
JOAN VENNOCHI
Why do Patriots fans celebrate
Belichick’s evasiveness?
A
ccept it, New England
Patriots fans. The better
team won.
Gisele Bundchen did
the right thing after
the New England Patriots lost the
Super Bowl. According to Yahoo’s
Dan Wetzel, she was seen
congratulating Philadelphia Eagles
players as she was leaving the
Minneapolis stadium. She also
reportedly told 5-year-old Vivian,
“Daddy won five times. They never
won before. Their whole life, they
never won a Super Bowl. You have to
let someone else win sometimes.”
The “let” part got some pushback.
But give Tom Brady’s wife some credit
and leeway. She was comforting
distraught children — not distraught
adults who also want to believe the
Eagles won because Bill Belichick let
them. That narrative lets the
hometown crowd gnash its teeth over
Malcolm Butler’s benching rather than
Brady’s fumble. The Eagles exploited
the defensive match-up. But Nick
Foles, a backup quarterback, played
the game of his life and hung in to beat
the greatest quarterback of all time. Of
course, Brady played a great game too.
But as he also acknowledged during
his post-game press conference, “They
made one good play at the right time.”
That game-changing play, by Eagles
defensive end Brandon Graham,
stripped the ball from Brady’s hands.
If a Patriots player made it, it would be
glorified as much as Butler’s legendary
interception against the Seattle
Seahawks.
Note to WEEI meanies: I know I’m
not a football expert. But arrogance, I
understand. The Patriots organization
personifies it, and their fans accepted
it as long as Belichick’s team won.
Now that Belichick’s on the losing side
of a Super Bowl showdown that had
great meaning for Brady, a belated
demand for transparency kicks in. Of
course, Belichick should have to
explain why Butler didn’t play a single
defensive snap against the Eagles.
Belichick shouldn’t be allowed to let
rumors undermine Butler’s
reputation. For once, Bill, tell us the
truth. What really drove this coaching
decision? Patriots Nation deserves to
know. But don’t expect Belichick to
give up anything.
He’s the MVP of rudeness and evasiveness. He got away with ill-tempered mumbles for too long and in
fact, was worshipped for it. It is what it
is. On to Cincinnati. Players and fans
celebrated his opaqueness about injuries, from Brady’s hand to Rob
Gronkowski’s concussion. Sure, it’s
part of the strategy of keeping opponents off-balance. But Belichick took it
to a bullying extreme. Everyone
seemed to go along with it, at least until this season, when Belichick’s ego
collided with Brady’s, according to media reports, which now seem accurate.
You know the old saying: There
can’t be two kings. That applies to the
turf at Gillette Stadium, along with
another old saying: Never give your
enemies a weapon they can use
against you.
By benching Butler without
explanation, Belichick did just that.
The Super Bowl defeat ruined a
storybook ending for “Tom vs Time”
and his ardent supporters. With loss,
Belichick becomes the villain of the
story. But to this non-football expert,
saying the Patriots lost solely because
of Belichick’s coaching decision about
Butler sounds as whiny as saying
Hillary Clinton lost because of former
FBI director Jim Comey’s decision to
reopen a probe into her e-mails. I’ve
whined about that, so I understand the
temptation. But sometimes you have to
step back, acknowledge that someone
ran a better campaign, and
congratulate the victor.
No, I can’t do that yet with
President Trump.
But true sports fans should be able
to do it with the Eagles. Foles threw
for 373 yards and three touchdowns,
and former Patriot LeGarrette Blount
ran for another score. Foles also
caught a touchdown. And, of course,
Graham knocked the ball from Brady’s
hands.
Congratulations, Eagles.
Joan Vennochi can be reached at
vennochi@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @Joan_Vennochi.
A biased selection process
leads to ‘inside male’ leaders
By Cathy Minehan and
Vanessa Calderón-Rosado
M
assachusetts has
long been accused of
being parochial.
While such
parochialism
energizes us when we’re all rooting for
the Patriots, it’s damaging when it
breeds a lack of diversity in key
leadership positions. This was never
more visible than during last week’s
selection of a new commissioner for
the Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education.
Jeff Riley will join Massachusetts’
all-male state education leadership
team: the secretary, all three
commissioners, and the president of
our public university system. Two of
the three education board leaders are
also men. Now consider these stats: 75
percent of the K-12 workforce is
female, yet there has not been a female
commissioner of the Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education
in more than 60 years, nor a female
secretary since creation of that office
in 2008. In the last four years, there
have been eight searches for
presidents of our state universities.
The finalist pools were 39 percent
female, yet men were chosen every
time. In 2007, five of the nine state
university presidents were women;
today they are all men.
What was striking about last week’s
pick was the degree to which (a) “I
know him” and (b) “He’s not there yet
but he’s got potential” played in the
decision-making. So much so that it
may have outweighed other
countervailing factors that, if looked
through a different prism, would have
carried the day. The problem is that
research shows these factors generally
tilt toward the white male inside
candidate and against the female,
diverse, or outside candidate.
It doesn’t mean that the board
members who weighed those factors
acted in bad faith or didn’t genuinely
believe they were valid criteria. After
all, isn’t it legitimate to favor someone
who is a known quantity and we know
would work well with the board? But
when those factors become too
decision-making and lead to
inequality. How can we expect to
improve our education system and
economy if we don’t have all voices at
the table in decision-making roles? It
just becomes an echo chamber.
The world certainly isn’t getting
less competitive over time. If we want
to compete as a world-class city and
state, we need to attract the best
talent. To do so, we need a
commitment to break this pervasive
parochialism and unconscious bias
that keeps leading us to hire the inside
We need a commitment to break this pervasive
parochialism and unconscious bias that keeps
leading us to hire the inside male over the outside
woman or person of color.
pronounced, over time it leads to a
parochial and homogenous series of
appointments. Any decision not to
appoint an outsider can be
rationalized using one reason or
another. And that’s exactly what
appears to be happening in the
education space in Massachusetts, as
evidenced by the numbers.
This example highlights a much
larger issue and pattern that we witness in business and other areas of our
economy. In fact, in some industries,
we are seeing a decline in the number
of women in leadership positions.
Without addressing the selection process, we will never reach parity.
We, as a city and a state, are truly
world class in so many sectors, yet
we’re still held back by these
unconscious biases that pervade
male over the outside woman or
person of color.
We’ll have another opportunity
soon to test ourselves, with the
appointment of a new UMass Boston
chancellor. We call upon Governor
Baker, UMass President Marty
Meehan, and the UMass board to take
a hard look at how we weight these
factors in that decision-making
process, and make sure we don’t miss
another chance to have our leadership
reflect all of our citizens.
Cathy Minehan is the former president
of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
Vanessa Calderón-Rosado is chief
executive officer of Inquilinos Boricuas
en Acción and a former member of the
board of the Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education.
Certainly it is egregious that Brenda Fitzgerald, the Trumpappointed director of the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, purchased tobacco industry stock (“CDC chief
quits over tobacco, other investments,” Page A3, Feb. 1). After all, Big Tobacco is responsible for the leading cause of
preventable disease and death on the planet, making it an
abhorrent investment for a person in her role. But such a
conflict isn’t shocking in our government, especially in this
administration, and it highlights a longstanding virus
plaguing our democracy: corporate conflicts of interest.
It’s all too fitting that such a high-profile resignation
would occur at the hands of a tobacco-industry conflict —
Big Tobacco invented the playbook for how to infiltrate every level of government to block, weaken, and delay publichealth policies. It’s that same playbook that has been employed by every abusive industry, from Big Food to Big Oil.
Thankfully, there’s an international precedent to prevent
such conflicts of interest. Article 5.3 of the World Health
Organization’s global tobacco treaty, to which the United
States is a signatory, prescribes measures to put policy making behind a firewall from the interference of Big Tobacco,
prevent revolving doors, and eliminate conflicts of interest
such as those of now-former CDC chief Fitzgerald.
Now more than ever, we need to put these precedents
into action. Our democracy depends on it.
KELLE LOUAILLIER
President
Corporate Accountability
Boston
Anti­vaxxers prey on parents’ fears
Re “Mounting a ground war against anti-vaxxers” (Editorial, Jan. 31): I would love to hold anti-vaxxers accountable
for the diseases and occasional deaths that result from vaccine-preventable illness in the youngest and frailest of our
society. These people prey on the fears of parents and caregivers. It is much easier to destroy confidence than to build
it. Even harder is the job of a parent or caregiver who is trying to do what is best for those in their charge, usually without the benefit of medical training.
The strongest thing we can do to support parents is to
make their choices easier. Some arguments, such as whether to vaccinate, do not have two sides. Policies such as philosophical exemption are a travesty, because they suggest
there is a legitimate choice. Experience has shown that the
best way to ensure that vaccination happens is to make it
required, routine, and common.
Parents want to do what is best. The case for vaccination
is stronger than other interventions that we take unquestioningly. Let’s stop torturing parents by making them feel
like they need to go to medical school; they have so many
other things to do. Let’s show them that this argument has
only one side: vaccinate.
MARIAN W. WENTWORTH
President and CEO
Management Sciences for Health
Medford
Charges against Iranian blogger
sully an important global voice
Friday’s op-ed, “Harvard rewards Iranian propagandist,”
by Roya Hakakian and Daniel Jafari, accusing Hossein Derakhshan of being an agent of the Iranian regime, was full
of disinformation. Some of these accusations against Derakhshan have been circulating for almost 15 years, and I
have no doubt that Hakakian and Jafari sincerely believe
them. But the facts I know do not support their positions.
I have been friends with Derakhshan since 2004, when
I invited him to an international conference for bloggers at
Harvard University. He was already famous in Iran, as the
“blogfather,” for starting a movement with his Persian-language blogging guide, helping tens of thousands of Iranian
blogs, sharing everything from poetry to politics, both reformist and pro-regime. He explained to me that Iranian
blogs could serve as bridges between people who move in
different circles and cafes, where people with different
points of view could connect and debate. Our conference
at Harvard gave birth to Global Voices, an online citizen
media community.
His trip to Israel to meet with bloggers there led in
2008 to his arrest and imprisonment by the Iranian government upon his return home. This is a critical fact Hakakian and Jafari failed to mention, as it undermines their
narrative. Derakhshan survived eight months in solitary
confinement, and was pressured to confess to being an Israeli spy. He was ultimately sentenced to 19½ years for
“insulting the religion of Islam” and “cooperation with
hostile states,” then pardoned and released after serving
six years.
It’s ironic that Derakhshan was sentenced to prison
based on his online writings, and Hakakian and Jafari propose exiling him from the United States based on similar
selective misreadings.
As Cardinal Richelieu wrote, “If you give me six lines
written by the hand of the most honest of men, I will find
something in them which will hang him.” Hakakian and
Jafari had almost a decade of online writing to choose
from, and found a handful of quotes — some mistranslated, taken out of context, or with key words omitted — that
they’ve sullied Derakhshan with.
ETHAN ZUCKERMAN
Director
Center for Civic Media
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge
The ever­evolving
Trump position statement
Forgive me, but I’m confused. If I want to know the president’s position on a given issue, should I listen to Donald
Trump or should I listen to Sarah Sanders?
JAMES P. PEHL
Marlborough
Letters should be exclusive to the Globe and include name,
address, and phone number. Letters to the Editor, The
Boston Globe, 1 Exchange Pl, Ste 201, Boston, MA 021092132; letter@globe.com
A12
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T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Chandler to remain Senate president through the year
uSENATE
Continued from Page A1
change that strengthens her
hand as she negotiates legislation with the more conservative House of Representatives
and governor.
“We have work to do for the
people who have elected us,”
Chandler, standing with Democratic colleagues, told reporters
at the State House. “And ‘acting’ doesn’ t quite do it any
more. We are now at the point
where we need a president who
has the full responsibilities and
the full authority of a presidency.”
Chandler said she would relinquish the presidency on Jan.
2, 2019, when the newly elected Senate will vote for a new
Senate president. She also confirmed that Rosenberg would
not return to the presidency
this year.
Chandler, formerly Rosenberg’s top deputy, was chosen
as acting president by her colleagues in December to fill in
for Rosenberg, who stepped
aside after the Globe detailed
accusations from four men
who alleged that Rosenberg’s
husband had sexually assaulted
or harassed them and who said
Hefner bragged he could influence Senate business.
Over the weekend, the
Globe reported that Hefner had
access to Rosenberg’s e-mails,
tried to affect the state budget,
and involved himself in the
workings of Rosenberg’s office,
as well as in Senate affairs — all
after Rosenberg had promised
a “firewall” between his personal life and Senate business.
The story cited interviews with
unnamed people who dealt
with Hefner, as well as communications re vie wed by the
newspaper.
Rosenberg, who remains a
senator, took issue with that report Sunday, saying it included
“a number of significant factual
inaccuracies.” He has declined
to specify what they were.
The Senate Committee on
Ethics is investigating whether
Rosenberg broke chamber
rules. That probe is ongoing.
“I support what’s best for
the Senate and the Common-
wealth, and I deeply regret the
disruption that has been
caused by the necessity of the
investigation,” said Rosenberg,
who was not at the meeting of
his colleagues. “I reiterate that
Bryon had no influence over
my actions or decisions as Senate president, and I look forward to the completion of the
investigation by the Senate
Ethics Committee.”
The decision to retain Chandler as president sets the stage
for what could be an 11-month
struggle to fill a power vacuum
that emerged after Rosenberg’s
abrupt fall from power.
At the same time, senators
of both parties said it would
give the membership some
breathing room after weeks
during which the internal
horse race for the presidency
has overshadowed more substantive concerns. Senate leaders are putting together their
state budget proposal for the
new fiscal year, are expected to
release a wide-ranging energy
bill on Monday, and are in the
midst of negotiations with the
‘What it does do is
allow us to focus
not on a race for
Senate president
but on the matters
that are before us
as a Legislature,
and there are
many.’
SENATOR BRUCE E. TARR
Senate minority leader
House over differing criminal
justice legislation passed by
each chamber.
“What it does do is allow us
to focus not on a race for Senate president but on the matters that are before us as a Legislature, and there are many,”
said Senator Bruce E. Tarr, the
Republican leader. He added
that the Chandler decision “removes the sense of urgency”
about picking a new leader and
“creates a much more stable
process.”
At least two Democratic senators, Sal N. DiDomenico of Everett and Karen E. Spilka of
Ashland, have been vying for
the post. Another senator, Eileen M. Donoghue of Lowell,
had also said she would seek
the chamber ’s presidency,
should it open. Eric P. Lesser of
Longmeadow is weighing a bid
for the top legislative post, as
well.
But Lesser said Wednesday
that, like his colleagues, he supports Chandler as leader until
2019 because it will give the
Senate a break from the public
maneuvering for the top job.
“Everyone is ready to take a
pause,” Lesser said. “We’re all
united behind Harriette Chandler, and we’ll have a discussion about the future in the
new session.”
Spilka, DiDomenico, and
Donoghue all released statements backing Chandler. And
they all emphasized the work
ahead for the Senate in the
months before the formal legislative session ends in July.
Joshua Miller can be reached at
joshua.miller@globe.com.
Michael Levenson can be
reached at
mlevenson@globe.com.
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T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, F E B RUARY 8, 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E.C O M / M E T R O
Yvonne Abraham
It matters
who the DA is
Maybe district attorneys in
Massachusetts are utterly
unassailable.
Year after year, they
cruise to reelection without
even a hint of an opponent:
A whopping eight of the
state’s 11 top prosecutors
faced no one in their most
recent elections. Most will run unopposed
this year, too.
Suffolk DA Dan Conley hasn’t had an opponent since he first ran in 2002. Ditto DA
Jonathan Blodgett, in Salem. There hasn’t
been a contested DA race in the Berkshire,
Bristol, or Middle districts since 2006;
though Worcester’s Joseph Early Jr. has a
challenger this year.
What gives? Are they all so brilliant at
their jobs that nobody, including voters, believes someone else could do it better?
Not quite. It turns out voters don’t pay
much attention to district attorneys. In fact,
in a survey for the American Civil Liberties
Union of Massachusetts last year, more than
half of respondents said they believed individual DAs had a minor, or no, impact on
how the justice system runs. Almost 40 percent didn’t even know chief prosecutors are
elected.
That’s disturbing. Prosecutors have a massive say in how the system operates. They
choose how hard to go after somebody and
when to go easy. They decide the charges
that are brought against those accused of
crimes and what punishments to request of a
judge. Many times, there’s no judge or jury
involved at all: Nationally, over 90 percent of
felony cases are dispatched via plea deals,
and, in too many of those negotiations, district attorneys hold all of the cards, especially
when defendants can’t afford a decent defense.
They also shape policy. Last year, nine
Massachusetts prosecutors blasted a state
Senate bill designed to reduce the number of
people swept up into the criminal justice system. They opposed eliminating mandatory
minimum sentences for certain drug crimes,
which reformers on both sides of the aisle
say are a relic of the failed war on drugs.
They opposed raising the age at which people are charged with all but the most serious
crimes from 18 to 19. And they pushed back
against changing the law that makes having
sex with anyone under 16 a criminal act so
that consensual sex between teens close in
age would no longer be prosecuted. They
were often wrong, but their words carry
great weight on Beacon Hill.
If you think the criminal justice system is
too kind to those accused of crimes, or if you
think it is unfair to people of color and the
poor, then it matters deeply who your DA is.
If you believe we’re sending too few people to
prison, or too many, it matters who your DA
is.
For example, Cape and Islands DA Michael O’Keefe seems pretty satisfied with the
number of people incarcerated in Massachusetts.
“There are places in the world where their
penalties . . . are much more draconian than
incarceration,” O’Keefe said at a legislative
hearing in 2015. “For example. . . . They cut
off the hands of people who deal drugs in
certain parts of the world.”
If this logic pleases you, O’Keefe is your
man. However, if you feel our standards
should be higher than “at least we don’t sever appendages,” you might want to vote him
out. Although you could be out of luck this
year: So far, he hasn’t drawn an opponent.
Perhaps, if you live down that way, Plymouth DA Timothy Cruz is your perfect prosecutor. For that to be the case, you would have
to be fine with the fact that Cruz declined to
bring charges against the corrections officers
involved in the death of a young schizophrenic man named Joshua Messier at
Bridgewater State Hospital, a decision that
was overruled by a special prosecutor. If not,
you’re probably stuck with Cruz, since nobody has yet declared against him, either.
Even the best prosecutors ought to answer to somebody. To that end, the ACLU has
launched a campaign to raise awareness of
the state’s district attorneys, assess their effectiveness, and push voters to take a hard
look at them this election year.
These 11 people have the power to change
thousands of lives, for better and for worse.
Isn’t it time we started paying closer attention to them?
Globe columnist Yvonne Abraham can be
reached at yvonne.abraham@globe.com.
Greater Boston recorded 2 inches of snow;
Fitchburg recorded 5 inches, the state’s high
Outdoor
ads that
T plans
draw fire
Preservationists
object to location
near historic parks
By Adam Vaccaro
GLOBE STAFF
Chang signed with the US Department of Education’s
Office for Civil Rights last month, the district said it will
provide supplemental instruction to students with the
disease, offer special accommodations, and work to ensure students’ educations do not suffer.
“We see this as a really great step [forward] . . . Boston has been willing to work to resolve these issues,’’
said Jenny Chou, senior attorney at the Center for Law
and Education, a nonprofit advocacy group that
brought the federal discrimination complaint against
Boston.
School officials said they began making adjustments
The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority’s quest to
embrace the digital age is bumping up against the defenders of
Boston’s historical appeal.
The MBTA’s advertising contractor wants to install digital
billboards outside five transit
stations that would broadcast
train times and service updates,
as well as advertisements to generate re venue for the cashstrapped agency.
But preservationists are taking issue with plans for panels at
two stations: Park Street and Arlington. They argue the advertising and lighting would be out of
place so close to Boston Common and the Public Garden and
violate rules about outdoor advertising in the city’s historic
downtown.
“It’s just an inappropriate way
to use our streetscapes, and
we’re against them being right
across the street from Boston’s
historic parks,” said Liz Vizza, executive director of Friends of the
Public Garden, a nonprofit that
helps maintain the parks. “It’s
commercializing a city street.”
One of the Park Street Station
entrances that would be
equipped with a digital panel is
directly in front of a Dunkin’ Donuts, Burger King, and Capital
One — each of which already has
a large sign facing the Common.
The preservationists will
press their case Thursday morning at a hearing held by the Office of Outdoor Advertising at
the Massachusetts Department
of Transportation. Other proposed locations for digital billboards are the Aquarium, Back
Bay, and Haymarket stations.
Greg Galer of the Boston Preservation Alliance said he has no
issue with placing signs at the
other stations — but he doesn’t
want the T to sacrifice the “historic character of the neighborhood” around Park Street and especially Arlington Street.
The billboards, each about
the size of a large TV, would hang
over the stairways that descend
to the stations, below placards
bearing the stations’ names.
They would not be affixed to the
iconic Park Street station entrances on the Common, but at
the simpler entrances located
across Tremont Street.
The T has been rapidly ex-
SICKLE CELL, Page B9
MBTA, Page B5
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
GENTLE TOUCH — Angier Elementary School students in Newton, including third-grader Ryan
Dawley (center), tried to catch snowflakes on their tongues as they waited for the bus Wednesday.
The lazy, but sometimes heavy, snowfall blanketed the Greater Boston area generally with about 3
inches of powder before turning to rain during the afternoon.
Chang proposes modest
increase in school spending
By James Vaznis
GLOBE STAFF
Boston Superintendent Tommy Chang
is proposing only a slight increase in
school spending for next year, pushing
overall spending to $1.1 billion and allowing for the expansion of a few initiatives,
such as those for homeless students and
young men of color.
The proposal represents an additional
$16.5 million in spending over this year’s
budget, about a 1.5 percent increase.
School officials said the percentage is low
for next school year because the school
system and the teachers union are negotiating a new contract and it is not yet
Superintendent
Tommy Chang said
the budget’s mission
is to ensure success.
known how much of a raise teachers will
receive for the next fiscal year.
Chang said the core mission of the
budget is to ensure all students, regardless of their socioeconomic background,
can be successful in college and other endeavors.
“We need to make sure the learning
experience is culturally relevant, that we
are focused on our most marginalized
students, that are our schools are safe,
welcoming, and sustaining for young
people who come into our doors every
single day,” Chang said.
The budget proposal specifically calls
BPS, Page B4
Boston schools address sickle cell
Students with disorder now qualify for special accommodations
By Meghan E. Irons
GLOBE STAFF
The Boston school system has agreed to recognize
sickle cell disease — which affects millions of Americans
and is more common among blacks and Latinos — as a
disability that interferes with a student’s education, the
Globe has learned.
Students with the disease, a painful disorder that
causes red blood cells to deform into a sickle shape and
stick to vessel walls, often miss numerous days of school
and fall behind on their class work due to hospitalization or side effects from their medication.
In the voluntary deal that Superintendent Tommy
THE LONG ROAD TO JUSTICE
Thomas Farragher
In exhibit, retired judge traces
Boston’s African­American history
H
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Julian Houston on the second floor of the Edward W. Brooke Courthouse
with one of the exhibits that focuses on another Massachusetts judge.
e had grown up in the segregated South, where
black kids like him had to search for a toilet or a
water fountain deemed suitable for their use,
where the n-word was a common and cutting epithet hurled without hesitation or regret.
The only black student in his class at a Connecticut boarding school, Julian Houston chose Boston University for his undergraduate and his law school work for two reasons: He
didn’t have the grades for Yale, and Martin Luther King Jr. had
received a doctorate degree from BU.
If Boston was good enough for King, it was good enough
for him, too.
“I was determined to get involved in the civil rights movement in Boston,’’ Houston, now a retired state judge, told me
the other afternoon in a quiet office at the Edward W. Brooke
Courthouse.
FARRAGHER, Page B5
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
Do you know
this justice?
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
The state’s highest court needs an informant.
A portrait of an unnamed justice hangs
outside the chambers of state Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Ralph D. Gants, and
officials are seeking the public’s help in identifying the mystery jurist, who probably served
on the SJC during the late 18th or early 19th
century.
Gants is offering perks to the person who
comes forward with reliable information.
“If you know the identity of this Justice,
and provide the SJC with reliable authentication, you will be invited to the John Adams
Courthouse to stand with Chief Justice Ralph
D. Gants as he places a plaque identifying the
Justice to the frame surrounding the painting,” the SJC said in a statement.
The downtown courthouse, completed in
1894 at a cost of approximately $3.8 million,
houses the SJC, the Massachusetts Appeals
Court, and the Social Law Library, which is
the nation’s oldest law library, according to
the state Trial Court website.
The SJC and Social Law Library moved
next door in 1939 but returned to the august
courthouse in 2005 after a massive renovation, the website says.
The statement said the justice in question
may have served on the SJC between 1780
and 1820. The portrait depicts a middle-aged
man with short brown hair, clad in formal attire and wearing a solemn expression. His
eyes appear to be green.
In addition to the VIP treatment during
the plaque ceremony, the lucky tipster will get
an up-close look at the breathtaking venue
where the state’s highest court hears cases, according to the release.
“Following the identification ceremony,
you will be given a guided tour of the beautifully restored John Adams Courthouse,” the
statement said.
Founded in 1692 as the Superior Court of
Judicature, the SJC is believed to be the oldest
appellate court in continuous existence in the
Western Hemisphere.
Jennifer Donahue, an SJC spokeswoman,
said Gants came up with the idea to solicit
tips in an effort to learn the identity of the justice. But officials have been trying to crack the
case for more than a decade.
“Efforts have been made periodically within the SJC to identify the subject of the portrait from at least 2005, when we were rehanging all the portraits in the John Adams
Courthouse,” Donahue wrote in an e-mail.
The identity of the artist also remains a
mystery.
Emily Sweeney of the Globe Staff contributed
to this report. Travis Andersen can be reached
at tandersen@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @TAGlobe.
WHYDAH PIRATE MUSEUM
Conservationists said they’ve found skeletal remains of a crew member of the pirate ship Whydah inside a mass of hardened sand.
Bones may be those of legendary pirate
F
By John Hilliard
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
orget about pirate gold and silver. Researchers announced Wednesday they found real treasure: clues
pulled from an 18th-century shipwreck near Wellfleet that could reveal the fate of a legendary pirate
captain.
At the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, conservationists in November found part of the skeletal remains of a crew member of the Whydah Gally, a pirate ship that sank during a fierce nor’easter
in 1717, said Chris Macort, an archeologist and director of the museum’s
ship exhibit. “He walked among pirates and fought in the Caribbean,” Macort said. “It’s like walking through a history book.” And there’s a chance
these remains could be of pirate captain Samuel “Black Sam” Bellamy, an
English sailor who had lived in Wellfleet, Macort said.
Now Casey Sherman, who is creating a movie about finding the wreck,
said he is helping the museum coordinate with forensic experts at the University of New Haven to compare DNA found in the remains with that of a
known descendant of Bellamy living in England.
“The Whydah site is the maritime equivalent of King Tut’s Tomb,” Sherman said. “Clifford and his divers continue to find Bellamy’s astounding
treasure, and now there’s a strong chance that we’ve located the remains of
20
The new speed limit in Cambridge’s main squares
as of March 1, down from 25 miles per hour. City
officials say reducing speed in the heavily trafficked
areas will save lives. The change covers Kendall,
Central, Inman, Harvard, and Porter squares.
(Source: Cambridge Chronicle)
John Hilliard can be reached at john.hilliard@globe.com.
AROUND THE REGION
P O RT L A N D, M A I NE
Senator heralds lobster
emoji for smartphones
Texting ‘‘I love lobsters’’ just got easier. Maine Independent Senator Angus King says a long-overdue lobster emoji is coming to smartphones, and
it is cause for celebration. King tweeted thanks to
The Unicode Consortium for ‘‘recognizing the
impact of this critical crustacean, in Maine and
across the country.’’ Unicode said Wednesday the
lobster emoji was among more than 150 picked
to be added in the next round of emojis. Others
include a bagel, a pirate flag, and a mango. (AP)
BOSTO N
Amtrak cites ‘hardware
failure’ in Acela mishap
Amtrak officials blamed a “hardware failure” for
the separation of two high-speed Acela Express
cars traveling from Washington to New York and
Boston on Tuesday and said they will change out
similar equipment on all other Acela train cars.
Mechanical personnel will also conduct daily inspections of the connecting hardware on each of
the Acela train sets, Amtrak spokesman Jason
Abrams said Wednesday. No one was injured
when two cars of Acela Express Train 2150 separated near Havre De Grace, Md., around 5:55
a.m., Tuesday, according to Abrams. As a resultof
the incident, Amtrak mechanical personnel examined similar connecting hardware on each
Acela train set Tuesday and found no defects,
Abrams said. The National Transportation Safety Board is monitoring the incident, and the Federal Railroad Administration has launched an investigation.
O R FO R D, N . H .
School district gun ban
could challenge law
A school board for a district covering towns in
Vermont and New Hampshire is considering a
firearms ban, creating a potential challenge to
New Hampshire law. The Valley News reports
the Rivendell Interstate School Board considered
the proposal Tuesday. If adopted, it would prohibit weapons in school buildings and property,
in school-used vehicles, and at school events. It
would apply to students, Rivendell staff and the
public. Discussion started after state Representative David Binford, a Republican from Bath, car-
ried a sidearm while providing security at a Rivendell basketball game. In Vermont, it’s a crime
to carry deadly weapons onto school property.
But there’s no similar law in New Hampshire,
where the Legislature has sole authority to regulate firearms. The district covers Orford, New
Hampshire, and Fairlee, Vershire, and West Fairlee in Vermont. (AP)
K EN N E B U N K , M A I NE
Theater teacher resigns
over fake Facebook
A Kennebunk High School theater director who
acknowledged creating fake Facebook profiles to
eavesdrop on parents’ discussions is out of a job.
Superintendent Katie Hawes learned of Michael
Herman’s actions after a parent realized he had
used his school e-mail address to create a fake
profile with a woman’s name and photo. Herman
had offered to resign at the end of March to complete the winter musical production of ‘‘As You
Like It.’’ But he announced his resignation on
Wednesday morning, and Hawes announced he
was leaving the production ‘‘effective immediately.’’ Herman called what he did ‘‘the biggest mistake of my life.’’ His wife will continue working
with the production. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
BY THE NUMBERS
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
the Pirate Prince himself.”
In a short but successful career, the Whydah Gally raided
54 ships along the East Coast and in the Caribbean in 1716
and 1717, all under the command of Bellamy.
In 2008, Forbes reported Bellamy had collected the equivalent of $120 million in wealth during his time as a pirate.
The ship was built to carry slaves, and was armed with at
least 60 cannons when it sank. Many of those weapons were
found still fully loaded, he said. “Along with treasure and everything else,
these guys were stealing cannons as well,” said Macort. When the ship went
down, it took with it about four tons of pilfered silver and gold, and all but
two of the 142-member crew, including Bellamy. It’s the only pirate ship
found anywhere with its stolen treasure, said Macort. Experts have been
trying to recover artifacts from the wreck since it was discovered by Barry
Clifford and his diving team in 1984, said Macort.
The human remains, plus what appear to be a pistol, cuff links, a belt,
and other personal items, were encased in a 3,500-pound concretion — essentially a mass of hardened sand and stone — pulled from the wreck site
several years ago. Sherman said even if the remains are not those of Bellamy, he expects they will be interred.
R FATAL FIRE A 54-year-old Taunton man died in
a fire that burned through a three-family home
on Washington Street Tuesday. Robert A. Botellio lived on the third floor, according to the Bristol district attorney’s office. His body was discovered during firefighting efforts, and he was pronounced dead at the scene. The fire began
around 11 p.m. at a home at 246 Washington St.
“Heavy flames and smoke” were coming from the
top floor of the three-story home when firefighters arrived, fire officials said. Eight people escaped and have been displaced from their
homes. Officials believe the fire began on the
third floor, and they have not determined the
cause. The Taunton fire and police departments,
along with State Fire Marshal Peter Ostroskey’s
office and Bristol prosecutors, are investigating.
This is the seventh fire death this year in Massachusetts, according to Ostroskey’s office.
R RACIST GRAFFITI Boston University is investigating after a racist slur was found on the door of
a dorm room Monday, officials said. The slur was
accompanied by an expletive, as well as obscene
comments about the Super Bowl champion Phil-
adelphia Eagles and President Trump. It was
scribbled on a whiteboard on the door of an
18th-floor suite in the Student Village 2 building,
according to a letter Dean of Students Kenneth
Elmore wrote to the residents of 33 Harry Agganis Way on Monday. “This is an attack on our
residents and community, and is antithetical to
who we are as a larger community and to the basic respect for human beings that we, personally,
hold,” Elmore said. Elmore described the message as “vile.” “I continue to hope that we are
united in opposition to such coarse acts and can
express our support for students targeted by
such racial hatred,” Elmore said.
R FATAL TRAIN STRIKE A man who appeared to
be in his early twenties was struck and killed by a
commuter rail train in Gloucester Wednesday
evening, a fire official said. The Gloucester Fire
Department received a call at 7:33 of a report of
a person struck on the tracks on the Newburyport/Rockport line, about a mile west of the
main Gloucester train station, said Fire Captain
Barry Aptt. The man was struck by an outbound
train near LaPage Lane, Transit Police said in a
statement. He was pronounced dead at the
scene, Aptt said. Transit Police detectives and the
Essex district attorney’s office are investigating
the incident, but foul play is not suspected, according to the statement.
R HUMAN TRAFFICKING A Florida man was arraigned Wednesday on charges connected to trafficking women for sex in Woburn, according to
the Middlesex district attorney’s office. Kendall
Crawley, 46, of Lake Mary, Fla., was charged with
trafficking of persons for sexual servitude and
deriving support from prostitution, prosecutors
said. Authorities allege Crawley used online sites
to traffic women for sex. Judge Timothy Gailey
set Crawley’s bail at $15,000 cash. Crawley was
also ordered to have no contact with the victim
in this case, according to the DA’s office. He is
due back in court on March 13. In late January,
police started probing an alleged online scheme
that offered sexual conduct for a fee. During that
investigation, Crawley allegedly arranged to go to
a Woburn hotel on Tuesday to photograph an undercover state trooper who posed as a commercial sex worker, according to the DA’s office.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
State’s top court Bill on state ethnicity data broadened
Asian­only version
hears arguments spurred
a backlash
in lab scandal case
By Meghan E. Irons
GLOBE STAFF
By Shawn Musgrave
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
This week, the state’s top
court heard arguments in a case
that could expand the Hinton
drug lab scandal beyond former
chemist Annie Dookhan, who
was convicted of tampering
with samples at the lab.
A man convicted of cocaine
trafficking contends the state
inadequately investigated
Dookhan’s colleagues, a contention prosecutors reject as “baseless” given the “multi-agency”
investigative effort following
her arrest in 2012.
Justino Escobar was arrested in Bos ton in Novembe r
2008. Police sent white powder
found in his car to the Hinton
lab in Jamaica Plain for testing,
which were analyzed by one of
Dookhan’s co-workers. Escobar
pleaded guilty to cocaine trafficking in December 2009 and
was sentenced to eight to
twelve years in prison.
In 2015, Escobar asked for
his convictions to be thrown
out. By this time, another state
chemist, Sonja Farak, had confessed to tampering with evidence and stealing narcotics
from lab safes. Although she
pleaded guilty to crimes committed while she worked at the
drug lab in Amherst, Farak previously worked with Dookhan
at the Hinton lab in 2004.
A Superior Court judge denied Escobar’s motion in August 2017 but noted that “twice
over the past five years, the
courts of Massachusetts have
been asked to rely on representations by the Commonwealth
that the tip of an obvious iceberg is not so menacing as it
may seem, and that nothing
more sinister lies underneath.”
“ Twice this premise has
been proven wrong, at the cost
of due process to criminal defendants,” the judge ruled in
granting Escobar’s request for
more information about the
chemist who tested samples
from his case. Both Escobar and
the Suffolk District Attorney’s
Office appealed.
Escobar’s current argument
to the Massachusetts Supreme
Judicial Court hinges on the allegation that, if the state failed
to spot potential misconduct by
Farak during her time at the
Hinton lab, it might also have
missed misconduct by other analysts, including the chemists
who analyzed Escobar’s samples.
At then-Governor Deval Patrick’s request, the Massachusetts inspector general’s office
conducted what it called a “topto-bottom” review of the Hinton lab. Its 2014 report concluded that Dookhan was the
“sole bad actor,” and found “no
evidence that any other chemist
at the Drug Lab committed any
malfeasance with respect to
testing evidence” between 2002
to 2012.
And as Suffolk assistant district attorney Vincent DeMore
pointed out in his brief, the SJC
praised the inspector general’s
report as having “greatly enhanced public understanding
of the details surrounding
Dookhan’s misconduct at the
Hinton drug lab.”
But the inspector general’s
office did not carry out a similar
investigation of Farak or the
Amherst lab. In 2015, the SJC
ruled that the Commonwealth
had not adequately investigated
t h e s c o p e a n d d u r at i o n o f
Farak’s misconduct.
During subsequent investigation by Attorney General
Maura Healey’s office, Farak
testified to having abused drugs
on the job for years. She told a
grand jury that she never stole
from samples while working at
Hinton, although Farak previously told a substance abuse
counselor she “first tried methamphetamine when she was a
chemist at a previous job.”
Escobar’s attorney, James
McKenna, questions whether
the inspector general’s office actually carried out a meaningful
investigation into other chemists at Hinton besides Dookhan.
“Had there been such an investigation, it readily could
have identified the impairment
of the integrity of the evidence
by chemist Farak,” McKenna
wrote in his brief to the SJC.
But at oral arguments on
Monday, DeMore said the state
inspector general’s office is “incentivized to find misconduct”
and would have reported any
additional chemists’ misdeeds
if they found any evidence.
Shawn Musgrave can be
reached at shawnmusgrave
@gmail.com. Reporting for this
article was supported by the
Fund for Investigative
Journalism.
Lawmakers have scrapped a
bill that would have categorized
Asian-Americans by ethnicity
in state data and, instead, created new legislation that would
look into acquiring demographic information on all racial
groups.
The Joint Committee on
State Administration and Regulatory Oversight voted Wednesday to create a special commission to “investigate and study”
the feasibility and impact of directing state agencies to collect
disaggregated demographic data for all ethnic groups, as defined by the US Census Bureau.
The decision was in response to a measure proposed
by Representative Tackey Chan,
a Quincy Democrat, whose
original bill asked all state
agencies to document specific
data on Massachusetts residents from China, Vietnam, Korea, Japan, the Philippines, and
other parts of Asia. Chan had
argued that such data would
help advocates and lawmakers
better target health care, education, and cultural program-
ming to specific groups of
Asian-Americans.
But the proposal has met
stiff opposition and rancor
from people who say it would
create a registry of Asian-Americans akin to a Nazi death list.
Chan, in a statement,
praised the special commission,
target or harm my own or any
other community.”
Some skeptics said they
were pleased.
“I think this is a good decision — to study the benefits, the
costs, the risks, and the harm,’’
said Ye Pogue, a Brandeis University doctoral student.
‘As a Chinese American, I . . . want to
make it clear that I would never target
or harm my own or any other
community.’
REPRESENTATIVE TACKEY CHAN, Democrat of Quincy
saying it is “an important step
forward that will ensure that no
community is left behind.”
He said he had filed the
now-defunct bill with “placeholder language” to start a conversation at the State House
about a critical issue.
“ We have heard the concerns that have been voiced in
recent months, and will work
diligently to address them in
the next iteration of the bill,’’
Chan said. “As a Chinese American, I am intimately connected
to the issue at hand and want to
make it clear that I would never
She said Chan, born and
raised in Quincy, did not appear
to relate to the hard and perilous experiences of immigrants
from parts of China and Cambodia. Those immigrants still
carry a deep distrust of government and many of them, Ye
said, have been re-traumatized
by what they view as hard-line
immigration polices of the
Trump administration.
She said she has no problems with various organizations
and individuals collecting such
data, but thinks the government should stay out of it. She
said she supports the panel.
In explaining the House
panel’s decision, state Representative Jennifer Benson,
Democrat of Lunenbug, said
she was “disappointed at the
vitriol aimed at” Chan and
members of the committee.
“It was inappropriate and
damaging to this process,’’ she
added. “I am appreciative of
those who conducted themselves with civility while delivering passionate testimony.”
Still, she said she had concerns about the original legislation from the start, but argued
every bill deserves a thorough
hearing.
According to Benson’s office,
the commission would have 11
members, including legislators,
officials from Governor Charlie
Baker’s advisory commissions,
and appointees from the attorney general’s Civil Rights Division, the state’s Executive Office
of Health and Human Services,
and the secretary of the commonwealth’s office.
The commission would submit its recommendation to the
Legislature by Dec. 31.
Meghan E. Irons can be reached
at meghan.irons@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@meghanirons.
Professor’s comments 84th Midwinter Sale
& CLEARANCE
on Trump taken down Only time in 2018 that every
rug in our store
By Danny McDonald
GLOBE STAFF
Northeastern University is
distancing itself from comments made by a prominent
economics professor who recently said he wouldn’t mind
seeing President Trump dead.
“Sometimes I want to just
see him impeached other times,
quite honestly — I hope there
are no FBI agents here — I
wouldn’ t mind seeing him
dead,” said Barry Bluestone, a
professor of political economy,
during a Jan. 31 lecture focused
on the rule of law and inequality in the United States. The lecture was open and free to the
public. Video from the lecture
was uploaded to YouTube on
Monday.
In the video, Bluestone, the
founding director of the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern,
was responding to a question
about a “path forward” for the
nation when he made the comments.
In a statement released
Wednesday, university spokeswoman Renata Nyul said Bluestone’s comments “do not reflect the views of Northeastern.”
“The university and its leaders steadfastly oppose violence
in all its forms,” she said in the
statement. “While faculty members are free to express controversial opinions, the university
cannot provide a public platform for comments that could
be construed to condone violence. As a result, we have decided to take down the video of
this event.”
During a phone interview
Wednesday evening, Bluestone,
who has taught at Northeastern
since 1999, said he does not
condone violence and said he
strongly opposes assassinating
the president.
“That would be as bad as he
is,” Bluestone said. “That’s not
how we change things in this
country.”
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T h e
B o s t o n
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T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
School
spending
gets small
increase
uBPS
Continued from Page B1
PHOTOS BY PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
HOCKEY CAMP — Steven Zheng (top)
helped his son Hiccup, 8, suit up at a
hockey clinic as the Boston Bruins
continued their partnership with
Beijing manufacturer O.R.G. Packaging
to help popularize hockey in China.
Team manager Huang Ying Liang
(immediate right) spoke to the young
players before they took to the ice.
Twenty-six children are attending the
camp at Warrior Ice Arena, the Bruins
facility.
That ‘Lucky’ lottery terminal? Take a selfie with it!
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
A big star worth millions of
dollars — hundreds of millions,
in fact — is coming to Beacon
Hill this week.
Matt Damon filming a political drama? David Ortiz testifying in favor of a bill banning
the lefty shift at Fenway?
Nope.
The star we’re talking about
doesn’t say anything. But it
captured the world’s attention
last summer when it spit out
the winning Powerball ticket
that allowed Mavis L. Wanczyk
to claim a $758 million jackpot,
the largest of its kind ever won
by a single player in US lottery
history.
The terminal that put Wanczyk in the money, now dubbed
“Lucky,” will be on display
Thursday at state Treasurer
Deborah B. Goldberg’s office
for all comers.
And, Goldberg’s office said
in a statement, constituents
who swing by her State House
office between 2 p.m. Thursday
and noon Monday can capture
the moment for posterity.
“Visitors will have the opportunity to meet Lucky and
take their photo with the bud-
ding celebrity at a selfie station
complete with handheld
props,” the release said.
Lucky was just another terminal pumping out Powerball
tickets at Pride Market in Chicopee until August 2017, when
Wanczyk purchased her ticket
from the machine.
Wanczyk, a mother of two
who worked at Mercy Medical
Center before the windfall, told
reporters during an August
news conference that she wanted to “just sit back and relax” in
the wake of her massive haul.
“I want to just be me and be
alone and . . . figure out what I
want to do,” Wanczyk said.
She chose to collec t her
prize in a lump sum instead of
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The terminal that put Mavis
Wanczyk in the money, now
dubbed “Lucky,” will be on
display at the State House.
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monthly payments, so the payout came to $480 million, or
$336 million after taxes.
Dan Truong, a spokesman
for Goldberg, said in an e-mail
that neither Wanczyk nor the
proprietor of Pride Market will
be on hand to greet the public
during Lucky’s debut under the
Golden Dome.
“But, if you do stop by tomorrow you could take a selfie
with Lucky for good luck,”
Truong wrote.
There was no word on
whether any lawmakers up for
reelection this year plan to hobnob with Lucky.
All 4 digits
First 3
Last 3
Feb. 07
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Night
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Wed. Tri-State Megabucks
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for a $500,000 increase in
funding to help homeless students, bringing overall spending to $1.8 million. It also calls
for expanding, from four
schools to seven, a program
that provides young men of color with counseling and mentoring.
The presentation of the budget comes after Mayor Martin J.
Walsh blasted the state this
week for providing the school
system with less aid — a twodecade trend.
State aid is expected to cover
just 4 percent of the school system’s budget next year because
of more students attending
charter schools. The state funnels so-called Chapter 70 educational aid earmarked for Boston to the charter schools to
cover tuition costs. Next year,
nearly all of the $219 million in
Chapter 70 for Boston will end
up at charters.
Jessica Tang, president of
the Boston Teachers Union,
said the teachers union will
lobby the Legislature to ensure
Boston gets the state funding it
deserves.
“Too many of our schools
lack adequate staffing including nurses, librarians, social
workers, and teachers,” Tang
said in a statement. “The governor’s budget fails public education students, and we are calling on the Legislature to rectify
that because the consequences
are being felt painfully in Boston right now.”
School officials initially said
Wednesday that the new budget increases spending by $48
million. But that number includes $31 million in raises
that teachers received during
this school year. (School officials justified including that
amount in the increase for next
year because the raises were
negotiated with the teachers
union under an interim agreement after the School Committee approved this year’s budget,
resulting in the city providing a
supplemental appropriation.
The agreement expires in August.)
The school system is changing the way it distributes funds
for some outside programs that
had been paid for directly by
the central offices, handing
over $5.8 million to schools
with the highest-need students
so they can decide how to
spend it.
The proposed change is already creating waves. About
half of the 40 schools partnering with the Boston Debate
League will no longer have access to the funds — including
the Irving and Edwards middle
schools — and might have to
scrap their debate teams.
Mike Wasserman, executive
director of the Boston Debate
League, said his organization
supports giving schools more
control of partnership funds
but wishes it did not result in
other schools losing funding for
the program.
“I think we have built something powerful,” Wasserman
said. “We provide students the
opportunity to lead conversations and talk about real policy
issues that are rooted in facts.”
Only about 15 of the system’s 125 schools will experience notable drops in per-pupil
funding because of declining
enrollment, school officials
said.
Samuel Tyler, president of
the Boston Municipal Research
Bureau, a watchdog group
funded by businesses and nonprofits, said the budget proposal shows signs of reining in
some costs, such as transportation, which is slated to go up by
about 3 percent. Previously, annual increases have exceeded
10 percent.
But he said more needs to be
done to address excess capacity
in schools with declining enrollment.
“It looks like this is a budget
that has taken some drama out
of school spending,” Tyler said.
James Vaznis can be reached at
james.vaznis@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globevaznis.
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
WINTER RUN —
Bare trees on the
Esplanade framed
a runner on
Tuesday, the day
before the snow
arrived in Boston
and the rest of the
region. The
forecast calls for
high pressure on
Thursday and
chilly air despite
some sunshine.
Full report, B15
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
T’s plan for outdoor ads near Common, Public Garden draws fire
uMBTA
Continued from Page B1
panding digital advertising
across the transit system, with a
goal to increase the number of
such electronic displays to 700
by year’s end, up from 250.
The panels are being installed by the contractor Outfront Media, at no cost to the T,
which expects a sharp increase
in advertising revenue in the
coming years as a result.
Outfront on Wednesday did
not respond to a request for
comment.
The billboards would display station-specific information, such as train arrivals, delays, and other service alerts, as
part of the MBTA’s latest effort
to improve its sometimes confusing communications to riders. A handful of T stations have
already been equipped with the
outdoor displays.
“Displaying real-time transit
information and special service
announcements, the panels
represent an important part of
the MBTA’s ongoing efforts to
improve its communications
with customers,” said Joe Pesaturo, a spokesman for the T.
Vizza said the T could still
provide riders with information
if they installed the billboards
inside the stations, but before
riders pass through the turnstiles. She suggested that the T’s
real goal is to capitalize on
showing ads to drivers and pedestrians who are not using the
transit system.
“We support the MBTA providing information to their riders,” she said. “We think they
can provide for their riders and
even provide advertising, but
not on the city streets.”
The bid to install the panels
at Park Street Station comes
just over two years after a similar initiative fell through amid
opposition from activists and
some local politicians, according to minutes of past meetings.
Vizza said the panels should
not be allowed because Department of Transportation regulations that prohibit outdoor ads
within 300 feet of a park, while
‘We think they
[MBTA officials]
can provide for
their riders and
even provide
advertising, but
not on the city
streets.’
LIZ VIZZA, executive director,
Friends of the Public Garden
Galer said billboards at Arlington Station would run afoul of
architectural guidelines for the
neighborhood.
Pesaturo said that ads attached to “street furniture”
such as bus stations and other
infrastructure can be excused
from the rules.
This handout image shows the type of outdoor digital billboard proposed for the
Arlington, Park Street, Aquarium, Back Bay, and Haymarket stations.
Adam Vaccaro can be reached
at adam.vaccaro@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter at
@adamtvaccaro.
Exhibit traces African-Americans’ long road to justice
uFARRAGHER
Continued from Page B1
“And two months after I arrived in 1962, I was going to
Roxbury on the weekends to
work on a boycott of the Wonder Bread factory there. The
black community was buying
their goods there, but there
were no representatives on the
employment side.’’
Julian Houston was determined to change that, embracing a social justice movement
that animated his life. It still
does.
And it will be a centerpiece
of an exhibit to be unveiled at
the Brooke cour thous e on
Thursday that has been a longtime passion for Houston. It’s
called “Long Road to Justice:
The African-American Experience in the Massachusetts
Courts.’’
“I was sort of taken in by the
black leadership of Boston,’’ he
said. “I was the guy who knew
all the freedom songs, and people up here really didn’t know
them. So when there was a
demonstration, they asked me
to come up and lead the audience in those freedom songs.’’
In many ways, Julian Houston has been singing ever
since, the lyrics of justice still
on his lips, its rhythm still a
part of his social justice metabolism.
“Ain’t gonna let nobody turn
me ‘round, turn me ‘round/
“Ain’t gonna let nobody turn
me ‘round/
“I’m gonna keep on walkin’/
“Keep on talkin’/
Ma rc h i n’ o n t o f re e d o m
land/”
Houston, now 73, wants to
enshrine in our consciousness
the struggle toward justice for
African-Americans, from their
arrival here in chains in 1638
to the present.
He is the exhibit’s driving
force, pushing for its permanent place in the courthouse
named for the Massachusetts
Republican who was the first
African-American to be elected
to the US Senate since Reconstruction.
He’s also a walking, talking
exhibit himself, the personification of the recent AfricanAmerican judicial history in
this state where he served as a
judge for 27 years beginning in
1979 in Roxbury, service that
led to his later appointment to
the Superior Court bench.
“I think that for a lot of
young lawyers — and I was a
young lawyer when I first met
Judge Houston — the idea that
there was somebody like us on
the bench was affirming and
aspirational,’’ former governor
Deval Patrick said. “He’s been
dogged. Julian Houston is himself a pioneer, and he’s done exceptional and selfless work to
make sure we honor other pioneers.’’
What’s remarkable is that
his pioneering career on the
bench almost didn’t happen.
Governor Michael Dukakis’s
first term — ended by his electoral defeat the previous year
at the hands of fellow Democrat Edward King — was only
minutes from expiring when
his nomination of Houston to
the juvenile session of Roxbury
Municipal Court ran into trouble at a wild session of the Governor’s Council.
There were heated words.
Arms were twisted. A key vote
was switched. In an unusual
move, Dukakis chaired the
council meeting himself, winning Houston’s confirmation as
King waited outside to receive
the symbolic keys to the State
House from Dukakis.
Roxbury, what he saw from the
bench disturbed him. Poor people seeking the protection of
the court came into his courtroom accompanied by minor
children who had nowhere else
to go.
“The only place for them
was to sit in the courtroom,
where they were exposed to all
kinds of descriptions of violence and drugs,’’ he said. “It
was awful. I said we can do bet-
‘He was a great judge, a great
representative of his community, and
just a very special human being.’
FORMER MASSACHUSETTS GOVERNOR
MICHAEL S. DUKAKIS
Speaking of Julian Houston
It was worth the histrionics.
“Pardon the superlatives,
but this guy is just an extraordinary human being,’’ Dukakis
told me on the phone from
Southern California, where he
is teaching. “He grew up in the
South. Went to segregated
schools. Bright, thoughtful, eloquent at times. He was a great
judge, a great representative of
his community, and just a very
special human being.’’
Now retired, Houston’s still
at work with an eye on history.
“We have a saying in the law
that it’s important to establish
a record,’’ he told me.
He’s established an impressive one of his own.
When he went to work in
ter than this.’’
So that’s what he did, establishing child care centers modeled after those in New York
City and Washington, D.C., that
ultimately spread to more than
a dozen courthouses around
the state before falling victim
to budget c uts in the early
2000s.
“I was determined to use my
position on the court as a way
to elevate the court as an institution in the community,’’ he
said. “I knew that if I got there
and I was black, I would have a
better shot at making a difference in how the cour t was
viewed by people in the community than if I were white. I
had a certain responsibility to
the young people who came into the court — to enforce the
law, but also to exhibit compassion. And that’s what I tried to
do.’’
What he is trying to do with
the exhibit that opens amid
fanfare on Thursday is to trace
a history that includes the story of two slaves — Quock Walker and Elizabeth Freeman —
who used the courts to fight for
their rights and their freedom,
helping underline a belief that
the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780 made slavery illegal.
“This wouldn’t have happened without him,’’ said Randall Kennedy, a Harvard Law
School professor who will emcee Thursday’s event. “He’s a
very courtly, a very gracious
man, and he’s also very persistent. He had this idea and he
kept nudging and nudging and
pushing and pushing.’’
Margaret H. Marshall, a former chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial
Court, said despite the challenges he confronted — those
ugly epithets, those segregated
water fountains — Houston remains a man without bitterness, resentment, or regret.
“I think we sometimes forget how difficult the challenges
that he has had to confront
were,’’ Marshall said. “He has
borne no grudges. He has quietly and consistently tried to
make the world a better place
for everybody. I’ve known him
for decades, and I’m always
struck by his dignity and inclusiveness despite all the hurdles
he had to overcome. The bias
against African-Americans has
been so pervasive, and he’s of
an age when that bias would
have cut powerfully against
him.’’
Pa r t o f t h e e x h i b i t t h a t
Houston has helped breathe
life into includes the story of
the man for whom the courthouse we had been sitting in
was named for — Ed Brooke.
“He had been on the law review at Boston University Law
School,’’ Houston recalled
about Brooke. “And he needed
a job. He interviewed at the
major law firms in town and
nobody would hire him except
one firm. They said they would
hire him as long as he stayed in
an office in the back and not
come out to deal with clients.’’
That’s part of the AfricanAmerican experience in the
Massachusetts court system.
The judge who knows the
importance of establishing a
record wants to make stories
like those endure. They teach
us. They tell us who we were
and who we are.
“That’s what it’s intended to
do,’’ he said. “It’s a record. The
sacrifices that others have
made make it possible to find
justice for black people in Massachusetts.’’
Few know that better than
Julian Houston, the freedom
fighter who became a judge, a
protector of the record.
Thomas Farragher is a Globe
columnist. He can be reached
at thomas.farragher@globe.
com.
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BY CITY AND TOWN
ARLINGTON
DONOVAN, William J.
JONES, George W.
O’LEARY, Gabriella L. (Flaherty)
WEEKLY, Gordon
BEDFORD
SHEA, Sharon A. (Bertrand)
BELLINGHAM
ELLARD, Robert P. Jr.
BELMONT
O’CONNELL, Eileen
BILLERICA
BUTLER, John J.
BOSTON
BODI, Teresa V. (Dolan)
DARVICHE, Parviz, DMD
JONES, Victoria H. (DeSimone)
MORRIS, Monroe
REARDON, William F.
SIEGEL, Edward P.
BRIGHTON
DiFILIPPO, Christine K. (Koufos)
BROOKLINE
GAFFEY, Mary (Canney)
YAVNER, Carol F.
CAMBRIDGE
BERNARD, Catherine (Martin)
JONES, George W.
O’LEARY, Gabriella L. (Flaherty)
CANTON
McCLELLAN, John W.
CHATHAM
COOK, Richard P.
HAVERHILL
BERNARD, Catherine (Martin)
CHELMSFORD
KELLEY, John Edward
HUBBARDSTON
JONES, Victoria H. (DeSimone)
CHELSEA
HIGGINS, Alfred T.
JAMAICA PLAIN
JONES, Victoria H. (DeSimone)
REED, Mary I. (MacPherson)
CHESTNUT HILL
KELLEY, John Edward
CONCORD
ELLARD, Robert P. Jr.
DANVERS
REARDON, William F.
DEDHAM
BISSONNETTE, Thomas Joseph
KELLEY, John Edward
REED, Mary I. (MacPherson)
DUXBURY
VERELL, Jewel G.
EAST BOSTON
MARINO, William J.
QUARTARONE, John A.
RIZZO, Anna (Volta)
EVERETT
HIGGINS, Alfred T.
FRAMINGHAM
ACHMAKJIAN, Robert J.
LUZZI WHOOLEY, Barbara (Luzzi)
GLOUCESTER
SUDBAY, Donald E. Sr.
ACHMAKJIAN, Robert J.
“Bobby”
Age 69, passed away peacefully in his
sleep on Wednesday, January 31, 2018
in Wellesley, Massachusetts. He was
born on Sept. 5th, 1948 to Jack Achmakjian and the late Theresa (Ivanovic)
Achmakjian. He is survived by his
father and sisters, Maria and Gloria,
along with many friends and relatives
who will miss him dearly. Bobby grew
up in Framingham and graduated
from Framingham North High School
in 1966. After graduation, he opened
his own hair salon in Wayland, which
he successfully operated for a number
of years. His lifelong passion was
boating. Upon selling his business, he
relocated to Florida and became a yacht
broker until 1990. He returned to New
England to join a long time friend in
the real estate and land development
business until his death. Bobby had an
unforgettable charismatic presence and
a genuine friendly style. He touched the
lives of many lifelong friends who saw
his friendship as ‘a gift’. Remembrances
may be made to St. James Armenian
Church, 465 Mt Auburn St., Watertown,
MA 02472. A graveside service will be
held at 11:30am on Saturday, February
10th at St. Stephen’s Cemetery, 110
Fenwick St., Framingham, followed
by a bereavement lunch at The Hills
Clubhouse, 133 Hillside Dr., Wayland,
Massachusetts.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781 235 4100
BERNARD, Catherine
(Martin)
Of Haverhill, February 5, 2018. Dear
and devoted wife of the late Joseph Bernard. Loving mother of JoAnn Bernard
and her fiance Ryan Tarasuik of Lynn
and Robyn Bernard of Haverhill. Cherished grandmother “Nana” of Bryanna,
Andrew, David, Joseph, Jacob, John,
Catherine Marie and Kayley Bernard
and Ryan Fabrizio. Dear sister of Marjorie Martin of Stoneham, Marie Jones of
Cambridge, Carol Martin of VT, Louis
Martin of VT and Susan Martin of
Salem. Visiting Hours Friday 4-8 p.m.
at the Kfoury Keefe Funeral Home 8
Spring St. (at the corner of Centre St.)
WEST ROXBURY. Relatives and friends
respectfully invited to attend. In lieu
of flowers, contributions in Catherine’s
memory may be made to the American
Heart Assoc., 300 5th Ave., Waltham,
MA 02451; or to the American Diabetes
Assoc., 260 Cochituate Rd. #200,
Framingham, MA 01701. Interment
will be private. Guestbook and other information at www.KfouryFuneral.com.
LEXINGTON
DONOVAN, William J.
KIRKHAM, Lois (Jordan)
LYNN
BERNARD, Catherine (Martin)
HIGGINS, Alfred T.
LYNNFIELD
EYDENBERG, Robert F.
MELROSE
COOK, Richard P.
KRASIEWSKI, Ronald E.
O’LEARY, Gabriella L. (Flaherty)
NATICK
DONOVAN, William J.
SHAUGHNESSY, Margaret E.
NEWTONVILLE
DARVICHE, Parviz, DMD
SALEM
BERNARD, Catherine (Martin)
REARDON, William F.
MARLBOROUGH
DONOVAN, William J.
McCLELLAN, John W.
SHEA, Sharon A. (Bertrand)
NORTH READING
EYDENBERG, Robert F.
NORWOOD
KELLEY, John Edward
MASHPEE
EYDENBERG, Robert F.
OSTERVILLE
McCARTHY, Patricia M. (Brennan)
MEDFIELD
ELLARD, Robert P. Jr.
JONES, Philip E.
PEABODY
REARDON, William F.
Precious baby boy of Jason and Jodi
(Grandy) Bissonnette born November
18, 2017 died unexpectedly on February 4, 2018. In addition to his parents
and big sister Adele, he is survived by
maternal grandparents- Thomas and
Donna (MacIsaac) Grandy of Roslindale; Paternal Grandparents- Joseph
(Al) and Elizabeth (Hooley) Bissonnette
of Roslindale; Aunts and Uncles - William and Svea (Nelson) Bissonnette
of West Roxbury, Jacquelyn (Grandy)
and Brian Keaveney of Westwood,
Lisa (Grandy) and Victor Pereira of
Foxboro. Also survived by his cousins
Olin, Ronan and Simone Bissonnette,
Brendan, Addison and Gavin Keaveney,
Jake, Luke and Zoey Pereira. A Mass in
Memoriam will be held on Friday, February 9th at 11:00 a.m. at the Most Precious Blood Church, 25 Maple St., Hyde
Park, MA 02136. In lieu of flowers, a
Go Fund Me page has been created to
replace lost wages allowing the family
time together to grieve. https://www.
gofundme.com/in-memoryof-thomas-bissonnette. For guestbook,
directions and obituary, please see
thomasfuneralhomes.com
BODI, Teresa V. (Dolan)
PEMBROKE
KIRKHAM, Lois (Jordan)
REED, Mary I. (MacPherson)
QUINCY
DONOVAN, William J.
Lambert Funeral Home & Crematory
Manchester, NH
www.lambertfuneralhome.com
BUTLER, John J.
Announcements
LOCAL UNION 103,
I.B.E.W.
We regret to announce the death
of Brother Dominic S. Baccari
(Ret). Visiting hours will be held
from 4-8PM TODAY at the Magni
F.H., 365 Watertown St., Rt 16,
Newton. A Funeral Mass will be
celebrated at 10:30AM on Friday
at Our Lady Help of Christians
Church. Brother Baccari was
a member of the IBEW for 60
years.
Chuck Monahan
Financial Secretary
WELLESLEY HILLS
ACHMAKJIAN, Robert J.
McGREEVY, Thomas I.
SOUTH BOSTON
HENNESSEY, Eileen (Feeney)
WEST ROXBURY
BISSONNETTE, Thomas Joseph
GAFFEY, Mary (Canney)
Retired Natick
Schools Principal
Gately Funeral Home
(781) 665-1949
Of Newton, MA, peacefully entered
into rest on February 6th 2018, at the
age of 86. To all who knew him he
was a perfect gentleman, of the highest
integrity and consistency, a man of
great personal strengths and standards
of excellence. As a husband and father,
he was intimate, playful, charming,
and loyal. As the family leader, he
was nurturing, gentle, encouraging
and inspiring, which infused his very
large extended family as well. And as a
Doctor’s Doctor, he practiced dentistry
in Waltham and Newton for 56 strong
years, with compassion and friendship
for thousands of patients and scores of
colleagues, including 40 years as a clinical instructor at Tufts Dental School in
Boston. He was the very loving husband of Barbara Darviche, proud father
to Michael Darviche (Shula Malkin),
Jane Darviche (Kevin Henner), and Lisa
Darviche (Ami Joseph), and to eight
grandchildren Jacob, Allie, Eitan, Julian, Maya, Daniella, Gabriel and Madeline. To his last day, Parviz appreciated
and loved his very close brothers and
sisters, Parvin (Jamshid Yashar), Nahid
(Mansour Parsi), Manouch (Karolyn
Darvish), Louise (Mansour Moheban),
and Masoud (Carol Darvish). Services
at Temple Reyim, 1860 Washington
St., Newton, MA on Thursday at 2pm,
followed by the interment service at
Beit Olam East Cemetery in Wayland,
MA, then a visits of condolence are
welcome after burial at Temple Reyim
on Thursday for services at 5:30 pm
until 6:00 pm. Shiva continues at the
home of Parviz and Barbara Darviche
on Sunday-Tuesday from 2:00 pm –
4:00 pm, and 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made
to Temple Reyim, Newton; or Temple
Beth Avraham on Williston Road in
Brookline; or the Cardio Vascular Fund
at Tufts Medical Center in Boston.
DiFILIPPO, Christine K.
(Koufos)
Of Brighton, Mass., passed away on
Jan. 31, 2018. Beloved wife of the late
Anthony L. DiFilippo. Also survived by
many nephews, nieces, relatives and
dear friends. She was predeceased
by her parents and siblings. Funeral
Service on Friday, Feb. 9, 2018 at the
Taxiarchae Greek Orthodox Church,
25 Bigelow Ave., Watertown, MA at
11AM. Visitation prior to the Service
from 10AM to 11AM at the church.
Relatives and friends kindly invited to
attend. In lieu of flowers, donations in
her memory may be made to the above
named church. Burial in Evergreen
Cemetery. Arrangements by Faggas
Funeral Home, 551 Mt. Auburn St.,
WATERTOWN, MA. For online guestbook please visit www.Faggas.com
Faggas Funeral Home
800-222-2586
MAINE
McCLELLAN, John W.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
BODI, Teresa V. (Dolan)
McCLELLAN, John W.
WESTFORD
LUZZI WHOOLEY, Barbara (Luzzi)
SHEA, Sharon A. (Bertrand)
WESTWOOD
REED, Mary I. (MacPherson)
FLORIDA
MORRIS, Monroe
SUDBAY, Donald E. Sr.
OHIO
McGREEVY, Thomas I.
RHODE ISLAND
EYDENBERG, Robert F.
VIRGINIA
FORBES, John Douglas PhD
TOWNSEND
SHEA, Sharon A. (Bertrand)
Change of Time
Kfoury Keefe Funeral Home
West Roxbury 617-325-3600
Of Billerica, formerly of
Medford and Somerville,
Feb. 5. Beloved husband
of the late L. Eileen (Monte) Butler.
Devoted father of John J. Butler, Jr.,
USAF CMSgt (Ret) and his wife Eden
Ann of Mt. Home, Idaho, Kim Beech
and her husband Doug of Hudson, NH
and Stefanie Bishop and her husband
Scott of Dracut. Loving brother of Sr.
Frances Butler SSND of Dorchester and
the late Richard, William, Paul and
Anne Marie Butler. Loving grandfather
of Allison Smith and her husband
Jason and Courtney MacLaren and her
husband Jonathan. Great-grandfather
of Kian, Gracelyn and Liam. Visiting hours will be held Saturday at the
Sweeney Memorial Funeral Home,
66 Concord Rd., BILLERICA from 11
a.m. - 1 p.m. with a Funeral Service
to be held at 1 p.m. Burial in Fox Hill
Cemetery, Billerica. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made
to the Little Sisters of the Poor, 186
Highland Ave., Somerville, MA 02143.
www.sweeneymemorialfh.com
SOMERVILLE
BUTLER, John J.
KRASIEWSKI, Ronald E.
STONEHAM
BERNARD, Catherine (Martin)
KRASIEWSKI, Ronald E.
O’LEARY, Gabriella L. (Flaherty)
WOBURN
LEEN, Edward M. , Jr.
CONNECTICUT
McCLELLAN, John W.
WAYLAND
ACHMAKJIAN, Robert J.
SOUTH WEYMOUTH
REED, Mary I. (MacPherson)
WINTHROP
MARINO, William J.
QUARTARONE, John A.
OUT OF STATE
WATERTOWN
ACHMAKJIAN, Robert J.
JONES, George W.
WELLESLEY
LUZZI WHOOLEY, Barbara (Luzzi)
DONOVAN, William J.
Of Melrose, February 5, 2018. Beloved
husband of 49 years to Frances J. (Clifford) Cook. Devoted father of Jennifer
M. Cook of NY City and Christopher
Cook & his wife Kristen of Melrose.
Proud grandfather of Christopher J. &
Elana G. Cook. Caring brother of Marjorie Cook & her lifelong friend Dee of
Chatham, Robert Cook of Melrose and
the late Gerard, James & Bryan Cook.
Also survived by many nieces, nephews
and friends. Visitation will be held at
the Gately Funeral Home on Friday,
February 9th from 4:00-8:00PM.
Funeral procession from Gately Funeral
Home on Saturday morning, 2/10/18
at 10:00AM, followed by a Mass of
Christian burial at Incarnation Church,
425 Upham St. Melrose at 11:00AM.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend. Burial will be
private. In lieu of flowers contributions
in Dickie’s name may be made to St.
Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 262
Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN
38105 or @ www.stjude.org. To send
a message of condolence please visit
www.gatelyfh.com
WALTHAM
DARVICHE, Parviz, DMD
LUZZI WHOOLEY, Barbara (Luzzi)
SCOVEL, Edward S.
SAUGUS
COOK, Richard P.
NICHOLS, Shaun O.
COOK, Richard P. “Dickie”
DARVICHE, Parviz, DMD
91, of Manchester, NH, died Feb. 5.
Born in Boston and lived there many
years. Daughter of John and Sarah
(King) Dolan. Predeceased by former
husband, Alfred Bodi and siblings, John
Dolan, Mary Mulcahy, Helen Gedrich,
Anna DiTonno, Barbara Dolan and Rita
Dolan. Survived by sons, Dale and wife,
Jacqueline, Alfred and wife, Christine,
Brian and wife, Brenda, Mark and wife,
Marie, and Steven and wife, Maura; 7
grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.
Services are private and private
burial is at New Calvary Cemetery
in Mattapan. Complete obituary and
condolences at
www.lambertfuneralhome.com
WALPOLE
ELLARD, Robert P. Jr.
JONES, Victoria H. (DeSimone)
ROSLINDALE
BISSONNETTE, Thomas Joseph
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
ELLARD, Robert P. Jr.
BISSONNETTE, Thomas
Joseph
REVERE
EYDENBERG, Robert F.
MARINO, William J.
QUARTARONE, John A.
RIZZO, Anna (Volta)
ROCKLAND
GAFFEY, Mary (Canney)
NORFOLK
JONES, Philip E.
WINCHESTER
LEPPZER, Antone J.
McCARTHY, Patricia M. (Brennan)
O’CONNELL, Eileen
WAKEFIELD
COOK, Richard P.
SCOVEL, Edward S.
NEWTON
ACHMAKJIAN, Robert J.
DARVICHE, Parviz, DMD
SHAUGHNESSY, Margaret E.
MALDEN
COOK, Richard P.
MEDFORD
BUTLER, John J.
SCOVEL, Edward S.
READING
KRASIEWSKI, Ronald E.
82, of Natick, February 6, 2018. Beloved
husband of Dorothy A. (Wellington)
Donovan, sharing 55 years of marriage.
In addition to his wife he is survived
by one son Edward F. Donovan and his
wife Mary of Marlborough, one grandson Thomas James Donovan, two brothers Joseph H. Donovan and his wife
Anna of Arlington, Gerard M. Donovan
and his wife Donna of Billerica, two
sisters Sally Sutherland and her husband David of Quincy, Mary DeSimone
and her husband Michael of Lexington,
sister-in-law Martha Donovan of VA,
Elsie Wellington of NH, and many
nieces and nephews. He was also the
grandfather of the late Julian, Joseph
and William Donovan, and brother
of the late Admiral Francis Donovan.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend the funeral on Monday, February
12 at 9:00 A.M. from the John Everett
and Sons Funeral Home 4 Park Street,
at NATICK COMMON, followed by a
Mass of Christian Burial in St. Linus
Church at 10:00 A.M. Visiting hours are
Sunday, February 11 from 3:00 to 6:00
P.M. Interment St. Patrick Cemetery. In
lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy
may be made in his memory to the
American Cancer Society at www.
cancer.org. For directions and to sign
the online Guest Book please visit
www.everettfuneral.com
ELLARD, Robert P. “Bob” Jr.
Of Bellingham, formerly
of Medfield, February 6.
Husband of Regula Ellard.
Father of Robert, Katherine, Sarah, all
of Medfield. Brother of Deborah A.
Ribbens of Tinley Park, IL, Marilyn E.
Phillips of East Falmouth, Barbara E.
O’Connell of Sudbury, and Elizabeth
E. Christiansen. Uncle of Elizabeth,
Matthew, John, Andrew, Michael, Anna
and Henry. Nephew of Marilyn Priebe
of East Falmouth. Predeceased by his
parents Robert P. Ellard and Barbara A.
(Kingston) Ellard.
Robert was a caring; generous,
thoughtful person who always put
others needs first. An avid baseball
enthusiast, hockey player, and recently
discovered traveling. Bob was a Little
League and Senior Babe Ruth coach
of Medfield and touched many young
lives.
Bob has been the owner and operator of Roof Maintenance & Systems,
Inc. headquartered in Walpole, MA for
35 years. Happily married to Regula,
his soulmate, friend, and love of his
life. He loved all animals, especially
his three German Shepard Dogs, Jack,
Ginger and Bullet.
Special thanks to Dr. Christopher
Lathan and the nursing staff at Dana
Farber as well as the nurses at Brigham
and Women’s Hospital for their expert
care and attention.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend his funeral service Sat. Feb. 10th
at 11AM in the Charles F. Oteri and Son
Franklin Funeral Home, 33 Cottage St.,
FRANKLIN. His interment will be held
privately.
Calling hours are Fri. from 5-8PM at
the Funeral Home.
In lieu of flowers, contributions can
be made to MSPCA-Angel Memorial,
350 South Huntington Ave., Boston,
MA 02130; or Dana Farber Cancer
Institute, 10 Brookline Place West, 6th
FL, Brookline, MA 02445.
Guestbook/directions www.oterifuneralhome.com
Charles F. Oteri and Son Franklin
Funeral Home
508-528-0011
EYDENBERG, Robert F.
Retired Senior
Deputy Fire Chief
for the City of
Revere
In Mashpee, formerly of Revere, at 71
years, January 29th, following a lengthy
illness. Beloved husband of Margaret
“Peg” (Mooney) LaCava-Eydenberg.
Devoted father of Robert M. Eydenberg
of Revere. Dear brother of Nancy L.
Mulligan & her late husband, Thomas,
of North Reading; Lorriane DiGiovanni
& her husband, Ret. Revere Firefighter,
Anthony DiGiovanni, of Revere &
Kingston, NH; Roger W. Eydenberg &
his wife Maria of North Smithfield, RI;
Joyce A. Bielen of Plymouth; Revere
Fire Lt., Virginia “Ginny” Segee & her
partner, Cindy Mooney of Framingham; Maureen Franco & her husband,
Ralph, of Lynnfield & the late, Eileen
Eydenberg. Also lovingly survived
by “Peg’s” sons, John E. LaCava &
Michael J. LaCava, both of Mashpee &
their cherished children to “Grampy
Bob”, Morgan, Paige, Nicholas, Taylor
LaCava, Courtney, Richard “Richie”
& Timothy “Timmy” Cohan. Bob also
leaves many nieces, nephews & cousins.
He is the adored son to the late Revere
Fire Chief Arnold F. Eydenberg & Edith
W. (Kenney) Eydenberg. Family &
friends are respectfully invited to attend
a Memorial Funeral Service on Saturday, February 10th, at 9:30 a.m. from
the Vertuccio & Smith Home for Funerals, 773 Broadway (Rte. 107), REVERE,
followed by a Memorial Funeral Mass
on Saturday in the Church of Christ
The King, 5 Job’s Fishing Rd., Mashpee,
at 11 a.m. Visiting hours are in the
Funeral Home on Friday, February
9th, from 3 to 7 pm. Parking available
left of the funeral home. Interment is
private. Member of the Corvette Club of
America, The Quashnet Country Club
of Falmouth, Falmouth Lodge of Elks
#2380 & The Orient Heights Yacht Club
of Orient Heights, East Boston. In lieu
of flowers, remembrances may be made
to the Revere Firefighters Union Local
926, 4 Freeman St., Revere, MA 02151.
Visit: www.vertuccioandsmith.com
Funeral Services
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
Every life is a story
worth sharing
The Boston Globe’s new Featured Life offering
lets you honor your loved one with a professionally
written narrative about their life and achievements.
For more details, contact Boston
Globe Classifieds at 617-929-1500
or deathnotices@globe.com.
FORBES, John Douglas PhD
Passed away on January 19, 2018, at
the age of 107, at his home in Charlottesville, Virginia, following a long
illness.
Dr. Forbes was born in San Francisco on April 9, 1910, to the late John
Franklin Forbes and Portia Ackerman
Forbes. He earned the BA from the
University of California, Berkeley
(1931); the MA from Stanford University (1932) and the MA from Harvard
University (1936); and the PhD from
Harvard University (1937). After his
tenure as Curator of Art at the 1939
World’s Fair in San Francisco, he taught
at the University of Kansas City (now
the University of Missouri at Kansas
City); at Bennington College; at Wabash
College; and at the Colgate Darden
School of Business Administration at
the University of Virginia, where he
was also the Founding Professor. After
retirement from the Darden School, Dr.
Forbes continued to teach art history at
the University of Virginia until his final
retirement in 2003.
Dr. Forbes was a 2nd Lieutenant in
the United States Army in 1942 with an
Honorable Discharge.
John D. Forbes was a Doctoral student at Harvard University under Professor Wilbur Cortez Abbott. In 1954,
along with Dr. Abbott’s son, Charles
Cortez Abbott, Dr. Forbes was invited to
help found the Colgate Darden School
of Business Administration at the University of Virginia.
Dr. Forbes was a lifelong member of
the Cambridge Boat Club and of the
Tennis and Racquet Club.
John D. Forbes was predeceased by
his parents; by his first wife, Margaret
F. Forbes; and by a daughter, Penelope.
He is survived by his second wife, M.E.
Forbes; by his children, Pamela Forbes,
Peter Forbes, and Michael Forbes; by
his grandchildren, Alexander John
Forbes, II, Anne de Marcken Forbes, Sophia F. McLane, and Allegra L. Forbes;
by brothers- and sisters-in-law; and
numerous former students and friends.
Dr. Forbes will be interred at a later
date at Arlington National Cemetery.
The family asks that memorial contributions he sent to: the University
of Virginia, in care of Lee Forker, 718
Main St., Hingham, MA 02043, with
the Memo: “In Memory of Dr. John D.
Forbes” or to Caring for Creatures, 352
Sanctuary Lane, Palmyra, VA 22963,
with the Memo: “In Memory of Dr.
John D. Forbes.”
GAFFEY, Mary (Canney)
Of West Roxbury, formerly of Brookline
on February 6, 2018. Beloved wife of
Eamon Gaffey. Loving mother of Mary
“Mimi” Gaffey, Elizabeth “Betty” Differ
and husband Edward all of West Roxbury and Edward Gaffey of Brookline.
Adored grandmother of Eamon Differ.
Dear sister of Elizabeth Perkins and
husband George of Rockland, James J.
“Chet” Riley and wife Kathy of Natick
and Tenn. and the late Joseph W. Jr.,
Richard J., James P. and John J. Canney.
Also survived by her sisters-in-law and
many nieces and nephews. Funeral
from the Bell-O’Dea Funeral Home, 376
Washington St., BROOKLINE, Saturday
morning at 9:10 followed by a Funeral
Mass in St. Mary of the Assumption
Church at 10:00. Relatives and friends
are kindly invited. Visiting hours in
the funeral home on Friday from 3:00
– 7:00. Interment St. Joseph Cemetery.
Ret. Secretary Brookline School Dept.
In lieu of flowers, donations made to either St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, 501
St. Jude Pl., Memphis, TN 38105 www.
stjude.org or the Prader-Willi Assoc. of
N.E. c/o Mary Raymond, 27 Westward
Circle, No. Reading, MA 01864 would
be appreciated.
Funeral Services
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
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HENNESSEY, Eileen
(Feeney)
JONES, Philip E.
Founding
Member
South Boston
Youth Soccer
Of South Boston, passed away February
5 2018, at the age of 71. Beloved wife
and best friend of Daniel J. Hennessey.
Devoted mother of James Hennessey,
his wife Melissa and Michelle Hennessey. Cherished grandmother of
Brittany Korovich. Dear sister of Jane
Finn, her husband Pat and the late
Frank Feeney, his wife Kathy. Loving
niece of Evelyn Morash, her late husband Arthur. Beloved aunt of William
and James Santry, Patrick, Thomas and
Brendan Finn and Jarrod, Adam and
Jessica Feeney. Also survived by many
other great-nieces, nephews, cousins,
and friends. Eileen was one of the
founding members of the South Boston
Youth Soccer League, where she was a
long time Treasurer of the league, along
with The South Boston Youth Hockey
League. She will be missed by all who
had the privilege of knowing her.
Visiting Hours in The O’Brien Funeral
Home, 146 Dorchester Street, South
Boston, on Friday from 4-8PM. Prayer
Service in the Funeral Home promptly
at 7:30 PM. Relatives and friends are
invited to attend both services. Interment will be private. In lieu of flowers,
donations in Eileen’s memory can
be made to The American Parkinson
Disease Foundation, 72 East Concord
Street, Boston, MA 02118
HIGGINS, Alfred T.
Age 75 of Norfolk, formerly of Medfield, peacefully Feb 3, 2018. Beloved
husband of Nancy Sawyer Jones, loving
father of Elizabeth Jones and son-in-law
Chris Seymour of Brooklyn, NY, Kristen
Forrestal and son-law Dave Forrestal of
Broomfield, CO, Kate Jones and son-inlaw James Stuehler of Franklin, MA, a
son Peter E. Jones and daughter-in-law
Kim Halpert Jones of Auburn, MA, and
his stepchildren, David A Sawyer and
daughter-in-law Darbie Sawyer of Attleboro, MA, and Elizabeth S. Cherian and
son-in-law George Cherian of London,
UK. A sister Susan Panzer (Michael) of
Carver, MA, sister-in-law Janice Jones
of Hampden, MA, and eight grandchildren, Nora Forrestal, Malcolm Seymour
Jones, Fiona Stuehler, Penny Jones,
Robert and Michael Sawyer, and Ayla
and Thomas Cherian, and many nieces
and nephews. A memorial service will
be held at The Church of the Advent,
Medfield, MA, Saturday, February 10
at 10 AM. In lieu of flowers please send
donations in memory of Phil Jones to
The Church of the Advent, 28 Pleasant
Street, Medfield, MA, 02052, or The
Providence College Angel Fund, Providence College, 1 Cunningham Square,
Providence, RI, 02918, Att: Institutional Development.
KIRKHAM, Lois (Jordan)
Of Lexington, MA, beloved wife of
the late Thomas A. Kirkham, passed
away February 7, 2018. She was born
6/23/1925, raised in Coeburn, Virginia,
and married her beloved in 1950 in
Oakridge, Tenn. She lived in Lexington, MA much of her life and moved
to Pembroke, MA in 2015 to be near
her daughter. She leaves behind her
daughter Patricia McCabe and her husband Chuck McCabe of Pembroke, MA
and her late son Thomas R. Kirkham
and his surviving wife Marion “Sunny”
Kirkham of Union, ME and grandchildren Daniel and Kimberly McCabe,
and Iain and Brittany Kirkham, as well
as her 4 great-grandchildren, Steven,
Faith, Riley, and Falyn.
She had a great love of golf, and was
active at Nashawtuc Country Club and
with the WGAM for many years. She
retired from golf to care for her husband until his death in 2012. She lived
her life with grace, selflessness, and
kindness, and never lost her Southern
charm. She loved her family and will
be missed.
Visiting hours will be held Monday,
Feb. 12 at the Douglass Funeral Home,
51 Worthen Rd. LEXINGTON from
4pm to 7pm, and a Funeral Service will
be celebrated Tuesday Feb. 13 at the
funeral home at 10am. Relatives and
friends are kindly invited. In lieu of
flowers, donations in her memory may
be made to the Alzheimer’s Association at www.alz.org or to the Make a
Wish Foundation. Interment Westview
Cemetery, Lexington.
Lexington 781-862-1800
www.douglassfh.com
Roberts Mitchell Caruso
Funeral Home
JONES, Victoria H.
(DeSimone)
Died February 4, 2018 in
Kingston, NH. Husband of
the late Mary Higgins,
father to Michael Higgins, Kathleen
Terry, and Mary Ellen Ragucci. Brother
to Dr. Louis Higgins, Dorothy DiPesa,
numerous grand and great grandchildren. Predeceased by siblings Helen,
Marion, George, Raymond and Ruth.
Born in Lynn, MA on December 21,
1920, WWII Naval Vet. 40+ years employed at GE in Everett. Calling hours
are Sunday, Feb. 11, from 2-5 p.m.
at the Brewitt FH, Exeter, NH. Mass
on Monday, Feb. 12 at 9 a.m. at St.
Michael’s Church, Exeter, NH. Services
will conclude with burial in St. Mary
Cemetery in Lynn, MA. For full obituary www.brewittfuneralhome.com
Ginley Funeral Home, Walpole
www.ginleyfuneralhomes.com
JONES, George W.
Of Cambridge, February 5, 2018. Age
87. Beloved son of the late Llewellyn
Jones and the late Susan Wilbur Warren Jones. Devoted brother of the late
Llewellyn Jones, Jr. and the late Cornelia Jones. Long time electrical engineer
for Draper Labs, ham radio and trolley
car buff and friend of everyone with
a gentle smile. On Monday, February
12, friends may gather at the DeVito
Funeral Home, 761 Mt. Auburn Street,
WATERTOWN from 9:30 a.m. – 10:30
a.m. and proceed to Christ Church,
0 Garden Street, Cambridge, for the
funeral at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to the Seashore
Trolley Museum, Kennebunkport,
Maine. For directions or for an online
condolence, devitofuneralhomes.com.
Talk
Have the
Age 99, of Walpole passed away peacefully on Monday, February 5, 2018 at
Quaboag Rehabilitation Center in West
Brookfield, MA. She was the beloved
wife of the late Frederick Jones, who
died in 1977.
Mother of Patricia A. O’Leary of
Jamaica Plain, Jeffrey J. Jones and
his wife Joan Recesso-Jones of Hubbardston, and Dennis Jones and his
wife Michele of Walpole. Grandmother
of Ronald O’Leary of Dorchester, Shawn
O’Leary of Walpole and Derek Jones
and his wife Tiana of NY. Great-grandmother of Cooper Jones. Sister of Gloria
Johnson and the late Gilda DeNapoli
and Michael DeSimone.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend visiting hours on Saturday, February 10 from 9:00-11:00 a.m. followed
by a funeral service at 11:00 a.m. in the
Ginley Funeral Home, 892 Main Street,
WALPOLE.
Interment will take place in St.
Joseph Cemetery in West Roxbury.
In lieu of flowers, remembrances
may be made in her to name to National Down Syndrome Society, 8 E 41st
Street, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10017.
of a
Lifetime
SM
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from day-to-day details to
big events. Sharing stories
with those who matter most
isn’t just important today;
it will be especially significant
when it’s time to honor and
commemorate your lives.
Meaningful memorialization
starts when loved ones talk
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memories made, lessons
learned and how they hope
to be remembered.
Download a free brochure
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KELLEY, John Edward
Of North Chelmsford, passed away
on February 5, 2018, after a several
months long illness. He was predeceased by his much-loved wife Prudy
and his step-daughter Ann Mary McKinney. He is survived by his step-son
Fritz Hubacher; and by his sisters
Susan Raftice and her husband Robert,
of Scarborough, Maine, Jean M. Kelley
and her daughter Oksana of Chestnut
Hill, MA, and Kathleen A. Kelley and
her daughter Lauren of Norwood, MA.
John is also survived by his many other
nieces, nephews and cousins. John
was quietly brilliant, taking the top
prize in mathematics at Bowdoin in
1974. For many years John worked as
a mathematician/software engineer for
contractors working with the Department of Defense, traveling frequently
to Germany and South Korea. He truly
loved his work and his co-workers. Every summer he and his brother Michael
rented a house overlooking the marshes
at Higgins Beach in Maine. We lost Michael last year, and John greatly missed
him. This past summer John rented
the house a last time in remembrance
of Michael and the time they had spent
together. A Funeral Mass for John will
be held at St. Mary’s Roman Catholic
Church in Chelmsford, MA on Tuesday,
February 13 at 11:00 AM. Online guestbook at gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
To submit an obituary for
editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail to
obits@globe.com, or
information by fax to
617.929.3186. If you need
further assistance about
a news obituary, please
call 617.929.3400.
LEPPZER, Antone J.
McCLELLAN, John W.
VH Fri. 6-8PM. Funeral Sat. 10AM St.
Mary’s Church. Complete notice to follow Fri. www.costellofuneralhome.com
LUZZI WHOOLEY, Barbara
(Luzzi)
WWII Navy Vet
Of Wellesley, Feb. 4, 2018. Wife of Michael Kevin Whooley and loving mother
of Ralph Casale and his wife Susan of
Westford, Linda Frascarella and her
husband Anthony of Clarksville, MD,
and Joseph Casale and his wife Lisa of
Framingham, sister of Joseph Luzzi of
Belleville, NJ, Louis Luzzi of Frederick,
MD, and Laura Luzzi of San Francisco,
CA, and cherished grandmother of
Clara, Gerald, Louis, Nicholas, Joseph,
Luke, Anthony, Lauren, and Thomas.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend a Funeral Service in
celebration of Barbara’s life at the Mary
Catherine Chapel of Brasco & Sons, 773
Moody St., WALTHAM, MA Saturday at
11 a.m. Interment, Calvary Cemetery.
Visiting hours, prior to the service from
10 - 11 a.m. Parking attendants will be
on duty. For guestbook and complete
obituary please visit;
www.BrascoFuneralHome.com
Waltham (781) 893-6260
“Creating Meaningful Memories”
KRASIEWSKI, Ronald E.
Of Canton passed away
February 4th. Beloved
husband of M. Jean
(Connelly ) and the late Frances V.
(Mulqueeney). Father of John
McClellan and his wife Susan of
Marlborough, Robert McClellan and his
wife Stephanie of Canton, and Paul
McClellan of North Conway, NH.
Step-father of Paul Sullivan and his wife
Donna of Simsbury, Ct, and Peter
Sullivan and his wife Kathryn of
Boothbay Harbor, ME. Brother of the
late Helen Twomey. Also survived by
10 grandchildren. Visiting hours at the
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home 455
Washington St. Canton Friday from 4-8
pm. Funeral Mass at St. Gerard Majella
Church, Canton, Saturday morning at
10. Burial Blue Hill Cemetery,
Braintree. Navy Veteran WW II. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made
in his memory to “Our Neighbor’s in
Need” c/o St. Gerard Majella Church
1860 Washington St. Canton, MA
02021. For complete obituary and
guestbook see www.
dockrayandthomasfuneralhome.com
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home
(781) 828-0811
McGREEVY, Thomas I.
MARINO, William J.
Of Reading, formerly of
Somerville, Feb 6. Son of
the late Edward J. and Julia
(Melofski-Chmielowski) Krasiewski.
Brother of Lillian J. Salamone &
husband Vincent of Stoneham and
Phyllis Freedman of Florida. Uncle of
Julie Salamone & partner Dean
Abbruzzio, Kim Monteiro & husband
Jamie, Domenic Salamone, and Donna,
Richard, & Andrew Freedman. Also
survived by seven great nieces and
nephews. Funeral Mass in St. Patrick
Church, 71 Central St., Stoneham, on
Saturday at 10am. Visitation for
relatives and friends at the McDonaldFinnegan Funeral Home, 322 Main St.,
STONEHAM, prior to the Mass
beginning at 8:30am. Interment,
Lindenwood Cemetery, Stoneham. In
lieu of flowers, contributions may be
made to National Kidney Foundation,
Attn: Donations, 30 East 33rd Street,
New York, NY 10016. For obit/
guestbook, www.mcdonaldfs.com
Of Winthrop, peacefully
surrounded by his loving
family on Feb. 1. Loving
son of the late Gus and Rose (Sicliano)
Marino. Dear brother of Lawrence
Marino and his late wife Ann, Louise
Marino, Carol Nicoletti and her late
husband Walter, and Rosalie Marino,
all of Winthrop. Also survived by his
many cherished nieces, nephews, and
cousins. Family and friends will honor
William with a Memorial Mass at St
John the Evangilist Church, Winthrop,
on Saturday, Feb. 10 at 10AM. In lieu of
flowers memorial donations in
William’s name to Wounded Warriors
Foundation. William served his country
at the Bay of Pigs during the Cuban
Crisis. For more info or to send an
online condolence
www.ruggieromh.com
East Boston (617) 569-0990
McCARTHY, Patricia M.
(Brennan)
McDonald-Finnegan Funeral Home
Stoneham, MA
781-438-0405
LEEN, Edward M. “Ed”, Jr.
Of Woburn, Tuesday, February 6, 2018 at seventy-five
years of age. Edward died at
home surrounded by his loving family.
Beloved husband of Marie D.(Pazola)
Leen. Loving father of Elizabeth “Betsy”
Nazar, her husband Christopher of
Mansfield and Patricia “Tricia” Healy,
her husband Paul of Shrewsbury.
Devoted grandfather of Brandon and
Megan Nazar and Brian Healy. A
Funeral will be held in the Lynch Cantillon Funeral Home, 263 Main Street,
WOBURN on Saturday, February 10th
at Noon. Relatives and friends are
respectfully invited to calling hours, Friday 5-7 p.m. At the family’s request in
lieu of flowers, remembrances may be
made in Ed’s name to National Stroke
Association, 9707 Easter Lane, Suite B,
Centennial, CO 80112 or to the Woburn
Historical Society, PO Box 91, Woburn,
MA 01801. For directions or to leave
an online condolence, please visit www.
lynch-cantillon.com or Facebook under
Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home.
To access death notices and
obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home
www.lynch-cantillon.com
781-933-0400
NICHOLS, Shaun O.
Sales Executive,
Realtor
Thomas I. McGreevy, 89,
passed away peacefully on
Feb. 4, 2018 at The Woodland Country Manor in Somerville,
OH. He was oldest of 4 sons born to
Albert A. and Martha (Stuhlmueller)
McGreevy. A graduate of Hamilton
Catholic HS and Miami U. (OH), Tom
also served in the US Army in Korea.
Survived by his loving and devoted wife
of 67 years, Mary Jane (Batt) McGreevy,
children Ann M. Slone (John), Thomas
I. McGreevy, Jr. (Kaye), Marilyn M. Micciche (Romano) & Daniel A. McGreevy,
5 grandchildren & 2 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by brother Gerry,
survived by brothers, Parnel & Michael
(Laura) & many nieces, nephews &
good friends.
Tom was NE Dist Sls Mgr. for Champion Int’l. He enjoyed a 2nd career as
a Realtor in Naples, FL where he and
MJ spent 22 marvelous years before
returning “home” to Ohio in 2008. He
loved tennis, golf & the Patriots. His
kids enjoyed many wonderful family
vacations in MI, ME, NH and Cape
Cod. His twinkling blue eyes & Irish
charm will be dearly missed. Funeral
Mass, Fri. Feb. 9 at 11am, St. Mary’s
Church, Oxford, OH. Burial in St.
Stephen Cemetery, Hamilton, OH.
On-line condolences to: https://www.
oglepaulyoungfuneralhome.com
Of Winchester and Osterville, passed
away peacefully surrounded by her
loving family on February 6, 2018.
Beloved wife of Maurice J. McCarthy,
Sr. Loving mother of Maurice Jr. of
Winchester, Allen and his wife Ann
of Winchester, Jennifer Sullivan and
her husband John of Manhattan, and
the late Michael Patrick McCarthy.
Cherished grandmother of Patrick,
Elizabeth, Andrew, Jonathan, Alexandra, Brennan and Charlotte. Dear
sister of Joan Anniballi of Natick. Also
survived by many loving cousins, nieces
and nephews. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated at St. Eulalia’s
Church, 50 Ridge St., Winchester on
Saturday February 10th at 11am. Relatives and Friends are kindly invited
to attend. Visiting hours will be held
prior to the Mass on Saturday at the
Lane Funeral Home, 760 Main St., (Rte.
38) WINCHESTER from 9-10:15am.
Interment Wildwood Cemetery, Winchester. In lieu of flowers, donations
in her memory may be made to the
Winchester Hospital, 41 Highland Ave.,
Winchester, MA 01890. For online condolences, visit www.lanefuneral.com.
Of Boca Raton, Florida passed away on
February 4, 2018. Born in Scranton PA,
April 28, 1921, he lived in the Boston
area until retiring to Florida 35 years
ago. Beloved husband of the late Alma
Morris (Lipkin). Devoted father of
Barry Morris and his wife Louise and
Jeffrey Morris and his wife Claudia.
Cherished grandfather of Jonathan,
David and Amelia. Dear uncle of Dayle
Spiewak, Ellen McSwiggin and the late
Judith Yazbek, and devoted great-uncle
of Beth Yazbek. Graveside service on
Friday, February 9, 2018 at 12:45 PM
at Sharon Memorial Park, 40 Dedham
Street, Sharon. Memorial observance
will be held Friday from 3:00 PM to
7:30 PM at the home of Jeffrey and
Claudia Morris. In lieu of flowers,
donations in Monroe’s memory may be
made to Combined Jewish Philanthropies at www.cjp.org.
Lane Funeral Home
Winchester
781.729.2580
Stanetsky Memorial Chapels
www.stanetskybrookline.com
617-232-9300
MORRIS, Monroe
Of Saugus, age 53, February 5. Loving
husband of Heather (Pezzuto) Nichols.
Beloved father of Kyle & Hailey Nichols
of Saugus. Dear brother of Karl Nichols,
the late Bruce M. Nichols & the late
Karlene Rebidue. Shaun was an avid
sports enthusiast, loving football, golf
& hockey. He co-coached his son’s Little
League team for 3 years, and loved
traveling to Disney & the Caribbean
with his family. Relatives & friends are
invited to attend visiting hours in the
Bisbee-Porcella Funeral Home, 549
Lincoln Ave., SAUGUS on Friday 4-8
p.m. A funeral service will be held in
the funeral home on Saturday at 11
a.m. Interment Puritan Lawn Memorial Park, Peabody. In lieu of flowers,
the family asks in Shaun’s compassionate nature, for you to do a good
deed. For directions & condolences
www.BisbeePorcella.com.
O’CONNELL, Eileen
Of Winchester, formerly of Belmont,
Feb. 2, 2018. A longtime teacher at the
Payson Park and Wellington Schools
in Belmont. Beloved daughter of the
late Daniel and Margaret (Mahoney)
O’Connell. Loving sister of the late
Rosemary L. “Rory” O’Connell, Virginia
“Sheila” Berg and Daniel O’Connell
Jr. Sister-in-Law of Gordon Berg and
Clare O’Connell. Also survived by 7
loving nieces and nephews, Dan (and
Muffy) O’Connell of Whitefish Bay,
WI; Mark (and Ann) O’Connell of
Wyckoff, NJ; Chris (and Sue) O’Connell
of Winchester, MA; Liz O’Connell (and
Charlie) Robinson of Davidson, NC;
Ellen Berg (and George Dunder) of San
Rafael CA; John Berg (and Lisa Hemenway) of Santa Rosa, CA; and Erik (and
Erin) Berg of Santa Rosa, CA. She loved
and was loved by 16 grand-nieces and
nephews and one great-grand niece. Funeral from the Brown & Hickey Funeral
Home, 36 Trapelo Road, BELMONT on
Friday Feb. 9th at 9:30 AM, followed by
a Funeral Mass in St. Luke Church, 132
Lexington Street, Belmont at 10:30 AM.
Relatives and friends invited. Visiting
hours Thursday from 5:00 - 7:00 PM.
Interment Belmont Cemetery, Belmont.
On line guest book at
www.brownandhickey.com
O’LEARY, Gabriella L.
(Flaherty)
92, of Bear Hill Center, Stoneham,
formerly of Melrose, Brighton and
Cambridge, beloved wife of the late Lt.
Timothy J. O’Leary CFD, passed peacefully February 1st. Cherished mother
of Ann T. O’Leary and her husband
Stanley Angelaszek of Gansevoort, NY
and Timothy F. of Melrose. Loving
grandmother of Jason Angelaszek
of Wilton, NY, Karen Jeffers and her
husband Darnnell of Chicago, IL and
David Angelaszek of Germantown,
MD. Adoring great-grandmother of
Alexander Jude Jeffers of Chicago, IL.
Devoted sister of Francis X. Flaherty
and his wife Maureen of Arlington, the
late Ann T. Gilmore of Brighton, and
the late Mary E. Kostka of East Islip,
NY. Proud aunt of many nieces and
nephews. Dearest friend of Nora McIntee of Arlington. The daughter of Irish
immigrants, she was born and raised
in Brighton, MA. She graduated from
St. Columbkille school in 1943. She was
married at St. Columbkille Church in
1950. She worked as an executive secretary at MIT Draper Labs, a women’s
clothing clerk at Hit or Miss, and as
a homemaker. She was a member of
Catholic Daughters and a Eucharistic
minister. Visiting hours are on Sunday
from 3-6 pm in the DeVito Funeral
Home, 1145 Mass. Ave, ARLINGTON.
Funeral Mass Monday at 10:00am in St.
Patrick Church, Stoneham. Interment
at Bourne National Cemetery at a future date. In lieu of flowers, donations
in her name to St. Jude Children’s Hospital 501 St Jude Place, Memphis, TN
38105 would be appreciated. To send a
condolence visit, devitofh.com.
QUARTARONE, John A.
“Skip”
Of East Boston on Feb. 6. Visiting hours
Sun 12-4 PM. For more info visit ruggieromh.com
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston (617) 569-0990
Express your sympathy
View The Boston Globe’s complete list of death notices
and sign the guestbook at boston.com/obituaries.
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REARDON, William F.
Of Salem, 68, Feb 6, 2018. Bill is
survived by his loving wife of 32 years,
Karyn Ann (O’Donnell) Reardon of
Salem, his step-son, Richard Boudreault
of Exeter, N.H., his grandchildren,
Richard Parent-Boudreault of Peabody,
Brandy-Lee Parent-Boudreault of
Peabody & Jessica Karyn Boudreault of
Exeter, N.H., his two great grandchildren, Christopher Parent-Boudreault &
Blake Bettencourt, his sisters, Patricia
Reardon-Longever of Lauderdaleby-the-Sea, Fl., & Mamie Reardon of
Saugus. He was the brother of the late
Frank Reardon. His is also survivied by
brothers-in-law & sisters-in-law, Joseph
& Vicky O’Donnell of Kaneohe, Hawaii,
Kevin O’Donnell of Salem, Mark & Sandra O’Donnell of Seattle, WA, Shawn
O’Donnell of Salem, Joyce & William
Faircloth of Salem, Colleen & Richard
Ortins of Beverly & several nieces &
nephews. His funeral will be held from
The O’Donnell Funeral Home, 46 Washington Sq., (At Salem Common) Salem,
Saturday, Feb. 10th at 11 A.M. followed
by his funeral Mass in the Immaculate
Conception Church, Hawthorne Blvd,
Salem at 11:30 A.M. Relatives and
friends invited. Burial in Greenlawn
Cemetery, Salem, Visiting hours Friday,
Feb. 9th from 4 to 7 P.M. In lieu of
flowers, expressions of sympathy may
be made in Bill’s memory to the Mass
General North Shore Cancer Center,
102 Endicott St., Danvers, MA 01923
or to the Salem Children’s Charity, 1
Frederick St., Salem, MA 01970.
www.odonnellfuneralservice.com
REED, Mary I. (MacPherson)
Of Dedham formerly of Jamaica Plain,
February 7, 2018. Beloved wife of
the late Raymond Reed. Sister of the
late John “Barney” MacPherson and
Francis X. MacPherson. Aunt of Phyllis MacPherson of South Weymouth,
Robert MacPherson and his partner
Rodney of South Weymouth, Lawrence
J. MacPherson and his wife Marie of
Texas, Francis MacPherson Jr. and his
wife Sandra of Westwood, and Scott
MacPherson of Pembroke. Great-aunt
of Ross, Ian, Daniel, and Mark. Stepmother of Michael Reed and his wife
Jan of Tewksbury, and Douglas Reed
of Brighton. Nana Bell to Emma Reed
and Kaitlyn Mackey. Great-Nana Bell to
Aiden and Ella Mackey. Sister-in-law of
Jack and Biancha Reed of Stoughton.
Mary was a retired employee of Bank
of America and a devoted parishioner
of St. Mary’s Church, Dedham. Visiting
hours at the George F. Doherty & Sons
Wilson-Cannon Funeral Home, 456
High St., DEDHAM, Friday, Feb. 9 from
5-8pm. Funeral from the funeral home
Saturday, Feb. 10 at 10am followed by
a Funeral Mass in St. Mary’s Church,
Dedham at 11am. Relatives and friends
kindly invited. Interment in St. Joseph’s
Cemetery, West Roxbury. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Mary’s
memory to St. Mary’s Church, 420 High
St., Dedham, MA 02026. Online guestbook and directions at gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
RIZZO, Anna (Volta)
In East Boston, February 6, 2018, who
just turned 102 years old on January
17. Beloved wife of the late Ernest Rizzo. Daughter of the late Luigi and Maria (DiNublia) Volta. Sister of the late
Jennie Nickerson, Mary Travaglino, Lee
Petrella, Rose DiNublia, Jessie Filippo,
Joseph, Carmine, Minnie, Cosmo and
Anthony Volta. Survived by 3 generations of nieces and nephews. Funeral
from the Magrath Funeral Home, 325
Chelsea St. [at Day Sq] EAST BOSTON,
Friday at 12:30. Funeral Mass in the
Most Holy Redeemer Church at 1PM.
Relatives and friends invited. Visiting
Friday 11 - 12:30. Interment Woodlawn
Cemetery. Indoor parking and entrance
to funeral home from 340 Bremen St.
SCOVEL, Edward S.
Of Medford, Feb. 1, age 90.
Beloved husband of the late
Lillian Semonian Scovel.
Born in Chicago, IL, on Sept. 27, 1927,
he was one of a set of identical twins
born to James Dean Scovel & Mary
Edna Scovel (Stoddard). Ed is survived
by his loving children; Lynn Scovel
Chester & her husband Robert M.
Chester of Cambridge, Richard J. & his
wife Carole M. Scovel of Wakefield and
Diane Scovel Galvin of Waltham and
grandchildren; Robert and Ian Chester
and Jonathan and Colin Galvin. Visiting
hours will be at the Beals-GeakeMagliozzi Funeral Home, 29 Governors
Ave., MEDFORD, Friday, from 4 to 8
PM. Interment, Oak Grove Cemetery,
Medford. Korean Navy Veteran. For
additional information please visit
www.magliozzifuneralhome.com.
SHAUGHNESSY, Margaret
E. “Meg”
Of Natick, formerly of Newton Centre,
Feb. 4, 2018. Meg was the daughter of
Patricia (Staunton) and the late Roger
E. Shaughnessy, sister of Carol Shaughnessy Lehr and her husband Andy, and
Aunt of Roger T. Lehr all of Newton
Centre. Funeral services will be private.
Eaton & Mackay Funeral Home
Newton Corner 617-244-2034
SHEA, Sharon A. (Bertrand)
Of Townsend on Feb. 5 at the age of
67. She leaves her husband of 46 years,
Stephen A. Shea; a son and daughter-inlaw, Michael W. and Clare Shea of Eagle
River, AK; a daughter, Michelle D. Shea
of Leominster. She was the a daughter
of Luther (Blanchard) Bertrand Benoit
of Eunice, LA and the late Weston
Bertrand. She also leaves her brother,
David “Wade” Bertrand of Portland,
ND; three sisters, Elaine Achee of Baker,
LA, Marlene Savant of Youngsville,
LA, Denise Arnold of Basile, LA; two
grandchildren, Finley Shea and Weston
Shea. For seventeen years Mrs. Shea
worked as an administrator at Hologic
Company in Marlboro. A Funeral Mass
will be celebrated 11 AM, Sat, Feb.
10th at St. John’s Church, 1 School
St, Townsend. Burial will be private.
Calling hours are 4-7 Friday at the Anderson Funeral Home, 250 Main St (Rte
119) TOWNSEND CENTER. Memorial
contributions may be made to St. Jude
Children’s Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
Please see www.andersonfuneral.com
for additional information.
Anderson Funeral Homes
Townsend – Ayer - Fitchburg
www.andersonfuneral.com
SIEGEL, Edward P.
Edward P. Siegel, 88, of Boston and
South Dartmouth, MA, died en route
to a vacation in Key Largo, Florida, on
February 4, 2018. He is survived by
his wife of 59 years, Judith, his sister,
Ruth Mogel of Brooklyn, NY, his son,
Peter of Bethesda, MD, his daughter
Elizabeth Watkins of San Francisco,
CA, and his four grandchildren, Emily,
Ellen, Gabriel, and Olivia. The family
will receive callers at their home in
Boston on Sunday, February 11, 11
am - 2 pm. A celebration of life will
be held at their summer home later
this spring. In lieu of sending flowers,
please consider making a donation to
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in his
memory at https://www.bso.org/Forms/
Donation?fund=81.
Visiting Hours: February 11, 11-2.
Celebrate
their lives
Honor your loved ones
with a photo in the
Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
SUDBAY, Donald E. Sr.
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
WEEKLY, Gordon
Melvyn Weiss, 82,
battled fraud with
class­action suits
By Sam Roberts
NEW YORK TIMES
Mr. Donald E Sudbay Sr.,
husband of the late Phyllis
A. (Ruth) Sudbay passed
away on February 5, 2018. He was
surrounded by his loving family. Born
in Gloucester on April 10, 1927, he was
the son of the late James A. and
Margaret M. (Fraser) Sudbay.
Don enlisted in the United States
Navy during World War II, and after
finishing his Navy Tour, he returned
to Gloucester to earn his high school
diploma from Gloucester High School.
Don entered the automobile business
in 1949, where he spent his entire
career. Starting as a parts manager at
Reilly Motors on Washington Street in
Gloucester, he quickly moved up the
ranks to service manager. Don was
promoted to salesman in 1955, and
in 1960, owner Raymond O’Connell
entrusted his entire business to Don by
naming him General Manager. In 1965,
the opportunity arose to purchase Reilly Motors. Don and Phyllis took the risk
and started Sudbay Pontiac Cadillac
Buick, which celebrated its 50th year
in business in 2015. Nelson Bragg, the
local radio morning host, called Don
“The Gentleman of the Automotive
Business”, and he truly was. Don always
made sure that his customers as well as
his loyal employees were treated fairly.
Don was a very active member of
the Cape Ann community throughout
his life. He was a 59 year member of
the Gloucester Rotary Club as well as
a trustee for the Addison Gilbert Hospital for many years. In the 70’s Don
used his sales skills in the campaign to
build the Steele Wing at the hospital.
He was named a Lifetime Trustee in
1980. Named a trustee of the Cape Ann
Savings Bank in 1968, Don held this
position for almost 50 years, thoroughly
enjoying his association with Cape Ann
Savings. As a longtime member of the
Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce, he
was honored as the recipient of “The
Small Business Person of the Year” in
1984.
Throughout their 66 years of marriage, Don and his wife Phyllis, led
a very active life with their children,
grandchildren and the many dear
friends they met along the way. Skiing,
boating and golf were among their
various recreational pursuits, with Don
skiing well into his 70’s. His family
cherishes memories of vacations skiing
in New Hampshire and Colorado, and
the visits to Marco Island for fun with
“Nana and Pop”.
Next to his family, his true passion
was golf. He was good at it. The true
reward being the three “holes in one”
that he shot in his lifetime. A member
of the Bass Rocks Golf Club, he was also
a past president. He was also a member
of the Island Club of Marco Island and
the Mid-Ocean club in Bermuda.
Don is survived by his children, Donald E. Sudbay Jr. and his wife Jeannie,
Sally Ann Kane and her husband Kevin,
and David J. Sudbay and his fiancée
Sue Hayden. Don is also survived by
his six grandchildren, Caroline Sudbay,
Bradlee Sudbay and his wife Megan,
Brenden Kane, Andrew Kane, Sara
Sudbay, David (DJ) Sudbay and great
granddaughter Riley, step-grandchildren Jacqueline Sullivan, Timothy Sullivan and his wife Quinn, and Christine
Sullivan, and step-great grandchildren
Timothy, Lily and Brendan Sullivan
along with many nieces and nephews.
His Funeral Mass will be celebrated
on Monday, February 12 at 10 a.m. in
Our Lady of Good Voyage Church, 142
Prospect St. Gloucester, MA. Extended
family and friends are cordially invited
to attend. Visiting hours will be held
on Sunday from 4-7 p.m. in the Greely
Funeral Home, 212 Washington Street,
Gloucester, MA 01930. The burial will
be held in Calvary Cemetery, Gloucester. In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made in his name to: The
Addison Gilbert Hospital, c/o Northeast
Health Foundation, 55 Tozer Road, Beverly, MA 01915. For online condolences, please visit: greelyfuneralhome.com
Greely Funeral Home
Gloucester, MA (978) 283-0698
VERELL, Jewel G.
78,of Duxbury, died peacefully at home
surrounded by her loved ones on February 4, 2018 following her brave five
year battle with cancer. Beloved wife
of Charles F. (Chuck) Verell. Loving
mother of Jason J. Verell and Megan E.
Verell. A Memorial Service will be held
at Mayflower Church, 207 Main St.,
Kingston, MA, on Wednesday, February
14 at 11:00AM, followed by a reception
at the church. Donations in Jewel’s
memory may be made to Dana Farber
Cancer Institute, Attn: Ovarian Cancer
Contribution Services, 10 Brookline
Place West, 6th Floor, Brookline, MA
02445, or The Gideons International,
The Gideons International Processing
Center, P.O. Box 97251, Washington,
DC 20090-7251. For online condolences
please visit shepherdfuneralhome.com.
Share a special memory
Add a cherished memory or condolence to the online guestbook at boston.com/obituaries.
Gordon David Weekly, age 68, died
peacefully and surrounded by loving
family on February 1st, 2018 about 18
months after his initial prostate cancer
diagnosis.
Gordon was born on February 17,
1949, in Tulsa, Oklahoma to George
and Tai Weekly and grew up in Fort
Walton Beach, Florida as the eldest of
five children. In his teenage years, Gordon became an Eagle Scout and went
to Choctawhatchee High School. After
graduating, he attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to get his
Bachelor & Master’s degree in Electrical
Engineering and Computer Science.
Gordon would take a break from classes
on weekends by helping conduct the
choir at a nearby church, where he
became close friends with one of the
singers, Marian Forsyth. Gordon and
Marian married in the church where
they first met and made music together.
Their love was deep, their shared faith
abiding, and their marriage was a very
happy one. In 2012, just days before
Marian died from lung cancer, they celebrated their 41st wedding anniversary.
Gordon loved solving problems and
was well-suited to his successful career
as a software engineer. He spent 25
years at GenRad, and never retired
from the field. He was much beloved by
his coworkers and carpool commutermates at MathWorks, where he worked
right till the end of his life. A lifelong
aviation enthusiast and experienced
recreational pilot, he enjoyed contradancing, playing piano, the symphony,
theater, and taking regular trips to
the Berkshires to hike, swim, sail, and
canoe. Gordon wished his ashes to be
scattered in the same place as Marian’s:
a mountain lake in Connecticut where
they used to swim together.
Gordon was known for his kindness, cheerful and eager disposition,
sharp mind, remarkable facility with
mathematics (paired with hilariously
bad spelling), playfulness, and sense
of adventure. He deeply loved people
-- especially children -- and God. In the
last year of his life, he travelled to Fiji
and New Zealand with son David, attended his 50-year high school reunion
in Florida, and took his ten-year old
grandchild, Abi, on a special trip to
London.
Gordon is survived by his three adult
children and their spouses: Rebecca
Koering (and husband Jason), Christopher (and wife Shawna), and David
(and wife Rebecca), along with seven
grandchildren: Abigail, Harper, Samuel,
Elizabeth, Matthew, Maxwell, and
Cyrus. He is also survived by his sister
Brenda, brothers Roger and Peter, and
their families.
Family and friends are invited to a
service to grieve, honor and celebrate
Gordon’s life on what would have been
his 69th birthday: Saturday, February
17th, at noon. A lunch reception will
follow. The service and reception will
be held at Christ Revolution Church
(fka St Paul Evangelical), 451 Lowell St,
Lexington MA 02420.
In lieu of flowers, the family would
appreciate charitable donations in his
memory to the Rare Cancer Research
Foundation (https://rarecancer.org),
or one of the other causes he personally supported in life, such as CARE
(https://www.care.org) or Amnesty
International (https://amnesty.org).
YAVNER, Carol F.
Of Brookline, on Tuesday, February 6,
2018. Devoted daughter of the late
Clara (Harvey) and Meyer Yavner.
Loving sister of the late Earl M. Yavner.
Dear aunt of Jonathan and Lisa Jean
Yavner of Canada and Sharon Yavner
of Israel. Also survived by a host of
cousins. Funeral Services will be held at
the Beth El Chapel, 776 Baker St., West
Roxbury, on Friday, February 9 at 1PM.
Interment will follow at the Beth El
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to Combined
Jewish Philanthropies, Kraft Family
Building, 126 High St., Boston, MA
02110-2700. www.cjp.org
Levine Chapels, Brookline
(617) 277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
BostonGlobe.com
Melvyn I. Weiss, whose avalanche of class-action lawsuits
made him a pariah to corporate
America, a hero to plaintiffs, a
catalyst for legal protections of
investors and consumers, and
finally a felon, died on Friday at
his home in Boca Raton, Fla. He
was 82.
The cause was amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis, his son Stephen A. Weiss, a partner in the
law firm Seeger Weiss, said.
Mr. Weiss was a pro bono
lawyer for victims of terrorism
and other causes, a prodigious
fund-raiser for liberal Democratic candidates, and a leader
of the Israel Policy Forum,
which favors a two-state solution to the Palestinian conflict.
He and his wife, the former Barbara Joan Kaplan, sponsored a
program in public-interest law
at his alma mater, New York
University Law School.
But he was best known for
his aggressive advocacy in
building a fledgling law firm into a powerhouse robust enough
to compel miscreant and recalcitrant businesses to pay billions of dollars in claims to aggrieved shareholders and customers.
He sued, or threatened lawsuits against, them or their advisers for securities fraud, phony accounting, environmental
damage, false advertising, and
other misconduct.
Ironically, as an investor Mr.
Weiss was himself a victim of
Bernard L. Madoff ’s Ponzi
scheme, which claimed fictitious profits from Wall Street.
Madoff was arrested in 2008
and convicted in what was described as the largest financial
fraud in American history.
To corporate directors and
legal reformers seeking to curb
frivolous lawsuits, the firm that
Mr. Weiss cofounded, which became known as Milberg Weiss
Bershad Hynes & Lerach, was
an exemplar of tort litigation
gone amok. To many of his clients, though, he was a white
knight.
His lawsuits sometimes led
to more transparent corporate
bookkeeping and greater accountability, including the election of additional independent
directors to company boards.
A 1994 lawsuit against the
tobacco company R.J. Reynolds
was credited with helping to
kill its advertising campaign
built around the cartoon character Joe Camel, which industry critics argued was targeted
at underage smokers.
Mr. Weiss found himself in
the legal crosshairs in 2007,
w h e n f e d era l p r o s e c u t o r s
charged that in 150 cases across
the country, Milberg, as his firm
was known, had funneled $11.3
million in kickbacks to socalled figurehead investors so
that they would be readily available as potential plaintiffs.
Their unbridled litigiousness gave Mr. Weiss and his
partners an advantage by enabling them to file suit ahead of
rival firms, get themselves appointed lead counsel, and gain
a greater share of legal fees.
According to prosecutors,
the conspiracy generated more
than $250 million in fees to
Milberg — including $9.8 million for Mr. Weiss, who lived in
a 12,200-square-foot waterfront mansion in Oyster Bay,
N.Y., and owned 140 Picasso
lithographs and etchings.
“The scheme was based in
greed,” said Thomas P. O’Brien,
the federal prosecutor for central California, “and it affected
the integrity of the courts and
the interests of an untold number of absent class members.”
One figurehead plaintiff, Dr.
Steven Cooperman, presented
himself as an injured party in so
many Milberg cases that in
1993, dismissing a lawsuit
against a chain of used-car dealers, a federal judge caustically
described the doctor as “one of
the unluckiest and most victimized investors in the history of
the securities business.”
While Mr. Weiss often fulminated against corporate greed
— “Greed is a growth industry
and it always will be,” he said —
he candidly acknowledged his
NEW YORK TIMES
Mr. Weiss’s suits sometimes
led to more transparent
corporate bookkeeping and
greater accountability
own motivation.
“Am I in it for the money?”
he said in a 2004 interview with
The New York Times. “Yes.”
The federal charges against
Mr. Weiss and his partners did
not question the substance of
the lawsuits they had filed, but
only how the firm had contrived to increase its fees.
In 2008, facing 40 years in
prison if convicted on all
counts, Mr. Weiss pleaded
guilty to racketeering.
After an outpouring of more
than 250 letters to the court
from supporters and a 125page sentencing memorandum
from his lawyer, Benjamin Brafman, Mr. Weiss was sentenced
by US District Judge John F.
Walter to 30 months in prison
and ordered to forfeit $9.75
million and pay a $250,000
fine.
He served half his sentence
in a federal correctional institution and the remainder confined at home.
“Mel Weiss did not invent securities class actions, but he
brought them to a prominence
and impact unmatched by any
other lawyer of his time,” US
District Judge Jed S. Rakoff of
Manhattan said in an e-mail on
Monday.
Melvyn Irwin Weiss was
born on Aug. 1, 1935, in the
Bronx, a grandson of Jewish
immigrants from Russia and
the son of Joseph Weiss, an accountant, and the former Jean
Bystock.
He was raised in the Hollis
Hills section of Queens and
graduated from Jamaica High
School. He helped his father
keep the books for small businesses while earning a bachelor’s degree from City College of
New York in 1956. He graduated from New York University
Law School in 1959 and served
in the Army.
In addition to his son Stephen, he is survived by his wife;
another son, Gary; a daughter,
Leslie Weiss; a sister, Rita Fox;
and seven grandchildren.
After working in two other
law firms, Mr. Weiss joined
Lawrence Milberg, a veteran litigator, in a new partnership in
1965. A year later, the partners
gambled on a new federal court
rule that facilitated class-action
suits by one plaintiff on behalf
of many.
The goal of the regulation
was to empower private lawyers to help the government enforce laws against civil rights violations and consumer fraud.
Milberg exploited the new rule
to pioneer an aggressive legal
strategy: On behalf of groups of
investors, the firm sued corporations whose stock had
plunged on the ground that the
company had committed stock
market fraud by overstating its
revenue forecasts.
After 13 lean years of betting
on future contingency fees, Milberg collected a $4.5 million bonanza in 1978 for settling a
fraud case involving housing
funding by the bankrupt US Financial Corp.
But in 1995, Congress targeted Milberg and similar firms
with legislation to discourage
frivolous suits. The new law required plaintiffs’ lawyers to
demonstrate evidence of fraud
before a case could proceed.
And the lead plaintiff would be
whoever suffered the greatest
financial loss — not the party
who got to the courthouse first.
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
Boston schools will accommodate for sickle cell disease
uSICKLE CELL
Continued from Page B1
in school policy after the complaint was filed three years ago,
including updating its protocols for school nurses on how to
care for students with sickle cell
disease. The district said it is
pleased to see such work “coming to fruition.”
The Center for Law and Education and the Massachusetts
Law Reform Institute, a poverty
law and policy group, filed their
complaint in 2015, alleging
that because school officials did
not previously recognize sickle
cell disease as a disability, they
denied an alleged 250 affected
students “free and appropriate
education as required by law.”
Instead, the lawyers contended, students with the disease were penalized because
their illness interfered with
their ability to fully participate
in class.
“There is research out there
that said that sickle cell as a disease is often misunderstood,’’
said Rajan Sonik, a volunteer
lawyer with the law reform institute. He said teachers don’t usually understand the disease, or
they assume students are skipping class because of their illness.
The Centers for Disease Control estimates that sickle cell
disease affects approximately
100,000 Americans. About 1 in
13 black or African-American
babies is born with the sickle
cell trait, the CDC said.
Su ffere rs s trug gle with
chronic physical pain, infections, anemia, and fatigue. The
side effects from medication
used to treat the disease also
cause concentration difficulties.
The law center argued that
the district policies and practices have resulted in “the discriminatory expulsion of eligible
students with sickle cell disease
who are ‘African-American and
Hispanic.’ ”
Those students were denied
“access to instructional programs, supportive and related
services, and the range of accommodations that they need
to enjoy the same opportunities
to success as students without
disabilities,’’ according to the
Office of Civil Right’s findings
reviewed by the Globe.
The district did not notify
parents or students with sickle
cell disease of their rights under
a law that prohibits discrimination in federally funded pro-
grams on the basis of a disability, the complainants said.
After the complaint was
filed, the district expressed a
willingness to address the matter, the document said. The civil rights office said it will monitor the district’s implementation of the agreement until it
has determined that school officials have are in full compliance. “Failure to implement the
agreement could result in [the
Office of Civil Rights] reopening the complaint,’’ the document said.
The district agreed to establish a Sickle Cell Disease Advisory Group, comprised of parents, administrators, advocates, and school staff who will
determine ways to better serve
students in the district, develop
and review policies, and pro-
vide input to district leadership.
Officials also agreed to identify and serve students with the
disease and ensure they get a
comprehensive evaluation to
determine their educational
needs.
The district, the agreement
said, will make accommodations for the students, such as
modified gym requirements,
exemptions for certain activities, and door-to-door transportation.
Officials also promised to
develop an outreach and public
awareness campaign and staff
for the sickle cell disease policy.
‘We see this as a
really great step
[forward] . . .
Boston has been
willing to work to
resolve these
issues.’
JENNY CHOU
Senior attorney at the Center for
Law and Education
Meghan E. Irons can be reached
at meghan.irons@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@meghanirons.
Gaming commission continuing probe into Wynn Resorts
uWYNN
Continued from Page A1
founded in 2002.
Asked about Wynn’s share of
the business, a Wynn Resorts
official referenced the statem e n t f r o m t h e c o m p a n y ’s
board of directors announcing
Wynn’s departure, which said
that “details of Mr. Wynn’s separation will be disclosed when
they are finalized.”
Without its founder, Wynn
Resorts says it is moving ahead
with construction of Wynn Boston Harbor, a $2.4 billion casino on the Mystic River in Everett, which is well into construction. It is scheduled to open in
June 2019.
To replace Wynn as CEO, the
Wynn Resorts board promoted
company president Matt Maddox to chief executive.
Maddox, 42, a longtime,
trusted Steve Wynn lieutenant,
was a logical in-house choice
for the top job. He has been
with Wynn Resorts since 2002,
after previously working in corporate finances for the Caesars
Entertainment casino chain,
according to his company biography. From 2008 to 2014,
Maddox was Wynn Resorts’
chief financial officer. He took
on the title of president in
2013.
Wall Street investors liked
the move: Wynn Resorts stock
rose about 8.6 percent Wednesday.
Maddox is not well-known
outside of the casino industry,
unlike Wynn, who was the face
of the company and a recognized public figure who enjoyed media attention and
jousting with the press.
“ The fact that [Maddox]
doesn’t have visibility does concern me,” said Roger Gros, a
gambling industry specialist
and the publisher of Global
Gaming Business. “There was
no one with more visibility
than Steve Wynn. If he’s bringing in someone without visibility, what does that portend for
the company?”
Maddox is credited with
discovering the Everett property where Wynn Resorts is
now building its casino, and
proposing bringing the location to Steve Wynn. Wynn told
the Globe several years ago
that he was skeptical when he
first visited what was a polluted wasteland, the site of a former chemical plant. He remarked to Maddox at the time:
Do you know how much money it would cost to make this
pretty?
The company ultimately optioned the land, feeling good
about the view over the Mystic
River to the Boston skyline, the
political support from Everett
City Hall, and the prospects of
winning a citywide referendum.
Wy n n R e s o r t s w o n t h e
Greater Boston resort casino license in 2014, beating out a bid
from Suffolk Downs and its casino partner, Mohegan Sun.
The company has already
n a m e d t h e Ev e r e tt c a s i n o
Wynn Boston Harbor. Wynn
Resorts has no plans to rebrand
the project without the Wynn
name, a spokesman said. The
statement the company issued
Tuesday night announcing
Wynn’s resignation touted the
“high standards of excellence”
that “the Wynn brand has come
to represent.”
Whether the Wynn brand
can retain its commercial appeal may depend on whether —
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
The executive director of
the Massachusetts Gaming
Commission, Ed Bedrosian
(above), listened to
questions during a
commission meeting
Wednesday. The state is
reviewing sexual
misconduct allegations
against former Wynn
Resorts CEO and founder
Steve Wynn in light of the
construction of the Wynn
Boston Harbor casino in
Everett. The casino, a $2.4
billion project, is slated to
open in June 2019.
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
and how soon — the company
puts the scandal behind it, Gros
said.
“I do think the brand is
damaged now,” he said, noting
that Wynn’s alma mater, the
University of Pennsylvania, recently said it would remove the
mogul’s name from a campus
plaza named for him, while revoking an honorary degree
awarded to Wynn.
If the scandal were to end
with Wynn’s resignation, “I
think they would be able to rebuild the brand,” Gros said. But
other twists or turns that prolong the story would continue
to erode the Wynn name, potentially hurting business at
the high-end hotels that bear
his name, he said.
Meanwh ile , Wy nn’s old
competitors for the Boston-area casino license are making a
public case against Wynn Resorts.
Chip Tuttle, chief operating
officer of Suffolk Downs, said in
a commentary posted Wednesday by CommonWealth Magazine that Wynn’s resignation
“while clearly a step in the right
direction, does not make Wynn
Resorts suitable to hold a casino license in Massachusetts.”
A public relations firm that
represented Mohegan Sun during the licensing competition
has been quietly contacting reporters around town in recent
days, with an argument that
Wynn Resorts should be disqualified from holding a casino
license.
Work has continued uninterrupted on the Everett project. More than 1,000 people
now work at the site; that number will rise to about 1,500 in
the spring. The company expects to employ about 4,000
people when it opens.
T h e Ja n . 2 6 Wa l l S t r ee t
Journal story that ignited the
scandal reported that dozens of
people interviewed “told of behavior that cumulatively would
amount to a decade’s long pattern of sexual misconduct by
Mr. Wynn,” including acts of exposing himself and pressuring
employees for sex.
The story said that in 2005,
Wynn forced a manicurist at
his Las Vegas casino property
into sex, and later paid her a
$7.5 million settlement. The
existence of that settlement
was not disclosed to Massachusetts investigators who performed a background check on
the company in 2013.
The Wall Street Journal has
reported that a Wynn Resorts
spokesman said the private settlement was outside the scope
of the documents required by
the Massachusetts license application.
Steve Wynn has sharply denied the accusations, calling
the notion that he assaulted
any woman “preposterous.”
The $7.5 million settlement
appears to be a focus of the
Massachusetts Gaming Commission. Its chairman, Steve
Crosby, asked at Wednesday’s
meeting if the commission’s
staff knew whether Maddox or
Boone Wayson, the company’s
new non-executive chairman,
“had any knowledge of the
events of the $7.5 million settlement.”
Ed Bedrosian, the commission’s executive director, responded that he could not give
an answer.
Mark Arsenault can be reached
at mark.arsenault@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@bostonglobemark
T h e
B10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Business
At the heart of the matter
In honor of Valentine’s Day, Somerville startup Formlabs built a 10­by­12­foot
lens that reflects the neon lights of Times Square to a heart­shaped cutout
Former
GE CEO
takes on
new role
Immelt now chairman
of local athenahealth
By Jon Chesto
GLOBE STAFF
FORMLABS
I
By Andy Rosen
GLOBE STAFF
t might be one of the most photographed
places in the world, but New York’s Times
Square has never seen a lens like this before.
As part of an art display for Valentine’s
Day, the Somerville 3-D printing startup
Formlabs created a giant lens by manufacturing 1,000 clear plastic tiles that was assembled into a 10-by-12-foot circular installation with a
heart-shaped cutout in the middle.
Titled Window to the Heart, the installation has
become a magnet for selfie seekers at the tourist
hub. The tiles are assembled to create a Fresnel lens,
which are flatter than traditional glass lenses and
were originally used in lighthouses. The
ring-like arrangement captures and exaggerates the light of the famous neon
signs of Times Square, bending it toNumber of
ward the heart at its center and illumidesktop-size 3-D
nating the installation in the process.
printers Formlabs
“The final product is quite beautiful,
ran day-andand
it looks like a sculpture, so at a cernight for more
tain
point you don’t know whether this
than two weeks
was
someone
carving with their hands,”
to get the display
said Debra Simon, director of public art
ready for
for the Times Square Alliance civic
Valentine’s Day
group, which paid for the project. “I
think the technology is magnificent.”
Formlabs makes 3-D printers, which create objects from photopolymer resins under the guidance
of sophisticated design software. Given the scale of
the job, Formlabs had to run 50 of its compact, desktop-size devices day-and-night in Somerville for
more than two weeks, using about 300 liters of resin
to create the tiles, which range in size from a few
inches, to 5 by 6 inches.
The components were shipped to Brooklyn, and
it took another two weeks to assemble them on an
acrylic core and metal base. The assembled installation was trucked to Manhattan and unveiled Feb. 1.
50
Marcelo Coelho
(top) affixed
tiles to the
project, which
is called
Window to the
Heart. (Above)
people in Times
Square took
pictures with
the lens.
Formlabs
printers (left)
created the
tiles for the
lens.
VALENTINE, Page B12
Approvals near for Suffolk Downs redevelopment, part I
By Tim Logan
GLOBE STAFF
The start of development at Suffolk Downs — perhaps including an
Amazon headquarters campus at the
East Boston site — is set to easily win
city and state approvals this week.
The Boston Planning & Development Agency is scheduled to vote
Thursday on two proposed office
buildings, totaling 520,000 square
feet, near Suffolk Downs Station on
the MBTA’s Blue Line. In addition, the
project is expected to win city zoning
approval next week, and it has received a green light for accelerated
environmental permitting from the
state’s environmental secretary, Matthew A. Beaton.
A yes vote by the board of the BPDA — which nearly always approves
projects it votes on — would clear the
way for construction to begin this
spring.
“We just need a tenant,” said Tom
O’Brien, managing partner of HYM
Investment Group, the developer.
One potential tenant — and the
reason for the quick pace of permitting — is Seattle-based Amazon,
which is scouting the nation for a
place to build a massive second headquarters. Last month, the company
named Boston as one of 20 places it
might choose.
In their pitch to the retail giant,
city officials circled Suffolk Downs as
an ideal site, saying the former
horseracing track is the one place in
Boston where Amazon could build 8
million square feet of office space over
the next two decades. That’s Amazon’s long-term plan, but it also has
short-term needs: The company
wants 500,000 square feet of office
space it can move into by the end of
2019.
SUFFOLK DOWNS, Page B14
Jeff Immelt is filling out his postGeneral Electric life with another
high-profile company in the Boston area.
The former chief executive who relocated GE to Boston is now chairman
of athenahealth Inc., the Watertownbased developer of health care records
software.
Immelt arrives in the athenahealth
boardroom as chief executive Jonathan Bush makes several moves to prepare the company for a new stage of
growth and to respond to pressure
from an activist investor. Bush had
pledged to hand off his position as athenahealth chairman, among other
things, and Immelt’s retirement from
GE last year made him available for
the role.
The former GE executive has another experience relevant to athenahealth
right now: tangling with an activist investor. Elliott Management, a feared
Wall Street hedge fund that acquired a
9 percent stake in athenahealth, began
pushing for changes last year, saying
the company’s stock was undervalued.
Athenahealth has since announced
it would trim its
workforce by 9
percent and expand the board of
directors to 11
seats to include
more independent members,
first with the addition of Brian
McKeon in September and again Jeff Immelt is
with Immelt’s ar- also with a
r i v a l . A t h e n a - California firm.
health also hired
a new chief financial officer, Marc
Levine, in December.
Bush downplayed Elliott’s specific
role in these changes and said he expects Immelt’s arrival to be embraced
by athenahealth shareholders: “My
spider-sense is that they’re going to be
thrilled.”
GE, meanwhile, has been under
pressure from another investment
firm, Trian Fund Management, to
make deep cuts in operations and reverse a long-term slide in the stock
price. A Trian partner was appointed
to GE’s board, and the investor is believed to be behind not only Immelt’s
earlier-than-expected exit but the additional measures his successor, John
Flannery, is taking to shake up and
slim down the industrial giant.
Immelt’s new appointment follows
the announcement last week that he
would also join California-based venture capital firm New Enterprise Associates as a partner. Immelt said he expects to devote the majority of his time
to NEA, which also has an office in
Cambridge. He will keep his home in
Boston and work on both coasts. He is
ATHENAHEALTH, Page B14
MORE
ARBOUR HEALTH SYSTEMS
Lowell psychiatric hospital
cited for poor care to close B12
JetBlue contract workers strike
The workers
are being
organized by
32BJ Service
Employees
International
Union District
615.
By Margeaux Sippell
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
and Katie Johnston
GLOBE STAFF
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Undeterred by snowfall that turned
into a cold drizzle, airport workers
picketed outside the JetBlue terminal
at Logan Airport late Wednesday afternoon, vowing to persist in their effort to join a union.
Sonia Ramirez, 46, of Dorchester, a
cabin cleaner for ReadyJet Inc., which
contracts with JetBlue Airways, said
she’s prepared to see the protest
through no matter how long it lasts.
“Yes, it’s affecting me and my family,”
Picket
lines form
at Logan
as baggage
handlers,
others
seek to
unionize
she said, “but it’s for the greater good.
We’re in this fight because we want
better wages and health benefits.”
Contract workers for JetBlue and
other airlines at Logan voted last week
to authorize a strike, which could pull
as many as 500 baggage handlers,
wheelchair attendants, cabin cleaners,
and skycaps off the job as they protest
threats and illegal surveillance by
management during their six-year
quest to form a union.
A handful of workers scheduled to
work didn’t show up for their shift on
Wednesday afternoon, and by evening
STRIKE, Page B14
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
TALKING POINTS
ENERGY
MASSACHUSETTS
LOST MORE THAN 20%
OF ITS SOLAR JOBS
LAST YEAR
Massachusetts remains ranked No. 2 in the country for solar jobs, but its heft is slipping significantly. The state lost 21 percent of its jobs in the solar industry last year, with the number dropping to 11,530 at the end of the year, according to a report from the Solar Foundation. That marked one of the biggest percent declines of any state in the country. (The United States saw a 3.8 percent decline.) Possible factors in Massachusetts include: uncertainty
about changes in solar incentives; caps in some parts of the state on new net metering credits; and concern over a new charge on solar users imposed by Eversource. The report
prompted a coalition of pro-solar groups to send a letter to Governor Charlie Baker, seeking
his assistance in supporting the industry. — JON CHESTO
Agenda
➔ COMPETITION
Smart Fifty
Attend the Inaugural Smart Fifty
Competition hosted by Brandeis
International Business School and local
entrepreneurship non-profit TiE Boston.
ENERGY
BUSINESSES WANT
STATE LEADERS TO
KEEP NATURAL GAS
IN THE FOREFRONT
COFFEE
DUNKIN TO
PHASE OUT
FOAM CUPS
BY 2020
Some of the state’s biggest business associations have signed on to a new group, the Mass
Coalition for Sustainable Energy, to encourage state leaders to keep natural gas on the front
burner as an important energy source. The group sent a letter to House Speaker Robert DeLeo, Senate President Harriette Chandler, and Governor Charlie Baker, urging them to promote policies to expand the state’s natural gas supplies and buttress the electricity grid. The
group pointed to a recent report from grid overseer ISO New England that showed the ISO
could be forced to implement rolling blackouts because of a shortage of gas on cold winter
days. The coalition’s members include Associated Industries of Massachusetts, the Mass.
Business Roundtable, and the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, among others. The
group is getting funding from Eversource, National Grid, and Enbridge — the three companies behind the Access Northeast pipeline expansion project in New England. The three
partners halted the federal permitting process for the controversial project last year but remain hopeful about reviving it, possibly in a different form. — JON CHESTO
Foam cups at Dunkin’ Donuts will soon be history, removing what the company estimates
will be a billion of them each year from the waste stream. Dunkin’ said Wednesday that the
polystyrene foam cups will be completely phased out from its stores globally by 2020. Because foam packaging decomposes slowly, ends up in oceans and can harm marine life and
other animals that ingest it, there has been push to ban its use. Dunkin’ Brands Group, Inc.,
based in Canton, joins other chain restaurants trying to diminish its footprint. McDonald’s
said last month that it would use only recycled or other environmentally friendly materials
for its soda cups, Happy Meal boxes, and other packaging by 2025. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twelve finalists from Boston will present
their solutions to India’s socioeconomic
problems and vie for spot in the finals in
Delhi with a grand prize of $1.5 million in
funding. 2 to 6:30 p.m., Brandeis
International Business School, 415 South
St., Waltham. Free. Register online or go
to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
➔ SUMMIT
Making an impact
Boston-area professionals and MBA
students are invited to attend the sixth
annual impact summit featuring speakers
from the corporate, nonprofit, and
government sectors. Friday, 9:30 a.m. to
5 p.m., Boston University Questrom
School of Business, 1 Silber Way, Boston.
Tickets range from $45 to $60. Register
online or go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
BABY FOOD
GERBER CHOOSES
BOY WITH DOWN
SYNDROME AS ITS
‘SPOKESBABY’
TOYS
HASBRO HAD
LOWER SALES
DURING IMPORTANT
HOLIDAY SEASON
One-year-old Lucas Warren’s contagious smile won over executives at Gerber baby food
who have made him their ‘‘spokesbaby’’ this year. Lucas is Gerber’s first spokesbaby with
Down syndrome in the company’s 91-year history. His photo was chosen out of more than
140,000 submissions. He will receive $50,000, and the Dalton, Ga., boy’s image will be featured in the company’s social media posts. Lucas’ mom, Cortney Warren, says she hopes
this will bring help increase the acceptance of special needs kids. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Toymaker Hasbro Inc. delivered a surprise sales
drop for the critical fourth quarter as it struggled with lagging sales of ‘‘Star Wars’’ toys and
the woes of Toys R Us. The results, announced
Wednesday, underscore the challenges toymakers face as they wrestle with a shift in buying
habits. Parents are increasingly spending more
of their money for toys online at sites like Amazon. And kids are more interested in mobile devices than traditional toys. The bankruptcy last
fall of Toys R Us is also putting pressure on toymakers. Toys R Us announced that it was closing
182 locations after struggling through the holiday season. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ WORKSHOP
Do your own PR
Attend the third workshop of the Skillset
Series on public relations and media kits
HEALTH CARE
ENROLLMENT IN
OBAMACARE DROPS
SLIGHTLY, DESPITE
TRUMP’S BEST
EFFORTS TO KILL IT
WEIGHT LOSS
WEIGHT WATCHERS
PLANS ANNUAL
REVENUE OF MORE
THAN $2B BY 2020
SAFETY
HARLEY­DAVIDSON
RECALLS MORE THAN
250,000
MOTORCYCLES
President Trump has frequently been accused of trying to undermine Obamacare, his predecessor’s signature health law. New data show that by at least one measure he didn’t do a
particularly good job of it. Enrollment in individual health-insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act fell 3.7 percent in 2018 to 11.8 million, from 12.2 million a year earlier,
according to data compiled by the National Academy for State Health Policy, which calls itself a nonprofit, nonpartisan association of state health-policy makers. That’s a far smaller
drop than some health policy watchers had foreseen, after the Trump administration
halved the enrollment season and cut marketing and enrollment-assistance efforts. Trump
himself declared the law “dead.” The decline was concentrated in states where the federal
government runs the Obamacare markets. In those 34 states, enrollment dropped 5.3 percent. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
with Alessandra Pollina, founder of Pollina
PR & Communications. Participants will
create a PR plan for their business, learn
the basics of branding and messaging,
how to make a media kit, and how to
pitch yourself. Friday noon to 2 p.m., The
Studio at 550, 500 Mass. Ave.,
Cambridge. $25. Register online or go to
the or go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
Weight Watchers International Inc. is aiming to keep its Oprah Winfreyfueled momentum going into the next decade. The company announced
plans to top $2 billion in annual revenue by 2020, up more than 50 percent from its estimated sales last year. Weight Watchers also is working to
remove artificial ingredients from its products and will offer free memberships to teens this summer, part of a bid capitalize on growing demand for weight-loss services. Winfrey, who joined Weight Watchers’
board in 2015 and became the face of the weight-loss program, has
helped lead a dramatic recovery in the company’s membership and share
price. But the 54-year-old business still faces heavy competition from fitness apps and other emerging technology. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
Under pressure from US safety regulators, HarleyDavidson is recalling more than 250,000
motorcycles worldwide because the brakes might
fail. Documents posted Wednesday by the US
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
say the recall covers more than 30 models from the
2008 through 2011 model years. Harley says
deposits can form on brake parts if the fluid isn’t
changed every two years as specified in the owner’s
manual. That can cause a valve in the antilock
brake control unit to stick. The agency began
investigating problems in July of 2016 after getting
43 complaints including three reports of crashes
and two injuries. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ WEBINAR
Learn strategies for a
high­performing team
Join transformational leadership coach Dr.
Heather Williamson for a 60-minute
webinar to learn communication, task
management, and how to build a highperforming team for your organization.
Friday, 7 to 8 p.m., online. $10. Register
FAST FOOD
CHIPOTLE HOPES
NEW MENU ITEMS
WILL BOOST
SALES
Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. says adding new items to a
menu that’s barely changed in 25 years will help turn
around struggling sales. The problem is finding the right
one. Founder and chief executive Steve Ells said that the
burrito chain may try salads and grains, as well as more
traditional Mexican fare like nachos and adult-size
quesadillas. Ells spoke on a conference call after Chipotle
reported that customer traffic fell in the fourth quarter and
has remained down this year. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
online or or go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
B12
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Lowell psychiatric hospital will close
Facility has history
of citations for
poor patient care
By Liz Kowalczyk
GLOBE STAFF
Arbour Health System, the
state’s largest psychiatric hospital
company, plans to permanently
close Lowell Treatment Center, a
hospital with a history of citations for providing poor care.
This is the second Arbour hospital that has been shut down in
six months. The state Department of Mental Health closed the
troubled Westwood Lodge psychiatric facility in August, citing
“critical safety issues’’ and following years of quality lapses and inadequate staffing.
This time, the state said it did
not order the closure. Instead,
Arbour’s decision to shutter Lowell “was made after a comprehensive review of multiple factors,’’
including the availability of inpatient beds and outpatient pro-
grams in the state and the
amount of money required to
modernize the hospital, executive director Shawn Daugherty
said in a written statement.
But employees said there was
another factor: Massachusetts
Behavioral Health Partnership, a
company that oversees mental
health benefits for state Medicaid
enrollees, ended its contract with
Lowell. The state confirmed in a
statement that it had severed the
relationship “due to quality concerns.’’
The hospital will close Friday,
and the patients — who numbered 11 as of Monday — are being transferred to other hospitals. Patients who attend outpatient therapy programs at the
hospital also must find other
treatment facilities.
A G l o b e r e v i e w l a s t Ju n e
found that the seven psychiatric
hospitals then owned by Arbour
had repeatedly and sometimes
egregiously shortchanged patient
care while reaping robust profits.
Over the past several years, state
In the
past year,
state and
federal
inspectors
found
serious
problems
at Lowell.
and federal officials have found
safety lapses time and time again
and issued warnings or suspended admissions, only to have the
hospitals reopen and repeat the
pattern.
Arbour has long defended its
record, saying it cares for some of
the state’s most challenging patients, many of whom are turned
away by other hospitals. It is
owned by Universal Health Services, the biggest psychiatric hospital company in the country.
Universal is facing fraud investigations in numerous states.
In the past year, state and federal inspectors found serious
problems at Lowell, which has 41
beds.
In August, the federal government said it planned to fine Lowell $207,000 for failing to follow
through on promises to correct
workplace safety violations — an
accusation the hospital disputed.
Between December 2016 and
April 2017, at least three employees were seriously injured by patients, including a nursing super-
visor who suffered a concussion
and a case manager who was repeatedly punched and scratched,
requiring treatment for a
scratched cornea and a head injury, the federal government
said.
Federal Medicare inspectors
also criticized the hospital and
threatened to cut off funding
from the insurance program for
the elderly. In documents obtained by the Globe, inspectors
described an incident in which
patients grabbed ceiling tiles and
hit one another, staff, and police
officers with them. Two patients
said staff were aware that patients had removed the tiles in
the past.
In September, the state mental health department suspended
admission to Lowell for a month
because of “serious issues involving patient safety.’’ The state also
found that the facility was not
clean or well organized.
Liz Kowalczyk can be reached at
kowalczyk@globe.com.
Startup at
heart of
New York
attraction
Continued from Page B10
FORMLABS
public art that celebrates affairs
of the heart in Times Square.
Formlabs and the alliance said
the lens has caught the eye of
countless visitors who have used
it to frame pictures of their time
in New York.
The project will remain in
place through February.
Coelho said he is enjoying a
rare public reception of his work
by following the many social
media posts coming out of Times
Square that feature the lens.
“Those are really special,” he
said. “It’s great when you create
something and it resonates with
people like that.”
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — A biotech
billionaire struck a $500 million deal Wednesday to buy the
Los Angeles Times, ending the
paper’s quarrelsome relationship with its Chicago-based corporate overseers and bringing it
under local ownership for the
first time in 18 years.
The agreement between Los
Angeles medical entrepreneur
Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong and
Tronc Inc. represents the latest
instance of a rich, civic-minded
individual purchasing a newspaper from a big corporation.
Soon-Shiong, 65, amassed
his fortune in part by developing a cancer drug in 1991. He
was already a major shareholder in Tronc, one of the richest
men in Los Angeles, and the nation’s wealthiest doctor by
Forbes’ estimate, with a net
worth put at $7.8 billion.
The deal includes the purchase of The San Diego UnionTribune, other publications,
and the assumption of $90 million in pension liabilities.
Soon-Shiong takes over at a
time of turmoil at the paper.
The Times just replaced its top
editor, the third such switch in
six months, and publisher Ross
Levinsohn had been on unpaid
leave after it was learned he
was a defendant in two sexual
harassment lawsuits elsewhere.
Tronc said Wednesday he was
cleared of any wrongdoing.
Also, journalists voted last
month to unionize for the first
time in the paper’s 136-year
history.
Tronc, formerly known as
the Tribune Co., owns the Chicago Tribune and several other
US newspapers.
Clashes between the Times
and its Chicago-based owner
erupted not long after it acquired the West Coast paper in
2000. Staff at the Times bristled
over what it considered a string
of bad decisions made from
hundreds of miles away in Chicago, and the paper went
through a succession of top editors and publishers.
Among them was editor
John Carroll, who led the paper
to 13 Pulitzer Prizes but resigned under heavy pressure to
cut staff. His successor, Dean
Baquet, left after 15 months
and is now executive editor at
The New York Times.
Reporters at the Times were
also alarmed by the recent hiring of several news executives
who reported to business executives, and not to news editors.
Traditionally, the editorial and
business sides of a paper are
kept separate to maintain journalistic credibility.
As news spread of a potential sale Tuesday, cheering
erupted in the Times newsroom. After the deal was announced, the union representing the paper’s journalists said
it ‘‘looks forward to working
with a local owner who can
help us preserve The Times as a
guardian of our community
and as the voice of the American West.’’
With the newspaper industry thrown into deep turmoil by
the internet, Amazon founder
Jeff Bezos bought The Washington Post in 2013 for $250 million. The same year, Boston Red
Sox owner John Henry purchased The Boston Globe for
$70 million.
‘‘We find ourselves returning
to where we were a century ago
when a handful of wealthy
owners controlled big, influential newspapers,’’ said Al Tompkins of the Poynter Institute, a
There are about
1,000 tiles on
Window to the
Heart.
Andy Rosen can be reached at
andrew.rosen@globe.com.
GLOBE STAFF
Sanofi Genzyme’s manufacturing facility at Allston Landing in
Boston is laying off 130 employees
this week to reduce costs and “simplify our operations,” the company
said Wednesday.
“We must be flexible in our operations to remain competitive in a
dynamic and challenging healthcare environment,” Ashleigh Koss,
spokeswoman for the French parent company, Sanofi SA, said in a
statement.
‘We must be flexible
in our operations to
remain competitive
in a dynamic and
challenging . . .
environment.’
Koss would not say how many
workers remain at the facility but
said Sanofi has about 5,000 employees in Massachusetts — in Allston, Cambridge, Framingham,
Northborough, Waltham, and
Westborough. They work in research and development, biomanufacturing, and commercial operations.
The Allston Landing plant will
remain a biomanufacturing site,
she said.
In 2011, Sanofi bought Cambridge-based Genzyme Corp.,
which specialized in developing
medicines for rare diseases, for
more than $20 billion. Genzyme,
which was renamed Sanofi Genzyme, essentially became the raredisease unit of Sanofi, which employs about 100,000 people worldwide.
Last month, Sanofi made a major acquisition, paying $11.6 billion
to buy the hemophilia drug maker
Bioverativ Inc., of Waltham. Biogen
Inc., the largest Massachusettsbased drug maker, spun off Bioverativ as a separate company in 2017.
Jonathan Saltzman can be reached
at jsaltzman@globe.com
For Tesla, the Model 3
remains a costly pursuit
Medical entrepreneur
buys Los Angeles Times
By Brian Melley
By Jonathan Saltzman
ASHLEIGH KOSS, spokeswoman
uVALENTINE
Formlabs head of design Marcelo Coelho, who designed and
built the project with the studio
Aranda\Lasch, said he got his
first inkling the lens would work
during the ride from Brooklyn,
when it captured light from other cars and trucks on the road.
“It was like, all right, this
works,” he said in an interview.
“We’re not wrong. Our math is
correct.”
Window to the Heart was chosen in an annual competition for
public art that celebrates affairs
of the heart in Times Square.
When the installation arrived
at Times Square, he said he was
pleased to see it begin to draw in
the many colors of the brilliant
displays lining the area.
Window to the Heart was chosen in an annual competition for
Sanofi
Genzyme
cuts 130
in Allston
By Neal E. Boudette
NEW YORK TIMES
REED SAXON/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
journalism think tank in St. Petersburg, Fla.
Soon-Shiong, who also holds
a minority interest in the Los
Angeles Lakers, said in an interview with the Times last year
that as a major stockholder in
the paper, he was unhappy with
the way it was being run.
‘‘I am concerned there are
other agendas, independent of
the newspaper’s needs or the fiduciary obligations to the viability of the organization,’’ he
said. ‘‘My goal is to try and preserve the integrity and the viability of the newspaper.’’
Soon-Shiong has been the
subject of several investigative
pieces in STAT, the medical and
health news website. SoonShiong was a sought-after adviser by Vice President Joe Biden
for his expertise and influence in
cancer research. But soon after
Biden announced an ambitious
“moonshot” effort to cure cancer, Soon-Shiong announced his
own separate effort.
STAT investigated SoonShiong’s cancer project and reported that it found “several instances of inflated claims, with
the moonshot team taking
credit for progress that doesn’t
appear to be real.”
STAT also reported on a $12
million donation that SoonShiong gave to the University of
Utah. A state audit found that
the deal violated state procurement laws because it was tailored to benefit his company.
The agreement
between Los
Angeles biotech
billionaire Dr.
Patrick SoonShiong and
Tronc Inc.
represents the
latest instance
of a rich
individual
purchasing a
newspaper
from a big
corporation.
On Tuesday, Elon Musk had a Tesla Roadster launched toward an orbit
around the sun. A day later, he and
his car company came back to Earth.
T h e e l e c t r i c - ca r m a ke r s a i d
Wednesday that it lost nearly threequarters of a billion dollars in the
fourth quarter as it scrambled to root
out glitches from its manufacturing
operations and ramp up production
of its highly anticipated Model 3
compact car.
The company reported a net loss
of $771 million, more than tripling
the loss it reported for the same period a year ago. Revenue increased 44
percent to $3.3 billion, on rising sales
of its Model S luxury sedan and Model X, a sport utility vehicle.
On a positive note, Tesla reported
it used up only $277 million in cash
in the fourth quarter. That was down
from $1.4 billion in the third quarter.
On a full-year basis, however, the
company used nearly $3.5 billion in
cash, more than twice the amount it
used in 2016.
The company’s loss in the quarter
amounted to $3.04 per share on an
adjusted basis, slightly less than analysts had forecast, and $4.01 unadjusted.
Its shares were up modestly in extended trading after the earnings report. They had risen 3.3 percent during the regular session.
Analysts fret about the hiccups
Tesla has encountered and how
much money it must spend while trying to move into high-volume production.
“Cash burn does matter, as it is a
finite resource, and ramp delays on
the Model 3 only exacerbate the cash
burn,” Brian Johnson, a financial analyst at Barclays, wrote in a note to
investors.
Putting the Model 3 into mass
production is a critical task for Tesla
and Musk, its chief executive. The
company has taken $1,000 deposits
CHRISTOPHE ENA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Electric car-maker Tesla has now
lost money in eight of the last
nine quarters.
from about 400,000 customers interested in buying the car. If it can begin
producing the car rapidly, it will see
its sales and revenue soar — and
could vault into profitability.
The quarterly loss and new details
about Model 3 production and the
amount of cash the company is
spending come at a sensitive time.
Tesla has now lost money in eight of
the last nine quarters, and the company has consistently overestimated
how quickly it would be able to ramp
up production of the Model 3.
Just two years ago, Musk hoped to
produce 500,000 by 2018. The ambitious forecast helped drive Tesla
stock, pushing its market value
above that of General Motors and
Ford Motor for a period of time in
2017.
Last July, as Model 3 production
was about to begin, Musk ratcheted
back expectations, resetting his target to 20,000 vehicles a month by December. But difficulties producing
battery packs at its Nevada plant and
other glitches in the car’s assembly
process combined to slow output to a
crawl.
Tesla built just 260 by the end of
September. In January, it said it had
made only 2,425 in the final quarter
of 2017 and set a goal of increasing
output to 5,000 a month by the end
of the first quarter.
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
EVERY
WOMAN’S
VOICE
SHOULD
BE HEARD.
{Especially Niia’s voice cause it’s smokin’ hot.}
Niia “I” On Atlantic
Join Niia, recording Artist with Atlantic Records, and The Ad Club as we raise our
voices and awareness at The 10th Anniversary of The Women’s Leadership Forum.
MONDAY, MARCH 26, 2018
SEAPORT WORLD TRADE CENTER
CELEBRATING 10 YEARS OF THE WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP FORUM
For the full speaker lineup and tickets, visit adclub.org/womens.
Thank you to our sponsors
Thank you to our Sponsors
Presenting
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B13
B14
Business
T h e
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
Markets
Another shaky day for stocks
It was another shaky day on Wall Street: Indexes rallied
early, bobbed up and down for much of the day, then sank
in the last few minutes. Energy companies dropped along
with oil prices; technology companies also declined. About
20 minutes before the close, the Dow was up more than
260, but it finished with a small loss. After two steep plunges, including its worst loss in 6½ years on Monday, the S&P
500 is down 6.7 percent from its most recent record high,
set Jan. 26. The VIX, Wall Street’s ‘‘fear gauge’’ — it measures how much volatility investors expect — was at 27,
more than doubled from two weeks ago. It spiked above 50
early Tuesday. Global markets mostly rose and appeared
calmer Wednesday. Germany’s DAX was up 1.6 percent; the
British FTSE 100 rose 1.9 percent while the CAC 40 in
France picked up 1.8 percent. Big tech companies fared the
worst: Apple fell 2.1 percent, Facebook 2.8 percent, Alphabet 2.7 percent. Wynn Resorts jumped 8.6 percent as CEO
Steve Wynn, accused of sexual harassment, quit. Tronc
soared 19.1 percent after it agreed to sell the Los Angeles
Times and other newspapers for $500 million.
DOW JONES industrial average
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Pension deficit clouds GE’s recovery
By Katherine Chiglinsky,
Brandon Kochkodin,
and Richard Clough
BLOOMBERG NEWS
John Flannery hardly needs
any more headaches.
But at a time when General
Electric is facing what amounts
to an existential crisis, a $31 billion deficit in its pension plan
m ay c o m p l i c at e a ny t u r n around that involves a breakup
of the 126-year-old icon of
American capitalism.
Divvying up the obligations
won’t be easy. After all, GE owes
benefits to at least 619,000 people. And retirees aren’t the only
ones at risk. Ideally, breaking
up a conglomerate as sprawling
as GE would unlock value for
shareholders, who have seen
their stock fall 40 percent since
the CEO took the reins from Jeffrey Immelt in August. Stronger
divisions wouldn’t be dragged
down by weaker ones, and each
business would stand on its
own financially.
Yet GE’s pension deficit has
gotten so big, a misstep could
risk leaving the separate units
with commitments they ultimately can’t afford to pay.
‘ ‘ I t c a n b e d i ff i c u l t a n d
tricky, especially when you’re
substantially underfunded like
GE,’’ said Georgeann Peters, a
partner at BakerHostetler. ‘‘If it
were a well-funded plan, no one
would have too many qualms
about it. Being materially underfunded and being such a
material potential liability, I
think it will be a major factor in
any restructuring.’’
In an -emailed statement to
Bloomberg, GE said that ‘‘in the
evaluation of any alternative,
we always consider the synergies and dis-synergies, and we
Athenahealth hires former GE CEO
also teaching a course at the
Stanford Graduate School of
Business with venture capitalist Robert Siegel.
Bush said he lobbied the
search committee of athenahealth to consider Immelt
soon after GE announced in
June that Immelt would be replaced by Flannery.
“I heard Jeff was retiring,
and I’m thinking ‘Holy Moses,
this is a sign,’ ” said Bush, who
is also cofounder of the 21year-old company.
“If you’re me and you have
a chance to have Jeff Immelt
as your personal coach, I consider this to be a pretty significant perk to be added to my
job.”
The former GE boss brings
a big name to athenahealth, a
deep Rolodex of connections,
and considerable health care
and management expertise.
He ran GE’s health care business, which makes an array of
machines and software used in
hospitals, before becoming
CEO of the overall company in
2001.
Immelt said he has long
been intrigued with athenahealth’s approach — the company offers cloud-based services for health care providers
such as patient records and
scheduling — and sees its potential to become a dominant
platform within the health
care industry.
“Particularly in health care,
it’s going to be the small- and
medium-sized companies that
are going to be disrupters,” Immelt said.
Immelt said he would be an
adviser to Bush as athenahealth tries to grow from its
current size of $1.2 billion in
annual revenue to five to 10
times that size.
The company currently
employs nearly 5,200 people,
including 2,120 in Watertown.
Immelt plans to invest $1 million in the company’s stock to
show his commitment.
“I want to help Jon think
through strategy,” Immelt said.
“I want to help athena achieve
its dreams.”
only pursue things that generate meaningful value for our
shareholders.’’
Flannery, who has cut costs
and pledged to sell assets, renewed talk of a breakup among
analysts after GE disclosed a
$6.2 billion charge tied to an
old portfolio of long-term-care
insurance. The setback, which
has drawn scrutiny from regulators, was the latest for a company that’s struggled with flagging demand and suffered one
of its biggest annual losses in
recent memory.
At the time, the CEO said all
options were on the table and
emphasized an earlier plan to
focus GE on jet engines, powergeneration equipment, and
health care machines. Flannery
said he would update investors
in the spring.
Although Flannery made
scant mention of the underfunded plan during last
month’s conference call, GE
said in November it planned to
borrow $6 billion to help plug
its pension hole, the biggest
among major US companies.
Like many others across corporate America, GE’s pension returns have been pressured by
low interest rates that prevailed
in the aftermath of the financial
crisis.
To make matters worse, the
liabilities swelled under Immelt
as GE spent more than $45 billion in recent years on buybacks to win over Wall Street.
General Motors serves as a
cautionary tale. Back in 1999,
the automaker spun off Delphi
Corp., its auto-parts arm, along
with its pension. When Delphi
went bankrupt in 2005, GM
was forced to take back some liabilities. But it, too, went bust
during the financial crisis, leaving the underfunded plans for
70,000 Delphi workers and retirees in the hands of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp., a
government agency responsible
for backstopping troubled
plans.
Because of the size of Delphi’s pension deficit, which exceeded $6 billion, and a legal
limit on how much the PBGC
could cover, some retirees were
left with less than what they
were promised.
uATHENAHEALTH
Continued from Page B10
Jon Chesto can be reached at
jon.chesto@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @jonchesto.
Approvals
pending to
redevelop
racetrack
uSUFFOLK DOWNS
Continued from Page B10
HYM filed detailed plans for
the project with the BPDA two
month ago and requested a
quick environmental review at
about the same time. If BPDA
approval comes this week, it
would be far faster than for
most other comparably sized
projects, though the broader
161-acre site — with dozens of
buildings planned — probably
faces several more months of
review. city officials note. Likewise, the full site will undergo a
standard environmental review.
“This is about setting down
one single puzzle piece in a very
large puzzle,” said Jonathan
Greeley, the BPDA’s director of
development review. “There’s a
lot more to come.”
Both O’Brien and Greeley
noted that HYM began talking
with neighborhood groups
about plans for Suffolk Downs
HYM INVESTMENT GROUP
An architectural rendering shows the Belle Isle Square portion of Suffolk Downs’
proposed redevelopment by HYM Investment Group.
well before Amazon’s coming to
town became a possibility.
Comment letters filed last
week with the BPDA generally
supported the project, though a
few residents said HYM should
do more to provide affordable
housing for residents at risk of
being priced out of East Boston.
Other critiques focused on the
need to address rising sea levels, as well as transportation.
Three East Boston elected officials asked that the project help
fund a long-planned downtown
connection between Bowdoin
Station on the Blue Line and
Charles/MGH Station on the
Red Line — something that was
included in Boston’s pitch for
Amazon’s so-called HQ2.
If HQ2 goes elsewhere — to
another site in Greater Boston
or to another area — HYM
could still build the two office
buildings for someone else. But
if “the company from Seattle” —
as O’Brien repeatedly called
Amazon at a zoning hearing
Wednesday — wants to make
its second home in Boston,
ground can be broken for the
Suffolk Downs project immediately.
“This thing is designed and
ready to go,” O’Brien said.
“We’ll see what happens.”
Tim Logan can be reached at
tim.logan@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter at
@bytimlogan.
JetBlue contract workers go on strike at Logan
NASDAQ Composite index
uSTRIKE
Continued from Page B10
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
dozens were picketing, according to 32BJ Service Employees
International Union District
615, which is organizing the
workers. The union said it expects more workers to walk out
in coming days.
The workers are employed
by ReadyJet and Flight Services
& Systems and primarily serve
JetBlue.
The airline, the largest at Logan, said the picketing had no
impact on operations. The subcontractors had lined up extra
staff to fill in for striking workers, according to JetBlue.
ReadyJet and FSS did not
responded to repeated requests
for comment.
The two companies’ employees make up the vast majority
of JetBlue’s third-party workforce at Logan.
The Massachusetts Port Authority, which operates Logan,
said there was “zero impact
from people not reporting to
work.”
ReadyJet and FSS have been
fined for numerous wage theft
and safety violations at Logan
over the years, and the National
Labor Relations Board has previously charged the companies
with interfering with workers’
right to organize. The union
filed a new complaint with the
labor board this week stating
that an FSS manager had taken
photos of a worker talking to a
union representative.
The intimidation of workers
ramped up over the weekend,
according to the union, after
they voted Friday to authorize a
strike. FSS and ReadyJet managers, accompanied by Massachusetts State Police officers, approached groups of workers and
told them they weren’t allowed
to congregate on the clock.
Before the strike kicked off
Wednesday afternoon, about
20 airport workers attended a
meeting of the Boston City
Council, which passed a resolution in support of the workers.
“ T h e s e w o r ke r s a r e t h e
backbone of what keeps our
airport moving, yet they are
continually overlooked and undervalued at poverty wages,”
Councilor Lydia Edwards, who
introduced the resolution, said
in a statement. “They deserve
the dignity and respect to exercise their right to organize for
improvements and rights while
on the job, free from surveillance, threats, or acts of intimidation.”
Before the strike, workers
gathered at the Airport MBTA
stop. They marched in circles,
chanting in rhythm, “What do
we want? Justice! When do we
want it? Now!” and “Workers
united, we’ll never be defeated.”
They were supported by several members of 32BJ, in purple
hats and bright yellow ponchos.
Police soon moved the protest outside, across a footbridge
away from the T station and
out of sight of travelers. The
spokesman for 32BJ, Amity
Paye, said workers arriving for
their regular shifts would head
to the picket line instead. Paye
estimated that between 25 and
50 workers would picket from
4 to 11 p.m., resuming at 6 a.m.
Thursday morning.
The SEIU has applied for
permits to protest for the next
two weeks, but the length of the
picketing hinges on the response from ReadyJet and FSS,
the union said.
Juan Martinez, 61, from
Dorchester, and a ReadyJet
cabin cleaner, wore a sign over
his poncho that read “ReadyJet
ON STRIKE. Legal right to organize.”
Like Ramirez, he wore a determined expression. “The employer needs us just as much as
we need our wages,” he said.
“Even if we’re worried about
the risk that we’re taking, it
doesn’t matter. We need them
to respect us.”
Luis Paixao, a Boston resident flying to his home in Portugal, got off the train and onto
the shuttle bus without encountering protesters. “I didn’t
even know about the strike. I
wasn’t affected at all,” he said.
In Terminal C at the JetBlue
check-in desk, Helene Angut of
Boston, on her way to Denver,
was also surprised to hear of a
strike. “Now I’m worried this
might affect my flight,” she
said. “But I fully support them.”
Margeaux Sippell can be
reached at
margeaux.sippell@globe.com.
Katie Johnston can be reached
at katie.johnston@globe.com.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
SATURDAY
6 A.M.
High pressure building
in from the north and
west will bring in some
chilly air despite some
sunshine. Mostly clear and cold
at night.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Still rather cold with
sunshine giving way to
clouds. A little snow or
snow mixed with rain
possible at night; especially
later on.
HIGH
30-35
LOW
16-21
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Considerable cloudiness
and milder to start the
weekend. Some rain is
likely; especially during
the afternoon. Periods of rain
at night.
HIGH
31-36
LOW
28-33
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
1
11
9
6
HIGH
41-46
LOW
26-31
HIGH
42-47
LOW
30-35
5
6 P.M.
High pressure will build
back in to start the
new workweek and
some sun will return.
Temperatures near average for
mid-February. Clear at night.
A storm system moving
through the eastern
United States will bring
more rain to the area,
heaviest to the south of Boston.
Rain will taper at night.
HIGH
47-52
LOW
36-41
11
MONDAY
SUNDAY
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
FRIDAY
TODAY
8
13
10
5
4
3
10
1
2
1
Difficulty Level
2/08
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
TODAY: Brisk and cold with intervals of clouds and sunshine. A few snow showers in the mountains to the north
at night.
TOMORROW: Turning out cloudy with some
snow in the afternoon and at night, the steadiest in
PRESQUE ISLE
central and northern areas.
21/-2
EXTENDED: Mostly cloudy Saturday with
a few snow showers in the north. Rain
MILLINOCKET
Saturday night into Sunday in the south;
23/-1
snow in the mountains.
BURLINGTON
23/10
MONTPELIER
20/5
MT. WASHINGTON
0/-10
LEBANON
26/6
RUTLAND
24/7
Wind
Seas
Temp
 Boston Harbor NW 10-20 kts. 1-2 ft.
32/18
 East Cape
PORTLAND 30/12
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
Seas
Temp
 Martha’s
Vineyard
NW 10-20 kts. 2-4 ft.
33/19
 Nantucket
NW 8-16 kts.
2-4 ft.
33/21
 Provincetown
NW 12-25 kts. 2-4 ft.
31/21
7:05
6:59
6:02
5:55
6:27
5:49
1:57
1:50
7:05
6:09
2:17
2:10
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
Normal Temperatures
Feb. readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
38.1
21.0
28.8
1925
70
Record
high
60
56
Normal
high
37
Normal
low
23
0
-10
-20
Record
low
Yesterday’s low 23°
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
January
1.5"
1.26
1.24
1.2"
0.9"
0.62
T
T
0.25
0.23
0.06
0.03 T
0.04
0.5 0.6"
0.29 0.36
0.3"
T
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
FIRST
Feb. 23
-5
1875
February
0.21
NEW
Feb. 15
Norm.
36.8
23.0
29.2
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 35°
Moon phases
FULL
Mar. 1
LAST
Mar. 9
Snow Dawn moon and planets – A. MacRobert
Before 6 a.m. tomorrow, the moon shines with
1/16 of a mile
Jupiter far to its right. Much closer to the moon’s
south at 48 m.p.h. lower right is Mars, and below Mars is Antares.
16/-3 Saturn glows lower in the southeast.
10.0”
HOROSCOPE
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
see where it gets you. One can
weigh the pros and cons of a situation for only so long. Open up to
new possibilities. You don't need
to push so hard. Tonight: Feed
your imagination.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
One-on-one relating is highlighted. A long-overdue discussion
with a friend will help you to
clear the air. You have different
styles of communicating, and understanding each other takes
time. Dig into your imagination
to find the right response. Tonight: Say "yes" to an offer.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Drop the word "impossible" from
your vocabulary, and reach out
for more of what you want. You
might not always be comfortable
with this approach, but right now
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, Feb. 8, the
39th day of 2018. There are
326 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Composer-conductor John Williams is 86. Newscaster Ted Koppel is 78. Actor
Nick Nolte is 77. Actress Mary
Steenburgen is 65. Author John
Grisham is 63. Retired NBA
All-Star and College Basketball
Hall of Famer Marques John-
4:06 4:38
4:58 5:32
Heat
36
247
245
3250
3341
2972
80
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018:
This year you need to focus on
your goals and long-term desires;
you will see several of them come
to fruition by your next birthday.
It is important to remain goaloriented and focused. Your professional life will grow as a result.
If you are single, try to keep your
personal and professional lives
separate. Try to stay open to different types of people. If you are
attached, you will find it easier
and easier to relate to your sweetie. The two of you are likely to fall
in love all over again. SAGITTARIUS takes more risks than you do.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You have pondered an opportunity so much that you might feel as
if it would be best to go for it and
5:07 5:40
6:27
6:22
5:28
5:20
10
32/19
Weather
Visibility
Wind
High/low temperature
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
A.M. P.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
20
32/19
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
High tides
5:48
5:48
5:50
5:53
5:49
30
NW 7-14 kts.
6:50 a.m.
5:07 p.m.
10:17
1:05 a.m.
5:14
5:14
5:13
5:19
5:18
40
NW 10-20 kts. 2-4 ft.
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
5:25 6:02
5:25 5:55
5:10 5:47
A.M. P.M.
50
Cod Canal
Almanac
5:11 5:48
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
 Buzzards Bay
1-3 ft.
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
Yesterday
High/low
35/23
Mean
29
Departure from normal -1
Departure for month -4
Departure for year
-23
5 p.m. rel. humidity 96%
BAR HARBOR
28/12
LACONIA
27/7
MANCHESTER
PORTSMOUTH 29/13
BRATTLEBORO
30/11
29/7
NASHUA 32/9
PITTSFIELD
22/6
BOSTON 32/18
WORCESTER
PROVINCETOWN
SPRINGFIELD
NEW
26/9
29/10 PROVIDENCE
32/21
BEDFORD
34/17
34/19
HYANNIS 33/20
HARTFORD
30/11
NEWPORT
33/23
BRIDGEPORT
OAK BLUFFS NANTUCKET 33/22
32/22
32/21
New England marine forecast
High tides
5:14 5:48
9.3 8.4
11:3311:48
1.0 1.4
Boston’s recent climate
AUGUSTA
26/4
BERLIN
21/3
A.M. P.M.
High tides
Old Orchard ME
Hampton
Beach NH
Plum Island
Ipswich
BANGOR
26/3
NEWPORT
19/8
Tides
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
son is 62. Rock singer Vince
Neil (Motley Crue) is 57. Rock
musician Keith Nelson is 49.
Rock musician Phoenix (Linkin
Park) is 41. Actor William Jackson Harper is 38. Rock musician Max Grahn (Carolina Liar)
is 30. Actor Ryan Pinkston is
30. Professional surfer Bethany
Hamilton is 28. Actress Karle
Warren is 26.
January
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
0.50”
Precip days in February 6
0.0"
February
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
1.44”
Norm. month to date 0.76”
Year to date
Norm. year to date
6.44”
4.12”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
it has the highest likelihood of
success. Tonight: Don't underestimate the possibilities around an
untried path.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Though you might want to fly off
the rails emotionally, you won't.
Look carefully at an issue that
keeps arising. Stay centered, no
matter what you do or when.
Worry less about what is going on
with those around you. You will
see the right path open up. Tonight: Off to the gym.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Your fiery side comes out when
dealing with a loved one. Know
that getting angry won't help.
You need to get to the bottom of
an issue in order to move forward. You could be dealing with a
problematic situation. Stay upbeat. Tonight: Let the fun and
games begin!
ºIn 1587, Mary, Queen of Scots
was beheaded at Fotheringhay
Castle in England after she was
implicated in a plot to murder
her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I.
ºIn 1693, a charter was granted for the College of William
and Mary in Williamsburg in
the Virginia Colony.
ºIn 1910, the Boy Scouts of
America was incorporated.
ºIn 1937, during the Spanish
Civil War, Malaga fell to Nationalist and Italian forces.
South dealer — Neither side vulnerable
North
♠ A75
♥ 43
♦ AQ98
♣QJ82
West
East
♠ K 10 8 3
♥ Q 10 9 2
♦ 7
♣K543
♠2
♥J 8 7 6 5
♦K652
♣A 7 6
South
♠ QJ964
♥AK
♦ J 10 4 3
♣ 10 9
South
1♠
West
North
East
Pass
4♠
All Pass
Opening lead — ♥ 6
In the final of the Senior Knockout Teams at the Fall
NABC, Eric Rodwell earned a swing for his team with a
good deceptive play.
At both tables, South played at four spades. When
Rodwell was East, South’s opening bid of one spade was
limited in strength, so North simply jumped to game. West
led a heart, and South took the king and led the jack of
spades: deuce, five ... and Rodwell followed with the eight.
South could have led a low spade next, planning to insert
dummy’s seven as a safety play for one trump loser if West
played the three. But South didn’t know he could afford to
play safe; East might have held the king of diamonds.
It looked as if East had the bare eight or doubleton 10-8
anyway, so South led the queen next. Rodwell was sure of
two trump tricks. Down one.
At the other table, the pro sitting East missed the textbook falsecard: He won the first spade with his king. Later,
South picked up the trumps and made his game when the
diamond finesse won.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ A 7 5 ♥ 4 3 ♦ A Q 9 8 ♣ Q J
8 2. Your partner opens one club, you respond one diamond and he bids one heart. What do you say?
ANSWER: If a jump-preference to three clubs would be
forcing in your partnership, that bid would be fine. But
many pairs treat such a jump as invitational. (What would
you bid with A 7 5, 4 3, A Q 9 8, J 10 8 2?) Then you must
invent a forcing call. Bid one spade, a “fourth-suit” bid that
merely asks partner to continue describing his hand.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You often push so hard to accomplish what you must that you
barely have time to take a deep
breath and relax. Make an attempt to slow down and do
something just for you. This
break will renew your energy and
make it easier to deal with certain issues. Tonight: In the limelight.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Assess the present situation. Do
not minimize what is happening
between you and the other party
involved. You finally will be able
to clear the air and get past an
obstacle or misunderstanding
that exists between you. Tonight:
Return calls and catch up on others' news.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You suddenly might feel as if you
can get past an ongoing hassle.
Your ability to read between the
lines makes a big difference in
how you handle a personal matter. Others note your sensitivity
when you approach a controversial topic. Tonight: Let the party
go on and on.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Issues could arise a little too easily right now. You might prefer to
keep your energy at bay in order
to allow yourself the time to
weigh the pros and cons of a situation. Be ready to make a commitment. Don't hesitate to ask for
more of what you want. Tonight:
In your element.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
You could reach a point of agreement much easier than you originally had anticipated. Do not hesitate to go after what you desire.
You might not get the immediate
results you want, but at least you
will have taken the first step. Tonight: Take some much-needed
personal time.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
ºIn 1942, during World War II,
Japanese forces began invading
Singapore.
ºIn 1952, Queen Elizabeth II
proclaimed her accession to the
British throne following the
death of her father, King
George VI.
ºIn 1989, 144 people were
killed when an American-chartered Boeing 707 filled with
Italian tourists slammed into a
fog-covered mountain in the
Azores.
ºIn 1993, General Motors sued
NBC, alleging that ‘‘Dateline
NBC’’ had rigged two car-truck
crashes to show that 1973-to87 GM pickups were prone to
fires in side impact crashes.
NBC settled the lawsuit the following day and apologized for
its ‘‘unscientific demonstration.”
ºIn 2013, a massive storm
packing hurricane-force winds
and blizzard conditions began
sweeping through the North-
east, dumping nearly 2 feet of
snow on New England and
knocking out power to more
than a half a million customers.
ºIn 2017, the Senate confirmed Senator Jeff Sessions to
be attorney general, 52-47.
Britain’s House of Commons
gave its final approval to a bill
authorizing the government to
start exit talks with the European Union, despite fears by opposition lawmakers of a rocky
path ahead.
Reach out to a dear friend whom
you don't often get to see. Ask
more questions as you decide
what would be the best way to
catch up on each other's news.
Make a point of planning a visit
in person. Refuse to get involved
in a power play. Tonight: Hang
out with favorite people.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
You might opt to change direction, to others' surprise. People
often think that they have you
figured out, only to discover otherwise. You like to grow and
adapt to different situations. Stay
on top of a personal matter involving an older person. Tonight:
A force to be dealt with.
Jacqueline Bigar is on the internet at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2018 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Holliday was dressed for success in Minn.
Gisele ‘tired of people
twisting my words’
It seems like Gisele Bundchen has
heard enough.
The supermodel took to Twitter
Wednesday afternoon to address the
backlash she’s received for some of her
reported postgame remarks about Super Bowl 52.
“Just to be clear,” she wrote. “No
one ‘let’ anyone win. People win because of their own merit. Tired of people twisting my words to create drama
that doesn’t exist!”
Bundchen, who has been married
to Patriots quarterback Tom Brady for
nearly nine years, is referring to the
conversation she had with her children following the Patriots’ 41-33 loss
to the Eagles.
According to USA Today’s Josh Pe­
ter, Brady and Bundchen’s 8-year-old
son, Benjamin, and 5-year-old daughter, Vivian, were both visibly upset at
the result of the game. In an effort to
comfort the crying pair, the mother of
two reportedly told them, “Sometimes
you have to let other people win.”
“Their whole life, they never won a
Super Bowl. You have to let someone
else win sometimes,” Bundchen continued, according to Peter. “We have to
share. Sharing is caring.”
The story circulated on social media Monday and received a critical response.
“The idea that Tom Brady or the
Patriots ‘let’ the Eagles win the Super
Bowl is ridiculous, of course, and
Bundchen shouldn’t be peddling that
to kids,” Fox News’ Karol Markovitz
wrote. “It teaches them to expect that
winning is something that other people will sometimes grant them, instead of something they earn on their
own. It’s a lesson their father doesn’t
demonstrate on the field at all.”
(Nicole Yang, Boston.com)
Quincy Jones knows
who killed Kennedy
Quincy Jones has a lot to say in a
new interview with New York Magazine, but we’re not sure how much of
it’s true. For one thing, the 84-yearold producer says he knows who really killed President John F. Kennedy.
“[Chicago mobster Sam] Gian­
cana,” Jones says. “The connection
was there between Sinatra and the
Mafia and Kennedy. Joe Kennedy —
he was a bad man — he came to
Frank to have him talk to Giancana
about getting votes.”
You want more?
Jones says he dated President
Trump’s daughter Ivanka — when he
was 72 and she was 24.
“Yes, sir. Twelve years ago. Tommy
Hilfiger, who was working with my
daughter Kidada, said, ‘Ivanka wants
to have dinner with you.’ I said, ‘No
problem. She’s a fine [expletive.]’ She
had the most beautiful legs I ever
saw in my life. Wrong father,
though.”
And then there’s this: Jones says
Marlon Brando’s sexual conquests included some famous men — including James Baldwin, Richard Pryor,
and Marvin Gaye.
They were ready to
celebrate in style.
On Sunday, hours before the Patriots suffered
an ego-bruising loss to
the Eagles in Super
Bowl 52, Bill Belichick’s
longtime girlfriend Lin­
da Holliday was decked
out in support of the
team — and her man.
In a brief video posted to Twitter, Holliday,
who is also the director
of the Bill Belichick
Foundation, wore a
MATT YORK/AP
jacket with “Belichick”
encrusted in rhineBill Belichick and Linda Holliday last Sunday
stones across the back. prior to Super Bowl 52.
She is seen shimmying
alongside Camille Kostek, a former Patriots cheerleader who has been romantically linked to tight end Rob Gronkowski. Kostek also sported sparkles for the
big game, with a Patriots “Flying Elvis” logo on her cropped jacket.
Alas, their revelry was short lived, as the Patriots lost to the Eagles 41-33. But
given how tough the Patriots are year after year, the bedazzled devotees will
surely have more chances to don the garb.
Councilor speaks out against ‘SMILF’ signs
YOUCANTHAVEIT.NET
Is Gronk going Hollywood?
After Sunday’s disappointing Super
Bowl loss, Rob Gronkowski didn’t rule
out the idea that he might retire.
We’re doubtful he’ll do it, but now
comes word that Gronk may be considering a career in Hollywood. That’s
right, the tight end may try his hand at
acting.
The Eagle-Tribune reports that
Gronkowski has been encouraged by
former professional wrestler Dwayne
“The Rock” Johnson and “Rocky” actor Sylvester Stallone to start making
movies.
One reason Gronk might consider
such a gambit is because he’s suffered
a lot of injuries over the past few seasons, and it’s easier and safer to make
a bad action movie than to catch a
football with a defensive back bearing
down on you. Two weeks before the
Super Bowl, Gronk sustained a concussion in the AFC Championship
Game, and it’s unlikely that was his
first.
Gronk’s agent Drew Rosenhaus
could not be reached from comment
on his client’s apparent interest in a
movie career.
Here’s the thing: Gronkowski has
already made a movie, and it wasn’t
good. In “You Can’t Have It,” the Patriots pass catcher played a cop who’s
dispatched to keep the peace at a local
watering hole. Gronk was prominently
featured in the poster for the film, but
he had just one line.
Actress Joanna Krupa, one of
Gronk’s costars in the movie, said afterward that the big guy wasn’t good
to work with. Asked by TMZ if Gronk
might win an Academy Award for his
performance, Krupa sneered.
“Considering he was the only person we had to do re-take after re-take
for for his one line, I don’t know. I
think [Gronk] was too busy focusing
on the hot girls on set,” she said.
Krupa also said she was upset that
Gronk, given his high profile, didn’t
work harder to promote the film.
“To me he’s not a big team player,”
Krupa said.
In addition to commercials for Tide
and Dunkin’ Donuts, Gronk’s other
on-screen credits include the 2015
movie “Entourage,” in which he plays
himself; “The Clapper,” in which he also plays himself; and something called
“Deported,” in which he plays a character called Party Guy Jake.
None of that suggests Gronk is ticketed for stardom, but movies don’t
have to be good to be successful, as
Dwayne Johnson well knows. The former WWE wrestler is a bankable star
in Hollywood, but you wouldn’t call
“Snitch” or “Pain & Gain” or “Central
Intelligence” or, really, any movie he’s
made “good.” And yet, Forbes estimates “The Rock” earned $65 million
last year.
‘The Hate U Give’
author comes to
Cambridge
that he has not watched “SMILF,”
which costars Rosie O’Donnell and
Miguel Gomez. He did not know how
many “SMILF” ads are up around the
city, or if any have been taken down already.
The neighborhood blog CaughtInSouthie.com first posted Flynn’s statement to its website on Tuesday, eliciting backlash from people who said it
should be obvious that the show is a
work of fiction.
“With all of the very real concerns
that a City Councilor should be addressing it is alarming that this becomes one of your earliest efforts,” one
person wrote.
On Flynn’s Facebook campaign
page the responses ranged from supportive of the elected official’s call to
action, to very against it.
“Yes! Excellent work Ed,” one person said, echoing several other comments.
But others weren’t as impressed.
“This is embarrassing. Just turn the
channel if you don’t want to watch the
show,” someone said. “You represent
all of South Boston not one particular
group. Please address the real issues
that impact this community.”
Raisman to People: ‘I won’t be silenced’
Author Angie Thomas says personal experience informs “The Hate U
Give,” her acclaimed YA novel about a
young black girl whose unarmed
friend is shot by police.
Speaking at a Harvard Book Store
event this week, Thomas said that, like
her novel’s protagonist Starr Cater, she
grew up in a poor, predominantly
black neighborhood while attending
largely white schools.
Straddling those two worlds wasn’t
easy, especially in college, because
Thomas said she didn’t want to be
viewed by her peers as a “poor black
girl from the hood.” As a result, she
didn’t share much about herself,
which taught her a lesson that is a key
element of the book.
“If you have a friend in your life
who you’re having trouble sharing
your vulnerable experiences with,
maybe they’re not your friend,” Thomas said.
In addition to her own backstory,
Thomas said the “Black Lives Matter”
movement was an inspiration for “The
Hate U Give.” She said she wanted to
incorporate settings and themes familiar to an audience not accustomed to
seeing themselves represented in media. If that helps black teens find their
Painful
City Councilor Ed Flynn has called
for the removal of posters around Boston promoting the show “SMILF,” a
Golden Globe-nominated series, recently filmed in the city, that tells the
fictional story of a single mother living
in South Boston.
In a Facebook post Tuesday, Flynn
said disgusted constituents have
lodged complaints with his office —
and in person — claiming the Showtime series, starring Frankie Shaw,
who has roots in the area, casts the
people and families from the neighborhood in an unflattering light.
“The proud mothers I know from
Southie, who work so hard for their
families and our community, have told
me they find it unwatchable as it is a
degrading, crude, and inaccurate portrayal of their life,” Flynn said in the
statement. “I’m tired of Hollywood
making a profit off of these abysmal
shows that in no way capture the real
lives, character, and contributions of
the people of South Boston.”
Flynn, whose district includes
South Boston, Chinatown, the South
End, and Bay Village, said he noticed a
number of advertisements displayed
around the city at bus shelters to promote the series, which first aired in
November last year and has been renewed for a second season.
The appearance of the ads prompted Flynn to reach out “to officials from
the City of Boston,” who he said “kindly agreed to remove these advertisements.”
Bus shelters in Boston are owned
by the city, not by the MBTA, according to a T spokesman.
Boston city officials said that the
ads were already on their way out the
door, prior to Flynn’s complaint.
The “SMILF” posters were scheduled to come down this week, in place
of new material, according to a statement. The ads had been booked for
four weeks, with their time on display
ending two weeks ago. Since then, the
ads have been used as filler.
Flynn said in a telephone interview
ROBIN LUBBOCK/WBUR
Angie Thomas (left) with Robin Young at First Parish Church.
voice, all the better.
“It’s scary sometimes, but the scariest part is not making yourself heard,
it’s correcting the people in your life
you think you’re closest to,” she said.
Thomas also hopes her book encourages readers to think about black
men differently. Intentionally, the acronym of the book’s title is “THUG,” a
term used to describe some black
men.
“There are different types of black
males,” Thomas said. “Stop making
assumptions and putting them in boxes.”
There’s some controversy sur-
rounding the movie being made based
on Thomas’s book. YouTube star Kian
Lawley lost his role in the film after a
video of him making racist statements
appeared online.
“Due to the controversy surrounding his past comments and behavior,
Kian Lawley will no longer appear in
‘The Hate U Give,’ ” a spokesperson for
Twentieth Century Fox Films told
CNN Wednesday. “The studio plans to
recast the role of Chris and reshoot
scenes as needed.”
The film stars Amandla Stenberg
as Starr Cater, and Lawley was set to
play Starr’s boyfriend.
Aly Raisman is on the cover of People magazine this week, and she has a
message: She will not be silenced.
Raisman’s story is teased on the
cover of the magazine with the headline, “Taking Back My Life.”
The issue is set to hit newsstands Friday.
Raisman talked to the
publication about what it
was like to deliver her powerful statement during the
sentencing of former USA
Gymnastics team doctor
Larry Nassar last month.
“I felt very strong,” the
six-time Olympic medalist
and Needham native told
People. “I felt like I had so much I
wanted to say.”
Raisman,23, first said she was
abused by Nassar in an interview with
“60 Minutes” in November and detailed her experience in her book,
“Fierce.” In her victim impact statement at Nassar’s hearing, Raisman
said that Nassar had perpetuated the
“worst epidemic of sexual abuse in the
history of sports.”
“You never really want to say, ‘I was
sexually abused,’ ” Raisman told People, “but you have to process it. You
can’t push it aside forever, which is
what I did for a long time. I’m still processing it and coping with it.”
Raisman also told People that she has been privately counseling fellow
victims of Nassar.
“Those are difficult
phone calls,” Raisman said.
“I’ve been on the phone
with some of the girls for
hours, trying to calm them
down and help them understand how this could
have happened, even
though I can’t understand
it myself. I tell them, ‘I know it’s hard
to imagine right now, but you’re going
to be okay. You’re going to get through
this. We’re going to make change together.’ ”
Raisman told People that she’s still
coming to terms with the abuse, but
speaking out about it and advocating
for change has helped.
“I’m just starting to realize how
strong I am,” she said, “and I won’t be
silenced.” (Kevin Slane, Boston.com)
Steve Annear and Hayley Kaufman of the Globe staff and Globe correspondent
Siti Aisyah contributed. Read local celebrity news at www.bostonglobe.com
/names. Names can be reached at names@globe.com or at 617-929-8253.
‘It doesn’t matter who it is acting in it — it’s just tasteless.’
DEBRA TATE, sister of Manson family victim Sharon Tate, talking about “The Haunting of Sharon Tate,” an upcoming movie starring Hilary Duff (pictured)
TV HIGHLIGHTS
NBA: Celtics-Wizards, 8 p.m., TNT
College basketball: Duke-North Carolina, 8 p.m., ESPN
Olympics: Team figure skating, 8 p.m., NBC
Listings, C5, C7
Sports
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, F E B RUA RY 8 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Patriots’ backfield a priority
Lewis, Burkhead
are top free agents
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
While the Patriots aren’t expected
to make any significant roster moves,
including free agent signings or contract extensions, until the end of the
month, once the transactions start,
they could come fast and furious.
And speaking of fast and furious,
running back will be among the team’s
ºMcDaniels better have some assurances afte reneging on the Colts. A1
top priorities as James White and Mike
Gillislee are the only backs under contract.
Leading rusher Dion Lewis, along
with Rex Burkhead and Brandon Bolden, are free agents.
Lewis, 27, who played a career-high
19 games (including playoffs), rushed
180 times for 896 yards during the regular season — a healthy 5 yards per
tote for a guy who put injury concerns
in the rearview mirror
A compact and powerful runner,
Lewis is a top candidate to score a multiyear contract in New England. He is a
triple threat and was among the most
productive players in the league (he also had 32 catches for 214 yards and 23
kickoff returns for 570 yards). Lewis
scored touchdowns rushing, receiving,
and returning in 2017.
Burkhead, 27, is an effective runner
and receiver and a good fit in Josh McPATRIOTS, Page C6
GREGORY SHAMUS/GETTY IMAGES
DREAM JOB — Matt Patricia is introduced as the
new head coach of the Detroit Lions. Story, C6.
Top of the heap
MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bruin Riley Nash (left) scored on
a helper from David Backes.
Bruins
dismantle
Rangers
By Fluto Shinzawa
GLOBE STAFF
Bruins 6 N E W Y O R K — T h e
Bruins ran the RangRangers 1 ers out of Madison
settling on a consensus (OK, really it was more like Powers saying why his list was right and Pepin’s was wrong,
but Pepin did score on a few volleys).
We looked at the sports as a whole rather than breaking them down by disciplines or events, although speedskating is separated into long- and short-track because
of their major differences.
The criteria to frame the debate are also important,
and we settled on the following factors as key talking
points: drama, watchability, intensity, personalities,
competition format, and fan interest.
It’s subjective and open to debate, for sure. That’s the
fun of making lists.
Square Garden on Wednesday with a
6-1 win.
Patrice Bergeron led the offense
with two goals while welcoming Brad
Marchand back to his left side. Tim
Schaller, dropped back to the fourth
line, chased Henrik Lundqvist with a
top-shelf sparkler in the second period. The free-falling Rangers dropped
their fourth straight game.
Amid the carnage the Bruins inflicted on Broadway, they were still at
risk of falling behind by a 2-1 score in
the second period.
Anton Khudobin made sure that
didn’t happen.
“First period, our goaltender was
terrific,” coach Bruce Cassidy said of
Khudobin’s 10-save effort. “We had
some breakdowns in the slot, a little
uncharacteristic of us. Give credit to
the Rangers for getting there. They
OLYMPICS, Page C5
BRUINS, Page C3
GABRIELE FACCIOTTI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Drama, danger, and fascinating personalities such as Mikaela Shiffrin are a few reasons Alpine skiing is the best Winter Olympic sport.
For drama, viewing, Alpine skiing the best sport at Winter Games
By Matt Pepin and John Powers
GLOBE STAFF AND GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Let’s face it, the Winter Olympics are largely a collection of niche sports that are thrust into an international
spotlight because they’re called the Olympics.
These sports go on every year, but for many of them, interest rises only once every four years, and even then some
surge in popularity more than others.
So as the 2018 Olympics begin in PyeongChang, South
Korea, we decided to rank the Winter Olympics sports
that will suddenly be front and center in your living room
and the topic of discussion around the office. At a lunchtime discussion in the fall, we each made a list of the 15
sports, compared them, and debated their merits before
PyeongChang 2018
ºThe Winter Olympics in South
Korea are upon us. The Games begin
Thursday. Among the story lines:
Can the US women beat Canada in
hockey at Olympus? And what do
athletes do mentally to prepare?
Also inside, a sport-by-sport breakdown and TV listings. C4-5
Celtics have holes to fill at trade deadline
Gary Washburn
ON BASKETBALL
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Greg Monroe (center) is likely to join Daniel Theis
(left), Terry Rozier and the Celtics Thursday night.
ç
i
that disabled player exception because it can’t
be used on two players.
The team’s primary target is Memphis’s
Tyreke Evans, who is having his best season
since his ballyhooed 2009-10 rookie season
(winning Rookie of the Year over Stephen
Curry) and the Grizzlies have inactivated him
to ensure he doesn’t get injured.
The Grizzlies are seeking draft picks and
the Celtics have their own first-rounder to offer. The Celtics would not own Evans’s Bird
rights after a trade, so Ainge has to decide
whether two months of Evans is worth a firstON BASKETBALL, Page C2
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WASHINGTON — You’d like to think Celtics president of basketball operations Danny
Ainge is gearing up to upgrade the roster on
this final day to make NBA trades. While his
team remains the No. 1 seed in the Eastern
Conference two-thirds into the season, it is
flawed and crying out for help.
Ainge already used the team’s disabled
player exception on Greg Monroe, who is in
Washington now and working out in Celtics
gear at his alma mater, Georgetown University. Monroe is likely to be available Thursday
evening hours after the trade deadline ends.
As for the time before the deadline, the
Celtics obviously need to upgrade their
bench, and that may cost them Marcus
Smart. Smart is still waiting for his hand to
heal after losing a fist fight with a picture
frame and isn’t expected to return until Feb.
23 at the earliest.
The Celtics haven’t officially signed Monroe, so they have one roster spot remaining.
What the Monroe agreement did was limit
the Celtics in acquiring another player with
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Sports
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T h e
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
39
37
26
23
19
L
16
16
25
32
37
Pct. GB Streak Home
.709 —
L1
21­8
.698
1
W3
22­4
.510 11
W 1 14­10
.418 16
L 4 16­11
.339 20½
L 4 11­18
Conf.
24­11
21­7
14­13
11­20
12­21
CENTRAL
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Indiana
Detroit
Chicago
W
30
30
30
27
18
L
22
23
25
26
35
Pct. GB Streak Home
.577 —
L2
19­7
.566
½
W3
18­9
.545
1½
L 1 19­11
.509
3½
W 5 18­10
.340 12½
L 7 11­14
Conf.
23­12
17­16
20­15
16­18
16­15
SOUTHEAST
Washington
Miami
Charlotte
Orlando
Atlanta
W
31
29
23
17
17
L
23
26
30
36
37
Pct. GB Streak Home
.574 —
L1
17­9
.527
2½
L 5 13­12
.434
7½
L 1 15­14
.321 13½
W 2 10­14
.315 14
W 2 12­16
Conf.
18­13
20­15
12­17
10­22
7­26
WESTERN CONFERENCE
PACIFIC
Golden State
LA Clippers
LA Lakers
*Phoenix
Sacramento
W
41
27
22
18
17
L
13
25
31
37
36
Pct. GB Streak Home
.759 —
L2
19­7
.519 13
W 2 16­12
.415 18½
W 3 13­14
.327 23½
L3
9­19
.321 23½
W1
8­16
Conf.
22­10
20­16
10­21
12­21
9­22
SOUTHWEST
Houston
*San Antonio
New Orleans
Memphis
Dallas
W
40
34
28
18
17
L
13
21
25
36
37
Pct. GB Streak Home
.755 —
W6
20­6
.618
7
L2
22­6
.528 12
L 2 14­12
.333 22½
L 5 13­16
.315 23½
L 1 10­18
Conf.
22­8
19­11
14­19
15­20
9­25
NORTHWEST
Minnesota
Oklahoma City
Denver
Portland
Utah
W
34
31
29
29
26
L
22
24
25
25
28
Pct. GB Streak Home
.607 —
W2
22­6
.564
2½
W1
19­9
.537
4
W3
22­7
.537
4
L 3 15­10
.481
7
W7
15­9
Conf.
25­9
16­16
18­17
16­14
16­14
* — Not including late game
At Detroit 115
Brooklyn 106
At Cleveland 140 Minn. 138 (OT)
Houston 109
at Miami 101
Utah 92
at Memphis 88
San Antonio
at Phoenix
THURSDAY’S GAMES
BOSTON at Washington
8
Charlotte at Portland
Atlanta at Orlando
7
Dallas at Golden St.
10:30
Okla. City at LA Lakers
10:30
New York at Toronto
7:30
10
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
At Toronto 111
BOSTON 91
At Orlando 116
Cleveland 98
At Philadelphia 115
At Atlanta 108
Memphis 82
Okla. City 125
Houston 123
at Brooklyn 113
PISTONS 115, NETS 106
BROOKLYN
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Carroll... 33 4­14 3­3 2­12
Harris.... 36 7­13 0­1 1­6
Allen...... 32 5­11 3­3 5­14
Dnwdde 36 3­9 3­3 0­4
Crabbe.. 36 13­22 2­2 0­2
Russell .. 17 2­5 0­0 0­4
Okafor..... 9 1­2 0­0 0­1
Whitehd.. 8 1­3 0­0 0­2
Stausks. 12 0­6 0­0 0­0
Webb III 15 1­2 0­0 0­4
Mozgov... 7 2­3 0­0 0­1
Totals .... 39­90 11­12 8­50
A
4
6
6
11
0
5
1
0
0
0
0
33
F Pt
6 14
2 18
2 13
1 12
3 34
0 4
4 2
0 2
0 0
1 3
1 4
20 106
FG%: .433, FT%: .917. 3­pt. goals: 17­
51, .333 (Carroll 3­10, Harris 4­8, Allen
0­1, Dinwiddie 3­8, Crabbe 6­14, Russell
0­2, Whitehead 0­1, Stauskas 0­5,
Webb III 1­2). Team rebounds: 4. Team
turnovers: 20 (24 pts.). Blocks: 6 (Har­
ris, Allen 2, Crabbe, Mozgov 2). Turn­
overs: 19 (Carroll 2, Harris 5, Allen, Din­
widdie, Crabbe 2, Russell 6, Webb III,
Mozgov). Steals: 4 (Carroll, Allen, Rus­
sell, Whitehead). Technicals: Carroll,
2:05/2nd.
DETROIT
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
S.Jhnsn . 38 9­15 0­0 0­2 1 3 19
Griffin.... 34 9­19 6­7 1­3 7 2 25
Drmnd... 36 5­17 7­10 7­27 2 1 17
Bullock.. 34 4­7 0­0 0­2 1 1 9
Smith .... 30 6­14 2­4 0­6 4 1 15
Kennard 23 4­6 0­0 0­1 2 1 8
Tolliver . 27 2­5 3­4 0­2 1 2 9
Gallowy 18 5­9 0­0 0­3 2 1 13
Totals .... 44­92 18­25 8­46 20 12 115
FG%: .478, FT%: .720. 3­pt. goals: 9­
24, .375 (S.Johnson 1­3, Griffin 1­5, Bull­
ock 1­2, Smith 1­2, Kennard 0­2, Tolliv­
er 2­4, Galloway 3­6). Team rebounds:
7. Team turnovers: 7 (10 pts.). Blocks: 3
(Drummond 2, Bullock). Turnovers: 7
(Griffin 2, Drummond, Smith 2, Tolliver,
Galloway). Steals: 10 (S.Johnson 3,
Griffin 2, Drummond 3, Smith, Ken­
nard). Technicals: Griffin, 9:01/3rd.
Brooklyn................21 29 23 33 — 106
Detroit ...................26 27 26 36 — 115
A — 15,114 (21,000). T — 2:03. Offi­
cials — Courtney Kirkland, Mark Lind­
say, Aaron Smith.
ROCKETS 109, HEAT 101
HOUSTON
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Tucker... 41 1­2 0­0 1­5
MbhaMt 37 2­6 4­4 0­1
Capela .. 29 6­8 1­2 2­8
Paul....... 36 10­19 1­2 0­7
Harden.. 36 13­25 10­12 0­4
Green .... 26 3­8 4­5 0­3
Nene...... 19 3­6 1­1 0­5
M.Brwn. 16 0­0 0­0 1­2
Totals .... 38­74 21­26 4­35
A
1
0
0
7
6
0
2
0
16
F Pt
3 3
1 9
3 13
1 24
2 41
1 12
1 7
4 0
16 109
FG%: .514, FT%: .808. 3­pt. goals: 12­
31, .387 (Tucker 1­1, Mbah a Moute 1­4,
Paul 3­8, Harden 5­12, Green 2­6).
Team rebounds: 9. Team turnovers: 10
(11 pts.). Blocks: 6 (Mbah a Moute,
Capela 3, Harden, Green). Turnovers: 9
(Tucker 2, Capela 2, Paul, Harden 4).
Steals: 8 (Mbah a Moute 3, Paul, Hard­
en 3, Nene).
MIAMI
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Jons Jr... 19 1­7 0­0 2­3 0 2 3
Winslw.. 25 2­7 0­0 0­1 3 2 5
Whitsde 33 7­16 2­3 4­17 1 2 16
Dragic ... 38 11­17 6­7 1­3 6 3 30
Rchrdsn 39 11­20 1­1 2­4 5 1 30
T.Jhnsn . 34 1­7 0­0 2­6 3 4 3
J.Johnsn 36 4­12 0­0 2­2 3 1 9
Adebyo . 15 2­2 1­1 2­5 2 2 5
Totals .... 39­88 10­12 15­41 23 17 101
FG%: .443, FT%: .833. 3­pt. goals: 13­
32, .406 (Jones Jr. 1­5, Winslow 1­3,
Dragic 2­4, Richardson 7­9, T.Johnson
1­6, J.Johnson 1­5). Team rebounds: 7.
Team turnovers: 13 (21 pts.). Blocks: 3
(Richardson, Adebayo 2). Turnovers:
13 (Jones Jr., Winslow 3, Whiteside,
Dragic, Richardson, T.Johnson 3,
J.Johnson 2, Adebayo). Steals: 3 (Drag­
ic, Richardson, T.Johnson).
Houston.................35 26 22 26 — 109
Miami ....................24 33 23 21 — 101
A — 19,600 (19,600). T — 2:03. Offi­
cials — Jason Goldenberg, Eric Lewis,
Scott Wall.
Milwaukee 103
at New York 89
Wash. 102
at Golden St. 105
At LA Lakers 112
Phoenix 93
JAZZ 92, GRIZZLIES 88
UTAH
FG
FT
Min M­A M­A
Favors... 33 1­4 0­0
Ingles .... 28 3­7 0­0
Gobert... 38 1­5 6­8
Mitchell 31 4­12 0­0
Rubio..... 29 8­16 11­14
Jerebko... 3 0­0 0­0
O'Neale. 15 1­2 2­2
Hood ..... 23 5­12 8­8
Johnson 23 3­8 0­0
Neto ...... 17 3­3 1­1
Totals .... 29­69 28­33
Reb
O­T
2­8
0­2
3­12
2­3
1­8
0­1
0­4
0­1
0­1
1­3
9­43
A
0
4
2
1
3
0
0
2
1
1
14
F
2
1
5
3
2
1
0
1
0
1
16
Pt
2
7
8
9
29
0
4
18
7
8
92
FG%: .420, FT%: .848. 3­pt. goals: 6­
22, .273 (Favors 0­1, Ingles 1­4, Mitchell
1­3, Rubio 2­4, O'Neale 0­1, Hood 0­5,
Johnson 1­3, Neto 1­1). Team reb. 9.
Team TO: 20 (16 pts.). Turnovers: 19
(Favors, Ingles, Gobert 4, Mitchell 3,
Rubio 4, O'Neale, Hood, Neto 4). Steals:
6 (Favors 2, Ingles, Rubio 3). Techni­
cals: .
MEMPHIS
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Martin... 31 3­7 0­0 1­5 0 5 6
Green .... 30 4­7 2­2 4­7 1 3 11
Gasol..... 37 7­20 4­7 0­6 5 2 20
Brooks .. 31 4­13 2­2 2­6 1 3 11
Harrisn.. 35 9­15 3­3 0­1 4 6 23
Seldn Jr. 17 0­2 0­0 1­2 2 2 0
Ennis III 25 2­6 1­2 0­4 0 1 6
Chalmrs 23 3­8 0­0 0­2 4 4 7
Rabb...... 11 2­3 0­0 1­3 1 0 4
Totals .... 34­81 12­16 9­36 18 26 88
FG%: .420, FT%: .750. 3­pt. goals: 8­
23, .348 (Martin 0­1, Green 1­2, Gasol
2­6, Brooks 1­3, Harrison 2­5, Selden Jr.
0­1, Ennis III 1­2, Chalmers 1­3). Team
reb. 8. Team TO: 16 (17 pts.). Turn­
overs: 15 (Gasol 2, Harrison 2, Selden
Jr. 4, Ennis III, Chalmers 5, Rabb).
Steals: 12 (Martin, Green, Gasol,
Brooks 3, Harrison 2, Selden Jr., Ennis
III 2, Rabb). Technicals: Gasol,
8:37/3rd, Coach Bickerstaff, 9:19/4th,
Coach Bickerstaff, 7:41/4th, Brooks,
0:26/4th. Ejections: Coach Bickerstaff,
7:41/4th, Brooks, 0:26/4th.
Utah .........................1 23 24 24 — 92
Memphis...............16 23 24 25 — 88
A — 13,187 (18,119). T — 2:10. Offi­
cials — Marc Davis, Scott Twardoski,
Gary Zielinski.
CAVALIERS 140, T-WOLVES
138
MINNESOTA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Gibson .. 35 4­8 1­1 2­5
Wiggins 40 7­13 1­2 0­2
Towns... 37 10­12 4­4 1­10
Teague.. 39 6­12 0­0 0­3
Butler.... 46 14­21 3­3 0­5
Dieng..... 16 4­7 2­2 1­4
Crawfrd 20 7­13 0­0 0­0
Bjelica... 17 2­5 0­0 0­6
Jones..... 14 0­2 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 54­93 11­12 4­35
A
2
1
1
15
6
1
0
2
5
33
F Pt
1 9
3 19
2 30
4 14
2 35
3 10
1 16
2 5
1 0
19 138
FG%: .581, FT%: .917. 3­pt. goals: 19­
33, .576 (Wiggins 4­8, Towns 6­6,
Teague 2­4, Butler 4­5, Crawford 2­5,
Bjelica 1­4, Jones 0­1). Team reb: 2.
Team TO: 12 (16 pts.). Turnovers: 11
(Wiggins 2, Towns 3, Teague, Butler 2,
Dieng 2, Crawford). Steals: 7 (Towns,
Teague, Butler 2, Dieng, Jones 2). Fla­
grant fouls: .
CLEVELAND
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Crowdr.. 24 3­5 3­4 0­2 2 4 10
James.... 48 16­22 0­2 1­10 15 3 37
Thmpsn 29 7­9 3­5 2­5 2 1 17
Thomas. 31 4­8 2­2 0­3 7 1 13
Smith .... 36 7­14 0­0 0­3 1 2 20
Frye ....... 20 2­9 0­0 1­6 0 1 4
Green .... 29 4­6 5­6 1­6 2 3 13
Osman .. 21 3­5 1­2 1­4 0 3 9
Rose ........ 7 1­3 1­2 0­0 3 0 3
Korver... 19 5­7 0­0 1­2 1 3 14
Totals .... 52­88 15­23 7­41 33 21 140
FG%: .591, FT%: .652. 3­pt. goals: 21­
41, .512 (Crowder 1­2, James 5­7,
Thomas 3­5, Smith 6­11, Frye 0­6, Os­
man 2­4, Korver 4­6). Team reb: 6.
Team turnovers: 16 (25 pts.).TO: 15
(James 5, Thomas 3, Frye 2, Green 2,
Osman 2, Korver). Steals: 5 (Crowder,
James, Thompson, Frye, Osman).
Minnesota ......... 29 37 33 30 9 — 138
Cleveland .......... 31 33 37 28 11 — 140
A — 20,562 (20,562). T — 2:29. Offi­
cials — Nick Buchert, Mike Callahan,
Gediminas Petraitis.
RAPTORS 111, CELTICS 91
Tuesday night game
BOSTON
FG
FT
Min M­A M­A
Horford. 24 1­5 0­0
Tatum ... 21 2­9 0­0
Baynes.. 20 3­8 0­0
Brown ... 27 4­5 2­4
Irving..... 22 6­12 3­3
Morris ... 30 4­13 2­2
Rozier.... 24 5­12 4­4
Ojeleye . 20 0­4 0­0
Theis ..... 22 4­5 2­3
Nader.... 14 2­7 0­0
Yabusel. 11 1­1 2­4
Allen........ 5 1­2 0­0
Totals .... 33­83 15­20
Reb
O­T
0­6
0­1
3­8
0­6
0­0
0­2
1­5
0­2
1­2
2­3
2­3
0­0
9­38
A
3
0
1
2
3
1
4
2
1
3
0
1
21
F
1
0
1
4
1
0
2
6
2
2
0
0
19
Pt
2
4
6
11
17
12
18
0
10
5
4
2
91
FG%: .398, FT%: .750. 3­pt. goals: 10­
23, .435 (Horford 0­2, Tatum 0­1, Brown
1­1, Irving 2­6, Morris 2­5, Rozier 4­5,
Ojeleye 0­2, Nader 1­1). Team re­
bounds: 12. Team turnovers: 17 (17
pts.). Blocks: 3 (Horford 2, Brown).
Turnovers: 17 (Horford 4, Tatum,
Baynes, Brown 4, Morris 2, Rozier 2,
Nader 2, Yabusele). Steals: 3 (Rozier 2,
Nader).
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
By Peter Abraham and Nick
Cafardo
GLOBE STAFF
FORT MYERS, Fla. — It would
take J.D. Martinez about 2½ hours
to drive from his home in Miami to
JetBlue Park and
RED SOX
join the Red Sox
NOTEBOOK for spring training.
There are plenty of empty lockers in the clubhouse and his No. 28
hasn’t been given out since the Sox
released lefthanded reliever Rob­
bie Ross Jr. last fall.
But Wednesday passed without
any news on the free agent slugger,
the Red Sox continuing their staredown with agent Scott Boras.
The Red Sox still have a fiveyear, $125 million offer on the table and offered no reaction to a report by The Athletic that Martinez
has become irritated by the process
and is willing to sit out into spring
training or sign with another club.
Boras said that a “good-faith ne-
gotiation” continues with the Red
Sox, and he disputed that report.
“J.D. has never made any statement regarding the Red Sox,” said
Boras. “Reported quotes are inaccurate. A good-faith negotiation
continues.
“J.D. is involved in multiple negotiations and is pleased with the
participants and the good-faith
process. Suggestions otherwise are
not accurate.”
The Sox have made it clear they
view Martinez as a fit. But president of baseball operations Dave
Dombrowski and his staff also are
discussing whether to improve
other aspects of the team given the
number of free agents still unsigned.
The bear market could result in
some bargains. Players who otherwise would have commanded multiyear deals may soon feel compelled to sign for one season.
Logan Morrison, Lucas Duda,
and Matt Holliday are available
and fit the profile of designated hitters. The Sox also remain interested in a reunion with infielder Edu­
ardo Nunez. He would give the Sox
further depth at second base as
Dustin Pedroia recovers from knee
surgery.
The Sox could use money earmarked for Martinez to improve
their bullpen or even their rotation.
USA Today reported that the
Red Sox also considered trading for
a power hitter. One proposal discussed was sending Jackie Bradley
Jr. to Cleveland for Edwin Encarna­
cion.
The Red Sox passed on trying to
sign Encarnacion last winter. The
35-year-old has two years and $40
million remaining on his contract
with a $20 million team option for
2020.
Bradley, 27, has three years remaining before becoming a free
agent. Bradley has a 10.4 WAR the
last three seasons, Encarnacion
TORONTO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Anunby . 15 2­3 0­0 1­4
Ibaka..... 22 4­5 0­0 0­5
Vlancins 21 1­8 0­0 1­7
DeRozn . 29 6­17 1­1 0­3
Lowry.... 25 6­13 5­7 2­8
Poeltl..... 24 2­4 0­0 1­5
VanVlet. 31 3­5 2­2 0­3
Siakam.. 25 3­4 0­0 0­1
Wright... 25 6­11 1­2 0­3
Miles ..... 15 6­8 3­3 0­1
Noguira... 4 0­1 2­2 0­0
Powell..... 4 1­1 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 40­80 14­17 5­40
A
1
1
1
6
4
1
8
2
3
2
0
0
29
F Pt
0 4
1 8
3 2
2 15
1 23
4 4
2 10
1 6
1 14
0 20
2 2
1 3
18 111
FG%: .500, FT%: .824. 3­pt. goals: 17­
36, .472 (Anunoby 0­1, Valanciunas 0­2,
DeRozan 2­6, Lowry 6­11, VanVleet 2­3,
Siakam 0­1, Wright 1­4, Miles 5­7, Pow­
ell 1­1). Blocks: 4 (Valanciunas, Poeltl
2, Siakam). Turnovers: 15 (Anunoby,
Ibaka 4, Valanciunas, Lowry, Poeltl 2,
VanVleet, Siakam 2, Wright 3). Steals:
10 (Anunoby, Valanciunas, DeRozan,
Lowry 2, VanVleet, Siakam, Wright 3).
Boston ...................18 19 23 31 — 91
Toronto .................22 36 25 28 — 111
A — 20,017 (19,800). T — 2:00. Offi­
cials — James Capers, Tyler Ford, Aar­
on Smith.
11.2.
Cora stops in
Red Sox manager Alex Cora was
at JetBlue Park Wednesday, a temporary stop on his way to Miami.
He will be attending a dinner at the
University of Miami Friday that
will honor his college coach, Jim
Morris . . . Righthanded reliever
Carson Smith was among the newcomers to camp. About 20 players
off the 40-man roster already have
arrived . . . Chris Sale played long
toss and went through a series of
exhausting sprints with some minor leaguers. The lefthander has
changed apparel companies and
will now wear Adidas cleats, sneakers, and clothing. Sale will stick
with Mizuno gloves . . . The vaunted Red Sox equipment truck is expected to arrive Thursday.
Peter Abraham can be reached at
pabraham@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @PeteAbe.
Celtics have holes to fill at trade deadline
uON BASKETBALL
Wizards thumbnails
Continued from Page C1
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
at New Orleans
G l o b e
Martinez negotiations are ongoing
ATLANTIC
BOSTON
Toronto
Philadelphia
New York
Brooklyn
Indiana (ppd.)
B o s t o n
round pick and whether Evans
could be retained for the future
through salary cap space.
Boston needs more long-term
solutions for its bench. Patchwork
answers such as Gerald Green, Jonas Jerebko, or Tyler Zeller haven’t
worked. What the Celtics need is a
player who is comfortable coming
off the bench, would relish playing
in a winning situation, and still has
some productive years left.
Also, the Celtics do want their
newest acquisition to play some defense. The list of players who fit
those qualifications isn’t long, but
if the Celtics are going to go the
rental mode, they should pursue
Atlanta’s Marco Belinelli, but that
would likely require a move to clear
roster space and Ainge and his
brass will have to determine which
young player to potentially trade or
waive, if Smart stays.
The Celtics have loaded their
roster with younger players over
the past few years by virtue of the
plethora of draft picks Ainge has
acquired. But it may be time to part
with some of those picks or younger players for the present.
The Cleveland Cavaliers remain
a mess. Toronto has emerged as
the primary contender to the Celtics and Boston has to figure out a
way over the next few months to
figure out the Raptors. But the opportunity is there and Thursday is
the day.
Ainge told the Globe last week
that the club has scored better with
trades during the summer than
during the season. In-season trades
are risky and there are plenty of
general managers who will shy
away from deals with Ainge for fear
of being heisted.
R When, where: Thursday, 8 p.m., at
Capital One Arena, Washington.
R TV, radio: TNT, WBZ­FM (98.5).
R Scoring: Bradley Beal 23.8, Otto Por­
ter 14.0, Kelly Oubre 11.9.
R Rebounding: Marcin Gortat 7.9, Porter
6.2, Markieff Morris 5.6.
R Assists: Beal 4.0, Tim Frazier 3.7,
Tomas Satoransky 2.9.
R Head to head: This is the second of
four meetings. The Wizards defeated
the Celtics, 111­103, on Christmas Day
in Boston.
R Miscellany: The Wizards have won
five of six while averaging 113.5 points
since it was announced that guard
John Wall would miss 6­8 weeks with a
knee injury . . . The Wizards will be
playing their fifth game in eight nights.
DAVID GOLD/ASSOCIATED PRESS
If the Celtics are going to rent a player, Hawks guard Marco
Belinelli (right) can score — and play defense.
Just ask the 76ers’ Bryan Colangelo if he is second-guessing the decision to trade up to take Markelle
Fultz and give up a first-round pick
for the rights to Jayson Tatum.
It’s not that Celtics faithful want
to see Ainge sacrifice a chunk of the
future for right now, but they do
want Ainge to do something, to
show that he has faith that this
team is doing something more
than overachieving and headed for
a second-round elimination.
A move, even a small one, will
show that the Celtics are serious
about going far. Their weaknesses
have been exposed. They struggle
to score. An opposing NBA coach
told the Globe recently that he
could see early in the season that
the Celtics were going to have a
hard time scoring, especially when
Kyrie Irving is either slowed by injury or erratic from the field.
Irving needs help. The Celtics
bench needs help and it would give
the locker room a real boost to see
another veteran player along with
Monroe in Boston ready to help
make a long playoff run. It doesn’t
have to be a marquee name. You
don’t trade the first-round pick acquired from the 76ers, but the Celtics need to do something Thursday,
something.
Gary Washburn can be reached at
gwashburn@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter
@GwashburnGlobe.
SportsLog
Clippers award Williams multiyear extension
Lou Williams agreed to a contract extension
with the Los Angeles Clippers on Wednesday as
the team rewarded the NBA’s best scorer off the
bench with long-term security. The veteran
guard is averaging 23.3 points during the best
season of his 13-year career and going in to
Thursday’s deadline had been mentioned as a
trade possibility in the final year of a contract
that is paying him $7 million this season. Williams was hoping to stay put. He was dealt from
the Lakers to the Rockets last February, then
sent back to Los Angeles in the summer as part
of the deal for Chris Paul . . . With Kristaps Por­
zingis lost for the rest of the season, the New
York Knicks may be giving up on their playoff
hopes, dealing center Willy Hernangomez to the
Charlotte Hornets for forward Johnny O’Bryant
and second-round draft picks in 2020 and 2021
. . . The Pacers-Pelicans game was postponed after a nearly two-hour delay because of a roof
leak that briefly allowed rain water to puddle
near one of the foul lines at the Smoothie King
Center in New Orleans. Officials have not yet announced when the game will be made up.
BASEBALL
Yankees get Seahawks QB Wilson
Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wil­
son was traded — from the Texas Rangers to the
New York Yankees for future considerations.
The Rangers selected Wilson in the Triple A portion of the Rule 5 draft during the 2013 winter
meetings, about two months before he led the
Seahawks over Denver in the Super Bowl. Wilson spent time with the Rangers during spring
training in 2014 and 2015. He is expected to be
in training camp in March, participate in workouts, and watch games from the dugout. He will
be assigned to the Double A Trenton roster.
NHL
Burrows suspended 10 games
The NHL suspended Ottawa Senators forward Alex Burrows for 10 games for serving as
the aggressor in an altercation and kneeing New
Jersey forward Taylor Hall. Burrows was assessed two minor penalties, one for cross-checking and one for roughing, on the play in the second period in Ottawa’s 5-3 home win on Tuesday. The suspension will cost Burrows $134,409
. . . The Minnesota Wild will be without Jonas
Brodin for 3-4 weeks after the defenseman had
surgery Wednesday on his broken left hand suffered Tuesday against St. Louis . . . New York Islanders defenseman Scott Mayfield is expected
to miss at least four weeks with a lower-body injury sustained while blocking a shot in Monday’s loss to the Nashville Predators.
COLLEGES
BU women top Colgate in OT
Nia Irving scored 19 points, including three
straight baskets over the final two minutes of
overtime, and BU (9-13, 4-8 Patriot) hung on for
a 66-64 women’s basketball win over Colgate (419, 0-12) at Case Gym . Sophie Beaudry add 12
points and Tenisha Pressly 10 for the Terriers
. . . Katie Lou Samuelson scored 19 points and
Azura Stevens added 12 to help No. 1 UConn
(23-0, 11-0 American) pick up a 55-37 win at
Central Florida (16-8, 8-3) . . . Lauren Manis had
20 points and a career-high 20 rebounds, but
Holy Cross (10-13, 5-7 Patriot) dropped a 62-54
decision at Navy (19-4, 9-3, which was led by Bi­
anca Roach’s 15 points . . . Laura Cannatelli had
26 points and JaVonna Layfield had 12 points
and 17 rebounds to lead Dayton (19-4, 12-0 Atlantic-10) to a 78-49 win over UMass (11-13,
3-8) at the Mullins Center . . . Jordan Robertson,
averaging 5 points per game, came off the bench
to score 20 points in 20 minutes in leading Colgate (14-10, 9-4 Patriot) to a 74-60 men’s basketball win over BU (12-12, 8-5) at Hamilton, N.Y.
SOCCER
US women to take on Mexico
The United States women’s national team
will play Mexico in Houston on April 8, as both
teams prepare for World Cup qualifying in the
fall. The match at BBVA Compass Stadium will
be the 35th meeting between the teams. The
Americans eked out a 1-0 win in their last meeting, which came in 2016 Olympics qualifying.
Mexico has won just once and tied once in the
series. Three teams from the North and Central
America and Caribbean region will qualify for
the 2019 World Cup in France. The US won the
2015 edition in Canada.
MISCELLANY
Rooney hopeful on Bell deal
Pittsburgh Steelers president Art Rooney II
said he is optimistic the team can sign All-Pro
running back Le’Veon Bell to a long-term extension. Bell hinted last month he would consider
sitting out in 2018 if the team used the franchise
tag on him again . . . Simona Halep will miss Romania’s Fed Cup tennis series against Canada
this weekend because of an ankle injury sustained at the Australian Open . . . Former Dallas
Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo will make his
PGA Tour debut next month in the Dominican
Republic. Currently the lead NFL analyst for
CBS Sports, Romo got a sponsor exemption to
play in the inaugural Puntacana Resort & Club
Championship from March 22-25.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C3
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay
BOSTON
Toronto
Florida
Detroit
Montreal
Ottawa
Buffalo
GP
53
52
56
51
52
53
52
53
W
36
33
32
23
21
22
18
14
L OL
14 3
11 8
19 5
22 6
23 8
25 6
25 9
29 10
Pts. ROW
75
34
74
30
69
27
52
21
50
17
50
20
45
16
38
14
GF
189
173
182
146
136
139
137
120
GA
140
124
156
164
154
164
179
175
METROPOLITAN
Washington
Pittsburgh
New Jersey
Philadelphia
Columbus
NY Islanders
Carolina
NY Rangers
GP
53
55
52
53
53
54
54
54
W
31
30
27
25
27
26
24
25
L OL
17 5
22 3
17 8
19 9
22 4
22 6
21 9
24 5
Pts. ROW
67
28
63
28
62
24
59
25
58
21
58
23
57
21
55
22
GF
165
169
157
152
139
181
144
157
GA
154
166
156
155
150
197
164
168
WESTERN CONFERENCE
MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
In his return, Brad Marchand attempts to put a little puck pressure on Rangers goalie Ondrej Pavelec in the third period.
Marchand adds a helper in return
By Fluto Shinzawa
GLOBE STAFF
NEW YORK — In what all parties hope was Danton Heinen’s final game as the Bruins’ first-line
left wing, the
BRUINS
rookie scored the
NOTEBOOK winning goal and
added an assist in
Tuesday’s 3-2 decision over Detroit.
It might have been enough for
Brad Marchand to feel that his job
security was at risk.
“I’m not back with them tonight,” Marchand cracked before
Wednesday’s game of being reunited with Patrice Bergeron and
David Pastrnak. “He played great.
The whole team’s played awesome
the last five games. We’re just
playing really well right now.
“It’s great to see Heins have
that success. He’s played great all
year. He’s having a phenomenal
year. It just shows that he’s very
versatile and can play anywhere in
the lineup.”
Neither of Marchand’s two
shots went in. He assisted on
Bergeron’s shorthanded goal by
driving to the net with the puck
and waiting for his center to catch
up. Marchand’s best scoring
chance took place in the third period when he got behind the New
York defensemen. But relief netminder Ondrej Pavelec smothered
Marchand’s breakaway chance
with his blocker.
“I felt better after the first,”
Marchand said. “Took a little bit
of time to get back into it. They
were flying too. A little tougher,
but I felt good as the game went
along.”
He had the last five games to
ponder his flying elbow to the
head of New Jersey’s Marcus Jo­
hansson head and resolve not to
repeat such behavior. The Bruins
went 4-1-0 without their No. 1 left
wing. But they do not want to play
with fire again. Marchand’s next
run-in with the law would result
in a longer suspension, perhaps at
a more critical time.
The trick will be for Marchand
to continue playing abrasively but
not cross the disciplinary line. So
far, it’s a problem he hasn’t been
able to solve.
“He has to block out some of
the noise, but still be respectful of
the boundaries he needs to play
within,” said coach Bruce Cassidy.
“I’ve talked to him about both
sides. He’s said it. He’s come out
and said it’s what gotten him to
this level — being a pest, for lack
of a better term, and a guy who
played on the edge.
“We want him to make sure he
understands now that he’s an elite
player offensively, penalty killing,
200-foot player. Take some of the
other part that helped you get into
the league out of your game now,
because you’ve earned the right to
be more of a skilled guy without
losing the determination and passion for the game.”
With Marchand back, Heinen
returned to the third line with Ri­
ley Nash and David Backes. Tim
Schaller, who played on the third
line during Heinen’s promotion,
went back to the fourth line with
Sean Kuraly and Austin Czarnik.
Heinen had an assist on Nash’s
game-tying goal in the first period. Schaller chased Henrik Lun­
dqvist with his highlight strike in
the second.
“When our team’s playing that
well, anyone can jump in, do well,
and fit in,” Marchand said. “Our
team’s very good at picking each
other up when you’re not feeling
great, you’re a little banged up,
you’re a little sick, whatever it is.
We just have so much depth right
now that you’re able to slide back
into the lineup very easily. Hopefully that’s the case again.”
Red letter day for Krug
Torey Krug belongs to what
Cassidy classifies as the secondary
leadership tier. Krug, a native of
Livonia, Mich., was playing in his
hometown Tuesday. So with the
blessing of Backes, who has served
as the second alternate captain on
the road, Cassidy allowed Krug to
wear an “A” against the Red
Wings.
“It was awesome,” said Krug,
who wore the letter for the first
time. “Very humbling and honoring to wear an ‘A’ for an Original
Six team and do it in the hometown in front of friends and family. It’s a pretty special night, for
sure.”
Bergeron has been the full-time
No. 1 alternate since 2006-07.
Backes, Marchand, and David Kre­
jci have served as alternates for
part of the season. The 26-yearold Krug would not mind filling
the position again. A jersey with a
letter can often give a player the
strength of two men.
Vatrano out
Frank Vatrano was ruled out of
Wednesday’s game. The left wing
pulled up lame in Tuesday’s second period. After Wednesday’s
game, Vatrano left Madison
Square Garden with a walking
boot on his left foot. The East
Longmeadow native required sur-
At Madison Square Garden
FIRST PERIOD
Penalty — Boston, McQuaid, major (fighting) 2:42
Penalty — NY Rangers, McLeod, major (fighting) 2:42
NY Rangers 1, Boston 0 — Nash 16 5:00
NY Rangers 1, Boston 1 — Nash 8 (Backes, Heinen)
7:54
Boston 2, NY Rangers 1 — Chara 5 (DeBrusk) 16:09
SECOND PERIOD
Boston 3, NY Rangers 1 — Bergeron 23 (Pastrnak,
Krug) 3:47
Boston 4, NY Rangers 1 — Schaller 8 (Grzelcyk, Khu­
dobin) 7:25
Penalty — Boston, McAvoy (interference) 9:31
Boston 5, NY Rangers 1 — Bergeron 24 (Marchand,
Chara) 10:00
Penalty — NY Rangers, Miller (slashing) 17:55
THIRD PERIOD
Penalty — NY Rangers, Fast (hooking) 0:26
Boston 6, NY Rangers 1 — Kuraly 5 (Czarnik, Grzel­
cyk) 6:34
Penalty — Boston, McQuaid, served by Pastrnak
(roughing) 15:22
Penalty — Boston, McQuaid, major (fighting) 15:22
Penalty — NY Rangers, McLeod, major (fighting)
15:22
SCORE BY PERIOD
Boston............................................2
3
1
—
6
NY Rangers...................................1
0
0
—
1
12
4
GP
54
52
55
54
53
52
53
W
32
32
32
31
29
29
24
L OL
13 9
12 8
20 3
19 4
19 5
19 4
21 8
Pts. ROW
73
30
72
28
67
29
66
28
63
26
62
28
56
24
GF
176
163
155
167
159
167
155
GA
143
134
140
140
152
150
148
PACIFIC
Vegas
San Jose
Calgary
Anaheim
*Los Angeles
*Edmonton
Vancouver
Arizona
GP
53
53
53
55
52
51
53
53
W
35
28
27
26
28
23
21
12
L OL
14 4
17 8
18 8
19 10
19 5
24 4
26 6
32 9
Pts. ROW
74
33
64
25
62
25
62
23
61
26
50
21
48
21
33
11
GF
181
153
150
155
148
144
138
122
GA
145
145
151
159
126
163
171
186
* — Not including late game; ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Boston 6
at NY Rangers 1
At Toronto 3
Nashville 2 (SO)
Edmonton
at Los Angeles
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Bruins 6, Rangers 1
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Boston..........................................11
11
NY Rangers.................................11
7
CENTRAL
Winnipeg
Nashville
St. Louis
Dallas
Minnesota
Colorado
Chicago
—
—
34
22
Power plays — Boston 0 of 2; NY Rangers 0 of 2.
Goalies — Boston, Khudobin 11­3­4 (22 shots­21
saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 21­17­4 (16 shots­12
saves), Pavelec 4­7­1 (18 shots­16 saves).
Referees — Jake Brenk, Marc Joannette. Linesmen —
Pierre Racicot, Brian Murphy.
Attendance — 18,006 (18,006). Time — 2:21.
gery on his left foot before the
start of the 2016-17 season . . . Ke­
van Miller (upper body) and Noel
Acciari (lower body) remain out.
It’s unknown whether either will
be available for Saturday’s game
against Buffalo . . . Wednesday
marked the one-year anniversary
of Cassidy’s elevation to head
coach, albeit in an interim classification at the time. “It’s been a lot
of hockey games. A lot of wins,”
Cassidy said of his 50 victories.
“That’s the good news. That’s how
you keep your job and have a few
more anniversaries. The team’s
going well right now. We’re in a
good place.”
Fluto Shinzawa can be reached at
fshinzawa@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @GlobeFluto.
Montreal at Philadelphia
7
Arizona at Minnesota
Calgary at New Jersey
7
Colorado at St. Louis
NY Islanders at Buffalo
7
Dallas at Chicago
8:30
Vegas at San Jose
10:30
Vancouver at Tampa Bay
7:30
Nashville at Ottawa
7:30
8
8
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Boston 3
at Detroit 2
At Ottawa 5
New Jersey 3
Vegas 4
Minnesota 6
at St. Louis 2
At Pittsburgh 5
Philadelphia 2 at Carolina 1 (OT)
at Columbus 2
Washington 3
Anaheim 4
at Buffalo 3 (OT)
At Florida 3
Calgary 3
At Colorado 3
Arizona 3
at Chicago 2
San Jose 1
Vancouver 1
MAPLE LEAFS 3, PREDATORS 2
Nashville ..................0
Toronto ....................1
At Winnipeg 4
1
1
1
0
0 —
0 —
2
3
Maple Leafs win shootout, 2­1
First period — 1. Toronto, van Riems­
dyk 21 (Brown, Dermott), 16:06. Penal­
ties — Jarnkrok, Nsh (holding), 0:49.
Second period — 2. Toronto, Kap­
anen 4 (DMoore, Hainsey), 9:38. 3.
Nashville, Sissons 6 (Aberg, Ellis),
18:10. Penalties — Brown, Tor (hook­
ing), 8:21. Salomaki, Nsh (hooking),
12:04. DMoore, Tor (tripping), 15:01.
Third period — 4. Nashville, Arvids­
son 18, 0:25. Penalties — None.
Overtime — None. Penalties — None.
Shootout — Nashville 1 (Turris NG,
Fiala NG, Ellis G, CSmith NG, Josi NG,
Johansen NG, Arvidsson NG). Toronto 2
(Matthews NG, Nylander NG, Bozak G,
Marner NG, Marleau NG, Brown NG,
van Riemsdyk G)
Shots on goal — Nashville 8­19­16­3
— 46. Toronto 11­11­6­4 — 32.
Power plays — Nashville 0­2; Toron­
to 0­2.
Goalies — Nashville, Rinne 27­8­4 (32
shots­30 saves). Toronto, Andersen 26­
15­4 (46 shots­44 saves).
Referees — Ian Walsh, Dan O'Hal­
loran. Linesmen — Matt MacPherson,
Andrew Smith.
A — 18,878 (18,819). T — 2:49.
AVALANCHE 3, SHARKS 1
Tuesday night game
San Jose.......................0
Colorado ......................0
1
2
0 —
1 —
1
3
First period — None. Penalties —
Lindholm, Col (interference), 14:26.
Boedker, SJ (holding stick), 15:46.
Second period — 1. Colorado,
Bourque 3 (Compher, Jost), 2:31. 2. Col­
orado, Jost 4 (Yakupov, SGirard), 4:45.
3. San Jose, Ward 5 (Vlasic, Goodrow),
13:29. Penalties — Johnson, Col (inter­
ference), 17:54.
Third period — 4. Colorado, Compher
11 (Nemeth), 19:56 (en). Penalties —
DeMelo, SJ (slashing), 1:35.
Shots on goal — San Jose 14­12­13 —
39. Colorado 3­7­10 — 20.
Power plays — San Jose 0­2; Colora­
do 0­2.
Goalies — San Jose, Jones 15­13­5
(19 shots­17 saves). Colorado, Bernier
16­9­2 (39 shots­38 saves).
Referees — Francois St.Laurent, Wes
McCauley. Linesmen — Ryan Gibbons,
Brian Mach.
A — 13,349 (18,007). T — 2:25.
FRANK GUNN/THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP
James van Riemsdyk slips one past Pekka
Rinne in the shootout to win it for Toronto.
Khudobin sparkles as red­hot Bruins dismantle Rangers
uBRUINS
Continued from Page C1
did it well in here last time
against us. But we got through
it. Got a lead going into the second. Once that happened, our
group thought that from there,
they’d be in good shape getting
through that first period.
Tuukka Rask is scalding to
the touch. The ace is 19-0-2 in
his 21 decisions.
But Khudobin is no slouch
when he’s going full acrobat.
The backup, playing for the
first time since Jan. 30, submitted three sharp stops during
one sequence, none bigger than
a point-blank thievery of Rick
Nash. The Ranger flurry started
when Mika Zibanejad careened
toward the cage and ripped off
a short-distance snipe that
Khudobin turned back by dropping into the splits.
The Bruins looked like they
were in good shape. Torey Krug
settled the rebound and started
the breakout. But Krug
coughed up the puck, allowing
Nick Holden to send a long-distance shot on net from the
point. Khudobin kicked out
Holden’s shot, but Nash, who
scored the opening goal in the
first period, was lurking at the
right circle.
Khudobin was determined
not to allow Nash to score
again. With a flash of his left
pad, Khudobin booted out
Nash’s point-blank chance to
keep the score tied at 1-1. Khudobin then let teammates do
the rest.
“That was a scramble,” Khudobin said. “First one, I tried to
kick out. Didn’t happen. It went
through my legs.
“ Tried to find the puck.
Turned around, but there was
another shot. Deflection. Tried
to kick it out, then I went, ‘Ohoh.’ There’s another rebound. I
just tried to move there and just
keep it out.”
The only blemish on Khudobin’s night was Nash’s firstperiod off-the-rush strike, a
low-blocker shot that few goalies could have punched out.
Khudobin was perfect with his
20 other saves, the most crucial
taking place in the first-period
flurry while teammates were
finding their legs.
“We were way too sloppy in
our zone, giving up the slot almost every shift,” Bergeron
said. “He was huge. We had to
pick it up for him. He definitely
kept us in the game and gave us
a chance to go play offense
many times. That was an amazing game by him.”
It wasn’ t just Bergeron,
ABBIE PARR/GETTY IMAGES
The Rangers’ Cody McLeod (right) offered to drop the
gloves, and Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid obliged.
Marchand, and the rest of the
stars who led the turnaround.
Danton Heinen, back on the
third line following Marchand’s
return, picked Brendan Smith’s
pocket in the defensive zone to
initiate a 3-on-1 rush. Lundqvist punched out David Backes’s first shot, but the third line
kept the heat on for long
enough for Riley Nash to score
on the next wave. Jake DeBrusk
and Ryan Spooner executed
strong wall work late in the first
to spring Zdeno Chara for a
goal.
No goal, however, could
compare to Schaller’s secondperiod jaw-dropper.
Schaller found himself attacking Tony DeAngelo 1-on-1
down the left flank. Schaller
first thought about carrying the
puck wide. But then he saw a
better option: turning DeAngelo inside out.
“I was reading off the Dman,” Schaller said. “I was
probably going to take it wide.
Then I saw him flinch a little
bit. So I had space to cut to the
middle.”
Once Schaller faked DeAngelo into the Bronx, he closed
on Lundqvist and fired a rocket
over the ace at 7:25 to give the
Bruins a 4-1 lead. That was
enough for Lundqvist, who
turned over the keys to Ondrej
Pavelec.
“It was awesome,” Marchand said with a smile. “Everyone was very excited. It was an
unbelievable goal by him. Great
play and finish. It’s always fun
to see a teammate score a goal
like that. He works very hard.
It’s great to see him get reward-
ed like that.”
Fellow grinder Sean Kuraly
added his second goal in two
nights at 6:34 of the third. Later
in the third, Adam McQuaid
dropped the mitts with Cody
McLeod for a second time after
the Ranger bruiser leveled Matt
Grzelcyk with a hit along the
boards.
The Bruins are playing with
pace. They are a handful to defend because of how they skate,
support the puck, and sprint on
the attack. They’re even tougher to play when their secondary
cast does things like score highlight goals, stick up for teammates, and stop shots that have
no business staying out of the
net.
The Bruins are rolling. They
see no need to stop.
“We’re trying to win every
game that’s on the schedule in
front of us,” Cassidy said of approaching Tampa Bay, the division leader. “If we catch them,
great. If not, if they play great,
that’s the way it goes. We’ll pay
attention to it. But it’s not our
main focus if you ask our
group.”
Fluto Shinzawa can be reached
at fshinzawa@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeFluto.
C4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
PyeongChang 2018
A sport­by­sport look at Winter Games
By John Powers
humiliated on its home ice last time,
will be strongly motivated to win its
first gold in 26 years. The Canadian
women may be a habitual second to
their US rivals at the world championships but they’ve won gold at the last
four Olympics. The Finns likely will
join them on the stand.
US outlook: The US males have been
on-again, off-again at Olympus for two
decades. Last time after being blanked
by Canada, they no-showed in the
bronze match, where Finland hammered them by five goals. While this
group figures to be competitive, a
medal may be a stretch. The American
women had the gold won in Sochi
with four minutes to play, and they’ve
claimed seven of the last eight world
crowns. Getting the job done at the
Games has been the challenge ever
since 1998, when they were upset victors.
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
A look at the 15 Winter Olympic
sports in PyeongChang and how the
United States should fare:
Alpine skiing
Where: Yongpyong Alpine Centre
(technical) and Jeongseon Alpine Centre (speed).
When: Feb. 10 (men’s downhill), 11
(women’s giant slalom), 12 (men’s
combined), 13 (women’s slalom), 14
(men’s super-G), 16 (women’s super-G), 17 (men’s giant slalom), 20
(women’s downhill), 21 (men’s slalom), 22 (women’s combined), 23
(team event).
World view: The Norwegians may not
have Alp-sized mountains but their
men have become more than a match
for the Austrians and Swiss. They
could medal in all five events with super-G favorite Kjetil Jansrud, Aksel
Lund Svindal, and Henrik Kristoffersen grabbing two apiece. Austria’s Marcel Hirscher, the World Cup overall
leader, should sweep the slaloms and
Switzerland’s Beat Feuz is the man in
the downhill. There’s more balance on
the women’s side, where eight countries made the podium at last year’s
world championships. The Swiss
could win both the super-G (Lara Gut)
and combined (Wendy Holdener),
with the Americans taking the slalom
(Mikaela Shiffrin), the Italians the
downhill (Sofia Goggia), and the Germans the giant slalom (Viktoria Rebensburg).
US outlook: The Americans collected
five medals in Sochi and they could
manage it again with Lindsey Vonn
and Ted Ligety returning to form. Shiffrin, who’s favored to repeat as slalom
champion, also should make the podium in the giant slalom and downhill,
where her showdown with Vonn, the
2010 titlist, could be a Games highlight. Ligety, who won the giant slalom
last time, still is a medal contender.
Biathlon
Where: Alpensia Biathlon Centre.
When: Feb. 10 (women’s sprint), 11
(men’s sprint), 12 (men’s and women’s
pursuit), 14 (women’s individual), 15
(men’s individual), 17 (women’s mass
start), 18 (men’s mass start), 20
(mixed relay), 22 (women’s relay), 23
(men’s relay).
World view: The Germans, who produced only a couple of medals in 2014,
could carry off seven golds this time,
with Laura Dahlmeier taking four. The
Norwegians, who topped the table in
Sochi, will be led by Johannes
Thingnes Boe, who could make the
podium in every event. But the man to
watch is France’s Martin Fourcade, the
six-time World Cup overall victor
who’ll be favored in three events.
US outlook: The Americans have never
won an Olympic medal in this wintry
run-and-gun activity, but that could
change this time. Lowell Bailey’s gold
medal in the 20-kilometer event at last
year’s world championships was a
breakthrough, as was Susan Dunklee’s
silver in the mass start. If they can
replicate those performances in PyeongChang, it’ll be an historic double.
Bobsled
Where: Olympic Sliding Centre.
When: Feb. 18 (men’s two-man first
two runs), 19 (men’s two-man final
two runs), 20 (women’s first two runs),
21 (women’s final two runs), 23 (men’s
four-man first two runs), 24 (men’s
four-man last two runs).
World view: If the Russians hadn’t
doped their Sochi victors, the Germans likely would have claimed both
men’s titles last time. They’ll be favored again with four-time world
champion Francesco Friedrich in the
two-man and Johannes Lochner in the
four-man, where they could pull off an
unprecedented sweep. The Canadians
could grab a couple of medals in the
two-man behind World Cup leader
Justin Kripps, and countrywoman
Kaillie Humphries will be going after a
third consecutive women’s crown.
US outlook: The American women haven’t won since the inaugural Olympic
race in 2002, but they have the reigning world titlist in Elana Meyers Taylor, who’ll push Humphries all the way
down the hill. She and Jamie Greubel
Poser both made the award stand in
Sochi and should again. With last
year’s death of former champion Steve
Holcomb, who medaled in both races
in 2014, the men lost their best chance
for a medal. Codie Bascue has the best
shot but he’ll need four flawless runs.
Cross­country skiing
Where: Alpensia Cross-Country Skiing
Centre.
When: Feb. 10 (women’s skiathlon), 11
(men’s skiathlon), 13 (men’s and women’s sprint), 15 (women’s 10k freestyle), 16 (men’s 15k freestyle), 17
Luge
MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP PHOTO
United States men’s figure skater Nathan Chen steps to it during a
practice session at Gangneung Ice Arena in PyeongChang.
(women’s relay), 18 (men’s relay), 21
(men’s and women’s team sprint), 24
(men’s 50k mass start, women’s 30k
mass start).
World view: Norway and Sweden won
22 of 36 medals in Sochi, and not
much has changed since. The Norwegians took all six women’s events at
last year’s world championships behind superstar Marit Bjoergen, who
could collect three individual golds at
Olympus. The men, led by Johannes
Hoesflot Klaebo, could make the podium in every race. With top man Sergei
Ustiugov banned, the Russians are significantly weaker, which helps the
Norwegians and Canada’s Alex Harvey, the outlier who’ll be favored in the
50-kilometer grinder.
US outlook: Not since 1976 have the
Americans made the medal stand at
the Games, and the women never
have. That drought should end in Korea, where world medalists Jessica
Diggins, Sadie Bjornsen, and Kikkan
Randall all have excellent chances in
the sprints. That trio, plus Sophie
Caldwell and Ida Sargent, all have
made World Cup podiums this season
and one or more of them figure to do
it at Olympus. Though the US males
aren’t quite at the same level, Simi
Hamilton and Erik Bjornsen have an
outside chance in the team sprint.
Curling
Where: Gangneung Curling Centre.
When: Feb. 7-11 (mixed round-robin),
12-13 (mixed medal round), 13-21
(men’s and women’s round-robin), 22
(men’s semifinals, men’s bronze medal
match), 23 (women’s semifinals, men’s
gold medal match), 24 (women’s
bronze medal match, women’s gold
medal match).
World view: The Canadians, who
pulled off an unprecedented double
last time and are reigning men’s and
women’s global champions, are
primed for a rock-throwing reprise.
The men will be shooting for their
fourth consecutive victory, with the
Swedes and Swiss in the way. The
women, who deposed the Swedes in
Sochi for their first crown since 1998,
will be favored to repeat, with Sweden
and Great Britain (i.e. Scotland) in
pursuit.
US outlook: After terrible outings in
Vancouver and Sochi, the Americans
are positioned for a rebound. The
men, who were ninth last time, won
the world bronze two years ago with
John Shuster’s rink, and he’ll be skipping for redemption after 2014. The
women, who were 10th with Erika
Brown, now rank fifth with Olympic
rookie Nina Roth. If either were to collect a medal, it’d be the first since
2006.
Figure skating
Where: Gangneung Ice Arena.
When: Feb. 8 (team pairs and men’s
short programs), 10 (team pairs final,
women’s short program and short
dance), 11 (team men’s, women’s and
dance finals), 13 (pairs short program), 14 (pairs free skate), 15 (men’s
short program), 16 (men’s free skate),
17 (dance short program), 19 (dance
free dance), 20 (women’s short program), 22 (women’s free skate), 24 (exhibition gala).
World view: The Russians, who won
their first women’s crown in Sochi,
could go 1-2 this time with world victor Evgenia Medvedeva and European
titlist Alina Zagitova. They’ll also re-
tain their team laurels, should make
the pairs podium, and have a chance
in the dance. If defending champ Yuzuru Hanyu’s injured ankle holds up,
the Japanese can put two men on the
stand. Chinese world champs Sui
Wenjing and Han Cong will duel Germany’s Aliona Savchenko and Bruno
Massot in the pairs, while Canadian
former titlists Tessa Virtue and Scott
Moir will match steps with French
couple Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron.
US outlook: After being shut out of the
men’s and women’s medals in 2014 for
the first time since 1936, the Yanks
have a good chance at gold with teenage leaper Nathan Chen, the Grand
Prix champ. If Mirai Nagasu and rookie Bradie Tennell can keep their skates
beneath them, they’ll be in the chase,
but a medal seems unlikely. The US,
which has made three straight dance
podiums, should keep the string going
with either world medalists Maia and
Alex Shibutani or new domestic titlists
Madison Hubbell and Zach Donahue.
No shot in the pairs, where the Americans haven’t won anything in three decades.
Freestyle skiing
Where: Bokwang Phoenix Park.
When: Feb. 11 (women’s moguls), 12
(men’s moguls), 16 (women’s aerials
and slopestyle), 17 (men’s slopestyle),
18 (men’s aerials), 19 (women’s halfpipe), 20 (men’s ski cross), 21 (men’s
halfpipe), 22 (women’s ski cross).
World view: While the Americans
dominate this midair sport, their foreign rivals have become adept at stepping up in events where the US is
thinner. The French could scoop up a
half-dozen medals, the Canadians and
Australians a trio apiece, the Japanese
and Chinese each a couple, and the
Swedes could double up in ski cross.
US outlook: The Yanks rolled a seven
in Sochi, and they’re poised to do at
least as well again. They’ll be favored
to win both aerials with world champs
Ashley Caldwell and Jon Lillis, place
1-2 in men’s slopestyle with McRae
Williams and Gus Kenworthy, and
possibly sweep men’s halfpipe behind
Aaron Blunck. Defending halfpipe
champion Maddie Bowman is back, as
is slopestyle medalist Devin Logan,
who’ll be doubling up in halfpipe. Brita Sigourney (halfpipe) and Jaelin
Kauf (moguls) will contend as well.
Ice hockey
Where: Gangneung Hockey Centre
and Kwandong Hockey Centre.
When: Men: Feb. 14-18 (prelims), 21
(quarterfinals), 23 (semifinals), 24
(bronze-medal match), 25 (gold-medal
match). US prelim schedule: Feb. 14
Slovenia; 16 Slovakia; 17 Russia.
Women: Feb. 10-15 (prelims), 17
(quarterfinals), 19 (semifinals), 21
(bronze-medal match), 22 (gold-medal
match). US prelim schedule: Feb. 11
Finland; 13 Russia; 15 Canada.
World view: The NHLers may be absent for the first time since 1994, but
the contenders won’t be any different
than they usually are. The Canadians,
who were the first men’s champions to
repeat in 22 years in 2014, will be gunning for their fourth title in five
Games. Sweden, runner-up last time,
now is world champion. Finland,
which has missed the podium only
once since 1992, is chasing its fourth
consecutive medal. Russia, which
hasn’t won one since 2002 and was
Where: Olympic Sliding Centre.
When: Feb. 10 (men’s first two runs),
11 (men’s final two runs), 12 (women’s
first two runs), 13 (women’s second
two runs), 14 (men’s doubles), 15
(team relay).
World view: The Germans claimed all
four golds last time, and they’re the favorites to do it again with the same
crew. Felix Loch will be sliding for a
third consecutive title and Natalie Geisenberger and the double of Tobias
Wendl and Tobias Arlt are favored to
repeat, as is the relay. If Deutschland
doesn’t come away with a half-dozen
medals, it’ll be a shortfall. Figure the
Austrians for a couple as well.
US outlook: Erin Hamlin’s bronze four
years ago was a breakthrough for the
American women, who’d been crowded off the podium by the Germans for
decades. They have an excellent
chance at returning to the medal
stand with Summer Britcher, who was
third on the World Cup circuit, and
with Hamlin, the global silver medalist. The men never have medaled in
the single and won’t be close this time,
although Matt Mortensen and Jayson
Terdiman have an outside chance in
the double.
World view: No Asian ever has won an
Olympic skeleton medal, but that
should change with South Korea’s Yun
Sung Bin, who owned the World Cup
men’s season and will be favored on
his home track ahead of Latvia’s Tomass Dukurs. Though German women never have won gold, they figure to
end the British domination with Jacqueline Loelling and Tina Hermann
likely to go 1-2.
US outlook: The Americans picked up
a couple of medals in 2014 but they’re
likely to come up empty this time.
Matt Antoine, who earned the men’s
silver, didn’t come close to a Cup podium this winter. And Katie Uhlaender
finished 12th on the women’s circuit.
Ski jumping
Where: Alpensia Ski Jumping Centre.
When: Feb. 10 (men’s individual normal hill); 12 (women’s individual normal hill), 17 (men’s individual large
hill), 19 (men’s team large hill).
World view: Poland’s Kamil Stoch is
back to defend the twin titles he won
in Sochi, but he’ll get stiff challenges
from Austria’s Stefan Kraft, who took
both events at last year’s world championships, and Germany’s Andreas
Wellinger, who was runner-up in each.
The Poles will be favored in the team
event, though. German world champ
Carina Vogt is the one to beat on the
women’s side but Norway’s Maren
Lundby and the Japanese will be in
her way.
US outlook: The Americans haven’t
won an Olympic medal since 1924
and customarily don’t come close.
That pattern will continue in 2018.
Kevin Bickner is top-20 level at best
and former world titlist Sarah Hendrickson hasn’t been the same since
she tore up a knee before (and since)
the last Games.
Snowboarding
Where: Alpensia Ski Jumping Centre
and Cross-Country Centre.
When: Feb. 14 (individual normal hill
and 10k), 20 (individual large hill and
10k), 22 (team large hill and relay).
World view: The Norwegians topped
the table last time but the Germans
nudged them aside at last year’s world
championships, winning all three
events and sweeping the normal hill
medals. That’s the way to bet in PyeongChang with Johannes Rydzek positioned to reprise his global double.
The Japanese should make a podium
as well.
US outlook: The Americans, who hit
the mother lode in 2010 with a gold
and three silvers, reverted back to the
pack in Sochi. Hopes are duly modest
this time around. Bryan Fletcher
should place in the top 15, and he and
brother Taylor could crack the top 10
in the team event.
Where: Bokwang Phoenix Park.
When: Feb. 10 (men’s slopestyle), 11
(women’s slopestyle), 12 (women’s
halfpipe), 13 (men’s halfpipe), 14
(men’s snowboardcross), 15 (women’s
snowboardcross), 22 (women’s big
air), 23 (men’s big air and men’s and
women’s parallel giant slalom).
World view: The sport may be identified with star-spangled daredevils, but
it now belongs to the world. Nine
countries won the 10 Olympic events
at last year’s world championships, everyone from the Austrians to the Australians. Most notable is returnee Vic
Wild, the American transplant who
went double gold for Russia last time.
US outlook: The US won five medals
four years ago, three of them gold, and
that’s a reasonable expectation again.
Chloe Kim, who’s favored in women’s
halfpipe, is the team’s energetic new
face. She’s joined by Lindsey Jacobellis, the four-time Olympian and fivetime world titlist in snowboardcross,
defending slopestyle champion Jamie
Anderson, double global medalist
Chris Corning (big air and slopestyle),
and World Cup slopestyle leader Redmond Gerard. And, of course, Shaun
White, who’ll be chasing his third
halfpipe gold at his fourth Games.
Short­track speedskating
Speedskating
Where: Gangneung Ice Arena
When: Feb. 10 (men’s 1,500), 13
(women’s 500), 17 (men’s 1,000 and
women’s 1,500), 20 (women’s relay),
22 (men’s 500 and relay and women’s
1,000).
World view: With Viktor Ahn, the Korean import who produced three gold
medals in Sochi, kept out of these
Games as a suspected doper, the Russians have been relegated to the background. The home team will have to
fight to regain its primacy, though.
The Chinese, who topped the table in
2014, still are the Koreans’ top rivals.
The Dutch, who won their first shorttrack medal in Sochi, could claim a
sprint gold with world champ Sjinkie
Knegt plus the relay. Great Britain’s
Elise Christie was the best woman on
the planet last year, and the Canadians
should be good for five medals overall.
US outlook: When Apolo Anton Ohno
retired before the last Games, the
Americans’ best shot for gold departed
with him. While the coaching nightmare that bedeviled the team before
Sochi has been cleared up, the US has
struggled to break into the medals at
the global level. J.R. Celski, at 27, is
still the team’s top performer. He
sparked his mates to a relay silver last
time and could do it again. Minimal
prospects for the women, who didn’t
qualify the relay after winning bronze
in 2010.
Where: Gangneung Oval.
When: Feb. 10 (women’s 3,000), 11
(men’s 5,000), 12 (women’s 1,500), 13
(men’s 1,500), 14 (women’s 1,000), 15
(men’s 10,000), 16 (women’s 5,000),
18 (women’s 500), 19 (men’s 500), 21
(men’s and women’s team pursuit), 23
(men’s 1,000), 24 (men’s and women’s
mass start).
World view: The Dutch hit a sea-level
jackpot in Sochi, winning 23 medals
and eight of 12 golds, five of them on
the men’s side, and collected eight titles at last year’s world single distance
championships. While a repeat may
be too much to ask, the Oranje still are
the gilded standard at Olympus, led by
Sven Kramer, who’ll be pursuing a record third straight title in the men’s
5,000 meters. They’ll get a formidable
pushback in the sprints from Norway’s
Havard Holmefjord Lorentzen (men)
and Japan’s Nao Kodaira (women),
and from American rival Heather
(Richardson) Bergsma, whose husband, Torrit, won the 10,000 gold last
time.
US outlook: After their worst-ever
showing in 2014 (zero medals), the
country that produced Eric Heiden
and Bonnie Blair is desperate to get
back on the podium.
The best chance rides with Bergsma,
who was No. 1 on the planet in the
1,000 and 1,500 last year and also is a
contender in the new mass start event.
Top gun on the men’s side is Joey
Mantia, who’ll be favored in the mass
start and could also make the stand in
the 1,500.
Nordic combined
Skeleton
Where: Alpensia Sliding Centre.
When: Feb. 14 (women’s first two
runs), 15 (women’s final two runs), 16
(men’s first two runs), 17 (men’s final
two runs).
John Powers can be reached at
john.powers@globe.com.
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C5
PyeongChang 2018
Mental preparation
key part of process
By Rachel G. Bowers
GLOBE STAFF
CARLOS OSORIO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hilary Knight (21), Monique Lamoureux (7) and the US won World gold, but the Canadians have owned the Olympics.
US women overdue in hockey
Beating Canada
is golden goal
By John Powers
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Invariably the topic comes
up in every conversation with
members of the US women’s
hockey team. You’ve beaten the
Canadians for all these world titles. So what happens when you
play them at the Olympics?
“That’s certainly the age-old
question that everyone loves to
ask,” said captain Meghan Duggan. “We’ve heard that one a
lot.”
The Americans defeated
Canada to win the inaugural
five-ringed tournament in 1998
in Nagano, prompting a boom
on the women’s side of the
sport, from the youth to the collegiate levels. Since then, their
northern neighbors have won
four consecutive gold medals at
the Games, vanquishing the US
three times in the championship game.
“ We k n o w i t ’s b e e n 2 0
years,” said coach Robb Stauber, who was an assistant in
2014. “We don’t have to be geniuses to do that math. I think
for us it’s not necessarily about
the 20 years but more about, it’s
time. We’ve got to bring home a
gold medal.”
The most distressing aspect
of the continuous shortfalls is
that the last three times the US
came into the Games as world
champions. Their Sochi loss
was particularly painful since
the Americans led by two goals
with less than four minutes to
play in regulation before coming unglued. After pulling their
goalie, the Canadians tied the
game with 55 seconds remaining, then won, 3-2, in overtime
with two Yanks in the penalty
box.
“Obviously we would like to
change that result, but you have
to ask yourself why, which we
were able to do,” said Stauber.
“It’s a very difficult question.
“ Were there things that
could have been done that
w o u l d h av e e n h a n c e d o u r
chances of winning? Absolutely
we can say yes, but we can’t say
just because we would do those
things that we would guarantee
a win, because quite frankly
there’s no way that anybody can
guarantee a win.
“But we’re all about improving our chances of winning.
That’s first and foremost. The
players have taken that very seriously, day in and day out.”
As dispiriting as the Sochi
loss was, it served to make the
Americans more resolute to get
the job done in PyeongChang.
“Sometimes you really do
need to fail to succeed,” observed defenseman Kacey Bellamy, one of 10 holdovers from
the 2014 squad. “I don’t take
back any of those losses because
of how much we’ve learned. It’s
when you win over and over
again you don’t think you need
to change things.”
The Americans rebounded
to win the last three global
crowns, extending their dominance to seven of the last eight.
Each of those seven times, they
defeated the Canadians in the
final, twice on their rivals’
home ice. No country other
than those two has ever won a
world title nor even played in
the championship game.
“You’d be hard-pressed to
find a rivalr y in any sport,
men’s or women’s, that has had
such a longstanding rivalry like
we have with Canada,” said forward Monique Lamoureux-Morando. “When we train day in
and day out, we picture playing
in the gold-medal game and it
being against them.”
If familiarity has bred competition, if not contention, it
may be because these rivals
know each other all too well.
Nearly all of the Canadians
played with or against the
Americans for US college
teams, 10 of them for either
Wisconsin or Cornell. Head
coach Laura Schuler, a Northeastern grad who played on the
1998 squad, directs the Dartmouth program. And captain
Ma r i e - P h i l i p Po u l i n , w h o
scored the tying and winning
goals in Sochi, is a former Boston University captain.
“Every time we play, it’s like
a final,” said Poulin. “We can
see the rivalry. It’s so big. It’s so
intense. So every time we play,
it gets better every time.”
The rivalry also has gotten
decidedly closer on the scoreboard. Six of the last eight
world title games were decided
by one goal. Four, including the
last two, went to overtime. The
differences between the teams
are so minute by now that an
untimely penalty, a careless
clearance, or a bounce of the
puck can decide the champion.
The puck bounced the Canadians’ way in Sochi but hasn’t
since. Two years ago, they were
shut out in Kamloops in the
world finale. Last year, they led
the title match in Plymouth,
Mich., before losing in the extra
session.
“We take that seriously, and
it still hurts,” said forward Haley Irwin.
So when the Canadians took
a 5-2 beating from the US in
Quebec City in the October
opener of their exhibition series, an infuriated Schuler
called it “an embarrassment to
our country.”
Her chastened charges responded with a 5-1 triumph
three days later in Boston and
went on to win the final four
meetings by a 9-3 count.
“We need to elevate in a lot
of areas,” acknowledged Duggan. “Goal scoring is one of
them.”
While its global title gives
the US the favorite’s tag going
into the Games, the Americans
understand that they’re not
guaranteed a gold-medal rematch. They learned that to
their dismay a dozen years ago
in Turin, where they squan-
dered a 2-0 lead to the Swedes
in their semifinal, lost in a
shootout, and had to settle for
bronze.
“We caution our players day
in day out that it’s one game at a
time,” said Stauber, whose
squad will face Finland, Russia,
and Canada in the prelims.
“You don’t go to the Olympics
and just get to the gold-medal
game. That would be a mistake
on our part.”
Ever since Turin, the Americans have made it a point to get
to the championship game in
every Olympic and world tournament.
“We’re always hungry,” said
Duggan. “It runs deep in your
blood and in your soul.”
The Yanks still believe that
they were the best sextet on the
planet in 2014.
“The scariest thing is that
we’re even better than we were
b e f o r e ,” r e c k o n e d H i l a r y
Knight. “That’s what’s so exciting.”
The Americans have been
the best coming into the Games
four straight times now. They
returned home bemedaled but
unfulfilled from the last three.
“This team is so ripe,” said
Knight.
What she and her teammates discovered the hard way
is that at Olympus an entire
quadrennium comes down to
one night.
“We say to the players, no
matter what we do, no matter
how we prepare, you still have
to drop the puck,” said Stauber.
“It’s a game of hockey. There’s
no guaranteed outcome.
“But we believe that the
work that’s been put in the last
several years is going to give our
team the best chance for the
outcome that they want. They
know it, they believe in it, and
as our players have stated over
and over, they’re really hungry
for a different result.”
John Powers can be reached at
john.powers@globe.com.
There is a particular point
in a song that Nick Goepper
has to hear right before dropping into the halfpipe for a
run.
It cannot be a slow beginning. It cannot be tapering off.
It must be right in the middle
of the song. More specifically,
nearing the chorus.
“Often times I will pause
my music right until I’m about
to drop and then start it sort of
right at the chorus,” said Goepper, a slopestyle skier competing at the PyeongChang Winter Olympics. “It’s got to be
kind of ticking up.”
After spending 15-20 minutes visualizing his run atop
the slope, Goepper, who won
bronze four years ago in Sochi,
will say a short prayer and
then shuffle through his preferred genre of the moment —
thrash metal, EDM, classic
rock, hip-hop — to find just the
right tune. Then, he ditches
the headphones and it’s down
the slope he goes.
Athletes use various methods of mentally preparing
themselves in the leadup to
competition: music, prayer,
phone calls to mom, going to
the bathroom, dancing. Routines in the final minutes before competition can serve as a
checkpoint, an indication to
the mind and body that it is go
time.
For Gus Kenworthy, who is
competing in his second Winter Games after winning slopestyle silver in Sochi, visualization is a large part of how he
centers himself in the minutes
prior to a run.
“I’ll close my eyes and think
about every bizarre, minute
detail in the run, things that I
need to do, how it’s going to
feel coming into the jumps,
how much speed I’m going to
feel like I’m going to have,
what it’s going to sound like,
everything,” he said.
Then, in the moments before actually dropping in, Kenworthy turns his focus solely to
his breath, much like in yoga
practices. He admittedly can
let the moment get away from
him, thinking about what his
score may be, about what he
will say in post-run interviews,
about “all the dumb things”
that do not pertain to his task
at hand.
But the breath — focusing
on the breath clears the clutter.
“Trying to stay in the moment, grounded,” he said.
Bobsledder Elana Meyers
Taylor, a pilot competing in
her third Olympics, tries to
think of . . . nothing. “Absolutely nothing,” she said.
She prays upon arriving at
the start line and then wipes
her mind clean as much as she
can.
Fellow bobsledder Aja Evans, a brakeman for pilot Jamie Greubel Poser for a second
straight Games, has a couple of
things she does before going
down the track. Firs t , she
makes sure she uses the bathroom. (The G-forces created
when a sled goes down the
track can create . . . a problem.)
“You do not want to come
out with a big wet spot,” Evans
said with a laugh.
Then, no matter where she
is, she always calls her mother,
Sequocoria Mallory, who is an
immense inspiration and
source of motivation for Evans.
“I don’t care how much it
costs, I’m on the phone calling
her, and as soon as I call her,
she knows what that means,”
said Evans, a bronze medalist
in Sochi.
The two pray — for Evans’s
protection on the track, for a
performance that exceeds expectations.
“She says some very encouraging words, and then literally
it’s go time from there,” Evans
added.
Nordic skier Liz Stephen
has a few things she has to remember to get to the start line:
her skis, her race bib, and herself.
“All of which are definitely
things I’ve forgotten in the
past ,” Stephen said with a
laugh. “There’s always a learning curve with everything,
right?”
Sadie Bjornsen, a fellow
cross-country skier competing
in her second Olympics, packs
a bag to leave at the start line
with a dry change of clothes
for after the race. And for each
race, she is sure to wear her
lucky racing gloves and lucky
sports bra.
“I pull them on just 10 minutes before the start, zip up my
suit, and everything’s really
tight and so you just feel like
you’re not gonna catch any
wind,” she said.
Once in the race pen, Bjornsen does not remain still.
Sometimes, she leans on her
wax technician, Jean-Pascal
Laurin, for his sense of humor.
Hi s j o ke s go a l o n g w ay t o
soothing Bjornsen in the moments leading to a start.
“Enough to loosen me up
and remember I’m here for
fun,” Bjornsen said, “and the
No. 1 thing is I’m prepared
and I’m going to have fun.”
Olympics on TV Thursday
TIME
EVENT
CHANNEL
6 a.m.
Mixed doubles curling: US vs. Canada (live); ski
jumping
NBCSN
8 p.m.
Figure skating: team event (live); freestyle skiing
NBC
8 p.m.
Mixed doubles curling: US vs. Switzerland; Alpine
skiing (live); luge
NBCSN
11:35 p.m. Mixed doubles curling: US vs. South Korea (live)
NBCSN
Alpine skiing at top of heap of sports at Winter Games
uOLYMPICS
Continued from Page C1
1. Alpine skiing
Ski racing checks all the
boxes. There’s drama — even
the best ski racers can fall at
any time — and danger. There
are fascinating personalities
such as Mikaela Shiffrin and
Lindsey Vonn, who are both
teammates and rivals. You can
see the skiers’ faces, and the
format is as simple as it gets:
fastest one down the hill wins.
Plus, you have instant knowledge of where they stand. A
skier crosses the line, and a
number flashes up. Someone
sits on the top of the podium
until they get bumped.
What’s also good about ski
racing is you don’ t need to
know a lot about the sport.
You know whether you’re seeing a great performance. And
fan interest is amplified because of all the Winter Olympic sports, skiing is one many
viewers have tried, so for many
it’s easy to relate.
2. Figure skating
I t ’s o n e o f t h e m a rq u e e
sports of any Winter Olympics,
surely a contender for the top
spot because of its grace, elegance, athleticism, compelling
cast of characters, and the way
the music selections give it a
Broadway feel. It’s undoubtedly one of the highest scorers in
the fan interest category.
But a major con is the confusing scoring system. How
can a skater who fell twice beat
someone who didn’t fall at all?
It’s because the scoring favors
degree of difficulty and a skater can get more points for a
splattered quad than by completing a triple, but that’s not
exactly common knowledge.
3. Snowboarding
It appeals to a younger
crowd and was designed to interest that demographic in the
Olympics. A strong personality
factor is amplified by the popular X Games, and the variety
of snowboarding events, from
slopestyle and big air to halfpipe and snowboardcross,
puts a range of athletic skills
on display. However, a lexicon
that is difficult to understand
is a downside for the average
fan.
4. Short­track speedskat­
ing
Short-track’s appeal is its
universality. Asians are good at
it, Europeans are good at it,
and North Americans are good
at it. There is a level of drama
and uncertainty because anybody could win. It’s fast, there
are thrills and spills, and you
know who wins quickly so it’s
more gratifying than its longform cousin.
5. Hockey
While immensely popular,
hockey slots in below two other ice sports because the field
of true contenders is more lim-
ited. Without the NHL in the
men’s field, rosters are going
to be almost as anonymous as
those in the rest of the sports.
The women’s field features the
compelling US-Canada rivalry,
and the nation-vs.-nation team
concept taps into the allure of
other international team
events. But on the downside,
hockey is a two-week commitment before you know the
medals outcome.
6. Freestyle skiing
Danger is very attractive to
Olympics viewers, and freestyle skiing events such as aerials, moguls, and halfpipe are
loaded with danger. There’s incredible athletic ability involved — who hasn’t wondered
how a moguls skier’s knees tolerate such tor ture? — and
while these events are judged,
they are easier to understand.
Plus, American success in this
sport elevates it.
7. Bobsled
Among the sliding sports,
bobsled is the most dangerous.
You have four people involved
in pulling off a fast-paced, choreographed start, and those
athletes often can come from
all walks of sporting life. Plus,
bobsled is becoming more diverse and attracting competitors from the unlikeliest of
places, such as Jamaica, Nigeria, and Brazil. Underdog stories such as that add a lot.
8. Luge
Anyone who has ever gone
sledding can relate. Kind of. In
a that-looks-crazy kind of way.
9. Ski jumping
One of the classic Winter
Olympics sports continues to
fascinate anyone who remembers “ABC ’s Wide World of
Sports,” and it also gives them
the chance to educate a younger generation on where the
phrase “the agony of defeat”
was made famous. But it is
judged, which brings it down a
bit.
10. Skeleton
See luge, except headfirst.
11. Long­track speedskat­
ing
The 10,000-meter event can
take as much as six hours to
complete. There’s a reason a
mass-start event was added
this year.
12. Curling
Go ahead, dust off the
jokes, but curling has a high
curiosity factor. Land on curling and your clicker gets a momentary break. Land on any of
the next three and, well, click.
13. Nordic combined
Cross-country plus ski
jumping > just cross-country.
14. Biathlon
Cross-country plus shooting also > just cross-country.
15. Cross­country skiing
A lot of people go crosscountry skiing and it’s great
exercise, but it’s just not that
compelling to watch.
C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Lions, Patricia seek a clean start
By Larry Lage
GLOBE STAFF
Chris Ballard was so confident that Josh McDaniels was
on board as the next coach of
the Colts that the Indianapolis
general manager gave the goahead for the team to announce
the hire before McDaniels put
pen to paper.
That was Tuesday morning.
“I got a call Tuesday evening
saying he had decided to . . . he
had changed his mind and was
going in a different direction,”
Ballard told reporters during a
news conference in Indianapolis Wednesday, the morning after McDaniels backed out of the
job to remain in New England,
where he has spent 14 years of
his career in total and has been
offensive coordinator for the
past six seasons.
“ We were disappointed,”
Ballard said. “Unquestionably
we were disappointed and surprised. We’d agreed to contract
terms. We had an agreement in
place. We’d followed the rules
and did everything right.
“Two interviews, both of
them went very well. Very confident that we were going in the
right direction, very confident
Monday evening and Tuesday
morning.”
It was a little after 7 p.m.
Tuesday when McDaniels called
Ballard. The GM stepped out of
a draft meeting to take the call.
“I have bad news for you,”
McDaniels said.
“I just need a yes or no answer,” Ballard said. “Are you in
or out?”
McDaniels can continue to
w o r k w i t h To m B ra d y a n d
start from square one with their chase Super Bowl rings.
For the Patriots, keeping Mccoaching search, five weeks afDaniels gives them assurances
ter other teams did.
Colts general manager Chris as well. It assures the Kraft famBallard took the high road in a ily that they will have a compenews conference on Wednesday tent head coach (we think)
whenever Belichick decides to
morning.
“Unquestionably we were step down. It gives the Krafts a
disappointed and surprised,” little bit of leverage against
Ballard said. “Josh McDaniels is Belichick, in case the tension
a good football coach, and I between them mounts. It gives
wish him the best going for- the Patriots someone they can
ward.”
trust to identify and develop the
But McDaniels’s turnaround next Jimmy Garoppolo.
“Those people in New Engobviously is not sitting well inside the Colts’ offices. Ballard land, I promise you, are delightgave it away with his walk-off ed. It’s like the greatest thing
line at the news conference. He ever,” Weis said. “They don’t
lose their offensive coordinator,
just couldn’t help himself.
“The rivalry is back on,” Bal- they don’t lose the guy who’s
lard said.
Tommy’s confidant, you don’t
According to Peter King of lose a potential head coach,
The MMQB, McDaniels had a whenever Bill decides to go.”
McDaniels did have some
change of heart after having a
long meeting with Robert Kraft supporters outside of New Engand Bill Belichick on Tuesday. land on Wednesday. Former
NFL quarterBut McDaniels
back Sage
was not given
any written asRosenfels noted the double
surances
standard at
about being
play when
the successor
coaches routo Belichick in
tinely show no
New England.
loyalty to playThe key
ers and cut
there is “written.” It doesn’t
them on a
CHARLIE WEIS
have to be
whim.
“I know I’m
written into
in the minoriMc D a n i e l s ’s
contract that he is Belichick’s ty, but I’m fine with what Josh
heir apparent, but McDaniels McDaniels did,” Rosenfels
better have gotten verbal assur- tweeted. “The Colts org has
been a mess since Peyton left.
ances.
It’s the only way to justify Patriots as solid as it gets. He
committing “professional sui- changed his mind. Oh well.
cide,” as LaMonte characterized Change the NFL rules then.
This was bound to happen at
it late Tuesday night.
“If he’s not [the heir appar- some point.”
Bill Polian, the Colts’ presient],” Weis said, “then that
would’ve been the absolute dent from 1998-2011, said his
dumbest move in the history of phone was lighting up on Tuessports.”
day night with calls and texts
Because make no mistake, from his former employees in
McDaniels’s name is toxic right Indianapolis. The impression
now. His failed stint in Denver Polian got was that the Colts
(11-17 record, and was fired af- were thankful that McDaniels
ter Week 13 in his second sea- bailed on them now, instead of
son), and this about-face in In- after he already joined them.
dianapolis, are two big strikes Polian brought up the Bobby
against him. It’s going to take Petrino situation in Atlanta in
years for McDaniels to clear his 2007, when he lasted less than
a full season with the Falcons
name.
NBC analyst and former and bailed on the team for anC o l t s c o a c h To n y D u n g y other job with three weeks to
couldn’t contain his rage on go.
“No one’s upset, no one’s cryWednesday morning. Dungy is
a rival and a Colt at heart, but ing about spilled milk,” Polian
also among the most mild-man- said on ESPN Radio. “As somenered people you might ever one said, ‘Better to learn it now
meet. He’s not an emotional than later.’ ”
McDaniels wasn’t commitguy or a hot-take artist.
“I can tell you there is NO ex- ted to the Colts. He is commitcuse big enough to justify this,” t e d t o t h e P a t r i o t s , a n d
Dungy tweeted. “It’s one thing Belichick, and Brady, and the
to go back on your word to an Krafts.
organization. But having assisBut those dreams of becomtant coaches leave jobs to go ing a head coach again will
with you then leave them out to have to hinge on Belichick leavdry is indefensible. For COM- ing the Patriots. Unlike Matt Patricia, who was introduced as
FORT??”
Of course, none of it matters t h e L i o n s ’ h e a d c o a c h o n
if McDaniels was told that he Wednesday, McDaniels isn’t
eventually will take over for getting hired away any time
Belichick. And Belichick will soon.
turn 66 in April, so that time is
coming sooner rather than later Ben Volin can be reached at
— as soon as 2019, potentially. ben.volin@globe.com. Follow
Until Belichick does step down, him on Twitter @BenVolin
Continued from Page A1
PAUL SANCYA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
(Left) Bob Quinn, Martha Firestone Ford, and Rod Wood helped introduce Matt Patricia.
that could take us to the next
level and I am confident we
have found that in Matt Patricia,’’ Quinn said.
Quinn fired coach Jim
Caldwell last month with a 3628 mark over four years and
two playoff appearances. The
Lions went 9-7 last season and
missed the playoffs, ranking
among the NFL’s worst rushing
teams for the fourth straight
year.
In recent years, Patricia has
become a candidate to lead a
team in the league. He ap-
peared to be in the running to
be hired by his homestate New
York Giants, but seemed to
choose the challenge in the Motor City.
Patricia, who is from Sherrill, N.Y., has taken a unique
path in his career.
He earned an aeronautical
engineering degree at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and
later added a master’s degree in
education from the University
of Massachusetts to his résumé.
The former center and
guard was a graduate assistant
at RPI in 1996 before shifting
gears to be an aeronautical engineer for two years. Patricia
got back on the sideline as a defensive line coach at Amherst
College in 1999 and went on to
be a graduate assistant for Paul
Pasqualoni, whom he has hired
to be Detroit’s defensive coordinator.
Jim Bob Cooter was not
mentioned in the Lions’ release
regarding staff additions, but
he is listed on the team’s website as its returning offensive
coordinator.
Colts GM: ‘The rivalry is back on’
By Nora Princiotti
McDaniels had better
hope it was worth it
uON FOOTBALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALLEN PARK, Mich. — The
Detroit Lions desperately hope
Matt Patricia ends their decades-long search for a coach
who can help them have success in the playoffs.
Patricia, with his previously
bushy beard trimmed, had his
first news conference Wednesday on the team’s indoor practice field.
‘‘This is a dream come true,’’
he said.
The 43-year-old Patricia
helped New England win three
Super Bowls over 14 years. He
was the Patriots’ defensive coordinator the past six seasons. Patricia and Lions general manager Bob Quinn worked together
for a dozen years in New England.
Detroit has been searching
for decades to find a coach who
can help the franchise have success in the playoffs and at least
appear in the Super Bowl for
the first time.
‘‘Our goal is to win and to
compete for championships
and I believe we’re taking the
next step,’’ team president Rod
Wood said.
Since winning the 1957 NFL
title, Detroit’s only postseason
victory was more than a quarter-century ago.
‘‘I wanted to find a leader
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
McDaniels said he was out.
Ballard wished him the best of
luck. He said he didn’t ask what
led to the change of heart. He
didn’t try to persuade McDaniels to take the job. The conversation lasted about five minutes.
“I live in a black-and-white
world,” Ballard said. “Either
you’re in or you’re out. I didn’t
want the explanation.”
Ballard said he had gotten
no indication that McDaniels
was getting cold feet. There had
been a handful of media reports
that McDaniels was waffling,
but Ballard said he doesn’t deal
in rumors and that, internally,
he had been confident. He took
full responsibility for the announcement that turned out to
be premature.
On Wednesday, ESPN reported that agent Bob LaMonte, who was representing Ballard and McDaniels among
many other NFL coaches and
executives, dropped McDaniels
as a client. LaMonte, who did
not immediately return a request for comment, could have
alerted Ballard that there was a
potential problem, but it’s not
clear how much McDaniels was
telling him.
McDaniels had lined up several Colts assistants, some of
whom had signed contracts. Indianapolis will retain Matt
Eberflus as defensive coordinator, Dave DeGuglielmo as offensive line coach, and Mike Phair
as defensive line coach, all of
whom had signed on with the
expectation they would work
under McDaniels.
The Colts will interview Eagles offensive coordinator
Frank Reich and Saints assistant head coach Dan Campbell
for the head coaching position
this week. All the other candidates Ballard said the Colts had
looked at, including Mike Vrabel, Matt Nagy, and Kris Richard, are now unavailable.
Ballard said issues concerning the NFL’s interview process
for coaches whose teams are in
the playoffs were “over my
head.” Indianapolis had to wait
until after the Super Bowl to
make things official with McDaniels, while teams whose
seasons were over had already
made hires.
It’s possible the Patriots
waited until after the Super
Bowl to make overtures to McDaniels that he didn’t know
were coming, or he simply had
second thoughts given more
time to think about things. Last
week in Minnesota, McDaniels
seemed nostalgic about his
time in New England, thinking
back to his first Super Bowl as a
personnel assistant in 2001.
“I didn’t have any money,” he
recalled. “My wife was the only
one there and we were dirt poor
and happy. I just, again, being
at this game . . . if you’d have
told me when I was 5 years old,
‘You’ll make one Super Bowl,’ I
would have told you you could
take me then.
“Everything about this place
has really made me a better
coach, a better person, and given me all these opportunities to
come and compete like this. I’ll
forever be indebted for that.”
Ballard said that McDaniels
hadn’ t asked to speak with
quarterback Andrew Luck during the hiring process. He said
he had no indication that concerns about the quarterback’s
health were what caused McDaniels to change his mind.
Multiple reports cited comfort
in New England, as well as a
significant last-minute effort on
the part of the Kraft family, as
major reasons McDaniels chose
to remain with the Patriots.
Toward the end of the news
conference, Ballard was asked if
he blamed the Patriots and
Robert Kraft in part for McDaniels’s decision not to take the
job. There had been significant
tension between the organizations as the result of Deflategate, but that thawed once Ballard got the job in Indianapolis
and the teams completed the
Phillip Dorsett-Jacoby Brissett
trade in September.
Ballard said he didn’t blame
the Patriots or Kraft. He said he
didn’t feel betrayed. He laughed
off questions about how he and
owner Jim Irsay took the news,
acknowledging that both of
them are “competitive.” Ballard
called McDaniels a good coach
and wished him the best.
Before he walked off the podium, however, he said this:
“The rivalry is back on.”
Nora Princiotti can be reached
at nora.princiotti@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter at
@NoraPrinciotti.
‘Those people in
New England, I
promise you, are
delighted. It’s like the
greatest thing ever.’
Retaining Lewis, Burkhead may top Patriots’ wish list
uPATRIOTS
Continued from Page C1
Daniels’s offense. Though he
missed seven games because of
rib and knee injuries, he still
collected 518 yards from scrimmage and 8 TDs, and that production should earn him another shot (perhaps on a one- or
two-year pact) in New England.
Bolden, 28, is an exceptional
special teams player, valuable
depth back, and glue guy in the
locker room. Another one-year
deal similar to 2017 ($775,000)
seems logical.
Offensive tackle is another
position that will need to be addressed early. Starting left tackle Nate Solder, as well as Cameron Fleming and LaAdrian
Waddle, each of whom spent
time as the starter at right tackle, are free agents.
Solder, who was a rock protecting Tom Brady’s blind side,
has been the starter since 2012.
He has also been a rock off the
field, as he and his wife deal
with their son Hudson’s treatments for kidney cancer.
Solder, 29, is coming off a
two-year, $20 million deal, part
of which stipulated he cannot
be hit with the franchise tag. It
wouldn’t be a surprise if he
signed a deal similar in length
with a bump in salary.
Fleming, 25, and Waddle,
26, provide excellent swing
depth and likely will have plenty of suitors if they hit the market. Assuming Marcus Cannon
returns to health, they’d again
be competing to be the top
backup.
Guard/center Ted Karras,
24, is an exclusive-rights free
agent who should be back.
Receiver Danny Amendola
keeps getting better. The nineyear veteran is among the most
clutch players not only on the
roster but in the league — he
had 26 catches for 348 yards in
the postseason alone.
Amendola, 32, has taken pay
cuts in three straight seasons,
though he’d likely receive some
kind of bump from the $1.7
million he earned this past season.
On defense, cornerback is a
top area of concern with Malcolm Butler and Johnson Bademosi free agents.
Butler, who was benched for
the Super Bowl, played on a
one-year, $3.91 million restricted free agent tender in 2017
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Free agent Rex Burkhead missed seven games with injuries
in 2017 but still had 518 yards from scrimmage and 8 TDs.
and will have no shortage of
teams vying for his services
now that he’s unrestricted. A
former Super Bowl hero and
Pro Bowl player, Butler, 27, is a
scrappy competitor and a sure
tackler with eight career interceptions. A fresh start seems in
order for Butler, who visited
with the Saints last year as a restricted free agent but returned
when the teams couldn’t work
out a trade.
Bademosi, 27, arrived via
trade from the Lions at the start
of the season with the reputation as a special teams demon.
He lived up to that and also had
a nice midseason stretch at corner when Stephon Gilmore
missed time because of a concussion. Bademosi is coming off
a two-year, $4.5 million deal he
signed with Detroit, and he
likely will be seeking something
similar heading into 2018.
At linebacker, James Harrison and Marquis Flowers will
need new deals in order to return.
At 39, Harrison is the oldest
defensive player in the league
and proved during the postseason that there’s still plenty of
gas in the tank and fire in his
belly. He was stout on the edge
and a return on a short-term
deal at or slightly above the veteran minimum would not be a
surprise.
Flowers, 25, was another
valuable special teamer who
provided a spark on defense.
He has the athleticism to spy
quarterbacks or drop into coverage. Flowers is coming off his
rookie deal (four years, $2.29
million) and could land a oneor two-year deal to stick
around.
Defensive tackle Ricky Jean
Francois impressed in his two
stints this season, becoming a
regular in the rotation. Jean
Francois, 31, could return on a
s i m i l a r p a c t ( o n e y e a r,
$900,000).
Geneo Grissom hasn’t been
able to consistently crack the
rotation along the defensive
line. Grissom, 25, is a versatile
special teamer and could be retained on a short deal.
Special teams captain Matthew Slater is a perennial AllPro and Pro Bowler, as well as
one of the most respected leaders on the team by his peers and
coaches. Slater, 32, earned $1.8
million this past season — in
which he missed seven games
with hamstring issues — and
likely will exceed that on a new
deal.
Similarly, Nate Ebner is one
of the league’s top special teamers. Ebner, 29, tore an ACL midway through the season but
should be ready to return for
2018. His last deal was for two
years and $2.4 million, and a
raise would seem in order.
B ra n d o n K ing , ano th er
member of Joe Judge’s top special teams unit, is a restricted
free agent. King, 24, played on
a one-year, $615,000 deal, and
like Slater and Ebner likely will
get a bump in salary.
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globejimmcbride.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Scoreboard
Tennis
THU
2/8
FRI
2/9
ATP MONTPELLIER
Wednesday
Singles First Round
Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, def. Cal­
vin Hemery, France, 6­1, 6­2. Pierre­Hu­
gues Herbert, France, def. Kenny de
Schepper, France, 7­6 (4), 6­7 (5), 6­4.
Richard Gasquet (5), France, def. Daniil
Medvedev, Russia, 6­0, 6­3. Nicolas
Mahut, France, def. Dustin Brown, Ger­
many, 6­7 (2), 2­5, retired. John Mill­
man, Australia, def. Yuichi Sugita (8),
Japan, 5­7, 6­3, 6­4.
Second Round
David Goffin (1), Belgium, def. Gilles Si­
mon, France, 6­4, 6­2. Andrey Rublev
(6), Russia, def. Jeremy Chardy,
France, 6­2, 6­1.
ATP SOFIA
Wednesday
Singles First Round
Maximilian Marterer, Germany, def.
Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 7­6 (3), 6­4.
Marius Copil, Romania, def. Robin
Haase (5), Netherlands, 7­6 (5), 6­4.
Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, def. Laslo Djere,
Serbia, 6­4, 6­4. Andreas Seppi, Italy,
def. Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, 6­3, 6­4.
Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, def. Salva­
tore Caruso, Italy, 7­6 (4), 6­3.
Second Round
Jozef Kovalik, Slovakia, def. Lukas
Lacko, Slovakia, 4­6, 6­2, 7­5. Mirza Ba­
sic, Bosnia­Herzegovina, def. Philipp
Kohlschreiber (4), Germany, 7­5, 7­6
(5).
ATP QUITO
Wednesday
Singles First Round
Alessandro Giannessi, Italy def. Peter
Polansky, Canada, 6­3, 6­4. Gerald
Melzer, Austria, def. Marco Cecchi­
nato, Italy, l6­2, 6­2. Ivo Karlovic (7),
Croatia, def. Ernesto Escobedo, United
States, 6­4, 6­7 (6), 7­6 (4). Nicolas Jar­
ry (8), Chile, def. Facundo Bagnis, Ar­
gentina, 6­7 (4), 6­2, 7­6 (5). Roberto
Quiroz, Ecuador, def. Yannick Hanf­
mann, Germany, 7­6 (5), 6­3.
Hockey
AHL
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W
WB/Scrantn.. 28
Lehigh Val. ... 27
Providence ... 26
Charlotte....... 25
Bridgeport .... 23
Hartford ........ 22
Springfield.... 22
Hershey......... 18
L OL
12 3
14 3
16 3
19 0
17 5
20 4
24 1
23 3
SL Pts.
1 60
3 60
1 56
3 53
2 53
3 51
1 46
4 43
GF
152
156
133
159
133
136
142
122
GA
117
148
117
146
127
162
148
160
149
140
137
151
118
133
111
88
128
129
128
177
166
153
68
56
54
54
54
48
35
172
147
151
155
152
125
105
112
132
148
145
150
145
149
53
56
49
49
52
47
46
42
136
145
137
121
126
130
109
113
118
152
128
118
131
118
122
134
North Division
Toronto ......... 34
Rochester ..... 25
Utica .............. 24
Syracuse ....... 26
Belleville ....... 19
Laval .............. 17
Binghamton.. 13
11
11
14
17
25
23
23
0
6
6
2
1
5
6
1
5
3
2
3
2
3
69
61
57
56
42
41
35
Western Conference
Central Division
Manitoba ...... 31
Chicago......... 24
Iowa............... 22
Gr. Rapids..... 24
Rockford ....... 24
Milwaukee.... 22
Cleveland...... 14
10
15
15
18
18
20
24
3
6
7
1
3
4
4
3
2
3
5
3
0
3
Pacific Division
Tucson........... 25
Texas............. 25
San Diego ..... 24
Ontario.......... 23
San Antonio.. 24
Stockton........ 21
San Jose........ 21
Bakersfield ... 17
14
17
17
17
18
16
18
18
2
4
1
2
4
2
1
7
1
2
0
1
0
3
3
1
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a
win, one point for an overtime or shoo­
tout loss.
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Milwaukee 3.................Manitoba 2 (SO)
San Diego 5....................................Iowa 1
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Hartford 5...................Bridgeport 4 (OT)
Manitoba at Grand Rapids....................7
WB/Scranton at Springfield............7:05
Charlotte at Lehigh Valley...............7:05
Belleville at Rochester......................7:05
Laval at Binghamton.........................7:05
San Antonio at Rockford.......................8
THURSDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Hartford at Syracuse.............................7
Toronto at Belleville...............................7
Laval at Utica.......................................... 7
Manitoba at Cleveland..........................7
San Antonio at Grand Rapids...............7
WB/Scranton at Providence............7:05
Hershey at Lehigh Valley.................7:05
Springfield at Charlotte....................7:15
Milwaukee at Rockford.........................8
Chicago at Iowa......................................8
Tucson at Texas................................ 8:30
Ontario at Bakersfield......................... 10
Basketball
NBA G LEAGUE
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
Westchester
Raptors
Long Island
Maine
Central Division
Fort Wayne
Wisconsin
Grand Rapids
Windy City
Canton
Southeast Division
Erie
Lakeland
Greensboro
Delaware
Western Conference
Midwest Division
Iowa
Oklahoma City
Sioux Falls
Memphis
Pacific Division
South Bay
Reno
Santa Cruz
Northern Arizona
Agua Caliente
Southwest Division
Austin
Texas
Rio Grande Valley
Salt Lake City
W
24
21
19
16
W
20
17
17
13
13
W
19
16
10
10
L
13
14
16
19
L
14
17
18
19
21
L
17
16
22
23
PCT
.649
.600
.543
.457
PCT
.588
.500
.486
.406
.382
PCT
.528
.500
.313
.303
GB
—
2
4
7
GB
—
3
3½
6
7
GB
—
1
7
7½
W
18
19
17
15
W
21
19
18
16
17
W
22
21
20
10
L
14
16
17
21
L
12
14
16
18
20
L
13
14
17
27
PCT
.563
.543
.500
.417
PCT
.636
.576
.529
.471
.459
PCT
.629
.600
.541
.270
GB
—
½
2
5
GB
—
2
3½
5½
6
GB
—
1
3
13
Tuesday’s Games
Iowa 109, Memphis 98
Reno 155, Texas 141
Long Island 125, Raptors 119
N. Arizona 123, Rio Grande Valley 117
Salt Lake City 117, Santa Cruz 108
Wednesday’s Games
Erie 121, Agua Caliente 101
Fort Wayne at Greensboro, 7 p.m.
Wisconsin at Lakeland, 7 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Windy City, 8 p.m.
South Bay at Reno, 10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Iowa at Austin, 12 p.m.
Texas at Salt Lake City, 1 p.m.
Delaware at Westchester, 7 p.m.
WAS
8:00
TNT
Y
SAT
SUN
BUF
7:00
NESN
NJ
7:00
NESN
2/10
IND
7:30
NBCSB
B o s t o n
2/11
MON
2/12
TUE
2/13
Y
WED
2/14
CAL
7:00
NESN
LAC
8:00
ESPN,
NBCSB
CLE
3:30
ABC
Home games shaded
Y
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Bruins and Celtics, WBZ­FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
Bryant at Wagner
7 p.m.
Austin Peay at Murray State
7 p.m.
Georgia Tech at Louisville
7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Clemson
7 p.m.
Tulane at Tulsa
7 p.m.
Vermont at Albany
8 p.m.
Duke at North Carolina
8 p.m.
Stanford at Utah
9 p.m.
SMU at Houston
9 p.m.
Southern Illinois at Illinois State
9 p.m.
Tennessee Tech at Jacksonville State
10 p.m.
UCLA at Arizona
10 p.m.
Washington at Oregon
11 p.m.
Santa Clara at BYU
11 p.m.
USC at Arizona State
CBSSN
CBSSN
ESPN2
NESN
ESPNews
ESPNU
ESPN
FS1
ESPN2
CBSSN
ESPNU
ESPN
FS1
ESPNU
ESPN2
PRO BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
Boston at Washington
10:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at LA Lakers
TNT
TNT
GOLF
3 p.m.
Golf
PGA: AT&T Pebble Beach Pro­Am
Schools
Colleges
BASKETBALL
BASKETBALL
BOYS
BOSTON CITY
O'Bryant 80..........................E. Boston 31
Tech Boston 88.............New Mission 82
ISL
BB&N 66...........................St. George’s 56
MAYFLOWER
Blue Hills 59..............................Diman 56
NONLEAGUE
Nauset 78............................Monomoy 22
South Shore 50....S. Shore Christian 47
GIRLS
BOSTON CITY
Fenway 58.............................Brighton 28
MAYFLOWER
Blue Hills 42..............................Diman 33
NONLEAGUE
Latin Acad. 47...............BU Academy 37
Notre Dame (H) 54..............Abington 43
South Shore 26....S. Shore Christian 15
MEN
HOW AP TOP 25 FARED
1. Villanova lost to St. John's, 79­75
2. Virginia beat Florida St., 59­55
3. Purdue played 14. Ohio State
7. Texas Tech played Iowa State
8. Auburn played Texas A&M
23. Nevada played UNLV
25. Miami beat Wake Forest, 87­81
NEW ENGLAND
Colgate 74.............Boston University 60
UConn 68.......................South Florida 65
OTHER EAST
Fordham 67.....................Geo. Mason 66
Lafayette 81................................Army 54
Marquette 88.....................Seton Hall 85
Penn State 74......................Maryland 70
St. Bonaventure 79..........Saint Louis 56
St. John’s 79.........................Villanova 75
Temple 90.....................East Carolina 73
SOUTH
Campbell 78...............Gardner­Webb 70
Charleston So. 87....................Liberty 75
Florida 73........................................LSU 64
High Point 61......................... Radford 60
Lamar 79................ Northwestern St. 75
Loyola Maryland 72......American U. 69
Miami 87.........................Wake Forest 81
Navy 69..............................Holy Cross 34
UNC Asheville 78...............Longwood 73
UNCG 80.................................. Furman 67
Vanderbilt 81..........................Georgia 66
Virginia 59.......................... Florida St. 55
Winthrop 63...................Presbyterian 49
Wofford 92.............................Samford 79
MIDWEST
Dayton 88............................Duquesne 73
Evansville 63......................Valparaiso 59
Loyola Chicago 72.................... Drake 57
Northern Iowa 74...................Bradley 65
SOUTHWEST
Cent. Arkansas 100 Houston Baptist 80
Kansas St. 67.............................Texas 64
Nicholls 69............. Abilene Christian 65
Sm Hstn St. 66Texs A&M­Crps Chrst 64
SE Louisiana 86....... Incarnate Word 68
WOMEN
HOW AP TOP 25 FARED
1. UConn beat UCF, 55­37
4. Louisville beat Clemson, 65­46
19. Duke beat Wake Forest, 59­51
22. Oklahoma St. beat 24. TCU, 71­54
NEW ENGLAND
Boston University 66.............Colgate 64
Dayton 78..................................UMass 49
Saint Joseph’s 64...........................URI 46
UConn 55........................................UCF 37
OTHER EAST
Army 48................................Lafayette 39
Bucknell 59............................... Lehigh 52
Buffalo 80...........................Kent State 42
Duquesne 80.................................VCU 71
Kennesaw St. 61...........................NJIT 58
La Salle 87.........................Saint Louis 76
SOUTH
Duke 59...........................Wake Forest 51
George Washington 65.Geo. Mason 61
Jacksonville 61....................... Stetson 54
Louisiana Tech 75........................Rice 55
Louisville 65..........................Clemson 46
Navy 62..............................Holy Cross 54
Nicholls 81............. Abilene Christian 60
SE Louisiana 65....... Incarnate Word 54
South Florida 88...........East Carolina 47
Tulane 69.................................Temple 65
USC Upstate 80...................Lipscomb 64
Virginia Tech 90........North Carolina 74
MIDWEST
Ball State 91....................E. Michigan 85
Central Mich. 74..........................Ohio 72
Cincinnati 75................Wichita State 69
Kansas St. 83...................Texas Tech 69
Miami (Ohio) 67.......................Toledo 58
No. Illinois 84.............................Akron 61
SIUE 62............................... Eastern Ill. 52
South Dakota 79.........................IPFW 60
W. Michigan 81..........Bowling Green 67
Western Illinois 103................Omaha 68
SOUTHWEST
Cent. Arkansas 64..Houston Baptist 56
Houston 66...........................Memphis 55
Lamar 71................ Northwestern St. 44
Oklahoma St. 71...........................TCU 54
SMU 74.........................................Tulsa 70
Stephen F. Austin 73....McNeese St. 58
Texas A&M­Corpus Christi 62Sam
Houston St. 48
FAR WEST
Fresno St. 66................ San Diego St. 60
HOCKEY
BOYS
BAY STATE
Newton North 8....................Brookline 4
OLD COLONY
Barnstable 4........................Dartmouth 1
PATRIOT
Duxbury 6............................Silver Lake 0
Plymouth South 5................N. Quincy 2
SOUTH COAST
Wareham 8Apponequet/Bp. Connolly 2
SOUTH SHORE
E. Bridgewatr 4Mashpee/Upper Cape 2
NONLEAGUE
Blue Hills 5.........................Upper Cape 4
Latin Acad. 2....................... Somerville 1
Milton 7.........................................Tabor 0
Quincy 2...................Bridge.­Raynham 2
Watertown 8...........................O'Bryant 0
GIRLS
BAY STATE
Brookline/Newton South 6Nwtn Nrth 1
ISL
BB&N 1...............................St. George’s 0
NORTHEASTERN
Winthrop/Lynn English 6......Medford 2
SEMGHL
Hanvr/Chsst 1 Brne/Mshp/Wareham 1
NONLEAGUE
Barnstable 6..........................Sandwich 1
Dennis­Yarmth 6Wht.­Hnsn/Silvr Lke 1
Hingham 3.................................Norwell 0
Nwd 4Bp. Stg/Cs/Drmth/Smrst Brkly 4
INDOOR TRACK
Boston City League championships
Boys
55 dash ­ 1. Nasiar Rivera, West Rox­
bury, 6.80; 2. Marcus Heard, East Bos­
ton, 6.86; 3. Khorey James, Charles­
town, 6.87.
300 meter ­ 1. Joel Lara, Snowden,
37.02; 2. Rodney George, O’Bryant,
37.50; 3. Adly Francois, East Boston,
37.51.
600 ­ 1. Joel Lara, Snowden, 1:26.74; 2.
George Rodney, O’Bryant, 1:26.96; 3.
Roberto Duno, East Boston, 1:32.11.
1000 meter ­ 1. Victor Baez, Charles­
town, 2:45.40; 2. Flevor Green, West
Roxbury, 2:54.43; 3. Gelson DeBarros,
East Boston, 2:54.48.
1 mile ­ 1. Sean Dykens, O’Bryant,
5:00.26; 2. Douglas Alvarado, Charles­
town, 5:00.26; 3. Jordan Mejia, East
Boston, 5:08.64.
2 mile ­ 1. Sean Dykens, O’Bryant,
10:56.98; 2. Victor Baez, Charlestown,
10:59.48; 3. Douglas Alvarado, Charles­
town, 11:04.56.
55 meter hurdles ­ 1. Nathaniel Nelson,
Madison Park, 8.97; 2. Chris Michel,
Charlestown, 9.21; 3. Brandon Ortega,
East Boston, 9.45.
4x200 relay ­ 1. East Boston, 1:58.64; 2.
Latin Academy, 2:04.39; 3. New Mis­
sion, 2:07.69.
4x400 relay ­ 1. Charlestown, 3:41.80; 2.
East Boston, 3:45.05; 3. O’Bryant,
3:51.51.
High jump ­ Pedro Decius, Madison
Park, 5­06.00; 2. Ricardo Balbuena,
Charlestown, J5­06.00; 3. Gelson De­
Barros, East Boston, 5­02.00.
Long jump ­ 1. Joel Lara, Snowden, 19­
09.00; 2. Abel Fuentes, East Boston, 19­
00.50; 3. Kishan McCray, Charlestown,
18­08.50.
Shot put ­ 1. Francis Sosa­Baez, 47­
09.50; 2. Shean Smith, New Mission, 39­
06.00; 3. Javier Arruda, East Boston, 36­
10.50.
Points ­ 1. East Boston, 93; 2. Charles­
town, 79; 3. O’Bryant, 54; 4. Snowden,
30; 5. Latin Academy, 27.
Girls
55 meter ­ 1. Maleah Ferguson, South
Boston, 7.74; 2. Lia Van der Linde, Latin
Academy, 8.03; 3. Akia Kippins, O’Bry­
ant, 8.08.
300 meter ­ 1. Courtney Lambright,
O’Bryant, 44.95; 2. Maris Moffat,
Snowden, 47.03; 3. Ahria Ilyas, Latin
Academy, 47.18.
600 meter ­ 1. Maris Moffat, Snowden,
1:52.63; 2. Ketelyn Maguire, Latin
Academy, 1:56.95; 3. Theresa Piard,
O’Bryant, 1:58.96.
1000 meter ­ 1. Sarah Lawton,
Snowden, 3:29.91; 2. Katherine Keat­
ing, O’Bryant, 3:34.10; 3. Alicia Ale­
jandro, East Boston, 3:46.19.
1 mile ­ 1. Sarah Lawton, Snowden,
5:56.59; 2. Katherine Keating, O’Bryant,
6:04.05; 3. Kelly Cryts, O’Bryant,
6:40.55.
2 mile ­ 1. Katherine Keating, O’Bryant,
12:47.06; 2. Sarah Lawton, Snowden,
13:36.62; 3. Kamila Abdi, West Roxbury,
14:43.00.
55 meter hurdles ­ 1. Courtney Lam­
bright, O’Bryant, 10.27; 2. Alicia Ale­
jandro, East Boston, 10.50; 3. Nell As­
brand, Latin Academy, 10:59.
4x200 relay ­ 1. East Boston, 1:58.64; 2.
Latin Academy, 2:04.39; 3. New Mis­
sion, 2:07.69.
4x400 relay ­ 1. O’Bryant, 4:43.40; 2.
East Boston, 4:49.47; 3. Latin Academy,
5:05.62.
High jump ­ 1. Theresa Piard, O’Bryant,
4­06.00; 2. Zaira Garcia, East Boston, 4­
00.00; 3. Zaineb Kamoune, Latin Acade­
my, 4­00.00.
Long jump ­ 1. Stephanie Faiella, East
Boston, 14­09.00; 2. Akia Kippins,
O’Bryant, 14­05.50; 3. Claritza Vasquez,
West Roxbury, 13­11.50.
Shot put ­ 1. Aminata Sesay, O’Bryant,
27­02.50; 2. Juliana Vazquez, East Bos­
ton, 25­03.00; 3. Kelly Exilus, Latin
Academy, 22­11.25.
Points ­ 1. O’Bryant, 112; 2. East Bos­
ton, 72; 3. Latin Academy, 67; 4.
Snowden, 51; 5. New Mission, 17.
WRESTLING
NONLEAGUE
Rockland/Abington 36..Plymouth N. 33
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
Ski conditions
MASSACHUSETTS
Berkshire East — mg, 2 new, 16­40
base, 31­45 trails, 4­5 lifts
Blue Hills Boston — frgr, 12­48 base,
13­15 trails, 4­4 lifts
Bousquet — mg, 10­22 base, 15­23
trails, 5­5 lifts
Bradford — mg, 14­24 base, 15­15
trails, 7­10 lifts
Catamount — pp, 18­32 base, 29­36
trails, 5­7 lifts
Jiminy Peak — pp, 4 new, 15­52 base,
37­45 trails, 5­9 lifts
Nashoba Valley — mg, 13­32 base, 17­
17 trails, 11­11 lifts
Otis Ridge — lsgr, 15­40 base, 7­11
trails, 2­4 lifts
Ski Butternut — mg, 24­32 base, 21­22
trails, 6­11 lifts
Ski Ward — mg, 18­24 base, 8­9 trails,
4­4 lifts
Wachusett — mg, 18­58 base, 23­26
trails, 6­8 lifts
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Arrowhead — mg, 8­12 base, 1­1 trails,
1­1 lifts
Attitash — pdr, 4 new, 12­24 base, 60­
68 trails, 7­11 lifts
Black — pdr, 5 new, 12­36 base, 39­45
trails, 2­5 lifts
Bretton Woods — pdr, 2­4 new, 30­40
base, 97­97 trails, 7­10 lifts
Cannon — pp, 5­6 new, 24­36 base, 77­
97 trails, 6­11 lifts
Cranmore — mg, 4 new, 15­25 base, 39­
57 trails, 4­7 lifts
Crotched — mg, 16­24 base, 25­25
trails, 5­5 lifts
Dartmouth Skiway — mg, 2­24 base, 8­
31 trails, 3­4 lifts
Granite Gorge — pdr, 8 new, 10­36
base, 15­20 trails, 4­4 lifts
Gunstock — mg, 10 new, 47­47 base,
45­55 trails, 6­6 lifts
King Pine — mg, 6 new, 12­30 base, 17­
17 trails, 5­5 lifts
Loon — pp, 2 new, 20­30 base, 59­61
trails, 7­10 lifts
McIntyre — pdr, 4 new, 25­46 base, 9­9
trails, 4­4 lifts
Mount Sunapee — pdr, 5 new, 12­22
base, 55­66 trails, 8­10 lifts
Pats Peak — pdr, 7 new, 12­24 base, 28­
28 trails, 7­11 lifts
Ragged — pdr, 8 new, 24­30 base, 35­57
trails, 6­6 lifts
Waterville Valley — pdr, 5­6 new, 26­31
base, 45­60 trails, 6­11 lifts
Whaleback — mg, 6­24 base, 11­30
trails, 4­4 lifts
Wildcat — pdr, 4 new, 20­40 base, 32­48
trails, 3­5 lifts
VERMONT
Bolton Valley — pp, 2­3 new, 15­30
base, 51­71 trails, 5­6 lifts
Bromley — pp, 12­30 base, 40­47 trails,
5­8 lifts
Burke — pp, 2 new, 10­30 base, 48­50
trails, 4­4 lifts
Jay Peak — pdr, 5­6 new, 20­46 base,
76­79 trails, 8­9 lifts
Latest line
NBA
Thursday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At Orlando........OFF ..................Atlanta
At Toronto........OFF .............New York
At Washington.....2 ...............BOSTON
At Portland...........3½ ..............Charlotte
At LA Lakers....OFF ....Oklahoma City
At Golden St.... OFF ....................Dallas
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Thursday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
Towson..................3½ ..............At Drexel
At Elon...................2½ .................Hofstra
At Col Of Chrlstn. 7½ ..........Wm.&Mary
At Tulsa....................7 ...................Tulane
At Iupui..................5½ ..............Cleve. St.
At Louisville.............9 ...............Ga. Tech
Northeastern........6½ ........ At Delaware
At Clemson............19 ............Pittsburgh
La.­Lafyt................2½ ...........At Georgia
At Georgia So........11 ..........La.­Monroe
At Middle Tenn..21½ .......................Rice
At Wright St...........14 ............Green Bay
At N. Kentucky......13 ...........Milwaukee
At Ill.­Chicago.... 12½ ...........Yngstn. St.
Old Dominion.......7½ ..........At So. Miss
At La. Tech.............14 ..............Charlotte
At Utah..................4½ ...............Stanford
Duke..........................1 ..... At N. Carolina
At UAB....................10 ...............N. Texas
At Marshall...........9½ .........................FIU
At S. Alabama......5½ .....................UALR
At Troy.................. 9½ ........Arkansas St.
At W. Kentucky..18½ ........................FAU
At Illinois St.............2 .............. S. Illinois
At Illinois...............5½ ............Wisconsin
At Houston...............8 ......................SMU
At San Fran.........10½ ...............Portland
Gonzaga..............11½ .............At Pacific
Saint Mary’s Ca.14½ .At Loyola Mymt.
At CS Fullerton........8 ................Cal Poly
At UC Davis.......... 1½ ....UC Sant. Barb.
At Arizona................8 .....................UCLA
At Oregon.............6½ .........Washington
At Oregon St............9 ..............Wash. St.
San Diego..............6½ .....At Pepperdine
At BYU.................... 18 ..........Santa Clara
At Arizona St........2½ .......................USC
National Hockey League
Thursday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At New Jersey­113 Calgary..........+103
At Phila...........­146 Montreal........+136
NY Islanders...­125 At Buffalo......+115
At Tampa Bay­250 Vancouver.....+220
At Ottawa........OFF Nashville..........OFF
At St. Louis..... OFF Colorado..........OFF
At Minnesota.­228 Arizona.......... +208
Dallas...............­125 At Chicago....+115
Las Vegas.......­111 At San Jose...+101
Transactions
BASEBALL
MLB: Suspended Washington C Raudy
Read 80 games without pay after test­
ing positive for Boldenone, a perfor­
mance­enhancing substance, in viola­
tion of Major League Baseball’s Joint
Drug Prevention and Treatment Pro­
gram.
Minnesota (AL): Signed RHPs Myles
Jaye, Michael Kohn and Jake Reed; Cs
Willians Astudillo, Brian Navarreto and
Bobby Wilson; INFs Taylor Feather­
ston, Nick Gordon, Gregorio Petit and
Brock Stassi; and OFs Nick Buss, Ryan
LaMarre and LaMonte Wade on minor
league contracts.
Texas (AL): Traded INF Russell Wilson
to the New York Yankees for future
considerations. Named Josiah Igono
major league director of peak perfor­
mance; Brett Hayes major league ad­
vance scout; Randy Smith and Al
Hargesheimer pro scouts; Casey Fox
assistant, player development; Eric
Gagne pitching coach for Arizona
League Rangers, Don Kalkstein senior
advisor and Andrew Koo analyst, base­
ball operations.
New York (NL): Signed 3B Todd Frazier
on a two­year contract. Designated INF
Matt Reynolds for assignment.
BASKETBALL
LA Clippers (NBA): Agreed in terms
with G Lou Williams on a contract ex­
tension.
New York (NBA): Traded C Willy Her­
nangomez to Charlotte for 2020 and
2021 second­round draft picks and F
Johnny O’Bryant.
FOOTBALL
Cleveland (AFC): Named Sam Shade
assistant special teams coach.
Detroit (NFC): Named David Corrao di­
rector of football research, Paul
Pasqualoni defensive coordinator, Jeff
Davidson offensive line coach, George
Godsey quarterbacks coach, Al Golden
linebackers coach, Brian Stewart de­
fensive backs coach and Chris White
tight ends coach.
San Francisco (NFC): Re­signed DL
Cassius Marsh to a two­year contract.
HOCKEY
ECHL: Announced commissioner Brain
McKenna will be leaving the league
this summer.
SOCCER
MLS Players Association: Named Dan
Jones chief operating officer.
Dallas (MLS): Renewed its affiliation
agreement with Oklahoma City Energy
FC (USL) for the 2018 season.
Seattle (MLS): Acquired $50,000 in
general allocation money from D.C.
United for D Oniel Fisher.
TENNIS
ITF: Reduced the ban on Ilie Nastase by
eight months and doubled his fine to
$20,000 following his appeal of sanc­
tions for foul­mouthed comments and
misconduct as the Romanian Fed Cup
captain.
COLLEGE
Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference:
Named Phil Paquette director of new
media/communications.
Mountain West: Suspended New Mexi­
co senior F Joe Furstinger one game
and issued a public reprimand to Boise
State sophomore G Justinian Jessup
for their actions in a men’s basketball
game Tuesday.
Clemson: Announced RB C.J. Fuller is
transferring.
Fordham: Named Paul Rice defensive
coordinator, Vincent Natali offensive
line coach/recruiting coordinator, and
Scott Vallone defensive line coach.
Georgia: Rehired assistant football
coach Scott Fountain. Named Cortez
Hankton assistant football coach
Georgia Tech: Announced the resigna­
tion of men’s assistant basketball
coach Darryl LaBarrie.
Rutgers: Named Nunzio Campanile
running backs coach.
Soccer
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE
GP W D L Pts
Man City
26 22 3 1 69
Man United
26 17 5 4 56
Liverpool
26 14 9 3 51
Chelsea
26 15 5 6 50
Tottenham
26 14 7 5 49
Arsenal
26 13 6 7 45
Burnley
26 9 9 8 36
Leicester
26 9 8 9 35
Bournemouth
26 8 7 11 31
Everton
26 8 7 11 31
Watford
26 8 6 12 30
West Ham
26 6 9 11 27
Brighton
26 6 9 11 27
Crystal Palace
26 6 9 11 27
Southampton
26 5 11 10 26
Newcastle
26 6 7 13 25
Swansea
26 6 6 14 24
Stoke
26 6 6 14 24
Huddersfield
26 6 6 14 24
West Brom
26 3 11 12 20
Saturday, Feb. 10
Tottenham vs. Arsenal 1230 GMT
Stoke vs. Brighton 1500 GMT
Everton vs. Crystal Palace 1500 GMT
West Ham vs. Watford 1500 GMT
Swansea vs. Burnley 1500 GMT
Man City vs. Leicester 1730 GMT
Sunday, Feb. 11
Huddersfield vs. Bournemth 1200 GMT
Newcastle vs. Man United 1415 GMT
Southampton vs. Liverpool 1630 GMT
Monday, Feb. 12
Chelsea vs. West Brom 2000 GMT
G l o b e
Sports
C7
E. Boston wins City track
By Karl Capen
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
The East Boston boys’ track
and field team took their victory jog around the track with
coach Garcia
SCHOOL
D a l z o n
ROUNDUP
swarmed in
the middle of
the pack and a smile on his
face almost as wide as the Reggie Lewis Center itself, chanting “Three-peat!” along with
his athletes.
For the third year in a row,
the Jets stood alone atop the
podium at the Boston City
L eague championship on
Wednesday after totaling 93
points over a two-day event.
“This year was kind of just
putting everything together,”
Dalzon said. “The team
worked really hard. It was a
team effort, and it was a long
season. But I feel like we did
everything we could to come
out on top in the end.”
It wasn’t a handful of firstplace finishes that propelled
East Boston to the title, but a
collective effort across all
events in securing team
points. In the end, it was the
Jets’ winning 4 x 200-meter relay team that put the icing on
the cake with a resounding
victory in 1 minute, 34.71
seconds.
“We were trying to focus
on the relay all year,” Dalzon
said.
Even if the Jets stole the
main event, it was O’Bryant’s
Sean Dykens who took center stage during the opening
act of the afternoon. Coming
off his 2-mile run on Tuesday, Dykens took home the
mile, defeating Charlestown’s Douglas Alvarado by
the slimmest of margins —
two one-thousandths of a
second — after meet officials
reviewed video of the finish
to resolve the virtual tie
(5:00.26).
O’Bryant finished third
with 54 points as the Townies placed second with 79.
Snowden’s Joel Lara was
recognized as the meet’s
Most Valuable performer,
winning the long jump (19
feet 09 inches), 300 meter
(37.02 seconds), and the 600
meter (1:26.74) to help his
team to fourth with 30
points.
On the girls’ side, O’Bryant won the team title in a
runaway (112 points). The
Tigers’ Courtney Lambright
won Most Valuable performer with first-place finishes in
the 55-meter hurdles
(10.27), 300 meter (44.95)
and ran a leg on O’Bryant’s
winning 4 x 400 relay
(4:43.40.)
Snowden’s Sarah Lawton
won the 1,000 meter
(3:29.91) and received the
award for the most outstanding performer over the
course of the season.
East Boston (72), Latin
Academy (67), Snowden
(51), and New Mission (17)
rounded out the top five.
MIAA meeting
There has been no thornier issue to the collective MIAA than litigation. And the
biggest headache, acknowledged executive director Bill
Gaine after a two-plus hour
meeting of the MIAA’s Board
of Directors, “is parents taking us to court . . . not the
schools” over student eligibility and the transfer waiver
process.
Wednesday’s session in
Franklin was a follow-up to a
spirited discussion at the December meeting featuring
Cohasset boys’ basketball
coach Bo Ruggiero, past
president of the state basketball coaches’ association, and
Dick Baker, who oversees the
MIAA’s eligibility/waiver
process. Ruggiero argued
that students were circumventing the waiver process
under the guise of “school
choice.” The issue, he said,
will only get worse. Baker
would like to see the process
amended.
Currently, a transfer student-athlete only gains immediate eligibility if the principal of the “sending” school
s i g n s o ff o n t h e p r o c e s s
(Form 200).
In December, Peabody
High did not sign off on a
pair of transfers, Chibuikem
Onwuogu and Sammy Batista, who wanted to play basketball at St. Mary’s of Lynn.
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Snowden’s Joel Lara (left) edged O’Bryant’s Rodney
George in the 600 at the City League championships.
Peabody alleged there was recruitment. Onwuogo got a
court injunction to become eligible this season.
Two other items of note:
R The national federation
(NFHS) recently formed a
partnership with eSports and
is eyeing a fall launch for state
associations with an interest.
“There is an extraordinary
amount of young people in-
LEGAL NOTICES
volved in this and we will explore it,” said Gaine.
R The board unanimously
approved the membership of
Roxbury Prep, which opened
its doors in the fall of 2015 and
has an enrollment of 335 in
grades 9-11. The school will
field a football team in the fall.
Craig Larson of the Globe staff
reported from Franklin.
LEGAL NOTICES
ADVERTISEMENT
CITY OF BOSTON
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
INVITATION FOR SEALED BIDS FOR REPAIRS TO
SIDEWALKS IN AREAS I,II,III
IN THE CITY OF BOSTON
NOTE: For information specific to this particular bid
please contact Marie McDonald
@617-635-4912.
The City of Boston, acting by its Commissioner, invites
sealed bids for the performance of the work generally described above, and particularly set forth in the Invitation
For bids which may be obtained at Room 715 (Contract
Office), City Hall, Boston Mass., commencing at 9:00 a.m.
on Monday, February 12, 2018. Invitation for bids shall be
available until the time of the bid opening. There will be a
charge of five dollars ($5) NOT REFUNDABLE, for each set
of contract documents taken out.
THIS IS A STATE AID PROJECT:
THE MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (MASSDOT) HAS PROVIDED A LIST TO THE
BOSTON PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT OF APPROVED
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS FOR THIS PROJECT. ONLY THOSE
CONTRACTORS ON THIS LIST WILL RECEIVE OFFICIAL
BID DOCUMENTS. ALL OTHERS WILL BE PROVIDED
WITH AN INFORMATIONAL COPY.
Every Sealed bid shall be submitted in accordance with the
Invitation for Bids. All sealed bids shall be filed not later
than Thursday, March 1, 2018 at 2:00 pm. at the office of
the Official, Public Works Department, Room 714, City Hall.
All bids must be from bidders of record (those who have
purchased contract documents) on file at Room 714, City
Hall.
The attention of all bidders is directed to the provisions of
the Invitation for Bids and contract documents, specifically
to the requirements for bid deposits, insurance and performance bonds as may be applicable. A bid deposit of 5
percent of the total contract amount shall be required from
each bidder. A Performance bond in the amount of 100 percent of the contract shall be required from the successful
bidder. Sealed bids shall be publicly opened by the Official
on Thursday, March 1, 2018 at 2:00 pm in Boston City Hall,
Room 801. The award of any contract shall be subject to
the approval of the Mayor of Boston. The maximum time
for bid acceptance by the City after the opening of bids
shall be ninety (90) days.
The City/County and the Official reserve the right to reject
any or all bids or any item or items thereof.
NOTICE
The attention of all bidders is specifically directed to the
City of Boston Supplemental Minority
Participation and Resident Section contract provision of
the specifications and the obligation of the contractor
and subcontractors to take affirmative action in connection with employment practices in the performance of this
contract. During the performance of this contract, the
general contractor shall agree and shall require that his
subcontractors agree to the following Workforce Requirements (labor).
Minority Workforce: The contractor and its subcontractors
shall maintain a not less than 25 percent ratio of minority manhours to total employee manhours in each trade
worked on the contract. Boston Resident Workforce: The
contractor and its subcontractors shall maintain a not less
than 50 percent ratio of Boston resident employee manhours to total employee manhours in each trade worked
on this contract. Female Workforce: The contractor and its
subcontractors shall maintain a not less than 10 percent
ratio of female employee manhours to total employee
manhours in each trade worked on this contract.
The workforce requirements of paragraphs (1), (2), and (3)
above shall apply to each trade that appears on the list of
“Classification and Minimum Wage Rates,” as determined
by the Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development
Industries under the provisions of chapter 149, sections 26
through 27G, of the General Laws of Massachusetts, as
amended.
CHRIS OSGOOD
Chief of Streets, Transportation, and Sanitation
(Feb. 12)
Executive Office of Energy and Environmental
Affairs
Office of Coastal Zone Management
Notice of Issuance of the
Designation Report for the South Boston Designated Port
Area (DPA) Boundary
In accordance with applicable regulations at 301 CMR
25.00, public notice is hereby given of the Office of Coastal
Zone Management’s (CZM) issuance of the South Boston
Designated Port Area boundary designation report. CZM
shall consider written comments relative to the designation report. Comments must be received by 5:00pm on
March 9, 2018 (30 days after publication of this notice
in the Environmental Monitor). Comments should be addressed to:
Office of Coastal Zone Management
Attn: Lisa Berry Engler
251 Causeway Street, Suite 800
Boston MA 02114-2136
CZM will convene a public hearing on the DPA boundary
designation report on February 26, 2018 at 6 p.m. The
meeting will be held at:
EDIC - Raymond L. Flynn Marine Park
22 Drydock Avenue, 3rd Floor Conference Room
Boston, MA 02210
(parking available at Central Parking Garage,
12 Drydock Avenue)
Copies of the state DPA boundary regulations (301 CMR
25.00) can be obtained at the State Bookstore, Room 116,
State House, Boston, MA 02133, or electronically at: www.
mass.gov/files/documents/2016/08/wl/301-cmr-25.pdf
Notice of Proposed Agency Action
SUBJECT:
MassHealth: Payment for In-State Acute
Hospital Services, effective March 1, 2018
AGENCY:
Massachusetts Executive Office of Health
and Human Services, Office of Medicaid
EOHHS hereby announces changes to certain Rate Year
2018 (RY18) MassHealth payment methods for in-state
acute inpatient and outpatient hospital services, effective with the 2nd RY18 Period which begins March 1,
2018. A complete description of the MassHealth acute
hospital payment methods, including these updates, and
all other required information, is available under the heading “Acute Hospital Rate Year 2018 Notices” on the “Special Notices for Acute Hospitals” page of the MassHealth
website
at
www.mass.gov/service-details/specialnotices-for-acute-hospitals. For further information you
may also contact Steven Sauter at the Executive Office of
Health and Human Services, MassHealth Office of Providers
and Plans, 100 Hancock Street, 6th Floor, Quincy, MA 02171
or at steven.sauter@state.ma.us.
Statutory Authority: M.G.L. c. 118E; St. 2017, c. 47; St.
2012, c. 224; 42 USC 1396a; 42 USC 1396b.
Related Regulations:
Parts 431 and 447.
130 CMR 410, 415, 450; 42 CFR
February 8, 2018
Buying
a car this
week?
Check out new and used car
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NOTICE
The Massachusetts State
Lottery Commission will
offer a KENO monitor to
display the game to duly
qualified existing KENO To
Go agents, as listed below:
Shawmut
Grocery-614
Shawmut Ave., Boston
V&D Variety-365 Adams St.,
Dorchester
Court Market-505 Washington St., Dorchester
Glenway Market-8A Glenway St., Dorchester
Kimmy Pharmacy1435
Dorchester
Ave.,
Dorchester
La
Baguette
Restaurant-1229 Dorchester Ave.,
Dorchester
Park N Go-613 Park St.,
Dorchester
SKB Food Store-156 Washington St., Dorchester
Hancock St. Market-95 Hancock St., Dorchester
La Borinquena Grocery-534
Dudley St., Roxbury
Marcella Market-80 Marcella St., Roxbury
Bailey’s Too-354 W. Broadway, S. Boston
East Broadway Market-869
E. Broadway, S. Boston
LEGAL NOTICES
ADVERTISEMENT
CITY OF BOSTON
REQUEST FOR INFORMATION TO: INFORM
THE CITY OF BOSTON’S APPROACH FOR
INITIATING LITIGATION
AGAINST PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES
& DISTRIBUTORS
THAT IRRESPONSIBLY
SATURATED THE MARKET WITH OPIATES
KNOWINGLY PUTTING
CONSUMERS AT RISK
FOR ADDICTION
The City of Boston (the
“City”) is in the process
of information gathering and researching approaches: 1) for bringing mass tort litigation
against pharmaceutical
companies and others
in the distribution and
marketing chains that irresponsibly saturated the
market with opiates; and
2) for evaluating the financial, social, and other
costs caused by the reckless dissemination of opioids and misleading information about the safety
and purpose of their use,
which continues to cause
irreversible and fatal devastation and significant
damages to cities nationwide. The City seeks
to gather information
from qualified law firms,
universities, think tanks,
hospitals, governmental
entities, researchers, and
any other interested entities/parties to help inform
the City’s approach for
developing best practice
legal and other strategies
to recoup public money
in the form of damages
arising from the City’s
use of its public services
to combat the resulting
opioid crisis.
This RFI is not a solicitation for proposals,
proposal abstracts, or
quotations. This RFI is for
information and planning
purposes only and shall
not be construed as a
solicitation or as an obligation on the part of the
City to issue a Request
for Proposal. The City, in
its discretion, may decide
in the future to issue an
RFP or RFPs based on
information obtained as a
result of the RFI.
All responses should be
submitted in the manner set forth in the RFI,
which may be obtained
by contacting John Natoli, Boston City Hall,
Room 608, Boston, MA
02201 at John.Natoli@
boston.gov on or after
9:00 am on Monday,
February 5, 2018. The
City shall accept responses up to the time,
and at the location,
specified in the RFI.
INVITATION TO BID
THE
CONCORD
PUBLIC
SCHOOLS will receive sealed
bids for the renovation of the
STEAM Lab located at the
Ripley Building, Concord, MA.
Copies of the Instructions to
Bidders, Bid Form, and Specifications will be available
starting February 7, 2018 by
contacting the Business Office, Concord Public Schools,
120 Meriam Rd., Concord,
MA 01742 at 978-202-1120,
preferably through email at
mmartel@concordps.org.
General Bids will be received
until 10:00AM on Friday,
March 9, 2018 at the Office of
the Deputy Superintendent
for Finance and Operations,
at 120 Meriam Road, Concord, Massachusetts, 01742,
at which time and place the
bids will be publicly opened.
In the event of inclement
weather causing office closure, the bids will be opened
on Monday March 12, 2018 at
10:00 AM.
Filed Sub-Bids in the categories of Glass and Glazing, Aluminum Windows, Electrical,
and DCAMM Certified HVAC
Bids will be received until
10:00AM on Friday, February
23, 2018 at the Office of the
Deputy Superintendent for Finance and Operations, at 120
Meriam Road, Concord, Massachusetts, 01742, at which
time and place the bids will
be publicly opened.
The bids will be awarded at
a joint meeting of the School
Committee.
A
MANDATORY
PRE-BID
MEETING will be held for
General Bidders and Filed
Sub-Bidders at 10:00AM on
February 16, 2018
at the
Ripley building, 120 Meriam
Road, Concord, MA. Interested bidders are required to
sign in at the business office
at this location. The entrance
to the offices is in the rear of
the building.
The Awarding Authority reserves the right to determine
the ability of any bidder to
perform the work and any
Bidder shall, upon request of
the Awarding Authority, furnish such information as may
be necessary to determine
such ability, including a performance bond, if requested.
The Awarding Authority reserves the right to reject any
or all bids and to waive any
informality in bids received
where such rejection or
waiver is in the best interest of the Awarding Authority. The Awarding Authority
reserves the right to accept
any bid when it is determined
to be in the best interest of
the Concord Public Schools
to do so.
Boston’s best jobs,
The Careers
Section of The
Boston Sunday
Globe.
C8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“Grandma, what happened to all your pain meds?”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
2
6
4
3
7
5
8
9
1
1
7
5
9
4
8
3
2
6
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
8
3
9
1
6
2
4
7
5
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
5
9
6
2
3
7
1
8
4
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
3
1
8
6
9
4
2
5
7
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
7
4
2
5
8
1
9
6
3
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
6
8
7
4
2
3
5
1
9
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
4
2
1
7
5
9
6
3
8
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
9
5
3
8
1
6
7
4
2
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
C9
ZIPPY (See my Interview with Jerry Lewis at:
zippythepinhead.com/media/newyorkerjerry.jpg) by
Bill Griffith
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
There is no place quieter than a plugger’s house after
all the grandkids have gone home.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
COME TOGETHER BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Mischievous ones
5 Fresh no more
10 Clarinet type
14 Notorious Roman
emperor
15 PA’ed at BWI
16 Underwater
obstacle
17 Word on a gift tag
18 Fief holder
19 Toy in a tub
20 Old-school
entree
23 What two who
wed become
24 Cousin with
hair to there
25 ___ myrtle (var.)
27 Type of premiere
29 Follow orders
32 Eggs in water?
33 Sang in the Alps
36 Word with
“false”
37 Foxx and Wilson
TV show
40 Pork lo ___
41 Low-down thing
to clip
42 Mess up
43 It dissolved on
12/31/91
44 Nearby planet
48 Chronicler of
Alice
50 A babe in the
woods
52 Angola-to-Kenya dir.
53 Police officer’s
request
58 Joe in a mug
59 Egypt’s capital
60 Writer’s block
ender
61 Citation word
62 Race official
63 Regard in a
specified way
64 Truman’s first
lady
65 Vehicles on
runners
66 Fish-loving flier
DOWN
1 Company’s
receivables
2 Sheep with fine
wool
3 Theory confirmer
4 Not all
5 Wet impact sound
6 Sully
7 Piled on the years
8 Toy brick
company
9 First eviction site
10 Ann ___, Michigan
11 “Titanic” Jack
12 Brit’s four o’clock
swirler
13 Quite a bit,
in verse
21 Hindered by no
more
22 Worse than
snowy
26 Migratory
slitherer
28 Loretta with the
pipes
29 More 7-Down
30 It makes coffee
31 Bart’s animated
teacher
34 Pixels,
essentially
35 Archer of love
36 Romantic
getaway site
37 Song to the
balcony
38 Medium for
radio
39 Jackknifed
40 Director
Brooks
43 Put to the test
45 Wanter’s kin
46 Never noticed
47 Bun seed
49 Mosque
runners
50 Displayed pluck
51 Strong scents
54 Exploits
55 Catch but good
56 Call cost of old
57 Scrambler, e.g.
58 Triangular sail
3
8
6
7
4
2
7
1
5
8
1
3
8
3
5
2
6
2
3
7
5
4
9
1
5
9
8
3
C10
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
Honda Village*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
371 Washington Street
Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
Ferrari Of New England*
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
Audi Shrewsbury
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-975-6891
BochHyundai.com
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
Boch Maserati*
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Mirak Hyundai
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
Kelly Maserati*
Framingham Ford*
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
Kelly Ford*
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
Kelly Infiniti*
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Mirak Genesis
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St,
Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
Kelly Jeep*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Colonial Buick-GMC*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Best Chevrolet*
Boch Honda West*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
844-464-3560
BochChevrolet.com
Route 110, Westford
978-589-4200 BochHondaWest.com
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-364-2550 BochHonda.com
Boch Honda*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Boch Nissan*
Lev Kia of Framingham*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-996-7751
BochNissan.com
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
Kelly Nissan of Danvers*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20,
Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Cityside*
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
VillageSubaru.com
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Boch Toyota*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-321-6631 BochToyota.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
340 Mystic Ave, Medford, MA
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
smart center Boston
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
Mirak Chevrolet*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
Boch Chevrolet*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
smart center Lynnfield
Toyota of Watertown*
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Herb Chambers Genesis*
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Kelly Honda*
Boch Hyundai*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
Kelly Chrysler*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo of Boston
525 Boston Post Rd. • Route 20 • Wayland, MA 01778
New 2017 Alfa Romeo
GIULIA
AWD
STK# A181 • MSRP: $43,290
279
$
LEASE FOR
/ MO. 24 MOS.
*
New 2018 Alfa Romeo
289
STELVIO $
AWD
STK# A228 • MSRP: $47,885
LEASE FOR
**
/ MO. 24 MOS.
Available at Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo of Boston through 2/9/2018 to qualified lessees with Tier 1 approved credit through Chrysler Capital. Delivery by 2/9/2018 required. Subject to availability – quantities are limited. *Payment is shown
based on a 24-month closed-end lease with $3,999 down for a new 2017 model year Alfa Romeo Giulia Q4 AWD with an MSRP of $45,440.00 (stock # A181). **Payment is shown based on a 24-month closed-end lease with $3,999 down
for a new 2018 model year Alfa Romeo Stelvio with an MSRP of $47,885 (stock # A228). Lessee is responsible for insurance, maintenance, repairs, $0.50 per mile over 10,000 miles per tear, and excess wear and tear. MA sales tax, doc,
reg, acq, security deposit, and first months payment are separate. Lease payment reflects conquest cash for customers currently leasing a competitive brand vehicle (non Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, FIAT or Alfa Romeo product) and
enter into a new purchase or lease of an eligible model. Extra charges may apply at lease end. Requires Tier 1 Credit approval with Chrysler Capital. In stock models only. Photos are for illustration purposes only.
855-806-3336
herbchambersalfaromeoofboston.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo of Millbury
2 Latti Farm Rd. • Route 20 • Millbury, MA 01527
855-866-0411
herbchambersalfaromeo.com
Sales: Monday-Thursday 8:30am - 8:00pm
Friday-Saturday 8:30am - 6:00pm, Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
Service: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 6:00pm
ThursdayScene
G
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, F E B RUARY 8, 2018 | BO S TONG L O B E .C O M / L I F E S T Y L E
CRAVING THE
SILENT TREATMENT
In winter we spend more time cooped up inside with a constant cacophony. Here are
some places and activities to help you hit the mute button.
B y D i a n e B a i r a n d Pa m e l a Wr i g h t
Globe Correspondents
Above:
Getting away
from winter’s
noise can
reduce stress,
and blood
pressure.
Right: Quiet
can be found
at the Bates
Hall Reading
Room at
Boston Public
Library.
O
ur world gets smaller and louder in
winter. We spend
more time cooped
up inside with a
constant cacophony of blaring
TVs and radios, ringing phones,
shuffling shoppers, grinding
treadmills, and restless children.
It’s maddening and potentially
unhealthy — with recent studies
suggesting that a steady diet of
noise can increase blood pressure, stress, and sleep disorders.
It’s time to hit the mute button.
Here are some places and ways
to find a little peace and quiet.
UNWIND ON A WINDING PATH
Labyrinths have been around
for more than 4,000 years, ushering walkers into sessions of quiet
reflection. Slow down and follow
the winding passages of the Harvard Divinity School labyrinth, located near Andover and Rockefeller halls on the campus green. The
design was modeled on the famous
13th-century labyrinth found on
the floor in the nave of Chartres
Cathedral in France (www.hds.harvard.edu/life-at-hds/religious-andspiritual-life/retreats-and-quietplaces). You’ll likely have it to yourself, and simply walking the circuit
in silence can be a soothing elixir
for your racket-induced angst. Another Chartres-inspired installa-
TOM HERDE/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
MUSIC
By Ed Symkus
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
CBS
TELEVISION
In telling Clapton’s
life story, Zanuck
returns a favor
QUIET, Page G7
Buskin & Batteau retaking
the stage in a healthier state
Lili Fini Zanuck is an Oscarwinning film producer, with
“Cocoon,” “Driving Miss Daisy,”
and “Mullholland Falls” on her
résumé. Eric Clapton is a Grammy-winning guitar god who’s
played in the Yardbirds, Cream,
Blind Faith, and Derek and the
Dominos. Though their names
aren’t often associated, they’re
longtime friends, and their
working relationship stretches
back more than a quarter of a
century. Clapton scored “Rush,”
the 1991 film that marked Zanuck’s debut as a director. She
went on to direct the videos for
Clapton’s “Tears in Heaven”
(1992) and “Pilgrim” (1998). It
was Clapton who contacted Zanuck when he needed a director
for the new documentary “Eric
Clapton: Life in 12 Bars,” which
had a limited theatrical run in
November and makes its Showtime premiere Saturday.
By Dick Trust
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
ANNIE TRITT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
David Buskin (left) and Robin Batteau.
CLAPTON, Page G4
The long, glorious run of
folk duo Buskin & Batteau
could be coming to an end.
On the other hand, if the
music gods are agreeable, Buskin & Batteau could be coming
to a listening room near you for
years to come.
What will determine whether David Buskin and Robin Batteau’s first shows together in
nearly four years trigger a tour
for the singer-songwriters who
formed a perfect union in the
late 1970s and built a legion of
followers that exists to this day?
BUSKIN & BATTEAU, Page G3
Inside
THEATER
CONFRONTING
A CAPTOR
THING TANK
WRITE AND
WRONG
MUSIC
MILLENNIAL
BEACH BOY
A man, and a nation, are
put on trial in ‘Death and
the Maiden’
From a meh memo to
error-filled e-mails, a
review of the week online
BØRNS brings a host of
influences to his show at
the House of Blues
G3
G2
G4
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
Insider
THING TANK
A REVIEW OF THE WEEK IN THINGS
FROM THE BAR
MEMO GOTTEN
So, not a whole lot of good came
out of that Devin Nunes memo
this past week — but a whole lot
of great sure did! The steaming
hot nothingburger of the Nunes
memo sent Twitter — a community that is highly particular about
the ways in which its time is wasted — into a feeding frenzy, and
#YoMemoJokes were the main
course. By gently modifying the
classic template of the dozens
(a.k.a. the “yo mama” joke), the
zingy new flavor caught on
fast. “Yo memo so bankrupt, it
used to be a Trump casino,”
tweeted Steve Marmel. “Hey, Yo’
Memo . . . Y2K called . . . it wants
it’s [sic] pointless hype back,”
came the solid assist from Alyssa
Milano. And on it went: “Yo memo
contains so little intelligence
Trump just nominated it to be the
new Secretary of Education”; “Yo
memo so busted it signed a plea
deal with Robert Mueller”; and “Yo
memo so deflated Tom Brady is
going to throw it on Sunday.”
Yowch. (OK, that one may have
been too soon.) Hey, about that. . .
NOT SO SUPER
That was a rough Sunday. But
even with the rest of the country
giving you the full Nelson, Patriots
fans shouldn’t feel sad. Justin
Timberlake came leaping out of a
2012 Details shoot to bore a crater in the center of the field at
halftime, and the new installment
of the “Cloverfield” meh-thology
premiered on Netflix, so I promise,
everybody had a chance to be disappointed. You are not alone, you
hear me?
LIZA WEISSTUCH FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
This zesty drink is no cliché
Few people are more quali­
fied to provide perspective
on dating behavior and re­
lationships than bartenders.
They see it on full display
every night, for better or for
worse. Each couple is a pro­
verbial unicorn in their own
right, so no shame in admit­
ting that you prefer to avoid
Valentine’s Day clichés like
you would an insufferable
ex. In the words of Emily
Warren, bar director at
Back Bay’s classy yet laid­
back French restaurant
PLAYA PICANTE
Makes 1 drink
1½ ounces silver tequila
1 ounce fresh ruby red grapefruit juice
½ ounce fresh lime juice
¾ ounce grenadine
4 drops of cayenne tincture (to make tincture: In a jar, add 2 tablespoons of cayenne
powder to 2 ounces of vodka. Seal jar and let
sit for four days. The tincture is the black liquid that separates at the top of the mixture.)
Grapefruit wedge, to garnish
1. In a cocktail shaker over ice, pour all ingredients. Shake vigorously for 10 seconds.
2. Strain into a tumbler over fresh ice. Garnish with grapefruit wedge.
Adapted from Deuxave
Deuxave, “not every couple
is into wine and roses.” Her
Playa Picante, a staple on
the menu for years, is a re­
freshing deviation from
those hackneyed pink
drinks and overplayed bub­
bles. In what is essentially a
jazzed­up margarita, she
swaps traditional lime for
zestier grapefruit and amps
up the intrigue with a spicy
cayenne tincture. All of a
sudden, those bubbles don’t
seem so thrilling anymore.
LIZA WEISSTUCH
LAUGH LINES
JENNY ZIGRINO
READING IS FUNDAMENTAL
Librarians aren’t just the gatekeepers of knowledge in a civilized
society, they’re also the ones who
point you toward the restroom and
answer your crushingly stupid
questions. Among their storied
ranks are the supremely sassy li­
brarians of Framingham, who
tweeted a photo of one of their
proudest book displays, “I Don’t
Remember the title but the cover
was Red,” which assembles a
heap of books that match the description, and subtly pays tribute
to the telltale hue of an exasperated librarian’s face. (Pro tip: The
bathroom is almost always downstairs and to the left.)
TYPO POSITIVE
Typing the completely wrong
thing in an e-mail, we’ve all beer
there. But those uniquely embarrassing slips of the thumbs have
been shameful secrets until this
week, when British TV personality
Richard Osman confessed to signing off an e-mail with “have a lovely eeek.” From there, error­prone
typers found a common bond
through their clumsy sausage fingers, easing the angst of anyone
who’s ever told a friend
they’re “fart oo nice” or wished a
stranger a “Good Afterboob.” And
that’s all the useless news for
now; until next time, have a lovely
weep. (And yes, Pats fans, I
spelled that right.)
MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
BOTTLES
Post­race beers are nothing new, but
a beer with electrolytes? That sure is.
T
By Gary Dzen
GLOBE STAFF
he healthy beer market is, by definition, an oxymoron.
Which is why when Michelob
Ultra tries to sell us on its beer
meshing with a lifestyle of running
and biking, the conceit falls as flat as the product, a watered down version of anything beer
lovers would actually enjoy drinking.
“There really aren’t that many beers at all in
the world that are fit for this purpose,” says
Geoffrey Pedder, founder of Medfield’s ZeLUS
Beer Co. “I’ve done a lot of races and I’ve noticed after a lot of these events that people
would be served beer and drink beer, but none
of these beers were designed for that.
“Mich Ultra certainly goes after that market,
in terms of low calories or low alcohol. But I
have to be honest, I don’t know many people
who drink it.”
Pedder founded ZeLUS for runners and other athletes to drink after races, and for active
folks to enjoy in general. He makes it clear he’s
not claiming his products are healthy (the FDA
would never allow it), but ZeLUS beers contain
a higher proportion of potassium, sodium, and
calcium — electrolytes, in other words — than
normal brews.
The ZeLUS lineup includes four beers. Long
Run apricot pale ale (4.7 percent alcohol by volume) is unfiltered and brewed with real apricots. Competitor IPA (4.7 percent ABV) is
brewed with four different American hops and
flaked wheat, to keep things light. Light Into
Dark (4.7 percent ABV), a winter porter, satisfies the need for a cold-weather seasonal.
The best of the bunch is Race Pace (3.7 percent ABV), a New England mild ale heavily
hopped with Galaxy and Mandarina Bavaria. It
smells as pungently tropical as your favorite
pale ale and packs a ton of flavor for the ABV.
All of the ZeLUS brews taste a little salty, which
is kind of the point, but each stands up on its
own even if you didn’t know they were supposed to be extra quenching.
“If we’re at a running race, people are really
into the concept,” says Pedder. “At a liquor
store, it’s all about the beer. I think we do really
have something unique.”
ZeLUS contract brews in Ipswich and selfdistributes to about 130 accounts, mostly on
the North Shore. Pedder says he wants to prove
the concept here before expanding the brand
outside of Massachusetts.
Gary Dzen can be reached at
gary.dzen@globe.com.
‘If you have a little boy, you give
him the most realistic goals.
You’re like, “Jimmy, you can be
a fireman, a policeman, or
president of the United States.”
But for little girls, we give them
the most unrealistic goals.
We’re like, “Sarah, you can be a
princess, a mermaid . . . or
president of the United
States.” ’
— Zigrino plays Laugh Boston Thursday
through Saturday.
NICK A. ZAINO III
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G3
A man, and a nation, on trial in ‘Death and the Maiden’
By Don Aucoin
GLOBE STAFF
WELLESLEY — A barefoot woman
named Paulina Salas sits, listening intently, as her husband talks to a jovial
visitor in a nearby room. She is unseen by the two men.
As the moments pass, Paulina’s expression of fixed concentration is
transformed into a grim picture of resolve. She has clearly made up her
mind about something.
Paulina’s subsequent action in
Commonwealth Shakespeare Company’s visceral and gripping production
of “Death and the Maiden’’ will throw
her own harrowing past and that of
her nation into sharp relief.
The work of Argentine-ChileanAmerican writer Ariel Dorfman,
“Death and the Maiden’’ is talky and
reliant on far-fetched coincidence but
pretty compelling nonetheless. Director Steven Maler makes astute use of
a small black-box space at Babson
College to generate an air of claustrophobic tension while demonstrating
a firm grasp of the multiple dimensions of Dorfman’s play.
First produced in the early 1990s,
“Death and the Maiden’’ is part psychological thriller; part political allegory, weighing the competing demands of vengeance, reconciliation,
and justice; and part courtroom drama, albeit one that unfolds in a home
rather than a court of law.
For it is indeed a trial that Paulina
(Flora Diaz) has in mind for the visitor, a physician named Rober to
Miranda (Mark Torres). Fifteen years
earlier, when her unnamed nation
was under the sway of a brutal dictatorship, Paulina, a dissident, had
been imprisoned, interrogated, tortured, and raped by secret police.
(Dorfman has said that “Death and
the Maiden’’ was inspired by the restoration of democracy in Chile after
the blood-soaked dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet.)
Though Paulina was blindfolded
during her ordeal, she often heard
the voice of the doctor who oversaw
the interrogation. (He liked to play a
recording of Schubert’s “Death and
the Maiden.’’) Now she is certain she
is hearing that voice again. Before
long, she has Roberto bound and
gagged on the floor. Her goal: to force
him to confess while giving him a
taste of the terror and helplessness
she felt.
Facing Paulina’s calmly delivered
accusation, Roberto adamantly in-
NILE HAWVER
Flora Diaz and Mark Torres in the Commonwealth Shakespeare Company production of “Death and the Maiden.”
S TA G E R E V I E W
DEATH AND THE MAIDEN
Play by Ariel Dorfman. Directed by
Steven Maler. Production by
Commonwealth Shakespeare
Company. Presented by Babson
Arts. At Sandra L. Sorenson Black
Box, Sorenson Center for the Arts,
Babson College, Wellesley, through
Feb. 11. Tickets $40, 781­239­5880,
www.commshakes.org
sists she has the wrong guy. Can he
convince Paulina’s husband, Gerardo
Escobar (Mickey Solis), of his innocence, or will Gerardo — who has previously been worried about his wife’s
state of mind — remain loyal to her?
Two complicating factors are in
the mix. First, when Paulina was imprisoned 15 years earlier, she protected Gerardo, then her lover and a fellow dissident, refusing to give up his
name to the secret police despite her
suffering, as she reminds him. Second, in another of the play’s too-tidy
coincidences, Gerardo, a human
rights lawyer, has just been appointed
to a presidential commission to examine the abuses of the previous regime, making the husband’s dilemma
official as well as personal.
Unfortunately, Solis still seemed to
be working out his portrayal of Gerardo on opening night, dissipating the
impact of some of the friction-filled
exchanges between husband and
wife.
Torres fares better as Roberto, de-
livering a performance that is impressive on a physical level — the actor
has to absorb considerable punishment — and as a matter of an artfully
sustained balance: He succeeds for
much of the play in creating a small
sliver of doubt about Roberto’s guilt.
But it is Diaz’s nuanced portrayal
of Paulina that occupies the center of
“Death and the Maiden.’’ She endows
Paulina with a kind of reverberating
stillness that demands your attention. The actress skillfully conveys the
sense that Paulina has been emotionally immobilized for 15 years but is
now finding a kind of power in action, a stand-in for a traumatized nation that is finally confronting its
past.
Commonwealth Shakespeare
Company, long known for its annual
free summer productions of Shakespeare plays on Boston Common, has
expanded its partnership with Babson College over the past year. Last
spring CSC presented the world premiere at Babson of Jake Broder’s “Our
American Hamlet,’’ a muddled play
inspired by Edwin Booth, the actorbrother of Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth. But the company rebounded nicely with “Beckett in Brief,’’ an
evening of short dramas by Samuel
Beckett, starring Will Lyman. “Death
and the Maiden’’ is another solid step
toward broadening CSC’s identity
and proving the troupe can thrive beyond the Common.
Don Aucoin can be reached at
aucoin@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter@GlobeAucoin
‘I suggested . . . we try
rehearsing just to get
[Robin] over some of
the effects of chemo.
We started getting
good, so we said, “Let’s
fly it by the public.” ’
DAVID BUSKIN (far left, with Robin
Batteau and Marshal Rosenberg)
ANNIE TRITT FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Buskin & Batteau returning to familiar territory
uBUSKIN & BATTEAU
Continued from Page G1
“We’ll see how we feel about it and
how our fans feel about it afterwards,”
Batteau says. “We’ll take it one step at
a time.”
The first of those steps is a weekend
date at one of their old haunts, Club
Passim in Cambridge.
The two sold-out shows — billed as
“Up Yours, Cancer and Happy Valentine’s Day” concerts — were set in response to Batteau’s recovery from colon cancer (as well as a heart attack),
but almost six months of chemotherapy left him with numbness in his
hands and feet. It’s the hands, of
course, that present the greatest worry for a musician whose signature instrument is a violin (he plays guitar
too).
“That’s a challenge, and it’s on top
of the arthritis I’ve been dealing with
BUSKIN & BATTEAU
With Janie Barnett
At Club Passim, Cambridge,
Feb. 10­11 at 7 p.m.
for 10 years,” says Batteau, 70, a New
York native who was raised in Cambridge and graduated from Harvard
with a degree in biochemistry. “The arthritis has made me unable to play the
guitar as I need to. My fingers just aren’t as nimble.
“And I’m not as adept on the violin
as I have been, and that’s frustrating,”
adds Batteau, whose “The Boy With
the Violin” has captivated concertgoers for four decades. “I don’t want to
play for people if I can’t play as well as
I should. I’ ll do my best, but who
knows, this might be the last hurrah,
the last concerts I do because if I’m not
NEALE ECKSTEIN
Sophie Buskin, who studied for
two years at Berklee College of
Music, has been performing with
her father since 2016.
satisfied with the way it sounds, then
I’ll focus on something else for the last
chapter.”
Batteau said it was arthritis that
put the brakes on the duo four years
ago. The last time they performed together was March 22, 2014, as part of
a Stand for the Troops concert in
Washington, D.C.
From 1978 to 1990, they thrived as
Buskin & Batteau, in recordings and
concerts. They also enjoyed lucrative,
award-winning careers writing ad jingles. Then they took a break, spending
more time with their families while
pursuing other work before reuniting
in 2008.
On Sept. 10, 2016, Batteau suffered
a heart attack. His wife, Wendy, drove
him from their Wesport, Conn., home
to the hospital, where doctors inserted
a stent and tried to determine the
cause of the attack. Two days later,
they discovered that he had colon cancer. He had surgery around Christmas
2016, followed by chemotherapy treatments until May of last year.
Buskin, 74, who has been performing as a duo with his daughter Sophie
since 2016, is looking forward to reuniting with his old partner. (Longtime B&B percussionist Marshal
Rosenberg will also be on hand for the
Passim shows.)
“It’s a treat to play all these songs
again,” says Buskin, a Bronx native and
Brown University graduate who lives
in Katonah, N.Y. “When we started doing this, we weren’t even sure there
was a gig at the end of it. I suggested to
Robin that we try rehearsing just to get
him over some of the effects of chemo.
We started getting good, so we said,
‘Let’s fly it by the public.’ ”
Meanwhile, the Buskin fatherdaughter collaboration has given him
even more cause to count his blessings.
Sophie, 27, who studied for two years
at Berklee College of Music before hopping on the folk music carousel, performs a stirring solo rendition of her
father’s “When I Need You Most of All”
in their shows together. “When did I
write that, 1970?” Buskin says. “And
here’s my daughter, singing it better
than it’s ever been sung.” That song
will be included on the solo album Sophie is recording at Fox Run Studio in
Sudbury, and her dad is delighted she’s
joined “the family business.”
“I’d already considered myself one
of the luckiest people I know,” Buskin
says. “This just puts the proverbial icing on the cake. Who knew this treat
was waiting for me in my dotage?”
And who knew that Buskin & Batteau would still be a treat for fans 40
years after their first collaboration?
Dick Trust can be reached at
rtrust68@comcast.net.
T h e
G4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
By Isaac Feldberg
T
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
hree years since exploding
into the mainstream on
the platinum-selling
strength of glitter-pop anthem “Electric Love,” Garrett Borns isn’t the same starry-eyed
innocent he used to be. On “Blue Madonna,” his recently released sophomore album, the Michigan-bred singer-songwriter, 26, strikes a notably
melancholy chord, sorting through
heartbreak and loss under the same
sun-soaked, electro-pop grooves that
made his debut disc, “Dopamine,” a
critical darling.
The turn into more somber territory, he says by phone from a balcony in
New Orleans, was simply a matter of
maturing as both a person and a performer. Ahead of a sold-out stop at the
House of Blues Sunday, the singer —
who performs as BORNS — reflects on
the current tour, being influenced by
the Beach Boys, and his love affair with
Gucci.
Q. How has the tour been so far?
A. Pretty exciting and frightening at
the same time. It’s been really nice to
play a whole new body of work, so I’ve
just been playing the new record
down, top to bottom. The shows are
pretty cinematic in a way, with the
lights and backdrops.
Q. What’s distinct about playing “Blue
Madonna” live?
A. Some of the songs are a little more
intricate, so me and the band, we’re all
playing our asses off. It’s territory we
haven’t really gone to as a band, but it
feels like the next level. When I was
making [the record], I just wanted to
make interesting pop that would give
you an experience akin to going to a
Beach Boys concert in the ’70s. I picture this being a futuristic Beach Boys
concert.
BØRNS a millennial
Beach Boy, but the style
is all Gucci
A. Most of the time, it’s pretending I’m
somebody else to get into a different
head space. A lot of times, it’s just,
“Who do I want to be onstage tonight?
Is it going to be Marc Bolan, or is it going to be Grace Jones, or Roy Orbison?”
Q. You’re known for your fashion
sense. How have you changed your
personal style for this tour?
A. I’ve been wearing more suits on
stage, and I don’t usually perform in
suits, so that’s a change. One of my favorite eras of [David] Bowie is his Serious Moonlight tour, when he was the
Thin White Duke and wearing these
really cool double-breasted suits.
‘One of my
favorite eras of
[David]
Bowie is his
Serious
Moonlight
tour, when he
was the Thin
White Duke
and wearing
these really
cool double­
breasted suits.’
Q. Even off-stage, you’ve made a big
splash in the fashion world.
A. Yeah, I’ve been doing some work
with Gucci the past couple years and,
somehow, I think when Alessandro
[Michele], the creative director there,
started bringing these really beautiful
pieces to the table with studs, which
changed a lot of style everywhere, I
think we had similar influences. I feel
like his creative influences are taking
really old, almost Renaissance paintings and mixing them with today’s
streetwear, and in a way that’s how I
make music. I take these really old influences and put them into a contemporary context.
BØRNS
Q. You’ve cited the Beach Boys and Roy
Orbison as two huge influences on the
new album. What was your introduction to those artists?
A. I was pretty young when my folks
were playing those kinds of records,
’70s rock and psychedelic stuff. So I
just remember those songs being synonymous with my childhood, and I
was always trying to imitate them on
piano. I feel like I still am, in a way.
Q. There’s also an undercurrent of melancholy across “Blue Madonna” that
wasn’t present on “Dopamine.” To
what do you attribute that?
A. When I wrote “Dopamine,” I was so
enamored by Los Angeles and finally
making music I was really excited
about. There was a naivete in the mu-
BØRNS
With Charlotte Cardin
and Mikky Ekko
At the House of Blues, Boston,
Feb. 11 at 7 p.m.
CHUCK GRANT
sic, which was really intriguing, but I
think after playing it on the road for a
while, and becoming a different person and performer who’s growing,
“Blue Madonna” became a way of reflecting on the past and being like,
“Wow, those were really good times,
and I had no idea what I was doing.”
Q. Performing live is intimidating for
most people. Do you still get jitters?
A. Yeah, definitely. And I’ve learned to
just accept those jitters. One time, I
was playing a show last year and I
didn’t feel any kind of nervousness at
all, and I was just like, “What’s wrong?
Why am I not feeling nervous or that
excited energy?” I realized I wasn’t
challenging myself enough, so I tried
something completely different that
night, and it brought the excitement
back.
Q. What kind of things do you do differently?
Q. In one of his final interviews, Prince
name-dropped you as an artist he’d
been listening to lately, and you’ve
mentioned him as a major influence.
What did you think of the tribute to
him during Justin Timberlake’s Super
Bowl halftime show, and specifically of
the debate that preceded it when it
was rumored Timberlake would implement a Prince hologram?
A. Well, personally, I thought Prince
saved the Super Bowl. [Laughs] But
you know, virtual reality, projections,
and all that stuff are fascinating. We’re
always trying to make advancements
in the arts and technology, so it’s somewhat inevitable that we’re going to
make holograms of people. But it’s all
in the name of art, so I guess it depends on how seriously you want to
take it. If something can be done tastefully, why not?
Isaac Feldberg can be reached at
isaac.feldberg@globe.com, or on
Twitter at @isaacfeldberg.
He scored
her film;
she directed
his life story
uCLAPTON
Continued from Page G1
A native of Leominster, Zanuck
spent only the first year of her life
there, as her career-military father’s
frequent reassignments kept the family on the move. A short-lived enrollment at Georgetown University sent
her west with hopes of becoming a
film editor. But no doors opened until
she met her future husband, producer
Richard Zanuck, on a blind date. Richard Zanuck and his partner David
Brown, ran Zanuck/Brown Productions, which made, among many other
films, “Jaws,” “The Verdict,” and “Deep
Impact.” Her initial job with them, as a
gofer, led to duties including finding
original material, reading scripts, and
eventually producing and directing.
Zanuck, 63, spoke by phone from her
home in Beverly Hills.
Q. Hollywood history says that you are
responsible for getting the film “Cocoon” made. What were the circumstances?
A. I started going to the office to have
lunch with Dick, and then we would
pick up our boys from school together.
Dick and David had a small company
in terms of employees. They each had
a secretary, and there was a lot they
didn’t want to do. Material was always
coming in, but a lot of it would just
languish. So every time I went there I
would go through this and that. One
day I found this book called “Cocoon.”
It was terrible, but it started getting really interesting in Chapter 11, and I
thought it could make a good film. The
option for it was only $2,500, so Dick
and David let me do it. I developed the
script with two writers, and I produced the film.
Q. When did the idea of directing come
to you?
A. It was a few years before “Cocoon.”
When Dick and David were producing
DOC NYC
ERIC CLAPTON: LIFE IN 12 BARS
On Showtime, Feb. 10 at 8 p.m.
“The Verdict,” I watched Sidney Lumet
direct it. I liked everything about the
way he did it, with such subtlety and
grace. Right then I told Dick and David
that I was going to direct one day.
Q. Your first one was “Rush.” Why did
you choose Eric Clapton to do the
score?
A. I was a big fan, and I knew I didn’t
want an orchestral score. I wanted
mostly guitar, and I had temped the
movie with all Eric Clapton music because I felt it would work with the narrative. I didn’t know him, so I called
his manager, and talked him into making Eric available to see the film. He
committed to doing it after seeing the
rough cut that had his music in it.
Where “Tears in Heaven” is, I had “I
Am Yours,” the song from “Layla.”
Q. So, was “Tears in Heaven,” the song
about the death of his son, in your film
before it became a hit?
A. When he arrived in LA to do the
score, he said, “I’m gonna make a little
recording of a song I’ve been working
‘There was nothing
he wouldn’t talk
about, and when he
saw the finished
movie, there was
nothing he asked me
to change.’
LILI FINI ZANUCK, director, on
working with Eric Clapton on her
documentary about the guitar god
on.” We were in the Four Seasons, and
he sings “Tears in Heaven.” Later,
when I listened to the tape, I thought,
“This is just too intimate; I don’t even
know how to use something like this.”
So I tabled it and decided to wait and
see how everything went. Later he said
to me that he would never release it because he didn’t want anybody to think
he was trying to monetize a terrible situation. But he felt that if I put it in the
film, it was kind of hidden, and people
would have to discover it. It turned out
being the only successful thing about
the movie.
CBS
Q. How did “Life in 12 Bars” come onto
your radar?
A. Eric called and asked me. He said
some people had been archiving stuff
for him for a possible anthology. He
had been approached to turn it into a
documentary, and he said it was making him nervous. So, he called me and
said he would do it if I was involved.
Q. But you had no documentary experience. What was your immediate response?
A. I was kind of excited by it. Shortly
thereafter I had a great editor, Chris
King, who had done the Amy Winehouse documentary [“Amy”]. But
here’s where I was scared: I knew Eric
had an interesting life, and I wanted
the film to be a journey through it. But
we started getting archival stuff that
looked like garbage. A lot of it was
8mm footage that came from family
archives, a lot of it was on VHS, and a
lot of the early stuff, like the Cream
footage, is bootleg. I’m in the editing
room, and everything was pixilating.
But John Battsek, one of our producers, kept saying, “Don’t worry, when
we’ve finished grading the footage, it’s
going to look good.” And he was right.
Also, some of the photos in the film
were in boxes that Eric had in his attic,
Eric Clapton in a scene
from “Eric Clapton: Life
in 12 Bars.”
but back then, there were no selfies.
So, even if you were working on the
Beatles’ “White Album,” playing on
“While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” you
weren’t saying, “Hold on, could we get
a picture together?”
Q. Did Eric set any rules or limitations
in his interviews?
A. No, there was nothing he wouldn’t
talk about, and when he saw the finished movie, there was nothing he
asked me to change.
Q. Did making the film change your relationship with him?
A. It changed for the better. Even
though every once in a while, he says
something like, “You don’t know everything about me.” And I say, “No I
don’t,” but sometimes I want to say I
know a lot more than you know I
know!
Ed Symkus can be reached at
esymkus@rcn.com.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G5
MoviePass: Just the
ticket — or is it?
MOVIE STARS
Previously released
The service sparked a hullabaloo when it
pulled out of 10 high­traffic AMC theaters
By Sonia Rao
THE WASHINGTON POST
In the face of Netflix and other formidable forces, I refuse to abandon the
movie theater experience. The 20th
Century Fox fanfare on the big screen
makes my heart swell, the ‘‘Star Wars’’
crawl brings tears to my eyes, and
don’t even get me started on how
much better popcorn tastes when consumed in a plush red chair.
Frequent moviegoing is an expensive habit, so imagine my excitement
when I discovered MoviePass, a service
that charges $9.95 a month and allows
you to see one film a day. That’s cheaper than a single ticket in most major
cities. The company now has more
than 1.5 million subscribers and pays
the theaters full price for each ticket,
hoping to eventually make money in
part by leveraging the data it is gathering on subscribers.
MoviePass recently sparked a hullabaloo when it pulled out of 10 hightraffic AMC theaters in cities like Boston and Los Angeles. While one might
assume it’s because MoviePass bleeds
money at popular locations, CEO
Mitch Lowe attributed the decision to
the company’s desire to ‘‘strive for mutually-beneficial relationships.’’ AMC
executives have explicitly stated that
the theater chain has no intention of
sharing the admissions and concessions revenue that MoviePass claims it
has had a hand in generating.
Basically, mom and dad are fighting
about money again, and MoviePass
subscribers are caught in the middle.
So here are some points to consider if
you’re on the fence about signing up.
As of now, MoviePass still works at
a good number of theaters.
If you live in Boston, where the
most accessible theater, the AMC
Loews Boston Common, is one of the
rejected 10, you’ll need to look for alternatives. Same goes for those of you
who prefer Landmark Theatres such
as the Kendall Square Cinema in Cambridge or the Embassy Cinema in
Waltham. But Boston-area moviegoers
can still sample theaters where MoviePass works, including the AMC Assembly Row, AMC South Bay Center,
Regal Fenway, Brattle Theatre, Somerville Theatre, Capitol Theatre in Arlington, and Apple Cinemas in Cam-
THEATER
bridge. For those going there, it’s
worth the 10 bucks. You can see which
theaters in your area accept MoviePass
at www.moviepass.com.
You have to show up in person to
get tickets, so you risk a movie selling
out.
After hearing folks at the office rave
about a little movie called ‘‘The Post,’’ I
trekked across the city and got to an
AMC around 2 p.m. to purchase a ticket. Surprise! Every showing of the film
was sold out for the rest of the day.
That was four separate showtimes.
MoviePass doesn’t let you purchase
tickets online, which means you either
have to get to the theater earlier in the
same day to purchase a ticket, or risk it
and show up right before.
The moral: With MoviePass, you
must always be prepared. Guess who’s
going to show up hours early to see
‘‘Black Panther”?
It’s great for solo moviegoers, but
not so much if you prefer group out­
ings.
There’s so much to be said for seeing a movie alone. You can go whenever you want to, focus entirely on the
movie, and form an opinion all on your
own.
Solo moviegoing also prevents you
from having to bring other people into
that sold-out scenario. Back in my preMoviePass days, two friends and I decided to see ‘‘Call Me by Your Name’’
together after months of waiting for it
to hit theaters. A pair of us bought tickets online, and we arrived at the cinema about 45 minutes early so our cardholding pal could purchase hers. Alas,
it was sold out.
We ended up transferring our tickets to the next available showtime and
waited three hours in anticipation of
Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet’s gorgeous performances. It was
worth it, but just make sure to let your
friends know what the deal is ahead of
time.
MoviePass is another subscription
you’ll have to keep track of (or not).
How many subscription services
have you signed up for? Netflix, Spotify
. . . hmm. Five? Six? You’re probably
forgetting one. MoviePass charges you
automatically, which is convenient and
THEATER
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE/FILE
BRATTLE THEATRE
MoviePass still works at the
Brattle Theatre (above), the
AMC Assembly Row (top),
and several other cinemas in
the Boston area.
good for budgeting. But this could
work against you if you never use it or
forget you even have it.
The weirder thing about MoviePass
is that it also keeps track of you. Last
summer it sold a majority stake to Helios and Matheson Analytics, a data
company that can draw information
from MoviePass members. While the
company doesn’t plan to sell that user
data to others, according to Wired, it
can still use it to target movie promotion via the app or e-mail. It’s all very
‘‘Black Mirror.’’
You can’t use MoviePass on 3­D or
IMAX movies.
The tickets are simply too expensive for the service to afford. For people like me, this might not be an issue.
I haven’t seen a 3-D movie since I
watched glowing Na’vi warriors fly
around on mountain banshees during
‘‘Avatar’’ and went home with a pounding headache.
But for people like Christopher Nolan, this could be a problem. If you
didn’t see ‘‘Dunkirk’’ in IMAX 70mm,
did you even see it? Don’t worry, the
answer is yes.
YY½ 12 Strong A chronicle of unheralded American military retaliation in the weeks immediately following 9/11. The filmmakers and
their Chris Hemsworth-led ensemble focus on the strategic connections forged between US special
forces and Afghan militia in their
mutual fight against the Taliban.
The result is a film that’s alternately gritty and overly polished. (130
min., R) (Tom Russo)
YYY½ Call Me by Your Name
A rich, relaxed, novelistic comingof-age story, set in an overripe Italy
in the 1980s. Timothée Chalamet
plays an academic’s son and Armie
Hammer a young research assistant with whom he embarks on an
affair; no one films light and landscape with more sensuality than director Luca Guadagnino. In English and Italian, with subtitles.
(132 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ Coco Pixar’s latest journeys
south of the border and into a fluorescent Day of the Dead afterlife as
a young boy (voiced by Anthony
Gonzalez) seeks connection with
his ancestors. Gorgeous to look at
and not at all ghoulish, with only a
familiar plot structure keeping it
from the company’s best. Additional voices by Gael Garcia Bernal
and Benjamin Bratt. (109 min., PG)
(Ty Burr)
YYY Darkest Hour A glib,
entertaining biopic of Winston
Churchill, set as the great man becomes prime minister against a
backdrop of Dunkirk and the Nazi
threat. Gary Oldman, under layers
of padding and bluster, gives us an
old sharpie of a Winston and Joe
Wright directs with bravura confidence. With Kristin Scott Thomas
and Ben Mendelsohn. (101 min.,
PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YY The Greatest Showman Hugh
Jackman stars in a big, brassy musical about the life of P.T. Barnum.
It’s enthusiastic and reasonably
well made sub-Webber nonsense,
but the Top 40-style songs represent a very special form of torture.
With Zac Efron, Michelle Williams,
and the poised young performer
known as Zendaya. (105 min., PG)
(Ty Burr)
YYY I, Tonya The Tonya Harding
story, presented as an acrid, tragicomic look at the underside of
fame. Margot Robbie plays Harding, the working-class ice skating
champion who fell from grace
when her ex-husband (Sebastian
Stan) had her rival kneecapped. AlContinued on next page
THEATER
MUSIC
MUSIC
MUSIC
begins in 2 weeKs!
february 20 - march 4
gustav mahler
symphony no. 9
handel and haydn society
retrospective - hits from
the last decade
A Little Bit of
the interactive
solve-the-crime comedy!
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 5 & 8, Sun at 3 & 7
Added Show: Wed 2/21 @ 2 pm
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
final weeK!
must end sunday!
“A Masterpiece”
- Sunday Express
Boston Opera House
800.982.2787 | BroadwayInBoston.com
Box Office Hours: Mon - Fri 10am-5pm
Groups (10+) Call 617.482.8616
IRELAND
march 17 at 2 & 7pm
march 18 at 2pm.
Our Tribute to All Things Irish! ~ 781-891-5600
Jerry Walker / Liam Harney
The Massachusetts Harp Ensemble
Comhaltas Musicians - Reagle Singers
Robinson Theatre - 617 Lexington St., Waltham
ReagleMusicTheatre.com - FREE PARKING.
athol fugard’s engaging
political drama
This remarkable love story set in Apartheid South
Africa stands as a reminder of the intolerance
and cruelty of a not-so-distant past. Co-produced
by New Repertory Theatre & Boston Center for
American Performance. January 29-March 3.
Watertown | 617-923-8487 | newrep.org
“WAITRESS is a little slice of heaven!”
- Entertainment Weekly
Boston Opera House
800.982.2787 | BroadwayInBoston.com
Box Office Hours: Mon - Fri 10am-5pm
Groups (10+) Call 617.482.8616
february 25th at 2pm
781-891-5600
A Celebration of Classic Country Music
Featuring the Music of Hank Williams,
Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, Tammy Wynette,
Merle Haggard and Loretta Lynn.
ReagleMusicTheatre.com
617 Lexington St., Waltham. FREE PARKING!
MUSIC &
LYRICS
S�EP��N SO�D��IM
BOOK
“Hugely Entertaining!” - Jared Bowen, WGBH
Based on the delightful Oscar-winning film, this
witty comedy tells the story of how a young Will
Shakespeare overcame writer’s block to create
the greatest love story of all time. Tix from $25!
www.SpeakEasyStage.com / 617-933-8600.
JO�N WE��MA�
stephen sondheim’s latest
musical adventure!
“CLEVER! SOMETIMES EVEN
LAUGH-OUT-LOUD FUNNY!” – Arts Fuse
The true boom-and-bust story of two of
the most colorful fortune-seekers in US history.
Now thru Feb 11 Lyric Stage Copley Sq
617.585.5678 lyricstage.com
irresistible comedy –
now playing!
Meet restaurant manager/shoe connoisseur
Haley Walker in this hilarious & sharp comedy.
“Irresistibly charming!” – THE BOSTON GLOBE
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
III
Torrey Pines is part animated film, part live performance from Seattle band Your Heart Breaks.
Award-winning filmmaker Clyde Petersen’s
adolescent years unveil a queer coming-of-age
story, rich with ‘90s pop-culture references.
FEB 14 - 17. 617-824-8400 artsemerson.org
feb 7 - march 11
harvard square cambridge
ASP stages the Bard’s stunning portrait of a
Machiavellian genius and the murderous quest
for absolute power in the Swedenborg Chapel.
For tix actorsshakespeareproject.org.
Limited Seats Available
Sat, Feb 17, 7:30PM | NEC’S Jordan Hall
New Date Added
Sun, Feb 18, 3:00PM | NEC’S Jordan Hall
Limited Seats Available
riveting new play –
starts march 2!
Don’t miss the Boston premiere of
Dominique Morrisseau’s acclaimed drama!
“Warm-blooded and astute.” – NEW YORK TIMES
A Huntington Theatre Company production
South End / Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
Music from the 15th-17th Centuries celebrating
Michael Barrett’s ten years with Convivium.
Feb 10, 7pm: Harvard-Epworth Church, Harvard
Sq * Feb 11, 4pm: First Parish Church of Berlin *
Feb 25, 4pm: St. Paul’s Church, Brookline
Tickets at www.convivium.org or at the door.
magnificat: renaissance
spanish/portuguese music
The exquisite voices of Exsultemus celebrate the
Magnificat, Mary’s joyous and moving response
to the angel Gabriel, with music by Victoria,
Guerrero, Ortiz, Cardoso, de Brito & others.
Fri. Feb. 9, 8pm * First Lutheran Church, Boston
857-998-0219 * www.exsultemus.org
ACTIVITIES
mussorgsKy, proKofiev,
& tchaiKovsKy
An all-Russian program featuring the
great Georgian pianist Alexander Korsantia
MUSSORGSKY: Khovanshchina Prelude
PROKOFIEV: Piano Concerto No. 3
TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 4
THU FEB 22, 7:30pm / SANDERS THEATRE
Guide to the Music throughout the concert
SAT FEB 24, 8:00pm / JORDAN HALL
Conductor’s Talk / 6:45pm
SUN FEB 25, 3:00pm / SANDERS THEATRE
Conductor’s Talk / 1:45pm
617.236.0999 | bostonphil.org
debussy centennial:
beethoven/debussy/walton
Richard�
a queer coming-of-age
adventure story
Fri, Feb 16, 7:30PM | Sanders Theatre
final weeK!
must close sunday, feb. 11
THE
Country
Jamboree
Long acknowledged as a master of Mahler’s
final and possibly greatest symphony,
conductor Benjamin Zander brings
a lifetime of experience and knowledge to
this profoundly moving, truly overpowering
masterpiece. The ultra-virtuosic and
impassioned players of the BPYO add
their open-hearted passion to this
pinnacle of Mahler’s achievement.
SUNDAY MARCH 11, 3:00 PM
SYMPHONY HALL
617.236.0999 | bostonphil.org
Aisslinn Nosky and Ian Watson, co-directors
Highlighting the quartet and sonatas of Debussy
(1862-1918) in our Winter & Spring concerts.
Sun. 2/18, 3 pm at Sanders Theatre
Beethoven Serenade in D for Flute, Violin & Viola
Debussy Sonata for Flute, Viola & Harp
Walton Piano Quartet in D minor
Guest flutist Paula Robison, harpist Jessica Zhou
& pianist Andrew Armstrong w/ BCMS violinist
Jennifer Frautschi, violist Marcus Thompson,
cellist Raman Ramakrishnan
$25-$62; students: $8; seniors: $4 off
617.349.0086/www.bostonchambermusic.org
Joan tower celebration
Music by pioneering composer Joan Tower.
With flutist Carol Wincenc, bassoonist Adrian
Morejon, and the BMOP-NEC Composition
Competition winner. Gil Rose conducts.
Fri., Feb. 9 at 8pm | Jordan Hall at NEC
$20-$50 | 781.324.0396 | bmop.org
aldo abreu, recorder
SUN, FEB 11, 3 PM, SLOSBERG MUSIC CENTER
The internationally acclaimed virtuoso performs
with Brandeis faculty/emeriti Nancy Armstrong,
Frances Fitch, Sarah Mead, and Daniel Stepner.
FREE & Open to the Public (donations welcome).
Brandeis University, 415 South St, Waltham, MA
blo event: the bard, the
diva, and the showman
Boston Lyric Opera explores three operatic personalities through this special performance: Walt
Whitman, P.T. Barnum, and soprano Jenny Lind.
Sunday, February 11, 2018 | 2:00 – 3:00pm,
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
For tickets, visit BLO.org or MFA.org.
feb school vacation weeK
regent theatre arlington
Saturday, February 17 - Sunday, February 25
#1 All-Time Animated Film & Oscar-Nominee!
On Stage Costume Parade & On Screen Lyrics!
Tickets: RegentTheatre.com * 781-646-4849
* Save $3 Now with Code “Globe” *
LET IT GO!
Boston
Globe
Ticket to
the Arts
Order Online through
our Self Serve Order
Entry System.
24/7 from anywhere.
boston.com/tickettothearts
T h e
G6
Continued from preceding page
lison Janney is fearsome as Harding’s
loveless lizard of a mother, and the
film’s smarminess is balanced by its
smarts. And vice versa. (119 min., R)
(Ty Burr)
YYY½ Lady Bird A wise, funny, empathetic tale of a Sacramento teenager
(Saoirse Ronan) launching herself at
life headfirst. Actress-writer Greta
Gerwig’s feature directing debut —
based on her own adolescence — is as
strong as they come, if built on overfamiliar coming-of-age lines. Ronan and
Laurie Metcalf (as her mother) do topdrawer work. (93 min., R) (Ty Burr)
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
YY Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The finale of this YA dystopian trilogy
plays more like the pedestrian middle
installment, “The Scorch Trials,” than
the distinctive, adrenalizing original.
Determined to confront the story’s oppressive biotech outfit, Dylan O’Brien’s
amnesiac lab rat heads for the sole
surviving city on the planet, the scientists’ elitist, walled-off metropolis. But
the scene shift feels uninspired no
matter how it might thematically
bookend the maze. (142 min., R)
(Tom Russo)
YY½ Molly’s Game Jessica Chastain
stars as Molly Bloom, who ran an ille-
gal high-stakes poker game for years
before the feds brought her down.
Aaron Sorkin wrote the script (from
Bloom’s book) and directs (his debut),
and the film is fast, slick, chatty, and
ultimately nothing much — a bluff.
(140 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYYY Phantom Thread The latest
film from Paul Thomas Anderson is a
thing of rapture with a darkness at its
center. Daniel Day-Lewis (in what may
be his final role) plays a high-fashion
dressmaker in 1950s London; Vicky
Krieps (amazing) plays his muse. Absurdly pleasurable to watch, it dramatizes a desperate struggle for domi-
nance that doubles as the tenderest of
love stories. (130 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYYY The Shape of Water A fantastic romantic masterpiece, made at the
intersection between art film and pop
romance, from Guillermo del Toro.
Sally Hawkins (astonishing) plays a
mute cleaning lady who falls for an
imprisoned creature from the deep;
what sounds ridiculous is a rapture of
filmmaking. (123 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYYY Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
“Star Wars” movies have always been
pop-culture candy; this is the first one
that tastes like steak. Writer-director
Rian Johnson rearranges the beloved
characters in ways that feel visually
and emotionally fresh. It’s not a perfect movie but it is a great one, and it’s
immensely satisfying. (152 min.,
PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri Frances McDormand hits a career peak as a smalltown avenging angel, the mother of a
murdered teenager who won’t let the
local cops off the hook. Sam Rockwell
and Woody Harrelson also do fine
work in this juicy, outrageous dramatic farce from Martin McDonagh. The
final scenes clank, though. (115 min.,
R) (Ty Burr)
WINCHESTER (PG-13) (12:55) 4:10
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) (12:00,
3:35)
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) RPX G
(11:30, 3:05)
PADMAAVAT (NR) (3:50)
PADMAAVAT 3D (NR) (11:50)
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) (12:10, 3:15)
PHANTOM THREAD (R) (11:40, 3:30)
THE POST (PG-13) (12:15, 3:40)
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13)
(12:40) 4:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (12:25, 3:25)
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) (11:25, 3:00)
I, TONYA (R) (12:50) 4:20
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) (11:35, 2:50)
COCO (PG) (12:05, 3:10)
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) G 10:30,
1:40, 5:00, 8:20
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE -- THE IMAX 2D
EXPERIENCE (PG-13) G 11:50, 3:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 7:00, 9:45
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 7:30, 10:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(R) G 7:00, 10:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 9:30
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 7:10, 9:50
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:40,
1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 10:10
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 1:50, 4:30
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 11:30, 2:10, 5:00, 7:40,
10:15
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent 12:50,
7:10
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) AMC Independent
10:40, 4:30, 10:00
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 3:50
12 STRONG (R) 11:15, 2:45, 7:10, 10:15
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) AMC Independent 10:50, 1:40, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent 11:40,
3:00, 6:20, 9:20
THE POST (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:00, 10:00
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) AMC Independent 11:00,
1:30, 4:00, 6:40
PHANTOM THREAD (R) AMC Independent G 11:20,
2:40, 6:10, 9:15
WINCHESTER (PG-13) G 11:15, 1:50, 4:30
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 11:15, 2:30, 5:00
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent 4:00, 10:00
LADY BIRD (R) AMC Independent 2:00, 7:30
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent 11:45, 3:15, 6:30,
9:30
HOSTILES (R) AMC Independent G 11:10, 2:40, 6:15,
9:30
12 STRONG (R) 1:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:45
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent 12:45,
4:00, 6:50, 9:50
THE POST (PG-13) 12:15, 4:00
THE POST (PG-13) 7:00
THE POST (PG-13) 10:10
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) AMC Independent 1:30, 4:30
PHANTOM THREAD (R) AMC Independent 12:30,
3:40, 6:45, 9:50
WINCHESTER (PG-13) G 12:20, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00,
10:30
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent 7:15, 10:05
HOSTILES (R) AMC Independent G 12:30, 3:40
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) G 1:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:10, 2:35,
()
INFO VALID 2/08/18 ONLY
()
G
5
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
8
Stadium Seating
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
Rear Window Captioning
6
K
Hearing Impaired
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 4:15, 7:15
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 4:30, 7:30
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 7:00
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 4:00
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 4:45, 7:20
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5:00, 7:40
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
121 Grandview Rd.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 7:00, 9:45
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
www.coolidge.org
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
BURLINGTON
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) Advance Tickets Available
G 7:00, 9:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) (1:40, 4:50) 8:00
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) (12:30,
4:00) 7:15
PADMAAVAT (NR) (1:00) 6:30, 8:15, 10:00
PADMAAVAT 3D (NR) (4:40)
12 STRONG (R) (1:15, 4:25) 7:35
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) (1:20, 4:05)
PHANTOM THREAD (R) (12:40, 3:50)
HOSTILES (R) (12:45, 3:55) 7:05
THE POST (PG-13) (12:50, 3:40) 6:45, 9:40
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (1:30,
4:30) 7:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) (3:30) 7:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (12:55, 3:35) 6:15,
9:30
I, TONYA (R) (1:25, 4:35) 7:50
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) (1:05, 4:10) 7:20
COCO (PG) (12:35)
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) (1:10, 4:20) 7:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 12:50, 3:55, 6:50,
9:20
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 3:25, 9:25
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:00,
3:15
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 7:30, 9:45, 10:15
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 4:50,
10:25
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 2:00, 7:40
12 STRONG (R) 12:55, 6:25
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent G
12:15, 3:30, 6:25, 9:15
THE POST (PG-13) 2:05, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30
PHANTOM THREAD (R) AMC Independent 12:45,
3:50, 6:45, 9:55
WINCHESTER (PG-13) G 1:35, 4:15, 7:40, 10:05
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 1:10, 3:45, 6:20, 9:00
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent G 1:50, 4:40
BELMONT
CAMBRIDGE
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
www.studiocinema.com
THE POST (PG-13) 5:00, 7:30
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) Advance Tickets Available
G 7:00, 10:00
CHALO (NR) 12:50, 4:15, 7:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) (1:30) 4:25, 7:20, 10:00
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) (12:00,
3:25) 6:45, 10:05
12 STRONG (R) (12:35, 3:45) 6:55, 9:55
PADMAAVAT (NR) 4:05, 8:00, 9:40
PADMAAVAT 3D (NR) (12:20) 6:00
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) (12:30, 3:10)
PHANTOM THREAD (R) (12:40, 3:55) 7:05, 10:15
HOSTILES (R) (12:05, 3:35) 6:50, 10:05
THE POST (PG-13) (1:00) 4:00, 7:00, 9:50
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (1:10)
4:20, 7:15, 10:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (1:25) 4:30, 7:35,
10:25
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) (3:05) 6:35,
9:55
I, TONYA (R) (12:10, 3:20) 6:30, 9:35
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) (12:05) 6:15
COCO (PG) (12:15)
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 4:00, 10:20
LADY BIRD (R) (1:20) 7:30
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) (3:15) 9:30
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
www.artsemerson.org
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.applecinemas.com
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 1:00,
4:00, 6:30, 9:30
INTTELLIGENT (NR) 9:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 1:00, 3:20, 6:25,
9:30
KALAKALAPPU 2 (NR) 9:35
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 4:15, 6:35
HOSTILES (R) 3:30
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) 1:00, 9:25
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 3:45
PADMAAVAT (NR) 1:00, 2:30, 6:00, 9:20
12 STRONG (R) 1:00, 6:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 1:00, 3:05, 5:15, 7:20, 9:30
COCO (PG) 1:00, 4:20
CHALO (NR) 6:40
TOLI PREMA (NR) 9:40
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:15,
4:00, 6:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 9:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:35, 4:00, 7:00,
9:20
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 (1:05, 3:45) 6:35, 9:15
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 5 (1:25, 4:05) 7:00, 9:40
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 5 (1:05, 3:55) 6:45,
9:25
I, TONYA (R) 5 (1:20, 4:10) 7:05, 9:40
LADY BIRD (R) 5 9:55
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 5 (1:15, 4:10) 7:05
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 9:45
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 5 (1:10, 4:00)
THE POST (PG-13) 5 (1:15, 3:50) 6:30, 7:00, 9:45
LADY BIRD (R) 5 (12:55, 3:10, 5:20) 7:25
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 5 9:30
FILM STARS DON'T DIE IN LIVERPOOL (R) 5 (1:30,
4:20) 7:15, 9:50
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 7:00, 8:00, 10:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(R) G 7:00, 9:45
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) G 1:00
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
55 Boylston St.
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 10:00
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 10:00
DANVERS
5 8 DIG
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
www.neaq.org
100 Independence Way
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) Advance Tickets Available
G 7:00, 10:00
www.amctheatres.com
COCO (PG) 10:45, 1:20
GET OUT (R) 7:40, 10:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:35, 2:25, 5:00,
7:40, 10:15
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:10, 2:50,
6:15, 9:45
DEDHAM
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:35, 3:10,
6:30, 9:50
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 4:15
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:10, 1:40
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:25,
3:25
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:25
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 9:50
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) 1:15
HOSTILES (R) 12:15, 3:35, 7:00, 10:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 10:55, 2:10, 4:45,
9:10
LADY BIRD (R) 12:35, 10:10
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 1:00, 3:45, 6:35, 9:20
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:30,
3:40, 7:10, 9:45, 10:15
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:20, 4:10, 7:05, 10:05
THE POST (PG-13) 1:15, 4:00, 4:30, 6:50, 7:20, 9:30
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 6:45
12 STRONG (R) 11:25, 2:55, 6:05, 9:05
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 12:55, 4:25, 8:00
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55
I, TONYA (R) 3:50, 6:55, 9:35
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG-13) 7:30
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:45, 3:05,
9:45
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 11:15, 1:40, 4:15
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 6:40, 9:35
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 7:05,
9:55
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:15,
3:10
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 9:50
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) 1:15
HOSTILES (R) 1:20, 4:15, 10:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 12:35, 3:25, 6:20,
9:05
LADY BIRD (R) 11:30, 1:50
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 4:10, 7:00
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:25,
3:45, 6:55, 10:05
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:35, 4:25, 7:15, 10:10
THE POST (PG-13) 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30
12 STRONG (R) 12:30, 3:30, 6:40, 9:40
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 12:45, 3:55, 7:05, 10:15
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG-13) 7:30
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) 11:25, 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
COCO (PG) 1:45, 4:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:45, 4:40, 7:15,
10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 3:30, 9:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
12:10
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:45,
4:15, 7:20, 10:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30,
9:15, 9:45, 10:15
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 10:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 3:10, 5:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:30,
4:45, 10:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 7:45
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent 1:00, 4:00,
7:10
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) AMC Independent
10:30
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 12:00
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
6:05, 9:30
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 10:55, 1:35, 4:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:15,
4:10, 7:05, 10:05
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:30, 10:20
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 9:50
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) 1:15
HOSTILES (R) 12:35, 3:25, 6:40, 9:50
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 12:25, 3:10, 6:15,
8:55
LADY BIRD (R) 11:40, 5:00, 10:30
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 2:05, 7:35
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:15,
12:45, 3:30, 4:00, 7:00, 10:15
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 12:40, 3:35, 6:30
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 9:35
5 DOL DSS
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 12:10, 3:50, 6:25, 9:05
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 3:45, 6:45
LADY BIRD (R) 4:15, 7:00
12 STRONG (R) 1:00, 4:15, 7:10, 10:25
LOWELL
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 12:05, 3:20, 6:50, 10:05
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 11:05, 1:50, 4:50, 7:45,
10:35
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:25, 1:55, 4:25, 6:55, 9:20
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG-13) 7:30
5 6 8 DIG
COLAO (NR) 11:15, 1:20, 3:45, 10:30
www.nationalamusements.com
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:20,
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:30, 10:20
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 9:50
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) G 1:15
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55
3:40, 6:35, 9:40
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) 11:00, 1:40, 4:20, 7:15,
10:00
BILAL: A NEW BREED OF HERO (PG-13) 12:55, 4:05,
6:45, 9:20
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:55, 2:15, 4:40
SOMERVILLE
5 6 8 DSS
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
www.showcasecinemas.com
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:40, 3:05,
6:20, 9:35
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:35
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:50,
3:40, 6:45, 9:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 7:30, 9:50, 10:20
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) 1:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:30, 2:00, 4:30,
7:05, 9:40
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:30,
1:10, 3:50, 4:20, 7:40, 10:10
THE POST (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 7:10, 9:50
12 STRONG (R) 12:35, 3:30, 6:40, 9:35
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 11:45, 2:20, 4:50
HOSTILES (R) 12:55, 3:55, 7:15, 10:15
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 12:15, 2:40, 5:05, 7:35, 10:05
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 1:55, 4:25
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG-13) 7:30
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 12:40, 3:45, 6:55, 10:00
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) 1:20, 4:40, 7:25, 9:55
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE -- THE IMAX 2D
EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00
FIFTY SHADES FREED: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(R) 7:00, 9:20
5 6 I DIG
http://somervilletheatre.com/
I, TONYA (R) 4:40, 7:15
LADY BIRD (R) 5:00, 7:40
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 4:30, 7:20
THE POST (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30
THE DISASTER ARTIST (R) 4:20, 7:15
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) Advance Tickets Available
G 7:00, 9:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) (1:45) 4:45
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) (1:10,
3:45)
12 STRONG (R) (12:45, 3:45)
DEN OF THIEVES (R) (1:05) 4:15
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) (12:45) 4:30
THE POST (PG-13) (1:25) 4:25
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (1:00,
3:40)
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (12:55, 3:55)
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) (1:05)
COCO (PG) (3:20)
LADY BIRD (R) 4:30
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) (12:50)
5 6 DIG
WALTHAM
www.nationalamusements.com
EMBASSY CINEMA
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:30, 2:50,
6:20, 9:50
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:05,
4:05, 7:00, 10:10
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 7:30, 9:50, 10:20
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) 1:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:20, 4:10, 6:50,
9:35
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:00, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:50,
4:00
12 STRONG (R) 12:45, 3:55, 6:55, 10:15
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 11:40, 2:10
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:45, 2:15, 4:50, 7:30, 10:00
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:35,
10:25
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 12:30, 3:40, 6:45, 10:05
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) 11:50, 2:20, 4:55, 7:45,
10:20
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
THE FLORIDA PROJECT (R) 5 (1:10, 4:20) 7:15
DUNKIRK (PG-13) 5 (1:05)
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 5 (3:55)
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 5 7:05
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 5 (1:00,
4:00) 7:00
12 STRONG (R) 5 (1:15, 4:05) 7:05
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 (1:25, 4:15) 7:20
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 5 (1:20, 4:10) 7:10
WESTBOROUGH
WOBURN
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:00, 7:30, 9:50, 10:20
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) 1:15
THE DARK KNIGHT (PG-13) 7:30
READING
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - READING
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:00, 3:15,
6:40, 10:00
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 2:10, 4:50
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:45,
3:35, 6:30, 9:25
COCO (PG) 1:10
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 7:10, 9:40
FIFTY SHADES MARATHON (NR) 1:15
HOSTILES (R) 1:00, 4:05, 7:10, 10:20
5 8
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 9:30
www.jordansimax.com
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE -- THE IMAX 2D
EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00
FIFTY SHADES FREED: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(R) 7:00, 9:30
(R) 7:30, 10:25
REVERE
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:10,
3:20, 6:35, 9:45
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:40,
3:50, 7:05, 10:15
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:30
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
THE POST (PG-13) 1:40, 4:00, 4:30, 6:45, 9:35
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
12 STRONG (R) 12:50, 3:55, 6:55, 9:50
5 6 8 I K DIG
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:10
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 12:00, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55
FIFTY SHADES DARKER (R) 7:15, 10:15
I, TONYA (R) 12:55, 3:40, 6:25, 9:15
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G7
THE TRUSTEES OF RESERVATIONS
Finding peace and quiet all over the region
SEEK A SANCTUARY
uQUIET
Continued from Page G1
tion can be found at Boston College.
The Memorial Labyrinth (www.bc
.edu/sites/labyrinth), honoring 22
alumni lost in the 9/11 tragedy, is located behind Burns Library, and open
weather permitting. You can also enjoy
a moment or two of intentional contemplation as you walk the labyrinth
at Armenian Heritage Park on the
Greenway (www.armenianheritagepark.org). Many people visit it daily, practicing walking meditation.
PLEASE­BE­QUIET ZONES
There’s no need for a librarian to
shush you in the Bates Hall Reading
Room at Boston Public Library (617536-5400, www.bpl.org). The majestic
space, with a high barreled ceiling, tall
arched windows, English oak bookcases, and long wooden reading tables,
commands hushed reverence. The
Boston Athenaeum, one of the oldest
private libraries in America (617-2270270, www.bostonathenaeum.org), is
also glorious, housed in a handsome
neo-Palladian building on Beacon Hill.
It’s filled with comfy chairs, original
paintings, and cozy alcoves. Members
have access to the silent fifth-floor
reading room, but the Norma Jean
Calderwood Gallery, the Bayard Henry
Long Room, and the G. d’Andelot Belin Bow Room are open to the public.
Are you a serious writer longing for a
quiet place to work? The Writers’
Room of Boston (617-523-0566,
www.writersroomofboston.org) is one
of the quietest places in town, offering
24/7 access to 10 private work areas
with large windows and lots of light.
MARGARET SLOWIK
THE GETAWAY
REST IN PEACE
You’ ll leave the din of Harvard
Square behind as you enter the ornate
main gate of Mount Auburn Cemetery
(617-547-7105, www.mountauburn.org), considered one of the first
garden cemeteries in the country.
Winding paths travel through an arboretum, filled with monuments, sculptures, and more than 5,500 trees,
shrubs, and other plants. It’s particularly serene in winter, especially after a
fresh snowfall when it turns into a soft,
muted fairyland.
From top: Powisset Farm in Dover; Mercy by the Sea in Madison, Conn.;
Eleanor Cabot Bradley Estate in Canton. Below: Mount Auburn
Cemetery in Cambridge and Seppo Pakkala at Finland Steam Baths in
Quincy in 2012.
YOON S. BYUN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Silence, stillness, and solitude is
what Mercy by the Sea in Madison,
Conn., offers its guests (203-245-0401,
www.mercybythesea.org). If you need
more than a few hours of calm to recharge, consider a stay at this retreat
set on 33 picturesque acres on Long Island Sound. There are day and weekend programs and plenty of time to
stroll the private beach, take a moonlight walk through the garden labyrinth overlooking the ocean, and attend workshops on a myriad of topics
and practices, like mindfulness, second half of life, and creativity. Great
vibe. Peaceful. Beautiful. That’s what
guests say about the Spirit Fire Retreat
Center, located on the eastern edge of
the Berkshires in Leyden (413-6243955, www.spiritfire.com). It’s set on
95 acres of forest and meadows, crisscrossed by hiking trails. Book a small,
private room, bundle up to walk the
paths, return to dine on fresh organic
meals, sit by a bonfire under a starsplashed winter sky, and return home
restored and recharged.
Many Trustees of Reservations preserved properties (978-921-1944,
www.thetrustees.org) are restful and
beautiful and offer opportunities for
secluded, silent escapes, especially in
winter. If you crave silence, you can
easily find it at Eleanor Cabot Bradley
Estate (www.thetrustees.org/placesto-visit/greater-boston/bradley-estate.html) in Canton, which includes
90 acres of woodlands, meadows, and
gardens, with 3 miles of trails. Snowshoe rentals and lessons are available
on Saturdays, weather permitting.
Early risers should head to Powisset
Farm in Dover (www.thetrustees.org/
places-to-visit/greater-boston/powisset-farm.html) for the 30-minute
Mindfulness on the Farm program,
held Thursdays at 6:45 a.m. After the
program, hike the 1-mile loop trail to
the edge of the nearly 109-acre property. You’ll have views of Boston, without
its insistent urban clatter, at Ward Res­
ervation in Andover (www.thetrustees.org/places-to-visit/north-shore/
ward-reservation.html). There are 10
miles of trails traversing the 900-acre
property set along the Merrimack River, including a hike to the open summit of Holt Hill, the highest point in
Essex County.
SOAK IN STEAMY SILENCE
Imagine reclining on wooden
planks in a steam room at the Finland
Steam Baths in Quincy (617-4795556, www.facebook.com/FinlandSteam-Baths-113433615389619). It’s
silent except for the whoosh you hear
when you pull the lever, dumping water on the hot furnace. You’re hot and
sweaty; your body sheds toxins; your
mind empties; you relax. Repair to the
private shower to cool down as the
lights flicker, signaling the end of your
session. The family-owned facility,
which has been around since 1928, is
basic — six private rooms — but gives
you everything you need: a towel,
washcloth, bucket of cold water, and
one hour of nearly complete silence in
the steam.
Diane Bair and Pamela Wright can be
reached at bairwright@gmail.com.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
T h e
G8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 8 , 2 0 1 8
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
ASK AMY
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
Should son of abusive father
try to reconcile?
BEN KING/CBS FILMS VIA AP
“I am very excited by the possibility of embodying a woman from history who grabbed
and then wielded great power,” Helen Mirren said of portraying Catherine the Great.
Great expectations as Mirren plays Catherine
She may just be the mother of monarchs.
Helen Mirren has played more than her share of
sovereigns over the course of her career, including Queen Charlotte, Queen Elizabeth I, Queen
Elizabeth II (twice), and at least two animated
queens. And there’s no denying it, she can be
quite commanding if need be.
It’s time to add a Russian empress to the list,
don’t you think? Mirren has signed up to play
Catherine the Great in a four-part drama for Sky
in the UK and HBO, where she also starred in
the remarkable (and worth watching) “Elizabeth I” with Jeremy Irons, Hugh Dancy, Eddie
Redmayne, and Toby Jones. What’s more, “Catherine the Great” is written by the same person
who wrote “Elizabeth I,” Nigel Williams. The
miniseries will focus on Catherine toward the
end of her reign and her affair with Grigory
Potemkin, who has not been cast yet.
“I am very excited by the possibility of embodying a woman from history who grabbed
and then wielded great power,” Mirren said in a
statement. “She rewrote the rules of governance
by a woman, and succeeded to the extent of having the word Great attached to her name, Catherine the Great. I am very grateful to have HBO
and Sky as partners in this endeavour. There are
no other homes on television that bring the support and understanding needed for this kind of
project.”
Thursday February 8, 2018
7:00pm
2
WGBH Greater
PBS Boston
4
WBZ Wheel
CBS NEW
7:30pm
8:00pm
8:30pm
Steves
Old House Hour:
Composite decking.
Jeopardy Big Brother (CC) HD
TV-PG-L NEW
NEW
Movies
9:00pm
9:30pm
Finding/Roots: Nas,
Angela Bassett.
Big Bang Young
Theory
Sheldon
Sports
How to Get Away
HD TV-14-L NEW
News
(CC) HD
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NEW
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Extra HD F. Feud
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NEW
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Murder NEW
News HD
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NEW
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(CC)
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Olympics 2018 Prime Time (CC): Figure Skating, Freestyle Skiing. Live.
9 WMUR ABC N.H. Ch.
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HD
11
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NEW
25
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FOX
TMZ HD
TV-PG
27
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Papa a toda madre
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36
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44
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Hidden Killers: An
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"innovation." TV-PG (CC) HD
50
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Cinemax
Encore
Flix
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The Four: Battle for Stardom (CC): The
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PREMIUM CABLE
(6:40) Tim Burton's Drag Me to Hell (2009): A loan (9:40) ★★ The Mummy (1999) (CC): An
Strike
Back
(2005) NR
officer is cursed. HD TV-14
adventurer vs. a mummy. HD TV-PG-V
★★★ Trouble/Harry: A dead
(10:42) Once Upon Time:
Lo. Dove (7:27) Return to Lonesome
Gunfighters protect a widow.
Dove (CC) TV-14
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(5:25)
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(8:50) ★★ Star Trek: Ins.:
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Enterprise fights the Borg. HD TV-PG
Picard protects a planet.
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Peppa
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HD
5
Q. My husband, “Steven,” was raised by an abusive father. He received regular beatings and humiliation (in front of his friends) as punishment.
He was not a bad kid. His mother stood by passively and did nothing about it.
Steven had two siblings who were not treated
badly. His mom and dad continued to “put him
in his place” in other ways when he was an
adult. Since he could no longer be beaten, at
family gatherings they liked to humiliate him by
bringing up “bad” things he did when he was a
child.
No matter what his accomplishments were,
they never praised him.
He is a 60-year-old man now. He has suffered
his entire life and was made to feel like there
was something wrong with him.
When we noticed that our daughter was also
being singled out and treated as if she was inferior to her cousins, we finally felt we had to do
something about it and decided to no longer celebrate holidays with them.
We send cards and e-mail greetings, but we
do not feel it is healthy for us to spend time with
them.
This has made us so much happier, and our
holidays are now stress-free.
Steven’s father has Alzheimer’s now, and his
brother has contacted him acting contrite for
his past behavior. He wants to get together.
I am fearful about this. My husband is a wonderful person and wants to do the right thing.
What is your opinion?
WORRIED WIFE
A. I think your husband should seek a meeting
with his brother, and perhaps visit his father.
I believe that the right thing to do is to give
people a chance to make amends, while still reserving a self-protective skepticism and overall
release from specific expectations about how
things will go.
Your husband’s parents created a toxic atmosphere in their home, where one child was singled out for tough treatment and the other children were enlisted as part of the abusive system.
Understand that when parents do this, all of the
children suffer. The child being abused suffers,
of course, but their siblings grow up witnessing
this behavior, knowing that they might be next
and feeling extremely conflicted and guilty.
Now that the father is no longer a threat, Steven’s brother might have had a genuine realization regarding the family dynamic, and it could
be healing for Steven to talk to his brother about
it.
I know from my own experience with a tough
and sometimes frightening father that my willingness to spend time with him at the end of his
life proved liberating. I hope you will support
your husband’s choices through this challenging
time.
Q. My father-in-law is dying of pancreatic cancer, and may only have months to live.
I was assisting him on his cellphone and
found evidence that he had an affair. I saw an
exchange of X-rated messages and “I love yous.”
I pretended not to see anything and said nothing to him.
I assume the affair is over; he can barely care
for himself and my mother-in-law is his caregiver.
But what now? I know the information
would hurt my wife, her sisters, and of course
my mother-in-law, who have all been taking care
of him through his journey. I am angry at him
for betraying our family, but I feel that saying
something would make things worse in this
hard time.
If I say nothing, they may never learn about
his affair, and he can be remembered as a faithful and loving husband and father. Do I keep his
secret?
WORRIED SON-IN-LAW
A. When faced with a dilemma regarding divulging a secret, the questions to try to resolve are:
“Who would benefit?” and “What good would it
do?”
In many cases regarding family secrets, the
“good” is simply “truth.” If it is the truth, then
those affected by the truth — even if it is a tough
truth — should be led to the light.
In this case, your father-in-law has no opportunity to alter his behavior, and little opportunity to explain, apologize, and make amends.
I think you should let this one lie.
Q. You were too easy on “Fed Up in Chicago,” the
vegetarian whose mother-in-law brought meat
dishes to their home. Even Fed Up conceded
that her MIL was probably just trying to be social. Her characterization of these dishes as “disgusting” was revealing. She’s the rude one.
FELLOW VEGETARIAN
A. I agree that this trashing was quite unnecessary.
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
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