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The Boston Globe – January 02, 2018

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Tu e s d a y, Ja n u a r y 2 , 2 0 1 8
At hospitals,
Alzheimer?s
care lacking
Drive underway in Mass.
to address shortcomings
By Felice J. Freyer
GLOBE STAFF
Steve Johanson had a fierce and knowledgeable advocate at his side when he visited a
hospital recently: his wife, Judy. In the six
years since Steve had been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer?s disease, she had immersed herself in understanding the illness
and preparing for its consequences.
But even so, the hospital stay to adjust
Steve?s Alzheimer?s medication was a nightmare. In the emergency room, nurses briskly
took his vital signs, oblivious to his confusion.
When he became upset, the staff didn?t seem
to understand why.
?I felt like we were aliens that had just landed in a place that had no idea of the language
we spoke and no concept of the disease my
husband had,? Judy Johanson said.
By the end of his four-week stay, Johanson
said, her husband had lost the ability to walk
and could not return to their Watertown
home.
People with Alzheimer?s and other forms of
dementia frequently need hospital care, yet
few hospitals are prepared for them. Nearly every aspect of that environment ? beeping ma-
A bitter, bleak reality for city?s homeless
By Evan Allen
GLOBE STAFF
and Sarah Betancourt
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
New Year?s Day brought the fifth
consecutive day of temperatures below 20 degrees to Boston and fears
from officials and homeless people
that the sustained frigid weather was
taxing the city?s resources and imperiling the lives of people on the
streets.
About 1,700 homeless people
have filled shelters ? several hundred more than usual, city officials
said, straining resources and sending advocates, police, and other
emergency personnel on searches to
bring more people inside.
?It has never been this bad,? said
Karen LaFrazia, president of St.
Francis House, the day shelter where
she has worked for 20 years. ?It?s just
so frozen. I see people coming in
with their hands bloated, skin purple. . . . You can sort of see people
hunkered into themselves.?
With Tuesday projected to hit a
high of 18 degrees, the city is poised
to record its second-longest stretch
of consecutive days ? six in a row ?
with temperatures below 20, said
Hayden Frank, meteorologist for the
National Weather Service. The record of seven days, he said, stretched
HOMELESS, Page A5
DINA RUDICK/GLOBE STAFF
Jose Jelgado, a homeless man, rested at South Station Monday.
Walsh starts new year with vow
At swearingнin for new term, mayor says Long Island will again be recovery center
ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE, Page A6
Wiretap law
update resisted
Despite support for change,
1968 rules are left intact
PHOTOS BY KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
By Joshua Miller
GLOBE STAFF
For decades, Massachusetts prosecutors
have urged lawmakers to grant them broader
power to conduct wiretaps to fight crime. For
decades, the lawmakers have refused.
These days, updating the state?s 1968 wiretapping law is supported by every district attorney, and also by the Republican governor,
the Democratic attorney general, and the progressive chief justice of the Supreme Judicial
Court.
Standing in their way: the Massachusetts
Legislature, which this fall killed a measure to
make it easier for prosecutors to wiretap suspected criminals.
?When I speak to legislators one-on-one,
the conversations are good and promising,?
said Suffolk District Attorney Dan Conley. ?But
for some reason, year after year after year, this
ends up rotting on the vine.?
At its core, the debate speaks to a key tension in every democracy: How much power
should the government have to breach citizens?
privacy in attempts to keep the public safe?
The current law allows wiretapping only
WIRETAP, Page A10
In the news
Heat wave
Tuesday: Mercury up, slightly.
High 17-22, low 11-16.
Wednesday: Sunny, warmer.
High 27-32, low 18-23.
High tide: 11:31, 10:50.
Sunrise: 7:13. Sunset: 4:23.
Complete report, C8.
For breaking news, updated
stories, and more, visit our website:
BostonGlobe.com
VOL . 293, NO. 2
*
Suggested retail price
$2.00
Former vice president Joe Biden was a guest Monday to the swearing-in of Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh.
By Milton J. Valencia
GLOBE STAFF
In a historic precedent, six of Boston?s 13 city councilors are now women of color.
From left: Lydia Edwards, Michelle Wu, Annissa Essaibi-George, Andrea Campbell,
Ayanna Pressley, and Kim Janey. Campbell was elected council president Monday.
Add 20 minutes of travel time
to your morning commute, the
MBTA advised, as frigid temperatures hinder bus, ferry, and
rail services. B3.
Lawmakers returning to Capitol Hill must grapple with how
to avoid a government shutdown and deal with several
contentious issues. A7.
POINT OF VIEW:
CHRISTOPHER GASPER
The playoff field ?worked
out so favorably for the Paн
triots that you would think
NFL senior vice president of
officiating Alberto Riveron
was reviewing and setting
the playoff field for them.?
C1.
Iranian protesters, ignoring
pleas for calm, took to the
streets in several cities for the
fifth day as state television reported 13 people have been
killed in the strife. A4.
North Korea?s surprise call for
direct talks could undercut
President Trump?s insistence
that the world isolate the
country as it continues to ad-
A former Fenway health center
doctor faces new allegations
of sexual harassment. B1.
based drinks with more than 6
percent alcohol. B10.
Labor battles could help determine which party controls Con-
gress later this year. B10.
INAUGURATION, Page A10
Tax cuts bump up paychecks
but can?t help like raises would
By Evan Horowitz
GLOBE STAFF
It?s more than a new year, it?s a whole new
regime for employers and workers, who have
to make sense of the major tax changes Congress passed in December.
Starting in February, most workQUICK
ers
will see a much-appreciated
STUDY
bump in their paychecks as a result
of these tax cuts. But over time
those benefits will shrink, and after eight years
they?ll disappear, when key provisions expire.
And that helps drive
home a key point: Tax
cuts are a poor substitute
for raises.
L e t ?s i m a g i n e o u r selves as a typical breadwinner in Massachusetts,
with a salar y of about
$80,000. Under the old
tax system, we could expect to keep about
$55,000, after accounting
for local, state, and federal taxes.
Under the new law, though, our take-home
pay jumps to $56,000, an increase of about 1.8
percent, according to calculations from the
nonpartisan Tax Policy Center. That?s not nothing ? who would turn down an extra $1,000?
? but it?s probably not life-altering, either.
Especially when you consider this won?t be
the only change in our paychecks.
Lots of us will also see our health insurance
premiums go up. In recent years, employee premiums have been steadily rising all over the
country, enough to cut our take-home pay by
roughly $200, which would wipe out a chunk of
the expected tax benefit.
Then there?s the question of whether we get
a raise this year. When the economy is growing
and the labor market is tight ? as ours has been
for years now ? average wages should be increasing around 3.5 percent per year.
Unfortunately, typical
workers haven?t been seeing these gains. Instead,
wages have been growing
between 2 and 2.5 percent per year. That means
such workers as us ? typical breadwinners in Massachusetts ? are getting
raises worth $1,300 instead of $2,000, after taxes.
Taken at face value, that missing $700 seems
to be more than compensated for by the $1,000
tax break. But there?s a big difference here:
Wage growth compounds. Raises happen every
year, so we wouldn?t just get that extra $700
When the economy is
growing and the labor
market is tight . . . wages
should be increasing
around 3.5% per year.
vance its nuclear weapons program. A3.
A state task force recommended relaxing tax rules that pummel hard ciders and other fruit-
As he embarked on his second term, Mayor Martin J. Walsh on Monday vowed to rebuild the bridge
to Long Island, proclaiming that the former base of
homeless shelters and rehabilitation programs on
the island will once again play a ?vital role in Boston?s recovery landscape.?
Walsh also promised to expand education and
job training programs and offered a bevy of social
services aimed at helping Boston?s most vulnerable
populations and boosting its middle class.
?We can be the city that is world class because it
works for the middle class,? Walsh said to thunderous applause before hundreds of supporters who
gathered for his swearing-in ceremony at the Cutler
Majestic Theater on a frigid New Year?s Day morning.
Several of his proposals sparked questions from
city councilors, specifically his plans to rebuild the
Long Island bridge at a cost of up to $100 million.
The mayor ordered an emergency evacuation of
the island and the closure of the aging bridge in
EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
CALIFORNIANS QUEUE UP
With legal sales of recreational
marijuana off to a strong start,
proponents believe the Golden
State will become the world?s
largest market. A2.
TAX CUT, Page A7
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Recreational marijuana becomes legal in Calif.
State expected
to rack up most
sales in nation
By Thomas Fuller
NEW YORK TIMES
OAKLAND, Calif. ? Retail
cannabis shops in California
opened their doors Monday for
the first time, inaugurating
what proponents say will become the world?s largest market
for legalized recreational marijuana.
A transaction that remains
illegal in many parts of the
country seemed almost banal
Monday for the customers at a
dispensary in Oakland who
picked out their marijuana,
showed their driver?s licenses,
a n d w a l ke d i n t o t h e b r i s k
morning air with their drugs in
a paper bag.
?This is a whole new world
opening up,? said Diana Gladden, 48, who bought marijuana
for herself and her aging parents. ?My mother, a very strict
Southern Baptist, now thinks
it?s OK because it?s legal.?
One customer left with more
than $1,000 worth of cannabis
in a large grocery bag.
Medical marijuana has been
legal in California for more
than two decades but the arrival of full legalization in the state
is a milestone for the nation?s
fast-growing cannabis industry.
Marijuana is now sold legally
down the entire length of the
West Coast, plus Alaska.
So far, 29 states have adopted medical marijuana laws. In
2012, Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize recreational marijuana.
Since then, five more states
have passed such laws, including Massachusetts, where retail
sales are scheduled to begin in
July.
A slow and halting rollout of
California?s new cannabis regulations limited the number of
shops offering the drug Monday
to just a handful of cities across
JOHN G. MABANGLO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
A clerk showed marijuana plants to customers at the Harborside cannabis dispensary in Oakland on New Year?s Day.
the state, including Berkeley,
Oakland, San Jose, and San Diego. But more municipalities,
including San Francisco and
Los Angeles, are expected to issue licenses soon.
Alex Traverso, a spokesman
for California?s Bureau of Cannabis Control, said around 100
dispensaries in the state were licensed to sell recreational cannabis Monday.
Shayna Schonauer, the manager of a cannabis dispensary in
Sacramento, said sales were
good on the first day, though
not as big as for marijuana holidays like April 20.
Schonauer, the regional
manager of the RCP Sacramento dispensary, told the Associated Press that Monday?s crowds
met her expectations.
Outside the dispensary in
Oakland nearly 200 people
waited in line before dawn for
the 6 a.m. start of sales.
?Happy New Year!? Steve
DeAngelo, executive director of
t h e d i s p e n s a r y, s h o u t e d
through a bullhorn. ? We?ve
been looking forward to this
day for a long time.?
But in a state where marijuana has been widely available
for so long, the enthusiasm was
relatively muted. Outside a dispensary in neighboring Berkeley only a handful of customers
waited in line before sales began.
Legalization here may further raise tensions between the
state and federal drug enforce-
ment officials led by Attorney
General Jeff Sessions, a vocal
opponent of legalization. The
federal Drug Enforcement Administration considers marijuana a Schedule 1 drug, the same
category as heroin.
National opinion polls have
shown a gradual and steady approval of legalization. Californians voted for recreational use
of the drug by 57-to-43 percent
in a November 2016 ballot initiative. The law prohibits smoking in public, although such
bans are already commonplace
in California cities.
Unlike the other states that
have legalized, California has a
vast industry producing the
drug, much of which is illegally
sold across state lines. By one
estimate, California produces
seven times more marijuana
than it consumes.
Legalization here will test
whether that vast black market
of growers, many of whom have
been reluctant to join the legal
market, will come out of the
shadows.
It is unclear how much legalization will increase consumption of the drug in California.
Since 1996 marijuana has been
available from medical dispensaries for adults with an easily
obtainable recommendation
card. And even those without
medical cards have had little
fear of prosecution.
It has been many years since
police officers in California
made arrests for possession of
small amounts of marijuana,
according to Jennifer Tejada,
chairwoman of the law and legislative committee of the California Police Chiefs Association.
Jonathan Duenas, a college
student and one of the cannabis
customers in Oakland on Monday, said he had come for the
novelty but probably would not
return. ?I have a friend who
grows it,? he said. ?I can get it
much cheaper.?
Even as more cities in California prepare to issue cannabis
licenses, a number of questions
remain about the effects and
implementation of the new
laws.
The head of the Bureau of
Cannabis Control has raised
concerns that there may not be
enough licensed cannabis distributors in the early days of retail sales. A similarly bumpy
rollout took place in Nevada in
July when Governor Brian Sandoval took emergency measures to combat a shortage of
legal marijuana soon after legal
sales began.
Opponents of legalization
warn that California could see
an increase in traffic deaths, as
appears to have happened in
Colorado since stores in that
state began selling recreational
cannabis four years ago.
Traffic deaths in Colorado
involving drivers who tested
positive for marijuana more
than doubled from 2013 to
2016, according to a study published by a federal government
agency in October. The report
also noted a 35 percent increase
in emergency room visits related to marijuana.
California has not yet adopted a standard measure for marijuana impairment, an issue
highlighted on Christmas Eve
when a California Highway
Patrol officer was killed after a
man whom police said was
driving under the influence of
both alcohol and marijuana
rammed into the back of the officer?s vehicle.
Daily Briefing
Chicago homicides down slightly
Volunteers search
for cats missing
from Calif. wildfire
SANTA ROSA, Calif. ?
When a firestorm swept down
the hillsides of Sonoma County,
bringing terror to this tight
grid of thousands of homes,
dogs tended to rush to their
masters.
But cats went in the opposite direction, ignoring the
pleas of panicked owners and
disappearing amid the chaotic
evacuation.
Finding the missing cats
that fled the October wildfires
has been an impassioned quest
for Jennifer Petruska, an animal lover whose home, pets included, was one of the few in
her neighborhood to be spared.
Petruska has spent nearly
every night since the fires
tracking and trapping fire cats,
as she calls them, the felines
that for weeks have remained
missing because of stubbornness, trauma, instinct, or a mix
of all three.
Catching cats can be tricky
DAVID MCNEW/GETTY IMAGES
Santa Rosa, Calif., is ground zero for efforts to find cats that went missing in October.
in the best of circumstances,
but Petruska and her team of
volunteers have caught more
than 70. They believe many
dozens more are out there.
Pet Rescue & Reunification,
as the volunteers call themselves, have set up night-vision
cameras in storm drains and
creek beds, where many cats
went into hiding. Every evening at dusk they set traps baited with tuna and mackerel,
checking them hourly until
dawn.
?If you want to catch a cat
you have to stay up all night ?
that?s just the name of the
game,? Petruska said as she
prepared for another dark and
cold round of cat stalking. ?I?ve
been a horrible insomniac my
whole life so it suits me.?
NEW YORK TIMES
New weapon touted in war on opioids
2018 could be a big year for space
PITTSBURGH ? A nationwide group of federal law enforcement officials are working to stop doctors who prescribe opioids to patients who
don?t need them.
They are armed with new
access to a broader array of
prescription drug databases,
Medicaid and Medicare figures, coroners? records, and
other numbers compiled by
the Justice Department.
The department is providing the data to the Opioid
Fraud and Abuse Detection
Unit, which draws together officials in 12 regions. It shows
which doctors are prescribing
the most, how far patients
travel to see them, and whether any have died within 60
days of getting a prescription.
NEW YORK ? If you love
tice when they blast off.
space and astronomy, 2018
In January, Elon Musk?s
will be an exciting year.
company, SpaceX, is planning
NASA has announced plans
the first test flight of Falcon
to send spacecraft to
Heavy, what it calls
Mars and the sun,
the most powerful
Japanese and Amerioperational rocket in
can probes already in
the world. A successspace are set to enter
ful test would be an
orbit around two asimportant step toteroids, and a variety
ward demonstrating
of eclipses and meteSpaceX?s ability to
or showers offer opsend spacecraft beportunities for skyyond Earth?s orbit.
gazing.
While tests of the
SpaceX plans
to launch its
While some dates
rocket have been deFalcon Heavy
are certain or proxilayed in the past, the
mate, spacecraft
vehicle was installed
in January.
sometimes are not
at a launchpad at the
ready on time for launch, or
Kennedy Space Center at the
their launches get scrubbed
end of December, according to
due to weather. Some space
the website Spaceflight Now.
agencies do not give much noNEW YORK TIMES
Authorities have been going after so-called pill mills for
years, but the new approach
brings additional federal resources to bear.
??This data shines a light
we?ve never had before,?? said
federal prosecutor Robert Cessar. ??We don?t need to have
confidential informants on the
street to start a case. Now, we
have someone behind a computer screen who is helping us.
That has to put [doctors] on
notice that we have new tools.??
Rod Rosenstein, deputy US
attorney general, said the Justice Department will consider
going after any lawbreaker as
it seeks to bring more cases
and reduce the number of unwarranted prescriptions.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO ? Chicago ended 2017 with fewer homicides
than in the year before, but
gang violence in the city?s most
dangerous neighborhoods
kept the number of killings
above the 600 mark.
The Chicago Police Department released statistics Monday that show the number of
homicides fell from 771 in
2016 to 650 last year. The
number of shootings dropped
from 3,550 to 2,785 during the
same period.
Although the drops were
significant, the homicide total
in a repeat of 2016 eclipsed the
number of killings in New
York City and Los Angeles
combined.
??You still have to start with
the fact that 600 people dead
in Chicago is a hell of a lot of
people to be dead in one year,??
said the Rev. Marshall Hatch,
whose church is in one of the
city?s most violent neighborhoods.
Still, the drops have police
and others optimistic that
some of their efforts will lead
to more declines over the next
year. Chief among those efforts
will be the expansion of hightech strategies and equipment
to fight crime.
??I am proud of the progress
our officers made in reducing
gun violence all across the city
in 2017,?? Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said. ??In
2018, we are going to work to
build on the progress we made
last year ? to reduce gun violence to save lives and to find
justice for victims.??
ASSOCIATED PRESS
N.J. teen charged with killing family
LONG BRANCH, N.J. ? A
16-year-old New Jersey boy
armed with a semiautomatic
rifle shot and killed his parents, sister, and a family friend
inside the home where they
lived, authorities said Monday.
Monmouth County prosecutor Chris Gramiccioni said
the teen will be charged with
four counts of murder and a
weapons offense stemming
from the shooting,which occurred less than 20 minutes
before midnight on New Year?s
Eve in the shore town of Long
Branch.
A possible motive for the
shooting has not been disclosed. The rifle used in the
shooting was legally registered
to a resident of the house,
Gramiccioni said.
The victims were identified
as the boy?s parents, Steven
Kologi, 44, and Linda Kologi,
42; his 18-year-old sister, Brittany; and 70-year-old Mary
Schultz, who lived with the
family.
Police responded to a 911
call of shots fired at the home
just after 11:30 p.m. Sunday,
Gramiccioni said. He described the shooting as an isolated domestic incident and
said the teen was taken into
custody without issue.
The teen?s grandfather and
brother were not targeted and
left the home unharmed.
??It?s a terribly tragic incident,?? Gramiccioni said.
Charges were expected to
be filed later Monday, he said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Reporting corrections
The Globe welcomes information about errors that call for
corrections. Information may be sent to comments@globe.com or
left in a message at 617-929-8230.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A3
The World
N. Korea could
drive wedge in
US, Seoul ties
Daily Briefing
Kim?s push for
talks undercuts
Trump?s stance
By Choe Sang-Hun
NEW YORK TIMES
(PETER BYRNE/PA VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cars can be seen engulfed in flames inside the garage at Liverpool?s Echo Arena on Sunday night.
Massive conflagration destroys 1,400 cars in Liverpool parking garage
LONDON ? An estimated
1,400 cars were destroyed in a
huge fire that raged through a
multistory parking garage in
the northern English city of
Liverpool.
The fire next to Liverpool?s
Echo Arena also threatened
horses that were stabled in the
garage for performances at the
Liverpool International Horse
Show.
The horses were moved to
safety inside the arena. The
show was canceled because of
the fire, which was brought
under control early Monday
morning. The charred wrecks
of ruined vehicles were visible
in all seven stories of the parking garage.
There were no reported injuries in the blaze. Officials set
up an emergency shelter to
In tweet, Trump slams Pakistan
ISLAMABAD ? President
Trump slammed Pakistan for
?lies and deceit?? in a New
Year?s Day tweet that said Islamabad had played US leaders for fools.
?No more,? Trump added.
Trump said Washington
had given Pakistan $33 billion
in the last 15 years, yet Afghanistan and the United
States have long accused Pakistan of providing safe havens
for militants. Pakistan had no
official comment, but Foreign
Minister Khawaja Asif tweeted
that his government was preparing a response that ?will let
the world know the truth.?
Pakistan?s Geo Television
quoted Asif as saying: ??We
have already said ?no more? to
America, so Trump?s ?no more?
has no importance. We are
ready to give all account for every single penny to America in
public.??
Asif said that Trump?s tweet
was borne out of frustration,
and that the United States
should pursue dialogue with
Afghanistan?s insurgents rath-
er than military force.
The Afghan ambassador to
the United States welcomed
Trump?s tweet.
??A promising message to
Afghans who have suffered at
the hands of terrorists based in
Pakistan for far too long,??
Hamdullah Mohib tweeted.
The uneasy relationship between the United States and
Pakistan has been on a downward spiral since the 2011 US
operation that located and
killed Osama bin Laden.
Trump ratcheted up the
pressure last year when he
called out Pakistan for harboring Afghan Taliban insurgents.
In August, the United
States said it would hold up
$255 million in military assistance for Pakistan until it
cracks down on extremists
threatening Afghanistan. On
Monday, the Trump administration?s National Security
Council said that was still the
plan, although the United
States would continue to assess the situation.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Saudi airstrikes kill 23 in Yemen
SANA, Yemen ? Saudi-led
coalition airstrikes killed at
least 23 people and wounded
eight others in the Yemeni city
of Hodeida on Monday, officials and witnesses said
A fire erupted in a market
after one strike targeted a
nearby gas station in el-Garrahi district. The coalition could
not immediately be reached
for comment on the reports.
International rights groups
have accused the coalition of
bombing civilian gatherings,
markets, hospitals, and residential areas across Yemen
since the beginning of its air
campaign against the Iranian
backed rebels, known as
Houthis, in March 2015.
The war has killed more
than 10,000 civilians and
pushed the Arab world?s poorest country to the brink of
famine.
The United States has tripled the number of airstrikes
this year against Al Qaeda?s
branch in Yemen, one of the
deadliest and most sophisti-
cated terrorist organizations
in the world.
US coalition fighters have
pushed the militants from
their coastal strongholds, and
the Pentagon recently boasted
of killing key Al Qaeda leaders. Yet the top US counterterrorism official and other
American intelligence analysts conceded that the campaign has barely dented the
terrorist group?s ability to
strike US interests.
?It doesn?t feel yet that
we?re ahead of the problem in
Yemen,? Nicholas J. Rasmussen, who stepped down this
month after three years as director of the National Counterterrorism Center, told The
New York Times.
The threat of a terrorist attack ? with the most commonly feared target a commercial airliner ? emanating
from the chaotic, ungoverned
areas of Yemen remains high
on the government?s list of
terrorism concerns.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
help the many people who
could not get home because
their cars had been burned.
Fire officials said two dogs
were rescued from vehicles
parked inside. They are believed to have been the only
animals inside cars at the
time.
The Echo Arena said all
people and horses were safe.
Witnesses said cars seemed
to explode every couple of seconds when the fire was at its
peak. They said the fire appeared to start in the engine of
an older Land Rover and
quickly spread.
Police said initial reports
indicate that an ??accidental
fire within a vehicle caused
other cars to ignite.?? The blaze
started Sunday afternoon.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
US general cites progress against ISIS
WASHINGTON ? The US
general who is commanding
coalition forces against the
group the calls itself the Islamic State said that the militants
have lost 98 percent of the
land they had previously
claimed, and that 7.7 million
people have been liberated
from their control. But he
warned the group could continue as a shadow terror outfit
operating without a base.
Army Lieutenant General
Paul Funk, commanding general of the joint task force
fighting the group, said the
coalition had grown to 74 nations and had reclaimed more
than 25,000 square miles of
land from the militants.
Yet he warned that the allies can?t let up.
?Their repressive ideology
continues . . . and only
through coalition and international efforts can the defeat
become permanent,?? Funk
said in a New Year?s message
on the coalition Facebook
page.
President Trump, in a New
Year?s Eve video posted to his
official Twitter account that
highlighted his first year in office, included an excerpt from
a speech in which he vowed to
?defeat radical Islamic terrorism? and ?not allow it to take
root in our country.?
Last week, the group
claimed responsibility for
three suicide attacks in Kabul
that killed as many as 41 people and wounded 80 at the Afghan Voice Agency and Shi?iterun Tebyan cultural center.
That followed a November
strike against a Kabul television station that killed two
guards and wounded 20, and
an October attack on a mosque
that killed more than 30.
Syrian Democratic Forces
are in the final stages of liberating the middle Euphrates
Valley from the group, and
Iraq is rebuilding after fully
expelling it, according to a coalition statement.
The statement also praises
the ?hundreds of brave Iraqis
and Syrians who gave their
lives for their nations? in 2017
as well as coalition service
members and civilians who
died last year.
BLOOMBERG NEWS
Likud Party favors annexing settlements
JERUSALEM ? The ruling
its decisions reflect the preLikud Party?s central commitvailing opinions in the party of
tee has unanimously endorsed
Prime Minister Benjamin Nea resolution calling for the antanyahu. Several leading polinexation of West Bank settleticians, including senior memments, sending a tough mesbers of Netanyahu?s cabinet,
sage to the Palestinjoined the vote to imians in the wake of
pose Israeli law on all
President Trump?s
liberated areas of setrecognition of Israel?s
tlement in Judea and
capital.
Samaria.
The decision Sun??Two states for
day night marked the
two peoples is a conlatest step by Likud
cept that has disapto distance itself
peared from the
from the internationworld,?? Science MinBetjamin
ally backed idea of
ister Ofir Akunis was
establishing an indequoted as saying by
Netanyahu
skipped the
pendent Palestinian
the Haaretz daily.
state as part of a fu??And to my joy, US
vote.
ture peace deal. The
President Trump is
Palestinians condemned the
sitting in the White House and
decision and accused Trump
does not accept this mistaken
of emboldening the Likud parconcept.??
ty.
Trump has said he hopes to
The central committee is
broker what he calls the ??ultionly an advisory body, and
mate deal?? between Israel and
Sunday?s vote did not reflect
the Palestinians.
an official policy change. But
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEOUL ? North Korea?s
surprise call on Monday for
direct talks with South Korea
could drive a wedge into the
decades-old alliance between
Seoul and Washington, potentially creating a reprieve from
months of tensions but also
undercutting President
Trump?s tough approach to
the nuclear-armed North.
A New Year?s Day speech
by Kim Jong Un, the North
Korean leader, contained a
dramatic shift in tone and
policy regarding the South.
After ignoring South Korea
for years, Kim called for urgent dialogue to discuss improving ties and easing military tensions on the divided
Korean Peninsula, even as he
claimed an ability to strike
the mainland United States
with nuclear missiles.
Kim also agreed to a request by President Moon Jaein of South Korea to send a
North Korean delegation to
the Winter Olympics to be
held in the South next month.
Kim?s about-face, which
was broadcast on state-run
television, came just days after Washington rallied its allies and rivals to support increasingly punishing United
Nations sanctions against
North Korea.
Analysts said Kim was
looking for opportunities to
weaken international resolve
to enforce the penalties, as
well as to sow discord between the United States and
South Korea.
Moon has repeatedly
called for dialogue with the
North, hoping that talks
would ease tensions and lead
to broader international negotiations to end its nuclear
weapons program.
Hours after Kim?s speech,
Moon?s office welcomed the
North?s proposal.
? We h a v e a l r e a d y e x pressed our willingness to engage in a dialogue with North
Korea at any t ime, i n any
place, and in any format, as
long as both sides can discuss
restoring their relations and
peace on the Korean Peninsu-
l a ,? s a i d Pa r k S o o - h y u n ,
Moon?s spokesman.
Trump, on the other hand,
has stressed maximum pressure and sanctions and even
suggested possible military
action to force the North to
give up its nuclear arsenal.
Moon officially supports
the enforcement of UN sanctions. In recent weeks, his
government has seized two oil
tankers on the suspicion that
they were used in violation of
the sanctions to smuggle refined petroleum products into North Korea through shipto-ship transfers on the high
seas.
But the South Korean president also agrees with China
a n d Ru s s i a t h a t t a l k s a r e
needed to resolve the nuclear
crisis. Kim?s sudden peace
overture Monday will probably encourage both South Korea and China to raise their
voices for dialogue.
?Kim Jong Un is using the
Pyeongchang Olympics as a
way to weaken the sanctions,?
said Kim Yong-hyun, a professor of North Korean studies at
Dongguk University in Seoul.
?He is seeking to create a fissure between Seoul and
Washington and be tween
Washington and Beijing.?
In his speech, Kim warned
that he had ?a nuclear button?
in his office that could send
intercontinental ballistic missiles, ICBMs, hurtling toward
any point in the mainland
United States. He also vowed
to increase production of nuclear-capable missiles.
In recent years, while ignoring South Korea, North
Korea has pursued opportunities for talks with Washington. But those efforts have not
created a long-term solution.
The United States is not interested in holding talks that
lack a clear commitment from
the North to discuss denuclearization.
The North, however, insists on being recognized as a
nuclear state.
?After getting nowhere
with the Americans, North
Korea is now trying to start
talks with South Korea first
and then use that as a channel to start dialogue with the
United States,? said Yang
Moo-jin, a professor at the
University of North Korean
Studies in Seoul.
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T h e
A4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
Toll rises to 13 as Iranians defy crackdown
Rouhani defends
protesters? rights
to demonstrate
By Thomas Erdbrink
NEW YORK TIMES
TEHRAN ? Ignoring pleas
for calm from President Hassan
Rouhani, Iranian protesters
took to the streets in several cities for the fifth day Monday as
pent-up economic and political
frustrations boiled over in the
broadest display of discontent
in years.
The Iranian government responded with conciliator y
words from Rouhani, but also a
widening security clampdown
? and a pledge late Monday to
crack down even harder.
?We will not at all let insecure situation to continue in
Tehran,? Brigadier General Esmaeil Kowsari, deputy chief of
the main Islamic Revolutionary
Guards Corps base in Tehran,
told the semiofficial ISNA news
agency. ?If this situation continues, the officials will definitely
make some decisions and at
that point this business will be
finished.?
Despite Rouhani?s diplomatic language, it was clear the
demonstrators would be given
no leeway.
The deputy interior minister, Hossein Zolfaghari, told the
semiofficial Jamaran website,
?From tonight the unrest will
be controlled more seriously.?
On Monday, a crackdown by
the government and security
services was building, and riot
police officers with water cannons were out in full force in
Tehran, the capital.
Since the protests began
Thursday, at least 13 people
have been killed in clashes with
security forces, according to
state television.
One police officer was
among the dead and three others were wounded, the Associated Press reported. Officers
were targeted in the central city
of Najafabad, about 200 miles
south of the capital.
In all, about 200 people have
so far been arrested in Tehran
alone since the protests began
Assad replaces
three top ministers
By Bassem Mroue
ASSOCIATED PRESS
EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/SHUTTERSTOCK
About 200 people have been arrested in Tehran alone since the protests began last Thursday.
Thursday, one security official
told Iran?s ISNA news agency.
There were arrests in provincial
towns as well.
Rouhani has urged demonstrators to avoid violence but
defended their right to protest.
He did so again Monday on
Twitter.
?People want to talk about
economic problems, corruption
and lack of transparency in the
function of some of the organs
and want the atmosphere to be
more open,? he wrote. ?The requests and demands of the people should be taken note of.?
The protests are not just the
largest in Iran since 2009. They
also suggest a rejiggering of
some traditional divisions.
People who live in rural
provinces long viewed as supporters of authorities are now
leading most of the demonstrations. And while people in Tehra n h av e a l s o t a ke n t o t h e
street, the capital is not the epi-
center of the protests, as it was
during the so-called Green
Movement in 2009. In Tehran,
many middle-class Iranians
share the discontent but also
fear insecurity.
The frustrations that led to
the protests also appear different from the sentiments in
2009.
That year, a wave of demonstrations broke out after the
contested election of a hardline president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and then turned into a wider protest movement
against Iran?s leaders.
This time, it is the failure of
Rouhani, a moderate, to deliver
greater political changes and
economic opportunity, despite
the lifting of some of the sanctions against Iran as part of the
nuclear deal. Young people are
especially angry. The average
age of those arrested is younger
than 25, one official said.
The poor economy especial-
ly affects Iran?s young people ?
more than 50 percent of the
population is younger than 30,
according to official statistics.
Officially, youth unemployment
is near 20 percent, but experts
say it is really closer to 40 percent.
When the protests started
Thursday in the city of Mashhad, demonstrators chanted
slogans about the weak economy.
But as the protests spread,
they have taken on a far more
political cast. Increasingly, they
are being directed at Iran?s entire political establishment.
Some demonstrators have even
called for the death of Rouhani
and of the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
The strength and volatility
of the protests have caught Iranian politicians by surprise.
Some have denounced them as
?riots,? while others have acknowledged that the wide-
spread frustrations at their root
can no longer be ignored.
On Monday in Tehran, the
atmosphere was tense and security forces were out in large
numbers. Protest occurred sporadically, with people shouting
slogans and leaving. The day
before, protesters in provincial
towns tried to storm police stations, military installations,
and also attacked a seminary,
state television reported, showing footage of burned cars and
fires.
Protests have taken place in
at least half a dozen cities, including Karaj, Qazvin, Qaemshahr, Dorud, and Tuyserkan, it
said.
?We need to improve our
economy, and the people?s voices must be heard,? said a 28year-old woman, a piano teacher in Tehran, who asked not to
be named out of fear of repercussions. ?I?ll go out tonight
again.?
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NEW YORK ? The families
had striking similarities: They
lived in prosperous suburbs,
had children in college, enjoyed
exploring other cultures, and
were strongly involved in Jewish causes.
Both families ? the Steinbergs, a family of five from
Scarsdale, N.Y., and the Weisses, a family of four from Belleair, Fla. ? were killed Sunday
when the single-engine turboprop they were traveling in
crashed into a hill in Costa Rica
after takeoff. An American tour
guide also died, as did two Costa Rican crew members.
T he crash of the Cessna
208B Caravan traveling from
Punta Islita, on the Pacific
Coast, to San Josщ, the capital,
was the deadliest in Costa Rica
since 1990.
?It is a devastating loss to
their families and to our con-
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AFP/GETTY IMAGES
The tail of the burned
fuselage of a Cessna
turboprop was found on a
hillside along Costa Rica?s
Pacific Coast.
gregation,? said Rabbi Jacob
Luski of Congregation B?nai Israel of St. Petersburg, Fla. In a
phone interview Monday, he
confirmed the deaths of husband and wife Mitchell Weiss,
52, and Leslie L. Weiss, 50;
their daughter, Hannah, 19;
and their son, Ari, 16.
?They were together and
they all perished,? he said. ?It is
a terrible tragedy.?
Leslie Weiss was a neonatal
pediatrician and Mitchell Weiss
was the head of interventional
radiology, both at Morton Plant
Hospital in Clearwater.
?Their lives and medical
skills have touched so many in
and around our community,
and we are forever grateful to
them,? Kris Hoce, the hospital?s
president, said in a statement
mourning their deaths.
Hannah and Ari were both
involved in the southeastern
chapter of United Synagogue
Youth, a Conservative Jewish
organization that promotes engagement with Israel.
Hannah was a student at
List College, the undergraduate
school of the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York City,
under a program that allows
students to pursue two bachelor?s degrees simultaneously, in
coordination with Columbia
University.
In Scarsdale, an affluent
suburb just north of New York
City, the Westchester Reform
Temple learned Sunday of the
deaths of husband and wife
Bruce M. Steinberg, 50, and
Irene G. Steinberg, 51; and
their sons, Zachary, 19, William, 18, and Matthew, 13.
Zachary was a student at Johns
Hopkins University and William at the University of Pennsylvania.
The family supported a nonprofit organization, Seeds of
Peace, that trains prospective
leaders from around the world
in conflict resolution.
Rebecca Gorman, who attended Seeds of Peace camps in
Maine with William Steinberg,
said his world travels and loving family had given him confidence and wisdom beyond his
years, whether navigating conversations among children
from countries in conflict or
just listening to friends.
?Whenever he would speak,
it left you with an impression
for the rest of the day,? said
Gorman, 19. ?It?s just hard to
accept that more people didn?t
get to see what a wonderful
young man he was.?
Leslie Adelson Lewin, executive director of Seeds of Peace,
said Will had ?ambitions for a
p o l i t i c a l c a r e e r t h at w e r e
formed at Seeds of Peace.?
The 10th passenger on the
plane was Amanda Geissler, 33,
a guide from Back Roads, which
provides ?active travel? experiences. Her LinkedIn profile said
she was based in Salt Lake City
and had received undergraduate and MBA degrees from the
University of Wisconsin.
The names of the crew
members have not been formally released, but Laura Chinchilla, a former president of
Costa Rica, said her cousin
Juan Manuel Retana was the
pilot.
Enio Cubillo Araya, director
general of Costa Rica?s civil aviation agency, said in a phone
interview investigators did not
yet know the cause of the crash
but early theories include mechanical malfunction, human
error, and the possibility that a
raft of wind, common in the area this time of year, may have
destabilized the small plane.
BEIRUT ? President Bashar
Assad reshuffled his government Monday, replacing the
ministers of defense, information, and industry, Syria?s state
news agency SANA reported.
SANA did not give a reason
for the government reshuffle
that comes at a time when Assad?s forces have been gaining
ground over the past two years
under the cover of Russian airstrikes and with the help of
Iran-backed fighters.
It said the army commander,
General Ali Ayoub, has been
named defense minister, replacing Fahd Jassem al-Freij
who had held the post since
2012.
Ayoub had been the army
chief of staff since July 2012 until he became defense minister.
The agency added that Imad
Sarah has been named information minister, while Mohammed Mazen Youssef was chosen
as the new minister of industry.
The announcement came as
different parts of Syria witnessed violence, mostly in the
suburbs of the capital Damascus and northwestern Syria,
where troops are on the offensive on the southern edge of
Idlib province.
Heavy clashes broke out between Syrian government forces and insurgents east of Damascus when troops tried to
reach under the cover of a dozen airstrikes a force trapped inside, opposition activists said.
The clashes have been ongoing for three days, but, on Sunday, rebels backed by an Al Qaeda-linked cell attacked troops
and progovernment gunmen,
capturing parts of a military installation and surrounding a
force inside.
The Britain-based Syrian
Observatory for Human Rights
and Syria-based activist Mazen
al-Shami said Monday?s fighting was concentrated inside the
military installation near the
suburb of Harasta, where the
government force has been
trapped.
The Observatory said the
Syrian air force conducted at
least a dozen airstrikes on Harasta and nearby suburbs. Shami repor ted dozens of airstrikes. He said the government
brought in reinforcements
overnight and is trying to reach
the trapped force.
The Observatory said three
days of violence in the suburbs
of Damascus known as eastern
Ghouta has killed 35 civilians,
as well as 24 government
troops and 29 insurgents.
An official with the ultraconservative Ahrar al-Sham insurgent group said the government
is negotiating the passage of its
fighters trapped in the military
installation. The official, who
asked not to be named because
of the secrecy of the talks said
the negotiations are in the preliminary stages.
Syria?s state media did not
mention the trapped force but
blamed insurgents for the violence saying that they are firing
shells into government-controlled areas, killing at least one
civilian.
The UN says government
forces are holding nearly
400,000 people under siege in
eastern Ghouta. The region was
once a hotbed of protest against
Assad?s government.
A crackdown on demonstrations in Ghouta and other parts
of the country in 2011 sparked
the ongoing civil war that has
killed more than 400,000 people and displaced half of Syria?s
population.
Government forces battled
with rebels and Al Qaeda militants on two fronts in Syria on
Sunday as the country closed
out another violent year since
the country descended into civil
war in 2011.
In addition to the battle with
the Qaeda-linked cell, there was
fresh fighting in northwest Syria, along the border between
Idlib and Hama provinces, according to the Observatory and
Syrian military media.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Nation/Region
A5
At least 2 die as year begins with record cold in parts of US
In Midwest,
temperatures
dangerously low
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILWAUKEE ? Bone-chilling cold gripped much of the
United States as 2018 began
Monday, breaking century-old
records, icing over some New
Year?s celebrations, and leading
to at least two deaths attributed
to exposure to the elements.
The National Weather Service issued windchill advisories
covering a vast area from South
Texas to Canada, and from
Montana through New England. Dangerously low temperatures enveloped much of the
Midwest.
T h e Mi l w a u ke e Co u n ty
medical examiner?s office said
two bodies found Sunday
showed signs of hypothermia.
They included a man in his 50s
found on the ground in an alley
and a 34-year-old man.
Po l i c e b e l i e v e t h e c o l d
weather also may have been a
factor in the death of a man in
Bismarck, N.D., whose body
was found near a river.
The cold didn?t deter hundreds of people from ringing in
the new year by jumping into
Lake Michigan in Milwaukee.
Despite subfreezing temperatures and a warning of potential hypothermia from the local
fire chief, throngs of people
took part in the annual tradition, warming up later with
chili or heat from a beach fire
pit.
A similar event was canceled
from the Chicago lakefront,
where the temperature dipped
below zero as thick white steam
rose from the lake Monday
morning. Organizers said the
arctic blast made jumping into
the lake too dangerous.
??I?m not happy about it. But
I was down by the lake and,
gosh, if you were dropped in
there, it?d take you 10 minutes
to get out,?? Jeff Coggins, who
helped organize the thwarted
Chicago event, told WBBM-TV.
Stretch of severe cold weather endangers homeless on Boston streets
uHOMELESS
Continued from Page A1
from Dec. 29, 1917 to Jan. 4,
1918. And while temperatures
are expected to rise briefly on
Wednesday into the 20s, he
said, snow is likely to follow
Thursday, and then the temperatures will plunge again
through Saturday.
It was 12 degrees at Logan
Airport on Monday at 1 p.m.,
Frank said, and the windchill
put it 6 below zero. And in cities such as Boston where wind
funnels between buildings, he
said, the windchill can drop
even lower. At temperatures of
15 below, he said, just 30 minutes outside can cause frostbite
to exposed skin.
?You don?t want anybody
out in these subzero temperatures; it?s just terrifying,? said
Jim Greene, assistant director
for Street Homeless Initiatives
at the city?s Department of
Neighborhood Development.
The number of cold-related
injuries citywide was not availa b l e Mo n d ay n i g h t , b u t a
spokesperson for Massachusetts General Hospital said the
emergency room has seen an
uptick in cases of hypothermia
and frostbite.
City shelters and places such
as the Pine Street Inn have added beds, Greene said, and South
Station has opened for overnight emergency shelter-inplace. Workers have been out
24 hours a day driving outreach
vans, handing out food and
blankets, and trying to get people to come to shelters.
But about 40 people around
Instead, would-be Chicago
plungers had their pictures taken while jumping on the frozen
beach ? in their swimsuits.
Temperatures plunged below zero elsewhere in the Midwest, including in Aberdeen,
S . D ., w h e r e t h e m e r c u r y
dropped to a record-breaking
DINA RUDICK/GLOBE STAFF
Homeless people sought refuge Monday in South Station?s main atrium.
the city have refused to come
inside, said Greene. Many of
them, said Greene and others
who work in shelters, have serious mental health issues that
keep them from making good
decisions. Some are struggling
with addiction or become overwhelmed in crowded shelters.
Those are the people at the
highest risk, officials said.
Outreach and city workers
and first responders are on the
lookout and already know
most of the homeless people
who refuse to come inside,
Greene said. They are checking
on them regularly, he said. Recently, one homeless man who
workers know has suffered
cold injuries in the past was
out in his electric wheelchair,
Greene said, and the power ran
down, leaving him unable to
get around. Boston police
found him and took him to
Mass. General, Greene said.
But with the bracing cold,
there are simply fewer people
outside to notice when a homeless person is in trouble, he
said. The general public should
be aware of the danger, he said,
and be ready to call 911 if they
see a person in distress.
As the cold weather drags
on, the crush of people in need
of services is straining the shelter system and city resources.
LaFrazia, of St. Francis House,
said her workers have picked
up extra hours and are serving
extra meals. They are asking
for donations of hats, gloves,
hand warmers, winter coats,
and footwear ? they?re giving
out supplies as fast as they
come in, she said.
The Pine Street Inn, said
communications director Barbara Trevisan, has enough
coats ? the Patriots made a
generous donation last week ?
but needs financial donations.
They?ve brought in extra staff,
she said; their outreach vans,
which usually operate at night,
have been going 24 hours a
day; and they?ve made room in
their shelters for 30 to 100 people each night.
At South Station, which on
Monday was scheduled to be
open overnight for the eighth
night in a row, from about 35
to 125 people have crowded in
minus 32. The previous New
Year?s Day record there had
stood for 99 years.
In Nebraska, temperatures
hit 15 below zero before midnight Sunday in Omaha, breaking a record low dating to 1884.
Omaha officials cited the forecast in postponing an annual
New Year?s Eve fireworks show.
It was colder in Des Moines,
where city officials closed a
downtown outdoor ice skating
plaza and said it wouldn?t reopen until the city emerged
from sub-zero temperatures.
The temperature hit 20 below
zero early Monday, with the
windchill dipping to negative
31 degrees.
In northeastern Montana,
the windchill readings dipped
as low as minus 58. And in Duluth, Minn., a city known for its
severely cold winters, the windchill dipped to 36 below zero.
Plunging overnight temper-
nightly, said MBTA Police Superintendent Richard Sullivan.
?I?ve been staying here for a
week,? said one homeless woman at the station, who asked to
be identified only as Christina.
?There are really no places
where you can?t get kicked out.
Even when it?s cold.?
The woman coughed hard,
her asthma exacerbated by the
cold and by her inability to afford an inhaler. She travels
with a group, she said, and
they all look out for each other.
?Socks, blankets, if we see
one of them who needs help,
and we have extra, we give it,?
said her friend, who also asked
to be identified by his first
name, Joe. ?Our policy is not
hungry, not thirsty, not cold.?
Sullivan said ?the MBTA is
committed to being a good and
responsible neighbor? by offering a warm place for the homeless. Still, it hasn?t been easy:
on one recent night, a police officer got a knee injury during a
scuffle with one of the people
staying overnight, Sullivan
said. The officer was taken to
the hospital, and the other man
was arrested ? and attacked
the booking officer, he said.
But homeless people say
they are grateful to have places
to go, and city and shelter officials say they will do whatever
it takes to keep people safe as
one freezing day drags into another. ?On days like this, it?s
k i n d o f, ? K e e p e v e r y b o d y
alive,? ? said Trevisan.
Evan Allen can be reached at
evan.allen@globe.com.
atures in Texas brought rare
snow flurries as far south as
Austin, and accidents racked
up on icy roads across the state.
In the central Texas city of
Abilene, the local police chief
said more than three dozen vehicle crashes were reported in
24 hours.
Court to review sex abuse policies
Roberts notes
issue in annual
judiciary report
By Jessica Gresko
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON ? Chief Justice John Roberts is promising
a careful evaluation of the federal judiciary?s sexual misconduct policies.
Writing in his annual report
on the judiciary, issued Sunday,
Roberts touched briefly on the
issue of workplace sexual misconduct, which has in recent
months brought down men in
entertainment, politics, and the
media.
In December, prominent
federal appeals court Judge Alex Kozinski retired after accusations by women that he had
touched them inappropriately,
made le wd comme nts and
shown them pornography.
??Events in recent months
have illuminated the depth of
the problem of sexual harassment in the workplace, and
events in the past few weeks
have made clear that the judicial branch is not immune,??
Roberts wrote, without mentioning Kozinski by name.
Rober ts had pre viously
asked that a working group examine the judiciary?s workplace
conduct policies, with a report
expected by May 1.
The chief justice wrote that
the group will examine whether
changes are needed in a number of areas, from codes of conduct to the handling of misconduct complaints.
??I have great confidence in
the men and women who comprise our judiciary. I am sure
that the overwhelming number
have no tolerance for harassment and share the view that
victims must have clear and immediate recourse to effective
remedies,?? the chief justice
wrote in the 16-page report.
Kozinski resigned two weeks
ago after The Washington Post
reported that 15 women had
accused him of sexual harassment. Other women came forward later with similar complaints.
The women, many of whom
ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
?Events in recent
months have
illuminated the
depth of the
problem of sexual
harassment in the
workplace. The
judicial branch is
not immune.?
JOHN ROBERTS
Supreme Court chief justice
had served as his law clerks,
said Kozinski had touched
them inappropriately, made unwanted sexual comments and
forced them to view sexual materials on his computer.
Kozinski had served on the
9th US Circuit Court of Appeals
for more than three decades, establishing a reputation as a
powerful and unpredictable intellect and a vivid writer.
Kozinski, a libertarian, was
first appointed to the Ninth Circuit by President Ronald Reagan in 1985. From 2007 to
2014, he served as chief judge
of the court, the largest federal
appeals court in the United
States.
In announcing his retirement, Kozinski suggested that
he had been misunderstood
and apologized.
?I?ve always had a broad
sense of humor and a candid
way of speaking to both male
and female law clerks alike,? he
wrote. ?In doing so, I may not
have been mindful enough of
the special challenges and pressures that women face in the
workplace.?
Roberts said the task force
may look into whether enough
protection is given to young
lawyers who serve as clerks to
judges.
The lawyers, who typically
serve for a year soon after graduating from law school, might
require special attention, Roberts suggested, because they are
supposed to keep confidential
what happens in their judge?s
chambers.
?I expect the working group
to consider whether changes
are needed in our codes of conduct, our guidance to employees ? including law clerks ? on
issues of confidentiality and reporting of instances of misconduct, our educational programs, and our rules for investigating and processing misconduct complaints,? Roberts
wrote.
Roberts spent most of his
year-end report talking about
the federal judiciary?s response
to this year?s devastating hurricanes, which affected Texas,
Florida, Puerto Rico, and the
Virgin Islands, and he also
mentioned wildfires in California
Roberts praised judges and
court employees in the Virgin
Islands and Puerto Rico in particular, saying that after hurricanes Irma and Maria, they ??responded in dedicated and even
heroic fashion,?? continuing to
work ??even in the face of personal emergencies.??
He said the judiciary has also learned lessons from the
storms and will develop better
backup communications systems and do more to position
emergency supplies in areas
susceptible to hurricanes and
flooding.
Roberts said the judiciary
must be ready for a range of potential disasters, such as earthquakes, cyberterrorism, and
terrorist attacks.
??The courts cannot provide
food, shelter, or medical aid,
but they must stand ready to
perform their judicial functions
as part of the recovery effort,??
he wrote.
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Hospitals often illнprepared to help Alzheimer?s patients
uALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
Continued from Page A1
chines, frenetic activity, rigid
schedules ? runs contrary to
the needs of patients who arrive
confused and fearful.
?Hospitals were never designed to accommodate people
with dementia,? said Susan
Antkowiak, vice president of
the Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter of the Alzheimer?s Association.
With an estimated 120,000
Massachusetts residents suffering from Alzheimer?s disease,
and 150,000 expected by 2025,
an effort is underway to improve patients? experiences in a
place one advocate calls the last
frontier of dementia care: hospitals.
A committee established in
2016 by the Legislature recently called on hospitals to develop, within three years, a comprehensive plan for addressing
the needs of patients with dementia, about 60 to 80 percent
of whom have Alzheimer ?s.
Composed of elder-care specialists, government officials, and
patients? caregivers, the committee recommended establishing protocols for identifying
people with dementia, training
staff, and changing the surroundings, such as creating
quiet areas.
The recommendations are
voluntary, and hospitals face
big challenges adapting their
fast-paced, high-tech environment to the needs of fragile
minds. But the Massachusetts
Health & Hospital Association,
which had a representative on
the committee, said hospitals
are committed to addressing
the problem.
A hospital was not an ideal
environment for Steve Johanson, who was diagnosed when
he was 59 ? among the 5 percent of Alzheimer?s patients
who are stricken before age 65.
When Steve began experiencing terrifying hallucinations
that caused him to strike out
defensively, his doctor advised
a hospital visit to adjust his
medications. Judy took him to
the emergency room at a hospital she declined to name.
?I thought we were going to
a safe place,? she said. ?I found
out they were really not prepared.?
After hours of waiting, Steve
began hallucinating and
grabbed his wife. As the staff
rushed to subdue him, they
kept asking him why he was attacking her.
To Judy, that was like asking
a person having a seizure why
he?s thrashing about. Didn?t
they understand that Steve is a
gentle man in the grip of a disease he cannot control?
Soon the Johansons were
moved to a separate area, with
a guard at the door. Sedated,
Steve lay with his wrists tied to
the bed rails above his head.
Judy made sure the restraints
were removed within a halfhour, but the couple stayed in
the emergency room for four
days, until they found a bed in a
geriatric psychiatry unit at another hospital.
The problems persisted at
the second hospital, as miscommunications and misunderstandings led to Steve being restrained again. Judy insisted on
staying at his side for 24 hours
to ensure every staff member
on every shift understood her
husband?s condition.
?Every single person had
empathy. They were skilled in
their professions ? just not educated in Alzheimer?s,? she said.
Ju d y Jo h a n s o n , 5 5 , i s a
board member of the Alzheimer?s Association?s local chapter.
If someone like her had such a
struggle, she worries, how excruciating must it be when the
patient?s spouse is frail and elderly, or when there is no advocate at all?
Dr. Mark Messenger, a Lynn
internist who specializes in
home care for elderly people,
said a hospital stay can be disorienting for anyone but becomes traumatic for a person
who?s already confused. When
patients become agitated, the
hospital?s response is often to
sedate them, with inevitable
RHIANA KOHL
?I felt like we were aliens that had just landed in a place that
had . . . no concept of the disease my husband had.?
JUDY JOHANSON, referring to a hospital visit with her husband, Steve (above)
side effects, Messenger said.
Many people with Alzheimer?s are accustomed to walking
a great deal, he said. In the hospital, they?re required to stay
put , frus trating them and
speeding their decline. People
often lose the abilities they had
before admission, such as how
to dress themselves.
Messenger tries to keep his
patients out of the hospital
whenever possible. ?When they
come home, they?re not the
same person as when they went
in,? he said.
Barbara Meehan of Wareham witnessed that phenomenon with her late partner, Faye
Miles, who was diagnosed with
Alzheimer?s in 2008.
Miles was hospitalized three
times for urinary tract infec-
tions. Each time, she returned
home less able to take care of
herself.
After the final visit, Miles
had to move into a nursing
home. She died in 2015 at age
75.
Like the Johansons, Meehan
and Miles said they encountered hospital clinicians who
were well-meaning but ill-informed. At one hospital, when
Meehan left Miles overnight,
she returned to find her with
one hand bruised and the other
tied to a railing. Miles had been
pulling out the intravenous
line.
?If they called me, I would
have come to hold her hand,?
said Meehan, who had been
with Miles for 35 years.
Even though she told staff-
ers that Miles had Alzheimer?s,
Meehan said, a social worker
interviewed the patient, heedlessly inscribing Miles?s skewed
responses.
State law requires police officers and staff at nursing
homes to receive training in dementia. But hospitals remain
one of the last frontiers of dementia care, said Daniel Zotos,
director of public policy and advocacy for the Alzheimer?s Association?s local chapter.
Although every state has an
Alzheimer?s disease plan, Massachusetts is alone in establishing a committee focused solely
on hospitals, according to the
national Alzheimer?s Association.
The committee?s September
report provided 70 pages of re-
sources and suggestions. Patricia M. Noga, vice president for
clinical affairs at the Massachusetts Health & Hospital Association, said the association has
formed a working group to
identify ways hospitals can
change and share knowledge
about practices that are known
to work.
?Everybody is on board with
it,? Noga said.
Emerson Hospital, in Concord, has already taken steps to
accommodate patients with dementia, said Margaret Foley, director of care management.
The staff works to help patients
maintain the abilities they arrived with, she said. Trying to
avoid sedating medications, the
hospital seeks other ways to
soothe, such as a family photo
or a familiar blanket.
Zotos said many hospitals
have instituted beneficial practices, ?but these efforts are in
no way a standard, are often
piecemeal, and would certainly
lack the comprehensive approach outlined in the report
that is necessary for success.?
Many effective measures
?are not a heavy lift,? said Alice
Bonner, Massachusetts secretary of elder affairs and cochairwoman of the legislative committee. She recalled a daughter
telling the committee how
merely placing her mother near
a window had eased the ordeal.
And other changes, such as
lowering noise levels, benefit all
patients, Bonner said.
Bonner expressed confidence the committee?s work
will reap results, because dementia stirs such deep concern.
She sees it at every talk she
gives: When she mentions dementia, people are riveted and
line up afterward to talk with
her.
?Everyone has a story,? Bonner said. ?Dementia just strikes
a chord with people. This is a
disease that is about families.?
Felice J. Freyer can be reached
at felice.freyer@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@felicejfreyer.
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A7
Congress returns to full slate of difficult domestic issues
Budget, DACA,
and child health
awaiting action
By Jeff Stein
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON ? Congress
faces a long to-do list when it
returns this week, with deadlines looming on difficult issues
? including how to fund the
government and avoid a shutdown, stabilizing the health
program for poor children, and
whether to shield young undocumented immigrants from deportation.
Fresh off a party-line vote to
overhaul the tax code, the negotiations will test whether Congress and the White House still
have the potential to craft any
form of bipartisan agreement.
If so, several of the year?s
most contested issues might be
resolved with months to spare
before the 2018 midterm campaign heats up.
If not, the government could
soon be on the verge of a shutdown, with pressing questions
regarding health care, immigration, and other policies left unresolved.
Also on the agenda is emergency relief for regions upended by last year?s natural disasters, a key national security program, and the fate of an
agreement to stabilize health
insurance markets under the
Affordable Care Act.
A big unknown is whether
the shortened timetable will
prove an asset in addressing all
the issues before Congress, or a
hindrance.
Officials in both parties hope
to make progress by Jan. 19,
when a short-term government
funding bill that Congress
passed last month expires.
On Wednesday, congressional leaders from both parties
will meet at the Capitol with
White House budget director
Mick Mulvaney and legislativeaffairs director Marc Short to
renew talks on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which expires March 5.
In September, President
Trump decided to sunset the
program ? started under the
Obama administration ? that
protects 700,000 young immigrants, often called ??dreamers,??
from deportation.
Congressional Republicans
and the White House have demanded that any deal to protect
these immigrants inclu de
stronger border enforcement ?
but exactly what that looks like
is expected to be a key sticking
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
Bipartisan agreements might be needed to make headway in several areas, with this year?s midterm elections looming.
Tax cuts likely to prove to be a poor substitute for pay raises
uTAX CUT
Continued from Page A1
this year but a $1,400 boost
the next year, and so on.
If we could get wages growing robustly again, our takehome pay in 2025 would be as
much as $5,000 higher.
Tax cuts don?t work like
this.
By 2025, our $1,000 pay
bump is actually slated to
shrink to around $700. There?s
no compounding, as you have
with wages.
And several of the biggest
point in negotiations.
Congressional Democrats
express openness to finding additional funding for border security but have ruled out funding the wall along the US-Mexico border that Trump promised
during his presidential campaign.
Democrats are under intense pressure from Hispanic
lawmakers and progressive ac-
benefits for middle-income
families ? including the greatly expanded child tax credit
and the larger standard deduction ? are tied to a new, slower-growing inflation adjuster,
so they won?t keep up with
costs quite as well.
Then, come 2026, even this
modest tax benefit may disappear, because many of the
most worker-friendly elements
are set to expire ? unless a future Congress extends them.
The takeaway here isn?t really about the limited impact
of the Republican tax plan, only its limited effect on middleincome workers. For corporations and big investors, the
benefits are much larger, and
they don?t expire.
But for people who earn
paychecks ? rather than profits ? this doesn?t help much.
They may, over time, be able to
bargain for a share of the corporate gains, but the estimates
used above already try to account for this trickle-down effect.
In the new post-tax-cut
tivists to reject any government
funding deal that does not resolve the issue. Already, Democratic senators have helped
pass multiple funding deals
that did not include DACA protections, including one in December.
About 22,000 DACA recipients failed to renew their applications after the Trump administration gave them 30 days to
do so this September, with reports emerging of some applications getting lost in the mail.
At least 7,800 people in this
group had lost their DACA status by December, and the rest
will lose protection before
March, according to the Center
for American Progress, a center-left think tank.
??If Democrats don?t hold the
line and ensure dreamers get
world, the biggest issue for
workers? welfare hasn?t really
changed: It isn?t so much what
the federal government does to
provide tax cuts, but what employers deliver in terms of rising wages.
Evan Horowitz digs through
data to find information that
illuminates the policy issues
facing Massachusetts and the
nation. He can be reached at
evan.horowitz@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeHorowitz.
protected, the unity between
the grass roots and the elected
party will shatter,?? said Ben
Wikler, Washington director
of the progressive group
MoveOn.org. ??Democrats and
Republicans have alr eady
kicked this can down the road
three times already. A fourth
time is unacceptable.??
Senate Majority L eader
Mitch McConnell, Republican
of Kentucky, said last month he
hopes a bipartisan working
group led by Senators Dick
Durbin, Democrat of Illinois;
Jeff Flake, Republican of Arizona; and Charles Grassley, Republican of Iowa, comes up
with a deal the Senate can pass
in January. But he didn?t commit to a specific timetable for a
vote.
Lawmakers will also have to
agree to new government funding levels or pass another shortterm extension of spending limits ? known as a continuing
resolution ? by Jan. 19. Failure
to do so would cause a government shutdown, which would
cost the economy about $6.5
billion every week it lasts.
Keeping the government
funded at existing levels (or increasing government spending)
would put Congress on track to
trigger automatic spending cuts
through what is called the sequester, because of a 2011 law
that imposed caps on spending.
Congress must raise these
caps, as it did in 2013 and 2015,
by Februar y to avoid these
across-the-board cuts to government programs.
But Democrats and Republicans have been unable to resolve an impasse over how to
raise the caps. Republicans
passed a bill in December to increase military funding by $650
billion through Sept. 30.
Congressional Democrats
have held firm to the line that
every dollar increase in military
spending must be met by an
equal increase in domestic
spending, in line with previous
agreements in the past to avoid
the sequester.
Lawmakers also will have to
increase the debt ceiling by
March, when the Treasury Department can no longer meet
the federal government?s financial obligations without additional borrowing, according to
the Bipartisan Policy Center.
Similarly unresolved is the
Children?s Health Insurance
Program, which 9 million children use to help meet their
medical costs.
Right before the Christmas
break, Congress plowed $3 billion into CHIP ? money that
will prevent 1.9 million children from losing coverage in
Ja n u a r y, a c c o r d i n g t o t h e
Georgetown University Health
Policy Institute.
But that temporary solution
keeps CHIP funded for only
three more months, and state
health programs throughout
the country have begun notifying families that funding could
expire.
High court to rule whether rental car driver could refuse police search
By Adam Liptak
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON ? In the
summer of 2014, Terrence Byrd
was driving a rental car on an
interstate highway in Pennsylvania. His fiancщe had rented it,
and he was using it with her
permission. But he was not listed on the rental agreement as
an authorized driver.
A state trooper, David Long,
noticed Byrd and decided to follow him. At a hearing months
later, Long testified that Byrd
had aroused his suspicion by
holding the steering wheel as
driving instructors recommend, at the ?10 and 2? position, and by sitting far back in
his seat.
A lawyer for Byrd seemed incredulous about all of this. ?So
the only reason you pulled out
was the fact that he was at 10
and 2 and you couldn? t see
him?? the lawyer asked.
L o n g t h e n m e n ti o n e d a
third factor. ?In a rental vehi-
cle,? he said. ?That?s what drew
my attention to it, yes.?
In short order, Long pulled
Byrd over, for failing to move
into the right lane fast enough
after passing a slow-moving
truck. At that point, the car
rental company?s boilerplate
contract collided with the
Fourth Amendment, which
bars unreasonable searches.
Because Byrd was not listed
as an authorized driver, Long
said he was free to search the
car without Byrd?s consent. He
found body armor and 49
bricks of heroin in the trunk.
After a judge refused to suppress the evidence, Byrd was
convicted of drug charges and
sentenced to 10 years in prison.
Next week, the Supreme
Court will consider whether
privacy rights turn on the fineprint contracts signed by the
more than 115 million people
who rent cars every year.
?If the government prevails,?
Byrd?s lawyers wrote in a brief
filed last week, ?it will have the
power to conduct suspicionless
searches whenever it stops a
rental car driven by an unlisted
driver for a routine traffic violation.?
Letting a family member or
friend drive a car you have rent-
ee (with the renter?s permission, on company business) or a
person who appears at the time
of the rental and signs an additional driver form.?
Byrd was none of those. But
he testified that he and the
woman who rented the car,
An arrest pits the Fourth Amendment
against a vehicle rental contract.
ed can be a breach of the rental
contract. But it is not generally
considered a crime, and it is not
obvious that people who drive
cars that others have rented
should forfeit their Fourth
Amendment rights.
The contract in Byrd?s case,
from Budget, was typical. It
said that ?the only ones permitted to drive the vehicle other
than the renter are the renter?s
spouse, the renter?s co-employ-
Latasha Reed, had been together for 17 years, had five children, and were engaged to be
married.
In rejecting Byrd?s appeal,
the 3rd US Circuit Court of Appeals, in Philadelphia, acknowledged that federal appeals
courts have differed about
?whether the sole occupant of a
rental vehicle has a Fourth
Amendment expectation of privacy when that occupant is not
named in the rental agreement.?
The 3rd Circuit?s own precedents, the court said, ?determined such a person has no expectation of privacy and therefore no standing to challenge a
search of the vehicle.?
Byrd?s lawyers said this ignored reality.
?Widespread noncompliance with authorized-driver
provisions is an open secret,?
they wrote, which is why rental
agreements ?often specify that
the renter will carry greater risk
of loss when an unlisted driver
operates the vehicle.?
The Supreme Court?s decision in the case is likely to have
an outsize effect on black and
Hispanic drivers, according to a
brief from the American Civil
Liberties Union and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.
Poor people rent a lot of
cars. ?There is a commonly held
misconception that car rental is
a luxury reserved for the
wealthiest individuals,? a 2010
tax study found, noting that
?more car rentals occ ur at
neighborhood locations than at
airport locations.?
?African-Americans generate over four times as many retail rental transactions as otherwise comparable Caucasians,?
the study said. Other reports
have demonstrated that black
drivers are more likely than
white ones to be pulled over by
police and more likely to be
searched during the stop.
Solicitor General Noel J.
Francisco urged the justices to
hold Byrd to the terms of the
rental agreement. ?It is common knowledge,? he wrote,
?that car rental is a personal
transaction that does not make
the car available for general enjoyment, and straw man car
rentals disserve society by frustrating law-enforcement efforts
to prevent smuggling and other
crimes.?
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Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
I
Time for Congress to act on CHIP, DACA
n their rush to wrap their tax cut presents and
get out of Washington for Christmas, lawmakers took two issues where there?s supposedly bipartisan support for action and kicked them
down the road into 2018.
One is the Children?s Health Insurance Program, or
CHIP, which provides affordable health coverage for almost 9 million children in families who earn too much
to quality for Medicaid but still have relatively modest
incomes; regular federal funding for that program expired at the end of September.
The other is Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,
or DACA, under which the Obama administration had
protected from deportation some 800,000 illegal immigrants brought to this country as kids. In September,
Trump said he was bringing DACA to an end; the administration claims, disingenuously, that it doesn?t
have the legal authority to decide not to deport the socalled Dreamers without explicit congressional approval ? though it has also said it will defer action for six
months to give Congress time to act to protect the
Dreamers if it wants.
The stop-gap funding measure passed just before
Christmas does avert the immediate crisis for CHIP.
Otherwise, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation,
16 states would have run out of funding for their CHIP
programs in January, with another 21 arriving at that
point in February and March. DACA isn?t quite as
pressing, because as Trump himself has said, he could
revisit the issue.
But continuing uncertainty has created confusion
for states trying to plan for their CHIP programs and
trauma for the Dreamers trying to plan their futures.
Whatever the merits of the tax cut, that?s now law.
When Congress returns from its Christmas break, it?s
time to focus on CHIP and DACA.
As US Senator Ed Markey sees it, there is bipartisan
support to resolve both issues.
?We probably have the votes from the Republicans
on both CHIP and DACA,? he says. ?But it is all being
held hostage by Republican leadership and the White
House.?
President Trump, for example, has said and
tweeted in recent days that he won?t do a DACA deal
without funding for a wall on the southern border ?
the same wall he repeatedly claimed Mexico would
pay for ? or without changes in immigration policy,
including an end to family-based, or chain migration, the effects of which the administration has
greatly exaggerated.
Markey thinks the Republican leadership will also
probably try to leverage more money for the Defense
Department, a waiver of the so-called pay-go rules, under which spending increases here must be offset there,
and a reauthorization of surveillance under the Foreign
Intelligence Service Act that allows monitoring of foreigners but also sweeps into its net communications of
US citizens.
These are very different and complex matters, all
important enough to be considered on their individual
merits rather than jammed together in the next bout of
budgetary brinksmanship.
Republicans have been declaring for months that
they intend to find a solution on both CHIP and DACA.
The time has come to make good on those pledges ?
and before the impending midterm elections make any
legislative action uncertain. And if they don?t? Well,
then Republicans will have provided voters with yet another reason why don?t deserve to stay in power.
The ethics of warning
the public about a dangerous president
I
n spite of widespread concern regarding Donald Trump?s ability to execute his office, the
psychiatric establishment continues to enforce
silence on its members, depriving the public of
their expertise. Hampering the profession?s
ability to warn about danger needs reconsideration. A sense of this critical need gave rise to
?The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump,? a collection of mental health expertise made accessible for lay readers.
Ordinarily, psychiatrists abide by what is called the Goldwater rule, which prohibits diagnosing public figures without a personal examination and without consent. But assessing dangerousness is different from making a diagnosis, in
that we are evaluating the situation, not the person. The
same person may not be dangerous in a different situation,
for example, but a diagnosis stays with the person. Diagnosing a public figure is outside our business and should not be
done ? but it is also irrelevant when it comes to danger. For
example, a Duke University study has shown that almost
half of presidents until recent history probably suffered
from a mental illness, and yet many have been great leaders.
Dangerousness
in a public figure is
what threatens public health, and the
only situation in
which we as mental
health professionals have a role, if any. While police and security personnel generally step in after the fact, mental
health professionals are expected to intervene when they see
signs or risk of danger. In all 50 states, they have the legal
authority, if not the obligation, to report, to warn, and to
take steps to protect potential victims, be they themselves,
others, or the public. This includes involuntary hospitalization so that an evaluation can be performed ? which can
then lead to a diagnosis, among other things But first and
foremost is the health and safety of the persons potentially
endangered.
The humanitarian goals of medicine are outlined in the
World Medical Association?s Geneva Declaration, in direct
response to the complicity of doctors under Nazism, and
echo the principles underlying the American Psychiatric
Association?s code of ethics, which follows the American
Medical Association?s code, and the Hippocratic oath. Our
assessment leads us to recognize that warning about a
public figure should not be based on formal understanding about which professions should be allowed to voice
their concerns in which forums, but on whether rules continue to serve these humanitarian goals when mental
health expertise might be critical to a population?s wellbeing and survival.
Few criticisms, if any, have been made against a prominent psychiatrist who has overtly broken the Goldwater rule
(by declaring, without examination, that Trump does not
have a certain disorder). On the other hand, authors of ?The
Dangerous Case of Donald Trump? do not diagnose but are
repeatedly accused of violating the Goldwater rule, because
it has been reinterpreted since Trump?s campaign and presidency to deem any comment of any kind on this crucial public health issue as an ethical transgression. This discrepancy
ought to raise questions as to whether we are really speaking about ethics ? or is our concern merely a public appearance of professionalism? Extraordinary situations may re-
quire an extraordinary response, if we are keeping with
medical neutrality and the standards of our practice. To
ramp up ?ethics? to the point of turning a rule into a gag order, just to maintain a semblance of professionalism, fosters
a complicity of silence on the nation?s mental health experts
in the face of public health risks of potentially catastrophic
proportions.
?The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump? became an instant bestseller in ways that even one of the largest publishers in the nation did not anticipate. Perhaps it is an indication of the public?s thirst for professional insight rather than
being left to rely on columnists and late-night comedians.
The book contains the work of 27 mental health experts but
represents a movement of thousands. Given that misconceptions and stigma ? and the very use of psychiatric terms as
epithets ? arise from a lack of knowledge, mental health
professionals should further engage in educating the public,
not less. And it is about time the professional organizations
catch up with the voice of their professional members, rather than trying suppress their interactions with a public
struggling to comprehend the nature and magnitude of the
risk it faces from an unstable leader.
______________
Dr. Bandy X. Lee is assistant clinical professor in law and
psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Leonard L. Glass
is associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical
School and a senior attending psychiatrist at McLean
Hospital. Edwin B. Fisher is a clinical psychologist and
professor in the Department of Health Behavior of the
Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of
North Carolina-Chapel Hill.
By Bandy X. Lee,
Leonard L. Glass,
and Edwin B. Fisher
abcde
Fo u nd ed 1 87 2
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T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A9
Inbox
The return of fallout shelters?
Is this the best we can do?
Instead of spending $200,000 or more on a fallout shelter
in the faint hope of protecting yourself against a nuclear attack (?Amid tensions, fallout shelters get another look,?
Page A1, Dec. 26), it would be better to work to prevent nuclear war in the first place.
Donate to one of the nonprofits with this mission. Support Senator Ed Markey?s bill that would require congressional authorization before nuclear weapons could be used,
except in response to a nuclear attack. Push the government to use negotiations, not just sanctions, to restrain
North Korea?s nuclear program. Support the idea of an
Olympic Truce, in which the United States would not engage in military exercises on the Korean peninsula, and
North Korea would not test missiles or warheads, during
the time of the Olympics in South Korea this winter.
We?re more likely to survive if we work together to avoid
war than if we each build our own fallout shelter.
CHRISTOPHER WEYANT
KEN OLUM
Sharon
After verdict in fatal shooting, one
is left with an expansive sense of grief
What exactly is
zero tolerance
on sexual harassment?
By Jonathan Brock, Billie Pirner
Garde, and Marcia Narine
Weldon
O
sponsible for preventing harassment
and for immediately placing any complaint into the proper channel for resolution, (b) must ensure employees do
not suffer retaliation by peers, supervisors, or others, and (c) will be held
accountable in their career opportunities and compensation if they fail to
adhere to (a) and (b). Similarly, higher
levels of leadership ? senior executives and board (or in the case of legislatures, the bipartisan leadership) ?
must know that this accountability also extends to them. They are responsible for establishing and ensuring the
effectiveness of the overall program
come forward without fear, and to
learn if unreported sexual misconduct
or other noncompliance is occurring.
As recent events have proved, lack of
reported incidents does not mean
there is no harassment; and intimidation can pervade a workplace below
the surface despite a stated zero-tolerance policy. Such assessments almost
always require an independent outside entity confidentially administering anonymous surveys and interviews. The best of these use benchmarked and validated questions that
can provide insight into the effectiveness of the compliance program and
whether employees trust the system.
Finally, in those workplaces in
which employees have formed a
union, it is critical that they be
involved in the development,
implementation, and assessment of the policy.
They hear things and
know things that management will probably not otherwise be
able to learn, or
may be likely to
overlook.
Let us not forget that highly
visible sectors
such as the media, entertainment, and the political realm are
only part of the
workplace landscape. Employees in
smaller, less-visible,
or less easily policed
sectors ? such as restaurants, farms, retail outlets,
laboratories, and warehouses ? may have the most to
worry about. Their employers
may lack the resources or incentives
to motivate the needed changes. If so,
protections must come through the
regulatory presence of state, local, or
federal agencies, or from public-interest advocates, none of which will have
sufficient reach or resources for the
task.
Calling for zero tolerance is a good
start, but is only the beginning of the
journey to real protections and cultural change. Achieving zero tolerance
requires sustained and focused leadership on the programs, systems,
skills, and backing for reporting, investigation, and accountability. In the
absence of this ongoing investment by
business and political leaders, we may
simply be witnessing a wave of celebrity firings and embarrassing political
resignations, with no lasting change
away from the glare of floodlights. A
zero-tolerance promise without an underlying system to redeem that promise is an invitation for nothing to happen, or worse.
0
ne encouraging organizational response to the recent spate of high-profile sexual harassment
allegations has been the
instant announcement of a zero-tolerance policy. But merely calling for zero
tolerance or citing a lack of reported
complaints as evidence of an alreadyeffective policy doesn?t ensure a harassment-free workplace. Indeed, a
lack of complaints often means exactly the opposite: that employees fear
nothing will be accomplished except
to expose themselves to retaliation.
The simple announcement of a
zero-tolerance policy alone will
not make previous fears disappear, nor nonfunctioning
systems for complaints
and protections roar to
life, and the culture
will not change. Anyone who complains
after such an announcement is likely to be at the same
risk as before ? or
worse, unless critical new steps are
taken
A true zero-tolerance policy requires
not only good intentions, but also a trustworthy, independent
system, staffed with the
proper skills to conduct
swift, full, and fair investigations and to carry them to
a just resolution, observing
principles of confidentiality and
discretion, and including ongoing
protection of those who report. Only if
the board and top-level officers back
the process will investigators be able
to provide the truth. Multiple channels are needed so that all concerned
employees can find a comfortable and
trusted avenue for reporting a problem.
First, everyone must be confident
that, if they report a problem, action
will be taken, and they will be protected from retaliation and career damage. The best programs focus on prevention but are ready to respond
swiftly when incidents arise. They go
to lengths to ensure protection, including review of all proposed discipline to check if it might be payback
for some prior complaint. These protections should extend to witnesses
who take the risk of coming forward.
Second, a trusted program must be
established that has the power to protect and investigate, rectify career
damage, and address personal injury
or trauma. Proper investigations and
resolutions require strict protocols,
expertise, and full access to information, so that facts are found, conclusions are fair and accurate, rights and
confidentiality of all are protected,
and proper and proportionate accountability is assured.
Third, all managers and supervisors must know that they (a) are re-
TOLERANCE
along with a strong code of ethics as
the standard.
Fourth, achieving a culture of zero
tolerance means that measures, incentives, and informal norms do not
tacitly condone inappropriate behavior. Bad behavior must not get a wink
and a pass. Such cultural features
create an undertow that the best antiharassment training and policy cannot overcome.
Instead, specific policies should
direct bonuses, raises, and other incentives and opportunities to those
who, in addition to meeting business
targets, actively prevent and respond
appropriately to harassment, retaliation, and other compliance problems.
Clawbacks should be considered if
unsupportive behavior later comes to
light. Injurious behavior must be
called out and exemplary behaviors
credited: Without naming names,
statements to the workforce can inform employees that actions have
been taken against perpetrators, or
that behavior in support of zero tolerance has been rewarded. What gets
measured gets treasured.
Fifth, periodic assessments are
needed to determine accurately
whether employees believe they can
The authors are former members of
the US Department of Labor?s
Whistleblower Protection Advisory
Committee, a bipartisan labormanagement group, which
unanimously developed a ?best
practices? template for antiretaliation programs.
So we have a verdict at last in the case of Keith Williams
and Wesson Colas, two young men whose rivalry led one of
them to fire a bullet that killed an innocent bystander
(?Two men are convicted in
?14 carnival murder,? Page
A1, Dec. 29). Has justice
been done? It would seem
so, from the reaction of the
victim?s relatives, who
?fought back tears and embraced when they heard the
verdicts, which carry an automatic life sentence without the possibility of parole
for each defendant.?
But think about it: young
people whose life choices are so restricted, whose sense of
self is so confined, that the only achievement they can envision is dominance over a neighborhood rival, and whose
need for that dominance is so consuming that they react
with violence when it is thwarted. Our society has largely
created the conditions that limit their horizons and their
opportunities, while giving them easy access to weapons.
And our solution when they lash out is to lock them away
for life ? as if any other options were impossible or too expensive to contemplate.
It is right to grieve for the innocent victim, but our grief
? and our responsibility ? should not stop there.
Our solution is
to lock them
away for life ?
as if any other
options were
impossible.
JAN SCHREIBER
Brookline
State shouldn?t cut back on a key
support for minorityнowned businesses
The Boston Globe Spotlight series ?Boston. Racism. Image.
Reality.? highlights the need to support African-Americanowned businesses and other small businesses owned by
people of color. The state?s Small Business Technical Assistance program, administered by the Massachusetts Growth
Capital Corp., has been quietly doing just that since 2006 by
providing grants to community-based groups in Boston, in
Gateway Cities, and across the Commonwealth.
These community groups, in turn, helped nearly 1,700
small businesses last year ? 51 percent people of color, 31
percent immigrants, 55 percent women-owned, and a total
of 88 percent that fell into at least one of the state?s categories for disadvantaged business owners. What?s more, 79
percent of these businesses achieved positive outcome by
opening, growing, or stabilizing their business.
Unfortunately, funding for this highly effective program
has been cut by 62.5 percent over the past two budget cycles. We urge Governor Baker and the Legislature to restore
the program to the fiscal 2016 level of $2 million or more. If
we are serious about moving the needle on racial inequity,
then we have to invest in programs that work.
JOSEPH KRIESBERG
President
Massachusetts Association
of Community Development Corporations
Boston
Shakeнup in store
for Mass. alcohol laws
The following is an edited sample of online comments posted in response to Dan Adams?s Dec. 28 article about a proposed overhaul of Massachusetts alcohol regulations:
It drives me bonkers that grocery stores in every other
state I?ve visited can sell beer and wine. What?s wrong with
Mass. residents? Can?t we be trusted to buy wine while food
shopping? (Hanscome) . . .
For someone who is a recovering alcoholic, I like being
able to go into a grocery store and not
THE SCROLL
see booze for sale. I think it?s a small
sacrifice for you and others to go next
door and purchase your alcohol. (jmconly) . . .
The state trying to fix a hodgepodge of laws by adding more
laws and regulations ? that?s what they do. Oh, and raise
the fines to boot. Oh my. (Banned Porte) . . .
Exactly. ?The task force would also outlaw loyalty cards and
other discount programs for consumers, saying they tend to
increase alcohol consumption.? Ah yes, because saving $3
on a 12-pack of beer instantly makes me want to buy and
consume more beer. [They?re] creating more nannyнstate
regulations in an attempt to suck more money into state
government. (bos-guy22) . . .
Looks like NH state liquor store will win again! (jhaepers)
Letters should be written exclusively to the Globe and
include name, address, and daytime telephone number.
They should be 200 words or fewer. All are subject to
editing. Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, 1 Exchange
Pl, Ste 201, Boston, MA 02109-2132; letter@globe.com
A10
The Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
As second term begins, Walsh vows to restore Long Island
uINAUGURATION
Continued from Page A1
2014 because of safety concerns, forcing the relocation of
more than 400 homeless people and as many as 300 others
in recovery programs on the
island. He promised to rebuild
the bridge shortly after the closure, but the project has not
moved forward.
?I look forward to getting
into the nitty-gritty of it,? said
Councilor Annissa EssaibiGeorge, a Walsh ally who has
focused on rehabilitation and
homeless programs.
The mayor also announced
the launch of Boston Hires ?
an expansion of his administration?s job training initiative
that aims to secure training
and what he described as
?good-paying? jobs for 20,000
low-income Boston residents
by 2022.
The mayor said he would
work with nonprofit partners
and private employers, and
Boston Hires will begin recruitment next month. The
city would also offer training
and jobs in his administration
to residents and Boston public
school graduates through a
new City Academy program,
his office said.
Wa l s h d i d n o t s a y h o w
much city funding would be
devoted to the jobs and training initiative.
He called for the region?s
colleges and universities to
help build ?academic pathways? for students through recruitment in local schools. In
2016, he said, 710 Boston residents attended a private college in the region on scholarships worth roughly $32 million, an increase over the
previous four years of 14 percent.
But he asked colleges to ?do
more? by collectively adding
100 full scholarships for city
students.
?Come into more of our
schools. Admit more of our
graduates,? Walsh said, addressing his remarks to the
many colleges and universities
in the Boston area.
The mayor also announced
creation of a Boston?s Way
Home Fund, which seeks $10
million in private funds to support 200 new units of longterm housing for chronically
homeless men and women
over the next four years. The
Bank of America has pledged
$250,000 and to help administer the account.
In addition to replacing the
Long Island bridge, Walsh also
committed to developing more
rehabilitation programs for
drug and alcohol abuse.
?We will create, on Long Island, the comprehensive, longterm recovery campus that our
city and state need more than
ever, to tackle the opioid crisis,? the mayor said.
He did not say when construction would begin, but his
office estimated the cost of a
new bridge would range from
$40 million to $100 million.
The city would then invest in a
recovery facility that would offer detox, residential treatment, peer support, and transitional housing services.
Essaibi-George welcomed
the proposal, though she wondered about the logistics ?
when construction would begin; how existing structures on
the island would be used; and
whether there are other uses
for the island pending construction of a new facility.
?How are we going to make
it happen?? she asked.
She also questioned what
role the city of Quincy would
have in plans for a new bridge.
That city has opposed construction plans, because drivers would have to pass through
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Bridge to Long Island
The city estimates costs for a replacement bridge at between
$40 million and $100 million.
Spectacle
Island
Long
Island
Thompson
Island
The bridge was closed
on Oct. 8, 2014 for
deteriorating conditions.
Moon
Island
Quincy
It had been the site
of a 450-bed
homeless shelter
program and drug
treatment program
for 300 clients.
Boston
Quincy Bay
SOURCE: Google Maps
it to reach the bridge.
Walsh?s office said that partial funding for the bridge is
already included in the city?s
capital plan for the fiscal years
2018 through 2022. The city
projects it will have more than
$ 3 0 m i ll i o n ava i l a b l e i n a
parking meter fund around
the time construction could
begin, though the administration did not say when that
would happen.
YAN WU/GLOBE STAFF
On other matters, Walsh
said his administration will
continue to prioritize changes
and improvements to Boston
schools and education programs, including an effort to
renovate school buildings or
build additional ones.
The mayor said the city will
?scale up? a pilot food program
in use at several schools in
East Boston, ?until every student gets at least two fresh,
Boston Mayor Martin J.
Walsh delivered his second
inauguration speech on
Monday.
nutritious meals, every day, all
across the district.?
Walsh, 50, who handily
won a second four-year term
in November, was sworn in by
Supreme Judicial Court Justice Kimberly S. Budd and former vice president Joseph R.
Biden Jr., an invited guest who
called Walsh ?a mayor who
will never forget where he
came from.?
? T h a t ?s t h e r e a s o n h e
sought this position in the first
place,? said Biden, who has
grown close to the mayor in recent years, adding, ?This is a
match made in heaven, Marty
Walsh and Boston.?
The city will celebrate its
400-year anniversary in four
years, and Walsh said his goal
? laid out in an Imagine Boston 2030 plan ? will be to prepare the city for the next 100
years.
?We are one of the greatest
cities of the world, and after
nearly four centuries our
greatest days are yet to come,?
the mayor said.
Walsh later swore in the 13
members of the City Council,
including new councilors Lydia Edwards, a lawyer from East
Boston, Charlestown, and the
North End; Ed Flynn, a Navy
veteran and probation officer
whose district stretches from
South Boston to the South
End; and Kim Janey, whose
district makes up much of
Roxbury.
With the new additions, the
council has six women, all of
color, a historic precedent and
a reflection of the changing
political landscape in Boston.
Later on Monday, Councilor
Andrea Campbell was elected
council president ? the first
black woman to serve in that
role ? and she praised Walsh?s
focus on affordable housing,
education, and public safety in
his outline of priorities for the
next four years.
Campbell said she also had
her own priorities, particularly
in public safety, such as increasing diversity within the
police and fire departments
and strengthening a police civilian review board.
?We have an opportunity to
ask ourselves, ?What do we
want for our city, what do we
want for our children, and the
next generation??? Campbell
said, adding that she looked
forward to working with
Walsh and for the priorities he
set out in his speech.
?One of the things I?m most
excited in is him recognizing
that we can always move the
needle faster, and that we all
have to work together, and we
have to look forward,? Campbell said.
Milton J. Valencia can be
reached at milton.valencia
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @miltonvalencia.
Despite pleas from DAs, Legislature balks at update to wiretap law
uWIRETAP
Continued from Page A1
when a judge finds probable
cause that a serious crime is being committed in connection
with organized crime and normal investigative procedures
have been exhausted. Law enforcement officials say the organized crime requirement makes
the law too narrow and pre-
vents them from being able to
gather key evidence to stop
murderous street gangs, human trafficking rings, and other criminals.
Former attorney general
Martha Coakley, who served on
a federal task force that went after the mob and similar groups,
said she saw how important
wiretaps were to break the back
*Not to be
combined
with any
other offer.
of organized crime.
But when criminal activity
shifted more to street gangs
that use cellphones for drug
dealing, violent crime, and human trafficking, the state?s
wiretap law remained mired in
the past, she said last week.
?In 2017, almost 2018, the
unwillingness of the Legislature
to give law enforcement the
SINCE 1988
www.pfe-inc.com
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between Bertucci?s & Starbucks
617-244-0812
AUBURN
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774-321-6600
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303 Worcester Rd.
(Behind Citizens Bank)
508-861-7860
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1422 Washington St.
(Route 53)
781-829-2171
NASHUA
417 Amherst St.
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603-821-9882
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North Hampton, NH
603-379-2081
tools they need to keep Massachusetts residents in our cities
and towns safe is? ? Coakley
paused to find the right phrase
? ?a little inexplicable.?
But many lawmakers, defense attorneys, and civil libertarians argue that the changes
being sought are a vast expansion of police surveillance authority without privacy protections. That constitutes ?a broad
overreach,? said Rahsaan Hall
of the American Civil Liberties
Union of Massachusetts.
And for all the paperwork
law enforcement officials must
go through to ask a judge to approve surreptitious eavesdropping, the courts rarely tell prosecutors no, they note. In 2016,
according to data compiled by
the Globe, Massachusetts prosecutors applied for 59 warrants
to wiretap. Superior Court
judges granted all of them.
But 59 wiretaps ? that?s
fewer than 59 individual telephone numbers tapped because
some warrants for the same
number were renewed ? is not
very many in a state of 6.9 million people.
Eight Massachusetts district
attorneys did not conduct any
wiretaps in 2016, according to
filings.
The result is that many investigations seen as requiring
surreptitious eavesdropping ?
extortion, public corruption,
racketeering ? are conducted
and prosecuted by federal authorities. There were about 100
federal wiretaps in Massachusetts that concluded in 2016,
according to official data.
Martin W. Healy, chief legal
counsel of the Massachusetts
Bar Association, which includes
many defense attorneys, said
his group is opposed to updating the wiretap law.
?There are enough tools already available to federal prosecutors, and we worry about the
erosion of people?s privacy
rights and due process rights if
we expand the wiretap law here
in Massachusetts,? he said.
Lawmakers wrote the state?s
current wiretapping law in response to a 1967 US Supreme
Court ruling that found law enforcement?s use of wiretapping
without robust judicial oversight unconstitutional.
?The use of such devices by
law enforcement officials must
be conducted under strict judicial supervision and should be
limited to the investigation of
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Chief Justice Ralph D. Gants
has questioned restricting
wiretaps to organized crime.
organized crime,? state law
says.
Under the law, only 12 people in the state can apply for a
wiretap warrant: the attorney
general and the 11 district attorneys.
The law sets such a high bar
that the official seeking the permission has to prove to a Superior Court judge there is probable cause the wiretap will show
the target has committed or is
committing one of several specified serious crimes, and it?s
connected to organized crime,
such as the Mafia. Street gangs
often don?t count.
Prosecutors must also convince the judge reviewing a request for a wiretap that all other investigative procedures
have been exhausted ? one of
the highest hurdles they say
they face.
Furthermore, the law limits
what police can listen to once
they get permission to secretly
intercept someone?s telephone
calls: pertinent information.
?If the target is speaking to a
coconspirator about what they
are having for dinner, we have
to stop listening,? Kim West, the
chief of the criminal bureau in
the attorney general?s office,
testified this year. ?If a target is
speaking to a friend about a
football game, we have to stop
listening. We employ a 90-second rule. If, within the 90 seconds, the conversation does not
become pertinent to the crimes
we are investigating, we have to
stop listening.?
Supporters of proposals to
update the law point to a 2011
decision by the Supreme Judicial Court that secretly recorded
evidence could not be used
against a man who was allegedly caught on tape admitting to a
Brockton murder.
In t h e r u l i n g , R a l p h D.
Gants, now the chief justice,
wrote that limiting usage of
wiretaps to only investigating
organized crime makes it ?unavailable to investigate and
prosecute the hundreds of
shootings and killings committed by street gangs in Massachusetts, which are among the
most difficult crimes to solve.?
He continued: ?If the Legislature wishes to avoid this result, it should amend [the law]
to delete those words.?
A bill proposed by Governor
Charlie Baker, and backed by
Attorney General Maura Healey
and all the DAs, would effectively do just that.
But Hall, of the ACLU, warns
it would go much further, allowing prosecutors to ask a
judge for a warrant to tap someone?s phone not just for alleged
acts such as murder and human trafficking but also for
more petty crimes, such as
small-time drug dealing. It
would double to 30 days how
long a wiretap is allowed before
police and prosecutors have to
check back in with a judge. And
it would allow judicially approved wiretapping of phones
outside of Massachusetts if it?s
connected to an alleged conspiracy to commit a crime in
the state.
In November, a version of
Baker?s proposal that was considered during the House debate of a wide-ranging criminal
justice measure was ruled beyond the scope of the bill.
And it was after midnight
one Friday in October when a
similar measure came before
the Senate.
With some urgency, Senator
Harriette Chandler approached
Arline Isaacson, a lobbyist for
the state ACLU. Chandler, now
the acting Senate president,
asked for talking points. Isaacson handed them to her. Chandler walked to the Senate floor
to persuade her colleagues to
kill the measure.
?We?re rushing it through
now,? Chandler said, looking
down at the ACLU memo. To
pass the amendment ?would be
a grave mistake.?
When the vote was taken at
12:29 a.m., the language was
rejected ? just as some version
of it has been regularly for decades ? with 14 votes in favor
and 22 votes opposed.
Miller can be contacted at
joshua.miller@globe.com.
Business
Cider houses are crying foul
over higher taxes on some
of their alcoholic brews
PAGES B10н11
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Labor movement unsettled as the new year begins
Bold Types: RxAdvance seen as a highнtech flagship
Antivirus software turned into tool for espionage
Metro
B
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T U E S DAY, JA N UA RY 2 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E T R O
Kevin Cullen
The last
fighter pilot
In August 1945, an Army
fighter pilot named Jerry
Yellin climbed into the
cockpit of his P-51 Mustang and took off from an
airfield on Iwo Jima. His
mission, the mission of
his wingman, a 19-yearold kid named Phil
Schlamberg, and those in the B-29s they
were escorting, was to attack the enemy
airfields near Nagoya in Japan.
The talk of Japanese surrender was in
the air, but then so was Jerry Yellin, on
what would be the final combat mission
of World War II.
Yellin and the other pilots had been
told to listen for the code word ?Utah,?
which meant the Japanese had surrendered and the war was over. But the word
never came and it was only after Jerry
Yellin landed back on Iwo Jima that he
found out the Japanese had surrendered a
few hours before he and the others had
bombed and strafed the erstwhile enemy.
Worse, when young Phil Schlamberg?s
plane didn?t make it back, Jerry Yellin realized the kid had died needlessly.
Jerry Yellin returned to the United
States with a paralyzing case of post-traumatic stress. He tried to numb his feelings
with booze but that only made things
worse. He couldn?t get the images of thousands of rotting bodies on Iwo Jima out of
his head. He kept losing jobs.
He kept thinking about Phil Schlamberg, just a kid. He thought about killing
himself.
After years of suffering in silence, he
began meditating and his brain began to
heal.
Even so, he couldn?t get over his hatred
of the Japanese. He had seen what they
had done in war and it was brutal and
Jerry Yellin just couldn?t get over that.
Then he went to Japan on a business
trip in 1983 and stood in the middle of
Tokyo and imagined bombs raining down
on the place and something inside him
shifted. Jerry Yellin felt an odd empathy
for an old enemy.
Life is funny. Years later, his son Robert
moved to Japan and fell in love with a
Japanese woman. The woman?s father, Taro Yamakawa, had trained as a kamikaze
pilot but the war had ended before he had
a chance to kill himself and Allied troops
for the emperor. He was against the idea
of his daughter marrying an American
until he found out that Robert?s father
had fought against the Japanese.
To Taro Yamakawa, Jerry Yellin was
someone to honor, because he fought for
his country.
The two old soldiers met and, through
a translator, made peace with each other
and with something bigger than both of
them. They stood together, proudly,
watching their children marry each other.
Jerry Yellin and Taro Yamakawa remained
the best of friends for the rest of their
lives.
Jerry Yellin died a couple of weeks ago.
He was 93 and spent half of those years
helping veterans who suffered from posttraumatic stress.
His great friend, Kevin Jarvis, the director of veterans services in Malden, had
traveled to Iwo Jima with Jerry and was
looking forward to catching up with him
in Washington next month at the 73rd anniversary of the battle of Iwo Jima.
Instead, he was left to reflect on a genuine American hero, a man who knew the
cost of war and what it does to warriors,
and who spent the rest of his life helping
those warriors get to a place that he was
lucky enough to find after so many years
of suffering.
?Listening to Jerry?s stories about flying in the very last mission over Japan
and landing on Iwo Jima and then struggling over the years was fascinating and
heartbreaking,? Kevin Jarvis said. ?But
then it always ended with his joy and
pride, with a smile as he spoke about
his three grandchildren who live in Japan.?
There is an old Japanese proverb
which holds that the righteous man has
many hardships. Jerry Yellin was a righteous man who used those hardships to
help so many others. He was, in a life of
war and peace, a mensch.
Kevin Cullen is a Globe columnist. He can
be reached at cullen@globe.com.
Fenway doctor leaves two more posts
Accused of sexual harassment, bullying by two doctors, lawyer
By Beth Healy
GLOBE STAFF
A doctor who was dismissed
from Fenway Community Health
Center after allegedly sexually harassing and bullying co-workers has
stepped down from two other prestigious medical positions, according to officials of those institutions.
Dr. Harvey J. Makadon, 70, resigned from Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center on Dec. 8, a spokeswoman said, the day a Globe story
detailed the allegations against him
at Fenway. That same day, his role
as a member of the faculty at Harvard Medical School ended, according to a Harvard spokeswoman.
The spokeswomen declined to
comment on additional allegations
that have surfaced about Makadon
in recent weeks, both in his role as a
physician at Beth Israel in the 1990s
and as a member of the Harvard
Medical School faculty.
Three men ? two doctors and a
lawyer ? told the Globe in detail
about improper interactions with
Makadon some 25 years ago that
are troubling them anew, they said,
amid the national furor over sexual
harassment.
One said Makadon made a pass
at him when he was a Harvard graduate student, while another said he
was a newly minted doctor, in training under Makadon at Beth Israel,
when Makadon allegedly touched
him in the dark during a presentation. A third was a patient of Makadon?s, with whom Makadon allegedMAKADON, Page B5
FACEBOOK
Dr. Harvey J. Makadon has left
two more medical positions.
PHOTOS BY ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Erik Kondo, who sustained a spinal cord injury in a motorcycle accident at 19, was carried by childhood friend Steve Sheerin.
A MATTER OF DEGREE
200 fearless souls take part in frigid
L Street Brownies swim in South Boston
T
By Jeremy C. Fox
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
he first morning of 2018 was
sunny and cloudless in Boston, but with a temperature
about 1 degree above zero, it
was not what most people
consider beach weather.
For 200 or so brave souls,
though, it was a day to step
out onto the sand and ? at
least briefly ? into the frigid waters of Boston
Harbor at the annual L Street Brownies New
Year?s Day Swim.
Monday marked the fifth trip into the bitterly
cold brine for 17-year-old Ariana Farr, of Lunenburg, who got the idea after her grandmother?s
death, when she found a shirt from one of many
?polar bear plunges? the matriarch had done.
BROWNIES, Page B4
The water temperature was 44 degrees. Many said they felt
colder after getting out of the water than while they were in it.
City of Framingham installs its first mayor
Spicer promises a spirit
of openness, collaboration
By Eric Moskowitz
GLOBE STAFF
FRAMINGHAM ? The words carved on the
shingles outside, embossed on the windows, and
even stamped on the lectern in the vast auditorium all proclaim this to be the town of Framingham, as it has been known for 317 years.
But Monday it officially became the city of
Framingham, as Yvonne M. Spicer took the oath
of office as mayor.
With her left hand on a colonial Bible held by
US Senator Elizabeth Warren and her right hand
raised, Spicer at once became the first mayor of
what had been the state?s ? and the country?s ?
largest town and the first popularly elected African-American woman mayor in Massachusetts.
The 55-year-old former teacher and Museum
of Science administrator won the mayor?s race by
a comfortable 17 percentage-point margin in
FRAMINGHAM, Page B5
JOSH REYNOLDS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Yvonne M. Spicer reacts during a ceremony in which she was sworn in as mayor.
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
FLYING HIGH ?
A plane was seen
flying between
clouds of steam
from a smoke
stack in
Somerville on
New Year?s Day.
NASA/DSCOVR/HANDOUT/EPA
A tinier world:
The breakdown
By Matt Rocheleau
GLOBE STAFF
The world is a massive place ? some 7.5
billion people and counting. That?s so large, it
can be hard to even wrap our brains around
worldwide statistics.
But what if it were smaller ? a lot smaller?
A nonprofit known as The 100 People Foundation aims to frame the global population
through a much more manageable lens ? in
other words, what it would look like if the
world was made up of just 100 people.
The Globe took each of the foundation?s
statistics and extrapolated them using today?s
percentages and added in some of our own.
Here?s a look at the world, conveniently
shrunk down.
R Half would be male, half would be female.
R The age breakdown would be: 25 children and young teens; and 75 teens and
adults (15 and over), including nine adults 65
and older.
R North Americans would be vastly outnumbered: 60 from Asia, 16 from Africa, 10
from Europe; nine from Latin America; and
five from North America.
R So would native English speakers: 12
would speak Mandarin Chinese as first language; six speak Spanish; five speak English;
four speak Hindi; four speak Arabic; and 69
speak other languages.
R The third-most popular religion? No religion: there would be 31 Christians; 24 Muslims; 16 unaffiliated; 15 Hindus; seven Buddhists; and seven people who follow other
faiths.
R Basic necessities: 32 would use potentially unsafe sanitation services; 15 would not
have electricity; 13 would reside in slums and
informal settlements; and 11 would be undernourished, including one dying of starvation
(even though 30 would be considered overweight).
R Education: Of the 75 teens and adults
age 15 and older, 10 would not be able to read
and write. Of the 61 adults age 25 and over,
only six of them would have completed college.
R A majority wouldn?t be online: 52 would
not be Internet users for various possible reasons, including lack of access, skills, and interest.
R Cellphone service: 32 would not have cellular service (even though cellphone subscriptions would outnumber people 103 to 100).
R The future: There would soon be more
than 100 people. Although you can expect one
person will die in the next year, in that same
time, you can expect two babies would be
born.
Sources: US Census Bureau; Central Intelligence Agency?s World Factbook; UN Population Division; UN Human Settlements Programme; Barro-Lee Educational Attainment
Data; UN Food and Agriculture Organization;
Pew Research Center; GSMA Intelligence; The
World Bank; The International Energy Agency; Facebook Inc.; Twitter Inc.; International
Telecommunication Union; World Health Organization
Matt Rocheleau can be reached at
matthew.rocheleau@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @mrochele.
BY THE NUMBERS
68
MARK WILSON/FILE
The number of breeding bald eagle pairs documented in Massachusetts in 2017, up from 59 in 2016.
The tally for 2017 was more than any other year
since the majestic birds were reintroduced to the
state in 1982, according to the state Division of
Fisheries and Wildlife. Breeding bald eagles had
been eliminated from Massachusetts by the early
1900s. (Associated Press)
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Getting a bead on the flu bug
T
By Sophia Eppolito
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
o advance the science of forecasting infectious diseases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been hosting a competition in which researchers use social media, as well as data
from CDC?s routine flu surveillance systems, to predict the timing, peak, and intensity of the flu season.
For this flu season?s competition, University of Massachusetts Amherst
biostatistician Nicholas Reich joined forces with Carnegie Mellon University, Columbia University, and a group at Los Alamos National Laboratory in
a group they named the FluSight Network.
?What makes the flu hard to predict is that there are not a lot of early indications about how the season is going to go,? Reich said. ?We?re still trying to figure out what those early indicators are of a bad season.?
A current assessment of the flu, and an ability to look to the future, can
be invaluable for the CDC, Reich said.
?Being able to anticipate those events gives them a head start on putting
into place the risk-communication efforts to encourage people to get the
vaccine, perhaps earlier than usual,? he said.
Each of the member groups in the FluSight Network has competed individually before this year. Reich estimated that the team has a combined 10
years of forecasting experience.
The group?s strategy is to submit a single model to the CDC that combines all of their models together, Reich said. To create these models, the
network studies climate data as well as recent digital trends from Twitter,
Google, and Wikipedia.
He said researchers primarily focus on those specific sites to look for
trends in searches on flu-related terms.
?We saw this as this great opportunity to work together and have the
best pieces of our best models all attribute to one forecast,? he said. ?It?s sort
of like a symphony. Any one of these models is playing their own instrument, but they work better together and they sound better together.?
About 20 teams are participating in the CDC?s challenge this year. The
nationwide competition began in early November and is expected to end
some time in April.
The teams measure flu trends weekly by attempting to predict the percentage of doctor?s office visits linked to flu-like illness. Each week, they
send their updated forecasts to the CDC before they?re then posted online
at predict.phiresearchlab.org.
Reich said it has been an abnormally early flu season but points out that
it?s a little too early to predict its severity in New England.
But, he added, his group?s model has predicted a 50 percent chance that
the season will peak before mid-January.
?Based on what we are seeing in New England so far this year, there is a
small signal suggesting this season will peak earlier than usual, although
we still have a fair amount of uncertainty about exactly when the peak of
flu season will be,? he said.
Sophia Eppolito can be reached at sophia.eppolito@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter @SophiaEppolito.
AROUND THE REGION
B RA IN T R E E
Lottery rings in 2018
with three big jackpots
For those with a resolution to get rich, 2018
might just be your year. The Massachusetts State
Lottery is starting the year with three of its highest jackpots, totalling over $790 million, according to a statement from the agency. On Tuesday,
the Mega Millions drawing will be worth about
$343 million, with an estimated cash payout of
$215.3 million. The Powerball drawing on
Wednesday will be about $440 million, with a
payout worth $278.3 million. The in-state Megabucks Doubler jackpot on Wednesday is about $8
million, or a $6.36 million cash option.
BOSTO N
Water main break
closes, freezes streets
A major water main break flooded Huntington
Avenue and forced the closure of several streets
before it was repaired late Monday night, officials said. All roads should be open for the morning commute, said Sean Navin, a spokesman for
the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. A
broken valve caused the pipe to burst at 7:49
p.m. Water shot into the frigid air, causing roads
to freeze. The valve was shut off shortly before 11
p.m., and there was no interruption in water service, he said. The break forced the closure of
Huntington, River Road, the Riverway in Boston,
and Washington Street in Brookline. Crews from
the Boston Fire Department and the Water and
Sewer Commission assisted at the scene. The
state sent heavy equipment, including sanders,
to treat the frozen roadways.
M O N T P EL I ER
Stakes seen as huge for
renewable energy bids
Some entrepreneurs hoping to provide renewable energy for Massachusetts electricity customers are touting their projects in the run-up to the
decision about which company could be chosen
to help provide clean power to the Bay State. The
stakes are potentially huge for the companies,
some of which are proposing major infrastructure projects that would carry Canadian electricity produced by wind or hydro power across Vermont, New Hampshire, or Maine. National Grid
is running online advertisements promoting its
Granite State Power Link. The utility backs a
project that runs through Vermont and New
Hampshire. There are dozens of other projects in
the three states competing to be chosen later this
month by Massachusetts officials. Contracts are
due to be finalized in the spring. (AP)
SO M E RV I LL E
Weather postpones
ceremonial flagнraising
A reenactment of the raising of the nation?s first
flag in a Boston suburb has been postponed because of freezing cold weather. The annual ceremony in Somerville was set for Monday but has
been postponed to March 4. The festivities commemorate the raising of the ??Grand Union Flag??
atop Prospect Hill on New Year?s Day in 1776.
This year?s event was to include a procession led
by a reenactor portraying George Washington,
then a ceremony at Prospect Hill Park. The hill
was a key fortification for the Continental Army
in its siege of Boston during the American Revolution. The flag, also known as the ??Continental
Colors,?? featured 13 red and white stripes and a
British ??Union Jack?? flag in the corner where the
50 stars are now on today?s flag. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
R MAN KILLED A man believed to be in his twenties was shot to death in Lawrence on Sunday
night, according to Carrie Kimball-Monahan,
spokeswoman for the Essex District Attorney?s
office. The man was found with multiple gunshot
wounds in a Honda Odyssey on Reservoir Street,
Kimball-Monahan said. No arrests had been
made as of Monday afternoon and officials had
not confirmed the victim?s identity, she said. Officials did not know the motive of the shooting,
Kimball-Monahan said.
R EVACUATION A three-story Gardner apartment
building was evacuated Monday morning due to
a boiler malfunction, which was spreading carbon monoxide throughout the residence, Gardner police said. Lieutenant Craig Osowski said
the problem was under control. Some people
were treated on the scene, but there were no serious injuries and no one was taken to a hospital,
Osowski said. The 377 Elm St. building contains
about 30 apartment units.
R COLD PUP A man who left his puppy shivering
in a car for an hour is being charged with animal
cruelty, according to the Dartmouth Police Department. Police received a call at 5:30 p.m. Saturday reporting an unattended dog inside a vehicle in the Dartmouth Mall parking lot. The caller
told police that the puppy had been left in the vehicle for at least 20 minutes without heat. Police
later determined it had been there for closer to
an hour. The unidentified owner was being
charged with animal cruelty, but Dartmouth police said they will not release his name until arraignment. A responding officer documented
that the puppy was shivering and rolled up in a
ball on one of the car seats. Dartmouth Animal
Control took the dog to a veterinary hospital.
R SHOOTING PROBE Dean A. Tupper, a former
employee of Stonehill College in Easton, was arrested Friday and charged in connection with an
accidental shooting at the school in October, according to a statement from the Bristol County
District Attorney?s office. On Oct. 11, Tupper, 57,
allegedly shot his co-worker, Dave Pigeon, in the
Plumber?s Shop of Stonehill College?s Clock
Farm, which is across the street from Stonehill?s
campus, according to the release and police re-
ports. According to previous reports from the
Globe, Pigeon was sitting at his desk when he
?felt a pain in his right knee? and started bleeding. Tupper initially told the police he was trying
to make a homemade bullet when an explosion
caused the lead to shoot off, hitting Pigeon as he
walked by. Police reported being suspicious of
Tupper?s story in early December. Tupper is expected to be arraigned in Taunton District Court
on Tuesday on charges of discharging a firearm
within 500 feet of a building, making false statements to the police, improper storage of a firearm, carrying a dangerous weapon on school
grounds, and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, according to the release. He was released over the weekend on $1,000 cash bail.
R FOUND SAFE An 84-year-old man was found
around 3:30 p.m. on Monday after being reported missing in bitterly cold weather. Newton police tweeted around 2 p.m. that Enio Vespa,
wearing a brown winter jacket and blue baseball
cap, was missing from Elinor Road. About an
hour later, the department tweeted that Vespa
was found and is safe.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
?It was difficult
moving through
the home. There
was a significant
amount of debris
collected in the
home throughout
the years, so it
was a little bit of
a challenge.?
SCOTT WODZINSKI,
Littleton fire chief
Woman,
76, dies in
Littleton
house fire
One escapes
morning blaze
By Elise Takahama
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
and Eric Moskowitz
JOSH REYNOLDS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
FIRE AMID THE ICE ? Fireworks once again heralded the New Year at the strike of midnight over Boston Harbor. A lack of funds forced the
cancellation of the midnight fireworks last year, but waterfront businesses and associations paid for the renewal of the traditional celebration.
GLOBE STAFF
LITTLETON ? A 76-yearold woman died in a house
blaze that broke out early
Monday morning in Littleton,
becoming the first fire fatality
in Massachusetts in 2018, authorities said.
?Sadly, I am confirming
that one adult has died in a
fire in a single-family home at
315 King St. in Littleton,? said
Jennifer Mieth, spokeswoman
for State Fire Marshal Peter
Ostroskey. ?One person escaped the fire and was taken
to a hospital.?
Fire officials said they
were told a person was
trapped inside when they arrived on the scene.
?We were called at 5:14
this morning for a house fire,?
Littleton Fire Chief Scott
Wodzinski said. ?We were met
outside by the homeowner,
who said that his wife was still
inside. I can confirm that it is
a fatal fire.?
The fire occurred in a onestory, two-bedroom, circa1750 antique-style clapboard
home, near a gentle bend on
Route 2A overlooking a frozen
brook and the town?s Congregational Church. From the
front, a window framing the
d o o r w a s a s k e w, a n d t h e
snow-covered roof was partly
ripped open. Most of the damage appeared to be in the back
and side of the house.
The cold weather also had
an effect on the fire department?s response, Wodzinski
said, adding that the trucks,
equipment, and water began
freezing.
?It played a role for us but
not really for the fire,? he said.
A few state and local fire
vehicles remained on scene
later Monday, and some heavily bundled firefighters were
spreading salt from a truck on
the icy street as others moved
about. About 30-40 firefighters arrived responded to the
fire.
?They?re out investigating
now,? said Bill Harrold, Littleton Police communication supervisor. ?The husband had
called and said his wife was
still in the house.?
Harrold said there was a
?high accumulation of collectibles,? inside the house. The
woman?s body was found inside the home.
?It was difficult moving
through the home,? Wodzinski added. ?There was a significant amount of debris collected in the home throughout
the years, so it was a little bit
of a challenge.?
No other injuries were reported.
Mieth said the investigation into the origin and cause
of the fire is being conducted
by the Littleton Fire and Police Departments and State
Police assigned to the state
fire marshal and to the Middlesex District Attorney?s office.
Elise Takahama
can be reached at
elise.takahama@globe.com.
Eric Moskowitz
can be reached at
eric.moskowitz@globe.com.
Hospitals weigh in with the first newborns of 2018
By Sean Smyth
and Sarah Betancourt
GLOBE STAFF
AND GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Newton-Wellesley Hospital
has New Year?s Day bragging
rights.
T h e B o s t o n a r e a?s f i r s t
known baby of 2018 was delivered by caesarean section at
the hospital at 12:26 a.m. Monday. Jaxon Thomas Clansy, a
boy, weighed 8 pounds, 12
ounces.
His parents are Jennie and
Marcus Clansy of Norton, and
he arrived five days later than
expected. ?It?s pretty awesome,?
said Jennie Clansy, 28, who
had been induced into labor on
Friday. ?The hospital gave us
this welcome basket with baby ?s first teddy bear, piggy
bank, and a hat.?
Newton-Wellesley unwittingly took top honors in a
friendly New Year?s baby rivalry among Boston?s largest hospitals.
Massachusetts General Hospital, Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center, Boston Medical Center, Tufts Medical Center, and St. Elizabeth?s Medical
Center also stay in touch as the
city rings in the New Year to
determine which will welcome
the first baby.
That Boston honor went to
Brigham and Women?s Hospital, where a baby girl, weighing
6 pounds, 6 ounces, was born
at 1:14 a.m., said Elaine St. Peter, a hospital spokeswoman.
Boston Medical Center welcomed its first baby of 2018 at
1:55 a.m. The family asked
that no other information be
provided, according to the hospital.
A second baby, a girl named
Samantha Rose, was born at
4:35 a.m. and was happily
sporting a New Year?s crown,
according to a posting on the
hospital?s Facebook Page.
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center welcomed a baby
boy, Ethan, at 1:22 a.m. The
first baby born at Tufts Medical
Center arrived just after noon,
at 12:17 p.m., according to the
hospital.
Newborn Jaxon Thomas
Clansy with his parents,
Jennie and Marcus Clansy.
Sarah Betancourt can be
reached at sarah.betancourt
@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter@sweetadelinevt.
Workers seek to cut off gas main spouting flames
By Evan Allen
GLOBE STAFF
and Martha Schick
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
A spout of fire that burst
from a gas main on Hyde Park
Avenue in Roslindale on Sunday was still burning late Monday night, with crews working
to install a temporary bypass
line, according to the Boston
Fire Department.
The fire in a 10-inch gas
main began shortly after 6
p.m. near 340 Hyde Park Ave.,
about a mile south of the Forest Hills MBTA station. Fire
crews tried to use sand to
smother the flames.
The Fire Department
tweeted on Monday afternoon
that the fire would be ?ongoing at least through today? as
the crews install a bypass to effectively cut off fuel to the fire.
The fire continued to burn
past 9 p.m. Monday, and National Grid crews were still
trying to install the bypass
line, said Steve MacDonald, a
spokesman for the Fire Department.
Shortly after noon, the
work crews were digging two
holes in the street where the
temporary line would be connected, according to Fire Department?s tweets.
Crews from National Grid
?know how best to deal with
this in the safe manner,? said
MacDonald, ?but it?s in consultation with all the city officials
here.?
MacDonald said National
Grid did not shut off the gas
Sunday night because of the
extreme cold.
?We? ll try not to shut the
gas off, because that will affect
hundreds of households, if not
thousands,? MacDonald said.
Once the bypass line is installed, and the fire extinguished, National Grid crews
would still need to dig up the
original pipe to repair or replace it, MacDonald said.
The extreme cold hampered repair efforts, he added.
?The weather certainly isn?t
helping,? MacDonald said.
?[Crews] are out in full force,
[trying to install the pipe],? he
said.
National Grid did not immediately return a request for
comment Monday night.
Earlier in the day, flames
were still shooting into the air
from the street, half the height
of the surrounding trees.
Sidewalks were covered
with sheets of ice from where
firefighters had sprayed water.
?I heard they had it under
control, but gas is very dangerous,? said Helen Loney, who
Cold snap prompts T to warn
commuters to add travel time
By Dylan McGuinness
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
The MBTA is advising commuters to add 20 minutes of
travel time in the morning, in
anticipation of frigid temperatures affecting bus and rail services this week, officials said.
The Hingham commuter
ferry to Boston has been suspended indefinitely due to ice
damage on a dock and extreme
tides, the agency announced
Monday night.
?For us, our first priority is
to run a safe system for all the
riders and the employees that
are operating them,? MBTA
General Manager Luis Ramirez
said Monday evening in a conference call. The agency will be
doing e ver ything it can to
maintain normal service,
Ramirez said, but noted that
?given the last few days and
the experiences we?re seeing
across the region, we think it?s
prudent to prepare? for possible delays.
Shuttle buses will take passengers from the Hingham ferry terminal to the commuter
rail station in West Hingham,
which will accept their boat
passes, said Joe Pesaturo, an
MBTA spokesman.
The agency will take several
steps to try to maintain train
service, Ramirez said. Trains
will be stored in tunnels and
maintenance facilities during
morning hours to avoid hazards from freezing, and those
that can?t fit will run on rail
yards, he said.
Operators will open and
close train doors and test
brakes, and the heaters for
track switches will be tested
throughout the day. Extra
maintenance staff will stand by
at ?strategic locations? to address any issues that arise.
Additional crews will also
be on call at the end of lines,
where trains are swapped out,
deputy general manager Jeff
Gonneville said.
Cold weather can affect a
train?s air system, which controls braking, the doors, and
more, and can create difficulties for the rails as well. Moisture within those systems can
freeze, which causes the vehicles to malfunction, officials
said last week.
The weather contributed to
delays on both the commuter
ra i l a n d s u b w ay l i n e s l a s t
week. A piece of Orange Line
t r a c k o n t h e My s t i c R i v e r
b r i d g e b r o ke e a r l y Fr i d ay
morning, causing significant
delays.
The extreme cold that
gripped the region over the
holiday weekend is expected to
continue this week, according
to the National Weather Service.
Dylan McGuinness can be
reached at
dylan.mcguinness@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter at
@DylMcGuinness.
lives near the fire. ?I feel bad
for them working out there.?
Three three-decker homes
near the fire were evacuated as
a precaution on Sunday night.
Neighbors said they weren?t
worried by the flames.
?The Boston Fire Department is outstanding,? said a
woman named Susan, who
lives down the street and declined to give her last name to
protect her privacy.
Three of the utility workers
at the scene suffered burns
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and were transpor ted to a
nearby hospital for treatment,
according to a tweet from the
Fire Department.
Globe correspondents Dylan
McGuinness and Maddie
Kilgannon contributed to this
report. Evan Allen can be
reached at evan.allen@globe.
com. Follow her on Twitter
@evanmallen. Martha Schick
can be reached at martha.
schick@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter @MarthaSchick.
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T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
IN SOUTH BOSTON, COLD
BRINGS OUT THE BOLD
uBROWNIES
Continued from Page B1
But ? important distinction ?
her grandmother lived and plunged
in Florida.
Still, after the teen emerged from
the tides, she said she had no regrets.
?I can?t feel my feet, but [I feel]
great!? she said.
Her proud mother, Jenny Farr,
said, ?It?s pretty fantastic, and hey,
great thing to put on your college rщsumщ.? She said it was one of many
challenges Ariana plans to tackle,
including the Boston Marathon and
Mount Everest.
Barry Jennings of South Boston,
dove in with his wife, son, and
daughter, a tradition their family
has observed for 20 years, he said.
?Every year it gets colder,? Jennings said. ?And I?m getting older,
which makes it colder.?
The temperature in the water
Monday morning was 44 degrees,
according to the National Weather
Service. Many swimmers said they
felt colder after getting out of the
water than while they were in it.
Jennings?s son Conor, 26, said
he?d been going in since he was 6 or
7, though he has missed some years.
Steve Sheerin, 52, of Bolton,
went into the water carrying his
childhood friend, Erik Kondo, also
52, of Lexington. Kondo sustained a
spinal cord injury in a motorcycle
accident at 19, he said, and uses a
wheelchair.
Kondo came up with the idea to
participate about nine years ago, he
said, and every year he and Sheerin
come with a group of buddies.
?This is a tradition,? Kondo said.
?It?s a good way to start off the year.?
Sheerin joked that he asks Kondo
every year if they can skip the frigid
dive. ?I keep trying to get out of it,
but he won?t let me,? Sheerin said. ?I
wouldn?t be here if he didn?t guilt
me into it.?
Dan Monahan, interim director
of the Curley Community Center,
where the plunge takes place, estimated that last year about 1,600
people attended, and about 500
jumped in the harbor. This year, he
said, only 800 or 900 turned up, and
maybe 250 went into the water.
Other plunges up and down the
coast were canceled because of the
extreme cold that has gripped the
region since last Tuesday, but the
Brownies ? who say their New
Year?s swim is the country?s oldest ?
have never canceled in more than
100 years, Monahan said.
Out on the beach, Ernie Moreau,
52, of Framingham, yelled, ?It?s off
my bucket list! I?m never going in
again.?
Moreau swam two years ago, he
said, but on Monday he was there to
cheer on fellow supporters of Spectrum for Hope, which provides support to families with two or more
children who have special needs. It?s
one of many charities that use the
swim to help raise money.
?I dove in, and I popped up like
20 yards offshore,? Moreau recalled
of his 2016 plunge. ?I didn?t know
how far out I went, so I was swimming back, I?m like, ?Oh my God, I?m
not going to make it. This is awful.? I
was not so smart.?
Bob Murphy, 59, of Holliston,
who was also supporting Spectrum
for Hope, emerged dripping and
shivering. ?It?s a very good cause,? he
said. ?Last year we raised over
$8,500 for them. We?re going to try
to match or beat that this year.?
Monday was the first trip into the
icy water for Christy Lea, 50, of
Dracut, who dressed as Batwoman.
But it was the 10th wintry swim for
her fiancщ, Mike Breidenbach, also
of Dracut, who was celebrating his
52nd birthday Monday and had
dressed as Superman.
Breidenbach said it was ?a good
way to start off the year. . . . If you
can do this, you can do anything.?
Lea said experiencing the chill
with Breidenbach was symbolic.
?If he?s willing to take the plunge
and marry me, I?m willing to take
the plunge with him and be by his
side on this,? she said.
Breidenbach?s 9-year-old daughter, Lily, said she had tried to dissuade her father. ?I said, ?It?s too
cold. I don?t want you to go out because then you?re going to get frostbite,? ? she said. ?He didn?t listen.?
Jeremy C. Fox can be reached at
jeremy.fox@globe.com.
PHOTOS BY
A RA M B O G H O S IA N F O R
THE BOSTON GLOBE
Fewer people jumped into
the water at the annual L
Street Brownies New Year?s
Day Swim this year than
last year, but more than 200
took the plunge, many for
charities. Other plunges up
and down the coast were
canceled because of the
extreme cold that has
gripped the region since
last Tuesday, but the
Brownies ? who say their
New Year?s swim is the
country?s oldest ? have
never canceled in more
than 100 years, said Dan
Monahan, interim director
of the Curley Community
Center, where the event
takes place.
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
Framingham, a new city, elects its first mayor
uFRAMINGHAM
Continued from Page B1
November, after decades of debate and a razor-thin majority
last April endorsed a charter
change. That called for replacing the New England hallmarks of Town Meeting and
Board of Selectmen with a mayor and City Council.
For many, that contest had
less to do with how they saw
Framingham ? a place of both
suburban subdivisions and
large apartment complexes,
where an agric ultural and
manufacturing past gave way
to robust highway development but also a fatigued downtown, and where the population has grown steadily more
diverse ? than with simply
which government type they
preferred.
Some saw the new system as
essential for modernizing a
place that recently surpassed
70,000 residents, too large and
complex to be a town. Others
worried that it would abolish
the democratic spirit of representative Town Meeting, where
people can bring potential legislation to the floor with just a
few signatures.
Spicer, who holds a doctorate in education, spoke Monday to both camps, promising
openness and collaboration ?as
the first mayor ? the first people?s mayor ? of the city of
Framingham.?
But she did not lose sight of
the symbolic power of her vict o r y. Ne i t h e r d i d a j o y o u s
crowd that easily exceeded 500,
which rose to give Spicer a long
standing ovation. Some see
Spicer?s election as a point of
pride for a diverse community.
Framingham?s 8,609-student
public school district is 27 percent Hispanic, 7 percent African-American, and 5 percent
Asian, according to state data.
?The cornerstone of
Framingham is its people ? diverse culturally, ethnically, and
socioeconomically,? Spicer said,
recalling how President Bill
Clinton visited Framingham in
1994, praising it as a place
?that really looks like America.?
?From our first English settlers to the wave of Italian,
Irish, Eastern European, Portuguese, Latino, and now our
Brazilian community . . . . the
fabric of Framingham has been
strongly woven with the thread
of diversity,? said Spicer, who
thanked the voters of ?our
amazing new city? in Portuguese, Spanish, and Mandarin
as well as English, with a signlanguage interpreter by her
side.
She said her own family
?looks like Framingham. We
are African-American, Caucasian, Latino, Asian, Native
American, Christian, Muslim,
millennials, and older adults.?
She imagined her own ancestors ?smiling upon me today,?
PHOTOS BY JOSH REYNOLDS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Yvonne M. Spicer left the
Monday ceremony after she
was sworn in as the first
mayor of Framingham,
which voted to change from
a town form of government
last year. During her
address, she said: ?The
cornerstone of Framingham
is its people ? diverse
culturally, ethnically, and
socioeconomically.?
At left, US Senator
Elizabeth Warren of
Massachusetts held the
Bible as Spicer was sworn
in.
especially her late parents, Bill
and Dot Spicer, gesturing over
each shoulder and speaking
with palpable emotion.
Themes of family and diversity permeated the day, from
the opening greeting in five
languages by outgoing Town
Manager Robert Halpin to an
address by Dennis Giombetti,
chairman of Framingham?s
new 11-member City Council.
Giombetti noted that the riser on the stage at Framingham?s Memorial Building ?
dotted with local, state, and
federal officials and dignitaries
? included new councilors
Margareth Basilio Shepard, a
Brazilian-American woman,
and Edgardo Torres, who has
Puerto Rican heritage.
?What an absolutely glorious day for our city,? said Giombetti.
And he imagined his late father ? a son of Italian immigrants, and a municipal employee who started as a janitor
in this very building ? looking
down with pride on the proceedings.
Spicer only briefly dipped
into a life story that many voters knew, ?as an African-American woman [who] came to
Framingham with a promise of
a job and a hope of building a
life.?
That was in 1985, when the
Brooklyn native ? who had
sometimes helped her mother
clean houses on the Upper East
Side, and heeded her emphasis
on education ? listened to her
mother and relocated to
Framingham for a teaching job.
?Framingham opened its
arms to me,? the new mayor
said.
Eric Moskowitz can be reached
at eric.moskowitz@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeMoskowitz.
Fenway doctor accused of harassment leaves 2 more posts
uMAKADON
Continued from Page B1
ly initiated sex at his home.
The new allegations suggest
that Makadon?s alleged sexual
misconduct predates complaints against him starting in
2013 at Boston?s Fenway Community Health. The medical
center?s chief executive and
chairman resigned last month
in the wake of the Globe report,
which found that an outside
law firm hired by Fenway recommended Makadon be fired
in 2015.
Makadon, in statements
provided by his lawyer, said
some of the allegations against
him are untrue, but he apologized for his behavior in other
cases. In some instances, he
said, he could not recall the accusers or alleged events.
?I now understand that at
times my behavior caused some
to feel uncomfortable in my
presence. For that, I am truly
sorry,?? he said in the statement.
?I have worked hard during
my career to advance the care
of patients with HIV and sexual
and gender minorities,? Makadon said. ?I have never knowingly used my role to harm
those whom I sought to help.?
The new accusers came forward reluctantly, in hopes that
medical institutions will take
greater care to protect students,
medical residents, and patients
from harassment, all three said.
Dr. Armin Fidler said he was
29 and a graduate student at
Harvard?s School of Public
Health when he met Makadon
in 1990. Both men were part of
an AIDS committee at Harvard,
Fidler as a student representative and Makadon as a wellknown Boston physician to gay
men.
When Makadon offered to
take Fidler to dinner to discuss
a work matter, Fidler was honored.
?I was a very poor international student, and to have dinner with a Harvard professor,
that seemed like a fantastic opportunity for me,?? he recalled.
But he was quickly disappointed ? and shocked ? by how the
evening went.
Instead of heading to a restaurant, Makadon allegedly
drove Fidler to his home in the
suburbs, saying he had to pick
something up, Fidler said. Once
inside, Makadon put on music,
went upstairs to change, and
returned in a bathrobe, to Fidler?s shock, he said.
Fidler insisted they go to
dinner as planned, he said.
Makadon then allegedly took
him to Club Cafe, a gay restaurant in Boston?s South End,
where Fidler, who is straight,
said he felt uncomfortable. At
one point, he said, Makadon
put his hand on Fidler?s leg un-
der the table. Fidler then demanded to be taken home, he
said.
?It was very, very disturbing
to me at the time and later on,??
said Fidler, who went on to
work at the World Bank, responsible for health strategy,
and now teaches. He sought
therapy later in life over the incident, he said.
Coincidentally, in Novem-
ate dean for faculty affairs at
the Harvard T.H. Chan School
of Public Health, in an e-mail
response to a Globe inquiry,
said she has not received other
complaints about Makadon.
She said the school contacted
Harvard University and Harvard Medical School about the
Fidler complaint.
Makadon said he did not recall ever meeting Fidler and
?I now understand that at times my
behavior caused some to feel
uncomfortable in my presence. For
that, I am truly sorry.?
DR. HARVEY J. MAKADON
In statement provided by his lawyer
ber, prior to the Globe?s report
on Makadon?s alleged behavior
at Fenway Health, Fidler had
written to Harvard to complain
of ?serious sexual misconduct?
by Makadon in 1990. In his email correspondence, a copy of
which he provided to the Globe,
he asked whether other students had suffered similarly at
the hands of a Harvard faculty
member.
? T he fac t that I am still
thinking about it tells me that
the trauma of this experience
still lives on,?? Fidler wrote.
Mahnaz El-Kouedi, associ-
that the allegations were false.
Dr. Gary Brissette was one of
a group of new doctors under
Makadon?s watch at Beth Israel
from 1992 through 1994, and
counted Makadon as his mentor. He recalled that Makadon
sat beside him at a presentation
one day, and when the lights
were dimmed, Makadon
rubbed his leg against his own.
After that, Makadon touched
Brissette?s leg, he said.
?I never said a thing to him,
ever,?? said Brissette, who did
not want to do anything to derail his career. He had to con-
tinue having regular meetings
with Makadon, who never tried
to touch him again, Brissette
said.
Although he never reported
the incident to higher-ups, Brissette said, he now recognizes it
as something more than just a
nuisance amid the rigors of
medical training.
?It was definitely an experience that, as a trainee, I should
not have had to have dealt
with,?? he said.
Makadon said he did not recall the incident with Brissette,
but he thinks ?very highly of Dr.
Brissette and, if my behavior in
the past made him feel uncomfortable in any way, I sincerely
regret that.?
The third man who told the
Globe his story was a lawyer in
his late 30s working for the
state when he was referred to
Makadon for routine medical
care around 1987.
The man said Makadon sat
close to him during his first appointment at Beth Israel, tapping the man?s foot with his
own. Down the road, Makadon
invited the man to lunch at his
home, then to watch TV ? in
his bedroom.
?It was bizarre. I was vulnerable,?? said the man, who asked
not to be named for his family?s
privacy. ?There were so many
red flags.?
Makadon initiated sex, the
man said, and he went along
with it. Because Makadon was a
revered physician in the gay
community, the man continued
doctor visits with him at Beth
Israel until 1995.
Makadon did not deny the
man?s account, but said there
was no doctor-patient relationship with him at the time, an
explanation the man said is untrue.
?It was always my practice
never to engage in any kind of
intimate relationship with anyone who was actively under my
care and I did not do so? in this
case, he said.
Dr. Beverly Woo, a longtime
colleague of Makadon?s who
taught with him at Harvard,
said former residents and people who have worked closely
with Makadon have been surprised by the allegations
against him. ?They have been
extremely positive about working with him. Never has anything been raised about ethical
issues,?? she said.
The state Board of Registration in Medicine lists Makadon?s license as ?active,? but
notes that he is not currently
practicing. He has no record of
discipline with health care facilities.
Beth Healy can be reached at
beth.healy@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @HealyBeth.
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BY CITY AND TOWN
ANDOVER
BLOOM, Melvin I.
CANTON
COX, Edith
HARDY, Ellen V.
STANISLAUS, Herman
THOMPSON, Evelyn E.
HOLBROOK
SERONICK, Allan
BELMONT
CANNING, Brenton W.
CITINO, Michael A.
TAGARIELLO, Lorraine E.
(Privitero)
CHARLESTOWN
KEEGAN, Jacqueline Lee
BEVERLY
KIRBY, Robert John
CHELMSFORD
MILLS, Kenneth A.
LEOMINSTER
ANTONIONI, Jacqueline M.
(Gagne)
BOSTON
BURR, Stephen Ives
LEYDON, Daniel T.
McNAMARA, Edmund L. Jr.
MORSE, John F., III
O?CONNELL, Lisa A.
TSAIRIS, Mary
CONCORD
MORSE, John F., III
LEXINGTON
MILLS, Kenneth A.
DANVERS
MacDONALD, Nathaniel A., MD
LINCOLN
LOUD, Robert Livingston
DEDHAM
CHENELL, Marion B. (Lindsay)
KEEGAN, Jacqueline Lee
REED, Gloria J. (Panaioli)
LYNN
OLIVITO, John S.
BOURNE
THOMPSON, Evelyn E.
BRIGHTON
KENNEDY, James W.
BROCKTON
MARTIN, Mildred L. (Joyce)
BROOKLINE
PFEIFFER, Marguerite W.
(Wessels)
ROSENBERG, June (White)
CAMBRIDGE
BEST, Madeline
CITINO, Michael A.
DORCHESTER
MUNROE, Kim M.
SWEENEY, Denis P.
EAST BOSTON
ALBANO, Ann A. (Ricci)
DiFRONZO, Josephine
FALMOUTH
FITZGERALD, Robert G., Jr.
THOMPSON, Evelyn E.
HYDE PARK
CHENELL, Marion B. (Lindsay)
KEEGAN, Jacqueline Lee
REED, Gloria J. (Panaioli)
MALDEN
CONSERVA, Marie (Spadafora)
DONOVAN, Augustine W.
LEYDON, Daniel T.
VITO, Anthony
MARBLEHEAD
KIRBY, Robert John
NATICK
NAWFEL, Jamila H.
ROSLINDALE
MUNROE, Kim M.
NEWBURYPORT
KIRBY, Robert John
SALEM
VITO, Anthony
NEWTON
HARDY, Ellen V.
SAUGUS
DiFRONZO, Josephine
KENNEDY, James W.
VITO, Anthony
NORWOOD
KEEGAN, Jacqueline Lee
McNAMARA, Edmund L. Jr.
SERRATORE, Tommaso
THOMPSON, Evelyn E.
PEABODY
PFEIFFER, Marguerite W.
(Wessels)
TSAIRIS, Mary
PEMBROKE
SWEENEY, Denis P.
MARSHFIELD
COX, Edith
FRANKLIN
McNAMARA, Edmund L. Jr.
HAVERHILL
COX, Edith
MELROSE
OLIVITO, John S.
BLOOM, Melvin I.
REVERE
ALBANO, Ann A. (Ricci)
DiFRONZO, Josephine
MILLSTONE, Shelia (Swalnick)
NORWELL
COX, Edith
MEDFORD
DONOVAN, Augustine W.
LEYDON, Daniel T.
OLIVITO, John S.
ALBANO, Ann A. (Ricci)
MILTON
FITZGERALD, Robert G., Jr.
HARDY, Ellen V.
SWEENEY, Denis P.
QUINCY
FITZGERALD, Robert G., Jr.
O?CONNELL, Lisa A.
THOMPSON, Evelyn E.
READVILLE
CHENELL, Marion B. (Lindsay)
KEEGAN, Jacqueline Lee
REED, Gloria J. (Panaioli)
BURR, Stephen Ives
Of Revere, formerly of East Boston,
peacefully on Dec. 29. Visiting and
Funeral Service 1/3/18 in Sacred Heart
Church. For more info
www.ruggieromh.com
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston (617) 569-0990
ANTONIONI, Jacqueline M.
(Gagne)
Devoted to her
Family, Parish and
Community
86, of Leominster, died December 30,
2017, in Notre Dame Long Term Care
Center, Worcester, with her family by
her side. She was born in Sanford,
Maine, October 11, 1931, daughter of
the late Marie-Louis and Diana (Lavallee) Gagne. Jacqueline was a member
of St. Anna?s Parish, Mass. Citizens for
Life and St. Anna?s Society. She was a
woman of great faith, who was devoted
to her family, parish and community.
Jacqueline is survived by her son;
Robert A. Antonioni and his wife Maria, four daughters; Marie D. Sunder
and her husband N. Sunder of Winchester, Janet L. Antonioni of Belmont,
Ellen F. Bernard of Leominster and
Christine M. Hanson and her husband
Kristian of Paxton, along with grandchildren, Diana, Dennis, Christian,
Michael, Logan, Tristan and Corey.
She was predeceased by her husband
of 54 years, Attilio R. Antonioni, in
2012, and her son, John G. Antonioni
in 1999.
Jacqueline?s funeral will be held
Wednesday, January 3, 2018, from
Wright-Roy Funeral Home, Inc., 109
West Street, LEOMINSTER with a Mass
of Christian Burial at 11:00 a.m. in
St. Anna?s Church, 199 Lancaster St.,
Leominster. Burial will follow in St.
Leo?s Cemetery. Calling hours will be
held Tuesday, January 2nd from 4:00 7:00 p.m. in the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers donations in her
memory may be made to Our Father?s
House, 55 Lunenburg St. Fitchburg,
MA 01420.
To Light A Candle, Sign her Guestbook or Leave A Message of Condolence
visit www.wrightroyfuneralhome.com
BEST, Madeline
Of Cambridge, Fri., Dec. 22. Beloved
wife of the late Ralph Best. Devoted
mother of Gilma Best and Ernest Best.
She also leaves 4 grandchildren, 7 great
grandchildren, 3 great great grandchildren, and a host of other relatives and
friends. Funeral Service Thur., Jan. 4,
10 a.m. at St. Paul AME Church, Bishop
Allen Drive and Columbia St. Visiting
hour at the Church Thur. 9-10 a.m. Relatives and friends most kindly invited.
Interment Cambridge Cemetery.
A.J. Spears Funeral Home
Cambridge (617) 876-4047
In Memoriam
JAMES AND GERTRUDE
DONOVAN
Mass at Saint Theresa Church.
Of Andover, on Saturday, December
30, 2017. Beloved husband of the late
Louise (Rivitz). Loving father of David
& Ellen Bloom of CA, Judi & Jay
Robinovitz of MO, and Barry &
Julianne Bloom of Sharon. Adored
grandfather of Stephanie, Jared, Jaime,
Emily, Eric, and Mark. Dear brother
of Joel Bloom of Sharon, and Deanna
Avedissian of Stoughton. Services at
Temple Emanuel of Andover, 7 Haggets
Pond Rd., Andover, on Wednesday,
January 3 at 11AM. Burial will follow
at Temple Emanuel Cemetery, Mount
Vernon St., Lawrence. Following burial
Memorial Observance will be at Temple
Emanuel of Andover until 3:30PM,
continuing on Thursday at the home of
Barry & Julianne Bloom from 6-8PM.
In lieu of flowers, remembrances may
be made to National Kidney Foundation, 85 Astor Ave., Norwood, MA
02062. www.kidney.org
Levine Chapels, Brookline
(617) 277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
BURNS, Anna M.
Lovingly
Remembered
Of South Boston, devoted wife of the
late Edward J. (Punchy) Burns, died
suddenly, December 30, 2017 surrounded by her loving family. Born and
raised in South Boston she attended
Gate of Heaven High School. Worked
as a Crossing Guard for the Boston
Police Department for 30 years, Anna
also taught evening knitting classes
at Girls Latin for many years. Loving
daughter of John and Cecilia MacDonald. Mother of Michael E. and his wife
Paula (George) of Canton, MA, Edward
T. and his wife Nancy (Kuzmich) Burns
of South Boston, John A. (Jackie) and
wife Mary (MacVarish) Burns of South
Boston. Sister of the late Eleanor (Ellie)
MacDonald and the late Marie Lynch
and her husband William of Quincy.
Loving Nana of Sean and wife Colleen,
Macklin, Shane, Chelsea, E.J., Abigail
and Brooke Burns. Loving Great Grandmother to Kaleigh, Stephen and Nolan
Burns. Aunt of the late John (Macca)
MacDonald. Also survived by nieces,
Jeannette and Cathy Lynch and their
families of Weymouth. Visitation in the
Wm. F. Spencer Funeral Home, 575 E.
Broadway, (at Hst.) SOUTH BOSTON
on Wednesday from 10 AM to 12 PM.
Funeral liturgy at 12 PM. Relatives and
Friends kindly invited. Donations may
be made in Anna?s memory to VNA
Care Network of South Shore, 30 Reservoir Pk. Rockland, MA. 02370.
www.spencerfuneralservice.com
Passed away at his home in
Boston on December 24,
2017 at the age of
70. Stephen is survived by his loving
wife, Taryn, and his two children,
Stephen, Jr. and Juliet. Stephen was
born in Waterbury, Connecticut on
August 13, 1947. He was raised in
Waukesha, Wisconsin, and attended
Lawrence University in Appleton,
Wisconsin, where he received a
Bachelor of Arts with distinction in
1969. He then graduated from Boston
College Law School, magna cum laude,
and Editor of the Law Review in 1976.
Stephen also served in the Air Force as
Captain and Special Agent for the Air
Force Office of Special Investigations
from 1969-1973. Stephen became an
attorney and resident of Boston in
1976. His career in real estate and
finance law spanned over 40 years. He
was associated with several prestigious
law firms during his career, including
Bingham Dana (now Bingham
McCutchen), Eckert Seamans Cherin &
Mellot, Foley & Lardner, and Greenberg
Traurig, where he was Founding
Partner of the Boston office. He was
privileged to have worked on several
high profile projects including the New
Boston Garden (now TD Garden) and
Brighton Landing (the New Balance
headquarters). Stephen enjoyed the
outdoors and spent his early summers
at the family farm, Sunrise Farm, in
Wayne, Maine. He especially enjoyed
fly fishing and annually climbed Mount
Katahdin. He was an avid reader, fond
of classical music, and enjoyed singing
in choral groups. His biggest joy came
from spending time with his family,
particularly attending his children?s
many sports events. He was very proud
of them and was their biggest
cheerleader. A Memorial Service will be
held at Park Street Church, 1 Park
Street, Boston, MA on Saturday,
January 6th at 1:00 PM. In lieu of
flowers, memorial donations may be
made to The American Heart
Association, P.O. Box 417005, Boston,
MA 02241. For online condolences and/
or directions, please visit:
www.bostonharborsidehome.com.
Announcements
Funeral Services
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800-439-3690 ? 617-876-9110
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583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
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1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
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Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
PIPEFITTERS LOCAL 537
Serving Greater Boston
We regret to announce the death
of Brother James Patrick King,
Life Member. Visiting hours at
the Badger Funeral Home, 347
King St, Littleton, MA, Thursday
January 4, 2018 from 4-8 p.m.
Brian P. Kelly, Bus. Mgr./FST
John F. McMasters Jr. President
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
Express your sympathy
View The Boston Globe?s complete list of death notices
and sign the guestbook at boston.com/obituaries.
OUT OF STATE
WATERTOWN
O?CONNELL, Lisa A.
TSAIRIS, Mary
FLORIDA
MUNROE, Kim M.
SALTZMAN, Mary (Perlman)
WENHAM
TSAIRIS, Mary
WEST ROXBURY
CHENELL, Marion B. (Lindsay)
MORAHAN, Deborah C. (O?Connor)
MUNROE, Kim M.
WESTWOOD
CHENELL, Marion B. (Lindsay)
REED, Gloria J. (Panaioli)
SERRATORE, Tommaso
SHARON
STANISLAUS, Herman
WEYMOUTH
MUNROE, Kim M.
SOUTH BOSTON
BURNS, Anna M.
MARTIN, Mildred L. (Joyce)
WILMINGTON
OLIVITO, John S.
STONEHAM
CONSERVA, Marie (Spadafora)
LEYDON, Daniel T.
TAGARIELLO, Lorraine E.
(Privitero)
WINCHESTER
WEISSBLUM, Herbert
TOPSFIELD
MacDONALD, Nathaniel A., MD
WORCESTER
HARDY, Ellen V.
WAKEFIELD
MILLSTONE, Shelia (Swalnick)
WALPOLE
McNAMARA, Edmund L. Jr.
SERRATORE, Tommaso
WINTHROP
ALBANO, Ann A. (Ricci)
DiFRONZO, Josephine
MAINE
NAWFEL, Jamila H.
VITO, Anthony
NEW HAMPSHIRE
COX, Edith
MILLSTONE, Shelia (Swalnick)
OLIVITO, John S.
NEW YORK
SALTZMAN, Mary (Perlman)
NORTH CAROLINA
VITO, Anthony
RHODE ISLAND
CANNING, Brenton W.
WASHINGTON
WEISSBLUM, Herbert
OUT OF COUNTRY
SENEGAL
LOUD, Robert Livingston
YARMOUTH
CITINO, Michael A.
WALTHAM
CANNING, Brenton W.
CANNING, Brenton W.
Of Waltham passed away
at the age of 98 at Meadow
Green Rehabilitation and
Nursing Center on Monday, Jan. 1,
2018. He was born on December 6,
1919 in Cape D?or, Nova Scotia, the son
of the late Hubert and Carrie (Field)
Canning. He graduated from Belmont
High School and Bryant and Stratton
Business School. He served honorably in the United States Navy during
World War II. He was employed by
DuPont and for many years by Canning
Brothers, Inc. Plasterers. Brenton was
predeceased by his loving wife, Iris A.
Canning, whom he married on June
21, 1941, and they shared 72 wonderful years until her death on August
17, 2013. He was also predeceased
by his son, James E. Canning, his
brother, Kenneth Canning, and his
sister, Shirley McGowan. Brenton was
a member of the Belmont-Watertown
United Methodist Church, the Retired
Men?s Club, and a Past Master of over
fifty years of the Belmont Masonic
Lodge. He was also a member of the
Watertown Yacht Club for many years
and thoroughly enjoyed fishing off his
boat in Boston Harbor and in Maine.
Brenton is survived by two sons,
Donald B. Canning and his wife, Fayth
of Waltham, and Brian A. Canning
and his wife, Maura of Richmond, RI,
and a daughter-in-law, Lynn Canning
of Biddeford, ME; his grandchildren,
Sheryl (Sherry) Ruiz and her husband,
Kenneth of Waltham, Colleen Concepcion of Biddeford, ME, Natalie Moulton
and her husband, Shawn of Florida,
Linda Smith and her husband, Tyler of
Foxborough, Alicia Canning and her
husband James Mark, and Breanna
Canning of Providence, RI, and Conor
Canning of Richmond, RI; his nine
great-grandchildren, Nicolas Canning,
Ashley Ruis, Venessa Vilar, Justin Ruiz,
Corbin Concepcion, Devin Moulton,
Kyle Smith, Jessica Ruiz, King Mark
and two nephews. Family and friends
will honor and remember Brenton?s life
by gathering for visitation at Brown &
Hickey Funeral Home, 36 Trapelo Rd.,
BELMONT, on Wednesday Jan 3, 2018
from 10:00 ? 12:00 noon. Followed by a
funeral service at 12:00 noon. Relatives
and friends invited. Interment Belmont
Cemetery, Belmont. On line guest book
at www.brownandhickey.com
CHENELL, Marion B.
(Lindsay)
Of West Roxbury, December 31, 2017.
Beloved wife of the late Herbert L.
Chenell. Devoted mother of Herbert L.
Chenell of West Roxbury and David E.
Chenell of Kittery, ME. A visitation will
be held at the George F. Doherty & Sons
Wilson-Cannon Funeral Home, 456
High St., DEDHAM, on Friday, January
5th from 11-1pm. Followed by a Funeral Service in the Funeral Home at 1pm.
Relatives and friends kindly invited.
Interment Gardens of Gethsemane
Cemetery, West Roxbury. For directions
and guestbook gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781 326 0500
CITINO, Michael A.
Of Belmont, December 31.
Beloved husband of the late
Terpsie (Tagarelis) Citino.
Loving father of Donna Citino, Michael
Citino both of Belmont and David
Citino of South Yarmouth. Brother of
Elizabeth, Orlando and his wife June,
Anne Cucchi and her husband Tony,
Frances Sullivan and her husband
John and the late Vito, Camille Fratto,
Grace Colosimo, Ralph, Victor, Mary
Shell. Brother in law of the late Ted,
Bill, George and Erasmia Tagarelis.
Also survived by his beloved nieces and
nephews. Funeral from The DeVito
Funeral Home, 761 Mt. Auburn St.,
WATERTOWN, Thursday morning at
8:00 followed by a funeral mass at 9:00
in The Sacred Heart Church, Watertown. Interment to follow Cambridge
Cemetery. Visiting at the funeral home
on Wednesday 3 to 7pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Mike?s
memory to: Sacred Herat Church,
770 Mt. Auburn St., Watertown, MA
02472, Northeast Animal Shelter 347
Highland Avenue, Salem, MA 01970 or
Home for Little Wanderers, 10 Guest
St., Boston, MA 02135
CONSERVA, Marie
(Spadafora)
Of Stoneham, Dec. 31, 2017, at home
surrounded by her loving family. Beloved wife of the late William ?Pumpsy?
Conserva. Visitation on Thursday, Jan.
4th, 4-8pm at A.J.Spadafora Funeral
Home, MALDEN. Funeral Friday 10am
at St. Patrick Church, Stoneham. Complete notice to appear on Wednesday,
January 3, 2018.
Spadafora Funeral Home
www.spadaforafuneral.com
781-324-8680
COX, Edith ?Lea?
U.S. Navy Veteran
Of Marshfield, formerly
of Norwell and Haverhill,
Dec. 29. Beloved wife of 56
years to Charles Cox Sr. of Marshfield,
loving mother of, Elizabeth Ryan and
her husband Robert of Canton, LoriAnne Valianti and her husband John
of Marshfield, Julianna Hale and her
husband Alan of Atkinson, NH, and
the late Charles S. Cox, Jr.. Cherished
mother- in-law to Hillary Blocker of
Canton, devoted grandmother of 9 and
aunt and cousin to many. Relatives
and friends are respectfully invited to
attend her calling hours on Thursday,
Jan. 4 from 4-8 P.M. at the H.L. Farmer
and Sons Bradford Funeral Home, 210
South Main St. (Rt. 125), BRADFORD.
Her Funeral Service will be Friday, Jan.
5, at 11 A.M. at the Atkinson Congregational Church, 101 Main St. Atkinson,
NH. Interment will follow at Linwood
Cemetery, Haverhill. In lieu of flowers,
contributions in her memory can be
made to St. Jude Children?s Research
Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis
TN 38105 or CAALM, P.O. Box 158
Carmichael, CA 95609. To view her
complete obituary, obtain directions,
share a memory or for more information, please visit
www.farmerfuneralhomes.com
H.L. Farmer & Sons Funeral Homes
Haverhill & Bradford
978-372-9311
Paying
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important
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and on
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your funeral director, visit
boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500. Now
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To submit an obituary
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about a news obituary,
please call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices
and obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
DiFRONZO, Josephine
Lovingly
Remembered
Of East Boston, peacefully surrounded
by her loving family in her home
on Dec. 31st. Loving sister of Viola
D?Annunzio and late husband Joseph of
N.J., Anne DiStefano and husband Robert of Revere, and the late Connie Botticelli and late husband Nicholas, Nicholas DiFronzo and surviving spouse
Gloria of Winthrop, the late Florence
Brown and her surviving Harold, the
late Michael ?Sonny? DiFronzo and Alfred DiFronzo. In absence of Josephine
having children of her own, her nieces
and nephews were her surrogate children and by loving them as her children
she had a special bond with each one,
leaving many nieces, nephews, great
and grand nieces and nephews and
great great nieces and nephews and
will be missed in a special way by each
one of them. Family and friends will
honor Josephine?s life by gathering in
the Ruggiero Family Memorial Home,
971 Saratoga St. (Orient Heights), EAST
BOSTON on Thursday, Jan. 4th from
5-8 and again on Friday morning at
8:30, before leaving in procession to St.
Joseph St. Lazarus Church, East Boston
for a funeral mass in celebration of her
life at 10AM. In honoring Josephine?s
life, in lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to St. Jude
Children?s Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas
Pl, Memphis, TN 38105. Service will
conclude with Josephine being laid to
rest in Holy Cross Cemetery. Funeral
home is handicapped accessible, children?s lounge available, courtesy valet
parking front entrance of funeral home.
For complimentary transportation to
funeral home, please call 617-569-0990.
Ample off street parking with attendant
in several of our parking lots. For more
info, please visit www.ruggieromh.com
East Boston 617-569-0990
DONOVAN, Augustine W.
?Gus?
Of Medford, December 31st. Visiting
hours will be held at the Breslin Funeral Home, 610 Pleasant St., MALDEN
on Wednesday, January 3rd from 4-8
PM. Complete notice to appear on
Wednesday, January 3, 2018.
FITZGERALD, Robert G., Jr.
Of Milton & Falmouth, December 30,
2017.
Beloved husband of Carolyn (Kealey)
FitzGerald of Milton. Loving father
of Alexandra FitzGerald and Brianne
FitzGerald, also of Milton. Cherished
son of Marjorie F. (Gill) FitzGerald and
the late Robert G. FitzGerald, Sr. of
Milton. Bob is also survived by his five
siblings, Jeanne FitzGerald of Canton,
Maureen Pacella of Dedham, Patricia
Deware of Needham, Richard FitzGerald of Milton, and John FitzGerald of
Quincy, and a host of devoted nieces
and nephews.
Visiting hours at the Dolan Funeral
Home, 460 Granite Avenue, MILTON
on Wednesday, January 3rd from 4
p.m. to 7 p.m. A Mass of Christian
Burial in celebration of Bob?s life and
love, will be held on Thursday, January
4th at Saint Agatha Church, Milton at
10:30 a.m. Private interment.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in Bob?s honor may be made to
the Appendix Cancer Pseudomyxoma
Peritonei Research Foundation (acpmp.
org/donate).
For further information & directions,
dolanfuneral.com.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B7
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
KIRBY, Robert John ?Bob?
HARDY, Ellen V.
Formerly of Canton, MA, passed away
peacefully at the Worcester Health
Center on December 31, 2017 at the
age of 89. Her family was at her side
through the last days of her life and will
miss her dearly. The wife of Herbert N.
Hardy who predeceased Ellen, and the
loving mother of William Hardy, Brian
Hardy, and Judith Leavey, she is also
survived by eight grandchildren and
five great grandchildren. Ellen?s family
deeply appreciates the loving care
received by the staff of the Worcester
Health Center where she spent the last
ten years of her life and to the Beacon
Hospice team, both of whom made her
last days very comfortable. Relatives
and friends are invited to visiting hours
in the Eaton & Mackay Funeral Home,
465 Centre St., NEWTON CORNER, on
Wed., Jan 3 from 10- 11 AM, followed
by a Funeral Service in the Newton
Cemetery Chapel, 791 Walnut St.,
Newton Centre at 11:30 AM. In lieu of
flowers, donations can be made in her
memory to the Beacon Hospice. For directions or to share a memory of Ellen,
please visit www.eatonandmackay.com
Eaton & Mackay Funeral Home
Newton Corner 617-244-2034
KEEGAN, Jacqueline Lee
?Jackie?
70, of Newburyport, formerly of
Marblehead and Beverly, passed away
peacefully at High Pointe House, Merrimack Valley Hospice, in Haverhill, on
December 27, 2017. Bob was born on
June 22, 1947 in Winthrop to William
and Mary (Harkins) Kirby. He was
predeceased by his parents and three
siblings. He is survived by his beloved
partner of 35 years, Carol L. (McSheehy) Harris, her sons, Roger Guy and
Justin Harris, and Justin?s spouse, Lisa
Phillips. He also leaves behind his devoted Sato dog, Charlie, and his granddog, Lloyd. Friends and family are
invited to call from 4?8 p.m. on Friday,
Jan. 5, 2018, at Twomey, LeBlanc, &
Conte Funeral Home, 193 High Street,
NEWBURYPORT, MA 01950. In lieu
of flowers, memorial donations may
be made to The Sato Project (www.thesatoproject.org/donate). Private burial
service will be held at a later date.
LEYDON, Daniel T.
Age 24, of Dedham, suddenly, December 30, 2017. Loving mother of Christopher Negussie and Amari Kieran Powell. Beloved daughter of Francis Keegan
of Charlestown and Helen Rotondi of
Dedham. Granddaughter of Evelyn
Mae Keegan of Plainville, and the late
Gus Keegan and Ida and Bob Rotondi.
Sister of Joanne Byrne of Hyde Park,
Samantha Keegan of Canton, and Dana
Marie Phelan of Norwood, and the
late Joseph Rotondi. Also survived by
several nieces and nephews. A Funeral
Mass will be held in St. Mary?s Church,
Dedham on Friday, January 5th at 9 am
(Please go directly to church). Relatives
& friends kindly invited. Interment
Brookdale Cemetery, Dedham. For
online guestbook: gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
KENNEDY, James W.
Daniel Thomas Leydon,
79, of Stoneham, beloved
husband of the late Anne
(Hanright) Leydon, passed away on Saturday, December 30, 2017 surrounded
by his family. He is survived by his
children and their families: Daniel
S. Leydon and his wife Nora of New
Jersey, and their children Courtney,
Shawn and Shannon, Michael J. Leydon
and his wife Jane of Tewksbury and
their children Maryn and Hannah and
Tricia Halpin and her husband Doug of
Stoneham and their children Shawn,
Jonathan, Michael and Jessica. Funeral
services will be held from the Barile
Family Funeral Home, 482 Main St. (Rt
28) STONEHAM, on Thursday at 9am,
followed by a Funeral Mass celebrating Daniel?s Eternal Life at St. Patrick?s
Church, 71 Central St., Stoneham at
10am. Family and friends are cordially
invited to gather and share memories at
the funeral home on Wednesday from 4
to 8pm. Parking attendants and elevator are available. Memorial donations
may be made in Daniel?s Memory to
the Wounded Warrior Project at www.
woundedwarriorproject.org. For information, directions and condolences
please visit www.barilefuneral.com.
And for further information, please
visit www.facebook.com/BarileFamily
FuneralHome.
Barile Family Funeral Home
Celebrating Life ~ Sharing Memories
781.438.2280
Talk
Have the
U.S. Navy Veteran
Of Brighton, December 30,
2017. Beloved husband
of the late Barbara Ann
(O?Reilly) Kennedy. Devoted father of
Donald Kennedy, Steven Kennedy and
his wife Susan all of Saugus. Loving
grandfather of Paige and Zachary Kennedy. Brother of Dorothea Harmon.
Also survived by several nieces and
nephews. Funeral from the Lehman,
Reen & McNamara Funeral Home, 63
Chestnut Hill Ave. (nr. Brighton Courthouse) BRIGHTON Thursday Jan. 4th
at 9:30 am. Followed by a Funeral Mass
in St. Columbkille Church, 321 Market
St, Brighton at 10:30. Relatives and
friends are kindly invited to attend. Visiting Hours Wednesday, Jan. 3rd from
4-8 pm. Interment Evergreen Cemetery, Brighton. Late member of the
VFW Post 669 Allston, Brighton Lodge
of Elks #2199 and Brighton Council K
of C #121. Navy Veteran Vietnam. In
lieu of flowers, donations in memory of
Jim may be made to Wounded Warriors
Project, PO Box, Topeka, KS 66675.
Funeral Home Handicapped Accessible.
For directions and guest book please
visit www.lehmanreen.com
of a
Lifetime
SM
You talk about many
things with your loved ones:
from day-to-day details to
big events. Sharing stories
with those who matter most
isn?t just important today;
it will be especially signi?cant
when it?s time to honor and
commemorate your lives.
LOUD, Robert Livingston
Robert Livingston Loud, 84, of Lincoln,
died of congestive heart failure on
December 28, 2017, peacefully at home
surrounded by his family. Rob was the
son of John and Mary Loud. He was
afflicted with tuberculosis at the age
of 3, resulting in numerous orthopedic surgeries over the years, but he
surmounted these challenges with a
fierce resolve to be active and enjoy life.
His radiant smile, curiosity and joie de
vivre were infectious. He was usually
the first to shout ?bravo? at the end of
a great performance and no one forgot
Rob?s strong handshake.
Rob graduated from Weston High
School in 1952 and from Harvard College in 1956, where singing with the
Harvard Glee Club was a highlight of
his college years. As an adult he sang
with the Cantata Singers and most
recently, with the Harvard-Radcliffe
Chorus, never losing his magnificent
tenor voice. His charismatic leadership
brought joy to all when he led carol
parties and sing-alongs. After obtaining
a MAT degree in music education, Rob
taught music at the Hawken School
in Cleveland, in the Sudbury public
schools and at Cambridge Friends
School where he met his bride, Gwyneth Elkinton. They became engaged
after just three weeks and were married
at Westtown School outside Philadelphia in 1966. In 1969 Rob pursued
a masters in library science at the
University of Denver. He worked at the
Concord Public Library and Hudson
Public Library before spending twenty
years as the librarian at St. Elizabeth?s
School of Nursing in Brighton.
Rob adored his family and enjoyed
singing for and with his daughters,
woodworking, photography, beekeeping, gardening, birding, raising
chickens, camping, and travel. Rob
loved regularly attending the Boston
Symphony with Gwyn.
Rob treasured Lincoln, attended
Town Meeting faithfully and enjoyed reunions of his 8th grade classmates. He
was a thespian with the Lincoln Players
and active on various town committees
such as the Cultural Council, Historical
Society, Commission on Disabilities and
with Codman Community Farms.
Rob is survived by his beloved wife
of 51 years and two daughters, Miranda
Loud of Watertown and Rebecca Zug
of Wilmington, DE, his son-in-law,
James Zug, two grandsons, Livingston
and Collier Zug, his sister, Jean Mallary
of Hanover, NH, and many nephews,
nieces, and cousins.
A memorial service will be held at
the First Parish Church, 4 Bedford Rd.,
Lincoln, MA on January 21 at 2 pm,
jointly led by Wellesley Friends Meeting, with reception to follow. In lieu of
flowers, contributions may be sent to
Friends of the Lincoln Council on Aging, P.O. Box 143, Lincoln, MA 01773,
Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, 301 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02115-4511,
or Westtown School, 975 Westtown
Road, West Chester, PA 19382.
MacDONALD, Nathaniel A.,
MD
Meaningful memorialization
starts when loved ones talk
about what matters most:
memories made, lessons
learned and how they hope
to be remembered.
Download a free brochure
and Have the Talk of a
Lifetime today. It can make
the difference of a lifetime.
talkofali fetime.org
Lehman Reen McNamara
617 782 1000 Brighton
Every life is a story
worth sharing
Share theirs in The Boston Globe
The Boston Globe?s new Featured Life offering
lets you honor your loved one with a professionally
written narrative about their life and achievements.
MARTIN, Mildred L. ?Millie?
(Joyce)
MORAHAN, Deborah C.
(O?Connor)
72, of Brockton, formerly of South Boston, passed away December 30 2017.
Beloved wife of the late Richard ?Richie?
Martin. Cherished daughter of Mildred
L. and the late John Joyce. Devoted
mother of Erin Marie Coleman, her
husband Russell, and Anthony Francis
Martin. Loving grandmother of Javar.
Dear sister of Alice and John Joyce, and
the late Barbara Baughman, and James
Joyce. Sister-in-law of Bill Baughman.
Beloved aunt of Mark Swales, Barbie
Pupalaikis, and Kevin Baughman. Also
survived by many loving relatives and
friends, especially her extended work
family at the Boston Harbor Hotel.
Visiting hours in The O?Brien Funeral
Home, 146 Dorchester St., SOUTH
BOSTON, on Wednesday from 5-8PM.
Prayer service to follow at 8:00PM.
Relatives and friends are invited to attend. Interment will be private.
Of West Roxbury, December 31, 2017.
Beloved wife of Michael N. Morahan.
Visiting hours Thursday 4-8 PM. Complete notice to appear on Wednesday,
January 3, 2018.
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
Gormleyfuneral.com
MORSE, John F., III
McNAMARA, Edmund L.
?Ned? Jr.
Of South Walpole, December 30, 2017,
age 57. Beloved husband of Kathleen
M. (Lynch) McNamara. Arrangements
by James H. Delaney & Son Funeral
Home, Walpole. Complete notice to appear on Wednesday, January 3, 2018.
MILLS, Kenneth A.
Of Chelmsford, formerly of Lexington,
December 31, 2017. Beloved husband
of Beverly A. (Cuzzi) Mills. Loving father of Kenneth A. Mills Jr. of Bedford,
Stephanie Mills of Chelmsford, and
Derek S. Mills of Billerica. Brother of
Peter Mills of Naples, FL, and the late
Robert Mills. Ken is also survived by 5
grandchildren: Arianna, Kristen, Anna,
Dmitri, and Lily. A private graveside
service will be held at Westview
Cemetery, Lexington. In lieu of flowers,
donations in his memory may be made
to the Wounded Warrior Project, P.O.
Box 758516, Topeka, KS 66675 or to
St. Jude Children?s Research Hospital,
262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis,
TN 38105.
Beloved husband of Sonya
Dehon Driscoll of Plymouth
Meeting, PA and the late
Virginia Payne Morse of Verona, NJ.
John ?Jack? F. Morse passed away on
December 30, 2017 in Boston, MA. A
graduate of The Governor?s Academy,
Byfield, MA and Brown University,
Providence, RI, he was a lieutenant
in the USNR. He was the Founder,
President and CEO of Global Access
Telecommunications and worked in the
broadcast and satellite industries for
30 years before retiring. He also served
as a Flag Officer in the Quissett Yacht
Club, Falmouth, MA and on several
boards of directors within the satellite
industry. He is survived by his two
children Elizabeth S. Morse of Boston
and John C. Morse of Phuket, Thailand.
Burial will be private. Services will be
held at Saint Cecilia Parish, Boston, MA
on January 5 at 11AM followed by a
reception. In lieu of flowers, donations in his late wife?s memory may
be made to The Boston Home, 2049
Dorchester Avenue, Boston, MA 02124.
For online guestbook, please visit
www.deefuneralhome.com.
Dee Funeral Home of Concord
978-369-2030
Caring for families since 1868
Lexington 781-862-1800
www.douglassfh.com
MILLSTONE, Shelia
(Swalnick)
MUNROE, Kim M.
Of Dorchester, formerly of Roslindale,
December 28, 2017. Beloved sister of
William of Florida and Luanne Kasper
of East Weymouth. Dear companion
of Larry Casilli of Dorchester. Also survived by several nieces, nephews and
great nieces and nephews. Funeral from
the William J. Gormley Funeral Home,
2055 Centre St., WEST ROXBURY, on
Thursday, January 4th at 9am followed
by a Funeral Mass in the Sacred Heart
Church, Roslindale at 10 o?clock. Visiting hours Wednesday 4pm - 8pm. Relatives and friends respectfully invited.
Interment private.
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
gormleyfuneral.com
Of Revere, on January 1st, 2018.
Beloved wife of Michael Millstone. Devoted & loving mother of Ira Millstone
& his wife Kelly of Pelham, NH, Jay
Millstone & his wife Dawn of Wakefield.
Daughter of the late Samuel & Jeanette
(Venooker) Swalnick. Loving grandmother of Samuel, Patrick, Amelia
& Connor & beloved sister-in-law of
Phyllis, Anne & Tina. Dear sister of the
late Lewis Swalnick. Funeral services
will be held at Torf Funeral Chapel,
151 Washington Avenue, CHELSEA,
on Wednesday, January 3rd at 12PM.
Interment in New Tifereth Israel of
Everett Cemetery, Everett. Shiva will be
held at the home of Anne & Les Mitchell of Peabody following burial until 7
PM & continue Thursday 1PM-5PM.
In lieu of flowers donations in Sheila?s
memory may be made to The Chelsea
Jewish Nursing Home, 17 Lafayette
Ave., Chelsea, MA 02150. Pease visit
www.torffuneralservice.com for guest
book & directions.
NAWFEL, Jamila H.
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92, of Waterville, passed away unexpectedly at her residence on December
29, 2017. She was born in Natick, MA
on February 20, 1925, daughter of
John A. and Rose J. (Homsy) Haddad.
Jamila was educated in Natick schools,
graduating from Natick High School in
1942. As a young girl growing up with
her brothers and sisters, Jamila helped
on the family farm, especially taking
care of their vegetable gardens and
many fruit trees. This became her passion and continued throughout her life.
She loved to pick her own fruits and
vegetables, when in season, and would
insist on going to local farms rather
than shopping in grocery stores.
As a young woman, Jamila worked in
her father?s garment factory in Boston,
as a fore-lady running the day-to-day
operations of the business. Jamila
was also very involved in her church,
Saint John of Damascus in Boston,
MA, where she was a member of the
Syrian Orthodox Youth Organization
(SOYO). She played the lead in many
Arabic musicals in her church, and
could recite some of her verses until the
present day.
She met her husband Dr. Elias Richard Nawfel in Boston, and married in
1957. They later moved and settled in
Waterville, ME, and raised their family.
Jamila worked as the office manager
in her husband?s dental practice for
25 years. One of the most important
aspects of her life was maintaining her
Arabic heritage with her family. She
demonstrated this through cooking
many traditional dishes, as well as
baking many Arabic sweets up until the
present. She loved the Arabic language
and passed on this love to future
generations by insisting on maintaining
these traditions.
She will be remembered for her sense
of humor, her abundant energy, and her
beautiful smile. This radiant personality
allowed her to easily interact with any
generation, especially older, non-native
family members.
Jamila was predeceased by her
husband, Dr. Elias Richard Nawfel,
her parents, her siblings George J. and
his wife Rachel Haddad, Lillian and
her husband Antoon Khouri, Russell J.
Haddad, and Gloria and her husband
Frederick Matook.
Jamila is survived by three loving
children; RoseMarie (Nawfel) Stamboulides and her husband Nico of Ashland,
MA; Richard D. Nawfel of Waltham,
MA; and Elias J Nawfel and his wife
Eleni of Waterville, ME; her two brothers, Mitchell J. Haddad and his wife
Marion of Natick, MA; Alfred J. Haddad
and his wife Marjorie of Arlington, MA;
and a sister-in-law Arlene Haddad of
Natick, MA. She is also survived by her
four grandchildren, Elias G. Nawfel,
John C. Nawfel, Christopher C.B.
Nawfel, and Maria E. Nawfel; as well as
several nieces, nephews, and cousins.
Visiting hours will be held from 3 to
7 PM on Sunday, January 7, 2018 at the
First Congregational Church on 7 Eustis Parkway in Waterville, ME. A funeral
service will be held at 10 AM Monday,
January 8, 2018 at the First Congregational Church with Archpriest John K.
Teebagy presiding. Interment will be
in the spring, date to be determined, in
Pine Grove Cemetery, Waterville, ME.
Donations, in Jamila?s memory, may
be made to the Church of St. John of
Damascus, 300 West Street, Dedham,
MA 02026 or St. Jude Children?s
Research Hospital, PO Box 1893, Memphis, TN 38101-9950.
Arrangements are under the direction of the Veilleux Funeral Home, 8
Elm St., WATERVILLE, ME.
www.veilleuxfuneralhome.com.
O?CONNELL, Lisa A.
Of Danvers, age 95, December 20, 2017. Beloved
husband of the late Eunice
(King) Macdonald. Served as a Captain
in the United States Air Force Medical
Corps. A compassionate and caring
community leader Nathaniel, had a
private practice in Internal Medicine
in Danvers for 35 years and was Chief
of Staff at Hunt Memorial Hospital
from 1959 to 1972. Loving father and
grandfather of Deborah (Harry) Ritchie,
Douglas (Cheryl), & their children Katie
(Greg) Salois, Scott (Kelly), Rebecca
(Ryan) Murphy, James (Ashley) & Kellie. Barbara (Barry) Crommett & their
children Peter (Elizabeth), Matthew
(Sophie), & Marisa (Luke) Stevens.
Natalie (William) Whelan & their children, Amanda (Benjamin) Farrer, Kevin
& Jack. He also leaves behind seven
great grandchildren: Austin, Grady,
Shea, Nathaniel, Marshall, William, &
Madeleine, his sister-in-law Jane King,
as well as nieces & nephews. He was
also predeceased by a granddaughter Courtney. Relatives & friends are
invited to visiting hours which will be
held in the Peterson-O?Donnell Funeral
Home, 167 Maple St., (rte. 62) DANVERS, on Thursday, January 4th from
4-7pm. All other services are private. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made
in Nathaniel?s memory to Care Dimensions c/o Kaplan House, 75 Sylvan St.,
Danvers, MA 01923 or the American
Heart Association, PO Box 417005,
Boston, MA 02241-7005.
For more details, contact Boston
Globe Classifieds at 617-929-1500
or deathnotices@globe.com.
www.odonnellfuneralservice.com
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Of Watertown, MA, formerly of Quincy
and Boston, MA, passed away surrounded by her loving family on Dec.
28, 2017. Beloved daughter of the late
Harold and Joan M. (Saba) O?Connell.
Devoted sister of Richard J. O?Connell.
Loving aunt of Sara O?Connell. Sister in
law of Nancy J. St. Michel. Niece of Dr.
Norma Saba Corey, who is also Lisa?s
Godmother, George Saba and his wife
LInda Fox, and the late Donald and Diane Stewart. Cousin of Jennifer Saba,
Douglas Corey, Donald, Denise and
Natasha Steward. Also survived by her
best friend and companion, Abbie The
Wonder Dog, and many relatives and
dear friends. Lisa was known for her
sense of humor and for the compassion
and care that she extended both professionally and personally. Visiting hours
will be held on Wed., Jan. 3, 2018, at
the Faggas Funeral Home, 551 Mt.
Auburn St., WATERTOWN, MA from
5PM to 8PM. Relatives and friends
kindly invited to attend. Burial will be
private. For online guestbook, please
visit: www.Faggas.com
Faggas Funeral Home
800-222-2586
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OLIVITO, John S.
ROSENBERG, June (White)
Of Medford, Dec. 29. Devoted father of John Olivito
and his wife Carol of Lynn,
and Joanne Fisher and her husband
Alan of Wilmington. Loving grandfather of Kara and Kelsey Olivito of Lynn,
Allison Frazier and her husband Dylan
of Melrose, Adrienne Byrne and her
husband Peter of Windham, NH, and
Amy Fisher of Wilmington. Loving
great grandfather of Jude Frazier. Also
survived by his sister Rose Pareti and
her son Mark, both of Medford. A
funeral service will be conducted in the
Dello Russo Funeral Home, 306 Main
St., MEDFORD Thursday, Jan. 4 at 10
AM. Relatives and friends are
respectfully invited to attend and may
visit with the family from 9-10 AM.
Services will conclude with burial at
Oak Grove Cemetery, Medford. In lieu
of flowers, contributions may be sent,
in John?s name, to the Alzheimer?s Association, 309 Waverly Oaks Rd.,
Waltham, MA 02452. Late U.S. Army
veteran of WW II. To leave a message of
condolence, visit: www.dellorusso.net.
Of Brookline, on Friday, December 29,
2017. Beloved wife of the late Norman
Rosenberg. Loving daughter of the
late Louis & Beatrice White. Wonderful mother of Ruth Rosenberg, Edith
Rosenberg & Robert Gross, and Robert
Rosenberg & Karen Van Kooy. Adored
grandmother of Maia & Derek, Joanna
& Trevor, and Alison & Brendan. Dear
sister of Robert White, David White,
and Marcia Fine. Services at Levine
Chapel, 470 Harvard St., BROOKLINE
on Wednesday, January 3 at 10 AM.
Burial will be at Sharon Memorial Park,
40 Dedham St., Sharon. Memorial
Observance will be at her late residence
following burial until 7 PM, continuing
on Thursday evening from 5-9 PM. In
lieu of flowers, remembrances may be
made to Yiddish Book Center, 1021
West St., Amherst, MA 01002.
www.yiddishbookcenter.org.
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Medford - Woburn - Wilmington
PFEIFFER, Marguerite W.
(Wessels)
Of Peabody, formerly of Tyler, TX, age
84, died Thursday, December 28, 2017,
at Lahey Medical Center, Burlington.
Mrs. Pfeiffer had been employed as
Head Administrative Assistant at
Brookline District Court for 21 years. A
longtime Patron of the Arts, Marguerite
founded the Brooksby Village Classical
Concert Committee in 2001 & was a
member of Kappa Kappa Gamma at
University of Texas for many years.
She was the loving mother of Carol
Messmore & her husband Peter &
her grandson, Peter Messmore, all of
Florida. She was also the mother of
the late Katherine Pfeiffer & Clifford
Pfeiffer. Her services will be held in
Florida. Assisting the family with the
arrangements is the Peterson O?Donnell
Funeral Home, 167 Maple St. (Rte 62),
DANVERS. Expressions of sympathy
may be made in Marguerite?s memory
to Rosie?s Place, 889 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02118 or to Perkins Institute
for the Blind, Perkins Trust, 175 North
Beacon St., Watertown, MA 02472.
www.odonnellfuneralservice.com
REED, Gloria J. (Panaioli)
Of Readville, December 30, 2017.
Beloved wife of the late Franklin Reed.
Devoted mother of Gregory Reed and
his wife Margaret of North Brookfield, MA, and Loriann Poch and her
husband David of Easton, MA. Loving
grandmother of Christopher and his
wife Erin, Joseph and his wife Jillian,
and Destiny. Great grandmother of
Tucker, Chloe, Maia, and Molly. Sister
of Shirley DeBerardinis and her husband Ken of Readville. Also survived
by many nieces and nephews. Gloria?s
interests were bingo, knitting, lottery,
card games, cooking, but most of all
taking care of her family and friends.
Funeral from the George F. Doherty &
Sons Wilson-Cannon Funeral Home,
456 High St., DEDHAM on Thursday,
Jan. 4th at 9 am followed by a Funeral
Mass in St. Anne?s Church, Readville
at 10 am. Relatives and friends kindly
invited. Visiting hours Wednesday, Jan.
3rd. from 4-8 pm. Interment Fairview
Cemetery, Hyde Park. For directions &
guestbook: gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781 326 0500
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Boston Globe.
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director for details.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
SALTZMAN, Mary (Perlman)
Of Plainview, NY, and Margate, FL,
passed away on December 31, 2017.
Beloved wife of the late Benjamin
Saltzman. Devoted mother of David
Saltzman and his wife Jill, and Rena
Wohl and her husband Dr. Laurence
Wohl. Proud grandmother of Michael
?Mickey? Saltzman, and Jake Saltzman.
Dear aunt of Robin Lowe and the late
Jeffrey Lowe. Funeral services will be
held at Stanetsky Memorial Chapel, 475
Washington Street, CANTON, MA on
Wednesday, January 3, 2018 at 2 pm.
In lieu of flowers, donations in Mary?s
memory may be made to Hebrew
Seniorlife, c/o Hebrew Rehabilitation
Center, 1200 Centre Street, Roslindale,
MA 02131.
SERRATORE, Tommaso
SWEENEY, Denis P.
THOMPSON, Evelyn E.
TSAIRIS, Mary
Of Norwood, passed away on January
1, 2018 at the age 92. Beloved Husband
of the late Maria (Serratore) Serratore.
Devoted and loving Father of Antonio,
Giovanna and Connie, all of Norwood.
Cherished Grandfather of 7 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Also
survived by 2 Brothers and 3 Sisters.
Son of the late Antonio and Concetta
(Serratore) Serratore. Funeral from
the Kraw-Kornack Funeral Home the
Kraw-Kornack Funeral Home, 1248
Washington St., NORWOOD, Thursday
January 4, 2018 at 8am followed by a
funeral Mass at 9am in St. Catherine of
Siena Church, Norwood. Visiting hours
will be held on Wednesday, January
3, 2018 from 4-7pm. Burial will be at
Highland Cemetery, Norwood.
73, of Pembroke, formerly
of Dorchester, died on
December 30, 2017 at the
Massachusetts General Hospital after a
short but courageous battle with lung
cancer. Born on April 13, 1944 in Boston, he was the son of the late John and
Mary ?Molly? Sweeney. Denis worked
for the MBTA Police Department and
after 23 years of service he retired as
Captain in 1992. Later, after 10 years of
service in The Office of Public Safety at
The Massachusetts College of Art, he retired as the Chief of Police. He enjoyed
traveling, reading, photography, going
to the gym, as well as spending time
with family and friends, particularly his
adored grandchildren.
Denis was lovingly devoted to his
wife of 46 years, Patricia (Corbett)
Sweeney, whom he married on November 20, 1971 in Medford. He was the
loving father of John Patrick Sweeney
of Dorchester, Kathleen (Sweeney)
Prince and her husband Edward of
Milton, and Christine (Sweeney) Condon and her husband Kieran of Milton.
Dear brother of Jeremiah Sweeney and
his wife Linda, John Sweeney and his
wife Kathleen, and Maureen (Sweeney)
Leydon and her husband William, all
of Dorchester. Denis is also survived by
his four treasured grandchildren: Jack,
Devin, and Mabelle Prince as well as
Denis Condon. He also leaves behind
several beloved nieces and nephews.
Visiting hours in the Sullivan
Funeral Home, 551 Washington St.,
HANOVER, on Wednesday 4-7 pm.
Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St.
Thecla Church, 145 Washington St,. Rte
53, in Pembroke on Thursday at 10 am.
Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery in
Dorchester to follow. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to the Lung
Cancer Alliance or a charity of your
choice. For directions and to sign Denis?
online guestbook, please visit:
Of Canton, died peacefully in her home
on Christmas Eve at 91 years old. Evelyn was the wife of the late Michael J.
Thompson Jr. who asked her to marry
him on Christmas Eve just 70 years
earlier. Evelyn was born in Norwood,
MA in 1926, graduated from Norwood
High School, met her husband in 1946,
they married in 1948 and settled in
Canton where she became a housewife,
mother of eight children and dedicated
her life tirelessly to her family and
their well-being. She also worked in
the Canton Public School system for
many years. Evelyn was an avid athlete
excelling in swimming, softball, and
bowling. She rarely missed a Pats,
Bruins or Red Sox game. However, her
passion was being a committed wife,
mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. She loved hosting the holidays
and being surrounded by her family.
Her devotion was an inspiration to
all that knew her, truly God?s chosen
servant of all that?s good. She rests in
peace. Evelyn was the loving mother
of Michael Thompson III and wife
Mary of Falmouth, Robin Thompson
of Canton, Kevin Thompson and wife
Esther of Canton, Glenn Thompson and
wife Donna of Cocoa Beach FL, Dale
Thompson and husband Howard Mutz
of San Francisco CA, Gregg Thompson
and wife Susan Orpin of Quincy, Jean
Thompson and wife Lora of Canton,
and Bryan Thompson and wife Scarlett
of Brooksville FL. Loving sister of Gene
Erickson of AL, Faith Soderberg of
Bourne, Donna Bentley of NC, along
with their spouses. Proud grandmother
of 16 grand and 16 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by parents John and
Helen Erickson of Norwood, brother
John Erickson of CA and sister Jeanette
Carr of TN.
Visiting hours in the Pushard
Family Funeral Home, 210 Sherman
St., CANTON, Thursday, January 4th
from 4-8 PM. Relatives and friends are
respectfully invited to attend. A Mass of
Christian burial will be celebrated Friday in St. John the Evangelist Church,
700 Washington St., Canton, at 10:30
AM. Interment Knollwood Memorial
Park. In lieu of flowers donations can
be made in her name to Hessco Elder
Services, 1 Merchant St. #106, Sharon,
MA 02067.
Mary Tsairis, 93, of Peabody, MA, formerly of Belmont, MA, passed away on
December 29, 2017 surrounded by her
family following a brief illness. She was
the beloved wife of the late John Tsairis.
Born August 14, 1924, Mary graduated from South Side High School in
Newark, NJ before working as a
bookkeeper at several Newark businesses. Following her marriage, she
and her husband moved to Boston and
opened the Stuart Manor restaurant,
which they ran for almost thirty years.
She was a longtime member of the
Taxiarchae Greek Orthodox Church
in Watertown, MA and served in the
Greek Orthodox Ladies Philoptochos
Society. Mary was well-loved by all
who knew her and will be remembered
for her kindness, sense of humor and
warm smile.
Mary is survived by her daughter,
Stacey Tsairis Kacoyanis and her
husband, Dr. George P. Kacoyanis,
of Wenham, MA; a granddaughter,
Stephanie Kacoyanis of Belmont, MA; a
grandson, John Kacoyanis and his wife,
Marla, of Somerville, MA; a brother,
Elias Panayote, of East Brunswick, NJ;
a nephew, William Panayote and his
wife, Deborah, of Bridgewater, NJ; and
many nieces and nephews. She was
the daughter of the late Theodore and
Stamatia (Primikiris) Panayote; the
sister of the late George Panayote; and
sister-in-law of the late Anne Panayote.
A Funeral Service will be held at
11am on Wednesday, January 3 at the
Assumption of the Virgin Mary Greek
Orthodox Church, 8 Lafayette Road, Ipswich, MA. Relatives and friends kindly
invited. Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, MA. There will be
no visiting hours. In lieu of flowers,
donations in Mary?s memory may be
made to the Alexia Foundation (www.
alexiafoundation.org/donate) or the
Assumption of the Virgin Mary Greek
Orthodox Church, P.O. Box 6, Ipswich,
MA 01938. Funeral arrangements
are through Campbell Funeral Home.
www.campbellfuneral.com
Kraw-KornackFuneralHome.com
Family Owned and Operated
(781) 762-0482
STANISLAUS, Herman
Stanetsky Memorial Chapels
781-821-4600
www.stanetskycanton.com
SERONICK, Allan
Of Holbrook, on December 31, 2017. Beloved
husband of Bernice (Miller)
Seronick. Loving brother of Muriel
Ellman (Norton), and the late Ben
Seronick. Dear uncle of Sheila Izen,
Felice Trabelsi, Paula, Matthew, and
Larry Ellman, Phyllis Ben Abram, Alvin
Seronick. Graveside service at Koretz
Cemetery, 776 Baker St., West Roxbury,
on Wednesday, January 3, 2018, at
2:00 pm. Following services memorial observance will be at the home
of Norton and Muriel Ellman today
only. Remembrances may be made to
Alzheimer?s Association of MA, 480
Pleasant Street, Watertown, MA 02472
or to The ARC of MA, 217 South St.,
Waltham, MA 02453.
Of Sharon, December 29th. Beloved
husband of Sandra (Lindsay). Father of
Bryan E. Stanislaus and his wife Belinda of Cary, NC and Drew A. Stanislaus
of Mansfield. Grandfather of Bracen
and Reme Stanislaus. Brother of of Edbert, Hugh and Joyce Jones and Agatha
Philbert, all of Trinidad. Relatives and
friends invited to attend a funeral service at the Dockray & Thomas Funeral
Home, 455 Washington St., CANTON
Saturday morning at 11. Visiting hours
prior to the service Saturday morning
from 9 to 11 am. Burial Rock Ridge
Cemetery, Sharon. For complete obituary and guestbook, please see: www.
dockrayandthomasfuneralhome.com.
SullivanFuneralHomes.com
781-878-0920 781-293-2020
TAGARIELLO, Lorraine E.
(Privitero)
Pushard Family Funeral Home
www.Roache-Pushard.com
(781) 828-2929
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home
(781) 828-0811
Every life is a story
worth sharing
Share theirs in The Boston Globe
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lets you honor your loved one with a professionally
written narrative about their life and achievements.
For more details, contact Boston
Globe Classifieds at 617-929-1500
or deathnotices@globe.com.
Of Belmont, Dec 28, 2017. Beloved
wife of the late Carlo A. Tagariello ?The
Love of Her Life?. Loving mother of
Joseph Tagariello and his wife Marylee
of Stoneham and Maria Murphy
and her husband John of Belmont.
Grandmother of Julie Doherty, Joseph
and Alicia Tagariello and their mother
Susan, Danielle Greene and her husband Justin, and Richard Murphy.
Great Grandmother of Benjamin and
Daniel Doherty and Charlotte and Ryan
Greene. Sister of the late Joseph Privitero. Funeral from the Brown & Hickey
Funeral Home, 36 Trapelo Road,
BELMONT, on Thursday, Jan. 4, at 8:00
AM. Followed by a funeral mass in St.
Joseph Church, 128 Common Street,
Belmont at 9:00 AM. Relatives and
friends invited. Visiting hours Wednesday from 4:00 - 7:00 PM. Interment
Highland Meadow Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made in her
memory to St. Jude Children?s Research
Hospital, 501 St Jude Place, Memphis,
TN 38105. On line guest book at:
www.brownandhickey.com.
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
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VITO, Anthony
Of Malden, December 30.
Husband of the late Rosaria
(Blandini) Vito. Loving father of Christine Vito of Maine & Darryl
Vito of Malden. Dear brother of Ralph
Vito of Salem & Marion Frost of NC.
Beloved uncle to his nieces & nephews.
Late U.S. Navy WW II veteran. Relatives & friends are invited to attend a
visitation in the Bisbee-Porcella Funeral
Home, 549 Lincoln Ave., SAUGUS, on
Thursday, 11 a.m. to noon followed by
a funeral service at noon. Interment
Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. Much
gratitude to Anthony?s devoted aides
and friends, as well as to Home Again
Health Care, Care Dimensions and the
Kaplan Family Hospice House. In lieu
of flowers, donations, in his memory,
may be made to the Kaplan Family
Hospice House, 78 Liberty St, Danvers,
MA 01923. For directions & condolences: www.BisbeePorcella.com.
WEISSBLUM, Herbert
Of Whidbey Island, Washington, formerly of Winchester, entered into rest
December 26, 2017. Beloved son of the
late Jack and Tillie (Wax) Weissblum.
Survived by his dear brother Walter
Weiss and cousin, Bernard Shuster.
Funeral services at the Stanetsky
Memorial Chapel, 1668 Beacon St.,
BROOKLINE, MA 02445 on Wednesday, January 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM with
interment to follow at New Tifereth
Israel of Everett, 232 Fuller St., Everett.
Donations in his memory may be made
to the charity of your choice.
Stanetsky Memorial Chapels
617-232-9300
www.stanetsky.com
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
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Obituaries
William Agee, CEO whose star was dimmed
By Steve Lohr
NEW YORK TIMES
BYRON SMITH/NEW YORK TIMES/FILE 2015
Dan Talbot operated the Lincoln Plaza Cinemas, which
opened in 1981 and is scheduled to close on Jan. 28.
Dan Talbot, at 91;
impresario of art films
By Anita Gates
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK ? Dan Talbot,
one of the most influential figures in the world of art-house
film as an operator of Manhattan theaters ? including Lincoln Plaza Cinemas, which is
scheduled to close Jan. 28 ?
and a founder of the film distribution company New Yorker
Films, died Friday at his home
in New York. He was 91.
His death was confirmed by
Ewnetu Admassu, the general
manager of Lincoln Plaza.
Manohla Dargis, cochief
film critic for The New York
Times, summed up Mr. Talbot?s
impact in a 2011 interview
with him at the Cannes Film
Festival, where in his 80s he
continued to see four to six
films a day. She described his
theaters as places where ?generations of moviegoers have
had their minds and worlds expanded, and even blown.?
Mr. Talbot was always realistic about the narrow appeal of
his product. In 1987, interviewed during a Public Theater
retrospective, ?The Age of New
Yorker Films,? he described his
chosen field as ?a very financially masochistic business.? In
fact, he told Dargis (and others) what he thought of the
term show business: ?It?s not a
business. It?s a casino.?
And he acknowledged that
the audience for art-house
films was both small and static.
?It?s an elite, college-educated,
well-traveled group, and it?s
very determined,? but it isn?t
growing, he told The Times in
1981.
Mr. Talbot chose to trust his
own tastes. ?When I look at
movies, I don?t think of the box
office,? he said in the same interview. ?If it appeals to my aesthetic sense, if it has some artis tic foundation, I take a
chance with it.? And that system worked.
He introduced US moviegoers to a whole universe of European filmmaking, including
the French New Wave and the
postwar German auteurs. One
of his greatest successes was
Rainer Werner Fassbinder?s
?The Marriage of Maria Braun?
(1979), about one German
woman?s struggles after World
War II, which ran for a full
year.
Mr. Talbot?s boldest moves
included ?Point of Order,? 188
hours of the 1954 McCarthy
Senate hearings, edited to 97
minutes; ?Shoah,? Claude Lanzmann?s almost 9╜-hour interview-based documentary about
the Holocaust, which aired on
PBS after half a year in theaters; and a 1960 release of
?Triumph of the Will,? Leni Riefenstahl?s infamous propaganda documentar y about the
1934 Nazi Party Congress.
Daniel Talbot was born on
July 21, 1926, in the Bronx. His
father, Israel, worked as a textile jobber. His mother, the former Jeanne Frances Charak,
owned a fabric and notions
shop.
After graduating from New
York University with a literature degree, Mr. Talbot worked
in publishing and film ? as a
book editor, as East Coast story
editor for Warner Bros., and
briefly as film critic for the pacifist magazine The Progressive.
After a year living in Spain, putting together a collection of essays titled ?Film: An Anthology? (1959), Mr. Talbot returned
to the United States and the opportunity that became the New
Yorker Theater.
Mr. Talbot and his wife, the
former Toby Tolpern, learned
that the old Yorktown Theater,
on Broadway between 88 th
and 89th Street, was available.
They renamed the theater the
New Yorker and reopened it in
March 1960 as a revival house,
presenting ?Henry V? with
Laurence Olivier and ?The Red
Balloon? as their first double
feature. By 1962, business was
so good that the couple bought
the lease. By 1964, Mr. Talbot
was being interviewed for The
New York Post by a young writer named Nora Ephron, who
described his theater as ?a raving success?
It all seemed easy. ?The theater had a policy of no policy,?
Toby Talbot wrote in ?The New
Yorker T he at er an d Oth er
Scenes From a Life at the Movies,? her 2009 memoir. ? We
t h o u g h t o f i t a s o u r l i v in g
room, playing movies we wanted to see.?
By the mid-1970s, the couple were devoting themselves
full time to distribution, Toby
Talbot recalled. New Yorker
Films? hundreds of credits included ?Aguirre, the Wrath of
G o d ? ( 1 9 7 2 ) , ? Ta m p o p o ?
(1985), ?The Boys of St. Vincent? (1992), and ?My Dinner
With Andre? (1981). The company ceased operations in 2009
but was later revived under
new owners.
In the intervening years,
other projects had come along.
Two more Upper West Side theaters came and went. And the
theater that became Dan Talbot?s final legacy began a 37year run across the street from
Lincoln Center.
Lincoln Plaza Cinemas
opened in April 1981 with
three screens (later expanding
to six). Dan Talbot described it
as ?a supplement on a yearround basis to the New York
Film Festival.? The first film
that played there was Federico
Fellini?s ?City of Women.? The
theater?s current features include ?Darkest Hour,? a British
drama starring Gary Oldman
as Winston Churchill; ?1945,? a
black-and-white period drama
from Hungary; and ?Loving
Vincent,? a Polish-British coproduction about the life of
Vincent van Gogh.
It was revealed in mid-December that the real estate
company Milstein Properties,
which operates Lincoln Plaza
with the Talbots and Gaumont
Films (a French studio), would
not be renewing the theater?s
lease.
In a d d i t i o n t o h i s w i f e ,
whom he married in 1950, Mr.
Talbot leaves three daughters,
Nina Talbot, Emily Talbot, and
Sarah Tanzer; and four grandchildren.
NEW YORK ? William Agee
was 38 and a rising corporate
star in 1976 when the Bendix
Corp., a large auto-parts maker,
made him one of the youngest
chief executives of a major US
company.
Handsome and articulate,
with an MBA from Harvard,
Mr. Agee personified a new,
more fast-moving, less bureaucratic management style that
was starting to take hold. He
got rid of Bendix?s boardroom
table as a stodgy artifact of the
past, banned executive parking
spaces, and often dressed in a
style now known as business
casual.
Three years after he took the
reins at Bendix, Time magazine
featured him in a cover article
with the headline ?Faces of the
Future.? He was personally appealing, and so was his message: Success at his company
should be based on merit rather
than seniority or tradition. He
acted on that notion by recruiting and promoting young managers.
As it turned out, it was a recruiting decision ? the hiring
in spring 1979 of a bright,
promising female employee
named Mary Cunningham ?
and Mr. Agee?s subsequent handling of their relationship that
largely defined his business career, touching off a national discussion about workplace behavior that reverberates today.
Mr. Agee died on Wednesday
at the Swedish Hospital in Seattle. He was 79. His daughter Suzanne Agee said the cause was
respiratory failure as a complication of scleroderma, a degenerative disease in which the immune system harms healthy tissue.
Mr. Agee originally hired
Cunningham, who also had a
Harvard MBA, as his executive
assistant. She quickly moved up
the ranks at Bendix, becoming
vice president for strategic
planning within 15 months.
Soon after that, however,
she was forced to leave the company under pressure amid allegations that she and Mr. Agee
were having an affair ? something they both denied. They
later divorced their spouses,
and they married in 1982.
Cunningham?s abrupt departure from Bendix provided
fodder for months of newspaper and magazine articles and
MARIO SURIANI/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 1983
Mr. Agee with Mary Cunningham, whom he married in 1982. His relationship with
Cunningham, who was hired by Bendix Corp. in 1979, raised questions about his judgment.
commentary. Author Gail Sheehy wrote a syndicated newspaper series titled ?The Saga of
Mary Cunningham.?
In her book ?Powerplay:
What Really Happened at Bendix,? written with Fran Schumer and published in 1984, Cunningham denied that she and
Mr. Agee had a sexual relationship while they were co-workers. But she admitted to being
?very naive,? and said she had
miscalculated the strength of
gender stereotypes inside the
company.
?It was my very competence
that threatened them,? she
wrote.
Although the episode differed in key respects from the
current wave of sex-related office scandals ? the question
then centered on romance-fueled favoritism, not harassment
or assault ? it helped lay the
foundation for the current debate over gender and behavior
in the workplace, especially the
dynamics involved when one of
the people in a relationship is
the boss.
Peter Cappelli, director of
the Center for Human Resources at the Wharton School of the
University of Pennsylvania, said
the drama that swirled around
Mr. Agee and Cunningham at
Bendix had ?a big effect, especially on boards? at large public
companies. In recent years,
Cappelli noted, boards have
pushed out senior executives at
corporations including Best
Buy, Boeing and Hewlett-Packard for inappropriate behavior,
typically affairs with subordinates.
William McReynolds Agee
was born on Jan. 5, 1938, in
Boise, Idaho. (He later changed
his middle name to Joseph.) His
father, Harold J. Agee, held various jobs, including manager at
a manufacturing company,
dairy farmer and state legislator. His mother was the former
Suzanne McReynolds.
Mr. Agee paid his own way
at the University of Idaho while
working in a supermarket?s accounting department. After
graduating from Harvard Business School, he joined the paper company Boise Cascade,
earning a series of promotions
and becoming chief financial
officer at 31.
He joined Bendix, which
was based in a Detroit suburb,
in 1972 and thrived immediately. He was named chief executive when W. Michael Blumenthal, his predecessor, left the
company to become Treasury
secretary under President Jimmy Carter.
Bendix performed well under Mr. Agee at first, although
his relationship with Cunningham raised questions about his
judgment. His strength was
mainly in finance. Increasing
the value of a company?s shares,
he wrote in an op-ed essay in
The New York Times, is ?the
foremost objective of responsible management.?
To that end, he pursued asset sales, investments and
mergers. But even as a dealmaker, he was occasionally
dogged by the public perception of his ties to Cunningham.
When Bendix purchased a 5
percent stake in RCA in 1982,
RCA rebuffed the move. ?Mr.
Agee,? RCA said, ?has not demonstrated the ability to manage
his own affairs, let alone someone else?s.?
Ultimately, an ill-conceived
takeover attempt that year led
to Mr. Agee?s departure from
Bendix.
Seeking new markets, he bid
for the rocket-maker Martin
Marietta. In what The Times
described as ?one of the most
bizarre takeover battles in
American corporate history,?
Martin Marietta responded by
trying to take over Bendix.
The fight ended with Bendix
being bought by Allied Corp.,
now Allied Signal. Mr. Agee left
the merged company in 1983.
In addition to Cunningham
Agee and his daughter Suzanne,
from his first marriage, to Diane
Weaver, Mr. Agee is survived by
two other children from that
marriage, Kathryn Gillis and
Robert William Agee; two children from his second marriage,
Mary Alana Kurz and William
Nolan Agee; two sisters, Carolyn
Hjort and Jacqueline Agee; and
eight grandchildren.
Maura Jacobson, creator of witty crosswords
By Neil Genzlinger
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK ? Maura Jacobson, who for 31 years made
crossword puzzles for New York
magazine that were beloved by
aficionados for their pun-filled
wit, died on Dec. 25 in White
Plains, N.Y. She was 91.
Her death was confirmed by
her husband, Dr. Jerome Jacobson.
Ms. Jacobson owed her career, in a way, to a traffic accident. She had dabbled in puzzle
making, sending some to Margaret Farrar, the crossword puzzle editor at The New York
Times, but had let the hobby
lapse. Then, in 1971, she was
seriously injured in an auto accident. It kept her off her feet
for a year, she said.
?Margaret Farrar sent me
grids and said, ?Stay well and
keep working,?? Ms. Jacobson
recalled years later. So she began putting more effort into the
craft, and by 1978 was making
puzzles for a listings magazine
called Cue. In 1980, New York
bought Cue, and Ms. Jacobson
and her puzzles were part of the
package.
In a 2011 article commemorating her retirement, the magazine said she had created more
than 1,400 puzzles for New
York. In the universe of cruciverbalists ? people good at
making or solving crosswords
? Ms. Jacobson was a super-
star. When her name would be
announced at the annual American Crossword Puzzle Tournament, the hall would burst into
applause.
Maura Bandler was born on
April 28, 1926, in Brooklyn.
Her father, William, was a
salesman, and her mother, the
former Nettie Duberstein, was
a homemaker. She graduated
from Hunter College when she
was 19, with a degree in English, and became a kindergarten teacher in the Bronx. She
married Jerome Jacobson in
1948.
In 1964, Ms. Jacobson was
among the first contestants ever on a new quiz show, ?Jeopardy!,? winning three times and
taking home $3,150, according
to New York magazine. But her
mastery of trivia would really
pay off when she turned her attention to puzzle making. It
happened one day when she
was sick in bed.
?I decided to try to make up
a puzzle,? she said. ?I started
with my husband?s name. And I
sent it to The Times. It was a
terrible puzzle ? I had made up
words, I did all sorts of things
you didn?t do.?
But Farrar sent it back with
some encouraging words and
suggested changes, and accepted a revised version. A few
years later came the car accident and more time to devote
to puzzle making. Eventually,
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the pastime turned into a career.
Ms. Jacobson?s puzzles were
dense with thematic clues and
full of intricate puns, but she
was not the kind of diabolical
cruciverbalist whose goal is to
make the puzzle unsolvable.
She said she would generally
make the clues for the upper
left of the grid, where most
solvers start a puzzle, unintimidating, so as not to discourage
people.
And she took care not to
have two unfamiliar words
cross each other, so a solver
could figure out a strange word
by default.
She didn? t mind if those
tackling her puzzles turned to
dictionaries and other resources; for her, it was all about filling in the grid by whatever
means necessary.
?There?s no such thing as
cheating,? she said at a crossword event in 1996.
Not that a dictionary would
be much help cracking her witty thematic clues. Take, for instance, the puzzle she provided
for the 2008 American Crossword Puzzle Tournament. It
was sprinkled with phrases the
cartoon character Elmer Fudd
might have uttered. The answer
for a clue for parakeet noise in
the Netherlands was ?Dutch
tweet.?
In addition to her husband,
Ms. Jacobson leaves a daughter,
Joanne Pye, two grandchildren,
and two great-grandchildren.
Along with her puzzles for
New York, Ms. Jacobson had 66
puzzles in The New York Times
over the years. She also wrote
more than two-dozen crossword books.
In a 1988 interview, she said
it took her about 25 hours to
construct a puzzle.
?Sometimes you get to the
point where you have a great
corner, everything crossing
nicely, and you find there?s no
such word,? she said. ?Then you
have to start over. I go through
more erasers than pencils.?
How many of each she went
through making the doozy she
created for the 1983 United
States Open Crossword Puzzle
Championship is unknown.
The puzzle, though, was dizzying. Its theme was storytelling.
Here is how The Times described it:
?That puzzle?s central pun,
which drew raves from many
contestants, took up three full
?across? lines. The clue was:
?Coretta, Steve, Nick, Robert E.,
Thomas, Toni, Susan B., Joe,
Blanche, Gladys.?
?The answer was ?King, Forrest, Lowe, Lee, Mann, Tennille, Anthony, Namath, Thebom, Knight.? If the names are
read quickly, the line sounds
like: ?King forced lowly man to
kneel, and then he named the
bum knight.??
T h e
B10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
Business
For labor,
much is
unsettled as
year begins
$15 base wage, paid leave
apt to be election issues
By Katie Johnston
GLOBE STAFF
As 2018 begins, battles are being waged
over a number of issues that affect workers ?
with outcomes that could help determine
which party controls Congress as voters head
to the polls later this year.
President Trump campaigned on a promise
to lift up working-class Americans. But so far,
businesses have been reaping most of the rewards, ending 2017 with a big win in the form
of a major corporate tax cut and a number of
rolled-back regulations.
And as workers contemplate changes in
their wages and workplace protections, or a
lack thereof, many of them will be asking
themselves: Has my quality of life improved
since President Trump and the Republicans
took over?
If the answer is no, it could fuel a political
backlash.
MATTHEW MEAD/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2015
In Massachusetts, a little extra kick in the cider, alcohol-wise, brings a hefty increase in the excise tax that?s levied.
A taxing time for cider
Distributors of the fermented kind say the state treats them unfairly
By Dan Adams
W
GLOBE STAFF
hen the weather gets
cold, Downe as t Cider
House in East Boston releases a winter brew
that ?s a little heavier,
spiced with nutmeg and cinnamon, and
has an ?extra kick? in the form of a 6.5 percent alcohol level ? just slightly more than
the company?s crisp original cider, which
clocks in at 5.1 percent.
But when it comes to taxes, the difference between the two drinks is huge: Distributors pay 3 cents for every gallon of
Downeast Cider?s original blend, but 70
cents a gallon for the Winter Blend.
The difference? An arcane Massachusetts law that classifies any drink made of
fermented fruit with more than 6 percent
alcohol as sparkling wine, a category that?s
subject to much higher taxes than cider
with 3 to 6 percent alcohol by volume
(ABV).
?I can?t see any practical justification
for these laws,? said Downeast cofounder
Ross Brockman.
Last week, a task force appointed by
state Treasurer Deborah Goldberg to suggest reforms to the state?s decade-old alcohol rules agreed with Brockman. Among
dozens of proposals the group released in
Cider rules
A slight difference in alcohol levels makes a
huge difference in taxes for Downeast Cider
House?s products:
Original Blend
Alcohol level:
5.1 percent
Excise tax:
3 cents a gallon
Winter Blend
Alcohol level:
6.5 percent
Excise tax:
70 cents a gallon
SOURCES: Commonwealth of Massachusetts,
Downeast Cider House
late December is one that would expand
the definition of hard cider to include
those containing up to 8.5 percent alcohol.
The change, which needs legislative approval to take effect, would bring Massachusetts in line with the federal government?s classification of cider. The Alcohol
and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau in January raised the federal ABV limit on ciders
to 8.5 percent. As in Massachusetts, going
above the federal limit triggers a much
higher tax charged to champagne and similar drinks.
Other states have also debated simplifying their complex alcohol tax categories. In
Pennsylvania, policy makers in 2016
raised the state?s limit on alcohol in cider
to 8.5 percent, after cider makers complained the previous threshold of 5.5 percent was forcing them to dilute their products.
The task force in Massachusetts, comprised of seven attorneys and state officials, is also recommending a broad increase in alcohol excise taxes: to 16 cents a
gallon on beer, from 11 cents; to 82 cents a
gallon on wine, from 55 cents; and to
$6.07 a gallon on hard liquor, from $4.05.
Dan Adams can be reached at
daniel.adams@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @Dan_Adams86.
Bold Types
A prediction: RxAdvance
will be one of our big names
John Sculley (right) foresees a time
when RxAdvance, a pharmacy benefit
manager in Southborough, becomes a
flagship company for the Boston area?s
high-tech economy.
A bold prediction? Sure. But Sculley
knows a thing or two about tech pioneers.
Sculley is perhaps best known for his
time as chief executive at Apple. Now he is
chairman and chief marketing officer at
RxAdvance, which he sees as his most interesting career opportunity since he left
the California computer company in 1993.
RxAdvance, which is primarily owned
by founder and CEO Ravi Ika and a dozen
other entrepreneurs, wrapped up 2017
with about $500 million in contracted revenue and is ?crossing over? into profitability, Sculley says. The company is estimating that it will hit at least $10 billion in
revenue by 2020.
Ika says RxAdvance expects to employ
at least 600 people in 2018, primarily in
Southborough, and he?s confident that
number will rise to at least 1,600 by the
end of 2020.
Traditional pharmacy benefit manag-
ers, or PBMs, negotiate lower rates for
drugs. RxAdvance says it?s more effective
because it uses computing power to manage expenses, helping health insurance
companies rein in costs.
?I am the kind of person who loves to
be involved in transformative moments,?
Sculley says. ?This is one of those things
we used to say at Apple, ?There has to be a
better way.? This is one of those opportunities on a huge scale where there is a better
way.?
Sculley says he started working with
RxAdvance after he spoke at St. Mark?s
School in Southborough, his alma mater,
more than two years ago. Ika?s daughter
was a senior there at the time and asked
him for his business card.
Sculley lives in Florida now, so he
generally works remotely, but he visits
Massachusetts at least several times a
month. He says he is optimistic that
Boston?s tech economy can flourish, in
part by relying on its strengths in health
care and higher education, putting it on
par with Silicon Valley.
BOLD TYPES, Page B11
RICHARD VOGEL/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2017
Union workers and minimum wage
activists rallied on Labor Day in Los
Angeles and other cities.
F. Vincent Vernuccio, senior fellow at the
right-leaning Mackinac Center for Public Policy in Michigan, said that the recent tax overhaul, which will reduce taxes for many people,
should put voters in a good mood.
?When workers across the country see that
in their paychecks, obviously they?re going to
be grateful that they can keep more of their
hard-earned money,? Vernuccio said.
Workers also benefit from business-friendly policies that allow the economy to flourish,
he said: ?Policies that give employers more
freedom to run their business and create jobs
will undoubtedly help employees.?
But the November 2017 elections indicate
that more liberal candidates could be gaining
the upper hand, said Paul Sonn, general counsel at the National Employment Law Project, a
New York advocacy group for low-wage workers, noting that gubernatorial races in Virginia
and New Jersey were both won by Democrats
who campaigned on a $15 minimum wage.
?The [2018] election will show contrasting
economic visions in many states, between a
pro-worker populist agenda on the one hand
versus a deregulatory Trump-style platform
on the other,? Sonn said. ?Trump ran on delivering a real difference to the lives of workingclass voters, especially in the Midwest, and instead he?s delivered attacks on health care and
a tax cut for corporations and the wealthy. The
big question is, will the voters notice??
With this in mind, here are five labor issues
that could have an impact on the 2018 midterm elections:
Wages
CHRIS MORRIS FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
A handful of companies already have announced bonuses and minimum-wage increases as a result of lower tax rates included
in the recent tax overhaul. But it remains to be
seen how widespread the generosity will be.
Wages have been flat for years; in Massachusetts, average pay is expected to rise only 2.66
percent this year, slightly less than it rose in
2017, according to a survey by Associated Industries of Massachusetts. Massachusetts is
one of a number of states considering raising
the minimum wage to $15 an hour (California
and New York have already approved this
rate). If the Legislature doesn?t act, the issue
will be put before voters in the fall.
LABOR, Page B11
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
TALKING POINTS
TAXATION
TAX ON
MEDICAL DEVICES
TO RESUME AFTER
2нYEAR
SUSPENSION
Much of corporate America will enjoy a tax cut this year, but one industry is getting a
tax increase. A 2.3 percent excise tax on medical device manufacturers went back into
effect Monday after a two-year hiatus. It was originally imposed in 2013 to help pay for
expanded health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. The tax was opposed by the
$150-billion-a-year industry. In Congress, it was unpopular not only with Republicans
but many Democrats from states like Massachusetts and Minnesota with large numbers of medical device companies. Congress suspended the tax for 2016 and 2017. But
various GOP efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act and the taxes associated with it
failed, and the sweeping federal tax overhaul recently signed by President Trump
didn?t eliminate the medical device tax, either. Industry groups say the tax will take a
$20 billion bite over the next decade. ??What we have seen from past experience is that
it comes out of funding for product development, research, and the jobs associated
with those things,?? said J.C. Scott, AdvaMed?s head of government affairs. Supporters
of the tax say manufacturers overstate the harm suffered while the tax was in effect.
They argue expansion of health coverage under the ACA benefited device makers by
boosting the potential market for their products. ? ASSOCIATED PRESS
CURRENCY
Bitcoin is already having a bad year. For the first time since
2015, the cryptocurrency began a new year by tumbling, extending its slide from a record $19,511 reached on Dec. 18.
The virtual coin traded at $13,440 as of 3:55 p.m. in New
York, down 6.1 percent from Friday, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That?s also a fall from the $14,156 it hit
Sunday, according to coinmarketcap.com. Bitcoin got off to a
much stronger start last year and then kept that momentum
going, creating a global frenzy for cryptocurrencies. It rose 3.6
percent on the first day of 2017, to $998; it ended the year up
more than 1,300 percent. That rally drew a growing number
of competitors and last month brought bitcoin to Wall Street,
in the form of futures contracts. ? BLOOMBERG NEWS
BITCOIN
STARTS
A NEW YEAR
BY TUMBLING,
FIRST TIME
SINCE 2015
CORPORATIONS
CHIEF
OF COMPASS, UK
CATERING GIANT,
IS KILLED
IN PLANE CRASH
COMMODITIES
COTTON WAS
2017?S STAR CROP,
AND FUNDS HAVE
HIGH HOPES
FOR 2018
The chief executive of the world?s biggest catering company, which is also one of Britain?s biggest businesses, died Sunday in a plane crash near Sydney. Richard Cousins,
CEO of Compass Group, was among six people killed when a seaplane went down off
Jerusalem Bay, according to the New South Wales police, who confirmed that Cousins,
his two sons, his fiancщe and her daughter, and the pilot all died. The cause of the
crash was being investigated. Reuters said a preliminary report was expected within
30 days, but it could take as long as a year to find out what caused the crash. Cousins,
58, led Compass, which employs 550,000-plus people, for more than 11 years. Cousins
had been expected to leave Compass at the end of March. His planned successor, Dominic Blakemore, currently chief operating officer for Europe, will take over immediately, Compass said. When Cousins took the helm of the company, it was mired in a corruption scandal, accused of bribing a United Nations official to garner contracts to
supply peacekeepers. Settling lawsuits and ending investigations tied to the allegations cost the company 39 million pounds, it said in its 2007 annual report, or about
$53 million at current exchange rates. During Cousins? time as chief executive, revenue more than doubled and operating profit increased fourfold. The company?s share
price has increased by more than six times since he took over. Last year, The Harvard
Business Review named him the 11th-best performing chief executive in the world.
? NEW YORK TIMES
The crop commodity with the biggest
increase last year? It was cotton ? propelled by the longest winning streak in
two decades. And hedge funds are
ready for more. Of the nine components tracked by the Bloomberg Agriculture Subindex, only cotton and
wheat contracts posted gains last year.
The fiber lead the way, with an 11 percent advance as demand grew for US
exports. Prices capped 2017 with 10
straight weekly gains, the best streak since 1998. Cotton was one of the few crops that
hedge funds got more positive on last year. Cotton?s stellar performance came as crop
woes in Pakistan and India raised the prospects for American shipments. In the 20172018 season, commitments for US cotton exports are running 29 percent higher than
a year earlier, government data show. While both varieties of winter wheat posted
gains in 2017, they were small, less than 5 percent. The other members of the
Bloomberg subindex ? corn, soybeans, soybean meal, soybean oil, sugar, and coffee ?
finished the year with losses. ? BLOOMBERG NEWS
Business
B11
Antivirus software
turned into tool
for cyber spying
Questions raised
about Kaspersky
By Nicole Perlroth
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK ? It has been a
secret, long known to intelligence agencies but rarely to
consumers, that security software can be a powerful spy tool.
Security software runs closest to the bare metal of a computer, with privileged access to
nearly every program, application, Web browser, e-mail and
file. There is good reason for
this: Security products are intended to evaluate everything
that touches your machine in
search of anything malicious, or
even vaguely suspicious.
By downloading security
software, consumers also run
the risk that an untrustworthy
antivirus maker ? or hacker or
spy with a foothold in its systems ? could abuse that deep
access to track customers? every
digital movement.
?In the battle against malicious code, antivirus products
are a staple,? said Patrick Wardle, chief research officer at
Digita Security.
Wardle would know. A former hacker at the National Security Agency, Wardle recently
succeeded in subverting antivirus software sold by Kaspersky
Lab, turning it into a search
tool for classified documents.
Wa r d l e?s c u r i o s i t y w a s
piqued by recent news that
Russian spies had used Kaspersky antivirus products to siphon classified documents off
the home computer of an NSA
developer, and may have played
a critical role in broader Russian intelligence gathering.
For years, intelligence agencies suspected that Kaspersky
Lab?s security products provided a back door for Russian intelligence. A draft of a top-secret report leaked by Edward J.
Snowden, the former NSA contractor, described a top-secret
NSA effort in 2008 that concluded that Kaspersky?s software collected sensitive information off customers? machines.
T he doc uments showed
Kaspersky was not the NSA?s
only target. Future targets included nearly two dozen other
foreign antivirus makers, including Checkpoint in Israel
and Avast in the Czech Republic.
At the NSA, analysts were
banned from using Kaspersky
antivirus software because of
the risk it would give the Kremlin broad access to their machines and data. But excluding
N SA h e a d q u a r t e r s at Fo r t
Meade in Maryland, Kaspersky
still managed to secure contracts with nearly two dozen US
government agencies over the
past few years.
In September, the Department of Homeland Security ordered all federal agencies to
cease using Kaspersky products
bec au se o f t h e t h re at t hat
Kaspersky?s products could
?provide access to files.?
Kaspersky continues to deny
that it knew about the scanning
for classified US programs or allowed its antivirus products to
be used by Russian intelligence.
Eugene Kaspersky, the company?s chief executive, has said he
would allow the US government to inspect his source code
to allay distrust of its antivirus
and security products.
But Wardle discovered, in
reverse-engineering Kaspersky
antivirus software, that a simple review of its source code
would do nothing to prove its
products have not been used as
a Russian intelligence-gathering tool.
Wardle found that Kaspersky?s antivirus software is incredibly complex. Unlike traditional antivirus software, which
uses digital ?signatures? to look
for malicious code and patterns
of activity, Kaspersky?s signatures are easily updated, can be
automatically pushed out to
certain clients, and contain
code that can be tweaked to do
things such as automatically
scanning for and siphoning off
classified documents.
In short, Wardle found, ?Antivirus could be the ultimate espionage spying tool.?
The next question was:
What happens to these files
once they are flagged? Wardle
stopped short of hacking into
Kaspersky ?s cloud servers,
where suspicious files are routinely uploaded.
However, he noted that antivirus customers, including
Kaspersky?s, agree by default to
allow security vendors to send
anything from their machine
back to vendors? servers for further investigation.
There are legitimate reasons
for this: By uploading items to
Kaspersky?s cloud, security analysts can evaluate whether they
pose a threat, and update their
signatures as a result.
Kaspersky Lab said Wardle?s
research did not reflect how the
company?s software works. ?It
is impossible for Kaspersky Lab
to deliver a specific signature or
update to only one user in a secret, targeted way because all
signatures are always openly
available to all our users; and
updates are digitally signed,
further making it impossible to
fake an update,? the company
said in a statement.
Ex-adviser to R.I. governor joins firm For workers, much remains
uBOLD TYPES
Continued from Page B10
?I will predict that RxAdvance is going to be one of the
best role models that Boston
could ever want to have,? Sculley says. ?It will become very
apparent before the end of
2018.? ? JON CHESTO
From government to
the law office
Nixon Peabody has just recruited another prominent government official; this one will
work for the Boston-based law
firm at its Providence office.
David Cruise, a top adviser
to Rhode Island Governor Gina
Raimondo for the past three
years, will join the 650-lawyer
firm, helping clients plan for
and respond to government initiatives. The former state senator has held numerous publicsector positions.
?He understands the intersection of business and government and can help our clients
navigate complex policy and
regulatory issues,? Andrew
Glincher, the firm?s CEO, said
in an e-mail.
Like a number of other law
firms, Nixon Peabody has attracted several government
leaders over the years. Among
them: former state representative Jim Vallee; former federal
prosecutor Brian Kelly; and for-
mer state rep John Fernandes.
Scott Brown, the onetime state
senator turned US senator for
Massachusetts, was arguably
the most well-known former
pol to join the firm in recent
years. Brown, now US ambassador to New Zealand and Saн
moa, worked at Nixon Peabody
for about a year, leaving in
2014 before his unsuccessful
run for US senator in Ne w
Hampshire. ? JON CHESTO
A job that honors a
family legacy
If only Robin Powell
Mandjes?s grandmother could
see what her granddaughter is
up to now.
Mandjes says her Mississippi grandmother joined Martin
Luther King Jr. and thousands
of others in the Selma marches
of 1965. She grew up hearing
the stories of King?s leadership
and activism.
Now, Mandjes has the perfect job to honor that legacy.
She was just hired to be executive director of MLK Boston, a
new group launched by entrepreneur Paul English to build a
memorial to King and his wife,
Coretta Scott King, in Boston.
The two famously met while
students in the city.
MLK Boston, which is operating out of donated space at
the Boston Foundation, faces
three important challenges
that Mandjes will have a key
role in tackling: raising as
much as $5 million for the project, picking a location, and selecting the artist who will design it.
English, CEO of the Boston
travel startup Lola, gave the effort a jump-start, committing
at least $1 million of his own
money. He remains cochair of
the organization, along with
the Rev. Liz Walker.
City officials are also helping
out; the memorial is a priority
for Mayor Marty Walsh?s administration. MLK Boston will
host a meeting on Jan. 8 at City
Hall to gather ideas from the
public, and artists are invited
to submit initial applications to
the city by Feb. 28. Five finalists will get $5,000 stipends to
develop their proposals.
?This is an ideal time to put
a stake in the ground with respect to who we are as a community,? said Mandjes, who
previously worked in real estate. ?The timing could not be
more perfect for a project like
this. Dr. King?s message transcends what is often a polarized
national discourse.?
? JON CHESTO
Can?t keep a secret? Tell us. Email Bold Types at
boldtypes@globe.com.
unsettled as new year begins
uLABOR
Continued from Page B10
Overtime pay
For years, salaried exempt
workers earning as little as
$23,660 a year were not eligible
for overtime pay, including retail store or restaurant managers putting in 80 or 90 hours a
week. Under President Obama,
the Department of Labor doubled that salary threshold to
$47,476, making more than 4
million additional workers eligible to earn extra pay when
they work overtime. But before
it went into effect, a district
court judge in Texas ruled the
salary cap invalid. Trump?s labor department is expected to
issue a new threshold this year,
but the amount is widely anticipated to be lower than $47,476.
Meanwhile, Democrats have introduced a bill to restore the
overtime salary level to roughly
that amount.
Public sector unions
In February, the Supreme
Court is scheduled to hear a
case whose outcome could be
devastating to organized labor.
The plaintiff, Mark Janus, a
state worker in Illinois, argues
that forcing public employees
to pay union dues is unconstitutional. The court heard a similar case in 2016 but deadlocked 4-4 following Justice Ant o n i n S c a l i a ?s d e a t h , a n d
Trump?s Supreme Court pick,
Neil Gorsuch, is expected to be
the deciding vote. If the court
rules in Janus?s favor, it would
free government workers from
financing a union they don?t
support. It would also mean
less money for unions to negotiate and enforce contracts, a
change that could hinder workers? ability to bargain for higher
wages and better working conditions.
Joint employers
After Trump appointed two
members to the National Labor
Relations Board, shifting the
balance of power to Republicans, the board in December reversed a 2015 ruling that made
companies liable for the actions
of their franchisees and subcontractors. Following the recent
decision, a lead company can
be considered a joint employer
only if it has direct control over
subcontracted or franchise employees, removing the parent
organization from responsibility for labor law violations. Business groups applauded the decision as a victory for entrepreneurs, while worker advocates
say it leaves the growing number of temporary and contract
workers with fewer protections.
Paid family and
medical leave
The United States is the only
developed country without a
national paid-leave program,
and an overwhelming majority
of Republicans and Democrats
support giving employees paid
time off to care for a newborn
or sick family member. A number of proposals are in the
works at both the federal and
state level, including in Massachusetts, yet there are drastic
differences between what the
two parties are proposing when
it comes to the amount of time
off and how it would be implemented.
Katie Johnston can be reached
at katie.johnston@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@ktkjohnston.
T h e
B12
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
TV CRITIC?S CORNER
LOVE LETTERS
BY MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
BY MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN
?Should I
give up trying??
HBO
A white nationalist is pictured in the ?Vice News Tonight? story ?Charlottesville: Race and Terror.?
Vice, principled: Get news without talking points
One of my resolutions for this year is to find news
through sources devoid of emotion. So as much as
Tucker?s fed-up little face helps me through my cardio,
and Rachel?s furrowed disappointment in all of us eases me to sleep, I really should be getting crucial information from a more black-and-white source. If only I
could think of one!
In the meantime, I have been enjoying the slight
daily serving of passion-neutral news presented by
HBO in the form of ?Vice News Tonight? (airing nightly at 6:30 p.m.).
It may seem odd to turn to Vice ? the most hedonistic network of them all ? for a nightly news bulletin that doesn?t lean too hard on feelings (or smell like
it just smoked a joint), but it actually works. Turns out,
the overcool detachment baked into the ethos of
sk8er-zine-turned-mutlimil-media-conglomerate
makes a suitable substitute for journalistic gravitas.
Presented as a minimalist modular slideshow that
incrementally ?reads? left to right in a white anchorless void, ?Vice News Tonight? touches briefly on major topics and lily-pads to the next one every few minutes, leaving only enough room to dig into one topic
with any (not much) depth. Still, if you have a halfhour and little patience for the typical hand-holding
nightly news tuck-in routine, Vice?s zero waste packaging, brisk pacing, and design-driven presentation
(complete with unique typographical umami) will
leave you feeling caught up without the empty calories
of talking points.
And, in true Vice form, it will also leave you feeling
deeply depressed about the world we live in and asking around to see if your guy from college still deals.
Good night and good luck!
Tuesday January 2, 2018
7:00pm
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ION (CC) HD TV-14
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Flix
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Rey David (CC) HD
Are You/ S. Wine
Served?
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Finding/Roots: Fred American Exp. (CC) Frontline (CC): A Chinese
Armisen. TV-PG
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Lethal Weapon (CC) -) Vegas
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Up App.
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Newhart
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(11:05)
Seinfeld
Fam Ties
Modern
Family
Goldberg
Criminal Minds
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
PREMIUM CABLE
All About Steve (2009) (CC): A (9:40) ??? Wedding Singer (1998) (CC): (11:20)
(5:50) ?? The
Her R
woman follows a cameraman. A singer is left at the altar. HD TV-PG
Bodyguard TV-14
??? Star Trek III (1984): A captain
(6:05) District 9
(9:48) ??? Star Trek IV (1986): Time
(2009) HD TV-14
searches for a body. HD TV-PG NEW
travelers save Earth. HD TV-PG NEW
Rhapsody (7:25) Music Within (2006)
The Family That Preys (2008) (CC):
Bangkok Danger.
(CC) HD TV-PG
Scandal rocks two families. HD TV-14
(2008) (CC) HD R
Deepwat. Vice
News
In a Valley of Violence (2016): A drifter
battles a marshal. HD R NEW
The Fight (10:15) I Love You Beth: A geek
has a wild night. TV-14-DLSV
Game
(10:26)
(10:59)
(11:25)
(6:00) War of Roses: Sex and the City (2008) (CC): Romances of a chic
Divorce Divorce Divorce
Dark comedy.
New Yorker and her friends. HD TV-14
(6:05) ??? Scream Shameless (CC) HD Inside the NFL (CC) Shameless (CC) HD Inside the NFL (CC)
TV-MA
TV-MA
HD NEW
HD NEW
TV-14-LV NEW
Vanilla
Middle School: (2016): A boy
(9:05) Extreme Movie (2008):
SMILF
Revolver: An ex-con
Sky
breaks rules at school. PG
Spoof of teen sex comedies. R (CC) HD seeks revenge.
??? The Mask of Zorro (1998): The hero turns over Legend
(7:13) ?? Reindeer Games (2000) (CC):
of Zorro
Ex-con is drawn into a heist. HD TV-14
his title to a bumbling thief. HD TV-PG
Hell or High Water (2016) (CC): Two
(9:45) Out of the Furnace (2013) (CC): Ex(5:40) ??? Open
brothers rob banks. HD R
con must save his brother. HD R
Range TV-14-DLV
SPORTS
Patriots Boston Sports Tonight (CC) Live. HD
(CC) HD
Animal Planet River Monsters
(CC) HD TV-14-V
Column and comments are edited and
reprinted from boston.com/loveletters.
Send letters to meredith.goldstein@
globe.com.
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Wow ? this happened to me in college.
He pursued me. He said, ?I love you? first.
He wanted to be engaged and then, suddenly, I was asking too much!!! After he
broke up with me, he started being rude to
me, making snide remarks. Acting like I?d
been the one to hurt him.Anyway, he broke
up with you. Stop talking to him and move
ahead. Still not sure why he acted like he
did. Maybe some sort of rationalization so
he could get over it easier. Didn?t matter.
Over is over.
DOWNTOEARTH
Housewives/BH
(CC) HD TV-14
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
Friends
Blaze
^^Hollywood, fiction writers, and pop
songs.
JIVEDIVA
Housewives/BH
(CC) HD TV-14
College Basketball (CC): Michigan at
Iowa. Live. HD
Nickelodeon
Noggin
I don?t get this whole ?fighting for a relationship? thing. Who created this fantasy
that this means love or dedication? If you
have to fight for something to happen, it
probably wasn?t meant to be.
HARAJUKUBARBIE3
Bravo
ESPN 2
The 700 Club (CC)
TV-G
I do this sometimes; that actually can be
quite exfoliating
JUSTICEALANBOWIE
?? Outsiders (1983): Rival gangs fight.
?? Outsiders (1983): Rival gangs fight.
Star Trek: TNG
Roll
(7:25) The Single Moms Club (2014): Mothers form a ? Are We There Yet? (2005) (CC): A man
Bounce
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TCM
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TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
HD
?Should I give up trying?? Do you like
going to the beach and smashing your face
onto the rocks? I mean, go ahead if that?s
what you?re into. It just seems like you
could find something to do that would be
more . . . pleasurable. JIM-IN-LITTLETON
BBC America
BET
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falls for a maid. HD TV-14-DLS NEW
F. House F. House F. House Fresh P. Fresh P.
Peppa
Paw P.
Paw P.
Paw P.
Blaze
You seem to constantly let him call the
shots. He does this or that, and then you react and try to adapt to it. Whether it?s regarding your romances or any other aspect
of your life, you should take more control.
When you?re not getting what you want
from someone or something, learn how to
make positive changes or move on. In this
case I?d say move on.
ICHOR
?? Armageddon (1998): NASA hires a team of experts to split a massive
(5:00) ??? True
Lies (CC) TV-14-DLV asteroid in half before it destroys Earth. HD TV-PG
ESPN Classic
Freeform
7:30pm
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AMC
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Wisconsin. Live. HD
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Taped. HD
Who doesn?t?
Intervention (CC)
HD TV-14-L
ESPN
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
He just wants a booty call when he?s
home from break. Move on.
MIKELT
A&E
(6:30) Early Edition
(CC) Live. HD
College Basketball (CC): Texas Tech at
Kansas. From Allen Fieldhouse. Live. HD
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Q. I have been dating a guy for about
three years, and we broke up in August. I
should say that in the beginning of the relationship, he fought for me so hard, despite my wanting to be a single college
student. I finally gave in and we started
dating.
This past September, a month after
our breakup, he came back and told me
he wanted to work on things ? but then
ended it again. On Halloween, he texted
me saying he loved me and that he
messed up, and we started talking again.
We go to different schools (we?re about
three hours away from each other). We
saw each other over Thanksgiving break
and it felt so normal and right. We wanted to work on things, and he told me he
loved me.
The next day, when I returned to
school, he reached out to say he didn?t
want anything, but told me it wasn?t anything I did, but rather he needs to work
on himself. He is very rude to me in texts
now and doesn?t give me much information. Should I give up trying? Or should I
show him how much I want this?
BREAKS AND BREAKUPS
A. Seeing as you wrote this letter just before the start of winter break (sorry for
the posting delay), I?m going to assume
that you and your ex have already seen
each other and rekindled things again ?
because you?re home . . . and that?s what
you do.
If that?s the case, I must advise you to
avoid making promises about what will
happen next. The two of you continue to
assume it has to be all or nothing. Sometimes it?s more honest to say: ?It was great
to hang out. Let?s play the rest by ear.?
At the end of the day, if you?re really into him, I do think you should give up ?
because he doesn?t want a commitment
right now. Letting go means no more
texts. It also means learning to enjoy
school without including him in the narrative.
I understand you feel betrayed because he?s the one who wanted to start
this relationship, but it?s three years later.
He?s allowed to change his mind.
MEREDITH
HD
Housewives/BH HD Stripped (CC) HD
TV-14 NEW
TV-14 NEW
Curse Oak Isl.: New (10:09) Hunting
evidence. NEW
Hitler HD NEW
Married NEW
Married NEW
Mommy's Prison: A mom who was in jail.
All In/Hayes Live.
Maddow NEW
Teen Mom OG
Challeng NEW
Monster Fish (CC)
Monster Fish (CC)
HD
HD
Forensic Forensic
Healthy Cooking
Winter's Grave (CC)
HD TV-14-LV NEW
Real H.
Crazy, Stupid, Love.
CNN Tonight Live.
Daily
Klepper
NEW
NEW
Politico Forum
My Haunted TV-14
Moonshiners
Off the Grid (CC)
E! News NEW
Weight/Loss
Chopped: A chili
cook-off. HD TV-G
(11:08) Curse Oak
Isl.: New evidence.
Forensic Forensic
Travel Essent. TV-G
Evil Lives Here (CC):
A serial killer's wife.
Married Married Married Married
Psycho She Met (2017) HD TV-14-DLSV
Last Word Live. HD The 11th Hour Live.
Challeng NEW
Floribama Shore
Monster Fish: Zeb
Monster Fish (CC)
Hogan visits Indian. HD
Incredible Dr. Pol
Incredible Dr. Pol
necn News 10Pm
necn News 11PM
Sleepless: Reporter falls for a widower.
Dateline on OWN
Dateline on OWN
(CC) HD TV-14-D
(CC) HD TV-14-V
Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama
Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Joker's
Drop Mic
??? Million Dollar Legs TV-G (9:15) It's a Gift
Dorsey
My Big Fat/Life (CC) HD TV-14-DL NEW
I Am Jazz NEW
Major Crimes HD
Major Crimes NEW Major Crimes HD
Bizarre
Bizarre
Bizarre
Bizarre
Bizarre
Bizarre
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Hack My Hack My
Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Teachers Mom
The Perfect: A husband would be a gift.
D. World D. World
WWE SmackDown (CC) Live. HD
Chrisley Chrisley
Knows
Knows
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
Watch/
Andy
Futurama Futurama
Conan TV-14-DLV
(10:45) Bank Dick
My Big Fat/Life
Law & Order TV-14
Bizarre
Bizarre
Jokers
Jokers
King/Qu. King/Qu.
D. World D. World
Modern Modern
Family
Family
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
MOVIE STARS
Previously released
YY╜ All the Money in the World This
really happened in 1973: J. Paul Getty,
the richest man in the world, wouldn?t
ransom his kidnapped grandson. This
really happened in 2017: After Ridley
Scott had finished this version of the
story, the Kevin Spacey sexual-harassment allegations became public, and
Christopher Plummer replaced him.
You?d never know the difference. Michelle Williams and Mark Wahlberg
costar. (132 min., R) (Mark Feeney)
B o s t o n
G l o b e
YYY╜ Call Me by Your Name A rich,
relaxed, novelistic coming-of-age story,
set in an overripe Italy in the 1980s.
Timothщe Chalamet plays an academic?s son and Armie Hammer a young
research assistant with whom he embarks on an affair; no one films light
and landscape with more sensuality
than director Luca Guadagnino. In
English and Italian, with subtitles.
(132 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY Darkest Hour A glib, entertaining biopic of Winston Churchill, set as
the great man becomes prime minister
against a backdrop of Dunkirk and the
Nazi threat. Gary Oldman, under lay-
ers of padding and bluster, gives us an
old sharpie of a Winston and Joe
Wright directs with confidence. With
Kristin Scott Thomas and Ben Mendelsohn. (101 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YY╜ Ferdinand This adaptation of
the classic picture book about a peaceloving bull comes to us from Blue Sky,
the outfit behind ?Ice Age,? with John
Cena as its star voice. While the movie
is susceptible to some pandering, it also takes the story?s charming core elements and gives them a contemporary
luster. (106 min., PG) (Tom Russo)
YYY I, Tonya The Tonya Harding story, presented as an acrid, tragicomic
look at the underside of fame. Margot
Robbie plays Harding, the workingclass ice skating champion who fell
from grace when her ex-husband (Sebastian Stan) had her rival kneecapped. Allison Janney is fearsome as
Harding?s loveless lizard of a mother,
and the film?s smarminess is balanced
by its smarts. And vice versa. (119
min., R) (Ty Burr)
YY╜ Pitch Perfect 3 Life after college
is such a drag for a cappella sisterhood
the Barden Bellas that Anna Kendrick,
Rebel Wilson, and pals decide to hit
the USO circuit along the Mediterranean for a last hurrah. Wilson?s sassy
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 10:45, 1:45,
4:45, 7:55
YOUTH (NR) AMC Independent 10:00, 1:05, 4:10,
7:15, 10:20
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent 10:10, 1:00, 4:05,
7:05, 10:05
EX-FILES 3: RETURN OF THE EXES (NR) AMC Independent 10:00, 12:45, 3:45, 6:55, 9:40
THE LIQUIDATOR (NR) AMC Independent 7:30, 8:35
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:30, 1:00,
4:00, 4:30, 7:30, 8:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 10:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:20, 2:30, 3:00, 6:30,
9:30
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:20, 2:30, 3:00, 6:30,
9:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:00,
3:30, 6:00, 7:00, 9:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:00,
3:30, 6:00, 7:00, 9:00
COCO (PG) 11:40
COCO (PG) 11:40
DOWNSIZING (R) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:30
DOWNSIZING (R) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:30
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 1:45, 4:45, 8:00
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) G 9:45
DANVERS
www.nationalamusements.com
B13
fightin? moves during a gleefully preposterous hostage rescue jump-start
the trilogy capper when even the musical performances sometimes can?t.
(93 min., PG-13) (Tom Russo)
YYYY Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
?Star Wars? movies have always been
pop-culture candy; this is the first one
that tastes like steak. Writer-director
Rian Johnson rearranges the characters in ways that feel fresh. It?s not a
perfect movie but it is a great one, and
it?s immensely satisfying. With Daisy
Ridley, John Boyega, Carrie Fisher,
Mark Hamill, Adam Driver, and Oscar
Isaac. (152 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
()
INFO VALID 1/02/18 ONLY
()
G
5
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
8
Stadium Seating
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
Rear Window Captioning
6
K
Hearing Impaired
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 4:30, 7:15
FERDINAND (PG) 3:45, 7:40
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 4:15,
7:20
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 4:20, 7:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 4:00, 7:00
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) (1:35, 4:50)
8:05
DOWNSIZING (R) (1:05, 4:15) 7:35
FATHER FIGURES (R) (12:40, 3:35) 6:30, 9:40
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) (1:45, 4:45) 7:15, 9:50
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) (12:35, 4:20) 8:05
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (12:45,
2:00, 5:15) 6:45, 8:15
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13) G
(3:45) 9:45
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (12:50, 3:30) 6:15,
9:30
FERDINAND (PG) (1:15, 4:05) 7:00, 10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) (1:00, 1:30,
4:30, 5:00) 8:00, 8:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G (12:30,
4:00) 7:30
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) (1:20, 4:35) 7:45
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) (1:50, 5:05) 8:20
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
www.studiocinema.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 4:30, 7:30
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) (11:55, 3:10)
6:40, 9:45
DOWNSIZING (R) (12:10, 3:30) 6:45, 10:00
FATHER FIGURES (R) (1:15) 4:15, 10:25
HELLO (NR) 7:25, 9:55
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) (11:55, 2:10) 4:45, 7:20,
9:50
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) 5:00, 8:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) G
(12:30, 1:30, 3:30) 6:30, 7:30, 9:40
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13) G
4:30, 10:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G (12:00, 2:35)
5:10, 7:45, 10:25
FERDINAND (PG) (1:15) 4:05, 6:55, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) G (12:40, 1:35,
2:30) 4:20, 6:00, 7:00, 9:20
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G (11:50,
3:20) 8:00, 9:50
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) (12:55) 4:00, 7:05, 10:05
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) (1:05) 4:10, 7:15, 10:10
WONDER (PG) (1:20) 4:15, 7:10
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
www.artsemerson.org
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
FERDINAND (PG) 10:15, 12:50, 3:25, 6:00
COCO (PG) 11:05, 1:35, 4:05
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:20, 2:05, 4:50,
7:30, 10:15
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 10:00, 12:30,
4:00, 5:00, 7:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
1:30, 2:30, 6:00, 8:30, 9:45
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 10:10, 11:05, 1:50, 4:35,
7:10, 10:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:30,
1:15, 7:15
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 4:15, 10:15
FATHER FIGURES (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 10:30
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 11:40
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:05,
1:00, 4:00, 6:50, 9:50
DOWNSIZING (R) 10:05, 1:05, 4:20, 7:20, 10:25
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) AMC Independent
10:25, 1:30, 4:25, 7:25, 10:20
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent 10:15,
1:20, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10
THE DISASTER ARTIST (R) AMC Independent 7:00,
9:30
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent 12:15, 3:40,
6:45, 9:55
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
AMAZON ADVENTURE 3D (NR) 12:00, 4:00
GREAT WHITE SHARK (NR) 1:00, 3:00, 5:00
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
11:00, 2:00, 6:00
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
MOLLY'S GAME (R) (11:30, 3:05) 6:35, 10:15
DOWNSIZING (R) (11:50, 3:20) 6:50, 10:20
FATHER FIGURES (R) (11:55, 3:10) 6:20, 9:45
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) (11:30, 1:55) 4:30, 7:10,
9:50
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) (12:00, 3:50) 8:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) G
(12:40) 4:00, 7:20
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
G 10:40
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G (12:35) 4:00,
7:00, 10:30
FERDINAND (PG) (12:45) 4:05, 7:45, 10:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) RPX G (11:30,
3:00) 6:35
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RPX G 10:10
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) G (12:05) 7:05,
8:20
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G (12:50,
3:40) 4:35, 9:40
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) (11:45, 3:00) 6:20, 10:35
THE DISASTER ARTIST (R) 10:15
COCO (PG) (12:55, 3:55) 7:20
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
100 Independence Way
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
FERDINAND (PG) 10:45, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00
COCO (PG) 11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:50, 10:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 10:30, 1:15, 3:55,
6:45, 9:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 10:30, 5:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:15, 2:45,
6:15, 9:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) G 12:15, 3:30, 7:00, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
2:00, 9:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:00, 2:00, 4:45, 7:45,
10:15
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:00,
1:45, 7:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 4:30, 10:20
FATHER FIGURES (R) 12:30, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00
DOWNSIZING (R) 11:45, 3:15, 6:30, 9:45
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) G 10:45, 1:30,
4:30, 7:15, 10:20
AMC BRAINTREE 10
DEDHAM
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
121 Grandview Rd.
www.nationalamusements.com
5 6 DIG
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 1:00, 4:30, 8:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:30, 12:30,
3:00, 4:00, 6:30, 7:30, 10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30,
7:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:25, 11:55, 1:55, 4:25,
4:55, 7:15, 7:45, 9:45, 10:15
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:55,
4:10, 7:10, 10:05
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:00,
2:25, 5:10, 8:10
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:25, 3:40,
6:45, 9:50
COCO (PG) 11:05, 2:20
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 1:10, 4:15, 7:20, 10:20
FERDINAND (PG) 1:15, 3:45, 6:20, 9:05
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:20, 2:05, 4:45,
7:25, 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:05, 3:55, 6:35, 9:20
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:15, 3:35, 6:50, 10:10
FATHER FIGURES (R) 1:40, 4:20, 6:55, 9:30
www.amctheatres.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) G 11:00, 1:15,
4:30, 7:45, 11:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:30
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
www.coolidge.org
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 11:15, 2:00, 4:30, 7:15,
9:45
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:55
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 11:00, 1:45, 4:45, 7:30,
10:05
LADY BIRD (R) 11:30, 1:30, 4:15, 6:45, 9:00
BURLINGTON
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) G 12:45, 4:15,
7:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
10:00, 1:45, 5:15, 6:45, 8:45, 10:15
CAMBRIDGE
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.applecinemas.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) G 10:30, 11:45,
1:45, 3:00, 5:00, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:30, 10:30
JUSTICE LEAGUE (PG-13) 8:00
COCO (PG) 10:00, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:00,
11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:20
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 10:00, 2:50,
5:40, 8:00, 10:50
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) 1:00
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) 4:20
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) 7:40
TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) 11:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 10:00, 12:10, 2:20, 4:30,
6:40, 8:50, 11:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G 12:45,
4:00
FERDINAND (PG) 10:00, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00,
10:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 10:00, 12:30, 8:30,
11:00
FATHER FIGURES (R) 10:00, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 10:45
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 5 (1:45, 4:25) 7:05, 9:40
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 5 (1:00, 2:00, 4:00,
5:00) 7:00, 8:00, 9:00
LADY BIRD (R) 5 (1:30, 3:50) 6:45, 9:50
I, TONYA (R) 5 (2:45, 5:30) 8:10
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 (1:00) 7:15, 9:45
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 5 (1:40, 3:45, 4:15)
7:00, 9:45
I, TONYA (R) 5 (1:35, 4:15) 7:00, 9:40
DOWNSIZING (R) 5 (2:15, 5:15) 8:15
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
55 Boylston St.
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:30, 1:00,
4:00, 4:30, 7:30, 8:00
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
5 DOL DSS
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 4:00, 6:45
LADY BIRD (R) 4:15, 7:00
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
WONDER (PG) 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:25
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:30, 12:00,
1:00, 3:00, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 7:00, 9:00, 10:00, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 9:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:30, 7:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 10:05, 6:20
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:00, 2:30,
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
6:05, 9:35
5 6 8 DIG
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 4:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:30, 12:00,
3:00, 3:30, 6:30, 7:00, 10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 1:00, 4:30,
8:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:30, 7:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 4:00
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 1:35, 4:35, 7:35, 10:25
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:25, 1:55, 2:25, 4:25,
4:55, 7:15, 7:45, 9:50, 10:20
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:20,
1:50, 4:10, 4:40, 7:10, 7:40, 10:05, 10:35
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:55, 3:55,
7:05, 10:05
COCO (PG) 11:50
FERDINAND (PG) 1:15, 4:05, 6:45, 9:40
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:20, 2:05, 4:45,
7:20, 9:55
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:15, 3:35, 6:50, 10:10
FATHER FIGURES (R) 11:35, 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 10:15
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS
www.showcasecinemas.com
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
BRAINTREE
LEXINGTON
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:00,
12:30, 1:00, 2:50, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 6:10, 6:40, 7:10,
7:40, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30
COCO (PG) 11:55
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:55, 4:00,
7:05, 10:05
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 12:15, 12:45, 2:35, 3:05,
4:55, 5:25, 7:25, 7:55, 9:50, 10:15
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:10,
12:40, 1:10, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 9:10,
9:40, 10:10
FERDINAND (PG) 12:50, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:40, 4:15, 6:45,
9:25
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:35, 3:35, 6:55, 9:55
FATHER FIGURES (R) 11:40, 2:20, 5:05, 7:45, 10:25
NATICK
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 12:15, 3:20, 6:25, 9:30
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:25, 1:55, 4:25, 7:15,
9:50
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 4:55, 7:45,
10:20
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:25,
1:20, 4:10, 7:05, 7:10, 10:05
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:50,
12:50, 1:50, 3:40, 4:40, 6:40, 7:40, 9:40, 10:35
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 11:50, 2:55,
6:10, 9:20
COCO (PG) 1:20, 3:55
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 12:00, 3:35, 6:55, 9:55
FERDINAND (PG) 10:50, 1:25, 4:05, 6:45, 10:10
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:20, 2:05, 4:45,
7:20, 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 10:25, 1:15, 4:20, 7:25,
10:25
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:50, 10:40
FATHER FIGURES (R) 10:55, 1:35, 4:15, 10:15
SOMERVILLE
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
5 6 I DIG
http://somervilletheatre.com/
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 5:00, 8:00
DOWNSIZING (R) 5:15, 8:15
LADY BIRD (R) 5:00, 7:30
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 5:30, 7:40
THE DISASTER ARTIST (R) 4:45, 7:15
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) (12:25, 3:30)
6:45, 9:50
DOWNSIZING (R) (12:20, 3:25) 6:30, 9:35
FATHER FIGURES (R) (12:45, 3:55) 7:15, 10:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) (12:30, 3:20) 7:35, 10:00
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) G
FURNITURE - NATICK
(12:30, 3:20) 6:15
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:15
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 3:30, 6:45, 10:00
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
www.nationalamusements.com
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 4:30, 8:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:30, 12:30,
3:00, 4:00, 6:30, 7:30, 10:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30,
7:00, 10:30
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 12:20, 3:25, 6:40, 9:35
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 1:15, 3:45, 6:10, 9:15
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:55,
1:20, 1:50, 4:10, 4:35, 7:10, 7:40, 9:55, 10:25
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:35, 3:50,
7:15, 10:20
COCO (PG) 11:25, 2:00
FERDINAND (PG) 1:10, 4:05, 6:45, 9:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:20, 2:05, 4:45,
7:20, 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:35, 4:30, 7:25, 10:15
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:15, 3:35, 6:50, 10:10
FATHER FIGURES (R) 1:25, 4:15, 7:05, 9:45
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:30,
12:00, 12:30, 2:50, 3:20, 3:50, 6:10, 6:40, 7:10,
9:30, 10:00, 10:30
COCO (PG) 11:45, 2:10
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 12:35, 3:40,
6:45, 9:50
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 12:15, 2:00, 2:35, 4:30,
5:05, 7:25, 7:55, 9:45, 10:25
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:00,
1:05, 4:05, 4:40, 7:15, 7:45, 10:10, 10:30
FERDINAND (PG) 1:10, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:20, 4:10, 6:50,
9:35
DOWNSIZING (R) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:15
FATHER FIGURES (R) 1:25, 4:25, 7:20, 9:55
G 9:10
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G (1:45) 4:35,
7:30, 10:05
FERDINAND (PG) (1:00) 4:05, 7:00, 9:40
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) G (12:15, 3:40)
6:00, 9:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G (1:30)
5:00, 8:45
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) (1:15) 4:15, 7:20, 9:55
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 5 12:30, 3:45,
6:55
DOWNSIZING (R) 5 12:15, 3:30, 6:45
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 1:15, 4:30, 7:05
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 5 1:00, 4:00,
6:30, 7:00
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 5 12:45, 4:15, 7:10
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) 5 12:00,
3:15
WESTBOROUGH
FRAMINGHAM
RANDOLPH
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
231 Turnpike Road 844-462-7342-453
THEATRES
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
www.amctheatres.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:00,
11:20, 12:00, 12:30, 1:30, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00,
5:00, 6:05, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:30, 9:35, 9:35,
9:50, 10:20
COCO (PG) 12:20, 3:15
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 12:45, 3:40, 6:55, 9:55
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 1:00, 4:15,
7:25, 10:40
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) 11:25, 11:55, 1:55, 2:20,
4:25, 4:55, 7:15, 7:45, 9:50, 10:20
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:05,
1:20, 1:50, 3:55, 4:10, 4:40, 7:10, 7:40, 10:05, 10:35
FERDINAND (PG) 1:15, 4:05, 6:45, 9:40
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:10, 1:40, 4:20,
7:05, 9:45
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:10, 3:25, 6:50, 10:10
FATHER FIGURES (R) 1:05, 7:20, 10:15
FERDINAND (PG) G 4:10, 9:30
FERDINAND 3D (PG) RealD 3D G 1:35, 6:45
COCO (PG) 12:45, 3:20, 6:00
JUSTICE LEAGUE (PG-13) 10:05
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 1:10, 3:45, 6:30,
10:10
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) G 11:00, 12:00,
2:30, 4:00, 6:15, 7:00, 9:15
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 8:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
12:30, 3:30, 7:45, 10:20
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D
1:30, 5:00
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) G 12:00, 2:20, 4:40, 7:30,
10:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) G
12:45, 3:40, 6:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D G 9:30
FATHER FIGURES (R) G 1:15, 4:15, 7:00, 9:40
WONDER (PG) 2:00, 4:45, 7:30
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent G 1:20,
4:15, 7:15
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent G 9:00
DOWNSIZING (R) G 12:15, 3:20, 6:40, 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent G 1:00,
4:00, 7:20, 10:10
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent G 12:00, 3:10,
6:20, 9:45
READING
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - READING
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
REGAL WESTBOROUGH STADIUM 12
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) G 11:00, 11:30,
12:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 6:05, 6:30, 7:00, 9:30,
10:00, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI 3D (PG-13) G 12:30,
4:00, 7:30
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 12:55, 3:45, 6:50, 9:40
PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13) G 11:25, 1:55, 4:25, 7:15,
9:50
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) G 4:20
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:50,
3:40, 6:40, 9:35
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) G
1:20, 4:10, 7:10, 10:05
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 11:40, 2:50,
6:20, 9:20
5 8
FERDINAND (PG) 1:25, 4:05, 6:45, 9:25
www.jordansimax.com
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 11:20, 2:05,
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 12:15
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13) 3:30, 6:45, 10:00
4:45, 7:20, 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:40, 4:30, 7:25, 10:20
DOWNSIZING (R) 12:35, 3:35, 6:55, 10:15
FATHER FIGURES (R) 1:35, 7:05, 9:45
B14
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
?OK, Eddie, here she comes. Just relax, play it cool, and
let her sniff your butt first.?
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today?s Sudoku Solution
4
6
9
7
5
8
2
3
1
5
3
7
6
1
2
8
4
9
Today?s Calcudoku Solution
2
1
8
3
4
9
5
7
6
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
6
5
2
8
9
4
7
1
3
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
1
9
3
5
2
7
6
8
4
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
8
7
4
1
6
3
9
5
2
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
7
4
5
2
3
6
1
9
8
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
9
8
6
4
7
1
3
2
5
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
3
2
1
9
8
5
4
6
7
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today?s Crossword Solution
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
ZIPPY ?The Long Corn Rye? by Bill Griffith
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
The plugger well-balanced meal.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
OFFICE PRODUCTS BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Illegal incentive
6 Pizarro?s foe
10 Ink stain
14 Speed detector
15 Bit of bridal
wear
16 Raspy breath
17 Gladiators?
venue
18 Front to ?space?
19 Verdi opera
20 Office
collection?
23 Slithery fish
24 ?Nail? anagram
25 ?Country?
event
28 Japanese
drink
31 Artist Rivera
35 Be entitled?
36 Crafty
37 Intensify
38 Office
communication?
41 Mortgaged one
42 Sailors
43 Dec. 24, e.g.
44 Precious violin
45 Drink heavily
46 Commencement VIP
47 ?Be Like ___?
49 Old ?Gang??
51 Office
get-together?
58 Not empty
59 Balder?s father
60 Trumpeter?s
noise
61 Isolated spot
of land
62 Big name in
electronics
63 Commercial cow
64 Peruse a book
65 Gold-holding
fort
66 Abrupt
transitions
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
DOWN
Paisley of music
Collectible
Caesar?s bad day
Loan offerer
Wipe chalk
Scientist Pavlov
It can be
pressing
8 Word with
?winner?s?
9 Hello or
goodbye
10 Really smart one
11 Lion?s digs
12 Ford competitor,
once
13 A cozy drink?
21 ___-Lorraine
(French
territory)
22 Helping ones
25 Ducks, turkeys
and such
26 Anticipate
27 Start for ?state?
29 Long time
trailer?
30 City in
central Japan
32 Old anesthetic
33 Exotic jelly
flavor
34 Chose or
decided
36 Type of union or
bureau
37 Concerning this,
in legalese
39 Like some pans
40 Drink like
a kitten
45 Muscle-to-bone
connector
46 Car front
48 Tall mall stall
50 Flower cluster,
as on carrots
51 Erato, for one
52 Jazz legend
Fitzgerald
53 Marchetti or
Vannelli
54 Jet black
55 Launch
party?
56 Leak indicator
57 Is dating
58 Certain
evergreen
9
9
5
4
6 5
7 3
3 1
9
5
4
1
9
1
8
3
4
8
4
1
8 9
4 5
5 2
7
1
6
2
T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
?17 brought many film, TV projects to Mass.
2017 was another busy year for filming around Boston and beyond. Here?s a list
of some of the productions based in and around the city, and when we can see
them on the big (and small) screen.
?The Burning Woman?
Abington, Brockton, and other Massachusetts locations stood in for the
small blue-collar Pennsylvania town
where this film takes place. The Jake
Scott-directed drama ? which doesn?t
have a release date yet ? stars Christiн
na Hendricks and Aaron Paul.
?City on a Hill?
This Showtime pilot, executive produced by Matt Damon and Ben Afн
fleck, was filming around Boston right
before the holidays. The series is a fictionalization of the mid-?90s era when
local law enforcement helped curtail
street violence.
?Castle Rock?
Several Massachusetts spots stood in
for Stephen King?s fictional town of
Castle Rock, Maine, in this J.J.
Abrams-produced TV series, set to debut on Hulu in 2018. It?s the first
scripted television series to film in
Massachusetts in 30 years. Scenes
were shot in Lancaster, New England
Studio in Devens, and the Worcester
Mercantile Center.
?Equalizer 2?
Haverhill and Chelsea hosted filming
for the first ?Equalizer? feature. The
Denzel Washington-led sequel filmed
in the South End in September. Duxbury?s Powder Point Bridge, which has
been featured in such films as ?The
Way, Way Back? and ?The Finest
Hours,? also hosted a shoot in October.
?I Feel Pretty?
Amy Schumer was spotted all over the
Boston area this summer while filming this comedy. Locations featured in
the shoot included the South End, Chinatown, Dedham, Salisbury Beach,
and Lynn. The film takes place in New
York.
?Proud Mary?
This is one of the Boston film projects
we?ll get to see soon; Taraji P. Henson
stars as a hit woman in Boston?s organized-crime community. Scenes were
shot last spring, and the movie will be
released Jan. 12.
DANA STARBARD/SONY PICTURES
Taraji P. Henson in ?Proud Mary,?
which will be released Jan. 12.
?XнMen: The New Mutants?
The latest addition to the popular superhero franchise filmed at Medfield
State Hospital over the summer. It?s
not the first time the abandoned hospital has appeared on film; Martin
Scorsese used it in his 2010 movie
?Shutter Island.? The ?X-Men? film is
expected out in April.
NICHOLAS PFOSI FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE/FILE
Amy Schumer on the Tremont Street set of ?I Feel Pretty? in August.
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
Antiнharassment
initiative launched
Reese Witherspoon, Shonda
Rhimes, Eva Longoria, and Jennifer
Aniston are among hundreds of Hollywood women who have formed an anti-harassment coalition called Time?s
Up.
The initiative (www.timesupnow.com) was launched Monday with
an open letter vowing support for
women in the entertainment business
and beyond, from janitors to healthcare workers. Time?s Up will include a
legal defense fund and will advocate
for legislation combating workplace
harassment.
?The struggle for women to break
in, to rise up the ranks and to simply
be heard and acknowledged in maledominated workplaces must end;
time?s up on this impenetrable monopoly,? the letter says.
The group is one answer to the
question of how women in Hollywood
would respond to cascading allegations that have upended the careers of
powerful men in an industry where
the prevalence of sexual predation has
yielded the minimizing clichщ of the
?casting couch,? and where silence has
been a condition of employment.
Contributors to the Time?s Up defense fund include Meryl Streep, Tayн
lor Swift, J.J. Abrams, and Viola Davis.
Dozens of men in the entertainment industry have faced harassment
and assault allegations in recent
New year
BRINSON+BANKS/THE NEW YORK TIMES/FILE
Eva Longoria is among hundreds
of Hollywood women who have
formed the Time?s Up coalition.
months, including Harvey Weinstein,
Charlie Rose, and Kevin Spacey.
Time?s Up has also been urging
women to wear black at the Golden
Globe Awards on Sunday, to use the
red carpet to speak out against gender
and racial inequality, and to raise
awareness about their initiative and
the legal fund.
?This is a moment of solidarity, not
a fashion moment,? Longoria said.
(AP/NYT)
Women rule ?17 box office
Sorry, Batman. So close, yet so far
away, Star-Lord. Better luck next time,
Captain Jack Sparrow.
Rather, the three most popular
movies at theaters in the United States
and Canada in 2017 ? ?Star Wars:
The Last Jedi,? ?Beauty and the Beast,?
and ?Wonder Woman? ? were each
driven by female characters, some-
PHOTOS BY DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES
Menounos?s surprise wedding warms hearts on live TV
Medford native and television star
Maria Menounos and fiance Keven
Undergaro made it a New Year?s Eve to
remember with a surprise televised
Times Square wedding officiated by
Steve Harvey.
?Omg! I can?t believe we are finally
getting married after 20 years! Tune in
to #nye on @foxtv to watch us get
hitched in just a few!#coldestbridever,? the Emerson grad tweeted a little
more than three hours before the anticipated ball drop.
Harvey ? who was hosting this
year?s New Year?s Eve coverage on Fox
along with Menounos ? officially became ordained, ?as of about 48 hours
ago courtesy of the Internet,? he joked
moments before officiating the brief
ceremony.
?We often say that a bride and
groom declare their love in front of the
whole world, but this time that?s for
real,? Harvey said right before the couple engaged in an emotional exchange
of vows.
?I was afraid of the big C word ?
the commitment word,? Undergaro
said as part of his vows.
?Maria, you are a blessing, not just
to my life, but an even bigger blessing
to the entire world,? Undergaro added
to Menounos, who in June had a benign brain tumor removed on her
thing that has not happened in at least
37 years, as far back as full box-office
data is available. The top comedy of
the year, ?Girls Trip,? was also anchored by women, as was the top film
to play in limited release, ?Lady Bird.?
?Women truly emerged as the giants of cinema this year,? said Paul
Dergarabedian, a senior comScore analyst, adding Oscar contenders like
?The Shape of Water,? ?The Post,? and
?I, Tonya? to the list.
Between Friday and Sunday, ?Star
Wars: The Last Jedi? (Walt Disney Studios) collected an estimated $52.4 million to become the No. 1 movie of
2017 in North America, with a threeweek total of $517 million. Overseas,
?The Last Jedi? has taken in an additional $523.3 million and has yet to
arrive in China, the world?s secondlargest movie market.
Disney also had the No. 2 movie of
the year. The live-action remake of
?Beauty and the Beast,? with Emma
Watson as the warbling Belle, collected $504 million at domestic theaters.
Directed by Bill Condon, ?Beauty and
the Beast? took in $759.5 million overseas.
Third place went to that breaker of
comic-book movie glass ceilings,
?Wonder Woman,? which lassoed
$412.6 million in domestic ticket sales
($409.3 million overseas) for Warner
Bros., minting two new A-list stars in
the process ? actress Gal Gadot and
director Patty Jenkins.
Overall, the year was a mixed one
for studios and theater owners. Domestic ticket sales totaled about
$11.12 billion, a 2.3 percent decline
from last year and on par with results
for 2015. (The New York Times)
39th birthday.
?When I couldn?t fight anymore,
you fought,? Menounos said ?You
stood tall.?
?I can?t believe this is happening
right now,? she said before the couple
shared their first kiss as husband and
wife in the final few moments of 2017.
Menounos and Undergaro are no
strangers to publicly broadcast displays of affection ? the two were engaged on ?The Howard Stern Show? in
March 2016.
From top: Maria Menounos marries Keven Undergaro, poses
with parents Litsa and Constantinos, and shows off her gown.
Globe correspondents Terence Cawley
and Maddie Kilgannon contributed.
Names can be reached at names@
globe.com or at 617-929-8253.
ERIC ANTONIOU
Wolf rings in 2018 in classic fashion
Singer Peter Wolf, backed by his ace band the Midnight Travelers, rang in 2018
at the Cabot Theatre in Beverly, treating the sold-out crowd to a stellar set of his
own songs and a few J. Geils classics, including ?Homework,? ?Musta Got Lost,?
and Bobby Womack?s ?Lookin? for a Love.? . . . A couple of JTs ? James Taylor
and Justin Timberlake ? were hanging out together on New Year?s Eve. The two
singers were at a house party in Big Sky, Mont., so naturally indulged in a couple
of impromptu duets in the kitchen. We?re told Timberlake referred to Taylor as
OGJT, an abbreviation for ?original gangsta JT.?
?I?m feeling a lot better than last year, when I had to get my own police escort to
walk away.? MARIAH CAREY, to Ryan Seacrest after her New Year?s Eve performance in Times Square
Sports
TV HIGHLIGHTS
NHL: Bruins-Islanders, 7 p.m., NESN
NBA: Trail Blazers-Cavaliers, 7 p.m., NBA
College basketball: Butler-Xavier, 7 p.m., FS1
Listings, C6
C
T H E B O S T O N GL OB E T U E S DAY, JAN UA RY 2 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Georgia takes
Rose in 2 OTs
A lot to track
on Celtics watch
By Ralph D. Russo
By Adam Himmelsbach
ASSOCIATED PRESS
GLOBE STAFF
Georgia 54 PASADENA, Calif. ? Sony Michel burst
through the line for a 27-yard touchdown
Oklahoma 48 run to give No. 3 Georgia a 54-48 victory
The Celtics closed 2017 with a mostly ho-hum win over
the Nets Sunday, but that was just about the only thing
that was ho-hum about their year. Now Boston enters
2018 with a 30-10 record, once again atop the Eastern
Conference, once again nearing a spring that is rife with
hope and possibility. So here are 18 Celtics-related things
to be aware of as the new year begins.
Monday night against No. 2 Oklahoma, winning the first
overtime Rose Bowl and sending the Bulldogs to the College
Football Playoff championship game.
Michel, who had a fumble in the fourth quarter returned
for a go-ahead Oklahoma touchdown, ran for 181 yards and
three scores for the Bulldogs (13-1), but none bigger than
the last one in the second overtime.
??I made plays. I gave up plays. My team just had faith in
me,?? said Michel, who did all that damage on just 11 carries.
??That?s what this team is all about. They showed true character today.??
In the final game of his great career, Oklahoma?s Baker
Mayfield threw for 287 yards and two touchdowns, and
caught a touchdown pass that gave the Sooners a 17-point
lead with six seconds left in the first half.
But the Heisman Trophy winner could not get the Sooners into the end zone in the first overtime when a touchROSE BOWL, Page C6
║Isaiah Thomas will play for the Cavaliers this week ?
but not against the Celtics on Wednesday. C2.
MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES
Georgia?s Lorenzo Carter, who blocked a field goal attempt in the
second OT, celebrates the Bulldogs? advancement to the title game.
1. Gordon Hayward?s possible return.
Hayward suffered a gruesome fracture-dislocation of
his left ankle Oct. 17. It was widely believed that he would
be out for the season. And, to be clear, that still remains
the most likely possibility.
But Hayward has made progress, and he said last
month that he remains hopeful of returning this year. He
no longer uses crutches or a walking boot, and he is again
able to shoot baskets while standing up. And with 3╜
CELTICS, Page C2
Going strong
At 39,
Harrison
still has it
Ben Volin
ON FOOTBALL
MADDIE MEYER/GETTY IMAGES
James Harrison played 27 snaps in his Patriots debut Sunday, primarily at weakside linebacker and almost exclusively on first and second down.
Playoff opponents
aren?t well-armed
By Stan Grossfeld
GLOBE STAFF
Bring on the Foxborough fodder. Book the
Patriots for their annual AFC Championship game appearance. They?re regulars at
the NFL?s Final Four establishment.
Armed with home-field advantage, that
shouldn?t change this postseason. It
should be Saturday night lights out for
whatever unlucky team ventures to Gillette Stadium on Jan. 13 for the AFC divi-
GASPER, Page C3
ON FOOTBALL, Page C5
Cold comfort for
hardy Gillette fans
Christopher L. Gasper
sional playoffs.
There is no jinx that a mere writer can put on the Patriots that will be responsible for their demise prior to the
AFC title game, a Foxborough birthright. If the Patriots fail
to advance to a seventh straight AFC Championship, it
won?t be because of a premature declaration.
It will be because a star is born in Tennessee Titans
quarterback Marcus Mariota. It will be because the Buffalo
Bills, playoff participants for the first time since 1999, get a
playoff miracle of their own this millennium. It will be because Alex Smith and the Kansas City Chiefs have replaced
Eli Manning and the New York Giants as the Patriots? Kryptonite. All seem unlikely.
The Steelers wanted nothing to do
with James Harrison this year, stashing their 39-year-old pass rusher on
the bench and refusing to unwrap
him. The Patriots signed Harrison to a
minimum contract last week, because
no other team called him.
But after watching just one game of
Harrison on Sunday, the Patriots? 26-6
win over the Jets, this much is clear ?
he still can play football. And the Patriots suddenly have a formidable linebacker group.
The Patriots have been hit with injuries at linebacker this year ? Dont?a
Hightower suffered a season-ending
pectoral injury in Week 7, Kyle Van
Noy has a calf injury that has mostly
kept him out of the last five games ?
and the Patriots have been forced to
piece it together with Elandon Roberts, special teamer Marquis Flowers,
and guys off the street such as Eric Lee
and Jonathan Freeny.
But it?s all starting to come back together. Van Noy returned from a
three-game absence to play strongside
linebacker. He only played 12 snaps,
but now he gets two weeks to prepare
for the Patriots? playoff game, and he
should be good to go, barring a setback. Van Noy is a big addition to the
defense, someone who can maintain
the edge in the run game and can cover running backs in the pass game.
They had Roberts at middle linebacker, who although he can be a liability in coverage, is still a missile in
STAN GROSSFELD/GLOBE STAFF
Dan Lavanway of West Lebanon, N.H., heads to his seat after procuring
a much-needed hot chocolate in the upper deck at Sunday?s game.
FOXBOROUGH ? Way up in the nosebleed seats of
Gillette Stadium, the beer is frozen solid. Fans in Section
340 wrapped the free hand warmers the Patriots gave out
around their blue aluminum bottles of Bud Light, trying
to thaw them out.
?Ice-cold beer? took on new meaning for Eric Fay of
Haverhill, who was bundled up like a Siberian survivor
but drinking responsibly during Sunday?s Patriots-Jets
game.
?This is what they give you for $9 ? a frozen beer? ?
said Fay, laughing under a blanket, scarf, and beard.
The beer froze when it hit the air, forming mini-ice
sculptures like some crazy Mount Washington weather experiment.
?You can?t even drink it,? said Fay. ?I had to put a hand
warmer on it and it still don?t unfreeze.?
But Fay said going to the game was better than staying
home and being a couch potato.
?It?s the last regular-season game of the year and it?s
windy, but I?m still enjoying it,?? he said.
Paul Emery had a hand warmer pasted on his beer, too.
He tried to drink it but said it ?froze sideways.?
He called out to his friends.
PATRIOTS, Page C4
C2
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
NBA
Thomas ready to go
? but not vs. Celtics
By Gary Washburn
GLOBE STAFF
C L E V E L AN D ? Fo r m e r
Celtic Isaiah Thomas will finally make his Cavaliers debut in
Tuesday?s home game against
the Portland Trail Blazers.
The bad news for Celtics
fans is that Thomas will not
play Wednesday when the Cavaliers come to TD Garden because he has yet to be cleared
to play in back-to-back games.
Thomas has missed Cleveland?s first 36 games as he recovered from a torn hip
labru m suffe red in Ma rch
when he was with the Celtics.
Thomas was traded to
Cleveland in August in the
Kyrie Irving deal, and Celtics
president Danny Ainge said
Thomas?s injury was a factor in
making the deal. T homas,
though, repeatedly said the hip
injury wasn?t career-threatening, and he has been working
feverishly to return.
Thomas practiced Monday
and was given clearance to play
his first NBA game since May
19, when he was removed from
Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals after aggravating
the injury.
?It?s been a long process for
me, frustrating and tough process , but at the same time
you?ve got to trust it,? he said
Monday. ?Now that day?s here.
I haven?t played in so long. It?s
going to be a weird feeling. I?m
happy it?s here.?
The Cavaliers have brought
Thomas on their road trips and
he warmed up before recent
games, hoping to make his debut this past Saturday at Utah.
But the club wanted him to
make his debut at home.
?It?s been a process,? said
coach Tyronn Lue. ?Overnight
[success] is not going to happen. He?s been doing a great
job of encouraging guys on the
LEGAL NOTICES
bench, and now he gets to play.
Everybody is excited for him.
I?m excited for him.?
Thomas will come off the
bench Tuesday and will be on a
minutes restriction as he
works himself into playing
shape.
Last season, Thomas averaged 28.9 points per game for
the Celtics ? second-highest in
team history to Larry Bird ?
along with 5.9 assists per game
and 46.3 percent shooting. He
helped lift the Celtics to new
heights under coach Brad Stevens, and his presence in
Cleveland could relieve some
scoring pressure off four-time
MVP LeBron James.
?I think a guy who can play
with pace, get into the paint,
when Bron gets tired or not
having a great game, you can
put the ball in his hands,? Lue
said. ?He can create and make
plays. We?re excited about that.
?Just seeing how he can play
with pace and ge t into the
paint with his speed and quickness and ability to shoot the
basketball, it really changes
our team.?
Thomas said he is healthy
but hardly in premium basketball shape because of the long
layoff.
?My hip is better, but I have
no feel, no rhythm for t he
game,? he said. ?I?ve been out
for so long, it feels like I lost my
powers. When we?re out there
scrimmaging, I can move
around and do what I want, I
just don?t have my powers yet.
?It might take some time,
but I?m excited about the opportunity to get out there and
compete.?
Gary Washburn can be
reached at
gwashburn@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter
@GwashburnGlobe.
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
CITATION FOR PUBLICATION
COMPLAINT TO QUIET TITLE
Superior Court Rule 4(d)
City of Newton
Legal Notice
Tuesday, January 9, 2018
Case Name: Town of Auburn v Nellie May Davenport and
Unknown Persons being the Heirs of Nellie May Davenport
Case Number: 218-2017-CV-01393
Date Complaint Filed: December 05, 2017
A Complaint to Quiet Title to a certain tract of land with any
attached buildings located in Auburn, New Hampshire, in
the State of New Hampshire has been filed with this court.
The property is described as follows:
?Consists of approximately 2.5 acres of land located
on Appletree Road? (more descriptive address on file
in Clerk?s office)
The Court ORDERS:
Town of Auburn shall give notice to Nellie May Davenport
and Unknown Persons being the Heirs of Nellie May Davenport of this action by publishing a verified copy of this
Citation for Publication once a week for three consecutive
weeks in the Boston Globe, a newspaper of general circulation. The last publication shall be on or before January
26, 2018.
Also, ON OR BEFORE
30 days after the last publication
Nellie May Davenport and Unknown Persons being the
Heirs of Nellie May Davenport shall file an Appearance and
Answer or responsive pleading with this court. A copy of
the Appearance and Answer or responsive pleading must
be sent to the party listed above.
February 16, 2018
Town of Auburn shall file the Return of Service with this
Court. Failure to do so may result in this action being
dismissed without further notice.
Notice to Nellie May Davenport and Unknown
Persons being the Heirs of Nellie May Davenport: If
you do not comply with these requirements, you will be
considered in default and the Court may issue orders that
affect you without your input.
Send copies to:
Charles F. Cleary, ESQ
Wadleigh Starr & Peters PLLC
95 Market Street
Manchester NH 03101
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
Maureen F. O?Neil
Clerk of Court
(504)
December 12, 2017
Public hearings will be held
on Tuesday, January 9, 2018
at 7:00 PM, second floor,
Newton City Hall before the
Land Use Committee of the
Newton City Council for the
purpose of hearing the following petitions at which
time all parties interested
in the items shall be heard.
Notice will be published
Tuesday,
December
26,
2017 and Tuesday, January
2, 2018 in The Boston Globe
and Wednesday, January
3, 2018 in the Newton Tab,
with a copy posted on the
city?s website at www.newtonma.gov and in a conspicuous place at Newton
City Hall.
NOTICE OF SUMMONS BY
PUBLICATION
Trial Court, Suffolk County
Superior Court, Massachusetts, 1784CV01009Joseph Milane, PLAINTIFF v.
John Doe, DEFENDANT.
JOHN DOE, whose address is
unknown, is hereby notified
that a complaint was filed in
the Suffolk County Superior
Court, 3 Pemberton Square,
Boston, MA 02108, Cause
Number 1784CV01009, alleging that Defendant posted
false and defamatory statements about Plaintiff on the
website
RipoffReport.com;
that Plaintiff has suffered
significant reputational harm
and sustained actual damages including loss of capital
and revenue, lost productivity,
and loss of intangible assets;
wherefore Plaintiff demands
judgment against Defendant,
compensatory and punitive
damages, an injunction, interest, attorney fees, costs
and all other relief that the
Court determines Plaintiff is
entitled.
Defendant is further notified to answer said
complaint and file his or her
answer to the Civil Clerk?s Office at 3 Pemberton Square,
Boston, MA 02108, within 20
days after the last day of publication or within such further
time as the law allows. Beauregard Burke & Franco, 32
William St, New Bedford, MA
02740, 508-993-0333 ? Counsel for Plaintiff.
Experience Globe.com
Special Permit Petition to allow oversized dormer at 165
Harvard St
DIEGO TEBALDI petition for
SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN
APPROVAL to allow dormer greater than 50% of
the exterior wall below it at
165 Harvard Street, Ward 2,
Newtonville, on land known
as Section 22, Block 23, Lot
2, containing approximately
9,273 sq. ft. of land in a district zoned MULTI RESIDENCE
1. Ref: 7.3.3, 7.4, 1.5.4.G.2,
1.5.4.G.2.b of the City of Newton Rev Zoning Ord, 2015.
Special Permit Petition to extend non-conforming use at
307-309 Lexington St
LESVOS PROPERTIES LLC./
MARIA BANIS petition for
SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN
APPROVAL to extend the
non-conforming use to allow
reconfiguration of the existing two-family dwelling into
one unit and adding a second
two-story attached dwelling
unit at 307-309 Lexington
Street, Ward 4, Auburndale,
on land known as Section 41,
Block 30, Lot 36 and Section
41, Block 30, Lot 37, containing approximately 15,216 sq.
ft. of land in a district zoned
SINGLE RESIDENCE 3.Ref:
7.3.3, 7.4, 3.4.1, 7.8.2.C.2 of
the City of Newton Rev Zoning Ord, 2015.
Special Permit Petition to
exceed FAR at 43 Fisher Avenue
DOUGLAS WHITAKER petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE
PLAN APPROVAL to construct
a first floor kitchen and mudroom and second floor bedroom and bath after razing
the existing first floor bump
out, creating an FAR of .47
where .44 is allowed and .40
exists at 43 Fisher Avenue,
Ward 6, Newton Highlands,
on land known as Section
52 Block 13 Lot 06, containing approximately 7,430 sq.
ft. of land in a district zoned
SINGLE RESIDENCE 2. Ref:
7.3.3, 7.4, 3.1.9.A.2 of the
City of Newton Rev Zoning
Ord, 2015.
Special Permit Petition to allow oversized dormer and office at 9 Crofton Road
JOSEPH AND KELLY ROGERS
petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE PLAN APPROVAL to
convert the second level of
an existing detached garage
structure for home business
office use and construct a
dormer greater than 50% of
the wall below it, on the detached garage structure at 9
Crofton Road, Ward 5, Waban,
on land known as Section 55,
Block 14, Lot 13, containing approximately 38,197
sq. ft. of land in a district
zoned SINGLE RESIDENCE
2. Ref: 7.3.3, 7.4, 1.5.4.G.2,
1.5.4.G.2.b, 6.7.3.B.1.k.iv of
the City of Newton Rev Zoning Ord, 2015.
Now place your want ads
whenever you want ads.
Create your ad today at
boston.com/monster
о
Special Permit Petition to
extend non-conforming commercial use at 203 Elliot St
BRICE BEN HOBBS AND REBECCA BELLA WANGH petition for SPECIAL PERMIT/SITE
PLAN APPROVAL to extend
the non-conforming commercial use, extend the nonconforming front setback,
extend the non-conforming
side setback and exceeding
the maximum FAR by extending the commercial use from
retail to an art studio and
constructing a second floor
residence at 203 Elliot Street,
Ward 5, Newton Upper Falls,
on land known as Section 51,
Block 18, Lot 4, containing
approximately 4,164 sq. ft. of
land in a district zoned MULTI
RESIDENCE 1. Ref: 7.3.3, 7.4,
3.1.4, 7.8.2.C.2, 3.2.3, 3.2.11
of the City of Newton Rev
Zoning Ord, 2015.
***
You may call the City Council
Office at 617-796-1210 for
information.
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
W
L
BOSTON
Toronto
New York
Philadelphia
Brooklyn
30
24
18
17
14
10
10
18
19
23
CENTRAL
W
L
Cleveland
Detroit
Milwaukee
Indiana
Chicago
24
20
19
19
13
12
15
15
18
23
SOUTHEAST
W
L
Washington
Miami
Charlotte
Orlando
Atlanta
21
19
13
12
10
16
17
23
26
26
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF FILE
Jayson Tatum has been outstanding ? but will he hit a ?rookie wall??
Here is what to track
on Celtics watch in 2018
uCELTICS
Continued from Page C1
months left in the regular season, there
is still so much time for more progress.
Still, there are many boxes to check
off, from jogging to sprinting to cutting. The guess here is that Hayward
sticks with the original plan and returns fully healthy next year. But the
fact that this is even a discussion
shows how far he has come.
2. The disabled player exception.
After Hayward was injured, the
NBA granted the Celtics an $8.4 million disabled player exception. This
will allow the Celtics, who are over the
salary cap, to sign a player to a oneyear deal for up to $8.4 million, or
trade for a player on an expiring contract worth $8.4 million or less.
There are other parameters. If Boston does not use the exception by
March 10, it will expire. Also, the team
can use the exception only on a trade
for a single player. If the Celtics do not
use the exception prior to the Feb. 8
trade deadline, they would target the
buyout market. Even if the Celtics use
the exception, though, it does not
make Hayward ineligible to return this
year.
3. Watch that Lakers pick.
Last June, the Celtics traded the
rights to the No. 1 overall pick to the
76ers in exchange for the No. 3 pick as
well as a future first-round choice. If
the Lakers? pick ? which Philadelphia
had previously acquired ? ends up in
the 2-5 range in this year?s draft, Boston will receive it. Los Angeles is currently 11-24, the second-worst record
in the NBA. With a stacked 2018 draft,
Celtics fans should keep one eye on
their longtime rivals.
4. But don?t totally forget the Nets
pick.
After drafting Jaylen Brown and
Jayson Tatum with picks they received
from the Nets in the 2013 Paul PierceKevin Garnett trade, the Celtics traded
the last Brooklyn pick from that deal,
the 2018 choice, to the Cavaliers as
part of the package to acquire Kyrie Irving. The Nets are 13-23, and the Celtics would not like the Cavaliers to cash
in with a high pick, especially since it
could entice LeBron James to re-sign
in Cleveland.
5. Tatum?s rookie wall?
Tatum has been magnificent ,
spending much of the year as the top 3point shooter in the league. On the
court, the adjustment has been easy.
But he has often said how the grueling
schedule has offered a challenge. So it
will be worth monitoring whether he
hits a wall.
Consider: In the seven games in
which the Celtics were playing on no
rest, Tatum made just 30.8 percent of
his 3-pointers. In the 33 other games,
he made 51.8 percent.
6. About that schedule . . .
The Celtics have played 40 games,
the most in the NBA and six more than
the Bucks and Raptors. Boston?s schedule was front-loaded because of the
Jan. 11 game against the 76ers in London. That matchup will be bookended
by a total of eight days off, and those
days had to be made up somewhere.
The good news is that the Celtics essentially get two All-Star breaks.
7. But AllнStar weekend will not be
a vacation for everyone.
The Celtics could be well-represented in Los Angeles in February. Irving is
an All-Star lock, and Al Horford seems
likely to make the team as a reserve.
Tatum will be asked to take part in the
Rising Stars game, and Brown could
be, too. Tatum and Brown could also
be options for the 3-point and slamdunk contests. But the Celtics staff will
get a breather, because the NBA does
not allow coaches to guide the All-Star
team in consecutive seasons.
8. Isaiah Thomas?s multiple reн
turns.
The Cavaliers said Monday that the
former Celtics star, who has been sidelined all season because of his hip injury, will make his debut Tuesday against
the Blazers but will not play in Boston
Wednesday. That means Thomas will
likely make his on-court return in Boston when the Cavs return Feb. 11. But
the Celtics would be smart to honor
Thomas on Wednesday anyway, because Feb. 11 is already booked.
9. Paul Pierce?s number retirement
ceremony.
The Truth?s No. 34 will be the 22nd
number to be retired by the Celtics.
The ceremony will take place about a
half-hour after that Feb. 11 game
against the Cavs. That event, combined
with Thomas?s return and two teams
jostling for playoff position, will make
it the hottest TD Garden ticket in
years.
10. An NBA Finals preview?
In the previous two seasons, the
Warriors were 0-2 at home against the
Celtics, and 75-5 against the rest of the
N B A . I n N o v e m b e r, t h e C e l t i c s
stormed back from a 17-point deficit
against Golden State at TD Garden and
grabbed the signature victory of their
16-game winning streak. The rematch
in Oakland Jan. 27 will be juicy.
11. Keep an eye on the Raptors.
The Raptors have somewhat quietly
nudged into contention in the East. Toronto has played six fewer games than
the Celtics, but the teams are equal in
the loss column. Toronto also has a net
rating of 7.6, considerably higher than
Boston?s 4.9. The Raptors are 13-1 at
home, and no team has played fewer
home games, so even though they have
had a light schedule, there will be an
opportunity for them to make up
ground.
12. Is the Celtics? defense elite?
It sure seemed to be at the start of
the year, although the unit has since
taken steps backward. After a dominant 95.6 defensive rating in October,
that slipped to 99.6 in November before falling to 104 in December. That
dip has coincided with a gradual improvement in offensive numbers, but
the Celtics need to steady themselves
at the defensive end.
13. Kyrie for MVP?
There are so many outstanding candidates this year, from James Harden
to James to Giannis Antetokounmpo,
that Irving will need to dazzle in the
second half to have a real shot. But if
the Celtics finish atop the East despite
Hayward?s injury, and Irving continues
his career-best shooting year, he?ll be
in the conversation.
14. Keep an eye on Marcus Morн
ris?s knee.
Morris has missed 21 games because of knee soreness, but over the
past six quarters he has shown how
valuable he can be, making 6 of 7 3point attempts and 9 of 13 shots overall, while also showing his defensive
versatility guarding players such as
Harden.
15. Playoff matchups.
The Celtics are all but certain to
land one of the top three seeds in the
Eastern Conference, and they must be
considered favorites to be No. 1. But
the bottom half of the conference is
congested, and matchups will be important. The Celtics would not want to
see a team like the Wizards fall to them
in a first-round series.
16. Strength of schedule.
Although the Celtics? schedule has
been quite busy, it has not been the
most difficult. They played the Cavs,
Raptors, and Wizards just three times
over those first 40 games, but will play
a total of eight games against them
over the final 42.
17. Earlier trade deadline.
The NBA moved the trade deadline
up two weeks, to Feb. 8. The Celtics
have been in the mix at the deadline
the past two years but have come up
empty. Their roster does not have as
many holes as it once did, but they do
have the disabled player exception. If
they make a deal, it will likely be a minor one.
18.
The Celtics have a blank banner
hanging at their facility, as they wait
for their 18th title. We?ll leave this No.
18 space blank, too, but mostly because we?re out of material. Happy
New Year.
Pct. GB
.750
.706
.500
.472
.378
Pct. GB
.667
.571
.559
.514
.361
W3
W1
W1
W2
W1
Conf.
16н5
13н1
15н6
7н9
8н10
19н8
13н4
9н13
7н9
8н12
Streak Home
Conf.
?
3╜
4
5╜
11
Pct. GB
.568
.528
.361
.316
.278
Streak Home
?
3
10
11
14╜
L3
W1
W2
L4
L1
14н4
12н5
12н6
11н9
9н8
18н7
12н10
7н10
14н10
12н11
Streak Home
Conf.
?
1╜
7╜
9╜
10╜
W2
W1
L1
L2
W1
12н6
8н9
10н10
7н10
7н11
10н9
12н9
7н14
7н16
6н19
Streak Home
Conf.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
PACIFIC
W
L
Golden State
LA Clippers
Phoenix
Sacramento
LA Lakers
29
16
14
12
11
8
19
24
24
24
SOUTHWEST
W
L
Houston
San Antonio
New Orleans
Dallas
Memphis
26
25
18
13
12
9
12
18
25
25
NORTHWEST
W
L
Minnesota
Oklahoma City
Denver
Portland
Utah
23
20
19
18
16
14
17
17
17
21
Pct. GB
.784
.457
.368
.333
.314
?
12
15╜
16╜
17
Pct. GB
.743
.676
.500
.342
.324
15н5
9н7
6н14
6н10
6н12
16н5
11н11
9н13
7н12
5н17
Streak Home
Conf.
?
2
8╜
14╜
15
Pct. GB
.622
.541
.528
.514
.432
W1
W3
L1
L2
L6
W1
L1
L2
W4
W1
14н5
17н2
9н9
8н11
7н12
15н5
13н7
9н13
8н16
11н14
Streak Home
Conf.
?
3
3╜
4
7
W1
L2
L2
L1
W1
12н6
14н6
12н4
8н10
13н6
19н6
11н10
10н11
9н10
9н12
MONDAY?S RESULTS
At Brooklyn 98
Orlando 95
At Toronto 131
Milw. 127 (OT)
Portland 124 at Chicago 120 (OT)
At Minnesota 114
LA Lakers 96
TUESDAY?S GAMES
Portland at Cleveland
7
San Antonio at New York
7:30
Atlanta at Phoenix
Charlotte at Sacramento
10
Memphis at LA Clippers
10:30
9
SUNDAY?S RESULTS
At BOSTON 108
At Washington 114
Minnesota 107
Brooklyn 105
Chicago 110
at Indiana 90
At Hous. 148 LA Lakers 142 (2OT)
NETS 98, MAGIC 95
ORLANDO
FG
FT Reb
Min MнA MнA OнT
Gordon.. 41 8н20 2н3 1н12
Smmns . 30 3н12 3н4 3н5
Biyomo . 29 4н9 5н6 9н17
Fournier 33 4н15 5н5 0н0
Payton .. 32 7н15 2н3 1н4
Iwundu . 19 2н6 0н0 3н4
Hezonja 17 2н7 0н0 1н2
Spghts .. 16 3н5 1н2 1н7
Agstn .... 16 1н5 1н2 0н1
Afflalo ..... 8 1н2 0н0 0н0
Totals .... 35н96 19н25 19н52
A
0
3
0
1
7
1
0
1
2
1
16
A
2
1
0
1
5
8
0
0
0
0
17
F
2
1
3
5
2
2
0
2
1
0
18
Pt.
20
10
13
13
17
5
4
8
3
2
95
F
3
4
3
1
2
3
0
2
3
1
22
Pt.
14
13
7
15
7
15
9
16
0
2
98
FG%: .439, FT%: .739. 3нpt. goals: 9н
25, .360 (Crabbe 3н6, Dinwiddie 2н5,
Zeller 1н1, LeVert 1н2, Carroll 1н4, Harн
ris 1н4, HollisнJefferson 0н1, Acy 0н2).
Team rebounds: 7. Team turnovers: 13
(12 pts.). Blocked shots: 10 (Crabbe 3,
Allen 2, Dinwiddie 2, Acy, HollisнJefferн
son, Zeller). Turnovers: 13 (LeVert 5,
Harris 2, HollisнJefferson 2, Acy, Crabн
be, Dinwiddie, Stauskas). Steals: 7 (Leн
Vert 2, Carroll, Crabbe, Dinwiddie, Harн
ris, HollisнJefferson). Technical fouls:
None.
Orlando .................27 21 22 25 ?
Brooklyn................22 25 24 27 ?
95
98
A?16,164 (17,732). T?2:12. Offiн
cials?Bill Kennedy, Ray Acosta, Gediн
minas Petraitis
BLAZERS 124, BULLS 120
PORTLAND
FG
FT Reb
Min MнA MнA OнT
Aminu ... 41 9н17 1н1 1н7
Turner... 38 10н14 1н1 0н4
Nurkic ... 38 5н13 1н2 4н15
McCllm . 45 11н30 5н6 1н6
Napier... 41 3н13 4н4 1н5
Conught 22 5н9 4н4 0н2
Davis ..... 15 2н5 0н0 5н8
Hakless. 14 0н2 0н0 0н1
Cllns ...... 12 2н5 0н0 0н2
47н
Totals ....
16н18 12н50
108
Min
Makaen 34
Vaetine . 34
Lopez .... 36
Dunn ..... 35
Holiday . 41
Mirotic .. 19
Nwaba .. 19
Grant..... 18
Portis .... 17
Zipser.... 12
Totals ....
Charlotte 98
at Sacramento 96
Dallas 116
Philadelphia 123
at Okla. City 113
at Phoenix 110
L.A. LAKERS
FG
FT Reb
Min MнA MнA OнT
Ingrm .... 29 4н11 6н7 0н5
Kuzm..... 18 2н7 0н1 0н1
Rndle..... 28 6н10 3н4 5н12
Ennis ..... 23 2н7 2н2 1н4
Hart....... 21 4н7 0н0 0н1
Clrkson . 24 7н15 4н7 0н2
Brewer.. 22 4н7 3н4 0н0
Nance.... 20 3н5 0н0 1н4
Caruso .. 18 0н2 1н2 0н1
Blue....... 17 0н2 1н2 0н0
Zubac.... 12 2н3 0н0 1н4
Bogut ...... 8 0н0 0н0 1н3
Totals .... 34н76 20н29 9н37
A
1
1
0
4
1
4
1
2
1
2
0
1
18
F
2
2
2
3
5
1
3
1
3
0
3
0
25
Pt.
14
6
15
7
10
20
12
6
1
1
4
0
96
FG%: .447, FT%: .690. 3нpt. goals: 8н
26, .308 (Hart 2н4, Kuzma 2н4, Clarkson
2н6, Brewer 1н3, Ennis 1н4, Caruso 0н1,
Blue 0н2, Ingram 0н2). Team rebounds:
11. Team turnovers: 24 (29 pts.).
Blocked shots: 4 (Brewer, Ennis, Inн
gram, Randle). Turnovers: 24 (Brewer
4, Randle 4, Caruso 3, Clarkson 3,
Nance Jr. 3, Ingram 2, Blue, Bogut,
Hart, Kuzma, Zubac). Steals: 12 (Brewн
er 2, Caruso 2, Ennis 2, Nance Jr. 2,
Blue, Clarkson, Hart, Randle). Techniн
cal fouls: None.
MINNESOTA
FG
FT Reb
Min MнA MнA OнT
Gibson .. 33 5н9 4н4 0н5
Wiggins 35 7н16 6н7 2н9
Towns... 27 7н13 0н0 2н13
Butler.... 37 8н14 11н11 1н3
Jones..... 27 1н4 2н2 0н1
Dieng..... 22 7н8 3н4 2н4
Crwfrd .. 20 1н7 1н2 0н1
Bjelica... 15 2н4 0н0 0н4
Brooks .. 14 0н2 0н0 0н0
Georges.. 7 2н3 0н0 0н0
Aldrich .... 2 0н1 0н0 0н1
Totals .... 40н81 27н30 7н41
A
1
4
1
9
5
0
4
1
1
0
0
26
F Pt.
3 14
1 21
4 16
2 28
4 5
2 17
2 3
2 5
3 0
1 5
0 0
24 114
FG%: .494, FT%: .900. 3нpt. goals: 7н
20, .350 (Towns 2н4, Butler 1н1, Georgн
esнHunt 1н1, Bjelica 1н3, Jones 1н3, Wigн
gins 1н5, Brooks 0н1, Crawford 0н2).
Team rebounds: 6. Team turnovers: 17
(20 pts.). Blocked shots: 5 (Dieng 2,
Butler, Towns, Wiggins). Turnovers: 17
(Butler 7, Towns 4, Brooks 2, Crawford
2, Gibson, Jones). Steals: 14 (Butler 3,
Crawford 3, Jones 3, Towns 2, Wiggins
2, Brooks). Technical fouls: coach Timн
berwolves (defensive 3нsecond), 4:48
first; Butler, 1:09 second.
L.A. Lakers............18 30 28 20 ? 96
Minnesota.............30 30 31 23 ? 114
Officials?David Guthrie, Michael
Smith, Jacyn Goble
RAPTORS 131, BUCKS 127
A
1
6
2
8
6
1
0
0
1
F
4
2
2
2
2
0
0
1
3
Pt.
24
22
11
32
11
16
4
0
4
25 16 124
FG%: .435, FT%: .889. 3нpt. goals: 14н
33, .424 (Aminu 5н7, McCollum 5н11,
Connaughton 2н4, Turner 1н2, Napier
1н5, Harkless 0н1, Collins 0н3). Team reн
bounds: 9. Team turnovers: 8 (13 pts.).
Blocked shots: 5 (Davis 3, Nurkic 2).
Turnovers: 8 (McCollum 2, Nurkic 2,
Aminu, Connaughton, Harkless, Turnн
er). Steals: 7 (Nurkic 3, Aminu, Harkн
less, Napier, Turner). Technical fouls:
None.
CHICAGO
FG
FT Reb
MнA MнA OнT
7н12 1н2 0н8
4н13 0н0 1н7
6н16 3н4 5н6
9н20 3н3 1н7
4н10 5н5 0н7
6н13 4н4 1н10
1н4 1н2 2н4
1н4 1н2 0н1
6н9 1н1 5н7
1н3 0н0 0н1
45н
19н23 15н58
104
Memphis 114
WOLVES 114, LAKERS 96
FG%: .365, FT%: .760. 3нpt. goals: 6н
31, .194 (Gordon 2н8, Speights 1н2,
Iwundu 1н3, Payton 1н3, Simmons 1н5,
Afflalo 0н1, Hezonja 0н2, Augustin 0н3,
Fournier 0н4). Team rebounds: 8. Team
turnovers: 12 (9 pts.). Blocked shots: 5
(Biyombo 3, Fournier, Payton). Turnн
overs: 12 (Payton 3, Afflalo 2, Gordon 2,
Augustin, Biyombo, Fournier, Simн
mons, Speights). Steals: 5 (Payton 2,
Fournier, Gordon, Simmons). Technical
fouls: None.
BROOKLYN
FG
FT Reb
Min MнA MнA OнT
Carroll... 29 6н12 1н2 2н10
HllsJfrn . 38 4н13 5н6 2н7
Zeller..... 13 3н7 0н0 2н7
Crabbe.. 28 3н8 6н6 1н8
Dinwiie.. 30 2н6 1н2 0н3
LeVert... 27 6н15 2н3 1н5
Harris.... 26 4н8 0н0 0н4
Allen...... 20 7н8 2н4 2н6
Acy ........ 17 0н2 0н0 0н0
Staskas. 12 1н3 0н0 0н2
Totals .... 36н82 17н23 10н52
At LA Clippers 106
A
1
6
5
4
4
2
0
2
4
0
F
2
4
1
4
3
0
2
2
1
2
Pt.
19
10
15
22
14
18
3
3
14
2
28 21 120
FG%: .433, FT%: .826. 3нpt. goals: 11н
27, .407 (Markkanen 4н6, Mirotic 2н5,
Valentine 2н8, Portis 1н1, Dunn 1н2, Holн
iday 1н4, Zipser 0н1). Team rebounds:
9. Team turnovers: 12 (13 pts.).
Blocked shots: 7 (Lopez 3, Dunn, Holiн
day, Markkanen, Portis). Turnovers: 12
(Dunn 8, Grant, Lopez, Mirotic, Portis).
Steals: 5 (Valentine 2, Dunn, Grant,
Mirotic). Technical fouls: None.
Portland............. 31 21 31 29 12 ? 124
Chicago.............. 23 30 34 25 8 ? 120
A?20,860 (20,917). Officials?Ron
Garretson, JB DeRosa, Mark Ayotte
MILWAUKEE
FG
FT Reb
Min MнA MнA OнT A F Pt.
Antepo.. 42 9н18 7н9 2н9 7 4 26
Middleн
43 7н17 4н4 0н3 2 4 18
ton.........
Henson . 26 4н8 2н2 3н7 2 3 10
Bledsoe 35 9н15 6н6 1н7 3 3 29
Snell ...... 18 1н4 0н0 0н2 0 0 2
Brogdon 39 7н13 0н0 3н6 2 4 15
Deldova 29 2н5 0н0 1н5 10 2 6
Maker ... 18 4н8 5н5 0н4 1 3 16
Kpatrick 10 1н3 2н2 0н0 0 0 5
Terry ....... 5 0н2 0н0 0н0 0 0 0
Totals .... 44н93 26н28 10н43 27 23 127
FG%: .473, FT%: .929. 3нpt. goals: 13н
27, .481 (Bledsoe 5н7, Maker 3н4, Delн
lavedova 2н4, Brogdon 1н2, Kilpatrick
1н2, Antetokounmpo 1н3, Snell 0н1, Midн
dleton 0н4). Team rebounds: 11. Team
turnovers: 14 (13 pts.). Blocked shots:
3 (Henson, Maker, Middleton). Turnн
overs: 14 (Bledsoe 5, Brogdon 3, Midн
dleton 2, Dellavedova, Henson, Maker,
Snell). Steals: 9 (Bledsoe 4, Middleton
2, Brogdon, Maker, Snell)
TORONTO
FG
FT Reb
Min MнA MнA OнT
Annoby . 35 0н0 1н2 0н6
Ibaka..... 38 5н19 1н1 2н8
Valciuns 16 2н3 2н2 0н5
DeRzn.... 43 17н29 13н13 1н5
Lowry.... 41 7н13 7н10 1н6
Vanlet ... 22 4н7 1н2 0н2
Wrght.... 19 3н7 2н3 0н1
Miles ..... 17 3н7 0н0 0н4
Poeltl..... 17 2н3 0н0 1н2
Siakam.. 16 2н3 0н0 1н1
Totals .... 45н91 27н33 6н40
A
2
2
0
8
6
2
2
1
2
0
25
F Pt.
1 1
2 11
1 6
4 52
5 26
1 11
0 8
2 8
3 4
1 4
20 131
FG%: .495, FT%: .818. 3нpt. goals: 14н
33, .424 (DeRozan 5н9, Lowry 5н10, Vanн
Vleet 2н3, Miles 2н4, Wright 0н2, Ibaka
0н5). Team rebounds: 9. Team turnн
overs: 12 (16 pts.). Blocked shots: 8
(Ibaka 4, Wright 2, DeRozan, Lowry).
Turnovers: 12 (Lowry 3, DeRozan 2,
Ibaka 2, Anunoby, Siakam, Valanciuн
nas, VanVleet, Wright). Steals: 8 (Ibaka
2, DeRozan, Lowry, Miles, Poeltl, VanVн
leet, Wright). Technical fouls: None.
Milwaukee ........ 30 26 28 30 13 ? 127
Toronto.............. 35 25 28 26 17 ? 131
A?19,800 (19,800). T?2:31. Offiн
cials?Derek Richardson, Ed Malloy,
Gary Zielinski
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
Rask is hottest thing on ice
Fluto Shinzawa
ON HOCKEY
There is an easy solution to
ease the sufferings of the frostbitten masses: Huddle around
Tuukka Rask.
The Bruins goalie is hot
enough to make anybody within his vicinity peel off the layers.
In his last 12 starts, Rask is 101-1 with a 1.43 goals-against average and a .943 save percentage. He has two shutouts within
this 12-start segment, including
a 25-save laugher Saturday in
the Bruins? 5-0 licking of Ottawa.
Of the 14 NHL goalies who
have made 12 or more starts
since Nov. 26, none has a higher
save percentage than the skinny Finn ? not the inimitable
Carey Price, not Bruins killer
Braden Holtby, not even Vezina
favorite Sergei Bobrovsky.
?He?s dead-on,? said Bruins
coach Bruce Cassidy.
The Bruins closed out 2017
with an 11-3-2 sprint. There
were many reasons for that roll,
which catapulted them into second place in the Atlantic Division. The primary factor is in
goal.
There is little need to explain
how a puckstopper who allows
fewer than 1.5 goals per game
can make a difference between
wins and losses. The Bruins
have a dominant first line, good
secondary scoring, and six reliable defensemen. Airtight goaltending can make up for deficiencies in any of those areas.
It is probably no coincidence
that Rask?s pilot light roared to
life after one of the most challenging stretches of his career.
Other goalies have not
pushed Rask since Tim Thomas
made his exit after the 2011-12
season. The Boston net has
been marked as Rask?s territory,
protected from advances by
Niklas Svedberg , Jonas
Gustavsson, or even Chad Johnson, who was excellent as the
No. 2 in 2013-14.
But in November, for the
first time since the net belonged to Thomas, Rask sat for
four straight games. It was Anton Khudobin?s turn to carry
the team ? a well-deserved
ple off weeks for Tuukka before
you say, ?Hey, we need a wholesale change here.? That?s the
way I felt.
? We communicated that
with the goalies internally.
Goalie Bob talked to them every
day about it. Just something we
decided to do at the time.
?I think it?s worked out well
for both. I don?t think Anton?s
lost a lot of his edge. Tuukka
has clearly, however you want
to summarize it, benefited from
being pushed, not playing, or
finding his game, whatever you
want to call it.?
From the perspectives of
both goalie and employer, Rask
wasn?t far off his game, even if
the numbers said otherwise.
When Rask was parked in a
four-game losing streak, the
Bruins were averaging 1.75
goals per outing. One so-so goal
allowed by Rask would cave in
his team?s prospects of winning.
Rask?s teammates had yet to
find their current degree of
seamless defensive coverage.
For whatever reason, Khudobin
was better at compensating for
the D-zone breakdowns.
But while Khudobin was
winning, Rask was getting angry. He understood why he
wasn?t playing. That didn?t
mean he liked it.
?You?d see it a little bit in his
demeanor after a few games,?
Cassidy said. ?You?d see him get
a little more ornery. You could
see the passion was there and
he wanted the net back.?
The net has not been the only locus of competition. The
healthy Bruins are bloated at
multiple positions.
Flashy rookie Anders Bjork
will be scratched against the Islanders Tuesday because of Ryan Spooner, who pumped in
two goals against Ottawa as the
No. 2 right wing. Adam McQuaid has put his health at risk
every time he?s pulled on his jersey. But the musclebound defenseman cannot crack the blue
line because of the play of his
peers. Frank Vatrano, once projected as a top-six wing, is a
press box regular. Depth has
improved to the point that Matt
Beleskey, due $3.8 million annually through 2020, is parked
in Providence.
Islanders thumbnails
R When, where: Tuesday, 7 p.m., at
Barclays Center, Brooklyn.
R TV, radio: NESN, WBZнFM (98.5).
R Goals: Anders Lee 24, John Tavaн
res 21, Mathew Barzal 13, Jordan
Eberle 13.
R Assists: Josh Bailey 38, Tavares
28, Barzal 23.
R Goaltending: Jaroslav Halak (11н
10н2, 3.15 GAA), Thomas Greiss (9н
5н2, 3.82 GAA).
R Head to head: This is the second
of three meetings. The Bruins won
the first, 3н1, Dec. 9.
R Miscellany: The Islanders are
second in the NHL with 134 goals,
but have given up the secondнmost
(138) . . . Bailey is tied for the
league lead in assists . . . The Isн
landers went 5н8н2 in December
. . . Former Bruins defenseman
Johnny Boychuk is sidelined with a
lowerнbody injury.
turn, at that. Khudobin was on
fire. At a time when the Bruins
needed every point, Khudobin
delivered 16 of 18, including
one in every start, when he
went 7-0-2. Rask, on the other
hand, did not qualify as a No. 1.
Rask started the season 37-2 with a 2.89 GAA and an
.897 save percentage. According to Corsica Hockey, Rask?s
high-danger save percentage
was .771, indicating that he was
not taking goals off the scoreboard as aces sometimes do.
Yet Cassidy, with input from
goaltending coach Bob Essensa,
made it clear at the time that
Rask was still the organization?s
No. 1 netminder.
Asked what that meant at
the time, Rask said wit h a
shrug, ?I don?t know. I guess it?s
good to have that confidence
from your coach.?
Other coaches might not
have been so generous. They
would have leveled the playing
field and not offered as much
clarity as to who was the ace
and who wasn?t.
In retrospect, Cassidy was
right to pump Rask?s tires.
?Because, in my estimation,
he was,? Cassidy said. ?Sitting
down with Anton, he knew
what his role was. His job was
to push the No. 1 and give us
good, strong starts. He did that
and more.
?But we just always felt
Tuukka was our guy. I think you
need a bigger body of work
than just a few games or a cou-
G l o b e
Sports
Playoff opponents not well-armed
uGASPER
Continued from Page C1
The formula to take down
Bill Belichick and Tom Brady
in the postseason is proven. It
requires high-level quarterback play and an indefatigable
and unintimidated defense
that won?t cower before Brady
and is willing to test just how
pliable he is ? mentally and
physically. If you don?t have a
quarterback who can stand up
to the mental pressure from
Belichick?s schemes and Brady?s brilliance, you have no
shot.
The three potential opponents have not proven they
have that type of steely-eyed
signal-caller. (Smith still lacks
t h a t e l i t e Q B e l a n .) T h e y
shouldn?t feel bad. That type
of quarterbacking cachet is in
rare supply this postseason.
Assessing the playoff invite
list, it worked out so favorably
for the Patriots that you would
think NFL senior vice president of officiating Alberto Riveron was reviewing and setting the playoff field for them.
No Baltimore Ravens with Joe
Flacco to worry about. No Los
Angeles Chargers and Philip
Rivers to contend with. Instead, the final two spots belong to Mariota, who threw 15
interceptions and 13 touchdown passes this season, and
Tyrod Taylor, who is like the
threadbare sock the Bills keep
trying to throw out only to
have it reappear in the dryer.
In the AFC, half the field
boasts a quarterback who has
never started a playoff game,
never mind won one. Jacksonville?s Blake Bortles joins Mariota and Taylor in the postseason christening club.
Smith sports a 2-4 career
playoff record, but he has won
one playoff game in four tries
in Kansas City. That victory
came two seasons ago against
the Houston Texans. His counterpart that day was current
Patriots backup Brian Hoyer,
who committed five turnovers.
If history is a guide, it takes
a certain passing pedigree to
oust the Patriots. Outside of
Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger,
where are those guys in this
AFC field?
Since the 2006 season, the
quarterbacks who have
knocked New England out of
the playoffs have been good
enough to win Super Bowl
rings. Eli Manning, Flacco,
and Peyton Manning have
combined to hand the Patriots
seven of their eight playoff
losses in that time.
The Rex Ryan-sized exception was Off the Mark Sanchez
beating the top-seeded Patriots during the 2010 season
playoffs at Gillette Stadium,
one of the most shocking losses of the Brady-Belichick Era.
Yet, Sanchez piloted the Jets to
back-to-back AFC title games
in 2009 and 2010.
Is Smith, known throughout his career as a cerebral
and cautious caretaker, not a
gunslinger, ready to take the
leap to championship-caliber
QB? Kansas City certainly
didn?t think so before the season when it traded into the top
10 to draft quarterback Patrick Mahomes.
Smith has a tidy 12 touchdowns and just two interceptions in his postseason career.
In three career games against
the Patriots, he has completed
69 percent of his passes and
thrown eight touchdowns and
zero interceptions. In KC?s season-opening 42-27 victory
over the Patriots at Gillette
Stadium Sept. 7, the night
they unveiled their fifth Super
Bowl banner, Smith was surgical, finishing 28 of 35 for 368
yards and 4 touchdowns.
But that was when the Patriots were finding themselves
? and beating themselves ?
defensively, struggling to cover and communicate in their
secondary. And we?re talking
about the playoffs now. Both
times Smith has beaten the Patriots it has been during the
first four games of a season, or
as it?s known around here the
Extended Preseason. Winning
in September and winning at
Gillette in January are completely different tasks.
The Chiefs are the only
team to fear before the AFC
championship. They have the
NFL?s rushing champion in
rookie Kareem Hunt, talented
tight end Travis Kelce, and
fleet wide receiver Tyreek Hill.
But they?ve been as streaky as
a road salt-caked windshield.
KC won its first five games of
the season. Then it dropped
six of seven, including four
straight. Then KC closed the
season with four straight wins.
Will the real Chiefs please
stand up?
The Patriots? good fortune
in what Bill Parcells called The
Tournament extends to the
NFC, if you dare look ahead to
Super Bowl LII. (This is anathema to Belichick, who believes
myopia isn?t a condition, it?s a
virtue.) The odds are ever in
the Patriots? favor. The NFC?s
top two seeds, Philadelphia
and Minnesota, are rolling out
Nick Foles and Case Keenum
at quarterback.
There are three quarterbacks on the NFC side who
have reached the Super Bowl.
Two of them will face off in the
wild-card round as Drew
Brees and the New Orleans
Saints host Cam Newton and
the Carolina Panthers. The
other is Atlanta?s Matt Ryan,
who faces the Los Angeles
Rams and playoff neophyte
Jared Goff. This is the Matt Ryan who was a co-conspirator
in the Patriots? epic comeback
in Super Bowl LI, immortalizing ?28-3? in local sports lore.
When it comes to dethroning the Patriots, it?s no quality
quarterback, no shot. If you
come at the NFL?s kings in the
playoffs, you best bring a quarterback who doesn?t miss.
Christopher L. Gasper can be
reached at
cgasper@globe.com.
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
BRUCE BENNETT/GETTY IMAGES
THE OUTSIDERS ? The Rangers beat
the Sabres, 3-2, in OT in the Winter
Classic at Citi Field in New York.
Gionta to lead
Olympic team
FROM WIRE REPORTS
Veteran winger Brian Gionta will serve as
captain of the US Olympic hockey team at the
Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, which will
be the first without NHL players since 1994.
USA Hockey announced its roster Monday
at the Winter Classic in New York. It includes
college players Troy Terry from Denver, Jordan Greenway from Boston University, Will
Borgen from St. Cloud State, and Ryan Donato from Harvard.
Without the ability to name NHL stars, the
US roster is a mix of players from the NCAA
ranks, European professional leagues, and the
American Hockey League. AHL star Chris
Bourque from Boston and a handful of former
NHL players now in Europe, including Mark
Arcobello, Jim Slater, James Wisniewski, and
Bobby Sanguinetti, are expected to help Gionta on the leadership front. The roster also includes Brighton native and Harvard graduate
Noah Welch and BU grad Matt Gilroy.
The women?s roster includes 10 Olympians, six of whom competed at the 2010 Vancouver Games and 2014 Sochi Games ? Westfield native Kacey Bellamy, captain Meghan
Duggan of Danvers, Hilary Knight, Jocelyne
Lamoureux-Davidson, Monique LamoureuxDavidson, and Gigi Marvin ? and four that
made their Olympic debut in Sochi ? Northeastern graduate Kendall Coyne, Brianna
Decker, Amanda Kessel, and Lee Stecklein.
Boston College has five representatives, including defensemen Cayla Barnes, Kali Flanagan of Burlington, Megan Keller, Emily Pfalzer, and forward Haley Skarupa. Among the final cuts from the team were 2015 Kazmaier
winner Alex Carpenter of Reading and BC.
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay
BOSTON
Toronto
Florida
Detroit
Montreal
Ottawa
Buffalo
GP
38
37
40
38
38
39
37
39
W
28
21
23
17
15
16
12
10
L OL
8 2
10 6
15 2
16 5
16 7
19 4
17 8
20 9
Pts. ROW
58
26
48
19
48
21
39
15
37
12
36
15
32
11
29
10
GF
144
114
135
108
104
100
98
86
GA
93
94
118
121
119
122
128
129
METROPOLITAN
Washington
New Jersey
NY Rangers
Columbus
NY Islanders
Carolina
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
GP
40
38
39
40
39
38
40
38
W
24
22
21
22
20
18
19
16
L OL
13 3
10 6
13 5
15 3
15 4
13 7
18 3
14 8
Pts. ROW
51
21
50
19
47
19
47
18
44
18
43
15
41
17
40
16
GF
123
121
123
113
136
106
111
106
GA
113
113
109
114
139
114
128
109
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
Winnipeg
Nashville
St. Louis
Dallas
Minnesota
Chicago
Colorado
GP
40
38
41
40
39
38
38
W
23
23
24
22
20
18
19
L OL
11 6
10 5
15 2
15 3
16 3
14 6
16 3
Pts. ROW
52
22
51
20
50
22
47
19
43
18
42
18
41
18
GF
134
123
119
122
110
112
123
GA
110
104
102
112
113
106
120
PACIFIC
Vegas
Los Angeles
San Jose
Anaheim
Calgary
Edmonton
Vancouver
Arizona
GP
37
39
36
40
39
39
39
41
W
26
23
20
18
19
17
16
9
L OL
9 2
11 5
12 4
14 8
16 4
19 3
18 5
27 5
Pts. ROW
54
24
51
21
44
18
44
16
42
17
37
17
37
16
23
8
GF
132
115
98
109
108
114
106
94
GA
106
91
92
115
114
126
127
146
ROW ? Regulation plus overtime wins
MONDAY?S RESULT
NY Rangers 3
at Buffalo 2 (OT)
TUESDAY?S GAMES
Boston at NY Islanders
7
Florida at Minnesota
Tampa Bay at Toronto
7
Columbus at Dallas
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
7
Winnipeg at Colorado
Washington at Carolina
7
Los Angeles at Edmonton
San Jose at Montreal
7:30
New Jersey at St. Louis
8
8
8:30
9
10
Nashville at Vegas
10
SUNDAY?S RESULTS
At Vegas 6
Toronto 3
Winnipeg 5
At Anaheim 5
Arizona 2
At Dallas 6
Tampa Bay 5
at Columbus 0
At Detroit 4
Pittsburgh 1
RANGERS 3, SABRES 2
NY Rangers .............2
Buffalo......................0
0
1
0
1
1 ?
0 ?
3
2
First period ? 1. NYR, Carey 5 (Fast,
Nieves), 4:09. 2. NYR, Grabner 18
(Hayes, Miller), 8:20. Penalties ? Bogoн
sian, Buf (roughing), 0:38. Smith, NYR
(tripping), 13:59. Hayes, NYR (hookн
ing), 17:27. Holden, NYR (hooking),
19:37.
Second period ? 3. Buffalo, Reinhart
6 (Okposo, Ristolainen), 0:56 (pp). Penн
alties ? Bogosian, Buf (holding), 3:39. ,
NYR, served by Miller (too many men
on ice), 8:44. McDonagh, NYR (tripн
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9:30
Anaheim at Vancouver
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have the news delivered straight to your desktop.
at Edmonton 0
San Jose 0
At Colorado 6
NY Islanders 1
At Calgary 4
Chicago 3 (OT)
ping), 13:57.
Third period ? 4. Buffalo, Ristolainen
2 (O?Reilly, Okposo), 0:27. Penalties ?
None.
Overtime ? 5. NY Rangers, Miller 8
(Shattenkirk, Zuccarello), 2:43 (pp).
Penalties ? Josefson, Buf (tripping),
2:15.
Shots on goal ? NYR 16н10н12н4 ?
42. Buffalo 13н11н8н1 ? 33.
Power plays ? NYR 1н3; Buffalo 1н5.
Goalies ? NYR, Lundqvist 18н9н4 (33
shotsн31 saves). Buffalo, Lehner 9н14н6
(42 shotsн39 saves).
Referees ? Gord Dwyer, Chris Lee.
Linesmen ? Shane Heyer, Tony Sericoн
lo.
A ? 41,821 (41,922). T ? 2:40.
C3
Access your Globe account online:
bostonglobe.com/subscriber
C4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
Three more teams
in search of a coach
ASSOCIATED PRESS
The NFL?s annual coaching
carousel continued to pick up
momentum Monday as three
more teams
NFL
announced
NOTEBOOK changes, following the two
that happened Sunday.
Less than 24 hours after
Chuck Pagano (Colts) and Jack
Del Rio (Raiders) were fired,
two more head coaches were
dismissed in Jim Caldwell
(Lions) and John Fox (Bears).
Cardinals coach Bruce Arians
decided to retire.
The Lions fired Caldwell after a season in which the team
raised hopes before fading and
missing the playoffs with a 9-7
record. They also fired offensive line coach Ron Prince,
keeping the rest of the assistants under contract in case the
next coach wants to retain any
of them.
Caldwell was 36-28 in four
seasons and went 0-2 in the
postseason with the Lions.
General manager Bob Quinn
said that he fired Caldwell, in
part, because he thought the
team was capable of winning
more than nine games in each
of the last two seasons.
Detroit defensive coordinator Teryl Austin will interview
for the job Tuesday, according
to a person familiar with the
coaching search.
The Bears fired Fox after
three losing seasons, ending
one of the least successful
coaching stints in team history.
Fox was 14-34 with Chicago, a
.292 winning percentage that
ranks as the second lowest for
the Bears.
Chicago has had four consecutive losing seasons ? each
with 10 or more losses, including 5-11 this season. While Fox
was let go, GM Ryan Pace got a
contract extension through the
2021 season.
Arians, one of the NFL?s biggest personalities, retired from
coaching after five mostly successful and usually entertaining
seasons as head coach of the
Cardinals.
Arians, a 65-year-old twotime NFL Coach of the Year, announced the decision in an
emotional session with the media. He won a franchise-record
50 games.
??It?s been an unbelievable
journey,?? he said. ??The tears
you see are really tears of joy
and peace. I'll miss the players.
I'll miss coming out of the locker room hearing the national
anthem because it still gets to
me.??
Of the reason for his retirement, Arians said, ??Family?s a
big one.?? Arians has also had
health issues in recent years,
including treatment for diverticulitis as well as a successful
fight against kidney cancer last
offseason.
NFL playoff glance
AFC
Wildнcard round
Saturday, Jan. 6
Tennessee at Kansas City...........4:35
Sunday, Jan. 7
Buffalo at Jacksonville................1:05
Divisional round
Saturday, Jan. 13
KC/Tenn/Buf at New England... 8:15
Sunday, Jan. 14
Jac/KC/Tenn at Pittsburgh.........1:05
Conference championship
Sunday, Jan. 21
Teams TBD.....................................3:05
NFC
Wildнcard round
Saturday, Jan. 6
Atlanta at LA Rams......................8:15
Sunday, Jan. 7
Carolina at New Orleans............ 4:40
Divisional round
Saturday, Jan. 13
NO/Car/Atl at Philadelphia.........4:35
Sunday, Jan. 14
LAR/NO/Car at Minnesota..........4:40
Conference championship
Sunday, Jan. 21
Teams TBD.....................................6:40
SUPER BOWL LII
Sunday, Feb. 4
At US Bank Stadium, Minneapolis
AFC champ vs. NFC champ........6:30
CHARLES KRUPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Patriots defensive coordinator Matt Patricia, being eyed by other teams, has his focus trained on playoff preparations.
Joseph staying put
John Elway is giving Vance
Joseph another chance. The
Broncos GM decided to retain
his rookie head coach following
a 5-11 season that was in many
ways the franchise?s worst since
Denver?s dismal AFL days in
the 1960s . . . Coach Marvin
Lewis talked to Bengals owner
Mike Brown about his future
with the team, but they reached
no conclusions and planned
more discussions.
Gruden rumors grow
As the Raiders enter another
offseason of uncertainty, already the speculation has
turned to Jon Gruden returning
to Oakland for a second stint as
coach, with ESPN reporting
that Gruden is expected to be
named the team?s next coach.
Gruden has spent the past nine
seasons as an announcer for
ESPN . . . NFL Network reported that Packers GM Ted
Thompson will transition to a
new role within the organization . . . Ravens defensive coordinator Dean Pees, 68, announced his retirement.
Good news on McCoy
Bills coach Sean McDermott
said test results on LeSean
McCoy?s injured right ankle
were negative, giving the star
running back a chance to play
against Jacksonville in the AFC
wild-card game next Sunday.
McCoy was carted off the field
in the third quarter of Buffalo?s
win at Miami on Sunday . . .
Texans GM Rick Smith, who is
taking an extended leave of absence to be with his wife as she
battles breast cancer, said that
he will return to the team, but
that he expects to be away for
at least a year.
Coordinators stick to business
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
The Patriots? next game?
The waiting one.
They know when they?ll play
next (Jan. 13, 8:15 p.m.) and
who the potential foes are (it?ll
be the lowest remaining seed
among the Chiefs, Titans, and
Bills) but a bigger question
mark this week is whether the
coaching staff will return intact
next season.
Coordinators Josh McDaniels and Matt Patricia will be in
high demand for the head
coaching positions that have
opened up around the NFL.
The Giants, Lions, Bears,
Colts, Raiders, and Cardinals
all have vacancies.
According to ESPN, the
Giants already have submitted
requests to interview both McDaniels and Patricia. Additionally, the Colts have sought permission to speak to McDaniels
and the Lions have done the
same for Patricia.
Detroit general manager
Bob Quinn knows Patricia well
from his days running the Patriots scouting department before leaving in 2015.
The network also reported
that the Cardinals have requested permission to interview Patriots linebackers coach
Brian Flores, who would be an
in-house candidate to replace
Patricia should he leave.
Speaking to reporters Monday morning, both McDaniels
and Patricia shed little light on
their future except to say their
focus right now is on postseason preparations.
?That process ? whatever it
is, it will take place,?? said McDaniels. ?I?m certainly not
aware of anything at this point.
I?ve just been focused on trying
to grade our tape and work
with our staff to try to get ourselves ready to have a productive week here with our guys
and get ready to go.??
Patricia sounded a similar
tune when asked about potential interviews.
?I have no idea on any of
that,?? Patricia said. ?None of
that is even really applicable for
me right now because I don?t
have any information on that.
I?m in normal mode ? came in
and graded the Jets [film].??
Bill Belichick has been in
the enviable position of having
both his coordinators in place
since 2012 ? a rarity in the
modern NFL ? and he appreciates that consistency and the
job his staff has done.
?I think our staff has done a
good job this year, as they have
throughout the years,?? said the
coach. ?I?ve been really fortunate to have a lot of great
coaches and coordinators on
the staff, so that?s been a real
positive for me and a positive
for our team and our organization.??
As for other teams pursuing
McDaniels and Patricia,
Belichick said, ?I don?t really
know about the rest of it. We?ll
see how it goes, but those guys
have done a great job for me.??
Belichick has said that he
believes both McDaniels and
Patricia would make excellent
head coaches.
McDaniels has head coaching experience in the league,
compiling an 11-17 mark with
the Broncos in 2009-10.
The process is nothing new
to either, as both McDaniels
and Patricia interviewed for
head coaching posts last year
before ultimately returning to
Foxborough.
McDaniels interviewed with
the 49ers, Rams, and Jaguars
last season.
?All of that stuff, you know,
usually takes care of itself,?? said
McDaniels. ?There?s a time and
a place for that. I?ve gone
through it before, which is
helpful in terms of being able to
balance that and multitask it.??
Asked in what area he has
grown the most during his second stint in Foxborough, McDaniels was expansive.
?It?s hard to say one area,? he
said. ?I?m 41 years old, so I
have a lot of people I look up to.
A lot of people that I watch do
their jobs I have a tremendous
amount of appreciation and respect for.
?Bill certainly is as good a
mentor for me as I could ask
for. Dante [Scarnecchia] has
done a tremendous job for
many, many years. I?ve learned
so much from him. Learned a
lot from the players that you
work with, you get feedback
with them.
?I just think it?s important to
watch and listen to other people to gather information that
you can and try to make the
best decisions that you can
make in a position of leadership. Hopefully, I?ve grown in
that area and many others.?
Patricia?s name also perennially pops up when jobs come
open. He interviewed with the
Rams and Chargers last year
and with the Browns after the
2015 season.
?I?ve been very, very lucky to
be at such a great place for a
long time and work for Coach
Belichick,?? Patricia said. ?A
great coach to follow and try to
learn from and try to expand
my knowledge.
?So we?re constantly trying
to compete, whether it?s just internally as a coach to be better,
whether it?s out there on the
field with an opponent. I think
that?s kind of the drive that you
have to have every day as a
coach to try and make yourself
better, to try to help your players be in a great position to perform on Sunday.??
If the Patriots were to lose
McDaniels and Patricia, it
would be similar to 2004, when
offensive coordinator Charlie
Weis left for Notre Dame and
defensive coordinator Romeo
Crennel took the Browns job.
Back then, Belichick didn?t
officially name a replacement
for Weis, though it was largely
assumed that McDaniels, serving as quarterbacks coach,
called the plays. He was officially named offensive coordinator
in 2006.
Eric Mangini was promoted
to replace Crennel.
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globejimmcbride.
Hardy fans found cold comfort in Gillette?s upper deck
uPATRIOTS
Continued from Page C1
?Hey, I know how to get on
t h e Ju m b o t r o n ,? h e s a i d .
? Yo u ? v e g o t t o s t i c k y o u r
tongue on the railing and the
cameras will flow in your direction.?
Despite a game-time temperature of 14 degrees and a
windchill of minus-2, few fans
complained, as the Patriots
clinched home-field advantage
for the playoffs with a 26-6 victory over the Jets.
?I wouldn?t want to be anywhere else in the world,? said
Tom Musgrove of Shrewsbury,
who was sitting in the last row
with his brother Dan.
In the upper deck, noses
ran faster than Dion Lewis,
and fans had so many layers
on that pliability wasn?t a possibility.
The gusts created a wind
tunnel in Section 340, which is
located in the shade, on the
open end of the stadium, opposite the lighthouse.
Westerly winds smacked into the side of Gillette harder
than linebacker James Harrison, and delivered a winter?s
jolt to freezing fans.
?I think this is the coldest
section in the stadium,? said
Jerry Haines of Team Ops.
?I?ve probably got five layers on my bottom and five or
six on top,? said Josh Hyre of
STAN GROSSFELD/GLOBE STAFF
You know it?s cold in Foxborough when the beer is undrinkable, as Paul Emery found out.
Norton. ?It?s all about layers,
layers, and layers.?
Musgrove and his brother
pai d $160 each to a ticke t
agency for the seats. He realizes he could have used that
money to pay for a flight to
Florida instead. But he didn?t
care.
From his perch, he could
see the entire field and all the
way across the frozen tundra
to the Pru and Hancock buildings in Boston.
?L e t ?s goooooo!? he
screamed down at Brady.
His brother sipped a beer
that had become a slushie.
? L o o k , w e?r e c r a z y, b u t
we?re having a blast,? he said.
In the upper deck, wind
gusts could be 25-30 miles per
hour, according to Matthew
Belk, a National Weather Service meteorologist
?You?re above the tree line
and above most buildings, so
the wind is a little bit freer,?
said Belk.
The temperature up there
would be a degree or two colder than field level, said Belk,
?but the windchill would be
worse.?
Fans added or subtracted
layers on the frozen concourse
as if they were trying on wedding gowns at the old Filene?s
Basement.
Shawn Houk of New York
stripped down to his long thermal underwear to quickly add
insulated snow pants he had
borrowed for the game.
H e b r o u g h t h i s f a m i l y,
which included a teenage Jets
fan and a Patriots fan. They all
attended the infamous Patriots-Jets ?butt fumble? game
five years ago on Thanksgiving. The boys fought in the
stands that day, but cooler
heads prevailed this time.
?We hope they are a little
bit more mature now,? said
their mother, Jackie.
No one in this family complained about the weather.
?Our oldest son, Tim, had
this on his bucket list ? not his
Christmas list ? to see Tom
Brady play in his own stadium,? said Jackie, ?so we?re
making his dream come true.?
In the last row of Section
339, 15-year-old Gabriella
Drawnowski of Holyoke sat
with her family.
?I promised not to whine,?
she said. ?I love the seats and
I?ve got these really thick fuzzy
socks on. Go Tom Brady.?
This was her first game.
?Just don?t think about the
cold,? she said. ?Just watch the
game and you?ll be fine.?
On the upper-deck concourse, bathrooms became
warming stations.
?Let?s just stay in here,? said
Connor McLaughlin, 17, of
Plymouth, N.H.
He acknowledged that he
was just kidding. Sort of.
?It?s pretty cold. but I?m still
having a lot of fun,? he said.
?It?s the experience of a lifetime. I got into the game for
free.?
Halfway up in Section 340,
Vanessa DeMelo of Fall River
shivered despite layers, blankets, and hand warmers.
?I bought the tickets as a
Christmas present for him,?
she said. ?Yeah, it?s pretty cold.
I can feel it, and I?m a little bit
sorry I got them.?
Her boyfriend, Aaron Notarangelo, moved closer, and
she smiled.
?This is the best Christmas
present anybody could ever
ask for,? he said.
Diagonally across the stadium in Sec tion 317, things
weren?t much better.
Ayanah Dowdie and Essah
Chisholm of Boston snuggled
under a blanket, the wind hitting them in the face like a
fist.
Dowdie bought the tickets
as a Christmas present for her
friend. It was her first Patriot
game, too.
?I would not be here without him,? she said. ?I need
body warmth. We have this
fleece blanket and it helps,
like, a million percent.
?But next Christmas present, I?m thinking maybe Aruba
instead.?
Stan Grossfeld can be reached
at grossfeld@globe.com.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
PATRIOTS
G l o b e
Sports
C5
REPLAY
B Y B E N V O L I N | G L O B E S TA F F
The elusive Dion Lewis
Lewis
But he jump-cuts and squeezes
through a small hole in the
middle...
...and emerges free on the other side for a big 17 yard gain.
Patriots running back Dion Lewis is stymied in the backfield.
James Harrison effect
James Harrison played 27 snaps in his Patriots debut, almost exclusively at weakside linebacker (on the opposite side of the formation away from the tight end).
He did a nice job taking
on two defenders in run
defense, setting the edge,
and letting Elandon Roberts
make the tackle in the
backfield.
Roberts
Harrison
Harrison
Harrison also dropped into
zone coverage on six of his
snaps.
At 39, Harrison proved he still has game
uON FOOTBALL
Continued from Page C1
run defense and packs a big punch.
And they had Harrison playing
weakside linebacker, and he looked
like a complete football player on Sunday. The general assumption was that
Harrison was brought here to be a situational pass rusher, but he was much
more than that against the Jets.
First off, Harrison played almost exclusively on first and second down,
and came off the field on obvious passing third downs. He only played weakside linebacker ? on the side of the
formation away from the tight end ?
so that he often was the unblocked defender on running plays, or went headto-head with the offensive tackles.
The Patriots then used Harrison in
three different ways. In his 27 snaps,
Harrison rushed the passer 11 times,
almost all of them in the second half,
when the Jets were mostly throwing
the ball. He doesn?t have a great initial
burst anymore, but Harrison still has
strength and a motor, and came away
with two second-effort sacks and a QB
pressure, all against left tackle Kelvin
Beachum.
Harrison played the run on 10 of
his snaps. Most of the runs were away
from his side of the field, but on one
notable occasion, Harrison took on
two blockers, held the edge, and let
Rober ts swoop in to stuff Elijah
McGuire for a 1-yard loss. This is why
they got Harrison ? Lee, Cassius
Marsh, and Deatrich Wise have not
been consistent at holding the edge.
And Harrison even dropped into
zone pass coverage six times. The Patriots never matched him up one-onone vs. a receiver, but had him drop into the flat or the middle of the field. On
one third and 5, Harrison dropped
back, then exploded to the ball and
dropped Robby Anderson for a 2-yard
stop.
Harrison is still a situational player.
But he?s a lot more than just a pass
rusher, and he still has some football
left in him. With Harrison and Van
Noy back in the fold, the Patriots suddenly have a credible linebacking
corps.
Other observations after rewatching the tape:
When the Patriots had the ball
R Dion Lewis had too many impressive runs to count, and his ability to
gain extra yards continues to astound.
We counted seven tacklers that Lewis
made whiff with his spin moves, jumpcuts, and dynamic ability to start and
stop. Among his best runs: making Demario Davis whiff in the backfield and
powering through Xavier Cooper to
barely convert a third-and-1; on second and 8, Lewis is seemingly corralled by three Jets defenders short of
the sticks, but he still squires around
Morris Claiborne and picks up the first
down; breaking Buster Skrine?s ankles
on a 9-yard swing pass; on first and 10,
Lewis looks like he?s bottled up inside,
but he jump-cuts twice, squirms
through a hole, and emerges on the
other side for a big 17-yard gain.
And Lewis looked like he?s been taking lessons from Le?Veon Bell lately by
showcasing an impressively patient
running style. On second and 5 in the
third quarter, Lewis took a handoff
left, stopped, literally took a step backward, squared his body to the line of
scrimmage, hit the hole right up the
middle, smashed through Rontez
Miles to gain 4 extra yards, and picked
up the first down.
Lewis is setting himself up for a
nice payday in free agency this spring,
from the Patriots or someone else.
R We wrote after Sunday?s game
about how Tom Brady needs more
help from his teammates in the playoffs. In rewatching the game, it became even more apparent how Brady
just isn?t on the same page as his receivers.
The CBS cameras showed Brady
having a nice, long chat with Danny
Amendola as the two walked off the
field and hit the sideline following a
miscommunication on third and 12.
And toward the end of the game,
the cameras again showed Brady having a stern discussion with Brandin
Cooks on the sideline after the two had
a miscommunication on third down
(the play where Brady was called for
intentional grounding). This after Brady was ticked off at Cooks for slowing
down on a deep ball early in the game.
It?s not a good sign when the quarterback is having communication errors with two of his top receivers this
late in the season.
R With several starters out because
of injury, and the Patriots clearly protecting Rob Gronkowski from taking
any hits, the Patriots again had to rely
on some gimmicks to move the ball.
For the second week in a row Josh McDaniels called a steady diet of play-action just to give Brady enough time to
throw against the Jets? front seven.
The tactic worked, as Brady was hit
just five times and sacked twice on 39
dropbacks. Lewis?s touchdown reception came off play-action.
And they went no-huddle to start
the game, to try to get into a rhythm
and post an early lead. The Patriots
surprisingly took the ball to start the
game instead of deferring, and Jim
Nantz noted that the Patriots emphasized the need to play from ahead
against the Jets.
R The Jets took a cue from the Patriots? recent opponents and played a lot
of press-man coverage with just a single deep safety, daring the Patriots to
beat them deep. And for the most part,
the Patriots once again struggled to get
separation. The word is out ? press
the Patriots receivers at the line of
scrimmage and blitz Brady. The Jets
tallied both of their sacks this way, and
forced four key incompletions with
their blitz, including two on third
down.
Fortunately, the Jets committed
three defensive holding penalties, an
illegal hands to the face, and a 39-yard
pass interference. But the word is out
on how to slow down the Patriots. The
Patriots? longest play in the first half
was just 16 yards, and for the game
they only had two passes over 20
yards.
R Right tackle Cam Fleming had a
rough game. He got beaten badly to
the outside by David Bass for an easy
sack on a four-man rush. Fleming also
allowed a run stuff in the third quarter,
and let Jordan Jenkins plow right
through him to hit Brady and force an
incompletion. The right tackle spot
could be an issue for the Patriots in the
playoffs.
R Phillip Dorsett hasn?t done much
to earn Brady?s trust, and dropping
that beautiful deep pass on Sunday
won?t help. But Dorsett had a key block
around the edge to spring Lewis for a
3-yard touchdown run around the left
edge. Dwayne Allen had the other key
block.
R Scary moment in the second quarter, when Lewis rolled up on Nate Solder from behind. Solder hit the deck
and came up hopping a few moments
later, but he was OK. That could have
been disastrous.
When the Jets had the ball
R The Patriots? run defense was excellent, holding the Jets to 40 yards on
19 carries. Of course, it helps that they
could sell out to stop the run because
Bryce Petty was the quarterback, but
Lawrence Guy (three stuffs), Malcom
Brown (two stuffs), Trey Flowers,
Ricky Jean Francois, and Roberts (one
each) all made plays behind the line of
scrimmage. Guy, especially, has been
on a dominant run over the last month
or so. The Jets had a big run set up
with a toss to the right, but Guy maintained his leverage against the guard
and dropped Bilal Powell for just 2
yards.
R Harrison is going to be a big addition in the run game, because Lee just
isn?t getting it done. Once again, Lee
was unable to set the edge and allowed
Powell to scamper for 24 yards to the
left side. And Trey Flowers got caught
inside on an 11-yard run by Elijah
McGuire.
R Speaking of the Patriots? suddenly
formidable linebacker corps, that includes Marquis Flowers, who has
played 86 snaps over the last two
games and has done a nice job in all
phases. He?s not the most fluid athlete
in zone coverage, but he covers the
middle of the field well enough, and
had a beautiful delayed pass rush for a
sack up the middle.
R Van Noy definitely looked tentative running around the field. This
looked important for him just to get
some game action before the playoffs,
because the Patriots need him.
R The Patriots showed a Cover 0 defense for the first time all year (no deep
safeties), daring Petty to beat them
deep. Petty took advantage twice, hitting Neal Sterling in the flat for 15
yards, and throwing a beautiful deep
ball to ArDarius Stewart over Jonathan Jones for 46 yards.
Special teams
R The kickoff coverage wasn?t always perfect, but Stephen Gostkowski
again was masterful with the placement of his short kickoffs. Only 1 of his
5 kickoffs went for touchbacks, and
Gostkowski finished the regular season with the second-lowest touchback
percentage in the NFL (40.8 percent),
behind only Tampa Bay.
R Tremendous punting day for Ryan Allen. The net average of 41.8
doesn?t jump off the page, but five of
his eight punts were downed inside
the 20, and three were downed inside
the 5 (all in the fourth quarter). His
coffin corner punt that went out of
bounds at the 3 was a beauty.
Ben Volin can be reached at
ben.volin@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @BenVolin
C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
UCF ends season unbeaten
ASSOCIATED PRESS
McKenzie Milton wanted to throw a
blanket of 13 wins and no losses over
the College Football Playoff.
After Milton and
BOWL
Central Florida capped
ROUNDUP
a perfect season, he
suggested it was time
to respect the Knights, even if they
weren?t invited to the playoff.
Milton threw two touchdown passes
and ran for 116 yards with another
touchdown, leading No. 10 UCF to a
34-27 Peach Bowl win over No. 7 Auburn on Monday in Atlanta.
Then it was time to boast.
??I said on the podium you can go
ahead and cancel the playoffs,?? Milton
said. ??I'm not changing my mind.??
UCF (13-0) led, 34-20, before having
to stop a late Auburn comeback. Antwan Collier?s interception in the end
zone with 24 seconds remaining
clinched the win.
The UCF players launched a joyous
postgame celebration, rolling around
in confetti on the field while wearing Tshirts that read ??Champions.??
The Knights won in their final game
with coach Scott Frost, who stayed with
the team through the bowl game after
accepting an offer to become the new
coach at Nebraska, his alma mater.
Frost will bring most of his UCF assistants to Nebraska.
The Knights thought they deserved
a higher ranking after winning the
American Athletic Conference and
leading the nation in scoring. They
made a strong statement by beating
Auburn (10-4), which was held to 90
yards rushing on 44 carries.
Frost said ??it wasn?t right?? for UCF
to not receive more consideration for
the four-team playoff.
Citrus Bowl ? Receiver Miles Boykin
made a dynamic one-handed grab and
raced down the sideline for a 55-yard
touchdown with 1:28 remaining to give
14th-ranked Notre Dame a 21-17 victory over No. 16 LSU in Orlando.
The win by the Irish (10-3) is their
first in a New Year?s Day bowl since the
1994 Cotton Bowl against Texas A&M
and snapped a nine-game skid in January postseason games.
Boykin had only nine catches for
151 yards and a TD coming into the
game, but he got his first start after
starters Chase Claypool (shoulder injury) and Kevin Stephenson (suspension)
were ruled out. Boykin finished the Citrus Bowl with three receptions for 102
yards and a touchdown and was named
the game?s MVP.
Outback Bowl ? Jake Bentley threw for
239 yards and two touchdowns to help
South Carolina overcome a 16-point
second-half deficit to beat Michigan,
26-19, in the Outback Bowl in Tampa.
The sophomore tossed scoring passes of 21 yards to Bryan Edwards and 53
yards to Shi Smith, the latter giving the
Gamecocks (9-4) a 23-19 lead early in
the fourth quarter.
Michigan (8-5) finished with its first
three-game losing streak under coach
Jim Harbaugh.
Georgia wins Rose in 2нOT thriller
uROSE BOWL
Continued from Page C1
down would have ended the game.
The Bulldogs will play either Alabama or Clemson, who played late
Monday night, on Jan. 8 for the national championship in Atlanta, about 90
miles from their campus ? with a
chance to win their first national title
since 1980.
??We got to get back to work. It?s not
done,?? Michel said. ??Now we got to finish. Let?s just finish this season off
right.??
The first overtime Rose Bowl was also the highest-scoring, surpassing last
year???s 52-49 USC victory against Penn
State. There was a lot more on the line
in this one, which will go down as one
of the greatest Granddaddies of Them
All.
After an offside penalty on Georgia
gave Oklahoma a first down on third
and 5 in the second OT possession, the
Sooners stalled again and Austin Seibert came out for a 27-yard field goal.
Leaping through the line, Lorenzo
Carter got his outstretched hand on the
kick and the ball fluttered down short
of the uprights.
Any score would have ended it for
the Bulldogs, and on the second play
Michel slipped one tackle and was
home free. The Bulldogs sprinted off
the sideline and toward the corner of
the end zone to mob Michel. Confetti
rained down. Meanwhile, Mayfield
stood motionless on the sideline for
several seconds, bent over with his
hands on his knees and head down.
Mayfield battled flu-like symptoms the
week leading into the game, but he
played just fine.
??I can?t believe it?s over. It?s been a
wild ride,?? said Mayfield with a hoarse
Scoreboard
TUE
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Home games shaded
first half, including a nifty reverse pass
to the Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback that made it 31-14 with six seconds left in the second quarter. Oklahoma had 360 yards in the first half.
Georgia coach Kirby Smart said the
defense ??stunk it up?? in the first half,
but there were no dramatic changes in
the second. Oklahoma managed only
171 yards and one touchdown in the
second half and OT.
Oklahoma linebacker Caleb Kelly
lowered a shoulder into Michel trying
to turn the corner on a sweep and the
ball popped loose. Steven Parker picked
it up on the bounce, tight-roped the
sideline, and raced 46 yards for a score
to put the Sooners up, 45-38, with 6:52
left in the fourth. With 3:22 left in the
fourth, Georgia freshman quarterback
Jake Fromm led a game-tying drive,
capped by Chubb?s TD run.
SportsLog
Rockets? Harden to miss two weeks
Houston Rockets star James Harden will miss at least two
weeks with a left hamstring strain. The team announced
Monday that the NBA?s leading scorer has a grade-2 strain
and will be reevaluated in two weeks. Harden was injured on
a missed layup late in the fourth quarter of Houston?s 148142 double-overtime win against the Los Angeles Lakers on
Sunday night. He said after the game that he didn?t think the
injury was serious, but the guard was walking with a pronounced limp. Harden is averaging 32.3 points and 9.1 assists (third in the league) . . . DeMar DeRozan scored a Raptors-record 52 points as Toronto beat the Milwaukee Bucks,
131-127, in overtime, matching a team record with its 12th
consecutive home victory. DeRozan is the third Raptor to
score 50 or more in a game, joining Vince Carter and Terн
rence Ross, who each had 51.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Michigan State is new men?s No. 1
Michigan State (14-1) moved up to No. 1 in the Associated
Press men?s basketball poll, receiving 43 of 65 first-place
votes following previously top-ranked Villanova?s loss to Butler on Saturday. No. 2 Duke, up two spots, received 21 firstplace votes and No. 3 Villanova had one. The Spartans are
No. 1 for the first time since the 2015-16 season . . . UConn
(11-0) remained the unanimous No. 1 choice in the AP women?s poll, receiving all 32 first-place votes. The top eight spots
remained unchanged. One week after seeing its 17-year run
in the poll end, Stanford is ranked again at No. 24.
WINTER SPORTS
Shiffrin matches idol in Cup wins
Mikaela Shiffrin won a parallel slalom city event on Monday in Oslo to match her childhood idol, Marlies Schild, with
her 37th World Cup victory. Shiffrin pumped her fist after
edging Swiss rival Wendy Holdener in the final of a night
race made complicated by fog and mist. ?It worked out really
well for me,? she said. ?It?s not always that way. . . . You have
to really dig deep.?? Shiffrin, the 22-year-old American standout, and Schild, the retired Austrian slalom specialist, are
now joint sixth on the list of all-time winners that Lindsey
Vonn tops with 78 victories. It was the seventh win overall
and second in parallel this season for Shiffrin, who is favored
to defend her Olympic slalom title at the PyeongChang
Games next month. In the men?s parallel event, Andre
Myhrer of Sweden defeated Michael Matt of Austria to claim
his eighth career win . . . Defending champion Kamil Stoch of
Poland won his second straight ski jumping World Cup to extend his lead in the Four Hills Tournament in GarmischPartenkirchen, Germany.
NHL
Wild?s Parise set to return to action
Minnesota Wild left wing Zach Parise has been cleared to
make his season debut, after missing the first 39 games because of back trouble. Parise told reporters after practice that
he?s ??got the green light?? to play Tuesday night against Florida. Parise had surgery Oct. 24 to address a disk problem in
his lower back that caused leg pain and weakness. He resumed skating on Nov. 29 and rejoined the team for practice
on Dec. 14 . . . The Bruins assigned forward Peter Cehlarik to
Providence of the AHL. Cehlarik, 22, has missed the last 16
games because of a lower-body injury suffered against the
Penguins on Nov. 24. Cehlarik has one goal and one assist in
five games with Boston this season.
MISCELLANY
Muguruza retires in Brisbane event
Top-seeded Garbine Muguruza fell to the court behind the
baseline in the third set before retiring from her opening
match at the Brisbane International in Australia because of
leg cramps. The Wimbledon champion was up a set and a
break but couldn?t close it out. Aleksandra Krunic advanced
to the quarterfinals with a 5-7, 7-6 (7-3), 1-2 retired, victory
. . . Maria Sharapova and top-ranked Simona Halep opened
the Shenzhen Open in China with straight-set wins. Sharapova took a 6-3, 6-0 win over Mihaela Buzarnescu, and Halep
started her bid for a second Shenzhen title with a 6-4, 6-1 victory over Nicole Gibbs . . . Johanna Konta opened her season
with a 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 win over US Open finalist Madison Keys
at the Brisbane International in Australia. The fifth-seeded
Konta lost her last four matches in 2017. Keys played just her
second match since the US Open. Petra Kvitova withdrew because of a viral illness . . . Anthony Martial and Jesse Lingard
delivered a pair of second-half finishes to lead Manchester
United to a 2-0 win at Everton, ending its run of three
straight draws in the Premier League . . . Ragnar Klavan
headed home from close range in the fourth minute of stoppage time to earn Liverpool a 2-1 win at Burnley.
PIT
7:30
NBCSN
MON
1/8
BRO
6:00
NBCSB*
ON THE AIR
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
Auburn at Tennessee
7 p.m.
Butler at Xavier
7 p.m.
Indiana at Wisconsin
7 p.m.
Michigan at Iowa
7 p.m.
TCU at Baylor
7 p.m.
Toledo at Buffalo
9 p.m.
Florida at Texas A&M
9 p.m.
Georgetown at DePaul
9 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Louisville
9 p.m.
San Diego State at Colorado State
9 p.m.
Texas Tech at Kansas
ESPNU
FS1
ESPN
ESPN2
ESPNews
CBSSN
ESPN
FS1
ESPNU
CBSSN
ESPN2
PRO BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
Portland at Cleveland
10:30 p.m. Memphis at LA Clippers
NBA
NBA
PRO HOCKEY
7 p.m.
Boston at NY Islanders
7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
9:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Edmonton
NESN
NBCSN
NBCSN
Premier: Tottenham at Swansea City NBCSN
Colleges
voice before he started to cry.
Michel and his running mate Nick
Chubb were awesome for Georgia.
Chubb ran for 145 yards and two
touchdowns, including a 2-yarder on a
direct snap with 55 seconds left in regulation to tie it.
Both teams settled for field goals in
the first overtime, first Georgia?s Rodrigo Blankenship from 38 to make it 4845. Then it was Mayfield?s turn. A
touchdown would have sent the Sooners to Atlanta, but on a third and 2 from
the 17, Georgia All-America linebacker
Roquan Smith nailed Jordan Smallwood a yard short of the first down.
Seibert kicked a 33-yarder and the Bulldogs and Sooners played on, but not for
much longer.
The Bulldogs came in with the sixthbest defense in the country, but Mayfield and the Sooners sliced it up in the
CAR
7:00
NESN
1/7
Y
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
WINTER SPORTS
5:30 p.m. Speed skating: US Olympic trials
Georgia?s Lorenzo Carter (7) blocks a field goal attempt in the second OT.
SUN
Y
On the radio, unless noted: Patriots, Bruins, and Celtics, WBZнFM 98.5; *WZLXнFM 100.7
SOCCER
2:45 p.m.
MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES
SAT
1/6
FLA
7:00
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8:00
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Y
NBCSN
Schools
BASKETBALL
BASKETBALL
MEN
HOW AP TOP 25 FARED
West Virginia 77...............Kansas St. 69
NEW ENGLAND
Quinnipiac 71...........................Sienna 70
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 71........Grambling St. 64
Stetson 94................Florida National 88
MIDWEST
Youngstown St. 80..Cleveland State 77
WOMEN
SOUTH
Grambling St. 78........Alabama A&M 49
UAPB 64.....................Miss. Valley St. 59
Wofford 69....................North Florida 57
BOYS
NONLEAGUE
Bedford 53...............Wilsonville (OR) 43
National polls
AP MEN?S TOP 25
Firstнplace votes in parentheses, reн
cords through Dec. 31, total points
based on 25 points for a firstнplace
vote through one point for a 25thнplace
vote and previous ranking:
Rec. Pts. LW
1. Michigan St. (43) ..... 14н1 1600
2
2. Duke (21)................... 13н1 1556
4
3. Villanova (1)............. 13н1 1444
1
4. Arizona St ................. 12н1 1336
3
5. Xavier......................... 14н1 1325
6
6. West Virginia ........... 12н1 1304
7
7. Oklahoma.................. 11н1 1160 12
8. Virginia...................... 12н1 1048
9
9. Wichita St. ................ 11н2 1026
8
10. Kansas....................... 11н2 963 11
11. Texas A&M....... +..... 11н2 894
5
12. North Carolina ......... 12н2 890 13
13. Purdue....................... 13н2 883 14
14. Arizona ...................... 11н3 832 17
15. Miami......................... 12н1 782 15
16. TCU............................. 12н1 760 10
17. Kentucky ................... 11н2 742 16
18. Texas Tech ............... 12н1 483 22
19. Gonzaga .................... 12н3 410 20
19. Cincinnati.................. 12н2 410 21
21. Seton Hall ................. 13н2 353 23
22. Arkansas ................... 11н2 254 ?
23. Tennessee................... 9н3 198 19
24. Florida St................... 11н2 119 24
25. Clemson .................... 12н1 104 ?
Others receiving votes: Baylor 83,
Creighton 54, Notre Dame 37, Butler 23,
UCLA 14, Texas 10, St. Bonaventure 7,
SMU 5, Auburn 4, Syracuse 4, Nevada
2, Rhode Island 2, Alabama 1, New
Mexico St. 1, NC State 1, Mississippi St.
1.
AP WOMEN?S TOP 25
Firstнplace votes in parentheses, reн
cords through Dec. 31, total points
based on 25 points for a firstнplace
vote through one point for a 25thнplace
vote and last week?s ranking:
Rec. Pts. LW
1. UConn (32)................ 11н0 800
1
2. Notre Dame .............. 13н1 750
2
3. Louisville ................... 16н0 736
3
4. South Carolina ......... 12н1 680
4
5. Mississippi St. .......... 15н0 677
5
6. Baylor ........................ 12н1 634
6
7. Tennessee................. 13н0 619
7
8. Texas ......................... 11н1 600
8
9. Oregon....................... 13н2 515 10
10. Ohio St....................... 13н2 485 12
11. Florida St................... 13н1 455 13
12. West Virginia ........... 13н1 453
9
13. Maryland................... 13н2 420 15
14. UCLA .......................... 10н3 371 11
15. Missouri..................... 13н1 362 16
16. Oregon St.................. 11н2 323 17
17. Duke........................... 11н3 291 14
18. Iowa ........................... 14н1 228 23
19. Texas A&M ............... 11н4 172 22
20. Oklahoma St............. 11н2 161 24
21. Villanova ................... 11н1 126 18
22. Michigan ................... 12н3 105 21
23. California................... 10н3
94 20
24. Stanford ...................... 8н6
85 ?
25. Arizona St. ................ 11н3
67 ?
Others receiving votes: South Florida
65, Rutgers 47, Green Bay 46, Miami 14,
New Mexico 7, Syracuse 3, Georgia
Tech 3, NC State 2, Brown 1, Virginia
Tech 1, DePaul 1, Navy 1.
FOOTBALL
Citrus Bowl
Notre Dame 21 .............................LSU 17
Outback Bowl
South Carolina 26...............Michigan 19
Peach Bowl
UCF 34...................................... Auburn 27
Rose Bowl
Georgia 54...............Oklahoma 48 (2OT)
Georgia, 54н48
Georgia...............7 10 14 14
Oklahoma.........14 17 0 14
3
3
6 54
0 48
OKL?M.Brown 13 pass from Mayн
field (Seibert kick), 11:31
UGA?Michel 13 pass from Fromm
(Blankenship kick), 8:27
OKL?Anderson 9 run (Seibert kick),
6:56
OKL?Anderon 41 run (Seibert kick),
14:12
UGA?Michel 75 run (Blankenship
kick), 14:00
OKL?FG Seibert 38, 9:12
OKL?Mayfield 2 pass from Lamb
(Seibert kick), :06
UGA?FG Blankenship 55, :00
UGA?Chubb 50 run (Blankenship
kick), 12:25
UGA?Michel 38 run (Blankenship
kick), :41
UGA?Wims 4 pass from Fromm
(Blankenship kick), 13:57
OKL?Flowers 11 pass from Mayfield
(Seibert kick), 8:47
OKL?S.Parker 46 fumble return
(Seibert kick), 6:52
UGA?Chubb 2 run (Blankenship
kick), :55
UGA?FG Blankenship 38, :00
OKL?FG Seibert 33, :00
UGA?Michel 27 run, :00
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING?UGA, Michel 11н181,
Chubb 14н145, Swift 4н6, (Team) 1н(н2),
Fromm 4н(н13). OKL, Anderson 26н201,
Sermon 2н34, Badet 1н9, Smallwood
1н1, Mayfield 12н1, M.Brown 1н0,
Ky.Murray 1н0, Flowers 1н(н4).
PASSING?UGA, Fromm 20н29н0н210.
Ok, Lamb 1н1н0н2, Mayfield 23н35н1н287.
RECEIVING?UGA, Wims 6н73, Godн
win 5н51, Michel 4н41, Woerner 3н21,
Hardman 1н15, Simmons 1н9. OKL,
M.Brown 8н114, Lamb 6н66, Andrews 4н
52, Flowers 3н53, Badet 1н4, Mayfield
1н2, Anderson 1н(н2).
MSED FGS?UGA, Blankenhip 48.
OKL, Seibert 27.
HOCKEY
BOYS
NONLEAGUE
Cath. Memorial 2..................Needham 1
Nauset 4..........................Sacred Heart 0
N. Andover 4............................Danvers 2
Cashman Holiday Tour
Dartmouth 4...........................Abington 1
Rockland 9......................Whit.нHanson 3
GIRLS
NONLEAGUE
Matignon 9.........................Leominster 0
Stoughton 5..........................Hopkinton 2
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/highн
schools.
Ski conditions
CONNECTICUT
Mohawk ? mg, 18н24 base, 19н25 trails,
6н8 lifts
Mt Southington ? pp, 18н42 base, 14н14
trails, 7н7 lifts
Powder Ridge ? mg, 16н16 base, 7н19
trails, 4н5 lifts
Ski Sundown ? mg, 20н24 base, 16н16
trails, 5н5 lifts
MAINE
Big Squaw ? mg, 10н20 base, 24н29
trails, 1н1 lifts
Bigrock ? mg, 18н36 base, 35н35 trails,
3н3 lifts
Black Mtn ? mg, 35н35 base, 33н35
trails, 2н5 lifts
Camden ? pp, 12н20 base, 9н26 trails,
3н3 lifts
Hermon ? pdr, 36н42 base, 20н20 trails,
1н3 lifts
Lost Valley ? mg, 10н16 base, 21н18
trails, 3н3 lifts
Mt Abram ? pp, 36н36 base, 54н54
trails, 3н5 lifts
Shawnee Peak ? mg, 22н26 base, 41н42
trails, 5н5 lifts
Sugarloaf ? pp, 24н36 base, 106н162
trails, 11н13 lifts
Sunday River ? mg, 38н56 base, 99н135
trails, 12н15 lifts
Titcomb ? mg, 12н18 base, 6н17 trails,
2н3 lifts
MASSACHUSETTS
Berkshire East ? mg, 1 new, 16н40
base, 26н45 trails, 5н5 lifts
Blue Hills Boston ? pp, 8н24 base, 5н15
trails, 3н4 lifts
Bousquet ? mg, 6н14 base, 10н23 trails,
3н5 lifts
Bradford ? mg, 10н24 base, 15н15
trails, 4н10 lifts
Catamount ? mg, 10н20 base, 24н36
trails, 7н7 lifts
Jiminy Peak ? mg, 22н60 base, 42н45
trails, 7н9 lifts
Nashoba Valley ? mg, 10н10 base, 15н
17 trails, 5н11 lifts
Otis Ridge ? pp, 6н30 base, 7н11 trails,
3н4 lifts
Ski Butternut ? mg, 12н18 base, 22н22
trails, 11н11 lifts
Ski Ward ? mg, 10н24 base, 7н9 trails,
4н4 lifts
Wachusett ? mg, 18н38 base, 25н26
trails, 7н8 lifts
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Arrowhead ? pp, 12н15 base, 1н1 trails,
1н1 lifts
Attitash ? mg, 12н24 base, 58н68 trails,
8н11 lifts
Black ? pp, 12н36 base, 41н45 trails, 2н5
lifts
Bretton Woods ? mg, 28н38 base, 95н
97 trails, 6н10 lifts
Cannon ? pp, 14н36 base, 90н97 trails,
9н11 lifts
Cranmore ? pp, 25н32 base, 48н57
trails, 5н7 lifts
Crotched ? mg, 14н25 base, 23н25
trails, 3н5 lifts
Dartmouth Skiway ? mg, 24н24 base,
10н31 trails, 3н4 lifts
Granite Gorge ? pp, 16н30 base, 4н20
trails, 2н4 lifts
Gunstock ? mg, 22н22 base, 40н55
trails, 6н8 lifts
King Pine ? mg, 18н30 base, 17н17
trails, 5н5 lifts
Loon ? pp, 20н30 base, 52н61 trails, 10н
10 lifts
McIntyre ? mg, 24н56 base, 9н9 trails,
3н4 lifts
Mount Sunapee ? mg, 12н22 base, 62н
66 trails, 8н10 lifts
Pats Peak ? mg, 12н22 base, 28н28
trails, 9н11 lifts
Ragged ? mg, 18н24 base, 25н57 trails,
4н6 lifts
Waterville Valley ? mg, 20н26 base, 50н
60 trails, 5н11 lifts
Wildcat ? mg, 10н20 base, 46н48 trails,
4н5 lifts
RHODE ISLAND
Yawgoo Valley ? mg, 18н48 base, 10н12
trails, 2н4 lifts
VERMONT
Bolton Valley ? pp, 15н30 base, 30н71
trails, 4н6 lifts
Bromley ? mg, 18н36 base, 41н47 trails,
5н8 lifts
Burke ? mg, 12н36 base, 44н50 trails,
3н4 lifts
Jay Peak ? mg, 18н44 base, 20н79 trails,
5н9 lifts
Killington ? mg, 1 new, 15н24 base,
146н155 trails, 20н22 lifts
Mad River Glen ? pp, 6н24 base, 45н45
trails, 4н5 lifts
Magic ? vc, 14н35 base, 46н50 trails,
2н5 lifts
Middlebury ? pp, 8н38 base, 9н17 trails,
3н4 lifts
Mount Snow ? mg, 20н24 base, 85н86
trails, 14н20 lifts
Okemo ? mg, 28н40 base, 120н121
trails, 14н20 lifts
Pico ? mg, 1 new, 12н18 base, 57н57
trails, 5н7 lifts
Ski Quechee ? pp, 24н32 base, 11н13
trails, 3н3 lifts
Smugglers Notch ? mg, 16н44 base,
53н78 trails, 6н8 lifts
Stowe ? mg, 24н48 base, 107н116 trails,
11н13 lifts
Stratton ? mg, 28н28 base, 83н97 trails,
8н11 lifts
Sugarbush ? mg, 10н36 base, 111н111
trails, 14н16 lifts
Suicide Six ? pp, 19н45 base, 23н24
trails, 3н3 lifts
Latest line
NBA
Tuesday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At Cleveland....OFF ...............Portland
San Antonio..........4 ........At New York
At Phoenix............1╜ ..................Atlanta
Charlotte...............3╜ ....At Sacramento
At LA Clippers......5 ..............Memphis
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Tuesday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At Baylor...............2╜ .......................TCU
At Xavier.................. 7 ....................Butler
At Ball St...............5╜ ..........E. Michigan
At C. Michigan........ 3 ......................Ohio
At Maryland.............4 ................Penn St.
Michigan...................2 .................At Iowa
At Wisconsin........... 5 .................Indiana
At Northeastern...3╜ .................Hofstra
At Vanderbilt........PK ...............Alabama
At J. Madison........PK ..........Wm.&Mary
At Tennessee.......5╜ ................. Auburn
At Coll Of Chrlstn. 11 ..............Delaware
At W. Michigan.......7 ....................Akron
At Buffalo.................6 .................. Toledo
At NCнWilmg.......OFF ...................Drexel
Towson.....................2 ..................At Elon
At Bowl. Green.....4╜ ............Miami (O)
At N. Illinois..........3╜ ................ Kent St.
At Green Bay...........5 ......................Iupui
Arkansas.................. 4 ..........At Miss. St.
At Texas A&M.........4 ..................Florida
San Diego St.........7╜ .......... At Colo. St.
At Louisville........16╜ ............Pittsburgh
At Depaul.................3 .........Georgetown
At N?western........8╜ ..............Nebraska
At Kansas..............8╜ ..........Texas Tech
National Hockey League
Tuesday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
Pittsburgh.......н110 At Phila..........+100
BOSTON..........н111 At NY Isles....+101
Tampa Bay.....н129 At Toronto.....+119
At Carolina.....н111 Washington...+101
At Montreal....н108 San Jose..........н102
At Minnesota.н129 Florida............+119
At St. Louis.....н150 New Jersey....+140
At Dallas.........н150 Columbus......+140
Winnipeg........ н131 At Colorado...+121
At Edmonton..н117 Los Angeles.. +107
Anaheim..........н124 At Vancouver+114
At Las Vegas..н135 Nashville........+125
NFL
Playoffs Saturday
Favorite................Pts. .............Underdog
At Kansas City.....7╜ ........... Tennessee
At LA Rams...........6 ..................Atlanta
Playoffs Sunday
At Jacksonville.....7╜ ..................Buffalo
At New Orleans....6 ................Carolina
Transactions
BASKETBALL
Chicago (NBA): Recalled G Zach
LaVine from Windy City (NBAGL).
FOOTBALL
Arizona (NFC): Announced the reн
tirement of coach Bruce Arians.
Baltimore (AFC): Announced the reн
tirement of defensive coordinator
Dean Pees.
Chicago (NFC): Fired coach John
Fox.
Cleveland (AFC): Signed WR C.J.
Board, LB Austin Calitro, DB Trevon
Hartfield, WR Bug Howard, RB Josh
Rounds, OL Victor Salako, DB B.W.
Webb and WR Kasen Williams to reн
serveнfuture contracts.
Detroit (NFC): Fired coach Jim
Caldwell. Signed CB Adairius Barnes,
TE Brandon Barnes, DE Alex Barrett,
WR Dontez Ford, DT Toby Johnson, C
Leo Koloamatangi, S Rolan Milligan, T
Dan Skipper, QB Alek Torgersen and
DE Jeremiah Valoaga to reserveнfuture
contracts.
Tennessee (AFC): Signed CB Jeremy
Boykins to practice squad.
Washington (NFC): Signed CB Quinн
ton Dunbar to a multiyear contract exн
tension. Signed OL Alex Balducci, DL
Tavaris Barnes, TE Chris Bazile, RB
Kenny Hilliard, OL Cameron Jefferson,
OL John Kling, LB Alex McCalister, LB
Cassanova McKinzy, DL Ondre Pipkins,
DB James Sample and S Orion Stewart
to reserveнfuture contracts.
HOCKEY
Bridgeport Sound Tigers (AHL) :Reн
called D Mike Cornell from Worcester
(ECHL).
NY Islanders (NHL): Assigned F Anн
thony Beauvillier and F Steve Bernier
to Bridgeport (AHL).
AHL
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L OL SL Pts.
Providence ... 21 8 3 0 45
Lehigh Val. ... 21 10 2 2 46
Charlotte....... 21 12 0 1 43
Scranton ....... 18 10 2 1 39
Bridgeport .... 16 12 2 1 35
Hershey......... 15 16 1 3 34
Hartford ........ 13 15 3 3 32
Springfield.... 14 19 1 1 30
GF
100
127
129
109
99
93
99
100
GA
81
117
102
95
87
117
124
113
North Division
Toronto ......... 23 11 0 0
Rochester ..... 20 8 3 3
Syracuse ....... 18 12 1 2
Laval .............. 14 14 5 2
Utica .............. 13 13 4 3
Belleville ....... 13 18 0 3
Binghamton.. 10 17 4 1
46
46
39
35
33
29
25
104
107
113
107
90
89
82
74
92
95
121
102
129
112
Western Conference
Central Division
Manitoba ...... 24 6 1 2 51
Rockford ....... 18 13 1 1 38
Milwaukee.... 16 12 4 0 36
Iowa............... 15 11 6 2 38
Chicago......... 15 12 5 2 37
Gr. Rapids..... 14 15 1 4 33
Cleveland........ 9 15 3 2 23
130
104
91
104
102
105
65
70
97
97
109
100
113
100
Pacific Division
Tucson........... 16 9 2 1
San Antonio.. 19 12 2 0
Stockton........ 16 10 2 2
Texas............. 18 12 3 1
San Jose........ 15 12 0 2
San Diego ..... 15 13 1 0
Ontario.......... 15 13 1 1
Bakersfield ... 12 13 5 0
91
102
99
102
80
94
75
83
76
98
82
116
87
99
79
91
35
40
36
40
32
31
32
29
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a
win, one point for an overtime or shooн
tout loss.
SUNDAY?S GAMES
Toronto 5................................ Belleville 1
Manitoba 5..............................San Jose 2
San Antonio 2.......................San Diego 1
Grand Rapids 4.........Milwaukee 3 (OT)
Syracuse 5........................ Binghamton 0
Bakersfield 3...........................Stockton 1
Tucson 2....................................Ontario 1
MONDAY?S GAMES
Chicago 2........................................Iowa 1
TUESDAY?S GAMES
Cleveland at Rockford...........................8
WEDNESDAY?S GAMES
Binghamton at Belleville.......................7
Bridgeport at WB/Scranton............ 7:05
Toronto at Laval................................7:30
Grand Rapids at Milwaukee.................8
Cleveland at Chicago.............................8
Bakersfield at San Antonio...................8
San Diego at Texas...........................8:30
Soccer
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE
Sunday?s Games
Crystal Palace 0.................... Man City 0
West Brom 1.............................Arsenal 1
Monday?s Games
Brighton 2.......................Bournemouth 2
Stoke 0..................................Newcastle 1
Leicester 3.......................Huddersfield 0
Burnley 1................................Liverpool 2
Everton 0............................Man United 2
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C7
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Chrysler*
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynn?eld
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambers?at.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000 drivepremier.com
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
Honda Village*
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
107 Andover St., Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
Audi Cape Cod ? A Premier Company
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000 drivepremier.com
25 Falmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5600
drivepremier.com
Audi Shrewsbury
Ferrari Of New England*
?On The Automile,? Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
?On The Automile,? Norwood
855-278-0016 herbchamberslincoln.com
Boch Hyundai*
Boch Maserati*
?On The Automile,? Route 1, Norwood
855-975-6891
BochHyundai.com
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Mirak Hyundai
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
Kelly Honda*
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, ?The Automile,? Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
?On The Automile,? Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
Kelly Maserati*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
smart center Lynn?eld
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynn?eld
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynn?eld.com
smart center Boston
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Herb Chambers In?niti of Boston*
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
?atusaofworcesterma.com
BMW Cape Cod ? A Premier Company
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersin?nitiofboston.com
Premier Mazda Cape Cod
141 Stevens St, Hyannis
508-815-5900
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers In?niti
Westborough*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersin?nitiofwestborough.com
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyin?niti.com
500 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5500
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynn?eld
877-337-2442
?agshipmotorcars.com
Framingham Ford*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Kelly Ford*
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynn?eld*
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynn?eld
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynn?eld.com
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
Mirak Genesis
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington *
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
978-263-7300
actonchrysler.com
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.*
Boch Nissan*
?On The Automile,? Route 1, Norwood
855-996-7751
BochNissan.com
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
Boch Honda*
?On The Automile,? Route 1, Norwood
888-364-2550 BochHonda.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
888-871-3051
actonchrysler.com
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
340 Mystic Ave, Medford, MA
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Kelly Nissan of Beverly*
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
420 Cabot St, Route 1A, Beverly
978-922-1405
nissanofbeverly.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynn?eld*
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynn?eld
781-598-1234
kellynissano?ynn?eld.com
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Toyota of Wellesley*
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
Lev Kia of Framingham*
Route 110, Westford
978-589-4200
BochHondaWest.com
Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Boch Honda West*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Toyota of Braintree*
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynn?eld
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
Mirak Chevrolet*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
?On The Automile,? Route 1, Norwood
844-464-3560
BochChevrolet.com
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
Toyota of Watertown*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
Kelly Jeep*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Boch Chevrolet*
?On The Automile,? Route 1, Norwood
888-321-6631 BochToyota.com
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
Best Chevrolet*
Boch Toyota*
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
VillageSubaru.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynn?eld*
Kelly In?niti*
Cityside*
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd,
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054 landroverofsudbury.com
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
?On The Automile,? Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Volvo Cars Cape Cod ? A Premier
Company
270 North St, Hyannis
508-815-5400
drivepremier.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
NEW 2017 MASERATI
GHIBLI
S Q4 AWD
Stk# M437 ? MSRP $80,950
LEASE
FOR
589
$
*
MO./39
MOS.
$5,999 DUE AT SIGNING
7500 MILES PER YEAR
NEW 2017 MASERATI
LEVANTE
AWD
Stk# M513 ? MSRP $79,375
658
$
LEASE
FOR
*
MO./39
MOS.
$5,999 DUE AT SIGNING
7500 MILES PER YEAR
Available at Herb Chambers Maserati Boston through 1/8/2018 to qualified lessees with Tier 1 approved credit through JP Morgan Chase Bank NA. Delivery by 1/8/2018 required. Subject
to availability ? quantities are limited. *39-month closed-end lease for a new 2017 model year Maserati Ghibli S Q4 with an MSRP of $80,950.00 (stock # M437). **39-month closed-end
lease for a new 2017 model year Maserati Levante SUV All-wheel Drive with an MSRP of $79,375.00 (stock # M513). Lessee is responsible for insurance, maintenance, repairs, $0.30 per
mile over contracted miles per year, and excess wear and tear. Lessee may have to meet additional program requirements. All applicable taxes and fees (title, registration, doc/title
prep, bank acquisition) are additional to be paid by customer.
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston
527 Boston Post Road ? Rt. 20 ? Wayland, MA 01778
888-759-9612
HerbChambersMaserati.com
Sales: Monday-Thursday 8:30am-8:00pm, Friday 8:30am-6:00pm
Saturday 8:30am-6:00pm, Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
Service: Monday-Friday 7:30am-5:30pm
T h e
C8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
Boston?s forecast
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Breezy with plenty of
sun. It will be cold, but
not as brutal as recent
days. Winds will stay
gusty through tonight under
clear skies.
THURSDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Mostly sunny and not
as cold. Winds will be
lighter than recent days.
Clouds will increase
during the afternoon. Remaining
cloudy at night.
HIGH
17-22
LOW
11-16
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
A nor?easter will track
up the coast and bring
snow to the area. Strong
winds will accompany
the snow causing near-blizzard
conditions at times.
HIGH
27-32
LOW
18-23
SATURDAY
FRIDAY
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
6 P.M.
Extremely cold despite
sunshine. Gusty winds
will make it fell like it is
20 below zero at times
through the afternoon and at
night.
A little snow at times in
the morning; otherwise,
mostly cloudy, windy,
blowing and drifting
snow and frigid with falling temperatures
HIGH
29-34
LOW
9-14
NOON
2
2
HIGH
6-11
LOW
-6--1
HIGH
10-15
LOW
0-5
12
6
13
4
6
6
3
11
2
30
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
6 A.M.
By Dave Green
WEDNESDAY
TODAY
9
9
5
3
Difficulty Level
1/02
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to proн
duce the target numbers in the topнleft corners.
Fill in the singleнbox cages with the number in the topнleft
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
TODAY: High pressure will build across the area. But it will
be a brisk, cold day. Flurries are expected in the northern
mountains.
TOMORROW: It will be noticeable warmer across
the area. Sunshine will give way to clouds as low
pressure develops to the south. It will be dry.
EXTENDED: A nor?easter will pound the
region with near-blizzard conditions, especially near the coast. Snow will be heavy
at times into the night.
Tides
A.M. P.M.
High tides
A.M. P.M.
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
11:3110:50
10.6 12.2
5:17 4:37
-2.1 -0.9
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
11:3110:50
11:3110:50
11:3510:57
11:3310:54
11:3911:03
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
---11:44
---11:40
11:4511:04
11:3510:55
High tides
Old Orchard ME 11:2010:38
Hampton
Beach NH
11:3410:52
Plum Island
11:4611:09
Ipswich
11:1910:37
11:2310:44
10:18 9:40
11:1510:34
Boston?s recent climate
Yesterday
High/low
13/0
Mean
7
Departure from normal -23
Departure for month -23
Departure for year
-23
5 p.m. rel. humidity 38%
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today?s highs
and tonight?s lows.
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
Normal Temperatures
Jan. readings Actual Norm.
Avg. daily high 13.0 36.8
Avg. daily low
0.0 23.5
YTD avg. temp. 6.5 30.2
Record Temperatures
Yesterday?s high 13░
80
Normal
high
37
30
Normal
low
20
Wind
? Boston Harbor W 7-14 kts.
Seas
Temp
1-2 ft.
19/13
East Cape
Wind
24
10
Seas
Temp
? Martha?s
Vineyard
NW 12-25 kts. 4-6 ft.
23/16
Cod Canal
W 15-25 kts.
2-4 ft.
20/11
? Nantucket
NW 15-25 kts. 4-6 ft.
24/20
? Buzzards Bay
NW 12-25 kts. 1-3 ft.
20/11
? Provincetown
W 15-25 kts.
22/19
2-4 ft.
Record
low
0
-10
-20
Yesterday?s low 0░
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1
December
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
7:13 a.m.
4:23 p.m.
9:09
5:24 p.m.
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
0.08
LAST
Jan. 8
NEW
Jan. 16
FIRST
Jan. 24
FULL
Jan. 31
The moon, a day past full, forms a gently curving
arc tonight with Castor and Pollux to its upper left
and Procyon to its lower right. Off to the right of
this pattern is Orion.
HOROSCOPE
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday,
Jan. 2, 2018:
This year you often reach out to
others. Social relationships score
high on your list of priorities. You
have a sixth sense that helps you
understand what is about to happen. If you are single, tap into
this intuitive ability when choosing whom to date. Potential suitors can't seem to stay away from
you. If you are attached, be smart
and dote on your sweetie. You
might be going through a lot, but
understand that your significant
other will have his or her hands
full adjusting to you. CANCER
might be challenging to deal
with.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
In your mind, you could be won-
dering if today and yesterday are
representative of the rest of 2018.
Some of you might feel as if you
have been shot out of a cannon.
Uproar at home keeps your focus
on the domestic scene. You'll desire some peace and quiet. Tonight: Try to settle in.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You observe more than others
seem to realize. In fact, you don't
miss much because of your keen
perceptions. You typically are
nonjudgmental; however, that
might not be the case right now.
A loved one comes toward you
with good news. Tonight: Celebrate the night away!
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
You might be forced to deal with
your finances. Opportunities
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, Jan. 2, the
second day of 2018. There are
363 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Former House
speaker Dennis Hastert is 76.
TV host and zookeeper Jack
Hanna is 71. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. is 50. Actor Taye Diggs is
47. Actress Renee Elise Goldsberry is 47. Actress Kate Bosworth is 35. Trombone Shorty
is 32.
0.44
0.03
0.04
T
T
T
0.1
0.01
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1
Dense fog Moon and stars ? A. MacRobert
Weather
Visibility
1/4 of a mile
Wind
northwest at 58 m.p.h.
High/low temperature
-14/-26
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
23.0?
0.58
0.46
Moon phases
║In 1921, religious services
were broadcast on radio for the
first time as KDKA in Pittsburgh aired the regular Sunday
service of the city?s Calvary
Episcopal Church.
║In 1935, Bruno Hauptmann
went on trial in Flemington, N.
J., on charges of kidnapping
and murdering the 20-monthold son of Charles and Anne
Lindbergh. (Hauptmann was
-3
1918
January
0.66
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Almanac
Record
high
60
40
New England marine forecast
1876
70
70
50
? Small craft advisory
? Gale warning ? Storm warning
December
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
0.00?
Precip days in January
0
0.8"
0.7"
0.6"
0.5"
0.4"
0.3"
0.2"
0.1"
0.0"
January
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
0.00?
Norm. month to date 0.11?
West
Year to date
Norm. year to date
0.00?
0.11?
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. й2018
East
? 10 8 5 4
?QJ8632
? K
?65
?K3
?A 7 4
? 10 8 4 3 2
?9 8 2
South
---11:50
11:5911:32
8:07 7:40
8:00 7:33
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
58
58
35
1942
2019
1857
South dealer ? N-S vulnerable
North
? Q97
? 95
? A75
?KQJ43
? AJ62
? K 10
? QJ96
? A 10 7
South
1 NT
West
North
East
Pass
3 NT
All Pass
Opening lead ? ? 3
In my opinion, the standard of play among all players
has declined. Players focus on bidding and neglect dummy
play and defense.
Today?s deal from the 2017 World Championships was
played 12 times, in the semifinals of three major events. At
10 tables, North-South got to a routine 3NT.
West led a low diamond. When dummy played low, East
took the king and shifted to the queen of hearts, and the
defense raced off six heart tricks. In the Bermuda Bowl, the
deal was tied: plus 300 to East-West at both tables.
In such elite company, it seems someone would have
known about safety plays. Declarer doesn?t want East to get
in for a possibly fatal heart shift, so he should put up the
ace on the first diamond. If West has the king, he will have
it later. The actual fall of the king makes things easy.
If instead East played low, South could continue with a
spade to his jack. He would have many chances to succeed.
In the World Championships, one (!) declarer made 3NT.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ? Q 9 7 ? 9 5 ? A 7 5 ? K Q J
4 3. Your partner opens one heart, you respond two clubs,
he rebids two hearts and you try 2NT. Partner then bids
three diamonds. What do you say?
ANSWER: Your partner suggests six hearts, four diamonds
and minimum opening values. Your 2NT was a bit conservative, but to change your mind and act aggressively now
would be undisciplined. Bid three hearts. If partner holds
6 5, A K 10 7 6 4, K Q 6 3, 3, your black-suit honors will be
wasted.
break through the haze of wondering what to do. You'll want to
check out a risk carefully; you
don't want to feel as if you are
walking the plank! Be sure you
can handle any snafus. Tonight:
Run some errands.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
You will want to open up to
someone else, but this person
might seem somewhat distant at
the moment. Know when to take
a detour and avoid a collision of
wills. Your creativity surges and
allows many more options to appear than you originally had envisioned. Tonight: Fun and games.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You have a lot on your mind, but
will choose not to share it just
yet. Your fiery energy allows you
greater flexibility than usual. You
seem unusually resourceful, but
might need some time in meditation to think through a decision
carefully. Tonight: The unexpected occurs.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Just when you thought that most
of the holiday energy had dissipated, you find out otherwise.
Your words do count. You'll feel
liberated once you clear the air
with a loved one. You might not
have anticipated the reaction you
get. Tonight: Where the crowds
can be found.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Tension builds to unprecedented
levels. You might feel as if you are
finally in control. Remember this
feeling, as at any given moment a
surprise could throw your plans
into chaos. Learn to work with
the unexpected, as it seems to frequent your life. Tonight: Out and
about.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Your intensity has not lessened,
but your good humor seems more
present than usual. You greet
good luck as people flock toward
you. Allow yourself to follow
through on a dream, as it can be
accomplished far more easily
than you had imagined. Tonight:
You have reason to smile.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
You could be in the mood to retreat from the holiday atmosphere and add some calmness to
your day. This sounds like a great
idea, but making it happen could
be nearly impossible. Be prepared to handle a major disruption. Tonight: Make time for a
close friend or loved one.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Defer to others for the moment;
perhaps they need some time in
the limelight. A group of friends
might be more beneficial to you
than you are aware. Your perspective could be changing without you even realizing it. A family
member is likely to be reactive.
Tonight: Close to home.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Pace yourself, and get down to
basics. You can do only so much.
Fatigue marks your day and your
plans. You have a lot of ground to
cover, and many people to see.
You could experience an adrenaline rush because of an unexpected event. Tonight: Kick back and
relax.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Your creativity surges, and you
seem to be able to bypass many
problems that arise. You will find
unusual solutions. News from
someone whose expertise you respect will put a smile on your
face. Recognize that you are unstoppable. Tonight: Be extra careful with your money.
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com. (c) 2017 by
King Features Syndicate Inc.
found guilty and executed.)
║In 1942, the Philippine capital of Manila was captured by
Japanese forces during World
War II.
║In 1955, the president of Panama, Jose Antonio Remon Cantera, was assassinated at a racetrack.
║In 1967, Republican Ronald
Reagan took the oath of office
as the new governor of California.
║In 1974, President Nixon
signed legislation requiring
states to limit highway speeds
to 55 miles an hour as a way of
conserving gasoline in the face
of an OPEC oil embargo. (The
55 miles per hour limit was effectively phased out in 1987;
federal speed limits were abolished in 1995.)
║In 1991, Sharon Pratt was
sworn in as mayor of Washington, D.C., becoming the first
black woman to head a city of
Washington?s size and prominence.
║In 2006, a methane gas explo-
sion at the Sago Mine in West
Virginia killed 12 miners, but
one miner, Randal McCloy, Jr.,
was eventually rescued.
║In 2008, the Justice Department opened a full criminal investigation into the destruction
of CIA videotapes of the interrogation of two Al Qaeda suspects. (A special prosecutor later cleared the CIA?s former top
clandestine officer and others.)
Oil prices soared to $100 a barrel for the first time.
║In 2013, the United Nations
gave a grim new count of the
human cost of Syria?s civil war,
saying the death toll had exceeded 60,000 in 21 months.
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton left a New York
hospital, three days after doctors discovered a blood clot in
her head.
║Last year, a suicide bomber
driving a pickup loaded with
explosives struck a bustling
market in Baghdad, killing at
least 36 people in an attack
claimed by the Islamic State.
that had become a slushie.
? L o o k , w e?r e c r a z y, b u t
we?re having a blast,? he said.
In the upper deck, wind
gusts could be 25-30 miles per
hour, according to Matthew
Belk, a National Weather Service meteorologist
?You?re above the tree line
and above most buildings, so
the wind is a little bit freer,?
said Belk.
The temperature up there
would be a degree or two colder than field level, said Belk,
?but the windchill would be
worse.?
Fans added or subtracted
layers on the frozen concourse
as if they were trying on wedding gowns at the old Filene?s
Basement.
Shawn Houk of New York
stripped down to his long thermal underwear to quickly add
insulated snow pants he had
borrowed for the game.
H e b r o u g h t h i s f a m i l y,
which included a teenage Jets
fan and a Patriots fan. They all
attended the infamous Patriots-Jets ?butt fumble? game
five years ago on Thanksgiving. The boys fought in the
stands that day, but cooler
heads prevailed this time.
?We hope they are a little
bit more mature now,? said
their mother, Jackie.
No one in this family complained about the weather.
?Our oldest son, Tim, had
this on his bucket list ? not his
Christmas list ? to see Tom
Brady play in his own stadium,? said Jackie, ?so we?re
making his dream come true.?
In the last row of Section
339, 15-year-old Gabriella
Drawnowski of Holyoke sat
with her family.
?I promised not to whine,?
she said. ?I love the seats and
I?ve got these really thick fuzzy
socks on. Go Tom Brady.?
This was her first game.
?Just don?t think about the
cold,? she said. ?Just watch the
game and you?ll be fine.?
On the upper-deck concourse, bathrooms became
warming stations.
?Let?s just stay in here,? said
Connor McLaughlin, 17, of
Plymouth, N.H.
He acknowledged that he
was just kidding. Sort of.
?It?s pretty cold. but I?m still
having a lot of fun,? he said.
?It?s the experience of a lifetime. I got into the game for
free.?
Halfway up in Section 340,
Vanessa DeMelo of Fall River
shivered despite layers, blankets, and hand warmers.
?I bought the tickets as a
Christmas present for him,?
she said. ?Yeah, it?s pretty cold.
I can feel it, and I?m a little bit
sorry I got them.?
Her boyfriend, Aaron Notarangelo, moved closer, and
she smiled.
?This is the best Christmas
present anybody could ever
ask for,? he said.
Diagonally across the stadium in Sec tion 317, things
weren?t much better.
Ayanah Dowdie and Essah
Chisholm of Boston snuggled
under a blanket, the wind hitting them in the face like a
fist.
Dowdie bought the tickets
as a Christmas present for her
friend. It was her first Patriot
game, too.
?I would not be here without him,? she said. ?I need
body warmth. We have this
fleece blanket and it helps,
like, a million percent.
?But next Christmas present, I?m thinking maybe Aruba
instead.?
Stan Grossfeld can be reached
at grossfeld@globe.com.
T h e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
PATRIOTS
G l o b e
Sports
C5
REPLAY
B Y B E N V O L I N | G L O B E S TA F F
The elusive Dion Lewis
Lewis
But he jump-cuts and squeezes
through a small hole in the
middle...
...and emerges free on the other side for a big 17 yard gain.
Patriots running back Dion Lewis is stymied in the backfield.
James Harrison effect
James Harrison played 27 snaps in his Patriots debut, almost exclusively at weakside linebacker (on the opposite side of the formation away from the tight end).
He did a nice job taking
on two defenders in run
defense, setting the edge,
and letting Elandon Roberts
make the tackle in the
backfield.
Roberts
Harrison
Harrison
Harrison also dropped into
zone coverage on six of his
snaps.
At 39, Harrison proved he still has game
uON FOOTBALL
Continued from Page C1
run defense and packs a big punch.
And they had Harrison playing
weakside linebacker, and he looked
like a complete football player on Sunday. The general assumption was that
Harrison was brought here to be a situational pass rusher, but he was much
more than that against the Jets.
First off, Harrison played almost exclusively on first and second down,
and came off the field on obvious passing third downs. He only played weakside linebacker ? on the side of the
formation away from the tight end ?
so that he often was the unblocked defender on running plays, or went headto-head with the offensive tackles.
The Patriots then used Harrison in
three different ways. In his 27 snaps,
Harrison rushed the passer 11 times,
almost all of them in the second half,
when the Jets were mostly throwing
the ball. He doesn?t have a great initial
burst anymore, but Harrison still has
strength and a motor, and came away
with two second-effort sacks and a QB
pressure, all against left tackle Kelvin
Beachum.
Harrison played the run on 10 of
his snaps. Most of the runs were away
from his side of the field, but on one
notable occasion, Harrison took on
two blockers, held the edge, and let
Rober ts swoop in to stuff Elijah
McGuire for a 1-yard loss. This is why
they got Harrison ? Lee, Cassius
Marsh, and Deatrich Wise have not
been consistent at holding the edge.
And Harrison even dropped into
zone pass coverage six times. The Patriots never matched him up one-onone vs. a receiver, but had him drop into the flat or the middle of the field. On
one third and 5, Harrison dropped
back, then exploded to the ball and
dropped Robby Anderson for a 2-yard
stop.
Harrison is still a situational player.
But he?s a lot more than just a pass
rusher, and he still has some football
left in him. With Harrison and Van
Noy back in the fold, the Patriots suddenly have a credible linebacking
corps.
Other observations after rewatching the tape:
When the Patriots had the ball
R Dion Lewis had too many impressive runs to count, and his ability to
gain extra yards continues to astound.
We counted seven tacklers that Lewis
made whiff with his spin moves, jumpcuts, and dynamic ability to start and
stop. Among his best runs: making Demario Davis whiff in the backfield and
powering through Xavier Cooper to
barely convert a third-and-1; on second and 8, Lewis is seemingly corralled by three Jets defenders short of
the sticks, but he still squires around
Morris Claiborne and picks up the first
down; breaking Buster Skrine?s ankles
on a 9-yard swing pass; on first and 10,
Lewis looks like he?s bottled up inside,
but he jump-cuts twice, squirms
through a hole, and emerges on the
other side for a big 17-yard gain.
And Lewis looked like he?s been taking lessons from Le?Veon Bell lately by
showcasing an impressively patient
running style. On second and 5 in the
third quarter, Lewis took a handoff
left, stopped, literally took a step backward, squared his body to the line of
scrimmage, hit the hole right up the
middle, smashed through Rontez
Miles to gain 4 extra yards, and picked
up the first down.
Lewis is setting himself up for a
nice payday in free agency this spring,
from the Patriots or someone else.
R We wrote after Sunday?s game
about how Tom Brady needs more
help from his teammates in the playoffs. In rewatching the game, it became even more apparent how Brady
just isn?t on the same page as his receivers.
The CBS cameras showed Brady
having a nice, long chat with Danny
Amendola as the two walked off the
field and hit the sideline following a
miscommunication on third and 12.
And toward the end of the game,
the cameras again showed Brady having a stern discussion with Brandin
Cooks on the sideline after the two had
a miscommunication on third down
(the play where Brady was called for
intentional grounding). This after Brady was ticked off at Cooks for slowing
down on a deep ball early in the game.
It?s not a good sign when the quarterback is having communication errors with two of his top receivers this
late in the season.
R With several starters out because
of injury, and the Patriots clearly protecting Rob Gronkowski from taking
any hits, the Patriots again had to rely
on some gimmicks to move the ball.
For the second week in a row Josh McDaniels called a steady diet of play-action just to give Brady enough time to
throw against the Jets? front seven.
The tactic worked, as Brady was hit
just five times and sacked twice on 39
dropbacks. Lewis?s touchdown reception came off play-action.
And they went no-huddle to start
the game, to try to get into a rhythm
and post an early lead. The Patriots
surprisingly took the ball to start the
game instead of deferring, and Jim
Nantz noted that the Patriots emphasized the need to play from ahead
against the Jets.
R The Jets took a cue from the Patriots? recent opponents and played a lot
of press-man coverage with just a single deep safety, daring the Patriots to
beat them deep. And for the most part,
the Patriots once again struggled to get
separation. The word is out ? press
the Patriots receivers at the line of
scrimmage and blitz Brady. The Jets
tallied both of their sacks this way, and
forced four key incompletions with
their blitz, including two on third
down.
Fortunately, the Jets committed
three defensive holding penalties, an
illegal hands to the face, and a 39-yard
pass interference. But the word is out
on how to slow down the Patriots. The
Patriots? longest play in the first half
was just 16 yards, and for the game
they only had two passes over 20
yards.
R Right tackle Cam Fleming had a
rough game. He got beaten badly to
the outside by David Bass for an easy
sack on a four-man rush. Fleming also
allowed a run stuff in the third quarter,
and let Jordan Jenkins plow right
through him to hit Brady and force an
incompletion. The right tackle spot
could be an issue for the Patriots in the
playoffs.
R Phillip Dorsett hasn?t done much
to earn Brady?s trust, and dropping
that beautiful deep pass on Sunday
won?t help. But Dorsett had a key block
around the edge to spring Lewis for a
3-yard touchdown run around the left
edge. Dwayne Allen had the other key
block.
R Scary moment in the second quarter, when Lewis rolled up on Nate Solder from behind. Solder hit the deck
and came up hopping a few moments
later, but he was OK. That could have
been disastrous.
When the Jets had the ball
R The Patriots? run defense was excellent, holding the Jets to 40 yards on
19 carries. Of course, it helps that they
could sell out to stop the run because
Bryce Petty was the quarterback, but
Lawrence Guy (three stuffs), Malcom
Brown (two stuffs), Trey Flowers,
Ricky Jean Francois, and Roberts (one
each) all made plays behind the line of
scrimmage. Guy, especially, has been
on a dominant run over the last month
or so. The Jets had a big run set up
with a toss to the right, but Guy maintained his leverage against the guard
and dropped Bilal Powell for just 2
yards.
R Harrison is going to be a big addition in the run game, because Lee just
isn?t getting it done. Once again, Lee
was unable to set the edge and allowed
Powell to scamper for 24 yards to the
left side. And Trey Flowers got caught
inside on an 11-yard run by Elijah
McGuire.
R Speaking of the Patriots? suddenly
formidable linebacker corps, that includes Marquis Flowers, who has
played 86 snaps over the last two
games and has done a nice job in all
phases. He?s not the most fluid athlete
in zone coverage, but he covers the
middle of the field well enough, and
had a beautiful delayed pass rush for a
sack up the middle.
R Van Noy definitely looked tentative running around the field. This
looked important for him just to get
some game action before the playoffs,
because the Patriots need him.
R The Patriots showed a Cover 0 defense for the first time all year (no deep
safeties), daring Petty to beat them
deep. Petty took advantage twice, hitting Neal Sterling in the flat for 15
yards, and throwing a beautiful deep
ball to ArDarius Stewart over Jonathan Jones for 46 yards.
Special teams
R The kickoff coverage wasn?t always perfect, but Stephen Gostkowski
again was masterful with the placement of his short kickoffs. Only 1 of his
5 kickoffs went for touchbacks, and
Gostkowski finished the regular season with the second-lowest touchback
percentage in the NFL (40.8 percent),
behind only Tampa Bay.
R Tremendous punting day for Ryan Allen. The net average of 41.8
doesn?t jump off the page, but five of
his eight punts were downed inside
the 20, and three were downed inside
the 5 (all in the fourth quarter). His
coffin corner punt that went out of
bounds at the 3 was a beauty.
Ben Volin can be reached at
ben.volin@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @BenVolin
C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T U E S D A Y, JA N U A R Y 2 , 2 0 1 8
UCF ends season unbeaten
ASSOCIATED PRESS
McKenzie Milton wanted to throw a
blanket of 13 wins and no losses over
the College Football Playoff.
After Milton and
BOWL
Central Florida capped
ROUNDUP
a perfect season, he
suggested it was time
to respect the Knights, even if they
weren?t invited to the playoff.
Milton threw two touchdown passes
and ran for 116 yards with another
touchdown, leading No. 10 UCF to a
34-27 Peach Bowl win over No. 7 Auburn on Monday in Atlanta.
Then it was time to boast.
??I said on the podium you can go
ahead and cancel the playoffs,?? Milton
said. ??I'm not changing my mind.??
UCF (13-0) led, 34-20, before having
to stop a late Auburn comeback. Antwan Collier?s interception in the end
zone with 24 seconds remaining
clinched the win.
The UCF players launched a joyous
postgame celebration, rolling around
in confetti on the field while wearing Tshirts that read ??Champions.??
The Knights won in their final game
with coach Scott Frost, who stayed with
the team through the bowl game after
accepting an offer to become the new
coach at Nebraska, his alma mater.
Frost will bring most of his UCF assistants to Nebraska.
The Knights thought they deserved
a higher ranking after winning the
American Athletic Conference and
leading the nation in scoring. They
made a strong statement by beating
Auburn (10-4), which was held to 90
yards rushing on 44 carries.
Frost said ??it wasn?t right?? for UCF
to not receive more consideration for
the four-team playoff.
Citrus Bowl ? Receiver Miles Boykin
made a dynamic one-handed grab and
raced down the sideline for a 55-yard
touchdown with 1:28 remaining to give
14th-ranked Notre Dame a 21-17 victory over No. 16 LSU in Orlando.
The win by the Irish (10-3) is their
first in a New Year?s Day bowl since the
1994 Cotton Bowl against Texas A&M
and snapped a nine-game skid in January postseason games.
Boykin had only nine catches for
151 yards and a TD coming into the
game, but he got his first start after
starters Chase Claypool (shoulder injury) and Kevin Stephenson (suspension)
were ruled out. Boykin finished the Citrus Bowl with three receptions for 102
yards and a touchdown and was named
the game?s MVP.
Outback Bowl ? Jake Bentley threw for
239 yards and two touchdowns to help
South Carolina overcome a 16-point
second-half deficit to beat Michigan,
26-19, in the Outback Bowl in Tampa.
The sophomore tossed scoring passes of 21 yards to Bryan Edwards and 53
yards to Shi Smith, the latter giving the
Gamecocks (9-4) a 23-19 lead early in
the fourth quarter.
Michigan (8-5) finished with its first
three-game losing streak under coach
Jim Harbaugh.
Georgia wins Rose in 2нOT thriller
uROSE BOWL
Continued from Page C1
down would have ended the game.
The Bulldogs will play either Alabama or Clemson, who played late
Monday night, on Jan. 8 for the national championship in Atlanta, about 90
miles from their campus ? with a
chance to win their first national title
since 1980.
??We got to get back to work. It?s not
done,?? Michel said. ??Now we got to finish. Let?s just finish this season off
right.??
The first overtime Rose Bowl was also the highest-scoring, surpassing last
year?
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