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The Washington Post – March 07, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Freezing rain 42/33 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 44/32 B8
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
Seoul officials report that
Pyongyang wants talks,
would pause programs
BY K AREN D E Y OUNG
AND A NNA F IFIELD
N. KOREA CONTINUED ON A10
Spy drama
in Britain has
eyes turning
toward Russia
COHN LEADS TRUMP’S
ECONOMIC COUNCIL
ERIKA P. RODRÍGUEZ FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
An exodus of hundreds of thousands heightens worries for the storm-ravaged island’s future
BY A RELIS R . H ERNÁNDEZ
IN SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
There have been three muses in Ramoncito “El Andino” Rodríguez’s life: love, lament and la isla, Puerto Rico.
The founder of one of the oldest musical
acts here, Rodríguez croons boleros and
lyrical anthems that at times quicken the
heart and at others create a daydreamy lull.
Many of them are homages to his motherland, love songs to this Caribbean island. It
was a place he never wanted to leave.
But leave, he did.
Rodríguez reluctantly abandoned Puerto Rico after several feet of floodwater
spilled into his home during Hurricane
Maria in September, destroying his instruments, albums and handwritten compositions. The 78-year-old joined hundreds of
thousands of other islanders who boarded
flights in the past five months, creating a
growing diaspora that, as time passes, is
increasingly unlikely to return. Rodríguez
and his wife, like so many others, picked
Florida, and their stateside sojourn was
supposed to be temporary.
They didn’t expect stability back home to
be so elusive for so long.
“I’m still here,” Rodríguez said with a sigh
from his niece’s house in Homestead, Fla.,
in mid-February. If the past decade of Puerto Rican history is any indication, his stay
could become permanent. “Destiny will
decide what happens next.”
EXODUS CONTINUED ON A6
From left, Norma Ramos, 68, poses Thursday in her Cayey, Puerto Rico, home, which has been
without electricity for five months. Carla S. López de Azúa, 33, seen Friday in San Juan. Ramoncito
Rodríguez, 78, sits Friday at his home in Levittown. All three left the island in Maria’s aftermath but
eventually returned. Many others, however, are not coming back or plan to leave permanently.
Justice Dept. sues California on ‘sanctuary’ laws
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
The Justice Department dramatically escalated its war on
“sanctuary” jurisdictions Tuesday, alleging in a lawsuit that the
state of California has violated the
Constitution with laws that are
friendly to undocumented immigrants.
In a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Sacramento just after 9 p.m. Eastern time, the Justice
Department alleged that three recently enacted California laws obstruct enforcement of federal immigration law and harm public
safety.
The Justice Department asked
a federal judge to block the Cali-
fornia laws, which restrict how
state businesses and law enforcement agencies can cooperate with
immigration authorities. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is to
address the lawsuit in a speech
Wednesday at the California
Peace Officers Association’s 26th
Annual Law Enforcement Day,
saying, in part: “We are fighting to
Russia sanctions: New measures
“within a week,” senators told. A11
make your jobs safer and to help
you reduce crime in America. And
I believe we are going to win,”
according to an excerpt of his
prepared remarks.
California Attorney General
Xavier Becerra (D) said Tuesday
night that while he had yet to
examine what the Justice DepartSANCTUARY CONTINUED ON A7
BY D AMIAN P ALETTA
AND P HILIP R UCKER
Gary Cohn, the White House’s
top economic adviser, announced
Tuesday that he was leaving the
administration amid a major internal clash over President
Trump’s sharp and sudden pivot
toward protectionist trade policies.
The departure of Cohn, a
former president of Goldman Sachs who
had been an interlocutor between
the
Trump administration and Gary Cohn
the business
community, is the latest jolt to a
White House that has been especially tumultuous in recent weeks
and unable to retain some of its
top talent.
His resignation as National
Economic Council director will
leave the White House without a
financial heavyweight who business executives and foreign leaders believed had served as a counter to Trump’s protectionist impulses and as a moderating force
in other areas.
COHN CONTINUED ON A15
Trump advisers: Little-known
aides have outsize sway. A14
Industry adapts: How steelmakers
have survived without tariffs. A14
Crackdown on truancy
imperils graduations
london — It is a spy drama —
SPY CONTINUED ON A11
Latest free-trade booster
to leave White House
Leaving their hearts behind in Puerto Rico
BY K ARLA A DAM
AND W ILLIAM B OOTH
and it is real. An aging Russian
double agent is found slumped
beside his daughter on a park
bench in a quiet English town,
both near death, apparently poisoned. Now Scotland Yard is on
the case.
Britain’s counterterrorism police on Tuesday took over the
investigation into what caused a
former Soviet-era spy, 66-yearold Sergei Skripal, to collapse
Sunday, leaving him staring into
space, beside his comatose
daughter, 33-year-old Yulia.
The pair remain in critical
condition in a Salisbury hospital.
British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson cautioned Tuesday it
would be “wrong to prejudge”
the fast-moving investigation
but warned that if Russia were
found responsible, the British
government would respond “robustly.” Johnson told Parliament
that Russia was now a “malign
. $2
Foe of
tari≠s
to quit
post
N. Korean
overture
is ‘sincere,’
Trump says
The White House responded
with cautious optimism Tuesday
to North Korea’s reported proposal to hold “candid talks” with the
United States and South Korea,
and to put its nuclear weapons
and missile testing programs on
hold while engaged in dialogue.
“I think they are sincere,” said
President Trump, who attributed
the apparent change in attitude to
the tough sanctions and other actions that the United States has
applied and pushed others to impose on North Korea.
“Hopefully it’s positive; hopefully it will lead to a very positive
result,” he said.
Word of North Korea’s willingness to hold talks came from South
Korean officials returning from
what they described as productive
meetings in the North, during
which Pyongyang said it was prepared to discuss denuclearization
and normalizing relations.
North Korea did not confirm
South Korea’s version of events,
saying simply that the two sides
“made a satisfactory agreement”
during the meeting between the
North’s leader, Kim Jong Un, and
envoys sent by the South’s president, Moon Jae-in.
“We don’t know yet” the full
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
Some see enforcement
of long-ignored D.C.
school rules as unfair
BY
GODOFREDO A. VASQUEZ/HOUSTON CHRONICLE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
In Texas, waiting to cast their ballots
People wait in line Tuesday in Houston during primary voting in Texas. Democrats voted in numbers far
greater than in 2014, fresh evidence of liberal energy that could reshape even deeply red states. Story, A2
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
TEACHERS CHEER THEIR WIN. CRAIG HUDSON/CHARLESTON GAZETTE-MAIL/AP
Deal ends strike Gov. Jim Justice and West
Virginia’s teachers forged a deal to end a
nine-day strike, bringing relief and joy. A3
Kurds to leave ISIS fight The U.S. allies in
eastern Syria said they will withdraw from the
front line to battle Turkey in Afrin. A10
Stormy Daniels sued
President Trump, asking that her nondisclosure agreement about
their alleged affair be
declared void because
Trump didn’t sign it. A3
Two senators are
seeking information on
an EPA contract that
went to an associate of
Scott Pruitt’s security
chief. A3
Kellyanne Conway
violated the Hatch Act
with remarks ahead of
the special Senate election in Alabama last
year, a federal investigator says. A4
Robert S. Mueller III
is looking at incidents
involving President
Trump’s longtime attorney Michael Cohen,
though there’s no indication he’s a target of
the Russia probe. A4
Sam Nunberg, a former Trump campaign
aide, said he has
changed his mind and
will now comply with
Mueller’s subpoena. A5
Aides to Ben Carson
will comply with a
House request for
documents on the HUD
secretary’s office redecoration, amid an employee’s complaint. A5
The FDA has approved
the nation’s first genetic
test for cancer risk that
doesn’t need a doctor’s
prescription. A12
The TSA chief said the
transportation agency
needs to revise its strategies to deal with “lone
wolf” attackers. A17
THE WORLD
After his party’s strong
performance in Italy’s
elections, Matteo Salvini
of the League could
become Western Europe’s first far-right
leader since 1945. A9
An Israeli official
touted a technological
advance in combating
tunnel warfare by Palestinian militants. A9
THE ECONOMY
UnitedHealthcare said
P ERRY S TEIN
Kidist Deneke is supposed to
be seated in her first-period class
by 8:45 each morning. But most
days, the Roosevelt High senior is
dropping off her younger sister at
school then, before catching a
bus to her own school.
She almost always arrives late,
but it has never posed much of a
problem — until now.
Deneke is a member of the
Class of 2018, which approaches
its final three months of high
school in the shadow of a graduation scandal that has rocked Dis-
it will pass prescription
drug rebates directly to
consumers in highdeductible plans,
possibly lowering some
out-of-pocket costs. A13
trict schools.
An investigation showed that
one of every three graduates from
the District’s public schools last
year missed too many classes or
improperly took makeup classes,
undermining the validity of hundreds of diplomas. In the wake of
that review, school administrators tightened enforcement of
long-ignored attendance rules,
meaning seniors with too many
absences will not be allowed to
graduate.
The graduation crisis cost four
school officials their jobs and
now leaves students such as
Deneke, who thought they were
on track to graduate, scrambling
to figure out whether they can
earn their diplomas on time.
Taahir Kelly, a junior at
Roosevelt in Northwest Washington, said he never knew accruing
TRUANCY CONTINUED ON A16
Inside
FOOD
The return of Noma
Rene Redzepi is back in
Copenhagen to show the
future of cuisine. E1
THE REGION
Gov. Ralph Northam’s
ability to deliver on his
top priority of Medicaid
expansion has been put
to the test this week
amid budget talks. B1
To promote gender
parity, Democrats in 17
Maryland counties will
vote separately for men
and women seeking
state party positions. B1
Maryland’s top court
voted to restore the
names of police officers
involved in cases to a
court database. B1
ST YLE
Sociology a la carte
In New Orleans, a
Nigerian-born chef makes
a startling point. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A12
COMICS........................................C7
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C5
WORLD NEWS .............................. A8
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 92
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
2 8 0 0
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
Cruz pivots on primary day to blast November opponent
BY
E D O ’ K EEFE
Even before the primary votes
were counted Tuesday in Texas,
Sen. Ted Cruz (R) went on the
attack against his November opponent.
Cruz and Democratic U.S. Rep.
Beto O’Rourke (Tex.) were both
quickly declared winners by the
Associated Press on Tuesday after
polls in the state closed. And, quickly, both candidates turned toward
facing each other in November.
Cruz called out O’Rourke by
name in a conference call with
reporters before polls closed and
then repeated his criticisms of
O’Rourke’s support of gun-control
measures, the Affordable Care
Act, and “amnesty and open borders” in a TV interview after results were in.
“The good news is that there are
a lot more conservatives in Texas
than liberals,” Cruz said. “If conservatives show up in November,
we’ll be just fine.”
It was a fresh sign that the 2018
election in Texas, which has not
elected a statewide Democrat since
1994, could be more competitive
than the state is accustomed to.
O’Rourke, 45, a three-term congressman, still faces an uphill battle. But there are signs he could at
least keep November’s election
close, including an impressive
turnout among Democrats for
Tuesday’s primaries, robust fundraising reports and polls showing
declines in popularity for Cruz
and President Trump.
O’Rourke declined to respond
to the attacks from Cruz in a Facebook Live broadcast to his supporters. “What is really exciting
about what is going on in Texas
right now is that all of the energy is
around the big things we want to
do together,” he said.
Elected in 2012, Cruz, now 47,
earned national attention early on
when he launched an overnight
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is in Ethiopia as part of
a trip to Africa that continues through Tuesday. For
coverage, go to washingtonpost.com/world.
8:30 a.m.
The trade deficit for January is seen widening to
$55.1 billion. Go to washingtonpost.com/business for
developments.
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filibuster-style takeover of the
Senate floor ahead of a government shutdown. He parlayed the
acclaim from conservatives into a
2016 presidential bid and unsuccessfully challenged support for
then-candidate Donald Trump
among delegates to the Republican National Convention.
In the past year, Cruz has mostly
settled into the background, working with Trump on policy issues
and making nice with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) and other party leaders.
The Cruz-O’Rourke race is set to
be a clash of ideology and style.
Cruz was the only senator to vote
against even launching a formal
debate over immigration policy
last month, declaring that Trump’s
call to grant legal status to roughly
1.3 million young immigrants
amounted to amnesty. O’Rourke is
a strong supporter of a comprehensive immigration overhaul.
Cruz has been a strong proponent
of gun rights, while O’Rourke has
signed on to a new bill that would
restore and build on the expired
ban on military-style weapons.
O’Rourke was born and raised in
El Paso and won his congressional
seat in 2012. He represents a congressional district just across the
border from Mexico that is over-
ERIC GAY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Yvonne Heath looks at her phone Tuesday during a Democratic
watch party in Austin after primary polls closed in Texas. Rep. Beto
O’Rourke (D-Tex.) easily secured his party’s Senate nomination.
whelmingly Latino. Although his
childhood nickname, which he’s
used his entire political career, is a
diminutive of “Roberto,” he was
born Robert Francis O’Rourke.
Shortly after Trump’s election,
O’Rourke began touring Texas,
travels that he says convinced him
that “the conventional wisdom”
about Texas politics was off the
mark.
“I’d go to Lubbock or Midland
or College Station, and I’d see folks
coming to events saying, ‘I voted
for Trump, but I think we need
something better,’ ” O’Rourke said
in an interview with The Washington Post last year.
Gallup’s 2017 year-long average
found Trump’s job approval rating
at 39 percent among Texas adults,
with 54 percent disapproving. A
Texas Tribune-University of Texas
poll of registered state voters last
month found that the same shares,
46 percent, approve and disapprove of Trump. Cruz also got split
reviews, with 40 percent approving and 41 percent disapproving.
Strong disapproval of Cruz was
10 points higher than strong approval (32 percent vs. 22 percent),
according to the survey, which was
conducted online by YouGov.
Another sign of Cruz’s growing
vulnerability is money. Over the
first few weeks of 2018, O’Rourke
raised $2.3 million, compared
with $803,000 for Cruz, according
to federal fundraising reports. The
latest hauls signaled a narrowing
cash-on-hand gap between the
two: O’Rourke reported $4.9 million saved up, while Cruz had
$6 million.
But even with all those signs of a
potential shift in Texas, political
handicappers still showed Cruz as
the front-runner going into Tuesday’s primaries. The nonpartisan
Cook Political Report and Inside
Elections classify the race between Cruz and O’Rourke as
“Likely Republican” and “Solid
Republican,” respectively.
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
Scott Clement, Seung Min Kim and
Michael Scherer contributed to this
report.
Texas primaries show Democratic voter eagerness
Early voting results
exhibit turnout surge in
state’s biggest counties
BY M IKE D E B ONIS
AND M ICHAEL S CHERER
Democratic voters showed up
in force in Texas on Tuesday for
the nation’s first primary of the
year, providing fresh evidence
that liberal enthusiasm could reshape even deeply Republican
states come November.
Turnout appeared to be up for
both parties, but the Democrats
showed the greatest growth.
From Houston to the border with
Mexico, they voted in numbers far
greater than in 2014 primaries,
motivated by a surplus of candidates, concern over one-party
control of Washington and dissatisfaction with President Trump.
Republicans continued to have
a clear advantage in the state,
with more Texans voting in their
primary than in Democrats’. But
party leaders sent out a warning
call to their own supporters about
the growing Democratic engagement.
“They are mobilizing in a powerful way,” warned Sen. Ted Cruz
(R-Tex.) after the polls closed in
an interview with the CBS affiliate in Dallas. “At the end of the
day, the good news is that there
are a lot more conservatives in
Texas than there are liberals.”
Tuesday’s voting stood to give a
fuller picture of just how big the
Democratic tail winds will be in
November, when Trump will lead
a Republican effort to maintain
control of the House and Senate.
Texas has routinely elected
GOP officials in statewide races
for a generation, though recently
with declining margins. Trump
won the state by nine points four
years after GOP nominee Mitt
Romney beat President Barack
Obama by 16 points.
The turnout from the left in
Texas follows a string of races
around the country where Democrats have shown new enthusiasm for voting in nonpresidential
years. Democrat Ralph Northam
won the Virginia governor’s race
in November, even though the
Republican
candidate,
Ed
Gillespie, received more votes
than any GOP candidate for state
office in Virginia’s history.
Democrats have also been winning special state legislative elections around the country, in states
including Florida, Wisconsin and
Kentucky that were once considered safe for Republicans. “WAKE
UP CALL,” tweeted Wisconsin
Gov. Scott Walker (R) in January,
PHOTOS BY ERIC GAY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Senate hopeful Rep. Beto O’Rourke is seen onscreen at a Democratic watch party in Austin after
Tuesday’s Texas primary election. Turnout showed far more Democrats voted than in 2014 primaries.
after a Democrat handily won a
state legislative seat that Republicans won by 27 points in 2016.
The trend was set to continue
Tuesday.
“There’s something different
going on in Texas this cycle,” said
David Wasserman, who analyzes
House races for the nonpartisan
Cook Political Report. “It’s a
uniquely anti-Trump state, because it has a rare combination of
diversity and a suburban professional class. And, in that sense, it’s
becoming a little bit more like
California every year.”
Democrats fielded 111 congressional candidates Tuesday, including at least one for each of the
36 House districts in the state.
That’s more than two and a half
times the 41 candidates in the last
midterm elections in 2014. Republicans also had more candidates than in 2014 — 102 vs. 72 —
but failed to run anyone in four
Democratic-leaning districts.
Cruz easily won his party’s
nomination for a second term in
the Senate, but he all but admitted that he would have a far more
difficult general-election campaign this time around against
Democratic nominee Rep. Beto
O’Rourke, who has cast his campaign as a movement and boasted
of 10,000 volunteers in the state.
In an unexpected move, Cruz
decided to attack O’Rourke by
name before the polls had even
closed. “Congressman O’Rourke’s
campaign is benefiting from leftwing rage,” Cruz said in a conference call with reporters. “Leftwing rage may raise a bunch of
money from people online, but I
don’t believe it reflects the views
of a majority of Texans.”
O’Rourke declined to respond
in a streamed Facebook video to
supporters. “What is really exciting about what is going on in
Texas right now is that all of the
energy is around the big things we
want to do together,” he said.
The race for the Democratic
nomination for governor will go
to a runoff between Lupe Valdez,
the former Dallas County sheriff,
and Andrew White, the son of
former Gov. Mark White, who led
the state in the 1980s. The winner
of that race will face Republican
Gov. Greg Abbott, who won his
party’s nomination to run for reelection.
In another closely watched
race, George P. Bush, the incumbent land commissioner and the
son of former Florida Gov. Jeb
Bush, won the Republican nomination for reelection, after a competitive primary.
For the most contested House
primary races, Tuesday’s contests
provided no resolution, only a
narrowing of the field. In races
where no candidate received a
majority of votes, the top two
finishers are set to face off in a
runoff election May 22.
Much of the focus was on a trio
of fiercely contested Democratic
primaries, where candidates are
battling to win the right to challenge uniquely vulnerable Republican incumbents — Reps. John
Abney Culberson, Will Hurd and
Pete Sessions — who saw 2016
Democratic presidential nominee
Hillary Clinton outpoll Trump in
their districts.
Sessions said in an interview
Tuesday that he’s noticed the uptick in Democratic enthusiasm in
his district but also pointed out
that Republicans and Democrats
cast roughly the same amount of
ballots there in early voting.
“I think that what they want me
to understand is [their] frustration with the president,” he said.
“And I share some of those frustrations.”
Former Clinton aide Ed Meier
has a big cash advantage in the
Democratic race to replace Sessions in the Dallas-area 32nd District, but it was Colin Allred, a civil
rights attorney, who was leading
in the early vote count, followed
by local TV reporter Brett Shipp.
The Democratic race in the
Houston area 7th District, represented by Culberson, has gotten
especially heated after the Democratic Congressional Campaign
Committee
publicly
moved
against one of the candidates —
Laura Moser, a liberal activist and
organizer — because of concerns
that she would be less equipped to
defeat Culberson in the general
election.
The national party’s intervention has only brought more energy and attention to Moser’s candidacy, though the early vote
count showed her still trailing
Houston lawyer Lizzie Pannill
Fletcher.
GOP operatives have gleefully
watched the drama unfold. On
Tuesday, the National Republican
Congressional Committee released a new ad outing “Democratic Civil War” highlighting the
DCCC’s Texas attack.
In the 23rd District, which follows hundreds of miles of the
Mexican border, five Democrats
are looking to unseat Hurd, with
former federal prosecutor Jay
Hulings and former intelligence
officer Gina Ortiz Jones leading
the money and endorsement race.
Jones lead the early vote count.
Tariq Thowfeek, communications director for the Texas Democratic Party, said party officials
were expecting each of those primary races to proceed to runoffs
“just because of the sheer number” of candidates.
But Thowfeek said the surfeit
of Democratic candidates was ultimately good for the party, driving turnout still higher.
“It’s rivaling a presidential
year, which is unprecedented,”
he said.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
michael.scherer@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
SU
politics & the nation
Stormy Daniels sues Trump over nondisclosure deal
SHE ASKS COURT TO
FREE HER TO SPEAK
Porn star argues Trump
did not sign agreement
BY B ETH R EINHARD,
F RANCES S TEAD S ELLERS
AND E MMA B ROWN
Stormy Daniels, the porn star
who says she was paid to keep
quiet about her alleged affair with
Donald Trump, sued the president Tuesday, asking the court to
declare that her nondisclosure
agreement before the 2016 election is void because Trump did not
sign it.
In the lawsuit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, Daniels —
whose real name is Stephanie Clifford — said she had wanted to go
public with the story of her alleged decade-old affair with
Trump in the weeks leading up to
the election. The lawsuit was first
reported by NBC News.
Trump’s lawyer, Michael Cohen, and Daniels’s attorney at the
time, Keith Davidson, negotiated
what the lawsuit calls a “hush
agreement” in which she would
be paid $130,000. After delays
and even a cancellation of the
contract by Daniels on Oct. 17, the
payment arrived on Oct. 27,
12 days before the election, according to emails reviewed by The
Washington Post. Cohen said recently that he had used his own
money to “facilitate” the payment.
The lawsuit suggests that
Trump was aware of the agreement and that the money was
intended to influence the election’s outcome. That intimation
bolsters two complaints filed with
the Federal Election Commission
that say the payment violated
election law because it was not
reported as an in-kind campaign
donation.
The lawsuit says: “Mr. Trump,
with the assistance of his attorney,
Mr. Cohen, aggressively sought to
silence Ms. Clifford as part of an
effort to avoid her telling the
truth, thus helping to ensure he
won the presidential election.”
Cohen has previously denied
that the payment breached campaign finance law. But the lawsuit
raises new accusations
against Cohen, saying
that “through intimidation and coercive tactics,”
he caused Daniels this
year to sign a statement
denying the affair. The
suit says Cohen has continued to try to “intimidate” Daniels into keep- Stormy
ing quiet in recent weeks Daniels
as reports about the deal
and Daniels’s relationship with Trump have leaked out
and Daniels has given television
interviews.
Cohen did not respond Tuesday
to a request for comment. Davidson, the attorney who negotiated
the deal for Daniels, declined to
comment.
The White House did not immediately respond to a request for
comment Tuesday evening. A
spokesman for the Trump campaign, Michael Glassner, declined
to comment.
Gina Rodriguez, who has represented Daniels, referred all questions about the suit to Daniels’s
new attorney, Michael
Avenatti. He said in an
email: “A Supreme Court
Justice once said that
‘sunlight is the best disinfectant.’ And we fully
intend on bringing as
much sunlight to this
matter as possible. Let
the chips fall where they
may.”
In the complaint, filed
under Daniels’s real
name — Clifford — the court is
asked to declare the deal with
Trump invalid and unenforceable, and it says Trump deliberately did not sign it so that he could
later disavow knowledge of it.
A person familiar with the deal
said it required the signature of
Cohen or Trump, but not both.
The person described as “buyer’s
remorse” Daniels’s decision to sue
16 months after she was paid.
Appended to the complaint is a
copy of the alleged agreement
between Clifford and Trump,
making the document public for
the first time.
On Oct. 17, 2016, Cohen formed
a limited liability corporation in
Delaware that he used to send
$130,000 to Daniels under her
“Clifford” name, according to
public records and a person familiar with the transaction. The lawsuit alleges that Cohen formed the
LLC “to hide the true sources of
funds to be used to pay Ms. Clifford, thus further insulating Mr.
Trump from later discovery and
scrutiny.”
The lawsuit landed on the same
day that The Post reported that
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III requested documents and interviewed witnesses about incidents involving Cohen.
Avenatti graduated from the
University of Pennsylvania and
George Washington University
Law School, and founded the law
firm Eagan Avenatti, LLP in 2007
with offices in Newport Beach,
Calif., Los Angeles and San Francisco.
His website promotes Avenatti
as an attorney, commentator and
entrepreneur who has represented parties in cases brought
against celebrity defendants.
“Somebody should ask the
president and Mr. Cohen the following very simple questions:
First, did Mr. Trump sign the
agreement? And second, did he
know about the payment and the
agreement?”
said
Avenatti,
reached by phone Tuesday evening. “The ramifications of the
answers are significant.”
Karen Tynan, an attorney for
the adult entertainment industry,
described the suit as a smart
move, avoiding the possibility of
private arbitration.
“Stormy has got time to amend
the complaint and add more
causes of action in the next few
weeks,” Tynan said in a message.
beth.reinhard@washpost.com
frances.sellers@washpost.com
emma.brown@washpost.com
In W.Va., a deal with teachers ends 9-day strike
Senators question
work done for EPA All state employees to get
task force will
at health-care costs
by official’s associate 5%lookraises;
BY J ULIET E ILPERIN
AND B RADY D ENNIS
Two senior Senate Democrats
asked Environmental Protection
Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt
on Tuesday to provide details
about how a business associate of
the head of his security detail got a
security contract with the agency.
Pasquale “Nino” Perrotta —
who heads Pruitt’s security detail
and also serves as a principal of
Sequoia Security Group in Rockville, Md. — advised EPA officials
to hire a member of the management team at Sequoia, Edwin
Steinmetz, according to an administration official who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to discuss
internal agency decisions. The
$3,000 “communications audit”
contract to sweep Pruitt’s office on
March 3 for concealed listening
devices was conducted by Edwin
Steinmetz Associates, according
to records obtained by The Washington Post.
The Associated Press reported
last year that the EPA had hired
Steinmetz to conduct the bug
sweep, though it did not report
that Perrotta had suggested agency officials seek Steinmetz’s services or that they are in business
together.
Pruitt also had biometric locks
installed in his office last year by a
different firm, according to documents obtained by The Post, at a
cost of $5,656.75. Those expenditures, first reported by AP, weren’t
disclosed on the government’s
contracting website because they
were split into two payments and
the threshold for reporting stands
at $3,500.
Steinmetz is listed as Sequoia’s
vice president of technical surveillance measures. While it was his
own firm that received the bugsweeping contract, Sens. Thomas
R. Carper (Del.) and Sheldon
Whitehouse (R.I.), who serve on
the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, are seeking
documentation that Perrotta
obeyed federal conflict-of-interest
rules.
“These facts raise questions
about Mr. Perrotta’s compliance
with EPA regulations and concerns that he may have used his
position at the agency to influence
the award of EPA contracts to a
person or company in which he
has a financial interest,” they
wrote in Tuesday’s letter.
EPA spokesman Jahan Wilcox
said Tuesday that the agency “will
respond to Senator Carper and
Senator Whitehouse through the
proper channel.” He added, “According to EPA’s Protective Service, security sweeps are common
practice in government, as former
EPA Administrators Lisa Jackson
and Gina McCarthy also had their
office swept.” While there was no
competitive bidding for Steinmetz’s contract, Wilcox said the
agency considered multiple vendors for the biometric locks.
Another EPA official said that
the agency’s security office approved the expenditure of funds
for Steinmetz’s firm.
In an email Tuesday, Steinmetz
said that he has performed work
for numerous “federal entities.”
“They use me as I offer the lowest
prices (under the bid threshold),
can respond within 24 hrs and am
recognized as an expert in the
field,” he wrote. “Numerous Security Firms list me on their ‘team’
throughout the US, as a ‘resource’
and do not ask for any compensation or finders fee.”
Under federal statute, the senators noted in their letter, a government official cannot participate
“in a . . . contract, claim . . . or
other particular matter in which,
to his knowledge, he, his . . . general partner, [or] organization in
which he is serving as officer, director, trustee, general partner or
employee . . . has a financial interest.”
They continued, “EPA officials
can only issue a waiver from this
provision, in advance, if they determine that the employee’s financial interest in the contract is not
so substantial as to be deemed
likely to affect the integrity of the
services which the Government
may expect from such employee.”
Perrotta, a former Bronx criminal investigator and Secret Service
agent who held several overseas
posts, has protected EPA leaders
dating to the George W. Bush administration.
Despite that full-time job, he
has pursued side ventures over the
years. Since early 2013, he has
managed Sequoia, a “boutique security and investigative firm.” On
Sequoia’s website, Perrotta is listed as the firm’s principal leader. In
the past, he also has referred to
himself as the company’s “founder
and CEO.”
Steinmetz is listed as part of
Sequoia’s “management team.”
His own firm, Edwin Steinmetz
Associates, has received at least
one other government contract,
according to public records — a
$25,000 award last year from the
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
for “miscellaneous alarm, signal
and security detection systems.”
Pruitt’s security expenses have
repeatedly drawn scrutiny. Shortly after taking office, he switched
to a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week
protective detail, drawn in part
from the agency’s environmental
crime investigation staff, after his
staff concluded that he faced a
higher level of threat than did his
predecessors. After a member of
the public confronted the administrator while traveling last
spring, it was Perrotta who recommended that Pruitt fly in either
first or business class to avoid such
situations, according to a top EPA
official.
Perrotta has traveled with
Pruitt on multiple occasions, the
senators noted, including to Kentucky, Oklahoma, Colorado and
North Dakota last summer. At Sequoia, Perrotta has advertised his
expertise in “threat analysis and
mitigation” and “VIP travel.”
Pruitt spent nearly $25,000 in
agency funds last year to build a
secure, soundproof communications booth in his office. The Government Accountability Office is
investigating the matter, though
Pruitt told lawmakers he installed
the booth to have confidential
conversations with key administration officials.
“It’s necessary for me to be able
to do my job,” Pruitt said during a
hearing on Capitol Hill.
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
brady.dennis@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
BY
S ARAH L ARIMER
ranson, w.va. — Gov. Jim Jus-
tice sat before a crowd Tuesday
and proclaimed a new day for
education in his state.
“We will move forward,” the
Republican said at a news conference in Charleston, the state capital. “No more looking back. West
Virginia renews its investment in
education and our precious children today.”
On this day, Justice (R) and the
state’s teachers had a deal to end a
nine-day strike by educators that
swept across all of West Virginia’s
55 counties and left more than
277,000 public school students out
of school. Teachers — and all state
workers — are to get a 5 percent
raise.
West Virginia’s House of Delegates and Senate approved the
pay raise, and Justice later signed
it. Even as the announcement was
still young, counties in the state
Tuesday began to spread the word
that their school doors would
open again.
Randi Weingarten, president of
the American Federation of
Teachers, an educators union, was
in the state Tuesday and described
a sense of relief and joy.
“You’re seeing it, frankly, on legislators’ faces, on the governor’s
face, on members here, on parents,” Weingarten said. “It is a
sense of joy here, that West Virginia figured out a way to help its
public schools, to help its public
school educators, to help its public
school employees, and it did it
together.”
As the work stoppage stretched,
educators shared stories of scraping by in this state, where average
teacher salaries ranked 48th in
2016, according to National Education Association data. Some
have faced tough financial decisions or worked side jobs to make
ends meet. Some have found
themselves mired in complex
health-care issues. And some are
left asking: Who will teach West
Virginia children, if not us?
“We’re going to lose more teachers,” Keri Mahoney, assistant principal at South Jefferson Elementary School in Charles Town, said
this week, before the announcement. “We already have teachers
in our building saying to us, during this crisis, ‘I’m not going to lie
to you, I have to apply to other
places if this doesn’t get worked
out.’ ”
Brian Collins, a fifth-grade
teacher at South Jefferson, has
worked as a baseball umpire and
an after-school math tutor to
make ends meet. His wife is a
teacher who works out of state, he
said, pulling in more money. Even
with that, he said, the couple feel
as though they live paycheck to
paycheck. Collins worries about
keeping good teachers in the state,
and enticing new ones.
“I have two young girls. I want
them to go through the school
system having quality teachers all
the way through,” Collins said.
“Without proper pay and benefits,
you’re not going to attract . . . and
retain teachers that are highly
qualified.”
Mahaley Beaty is a 24-year-old
teacher in West Virginia. She woke
up one morning to discover her
cat, Toby, on the floor, in the midst
of seizures. She rushed him to a
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
A group of Jefferson County teachers celebrates at Paddy’s Irish Pub in Charles Town, W.Va., after
watching a live stream of Gov. Jim Justice (R) signing an agreement. Schools will reopen Wednesday.
veterinarian, leaving with a hefty
bill. Beaty put it on her credit card,
she said, but that meant she had to
stop paying her student loans.
“You just end up making these
choices,” Beaty said. “And I never
feel caught up.”
Chris Atkins, a physical education teacher at South Jefferson,
had been standing on picket lines
since the strike began, even on
Friday, when howling winds
crumpled his sign. Atkins, 39, was
diagnosed with multiple sclerosis
in 2008. On Monday, he was out
again, explaining the health-care
issues that teachers face, and how
their miserly benefits have affected his life.
Atkins said he has struggled to
see doctors out of state, because of
insurance coverage issues. He has
been denied medications. Every
year he has to get an MRI, he said,
but one year he was supposed to
get two. That was another fight.
And then there are the deductibles.
“At this point, all I want to deal
with is the disease,” he said. “I
don’t want to have to deal with
that insurance. But the battle of
having to deal with the insurance
kind of took over more than actually having the disease itself.”
The governor had already
promised to create a task force to
address health care — a major
concern during the strike. That
task force would include educators, Justice said in a letter to state
employees last week. At Tuesday’s
news conference, Justice said appointments were expected to be in
place later in the week.
“It is important that everyone
understand that identifying all of
the issues in our health-care program and finding a solution takes
time,” Justice said in the letter. “A
cure won’t come in 30 minutes,
but I can promise you this task
force will begin its work immediately.”
Atkins, a father of two young
boys, was named teacher of the
year in his county a few years ago,
his wife, Rachel Atkins, said. Recently, Atkins wrote to a member
of the West Virginia House of Delegates about the need for a pay
raise — something he’d never
done before. In that email, Atkins
reminded the delegate that he had
taught the man’s child.
“Teachers want to go back to
work,” Rachel Atkins said. “But
they also want to be heard. Because we have families, too. Teachers have kids. They have to fight
for what they believe in, because
they have to be able to afford to
live, and in our case, afford to get
good medical care. The reality is, if
that can’t happen, we’re going to
lose, we’re going to lose good educators.”
Collins, the fifth-grade teacher,
and Chris Atkins were back on the
picket line Tuesday morning,
demonstrating in the cold as lawmakers in Charleston reached the
deal that would end the stoppage.
As a line of educators stood bundled up, holding signs for passing
cars, Collins and Atkins stood together, heads down. They listened
to a live stream from the Capitol,
playing on a cellphone.
“I really hope that it’s finished
today,” Collins said Tuesday morning. “So we can get back to class
tomorrow.”
An announcement posted online Tuesday said that with a “joyous spirit,” the county would welcome its students and staff back to
class Wednesday.
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
Trump acknowledges Russian interference, pledges to counteract it in 2018
President long rejected
reports that Kremlin
intruded in 2016 election
“I think you have to be really watching
very closely. We won’t allow that to happen.”
President Trump, on preventing
foreign intrusions in future elections
BY
P HILIP R UCKER
President Trump on Tuesday
made his most forceful comments to date about Russia’s campaign to disrupt U.S. elections,
warning Moscow that his administration would counteract any
attempts to interfere in the 2018
midterm elections.
Though Trump has at times
expressed doubt that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential
election, he told reporters Tuesday that “certainly there was
meddling” and that the U.S. government must be vigilant to prevent foreign intrusions in future
elections.
“I think you have to be really
watching very closely,” Trump
said. “We won’t allow that to
happen. We’re doing a very, very
deep study, and we’re coming out
with, I think, some very strong
suggestions on the ’18 election. I
think we’re going to do very well
in the ’18 election, although historically those in the White
House have a little bit of a dip.”
Asked at a news conference
alongside Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven whether he
worries about Russia interfering
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump meets with Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven on Tuesday in the Oval Office,
where he acknowledged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and said his
administration was working to prevent it from happening in the 2018 midterm elections.
For more scenes from Trump’s second year in office, go to wapo.st/trumpyear2.
again, Trump said, “No, because
we’ll counteract whatever they
do.”
Trump’s comments signal a
turnabout. He initially rejected
the conclusions of U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia inter-
fered in the election to help
boost his campaign. During his
first year as president, Trump
held no Cabinet or high-level
National Security Council meetings about combating Russian
interference. He and his admin-
istration have sought to roll back
or simply have not enforced measures to hold Moscow accountable, such as sanctions passed
overwhelmingly by Congress.
Last week, Adm. Michael S.
Rogers, the director of the Na-
tional Security Agency and head
of U.S. Cyber Command, testified
to Congress that the U.S. government is “probably not doing
enough” to convince Russia to
change its calculus or behavior
ahead of this November’s midterm elections.
Rogers said Trump has given
him no new authorities or capabilities to strike at Russian cyberoperations. He said Russian President Vladimir Putin “has clearly
come to the conclusion that
‘there’s little price to pay here and
therefore I can continue this activity.’ ”
“If we don’t change the dynamic here, this is going to continue,”
Rogers added.
In his Tuesday comments,
Trump insisted that his administration was at work trying to
protect U.S. election systems
from foreign interference, but he
provided no details other than
advocating for paper-based voting systems.
“You have to be very vigilant,
and one of the things we’re learning is, it’s always good — it’s
old-fashioned, but it’s always
good — to have a paper backup
system of voting,” Trump said.
“It’s called paper, not highly complex computers. Paper. A lot of
states are doing that.”
Trump acknowledged Russia
interfered in the 2016 election
but insisted it did not influence
the outcome and qualified his
answer to suggest there may have
been other actors.
“The Russians had no impact
on our votes whatsoever, but certainly there was meddling and
probably there was meddling
from other countries and maybe
other individuals,” the president
said.
Trump has long sought to play
down any suggestion that Russia
had hacked Democratic emails or
did other things to help his campaign. In a September 2016 debate with Democratic nominee
Hillary Clinton, Trump famously
said, “It could be Russia. But it
could also be China. It could also
be lots of other people. It also
could be somebody sitting on
their bed that weighs 400
pounds, okay?”
philip.rucker@washpost.com
Mueller looking at episodes involving Trump’s attorney
No sign Cohen is a target
of the special counsel’s
Russia investigation
BY
R OSALIND S . H ELDERMAN,
T OM H AMBURGER
AND J OSH D AWSEY
Special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III has requested documents and interviewed witnesses
about incidents involving Michael Cohen, the longtime lawyer
for President Trump whose wideranging portfolio has given him a
unique vantage point into
Trump’s business, campaign and
political activities.
There is no indication that
Cohen is a subject or target of the
investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. But
the scrutiny of his interactions is
another sign of the far-reaching
nature of the special-counsel
probe, which is examining members of the president’s inner circle
and aspects of Trump’s past business outreach to Russia.
As one of Trump’s closest advisers, Cohen played a role in at least
two episodes involving Russian
interests that have drawn Mueller’s attention, according to several people familiar with document subpoenas and witness interviews.
One area of focus has been
negotiations Cohen undertook
during the campaign to help the
Trump Organization build a tower in Moscow. Cohen brought
Trump a letter of intent in October 2015 from a Russian developer to build a Moscow project.
Later, he sent an email to Russian
President Vladimir Putin’s chief
spokesman seeking help to advance the stalled project. He said
he did not recall receiving a response.
Another area that Mueller’s
team has explored is a Russiafriendly peace proposal for
Ukraine that was delivered to
Cohen by a Ukrainian lawmaker
one week after Trump took office,
the people said.
Cohen is also among nine
Trump associates whose communications with former Trump aide
Sam Nunberg are being sought by
the special counsel, according to
a grand jury subpoena sent to
Nunberg last week.
Cohen is the only individual on
the list who never worked for
Trump’s campaign or the White
House — and the only one still
working for the president.
Stephen Ryan, an attorney for
Cohen, rejected the notion that
his client was under particular
scrutiny by Mueller.
“Unsourced innuendo like this
succeeds only because the leakers
know the Special Counsel will not
respond to set the record
straight,” he said in a statement.
A spokesman for the special
counsel’s office declined to comment.
Known for his combative style
and fierce loyalty to Trump, Cohen served for a decade as a top
lawyer at the Trump Organization, tangling with reporters and
Trump’s business competitors on
behalf of the celebrity real estate
mogul.
He never formally joined
Trump’s campaign but was in
close contact with his longtime
boss from his Trump Tower office
throughout the 2016 race and
presidential transition.
Cohen’s aggressive tactics recently came into public view
when he acknowledged he facilitated a $130,000 payment in October 2016 to an adult-film actress who claimed to have had a
sexual encounter with Trump.
Cohen left the Trump Organization in January 2017, around
the time of Trump’s inauguration,
and since then has served as a
personal attorney to the president.
Despite having no formal role
in the administration, Cohen was
a frequent White House visitor in
the months after Trump took
office, often dropping by the Oval
Office without an appointment to
visit with the president, according to three current and former
administration officials.
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michael Cohen, President Trump’s attorney, arrives on Capitol Hill
in September to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee.
Cohen’s access worried some
senior aides in the West Wing,
who felt he tended to bring out
the president’s scorched-earth
tendencies. Cohen told others
that Trump was fond of him and
expressed his desire to have him
in the White House.
Cohen has been seen far less in
the White House during the past
six months but remains in regular
contact with the president, according to people familiar with
his role.
It is unclear how aggressively
Mueller’s prosecutors have been
probing issues involving Cohen,
but they have periodically sought
information related to the longtime Trump lawyer during the
past several months, including in
recent weeks, according to people
familiar with the special counsel’s
investigation.
Cohen figured in two key episodes related to the former Soviet
Union during and immediately
after the campaign, including discussions about the never-realized
Trump Tower Moscow.
Cohen has said he worked on
the deal with Felix Sater, a real
estate developer who helped
build a number of Trumpbranded properties, including
Trump SoHo in New York, and
had tried to help Trump build in
Moscow a decade earlier.
The most recent effort to
launch a Trump-branded development in Moscow began in the
fall of 2015, at the same time
Trump was competing for the
GOP presidential nomination.
In January 2016, Cohen
emailed Dmitry Peskov, Putin’s
spokesman, to ask for help advancing the project, according to
documents submitted to congressional investigators.
Cohen said in an August statement that he did not recall receiving a response. He said that the
plan was abandoned in January
2016 “for business reasons” when
government permission was not
secured and that the matter was
“not related in any way to Mr.
Trump’s presidential campaign.”
Mueller has requested documents related to the project, and
his prosecutors have asked witnesses about it, according to people familiar with the probe.
Sater and Cohen also figure in
the Ukrainian peace proposal,
another episode that has been
reviewed by special-counsel investigators, the people said.
Robert S. Wolf, an attorney for
Sater, said he was not aware of
any recent interviews by the spe-
cial counsel regarding the episodes involving Sater.
“Mr. Sater’s description of
these events has never changed
one iota,” he added.
In a statement, Sater said that
“the only purpose for the Ukrainian peace proposal was to save
lives, which is a noble pursuit.”
Sater organized a Jan. 27, 2017,
meeting at the Loews Regency
hotel in New York during which
Ukrainian lawmaker Andrii V.
Artemenko gave Cohen the proposal, according to interviews
last year with the three participants.
The back-channel proposal offered a pathway for resolving the
Ukrainian dispute that could
have led to the lifting of U.S.
sanctions on Russia and given
Putin a prize he has long sought
— undisputed control over
Crimea, territory that Russia
seized in 2014.
The plan was presented to Cohen a few weeks after thennational security adviser Michael
Flynn was heard in an intercepted phone call telling the Russian
ambassador that the Trump administration would roll back
sanctions imposed by the Obama
administration intended to punish Moscow for interfering in the
2016 election.
All three men who participated
in the January meeting have said
that the initiative was driven
solely by their joint desire for
peace in war-torn Ukraine and
that nothing came of the proposal.
But Cohen, Sater and Artemenko — who at the time served in the
Ukrainian parliament — have offered conflicting accounts of key
aspects of their interactions, including whether the proposal
reached the White House, as Artemenko had intended.
The New York Times, which
first reported the meeting last
year, said Cohen told the newspaper he left the plan in Flynn’s
White House office about a week
before Flynn resigned.
In an interview last year, Artemenko said Cohen suggested that
Flynn would be the correct per-
son at the White House to receive
the plan, but he said Cohen made
no promises to deliver it. Nevertheless, Artemenko said he was
told later by Sater that Cohen had
gotten the plan to Flynn.
However, Sater told The Washington Post last year that he
understood Cohen intended to
give the plan to Flynn but that the
national security adviser resignation’s interceded.
In interviews last year with
The Post, Cohen called the Times
story “fake news.” He denied that
he gave the proposal to Flynn or
that he had ever said he had done
so.
Instead, Cohen told The Post
he threw away the unopened
envelope containing the plan in a
trash can at his New York apartment.
“I never looked at it,” Cohen
said. “I never turned it over to
anyone.”
The men also differed about
the extent of Russian involvement in the proposal. Cohen told
The Post that Artemenko had
announced during their brief
meeting that he had devised the
proposal in consultation with the
Russian government.
“He said Russia was on board
— the Russian government,” Cohen said.
Artemenko, who had served in
the Ukrainian parliament since
2014, told The Post last year that
he spoke to no Russian officials
and that his proposal was the
product of consultations among
Ukrainians, including other lawmakers.
“The Russians are not involved
in this conversation,” he said in a
phone interview last year. “I’m a
guy who was born here, who
really wants to help. . . . My intention is very simple — complete
cessation of all hostility.” Reached
last week, he declined to comment.
A spokesman for the Kremlin
has said that Russia had no advance notice of the plan and did
not support it.
rosalind.helderman@washpost.com
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
Kellyanne Conway violated the Hatch Act twice, federal investigator finds
Trump adviser went too
far with special election
remarks, report says
BY
M ICHELLE Y E H EE L EE
Kellyanne Conway, a top adviser to President Trump, violated
federal law on two occasions by
making public comments supportive of one candidate and
against another ahead of a special Senate election in Alabama
last year, a federal investigator
said Tuesday.
The remarks, in a pair of
televised interviews, amounted
to a violation of the Hatch Act,
which prohibits public employees from using their official capacity to conduct political activity, special counsel Henry J. Kerner said in a report.
The White House on Tuesday
rejected the findings, saying Conway was only reflecting the president’s views when she spoke
against Doug Jones, the Democrat running for the Senate seat,
and in favor of Roy Moore, the
Republican candidate. Jones ultimately won the seat.
Conway “did not advocate for
or against the election of any
particular candidate,” White
House spokesman Hogan Gidley
said in a statement. “She simply
expressed the President’s obvious position that he have people
in the House and Senate who
support his agenda.”
But in an 11-page report, the
Office of the Special Counsel
concluded that Conway “impermissibly mixed official government business with political
views about candidates in the
Alabama special election,” and
advised Trump to consider disciplinary action against Conway.
Conway did not immediately
respond to a request for comment.
Under the law, federal officials
may express their political views
as private citizens, but not in
their government roles. That includes comments that could influence elections, the report says.
The law is intended to “prevent the impression that the
executive branch and the tools of
the executive branch are being
used to promote political agendas,” said Mark M. Lee, a former
federal prosecutor.
The report centered on appearances by Conway late last
year on the Fox News program
“Fox & Friends” and on CNN’s
“New Day.”
The White House Communications Office gave Conway talking
points for the interviews, but
Conway’s interview answers
“went beyond providing ‘commentary’ on the Administration’s
KATE PATTERSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Kellyanne Conway’s remarks in
two TV interviews drew notice.
policies, and thus constituted
political activity,” according to
the findings.
During the Nov. 20 interview
on “Fox & Friends,” Conway “volunteered a comment about Doug
Jones and the Alabama special
election,” even though talking
points provided by the White
House did not include a reference to Jones, the special counsel
found.
On Dec. 6, during a CNN
appearance, Conway again discussed the election in a way that
diverged from the talking points,
according to the report.
She strongly criticized Jones,
saying he would vote for tax
increases and against national
security and the Second Amendment. She added that he was “out
of step for Alabama voters, according to the president.”
Though Conway attributed
her comments about the candidates to Trump’s position, she
“was still providing voters with
reasons to vote for Roy Moore
and against Doug Jones,” the
report said.
In his statement, Gidley noted
that Conway twice declined to
respond when specifically asked
to encourage Alabamians to vote
for the Republican, showing “her
intention and desire to comply
with the Hatch Act.”
This is not the first time Conway has been accused of ethics
violations over her public remarks. Last year, she was upbraided by a top federal ethics
official for touting the clothing
line sold by Trump’s daughter
Ivanka Trump. The White House
said Conway was “counseled”
after that misstep, but no further
disciplinary action was taken.
Another White House official
was previously found to have
violated the Hatch Act. The special counsel’s office last year
found that White House social
media director Dan Scavino Jr.
violated the law when he posted
on Twitter urging Trump’s supporters to defeat a GOP congressman, Justin Amash, in Michigan.
michelle.lee@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
RE
The Beatles had Pete Best. Trump has Sam Nunberg. Nunberg now says he’ll
comply with subpoena
Politics
Debrief
ROBERT
COSTA
Before Hope
Hicks, before
Corey Lewandowski and before Stephen K.
Bannon, there
was Sam Nun-
berg.
“Sam!” businessman Donald
Trump would yell out as he
scanned the latest printouts of
news stories about himself in his
26th-floor office at Trump Tower. He would usually follow with
a burst of requests or ridicule for
Nunberg, his brash young fixer.
Trump, eager to gain traction
inside the Republican Party,
leaned on Nunberg to guide him
through that political jungle and
the new media landscape. They
argued, they exaggerated, and
they schemed. They clicked.
But until this week — as Nunberg whipsawed through cable
channels vowing to defy and, later, cooperate with the Justice
Department’s special counsel —
you probably wouldn’t have recognized him if you saw him on
the street, cursing on the phone
with the New York Post tucked
under his arm.
You would have just passed by
the Pete Best of the Trump presidency.
Best was the original, relatively inexperienced drummer for
the Beatles who was dismissed
by the band in 1962, achingly
close to the start of its global
domination. For years after, Best
was tortured as he watched his
former bandmates — even Ringo
— become cultural icons.
Nunberg, 36, understands
that pain. In the early years of
this decade, working under his
mentor Roger Stone and with
Trump attorney Michael Cohen,
Nunberg functioned as the
fledgling media strategist for a
campaign-in-waiting that almost
no one, including Trump, really
believed would ever launch.
He toiled at Trump’s side for
parts of four years, a relentless
adviser for a reality TV star who
wanted to spend little to nothing
on staff as he teased a White
House bid. And right as Trump’s
campaign finally took off in the
hot summer of 2015, Nunberg
was fired.
News reports revealed that
Nunberg had posted offensive
and racist comments on Facebook. Lewandowski, by then
Trump’s campaign manager,
called him a “low level” aide in a
statement announcing the termination.
Nunberg was furious. For the
next year, he watched as Trump
engulfed the GOP field, running
on gut instinct and bluster but
also on the playbook that he and
Stone had worked on with
Trump for years — build the
wall, threaten a trade war, all of
it.
Nunberg was soon all but forgotten. On rough days, he called
up reporters to vent about Lewandowski and Hicks, Trump’s
campaign spokeswoman, whom
he also blamed for the “low level” knock during his exit.
On a good day, he might get a
call from a reporter who needed
a quote from a “former Trump
adviser” to fill out a story, or he
might snag a part-time paid
project. Hicks and Lewandowski, and then Bannon and Jared
Kushner and Kellyanne Conway,
became the advisers turned stars
who were linked in the public
imagination with Trump’s winding and unconventional victory.
Ex-Trump campaign aide
changes mind a day after
loudly defying Mueller
BY A SHLEY P ARKER
AND J OSH D AWSEY
“THE BEAT WITH ARI MELBER”/MSNBC
Sam Nunberg is interviewed Monday on MSNBC. The former Donald Trump aide, who is chafing at
scrutiny in the Russia probe, was exiled from the Trump campaign just as it was on the cusp of history.
It wasn’t always like that,
however, as special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s team has evidently discovered.
Nunberg — who on Monday
initially balked at complying
with a subpoena to appear in
front of a federal grand jury investigating Russia’s interference
in the 2016 presidential election
— remains a figure caught in the
footnotes of the past, but also
someone who knows a lot about
what it was like in Trump’s inner
sanctum when the campaign
was hatched.
From when Nunberg first
jumped into Trump’s orbit in
2011, Trump’s fickleness often
seemed to define the job, Nunberg has confided to associates
over the years. There were periods when Trump would get an
adrenaline shot of media attention and would talk at length
with Nunberg and Stone about
running. But then there were
idle stretches when Trump
seemed inclined to never bring
up the subject again, Nunberg
said.
In the wake of Mitt Romney’s
2012 presidential defeat, Nunberg began to sketch out memos
about the contours of a 2016
Trump presidential campaign.
At first, it was almost a lark and
a way to keep the gig. The more
Trump flirted with a White
House bid, the more work for
him and Stone, Nunberg said in
conversations over the years.
As Nunberg, who has a degree
from the Touro College Law Center on Long Island, rifled
through classic campaign books
and scribbled a list of ideas he
“stole from them,” as he has put
it, the notion eventually faded as
a lark and became something he
saw as remote but possible.
While always unsure of exactly
what Trump would do, Nunberg
became convinced that a candidate who could blend Ross Perot’s billionaire populism with a
hard-line stance on undocumented immigrants could capture the Republican presidential
nomination.
Eventually, Nunberg asked
this reporter to talk with Trump
and hear him out. When Trump
called in July 2013, it was the ex-
pected tough talk from the host
of NBC’s “The Apprentice”
mixed with sharply right-wing
positioning — stances right out
of the memos by Stone and Nunberg.
Nunberg, who routinely went
too far to find ways to impress
the boss, fell out of favor with
Trump after a 2014 BuzzFeed
profile that Nunberg arranged
became an embarrassment. It
portrayed Trump as an unserious person who would never
run, and Nunberg resigned in
the aftermath.
Days later, Nunberg traveled
alone to the Conservative Political Action Conference at National Harbor in Maryland, where
Trump spoke to a packed crowd
of GOP activists. Sitting at a bustling hotel bar nearby, Nunberg
said in an interview then that he
hoped Trump would give him
another shot.
“I’m in touch with his people,”
Nunberg said. “You know, I actually helped Mr. Trump get this
nice afternoon speaking slot, before I left.”
Months later, as Trump began
to take concrete steps toward a
campaign in early 2015, Nunberg
was back at Trump Tower.
Trump still hated the BuzzFeed
story and ragged Nunberg about
it whenever he wanted to put
him in his place, Nunberg said.
But Nunberg was one of Stone’s
guys and a Trump guy — a
bomb-thrower who worshiped
the combative legacy of Trump’s
late mentor, Roy Cohn. Of course
he was back.
But the second tour was brief.
Ever since his messy departure in the summer of 2015,
Nunberg’s life has taken various
turns, not all of them welcome.
Trump sued him for $10 million
in 2016 for allegedly violating
his confidentiality agreement,
although they eventually settled.
The campaign viewed him as a
threat and blamed him for
scores of single-source stories it
found troubling.
As for Trump, Nunberg
wished him well with a letter at
the outset of his presidency.
Nunberg has also worked closely
with several Trump allies, such
as Newsmax chief executive
Carson aides to supply decor records
Spokesman denies that
HUD overspent on
secretary’s office
BY
J ULIET E ILPERIN
Aides to Housing and Urban
Development Secretary Ben Carson said Tuesday that they are
confident they can respond to a
House committee’s request for
documents related to the redecoration of his office last year, even
as a senior career official claimed
the department had curbed internal communications on the issue.
The controversy over Carson’s
office upgrade surfaced last
month, when HUD’s chief administration officer, Helen Foster,
publicly charged that she had
been instructed to authorize redecorating expenses of more than
$5,000, which normally require
advance notice to the House and
Senate Appropriations Committees. Foster, who filed a complaint
with HUD’s office of special counsel last year, had a follow-up interview Monday with that office.
HUD spokesman Raffi Williams has denied that the department overspent to redecorate the
office, saying used chairs were
brought from the basement and
blinds were replaced for $3,400.
Carson responded to Foster’s
complaint a day after The Washington Post and other outlets reported on the charges, although
he did not identify her directly,
tweeting last Wednesday that
“there has been no dishonesty or
wrongdoing by us.”
“We suspect, based on past attempts, that they will continue to
probe and make further accusations even without evidence or
substantiation,” he said in a subsequent tweet. “We will continue to
ask for God’s guidance to do what
is right.”
On Tuesday, Marcus Smallwood, who directs the office of
records and information management in HUD’s office of administration, wrote an open letter to
Carson demanding that the secretary apologize to Foster and assure
other department employees that
they “should feel free to follow the
law, ask when they are unsure, and
not fear retribution” as a result.
Foster alleges in her complaint
that she was reassigned to a lower
position, the department’s chief
privacy and Freedom of Information Act officer, after complaining
about the effort to redecorate and
how top officials processed public
records requests from the Democratic National Committee.
Foster has now been detailed to
the Treasury Department.
On Feb. 28, Rep. Trey Gowdy
(R-S.C.), chairman of the House
Oversight and Government Reform Committee, asked Carson to
provide a variety of documents
“no later than” March 14, including “all documents and communications referring to or relating to”
Foster since Aug. 1, along with
similar files pertaining to any redecorating done to Carson’s office
since Jan. 1, 2017, and to redecorating efforts for previous HUD secretaries’ offices since Jan. 1, 1998.
Smallwood said that given his
role as the department’s records
officer, “I’m obligated by law to
report to you that I do not have
confidence that HUD can truthfully provide the evidence being
requested by the House Oversight
Committee because there has
been a concerted effort to stop
email traffic regarding these matters prior to August 1st.”
Williams, who said Smallwood’s email is under review, disputed his claim that email traffic
about any redecoration of Carson’s office ceased last summer.
“The House Oversight Committee will receive a complete response to their query,” he said. “We
can assure you that email traffic at
HUD did not cease on August 1st.”
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
Christopher Ruddy, as a media
operative. But there have been
no White House job offers for
him.
Making the rounds on TV on
Monday, Nunberg snapped back
into the headlines with freewheeling interviews in which he
lashed out at the Russia probe,
pledged to stand by Stone, and
made demeaning remarks about
women, the president and Mueller. By Tuesday, he had retreated,
saying he would in fact cooperate with the investigation.
Amid the firestorm, the Nunberg comments that stuck out
were those about pain — the
pain of a man cut from Trump’s
band on the cusp of history and
still dealing with the fallout.
“Do you know the way I’ve
been treated by Donald Trump?
I hate the guy,” Nunberg told
CNN’s Erin Burnett. “He called
me a low-level, part-time consultant? I was being laughed at for
years. I supported him. He was
like — he shouldn’t have been —
but he was like a father to me.”
robert.costa@washpost.com
Former Trump campaign aide
Sam Nunberg said Tuesday that he
plans to comply with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s subpoena, an abrupt turnabout from just
24 hours earlier, when Nunberg
publicly defied the Justice Department in an extraordinary day-long
media blitz.
In a brief interview Tuesday
with The Washington Post, Nunberg said he plans to comply with
Mueller’s subpoena — part of the
probe into Russian interference in
the 2016 presidential election —
and had changed his mind after
receiving public and unsolicited
advice from Maya Wiley, a lawyer
with whom he appeared on Ari
Melber’s MSNBC show Monday
evening.
“She’s very, very smart,” Nunberg said of Wiley, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio’s former chief
counsel. “She made a compelling
case to me, and the case was that
they have to do this for their investigation, and it was a fair point.”
Nunberg began his media
whirlwind Monday with The Post,
declaring, “Let him arrest me” as
he explained why he did not plan
to hand over emails and other
documents related to President
Trump and nine current and former Trump advisers, material that
Mueller had requested.
But by the time Nunberg appeared on Melber’s show Monday
evening, his behavior had grown
increasingly erratic — captivating
observers from West Wing aides to
members of the media, and alarming some of his friends, who called
him and begged him to stop.
Nunberg appeared on the show
with Wiley as another panelist.
Wiley several times spoke directly
to him, seeming to offer free legal
advice. Addressing a concern of
his, she said he was not protecting
his self-described mentor, Roger
Stone, by refusing to cooperate,
and she urged him to “go testify.”
When Nunberg said the subpoena was costing him 80 hours of
time as he tried to sort through the
materials Mueller had requested,
Wiley interjected, somewhat incredulously: “You’d rather spend
possibly a year in jail than 80
hours going through documents?”
“I think your family wants you
home for Thanksgiving, and I
think you should testify,” she said
at another point.
By Tuesday morning, Nunberg
seemed to have come around to
her viewpoint.
Told that Nunberg said Wiley
was the reason he had changed his
mind, the lawyer laughed and said
she was happy that he seemed to
be following better legal advice
now. “If it encouraged him to go to
speak to his attorney, I am happy
we prevailed upon him a more
rational path,” Wiley said. “I did
not think it was going to be a
therapy session, but I think it became a therapy session.”
Echoing a sentiment Nunberg
expressed — that he was frustrated by what he viewed as Mueller’s
overly cumbersome request,
which he said was causing him to
fall behind on his other work —
Wiley said that Nunberg “was in a
difficult position and had not
thought it through.”
“I don’t consider [it] as giving
him legal advice,” she said. “I was
just pointing out some of the errors in his thinking.”
But, she added, Nunberg could
change his mind yet again: “With
Sam, one needs to pay attention
hour by hour.”
Nunberg, a top political staffer
for Trump in the run-up to the
campaign, was fired in 2015 for
racially insensitive Facebook
posts and has since existed on the
fringes of Trump’s orbit as a consultant. White House officials attacked his credibility Monday and
characterized his media appearances as unhinged.
Tuesday, after explaining why
he’d reversed himself, Nunberg
said he had to end the interview:
He didn’t have time to chat, he
said, because he was busy working
his way through Mueller’s request.
ashley.parker@washpost.com
joshua.dawsey@washpost.com
Philip Rucker contributed to this
report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
As Puerto
Rico works
to rebound,
many flee
EXODUS FROM A1
Even before Maria strafed the
region, a record number of Puerto
Ricans were realizing that the declining island might be where
their heart is but cannot be where
their feet stay. Nearly 500,000
people left Puerto Rico for the
mainland during the past decade,
according to the Pew Research
Center, pushing the stateside
Puerto Rican population past the
number living on the island last
year — an estimated 3.3 million.
The government of Puerto
Rico’s guess is that by the end of
2018, 200,000 more residents will
have left the U.S. territory for
good, moving to places such as
Florida, New York, Texas, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New England. It would mean another drop
of more than 5 percent in the
island’s population.
Experts say the storm and its
widespread devastation undoubtedly have sped up the pace of
migration as residents have dealt
with extended power outages,
communication lapses, infrastructure failures and, in some
cases, isolation. What already was
the largest exodus in the island’s
history now includes people fleeing in droves simply to achieve
some sense of normalcy.
Just this week, a power outage
put nearly 900,000 residents in
and around the capital city of San
Juan in the dark and without water — again. Tens of thousands in
Puerto Rico have had no electricity since the hurricane struck five
months ago, and the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers estimates that
1 in 10 customers still won’t have it
as of the end of March. The island’s bankrupt public utility has
struggled to restore power amid
contracting scandals, materiel
shortages and intermittent blackouts, and the biggest restoration
contractor, Fluor Corp., confirmed that it is pulling out of
Puerto Rico in the next several
weeks after reaching the funding
limit of its $746 million contract.
The governor announced plans
last month to privatize the electric
utility, sparking standoffs with
unionized workers and arousing
suspicions from residents. Some
municipalities such as San Sebastian, a town in the island’s northwest corner, didn’t wait and
formed their own volunteer brigades to string up power lines and
return electricity to thousands of
residents.
Nearly 58,000 homes here have
roofs made of blue tarps while
they await federal assistance;
more than 437,000 residents —
about 2 of every 5 who applied so
far — have received money from
the Federal Emergency Management Agency for home repairs.
For many, the future feels ominous.
Victor Dominguez set a June
deadline for his island. If Puerto
Rico doesn’t get the lights back on
and move the economy, the mortgage banker will take his family
elsewhere.
“I am very attached to my island, and my preference is to stay
here, but I have to think what’s
best for my son,” the 39-year-old
said. “I’m in a moment in which I
have to be very observant about
what’s happening and be flexible.”
Immediately after the storm,
Dominguez sent his family to the
States for two weeks while he
continued working and taking
care of their home. When schools
in Florida announced that they
would take in Puerto Rican students, he and his wife considered
enrolling their 10-year-old. But as
long as he had a job on the island,
the family decided to work and
wait it out. Many of his colleagues
and neighbors did not.
“Combined with this economic
crisis, this was a perfect storm for
the country to just empty,” he said.
“There’s still a lot of people, but I
hear about people who are leaving
on a weekly basis. I’ve spoken to
people who have this hope of coming back to Puerto Rico, but I’ve
also heard from people who are
happy to have permanent stability.”
José Luis Rodríguez, 53, spends
his nights in a wind-damaged
wooden home pressed against a
steep hillside in Comerio, in central Puerto Rico. The mosquitoes
are relentless, but the loneliness is
what stings; he lives by himself in
a barrio where most of the residents rely on government assistance, and half of the homes are
now vacant because of the hurricane.
The La Plata river that runs
through the town swelled by more
than 60 feet, inundating hundreds of homes, including that of
Rodríguez’s daughter, 24. Having
lost everything, she joined her
twin sister on the mainland, leav-
PHOTOS BY ERIKA P. RODRÍGUEZ FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
An electric crew works near the La Plata River in Comerio, Puerto Rico, on Thursday. Hurricane Maria sped up rates of migration from the island that were already high.
Helga Marrero, 57, switches breakers in her house after powering up a generator in Cayey,
Puerto Rico, on Thursday. The house has been without electricity for more than five months.
ing behind their father, who is
struggling.
“They are the only thing I have,”
Rodríguez said. “If I could, I
would be there. My daughter said
she would come back, but she
doesn’t have a place to live.”
‘Pretty tough here’
Puerto Ricans have moved
back and forth between the island
and the mainland for more than a
century, after they received U.S.
citizenship in 1917. The circular
migration is a fundamental part
of the Puerto Rican experience,
immortalized in the island’s art
and music, because moving from
the territory is as easy as moving
between states.
The difference between the
past decade’s migration and that
of previous generations is the
character, size and speed with
which it threatens to change Puerto Rico’s economic and social future.
Migrants are looking for the
things they can’t find on the island: jobs and stability. Puerto
Rico’s teens and young adults
don’t know what kinds of opportunities will be available to them
as the economic depression deepens.
Hector Camacho, 24, has tried
to secure a job as a high school
literature teacher for more than a
year since graduating from the
University of Puerto Rico. He now
sends résumés to places such as
Wyoming and Washington, D.C.,
hoping for an answer.
“Will I have a roof tomorrow?
That’s the worry I have,” said Camacho, who is waiting tables here
at a newly opened restaurant and
arcade. “I also have loans to pay.
It’s been pretty tough here.”
Camacho and his friend, Christopher Rosario — who left the
island a year ago and joined the
U.S. Army — were talking outside
a laundromat near the university
campus in San Juan last week
when the power went out for the
second time in 24 hours. Both
grew up in Utuado, in the central
mountains and one of the
hardest-hit regions of the island,
and what they saw there killed
any lingering hope.
“You try to see the bright side,
but it’s too dim to see anything
good,” Camacho said. “I’m done.
Once I get a chance, I’m out.”
Puerto Rico’s government fears
Camacho is not alone. The administration of Gov. Ricardo Rosselló
(PNP of Puerto Rico) published
projections that put the island’s
population well below 3 million
within a decade, a possible 10 percent decline in line with what
researchers expect to see in war
zones or what happened during
the Irish potato famine in the
mid-1800s.
“What we are observing is a
major depopulation event that is
not extremely common in modern history,” said Lyman Stone, an
independent migration researcher and economist at the Agricul-
José Luis Rodríguez, 53, at his Comerio home Thursday. A second of Rodríguez’s twin daughters
moved to the mainland United States after the hurricane. “If I could, I would be there,” he says.
ture Department who provided
models to Puerto Rico. “People
kind of treated me like a crazy
person when I put it out there.”
Demographers and economists
say Stone’s projections appear to
be on the high end, but they caution that the Puerto Rican exodus
will cut deeply. The Center for
Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter
College in New York estimates
that between 114,000 and 213,000
people will leave the island in
2018, with the vast majority headed for Florida.
Most projections are based in
part on volatile airline passenger
data tracking the number of people boarding flights leaving the
island. Three Florida airports reported 371,000 people traveling
commercially from Puerto Rico
since October. But so far, fewer
than 40,000 people have visited
the state’s multiagency service
centers set up to assist migrants,
and far fewer — about 4,500 —
have been issued state driver’s
licenses.
The center’s director, Edwin
Meléndez, is using school enrollment data from six states receiving Puerto Rican children to more
accurately pinpoint migration.
Since the hurricane, more than
22,000 students from the island
have enrolled in stateside schools.
More than half of those — 10,324
students — enrolled in school districts in Florida.
Pennsylvania State University
demographer Alexis R. Santos
said it is difficult to measure the
magnitude of the outflow without
also considering people like
Rodríguez, the musician, who expect to return.
“It’s all speculative,” Santos
said. “We have to be really careful
with the numbers.”
A more accurate migration
head count won’t be available for
months from the Census Bureau,
and even then it probably won’t
capture the entire picture of Puerto Rico’s population fluctuations
since the storm.
“Even before Maria, our ability
to measure net migration in Puerto Rico wasn’t very good,” said
Mario Marazzi, director of the
Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics,
an independent agency.
Economic predictions depend
on good population statistics, said
Puerto Rican economist José
Joaquín Villamil.
The island’s economy had all
but sputtered to a halt before the
Category 5 hurricane hit, and
there already was severe turmoil
and job losses. The central government had tried to borrow its
way out of strife to the point of
bankruptcy. Bondholders demanded payment, and Congress
appointed a fiscal oversight board
in 2016 that imposed austerity
measures.
Nearly half of the island’s population lives in poverty, and household income is about $18,000 a
year, less than half that of Mississippi, the country’s poorest state.
The scarcity of jobs, along with
low wages and a rising cost of
living, has caused young, working-age Puerto Ricans to head for
the mainland, Villamil said. He
estimates that nearly half of migrants are younger than 24. Falling birthrates led to a deeper population decline, and Puerto Rico
has been left with a rapidly aging
populace.
Genesis Muñoz, 19, a student at
the University of Puerto Rico,
wants to believe she can finish her
bachelor’s degree in art and painting. But money has gotten tighter
since the storm. She doesn’t eat
well, her family home in Humacao was severely damaged, and
attending classes 40 miles away is
becoming too expensive.
“Everything is going badly,”
Muñoz said. “It bothers me that
there are people who live in their
bubble of privilege saying everything is okay. It’s not, and I can’t
judge those who leave because in
the long term I know that I will
also have to leave for my career.”
Population decline is one of several factors Rossello’s administration weighs in a fiscal plan that was
revised this month, detailing how
the government views its economic future and how it will find
its way out of the red. Critics have
said that plan depends heavily on
billions in hoped-for federal
spending.
“With a less-productive population, you are heading toward
serious problems,” Villamil said.
‘Puerto Rico Pa’Lante’
Despite the outlook, some
Puerto Ricans who left immediately after the hurricane have returned to their homes and businesses, trying to salvage the lives
they had here.
Carla Lopez was almost certain
she would have to relocate her
pop-up retail incubator, Santurce
Pop, to central Florida in the days
after the hurricane. She and her
husband own a building in San
Juan that provides affordable
space to local entrepreneurs to
build their small businesses, most
of which specialize in locally
sourced products and services.
Lopez, 33, took her two young
children to Orlando and began
making arrangements with the
local Chamber of Commerce to
move her business there. But
while she was shopping at a farmers market, she realized her heart
was still in Puerto Rico.
“What am I doing here?” she
said. “I felt bad being there knowing what was happening back
home.”
She and her husband decided
to return to San Juan and give the
business six months to see if they
could rebound. Although they lost
about half of their clients, the
couple reasoned that there was an
opportunity to find new customers because many entrepreneurs
lost their storefronts or are unable to pay high rent. Since the
storm, they have opened a second
location in metro San Juan.
“We have a social responsibility
to provide this space,” Lopez said.
“This is ours, this is our baby, and
if we don’t fight for it, who will?”
That’s a decision over which,
Rodríguez, the musician, agonized. He, too, chose to return to
the island, arriving Thursday to
his waterlogged home, carrying
his blue binder of crinkled compositions. Among them is a new
song he wrote during his time in
Florida.
“It’s called ‘Puerto Rico Pa’Lante,’ ” said the crooner, smiling beneath the brim of his Panama hat,
explaining that the title means
that the commonwealth is moving forward. “The island beckoned me back.”
arelis.hernandez@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
SU
Justice Dept. escalates ‘sanctuary’ fight
SANCTUARY FROM A1
ment filed, he felt the state was
abiding by the Constitution and
cooperating with its federal partners to foster public safety.
“States and local jurisdictions
have the right to determine which
policies are best for their communities,” he said.
California Gov. Jerry Brown (D)
wrote on Twitter, “At a time of
unprecedented political turmoil,
Jeff Sessions has come to California to further divide and polarize
America. Jeff, these political
stunts may be the norm in Washington, but they don’t work here.
SAD!!!”
The Trump administration and
the Justice Department have been
waging an increasingly acrimonious battle with sanctuary jurisdictions, although the latest lawsuit
is perhaps the most consequential
step yet. It sets up a clash not just
on what is the best immigration
policy to promote public safety,
but also on what power the federal
government should exert over the
states.
Although the court is being
asked to consider only California,
which this year became a “sanctuary state” to some fanfare, the
court’s decision could have farreaching consequences for other
jurisdictions with similar policies. There is no formal definition
of a “sanctuary” jurisdiction, but
the Justice Department has put
dozens of other locales in its
crosshairs, this year threatening
to subpoena 23 jurisdictions, including Chicago and New York
City, that it suspects of unlawfully
interfering with federal immigration enforcement.
A senior Justice Department
official said department lawyers
are still evaluating other places’
laws and could bring other lawsuits — although the measures
California passed stood out as being especially high-profile and
transgressive of what Sessions
thought was constitutional.
Becerra has proved to be a
thorn in the Trump administration’s side. He noted in a recent
interview with The Washington
Post that the state had 28 lawsuits
against the Trump administration
and — at that time — had not lost a
case. Later that day, a judge ruled
against the state in a suit over the
Trump administration’s move to
try to expedite border-wall construction.
“Our track record so far when it
comes to any dispute with the
federal government has been
pretty good on this count,” Becerra said Tuesday night.
The new lawsuit takes aim at
three California laws: Assembly
Bill 450, which prohibits private
employers from giving immigration officials access to workplaces
or documents for enforcement
without a court order; Assembly
Bill 103, which created a state
inspection system for immigration detention facilities; and Senate Bill 54, which limits what state
and local law enforcement authorities can communicate about
some suspects and which people
they can transfer to federal custody.
The suit argues that the measures are preempted by federal
law and thus violate the Constitution’s supremacy clause. A senior
Justice Department official said
the department hopes a judge will
be able to take action in the case in
a matter of weeks, after setting a
briefing schedule for California to
respond.
“The provisions of state law at
issue have the purpose and effect
of making it more difficult for
federal immigration officers to
carry out their responsibilities in
California,” Justice Department
lawyers wrote. “The Supremacy
Clause does not allow California
to obstruct the United States’ ability to enforce laws that Congress
has enacted or to take actions
entrusted to it by the Constitution.”
The Justice Department’s suing
states over their laws is uncommon but not unheard of. Toward
the end of President Barack
Obama’s tenure, his administration sued North Carolina over
what came to be known as the
“bathroom bill,” which barred
transgender people from using restrooms that did not correspond
with the sex on their birth certificates. The state ultimately repealed and replaced the measure,
and the Trump Justice Department said that meant the case
should be dropped.
The Justice Department during
the Obama administration also
sued North Carolina and Texas
over their voter ID laws, and it
sued Arizona over a law designed
to crack down on illegal immigration. That case ultimately made it
to the Supreme Court, which
struck down portions of the law
but let stand the provision requiring police officers to check the
immigration status of people they
detained and suspected were in
the country without legal documentation.
Former attorney general Eric
H. Holder Jr., who was tapped to
represent the California State
Senate in private practice, opined
in a letter that Senate Bill 54 “fully
complies with the Constitution
and federal law.”
President Trump effectively declared war on sanctuary jurisdictions within a week of taking office, signing an executive order
stating that such places “have
caused immeasurable harm to the
American people and to the very
fabric of our Republic” and threatening to withhold federal funds
from them. That order, though,
triggered legal challenges, and in
April, the administration suffered
a setback when a federal judge in
San Francisco blocked the order’s
implementation.
Later, a judge in Chicago similarly ruled that the attorney general had exceeded his authority in
tying federal grant money to jurisdictions’ cooperation with immigration officials, and a judge in
Philadelphia ruled that the city
was in compliance with immigration law and blocked the Justice
Department from withholding
money there.
This time, the Justice Department will enter court as the plaintiff in a suit, forcing California to
appear as the defendant and make
the case that its actions are legal.
California is not the only jurisdiction to draw the ire of the
Justice Department, but tensions
between Justice and the state
have been particularly acute. As
Brown was contemplating signing a law late last year that would
limit how state and local police
could cooperate with federal immigration enforcement, Sessions
said publicly that the measure
would endanger law enforcement
officers and neighborhoods.
Brown ultimately signed it.
Last month, Oakland’s Democratic mayor warned residents
that Immigration and Customs
Enforcement was planning a raid,
just before authorities took into
custody more than 150 people in
Northern California suspected of
violating immigration laws.
ICE Deputy Director Thomas
D. Homan said that hundreds
were able to dodge the operation,
“thanks to the mayor’s irresponsible decision.”
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
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Firefighters work to control a wildfire near Harper, Kan., on Tuesday. Crews are battling fires in three
southern and western Kansas counties as forecasters warn that strong winds could spread the flames.
IMMIGRATION
Federal judge sides
with Trump on DACA
A federal judge in Maryland
has affirmed the Trump
administration’s authority to end
an Obama-era program that
protected from deportation
people brought to the country as
children.
U.S. District Judge Roger W.
Titus, who was appointed to the
federal bench by President
George W. Bush, issued the ruling
Monday in a case brought by the
advocacy organization CASA de
Maryland.
President Trump cited the
decision in a message Tuesday
morning on Twitter.
“Federal Judge in Maryland
has just ruled that ‘President
Trump has the right to end
DACA,’ ” Trump wrote in an
8:46 a.m. tweet.
Titus’s decision affirmed that
Trump’s administration had the
authority to wind down the
Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals program. The judge,
however, criticized Trump for his
“unfortunate and often
inflammatory rhetoric” and
noted that, were he not a judge
constrained to interpreting the
law, he would opt for a different
result.
The Trump administration
had hoped to end DACA on
March 5, although federal district
judges in California and New
York had issued nationwide
injunctions stopping it from
doing so — making the date
effectively meaningless. Late last
month, the U.S. Supreme Court
turned down a request to get
involved in the dispute. Titus’s
ruling does not affect the earlier
injunctions.
TENNESSEE
Nashville mayor
resigns over affair
A longtime Harvard University
government professor said
Tuesday he plans to retire after
several women accused him of
sexual harassment over decades.
Jorge I. Dominguez, who has
been on the Harvard faculty since
the 1970s, said in an email to
colleagues that he would retire by
the end of the semester and
immediately step down from
administrative duties. He is not
teaching this semester.
Dominguez has faced scrutiny
in recent days since the Chronicle
of Higher Education reported
last week on allegations from
several women that he had kissed
them or touched them
inappropriately, or said things
that made them uncomfortable.
The number of accusers has
reached 18, the Chronicle
reported this week.
Megan Barry resigned as
Nashville’s mayor Tuesday
morning, weeks after admitting
an affair with the police officer
who ran her security detail.
Barry (D) announced her
resignation at a news conference,
shortly after she pleaded guilty to
a felony theft charge related to
the affair, the Tennessean
newspaper reported.
Vice Mayor David Briley (D)
was sworn in as Nashville’s acting
mayor Tuesday afternoon.
Barry, 54, who was elected
mayor in 2015, disclosed the
affair in late January.
The Tennessean identified the
officer as Sgt. Robert Forrest Jr. of
the Metropolitan Nashville Police
Department. Forrest has
resigned from the department.
On Tuesday, Barry pleaded
guilty to theft of property over
$10,000. She agreed to reimburse
the city $11,000 and serve three
years’ probation, according to the
newspaper.
Forrest accompanied Barry
on trips to Paris, Athens,
Washington and New York, and
racked up about $33,000 in
expenses for the trips and more
than $50,000 in overtime in 2017
on top of an $84,500 salary, the
Tennessean reported.
— Nick Anderson
— Amy B Wang and Eli Rosenberg
— Matt Zapotosky
MASSACHUSETTS
Harvard professor to
retire amid accusations
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
The World
Deaths mount, U.N.-led aid e≠ort halted as Assad forces pound East Ghouta
BY
L OUISA L OVELUCK
beirut — Civilian deaths have
surged in a besieged Damascus
suburb this week as Syrian government forces press an offensive
to recapture the area in defiance of
U.N. calls for a cease-fire and increasingly desperate international efforts to halt one of the gravest
humanitarian crises of the war.
More than 600 people have
died and thousands have been
wounded in the rebel-held enclave
of Eastern Ghouta since midFebruary, according to the United
Nations. The shortcomings of a
U.N. Security Council resolution
urging a cease-fire were clear
Monday as the first aid convoy to
reach the area this year halted
operations amid continued shelling and airstrikes.
At least 100 people are estimated to have been killed in the enclave since Monday, marking one
of the deadliest periods since the
military operation began.
Eastern Ghouta is the final rebel pocket on the outskirts of Damascus, the capital. As Syrian government and allied Russian forces
BY
J AMES M C A ULEY
paris — In France, wine is not a
drink; wine is a way of life.
A crisp sauvignon blanc. A
light pinot noir. A mature Bordeaux, deep and dark and wise
with age. These are all pillars of
national identity at least as much
as they are beverages. With the
tannins comes a trace of the
terroir, and with the terroir
comes the taste of tradition.
But wine also poses a significant health risk — or so say the
country’s health minister, Agnès
Buzyn, and a host of doctors who
have rallied behind her. They
have launched a bitter debate
that has shocked a multibilliondollar industry and divided
ranks even within the French
government.
For Buzyn and her allies, the
point is not to attack wine but to
share the veritas about the vino,
so to speak. Her goal is to raise
public consciousness about a
type of alcohol that can have, in
excessive quantities, the same
deleterious effects as any other.
“The wine industry today
claims wine is different from
other types of alcohol,” she said
on French television last month.
“In terms of public health, it is
exactly the same thing to drink
wine, beer, vodka, whiskey. There
is zero difference.”
President Emmanuel Macron,
Buzyn’s boss, begs to differ.
Macron reassured his compatriots that he enjoys wine every
day with lunch and dinner and
that, yes, there is a difference
between wine and other types of
booze.
“There is a public health
scourge when young people get
drunk at an accelerated speed
with alcohol or beer, but that’s
not the case with wine,” Macron
said last month. He added that
he did not support any heightened regulations that industry
leaders feared Buzyn would pursue.
Rising to Buzyn’s defense,
however, nine prominent doctors
wage their relentless campaign to
reclaim the area, rebel groups
have sent volleys of mortar shells
into densely populated districts of
Damascus.
As many as 400,000 civilians
are caught in the middle in Eastern Ghouta, many severely weakened after five years of siege.
Shortly before midnight Monday,
local doctors said they had treated
at least 12 patients in the
Hamouriyeh district with breathing difficulties consistent with exposure to chlorine munitions.
Those reports could not be immediately verified; the Syrian government also has used fertilizer in
its bombs, which produces similar
symptoms.
Hamouriyeh sits in the center of
the enclave and appears to be a key
target for forces loyal to President
Bashar al-Assad as they move to
split Eastern Ghouta in half. A
team of U.N. war-crimes investigators has blamed Syrian forces for
earlier chlorine attacks in Eastern
Ghouta.
The Syrian army’s advances
continued Tuesday as troops
chipped away at rebel-held areas
MOHAMMED BADRA/EPA-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Syrian Arab Red Crescent workers unload aid trucks Monday in the
enclave. The U.N.-led effort was halted Tuesday amid airstrikes.
east and west of Ghouta. The front
page of the government-aligned
al-Watan newspaper showed pictures of U.N. aid trucks moving
through empty streets controlled
by Syrian soldiers. “Army controls
Mohamedeya, nears Douma and
besieges Harasta completely,”
read one headline, reeling off a list
of districts in the area.
The Trump administration has
considered new military action
against the Syrian government in
response to allegations of ongoing
chemical weapons use, The Washington Post reported Monday,
raising the prospect of a second
U.S. strike on Assad in less than a
year.
But there appears to be little
appetite for deeper intervention,
as the United States wrestles with
the political contradictions of its
military deployments in Kurdishcontrolled areas across Syria’s
north and east. On Tuesday, a
U.S.-backed alliance known as the
Syrian Democratic Forces, which
was formed to fight the Islamic
State militant group, said it was
diverting 1,700 troops to a separate front in the north where
Kurdish militants are clashing
with Turkey, one of Washington’s
NATO allies.
More broadly, the international
community has failed to translate
fierce rhetoric at the Security
Council into results after the
Feb. 24 cease-fire resolution
aimed at halting the fighting in
Eastern Ghouta and ensuring safe
passage for aid convoys there.
Food parcels, nutritional supplements and some medical supplies arrived aboard a 46-truck
U.N. convoy that reached Eastern
Ghouta on Monday amid fraught
France split over wine’s health impact
A bitter debate instigated by the health minister has shocked a storied industry, roiled the government
STEPHANE MAHE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
French President Emmanuel Macron, center, sniffs a glass of wine at a Paris agricultural fair last month. He says he drinks wine every day.
published an open letter in
France’s Le Figaro newspaper
Monday, arguing that “what matters in terms of toxicity is the
amount of alcohol drunk” and
that “French consumption of alcoholic beverages, although declining for half a century, remains one of the strongest in
Europe.”
They also took Macron to task
for disseminating what they see
as false information and bad
advice, given that they cited
alcohol as a leading cause for
50,000 deaths in France.
French people over the age of
15 consume 3.2 gallons of “pure
alcohol” per capita each year on
average, according to the latest
statistics from the World Health
Organization. In Germany, the
average rate is 3.1 gallons. In
Britain, it’s just over three gallons, and in Sweden, the rate is
2.4 gallons — the same as in the
United States. On the upper end,
the Russian average is four gallons. “Pure alcohol” refers to the
portion of a beverage that is
100 percent ethanol.
“A large majority of French
people drink wine for pleasure,
but we must remember that
alcohol is the most dangerous
psychotropic,” Michel Reynaud, a
signatory of the Figaro letter and
an addiction expert in France,
said Monday on French radio.
The letter likewise cites the
dark side of France’s national
drink. “Alcohol, especially wine,
is the source of domestic violence, marital violence and street
international negotiations and increasingly desperate pleas from
trapped civilians.
But by nightfall, dozens of civilians were dead and the aid mission had been forced to pull out. It
was unclear when or whether the
U.N.-led aid convoys could resume.
“We kept going until the situation had escalated so much that
we could not guarantee that our
teams would be safe,” said Pawel
Krzysiek, a spokesman for the International Committee of the Red
Cross in Syria. The United Nations
said that more than a quarter of
the trucks had yet to be fully emptied. Some had not been opened.
In Eastern Ghouta’s hospitals,
supplies have been exhausted and
wounds are bandaged with rags.
“We delivered as much as we
could amid shelling. Civilians are
caught in a tragic situation,” Sajjad Malik, a representative for the
U.N. displacement agency in Syria,
wrote on Twitter late Monday.
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
Erin Cunningham and Zakaria Zakaria
in Istanbul contributed to this report.
violence, binge drinking, a significant proportion of mental illnesses, suicides and accidental
road deaths,” it states.
The wine industry was none
too pleased.
In another open letter, also
published in Le Figaro, several
members of France’s storied
Academie du Vin voiced their
displeasure. (The Academie is an
institution devoted to “the defense of French wines and the
fostering of their understanding,
the fight against frauds, deceptions and even ignorance, which
could harm the esteem of these
wines.”)
The title of their letter: “Stop
Demonizing Wine, Which is Part
of French Civilization!”
Likewise, Joël Forgeau, head
of the Vin et Societe wine lobby,
told the French news magazine
L’Express that producers and
their business could be affected
by a potential shift in consumer
practices. French exports of
wine and spirits reached a record 12.9 billion euros ($15.9 billion) in 2017, the Federation of
French Wines and Spirits Exporters, a leading trade body,
announced in February.
Producers “feel stigmatized, as
they have been engaged in promoting responsible consumption
for several years now,” Forgeau
said.
But despite the public outcry,
Buzyn’s line has been firm. “ ‘In
moderation’ shouldn’t be used
anymore,” the minister said in
her appearance on French television. “The real message we
should be sending today is that
alcohol is bad for your health.”
At the same time, the government has been trying to douse
the flames where it can.
After conceding the potential
dangers of alcohol consumption,
Édouard Philippe, Macron’s
prime minister, put this question
to the French Parliament: “Do
you honestly think this government will take measures against
winemakers and wine culture?”
james.mcauley@washpost.com
DIGEST
SOUTH KOREA
High-profile politician
quits over rape claims
A provincial governor and
presidential hopeful in South
Korea resigned Tuesday after
admitting that he had repeatedly
sexually assaulted his secretary,
becoming the most high-profile
man in that country to fall in a
mushrooming #MeToo reckoning.
An Hee-jung, the governor of
South Chungcheong province,
had run for the Democratic
Party nomination in last year’s
presidential election. Both the
nomination and the election were
won by Moon Jae-in, but An was
widely considered a front-runner
for the next election.
An’s secretary, Kim Ji-eun, told
a television channel Monday that
An had raped her four times since
she started working for him in
June and that he had sexually
harassed her on other occasions.
“He called me in recently
and brought up the #MeToo
movement,” a tearful Kim told the
JTBC channel, adding that An
seemed rattled. She said he asked
whether she was okay.
“So I thought he wouldn’t do it
[rape me] that day. But he did it
[again], even on that day,” she
said.
An’s office immediately denied
the rape allegations, saying the
relationship had been consensual.
But just before 1 a.m. local time
Tuesday, An posted a statement on
his Facebook page expressing
remorse, especially to Kim.
An, 52 and married, said his
office had wrongly claimed that
the intercourse was consensual,
but he did not use the word “rape.”
“It’s all my fault,” he wrote, asking
for forgiveness. He also stepped
down from his post.
The case comes amid a growing
number of accusations against
other prominent South Korean
men, including filmmaker Kim
Ki-duk, playwright Lee Youn-taek
and poet Ko Un.
THOMAS PETER/REUTERS
Russian cargo plane
crashes, killing 39
A delegate in traditional dress attends a news conference of the
Chongqing municipality on the sidelines of China’s National People’s
Congress in Beijing. The ceremonial legislature, which opened its
annual session on Monday and will meet through March 20, is set to
name President Xi Jinping to a second term and repeal constitutional
term limits preventing him from staying on indefinitely.
A Russian military cargo plane
crashed near an air base in Syria
on Tuesday, killing all 39 service
members on board in a blow to
Russian operations in Syria. The
Russian military blamed the crash
on a technical error.
The Russian Defense Ministry
said the An-26 crashed just 1,600
feet from the runway of Hmeimim
air base. It said the plane did not
come under fire.
The base, which is near the
Mediterranean coast, is far from
the front lines of the conflict in
Syria but came under shelling in
December. Russian military
outposts in Syria also have come
under rebel attacks recently.
The An-26 was the second
Russian military plane to crash in
Syria this year, after an Su-25
ground-attack jet was struck by a
portable air defense missile over
— Anna Fifield
SYRIA
northern Idlib province last
month.
— Associated Press
SRI LANKA
Emergency decreed as
Muslims face violence
Sri Lanka’s president declared
a state of emergency Tuesday
amid fears that attacks against
Muslims in several central hill
towns could spread.
Details of the emergency decree
were not announced, and it was
unclear how it would affect life on
the South Asian island nation,
where Buddhist-Muslim tensions
have flared in recent years with
the growth of extremist Buddhist
groups. Life went on as normal on
Tuesday afternoon in the capital,
Colombo, and other places.
The areas where the violence
erupted Monday remained under
curfew Tuesday.
The emergency announcement
came after Buddhist mobs swept
through towns outside Kandy,
burning at least 11 Muslim-owned
shops and homes. The attacks
followed reports that a Buddhist
man had been killed by a group of
Muslims. Police fired tear gas into
the crowds and later announced a
curfew in the town.
Sri Lanka has long been divided
between the majority Sinhalese,
who are overwhelmingly
Buddhist, and the minority
Tamils, who are Hindu, Muslim
and Christian. The country
remains deeply scarred by its
1983-2009 civil war, when Tamil
rebels fought to create an
independent homeland. While the
rebels were eventually crushed, a
religious divide has taken hold in
recent years, with hard-line
Sinhalese accusing Muslims of
forcing people to convert and
destroying sacred Buddhist sites.
— Associated Press
23 migrants feared dead in
Mediterranean: Twenty-one
migrants were missing and
probably drowned after a rubber
dinghy and a wooden boat set off
from Libya for Italy and had to be
rescued, the International
Organization for Migration said.
The 21 were among 51 people on
the boat, and two dead infants
reportedly were discovered on it,
bringing the likely death toll to
23, an IOM spokesman said at a
United Nations briefing in
Geneva. All 132 people on the
dinghy were rescued, he said.
Outgoing leader proposes
new charter for Chile: Chilean
President Michelle Bachelet,
who leaves office Sunday, sent
Congress an ambitious proposal
for a new constitution that would
ensure equal pay for men and
women and strengthen
guarantees of the right to strike.
The plan also calls for improved
health care, education and social
security, among other things.
Chile’s current constitution was
drafted during the 1973-1990
dictatorship of Gen. Augusto
Pinochet.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
W. Europe may get first far-right leader in decades Israeli o∞cial touts
military’s advances in
Italy’s Matteo Salvini,
a foe of migrants, could
anti-tunnel technology
be premier in a coalition
were even elected from Sicily and
elsewhere in the south, a previously unthinkable development.
League leaders say that establishment politicians on the continent have failed to listen to the
anxieties of their voters.
“It’s a battle raging across national and regional borders,” said
Lorenzo Fontana, one of Salvini’s
top deputies.
“Citizens have been sending important signals to all of Europe,”
he said. “If we want to make it so
that the situation doesn’t get any
worse, we need to understand
how to get those signals.”
But even as Italians delivered a
clear rejection of their country’s
traditional parties, no other force
gained enough support to govern
outright, leading to a chaotic outcome that could take months to
resolve. The most natural alliance
may be between the League and
the Five Star Movement, since
they share a coolness toward globalization and want to bolster Italy’s safety net. Political analysts
think a League-Five Star coalition
is unlikely because Five Star leaders would struggle to persuade
their largely left-wing voters to
support it. But neither side is ruling out a union.
Five Star leader Luigi Di Maio
said Monday that he was ready to
speak to every political force in the
country.
Analysts say that if Salvini becomes prime minister, his coalition partners and practicality
probably would force him to be
more moderate. Human rights issues aside, an effort to deport hundreds of thousands of migrants is
unlikely to succeed, because other
countries would have to agree to
take them in. And other European
leaders who tried to challenge the
continent’s economic mainstream
walked into a buzz saw of financial
crisis, then backed down.
Still, the possibility of Salvini as
prime minister has mainstream
opponents fearful.
“He’s closed to the world, afraid
of globalization, Europe, migrants. He’d take this country 50
years back into the past,” said Laura Boldrini, the speaker of the
lower house of Parliament, whom
Salvini once compared to an inflatable sex doll.
“He compared me to a sex doll,”
she said. “Is a person like this
suitable to represent Italy?”
BY M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
AND S TEFANO P ITRELLI
rome — The Northern League
once derided southern Italians as
smelly, shifty and indolent. But
after a successful national rebranding that put migrants instead of other Italians in its
crosshairs, voters may have given
its youthful head, Matteo Salvini, a
shot at leading the whole country.
In an establishment-smashing
season in Italy, Salvini’s party —
now renamed “the League” to appeal to the entire country — has
driven home its anti-migrant, nationalist message with more success than far-right cousins elsewhere in Europe. After Italians split their vote Sunday between the populist Five Star
Movement and the League’s rightwing coalition, Italian President
Sergio Mattarella may give Salvini
a mandate to build a government.
If that happens, Salvini, a genial
44-year-old everyman who favors
faded jeans, T-shirts and anti-Islamic rhetoric, could be Western
Europe’s first far-right leader
since 1945. He has risen to dominance by abandoning his party’s
old regionalism and instead channeling fears of migrants and bureaucrats in Brussels.
He says he wants to close
mosques, bolster Italy’s borders
and take sovereignty back from
the European Union. He praises
Russian President Vladimir Putin
for promoting traditional family
values.
And his earthy humor — critics
would say racism and misogyny —
has proved to be a vote winner
among Italians who are nostalgic
for an earlier, less racially diverse
era. He once quipped that there
should be racially segregated buses
and
trains
in
Milan,
which
opponents said called to mind the
American civil rights icon
Rosa Parks. Another time, he compared a top female politician to
a sex doll.
After a failed League candidate
for local office shot six African
migrants in a central Italian city
MARCO BERTORELLO/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Supporters of the League display the party leader’s name in Turin.
last month, Salvini said it was
migrants who were bringing violence to Italy.
“We will go to Europe to change
the rules that have impoverished
Italians,” Salvini said Tuesday in
Milan, after meeting with the
newly elected governor of the
Lombardy region, a League member who during the campaign said
that migrants were a threat to the
“white race.” (The governor-elect,
Attilio Fontana, later called it a
“slip of the tongue.”)
Salvini said he was prepared to
save Italy from “quicksand.”
His star role comes after years
as a junior partner to former
prime minister Silvio Berlusconi,
who often barely disguised his
disdain for an ally far on his right
flank who was young enough to be
his son. Europe’s elite, wincing at
the anti-establishment fervor in
the Italian campaign, had counted
on the pro-E.U. Berlusconi to bind
his far-right allies to more-moderate positions.
Instead, Salvini has broken
free, with his party beating Berlusconi’s Forza Italia with 17.4 percent of the vote to Forza Italia’s
14 percent — and more than quadrupling its tally from elections
five years ago.
The result positions him as the
right-wing heir to Berlusconi, 81,
who never cultivated a younger
generation of leaders in his own
party. With Berlusconi’s long political career most likely over after
the failure at the polls, the shakeup of Italy’s right wing could rival
the populist transformation of the
Republican Party under President
Trump.
The parallels are similar
enough that former Trump strategist Stephen K. Bannon went to
Rome to watch the elections,
praising Salvini to local journalists for his ability to channel Italian passions in a populist direction.
“Salvini could really invent or
build a new right-wing coalition,”
said Paolo Natale, a professor of
political science at the University
of Milan.
The new lead role for the
League takes it far beyond its regional roots as a northern group
that wanted to split the country’s
rich industrial territories from the
agricultural south. After Salvini
took over four years ago, he shifted the focus away from separatism
and amped up the nationalist, Italy-first message. He borrowed
from the old pro-worker, left-wing
playbook, saying he wanted to
boost pensions and lower the retirement age — and pay for it by
spending less on the more than
600,000 migrants who have arrived in Italy since 2013.
“The problem with Islam is that
it’s a law, not a religion, and it’s
incompatible with our values, our
rights and our freedoms,” Salvini
said last month while campaigning in Umbria, where local allies
were trying to prevent the construction of an Islamic cultural
center.
The promises worked: All
across the former heartland of the
center-left Democratic Party, the
League was the top vote-getter
Sunday. And League candidates
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
Top 10 Things To Do When
Replacing Your Roof:
New methods may use
techniques gleaned from
mining industries
BY
M ISSY R YAN
Advances in anti-tunnel technology have provided the Israeli
military with new means of heading off attacks from Palestinian
militants based in the Gaza Strip,
an Israeli military official said
Tuesday.
The official, who heads the
underground-warfare section of
the Israeli military’s technological unit, said the new methods for
detecting and destroying extensive, often sophisticated underground spaces had resulted in the
elimination of at least three tunnels since October.
Israeli leaders have hailed the
use of new technology for countering border vulnerabilities, saying it will help keep Israelis who
live near the Palestinian enclave
safe.
The official, who spoke on the
sidelines of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
conference in Washington, said
the new methods are the culmination of three to four years of investment, including funding from
the U.S. government and work by
Israeli military and defense firms
including Elbit Systems and Rafael Advanced Defense Systems.
Militants’ ability to use underground tunnels to launch attacks
was a major feature of the Israeli
military’s 2014 war with the Palestinian group Hamas in Gaza.
About 30 tunnels were destroyed
during that conflict.
“We realize that we know what
we’re doing now. We know how to
conduct these operations, and we
know how to apply these technologies,” said the official, who spoke
on the condition of anonymity for
security reasons. “It’s not that we
stopped [the problem] and everything’s fine. But we have a good
plan.”
According to the Israel Defense
Forces, militants have used tun-
nels to attack Israel since the early
2000s, but their use has accelerated since then. In 2006, an Israeli
soldier was abducted by Hamas
militants who crossed into Israel
through a tunnel. (He was released in 2011.)
While the official declined to
provide details about the technology, he suggested that it was
based on techniques used by extractive industries, which sometimes employ seismic or sound
waves to prospect for minerals or
fossil fuels.
“When we started working on
this, we wanted to see what was
being done in the world,” he said.
“Oil and gas use a lot of seismic
technologies, and we definitely
wanted to learn from them.”
Militants’ ability to use
underground tunnels to
launch attacks was a
major feature of the
Israeli military’s 2014
war with the
Palestinian group
Hamas in Gaza.
The official said the soil around
Gaza is extremely varied, making
it more difficult for detection
technology to distinguish between concrete or open space associated with tunnels and naturally occurring clay or sand.
Looking for tunnels is basically
a task of finding “the right anomaly,” he said.
According to Israeli media reports, the technology includes
seismic sensors that seek to detect
underground vibrations and
could identify the location and
dimensions of a tunnel.
“What we’re doing is building
an arsenal of tools that is varied to
be able to fight off our enemy in
any way they choose,” he said.
missy.ryan@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
Trump credits his toughness, sanctions for prospect of talks
N. KOREA FROM A1
parameters of the dialogue, said
a senior administration official
who spoke to reporters on the
condition of anonymity. Senior officials from Seoul are expected to
travel to Washington this week to
provide more details.
In the meantime, “I think it’s a
good idea for everybody to take
some perspective, take a deep
breath [and] keep in mind we have
a long history, 27 years, of talking
to North Koreans,” the official
said. The official added that there
is “also a 27-year history of them
breaking every agreement they’ve
ever made with the United States
and the international community.”
“We are open-minded, we look
forward to hearing more. But the
North Koreans have earned our
skepticism.”
Others were even more skeptical. “Maybe this is a breakthrough.
I seriously doubt it, but hope
springs eternal,” Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats
told the Senate Armed Services
Committee.
Other intelligence officials
shared his doubts. Lt. Gen. Robert
Ashley, director of the Defense
Intelligence Agency, noted to the
committee that maintaining the
threat of nuclear weapons is too
vital to the regime’s survival for
Kim to give them up quickly.
Analysts agreed.
“I’d caution against too much
optimism because we’ve been
down this road too many times
before,” said Abraham Denmark, a
former Asia official at the Pentagon who is now director of the Asia
Program at the Woodrow Wilson
International Center for Scholars.
“Even if it’s eventually successful, it’s going to be difficult. There
will be setbacks and uncertainty,”
Denmark said.
Lawmakers, while noting that
North Korea should not be trusted, stressed that even imperfect
talks were better than no talks.
Sen. James M. Inhofe (ROkla.), who has been chairing the
Armed Services Committee’s hearings in the absence of Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.), counted himself
“a little more optimistic” than
Coats. “It is something that is kind
of unprecedented in coming forth
and saying under some conditions
he would follow the denuclearization,” Inhofe said.
Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii)
said that “any opening of a diplomatic channel toward easing the
tensions and removing a clear
threat from North Korea is a good
thing.” She noted that for such
talks to succeed, the United States
would need a much stronger diplomatic corps.
The Korean overtures come at a
time when the United States has
no ambassador in South Korea
and no special representative on
North Korea, and when the nominee for assistant secretary of state
for East Asia has yet to be confirmed by the Senate.
But Trump himself seemed
buoyant. Speaking at a news conference with Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, Trump was
asked “to what do you owe” the
reported North Korean offer. “Me,”
he replied, apparently referring to
the sanctions, his harsh personal
criticism of Kim and his threat to
rain down “fire and fury” on North
Korea. “No,” he quickly added as
silence engulfed the room. “Nobody got that.”
“I think they are sincere, but I
think they are sincere also because
of the sanctions and what we’re
doing in respect to North Korea,”
Trump said, describing the measures as “very strong and very
biting.” He also said that “the great
help we’ve been given from China”
has played a role, although there
are repeated reports of both Chinese and Russian assistance in
helping North Korea evade sanctions.
Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) agreed with Trump that
his tough language and actions
may have turned the tide in Pyongyang. If any denuclearization
agreement is reached, Graham
said in a statement, “the lion’s
share of credit will go to President
Trump for his strong stand.”
Earlier, when he met with
Lofven in the Oval Office, Trump
directed blame for the failure of
previous efforts to secure the nuclear disarmament of North Korea
toward his three predecessors:
former presidents Barack Obama,
George W. Bush and Bill Clinton.
“This should’ve been handled
over many years by many different
administrations, but these are the
cards we are dealt,” Trump said.
Vice President Pence appeared
to be the White House’s designated pessimist. “All options are on
the table and our posture toward
the regime will not change until
we see credible, verifiable, and
concrete steps toward denuclearization,” he said in a statement.
The senior administration official said that U.S.-South Korean
military exercises planned for this
month, but postponed until after
the Winter Olympics in South Korea, “will resume. . . . Naturally,
allies are going to train their militaries together for defensive purposes.”
North Korea has said a number
of times in the past that it would
give up its nuclear weapons under
certain conditions, but it has reneged on every deal it has ever
signed. The scope of any proposed
talks was not clear. At various
shorensteincenter.org
@ShorensteinCtr
FB/ShorensteinCenter
KOREAN CENTRAL NEWS AGENCY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, shakes hands with South Korean national security adviser
Chung Eui-yong, who headed a visiting delegation, during their meeting Monday in Pyongyang.
times, Pyongyang has demanded
the full withdrawal of the U.S.
military from South Korea or the
withdrawal of “nuclear” troops
and weapons — of which there are
none in the South. Pyongyang has
also demanded the cancellation of
U.S. military exercises in exchange
for eliminating its weapons.
Similarly, the Trump administration has not clarified whether
North Korea must pledge the “denuclearization” Trump has demanded as a precondition for substantive talks or whether it can be
agreed upon at the end of negotiations. But the sudden thaw could,
at the very least, bring a reprieve
in the months of acute tensions on
the Korean Peninsula.
During its visit to Pyongyang, a
delegation led by Chung Eui-yong,
the South Korean national security adviser, had a four-hour dinner with Kim and his wife, as well
as other senior officials including
Kim’s sister, Kim Yo Jong, who
went to South Korea for the opening of the Winter Olympics last
month.
“The dinner proceeded in a
warm atmosphere overflowing
with compatriotic feelings,” the
North’s official Korean Central
News Agency said in a report, one
of several that mentioned the Koreans’ shared blood and implied
that they were united together
against the outside world.
During the Olympics, Pence
met with the South’s president,
Moon. But a planned encounter
with Kim’s sister was scrapped by
North Korea.
Chung said North Korea “made
it clear” that it would not resume
provocations — such as nuclear
tests or intercontinental ballistic
missile launches — while it was
engaged in talks with the South.
The regime, he said in Seoul, reiterated a willingness to talk with
the United States, its avowed enemy since the Korean War, and
“clearly affirmed its commitment
to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.”
If events play out the way Seoul
hopes, Moon will be meeting Kim
for a summit on the southern side
of the inter-Korean border late
next month.
Moon’s progressive predecessors both traveled to Pyongyang
for summits with Kim’s father,
Kim Jong Il. Analysts had said it
would be unseemly for a South
Korean leader to make the same
pilgrimage a third time.
The two sides agreed that the
next summit will be held inside
the Peace House at Panmunjom,
the “truce village” straddling the
demilitarized zone that divides
the peninsula. The house is just
over the southern side of the line.
It would mark the first time since
the Korean War ended in 1953 that
a North Korean leader had crossed
into the South and would be the
first meeting between Kim and
another head of state in his six
years in power.
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Fifield reported from Tokyo. Karoun
Demirjian, Philip Rucker, Brian
Murphy and John Hudson contributed
to this report.
Announces the Winner of the $25,000
2018 GOLDSMITH PRIZE FOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING
Kurds pulling back from ISIS fight
Nina Martin, ProPublica
Renee Montagne, NPR
U.S.-allied forces in Syria
are angered by American
outreach to Turkey
Lost Mothers
The United States has the highest rate of maternal deaths in the developed world;
NPR and ProPublica found at least half could be prevented with better care. The
series tracked maternal deaths, saved lives by raising public awareness of post-birth
complications, and prompted legislation in New Jersey and Texas.
FINALISTS
Shannon Mullen and
Payton Guion
Asbury Park Press
Renter Hell
This investigation exposed
the hazardous living conditions of thousands of tenants
in New Jersey’s governmentsupported housing. As a
result, the state issued more
than 1,800 violations, and
two state senators introduced
a bipartisan bill aimed at
fixing many of the issues
brought to light in the series.
Melissa Segura
BuzzFeed News
Broken Justice in Chicago
BuzzFeed News investigated
a Chicago detective accused
by the community of framing more than 50 people for
murder. The findings from
the series led to the freeing of
an innocent man from prison
after 23 years, and authorities
reviewed the cases of other
prisoners.
Carol Marbin Miller,
Audra D.S. Burch,
Emily Michot, and
the Miami Herald
digital team
Miami Herald
Fight Club: An
Investigation into Florida
Juvenile Justice
This investigation found
widespread beatings and
brutality, sexual exploitation, and medical neglect
in Florida’s juvenile detention centers. As a result,
the Florida Department of
Juvenile Justice overhauled
its hiring practices and
created an Office of Youth
and Family Advocacy to
investigate complaints.
David Armstrong and
Evan Allen
STAT and The
Boston Globe
The Addiction Trade
STAT and The Boston Globe
exposed treatment centers,
middlemen, and consultants
that exploited people seeking addiction treatment,
and has led to criminal and
congressional probes. Stories
ranged from insurance fraud
schemes, to poor care at
Recovery Centers of America,
to patient health put at risk
on the TV program Dr. Phil.
The Washington Post staff
The Washington Post
Russia
The Washington Post examined Russian interference in
the 2016 election, possible
links between the Trump
campaign and Kremlin
agents, and the United States’
response throughout 2017.
The Post’s reporting contributed to the resignation of
National Security Adviser
Michael Flynn.
SPECIAL CITATION
Emily Steel, Jodi Kantor,
Megan Twohey, Michael
S. Schmidt, and New York
Times staff
The New York Times
Harassed
By revealing secret settlements, persuading victims to
speak, and bringing powerful men across industries to
account, such as Bill O’Reilly,
Harvey Weinstein, and Louis
C.K, New York Times reporters
spurred a worldwide reckoning about sexual harassment
and abuse.
GOLDSMITH CAREER
AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE
IN JOURNALISM
Martha Raddatz, ABC
News chief global affairs
correspondent, co-anchor
of This Week with George
Stephanopoulos
BY
L IZ S LY
beirut — U.S.-allied forces in
eastern Syria said Tuesday that
they are withdrawing from the
front lines of the war against the
Islamic State in order to battle the
United States’ NATO ally Turkey
elsewhere in the country, jeopardizing the fight against the militants.
Citing disappointment with the
United States, the Kurdish-dominated Syrian Democratic Forces
(SDF) said they were pulling fighters off the front lines in the province of Deir al-Zour, where Islamic
State fighters have been putting
up a fierce fight in a pocket of
territory on the eastern bank of
the Euphrates River. The holdouts
there are thought to include some
of the most senior leaders of the
organization who escaped the cities of Mosul in Iraq and Raqqa in
Syria last year, U.S. officials say.
The move follows an effort by
the Trump administration to assuage Turkish ire over the U.S.
military’s close relationship with
Syrian Kurdish forces. Those forces have been instrumental in the
capture of vast swaths of territory
from the Islamic State over the
past three years, including the
militants’ self-styled capital,
Raqqa.
According to a statement by the
SDF, which has received arms and
training from the United States,
the fighters will relocate to the
Kurdish-controlled enclave of
Afrin in northwestern Syria to
help fend off a six-week-old Turkish offensive that has reportedly
killed hundreds of civilians, displaced more than 10,000 people
and contributed to one of the
worst crises in U.S.-Turkish relations in decades.
It is with “regret” that the “painful decision” has been made to pull
fighters away from the battle in
Deir al-Zour, the SDF statement
said. The decision would not have
been taken, it added, “were it not
for the failure of the international
community to curb the Turkish
aggression and put real pressure”
on the government of President
Recep Tayyip Erdogan to “stop its
madness within our Syrian borders.”
The SDF withdrawal was a direct result of Kurdish frustration
with the recent American rapprochement with Turkey and the
lack of support Washington has
given to the Kurds in their fight
against Turkish troops in Afrin,
according to Aldar Xelil, a senior
official with the self-proclaimed
Kurdish-led administration governing northeastern Syria.
“The international coalition let
us down,” he said in an interview
over Skype. “They did not do what
we expected them to do for us after
a very long partnership.”
“We are allies. The Americans
should have helped us. We were
allies for a very long time,” he
added. “For one and a half months
we have been under attack by Turkey. Turkey is using NATO weapons to attack an American ally. We
were partners in the fight against
[the Islamic State], and they did
not do anything to help us.”
The redeployment involves
about 1,500 to 1,700 fighters
drawn mostly from Arab groups
affiliated with the Kurdishdominated SDF. Thousands of
Kurdish fighters had previously
left northeastern Syria for Afrin,
and operations against the Islamic
State had already come to a standstill, Xelil said. Some SDF fighters
will remain on the front line there,
alongside U.S. troops, and will
continue to defend their positions,
he said.
In recent months, the Islamic
State fighters have begun to regroup, Xelil warned. “There is a
danger this will give ISIS a chance
to revive, to come back to life, and
they might even expand their territory again,” he said.
The U.S. military said operations against the Islamic State had
slowed but not stopped entirely,
and warned that U.S. support for
the SDF could be jeopardized by
the withdrawal from the fight.
“We are aware of the departure
of some SDF forces from the Middle Euphrates River Valley and
continue to point out the potential
costs of any distraction from the
defeat-ISIS fight,” Maj. Adrian
Rankine-Galloway, a U.S. military
spokesman, said in an emailed
statement. “The Coalition will
achieve its goals, but the increased
complexity of the situation in Syria can result in operations taking
longer.” U.S. support for the SDF
will continue “as long as they remain focused on the defeat-ISIS
fight,” Rankine-Galloway added.
“Any military efforts outside those
specifically focused on defeating
ISIS do not, and will not, receive
coalition support.”
The SDF withdrawal reflects
the deepening complexities of the
U.S. involvement in Syria as the
fight against the Islamic State
winds down, leaving about 2,000
U.S. troops in de facto control of a
vast swath of northeastern Syria
alongside a Kurdish-dominated
force that is anathema to Turkey.
The Syrian Kurdish group that
dominates the SDF is closely affiliated with the Kurdistan Workers’
Party, or PKK, which is designated
a terrorist organization by Turkey
and the United States. Over the
past three years, Turkey has repeatedly expressed its frustration
over the level of U.S. military support for the Kurdish People’s Protection Units, or YPG, which is the
main component of the SDF and
has been described in U.S. intelligence reports as the Syrian branch
of the PKK.
A visit by U.S. Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson to Ankara last
month went a long way toward
assuaging Turkish concerns. Tillerson described Turkey as the
“enduring” ally in the complicated
triangular relationship, and a
meeting is due to take place in
Washington on Thursday to establish a mechanism for what U.S.
officials have described as “diluting” the YPG’s level of control in
northeastern Syria.
On the table is the fate of Manbij, a majority-Arab town in northern Syria that is under the control
of the SDF despite promises to
Turkey made by the Obama administration that the Kurdish allied forces would withdraw after
the Islamic State was driven out.
The SDF statement on the withdrawal from the Islamic State
fight may have been timed ahead
of the talks to put pressure on the
United States not to surrender
Manbij to Turkey, analysts said.
That the Trump administration
has alienated the Kurds in seeking
to regain Turkish trust reflects the
complexities of a war that pushed
the United States into alliances
with multiple armed groups in
Syria and Iraq that are often at
odds with one another.
The Turkish-Kurdish dispute
predates the Islamic State war by
decades and has now left the United States in “an impossible position,” said Aaron Stein of the Atlantic Council.
The Trump administration is
divided over whether to prioritize
repairing the U.S. alliance with
Turkey or to remain loyal to the
Kurds. The U.S. military favors the
Kurdish allies it has fought alongside, and the State Department is
mindful of Turkey’s broader importance to the United States’
NATO relationships and the building tensions with Russia, Stein
added. “The U.S. is stuck, and
there are really no good outcomes
here,” he said.
liz.sly@washpost.com
Zakaria Zakaria in Istanbul and Heba
Habib in Stockholm contributed to this
report.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
New Russia sanctions
likely ‘within a week,’
intelligence chief says
Measures will target 13
named in Mueller probe
and more, Congress told
BY
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
New sanctions against Russia
will probably be unveiled “within
a week” and will include measures
against the 13 Russians indicted
last month in the special counsel’s
probe of election interference, the
nation’s top intelligence official
told senators Tuesday.
Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats told the Senate
Armed Services Committee that
Treasury
Secretary
Steven
Mnuchin “very shortly will be
bringing out a list of sanctions on
those individuals that had been
complicit” in the cyber-measures
described in the charges announced by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s office. Coats
also said the list would go beyond
those 13 names in the indictment.
He added that he did not know
what other names would be on
Mnuchin’s list, although the intelligence agencies had provided the
Treasury Department with information on others.
Congress and the White House
have been at odds over the Trump
administration’s refusal to implement additional sanctions against
Russian officials and entities. Last
year, Congress almost unanimously passed a law stepping up
mandatory sanctions against Russia’s defense, energy and banking
sectors, as well as intelligence,
railways, metals and mining industries. But the White House
never officially designated the targets of those sanctions, concluding in January that the threat of
sanctions by itself was enough of a
“deterrent.”
Last month, Mnuchin said that
he would consider applying sanctions against the 13 Russians and
three companies Mueller named
in an indictment of participants in
a Russian-organized online influence campaign to spread discord
in the U.S. electorate before the
2016 election.
The indictment prompted a
wave of partisan finger-pointing.
Republicans accused the Obama
administration of having been too
soft on Russia, while Democrats
excoriated the Trump administration for not taking decisive steps
to punish or repudiate Moscow’s
efforts at electoral interference.
“Why on earth hasn’t the administration found anyone to
sanction?” Sen. Martin Heinrich
(D-N.M.), a member of the Armed
Services and Intelligence committees, asked Coats on Tuesday.
Democrats also pressed Coats
to explain why President Trump
had not authorized the intelligence community to do more to
prevent Russian aggression. Adm.
Michael S. Rogers, National Security Agency director, told senators
last week that the president had
given him no new authority or
capability for such actions ahead
of the midterm elections.
Coats said during Tuesday’s
hearing that he had discussed the
intelligence community’s cyberthreat response with Trump since
Rogers’s testimony and that
Trump’s response had been: “I assume you’re doing your job, all of
you . . . but if you need me to say,
direct you to do it, do it.”
But when asked by Sen. Jeanne
Shaheen (D-N.H.) to clarify his
comments, Coats added that his
discussions with the president
had been “relative to the cyber
issue and the direction to go forward on cyber.”
“I did not understand it to be
said in the context of Russian influence in the elections,” Coats
said.
Neither the Trump administration nor any of the three congressional committees looking into
Russian interference in the 2016
U.S. elections has yet publicly released recommendations, legislation or other policy instructions
for how states ought to contend
with the threat the intelligence
community has warned Russia
will pose to the 2018 midterms.
The Senate Intelligence Committee is expected to release recommendations this month.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
EZ
A11
RE
Britain investigates collapse of ex-spy
SPY FROM A1
and disruptive force.”
The circumstances — two people, both in critical condition just
minutes after they appear
healthy and ambling past a security camera — immediately rang
red bells in security circles.
The ex-spy Skripal was, according to neighbors, living a
quiet life in Salisbury. He was a
man with a past. He had enemies.
Skripal was jailed in Russia in
2006 after he was convicted of
passing the names of Russian
intelligence agents working
undercover in Europe to MI6,
Britain’s foreign intelligence
service.
In 2010, he was handed over to
Britain as one of four prisoners
released by Moscow in exchange
for 10 Russian sleeper agents
living in the United States.
The high-profile spy swap
took place on an airport tarmac
in Vienna — like something out
of a Cold War novel by John le
Carré.
The strange doings in Salisbury also immediately called to
mind the 2006 poisoning of
Alexander Litvinenko, who died
in a London hospital bed three
weeks after drinking tea laced
with a rare radioactive substance.
In 2016, a 300-page British
government inquiry found that
Russian President Vladimir Putin had “probably approved” the
killing of Litvinenko, who was an
outspoken critic of the Kremlin
and a former KGB operative.
In a statement Tuesday, Wiltshire Police said Skripal and his
daughter were in intensive care,
being treated for “suspected exposure to an unknown substance.”
The police added that a first
responder who helped the pair
also remained in a hospital. Authorities were sweeping nearby
sites — a restaurant and a pub —
for forensic evidence.
“It’s a very unusual case, and
the critical thing is to get to the
bottom of its causes as quickly as
possible,” said Mark Rowley,
head of counterterrorism policing in the United Kingdom.
“We’re doing all the things you
would expect us to do,” he said.
“We’re speaking to witnesses.
DAN KITWOOD/GETTY IMAGES
Police officers in Salisbury, England, stand guard Monday near a
bench where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal, 66, and
his 33-year-old daughter, Yulia, had been found the day before,
apparently poisoned. Neighbors said Sergei Skripal had been living
a quiet life since 2010, when Russia handed him over to Britain in a
swap of spies. The circumstances of his health emergency
immediately raised suspicions that Russia had targeted him.
We’re taking forensic samples at
the scene. We’re doing toxicology
work, and that will help us to get
to an answer.”
The
Russian
president’s
spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told
reporters Tuesday that the Kremlin knew nothing at all about the
case and was ready to cooperate
in the investigation if asked.
“We know that this tragic
situation has happened, yet we
have no information about its
probable causes, what this man
has been doing and what this is
about,” Peskov said.
He described any accusations
against Russia as predictable
and “not long in coming.”
Rowley, the counterterrorism
chief, said no one was rushing to
judgment — Russians living in
England die all the time of
natural causes — but the special
circumstances raised troubling
questions.
“There are deaths which attract attention,” Rowley said. “I
think we have to remember that
Russian exiles are not immortal,
they do all die, and there can be a
tendency for some conspiracy
theories. But likewise we have to
be alive to the fact of state
threats, as illustrated by the
Litvinenko case.”
Putin supporters said the Skripal affair was an attempt to stir
anti-Russian sentiment ahead of
a March 18 presidential election
in Russia.
Two Russians whom Britain
accused of being behind the
2006 Litvinenko murder were
never charged — instead, they
have thrived. Andrey Lugovoy
and Dmitry Kovtun both deny
involvement in Litvinenko’s killing.
“The Britons suffer from phobias,” Lugovoy, a former KGB
bodyguard who is now a member
of the Russian parliament, told
the Interfax news agency Tuesday. “If something happens to a
Russian, they immediately start
looking for a Russian trail.”
Kovtun, a businessman, predicted that British authorities
would pursue “an anti-Russian
scenario,” as he claims they did
in investigating Litvinenko’s
death.
“If someone did poison Skripal, if this is not just an accident,
then, of course, this is a provocation by British special services
aimed primarily at discrediting
Russian government bodies in
the run-up to the presidential
election,” Kovtun told Interfax.
Litvinenko’s widow, Marina
Litvinenko, said in an interview
that seeing television footage of
investigators wearing hazardous-materials suits brought back
painful memories.
“I had hoped it never would
happen again, and when I saw
those pictures of special suits, of
course it was quite difficult to
believe it might happen again,”
she said.
She praised the police for
launching an investigation immediately — they waited 21/2
weeks in her case, she said — but
she suggested that if this is
shown to be an assassination
attempt by Russia, it would point
to enduring vulnerabilities.
“Because it did happen to
another Russian person, it shows
lessons were not learned and
people asking for protection, for
political asylum or refugees — or
even this guy, who was exchanged — they can’t be safe,
can’t be protected,” she said.
If it turns out that Russia
played any role in another assault on British soil, it would also
plunge the current frosty feelings between the two nations
“well below a Siberian zero,” said
Jonathan Eyal, associate director
at the Royal United Services
Institute, a London-based think
tank.
Eyal said the Litvinenko case
strained relations, as did more
recent charges that Russian
state-sponsored trolls interfered
in British politics.
Eyal added that authorizing
an assassination would “violate
the quasi gentleman’s agreement
that spies who have been
swapped are usually left out of
these games.”
Skripal kept a low profile in
Britain until Sunday afternoon,
when a member of the public
called the police, concerned
about the welfare of two people
on a bench. Eyewitnesses who
saw the pair said they did not
look well.
It seemed as if they had taken
“something quite strong,” Freya
Church told the BBC. “On the
bench there was a couple, an
older guy and a younger girl. She
was sort of leaned in on him. It
looked like she had passed out,
maybe. He was doing some
strange hand movements, looking up to the sky.”
karla.adam@washpost.com
william.booth@washpost.com
Anton Troianovski in Moscow
contributed to this report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
Economy & Business
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Bill to roll back
Dodd-Frank rules
passes crucial test
Bipartisan Senate vote
advances proposal to
relax banking regulations
BY E RICA W ERNER
AND R ENAE M ERLE
A plan to scale back postfinancial-crisis banking rules
cleared a key Senate hurdle Tuesday, with more than a third of the
Senate Democratic caucus joining united Republicans to move
the measure toward passage.
The vote was 67 to 32, well over
the 60 votes needed in the closely
divided Senate, setting up debate
and final passage in coming days.
Days of contentious wrangling
on the Senate floor lie ahead, with
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)
pledging to deliver speeches in
opposition. But the level of bipartisan support Tuesday, with 17
members of the Senate Democratic caucus voting “yes,” suggested the measure will ultimately get the chamber’s approval.
The House would need to approve the legislation as well before it could become law.
If passed, the measure would
mark the most significant revision of banking rules since Congress passed a sweeping financial
regulatory law in response to the
2008 economic crisis. It is also a
rare instance of bipartisan legislating in the Senate, something
that has occurred infrequently
during the Trump presidency.
Supporters argue that the legislation would bring needed relief
to small and regional banks,
which say they were treated unfairly under the 2010 financial
reform law known as the Dodd-
Frank Act.
“This bill is mostly focused on
community banks and credit
unions. My state’s lost 30 percent”
of such institutions, Sen. Mark R.
Warner (D-Va.) said ahead of the
vote. “That does not help grow the
economy, particularly in smaller
communities.”
Opponents say the bill would
weaken the oversight needed to
stave off the type of dangerous
lending and investing that
brought the U.S. economy to its
knees a decade ago.
This bill is “extraordinarily
dangerous” for the economy, Warren told reporters Tuesday. “It’s
not as if the banks are suffering.
They think they can juice their
profits if they can get Congress to
turn down the regulations.”
The vote is a significant victory
for the banking industry, which
has seen its fortunes improve
under President Trump. He repeatedly promised during the
presidential campaign to do a
“big number” on Dodd-Frank.
The Senate legislation leaves the
law’s major provisions intact,
though with some parts significantly weakened.
The bill would exempt about
two dozen financial companies
with assets between $50 billion
and $250 billion, including American Express, Ally Financial and
Barclays, from the toughest banking regulations. These banks
would no longer be labeled “too
big to fail” and automatically
undergo a yearly stress test to
prove they could survive another
period of economic turmoil. It
also delivers relief to small banks
from mortgage and other rules
put in place after the financial
crisis.
The likelihood that a big bank
will fail is small but would be
REMY GABALDA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Spiral jetty
Workers help assemble part of an engine of an Airbus A380 aircraft at a factory in Blagnac, near Toulouse, France.
“slightly greater under the legislation,” the Congressional Budget
Office said in a report Monday.
The report also offered a potential challenge to one of the central
arguments of the bill’s supporters: that it will help small banks,
not Wall Street behemoths. There
is about a 50 percent chance that
JPMorgan and Citibank could
take advantage of efforts to help
other parts of the industry, according to the CBO report.
The measure has exposed a
Democratic Party rift over financial regulations that pits liberals
such as Warren and top Banking
Committee Democrat Sherrod
Brown (Ohio) against moderateleaning Democrats including
Sens. Jon Tester (Mont.), Heidi
Heitkamp (N.D.) and Joe Donnelly (Ind.).
Tester, Heitkamp and Donnelly
are all up for reelection in November in states Trump won by a large
margin. Along with Warner, who
was one of the lead authors of the
original Dodd-Frank bill, Tester,
Heitkamp and Donnelly helped
negotiate the legislation with
Senate Banking Committee
Chairman Mike Crapo (R-Idaho).
But they said they were not motivated by reelection concerns or
the desire to establish a bipartisan voting record.
“I would just tell you that this
election has nothing to do with
this,” Tester said. “We were work-
ing on this five years ago. This has
everything to do with access to
capital and making sure rural
America remains strong moving
forward.”
The House passed legislation
last year that would repeal larger
chunks of the Dodd-Frank rules,
so proponents’ biggest challenge
may be to reconcile the drastically different bills.
Several of the key Democrats
supporting the bill insisted Tuesday that the House must pass
their version unchanged or risk
ending up with no bill at all. For
the House to change the bill
“would be folly,” Heitkamp said.
The House typically resists
swallowing legislation passed by
the Senate without putting its
imprint on it. Still, it would be
tough for the House to make
substantive changes to the Senate
version of the bill, said Jaret
Seiberg, a financial services analyst for Cowen Washington Research Group.
“That doesn’t mean the House
won’t spend a few months trying,”
he said. “Yet at the end of the day,
the final package will be whatever
can get out of the Senate. We don’t
see the House being able to make
changes.”
erica.werner@washpost.com
renae.merle@washpost.com
Jeffrey Stein contributed to this
report.
FDA allows 1st firm in U.S. to test for cancer risk without a prescription
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
The direct-to-consumer genetic testing company 23andMe has
received federal approval to inform people of breast cancer risk
linked to three gene mutations —
making it the first company allowed to test for cancer risk
without a doctor’s prescription in
the United States.
The Food and Drug Administration decision is a step forward
for the evolving world of consumer genomics. The company can
report back the three mutations
in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes
that are the most common in the
Ashkenazi Jewish population.
But those are not the most common BRCA mutations in the
broader population.
Donald St. Pierre, acting director of the office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health
in the FDA’s Center for Devices
and Radiological Health, said in a
statement the approval was a step
forward with “a lot of caveats.”
“Most BRCA mutations that
increase an individual’s risk are
not detected by this test,” St.
Pierre said. “The test should not
be used as a substitute for seeing
your doctor for cancer screenings
or counseling on genetic and
lifestyle factors that can increase
or decrease cancer risk.”
23andMe previously included
breast cancer risk in its genetic
tests in the United States but
stopped in 2013 after the FDA
sent the company a warning letter stating the firm was marketing their test without approval.
Anne Wojcicki, the co-founder
and chief executive of 23andMe,
said the company’s experience
selling the test before 2013 in the
United States, Britain and Canada had provided insight into how
useful the information can be,
particularly to customers who
did not realize they had Ashkenazi Jewish heritage.
“Since the FDA warning letter,
it’s been a high priority for me
and the company to get this
report back,” Wojcicki said. “I’m
thrilled today.”
Wojcicki said that although the
company hasn’t yet announced
specific cancer risk mutations it
will add in the future, the approval surmounts a major hurdle.
Direct-to-consumer
genetic
tests have typically raised concern because of fears that people
may not understand the information and panic or might be falsely
reassured. Any person who
comes back with a negative for
these three gene mutations, for
example, could still carry other
mutations in the BRCA genes that
elevate their cancer risk. They
could also face elevated breast
cancer risk due to other gene
variations or other factors.
Robert C. Green, a medical
geneticist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, said the
FDA’s decision was somewhat
surprising but gratifying — and a
step forward in democratizing
genomic information.
Green has studied how people
handle information about genetic disease risks, and said that
while the information can be
upsetting, it can empower people
to take actions.
“I don’t want to trivialize the
potential for serious psychological burden that this risk information might provide; however, it is
risk information that we know
can lead to lifesaving interventions,” Green said. “So you have to
balance that against the distress
people might feel.”
confirmed that it was testing a
fresh beef burger that used a patty
that was slightly smaller than the
one in the Quarter Pounder.
investors by selling risky
mortgage securities that
contributed to the 2008 global
financial crisis. The deal
announced Tuesday by New York
Attorney General Eric
Schneiderman calls for the
British bank to pay $100 million
to the state and provide
$400 million of relief to
homeowners and communities.
RBS admitted to having in 2006
and 2007 misled investors into
believing the residential
mortgage-backed securities it
sold were properly underwritten
and complied with the law.
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
DIGEST
ACQUISITIONS
Treasury warns about
Qualcomm takeover
Broadcom’s hostile takeover
attempt of Qualcomm could pose
a national security risk because of
Qualcomm’s leadership in
developing critical
semiconductor technology,
according to the Treasury
Department.
Qualcomm’s sale to Singaporebased Broadcom could hurt the
chipmaker’s competitiveness by
reducing research and
development, which would
threaten U.S. security, the
Treasury Department said in a
March 5 letter released by
Qualcomm on Tuesday. Harm to
Qualcomm’s innovation would
allow China to expand its
influence in key wireless
technology, the government said.
The United States “has
identified potential national
security concerns that warrant a
full investigation of the proposed
transaction,” the Treasury
Department said.
The Treasury Department also
cited the Defense Department’s
reliance on products made by
Qualcomm, which is based in San
Diego. The company has “active
sole source classified prime
contracts” with the Pentagon,
according to the letter.
— Bloomberg News
— Associated Press
MARKETS
U.S. fines NYSE over
trading missteps
SHAMMI MEHRA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A worker packs cauliflower at a wholesale vegetable market in Jalandhar, India. In a recently released
economic survey, the country noted its economic progress but acknowledged a lack of gender equality.
FAST-FOOD CHAINS
Quarter Pounders to
have fresh beef in May
McDonald’s said Tuesday that
it is serving Quarter Pounders
with fresh beef rather than frozen
patties at about a quarter of its
U.S. restaurants, a switch it first
announced about a year ago as it
works to appeal to customers who
want fresher foods. It will roll out
fresh beef Quarter Pounders to
most of its 14,000 U.S. restaurants
by May.
The fast-food giant, which has
relied on frozen patties since the
1970s, said workers will cook the
fresh beef on a grill when the
burger is ordered. “The result is a
hotter, juicier, great-tasting
burger,” said Chris Kempczinski,
who oversees McDonald’s
restaurants in the United States.
Its pricier “Signature Crafted”
burgers, stuffed with guacamole
or bacon, will also be made with
fresh beef because they use the
same-size patty as the Quarter
Pounder. The Big Mac and its
other burgers will still be made
with frozen beef.
McDonald’s has signaled that it
may use fresh beef in more
burgers. This year, the company
The New York Stock Exchange
and its sister markets were fined
$14 million by federal securities
regulators for missteps in dealing
with a 3½-hour trading halt in
July 2015 and a wild trading
session that roiled exchangetraded funds a month later.
The exchanges didn’t have
proper rules, violated some they
did have and in some cases broke
the law, the Securities and
Exchange Commission said in an
order released Tuesday. The
markets, all divisions of
Intercontinental Exchange,
settled without admitting or
denying the SEC’s findings.
The July 2015 outage froze one
of the world’s biggest financial
markets. In the 47 minutes before
the halt began, NYSE and NYSE
American “experienced
escalating connectivity problems”
between their trading systems
and computers that customers
use to access the exchanges.
— Bloomberg News
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Royal Bank of Scotland has
reached a $500 million
settlement with New York state to
resolve charges it misled
Airbnb hired Greg Greeley, the
head of Amazon.com’s Prime
business, as president of its main
home-rental unit. Greeley helped
Amazon expand the Prime service
internationally. He announced
his resignation Monday on
LinkedIn. Greeley, who will start
March 18, is expected to oversee a
slew of new initiatives designed
to broaden Airbnb’s appeal.
Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P.
Bezos owns The Washington Post.
— From news services
COMING TODAY
8:15 a.m.: Payroll processor ADP
reports how many jobs private
employers added in February.
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases
international trade data for
January.
8:30 a.m.: Labor Department
releases fourth-quarter
productivity data.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
When a $4,000 Alexander McQueen dress is a symbol of frugality
My new favorite
comedian is
Tiffany Haddish.
She’s a pennypinching heroine.
Don’t know
Michelle
her? You will.
Singletary
Haddish was
the breakout star
THE COLOR
in last year’s
OF MONEY
comedy box-office
hit “Girls Trip.”
Off-screen, Haddish — who
grew up in foster care and is
now socializing with such bigtime, uber-wealthy actors and
actresses as Will Smith and Jada
Pinkett Smith — is holding on to
her frugal roots.
Most recently, Haddish
shared the stage at the Academy
Awards with fellow comedian
Maya Rudolph. They both were
hilarious. Right away I noticed
Haddish’s dress, a stunning
white gown from Alexander
McQueen with a bejeweled
neckline.
Haddish paid a lot of money
to wear it for the red-carpet
premiere of “Girls Trip.” And she
has vowed to keep wearing it to
get her money’s worth.
The gown co-starred with her
when she hosted “Saturday
Night Live” last November. It
was during her opening
monologue that Haddish
introduced me to the dress. I’m
not embarrassed to say I had
never heard of the designer. I
mean, I can’t bring myself to
buy a $110 pair of Ugg boots.
Haddish riffed on SNL about
how people will try to shame
you over what you wear. She set
up the punchlines about the
dress with a conversation she
had with megastar comedian
Kevin Hart. The two of them
had worked on a movie last
summer, and Hart took notice of
Haddish’s love of travel.
“Kevin came up to me one day
at work and said: ‘Tiffany, you
been to Thailand, China, Japan.
You went to Florida. You went to
Texas. You went to San
Francisco, Los Angeles, and you
did all that in the same day?’ I
was like, ‘Nah, Kevin, it took me
like two years to go to all those
places.’ ”
To which Hart said, “Really?
RICHARD SHOTWELL/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiffany Haddish arrives at the
Oscars on Sunday. She wore a
different dress later as a
presenter — the same one she
wore on SNL last November.
Because I went on your
Instagram and you was wearing
the same outfit in all those
places.”
People are always trying to
call you out for your frugality.
“That’s what I can’t stand
about the Internet,” Haddish
added. “It’s messing with my
fashion game. I feel like I should
be able to wear what I want,
when I want, however many
times I want, as long as I
Febreezed it. What!”
Love this woman.
Then came the story about
the dress, which Haddish said
her whole team warned her she
couldn’t wear again. Doing so
wouldn’t look good for her
rising status.
“I don’t give a dang about no
taboo,” Haddish said defiantly
during the SNL monologue. “I
spent a lot of money on this
dress. This dress cost way more
than my mortgage. . . . This is a
$4,000 dress. I’m going to wear
this dress multiple times.”
I wanted to ask Haddish
about her commitment to living
below her means. Can she keep
it going in the face of so much
pressure to look the part of a
successful entertainer?
In various interviews and in
her book of personal essays
called “The Last Black Unicorn,”
she candidly (and hilariously)
talks about her financial
struggles, including having to
live in her car. But now that her
star is rising and the money is
coming in, I wanted to know
what strategies she plans to use
to stay financially grounded.
“I’m so sorry, but Tiffany is
slammed and not available for
an interview at this time,” her
representative emailed me.
That’s okay — her actions
speak volumes.
There’s an expectation that
Haddish, as an actress, has to
look the Hollywood part. You
have to wear extravagant gowns.
At awards time, major
entertainers can get designers
to lend them clothes and
jewelry. But there is still the
house, the impressive car and,
of course, the entourage.
Even when you make
millions, you can still go broke.
Just recently, there have been
news reports of a lawsuit
involving Lisa Marie Presley and
her former business manager,
whom Presley has accused of
mishandling her money. The
manager says Presley, the only
child of Elvis Presley, lost her
fortune because of out-ofcontrol spending.
Former managers of Johnny
Depp have said he mismanaged
his money, leading to financial
troubles. Rapper 50 Cent, whose
real name is Curtis James
Jackson III, filed for Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection. Movie
mogul Francis Ford Coppola has
filed for bankruptcy protection
multiple times.
Although wearing the
Alexander McQueen dress is
now part of her shtick, Haddish
continues to talk about
watching her spending. She
loves Groupon and, in fact, has
become a spokeswoman for the
company.
As absurd as it sounds,
Haddish has turned a $4,000
dress into a symbol of
thriftiness. Good for her. So,
ladies, if you say yes to the
dress, wear it multiple times!
michelle.singletary@washpost.com
UnitedHealthcare to pass drug rebates directly to consumers
The move could lower
out-of-pocket costs
for 7 million people
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
In a move likely to help people
in high-deductible health insurance plans who take expensive,
brand-name drugs, the nation’s
largest health insurer announced it will pass on rebates
on prescription drugs directly to
some consumers.
UnitedHealthcare said the policy, which would begin next year,
would lower out-of-pocket costs
for 7 million people enrolled in
fully insured commercial group
benefit plans. Health-care policy
specialists noted that the effects
for individuals covered by those
plans would vary, depending on
which drugs they take, how big
the rebates are and how their
health benefit is structured.
“I think this is a great step in
the right direction. I think patients — particularly those struggling with very high deductibles
and costs associated with prescription drugs or high coinsurance rates associated with very
high-price drugs — stand to
benefit significantly from this
announcement,” said Rena Conti, a health economist at the
University of Chicago.
As people have struggled with
high prices for drugs, including
insulin for diabetes and the lifesaving EpiPen, there has been
heightened scrutiny of the complicated mechanics of drug pricing. Drugmakers set the list prices of drugs but grant secret
rebates to pharmacy benefit
managers who negotiate on behalf of insurers and employers.
Because of the lack of transparency in the industry, a debate
has developed over the extent to
which those rebates are being
passed on to insurers, employers
and consumers, with pharmacy
“I think this is a great
step in the right
direction. I think
patients . . . stand to
benefit significantly
from this
announcement.”
Rena Conti, health economist
at the University of Chicago
benefit managers saying they
produce savings and drug companies arguing that rebates
aren’t trickling down to patients.
The most concern has focused on
consumers in high-deductible
plans, who get stuck paying the
high list price — even though
their plan receives a discount.
Analysts said that other companies were likely to follow the
move, which has been an idea the
Trump administration also has
been exploring as a potential
policy change to Medicare’s prescription drug benefit.
“Today’s announcement by
UnitedHealthcare is a prime example of the type of movement
toward transparency and lower
drug prices for millions of patients that the Trump Administration is championing,” Health
and Human Services Secretary
Alex Azar said in a statement.
The United States’ largest
pharmacy benefit manager, Express Scripts, allows clients to
share rebates with consumers at
the point of sale but has not seen
uptake of the plan design. Ex-
press Scripts negotiates drug
prices on behalf of employers or
insurers, which can choose
whether to pass on rebates or use
those savings to lower premiums
more broadly.
“Most prefer to use the discounts from rebates in other
ways that benefit all of their
members since not all medications are rebated,” spokeswoman
Jennifer Luddy said in an email.
CVS Caremark, another large
pharmacy benefit manager, said
that it provides more than
90 percent of the rebates it negotiates to clients. CVS has offered
an option to pass on rebates at
the point of sale since 2013. At
the moment, about 12 million
members are enrolled in plans
with this kind of benefit design.
“For clients who do not choose
to apply rebates at the point of
sale, they may instead opt to use
rebates to lower overall member
health benefit costs by reducing
deductibles, premiums or co-
pays for all members,” CVS
spokeswoman Christine Cramer
said in an email.
In theory, passing rebates to
consumers could increase premiums for everyone else, but
UnitedHealthcare
spokesman
Matthew Wiggin said that the
company expected a minimal
effect. Conti said that it was not
readily apparent what effect the
change could have on premiums
but was skeptical that it would
have much of an effect.
George Hill, an analyst at RBC
Capital Markets, wrote in a note
that the move was more of a
public-relations feint than a
structural change to how pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs)
work.
“We expect other health plans
to follow suit working with their
PBM partners, and for this news
to have little actual impact (if
any at all) on the PBM space,”
Hill wrote.
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
Mattis, Tillerson warned Trump tariffs could undermine national security
BY D AMIAN P ALETTA
AND J OSH D AWSEY
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis
and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson privately warned senior trade
officials on Tuesday that President
Trump’s proposed tariffs on steel
and aluminum could endanger
the U.S. national security relationship with allies, according to five
people familiar with the meeting.
The morning meeting came as
Republican lawmakers grasped
for a strategy to persuade Trump
to change his mind, with House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (Wis.), who
had loudly criticized the plan on
Monday, telling members in a
closed-door meeting not to bully
Trump on the decision. He said it
could backfire and make things
even worse.
And then on Tuesday evening,
top White House economic adviser Gary Cohn, who had been furiously fighting the tariffs for
months, announced his resignation. His exit will remove the most
vocal critic of Trump’s new trade
agenda from internal debates.
The trio of events showed in
stark fashion how establishment
figures in Washington — national
security leaders, top lawmakers,
the former president of Goldman
Sachs — had suddenly found
themselves in a losing battle with
a small posse of Trump advisers
who have nurtured the president’s
long-running skepticism of foreign trade.
“We are urging caution,” Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) said Tuesday.
The last-ditch efforts to get
Trump to scale back, if not reverse,
the tariffs came after a power
struggle within the White House
where Cohn, Mattis and others
routinely tried to dissuade Trump
from launching what many fear
will be a trade war that could rattle
the world’s largest economies.
Yet the success of other officials,
including White House aide Peter
Navarro and Commerce Secretary
Wilbur Ross, speaks to how
Trump, in his second year in office,
is fighting the constraints that
have held him back from pursuing
some of his most unorthodox positions.
“We’ve been mistreated as a
country for many years, and it’s
just not going to happen any
more,” Trump said at a news conference Tuesday with Swedish
Prime Minister Stefan Lofven.
“When we’re behind on every single country, trade wars aren’t so
bad.”
Trump announced the tariffs
last week, invoking a rarely used
national security provision of
trade law, at a gathering of steel
and aluminum executives who
stand to benefit from the move —
and were secretly brought to the
White House without consulting
Cohn or other top economic officials.
Within two hours, the stock
market fell 400 points.
In one of his last moves before
announcing his resignation, Cohn
had tried to set up a meeting with
executives from companies that
would be harmed by the tariffs,
but Trump blocked the move this
week.
Ross and Navarro didn’t drive
the decision to impose the tariffs,
but they helped Trump craft it in
secret, senior administration officials said, aware that lawmakers
and other top advisers would try
to torpedo any decision if they
found out in advance. Cohn
learned of Trump’s decision hours
after he made it and was furious,
according to five people who
spoke to him.
But Trump had made clear to
advisers that he was sick of lawmakers urging caution. That’s
why he had elevated Navarro, an
economist who believes that China has abused free-trade rules and
destroyed much of the U.S. manufacturing industry, back into his
inner circle. Navarro advised
Trump during the 2016 campaign,
and their views overlapped on the
need for a tougher approach to
trade, particularly with China.
Trump wanted to give him a
senior role in the new White
House last year, making him head
of a newly formed National Trade
Council, but he was effectively demoted by the summer, reporting
to Cohn, National Economic
Council director. He was often
relegated to an obscure floor in
the Eisenhower Executive Office
Building. The National Trade
Council idea fizzled.
Navarro is slight and wiry, a
distance runner who often patrolled the West Wing in a suit and
sneakers with white headphones
in his ears. He would linger outside the Oval Office, advisers said,
looking for a reason to get his
views in with Trump while not
getting caught. He was sometimes
followed inside and chastised by
Rob Porter, the former staff secretary who led the trade process but
resigned after spousal abuse allegations emerged from his exwives.
Cohn is big and exudes confidence, a Wall Street warrior from
Ohio who commands the room.
He has at times waxed and waned
in the West Wing, going from
nearly quitting over Trump’s incendiary comments over protests
in Charlottesville to recently being rumored as a potential chief of
staff replacement.
They engaged in philosophical
and substantive debates, sometimes weekly, with the academic
saying tariffs would revive U.S.
manufacturing, and Cohn leaning
on his experience as a Wall Street
executive to counter that tariffs
would only hurt American consumers and the economy. Cohn
had the direct access to Trump,
and Navarro’s views were rarely
represented in the Oval Office.
Navarro felt his views on trade
were being filtered out of the formal presentations Trump would
receive, people close to him said,
but he persisted and would not
leave the White House. During
weekly meetings in the Roosevelt
Room with Cohn and others, Navarro would allege that others in
the meeting had lost touch with
Trump’s electoral vision and his
promises to manufacturing towns
that were left behind in recent
decades. These comments often
grated on others in the room, and
further polarized Trump’s economic team.
During 2017, Trump was
champing at opportunities to enact protectionist trade decisions,
but he was steered away by Cohn
and a number of other advisers at
almost every turn.
Cohn and Treasury Secretary
Steven Mnuchin had persuaded
Trump to put his trade agenda on
ice while they tried to unify Republicans around their push to
cut taxes. Trump reluctantly
agreed, and the tax law was enacted in late December.
By January, there was little
standing in the way of Trump’s
trade agenda, and a number of
Republicans started getting nervous. On Jan. 22, he imposed tariffs on imported solar panels and
washing machines. Many GOP
lawmakers were mortified. But
those had been agreed to in weekly trade meetings, unlike the tariffs, officials said.
They knew more was coming.
That’s because last year, Trump
ordered Ross to launch a review of
steel and aluminum and see if the
large reliance on imports posed a
national security risk. Ross
launched these reviews, but they
took months as they solicited input from industry experts, labor
groups, and assembled data. The
camps within the Trump administration mobilized early, however.
Cohn told others tariffs would
be incredibly disruptive to the
economy, and Mattis also argued
that there wasn’t a national security case to make for blocking steel
and aluminum imports from U.S.
allies like Canada and Europe.
White House legislative director Marc Short also tried to warn
Trump of the negative blowback,
bringing in a parade of GOP lawmakers who held firm free-trade
views and worried about major
changes like tariffs. Mattis argued
internally that the tariffs did not
have a national security purpose
and would be opposed by allies.
Tillerson was also skeptical of the
need. White House officials told
Trump that Cohn and Navarro
were using faulty information.
Those who opposed the tariffs
were disappointed in Robert E.
Lighthizer, an official involved in
the discussions said, because he
expressed skepticism in private
but usually not in front of the
president. And Jared Kushner, the
president’s son-in-law, did not
work to sway his father-in-law
against the tariffs, senior officials
said.
The president considered the
advice, but said he was skeptical of
economists and their data. He had
promised this sort of policy as a
presidential candidate, and it was
popular with his base. At the time,
Porter, who opposed the tariffs,
told others they would need to
find new ways to sway Trump,
people involved in the debate said.
Almost everyone in the West Wing
was opposed, two White House
officials said.
“I think there’s been an awful
lot of advice,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.). “This president
doesn’t seem to be taking it.”
While a number of advisers
tried to pry Trump away from the
idea of tariffs, Navarro was worried the problem had gotten
worse. The Commerce Department’s national security review
had spooked a number of global
businesses, triggering a surge in
the flow of steel and aluminum
imports into the United States.
U.S. buyers wanted to acquire as
much product as they could before any restrictions were in place.
Trump’s threat of a hard line was
actually making the problem
worse, Navarro warned, according to people familiar with his
argument, and he wanted action
to be taken soon.
Cohn’s grip on the process was
weakening.
In early February, Porter resigned amid domestic-abuse allegations. Porter had helped Cohn
bottleneck Navarro by limiting his
access to Trump.
The Porter scandal engulfed
Chief of Staff John F. Kelly, weakening his standing internally. Kelly hadn’t taken a strong position
on trade policy but did try to
reinforce chains of command
within the West Wing, and this
made it easier for Navarro to work
closely with Trump on designing
the steel and aluminum plan in
secret.
On Feb. 14, the White House’s
late-winter and spring agenda
was rocked by a school shooting in
Florida, an event that appeared to
shift Trump’s focus away from bureaucratic budget battles and
back toward campaign promises
and his legacy.
Two days later, Ross released
the recommendations of his investigation into the national security implications of steel and aluminum imports.
Trump has told advisers he
likes simple policy prescriptions
he can describe to voters, and he
latched on to the option that effectively represented this — big,
across-the-board tariffs on steel
and aluminum imports, regardless of the country of origin.
Navarro again took that argument to Trump last Wednesday
night, unknown to other aides. He
frequently warned Trump, including in a meeting just before Trump
announced the tariffs, that he
needed to be “strong” and deliver
on his promises, a senior White
House official said.
Trump agreed to go forward
with the tariffs. A scramble began.
Then, since the announcement,
Cohn and other officials tried to
persuade Trump to reverse
course. In a senior staff meeting
Monday, the former Goldman
Sachs president said that he could
not support the decision.
On Tuesday, Mattis and Tillerson met with Ross and Lighthizer
to try yet again to change Trump’s
mind.
“In a broad discussion, the secretary raised concerns about tariffs that had been mentioned to
him by some allies, or are likely to
be mentioned,” said Steven Goldstein, the State Department’s undersecretary for public diplomacy
and public affairs.
Tuesday, after another meeting
with Cohn, Trump reiterated at a
news conference that the tariffs
would be installed “lovingly.”
Hours later, Cohn resigned.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
joshua.dawsey@washpost.com
Erica Werner, Mike DeBonis and Dan
Lamothe contributed to this report.
U.S. steelmakers hold their own without Trump’s tariffs
Industry has seen a
fivefold rise in labor
productivity since 1980s
BY S TEVEN M UFSON
AND A NDREW V AN D AM
President Trump’s new proposal to erect a wall — this one a
tariff-fueled steel and aluminum
curtain — masks an inconvenient
truth: The U.S. steel industry has
been holding its own thanks to
advances in productivity and the
spread of cheap natural gas and
gas-fired electricity.
Trump has called his tariffs a
way to halt the slide in U.S. jobs.
Yet the slide in U.S. steelworker
jobs has in large part been the
result of increases in efficiency.
Labor productivity has seen a
fivefold increase since the early
1980s, going from an average of 10
hours of work for each finished
ton of steel to an average of two
hours in 2016, according to the
American Iron and Steel Institute.
Many North American plants
were producing a ton of finished
steel in less than one person-hour,
AISI said.
Thanks to automation, workers
in control rooms operate equipment that used to require hundreds of people. Open vessels that
were once used to melt raw material have been replaced by more
labor- and energy-efficient furnaces.
“The steel producers that survived did so by aggressively increasing physical productivity,”
said Edward “Ned” Hill, a professor of economic development and
urban planning at Ohio State University. “Labor costs are a very
small part of production costs at
this point. When you consider old
pictures of cluttered steel mills,
the level of automation has been
fantastic.”
Trump’s proposed 25 percent
tariff on steel imports wouldn’t
stimulate “massive rehiring because there aren’t that many
plants to fill,” Hill said. He said he
was aware of only one idle plant in
Ohio with equipment still intact.
“You really can’t turn on a valve
and — boom — up comes the steel
plant,” he said.
Hill said it was more likely that
workers at existing plants would
get some overtime pay and that
companies would be able to fatten
up their profit margins.
Still, some economic studies
say hiring gains in the steel industry could be substantial. A
Washington-based
consulting
firm called the Trade Partnership
JOE LAMBERTI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Crane operator Benjamin Ruiz works to move 40,000-pound slit coils at Camden Yards Steel in Camden, N.J. President Trump says his proposed tariffs on steel are a way to
halt the slide in U.S. jobs, but the slide in steelworker jobs has come in part from increases in worker efficiency.
estimates that the Trump tariffs
would create 33,464 jobs in the
iron, steel and aluminum industries.
But the Trade Partnership said
that job losses in other industries
would far outweigh gains in the
steel sector. For every steel job
created, five would be destroyed
in other sectors, resulting in an
overall job loss of nearly
146,000 jobs.
Two-thirds of the job losses
would hit production workers
and those holding positions requiring low skills, the group said.
The surge in shale gas from
fracking is another reason domestic steel plants have been able to
better compete with foreign manufacturers. Over the past decade,
they have changed their fuel mix,
saving money while reducing
greenhouse-gas emissions.
The natural gas boom has dovetailed with changes in the U.S.
steel industry. Steel companies
have switched about two-thirds of
U.S. production away from blast
furnaces producing molten iron
to electric arc furnaces that use
scrap as their main input. In an
electric arc furnace, scrap is melted using electricity.
And thanks to the shale drilling
boom, more and more of that U.S.
electricity is generated by natural
gas, which can also be used directly by steel factories.
According to the Energy Information Administration, the share
of natural gas in the broader manufacturing fuel mix jumped more
than sixfold from 2010 to 2014 and
has jumped far more since. Natural gas has become cheaper than
coal, and in combustion it emits
about half the greenhouse gases.
This is important in helping
U.S. firms compete with China,
which was first described as the
main target of Trump’s tariffs.
China’s steel sector has flooded
the world with excess capacity.
Chinese steel accounts for about
6 percent of U.S. steel imports, but
China has contributed to a global
glut that has affected prices and
markets worldwide. Its capacity is
eight times that of the next biggest producer, Japan.
Chinese steel plants have benefited and continue to benefit
from cheap capital, sweetheart
loans and the protection of provincial authorities who want to
keep workers on steel payrolls.
Often the steel firms have not paid
for the land they occupy.
“The simple fact is that a great
deal of investment in China is not
conducted on a commercial basis,” said Thomas Rawski, an
economist specializing in China
at the University of Pittsburgh.
“And that is certainly true
in steel.”
However, while China’s steel
industry was nurtured in part by
cheap energy costs in the 1990s
and 2000s, the Chinese govern-
ment has been steadily raising
those costs. Now Chinese industry pays about 50 percent more for
electricity than manufacturers in
the United States, according to
Rawski.
The Chinese government has
also launched campaigns to reduce capacity in steel and other
industries.
The International Monetary
Fund in its periodic review of
China’s economy — known as an
Article IV review — said that the
government was cutting the number of steelworkers, but the overall capacity remained roughly
the same.
“China’s protracted excess capacity has contributed to downward pressure on global prices,
rising market share for Chinese
firms, and tensions with key trading partners,” the IMF said.
But China, which sells mostly
to its own domestic market, poses
a smaller threat than it once did.
David Fickling, a columnist for
Bloomberg News, wrote: “The
thing that China’s steelmakers
care much more about is their
domestic market, which consumes about half of the world’s
steel and has been doing rather
well of late.”
The U.S. steel industry today
looks nothing like it did in
the high-employment, high-wage
glory days that the tariffs are
designed to resurrect.
America’s steelmakers have
pivoted toward “minimills,” more
flexible, often smaller operations
that process scrap and other materials without the overhead of a
full steelworks.
This new, more energyefficient and automated model —
which currently exports steel to
Canada and Mexico — might not
need a tariff wall to make America
great again.
steven.mufson@washpost.com
andrew.vandam@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
SU
Cohn’s influence in White House was waning
COHN FROM A1
Last week, communications director Hope Hicks resigned. In
February, staff secretary Rob Porter was forced out over domestic
abuse allegations. That followed
the departures of deputy national
security adviser Dina Powell and
Cohn’s deputy on the National
Economic Council, Jeremy Katz.
Taken together, the departures
diminish the White House faction
of free trade advocates who hold
more traditional views on economics and more closely align
with Republican leaders in Congress.
Cohn plans to stay in his job for
several weeks and continue to
push back on Trump’s planned
tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, which have threatened to
touch off a global trade war, said a
person who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss
Cohn’s plans.
But Cohn’s influence on the
president has clearly eroded. In
the past week, Trump has said he
will impose tariffs that will hit
imports from Canada, Germany,
Mexico, Britain, Turkey, South Korea and a range of other countries,
threatening to escalate the penalties if any nation dares to retaliate.
This came after Cohn spent
months trying to steer Trump
away from tariffs and trade wars.
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
also lobbied against the tariffs.
But they were eventually outmaneuvered by Commerce Secretary
Wilbur Ross, trade adviser Peter
Navarro and ultimately Trump
himself.
Financial markets reacted negatively to Cohn’s announcement,
with Dow futures diving immediately afterward.
“It has been an honor to serve
my country and enact pro-growth
economic policies to benefit the
American people, in particular
the passage of historic tax reform,” Cohn said in a statement. “I
am grateful to the President for
giving me this opportunity and
wish him and the Administration
great success in the future.”
Trump said in a statement:
“Gary has been my chief economic
adviser and did a superb job in
driving our agenda, helping to
deliver historic tax cuts and reforms and unleashing the American economy once again. He is a
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Gary Cohn, director of the National Economic Council, had always
planned on leaving the post in early 2018, people said, but became
infuriated by the president’s recent shift toward protectionism.
rare talent, and I thank him for his
dedicated service to the American
people.”
Cohn was seen as an unconventional pick to lead Trump’s economic team because he was a
Democrat from Goldman Sachs, a
bank Trump had pilloried during
the campaign.
Trump admired Cohn as a
wealthy titan of Wall Street, but
the two men had an on-again,
off-again relationship — which
was nearly severed in August after
the deadly white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville. After privately seething over Trump’s claim
that “both sides” were responsible
for the violence, Cohn voiced his
criticism publicly in an interview
with the Financial Times that was
interpreted as a rebuke of his boss.
But Trump and Cohn repaired
their relationship during last fall’s
push for tax cuts, which became
the administration’s first major
legislative accomplishment.
The president could cast a wide
net in searching for a replacement, though he has told advisers
that he wants to consider Larry
Kudlow, a media personality and
2016 campaign adviser, according
to several people briefed on
Trump’s discussions.
In many ways, Cohn’s National
Economic Council was one of the
most stable parts of the White
House, avoiding the scandals and
revolving-door image that the National Security Council and other
offices endured.
Cohn’s departure rattled a
number of business executives
around the country, many of
whom saw the Wall Street veteran
as a free-market capitalist who
would speak out against those
who wanted to pick fights with
global trading partners.
“The protectionists are clearly
running the show right now, the
economic nationalists are,” said
Brian Gardner, managing director of Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, an
investment banking firm. “If they
replaced [Cohn] with another
economic nationalist, then it really gets dicey for the markets and
investors.”
Kudlow has been largely supportive of Trump’s economic
agenda, but he has expressed concerns about the president’s moves
on trade. He has in recent days
encouraged Cohn to stay. Reached
by phone Tuesday, Kudlow declined to comment.
Cohn’s departure was first reported by the New York Times and
immediately confirmed by White
House officials.
“The protectionists are
clearly running the
show right now.”
Brian Gardner, managing director of
Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, an
investment banking firm
Cohn had first discussed with
Trump the possibility of departing
the White House in January, a
person familiar with the conversation said, having always had the
goal of staying in the Trump administration for about a year. He
agreed to join Trump at economic
meetings in Davos, Switzerland,
and then help with the State of the
Union address. An infrastructure
plan Cohn had spent months trying to design was supposed to be
the focus of the early part of this
year, but it has been repeatedly
sidelined, first for a debate about
immigration policy and then by
last month’s mass shooting at a
Florida high school.
It was Cohn and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin who
helped persuade Trump to postpone ripping up trade agreements
or imposing tariffs late last year to
avoid enraging congressional Republicans during the tax debate.
“I was quite impressed with the
job he did,” said Steve Moore, who
was an economic adviser to
Trump during the 2016 campaign.
“I don’t always admit I was wrong,
but I was wrong about Gary. He
was very valuable to Trump. He
was a steadying hand.”
Cohn was not expected to stay
long into 2018, but he did outlast
the first wave of departures in
January and February. The stock
market soared in 2017 in part because of global growth but also
because of investor enthusiasm
about Trump’s deregulatory agenda and focus on tax cuts, items
that Cohn helped design.
But people close to Cohn said
he found the pivot toward protectionism this year infuriating, and
he wouldn’t force himself to go
out in public and defend it. Cohn
did not attend Trump’s news conference Tuesday, something he
typically does.
“He was a voice of reason and
sanity on economic policy, so I
think a lot of people valued his
presence and the grounding that
he brought to the White House,”
said Lanhee Chen, a Republican
policy expert and a fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.
Cohn made a last-ditch effort
Monday to schedule a meeting for
Trump with companies that
would be harmed by new steel and
aluminum tariffs, but the White
House refused to schedule the
meeting for the president.
At the center of the West Wing
drama has been a president who
aides say is not easily controlled
and whose dark moods of late
have manifested themselves in
private fits of rage as well as policy
gyrations.
Trump has chosen to manage
his White House as he did his real
estate empire, as well as the casts
of his hit reality television show
“The Apprentice” — by fostering
chaos. At a Tuesday afternoon
news conference, just two hours
before Cohn’s resignation was announced, Trump defended his
management style.
“I like conflict,” the president
said. “I like having two people
with different points of view, and I
certainly have that. And then I
make a decision. But I like watching it. I like seeing it. And I think
it’s the best way to go.”
Trump went on to argue that
his White House is a talent magnet, even though Chief of Staff
John F. Kelly has struggled to
recruit experienced candidates
for top-level jobs in the administration.
“I read where, oh, gee, maybe
people don’t want to work for
Trump,” the president said. “Believe me, everybody wants to work
in the White House. They all want
a piece of that Oval Office. They
want a piece of the West Wing.
And not only in terms of, it looks
great on their résumé. It’s just a
great place to work. It’s got tremendous energy. It’s tough.”
Trump on Tuesday morning
previewed future firings. “I still
have some people that I want to
change (always seeking perfection),” he wrote in a tweet.
But asked at the news conference who he had in mind — and
whether he was looking to fire
Attorney General Jeff Sessions,
with whom he has feuded bitterly
for months — Trump would not
say.
“I don’t really want to talk
about that,” the president said. He
added: “There will be people that
change. They always change.
Sometimes they want to go out
and do something else. But they
all want to be in the White House.
So many people want to come in. I
have a choice of anybody.”
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
peter.whorisky@washpost.com
Ashley Parker, Heather Long and Josh
Dawsey contributed to this report.
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
HUY MACH/ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A worker at U.S. Steel’s Granite City, Ill., plant in 2015. The plant closed on a “temporary” basis that year and did not reopen. “I expect to
get the call to start this plant up immediately,” steelworker Dan Simmons in response to President Trump’s announcement of a steel tariff.
facturing, a nonprofit organization that supports factory workers, and an estimated 52,000
American workers in the industry have lost their jobs in the
same period.
That’s why he supports
Trump’s goal. “I just want to get
this over the finish line,” Paul
said.
In 2000, 105 companies produced raw steel at 144 plants in
the United States, according to a
recent report from the Department of Commerce. Today, 39
firms make steel in 93 plants.
“This is a critical issue for
steelworkers who have been really pummeled by imports,” Paul
said. “They’ve been struggling in
an economy that is otherwise
growing.”
Automation is also at fault.
Tasks that used to take 10 hours
for steelworkers in the 1980s can
now be completed in two, allowing plants to produce more goods
with fewer people, according to
the American Iron and Steel Institute, a trade group in the
District.
Some groups argue that tariffs
would not reverse technologydriven disruption but could carry
unintended consequences.
The Trade Partnership, a consultancy in the District, estimated in a study published Monday
that tariffs would boost iron and
steel jobs in the United States by
33,464 positions but slash
179,334 other jobs in the broader
economy.
Other experts say the tariffs
could put even more jobs at risk.
“Even if tariffs save every one
of the 140,000 or so steel jobs in
America, it puts at risk 5 million
manufacturing and related jobs
in industries that use steel,” conservative pundit Larry Kudlow
wrote in a CNBC column Saturday with economists Arthur Laffer and Stephen Moore. “These
producers now have to compete
in hypercompetitive international markets using steel that is
20 percent above the world
price.”
Meanwhile, Trump has asserted that tariffs would lift American factories.
“You will have protection for
the first time in a long while, and
you’re going to regrow your industries,” he said Thursday when
he unveiled the plan at the White
House.
Simmons, the Illinois steel-
P ETER W HORISKEY
worker, thought this week of the
workers at his U.S. Steel plant
who have struggled to find work
elsewhere.
“I have grown men who are
proud steelworkers — they’re in
tears, crying up here in my office,” the union leader said.
“They’re too proud to take handouts from people in our community.”
Since the plant closed, Simmons has focused on connecting
people to food pantries and helping them sign up for unemployment benefits. A surge in demand
for American-made products, he
thought, could reverse their fortunes — and quickly.
“But I’ve heard this administration say things,” he said, “and
not follow through.”
damian.paletta@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
Jobs recovered could number in the tens of thousands, but analysts say adverse effects would touch millions of other workers
BY
BY
The United Nations panel enforcing trade sanctions against
North Korea has been hacked
repeatedly by a “nation-state actor,” compromising the email accounts of four current or former
members of the panel and a “considerable number” of email messages, according to a U.N. incident report.
The Washington Post reviewed
a heavily redacted draft of a forthcoming report from the U.N. Panel
of Experts that includes the U.N.
account of the attack, elements of
which had been previously reported.
The documents do not disclose
the nature of the information the
hackers acquired. But members of
the panel routinely review secret
intelligence analyses of the smuggling operations propping up the
regime of leader Kim Jong Un.
North Korea smuggles goods
into and out of the country to
evade the U.N. sanctions, which
limit trade and are aimed at undermining the North Korean
economy and halting the country’s nuclear weapons efforts. The
panel’s work is aimed at identifying the smuggling so that it may
be stopped.
“The panel continues to be targeted by a sophisticated hacking
campaign,” according to the U.N.
report, expected to be released
this month.
North Koreans have been implicated in numerous hacks
around the globe, but the redacted version of the account of the
incident does not identify the nation-state behind the attack.
A report this month from FireEye, a California-based cybersecurity firm, described a North Korean
cyberespionage
group
known as APT37 (Reaper) that
appears to be working on behalf of
the North Korean government.
Among its targets was an entity
associated with the U.N. missions
on sanctions and human rights.
John Hultquist, director of intelligence analyses at FireEye,
cautioned that he has no information directly linking the attack on
the U.N. panel to APT37.
But “on several occasions,
we’ve seen countries leverage
their cyberespionage capabilities
to surveil organizations and people who are involved in sanctions,”
Hultquist said. “We’ve been tracking this group for a few years now.
Their targeting is overwhelmingly focused on North Korean interests — on defectors, on sanctions
and on organizations involved in
the reunification of Korea.
They’ve also made mistakes that
allowed us to see their Internet
addresses — in North Korea.”
It can be difficult to identify the
source of hacks, however. For example, U.S. intelligence officials
say that a hack at the Olympics in
PyeongChang, South Korea, was
conducted by Russian military
spies but was disguised to appear
as if it had been perpetrated by
North Korea. North Korean officials have previously denied hacking the U.N. group.
The report gives a fuller sense
of the extent of the cyberattacks
against the United Nations than
was previously available.
In May, Reuters reported that
an email alert at the United Nations said that hackers had
breached the computer of one of
the panel members and that
“hackers have very detailed insight into the panel’s current investigations structure and working methods.” And in a footnote to
a September report, the U.N.
group said that persistent hacking
had “hampered the ability of the
Panel to report on the implementation of sanctions.”
The new information in the
report identifies the hackers as a
“professionally operating” group
from a nation-state and provides
details regarding their methods
and the extent of the attack.
The U.N. incident report also
indicates that the attack appears
to have begun with a tactic known
as “spear phishing.” Victims received forged email messages
with file attachments. Those attachments were made to appear
like legitimate documents, according to the report, making it
more likely that recipients would
open the files — and expose them
to risk.
The panel members were using
Microsoft’s Office 365 software,
and after an investigation by
Microsoft, the company reported
to the U.N. that it associated the
attack with a “nation-state.”
“The incident resulted in the
compromise of four email accounts of current or former members of the DPRK panel,” according to the report. “A considerable
number of email messages had
been forwarded to external accounts that were presumably created for this specific purpose.”
Trump’s steel tariff delights some, frightens others
Dan Simmons believes President Trump’s plan to slap hefty
tariffs on steel imports could save
his plant.
The U.S. Steel mill in Granite
City, Ill., closed in 2015 — a move
the company called “temporary”
at the time and blamed on foreign competition. But the blast
furnace that once employed
about 1,800 people is still cold.
If Trump’s tariff takes hold,
however: “I expect to get the call
to start this plant up immediately,” said Simmons, who
worked there for nearly 40 years
and heads the United Steelworkers Local 1899.
He felt optimistic last week
after Trump announced a plan to
impose a tariff of 25 percent on
imported steel (and 10 percent on
aluminum).
Some of his union comrades in
Canada, however, condemned
the proposal.
“This is going to cause chaos,”
said Gary Howe, president of the
United Steelworkers Local 1005
in Hamilton, a city in Ontario
that produces more than half of
Canada’s steel. “A lot of steel goes
back and forth, and automakers
depend on that.”
The international union,
which represents 1.2 million
members in North America, with
about a third in Canada, has
urged Trump to leave Canada out
of the trade war that the president said on Twitter could be
easily won.
“Canadian steel exports are
part of deeply integrated supply
chains for U.S. products,” United
Steelworkers national director
Ken Neumann said in a statement last week. “Imposing tariffs
on Canadian exports risks causing significant economic harm
and job losses on both sides of
our border.”
The tension between union
members comes as steelworkers
in the United States have seen
their ranks shrink, in part because of cheaper imports from
Canada, Brazil, South Korea and
Mexico.
Ten U.S. steel furnaces have
been closed in the last two decades, said Scott Paul, president of
the Alliance for American Manu-
U.N. report
details hacking
of North Korea
sanctions panel
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
Rules crackdown imperils some D.C. students’ graduation
signed the letter. They also called
on the chancellor to create alternative school schedules for students who have legitimate reasons for not being at school each
day.
“Students were appalled they
didn’t know what was going on,”
said junior Jahara Abubaker, who
helped write the letter.
Junior Kevin Hernandez said
his cousin, a senior at Roosevelt,
will have to go to summer school
if he wants to graduate — a reality
that has caused tension in the
family.
“Just like we’re held accountable — my cousin has to go to
summer school — adults should
be held accountable,” Hernandez
said. “It’s a two-way street.”
Benjamin Korn, a Wilson High
senior who co-edits the student
newspaper, said administrators
did little to inform students of the
attendance rules.
He said the introduction of
more stringent enforcement of
the policy complicated the college application process for some
students because the school delayed the release of second-term
report cards while it verified that
attendance and grading policies
were followed.
“It’s such a major policy
change coming halfway through
the year,” Korn said. “It’s really
unheard of.”
The school system released
midyear data last week showing
that the graduation rate is expected to decline in 2018 — a
sharp reversal for a system that
has boasted seven consecutive
years of increases. According to
the data, 42 percent of seniors
attending traditional public
schools are on track to graduate,
while 19 percent are considered
“moderately off-track,” meaning
they could still earn enough credits for a diploma.
Even if all of the students who
are “moderately off-track” get diplomas, the graduation rate this
year would still dip below last
year, when it stood at 73 percent.
“Students are what we need to
focus on,” D.C. Council member
Trayon White Sr. (D-Ward 8) said.
“We need to figure out a way to
wrap our arms around the children so they can get a good
education and have the community support.”
Students and teachers acknowledged that the culture
around attendance needs to
change, but they said administrators cannot expect it to change
overnight.
“It’s impossible to change a
culture in three weeks,” Chisholm
said. “And that’s what central
office has tried to do.”
TRUANCY FROM A1
30 unexcused absences in a
course would automatically result in a failing grade. He has
eight older brothers who graduated from the school, and they
also did not realize that such a
policy existed, he said.
Since middle school, Kelly
said, every academic term had
played out the same way: Teenagers would miss class, complete
makeup work and pass. That is
changing.
Kelly said he and his friends
think the school’s attendance policy is reasonable. But they object
to the sudden enforcement and
believe the city should have waited until at least next year to adopt
the tougher policy.
“Students are getting penalized for having this mind-set, but
they got this mind-set from
school,” said Kelly, who does not
have attendance issues and hopes
to attend college on a track
scholarship.
Deneke said she was informed
by administrators near the end of
the second term that she had
been tardy too many times and
could fail her D.C. history class —
which is required to graduate — if
she did not get her absences
excused.
She got lucky; the late arrivals
were excused. Other students,
she and classmates said, are discovering they will not receive
their diplomas. They want city
leaders to realize that it is students who stand to face the steepest consequences over the graduation scandal and the stricter
enforcement of standards for receiving a diploma.
“I feel really bad for the Class
of 2018,” said Darrell Watson, a
longtime music teacher at Ballou
High School, epicenter of the
graduation scandal. “They are
working really hard. It’s almost
like they are putting all the
weight on their shoulders and are
trying to prove a point.”
Latisha Chisholm, the specialeducation
coordinator
at
Anacostia High, said that over the
past month, she and other
educators have had difficult
conversations with students who
no longer stand a chance of
graduating in June, because they
have already accrued 30 absences
— the number that leads to failing
a class. In her job, Chisholm says,
she endeavors to help students
come up with solutions to
problems they face, but this time,
there is little she can do to help
some students reach the
graduation stage on time.
Many of these truant students
have stopped coming to class or
have been disruptive in school,
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
From left, D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser; Antwan Wilson, then the schools chancellor; and State Superintendent of Education
Hanseul Kang talk in January about the probe into graduations that led to enhanced attention to attendance requirements.
knowing that even if they complete their work, they will not
receive their diplomas on time,
Chisholm said.
She and other Anacostia staff
members are rushing to connect
with the families of children who
have more than 20 absences to
ensure they know they will flunk
out if they reach 30 unexcused
absences.
“They are being blindsided by
this new crackdown of old rules
they had no clue about,” Chisholm said. “For the students who
already have gotten 30 absences,
it feels like there is nothing they
can do, so there is a feeling of
hopelessness among teachers
and students.”
The school system is hosting
events at high schools through
March to make sure parents and
students understand attendance
and graduation policies and
know what resources are available. D.C. schools spokeswoman
Kristina Saccone said that more
sections of core classes will be
added for students needing to
retake them to graduate. Students who cannot meet the requirements in time will receive
guidance if they want to enroll in
summer classes or alternative
high schools.
The investigation of the gradu-
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Darrell Wilson, a graduate of Ballou High School in
Southeast Washington and now a music teacher at the
school, says, “I feel really bad for the Class of 2018. They
are working really hard.”
ation issue concluded that the
District’s schools are plagued by a
culture that encourages educators to hand out diplomas to meet
lofty graduation goals even if that
means giving a high school degree to a student who missed half
the academic year.
After the findings were released, Antwan Wilson, who was
schools chancellor, vowed that
stricter adherence to graduation
rules would take effect before the
Class of 2018 graduates.
“Are you telling me that they
Seniors “are being
blindsided by this
new crackdown
of old rules they
had no clue about.”
Latisha Chisholm,
special-education coordinator
at Anacostia High School
didn’t know they were supposed
to go to school?” Wilson said at a
news conference last month, before he was swept up in a different scandal and forced to resign
after he skirted school system
rules to transfer his daughter to a
sought-after school. “They know
that they are supposed to go to
school. You can have an attendance issue and not miss 30 periods of a class.”
The Roosevelt students say it is
more complicated than that.
They are frustrated their
school may have graduated some
of their peers unprepared for
college and the workforce. But
they also are angry that the
school system never sought student input as officials started
more rigorously enforcing graduation rules midyear. They fear
that no one truly understands the
policies and that motivated students with difficulties at home
that prevent them from showing
up for school will be penalized for
the school system’s failures.
Roosevelt students wrote a
petition to school administrators
calling on them to delay enforcement of the attendance rules and
lamenting that school leaders
had also been unaware of attendance policies — or ignored them.
Dozens of juniors and seniors
perry.stein@washpost.com
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6700
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2728.12
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371.37
5170.23
12,113.87
7146.75
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0.2
0.4
5962.44
4066.57
30,510.73
21,417.76
1.1
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–15%
0%
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3M Co
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233.66
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348.92
153.75
113.65
44.29
43.93
70.79
76.18
14.64
266.93
181.64
155.72
50.71
0.4
–0.6
–0.1
–1.1
1.7
0.4
–0.5
0.1
1.6
–0.1
1.5
1.4
–0.1
–0.8
1.9
–0.7
–3.3
4.4
18.3
–2.4
–9.2
15.6
–4.3
–0.6
–8.9
–16.1
4.8
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1.5
9.9
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
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P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
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WalMart
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226.18
48.89
121.06
89.06
104.94
–1.2
0.1
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0.3
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–0.7
1.3
–0.1
–1.0
0.4
–0.7
–1.0
1.5
–8.2
7.7
–12.2
–3.5
9.1
4.3
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4.2
3.2
2.6
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6.2
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US $
US $ per
EU € per
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Japan ¥
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Canada $
1.2406
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0.0533
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1.1196
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0.6258
0.0430
147.4850
33.0746
82.4370
5.6644
0.2243
0.5590
0.0384
0.8061
Japan ¥ per 106.1900
131.7300
Britain £ per
0.7200
0.8932
0.0068
Brazil R$ per
3.2109
3.9831
0.0302
4.4575
Canada $ per
1.2881
1.5979
0.0121
1.7891
0.4012
Mexico $ per
18.7467
23.2566
0.1770
26.0368
5.8410
Mexico $
2.4915
0.1713
0.0687
14.5531
Index
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DJ Total Stock Market Index 28,237.63
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CBOE Volatility (VIX)
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YTD % Chg
2.0
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66.3
Daily
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$3.1590
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$62.60
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$2.75
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$1.4245
$16.78
$10.7475
$0.1345
$5.0700
+1.5
+2.3
–0.3
–0.8
–0.4
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
0.4
1.3
0.4
0.2
–0.2
–0.2
1.2
0.6
2.4
Gainers
American Public Edu
Cardtronics PLC
Analogic Corp
Genworth Financial
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MiMedx Group Inc
Daily
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$40.15
$26.77
$93.90
$3.22
$25.71
$41.76
$12.82
$7.92
$15.63
$18.61
$11.75
$7.88
$19.41
$105.60
$10.00
$22.64
$18.50
$37.00
$88.45
$8.21
13.3
11.4
10.5
10.3
10.1
9.7
8.4
7.9
7.7
7.5
7.3
6.8
6.5
6.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
5.9
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Losers
Progress Software
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$24.90
$98.09
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$35.40
$54.70
$19.18
$93.41
$48.75
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$32.10
–7.6
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–5.9
–5.0
–5.0
–4.8
–4.6
–4.5
–4.5
–4.0
–3.9
–3.6
–3.5
–3.5
–3.5
–3.4
–3.2
–3.1
–3.1
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7200
2300
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.30
0.52
0.80
1.60
3.34
5.86
4.50%
4.34%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
2.03%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.77%
10-year note
Yield: 2.88
2-year note
Yield: 2.25
5-year note
Yield: 2.65
6-month bill
Yield: 1.87
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.62%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
SU
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Patience pays off for Peter Navarro, the protectionist hawk in the White House
After being
marginalized
inside the White
House over the
JAMES
past year, Peter K.
HOHMANN
Navarro has been
taking a public victory lap to
celebrate his success at
persuading President Trump to
announce tariffs on steel and
aluminum imports.
As rivals in the West Wing
maneuver to defuse a looming
trade war — thus far to no avail
— Trump’s most protectionist
adviser is celebrating what he
sees as his greatest achievement.
Navarro, the director of the
White House’s Office of Trade
and Manufacturing Policy, has
become ubiquitous on television
since last week, in appearances
that have been at turns
triumphal and testy. His
outspoken bluntness has quickly
turned him into one of the
biggest lightning rods in
Washington.
Navarro, 68, is a professor
emeritus at the business school
at the University of California at
Irvine. After getting sidelined
and effectively demoted by White
House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly
this past fall, many advisers
might have looked for other jobs.
But Navarro had nowhere else he
wanted to go. So he stuck it out.
Now he’s back in the room where
it happens.
Conservative economists,
business executives and
Republican elites who support
free trade hate him for that, and
they now speak of Navarro as a
boogeyman.
In a signal of just how much
juice Navarro now has, several
GOP leaders on Capitol Hill have
attacked him by name. “[Trump]
has got a few days to think this
through. And I think he will. But
I totally disagreed with that one
staffer down there who is, in my
opinion, misleading the
president,” Sen. Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah), chairman of the Senate
Finance Committee, told
reporters. “Navarro should know
better.”
For conservatives who have
embraced Trump, it’s politically
safer to blame Navarro over
Trump for the tariffs they hate.
They risk less backlash from the
president that way. These tariffs
are completely consistent with
everything Trump said on the
campaign trail, but many
The Daily
202
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump’s trade adviser, Peter K. Navarro, center, and senior presidential adviser Jared
Kushner greet legislators before a meeting in the White House early last month.
Republicans who know better
have been pretending the past
few days that this is something
the president just dreamed up
after talking to Navarro.
In that way, Navarro is playing
the role on trade that Stephen
Miller did on immigration: the
hard-liner who is seen by
outsiders as enabling and egging
on Trump’s most nativist and
nationalistic instincts. Miller
took much of the blame last
month when Trump decided to
torpedo a bipartisan
compromise that could have
protected the young
undocumented immigrants
know as “dreamers” and secured
funding for a border wall
because the deal didn’t reduce
the levels of legal immigration.
Guests on CNBC speculated in
alarmed tones about Navarro’s
influence over Trump and what it
might mean for the stock market.
Canada’s most widely read
newspaper, the Globe and Mail,
called Navarro “Ottawa’s worst
nightmare”: “In the stiff-headed
Navarro world view, free-trade
talk is globaloney. Canadian
officials have long shuddered at
the nativist creed of the wiry and
abrasive 68-year-old. And with
good reason.”
Stateside, prominent
economic voices on the right
suggest that he may be up to
something even more sinister.
“Navarro may well want to
undermine the entire global
trading system — including the
World Trade Organization and
global supply chains — that has
led to postwar peace and
prosperity, and brought
hundreds of millions of our
fellow humans out of deep
poverty,” writes James
Pethokoukis, an economic policy
analyst at the American
Enterprise Institute. “They are
nationalists who may be willing
to tolerate a poorer, more insular
America in the name of greater
sovereignty and less economic
disruption.”
“It’s easy to cry ‘MAGA!’ and
let slip the dogs of trade war;
much harder to put them back
into the kennel before a lot of
people get mauled,” conservative
columnist Max Boot writes in
The Washington Post.
Just as he’s become a villain in
the eyes of the establishment,
Navarro has earned hero status
among some of the president’s
core loyalists. Breitbart News has
portrayed him as a heroic figure
who is helping Trump keep his
promises. Appearing on
Breitbart’s satellite radio show
As more terrorists turn to ‘lone wolf’
attacks, TSA looks to new strategies
BY
over the weekend, Navarro
attacked the “hair on fire”
reaction to the tariffs as the
“biggest bunch of horse-puckey
that you can imagine.”
Some senior White House
aides have persisted in trying to
persuade the president to
reconsider the tariffs, even as
their colleagues labor over the
legal work needed to implement
them. Trump hasn’t been
swayed by the
counterarguments — at least not
yet.
It has seemed at times as
though Navarro is trying to box
the president in with various
public comments that present
the decisions as essentially
finalized. He said Sunday that
Trump won’t exclude even close
allies from the levies.
But there are signs the
persuasion campaign will persist
until the final details are
unveiled. Gary Cohn, who
opposed the tariffs and
announced his resignation as
director of the National
Economic Council on Tuesday,
had summoned executives from
top U.S. companies that depend
on aluminum and steel to meet
with Trump at the White House
on Thursday.
Navarro’s reemergence is a
testament to the value of
longevity and staying power in
Trump’s orbit. The survivors who
can stick it out long enough often
wind up near the top of the pile.
During the chaotic first few
weeks of the administration,
Navarro was often seen at
Trump’s side. But he was
marginalized over time as the
globalists, corporatists and more
traditional conservatives in the
West Wing found their footing
and worked together to sideline
him.
Navarro suffered several
public humiliations this fall
when Kelly reorganized the
White House economics team to
place him under Cohn.
Trump decided three weeks
ago to reverse such moves.
Navarro is now in the process of
being formally promoted from
“deputy assistant” to “assistant to
the president,” which puts him at
the rank of Cohn. A White House
spokeswoman on economic
issues did not respond to
questions about Navarro’s role.
Several of Navarro’s TV
appearances have become
contentious, and he has
appeared to enjoy mixing it up
with his interlocutors. On
Sunday, Navarro criticized the
media for saying the president
was launching a trade war. “I
think what we need to do here is
keep the rhetoric down,” he said
on “Fox News Sunday” when
asked about threats of
retaliation. “It would be helpful if
the media didn’t have all these
crazy headlines about trade
wars.”
Host Chris Wallace noted that
Trump had tweeted that “trade
wars are good, and easy to win.”
“The talk of trade wars is not
an invention of the media,”
Wallace said.
“You guys are fanning flames
here,” Navarro said.
“I’m fanning the flames?”
Wallace replied. “I didn’t write
the presidential tweet!”
One reason Navarro might
enjoy being on TV is that most of
his peers in the economics field
do not take him seriously.
Art Laffer, of “Laffer curve”
fame, said on Fox Business on
Monday that he hopes Trump
doesn’t mean what he says and is
only talking tough to extract
concessions in negotiations.
Asked for reaction to Navarro’s
insistence on the network earlier
in the day that tariffs are good for
U.S. workers, Laffer, who was an
economic adviser to President
Ronald Reagan, replied firmly: “I
don’t agree with him on that.”
Navarro wound up in this spot
partly because of serendipity. “At
one point during the campaign,
when Trump wanted to speak
more substantively about China,
he gave [Jared] Kushner a
summary of his views and then
asked him to do some research,”
Washington Post reporter Sarah
Ellison wrote for Vanity Fair last
year. “Kushner simply went on
Amazon, where he was struck by
the title of one book, ‘Death by
China,’ co-authored by Peter
Navarro. He cold-called
Navarro . . . who agreed to join
the team as an economic adviser.
(When he joined, Navarro was in
fact the campaign’s only
economic adviser.)”
The book was turned into a
movie the following year. “The
best jobs program is trade reform
with China,” Navarro says in the
film, which was narrated by
Martin Sheen (a.k.a. President
Josiah Bartlet on TV’s “The West
Wing”).
It is one of more than a dozen
books Navarro has published.
Another, from 2001, was titled:
“If It’s Raining in Brazil, Buy
Starbucks: The Investor’s Guide
to Profiting From News and
Other Market-Moving Events.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/
news/powerpost
KITCHENS | BATHS | ADDITIONS
Remodeling
Seminar
A SHLEY H ALSEY III
The face of terrorism has
evolved from the coordinated,
carefully plotted events of 9/11 to a
helter-skelter approach where
lone wolves use low-tech means to
attack soft targets, according to
one of the officials charged with
keeping the traveling public safe.
“We face ambitious adversaries
who are continuously looking for a
point of attack and waiting for us
to slip up,” Transportation Security Administration chief David
Pekoske said in remarks prepared
for delivery at George Washington
University on Wednesday.
Adapting his agency to grapple
with solo operators who may
claim allegiance to a cause without having genuine connections to
a terrorist group has been Pekoske’s focus since taking over as
head of the TSA in August.
“Today we are confronted by a
current of less-sophisticated techniques and tactics, where lone
wolves, radicalized on the Internet, are using inexpensive, lowtech methods to target civilians,”
Pekoske said, describing his vision
of an increasing need to be nimble
in response to threats.
The emergence of vehicles
plowing into crowds in London,
Barcelona and Nice, France, in
acts of terrorism has underscored
the public’s vulnerability. Three
U.S. incidents in the past 18
months — on the Ohio State University campus, during a whitenationalist demonstration in
Charlottesville and in New York
City — have demonstrated that
terrorists in the United States
have embraced the use of vehicles
as weapons.
The public face of the 60,000member TSA is at airport security
checkpoints, but the agency’s
mandate is to protect all modes of
transportation against attacks,
monitoring rail stations, transit
systems and bus terminals.
A January 2017 attack taught
the TSA another lesson when an
arriving passenger in the airport
in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., picked up
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
Transportation Security Administration head David Pekoske, seen
in January, warned of the rise of “inexpensive, low-tech” terrorism.
a checked bag, loaded a handgun
in the adjacent restroom, and
emerged to shoot and kill five people and wound six more.
In an attack almost a year earlier in the Brussels Airport, suicide
bombers exploded devices in the
unsecured check-in lines, killing
more than 20 passengers headed
for flights.
“We can no longer focus only on
preventing the bad guys from getting into the secure area of an
airport,” Pekoske said in the prepared remarks. “We must focus on
both sides of the checkpoint and in
the public areas where airport and
surface transportation systems intersect.”
Behind the scenes, the agency
also maintains a worldwide intelligence network coordinated with
other federal agencies, including
the FBI, the CIA and the National
Security Agency.
That intelligence capacity was
nurtured under two previous TSA
administrators — Peter V. Neffenger and former FBI deputy director John S. Pistole — and Pekoske said he would continue to rely
on the intelligence apparatus in
shaping the TSA’s strategies.
“When our adversaries evolve,
they concede that we have been
successful today and that they
have not given up on attacking us
tomorrow,” Pekoske said.
Terrorism expert Brian Michael
Jenkins, who advises the Rand
Corp. and co-wrote “The Long
Shadow of 9/11: America’s Response to Terrorism,” said it is
difficult to explain why the United
States has not seen the sort of
terrorist attacks Europe has experienced.
“The question as to why something hasn’t happened is harder to
answer than why something has,”
he said in an interview last year.
“We’re actually living in comparatively tranquil times [in the United States]. We haven’t seen anything up to the level of Madrid or
London or Brussels.”
Jenkins said that the chance of
falling victim to terrorism in the
United States is slender but that
each attack has the effect desired
by the terrorist.
“When you look at the odds of
being a victim of terrorism, you’re
talking about lottery odds,” he
said. “You’re put in a situation of
apprehension. The message is that
nowhere is safe. It has a tremendous psychological effect. That’s
what terrorism is all about.”
ashley.halsey@washpost.com
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Lunch and Q&A to follow all seminars.
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Awards aren’t proof of innocence
EDITORIALS
‘Maximum pressure’ bears fruit
Now Mr. Trump should seek, cautiously, to pursue talks with North Korea.
T
a position it reiterated as recently as last Saturday.
If North Korea is indeed ready to talk, most likely
its aims are short-term and tactical: to win an easing
of international sanctions and renewed economic
concessions from South Korea, or to drive a wedge
between the allies. In past rounds of negotiations,
beginning in 2005, Pyongyang promised steps
toward denuclearization, then reneged once it had
obtained economic relief. Remarkably, Mr. Kim reportedly accepted in talks with a South Korean
delegation over the weekend that upcoming
U.S.-South Korean military exercises would go forward. But most analysts believe the regime’s ultimate
aim is to force a U.S. withdrawal from South Korea.
The reported offer nevertheless provides an opening that Mr. Trump should seek to exploit. It indicates
that the tough new sanctions the administration
succeeded in pushing through the U.N. Security Council, and that it applied on its own, have put real
pressure on the regime. Even if talks led only to a
sustained suspension of what has been an unprecedented sequence of North Korean nuclear and mis-
Don’t wait for the
White House
sile tests — which have brought the regime to the brink
of deploying a nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missile capable of striking the United States — that
would be progress. For the United States, the challenge would be achieving that more stable status quo
without prematurely relieving pressure on the regime.
It’s not clear whether the Trump administration is
ready for this diplomatic challenge. Its expectations
for talks, at least as publicly expressed, are unrealistic: It’s unlikely the Kim regime will ever agree to fully
denuclearize, or even to take the verifiable steps
toward denuclearization that the administration has
demanded. It doesn’t help that Mr. Trump does not
have a Korea team in place: no ambassador to South
Korea; no confirmed State Department assistant
secretary in the region; no special envoy. A good first
step in response to Tuesday’s developments would be
for Mr. Trump to fill those jobs with seasoned experts.
Then he should set them to work devising a serious
and pragmatic strategy for engaging with the Kim
regime — without sacrificing, for now, “maximum
pressure.”
TOM TOLES
It was with admiration that I read the Feb. 28
Metro article “Would-be citizens get a boost in
Arlington.” It is no secret that immigration has
been and continues to be a hot-button issue. Much
of the rhetoric surrounding immigration and
potential reform is dichotomized: There is the “us,”
the legal citizens of the United States, and the
“them,” the foreign others whom President Trump’s
proposed wall would obstruct. Needless to say, this
rhetoric has proved divisive.
The unnamed Arlingtonian who created the
scholarship fund to assist immigrants intending to
take the U.S. citizenship exam is emblematic of a
break in the “us” and “them” dichotomy. This
woman represents a restoration of “we,” and it is a
restoration that more Americans ought to work to
bring about. Too often, the topic of illegal immigration diverts attention from the immigrants seeking
naturalization legally. The immigrants at the center
of this article are among those working tirelessly to
acquire citizenship by U.S. standards. The scholarship fund is an example of how Americans can and
should help immigrants in their communities and
how America can reinstate the language and
thinking of a collective “we.”
Rachel Narozniak, Washington
A
Food as a tool for peace
The same can be said about legislation banning
bump stocks — devices made notorious by the Las
Vegas gunman who used them to kill 58 people in the
country’s deadliest mass shooting in the modern era.
It is time for Congress to act on these most modest
of reforms — and to tackle more ambitious and
needed changes. A recent Politico-Morning Consult
poll showed that 88 percent of Americans now
support universal background checks, 81 percent
think a person should be at least 21 to buy a gun,
70 percent favor a ban on high-capacity magazines
and 68 percent think assault-style weapons should
be banned. If Congress continues to ignore the
public’s clamor for reasonable gun-control legislation, voters should use the upcoming midterm
elections to reiterate the message.
Who knew what?
The investigation into how Mr. Wilson’s family bypassed the school system lottery should be a top priority.
T
HE MOST remarkable aspect of former D.C.
Public Schools chancellor Antwan Wilson’s
latest version of the events that led to his
ouster is not his new claim about Mayor
Muriel E. Bowser’s (D) complicity. No, what’s most
striking is Mr. Wilson’s claim that he did nothing
wrong when his daughter bypassed the system’s
competitive lottery to transfer to one of the city’s
most desirable high schools — even though the
transfer violated a rule that Mr. Wilson himself had
promulgated only months before.
In his first interview since his ouster, Mr. Wilson
said he had not asked for any special treatment in
seeking a change in schools for his daughter last
September. “I just want people to know that I tried to
follow the rules,” he told Post reporters Perry Stein
and Peter Jamison. In fact, city rules — established
by Mr. Wilson last June to quell an uproar over
well-connected parents bypassing the lottery —
specifically state that the discretionary transfer
process is not available for a student whose parent or
guardian is a current or former public official. “DCPS
will deny the request immediately without further
consideration,” reads Chancellor’s Directive #103.
Mr. Wilson’s apparent lack of awareness of what
constitutes special treatment and his refusal to take
responsibility for his own actions are damning.
Nonetheless, his explosive (if belated) claim that
the mayor knew and had no objections to plans to
transfer his daughter from Duke Ellington School
for the Arts, where she was unhappy, must be
investigated. Ms. Bowser has vehemently denied any
suggestion she was aware or approved of a break in
policy. She has said she learned of the matter on
Feb. 12 when D.C. Inspector General Daniel W. Lucas
informed her office that his office was looking into
the circumstances of the assignment of Mr. Wilson’s
daughter to Woodrow Wilson High School, one of
the city’s best, with a waiting list of more than
600 students.
“Absolutely not,” Ms. Bowser said when we asked
her if she gave either affirmative or implicit consent
to the transfer. She told us she does not believe
Mr. Wilson told her about his daughter attending
Wilson High but said she couldn’t completely rule
out the possibility that he might have made an
offhand reference to it. Administration officials say
they have been consistent in their explanation of
events and that Mr. Wilson never raised the mayor’s
alleged knowledge as a defense for his actions. He
went public with his claim after signing a separation
agreement that gives him $140,000, half of his salary.
The D.C. Council said it plans to hold a hearing on
this matter, but Ms. Bowser said she doesn’t plan to
testify because it’s likely to be a “political circus” and
she believes the inspector general, with whom she
and her administration are cooperating, is better
positioned to get to the bottom of things. With the
mayor’s credibility under challenge in an election
year, the inspector general should report to the
public as expeditiously as possible. Key to that effort
will be hearing from former deputy mayor Jennifer
C. Niles, who also was forced to resign for her role in
facilitating the transfer and who has declined to
comment on the events. We urge the inspector
general to give this matter top priority because the
longer questions linger, the harder it will be to focus
attention on the crucial work of school improvement.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Time for Republicans to be on the right side of history
The March 3 Metro article “Gun debate in Va.
House gets fiery, halts session” offered such vivid
descriptions and ample quotations from floor speeches that I felt as if I were there in the House of
Delegates. I fully expected someone to pull out a cane
and re-create Rep. Preston Brooks’s (D-S.C.) attack on
Sen. Charles Sumner (R-Mass.) in the U.S. Senate in
1856.
Del. Nicholas J. “Nick” Freitas’s (R-Culpeper)
fraught references to the Democratic Party’s past
support of segregation needed no rebuttal. It is a
historical fact.
Perhaps now that Mr. Freitas has collected his wits,
he will consider another historical fact. The Democratic Party recognized its mistakes and came to
reject its racist past, just as the Republican Party, such
I graduated from the magnet program at Montgomery Blair High School 12 years ago, but I have
clear memories of seeing, hearing and experiencing
the sexually inappropriate behavior described in the
March 2 front-page article “Hundreds say renowned
teacher harassed girls.”
The article documented that this behavior went
on openly and brazenly for multiple decades, with
multiple complaints to administrators, seemingly
without consequence. In response to allegations
from hundreds of alumni, the teacher at the center of
this, Eric Walstein, asked, “How can I be the best
teacher and be a sexual harasser at the same time?” A
variation of this question has been asked countless
times in conversations around the #MeToo movement, but it overlooks a simple yet uncomfortable
truth: External markers of professional success and
inappropriate behavior — sexual or otherwise — are
in no way mutually exclusive.
Being an award-winning math teacher, a decorated film producer or an elected official does not serve
as proof of innocence against accusations of harassment and abuse, and may in fact create a greater
potential for abuse of power. I have been fortunate to
know many wonderful educators, in the magnet
program and beyond, and I unequivocally believe
that the truly “best” teachers are those who support,
respect and inspire their students, regardless of
awards and recognition, without resorting to sexualization and intimidation.
Moving forward, school administrators should
look beyond teachers’ professional accolades and
listen to the voices of accusers the first time they
speak up — not several decades too late.
Rose Feinberg, Durham, N.C.
A shining example
GOP leaders should listen to the
public on gun control.
CTION ON gun-control legislation has
stalled in Congress as Republican leaders
try to get some sense of what President
Trump might support. We have a better
idea. Rather than trying to decipher signals from a
president who changes his mind by the hour,
lawmakers should listen to the public they are
elected to represent. Its message in the aftermath of
last month’s fatal shooting at Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School has been clear: It’s time to end
the decades-long stalemate on gun control and
enact laws to keep guns from falling into the wrong
hands.
A number of bipartisan bills have been introduced, including to bolster the national system of
background checks, but debate was slowed after
Mr. Trump’s shifting stances last week created
confusion. At various points, Mr. Trump embraced
arming teachers, strengthening background checks,
raising the minimum age for gun purchases and
forgoing due process to seize weapons from mentally disturbed people. After Mr. Trump met privately
with the National Rifle Association — and tweeted
how “Good (Great)” it went — the White House
hedged support on universal background checks
and the minimum age. “I think the president is
trying to have it both ways,” Sen. Chris Murphy
(D-Conn.) said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week” about
Mr. Trump trying to appeal to public sentiment
while still appeasing the NRA, which helped underwrite his presidential campaign.
Mr. Murphy is among the co-sponsors, along with
Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.), of a bill that would bring
improvements to the National Instant Criminal
Background Check System (NICS). The bill, which
also enjoys bipartisan support in the House, was
introduced after last year’s mass shooting in a rural
Texas church showed breakdowns in information
being fed to the system. The bill essentially strengthens existing law, and passage should be a no-brainer.
MARCH 7 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
HE SOUTH KOREAN government on Tuesday announced an apparent diplomatic
breakthrough with North Korea: agreement
by the government of Kim Jong Un to discuss
dismantlement of its nuclear program with the United States, and to suspend further warhead and missile tests while talks continue. If confirmed by the
Pyongyang regime, the shift of position would mark a
success for the Trump administration’s policy of
applying “maximum pressure” to North Korea and
open the possibility of a needed reduction of tensions
on the Korean Peninsula. The question is whether
President Trump is prepared to capitalize on the
opportunity.
Mr. Trump greeted the South Korean announcement appropriately: positively, but with caution. He
spoke of “possible progress” while saying the United
States “is ready to go hard in either direction.” The
surprising announcement by the dovish South Korean
government of Moon Jae-in still must be vetted; the
Kim regime has not publicly confirmed what would be
a reversal of its refusal to discuss its nuclear program,
. WEDNESDAY,
as it is, has the opportunity now to reject its devil’s
pact with the National Rifle Association and move us
forward toward reasonable gun control, including
banning assault-style weapons and expanding background checks. In the mid-20th century, people saw
just how indefensible Jim Crow laws were by watching their enforcement on TV with police, fire hoses
and dogs. In the 21st century, we see real-time
streaming of the latest school massacre. How will we
react to what we see this time?
As a longtime citizen of the commonwealth of
Virginia, I call on Del. Thomas C. Wright Jr. (RLunenburg) and his Republican colleagues to stop
killing gun-control bills and let them come to the floor
for debate and votes. What are they afraid of?
Cathy Clary, Afton, Va.
News pages:
MARTIN BARON
Executive Editor
CAMERON BARR
Managing Editor
EMILIO GARCIA-RUIZ
Managing Editor
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Regarding the Feb. 28 news article “Aid delivery
fails during cease-fire in Syria”:
President Trump and Congress need to keep the
pressure on Russia and Syrian President Bashar
al-Assad to allow humanitarian aid for all Syrian
civilians.
But the United States must also fund humanitarian
relief so aid will continue. The funding for the
U.S. Agency for International Development’s Food for
Peace program is way too low considering the humanitarian emergency in Syria and many other countries.
Yemen, Somalia and northeast Nigeria are all on the
brink of famine. Ethiopia and others also are in
desperate need of food aid.
Congress should increase Food for Peace funding
to at least $3 billion a year, from nearly $1.5 billion last
fiscal year. Funding for the McGovern-Dole global
school lunch program should be raised to at least
$300 million a year, from $201 million last fiscal year.
We need to provide school meals to hungry children
everywhere.
After World War II, we responded to the hunger
crisis overseas by increasing food aid. Today we must
do the same. Food is the most important tool for peace
and stability.
William Lambers, Cincinnati
The writer partnered with the U.N. World Food
Program on the book “Ending World Hunger.”
Which decision was political?
I completely disagreed with Megan McArdle’s
March 4 op-ed, “When companies go political.” I see
Delta Air Lines dropping its National Rifle Association discount as a nonpolitical correction to a
previous decision that was fundamentally political.
The NRA is an organization that has pumped
millions of dollars into our elections, giving it an
unreasonable degree of political power.
Giving NRA members a discount is the action that
should be deemed political.
Katherine Benjamin, Garrett Park
Hypersensitive liberals
Regarding Christine Emba’s March 3 op-ed,
“Twitter is sick. The prognosis is grim”:
Twitter’s solicitation of solutions rings hollow for
one simple reason. Twitter chief executive Jack
Dorsey is a liberal, and liberals don’t see themselves
as ideological, merely as correct. Any disagreement
on the smallest minutiae of policy is hate speech.
Any statement that runs counter to the narrative is
hate speech. “Openness and civility” mean that
liberals will be free to say whatever they wish, and
the audience is obliged to accept and acquiesce. Any
skepticism will be an “assault on their humanity.”
Liberalism is neatly summed up by Noam
Chomsky’s warning about public debate: “The
smart way to keep people passive and obedient is to
strictly limit the spectrum of acceptable opinion,
but allow very lively debate within that spectrum.” Openness and civility are antithetical. They
weren’t always, but liberals’ hypersensitivity has
made them so.
Michael Vann, Alexandria
Letters and Local Opinions: letters@washpost.com
Op-eds: oped@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
KATHLEEN PARKER
DAVID IGNATIUS
Secure the schools
We ignore
Russia at our
own peril
A
t least they’re doing something,
which is about the most one can
say about Florida’s proposed
gun bill.
But doing something and doing something effective are very different animals.
State legislators, under pressure to
“do something” following the murders of
14 students and three faculty members
at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School in Parkland Fla., cobbled together a bill that likely wouldn’t do much
good.
Though hearts are in the right place,
minds are still limited by politics and
hobbled by haste. Democrats want
more; Republicans want less.
As passed by the state Senate on
Monday, the bill raises the minimum age
to buy a gun from 18 to 21. While this is a
sensible move for myriad reasons and,
indeed, might have made a difference in
the Parkland case (the alleged shooter
was 19 and bought his weapon legally),
many similar killers have used guns they
didn’t personally buy. Even so, the age
change, as well as a three-day waiting
period and a provision for greater
resources for mental health, surely can’t
hurt.
To predictable arguments that
18-year-olds in the military are permitted to carry serious artillery: We should
never confuse the requirements of combat with the ordinary demands of civilian life. Under my dictatorship, we
would permanently reset the official age
of adulthood to 21, which, by most
conventional markers of adulthood, is
generous in its assumptions. To the
pertinent point, most school shooters
are under age 20.
Florida’s state senators did not restrict the sale of assault-style weapons,
despite the fact that 62 percent of
Floridians polled say they would support
such a ban. Instead, the legislators endorsed perhaps the dumbest idea ever to
tumble from a U.S. president’s lips. The
bill from the Republican-majority Senate picked up the armed-teacher challenge and proposed arming certain
teachers — including coaches, teachers
who are current or former law enforcement officers, members of the military
and teachers in a Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps program. Other
classroom teachers would not be allowed to participate in this all-volunteer,
school-days militia.
At least we’re no longer trying to
imagine Miss Crabtree dropping her
algebra textbook and reaching for the
Glock in her Spanx waistband. In mak-
ing his pitch, President Trump suggested
that if someone like, say, retired fourstar Gen. John F. Kelly were a teacher,
parents might like for him to have a gun.
Yes, and I’m thinking that when field
generals start teaching math in Miami,
I’ll put on my Mary Poppins dress, grab
my flying umbrella and a basket of daisy
cutters, and report for duty.
Any combat veteran will tell you that
you don’t know how you’ll react to
enemy fire until you do. Even the bravest
sharpshooter may be no match for the
overwhelming power of weaponized insanity. How likely is it that a coach, no
matter how brave, would prevail over a
19-year-old with “issues” and a semiautomatic weapon? You’ll find your answer
in the armed deputy who decided not to
enter the Parkland school.
The real concern, of course, is crossfire — the child straggler wandering the
halls, the unintended consequences in a
pop-up war. We’re not talking about a
Hollywood SWAT team. We’re talking
about a man or woman in direct combat,
probably with an inferior weapon.
And God forbid a school employee
should accidentally kill a child.
This possibility alone should be sufficient to dissuade legislators from engineering potentially worse scenarios. At
best, it seems, we should limit any armed
personnel to legitimate, third-party operators with extensive training and field
experience. Let them bear the burdens of
terror and the liability of error.
Andrew Pollack, whose precious
daughter was shot nine times at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas, has argued convincingly that lawmakers should focus first
on securing the schools — and bicker
about guns later. Rambo-ing the perimeter is only part of the fix. Whither the
fob?
Here in Washington, everyone passes
through some level of security during
the course of a day. Such is life in a target
zone. My apartment building has few
exterior doors and none are accessible
without a security fob. To reach my
office, I have to pass through three
checkpoints using a personalized security badge. Most retailers now have a
serious-looking security presence.
Given recent history, schools should
be treated as target zones, too, and
security starts at the door. Converting
schools to secure institutions will be
costly and time-consuming. But,
realistically, what choice do we have? If
maximum security is good enough for
Washington, surely it’s good enough for
our children.
kathleenparker@washpost.com
DANA MILBANK
A third rail made of steel
W
hat would it take for Republicans to turn against
Donald Trump?
Now, finally, we know.
For nearly three years, Republican
lawmakers have stood with Trump,
offering only isolated protest, through
all manner of outrage. Disparaging
Mexican
immigrants.
Videotaped
boasts about sexually assaulting women. Alleging that his predecessor put a
wiretap on him. Falsely claiming massive voter fraud. Racism directed at a
federal judge. The firing of James B.
Comey. Talk of women bleeding. A
payoff to a porn actress over an alleged
affair. A defense of white supremacists
in Charlottesville. Support for Senate
candidate Roy Moore despite allegations of child molestation. The guilty
pleas of Michael Flynn, George Papadopoulos and Rick Gates and the indictment of Paul Manafort. The botched
travel ban and bungled repeal of
Obamacare. Insulting Britain and other
allies. Attacks on the FBI and judiciary
and attempts to fire the attorney general. Talk of African “shithole” countries.
Questions about his mental stability.
The lethargic hurricane response in
Puerto Rico. The stream of staff firings
and resignations and personal and
ethical scandals, most recently Tuesday’s finding that Kellyanne Conway
twice violated the Hatch Act.
Republican lawmakers were, by and
large, okay with all that. But now Trump
has at last gone too far. He has proposed
tariffs on foreign steel and aluminum.
And the Republican Party is in an
all-out revolt.
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (Wis.)
fielded four questions at a news conference Tuesday morning and answered
the same way four times: with a warning about the “unintended consequences” of Trump’s proposed tariffs.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) spoke Tuesday afternoon
of “a high level of concern” and fear that
“this could metastasize into a larger
trade war.”
The No. 2 Senate Republican, John
Cornyn (Tex.), warned about “jeopardizing the economy.”
Sen. Orrin Hatch (Utah), usually a
Trump cheerleader, warned that it
would be a “real mistake.”
House Ways and Means Committee
Chairman Kevin Brady (Tex.) urged
Trump to “weigh carefully” what he’s
doing.
Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) suggested a
“scalpel not a sledgehammer.”
Rep. Kevin Yoder (Kan.), at a hearing
Tuesday, warned Treasury Secretary
Steven Mnuchin that “retaliatory measures are already occurring.”
Rep. Jackie Walorski (Ind.) wrote to
Trump to say a manufacturer in her
district called off an expansion because
of the threatened tariffs.
Sen. Lamar Alexander (Tenn.) went
to the Senate floor to warn that “tariffs
are big taxes” and said a company in
Tennessee suspended a planned expansion because of the tariff threat. He read
into the record a Wall Street Journal
editorial calling the tariffs Trump’s
“biggest policy blunder.”
The Republican criticism poured
forth, from Sens. Mike Lee (Utah),
Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.) and Rand Paul
(Ky.), from Reps. David Young (Iowa),
Thomas Massie (Ky.) and Cathy
McMorris Rodgers (Wash.), and even
from new Fed Chairman Jerome H.
Powell.
And it isn’t just criticism. GOP
lawmakers are considering action, even
though options are limited: attempting
to block the tariffs with veto-proof
legislation or as part of a must-pass bill,
or denying Trump fast-track trade
negotiating authority when it comes up
for renewal. Republicans have nudged
Trump in their direction before, on
taxes and immigration. But never
before has there been a full-scale
rebellion.
The conventional analysis is that
Republican lawmakers bend to Trump
because he has the support of the party’s
base. But that calculus does not apply
here. The base is with Trump — a Pew
Research Center poll last year found
only 36 percent of Republicans have a
positive view of trade agreements — but
lawmakers are defying him anyway.
This, then, shows the extent to which
the congressional GOP, despite Trump’s
populist talk, has been a wholly owned
subsidiary of corporate America under
Trump. Republicans are with Trump
most of the time (that is, when he is
cutting regulations and taxes on corporations and the wealthy) but against
him on the rare occasions he is opposed
by industry, or at least all industry that
doesn’t make steel and aluminum.
These lawmakers know where their
bread is buttered, and they must keep
corporate contributors happy. Perhaps
they also recognize that the economy is
in a precarious state. Trump himself
called it a bubble, and that bubble has
been pumped up further with
debt-financed tax cuts and spending
stimulus. A trade war, or even a trade
skirmish, could be most deflating.
This is why Republican lawmakers
look the other way when presented with
Trump’s alleged sexual misconduct, racial provocations, conflicts of interest,
cowboy diplomacy and assaults on the
rule of law. But slapping a tariff on
foreign metals? That crosses the line.
Twitter: @Milbank
I
have to offer. So, when you consider the
breadth of Mueller’s subpoena, it is easy to
think the investigation is overreaching.
Mueller’s subpoena appears to ask for
several years of “records of any kind”
pertaining to President Trump and nine
other individuals — many of whom are
either no longer working in the White
House or never joined the administration
to begin with. By any measure, the subpoena seems to be overly broad.
Nunberg seems personally tormented.
Mueller’s pursuit of him suggests that
there is no limit to what he or the
partisans working for him will do next.
There are hundreds of Trump campaign
staffers, volunteers and contributors in
closer proximity to the campaign than
Nunberg ever was.
I’ve been pretty sympathetic to the
Mueller probe, and I remain respectful of
Mueller himself, but this is puzzling.
Mueller’s latest move means either he is
wrapping up his investigation but taking
an unnecessarily harsh look at a few
remaining players — or else he has nothing on Trump and is grasping at straws.
Mueller must be aware of how the appearance of his pursuit of Nunberg diminishes
the overall credibility of his investigation.
n his chilling account of the
Romanov dynasty, the British historian Simon Sebag Montefiore quoted
Pyotr Stolypin, who was interior
minister for Nicholas II, the last of the
czars: “In Russia, nothing is more dangerous than the appearance of weakness.”
Montefiore explained that during the
300-plus years of Romanov rule, power
had been an instrument not simply of
governing but of survival, too. He cited
the aphorism of the French writer
Madame de Stael: “In Russia, the government is autocracy tempered by strangulation.”
President Vladimir Putin embodies
this Russian paranoid ethic, never more
than during his belligerent March 1
speech boasting of a new generation of
“invincible” nuclear-powered missiles
and super-fast torpedoes. Putin’s address
included video mock-ups of new cruise
missiles that were so hokey, they would
embarrass a Hollywood studio.
What should Americans make of
Putin’s speech and the policy challenge it
implicitly poses for the United States?
Some analysts were quick to discount
Putin’s military claims as fanciful. The
new Russian technologies he described
were already well-known to U.S. intelligence agencies, analysts said.
The speech was obviously a message to
Washington, but one with several layers
of meaning. On its face, it was meant to
frighten and intimidate; but on that
level, it surely failed. The United States
has vast military power to deter Russia,
including new weapons systems that are
at least a match for what Putin described.
On a deeper level, Putin’s speech was a
plea for attention by a leader who sees
himself avenging his nation’s humiliation after the collapse of the Soviet
Union. Despite Putin’s wounded,
chip-on-the-shoulder
posture,
this
struck me as the core of his address, and
worth a well-considered response.
The crux of Putin’s argument is that
Russia was ignored during its years of
weakness and is only taken seriously now
because it looks threatening. Putin recounted that before he took power, “the
military equipment of the Russian army
was becoming obsolete, and the armed
forces were in a sorry state.” With the
collapse of the Soviet Union, he said, “the
nation had lost 23.8 percent of its territory, 48.5 percent of its population,
41 percent of its gross domestic product
and 44.6 percent of its military capability.
“Nobody really wanted to talk to us
about the core of the problem [of the
nuclear-weapons balance], and nobody
wanted to listen to us. So listen now,” he
demanded.
Putin is a bully, but a predictable one.
He has been advertising his desire to
restore Russia’s lost glory since he became president in 2000. Last month’s
indictment by special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III of 13 Russians and three
companies for interfering in the
2016 presidential election describes an
organization, the Internet Research
Agency, that, according to other accounts, field-tested Putin’s Internet manipulation techniques in 2014 in Ukraine
before deploying them in America. To
manage these covert actions, Putin
turned to a billionaire oligarch pal,
Yevgeniy Prigozhin, who also helped
organize Russian mercenaries in Syria.
Ukraine has been Putin’s laboratory.
Oleksandr Danylyuk, the chairman of the
Center for Defense Reforms in Ukraine,
warned in a 2016 paper for the Naval
Postgraduate School that Russia has
“been carrying out not only information
operations but also other clandestine
and special operations against Ukraine
for more than a decade.” His conclusion:
“Russia is not preparing for war with the
West; the war is already being actively
conducted — on Russia’s terms.”
Just because Putin proposes renewed
discussions with the United States, that
doesn’t mean it is a bad idea. Israel, Saudi
Arabia, Japan and India all have serious
dialogue with Russia about key foreign-policy issues, but the United States
does not. That’s a mistake, especially
now.
It was unwise, for example, for the
United States to suddenly cancel talks on
cybersecurity that had been planned for
late February with a 17-member Russian
team headed by Putin’s cyberadviser,
Andrei Krutskikh. The Russians responded by canceling planned discussions about strategic stability. The two
countries’ militaries continue to have
daily “deconfliction” consultations in the
congested battlespace of the Middle
East, but the dialogue should be broader.
This barren Russian-American landscape is a perverse consequence of
Putin’s attempts to meddle in U.S. politics and foster the candidate who kept
proclaiming what a great guy the Russian leader was, and how much he
wanted a rapprochement. Paradoxically,
President Trump’s election has made
dialogue with Russia politically toxic,
and arms control has all but disappeared
from the U.S. agenda.
“In an autocracy, the traits of character
are magnified; everything personal is
political,” wrote Montefiore about the
Romanovs. Putin is inescapable. The U.S.
military will counter Putin’s death-star
weapons, but in the meantime, American
diplomacy needs to open better channels. Ignoring Russia may be good politics, but it is bad policy.
— Ed Rogers
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
KCNA/REUTERS
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang on Feb. 13.
DAVID VON DREHLE
Why Kim Jong Un
is talking peace
S
ay what you will about Little
Rocket Man. North Korean
dictator Kim Jong Un is the
chief thief of a family-run
kleptocracy. Like his father and
grandfather, he’ll starve his own
people to get what he wants. Torture
and murder are preferred tools of
statecraft.
But he ain’t stupid.
With the announcement of a
summit between North and South
Korean leaders as a possible prelude
to talks with the Trump administration, Kim has maneuvered within
view of a victory his forefathers only
dreamed of: membership in the
world community, on North Korea’s
terms. Many things can still go
wrong. But his path forward seems
pretty clear.
Step one is his rapidly advancing
rapprochement with South Korea.
The collapse last year of the conservative government in Seoul produced a new South Korean president, Moon Jae-in, who favors better relations with North Korea. Kim
responded by rushing to complete
testing of his intercontinental ballistic missile in time for an ostentatious peace overture tied to the
Winter Olympics near the demilitarized zone.
That led, in turn, to a rare visit by
emissaries of the South Korean
president to Pyongyang. They returned to Seoul on Tuesday with
plans for the late-April meeting —
and what appears to be Kim’s next
gambit. According to Moon’s national security director, the North
Koreans offered a moratorium on
further nuclear and missile tests in
exchange for “heart-to-heart” talks
with the United States. The Kim
regime also dangled the idea of
giving up its nukes entirely if North
Korea’s safety and sovereignty are
guaranteed.
“We will see what happens,” President Trump tweeted, with commendable caution. As he weighs his
options, he’s sure to hear from critics of new talks between Washington and Pyongyang. Many of them
will cite the example of Lucy van
Pelt and Charlie Brown’s football.
The Kim family has a long track
record of promising changes, then
snatching them away.
But it’s hard to see that Trump
has much choice. The alternative to
dangling carrots of safety and sovereignty is to wield the military stick,
but this particular stick is in South
Korea. Swinging it requires help
from our allies on the front lines. Yet
Seoul is not on board.
Kim appears to understand that
the United States can hardly expose
South Korea to a potentially apocalyptic war without support from
Moon. To do so would court disaster
diplomatically, economically and
militarily.
Thus Kim’s thaw with South Korea will likely lead to new talks
eventually. When that happens, at
least three important facts will be
materially different from the last
time Lucy got the ball.
First, North Korea’s nukes are an
accomplished reality, no longer a
possibility to be averted. As appalling as it is to acknowledge this,
Kim’s negotiating position is much
stronger now. He can aim for a
lasting settlement rather than temporary breathing room.
Second, Kim has in neighboring
China a model for his own future.
His family has always believed that
modernization threatens their grip
on power, so they sealed it out,
making theirs a Hermit Kingdom.
But Xi Jinping, the Chinese premier,
is attempting to prove that economic liberalization can coexist
with political dictatorship. Kim may
conclude that he can maintain power without utterly isolating his
country.
Third, Kim has on the horizon a
prospect for greater security than
ever before. It looks like this:
Vladimir Putin is champing at the
bit to build a natural gas pipeline
through North Korea to supply the
energy-hungry dynamo to the
south. America’s fracking revolution has put tremendous pressure
on Russia’s state-owned Gazprom to
find new customers for piped gas,
which is cheaper than U.S. gas that
must be liquefied for oceanic shipping. South Korea is an especially
tantalizing market.
Putin was sidetracked by Kim’s
decision to weaponize his nuclear
capability, and the international
sanctions that followed. But if talks
with the United States clear away
the most severe restrictions, Putin’s
pipeline project will surely be resurrected. And if completed, the pipeline will constitute a major strategic
Russian asset running right
through the middle of North Korea
— enough insurance against a U.S.
attack that Kim could afford to
mothball his own nukes to shelter
under the Russian umbrella.
These facts point to a possible
solution of the nuclear standoff.
Further provocation gains Kim
nothing. But his past outrages have
put him in a new position, potentially able to turn the page.
On the other hand, the prospect
of a normalized North Korea underlines the longer-term challenge
for the United States. Would
de-escalation erode the rationale
for American bases in the south?
China and Russia would certainly
be happy to see us leave. And happiest of all would be Kim Jong Un —
reckless, dangerous, ruthless Kim —
the madman who just might be
crazy like a fox.
david.vondrehle@washpost.com
POSTPARTISAN
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
Mueller’s puzzling move
On Monday, breathless reports of former
Trump campaign hand Sam Nunberg’s
media spasm obsessed political Washington. Nunberg was an on-and-off political
adviser to Donald Trump, but his role with
the campaign came to a complete end in
August 2015. The relationship ended badly, but everybody moved on. As I understand it from people who were there at the
time, Nunberg never had a defined role.
The only thing that makes Nunberg significant today is that he is now the focus of
some part of the Mueller investigation.
It is difficult to imagine at this late date
what possible information Nunberg could
have that is relevant to special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III’s probe. That tends to
confirm some of the worst suspicions
many have about the investigation: in
particular, that the people Mueller has
hired — several of whom have contributed
to Hillary Clinton and other Democratic
candidates, or represented Democrats —
have a free hand to go after Republicans
no matter how peripheral to the campaign
or to Mueller’s original charter.
No one I have talked to who was
associated with the Trump campaign and
knew Nunberg can fathom what he might
A20
EZ
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MAKE MARCH
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
MARYLAND
OBITUARIES
You’ve heard of Katharine
Graham. Here’s the story
of another D.C. publisher
from the Watergate era. B3
The parents of Annie
McCann, who died of
“Bactine poisoning,” press
Hogan to intervene. B3
Russ Solomon founded
Tower Records, a billiondollar business doomed
by digital downloads. B5
Northam’s GOP bonds, bargaining skills tested in Medicaid talks Md. court
reverses
‘I love the guy,’ one Va.
Republican says, but will
database
friendships bring results?
‘mistake’
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Democrats determined to expand Medicaid
cooked up a plan to flip a Republican in Virginia’s closely divided
state Senate. They’d take one of
Sen. William M. Stanley Jr.’s bills,
aimed at reviving a shuttered
hospital in his struggling rural
district, and hold it hostage until
the Republican got on board.
But one Democrat, a longtime
friend of Stanley’s, was so bothered by the hardball tactic that he
tipped him off and then persuaded fellow Democrats to approve
the bill. To top it off, Stanley’s pal
whisked him from Richmond to
the North Carolina border, and
there, on the grounds of defunct
Patrick County Hospital, signed
the Republican’s bill into law.
Gov. Ralph Northam (D) is a
pretty good guy, it seems, to have
for a friend.
“Here he was — first week as
governor — comforting me, and
saying, ‘Buddy, don’t worry. I’m
with ya, I’m with ya,’ ” Stanley
said. “He didn’t have to spend
that kind of political capital. . . .
So I love the guy.”
The gesture is all the more
stunning because Northam ran
on the promise that he would
expand Medicaid to about
400,000 uninsured Virginians.
It’s his top priority in the legislative session that ends Saturday.
And it will be the first big test of
his young governorship, in a fight
that could crescendo amid budg-
et negotiations this week.
Northam has lots of friends in
Virginia’s GOP-controlled General Assembly, where the former
senator and lieutenant governor
worked so well across the aisle
that Republicans once wooed him
to join their party. Particularly in
the Senate, where the mild-manNORTHAM CONTINUED ON B8
BOB BROWN/RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH/AP
Gov. Ralph Northam faces the
first big test of his tenure as he
pushes for his top priority of
Medicaid expansion with a
GOP-controlled legislature.
POLICE NAMES WILL
AGAIN BE INCLUDED
Panel’s head says change
had unintended results
BY
A NN E . M ARIMOW
Maryland’s highest court voted
unanimously Tuesday to restore
the names of police officers to a
statewide database of court records and for the fix to take place
by the end of the week.
The judges moved quickly to
reverse a controversial decision
that had blocked online public
access to information previously
available about arresting officers
and the names of other law enforcement officials involved in
criminal cases. The change was
criticized by lawyers, civil rights
advocates and journalists who
rely on the database to look for
patterns of misconduct and to
hold police accountable.
“We are accountable. We will
address this error,” Chief Judge
Mary Ellen Barbera said before
the Court of Appeals voted to put
back the names of police officers.
“Sometimes small mistakes
can have big consequences, and
that’s what happened here.”
The seven-member court
signed off on stripping out the
officers’ names last June at the
recommendation of an advisory
committee and said last week
POLICE CONTINUED ON B5
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
One ‘miracle’ lesson
At a Prince George’s County school, a teacher’s kidney donation is an education in kindness
BY
D ONNA S T. G EORGE
themselves as sisters.
“Both of them have the biggest
hearts,” said Sarah Bannat, a fellow educator at John Hanson
Montessori School in Oxon Hill,
the Maryland public school
where the women teach. “Every
time I start talking about them, I
start to cry.”
The story of Rivera-DeLeon’s
transplant — and Grissett’s gift —
is at once increasingly common
and not common enough. Patients are regularly added to a
lengthy national transplant waiting list, and many die before ever
They were not close in the
beginning. One educator taught
Spanish, the other art, each consumed by the whirlwind of busy
days in the classroom. But in the
spring of 2016, Sunny Grissett
read a Facebook page created by
Vivian Rivera-DeLeon.
She needed a kidney.
What has unfolded since has
helped save a life and inspire a
wider community, as one teacher’s need became another’s cause,
forging a bond so strong the
women have come to think of
KIDNEY CONTINUED ON B2
Spanish teacher Vivian Rivera-DeLeon, top center, talks with Adaoara Wilson, 13, left, and Jessica Santos, 14, at
John Hanson Montessori School. Art teacher Jacquelyn “Sunny” Grissett, above, gave Rivera-DeLeon a kidney.
Man steals 2 cars in NE, Obama meets girl who was captivated
but not without a fight by her portrait. And then they dance.
‘I pummeled him pretty
good,’ one owner, 58,
said of arrested suspect
BY P ETER H ERMANN
AND L AUREN L UMPKIN
They were headed to work and
had pulled into a gas station in
Northeast Washington to fill their
vehicles — a hulking Chevrolet
TrailBlazer and an older-model
Honda Accord.
Kelly Byron Williams, 58, and
Freddie Wyatt, 52, had never met.
But on the afternoon of Feb. 27,
police said, each became a victim
of a carjacker who, in a few chaotic and violent moments, stole and
wrecked both their vehicles.
Williams, a maintenance supervisor for D.C. schools, said he
fought back, punching the assailant several times in the face as the
man wrested control of the TrailBlazer from him at a Shell station
in the 3800 block of Minnesota
CARJACK CONTINUED ON B2
BY
M ICHAEL S . R OSENWALD
In the span of less than a week,
here are a few things that happened in the life of Parker Curry,
age 2:
Last Thursday, she was photographed totally in awe of Michelle
Obama’s new portrait at the National Portrait Gallery.
Over the weekend, the photo
went viral. The world fell in love
with Parker, with many hoping
the two could meet.
On Tuesday, they did.
And they danced.
“Parker, I’m so glad I had the
chance to meet you today,”
Obama wrote on Instagram in a
post that immediately went viral,
too. “. . . Keep on dreaming big
for yourself . . . and maybe one
day I’ll proudly look up at a
portrait of you!”
Parker, whose mom, Jessica
Curry, is a lifelong District resident, displayed some impressive
moves dancing with Obama to
her favorite song, Taylor Swift’s
“Shake It Off.”
Of course, the Internet went
insane.
Chelsea Clinton, who had
tweeted the photo Monday night,
responded almost instantly.
“Magic. Pure Magic,” she wrote.
Parker’s mother wasn’t immediately available to describe
the moment, referring an inquiry to a public relations firm —
thus confirming Parker’s bigtime status.
Later in the day, after Parker
took a nap, Curry explained how
the meeting happened. She said
Obama’s staff contacted her a
couple of days ago and invited the
OBAMA CONTINUED ON B4
Maryland
Democrats
to vote by
gender lists
The aim is to boost
women’s presence in
party’s central committee
BY
J ENNIFER B ARRIOS
There’s a surge of Democratic
women running for office in
Maryland this year — and party
officials say they want to make
sure it stays that way.
New rules in place for the
June 26 primary mean Democratic voters in 17 counties, some for
the first time, will vote separately
for men and women who are seeking central party positions.
State party chair Kathleen Matthews said the rules will help ensure a pipeline of future female
candidates for higher office.
Maryland has no women in its
congressional delegation or in any
top statewide elective positions.
“Maryland is a state that rewards people who have run for
office by electing them to higher
office,” Matthews said. “And the
central committees are the first
tier of elective office that you can
run for.”
According to numbers compiled by the party, the number of
Democratic women running for
county and state positions has
increased 44 percent this year —
to 545 from 378 in 2014. The number of women seeking state Senate
seats doubled to 36, and the number running for the House of Delegates increased by nearly 60 percent, from 67 to 107.
CANDIDATES CONTINUED ON B4
Courtland
Milloy
He is away. His
column will resume
when he returns.
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
In Md., one teacher’s need becomes another’s cause
not donate because her protein
levels were too high. She asked for
a retest, which she said confirmed
the problem. She was told to seek
medical care for herself, she said.
“I’ve never been so low in my
life,” she said.
She said she prayed. RiveraDeLeon prayed. Their friends and
relatives and churches prayed.
And she said a few months later, a
Hopkins doctor reached a different conclusion: Her protein levels
were excellent — and her kidneys
were beautiful.
“I knew that was from God,”
she said, describing the seeming
setback as “an opportunity to
practice my faith in Christ.”
It was late November when
Grissett’s cellphone rang during a
break at school. When the call
ended, she ran to RiveraDeLeon’s classroom.
“I’m our donor!” she exclaimed.
Rivera-DeLeon put both her
hands over her mouth.
KIDNEY FROM B1
receiving a donated organ.
Those lucky enough to find a
living donor often are helped by a
relative or spouse. But in the last
two decades, there has been a
sharp rise in kidney donations
from acquaintances — co-workers, neighbors, fellow church
members, friends.
In the Washington area, a police officer in Charles County last
year received a kidney from a
fellow officer he had known since
childhood. In the celebrity world,
pop star Selena Gomez’s close
friend gave her a kidney. In a
Florida school, a teacher donated
to the mother of one of her fourthgraders.
For the Maryland teachers, the
big day came Jan. 25 at Johns
Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore —
a time they had anticipated for
much of a year.
That morning, hours before
being wheeled into an operating
room, Rivera-DeLeon posted a
photo of herself and Grissett on
Facebook.
“The Miracle!!” she wrote.
J
acquelyn “Sunny” Grissett,
31, became the full-time art
teacher three years ago at
John Hanson Montessori, a
close-knit school with a little under 500 students from pre-K to
eighth grade. She and RiveraDeLeon, 40, were casual friends.
But last March, Grissett invited
the Spanish teacher and another
educator to an annual hope night
at her church, LaPlata Baptist.
The evening sparked plans
among the three for a weekly
Bible study, and they later gathered at Grissett’s home.
Grissett had not seriously considered being a donor, and the
issue did not come up that night,
she said. But after the teachers
left, she said she was overcome.
“I was sitting in my living
room. All of a sudden I felt like
full, like every edge of me was
pressed. and I can only express it
as it was the Holy Spirit and I had
a complete undeniable understanding that I was going to give
my kidney to Vivian,” she said.
Her husband, Mike, who owns
a barbershop, walked through the
door afterward, she said, and she
expected a shocked reaction. Instead, he told her he had just
watched a television program
about live-donor kidney donations as he swept up his shop. He
had nearly called for more information, she said.
“God prepared him to hear
what I had to say,” she said.
Despite feeling called to donate, Grissett admits she struggled at first. She thought of pain.
She thought of dying. She cried as
she commuted to work. But after
maybe 10 days, she said, she
stopped thinking of her own
risks.
She thought of Rivera-DeLeon.
Rivera-DeLeon started at John
Hanson in 2008 — an educator
who grew up in Puerto Rico and
who connected easily with children and loved teaching. Though
she could be reserved, she was
bubbly among friends, a woman
who found humor in life and was
deeply proud of her two sons and
daughter.
In 2010, Rivera-DeLeon said,
she was diagnosed with lupus,
B
N/AFAMILY PHOTO
TOP: Spanish teacher Vivian
Rivera-DeLeon, right, is
comforted by Jacquelyn
“Sunny” Grissett, the art
teacher who donated a kidney
to her. The two educators work
together at John Hanson
Montessori School in Oxon
Hill, Md.
RIGHT: This handmade
bracelet, with green charms
and ribbons to represent organ
donation, was a gift from the
transplant center at Johns
Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.
FAMILY PHOTO
“Both of them have the
biggest hearts. Every
time I start talking
about them, I start to
cry.”
Sarah Bannat, a teacher at John
Hanson Montessori School in Oxon
Hill, Md., about fellow educators
Jacquelyn “Sunny” Grissett
and Vivian Rivera-DeLeon.
Grissett gave Rivera-DeLeon
a kidney on Jan. 25.
and kidney problems soon followed. She received treatment
and dialysis. She did not dwell on
her health problems at school,
colleagues said. In recent years,
she was an assistant coach for the
school’s baseball and basketball
teams.
“It took me by surprise that she
was even sick,” said Antje Hultgren, who teaches PE at the
school and has become a friend.
“She comes into work with a
smile. She doesn’t complain.”
In April, Grissett recalls, she
and Rivera-DeLeon were standing near the school entrance,
waiting for children to arrive.
Grissett had not yet mentioned
donating the kidney, thinking she
should get blood tests first. But
that morning, Rivera-DeLeon
seemed
uncharacteristically
down.
So she told her.
Rivera-DeLeon’s reaction: No.
She knew Grissett and her husband were trying to start a family.
She said she did not want Grissett
to do anything that might interfere.
“I’m not going to let you,” she
told Grissett. “You want kids.”
Grissett insisted.
“You have three kids,” she told
her. “And they need their mom.”
T
here has been a dramatic
rise in live kidney donations from nonfamily members, which last year accounted
for about 35 percent of the total,
up from 5 percent in 1995, said
Dorry Segev, a transplant surgeon
at Johns Hopkins University.
The increase was initially driven by the development of minimally invasive surgery to remove
donor kidneys, he said, but the
trend continued amid cultural
changes that inspired people to
donate.
“Getting a kidney transplant
from a live donor doubles your
remaining life expectancy,” Segev
said. “That’s huge.”
Segev emphasized that donors
no longer have to be a biological
match. Doctors find ways around
incompatibility through a medical procedure called desensitization, which shifts a patient’s immune system in a way that protects a transplanted organ, or
through a swap between patients
with live donors so that each gets
a suitable kidney, he said.
The Maryland teachers, as it
turned out, shared the same types
of blood and tissue.
They discovered plenty of other similarities: Both are 5-foot-2
and wear the same shoe size and
like the same clothes and jewelry.
Not only do they teach at the
same school, both live in Waldorf,
about 35 to 45 minutes south of
where they work.
They began to spend time together outside of work and learn
about each other’s lives.
Grissett, whom one friend described as hilarious and wise beyond her years, met her husband
at a Bible study when she was 20
and married a year later. Teaching art is a passion. She puts
together an annual art show at
John Hanson, a fancy affair with a
red carpet and formal attire, to
showcase student art work. She
studied — and enjoys — the language Rivera-DeLeon teaches.
Last year, the Grissetts also
grew close to Rivera-DeLeon’s
children — ages 18, 16 and 13.
“I cook for her, and she does my
hair,” Rivera-DeLeon said one day
before the transplant. “It’s a good
trade.”
But there were bumps on the
road that led to the transplant,
both women recall. Grissett said
she was told in July by a doctor at
another hospital that she could
y the time the surgery date
arrived in January, the
news about Grissett’s gift to
Rivera-DeLeon had swept across
John Hanson. Teachers were
emotional. Parents were awed.
Students were impressed and full
of questions.
“Seriously, don’t you need that
kidney?” one quizzed Grissett,
who assured children that she
had two kidneys and would be
fine with one.
Zory Kenon III, principal of the
Prince George’s County school,
called the gift “a phenomenal act
of kindness.”
“It’s the most courageous thing
I’ve ever experienced in my educational career,” he said.
Inspired by the generosity, the
PTSA threw a fundraiser to help
support any uncovered medical
or living expenses the women
might incur.
“They have done so much for
our community, and it was a way
to tell them we care about them
and we are praying for a speedy
recovery,” said Nicole Nelson, the
PTSA president.
Segev, the Hopkins doctor,
called the surgery “textbook” —
successful for patient and donor.
More than 98 percent of livedonor kidney transplants are still
functioning after a year, he
said.
“It’s been awesome to see two
co-workers become sisters because of a crisis, and then that
brings the whole community together,” said Tia Breckenridge,
the school’s counselor.
A day after the operation, the
two teachers posted selfies in
their hospital gowns.
Rivera-DeLeon wrote:
“My twin!!! Sunny Grissett
God put us together!! No doubt
about it...
”
The recovery has had ups and
downs, particularly for RiveraDeLeon. But she said she is grateful to many people, and especially
to Grissett. Both teachers hope to
be back in their classrooms in
coming weeks.
Grissett has an art show to put
together.
Rivera-DeLeon wants be back
in her Spanish classroom — and
on the playing field, too. Come
spring, she will be the coach of the
school’s soccer team.
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
In few violent moments, carjacker steals and wrecks 2 vehicles in Northeast
CARJACK FROM B1
Avenue NE, between Benning
Road and East Capitol Street.
“In my mind, this guy was not
going to take my car,” Williams
said, sprinkling a number of offcolor descriptors into his account.
“I pummeled him pretty good.”
Williams said the man managed to speed away in his truck,
only to crash into a guardrail
moments later. Police said the
suspect, Brandon James, 33, then
jumped out of the TrailBlazer and
into Wyatt’s Honda and drove it
several blocks before crashing
into another car with an infant
inside.
Police charged James, who has
no fixed address, with two counts
of unarmed carjacking. A D.C.
Superior Court judge ordered
him detained until a court hearing March 23. His attorney with
the Public Defender Service did
not respond to an interview request. Police said in an arrest
affidavit that they suspect James
was under the influence of drugs.
The Feb. 27 carjackings are
among 27 reported by police in
the first two months of 2018,
slightly higher than over the same
period in recent years. There were
141 carjackings in fiscal year 2015
and 142 in fiscal 2016. There have
been 95 carjackings thus far in
fiscal 2017, which includes the 27
that occurred in January and February.
Police also said they have arrested 18 people and charged
them with carjacking since Jan. 1
and an additional 153 suspects
since summer 2014.
Court records and police reports do not show any discernible
pattern linking this year’s carjackings that have targeted neighborhoods from Woodland Terrace
in Southeast to Cleveland Park in
Northwest. At least one carjacking occurred on Capitol Hill. Several victims were taxi drivers.
Among those charged was a
THE DAILY QUIZ
How many seats does the main
dining room at Noma contain?
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Food section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
15-year-old boy, who police said
was also charged in other types of
robberies. Police said the youth
pointed a handgun at two drivers
and stole one of their cars, a 2012
“In my mind, this guy
was not going to take
my car.”
Kelly Byron Williams, carjacking
victim who punched suspect
Honda Accord, from a street in
Shaw. He was arrested after a
police pursuit.
Three teens were arrested after
a carjacking in Northwest’s
Brightwood neighborhood, police said, after the driver was
ordered out of a vehicle at gunpoint. The suspects were 13, 14
and 16 years old. Last month,
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police said, a man armed with a
gun stole a car owner’s wallet and
tried to take his phone before
driving off in his vehicle in Cleveland Park. He fired one shot as he
fled, police said, and escaped after crashing the owner’s car during a police pursuit.
In January, police chased a
carjacked vehicle and, after it
crashed, found a gun in the vehicle that had been used to kill a
14-year-old boy in Southeast
Washington, authorities said.
That gun led to an arrest this
week in the fatal shooting.
Police and victims said the
Feb. 27 carjackings began when a
man tried to take a vehicle at the
Valero gas station in the
3700 block of Minnesota Avenue
NE, a block south of the Shell.
Police said the suspect jumped
into a silver Acura and put the
vehicle in drive. A front-seat passenger fought with him, police
said, and the owner ran to the
vehicle and pulled the suspect
out.
Police said the man then ran up
Minnesota Avenue to the Shell
station. Williams, headed to pick
up a co-worker before their shift
started, had just pulled in to get
gas and was standing next to his
vehicle. Williams said he saw the
man, who wore a black face mask
rolled up so his face was visible,
run to the station. The man
slipped into the driver’s seat of
the TrailBlazer.
Williams said he hit the suspect repeatedly in the face, causing knots to form around his eyes.
“He seemed pretty acrobatic and
strong,” Williams said, noting
that although many of his punches landed, the man was still able
to fend him off and drive away in
the TrailBlazer.
Meanwhile, Wyatt, a landscape
contractor, said he was backing
his red 1995 Honda Accord next to
a gas pump. He said the fleeing
TrailBlazer struck his vehicle, ripping off the Honda’s front fender.
The TrailBlazer, still dragging
Williams a few feet, turned onto
Minnesota Avenue.
The now-damaged SUV did not
get very far. Williams and police
said the driver almost immediately plowed into a metal guardrail, making the vehicle inoperable. Williams said the man
jumped out of the TrailBlazer and
got into Wyatt’s Honda.
“The next thing I knew, he took
off and was headed up the street,”
Wyatt said. Police said the suspect
drove about three blocks before
crashing into a Chevrolet Camaro
at Minnesota Avenue and Benning Road. An infant was among
the Camaro’s passengers, police
said, and the child and an adult
were taken to a hospital for treatment. Their injuries did not appear serious, authorities said.
Wyatt said the suspect “didn’t
say a word. He seemed like he was
in another state of mind.”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
lauren.lumpkin@washpost.com
DID YOU KNOW?
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
A publisher’s fond remembrance of the Washington Times (no, not that one)
Frank Bolling
said it was a little
painful when the
Washington
Times debuted in
1982, another
John
newspaper
Kelly's
hoping to make
Washington its mark on the
capital.
“It hurt because
it had so much financial
backing,” Frank said of the
Unification Church-funded
newspaper.
Financial backing was the one
thing Frank’s little paper lacked.
The irony was, Frank’s paper was
also called the Washington
Times, and, as publisher, Frank
poured a lot of his soul into the
biweekly tabloid, which strutted
but briefly upon the stage: born
in late 1974, dead by the fall of
1976.
Frank and I were in my office,
the entire run of the Washington
Times in a plastic bin in front of
us. Also inside the box were
memos Frank wrote and
spreadsheets he prepared during
his time at the Times. There was
a handmade birthday card to
Frank from his then-wife: “My
gift to you is a 1-year
subscription to the Sunday
edition of any paper you choose
. . . Love, Martha. August 17,
1973.”
Frank is pretty sure he chose
The Washington Post.
“I wanted to cover Watergate,”
he said.
Watergate did that to a lot of
people then.
“The country was going to
change dramatically,” Frank said.
And he wanted to be part of it.
Frank was from Tennessee.
He’d gone to Vanderbilt
University and worked for a year
at a small paper in Abingdon, Va.
He drove to Washington and
wangled an interview at The
Post, where the redoubtable
Elsie Carper said his writing
was good but that he lacked
experience.
Alternative papers had come
and gone, including the
Washington Free Press (19661970). A paper called the
Washington Globe had managed
four issues in 1974 before dying,
but from its ashes came the
Times, whose three equal
partners were Teddy Vaughn,
who oversaw the editorial
content, George Fisher, who
sold the ads, and Frank, the
publisher, lured from a job
running a paper called the
Prince George’s Post. They
worked out of an office at 2430
Pennsylvania Ave. NW.
“It was my graduate school,”
said Frank, who was 27 at the
time.
The copies are yellowed now,
and brittle. In the way of any old
Group: D.C. wins gold
in bike friendliness
The District’s investments in
bike sharing, bike lanes and a
wider trail system are paying
off. Not only does the nation’s
capital have the second-highest
share of bike commuters among
major U.S. cities, it now holds
gold status as one of the most
bike-friendly cities in the
country.
The District joins an elite
group of communities that have
embraced biking as a form of
transportation and earned Gold
Bicycle Friendly Community
status. It also is the only major
city on the East Coast to receive
the designation, awarded
through a rigorous application
and vetting process by the
League of American Bicyclists.
“This award is a testament to
how far the District has come,”
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) said
Monday.
More than 400 communities
across the country are
recognized with the bikefriendly community award, but
only 30 have earned gold, a level
reached by communities that
have made gains in various
areas, from bike infrastructure
to bike laws and enforcement
that protect riders, and
educational campaigns.
— Luz Lazo
Man is charged
in 2016 murder
A Maryland man was arrested
and charged with murder in the
shooting of a man in the District
in 2016, police said.
At around 1:45 a.m. on May 8,
2016, officers responded to the
2900 block of Nelson Place SE
for reported gunshots, D.C.
police said in a statement. They
found Don Lavae Williams Jr.,
34, of Waldorf suffering from
gunshot wounds. He was taken
to a hospital, where he died, the
BY
— Justin Wm. Moyer
VIRGINIA
Fairfax sets ceiling
on real estate tax rate
Fairfax County’s Board of
Supervisors on Tuesday adopted
a ceiling for next year’s real
estate tax rate that would
probably amount to a $268
increase in the average annual
bill for homeowners.
The advertised tax rate of
$1.155 per $100 of assessed
value, approved 9 to 1, would
raise the current tax rate by 2.5
cents. The county board will
decide the tax rate in May but
cannot go beyond that amount.
Several supervisors said they
hope to adopt a new rate below
the approved ceiling. Supervisor
Pat Herrity (R-Springfield) cast
the sole dissenting vote on
Tuesday, saying homeowners on
fixed incomes are being priced
out of the county.
— Antonio Olivo
Police: 2 naked people
showed up at hotel
Two apparently naked people
showed up at a hotel in
Loudoun County on Sunday,
and two arrests were made, the
county sheriff ’s office said.
They said the two arrived
“unclothed” at a hotel in the
21000 block of Ridgetop Circle
in Sterling on Sunday afternoon.
After deputies went to the
hotel, two people from Sterling
were arrested, the sheriff ’s office
said.
They were identified as Brent
A. Martinez, 36, and Maria
Cano-Morales, 31. Each was
charged with indecent exposure,
the sheriff ’s office said.
— Martin Weil
VIRGINIA
DISTRICT
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remains as inaccessible
psychologically as it is in fact
geographically.”)
There is an article by Mark
Toor about property-hungry
George Washington University
gobbling Foggy Bottom and an
interview with the then-editor of
the New Republic, a guy named
Walter Pincus. (“Well,
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/john-kelly.
Dead teen’s parents press Hogan for help with case
statement said.
On Tuesday, Andrew
McKinney, 35, of Landover was
arrested and charged with firstdegree murder while armed,
police said.
LOTTER I ES
Results from March 6
medium, the content seems both
familiar and exotic. There is an
article by Deirdre Frontczak on
the Kennedy Center’s fifth
anniversary. (It’s generally
positive, while noting the gap
between Washingtonians who
already love the arts and those
yet to discover them. “To the
latter, the Kennedy Center
Frank went into politics,
working as press secretary for
“Howlin’ Henry” Howell during
the Virginia lieutenant
governor’s campaign for
governor. Howell lost, and Frank
got a job at the Federal Home
Loan Bank Board, then the
Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission.
Then he went into real estate.
He lives and works in Annapolis,
Md.
Frank watches with a familiar
sadness as papers fold one by
one across the country. It looked
like our own City Paper might go
the way of the tabloid Times
until millionaire Mark Ein
stepped in to revive its fortunes.
“I’m hopeful that an
alternative paper can survive,”
Frank said.
Running a newspaper was fun,
he said. It was taxing, but God it
was fun. From the smallest
neighborhood free sheet to the
biggest city daily, there is
something powerful and
invigorating about taking the
raw materials of ideas and
observations and by thought and
toil and ink and paper turning
them into something you can
hold in your hands.
MARYLAND
LOCA L D I G ES T
THE DISTRICT
JOHN KELLY/THE WASHINGTON POST
For two years while he was in his 20s, Frank Bolling was the
publisher of the Washington Times, a biweekly tabloid that covered
news and arts in the District. The paper never turned a profit, but
Bolling has fond memories of the experience in the mid-1970s.
everybody has a different idea of
what’s important,” he said, “so
there’s no single standard of
objectivity.”)
There are ads for head shops
and massage parlors: the Geisha
House, the Playpen, the Velvet
Touch, the House of Joy . . .
There’s an ad for something
called VideoDate, “the better way
to meet.” (How did that work?
And in the 16th century was
there something called Camera
Obscura Date?)
Some of the writers’ names
are familiar. Here is critic
Howard S.-M. Wuelfing — later
in seminal D.C. punk band the
Nurses — on the Ramones’ first
LP: “There hasn’t been an album
in five years as strong or as
invigorating as this.” Here is
Zofia Smardz, now an editor at
The Post, on Dumbarton Oaks:
“the last great American garden.”
None of the owners of the
Times took a salary. They kept
the paper afloat by printing
theater programs. Frank created
a detailed proposal on how to
expand the Times. All they
needed was $135,000 to increase
the press run, hire more ad
sellers, launch a marketing
campaign . . .
They never got it. The Times
folded.
Said Frank, now 70: “It was a
feeling of loss, like a funeral, like
the loss of a friend.”
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S
T OM J ACKMAN
The mystery of how 16-year-old
Annie McCann wound up in Baltimore, and how she ingested a fatal
amount of the numbing agent
lidocaine, has never been solved,
more than nine years after her
body was discovered behind a
housing project dumpster. But
her still-grieving parents have not
relented in their search for answers, and this week took their
case to Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) and asked him to order the
state police to take over the case
from the beleaguered Baltimore
Police Department.
Dan and Mary Jane McCann
have continued to press for answers as to why their daughter, a
junior at West Potomac High
School in Fairfax County, Va., ran
away from their Alexandria-area
home on Halloween of 2008, taking her $1,000 cash savings, her
jewelry and her family’s white
Volvo. She left a note saying she
had considered suicide, but instead decided to buy “a plane
ticket far away from here. . . . I
love life, and I’m ready to live.”
Annie had not previously expressed any unhappiness, had no
connection to Baltimore and was
a new driver with little sense of
direction, her parents said.
Two days later, she was discovered at the Perkins Homes, near
Pratt Street in Baltimore, not far
from Fells Point. Baltimore police
said there were no obvious signs
of trauma on Annie’s body. In
March 2009, when the Maryland
medical examiner determined
that Annie had died from a toxic
dose of lidocaine, found in overthe-counter pain medications
such as the Bactine that Annie
used for her recently pierced ears,
the police ruled the case a suicide.
The McCanns have long felt
that the Baltimore police didn’t
follow leads that involved human
trafficking, including an unidentified woman seen with Annie
who possibly lured her to Baltimore, and the involvement of five
teenagers who claimed that Annie
was dead when they found her in
the back seat of the Volvo. The
youths said they dumped her body
and took the car for a joy ride.
Using a private investigator,
the McCanns have continued to
seek answers, learning from one
convicted human trafficker that
numbing agents such as Bactine
are often used to subdue young
women. They have also watched
as problems with Baltimore police
investigations and the state crime
lab have unfolded, leading them
to wonder if such problems tainted the investigation of Annie’s
case. One of the Baltimore commanders who oversaw the coldcase investigation into Annie’s
death in 2013 has recently been
accused of coaching a corrupt officer to cover up a suspicious shooting death, then suddenly retired.
The director of the Baltimore
crime lab was fired in August
2008 over problems handling
DNA, about two months before
Annie’s death.
“The Baltimore justice system
is a cesspool,” the McCanns wrote
to Hogan, “a foul carbuncle benighting the people of Baltimore
and Maryland.” The parents said
that “Annie’s death, her murder,
has never been seriously investigated by the Baltimore Police Department — not in the initial
FAMILY PHOTO
Annie McCann, right, was found dead in Baltimore in 2008. Her
parents say the city’s police have not followed leads in the probe.
homicide investigation, and not
in the clownish cold-case investigation in 2013.”
The Baltimore police and the
longtime lead investigator of the
case, homicide Sgt. Sean Jones,
declined to comment Monday. In
2016, Jones told the ABC-TV show
“20/20” that he had investigated
Baltimore police ruled
Annie’s death a suicide
after it was determined
she died from a toxic
dose of lidocaine.
the case as a likely murder, but the
evidence led to a conclusion of
suicide. In 2009, Baltimore police
Maj. Terry McLarney told The
Post that there was no trauma on
Annie’s body, so “We know it’s not
a homicide at that point.”
Hogan’s office received the letter and accompanying attach-
ments Monday, spokeswoman
Amelia Chasse said. “The governor deeply sympathizes with the
McCann family and the tragedy
they have experienced,” Chasse
said. “He has forwarded the materials to the Maryland State Police for discussion with the new
Baltimore City Police administration.”
The McCanns said Baltimore
police have not addressed several
issues the family raised. Among
them:
• Skin cells were found under
Annie’s fingernails, often a clue to
an attacker’s identity if a struggle
occurred, but the police case file
indicates they were not tested for
DNA.
• A crime scene photo of Annie
lying on her side clearly shows
that blood had pooled in her lower
back, as if she had been lying on
her back for some time before
being found. Also, an autopsy
photo of Annie shows what appears to be the letter “J” on her
lower left leg, as if branded or
tagged by human traffickers,
though some experts said this
could be blood pooling around a
“j-shaped” object pressed into her
leg.
• Autopsy records indicated
that Annie had at least 20 abrasions on her body, contrary to
McLarney’s claims, and that she
had “subgaleal hemorrhaging” in
her skull, all indicative of bluntforce trauma. The McCanns have
also previously noted that Annie
had a new, round abrasion on her
forehead which they believe is “an
obvious cigarette burn” and that
the funeral home where she was
embalmed observed a grossly distended rectum indicative of sexual abuse. Some experts said such
a condition can occur as muscles
relax after death, but the embalmer told The Post in 2016 he had
never seen such a case in thousands of bodies.
The McCanns criticize both the
medical examiner and the police
for concluding that Annie must
have drunk lidocaine from a halffull bottle of Bactine because her
DNA was found on the lip of the
bottle, without ever checking with
the drug’s manufacturer, Bayer, to
see if there was enough lidocaine
in a bottle to cause death. Bayer
has said it would take three full
bottles of Bactine to kill a 110pound girl.
The police were also criticized
for not attempting to identify a
woman seen with Annie in a Baltimore pastry shop on the morning
after Halloween, who was clearly
described by two shop employees.
The police also did not pursue a
Virginia man who exchanged text
messages with Annie in the days
before her death, the McCanns said.
The McCanns also asked Hogan to direct the state secretary of
health to commission an independent autopsy and review the
original findings, in which the
manner of death was “undetermined” and the cause of death was
listed as “lidocaine toxicity.”
“Governor Hogan, we are begging you,” the parents wrote,
“please help us!”
tom.jackman@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
New Md. rule aims
for ‘gender parity’
CANDIDATES FROM B1
But that is not enough, Matthews said in an interview.
“Even though you have roughly
twice as many women running for
office in Maryland, you still have
more men running for office than
women,” Matthews said. “We’re
not at gender parity in terms of the
broad pool of candidates.”
The Democratic National Committee has required equal numbers of men and women on party
central committees for decades.
But in many places, that often
meant party leaders appointing
nonvoting “gender-balance” members to address disparities among
elected committee members.
In some Maryland counties, appointed members only recently
were given the right to vote and
make floor speeches. In six other
counties — Allegany, Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, Harford and Washington — Democratic committee
seats are already divided between
male and female candidates on
the ballot. Eleven more, including
Montgomery, the state’s most
populous, will do so starting in
June. And Democrats in all 23
Maryland counties and Baltimore
City will adopt the rules by the
June 2022 primary.
The change prompted cries of
discrimination from Democrat
Edward Kimmel of Takoma Park,
a retired lawyer, who criticized
the policy on the political blog
“Seventh State.”
“Any individual can only run for
half of the slots,” Kimmel said.
“They get to vote for all of them,
but they can only run for half of
them.”
He pointed to District 20 in
Montgomery County, which has
two seats on the central committee. “They are now going to be a
boy seat and a girl seat,” Kimmel
said. “If I am well satisfied by the
way the man votes, that’s cool. . . .
If I am unhappy about the policy
positions taken by the woman . . . I
cannot run against her. I have to
recruit some other woman to run
against her.”
Matthews said courts have upheld the Democrats’ 50-50 rules.
She likened the new Maryland
measure to Title IX, which prohibits sexual discrimination in educational institutions that receive
federal funds, and said being
elected to a party committee gives
individuals more legitimacy than
being appointed in the name of
gender parity.
Melissa Deckman, a professor
and chair of the political science
2-year-old girl meets
Obama: ‘She’s a queen’
family for a visit at her office in
Washington. They spent about
45 minutes together.
“She was so unbelievably generous with her time,” Curry said.
“She’s everything I thought she
would be and more — classy,
elegant, so down to earth.”
During the fun and dancing,
Parker offered the same assessment of Obama that she did after
seeing the portrait.
“She’s a queen,” she declared.
The past few days have been a
whirlwind for Parker and her
family.
On Thursday, Curry took Parker and her 1-year-old sister, Ava,
to the National Portrait Gallery to
see the new paintings of the
Obamas.
Parker is a big fan of Michelle
Obama. Earlier in her short life,
after watching Obama dance on
“The Ellen DeGeneres Show,”
Parker declared that she too
would like to dance with the
former first lady.
At the gallery, Parker was so
entranced by the portrait, looking
up at it with her mouth wide
open, that she wouldn’t turn
around to her mom for a photograph. This was precisely the moment Parker’s life would change.
Ben Hines, a 37-year-old visit-
ing from North Carolina, was
standing nearby and watched the
moment unfold. He took out his
cellphone and snapped a photo of
Parker staring at the portrait in
total amazement. He tried to find
Parker and her mom later but
couldn’t, so he posted the photo
on Facebook, hoping the Internet
would connect them.
Oh, it did.
The photo quickly went viral.
And eventually, someone tagged
Curry on Hines’s Facebook post.
“This is what America is all
about,” tweeted an Atlanta man.
“This young girl can now dream
about being someone like Michelle Obama.”
The striking portrait of Obama
— in a long, flowing dress against
a light-blue background — was
painted by Baltimore artist Amy
Sherald, who was chosen by the
former first lady.
At her portrait’s unveiling last
month, Obama said she was
thinking of young girls — and
girls of color, “who in the years
ahead will come to this place and
. . . see an image of someone who
looks like them hanging on the
wall of this great American institution. . . . And I know the kind of
impact that will have on their
lives, because I was one of those
girls.”
michael.rosenwald@washpost.com
Enjoy the Breeze
in Your New
Screen Room
Man admits racist posts
threatening Howard U.
B Y R ACHEL W EINER
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
State party chair Kathleen Matthews said the rules will help ensure
a pipeline of future female candidates for higher office.
department at Washington College in Chestertown, Md., called
central committees “important
gatekeepers for people who want
to run for office.”
“Having more women in these
central committees is really important,” she said. “I think it will
ultimately lead to more women
running for political office.”
Women who run for office are
as likely to be elected as men who
run, said Mileah Kromer, an associate professor of political science
at Goucher College in Baltimore.
The challenge, she said, is “getting
women to step into the arena,”
which is much more likely to happen if they are encouraged by
jennifer.barrios@washpost.com
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T ALIA R ICHMAN
Hundreds of Baltimore students walked out of class Tuesday
and marched to City Hall to protest gun violence in schools.
Tuesday’s event in Baltimore
brought together public and private schools from across the city.
Many students marched for
miles, snaking through the city
and chanting, “Guns down!
Grades up!”
The protest comes a few weeks
after a deadly shooting at a Florida high school left 17 students
and teachers dead. The students
of Marjory Stoneman Douglas
have become powerful voices for
gun control, galvanizing a movement among young people across
the country.
“Students were willing to walk
out, to let go of whatever test or
project they had and put their
energy towards the protection of
their friends,” said Cassius Comfort, a senior at Friends School
who walked nearly five miles to
the plaza outside City Hall.
Mayor Catherine E. Pugh (D)
and Baltimore Police Commissioner Darryl De Sousa addressed
the students, who later participated in a 17-minute “lie-in” to
honor the Florida victims. Pugh
said the city plans to spend an
estimated $100,000 to send students on a fleet of buses to the
LLOYD FOX/BALTIMORE SUN
Baltimore students demonstrate at City Hall, the final destination of a #GunsDownGradesUp school
walkout on Tuesday to protest gun violence in schools and the city.
national march in Washington
planned for later this month.
“America needs to hear the
voices of the young people of
Baltimore,” she said.
The local students compiled a
list of demands, which originally
called for stricter gun-control legislation, including the passage of
a “red flag law” allowing judges to
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Baltimore students walk out over gun violence
Help scheduling
tours
WINTER SPECIAL
A 26-year-old convicted sex offender admitted Tuesday that he
made online racist threats
against Howard University students from a Panera Bread restaurant in Virginia in the fall of
2015.
John Edgar Rust left messages
on 4chan and Reddit using the
n-word to say that any blacks “left
at Howard University after 10 tomorrow will be the first to go . . .
After all, it’s not murder if they’re
black.”
He also wrote, “I’ll go out a
hero knowing I made the world
better.”
The threat was taken seriously,
with city and campus police stepping up their patrols around
Howard for two days after the
messages were posted online.
Some classes were canceled, and
parents and students expressed
concern that the campus was not
locked down.
In court Tuesday, public defender Maria Jacob said her client
was struggling with mentalhealth issues but that they did not
affect his competency.
Rust is a sex offender who was
on probation and barred from
using the Internet at the time he
made the threats. His 2012 conviction stems from an incident
involving a child in Loudoun
County, according to court records.
Prosecutors say they were able
to identify Rust because a MacBook Air and Nokia phone registered under his name were both
connected to Panera’s WiFi network the day of the threat, and his
credit card had been used at the
restaurant.
He initially denied making the
threats, according to an FBI
agent’s report, telling law enforcement he used the Internet
only to look for work and check
his email. Later he told his probation officer he went on Reddit
only to look at cat videos and had
used the Panera WiFi to talk to his
girlfriend.
When they searched his computer, law enforcement found
drafts of the violent, racist message.
Threats against schools appear
to be on the rise in the wake of the
shooting at Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School in Florida
that left 17 people dead. In federal
court, the maximum sentence for
making such threats is five years.
Rust will be sentenced July 20.
MARYLAND
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local Advisor
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party officials.
“This is going to force change,”
Kromer said.
Jennifer Guzman Hosey, who
was appointed to the central committee in Montgomery County in
2015 as a “gender balance” member, worked with Matthews on the
rules change and will be on the
ballot to remain on the committee
in June.
Hosey said she plans to one day
run for higher office, and her time
on the committee has convinced
her that it is a vital steppingstone
for potential candidates statewide.
“It prepares you for actually
holding office,” she said.
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MARCH 7 , 2018
THE DISTRICT
BY
OBAMA FROM B1
. WEDNESDAY,
Joan Lunden, journalist, best-selling author, former
host of Good Morning America and senior living advocate.
temporarily order gun owners to
surrender firearms if they are
deemed a danger to themselves or
others. Republican Gov. Larry
Hogan has endorsed the creation
of such a law.
By the end of the march, the
students had chosen to limit their
demands to more local action:
They called for more frequent
active-shooter drills and comprehensive follow-up investigations
into allegations of school police
misconduct.
They also want all schools to
establish social work and counseling services “to prevent the
culture of violence,” among other
measures.
The student organizers from
Friends said they were disappointed with the mayor’s response and her plan to spend
money on transporting students
to the March 24 march in Washington. The students said they
wanted Pugh to focus on action to
make Baltimore schools safer and
better, such as using money to
improve school infrastructure.
“Spending money on lunches
and T-shirts is not going to protect students,” said Friends senior
Carrie Zaremba.
Unique Chisholm, a 17-year-old
Paul Laurence Dunbar High
School student, said she wants to
see universal background checks
for gun owners and the minimum
age for purchasing a gun raised to
21 years old.
“Something needs to change,”
she said. “Guns just need to be
stopped. People need to stop killing people. Period.”
The students developed a code
of conduct calling for a peaceful
demonstration, and Baltimore
police escorted groups of students from their schools to downtown.
Quinn Parker, 16, who walked
out of his Spanish class at
Friends, held a sign that read, “We
stand with Excel Academy.” Students at the West Baltimore
school have lost seven of their
classmates to gun violence over
the last two years.
“Our city, with its history of
such high homicide rates, needs
to do a better job of keeping its
students safe — everywhere,”
Parker said.
Some students said they felt
overwhelmed by how many peo-
ple showed up. As they marched
near the Johns Hopkins University campus, one girl turned
around, looked at the massive
line of kids behind her and said to
a friend: “Wow, that’s all us.”
It’s not often, some said, that
Baltimore students of all races
and genders, from public and
private schools in different parts
of the city, come together to
march.
“We’re all teens,” said D’Mayre
Cash, an 18-year-old student at
Bard High School Early College.
“We may all be from different
places, but we all feel that pain.”
De Sousa, standing outside
City Hall, told the students their
message was clear and unobjectionable.
“Every day when you come to
school you have a right to learn,
you have a right to be safe,” he
said. “I stand beside you 100
percent. Enough is enough.”
Elijah Eaton, an 18-year-old
student at City College, set up a
voter registration booth outside
City Hall.
“Gen Z is going to vote staunchly against gun violence,” he said.
Baltimore schools chief executive Sonja Santelises said in a
statement that the district encourages students “to make
themselves heard about an issue
that affects them profoundly.” But
she said principals were encouraged to use time and space within
their buildings for students to
discuss gun violence and steps to
prevent it.
“With respect to today’s protest, school police are working
with city police to ensure that
students who left our buildings
are safe and do not impede traffic
or cause potential danger for
themselves or others,” she said.
“Principals of schools whose students participated will continue
working with their school communities to ensure future protests are both productive and
safe.”
Charlotte Corcoran, 14, said
she had no reservations about
walking out of Roland Park Country School, regardless of the potential consequence for skipping
class. She carried a sign that read:
“I’m missing a day of school
because 17 are missing the rest of
their lives.”
— Baltimore Sun
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
THE DISTRICT
VIRGINIA
Bill would let homeowners sell without giving renters 1st dibs More give
money to
citizenship
fund
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
The D.C. Council on Tuesday
gave preliminary approval to legislation allowing homeowners
who rent out their homes to sell
them without giving their tenants
the first opportunity to buy.
Realtors and housing activists
packed the council chamber as
lawmakers voted 10 to 2 to exempt
single-family houses from the District’s Tenant Opportunity to Purchase Act (TOPA), a law designed
to protect renters from being
pushed out of their homes during
redevelopment.
In a fast-gentrifying city where
housing prices have soared, any
changes to tenant protection laws
strike a nerve.
Critics blasted the bill as a giveaway to developers and real estate
interests that would displace lowincome renters.
But supporters say TOPA hurts
the housing market. They contend
homeowners aren’t renting out
rooms, basements or attached
units because they fear the headaches associated with the law
when they want to sell. Some
homeowners trying to put their
houses on the market said they
were shaken down for tens of
thousands of dollars by companies that purchased tenants’
rights, the subject of an NBC4
Washington investigative report
last year.
“I firmly believe that this bill
would help to expand affordable
housing options for District residents by implementing policy
changes that will encourage single-family homeowners to offer
their basements, cottages and ga-
In a city where housing
prices have soared, any
changes to tenant
protection laws
strike a nerve.
rages for rent,” said council member Anita Bonds (D-At Large), who
shepherded the bill as chair of the
housing committee.
The bill passed over the objections of council members Elissa
Silverman (I-At Large) and Brianne K. Nadeau (D-Ward 1). They
acknowledged that existing law
was unfair to some homeowners
but said the bill before them didn’t
do enough to protect tenants.
“To be clear, we cannot allow
third parties to take advantage of
our laws, nor can we allow homeowners to be manipulated by bad
actors,” said Nadeau. “But we must
use a scalpel, not a sledgehammer,
to address an issue of such great
importance.”
She instead wants to block tenants in single-family homes from
selling their TOPA rights, as a way
to address what some homeowners describe as extortion from
predatory companies. Nadeau
also unsuccessfully proposed an
amendment that would allow tenants who have rented a house for
at least a decade to purchase it
when it comes up for sale.
The existing TOPA law is most
commonly associated with condominiums and multifamily buildings where tenants’ associations
work with developers to keep renters in their homes when the property owner wants to sell.
But tenants in single-family
homes, often renting because they
can’t buy, rarely use the TOPA law
to purchase their homes. The
council pegged the average number of such sales as 3.2 homes
annually. For that reason, the bill’s
supporters said effects on tenants
would be minimal while benefits
to homeowners would be enormous.
“It’s going to be great for both
sides,” said District of Columbia
Association of Realtors 2017 President Colin Johnson, who said
homeowners “are going to feel
confident they can rent their
homes out . . . and they’ll also feel
confident that their investment in
their homes — which is in many
cases their retirement and their
life savings — won’t be tied up and
won’t be extorted.”
The bill has also emerged as a
campaign issue in the upcoming
June Democratic primary.
Ed Lazere, who is challenging
council Chairman Phil Mendelson
(D) from the left, released a statement hours after the vote needling
the incumbent for supporting the
bill.
“Unfortunately, at a time when
we are facing an affordable housing crisis, when residents are demanding greater action, he used
his political capital to advance legislation that will only make life
harder for renters in D.C.,” said
Lazere, who is on leave as executive director of the left-leaning
D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute.
Mendelson, in turn, blasted
critics for propagating “misinformation” about the bill and said he
was looking out for residents who
are unable to make quick sales or
who are too wary to rent out
rooms for extra income because of
the current system.
“It hurts homeowners,” Mendelson said at the council meeting.
“Homeowners are complaining.
Homeowners are keeping units off
the market. Homeowners are finding it harder for them to age in
place because they can’t get the
supplemental income.”
Jeremiah Lowery, an at-large
Democrat who is challenging
Bonds in the June primary, said
her bill would lead to displaced
residents. On Tuesday, Bonds said
she wouldn’t support measures
that exacerbate displacement.
Council member Robert C.
White Jr. (D-At Large) recused
himself from action on the bill
because his wife is selling a single-family home where TOPA may
be involved. The bill must clear
another vote before heading to
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) for
consideration.
The council on Tuesday also
unanimously gave final approval
to legislation that would allow police officers seriously injured on
the job to keep working, provided
there are desk duties or other jobs
they could still perform. They also
sent another bill to Bowser that
would establish a commission to
study the District’s maternal mortality rate, which is twice the national average.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
Md. court restores o∞cers’ names to searchable public database
POLICE FROM B1
that the policy came in response
to concerns about the safety of
members of law enforcement.
But on Monday, the head of the
committee said the decision to
delete was all a mistake. The
court scheduled Tuesday’s unusual emergency hearing to reconsider the policy.
“It was an honest mistake, not
for any improper motive, but a
mistake that never should have
occurred, and for which I humbly
apologize,” the judiciary’s rules
committee chairman, Alan M.
Wilner, a former appeals court
judge, said Monday. He attended
Tuesday’s meeting.
His 30-member advisory committee includes judges, attorneys,
prosecutors and state legislators.
A spokeswoman for the judiciary
said there was no record of which
members voted in favor of the
new rule.
The policy became official in
August but did not take effect
until last week, “after the necessary re-programming and testing
of the site,” the court said.
Before the change, the public
could search online to pull up a
list of cases involving particular
officers. Since the change, first
reported by the Baltimore Sun,
the names of officers are no
longer available online. The
information is accessible on
some courthouse computers or in
paper case files.
Cary Hansel, a civil rights lawyer in Baltimore, was among the
attorneys, academics and community activists who urged the
“It was an honest
mistake . . . for which I
humbly apologize.”
Alan M. Wilner, head of advisory
committee on judiciary rules
court Tuesday to ensure public
access to the full names of arresting police officers. He called the
prospect of leaving the rule in
place “frightening.” People who
believe they have been subjected
to false arrest or excessive force
by the police may be too traumatized, he said, to get the names of
the officers.
“This is a critical tool for civil
rights advocates to use in polic-
ing the police, and without it we
lose the type of transparency
necessary to do our jobs,” Hansel
said.
Amy Petkovsek of Maryland
Legal Aid told the judges the
deletion of officers’ names was
affecting hundreds of lowincome residents. Her clients are
having trouble getting jobs because of online arrest records
even in cases that did not lead to
convictions. To complete the formal process to have those online
references removed, an individual needs to know the names of
arresting officers, Petkovsek said.
After the vote at the public
hearing to revert to the earlier
system, Hansel and Petkovsek
praised the court for its rapid
response to concerns.
In Virginia, the state Senate in
2016 approved a measure that
would have kept secret the names
of police officers and fire marshals by classifying the information as “personnel records.” The
legislation failed in the House.
The decision in Maryland to
remove officers’ names from the
online database came as the police department in Baltimore
struggled to overcome allegations of widespread corruption.
Members of an elite police task
force have been implicated in a
conspiracy, and thousands of
convictions in cases handled by
the unit are being re-examined by
defense lawyers.
In explaining the new policy
last week, the judiciary said in a
statement that the rules committee approved it only after holding
a public meeting and posting
information about the coming
changes on the court’s website.
The judiciary is “committed to
balancing the public’s interest in
access to court information with
our equally important obligation
to protect personal identifying
information from potential misuse,” the statement said.
Police in Anne Arundel County
initially pressed for a change, but
only for removal of officers’ first
names — consistent with other
court documents that display an
officer’s rank, first initial and last
name, according to department
spokesman Lt. Ryan Frashure.
The committee went further,
striking the full names, office
address, phone number and
email address of officers. The
database contains the names of
prosecutors, defense attorneys
and judges.
Wilner, the committee chairman, told the Court of Appeals in
BY
P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN
Fourteen people in the past
week have contributed money
to a fund that helps immigrants
afford the fees required to apply
for U.S. citizenship, more than
doubling the $7,000 that an
anonymous donor gave Arlington County to launch the effort.
The new contributors added
$7,175 to the scholarship fund,
said Kurt Larrick, a spokesman
for Arlington’s Department of
Human Services, which is managing the scholarship effort that
was described in The Washington Post last week.
The county has not yet awarded any scholarships, Larrick
said, but officials are sorting
through applications and hope
to do so soon.
When the donor noticed
that some put off taking
the test even when they
appeared ready, she
guessed it was because
they could not afford the
$725 application fee.
a letter Monday that he could not
immediately provide a full accounting of how the previous
language allowing access to officer information was deleted. The
vote on Tuesday immediately restores the section that was removed. State court administrator
Pamela Harris told the judges
that the full names could be back
in the system by Friday.
The database, known as CaseSearch, was created in 2006.
Wilner said initial concerns
about it surfaced during the 2016
General Assembly session and
appeared to get tangled up in
committee discussions about
other proposals for rules governing the database.
The deletion of the language
on officer names, Wilner wrote,
“should have been caught, and,
had it been, the current problem
would not have arisen.”
After the hearing Tuesday, Wilner described the deletion of the
language as a “procedural error”
that was the result of a long,
contentious meeting. The committee considered changing full
names to officers’ first initials,
but never intended to completely
wipe them from the system.
“We just missed it,” he said.
The initial donor, who spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
protect her privacy, is a retired
federal worker who has lived in
Arlington nearly all her life.
For the past two years, she
has volunteered teaching civics
and language to immigrants
seeking U.S. citizenship. When
she noticed that some put off
taking the test even when they
appeared ready, she guessed it
was because they could not
afford the $725 application fee.
The woman, whose four
grandparents were immigrants
to the United States, said she
wanted those seeking citizenship to feel welcomed by this
country.
Those who wish to donate to
the fund can write a check to
Treasurer-Arlington
County
(Citizenship Scholarship) and
send it to Department of Human Services — Citizenship
Scholarship, 2100 Washington
Blvd., 4th Floor, Arlington, VA
22204.
ann.marimow@washpost.com
patricia.sullivan@washpost.com
obituaries
RUSS SOLOMON, 92
Founder of Tower Records, an eclectic mecca for music lovers
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Russ Solomon, whose company Tower Records helped invent
the music megastore but was
felled by the rise of digital downloads and growing competition
from discount chains, died
March 4 at his home in Sacramento. He was 92.
He was watching the Academy
Awards and had just asked his
wife “if she would go pour him a
whiskey” when he apparently
suffered a heart attack, said his
son Michael Solomon.
A high school dropout who
made his first album sale at 16,
dealing used jukebox records out
of his father’s California drugstore, Mr. Solomon built a music
empire that sprawled across
more than a dozen countries and
nearly 200 stores.
Founded in 1960, Tower Records boasted more than $1 billion in annual sales, employing a
strategy of low prices and a
dizzying selection that kept audiophiles busy for hours. Under
the direction of Mr. Solomon,
known to some music industry
observers as “King Solomon,” its
stores modeled themselves after
supermarkets, piling items on
the floor and keeping their doors
open until midnight in the era
before the Internet made any
song available at any time.
“Taking your date to Tower
Records has become an institution,” CBS Records chief Walter
Yetnikoff told the New York
Times in 1987, “and it’s cheap if
you don’t buy too many records.”
Mr. Solomon added books to
Tower’s offerings in the early
1960s, expanded to video in 1981
and in 1995 partnered with the
Good Guys chain to launch Wow,
a superstore for electronics and
software as well as books, music
and videos.
Yet his stores remained a mecca for music lovers — the performer Elton John once boasted
that he “spent more money in
Tower than any human being” —
even as vinyl was succeeded by
cassette tapes and supplanted by
CDs.
At more than twice the size of
rival neighborhood music shops,
Tower stores stocked albums
that ranged far beyond Top 40
hits to include international acts
in rock, pop, classical and jazz.
Mr. Solomon, who served as
Tower’s chief executive until Michael Solomon took over in 1998,
empowered his employees to
stock their stores with nearly
anything they wished.
“New Orleans had a huge
heritage music section; Nashville
had a gigantic country section,”
Colin Hanks, director of the
Tower documentary “All Things
Must Pass,” told NPR in 2015.
“Tower was, in essence, a bunch
of mom-and-pop record stores.
. . . Each store represented its
city or its neighborhood in the
city. They all had their own style.”
Employees such as Dave
Grohl, who went on to become
the drummer for Nirvana and
frontman for the Foo Fighters,
venerated Mr. Solomon, who
wore jeans to work and invited
visiting executives to “donate”
their neckties to a collage of
cravats he kept outside his office.
But while Mr. Solomon’s ambition helped grow the business
into a juggernaut — his competi-
RICH PEDRONCELLI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Russ Solomon at the Tower Records headquarters in Sacramento in 2001. He opened his first location
in 1960 and saw the chain grow to nearly 200 stores in a dozen countries before closing in 2006.
tor Barry Bergman once quipped
that Mr. Solomon had “the guts
of a riverboat gambler” — it also
contributed to his undoing.
His company took on $110
million in debt to finance its
global expansion, and by the
turn of the millennium it faced
competition from big-box stores
such as Best Buy and digital
file-sharing services including
Napster.
“As for the whole concept of
beaming something into one’s
home, that may come along
someday, that’s for sure,” Mr.
Solomon said in a 1994 promotional video. “But it will come
along over a long period of time,
and we’ll be able to deal with it
and change our focus and change
the way we do business. As far as
your CD collection — and our CD
inventory, for that matter — it’s
going to be around for a long,
long time, believe me.”
Ten years later, Tower Records’
parent company, MTS Inc., filed
for bankruptcy protection, after
closing many of its stores and
struggling to find a buyer. It
seemed to recover before filing
for bankruptcy a second time in
2006 and going out of business
later that year.
“The fat lady has sung,” Mr.
Solomon wrote in an email to
employees. “She was off-key.
Thank You, Thank You, Thank
You.”
Russell Malcolm Solomon was
born in San Francisco on Sept.
22, 1925. His mother worked as a
bookkeeper for his father, and
the family moved around California until his father started a
pharmacy in Sacramento, inside
the city’s Tower movie theater.
The building gave Mr. Solomon’s
company its name.
He studied photography in art
school before serving as a radar
technician in the Army during
World War II, and later worked
as a “rack jobber,” stocking store
shelves with vinyl records, until
going broke in 1960.
With a $5,000 loan from his
father, he responded by opening
his first Tower Records location
in Sacramento. Eight years later,
he expanded to San Francisco,
then the epicenter of American
rock music, with a 6,000-squarefoot store that was reportedly the
nation’s largest. A Los Angeles
outpost on the Sunset Strip followed in 1970, and a decade later,
Tower had megastores in Manhattan and in London’s Piccadilly Circus shopping district.
His marriage to Doris Epstein
ended in divorce. Survivors include his wife of eight years, Patti
Drosins, and two sons from his
first marriage, Michael Solomon
and David Solomon, all of Sacramento; four grandchildren; and
two great-grandchildren.
Mr. Solomon largely devoted
himself to photography after
Tower’s demise, exhibiting portraits of Sacramento artists
whose work he had collected
over the decades. But he also
remained attached to music and
for several years ran a Sacramento record store.
His taste in music, Michael
Solomon said, was as wide-ranging as that of his employees at
Tower. “His own contemporaries
would think the Beatles were
madness,” he said, “but he loved
it.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
DEATH NOTICE
obituaries
BERDAK
MARGARET BERDAK (Age 92)
JOHN BOYD, 92
His hat tips graced British royals, commoners
BY
P HIL D AVISON
Although she was born into
British nobility, Lady Diana
Spencer was not fond of hats,
except for a woolly one she wore
against the chill of a London
winter or skiing in the Alps.
When she began dating Prince
Charles, heir to the British
throne, her mother decided to
smarten her up and called in her
own milliner, the London-based
John Boyd.
Mr. Boyd, who died Feb. 20 at
92, helped turn Lady Diana, later
Diana, Princess of Wales, into a
global fashion icon. He provided
her with the pink tricorn hat that
she wore after her wedding and
on her way to her honeymoon — a
chapeau that was later copied by
milliners across the world and
credited with rebooting a stagnant industry.
Princess Diana became one of
the world’s most photographed
people, bringing global attention
to Mr. Boyd and his hats. He
preferred not to be photographed
in his own favorite hat, a replica
of Chairman Mao’s army-style
cap.
“Princess Diana frequently visited his shop but preferred to be
in his messy workroom where the
milliners were working on the
hats,” said Mr. Boyd’s protegee
Sarah Marshall, who took over
the business two years ago. “He
was always very discreet about
his royal clientele, which rewarded him with their loyalty.”
Mr. Boyd was the official milliner to British Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher, and he went
on to “do a Princess Di” for Kate
Middleton, who became the
Duchess of Cambridge when she
married Diana’s elder son, Prince
William. The duchess, or Kate as
most Brits still call her, was
considered a rather staid dresser
until Mr. Boyd’s hats helped
make her a fixture on magazine
covers.
He was a milliner for 75 years,
eventually based out of a basement shop in London’s tony
Beauchamp Place shopping district. Although Mr. Boyd would
visit the royals in their palaces
when summoned, many of his
clients arrived at 16 Beauchamp
Place incognito, slipping down
the basement stairs while pa-
TIM GRAHAM/GETTY IMAGES
Milliner John Boyd designed his fantastical hats to be off the face of the wearer but very much in the
face of the beholder. He helped turn Princess Diana into a global fashion icon and also designed hats
for Princess Anne and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.
parazzi lurked outside the nearby
restaurant San Lorenzo, looking
for celebrities.
His own byword was discretion. Queried in 1986 about hats
he was making for Thatcher and
the royal scion Princess Anne, he
replied dryly, “They have a brim.”
When Mr. Boyd started out,
there were no fewer than 44
milliners in Beauchamp Place,
then known as milliner’s row. His
shop was, and remains, the last
millinery on that street, and it
has since become a destination
for clients who include workingclass women dressing up for
Wimbledon or the Royal Ascot
and Epsom Derby horse races —
aiming, in most cases, to match
or even outdo the costumed royals and nobles who formed the
core of Mr. Boyd’s business.
Mr. Boyd’s hats were often
conspicuous, with huge brims,
but his basic principle was that
the wearer, usually a woman,
should wear the hat rather than
the hat wear the woman. His hats
were designed to be off the face of
ANWAR HUSSEIN/SIPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Diana, Princess of Wales,
wearing a John Boyd hat in
1983. She became one of the
world’s most photographed
people, bringing global notice
to Mr. Boyd and his hats.
the wearer but very much in the
face of the beholder.
John Richardson Boyd, a
printer’s son, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on April 5, 1925.
The youngest of seven siblings,
he was closest to his eldest sister,
Jessie, a ballet dancer who would
later work in his hat shop and
whom he cared for her until her
death in 2014. He remembered as
a boy helping her and her sisters
prepare for dances, fiddling with
their hair and dresses to make
sure they looked their best.
After leaving school at 15, Mr.
Boyd worked briefly for the
North British Rubber Co. in Edinburgh, where co-workers noticed
that he spent most of his time
sketching them or his surroundings. They recommended that he
head south to London. He was
planning to do so when war
intervened.
Mr. Boyd served in the Royal
Navy and was aboard a minesweeper during the Normandy
invasion. The naval vessels were
crucial to the success of the
landings, and his ship helped get
the Allied wounded back to hospitals in Britain.
When he started off in the hat
trade in postwar England, rationing was still in force and most
women were still wearing handme-down hats from their mothers. He apprenticed with the
Danish-born Aage Thaarup, at
the time the most famous milliner in the United Kingdom, before starting his own business in
1951, sleeping under his work
table while amassing royal clients based on word of mouth.
One of his first clients was
Frances Shand Kydd, Lady Diana’s mother. Another was a teenage Princess Anne, whose image
he helped turn from “horsy” —
like many royals, she loved horses
and wore men’s flat caps — to a
fashion heroine in her own right.
She initially thought fancy
women’s hats were “square” —
uncool, in 1960s argot — until Mr.
Boyd regaled her royal head with
boaters, sombreros, London businessmen bowlers and even a
black Stetson. Princess Anne became a driver of women’s fashion,
a precursor of her future sisterin-law Diana.
After many relocations over
the decades, Mr. Boyd settled his
shop on Beauchamp Place in
1994. Some of his hats are part of
a permanent collection in London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. He also started another
business, Pamela’s, which sold
secondhand designer dresses to
women who could not afford the
originals. It became what locals
called “a secondhand boutique
for posh frocks.”
In 2014, the queen awarded
Mr. Boyd an MBE — Member of
the British Empire — for his
services to fashion. He died at his
home in Brighton, England, said
Marshall, who did not provide a
cause. He never married and had
no immediate survivors.
For all his acclaim, Mr. Boyd
liked to recall his initial attempt
to fashion a head-crowning design for a demanding client. “My
first hat was literally thrown back
at me by an outraged woman in
Chelsea,” he once said. “ ‘You
beast!’ she screamed. ‘I’m looking
for a new husband, not trying to
get rid of one.’ ”
newsobits@washpost.com
“He was always very discreet about his royal clientele, which rewarded him with their loyalty.”
On Saturday, March 3, 2018, formerly of
Hyattsville, MD. Beloved wife of the late
Andrew Berdak; loving mother of Mary
Ann (Richard) Zavadowski, Michael (Barbara) Berdak, Karen (Edward) Patton and
Marlene (Romano) Mascetti; deeply cherished grandmother of Tina, Angela, Chris,
Andrew, Daniel, Heather and Rom; greatgrandmother of Kyle, Natalie and Lexi.
Friends may call at Gasch's Funeral Home,
P.A., 4739 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville,
MD on Thursday, March 8 from 2 to 4 and
7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be offered
at St. Jerome's Catholic Church, 5205 43rd
Avenue, Hyattsville, MD on Friday, March
9 at 10:30 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in her name to the
Alzheimer's Association National Capital
Area, 3701 Pender Drive, Suite 400, Fairfax,
VA 22030.
www.gaschs.com
BUCHANAN
Honorable JOHN H. BUCHANAN, JR.
(Age 89)
On, Monday, March 5, 2018 of Rockville, MD.
Beloved husband of the late Elizabeth “Betty”
M. Buchanan. Dear father of Liz and Lynn
Buchanan. Loving grandfather of three beautiful granddaughters. John is also survived by
many other loving relatives and friends.
Born in Tennessee, Buchanan was raised in
Birmingham, AL, which he represented in the
U.S. Congress for 16 years. He was an ordained
Baptist minister and served as interim pastor
at Riverside Baptist in Washington. Over a
long career in public service, he advocated
on behalf of many causes such as first amendment rights, human rights and civic engagement.
Friends may be received at Pumphrey’s Funeral Home, 300 W. Montgomery Ave., Rockville,
MD on Friday, March 9 from 3 to 4 p.m.
and 7 to 8 p.m. A memorial service will be
held at St. Alban’s Church, 3001 Wisconsin
Ave., NW, Washington, DC on Sat. March 10
at 11 a.m. Inurnment to take place at the
church Columbarium. In lieu of flowers, the
family request donations may be made in
John’s name to SOME So Others Might Eat,
www.some.org or to St. Alban’s Church in his
memory. Please view and sign online family
guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
BUCKELEW
BRUCE NORMAN BUCKELEW (Age 68)
A former USAF Guard Sergeant and FAA Police
Officer, died February 18, 2018, at his home in
Sterling, VA after a stroke.
Mr. Buckelew was born in Washington, DC and
grew up in Falls Church, VA. He graduated from
George C. Marshall High School in Falls Church.
In the USAF, he was assigned to Combat
Security Police Squadron 483 stationed at Cam
Ranh Bay AFB in Vietnam, at Andrews AFB in
MD, and other postings. Following his USAF
service, he was an FAA Police Officer at Dulles
International Airport in Chantilly, VA.
Survivors include a son, Michael B. Buckelew of
Aldie, VA; a grandson, Colin M. Buckelew; and
two brothers, Roger C. Buckelew of Manassas,
and Daniel V. Buckelew of Vienna.
Sarah Marshall, a protegee of hatmaker John Boyd who took over his business two years ago
Interment ceremony at the Arlington National
Cemetery Columbarium to be scheduled. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the
Wounded Warriors Project.
OF NOTE
GERRIG
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern
Virginia.
the Meridian International Center, a nonprofit educational and
cultural organization.
Roger Landrum,
service movement leader
Roger Landrum, 80, a cofounder and executive director of
the volunteer organization Youth
Service America, died Dec. 9 at
his home in Washington. The
cause was cancer, said a friend,
William Currier.
Dr. Landrum, a District resident, was born in Overton, Tex.
He was a Peace Corps volunteer
in Nigeria and later became president of Returned Peace Corps
Volunteers of Washington. In the
late 1960s, he founded The Teachers Inc., a predecessor of Teach
for America. He helped start
Youth Service of America in 1986
and, later, Youth Service International. After his retirement in
1998, he traveled widely and won
awards for his photography.
Sybil Goldman,
mental-health expert
Sybil Goldman, 74, who retired
from Georgetown University in
2014 after three decades as an
expert in children’s mental
health and health-care policy,
died Dec. 26 at her home in
Washington. The cause was peritoneal cancer, said a son, Ethan
Goldman.
Mrs. Goldman was born Sybil
Killourhy in Boston. She settled
in the Washington area in 1978
and spent most of her career with
the National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health and Georgetown’s Center for Child and Human Development, where she was a senior
adviser.
In the early 2000s, Mrs. Goldman went on loan to the federal
Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Services Administration
as a senior adviser. She also
worked on national mentalhealth task forces and commissions and volunteered as an usher at Arena Stage in the District.
William Hotes,
lobbyist
William Hotes, 86, a lobbyist
and vice president for Diamond
Shamrock Corp., an oil and
chemical company where he
worked for three decades, died
Dec. 30 at his home in Silver
Spring, Md. The cause was kidney failure, said a son, Robert
Hotes.
Mr. Hotes was born in East
Cleveland, Ohio. He moved to the
Washington area in 1977 and
worked in government relations
before retiring in 1994. He was a
past president of Telocator, a
trade association for the mobile
communications industry, and
was on the board of what is now
Kendrick Lee Jr.,
HHS officer
Kendrick Lee Jr., 80, who spent
20 years as an officer of the
Department of Health and Human Services, died Feb. 14 at a
hospice center in Harwood, Md.
The cause was a brain tumor, said
his wife, Sandra Lee.
Mr. Lee, a resident of Mitchellville, Md., was born in Boston. He
retired from HHS 25 years ago as
a specialist in working with
states on welfare regulations and
programs. He was a former senior warden and co-director of the
education program at St. Mark’s
Episcopal Church on Capitol Hill.
He was a wintertime skier and a
summertime sailor who sailed
his boat to Bermuda and Maine.
Herman ‘Hy’ Badler,
CBS executive
Herman “Hy” Badler, 91, an
engineer and vice president of
CBS News who directed engineering and planning for coverage of such special events as
NASA space missions and national political conventions, died
Jan. 2 at a hospital in Silver
Spring, Md. The cause was pneumonia, said a daughter, Danielle
Badler.
Mr. Badler, a Silver Spring
resident, was born in New York
City. He moved to Washington in
1977 and retired from CBS in 1988
after 37 years with the network.
He later was a consultant with
the U.S. Information Agency, PBS
and the 1996 Olympic Games in
Atlanta.
Janice Shellington,
communications specialist
Janice Shellington, 61, a 30year employee of Children’s National Medical Center who handled telephone communications
between patients and medical
care providers, died Dec. 29 at
her home in Washington. The
cause was cancer, said a daughter, Shaka Ussery.
Mrs. Shellington was born Janice Burke in Boston and moved to
Washington as a child. She
worked at Children’s National
Medical Center until 2016.
William Hamilton,
USIA officer
William Hamilton, 92, a U.S.
Information Agency employee
from 1952 to 1984 who had served
in London, Brussels and Jakarta
and whose duties included press
attache and public affairs officer,
died Dec. 8 at an assisted-living
center in Hyattsville, Md. The
cause was several strokes, said a
daughter, Ellen O’Donnell.
Mr. Hamilton, a former resident of Silver Spring, Md., was
born in Brooklyn, N.Y. After he
retired from the USIA, he was a
research fellow and faculty adviser at the National War College
and a historian with the Commission on the Bicentennial of the
U.S. Constitution.
Sidney Glazer,
Justice Dept. lawyer
Sidney Glazer, 96, a lawyer for
50 years with the Justice Department who had served as chief of
the appellate section in the criminal division and argued nine
cases before the U.S. Supreme
Court, died Jan. 3 at a hospital in
Bethesda, Md. The cause was
pneumonia, said his son Saul
Glazer.
Mr. Glazer, a Bethesda resident, was born in St. Louis, where
he practiced law before joining
the Justice Department in 1961.
In 1973 and 1974, he served on the
Watergate special prosecution
team that investigated the breakin and coverup that eventually
led to the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon. He retired in 2011.
John Marsh,
FAA lawyer
John Marsh, 94, who spent 22
years as an Federal Aviation Administration lawyer before retiring in 1980, died Dec. 30 at a
hospital in Fairfax County, Va.
The cause was a stroke, said a
daughter, Sharon Marsh.
Mr. Marsh, a Fairfax County
resident, was born in Petersburg,
Tenn. He had lived in the Washington area since 1951 and
worked with the federal Office of
Price Stabilization, the former
Veterans Administration and the
Justice Department before joining the FAA.
His work there included a stint
as associate general counsel of
the enforcement division. In the
wake of aircraft hijackings, his
family said, he helped develop a
passenger screening list for commercial airlines. He also helped
develop the federal sky marshal
program, his family said.
Janet Levin,
teacher, office manager
Janet Levin, 82, who worked
variously as a preschool teacher
at the Chevy Chase Baptist
Church Child Care Center, a medical office manager in Bethesda,
Md., and a partner in a craftssales booth at the Bethesda Farm
Women’s Market, died Dec. 20 at
a hospital in Washington. The
cause was a stroke, said a daughter, Pamela Levin. Mrs. Levin, a
District resident, was born Janet
Archibald in Winchester, Mass.
She retired in 1994 after having
been an office manager for a
neurology practice and an obstetrics and gynecology practice.
— From staff reports
The green pages.
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 5x.1
DANIEL LOUIS GERRIG
On Sunday, March 4, 2018, DANIEL
LOUIS GERRIG at his home in Leesburg, VA, after a year-long battle
with cancer. Born on February 9,
1961 in Marblehead, MA, to Burton and the late Marcia Gerrig,
Dan graduated from Marblehead High School,
Cornell and George Mason University. After a
career with the Air Force, Dan worked for the
Department of Defense. Survivors include his
wife, Yehudit Shem-Tov; son, Aylon; daughter,
Ariella, all of Leesburg, VA; father, Burt of
Ashland, MA; brother, Robert Gerrig of Natick,
MA; sister, Jennifer (David) Walsh of Medway,
MA and three nephews. Graveside funeral
services will be held on March 7, 2018, 2
p.m., Garden of Remembrance Memorial Park,
Clarksburg, MD. Shiva will be observed at
family home on Thursday, Saturday, Sunday
and Monday evenings, with minyan at 8 p.m.
Memorial contributions may be made to
Chabad of Reston-Herndon at ;
www.chabadrh.org.
Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY
HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001.
GRIFFIN
DANIEL MICHAEL GRIFFIN (Age 92)
On Monday, March 5, 2018.
Beloved husband of the late Edith
Orlando Griffin; father of Patrick
Joseph (Annie) and Daniel Michael
(Rebecca Weiss) Griffin; grandfather of Tricia, Brian, Rael and Elia
Griffin; great-grandfather of Benjamin, Madeline Griffin, and Rosie Griffin Walsh,
Theodore Griffin, and Charles Sagley. Relatives
and friends may call at St. Camillus Catholic
Church, 1600 St. Camillus Drive, Silver Spring,
MD on Thursday, March 8 from 9 a.m. till the
Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. Interment
Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
www.borgwardtfuneralhome.com
GRIFFITH
ETHEL TOLSON GRIFFITH (Age 90)
A lifetime resident of Upper Marlboro, MD
transitioned on Saturday, February 24, 2018.
Survived by her son, Adrian Griffith (Lorrie);
brother, Donald Gilford Tolson, Sr.; daughter-inlaw, Angelia Griffith; son-in-law, James Pinkney;
grandchildren, Jessica, April, Aric, Andre and
Jordan; Union United Methodist Church
friends; a host of other relatives and friends.
She was predeceased by her daughter, Pamela
Pinkney and son, Steven Griffith. Service will be
held Friday, March 9, 2018 at Forest Memorial
United Methodist Church, 3111 Forestville Rd.,
Forestville, MD, visitation, 10 a.m.; service,
11:30 a.m. Interment Cheltenham Veterans
Cemetery Monday, March 12, 1 p.m. Arrangements by McGUIRE.
www.mcguire-services.com
DEATH NOTICE
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
CRANFORD
SMITH
CASEY
GRIFFITH
PARRIS
WATSON
JOHN J. CASEY
STEVEN GRIFFITH
(Age 53)
JAMES L. PARRIS
RASHEED TARIK WATSON
On Sunday, March 4, 2018. The quintessential Irish gentleman, he was a husband, father, grandfather, Marine, pilot, and
police officer who put his heart into all his
callings. He was kind and fun-loving, and we
always loved his company. He was a strong
willed, independent man who believed in
doing-it-yourself, and taught his family to
do the same. He will be greatly missed.
John is survived by his daughters, Susan
and Regina; and his two grandchildren. A
Requiem Mass will be held at St. Mary of
the Assumption Catholic Church in Upper
Marlboro this Saturday at 11 a.m.
DELIS
NIKI K. DELIS
On March 1, 2018, Niki K. Delis of Washington, DC passed away peacefully while surrounded by loved ones. Niki was born in
Greece and proudly became a United States
citizen in 1950. She was a devout member
of St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral since
the 1950s. She was an active member of
St. Sophia’s Philoptochos society and wholeheartedly enjoyed volunteering her time cooking for the Greek bazaars, helping to raise
money for various causes, and singing in the
church choir. She embraced her identity as a
Greek-American often writing articles on social
events for a Greek newspaper. In addition, she
taught Greek to young students in school and
at home. She is survived by Chris, her loving
husband of 57 years; George, her devoted son;
and Niki, her cherished granddaughter who
carries on her name. She will be remembered
as an active member of the community; a
woman with a zest for life expressed most
often through dance, song, and cooking; and
a matriarch who valued faith and family above
all. Niki’s viewing will be at the Joseph Gawler’s
Sons Funeral Home, located at 5130 Wisconsin
Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016 on Wednesday,
March 7, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Her funeral service will be at the St.
Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral at 11 a.m.
on March 8. In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to the St. Sophia Greek Orthodox
Cathedral, 2815 36th St and Massachusetts.
Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20007.
DOYLE
DORIS PATEROS DOYLE (Age 89)
On Saturday, March 3, 2018, of
Leisure World in Silver Spring, MD,
formerly of Kensington, MD and
Cape Cod, MA. Beloved wife of
the late Thomas F. Doyle; sister of
the late John J. Pateros; sister-inlaw of the late Margaret Pateros;
aunt of John Pateros (Deirdre), Lawrence H.
Pateros (Kathryn), Mertie Ann Pateros, Doris
VanSickle (Paul), Charles N. Pateros (Denise)
and the late Mary Jo Pateros. Also survived by
great nieces, nephews and other loving family
and friends. Relatives and friends may call at
Our Lady of Grace Church, 15661 Norbeck Blvd,
Silver Spring, MD, Friday, March 9, from 10:30
to 11 a.m.; where the Mass of Christian Burial
will follow at 11 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions in her
memory may be made to Sisters of the Blessed
Sacrament, 1663 Bristol Pike, Bensalem, PA
19020.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
FINK
Suddenly a lifetime resident of Prince George's
County, MD on Saturday, February 24, 2018.
Survived by his wife, Angelia Griffith; son, Jordan Griffith; stepson, Andre Henderson; brother, Adrian Griffith (Lorrie) of Mt. Pleasant, SC;
nieces and nephews, Jessica, April and Aric;
and a host of other relatives and friends.
He was predeceased by his father, Edward
Griffith and his sister, Pamela Pinkney. He
preceded his mother, Ethel Tolson Griffith in
death by nine hours. Services will be held
Friday, March 9, 2018 at Forest Memorial
United Methodist Church, 3111 Forestville Rd.,
Forestville, MD, visitation, 10 a.m.; service,
11:30 a.m. Interment private. Arrangements by
McGuire.
www.mcguire-services.com
JOHNSON
DALE MARIE JOHNSON
Dale passed away on February 11, 2018.
She is survived by family members,
Emmanuel (son), Dianne, Donald and
Debra (sisters and brother) and their families. Dale was born on July 2, 1952 to
parents, John F.. Johnson and Dolly Pitts
Johnson (both deceased) in Washington,
DC. Dale attended District schools and
graduated from Howard University. Dale
was a faithful attendee at Holy Comforter
and Emory churches. SERVICE WILL BE
PRIVATE.
KECK
PERCY THOMAS KECK
On Saturday, March 3, 2018 of Burke, Virginia.
Beloved husband of Jane L. Keck, loving father
of Fred (Sheridan) Keck, Karen Canniff, John
Kim Keck and Leslie (John) Schetter. Grandfather of Kimberly and Emily Keck, Jason and
Jordan Graves, Cody and Tyler Canniff, great
grandfather of Jacob, Romero, Mya and Marcello.
The family will receive friends at Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock Road, Fairfax
on Thursday, March 8 from 2 to 4 and 7
to 9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in
St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church, 9203
Braddock Road, Burke on Friday at 11 a.m.
Interment Fairfax Memorial Park. In lieu of
flowers memorial contributions may be to
St. Stephen’s UMC Memorial Fund or to the
Alzheimer’s Foundation.
LOGAN
ELLA LaVERNE LOGAN (Age 91)
Of Sunderland on February 23, 2018. She is
survived by children Robert Bruno, Christian
Bruno (Anita) and Stanley Cook III (Pamela), four
grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren and
“adopted” daughter Beth Jenkins. Preceded in
death by husbands Mauro Bruno, Stanley Cook,
Jr. and Richard Logan and brother Louis Wolf,
Jr. Friends will be received Saturday, March
10 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at First Lutheran
Church of Calvert County, service to follow at
11:30 a.m. Interment will follow in Parklawn
Memorial Park at 2 p.m.
www.rauschfuneralhomes.com
MASER
RUTH G. MASER
BONITA L. FINK
"Bonnie" (Age 70)
Of Arundel, ME died peacefully on Sunday,
March 4, 2018 at The Landing at Saco Bay
in Saco, ME, following a period of declining
health. She was born in Brattleboro, VT on
October 2, 1947, the daughter of Elliot Richmond and Patricia Ann (McGrail) Brown. She
grew up in New Hampshire, graduating from
Stevens High School in Claremont, NH.
Bonnie was introduced to her future husband,
Dan L. Fink, by Dan’s father, with whom she
worked. Bonnie and Dan were married on
February 3, 1968, and just celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary this year.
Living in Virginia, Bonnie was an Administrative
Officer for Fairfax county schools. She and Dan
moved to Maine in December 2006.
Bonnie enjoyed cooking, traveling, antiquing,
and spending time with Dan at many Bed and
Breakfast inns.
Survivors include her loving husband of 50
years, Danny L. Fink of Arundel; two sons,
James C. Fink of Sterling, VA and Patrick L. Fink
of Ashburn, VA; her brother, Elliot Brown of
Charlestown, NH; and her four grandchildren,
Rachel, Ethan, Connor and Emma.
A Celebration of Life will be held in both
Kennebunk and Virginia at a later date. Should
friends choose, memorial donations in her
name are encouraged to: The Alzheimer’s
Association-Maine Chapter, 383 U.S. Route
One, Suite 2C, Scarborough, ME 04074.
To share a memory or leave a message of
condolence, please visit Bonnie’s Book of
Memories Page at
www.bibberfuneral.com
FISHER
FREDERICK FISHER
Passed away on February 25, 2018. Loving
husband of Carrie Fisher; father of Frederick II (Patricia) and Cherita. Friends may
call at Historic Berean Baptist Church, 1400
Montana Ave., NE, Washington, DC On
March 9, 2018 from 10 a.m. until the funeral
at 11 a.m. Interment Maryland Veterans
Cemetery, Crownsville, MD.
www.gaschs.com
When the need
arises, let families
find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
On Monday, March 5,
2018 of Bethesda, MD.
Beloved wife of the late
Dr. Avron Maser; devoted mother of Peter (Beth)
Maser and Karen Maser;
loving sister of Joanne
Goldwater and cherished
grandmother of Jordan
Maser and Maxwell
Maser. Graveside services will be held on
Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. at
Garden of Remembrance, 14321 Comus
Road, Clarksburg, MD 20871. Family will be
observing Shiva at the home of Peter Maser
on Thursday evening. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to
Johns Hopkins Office of Annual Giving, 3400
N. Charles Street, San Martin Center, Baltimore, MD 21218 with attention to Gift
Processing Supervisor. Services entrusted
to Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky Goldberg.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
McKENZIE
LLOYD G. McKENZIE, JR.
Passed away on Monday, February 26,
2018. On Thursday, March 8, 2018 from 10
a.m. until service time at 11 a.m. friends
may visit with the family at Trinity AME Zion
Church, 3505 16th St. NW, Washington, DC
20010. Interment: Lincoln Memorial Cemetery, Suitland, MD.
PENNY
MILLIE LOU PENNY (Age 91)
Passed away on March 4, 2018 at Manor
Care Nursing Home.
Wake 10 a.m. and Services 11 a.m. on
Friday, March 9, 2018 at First Rising Mount
Zion Baptist Church, 602 N Street, NW.
She leaves behind, one daughter, Ruby
Morse; two sons Roland Penny (Harriett),
Thomas Penny, Jr. (Gail); granddaughter,
Tanya Penny; two grandsons Thomas
Penny, III, Carl Hampton and four great
grandchildren and a host of other relatives
and friends.
Interment Lincoln Cemetery, Suitland, MD.
Arrangements by J.B. Jenkins Funeral
Home.
WHALEN
GEORGIA LEE CRANFORD (Age 82)
SASSO
MARIO P. SASSO (Age 79)
Of McLean, VA, passed away peacefully on
Sunday, March 4, 2018. Loving husband of Lynn
M. Sasso; father of Lisa M. Lang, Kimberly
D. Cooper, Pietro A. Sasso and Lisa Damiano;
grandfather of five and brother of Victoria
Salerno. Visitation will be held Thursday, March
8, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Money and King Funeral
Home, 171 W Maple Ave., Vienna, VA. A Funeral
Mass will be celebrated Friday, March 9 at 10
a.m. at St. James Catholic Church, 905 Park
Ave., Falls Church, VA. Interment will follow at
Columbia Gardens Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to the American
Cancer Society or the Hospice Foundation of
America. Share a memory with the family at
www.MoneyAndKing.com
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
DEATH NOTICE
EVA EVELYN WHALEN (nee Countiss)
(Age 79)
On Monday, February 26, 2018, Eva Evelyn
Whalen (nee Countiss) of Capitol Heights, MD
died peacefully. She leaves to cherish her
memory her devoted husband, John Whalen,
Jr.; granddaughter, Tannia; brother, Edward
Countiss (Catherine), Mechanicsville, MD; sister, Mary Ann Allen (George), Mitchellville, MD
and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and
friends
Funeral services will be held on Thursday,
March 8, 2018 at St. Margaret of Scotland
Catholic Church, 410 Addison Road South,
Seat Pleasant, MD, Viewing: 10 a.m.; Mass: 11
a.m. Interment Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD on March 14, 2018 at
2:30 p.m.
On Monday, March 5, 2018 of Bethesda, MD,
Steven A. Schatten passed away peacefully. He
is survived by his wife of 46 years, Francoise
Maury Schatten; sons Marc and Eric; his daughter-in-law Stacy Rich and his grandsons Louis
and Charlie. He is also survived by his brothers
Gerald Schatten and Kenneth Schatten and
many relatives and friends in the U.S. and in
France.
Mr. Schatten was born in Brooklyn, NYC. He
received his degree in finance from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School. He
graduated from Harvard Law School where
he served as an Editor of the Harvard Law
Review. He clerked for U.S. District Judge Walter
Mansfield. He worked as a federal prosecutor
in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan and
worked as an attorney for the Department
of Energy. After retirement, he volunteered
for the National Alliance of the Mentally Ill.
Service will be held at PUMPHREY’S BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE FUNERAL HOME, 7557 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, MD 20814 on Thursday,
March 8, 2018 at 10 a.m. Interment Monocacy
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to National Alliance of
the Mentally Ill, 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100
Arlington, VA 22203. Please view and sign the
family guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
SHAPIRO
Wife of James Whitney, mother of Kevin Whitney and Karen Curry, servant of Jesus Christ
transitioned on February 13, 2018. Memorial
Celebration March 10, 2018 at The Pennsylvania Avenue Baptist Church, 3000 Pennsylvania Ave., SE, DC 20020. Visitation at 10 a.m.,
Memorial Celebration Service at 11 a.m.
WOHLFARTH
DOROTHY LEE REED WOHLFARTH
(Age 98)
Of Pompano Beach, FL passed away on March
1, 2018. Graveside service at Rock Creek
Cemetery, Washington, DC on Friday, March 16
at 1 p.m.
www.kraeerpompanobeach.net
Family will receive friends for Georgia’s Memorial Gathering on Thursday March 8, 2018 at
12 p.m. at the Mechanicsville Moose Lodge,
27636 Mechanicsville Rd., Mechanicsville, MD
20659. Interment will be private.
Condolences to the family may be made at
www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by
the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A. Charlotte
Hall, MD.
In lieu of flowers, please send donations to
Hospice of St. Mary’s.
CELESTINE M. TYLER
On Sunday, February 25, 2018. Loving and
devoted mother of Alicia P. Moore, Denise
C. Tyler, Teresa A. Jones, Kenneth D. Watson
and Michael Tyler. She is also survived by her
brother, Gerald Watson; six grandchildren, six
great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren and a host of other relatives and
friends. Mrs. Tyler will lie in state at Peoples
Congregational Church, 3704 13th St., NW,
Saturday, March 10 from 9 a.m. until funeral
services at 10 a.m. Interment Lincoln Memorial
Cemetery. Services by STEWART.
WRIGHT
Passed away peacefully on Saturday, March
3, 2018 after a five-year battle with Lewy
Body/Parkinson disease. John was born on
August 8, 1932 in Seattle, Washington. He
spent much of his life overseas in the Foreign
Service and travelling over decades on fun
adventures with his wife Lucy. He worked for
almost 50 years at the Central Intelligence
Agency – a true public servant; however, his
true loves were family, friends, and music! He
is survived by his beloved wife Lucy Dailey;
their children and their spouses, Patricia Dailey,
Peter and Karen Dailey, and Allen and Jen
Herzberg; grandchildren, P.J. Dailey, Grant
Herzberg, Jessica Lowe, Lauren Herzberg, and
Gracie Lowe; and his cherished caregiver
Janelaze “Munchie” Dermott. A visitation will
be held on Friday, March 9, 2018 from 6 to 8
p.m. at the Everly Funeral Home & Cremation
Service, 6161 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church,
Virginia. A Catholic Mass will be offered on
Saturday, March 10, 2018 at 1 p.m. at St.
Charles Catholic Church, 3304 N. Washington
Blvd., Arlington, Virginia. Following the Mass,
a reception will be held at John and Lucy’s
home in Arlington. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made in John’s name to the Parkinson
Foundation of the National Capital Area at
7700 Leesburg Pike #208, Falls Church, Virginia
22043.
www.everlycommunity.com
JAMES S. WRIGHT "Jim" (Age 90)
Of Reading, PA passed away March 4, 2018.
Jim was employed by the Government Housing
& Urban Development in Washington, DC in the
accounting Department for 32 years retiring
in 1998. Services will be Wednesday, March
14, 2018 at 10 a.m. in Theo C. Auman Funeral
Home, 247 Penn St., Reading, PA. Burial to
follow in Christ Yocom's Lutheran Church
Cemetery. Viewing will be Wednesday 9 to
10 a.m. in the funeral home.
www.theocauman.com
FENNELL
ANTHONY NATOLI
"Tony " (Age 93)
Of Annandale, Virginia on March 5, 2018.
Husband of the late Virginia Natoli; father of
Lee Anthony Natoli, Linda (John) Almassey and
Mildred; son of the late Salvator and Rose
Natoli; grandfather of Quentin Casper, Brenda,
Greg and family; great grandfather of Kelly and
Rachel. Funeral service at Jefferson Funeral
Chapel, 5755 Castlewellan Drive, Alexandria,
VA at 11 a.m. on Saturday March 10, 2018,
where family will receive friends one hour
prior. Interment at Quantico National Cemetery
on Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 2 p.m. Please
view and sign the family guestbook at
www.jeffersonfuneralchapel.com
OBERG
HERBERT A. SHAPIRO
VINCENT
FRANCIS C. VINCENT
GAITHER
CAROL MILLER OBERG
Passed away suddenly at her home in Bowie,
MD on February 26, 2018. Born in Los Angeles,
CA in 1947 to the late Dr. Alwin and Patricia
Miller. She is survived by her brothers, Alwin
and William; daughter, Nitiya; daughter-in-law,
Claudette; five grandchildren; three greatgrandchildren, and beloved husband of nearly
forty years, Chris Oberg. She was predeceased
by her son, Thomas.
Avid traveler, nature lover, fan of fine arts and
fine foods and fine wines and laughter, a loving
friend, a great wife and devoted daughter,
sister, wife, mother, daughter-in-law, motherin-law, grandmother and great-grandmother.
She touched many lives and hearts and will be
deeply missed.
A memorial service will be held Saturday,
March 10, 2018 at Beall Funeral Home, 6512
Crain Hwy. (Rt. 3 South), Bowie, MD 20715,
at 1 p.m. Interment details are still to be
determined. In lieu of flowers, the family
requests donations in her memory to St. Jude’s
Children’s Medical Center or the Wounded
Warrior Project or a recognized charity of your
own choice. Please view and sign the family’s
guestbook at:
www.beallfuneral.com
On Sunday, March 4, 2018, of
Silver Spring, MD. Beloved husband of the late Anita Lenahan
Vincent; uncle of Anne Marie Martinez, Mike, Tim, Jerry, Joe, and
Bob Vincent; also survived by several generations of great nieces
and nephews who were a special part of
his life. The family is deeply grateful to all
those who cared for Uncle Franny, especially
Meg and the staff at Grace House, and the
caregivers of CarePlus and Montgomery Hospice. Relatives and friends may call at St. John
the Baptist Church, 12319 New Hampshire
Avenue, Silver Spring, MD, on Saturday, March
10 beginning at 10 a.m. with Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Interment
Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to Gonzaga College High
School, 19 Eye St. NW, Washington, DC 20001
or Little Sisters of the Poor, 4200 Harewood
Rd. NE, Washington, DC 20017 or Montgomery
Hospice, 1355 Piccard Dr., Suite 100, Rockville,
MD 20850.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
DORIS PAYNE YOUNKERS (Age 89)
On Sunday, March 4, 2018 of Silver Spring,
MD. Loving wife of the late Donald Robert
Younkers; Dear mother of Sandra (husband
Jack) Pace, Susan (husband Mark) Lindnerdeceased, Buddy (wife Jaye) Younkers, Sharon
Younkers, Lee (wife Deborah) Younkers, and
Jim (wife Rebecca) Younkers. Cherished grandmother and great-grandmother. She is also
survived by many other loving relatives and
friends.
Doris was born in Charlotte, NC in 1928 to
Lee A. and Elizabeth B. Payne and her family
migrated to Silver Spring, MD shortly thereafter. She is survived by two sisters, Anita
Coates and Barbara Rees. She is predeceased
by one sister, Betty Romero. Doris met her
husband, Donald R. (Buddy) Younkers in Silver
Spring in 1942 and they married in 1946. In
addition to raising six children, Doris and her
husband, Buddy, founded Rockville Dental Lab
in 1951, and then Mt. Airy Dental Lab, which
still operates today.
A graveside service will be held on Monday,
March 12 at 1 p.m. at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, 13801 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, MD.
Please view and sign online family guestbook
at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
DEATH NOTICE
COLSTON
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
YOUNKERS
Peacefully on Thursday, March 1, 2018. Family
will receive friends at Redeeming Love
Outreach Center, 4611 Nannie H. Burroughs
Ave., NE, Friday, March 9, visitation, 10 a.m.;
service, 11 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery, Clinton, MD. Services by FREEMAN.
On Monday, March 5, 2018 Herbert A. Shapiro of Grasonville,
MD. Beloved husband of Louise
Shapiro; devoted father of
Mark, Marcia, Lawrence Norman, and Rona Shapiro; loving
grandfather of nine grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will be held on Sunday,
March 18, 2018 at 11:30 a.m. at Temple
B’nai Israel, 101 W Earle Ave., Easton, MD
21601 with interment at Arlington National
Cemetery at a future date to be announced.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to Temple B’nai Israel, or to
Dr. Evan Lipson Melanoma and Immunology
Research at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, PO Box 17029, Baltimore, MD
21297. Services entrusted to Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky Goldberg Funeral Care.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
TYLER
JOHN JOSEPH DAILEY
DOROTHY BERNICE WHITNEY
McMILLAN-MILLER
NATOLI
LLOYD G. SMITH
LT. COL., D.C. ANG (Ret.)
On Wednesday, February 28, 2018, Lloyd G.
Smith, beloved husband of Claudette Smith
died suddenly at his home. Visitation, Thursday,
March 8 from 9:30 a.m. until service, 10:30
a.m. at J.B. JENKINS FUNERAL HOME, 7474
Landover Rd., Hyattsville, MD. Interment Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.
DAILEY
SCHATTEN
STEVEN ARTHUR SCHATTEN (Age 75)
Of Charlotte Hall, MD, passed away on March
2, 2018 at her residence. Georgia was born
on February 8, 1936 in Gallinger Hospital in
Washington, DC. She was the daughter of the
late Kemper Lee Mills and Lillian Evon Ryan
Mills. She and her loving husband, Charles
Cranford lived a beautiful happy life until he
passed away in 1994. At the age of 21, Georgia
began her career with the U.S. Department
of Agriculture, retiring in 1986 after 29 years
with the Federal Government. In addition to
her parents, Georgia was predeceased by her
husband, Charles Edward Cranford and her
brothers Kemper Lee Mills and James Robert
Mills. Georgia is survived by her daughter Terry
L. and son-in-law Gary W. Kitts; sisters Lillian M.
“Eve” Alderson (James), and Carole Williams.
As well as many nieces and nephews.
WHITNEY
LINDA ANN McMILLAN-MILLER (Age 59)
DEATH NOTICE
LARRY J. GAITHER
Departed this life on March 2, 2018. Rasheed is
survived by his mother and sister. Services at
Galbraith AME Zion Church, Thursday, March 8;
Viewing, 10 a.m.; Services, 11 a.m. Interment
at Maryland National Cemetery. Arrangements
by Universal Mortuary.
WILLIE MAE FENNELL
To be seen in the Funeral
Services Directory, please
call paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
On Wednesday, February 28, 2018. Beloved
husband of Sylvia Gaither; father of Jujuan and
Tory Gaither and Erica Keys; son of Bertha and
Gaither son-in-law of Doretha Lewis. Family
will receive friends on Thursday, March 8,
from 10 a.m. until time of funeral service
11 a.m. at Allen Chapel AME Church, 3818
Fairland Rd., Silver Spring, MD. Interment Gate
of Heaven Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted
to SNOWDEN FUNERAL HOME.
www.snowdencares.com
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the February 16, 2018
death of James L. Parris. He was an
OFF with MPD-8PCT when retired
on January 1, 1964.
B7
RE
On Monday, February 26, 2018, Willie Mae
Fennell of Clinton, MD passed on to her Heavenly reward. Loving mother of Valerie Dancy,
Sylvia Dorsey (Gregory), Adrienne Reeder
(Alvin) and David Fennell (Romaine). Also survived by 12 grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends. Family will receive friends
on Thursday, March 8, 2018 at STRICKLAND
FUNERAL SERVICES, 6500 Allentown Rd., Camp
Springs, MD, viewing, 6 to 9 p.m. and Friday,
March 9 at Peace Lutheran Church, 15 - 49th
Pl., NE, Washington, DC from 10 a.m. until
time of funeral service at 11 a.m. Interment
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 at Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MD at 1:45 p.m.
www.stricklandfuneralservices.com
KAY
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $566
4" - $609
5" - $744
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $599
4" - $685
5" - $834
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
THELMA EPPERSON KAY
Of Lanham, Maryland, entered into eternal rest
on Friday, February 23, 2018. Beloved wife of
the late Philip John Kay and devoted mother of
Kymberly C. Kay and Kendra C. Kay. She also
leaves to cherish her memory, a sister-in-law,
Emma K. Boyd, five nieces and five nephews.
Family will receive friends on Friday, March 9,
2018 from 10:30 a.m. until funeral service at
11 a.m. at First Baptist Church of Glenarden,
3600 Brightseat Road, Landover, MD. 20785.
Arrangements entrusted to JOHN T. RHINES
FUNERAL HOME.
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
WATERMAN
WILLIAM C. WATERMAN, JR. (Age 86)
Of LaPlata, MD passed away on February 28,
2018 at the University of MD Charles Regional
Medical Center in LaPlata, MD. He is predeceased by his parents William C. Waterman, Sr.
and the late Irene Waterman, his loving wife,
Norma E. Waterman; son, William Waterman;
and brother, Carl Waterman. He is survived by
his son, Kevin Waterman; sisters, Agnes Lamb
and Joan Hunt. The family will receive friends
at the Arehart-Echols Funeral Home LaPlata,
MD on Saturday March 10, 2018 from 1 p.m.
until Service time at 2 p.m. Interment will be at
a later date at the Arlington National Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be
made in William’s memory to the Alzheimer’s
Association.
Online condolences to the family can be left at
www.arehartechols.com
FLORA L. PROCTOR COLSTON (Age 100)
Transitioned peacefully on Tuesday, February
27, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Fred Colston,
Esq.; loving and devoted mother of Carol C.
Arledge-Clomax and Sandra Lee Pauciello (Sal).
She is also survived by her sister, Mildred
Nelson; one grandson, Derek C. Arledge, Sr.
(Chandace); two great-grandchildren, Derek C.
Arledge, Jr. and Charis K. Arledge; a host
of cousins, other relatives and friends. Mrs.
Colston will lie in state at Ashbury United
Methodist Church, 11th & K Sts., NW on Friday,
March 9 from 9:30 a.m. until funeral services
at 10:30 a.m. Interment Rock Creek Cemetery.
Services by STEWART.
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Rain and snow in the morning
A second round of precipitation may
be developing or ongoing around
sunrise, which could affect the
commute. For the most part, this
should be light in the immediate
area. Snow is favored to the north, while the I-95
corridor may see a mix, with rain farther south
and east. Winds will pick up and turn gusty out of
the northwest as precipitation tapers off during
the midday, and we might see some breaks in the
clouds before sunset. Highs are in the mid-40s or
so.
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Today
A.M. slushy
mix, windy
Thursday
Partly sunny,
breezy
Friday
Partly sunny,
breezy
Saturday
Partly sunny
42° 33
44° 32
47° 30
49° 31
46° 34
47° 34
FEELS*: 33°
FEELS: 37°
FEELS: 37°
FEELS: 44°
FEELS: 41°
FEELS: 39°
CHNCE PRECIP: 65%
P: 10%
P: 15%
P: 0%
P: 25%
P: 25%
WIND: NNE 10–20 mph
W: WNW 10–20 mph
W: WNW 10–20 mph
W: WNW 8–16 mph
W: NW 7–14 mph
W: NW 10–20 mph
°
°
°
Sunday
Mostly cloudy
°
°
Monday
Mostly cloudy,
breezy
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
35/29
Hagerstown
38/28
Davis
34/17
Sa
Su
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
37/31
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
37/28
Dover
41/31
Washington
42/33
FORECAST
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
46° 2:00 p.m.
33° 5:00 a.m.
52°/35°
81° 1961
10° 1888
43° 3:00 p.m.
23° 4:43 a.m.
52°/30°
70° 2004
6° 2015
45° 2:00 p.m.
24° 6:00 a.m.
50°/31°
76° 1935
10° 2015
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +1.9° yr. to date: +2.7°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 44°
Ocean City
44/33
OCEAN: 41°
Lexington
48/27
Richmond
53/32
Norfolk
53/36
Virginia Beach
54/36
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 41°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
53/38
OCEAN: 46°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
Trace
0.10"
0.57"
5.83"
6.00"
0.0"
3.3"
Trace
0.13"
0.56"
6.52"
5.98"
0.0"
6.6"
Trace
0.46"
0.66"
6.76"
6.61"
0.0"
8.7"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
1 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly cloudy, breezy, snow showers.
High 32–36. Wind northwest 15–25 mph. Tonight, breezy,
very cold. Low 15–19. Wind northwest 15–25 mph.
Thursday, partly sunny, cold. High 24–28. Wind northwest
8–16 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, morning rain, very windy, coastal
flooding. High 44–53. Wind northwest 15–25 mph. Tonight,
partly cloudy, breezy, cold. Low 33–37. Wind west 10–20
mph. Thursday, partly sunny, breezy. High 43–50. Wind
west 10–20 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, morning showers, mostly
cloudy. Wind northwest 10–20 knots. Waves 2 feet or less. •
Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, windy, mostly cloudy, a
morning shower. Wind northwest 15–25 knots. Waves 2 feet or less
on the Potomac, 1–3 feet on the Bay.• River Stages: Today, the stage
at Little Falls will be 4.4 feet, rising to 4.6 feet on Thursday. Flood
stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
6:30 a.m.
12:01 p.m.
7:17 p.m.
none
Annapolis
2:51 a.m.
9:21 a.m.
3:40 p.m.
9:26 p.m.
5:26 a.m.
11:20 a.m.
5:36 p.m.
11:48 p.m.
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Cape May
40/35
Annapolis
39/32
Charlottesville
52/30
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
Norfolk
1:07 a.m.
7:22 a.m.
1:24 p.m.
7:31 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:15 a.m.
12:02 p.m.
5:27 p.m.
11:27 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Melbourne, FL 83°
Low: Eureka, NV –15°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
34/30/sn
61/37/s
28/20/c
51/34/s
65/38/s
37/28/sn
37/24/pc
55/35/s
24/–1/pc
51/37/pc
38/34/sn
41/27/sn
39/30/sn
62/36/s
43/26/sn
54/28/pc
51/26/s
31/21/c
39/24/sf
39/25/sf
61/41/s
53/26/s
Tomorrow
37/26/sn
68/38/pc
31/25/sn
50/33/pc
66/50/pc
42/28/pc
40/31/c
53/33/s
26/14/pc
53/41/sh
43/31/sf
32/28/sf
36/27/sn
58/34/pc
36/26/sf
50/26/pc
59/33/c
36/21/s
37/23/c
34/29/sn
68/49/pc
65/34/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
35/21/pc
40/26/sf
72/46/s
27/14/pc
25/11/c
35/32/sn
79/67/pc
65/42/s
36/22/sf
57/34/s
68/37/s
42/22/pc
68/50/pc
53/32/s
74/53/pc
43/27/c
50/32/s
78/56/sh
31/22/c
28/15/pc
47/32/pc
62/45/s
37/32/sn
53/36/pc
37/22/pc
38/27/sn
76/52/c
25/17/sn
26/8/pc
42/27/c
79/67/pc
68/50/pc
35/22/pc
60/36/s
63/35/s
46/29/s
76/53/pc
57/38/s
75/54/pc
40/26/c
52/36/s
74/51/s
36/24/pc
30/15/pc
46/30/pc
66/47/pc
42/30/pc
50/33/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
54/30/s
33/18/pc
73/43/pc
37/31/sn
82/59/pc
43/24/sn
37/31/sn
56/43/pc
38/35/sn
53/30/pc
55/36/pc
53/32/pc
68/47/pc
40/26/pc
81/73/pc
47/32/s
70/53/pc
65/52/pc
82/71/pc
51/42/pc
45/35/pc
36/28/sn
70/50/pc
53/25/s
64/43/s
38/24/pc
68/42/s
41/26/pc
84/56/pc
34/27/sf
38/25/sn
54/44/r
45/29/c
48/27/pc
59/37/c
49/29/pc
66/46/sh
42/28/pc
82/73/pc
56/39/pc
70/54/pc
64/50/sh
84/74/pc
50/42/r
45/38/sh
34/27/sf
66/48/s
59/38/s
World
High: Kaolack, Senegal 110°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –58°
Mar 9
Last
Quarter
Mar 17
New
Mar 24
First
Quarter
Mar 31
Full
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
6:32 a.m.
none
7:11 a.m.
1:59 a.m.
11:28 p.m.
2:55 a.m.
Set
6:07 p.m.
10:00 a.m.
7:12 p.m.
11:24 a.m.
9:37 a.m.
12:27 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
71/48/pc
Amsterdam
48/36/sh
Athens
69/54/pc
Auckland
74/62/r
Baghdad
79/56/pc
Bangkok
92/78/t
Beijing
41/24/pc
Berlin
39/33/sn
Bogota
67/48/c
Brussels
48/36/sh
Buenos Aires
82/57/s
Cairo
93/77/s
Caracas
74/65/pc
Copenhagen
36/31/sn
Dakar
77/67/s
Dublin
45/31/pc
Edinburgh
45/30/c
Frankfurt
50/36/sh
Geneva
46/33/sh
Ham., Bermuda 68/64/pc
Helsinki
23/16/c
Ho Chi Minh City 96/76/pc
Tomorrow
77/47/pc
45/36/r
64/48/pc
73/63/sh
80/61/pc
93/73/t
45/22/s
47/33/pc
67/47/c
45/36/r
85/62/pc
93/61/pc
75/66/s
37/33/c
78/68/s
46/30/pc
43/31/pc
52/38/pc
49/39/pc
68/64/sh
26/22/sn
97/76/s
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
74/59/pc
81/53/pc
63/50/pc
70/55/s
79/59/pc
63/37/s
83/72/pc
92/66/pc
89/78/pc
77/70/pc
58/53/r
48/39/pc
52/41/pc
91/77/s
71/48/pc
37/26/c
22/11/c
91/77/pc
81/57/s
88/59/pc
31/25/sn
36/27/sn
49/39/sh
45/34/pc
62/55/sh
82/55/c
57/46/sh
79/52/pc
73/56/pc
59/38/c
85/74/pc
92/67/pc
89/78/t
78/69/pc
63/57/sh
48/36/pc
56/48/sh
90/77/s
76/52/pc
33/26/sn
24/13/s
91/77/pc
84/60/pc
91/63/pc
30/23/sn
34/24/sn
52/39/r
46/33/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
90/78/t
89/63/s
56/42/t
89/66/s
84/55/s
52/35/pc
50/32/c
51/43/r
89/76/t
32/26/c
74/68/pc
75/59/pc
66/50/pc
46/42/pc
39/28/c
49/37/pc
44/33/r
88/77/pc
91/62/s
59/48/pc
91/65/pc
83/55/s
44/29/sh
49/27/pc
53/34/c
90/78/c
32/28/sn
73/68/c
60/51/r
69/53/s
50/47/r
37/28/c
50/32/pc
46/31/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
Northam’s charm wins admirers, but Medicaid expansion still faces hurdles
NORTHAM FROM B1
nered pediatrician pulled practical jokes, played on the chamber’s
hapless basketball team and
treated legislators stricken with
flu, he enjoys goodwill that’s sorely missing from politics just
across the Potomac.
The question is whether those
bonds can translate into legislative victory.
Friendships
might
take
Northam only so far. Consider
Stanley, perhaps the governor’s
best pal in the Senate, who has led
opposition to Medicaid expansion for the past four years, convinced that the federal government would not keep its promise
to pick up 90 percent of the
$2 billion-a-year tab. His view has
not changed simply because
Northam is leading the charge
now.
Late last week, Northam said
he would resort to hardball if
need be: If the legislature sends
him a budget without expansion,
he will add it as an amendment —
a procedure that gives him a
stronger hand in the Senate.
In an odd twist, it is the Senate
— traditionally the more moderate chamber, and the place where
Northam’s personal ties are
strongest — that stands in his
way, not the House.
That’s due in part to a fluke of
the election calendar: On the ballot with Northam last year were
all 100 House of Delegates seats. A
blue tidal wave shrank the GOP’s
66-to-34 majority to 51 to 49. A
chastened House Speaker M.
Kirkland
Cox
(R-Colonial
Heights), seeking to rebrand Republicans as results-oriented
pragmatists, came out in favor of
expansion if work requirements,
co-pays and other conservative
strings were attached. Nineteen
House Republicans joined Democrats to pass a budget bill that
includes it.
But there has been no similar
evolution in the Senate, which did
not face voters last year. Senate
Republicans saw the carnage in
the House, but they either didn’t
feel it or just don’t think the
solution is embracing “Obamacare.” While voters called health
care a priority in exit polls and
Northam won on a promise to
expand, some Senate Republicans say what crushed the House
was an anti-Trump wave, not proMedicaid fervor.
Even Sen. Emmett W. Hanger
Jr. (R-Augusta), a moderate who
has voted for expansion in the
past, has said he does not like the
particulars of the House plan,
including a tax on hospitals to
cover the state’s 10 percent share.
And so Senate Republicans, who
lead that chamber 21 to 19, passed
a budget that did not include
Medicare expansion.
Now negotiators are trying to
hash out differences in two wildly
different budgets. The House version has about $420 million extra
for teachers’ raises, Metro and
other priorities because of savings the state is projected to
realize if Medicaid is expanded.
There is no easy way to split
that baby.
Legislators could go into overtime if they do not reach a deal
before adjournment Saturday. Or
they could punt, sending
Northam a budget without expansion, which he could send
back with an amendment that
adds it.
Going the amendment route
gives Northam more muscle,
thanks to procedural arcana related to when Lt. Gov. Justin
Fairfax (D) is allowed to break
ties. Northam would need to win
over two Republicans to pass a
spending plan with expansion
because Fairfax, who presides
over the Senate, is not allowed to
vote on the budget. But the lieutenant governor is permitted to
vote on amendments, so if the
governor proposes expansion as
an amendment, he would need
only one Republican senator to
join Democrats to pass the plan.
With an amendment, Northam
might be able to reshape the plan
to win over Hanger, perhaps by
sparing rural hospitals like the
one in Hanger’s district from the
hospital tax. Northam noted last
week — as a gentle warning —
that he could strip out some of the
conservative sweeteners if legislators leave it to him.
But clearly, Northam, who ran
as a consensus-builder, would
rather not ram through a measure as consequential as Medicaid.
Which is why he has been courting lots of Senate Republicans,
including Stanley.
Since before his January
swearing in, Northam has been
trying to gently twist Stanley’s
arm — earnestly and privately,
playfully and publicly. Hailing
from deep-red Trump country,
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOB BROWN/RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, center shaking hands, arrives in the House on Jan. 15 to deliver his
State of the Commonwealth address before a joint session of the Virginia General Assembly.
ABOVE: Northam, center, meets with staff and reporters Friday for a question-and-answer session.
Stanley would not be the most
obvious expansion ally but for his
close bond with the governor.
“The governor and I have been
friends since the first day I got
here in 2011,” Stanley said. “His
office, when he was a senator, was
right across the hall from mine.
And I just took a liking to him
immediately. And he had no
choice but to like me back.”
They are an unlikely pair —
Northam, quiet and understated,
and Stanley, the Senate’s charismatic class clown. One sits to the
left of center, the other to the
right. Yet both have sunny personalities, a love for silly pranks
and independent streaks.
Stanley, an attorney who
opened a practice with his widowed mother after encouraging
her to pursue her dream of becoming a lawyer, is a conservative
Republican. But he opposes capital punishment, champions animal rights and pushes legislation
meant to break the cycle of poverty in a region that, as he likes to
say, was “on the top of the economic food chain in Virginia just
30 years ago.”
Then came NAFTA, CAFTA,
the EPA. Stanley rattles off the
alphabet soup he blames for robbing his region of textile mills,
furniture-making, tobacco and
coal. He figures Medicaid expan-
sion would be no better.
That has not stopped Northam
from trying.
“He did in his good ol’ friendly
way,” Stanley said. “He wasn’t
going to hold anything hostage,
like the Senate Democrats did, or
use that kind of leverage. He
simply was to me, ‘How do we get
to ‘yes’? And I said, ‘Governor, you
know where I’ve sat on this for
years. I’ve sat on principle.’ ”
They had that conversation
even before Northam was sworn
in, when they met to talk about
rural issues. They had it again just
three days after inauguration, after Senate Democrats made good
on a threat to kill Stanley’s hospi-
tal bill if he did not back expansion.
Stanley’s bill would have extended the state’s certification of
the hospital, which closed in September, for another year — a
measure meant to make the property more marketable. He said the
hospital’s plight had nothing to
do with Medicaid. It mostly
served elderly Medicare patients
and made a profit, closing only
because of mismanagement by its
out-of-state owner, Stanley said.
But some Democrats felt the
hospital bill was fair game given
the big picture: Stanley was trying to expand access to health
care in his region, something
Medicaid could achieve statewide.
After Democrats killed his bill,
Stanley filed an identical measure. As Northam was trying to
persuade Democrats to pass that
one, Stanley agreed to keep an
open mind about Medicaid. Soon
after, Northam dispatched his
health secretary and Medicaid
chief to Stanley’s office. They
made their pitch, but also picked
his brain: What would a Republican plan for Medicaid expansion
look like, they asked, even if he
could not support it? He talked
about work requirements, which
wound up in the House plan.
“I did that for Ralph, but also, I
want to learn,” Stanley said. “And
after that, the bill passed.”
Stanley’s hospital bill sped to
Northam’s desk. He chose to sign
it — his first as governor — at the
hospital, a gesture bound to create more attention and goodwill.
He invited Stanley to fly there
with him — just days after sending a Valentine’s greeting to Stanley — and only Stanley — on the
Senate floor.
It was a bumpy ride in rainy
weather.
“I was convinced the governor
was telling the pilot to shake it,”
Stanley said, who through nervous laughter jokingly agreed to
expand Medicaid if Northam
could make it stop.
Back on the ground, though,
Stanley was back to no.
“I think Ralph knows . . . how
to make friends, and knows how
to gain influence, and knows how
to get support,” Stanley said. “I
fully expect him to be talking to
other people. I think he knows,
though, I can’t vote for the House
budget.”
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
KLMNO
Style
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
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THEATER REVIEWS
INFOWARS
CAROLYN HAX
Did a Wall Street Journal
reporter say, “Stop it!
Stop it!” during Trump’s
Gridiron speech? C2
Alexander Strain shines in
Olney’s “Every Brilliant
Thing,” plus Taffety Punk’s
“Mom Baby God.” C3
Accusing YouTube of
censorship, Alex Jones
makes the Parkland
shooting all about him. C9
After being gaslighted in
her previous relationship,
she wonders if her new
guy’s red flags are real. C9
A New Orleans chef charges white people $30 for lunch and people of color $12. The reactions are priceless.
Sam Nunberg:
Freewheeling
or off the rails?
BY
P AUL F ARHI
As of midday Monday, most people had
never heard of Sam Nunberg. Before the
day was over, he was practically a legend.
The former campaign aide to President Trump did a marathon round of
interviews with news outlets that attracted attention as much for what Nunberg
said as how he said it: Oddly, erratically,
and quite possibly inebriated.
“Talking to you, I have smelled alcohol
on your breath,” CNN anchor Erin Burnett told Nunberg during her Monday
evening show, roughly his sixth broadcast of the day and his third just on CNN.
Nunberg denied it. She pressed, “No,
you haven’t had a drink today?”
His reply: “I haven’t had a drink.” He
insisted he’d only taken antidepressants.
It was a day that raised questions
about the ethics of TV news programs
booking a newsmaker who may not have
full control of his faculties — even as the
significance of Nunberg’s story appeared
to diminish.
Nunberg began the slaloming course
of his media blitz with the extraordinary
claim that he would ignore a subpoena
issued by a grand jury hearing evidence
from special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III. He dared Mueller to arrest him,
complained about the hassle of pulling
together the emails Mueller is seeking,
and averred that Mueller may have
NUNBERG CONTINUED ON C9
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
PARIS FASHION WEEK
Balenciaga’s
kaleidoscopic
look to future
Lunch with A
lagniappe of sociology
BY
BY
M AURA J UDKIS
paris — Oh, boy, do clothes that exist
A
pproach Tunde Wey’s lunch counter/sociology experiment at the Roux Carre market in
New Orleans, and — if you’re white — you’ll
have a decision to make. And it’s not just
whether you want to try his jollof rice or his
fried plantains. Wey serves his Nigerian food with a
lesson about racial wealth disparity: The median
income among African American households in New
Orleans is only $25,806, compared to $64,377 for white
households. According to the Urban Institute, the
national average wealth of white families is $919,000,
while the average wealth of black families is $140,000.
Wey will share some stats with his customers, and then
he’ll tell them the price of their lunch.
If they’re a person of color, they pay $12. If they’re
white, he’ll tell them they can either pay $12, or they can
pay $30 — 21/2 times the base price, which reflects the
wealth disparity in New Orleans. He tells them the
profits will be redistributed to people of color, but not as
charity — just to any minority customers of his who
want it, regardless of their income or circumstance.
“When I tell black folks what’s happening, 90 percent
of them start laughing, like, ‘For real?’ They’re tickled,”
he said. “White folks, there’s this blank — ” he paused
and laughed, “— this blank look. They’re like, ‘Huh,
okay.’ ”
Wey is familiar with that look. In 2016, he traveled
across the country hosting a dinner series he called
“Blackness in America.” He would cook a Nigerian feast
for his guests and engage them in conversation about
some of the most pervasive problems facing our country,
such as racism, sexism and police brutality. Black guests
found these discussions cathartic, while many white
guests found them uncomfortable. “White folks or
privileged folks are quick to try to find a solution, or ask
for a solution, as opposed to sitting in the discomfort,”
EXPERIMENT CONTINUED ON C3
R OBIN G IVHAN
beyond the familiar and reassuring ever
tick folks off. They get downright hostile.
They will call a critic “evil,” demand a
resignation or simply let the rage roar, as if
the scribe herself was the one up in the
atelier, stitching together the crazy frocks
for the sole purpose of making so-called
normal folks look like fools.
Fashion is not out to get you or confuse
you. Granted, sometimes it may feel that
way, the same way sports makes games
incomprehensible to the novice with all
those convoluted rules. And certainly,
there are designers who relish tweaking
the nonbelievers.
But more than anything, a brand like
Balenciaga has a way of inviting outrage
because it shakes up the status quo. And
while you, fine citizen dressed in your
FASHION CONTINUED ON C2
DEJI OSINULU
TOP: Nigerian-born chef Tunde Wey says, “When I tell black folks what’s
happening, 90 percent of them start laughing, like, ‘For real?’ They’re tickled.
White folks, there’s this blank — this blank look. They’re like, ‘Huh, okay.’ ”
ABOVE: Tunde Wey’s pop-up lunch counter/sociology experiment.
BOOK WORLD
The ’20s, roaring with a fusillade of bullets and Mamet-isms
CHICAGO
By David Mamet
Custom House. 352 pp. $26.99
BY
R ON C HARLES
Although the characters in David
Mamet’s new novel, “Chicago,” never
sound like real people, they always sound
like David Mamet people, which is a
strange indication of his success. We
would recognize these guys in a dark
alley, not from any actual experience in
dark alleys but from “Speed-the-Plow,”
“American Buffalo” and “Glengarry Glen
Ross,” plays that have explored 86-proof
masculinity for decades.
In “Chicago,” Mamet returns once
again to the city where he was raised and
where he started to work in theater. The
novel also marks a return to the Prohibition era of “The Untouchables” (1987),
Brian De Palma’s gangster film for which
Mamet wrote the screenplay. But what’s
striking is how little difference the time
makes. Past or present, Mamet’s men
must always contend with the rapidly
changing currents of the day. The moment you hear Mamet working in 1920s
Chicago, it’s obvious that this bullet-ridden era fits him as comfortably as a
newsboy cap. Yet he’s often felt like an
on-the-money writer, catching the zeitgeist even before the cigarette smoke
clears the room. Remember that “Oleanna,” his deeply unsettling play about
sexual harassment, opened just months
after Clarence Thomas joined the Supreme Court. And now, while releasing
this novel set 90 years ago, he’s working
on a script about recently disgraced
Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein.
“Chicago” is not overly inconvenienced by the actual history of the 1920s.
“Received chronology,” Mamet notes at
the opening, “has been jostled into a
better understanding of its dramatic
responsibilities.” (Leave it to Mamet to be
more responsible than God.) But if this
isn’t the exact history of Chicago, it’s still
the city you think you know. Italian and
Irish gangsters rule competing halves of
the town. Al Capone makes a cameo.
With alcohol illegal and ubiquitous, the
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C4
Balenciaga
focused on
once-maligned
sections of the
color wheel.
JONAS GUSTAVSSON/
MCV PHOTO FOR THE
WASHINGTON POST
C2
EZ
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RE
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MARCH 7 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
At Gridiron dinner, a serving of discourse
T
CHARLES DHARAPAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tina Tchen: “The music industry faces numerous
challenges — from combating long-held biases to
making sure women are represented and respected.”
Michelle Obama’s former chief of staff to
head up Grammy task force on diversity
Just weeks after Recording Academy
President Neil Portnow drew fire for
saying women “need to step up” when
asked why there weren’t more female
Grammy winners, the organization
announced a new task force on
inclusion and diversity to be headed by
Tina Tchen, former chief of staff to
Michelle Obama.
Tchen, a lawyer, is also working with
the legal defense fund for Time’s Up, a
group created by Hollywood women to
combat sexual harassment.
The music-industry task force will
look into “barriers and unconscious
biases faced by underrepresented
communities” within the Recording
Academy and the broader music
industry, the organization said in a
statement. The task force also will
include “music executives, music
creators, academia, and experts in
diversity in entertainment,” and
eventually develop recommendations,
per the academy.
The powerful association’s decision
to investigate itself follows outrage not
only over Portnow’s comments, but
broader criticism that, although the
organization might have publicly
embraced the #MeToo and Time’s Up
movements at this year’s Jan. 28
awards ceremony, gender equality
wasn’t reflected in the heavily male
winners’ list and performers in the
televised event.
In one example, “Shape of You”
singer Ed Sheeran took best pop solo
performance honors over Kelly
Clarkson, Kesha, Lady Gaga and
Pink. And singer Lorde, who was the
only woman nominated in the best
album category, didn’t perform. All of
which prompted the #GrammysSoMale
hashtag — and now, apparently, the
task force, which is charged with
examining the group’s “operations and
policies,” the group says.
“The music industry faces numerous
challenges — from combating longheld biases to making sure women are
represented and respected within the
community,” Tchen said in the
statement.
Portnow noted that Tchen, who also
was executive director of the White
House Council on Women and Girls,
has no business ties to the music
industry, something he said would
make her objective. “We are honored to
have her at the helm, guiding the
Academy and our industry toward a
greater good for everyone involved,” he
said.
he annual Gridiron dinner is
about as swampy a tableau as
one could find: On Saturday
night, hundreds of Washington’s top
journalists were breaking bread
with the president, cabinet
secretaries and members of
Congress in a hotel ballroom. The
event is typically intended to be a
white-tie evening’s detente between
the White House and the reporters
who cover it, a night of wine and
comedy, but in the acrimonious
atmosphere of 2018, what does a
cease-fire involving a president who
has called his hosts “enemies of the
state” even look like?
At one point it looked like this: a
veteran Washington journalist
shouting at President Trump during
his mostly comedic monologue,
according to witnesses.
Wall Street Journal political
editor Jeanne Cummings, a wellrespected Washington long-timer,
audibly admonished Trump,
responding to his remarks with a
loud “Stop it! Stop it!” according to
four people who overheard it. Two
more people heard what one
described as her “outburst” but
couldn’t make out her words.
Her comments, according to some
of the witnesses, came around when
Trump was lambasting CNN. The
network “lost a tremendous amount
of credibility this year,” Trump said,
although he turned the insult into a
joke about his recently departed top
aide Stephen K. Bannon. “But they
also lost one of their true stars, the
guy who got you the most scoops,
LEAH MILLIS/REUTERS
Sources say President Trump had a heckler at the Gridiron Club dinner.
inside info . . . your really very best
reporter. There was nobody like him
— Steve Bannon. That guy leaked
more than the Titanic,” he joked.
The witnesses said Cummings left
the ballroom soon afterward while
Trump was still speaking.
Reached by phone on Monday,
Cummings said she had no
comment and referred a reporter to
“New York,” presumably meaning
the Journal’s headquarters. A Wall
Street Journal spokeswoman did not
respond to requests for comment.
Gridiron Club President David
Lightman said, though, that he
wasn’t aware of any hiccups in the
inaugural meeting of Trump and the
press corps. “I didn’t hear them and
as far as I can tell it didn’t disrupt
his speech,” he wrote in an email of
the peanut gallery comments.
Trump, for his part, called it a
“wonderful evening.” And in the
closing of his speech, he even
managed to muster a little bit of
praise for the media he usually
scorns. “I want to thank the press for
all you do,” he said, “to support and
sustain our democracy.”
I think the president has good intentions, but I do think he goes
off the rails. Maybe you could have an intervention with him,
maybe bring you to the Oval Office and have an intervention.”
— Former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci to Dr. Phil during an interview Tuesday.
Scaramucci, whose tenure at the White House lasted 10 days, told the host that leaving the job saved his marriage.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Thom Browne is all business (well, half, anyway)
FASHION FROM C1
lovely navy Talbots sheath, may
have no interest right now in
Balenciaga’s garishly colored floral
frocks, just you wait. Designer
Demna Gvasalia is turning our attention to once-maligned sections
of the color wheel, loosening the
standards for what is stylish, and
bringing value to things that would
seem to have little.
He presented his fall 2018 collection in a film studio just outside
Paris. There were derriere-skimming minidresses that wrapped
and draped snugly around the
body. There were hourglassshaped blazers and coats crafted
using 3-D body-scanning technology; the glen plaid and houndstooth, bonded to foam, looked like
something plucked from a virtualreality boutique.
He layered coats upon coats
upon coats, fused together so that
sometimes a model looked almost
as wide as he or she was tall. The
effect was unnerving no matter
how one might have interpreted it.
At the most basic level: Just how
cold does Gvasalia think it’s going
to be next winter?
O
ccasionally there’s a runway
show that leaves you with
your mouth agape, not because it is shocking or controversial or groundbreaking, but because it has simply astounded you
by being gorgeous, in a manner
that is timeless and universal.
There’s nothing to figure out
about the Valentino collection for
fall 2018. There are no riddles, no
concepts. These are just options.
Designer Pierpaolo Piccioli’s
color palette is filled with shades of
rose and fuchsia, geranium and
pink. He mixes mint green, lime
and sea foam in a single ensemble,
and the effect is delicious. And slim
trousers in camel are topped with a
long, breezy top in cornflower
blue.
His evening gowns are whimsical and charming — grown-up
without letting go of youthful frivolity. He offers strapless dresses
and translucent ones, but no one
ever looked overexposed. No garments ever seemed to be hanging
by a thread.
In his program notes, Piccioli
says “romanticism is strength” and
“grace is authority.” Those aren’t
exactly words that reflect the tenor
of the times. Talk of emotion, nature and creativity — romanticism
in the literary sense rather than the
“Bachelor” worldview — is
PHOTOS BY JONAS GUSTAVSSON/MCV PHOTO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
FROM LEFT: Designer Demna Gvasalia’s fall collection for Balenciaga features coats, lots of coats, and floral mini-dresses. Some designers might make you wonder why, but
with Valentino, there’s never any doubt: It’s all for beauty’s sake. Working in his signature grays and whites, Thom Browne focuses, as usual, on the details.
drowned out in an increasingly
mechanized world. And well, grace
as a kind of power? This is a world
of if-they-punch-him-he-punchesback-a-thousand-times-harder.
Grace is endangered.
So Valentino, in offering something inviting, gentle and gorgeous, is also offering something
rare.
T
hom Browne’s models were
dressed in his signature
shades of gray and white,
and they wore clothes that played
with the traditions of masculine
and feminine attire, using the vo-
cabulary of France’s highest fashion order: haute couture. It was a
gender-blending collection, but
not in a manner that drains the
vigor and grace out of clothes.
In Browne’s version, tailored
gray suits are spliced with hourglass skirts and molded corsets.
Man and woman combined. Traditions merged. The trappings of
both masculinity and femininity
are brought together in all of their
formal, buttoned-up, bound-up
rigor.
The clothes reflected Browne’s
version of history, with references
to statuary and goddesses on ped-
Evening gowns from
Valentino are whimsical
and charming — grownup without letting go of
youthful frivolity.
estals. But they were viewed
through 21st-entury eyes and a
cheeky sense of humor that included the placement of a bit of bedazzled jewelry where there would
otherwise have been a visible nipple.
What Browne puts on his runway stands out because of the level
of detail: the embroidery, the embellishments. They are not what
one is accustomed to seeing
emerging from the depths of a subway on a busy workday. But then,
that’s not what his runway reverie
is for. It is to take you outside of
that day-to-day monotony.
And yet, the fantasy is always
built on a solid foundation of tailoring — close to the shoulder, taking note of the waist, rounding out
the hips. In the commercial collection destined for stores, the palette
is discreet. Respectable. Serious.
The materials are luxurious.
But the clothes come with a
wink, an acknowledgment that
there is something reassuring
about repetition, familiarity. . .
consistency. But that can also be
stultifying if people aren’t careful.
So he offers consistency with creativity.
robin.givhan@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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At hearing, Cosby’s attorneys paint his accuser as ‘greedy’
No decision on whether
prosecutors can call
other accusers to stand
BY
M ANUEL R OIG- F RANZIA
norristown, pa. — For years,
Bill Cosby has tried to portray
Andrea Constand as his ex-lover
— not a victim of sexual assault.
The comedian and his attorneys have painted the former
college basketball star and Temple University women’s basketball team official as confused and
mendacious, a lost soul he not
only seduced, but also tried to
guide to career success. But on
Tuesday, during a key hearing in
advance of Cosby’s April 2 retrial
on charges of sexually assaulting
Constand, the comedian’s attorneys signaled another prong in
their strategy to undercut his
accuser’s credibility.
They hope to portray Constand
as money-hungry.
Thomas Mesereau, Cosby’s
lead attorney, told a Montgomery
County, Pa., judge that he wants
to present evidence to the jury
about a lawsuit settlement Constand received from Cosby to
prove “just how greedy this person was.”
The civil suit has played an
important, yet still somewhat
cloaked, role in the saga of the
comedian and the hoops star. It
goes back to 2004 when Constand told authorities in Pennsylvania that Cosby had drugged
and sexually assaulted her at his
suburban Philadelphia home. At
the time, the local prosecutor
declined to press charges, and
Constand filed a lawsuit in 2005
against the famous entertainer.
That lawsuit was settled for an
amount that has been kept so
secret that the current team of
prosecutors attempting to convict Cosby said Tuesday they still
don’t know how much money she
received. Mesereau, Cosby’s attorney, wants to call a witness
who says Constand told her that
she could falsely accuse a celebrity of sexual assault, then collect a
lawsuit settlement that would
allow her to start a business. The
same witness — a former Temple
colleague of Constand’s named
Margo Jackson — was blocked
DON EMMERT/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Bill Cosby leaves the Montgomery County Courthouse in
Norristown, Pa., Tuesday, where his second trial will begin April 2.
from appearing at Cosby’s first
trial. But Mesereau has said he
wants to reference her claim in
his opening statement during the
retrial. Prosecutors are asking
the judge to block him from doing
so.
A deposition Cosby gave as
part of the civil case was introduced in his first trial, which
ended last June in a hung jury.
During the deposition, Cosby describes his sexual encounter with
Constand in cringe-inducing detail, and also admits to acquiring
quaaludes, a powerful sedative,
to give to women with whom he
wanted to have sex in the 1970s.
Constand says Cosby sexually
assaulted her at his suburban
Philadelphia estate in January
2004 after meeting her through
her work as an official with the
woman’s basketball team at Temple University. Prosecutors are
eager to delve back decades into
Cosby’s life by persuading Judge
Steven O’Neill to allow testimony
from 19 women — besides Constand — who say Cosby drugged
and sexually assaulted them between 1965 and the 1990s. On
Tuesday, one of Cosby’s attorneys,
Becky James, argued that the
testimony from past accusers
would be unfairly prejudicial.
James sketched out the possibility of a defense attorney’s
nightmare, in which Cosby’s legal
team would be forced into 19
“mini-trials” if all the women
were allowed to testify. James
drolly described her dilemma as
the “numbers issue.” One of the
biggest problems, she said, is that
many of the people she would
need to interview to defend Cosby against the accusations are
dead or dying, and many necessary documents are simply gone.
James also complained that
she and her co-attorneys would
not have enough time to prepare
for such a broad and complex
defense. But O’Neill seemed to
have little sympathy, saying prosecutors had signaled their intention to call the additional accusers months ago.
“I’m telling you — prepare as if
it were all 19,” O’Neill said.
Before Cosby’s first trial,
O’Neill blocked prosecutors from
calling 12 of the 13 past accusers
they’d hoped to have as witnesses. But this time around, prosecutors have put forth half a dozen
additional accusers as possible
witnesses, and presented new
legal arguments for their place in
the trial. In this week’s often
prickly hearings, prosecutors
have pointed out that another
Pennsylvania judge allowed six
previous accusers to testify in a
sex-assault case.
O’Neill hasn’t tipped his hand
on how he’ll rule. But those
looking for clues perked up late
Tuesday when the judge estimated how long the retrial might
take. The 80-year-old comedian’s
first trial lasted two weeks. This
time, O’Neill said, jurors should
expect the trial to last one month
— at the very least.
manuel.roigfranzia@washpost.com
Hard questions in the
Big Easy as a chef cooks
up a social experiment
EXPERIMENT FROM C1
STAN BAROUH
As the narrator of “Every Brilliant Thing,” Alexander Strain works the crowd and guides the gentle audience participation.
THEATER REVIEWS
Brilliant solo shows from Olney, Taffety Punk
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
You don’t simply watch Alexander Strain perform “Every Brilliant Thing,” the minor phenomenon that has migrated from Britain to HBO and now to the intimate lab theater at the Olney
Theatre Center. You hang with
him, maybe grabbing cookies and
coffee from a cart at the center of
the in-the-round stage as you
enter. You absorb the play’s
quirky story as Strain persuades
you to be present in a singular and
uplifting way.
Breaking the fourth wall is
hard-wired into the solo script
that Duncan Macmillan fashioned with comedian Jonny Donahoe, who toured the piece in
the United Kingdom and the
United States. Few shows manage
this kind of interaction so deftly,
and a soft touch is critical to the
story Macmillan is out to tell.
What our narrator relates is how
he has coped with his mother’s
depression and suicidal tendencies. His tactic: List every brilliant thing that makes life worth
living.
The project goes on for years,
though the performance wraps it
into an unexpectedly enjoyable 75
minutes. It does not sugarcoat,
which is one of the ways it disarms you. It’s honest about depression, and despite the show’s
ability to make audiences laugh,
it’s also instructive. The narrator
shares what he learns about mental health, and the information
feels exactly like that — the best
available guidance, to be received
soberly.
But the narrator also has an
idiosyncratic story to tell of mother, father, first love, vinyl records
— life going on. The wonder of the
performance is how Strain, who
has been offstage for four years
getting a graduate degree and
starting a career in psychology,
plays this character while also
building a keen rapport with the
audience. Confessional stand-up
comedians sometimes muster
this, but it’s a rarer experience in
Wey told The Washington Post
during one of the dinners.
The lunch counter, Saartj, is
named after Saartjie Baartman, a
South African woman who was
put on display in the early 1800s
in Europe because of her large
buttocks, and given the nickname
“the Hottentot Venus.” When Wey
devised the project in New Orleans, he wanted to study people’s
reactions to it, so he enlisted a
student from Tulane University
to devise an exit interview that
would help him understand why
people decided to pay the amount
that they chose. After the price
reveal, the conversation would
typically take one of several established paths. People of color,
who were asked if they wanted
their money back after the conclusion of the experiment on
March 4, typically said no —
many said it should go to someone who needed it more than
them. Some black people tried to
also pay the $30, saying that
because they could afford it, they
felt obligated to pay the higher
price. (Wey would accept only
$12 from people of color.) In the
end, when Wey totals up the
profits, he expects the customers
who opted to receive money will
we’ll see the same server twice, so
it doesn’t incentivize better service in the future for us, individually. Studies have found that social pressures and stigmas are
what compel people to tip, even
in scenarios when there would be
no consequences if they decided
not to. Economists have found
that people tip to “feel positive
feelings like pride or avoid negative feelings like guilt,” and “receive social approval/status or
avoid social disapproval.” Tipping, they found, is also a way to
exercise power over a server.
Would the white people who
paid $30 have made the same
choice if they were presented
with the same scenario by, instead of Wey’s smiling black face,
a white woman? Or an automated
kiosk? Wey can’t say. “They could
be more dismissive, they could be
more openly resentful, but still
pay the $30,” he said.
While some people have been
hostile, the majority have been
willing to engage with him on the
topic. He and his researcher have
had conversations with many of
the customers about the privileges, or lack thereof, that have
informed their life decisions. The
consequences of racial wealth
disparity were perfectly illustrated, he said, by two men who came
“I thought, if given the chance to voluntarily give
up privilege, folks would not,” Tunde Wey said. But
he was wrong: So far, more than 80 percent of
white customers have opted to pay the higher price.
TERESA CASTRACANE
Madeline Joey Rose plays the teenager Destinee in “Mom Baby God,” her solo play. Besides
Destinee, Rose portrays various participants at a youth pro-life conference.
theater. Under Jason Loewith’s
direction, Strain works the crowd
and guides the gentle participation. (You may be given a line to
read.) It’s a very live event. But it’s
also a subtle piece of acting.
Madeline Joey Rose is also going it alone in “Mom Baby God,”
her portrait of the more familiar
pro-life movement. (A Solo Voices
Theater Festival has broken out
in town; four one-person shows
opened in the past week.) Rose is
an abortion rights activist who
immersed herself in the other
side, undercover. Her show is not
an exposé so much as an empathetic portrait of teen girls being
buffeted by hardcore faith and
life’s inevitable dramatic swings.
Rose’s main character is 14year-old Destinee, who reveres
antiabortion activist/Live Action
founder Lila Rose and has a crush
on Justin Bieber. Rose looks the
part in bangs, a hoodie and pink
Chucks, and the Christian devotion videos she devises with director Lise Bruneau and projection
designer Patrick Lord are sweet
and awkward.
Destinee goes to a youth prolife conference, and Rose plays all
of the parts. It’s an impressive
performance: She smoothly takes
on everything from the light Texan twang of a rival to the posh Brit
accents of guest speakers and the
swaggering-bashful patter of the
handsome young frontman for an
outfit called Praise Cr3w.
It’s also a good story, if slightly
padded at 90 minutes. You suspect Rose wants to give you a
taste of all the personalities and
rhetoric she’s discovered in the
years she has been piecing this
together. The first hour feels like a
vivid collage. The last 30 minutes
grow poignant.
Taffety Punk Theatre Company
is giving this a limited run at the
Capitol Hills Arts Workshop, but
it’s sure to surface again. There
are sharp edges, but it doesn’t
come across as a mean-spirited,
one-sided caricature. Rose makes
Destinee a truly adorable kid, and
she compellingly illustrates that
when true believers lapse, the
penalty can be awfully high.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
Every Brilliant Thing, by Duncan
Macmillan with Jonny Donahoe.
Directed by Jason Loewith. Set, Paige
Hathaway; costumes, Debra Kim
Sevigny; lights, Max Doolittle; sound
design, Jane Behre and Ryan Gravett.
Through March 25 at Olney Theatre
Center. $47-$74. Call 301-924-3400
or visit olneytheatre.org.
Mom Baby God, written and
performed by Madeline Joey Rose.
Directed by Lise Bruneau. Through
Saturday at the Capitol Hill Arts
Workshop. $15. Visit taffetypunk.com.
get about $75 each. He says he is
not keeping any profit for himself.
As for white customers: A
handful of them immediately
canceled the transaction and
walked away. The remainder
were faced with “this awkward
moment where they have to make
a choice” — and, importantly,
they had to make that choice in
front of Wey.
Initially, he expected that few
white people would pay the $30.
“I thought, if given the chance
to voluntarily give up privilege,
folks would not because it is not
in their interest,” he said. But he
was wrong: So far, more than
80 percent of white customers
have opted to pay the higher
price, and Wey realized that he
had been underestimating the
power of social pressure.
“If I created the framework
where I outline a problem that is
indisputable, and I position you
as an antagonist, and I give you a
way to solve the problem tidily
and be the hero — in the moment,
anything other than the $30
choice becomes antisocial behavior,” he said. Social pressure also
explained why the handful of
white people who decided to pay
the $12 did so with apologies,
trying to justify their choice.
“That explained to me why the
folks who refused to pay the $30
were equivocating, because they
understood that they were participating in antisocial behavior.”
Wey’s experience aligns with
research on what is — in a way —
another form of wealth redistribution: tipping. We’re not legally
required to tip at a restaurant,
and unless we’re regulars at a
particular place, it’s unlikely that
to buy lunch one day, one right
after another. The first man, who
was black, was from a rougher
neighborhood, but had gone to a
well-to-do high school one neighborhood over. He told Wey about
how he was a good student and
got into a prestigious university,
along with his classmates who
didn’t have grades as good as his.
Other students’ parents paid for
them to attend the university, but
“he only got half-funded, so he
had to go to a less prestigious
school, which impacted him and
the generation of folks to come
after him,” said Wey. Next in line
was a white man who gladly paid
the $30. When Wey talked to that
man about his education, he said
that he had gone to a prestigious
school because his father gave
him a loan, and that he had the
well-paying job he has now because of that university.
“Decisive moments in these
individuals’ lives changed their
direction — the idea of what their
trajectories would be,” said Wey.
“That was an example for me of
what wealth looks like. It doesn’t
look like magical benevolent
gifts. . . . That sort of ordinary
intervention has repercussions
across generations, across lives.”
Though Wey’s lunch counter is
only temporary, he says that people who want to use food to
address racial wealth disparity
can do so by patronizing minority-owned restaurants, because
minority businesses are more
likely to hire other minorities.
“It takes more than that to
change things. We also have to
change things on a policy level,”
he said. But “It’s a good place to
start, for sure.”
maura.judkis@washpost.com
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
book world
Mamet’s Windy-but-Not-Breezy City
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
city government is an institution of organized influence peddling. Every crime
scene is picked over by sticky-fingered
policemen shopping for their wives and
girlfriends.
The professional narrators of this roiling city are the intrepid reporters of the
Chicago Tribune, men — all men —
wholly devoted to the truth of a good
story. These are writers and editors who
sip romanticism at home but chug tankards of cynicism in public. “Idiosyncratic expressions of self-loathing” are reflexive for these guys.
If you know a male journalist —
present, former or aspiring — give him
this novel. It’s full of wry advice like, “If
one can afford it, but one has nothing to
say, one should not write. That is not
writer’s block but common courtesy.”
“A newspaper is a joke,” the city editor
declares. “Existing at the pleasure of the
advertisers, to mulct the public, gratifying their stupidity, and render some
small advance on investment to the
owners, offering putative employment to
their etiolated, wastrel sons.”
If nothing else, this dialogue makes
good prep for the SATs.
“Chicago” focuses on two daily scribes
“debauched by journalism”: Parlow and
his best friend, Mike, a flier during the
Great War still haunted by the carnage he
witnessed. They’re both men of deep
sentiment but “jaded unto death,” constantly ready to mock any wisps of
sentimentality. “It was the reporters’
daily job to be brash and unfeeling,”
Mamet writes, “to steal the photo portrait of the slaughtered infant from the
mother’s bureau; to taunt the spouse
murderer into an interesting outburst; to
withhold pity for the youth sentenced to
death. It was their job to be not only brave
but foolhardy. Covering the shootout, the
school fire, the flood, the train wreck.”
When the novel opens, Mike and Parlow, along with Chicago’s bloodthirsty
readers, are fixated on a pair of assassinations involving the owners of the Chez
Montmartre, along with a mistress and
her maid. But even while Mike pursues
that story, he’s seriously distracted. Like a
fool, Mike has gone and fallen in love
with a young Irish Catholic lass named
Annie, a woman of “shocking virginal
beauty.” That he’s not Catholic is a barrier
he’s willing to surmount, though he
suspects Annie’s parents will be less
accommodating. For sure, he knows that
if they find out they’ve been sleeping
together, he’s a dead man. But before that
theory can be tested, someone bursts into
his apartment after an afternoon tryst
and shoots Annie.
Who this killer is and why Mike has
been spared are the abiding mysteries of
“Chicago.” But anyone hoping for a hardhitting thriller will Always Be Closing
this book disappointed. Attitude, though,
rolls in thicker than fog off Lake Michigan. The whole story is lousy with attitude: grieving Mike trying to drink away
his sorrow; confounded Mike trying to
understand his survival; vengeful Mike
trying to find Annie’s killer.
He’s assisted in these various moods by
Peekaboo, the African American madam
at a whorehouse called the Ace of Spades.
(“Chicago” is an encyclopedia of early20th-century slurs.) Hard and philosophical, Peekaboo spins off the kind of
aphorisms you’d expect from the African
American madam of a whorehouse conceived by a white man with a subscription to HBO. “There’s only one known
cure for a broken heart,” she tells Mike.
“It’s time; and that don’t work.”
“What gets you killed, more than the
next thing, is the inability to let things
be.”
Y OU NG R E AD E R S
Many young readers might rightfully
wonder: How could it possibly have
taken until 1920 for women to win the
right to vote? Two new books make clear
how fierce the struggle was, exploring
how generations of female activists
challenged women’s inferior status and
faced derision, physical attacks and (in
the 1910s) lengthy imprisonment. In
Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of
How American Women Won the Right
to Vote (Penguin, ages 10 and older),
Susan Zimet powers through many
decades of history, focusing on the
central roles of Elizabeth Cady Stanton,
Susan B. Anthony and Alice Paul but also
highlighting the work of such agitators as
Mary Wollstonecraft, Sojourner Truth
and Matilda Joslyn Gage. Writing for a
slightly older audience with Votes for
Women: American Suffragists and the
Battle for the Ballot (Algonquin, ages 12
and older), Winifred Conkling provides a
more detailed and nuanced account of
Stanton, Anthony, Paul and their allies.
Both authors ably show how women’s
suffrage intertwined with abolitionism,
Quakerism and the temperance
movement, while also pointing out the
racism and elitism of some suffrage
leaders. With either book, young readers
will find fascinating, still-relevant
lessons about power, persuasion and
politics.
— Abby McGanney Nolan
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago gang boss Al Capone, left, talks to an unidentified man a month after 1929’s Saint Valentine’s Day Massacre.
Other sections glide along like the
winning entry in a Hemingway contest.
(Mamet even misspells “alright” like
Hemingway.) At its best, this can make
for irresistible passages of slick, noir
prose: “He had loved his job, and its
proximity to violence, which, he knew,
was a drug, and he had loved the Irish
girl; and now he was sick and grieving in
that impossible grief of betrayal at having your heart broken by life.”
But when Mike and Parlow fall into
their self-mocking dialogues, the stage
suddenly thrusts through the pages, and
they sound as gratingly artificial as characters in a Mamet parody:
“What makes you sad about the rich?”
Mike said.
“That which makes everyone sad who
is not of their number,” Parlow said.
“That they are better off than we; and we
brave our unmerited poverty stoically,
whilst they sail yachts, and indulge in
God knows what depravities in boathouses.”
“But do you not also hate the poor?”
said Mike. “For they possess no money.
Therefore what can they do for me, save
impotently rage, because I, occasionally,
sport a clean collar? Further, saving
always the criminals, they have misunderstood the situation. For, how do they
propose to raise their state? By appeal,
finally, to government.”
There’s a lot of that winking playacting. If only Mamet had taken the city
editor’s advice: “We require bold, clear
words and gruesome pictures.”
Totally Hip Video Book Review
Ron Charles is “untouchable” in the latest
episode. To watch, go to wapo.st/mamet.
bookworld@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book World and
host of TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
A profound parable of a special-needs son
BY
D REW N ELLINS S MITH
Rare is the author who materializes
from behind his novel to announce its
purpose. But then everything about
Jesse Ball’s writing feels strange and
exploratory. In the introduction to “Census,” his eighth novel, Ball says the story
was inspired by his now-deceased brother: “I felt, and feel,
that people with
Down syndrome are
not really understood. What is in my
heart when I consider him and his life is
something so tremendous, so full of
light, that I thought I
must write a book
that helps people to
CENSUS
see what it is like to
By Jesse Ball
know and love a
Ecco. 272 pp.
Down syndrome boy
$25.99
or girl. It is not like
what you would expect.”
A cynical reader might read that
introduction and cringe, “Oh no — tears
will be jerked, our humanity laid bare.”
But you have to respect such frank
aspirations to literature’s highest and
most affecting aim: to reveal others to
us, in all their complexity.
And, in any case, as Ball says, “It is not
like what you would expect.”
JAMES FOSTER
“I felt, and feel, that people with Down syndrome are not really understood,” says
Jesse Ball, who cites his late brother as the inspiration for his novel “Census.”
The story begins in the town of A,
where an unnamed widower learns that
he’s dying. Being a philosophical fellow,
he accepts his fate, but things are
complicated by his adult son, who is
wholly reliant upon him. After confirm-
ing arrangements for a neighbor to care
for his son when the time comes, the
father decides that, in these final days,
they’ll live out his late wife’s lifelong
wish to “take to the road.” Spontaneously, he joins the Census Bureau — a
slightly warped version of the one we
know — and ventures out into the world
with his son at his side.
The two of them drive to the towns of
B, C, D and so on, hoping to make it to Z
before the man dies. What they find in
this timeless world of villages and
farmhouses, as they interact with the
country’s citizens and one another, is
rejection, acceptance, pain and love. The
novel’s twin themes, the limits of empathy and language, are explored from
every angle in living room census interviews that more closely resemble religious confessions than a bureaucratic
process.
The words “Down syndrome” never
reappear after the introduction, and
Ball is too smart — and, one assumes,
too invested — to rely on cheap tricks of
sentimentality. The son isn’t a tragic
inconvenience nor a spouter of wisdom
disguised as simplicity. Most of the time
he’s just another person along for the
ride, as bewildered by the populace as
his father is.
Though “Census” reads, at times, like
a protracted parable, it eschews tidy
lessons. The result is an understated
feat, a book that says more than enough
simply by saying, “Look, this is how
some people are.”
bookworld@washpost.com
Drew Nellins Smith is the author of the
novel “Arcade.”
Two hundred years ago, the “first
science fiction industrial-age novel” was
published anonymously, notes Lita Judge
in her haunting, graphic novel Mary’s
Monster (Roaring Brook, ages 15 and
older). Since then, “Frankenstein: or, the
Modern Prometheus” has inspired
heated discussion, countless speculative
fiction stories and numerous theater and
film adaptations. Yet today, most teens
know little more about the book’s English
author than her name: Mary Shelley, who
at 19 wrote her masterpiece in nine
months. Through free-verse poems that
draw vividly upon Shelley’s journals,
letters and manuscripts, Judge offers a
riveting immersion in Mary’s experiences
as a teenage runaway. Judge’s intense,
shadowy watercolor illustrations add to
the dark drama of her tale. Mary’s
mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, died soon
after Mary’s birth, but young Mary
absorbs her mother’s then-radical ideas
about women’s rights by reading her
books. These bolster Mary when she
faces rejection — by her family, friends
and society — for running off with a
married man, the Romantic poet Percy
Bysshe Shelley. Judge also revisits that
stormy summer in Geneva, when the
Shelleys’ erratic host, Lord Byron,
challenges them to write a ghost story.
Throughout Judge explores the
circumstances that deeply animated
Mary’s creation of her bereft, wandering
“Creature”: the early deaths of her
children, the suicides of her older half
sister and Percy Shelley’s estranged wife
and most especially, the banishment by
her father. For teens, Mary’s life is a
powerful example of resilience and
artistic integrity. Fittingly, it is her
monster who has the last word, praising
this long-dead author for the hard work
that allowed her fierce genius — and him
— to flourish: “Her spirit whispers
eternally through me.”
— Mary Quattlebaum
Baby Monkey is a soft-coated young
monkey with the cheeky grin of a prekindergartener. He has a job: Solving
cases involving missing or purloined
valuables. Baby Monkey is quite a
successful detective with his own
routines: Look for clues, take notes, have
a snack, solve the crime. Oh, and put on
pants before solving the crime. This is the
part that will have the audience for Brian
Selznick and David Serlin’s delightful
Baby Monkey, Private Eye (Scholastic,
ages 2-7) in giggles: Baby Monkey is not
at all adept at putting on his pants, but he
doesn’t give up. Baby Monkey’s office is a
cozy space, filled with intriguing detail
and references to cinema, art and
invention that change to reflect each of
Baby Monkey’s upcoming cases.
Selznick’s pencil illustrations are
delightful — full of energy and humor.
The nearly 200 pages give the book a
solid feel, enhanced by the inclusion of a
table of contents, a tongue-in-cheek but
usable index and a clever made-up
bibliography. Serlin and Selznick use
fewer than 70 new words — all in an
impressively large font — to tell the story,
with plenty of repetition and clues about
what comes next. It’s silly, endearing and
adventurous for a brand-new reader and
any older listeners who will enjoy the fun.
— Kathie Meizner
bookworld@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
TV Highlights will return Thursday.
BOOK WORLD
Ward’s ‘Sing,
Unburied,
Sing’ up for
PEN/Faulkner
Jesmyn Ward’s novel “Sing, Unburied, Sing,” which won the National Book Award for fiction in
November, has been named a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner
Award for Fiction.
Ward’s novel about an African
American woman and her children picking up a man from prison, is one of five finalists named
Wednesday by the PEN/Faulkner
Foundation in Washington. The
other finalists:
“In The Distance,” by Hernan
Diaz (Coffee House), about a
young Swedish immigrant in the
American West.
“The Dark Dark,” by Samantha Hunt (FSG Originals), a collection of fantastical short stories.
“The Tower of the Antilles,” by
Achy Obejas (Akashic), a collection of short stories about Cuban
culture.
“Improvement,” by Joan Silber (Counterpoint), about a single
mother living in Harlem.
The PEN/Faulkner Award is
America’s largest peer-juried prize
for fiction. The winner, who will
receive $15,000, is to be announced on April 4. The other
finalists will receive $5,000 each.
This year’s judges are Andrea
Barrett, Stacey D’Erasmo and Alex
Espinoza. They considered more
than 400 novels and story collections written by Americans and
published in the United States in
2017.
The winner and four finalists
will read from their work during
the PEN/Faulkner award ceremony at the Folger Shakespeare
Library in Washington on May 5.
Tickets ($100) for the ceremony
and reception can be purchased
online or at the Folger Box Office
at 202-544-7077.
3/7/18
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AMC
Treehouse Masters
Treehouse Masters
Treehouse Masters: Branched Out
Treehouse Masters
Animal Planet
Baggage
(7:28) Movie: A Madea Christmas ★ (2013)
Movie: Baggage Claim ★ (2013)
BET
Housewives/NYC
Real Housewives/Beverly
Real Housewives/Beverly
Real Housewives/Beverly
Watch
Housewives
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Gumball
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
Corporate
South Park
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central South Park
Street Outlaws
Street Outlaws
Street Outlaws
(10:01) Twin Turbos
(11:02) Street Outlaws
Discovery
Bunk’d
Bunk’d
Bunk’d
Bunk’d
Bizaardvark Bizaardvark Gravity Falls Gravity Falls Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark
Disney
E! News
Hollywood Medium
Hollywood Medium With Tyler Henry
E! News
E!
NBA Countdown (Live)
NBA Basketball: Toronto Raptors at Detroit Pistons (Live)
NBA Basketball: Cavaliers at Nuggets
ESPN
College Basketball: ACC Tournament
College Basketball: ACC Tournament -- TBA vs North Carolina (Live)
SportCtr
ESPN2
Guy’s Grocery Games
Guy’s Grocery Games
Guy’s Grocery Games
Guy’s Grocery Games
Guy’s Grocery Games
Food Network
The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
Hannity
The Ingraham Angle
Fox News Night
Fox News
(6:00) Movie: Matilda ★★★ grown-ish
Alone
(9:02) Movie: Hot Rod ★★ (2007)
The 700 Club
Freeform
Movie: Straight Outta Compton ★★★ (2015)
The Assassination of Gianni Versace
Gianni Ver
FX
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Psych
Movie: Garage Sale Mystery: The Wedding Dress (2015)
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Psych
Why Him?
VICE
Movie: Wonder Woman ★★★ (2017)
Divorce
High Main.
The House
HBO
Property Brothers: Buying
Property Brothers
Property Brothers
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Dream Home Dream Home
HGTV
Forged in Fire
Forged in Fire
The Men Who Built America: Frontiersmen
The Curse of Civil War Gold
History
Little Women: Atlanta
Little Women: Atlanta
Little Women: Atlanta
(10:02) Glam Masters
Laurieann Gibson: Beyond
Lifetime
Nationals Classics
Inside Villan Coach K
MASports
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Catfish: The TV Show
Catfish: The TV Show
Catfish: The TV Show
Catfish: The TV Show
Catfish: The TV Show
MTV
Drugs, Inc.
Drugs, Inc.: The Fix
Louis Theroux: Dark States Drugs, Inc.
Nat’l Geographic Drugs, Inc.
Wizards in 30 1-on-1
Best of The Sports Junkies
Caps in 30
Redskins 100 Redskins
Basketball
NBC SportsNet WA Best of Dan Patrick
Knight Squad SpongeBob Full House
Full House
Movie: Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules ★★ (2011)
Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
To Be Announced
To Be Announced
PARMT
(6:00) Movie: National Treasure ★★ (2004)
The Magicians
Butcher’s Block
(11:01) National Treasure
Syfy
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Full
Conan
TBS
(5:30) The Sundowners
Movie: Dick Tracy ★★
(9:15) Movie: Riff-Raff ★★ (1947)
(10:45) Movie: Dillinger ★★ (1945)
TCM
(7:05) My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
Skin Tight
(11:08) My 600-Lb. Life
TLC
Bones
Movie: Hercules ★★ (2014)
(10:15) Movie: 47 Ronin ★★ (2013)
TNT
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Travel
Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Jokes
Laff Mobb
Inside Jokes
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Unsung
Uncensored
Unsung Hollywood
TV One
Movie: The Wedding Ringer ★★ (2015)
Movie: The Wedding Ringer ★★ (2015)
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
USA Network
Black Ink Crew
Black Ink Crew
Black Ink Crew
VH1 Beauty Bar
Black Ink Crew
VH1
GE
Washington
Matters
On
Your
Side
SportsTalk
ABC
News
News
at
10pm
Government
On
Your Side
WNC8
Movie: Edge of Tomorrow ★★★ (2014)
Movie: Jumper ★ (2008)
Jumper ★
WGN
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
— From staff reports
A request for a pimento cheese recipe,
and why brie is di≠erent in France
Dear Heloise: My sister-in-law
says brie cheese is different in
France and has refused to eat it in
this country. Is that true?
Laura K., Steubenville, Ohio
Laura K.: Yes, brie in France is
Hints
From
Heloise
Dear Heloise: I’m
looking for your
mother’s Pimento
Cheese Spread.
Would you please
print it for me?
Donna DeC., via email
Donna DeC.: This was one of my
mother’s favorite recipes:
Pimento Cheese Spread
1 pound boxed soft cheese
1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup super-finely chopped
sweet or sour pickles
4 ounces pimentos
Optional ingredients:
Juice from 1 jar of pimentos
4 ounces chopped stuffed salad
olives
Chopped onions, to taste
Grate the cheese coarsely using
the large opening of a grater or a
food processor. Layer the ingredients as if you were making lasagna. Place a large piece of wax
paper or plastic wrap on the counter. Put down a layer of grated
cheese, then mayonnaise, pimen-
tos and a handful of pickles. Use a
spatula to fold it over and over,
starting from the bottom. Repeat
the process, folding until all the
ingredients are blended. I divide
this up into two batches. Put the
mixture in jars, seal well and store
in the refrigerator.
Options: If you want a thinner,
gooey spread, add the juice from
one jar of pimentos and mix well.
Vary the spread by adding
chopped salad olives and/or onions.
made with unpasteurized milk.
Our laws prevent the importation
of brie made from unpasteurized
milk unless it has been aged for
60 days. Brie aged that long
would have a very unpleasant
taste and texture.
Dear Heloise: For adding a tangy
taste to meats and vegetables that
are going to be deep-fried, dip
them first in buttermilk before
breading. This works so well for
folks who can’t eat eggs, which is
what we usually use before
breading.
Cathy W., Vicksburg, Miss.
is white pepper, and does it have a
different name?
Abby H., Alpena, Mich.
Dear Heloise: What does it mean
when someone talks about
“empty calories”?
Rita S., Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Rita S.: “Empty calories” are
calories that are nutritionally
worthless. Sugars and fats add
calories (and inches to your
waistline), but they contain few, if
any, nutrients for your body. Fruit
contains some sugar, but it also
has vitamins and minerals, while
a doughnut is filled with empty
calories.
Dear Heloise: I have a recipe that
calls for white pepper. I have
never heard of such a thing. What
Abby H.: Yes, there is such a thing
as white pepper. It’s soaked in
water until the black outer shell
comes off. It has a hotter flavor
than black pepper and is used in
Southeast Asian and Eastern
European dishes such as grilled
meats, soups and light-colored
dishes.
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795000, San Antonio, TX 782795000, or email it to
Heloise@Heloise.com.
©2018, King Features Syndicate
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This record-breaking interactive solve-the-crime comedy
keeps the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Added Shows:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Great Group Rates
for 15 or More
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Dumbarton Concerts
Celtic Tenors
Vocal Trio
March 17, 2018 at 4 PM
March 17, 2018 at 8 PM
Performing in venues large and small, the trio always
delights their audiences. Whether it’s the haunting Danny
Boy or exhilarating classics, they are known for their
professional, sparkling and good humored performances.
Dumbarton Concerts
Dumbarton United
Methodist Church
3133 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-965-2000
Dumbartonconcerts.org
$42 Adults
$39 Senior
202-965-2000
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
AfterWords
post-performance
discussion with
Giandrea Noseda
and John Adams
immediately
following the Thu.,
Mar. 8 performance.
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
John Adams's
“The Gospel
According to the
Other Mary”
Part of
DIRECT CURRENT
Tomorrow at 7
Saturday at 8
In celebration of John Adams's 70th birthday year, Gianandrea
Noseda conducts Adams's expansive composition for chorus,
soloists, and orchestra depicting Jesus's final weeks as told
from the unique perspective of Mary Magdalene.
Saturday, Mar. 10 at 6:30 p.m.: ForeWords: "The Ministry
of Mary Magdalene". John Adams will take part in this farreaching, one-of-a-kind talk
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Plug in at direct-current.org
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Advertise in The Guide to the Lively
l Arts!
202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
C6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:451:15-4:30-7:15-7:45-10:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 2:00-4:00-5:158:30-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 1:205:15-11:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:25-3:506:15
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 2:00-8:45
Game Night (R) CC: 2:30-5:007:30-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 3:457:30-10:20
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 4:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:307:20-10:10
Death Wish (R) CC: 1:50-4:407:40-10:20
I, Tonya (R) CC: 12:40-7:00
Annihilation (R) CC: 1:35-4:307:20-10:10
Detective Chinatown 2 (R)
4:00-9:50
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 2:45-6:00-9:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:457:00-10:15
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:404:00-7:30
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:504:00-4:50-7:00-8:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:00-3:20
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 1:104:20-7:30
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 12:50-3:105:30-7:50
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 2:10-5:007:40
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 1:404:30-7:20
Black Panther (PG-13) (!) 1:00
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air & Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Angelika
Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
The Young Karl Marx (Le jeune
Karl Marx) (NR) 11:30-3:15-7:30
The Post (PG-13) 2:00-4:20-7:00
Have a Nice Day (Hao ji le) (NR)
11:15-5:45
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 1:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-4:30-7:15
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Molly's Game (R) 1:45-7:30
Loveless (Nelyubov) (R) 11:002:00-5:00-8:00
I, Tonya (R) 4:45
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:204:55-7:25-10:00
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:30-2:004:35-7:15-9:55
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:0012:00-1:45-3:00-4:30-6:45-7:309:30-9:50-10:15
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-10:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 11:101:50-4:25-7:10
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story
12:45-3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:10-9:40
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 1:45-7:15
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 4:30-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:506:50-9:30
The Party (R) CC: 4:30-6:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:15-8:30-9:45
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 1:00-4:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:40-3:40-6:40-9:20
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
Auntie Mame (1958) (NR) 1:304:30-7:30
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 4:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:15
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Documentary (NR) 12:15-4:00-7:45
Medal of Honor Theater NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:0012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place
Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street NW
MARYLAND
Game Night (R) CC: 11:45-2:155:00-7:30-10:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: (!)
9:15-12:15
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 9:45-2:155:00-8:00-10:45
Annihilation (R) CC: 10:30-1:154:00-6:45-9:30
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Center 12
800 Shoppers Way
AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
11:00-12:00-2:00-3:00-5:00-6:008:00-9:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 11:502:30-4:50-7:20-9:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:25-1:454:15-6:30-9:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:15-6:10-9:15
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:30-2:45AMC Academy 8
6:15-9:15
6198 Greenbelt Road
Game Night (R) CC: 11:00-1:25Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
3:40-6:05-8:45
10:30-12:30-1:30-3:30-4:30-6:30- Get Out (R) CC: 2:50-8:30
7:30-9:30
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:40-5:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D Annihilation (R) CC: 11:15-2:10(PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30 5:05-7:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Death Wish (R) CC: 11:45-2:15(PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:45-7:00
4:45-7:15-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00-2:00- Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
4:20-6:45
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:00Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 10:457:00-10:00
12:35-3:45-7:00-9:30
ArcLight Bethesda
Game Night (R) CC: 2:15-4:457101 Democracy Boulevard
7:15-9:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30-2:30Death Wish (R) CC: 11:45-2:255:30-8:30-10:15
5:15-8:00-9:10
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:35AMC Center Park 8
2:50-5:10-6:50-9:35
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:10-5:05
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:30- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3:45-5:00-6:45-10:00
(PG-13) 11:25-2:00-4:45-7:20-9:55
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 2:00-4:30- Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:006:55-9:15
7:10-9:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Early Man (PG) 11:45-3:55
3D (PG-13) CC: 1:30-2:00-5:30Darkest Hour (PG-13) 3:10-6:20
8:30-9:00
Game Night (R) 11:55-2:05-5:50Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 12:30-3:40- 8:00-9:40
6:50-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) 1:50-8:40
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 2:30-5:00- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
7:30-10:00
Missouri (R) 11:00-1:25-6:15
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 1:00-4:00- Death Wish (R) 11:50-2:20-5:556:45-9:20
8:20-10:10
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 1:00-4:00- The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:407:00-9:45
4:40-7:40
Annihilation (R) 11:35-1:20-4:25AMC Columbia 14
7:05-9:20
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:00- I, Tonya (R) CC: 3:50
Every Day (Every Day Another
4:20-7:25-10:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D Day) (PG-13) 11:05-12:25-4:35(PG-13) CC: 12:00-3:20-6:40-9:50 7:25-10:05
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:152:55-3:30-4:05-5:45-6:30-7:00-9:00
11:00-1:35-4:10-6:50-9:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 4:30-7:30
(PG-13) CC: 2:20-5:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:40- Red Sparrow (R) 11:20-12:20-2:155:15-8:15-8:45-9:50
3:20-6:10-9:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 12:05-3:10-6:40-9:45 (PG-13) 12:30-9:30
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:10-1:451020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
4:20-7:00-9:30
Early Man (PG) CC: 11:15-4:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 4:10-10:20
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:30-3:00Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
6:35-10:00
(PG-13) 1:10-7:10
Game Night (R) CC: 11:40-2:15Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:30-10:05
(PG-13) 11:05-1:50-4:35-7:30-10:15
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 10:55-1:40- Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:15-12:15-2:304:30-7:25-10:20
4:45-7:00-9:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:15-9:00 Early Man (PG) 11:10AM
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:50-3:05The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
6:50-9:50
1:45-9:40
Every Day (Every Day Another
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:50-2:20Day) (PG-13) (!) 11:20-1:50-4:20- 5:05-7:40-10:05
6:55-9:25
Game Night (R) 12:50-3:10-5:30The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
7:50-10:10
1:40-10:00
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:50-4:20Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
5:25-7:05-8:00-10:35
Experience (PG-13) 11:00-2:20Black Panther (PG-13) 11:006:00-9:10
11:30-12:20-1:40-2:10-2:40-3:20Game Night (R) 4:50
4:40-5:10-5:40-6:20-7:45-8:20AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 8:50-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) 6:30
She's Beautiful When She's Angry
(NR) 7:00
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 5:15-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:10-9:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:50
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-4:20
Lady Bird (R) 5:05
Call Me by Your Name (R) 7:15
Phantom Thread (R) 2:30-9:15
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:352:05-3:45-5:15-6:55-8:25-10:05
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 12:35-2:45-5:55-9:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 11:302:20-5:10-7:50-10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:50-4:507:45-10:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:15-1:554:20-7:00-9:25
Early Man (PG) CC: 1:45-4:10
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 11:25-1:004:10-7:20-10:30
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 3:15-9:40
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 11:45-2:255:05-7:30-9:55
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 11:20-2:355:20-8:00-10:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:45-6:50
Pari (Hindi) (NR) (!) 12:10-3:356:40-9:45
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR) (!)
12:00-3:10-6:35-9:50
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:10-7:10
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:155:00-7:55-10:40
Every Day (Every Day Another
Day) (PG-13) (!) 11:05-2:00-4:457:15-10:10
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
11:40-4:40-9:35
Detective Chinatown 2 (R)
6:30-9:30
Nostalgia (R) CC: 11:00-1:30-4:157:25-10:15
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:307:35-10:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:35-2:456:00-9:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 11:00-2:05-5:10-8:10-11:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:307:00-10:15
Game Night (R) 1:40-4:15
Death Wish (R) 11:00-1:50-4:30AMC Loews
7:30-10:35
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
Annihilation (R) 11:35-2:20-5:0511115 Mall Circle
7:55-10:50
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 9:30Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin 11:30-12:45-2:45-4:00-4:30-6:00IMAX Theater
7:15-9:15-10:30
601 Independence Avenue SW
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 10:00-1:15-3:15-6:30D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
7:45-9:45-10:45
12:25-2:40
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:45-1:153:45-6:15-9:00
Seas 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our World: Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 11:00An IMAX 3D Experience Please Call 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
Winchester (PG-13) 11:30-2:004:30-7:00-10:15
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR)
11:10-3:00
Annihilation (R) 10:55-1:45-4:407:30-10:25
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 11:05-1:50-4:25-7:05-9:40
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:202:50-5:20-8:00-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:50-2:454:15-7:40-9:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 11:20-6:05
Hoyt's
West Nursery Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Road
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
12:00-12:50-1:40-2:30-3:10-4:004:50-5:40-6:20-7:10-8:00-8:509:30-10:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:102:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:05-6:50-9:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00-2:154:30-6:45-9:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 12:00-1:103:00-4:20-6:10-7:20-9:10-10:20
Game Night (R) CC: 12:20-2:455:10-7:35-10:00
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:556:55-9:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 4:10
Death Wish (R) CC: 12:10-2:455:20-7:55-10:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 1:30-4:157:05-9:50
Every Day (Every Day Another
Day) (PG-13) CC: 12:15-2:35-5:007:25-9:45
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
4:00-9:50
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:503:50-6:50-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:30-7:109:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:304:20-7:20-10:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-3:30-5:457:50-10:05
The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) 1:20-7:30
The Party (R) CC: 1:10-3:00-5:007:00-9:20
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 3:40-7:45
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 1:15-5:30-9:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:504:40-7:25-10:00
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 5:30
I, Tonya (R) 8:00
Phantom Thread (R) 2:30
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:002:00-3:00-4:00-5:00-6:00-7:008:00-9:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:45-2:45-5:25-8:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:05-2:254:45-7:05
Game Night (R) 12:15-2:45-5:107:45
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 2:45-6:00-9:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00-2:455:30-8:15-11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:30-9:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:45-4:156:45-9:15
Early Man (PG) 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-4:007:15-10:30
Game Night (R) 12:15-3:00-5:458:30-11:15
The Shape of Water (R) 12:00-3:156:15-9:30
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:15-5:007:45-10:45
Annihilation (R) 2:00-4:45-7:3010:30
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 12:00-2:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:002:30-5:45-8:15-11:00
VIRGINIA
HAVE YOU ACCOMPLISHED ANYTHING LATELY?
YES
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:003:30-4:00-6:30-7:00-9:30-10:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 1:30-2:00-4:30-5:00-7:308:15-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:40-4:106:45-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:40-3:20-6:00-9:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:50-3:306:00-8:30
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
Early Man (PG) 2:10-4:50-7:15-9:40
6505 America Blvd.
Red Sparrow (R) 12:45-4:00Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:00- 7:10-10:20
1:15-1:45-3:45-4:15-4:30-5:00-7:00- Game Night (R) 1:45-4:30-7:20-9:50
7:45-8:15-10:15-11:00-11:30
Death Wish (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 8:00-10:30
Annihilation (R) 1:50-4:40-7:40(PG-13) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:00-3:45- 10:25
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
6:30-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG-13) 1:15-3:45-6:15-8:50
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:20(PG-13) 2:15-5:05-8:00-11:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:00-6:30- 3:50-6:15-8:40
9:00-11:25
Xscape Theatres
Red Sparrow (R) 12:45-4:00Brandywine 14
7:15-10:30
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Game Night (R) 1:45-4:15-7:00-9:45 Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 10:00-11:00-1:00-2:00-4:05-5:00Missouri (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30-10:30 7:00-8:00-10:00-11:00
Death Wish (R) 1:30-4:15-7:00Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 10:1010:00
12:45-3:15-6:15-9:00
Annihilation (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
10:30
(PG-13) CC: 9:50-12:50-3:50Every Day (Every Day Another Day) 6:45-9:45
(PG-13) 1:15-3:50-6:20-9:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:50-1:20Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 3:40-6:00-8:50
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 10:4014716 Baltimore Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-2:00- 12:15-1:40-5:10-6:10-6:50-10:1510:50
3:15-5:25-6:45-8:30-10:00
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 11:50-2:50Black Panther in Disney Digital
5:15-7:45-10:10
3D (PG-13) 11:30-12:40-2:40-4:15Den of Thieves (R) CC: 3:40-9:15
6:00-7:30-9:15-10:35
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:45-4:45- Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 9:40-11:151:50-4:40-7:15-8:15-9:50
7:45-10:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:10-2:30-5:00- Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 10:15-1:154:20-7:20-10:20
7:30-10:00
Early Man (PG) 1:15-3:30-6:15-8:45 Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) CC: 10:45-1:20-3:45
Red Sparrow (R) 12:20-3:45Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:15-10:40
Game Night (R) 1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45 9:25-10:30-11:30-12:30-1:30-2:303:30-4:30-5:30-6:30-7:30-8:30Den of Thieves (R) 12:50-4:009:30-10:30
7:15-10:20
iPic Pike & Rose
Death Wish (R) 11:30-2:15-5:0011830 Grand Park Avenue
8:00-10:45
Annihilation (R) 11:45-3:00Black Panther (PG-13) 10:456:30-9:30
11:15-12:00-2:15-2:45-3:45-6:006:30-7:30-9:45-10:30-11:00
Regal Rockville Center
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:30-3:00Stadium 13
6:15-9:30
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 11:45-3:30Black Panther (PG-13) 12:1512:45-3:30-4:00-6:45-7:15-10:00- 7:15-10:45
Annihilation (R) (!) 1:15-4:3010:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 7:45-11:15
Game Night (R) 12:45-4:00-7:00(PG-13) 11:45-3:00-6:15-9:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:30-3:15- 10:15
Death Wish (R) (!) 1:30-4:45-8:006:30-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:00- 11:30
7:30-10:00
Early Man (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:457:15-9:45
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Red Sparrow (R) 1:00-4:15-7:152150 Clarendon Blvd.
10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Game Night (R) 1:15-4:15-7:151:00-1:30-2:00-4:00-5:00-6:0010:15
7:00-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 3:45-9:30 Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, (PG-13) CC: 3:00-8:00-9:00
Missouri (R) 1:00-6:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Death Wish (R) 1:00-4:30-7:30(PG-13) CC: 4:45-10:15
10:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:45-4:30Annihilation (R) 1:15-4:15-7:156:45-9:15
10:15
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 1:00-4:15Detective Chinatown 2 (R) 12:45- 7:00-10:15
4:00-7:00-10:00
Game Night (R) CC: 3:20-5:40Operation Red Sea 12:30-4:008:00-10:20
6:45-9:45
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:45-7:30
Death Wish (R) 12:45-1:50-4:30Regal Waugh Chapel
7:30-10:00
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:30-2:102:50-3:30-4:50-5:30-6:10-6:50-8:108:50-9:30-10:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 1:00-4:10-7:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:30-5:107:50-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 3:20-6:30-9:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:20-5:00-7:40Bow Tie Harbour 9
10:20
2474 Solomons Island Road
Red Sparrow (R) 3:50-7:00-10:15
12 Strong (R) 1:50-4:40-10:40
Game
Night (R) 3:15-6:15-9:10
Hostiles (R) 10:20-4:15-7:10
Den of Thieves (R) 3:40-7:20-10:30
Call Me by Your Name (R) 9:55Death
Wish (R) 1:10-4:20-7:103:40-6:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 10:00
Annihilation
(R) 3:05-6:20-9:35
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Missouri (R) 1:20-10:05
Every Day (Every Day Another Day) Every Day (Every Day Another Day) Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-1:302:00-4:30-7:05-9:45
(PG-13)
3:10-4:40-6:20-7:50-9:30
(PG-13) 2:20-4:50-7:15
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Phantom Thread (R) 9:20
Stadium 20 & IMAX
(PG-13) 1:00-4:10-7:20-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) 10:50900 Ellsworth Drive
1:30-4:10-6:40-9:40
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:204:05-6:40-9:15
The Shape of Water (R) 12:50-9:55 Black Panther (PG-13) 12:10Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:05-2:40The Post (PG-13) 11:00-1:40-4:20- 12:35-1:50-3:25-3:50-5:15-6:457:05-8:30-10:00-10:20
5:15-7:50-10:25
7:20-10:00
Annihilation (R) 11:10-2:00-5:00- Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:00-1:15-3:15-4:30-6:30- (PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:30-9:20
7:50-10:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:50-3:30Nostalgia (R) 9:50-12:30-3:10-6:30 7:45-9:45-11:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:55-3:40- 6:10-8:45
Red Sparrow (R) 10:00-10:406:40-9:30
Red Sparrow (R) 12:40-3:5011:20-1:00-4:00-7:00-7:40-9:30Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 7:00-10:20
10:10
12:45-3:50-9:50
(PG-13)
Game Night (R) 1:15-4:20-7:10-9:45
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
Coco (PG) 12:10-3:15-10:20
Death Wish (R) 12:10-2:45-5:207000 Arundel Mills Circle
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:15-4:008:00-10:35
Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 12:30- 6:25-9:00
Annihilation (R) 1:10-4:15-7:303:45-7:15
Early Man (PG) 12:45-3:30-5:5510:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 8:40-11:00
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
(PG-13) 11:20-4:55-6:05-8:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:45-4:05Experience
(PG-13) 12:30-3:40Black Panther (PG-13) 10:557:35-10:55
6:50-10:00
12:00-12:50-1:30-2:00-2:15-2:45Game
Night
(R)
12:15-2:55-5:35Regal Westview
3:20-4:15-5:15-5:35-6:45-7:40-8:358:15-10:55
Stadium 16 & IMAX
8:50-9:25-10:05
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D Samson (PG-13) 12:30-3:356:30-9:35
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:45(PG-13) XD: 10:30
12:45-1:45-3:00-4:00-5:00-6:15The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:05- Den of Thieves (R) 12:25-3:457:00-10:50
7:15-8:30-9:30-10:30
1:45-4:20-7:10-9:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:55-1:40- Annihilation (R) 1:25-4:20-7:1510:10
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
4:15-6:50-9:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle I, Tonya (R) 12:05-3:05-6:15-9:30 The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:30Death Wish (R) 12:05-2:55-5:403:45-6:30-9:15
(PG-13) 11:15-2:05-5:00-7:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00-3:00Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-1:35-4:15- 8:20-11:00
Every Day (Every Day Another Day) 5:45-8:30-11:15
6:50-9:20
(PG-13) 1:40-4:15-6:45-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Early Man (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:50The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:50- (PG-13) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:45
7:20-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:45-3:15Red Sparrow (R) 11:00-12:15-2:20- 3:20-5:50-8:35-11:00
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
6:00-9:00
3:35-5:40-7:00-9:00-10:15
Early Man (PG) 11:00-1:30-4:15Game Night (R) 11:50-2:30-5:05- Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:157:30-10:45
6:45-9:15
7:35-10:10
Red Sparrow (R) 11:30-3:15Samson (PG-13) 11:20-2:05-4:50- Black Panther (PG-13) 9:30AM
Regal Germantown
7:00-10:15
7:45-10:25
Stadium 14
Game Night (R) 11:00-2:00-5:15Den of Thieves (R) 11:30-3:0520000 Century Boulevard
8:00-10:45
6:15-9:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:30- Death Wish (R) 11:15-2:00-4:45Death Wish (R) 11:25-1:00-2:103:45-4:45-7:00-8:00-10:15-11:15
3:40-5:00-6:25-7:45-9:15-10:30
7:30-10:30
NO
IT’S GO-GO-GO
ALL THE TIME
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 1:15-7:45
Annihilation (R) 10:45-2:15-5:008:15-11:15
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 1:15-4:00-6:30-9:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:003:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 4:30-11:00
AMC Hoffman Center 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:0012:00-12:30-3:15-3:45-5:15-6:006:30-9:15-9:45-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 10:15-1:30-2:15-4:458:00-8:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
1:15-3:50-6:25-9:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:153:05-5:45-8:15-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:30-6:207:25-9:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:15-4:006:45-9:30
Early Man (PG) CC: 12:10-2:20
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:15-2:356:00-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:50-3:20
Game Night (R) CC: 10:20-12:403:00-5:20-7:45-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:05-6:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
12:20-6:15
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
3:15-9:05
Get Out (R) CC: 2:15-10:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 1:35-10:20
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:257:10-10:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 4:05-9:40
Death Wish (R) CC: 10:20-12:152:50-5:30-8:05-10:40
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:00-1:454:30-7:20-10:05
I, Tonya (R) CC: 10:45-4:35
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 11:45-4:45-7:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:35-3:00-5:20
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
4:40-7:05-9:35
Detective Chinatown 2 (R)
7:40-10:35
Red Sparrow: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-4:157:30-10:45
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
11:30-12:00-1:00-2:00-2:45-3:304:15-6:00-6:45-7:45-8:30-9:1510:00-10:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-11:45-3:00-5:156:15-9:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:20-4:30-9:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:253:20-6:15-9:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:40-5:308:45-9:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:30-11:101:45-4:20-7:00-9:30
Early Man (PG) CC: 11:15-1:40-4:10
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 11:00-2:155:30-8:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:507:30-10:30
Game Night (R) CC: 11:10-1:404:10-6:40-9:20
Death Wish (R) CC: 11:15-2:004:45-7:30-10:15
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 6:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:10-4:45
Annihilation (R) CC: 11:10-2:105:00-7:50-10:30
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 12:10-2:50-5:10-7:40-10:10
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
1:50-7:10
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:452:15-5:45-9:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:156:30-9:45
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 2:30-5:30-8:30
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 1:154:15-7:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
1:45-6:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 4:10-7:10
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:10
The Party (R) CC: (!) 4:45
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:30-7:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 1:20-4:20-7:20
I, Tonya (R) CC: 4:30
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
11:00-12:15-2:05-3:25-5:15-6:358:25-9:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 11:35-2:40-5:55-9:05
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:35-4:10-9:35
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 10:2512:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:10-1:05-4:006:55-9:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:05-1:454:15-7:00-9:25
Early Man (PG) CC: 10:10-12:403:00
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 10:05-1:154:25-7:35-10:45
Game Night (R) CC: 10:20-12:453:15-5:40-8:05-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:454:20-9:55
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 10:00-12:353:10-5:45-8:20-10:55
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:20-6:45
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:004:05-7:15-10:20
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:55-7:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 10:55-1:504:55-7:50-10:35
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 10:05-12:30-3:05-5:307:55-10:25
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
5:20-8:10-10:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:30-1:354:40-7:45-10:50
AMC Worldgate 9
13025 Worldgate Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 2:002:45-5:00-5:45-8:00-8:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) CC: 4:00-7:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 2:50-5:40-8:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 3:00-5:257:45
Red Sparrow (R) CC: (!) 2:005:10-8:20
Game Night (R) CC: 2:30-4:50-7:10
Death Wish (R) CC: (!) 2:40-5:157:50
Annihilation (R) CC: 2:15-5:05-8:05
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema One Loudoun
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:40-1:20-4:006:40-8:40-11:25
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:20-1:001:50-4:30-5:20-8:00-9:20-11:20;
11:40-3:25-7:00-10:25
Game Night (R) 11:15-12:20-2:104:55-5:35-8:20-11:00
Red Sparrow (R) 10:55-12:00-2:253:45-6:00-7:20-9:35-10:55
Annihilation (R) 10:00-11:25-2:353:05-6:20-9:20-11:10
Before We Vanish (Sanpo suru
shinryakusha)7:40
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2911 District Ave
Nostalgia (R) (!) 12:00
The Shape of Water (R) 10:454:15-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:30-2:15-5:057:45-10:45
The Party (R) 10:05-2:45-4:45-6:458:45-10:35
Death Wish (R) (!) 12:15-3:00-5:408:15-10:55
Lady Bird (R) 1:45-7:15
NO
NO
YES
Samson (PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:0010:00
Death Wish (R) 12:30-4:45-7:3510:20
Annihilation (R) 12:50-3:506:35-9:20
Hostiles (R) 12:25-3:25-6:25-9:30
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 12:45-3:40-6:20-8:50
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:103:30-5:50-8:15-10:35
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10-3:004:15-6:00-7:30-8:30-9:15
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10-2:104:20-5:30-7:30-8:30-10:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 3:20-6:30-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
1:00-3:50-7:10-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:15-10:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:40-4:40-7:15-9:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:156:50-9:10
Red Sparrow (R) 3:10-6:15-9:30
Game Night (R) 12:45-2:45-5:107:40-10:15
Samson (PG-13) 1:15-4:00-7:0010:00
Death Wish (R) 12:45-2:30-5:158:00-10:45
Annihilation (R) 12:50-3:456:45-9:45
Hostiles (R) 1:50-5:00
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 1:30-4:10-6:40-9:00
Red Sparrow: The IMAX 2D Experience (R) 1:20-4:30-7:45-10:50
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-1:302:00-3:00-4:05-4:35-5:05-6:05-7:107:40-8:10-9:10-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 12:30-2:30-3:35-5:35-6:408:40-9:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:103:40-6:10-8:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:30-2:50-5:107:30-9:50
Early Man (PG) 1:35-4:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:30-3:407:25-10:30
Game Night (R) 12:40-3:05-5:307:55-10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:40-4:20-7:10-9:50
Death Wish (R) 12:30-1:15-3:556:50-9:35
Annihilation (R) 1:45-4:25-7:2510:10
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 4:40-7:05-9:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
6:45-9:05
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:40-1:103:50-4:20-7:00-7:30-10:10-10:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 11:40-12:10-2:50-3:206:00-6:30-9:10-9:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:55-1:304:30-7:20-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-6:40-9:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:50-3:356:10-9:00
Red Sparrow (R) 12:00-3:307:10-10:40
Game Night (R) 11:30-2:20-5:107:50-10:20
Death Wish (R) 11:00-2:00-5:008:00-11:00
Annihilation (R) 11:05-1:50-4:407:40-10:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:004:00-6:50-9:45
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Black Panther (PG-13) 4:30-7:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
(PG-13) 1:30-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) 2:205:10-8:05-10:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:05-4:407:20-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:30-4:15-7:10-9:55
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:20-3:456:15-9:15
Early Man (PG) 1:50-4:05-6:20-9:10
Red Sparrow (R) 1:05-4:10-7:1510:20
Game Night (R) 1:55-4:20-6:45-9:45
Death Wish (R) 2:00-5:15-7:45-10:15
Annihilation (R) 2:15-5:00-8:0010:45
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
(PG-13) 1:15-3:40-6:00-9:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:105:30-8:15-10:35
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-2:303:30-4:00-6:30-7:00-9:30-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
MAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-2:20
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Seas 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
An IMAX 3D Experience Please Call
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 7:05
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 4:15-9:55
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 7:15-10:00
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-2:30-4:45
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:052:20-4:35
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 7:30-10:10
NO
IT’S...
TURNS OUT I HATE THE...
PAID FOR
COUNTRY
BURBS
CITY
YES
WANT TO SELL?
NO
I’M EXHAUSTED
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:204:15-7:20-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:25-5:157:45-10:25
Early Man (PG) 2:10-4:35
Red Sparrow (R) 1:50-5:10-8:30
The Shape of Water (R) 1:00-4:006:50-9:50
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX Death Wish (R) 1:35-4:25-7:1510:05
11940 Market Street
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-4:00- Annihilation (R) 2:00-5:00-8:00
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
7:00-10:10
(PG-13) 1:05-3:50-6:30-9:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 4:05
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
I, Tonya (R) 12:40-6:20
7:00-9:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:30-4:457:05-9:20
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 3:50-9:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:45Fifty Shades Freed (R) 9:50
12:45-2:55-4:00-6:00-7:05-9:10Game Night (R) 12:10-2:40-5:10- 10:10
7:40-10:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:40-2:20Phantom Thread (R) 1:05-6:55
5:00-7:40-10:15
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:05 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Death Wish (R) 1:10-4:10-7:20-10:20 (PG-13) 11:35-2:40-5:30-8:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:05-2:35-4:55The Post (PG-13) 3:30-9:40
The Shape of Water (R) 12:50-6:40 7:30-9:55
Early Man (PG) 1:00-3:40-6:20-9:00
Annihilation (R) 1:30-4:30-7:10Red Sparrow (R) 12:25-3:3510:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-2:00- 6:45-9:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:40-3:403:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-9:00
6:35-9:35
Red Sparrow (R) 12:20-3:40Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
6:50-9:55
(NR) 11:50-3:10-6:40-10:00
Cinema Arts Theatre
Game Night (R) 12:25-3:05-5:459650 Main St
Red Sparrow (R) CC: 10:15-1:15- 8:25
The Shape of Water (R) 12:30-3:254:15-7:10-9:55
6:25-9:25
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:45Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13) 12:152:40-5:10
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 5:00- 3:25-6:35-9:45
Samson (PG-13) 11:25-2:15-5:057:30-9:55
7:55-10:35
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
Aiyaary (NR) 11:35-2:55-6:20-9:50
10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Winchester (PG-13) 12:50-3:356:10-8:50
Missouri (R) CC: 12:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:35-5:05-7:40 Pari (Hindi) (NR) 11:55-3:006:15-9:15
The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) CC:
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR) 11:309:40-10:00
2:45-5:50-9:00
The Party (R) CC: 9:55-12:00-1:45Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
3:20-7:00-8:35-10:10
(PG-13) 12:00-2:30-5:10-7:50-10:25
Lady Bird (R) CC: 9:50-12:20Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
2:45-4:55
12:15-3:15-6:30-9:45
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts
Awe! (NR) 12:20-3:20-6:20-9:20
- Animation (NR) 10:00-2:00Regal Dulles Town Center 10
6:00-10:00
21100 Dulles Town Circle
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 12:00-4:00-8:00 Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30-1:453:45-4:45-6:45-7:45-9:45-10:45
Nostalgia (R) CC: 12:00-7:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
(PG-13) 11:45-2:45-5:45-8:45
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:45- The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:103:30-6:30-9:15
2:15-4:45-7:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:00-4:00Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:50-2:057:00-10:00
4:40-7:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:40-3:15The Post (PG-13) 12:15-7:40
6:00-8:30
Annihilation (R) 11:40-2:20Red Sparrow (R) 12:45-4:155:00-7:45
7:30-10:15
Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
Game Night (R) 11:50-2:15-5:15(PG-13) 3:00-5:20
8:00-10:30
Game Night (R) 12:10-2:35-5:15-7:50
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:00-4:30Death Wish (R) 11:20-12:20-1:50- 7:15-10:50
2:50-4:20-5:25-7:00-7:55
Annihilation (R) 12:20-2:30-5:30Black Panther (PG-13) 11:30-12:30- 8:15-11:00
1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30-6:30-7:15-8:00
Regal
Red Sparrow (R) 11:35-12:50-2:40Fairfax Towne Center 10
4:10-5:45-7:30
4110 West Ox Road
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:203:30-6:30
2:55-5:30-8:10-10:45
Manassas 4 Cinemas
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:20-4:158890 Mathis Ave.
7:10-9:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 2:10-4:50; Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:25-4:552:55-5:35
7:20-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:00-4:00-6:00 Early Man (PG) 12:10-2:30
Game Night (R) 2:05-4:10-6:15
Red Sparrow (R) 12:50-4:10Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 7:30-10:45
6201 Multiplex Drive
Game Night (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D 7:50-10:30
Samson (PG-13) 1:00-3:40
(PG-13) 12:00-6:00
Annihilation (R) 12:45-3:50Black Panther (PG-13) 10:0010:30-11:00-1:00-1:30-2:00-3:00- 6:45-9:40
4:00-4:30-5:00-7:00-7:30-8:00-9:00- Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
10:00-10:30-11:00
(PG-13) 1:30-4:20-7:00-9:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:05-12:35- Golden Slumber (Goldeun Seul3:05-5:35-8:05-10:45
reombeo) (NR) 5:00-7:40-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Detective K: Secret of the Living
(PG-13) 11:05-1:50-4:35-7:25-10:20 Dead (NR) 6:30-9:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:25-1:45-4:15- Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
7:10-9:35
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Red Sparrow (R) 10:35-1:40-4:45- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00-3:157:50-10:55
6:30-9:45
Game Night (R) 10:05-12:30-2:55- Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
5:20-7:45-10:15
(PG-13) 2:00-5:15-8:30
Death Wish (R) 12:00-2:40-5:15The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:308:00-10:40
3:00-6:00-8:45
Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety (NR) 12:20- Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:45-4:153:30-6:40-9:50
6:45-9:15
Annihilation (R) 10:50-1:35-4:20- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:15-10:05
(PG-13) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
Rave Cinemas
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:45-5:15Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme 7:45-10:15
11900 Palace Way
Early Man (PG) 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:50-2:15- Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:453:05-5:35-9:45
7:15-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:30- Game Night (R) 12:30-3:00-5:302:10-4:55-7:40-10:25
8:00-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D Death Wish (R) 12:45-3:15-5:45(PG-13) 11:45-6:25-8:55
8:15-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Annihilation (R) 1:15-4:00-6:45(PG-13) 10:15-1:10-4:05-7:05-10:10 9:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 4:50-10:05 Every Day (Every Day Another Day)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:30(PG-13) 12:00-2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
1:55-7:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:00Red Sparrow (R) 10:00-1:15-4:30- 2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
7:45-11:00
Chalo (NR) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 1:00-9:20 Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
12 Strong (R) 10:20-1:35-4:4512:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
7:50-10:45
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
2018 Oscar Shorts 2:00
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:15Annihilation (R) 10:40-1:30-4:15- 7:30-10:45
7:25-10:15
Regal Kingstowne
Death Wish (R) 11:20-2:00-4:40Stadium 16 & RPX
7:35-10:20
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
The Post (PG-13) 12:50-7:10
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:15-3:30Lady Bird (R) 10:35-4:00-6:50
6:45-10:05
Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 10:05- Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D
12:35-1:20-3:55-4:35-7:15-7:55(PG-13) 2:10-5:15-10:30
10:35-11:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:30-5:10I, Tonya (R) 4:20-10:00
7:50-10:25
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:25- Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:207:00-9:35
6:50-9:20
Regal Ballston Common
Early Man (PG) 2:20-4:40-7:20-9:35
Stadium 12
Red Sparrow (R) 12:15-3:45671 N. Glebe Road
7:05-10:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10-1:55- Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
2:50-4:20-5:05-6:00-7:30-8:15-9:10 (NR) 1:15-3:05-6:30-9:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital 3D Game Night (R) 12:35-3:20-6:05(PG-13) 3:35-6:45-9:55
8:35
STILL LOVING YOUR HOUSE?
MY CASTLE
WANT TO KNOCK SOMETHING
ELSE OUT OF THE PARK?
Annihilation (R) (!) 11:05-1:50-4:357:35-10:20
Red Sparrow (R) (!) 10:30-1:304:30-7:30-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:0011:00-1:00-2:00-4:00-5:00-7:008:00-10:00-11:00
YES
WHAT IF YOU TRIED CLEANING AND ORGANIZING?
MARCH 7 , 2018
Wednesday, March 7, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 9:30
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 4:20
. WEDNESDAY,
GARAGE
BASEMENT
CLOSETS
YOU’LL HAVE TO
CARRY ME OUT
ATTIC
MAYBE
YES
I GOTTA GET
BACK TO THE...
REFRIGERATOR
THE KIDS
ARE GONE
WELL, KEEP US IN MIND
BONUS: YOU COULD SELL YOUR STUFF
WELL, KEEP
US IN MIND
CLASSIFIED
SQUIRRELS
HAVE
MOVED IN
COUNTRY
CITY
BURBS
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
KLMNO
2.1 million readers, bargain hunters included • 202.334.6200 • washingtonpost.com/classified • Open 24/7
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Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Average Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach.
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Average Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach.
C054C 3x4.5
Or place your ad in Express, our daily commuter read, and reach 536,000 readers.
C054D 3x4.5
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C7
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
AJ84
K J 10 5
75
432
EAST (D)
K6
Q32
A 10 9 6
Q987
WEST
53
A987
8432
J 10 6
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
Q 10 9 7 2
64
KQJ
AK5
The bidding:
EAST
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
Pass
1
Pass
3
Pass
4
All Pass
Opening lead — J
hen we speak of count- CLASSIC PEANUTS
ing as declarer, we
often mean counting the
defenders’ shape. But there
are other things to count.
At four spades, South took
the ace of clubs and lost a
trump finesse. He won the
club return and drew trumps,
but when he led the king of
diamonds next, East won
and cashed a club. South
won the diamond return, led RHYMES WITH ORANGE
a heart and misguessed,
playing dummy’s jack. Down
two.
South needed some
serious counting. He can
count four losers: a club, a
diamond, at least one heart
and maybe a trump. But he
can set up a diamond winner
for a fast club discard from
dummy.
At Trick Two, South leads
LIO
the king of diamonds. When
East returns a club, South
takes the king and then the
Q-J of diamonds to pitch
dummy’s last club.
South next finesses in
trumps, losing. He wins the
trump return, counts East’s
points and leads a heart
to the king. East, a passed
hand, has shown the king of
spades, queen of clubs and
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
ace of diamonds. West has
the ace of hearts.
W
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
Q 10 9 7 2 6 4
KQJAK5
The dealer, at your right,
opens one heart. You bid one
spade, the next player raises
to two hearts and two passes
follow. What do you say?
ANSWER: Your partner has
BLONDIE
a few values, else the opponents would have bid more.
Moreover, since they have
a trump fit in hearts, your
side probably has a fit somewhere. Double. Partner will
support your spades or bid a
minor. Your primary goal is to
push the opponents higher.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C8
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | MARCH 7
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you open up
to new opportunities
that seem to appear
from out of the blue.
If you are single, you easily
meet intriguing people. You
might choose to date a lot
until you feel as if you have
met someone you would
like to know better. If you
are attached, the two of you
seem to revive your interest
in each other. Together, you
could decide to pursue a new
mutual interest. Sagittarius
often introduces you to avantgarde ideas.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You sense a difference in a
partner or close associate. You
feel as if no one can change
your mind about the direction
you have chosen to head in.
Understand what is happening
with a loved one.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You finally sense some
movement in the right
direction. Opportunities
appear through others.
Be open and receptive to
conversations that could be a
bit uncomfortable at times.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You seem to be on top of a
difficult situation, but could
be weighing which way would
be best to proceed. You will
figure it out by having several
important conversations. Give
yourself the space to figure out
WEINGARTENS & CLARK what you want.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Your emotions run the show.
You discover the importance
of discussing your personal
life with a close friend. You
gain confidence just by being
around this person. Be willing
to discuss a professional
matter as well, especially if the
issue affects you.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You might feel the need
to head in a new direction
and create a greater sense
of satisfaction for yourself.
Though you might think you
are spontaneous, in reality,
you have worked through this
matter on a subliminal level.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Communicate what you would
like to share. Your way of
dealing with a problem could
be overly optimistic, yet it
is likely to work. Conclude
a conversation with a
comprehensive summary to
make sure that everyone is on
the same page.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You ask valid questions as you
seek out answers. You could
be overwhelmed by everything
you need to understand. Keep
reaching out to others and
seeking new insights. The
more people you ask, the more
complete your perspective
will be.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Generally, you are considered
to be a source of knowledge in
certain areas, and you often
give wise advice and insightful
feedback. Avoid getting caught
in trivial discussions, as you
could get frustrated waiting for
people to see the big picture.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You might feel let down by
a particular series of events
and by a lack of creativity.
You could be tired of always
hearing the same solution. Pull
away from the issue, and allow
yourself to let go.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You might opt to attend a
series of meetings. You’ll need
to gather more information
and learn to take news with a
grain of salt. Though you might
have a reason to celebrate,
being a skeptic would be wise.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Follow your sense of what
needs to happen. You’ll do
your best to guide people and
events in the direction that
you visualize being best. Don’t
worry about closing a door that
has been uncomfortable for
you to walk through.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Reach out for more
information. You have a
clear sense of direction.
The best way to touch base
with a key person, especially
someone with whom you
often butt heads, is through
a work-related matter.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C9
M2
How Alex Jones made Parkland about Alex Jones
Infowars says YouTube
is censoring it. YouTube
says that’s not quite true.
BY
A BBY O HLHEISER
The loyal fans of Infowars
grabbed their pitchforks as their
detractors started to make popcorn. On Saturday night, it appeared as though Alex Jones and
his empire of conspiracy theories
were about to be banned from
YouTube for good.
“The Alex Jones channel with
billions of views is frozen,” Jones
tweeted in an emergency message to his followers. “We have
been told it will be deleted tomorrow.” The tweet linked to Infowars Censored, a YouTube
channel he created two days before that has amassed 17,000 subscribers.
Infowars Censored has the feel
of a makeshift bunker, where
instead of his studio, Jones broadcasts from his kitchen table and
claims that YouTube is infringing
on his speech by banning videos
in which he criticizes student
gun-control activists who survived a mass shooting at a high
school in Parkland, Fla. “They
banned videos where I’m saying
they’re not crisis actors, it’s a real
shooting, they’ve just been Democratic Party operatives and have
been scripted in what they’re
saying,” Jones said, clutching two
pages of handwritten notes. The
video also was shown live on
Facebook.
But YouTube says Jones’s dramatic version of events isn’t quite
true: Jones was not told by YouTube that his main channel,
which has 2 million subscribers,
would be deleted Sunday. That’s
not even how account termination works. (Jones did get one
recent communication from YouTube notifying him that some
advertisers were asking to have
their ads removed from his videos, in response to his Parklandrelated commentary.)
This cycle should be familiar to
anyone who has watched Jones
work before: A controversy about
something Jones has said inevitably becomes, for him, fodder for
even more videos and conspiracies. Over the past week, Jones
has sparred on Twitter with a
Parkland survivor, made several
videos about that fight and posted video after video about how,
Jones said, YouTube was trying to
censor him. The YouTube ban
drama captivated his fans and
detractors alike — even as that
narrative turned out to be not
quite what it seemed. And the
result often matters less than the
attention Jones can siphon from
the mainstream media in the
meantime.
Here is how the latest cycle
happened:
‘This will be hyped tomorrow’
Jones has long questioned the
basic facts of mass shootings in
the United States, once saying
that the 2012 massacre at Sandy
Hook Elementary School was
“completely fake with actors.” But
now he says that the shooting
happened, even though he thinks
there were “anomalies.” When
reporters bring up his past comments about Sandy Hook, he
turns around and accuses the
TAMIR KALIFA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Infowars host Alex Jones said Saturday that he was about to
banned from YouTube, but he’s still putting new videos on the site.
media of slander.
If your first instinct after a
tragedy such as the Parkland
shooting is to worry about your
gun rights, it becomes easier to
suspect its victims and survivors.
And Jones began preparing his
audience to suspect the official
story about the massacre in the
first moments after it was reported.
“It’s as if the media advertises,
‘This is where you go where no
one’s armed to shoot you,’ ” Jones
said to Republican political operative Roger Stone in one video
from the day of the shooting.
“And then it’s almost always some
crazed leftist or weird Islamicist
that’s done it, and the left keeps
saying, ‘If you expose us on the
memo, there’ll be big massacres
blamed on you.’ ”
Stone chimed in: “This will be
hyped tomorrow. Jake Tapper
and Wolf Blitzer and Ana Navarro
will be using this yet again as an
excuse to take away our firearms.”
Jones said, “If there is any
Islamic connection, you can bet
your bottom dollar there’ll be no
coverage of it.”
Then, Stone said, “Alex, we’re
praying for the families.”
‘They’re actors! They’re
actors!’
In the days after the Florida
shooting, Jones started talking
more and more about Parkland
student David Hogg. Conspiracy
theorists had accused Hogg and
his activist classmates of being
“crisis actors,” or paid actors who
pretend to be victims of a tragedy
to advocate for gun control.
Last week, CNN reported that
Jones was one of three disciplinary “strikes” away from getting
banned from YouTube. An Infowars video called “David Hogg
Can’t Remember His Lines in TV
Interview” was to blame — it has
since been removed from YouTube. Jones later said his channel
received a second strike for another video about Hogg, bringing
him one strike away from a ban.
Although Jones has said that
Infowars never accused the Parkland students of being fake, he
hardly has to explicitly spell out
the “crisis actor” conspiracy theory to allude to it. In one video,
Owen Shroyer, host of Infowars’
“War Room,” repeatedly bellows,
“They’re actors! They’re actors!”
and then reveals his justification
for that claim: The students were
members of the drama club at
their school.
Get it? This, Shroyer argued,
was why anyone saying Infowars
was promoting the crisis actor
conspiracy theory was fake news.
Infowars seemed to be walking
the line between winking at conspiracy theories and explicitly
promoting them.
‘David Hogg has backed
down. He said he will never
debate an evil, horrible
person like me.’
As rumors that Infowars might
be banned from YouTube spread,
Jones made his most dramatic
transformation: If YouTube and
his critics were going to claim
that he was bullying a kid, Jones
would invert the whole thing to
claim that it was the teenager
who was the real bully.
That teenager was Hogg. On
Feb. 27, Hogg tweeted, “Hey Alex
Jones you seem to be really confused as to what I do/who I am I’d
love to come on and clear some of
this up because clearly as a s--journalist you can’t clearly.”
After Hogg chided Jones again,
Jones saw an opportunity and
asked him to come on the show,
saying that Hogg called him a
“ ‘snake oil’ salesman when I have
never called you any disparaging
names.”
But Hogg had already moved
on to tweeting memes about the
Infowars host, including an image from a video that presumably
showed Jones’s body before and
after he started taking one of his
branded health supplements.
Jones responded to this tweet
in a YouTube video about Hogg’s
“David Hogg challenged me to a debate
by bullying and viciously attacking me.
After I politely accepted, he backed out
when his real goal of baiting me failed.”
Alex Jones on the 17-year-old school shooting survivor
offer to talk to him. “You can see
how much softer I was, how much
more toned I got,” Jones said,
looking at Hogg’s tweet.
By that afternoon, Jones had
posted yet another video about
Hogg.
“Here’s the big breaking news,”
he said. “David Hogg has backed
down. He said he will never debate an evil, horrible person like
me.”
He shuffled through the pile of
papers on his desk until he found
a printout of the tweet he wanted
to show: “I will not speak to
anyone that has had disgusting
remarks to victims of mass shootings in the past,” Hogg said in the
tweet. “I sent that tweet without
realizing just how awful so many
people have been to victims and
witnesses of these events in the
past.”
Jones then repeated the implication that someone must be
coaching Hogg. “Man, you can see
his tweets, they sound like about
a 10-year-old wrote them, and
then there’s these tweets on his
Twitter, which, you know — I’m
allowed to say — do not sound
like the same person.”
He also responded on Twitter:
“David Hogg challenged me to a
debate by bullying and viciously
attacking me. After I politely accepted, he backed out when his
real goal of baiting me failed.
Only #HoggWash fears investigation.”
‘YouTube purge’
Later in the week, Jones’s
claims of YouTube censorship got
some backing from YouTube itself, when the company admitted
that its new moderators had overreached, adding strikes to channels that hadn’t violated YouTube’s community guidelines. Although Jones and others said the
mistakes were an attempt to
“purge” right-wing voices from
the platform, The Washington
Post reported last week that the
mistakes also targeted some leftwing and mainstream channels.
YouTube has long struggled
with transparency and consistency while enforcing its own rules, a
problem that remains even as
YouTube begins to contend more
seriously with the effect its recommendation algorithms have
on promoting conspiracy theories. In this case, YouTube managed to participate in one.
As of Tuesday, Jones may or
may not be on the verge of a
YouTube ban. But the threat of
one was enough to shower him
with mainstream media attention, as both Jones and the news
outlets he loathes covered his
YouTube drama iteratively.
By the end of last week, Jones
had turned the controversies into
a fundraising marathon, Operation Paul Revere. Infowars
streamed for 34 hours straight,
encouraging supporters to buy its
merch and make donations.
Meanwhile, the day after Jones
claimed that his YouTube channel
was about to be destroyed, Infowars started uploading to the
main Jones channel again. One of
the first videos that day was
called, “IS THIS THE LAST VIDEO OF ALEX JONES ON YOUTUBE?”
As of this writing, Infowars has
uploaded 39 videos since.
MSNBC
Sam Nunberg, a former campaign aide to President Tump, on MSNBC’s “The Beat With Ari Melberg,”
one of his many chats Monday with the media about his subpoena in the special counsel’s investigation.
clared. The New York Times soon
followed with its own interview.
But Nunberg would probably
not have become a trending topic
on social media without the power of television. A series of cable
interviews — first via phone with
MSNBC’s Katy Tur and CNN’s
Gloria Borger, and later in studio
with several MSNBC and CNN
I’ve been seeing a
lovely man for a
year. We eased
slowly into the
relationship —
friends for
Carolyn
months first — as
Hax
we were both still
hurting after
recent divorces.
We are perfectly suited in so
many ways — identical interests,
shared friends, same-age
children, parallel life experiences
— and we enjoy one another very
much, despite the time
restrictions that running
separate households and raising
children entail. There’s a lot of
laughter and a sense of relief and
sanctuary.
So what’s the problem? I’m
having a hard time trusting him.
His longtime marriage ended
because of an infidelity on his
part. He takes full responsibility.
But he often doesn’t take
responsibility for admittedly
minor things between us —
saying something hurtful, for
example, or forgetting plans
we’ve made, or other mild but
annoying, inconsiderate actions.
There is always an excuse — a
reason I don’t understand or
somehow misinterpreted.
When I raise my concerns he
says he certainly understands
but that’s just the way he is —
spacey, no filter. And, well, he is
charmingly socially awkward
and absent-minded-professorish.
Which is all fine if he would
accept the impact of his actions
on me.
On the other hand, I was
married to an occasionally
verbally and physically violent
drug addict for 16 years with all
the passion, intensity, gaslighting
and insanity that sort of
relationship entails. The two
men could not be more different.
I never gave up hope until the
bitter end and nearly died from
grief. My current relationship is a
welcome, healing relief.
Am I oversensitive or seeing
real red flags?
— Red Flags?
Red Flags?: People who can’t or
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-intersect
NUNBERG FROM C1
Trump advisers mentioned in the
subpoena referenced by Axios.
By Monday morning, Nunberg’s phone was ringing with
interview requests. In the early
afternoon, he first told The Washington Post’s Josh Dawsey that he
would defy Mueller’s subpoena,
setting the tone for the day’s story
line. “Let him arrest me,” he de-
Dear Carolyn:
won’t admit fault are always a
red flag.
There are judgment calls,
always, but — forgetting plans? If
one can’t simultaneously be one’s
unfiltered self and form the
words, “Oh, no! I’m sorry. No
excuse. Please forgive me” — then
that’s not a self around whom I
want to spend much time.
But, also always a red flag:
Coming out of 16 years of
“passion, intensity, gaslighting
and insanity” with a “violent
drug addict” and still greeting
your own distrust with “Am I
oversensitive?”
Questioning your reality is the
emotional signature of
gaslighting. You know this. It’s
when you respond to something
done to you that’s objectively bad
— as in, something you’d never
encourage anyone you care about
to put up with — by wondering
whether you’re the one at fault.
Plus, the reasons you cite for
his suiting you — besides
sanctuary, which I’ll get to — are
ones of coincidence, not
character. Interests, kid ages,
“parallel life experiences.” These
are important for compatibility,
but they won’t help you trust an
untrustworthy person or like an
unlikable one. Commonality and
character count.
When you question your
ability to judge character —
especially when your history
gives you cause to — then I urge
you not to go it alone. Find a
good therapist who can help you
(re-)calibrate your boundaries
and judgment.
That you find emotional relief
in this man compared with your
ex is a character point in his
favor, and it could mean one of us
is overstating the importance of
your boyfriend’s defensiveness.
But he could just be less awful,
too.
So there’s no overstating how
important it is to hear and trust
your own voice. Please do not
commit further, to anyone, till
you do.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
abigail.ohlheiser@washpost.com
Nunberg’s
wild ride in
Monday’s
media cycle
“something” on Trump.
Over several media appearances, he also called White House
press secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders “a fat slob” (he apologized for that on Tuesday), and
said former Trump adviser Carter
Page had been “colluding with the
Russians.” At one point, in what
sounded like a stunt straight out
of pro wrestling, he threatened to
rip up the subpoena on live TV.
Then, by the end of the day, he
recanted his defiance and said he
would play ball with Mueller’s
grand jury.
Nunberg’s march to fame began Sunday night when the news
site Axios reported it had reviewed a grand jury subpoena to a
witness the site didn’t identify.
But it didn’t take much for
reporters and cable TV bookers to
figure out the identity of the
subpoena-ee: Nunberg, a chatty
but intermittently accurate
source with connections to the
denizens of TrumpWorld, including the nine current and former
After a gaslighting, learn
to trust your own voice
hosts — revealed Nunberg to be a
fidgety, peevish and slightly bizarre character.
“I think [Trump] may have
done something during the election, but I don’t know that for
sure,” he told Tur in a rambling
17-minute interview that included Nunberg’s assertion that, had
he been involved in Trump’s cam-
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
paign in its latter stages, he would
have invited “Bill Clinton’s illegitimate black child” to the first
debate involving Trump and Hillary Clinton as a media stunt.
The Tur interview was done
more or less on the fly; Tur had
spoken with Nunberg on Sunday
night, at which point he gave her
no indication that he intended to
defy the subpoena. While on the
air Monday, she spotted The
Post’s headline saying he now
intended to disobey it; she called
Nunberg and booked him for a
phone interview on the spot.
Nunberg was only getting
warmed up. He taped a phone
interview with Borger, then appeared on Jake Tapper’s program
on CNN, Ari Melber’s MSNBC
show, and was interviewed at
length by Erin Burnett on CNN.
Before the day was over, he
squeezed in interviews with
Bloomberg News, the New York
One cable channel, Vox, Yahoo
News, New York magazine, and
the Associated Press.
Through it all, a question began growing: Was he drunk?
Fox Business reporter Charlie
Gasparino talked to Nunberg off
the air but determined that Nunberg was too impaired to be interviewed on air. He later told network host Liz Claman, “I asked
him three times whether he was
sure and is he of sound mind to do
[interviews]. He told me he was
drinking.” A Fox News Channel
spokeswoman said her network
tried to secure an interview with
Nunberg but he did not respond.
Journalists rarely use material
from people they know to be
intoxicated or mentally impaired,
and the known instances of live
TV interviews with drunk people
are few. The issue is fairness:
Would a person say what he or she
said if they were fully sober?
On the other hand, Nunberg,
who is a lawyer, has dealt with the
media many times before, which
suggests he wasn’t naive in doing
interviews on Monday. His involvement in Mueller’s investigation also makes him undeniably
newsworthy.
Still, given the suspicions expressed by Burnett and Gasparino, the wiser course may have
been to tape an interview with
Nunberg rather than airing it live,
wrote Andrew Seaman, the chairman of the ethics committee of
the Society of Professional Journalists. Doing so “would give
journalists, editors and producers more time to evaluate the
accusations he made during the
interview. They could also put his
statements into context,” he said,
adding, “In many cases — including this one, I think journalists
can do better.”
As is, Nunberg thought better
of his day’s statements at the end
of his long media tour on Monday.
In his last interviews, he reversed
himself. “Of course, I’m going to
cooperate” with Mueller’s investigation, he told New York magazine, thereby undermining the
reason the media found him
newsworthy in the first place.
paul.farhi@washpost.com
C10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
Celebrate women in aviation and space with hands-on
activities and special guests this Saturday at the Air
and Space Museum’s Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly.
For more information, visit wapo.st/airandspace.
A cloudy day may start with a mix of
rain and snow. Temperatures should
rise into the 40s.
Find more stories about
history, science, books, the
arts and current events on
our website.
ILLUSTRATION BY JAMES GRAHAM, 7, ARLINGTON
WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH
Men aren’t
the only ones
who have made
a big di≠erence
BY
When British soldiers attacked Washington in 1814, I saved the large portrait
of George Washington before the White
House went up in flames.
In 2009, I became the first Hispanic
justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. As a
lower court judge, I was credited with
“saving baseball” by ending a players’
strike.
JULIETTE GORDON LOW
MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN
SALLY RIDE
The first woman elected to Congress, I
supported voting rights for women and
was the only member to vote against U.S.
involvement in both world wars.
M ARYLOU T OUSIGNANT
M
arch is Women’s History
Month, which highlights
the role women have played
in the nation’s birth and
growth. KidsPost is celebrating with a matching game. Can you
identify the notable women pictured on
this page?
Draw a line between the blurb at right
and the image that matches. Have a
parent or teacher send your page to
KidsPost, The Washington Post, 1301 K
St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071, or complete the game at kidspost.com. Include
your name, age, address and the adult’s
permission and contact information.
Those with the correct answers will be
entered into a raffle for a selection of
KidsPost goodies and books by female
authors. The contest is open to ages 6 to
13. One entry per person. Entries are due
by March 21. The winner’s name and the
answers will be published March 27.
Some matches are easier than others,
and we’ve got a couple of “extra” names to
keep you on your toes. But we know you
can do it!
I was the first black tennis player to win
a grand slam event (the French Open). I
was also the first black to win Wimbledon
and the U.S. National Championship.
MAYA LIN
DOLLEY MADISON
SACAGAWEA
Only six authors have won two New-
bery Medals for great children’s literature. I won in 2014 for “Flora & Ulysses”
and in 2004 for “The Tale of Despereaux.”
ELLEN OCHOA
KATE
E DICAMILLO
SONIA SOTOMAYOR
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
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ACROSS
Drone sound
Spicy dip
French flag
couleur
Parade celebrity
Cotton swabs
Pair on a Disneyland hat
Verdi highlight
It’s prohibited
on many
highways
Vast landmass
Musical
Christmas
staple
Culinary
student’s
assent
Native American symbol
Bit of cheer?
22% of the
U.S. Senate
WWII female
Program breaks
Enthusiastic
“Good Lord!”
Miscellany
[Uh-oh!]
Big name in
threshers
In __ of:
replacing
City ENE of
Reno
One of pop
music’s Papas
Permits
Takes a load off
Mil. officers
High-IQ group
Perilous hisser
In check
Succeeding
like nobody’s
business
Like most
kosher
frankfurters
Water sport
Only inanimate
zodiac sign
Iams alternative
“Quite so”
Historical
period
Slimming
procedure,
briefly
Shopping club
Swearing-in
rituals
For fear that
I served as guide, interpreter and
plant collector on the Lewis and Clark
Expedition. My name, which has many
spellings, means “Bird Woman” in the
Hidatsa language.
SERENA WILLIAMS
ALTHEA GIBSON
JEANNETTE RANKIN
Miss
Manners
Dear Miss
Manners: What is
the proper
etiquette when an
elevator’s doors
are closing and
someone is
walking toward
it?
Are the people
inside obligated to press the
“open door” button? Is it
improper for the person trying to
get on the elevator to stick their
hand in and stop the door?
I think once the doors are
closing, one must wait for the
next elevator and should not
expect the passengers to open
the doors. And that passengers
should be annoyed (as I am)
when someone sticks their hand
in and delays my trip!
Would you allow a regular door
to swing closed in someone’s
face? Miss Manners trusts not.
Etiquette demands a
reasonable effort to
accommodate elevator
latecomers, which means visibly
reaching for the “open door”
button. Whether actual contact
is made with the button can be
judged in relation to the distance
of the latecomer from the door
and how close the door is to
shutting.
Etiquette absolutely prohibits
swatting away hands that have
been inserted into closing doors
— for reasons of both social
comity and safety.
JUDITH
MARTIN,
NICHOLAS
MARTIN AND
JACOBINA
MARTIN
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
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As an engineer and astronaut, I logged
nearly 1,000 hours in orbit. Now I direct
the Johnson Space Center in Texas,
home of several space programs.
The answer is not open-ended: Hold
door for those approaching elevator
By Jeffrey Wechsler
DOWN
“Careless
Whisper” pop
group
“__ comes
trouble!”
Eye part
Sunday dinner
side dish
Weightlifting
maneuver
Driving
“Elementary”
co-star Lucy
Nimble
Ed with seven
Emmys
Summer
Olympics event
since 1996
Word with back
or whip
Historic canal
“Aim High ...
Fly-Fight-Win”
military org.
Non-neutral
atom
Took a load off
Purplish hue
Ante, e.g.
Small egg
Takes full
advantage of
Children, education and civil rights
have been my life’s work. Head Start and
the Children’s Defense Fund are two
programs I helped launch.
While still in college, I won a national
competition to design the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall. There were
more than 1,400 entries.
kidspost@washpost.com
FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM: JULIETTE GORDON LOW
BY EDWARD HUGHES/NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY; SALLY
RIDE BY NASA; MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN BY ROBERT GIROUX/
ASSOCIATED PRESS; MAYA LIN BY HARRY NALTCHAYAN/THE
WASHINGTON POST; DOLLEY MADISON BY GILBERT STUART/
ASSOCIATED PRESS; SACAGAWEA BY ROGER JENSEN/THE
OREGONIAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS; ELLEN OCHOA BY NASA;
SONIA SOTOMAYOR BY CLIFF OWEN/ASSOCIATED PRESS; KATE
DICAMILLO BY CATHERINE SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY; ALTHEA
GIBSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS; SERENA WILLIAMS BY KIRSTY
WIGGLESWORTH/ASSOCIATED PRESS; JEANNETTE RANKIN BY
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
I started the Girl Scout program more
than 100 years ago in Georgia with a
troop of 18 members. Today, 1.8 million
girls take part worldwide.
3/7/18
31 Gravy thickener
33 From far away
(perhaps
very far)
34 See 51-Down
35 “The March
King”
37 Unexpected
38 Susan of
“L.A. Law”
47 Ottawa-to-NYC
dir.
49 Prefix with ware
51 With 34-Down,
really retro eating programs
53 Vague discomfort, with “the”
54 Makes a choice
55 Romance writer
Roberts
56 Grad
57 Longtime
“Live!” host
59 Author Wiesel
60 Omar of
“Shooter”
61 Body part
whose parts
are aptly
found at the
bottom of
this puzzle’s
four longest
answers
64 Plant sci.
Dear Miss Manners: My 15-
year-old son wishes to
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
participate in an after-school
activity that lets out at 4:30 p.m.,
but my husband and I cannot
always get to the school by then
because of work.
A friend of his who lives down
the road is participating, and I
told my son he should see if he
can hitch a ride home with him
and then walk home from his
friend’s house. He feels this is
rude, and I cannot convince him
Etiquette demands a
reasonable effort to
accommodate elevator
latecomers, which
means visibly reaching
for the “open door”
button.
otherwise — you are the final
word.
I offered to talk to the parents,
but he thinks that’s rude. Is it
rude to ask your friend, or for me
to ask the parents, for a ride?
Asking a favor is not rude so
long as you and your son
understand that the friend is
under no obligation to comply,
you are gracious no matter the
answer and you are prepared to
return the favor when
opportunity arises.
The question of who should do
the asking gives Miss Manners
more pause. The parent of a
young child is responsible for his
transportation and care, while
an adult child shoulders the
responsibility himself.
In this case, etiquette allows
the request to be made by parent
or child, but because the child is
unwilling, it will have to come
from the parent. And there is
another parental duty to be
performed first: namely,
convincing your son that he need
not be embarrassed to receive
the ride.
Dear Miss Manners: Friends
frequently make donations in my
name to organizations or
charities that they support, but I
don’t. I never know how to
respond. It seems rude to say
that I don’t support or subscribe
to the group getting a
contribution in my name. Should
I just not mention it?
Although she agrees that thirdparty donations are not proper
gifts, Miss Manners does not
believe it is polite to ignore
something given in good faith.
You may, however, temper the
enthusiasm of your thanks,
expressing delight that while you
had never heard of the charity,
you are pleased and grateful on
their behalf.
New Miss Manners columns are
posted Monday through Saturday on
washingtonpost.com/advice. You can
send questions to Miss Manners at
her website, missmanners.com.
© 2018, by Judith Martin
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
D. C. SPORTS BOG
BASEBALL
PRO BASKETBALL
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Smells like team spirit: Remembering
JMU’s run to 2013 NCAA tournament. D2
The Nats are experimenting with more
infield shifts. Not everyone is a fan. D3
Chris Paul and James Harden have big
nights as Rockets win 16th straight. D4
A wide open Atlantic 10 tournament
starts today at Capital One Arena. D7
Big East upperclassmen
rise over one-and-dones
Juniors and seniors are
the players to watch
BY
AVA WALLACE
At Villanova, where Coach Jay
Wright’s vision for the men’s basketball program is executed year
after year with barely a trace of
drama, there is one question that
always seems to stir discord
among the coaching staff. When
identifying players to recruit,
what should come first: talent or a
desire to be a part of Villanova’s
culture?
Late-game execution is
the di≠erence . . . in win
“That’s a really controversial
topic amongst our staff and in our
program, in that we would love to
have some of these one-and-done
players; you know, we really
would,” Wright said on a teleconference late last month. “. . . We
love those guys, and we want
them, and I want it to be known
we want them. It’s just, it can’t
supersede wanting to be a part of
the Villanova program. Now, it’s
WIZARDS 117,
HEAT 113 (OT)
BY
BIG EAST CONTINUED ON D7
Big East tournament
Madison Square Garden
Today’s first round | TV: FS1
Georgetown vs. St. John’s, 7 p.m.
Marquette vs. DePaul, 9:30 p.m.
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Wizards forward Markieff Morris slams home a pair of first-half
points and later added a pivotal three-pointer in overtime.
C ANDACE B UCKNER
During the Washington Wizards’ longest losing streak of the
season, the team’s late-game decision-making could not be ignored. Defensive mistakes, poor
shots and bad passes turned tight
games into three straight tough
losses.
Tuesday night against the Miami Heat, the Wizards cleaned up
their execution and held on for a
117-113 overtime win at Capital
Ovechkin’s memorabilia is housed on two continents and expands as his greatness endures
One Arena.
Signs of bad defense? Not
when center Marcin Gortat absorbed contact from Heat forward Justise Winslow, taking the
offensive foul and protecting a
one-point lead.
Heaps of bricks? This time,
Markieff Morris carried his clutch
card after Gortat’s sacrifice by
drilling a corner three-pointer
while falling out of bounds with
1:07 left in the extra period.
And regrettable turnovers?
The Wizards spent the final five
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D4
Wizards at Pelicans
Friday, 8 p.m., NBCSW
Another
early
exit for
Holtby
DUCKS 4,
CAPITALS 0
Goalie pulled again after
three goals on nine shots
BY
PHOTOS BY MARY GELMAN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A Capital’s keepsakes
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
moscow — The full collection of the Alex
Ovechkin museum spans roughly 5,000 miles
with an ocean in between two main branches.
The original exhibit, though, sits 90 minutes
from downtown Moscow, past a guarded gate
and up the stairs of the pool house.
First, have some tea while watching last
night’s Washington Capitals game in the
breakfast nook. Don’t mind the five German
shepherd dogs; they’re friendly. Check out the
tennis and basketball courts in the back yard,
blanketed by snow in early February.
Welcome to the Ovechkin family country
home, or “dacha” in Russian. The pool house is
just a few steps from the back deck. As the
stairs wind up, a banner of Ovechkin during
his rookie season hangs along the wall. A few
more steps and photos from Ovechkin’s stint
TOP: The Ovechkin family’s country house in
Russia holds many souvenirs from early in Alex’s
hockey career. ABOVE: Mikhail and Tatiana are
proud to point out their son’s accomplishments.
with Dynamo Moscow are taped to the wood
paneling.
Enter the loft, and start the tour. Ovechkin’s
old Russian national team jerseys line the wall
with matching photos. An Ulf Dahlen San Jose
Sharks jersey, the first piece of NHL apparel
Ovechkin’s father ever bought him, is also
displayed. Old gloves and helmets sit atop the
ceiling’s wood beams. Five tickets from the
2004 NHL draft, when Ovechkin was picked
first overall by Washington, are tacked into
the wall, next to the draft jersey Ovechkin was
presented on stage.
“It feels like he just got to the NHL, but it’s
been 13 years,” Ovechkin’s mother, Tatiana,
muses. The matriarch of the family points out
an Ovechkin statuette in the back of the room,
a gift from Capitals owner Ted Leonsis during
Ovechkin’s first season.
OVECHKIN CONTINUED ON D5
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
anaheim, calif. — Braden Holtby stood in the tunnel alone,
apparently needing a few minutes before he joined his teammates on the bench. He was folded over, forearms on his goaltending pads, frozen in that same
position and mostly obscured
from view of most fans at Honda
Center.
Then he stood up straight, put
a baseball cap on his head and
took a seat. The routine has become excruciatingly familiar for
the Washington Capitals goaltender, pulled from a game early
three times in his past six starts.
This one seemed to sting most
with Holtby visibly frustrated as
he got back to the bench and went
to the locker room. He had allowed three goals on Anaheim’s
first nine shots, putting the Capitals in an early hole in what was
ultimately a 4-0 loss.
The defeat continued a rough
stretch for Holtby. He was 2-5-2 in
February with an .873 save percentage while allowing 4.00 goals
per game. He endured a careerworst six-game losing streak before making 27 saves in Saturday
night’s 5-2 Stadium Series win
over the Toronto Maple Leafs. It
seemed like that game on the big
stage could be the turning point
Holtby has so desperately needed.
Entering Tuesday night’s game,
Holtby had a .908 save percentage on the season with a 3.00
goals against average.
It hasn’t helped Holtby that
Washington’s defense has allowed more shots per game along
with more high-danger scoring
chances. But while Holtby has
struggled, No. 2 goaltender
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D4
Capitals at Kings
Tomorrow, 10:30 p.m., NBCSW
Redskins make it official, allow Cousins to become free agent
BY
K AREEM C OPELAND
What was widely anticipated is
now official with the passing of
Tuesday’s NFL franchise tag deadline: Kirk Cousins will become a
free agent.
The Washington Redskins did
not place the franchise tag on the
quarterback for a third consecutive year, clearing the way for
Cousins to hit free agency March
14.
Last season, Cousins became
the first quarterback in league history to play consecutive years under the franchise tag. He earned a
combined $43,896,600 in those
two seasons.
The team and Cousins could
never agree on a long-term deal, so
the Redskins moved on and in
January committed to a trade with
the Kansas City Chiefs for Alex
Smith that will also become official March 14. The Redskins
agreed with Smith on a four-year
extension worth up to $94 million.
The team cannot comment on the
deal until it is official.
Coach Jay Gruden lamented
last week at the NFL Scouting
Combine in Indianapolis that it
was time “to get some stability” at
the position after living year-toyear with Cousins.
“The decisions that the quarterback has to make on every given
play and every situation are criti-
cal to the success of a football
team,” Gruden said. “And hopefully we’ll get a guy in here who’s
consistently made good, sound decisions in those situations year in
and year out for a very long time.”
There was a thought the team
could place the franchise tag on
Cousins again, even after agreeing
to trade for Smith, and then attempt to trade Cousins. There was
heavy risk with that move, though,
as Cousins planned to file a griev-
ance through the NFL players’
union if tagged, said a person with
knowledge of the situation who
spoke on the condition of anonymity. The team also would not have
been able to trade Cousins until he
signed the franchise tag offer,
something he could have delayed,
which would have hindered Washington’s pursuit of other free
agents.
Doug Williams, the Redskins’
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D6
KIRBY LEE/USA TODAY SPORTS
Rickard Rakell and Anaheim
celebrated a shutout triumph.
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
D.C. SPORTS BOG
EARLY LEAD
D.C. SPORTS BOG
NFL refs
Hochuli,
Triplette
are retiring
BY
Durkin sold
Friedgen
on return
to U-Md.
C INDY B OREN
Let’s get the snark out of the
way right off the bat.
Ed Hochuli, perhaps the buffest referee in the NFL, is hanging
up his guns, retiring from the
game, which will now be much
shorter because we won’t have to
listen to him ref-splain plays ad
infinitum. Also going off into
retirement is Jeff Triplette, the
referee fans loved to rip.
Replacing them will be Hochuli’s son, Shawn, a former back
judge, and Alex Kemp, a former
side judge.
Game-day officials aren’t really
supposed to be stars, but Hochuli
brought that quality to every
game he worked, with the ribbing
usually gentle when it came to his
physique and a little more harsh
when he started explaining.
He has been a referee since
1992, stepping up after two years
as a back judge, and, in his spare
time, is a practicing attorney,
which is probably why his description of penalties often
sounded like closing arguments.
He refereed two Super Bowls.
And then there’s Triplette, who
became an NFL official in 1996
and a referee in 1999. On any
given Sunday, though, fans could
be flagged for piling on with
every questionable call that came
from his crew. In the TitansChiefs playoff game in January,
Triplette and his crew were in the
bull’s-eye, with fans on social
media and Fox Sports commentator Mike Pereira, the former NFL
head of officiating, calling out
him and his crew for a botched
call. “Horrible way to start the
playoffs,” Pereira tweeted. “I hate
to say it but this was not a good
performance by the crew.”
In the playoff game between
the Falcons and Rams, it was left
to NBC’s Al Michaels to speak for
America as plays underwent excruciatingly long review (do they
not have cable?) in the NFL’s Park
Avenue headquarters and the
verbose Hochuli was left to fill
time. “I can’t figure out how this
can take this long,” Michaels said.
“You saw it.”
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“Why was he taken and
I wasn’t? I ask, ‘Why?’
all the time.”
BILL HAAS,
PGA Tour golfer, speaking to the
Associated Press in his first interview
since he was injured in a Feb. 13 car
crash in which a friend was killed.
Haas returns this week at the Valspar
Championship in Palm Harbor, Fla.
(Via Early Lead)
BY
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A.J. Davis helped a James Madison team clad in unwashed jerseys beat Northeastern for the 2013 CAA tournament crown.
Recalling a season on the stink
JMU’s last NCAA tournament berth was clinched in smelly jerseys and fueled by sweat
BY
M ARK S ELIG
Joe Kuykendall was a James Madison
basketball team manager for four years,
and many of his duties were
unremarkable: setting up equipment
for practice, organizing gear for road
games, ordering postgame meals. Being
behind the scenes of a mid-major hoops
program, though, provided Kuykendall
amusing stories he’ll remember for a
lifetime. Such as the time he broke a
coach’s cellphone celebrating a buzzerbeating victory. Or the time the team
bus broke down in Nowheresville, Pa.,
on Thanksgiving Day.
His favorite tale is about the time
JMU won the Colonial Athletic
Association tournament championship
in smelly uniforms.
The five-year anniversary of the
Dukes’ surprising conference title is
approaching, giving JMU alums a
convenient excuse for a nostalgia trip
back to 2013, when a coach on the hot
seat and his surprising team of seniors
and freshmen reached the NCAA
tournament.
We’ll get to the smelly uniforms,
after a bit of context on how JMU was
in position to win its lone league title in
the past 24 seasons.
The CAA was a popular conference
from which to poach during the late
stages of realignment, so the league had
just lost powerhouse VCU to the
Atlantic 10. Another perennial
contender, Old Dominion, was on its
way out and therefore deemed
ineligible for the CAA tournament.
Towson, in a breakout season, was
ineligible because of academic
sanctions. That left just seven teams
vying for the league championship and
a coveted spot in the NCAA tourney.
In their first CAA tournament game,
on a Saturday at Richmond Coliseum,
the third-seeded Dukes wore their
white uniforms in a tight win against
longtime antagonist William & Mary.
In their second tournament game, on
Sunday, the Dukes wore purple as they
eked out an ugly victory over secondseeded Delaware.
After each of the games, Kuykendall
and another manager stuffed the
Dukes’ dirty uniforms into duffel bags
and shoved them in the corner of their
hotel room at the nearby Marriott, a
few blocks from the cavernous arena.
The conference championship game
was to be played Monday against topseeded Northeastern, and the Dukes,
on national television for a night,
planned to wear their sharp, new
“Vegas gold” uniforms.
With Harrisonburg an easy two-hour
drive from Richmond and JMU playing
for its first NCAA tournament berth in
nearly 20 years, fans flooded the
Coliseum, creating a Dukes-partisan
crowd. There was only one problem,
which prompted another.
Roughly a half-hour before tip-off, a
referee told a JMU assistant coach that
the team’s gold uniforms did not
visually
contrast
enough
with
Northeastern’s whites. They’d have to
change.
JMU’s purple uniforms — having
been worn the previous night and
never washed — were still in
Kuykendall’s room, “just festering” in
that duffel bag, as he put it. You see,
basketball players sweat a lot, and
fabrics that marinate in sweat for
24 hours smell a bit foul.
Alas, sweaty uniforms were better
than no uniforms, so Kuykendall and
three others, including a redshirt
forward, ran from the arena to the hotel
to secure the gnarly purples. With just
eight minutes until tip-off, they
returned to the locker room and
instructed the players to change. The
Dukes took the request in stride and
didn’t seem to notice anything awry.
“I don’t know if they were already
sweaty, or in the zone,” Kuykendall said
of the players. “Maybe they just didn’t
care.”
JMU bombarded Northeastern from
the get-go, taking a 22-point lead by
halftime and coasting to a 70-57 win.
The Dukes thus reached the place every
team hopes to be in March, a place
where the NCAA provides laundry
services for teams.
As a No. 16 seed with the stench of a
weak conference and mediocre Rating
Percentage Index number, the Dukes’
first tournament assignment was a
play-in game against LIU Brooklyn.
They won that game, 68-55, (in their
white uniforms) and then lost to topseeded Indiana, 83-62 (while wearing
their since-washed purples) during the
first full round of the tournament.
It was a high point for a program that
has not built on that success. Of the
team’s four impact freshmen, only one
would go on to play four seasons at the
school. None of the team’s senior
leaders sniffed the NBA. Coach Matt
Brady received a contract extension
after the season but was fired in 2016;
he is now director of player personnel
at Maryland.
Nostalgia has a way of ignoring those
specifics in favor of cozy memories.
Kuykendall appreciates that season
more now than he did at the time. His
parents met as basketball managers
years earlier, and they dreamed of a trip
to the NCAA tourney. Kuykendall, as a
freshman in a job he signed up for on a
whim, got to live out that dream right
away.
After graduating from JMU in 2016,
he spent a season working for the
women’s basketball team at Mercer,
then left the industry and is now
working toward an MBA at U-Mass. He
still consumes college basketball and
listens to the Ringer’s “One Shining
Podcast,” which typically focuses on
big-name programs, not tournament
crashers such as JMU.
But in January, hosts Mark Titus and
Tate Frazier asked for college
basketball managers past and present
to submit their most memorable
stories. Many of the tales — these are
college kids, remember — were a bit . . .
suggestive. The hosts saved the best
story for last: Kuykendall’s submission
about the Dukes’ wardrobe malaroma.
Titus and Frazier have made these
types of manager stories a regular
segment on their podcast. Their title for
it: Dirty Laundry.
mark.selig@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
Maryland announced in January that former Terps football
coach Ralph Friedgen would be
the featured speaker this Friday at
Coach DJ Durkin’s spring coaches
clinic at the recently renovated
Cole Field House. Durkin and
Friedgen, who have never met,
recently explained how the reunion came about, and Friedgen
said it wouldn’t have happened if
Maryland Athletic Director Kevin
Anderson, the man who fired him
December 2010, weren’t in the
midst of a six-month sabbatical.
“It was early on I decided to
reach out to him,” Durkin — who
was hired to replace Friedgen’s
successor, Randy Edsall, after the
2015 season — told PressBox’s
Glenn Clark. “I feel really strongly
about in college football, the
whole tradition of things and respect to those who came before
you, both coaches, players alike.”
Friedgen, 70, was an offensive
lineman at Maryland from 1966 to
1968. He served as the Terps’ offensive coordinator under Bobby
Ross from 1982 to 1986 and then
returned to College Park as head
coach in 2001 after stints at Georgia Tech and in the NFL. Friedgen
led Maryland to 31 wins and an
Orange Bowl berth in his first
three seasons at Maryland but was
fired after going 9-4 and leading
the Terps to a win in the Military
Bowl in 2010. In firing Friedgen,
who went 75-50, including five
bowl wins, during his decade in
College Park, Anderson said he
wanted to take the program from
“good to great.” Edsall went 22-34
at Maryland and was fired six
games into the 2015 season.
In 2011, Friedgen told Clark: “I
could care less about Maryland.
I’ve burned my diploma. I’m flying
a Georgia Tech flag right now.”
Friedgen maintains he was only
joking, but after Rutgers rallied to
beat Maryland in College Park in
November 2014, with Friedgen
serving as the Scarlet Knights’ offensive coordinator, he described
it as “a special win.” He made it
clear that his appearance at Friday’s coaching clinic doesn’t mean
he’s ready to move on from the way
he was treated by his alma mater.
“I had reservations to whether
I wanted to do it or not,” Friedgen
told Clark. “I said, ‘Can you give
me the weekend to kind of think
about it?’ [Durkin] said ‘sure.’ So
then he kind of called me back
and he said, ‘You know, if you’re
not ready to do this, that’s fine,
but I’m going to keep asking.’ So
of course my wife wanted me to
do it, so I told him I would do it.”
Friedgen, who stepped down as
Rutgers’s offensive coordinator after the 2014 season, said he
wouldn’t have agreed to attend
Friday’s event if Anderson were
still in College Park. In October,
the school announced he would
take a six-month sabbatical.
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
DIG ES T
SOCCER
Juergen Klopp said after his
Real Madrid advances
in Champions League
team secured a place in the final
eight for the first time in nine
years. . . .
Organizers of the North
American bid to host the 2026
World Cup have reconfigured
their leadership group after the
election of new U.S. Soccer
Federation president.
New USSF President Carlos
Cordeiro, Mexican Football
Federation President Decio de
Maria and Canadian Soccer
Association President Steven
Reed have become co-chairmen
of the bid, Cordeiro said.
Sunil Gulati, who had been
the sole chairman, will remain a
member of the bid committee’s
board. Gulati served as USSF
president for 12 years but
decided after the United States
failed to qualify for this year’s
World Cup that he would not
seek a fourth four-year term. . . .
Struggling Sparta Prague fired
Andrea Stramaccioni as coach
despite spending big on new
players.
The move comes after Sparta
drew, 1-1, with 10-man Brno over
the weekend. The team is fifth in
the Czech league standings, 14
points behind leader Viktoria
Plzen.
Paris Saint-Germain’s dream
of joining Europe’s elite with a
Champions League trophy will
have to wait another season, as
Real Madrid delivered a brutal
reality check by cruising through
to the quarterfinals with a 2-1
win Tuesday night in Paris.
Cristiano Ronaldo’s powerful
header — his 12th goal of the
competition — and a deflected
effort from midfielder Casemiro
that came on either side of a
close-range finish from PSG’s
Edinson Cavani sent Madrid
through 5-2 on aggregate.
PSG still has not reached the
semifinals since its lone
appearance in 1995. . . .
Liverpool coasted into the
Champions League quarterfinals
with a 0-0 draw against visiting
Porto to clinch a 5-0 aggregate
victory.
Having scored five goals
without reply in a dazzling firstleg display in Portugal three
weeks ago, this was always going
to be a procession for Liverpool
in its home stadium.
“It’s time we showed up
again,” Liverpool Manager
S COTT A LLEN
TRACK AND FIELD
International Association of
Athletics Federations President
Sebastian Coe said Russians
could be stopped from
competing as neutral athletes if
the country fails to shows
“dramatic progress” in the fight
against doping.
Russia has been suspended
since 2015, when the World AntiDoping Agency found evidence
of widespread doping. The only
Russians allowed to compete at
IAAF events since then have
been designated as neutral
athletes.
Coe said “unless dramatic
progress is made, and we
genuinely hope it is being made,
then we will have to review at
our council meeting in July the
status of the neutral competitors
and the potential for the
congress to decide upon the
ultimate sanction, I guess, which
is expulsion.”
GOLF
Shubhankar Sharma can add
another achievement to his rapid
rise. He is going to the Masters.
Two days after Sharma held
the 54-hole lead in his first World
Golf Championships appearance,
the 21-year-old from India
accepted a special invitation to
play in the Masters next month.
He will be the fourth Indian to
play the Masters and the second
to receive a special invitation.
Jeev Milkha Singh, a mentor to
Sharma, received one in 2008.
Sharma was at No. 462 in the
world three months ago when he
shot 61 in the second round and
won the Joburg Open. He closed
with a 62 last month to win the
Malaysian Open, making him the
only two-time winner on the
European Tour this season.
He held at two-shot lead going
into the final round of the
Mexico Championship last week,
but he failed to make a birdie
until the 12th hole and a string of
bogeys late in the round dropped
him into a tie for ninth.
It still was enough for Sharma
to rise to No. 66 in the world.
PRO BASKETBALL
The Phoenix Mercury
swapped point guards, trading
Danielle Robinson to the
Minnesota Lynx while acquiring
Briann January from the
Indiana Fever.
Phoenix also sent the No. 8
pick in this year’s WNBA draft to
the Fever and received
Minnesota’s No. 12 pick.
The Fever now owns the No. 2,
8 and 14 picks in the draft.
8 p.m.
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Cleveland at Denver » ESPN
NHL
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Pittsburgh at Philadelphia » NBC Sports Network
MLB SPRING TRAINING
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New York Yankees vs. New York Mets » MLB Network
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Chicago Cubs vs. Cleveland » MLB Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
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7 p.m.
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ACC, second round: Louisville vs. Florida State » ESPN, WDCA (Ch. 20)
ACC, second round: N.C. State vs. Boston College » ESPN, WDCA (Ch. 20)
Big East, first round: St. John’s vs. Georgetown » Fox Sports 1,
WNEW (99.1 FM)
ACC, second round: Virginia Tech vs. Notre Dame » ESPN2, WDCA (Ch. 20),
WJFK (106.7 FM)
SEC, first round: Vanderbilt vs. Georgia » SEC Network
Big 12, first round: Oklahoma vs. Oklahoma State » ESPNU
Patriot League, final: Colgate at Bucknell » CBS Sports Network,
WTEM (980 AM)
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UEFA Champions League: Juventus at Tottenham » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Champions League: Basel at Manchester City » Fox Sports 2
SheBelieves Cup: United States vs. England (in Orlando) » ESPNews
COLLEGE LACROSSE
Jake Carraway led the No. 16
Georgetown men’s lacrosse team
with three goals and four assists,
and Daniel Bucaro also scored
three goals as the Hoyas beat
Marist, 13-6, in Washington.
— From news services
and staff reports
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
baseball
NA T IO NA L S NOTES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Curfew violations
led to Romero’s exit
The Washington Nationals sent
2017 first-round draft pick Seth
Romero home from spring
training Monday for a violation
of team rules, although the team
gave no information about the
nature of the violation.
No one with the team gave
specifics Tuesday, either. But a
person familiar with the
situation said Romero was sent
home for repeated curfew
violations, the last coming
Monday despite being warned
that another violation would
incur consequences.
The Nationals have not said
when or whether Romero will
return to camp, though they do
expect him to stay on schedule
for his development plan. He
finished last year in short-season
Class A, and no one has given
word on where he will start 2018.
He is currently home in Texas.
The 21-year-old has a history
of missteps, including failed
drug tests and fighting a
teammate at the University of
Houston. The Nationals took a
risk when they selected him 25th
in last year’s draft. That he was
sent home was not a surprise to
many, but the nature of his
violation led to speculation.
Romero did not fail a drug
test. He has undergone several
this year and has passed them,
according to a person familiar
with the Nationals’ handling of
his situation. That person also
said Romero did not have
trouble with the law — just the
day-to-day regulations set by the
team, such as being on time and
camp conduct. Namely, curfew.
Romero did not violate any
Major League Baseball rules. But
the Nationals did not want to
look the other way, lest they
indicate preferential treatment.
The move is not unprecedented:
The Nationals have sent several
players home over the years,
most notably outfielder Steven
Souza Jr., who overcame off-field
habits to become a major leaguer
and is now with the Arizona
Diamondbacks.
The Nationals still see Romero
as a major league talent, a future
left-handed relief stalwart with
the talent to be ready in the next
few years. They also saw him as a
project, at least off the field, and
thus far the risk they took in
drafting him has yielded only the
results they hoped to avoid.
Roark keeps it simple
The 2017 season left Tanner
Roark frustrated. His results
didn’t mimic those he was used
to as a starter, and he didn’t get
to pitch in the National League
Division Series.
So he went home to his family
and thought about it. He decided
he needed to change.
Roark used to stand on the
rubber and face the hitter when
no one was on base. He would
turn and lean and reach back
before delivering, which worked
rather well for him in his first
two seasons as a starter. He won
15 games as a first-time, full-time
starter in 2014. He won 16 when
he returned to the rotation in
2016. His ERA was 2.85 in 2014
and 2.83 in 2016.
But he never found
consistency last season. His
4.67 ERA was nearly two runs
higher, and he never seemed
comfortable. Roark admitted he
was overthinking all year.
“There was just a lot going on.
You know, life,” he said. “Learn
from it. Get better.”
As he threw four scoreless
innings in his third spring
training outing Monday, Roark
had little going on at all. He
allowed one hit. His stuff looked
strong, well-located, repeatedly
reliable. And as in all three of
those starts now, he didn’t
square up to the hitter when the
bases were clear.
Instead, he stood with his
back foot on the rubber, as he
might in the stretch, came set
and stepped laterally back with
his front foot — like Noah
Syndergaard or David Price, for
example — before loading over
the rubber and pushing forward.
In other words, he is using a
simplified windup — not quite as
stark of a change as Stephen
Strasburg made in throwing only
from the stretch, but a
substantial change nonetheless.
“If you have a tendency to
think too much sometimes,
sometimes you get stuck in a rut,
or you’re struggling a little bit
and you keep overthinking and it
just adds, adds, adds,” Roark
said. “Sometimes simplifying
mechanics can simplify easy
fixes.”
— Chelsea Janes
Nationals’ infield shifts to mind games
Martinez’s staff starts
with data, but there is
gamesmanship afoot, too
BY
J ORGE C ASTILLO
west palm beach, fla. — The
Washington Nationals ran an ingame experiment Sunday. It happened the three times New York
Mets first baseman Adrian Gonzalez stepped into the batter’s box
during the teams’ second Grapefruit League meeting in three
days. It didn’t raise any eyebrows.
The casual observer didn’t notice.
The Nationals think it worked.
A couple of days earlier, the
Nationals didn’t deploy the typical
exaggerated infield shift against
Gonzalez, a pull-heavy left-handed slugger, in his three at-bats.
Instead of placing the shortstop
on the first base side of second
base to have three infielders on
that side, the shortstop was up the
middle behind second base. Gonzalez, the Nationals noticed, tried
to hit the ball through the hole to
the left of second base. He succeeded once in three at-bats.
On Sunday, they changed their
scheme when Gonzalez batted,
moving the shortstop to the first
base side of second base to create
the traditional infield shift against
left-handed hitters of Gonzalez’s
profile. Gonzalez, the Nationals realized, then changed his approach:
He tried to yank everything. He
rolled two groundballs over and
struck out in three at-bats.
Nationals first base and infield
coach Tim Bogar explained the
point of the change was to make
Gonzalez uncomfortable, to force
him to think about something else
as he tried to hit 95-mph fastballs.
Sometimes, he said, the Nationals
will utilize alignments this season
to confuse not only batters but
opposing coaching staffs and
scouts.
“Whenever I can try to make a
hitter do something he’s not used
to doing, that’s another thought
that goes into his mind,” said Bogar, who oversaw infields in previous coaching stops with the Boston Red Sox and Texas Rangers.
“By changing his visuals, maybe
we can get in his head. So if we can
make him think that way, he might
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
A program will help determine where Nationals second baseman
Howie Kendrick aligns on each play, but that’s just the start.
go away from his strength, and
that gives us an advantage.”
The example illustrates one of
the ways the Nationals plan to
implement shifting — or, as Bogar
would rather call it, positioning —
this season. Most won’t involve
mind games, just hard data. The
point, Manager Dave Martinez has
repeated, is to compile 27 quick
outs en route to victory. The quicker, the better — no matter where
the defenders are standing, an approach more teams have taken as
the number of defensive shifts
around the majors has grown exponentially in recent years.
“Our goal is to be where they’re
going to hit the ball,” Bogar said.
“If that means slight movement or
a lot of movement, it’s just about
giving us the best opportunity to
get outs.”
Martinez, of course, came over
from the Chicago Cubs, who made
headlines in August for using a
four-man outfield against the Cincinnati Reds’ Joey Votto, one of the
most extreme examples of shifting
in recent memory. Yet they ranked
last in the majors in infield shifts
last season, according to FanGraphs. The Nationals ranked
21st. The Seattle Mariners ranked
third. Bogar was the Mariners’
bench coach each of the past two
seasons, and the Nationals’ approach seems to be trending in
that direction with their overhauled coaching staff so far this
spring.
Bogar explained that he will
work directly with the Nationals’
analytics staff, which uses a program that assesses thousands of
scenarios, to determine the best
ways to position fielders for each
pitcher against each hitter. He’ll
relay that information to pitchers,
catchers and pitching coach Derek
Lilliquist in meetings. The Nationals will apply the findings as a
starting point. He explained that
different variables could affect
how Nationals fielders are positioned over the course of a game —
batter counts, runners on base,
how the pitcher will attack the
hitter, etc. — and pitchers have
veto power.
“We’re trying to space the players correctly so that, if we talk
about cutting the field into pies,
each part of the pie is covered by
fielders,” Bogar said. “You want to
see uniformity in where we are, so
that when the ball is hit hard, we’re
standing where the ball is hit hard.
If it’s hit softly, they can move and
cover the ground.”
Not everyone is a shifting proponent. Brandon Kintzler is adamant. The groundball specialist
isn’t a fan because, he maintained,
they hurt more than help him. The
Milwaukee Brewers, for example,
told him he was victimized by the
shift more than any other reliever
in 2014. He hasn’t forgotten. Stephen Strasburg is on Kintzler’s
side. He said he would rather have
his fielders straight-up because he
believes he has the stuff to consistently generate weak contact.
“If I execute the pitch, I think
you’re going to get more weird
swings,” Strasburg said. “For me, it
comes down to the execution. And
I think if my stuff’s there and I’m
executing the pitch, I’d much rather we minimize the damage on
those bleeders. Where if I don’t
make the pitch and they crush one
into the gap, we might be able to
save that if we shift, but that’s also
on me. I didn’t do my part.”
Max Scherzer is completely on
board with the movement. The
2016 and 2017 National League Cy
Young Award winner remembered expressing skepticism when
he was introduced to aggressive
shifting tactics when he was with
the Detroit Tigers in 2014. He
feared left-handed hitters would
just bunt their way on. He quickly
realized they rarely bunted. Since
then, he said he has concluded
that batters will usually hit
groundballs where the data indicates they’re going to hit them —
regardless of pitch execution.
Scherzer is instead more concerned with outfield positioning
— and the possibility that the Nationals will use a four-man outfield at points this season, as Martinez recently suggested they
could.
“That’s where I put most of my
effort into game-planning,” Scherzer said. “I’m a flyball pitcher. I
need to take away doubles.”
The Nationals’ aggressiveness
was immediately on display
against the Houston Astros on
Tuesday when they shifted the infield against Josh Reddick and
Marwin Gonzalez, both batting
left-handed, with A.J. Cole on the
mound in the first inning. In both
instances, the shortstop, Wilmer
Difo, was shifted to the first base
side of second base, and the second baseman, Howie Kendrick,
moved to shallow right field. Anthony Rendon moved over to the
shortstop’s usual spot against
Reddick but was closer to third
base and in against Gonzalez.
Reddick flied out to right, but
Gonzalez socked a solo home run.
Four innings later, the Nationals
implemented the same shift
against Gonzalez, who roped a line
drive down the left field line. Rendon stuck his glove out as if to say
he could’ve been over there. An
infield shift, it turns out, can only
do so much.
BY
D AVE S HEININ
day was Jake Arrieta’s 32nd birthday, an occasion the Washington
Nationals marked by giving the
ball to a different starting pitcher,
getting on with the task of preparing for the 2018 season and otherwise ignoring the ethereal existence, somewhere out there in the
free agent wasteland, of the 2015
National League Cy Young Award
winner. Twenty-nine other teams,
spread across Florida and Arizona, did more or less the same.
While Arrieta remains unsigned 23 days before Opening
Day — a virtually unprecedented
scenario for someone of his pedigree, age and presumed health —
the Nationals, the team most frequently linked to him by industry
insiders, trotted presumed fifth
starter A.J. Cole to the mound in a
Grapefruit League game against
the defending World Series champion Houston Astros.
It is a spot the Nationals, some
around the game might believe,
are merely keeping warm for Arrieta — the thinking being that
Washington has the need for a top
starter to slot in behind Max
Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg,
plus a long-term replacement for
pending free agent Gio Gonzalez,
and that agent Scott Boras maintains an open channel of communication with Nationals owner
Ted Lerner.
None of those assumptions are
incorrect, and when Nationals
General Manager Mike Rizzo
claims, as he did Tuesday, that the
team is not in active negotiations
with Arrieta — “There’s nothing to
talk about,” he said, before declining to address Arrieta’s situation
— it comes with the caveat that
such talks, if they are happening,
could be taking place above Rizzo’s pay grade. Boras is already
known to have met with the Nationals’ ownership early in the
winter.
But at this point, it is fair to
wonder: What exactly is the market for Arrieta? Last November, at
the start of free agency, published
reports had the former Chicago
Cubs ace seeking a Scherzer-like
contract, which means something
in the neighborhood of $200 million. But once Yu Darvish, a pitcher
of similar age and recent track rec-
ord, set the market for top-shelf
starters with a six-year, $126 million contract with the Cubs last
month, Arrieta was left to contemplate a shifting landscape where it
is difficult to see another team being willing to go that high for him.
It isn’t Arrieta’s fault he made
his first foray into free agency at a
time when the industry was in the
midst of a radical rethinking of the
concept — with many rich teams
avoiding free agents to stay under
the luxury-tax threshold, poor
teams avoiding them to stay in
“rebuilding” mode, and most
teams, rich and poor, in agreement that it is generally best to
avoid expensive veterans on the
wrong side of 30.
Clearly, Boras, as he has been
known to do, gambled that by
waiting until deep into the winter,
then into the spring, it would result in a desperate team giving
Arrieta what he wants. But not
only has no team met that threshold, it is not even clear at this point
who — with the possible exception
of the Nationals — would be so
motivated.
Normally, someone in Arrieta’s
position — a free agent whose
market has failed to materialize —
might consider signing a one-year
deal at a high salary as a means of
waiting out the downturn and taking his chances again next winter.
But even if Arrieta were to be on
board with that strategy, and there
is no indication either way, a team
such as the Nationals may not be
very motivated to forfeit a pair of
2018 draft picks (by virtue of Arrieta’s having rejected the Cubs’
qualifying offer) for just one year
of his services.
As the overwhelming favorites
in a weak division, the Nationals
appear perfectly capable of winning the NL East and waltzing into
the playoffs with or without Arrieta. But as a franchise haunted by
its uncanny run of October failures — four straight playoff appearances that ended in the Division Series — they also know they
could probably use one more
front-line starter in their postseason rotation. Arrieta’s postseason
track record includes a 5-3 career
record, a 3.08 ERA and wins in
Games 2 and 6 of the 2016 World
Series for the Cubs.
And it is exactly that link —
Arrieta’s October exploits and the
Nationals’ October failures — that
Boras would surely play up in any
conversation about the pitcher. In
a recent interview, Boras described Arrieta as “one of the rare,
franchise-type players who can
win the big game.”
“There are a lot of men that can
pitch during the regular season,”
Boras said, “but there are few who
can win elimination games when
it’s all on the line. . . . When owners
wake up and fans wake up every
day, they [ask] are we really the
best team we can be? Every team
has to look at that: Are we the best
team we can be?”
But we are also reaching the
point where waiting any longer for
Arrieta calls into question his ability to get ready for the start of the
season.
While the Nationals were playing Tuesday, Arrieta remained at
his home in Austin, presumably
throwing regularly and keeping
himself in something resembling
Cubs’ Darvish throws
two hitless innings
baseball shape. But while a hitter
might need just a week’s worth of
batting practice and a week’s
worth of games to get their timing
down, starting pitchers need to
build up arm strength and stamina; one month is the accepted
industry timeline for getting a
starter ready.
Because of an off-day following
Opening Day — March 29 at Cincinnati — the Nationals won’t
need a fifth starter until April 5, in
their seventh game of the season.
Most other teams face similar scenarios. There may still be time to
squeeze Arrieta’s spring training
into a small enough window to get
him ready for the start of the season. But it will be close, and every
day that passes only makes it more
difficult.
The candles on Arrieta’s birthday cake were just one more reminder: Time is marching on, and
none of us are getting any younger.
If Yu Darvish was tipping his
pitches in the World Series last
year, he seems to have fixed it.
Darvish threw two hitless
innings in his spring debut for the
Chicago Cubs, facing his former
Los Angeles Dodgers teammates
in Mesa, Ariz.
When last on the mound,
Darvish was chased by the
Houston Astros after getting just
five outs in Games 3 and 7 of the
World Series. Darvish said he was
moved to lose 15 pounds “because
of what happened in the World
Series.”
Darvish was concerned about
the possible impact of the weight
loss on his velocity.
ROYALS: Outfielder Jon Jay
agreed to a one-year, $3 million
contract with Kansas City, a deal
that allows him to earn an
additional $1.5 million in
performance bonuses.
Jay, who turns 33 on March 15,
hit .296 with two homers and 34
RBI in 141 games last season with
the Cubs, including 13 for 40
(.325) as a pinch hitter.
His deal, announced Tuesday,
is a large cut from his $8 million
salary last year.
Jay did not commit an error in
141 chances last season and has
gone 141 games without an error
since April 15, 2016. As a lefthanded hitter, he was attractive to
the predominantly right-handedhitting Royals.
RANGERS: After wearing
No. 55 for his entire major league
career, Tim Lincecum will switch
to 44 with Texas in honor of his
late older brother.
Sean Lincecum’s funeral was
Saturday, which delayed Tim
Lincecum from taking the
physical needed to finalize his
one-year, $1 million contract with
the Rangers. The two-time Cy
Young Award winner passed the
physical Tuesday and said he will
wear the number his brother used
as an amateur.
“I always looked up to my
brother,” Lincecum said. “He was
an idol for me. He just had a lot of
bad runs with the choices he
made in life.”
Texas General Manager Jon
Daniels said the 33-year-old righthander will be a reliever and
could be the Rangers’ closer as he
attempts to pitch in the big
leagues for the first time since
2016.
DIAMONDBACKS: Arizona
is bringing back the bullpen cart.
The Diamondbacks announced
that the team will use an OnTrac
bullpen cart to transport relief
pitchers from both bullpens at
Chase Field before entering a
game.
The last known use of a
motorized vehicle in MLB was in
1995, when the Milwaukee
Brewers used a motorcycle with a
sidecar. Mike Fetters, Arizona’s
bullpen coach, was the closer for
the Brewers that season.
TIGERS: Detroit left-hander
Francisco Liriano threw two
scoreless innings against the New
York Yankees in his first start with
a new team.
Liriano allowed one hit,
walked two and struck out three
in the Tigers’ 7-2 loss in Lakeland,
Fla.
Liriano worked out of a two-on,
one-out jam in the first by
striking out Giancarlo Stanton
and Gary Sanchez. He induced a
double-play grounder from
Miguel Andujar to end the
second.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
— Associated Press
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
Arrieta’s window narrows as he remains unsigned
west palm beach, fla. — Tues-
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
NBA ROUNDUP
Houston extends winning streak to 16
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Chris Paul scored 25 points and
the Houston Rockets beat the
Thunder, 122-112, on Tuesday
night in Oklahoma City for their
16th straight win.
James Harden had 23 points
and 11 assists, and Trevor Ariza
added 15 points for the Rockets,
who are on the second-longest win
streak in franchise history.
Russell Westbrook scored 32
points for Oklahoma City, which is
in a logjam of teams trying to fight
their way into third place in the
West.
Oklahoma City had beaten several of the league’s top teams this
season. The Thunder has two wins
over Golden State, a victory over
Toronto and a win over Cleveland
this season. The Rockets avoided
that fate by going 17 of 33 on
three-pointers and 29 of 34 on free
throws.
RAPTORS 106, HAWKS 90:
DeMar DeRozan scored 25 points,
Jonas Valanciunas had 15 and host
Toronto beat Atlanta for its fifth
straight win.
C.J. Miles added 14 points, and
MAVERICKS 118, NUGGETS 107: Yogi Ferrell rode hot
ROCKETS 122,
THUNDER 112
Delon Wright and Serge Ibaka
each had 10 as the Eastern Conference leaders won for the 12th time
in 13 games and completed their
first season sweep of the Hawks
since 2001-02.
The Raptors are 27-5 at home,
the best record in the NBA.
76ERS 128, HORNETS 114:
Robert Covington scored 22
points, rookie sensation Ben Simmons flirted with a triple-double
and Philadelphia handed Charlotte its fourth straight loss.
Simmons had 16 points, 13 assists and eight rebounds as the
76ers won for the third time in
their last four games.
While the 76ers shot 57.5 percent from field — including 16 of
33 from three-point range — Charlotte’s all-star point guard Kemba
Walker couldn’t find the bottom of
the net. Walker had a season-low
five points on 1-of-9 shooting.
Dwight Howard had a seasonhigh 30 points for the Hornets.
three-point shooting to a seasonhigh 24 points, Dirk Nowitzki also
was strong from long range to
score 17 and Dallas handled Denver at home.
Ferrell and Nowitzki both made
their first five three-pointers, and
Ferrell finished 9 of 11 from the
field to help one of the NBA’s worst
teams hand the Nuggets a loss
they didn’t need in the tight Western Conference playoff race.
A second-year guard who came
to Dallas on a 10-day contract last
season, Ferrell finished 6 of 7 from
long range.
TRAIL
BLAZERS
111,
KNICKS 87: Damian Lillard
scored 37 points and made eight
three-pointers, and host Portland
won its eighth straight game.
CJ McCollum added 19 points
for the Blazers, on their longest
winning streak since winning
nine in a row in 2014. They have
moved into third place in the
Western Conference standings.
The Blazers hit a season-high 20
three-pointers in 33 attempts (60
percent).
Wizards snap skid with overtime win
WIZARDS FROM D1
REED SAXON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rickard Rakell scores past Braden Holtby, who allowed three goals on the Ducks’ first nine shots.
Capitals blanked by Ducks
CAPITALS FROM D1
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
Philipp Grubauer has been playing behind the same team and has
a .944 save percentage and 1.50
goals against average since late
November. On Tuesday night, he
had to make just eight saves in
relief with the Ducks’ fourth goal
an empty-net tally.
The Capitals had hoped the
Stadium Series win would be a
spark before their three-game
California swing. The play of
Washington’s defense in that
game especially, outshooting Toronto as the Capitals spent most
of the night in the Maple Leafs’
end, was an encouraging sign
after the team had allowed 3.57
goals per game in February. Entering Tuesday night’s contest in
Anaheim, the Capitals had an
opportunity to string together
their first three-game win streak
since the first week of the calendar year.
But Washington found itself on
the ropes from the game’s first
shift. Forward Tom Wilson was
called for interference after just
36 seconds, and Anaheim’s Adam
Henrique scored on the Ducks’
first shot of the game, snapping a
puck over Holtby’s glove from the
slot. Then with a cluster of bodies
jockeying for position in front of
Holtby, Hampus Lindholm’s
point shot deflected off Capitals
defenseman Michal Kempny for a
2-0 Ducks lead 13:15 into the
at Los Angeles Kings
Tomorrow
10:30 NBCSW
at San Jose Sharks
Saturday
4 NBCSW
vs. Winnipeg Jets
Monday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
Ducks 4, Capitals 0
WASHINGTON ......................... 0
ANAHEIM ................................ 2
0
1
0 —
1 —
0
4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Anaheim, Henrique 20 (Rakell, Getzlaf), 1:24
(pp). 2, Anaheim, Lindholm 10 (Silfverberg, Manson),
13:15. Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (interference), 0:36;
Bieksa, ANA, (interference), 5:04; Ritchie, ANA, (slashing), 17:24.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Anaheim, Rakell 28 (Getzlaf, Manson), 5:37.
Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (cross checking), 7:05; Perry,
ANA, (roughing), 7:05.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Anaheim, Ritchie 6 (Henrique, Bieksa), 18:34.
Penalties: Getzlaf, ANA, (hooking), 1:41.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WASHINGTON ......................... 7
14
15 — 36
ANAHEIM ................................ 7
7
4 — 18
Power-play opportunities: Washington 0 of 3; Anaheim 1
of 1. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 29-15-4 (9 shots-6
saves), Grubauer 8-7-3 (8-8). Anaheim, Gibson 25-15-6
(36-36). A: 15,910 (17,174). T: 2:27.
game.
After Washington failed to get
a shot off on a four-on-two rush,
Anaheim’s Rickard Rakell beat
Holtby glove side with a clean
shot from the left faceoff circle to
make it a 3-0 game less than six
minutes into the second period.
That’s when Coach Barry Trotz
turned to Grubauer, yanking
Holtby for the fourth time since
the start of February.
Grubauer tapped Holtby’s pads
with his stick as the two skated
past each other to swap spots.
Capitals players extended their
sticks to give encouraging pats to
Holtby as he skated by them and
then walked straight down the
tunnel to the locker room. In the
other net, Ducks goaltender John
Gibson made 36 saves, denying
Washington on three power
plays. Through two periods, the
Capitals’ fourth line didn’t register a single shot attempt as the
team was shutout.
A year ago, the Capitals lost all
three games of this California
swing. The team still went on to
finish with the league’s best regular-season record, but Washington may not have as much wiggle
room this year. The Capitals have
a one-point lead for first in the
Metropolitan Division, but just
two points separate the top three
teams and Washington has just a
five-point edge on the first wildcard team.
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
NHL ROUNDUP
Marchand helps Boston to latest win
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Brad Marchand completed his
hat trick 34 seconds into overtime
and the Boston Bruins, who twice
squandered a two-goal lead in regulation, escaped with a 6-5 victory
over the visiting Detroit Red
Wings on Tuesday night.
It was a team-record 11th regular season overtime goal for
Marchand, who also had two assists.
Torey Krug had two goals and
two assists, and David Pastrnak
had three assists for the Bruins,
who won for the fourth game in a
row.
LIGHTNING 5, PANTHERS
4 (OT): Brayden Point scored 2:49
into overtime to give Tampa Bay a
win over Florida in Tampa.
Yanni Gourde scored twice and
finished with three points for the
Lightning, which reached overtime for the sixth consecutive
game.
BLUE
JACKETS 4, GOLDEN KNIGHTS 1: Joonas Korpisa-
lo stopped 37 shots, Artemi
Panarin and Pierre Luc-Dubois
each had a goal and two assists,
and host Columbus beat Vegas.
Zach Werenski and Ian Cole
also scored for the Blue Jackets,
winners of two straight and four of
their last six.
JETS 3, RANGERS 0: Patrik
Laine scored all three goals for his
fourth career hat trick and set a
career high with his 38th goal as
BRUINS 6,
RED WINGS 5 (OT)
Winnipeg won in New York.
Steve Mason made 31 saves as
the Jets extended their winning
streak to three.
DEVILS
6, CANADIENS 4:
Taylor Hall had two assists to extend his point-scoring streak to 19
games, Travis Zajac scored two
power-play goals, and New Jersey
snapped a three-game skid with a
win over Montreal in Newark.
Hall’s
consecutive-points
streak is the longest in the NHL
this season.
WILD
6, HURRICANES 2:
Eric Staal scored twice against his
former team, helping Minnesota
beat Carolina in St. Paul, Minn.
The Wild set a franchise record
in the second period with four
goals in a span of 3:28.
PREDATORS
2, STARS 0:
Pekka Rinne made 26 saves as host
Nashville beat Dallas for its ninth
consecutive win.
BLACKHAWKS 2, AVALANCHE 1 (OT): Jonathan Toews
scored nine seconds into overtime
and had an assist in regulation to
lead host Chicago past Colorado.
Boeser likely out for season
Vancouver Canucks forward
Brock Boeser will likely miss the
rest of the season after the team
said he will be out four to six weeks
with a back injury.
The star rookie fell into an open
gate at the players’ bench during
the Canucks’ win over the New
York Islanders on Monday.
The Canucks said Tuesday that
he was diagnosed with a soft-tissue injury and a nonstructural,
non-displaced fracture of a transverse process in his lower back.
BRUINS: Boston said rookie
defenseman Charlie McAvoy is
out for at least a month with a
sprained left medial collateral ligament suffered Saturday.
SHARKS:
Jonathan
Cheechoo retired from hockey after playing seven NHL seasons
and finishing with four years in
Russia’s Kontinental Hockey
League.
Cheechoo, 37, announced his
retirement through San Jose. He
played six seasons with the
Sharks, including 2005-06 when
he led the league with 56 goals.
FLAMES: Calgary goalie
Mike Smith practiced with the
team for the first time in nearly a
month since sustaining a lower
body injury.
GLOBAL SERIES: The NHL
and NHL Players’ Association announced the New Jersey Devils
will play the Edmonton Oilers in
Gothenburg, Sweden, on Oct. 6 to
open the 2018-19 regular season.
In the second season of regular
games in Europe, the Florida Panthers and Winnipeg Jets will also
play Nov. 1 and Nov. 2 in Helsinki.
minutes forcing mistakes (three
by the Heat) rather than committing them (one, which did not
lead to Miami points, although
the team finished with 18 turnovers).
“It was two competitive teams,
[and] we both fought,” Wizards
Coach Scott Brooks said. “It’s one
of those games that someone is
going to have to come away with a
loss. We’ve been in those situations, it feels like, the last three
games in a row on our home
floor.”
In snapping their three-game
losing streak, the Wizards (37-28)
moved a half-game closer to reclaiming the fourth seed in the
Eastern Conference.
While playing on the second
night of a back-to-back, the Heat
(34-31, eighth place in the East)
relied on its bench, which scored
a stunning 64 points. Even as the
Wizards tried to protect a twopoint lead in the final 31/2 minutes
of regulation, they competed
against the Heat’s starting backcourt along with three reserves
(Winslow, Tyler Johnson and
Dwyane Wade).
When Bradley Beal made a bad
pass, Johnson streaked down the
court and scored a tying layup
with 3:13 to play. Then, with 22.8
seconds remaining, it was Wade’s
turn. The 12-time all-star drove
and finished at the rim through
contact from Beal, and his threepoint play again evened the score.
Before the buzzer, Beal’s stepback jumper missed off the rim,
forcing overtime.
The foul on Beal recalled the
Feb. 8 heartache when the Wizards led by three late in a game
against the Boston Celtics when
Morris fouled Kyrie Irving as he
attempted a shot from beyond the
arc. Irving made all three free
throws to force overtime, and the
bad foul served as a prelude to a
Wizards loss.
In the locker room Tuesday
night, Beal stated the simple reason things turned out differently
this time.
“We needed the win,” he said.
“We were going to do whatever it
took to get the win. The call was
made; we’re not going to argue it.
You never want to make that play
in that position or be in that
position, but it happens. We
didn’t cuss each other out. . . . We
moved on from it and did a good
job of getting stops and playing
solid defense in overtime.”
Solid in overtime, but the fact
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at New Orleans Pelicans
Friday
8 NBCSW, NBATV
at Miami Heat
Saturday
7:30 NBCSW
vs. Minnesota Timberwolves
Tuesday
7 NBCSW, NBATV
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
Wizards 117, Heat 113 (OT)
Miami ............................. 26
Washington ................... 31
MIAMI
Babbitt
J.Johnson
Whiteside
Dragic
Richardson
Winslow
T.Johnson
Wade
Olynyk
McGruder
Adebayo
TOTALS
24
28
30
27
25
19
8 — 113
12 — 117
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
5:33
1-2 0-0 0-0 0 0
3
14:22
2-4 2-2 2-3 1 0
6
21:19
4-9 0-0 4-6 1 2
8
35:38 6-15 3-3 3-7 5 6 16
35:04
5-9 3-4 1-2 2 3 16
38:29 6-11 2-3 1-6 1 2 15
38:12 8-15 3-7 0-3 4 0 21
28:16 8-18 6-6 0-2 6 2 22
25:17
1-7 0-0 1-9 5 5
3
19:03
1-2 1-2 1-1 1 4
3
3:47
0-1 0-0 0-2 0 0
0
265 42-93 20-27 13-41 26 24 113
Percentages: FG .452, FT .741. 3-Point Goals: 9-33, .273
(Richardson 3-5, T.Johnson 2-6, Babbitt 1-2, Winslow
1-4, Dragic 1-5, Olynyk 1-5, J.Johnson 0-1, Wade 0-5).
Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 14 (23 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 2 (T.Johnson, Whiteside). Turnovers: 14
(Richardson 3, Wade 3, Olynyk 2, Winslow 2, Babbitt,
Dragic, McGruder, Whiteside). Steals: 11 (Richardson 3,
T.Johnson 3, Dragic, J.Johnson, Olynyk, Wade, Winslow). Technical Fouls: None.
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Satoransky
Oubre Jr.
Scott
Sessions
Meeks
Mahinmi
Smith
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
41:32 6-12 2-3 2-13 3 5 16
31:40
5-8 0-0 1-5 5 2 12
22:48
2-8 4-4 2-6 1 2
8
43:01 12-16 0-0 0-6 7 3 30
39:39 6-12 6-8 2-3 7 2 19
27:53
3-8 6-6 0-1 1 4 14
26:58
3-6 1-2 0-2 0 1
8
13:25
1-5 4-4 0-0 1 0
6
10:10
1-1 0-0 0-0 0 1
2
4:23
1-2 0-0 0-2 0 1
2
3:31
0-1 0-0 0-2 0 1
0
265 40-79 23-27 7-40 25 22 117
Percentages: FG .506, FT .852. 3-Point Goals: 14-24, .583
(Beal 6-7, Morris 2-3, Porter Jr. 2-3, Oubre Jr. 2-6,
Satoransky 1-2, Scott 1-2, Sessions 0-1). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 18 (29 PTS). Blocked Shots:
2 (Oubre Jr., Porter Jr.). Turnovers: 18 (Beal 4, Morris 3,
Gortat 2, Oubre Jr. 2, Satoransky 2, Sessions 2, Mahinmi,
Porter Jr., Scott). Steals: 7 (Oubre Jr. 2, Morris, Porter
Jr., Satoransky, Scott, Sessions). Technical Fouls: Morris, 00:03 third.
that the Wizards even needed to
endure some adversity late in the
game should raise concerns.
Washington built an 18-point
lead in the first quarter, largely
thanks to a sizzling start from the
three-point arc. For the game,
Washington made 14 of 24 from
deep, led by Beal’s efficiency
(30 points on 12-of-16 shooting,
including 6 of 7 from the threepoint line).
If Beal was shaky at the end of
the Wizards’ Sunday night loss to
the visiting Indiana Pacers — as
the primary ballhandler, he committed costly turnovers and
missed his final five shots — then
he was the exact opposite of that
at the start against the Heat.
Less than 21/2 minutes into the
game, Beal hit his first three: a
spot-up look off a drive and kick
from point guard Tomas Satoransky. Beal was unflappable while
operating in his natural role of
scorer, moving off the ball and
getting a second spot-up triple,
then hitting a floater in the lane
to expand the Wizards’ lead to
20-7.
After a Heat miss, Beal grabbed
the rebound and reminded everyone that he’s pretty good while
handling the ball as well. Beal
never gave up his dribble while
surveying the floor, then moved
around a screen from Gortat and
pulled up from 13 feet.
While Beal was on the court in
the first quarter, the Wizards outscored Miami by 17 points. When
the Heat began to whittle away at
the lead — tying the score at 39
before the midway point of the
second quarter — Beal again provided the plus/minus advantage.
The score was 39-37 when Beal
checked back into the game.
When he committed his second
foul with 4:35 remaining, Brooks
didn’t even look down the bench.
Beal remained in and, boosted by
his stabilizing presence, the Wizards led by nine at halftime.
This week, Brooks has had to
address his allocation of minutes
— particularly for Beal, who entered the night tied for the league
high in minutes over the past 16
games. On Tuesday, Beal rested
near the end of the third quarter
and did not pop off the bench
until the 9:10 mark of the fourth.
But after getting Beal back on the
floor, the Wizards soon watched
Otto Porter Jr. slowly walk off it.
On the play before Beal
checked in, point guard Ramon
Sessions attempted a long pass to
Porter running in transition. As
Porter attempted to bring in the
pass, he collided with Wade and
collapsed to the floor. Although
Porter remained in the game for
the next two possessions and
even hit an open three-pointer, he
checked out with 8:29 left and did
not return.
“Bruised hip,” Brooks said. “We
will see how he feels [Wednesday]
morning at practice.”
The Wizards played the rest of
the game with reserve Kelly Oubre Jr. filling in at small forward.
In overtime, Morris forced Wade
to loft a floater high to the rim.
When Heat forward Kelly Olynyk
missed the putback, Oubre secured his first rebound of the
game. Miami fouled Oubre, who
made both free throws to cap a
night when the Wizards finally
executed in crucial moments.
candace.buckner@washpost.com
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Bradley Beal had a game-high 30 points on the strength of 6-for-7 shooting from three-point range.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
NFL NOTES
Steelers put tag on Bell
for second straight year
Four other players get
franchise designations
before deadline
A SSOCIATED P RESS
PHOTOS BY MARY GELMAN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Ovechkin’s relic collection is extensive
OVECHKIN FROM D1
Every chapter of Ovechkin’s
storied hockey career has been
preserved so it can be appreciated. The dacha features memorabilia from the early years, when
Ovechkin’s father, Mikhail, was
the one proudly displaying his
son’s accomplishments. But
Ovechkin has carefully maintained — and expanded — the
collection himself, saving the
stick from every milestone NHL
goal he scores. The next one will
be from the 600th tally of his
career, and in what has become a
tradition, Ovechkin will ask the
players who record an assist on
the goal to sign the stick before
it’s displayed in the basement of
his Northern Virginia home.
“It’s pretty cool for a guy like
him who scores so many goals,”
said Capitals center Nicklas Backstrom, who has signed several
Ovechkin sticks over the course of
their 11 seasons playing together.
“It shows how important everything is to him. Everything’s got a
value.”
Elaborate displays
Ovechkin has the stick he used
to score the 50th goal of his
career, recorded in his rookie
season — the first of seven 50-goal
campaigns. He kept the stick
from when he scored his 61st goal
of the 2007-08 campaign because
that marked a single-season franchise record. When Ovechkin
scored his 50th goal the next year,
he placed the stick down on the
ice and fanned his gloves over it,
the famous “hot stick” celebration. He kept that one, too. Most
recently, Ovechkin saved his stick
from Washington’s game against
the Minnesota Wild last month
because he recorded the 1,100th
point of his career that night.
Ovechkin isn’t the only NHLer
who has kept mementos from his
career, but his collection has been
described as on the “extreme”
side. The saved sticks are behind
glass in what Ovechkin calls his
gym “because there’s some heavy
stuff there.” It’s a sort of attraction
for those who visit his house in
McLean.
“His basement is definitely a
shrine,” forward Tom Wilson said.
It feels as if he’s already immortalized at the family dacha in the
Moscow suburbs. In the summers, he spends most weekends
here. A banner with a close-up
photo of his face lines the back
fence of the basketball court, and
a second one runs along the tennis court. There’s a painting in the
living room depicting Ovechkin
riding a horse while playing the
mandolin. Old posters and cardboard cutouts of him advertising
everything from a brand of hockey equipment to a Russian bank
are scattered throughout the
sprawling property. Of the five
German shepherds, his mother
points out the one named “Ovi.”
“Look how strong Ovi is,” she
says, referring to the dog.
Ovechkin calls his mother every day, and Tatiana and Mikhail
stream every game in their breakfast nook. “It’s like we’re in Washington,” she says. A framed Russian magazine article with a photo of a dapper Ovechkin is beside
the TV. An Ovechkin Russian
nesting doll sits atop a nearby
shelf. At his parents’ apartment in
Moscow, there are three more
glass cases with plaques, photos
and signed hats, everything from
medals dating back 16 years to a
D.C. Sportsman of the Year award
from 2008 to the puck from his
first NHL goal. It all has a place,
and nothing is too insignificant to
be discarded.
“There’s more. But Sasha has to
display it for himself,” Tatiana
says, referring to her son by the
affectionate Russian diminutive
for Alexander.
That exhibit resides back in his
McLean basement, another
elaborate display that should
soon grow larger still.
“He obviously takes a lot of
pride in it, but it’s almost like a
museum — an Ovechkin museum
in his basement,” Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik said. “I
don’t even know how to describe
it. There’s one thing where it’s like
a life-size mannequin dressed up
in his gear.”
That would be everything
Ovechkin was wearing when he
scored the 500th goal of his career two years ago. The 600th
one, which remained just two
pucks away following Tuesday
night’s loss at the Anaheim
Ducks, will mark his 42nd goal of
the season. At age 32, he once
again leads the NHL in goals and
could record the eighth 50-goal
campaign of his career. Just four
players in NHL history have
scored at least 50 goals at 32 or
older; Jaromir Jagr was the last to
do so during the 2005-06 season.
If there was any doubt Ovechkin
is shooting for that mark, his
reaction to scoring his 40th goal
of the year Saturday night cleared
that up. “Forty is nice,” he said,
“but 50 is better.”
Adding to the collection
Coming off a down season by
his standards — 33 goals in 82
games last year — there was some
concern age had finally caught up
to Ovechkin. As salary cap constraints forced the Capitals to
part with two top forwards last
summer and rely on less experienced and less expensive players,
Ovechkin has carried the load,
scoring 20 percent of Washington’s goals this season. He’s on his
best points-per-game pace (1.11)
in five years, even as he’s poised to
play in his 1,000th game April 1
against the Pittsburgh Penguins.
“I feel like we’ve already seen
four or five milestones this year,”
center Jay Beagle said. “I don’t
even know what they are, but he
just keeps collecting pucks.”
“I think this is the quickest
season of my life, you know?”
Ovechkin said. “Time moves fast.”
His memorabilia collection is a
reminder of that — a combination
of his personal history, hockey
history and the intersection.
When Ovechkin was a 20-yearold rookie, the Penguins’ equipment manager sought him out
after a Capitals practice in Piney
Orchard, Md. He had a gift for
Ovechkin: a signed Mario Lemieux stick. It was the first one he
had ever received from another
player, so Ovechkin then started
asking other stars for their sticks,
typically offering one of his in
exchange. He has roughly 100
sticks from other players now,
including Pittsburgh centers Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin
and Edmonton’s Connor McDavid. Lemieux’s is still his favorite.
Even as his basement has started to rival Toronto’s Hockey Hall
of Fame, Ovechkin has acquired
other memorabilia. When Capitals goaltender Olaf Kolzig retired, Ovechkin asked for his
glove as a way to remember a dear
teammate. After Braden Holtby
won the Vezina Trophy two years
ago as the league’s top netminder,
Ovechkin asked for Holtby’s goalie pads from that season. At his
parents’ apartment in Moscow,
there’s a Marty Turco mask from
the 2007 All-Star Game in Dallas
that Ovechkin had other players
there sign for him.
“It’s pretty cool,” Ovechkin
said. “It’s something when I’m
going to be retired that I’m going
to remember.”
Ovechkin doesn’t need reminding of what’s still missing
from his collection. A first Stanley
Cup would complete it, a perfect
complement to the scores of individual accomplishments and the
sticks of other stars who have
already celebrated a championship. But the Alex Ovechkin museum is far from a finished product. “I think this is for my future
generation, you know? Kids,
grandkids,” Ovechkin said. “They
will see it, and I think it’s a proud
moment.”
Five NFL players were given the
franchise tag ahead of Tuesday’s
deadline, with only Pittsburgh
Steelers running back Le’Veon
Bell getting the exclusive tag.
Bell, who has been adamant
about not playing under the tag
for a second straight season, can’t
negotiate with any other teams.
Pittsburgh must offer him the average of the top five running
backs’ salaries. Both sides plan to
continue negotiating.
“Pittsburgh: the city that took
in a 21-year old kid from smalltown Ohio, the city I battled thru
adversity in, the city that I became
a man in,” Bell tweeted. “I love
everything about being a Pittsburgh Steeler, and I want nothing
more than to finish the rest of my
career in Pitt!”
Also getting franchise tags were
Miami Dolphins wide receiver
Jarvis Landry, Detroit Lions defensive end Ezekiel Ansah, Dallas
Cowboys defensive end DeMarcus
Lawrence and Los Angeles Rams
safety Lamarcus Joyner. They can
talk with other teams, but their
current team would get compensation if they leave.
The only player given the transition tag was Chicago Bears cornerback Kyle Fuller. Fuller can
sign an offer sheet with another
team, but the Bears get a chance to
match it and they are expected to
seek a multiyear deal. The team
gets no compensation if it chooses
not to match.
Free agency begins March 14.
The franchise tag value for running backs is $11.866 million, but
Bell is scheduled to make
$14.54 million in 2018 because it is
his second straight tag.
For defensive ends, it is
$17.143 million, while it’s
$15.982 million for receivers and
$11.287 million for safeties.
Fuller’s transition amount is
$9.536 million.
RAIDERS: Former Oakland
linebacker Aldon Smith surrendered to police, who said he is a
suspect in a domestic violence incident reported three days earlier.
Smith was booked on four misdemeanor charges of domestic
violence and related counts and
released on $30,000 bail from San
Francisco County Jail.
San Francisco police had been
looking for Smith since he fled a
home Saturday night after someone called 911 to report a domestic
violence incident.
Jail records don’t show if he is
represented by an attorney.
The Raiders released Smith on
Monday.
He had been on the suspended
list since late 2015 for violating the
NFL’s policy on substance abuse.
DOLPHINS: Miami owner
Stephen Ross said he won’t force
his players to stand for the national anthem, even though he believes kneeling is a counterproductive way to promote social justice.
Ross’s comments Tuesday in a
statement released by the Dolphins came after the New York
Daily News reported that he said
all of the team’s players will stand
for the anthem in 2018. Ross was
in New York on Monday to be
honored by the Jackie Robinson
Foundation and receive its ROBIE
Lifetime Achievement Award.
“I have no intention of forcing
our players to stand during the
anthem, and I regret that my comments have been misconstrued,”
Ross said in his statement.
BILLS: Running back Chris
Ivory agreed to sign a two-year
contract with Buffalo, where the
eighth-year player will have an
opportunity to serve as LeSean
McCoy’s primary backup.
Ivory, 29, was cut by the Jacksonville Jaguars last month after
he finished with just 382 yards
rushing and a touchdown and was
inactive for four of the Jaguars’
final five games. He lasted just two
seasons with Jacksonville after
signing a five-year, $32 million
contract.
PANTHERS: Carolina announced it signed Pro Bowl kicker
Graham Gano to a four-year contract extension.
The deal is worth $17 million
overall with $9 million guaranteed, a person familiar with the
situation said.
Gano, 30, was set to become an
unrestricted free agent, and the
team had considered using the
franchise tag on him but came to
an agreement just hours before
the deadline to use the tag.
RAVENS: Baltimore signed
defensive end Brent Urban to a
one-year contract, less than two
weeks before he was slated to become an unrestricted free agent.
Urban’s four years with Baltimore have been marked by injuries. He has played in just 25
games and was healthy for an
entire season only in 2016.
JAGUARS: If Allen Robinson
remains in Jacksonville, it won’t
be as one of the highest-paid wide
receivers in the league.
The Jaguars declined to use the
franchise or transition tag on Robinson, stirring questions about his
future.
Had the Jaguars tagged Robinson, he could have signed a oneyear, $15.982 million contract for
2018. Now Jacksonville and Robinson still have a week to reach a
contract agreement; the team has
exclusive negotiating rights with
him until Monday.
If no deal is reached by that
point, then Robinson would become an unrestricted free agent
March 14.
Robinson suffered a torn left
anterior cruciate ligament in
Week 1 in September and missed
the rest of the season.
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
The family “dacha,” at top, outside Moscow holds a portion of Capitals star Alex Ovechkin’s memorabilia. Above left are pictures and
awards kept by his parents, and above right is a Marty Turco mask from the 2007 All-Star Game in Dallas with several players’ signatures.
202-855-7033 DC | 301-683-7290 MD
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D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Redskins don’t use a third franchise tag on Cousins
REDSKINS FROM D1
senior vice president of player personnel, said at the combine that
tagging Cousins was never a serious consideration.
Cousins is expected to sign a
massive deal in free agency, possibly the richest in league history.
The Minnesota Vikings, New York
Jets, Denver Broncos, Arizona
Cardinals and Cleveland Browns
are among the teams in need of
quarterback help.
“Next week is now officially the
first time since 2007 that I’ll be
choosing where to play football,”
Cousins tweeted Tuesday evening
along with a photo of himself as a
teenager. “I’m open to suggestions. #freeagency”
Cousins will move on after
starting every game for Washington over the past three seasons,
throwing for more than 4,000
yards in each and earning a Pro
Bowl selection in 2016. He was
drafted by the Redskins in the
fourth round of the 2012 draft
despite the team selecting Robert
Griffin III with the No. 2 overall
pick. Cousins succeeded Griffin as
the full-time starter in 2015 after
the 2012 offensive rookie of the
year continued to be plagued with
injuries and increasingly poor
play.
Both the Redskins and Cousins
will now turn their attention to
free agency. The NFL announced
that the 2018 salary cap will be
$177.2 million, an increase of $10.2
million. This is the fifth consecutive year the cap has increased by
at least $10 million per team. Given the increase and after adding
Smith’s contract to its books,
Washington will have about $23
million available next season before any additional cuts, according to the sports salary-tracking
database Spotrac.com.
Williams expects to be active in
free agency to plug holes and allow
the organization to take the best
player available in April’s draft.
The Redskins hold the No. 13, 44,
113, 149, 188 and 231 overall picks
in the 2018 draft. The team’s thirdround pick (No. 78) will be included in the trade for Smith.
Running back, wide receiver,
defensive line and the defensive
secondary are all areas of need this
“Next week is now
officially the first
time since 2007
that I’ll be
choosing where to
play football.”
Kirk Cousins, tweeting about
becoming a free agent after
the Redskins declined to use
the franchise tag on him
offseason. Inside linebacker could
be added to that list if Zach Brown
leaves in free agency.
Several NFL agents and one NFL
executive familiar with the free
agent market said at the combine
that they believe the Vikings are
the favorite to sign Cousins. Minnesota advanced to the NFC championship game with one of the
league’s top defenses and journeyman Case Keenum under center.
The Vikings played Sam Bradford,
Teddy Bridgewater and Keenum at
quarterback last season, but all are
eligible for free agency.
The Cardinals are trying to
avoid a drop-off at the position
after Carson Palmer retired. Injuries played a large role in the Cardinals finishing 8-8 last season, but
the team brings in a new regime
under rookie Coach Steve Wilks
after former coach Bruce Arians
also retired after the season. Arizona does return top wide receiver
Larry Fitzgerald, however.
The Broncos, who received subpar play from Trevor Siemian,
Brock Osweiler and Paxton Lynch
last season, may have the roster
most likely to contend immediately after they won the Super
Bowl following the 2015 season.
The cost of Cousins, though, could
force Denver to make cuts to its
talented roster.
Notes: The Redskins announced they have re-signed Deshazor Everett to a multi-year deal,
helping address their depth at the
safety position that is a concern
this offseason.
The three-year veteran would
have been eligible for restricted
free agency when the league year
begins March 14.
In other moves, The team
waived tackle Kevin Bowen and
running backs Dare Ogunbowale
and Kenny Hilliard.
kareem.copeland@washpost.com
VIRGINIA BOYS’ BASKETBALL
Colorful Millora-Brown guides Stallions into final
SOUTH COUNTY 63,
BATTLEFIELD 54
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
Before Quentin Millora-Brown
could celebrate No. 14 South
County’s 63-54 victory over No. 19
Battlefield, which clinched a berth
in the Virginia Class 6 state championship game, the senior had to
take a picture.
So while his Stallions teammates jumped and hollered with
the student section, elated to have
extended the team’s best season
one more game, Millora-Brown
found the group of third-grade
basketball players who had started a recent tradition of dying their
hair blue like the center’s.
Millora-Brown gathered them
together, one boy flashed a
thumbs up, and a mom snapped a
few images.
The scene at Patriot High in
Nokesville on Tuesday night exhibited why Coach Mike Robinson
calls Millora-Brown “the foundation” of South County’s historic
run, which will continue Thursday night at Virginia Commonwealth University for the title
game against Western Branch.
“Right now I don’t have hair,
but when I was 7 and 8 and did
have hair, I would’ve dyed my hair,
as well,” Robinson said. “He’s a
great role model.”
Millora-Brown, who transferred
from O’Connell before the season
and led the Stallions with 19 points
Tuesday, has long experimented
with different hair designs and
cuts, so before the season, his mom
suggested he try dying the top.
“I just think it’s helped me have
fun and be relaxed,” he said.
As South County (26-3), a ninewin team a year ago, progressed
through the playoffs, first winning
the Patriot District and then the
Region 6C championship, the fans
adopted his style.
Millora-Brown had some leftover blue dye from giving it out on
senior night, so he gave it to the
kids to sport through the rest of
the postseason.
Millora-Brown’s young fans
had lots to cheer for throughout
the game Tuesday. He had 12 firsthalf points and seven in the fourth
quarter, including a three-point
play with about a minute left that
extended South County’s lead to
four. Battlefield (19-9) never
pulled closer.
The Stallions didn’t falter when
Millora-Brown picked up two
quick fouls after halftime and
missed most of the third quarter.
Instead, South County, trailing
by three when Millora-Brown exited, contained Brayden Gault —
Battlefield’s all-time leading scorer who led the game with 24 points
including five three-pointers —
and the Stallions led by two when
their leader returned.
“This was the vision when I
came here,” Millora-Brown said.
“We all thought we had a chance,
and now we’re seeing it come true.”
Wakefield beats Edison
In the Virginia Class 5 state
semifinals, Wakefield defeated
Edison, 82-66, to advance to the
championship game Thursday at
VCU against Varina. Senior guard
Benjamin Horsford scored a
team-high 19 points, and senior
forward Amari Cooper added 18
for the Warriors.
“It’s surreal, man. I’ve had better teams, and I’m not saying that
to discredit these guys,” Wakefield
Coach Tony Bentley said. “I
thought this year would be a year
of rebuilding. . . . These guys have
surpassed my expectations.”
K ATE Y ANCHULIS
Langley senior Jordyn Callaghan watched her team rally
again and again throughout
Tuesday night’s Class 6 girls’ basketball state semifinal against
No. 16 T.C. Williams, so when the
Saxons called on her for a buzzerbeating three-pointer, she did not
hesitate.
“I just set my feet, and I let it
fly,” Callaghan said.
Her shot as time expired lifted
the Saxons to a 56-54 overtime
win and to their second state
final appearance in three years.
Even though Langley mounted
comeback
after
comeback
throughout the game at Robinson Secondary School in Fairfax,
the Saxons trailed by one when
the Titans missed a free throw
with 5.8 seconds remaining in
overtime.
T.C. Williams held a height
advantage over Langley, an edge
that only grew after the Saxons’
starting forwards, Rana Azad and
Hailey Chapman, fouled out. But
Langley senior guard Carly Britt
LIU-BROOKLYN 71, WAGNER 61: Joel Hernandez had 32
points and seven rebounds, and
the Blackbirds surprised their
New York City rivals to win the
Northeast Conference tournament title and earn its first NCAA
bid in five years.
Raiquan Clark had 20 points
and eight rebounds for the fourthseeded Blackbirds (18-16), who
handed the top-seeded Seahawks
(23-9) their first loss this season on
their Staten Island campus.
WRIGHT
STATE
74,
CLEVELAND STATE 57: Grant
Benzinger had 19 points and nine
rebounds to help the second-seeded Raiders defeat the eighth-seeded Vikings to win the Horizon
SOUTH DAKOTA STATE 97,
SOUTH DAKOTA 87: David Jen-
kins scored 29 points, Mike Daum
had 25 points and 11 rebounds,
and the Jackrabbits (28-6) defeated the Coyotes (26-8) in Sioux
Falls, S.C., to clinch their third
straight NCAA berth with the
Summit League tournament title.
FLORIDA
A&M 88, HOW-
ARD 78: Elijah Mayes had 27
points and six assists to lead the
Rattlers past the Bison in the first
round of the Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference tournament. RJ Cole,
the conference’s rookie of the year,
for No. 8 seed Howard (10-23).
U-Conn. women win AAC title
Gabby Williams scored 19
points to lead No. 1 Connecticut to
a 70-54 victory over 19th-ranked
South Florida in the American
Athletic Conference tournament
final in Uncasville, Conn.
Williams returned to the Huskies’ lineup after sitting out the
semifinals to rest a hip injury she
tweaked Sunday. She also had seven rebounds, six assists and five
steals before exiting for good with
just under six minutes left.
U-Conn. is 32-0, while the Bulls
fell to 26-7.
DEPAUL 98, MARQUETTE
63: Amarah Coleman scored a ca-
reer-high 27 points, and the second-seeded Blue Demons routed
the top-seeded Golden Eagles in
the Big East tournament final in
Chicago. DePaul (26-7) made 16
three-pointers, one shy of a tournament record. Marquette is 23-9.
SOUTH DAKOTA STATE
65, SOUTH DAKOTA 50: In
Sioux Falls, S.D., Summit Conference player of the year Macy Miller
had 16 points, 11 rebounds, four
assists and three steals and the
Jackrabbits (26-6) snapped the
Coyotes’ 20-game winning streak
for their eighth NCAA bid in 10
seasons. South Dakota is also 26-6.
GREEN BAY 62, WRIGHT
STATE 44: In Detroit, Allie Le-
claire scored 24 points and
grabbed eight rebounds, and the
No. 22 Phoenix (29-3) beat the
Raiders (23-10) to win its fourth
straight Horizon League tournament championship.
GONZAGA 79, SAN DIEGO
71: In Las Vegas, Jill Barta scored
32 points, helping the Bulldogs
(27-5) repeat as the West Coast
Conference tournament champions by beating the surprising Toreros (17-15).
Joshua Needelman contributed to this
report.
HIGH SCHOOLS
Callaghan sends Saxons to title game
BY
Joe Chealey had 32 points, and
College of Charleston rallied from
17 points down in the second half
to win the Colonial Athletic Association tournament championship and earn its first NCAA tournament berth in 19 years with an
83-76 overtime win against Northeastern on Tuesday night in North
Charleston, S.C.
After rallying to tie, the Cougars
caught fire in the extra period.
They hit their first four shots, including a pair of three-pointers by
Marquise Pointer, to take a 75-69
lead. Northeastern (23-10) could
not come back.
“Amazing grit by the players,
amazing toughness, amazing belief,” Charleston Coach Earl Grant
said.
The Cougars (26-7) appeared
done early in the second half, trailing 42-25 after Vasa Pusica’s threepointer with 17:27 to go. That’s
when Charleston ramped up the
pressure — it forced 14 turnovers
the second half — and tied it at 65
on Chealey’s layup with 10.1 seconds to go.
Charleston got the ball back
with the chance to win in regulation, but Chealey’s long threepointer hit off the front of the rim.
GONZAGA 74, BYU 54: In
Las Vegas, Killian Tillie scored 22
points, and the No. 6 Bulldogs won
their sixth straight West Coast
Conference tournament title.
Gonzaga (30-4) appeared as if it
would lock into a defensive battle
with BYU (24-10). The Bulldogs
turned it into a title-game rout
with a halftime-spanning 36-6 run
to win their 17th WCC title. Gonzaga held BYU to 35 percent shooting to win its 17th straight conference tournament game.
League tournament in Detroit.
The Raiders (25-9) will play in
the NCAA tournament for the
third time in school history and
the first since 2007. The Vikings,
playing their fourth game in five
days, fell to 12-23.
callie.caplan@washpost.com
VIRGINIA GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
LANGLEY 56,
T.C. WILLIAMS 54 (OT)
Cougars survive
a 17-point deficit
A SSOCIATED P RESS
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
MARCH 7 , 2018
COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP
CHARLESTON 83,
N’EASTERN 76 (OT)
Kirk Cousins will be moving on after starting every game for the Redskins for the past three seasons.
. WEDNESDAY,
managed to come away with the
pivotal rebound and streak up
the court, where she found Callaghan open behind the arc.
“Before that play, one of my
teammates told me, ‘Muscle
memory,’ ” Callaghan said. “I’ve
been shooting the ball since I was
in second grade, so I just trusted
my form.”
A four-year starter and the
leading scorer for the Saxons,
Callaghan scored a game-high 21
points.
The Titans held Callaghan and
the rest of her team in check into
the second quarter, but the Saxons rallied from a 12-point deficit. They closed the first half on a
15-4 run and trailed 24-23 at
halftime.
Langley kept pace through a
back-and-forth second half but
trailed by two with 5.3 seconds
left in regulation. That’s when
junior guard Lauren Maloney
drew a foul and made two free
throws to send the game to overtime.
With the victory, Langley advanced to the state championship
matchup with Cosby at 6 p.m.
Thursday at Siegel Center in
Richmond. In the Saxons’ first
state final appearance in 2016,
they lost, 42-37, to Cosby.
“We didn’t get business done
my sophomore year, so hopefully
we can get business done this
year,” Callaghan said.
Edison prevails this time
On Feb. 23, the Edison Eagles
couldn’t get it done against Freedom-South Riding. In the Virginia Class 5 Region C championship game, Freedom led almost
all the way in its 10-point victory.
But Tuesday, Edison got another shot at Freedom in the
Class 5 state semifinals. Edison
made it count, using its signature
full-court press to build and sustain a lead for much of a 49-32
win at Champe High School.
“We really studied that first
game, came up with a different
game plan on defense,” Coach
Dianne Lewis said. “And we
pressed. If something is working,
why stop doing it?”
Junior forward Carole Miller
helped Edison start fast, scoring
13 points in the first half.
With the victory, Edison secured a date with Virginia Beach
power Princess Anne in the state
championship game at 2 p.m.
Thursday in Richmond.
hss@washpost.com
Michael Errigo contributed reporting.
THE TOP 10
Ice hockey
Gonzaga lost its first game to a local team in the
Washington Catholic Athletic Conference semifinals
against O’Connell before rallying to bring a second
straight Mid-Atlantic Prep Hockey League title back to
Capitol Hill. . . . Churchill has won four straight Maryland
Student Hockey League titles. . . . DeMatha won its
second straight WCAC title but, after a 4-1 loss to
Gonzaga in the final, DeMatha is still searching for its
first MAPHL title since 2008. . . . O’Connell regrouped
after a slow start to beat Broad Run, 4-2, for its first
Northern Virginia Scholastic Hockey League title since
2009. . . . T.C. Williams beat Robinson, W.T. Woodson
and Lake Braddock by a goal apiece to win its first Capital
Scholastic Hockey League championship.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Team
Gonzaga
Churchill
DeMatha
O’Connell
Landon
T.C. Williams
Broad Run
Briar Woods
Glenelg
Record
22-5-1
22-2
26-10-2
21-10-2
19-3-1
10-2-1
11-1
10-2-1
10-2
10
Lake Braddock/Park View
8-5-1
MIC SMITH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
College of Charleston’s Joe Chealey, right, was emotional after his
Cougars clinched their first NCAA tournament berth in 19 years.
They’re going dancing
Teams that have earned an automatic berth in the NCAA tournament:
Men
Women
THE TOP 10
Charleston, 26-7 (Colonial)
Baylor, 31-1 (Big 12)
Wrestling
Gonzaga, 30-4 (West Coast)
Belmont, 31-3 (Ohio Valley)
Iona, 20-13 (MAAC)
Connecticut, 32-0 (American)
Lipscomb, 23-9 (Atlantic Sun)
DePaul, 26-7 (Big East)
LIU-Brooklyn, 18-16 (Northeast)
G. Washington, 19-13 (Atlantic 10)
Loyola-Chicago, 28-5 (Mo. Valley)
Gonzaga, 27-5 (West Coast)
Michigan, 28-7 (Big Ten)
Green Bay, 29-3 (Horizon)
Murray State, 26-5 (Ohio Valley)
Mercer, 30-2 (Southern)
Radford, 22-12 (Big South)
Ohio State, 27-6 (Big Ten)
South Dakota State, 28-6 (Summit)
Oregon, 30-4 (Pacific-12)
UNC Greensboro, 27-7 (Southern)
Quinnipiac, 27-5 (MAAC)
Wright State, 25-9 (Horizon)
S. Carolina, 26-6 (Southeastern)
Ryan Lawrence (145 pounds) and Johnny McLaughlin
(126) took home Maryland 2A/1A state titles for
Damascus. . . . Although Battlefield loses four-time
Virginia Class 6 state champion River Curtis, the team
should be strong next season, with three-time champion
Brandon Wittenberg leading a talented crop of returners. . . . At the Maryland 4A/3A state championship,
Huntingtown 113-pounder Blake Jury and 170-pounder
Tristin Breen earned individual championships. . . .
Thomas Mukai, a two-time state champion, returns next
season to help Robinson try to dethrone Battlefield in
Virginia Class 6. . . . Glenelg had six place-winners and
two state champions (132-pounder Jared Thomas and
170-pounder Max Sotka) in the Maryland 2A/1A finals.
. . . Westfield has finished second to Battlefield in its
region tournament each of the past two seasons.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Team
Damascus
Battlefield
Huntingtown
Robinson
Glenelg
Westfield
Spalding
St. John’s
Landon
Record
25-0
9-1
33-2
11-0
23-1
19-3
11-6
19-10
15-6
10
Leonardtown
13-2
South Dakota State, 26-6 (Summit)
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
SU
college basketball
U-Va. gets a ‘full reset’ for postseason
Following dominant
regular season, No. 1 Cavs
prepare for tourney play
BY
G ENE W ANG
charlottesville — Overcome
CHRIS SZAGOLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Coach Dan Hurley and top-seeded Rhode Island are slumping at the
wrong time, having lost three of five heading into the A-10 tourney.
Unpredictability reigns
in the A-10 tournament
If history is any guide,
five-day scramble will
produce plenty of upsets
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
Even before this turbulent and
unpredictable winter, the Atlantic 10 had molded a reputation for
conducting an upset-tinged conference tournament.
Since 2006, the top seed has
been more likely to lose its first
game (five times) than raise the
trophy (twice).
And now this: the season-long
front-runner showing late-year
cracks, a contender that hasn’t
lost in more than six weeks and
eight teams separated by two
games in the final standings.
“It’s going to be fun, and there
are going to be some surprises,”
said George Washington Coach
Maurice Joseph, whose team is
the No. 11 seed. “Hopefully, it’s
us.”
GW and 13 others will gather at
Capital One Arena this week for a
five-day scramble that will reward an automatic berth in the
NCAA tournament and, depending on how it unfolds, perhaps
two at-large invitations.
The festivities will begin
Wednesday with first-round
games involving the bottom four
teams: No. 12 La Salle vs. No. 13
Massachusetts and No. 11 GW vs.
No. 14 Fordham. Another six,
including No. 5 George Mason,
will enter the fray Thursday,
while the top four seeds enjoy
double byes to Friday’s quarterfinals.
It has been a down year for the
A-10. Typically boasting several
teams of national merit, the
league has had just one in the
Associated Press poll all season,
top-seeded Rhode Island, which
this week is ranked 25th. Secondseeded St. Bonaventure, which
has won 12 straight, is next in the
AP voting.
Those two are the only Atlantic
10 representatives in the top 75 of
the Rating Percentage Index, a
strength-of-schedule
formula
that will figure prominently in
the NCAA selection committee’s
at-large choices Sunday. At Nos.
16 and 21 respectively entering
Tuesday, the Rams and Bonnies
are well positioned for at-large
slots, should they fail to win the
league championship.
Another A-10 team doesn’t appear in the RPI until No. 81
(Davidson).
The league earned 26 at-large
berths in the previous 10 seasons
and enjoyed a high of six NCAA
participants in 2014. However,
the worst nonconference winning percentage in 13 years initially dimmed the Atlantic 10’s
hopes of multiple bids.
Rhode Island (23-6) ran away
with the regular season title by
winning its first 13 conference
games, then dropped three of the
last five. St. Bonaventure (24-6)
ended the Rams’ streak Feb. 16.
Davidson’s only setbacks in the
past 10 games were at Rhode
Atlantic 10 tournament
Capital One Arena
Today’s play-in games, Stadium TV
La Salle vs. Massachusetts, 6
G. Washington vs. Fordham, 8:30
Island and at St. Bonaventure, a
117-113 triple-overtime thriller
featuring five players with at least
30 points. The Wildcats avenged
the URI defeat with a late-game
rally at home Friday.
In between the top three and
bottom two seeds, there is not
much separation. At 10-8, only
Saint Joseph’s had a winning
record in conference games. Four
teams finished 9-9 and another at
8-10.
Rhode Island is “still the favorite, in my mind,” George Mason
Coach Dave Paulsen said. “But
certainly the Bonnies and Davidson are playing really well. Anyone can win it. The gap was very
wide early on, but some of the rest
of us made progress figuring out
how we can be effective.”
Without any scholarship seniors or much depth, the Patriots
were predictably erratic. They
went 3-6 in the first half of the
league schedule and 6-3 in the
last half. They followed three
consecutive last-second victories,
all provided by sophomore Ian
Boyd, with a 14-point home defeat to Richmond on Saturday.
If they defeat La Salle or Massachusetts on Thursday, the Patriots would face fourth-seeded
Saint Joseph’s, a team they defeated at the buzzer in both regular season meetings.
“Anyone can win it.”
George Mason Coach Dave Paulsen,
on the upcoming Atlantic 10
men’s basketball tournament
at Capital One Arena.
GW had won four of five before
losing at Dayton on Saturday, a
result that dropped it into the
bottom four.
“We always felt if we were
playing our best basketball in
February and March, we have a
chance to make things happen in
the conference tournament,” said
Joseph, whose team Feb. 28 routed its first-round foe, Fordham,
72-56, at Smith Center. “I think a
lot of coaches are telling their
teams to be confident because of
the amount of parity across the
board.”
Notes: Davidson’s Peyton
Aldridge (21.3 points per game)
and St. Bonaventure’s Jaylen Adams (20.5) shared player of the
year honors, while Rhode Island’s
Dan Hurley received the coaching
award. GW’s Yuta Watanabe was
named defensive player of the
year, and Davidson’s Kellan Grady (17.9 points per game) was the
top rookie. . . .
Aldridge, Adams, VCU’s Justin
Tillman, St. Bonaventure’s Matt
Mobley and Rhode Island’s Jared
Terrell were named first-team allconference. George Mason’s Otis
Livingston II made the second
team and Watanabe the third
team.
steven.goff@washpost.com
with emotion, Virginia men’s basketball player Isaiah Wilkins
wiped away tears and waved
goodbye to supporters who had
remained in the stands last weekend following the regular season
finale for the starting forward
and his fellow seniors.
Wilkins spoke glowingly about
how much he enjoyed playing at
John Paul Jones Arena for four
seasons, but he wasn’t about to
dwell on nostalgia. It didn’t take
long at all, in fact, for Wilkins to
begin looking ahead to the next
assignment this week when the
top-ranked Cavaliers head to
Brooklyn seeking an ACC tournament championship.
Virginia (28-2) is the No. 1 seed
and plays its opener Thursday
afternoon in the quarterfinals
against the winner of Wednesday’s game between No. 8 seed
Florida State and ninth-seeded
Louisville. The Cavaliers went a
combined 3-0 against those opponents during the regular season.
“I think we have to have like a
full reset,” Wilkins said. “There’s a
chapter, and then you close it, and
you’ve just got to be extra prepared. Still play free and things
like that, but I think the way we’ve
prepared up to this point has
been good, from the summertime
until now, so it’s just time to lock
in. You’ve got to give a little bit
more.”
The freshly minted ACC defensive player of the year has done so
for his entire career at Virginia,
even helping to put the finishing
touches on the Cavaliers’ most
recent victory, a 62-57 win over
Notre Dame, by forcing a shotclock violation against the Fighting Irish in the closing minute.
Thus Virginia brings a fivegame winning streak to Barclays
Center after claiming the top seed
weeks ago in the midst of a
record-setting regular season.
The Cavaliers became the first
program to win 17 ACC games in a
single season and to go 9-0 on the
road in a conference that, according to CBSSports.com bracket
specialist Jerry Palm, is third in
the Rating Percentage Index.
Virginia’s last road triumph
came Thursday and produced
one of the most thrilling conclu-
RYAN M. KELLY/GETTY IMAGES
Kyle Guy injured a knee in the regular season finale but said he “should be good to go on Thursday.”
sions to any college basketball
game this season. Trailing Louisville by four with 0.9 seconds left
in the second half, Virginia scored
the final five points unanswered,
including De’Andre Hunter’s
three-pointer off the glass at the
buzzer, for a 67-66 road win.
The improbable finish, players
said, was a fitting way to welcome
college basketball’s most compelling month.
“I think it’s important just not
to overcomplicate things,” said
sophomore point guard Ty Jerome, the Cavaliers’ third-leading
scorer. “We’ve been working all
year, trying to get better every
[game], and we just keep doing
that. We control everything we
can control.”
Unlike some other notable programs in the ACC this season,
including Notre Dame, Clemson,
Miami and Georgia Tech, the Cavaliers enter the postseason having avoided major injuries.
Virginia has not had a player
miss a game because of injury or
illness, but it did receive a scare
Saturday when starting sophomore guard Kyle Guy collided
with Notre Dame forward Martinas Geben.
Guy was running to get around
a Geben screen late in the first
ACC tournament
Barclays Center, Brooklyn
Today’s second round, ESPN
Fla. State vs. Louisville, noon
N.C. State vs. Boston College, 2
Virginia Tech vs. Notre Dame, 7
North Carolina vs. TBD, 9
half and hit knee-to-knee with
the senior listed at 6-foot-10,
252 pounds, immediately collapsing onto the court clutching his
left leg. The Virginia medical
staff assisted Guy to the locker
room, where he received treatment. He came back to the bench
to watch the rest of the first half.
Guy reentered the game in the
second half, missing both of his
field goal attempts while wearing
a brace on his left knee.
Subsequent tests revealed Guy
had a sprained medial collateral
ligament, but he indicated Monday that he expects to be in the
lineup for the Cavaliers’ ACC
tournament opener.
“It hurts like hell, but I should
be good to go on Thursday,” said
Guy, who was named all-ACC first
team. “Apart from my knee, I feel
100 percent ready to go and ready
to go far in the tournament.”
Guy leads Virginia in scoring
(13.9 points per game) and three-
pointers made, although he finished 0 for 4 from the field
against Notre Dame for his first
scoreless showing this season.
Over the past four games, Guy has
scored in double figures once
after 11 such performances in a
row.
With a longer layoff thanks to a
double bye in the ACC tournament, Virginia Coach Tony Bennett was able to give Guy and the
rest of the players the day off
Sunday and have a light practice
Monday before departing for
New York the following morning.
Guy looked to be on the mend
during Monday’s workout, according to Bennett.
“When you see someone go
down and grab their knee like
that, the first thing you think of is,
‘Man, I hope their ACL is okay,’ ”
Bennett said, referring to the anterior cruciate ligament. “You
don’t know, but they checked him
at halftime, and as we said, I got
the okay he could play, and he
looked like he had a brace on it,
and I’m sure he was a little sore.
“It was a concern, but I think
once he was able to go on the floor
and you could see him moving, I
think it made everybody feel better.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
Big East stars prove to be those who stick around
BIG EAST FROM D1
easy to say that, but it’s hard to
make those decisions.”
In the 16-plus seasons that
Wright has helmed the Wildcats,
the scales have always tipped
toward players who want to be a
part of the culture more than players for whom college is the necessary stopover before the NBA.
No player of Wright’s has ever
left school for the pros after just
one season, and though Villanova
has become a poster child for players sticking around college for
three or four years, Wright isn’t
alone in the Big East.
When the Big East tournament
gets underway at Madison Square
Garden on Wednesday, the players
to watch will all be juniors and
seniors, such as Villanova’s Jalen
Brunson, Xavier’s J.P. Macura and
Seton Hall’s Desi Rodriguez. The
starting lineups will be full of
upperclassmen, especially compared with the other larger conference tournaments starting this
week. There won’t be a one-anddone in sight.
Since its realignment before the
2014-15 season, the 10-program
league has had just two one-anddone players in Marquette’s Henry
Ellenson, who left in 2016, and
Creighton’s Justin Patton, who actually spent two years in school
but played only one season after
being redshirted. In comparison,
of the 54 one-and-dones in college
basketball since 2014, 15 of them
played in the ACC; 12 in the Pacific-12; and 11 in the Southeastern.
The lack of short-stay talent
hasn’t hurt the Big East’s national
standing. In the past few years, the
league has solidified its brand and
spawned a national champion in
Villanova, and this season, it
boasts two programs with résumés
worthy of No. 1 seeds in the NCAA
tournament. More teams without
one-and-done players have made
the Final Four since 2014 than
teams that had at least one.
Some Big East coaches, such as
Wright and Chris Mack, whose
Xavier team is the No. 1 seed in
AARON DOSTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Coach Chris Mack’s Xavier team is the Big East’s top seed: “Player
development has certainly been a hallmark of this conference.”
One-and-done players from 2014 to 2017, by conference
0
5
10
15
ACC
15
Pacific-12
12
SEC
11
Big 12
7
Big Ten
4
Big East
2*
Mountain West
West Coast Conference
2
1
*In 2017, Creighton redshirt freshman Justin Patton left the Bluejays after playing
just one season, but he was with the program for two years.
Source: NBA
this week’s tournament, think the
lack of one-and-dones jibes with
the brand the conference is trying
to sell.
“Player development has certainly been a hallmark of this
conference,” Mack said on a teleconference. “. . . Just being able to
make a guy better, own his skills
and still think team-first, I think,
has been a trademark of our
THE WASHINGTON POST
league and something that, at
least in our program, we’re really
proud of.”
Said Wright: “It’s because all of
us have very similar programs,
and that’s why the league was
formed. All the schools have great
tradition, academics are very important, graduation rates are very
high, so the culture at each of
these schools is such that you’re
coming here to be a part of us.”
At the same time, coaches are
aware that the league’s reputation
trickles down to high school recruits. Not every program in the
Big East has Wright’s dilemma
when it comes to recruiting, but
for those who can attract one-anddone-level talent, they spend a
considerable amount of energy
convincing those kids that they
are wanted.
“I don’t want to speak for every
coach, but I would be hardpressed to think that coaches in
our league wouldn’t want to have
a talented player that may be a
one-and-done,” Mack said. “To
throw all those guys in one bucket
and say they’re disinterested in
college, or it’s all about them, I
think would be doing a disservice
to some great players.”
“It’s hard to get a young person
to understand that we believe that
you can come in, be a part of our
culture and be one-and-done,”
Wright said. “It’s hard for them to
comprehend that, and then we
battle that in recruiting, where
everyone tells the guys that we
don’t want one-and-done guys. We
do. We just want them to believe
that if you come in and be a part of
our culture, you can do it in one
year.”
Wright’s quest is a common
theme among Big East coaches.
They don’t want just any one-anddone; they want the right oneand-done.
Georgetown Coach Patrick Ewing doesn’t hold NBA ambition
against any college recruit and has
made a point to make his NBA
experience and connections part
of his pitch on recruiting trips.
But even he wants a one-anddone who cares about Georgetown’s tradition.
“If I was in this era, I probably
would have been a one-and-done,”
Ewing said. “If I have the opportunity to get a one-and-done, I’m
taking it. But one of the things I
would love for that person to do if
he does come is come back, finish,
and get your degree.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
scoreboard
BA S KETBA L L
HOCKEY
NBA
NCAA men
NHL
Jets 3, Rangers 0
EASTERN CONFERENCE
TUESDAY’S TOURNAMENT RESULTS
AMERICA EAST CONFERENCE
SEMIFINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
WINNIPEG ............................... 1
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 0
ATLANTIC
W
Toronto ......................................46
Boston........................................45
Philadelphia ...............................35
New York ...................................24
x-Brooklyn .................................20
L
17
20
28
41
44
Pct
.730
.692
.556
.369
.313
GB
—
2
11
23
261/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................37
Miami.........................................34
Charlotte....................................28
Orlando ......................................20
Atlanta.......................................20
L
28
31
37
44
45
Pct
.569
.523
.431
.313
.308
GB
—
3
9
161/2
17
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................37
Indiana .......................................37
Milwaukee .................................34
Detroit .......................................29
Chicago ......................................21
L
26
27
30
35
42
Pct
.587
.578
.531
.453
.333
GB
—
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................50
x-New Orleans...........................36
San Antonio ...............................37
Dallas .........................................20
Memphis ....................................18
L
13
26
27
45
45
Pct
.794
.581
.578
.308
.286
GB
—
131/2
131/2
31
32
NORTHWEST
W
Portland .....................................39
Minnesota..................................38
Oklahoma City ...........................37
Denver........................................35
Utah ...........................................34
L
26
28
29
29
30
Pct
.600
.576
.561
.547
.531
GB
—
11/2
21/2
31/2
41/2
1/
2
31/2
81/2
16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
L
14
28
35
44
47
Pct
.778
.548
.444
.313
.288
GB
—
141/2
21
291/2
311/2
x-late game
Cleveland 112, Detroit 90
Indiana 92, Milwaukee 89
Miami 125, Phoenix 103
Boston 105, Chicago 89
San Antonio 100, Memphis 98
Utah 94, Orlando 80
Portland 108, L.A. Lakers 103
BIG SKY CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
N. Colorado 82, N. Arizona 59
North Dakota 76, Montana St. 74
S. Utah 76, Idaho St. 68
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
CHAMPIONSHIP
HORIZON LEAGUE
CHAMPIONSHIP
Wright St. 74, Cleveland St. 57
MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
Florida A&M 88, Howard 78
N.C. Central 60, Coppin St. 48
NORTHEAST CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
LIU Brooklyn 71, Wagner 61
SOUTHWESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
Ark.-Pine Bluff 77, MVSU 73
WEST COAST CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
No. 6 Gonzaga 74, BYU 54
BYU (24-10)
Childs 7-16 3-4 20, Worthington 0-3 0-0 0, Bryant 5-14
0-0 11, Hardnett 1-4 0-0 2, Haws 2-8 0-0 4, Nixon 1-2 0-0
2, Dastrup 4-7 1-1 11, Bergersen 1-2 0-0 2, Seljaas 0-3
0-0 0, Cannon 1-3 0-0 2. 22-62 Totals 4-5 54.
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Gonzaga (30-4)
Williams 4-9 2-3 10, Tillie 9-13 1-1 22, Norvell 5-11 3-3
17, Perkins 5-13 0-0 11, Melson 2-7 0-0 6, Jones 1-2 0-0 2,
Hachimura 2-6 0-0 4, Kispert 1-1 0-0 2, Larsen 0-0 0-0 0,
Wade 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-62 6-7 74.
Philadelphia 128, Charlotte 114
Toronto 106, Atlanta 90
Washington 117, Miami 113, OT
Houston 122, Oklahoma City 112
Dallas 118, Denver 107
Portland 111, New York 87
Brooklyn at Golden State, Late
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, Late
Halftime: Gonzaga 38-29. Three-point goals: BYU 6-19
(Childs 3-4, Dastrup 2-2, Bryant 1-5, Bergersen 0-1,
Hardnett 0-1, Nixon 0-1, Haws 0-1, Seljaas 0-2, Cannon
0-2), Gonzaga 10-23 (Norvell 4-8, Tillie 3-4, Melson 2-4,
Perkins 1-7). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: BYU 31
(Childs 8), Gonzaga 38 (Williams 13). Assists: BYU 7
(Bryant, Hardnett, Haws 2), Gonzaga 15 (Perkins 8).
Total fouls: BYU 11, Gonzaga 6.
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Utah at Indiana, 7
Houston at Milwaukee, 8
Memphis at Chicago, 8
Toronto at Detroit, 8
New Orleans at Sacramento, 10
Cleveland at Denver, 10:30
Orlando at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
UMBC 75, Hartford 60
Hartford (19-13)
Carroll 6-13 3-5 15, Attia 0-0 3-8 3, Lynch 3-8 1-2 8,
Weatherington 3-6 0-0 8, Dunne 5-16 1-4 15, Hobbs 2-5
0-0 6, Blagojevic 2-3 0-2 5, Twyman 0-0 0-0 0, Ramirez
0-1 0-0 0, Plousis 0-0 0-2 0. 21-52 Totals 8-23 60.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Brooklyn at Charlotte, 7
Philadelphia at Miami, 7:30
Boston at Minnesota, 8
Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 8
San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30
UMBC (23-10)
Akin 0-0 1-2 1, Lyles 6-16 0-1 13, Maura 6-11 3-4 18,
Sherburne 3-10 4-4 11, Lamar 4-6 2-4 13, Curran 2-3 0-2
4, Gerrity 2-4 0-0 4, Grant 3-5 3-4 11. Totals 26-55 13-21
75.
Rockets 122, Thunder 112
28
21
33
29
35 — 122
38 — 112
HOUSTON: Ariza 4-8 4-4 15, Tucker 4-8 0-2 10, Capela
4-6 2-4 10, Paul 7-14 6-6 25, Harden 8-13 6-7 23, Mbah a
Moute 3-3 4-4 11, Nene 3-5 2-2 8, Gordon 3-7 5-5 14,
Green 2-7 0-0 6. Totals 38-71 29-34 122.
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 7-16 1-2 17, Anthony 8-18 3-4
23, Adams 7-9 2-3 16, Westbrook 15-27 2-2 32, Huestis
1-2 0-0 3, Brewer 4-10 0-0 10, Grant 1-2 0-0 3, Patterson
0-1 0-0 0, D.Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Felton 3-8 0-0 8, Abrines
0-0 0-0 0, Ferguson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 46-93 8-11 112.
Three-point Goals: Houston 17-33 (Paul 5-6, Ariza 3-5,
Gordon 3-6, Tucker 2-5, Green 2-7, Mbah a Moute 1-1,
Harden 1-3), Oklahoma City 12-34 (Anthony 4-10, Felton
2-3, Brewer 2-6, George 2-8, Huestis 1-1, Grant 1-2,
Westbrook 0-4). Fouled Out: Brewer. Rebounds: Houston 37 (Tucker 6), Oklahoma City 33 (Adams 8). Assists:
Houston 25 (Harden 11), Oklahoma City 18 (Westbrook
7). Total Fouls: Houston 20, Oklahoma City 28.
76ers 128, Hornets 114
39
30
30
32
27 — 128
23 — 114
PHILADELPHIA: Covington 7-11 3-3 22, Saric 7-11 1-2
19, Embiid 8-16 2-2 18, Simmons 8-9 0-0 16, Redick 4-8
3-4 14, Holmes 0-3 0-0 0, Johnson 3-4 0-0 7, Ilyasova 4-7
1-2 11, McConnell 4-7 0-0 8, Luwawu-Cabarrot 1-1 0-0 2,
Belinelli 4-9 2-2 11, Anderson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 50-87
12-15 128.
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 1-2 3-4 5, Williams 4-10 0-0
11, Howard 12-17 5-7 30, Walker 1-9 3-6 5, Batum 3-5
4-4 12, Bacon 0-0 0-0 0, Kaminsky 4-9 2-2 11, Hernangomez 0-0 1-2 1, Zeller 4-4 0-0 8, Monk 3-10 2-2 9,
Graham 5-9 1-2 12, Stone 0-0 0-0 0, Lamb 3-5 2-2 10.
Totals 40-80 23-31 114.
Three-point Goals: Philadelphia 16-33 (Covington 5-9,
Saric 4-7, Redick 3-5, Ilyasova 2-3, Johnson 1-1, Belinelli
1-5, Embiid 0-3), Charlotte 11-29 (Williams 3-7, Lamb
2-2, Batum 2-3, Howard 1-1, Kaminsky 1-2, Graham 1-3,
Monk 1-6, Walker 0-5). Rebounds: Philadelphia 44
(Simmons 8), Charlotte 33 (Howard 6). Assists: Philadelphia 35 (Simmons 13), Charlotte 26 (Batum 10). Total
Fouls: Philadelphia 20, Charlotte 12. Technicals: Embiid,
Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second),
Kidd-Gilchrist 2, Howard. Ejected: Kidd-Gilchrist.
Raptors 106, Hawks 90
ATLANTA ........................... 28
TORONTO ........................... 27
Boston College 87, Georgia Tech 77
Notre Dame 67, Pittsburgh 64
Syracuse 73, Wake Forest 64
Gonzaga 74, BYU 54
MONDAY’S RESULTS
PHILADELPHIA .................. 32
CHARLOTTE ....................... 29
ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
Coll. of Charleston 83, Northeastern 76, OT
PACIFIC
W
x-Golden State...........................49
x-L.A. Clippers ...........................34
L.A. Lakers .................................28
Sacramento ...............................20
Phoenix ......................................19
HOUSTON ........................... 26
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 24
UMBC 75, Hartford 60
Vermont 70, Stony Brook 51
23
23
26
26
13 — 90
30 — 106
ATLANTA: Prince 3-6 1-2 9, Collins 6-12 2-2 14, Dedmon
4-6 4-4 12, Schroder 4-13 1-2 11, Bazemore 6-8 0-0 14,
Muscala 0-2 5-6 5, Plumlee 4-9 1-2 9, Taylor 1-7 0-0 2,
Magette 0-0 0-0 0, Dorsey 4-13 2-3 10, Morris 2-4 0-0 4.
Totals 34-80 16-21 90.
TORONTO: Miller 1-3 2-2 5, Ibaka 2-10 4-4 10, Valanciunas 4-11 7-8 15, Lowry 2-6 0-0 4, DeRozan 6-12 12-14 25,
Powell 1-3 2-2 5, McKinnie 0-0 0-0 0, Miles 5-11 0-1 14,
Siakam 4-7 0-0 8, Poeltl 3-8 0-0 6, Nogueira 0-0 0-0 0,
VanVleet 1-7 1-2 4, Wright 5-10 0-0 10. Totals 34-88
28-33 106.
Three-point Goals: Atlanta 6-21 (Schroder 2-3, Bazemore 2-3, Prince 2-5, Collins 0-1, Muscala 0-1, Taylor
0-1, Morris 0-1, Dedmon 0-2, Dorsey 0-4), Toronto 10-36
(Miles 4-9, Ibaka 2-7, Powell 1-2, DeRozan 1-2, Miller
1-3, VanVleet 1-4, Siakam 0-1, Wright 0-2, Valanciunas
0-2, Lowry 0-4). Rebounds: Atlanta 44 (Dedmon 10),
Toronto 45 (Poeltl 9). Assists: Atlanta 22 (Bazemore 5),
Toronto 25 (Lowry, VanVleet 7). Total Fouls: Atlanta 25,
Toronto 21. Technicals: Lowry, DeRozan.
Halftime: UMBC 32-25. Three-point goals: Hartford
10-29 (Dunne 4-11, Hobbs 2-4, Weatherington 2-5,
Blagojevic 1-2, Lynch 1-5, Ramirez 0-1, Carroll 0-1),
UMBC 10-27 (Lamar 3-4, Maura 3-7, Grant 2-4, Sherburne 1-5, Lyles 1-7). Fouled out: Lyles, Lynch, Weatherington, Carroll, Dunne. Rebounds: Hartford 32
(Blagojevic 8), UMBC 37 (Sherburne 9). Assists: Hartford 11 (Lynch, Dunne 4), UMBC 15 (Maura 5). Total
fouls: Hartford 26, UMBC 19. Technical fouls: Attia,
Hartford coach John Gallagher, Lyles.
Coll. Of Charleston 83,
Northeastern 76 (OT)
Northeastern (23-10)
Green 1-1 0-0 2, Gresham 2-8 2-3 8, Occeus 7-10 1-1 19,
Pusica 10-20 4-5 30, Boursiquot 5-11 0-0 12, Murphy 1-2
0-0 2, Begley 0-1 0-0 0, Brace 1-2 0-0 3. 27-55 Totals 7-9
76.
Coll. Of Charleston (26-7)
Brantley 8-15 2-2 18, Harris 0-1 0-0 0, Johnson 2-3 0-0 4,
Riller 7-17 3-4 20, Chealey 7-16 16-16 32, McManus 0-2
0-0 0, Ndiaye 0-0 0-0 0, Pointer 3-4 0-0 9. Totals 27-58
21-22 83.
Halftime: Northeastern 36-23. End Of Regulation_Tied
65. Three-point goals: Northeastern 15-27 (Pusica 6-11,
Occeus 4-6, Boursiquot 2-3, Gresham 2-5, Brace 1-2),
Coll. of Charleston 8-20 (Pointer 3-3, Riller 3-8, Chealey
2-5, Johnson 0-1, McManus 0-1, Brantley 0-2). Fouled
out: Gresham. Rebounds: Northeastern 29 (Gresham
12), Coll. of Charleston 29 (Brantley 11). Assists:
Northeastern 17 (Gresham, Pusica, Green 4), Coll. of
Charleston 8 (Chealey 3). Total fouls: Northeastern 17,
Coll. of Charleston 14. A: 7,945 (11,500).
37
29
23
38
22 — 107
22 — 118
Wake Forest (11-20)
Thompson 1-2 0-0 3, Moore 3-5 1-1 7, Crawford 8-16 3-3
22, Brown 2-7 2-2 7, Wilbekin 1-5 0-0 3, Okeke 0-2 0-0 0,
Rike 1-1 0-0 2, Mitchell 1-3 0-0 2, Sarr 1-4 0-0 2, Childress
4-9 3-3 11, Woods 1-9 3-4 5, Bilas 0-0 0-0 0, Spivey 0-1
0-0 0. 23-64 Totals 12-13 64.
Syracuse (20-12)
Dolezaj 6-7 8-10 20, Brissett 2-11 6-8 10, Chukwu 6-7 2-2
14, Howard 4-8 1-2 11, Battle 5-9 6-7 18, Moyer 0-0 0-0 0,
Herlihy 0-0 0-0 0, Sidibe 0-0 0-0 0, Belbey 0-0 0-0 0,
Featherston 0-0 0-0 0, Bayer 0-0 0-0 0, Autry 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 23-42 23-29 73.
Halftime: Syracuse 30-24. Three-point goals: Wake
Forest 6-29 (Crawford 3-8, Thompson 1-1, Brown 1-3,
Wilbekin 1-5, Spivey 0-1, Mitchell 0-2, Childress 0-4,
Woods 0-5), Syracuse 4-17 (Battle 2-5, Howard 2-6,
Brissett 0-6). Fouled out: Battle. Rebounds: Wake
Forest 28 (Okeke 6), Syracuse 33 (Chukwu, Brissett 9).
Assists: Wake Forest 16 (Crawford 6), Syracuse 13
(Howard 5). Total fouls: Wake Forest 21, Syracuse 18. A:
10,612 (17,732).
Notre Dame 67, Pittsburgh 64
Pittsburgh (8-24)
Brown 3-6 0-0 6, Carr 5-10 6-9 18, Stewart 5-13 0-0 14,
Davis 0-4 0-0 0, Wilson-Frame 7-15 1-2 18, Chukwuka
1-4 0-0 2, Milligan 2-4 0-0 4, Stevenson 1-5 0-0 2. 24-61
Totals 7-11 64.
Notre Dame (19-13)
Geben 2-6 0-0 4, Colson 5-14 9-10 19, Pflueger 3-7 5-6 13,
Farrell 4-11 7-9 18, Gibbs 3-10 5-6 11, Mooney 1-4 0-0 2,
Djogo 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 18-53 26-31 67.
Halftime: Notre Dame 36-24. Three-point goals: Pittsburgh 9-33 (Stewart 4-11, Wilson-Frame 3-10, Carr 2-4,
Brown 0-1, Milligan 0-1, Chukwuka 0-1, Stevenson 0-2,
Davis 0-3), Notre Dame 5-19 (Farrell 3-8, Pflueger 2-4,
Colson 0-3, Gibbs 0-4). Fouled out: Brown, Chukwuka.
Rebounds: Pittsburgh 26 (Stewart 5), Notre Dame 36
(Geben, Mooney 9). Assists: Pittsburgh 11 (Stevenson
4), Notre Dame 7 (Farrell 3). Total fouls: Pittsburgh 25,
Notre Dame 11.
NCAA women
TUESDAY’S TOURNAMENT RESULTS
DENVER: Chandler 7-12 4-6 21, Millsap 3-10 6-6 12, Jokic
2-9 0-1 4, Murray 2-8 1-1 6, G.Harris 5-13 0-0 11, Lyles
4-7 1-3 10, Plumlee 4-5 2-2 10, D.Harris 3-9 0-0 7, Barton
5-15 3-4 16, Beasley 3-4 3-3 10. Totals 38-92 20-26 107.
AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
DALLAS: Barnes 7-18 1-3 15, Nowitzki 6-11 0-0 17,
Powell 5-9 4-5 14, Smith Jr. 7-16 2-2 18, Ferrell 9-11 0-0
24, McDermott 4-8 6-6 15, Noel 3-6 2-5 8, Barea 2-9 2-2 7,
Collinsworth 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 43-90 17-23 118.
BIG EAST CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
Three-point Goals: Denver 11-36 (Chandler 3-5, Barton
3-7, Beasley 1-2, Lyles 1-3, Murray 1-4, D.Harris 1-5,
G.Harris 1-5, Millsap 0-1, Jokic 0-4), Dallas 15-27 (Ferrell
6-7, Nowitzki 5-7, Smith Jr. 2-6, McDermott 1-2, Barea
1-4, Barnes 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Denver 49
(Jokic 9), Dallas 51 (Noel 14). Assists: Denver 23 (Barton
7), Dallas 24 (Smith Jr. 11). Total Fouls: Denver 16,
Dallas 20. Technicals: Dallas coach Rick Carlisle. A:
19,504 (19,200).
Blazers 111, Knicks 87
NEW YORK ......................... 28
PORTLAND ......................... 35
24
22
19
30
16 — 87
24 — 111
NEW YORK: Hardaway Jr. 8-18 0-0 19, Thomas 2-2 0-0 6,
Kanter 6-9 6-6 18, Ntilikina 2-7 2-2 6, Mudiay 1-9 1-1 3,
Williams 3-5 1-2 8, Hicks 0-1 0-0 0, Beasley 8-13 0-0 16,
Kornet 1-2 0-0 3, O’Quinn 1-3 0-0 2, Burke 2-12 0-4 4,
Dotson 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 35-83 10-15 87.
PORTLAND: Turner 3-7 2-2 8, Aminu 2-3 0-0 6, Nurkic 5-8
1-1 11, Lillard 10-18 9-11 37, McCollum 7-18 0-0 19,
Layman 0-1 0-0 0, Swanigan 1-1 0-0 2, Davis 1-5 0-0 2,
Collins 1-7 2-2 5, Napier 2-5 6-6 12, Connaughton 3-8 0-0
8, Baldwin IV 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 35-81 21-24 111.
Three-point Goals: New York 7-19 (Hardaway Jr. 3-6,
Thomas 2-2, Williams 1-2, Kornet 1-2, Beasley 0-1,
Ntilikina 0-1, Mudiay 0-2, Burke 0-3), Portland 20-33
(Lillard 8-11, McCollum 5-7, Aminu 2-2, Napier 2-3,
Connaughton 2-6, Collins 1-3, Turner 0-1). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: New York 39 (Kanter 11), Portland 51
(Davis 14). Assists: New York 21 (Burke 7), Portland 22
(Napier, Nurkic, Turner, McCollum 4). Total Fouls: New
York 19, Portland 15. A: 19,393 (19,393).
W
37
38
34
34
34
29
29
30
L
22
25
21
25
28
27
29
31
OL PTS. GF GA
7
81 203 197
4
80 219 203
11
79 197 193
8
76 199 203
5
73 180 187
11
69 178 204
9
67 216 241
6
66 189 212
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
46
41
39
32
26
25
23
21
L
17
15
22
25
29
30
32
34
OL PTS. GF GA
4
96 245 186
8
90 215 163
7
85 223 195
7
71 193 204
11
63 175 199
11
61 171 206
10
56 177 227
11
53 159 214
U-Conn. 70, South Florida 54
Pittsburgh 4, Calgary 3 (OT)
Buffalo 5, Toronto 3
Ottawa 3, Dallas 2 (OT)
Edmonton 4, Arizona 3 (OT)
Vancouver 4, N.Y. Islanders 3 (OT)
0
0
0 — 1
1 — 2
SECOND PERIOD
OVERTIME
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Colorado at Columbus, 7
Winnipeg at New Jersey, 7
Philadelphia at Boston, 7
Buffalo at Ottawa, 7:30
Montreal at Florida, 7:30
Vegas at Detroit, 7:30
N.Y. Rangers at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Anaheim at Nashville, 8
Carolina at Chicago, 8:30
N.Y. Islanders at Edmonton, 9
Washington at Los Angeles, 10:30
St. Louis at San Jose, 10:30
SHOTS ON GOAL
COLORADO ........................ 9
18
7 — 34
CHICAGO .......................... 12
7
7
1 — 27
Power-play opportunities: Colorado 1 of 3; Chicago 0 of 2.
Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 18-13-5 (27 shots-25
saves). Chicago, Berube 2-1-0 (34-33). A: 21,508
(19,717). T: 2:25.
G
40
37
36
35
35
34
33
31
31
31
30
30
29
29
29
28
28
27
27
ASSISTS
Predators 2, Stars 0
DALLAS .................................... 0
NASHVILLE .............................. 0
0
0
0 —
2 —
0
2
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Nashville, Hartman 10 (Sissons, Watson),
5:33. 2, Nashville, Bonino 10, 19:46.
SHOTS ON GOAL
DALLAS .................................... 9
7
10 — 26
NASHVILLE .............................. 9
14
11 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Dallas 0 of 4; Nashville 0 of 5.
Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 11-6-2 (33 shots-32 saves).
Nashville, Rinne 35-9-4 (26-26).
Lightning 5, Panthers 4 (OT)
1
2
2
0
0 — 4
1 — 5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Gourde 23 (Sustr, Stralman),
10:38. 2, Tampa Bay, Miller 15 (Gourde), 12:51. 3,
Florida, Bjugstad 12 (Ekblad, Barkov), 18:23.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Tampa Bay, Gourde 24 (Miller), 1:27. 5,
Florida, Bjugstad 13 (Dadonov, Yandle), 13:35. 6, Tampa
Bay, Killorn 13 (Kucherov, Stamkos), 16:07.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 7, Florida, Bjugstad 14 (Barkov, Matheson),
0:21. 8, Florida, Trocheck 25 (Barkov, Yandle), 5:25 (pp).
OVERTIME
Scoring: 9, Tampa Bay, Point 27 (Johnson, Stralman),
2:49.
FLORIDA .......................... 18
14
16
1 — 49
TAMPA BAY ...................... 9
12
11
1 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Florida 1 of 2; Tampa Bay 0 of
0. Goalies: Florida, Luongo 12-7-2 (33 shots-28 saves).
Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 39-12-3 (49-45).
Bruins 6, Red Wings 5 (OT)
2
2
1
0
0 — 5
1 — 6
PLAYER
GP
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ............................ 66
Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg ................................ 65
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ............................. 66
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ............................... 67
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 64
Mathew Barzal, N.Y. Islanders
... 67
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ............................. 66
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 66
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 67
John Klingberg, Dallas ..................................... 66
Josh Bailey, N.Y. Islanders
... 63
Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh ............................... 67
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 57
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 63
Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles ............................... 66
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington ...................... 65
Jonathan Marchessault, Vegas
... 62
David Perron, Vegas
... 59
A
57
56
55
54
52
51
50
50
49
49
48
48
46
45
44
44
43
43
POWER-PLAY GOALS
PLAYER
GP
Patrik Laine, Winnipeg ..................................... 65
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 66
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 63
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 65
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ......................................... 66
Patric Hornqvist, Pittsburgh ............................ 55
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 57
Ryan O'Reilly, Buffalo ...................................... 65
Vincent Trocheck, Florida ................................. 63
Artem Anisimov, Chicago ................................ 56
Brock Boeser, Vancouver ................................. 62
Filip Forsberg, Nashville .................................. 51
Taylor Hall, New Jersey ................................... 61
Mikko Rantanen, Colorado ............................... 64
Wayne Simmonds, Philadelphia ...................... 59
Eric Staal, Minnesota ....................................... 66
Matthew Tkachuk, Calgary .............................. 65
Mika Zibanejad, N.Y. Rangers
... 57
PP
17
15
13
12
12
11
11
11
11
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
POWER PLAY ASSISTS
PLAYER
GP PPA
Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg ................................ 65
28
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ............................ 66
27
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 67
26
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 64
25
Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh ............................... 67
24
Josh Bailey, N.Y. Islanders
... 63
23
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ............................. 66
23
John Carlson, Washington ............................... 65
21
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ............................... 67
20
Shayne Gostisbehere, Philadelphia ................. 62
20
John Klingberg, Dallas ..................................... 66
19
Ryan Suter, Minnesota .................................... 66
19
Tyson Barrie, Colorado ..................................... 51
18
Victor Hedman, Tampa Bay ............................. 61
18
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington ...................... 65
18
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 63
18
Brent Burns, San Jose ...................................... 66
17
Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles ............................... 66
17
POWER-PLAY POINTS
Scoring: 11, Boston, Marchand 28 (Ril.Nash, Krug), 0:34.
PLAYER
GP
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 67
Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg ................................ 65
Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh ............................... 67
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ............................. 66
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 64
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 63
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 66
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ............................ 66
Josh Bailey, N.Y. Islanders
... 63
Patrik Laine, Winnipeg ..................................... 65
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 57
Mikko Rantanen, Colorado ............................... 64
John Carlson, Washington ............................... 65
Shayne Gostisbehere, Philadelphia ................. 62
Taylor Hall, New Jersey ................................... 61
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 65
Brock Boeser, Vancouver ................................. 62
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ............................... 67
Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles ............................... 66
SHOTS ON GOAL
SHORTHANDED POINTS
DETROIT ............................ 9
14
12 — 35
BOSTON ........................... 14
10
11
2 — 37
Power-play opportunities: Detroit 1 of 5; Boston 2 of 4.
Goalies: Detroit, Coreau 0-0-0 (16 shots-12 saves),
Howard 18-22-8 (21-19). Boston, Khudobin 15-4-4 (3530). A: 17,565 (17,565). T: 2:44.
PLAYER
GP SHP
Aleksander Barkov, Florida .............................. 62
5
Brian Gibbons, New Jersey .............................. 45
4
Derek MacKenzie, Florida ................................ 58
4
Ryan O'Reilly, Buffalo ...................................... 65
4
Brayden Point, Tampa Bay ............................... 66
4
Brandon Sutter, Vancouver ............................. 45
4
Patrice Bergeron, Boston ................................. 55
3
Logan Couture, San Jose .................................. 62
3
Leon Draisaitl, Edmonton ................................ 62
3
Darren Helm, Detroit ....................................... 58
3
Adam Henrique, Anaheim ................................ 65
3
Tomas Hertl, San Jose ..................................... 63
3
Evander Kane, San Jose ................................... 64
3
Dylan Larkin, Detroit ........................................ 65
3
Mark Letestu, Edmonton ................................. 64
3
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ............................. 66
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Boston, Krug 12 (Holden, Marchand), 0:37. 2,
Boston, DeBrusk 14, 0:52. 3, Detroit, Nielsen 14 (Zetterberg), 2:16 (pp). 4, Detroit, Green 7 (Athanasiou,
Mantha), 7:53. 5, Boston, Krug 13 (Marchand, Pastrnak),
13:48 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Boston, Marchand 26 (Krug, Pastrnak), 3:27
(pp). 7, Detroit, Mantha 22 (Bertuzzi, Green), 12:05. 8,
Boston, Marchand 27 (Pastrnak, Ril.Nash), 13:18. 9,
Detroit, Mantha 23, 15:50.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 10, Detroit, Frk 11 (Bertuzzi, Mantha), 9:46.
OVERTIME
Devils 6, Canadiens 4
MONTREAL .............................. 0
NEW JERSEY ........................... 4
2
2
2 —
0 —
4
6
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, New Jersey, Noesen 10 (Zajac, Butcher), 8:25.
2, New Jersey, Coleman 7 (Boyle, Butcher), 16:33. 3, New
Jersey, Zajac 9 (Palmieri, Vatanen), 18:08 (pp). 4, New
Jersey, Zajac 10 (Vatanen, Hall), 19:48 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Montreal, Gallagher 24 (Byron, Petry), 10:27.
6, New Jersey, Maroon 15 (Hall, Palmieri), 11:36 (pp). 7,
New Jersey, Boyle 12 (Coleman), 16:14. 8, Montreal, de
la Rose 2 (Benn, Danault), 19:46.
THIRD PERIOD
MONTREAL .............................. 5
16
12 — 33
NEW JERSEY ......................... 17
7
9 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Montreal 0 of 2; New Jersey 3
of 5. Goalies: Montreal, Lindgren 4-5-2 (33 shots-27
saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 16-9-2 (33-29).
SOUTHWESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
FIRST PERIOD
PPP
35
34
32
31
31
31
31
31
28
26
26
26
25
25
25
25
23
23
22
SHOTS
PLAYER
GP
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 65
Brent Burns, San Jose ...................................... 66
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ......................................... 66
Vladimir Tarasenko, St. Louis
... 66
Evander Kane, San Jose ................................... 64
Patrick Kane, Chicago ....................................... 66
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 64
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 67
Jeff Skinner, Carolina ....................................... 66
Taylor Hall, New Jersey ................................... 61
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ............................. 66
Vincent Trocheck, Florida ................................. 63
Seth Jones, Columbus ...................................... 66
Brendan Gallagher, Montreal ........................... 65
Dougie Hamilton, Calgary ................................ 67
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 57
Tyler Toffoli, Los Angeles ................................ 66
Rick Nash, Boston ............................................ 64
Max Pacioretty, Montreal ................................ 64
Mike Hoffman, Ottawa .................................... 65
S
279
271
266
258
236
236
229
225
223
222
221
220
219
215
214
213
213
212
212
210
PLUS/MINUS
1
2
0 —
1 —
1
4
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Panarin 21 (Atkinson, Dubois),
0:16.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Vegas, Haula 24 (Perron, Tuch), 1:30. 3,
Columbus, Werenski 13 (Panarin, Dubois), 8:01. 4,
Columbus, Cole 4 (Wennberg, Savard), 9:47.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Columbus, Dubois 15 (Panarin), 17:39.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VEGAS ................................... 19
12
7 — 38
COLUMBUS .............................. 9
5
7 — 21
Power-play opportunities: Vegas 0 of 2; Columbus 0 of 2.
Goalies: Vegas, Fleury 22-9-3 (20 shots-17 saves).
Columbus, Korpisalo 6-7-0 (38-37).
T PTS
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
2
2
2
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
GA
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
2
2
2
4
WESTERN
W
Houston ...........................1
San Jose ...........................1
LA Galaxy .........................1
Vancouver ........................1
Los Angeles FC ................1
Real Salt Lake ..................0
Dallas ...............................0
Colorado ...........................0
Minnesota United ............0
Portland ...........................0
Seattle .............................0
Sporting KC ......................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
T PTS
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
0
3
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
GF
4
3
2
2
1
1
1
0
2
1
0
0
GA
0
2
1
1
0
1
1
0
3
2
1
2
PLAYER
GP
William Karlsson, Vegas
... 65
Reilly Smith, Vegas
... 65
Jonathan Marchessault, Vegas
... 62
Brad Marchand, Boston .................................... 50
Yanni Gourde, Tampa Bay ................................ 66
Victor Hedman, Tampa Bay ............................. 61
Patrice Bergeron, Boston ................................. 55
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ........................... 66
Charlie McAvoy, Boston ................................... 59
Patrik Nemeth, Colorado .................................. 51
Zdeno Chara, Boston ........................................ 63
Dustin Brown, Los Angeles .............................. 65
Josh Manson, Anaheim .................................... 66
Auston Matthews, Toronto ............................. 53
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 66
Jonas Brodin, Minnesota ................................. 57
Radek Faksa, Dallas ......................................... 64
Dan Girardi, Tampa Bay ................................... 61
Zach Hyman, Toronto ....................................... 68
Nate Schmidt, Vegas
... 63
D.C. United 1, Orlando City 1, tie
Columbus 2, Toronto FC 0
Houston 4, Atlanta United FC 0
Philadelphia 2, New England 0
Real Salt Lake 1, Dallas 1, tie
San Jose 3, Minnesota United 2
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
MARYLAND
Riverdale Baptist 83, Arundel Christian 41
VIRGINIA
Eastside 69, George Wythe-Wytheville 65
Lancaster 53, Northumberland 42
Gate City 70, Graham 59
Lee-Staunton 62, Central-Woodstock 58
George Wythe-Richmond 56, John Marshall 40
Western Albemarle 68, Northside 64
Lake Taylor 84, Huguenot 73
John Handley 54, Loudoun Valley 52
Varina 69, Highland Springs 61
Wakefield 82, Edison 66
South County 63, Battlefield 54
Western Branch 74, Frank W. Cox 65
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
VIRGINIA
Surry County 49, Stonewall-Mt. Jackson 43
Parry McCluer 69, Eastside 29
Central-Wise 51, Virginia High 35
George Mason 36, Buffalo Gap 35
Hopewell 67, Tabb 24
Lord Botetourt 54, Abingdon 51
Lake Taylor 57, King’s Fork 38
Edison 49, Freedom-South Riding 32
Princess Anne 79, Highland Springs 48
VIRGINIA CLASS 6 Cosby 53, Landstown 44
Langley 56, T.C. Williams 54
SOFTBALL
PRIVATE
Paul VI 21, Holy Cross 0
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Scoring: 3, Chicago, Toews 18 (Keith, Kane), 0:09.
PLAYER
GP
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 65
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 63
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ......................................... 66
William Karlsson, Vegas
... 65
Patrik Laine, Winnipeg ..................................... 65
Eric Staal, Minnesota ....................................... 66
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 64
Anders Lee, N.Y. Islaanders
... 67
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 57
John Tavares, N.Y. Islanders
... 67
Taylor Hall, New Jersey ................................... 61
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ............................. 66
Brock Boeser, Vancouver ................................. 62
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ........................... 66
Sean Monahan, Calgary ................................... 66
Auston Matthews, Toronto ............................. 53
Jason Zucker, Minnesota ................................. 66
Patrice Bergeron, Boston ................................. 55
Logan Couture, San Jose .................................. 62
Calgary at Buffalo, 7:30
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 8
Arizona at Vancouver, 10
L
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Scoring: 1, Chicago, Gustafsson 2 (Saad, Toews), 5:08.
GOALS
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
DETROIT ............................ 2
BOSTON ............................. 3
1
0
FIRST PERIOD
Through Monday‘s games
Anaheim 4, Washington 0
Winnipeg 3, N.Y. Rangers 0
Columbus 4, Vegas 1
New Jersey 6, Montreal 4
Boston 6, Detroit 5 (OT)
Tampa Bay 5, Florida 4 (OT)
Minnesota 6, Carolina 2
Nashville 2, Dallas 0
Chicago 2, Colorado 1 (OT)
FLORIDA ............................ 1
TAMPA BAY ...................... 2
COLORADO ........................ 0
CHICAGO ............................ 1
NHL leaders
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
VEGAS ..................................... 0
COLUMBUS .............................. 1
Gonzaga 79, San Diego 71
WINNIPEG ............................. 16
12
6 — 34
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 9
10
12 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 0 of 0; N.Y. Rangers
0 of 1. Goalies: Winnipeg, Mason 4-6-1 (31 shots-31
saves). N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 25-22-5 (33-31). A:
18,006 (18,006). T: 2:26.
Scoring: 2, Colorado, MacKinnon 32 (Landeskog, Barrie),
16:18 (pp).
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Results
EASTERN
W
New York City FC .............1
Philadelphia .....................1
Columbus .........................1
Orlando City .....................0
D.C. United .......................0
New York .........................0
Chicago ............................0
Montreal ..........................0
Toronto FC .......................0
New England ....................0
Atlanta United FC ............0
SHOTS ON GOAL
OL PTS. GF GA
5
89 226 184
12
80 190 183
9
79 196 184
5
77 192 165
10
74 188 199
4
60 187 219
9
59 180 217
11
51 158 213
Boise St. 60, Air Force 46
Colorado St. 71, Fresno St. 55
WEST COAST CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
Scoring: 3, Winnipeg, Laine 38 (Wheeler), 19:26.
L
19
21
22
25
25
34
32
34
Blue Jackets 4,
Golden Knights 1
Appalachian St. 79, Arkansas St. 68
THIRD PERIOD
W
42
34
35
36
32
28
25
20
MOUNTAIN WEST CONFERENCE
QUARTERFINALS
SUN BELT CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
Scoring: 2, Winnipeg, Laine 37 (Morrow, Chiarot), 11:01.
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
Anaheim .......................
San Jose ........................
Los Angeles ..................
Calgary ..........................
Edmonton .....................
Vancouver .....................
Arizona .........................
Md.-Eastern Shore 77, Delaware St. 60
S.C. State 76, N.C. Central 67
S. Dakota St. 65, South Dakota 50
SECOND PERIOD
Blackhawks 2, Avalanche 1 (OT)
SHOTS ON GOAL
SUMMIT LEAGUE
CHAMPIONSHIP
Scoring: 1, Winnipeg, Laine 36 (Byfuglien, Stastny),
19:04.
OL PTS. GF GA
9
95 216 168
9
89 223 175
7
83 210 192
6
80 195 176
7
77 206 195
5
75 180 176
8
66 190 196
Scoring: 9, Montreal, de la Rose 3 (Reilly, Shaw), 14:40.
10, Montreal, Froese 3 (Reilly, Carr), 19:01.
Grambling St. 80, Alcorn St. 71
Prairie View 66, Jackson St. 64
FIRST PERIOD
L
14
17
22
24
24
26
30
HORIZON LEAGUE
CHAMPIONSHIP
MID-EASTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
FIRST ROUND
3
0
W
43
40
38
37
35
35
29
DePaul 98, Marquette 63
Green Bay 62, Wright St. 44
1 —
0 —
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
Minnesota .....................
Dallas ............................
Colorado ........................
St. Louis ........................
Chicago .........................
One point awarded for overtime losses.
H I GH S C HOOLS
MLS
1
0
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SHOTS ON GOAL
Syracuse 73, Wake Forest 64
Mavericks 118, Nuggets 107
DENVER .............................. 25
DALLAS .............................. 29
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
New Jersey ...................
Columbus ......................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
N.Y. Rangers .................
SOCCER
+/39
34
32
29
27
27
26
26
26
26
25
24
23
23
23
22
22
22
21
21
B OY S ' B A S K E TB A L L
Los Angeles FC 1, Seattle 0
Vancouver 2, Montreal 1
New York City FC 2, Sporting KC 0
LA Galaxy 2, Portland 1
TOP 20
JOHN HANDLEY 54, NO. 9 LOUDOUN VALLEY 52
SATURDAY’S GAMES
H (29-3)Totals 0 0-0 54.
LV (25-3) Melbourne 14, Dawson 8, Williams 7, Miller 17,
Adams 3 Totals 12 7-12 52.
Halftime: Loudoun Valley, (24-17).
Three-point goals: LV 7 (Dawson 2, Melbourne 3,
Peterson 1, Adams 1).
Montreal at Columbus, 1
Colorado at New England, 1:30
Los Angeles FC at Real Salt Lake, 3:30
Sporting KC at Chicago, 6
Vancouver at Houston, 6
Portland at New York, 7
Minnesota United at Orlando City, 7:30
NO. 14 SOUTH COUNTY 63,
NO. 19 BATTLEFIELD 54
SUNDAY’S GAMES
D.C. United at Atlanta United FC, 3
LA Galaxy at New York City FC, 5
CONCACAF Champions League
B (19-9) Gault 24, Pagon 12, Terry 5, Estridge 4, Svenson
3, Radford 2, Washington 2, Yates 2 Totals 16 4-9 54.
SC (26-3) Millora-Brown 18, Dunn 12, Powe 11, Myles 9,
Kellan 8, Bullock 5 Totals 17 11-13 63.
Halftime: Battlefield, (29-28).
Three-point goals: SC 6 (Powe 2, Myles 1, Bullock 1,
Kellan 2); B 6 (Gault 5, Svenson 1).
ROUND OF 16
CAPITAL BELTWAY
Home-and-home
Home teams listed first
Winners advance
RIVERDALE BAPTIST 83,
ARUNDEL CHRISTIAN 41
FIRST LEG
FEB. 20
Herediano (Costa Rica) 2, Tigres (Mexico) 2, tie
Toronto (Canada) 2, Colorado (United States) 0
FEB. 21
America (Mexico) 5, Saprissa (Costa Rica) 1
Tauro (Panama) 1, Dallas (United States) 0
Tijuana (Mexico) 1, Motagua (Honduras) 0
Arundel Christian (1-5)Totals 0 0-0 41.
RB (22-17) Toatley 26, Bilau 10, Russell 10, Briscoe, Jr 8,
Anderson 6, Gaskins 6, Shaw 5, Hardy 4, Grimes 4, Gross
2, Bello 2 Totals 27 8-13 83.
Halftime:Riverdale Baptist, (45-18).
Three-point goals: RB 7 (Briscoe, Jr 2, Toatley 3, Russell
1, Shaw 1).
F OOTBALL
FEB. 22
Guadalajara (Mexico) 2, Cibao (Dominican Republic) 0
Olimpia (Honduras) 1, New York Red Bulls (United
States) 1, tie
Santa Tecla (El Salvador) 2, Seattle (United States) 1
SECOND LEG
FEB. 27
2018 franchise players
Franchise player designations announced Tuesday for
the 2018 NFL free agency signing period, which begins
March 14:
EXCLUSIVE FRANCHISE PLAYERS
Toronto (Canada) 0, Colorado (United States) 0, Toronto
advanced on 2-0 aggregate
Tigres (Mexico) 3, Herediano (Costa Rica) 1, Tigres
advanced on 5-3 aggregate
Tijuana (Mexico) 1, Motagua (Honduras) 1, Tijuana
advanced on 2-1 aggregate
FEB. 28
Dallas (United States) 3, Tauro (Panama) 2; 3-3 aggregate; Tauro advanced on 2-0 away goals
Guadalajara (Mexico) 5, Cibao (Dominican Republic) 0,
Guadalajara advanced on 7-0 aggregate
America (Mexico) 1, Saprissa (Costa Rica) 1, America
(Mexico) advanced on 6-2 aggregate
Pittsburgh: RB Le’Veon Bell
NON-EXCLUSIVE FRANCHISE PLAYERS
Dallas: DE Demarcus Lawrence
Detroit: DE Ezekiel Ansah
L.A. Rams: S Lamarcus Joyner
Miami: WR Jarvis Landry
TRANSITION PLAYERS
Chicago: CB Kyle Fuller
MARCH 1
2018 franchise tag figures
New York Red Bulls (United States) 2, Olimpia (Honduras) 0, NY Red Bulls advanced on 3-1 aggregate
Seattle (United States) 4, Santa Tecla (El Salvador) 0,
Seattle advanced on 5-2 aggregate
NEW YORK: The Salary Cap for the 2018 league year has
been set at $177,200,000 per club. The resulting Cap
Percentage Average tenders for nonexclusive franchise
players and transition players:
QUARTERFINALS
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
NON-EXCLUSIVE FRANCHISE PLAYERS
America (Mexico) vs. Tauro (Panama) , Late
Tijuana (Mexico) vs. New York Red Bulls (United
States), Late
WEDNESDAY’S MATCHES
America (Mexico) 4, Tauro (Panama) 0
Tijuana (Mexico) 0, New York Red Bulls (U.S.) 2
TUESDAY, MARCH 13
New York Red Bulls (United States) vs. Tijuana (Mexico), 8
Tigres (Mexico) vs. Toronto (Canada), 10
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14
Tauro (Panama) vs. America (Mexico), 8
Guadalajara (Mexico) vs. Seattle (United States), 10
GO L F
LPGA Money Leaders
Position ................................................................. Tender
Quarterback ..................................................$23,189,000
Running Back ................................................$11,866,000
Wide Receiver ...............................................$15,982,000
Tight End .........................................................$9,846,000
Offensive Linemen........................................$14,077,000
Defensive End ...............................................$17,143,000
Defensive Tackle...........................................$13,939,000
Linebacker .....................................................$14,961,000
Cornerback ....................................................$14,975,000
Safety............................................................$11,287,000
Kicker/Punter..................................................$4,939,000
TRANSITION PLAYERS
Position ................................................................. Tender
Quarterback ..................................................$20,922,000
Running Back ..................................................$9,630,000
Wide Receiver ...............................................$13,924,000
Tight End .........................................................$8,428,000
Offensive Linemen........................................$12,525,000
Defensive End ...............................................$14,200,000
Defensive Tackle...........................................$11,407,000
Linebacker .....................................................$12,810,000
Cornerback ....................................................$12,971,000
Safety..............................................................$9,536,000
Kicker/Punter..................................................$4,493,000
Through Sunday
Trn
1. Jin Young Ko ....................................3
2. Michelle Wie ....................................3
3. Jessica Korda ...................................2
4. Brittany Lincicome ..........................3
5. Minjee Lee .......................................3
6. Lexi Thompson.................................3
7. Danielle Kang...................................3
8. Moriya Jutanugarn ..........................4
9. Brooke M. Henderson ......................4
10. Nelly Korda ....................................4
11. Shanshan Feng ..............................3
12. Wei-Ling Hsu .................................2
13. Amy Yang.......................................3
14. Ariya Jutanugarn...........................4
15. Hannah Green ................................2
16. Jenny Shin .....................................3
17. Charley Hull ...................................4
18. Katherine Kirk................................4
19. So Yeon Ryu...................................4
20. Marina Alex ...................................4
21. Angela Stanford ............................4
22. Pornanong Phatlum .......................3
23. Caroline Masson ............................4
24. Lizette Salas ..................................3
25. Lydia Ko .........................................3
26. Austin Ernst...................................4
27. Chella Choi .....................................4
28. Cristie Kerr.....................................3
29. Nicole Broch Larsen .......................4
30. Azahara Munoz..............................3
31. Sei Young Kim................................2
32. Carlota Ciganda..............................3
33. Jeong Eun Lee ................................2
34. Bronte Law ....................................2
35. Megan Khang .................................4
36. Mo Martin ......................................3
37. Madelene Sagstrom ......................4
38. Anna Nordqvist..............................2
39. Laetitia Beck..................................2
40. Emma Talley ..................................2
40. Sun Young Yoo...............................2
42. Sung Hyun Park .............................2
43. Jacqui Concolino ............................3
44. In Gee Chun....................................2
45. Sarah Jane Smith ..........................4
46. Mirim Lee.......................................3
47. Tiffany Joh.....................................2
48. Alena Sharp ...................................4
49. Pernilla Lindberg............................4
50. Lindy Duncan .................................2
Money
$282,641
$277,480
$269,845
$253,962
$181,101
$179,951
$174,562
$168,673
$168,204
$167,430
$156,271
$135,766
$134,599
$114,072
$107,908
$103,363
$87,365
$85,840
$84,669
$71,292
$68,165
$58,573
$58,197
$56,141
$55,360
$53,967
$51,678
$51,295
$50,807
$46,860
$46,373
$41,716
$41,694
$40,458
$39,240
$35,265
$34,275
$33,512
$31,905
$31,851
$31,851
$31,244
$28,436
$27,251
$27,170
$26,635
$26,155
$25,272
$23,042
$22,494
BAS E BALL
Astros 10, Nationals 5
HOUSTON
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
2
2
4
3
0
3
3
1
TOTALS
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
1
3
1
1
1
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
3
1
1
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
3
Wi.Difo ss
Rynolds lf
Kndrick 2b
M.Serra rf
B.Hrper rf
Sanchez pr
A.Rndon 3b
Gterrez pr
Wieters c
Kieboom 1b
Goodwin lf
Brignac ss
Stvnson cf
T.Gshue c
Dmnguez 1b
Perkins cf
Mrmljos dh
3
2
3
1
3
2
2
2
2
2
3
1
3
1
3
1
4
38 10 12 10 TOTALS
HOUSTON
WASHINGTON
102
000
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
2
0
1
38 5 11
201
032
040
000
—
—
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
5
10
5
DP: Houston 1, Washington 0. LOB: Houston 5, Washington 9. 2B: Gonzalez (2), Kemp (1), Garcia (1), Dominguez
(1). 3B: Birk (1). HR: Gonzalez (1), Reed (2), Kemmer (1),
Marmolejos (1). SB: Reddick (1).
HOUSTON
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
Morton (W, 1-0)
Giles
Hoyt
Guduan
Thornton (H, 2)
Ramsey
3
1
.2
.1
2
2
3
0
2
2
4
0
0
0
2
1
2
0
0
0
2
1
2
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
6
2
0
1
3
2
WASHINGTON
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
3
1
2
1
.2
1 .1
5
2
3
0
2
0
3
2
1
0
4
0
3
2
1
0
4
0
0
1
0
0
3
0
4
1
2
1
1
1
Cole (L, 0-1)
Goforth
Fedde
Collins
Mendez
Smith
Umpires: Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Tom Woodring;
Second, Larry Vanover; Third, David Rackley.
T: 3:13. A: 3,646
LPGA Tour Schedule
March 1-4 _ HSBC Women’s Championship (Michelle
Wie)
March 15-18 _ Bank of Hope Founders Cup, Wildfire GC,
Phoenix
March 22-25 _ Kia Classic, Aviara GC, Carlsbad, Calif.
March 29-April 1 _ ANA Inspiration, Mission Hills CC,
Rancho Mirage, Calif.
April 11-14 _ LOTTE Championship, Ko Olina GC, Kapolei,
Hawaii
April 19-22 _ HUGEL-JTBC Championship, Wilshire CC,
Los Angeles
April 26-29 _ Event name TBA, Lake Merced GC, San
Francisco
May 3-6 _ Volunteers of America LPGA Texas Classic,
Old American GC, The Colony, Tex.
May 17-20 _ Kingsmill Championship, Kingsmill Resort,
Williamsburg, Va.
May 24-27 _ LPGA Volvik Championship, Travis Pointe
CC, Ann Arbor, Mich.
May 31-June 3 _ U.S. Women’s Open, Shoal Creek (Ala.)
G&CC
June 8-10 _ ShopRite LPGA Classic, Stockton Seaview
Hotel and GC, Galloway, N.J.
June 14-17 _ Meijer LPGA Classic, Blythefield CC, Grand
Rapids, Mich.
June 22-24 _ Walmart NW Arkansas Championship,
Pinnacle CC, Rogers, Ark.
June 28-July 1 _ KPMG Women’s PGA Championship,
Kemper Lakes GC, Olympia Fields, Ill.
July 5-8 _ Thornberry Creek LPGA Classic, Thornberry
Creek at Oneida (Wis.)
July 12-15 _ Marathon Classic, Highland Meadows GC,
Sylvania, Ohio
July 26-29 _ Aberdeen Standard Investments Ladies
Scottish Open, Gullane GC, East Lothian, Scotland
AB R H BI WASHINGTON AB R H BI
Reddick rf
S.Wrenn rf
Gnzalez 3b
Ry.Birk 3b
J.Altve 2b
Tanielu 2b
C.Crrea ss
A.Serra ss
E.Gttis dh
Rbinson ph
A..Reed 1b
M.Stssi c
Ritchie c
J.Kmmer lf
To.Kemp cf
A.Grcia rf
TR ANS AC TI ONS
MLB
Chicago White Sox: Optioned OF Charlie Tilson and RHP
Thyago Vieira to Charlotte (IL) and RHP Jose Ruiz to
Winston-Salem (Carolina). Reassigned INF Jake Burger,
RHPs Dylan Covey and Michael Ynoa, C Alfredo Gonzalez
and LHP Jordan Guerrero to minor league camp.
Kansas City Royals: Placed RHP Jesse Hahn on the
60-day DL. Agreed to terms with OF Jon Jay on a
one-year contract.
Oakland Athletics: Released DH Brandon Moss.
Atlanta Braves: Assigned RHP Josh Ravin outright to
Gwinnett (IL).
NBA
NBA: Fined Boston G Marcus Smart $15,000 for public
criticism of officiating.
NFL
NFL: Announced the retirments of referees Ed Hochuli
and Jeff Triplette. Promoted back judge Shawn Hochuli
and side judge Alex Kemp to referees.
Baltimore Ravens: Signed DE Brent Urban to a one-year
contract.
Buffalo Bills: Agreed to terms with RB Chris Ivory on a
two-year contract.
Carolina Panthers: Agreed to terms with PK Graham
Gano on a four-year contract extension.
Chicago Bears: Placed the transition tag on DB Kyle
Fuller.
Pittsburgh Steelers: Placed the franchise tag on RB
Le’Veon Bell.
EFGHI
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mypublicnotices.com/
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BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
ORLANS PC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
LEESBURG, VA 20175
Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final Judgment
in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court for the
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
Eastern District of Michigan, United States of America and State of
Michigan v. W.A. Foote Memorial Hospital d/b/a Allegiance Health,
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
Civil Action No. 15-12311 (JEL) (DRG). On June 25, 2015, the United
States and the State of Michigan filed a Complaint alleging that
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
Defendant W.A. Foote Memorial Hospital d/b/a Allegiance Health
(“Allegiance”) entered into an agreement with Hillsdale Community
15811 Good Hope Road
10803 AMHERST AVENUE UNIT F
Health Center that unlawfully allocated customers in violation of
Silver Spring, MD 20905
Section 1 of the Sherman Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1, and Section 2 of
Wheaton, MD 20902
the Michigan Antitrust Reform Act, MCL 445.772. The proposed
Under
a
power
of
sale
contained in a Deed of Trust from SYEDA
Final Judgment, filed February 9, 2018, prohibits Allegiance from
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
agreeing with other healthcare providers to prohibit or limit marketing
certain Deed of Trust to DOUGLAS DOUGLAS, Trustee(s), dated S. HUSSAIN AND QAMAR U. HUSSAIN, dated November
or to divide any geographic market or territory. It also prohibits
3,
2003
and
recorded
in Liber 26091, folio 536 among
Allegiance from communicating with competing healthcare systems
April 23, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records of
regarding its marketing plans, with limited exceptions, and requires
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28639, folio the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default
appointment of an antitrust compliance officer and other training
having
occurred
thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case
and monitoring. A Competitive Impact Statement filed by the United
143, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
States describes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment, the
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by No.436962V; Tax ID No.05-00258038) the Sub. Trustees
industry, and the remedies available to private litigants who may have
will
sell
at
public
auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY
been injured by the alleged violation.
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are available for inspection on the Antitrust
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
Division’s website at http://www.justice.gov/atr and at the Office of
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
the Clerk of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of
MARCH 26, 2018 at 9:30 AM
Michigan.
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
Interested persons may address comments to Peter J. Mucchetti,
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
thereon
situated
in
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
Chief, Healthcare & Consumer Products Section, Antitrust Division,
Department of Justice, 450 Fifth Street NW, Suite 4100, Washington,
MARCH 16, 2018 at 10:00AM
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
DC 20530 (telephone: 202-307-0001) within 60 days of the date of this
notice. Such comments, including the name of the submitter, and
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
responses thereto, will be posted on the Antitrust Division’s website,
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
filed with the Court, and, under certain circumstances, published in
the Federal Register.
as follows:
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 10803-F IN THE TIERS AT Terms of Sale: A deposit $17,800.00 will be required at the
840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
WHEATON, A CONDOMINIUM, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARY- time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC.
LAND, AND THE COMMON ELEMENTS, APPURTENANT THERE- CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
TO, PURSUANT TO THE DECLARATION, FIRST, SECOND, of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
Suite 440
THIRD, FOURTH, FIFTH, AND CORRECTIVE FIFTH AMEND- final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
Washington, DC 20015
MENTS, RECORDED IN LIBER 6273 AT FOLIO 115, LIBER COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
202-463-4567
6306 AT FOLIO 761, LIBER 6384 AT FOLIO 812, LIBER purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
CONDOMINIUM LIEN FORECLOSURE SALE
6414 AT FOLIO 541, LIBER 6499 AT FOLIO 796, LIBER property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
OF
6557 AT FOLIO 619, LIBER 6577 T FOLIO 322 AND THE The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
PLATS RECORDED IN CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 33, PLAT first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
3427 ET SEQ., CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 33, PLAT 3453 provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
440 L STREET, NW, UNIT 913, WASHINGTON DC 20001
ET SEQ., CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 34, PLAT 3450 ET of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
WITHIN THE L AT CITY VISTA CONDOMINIUM
SEQ., CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 34, PLAT 3583 ET SEQ., sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
Pursuant to The L at City Vista Condominium Declaration
AND CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 36, PLAT 3727 AMONG THE the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
recorded on AUGUST 30, 2007, at Instrument No.
LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND. FOR shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
2007113768 et. seq., and as may be amended, the ConDERIVATION OF TITLE, SEE LIBER 6066 AT FOLIO 577 OF including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
dominium’s Bylaws recorded on AUGUST 30, 2007, at InstruMONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND.
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
ment No. 200711376 and as amended and in accordance with
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
Public Law 90-566 and D. C. Code Section 42-1903.13, and by
without either express or implied warranty or representation, from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
the power of sale held by the Board of Directors of The L at City
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
Vista Condominium Unit Owners Association shall sell at public
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
auction, within the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
20015-2034, on MARCH 20, 2018 AT 10:45 am at the date
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
thereof the above property known for assessment and taxation
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
purposes as Lot 2120 in Square 0515. The said improvements
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
consist of a condominium unit located at 440 L STREET, NW,
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
UNIT 913, WASHINGTON, DC 20001, and together with all the
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
appurtenances incident to said condominium unit as contained
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
in the Condominium Declaration.
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to any real estate taxes, or other
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $13,000.00 payable in certified water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
prior liens, encumbrances and municipal assessments, if any,
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
A deposit of $10,000.00 will be required at time of sale, such
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
deposit to be by certified check or in such other form as the
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.0% on thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
Board of Directors of the Condominium may require in its sole
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
discretion. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax, transfer
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
fees/taxes, and accrued condominium assessments and late
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
fees between auction date and settlement date are purchaser’s
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
costs and obligations, and must be paid at settlement. All
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
adjustments made as of date of sale. The balance of the
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchase price, together with interest at the rate of 20% per MARCH 7, 12, 19, 2018
12169193 purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
annum from date of sale to date of receipt of the balance
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 577273)
HARVEY
WEST
AUCTIONEERS,
INC.
of the purchase price, must be paid in cash or by cashier’s
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
certified check and all other terms to be complied with within
JAMES E. CLARKE,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
Suite 440
30 days of auction date, otherwise deposit is forfeited and the
RENEE DYSON,
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
Washington, DC 20015
property may be re-advertised and sold at the discretion of the
HUGH J. GREEN,
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
202-463-4567
Board of Directors of the Condominium and at the risk and
SHANNON
MENAPACE,
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
CONDOMINIUM LIEN FORECLOSURE SALE
cost of the defaulting purchaser. The Board of Directors of
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
OF
the Condominium shall convey a deed pursuant to D.C. Code
BRIAN
THOMAS,
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
Section 42-1903.13(c) (1) and (3) as amended and make no
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
further representations of warranties as to title. Purchaser also
440 L STREET, NW, UNIT 602, WASHINGTON DC 20001
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
agrees to pay $295.00 at settlement to the seller's attorney, for
take
place
for
any
reason,
the
purchaser(s)
sole
remedy
in
law
WITHIN THE L AT CITY VISTA CONDOMINIUM
review of the settlement documents. The Board of Directors of
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
the Condominium cannot guarantee clear title or the purchaser’s Pursuant to The L at City Vista Condominium Declaration deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
ability to obtain title insurance. For this reason, the purchaser recorded on AUGUST 30, 2007, at Instrument No. the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
may not be able to obtain financing and therefore, must be able 2007113768 et. seq., and as may be amended, the Con- provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
www.hwestauctions.com
to pay the purchase balance in full within 30 days. The Board dominium’s Bylaws recorded on AUGUST 30, 2007, at Instru- this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
12169188
of Directors of the Condominium reserves the right in its sole ment No. 2007113769 and as amended and in accordance with shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. MARCH 7, 14, 21, 2018
Public
Law
90-566
and
D.
C.
Code
Section
42-1903.13,
and
by
discretion to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
deed. In the event of failure on the part of the Board of Directors the power of sale held by the Board of Directors of The L at City loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
of the Condominium to convey such deed, the purchaser’s sole Vista Condominium Unit Owners Association shall sell at public into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
auction, within the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
remedy shall be return of deposit.
INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
20015-2034, on MARCH 20, 2018 AT 10:45 am at the date announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-00837)
thereof the above property known for assessment and taxation
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
purposes as Lot 2067 in Square 0515. The said improvements
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
consist of a condominium unit located at 440 L STREET, NW,
Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson,
UNIT 602, WASHINGTON, DC 20001, and together with all the
Substitute Trustees
MARCH 7, 12, 19, 2018
12169417 appurtenances incident to said condominium unit as contained
851
851
in
the
Condominium
Declaration.
Membership is rewarding.
Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to any real estate taxes, or other
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
prior
liens,
encumbrances
and
municipal
assessments,
if
any,
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
A deposit of $10,000.00 will be required at time of sale, such
Trustee(s)
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
Plaintiff(s)
www.hwestauctions.com
deposit to be by certified check or in such other form as the
12164052
vs.
vs.
Board of Directors of the Condominium may require in its sole FEBRUARY 28, MARCH 7, 14, 2018
ESTATE OF LEMUEL COTTON
ERNEST F FLEMING, JR A/K/A
discretion.
All
conveyancing,
recording,
recordation
tax,
transfer
C/O THOMAS J KOKOIS
ERNEST F FLEMING JR A/K/A
fees/taxes,
and
accrued
condominium
assessments
and
late
(SUCCESSOR) PER REP
ERNEST F FLEMING
Defendant(s)
fees between auction date and settlement date are purchaser’s
ESTATE OF ODESSA T. SCOTT
Mortgagor(s)
C/O THOMAS J KOKOLIS
costs and obligations, and must be paid at settlement. All
(SUCCESSOR)PER REP
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-27846
adjustments made as of date of sale. The balance of the
Defendant(s)
NOTICE
Mortgagor(s)
purchase price, together with interest at the rate of 20% per
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14798
annum from date of sale to date of receipt of the balance
day of March, 2018 by the CirNOTICE
cuit Court for the COUNTY OF
of the purchase price, must be paid in cash or by cashier’s
PRINCE
GEORGE'S,
Maryland
and
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 28th
by
the
authority
thereof,
that
the
certified check and all other terms to be complied with within
day of February, 2018 by the Cirsale made by Kristine D. Brown,
cuit Court for the COUNTY OF
30 days of auction date, otherwise deposit is forfeited and the
William
M.
Savage,
Gregory
N.
BritPRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
to,
R.
Kip
Stone,
Thomas
J.
Gartner,
property may be re-advertised and sold at the discretion of the
by the authority thereof, that the
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
Board of Directors of the Condominium and at the risk and
Real
Property
designated
as
5908
William M. Savage, Gregory N. BritACCOKEEK
ROAD,
Brandywine,
MD
cost of the defaulting purchaser. The Board of Directors of
to, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
20613 and reported in the above
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
the Condominium shall convey a deed pursuant to D.C. Code
entitled
cause,
will
be
finally
Real Property designated as 6811
ratified
and
confirmed,
unless
Section 42-1903.13(c) (1) and (3) as amended and make no
Pepper Street, Capitol Heights, MD
cause to the contrary thereof be
20743 and reported in the above
further representations of warranties as to title. Purchaser also
shown
on
or
before
the
2nd
day
entitled cause, will be finally
of
April,
2018
next;
provided
a
agrees to pay $295.00 at settlement to the seller's attorney, for
ratified and confirmed, unless
copy of this Order be inserted
cause to the contrary thereof be
review of the settlement documents. The Board of Directors of
NO SUCH
in
THE
WASHINGTON
POST,
1150
shown on or before the 28th day
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
the Condominium cannot guarantee clear title or the purchaser’s
of March, 2018 next; provided a
in
said
COUNTY
OF
PRINCE
LUCK
copy of this Order be inserted
ability
to
obtain
title
insurance.
For
this
reason,
the
purchaser
GEORGE'S
once
a
week
for
three
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
successive weeks before the 2nd
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
may not be able to obtain financing and therefore, must be able
day
of
April,
2018.
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
to pay the purchase balance in full within 30 days. The Board
GEORGE'S once a week for three
The report states the amount of
successive weeks before the 28th
the sale to be $129,000.00.
of Directors of the Condominium reserves the right in its sole
day of March, 2018.
BY THE COURT:
discretion to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the
The report states the amount of
Sydney J. Harrison #619
deed. In the event of failure on the part of the Board of Directors
the sale to be $191,000.00.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
NEED TO
of the Condominium to convey such deed, the purchaser’s sole
KEEP US
BY THE COURT:
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
Sydney J. Harrison #619
remedy shall be return of deposit.
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
RENT THE
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
840
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC.
5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Suite 440
Washington, DC 20015
202-463-4567
CONDOMINIUM LIEN FORECLOSURE SALE
OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
440 L STREET, NW, UNIT 510, WASHINGTON DC 20001
WITHIN THE L AT CITY VISTA CONDOMINIUM
Pursuant to The L at City Vista Condominium Declaration
recorded on AUGUST 30, 2007, at Instrument No.
2007113768 et. seq., and as may be amended, the Condominium’s Bylaws recorded on AUGUST 30, 2007, at Instrument No. 2007113769 and as amended and in accordance with
Public Law 90-566 and D. C. Code Section 42-1903.13, and by
the power of sale held by the Board of Directors of The L at City
Vista Condominium Unit Owners Association shall sell at public
auction, within the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS,
INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC
20015-2034, on MARCH 20, 2018 AT 10:45 am at the date
thereof the above property known for assessment and taxation
purposes as Lot 2061 in Square 0515. The said improvements
consist of a condominium unit located at 440 L STREET, NW,
UNIT 510, WASHINGTON, DC 20001, and together with all the
appurtenances incident to said condominium unit as contained
in the Condominium Declaration.
TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to any real estate taxes, or other
prior liens, encumbrances and municipal assessments, if any,
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
A deposit of $10,000.00 will be required at time of sale, such
deposit to be by certified check or in such other form as the
Board of Directors of the Condominium may require in its sole
discretion. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax, transfer
fees/taxes, and accrued condominium assessments and late
fees between auction date and settlement date are purchaser’s
costs and obligations, and must be paid at settlement. All
adjustments made as of date of sale. The balance of the
purchase price, together with interest at the rate of 20% per
annum from date of sale to date of receipt of the balance
of the purchase price, must be paid in cash or by cashier’s
certified check and all other terms to be complied with within
30 days of auction date, otherwise deposit is forfeited and the
property may be re-advertised and sold at the discretion of the
Board of Directors of the Condominium and at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser. The Board of Directors of
the Condominium shall convey a deed pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13(c) (1) and (3) as amended and make no
further representations of warranties as to title. Purchaser also
agrees to pay $295.00 at settlement to the seller's attorney, for
review of the settlement documents. The Board of Directors of
the Condominium cannot guarantee clear title or the purchaser’s
ability to obtain title insurance. For this reason, the purchaser
may not be able to obtain financing and therefore, must be able
to pay the purchase balance in full within 30 days. The Board
of Directors of the Condominium reserves the right in its sole
discretion to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the
deed. In the event of failure on the part of the Board of Directors
of the Condominium to convey such deed, the purchaser’s sole
remedy shall be return of deposit.
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
Newspaper Delivery Carriers
Trustees Sale - DC
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
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washingtonpost.com/recruit
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D10
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
850
Montgomery County
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Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
LEESBURG, VA 20175
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4349 Thistlewood Terrace
14006 GLEN MILL ROAD
Burtonsville, MD 20866
Rockville, MD 20850
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from ALICE
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain T. GREEN, dated March 9, 2009 and recorded in Liber 36793,
Deed of Trust to EXPRESS TITLE COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated folio 263 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
January 20, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29171, folio docketed as Case No.435175V; Tax ID No.05-02506416 ) the
229, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
MARCH 12, 2018 at 9:30 AM
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
MARCH 16, 2018 at 10:00AM
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
as follows:
Terms of Sale: A deposit $21,300.00 will be required at the
LOT NUMBERED TWELVE (12) OF THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
AS "SUBDIVISION RECORD PLAT, LOTS 8 THRU 12 & CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
PARCEL "A", BLOCK E, HUNTING HILL ESTATES" WHICH of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
PLAT IS RECORDED ON JUNE 28TH, 2002 AMONG THE LAND final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND AS PLAT COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
NUMBER 22249.
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
without either express or implied warranty or representation, first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $37,000.00 payable in certified any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578185)
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
JAMES E. CLARKE,
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
RENEE DYSON,
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
HUGH J. GREEN,
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
BRIAN THOMAS,
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-08796)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
www.hwestauctions.com
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
FEBRUARY 21, 28, MARCH 7, 2018
12165448
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
851
Substitute Trustees
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 28, MARCH 7, 14, 2018
12166092
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2104 Lubar Court
Brookeville, MD 20833
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from JOSE
A. RUIZ AND LUISA RUIZ, dated February 20, 2007 and
recorded in Liber 33998, folio 680 among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.440977V; Tax ID
No.08-03253693 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
MARCH 26, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 538406)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
MARCH 7, 14, 21, 2018
12169187
LEGAL NOTICES
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Lisa D.
Johnson a/k/a Lisa Davis Johnson dated July 17, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 25770, folio 538 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
MARCH 13, 2018 AT 10:53 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as unit number one thousand eight hundred sixty-five (1865)
in Group VIII of the "Olde Towne Village Condominium" and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-0557405.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $9,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66962.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 21, Feb 28 & Mar 7
12164116
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6306 BROOKE JANE DR.
CLINTON, MD 20735
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bruce
Edwards Phillips and Pamerly G. Phillips dated April 20, 2004 and recorded
in Liber 23078, folio 123 among the Land Records of Prince George's
County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's
County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance,
located on Main St.), on
MARCH 13, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-0916031.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66555.
Prince Georges County
851
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 21, Feb 28 & Mar 7
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
MARCH 13, 2018 AT 10:52 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #20-2242311.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $34,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 57571.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 21, Feb 28 & Mar 7
12164115
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
851
Prince Georges County
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #15-1716232.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64699.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit Numbered 303, in Building Numbered "2", The Addison
at St. Paul's Condominium II and more fully described in the aforesaid
Deed of Trust. Tax ID #18-3926086.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #04-675-90083605.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 54001.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 21, Feb 28 & Mar 7
12164677
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $39,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69624.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Feb 21, Feb 28 & Mar 7
12164486
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
13008 BLAIRMORE ST.
BELTSVILLE, MD 20705
5234 WASENA AVE.
BALTIMORE, MD 21225
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Yvonne M.
Davis dated January 9, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27337, folio 205 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Stacy
Lee Hynson dated October 27, 2006 and recorded in Liber 18502, folio
592 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
MARCH 27, 2018 AT 9:33 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-0013755.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $60,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65442.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 28, Mar 7 & Mar 14
12166681
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
MARCH 27, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69175.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Mar 7, Mar 14 & Mar 21
12166678
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
LAVETA HILTON
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-29248
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
day of March, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 2132
SOUTH ANVIL LANE, TEMPLE HILLS,
MD 20748 and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 2nd day
of April, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 2nd
day of April, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $248,422.62.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Mar 7, 14, 21, 2018
851
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Mar 7, Mar 14 & Mar 21
12168128
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit No. 1-10 of the "Westwood Park Condominium" and
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-3818002.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
851
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-003-18301200.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $11,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 59077.
851
6307 HIL MAR DR., UNIT #10
DISTRICT HEIGHTS, MD 20747
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Eddie Trice
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-27862
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
v.
KENNETH BROWN
NAKHIA T. WEBB-BROWN
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-29168
NOTICE
v.
Natalie Williams
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-17859
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 26th day of February 2018,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 523 Capitol Heights Boulevard,
Capitol Heights, Maryland 20743,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 26th day of March, 2018,
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 26th day of
March, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $144,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Feb. 28, Mar. 7, 14, 2018 12167919
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Cesar Hernandez and Sofia
Hernandez-Garcia
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-29230
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 26th day of February 2018,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 3117 Twig Lane, Bowie, Maryland
20715, made and reported by
James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Hugh J. Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian
Thomas, Substitute Trustees, be
RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 26th day of March,
2018, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 26th day of
March, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $353,487.95.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Feb. 28, Mar. 7, 14, 2018 12167921
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $55,000.00.
Home delivery
is convenient.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
851
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 26th day of February 2018, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
7206 Donnell Place, Unit 7206 C7,
District Heights, Maryland 20747,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 26th day of March, 2018,
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 26th day of
March, 2018.
Feb. 28, Mar. 7, 14, 2018 12167920
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Notice is hereby given this 27th
day of February 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 4517 Dalton
Street, Temple Hills, MD 20748, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 27th day
of March, 2018, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
27th day of March, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$205,200.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
March 7, 14, 21, 2018
852
12168815
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
David E. Carroll
David Edward Carroll
Defendant
No. C-02-CV-16-003221
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
February 26, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Sydney Roberson, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th
day of March 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 28th day of March 2018 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 7995
STONE HAVEN DRIVE, GLEN BURNIE,
MD 21060 to be $221,000.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Feb 28, Mar 7, 14, 2018 12168026
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
Versus
ALICE L. BRASS
JOHN C. BRASS
Defendant(s)
No. C-02-CV-17-001134
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this Tuesday,
February 27, 2018, that the sale
of the property mentioned in these
proceedings, made and reported
by E. Edward Farnsworth, Jr., Substitute Trustee BE RATIFIED AND
CONFIRMED, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 29th day of March 2018
next; provided, a copy of this Notice
be inserted in some newspaper
published in Anne Arundel County,
once in each of three successive
weeks before the 29th day of March
2018 next. The report states the
amount of the sale of the property
at 7811 ELIZABETH ROAD, PASADENA, MD 21122 to be $229,400.00.
Robert P. Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Anne Arundel County, Maryland
Mar 7, 14, 21, 2018
12169011
12169132
Home delivery
is convenient.
How about some
home delivery?
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
12167924
Anne Arundel County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Opeyemi
Akinfe dated September 29, 2006 and recorded in Liber 18352, folio 36
among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
MARCH 13, 2018 AT 9:32 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Marcus
Smoot dated December 11, 2006 and recorded in Liber 27110, folio 187
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
FEBRUARY 28, MARCH 7, 14, 2018
852
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Nikki
Roach a/k/a Nikki Y. Roach dated November 29, 2007 and recorded in
Liber 29270, folio 350 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
MARCH 13, 2018 AT 10:51 AM
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 28, Mar 7 & Mar 14
12166682
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5750 Morland Drive South
Adamstown, MD 21710
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to MICHAEL J. BROKER, Trustee(s),
dated September 18, 2009, and recorded among the Land
Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 7619,
folio 0335, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST,
FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON,
MARCH 20, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT 44, SECTION 3, PLAT 4, GREENHILL MANOR, AS SHOWN
ON PLAT ENTITLED, "LOTS 16 THRU 23 & LOTS 38 THRU
44, GREEN HILL MANOR", RECORDED AMONG THE PLAT
RECORDS OF FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT
BOOK 66, PAGE 155.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5.25% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (56960)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Anne Arundel County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8146 MALLARD SHORE DR.
LAUREL, MD 20724
MARCH 20, 2018 AT 10:54 AM
11505 MARYVALE RD.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joseph K.
West dated August 15, 2013 and recorded in Liber 35659, folio 114 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
MARCH 20, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
852
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1321 KAREN BLVD., UNIT #303
CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743
8318 DONOGHUE DR.
NEW CARROLLTON, MD 20784
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Easton
Williams a/k/a Easton R. Williams and Debra Williams a/k/a Debra Maison
Williams dated October 22, 2007 and recorded in Liber 28920, folio 399
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
www.hwestauctions.com
12164118
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2018
EZ
Prince Georges County
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
WP 2x1
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1865 ADDISON RD. SOUTH
DISTRICT HEIGHTS, MD 20747
851
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
SF
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2018
855
Charles County
855
OPQRS
EZ
855
Charles County
855
Charles County
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
857
Howard County
857
Howard County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4116 BLUEBIRD DR.
WALDORF, MD 20603
16224 AND 16195 WILKERSON PL.
BRANDYWINE, MD 20613
857
6652 HUNTER RD.
ELKRIDGE, MD 21075
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Ana
Tarango and Waldemar Velez dated January 17, 2008 and recorded in Liber
6559, folio 293 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La
Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit
Court and the District Court), on
MARCH 20, 2018 AT 1:06 PM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Eun Ho
Chang dated May 23, 2008 and recorded in Liber 11499, folio 174 among
the Land Records of Howard County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction, AUCTION
SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
MARCH 12, 2018 AT 9:32 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-011994 and Tax ID
#09-000968.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64872.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-155405.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $42,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 70088.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-214705.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $32,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67755.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 28, Mar 7 & Mar 14
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 21, Feb 28 & Mar 7
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from James
R. Wilkerson and Christine J. Wilkerson dated May 4, 2004 and recorded
in Liber 4725, folio 24 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles
St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the
Circuit Court and the District Court), on
MARCH 20, 2018 AT 1:07 PM
Feb 28, Mar 7 & Mar 14
12166692
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11185 James Run Place
La Plata, MD 20646
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to CHRIS A. HOPKINS, Trustee(s), dated April
30, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 08548, folio 0278, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
MARCH 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOUR (4) AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED "RECORD PLAT #2, TAX MAP 56, GRID 7 PARCEL
5, LOT 4, JAMES RUN POINTE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 56 AT FOLIO 60; LYING
AND BEING IN THE 4TH ELECTION DISTRICT OF CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND BEING PREMISES KNOWN AS: 11185
JAMES RUN PLACE, LA PLATA MD 20646
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $40,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.875% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-10628)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
856
Frederick County
12166686
856
12165167
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
857
Howard County
873
Howard County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9046 QUEEN MARIA COURT
Columbia, MD 21045
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to VALORIE KACHERIAN, Trustee(s), dated
November 18, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 09690, folio 295, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
MARCH 16, 2018 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. G-61, AS
SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED "COLUMBIA, VILLAGE OF
LONG REACH, LOTS G-1 TO G-72 AND G-148 TO G-161, A
RESUBDIVISION OF PARCEL G, SECTION 1, AREA 1, SHEETS
1 OF 2 AND 2 OF 2", WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK
NO. 22, FOLIOS 75 AND 76. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
NOW KNOWN AS 9046 QUEEN MARIA COURT, COLUMBIA, MD
21045. TAX I.D. NO. 16-126411
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $14,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.98% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-11688)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7944 PETTIGREW STREET
165 Fairfield Drive
Elkridge, MD 21075
Frederick, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed
of
Trust
to
LYNDE
SELDON, Trustee(s), dated May 27,
JACQUELINE SAINT-AMOUR AND FIRMIN SAINT-AMOUR,
dated May 18, 2006 and recorded in Liber 6079, folio 0762 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY,
MARYLAND
in
Liber 16270, folio 525, the holder
among the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed
the
undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument
No.C-10-CV-17-000058; Tax ID No.02-075075 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred
under
the
terms
thereof,
and at the request of the party
COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK,
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
MD 21701, on
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
MARCH 26, 2018 at 11:00 AM
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
MARCH 16, 2018 at 12:00PM
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the follows:
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 108, IN
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,700.00 will be required at the THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF RE-SUBDIVISION
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY BLUE STREAM LOTS 1-125, OPEN SPACE LOTS 126 & 127
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance AND BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-1, A RE-SUBDIVISION
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of OF BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-2 "BLUE STREAM", PLATS
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK 21737-21738, BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL K, "BLUE
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the STREAM", PLATS 21558-21564, AND EASEMENTS ON PARpurchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the CEL J-1, "BLUE STREAM", PLATS 21737-21738", AS PER
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. PLATS THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT NOS. MDR 21981,
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address MDR 21984 AND MDR 21986. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREprovided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum ON BEING KNOWN AS NO.: 7944 PETTIGREW STREET.
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this SUBJECT TO AN ANNUAL DEFERRED WATER AND SEWER
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of CHARGE PAYABLE IN THE MONTH OF JULY IN EACH AND
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser EVERY YEAR IN THE AMOUNT OF $400.00, FOR A PERIOD OF
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, THIRTY (30) YEARS.
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note without either express or implied warranty or representation,
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
www.hwestauctions.com
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, FEBRUARY 28, MARCH 7, 14, 2018
12154632
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, 872
873
Fairfax County
Prince William County
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merTRUSTEE’S
SALE
OF
chantability,
compliance
with
building
or
housing
codes
or
other
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
15507 Travailer Court
7208 MURRAY LANE,
Woodbridge, VA 22193
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
ANNANDALE, VA 22003
subject
to
easements,
agreements
and
restrictions
of
record
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
In execution of a Deed of Trust
execution of a Deed of Trust
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold In
in the original principal amount
in the original principal amount
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of of $245,471.00, with an annual of $198,432.00, dated June 30,
2008, recorded among the land
record
affecting
same
including
any
condominium
and
of
HOA
interest
rate
of
5.500000%
dated
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
records of the Circuit Court for
August 7, 2009, recorded among
Prince William County on July 3,
the land records of the Circuit
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
2008, as Instrument Number
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $37,500.00 payable in certified as Deed Book 20646, Page 0972, 200807030064481, the underappointed
Substitute
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at the undersigned appointed Sub- signed
Trustee will offer for sale at public
stitute Trustee will offer for sale
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final at public auction all that property auction, at the main entrance of
courthouse for the Circuit Court
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY, located in the COUNTY OF FAIR- the
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
on the courthouse steps at
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875% on unpaid FAX,
Ave, Manassas, VA on April 6, 2018
the front of the Circuit Court build9:00 AM, the property described
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The ing for the County of Fairfax locat- at
in said deed of trust, located at
ed at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a Fairfax, Virginia on April 11, 2018 the above address and briefly
described as: Lot 111, Section 1,
at
2:30
PM,
the
property
with
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will improvements to wit:
BEAU RIDGE ESTATES, as the same
appears duly dedicated, platted
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the Tax Map No. 60-3-21-101
recorded in Deed book 1561
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A and
at Page 513, and as rededicated,
replatted and rerecorded in Deed
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's DEBT COLLECTOR.
Book 1566 at Page 555, among
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A the land records of Prince William
deposit of 10% of the
County, Virginia. Tax ID: 8290-19deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other bidder's
sale price, will be required in cash,
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, public charges and private charges or assessments, including certified or cashier's check. Set- 9216.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidwithin fifteen (15) days
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 579641)
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to tlement
der’s deposit of $10,000.00 or 10%
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
the sale price, whichever is
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes forfeit deposit. Additional terms of
JAMES E. CLARKE,
lower, will be required in the form
to be announced at sale. Loan
and
all
other
costs
incident
to
the
settlement
shall
be
borne
by
of a certified or cashier’s check.
type: FHA. Reference Number
HUGH J. GREEN,
Cash will not be accepted as a
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner 18-272636.
SHANNON MENAPACE,
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of PROFESSIONAL FORECLOSURE (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
OF VIRGINIA, Submay forfeit deposit. Additional
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason, CORPORATION
stitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BRIAN THOMAS,
terms to be announced at sale.
BROWN,
LLP,
10021
Balls
Ford
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Vir- This is a communication from a
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
debt collector. This notice is an
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for ginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall Mar 7, 14, 2018
12166721
used for that purpose.
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
(Trustee # 565322)
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
Home delivery
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 777is convenient.
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
7101,
website:
www.hwestauctions.com
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
http://www.orlans.com
MARCH 7, 14, 21, 2018
12169003 claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postTowne #: 5000.0908
1-800-753-POST
sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
Feb 28, Mar 7, 2018
12165713
SF
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
Home delivery
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
is convenient.
Home delivery
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
1-800-753-POST
makes good
No. (17-05601)
SF
sense.
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
Substitute Trustees
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SF
is convenient.
www.hwestauctions.com
Home delivery
is convenient.
12166348
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or call 202-334-6100.
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FEBRUARY 28, MARCH 7, 14, 2018
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
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washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
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SF
12163740
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873
D11
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
14649 Red House Road,
Gainesville, VA 20155
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
March 28, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200604040053117
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $390,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
March 21, 2018 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot
numbered Twenty-Five (25), in the subdivision known as “Greenhill
Crossing”, Section 13, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and
recorded in Deed Book 2862 at Page 1456, among the Land Records of
Prince William County, Virginia.
Which has an address of 14649 Red House Road, Gainesville, VA 20155,
and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the
time of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever
is lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
will be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price,
with interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
February 21, 28, March 7, 14, 2018
12165548
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
9724 Holmes Place, Unit C003
Manassas Park, VA 20111
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
June 18, 2007, and recorded at Instrument Number 200706250074743
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $249,350.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
March 21, 2018 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Condominium Unit No. 003, Building C, Phase 6, The Reserve Condominiums,
a Condominium, and the limited common elements appurtenant thereto
established by Condominium Instruments recorded as Instrument Number
200606050084823 with the Plat recorded as Instrument Number
200606050084824, and any and all Supplemental Declarations and/or
Amendments recorded subsequent thereto among the Clerk’s Office of
the Circuit Court of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
February 28, March 7, 2018
12165418
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
4240 Jonathan Court,
Dumfries, VA 22025
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
February 10, 2017, and recorded at Instrument Number 201702130012022
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $269,616.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
April 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of The
following described property located in Prince William County, Virginia
(The “Property”):
Lot H-5-A, Section 4B, Montclair Subdivision as the same appears duly
dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 1396 at Page 539, among
the Land Record of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
February 28, March 7, 2018
12163779
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
13901 Gum Lane,
Woodbridge, VA 22193
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
March 2, 2009, and recorded at Instrument Number 200903040018803
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $117,826.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
March 21, 2018 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain lot or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in Prince William
County, Virginia, designated as Lot 289, Section 8, Dale City, as the same
is duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 514, at Page 289,
among the Land Records of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
February 28, March 7, 2018
12157664
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
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MARCH 7, 14, 21, 2018
Prince William County
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S0833-2 10x3
D12
877
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE SALE
3910 Norris Drive,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407-6862
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$108,276.00, dated April 16, 2010
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania
County, Virginia, in Document No.
100006948,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the undersigned Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at the
entrance to the Spotsylvania
County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on
March 20, 2018 at 12:00 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 207, Section 3, Maple Grove,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (27107)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 28, Mar 7,2018
12167437
OPQRS
877
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 31, 2010,
in the original principal amount
of $256,545.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 201000015315 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on April 5,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT,
PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND,
TOGETHER WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING AND SITUATE IN CHANCELLOR DISTRICT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND
KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT
35 OF HAWTHORNE WOODS SUBDIVISION, ON THAT CERTAIN PLAT
OF SUBDIVISION BY WEBB AND ASSOCIATES, DATED FEBRUARY 22,
2002 AND AS LAST REVISED, AND
RECORDED AS INSTRUMENT NO.
20020020215 IN THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3121001.
March 7, 14, 2018
12169129
878
879
Stafford County
Culpeper County
879
880
Culpeper County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
4 KNOLLSIDE COURT,
STAFFORD, VA 22554
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
5415 RIVERBEND LANE,
REVA, VA 22735.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
12505 HUNT ROAD,
CULPEPER, VA 22701.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 20, 2012,
in the original principal amount
of $201,188.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 120025630 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Spotsylvania County,
9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on April 5, 2018 ,
at 4:00 PM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL
THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF
LAND, LYING AND BEING IN SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA AND
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS LOT 95, SECTION THREE, CHANCELLOR HILLS SUBDIVISION, AS
SHOWN ON PLAT OF SURVEY BY
STEVEN R. WELHE, L.S. RECORDED
SEPTEMBER 1, 1988, IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PLAT FILE 1 AT
PAGES 587 THROUGH 589, INCLUSIVE.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence. If
the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be
entitled to a return of the deposit
paid. The Purchaser may, if provided by the terms of the Trustee’s
Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale,
be entitled to a $50 cancellation
fee from the Substitute Trustee,
but shall have no further recourse
against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Additional terms to be announced
at the sale. A form copy of the
Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase
real property is available for viewing at www.bwwsales.com. This
is a communication from a debt
collector and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller
confirmation. Substitute Trustee:
Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson
Blvd., Suite 1004, Arlington, VA
22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003
Executive
Blvd, Suite
101,
Rockville, MD 20852, 301-9616555,
website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3255041.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated October 26, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $400,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR060034584. The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
April 5, 2018 , at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: LOT 70, SECTION 2-E, WHITSON RIDGE, AS THE
SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED,
PLATTED AND RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 32, AT PAGES 160 THROUGH
161, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3217671.
Feb 28, Mar 7, 2018
12167918
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 26, 2016,
in the original principal amount
of $171,731.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 160004979 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on April 5, 2018 , at 11:00
AM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN
SALEM MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT,
CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
LOCATED ON RIVERBEND LANE,
AND ACCORDING TO A SURVEY
MADE BY RICHARD D. TOWNSEND,
LS, DATED JULY 29, 1990, A PLAT
OF WHICH IS RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF CULPEPER
COUNTY VIRGINIA, IN PLAT CABINET 2, SLIDE 337, SAID LOT IS
DESIGNATED AS LOT 46A, SECTION
3, OF RIVERBEND ESTATES, CONTAINING 5.2258 ACRES, MORE OR
LESS.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated November 9, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $195,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 060012552 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on April 5, 2018 , at 11:00
AM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN CULPEPER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: INCLUDING RIGHTS
OF WAY, OF THE STATE ROUTE 629
AND BEING DESCRIBED AS LOT 9
OF "HIGHLAND ESTATES" IN SALEM
MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, CULPEPER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, ON A PLAT OF
J. R. HUDSON, JR., CLS, DATED
NOVEMBER 21, 1977, RECORDED
IN DEED BOOK 283, PAGE 54 CONTAINING 10.9491 ACRES, MORE OR
LESS.
Feb 28, Mar 7, 2018
12167339
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
54 BRIARWOOD DRIVE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22405
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated September 26, 2005,
in the original principal amount
of $220,400.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR050051492 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on March 22, 2018, at 2:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND,
WITH ALL RIGHTS, WAY, EASEMENTS AND IMPROVEMENTS
THEREUNTO
BELONGING
OR
APPURTENANT THERETO, SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS LOT
12, SECTION 1, ARGYLE HILL SUBDIVISION, AS THE SAME APPEARS
DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND
RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 633 AT
PAGE 391, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF STAFFORD COUNTY,
VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3229321.
Feb 28, Mar 7, 2018
12167692
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
309 BRENTON ROAD,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22405
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated May 2, 2014, in
the original principal amount of
$268,658.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR140006446 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on April 5, 2018 , at 2:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF
LAND, WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND ALL APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING,
LOCATED AND BEING IN THE
COUNTY OF STAFFORD, COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, AND BEING
DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: UNIT
38, PHASE 20, RAPPAHANNOCK
LANDING CONDOMINIUM, AS SET
FORTH IN DECLARATION FOR RAPPAHANNOCK LANDING CONDOMINIUM, RECORDED AS INSTRUMENT NUMBER 100012402, AS
AMENDED IN INSTRUMENT NUMBER 110014703, AND AS FURTHER
AMENDED IN INSTRUMENT NUMBER 140003054, AND ANY AND
ALL PRIOR AND/OR SUBSEQUENT
AMENDMENTS THERETO, AND AS
SHOWN OR NOTED ON ANY
PLAT(S) ATTACHED THERETO,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-2024242.
Feb. 28, Mar. 7, 2018
12164832
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3242671.
March 7, 14, 2018
12169126
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3260721.
March 7, 14, 2018
12169125
City of Fredericksburg
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
December 21, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 070000014 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Fredericksburg, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $440,000.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at the
front steps of the Circuit Court for the City of Fredericksburg, Virginia, 701
Princess Anne Street, Fredericksburg, VA 22404-0359 on:
March 19, 2018 at 12:30 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of The
following described property, to-wit:
All that certain parcel of land fronting on the Southerly line of Wolfe Street
in the City of Fredericksburg, Virginia containing 2,503 square feet, known
as 318 Wolfe Street, and designated as “Marie Rollins 2503 SF”, on “Plat
of Property Line Adjustment”, dated December 7, 2001, made by Bartlett
Consultants LTD., and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of the City of Fredericksburg, Virginia along with the Deed of Lot Line
Adjustment, recorded as Instrument Number 020000915, together with all
buildings and improvements thereon and all rights and privileges thereto
appurtenant.
This conveyance is subject to the continued use of the right of way over the
driveway running along the Eastern part of the property hereby conveyed
and the Western part of the property known as 316 Wolfe Street from
the mutual benefit of the owners of both properties for the passage of
motor vehicles to and from Wolfe Street, and more particularly described
as follows:
Commencing at the point of intersection of the Westerly right of way line
of Princess Anne Street and the Southerly right of way line of Wolfe Street
(as shown on Royer’s Map of May, 1916); thence South 63 degrees 15’ 34”
West along said Southerly right of way of Wolfe Street 277.67 feet to the
true point of beginning; thence continuing along said Southerly right of
way line South 63 degrees, 15’ 34” West 7.0 feet; thence South 27 degrees
47’ 18” East 109.22 feet; thence North 49 degrees, 52’ 36” East 7.16 feet;
thence North 27 degrees, 47’ 18” West 107.56 feet to the true point of
beginning, containing 758.61 feet, or 0.0174 acre.
A portion of the property herein conveyed is the same property conveyed
unto the grantors herein by Deed dated August 2, 2001, and recorded in
the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of the City of Fredericksburg,
Virginia as Instrument Number 010001606.
A portion of the property herein conveyed is the same property conveyed
unto the grantors herein by Deed of Lot Line Adjustment dated January 17,
2002, and recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office as Instrument Number
020000915, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
February 28, March 7, 2018
881
12164874
881
Orange County
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated May 25, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$190,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Orange County, Virginia as Instrument No. 060005742 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Orange County, 109 W. Main
Street, Orange, Virginia on April 5,
2018 , at 10:00 AM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN TRACT
OR PARCEL OF LAND IDENTIFIED
AS TRACT A, CONTAINING 2.518
ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AS SHOWN
ON PLAT OF SURVEY DATED APRIL
5, 2006, BY KEVIN A. MERKEY,
LAND SURVEYOR, PREPARED BY
BERKLEY-HOWELL AND ASSOCIATES, P.C., WHICH PLAT IS TO BE
RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
ORANGE
COUNTY
VIRGINIA.
TOGETHER WITH THE USE OF A
50‘ RIGHT OF WAY OFF OF MARKS
LANE, AS SHOWN ON THE
ATTACHED SURVEY, AND ALSO
WITH ACCESS FROM ROUTE 20
ALONG THE EXISTING ROAD IN THE
AREA IDENTIFIED AS CONTAINING
1.269 ACRES, AND ADJOINING
ROUTE 20.
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3149931.
Feb 28, Mar 7, 2018
FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
12167331
881
882
Orange County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
3002 LAKEVIEW PARKWAY,
LOCUST GROVE, VA 22508.
Orange County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
11077 MCCUE LANE,
ORANGE, VA 22960
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
12232 SALT CEDAR LANE,
CULPEPER, VA 22701
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated February 27, 2013,
in the original principal amount
of $213,265.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 130001532 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on April 5, 2018 , at 11:00
AM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF
LAND, WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND ALL APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING,
LOCATED AND BEING IN THE
COUNTY OF CULPEPER, COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, AND BEING
DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: LOT
128, PHASE I, THREE FLAGS, AS
THE SAME IS DULY DEDICATED
INSTRUMENT NUMBER 050006735
AND AS SHOWN ON A PLAT IN
PLAT CABINET 8, SLIDE(S) 571-587,
ALL RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF CULPEPER COUNTY,
VIRGINIA.
880
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated January 25, 2007,
in the original principal amount
of $223,920.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Orange County, Virginia as Instrument No. 070001079 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Orange County, 109 W. Main
Street, Orange, Virginia on April 5,
2018, at 10:00 AM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND WITH ALL
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND
TOGETHER WITH ALL APPURTENANCES THEREUNTO BELONGING,
LYING AND BEING SITUATE IN THE
GORDON
DISTRICT,
ORANGE
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, BEING LOT 94,
SECTION 5, LAKE OF THE WOODS,
AS THE SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED
IN DEED BOOK 216 AT PAGE 418
OF THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF ORANGE
COUNTY, VIRGINIA. REFERENCE IS
HEREBY MADE TO THE SAID PLAT
FOR A
MORE
PARTICULAR
DESCRIPTION AS CONTAINED IN
THE SAID PLAT AND FURTHER, THE
METES AND BOUNDS DESCRIPTION CONTAINED THEREIN IS
INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE AS IF THE SAME WERE
TEXTUALLY CONTAINED HEREIN.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence. If
the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be
entitled to a return of the deposit
paid. The Purchaser may, if provided by the terms of the Trustee’s
Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale,
be entitled to a $50 cancellation
fee from the Substitute Trustee,
but shall have no further recourse
against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Additional terms to be announced
at the sale. A form copy of the
Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase
real property is available for viewing at www.bwwsales.com. This
is a communication from a debt
collector and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller
confirmation. Substitute Trustee:
Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson
Blvd., Suite 1004, Arlington, VA
22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003
Executive
Blvd, Suite
101,
Rockville, MD 20852, 301-9616555,
website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3224171.
Feb 28, Mar 7, 2018
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
12167298
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2018
Frederick County
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
TRUSTEE SALE
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
1218 Lakeview Drive,
Cross Junction, VA 22625
Frederick County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $151,182.00, dated November
20, 2013 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of Frederick County, Virginia, in Document No. 130013332, at Page
0134, default having occurred in
the payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of the
holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
at the entrance to the Circuit
Court of Frederick County, 5 North
Kent Street, Winchester, on April
6, 2018 at 11:30 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 34, Section 4A, Lake Holiday
Estates, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57719)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 28, Mar 7,2018
12168049
MD H PR. GEORGE'S CO.
Apartments
Condos H Co-ops
College Park/University Gardens
Apartments - 1BR and 2BR Garden
style apts. Walking distance to
UMD and College Park Metro. All
utilities included. On site parking.
Call rental office for details:
301-864-4100
www.jesapts.com
225
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
237
Firewood
EARLY SPRING SPECIAL! 1 cord $175.
2 cords $325. 3 cords $475.
4 cords $600. Call 703-357-2180
260
Furniture
table
america
stainless
art—$980, Alpharetta, GA, 706572-5125
TRISTARSTAINLESS.NET
TristarStainless.Net
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
Valet Self Storage—Let us do the
work. Storage starting at $99.00.
Pickup, storage and delivery.
www.closetbox.com 877-433-9636
275
Merchandise Wanted
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified buyer
will pick up, pay CASH. Cylinders,
cans. 312-291-9169
RECORDS - I pay cash for
50s, 60s, & 70s .
Categories: Jazz, Soul, R&R, R&B.
Call 703-865-6050
REDSKINS TICKETS WANTED—800296-3626 X3
350
Garage Sales, MD
Chevy Chase—3706 Curtis Court,
Chevy Chase, MD,
03/10/2018,
8:30 - 4:00, 508-667-2244
366
Real Estate Auctions
AUCTION!
Luxury Waterfront Villa
complete with Private Pier &
Nature Preserve – Ft. Washington,
MD; 1 ACRE – Opening
Bid - $350,000 – List
$1,000,000 – Gorgeous
5 Bdrm; 4.5 Bth;
www.PrimeAuctionSolutions.com
AUCTION March 16, 12 NOON;
OPEN HOUSE – SUN; Online &
On-Site Auction 703-889-8949
610
Dogs for Sale
APBT—Friendly Blue Nose Puppies.
To right homes. Socialised, loving,
gentle. Mum is here, stud owned
by friend. $500. Both. 571-494-8982
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS - AKC, vet
checked, shots, wormed, black &
tan, family raised, great pets or service dogs $700 540-809-7041
Labrador—571-313-1099
MARYLAND
Roommates
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
BOWIE - Shr furn house, room for
1, pref M. Internet, near shopping,
Sat TV, kit/laun priv, conv. $650/mo.
Call 301-328-4286 or 240-687-1519
Capital Heights - House to share.
Close to shopping and metro,
$165 and up 301-674-9278
LABRADOR RETRIEVERS FOR SALE
PUREBRED $1800 AKC REGISTERED
BORN 1-9-2018. 917-627-4881
francinejweir@yahoo.com
Cloverly— 1,000, 2 bedrm, 1 ba, 600
Marine Drive, 240-643-0693
FT WASH - Furn rms, beaut house
to shr. Mbdrm $700, reg. $600 incl
utils. wifi & cable rdy. 571-283-2422
1-800-753-POST
LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPPIES
AKC, Health guarantee,
Vet checked, ALL shots
(540) 879-9911
LANHAM - 2 Rooms avail, $570 &
$580/mo, Incl Utils, A/C, quiet.
240-645-2380
or
301-537-2635
LAUREL- 1 Room for rent in 2BR apt.
Priv BA, cbl, internet, prkg, W/D, incl
util, quiet. $800/mo. 240-392-5245
SF
1-800-753-POST
MITCHELLVILLE- Lg rm in bsmt for
rent. Cls to Wdmr Twn Cntr. M
pref. 301-335-5997 / 301-335-2782
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
SUITLAND - Share house. Rooms for
rent. 2 blocks from Suitland Metro.
$190/week + dep. Call 301-537-5032
How about some
home delivery?
Upper Marlboro/Perrywood- Furn rm
w/BA. N/S. Pref female. $700 + 1/3
utils, dep $200. Call 301-390-5608
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Oxon Hill— $500.00, 1 bedrm, 5100
Glassmanor Drive, 240-486-1948, Nr
Pub Transp, Men only
SF
MD Real Estate
Auctions
AUCTION!
Luxury Waterfront Villa
complete with Private Pier &
Nature Preserve – Ft. Washington,
MD; 1 ACRE – Opening
Bid - $350,000 – List
$1,000,000 – Gorgeous
5 Bdrm; 4.5 Bth;
www.PrimeAuctionSolutions.com
AUCTION March 16, 12 NOON;
OPEN HOUSE – SUN; Online &
On-Site Auction 703-889-8949
Labrador Retriever farm raised puppies,AKC, 3/4 english, black, yellow,
1stshots, vet chcked & dewormed.
Ready now. JUST REDUCED $400
cash
only.
1-540-879-2713
Miniature Dachs—$1650.00, Male &
Female, 11 weeks old yrs old, 240454-4702
Rottweiler—Puppies
Dad is National & International
Champion, ready now.
$1500, 405-481-5558
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIESBlack&white, red&white, males &
females, AKC reg. 12 weeks old.
540-877-1567 timreissig@yahoo.com
TOY POODLES & YORKIPOO PUPPIES,
8 weeks, shots/dewormed.
Will be small, hypoallergenic.
$650. Fred., VA. 540-538-1037
WHEATENS- 11wks, soft, no shed,
"meet the parents!" Black Wheatini
blending, 8wks. Crt/ppr trnd. 1.5yr
F&M Fursonality.com 540-286-0633
Yorkies Shihpoo & more— Puppies
On Sale. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC,
Easy Finance, www.wvpuppy.com,
59 East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit 16E
You know us for shopping, and
now Cars.com is the site for the
entire life of your car. So for
every turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 10x5.25
FROM "NO
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3189741.
March 7, 14, 2018
12168877
EZ
City of Fredericksburg
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
318 Wolfe Street,
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6952 RUNNYMEDE TRAIL,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407
878
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6916 HAWTHORNE WOODS CIRCLE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407-3302
Spotsylvania County
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Food
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2018
.
SECTION E
MG VA PG
EE
PHOTOS BY JASON LOUCAS /NOMA
CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: The 40-seat dining room at Noma in
Copenhagen is a calming oasis of oak, with fish skeletons hanging
on the wall; Sea snail broth is a first course, and a fitting entry
point to the multicourse meal; Venus clams are paired with a savory
black currant wood fudge.
At the new
Noma, you can
eat the future
Chef Rene Redzepi reopens his worldclass restaurant in Copenhagen with a
view toward what cuisine may become
BY
T OM S IETSEMA
copenhagen — “Sea snail broth,” a server says, introducing
the first course of a dinner for which I’ve just traveled 4,000
miles to try.
The initial impression is a warm and wonderful elixir
pooled inside a spiral-shaped shell, set on a bed of fine sand.
Part of the lip of the “cup” is rimmed with minced pickles —
oregano buds, elderflowers, lemon thyme — which add some
bite to the broth, robust with maitake oil and kelp dashi.
I have to hand it to Noma. Sea snail broth, it turns out, is
the perfect antidote to the Arctic chill that’s descended on
Copenhagen and a promising start to an hours-long journey
that will take me on a deep dive into the mind of one of the
most influential chefs on the planet.
When you’ve been away for a year and you’re staging a
return, one way to reintroduce yourself to the world is with
klieg lights and trumpet blasts. But that’s hardly the modus
operandi of Noma, hailed four times in a decade as “the
world’s best restaurant.” Seats for the Nordic adventure
created by rock star chef Rene Redzepi are in such demand
that when the acclaimed restaurant went dark and took its
show on tour last year, reservations for pop-ups in Tokyo,
Sydney and Tulum, Mexico, were snapped up in mere hours
— for their entire seasons.
How to impress customers anew after a year away? The
master of his universe, Redzepi turns out to be a master of
understatement at Noma 2.0, sharing the fruit of his latest
labors in small measures.
It’s dark when two of us are dropped off at the most
anticipated restaurant launch of the year, located less than a
mile from the original Noma and partly contained in a
former garrison, surrounded by oak and birch trees and a
small lake. Greeters standing on the side of the road assure
us we’ve come to the right place and point us to a long
wooden walkway that follows the outline of the building —
one of 11 structures on an urban farm — where a series of
windows gives us snapshots of Noma. A few paces in, we spy
neatly arranged uniforms inside. A few feet more, we spot
what we later learn to be an ant farm in the making, ants
being part of the restaurant’s legacy.
The next window demonstrates the global interest in
Noma’s return to its roots. Hey, look, it’s Jonathan Gold, the
NOMA CONTINUED ON E6
The way
to roll with
weeknight
meatballs
Tamar Adler is a quiet cook who gets people talking
BY
A LEX V AN B UREN
Special to The Washington Post
When you take the train to
Tamar Adler’s house in Hudson,
N.Y., a hamlet about 100 miles
north of Manhattan, the Hudson
River shimmers on your left. In
the winter, you can see fat hunks
of ice studding its surface. And
despite the fetid quality of the
cafe car — redolent of egg, cheese
and hot dogs swaddled in plastic
blankets — it is a meditative ride,
a quiet ride.
Adler is herself a peaceable
cook, and a pragmatic one. She is
the author of one cookbook acclaiming thrift and grace (“An
Everlasting Meal”), and a newthis-April one (“Something Old,
Something New: Classic Recipes
Revised”) that’s a meditation on
recipes of yore — and on remaking them in a simpler, less expensive way. She lives in an 1840s-era
home she and her husband
bought on impulse, where they’re
raising their toddler, a towheaded
boy who has recently learned how
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jimmy Kimmel makes adorable pancakes
for his kids, and his wife is so over it. E3
WINE
DUTCH BABY PANCAKES
Napa Valley rebounds
from fall wildfires. E7
Spectacular, versatile,
so easy to make. E8
MORE AT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RECIPES
Mushroom and Beef Stroganoff E2
Voraciously: One-Pan Roast Chicken and Potatoes E3
Blender Dutch Babies E8
ADLER CONTINUED ON E4
Harissa Dutch Baby With Tomatoes and Mozzarella E8
RECIPE
Tipsy Cake, pictured at right E4
Cauliflower Jalapeño Dutch Baby E8
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Chat At noon: live.washingtonpost.com Newsletter wapo.st/cookwithus
As the recipe
name suggests —
30-Minute
Spaghetti and
Meatballs — this
is no substitute
Bonnie S. for the kind of
Benwick
meatballs
simmered for
DINNER IN
hours in your
MINUTES
nonna’s Sunday
gravy. Strangely enough, the
recipe doesn’t even include
oregano or basil or a dry Chianti.
And yet, I think this is a meal
you’ll be happy to produce on a
weeknight or any time you are
craving tomato-y comfort food.
The meatball mixture is basic
but does the trick: ground
turkey, parsley, garlic and panko,
plus salt and pepper. The
meatballs brown in a skillet and
finish cooking in the sauce,
E2
EZ
In this spin on strogano≠,
mushrooms are the star
uncompromised, cultured,
spoon-coating silkiness, gives the
sauce its distinctive essence. But
this recipe calls for about half of
what many recipes call for and
does the trick without adding
heaviness.
Using olive oil instead of
butter also helps keep the dish in
the healthful zone. Spiked with a
tangy hint of mustard, sprinkled
with fresh parsley and served
over egg noodles (look for wholegrain), it’s an Old World dinner
with a new outlook.
This comforting
meal of beef and
sauteed
mushrooms
mingling in a
velvety, sour
Ellie
cream-enriched
Krieger
sauce has the
same basic
NOURISH
ingredients of a
classic stroganoff,
but they are re-proportioned so
the dish is much better for you,
with a balanced richness that
satisfies in a lighter way.
Here, compared with the
traditional recipe, the ratio of
beef to mushrooms is flipped. So
while there is tender steak in
every bite, meaty mushrooms are
more of a major player. Regular
sour cream — not reduced- or
low-fat — with its
food@washpost.com
Krieger is a registered dietitian,
nutritionist and author who hosts
public television’s “Ellie’s Real Good
Food.” She blogs and offers a weekly
newsletter at www.elliekrieger.com.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
It’s not Nonna’s. But it’ll do.
DINNER FROM E1
which is even simpler — canned
tomatoes, pureed in a blender.
When you drain the pasta, save a
little of its cooking water; it
contains some starch that will
help bind the sauce and
spaghetti together. (If you want
to geek on this, check out the
experimentation at
SeriousEats.com.) Add the
cooked pasta and a splash of
water to that pot of sauce and
meatballs, then let it cook for
just a minute or so. It makes a
difference.
I’m a big fan of cold spaghetti
for breakfast, and rate this dish
two snaps up, leftoverwise.
Remember, all these
ingredients are in the Dinner in
Minutes Pantry, which you can
view online: Voraciously.com.
Bonnie S. Benwick tested this
recipe. Questions? Email her:
bonnie.benwick@washpost.com or at
voraciously@washpost.com.
Find other quick meals with The
Post’s Recipe Finder:
washingtonpost.com/recipes
30-Minute Spaghetti
and Meatballs
4 servings
Serve with a green salad.
Adapted from “Martha Stewart’s Newlywed Kitchen: Recipes
for Weeknight Dinners and Easy,
Casual Gatherings,” by the editors
of Martha Stewart Living (Clarkson Potter, 2017).
PHOTOS BY STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Mushroom and Beef Stroganoff
4 servings, Healthy
We found No Yolks brand whole-grain egg noodles at Giant stores
and online via Amazon.com.
From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.
Ingredients
12 ounces boneless sirloin steak,
trimmed and thinly sliced
across the grain
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 or 2 large shallots, chopped
(about 1/2 cup)
20 ounces button mushrooms,
cleaned, stemmed and sliced
(about 6 cups)
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon flour
11/4 cups low-sodium beef broth
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1/2 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
parsley
Cooked whole-grain egg
noodles, for serving (see
headnote)
Steps
Season the meat with 1/4 teaspoon each salt and pepper.
Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a
large skillet over medium-high
heat. Once the oil shimmers, add
the beef and cook for 1 to 2
minutes, until seared but still
pink inside. Transfer the meat
with its juices to a plate.
Heat the remaining 2 table-
spoons of oil to the skillet (medium heat). Add the shallot and
cook for about a minute, stirring, until softened. Add the
mushrooms, and then the garlic,
and cook for 8 to 10 minutes,
stirring occasionally, until the
mushrooms have released their
water and it has evaporated.
Sprinkle the mushrooms with
the flour and stir until well combined. Add the beef broth and,
stirring, bring to a boil. Reduce
the heat to low; add the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Cook for about 5
minutes, until the mixture thickens and reduces slightly, then
stir in the mustard until well
incorporated. Add the sour
cream, stirring until well blended.
Return the meat and any accumulated juices to the pan; cook
for 1 to 2 minutes, until the meat
is just warmed through, but still
medium-rare.
Serve warm, garnished with the
parsley, over the noodles.
Nutrition | Per serving (without the noodles):
310 calories, 25 g protein, 11 g
carbohydrates, 19 g fat, 6 g saturated fat, 70
mg cholesterol, 450 mg sodium, 2 g dietary
fiber, 5 g sugar
Recipe tested by Matt Arnold and Nilar
Andrea Chit Tun; email questions to
food@washpost.com
FO O D
To contact us: E-mail:
food@washpost.com Telephone:
202-334-7575 Mail: The
Washington Post, Food, 1301 K St.
NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
Joe Yonan
Ingredients
Kosher salt
6 stems fresh parsley
2 cloves garlic
One 2-ounce piece ParmigianoReggiano cheese, for serving
8 ounces dried spaghetti
1 large egg
1 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper
1/3 cup panko (bread crumbs)
1 pound ground turkey,
preferably dark meat
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive
oil, or more as needed
One 28-ounce can whole
peeled tomatoes, plus their
juices
His column
will return
next week.
WEEKNIGHT
VEGETARIAN
Steps
Bring a large pot of water to a
boil over high heat. Add a generous pinch or two of salt.
Meanwhile, mince the parsley
leaves and the garlic. Use a
Microplane grater or box grater
to grate the cheese.
Add the pasta to the boiling
water; reduce the heat to medium-high and cook according to
the package directions, until al
dente.
While the pasta cooks, combine
the parsley, garlic, egg, 1 teaspoon salt and the pepper,
panko and ground turkey in a
mixing bowl. Use your clean
hands to gently mix, until thoroughly incorporated.
Form the meatballs; I like to do
this in two steps, which won’t
add time to the clock and eliminates the guesswork involved in
making them all the right size:
First, divide the meatball mixture into 16 equal portions,
placing them on a piece of
parchment paper or on a cutting board. Then, wet your
hands and roll them into balls.
Drain the pasta, reserving 2
tablespoons of the pasta cooking water.
Heat the oil in a large nonstick
skillet over medium heat. Add
the meatballs and cook for 8 to
10 minutes, turning as needed
ABOVE: To make the meatballs uniform in size, portion them first, then wet your hands and roll them.
BELOW: Brown them in a pan; they won’t be cooked through at that point, but will finish in the sauce.
to brown evenly. (They won’t be
cooked through.)
Pour the tomatoes and their
juices into a blender. Cover and
puree until smooth, then transfer the sauce and the meatballs
to the same pot you used for the
spaghetti (which should at this
point be cooked and drained, in
the colander). Once the mixture
starts to bubble, reduce the heat
to medium-low, partially cover
and cook for 10 to 12 minutes,
which will finish cooking the
meatballs.
Add the pasta to the pot, tossing
gently to incorporate; add the
pasta cooking water and let the
whole thing cook for another
minute or two; this will help
thicken the sauce. Divide
among bowls; drizzle with a
little more oil, if desired, and
scatter the Parm on each portion. Serve warm.
Nutrition | Per serving: 530 calories, 30 g
protein, 52 g carbohydrates, 20 g fat, 5 g
saturated fat, 135 mg cholesterol, 170 mg
sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 5 g sugar
The Dinner in Minutes Pantry
Every ingredient you’ll need to make dozens of meals in no time.
Online at Voraciously.com
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Great Reviews Awardee
GUILD QUALIT Y
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E3
EE
VORACIOUSLY
Roasting a chicken is a simple skill to learn
With minimal equipment
and effort, dinner can be
a showstopper
BY
B ECKY K RYSTAL
Learn to roast a whole chicken
and you’ll eat well for life. And,
hey, if you’re anything like Prince
Harry, it might help you get
engaged, too.
There are plenty of reasons
you should add roast chicken to
your cooking repertoire. It can be
an impressive centerpiece for
dinner, and you can use the meat
to make so many other dishes,
such as enchiladas, chicken salad
or pot pies. Plus, the bones are
ideal for broth, and if your
chicken comes with a giblet
packet of the liver, gizzard and
such, make stock or gravy.
Just as important: Roasting a
chicken is not hard to do.
You can scour the Internet or
cookbooks and find way too
many complicated or intimidating strategies. Brining. Flipping.
Stove top and then oven. Spatchcocking. I didn’t want any of it. I
wanted to roast a chicken, simply.
That is why this recipe from
America’s Test Kitchen appeals
to me. No special steps, no
special equipment. (You’ll want
an instant-read thermometer,
but that’s a workhorse that’s
worth the investment if you don’t
already have one. Also: kitchen
twine, cheap and easy to acquire,
although some chickens already
have the legs tied back when you
buy them; if you don’t have
twine, plain, unwaxed dental
floss works, as does cutting two
slats in the skin and inserting a
leg in each one.)
The only other requirements
are an ovenproof skillet and
some oil, salt and pepper. The
genius of the recipe is heating
the chicken in a very hot oven for
half the time inside the preheated skillet and then letting it
finish with the oven turned off.
Very little effort — or, really, skill
— is needed, and even if it
doesn’t result in the crispiest
chicken skin you’ll ever have, the
oven-off time keeps the meat
from drying out.
Instead of a skillet, I decided
to use a rimmed baking sheet (or
sheet pan), which better contained the splattering fat that
smoked up our Food Lab oven on
my first attempt in a cast-iron
skillet (the biggest oven-safe skillet a lot of people own). Plus, the
sheet pan gave me enough room
to throw on some sliced potatoes,
which further cut down on the
fat firecrackers and, of course,
resulted in a built-in side dish.
becky.krystal@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
One-Pan Roast
Chicken and Potatoes
4 to 6 servings
Once you master this recipe —
probably the very first time you
make it — you can start tweaking
it to suit your tastes.
Adapted from “How to Roast
Everything,” by America’s Test
Kitchen
(Penguin
Random
House, 2018).
Ingredients
One whole 31/2- to 4-pound
chicken, giblet packet
removed if included
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
11/2 pounds Yukon Gold
potatoes, scrubbed and cut
into 1/4-inch slices
Extra-virgin olive oil
Steps
Place a rimmed baking sheet
on the middle oven rack; preheat to 450 degrees.
Pat the chicken dry with paper
towels, then rub the entire
surface with the vegetable oil.
Season the chicken generously
with salt and pepper, including
a pinch of each tossed in the
Voraciously.com
Our new destination makes it
easier than ever to build kitchen
skills, get dinner on the table,
improve your equipment game
and share food with friends
cavity. Tie the legs together and
tuck the wingtips (the segment
from the last joint to the tip)
behind the back. (This keeps
those parts from cooking too
fast and drying out.)
Toss the potatoes with just
enough extra-virgin olive oil to
lightly coat them; this will help
keep them from sticking to the
pan.
Transfer the chicken, breast side
up, to the center of the preheated baking sheet in the oven.
Scatter the potatoes around, but
not under, the chicken. Alternatively, if you don’t feel comfortable reaching into the oven with
the rack pulled out, remove the
heated baking sheet from the
oven to add the chicken and
potatoes before proceeding with
roasting.
Roast the chicken and potatoes
for 25 to 35 minutes (middle
rack), until the breast registers
120 degrees on an instant-read
thermometer
(temperature
taken away from the bone) and
the thighs 135 degrees. Turn off
the oven; let the chicken and
potatoes rest there for 25 to 35
minutes, until the breast registers 160 degrees and thighs 175
degrees. Transfer the chicken
to a cutting board to rest for 20
minutes; this is a key step that
allows the juices to be reabsorbed into the meat.
Carve the chicken and serve,
drizzling pan juices over the
pieces, if desired.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 6): 510
calories, 46 g protein, 20 g carbohydrates,
26 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 140 mg
cholesterol, 320 mg sodium, 1 g dietary
fiber, 0 g sugar
Recipe tested by Becky Krystal; email
questions to food@washpost.com
Kimmel’s pancake art nets mixed reviews at home
BY
M OLLY M C N EARNEY
You may know my husband,
Jimmy Kimmel, at night. Late at
night. He’s funny and smart and
sometimes reflective. He works
exceptionally hard to entertain.
But I know him in the morning, and he’s annoying. Really
annoying. And not in a typical
way. Oh no. Never typical. He’s
annoying in a highly productive,
quietly creative, intensely aggravating way.
Just when I think he’s spent all
his energy on the previous night’s
show, when I think he has nothing left to give, he rises shortly
after the sun, crawls out of bed,
down the stairs and into our
kitchen, and with a quick squeeze
of a squirt bottle, spurts cartoon
characters onto a hot griddle.
He makes pancakes. And not
your average pancakes. He makes
art. With pancake batter. Like a
lumberjack psychopath.
I don’t mean to sound negative, but I’m a working mother.
I’m tired. I don’t have much
tolerance for showoffs. I write
full-time for “Jimmy Kimmel
Live!” and then come home to an
even more demanding job raising
our 10-month-old son, Billy, and
3-year-old daughter, Jane. And as
working parents know, getting
them fed, dressed, clean enough
and out the door while frequently
checking emails for work every
morning is chaotic. If you don’t
have kids, just imagine going
FAMILY PHOTOS
ABOVE: Late-night host Jimmy Kimmel, the writer’s husband, uses
colored pancake mixes to make artful breakfasts for his 3-year-old
daughter. RIGHT: A recent offering designed to look like Snoopy.
through your daily morning routine in the monkey cage at a zoo.
So, typically, I wake tired and
guilt-ridden and resigned to sluggishly pouring my toddler a bowl
of Cheerios, and magically, Dad
marches down the stairs to make
pancakes. That would make a
mother happy, right? It does. The
first half-dozen times.
Jimmy is an excellent cook. I
do not take that for granted. He
enjoys it, and I enjoy eating, and
that makes for a happy home.
Until the pancakes showed up.
And now I feel inadequate.
Jimmy first started making our
daughter “normal” pancakes
about a year ago. She enjoyed
them, and we were delighted.
But that wasn’t good enough.
He started to experiment. He
ordered plastic squeeze bottles
and organic food coloring. He
bought food decorating pens (as
every man does shortly after
turning 50).
He started with red heartshaped pancakes on Valentine’s
Day. He did not use a cookie
cutter. He freestyled. Jane loved
them. I loved them. We ate them
together, and I admired his
thoughtfulness.
A couple days later, he made a
delightful three-color clown.
Again, by hand. And again, as
someone who can barely draw a
stick figure, I appreciated his
handiwork.
Then he got aggressive. He
made Dory. She was perfect. Next,
a full-color Thomas the Tank
Engine. He made Nemo and a
Spider-Man who, I swear, rolled
his eyes at me. He started mixing
his batter before bed. He took
requests and delighted our
daughter, squirting Snoopy,
Charlie Brown and even Lightning McQueen the morning after
he hosted the Oscars. All realistic,
totally edible portrayals. All done
by hand over a hot griddle before
Kathie Lee and Hoda had
chugged their first quart of chardonnay.
I told you. He’s annoying.
And now his artistic ability has
become my burden. When he
isn’t home, our daughter sits at
the kitchen table, glares at me
and says, “I want a pancake.
Peppa Pig.” She doesn’t even
know that pancakes are round. I
try to sell her on a bowl of
oatmeal. I tell her it’s Wonder
Woman food. She doesn’t buy it.
She demands the edible art she is
accustomed to. I cave and nervously promise her a pancake.
“I’ll make you a ‘brown ball!’ ” She
looks at me with confusion, followed by pity and then disgust. A
tantrum follows.
Being a mother is hard enough.
Pancake artist is NOT in the job
description. I attempted a smiley
face once. I don’t want to talk
about it.
One day my children will appreciate that I gave birth to them
and stayed up all night breastfeeding and rubbing growing
pains out of their legs. One day
they will remember that I always
had a snack in my purse and a
baby wipe in my glove compartment. They might even thank me
for teaching them good manners
if I did it successfully.
Until then, I’ll make waffles.
food@washpost.com
McNearney is co-head writer of
“Jimmy Kimmel Live!”
E4
MG
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
The voice of women in the kitchen doesn’t require vulgar volume
ADLER FROM E1
Tipsy Cake
to say “spatula.” Spassla!
Living her relatively quiet life
in a relatively quiet place, Adler —
a former chef at Chez Panisse in
the Bay Area and at a small restaurant in Georgia — now seems
far from the hubbub ripping
through the bright-lights, big-city
restaurant world. But as male
celebrity chefs like Mario Batali
and John Besh topple after sexual
misconduct allegations, they
leave a question in their wakes.
For female cooks at home and at
work, after the big question of
being safe is tackled, what does
freedom look like?
In 2012, Adler wrote a New
Yorker piece asserting that in Anthony Bourdain’s TV show “No
Reservations,” he “bathes everything, even if it’s naturally quiet
and normal, in brutishness.” She
objected to the “swagger” and
“bluster” of Bourdainisms such
as, “I’m . . . quivering with desire
here,” and “I would jerk a rusty
butter knife over my best friend’s
throat just for this [soup].” Bourdain wasn’t happy with her critique, commenting that she had
mistaken a joke for bluster. Adler
had, it seemed, made an enemy.
Five years later, she caught
Bourdain’s eye again when reviewing Canadian restaurateur
Jen Agg’s memoir, “I Hear She’s a
Real Bitch,” in the New York
Times. The memoir is blowzy,
direct and, yes, swaggering —
loosely reminiscent of Bourdain’s
own writing. Agg writes that she
“can’t stand how vilified teenage
girls and women are for their
sexuality,” and proceeds to chronicle her own sex life and specific
instances of sexism. She curses.
She bridles at being labeled a
“mean girl” in magazine profiles.
Adler wasn’t a fan. It’s “a feminist mandate of a very specific
variety — the kind that invites, or
gives permission to, women to act
like stereotypical men,” she wrote.
Bourdain, who had blurbed Agg’s
book as “beautifully written,” retorted that Adler’s review was “a
badly written turdlet.”
8 servings
As author Tamar Adler says in
her new cookbook, “this is a good
dessert for people who don’t like
to bake and for those who lose
track of what they buy and when.”
It was also called Tipsy Charlotte
or Tipsy Parson. In the classic
recipe, stale pound cake is soaked
in sherry or brandy and topped
with whipped sweet cream.
MAKE AHEAD: The cake
needs to be refrigerated for 2 to 6
hours before serving.
Adapted from Adler’s “Something Old, Something New: Classic Recipes Revised” (Scribner,
2018).
Ingredients
One stale pound cake or
sponge cake, in loaf form
1/2 cup best-quality sweet wine,
such as moscatel or sauternes
3/4 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons whole-milk
ricotta cheese
AARON STERN/SIMON AND SCHUSTER
Tamar Adler worked in
kitchens for Gabrielle Hamilton
and Alice Waters before
concentrating on writing.
Fast-forward to 2018: For New
York magazine, Adler chronicled
what she ate for several days,
including an egg she cooked in a
hand-forged spoon in the coals of
a fire at her carriage house. Bourdain suggested Adler’s article
read as satire. Criticisms of her
life began to bubble up among his
7 million followers like water in a
glass: “Insufferable.” “Pretentious.” “Twee.” “Navel-gazing.”
Even “vomitorious.”
Bourdain, asked about Adler’s
work, his tweet and the comments that ensued, emailed, “As
with any writer of note, I feel Ms.
Adler’s work should speak for
itself. I was obviously very unhappy with her review of Jen Agg’s
book. But that’s one person’s opinion.”
Adler laughs about “Eggspoon-
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Use the 1/2 cup of sweet wine to
evenly moisten all the layers; a
pastry brush works well.
Combine the heavy cream and
ricotta in the chilled mixing
bowl. Use a balloon-whisk attachment (for the stand mixer)
to beat on medium speed, to
the consistency of just beyond
soft peaks.
Lay a first layer of the soaked
cake on a plate; top with one-
quarter of the whipped cream.
Gently place a second cake
layer on top and spread the
same amount of whipped
cream on it; the sides do not
have to be kept neat. Repeat
with the third layer of cake and
half the remaining whipped
cream, then place the last layer
of cake on top. You should have
some whipped cream left; cover and refrigerate until ready to
after four hours trying to thaw
pipes.
“I didn’t light a stove because I
had a fire going,” she marvels.
“How is that anything but practical?”
work. Many do, but in 2018, the
question is complicated further,
especially in professional kitchens. Beyond the harassment and
assault that continue to plague
women (and some men), there is a
sense in some restaurants that if
women don’t conform to the stereotypically male image of a chef
— the loud and threatening Gordon Ramsay, for example — they
won’t make it in the industry.
Not all chefs conform to an
aggressive model. Adler briefly
apprenticed for Gabrielle Hamilton, co-chef and owner of Prune
in New York City, during brunch
service. One morning, Adler had
been struggling to get Dutch baby
pancakes and eggs en cocotte in
and out of a very hot oven. It was a
juggling act in a pint-sized space,
and no one could squeeze by
when the oven door was open.
One morning, that was the chef
herself. Adler recalls Hamilton
saying quietly, “If I were a different kind of chef and this were a
different kind of restaurant, I
would count ‘1, 2, 3, 4, 5’ while you
have the oven door open, and
then I would slam it,” before walking away. (Hamilton, reached for
comment, clarified that she was
joking.) But Adler remembers being grateful that it wasn’t a different kind of chef, nor a different
kind of restaurant, and calls this
“one of the kindest things she ever
did.” She never saw Hamilton lose
her temper.
Options for how to act can feel
more limited for women trying to
make it farther down the pecking
order.
“I don’t manage by barking, by
swinging my d--- around, by saying, ‘I’m the best cook in this
kitchen,’ ” said one female chef
who works in a major metropolitan restaurant. (She spoke on the
condition of anonymity to protect
her job.) “I don’t think it has to be
that way.” She works in a mostly
male kitchen and says she has
been sexually harassed by a manager in front of all her colleagues.
She chose not to pursue legal
action. He has since been fired,
and she is rising through the
ranks.
Recently, though, she received
the first middling performance
evaluation of her life. Her “problem”? She is quiet.
“You need to learn how to command respect. You need to find
your voice,” she says a manager
told her.
The chef bristles at this: “I have
a voice; it’s just not the voice you
think I should have.”
If, in addition to being aggressive, the professional kitchen is a
hyper-sexualized space — which a
writer in the New York Times
credited in part to “Kitchen Confidential,” Bourdain’s memoir —
some women enter the industry
ready to play ball on both fronts.
Maybe they wear bustiers and
tons of makeup. Maybe they write
sexed-up, swear-stained memoirs, as Agg did. Tiffani Faison, a
Boston chef who gained notoriety
on “Top Chef,” recently wrote at
Eater that her likability shouldn’t
dictate her success.
Some would say that’s their
prerogative. “Good for them,” says
the chef who spoke on the condition of anonymity. “I think that
[women] should all be able to
exist in whatever form we are.”
But quiet cooks are legitimate,
too, she would posit. Though she
admits that some days she considers sexing up her look or being
louder, she says, “I shouldn’t have
to change who I am to be successful or deserving of respect in the
kitchen.”
Steps
Preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Chill the mixing bowl of a
stand mixer or handheld mixer.
Cut the loaf pound cake horizontally into 4 equal layers.
Arrange them flat on a baking
sheet; bake (middle rack) for 30
minutes, or until very dry.
gate” now. “People want women
in food media to be ingénues or
broads,” she says, adding that she
is neither. “I don’t find it terribly
graceful to curse if you don’t need
to, or talk too much about things
that are only important to you. It’s
just not how I was brought up.
When you are resistant to falling
easily into one of those two categories, that can feel unsettling.”
She had built a fire because the
former carriage house is neither
heated nor insulated. It’s where
she writes, high in the rafters, like
a mouse, to make money to help
feed her family. As for the egg, it
was the first thing she had eaten
A
woman in a kitchen has
been a hot-button topic
since 1963, when Betty
Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” — a searing condemnation
of women’s unpaid domestic labor — hit shelves. Since then,
many women with a yen for a
whisk and a stove have grappled
with the question of whether they
truly find pleasure in kitchen
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t WHEATON, MD
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serve the cake.
Cover the cake loosely with
plastic wrap and refrigerate for
2 to 6 hours.
To serve, top with the remaining whipped cream.
Nutrition | Per serving: 240 calories, 3 g
protein, 20 g carbohydrates, 16 g fat, 10 g
saturated fat, 110 mg cholesterol, 150 mg
sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 14 g sugar
Recipe tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; email
questions to food@washpost.com
Both of her bosses are men.
One is loud and swaggering, the
other quiet. No one, she says,
chuckling, would ever dream of
telling the quiet boss to be louder.
There’s hope that the #MeToo
movement has sparked some reflection among managers in restaurant kitchens, and that the era
of toxicity might be winding
down. “It’s a much healthier industry these days,” says chef Ashley Christensen, owner of Poole’s
Diner in Raleigh and other North
Carolina restaurants, who has
spoken out about sexual harassment. She is optimistic that yelling and fear-based management
is starting to become “part of the
past.”
If the first battle for women is
to be safe — to be free from
assault, to have a non-sexualized
workplace and to have physical
boundaries respected — perhaps
the second is to have freedom and
individuality. To be who you are in
your home or work kitchen, and
to have your choice be respected.
It might sound simple, or small,
but as any woman who has ever
had a random man yell, “Smile!”
at her as she walks down the
street knows, freedom can be a
complicated thing.
C
hopping parsley and whisking cream as the sun fills up
her kitchen, Adler doesn’t
appreciate being pigeonholed as
“twee.” “It’s preposterous.”
These days, she has mixed feelings about the piece she wrote
about Bourdain and thinks she’ll
avoid invectives, as a form, going
forward. (Her Agg review, however, she defends as a paid piece of
social criticism, not an attack,
though she added, “I dislike writing anything negative.”) She is
working on a new book — an
A-to-Z encyclopedia dedicated to
using leftovers — and is a contributing writer for Vogue, on topics
as eclectic as curing a Peking duck
in her window and making millefeuille for love.
She cooked dinner for friends
as her son ran around clutching
the spassla, babbling to his father.
She is a generous host — inviting
people she sees at the wine shop
at the last minute — and a resourceful one. (If you must make
a meal stretch, she says, “Starch,
starch, starch!”) Her economizing
ethos shines in her new book:
“This will be delicious when made
with less butter, less wine, less
time, less cost!”
Adler mixes haute and cheap
elements as a hog might snarfle
caviar and radishes — with alacrity. Her Tipsy Cake includes a
walnut liqueur from the French
countryside and a pre-made Marie Callender’s poundcake. Her
homemade orange spirit, which
she calls “vin d’orange,” is simple
as can be, conjuring a rocking
chair and a sunny porch. Her
freezer is stuffed to the brim with
all manner of stems and knobs
and chicken skins. When she fries
chicken for our supper, she tilts
the right side of her body toward
the stove, and her left away, the
better to hold her son safely. He
likes to be where she is, and
pointed, smiling, at the oil: “Bubbles.”
Of Eggspoongate, she says simply, “It seems like a willing desire
to make something that is not the
case the case. To make preciousness where in fact there is just . . .
a life.”
food@washpost.com
Van Buren is a writer, editor and
content strategist living in Brooklyn,
where she is working on a book.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
Can Noma 2.0 be even better than the original?
as we admire the work of the
pastry department: fermented
pear and roasted kelp ice cream
tucked into what looks like a mussel shell, and yogurt reworked as
powdery snow studded with soft,
itty-bitty candied pine cones.
Plankton cake demonstrates, once
again, the versatility of kelp.
NOMA FROM E1
Pulitzer Prize-winning food critic
from the Los Angeles Times! No
less a guide than Redzepi, disarmingly boyish at 40, is showing the
subject of the documentary “City
of Gold” around.
Call me lucky. Back in November, when the reservation site accidentally went live, briefly, 30 minutes before the world was told it
could take a crack at booking for
the first season, I found myself
staring at available lunch and dinner dates from its scheduled opening day on Feb. 15 through April.
Using a pseudonym, I scored a
first-month dinner reservation
(about $365 a head, not including
alcohol), so it comes as a surprise
when I walk through the door and
get a verbal bear hug from a gaggle
of chefs and servers, as if I’m their
long-lost friend from Tulum, my
only prior taste of Noma. With
only 40 seats in the peaked main
dining room, a calming oasis of
oak, every spot is a prized chef’s
table. I’m checking out the fish
skeletons on the wall and the
dried seaweed hanging from a
service table — fitting accents for a
debut menu celebrating seafood
— when the first course is set
before me.
N
O
ceans of shells follow, first in
the form of nickel-size Venus clams, some open to
reveal their tender insides, others
turned over and empty; they’re
decorative support. A condiment
of black currant wood oil, reduced
cucumber juice and butter makes
for a dense sort of savory fudge,
but the sweet little clams are better without it.
A clutch of blue mussels, polished to a sheen by the staff, adorn
the lid of the next course, two
mussels affixed to a single split
shell. The treat has us scratching
our heads, wondering how
Redzepi managed to mess not just
with us, but with Mother Nature.
Like many of the lead ingredients
tonight, the bivalves taste of the
sea times 10.
What appears to be creme brulee is a thin, crackling cover of
dried fish broth and shrimp butter
hovering over “dried fruits and
shrimps.” The liquid broth beneath the edible lace ping pongs
from sweet to buttery to tart,
thanks to gooseberries in the mix.
It soon becomes apparent that
we’re eating the future, so influential is Redzepi’s thought process
that his dishes are copied at the
speed of the Internet by chefs
around the world. Consider the
novel way he serves trout roe,
coaxed into the shape of a starfish
with lightly cured egg yolks and
finished with pumpkin seed oil, a
brilliant composition in all senses
of the word. Dinner is as much an
education as an interesting way to
fill up. Cigar-shaped razor clam
shells, we learn, make excellent
scoops. Tiled with peeled pumpkin seeds and sitting in a puddle of
rose oil-infused cream, a lobe of
sea urchin, the foie gras of 2018,
shows up in half its spiky shell.
Here and there, the sound of shells
rubbing on plates demonstrates
an attempt to engage all the senses.
A purple blob that looks like a
stand-in from “Alien” shows up on
a platter of ice, and we’re encouraged to poke it. The creature
moves, and my finger feels slimy,
as if I just touched a toad. “Sea
cucumber,” says an attendant. The
creature turns out to be a mere
garnish for two little bowls of ovaries (“a delicacy in Japan”) and
skin, the latter of which poke out
from a dab of whipped cream seasoned with salt kelp. If Poseidon
ate potato chips, he’d crave these.
Redzepi dips in and out of the
dining room to chat up his patrons. “If you’re lucky, you might
see a fox,” he says, nodding toward
an expansive window. “We have
ducks in the lake.” Later, he tells us
that he tested so many dishes in
advance of the restaurant’s return,
when “the ocean is the season,” he
actually created enough for two
distinct seafood menus. (Returning guests might want a change of
pace, right?)
Summer will highlight vegetables, fall and winter will showcase
game and forest fixtures. A chance
to try the former happened March
5, when bookings were made
available online at 10 a.m. Eastern
time.
As intriguing as most of the
dishes are at Noma, the ones that
linger in my memory are the seemingly simplest. An ivory tube of
squid, brushed with seaweed butter and poised on a raft of black
currant branches, is so finely
scored that when you poke the
poached seafood with a fork, the
pieces unfurl into what could pass
for linguine. “Head of the cod” is
delicious truth in advertising —
the cheek, jowl and eye area of the
fish, glossy and a bit sticky from
their time on the restaurant’s
wood grill. Alongside the plate of
fish are frizzy grilled ramsons, a
variety of wild garlic dressed with
JASON LOUCAS/NOMA
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: A seat in the dining room offers the possibility of seeing Danish wildlife in the wooded area outside. “If you’re
lucky, you might see a fox,” chef Rene Redzepi says. A dish called “head of cod” comes with condiments including wood ants, which add a
lemony flavor. A cook preps one of the dozen or so courses of the seafood-themed menu at Noma. Redzepi is planning to do a plant-based
menu for the next season, starting in May.
smoked butter and a scallop
“fudge” that relies on dried seafood and beeswax. Also, a trio of
condiments: salt, horseradish
cream and black dots that suggest
pepper but are in fact wood ants.
They add a fascinating lemony jolt
to the cod and, swear to God, make
me eager for the day Safeway
stocks them. (Ants are nothing
new to Noma-philes, who may
have been served the insects on
beef tartare at the original restaurant, atop live shrimp in Tokyo or
on avocado in Tulum.)
“W
ould you like to continue or pause?” a server
asks shortly before the
dessert courses. Guest comfort is a
major priority at Noma. The
courses aren’t so many or so heavy
that we want to cry “Stop!,” but it’s
nice to take a break from the food
and enjoy the view and the clientele, which a server figures is “half
Danish, half from all over the
world.” Through the window, we
spy a trio of smokestacks in the
distance, which turn out to produce clean steam at an ecofriendly incineration plant. So
mindful, the Danes.
A dozen or more courses is a
long time to stay in your seat.
Increasingly, ambitious restaurants the world over like to show
off the whole of their vision, which
means diners might be taken on a
tour of the grounds or escorted to
another room for part of lunch or
dinner.
Visiting so early in the game
means some of Redzepi’s many
ideas aren’t quite ready for prime
time. Noma isn’t offering bread at
the moment, since its bakery has
yet to fire up its ovens. Nor is the
test kitchen — a glass house in
which future guests will be able to
glimpse tomorrow’s ideas — completely done.
That still leaves plenty to see,
starting with a foyer of squid, octo-
Noma chef Rene Redzepi, above, demands a
lot from his staff, but he takes care of them as
well. What other restaurant is promising
its staff a sauna?
pus and other sea creatures displayed in jars on a big, round table,
an idea Redzepi got while visiting
a natural-history museum with
his daughter. There’s a sleek canteen for the staff, a library’s worth
of cookbooks from around the
world, a fish tank with animated
Norwegian crab — like the muchdiscussed cod sperm, the crabs are
on the next day’s menu — and a big
ant farm collected from twigs and
earth that Redzepi says is missing
“a sex room” for the insects. Nearer the enormous exposed kitchen
are rooms devoted to barbecue
and fermention.
Redzepi demands a lot from his
staff, but he takes care of them as
well. What other restaurant is
promising its staff a sauna? Employees also get to vote on how
much they want to work. For the
second half of June, vegetable season, they’ve agreed to do dinner
service only.
The new Noma benefits greatly
from the team’s travels abroad.
Tokyo, says Redzepi, taught him
that there’s “no one way to do
something,” but also, “we weren’t
stuck. We would be able to do
something different.” The pop-up
in Sydney, where the chef encountered pine cones the size of footballs, helped the staff to “organize
in proper fashion.” The jungle setting in Tulum, meanwhile, underscored the beauty of “being so
close to nature,” a priority that
plays out in the natural, light-enhanced design found in Copenhagen.
The last few bites at Noma are
enjoyed in a lounge that revels in
hygge, (pronounced HUE-gah)
the Danish concept of extreme
coziness. While much of the restaurant fuses “rawness with the
Blade Runner,” as Redzepi puts it,
the final stop of the meal is a
beautifully lit room furnished
with low couches and a crackling
fire. A choice of spirits are offered
oma has the advantage of
experience behind it. But
the pressure of reopening
on home turf (a day late because
some crucial parts didn’t arrive on
time), plus impressing guests
anew, occasionally slips into a
meal. “Pick up, please?” I overhear
a manager call out in the open
kitchen. “Can I get a waiter, now,
now, now?” he says with the urgency of a man who knows that
people have shelled out thousands
of dollars for the privilege of dining here, airfare and hotels not
included. When I suggest to a veteran server that working so close
and so long together must be like
live theater, she smiles and jests,
“more like a traveling circus.”
Yet service is every bit as considered as the food. It’s almost impossible to stump the staff with a
question. When I ask a server
about the oak planks in the dining
room, she tells me they’re held
together by 250,000 nails, and
that much of the wood was carried
in by staff. Team members tend to
be hired more for their personalities than their résumés, plus their
willingness to endure “11 months
of s---ty weather “ in Copenhagen,
jokes Redzepi, who has already
sent at least one colleague to the
doctor for vitamin D.
Noma’s Norwegian sommelier,
Mads Kleppe, appears to be BFF
with all his sources. Except for the
house-brewed beer, flavored with
coriander, the wines are mostly
from producers he knows personally. “I picked the grapes for this
vintage,” he says as he pours our
glasses with Laissez-Faire from
Christian Tschida in Austria. “Enjoy this while you are here,” he says
of the wine that few but the producer and Noma have in stock.
Menus aren’t presented until
after dinner, and then as a scroll
tethered to a cute woven crab.
Noma prefers you dine in the moment.
“Creativity comes when you fill
yourself with knowledge by reading, travel and conversation, then
fuse it with the now,” says Redzepi.
As early as it is in the seafood
season, Redzepi is already mulling
the next menu, a plant-based one,
in May. “What can we do with
crudites?” he asks himself.
“What’s a vegetable main course?”
There’s little chance Redzepi
will get bored now that he’s back in
Copenhagen. “We built this space
with that in mind,” he tells me over
coffee at the restaurant the next
morning, where dozens of staff are
back at work, pumping themselves up with “We Will Rock You”
blasting in the kitchen. The seemingly humble star of the show is
referring not just to the variety on
campus but the possibility that the
buildings might someday transform into multiple restaurants, a
hotel or even a school. The new
Noma, in other words, was “made
to be able to change.”
Will Noma — the original of
which was derided early on as a
“blubber restaurant” for serving
only Nordic ingredients — recapture the No. 1 slot on the influential World’s 50 Best list, ranked by
Restaurant magazine? (It was No.
5 in 2016.)
The more pressing question is,
of course, whether the price of
admission, including the difficulty of getting in, is worth the effort
and expense. There are thrilling
restaurants everywhere these
days, many of them easier to access than Redzepi’s, and some a
great deal less expensive. (But not
all: Lunch for two at the Michelin
three-star Geranium, also in Copenhagen, can set a host back
$1,000. Budget travel tip: The best
Wiener schnitzel of my life might
be the entree at Barr, in the waterfront space inhabited by the original Noma.)
As in all high-stakes dining, I
tend to ask myself a few questions,
starting with whether the food
was truly delicious. Most of it was,
and while I hope savory fudge
doesn’t catch on, I could live off
sea snail broth, squid that eats like
pasta and freak-of-nature mussels. Did I learn anything new?
Tons, including a fresh appreciation for sea cucumbers, Danish
design and housing requirements
of ants. Was it inspiring? Noma is a
rare chance to hang with a true
visionary. And the guy wants his
staff to enjoy a sauna!
Ultimately, would I go back on
my own kroner?
Race back is more like it. I, for
one, can’t wait to see what Noma
does with crudites — provided
lightning strikes twice and I can
book a seat.
tom.sietsema@washpost.com
Tom Sietsema’s First Bite column will
return next week.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E7
EE
R E C O M M E N D ATI O N S
Exceptional
Excellent
Very Good
Wine is a fickle thing. It relies on us
to age it in ideal conditions for
years or decades to reveal its glory.
And if we let it down by storing it
above the refrigerator, or under the
staircase, or any other place where
temperatures spike from time to
time, it will taunt us with what
might have been. Old wine is all too
often a lament of lost opportunity.
So when we have a chance to taste
a properly aged wine that has been
kept in the winery cellar for nearly
two decades before release, we
should celebrate. Here are five
wines: one that has aged
beautifully, and four that could.
— D.M.
Balgera Rosso di Valtellina 1999
NAPA VALLEY VINTNERS ASSOCIATION
Potential bidders taste auction lots before the annual Premiere
Napa Valley auction on Feb. 24 in St. Helena, Calif.
Scars of fires are hard
to see in Napa Valley
Distributed by Le Storie: Available in the
District at A. Litteri, MacArthur Beverages.
Available in Virginia at Camden’s Dogtown
Market and J. Emerson Fine Wines & Cheese
in Richmond, Chain Bridge Cellars in
McLean, Department of Beer and Wine and
Planet Wine & Gourmet in Alexandria, Grape
+ Bean (Old Town Alexandria, Rosemont),
Oakton Wine Shop in Oakton, Tastings of
Charlottesville, Vino Market in Midlothian.
napa, calif.
— It’s Saturday
night in Napa,
and First Street is
quiet. But the
shiny new Archer
Wine
Hotel, which
opened in
DAVE
MCINTYRE
November, is
teeming with
wine lovers. At
Charlie Palmer Steak, the hotel
restaurant that spills into the
lobby like a carelessly poured
sample of cabernet, chef Jeff
Russell sends out plates of
Wagyu beef, foie gras, crab salad,
citrus-infused salmon and . . .
well, you get the idea . . . to
hungry oenophiles fresh from
winery visits or the Premiere
Napa Valley auction.
Just steps from the
restaurant’s side door, tucked
away in a still-underconstruction pedestrian retail
mall, master sommelier Matt
Stamp and his business partner,
Ryan Stetins, are hosting a more
casual but equally enthusiastic
evening at Compline. The combo
wine bar, restaurant and retail
shop offers a quirky selection of
imported wines, most priced
under $40 a bottle. And perhaps
the best darn burger I’ve ever
tasted.
Across First Street, tucked
behind plywood walls
surrounding a store under
renovation, is Cadet wine bar. It
is a raucous scene where I am
able to enjoy a glass of Bedrock
zinfandel, if not a conversation.
(That may be an age thing; I’m
easily the oldest in the joint.) I
long for the quieter confines of
Outland wine bar just down the
alley, where earlier I had enjoyed
wines from three wineries and
the affections of an adorable
Bernese-poodle mix named
Hermione.
“What Napa has lacked for so
many years is a nightlife,”
Compline’s Stamp says. Not so
long ago, visitors to Napa Valley
could be excused for ignoring
Napa itself. It was a sleepy little
town, making the news
whenever the scrawny Napa
River flooded, or when the Copia
wine and food mecca famously
failed. But now the Oxbow Public
Market draws food lovers, and
Copia has reopened as part of the
Culinary Institute of America
(the “other CIA”), with a new
restaurant and a food museum.
The First Street renaissance is
a recovery from the 2014
earthquake, but it could not have
come at a better time for Napa
Valley and Northern California
wine country. Last October’s
wildfires created an impression
on mainstream and social media
that the entirety of Napa,
Sonoma and Mendocino
counties was ablaze, and tourism
plummeted at the busiest and
most profitable time of year. But
wineries in all three counties
survived relatively unscathed,
and they are open for business.
Business as usual meant the
annual Premiere Napa Valley
auction in St. Helena on Feb. 24.
The auction raised $4.1 million
for the Napa Valley Vintners
Association, featuring barrel lots
mostly from 2016, which wine
blogger Alder Yarrow dubbed
“the rock star vintage.” The
highest lot went for $110,000 for
20 cases of a Silver Oak cabernet
sauvignon, about $458 a bottle,
to a bidder from the big-box
retailer Total Wine & More. Napa
is enjoying a string of
exceptional vintages, as a
retrospective tasting of the
2013s, 2014s and 2015s
demonstrated the day before.
The scars of the fires are hard
to see in Napa Valley, except for
Lombardy, Italy, $30
You read that right: This current
release is a 1999 vintage nebbiolo
from northern Lombardy. It was
aged for 16 years in 100-liter
barrels made from Slovenian oak.
The wine has developed beautifully,
offering a full spice rack of cloves,
nutmeg, dried plums and cherries.
At $30, it’s a steal for a fully mature
nebbiolo. Alcohol by volume:
12 percent.
Priest Ranch Grenache Blanc
2016
Napa Valley, Calif., $20
Grenache blanc is common in
France’s Rhone Valley and in parts
of Spain, and lately it has become a
darling of California’s Rhone
movement. Priest Ranch gives it a
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Napa Valley panache; the wine is
intense and focused, certainly not
shy, but not heavy either despite
generous alcohol. Bravo! ABV:
14.6 percent.
Distributed by Country Vintner: Available in
the District at Rodman’s; on the list at the
Riggsby, Ris, Sonoma. Available in Virginia at
Grapevine in Warrenton, Unwined in
Belleview; on the list at Markham Street
Cafe in Annandale.
GREAT VALUE
Weingut Josef Bauer Riesling
Feuersbrunn 2016
Wagram, Austria, $17
This wine shows exceptional
balance and focus, a laser beam of
acidity that should help it age well,
and lovely fruit that makes it
exceptionally delicious now. ABV:
12.5 percent.
Distributed by Siema: Available in the
District at Cleveland Park Wine and Spirits.
Available in Maryland at Berry County
Market in Waldorf, Bo Brooks Lighthouse
Liquors in Baltimore, Cranberry Liquors in
Westminster, Fenwick Beer & Wine in Silver
Spring, Hop N Grape in North Bethesda,
Lucky Beer & Wine in Takoma Park, Orion
Wine & Spirits in Frederick, Sunderland
Wine & Spirits in Sunderland, the Wine
Harvest in Potomac. Available in Virginia at
Swiss Bakery in Springfield; on the list at
Crush Wine Bar in Winchester, Southside
815 in Alexandria.
GREAT VALUE
Attems Sauvignon Blanc 2016
Venezia Giulia, Italy, $16
This wine grew on me — reticent at
first, it developed a minerally
character in the glass. Think Loire
in style, and compare it to your
favorite Sancerre. ABV:
12.5 percent.
Distributed by M. Touton Selection: Available
in the District at Capital City Wine & Spirits,
Chevy Chase Wine & Spirits, Cleveland Park
Wine and Spirits, Connecticut Avenue Wine
& Liquor, Rodman’s, Wide World of Wines.
Available in Maryland at Cork & Bottle
Liquors in Laurel, Frederick Wine House and
Old Farm Liquors in Frederick, Giolitti
Delicatessen in Annapolis, Silesia Liquors in
Fort Washington.
Mas Amiel Vertigo 2016
Roussillon, France, $20
Mas Amiel is a family winery in
southwestern France that produces
a number of delicious wines.
Vertigo is its entry-level wine, and it
comes in red (red label) and white
(green label). Think Rhone in style,
with spicy, herbal notes on the red,
and white flowers and beeswax
(more a textural note) on the white.
ABV: 14.5 percent.
Distributed by Simon N Cellars: Available in
the District at Calvert Woodley. Available in
Maryland at Wine Cellars of Annapolis.
Available in Virginia at Tastings of
Charlottesville.
Availability information is based on
distributor records. Wines might not
be in stock at every listed store and
might be sold at additional stores.
Prices are approximate. Check
Winesearcher.com to verify
availability, or ask a favorite wine
store to order through a distributor.
★ ★ ★ ★ PARK FREE ON OUR LOT ★ ★ ★ ★
NAPA VALLEY VINTNERS ASSOCIATION
A bidder raises a placard at the
auction, which raised
$4.1 million for the Napa Valley
Vintners Association.
the “closed” sign outside
Signorello Vineyards along the
Silverado Trail. The space where
the winery building and tasting
room burned down has been
cleared; the surviving patio
furniture is stacked to one side,
awaiting construction of a new
facility. Fire damage is vividly
apparent in the hills between
Napa and Sonoma counties,
along Trinity Road connecting
Sonoma to Oakville and Mark
West Springs Road, where the
Tubbs fire raced across the
Mayacamas Mountains from
Calistoga to unleash its fury on
Santa Rosa.
In Napa, Sonoma and
Mendocino counties, where the
fires raged for more than a week,
“99.8 percent of vineyard acres
and 93 percent of wineries were
unaffected,” said Robert Eyler, an
economist at Sonoma State
University. He added that
99.5 percent of crop value was
recovered, and very little
replanting will be necessary.
Some vineyards at higher
elevations lost infrastructure,
such as irrigation and drainage
systems, fencing and equipment.
Some wines from grapes
harvested during or after the
fires have been tainted by smoke,
but not as many as initially
feared.
“If we think the wines are
tainted, we’re not going to
bottle,” said Christopher
Carpenter, winemaker at Lokoya,
Cardinale, La Jota and Mt. Brave
wineries. “The 2017s that are
released will be ones that
producers are 100 percent
confident in.”
There may be lingering effects
on vineyards. About 3 million
gallons of fire retardant were
dropped on wine country, with
potential effect on soil chemistry.
And labor issues remain, as
many vineyard workers were
displaced by the fires and may be
lured away by the newly legal
cannabis industry. Immigration
and Customs Enforcement
deportation raids in Northern
California are adding additional
uncertainty.
The overall attitude, though, is
defiant optimism.
“The story of our fires is not so
much about what was lost, but
more about how much was
saved,” said Jennifer Gray
Thompson, executive director of
Rebuild North Bay. “Downtown
Sonoma should not be there.”
But it is. And so is downtown
Napa, shinier and louder than
ever before.
food@washpost.com
McIntyre blogs at dmwineline.com.
On Twitter: @dmwine.
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ON MON
E8
EZ
These big babies
are easy, amazing
BY
B ONNIE S . B ENWICK
A
s soon as the server elbows through the kitchen
door and begins to wend
her way through the pancake-house rush, you can’t take
your eyes off what she is ferrying.
It is an eggy crater the size of a
dinner plate, with tender, fat-tire
curves and a sweet aroma the Pied
Piper only wishes he could deploy.
It’s called a Dutch baby on the
menu, and the reason is far from
apparent. No matter; it demands
immediate, before-it-deflates eat-
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
ing, topped with a compote or a
shower of confectioners’ sugar at
least.
Who could make such a thing?
You can, in short order. The batter
ingredients are few and come together in a blender. Pour smooth,
into a hot buttered pan, and the
batter will shimmer and bubble in
the oven until the moment of
liftoff. Then, the pancake curls at
the edges that rise above the rim,
accompanied by an occasional
mogul at the center.
It is an old recipe, and its history skews sweet. Pancakes in the
Dutch Manner as presented in the
1998 cookbook “The Sensible
Cook: Dutch Foodways in the Old
and New World” resembled
spiced (flat) crepes, while the topography gets much closer to
Dutch baby territory in recipes for
German puffed apple pancakes
made hundreds of years ago. The
origin of Dutch could be
“Deutsch,” and the dish’s popularity in America is due in part to
Sunset magazine articles dating
back more than 50 years.
But the Dutch baby is versatile
enough to step toward savory. In
other words, have your way with
it. Spice up the batter. Use the
pancake as a vessel for fresh vegetables and greens. Melt thin rafts
of cheese on it and cut it into
snack wedges. Old World becomes modern.
There are but a few rules to
keep in mind: The batter should
be well blended; any added bits
that have weight, such as diced
pancetta or bell pepper pieces,
may impede the rise, The pan and
its fat must be h-o-t. The puffed
Dutch baby needs to sit in the
oven for a few minutes after the
timer goes off, to improve the
odds it will retain its structure
longer.
. WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7 , 2018
It’s easy but spectacular. It can
be breakfast, dinner or dessert.
Isn’t it time you rediscovered the
magic or give it a go?
bonnie.benwick@washpost.com
Voraciously.com
Our new destination makes it
easier than ever to build kitchen
skills, get dinner on the table,
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and share food with friends
Harissa Dutch Baby
With Tomatoes
and Mozzarella
2 to 3 servings
Adding the spicy pepper paste
to the eggy pancake batter gives it
a cheerful color as well as a mild
boost of flavor.
From deputy Food editor/recipes editor Bonnie S. Benwick.
Ingredients
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 large eggs (see NOTE)
1/2 cup flour
2 tablespoons harissa
1/2 cup regular or low-fat milk
Pinch kosher salt, plus more as
needed
Pinch freshly ground black
pepper, plus more as needed
2 cups heirloom cherry and
grape tomatoes, cut in half
4 ounces bocconcini (small
mozzarella balls), drained
Handful fresh basil or flat-leaf
parsley leaves, torn
Steps
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Place the butter in an 8-inch
cast-iron or ovenproof skillet;
transfer to the oven. Watch
closely so the butter melts, but
do not let it brown or burn.
Beat the eggs in a blender on
medium-high speed for 5 seconds until frothy, then add the
flour, harissa, milk, salt and
pepper. Blend on low speed to
incorporate, then blend on medium-high for 5 seconds to form
a smooth batter.
Remove the hot pan from the
oven and swirl the melted butter so it coats the sides. Immediately pour in the batter; bake
(middle rack) for 13 to 15 minutes, until puffed and golden
brown at the edges, which
should curve and rise above the
rim. Turn off the oven, and let
sit for 5 minutes. This will help
the pancake keep its structure.
Meanwhile, toss together the
tomatoes, mozzarella balls and
basil or parsley in a bowl; season lightly with salt and pepper.
As soon as you remove the
Dutch baby from the oven, top
with the tomato mixture; the
cheese should start to melt just
a little. Use a thin spatula to
dislodge the pancake; it should
slide right out. Serve right away.
NOTE: To bring eggs to room
temperature,
place
them
(whole, in the shell) in a bowl of
warm tap water for 5 minutes.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 3, using
low-fat milk): 350 calories, 16 g protein, 24
g carbohydrates, 21 g fat, 11 g saturated fat,
175 mg cholesterol, 300 mg sodium, 2 g
dietary fiber, 6 g sugar
Blender Dutch Babies
4 to 6 servings
These puffy, eggy pancakes are
about the most versatile, quick
and easy things you can make in a
skillet — and if you don’t have the
8-inch skillets called for here, you
can bake all the batter in a single
9- or 10-inch ovenproof skillet, or
use a pie plate.
Here, the batter is barely
sweetened and flavored, with optional toppings that work for
breakfast and dessert.
The eggs need to be close to
room temperature order to maximize their rise in the oven; see the
quick technique for this, below.
Adapted from “The Minimalist
Kitchen: The Practical Art of
Making More With Less,” by Melissa Coleman (Oxmoor House,
April 2018).
Ingredients
For the pancakes
3 large eggs
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
3/ cup flour
4
3/ cup whole milk
4
1 to 2 tablespoons granulated
sugar
1/ teaspoon kosher salt
2
1/ teaspoon vanilla extract
2
For the optional filling
1 cup frozen cherries,
preferably tart
1 heaping tablespoon
granulated sugar
For the optional topping
(your choice, or a mix)
Plain Greek yogurt
Pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
Maple syrup
Toasted slivered almonds
Granola
Confectioners’ sugar
PHOTOS BY GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP RIGHT: Harissa Dutch Baby With Tomatoes and Mozzarella; Blender Dutch Babies; Everything Spice Dutch Baby With Brie; Dutch Baby With
Chorizo and Watercress (see recipe at washingtonpost.com/recipes); Cauliflower Jalapeño Dutch Baby.
Steps
For the pancakes: Preheat the
oven to 425 degrees. Place the
eggs in a bowl of warm tap water
for 5 minutes, or until they are
close to room temperature.
Divide the butter between two
8-inch cast-iron or ovenproof
skillets; transfer to the oven.
Watch closely so the butter melts,
but do not let it brown or burn.
Beat the eggs in a blender on
medium-high speed for 5 seconds, until frothy, then add the
flour, milk, granulated sugar (to
taste), salt and vanilla extract.
Blend on low speed to incorporate, then blend on mediumhigh for 5 seconds.
Remove the hot pans from the
oven and swirl the melted butter so it coats the sides. Immediately pour in the batter, dividing
it evenly between the pans;
bake (middle rack) for 13 to 15
minutes, until puffed and golden brown at the edges, which
should curve and rise above the
rim. Turn off the oven, and let
them sit there for 5 minutes.
This will help the pancakes
keep their structure.
Meanwhile, make the optional
filling: Combine the frozen
cherries and granulated sugar
in a small saucepan; cook over
low heat for about 10 minutes,
or until juices coat the back of a
spoon. Turn off the heat.
Use a thin spatula to dislodge
the Dutch babies from their
pans; they should slide out. Cut
into halves or wedges. Top each
portion with some of the stewed
cherries and an optional topping or two, if desired. Serve
right away.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 6): 170
calories, 6 g protein, 16 g carbohydrates, 9 g
fat, 5 g saturated fat, 110 mg cholesterol,
140 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 4 g sugar
Cauliflower Jalapeño Dutch Baby
Everything Spice Dutch Baby With Brie
2 to 3 servings
4 servings
This is a delightfully eggy way to upgrade a salad or veggie bowl. Feel
free to use olive oil instead of butter.
From deputy Food editor/recipes editor Bonnie S. Benwick.
This comes together almost as fast as the assembly of a toasted bagel
with cream cheese. Cut into wedges, it can serve as fun hors d’oeuvres.
For convenience, feel free to use a store-bought Everything-Spice
blend instead of making your own, as directed here. This can also be
baked in a pie plate.
Adapted from “The Minimalist Kitchen.”
Ingredients
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
(may substitute olive oil)
2 large eggs, at room
temperature (see NOTES)
1/2 cup flour
2 tablespoons harissa
1/2 cup regular or low-fat milk
Pinch kosher salt
2 cups white or green
cauliflower florets, blanched
(see NOTES)
1 medium jalapeño pepper,
seeded and minced
Fresh, crunchy sprouts, such as
a store-bought mix of lentils,
green peas, adzuki beans
Handful cilantro leaves
Extra-virgin olive oil, for
drizzling (optional)
Steps
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Place the butter in an 8-inch
cast-iron or ovenproof skillet;
transfer to the oven. Watch
closely so the butter melts, but
do not let it brown or burn.
Beat the eggs in a blender on
medium-high speed for 5 seconds until frothy, then add the
flour, harissa, milk and salt.
Blend on low speed to incorporate, then blend on mediumhigh for 5 seconds to form a
smooth batter.
Remove the hot pan from the
RECIPE FINDER
.
oven and swirl the melted butter so it coats the sides. Immediately pour in the batter;
bake (middle rack) for 13 to 15
minutes, until puffed and golden brown at the edges, which
should curve and rise above the
rim. Turn off the oven, and let
sit for 5 minutes. This will help
the pancake keep its structure.
Meanwhile, toss together the
blanched cauliflower florets, jalapeño, sprouts and cilantro in
a bowl.
As soon as you remove the
Dutch baby from the oven, top
with cauliflower mixture, then
drizzle with the oil, if desired.
Use a thin spatula to dislodge
the pancake; it should slide
right out. Serve right away.
NOTES: To bring eggs to room
temperature,
place
them
(whole, in the shell) in a bowl of
warm tap water for 5 minutes.
To blanch the cauliflower, prepare a bowl of water and ice
cubes. Bring a saucepan of water to a boil over high heat. Add
the cauliflower florets and
cook/blanch for about 30 seconds, then immediately drain
and transfer to the water bath
to cool. Pat dry before using.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 3, using
low-fat milk): 290 calories, 12 g protein, 29
g carbohydrates, 15 g fat, 7 g saturated fat,
150 mg cholesterol, 250 mg sodium, 3 g
dietary fiber, 4 g sugar
Ingredients
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 large eggs, at room
temperature (see NOTE)
3/4 cup flour
3/4 cup regular or low-fat milk
2 to 3 tablespoons harissa
Pinch kosher salt
3 ounces chilled brie cheese,
cut into thin slices
1/2 teaspoon black sesame seeds
1/2 teaspoon toasted white
sesame seeds
1/4 teaspoon dehydrated onion
flakes
Steps
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Place the butter in an 9- or
10-inch cast-iron or ovenproof
skillet; transfer to the oven.
Watch closely so the butter
melts, but do not let it brown or
burn.
Beat the eggs in a blender on
medium-high speed for 5 seconds until frothy, then add the
flour, milk, harissa (to taste)
and salt. Blend on low speed to
incorporate, then blend on medium-high for 10 seconds to
form a smooth batter.
Remove the hot pan from the
oven and swirl the melted but-
ter so it coats the sides. Immediately pour in the batter; bake
(middle rack) for about 15 minutes, until puffed and golden
brown at the edges, which
should curve and rise above the
rim. Turn off the oven, let sit for
5 minutes. This will help the
pancake keep its structure.
Reduce the temperature to 200
degrees. Remove from the oven
just long enough to arrange the
brie slices on the surface of the
Dutch baby (tamping down any
big bumps, as needed), then
sprinkle with the black and
toasted sesame seeds and the
onion flakes. Return to the
oven; bake for 2 minutes, or just
until the cheese begins to melt.
Use a thin spatula to dislodge
the pancake; it should slide
right out. Cut into wedges and
serve right away.
NOTE: To bring eggs to room
temperature,
place
them
(whole, in the shell) in a bowl of
warm tap water for 5 minutes.
Nutrition | Per serving (using low-fat milk):
330 calories, 14 g protein, 22 g
carbohydrates, 21 g fat, 11 g saturated fat,
190 mg cholesterol, 330 mg sodium, 1 g
dietary fiber, 3 g sugar
Recipes tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; email
questions to food@washpost.com
SEARCH MORE THAN 7,900 POST-TESTED RECIPES AT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RECIPES
EMAIL FOOD@WASHPOST.COM
.
RECIPE QUESTIONS?
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