close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Pracrical Russian: My First Six Steps

код для вставки
‘Practical Russian: My first six steps’ is for beginners who have already completed the introductory pronunciation course. This book is ideal for self-studying, as it provides detailed explanation and covers the most important basic things needed fo
Practical Russian
MY FIRST SIX STEPS
with
Natalia Sidifarova
Practical Russian
Beginner Course for Self-Learners
Natalia
Sidifarova
2017
First Edition
Copyright © 2017 by Natalia Sidifarova
All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used
in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher.
ISBN-13: 978-1544681085
ISBN-10: 1544681089
Grodno, Belarus, 2017
Cover photo:
View out of The Holy Kazan Icon and Saint Tryphon Convent over the upper
Chusovaya River, Perm, Russia
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Pages
Subject
Lesson 1
page 2
Alphabet /
Алфавит
Grammar
Word Formation
Speech Patterns
Zero form(s) of the
verb ‘быть’.
Feminine and
masculine nouns for
countries /
nationalities.
Suffixes and
endings: (1) -ия,
-а, zero; (2) -чан-,
-ан-, -ян-; (3) -ин,
-ец, -як, zero; (4)
-к-а.
Кто это?
Что это?
Какая это…?
Masculine adjectives
for languages /
nationalities. 1st
conjugation verbs
‘жить’ and ‘знать’.
Prepositional case of
nouns. Preposition
‘в’.
Ending -ий for
adjectives. Endings
-ёт/-ет and -у/-ю
for verbs.
Inflexions: -ии and
-е for nouns in the
prepositional case.
Где живёт …
(noun)?
Где …
Adverbs of manner.
1st conjugation verbs
‘жить’ and ‘знать’.
Prepositional case of
nouns. Preposition
‘о/об’. 2nd conjugation
verbs ‘говорить’ and
‘слышать’.
Prefix по-, suffix
-и for adverbs.
Endings -ёшь/
-ешь, -ёте/-ете,
-ём/-ем and -ут/
-ют for verbs.
Inflexions -ии and
-е for nouns in the
prepositional case.
Endings -ит and
-ю/-у for verbs.
Exercises
page 6
Lesson 2
page 8
Nationalities /
Национальности
Exercises
page 15
Vocabulary:
33 units
Lesson 3
page 19
Languages /
Языки
Exercises
page 26
Vocabulary:
13 units
Lesson 4
page 31
Countries /
Страны
Exercises
page 39
Vocabulary:
14 units
Lesson 5
page 43
Exercises
page 55
Studying and
working in
Russia / Учёба и
работа в России
Vocabulary:
34 units
Personal pronouns in
the accusative case.
2nd conjugation verbs
‘говорить’ and
‘слышать’. 2nd
conjugation verbs
‘учить/учиться’.
Reflexive verb
‘учиться’. Feminine
and masculine
possessive pronouns
‘её’ and ‘его’.
Prepositional case of
the neuter gender
noun ‘общежитие’.
Endings: -ишь,
-ите, -им and
-ат/-ят. Reflexive
particle -ся.
Inflexion: -ии.
(pronoun)
живёт?
Какой …
(inanimate noun)
ты
знаешь/вы
знаете?
Что ты
знаешь/вы
знаете о(б) …
(noun in the
prepositional
case)?
Он говорит,
что ….
Они говорят,
что ….
Вы говорите,
что …. etc.
Lesson 6
page 60
Family life /
Семья
Exercises
page 75
Vocabulary:
43 units
Summary
page 79
Now I know /
Теперь я знаю
Prepositional case
of nouns. Preposition
‘на’. Personal
pronouns in the
genitive case.
Reflexive verb
‘находиться’. 1st
conjugation verbs:
‘звать’, ‘играть’,
‘петь’, ‘плавать’,
‘писать’, ‘рисовать’
and ‘читать’. 2nd
conjugation verbs:
‘ездить’ and
‘любить’.
Inflexions -и and
-е for nouns in the
prepositional case.
Verb particle -ся.
Inflexions -и and
-ы for plural nouns
in the nominative
case.
У меня есть
….
Меня
зовут…. etc.
FOREWORD
The course Practical Russian is for beginners who have already
completed the introductory pronunciation course. It’s a short guide
which is good for those students who prefer not to rush things. This
book is ideal for self-studying, as it provides detailed explanation and
covers the most important basic things needed for further independent
studies. As the book is designed for learning the language in small
bits, it consists of only six lessons and is conceived to become the
first out of several mini-books altogether making up a complete
beginner course. The material (mainly, vocabulary and grammar) is
strictly limited, and even numbered and summarized, which makes it
possible for a new Russian language learner to track his/her progress.
Step by step the learner will accumulate the necessary amount of
vocabulary units, get good reading skills, acquire the rudiments of
grammar and get the initial idea of word formation.
Grammar rules are illustrated with tables.
Vocabulary units are provided with transcription, which, for
simplicity, is mainly given in Latin script traditionally used by
international English language learners. However, there are a few
exceptions. So, it’s a mixture of very simple symbols which may not
be considered as a commonly accepted transcription system. In words
of two or more syllables the stressed syllable is underlined.
The number of sentence patterns is also limited; the patterns are
illustrated by examples and included into the reading section of each
lesson.
At the end of each lesson the learner will find practical exercises
to drill the necessary skills.
And finally, at the end of the book there is Now I Know, a section
highly convenient for the self-learner, where the summary of the
knowledge (vocabulary and grammar minimum) acquired within the
first six steps is represented.
~1~
LESSON 1
IN THIS LESSON:
1. Letters of the Russian alphabet.
2. Rhyming letters.
3. Consonant letters ending in /ɛ/*.
*[э]
4. Consonant letters starting with /ɛ/.
5. Two signs: hard ъ and soft ь*.
*[твёрдый знак] /tv’or-dɨj znak/ and [мягкий знак] /m’ah-k’ij znak/
6. Letter й, called short i*.
*[и краткое] /i kra-tka-jə/
~2~
Letters of the Russian alphabet:
Аа [а] /a/
Бб [бэ] /bɛ/
Вв [вэ] /vɛ/
Гг [гэ] /gɛ/
Дд [дэ] /dɛ/
Ее [е] /je/
Кк [ка] /ka/
Лл [эль] /ɛl’/
Мм [эм] /ɛm/
Нн [эн] /ɛn/
Оо [о] /o/
Пп [пэ] /pɛ/
Хх [ха] /ha/
Цц [цэ] /tsɛ/
Чч [че] /t∫’ɛ/
Шш [ша] /∫a/
Щщ [ща] /ɕːa/
Ъъ – hard sign
[твёрдый знак]
Ёё [ё] /jo/
Жж [жэ] /ʒɛ/
Рр [эр] /ɛr/
Сс [эс] /ɛs/
Ыы [ы] /ɨ/
Ьь – soft sign
[мягкий знак]
Зз [зэ] /zɛ/
Ии [и] /i/
Йй [и краткое]
Тт [тэ] /tɛ/
Уу [у] /u/
Фф [эф] /ɛf/
~3~
Ээ [э] /ɛ/
Юю [ю] /ju/
Яя [я] /ja/
To remember the Russian letters better, let’s divide them into the
following groups:
1. Rhyming letters. This group includes vowel letters.
Яя /ja/, Аа /a/ rhyme with ‘car’;
Ёё /jo/, Оо /o/ rhyme with ‘floor’;
Юю /ju/, Уу /u/ rhyme with ‘who’;
Ее /je/, Ээ /ɛ/ rhyme with ‘yeah’;
Ии /i/, Ыы /ɨ/ rhyme with ‘she’.
2. Consonant letters ending in /a/:
Кк /ka/, Хх /ha/, Шш /∫a/, Щщ /ɕːa/
3. Consonant letters ending in /ɛ/:
Бб /bɛ/, Вв /vɛ/, Гг /gɛ/, Дд /dɛ/, Жж /ʒɛ/, Зз /zɛ/, Пп
/pɛ/, Тт /tɛ/, Цц /tsɛ/, Чч /t∫’ɛ/
4. Consonant letters starting with /ɛ/:
Лл /ɛl’/, Мм /ɛm/, Нн /ɛn/, Рр /ɛr/, Сс /ɛs/, Фф /ɛf/
5. Two signs: hard Ъъ and soft Ьь*
*These are only symbols; neither of them produces any sound. The hard or
soft sign inside a word indicates a ‘borderline’ between a consonant, which it
follows, and a vowel. If there’s no sign between a consonant and a vowel, the
consonant is influenced by the vowel. For example, я /ja/, е /je/, ё /jo/, ю /ju/, и /i/
indicate the softness of the preceding consonant; but if you insert one of the signs
(hard or soft) between them, the consonant becomes ‘protected’ from the influence
of the soft-indicating vowel; and this is the sign which makes the consonant soft or
hard. At the same time, the letters я /ja/, е /je/, ё /jo/, ю /ju/, и /i/ are also given
‘independence’ and are pronounced like in the alphabet. Let’s compare two
examples: (1) корове /ka-ro-v’ə/ – to a cow (singular noun, feminine gender, dative
case) and (2) коровье /ka-rov’-jə/ – produced by a cow or cow’s (singular
adjective, neuter gender). In example (1) the consonant and vowel letters -ве are
inseparable; the soft-indicating vowel е /je/ both influences the preceding consonant
(makes it sound soft) and loses its independence, too (i.e. is not pronounced like in
~4~
the alphabet; here it sounds like /ə/). In example (2) the same two letters are
separated by the soft sign -вье and are independent from each other: the softness of
the consonant is due to the soft sign (not due to the influence of the soft-indicating
‘е’), and the vowel is pronounced like in the alphabet, i.e. like /je/. In our example
the syllable is unstressed, so we deal with its reduced version /jə/.
While the hard sign occurs only inside a word, e.g. объём /ab-jom/ – volume
(singular noun, masculine gender), the soft sign may be used both in the middle and
at the end of a word, e.g. очень /o-t∫’ən’/ – very (adverb).
6. And Йй – a ‘strange’ letter, called ‘short и’*
*Why ‘strange’? Because it may not be considered as a variant of the vowel
letter Ии /i/ for the reason of being …a consonant. Inside a word it stands for the
sound /j/, or [й’] in the Cyrillic script (see the coursebook ‘Introduction into Basic
Russian’).
~5~
EXERCISES
1. Say what English words the following Russian letters rhyme with:
Яя /ja/, Аа /a/ rhyme with …;
Ёё /jo/, Оо /o/ rhyme with …;
Юю /ju/, Уу /u/ rhyme with …;
Ее /je/, Ээ /ɛ/ rhyme with …;
Ии /i/, Ыы /ɨ/ rhyme with ….
2. Say what consonant letters of the Russian alphabet end in /a/.
3. Say what consonant letters of the Russian alphabet end in /ɛ/.
4. Say what consonant letters of the Russian alphabet start with /ɛ/.
5. Say what letters of the Russian alphabet are only signs. What is
their role?
6. Why can’t the ‘short i’ letter (Йй) be a counterpart to Ии /i/?
7. Say what Russian letters rhyme with the following English words:
…, … rhyme with ‘car’;
…, … rhyme with ‘floor’;
…, … rhyme with ‘who’;
…, … rhyme with ‘yeah’;
…, … rhyme with ‘she’.
8. Learn the Russian alphabet by heart.
~6~
~7~
LESSON 2
IN THIS LESSON:
1. Names for countries and nationalities (expressed by nouns).
2. Zero form(s) of the verb ‘быть’.
3. Suffixes and endings:
-ия, -а, zero
to build nouns for country names;
-чан-, -ан-, -янto indicate a person’s belonging to a territory/area in nouns
for nationalities;
-ин, -ец, -як, zero
to indicate the masculine gender in nouns for nationalities;
-к-а
to indicate the feminine gender in nouns for nationalities.
4. Sentence patterns: Кто это? Что это? Какая это…?
5. Thirty-three vocabulary units.
~8~
VOCABULARY
страна /stra-na/ – a country (singular noun, feminine gender)
друг /druk/ – a friend (boy-friend) (singular noun, masculine gender)
подруга /pa-dru-ga/ or /pə-dru-gə/ (more reduced) – a friend (girlfriend) (singular noun, feminine gender)
Англия /an-gl’i-ja/ – England (feminine gender)
англичанин /an-gl’i-t∫’a-nin/ – an Englishman (masculine noun,
singular)
англичанка /an-gl’i-t∫’an-ka/ – an Englishwoman (feminine noun,
singular)
Германия /g’ər-ma-n’i-ja/ – Germany (feminine gender)
немец /n’e-m’əts/ – German (masculine noun, singular)
немка /n’em-ka/ – German (feminine noun, singular)
Япония /jə-po-n’i-ja/ or /ji-po-n’i-jə/ (more reduced) – Japan
(feminine gender)
японец /jə-po-n’əts/ – Japanese (masculine noun, singular)
японка /jə-pon-ka/ – Japanese (feminine noun, singular)
Америка /a-m’e-r’i-ka/ – America (feminine gender)
американец /a-m’ə-r’i-ka-n’əts/ – an American (masculine noun,
singular)
американка /a-m’ə-r’i-kan-ka/ – an American (feminine noun,
singular)
Литва /l’i-tva/ – Lithuania (feminine gender)
литовец /l’i-to-v’əts/ – Lithuanian (masculine noun, singular)
литовка /l’i-tof-ka/ – Lithuanian (feminine noun, singular)
Польша /pol’-∫a/ – Poland (feminine gender)
поляк /pa-l’ak/ – Polish (masculine noun, singular)
полька /pol’-ka/ – Polish (feminine noun, singular)
Китай /k’i-taj/ – China (masculine gender)
китаец /k’i-ta-jəts/ – Chinese (masculine noun, singular)
китаянка /k’i-ta-jan-ka/ – Chinese (feminine noun, singular)
Таиланд /ta-i-lant/ – Thailand (masculine gender)
таец /ta-jəts/ – Thai (masculine noun, singular)
тайка /taj-ka/ – Thai (feminine noun, singular)
Узбекистан /u-zb’ə-k’i-stan/ – Uzbekistan (masculine gender)
узбек /uz-b’ek/ – Uzbek (masculine noun, singular)
узбечка /uz-b’et∫’-ka/ – Uzbek (feminine noun, singular)
тоже /to-ʒə/ – also, too
~9~
какая /ka-ka-ja/ – what or which (pronoun or question word, feminine
gender)
быть /bɨt’/ – to be (infinitive)
TOTAL: 33 vocabulary units
SENTENCE PATTERNS
Remember the following sentence patterns:
Кто это? – Who’s this?
Что это? – What’s this?
Какая это…? – What (also: which) … is this?
(for the feminine
gender)
These are basic sentence patterns for questions with neutral word
order.
In the other sentences (below), which are their variations, the
logical stress is shifted. So is the word order. Look at the following
examples and practice reading them:
Что это? – Это страна. – What’s this? – It’s a country.
Какая это страна? – Это Китай. – What (which)
country is this? – It’s China.
А это какая страна? – Это Германия. – And what
country is that? – It’s Germany.
А какая это страна? – Это Америка. – And what
country is this (that)? – It’s America.
А это что? – Это Япония. – And what’s this? – This is
Japan.
Russian ‘это’ may stand for ‘this (that) is…’ in statements and
‘is this (that)…?’ in questions. In the sentences above we don’t see
any Russian equivalent for the English form ‘is’. This is because the
Russian verb ‘быть’ has zero forms in the Present tense (those
corresponding to ‘am/is/are’).
~ 10 ~
In addition to the above-said zero forms of the verb ‘быть’, in
this lesson we’ll learn the following 9 names of the countries, which
we divide into three groups: 2 groups of feminine nouns with endings
and 1 group of masculine nouns with a zero ending. Looking through
the list of additional examples (which are not for learning now) you
can get a general idea about how country names in Russian look. This
is not to frighten you, my dear learner!
NAMES OF COUNTRIES
Feminine nouns
ending in -ия
Feminine nouns
ending in -а
Masculine nouns
with a zero ending
Англия
Германия
Япония
Америка
Литва
Польша
Китай–
Таиланд–
Узбекистан–
Additional examples (not for memorizing)
Австрия
Бразилия
Дания
Грузия
Индия
Испания
Италия
Сирия
…
Ангола
Аргентина
Венесуэла
Гватемала
Камбоджа
Канада
Мексика
Украина
…
Алжир–
Азербайджан–
Вьетнам–
Кувейт–
Израиль–
Ирак–
Ливан–
Уругвай–
…
NOTE: Apart from feminine and masculine nouns, there are also a few examples of
neuter nouns for countries, e.g. Конго, Марокко, Чили, etc. These are
indeclinable.
In the sentences below you won’t see the predicate. It means
two things:
(1) Russian ‘это’ stands for ‘this is…’ in statements and for ‘is
this…?’ in questions.
~ 11 ~
(2) In the other sentences the predicate (equivalent to English ‘is’)
after the subjects ‘Его жена/Она’, ‘Его подруга/Она’, ‘Её муж/Он’,
‘Её друг/Он’ is implicated, but not used. This is a zero Present tense
form of the verb ‘быть’. In other words, ‘Она…’ in the sentences
below stands for ‘She is…’, ‘Её муж…’ stands for ‘Her husband
is…’, ‘Его жена…’ stands for ‘His wife is…’ and so on:
English
Russian
His girl-friend
Его подруга
is
---
also
тоже
Uzbek.
узбечка.
READING
Now look at the following examples and practice reading them:
Кто это? – Это Стивен. Он англичанин. Его жена
тоже англичанка. – Who’s this? – It’s Stephen. He is English
(or: an Englishman). His wife is also English (or: an Englishwoman).
Кто это? – Это Мизуки. Она японка. Её муж тоже
японец. – Who’s this? – It’s Mizuki. She is Japanese. Her husband
is also Japanese.
Кто это? – Это Гюнтер. Он немец. Его подруга
тоже немка. – Who’s this? – It’s Günther. He is German. His girlfriend is also German.
Кто это? – Это Джон. Он американец. Его жена
тоже американка. – Who’s this? – It’s John. He is American (or:
an American). His wife is also American (or: an American).
Кто это? – Это Ингеборга. Она литовка*. Её друг
тоже литовец. – Who’s this? – It’s Ingeborga. She is Lithuanian.
Her friend is also Lithuanian.
* The ‘o’ letter in the nouns ‘литовка’ and ‘литовец’ is called ‘a mobile
vowel’: it appears in the stressed syllable and disappears, when the stress shifts to
another syllable. Thus it is absent in the relative noun ‘Лит-ва’, where the stress
falls on the syllable ‘-ва’.
Кто это? – Это Януш. Он поляк. Его подруга
тоже полька. – Who’s this? – It’s Janusz. He is Polish. His girlfriend is also Polish.
~ 12 ~
Кто это? – Это Хонг. Он китаец. Его жена тоже
китаянка. – Who’s this? – It’s Hong. He is Chinese. His wife is
also Chinese.
Кто это? – Это Чимлин. Она тайка. Её муж тоже
таец. – Who’s this? – It’s Chimlin. She is Thai. Her husband is also
Thai.
Кто это? – Это Алишер. Он узбек. Его подруга
тоже узбечка. – Who’s this? – It’s Alisher. He is Uzbek. His girlfriend is also Uzbek.
NATIONALITIES
(Nouns)
Masculine nouns (singular)
Suffixes marked
Feminine nouns (singular)
Suffixes marked
англи-чан-ин /an-gl’i-t∫’a-nin/
нем-ец /n’e-m’əts/
япон-ец /jə-po-n’əts/
англи-чан-к-а /an-gl’i-t∫’an-ka/
нем-к-а /n’em-ka/
япон-к-а /jə-pon-ka/
америк-ан-ец /a-m’ə-r’i-kan’əts/
литов-ец /l’i-to-v’əts/
пол-як /pa-l’ak/
америк-ан-к-а /a-m’ə-r’i-kanka/
литов-к-а /l’i-tof-ka/
поль-к-а /pol’-ka/
кита-ец /k’i-ta-jəts/
та-ец /ta-jəts/
узбек-– /uz-b’ek/
кита-ян-к-а /k’i-ta-jan-ka/
тай-к-а /taj-ka/
узбеч-к-а /uz-b’et∫’-ka/
Let’s analyze what we see in this table. The nouns for
residents of any territory (area, region, island, country, town, etc.)
can be of two genders: masculine and feminine. The examples above
are given in the subjective (nominative) case, singular number.
~ 13 ~
The indication of the masculine gender (singular, nominative
case) is one of the suffixes -ин, -ец, -як or -– plus a zero ending
(inflexion).*
* Additional examples of masculine nouns:
-ин: грузин (Georgian), болгарин (Bulgarian), татарин (Tatar), etc.
-ец: австриец (Austrian), испанец (Spanish), вьетнамец (Vietnamese), etc.
-як: сибиряк (a resident of Siberia), пермяк (a resident of Perm or Пермь),
краковяк (a resident of Krakow or Краков), etc.
-–: грек- (Greek), казах- (Kazakh), серб- (Serbian), хорват- (Croatian), etc.
The indication of the feminine gender (singular, nominative
case) is the -к- suffix plus the -а ending (inflexion).*
* Additional examples of feminine nouns:
-к-а: канадка (Canadian), украинка (Ukrainian), эстонка (Estonian), etc.
You must have noticed that some nouns, in addition to one of
those suffixes mentioned above, have one more suffix: -чан-, -ан- or ян-. These are used not to indicate a gender, but to show a person’s
belonging to a certain place (territory, area, region, religion,
community, island, country, town, continent or part of the world).
Since they don’t indicate a gender, you may encounter them in nouns
of either gender. *
* Additional examples:
-чан-ин / -чан-к-а: датчанин / датчанка (Danish), сельчанин / сельчанка
(a villager), крымчанин / крымчанка (Crimean), etc.
-ан-ин / -ан-к-а: молдаванин / молдаванка (Moldovan), южанин / южанка
(a southerner), мусульманин / мусульманка (Moslem), etc.
-ан-ец / -ан-к-а: африканец / африканка (African), мексиканец /
мексиканка (Mexican), перуанец / перуанка (Peruvian), etc.
-ян-ин / -ян-к-а: гаитянин / гаитянка (Haitian), северянин / северянка (a
northerner), египтянин / египтянка (Egyptian), etc.
In the above-mentioned examples the suffixes -чан-, -ан- or -янare used in pairs (masculine / feminine). However, some nouns don’t
make a pair. For example, in the following pairs: китаец / китаянка,
кореец / кореянка – we can see -ян- in the feminine form, but not in
the masculine. Luckily, there are few of them.
NOTE: The information in the comments is given for illustration only!
~ 14 ~
EXERCISES
1. Read the following sentences in Russian and translate them into
your native language:
Что это? – Это страна.
Какая это страна? – Это Китай.
А это какая страна? – Это Германия.
А какая это страна? – Это Америка.
А это что? – Это Япония.
Кто это? – Это Стивен. Он англичанин. Его жена тоже
англичанка.
Кто это? – Это Мизуки. Она японка. Её муж тоже японец.
Кто это? – Это Гюнтер. Он немец. Его подруга тоже
немка.
Кто это? – Это Джон. Он американец. Его жена тоже
американка.
Кто это? – Это Ингеборга. Она литовка. Её друг тоже
литовец.
Кто это? – Это Януш. Он поляк. Его подруга тоже
полька.
Кто это? – Это Хонг. Он китаец. Его жена тоже китаянка.
Кто это? – Это Чимлин. Она тайка. Её муж тоже таец.
Кто это? – Это Алишер. Он узбек. Его подруга тоже
узбечка.
2. Translate the following word combinations of the feminine gender
into Russian. Use the pronoun ‘какая’. Example: which/what street
→ какая улица
what/which country, what/which wife, what/which girl-friend,
what/which Uzbek woman, what/which English woman, what/which
Thai woman, what/which German woman, what/which Chinese
woman, what/which Japanese woman, what/which Polish woman,
what/which American woman, what/which Lithuanian woman
~ 15 ~
3. Translate the sentences into Russian, using masculine nouns for
nationalities and a zero Present tense form of the verb ‘быть’.
Example: He is Canadian. → Он канадец.
He is English. He is Japanese. He is German. He is American. He is
Lithuanian. He is Polish. He is Chinese. He is Thai. He is Uzbek.
4. Insert the necessary suffix: -чан-, -ан- or -ян-. Practice reading the
nouns in Russian and translate them into your native language:
англи…ин (m.), америк…ка (f.), кита…ка (f.), америк…ец (m.),
англи…ка (f.)
5. Add the suitable suffix (-ин, -ец, -як or zero) to form a masculine
noun. Practice reading the nouns in Russian and translate them into
your native language:
нем…, узбек…, япон…, американ…, литов…, пол…, та…,
англичан…, кита…
6. Add -чан-к-а, -ан-к-а, -ян-к-а or -к-а to form a feminine noun.
Practice reading the nouns in Russian and translate them into your
native language:
нем…, поль…, кита…, тай…, узбеч…, англи…, литов…,
америк…, япон…
7. Add the necessary ending (-ия, -а or zero) to form the nouns for
countries. Practice reading the nouns in Russian and translate them
into your native language:
Герман…, Узбекистан…, Япон…, Америк…,
Польш…, Таиланд…, Англ…, Китай…
Литв…,
8. Translate the following country names into Russian:
Uzbekistan, England, Poland, Japan, Lithuania, China, Thailand,
America, Germany
~ 16 ~
9. Translate the following sentences into Russian (in some questions
more than one option are possible) and learn these micro-dialogues in
Russian by heart:
What’s this? – It’s a country.
What (which) country is this? – It’s China.
And what country is that? – It’s Germany.
And what country is this (that)? – It’s America.
And what’s this? – This is Japan.
Who’s this? – It’s Stephen. He is English. His wife is also
English.
Who’s this? – It’s Mizuki. She is Japanese. Her husband is also
Japanese.
Who’s this? – It’s Günther. He is German. His girl-friend is also
German.
Who’s this? – It’s John. He is American. His wife is also
American.
Who’s this? – It’s Ingeborga. She is Lithuanian. Her friend is
also Lithuanian.
Who’s this? – It’s Janusz. He is Polish. His girl-friend is also
Polish.
Who’s this? – It’s Hong. He is Chinese. His wife is also Chinese.
Who’s this? – It’s Chimlin. She is Thai. Her husband is also Thai.
Who’s this? – It’s Alisher. He is Uzbek. His girl-friend is also
Uzbek.
~ 17 ~
Что это? – Это страна.
Какая это страна? – Это Узбекистан.
Кто это? – Это Алишер. Он узбек.
Его подруга тоже узбечка.
~ 18 ~
LESSON 3
IN THIS LESSON:
1. Names for languages and nationalities (expressed by adjectives).
Ending -ий.
2. 1st conjugation verbs ‘жить’ and ‘знать’. Endings: -ёт/-ет
and -у/-ю.
3. Prepositional case of nouns. Preposition ‘в’. Inflexions: -ии
and -е.
4. Sentence patterns: Где живёт … (noun)? Где … (pronoun)
живёт?
5. Thirteen vocabulary units.
~ 19 ~
VOCABULARY
язык /jə-zɨk/ – a language (masculine noun, singular)
английский /an-gl’ij-sk’ij/ – English (masculine adjective, singular)
немецкий /n’ə-m’ets-k’ij/ – German (masculine adjective, singular)
японский /jə-pon-sk’ij/ – Japanese (masculine adjective, singular)
американский /a-m’ə-r’i-kan-sk’ij/ – American (masculine
adjective, singular)
литовский /l’i-tof-sk’ij/ – Lithuanian (masculine adjective,
singular)
польский /pol’-sk’ij/ – Polish (masculine adjective, singular)
китайский /k’i-taj-sk’ij/ – Chinese (masculine adjective, singular)
тайский /taj-sk’ij/ – Thai (masculine adjective, singular)
узбекский /uz-b’ek-sk’ij/ – Uzbek (masculine adjective, singular)
но /no/ – but (conjunction)
жить /ʒɨt’/ – to live (infinitive)
знать /znat’/ – to know (infinitive)
TOTAL: 13 vocabulary units
In this lesson we’ll need (1) two new verbs ‘жить’ and
‘знать’ belonging to the 1st conjugation, (2) three personal pronouns
‘он’, ‘она’ and ‘я’ (known to you from our introductory course) and
(3) a couple of tools (the preposition of place ‘в’, also familiar to you
already, and the inflexions -ии and -е) to form the prepositional case
of the earlier mentioned nouns.
The 1st conjugation verbs end in -у /-u/ or -ю /-ju/ in the 1st
person singular and in -ёт /-jot/ or -ет /-jət/ in the 3rd person singular
with the endings taking the place of the infinitive particle -ть /-t’/ (for
the infinitive particle -ть see ‘Introduction into Basic Russian’,
Lesson 5). Now look at the following verb forms and learn them:
жи-ть
-ёт / -ет
он жи-в-ёт /ʒɨ-v’ot/
– he lives
она жи-в-ёт /ʒɨ-v’ot/
– she lives
-у / -ю
я жи-в-у /ʒɨ-vu/
– I live
~ 20 ~
зна-ть
он зна-ет /zna-jət/
– he knows
она зна-ет /zna-jət/
– she knows
я зна-ю /zna-ju/
– I know
NOTE: Interestingly, the parts ‘жив-’ and ‘live’ sound in a similar way. As far as в- is concerned in the forms of ‘жить’, it’s considered to be a suffix by some
scholars or a part of the root by others. But in either case it plays a linking function
at the joint of two vowels. To me it reminds of the English ‘-v-’ in ‘Peruvian’
derived from ‘Peru’.
In order to practice the above-shown forms of ‘жить’, it
would be good to know how to use the nouns in the prepositional
case. For this purpose we’ll take the nine country names, you’ve
recently learned: (1) three names ending in ‘-ия’, (2) three names in
‘-а’ (both groups of the feminine gender) and (3) another three with a
zero ending (this group consisting of masculine nouns).
This is the rule:
The question to a noun in the prepositional case is ‘Where?’
(also: ‘Where in?’ or ‘In what place?’). The noun takes the
preposition of place ‘в’. The endings (inflexions) for the subjective
(nominative) case ‘-ия’, ‘-а’ or zero are changed as follows:
Subjective (nominative) case
Question: What? – Что?
Prepositional case
Question: Where? – Где?
-ия
-ии
Англ-ия (feminine gender)
Герман-ия (feminine gender)
Япон-ия (feminine gender)
в Англ-ии /v an-gl’i-i/
в Герман-ии /v g’ər-ma-n’i-i/
в Япон-ии /v jə-po-n’i-i/
-а
-е
Америка (feminine gender)
Литва (feminine gender)
Польша (feminine gender)
в Америке /v a-m’e-r’i-k’ə/
в Литве /v l’it-v’e/
в Польше /f pol’-∫ə/
~ 21 ~
-–
-е
Китай– (masculine gender)
Таиланд– (masculine gender)
Узбекистан– (masculine gender)
в Китае /f k’i-ta-jə/
в Таиланде /f ta-i-lan-d’ə/
в Узбекистане
/v u-zb’ə-k’i-sta-n’ə/
NOTE: In spite of the fact that in masculine nouns zero inflexions are replaced by
the ending -е when forming the prepositional case, there are a few nouns – some
known to you from the previous course – which take the ending -у, e.g. в саду, в
лесу, в году, в часу, в мосту (only possible with this preposition, when meaning
‘inside the bridge construction’) or на мосту (used more often, meaning 'on the
bridge'). These forms need to be remembered! Fortunately, they are few.
READING
Now look at the following examples and practice reading them:
Кто это? – Это Стивен. – Кто он? – Он
англичанин. – Где он живёт? – Он живёт в Англии. –
Его жена англичанка? – Да, англичанка. Она тоже
живёт в Англии. – И я живу в Англии. – Who’s this? –
It’s Stephen. – Who’s he? – He is English (or: an Englishman). –
Where does he live? – He lives in England. – Is his wife English? –
Yes, (she’s) English. She also lives in England. – (So do I) I live in
England, too.
Кто это? – Это Мизуки. – Кто она? – Она японка.
– Где она живёт? – Она живёт в Японии. – Её муж
тоже японец? – Да, тоже японец. Он тоже живёт в
Японии. – И я живу в Японии. – Who’s this? – It’s Mizuki. –
Who's she? – She’s Japanese. – Where does she live? – She lives in
Japan. – Is her husband also Japanese? – Yes, (he’s) also Japanese.
He also lives in Japan. – (So do I) I live in Japan, too.
Кто это? – Это Гюнтер. – Кто он? – Он немец. –
Где он живёт? – Он живёт в Германии. – Его подруга
~ 22 ~
тоже немка? – Да, она немка, но она не живёт в
Германии. – И я не живу в Германии. – Who’s this? – It’s
Günther. – Who’s he? – He’s German. – Where does he live? – He
lives in Germany. – Is his girl-friend German, too? – Yes, she’s
German, but she doesn’t live in Germany. – (Neither do I) I don’t live
in Germany, either.
Кто это? – Это Джон. – Кто он? – Он американец.
– А кто его жена? – Его жена тоже американка. – Где
живёт Джон? – Джон живёт в Америке. – Who’s this? –
It’s John. – Who’s he? – He is American (or: an American). – And
who is his wife? – His wife is also American (or: an American). –
Where does John live? – John lives in America.
Я Ингеборга. Я литовка. Я живу в Литве. Мой
друг тоже литовец, но он не живёт в Литве. – I’m
Ingeborga. I’m Lithuanian. I live in Lithuania. My friend is also
Lithuanian, but he doesn’t live in Lithuania.
Моё имя Януш. Я поляк. Я живу в Польше. Моя
подруга тоже полька. Она тоже живёт в Польше. –
My name’s Janusz. I’m Polish. I live in Poland. My girl-friend is also
Polish. She lives in Poland, too.
Моё имя Хонг. Я китаец. Я живу в Китае. Моя
жена тоже китаянка. Она тоже живёт в Китае. – My
name’s Hong. I’m Chinese. I live in China. My wife is also Chinese.
She lives in China, too.
Моё имя Чимлин. Я тайка. Я живу в Таиланде.
Мой муж тоже таец. Он тоже живёт в Таиланде. – My
name's Chimlin. I’m Thai. I live in Thailand. My husband is also
Thai. He also lives in Thailand.
Моё имя Алишер. Я узбек. Я живу в Узбекистане.
Моя подруга тоже узбечка. Она тоже живёт в
~ 23 ~
Узбекистане. – My name’s Alisher. I’m Uzbek. I live in
Uzbekistan. My girl-friend is also Uzbek. She also lives in Uzbekistan.
So, we’ve practiced conjugating the verb ‘жить’ with the
endings -у /-u/ for the 1st person singular and -ёт /-jot/ for the 3rd
person singular (both stressed).
Now let's look at the above-shown forms of ‘знать’, and practice
conjugating it, too. It’s got the endings -ю /-ju/ in the 1st person
singular and -ет /-jət/ in the 3rd person singular, both unstressed.
Please, read the following sentences:
Он знает английский язык. – He knows English (literally:
the English language).
Она знает немецкий язык. – She knows German (literally:
the German language).
Я знаю японский язык. – I know Japanese (literally: the
Japanese language).
Я знаю американский гимн. – I know the USA anthem.
Она знает литовский язык. – She knows Lithuanian
(literally: the Lithuanian language).
Он знает польский язык. – He knows Polish (literally: the
Polish language).
Я знаю китайский язык. – I know Chinese (literally: the
Chinese language).
Она знает тайский язык. – She knows Thai (literally: the
Thai language).
Он знает узбекский язык. – He knows Uzbek (literally: the
Uzbek language).
As you can see, the adjectives for languages and nationalities in
the examples above end in -ий, following the suffixes -к- (e.g. немецк-ий, rarely) or -ск- (e.g. япон-ск-ий, англий-ск-ий, etc.; most
often). This ending (alongside a couple of others) is the indicator of
the masculine gender singular, nominative case in adjectives.
~ 24 ~
SENTENCE PATTERNS
Remember the following sentence patterns:
Где живёт … (noun)?
Где … (pronoun) живёт?
Although the word order is not very strict, the given patterns are
more common, and such sentences sound neutral. For example:
Где живёт Джон? Где живёт его подруга? (noun)
Где он живёт? Где она живёт? (pronoun)
~ 25 ~
EXERCISES
1. Read the following dialogues and situations in Russian and
translate them into your native language:
Кто это? – Это Стивен. – Кто он? – Он англичанин. – Где он
живёт? – Он живёт в Англии. – Его жена англичанка? – Да,
англичанка. Она тоже живёт в Англии. – И я живу в Англии
Кто это? – Это Мизуки. – Кто она? – Она японка. – Где она
живёт? – Она живёт в Японии. – Её муж тоже японец? – Да,
тоже японец. Он тоже живёт в Японии. – И я живу в Японии.
Кто это? – Это Гюнтер. – Кто он? – Он немец. – Где он живёт?
– Он живёт в Германии. – Его подруга тоже немка? – Да, она
немка, но она не живёт в Германии. – И я не живу в
Германии.
Кто это? – Это Джон. – Кто он? – Он американец. – А кто его
жена? – Его жена тоже американка. – Где живёт Джон? –
Джон живёт в Америке.
Я Ингеборга. Я литовка. Я живу в Литве. Мой друг тоже
литовец, но он не живёт в Литве.
Моё имя Януш. Я поляк. Я живу в Польше. Моя подруга
тоже полька. Она тоже живёт в Польше.
Моё имя Хонг. Я китаец. Я живу в Китае. Моя жена тоже
китаянка. Она тоже живёт в Китае.
Моё имя Чимлин. Я тайка. Я живу в Таиланде. Мой муж
тоже таец. Он тоже живёт в Таиланде.
Моё имя Алишер. Я узбек. Я живу в Узбекистане. Моя
подруга тоже узбечка. Она тоже живёт в Узбекистане.
~ 26 ~
2. Add the necessary endings (-ёт/-ет or -у/-ю for verbs, -ий for
adjectives), suffixes (-к- or -ск- for adjectives) and inflexions (-ии or
-е for nouns):
Её муж японец? – Да. Он жив… в Япон…. – И я жив… в
Япон…. Я зна… япон… язык.
Его подруга жив…в Герман…. Она зна… немец… язык. – Я
тоже жив… в Герман…. Я тоже зна… немец… язык.
Мой друг зна… поль… язык. Он жив… в Польш…. Я зна…
поль… язык, но я не жив… в Польш…. Я жив… в Литв….
2. Make up interrogative sentences from the words below, using the
sentence patterns proposed in this lesson:
живёт / Павел / Где?
он / Где / живёт?
живёт / Где / она?
Где / подруга / живёт / его?
её / Где / муж / живёт?
Где / друг / её / живёт?
Анна / живёт / Где?
3. Construct word combinations (preposition + noun in the
prepositional case), making the required changes in noun inflexions.
Example: Дан-ия (Denmark) → в Дан-ии (in Denmark), Канада
(Canada) → в Канаде (in Canada), Ирак– (Iraq) → в Ираке (in Iraq):
Англ-ия → …
Таиланд– → …
Польша → …
Китай– → …
Америка → …
Узбекистан– → …
Герман-ия → …
Литва → …
Япон-ия → …
~ 27 ~
4. Derive adjectives from the following nouns (country names or
nationalities), using the masculine ending -ий and the necessary
suffix (-к- or -ск-). If necessary, remove not only the ending, but also
the suffix from the original noun. Example: Ливан (Lebanon) →
ливан-ск-ий (Lebanese), словак (Slovak, resident of Slovakia) → словацк-ий (Slovak or Slovakian). Look up the vocabulary section of this lesson
to check yourself.
Поль-ш-а → …
Япон-ия → …
Китай– → …
Англ-ия → …
немец → …
5. Conjugate the verbs ‘жить’ and ‘знать’ in the 1st and 3rd person
singular.
6. Translate the following dialogues, situations and sentences into
Russian and learn them by heart:
Who’s this? – It’s Stephen. – Who’s he? – He is English (or: an
Englishman). – Where does he live? – He lives in England. – Is his
wife English? – Yes, (she’s) English. She also lives in England. – (So
do I) I live in England, too.
Who’s this? – It’s Mizuki. – Who's she? – She’s Japanese. – Where
does she live? – She lives in Japan. – Is her husband also Japanese? –
Yes, (he’s) also Japanese. He also lives in Japan. – (So do I) I live in
Japan, too.
Who’s this? – It’s Günther. – Who’s he? – He’s German. – Where
does he live? – He lives in Germany. – Is his girl-friend German, too?
– Yes, she’s German, but she doesn’t live in Germany. – (Neither do
I) I don’t live in Germany, either.
Who’s this? – It’s John. – Who’s he? – He is American (or: an
American). – And who is his wife? – His wife is also American (or: an
American). – Where does John live? – John lives in America.
~ 28 ~
I’m Ingeborga. I’m Lithuanian. I live in Lithuania. My friend is also
Lithuanian, but he doesn’t live in Lithuania.
My name’s Janusz. I’m Polish. I live in Poland. My girl-friend is also
Polish. She lives in Poland, too.
My name’s Hong. I’m Chinese. I live in China. My wife is also
Chinese. She lives in China, too.
My name’s Chimlin. I’m Thai. I live in Thailand. My husband is also
Thai. He also lives in Thailand.
My name’s Alisher. I’m Uzbek. I live in Uzbekistan. My girl-friend is
also Uzbek. She also lives in Uzbekistan.
He knows English. She knows German. I know Japanese. I know the
USA anthem. She knows Lithuanian. He knows Polish. I know
Chinese. She knows Thai. He knows Uzbek.
~ 29 ~
Я Ингеборга. Я литовка.
Мой друг тоже литовец.
Я живу в Литве.
.
~ 30 ~
LESSON 4
IN THIS LESSON:
1. Adverbs for languages. Hyphenated prefix по-, suffix -и.
2. 1st conjugation verbs ‘жить’ and ‘знать’. Endings: -ёшь/ешь, -ёте/-ете, -ём/-ем and -ут/-ют.
3. Prepositional case of nouns. Preposition ‘о/об’. Inflexions:
-ии and -е.
4. 2nd conjugation verbs ‘говорить’ and ‘слышать’.
Endings: -ит and -ю/-у.
5. Sentence patterns: Какой … (inanimate noun) ты знаешь/вы
знаете? Что ты знаешь/вы знаете о(б) … (noun in the
prepositional case)?
6. Fourteen vocabulary units.
~ 31 ~
VOCABULARY
по-английски /pa-an-gl’ij-sk’i/ or /pə-an-gl’ij-sk’i/ (more reduced)
– in English (adverb)
по-немецки /pa-n’ə-m’ets-k’i/ or /pə-n’ə-m’ets-k’i/ (more reduced)
– in German (adverb)
по-японски /pa-jə-pon-sk’i/ or /pə-jə-pon-sk’i/ (more reduced) – in
Japanese (adverb)
по-американски /pa-a-m’ə-r’i-kan-sk’i/ or /pə-a-m’ə-r’i-kansk’i/ (more reduced) – in the American manner, like Americans
do, the American way (adverb used as adverbial modifier of manner)
по-литовски /pa-l’i-tof-sk’i/ or /pə-l’i-tof-sk’i/ (more reduced) – in
Lithuanian (adverb)
по-польски /pa-pol’-sk’i/ or /pə-pol’-sk’i/ (more reduced) – in
Polish (adverb)
по-китайски /pa-k’i-taj-sk’i/ or /pə-k’i-taj-sk’i/ (more reduced) –
in Chinese (adverb)
по-тайски /pa-taj-sk’i/ or /pə-taj-sk’i/ (more reduced) – in Thai
по-узбекски /pa-uz-b’ek-sk’i/ or /pə-uz-b’ek-sk’i/ (more reduced)
– in Uzbek
они /a-n’i/ or /ə-n’i/ (more reduced) – they (subjective personal noun,
3rd person plural)
какой /ka-koj/ – what or which (pronoun, masculine gender)
о /a/ or /ə/ (more reduced) – about (preposition before consonants, always
unstressed)
об /ab/ or /əb/ (more reduced) – about (the same preposition before
vowels, unstressed)
слышать /slɨ-∫ət’/ – to hear
говорить /ga-va-r’it’/ or /gə-və-r’it’/ (more reduced) – to speak
TOTAL: 14 vocabulary units
Before we get familiar with the second type of verb
conjugation, let’s learn the remaining forms of the 1st conjugation
verbs ‘жить’ and ‘знать’. The typical feature of this group is the
presence of the vowels -ё-/-е- and -у-/-ю- in the verb endings (see the
chart in Lesson 3). We can make sure of this once again looking at the
chart below. To finish the conjugation of the verbs ‘жить’ and
‘знать’ we’ll need the remaining personal pronouns: ‘ты’, ‘вы/Вы’,
‘мы’ (known to you from the previous course) and ‘они’ (new).
~ 32 ~
жи-ть
vowels
vowels
-ё- / -е-
-у- / -ю-
in endings
in endings
ты жи-в-ёшь /ʒɨ-v’o∫/
– you live
мы жи-в-ём /ʒɨ-v’om/
– we live
вы/Вы* жи-в-ёте /ʒɨ-v’o-t’ə/
– you live
зна-ть
ты зна-ешь /zna-jə∫/
– you know
мы зна-ем /zna-jəm/
– we know
вы/Вы зна-ете /zna-jə-t’ə/
– you know
они жи-в-ут /ʒɨ-vut/
– they live
они зна-ют /zna-jut/
– they know
*This pronoun, as well as the corresponding verb form, may refer both to the
plural number (more often) and to the singular number in a formal style. When
writing, use a lower case letter in ‘вы’, if you address several people, and a capital
letter in ‘Вы’, if you address one person in a polite manner.
Also mind that in the verbs given in this lesson the endings ёшь/-ём/-ёте and -ут are stressed, while -ешь/-ем/-ете and -ют are
not.
Let’s practice reading the following sentences:
Ты живёшь в Польше. – You live in Poland.
Мы живём в Китае. – We live in China.
Вы живёте в Таиланде. – You live in Thailand.
Они живут в Англии. – They live in England.
To ask yes/no questions (general questions) you need to change
the tone and pronounce the same sentences with the highest tone pitch
at the word which you want to emphasize (to be more exact, at the
stressed syllable in this word). At the syllable(s) following the stressed
~ 33 ~
one, the tone drops. In our case, most logical is to emphasize the
name of the country:
Ты живёшь в ^Польше? – Do you live in Poland?
Мы живём в Ки^тае? – Do we live in China?
Вы живёте в Таи^ланде? – Do you live in Thailand?
Они живут в ^Англии? – Do they live in England?
In addition, remember the following sentence pattern, familiar to
you from the previous lesson, but this time with new endings:
Где ты живёшь? – Where do you live?
Где мы живём? – Where do we live?
Где вы/Вы живёте? – Where do you live?
Где они живут? – Where do they live?
SENTENCE PATTERNS
Remember the following sentence patterns:
Какой … (inanimate noun) ты знаешь/вы знаете?
Что ты знаешь/вы знаете о(б) … (noun in the prepositional
case)?
READING
Please, read the following sample sentences:
Какой язык ты знаешь (Вы знаете)? – Я знаю
английский язык. – What language do you know? (singular
subject) – I know English.
Какой язык вы знаете? – Мы знаем литовский
язык. – What language do you know? (plural subject) – We know
Lithuanian.
~ 34 ~
Какой язык они знают? – Они знают немецкий
язык. – What language do they know? – They know German.
Что ты знаешь (Вы знаете) об Америке? – What do
you know about America? (singular subject)
Что ты знаешь (Вы знаете) об Узбекистане? –
What do you know about Uzbekistan? (singular subject)
Что они знают об Англии? – What do they know about
England?
Что мы знаем о Китае? – What do we know about China?
Что вы знаете о Польше? – What do you know about
Poland? (plural subject)
Что они знают о Таиланде? – What do they know about
Thailand?
Что ты знаешь (Вы знаете) о Литве? – What do you
know about Lithuania? (singular subject)
Что мы знаем о Японии? – What do we know about
Japan?
Что они знают о Германии? – What do they know about
Germany?
In addition to the preposition ‘в’, which we used earlier to form
the prepositional case, there is another preposition – ‘о’ /a/ (also /ə/)
or ‘об’ /ab/ (also /əb/) meaning ‘about’. It’s interesting to note again,
that Russian ‘об’ /ab/ (or /əb/) and English ‘about’ have some
similarity, too. Besides, the preposition‘о(б)’ reminds of the English
article ‘a(n)’, in the sense that we pronounce it as one vowel sound
before a consonant, e.g. о Китае, о Германии, о Литве, etc., and
only at the joint of two vowels we need a linking letter (or sound). In
our case it’s the consonant ‘б’, e.g. об Америке, об Англии, об
Узбекистане. As far as ‘Япония’ is concerned, this noun starts with
the consonant sound /j/ if you look at the transcription; therefore we
use the more common preposition ‘о’.
~ 35 ~
Subjective (nominative) case
Question: What? – Что?
Prepositional case
Question: What about? – О чём?
/a t∫’om/
-ия
-ии
Англ-ия (feminine gender)
Герман-ия (feminine gender)
Япон-ия (feminine gender)
об Англ-ии /ab an-gl’i-i/
о Герман-ии /a g’ər-ma-n’i-i/
о Япон-ии /a jə-po-n’i-i/
-а
Америка (feminine gender)
Литва (feminine gender)
Польша (feminine gender)
-е
об Америке /ab a-m’e-r’i-k’ə/
о Литве /a l’it-v’e/
о Польше /a pol’-∫ə/
-–
Китай– (masculine gender)
Таиланд– (masculine gender)
Узбекистан– (masculine gender)
-е
о Китае /a k’i-ta-jə/
о Таиланде /a ta-i-lan-d’ə/
об Узбекистане
/ab u-zb’ə-k’i-sta-n’ə/
In this lesson we’ll also get acquainted with the 2nd
conjugation verbs ‘говорить’ and ‘слышать’, as well as with some
adverbs for languages / nationalities. As these adverbs are compound,
we’ll need a couple of tools (the hyphenated prefix по-, also familiar
to you already from the course ‘Introduction into Basic Russian’,
Lesson 1, and the suffix -и) to derive adverbs from adjectives. It’s
very simple: take any adjective for languages / nationalities (e.g.
немецк-ий, китайск-ий, польск-ий, etc.), replace the masculine
ending -ий with the suffix -и and add the hyphenated prefix по- (e.g.
по-немецки, по-китайски, по-польски, etc.).
Now let’s start conjugating the verbs ‘говорить’ and
‘слышать’ with two forms, like we did before. For this purpose we’ll
need three personal pronouns ‘он’, ‘она’ and ‘я’ again.
The 2nd conjugation verbs end in -ю /-ju/ or -у /-u/ in the 1st
person singular and in -ит /-it/ in the 3rd person singular. Both
~ 36 ~
endings are added to the root. Now look at the following verb forms
and learn them:
говор-и-ть
-ит
-у / -ю
он говор-ит /ga-va-r’it/
– he speaks
я говор-ю /ga-va-r’u/
она говор-ит /ga-va-r’it/
– I speak
– she speaks
слыш-а-ть
он слыш-ит /slɨ-∫ɨt/
– he hears
я слыш-у /slɨ-∫u/
– I hear
она слыш-ит /slɨ-∫ɨt/
– she hears
Can you find out the main difference between the 1st and 2nd types
of conjugation (in the left-hand column)? That’s right! This is why the
1st conjugation may also be called the -ё-/-е- conjugation and the 2nd
type – the -и- conjugation.
Now let’s practice reading the following sentences:
Он говорит по-литовски. – He speaks Lithuanian.
Она говорит по-тайски. – She speaks Thai.
Я говорю по-узбекски. – I speak Uzbek.
Он живёт по-американски. – He lives the way
Americans do.
Я слышу хорошо. – I (can) hear well.
Она слышит не очень хорошо. – She doesn’t (can’t)
hear very well.
Он плохо слышит. – He (can hear) hears badly.
Let me remind you that in order to ask yes/no questions you
should change the tone and pronounce the sentences with the highest
tone pitch at the word which you want to emphasize (to be more
exact, at the stressed syllable in this word). At the syllable(s)
following the stressed one (if there is/are any), the tone drops. In our
~ 37 ~
case, it’s more logical to emphasize the verb in the first 3 questions
and the adverb in the last 2 questions:
Он гово^рит по-литовски? – Does he speak Lithuanian?
Она гово^рит по-тайски? – Does she speak Thai?
Я гово^рю по-узбекски? – Do I speak Uzbek?
Он живёт по-амери^кански? – Doe he live the way
Americans do?
Он слышит хоро΄шо? – Does (can) he hear well?
~ 38 ~
EXERCISES
1. Read the following dialogues and situations in Russian and
translate them into your native language:
Ты живёшь в Польше. Мы живём в Китае. Вы живёте в
Таиланде. Они живут в Англии. Ты живёшь в ^Польше? Мы
живём в Ки^тае? Вы живёте в Таи^ланде? Они живут в
^Англии? Где ты живёшь? Где мы живём? Где вы/Вы
живёте? Где они живут?
Какой язык ты знаешь (Вы знаете)? – Я знаю английский
язык.
Какой язык вы знаете? – Мы знаем литовский язык.
Какой язык они знают? – Они знают немецкий язык.
Что ты знаешь (Вы знаете) об Америке? Что ты знаешь (Вы
знаете) об Узбекистане? Что они знают об Англии? Что мы
знаем о Китае? Что вы знаете о Польше? Что они знают о
Таиланде? Что ты знаешь (Вы знаете) о Литве? Что мы знаем
о Японии? Что они знают о Германии?
Он говорит по-литовски. Она говорит по-тайски. Я говорю
по-узбекски. Он живёт по-американски. Я слышу хорошо.
Она слышит не очень хорошо. Он плохо слышит. Он
гово^рит по-литовски? Она гово^рит по-тайски? Я гово^рю
по-узбекски? Он живёт по-амери^кански? Он слышит
хоро΄шо?
2. Add the required endings to the verbs in the sentences below, i.e.
-ёшь/-ешь, -ёте/-ете, -ём/-ем and -ут/-ют for the 1st conjugation
verbs; -ит and -ю/-у for the 2nd conjugation verbs:
Ты жив… в Польше. Мы жив… в Китае. Вы жив… в
Таиланде. Они жив… в Англии.
Какой язык ты зна… (Вы зна…)? – Я знаю английский язык.
Какой язык вы зна…? – Мы зна… литовский язык.
Какой язык они зна…? – Они зна… немецкий язык.
~ 39 ~
Он говор… по-литовски. Она говор… по-тайски. Я говор…
по-узбекски.
Я слыш… хорошо. Она слыш… не очень хорошо. Он плохо
слыш….
3. Insert either the preposition ‘в’ or ‘о/об’ before a noun in the
prepositional case:
Что ты знаешь … Америке? Они живут … Англии? Что Вы
знаете … Узбекистане? Что они знают … Англии? Что мы
знаем … Китае? Что вы знаете … Польше? Мы живём …
Китае? Что они знают … Таиланде?
Что вы знаете … Литве? Ты живёшь … Польше? Что мы
знаем … Японии? Вы живёте … Таиланде? Что они знают …
Германии?
4. Use either the adjective for languages / nationalities with the
masculine ending -ий (e.g. английский) or the adverb with the
hyphenated prefix по- and the suffix -и (e.g. по-английски).
Example: Я знаю (English). → Я знаю английский (язык). Or: Я
говорю (English). → Я говорю по-английски.
Мы знаем (Lithuanian). Он говорит (Polish). Ты знаешь
(Chinese)? – Нет, но я знаю (Japanese). Она говорит (Thai). Он
живёт (like Americans do). Я говорю (Uzbek). Они знают
(German).
5. Translate the following sentences into Russian and learn them by
heart:
You live in Poland. We live in China. You live in Thailand. They live
in England. Do you live in Poland? Do we live in China? Do you live
in Thailand? Do they live in England? Where do you live? Where do
we live? Where do you live? Where do they live?
What language do you know? (singular subject) – I know English.
What language do you know? (plural subject) – We know Lithuanian.
What language do they know? – They know German.
~ 40 ~
What do you know about America? (singular subject) What do you know
about Uzbekistan? (singular subject) What do they know about England?
What do we know about China? What do you know about Poland ?
(plural subject) What do they know about Thailand? What do you know
about Lithuania? (singular subject) What do we know about Japan?
What do they know about Germany?
He speaks Lithuanian. She speaks Thai. I speak Uzbek. He lives like
Americans do. I (can) hear well. She doesn’t (can’t) hear very well.
He (can hear) hears badly. Does he speak Lithuanian? Does she
speak Thai? Do I speak Uzbek? Does he live the way Americans do?
Does (can) he hear well?
~ 41 ~
Она слышит плохо.
Я слышу не очень хорошо.
Он слышит хорошо?
Он не слышит.
~ 42 ~
LESSON 5
IN THIS LESSON:
1. Personal pronouns in the accusative case.
2. 2nd conjugation verbs ‘говорить’ and ‘слышать’.
Endings: -ишь, -ите, -им and -ат/-ят.
3. Sentence patterns: Он говорит, что …. Они говорят, что
…. Вы говорите, что …. etc.
4. 2nd conjugation verbs ‘учить/учиться’. Reflexive verb
‘учиться’ with the particle -ся.
5. Feminine and masculine possessive pronouns ‘её’ and
‘его’.
6. Prepositional case of the neuter gender noun ‘общежитие’.
Inflexion: -ии.
7. Thirty-four vocabulary units.
~ 43 ~
VOCABULARY
дети /d’e-t’i/ – children (only plural)
школа /∫ko-la/ – school (both as an institution and a system; feminine
gender)
информация /in-far-ma-tsɨ-ja/ or /in-fər-ma-tsɨ-ja/ –
information (feminine gender)
университет /u-n’i-v’ər-s’i-t’et/ – a university* (masculine)
текст /t’ekst/ – a text (masculine gender)
общежитие /ap-ɕːə-ʒɨ-t’i-jə/ or /əp-ɕːi-ʒɨ-t’i-jə/ (more reduced) – a
hall of residence, student’s home, dormitory accommodation
студент /stu-d’ent/ – a student (masculine gender)
студентка /stu-d’ent-ka/ – a student (feminine gender)
комната /kom-na-ta/ or /kom-nə-tə/ (more reduced) – a room
номер /no-m’ər/ – number, also: a hotel room (masculine gender)
паспорт /pas-pərt/ – a passport (masculine gender)
ключ /kl’ut∫’/ – a key (masculine gender)
пропуск /pro-pusk/ – an admittance card, laissez-passer
телефон /t’ə-l’ə-fon/ or /t’i-l’i-fon/ (more reduced) – a telephone,
also: a phone number (masculine gender)
журналист /ʒur-na-list/ – a journalist, a reporter (masculine
gender)
журналистка /ʒur-na-list-ka/ – a journalist, a reporter (feminine
gender)
материал /ma-t’ə-r’jal/ or /mə-t’i-r’jal/ (more reduced) – material
(masculine gender)
гостиница /ga-st’i-n’i-tsa/ or /gə-st’i-n’i-tsa/ (more reduced) – a
hotel
Берлин /b’ər-l’in/ or /b’ir-l’in/ (more reduced) – Berlin (masculine
gender)
Пекин /p’ə-k’in/ or /p’i-k’in/ (more reduced) – Beijing (masculine
gender)
Россия /ras-s’i-ja/ or /rəs-s’i-jə/ (more reduced) – Russia (feminine
gender)
светлый /sv’ə-tlɨj/ – light (masculine adjective)
долго /dol-gə/ – for a long time
десять /d’e-s’ət’/ – ten
меня /m’ə-n’a/ or /m’i-n’a/ (more reduced) – me
её /jə-jo/ or /ji-jo/ (more reduced) – her
~ 44 ~
их /ih/ – them
оно /a-no/ or /ə-no/ (more reduced) – it (personal pronoun singular,
neuter gender, nominative case)
уже /u-ʒɛ/ – already
его /jə-vo/ or /ji-vo/ (more reduced) – his (possessive pronoun singular,
masculine)
или /i-li/ – or (conjunction)
работать /ra-bo-tat’/ or /ra-bo-tət’/ (more reduced) – to work
собирать /sa-bi-rat’/ or /sə-bi-rat’/ (more reduced) – to collect, to
gather
учить /u-t∫’it’/ – to study, to learn, also: to teach
учиться /u-t∫’i-tsa/ – to study, to be educated, to take classes
TOTAL: 34 vocabulary units
*When you learn to pronounce complicated words, read them in the
transcription syllable by syllable, making the underlined syllable more prominent.
For this purpose the syllables in the transcription are divided.
We will start this lesson with the declension of personal
pronouns. So far we need only one case – the accusative case. The
term ‘accusative’ (‘винительный’) has the common root with the
Russian verb ‘винить’ (‘blame’). So, the question to such a pronoun
is the same as the one we ask after the verb ‘blame’, i.e. ‘Who(m)?’ or
‘What?’, for which the Russian question words are ‘Кого?’ /ka-vo/
(to animate pronouns or nouns) and ‘Что?’ (to inanimate pronouns
or nouns). In a sentence, a noun or pronoun in the accusative case
usually plays the role of a direct object to which the action is
directed, e.g. Я не слышу тебя. – I don’t hear you.
Я
не слышу
→
тебя.
subject
predicate
direction of the action
direct object
You already know the forms ‘нас’ /nas/, ‘вас’ /vas/, ‘его’ /jəvo/ and ‘тебя’ /t’ə-b’a/ from the previous course. Now look at the
table of personal pronouns in the accusative case and learn the
remaining forms:
~ 45 ~
1st person
2nd person
3rd person
SINGULAR
Nominative → Accusative
PLURAL
Nominative → Accusative
я → меня
ты → тебя
она → её
он/оно → его
мы → нас
вы → вас
они → их
To drill the above given forms it would be good to combine
them with a verb. So, let’s consider the remaining forms of the 2 nd
conjugation verbs ‘слышать’ and ‘говорить’:
говор-и-ть
vowel sound /a/
letters -я- / -аin endings
vowel sounds /i/ and /ɨ/
letter -иin endings
ты говор-ишь /ga-va-r’i∫/
– you speak
мы говор-им /ga-va-r’im/
они говор-ят /ga-va-r’at/
– we speak
– they speak
вы/Вы говор-ите /ga-va-r’i-t’ə/
– you speak
слыш-а-ть
ты слыш-ишь /slɨ-∫ɨ∫/
– you hear
мы слыш-им /slɨ-∫ɨm/
они слыш-ат /slɨ-∫at/
– we hear
– they hear
вы/Вы слыш-ите /slɨ-∫ɨ-t’ə/
– you hear
Probably, you have noticed that there is one common thing
between the 1st and 2nd conjugation verbs – this is the -у/-ю ending in
the 1st person singular (знаю, живу, говорю, слышу). But they differ
in the other personal forms, i.e. the so-called -е-/-ё- verbs end in -ут/ют in their 3rd person plural form, while the -и- verbs end in -ат/-ят
in the same form. And don’t forget that in the forms of the verb
‘говорить’ shown above the endings are stressed, while in the forms
of ‘слышать’ they are not.
~ 46 ~
Let’s take the personal forms of ‘слышать’ and combine
them with the personal pronouns in the accusative case:
Мы слышим вас. – We hear you.
Вы слышите нас. – You hear us.
(plural subject if we address
several people; or singular subject in the polite form if we address one person)
Ты слышишь меня. – You hear me.
Я слышу тебя. – I hear you.
Они слышат их. – They hear them.
Она слышит его. – She hears him.
Он слышит её. – He hears her.
SENTENCE PATTERNS
We may combine not only the words but simple sentences
(called 'clauses' in English) in one compound sentence. To do this, we
need the conjunction ‘что’ /∫to/, known to you from the previous
course, which otherwise may also be a pronoun. Remember the
following sentence patterns with the forms of the verb ‘говорить’:
Он говорит, что живёт в Китае. – He says (that) he
lives in China. (the subject is not repeated in the 2nd clause)
Она говорит, что Иван – её друг. – She says (that) Ivan
is her friend.
Они говорят, что они – муж и жена. – They say (that)
they’re a husband and a wife.
Они говорят, что знают всё о Японии. – They say
(that) they know everything about Japan. (the subject is not repeated in the
2nd clause)
Мы говорим, что слышим вас. – We say (that) we hear
you. (the subject is not repeated in the 2nd clause)
Вы говорите, что знаете, где мы живём. – You say
(that) you know where we live. (the subject is not repeated in the 2nd clause)
Он говорит, что слышит меня. – He says (that) he
hears (can hear) me. (the subject is not repeated in the 2nd clause)
~ 47 ~
Я говорю, что сейчас живу в Америке. – I say (that)
now I’m living in America. (the subject is not repeated in the 2nd clause)
Remember that the pronouns ‘её’ /jə-jo/ (feminine) and ‘его’
/jə-vo/ (masculine) may also show possession and thus be referred to
as possessive pronouns, e.g. его фотография (his photograph), его
имя (his name), его фамилия (his surname), его телефон (his
telephone) or её фото (her photo), её имя (her name), её фамилия
(her surname), её телефон (her telephone), etc. You’re going to see
these forms in the texts below.
READING
Practice reading the following texts with the help of the
vocabulary section of the lesson:
Текст 1.
Это Сунг. Он – китайский студент. Сейчас он
живёт в России. Он здесь учится. Он учится в
университете. Сунг живёт в России не очень долго,
но он уже хорошо говорит по-русски. Он живёт в
общежитии, в комнате номер десять. Вот его
паспорт, ключ и пропуск. В пропуске его
фотография, имя/фамилия и телефон.
Текст 2.
Это Кейт. Она англичанка. Сейчас она живёт в
Москве. Она здесь работает. Она журналистка. Кейт
собирает материалы о России. Она живёт в
гостинице. Вот её номер. Он большой и светлый. Это
её паспорт, ключ и пропуск. В пропуске её фото,
имя/фамилия и телефон.
~ 48 ~
Before we start doing the exercises, let’s analyze what
grammatical forms we can see in the texts. You must have recognized
the 1st conjugation verb ‘жить’ and the 2nd conjugation verb
‘говорить’. Here are three more verbs of both types. Please, look at
their forms and learn them (the stressed syllable is underlined):
работа-ть
-ет
-ю
он работа-ет /ra-bo-ta-jət/
– he works
она работа-ет /ra-bo-ta-jət/
я работа-ю /ra-bo-ta-ju/
– she works
– I work
оно работа-ет /ra-bo-ta-jət/
– it works (neuter)
-ешь / -ем / -ете
-ют
ты работа-ешь /ra-bo-ta-jə∫/
– you work
мы работа-ем /ra-bo-ta-jəm/
они работа-ют /ra-bo-ta-jut/
– we work
– they work
вы/Вы работа-ете /ra-bo-ta-jət’ə/
– you work
собира-ть
-ет
-ю
он собира-ет /sə-bi-ra-jət/
– he collects
она собира-ет /sə-bi-ra-jət/
я собира-ю /sə-bi-ra-ju/
– she collects
– I collect
оно собира-ет /sə-bi-ra-jət/
– it collects (neuter)
-ешь / -ем / -ете
-ют
ты собира-ешь /sə-bi-ra-jə∫/
– you collect
мы собира-ем /sə-bi-ra-jəm/
они собира-ют /sə-bi-ra-jut/
– we collect
– they collect
вы/Вы собира-ете
/sə-bi-ra-jə-t’ə/
– you collect
~ 49 ~
As you can see, the above given forms of ‘работать’ and
‘собирать’ refer to the 1st type of conjugation. The stress does not
shift, when we conjugate these verbs. It falls on the same syllable both
in the infinitive and the finite (personal) forms: работать – работаю,
работаешь, etc.; собирать – собираем, собирает, etc.
But if we consider the 2nd conjugation verb ‘учиться’ (formed
from ‘учить’), we will see that, in the majority of forms, the stress
shifts to another syllable. Please, keep this in mind, when you
memorize its forms. As the verb is new and is a little bit more
complicated than those we studied before (due to its ‘-ся’ variant),
we’ll deal with only two forms – 3rd person singular and plural:
уч-и-ть /u-t∫’it’/
-ит
-ат
она уч-ит /u-t∫’it/
– she learns; teaches
они уч-ат /u-t∫’at/
он/оно уч-ит /u-t∫’it/
– they learn; teach
– he learns; teaches
уч-и-ть-ся /u-t∫’i-tsa/
она уч-ит-ся /u-t∫’i-tsa/
они уч-ат-ся /u-t∫’a-tsa/
– she takes classes; studies
– they take classes; study
он/оно уч-ит-ся /u-t∫’i-tsa/
– he takes classes; studies
Let’s see how these two variants (one simple and its variant
with the ‘-ся’ particle) differ. The simple variant ‘учить’ is similar to
its group-mates (2nd conjugation verbs like ‘слышать’ or
‘говорить’ that you already know). It means that we conjugate it in
the same manner: я уч-у, ты уч-ишь, он/она/оно уч-ит, мы уч-им,
вы уч-ите, они уч-ат (see the charts in Lessons 4 and 5). There are
only two little problems about it. First, remember that in personal
forms – as opposed to the infinitive – the stress falls on the root (for
the exception of the 1st person singular, where the stress remains on
the ending: я учу). And second, it may have two meanings: (1) to
learn (smth) and (2) to teach (smb to do smth). Here are some
examples for you to practice:
~ 50 ~
Она учит новый язык. – She’s learning a new language.
Они учат гимн. – They’re learning an anthem.
Они учат их петь. – They’re teaching them to sing.
Он учит её говорить по-японски. – He’s teaching her
to speak Japanese.
Она учит меня бегать. – She’s teaching me to run.
In all the examples above the action (expressed by the forms of
‘учить’) is directed either (1) towards something (simple object) or
(2) towards somebody plus another action, i.e. петь, говорить пояпонски, бегать, in the form of the infinitive (complex object):
No.1
Она
Он
subject
учит
учит
→
→
новый язык.
гимн.
predicate
direction of the action
simple object
No.2
Они
учат
→
→
→
Он
учит
Она
учит
→
→
их
петь.
её
говорить пояпонски.
меня
бегать.
subject
predicate
direction of the action
complex object
→
As far as the verb ‘учиться’ is concerned, it’s used (and
looks) in a different way. You can see that it’s made up of the basic
infinitive ‘учить’ plus the particle ‘-ся’ (учиться). This particle is
called reflexive, and it originated from the reflexive pronoun ‘себя’
/s’ə-b’a/ or /s’i-b’a/, i.e. ‘oneself’. This is why the action is quite often
directed from the subject of a sentence through a verb (predicate)
back to the subject. At the same time, in many cases it may be
considered as a passive form (be educated, be taught, etc.). For
example, ‘Он учит-ся’ may be interpreted both as ‘He is selfstudying (literally: teaching himself)’ and ‘He is taught or educated
(by smb)’. In either case, the logical (not syntactic) object, to which
~ 51 ~
the action is directed, is the structural subject of the sentence. The
action may go from someone else (known or unknown), e.g. from
university teachers, etc., through the predicate towards the subject
(‘He is taught or educated’), or from the subject through the
predicate back to itself (‘He’s self-studying’):
Он
←
учится
subject
direction of the action
predicate
в университете.
adverbial modifier of place
Let’s practice saying some examples:
Дети учатся в школе. – Children go to school (literally:
Children study / are taught at school).
Студенты учатся в университете. – Students go to
university (literally: Students study / are educated at university).
Мой друг учится в Пекине. – My friend (also: boyfriend) studies in Beijing.
Моя подруга учится в Берлине. – My friend (also: girlfriend) studies in Berlin.
And in conclusion, let’s analyze the forms of the nouns used in
this lesson, which are: в России / о России, в университете, в
общежитии, в комнате, в пропуске, в Москве, в гостинице, в
школе, в Берлине, в Пекине. First of all, we need to divide them into
groups based on their gender:
1) masculine nouns: университет, пропуск, Берлин, Пекин (with the
zero inflexion);
2) feminine nouns: Россия, комната, Москва, гостиница, школа
(with the inflexions -ия or -а); and
3) neuter nouns: общежитие (with the inflexion -ие).
These nouns, as you can see, are used in the form of the
prepositional case, which is already known to you. Thus, we can
continue the list of nouns which we made earlier, but with one
alteration, i.e. to the -ия group of feminine nouns we’ll add one
neuter gender noun ending in -ие (общежитие).
Let me remind you that the question to a noun in the
prepositional case is ‘Where?’ – Где? (also: ‘Where in?’, ‘What in?’
~ 52 ~
– В чём? /f t∫’om/, ‘In what place?’), or ‘What about?’ – О чём? /a
t∫’om/. The noun takes the prepositions ‘в’ or ‘о/об’. The inflexions
for the nominative case ‘-ия/-ие’, ‘-а’ or zero are changed as
follows:
Subjective (nominative) case
What? – Что?
Prepositional case
Where? – Где? What about? – О чём?
-ия / -ие
-ии
Known:
Known:
Англ-ия (feminine gender)
Герман-ия (feminine gender)
Япон-ия (feminine gender)
в Англ-ии /v an-gl’i-ji/
в Герман-ии /v g’ər-ma-n’i-ji/
в Япон-ии /v jə-po-n’i-ji/
New:
Росс-ия (feminine gender)
общежит-ие (neuter gender)
New:
/ap-ɕːə-ʒɨ-t’i-jə/
в Росс-ии /v ras-s’i-ji/
о Росс-ии /ə ras-s’i-ji/
в общежит-ии /v ap-ɕːə-ʒɨ-t’i-ji/
-а
-е
Known:
Known:
Америка (feminine gender)
Литва (feminine gender)
Польша (feminine gender)
в Америке /v a-m’e-r’i-k’ə/
в Литве /v l’it-v’e/
в Польше /f pol’-∫ə/
New:
комната (feminine gender)
Москва (feminine gender)
гостиница (feminine gender)
школа (feminine gender)
New:
в комнате /f kom-nа-t’ə/
в Москве /v mask-v’e/
в гостинице /v ga-st’i-n’i-tsə/
в школе /f ∫ko-l’ə/
-–
-е
Known:
Known:
Китай– (masculine gender)
Таиланд– (masculine gender)
Узбекистан– (masculine gender)
в Китае /f k’i-ta-jə/
в Таиланде /f ta-i-lan-d’ə/
в Узбекистане
/v u-zb’ə-k’i-sta-n’ə/
~ 53 ~
New:
университет– (masculine gender)
пропуск– (masculine gender)
Берлин– (masculine gender)
Пекин– (masculine gender)
New:
в университете /v u-n’i-v’ər-s’it’e-t’ə/
в пропуске /f pro-pu-sk’ə/
в Берлине /v b’ər-l’i-n’ə/
в Пекине /f p’ə-k’i-n’ə/
Besides, we can find one more regularity, this time in word
formation. It refers to the formation of the feminine noun. If you look
at the noun ‘журналист-к-а’, you will recognize the tools (-к-а
shown in Lesson 2) for building some feminine nouns like ‘японка’,
‘полька’, ‘тайка’, etc. Look at the following sentences and pay
attention to the way how some feminine nouns are constructed:
Мой друг – журналист. – My friend is a journalist.
(masculine)
Моя подруга – журналистка. – My friend is a journalist.
(also possible: My girl-friend is a journalist). (feminine)
Мой друг – студент. – My friend is a student. (masculine)
Моя подруга – студентка. – My friend is a student. (also
possible: My girl-friend is a student). (feminine)
~ 54 ~
EXERCISES
1. Practice reading Text 1 and Text 2 above and translate them into
your native language. Answer the following questions in Russian:
Текст 1.
Кто это? Сунг амери^канец? Где он живёт сейчас? Он учится
в школе или в университете? Он гово^рит по-русски? Он
живёт в го^стинице или в общежитии? Какая информация в
его пропуске?
Текст 2.
Кто это? Кейт кита^янка? Где она живёт сейчас? Она учится
или работает? Она живёт в го^стинице или в общежитии?
Она сту^дентка? Какая информация в её пропуске?
2. Add the required ending to the root of the verb ‘слышать’ (-у, ит, -ишь, -ите, -им or -ат) and use the personal pronoun in the
accusative case. Read the sentences in Russian and translate them into
your native language. Example: Оно слыш… (it). → Оно слышит
его. (here both pronouns are inanimate: It hears it.)
Он слыш… (her). → …
Ты слыш… (me). → …
Я слыш… (you). → … (singular object)
Они слыш… (them). → …
Мы слыш… (you). → … (plural object)
Вы слыш… (us). → …
Она слыш… (him). → …
3. Use the verbs (infinitives) given in brackets in the correct form.
Example: Они (говорить), что (жить) в Москве. → Они
говорят, что живут в Москве.
Он (говорить), что (жить) в Китае. Она (говорить), что Иван
(быть) её друг (see Lesson 2). Они (говорить), что они (быть)
муж и жена. Они (говорить), что (знать) всё о Японии. Мы
(говорить), что (слышать) вас. Вы (говорить), что (знать), где
~ 55 ~
мы (жить). Он (говорить), что (слышать) меня. Я (говорить),
что сейчас (жить) в Америке.
4. Revise the conjugation of the 1st type verbs (see Lesson 2). Conjugate
the verbs ‘работать’ and ‘собирать’ accordingly.
5. Revise the usage of the verbs ‘учить’ and ‘учиться’. In the
sentences below use either the verb ‘учить’ or ‘учить-ся’ in the
appropriate form, i.e. 3rd person singular or plural:
Она … новый язык. Дети … в школе. Он … гимн. Моя
подруга … в Берлине. Они … их петь. Мой друг … в Пекине.
Он … её говорить по-японски. Студенты … в университете.
Она … меня бегать.
6. Add the zero inflexion or -к-а to the nouns in the following
sentences:
Моя подруга – студент…. Мой друг – журналист…. Мой друг
– студент…. Моя подруга – журналист….
7. Insert the required possessive pronoun ‘её’ or ‘его’:
a) Это журналистка. … имя Анна. Вот … дети. Они учатся в
школе.
b) Это студент. … имя Иван. Вот … комната. Он учится в
университете.
8. Use the following nouns in the prepositional case; first add the
preposition ‘в’ to each of them, and then the preposition ‘о/об’ (see
Lessons 3 and 4):
a) Россия, общежитие
b) Москва, гостиница, комната, школа
c) Берлин, Пекин, пропуск, университет
~ 56 ~
9. Practice reading the following sentences in Russian and translate
them into your native language. Learn the sentences.
Мы слышим вас. Вы слышите нас. Ты слышишь меня. Я
слышу тебя.
Они слышат их. Она слышит его. Он слышит её.
Он говорит, что живёт в Китае. Она говорит, что Иван – её
друг. Они говорят, что они – муж и жена. Они говорят, что
знают всё о Японии. Мы говорим, что слышим вас. Вы
говорите, что знаете, где мы живём. Он говорит, что слышит
меня. Я говорю, что сейчас живу в Америке.
Она учит новый язык. Он учит гимн. Они учат их петь. Он
учит её говорить по-японски. Она учит меня бегать.
Дети учатся в школе. Студенты учатся в университете. Мой
друг учится в Пекине. Моя подруга учится в Берлине
Мой друг – журналист. Моя подруга – журналистка. Мой
друг – студент. Моя подруга – студентка.
10. Translate the following sentences into Russian:
We hear you. You hear us. You hear me. I hear you. They hear them.
She hears him. He hears her.
He says (that) he lives in China. She says (that) Ivan is her friend.
They say (that) they’re a husband and a wife. They say (that) they
know everything about Japan.
We say (that) we hear you. You say (that) you know where we live. He
says (that) he hears (can hear) me. I say (that) now I’m living in
America.
She’s learning a new language. He’s learning an anthem. They’re
teaching them to sing. He’s teaching her to speak Japanese. She’s
teaching me to run.
~ 57 ~
Children go to school (literally: Children study at school). Students go
to university (literally: Students study at university). My friend studies
in Beijing. My friend (also: girl-friend) studies in Berlin.
My friend is a journalist (masculine). My friend is a journalist (feminine).
My friend is a student (masculine). My friend is a student (feminine).
11. Learn Text 1 and Text 2 by heart.
~ 58 ~
Студенты учатся в университете.
Мой друг – студент.
Он живёт в России.
Мой друг учится в Москве,
в университете.
~ 59 ~
LESSON 6
IN THIS LESSON:
1. Sentence patterns: У меня есть …. Меня зовут…. Similar
constructions in other persons.
2. Personal pronouns in the genitive case.
3. Prepositional case of nouns. Preposition ‘на’. Inflexions -и
and -е.
4. Reflexive verb ‘находиться’ (2nd conjugation) with the
particle -ся.
5. 1st conjugation verbs: ‘звать’, ‘играть’, ‘петь’, ‘плавать’,
‘писать’, ‘рисовать’ and ‘читать’; 2nd conjugation verbs:
‘ездить’ and ‘любить’.
6. Some forms of plural nouns. Inflexions -и and -ы.
7. Forty-three vocabulary units.
~ 60 ~
VOCABULARY
сын /sɨn/ – a son (masculine gender)
дочь /dot∫’/ – a daughter (feminine gender)
семья /s’əm’-ja/ or /s’im’-ja/ (more reduced) – a family (feminine
gender)
машина /ma-∫ɨ-na/ – a car (feminine gender)
газета /ga-z’e-ta/ – a newspaper (feminine gender)
редактор /r’ə-da-ktər/ – an editor (masculine gender)
главный редактор /glav-nɨj/ /r’ə-da-ktər/ – chief editor
компания /kam-pa-n’i-ja/ or /kəm-pa-n’i-ja/ (more reduced) – a
company (feminine gender)
увлечение /u-vl’ə-t∫’e-n’i-jə/ or /u-vl’i-t∫’e-n’jə/ (more reduced) –
a hobby (neuter gender)
гитара /g’i-ta-ra/ – a guitar (feminine gender)
книга /kn’i-ga/ – a book (feminine gender)
бумага /bu-ma-ga/ – paper (feminine gender)
буква /bu-kva/ – a letter (of an alphabet) (feminine gender)
тетрадь /t’ə-trat’/ or /t’i-trat’/ (more reduced) – an exercise-book,
a copy-book (feminine gender)
карандаш /ka-ran-da∫/ or /kə-rən-da∫/ (more reduced) – a pencil
(masculine gender)
краска /kras-ka/ – paint, ink colour/color (feminine noun)
деревня /d’ə-r’e-vn’a/ or /d’i-r’e-vn’a/ (more reduced) – a village,
countryside (feminine gender)
лошадь /lo-∫ət’/ – a horse (feminine gender)
воздух /voz-duh/ – air (masculine noun)
река /r’e-ka/ or /r’i-ka/ (more reduced) – a river (feminine gender)
Сибирь /s’i-bir’/ – Siberia (feminine gender)
главный /glav-nɨj/ – main, major, chief (masculine adjective)
свежий /sv’ə-ʒɨj/ – fresh (masculine adjective)
каждый /kaʒ-dɨj/ – each, every (masculine adjective)
большая /bal’-∫a-ja/ or /bəl’-∫a-ja/ (more reduced) – big, large
(feminine adjective)
иногда /i-na-gda/ or /i-nə-gda/ (more reduced) – sometimes (adverb)
вместе /vm’e-st’ə/ – together (adverb)
летом /l’e-təm/ – in summer, in the summertime (adverb)
зимой /z’i-moj/ – in (the) winter(time) (adverb)
~ 61 ~
туда /tu-da/ – there (shows direction away from the speaker ‘to/towards
some place’)
всё /fs’o/ – all, everything
ещё не… /jə-ɕːo/ /n’ə/ or /ji-ɕːo/ /n’ə/ (more reduced) – not yet
есть /jest’/ – is/are available, there is/are, am/is/are (applicable
to all persons)
звать /zvat’/ – to call, to name
плавать /pla-vat’/ – to swim
ездить /jez-d’it’/ – to go, to travel, including: to ride, to drive
(multidirectional verb for repeated actions)
находиться /na-ha-d’i-tsa/ or /nə-hə-d’i-tsa/ (more reduced) – to be
located, to situated
играть /i-grat’/ – to play
рисовать /r’i-sa-vat’/ or /r’i-sə-vat’/ (more reduced) – to draw
писать /p’i-sat’/ – to write
читать /t∫’i-tat’/ – to read
любить /l’u-b’it’/ – to love
петь /p’et’/ – to sing
TOTAL: 43 vocabulary units
SENTENCE PATTERNS
We'll start this lesson with two sentence patterns:
Меня зовут… – My name is…
У меня есть… – I’ve got…
The first pattern is easier. To learn it, you’ll need the forms of
personal pronouns in the accusative case which we listed in Lesson 5.
This type of sentences is called impersonal, because the subject is
absent. The place where it is supposed to be used is shown in the
chart:
Меня
←
---
зовут
...
↓
me
←
↓
they
↓
call
↓
…
object
direction of the action
implicated subject
predicate
…
~ 62 ~
For the list of the remaining personal pronouns, which may
play the role of an object in sentences like this, see Lesson 5. You can
substitute the object in this pattern by any other (out of the list
provided in Lesson 5), and you will get a new sentence, for example:
Меня зовут Анна. – My name is Anna.
Его зовут Павел. – His name is Pavel.
Нас зовут Анна и Павел. – Our names are Anna and
Pavel.
Её зовут Ольга. – Her name is Olga.
Их зовут Иван и Вадим. – Their names are Ivan and
Vadim.
The second pattern is a little bit more complicated. Let’s call it
‘a construction’. The English equivalent to the Russian construction
‘у меня есть…’ (often without ‘есть’, i.e. ‘у меня…’) is ‘I have…’
or ‘I’ve got…’. The structural subject of a sentence (which logically is
an object), to which the question is ‘what?’ (что?) or ‘who?’ (кто?),
and which is used in the subjective / nominative case, follows the
predicate ‘есть’. At the same time, the construction ‘у меня…’ may
be considered as the logical subject, since it shows ‘who’ owns ‘what’
(though the personal pronoun in the construction is not used in the
subjective / nominative case, it’s used in the genitive case).
Look at the examples below and practice reading them:
(1) У меня есть дети. У меня есть машина. У меня
есть дом. (with ‘есть’) – I’ve got children. I’ve got a car. I’ve got a
house.
(2) У меня всё хорошо. (without ‘есть’) – Everything is good
with me. (literally: All is well with me.)
Now look how each segment of a Russian sentence of this type
may be interpreted if taken separately. Pay special attention to the
interpretation of the construction ‘у меня…’, as well as to the
difference between Russian and English word order:
~ 63 ~
No.1
У меня
↓
in my possession
to me
by me
есть
↓
there is
belongs
is owned
дом.
↓
a house
a house
a house
construction
predicate
subject
No.2 (a)
У меня
↓
with me
--↓
is
всё
↓
all
хорошо.
↓
well
predicate
(zero link-verb)
subject
predicate
(predicative)
construction
No.2 (b)
У меня
↓
with me
всё
↓
all
--↓
is
хорошо.
↓
well
construction
subject
predicate
(zero link-verb)
predicate
(predicative)
Now look at the table below and learn the same construction
(showing possession) with other forms of personal pronouns:
st
1 person
2nd person
3rd person
SINGULAR
PLURAL
я → у меня есть…
ты → у тебя есть…
она → у неё есть…
он/оно → у него есть…
мы → у нас есть…
вы → у вас есть…
они → у них есть…
These mean ‘I’ve got…’, ‘You’ve got…’, ‘She/he/it has got…’,
‘We’ve got…’, ‘You’ve got…’ and ‘They’ve got…’ accordingly. Mind
the pronunciation of the constructions in the 3rd person singular ‘у
него…’ /u n’i-vo/ for ‘He/it has got…’, ‘у неё…’ /u n’i-jo/ for ‘She/it
has got…’ and 3rd person plural ‘у них…’ /u n’ih/ for ‘They have
got…’. The pronunciation of the remaining pronouns inside the
construction coincides with that of personal pronouns in the
accusative case (see Lesson 5). The case of the pronouns you see in
~ 64 ~
the table above is called genitive, which will be described in more
detail later. For the time-being, it’s enough to say that the question to
a pronoun in the genitive case is Кого? /ka-vo/ for animate pronouns
or Чего? /t∫’i-vo/ for inanimate.
Practice saying the following sample sentences:
У них есть дети. – They’ve got children.
У него есть семья. – He’s got a family.
У Вас ^есть пропуск? – Have you got an admittance card?
У нас есть книги, тетради, карандаши и краски. –
We’ve got books, exercise-books, pencils and paints.
У неё всё хорошо. (without ‘есть’) – All is well with her. (or:
She is OK.)
READING
Practice reading the following text with the help of the
vocabulary section provided:
Текст.
Меня зовут Ольга. Я живу в Томске. Томск –
это большой город. Он находится в Сибири.
Я замужем. У меня есть семья: муж, дочь и
сын.
Я работаю в газете. Я – главный редактор.
Мой муж работает в компании «Лукойл». Это
большая компания. У него есть увлечение – он
любит петь. Он хорошо поёт и играет на гитаре.
Мои дети ещё не учатся в школе, но я уже учу
их писать и читать. Мы вместе читаем книги и
пишем буквы. Дети рисуют, пишут и читают
каждый день. У них есть книги, тетради, карандаши
~ 65 ~
и краски. Иногда они пишут и рисуют в тетради, а
иногда – на бумаге.
У нас есть дом в деревне. Мы ездим туда на
машине. Мы живём там летом. Там хорошо –
свежий воздух, лес, река. Мы любим быть на
воздухе. Дети играют, плавают, ездят на лошади.
Зимой мы живём в городе.
We continue to familiarize with the prepositional case. As you
can see from the text, the nouns in the prepositional case may also
take the preposition ‘на’, e.g. на гитаре, на лошади, на бумаге, на
воздухе, на машине. The question to a noun with this preposition is
‘На чём?’ /na t∫’om/, which literally means ‘On what?’. Look at the
chart below for inflexions and prepositions:
MASCULINE
Nominative →
Prepositional
FEMININE
Nominative →
Prepositional
FEMININE
Nominative →
Prepositional
-– → -е
-а/-я → -е
-(и)я/-ь → -и
газета → в газете
школа → в школе
деревня → в
деревне
семья → в семье
компания → в
компании
Сибирь → в
Сибири
тетрадь → в
тетради
машина → на
машине
бумага → на
бумаге
гитара → на
гитаре
лошадь → на
лошади
Томск– → в
Томске
город– → в городе
воздух– → на
воздухе
NOTES:
1. If you look at the transcription of the word ‘деревня’ /d’i-r’e-vn’a/, or ‘семья’
/s’i-m’ja/, you will see that they end in the sound /-a/, which doesn’t make them
~ 66 ~
different from the other words included in the same column. In this sense, the
difference between them and the words in ‘-а’ is only in their spelling.
2. As far as the word ‘Сибирь’ is concerned, you can remember its declension
better if you look at its English spelling, i.e. ‘Siberia’, which reminds of Russian
words ending in‘-ия’. You know that the inflected part in words with the ‘-ия’
ending is ‘-я’, and in the prepositional case it is replaced by ‘-и’ (Россия → в
России, Англия → в Англии, etc.). But this trick may not be applied to all
feminine nouns ending in ‘-ь’!
3. As for the words ‘город’ (masculine), ‘тетрадь’ and ‘лошадь’ (feminine), you
should remember that ‘д’ at the end of the word is devoiced in the nominative case,
that’s /go-rət/ with hard /-t/, and /t’ə-trat’/ (or /t’i-trat’/) and /lo-∫ət’/ with soft /-t’/;
while in the prepositional case-form ‘д’ becomes voiced, i.e. /go-rə-d’ə/, /t’ə-tra-d’i/
(or /t’i-tra-d’i/) and /lo-∫ə-d’i/ with soft /-d’/ everywhere.
4. In the words where the final consonant is hard in the nominative case, e.g.
Томск /-k/, город /-t/, воздух /-h/ (masculine) and газета /-ta/, школа /-la/,
машина /-na/, бумага /-ga/, гитара /-ra/ (feminine), the consonant becomes soft in
the prepositional case-form, as it is followed by the soft-indicating ‘-е’: в Томске /k’ə/, в городе /-d’ə/, в воздухе /-h’ə/ (masculine) and в газете /-t’ə/, в школе /l’ə/, на машине /-n’ə/, на бумаге /-g’ə/, на гитаре /-r’ə/ (feminine). However, this
rule doesn’t apply to the three consonants that are always hard and don’t have soft
counterparts, they are ‘ж’, ‘ш’ and ‘ц’ (see the previous coursebook ‘Introduction
into Basic Russian’).
Remember the following word combinations:
рисовать на бумаге – to draw on paper
писать на бумаге – to write on paper
играть на гитаре – to play the guitar
быть/находиться на воздухе – to be outdoors
(outside), in the open air
быть/находиться на улице – to be outdoors (outside),
in the street
ездить на машине – to go by car
ездить на лошади – to ride a horse
In this lesson you can also see one reflexive verb
‘находиться’ with the particle ‘-ся’ (находиться). In the infinitive
the stress falls on ‘-ить’, i.e. ‘находиться’. As you know from Lesson
5, this kind of verbs may be compared with passive forms in English
(i.e. not ‘to locate / to teach’, but ‘to be located / to be taught’). The
action is directed towards the subject of a sentence.
~ 67 ~
Томск
Tomsk
←
←
находится
is located
в Сибири.
in Siberia.
subject
direction of the action
predicate
adverbial modifier of place
It’s the 2nd conjugation verb like the verb ‘учиться’. And
again, we will see that the stress shifts to another syllable in personal
forms, as compared to the infinitive. Please, keep this in mind, when
you memorize its forms. This time we’ll also deal with only two forms,
3rd person singular and plural:
наход-и-ть-ся /na-ha-d’i-tsa/
-ит
она наход-ит-ся
/na-ho-d’i-tsa/
– she/it is located
он/оно наход-ит-ся
/na-ho-d’i-tsa/
– he/it is located
-ят
они наход-ят-ся
/na-ho-d’a-tsa/
– they are located
Now let's practice the sentences with the verb ‘находиться’:
Дом находится в деревне. – The house is (located) in
the village.
Сейчас дети находятся в школе. – The children are
at school now.
Школа находится в городе. – The school is in the
town.
Люди находятся на улице. – The people are outside.
Город находится в Сибири. – The town is located in
Siberia.
Цирк находится на улице Гагарина. – The circus
is in Gagarin Street.
The verbs used in this lesson can be divided in accordance
with their belonging to the type of conjugation as follows:
1st conjugation – звать, играть, петь, плавать, писать,
рисовать, читать
~ 68 ~
2nd conjugation – ездить, любить, находиться
Some of the verbs, when being conjugated, take only personal
endings, by which the infinitive particle ‘-ть’ is replaced (like in the
verb ‘знать’ known to you from Lessons 3 and 4). Nothing else is
done to the stem (or root, if this is the case). The verbs ‘работать’,
‘собирать’ from Lesson 5 and ‘плавать’ from this Lesson 6 are also
conjugated according to the same pattern. These are the easiest verbs
in terms of conjugation. Let’s have a look at them and learn them:
чита-ть
-ет
-ю
он/она/оно чита-ет /t∫’i-ta-jət/
я чита-ю /t∫’i-ta-ju/
– he/she/it reads
– I read
-ешь / -ем / -ете
-ют
ты чита-ешь /t∫’i-ta-jə∫/
– you read
мы чита-ем /t∫’i-ta-jəm/
они чита-ют /t∫’i-ta-jut/
– we read
– they read
вы чита-ете /t∫’i-ta-jə-t’ə/
– you read
игра-ть
-ет
-ю
он/она/оно игра-ет /i-gra-jət/
я игра-ю /i-gra-ju/
– he/she/it plays
– I play
-ешь / -ем / -ете
-ют
ты игра-ешь /i-gra-jə∫/
– you play
мы игра-ем /i-gra-jəm/
они игра-ют /i-gra-jut/
– we play
– they play
вы игра-ете /i-gra-jə-t’ə/
– you play
Unlike the verbs ‘игр-а-ть’,‘чит-а-ть’ and ‘плав-а-ть’,
whose stems are ‘игра-’ ‘чита-’ and ‘плава-’ (root plus suffix) and
which (stems) are kept in all personal forms, there are verbs that have
one suffix in the stem of the infinitive and a different suffix in the
stems of its personal forms. For example, in the infinitive ‘рис-ова-
~ 69 ~
ть’ the stem is ‘рисова-’ (root plus suffix). The stem in personal
forms looks different; in our case it’s ‘рис-у-’. Accordingly, the
endings are added to the ‘new’ stem ‘рису-’. Also keep in mind that
the stress in the infinitive ‘рисовать’ falls on the last syllable, while
in personal forms it shifts. Please, look at the forms of the verb
‘рисовать’ below and learn them:
рис-ова-ть
-ет
-ю
он/она/оно рис-у-ет /r’i-su-jət/
– he/she/it draws
я рис-у-ю /r’i-su-ju/
– I draw
-ешь / -ем / -ете
-ют
ты рис-у-ешь /r’i-su-jə∫/
– you draw
мы рис-у-ем /r’i-su-jəm/
– we draw
вы рис-у-ете /r’i-su-jə-t’ə/
– you draw
они рис-у-ют /r’i-su-jut/
– they draw
Other verbs do have a suffix in the infinitive stem, too, like ‘игра-ть’ and ‘чит-а-ть’; but unlike them, they lose the suffix in the
personal forms; so the personal endings are added straight to the
root. (By the way, the same happens to many 2nd conjugation verbs,
e.g. ‘говор-и-ть’, ‘слыш-а-ть’, etc.) Let’s look what happens under
conjugation to the verb ‘зв-а-ть’, where the stem is ‘зва-’ and the
root is ‘зв-’. But not all is so simple! Here I would like to remind you
of such phenomenon as ‘a mobile vowel’, which we encountered in
Lesson 2 (Please, turn to the note about the ‘o’ letter, which is present
in the nouns ‘литовка’ and ‘литовец’, but is absent in the relative
noun ‘Лит-ва’). In the same way the ‘o’ letter is used in some related
forms of the verb ‘звать’ (in the noun ‘зов’, for example), but is
absent in the infinitive ‘з-вать’. This is how this verb is conjugated.
Look at the chart below and learn the following forms by heart:
~ 70 ~
зв-а-ть
-ёт
он/она/оно зов-ёт /za-v’ot/
– he/she/it calls
-ёшь / -ём / -ёте
ты зов-ёшь /za-v’o∫/
– you call
мы зов-ём /za-v’om/
– we call
вы зов-ёте /za-v’o-t’ə/
– you call
-у
я зов-у /za-vu/
– I call
-ут
они зов-ут /za-vut/
– they call
The remaining verbs of the 1st group (‘петь’ and ‘писать’) are
connected with the phenomenon called the ‘vowel and consonant
interchange’, which is typical for other languages, too. The examples
of the vowel interchange in related words or forms in English are:
‘long – length’, ‘wide – width’, ’foot – feet’, etc. The examples of the
consonant interchange in English are: ‘speak – speech’ (/k/ → /t∫/),
‘pleasant – pleasure’ (/z/ → /ʒ/), ‘press – pressure’ (/s/ → /∫/) etc. So,
there’s nothing unusual about things like that in Russian. Here we’ve
got one example of the vowel interchange (пе-ть, по-ю, по-ёт, etc.):
пе-ть
-ёт
он/она/оно по-ёт /pa-jot/
– he/she/it sings
-ёшь / -ём / -ёте
ты по-ёшь /pa-jo∫/
– you sing
мы по-ём /pa-jom/
– we sing
вы по-ёте /pa-jo-t’ə/
– you sing
-ю
я по-ю /pa-ju/
– I sing
-ют
они по-ют /pa-jut/
– they sing
…and one example of the consonant interchange (пис-а-ть, пиш-у,
пиш-ет, etc.). Please, look at the charts above and below and learn
the given forms by heart:
~ 71 ~
пис-а-ть /p’i-sat’/
-ет
-у
он/она/оно пиш-ет /p’i-∫ət/
я пиш-у /p’i-∫u/
– he/she/it writes
– I write
-ешь / -ем / -ете
-ут
ты пиш-ешь /p’i-∫ə∫/
– you write
мы пиш-ем /p’i-∫əm/
они пиш-ут /p’i-∫ut/
– we write
– they write
вы пиш-ете /p’i-∫ə-t’ə/
– you write
NOTE: In the 1st person singular of the verb ‘писать’ the stress remains on the last
syllable (пишу), but in the other forms it shifts to the root.
The remaining two verbs ‘ездить’ and ‘любить’ belong to
the 2nd conjugation. The verb ‘ездить’ is also a good example to
illustrate the consonant interchange. But this time only one verb-form
is involved in this process – the 1st person singular form, where /d/ is
replaced by /ʒ/. Look at the chart below and learn the forms:
езд-и-ть
-ит
он/она/оно езд-ит /jez-d’it/
– he/she/it goes (travels)
-ишь / -им / -ите
ты езд-ишь /jez-d’i∫/
– you go (travel)
мы езд-им /jez-d’im/
– we go (travel)
вы езд-ите /jez-d’i-t’ə/
– you go (travel)
-у
я езж-у
/jez-ʒu/ or /jeʒ-ʒu/ (most often)
– I go (travel)
-ят
они езд-ят /jez-d’at/
– they go (travel)
And at last, we'll get familiar with one more type of
interchange, which affects the final part of the root (б → бл, п → пл,
в → вл), and, like in the case of ‘ездить’, applies to only one verbform – the 1st person singular. For the time-being, one example of
~ 72 ~
such interchange will be enough for us, that’s ‘б’ → ‘бл’. This is
also the situation when the verb loses the suffix in the personal forms
(which is present in the infinitive stem), so the personal endings are
added straight to the root. Please, look at the chart and learn the
forms below by heart:
люб-и-ть
-ит
-ю
он/она/оно люб-ит /l’u-b’it/
я любл-ю /l’u-bl’u/
– he/she/it loves
– I love
-ишь / -им / -ите
-ят
ты люб-ишь /l’u-b’i∫/
– you love
мы люб-им /l’u-b’im/
они люб-ят /l’u-b’at/
– we love
– they love
вы люб-ите /l’u-b’i-t’ə/
– you love
NOTE: In the 1st person singular of the verb ‘любить’ the stress remains on the last
syllable (люблю), but in the other forms it shifts to the root.
Now we’re going to do something that we didn’t try before.
We will see how some of the Russian nouns produce their plural
forms in the nominative case. You’ve seen these nouns in the text.
Let’s consider the nouns ending in ‘-га/-ка’, ‘-ва/-та’, ‘-ш’ and ‘-ь’.
NOMINATIVE
singular → plural
NOMINATIVE
singular → plural
NOMINATIVE
singular → plural
NOMINATIVE
singular → plural
-га/-ка
↓
-ги/-ки
-ва/-та
↓
-вы/-ты
-ш–
↓
-ши
-ь
↓
-и
книга →
книги
краска →
краски
буква →
буквы
карандаш– →
карандаши
тетрадь →
тетради
~ 73 ~
Additional examples (for illustration)
нога → ноги
подруга →
подруги
рука → руки
собака → собаки
a leg → legs
a friend (fem.) →
friends
a hand → hands
a dog → dogs
корова → коровы
голова → головы
газета → газеты
карта → карты
a cow → cows
a head → heads
a newspaper→
newspapers
a map → maps
малыш →
малыши
ковш → ковши
душ → души
шалаш →
шалаши
a baby → babies
a scoop → scoops
a shower →
showers
a shelter (of straw)
→ shelters
лошадь →
лошади
площадь →
площади
жизнь → жизни
печь → печи
a horse → horses
a square →
squares
a life → lives
an oven → ovens
NOTES:
1. In the plural form ‘карандаши’ the stress falls on the last syllable.
2. As for the word ‘тетрадь’, you should remember that ‘д’ at the end of the word is
devoiced in the nominative case, that’s /t’ə-trat’/ (or /t’i-trat’/) with soft /-t’/; while
in the plural form ‘д’ becomes voiced: /t’ə-tra-d’i/ (or /t’i-tra-d’i/) with soft /-d’/.
~ 74 ~
EXERCISES
1. Practice reading the following sentences and translate them into
your native language:
Меня зовут Анна. Его зовут Павел. Нас зовут Анна и Павел.
Её зовут Ольга. Их зовут Иван и Вадим.
У них есть дети. У него есть семья. У Вас есть пропуск? У нас
есть книги, тетради, карандаши и краски. У неё всё хорошо.
Дом находится в деревне. Сейчас дети находятся в школе.
Школа находится в городе. Люди находятся на улице. Город
находится в Сибири. Цирк находится на улице Гагарина.
2. Revise the sentence patterns proposed in this lesson. Complete the
following sentences with the appropriate forms of pronouns (in some
sentences two or several options are possible):
… зовут Анна и Павел. … зовут Павел. … зовут Ольга. …
зовут Иван и Вадим. … зовут Анна.
У … есть дети. У … всё хорошо. У … есть пропуск? У … есть
книги, тетради, карандаши и краски. У … есть семья.
3. Translate the following sentences into Russian:
His name is Pavel. My name is Olga. Our names are Ivan and Vadim.
Her name is Anna. Their names are Anna and Pavel.
She’s got a family. All is well with me. (or: I am OK.) We’ve got
children. Has he got an admittance card? They’ve got books,
exercise-books, pencils and paints. All is well with her. (or: She is
OK.)
4. Revise the forms of the verb ‘находиться’ given in this lesson.
Use the necessary form in the sentences below. Practice reading the
sentences and learn them. Mind the stress in the verb forms.
~ 75 ~
Город … в Сибири. Люди … на улице. Школа … в городе.
Дом … в деревне. Цирк … на улице Гагарина. Сейчас дети …
в школе.
5. Translate the following sentences into Russian, using the correct
forms of the verb ‘находиться’:
The school is in the town. The children are at school now. The town is
located in Siberia. The circus is in Gagarin Street. The house is
located in the village. The people are outside.
6. Revise the preposition ‘на’ for the prepositional case and translate
the following word combinations into Russian using this preposition.
Make up a sentence in Russian with each word combination.
to play the guitar
to go by car
to ride a horse
to draw on paper
to write on paper
to be outdoors (outside), in the open air
to be outdoors (outside), in the street
7. Conjugate the verbs: звать, играть, петь, плавать, писать,
рисовать, читать (1st conjugation) and ездить, любить (2nd
conjugation). Learn their forms by heart.
8. Insert the required inflexion: -и or -е. For the noun inflexions used
in the prepositional case see the chart in this lesson. Example: Он
работает в Росси…. → Он работает в России. Они живут в
дом…. → Они живут в доме.
Её муж работает в компани…. Она живёт в Томск…. Он
находится в Сибир…. Ольга работает в газет…. Дети ещё не
учатся в школ…. Иногда они пишут и рисуют в тетрад…, а
иногда – на бумаг…. У них есть дом в деревн…. Они ездят
туда на машин…. Они любят быть на воздух…. Дети играют,
плавают, ездят на лошад…. Зимой они живут в город….
~ 76 ~
9. Insert the required inflexion: -и or -ы. For the inflexions used in
plural nouns see the chart in this lesson. Example: У них есть
(рука), (нога) и (голова). → У них есть руки, ноги и головы.
Мы вместе читаем (книга) и пишем (буква). У нас есть
(книга), (тетрадь), (карандаш) и (краска). Мой муж читает
(газета).
10. Read the text about Olga’s family and answer the questions:
Где живёт Ольга? Где находится её город? У неё ^есть муж и
дети? Где работает её муж? У него ^есть увлечение? Её дети
^учатся в школе? Что у них есть? Куда ездят Ольга и её
семья? На чём они туда ездят? На чём дети ездят летом в
деревне?
11. Retell the text on behalf of Olga’s husband. Start like this: ‘Меня
зовут Иван. У меня есть жена. Её зовут Ольга. У нас есть
дети. …’ Make the necessary corrections in the text.
12. Learn the text by heart.
~ 77 ~
У него есть увлечение.
Он хорошо играет на гитаре.
Мы живём в Томске, в Сибири.
У нас есть дом в деревне.
Мы ездим туда на машине.
~ 78 ~
NOW I KNOW
Dear Russian language learner, now that you have completed
the first six steps of the basic course for beginners, make sure the
things listed in this section are your active knowledge. Start checking
yourself with the vocabulary.
Alongside the vocabulary units offered to you in the current
book, here you will also find those used in the preceding course
‘Introduction into Basic Russian’, because the parts of the course are,
and will further be, based on the principle of continuity. The newer
vocabulary units are typed in blue:
NOUNS: 72 units
Masculine gender:
американец, англичанин, Берлин, билет, борщ, вечер, воздух,
гений, герой, гимн, год, город, декабрь, день, дом, друг, ёж,
журналист, карандаш, китаец, Китай, ключ, космонавт, кофе
(uninflected), литовец, материал, месяц, мир, мост, муж, музей,
немец, номер, паспорт, Пекин, поляк, праздник, пропуск,
проспект, редактор, сад, сезон, студент, сын, таец, Таиланд,
текст, телефон, тюльпан, узбек, Узбекистан, университет,
ураган, урок, физик, фильм, цирк, час, человек, язык, японец
Neuter gender:
дело, здоровье, имя, лето, место, молоко, общежитие,
Рождество, увлечение, фото (uninflected), эхо
Feminine gender:
Америка, американка, Англия, англичанка, буква, бумага,
газета, Германия, гитара, деревня, дочь, жена, жизнь,
журналистка, зима, информация, калина, китаянка, книга,
комната, компания, краска, Литва, литовка, лошадь, малина,
машина, немка, подруга, полиция, полька, Польша, помощь,
река, Россия, рюмка, семья, Сибирь, станция, страна,
студентка, тайка, тетрадь, узбечка, улица, фамилия,
фотография, химия, школа, юбка, Япония, японка
~ 79 ~
Only plural:
бахилы, деньги, дети, люди
PRONOUNS: 6 units
ваш/Ваш, все, всего, всё, вы/Вы, где, его (possessive, masculine),
каждый (adjective type, masculine), как, какая/какой (adjective type,
feminine/masculine variations), который (adjective type, masculine), кто, мой,
мы, наш, он, она, они (plural), оно (neuter), сам, твой, ты, что, это, я
ADVERBS: 18 units
вместе, долго, ещё (не…), завтра, замужем, здесь, зимой,
иногда, летом, мало, много, очень, плохо, по-американски, поанглийски, по-китайски, по-литовски, по-немецки, попольски, по-русски, по-тайски, по-узбекски, по-японски,
сегодня, сейчас, тихо, тоже, туда, уже, холодно, хорошо
VERBS: 16 units
First conjugation:
бегать, жить, звать, знать, играть, нюхать, петь, писать,
плавать, работать, рисовать, собирать, читать
Second conjugation:
говорить, любить, находиться, слышать, учить, учиться,
ездить
Special:
быть, есть
PREPOSITIONS: 1 unit
в, на, о/об (two variations of the same preposition), у
ADJECTIVES: 14 units
английский, американский, атомная (fem.), большой, главный,
добрый, женат (masc. short), каждый, китайский, коровье (neut.),
литовский, лучший, мощный, немецкий, новый, польский,
~ 80 ~
рад/рада/рады (masc./fem./pl. short), русский, свежий, светлый,
скорая (fem.), старый, тайский, тихий, узбекский, холодный,
холост/холостой (masc. short/full), японский
CONJ., PARTICLES, INTERJECTIONS: 2 units
а, вот, да, не, нет, но, и, или, привет, спасибо, тоже, что
NUMERALS: 1 unit
два, десять, один, первый, пять, три, четыре
SET EXPRESSIONS:
Всем привет! Всего хорошего! Добро пожаловать! Добрый
вечер! Добрый день! главный редактор; извините, пожалуйста;
Как дела? Как жизнь? Как здоровье? Который час? первый в
мире
COMBINATIONS WITH PREPOSITIONS:
в году, в лесу, в мире, в музей, в саду, на бумаге, на гитаре, на
воздухе, на праздник, на Рождество, на улице, на машине, на
лошади, три часа, у вас, у нас, четыре часа
Congratulations! Your vocabulary now approximates to three
hundred units minimum. And what about your grammar skills?
VERBS
By now you should have learnt how to conjugate 2 types of
verbs in the Present tense. Look at the tables below and make sure
you remember the endings:
Table No.1 (1st conjugation)
-ет
-ёт
он/она/оно … – he/she/it …
-у
-ю
я…–I…
~ 81 ~
-ешь / -ем / -ете
-ёшь / -ём / -ёте
ты … – you … (singular)
мы … – we …
вы … – you … (plural)
Table No.2 (2nd conjugation)
-ит
-ут
-ют
они … – they …
-у / -ю
он/она/оно … – he/she/it …
я…–I…
-ишь / -им / -ите
ты … – you … (singular)
мы … – we …
вы … – you … (plural)
-ят / -ат
они … – they …
PRONOUNS
By now, out of six Russian cases – Nominative, Genitive,
Dative, Accusative, Instrumental and Prepositional, of which
nominative is subjective and the others are objective – you should
have learnt two objective cases with reference to personal pronouns:
Accusative (Кого? Что?) and Genitive (Кого? Чего?):
Table No.1
1st person
2nd person
3rd person
SINGULAR
Nominative → Accusative
PLURAL
Nominative → Accusative
я → меня
ты → тебя
она → её
он/оно → его
мы → нас
вы → вас
SINGULAR
Nominative → Genitive
PLURAL
Nominative → Genitive
я → у меня есть…
ты → у тебя есть…
она → у неё есть…
он/оно → у него есть…
мы → у нас есть…
вы → у вас есть…
они → их
Table No.2
1st person
2nd person
3rd person
~ 82 ~
они → у них есть…
NOUNS
By now, out of the same six Russian cases you should have
learnt only one objective case with reference to singular nouns – the
Prepositional case (O/в/на ком? О/в/на чём?). For singular noun
inflexions in the prepositional case see the table below:
Nominative
Feminine
in -ия
Neuter
in -ие
Feminine
in -ь
Feminine
in -а/-я
Masculine
in -–
→ Prepositional
→ -ии
→ -и
EXAMLPES
в Англии, о компании, в России, …
в общежитии, об увлечении, …
на лошади, в тетради, в Сибири, …
об Америке, на карте, в деревне, в
семье, …
→ -е
Neuter
in -о/-е
на уроке, в городе, на острове, …
на озере, на море, на месте, …*
*not included in this book
And finally, remember some of the nouns whose plural forms
are constructed with the help of the endings -и/-ы. These are nouns
ending in ‘-га/-ка’, ‘-ва/-та’, ‘-ш’ and ‘-ь’.
~ 83 ~
Автор
Natalia
Документ
Категория
Образование
Просмотров
92
Размер файла
1 858 Кб
Теги
sidifarova, basic russian, russian beginner course
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа