close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

трумф-1

код для вставкиСкачать
Laser Based Manufacturing in the
Automotive Industry
TRUMPF, Inc.
David Havrilla
Manager – Product & Applications
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
1
Agenda
Introduction
Trends in Laser Welding
> Remote welding
> Conventional laser welding
> Brazing
Trends in Laser Cutting
> Remote cutting
> High speed cutting
Conclusion
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
2
Laser applications - Automotive Industry
B-Pillar
Roof
Tunnel
Roof rail
Trunk lid
Rear Center
Component
A-Pillar
IP Beam
Battery
Side Panel
Doors
Motor
Gearbox
Seat Rests,
Tracks,
Recliners
Torque Converters
Clutches
Differentials
Bumper
Remote
Bumper
Hotforming
Brazing
Driveshafts
Cross member
Door enforcements
Side member
Side member
Powertrain
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
3
Laser applications - Automotive Industry
Passenger-safety
Electronic
Interior
Chassis/BIW
Engine
Components
Exhaust systems
Powertrain
Suspension
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
4
Trend drivers
„ Manufacturing technology
> application incubators
> decreased investment cost
> green synergy
> throughput requirements
„ End product requirements
> miniaturization
> performance
> weight reduction
> cost reduction
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
5
Disk Laser technology
„ Solid state
„ Diode pumped
„ Excellent beam quality
„ Compact
„ High WPE
„ Fiber delivered
„ Modular design
„ > 1,000 sold
TLS Disk - Cavity
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
6
Principles of Programmable Focusing Optics
2D Scanner
ƒ PFO 20
ƒ PFO 33
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
3D Scanner
ƒ PFO 3D
University of Virginia - November 2010
7
Remote welding – increased productivity
Process Start
Home
Welding 8
Positioning 7
Welding 7
Positioning 6
Welding 6
Positioning 5
Welding 5
unproductive
travelling times
Positioning 4
Welding 4
Positioning 3
Welding 3
Positiotning 2
Welding 2
Positioning 1
Welding 1
approach
Conventional Laser Welding
Process End
Laser Scanner Welding
Process Start
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
Home
Welding 8
Welding 7
Welding 6
Welding 5
Welding 4
Welding 3
Welding 2
Welding 1
Approach
ƒ Elimination of non-productive
ƒ
travelling times
Maximization of beam-on
share
Process End
University of Virginia - November 2010
8
Remote welding – increased flexibility
Customized weld patterns allow for optimum strength of the
joints and increased design flexibility due to:
ƒ virtually any weld seam shapes
ƒ virtually any orientation of weld seams
ƒ user defined distribution of weld seams
ƒ optimum flow of forces
➩ reduced flange width
➩ material, weight and
cost savings
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
9
Remote welding in body-in-white
Trunk Lid / Rear Panels
Doors / Hang-on Parts
Side Walls
Picture: Daimler
B pillar
Picture: Daimler
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
10
Scanner welding: Seating
ƒ
Recliners
ƒ
Seat Frames
ƒ
Seat Tracks
ƒ
Seat Panels
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
11
Scanner welding: IP beams
ƒ
Instrument Panel Carrier for automotive dashboards
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
12
Scanner welding: VW Passat hat rack
Spot weld - production
Laser remote weld - production
34
34
+ mech. shift code
+ shift code
4 robots, 5 welding guns
1 robot, 1 scanner optic
Welding time: 34.7s
Welding time 13 s, ~9.5 s w/ 6 kW
Source: Volkswagen AG
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
13
Lap welding of Zn coated panels
Problem: Vaporization of Zn in between the panels causes
weld spatter on the surface:
ƒ Poor weld seam quality
technical „0-gap“
Possible solutions to manage the problem:
ƒ Spacers integrated in:
ƒ fixture
ƒ part design
ƒ Adapted melt pool dynamics
(twin-spot focus)
ƒ Adapted coating (Zn-Mg)
ƒ Gap created by dimples
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
0.2 mm gap
University of Virginia - November 2010
14
Laser dimpling
„
Constant dimple height (depending on zinc layer 0.1 - 0.2 mm (approximately)
„
Dimple height adjustable via laser parameter
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
15
Laser dimpling process
„ Step 1:
„ Step 2:
Laser Dimpling
Feed
„ Step 3:
Placement of
upper sheet
BEO
or
PFO
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
Laser Scanner Welding
Feed
University of Virginia - November 2010
PFO
16
Spot pattern for laser dimpling
5 laser dimples are
covering the area of the
later C-shaped weld seam
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
17
Production at Mercedes-Benz
Automotive Doors: Mercedes-Benz C and E class
welded parts:
welding station:
Source:
Daimler AG
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
18
Remote welding success Mercedes-Benz
ƒ 530 million remote welded seams by 2009 year end
ƒ Sedans and wagons welded on the same RobScan line
ƒ 35% floor space reduction
ƒ 40% cost reduction
ƒ Excellent part dimensional accuracy
ƒ Higher vehicle structural stiffness at lower weight
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
19
Scanner welding: Audi Q5 door
AUDI Q5 requirements to the door concept
Maximum viewing angle, window & door
opening as customer benefit.
Consequence:
Welding flange (< 6 mm).
No conventional spot welding technology
possible.
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
20
Scanner welding: Audi Q5 door
Solution:
ƒ Remote laser welding with PFO33
ƒ 45 laser stitches (25 – 40mm each)
39
ƒ Cycle time < 30 sec
3
40
36
2
1
35
34
33
4
5
41
42
37
38
31
32
6
30
7
43
29
8
28
44
9
26
27
45
10
11
13
15
20
18
21
22
24
25
12
14
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
16
17
19
University of Virginia - November 2010
23
21
Scanner welding: Audi Q5 door
Remote Welding of doors in high-volume production
Audi A4 / Q5
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
22
Conventional welding: BMW aluminum door
Conventional Laser weld with a Trumpf TruDisk 4002 and
welding head with filler wire.
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
23
Conventional welding: BMW aluminum door
7 Series Sedan
• 15,4 meters of laser seam
7 Series Sedan Long
• 16,2 meters of laser seam
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
24
Conventional welding: BMW aluminum door
Laser welding of Aluminum doors BMW 7series
sedan in production
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
25
Tailor welded blanks
Weight reduction
Ð Less material
Ð Less transportation weight
Higher stability
Ï Higher dynamic strength
Ï Higher crash performance
Reduced quantity of parts
Ð Less tooling cost
Ð Less forming cost
Ð Less logistics cost
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
Thyssen
26
Tailor welded blanks
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
27
Tubes & Tailor welded tubes
Transverse
Material
Wall thickness
Longitudinal
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
28
Powertrain
Motor
Damper Parts
Gearbox
Torque Converters
Driveshafts
Differentials
Clutches
Brakes / Hubs
Wheel
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
29
Laser brazing – Roof Joint
y- / z-Compensation
Step 1
Overlap Joint
Resistance welding
Sealer
15mm molding
Step 2
Overlap Joint
Laser stitch welding
Sealer
8mm molding
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
Step 3
Edge Fillet
Laser welding
No Sealer
8mm molding
Step 4
Fillet Joint
Laser brazing
No Sealer
No roof ditch
No molding
University of Virginia - November 2010
30
Laser brazing – deck lid
American License
Plate
European License
Plate
Global Products customized to local
markets with the help of laser
technology.
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
31
Melt pressure cutting
ƒ Melt ejection by melt pressure downwards
ƒ Remote cutting on the fly with PFO (no cutting nozzle!)
pv
ƒ Good (burr free) cut quality, but oxidation layer
ƒ Up to 4 mm sheet thickness
melt
ƒ Cutting speed < welding speed (approx. 50%)
ƒ One tool for remote welding & cutting
t = 1mm;, v = 8m/min; P = 6 kW
t = 3mm; v = 3.5 m/min; P = 6 kW
t = 2x 1 mm; v = ca. 3 m/min;
P = 4 kW; kerf welded together
Top side
Bottom side
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
32
Melt pressure cutting
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
33
Cutting with disk laser
Material:
Power:
Focus:
Thickness:
Speed:
Gas:
Pressure:
1.4301
1000 W
100 µm
0.8 mm
15 m/min
N2
12 bar
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
34
TruDisk (FKL)
TruFlow (CO2)
TruLaser Cell 7000 series
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
35
Faster cutting with SSL in thin sheets
Maximum production speed for mild steel and stainless steel
Production speed* *
35
TruDisk 2001
30
TruFlow 5000
TruDisk 3001
25
20
15
10
5
0
1,0 mm
1,5 mm
1,8 mm
2,0 mm
*3D processing speed depends on part geometry
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
36
Cutting of hot stamped material
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
37
Conclusion
ƒ Innovative technologies can be trend drivers
ƒ The beam quality & power of TRUMPF’s disk laser has enabled several
recent applications employed by automotive:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Æ
Æ
Æ
Æ
Æ
Remote welding
Remote welding of zinc coated steels w/ dimpling
High speed robotic cutting
Remote cutting
High speed 3D cutting
ƒ The automotive industry has a incorporated laser processing in virtually
every sub-system of the automobile
ƒ Ongoing laser innovations will continue to enable new trends in materials
processing and will continue to make laser implementation more and more
affordable
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
38
Thank you
TRUMPF Laser Technology Center
Plymouth, MI
(734) 454-7200
Lasers in the Automotive Industry
University of Virginia - November 2010
Автор
vp-dm
vp-dm10   документов Отправить письмо
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
1
Размер файла
3 296 Кб
Теги
трумф
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа