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REUTERS
DISRUPTIVE,
GAME-CHANGING
INNOVATION
2016 State of Innovation
“Valeo’s ambition is to bring the most innovative technologies into the
cars that are driven every day by hundreds of millions of people.
One definition perfectly describes our approach: innovation as an
invention that has found a market…In a world that is more and more
open, we promote an innovation of the widest possible scope, including
partnerships with public research bodies, academic organizations,
customers, and suppliers.”
—Jacques Aschenbroich, CEO, Valeo
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 4
Observations & Findings............................................................................................................. 5-6
Aerospace & Defense............................7-12
Information Technology....................43-48
Automotive..........................................13-18
Medical Devices.................................49-54
Biotechnology....................................19-24
Oil & Gas........................................... 55-60
Cosmetics & Wellbeing.....................25-30
Pharmaceuticals................................61-66
Food, Beverage & Tobacco................ 31-36
Semiconductors.................................67-72
Home Appliances.............................. 37-42
Telecommunications..........................73-78
DISRUPTIVE INNOVATIONS LEAD
DOUBLE-DIGIT GROWTH
It takes a village to do a lot of things these days, and innovation is no exception.
2015 was the year of many innovative firsts and it took lots of villages to get there. In fact,
innovation over the last year was one of the most active in history with double-digit growth of
13.7 percent. This jump was the result of lots of villages working to find better ways of doing
things and breakthrough science, technology and medicine. It was the year of Collabovation.
Defining the trend
Collabovation is a term used to represent the elegant
convergence of collaboration, innovation, cultivation,
cross-pollination and calibration, swirled into the powerful
process of bringing inventions to life with strategic partners
and suppliers. Coming up with a novel idea can be a feat
in itself, but actually bringing one to market is an entirely
different game. The Lifecycle of Innovation, from discovery
and protection to commercialization and launch, involves
everything from research and prototyping to intellectualproperty protection and product monetization. In today’s
fast-paced world of science, technology and medicine, where
disruption and multi-tiered competition are the norm, it takes
collabovation to truly succeed.
Breaking through
Think of the many breakthroughs that happened over the
last year. It was the first time astronauts from different
countries embarked on the longest human space mission
by two men: American Scott Kelly and Russian Mikhail
Kornienko, occupying the International Space Station for
nearly a year. It was the first time self-driving cars were
tested on public roadways in certain jurisdictions around the
world. And, the first time a biosimilar drug was approved in
the US, while certain other drugs were being tested on 3D
printers. It was also the year when the Internet of Things (IoT)
garnered mass appeal, allowing homeowners to manage their
dwellings with omnipotent-like intelligence, while cloud
storage became mainstream.
These firsts were possible because of the massive investment
in innovation–in collabovation–made by organizations
around the world. Overall, global innovation activity saw a
notable uptick over the last year, with Medical Devices, Home
Appliances and Aerospace leading the charge. These sectors
all experienced year-over-year, double-digit growth, as did
Information Technology and Oil & Gas. In fact, every sector
was in the black outside one: Biotechnology, which decreased
slightly given a leveling off in that industry.
Moving the needle
Collabovation is happening between corporations
and universities. Government agencies and research
centers. Start-ups and bellwethers. Physical and mental
boundaries are being lifted. Like-minded, similar-goaled
organizations are finding each other. A web of information
is aligning partners and best practices in an effort to
collaboratively innovate.
This report showcases some of these instances, as well as
uncovers key innovation trends for 2016. Examination of
global patent activity provides a glimpse into what’s hot,
what’s not, what’s coming next, who leads and which
regions are the most active.
Welcome to the 2016 State of Innovation. We invite you
to ponder these pages and consider new partners with
whom to collabovate.
Vincent J. Caraher,
President,
Thomson Reuters IP & Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Introduction 4
OBSERVATIONS & FINDINGS
90.00%
60.00%
30.00%
All Technology
Semiconductors
Telecommunications
Pharmaceuticals
Oil & Gas
Medical Devices
Food, Beverage & Tobacco
Home Appliances
Cosmetics & Wellbeing
0.00%
Biotechnology
Figure 1: Global Innovation Output
Across 12 Sectors (2009–2015)
120.00%
Information Technology
The longer-term view, covering the seven years from
2009–2015 (inclusive), highlights just how robust and active
innovators have been. The combined output across all 12
technology areas was on a consistent upward climb (Figure
1). The largest overall increase for the extended period was in
Food, Beverage & Tobacco, which skyrocketed 128.25 percent.
Aerospace & Defense and Home Appliances also experienced
triple-digit jumps, as shown in Figure 2.
150.00%
Automotive
Global innovation activity experienced gains across 11 of the
12 sectors throughout 2015, with the largest leaders being
Medical Devices, Home Appliances and Aerospace & Defense.
This rebound follows prior year declines for Medical Devices
and Aerospace, which had year-over-year innovation drops of
5 percent and 1 percent, respectively, while Home Appliances
was flat. Semiconductor activity also fell in 2014, but saw a
bump of 3 percent in 2015.
Figure 2: Percentage Growth in
Innovation Activity (2009–2015)
Aerospace
Up, up and away
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2,500,000
This longer-view shift is indicative of how our world has been
evolving. For example, the production of disease-resistant
crops and genetically modified foods, aimed at ensuring an
ample food supply for a world population projected to hit
10 billion later this century. The development of appliances
that communicate with one another and reflect their owners’
preferences; the actualization of the IoT. The quest to explore
space, understand the universe beyond our galaxy and find
new frontiers for future humans—as well as equip defense
teams for wars that require continued military investment.
2,000,000
1,500,000
1,000,000
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
Source: Derwent World Patents Index and Thomson Innovation
Sign of the Times
Looking across this seven-year span, it’s clear the figures
reflect a sign of the times. The world was rebounding from the
greatest economic crisis in the last 75 years, while technology
had catapulted the Digital Era into the next stratosphere,
creating opportunities heretofore unknown.
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Research & Innovation
The relationship between research and innovation is well
understood. Analysis shows that scientific and scholarly
research typically precedes discovery and the protection
of innovation rights by a few years. It’s therefore prudent to
look at what topics, institutions and regions lead globally
in research to get an even richer understanding of what the
future holds.
A look across the last decade and research related to the
12 technology areas, as contained in the Web of ScienceTM,
Observations & Findings 5
Figure 3: Scientific Research Output
Across 12 Technology Areas (2005–2015)
400,000
Innovation Drives the Future
Innovation is a driver of economic success and growth.
Companies and countries that consistently invest in innovation
by prioritizing R&D and allocating funds and resources for this
activity are proven to be more successful than those that don’t.
The Thomson Reuters Top 100 Global Innovators are an
example of this. The honorees of this designation, based on a
comprehensive, patent-based methodology, have consistently
outperformed the S&P 500 and/or MSCI World Index in terms
of market-cap weighted R&D investment, annual revenue and
employment. And, regions like the UK, which has fewer R&D
and innovation incentives compared to Germany and Japan,
has not made the Top 100 Global Innovators list in several years.
350,000
300,000
As the process of innovation becomes more collaborative in our
technologically driven world, it’s hard to imagine the trajectory
of activity changing in the near future.
250,000
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
Source: Web of Science
shows that output related to these topics has returned to its
pre-economic-crisis levels, as shown in Figure 3. As the tools for
finding prior research become even more refined, researchers
collaborate more with others and pure or basic research
investments are sometimes married with innovation,
causing the scholarly activity to even out.
Innovation drives the future. And the future is ours. Innovative
disruptions are a hallmark of the Digital Era. With the proper
balance of discovery, protection and commercialization, these
numbers will continue to grow and our world will continue to
evolve before our eyes.
Overall View of Innovation
%
Industry
2015
Volume
2014
%
Volume Change
5%
Aerospace & Defense
71,633
62,162
15%
12%
Automotive
166,867
153,872
8%
3%
Biotechnology
41,624
42,584
-2%
1%
Cosmetics & Well Being
11,307
11,017
3%
2%
Food, Beverage &
Tobacco
26,605
26,333
1%
6%
Home Appliances
86,301
71,278
21%
31%
Information Technology
429,806
380,325
13%
9%
Medical Devices
118,658
93,462
27%
2%
Oil & Gas
27,556
24,158
14%
9%
Pharmaceuticals
116,286
111,479
4%
8%
Semiconductors
114,488
110,761
3%
12%
Telecommunications
166,601
161,739
3%
30%
12%
5%
12%
8%
3%
1%
2%
6%
9%
2%
9%
31%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Observations & Findings 6
AEROSPACE & DEFENSE
From dreamliners to space stations to unmanned
military vehicles, the window on our world is changing.
2016 State of Innovation
stateofinnovation.com
REUTERS/LUCAS
JACKSON
Aerospace & Defense
7
COLONIZING THE MILKY WAY
Matt Damon gave us a peek at what life may be like for the first settlers on Mars in the movie
The Martian. As far-fetched as the idea of living on another planet may seem, it’s now projected
that the first humans could inhabit Mars within the next 25 years.1 Such a feat is going to require
an immense amount of innovation and collaboration as earthlings look to colonize Mars, and
potentially other parts of our galaxy.
In fact, it is reported that the US National Aeronautics and
Space Administration (NASA) will spend $18.5 billion on
its 2016 space exploration plan.2 Its goals this year include
increasing utilization of the International Space Station
(ISS) science and technology hardware by 70 percent and
launching 13 science and cargo missions, among many
other things.
an initiative to find private sector partners with which to
explore space in its “Space Exploration as a Driver for Growth
and Competitiveness: Opportunities for the Private Sector,”
where it states: “ESA is looking into novel ways to advance
its strategic goals for space exploration, based on strategic
partnerships with the private sector, including entities from
the space and nonspace industry.3 ”
In the race to colonize space, partnerships abound. There are
many public/private sector arrangements underway, related
to the Collabovation theme mentioned earlier. The European
Space Agency (ESA) recently launched
Similarly, articles about NASA partnering with Boeing,
Elon Musk’s SpaceX and others reaffirm the commitment
and passion to make history and be the first to get to Mars,
or other parts of the galaxy and universe.
“The recent ‘Martian’ movie starring Matt Damon is science-fiction in 2016, but with
NASA and ESA actively collaborating with private sector partners such as Boeing
and SpaceX to provide innovative solutions for the financing and execution of space
exploration missions, experts predict that human settlements will be operational on
Mars within 25 years.
Such a highly complex project will require massive innovation across a wide range
of technologies, not just ‘spaceflight’ aspects of aerospace. To sustain and protect
human life in extremely hostile alien environments will involve new solutions for food
and water processing, power generation, communications, healthcare and more, so
partners from ‘non-space’ industry sectors will also be major contributors and this
will in turn drive further innovation for Earth-based applications.”
—George Jack, Engineering Expert, Thomson Reuters
1 http://www.techinsider.io/buzz-aldrin-mars-plan-2016-4
2 https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/NASA_FY2016_Summary_Brief_corrected.pdf
3 http://esamultimedia.esa.int/docs/hso/ESA_CFI__Space_Exploration_as_a_Driver_for_Growth_and_Competitiveness.pdf
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Aerospace & Defense
8
AEROSPACE & DEFENSE OVERVIEW
%
Subsectors
2015
2014
% Change
39%
Production Techniques
22,392
18,823
19%
23%
Advanced Materials
13,002
12,233
6%
13%
Structures & Systems
7,468
7,136
5%
12%
Propulsion Plants
6,760
5,894
15%
11%
Instrumentation
6,502
6,270
4%
2%
Space Vehicles &
Satellite Technologies
1,424
1,156
23%
11%
2%
12%
39%
13%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
23%
Top 10 Global Innovators–Aerospace & Defense (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
United Technologies Corp
US
716
State Grid Corp of China
China
715
Airbus Operations
France
620
Jiangxi Hongdu Aviation Ind Group Co Ltd
China
617
Boeing
US
531
General Electric
US
424
LG
S Korea
392
Siemens
Germany
387
Toyota
Japan
360
Hyundai
S Korea
334
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Space Technology Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Harbin Institute of Technology
China
186
Korea Aerospace Research Institute
S Korea
163
China Academy Launch Vehicle Technology
China
157
Beijing Control Engineering Research Institute
China
108
University Beijing Aeronautics & Astronauts
China
93
Shanghai Satellite Engineering Institute
China
87
Beijing Institute Spacecraft Environmental Engineering
China
77
Shanghai Aerospace System Engineering Research Institute
China
72
Mitsubishi Electric
Japan
69
Beijing Space Aerocraft Collectivity
China
69
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Aerospace & Defense
9
Top 10 Space Technology Innovators–Europe (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Airbus
France
225
Energiya Rocket
Russia
113
Information Satellite Systems Reshetnev
Russia
80
Thales
France
73
Center Nat Etud Spatiales
France
42
Mechanical Engineering Research Institute
Russia
61
Cosmic Scientific Production Centre
Russia
41
Deut Zent Luft & Raumfahrt
Germany
32
Snecma
France
24
Moscow Mars Experimental Construction Bureau
Russia
19
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Space Technology Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Boeing
US
221
Honeywell
US
41
Lockheed Martin
US
33
Raytheon
US
31
NASA US National Aerospace & Space
US
29
Space Systems/Loral
US
21
US Navy
US
16
Hamilton Sundstrand
US
15
Emcore Solar Power
US
14
Qualcomm
US
12
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Influential Scientific-Research Institutions in Aerospace (2005-2015)
Institution
Country
# of Papers (WoS) Relative Citation Impact*
University of Michigan System
US
468
1.95
United States Department of Energy
US
372
1.43
Delft University of Technology
Netherlands
414
1.33
University of Texas Austin
US
333
1.32
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)
France
551
1.25
Goddard Space Flight Center
US
465
1.22
University of Florida
US
312
1.21
US Air Force Research Laboratory
US
512
1.19
Pennsylvania State University
US
403
1.18
Pennsylvania Commonwealth System of Higher Education
US
445
1.18
Source: Web of Science
* Citation impact normalized against average for field and year of publication (n = 1.00)
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Aerospace & Defense
10
Summary
Innovation activity over the last year reflects man’s quest
to conquer new frontiers, as well as push the boundaries of
our daily flight expectations, with faster, larger and more
frill-equipped airplanes than ever before.
The Aerospace & Defense sector saw a significant jump
of 15 percent over prior year activity, with the largest
jumps occurring in Space Vehicles & Satellite Technologies
(23 percent), followed by Production Techniques
(19 percent) and Propulsion Plants (15 percent). There’s
no denying the race is on to find a sustainable way for
humans to inhabit space, as part of global strategies
to handle the exploding human population and ill
effects of climate change on earth.
The international space race is just that, international.
The top 10 innovators in this sector hail from the United
States, China, France, South Korea, Germany and Japan.
And, they include a mix of expected and unexpected
companies, including United Technologies Corp., Airbus
and Boeing as well as General Electric, LG Electronics and
Toyota, respectively.
The US leads in the impact of its academic research in
aerospace, with 80 percent of the top 10 institutions coming
from that country. European organizations take the two
remaining top 10 spots, while Asian institutions are notably
absent from those with impactful contributions.
“[Our most innovative asset is] the shared belief that our products are useful to
society, and that we can help make the world a better place. For example, people
all over the world want to continue to “go places”, and that will only be possible if
we continue to reduce emissions, a very timely challenge…”
—Pierre Fabre, Senior Executive Vice President,
Research & Technology, Innovation Safran
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Aerospace & Defense
11
2016 State ofROSSI
Innovation stateofinnovation.com
REUTERS/MAX
Aerospace & Defense
12
AUTOMOTIVE
As automobiles become more advanced computers,
what’s to become of the pastime of taking a 4-cylinder
combustion engine out for a Sunday drive?
2016 State of Innovation
stateofinnovation.com
REUTERS/THOMAS
PETER
Automotive 13
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ON WHEELS
Over the last year, cars have evolved from being some of the most sophisticated computers on
wheels to being advanced artificial-intelligence transportation chariots. Not only do today’s
automobiles give drivers guidance when backing up, adjust to lane creep and intelligently adapt
to weather conditions, they can also identify the mood and, coming soon, consumption habits of
the driver based on steering-wheel sensors. This is all in addition to the vehicle’s already amazing
ability to operate itself independently.
The International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las
Vegas, Nevada, US, featured more automobile exhibitors
than ever before this year, which brought the show
organizers to create a “Vehicle Intelligence Marketplace”
for the first time.4 Such rapid automotive advancement is
the result of thousands of hours of research, development,
experimentation and innovation by auto manufacturers and
their partners around the world.
Auto-collabovation is alive and well. Daily news headlines tout
the latest partnerships in this space. For example, Renault
and ARZA, in order to bring the electric vehicle market to
Canadian masses5; Ford and Spotify, to enhance the musical
experience of FordPass customers; and organizations
like the Open Automotive Alliance (OAA), which aims to
make automotive technology safer, more seamless and
more intuitive.6
In today’s world, the realities of artificial intelligence stretch
far beyond the reach of IBM’s Watson. We must start to think
of and see our vehicles as the technological masters they are.
“Increased partnership between traditional vehicle manufacturers and information/
technology companies is already changing autonomous vehicles into advanced
artificial-intelligence transportation chariots that can continually adapt to
environmental conditions and driver ‘likes’. In today’s world, the realities of artificial
intelligence stretch far beyond the reach of IBM’s Watson. We must start to think of
and see our cars for the technological masters they are.”
—Kevin Chapman, Lead Engineering Expert, Thomson Reuters
4 http://www.ces.tech/News/Press-Releases/CES-Press-Release.aspx?NodeID=ebcec984-2cf5-49ad-b7dc-f181cbf49932
5 http://www.automotiveworld.com/news-releases/renault-azra-invests-40-million-canadian-transport-electrification/
6 http://www.openautoalliance.net/#about
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Automotive 14
AUTOMOTIVE OVERVIEW
%
Subsectors
2015
2014
% Change
21%
Alternative Powered Vehicles
37,844
32,973
15%
11%
Navigation Systems
19,753
18,538
7%
11%
Safety
18,551
18,893
-2%
11%
Transmission
20,175
18,484
9%
10%
Seats, Seatbelts and Airbags
18,165
13,596
34%
7%
Suspension Systems
12,827
11,003
17%
6%
Pollution Control
10,114
9,677
5%
6%
Steering Systems
10,841
11,599
-7%
5%
Engine Design and Systems
7,845
7,334
7%
5%
Security Systems
8,627
8,360
3%
4%
Braking Systems
7,654
6,831
12%
3%
Entertainment Systems
4,659
4,267 30%9%
4% 3%
5%
21%
5%
6%
11%
6%
7%
11%
10%
11%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Global Innovators–Automotive (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Toyota
Japan
4,214
Hyundai
S Korea
2,469
Bosch
Germany
2,390
Denso
Japan
2,169
Honda
Japan
2,039
Ford
US
1,837
Daimler
Germany
1,575
GM
US
1,435
Beiqi Foton
China
1,223
Nissan
Japan
1,188
Sources: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Alternative-Powered Vehicle Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Toyota
Japan
9,807
Hyundai
S Korea
2,827
Honda
Japan
2,732
Nissan
Japan
2,633
Denso
Japan
2,591
Samsung
S Korea
2,515
LG
S Korea
2,051
Panasonic
Japan
1,970
Toyoda
Japan
1,634
Sumitomo Electric
Japan
1,492
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Automotive 15
Top 10 Alternative-Powered Vehicle Innovators–Europe (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Bosch
Germany
3057
Daimler
Germany
1705
Peugeot Citroen
France
709
BMW
Germany
637
Siemens
Germany
624
Renault
France
580
Volkswagen
Germany
560
Audi
Germany
477
Valeo
France
411
Continental
Germany
386
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Alternative-Powered Vehicle Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
General Motors (GM)
US
1614
Ford
US
1517
General Electric
US
355
Caterpillar
US
168
Johnson Controls Technology
US
156
Tesla Motors
US
149
DuPont
US
117
Remy Technologies
US
109
Qualcomm
US
88
IBM
US
83
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Prolific Scientific Research Institutions in Automotive (2005–2015)
Institution
Country
# of Papers (WoS)
University of Michigan
US
292
Ford Motor Company
US
209
Polytechnic University of Turin
Italy
187
Technical University of Munich
Germany
173
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
China
161
Indian Institute of Technology System
India
158
Ohio State University
US
151
RWTH Aachen
Germany
135
Chalmers University of Technology
Sweden
134
Seoul National University
S Korea
131
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Automotive 16
Summary
Automotive innovation accelerated by 8 percent from
year-end 2014 to year-end 2015. All but two of the 12
subsectors jumped up, with the largest gains in Seats,
Seatbelts & Airbags (34 percent) followed by Suspension
Systems (17 percent) and Alternative Powered Vehicles
(15 percent), respectively.
Asia continues to dominate the field overall with 60 percent
of the Top 10 headquartered there. Japan’s Toyota takes
the top spot again, followed by the same top-five-priorityorder of last year: Hyundai (South Korea), Bosch (Germany),
Denso (Japan) and Honda (Japan).
China joined the top 10 ranks for the first time, coming in
ninth overall with Beiqi Foton, the country’s largest truck
manufacturer. This is despite recent news of the company’s
sales down 15.3 percent in March 2016 over the same period
one year earlier.7
In terms of alternative-powered vehicle innovation, Japan’s
Toyota is in a category almost unto itself with nearly 10,000
unique inventions in that area alone last year. The next
closest competitor in that space is Germany’s Bosch,
with just over 3,000 unique inventions.
Germany and France are the only two countries in Europe
in the top 10 for Alternative-Powered Vehicles, with
Germany taking seven of the 10 spots. The US occupied
all of the top 10 in North America, with GM and Ford
pulling into the lead.
The most prolific automotive research institutions have a
more diverse global footprint, representing the US, Italy,
Germany, China, India, Sweden and South Korea. Nine of
the top 10 research institutions doing work in this space are
the same as the prior year—the newcomer being Chalmers
University of Technology in Sweden.
The US, Germany and Japan round out the bottom half
of the Top 10 with Ford (US), Daimler (Germany), GM (US)
and Nissan (Japan) taking sixth, seventh, eighth and tenth
places, respectively.
“Although driverless vehicles won’t be ruling the roads in 2016, data shows that they
will likely become a reality in the years to come. Our fascination with this emergent
technology continues to abound. There was a time when it was difficult to imagine
the ability to get from one point to another in a vehicle without being completely
alert and in control of the automobile. But if we’ve learned anything in the 21st
century, it’s that technology seems to be boundless, as long as you have the right
collaborators at the helm.”
—Vin Caraher, President, Thomson Reuters IP & Science
7 http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSL3N17A3AE
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Automotive 17
REUTERS/TIM WIMBORNE
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Automotive 18
BIOTECHNOLOGY
The sequencing of the human genome is leading to
breakthroughs in and beyond medical treatments.
What doesn’t biotech have its hand in today?
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Biotechnology 19
GENETICALLY MODIFIED LIFE
Biotechnology experienced a large number of firsts over the last year.
One of the most significant, and potentially most life transforming, was that of the CRISPR
(clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) initiative and the editing of a humanembryo germline. CRISPR “interference” involved making targeted modifications to segments of
DNA to alter its immunity. Such work has implications not only for humans, but also for food crops
and other plants and animals.
Another set of firsts involved a series of bio-based approvals
by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including the
first biospecific antibody: Amgen’s Blincyto; the first biosimilar
drug: Novartis’ Zarxio; and the first biotech food animal:
Aquabounty Technologies Inc.’s salmon, which grows
faster than farmed fish.
There’s no disputing that the advent of biotechnology
has created an experimental sandbox for everything from
genetically manipulating DNA to modifying the composition
of plants and printing drugs using bio-organisms. While this is
cutting-edge work, the pace of innovation fell slightly short
of where it was a year earlier.
“Governments and payers are counting on biosimilars to revolutionize health care by
reducing the cost of important biologics and increasing access to life-saving drugs.
For that to happen, the follow-on biologics (FOBs) will have to deliver the power of
the reference drugs at a price financially strapped countries can afford and gain the
confidence of the marketplace.”
—Mari Serebrov, Regulatory Editor, BioWorld
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Biotechnology 20
BIOTECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW
5%
%
Subsectors
2015
2014
%
Change
70%
General biotechnology
30,197
29,374
3%
13%
Diagnosis of diseases
5,614
6,984
-20%
10%
Cancer treatment
4,412
4,855
-9%
5%
Genetically modified crops
1,969
2,153
-9%
2%
Drug discovery
824
951
-13%
2%
10%
13%
70%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
30%
Top 10 Global Biotechnology Innovators (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
DuPont
US
407
University of Jiangnan
China
287
Monsanto
US
229
Roche
Switzerland
203
University of Zhejiang
China
200
Rural Development Administration
S Korea
191
University of California
US
184
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)
France
166
Lanzhou Veterinary Res Inst China Agric
China
165
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM)
France
160
Company
Country
# Inventions
Samsung
S Korea
104
University Fudan
China
103
Seoul National University
S Korea
81
University Yonsei
S Korea
77
Agency for Science Technology & Research, A*STAR
Singapore
74
Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology
S Korea
71
University Shanghai Jiaotong
China
71
Peking University
China
69
Suzhou Puluoda Biological Technology Co
China
68
Osaka University
Japan
65
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Biotech-In-Cancer Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Biotechnology 21
Top 10 Biotech-In-Cancer Innovators–Europe (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Roche
Switzerland
335
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM)
France
244
CNRS
France
195
Novartis
Switzerland
161
Sanofi
France
136
UCL Business
UK
66
Glaxo Group
UK
65
Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum
Germany
59
Bayer Pharmaceutical
Germany
56
Yeda Research & Development Company
Israel
48
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Biotech-In-Cancer Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Genentech
US
266
University of California
US
241
US Department of Health
US
186
University of Texas System
US
170
John Hopkins University
US
140
Abbvie
US
134
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
US
127
General Hospital
US
116
Harvard
US
111
University of Pennsylvania
US
109
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Influential Scientific Research Institutions In Biotech (2005-2015)
Institution
Country
# of Papers (WoS) Category Normalized Citation Impact
Broad Institute
US
485
7.43
European Molecular Biology Lab
Germany
801
4.46
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
US
1,556
4.25
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
UK
755
4.11
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
US
913
4.10
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
US
375
3.26
Harvard University
US
3,288
3.07
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab
US
623
3.03
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
US
425
2.90
VA Boston Healthcare System
US
594
2.89
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Biotechnology 22
Summary
Biotech was the only technology area of the 12 studied
that decreased its year-over-year innovation output,
experiencing a 2 percent decline over 2014. This is after
having had a 7 percent overall increase from 2013. And all
but one of the subsectors, General Biotechnology, declined
from the earlier period, with the steepest drops in the
Diagnosis of Diseases (20 percent) and Drug Discovery
(13 percent).
China, France, Germany, South Korea and the US lead the
world in biotech innovation. China and the US each have
three of the top 10 spots, followed by France with two, while
Germany and South Korea split the remaining two.
Biotechers are clear collabovators. Three of the top 10
global biotech innovators are universities and seven of the
top 10 are either a university or research center. No other
sector has this mix in its top 10. The trend continues beyond
the global top 10 to regional sub-sector leaders in cancertreatment innovation as well, which comprises a mix of
private and public institutions.
The US dominates biotech scientific-and-scholarly research
output with 80 percent of the top 10. The remaining two
institutions are from Europe, one of which is headquartered
in the UK and the other is in Germany. Once again the
Broad Institute takes the lead spot with the most impactful
research, whereas MIT was bumped from second to third
place by the European Molecular Biology Lab.
It appears that Biotech has leveled off somewhat, but it
remains to be seen whether this sector will pull ahead
again in the future. The technologies are still in early stages
and the players are still coming into their own. One thing
is certain, the industry is one to watch as the output of
its activity is sure to have an immense impact on all life:
human, plant, animal, aquatic and more.
“Collaboration is critical to igniting innovation; we work closely with our customers,
and with each other. Our spirit of collaboration extends to our 46 technology
platforms, which range from adhesives and abrasives, to ceramics and light
management. We leverage those technologies across all our businesses and
subsidiaries to create unique and relevant products for customers.”
—Inge Thulin, Chairman, President & CEO, 3M
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Biotechnology 23
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Biotechnology 24
COSMETICS & WELLBEING
Computers aren’t the only things getting smarter—your personal
care products are getting to know you, too.
2016
State of Innovation
stateofinnovation.com
REUTERS/RAFAEL
MARCHANTE
Cosmetics & Wellbeing 25
SOCIAL MEDIA SPURS COSMETICS SECTOR
We live in the era of here-and-now. From Instagram and OoVoo to Snapchat and Vine, social
media and other outlets set new beauty standards with images of the Kardashians, Beyonce and
Taylor Swift leading the way. Selfies and facetime show us daily where we need to primp, plump
and perfect, spurring today’s cosmetic-conscious fad.
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons recently reported
there were 6.7 million Botox procedures done in 2015,
1 percent more than the prior year, as well as 27.5 thousand
lip-augmentation surgeries (a 48 percent increase from 2000)
and 12.7 thousand cheek-implant procedures (up 21 percent
from 2000)—and this just starts to scratch the surface
of the litany of possible cosmetic surgeries available.8
Bigger is better in today’s beauty-bingeing world,
and cosmetic innovations are making it all possible.
“Fuelled by the immediacy and intense magnifying focus of social media images,
being ‘close-up ready’ has never been more desirable nor more demanding.
Consumers are better informed than ever before and have high expectations:
the distinction between cosmetics and pharmaceuticals becomes ever more
blurred year on year and high-tech delivery formulations become the norm.
The instant worldwide exposure of new products and technology has brought
major new players into the market, particularly from the innovative Asian beauty
sector. Maybe the emergence of companies traditionally less known for cosmetics
and personal care shouldn’t be any surprise, as modern high performance beauty
products incorporate cutting-edge pigment formulations, reflective microparticles
and polymers for an Insta-perfect finish.”
—Peta Leggatt, DWPI Content Specialist-Pharmaceuticals, Thomson Reuters
8 http://www.plasticsurgery.org/Documents/news-resources/statistics/2015-statistics/2015-plastic-surgery-statistics-report.pdf
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Cosmetics & Wellbeing 26
COSMETICS & WELLBEING OVERVIEW
2% 2%
%
Subsectors
2015
2014
%
Change
41%
Skin
6,063
5,407
12%
38% Make-up
5,597
5,722
-2%
17%
Hair
2,522
2,614
-4%
2%
Perfume
289
342
-15%
2%
Antiperspirant
264
274
-4%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
17%
41%
38%
Top 10 Global Innovators–Cosmetics & Well Being (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
LG Household & Healthcare
S Korea
315
L'Oreal
France
314
Kao
Japan
214
Henkel
Germany
154
P&G
US
144
AmorePacific
S Korea
125
Aesthetic Beijing Technology Co
China
87
Unilever
Netherlands / UK
75
Beiersdorf
Germany
73
Kose
Japan
70
Company
Country
# Inventions
KAO
Japan
776
AmorePacific
S Korea
534
LG
S Korea
397
Shiseido
Japan
356
Kose
Japan
307
Pola Chem
Japan
178
Lion
Japan
144
Nippon Menard Keshohin
Japan
142
Nippon Oil & Fats
Japan
110
Fujifilm
Japan
91
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Make-Up Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Cosmetics & Wellbeing 27
Top 10 Make-Up Innovators–Europe (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
L'Oreal
France
1,636
Henkel & CO
Germany
271
BASF
Germany
214
Unilever
Netherlands / UK
202
Beiersdorf
Germany
198
CNRS
France
107
DSM IP Assets BV
Netherlands
91
Merck Patent
Germany
81
Evonik DeGussa
Germany
77
Symrise
Germany
52
Company
Country
# Inventions
Procter & Gamble
US
296
DuPont
US
156
Dow Corning
US
107
Celanese
US
99
Avon
US
96
Allergan
US
91
Johnson & Johnson
US
73
Dow Global Technologies
US
61
ELC Management
US
51
Colgate Palmolive
US
41
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Make-Up Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Prolific Scientific Research Institutions In Cosmetics (2005–2015)
Institution
Country
# of Papers (WoS)
University of Sao Paulo
Brazil
177
US FDA
US
108
Procter & Gamble
US
103
Cosmetic Ingredient Review
US
102
Seoul National University
S Korea
88
Harvard University
US
83
Chinese Academy of Sciences
China
81
State University of Campinas
Brazil
78
University of California Los Angeles
US
70
University of California San Francisco
US
68
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Cosmetics & Wellbeing 28
Summary
Despite plastic surgeons being busier than ever
(skin-related innovation is up 12 percent), the bulk of the
cosmetic subsectors dipped over the prior year. Fragrances
experienced the largest drop, of 15 percent. Nevertheless,
Cosmetics & Well Being came out on the positive side
overall, with a modest gain of 3 percent over 2014.
Asia continues to have a strong foothold in this sector, with
Japan leading the way. Germany has the most significant
presence in Europe, as more chemical companies branch
into cosmeceuticals. In the US, it’s a combination of
consumer-product and chemical companies that are
driving beautification.
The world’s most active Cosmetics & Well Being innovator
is, surprisingly, South Korea’s LG Household & Healthcare,
part of the LG family of businesses focused on helping
customers realize their “beauty, lifestyle and culture
dreams.” This is the first time since the inception of the
annual State of Innovation that a traditional cosmetics
company has been trumped by a technology-based
company, yet another example of an organization (LG)
that’s spreading its wings into tangential areas.
Brazil once again takes the top spot in terms of cosmeticsrelated scientific research, with the University of Sao Paulo
and State University of Campinas taking the first and
eighth spots in terms of research output, respectively.
This perhaps isn’t a huge surprise as Brazil is also among
the top five nations in the world in terms of the overall
number of aesthetic plastic surgeries performed annually.9
In the Make-up subsector, L’Oreal leads the pack with more
than twice as many inventions (1,636) as the next nearest
innovator, KAO (776). This continues L’Oreal’s leadership
streak in Make-up, which it has consistently dominated
since we’ve been tracking the field.
There’s no doubt about it: our socially connected world,
technology, nano-particles, new molecular entities and
the accessibility of new treatments are driving a boom
in beautification. The prospects are ripe for this sector to
continue its upward climb. We may not all be look-alikes
for Jennifer Aniston, recently named the 2016 World’s
Most Beautiful Woman by People magazine, but today’s
innovations certainly make replicating “that look”
a lot easier.10
“The French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) was established to
carry out research. Performed by more than 1,000 units throughout France and
abroad, this research improves knowledge, some of which results in breakthrough
innovation. Technology transfer is a logical extension of our research activities,
entrusted to more than 30,000 staff and partly led in partnership with industry.”
—Marie-Pierre Comets, Director of Innovation & Business Relations, CNRS
9http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-international-society-of-aesthetic-plastic-surgery-releases-global-statistics-on-cosmeticprocedures-300108852.html
10http://www.people.com/people/package/article/0,,20998070_21001278,00.html
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Cosmetics & Wellbeing 29
REUTERS/ISSEI KATO
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Cosmetics & Wellbeing 30
FOOD, BEVERAGE & TOBACCO
If history repeats itself, can developing nations change health
outcomes and still be the latest frontier for
Tobacco and Beverage innovation?
2016 State of Innovation
stateofinnovation.com
REUTERS/ALESSIA
PIERDOMENICO
Food, Beverage & Tobacco
31
TOBACCO OUT-INNOVATES
FOOD AND BEVERAGES
Despite warnings that they’re bad for your health, cigarettes continue to dominate the world
stage in the category of Food, Beverage & Tobacco innovation, while also topping the charts for
companies with strong dividend payouts.
A recent Thomson Reuters Lipper Fund analysis stated that
“CME Group, Dow Chemicals and Philip Morris are companies
with strong fundamentals…Philip Morris is seeing good
demand for cigarettes and enjoying healthy margins as its
business looks stronger than ever…If you are looking for
strong dividend payers, these companies may be worth
a second look.” 11
Where innovation really needs to happen, however, is in
the area of Food, for better ways to feed the world’s growing
population and produce healthy, non-processed alternatives
that don’t add to negative health effects.
2016 will be the year when consumer demand for “real” food
starts to seriously take effect as a decreased appetite for GMO
and non-natural foods gains momentum. GMO may be the
way to go to make certain staple crops have higher yields
and be more defect-resistant, however a growing number of
consumers are demanding healthy food products with clear
labeling. Similarly, the Beverage market continues to move
away from sugary drinks toward healthy drinks and teas.
“We know that our food may contain a wide range of potentially hazardous
substances. But interesting solutions abound. The EFSA European Food
Consumption Database is using data in innovative ways to identify and help
reduce the risk of contaminated food, particularly among vulnerable populations.”
—Davide Arcella, Scientific Officer
European Food Safety Authority (9billionbowls.com)
11 http://lipperalpha.financial.thomsonreuters.com/2016/04/top-dividend-payers-include-cigarettes-chemicals-and-financials/
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Food, Beverage & Tobacco
32
FOOD, BEVERAGE & TOBACCO OVERVIEW
2%
14%
2015
2014
%
Change
30% Meat
8,256
9,033
-9%
28% Brewing
7,662
6,479
18%
26% Bakery
7,267
6,841
6%
14%
Tobacco
3,923
4,215
-7%
2%
Sugar&Starch
667
689
-3%
%
Subsectors
30%
26%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
28%
Top 10 Global Innovators–Food, Beverage & Tobacco (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
China Tobacco Hubei Ind Corp
China
1122
Qingdao Xiuxian Foods Co.
China
165
Philip Morris
US
121
University of Guangxi
China
118
Inst Agro Food Science & Technology Chinese
China
114
University of Jiangnan
China
114
University of Zhejiang Ocean
China
104
Hefei Bulaochuanqi Health Science & Technology
China
87
Wuhu Hongyang Food
China
72
Anhui Xianzhiyuan Food
China
69
Company
Country
# Inventions
University of Jiangnan
China
217
Harbin Shanbao Wine Ind
China
166
Luzhou Pingchuang Technology
China
155
Korea Food Research Institute
S Korea
109
Rural Development Administration Korea
S Korea
89
Sapporo Breweries
Japan
83
Guangming Dairy Ind
China
82
Suntory Holdings
Japan
81
Kirin
Japan
80
Asahi Breweries
Japan
73
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Brewing Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Food, Beverage & Tobacco
33
Top 10 Brewing Innovators–Europe (2011–2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Novozymes
Denmark
105
DSM
Netherlands
89
Chr Hansen
Denmark
45
Nestec
Switzerland
40
Danone
France
35
Krones
Germany
32
IFP Energies Nouvelle
France
21
GEA Brewery Systems
Germany
18
Bayer Cropscience
Germany
16
LeSaffre
France
15
Company
Country
# Inventions
Danisco
US
150
Butamax Advanced Biofuels
US
31
Codexis
US
22
Coskata
US
22
BP North America
US
21
University of California
US
18
US Secretary of Agriculture
US
18
Poet Res Inc
US
16
Monsanto
US
14
Mascoma
US
13
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Brewing Innovators–North America (2011–2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Influential Scientific Research Institutions in Food Science & Technology
(2005 -2015)
Name
Country
# of Papers (WoS) Category Normalized Citation Impact
University of British Columbia
Canada
431
1.93
Universiy of Lleida
Spain
583
1.88
Polytechnic Institute of Braganca
Portugal
316
1.79
University of Massachusetts System
USA
824
1.73
Nanchang University
China
415
1.66
Dresden University of Technology
Germany
362
1.63
Rovira I Virgili Univeristy
Spain
343
1.57
University of Melbourne
Australia
306
1.55
University of Barcelona
Spain
518
1.55
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
Finland
314
1.54
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Food, Beverage & Tobacco
34
Summary
While food-related innovation can be found in the
Biotechnology sector where GMO crops and engineeredorganism inventions are categorized, the Food, Beverage
& Tobacco technology area covers inventions specific to the
manufacturing and composition of items outside of what is
genetically modified.
The sector remained predominantly flat over the last year,
growing by just 1 percent or about 300 inventions more
than the prior period. The largest growth was in the area
of Brewing, which bubbled over 18 percent to 7,662 unique
innovations last year, followed by Bakery, which puffed up
6 percent. Meat, Tobacco and Sugar & Starch all
experienced declines.
The top 10 most active innovators in this category are all
from China except one: Philip Morris in the US. This makes
logical sense since China has the world’s largest population,
which it will need to find a way to sustain in the coming
decades as earth’s population nears 10 billion people,
and smoking is still an accepted habit in this culture.
China Tobacco Hubei Industries Corp. is the most
prolific innovator across the entire sector, with 1,122
unique inventions, followed by Qingdao Xiuxian Foods Co.,
Philip Morris, University of Guangxi and Inst Agro Food
Science & Technology Chinese, all of which had 165 or fewer
inventions for the same period. This mix of organizations
gives a glimpse into their focus and priorities.
In terms of Brewing innovation, China again leads the
world, being home to the three most active Brewing
innovators globally: University of Jiangnan (217 inventions),
Harbin Shinbao Wine Industries (166 inventions), and
Luzhou Pingchuang Technology (155 inventions).
“The United States and China alone represent 68 percent of all of the patent
documents associated with crop breeding around the world. These two countries
are larger than the closest competing country by at least a factor of five.”
—Bob Stembridge, Senior IP Analyst, Thomson Reuters
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Food, Beverage & Tobacco
35
REUTERS/DANIEL
MUNOZ
2016 State of Innovation
stateofinnovation.com
Food, Beverage & Tobacco
36
HOME APPLIANCES
Will our appliances still need us when the
Internet of Things takes over?
REUTERS/REGIS
2016 State of DUVIGNAU
Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Home Appliances
37
TODAY’S CONNECTED HOME
The lyrics of a popular folk song for children read: “The head bone’s connected to the…neck bone;
the neck bone’s connected to the…back bone; the back bone’s connected to the…thigh bone…”
and so on. There could be a new take on this regarding our homes today. It might go something
like this: “The smart phone’s connected to the…coffee maker; the coffee maker’s connected to
the…refrigerator; the refrigerator’s connected to the…thermostat; the thermostat’s connected
to the…garage door…” and so on.
This isn’t such a far-fetched concept. Today’s connected
homes are technologically linked in ways we couldn’t have
imagined a decade ago. And, it’s exactly this connectivity
that’s driving much of the innovation in Home Appliances.
The Internet of Things (IoT) has brought changes to the way
we live and what we expect. New technologies incorporated
into our homes, offices, clothing and appliances make them
smarter, more efficient and better managers of us.
“The IoT revolution will offer us opportunities and ease-of-use
we could have never imagined, but suddenly find ourselves
unable to live without…We need to give IoT time to thrive,
and identify the markets for it that make sense. The Internet
of Things is really about finding new places that make
sense for the Internet. Let consumers decide what their next
Internet will be,” said Shawn DuBravac, chief economist of the
Consumer Technology Association (CTA) and author of Digital
Destiny: How the New Age of Data Will Transform the Way We
Live, Work, and Communicate.12
“BlackBerry began as a startup company that invented mobile computing. I can say
without reservation that the spirit of innovation, the drive to continue to improve,
is alive and well in this company. Every part of BlackBerry is driven by the desire to
create the most productive, secure and private solutions in the mobile marketplace—
that includes revolutionary smartphone features, software that makes critical
business and government communications more secure, and coming up with new
ways of enabling devices to communicate with one another through the Internet
of Things (IoT).”
—John Chen, Executive Chairman & CEO, BlackBerry
12 http://www.cio.com/article/3019286/ces/what-will-the-internet-of-things-be-when-it-grows-up.html
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Home Appliances
38
HOME APPLIANCES OVERVIEW
7%
7%
2015
2014
%
Change
43% Kitchen
39,026
33,590
16%
34% Heating/Air Conditioning
30,552
24,316
26%
9%
Household Cleaning
8,173
6,718
22%
7%
Human Hygiene
6,717
5,203
29%
7%
Laundry
6,402
5,659
13%
%
Subsectors
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
9%
43%
34%
Top 10 Global Innovators–Home Appliances (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Midea Group
China
5,427
Zhuhai Gree Electric Appliances
China
1,995
Haier Group
China
1,315
Panasonic
Japan
949
Mitsubishi Electric
Japan
948
Samsung
S Korea
736
BSH Hausgeräte
Germany
697
LG
S Korea
690
Hitachi Kucho System
Japan
460
Daikin Kogyo
Japan
446
Company
Country
# Inventions
Midea Group
China
3,309
Panasonic
Japan
3,102
Mitsubishi Electric
Japan
2,348
LG
S Korea
2,234
Haier Group
China
1,649
Joyoung
China
1,538
Hitachi Kucho
Japan
1,188
Sharp
Japan
916
Toshiba
Japan
907
Zhuhai Gree Electric Appliances
China
880
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Kitchen Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Home Appliances
39
Top 10 Kitchen Innovators–Europe (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
BSH Hausgeräte
Germany
2,905
SEB
Sweden
389
Electrolux
Sweden
320
Nestec
Switzerland
320
Philips
Netherlands
318
Arcelik
Turkey
253
Liebherr Hausgeraete
Germany
237
Miele & Cie
Germany
234
Rational
Germany
145
EGO Elektro-Geraetebau
Germany
135
Company
Country
# Inventions
Whirlpool
US
696
General Electric
US
376
Carrier
US
220
Johnson Controls
US
76
Trane Int.
US
65
Conair
US
64
Thermo King
US
63
DuPont
US
60
Kraft Foods
US
53
Illinois Tool Works
US
52
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Kitchen Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Prolific Scientific Research Institutions in Home Appliances (2005–2015)
Institution
Country
# of Papers (WoS)
University of Zaragoza
Spain
113
University of California Berkeley
US
63
National Cheng Kung University
Taiwan
53
Chinese Academy of Sciences
China
44
Tsinghua University
China
43
Polytechnic University of Milan
Italy
40
Waseda University
Japan
36
University of Tokyo
Japan
35
Tohoku University
Japan
35
Kyoto University
Japan
33
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Home Appliances
40
Summary
Home Appliances is cleaning house in terms of its ranking
on the innovation-activity barometer. The industry
experienced 21 percent year-over-year growth, with all
subsectors seeing double-digit jumps.
The most active subsector is Kitchens, however the largest
increase occurred in Human Hygiene, which was up 29
percent over the prior period. Human Hygiene items include
things such as a body scrub brush with a built-in soap
dispenser, hair-styling devices and nail clippers, to
name a few.
Asia is the undisputed leader in Home Appliance
innovation. All but one of the top 10 innovators reside there,
the lone wolf being BSH Hausgeräte, based in Germany.
China takes the top three spots with Midea Group, Zhuhai
Gree Electric Appliances and Haier Group, respectively.
In the Kitchen subsector, again Asia dominates, with Midea
Group (China) and Panasonic (Japan) being the most active
globally. The world’s third most active Kitchen innovator
is BSH Hausgeräte (Germany), followed by Mitsubishi
Electronics Home Appliances (Japan) and LG Electronics
(South Korea).
Asia is also home to 70 percent of the world’s top 10 most
prolific scientific-research institutions with a focus on home
appliances. Japan leads with four, followed by China with
two and Taiwan with one. But the most active in terms of
research-paper out by far is the University of Zaragoza in
Spain (113 papers) and the University of California Berkeley
(63 papers).
There is no shortage of videos that portray what the future
home may look like. If they are any indication of what’s
to come, this sector is sure to continue seeing increases
in innovation as the world is technologically modernized.
June and Ward Cleaver would be astonished to see what a
difference 50-plus years can make.
“Our objectives are to overcome scientific and technological barriers in order to
develop innovations that can be used by the industry to create wealth and jobs
and to promote the emergence of a sustainable energy mix. Our innovation model
is underpinned by dual know-how: strong knowledge of the market needs and a
scientific approach of the highest level. Beyond science, we take into account the
economic, societal and environmental constraints associated with the development
of any innovation.”
—Didier Houssin, Chairman & CEO, IFPEN (IFP Energie Nouvelles)
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Home Appliances
41
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Home Appliances
42
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
From the cloud to computers and blockchain,
this is the neural net of technology.
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Information Technology 43
PUSHING THE BOUNDARIES OF WHAT
WE THINK IS POSSIBLE
The IoT is a major contributor to what’s driving the Information Technology (IT) boom with its
increased demand for software, sensors and chips to connect our homes, cars and gadgets to
the Internet. In fact, it’s predicted that there will be 22 billion IoT installed devices by 2018.13
Cloud-based technology is another advancement that’s also
pushing IT boundaries. It’s expected that at least half of IT
spending will be cloud-related in the next two years, with it
reaching 60 percent of all IT infrastructure and 60 -70 percent
of all software, services and technology spending by 2020.14
Add to these technological trends things such as
cognitive computing, artificial intelligence, virtual reality
and blockchain, among many others, and it’s clear why IT is
the place to be. It’s the underpinning and connective tissue of
so many technological advancements, making it (IT) the true
cornerstone of the Digital Age.
“Information Technology (IT) is the true cornerstone of the Digital Age, and with the
world’s data estimated to increase 800% by 2020 driven by the Internet of Things
(IoT), major IT trends such as Cloud computing and Cognitive computing will
rapidly develop to provide the flexibility and intelligence required to store, analyze
and provide services based on this vast repository of human knowledge.”
—George Jack, Engineering Expert, Thomson Reuters
13 http://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2015/11/05/idc-releases-top-ten-2016-it-market-predictions/#222cac383e6b
14 http://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2015/11/05/idc-releases-top-ten-2016-it-market-predictions/#222cac383e6b
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Information Technology 44
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW
3% 2% 1%
2015
2014
%
Change
82% Computing
387,097
340,386
14%
7%
Other Peripherals
33,148
29,550
12%
5%
Printers
24,752
23,359
6%
3%
Smart Media
13,523
13,494
0%
2%
Screens
8,112
7,692
5%
1%
Scanners
4,471
4,510
-1%
%
Subsectors
5%
7%
82%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Global Innovators–Information Technology (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
State Grid Corp China
China
7,479
Canon
Japan
6,370
Samsung
S Korea
5,792
IBM
US
4,205
Ricoh
Japan
3,539
Google
US
3,164
Huawei
China
2,799
Lenovo
China
2,798
LG
S Korea
2,521
Tencent Technology Shenzhen
China
2,418
Company
Country
# Inventions
Samsung
S Korea
1,575
Toshiba
Japan
646
State Grid Corp of China
China
630
Toppan Printing
Japan
557
ZTE
China
369
Panasonic
Japan
342
Dainippon Printing
Japan
332
Sony
Japan
324
NEC
Japan
278
Hon Hai Precision Industry Co
Taiwan
274
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Smart-Media Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Information Technology 45
Top 10 Smart-Media Innovators–Europe (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Giesecke & Devrient
Germany
252
Gemalto
Netherlands
204
Siemens
Germany
201
NXP
Netherlands
171
Nokia
Finland
127
Ericsson
Sweden
115
STMicroelectronics
Switzerland
110
Oberthur
France
109
Merck
Germany
94
Infineon
Germany
88
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Smart-Media Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Sandisk
US
228
IBM
US
225
Qualcomm
US
225
Apple
US
223
Broadcom
US
185
Micron
US
166
Intel
US
153
Microsoft
US
103
BlackBerry
US
101
Google
US
96
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Influential Scientific-Research Institutions in Computer Science (2005–2015)
Institution
Country
# of Papers (WoS) Category Normalized Citation Impact
Technical University of Czestochowa
Poland
362
4.25
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
UK
392
4.25
European Molecular Biology Lab
Germany
675
3.80
Stanford University
US
5,107
2.77
California Institute of Technology
US
1,976
2.76
Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris
France
721
2.70
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
US
6,287
2.67
University of California Berkeley
US
4,804
2.60
University of California Los Angeles
US
3,627
2.56
University of South Wales
UK
339
2.53
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Information Technology 46
Summary
Information Technology is the engine behind much of the
innovation happening across many sectors. That’s why
IT continues to dominate as the largest technology area
covered in the State of Innovation, as has been the case
since this publication’s inception, and comprises 31 percent
of the overall activity volume with nearly 430,000 unique
inventions just last year.
The companies leading the top 10 in the global IT pack are
predominantly from Asia: China, Japan and South Korea,
with just two outsiders: IBM (US) and Google (US). The
world’s leading three innovators are State Grid Corp of
China (China), Canon (Japan) and Samsung (South Korea).
Each of these leaders’ activity is significant, with thousands
of unique inventions annually.
In the Smart Media subsector, Samsung is the clear
frontrunner with more than twice as many unique
inventions as its nearest competitor: Toshiba. Giesecke &
Devrient leads in Europe and Sandisk in the US, but with
much less overall activity than their Asian counterparts.
Academic and scientific research in computer science has
a more global footprint, with Asian institutions interestingly
absent from the world’s top 10 in scholarly research. Poland
and the UK are home to the most impactful institutions:
Technical University of Czestochowa and Wellcome Trust
Sanger Institute, respectively, however the Technical
University of Czestochowa has slightly fewer overall papers,
making them collectively more impactful than Wellcome’s.
Computing is by far the most active subsector, comprising
82 percent of IT’s overall activity. This includes inventions
to see through walls (Vayyar), etch 3-D printed logos into
almost any surface (Glowforge), charge smartphones
at stations (NRG-Go) and uniquely light objects to
photograph them in high detail.15
“Mobility is a key societal value, especially in megacities where half of the total
population is concentrated. Everyone expects more connected and autonomous
cars, with a simpler man to machine interface. Driving assistance features will
reinforce safety and reduce CO2 emissions, through optimized ‘eco-driving,’ while
improving the driving experience: this is the new concept of “Intuitive Driving”
that Valeo has developed.”
—Jacques Aschenbroich, CEO, Valeo
15http://www.computerworld.com/article/3021280/ces/looking-to-the-future-5-new-ideas-from-ces-2016.html#slide1
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Information Technology 47
REUTERS/SCOTT
AUDETTE
2016 State of Innovation
stateofinnovation.com
Information Technology 48
MEDICAL DEVICES
The support infrastructure of the healthcare industry, these varied
devices keep physicians and patients thriving and ticking.
2016 State of Innovation
REUTERS/DMITRY
NEYMYROK stateofinnovation.com
Medical Devices
49
PUMPING HARD TO KEEP US PUMPING
Medical devices are essential staples in every operating and hospital room. They’re the literal
sustenance of life for diabetics, dialysis patients and those who are oxygen dependent, among
many others. In life-threatening situations, they are silently behind the scenes ensuring
emergency technicians have the tools needed for the most successful outcome.
These syringes, tubes, tanks, vials and other apparatus are
the hardware of the medical and health industry, much like
semiconductors are the hardware of electronic gadgets.
Humans, as a whole, literally can’t live without them in the
appropriate situations.
It may not be much of a surprise then that the Medical Device
sector is alive and healthy. In developed nations, it’s a part
of daily life for many. With aging populations and growing
chronic medical devices, they’re essential. For the developing
world, they play an important role in the transformation to a
developed economy.
Medical device companies have a unique opportunity to
collabovate and partner with technology and software
businesses to marry their data insights with new solutions
and provide valuable views to physicians and patients alike.
Luckily for all of us, the sector is pulsing.
“A host of medical device companies, including frontrunner Medtronic, have filed
patents and are in the process of developing an artificial pancreas, with the first
system expected to be available for use by type 1 diabetics sometime in 2017.
This unique closed-loop system consists of an insulin pump, a continuous glucose
monitor placed under the user’s skin, and advanced control algorithm software
embedded in a smartphone that intuitively signals how much insulin the pump
should deliver to the patient. This system essentially takes the patient out of the
diabetes management equation via the automation of the insulin regulation and
injection process, which should greatly improve outcomes for these people.”
—Holland Johnson Executive Editor, Medical Device Daily
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Medical Devices
50
MEDICAL DEVICES OVERVIEW
17%
%
Subsectors
2015
2014
%
Change
33%
Diagnosis, Surgery
45,112
36,929
22%
30%
Sterilizing, Syringes,
Electrotherapy
41,528
31,898
30%
20%
Medical Aids,
Oral Administration
27,186
18,694
45%
17%
Dentistry, Bandages, Prosthesis 22,490
19,250
17%
33%
20%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
30%
Top 10 Global Innovators–Medical Devices (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Olympus Optical
Japan
818
Siemens
Germany
638
Toshiba
Japan
627
Fourth Military Medical University
China
623
Samsung
S Korea
526
Terumo
Japan
482
Philips
Netherlands
479
Canon
Japan
473
Medtronic
US
362
Covidien
US
358
Company
Country
# Inventions
Olympus Optical
Japan
3,246
Fujifilm
Japan
2,830
Toshiba Medical
Japan
2,682
Canon
Japan
1,862
Samsung
S Korea
1,539
Terumo
Japan
1,020
Hitachi Medical
Japan
913
Hoya
Japan
807
Konica Minolta
Japan
796
Seiko Epson
Japan
693
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Diagnosis-Surgery Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Source: Thomson Reuters Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Medical Devices
51
Top 10 Diagnosis-Surgery Innovators–Europe (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Siemens
Germany
2,850
Philips
Netherlands
1,861
Warsaw Orthopedic
Poland
400
Aesculap
Germany
328
Smith & Nephew
UK
305
Zeiss Meditec
Germany
281
Biosense Webster Israel
Israel
264
Storz GmbH & KG Karl
Germany
264
Roche Diagnostics
Switzerland
217
Biedermann Technologies
Germany
150
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Diagnosis-Surgery Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Covidien
US
2,353
General Electric
US
1,716
Boston Scientific SciMed
US
1,125
Ethicon Endo-Surgery
US
1,073
Medtronic
US
1,056
Depuy Synthes
US
769
St Jude Medical
US
417
Cook Medical Technologies
US
412
Intuitive Surgical Operations
US
379
Abbott Diabetes Care
US
368
Nellcor Puritan Bennett
US
346
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Prolific Scientific Research Institutions in Medical Devices (2005–2015)
Name
Country
# of Papers (WoS)
US FDA
US
219
Harvard University
US
190
University of Pennsylvania
US
101
University of Michigan
US
93
Stanford University
US
90
Duke University
US
88
University of Minnesota
US
85
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
US
80
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
US
72
University of North Carolina
US
71
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Medical Devices
52
Summary
Following the reported 6 percent year-over-year decline in
Medical Devices from the prior period, innovation in this
area got a shot in the arm to become the most active of
all technology sectors covered. It had the largest yearover-year increase, 27 percent, and all of its subsectors
had double-digit growth, with Medical Aids & Oral
Administration seeing the largest increase: 45 percent.
Japan is home to 40 percent of the world’s top 10 Medical
Device companies, including the world leader Olympus.
China and South Korea also have their hands in this sector,
with the Fourth Military Medical University and Samsung
Electronics, respectively. Europe and the US also make
contributions to the global top 10, with two and three
innovators each, respectively.
In the Diagnosis Surgery subsector, Japan has 90 percent
of the top 10 innovators in Asia, demonstrating the nation’s
proclivity in this field. South Korea’s Samsung is the only
non-Japanese company in that top 10. Germany is the clear
leader in Europe, with 60 percent of the top 10 companies,
and the US takes all of the top spots for North America,
with Covidien at the top followed by General Electric and
Boston Scientific.
Medtronic completed its acquisition of Covidien in 2015,
so their innovation activity for this period was reported
separately. Their combined total output is more than 3,400
inventions, however, making them the overall global leader
in Diagnosis, Surgery, even over Japan’s Olympus, with
3,246 unique inventions.
All of the top 10 most prolific medical device research
institutions are from the US, with the FDA at the top
followed by Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania.
It’s interesting that despite Japan’s leadership position in
innovation, it doesn’t rank in the top 10 of the most prolific
scholarly research organizations globally.
“For us, innovation isn’t just about creating exciting objects that catch the
imagination of our customers for one heady moment. Instead, it’s about perfecting
products, services and business models that help our customers to take care of
people and save lives, to live healthier and enjoy themselves, and to be part of a more
sustainable world. At Philips, Innovation is at the very core of our business strategy,
as well as our brand positioning and company’s mission: ‘At Philips we strive to make
the world healthier and more sustainable through innovation’.”
—Brian Hinman, Chief IP Officer, Philips
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Medical Devices
53
REUTERS/ALY
SONG
2016 State
of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Medical Devices
54
OIL & GAS
Fossil-fuel-based products emit harmful greenhouse gases.
Can we make the transition to environmentally
friendly alternatives to meet governmental goals?
2016 State of Innovation
REUTERS/WOLFGANG
RATTAY stateofinnovation.com
Oil & Gas
55
COP21 CREATES GLOBAL CHALLENGE FOR
ENERGY INNOVATORS
December 2015 will long be remembered as the month when the historic COP21 (Conference of
Parties) took place in Paris, where nearly 200 heads of state from around the world agreed to try
to slow global warming and overcome its negative effects.
Innovation is imperative in order to drive alternative ways
to power the planet and reduce our dependence on fossil
fuels. It’s essential that we find more environmentally friendly
sources of energy without harmful greenhouse gas emissions.
Could Oil & Gas bellwethers hold the answer?
Corporate quarterly-earning conference calls convey the
toll of the state of today’s industry, with plunging prices and
decreasing demand. Exxon Mobil reported a 58 percent
decline in its 2015 third-quarter profit over the same period
a year earlier;16 Shell’s quarterly profit dropped by 70
percent;17 and Total in France announced a 69 percent
decline,18 to name a few.
Nevertheless, the sector continues to innovate. Some of the
innovation has been related to finding new ways to extract
energy from traditional sources, such as the process involved
in hydraulic fracturing, or ways to mitigate carbon emissions
from existing oil-extraction methods. The big question on
many analysts’ minds, however, is whether or not the large
Oil & Gas players will be able to find sustainable solutions
to the COP21 challenge, via R&D investments or otherwise.
“The rout in crude prices is snowballing into one of the biggest avalanches in the
history of corporate America, with 59 oil and gas companies now bankrupt…The
number of U.S. energy bankruptcies is closing in on the staggering 68 filings seen
during the depths of the telecom bust of 2002 and 2003…”
—Ernest Scheyder, Houston Energy Correspondent, Reuters News &
Terry Wade, Houston Bureau Chief, Reuters News
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-shale-telecoms-idUSKCN0XV07V
16 http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/03/business/energy-environment/oil-company-earnings.html?_r=0
17 http://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Top-Oil-Companies-Report-Dismal-Earnings.html
18 Ibid
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Oil & Gas
56
OIL & GAS OVERVIEW
3% 1%
%
Subsectors
2015
2014
%
Change
64%
Exploration, Drilling,
Production
18,086
15,589
16%
32%
Fuels and Other Products
9,224
8,459
9%
3%
Transportation and Storage
864
658
31%
1%
Refining
241
183
32%
32%
64%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Global Innovators–Oil & Gas (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Sinopec
China
1,991
Petrochina
China
1,982
Halliburton
US
940
China National Offshore Oil
China
455
Schlumberger
US
378
Baker Hughes
US
288
PRAD Research & Development
US
272
University of China Petroleum
China
239
Toyota
Japan
219
Tatneft Stock
Russia
189
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Petroleum & Natural Gas Exploration Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Sinopec
China
7,612
Petrochina
China
7,245
China National Offshore Oil
China
1,798
University of China Petroleum
China
803
University of Southwest Petroleum
China
675
Nippon Oil
Japan
294
University of Northeast Petroleum
China
251
Toyota
Japan
232
Beijing Sany Heavy Machinery
China
227
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine ENG CO
S Korea
195
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Oil & Gas
57
Top 10 Petroleum & Natural Gas Exploration Innovators–Europe (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Tatneft Stock
Russia
903
Shell Oil
Netherlands
666
Saudi Arabian Oil Co
Saudi Arabia
468
IFP Energies Nouvelles
France
371
BASF
Germany
311
TOTAL SA
France
198
BP
UK
160
Statoil Petroleum
Norway
125
Linde
Germany
113
Welltec AS
Denmark
113
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Petroleum & Natural Gas Exploration Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Halliburton Energy Services
US
2,848
Schlumberger Technology
US
1,905
Baker Hughes
US
1,452
PRAD Research & Development
US
1,256
Exxon Mobil
US
637
UOP
US
619
Chevron
US
435
National Oilwell Varco
US
329
Weatherford/Lamb
US
308
Smith Int
US
223
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Influential Scientific Research Institutions in Oil & Gas (2005-2015)
Name
Country
# of Papers (WoS) Category Normalized Citation Impact
Imperial College London
UK
119
4.57
United States Department of Energy
US
102
2.89
Stanford University
US
191
2.65
University of Texas Austin
US
339
2.09
Delft University of Technology
Netherlands
108
1.93
Norwegian University of Science & Technology
Norway
149
1.81
Tallinn University of Technology
Estonia
170
1.72
Heriot Watt University
UK
154
1.63
Texas A&M University
US
338
1.52
University of Oklahoma
US
176
1.50
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Oil & Gas
58
Summary
The sector’s innovation pace ignited beyond the prior
period, jumping up 14 percent overall, with Refining and
Transportation & Storage seeing the largest subsector
jumps of 32 and 31 percent, respectively.
China leads the world’s innovation activity taking the top
two spots globally. Sinopec and Petrochina rank first and
second, respectively. China National Offshore Oil is fifth.
The US is the next most active region with Halliburton,
Schlumberger, Baker Hughes and PRAD Research &
Development making the top 10 list.
In the subsector Exploration, Drilling & Production, China
again dominates, with 80 percent of the top 10 for Asia,
including the same three innovators as above securing the
first three positions. Japan rounds out the remaining two in
the top 10 with, interestingly, Toyota as part of the mix.
Europe and the Middle East feature an eclectic mix in their
top 10, comprising Russia’s Tatneft Stock in the top spot,
followed by eight others from Europe and one from Saudi
Arabia. UK, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and
Denmark comprise the European contingent. Halliburton
Energy Services is the leading US Oil & Gas innovator for
Exploration, Drilling & Production, and is third globally
overall in volume for this category.
The Imperial College of London is the most influential
scholarly research institution in the Oil & Gas sector,
followed by the US Department of Energy and Stanford
University. Imperial’s department of Earth Science and
Engineering has a Petroleum Engineering group that does
significant industry-funded research, which can be found
on its website: imperial.ac.uk/engineering/departments/
earth-science/research/.
“These days, global businesses and technology environments see their existing
businesses and technologies being replaced at alarming speeds by new ones
through the combination and convergence of diverse businesses and technologies.
In the energy industry where LSIS engages, Internet of Things, big data, and
innovation of manufacturing are emerging, ushering in a smart era of ICT
combination and convergence and a direct-current era that can change the
existing electric power paradigm.”
—Ja-Kyun Koo, Chairman & CEO, LSIS
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Oil & Gas
59
2016 State ofMACGREGOR
Innovation stateofinnovation.com
REUTERS/LUKE
Oil & Gas
60
PHARMACEUTICALS
Do you know who makes your medication and where it’s from?
You might be surprised how much comes from Asia.
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Pharmaceuticals
61
CHANGING DYNAMICS STEER INDUSTRY
The pharmaceutical industry continues to grow thanks to its branching into creative, new markets.
Proof can be seen in the seven drugs expected to launch this year that Thomson Reuters predicts
will achieve blockbuster sales status of more than $1 billion in revenue by 2020, with some
predicted to hit $2 billion during that period.
The current pharmaceutical-success trend is a result of a
concoction featuring an increased focus on rare diseases,
ongoing development of more convenient Fixed Dose
Combination (FDC) regimens and the continuation of the
conflict between price versus access to medicines. These,
alongside new treatments involving bio-organisms, several
new vaccines (such as for malaria and dengue fever) and
immune-therapies have given the sector a burst of adrenaline.
Collabovation is a prerequisite for future pharmaceutical
growth in order to meet the health and drug needs of a
larger population, especially in developing nations, and to
ensure the longevity of an aging demographic as well. R&D
models will increasingly shift to involve partnerships between
pharmas and either their suppliers or partners, allowing each
party to focus on its respective area of expertise. Testing of
“virtual beings” is also expected to expedite development and
trial cycles, bringing drugs to market faster and with
more successful outcomes.19
“The relationship between drug prices and the costs of development is expected to
be a major focal point for drug companies, investors, regulators and politicians this
year. With the rise of global healthcare costs, the need to demonstrate meaningful
impact will be greater than ever for pharmaceutical companies. The 2016 drugs to
watch are likely to figure prominently in those discussions.”
—Richard Harrison, Chief Scientific Officer,
Thomson Reuters Intellectual Property & Science
19 http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/pharmaceuticals-life-sciences/pharma-2020/pharma2020-virtual-rd-which-path-will-you-take.html
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Pharmaceuticals
62
PHARMACEUTICALS OVERVIEW
3%1%
11%
%
Subsectors
2015
2014
%
Change
63%
Organics
88,116
85,679
3%
22% General
30,320
26,774
13%
11%
Heterocyclics
15,854
16,272
-3%
3%
Inorganics
3,975
1,373
190%
1%
Steroids
1,036
1,075
-4%
22%
63%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Global Innovators–Pharmaceuticals (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Roche
Switzerland
351
University of Jiangnan
China
320
University of Zhejiang
China
274
LG Household & Healthcare
S Korea
270
Foshan Saiweisi Pharma Technology
China
266
University of California
US
235
Sanofi
France
232
University of Shanghai Jiaotong
China
225
CNRS
France
223
University of Guangxi
China
209
Company
Country
# Inventions
University of China Pharmaceuticals
China
454
University of Nanjing
China
312
Takeda Pharmaceuticals
Japan
292
Shanghai Inst Pharma
China
263
University of Zhejiang
China
239
University of Shandong
China
238
University of Fudan
China
234
Foshan Saiweisi Pharma Technology
China
229
Cadila Healthcare
India
213
Hainan Weikang Pharma Qianshan
China
212
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Heterocyclics Innovators–Asia (2011-2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Pharmaceuticals
63
Top 10 Heterocyclics Innovators–Europe (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Roche
Switzerland
642
Novartis
Switzerland
499
Bayer
Germany
427
GlaxoSmithKline
UK
382
Boehringer Ingelheim
Germany
364
Sanofi
France
349
Janssen Pharmaceuticals
Belgium
244
CNRS
France
188
Merck
Germany
176
Astrazeneca
UK
134
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Heterocyclics Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Merck & Co.
US
732
Bristol-Myers Squibb
US
373
Abbvie
US
361
Allergan
US
282
Gilead Scientific
US
228
Genentech
US
200
Pfizer
US
199
University of California
US
195
Vertex Pharmaceuticals
US
172
Teva Pharmaceuticals US
US
123
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Influential Scientific Research Institutions in Pharmaceuticals (2005–2015)
Name
Country
# of Papers (WoS) Category Normalized Citation Impact
Tianjin University
China
325
4.97
Lundbeck Corporation
Denmark
529
3.59
Gilead Sciences
US
478
3.34
World Health Organization
EU
316
2.53
University of Newcastle
UK
450
2.37
University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences
China
742
2.31
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
US
477
2.28
Guy’s & St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust
UK
762
2.21
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
US
953
2.17
Tsinghua University
China
579
2.16
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Pharmaceuticals
64
Summary
Pharmaceuticals experienced 4 percent year-over-year
growth, with the most significant increase occurring in
inorganics, which jumped up by 190 percent, from 1,373
to 3,975 unique inventions for the period. Inorganics include
all non-carbon-based chemical compounds, featuring an
array of metallic compounds as well as those that
are synthesized in a chemical plant or lab.
Globally, China is the world’s leading region for
Pharmaceutical innovation with 50 percent of the top 10
pharmaceutical companies residing there: University of
Jiangnan, University of Zhejiang, Foshan Saiweisi Pharma
Technology, University of Shanghai Jiaotong and University
of Guangxi. The collabovation between the public and
private sectors is also clear in this industry, as all of
China’s representatives are from academia.
In the subsector for Heterocyclics, China again dominates
the top ten list in Asia with 80 percent of the organizations
in that area. Heterocyclics are classic compounds that have
atoms of at least two different elements as part of their
rings. Cadila Healthcare of India also makes the top 10
global innovator list within this area.
Merck, Roche and Novartis are the world’s three most
innovative organizations overall in Heterocyclic volume,
surpassing even China’s leading organizations in their
R&D activity. Contrary to Asia, nearly all of the top 10
organizations in Heterocyclics in Europe and North America
are from the private, corporate sector.
The most influential top 10 scientific research organizations
in pharmaceuticals have balanced representation across
China, Europe and North America, with China’s Tianjin
University taking the top spot.
“Innovation flourishes when you take away the fear to fail, encourage people to take
controlled risks and create a healthy mix of diverse skills, cultures and experiences
within your workforce. Last but certainly not least, we constantly remind ourselves
that the customers in our care, the physicians, veterinarians, farmers and
consumers, ultimately determine what the true innovations are.”
— Dr. Marijn Dekkers, CEO, Bayer AG
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Pharmaceuticals
65
REUTERS/CHAIWAT SUBPRASOM
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Pharmaceuticals
66
SEMICONDUCTORS
The lifeline of today’s technological devices,
semiconductors are the Digital Age organs that keep us
connected, informed, hopping...alive.
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Semiconductors
67
ASIAN CONDUCTORS
LEAD IN THE SPACE
The industry for those little chips, sensors and circuits that are the hardworking internal organs of
today’s electronic devices is going through a period of transformation. On the one side is massive
consumer demand for gadgets to be better, faster and more intelligent. The automotive and
IoT trends mentioned earlier in this paper are examples of how technology is becoming more
connected and being applied in new ways.
The flip side is lower manufacturer expectations for
profitability and the push for more environmentally friendly
solutions to power our future. Semiconductors have an
important role to play, however it will take the next
generation of innovation to bring them back to their heyday.
While China may be earmarked as the epicenter of
Semiconductor growth for the near future, the global
Semiconductor space is evolving, moving to the next stage of
its lifecycle, and is ripe for creative inventors to apply them in
new ways.
Intel recently announced plans to lay off 11 percent of its
workforce—up to 12,000 people.20 This comes on the tails
of other publicized layoffs from bellwethers like Samsung
Electronics, Marvell and others in the space.
“Overall growth in the semiconductor space is slowing due to the slowdown in the
largest segment, which includes desktop PCs (personal computers), notebooks,
ultra-mobiles and tablets. The latest growth drivers, occupying smaller segments,
are now the mobile sector, automotive markets, sensors, light-emitting devices
and the advanced packaging industry. On the horizon, the next big growth driver
is the Internet of Things (IoT), and is expected to have a significant impact on the
advanced packaging. Meanwhile the Chinese government continues to invest
heavily in building its own semiconductor industry with the aim to catch up
technologically with the world’s leading firms by 2030. Will this one day
mean cheaper electronics worldwide and major advancements in innovation
as competition increases? Time and research/analysis will tell.”
—Jason Foster, Senior Semiconductor Analyst,
Quality Expert & Content Specialist, Thomson Reuters
20http://www.investors.com/news/technology/elephant-intel-dances-but-12000-layoffs-could-signal-recession/
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Semiconductors
68
SEMICONDUCTORS OVERVIEW
4%
%
Subsectors
2015
2014
%
Change
Semiconductor Materials
40%
and Processes
54,907
56,827
-3%
Memories, Film and Hybrid
29%
Circuits
40,920
35,220
16%
27%
Discrete Devices
37,771
38,571
-2%
4%
Integrated Circuits
5,771
5,775
0%
27%
40%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
29%
Top 10 Global Innovators–Semiconductors (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Samsung
S Korea
4,144
BOE Technology Group
China
2,900
LG
S Korea
2,884
Shenzen China Star Optoelectronics Tech
China
1,701
Toshiba
Japan
1,521
Taiwan Semiconductor Mfg Co
Taiwan
1,424
Semiconductor Mfg. Int. Shanghai Corp
China
1,405
IBM
US
969
SK Hynix
S Korea
873
Oceans King Lighting Science & Technology
China
872
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Semiconductor Materials & Processes Innovators–Asia (2011–2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Samsung
S Korea
8,492
LG
S Korea
5,878
Toshiba
Japan
5,194
Semiconductor Mfg Int Shanghai Corp
China
4,953
Taiwan Semiconductor Mfg Co
Taiwan
4,836
SK Hynix
S Korea
3,929
Renesas Electronics
Japan
3,323
Panasonic
Japan
3,163
Tokyo Electron
Japan
2,998
Sharp
Japan
2,462
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Semiconductors
69
Top 10 Semiconductor Materials & Processes Innovators–Europe (2011–2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Infineon Technologies
Germany
1,508
Osram Opto Semiconductors
Germany
1,085
STMicroelectronics
Switzerland
1,011
Commissariat Energie Atomique
France
644
ASML Netherlands
Netherlands
614
Bosch
Germany
608
Merck
Germany
412
Zeiss Smt
Germany
391
Soitec
France
285
Fraunhofer Ges Foerderung Angewandten EV
Germany
280
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Semiconductor Materials & Processes Innovators–North America (2011-2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
IBM
US
5,307
Applied Materials
US
1,855
Micron Technology
US
1,629
GlobalFoundries
US
1,057
Texas Instruments
US
1,015
Intel
US
881
Freescale Semiconductor
US
844
Ase Group
US
615
Advanced Micro Devices
US
587
Intermolecular
US
527
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Prolific Scientific Research Institutions in Semiconductors (2005–2015)
Name
Country
# of Papers (WoS)
Chinese Academy of Sciences
China
7,121
Russian Academy of Sciences
Russia
3,566
University of Tokyo
Japan
2,092
CNRS
France
1,956
Tohoku University
Japan
1,700
Osaka University
Japan
1,695
University of California Berkeley
USA
1,684
Nanyang Technological University
Singapore
1,624
National Chiao Tung University
Taiwan
1,504
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Japan
1,334
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Semiconductors
70
Summary
Semiconductors hit a short circuit in the period ending
December 31, 2014 and showed a decline for the first time
in a number of years. Nevertheless, its path has been
somewhat corrected as it saw a 3 percent year-over-year
increase in activity, with Memories, Films & Hybrid Circuits
jumping 16 percent, the most of any subsector. The largest
segment: Semiconductor Materials and Processes, however,
declined by 3 percent over the period.
Germany is the European leader in the Semiconductor
Materials & Processes subsector with 60 percent of the
organizations in the world’s top 10. However, even with
Infineon at the top with 1,508 unique inventions over the
five years, Samsung still comes out on top in terms of its
output with 463 percent more activity than Infineon. Even
Japan’s Sharp, ranked tenth overall in Asia, is 63 percent
more active than the industry leader in Europe.
Asia continues to lead in the overall Semiconductor
landscape, with Samsung Electronics taking the top
position and logging over 4,000 unique inventions in just
one year. LG and SK Hynix (both from South Korea) also
rank in the top 10 overall. China, Japan and Taiwan all also
place in the world’s top 10, with China taking four of the 10
slots, compared to just one each by Japan and Taiwan. IBM,
which previously held the number one position in this sector
globally, is now eighth. Samsung has 328 percent more
inventions annually than IBM. Europe does not even place
in the top 10.
IBM takes the top US spot in this sub-category with 5,307
unique inventions over the five years, but that is still 40
percent fewer than Samsung.
Samsung also dominates the subsector category for
Semiconductor Materials & Processes, with 45 percent
more volume than its nearest competitor, LG. Japan fares
well with 50 percent of the top innovators in this subsector.
In the scholarly research realm, Asia again leads with 70
percent of the top 10. China, Russia and Japan take the
top three spots globally. The EU and the US each have one
representative institution on the list of the most prolific
semiconductor research organizations.
Asia is the clear frontrunner in Semiconductor innovation
activity. Given the volume generated from that continent,
it’s evident that the region will be a force to reckon with and
the companies on this list are paving the way. The question
now becomes: how do these organizations morph to
address the next stage of electronic and renewable needs.
“Marvell has a rich history of leadership in semiconductor innovation, and
innovation remains one of the core values of our company. Innovation means many
things to Marvell but at the heart of it, we continue to have a steadfast focus on
advancing the global semiconductor industry with cutting-edge technologies and
solutions. In collaboration with our service provider and OEM customers, we are
dedicated to helping them bring new electronic systems and devices to market that
ultimately improve the lives of consumers around the world.”
—Dr. Zining Wu, Chief Technology Officer, Marvell Technology Group
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Semiconductors
71
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Semiconductors
72
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
There’s a swirling convergence of Telecoms activity,
from 5G to IoT and NFC.
OMG–let’s c if u r able 2 keep up–LOL.
REUTERS/DANIEL
MUNOZ stateofinnovation.com
2016
State of Innovation
Telecommunications
73
TELECOMS TRIFECTA IS BASIS
FOR WHAT’S TO COME
The Telecommunications space is yet another that’s integral to the IoT phenomenon, providing
the network connectivity, equipment and devices essential for it to function. Collabovation
also plays a key role in the success of the sector, integrating Telecoms expertise with that of
automotive, appliance, fitness, wellbeing and other categories so partners on each side of the
equation can focus on what they respectively do best and leverage one another’s strengths.
The rub in all this is bandwidth. It’s currently somewhat
limited and in order for Telecoms to really take off, more
spectrum is needed. The sector is being hit by a trifecta of
sorts involving increased usage and demand for storage,
decreasing rates/pricing and the lack of a far-reaching
spectrum infrastructure. However, spectrum auctions and
5G-technology development are poised to change this in the
not-too-distant future.
The sky’s truly the limit when it comes to Telecoms, and that
limit can and will be pushed as IoT becomes more pervasive,
customers demand fast and better accessibility, and new
technologies break old barriers. IoT, 5G, streaming services,
the expansion of wearables and the shift to software-based
networking solutions will shape the future of Telecoms to
come. There’s ample growth opportunity and this is definitely
a space to pay attention to.
“Since the dawn of telecommunications, Ericsson has put enormous time and
effort into collaborating with others to set the open standards that make global
communications and connections possible, with a firm belief that interoperability
and enabling end-to-end performance is key to leading innovation in the
information and telecom industry. To continue to advance technology, patents
play an active role through standardization and licensing and with one of the
strongest patent portfolios in mobile communications, Ericsson is a key driver
of open innovation. Without this open innovation, many of the advances in
mobile communications that we have come to rely on simply would not have
been possible.”
—Kasim Alfalahi, Senior Vice President & Chief Intellectual Property Officer, Ericsson
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Telecommunications
74
TELECOMMUNICATIONS OVERVIEW
2015
2014
%
Change
26% Mobile Telephony
74,493
77,477
-4%
25% Data Transmission Networks
71,623
69,614
3%
21%
Telephone Subscriber
Equipment
60,054
64,760
-7%
9%
Digital Information
Transmission
25,797
27,053
-5%
9%
Telemetry & Telecontrol
25,417
18,437
38%
6%
Multiplex & Multiple Access
15,633
16,256
-4%
2%
Telephone Communications
6,855
7,003
-2%
2%
Telephone Exchange Systems
5,610
5,954
-6%
%
Subsectors
6%
2% 2%
9%
26%
9%
21%
25%
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Global Innovators–Telecommunications (2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Samsung
S Korea
4,132
Huawei
China
3,496
LG
S Korea
2,795
State Grid Corp China
China
2,585
ZTE Corp
China
1,960
Qualcomm
US
1,841
Ericsson
Sweden
1,424
Sony
Japan
1,129
NTT
Japan
1,129
Fujitsu
Japan
1,087
Company
Country
# Inventions
Samsung
S Korea
12,713
LG
S Korea
8,654
Sony
Japan
5,095
Sharp
Japan
4,627
Panasonic
Japan
4,568
Huawei
China
4,131
ZTE
China
3,998
NEC
Japan
3,786
Kyocera
Japan
3,661
Fujitsu
Japan
3,209
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Mobile Telephony Innovators–Asia (2011–2015)
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Telecommunications
75
Top 10 Mobile Telephony Innovators–Europe (2011–2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Ericsson
Sweden
3,873
Nokia
Finland
2,918
Alcatel Lucent (Nokia)
France
1,628
Nokia Siemens
Finland
733
Sony Ericsson
Sweden/Japan
651
Bosch
Germany
552
STMicroelectronics
Switzerland
471
Orange
France
341
Vodafone
UK
314
Infineon Technologies
German
298
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Top 10 Mobile Telephony Innovators–North America (2011–2015)
Company
Country
# Inventions
Qualcomm
US
6,534
Apple
US
3,576
BlackBerry
Canada
2,933
Intel
US
2,825
Microsoft
US
2,721
Google
US
2,571
IBM
US
2,083
AT&T
US
1,735
Broadcom
US
1,590
Motorola
US
1,266
Source: Derwent World Patents Index
Most Impactful Research Institutions in Telecommunications (2005–2015)
Name
Country
# of Papers (WoS) Category Normalized Citation Impact
Rice University
US
323
4.68
University of California Berkeley
US
792
3.25
University of Texas Austin
US
1,130
2.85
New York University
US
432
2.77
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich
Switzerland
723
2.76
Carnegie Mellon University
US
762
2.70
State University of New York Stony Brook
US
339
2.67
Illinois Institute of Technology
US
530
2.59
Princeton University
US
650
2.53
Microsoft
US
700
2.35
Source: Web of Science
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Telecommunications
76
Summary
Telecommunications was up 3 percent year-over-year,
despite three-quarters of its subsectors declining slightly
in activity from the last period. The subsector Telemetry
& Telecontrol, which covers measuring, transmitting and
receiving apparatus, experienced a whopping 38 percent
jump from 18,437 unique inventions at year-end 2014 to
25,417 unique inventions at the close of 2015. All the other
subsectors declined between 2–7 percent except for Data
Transmission Networks, which was up 3 percent.
Like in the Semiconductor sector, Asian companies lead
the top 10 list in Telecommunications innovation with 80
percent of the representation. Samsung (South Korea) takes
the most innovative spot, followed by Huawei (China) and
LG (South Korea). In addition to the two companies from
South Korea and three from China, there are three Japanese
organizations and one each from Sweden and the US in the
leading 10.
Samsung truly dominates in Mobile Telephony with 228
percent more activity than the nearest European competitor
(Ericsson) and 95 percent more activity than the nearest US
competitor (Qualcomm).
The US leads with 90 percent of the most impactful
Telecommunications scholarly research organizations,
the top three of which are Rice University, University of
California Berkeley and University of Texas Austin. The
only non-US institution in the top 10 is Switzerland’s
Federal Institute of Technology Zurich. It’s worth noting
that despite the fact that Asia leads in having the most top
innovators in Telecommunications, the leading scholarly
research organizations do not hail from there, but rather
primarily come from the US. Microsoft is the only corporate
organization to make it to the list of most impactful
Telecommunications organizations.
The same three Asian countries comprise the top 10 in the
Mobile Telephony subsector, with Samsung, LG and Sony
(Japan) taking the top three spots. In Europe, Ericsson,
Nokia (Finland) and Alcatel Lucent/Nokia (France) are
the three regional innovators, while Qualcomm, Apple
and BlackBerry (Canada) are the top three in North
America, the former two both from the US.
“The Telecommunications space is evolving at warp speed. Clients want faster
connectivity. Increased security. Lighter weight gadgets. Global access to the
Internet and their content. And so on. It’s the backbone supporting many other
industries and market opportunities. 5G is the next frontier to conquer, which will
drive an entirely new wave of advancements. It’s an exciting time to be in the space
and paving the way for future generations.”
—Bob Schukai, Head of Applied Innovation, Thomson Reuters
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Telecommunications
77
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Telecommunications
78
“We can never rest, never let ourselves get comfortable. The world is constantly
changing, and those that don’t adapt don’t stay on top for long. That really raises the
bar on our teams, and it drives us to think differently about how we bring innovation
to life in our markets, or in other words, how we commercialize it.”
—John Tracy, Chief Technology Officer, Boeing
2016 State of Innovation
stateofinnovation.com
REUTERS/CARLO
ALLEGRI
Conclusion 79
SOLUTIONS FOR INNOVATION SUCCESS
Derwent Patents Citation Index
Web of Science
For identifying possible partners, threats and ways to
evolve a technology area
For tracing the development of an area of study and
identifying top authors, institutions and publishers while
following the citation trail
Derwent Patents Citation Index (DPCI) is a value-added
citation database with both patent and scholarly literature
citations. These trace historical references on which an
invention is built, as well as an invention’s impact and future
technologies that advance it.
Updated weekly, there are more than 11 million patent
families and unique inventions that have been editorially
enhanced for following forward and backward citations. With
this insight, users can identify potential licensing partners,
competitive threats and ways to evolve core intangible assets.
Within Thomson Innovation, DPCI is combined with the
Derwent World Patents Index (DWPI) to provide the widest
perspective of an invention and its impact and influence.
Derwent World Patents Index
For validity and infringement insight, unearthing existing
prior art, identifying white space and performing competitivelandscape research
Derwent World Patents Index (DWPI) is the world’s most
trusted and authoritative source of global patent information,
covering 50 patent-issuing authorities. Bibliographic
patent information is translated into English and editorially
enhanced to bring clarity to a patent’s true intentions.
A team comprising hundreds of editors, most with advanced
degrees in their areas of specialization, incorporate valueadded insight alongside original patent content to accurately
understand the scope of an invention.
The Web of Science is the world’s most trusted citation
index covering leading scholarly literature. It is the gold
standard for research discovery and analytics, including
the world’s founding scientific citation database, covering
interdisciplinary fields such as the arts, humanities, sciences,
and social sciences.
The Web of Science platform is the search and discovery
choice for 7,000+ academic and research institutions,
national governments, funding organizations and publishing
organizations in 100+ countries worldwide.
Thomson Innovation
For turning research results into actionable intelligence
and collaborating across the innovation process
Thomson Innovation is the industry’s leading intellectual
property intelligence and collaboration platform for global
research and analysis. It incorporates patents, scholarly
literature and news information, alongside robust reporting,
visualization and work-file management tools, making it the
most comprehensive patent workflow solution available.
Featuring data from around the world, including the coveted
DWPI patent collection, Web of Science content and Reuters
news information, Thomson Innovation is a one-stop solution
for research and analysis.
The world’s first and only such patent-search resource, with
over 50 years of longevity and trusted by nearly 40 of the
world’s patent offices, DWPI is a unique and unparalled
resource for patent research.
2016 State of Innovation stateofinnovation.com
Conclusion 80
Methodology & Reprints
Data in this report was compiled using Derwent World Patents Index®, the
world’s most trusted and authoritative collection of editorially enhanced patent
information for more than 50 years; and Web of Science, the gold standard for
research discovery and analytics, including the world’s founding scientific citation
database, covering interdisciplinary fields such as the arts, humanities, sciences,
and social sciences.
Special thanks to our partners at STN for their assistance in providing access to
DWPI on STN for work done to determine the top assignees in each technology area.
Analysis was conducted by the Thomson Reuters PR & Thought Leadership team,
providers of expert insight and analysis for corporations, law firms and governments
around the world.
Report author: Laura Gaze, Thomson Reuters
Patent researcher: Bob Stembridge, Thomson Reuters
Scientific literature researcher: Christopher King
S022449
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