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LIFE WITH OLD LAND ROVERS: JOURNEYS, RESTORATIONS, REPAIRS AND EVENTS
CL
100%
C
SS C
COA
ILEIR
LASS
IC
ISSUE NO 49
�40
VISITING
THE RANGE ROVER
STORY AT SOLIHULL
THE WORLD'S BEST SELLING CLASSIC LAND ROVER MAGAZINE
INTERNATIONAL
RESCUE
www.classiclandrover.com
NESSIE
A monster of a
Series One
?SOUTH AFRICA
?AUSTRALIA
?SCOTLAND
?ICELAND
?CANADA
?USA
SOUNDS OF
THE SUBURBS
June 2017
�40
Readers' Series IIA and
III restorations
POLLYANNA
GLOBETROTTER
Barbara Toy?s well-travelled
1950 80in Series One
TECH AND TOOLBOX
Series IIA: Leaf springs
Series III: Hard-top swap
One Ten: Roll bar fitting
JAN 2017 �40
ExmoorTrim.indd 1
10/04/2017 15:50
FROM THE EDITOR
JUNE 2017
A GLOBAL BRAND
S
ince the earliest days of the Land Rover,
it has been exported around the world.
For example, Barbara Toy famously
drove around the world in 80 inches during the
1950s, Series Ones were exported to Canada
in connection with the oil industry, Series II/
IIAs were exported to Africa by the score for all
kinds of duties, more recent classics such as the
Discovery 1 were exported to work in the harsh
climate of Iceland, ex-army models have found
their way all around the world including New
Mexico in the USA and, closer to home, Land
Rovers have always been popular in Scotland
where the Scottish Land Rover Club was
founded during the 1950s. I could give 101
more examples but these are the ones that
the features in this issue reflect.
It?s also fair to say that the original Range
Rover gained an international following soon
after its launch in 1970. This means that the
new Story of the Range Rover exhibition at
Solihull is bound to be a success. Read our
preview story on page 40.
In closing, I have to say that, as someone who
likes Series IIIs and utility Land Rovers, I think
this month?s cover vehicle is the coolest thing
ever and it?s owned by one half of the duo that
won the Camel Trophy in 1989. Way to go!
?I think this
month?s cover
vehicle is the
coolest thing
ever?
EDITOR JOHN CARROLL
john.carroll@keypublishing.com
John Carroll
Garry Stuart
Martin Port
Kate Russell
Steve Donovan
Emrys Kirby
Louise Limb
Ros Woodham
Michelle Toner
Clare Westbrook
Vicky Turner
Ian Clegg
Editor John has owned leafsprung Land Rovers continuously
since 1985 and now has a small
collection that covers Series One,
IIA and III models
Art editor Steve is deeply
immersed in all things fifties so
needed little encouragement to
work on CLR beyond a sunny
greenlaning weekend in Wales
Michelle is new to the CLR team.
With a wealth of advertising
experience, she is the perfect
addition to deal with our advertisers
and their specific needs
Photographer Garry Stuart has
been photographing Land Rovers,
and plenty of other things with
engines, for decades and is the
owner of a Series III 88in
Knowledgeable contributor Emrys
has his own collection of Land
Rovers and is immersed in the club
scene which makes him an ideal
member of the team
Writer Clare has been using
Nellie, her Series IIA 88in with a
200Tdi engine, as daily transport
for the past decade and has now
bought two classic Range Rovers
Copies of Classic Land Rover can be obtained
each month by placing a standing order with
your newsagent.
Editor: John Carroll
Art Editor: Steve Donovan
Design: Ros Woodham
Additional Contributors: Tony Sinclair,
Andrew Sinclair, Jim Willett, Nick Dimbleby,
John Bowden, Richard Johnson, Dave Marsh
Advertising Manager: Michelle Toner
Advertising Production: Kay Townsin
Production Manager: Janet Watkins
Group Marketing Manager: Martin Steele
Commercial Director: Ann Saundry
Executive Chairman: Richard Cox
Managing Director & Publisher: Adrian Cox
www.classiclandrover.com
Subscriptions
Please refer to main advertisement
within the magazine. All applications
stating name, address, date to commence
and remittance to:
Subscriptions Department,
Classic Land Rover,
Key Publishing Ltd, P0 Box 300,
Stamford, Lincolnshire, PE9 1NA, UK.
Telephone: +44 (0) 1780 480404
Fax: +44 (0) 1780 757812
E-Mail: subs@keypublishing.com
Readers in USA may place subscriptions
by telephone toll-free 800-676-4049 or
by writing to Classic Land Rover, 3330
Pacific Ave, Ste 500, Virginia Beach,
VA23451-9828.
Regular contributor Martin
Port is the art editor of Classic
and Sports Car magazine and
owner of a former Trans-Africa
expedition Series II 88in
Louise is well known around
the club scene as an illustrator,
photographer and writer
and you'll frequently see her
scribbling away at events
Vicky Turner is the latest
addition to the CLR team
as the magazine's Editorial
Assistant. She's the owner of a
88in IIA Searle Safari Sleeper
Classic Land Rover (ISSN 2052 2258) is
published monthly by Key Publishing Ltd
and distributed in the USA by Mail Right
Int., 1637 Stelton Road B4, Piscataway,
NJ 08854.
Postmaster: Send address corrections to
Classic Land Rover, Key Publishing Ltd, c/o
Mail Right International Inc. 1637 Stelton
Road B4, Piscataway NJ 08854.
The Editor is happy to receive contributions
to Classic Land Rover. All items submitted
for publication are subject to our terms and
conditions, which are regularly updated
without prior notice and are freely available
from Key Publishing Ltd or downloadable
from www.keypublishing.com.
The entire content of Classic Land Rover
is a copyright of Key Publishing Ltd and
cannot be reproduced in any form without
permission.
Kate, who now owns a 109in
Series IIA camper, does the subediting and a lot of the behindthe-scenes work on Classic Land
Rover magazine
Contributor Ros now has two
Land Rover Santana classics,
enjoys overland travel and takes
great pictures, so she's most
definitely one of us
Photographer and designer Ian
Clegg is gradually sorting through
the files of his 1980s B&W
negatives for the regular and
nostalgic Memory Lane feature
We are unable to guarantee the bona fides of
any of our advertisers. Readers are strongly
recommended to take their own precautions
before parting with any information or
item of value, including, but not limited
to, money, manuscripts, photographs or
personal information in response to any
advertisements within this publication.
Printed in England by Warners (Midlands)
plc, Bourne, Lincolnshire.
Distributed by Seymour Distribution Ltd,
Tel: +44 (0)20 7429 4000
Key Publishing Ltd,
PO Box 100, Stamford,
Lincolnshire, PE9 1XQ, UK.
Telephone: +44 (0)1780 755131
Fax: +44 (0)1780 757261
Subscription: subs@keypublishing.com
Website: www.keypublishing.com
JUNE 2017
3
XX XXXXX XX
XXX XXXXX XXX XX
21 LAND ROVERS IN THIS ISSUE 1948-1994
TRUE HUE
Second surviving HUEregistered 1948 80in
100%
SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE!
ISSUE 49 JUNE 2017
Make great savings when you subscribe to Classic Land
Rover today. See inside this issue for special offers
LAND ROVERS
XX XXXXX XX
CLAS
SIC
ISSUE NO 46
�40
LIFE WITH OLD LAND
THE WORLD'S BEST SELLING CLASSIC LAND ROVER MAGAZINE
Let's
THE WORLD'S BEST SELLING
SSIC
SCOTTISH
SERIES IIIs
ISSUE NO 47
�40
? Teuchter Wagon
?Teuchter
? Paratrooper?s 88in
CLAS
COI SIC
LER
CLASSIC LAND ROVER
MAGAZINE
SERIOUS ONES
One family, two
generations,
three Land
Rovers
1965 and 1971 88ins
www.classiclandrover.c
om
LAND ROVER
CLUB HISTORY
Vintage trials and a
50th birthday
OFF-ROAD TEST
? By the time
Heap was being
finished, younger
brother Nick also
had a developing
Land Rover
addiction"
NEIGHBOURS?
SERIES IIAS
Discovery 1 driven at
Eastnor
ABANDONED
PROJECT
Hybrid Lightweight
SAND ROVERS Range
Rover LSE The 4x4 that led the way
Restored
March 2017
�40
CLAS
COIL SIC
ER
TECH AND TOOLBOX
Dune Bashing in Dubai
? Dynamat Xtreme soundproofing
? Old-school trailer tech
? Painting the Lightweight Blue
JAN 2017 �40
ACCURATELY
RESTORED Pre Production Land
8 FROM A LAND DOWN-UNDER
CROSSING
THE CONGO
To the edge of civilisation
in a 1986 Ninety
Bob Ives? 109in Series III tray-back transported from
Australia to Hampshire
28 BIRMABRIGHT AND BRASS
Brass band musician Mark Sidwell on his cornet, and his
Series IIA 88in
32 RETURN OF THE NATIVES
A classic car dealer in the UK reunites three sequential
chassis number Series Ones, sent out to Canada in 1957
36 WHAT?S THAT COMING OVER THE
HILL?
Michael Bruce talks off-road motorsport, the Hillrally
Championship and about his Series One called ?Nessie?
Rover R23
JOURNEYS
44 A ROAD LESS
TRAVELLED
Toby Savage takes his 1948 Land
Roverfrom Leicester to Helmsley,
sticking to back roads and 45 mph
56 ICELANDIC
DISCOVERY
Vicky Turner and her family
travel parts of Iceland in a
1997 automatic Discovery 1
�
Garry Stuart visits Lode Lane facility and the new Range
Rover exhibition to mark 50 years of production
52 THE SOUND OF THE SUBURBS
Having neglected the vehicles of his youth, Jolyon Ryall
is trying to make amends with this 1976 Series III
60 A LIFETIME OF ADVENTURE
Barbara Toy and her 1950 80in inspired decades of
exploration. Emrys Kirby meets the Series One
68 EARLY RETIREMENT
Thom Moran?s daily worker, a 1971 Series III 109in
Military GS, retires in New Mexico
80IN FLAT SCREEN
John Carroll?s 80in trialler evolves into a less specialised
Land Rover with the removal of its roll cage
75 TEENAGE TYRO
Clare Westbrook?s daughter takes part in her first ever
trial ? and does rather well
92 SOUTH AFRICAN SERIES
Jeff Gaisford of KwaZulu ? Natal has a beautiful 1959
Series II Station Wagon with an interesting history
44
TECH AND TOOLBOX
78 ROLL CAGE RETROFIT
80 HIT THE ROOF
68
82 HOT SPRINGS
Adrian Cox?s One Ten Station Wagon
gets some roll-over protection
80
4
JUNE 2017
Putting the hard-top roof on a Series
II or III Land Rover? Here are a few
dodges to ensure that the new roof fits
well and keeps the rain out
Clare Westbrook visits Jones Springs
of Darlaston to see how Land Rover
leaf springs are made
April 2017
�40
TECH AND TOOLBOX
80in: Winter Engine Rebuild
Series III: Fuel tank outriggers
One Ten: Door tops overhauled
40 THE RANGE ROVER STORY
73
REPAIRS AND EVENTS
FACTORY FRESH
Range Rover Reborn in Solihull
100
www.classiclandrover.com
CLA %
Driving tuition from one of Land
Rover?s original Exhibition Team
Off-Road
XXX XXXXX XXX XX
ROVERS: JOURNEYS, RESTORATIONS,
82
www.classiclandrover.com
JAN 2017 �40
CONTENTS
WWW.CLASSICLANDROVER.COM
REGULARS
14 NEWS
50 CENTRESPREAD
21 BEHIND THE WHEEL
66 VINTAGE ESSENTIALS - MAPS
This month?s readers' input, products, news and dogs
Martin Port tries hard not to be too ?precious? about his LR
23 EVENTS CALENDAR
Your guide to Land Rover events near and far
26 BRAVING IT AT BROTHERTON
Yorkshire Land Rover Owners Club kicked off its trials
season with an RTV near Pontefract
www.classiclandrover.com
A Rover press picture of a 1966 109in Series IIA hard-top
John Carroll?s enthusiasm for old road maps can be traced
back to his childhood
98 LOOKING BACK
1971: The Major?s Trial at
the Eastnor estate
5
Paddock LHP.indd 1
06/12/2016 15:39
Paddock Spares.indd 1
06/12/2016 15:45
SERIES III
From a land
Down Under
Bob Ives? Series III tray-back has been transported from the
farmlands of Australia to the leafy lanes of Hampshire
WORDS AND PICTURES MARTIN PORT
I
t is not unusual to kick off a piece
in this magazine by clarifying that a
featured owner is ?no stranger to Land
Rovers?, but in this instance that would
perhaps be stating the obvious. For Bob
Ives, and his brother Joe, are the only
Britons to have won the Camel Trophy
endurance event. In 1989 Bob took part in
the selections for a third time, and it was on
this occasion that he was paired with Joe,
resulting in a team that led from the start
8
JUNE 2017
of the 1,062-mile route, beating competitors
from 13 other countries and securing their
place in motorsport history.
But Bob?s relationship with Land Rovers
goes back even further when, in 1983, he
bought his first: a late Series IIA. When you
look around the family farm in Hampshire,
it?s easy to see that there is very little
ambiguity when it comes to whether or not
Bob is a Land Rover enthusiast.
A 1970 IIA, that is a virtual twin for his
first, takes pride of place, although by his
own admittance the 88in that he rescued
locally is getting to the stage where it
would perhaps benefit from some chassis
work. The barn space is shared with a IIA
One Ton awaiting restoration and there are
no fewer than five Discoverys ? three of
which are on the road.
However, it is something a little different
that we have come to see: a 1975 Series III
tray-back that Bob imported from Australia
www.classiclandrover.com
?The authorities
granted the Series
III an age-related
registration number?
Former Camel Trophy
winner, Bob Ives is
pleased with his latest
Land Rover; INSET:
This brochure shows
a similar offering on
the Australian market
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017
9
SERIES III
just last year.
?My son, Dan, had been working out there
for nine months and everyone on the farm
had Holdens,? Bob explains. ?He bought one
for himself and decided when he returned to
the UK that the Holden was coming too.?
Dan?s 1974 V8 Holden HQ needed to go
into a shipping container and with only a few
hundred pounds difference between the cost
of a 20ft and 40ft unit, it made sense to go
for the larger and fill it with something else.
?I quite liked the look of the Series One
pick-up that I?d seen recently and so
idly typed Land Rover pick-up into Ebay
Australia and it brought up this,? Bob says
gesturing towards the faintly mustardcoloured Series III.
At first, the seller didn?t reply to Bob?s
email enquiries thinking that it was some
kind of scam, but eventually the pair got
in touch and with the seller realising that
Bob was a genuine potential buyer, he
agreed to let a friend of Bob?s go and give
the 109in a look over.
The seller was advertising the Land Rover
on behalf of his uncle, and although he
could tell Bob very little of its history, he
was satisfied enough to secure the Series III
and begin to arrange shipping.
TOP: At
some point in its past, this particular
Series III has been fitted with a larger fuel tank;
RIGHT: Interior is as standard with the exception
of the outer seat brown re-trim which Bob has
no intention of changing!
To make matters simple, the seller (who
just happened to have a transportation
business), agreed to deliver the tray-back
to nearby Melbourne docks for $100AUD
and it was loaded onto the container
bound for the UK.
?The process was really quite simple,?
explains Bob. ?I let Kingstown Shipping
do it all and it cost us about �800 per
vehicle, although we were lucky as the
import duty on both were negligible as they
With all drop-sides removed the ?tray-back? is instantly transformed
into a flatbed.
RIGHT: (Top
to bottom) Leyland badge piggy-backs the more familiar
Land Rover plastic grille; Rims are stamped ROK Australia ? Rubery
Owen and Kelmsley being the company that made them; Simple
Land Rover badge does away with any geographical reference;
Compliance plate on the radiator mount panel identifies this 109in
as an Australian-assembled vehicle
10
JUNE 2017
www.classiclandrover.com
were granted historic status.?
So after approximately six weeks the
Holden and Land Rover were collected
from Southampton docks and there began
the process of getting them registered with
the DVLA. After some to-ing and fro-ing
of paperwork and a letter from Land Rover
confirming that it was dispatched for local
assembly at the Pressed Metal Corporation
(PMC) Factory, Enfield, New South Wales in
May 1975, the authorities granted the Series
III an age-related registration number, but not
before Bob had put it through an MoT at a
local test centre.
?It practically sailed straight through,?
smiles Bob. ?We had to change the bushes
for the dampers, but that was about it.?
That meant Bob could finally take the Land
Rover for its maiden voyage on Hampshire?s
roads and fortunately it didn?t throw up
ABOVE: Window
?All three sides are easily removable
or fold down out of the way?
www.classiclandrover.com
sticker in the truck cab shouts
Aussie patriotism; BELOW: Hampshire may be a
far cry from Australia, but the ?tray-back? Series
III looks resplendent in the spring sunshine
JUNE 2017
9
SERIES III
any nasty surprises, starting straight up and
driving very nicely ? only an occasional
tendency to pop out of third gear being of
minor concern.
The tray-back option was something
offered by Leyland Australia on the Series
IIIs, with steel and aluminium alternatives:
the one on Bob?s vehicle is steel and
fortunately has held up rather nicely.
With just 80,000km showing on the
odometer, the straight six 2,625cc engine
feels very fresh ? Bob admits that he?s not
even changed the oil yet, and although it
has an incredible smoothness and gentle
torque about it, it is somewhat lacking in
overall grunt and seems very ?considered?.
That said, on the road it is very tractable ?
pulling out of corners still in third gear and
providing quite a relaxed drive as it picks
up a bit of speed.
You may think that this would be the
perfect vehicle to have around a farm: all
three sides are easily removable or fold down
out of the way, but Bob has plenty of other
hardy options on hand and so for now is
planning only to use it for a little light work
and for taking to a few Land Rover shows.
There is talk of changing the axles to
improve the gearing a little, but whatever
Bob changes, the original parts will be kept
so that it can be put back to standard at
the drop of a hat.
?I?d like to find out some more details with
regard to its past,? admits Bob. ?What it?s
done, where it?s been, but I think it?s a lovely
example that really doesn?t need anything
doing to it ? just a wipe with an oily rag!?
In a brief moment where the early spring
sun comes out in full force and dares
to push the temperatures up, last year?s
browning grass and the distant hills help to
briefly put this tray-back back in Australia?s
farmlands, but for now it is staying in
Hampshire, unless Bob admits, he gets a
very good offer!
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Bob shows how easy it is to remove the tray sides in order to turn it into a
flatbed ?truck?; All corners have a swing latch that allows the sides to be swung down from the hinges
on the lower edges; 2,625cc six-cylinder has done around 80,000km and sounds in fine fettle, pulling
like a dream around the farm; Leyland identification plate is mounted on the bulkhead.
a
Bob?s new acquisition
makes itself useful with
some light duties around
the farm?s fields
8
JUNE 2017
?The barn space
is shared with a IIA
One Ton awaiting
restoration?
www.classiclandrover.com
www.classiclandrover.com
P013_CLR_JUN17_ad.indd 1
JUNE 2017 13
11/04/2017 10:53
NEWS & VIEWS
Plenty of muddy water to be found during the Inter-Club RTV Challenge at Mannington
Rain aids play
No fewer than 32 drivers competed in Dorset Land
Rover Club?s Inter-Club trials competition for Road
Taxed Vehicles at Mannington on February 26, making
it the biggest in the event?s four year history. Hants &
Berks Rover Owners Club, the Somerset & Wilts LRC
and of course the Dorset Land Rover Club were all well
represented.
Recent heavy rain, combined with the very varied
terrain at the Mannington site meant that there was
plenty of water and mud to contend with. There were
vehicles ranging from very original Series One, II and
III leaf-sprung vehicles, through to rather more modern
Land Rovers, including those modified for this sort of
event in line with ALRC regulations, and even included
a representative of
the newly recognised Q class.
Alan Braclik,
representing Hants
& Berks LROC, won
the standard class.
Driving an immaculately prepared
Ninety, Alan picked
up only 12 penalty
points with eight of
the 12 challenging
sections clear. Alex
Moore of Somerset
Rob Shadbolt (DLRC) competing in the LeafSprung
& Wilts LROC won
class at the Inter-Club RTV event at Mannington
the modified class,
for the second
year in a row and
recorded only four penalty points in total. Top DLRC driver was Trevor
Harmer who came third in the LWB standard class with 29 points while
the best placed leafer was driven by Russell Smith of Hants and Berks
who finished on 27 points.
14 JUNE 2017
Russell Smith (H&BLROC) competing in the InterClub
Challenge at Mannington, where he won the Leaf-Sprung Class
Alex Moore (S&WLRC) competing in the Inter-Club
Challenge at Mannington, where he won the Modified Class
NEWS & VIEWS
Barry Redman
obituary
In April, the Land Rover world
lost another of the good guys
and a real character, Barry Redman. Like many, he stumbled
into the 4x4 world by accident
after buying a Series One Land
Rover to use as a recovery truck
in connection with his business
as a self-employed motor mechanic. Before long, he?d been
to an AWDC trial, joined the club and was trialling at weekends. As
a former stock car racer, he decided that he needed more power
and was among the first to fit a Rover V8 to his Series One, known
as Thumper, in which he went on to win the AWDC trials championship in the 1980s.
Barry?s interests extended beyond Land Rovers into military vehicles and classic Jeeps and, as well as the V8 Series One, he had the
coolest CJ-2A Jeep imaginable. The torque reaction of its Chevy V8
made it change lanes when given a foot full.
I?m proud to say I knew Barry well; in the 1980s, we got talking at a 4x4 event, had a few beers and a friendship started. We
went to Normandy a few times and to European trials and Jeepers
Jamborees. We talked about Series Ones, we laughed about muddy
predicaments, we toasted brave men in Arromanches and we did
some AWDC trials together. I could go on but suffice to say our
world will be poorer for the loss of Barry. I am far from alone in
thinking this, many of the ?names? from the AWDC of years ago are
also mourning his passing. Just one of many - posted on Facebook
- came from Andy Sergeant: ?What very sad news, he will be missed
by very many people, so many of us go back many, many years in
the AWDC and I have very fond memories of Barry and Thumper.?
Barry leaves a daughter, Sophie (pictured), wife Lynsey and three
step-children. JC
Desperately
seeking
I am desperately trying to trace
a blue and white Series III with
the plate FBX 290W. I believe
it?s in the motor trade awaiting
sale or restoration and belonged
to my late father. Even if it?s
broken for parts I could declare
it SORN and adopt the plate.
I would dearly love to trace it
and ideally restore it
Rob Johnson
07771 928392
Please send in your news and letters for inclusion on
these pages. It may be a new product you?re retailing
for the first time; a show you?re organising; a piece of
research you?re aware of; a special Land Rover you own
or know of; in fact, anything at all you feel may be of
interest to our readers.
Please email vicky.turner@keypublishing.com
www.classiclandrover.com
Land Rover Dog of the
Month
More applications for the most exclusive club in motoring?
To enter, send us a photo of your dog and your
classic Land Rover and a few words about both to
news@classiclandrover.com.
Bernard
Bernard the French bulldog
sits on our 1979 cherry picker
that is being prepared for a trip
to the south of France to help
do some restoration work on a
holiday home.
Daisy Roberts,Wolverhampton
Sassy
Sassy our lurcher, waiting to be
served at a burger van in our
1975 half tonne. I was lucky to
catch her awake, truthfully.
Will Harris,
Woodchester
Dougal
Dougal is a Jack Russell rescue
dog, about five years old. He
loves travelling in all Land
Rovers and watching me work
on them. He is particularly
gifted at doing ?nose art? on the
windscreen. The fire truck is a
1950 80in, ex-Derbyshire fire
service, mine since 2003.
Emrys Kirby, Lancashire
Darcy
This is Darcy, my seven-yearold rescue staffy, singing and
howling with delight in the back
of my 1975 Series III. She
knows it?s somewhere different
for a walk when the Land Rover
is used.
Michael Seeds, Biggar,
South Lanarkshire.
Amanda
Not my dog, but a fine and
well-behaved Great Pyrenees
called Amanda, watching my
Forward Control, a 1970 IIB
which gets used every summer.
Christian Moe, Troms�,
Norway
Bracken
Bracken loves reading Classic
Land Rover Magazine; even
when he needs a power nap,
he makes sure no one else can
read it first.
Sue Milligan, Lancashire
JUNE 2017 15
NEWS & VIEWS
With more space at Kelmarsh for
the Original Land Rover Show on
July 21-23, Live Promotions are
planning bigger and better arena
displays and expect to have more
spacious areas for club displays,
camping and trade stands.
More than 50 exhibitors have
confirmed their attendance including Flatdog UK, Duckworth Parts,
Bell Autos, Alive Tuning, Goodwinch,
Maverick 4x4, RAC Parts, 1948
Original Equipment, Raptor 4x4 and
Griffin Performance as well as the
usual auto jumble stands.
There will be two distinct areas,
a woodland safari drive featuring
small camel humps, axel twister
and side slopes that leads into the
adventure section which incorporates drops, climbs, technical
sections and other opportunities to
test off-road skills.
Classic Land Rover magazine has
a stand in the middle of the event so
feel free to come and meet the team.
Off-road at
Kelmarsh
Stranger
than fiction
Since my recent retirement I decided to try and fulfill a long-term ambition, to write a story for the young at heart about a Series One Land
Rover, called ?Charlie? complete with illustrations, as I like to draw.
I wanted some reference pictures of Series One Land Rovers so I
looked at the latest array of Land Rover magazines and picked yours
because it had just what I required; lots of amazing pictures of Series
One Land Rovers in various positions and situations.
My story is about a new Land Rover just out of the factory in Solihull
in 1958 (a Series One, 86in because I used to own one) and in his first
encounter ?Charlie? meets and falls for a limousine called ?Geraldine?.
Looking through your magazine, I got a bit of a shock when I
reached page 14, and saw your ad for Stalking ?Geraldine? written
by someone with the same name as me (Ray Wood). I emailed Ray
Wood, explaining the situation, and he was good enough to answer
me and send me pictures of his Land Rovers.
He stated that his real name is Robert Arthur Ray Wood, but his
father called him ?Little Ray? and the name had stuck. Now my full
name is ?Raymond Arthur Wood? so there is yet another connection
in the name ?Arthur?.
Rob/Ray lives in West Vancouver Canada and as well as being an author
he runs a company that makes ?overdrive? units for Land Rovers called
?Roamerdrive? as advertised at the bottom of page 25 in your mag.
Anyway thanks for the magazine, super pictures and for the
bizarre circumstances, which lead to the meeting of my namesake
from the other side of the world.
Ray Wood, Wakefield.
16 JUNE 2017
Series III in
snowy Scotland
This is my 2,286cc diesel Series III, christened Old Smokey
by my wife, which I bought
from Nairn near Inverness two
years ago
It was in a poor state but
being a mechanic by trade I
soon had it ready for the MoT.
Since then I have replaced
all the springs, rewired it, re
sheeted the rear door and
started painting the body panels. I?ve also sheeted inside
the rear and replaced the body
crossmembers. Call it a work
in progress!
I use it every Saturday
either to go to work or just to
run around and keep the cobwebs of it and I travel to Land
Rover Shows when I can.
Alex Cunningham
Alex Cunningham?s Series III on snowy
day in Scotland a few weeks ago, reminding us that it isn?t so long since winter.
After having a bit of TLC, here is Old
Smokey pulling a truck and trailer
into the works? yard.
www.classiclandrover.com
www.classiclandrover.com
P017_CLR_JUN17_ad.indd 1
JUNE 2017 17
11/04/2017 10:57
Exclusive to the UK, red Wild Mats for vehicle recovery in soft sand, slippy mud
and snow. Light and easy to store. Only � per pair.
Krazy Beaver ? Super Shovel, made in the USA and brought to you exclusively by Matt Savage. This is a full size shovel that means business.
The sharp reinforced teeth are perfect for hacking through frozen snow,
compact clay and anything that gets in your way! Measuring 40 inches tall
and with a shovel head that?s nearly 9 inches wide and made from heat
treated heavy duty 13 gauge steel this shovel is STRONG! Lightweight handle, decent sized D grip which can be used with gloves on, and altogether
a great piece of kit to carry on your off road adventures. �.
Here at Matt Savage 4x4 we are the UK dealer for Viair 12 volt compressors. We stock the full range of Viair products including
portable compressors, on board air systems and individual parts such as pressure switches and tanks. Take a look at our Viair
website that is dedicated to Viair compressors only, www.viair.co.uk
85P Portable Compressor Kit �.36
High Speed 2on2 Compressor kit
�9.93
Extreme Duty On Board Kit �5.64
We also sell CTIS kits by SYEGON. This
enables you to in?ate and de?ate your
tyres whilst driving! This is great for soft
sand, or if your load changes a lot (tractors
or lorries) to prevent tyre wear due to tyre
over/under in?ation. This is used a lot for
the Dakar race and similar things.
400P Portable Compressor kit
�5.64
1.5 Gallon Air Source Kit
�7.08
Matt Savage 4x4 based in Derbyshire. We specialise in Land Rover service and repair as well as overland preparation and vehicle rebuilds. We have a fully equipped workshop with two ramps and vehicle diagnostic equipment.
Please call us on 01629 735555 or email sales@mattsavage.com
WWW.MATTSAVAGE.COM
Matt Savage 4x4, Unit 3 Unity Complex, Dale Road North, Darley Dale, Derbyshire, DE4 2HX tel 01629 735555
Matt Savage F_P.indd 1
07/09/2016 11:42
NEWS & VIEWS
Landy inspires World
Book Day costume
Airfreight
letter to
the editor
In March this year many primary
schools around the UK celebrated
World Book Day with children
encouraged to bring in their favourite book and dress up as their
favourite character. For Eddie,
there was no doubt as to which
character he would choose. It had
to be Landy the Series One from
Veronica Lamond?s much loved
Landy and Fender books. Eddie
has all of the Landy and Fender
books and he has read and reread
them all many times as their wellthumbed condition shows.
With a bit of help from his mum
and dad, Eddie set about making
the cardboard Landy which he
painted himself in Sage Green
rather than Bronze Green as that
was the only paint close to hand.
He got a wave and a toot of the
horn from a Land Rover driver as
he walked to school wearing his
Landy outfit.
Eddie?s photo was published on
FaceBook?s Series Land Rover
Group and racked up more than
500 likes in one day. His picture
was also shared on veronicalamond.com and her Landybooks
Facebook page. We think grandpa
might have had something to do
with Eddie?s love of Land Rovers,
as Eddie is the grandson of CLR
photographer Garry Stuart.
Series eBay challenger
Online auction site eBay has unveiled the three classic restoration projects that will take part in eBay Car
Challenge 2017, one of which is a 1964 Series IIA Land Rover. All three vehicles will be allocated a budget
of �000 to spend on parts and accessories from eBay and the work must be completed by the deadline
of July 10.
The Land Rover, ?Bertha? to her owner Dan Goude, spent seven
years serving as a 24volt fitted for radio truck in the British Army
before being de-mobbed in 1971 and given civilian plates. Dan
bought it two decades later as his first car as an 18-year-old but,
following a number of setbacks and false starts over the years,
Bertha sat unused in his garage for more than 20 years. The plan
was to dust it off in time for Dan?s 40th last year, but alas the
party excitement was too much for Bertha and a blown head-gasket landed it back in disuse. Finally though, with eBay?s help, Dan
might finally be able to realise his teenage dream.
Dan says ?To start with, I?m going to strip down the engine and
overhaul it, including fixing a problem with the battery charging. The fuel tank is shot, it?s rusty and it leaks, so that?s coming out. I?ll be sprucing up the bodywork, replacing the dented
and cracked panels and giving it a fresh paint job in bronze
green. I also aim to fit a new canvas top, some new back seats
and seat belts for the kids, and some original period features
like original military spec bumperettes for the front and the
same for the crossmember at the rear.?
Find out more at www.ebay.co.uk/carchallenge
www.classiclandrover.com
Not totally sure about the
location of the photo page 54,
in CLR 48, of LNX403 being
loaded into a Silver City air
freighter.
I think it?s the original Birmingham
Airport, a mile or so north of Lode
LaneratherthanSouthendAirport.
The man this side of the ramp,
with his back to the camera, is
Arthur Goddard, the Land Rover
project engineer. When he was
back in the UK in 2010, we visited (with the help of Mike Bishop
and Alex Massey) many of the
important locations in the Land
Rover story, including the old terminal buildings at Birmingham.
I interviewed Arthur on camera, and he said: ?We used to fly
Land Rovers overseas from here,
mainly for army testing - we
used to hire a Bristol Freighter.
And we flew from here to Caracas Airport, outside Madrid,
and of course we had to fly over
the mountains to get to Madrid.
And I tell you, you don?t know
what cold is until you?re in the
back of a Bristol Freighter!?
I don?t believe that Rover
would have used Southend,
when Birmingham was just
up the road, and I?m sure that
Arthur would have remembered
if they had. You can see the
whole interview, with Arthur?s
memories of the other iconic locations, and debunking of many
of the LandRover myths, on the
?Stop Gap? DVD. www.teeafit.
co.uk/dvdsales.htm
Graeme Aldous,
Teafit Sound and Vision,
Yorkshire.
JUNE 2017 19
20 JUNE 2017
P020_CLR_JUN17_ad.indd 1
www.classiclandrover.com
11/04/2017 11:02
BEHIND THE WHEEL
Rivet-counting
Martin Port is trying very hard not to fall into the
trap of becoming too ?precious? about his Land Rover
WORDS MARTIN PORT ILLUSTRATION LOUISE LIMB
I
?ve written before about how I first
came to the point of buying a Land
Rover: I?d been enjoying the trappings
of Porsche ownership with a late 1960s
Crystal Blue 912 bought cheaply at auction
(something you should never do), and after
a few wonderful years it all came crashing
down around my ears with the realisation
that it was completely and utterly
structurally rotten.
Of course, everything else I considered
as a replacement ran the risk of obvious
comparison and therefore would fall short
of the expectations left by the 912. And so
I went for the other end of the spectrum
and bought a 1969 88in Series IIA.
At the time I recall being relieved. Why?
Well because the pressures of Porsche
ownership had started to get on top of me.
If you had the wrong weave of carpet in the
footwells, some owners looked down at you.
If you hadn?t had the tinware in the engine
bay powder-coated in the correct black then
you ran the risk of being shunned at pub
meets and God help you if you dared dabble
with a power-plant other than what was
meant to be under the bonnet.
Of course, I?m over-dramatising things.
It wasn?t quite that bad, but at the time I
put myself under a fair bit of pressure to
do things ?properly? and use only the most
expensive ?right? or original parts and
finishes as dictated by others. As a result, I
committed far more financial outlay than I
should have and suffered as a result.
I bought a Land Rover because I was
under the impression that I could fix it
with a hammer and paint it with a brush,
and to a certain extent I was absolutely
right to start with. Instead of paying
�000 for a set of pistons for the Porsche
engine, I could suddenly buy a set for the
www.classiclandrover.com
Land Rover for around a tenth of that, and
the cost of most parts followed suit.
More importantly however, I felt free
from the pressures of doing things to
standards set by someone else. Instead of
sleepless nights worrying about the state
of the bubbling paintwork on the wings of
the Porsche, I revelled in the fact that the
Birmabright was clearly visible in places
where the mid-grey finish on the Land
Rover had worn away. If something fell
off, then I grabbed my rivet gun or a nut
and bolt of some description and put it
back on again without concerning myself
as to whether it was the correct 10mm
fixing. Happy days.
However, the past few years have seen the
humble Series Land Rover climb the social
ladder. Heritage as a marketable tool has
helped this, and although there have, for
decades, been specialists within our field
who have been rebuilding and restoring
vehicles to a factory-correct and extremely
?I am now finding
myself on odd
occasions being ever
so slightly critical
when I see something
non-standard in a
Series vehicle?
high standard, discussions about the right
sort of rivets, bolts, finishes and datecorrect parts has arguably never been more
apparent on the forums and at shows.
As a result, I am now finding myself
on odd occasions being ever so slightly
critical when I see something non-standard
in a Series vehicle and with the purchase
of my latest 1959 example have already
got caught up with putting original and
?correct? bits on it.
Of course, I?m trying very hard to temper
that approach: it needed a new switch for
the (non-standard) windscreen washer
pump, but instead of ripping it all out
or replacing it with an original option
manual pump switch, I dug out a 1950s
switch that had been fitted to an old AC
tourer ? non-original, not correct and
still a compromise of sorts, but it looked
suitable and, importantly worked.
I?ve never been one for hugely-modified
classics and so although I completely
understand the practicality behind popping
a Tdi under the bonnet of a Land Rover
(and I take my hat off to those that do),
or bolt some nice comfy saloon car seats
up front, it?s something I?m probably not
going to emulate. But the last thing I want
to do is get too precious about my own
Land Rover in case it gets in the way of
my actual enjoyment. I love the fact that
you can still go and walk along a line
of Series vehicles and each one will be
different because the owners have tailored
them to their own needs and budgets
rather than them all having been restored
to an identical finish. Even Land Rover
themselves vowed to retain some of the
variants and oddities found when preparing
Series Ones for the Reborn programme.
So I?m reining myself back in again and
not allowing myself to get too caught up
in the correctness of refurbishing my own
Series II. After all, if I bought a Land Rover
because of the pressures of Porsche
ownership, then where do I
go from here if it all gets too
much?
a
JUNE 2017 21
GlobalRoamer_FP.indd 1
19/04/2017 09:47
Events
Start to mark your diary for 2017
with our at-a-glance guide
June
3-4
Malvern Land Rover Show & 4x4
Spares weekend
Three Counties Showground, Malvern, WR13 6NW
Club and vehicle displays, indoor and outdoor trade and
auto-jumble, arena plus challenge trucks.
Weekend camping from �, bar and food court.
www.4x4sparesday.co.uk
10
The Patina National
Hosted by Classic Land Rover, for non-shiny, road legal,
leaf-sprung 80, 86 and 88in Land Rovers.� Door tops
not required, but hood sticks and windscreens required.
Drivers must be in an MSA-registered club and bring
their membership card. � entry per driver. Camping on
site and nearby, Catlow Quarry, Lancashire.
www.facebook.com/events/233139490440896
lpmc
l
c
p
b
Land Rover Only Event
CLR coverage
Beer Tent
Somerset and Wiltshire Land Rover Club
www.somersetandwiltshirelrc.co.uk
ltim
23-25
LRSOC Rally
Wicklow, Ireland
www.lrsoc.com
(club members? event)
ltibp
24-25
Flywheel 2017
Bicester Heritage, Oxon
Third annual event celebrating classic winged and
wheeled vehicles
www.flywheelfestival.com
24-25
Steam on Rutland Water
10-11
All 134 of their Land Rovers out on display at once.
June 29-July 2
www.dunsfoldcollection.co.uk
11
Camping Weekend
Goosemoor, Somerset
www.classiclandrover.com
Leafers Meeting
Motorsport
t
Camping
i
Points of interest
Prizes
Empingham, LE15 8PX. This event attracts a mix of
Series One, II and III, as well as steam engines, boats,
vintage tractors and classic cars.
www.anglianwater.co.uk
Dunsfold Collection Open Weekend
m
Herkenrodehoeve, Opheers, Belgium. Camping, laning
and food
http://leafers.fr.yuku.com or see www.facebook.com/
events/1852979951646583/
�
July
2
Doncaster Classic Car and Bike show
Doncaster racecourse, DN2 6AY
www.doncasterclassiccarshow.org.uk
7-9
Mendip Challenge
RTV and CCV trialsLambs Lair, Somerset
Somerset and Wiltshire Land Rover Club
www.somersetandwiltshirelrc.co.uk
lmp
7-10
Swiss Series meet ?Les Series
en Helvetie?
Biere, 50km from Geneva. Camping with 4x4 course and
Food and drink facilities nearby
For information and registration, www.series-helvetie.ch
ltbc
15-16
Parson Drove Custom and Classic Car
Show and Shine
Camping from July 14, beer fest and live music. Wisbech,
Cambridgeshire, PE13 4LA
www.customcarbikeandtrikeshow.co.uk
tb
JUNE 2017 23
10
Kent Classic Car Show,
Aylesford Priory
www.kentsclassiccarshow.co.uk�
16-17
LRO Show
Peterborough Show Ground
www.lroshow.com
�
October
1
Newbury 4x4 & Vintage Spares Day
Newbury Showground, Chieveley, Berkshire, RG18 9QZ
Largest Land Rover autoj-umble in Europe plus added
vintage auto-jumble, more than 700 plots
Adm �50. 10am?2pm
www.4x4sparesday.co.uk
8
16
Torbay Motor Show, Paignton Green,
Devon
21-23
Kelmarsh The Original Land
Rover Show
Kelmarsh Hall, Northamptonshire
www.kelmarshlandrovershow.com
ltpb
21-23
Weird Dale
Cumbria Classic Land Rovers
Lanes, beer, campfire and weird dale banter
Haggs Bank Bunkhouse, Nenthead, Cumbria (haggsbank.
com)
Search Facebook for weird dale 2017 Camping Weekend
ltbc
28-30
Billing Off-Road Show
The Billing Off-Road Experience
Billing, NN7 1AL
www.thebillingoffroadexperience.co.uk
ltbp
25-29
War and Peace Show
Folkestone Racecourse, Hythe, Kent
www.warandpeacerevival.com
pibt
�
August
10-13
Series 2 Club International Rally
Hole Park, Kent, TN17 4JA
Open to members and non-members alike with discounted
membership being offered at the weekend. www.
series2club.co.uk
Somerset and Wiltshire Land Rover Club
www.somersetandwiltshirelrc.co.uk
18-20
French Series Club, ?Le Bal des Series?
Village of Creon d?Armagnac
www.le-temps-des-series.com
25-28
Leafers at t?Pit
Leaf Sprung Land Rover gathering
National Mining Museum, Wakefield, West Yorkshire
www.seriouslyseries.co.uk
15
Classic Land Rover Day
Amberley Museum, Sussex
www.amberleymuseum.co.uk
15
Ripon 4x4 Spares Day & Land Rover
Auto-jumble
Ripon Racecourse, Boroughbridge Rd, Ripon, HG4 1UG
www.4x4sparesday.co.uk
25-28
29
With RTV and CCV trails, Red Wharf Bay,Anglesey. For
more info email secretary.nwlrc@btinternet.com or
call Wyn or Gina Williams on 07747 760 027 or 01745
860112 or visit http://nwlrc.co.uk
Wye Halls, Three Counties Showground, Malvern, Worcs,
WR13 6NW
www.4x4sparesday.co.uk
�
North Wales Land Rover Club?s
annual Interclub event
lpm
27
17th Ripon Autumn Classic Car and
Bike Show and autojumble
Ripon Racecourse, North Yorks, HG4 1UG
Large displays of classic cars, motor cycles, vans, trucks,
ex-military plus classic Land Rover display, arena &
commentary.
Adult �50. 10am-4pm.
www.markwoodwardclassicevents.com
27
Series One Land Rover Gathering.
40 or more vehicles on public display at Tywyn Wharf
Station. Showing a cross section of all models built
between 1948-1958
Talyllyn Railway. To enter a vehicle ring 01654 710472
or contact
Daniel.king@talyllyn.co.uk
�
September
10
13
Goosemoor
Somerset and Wiltshire Land Rover Club
www.somersetandwiltshirelrc.co.uk
24 JUNE 2017
Yatton Keynell
SWLRC
www.somersetandwiltshirelrc.co.uk
pit
ltbip
RTV and CCV trials
RTV/CCV Trials
Malvern 4x4 Spares Day and Land
Rover Auto-jumble
November
10-12
Classic Car Show
NEC, Birmingham
12
RTV and CCV trials
Binegar Quarry, Somerset
Somerset and Wiltshire Land Rover Club
www.somersetandwiltshirelrc.co.uk
�
December
10
RTV and CCV trials
Charlton Mackerel, Somerset
Somerset and Wiltshire Land Rover Club
www.somersetandwiltshirelrc.co.uk
�
RTV and CCV trials
To have your Land Rover event listed here send
details to vicky.turner@keypublishing.com
www.classiclandrover.com
www.classiclandrover.com
P025_CLR_JUN17_ad.indd 1
JUNE 2017 25
10/04/2017 10:55
EVENTS AND RALLIES
WORDS EMRYS KIRBY PICTURES GARRY STUART
Overall winner Andy Cope
Braving it at
Brotherton
Yorkshire Land Rover
Owners? Club kicked off
the trials season with an
RTV near Pontefract
T
he sun may have been shining
but the ground was still damp and
slippery for YLROC?s first RTV of
the season on March 12. Club stalwart
Barrie Mounty had set up ten challenging
sections in the woods round an old
quarry site at Brotherton, near Pontefract.
Sections not only had steep banks and
deep axle twisters to steal traction but
unforgiving trees were ready to modify the
wings and bumpers of those who dared
to aim for the lowest scores. Mick Moses
played the role of marshal, adjudicating
whether the drivers had managed to pass
their front axle past the numbered gates
and shouting out the scores.
Thirteen drivers braved the course in a
number of different classes of vehicle from
standard Nineties (Class 4), a standard
Discovery (Class 5) to coil-spring Series
hybrids (Class 10) and one modified
Series leaf-spring 88in (Class 7). The
atmosphere was relaxed, helping to calm
the butterflies as drivers got back into the
swing of competitive driving. A number of
challenging turns round saplings caused
26 JUNE 2017
Matthew Abbey?s Series IIA was the only leafer
Steven Cann in his tidy hybrid
Phil Jenkins? classic-looking Ninety
?Gate seven on
section five caused
significant problems
for most drivers with
a tight left hand?
a few issues until one brave soul decided
that a spindly tree was no match for his
bumper and simply drove over the top
of it making life easier for subsequent
vehicles.
Gate seven on section five caused
significant problems for most drivers
with a tight left hand turn with an evil
off-camber climb. Matthew Abbey found
the best solution by squeezing his narrow
V8-powered Series IIA through the tiniest
of gaps in the trees to square up the
approach angle and ended up with the
only zero score for the section.
Overall victory went to Andy Cope in
his Class 10 Series One hybrid with Gary
Docherty in overall second, also in a Class
10 motor. Matthew Abbey gave a sterling
performance in his modified Series IIA to
finish third overall. Class 4 win went to
trials regular Tom Benson in his everyday
driver, a very straight classic-looking 1986
Ninety County Station Wagon.
a
www.classiclandrover.com
www.classiclandrover.com
P027_CLR_JUN17_ad.indd 1
JUNE 2017 27
10/04/2017 11:00
SERIES IIA
Mark Sidwell?s 1967 Series IIA 88in was chosen for its
potential as a classic restoration in deep bronze green
WORDS AND PICTURES LOUISE LIMB
Birmabright
and Brass
28 JUNE 2017
Brass band
musician Mark
Sidwell bestows
the same care and
attention on his
restored Series
IIA 88in as he
does his cornet
www.classiclandrover.com
With a relatively modern engine and overdrive the Land Rover runs smoothly on the open road
M
ark Sidwell?s training as an
apprentice agricultural engineer
in the late 1980s gave him a head
start when he decided it was time to acquire
a Land Rover Series IIA. After regular
outings to the local steam rallies in the early
2000s - Masham, Helmsley and Hunton Mark?s young son Matthew decided they
had to have their own tractor. Mark, who is
now a music teacher in Ripon, decided they
would try and find a good Fordson Dexter
or a Massey Ferguson, either a 35 or a 135,
but then a farming friend, Jeremy Wise bid
successfully on a Land Rover Series One on
an auction site and Mark paid a visit.
A ?barn find?, the sorry-looking Series
One arrived in a non-running, seized state
and Jeremy took the plugs out and poured
a little diesel down each bore, repeating this
process each night. After a week Jeremy
reached for the starting handle and managed
to turn it over. A replacement fuel tank, a
few light bulbs and a new battery later and
the Series One fired up and into life again.
With its MoT soon passed, the practicality,
tenacity and durability of the Land Rover
persuaded Mark that it was this vehicle and
not a tractor that he needed. It would just
about fit in his garage, transport his two
young children to steam fairs and quite
possibly turn heads, all at the same time.
However, it was not a Series One that
Mark admired the most but the Series IIA,
its barrel-sides designed by David Bache
and the shape probably most familiar
to those who are new to the marque. As
Mark put it: ?I think it is the ?classic? Land
Rover shape that is the first that springs
to mind when the words Land Rover are
uttered.? The hunt began for a Series IIA,
www.classiclandrover.com
?Mark turned his
attention to the truckcab as the children
were outgrowing
the three-seat
arrangement?
scouring the auction site listings, magazine
small advertisements and every other
possible avenue. In February 2011, Mark
found a suitable vehicle at the right price;
presentable and well enough maintained to
drive away immediately.
A 1967 Series IIA SWB, the Land Rover
had originally been powered by a 2,286
cc diesel four-cylinder but now a 2,286cc
petrol version had taken its place. The engine
number confirmed that it had seen service in
an early Ninety, the five-bearing crankshaft a
Whistle-clean engine bay with neatly routed
wiring and new Weber carburettor complement
late 2,286cc four cylinder petrol engine
late modification to the trusty Rover engine
just before it was replaced by the 2,495cc 17H
petrol engine in 1985. It sounds fantastic, as
smooth as a well-oiled sewing machine and
has benefitted from just the addition of a
new Weber carburettor and new fuel pipes.
Mark, being fastidious with the appearance of
working parts has powder-coated the battery
box and air filter housing.
While there was considerable potential
in the NATO green painted truck cab, there
would also be extensive refurbishment work
to follow for the project to meet Mark?s
exacting standards. With paint that ?had
been sprayed but might as well have been
painted with a yard brush?, the Land Rover
had changed hands no fewer than 21 times.
Its provenance was also a little mysterious,
the military bumper and number plate looked
long established, while the rest appeared
superficially tidy and recently spring-cleaned.
The rubber matting that completely covered
the inside surface of the rear tub peeled off
relatively easily but the adhesive left behind
took a variety of different solvents, scrapers
and an age to remove using a substantial
quantity of elbow grease.
After a couple of years? ownership, Mark
decided that the drab NATO green paint
had to go and engaged Martin Stubbs, a
local vehicle painter and mechanic, handier
than most with the spray gun. Though he?d
toyed with different colours, the resultant
shiny Deep Bronze Green seemed perfect for
Mark?s classic Land Rover.
There was however a snag with the chassis.
Although it was strong and adequately
welded it was two inches too short and was
placing enormous strain on the suspension.
Salvaging the chassis was beyond Mark?s
JUNE 2017 29
SERIES IIA
Replacement Rocky Mountain door tops are a
wise choice for durability and quality
Fairey Capstan winch is both a practical addition
and a beautiful piece of engineering
Canvas tilt by Exmoor Trim to replace a truckcab was the natural choice for family outings
?He sent the whole
bulkhead away to
be repaired and
galvanised, a process
which took six
months to complete?
An ingenious approach to interior lighting
typical of Mark?s approach to the restoration
of his Series IIA
30 JUNE 2017
skills and he ordered a Richards galvanised
replacement, all the work of rebuilding
undertaken by Peter May near Harrogate.
Messily patched repairs to the footwells
had made Mark wince and he sent the
whole bulkhead away to be repaired and
galvanised, a process which took six months
to complete. On reflection he feels he could
probably have managed the job himself.
The Series IIA already had LWB rims and
Fairey freewheeling hubs fitted when
Mark acquired the vehicle and as well as
the recent addition of servo-assisted brakes,
last year he invested in a Fairey capstan
winch.
Mark was lucky to find one at a
reasonable price on an auction site and
even more fortunate when he discovered it
was located in Masham, a mere ten miles
north. Mark stripped it down, cleaned it out
and took all the external parts back to bare
metal, repainting it and taking it to Brian
May to be fitted. The safety bar that locks
the handle when not in use was missing, so
rather than use a standard bolt or lynch pin,
Mark fashioned a stainless steel one himself
which looks very neat.
Once the Land Rover was more securely
underpinned, Mark turned his attention
to the truck-cab as the children were
outgrowing the three seat arrangement.
With 12-year-old son Matthew assisting,
Mark replaced it a couple of years ago
with an Exmoor Trim tilt, far more sociable
when carrying the children in the rear.
As with the tilt, Exmoor Trim came to the
www.classiclandrover.com
rescue supplying the rear bench seat and
replacements for the tatty front ones, all
in elephant hide.
Recently, Mark fitted a new Autosparks
loom as he?d been gradually adding further
load to the system; a compressor, various
auxiliary power sockets and USB ports.
The additional jumble of wires was not
only messy but becoming unsafe and Mark
started from scratch, braiding the new
wiring into the main harness and adding
the period touch of fabric insulation.
As a musician of some 35-years standing,
Mark bestows the same care and attention
on his Land Rover as he does his cornet,
striving for perfection in everything
he does.
He has even made a Series 2 Club grille
badge and decided to take it with him to
Czech Republic to visit a friend who has
silver-plating facilities.
However, the bare metal badge was very
nearly confiscated at Leeds Bradford Airport
as the young lad on customs thought it
was an offensive weapon and summoned
a senior colleague. Fortunately the senior
officer knew exactly what it was, saying:
?That?s the Land Rover Series 2 club
emblem?, so it was eventually allowed
through with the recommendation that
on the return trip it went in a suitcase
and not hand luggage!
a
The Series IIA SWB as it arrived in 2011
Mark would like to thank Peter and
Brian May at Peter May Restoration at
Darley near Harrogate for their patience
and generosity in offering advice and
support throughout.
Peter May Restoration 01423 781622
He also extends his gratitude to Gordon
and Wendy Lowe of the Series 2 Land
Rover Club. Gordon is the Yorkshire rep
and organises very friendly, welcoming
events. Through the club, Mark has joined
a very supportive network of friends who
are always on hand to help. The Series IIA
has become as much part of the family
as his partner Vanessa and two children
Matthew and Rebecca.
partially stripped for painting, Mark discovers
the odd chassis modifications
www.series2club.co.uk
Thanks also to go to the staff of Ripon
Cathedral for access to the cathedral?s
west front
Frilly seam typical of messy welding found
on the bulkhead
Elephant hide seats and tidy dash with additional
gauges look authentic as well as functional
The family that drives a
Land Rover together
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 31
SERIES ONE
Return of the
Natives
These sequential chassis number Series Ones were
sent out to Canada in 1957 and have just been reunited
by a classic car dealer in the UK
WORDS EMRYS KIRBYPICTURES GARRY STUART
32 JUNE 2017
www.classiclandrover.com
L
ike many Series One owners, I have a
thing for chassis numbers. I regularly
look through the Vehicle Register
photo gallery on the Series One Club forum
which lists vehicles in chassis order, often
giving a build and registration date. Beyond
the obvious significance of placing a vehicle
in time and history, there is something very
satisfying in finding vehicles with close or
sequential numbers. The thought of vehicles
that followed one another down the Solihull
production line being reunited almost 60
years later is remarkable and the odds of it
happening are pretty slim.
But what are the odds that three Land
Rovers with sequential numbers could be
sent out to Canada and some six decades
later could be reunited back in the UK?
That?s exactly what happened recently when
Rowland Wood set out to find vehicles
for Roman Garages, his newly-established
classic car business in Grantham.
Rowland, who has a background in
marketing, has been a classic car enthusiast
for years but recently decided to turn his
hobby into a job. He has two business
colleagues in Alberta in Canada and they
have been on the search for good classic
American cars to import to the UK for the
new venture.
One colleague had already bought a 1957
Land Rover with a view to restoring it for
himself but hadn?t done much with it. He
then had the opportunity to buy two more
1957 models locally which, co-incidentally,
were just two chassis numbers apart.
When he got them home, he discovered
that the vehicle he already had was the
chassis number in the middle! As much
as Rowland is not a Land Rover specialist,
he couldn?t turn down the opportunity to
return the vehicles to the UK. Since then he
has started to research the vehicles, looking
at not only where they went but some
of the unique features on the Canadian
specification models.
?The doors are lined
rather like homemarket deluxe
models but seem to
have an extra layer
of insulation?
Export spec hard top with side windows
Green Vehicle has chassis number 114703575
Standard 1,997cc petrol engine
The all important chassis plate
Rowland?s research discovered that all
three vehicles were ordered by Shell in
mid 1957 as part of a batch of 50 sent to
British Columbia. He?s not sure exactly
what the vehicles were used for but it is
likely that they performed a range of tasks
on drilling sites. The Heritage Certificates
state that they were sent to Rootes Motors
Limited, Vancouver, Canada. Rootes Motors
handled the distribution of Rover vehicles
in North America in the 1950s with limited
input from the Solihull factory though this
arrangement changed in late 1958 when the
Rover Motor Company of North America
was established to directly handle sales in
PTO control for winch
www.classiclandrover.com
Interior trim is missing on this one
America and Canada.
The Heritage Certificates also state that
the vehicles were supplied in Wimpey
Yellow and the specification is LHD North
American (Canadian) Export. There were
a number of features unique to vehicles
sent out to Canada and indeed the chassis
numbers (114703574, 114703575 and
114703576) have a C8 suffix tagged on
designating the Canadian market.
Looking through the parts manual, there
are various entries with Canadian specific
numbers. The colour is the most obvious
visible difference to our normal home-market
fayre. Wimpey Yellow was named after
George Wimpey & Co, Hammersmith who
had a fleet of Land Rovers on their building
sites in the UK but it seems the colour was
JUNE 2017 33
SERIES ONE
?All three of these
vehicles have been
fitted with Kodiakstyle heaters?
also available on Canadian export vehicles.
As well as these Shell vehicles, Wimpey
Yellow was also used on Land Rovers in
the British Columbia Highways department.
As much as all three have been repainted
different colours over the last six decades,
the interiors all retain the unique yellow
hue on the bulkhead, seat box and inside
the hard tops.
While we?re thinking about interiors, the
basic Canadian vehicles were kitted out with
Station Wagon-type trim to give a modicum
of comfort in their harsh winters. The doors
are lined rather like home-market deluxe
models but seem to have an extra layer of
insulation made out of a substance that looks
like rock wool. Notably, the doors are skinned
as one-piece units, not the usual separate
top and bottom ? I guess there?d be little
need to remove the door tops in the throes
of a British Columbian winter. One of the
Bodywork is still pretty straight
Seatbox lining still in place
Chassis plate with Canadian C8 suffix
Fitted with North American spec 15in rims
Yellow vehicle is chassis number 114703576
vehicles still retains the Hardura-type lining
round the seatbox and seatbox lids covering
the large expanse of cold metal round the
occupants? posteriors. The roofs (all export
spec hard tops with side windows) also have
headlinings above the front seats, a must for
retaining heat and reducing condensation. A
Land Rover with no trim gives all the comfort
of driving an empty biscuit tin.
The ubiquitous round Smiths heater
was an option in home-market vehicles
but would have been totally inadequate
in Canada. Instead dealers could offer
something more powerful, the most
common of which was the Kodiak
manufactured by Eton. The Mark 1 was
introduced around 1956 and a number of
34 JUNE 2017
Engine on the yellow vehicle runs OK
Chassis is in remarkable condition
www.classiclandrover.com
specification vehicles.
While only one of them runs at the
moment, the vehicles are remarkable solid
and have none of the rust you?d expect to
see in a vehicle that had spent all its life
in the UK. The bulkheads still have most
of the original Wimpey Yellow paint with
just a dusting of surface rust in places. The
chassis are solid, again just with just surface
rust and most of the factory-applied black
paint. The relatively dry climate and lack
of salt on the roads in Western Canada
have definitely helped. When these Land
Rovers are up and running, they have the
potential to be excellent vehicles, either
just recommissioned and used with their
lovely historical patina or as the basis for
a restoration with a difference. Roman
Garages has just moved into their new
premises in Bridge End Road, Grantham
and can be contacted on 0203 189 1099 or
07468 711565.
a
Red vehicle is chassis number 114703574
Note PTO lever on the seatbox
Standard 1,997cc spread bore engine
Slightly scruffy but a good solid base for a restoration
Warn freewheeling hubs
?The vehicles are
remarkable solid
and have none
of the rust you?d
expect to see in a
vehicle that had
spent all its life in
the UK?
www.classiclandrover.com
revisions were made over the following
decade. These units extended the full width
of the lower dash and drew fresh air from
a vent in the wing near the right hand
headlight. These heaters remained a dealer
option or after-market kit for Canadian
Series Land Rovers until the Series III
arrived in 1971 with its ?modern? integral
dash and heater assembly. All three of these
vehicles have been fitted with Kodiak-style
heaters (the type seems to vary between the
vehicles) and all have a square vent hole cut
in the usual place on the right wing.
Two of the vehicles have had the same
unusual modification to the wings; a heavy
steel band wraps round each wing and
connects to a plate bolted onto the grille
panel. The purpose is unclear ? it possibly
stops the wings from drooping, a common
problem if they are stood on, or it may
have been to mount a piece of equipment.
It is also unclear when these were fitted
although the presence of yellow paint
suggests that may well have been pretty
early on in life, possibly while at Shell.
Rowland is unsure how long the vehicles
stayed in service with oil-related activities
Note C8 suffix on chassis plate
or what happened to them after they were
sold on. Most likely they all went their
separate ways and it was pure chance
that saw them all reunited in Alberta (the
neighbouring province to British Columbia)
and subsequently brought ?home?. Certainly
they have all had different paint finishes
over the years suggesting a multitude of
different owners. All have had tail light
modifications although all three still have
the remains of the tailgate mounted ?licence?
plate that was standard on North American Massive bumper fitted at some point in its life
JUNE 2017 35
SERIES ONE
What?s that Coming
over the Hill?
O
ne of my early introductions to the
world of off-road motorsport was
a Duke video from 1995 entitled
This is Advanced 4WD. As well as covering
driving techniques, it also had footage
from All Wheel Drive Club events and the
Superwinch Hillrally showing vehicles being
pushed to the limit. My lasting memory
from the video was a Hillrally clip of a
blue Series One coming over a slippery
hill with the commentator marvelling that
such an old vehicle was still competing
36 JUNE 2017
among all the specialist racers. Later in life,
I discovered that the Series One in question
was an 86in known as Nessie and has been
owned by Scottish Land Rover Owners Club
president Michael Bruce since 1974.
Michael, who hails from the Scottish
Borders, grew up within the motor trade
and the Scottish Land Rover club scene.
His father was a partner at the first Land
Rover dealers in Hawick, and the business
continued to sell Solihull?s finest until the
late 1960s when Land Rover was taken over
by British Leyland. In the late 1950s, the
original factory-based Land Rover Owners
Club was expanded into regional groups
and his father was instrumental in setting
up the Scottish branch in October 1958.
Back in those days, the club trials events
were reasonably benign, set up so that
everyday Land Rovers could drive to the
event, compete with minimal damage and
drive home again. Over time, the events
started to become more challenging and
damage became more likely so different
www.classiclandrover.com
Nessie leads out other trials motors at the
Scottish Land Rover Show
(Is it a Monster?)
Emrys Kirby speaks to SLROC
president Michael Bruce about
off-road motorsport, the Hillrally
Championship and his famous Series
One trials motor known as Nessie
WORDS EMRYS KIRBY
PICTURES GARRY STUART
levels of competition developed.
In his early teens, Michael was involved in
the club, helping out with recovery and he
started competing as soon as he could drive,
taking part in events while he was still at
school. University stopped play for a few
years but in 1974 he attended an event in
Edinburgh, volunteered to be a marshal and
got the bug again.
After the trial he decided to go out and
buy his own trials motor and found NS
2753, a 1954 86in as a non-runner from a
www.classiclandrover.com
farmyard for �. Back in those days, most
trials vehicles were battered Series Ones,
usually 80in or 86in and by this point,
drivers were starting to add simple T-bars
for roll-over protection. Michael rebuilt
the vehicle over the next couple of years
and started competing again in a variety of
classes including Comp Safari. Over time,
the original 1,997cc engine was replaced
with the slightly more powerful and
ubiquitous 2,286cc powerplant.
In the 1970s, the sport was moving on
with tougher terrain and higher speeds with
Comp Safari events. In the early 1970s, the
concept of the Hillrally speed event was
founded with the first event taking place
near Llangollen in May 1971.
It was organised by the Peak and Dukeries
Land Rover Club and sponsored by Senior
Service cigarettes. There were subsequent
events in September 1971 and three in
1973 but the Hillrally series stopped at the
end of that year. However, the concept was
re-established in 1991 with the formation of
JUNE 2017 37
SERIES ONE
Michael Bruce has owned Nessie since 1974
the Hillrally Club Limited.
The first modern-era Hillrally took place in
1992 at the Baskerville Hall Hotel in Clyro
on the edge of the Brecon Beacons. Michael
was taken with the idea of the Hillrally
concept so he reconditioned Nessie in time
to enter the 1993 event. Of the 57 starters,
he was one of the 24 finishers, despite the
age of the vehicle and the fact that 4x4
motorsport had moved on to include spaceframe buggies with snorting V8 engines and
independent suspension.
This was to be the first of many and
Michael and Nessie competed in just
about every Hillrally event for the next 12
years, navigated by Henry Webster. More
events were added to the calendar with a
Southern Hillrally from 1995 and a Scottish
Hillrally from 1996. Michael?s approach was
pretty old-school, driving to and from the
events in Nessie, a contrast to many of the
competitors who trailered their competition
motors there and back. The duo only failed
to finish on two occasions, despite the
punishing courses. One of these occasions
in Wales was very frustrating because
Michael had just overtaken the legendary
David Simmonite when a camshaft bearing
moved, cutting the oil flow and causing the
engine to fail. The other occasion was in
Scotland and was simply due to a broken
half shaft; he was unable to climb out of a
dip in two-wheel drive in filthy weather.
As you might expect, breakages of
components like springs and half shafts was
just par for the course so it was common for
Michael to put new springs on at the start
of the event. He was one of the first to use
parabolic springs after he was given a set to
test by Chris Perfect who was the distributor
for TI Console/Heystee Automotive, the first
company to make parabolic springs available
on a large scale. The market has changed
out of all recognition since then but back in
38 JUNE 2017
Michael and navigator Henry Webster at speed
A competent (and happy!) navigator is
required on speed events
Time for essential maintenance at service
In action on the Goodyear supported 1996
Welsh Hillrally
Side fill fuel tank is safer for speed events
the mid 1990s, parabolics were cutting-edge
equipment. Michael stopped competing in
Hillrallies in 2005 but he still continues to use
Nessie in a range of SLROC events.
Over the years, Nessie has evolved with
different engines, gearboxes and axles.
These days it is powered by a 2,495cc
90/110 petrol engine fed through an SU
carb which offers far better performance
than the factory Weber set-up. It has a
Series IIA gearbox, generally reputed to
be the strongest LT76 built with the larger
layshaft bearing and no fragile synchro
on first and second gears. The overdrive is
not only useful for higher speed cruising
(Michael says he once did 90mph on the
motorway!) but useful as a ?splitter?, giving
an extra range of gear options when driving
in 4x4 Low. The axles are Series IIA units
www.classiclandrover.com
giving a slightly wider track and having
stock size, fully floating half shafts. Original
Series Ones had semi-floating rear half
shafts which if broken, will disable the
vehicle as the wheel hub winds its way out
of the axle! A fully floating shaft is easy to
change in competition and at worst you will
only lose drive to the rear wheels.
Being a racing vehicle, Nessie has a
full roll cage which is now on its third
incarnation and Michael told me is pretty
much still up to current specification. He
has had a number of rolls over the years so
it has proved its value.
The truck cab was made up out of
a cut down full hard top, a common
modification on trials motors. The rally
seats and harnesses mean that the normal
transmission controls are out of reach so
these have been extended. The hi/low lever
has an adapted axle U-bolt bolted on which
usefully has the same thread as the red
knob. The handbrake is from a late Series
IIA/III and was designed for use with a
seatbelt which was fitted when they became
compulsory in the mid 1960s.
?Travelling at speed
over rough terrain
is always going to
take its toll?
Multiple gauges are essential when pushing
the limits of the engine
Power now supplied by a 2,495cc 90/110 engine
Massive slider plate protects the gearbox
Harnesses attach to rear brace of roll cage
Late Series IIA single motor wiper assembly
Travelling at speed over rough terrain is
always going to take its toll so Michael has
designed a number of clever modifications
to protect the underbelly. The front diff pan
has a thick plate welded over the top and
the gearbox has a huge bolt-on skid-plate
from front to rear, supported at the back by
an extra crossmember.
After getting stopped dead by a tree
stump, Michael fitted skid plates just below
the front bumper to guide the vehicle
up and over the spring hangers. He also
adapted the bottom fixing plates on the
front springs with sliders that not only
guide the spring over obstacles but also
protect the bottom of the U-bolts.
The exhaust is also protected by a small
slider wedge welded to the bottom of the
passenger outrigger. The steering box and
wheel is from a late Series IIA or III with the
robust plastic wheel; in a previous incarnation
it had the original wire spoke wheel which
broke during a competition in Perth and he
had to hide it from the scrutineers.
The Scottish Land Rover Owners Club
is still active and vibrant with new talent
and younger generations coming on
board. Comp safaris and speed sprints are
complemented with less damaging Tyro
and RTV trials, as well as events like the
Mudmaster navigational trial organised in
partnership with BAMA. Michael and Nessie
have had a long and successful career
together and both are an important part of
SLROC history. Nessie might be old but is
certainly not over the hill.
a
Transmission control extended for use with
harnesses on
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 39
CLASSIC COILER
The Range Rover S
It?s been 50 years since the iconic Range Rover was introduced. Garry
Stuart reports on an exhibition celebrating this important milestone
WORDS AND PICTURES GARRY STUART
J
aguar Land Rover (JLR) continue their
commitment to presenting the story
of Land Rover?s strong heritage to the
world. Two years ago they built a replica of
the original 1948 production line and the
visitor attraction proved extremely popular.
This was followed up and integrated into
the Land Rover Reborn Experience which
allowed the public to take a tour through
Land Rover?s classic workshop and see first
hand original condition Series One Land
Rovers being ?reborn? as fully-restored
vehicles as well as viewing the Defender
Celebration Tour exhibition.
Ever aware of the significant anniversaries
coming up they spent around four years
planning an exhibition ?The Range Rover
Story? to celebrate 50 years of
the iconic Range Rover. As with the previous
presentations this was staged at their Lode
Lane manufacturing facility which allowed
JLR to offer the public an opportunity to view
two of their production lines in operation
as part of the package. This kind of access
afforded to the public by a car giant such
as JLR is unprecedented and an opportunity
for enthusiasts to experience a unique
opportunity to connect with the company.
The Range Rover Story is presented in a
series of dioramas representing key stages of
the timeline. Upon entering the exhibition
the visitor will find themselves in a
blacked out room with large transparencies
depicting the social and political conditions
in the late 1960s when the seed of the Range
Rover story was germinating.
Photographs of prime minister Harold
Wilson and England?s football team lifting
the World Cup together with domestic
situations helps set the scene while a track
of Beatles music runs in the background.
Land Rover?s in-house historian James
Taylor gave a talk about what was going
on in the company at that time and how
pressure from the American market was
influencing the thinking of Land Rover?s
executives and engineers.
The next section of the exhibition deals
with the engineering
of the Range Rover
prototypes and the
A factory-restored 1971 Range
Rover transported the press around
the Lode Lane site
40 JUNE 2017
www.classiclandrover.com
r Story
?JLR have reconstructed two rolling
chassis identical to the one they made
back in 1967 for test driving?
Roger Crathorne explains the
workings of a replica of the
driveable chassis tested in 1967
development of the chassis and suspension.
On our press tour ?Mr Land Rover? Roger
Crathorne, who worked for Land Rover
for more than 50 years, gave his personal
account of how the Range Rover concept
developed. The company initially looked
at the Ford Bronco for inspiration as a
coil-spring suspension was necessary to
deliver the ride quality they were seeking.
Roger was keen to stress that they were not
trying to create a ?luxury? car just a better,
more refined, working vehicle for farmers
and contractors.
For the purposes of the exhibition JLR have
reconstructed two rolling chassis identical
to the one they made back in 1967 for test
driving. The rig did not have bodywork and
was powered by a Buick-derived V8 motor.
Seven prototypes were built and tested and
all were badged as Velars, as were around
40 pre-production vehicles, so as to not flag
them up as Land Rover projects.
Photographs of engineer Spen King and
designer Gordon Bashford are displayed
alongside original sketches and drawings
left from top: Land
Rover historian James
Taylor sets the scene in the late 1960s when the
project began; Neil Doswell was a Land Rover
engineer for 40 years and was involved in the
first diesel powered Range Rover in 1986. Here
he describes the four generations of Range
Rover; The new Range Rover Velar displayed in
the lobby of JLR?s visitor centre
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 41
CLASSIC COILER
left: In 1971 a Range Rover identical to this one
was displayed in the Louvre Museum in Paris as
part of an exhibition celebrating British design
and styling; below: The tools and materials of
the clay modellers on show
?The Range Rover
brand leapt upmarket thanks to
its adoption by the
world?s top fashion
and society
magazine Vogue?
which were painstakingly pulled together by
raiding the lofts and attics of many of the
original development team.
The next section demonstrates how the
styling of the Range Rover came to be.
Life-size models were built on wooden
superstructures upon which modelling
clay was applied and formed to represent
the bodywork. This is a technique still
used today by vehicle design studios.
JLR commissioned a team to build an
exact replica of the original Range Rover
?claymation? designed by David Bache which
took over 800 man hours to construct and
is on display as part of the storyline. This
level of attention to detail is indicative of
the commitment of JLR to present the Range
Rover Story in a truly experiential way.
Further on we arrive in 1970 and the
launch of the Range Rover. A white Range
Rover is presented as it was at the Louvre in
Paris in March 1971 as part of an exhibition
celebrating British Industrial design.
Displays of 1970s design and technology
such as Concorde, the Trimphone and the
much desired ?Sindy Doll? Range Rover are
displayed alongside the Range Rover, truly
a trip down memory lane.
There is a section dedicated to the
aftermarket modified Range Rovers which
flourished soon after the introduction of
the intended utilitarian vehicle and had
vinyl seats and a plastic dashboard that
could be washed down with a hosepipe.
There were approved aftermarket companies
which modified the basic Range Rover
such as Carmichael who adapted them as
fire tenders converting them to six wheels.
42 JUNE 2017
Graham Silvers worked as a design engineer
on the original Range Rover project. Here
he explains the method of building actual
size clay models to test design concepts.
This is an exact replica in clay on a wooden
frame. There are 800 man-hours in this
model; left: Early 1970s contemporary
design icons on display including Sindy
doll?s Range Rover next to a Trimphone and
space-age TV; left below: James Watkins
is the exterior design manager and Bethan
Jones is the senior colour and materials
Designer for the new Velar
Police and ambulance variants were also
produced by outside companies.
So far, so very utilitarian, but the next
display shows how the Range Rover brand
leapt up-market thanks to its adoption
by the world?s top fashion and society
magazine Vogue. This was a hugely
important period that introduced the Range
Rover as a luxury vehicle for royalty
and film stars and the gentrification and
refinements to the model were quick in
coming. The fashionable relationship led
to the introduction of the Vogue-badged
models and Range Rover joined the ?upper
set? associated with brands such as Barbour
and Burberry. From then on any semblance
to utilitarian use fell away as the Range
Rover brand took off as a luxury label
worlds apart from the continuing Series
III models.
Further exhibits tell the story of the
subsequent generations of Range Rover
before we enter a darkened room for the
big reveal - the new generation of Range
Rover Velar is illuminated by spotlights
as if on a stage. What a beginning, what
a story, the Range Rover continues to set
standards of class and refinement that other
manufacturers can only dream of.
a
www.classiclandrover.com
LandRoverExperienceSolihull.indd 1
13/04/2017 11:52
JOURNEYS
T
he call went out from CLR editor
John Carroll, that perhaps a few of
the team should meet up in North
Yorkshire for what roughly translated as an
?editorial meeting?.
We were invited to join The Yorkshire
Land Rover Owners? Club (YRLO) at
a campsite at Nawton near Helmsley.
YLRO were hosting a green lane event on
Saturday and a trial on Sunday. We were
made most welcome by all the members
present and enjoyed remarkable weather
and some excellent fun on the local green
lanes. The evening was filled with the heady
aroma of barbecues, beer and some lively
evening banter where exciting plans were
discussed for future escapades.
The challenge I faced was to drive my
1948 Land Rover from Leicester to Helmsley
- a distance Google maps confirmed was 160
miles, then drive approximately 40 miles of
green lanes and return the next morning.
I am embarrassed to confess that I do not
?I was finding that my journey
of exploration was taking even
longer than I had expected?
use the 80in nearly as much as I would
like, but when I do, it usually performs
well and gives me great pleasure. With the
top removed all the noise evaporates into
thin air and 45 mph feels like 70. With
the canvas tilt on though, it is a little like
driving an old hen shed. Noise, drafts and
general discomfort mean it is a situation to
be avoided if at all possible.
However, with rain forecast on the
Saturday morning I was left with little
choice. Either fit the tilt and door tops or
arrive wet through, cold and miserable.
With the added factor of a rear tub full
of camping gear and food to keep dry I
reluctantly fitted the tilt.
My other quandary was over which route
to take. An 80in Land Rover running a
two-litre petrol engine is not popular on
motorways and dual carriageways and is
quite frankly a bit scary!
I have always tried to use roads that would
have existed back in 1948 to try and get a
feel for what motoring was like when our old
Land Rovers were new. With a combination
of Google Maps and a paper map I plotted a
route that would avoid as many major roads
as possible and take me north, ?the pretty way?.
Along the way I could pause at interesting
sites and see small towns and villages
normally missed in the quest for speed. The
downside of this plan was that it would add
at least an hour, if not more, to my journey
time. The answer to this was to start off a
good two hours earlier than I needed to.
I had packed and prepared the Land
Rover the evening before so that when the
alarm went off at 5.30am all I had to do
was gulp down some strong coffee and
jump in. We headed first for the old market
town of Melton Mowbray, famous for pork
pies and stilton cheese, but not at 6.30am
when it was viewed through the murk of
persistent drizzle cleared by the one and
only 8in wiper blade ponderously making
44 JUNE 2017
Under the M62 and a brief diversion across
a stubble field conveniently linking one B
road with another
www.classiclandrover.com
A road less
Travelled
Meandering north on B roads
WORDS AND PICTURES TOBY SAVAGE
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 45
JOURNEYS
its way from left to right across my side of
the screen.
From Melton I took a variety of B roads
directly north through the Vale of Belvoir
through Scalford, Eastwell and into Belvoir
itself, skirting around the southern edge of
the famous Belvoir Castle long before the
11th Duke of Rutland had even thought
about putting the kettle on.
It was all I hoped for. Pheasants dashed for
cover at my approach, a thin sliver of warm
daylight appeared between the heavy clouds
and the horizon to the east, as I put the next
destination into the sat nav. It was very
important to add each village name, one at
a time, or the technology would try and take
me back to a bigger road, but by breaking it
down into small sections I was never more
than 10 miles from the next waypoint.
I found myself criss-crossing the Viking
Way - an ancient byway now classed as a
Byway Open to All Traffic (BOAT) in places
and could not resist taking a short diversion
along its historic path, rejoining the road
some three miles further along.
It looks as though much of it is drivable and
I made a mental note to research it and return
another day when I had more time. But, from
this rural idyll it was a shock to have to join
the A1 for about six miles past Newark as it
really was the only practical option.
Once clear of the mayhem I was soon
between the rivers Don, Trent and Idle. The
regular flooding from the River Trent in
combination with a peat-rich soil makes
this land very fertile for farming with wheat
and sugar beat crops being the ones that
had just been harvested as I drove through.
Entering the town of Gainsborough one of
the dominant architectural features is a large
brick and stone gateway called Marshall?s
Yard. Now the home of supermarkets and
fashion shops, it was, in its heyday, the
engineering works of Marshall, Sons & Co,
makers of many of the steam engines we see
belching out smoke and steam at country
fairs and other shows today.
I was finding that my journey of
exploration was taking even longer than I
had expected as each new settlement was so
interesting I stayed too long to absorb what
was on offer, both culturally and visually.
I had to resolve to stop less and drive
more! I floored the throttle and upped the
cruising speed to a heady 50 mph taking
the A167 to the west of Scunthorpe and
?Either fit the tilt and
door tops or arrive
wet through, cold
and miserable?
A drive through rural Lincolnshire reveals a life that
has largely disappeared in the quest for modernisation,
leaving faded clues to once ambitious plans
All you need for a 400 mile expedition in 36 hours. A
two-litre 80in Land Rover and a spot of imagination
Finally in Yorkshire. Land of wooden
signposts and descriptive village names
on the far smaller A1133 meandering up
through Collingham and Girton to Newton
on Trent. Here we joined the slightly bigger
A156 to Gainsborough. It was driving
through one of these small villages that I
saw a sight you could only ever witness
passing through rural England early in the
morning. A gentleman of a certain age
was bump-starting his BSA Bantam down
the high street. It clearly fired up without
hesitation and he leaped on with the agility
of a man half his age and sped off in a
small cloud of blue two-stroke smoke.
Approaching Gainsborough I saw signs
welcoming me to the Isle of Axholme. It
refers to the low lying marshland that once
dominated this part of North Lincolnshire
46 JUNE 2017
north to the charmingly named Swinefleet
on the River Ouse, then on to Goole which
proudly boasts being the UK?s furthest
inland port. It is a remarkable feat of civil
engineering with three locks to keep the
water in its 37acres of floating dock. It has
been in continual use from the time of its
construction between 1826 and 1912 until
today. Well worth a visit another day.
By now I was clear of North Lincolnshire,
I?d skirted around Humberside and was
entering South Yorkshire on the B1228
under various titles such as Birk Lane, Fog
Lane and General Lane - all leading to
Sutton upon Derwent and a distant glimpse
of the Yorkshire Air Museum at the former
RAF Elvington site. No time to stop this
Destination successfully reached and parked
up next to Emrys Kirby?s 80in?Rocky?
www.classiclandrover.com
The original Butler
headlights are not good for
night driving but fine in the
early morning light
Although a long distance footpath linking
Humberside with Rutland many sections of the
Viking Way are Byways Open to All Traffic
on,
A pause on the banks of the River Ouse navigable
by ships as far as the docks at Goole
time as our afternoon green laning trip
would not wait. Driving to the east of York
through Stamford Bridge avoided the York
traffic and offered a less hectic pace. With
one last haul up the Howardian Hills where
I had to change down into second gear,
I was closing in on the planned meeting
point at Nawton.
I arrived at 12.30pm - exactly as planned
following the increase in pace for the final
50 miles. Warm greetings were exchanged
with fellow contributors and conversations
continued from where we?d left off the last
time.
I had enjoyed my run north immensely
and had seen and experienced a parallel
universe to the fast lane madness that is the
norm these days. It was a relief to find that
the quaintness of rural England still exists
and that by choosing the road less travelled
it is all there laid bare for us all to enjoy. The
green lanes of the North Yorkshire Moors
offered a great afternoon out as well.
a
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JUNE 2017 47
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19/04/2017 09:54
A Rover press picture that could just easily be a still
from one of those 1960s neo-noir Cold War spy dramas
that involved kidnapped scientists and the KGB. Here
they are on the run in a remote location, with little more
than a wind-up field telephone and a 1966 109in Series
IIA hard-top in which to make their escape
SERIES III
The Sounds of the
Suburbs
Jolyon Ryall didn?t treat his vehicles very well in his
youth but he?s making amends with this 1976 Series III
WORDS AND PICTURES MARTIN PORT
PICTURES OF 109IN COURTESY OF JOLYON RYALL
52 JUNE 2017
www.classiclandrover.com
?I
tend to drive it around with one
side of the tilt down ? the side
nearest the kerb,? explains Jolyon
Ryall, ?the dog sits in the back and he can
be a bit? er, ?bitey?.?
Well I suppose there?s nothing like
honesty, yet I am pleased to discover that
Alfie the dog does nothing other than offer
me a go with his favourite ball when we
come face-to-face; dogs are intelligent
animals and so perhaps he knows when he
is in the presence of another Land Rover
enthusiast and has nothing to fear?
Of course, one suspects that if this Series
III were in an arguably more natural habitat
for a classic Land Rover than surburbia ?
rolling Yorkshire Dales or a Welsh forest
track for example - then the prospect of the
dog in the tub having a bit of a bark when
it trundled past wouldn?t be as much of an
issue. But this is south west London and
it?s just possible that the sort of people who
wear a pair of wellies to Waitrose instead
of to muck out the horses might not react
quite as favourably!
Unsurprisingly, there isn?t exactly a
plentiful supply of byways and greenlanes
in this part of the country, but as Jolyon
explains, his agenda for buying the Series
III wasn?t about going off-road.
?I had a Freelander at the time, and I
just saw it sitting outside depreciating. We
have the dog and do a fair bit of cycling
so needed to be able to throw everything
in the back, but I started to think about
a long-term replacement ? something
left: Jolyon, Alfie the dog and son Rory are all pretty keen on the Series III as family
transport; below; The 88in is used mainly for taking son Rory to nursery and for carrying
Alfie the dog and various bikes in the back; bottom: Street-parked in the suburbs of
London ? the Series III stands out among more common modern offerings
?Ultimately I want to
hand it down to my
son, Rory?
that I could perhaps keep without its
value disappearing.?
?I also guess that nostalgia played a part
in the decision to get a Series III,? admits
Jolyon. ?I had an ex-military 109in for
about six years when I was a student. I
can?t remember why I wanted one, but I saw
an advert and a friend of mine went to look
at it for me. I?d given him the money just in
case and when I came home that night, it
was parked outside!?
Jolyon spent the next few summers
in Europe with the 109in and covered
thousands of miles. ?Some friends of mine
were slowly rebuilding a house near Le
Mans and so every summer we would load
the Land Rover up with supplies and people,
then drive down and help them out before
travelling around a bit. We drove over the
Pyrenees in it and down to Portugal ? in
fact, I drove it from Portugal to Paris in one
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 53
SERIES III
?There are a few
greens on here and
I?m sure the original
is somewhere
under there?
54 JUNE 2017
left: Unlike his previous 109in, the 88in Series
III is not ex-military as far as Jolyon is aware;
bumperettes have been added by a previous
owner; left below: Jolyon admits that he hasn?t
investigated the curious wooden box that
conceals the rear bulkhead.
above left: Dixon-Bate
hitch and rear steps
add to the overall practicality of the 88in;
above right: Midland Rover Owners Club is
one of the largest clubs in the ALRC; this
Series III lived in the Coventry area for a
significant part of its life
go on one occasion. It never let me down.?
With some awkwardness, he admits that
the 109in was behind a bit of a party trick:
?We lived in a shared house near Catford,
and there were five speed humps down our
road. We would fill the back of the Land
Rover with people and set off ? hitting the
first hump in first gear, second hump in
second gear and so on. By the time we hit
the fourth hump, we would be achieving
a bit of speed so that if you got it right
you?d actually get the thing airborne!?
When Jolyon got a job as a maths
teacher in a secondary school, the Land
Rover was his transport each day, but
when he decided to move to live in Turkey
for six years, he left the 109in behind
and it was ?disposed of?. ?I?ve looked for
it, but can?t find it,? he says. ?But I?d be
interested to know if anyone has A630
LLM tucked away somewhere.?
?That first half of my life can almost
be characterised by my treatment of
vehicles.?I neglected quite a few ? I even
left a VW Campervan in the car park of a
Greek hotel having driven it from London
to Turkey, and I guess in part that is
what I?m trying to make up for with the
Series III.?
In an area of the capital where the
infamous ?school run 4x4? normally takes
the form of a Range Rover Sport or Evoque,
it is refreshing to hear Jolyon explain the
other reasons behind his purchase.
?I?ve got a modern car, and I am fortunate
to be able to afford a second vehicle, but
I don?t have a garage and didn?t want
something that I was going to worry about
all the time.
As he quite rightly points out, no-one
resents a tatty 1970s Land Rover: ?People
smile at you; it?s a great leveler.?
So, Jolyon?s long-term plan began with
the purchase a couple of years ago, and
although he is perfectly happy to just use it
for pottering around and doing the school
www.classiclandrover.com
runs rather than epic European jaunts, he
has a keen eye on its future.
?Ultimately I want to hand it down to
my son, Rory. He refers to it as ?the truck?
and has already worked out that he can
throw Daddy a curveball by kicking it
out of second or fourth gear when we are
driving along!?
?I know I?ve got a while before it would
become his, but the plan is to slowly
improve it,? he explains. ?I?m hoping that
the chassis will be solid enough to not need
replacing, but I?d like to rebuild the axles,
put new leaf springs on and perhaps replace
the tilt with a ?bikini? hood. The engine
smokes a bit, but it starts and stops when I
want it to, so it?s not that bad!?
Last on his planning list is the bodywork.
He says: ?There are a few greens on here
and I?m sure the original is somewhere
under there, but if I ever got around to
painting it, I might go with a Heritage-style
light green.
? I?m not obsessed with originality to be
honest as long as it is practical and works
for me then it will survive, plus if I make it
too precious then I?ll start to worry about it
and then it will just end in tears.?
For now though, Jolyon is happy just
putting those smiles on the faces of passerby who are more used to seeing something
rather more luxurious delivering the kids to
the playground in the morning. But if you
happen to see him and Rory driving by, it
might just be worth counting the number
of speed humps and taking a step back?
sometimes old habits die hard!
above: A
hitch-hiker named Ralph, picked up at
Gordano Services and subsequently taken along
on the trip to France, preparing a new sign;
right: Washing to dry and a spot of mid-trip
reorganisation in the rear of the 109in; below:
Pal, Sonia Huddle posing atop the spare wheel
a
?Jolyon spent the
next few summers
in Europe with the
109in and covered
thousands of miles?
above: The
hood sticks of the 109in came
in rather handy for drying washing while in
France; Jolyon and the 109in outside a farm
house in La Sarthe in the early 1990s; left:
Joolz Watson was responsible for taking
Jolyon?s money and coming back with the
ex-military 109in
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 55
CLASSIC COILERS
Icelandic
R
agnar lives in Iceland with his
elderly Discovery 1, a 1997 300Tdi
automatic, owned originally by a
mechanic, Benni, from the island?s most
widely-recognised Land Rover garage, S
S Gislason.
The car was known for years as Benni?s
truck. This says a lot about the community
in Iceland, each Land Rover is unique
and, coupled with the small population
of just 332,000 means each vehicle is
instantly recognisable.
Ragnar bought the Disco from Benni
56 JUNE 2017
about ten years ago, and apart from the
years he spent living in the UK, it has been
his daily drive ever since.
The Disco is not what you?d call a ?normal?
classic Land Rover but features de rigeur
Iceland modifications to cope with the
harshness of the weather. Benni fitted
oversized wheels with 38in tyres, moving the
front axle forwards by 8cm and the rear back
by 14cm; lower axle ratios, an on-board air
compressor and an auxiliary fuel tank.
The trusty Land Rover has accumulated
plenty of miles and plenty of rust, so when
Ragnar returned to live in Iceland with all his
worldly possessions, he filled the remainder
of the shipping container with spare parts.
So far, only the rear floor and wheel wells
have been installed; Ragnar is no welder
so the Disco remains in desperate need of
having the sills, firewall and inner-fenders
repairing, so much so that he would seriously
consider lending it out to anyone willing to
exchange the loan for some welding.
I first met Ragnar at a party in the UK in
2009 and we became firm friends due to
our shared love of Land Rovers. I paid my
www.classiclandrover.com
Feeling intrepid we ignore the ?impassable? signs
onto the Langj鰇ull Glacier, this is what this
Discovery 1 has been built for
Discovery
Vicky Turner and her family travel around Iceland in style
WORDS AND PICTURES VICKY TURNER
?We took it up a glacier, across frozen
roads and clocked up many miles on the
highways. ?
first visit to Iceland in 2015 and returned a
couple of months ago with my two children.
In Iceland it is the car that is insured rather
than the individual driver and so Ragnar
loaned me his Disco so we could go on a
road trip and explore the island properly.
Ragnar has renamed his old Land Rover
Wicky (he can?t say his ?V?s ), apparently in
my honour. But as his old Disco is ageing,
and not particularly gracefully at that, I?m
not really sure it is actually an honour!
Despite manifesting usual old Discovery
problems, it looks the part in an Arctic
www.classiclandrover.com
Camo wrap, and new studded 38in AT405
tyres on 15x15in rims, and not once in
our week-long trip did it give us any
mechanical cause for concern.
We took it up a glacier, across frozen roads
and clocked up many miles on the highways.
Even with the temperamental rear lights,
the passenger door jamming, intermittent
locking and windows that would wind down
but weren?t guaranteed to wind back up
again, it was a complete joy to drive and
the grins that emanated from the kids faces
when they first saw it said it all.
Having arrived late in Reykjav韐, we spent
the next morning wandering around the city.
By early afternoon, the kids were pestering to
begin driving so we all climbed into Wicky,
and, armed only with some dropped pins on
the Google Maps app provided by Ragnar,
went south and east of the city.
From Reykjav韐, we drove to Kleifarvatn,
where we parked up to admire the views of
the lake, driving onto the black volcanic
sands of its shores.
Onwards to Kr齭uv韐 and Selt鷑?s
sulphurous, geothermal springs where
JUNE 2017 57
CLASSIC COILERS
It is like going into the pages of a physical
geography textbook, glacial melt water, alluvial
plains and moraine deposits
A local helps when we can?t find the hose for the
compressor. He is happy to leave us with his
?We drove for miles
up an alluvial plain,
through glacial
meltwater and over
moraine deposits?
Kleifarvatn, a lake south of Reykjavik, has
legends of monsters living beneath the surface
Wicky?s Arctic Camo wrap doesn?t look out of
place here
the smell of egg almost detracts from the
myriad of mineral colours visible through
the steam of the volcanic vents.
We continued onto the main coast road
and back up to Reykjav韐 via the impressive
4km-long black cliffs of Kr齭uv韐uberg.
The following day we headed north in
the rain to the Sn鎓ellsj鰇ull National Park
which is a 450km round trip. We didn?t
mind as fortunately the heaters worked
58 JUNE 2017
and the holes in the floor are covered in
sound proofing. En route we found a tiny
tap in the middle of nowhere claiming
to be Iceland?s only naturally carbonated
spring. The water flowing from it tasted
very metallic.
Driving further north we hadn?t yet
encountered snow but the road was iced
over - no problem for Wicky?s studded
tyres, but we failed to see the glacier as the
cloud was too low.
A couple of days later we drove up and
beyond the magnificent Gullfoss, the
scale and sound of which it is impossible
to convey in words or a photograph, and
drove on past the ?impassable? signs onto
the Langj鰇ull
As we pulled off the tracks, we let the
tyres down to increase the grip on the snow
and ice, paid attention to the GPS, made
sure we had plenty of supplies and had
given Ragnar our route, and with a sense of
trepidation, headed up and up and up some
more.
Once again Wicky did not flinch. It
chewed up the miles of snow without
hesitation; finally we were properly offroading. Iceland has strict off-roading
regulations, but put simply, where the
ground is covered in snow as a protective
blanket, you can drive. If there is no snow
and there is a danger to delicate ecosystems
- you do not drive off-road.
We pulled up next to the snowmobile
school for our picnic, and predictably, met
a fellow Land Rover enthusiast, who was
pleased to show us pictures of his pride and
joy and kick the tyres of the old Discovery.
The return journey passed without hitch,
After a morning of driving in torrential rain,
Sn鎓ellsj鰇ull National Park sparkles in the
light of early spring when the storm breaks
www.classiclandrover.com
Miles of deserted lava fields lead to Bjarnarh鰂n,
and its Shark Museum next to this tiny church
other than realising that the hose, essential
for re-inflating the tyres for road driving,
was not to be found.
A potential disaster was averted by a
tour guide who had stopped for a photo
opportunity and was happy to lend us
his, telling us, as he drove away, to put
it back in his boot when we ?pass back
through Gulfoss?.
On our last day in Iceland we needed to
give the keys back to Ragnar and head
for the airport, but there was time for
one last exploration. Iceland is the living
embodiment of a physical geography
textbook, with volcanoes, lava, geothermal
springs and plate tectonics. We drove for
miles up an alluvial plain, through glacial
meltwater and over moraine deposits all
under the shadow of three converging
glaciers on a route not possible for the usual
hire car option. Going in February meant
we had the place entirely to ourselves.
www.classiclandrover.com
Information
Iceland is a fascinating country with
a wealth of history, culture and a
geologically-diverse landscape.
It is said to be one of the safest countries
in the world, crime rate is extremely low
and medical care is excellent, so is an
ideal place to visit with children.
A number of international airlines
maintain regular scheduled flights to
Iceland from Europe and Smyril Line
offers a regular scheduled cruise and
car ferry service with the M/S Norr鰊a
between Iceland and Europe.
Full details can be found on the website:
www.visiticeland.com
If you can help Ragnar with his welding
contact him at eiriksra@gmail.com
I still feel like we?ve barely scratched
the surface of Iceland. We can?t wait to
get back; I just hope that Wicky lives
on, with some welding to keep its ageing
body together.
Ragnar is due to visit the UK in August
for two weeks and will have the use of
Bluetit, my 1968 Series IIA. He?s a tall chap,
6ft 4in, but I think they?ll have a blast, I just
hope my Land Rover is as reliable as Wicky
proved to be.
a
When the track ends and snow begins, tyre
pressure is dropped from normal road levels of
25 down to around four PSI
In summer, the park is busy, but we had the
whole place to ourselves
This terrain is not suited to a regular vehicle.
Depending on the season and weather, big tyres
and a snorkel are essential
JUNE 2017 59
SERIES ONE
Tom resprayed
Pollyanna as part of
essential maintenance
N
o vehicle inspires the sense of
adventure like a Land Rover.
The dream of exploring remote
places and self-sufficient globe-trotting
is incomplete without a vehicle that is
capable, trustworthy and easy to repair. This
spirit of adventure has inspired countless
owners and been exploited by Land Rover?s
marketing department for decades. We can
trace much of it back to one formidable but
diminutive Land Rover called Pollyanna
and its equally formidable and diminutive
owner, Barbara Toy.
Barbara Toy was born in Australia in 1908
where her father was a newspaper editor
and war correspondent but she moved to
England in the 1930s. As well as being well
travelled in her younger years and a Fellow
of the Royal Geographical Society, she
was an author, actress and theatre director.
She became well connected in London
society and literary circles and was a friend
of Agatha Christie and her prominent
archaeologist husband Sir Max Mallowan.
60 JUNE 2017
In 1950, Miss Toy, as she was usually
known, decided that she wanted to visit
Baghdad via the North African coastline
and thought that the ideal mode of
transport would be an old Jeep. Uninspired
by the war surplus offerings, she was
introduced by a friend to the manager of
Henlys, a prestigious London Rover dealer
that just happened to have a demonstrator
Land Rover 80in in stock.
On the December 19, 1950, she handed
over �0 and took ownership of KYH 628
which she soon christened Pollyanna. She
organised all the appropriate paperwork
Pollyanna?s proud guardian Tom Pickford
?Armed with the
king?s invitation
she drove across the
Arabian Peninsula
to Jeddah?
www.classiclandrover.com
A Lifetime
of Adventure
Barbara Toy and her 1950 80in
Pollyanna inspired more than six
decades of global adventuring and
exploration. Emrys Kirby meets the
Series One and its latest custodian
WORDS EMRYS KIRBY PICTURES GARRY STUART
Pollyanna was used in
various Peak District tria
ls
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 61
SERIES ONE
and visas, freighted Pollyanna to Gibraltar
and flew out to meet it. Her first epic solo
journey took her through Morocco, Algeria,
Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria,
Jordan and finally to Iraq. After visiting
various archaeological sites, she drove home
to London after completing one of the very
first international Land Rover expeditions.
She published an account of the journey
entitled A Fool on Wheels: Tangier to
Baghdad by Land-Rover, in 1955.
Miss Toy?s next adventure in 1952
found her exploring in Libya; chronicled
in A Fool in the Desert, in 1956. For this
adventure, she had Pollyanna fitted with
a basic station-wagon-type bodywork on
a wooden frame fabricated by a carpenter
in Kent. On this expedition, she spent
time with Herman Schultze-Dewitz of
the German War Graves Commission,
looking for bodies of Rommel?s lost men
in the desert and went diving on a sunken
ammunition ship near Benghazi. Obviously
her post-war, high-society connections
were instrumental in making such things
happen but the tenacity and bravery
required for a woman to travel solo on such
a journey, was unheard of at the time.
In 1953 Miss Toy and Pollyanna set
off on another expedition from Kuwait
through Saudi Arabia to Qatar and Oman.
In Kuwait, she discovered that women were
not permitted to drive in Saudi Arabia;
unperturbed, she wrote to King Abdulaziz
to ask permission to visit. Permission
was granted and armed with the king?s
invitation she drove across the Arabian
Contents list for the ?umbrella box?
An impressive collection of AA badges!
A signed
copy of
In Search
of Sheba
Peninsula to Jeddah. In this post-war
period, Saudi Arabia was just starting
large-scale oil production and Toy?s
account of the journey published in
1957 was entitled A Fool Strikes Oil.
By this time, Miss Toy was becoming
a significant character and attracted
the attention of ?those nice people
at Rover?. In 1956-7, Rover sponsored
Miss Toy and Pollyanna to be the first
Land Rover to drive round the world. The
journey took her through Europe, Turkey,
Pakistan, India, Burma, Thailand, Cambodia,
Malaya and Singapore before driving across
Australia. Pollyanna was then shipped to
San Francisco and returned to England
from New York. She chronicled the first
global Land Rover expedition in, Columbus
was Right! Rover Round the World, in 1958.
She wasn?t particularly mechanically
minded so it was just as well that Pollyanna
proved to be very reliable. She travelled
light and though Rover had insisted on
fitting a capstan winch for the round the
world trip, she never needed to use it.
Despite travelling alone, she was never
armed, choosing instead to carry a hammer
or a Moroccan police truncheon!
By this time, Pollyanna was a relatively
old vehicle with some 200,000 miles under
its wheels so to
continue the positive,
up-to-date marketing image, in
1959, Rover replaced Pollyanna with 5751
WD, a brand new Series II 109in Martin
Walter-built ?Dormobile? which she then
drove from Timbuktu to Tripoli (chronicled
in Way of the Chariots in 1964). Miss Toy
never really bonded with the new vehicle
which proved to be less reliable than her
beloved Pollyanna.
Rover donated Pollyanna to a technical
college in Chesterfield where it was used as
a project vehicle and also used to compete
at Land Rover owners? club events and trials
in the 1960s. A search in the British Pathe
archives will find a short film from 1964
from a Land Rover club event with footage
of various Land Rovers, including Pollyanna.
There is also footage shot from inside
Pollyanna with the windscreen folded down,
clearly showing Miss Toy?s first aid box still
attached to the bulkhead grab handle.
In the 1970s, Pollyanna was then sold to
a Mr Shakespeare who eventually tracked
Miss Toy down and reunited the old
travelling companions. In 1989, aged 80,
she bought her old friend back and decided
to have it recommissioned for another
epic round-the-world trip. This led on to
a new chapter of adventure and a special
relationship with Series One expert Guy
Pollyanna has had a number of speedos!
62 JUNE 2017
www.classiclandrover.com
Pollyanna?s steering is remarkably good for an 80in
?In 1998, Miss Toy
and Pollyanna took
second place in Land
Rover?s ?Search for a
Legend? competition?
Tom plans to recreate the wooden hard top
from the 1950s
Miss Toy was a journalist and playwright
Hemet Cavalcaders is a Californian 4x4 club
www.classiclandrover.com
Pickford and his son Tom.
By this time, Miss Toy had moved to
Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire and she
entrusted the work to Guy?s Workshop
based in Bicester. Guy produced a
meticulous list of works required to prepare
it for yet another round of globe-trotting,
from installing a new rear diff, fitting a
new water pump, to securing the essential
Pollyanna badge to the door. The coachbuilt hard top from the 1952 expedition
to Libya had long gone so Guy fitted a
factory-built hard top and locks to the
door flaps to improve security. He also put
together essential spares in a beautifullybuilt dovetail-jointed plywood box. In
1990, and in her early 80s, Miss Toy and
Pollyanna headed off on their second
round-the-world trip though some of the
route was interrupted by growing conflict
in the Middle East. The pair also took a
trip across the Alps, following the famous
Hannibal Trail.
In the early 1990s, Tom was a teenager
and built up a friendship with Miss Toy. He
learned to drive in Pollyanna in the fields
long before he passed his test and helped
out with her press work. In 1998, Miss Toy
and Pollyanna took second place in Land
Rover?s ?Search for a Legend? competition
as part of the company?s 50th Anniversary
celebration. First place went to diplomat
Hugh Leach and his Series II called Martha,
though many thought Pollyanna would
have been a worthy winner. Land Rover
itself is still highly proud of the incredible
achievements of this famous vehicle. ?The
Pollyanna Expedition? appears on the
company?s official website and the page even
invites you to share your own ?Defender?
journey. Also as part of the 50th Anniversary
celebrations, Tom and a couple of friends
drove Pollyanna to an event in Samedan in
Switzerland during August 1998.
Miss Toy died in 2001 aged 93 and it was
her wish that Pollyanna should remain in
the Pickford?s care. Guy has now retired to
rural Shropshire so Tom has taken over the
JUNE 2017 63
SERIES ONE
mantle of guardian and has continued to
use, enjoy and share the vehicle with fellow
Land Rover enthusiasts.
He regularly attends shows throughout the
year and has even loaned her out for use
on Peter Wales? Annual Charity Land Rover
Run from Kent to Northern France, the
Netherlands and Belgium.
Tom has recently carried out essential
maintenance including repairs to the
bulkhead top rail and a sympathetic
re-spray ? a slightly controversial move
to some but Tom explained that he saw
the new paint as part of his essential
maintenance. She certainly looks and drives
beautifully; the engine is exceptionally
quiet despite the huge mileage (it has been
rebuilt a couple of times) and the steering
very light and manoeuvrable.
The bodywork is still pretty much
original today with a number of holes
showing evidence of the coach-built hard
top built for the 1952 trip and which
stayed on throughout all of Miss Toy?s
expeditions. It was probably removed
when Rover passed it on to the Chesterfield
technical college and was no doubt
scrapped. Before becoming one of the
country?s top Series One restorers, Tom?s
professional background was in carpentry
so he plans at some point to fabricate a
new top based on historical photographs,
returning Pollyanna?s iconic
silhouette with
side windows and
1,595cc engine has been rebuilt a couple of times
Miss Toy?s first aid box
Bodywork is pretty much original
wooden door trims. The sturdily-built
spares box is still in the back with a typed
list of contents and Tom refers to this as an
?umbrella box? ? you hope you won?t need
it but if it rains you?ll be very glad of it!
Pollyanna has been in the media spotlight
since the earliest days and still continues
to be a ?poster? vehicle. Last year its image
was used on MAC Tools Land Rover
tool chest, continuing its role as a brand
ambassador. Today Land Rover prides itself
on the adventurous image of its products
but most people?s expeditions will pale into
insignificance in comparison to the
indomitable Pollyanna
and Miss Toy.
a
Pollyanna has been
driven round the
world twice
64 JUNE 2017
www.classiclandrover.com
Comptons2000.indd 1
13/04/2017 10:00
VINTAGE ESSENTIALS
THE ROAD GOES EVER ON
John Carroll?s enthusiasm for old road maps can be traced back to his childhood
WORDS AND PICTURES JOHN CARROLL
I
t might be the long highways of 1950s
America that spring to mind when
fuel branded road maps are discussed.
Certainly such ?gas station? memorabilia
does conjure up the America of Jack
Kerouac and Johnny Cash but there?s
similar ephemera to be collected closer to
home. The terminology might be different
- petrol stations and dual carriageways
rather than gas stations and freeways
- but the branded road map wasn?t an
exclusively American thing.
My enthusiasm for maps may well have
started in those ?are we there yet?? days of
my Morris Minor childhood. I was eager
to know where we were going and my
parents - patient as always - explained the
differences between the different coloured
roads and all the symbols used on printed
maps. Like many fondly-remembered
things from my childhood, it was the roads
of North Wales where it started. The petrol
stations on the A543 and the A5 had
rotating racks of maps for sale and their
illustrated covers offered tempting views
of places that I hadn?t yet seen.
Looking back it seems that all the
petrol companies offered them; National
Benzole, Shell, Mobil, Esso and BP and,
to be of use to motorists, covered whole
regions. This meant the size of the map
would cover lengthy journeys in sufficient
detail to allow accurate navigation in
those pre-satnav years. Different editions
were printed and reflect the advent of
motorways, bypasses and ever-extending
dual carriageways.
When I look at the selection pictured
here, they sub consciously but
?As collectors?
items they are more
curiosities than
things of value?
unashamedly, allude to the 20th century
road poems of G K Chesterton and John
Betjeman, The Rolling English Road
and Meditation on the A30 respectively.
The American maps of this type may
reek of Route 66 and pink Cadillacs but
these of the British Isles offer a glimpse
into ancient corners of the old shires
and border towns with welcoming
cover images of Ludlow, Cornwall and
Tarbert Castle.
As collectors? items they are more
curiosities than things of value and they
turn up regularly in charity shops and
secondhand bookshops. A glance at eBay
suggests that those advertised at �95
each are unlikely to sell. I can?t say that I
have deliberately sought any of these out
or consciously collected them. Somehow
I have ended up with a box full and they
appeal to the cartologist in me and my
enthusiasm for the decades that my Series
Land Rovers belong to.
The pictured selection contains, at bottom
left, a National Benzole map with a mustard
cover from the 1950s. The majority of the
remainder date from the 1960s especially
the two different red top editions of the
same Esso maps and the National Benzole,
BP, Mobil and Shell maps, centre top,
belong to the Series III 1970s.
Some are dog-eared, some have been
written on and others are hardly used so
I?d estimate that there?s not much more
than � value in the pictured selection.
However memories of those red-topped
Esso maps in a Morris Minor glovebox are
priceless; I unfolded a couple of them in
the mid-sixties and started to follow them
down the road that, in Tolkien?s words
?goes ever on and on.?
a
66 JUNE 2017
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P.A BLANCHARD & CO.
EX MILITARY LANDROVER SPECIALISTS, CLAY LANE, SHIPTONTHORPE, YORK, UK YO43 3PU
TEL: +44 (0)1430 872765 | FAX: +44 (0)1430 872777
www.pablanchard.co.uk | email: info@pablanchard.co.uk
EX MOD SPARES,
SURPLUS STORES
& EQUIPMENT
checkout our facebook page & surplus stores page.
1000?s of series parts stocked 1948 - 1984
for military and civilian models.
telephone or
place your order on our website.
wanted
new land rover parts purchased in any quantity
PA Blanchford FP.indd 1
14/02/2017 11:57
SERIES III
Early
Retirement
WORDS AND PICTURES SARAH LEAMY
Thom Moran?s daily worker, a 1971 Series
III 109in Military GS, has finally earned itself a rest
68 JUNE 2017
www.classiclandrover.com
Series 109in at work
?
I
?ve done everything on that 109in for
the past 14 years, from every oil change,
suspension and new springs, brakes,
driveshaft, everything to keep it running
off-road in the Ortiz Mountains. I need a
break too, you know?,? says Thom Moran.
It?s true. I?ve known Thom and Elisa for
more than a decade in this tiny mountain
town of 350 in rural New Mexico and he
has been working on, and taking care of,
this daily driver all that time, although at
one point he realised he didn?t have to do
every repair.?
That was a mistake though, the local
mechanics who were working on a new
driveshaft didn?t get him the greased fittings
for the U-bolts as requested, and in the
process they also broke the yoke, leaving a
hairline crack, but didn?t tell him.
His Land Rover journey began in the late
nineties with a Defender 90 NAS, an allblack 1994, that he and Elisa bought while
living in Colorado. They added a winch,
suspension kit, and double batteries and an
extra seat in the back for seven-year-old
daughter, Claire.
The first time they went out in it they
drove into the hills through the snow and
slipped into a ditch. Embarassing? Yes,
Thom grins at the memory. ?Elisa walked
to the nearest town to get help, it was
probably half a mile away. I sat in the
Defender. Then I realised that this vehicle
could do much more than I?d given it
credit for. In low four, I plowed deeper
into the snowbank, up through the ditch
and then kept going until I was out onto
the highway.?
They then joined a few local Land Rover
clubs, explored Moab and Colorado, and
learnt much more about what they could
tackle with such a vehicle. His childhood
dreams of owning a Land Rover were
satisfied, it took some 20 years to find and
afford one, but that Defender 90 was just
what he needed.
He also found a 1966 Series IIA Land
Rover for sale online, one that ran but
was bashed up from a rough life in the
mountains, a hard life, but Thom bought
it and stored it at a friends' place in New
Mexico until they moved there shortly after.
The Defender ended up being used fully in
its new home, for his work as a carpenter
and for other jobs that came up. He tells me
of towing a caravan out of the back roads.
It had been sitting on some flat high desert
land for decades and needed to be moved.
The only way to reach it on the 16,000
acres was driving down a dried-up riverbed,
avoiding the quicksand, and following
the tracks until they got closer, a mile or
so of desert ahead of them, full of juniper
and cacti. With some metal ladders to get
Thom in the 109in
Thom
driving
the 10
9in
www.classiclandrover.com
109in as a workhorse
?Tuning the
109in was
another testing
moment as the
timing was set
for sea level
in Georgia?
JUNE 2017 69
SERIES III
109in Series
Time for some work
Thom
, NM
Sands
White
t
a
in
109
Elisa in 109in
70 JUNE 2017
it down the steep sandy
drop, they slowly towed
it out and back down the
riverbed to the highway,
some four miles or more.
Thom also used it as a
hoist to take out an engine
from an old Toyota, with
chains over the thick wooden
beam across their gate, he winched out the
motor only to find a handful of locals had
turned up to watch. That was one aspect
of having such a unique vehicle that made
both Thom and Elisa uncomfortable; the
attention sometimes would be too much.
They sold the 1966 Series Station Wagon
after playing with it locally, trundling
around the dirt roads but Thom never
invested too much time or energy into
improving it. They then sold the Defender.
He had a short period without any Land
Rovers but then he found a 1971 Series III
109in Military GS for sale in Georgia. After
seeing the paperwork and photographs, he
bought it and had it shipped cross country.
This is the Land Rover I know. He?s had it
for 14 years now and put more than100,000
miles on it, nearly all off-road. Thom
wanted a work truck, a daily driver, it?s just
that for him, his jobs mostly take him down
really rough back roads, and so he keeps
the hubs locked to shift on the fly, ready for
those river beds, rocky lined hills and along
washed out dirt tracks to get to the many
homes hidden in the Ortiz Mountains in and
around Madrid.
Shortly after bringing the 109in to New
Mexico, Thom and his daughter Claire
were paid to drive it to White Sands for a
photoshoot, some five hours south, a huge
national park that covers 144,000 acres
of gypsum sand dunes. It?s a breathtaking
setting and while the photographers and
model worked, Claire played in the sand
dunes with her dad.
Since then, the Series has worked hard and
reliably. ?It has never left me stranded in 14
years,? adds Thom. Although, one challenge
to owning a vehicle with a carburetor at
elevations ranging from 6000-8500 feet is that
vapour lock in summer is a constant hassle.
Thom?s solution was to keep the fuel pump
wrapped in a flannel and whenever he had
to drive to Santa Fe, 30 miles each way,
he?d pour cold water on the rag and keep
it moist. The Land Rover?s unpressurised
www.classiclandrover.com
1971 Series III
109in Military
British market yet LHD
TCL 528K
Chassis #91100220A
If anyone knows anything more about
this 109in, Thom would love to hear
from you.
Thom Moran, the proud owner
system doesn?t like the ethanol heavy gas
for sale these days.
He only recently put in an electric fuel
pump inline so now there is always a
back-up. Tuning the 109in was another
testing moment as the timing was set for
sea level in Georgia and the military timing
marks are slightly different to civilian
Series IIIs which was the only manual
he had originally. Like with everything
else mechanical, Thom read his manuals,
checked forums, talked to other owners via
email, and finally just tackled it himself,
working it out by trial and error and his
confidence has built over the years.
In the village just three miles away, Thom
knew of an early Series IIA that was sitting
in a yard. He persuaded the owner Don to
sell it to him for a few hundred dollars but
getting it out became an afternoon?s work.
The 1963 Land Rover had been driven
for a decade or so and then ?stored? in the
back yard since 1975. It was a wreck and
Thom only really wanted a few parts from it
including the tailgate and flap. The hard top
was the main attraction and I helped one
day this winter taking it off and storing it.
Of course it wasn?t as easy as we?d hoped,
but Thom, Elisa and I got it off in one piece
and tucked it behind a shed at their home.
Elisa gave me the rear-view mirror and
Thom said he?d lend me the tailgate and flap
for my 1973 Series III, but I?ll have to give
it back someday. The next day, Jim Coryat,
who owns the Rover Ranch in Mora County,
NM, took it away to use as a display in a zoo!
When I ask Thom what?s next, he smiles,
?I?ve got another truck for a daily driver
now, and so I?m doing nothing for a while.
I?ve done so much over the past 15 years,
I?m beat. I need a break! But, I?ll fix it up,
rebuild the engine, maybe restore it? Who
knows? But I?m not selling it, nor am I
going to let anything happen to it. Hey, did
I show you the manual? See, four pages on
how to destroy it, the military were serious
about not letting it get into the wrong
hands. No worries here, the 109in stays with
us. It?s safe. Just taking a well earned rest,
like me.?
a
ot
o sho
phot
r
o
f
9in
in 10
ding
n
a
t
ia s
Beal
Defender 90
in Madrid
Sarah?s 88in and Thom?s 109in
?Thom never
invested too
much time or
energy into
improving it?
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 71
Kelmarsh.indd 1
08/03/2017 14:13
Following the removal of the motorsport roll cage, John
Carroll?s 80in trialler evolves into a less specialised
Land Rover and offers wind-in-the-hair motoring
WORDS AND PICTURES JOHN CARROLL
80IN FLAT SCREEN
?Removing the
cage would also
make the Land
Rover look less like
something from
Mad Max?
On a local green lane in the autumn sunshine
The number of layers required increased as the temperature dropped
S
ome people change their Land
Rovers frequently and some keep
them for a lifetime. I guess that I?m
in the latter category although things do
change. My Land Rovers tend to evolve
as the years pass and the 80in known as
the Dinosaur is an example. It?s a relative
newcomer to me; bought as junk in
the guise of a trialler with the newness
having worn off. We got it back on the
road in 2003 in time for Tony Sinclair
and Roo Luckett to use it in the Land?s
End to John O?Groats Historic Endurance
Rally.
A current-spec roll cage allowed it to
be used in RTV and CCV trials where its
nickname was proven - it was trials legal
but far from competitive and huge fun.
Nonetheless times moved on and CCV
trials designed for coiler 80in specials,
were so tough that trials outings were
reduced to RTV events and, even at these,
the vast amour of red tape made entering
At a HCVS gathering in Huddersfield
www.classiclandrover.com
Although it has evolved, it is still the Dinosaur
and here?s the Triceratops to prove it
a challenge in itself. Time for a change of
plan. Carrying the weight of a MSA-spec
?climbing frame? roll cage about seemed
unnecessary, so the decision to remove
it was made. Removing the cage would
also make the Land Rover look less like
something from Mad Max when the roof
was off and the screen was down. It is still
eligible for RTV trials where a roll cage is
not mandatory. While the 80in?s nonstandard 2,286cc engine was being rebuilt
the cage was removed and the Land Rover
immediately assumed a new personality.
As soon as it came home from Howard
Beaumont?s garage with the engine fully
rebuilt, I took the tilt, hood sticks and
door-tops off then folded the windscreen
down on the bonnet.
For the rest of the autumn I drove it
around in that configuration relying on
a thicker coat and more layers as winter
came on rather than change its ?flat pack?
look. Spare time was in short supply in
those autumn months but I squeezed in
The long way back from Tesco on a Tuesday
a spot of gentle greenlaning and a visit
to a Historic Commercial Vehicle Society
(HCVS) gathering on Great Northern
Street in Huddersfield. However, liking
the way it had evolved, the main use was
what would be described on the insurance
certificate as ?social, domestic and
pleasure? like going to the supermarket
and the Post Office on weekdays.
Eventually, I put it in the shed and
opted for a Land Rover with a roof for the
winter but, with the daffodils of spring
in evidence it?s time to get it out again
as there are dates in the diary where it?ll
be needed - not least the Patina National
RTV trial in June where it?ll be used to set
out the sections. See you there?
a
JUNE 2017 73
War&Peace.indd 1
11/04/2017 12:16
Clare Westbrook?s daughter takes part in
her first ever trial ? and does rather well
WORDS AND PICTURES CLARE WESTBROOK
TEENAGE TYRO
?In true Land
Rover style, Nellie
broke down?
Franki with the day?s trophies
I
was lucky enough to start driving at an
early age. I?ve been hooked ever since
and believe it?s still an important life
skill, even in today?s ?greener? times; which
is why I?ve been keen to get daughter
Franki behind the wheel for years.
Finally, after watching the Comp Safari at
the ALRC Nationals, she?s found something
in the Land Rover ?scene? which excites
her; and she was amazed to discover she
can compete, although thankfully not at
that level yet!
The ALRC regulations allow drivers from
13 years old in TYRO (Try Your Rover
Out) trials and our local competitive club
? the Wye & Welsh ? welcomes young
participants.
After a few lessons on private land in
a ?proper? car, we took Nellie, my 1967
IIA, out into the fields and Franki had her
first taste of old-fashioned driving: no
power steering, no synchromesh on first or
second gear, no modern wing mirrors and
as she said: ?The turning circle of a small
continent.?
I forget how difficult these vehicles can
be to drive, but she did remarkably well
and more importantly, she loved it. She
found a friend who was keen to have a
go too, and we planned to join the Wye &
Welsh so the girls could enter the TYRO at
the Club?s Baskerville Challenge. In true
Land Rover style, Nellie broke down; and
despite the girls? best efforts to fix it, we
attended as spectators instead.
Undaunted by what they saw (and
definitely excited by the RTV) we made
www.classiclandrover.com
format is an early start for scrutineering,
four driving sections in the morning, a
break for lunch (there?s usually a catering
van on site), then four more sections in
the afternoon. Each section has 12 pairs
of markers or gates, starting at 12 points
and decreasing to one. The aim is to drive
between the gates without stopping or
hitting a gate; and you must pass through
the gates with the white marker on your
right and the red marker on your left. If
you commit a foul you accrue the number
of points on that gate; a ?clean? section is
worth zero. At the end of the day, points
are tallied and prizes awarded to those
with the lowest scores.
We divided into a group doing the TYRO
Walking the first section in the mist
?Slalom? style gates can be tricky in a Series
a date for the club?s ?Taster Day? and
headed home for more practice. After
plenty of low gear work, reversing and
manoeuvring, the girls were ready to try a
course. I set-up a basic one using garden
canes, retired to a safe distance, and they
spent an afternoon getting to grips with
red/left and white/right!
The Taster Day dawned cold and foggy,
but it didn?t dampen our spirits. When
you?re competing, it?s a long day: the
and those trying the RTV (Road Taxed
Vehicle trial); they were heading for more
challenging terrain. We walked each
section before driving it and the marshals
were very helpful with hints and tips;
the land was much rougher, muddier and
steeper than our practice fields and the
driving was going to be more technical
than anything the girls had done before.
They weren?t the only young drivers,
but they were the only ones in a Series
Land Rover; all the others juniors had the
advantage of power steering, some even
had automatic gearboxes to help. I rode
as passenger for both girls and we quickly
learned a lot about vehicle positioning;
even then, in a Series we simply couldn?t
navigate some of the tightly-spaced gates
without a shunt or two. Both girls ?aced?
the muddiest section where others were
foundering; we were only recovered once
and we only hit one tree. I?m proud to
say they came first and second in their
class. More importantly, we had a great
day in the great outdoors; not a tablet or
smartphone in sight!
a
To compete (other than taster
days) you need to be a member of
a club affiliated to the Association of
Land Rover Clubs; a list of these clubs,
plus further details and regulations
pertaining to competitions and vehicle
specifications can be found on the
ALRC website: www.alrc.co.uk
JUNE 2017 75
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BOOKS / MANUALS
SPARES
VEHICLES / PARTS
CLASSIC RANGE ROVER
HAYNES WORKSHOP MANUAL
WANTED
88 SERIES 2A/3, 1969,
TUB AND HARD TOP
FORWARD CONTROL 2B
BODY WITH SIDES
sound condition, but paintwork tatty,
These are needed to complete a
FC project in Australia, we have
contacts in the UK for dismantle
and ready for shipping,
FIVE EVENT TYRES,
wrong ones fitted to my land rover
series 1, 205/80 R16 104T,
approx 30 miles done �0 ono,
defender seats driver/passenger,
all complete, vgc inc runners �0,
West Midlands, 07831 579848
philstokes@blueyonder.co.uk
Gwent, Wales,
07989 951895
JEEPS / LANDROVERS
�0 ono, collection only,
07887 381222
2 NEW INSA TURBO DAKAR
MUD TERRAIN TYRES
VERY RARE RED RANGE
ROVER CLASSIC 200 TDI
PETROL TANK FOR
LPG CONVERSION ON
CLASSIC RANGE
LAND ROVER SERIES 2A,
1964,
109 for restoration,
good chassis and van top, ex army,
good engine and gearbox with V5
needs foot wells
�0
tel 07712 019343
tel 0061 885247269
craighaylymac.co.uk
Rover with low filler cap.
Any condition considered if
the price is right.
215/65/16
�
Call 01732 456172 or
07444 548488.
Can deliver free in Sevenoaks area
1990, manual classic Rang Rover,
used daily 40 mpg, high mileage
but new engine and LT77 gearbox
less than 50,000 miles ago, sound
chassis, good overall, Lancs, �95
01254 776635
brian.massey@btconnect.com
5 750 R16C MICHELIN
LATITUDE ON DEFENDER RIMS
STAINLESS STEEL
PETROL TANK
1 unused spare, 2 8mm, 2 7.5mm.
proffesionally painted at �0 cost,
hardly used. �0
For LPG conversion on high filler cap
Classic Range Rover �5. Injector
emulators and harness for V8 �.
As supplied by RPI Engineering.
Essex
01376 583601 / 07518067510
Contact 01673858043
(Lincoln)
Contact 01673 858043
(Lincoln Area)
LANDROVER S186,
1957
in 100% original,
chassis all good bulkhead,
good canvas top
no dents
Devon
07866003493
LAND ROVER S2A
1961
JULY ISSUE
COPY DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY 17TH MAY
ON-SALE: WEDNESDAY 7TH JUNE
To Place your FREE ad call Classic Land Rover on 01780 755131
1970 to 1980,
clean white pages,
original manual,
not reprint,
�75
Just fill in the coupon opposite and return to:
Losing storage must sell MOT?d until
July 17 New Clutch New Brakes
New wheel cylinders All suspension
Bushes replaced Replace Copper
pipes New flexi hoses New Alternator
conversion Rewired with new lamps
New Steering Damper New Steering
Joints 4 x New Tyres New doors and
door tops �245 ono
For more details,
call Jon on 07740518453
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JUNE2017FREE ADS.indd 77
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DIFFICULTY RATING:
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ROLL CAGE RETROFIT
blar blar blar
WORDS AND PICTURES JOHN CARROLL
GOING TO THE BAR
Adrian?s One Ten Station Wagon gets some roll-over protection
I
n the long term, the end of Defender
production will undoubtedly have an
effect on the production of accessories
for the model. Without new models for
commercial users requiring large items
such as roll cages, for example, it is likely
that fewer aftermarket components will
be made for them. This means many of
the enthusiast-owned, coil-sprung utilities
will be maintained and upgraded with
pattern, used and reconditioned parts in
the same way as Series Land Rovers have
been for the past 20-plus years. Think how
currently fashionable and sought-after old
accessories - PTO winches, freewheeling
hubs, overdrives etc - are for enthusiasts?
Series Land Rovers.
This idea can be applied to the coil-
78 JUNE 2017
sprung models and an example of this is
Adrian Cox?s early One Ten Station Wagon
which he has accessorised to suit family
camping needs. Since preparing it, he
has hankered after some enhanced rollover protection and recently acquired a
professionally-made, proprietary roll cage
from a former National Coal Board 110
Station Wagon. With careful removal from
the vehicle this could then be transferred
to his own earlier Station Wagon to offer
?This idea can be
applied to the
coil-sprung models?
some retro Camel Trophy-inspired chic.
Roll cages of this type were previously
manufactured by companies such as
Safety Devices and used on high profile
Land Rovers such as the numerous
generations of Sandglow-painted Camel
Trophy Land Rovers and similar.
The different ages and versions of 110s
mean that although the roll cage would ?fit?
in the loosest sense, it had to be fitted and
tweaked to suit the earlier model. This job
was entrusted to Kev Kelleher at Howard
Beaumont?s garage near Halifax. The roll
cage is of a bolt-together design rather
than the one-piece welded, motorsport type
and in the absence of any instructions, the
job can be likened to some sort of threedimensional jigsaw puzzle.
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1. The roll cage was carefully removed from
the donor vehicle and each part labelled to aid
reassembly
2. To ensure that the mounting holes were drilled
in the right places on the body of the recipient
One Ten, measurements were taken and templates
made
3. The roll cage has substantial mounting brackets
that bolt to the chassis through the floor of the One
Ten?s passenger compartment
4. Substantial brackets mount the cage to the
vehicle. This one has been labelled offside to help
sort the components for reassembly
5. The rear hoop bolts through the barrel-sided
portion of the body and is visible so the holes must
be accurately marked for drilling
6. A second hoop bolts through the bodywork
immediately behind the second pair of doors. The
nearside is being fitted here
7. Brackets such as this bolt to the chassis
outriggers and then the roll cage feet bolt to them.
This is the offside
8. Careful positioning of components such as these
hoops is crucial to make it both fit the Land Rover,
allow assembly and look right
9. The roll cage is designed to offer protection to
the passengers within the Land Rover and relies
on bolted together tubular components
10. The front nearside hoop interfered with
the bracket for the snorkel in the wing so some
judicious trimming was called for
11. Once Kev was happy with the fit all the roll
cage assembly bolts could be tightened ahead of
the fixing bolts
12. The hoops that go over the vehicle and down to
the chassis are braced by these horizontal tubes as
well as diagonal ones inside the rear load space
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THE DOVEY WINCH PART EIGHT
blar blar blar
WORDS AND PICTURES JOHN CARROLL
HIT THE ROOF
Putting the hard-top roof on a Series II or III Land Rover is straightforward
but there are a few dodges to ensure that the new roof fits well
O
ne thing about this 1982 Series III
88in hard-top that has bothered me
since we started work on it, was
the roof. It contained several bolt holes
- including a badly-filled one in the side
- a couple of dents and a rotating vent. It
wasn?t essential to change it but, as Series
III hard-tops are cheap and plentiful, doing
so would smarten up the whole Land Rover
considerably. As it happened, Jason Lindsay
had one among his secondhand Land
Rover parts that was straight and, with the
exception of fixed side windows, identical. I
was ambivalent about the windows but they
do, undoubtedly, enhance visibility. In turn
this makes old Land Rovers easier to drive
in traffic and safer at angled T-junctions.
80 JUNE 2017
The hard-top comprises three large
sections, namely the two sides that
incorporate the rear corner windows and
the roof panel with the stiffening ribs and
angled portion that comes down to the top
of the windscreen.
The fixed side windows in the one we
are fitting seem to be original equipment
although many Land Rovers have been
fitted with aftermarket side windows over
the years. Aside from the ?blind? hard-top,
other variations of such roofs incorporate
the second skin of the tropical roof,
windows in the radius of the roof sides alpine lights - and sliding side windows
especially in Station Wagon models.
The other variation is at the rear, some
have a tailgate and the so-called top hung
?cat flap? door combination while plenty
more have the side hung Safari rear door.
Both offer advantages; the tailgate as a
table for ?tailgate tea? on greenlaning trips
and the safari door for easier access for rear
seat passengers. In the case of this Land
Rover we are sticking with the Safari door
arrangement that it came from the factory
with - proved by the lack of antiluce drop
catch fasteners in the galvanised cappings.
Changing one hard-top for another isn?t
the most complex job to be carried out
during the recommissioning of this Series
III but there are a few things to be aware of
to get a nice fit to the roof and ensure that
the doors close.
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1. The rear door is removed first as its top hinge is
attached to the portion of roof to be removed and
its lower hinge to the body
2. The seat belts must be removed as must the
fixing bolts at each corner of the hard-top. Top
seat belt brackets are probably later 90 items
3. The middle of the hard-top?s bottom edge is
connected to the galvanised waist rail on each side
of the vehicle with these brackets
4. The old roof is lifted clear by Jason and Ryan.
It is easier with two people to lift the unit that is
cumbersome rather than heavy
5. This Land Rover has had the fixed seatbelt
converted to an inertia reel one at some point. We
may change this in due course
6. The new roof - with side windows - is lifted into
place over the Land Rover waist rail as a straight
swap for the original
7. There is considerable adjustment in each of the
fixing bolts with slotted and oversize holes that
allows an accurate fit to the tub to be achieved
8. Having slackened the fixing bolts, Ryan pulls the
roof into position to ensure the rear door will fit in
the opening the roof creates
9. Slight pressure on the pry bar through one bolt
hole allows others to be lined up across the top of
the windscreen frame
10. A row of bolts is used to fix the top of the
windscreen frame to the internal portion of the
Land Rover roof?s frame
11. The rear view mirror bracket is also bolted
to the frame. A seal between the roof and the
windscreen frame keeps the rain out
12. The front corner fixings also allow adjustment
in order to get a neat and square fit of the roof
onto the body and form the door frame
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JUNE 2017 81
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HOT SPRINGS
Having a keen interest in our industrial heritage, Clare Westbrook couldn?t
resist a visit to Jones Springs of Darlaston to see how leaf springs are made
F
or Series Land Rover owners,
springs can be a bit of a hot topic.
Search any forum and you?ll find
regular questions, long threads and
heated discussions about the pros and
cons of multi-leaf versus parabolic, how
you should look after them and (dare
I say it) even advocates of the dreaded
coil! Personally, I?ve tried multi-leaf and
parabolics and have serious spring envy
whenever I see a perfectly level, wellsprung Series Land Rover: mine always
seems to lean. So I decided I?d try to
find out more about leaf springs, in an
attempt to make an informed decision
about my next set.
Over the years, leaf springs have
appeared in many forms, from a single
plate to some of today?s huge, multi-leaf
versions for heavy goods trains, but the
basic principle is the same: to improve
vehicle road (or track) holding, handling
and comfort. Apparently, the first leaf
?The multi-leaf spring
is a relatively simple
structure, originally often
made and repaired by the
local blacksmith?
WORDS CLARE WESTBROOK
PICTURES GARRY STUART
82 JUNE 2017
sprung vehicle we know about was
the Roman pilentum: a ?splendid fourwheeled carriage? which was suspended
on two elastic wooden poles, or leaves.
The technique was so successful that
it extended to travelling carriages and
wagons across the Roman empire. Sadly,
like many Roman inventions (concrete,
sanitary systems, under-floor heating) the
techniques largely died with them and leaf
springs don?t reappear in history until the
mediaeval period.
Some historians say the level of Roman
wagon technology and suspension
systems was unreached until the 18th
century or later, when the French
started using a single flat plate on
their carriages. The leaf spring as
we recognise it today was invented
by Obadiah Elliot of London, who
was awarded a patent for ?mounting
carriages on elliptical springs attached to
the axle? in 1804. And frankly, not a lot
has changed since then!
Leaf springs work by flexing. The
original curvature of the leaves, the
flexing and the friction between leaves
as they move, all combine to take the
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MD C
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started out in 1947. Brothers Clifford and
Horace Jones ran a blacksmith?s business
in Wolverhampton where they repaired
car springs. The company grew and
moved to a larger site and then onto the
current premises in 1993. Here it makes
and repairs leaf springs for everything
from a 1900s Stanley Steam Car to Volvo
eight-wheelers and rail locomotives; even
a Victorian rocking horse!
Due to a surge in demand, it?s recently
restarted production of multi-leaf springs
for Series Land Rovers. The factory is a
hive of activity, full of the noise, heat and
smells of a traditional metalworking shop
and there?s a warehouse and stockholding
on site too. Land Rover springs are made
to order; at the moment they can?t make
them quickly enough and are sending them
all over the world, even as far as Hawaii.
Each spring is made according to an exact
working specification and list of parts,
generated from a detailed manufacturing
drawing of the spring for the particular age
and variant of Land Rover.
A Jones leaf spring starts life as a flat bar
of 251A58 silicon manganese spring steel.
The smaller section used for Land Rover
springs is sourced in the UK; the larger
section is imported from Scandinavia and
the company never uses what it considers
to be far inferior Chinese or Indian steel.
The bar is cut to length using a powerful
guillotine shear; the noise of its rollers and
the crash of the shears is impressive. After
the lengths are cut they?re scarfed to remove
defects, drilled with the centre hole and
the longest leaf moves to the ?eye? rolling
process. This leaf is heated to 1200?C and
the eye is formed in a succession of roll and
heating cycles. It?s checked and adjusted to
ensure a slight interference fit, so it grips
the bush. After that, the leaves are sent to
the main furnace.
1. Steel bar waiting for use
2. Cutting the bar to length
3. Measuring to make sure eye is in the right place
4. Heating the end before rolling the eye
5. Beginning the eye rolling process
6. The eye-rolling machine
ager Kevin Partidge
MD Carl Jones and production man
vehicle?s weight and absorb unevenness
in the terrain. The more leaves there are,
the heavier the vehicle they can support.
They?re fixed either laterally, with one
spring at each wheel as in Land Rovers
or transversely, with a spring across each
axle. The latter were fitted in the Model T
Ford and, more recently, various Triumphs
including the Herald, Spitfire and Vitesse,
which contributed to their lively handling
around corners!
The only real innovation in leaf springs
has been the introduction of the parabolic
spring. These springs have fewer leaves
than conventional springs and they only
touch at the centre and ends, rather than
along their entire length. Each leaf tapers
in thickness from the centre to the outer
ends and this tapering is parabolic: with
every centimetre of length the thickness
decreases proportionately to its length.
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It sounds complicated, but what it really
means is that each leaf is roughly the
same shape as a complete multi-leaf
spring, so each leaf acts as a separate
spring, which gives a better ride. Although
Kevin Partridge, the production manager
at Jones Springs, previously worked on
developing the first parabolic springs in
the UK, the company concentrates on
traditional multi-leaf springs for Land
Rover customers who are putting their
vehicles back to the original specification.
The multi-leaf spring is a relatively
simple structure, originally often made
and repaired by the local blacksmith;
and that?s exactly how Jones Springs
?Dwell time in the
furnace depends
on the thickness of
the steel?
JUNE 2017 83
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7. Finishing the eye by hand
8. Sets of leaves ready for heat treatment and
bending
9. Leaves being heated in the main furnace
10. The curve is formed by hand
11. Large springs take more handling
12. These springs are for an airport fuel carrier at
Birmingham Airport
13. The leaves are quenched in an oil bath
14. The oil flares as the hot metal hits it
15. Large leaves take two men to form them
16. Land Rover springs, just painted
17. Finished leaves for a variety of vehicles
18. British springs sold across the world
84 JUNE 2017
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Stocks of U-bolts
Tradition tools and techniques; the wooden
block absorbs reverberation
Fairbank Brearley made some of the best
equipment
Dwell time in the furnace depends on
the thickness of the steel; it has to reach
980?C before it can be worked. The white
hot leaves are ?hooked? through the central
hole and dragged to the edge of the
furnace, where they spark and flame. Then
it?s onto the forming bench, where they?re
beaten into shape against a former.
The men work quickly and deftly, there?s
a rhythm to the process: the thunk as the
hot leaf hits the bench, several blows to
form the curve, a few adjustments by eye
to ensure the tolerances, then into the
oil bath before the steel cools to 800?C.
The leaves sizzle and the oil flares. This
quenching process hardens the steel and
the skilled staff can tell by eye whether a
hardened leaf is ?good? or not - apparently
the colour gives it away.
Once all the leaves are cool, they?re
assembled into a spring with the centre
bolt and rebound clips, and painted ready
for use. Everything is done by hand and it
takes about 24 man hours to make a set of
Land Rover leaf springs. Experience really
counts: every process is judged by eye
busy looking for a replacement. It?s also
expanding the workforce, investing in
new equipment to increase production of
Land Rover springs, has been involved
in a Discovery Channel project, regularly
works with the Car SOS team and produces
springs for a prestigious heritage project.
Maintenance of multi-leaf springs can
be a hotly debated topic in Land Rover
circles. Some advocate wrapping them,
others favour greasing or oiling them,
but Carl Jones, managing director of
Jones Springs, simply advises you make
sure they?re well lubricated at the pivot
points around the eyes. As he points out,
if you wrap your springs, you can?t see
them to assess their condition. I guess he
should know!
?The bar is cut to
length using a
powerful guillotine
shear?
and the skills on display are impressive.
These Land Rover springs are at least
95% UK content; at present the bushes
may be imported, as the company?s UK
supplier has ceased production, but it?s
Jones Springs are available through the
website at www.jones-springs.co.uk
The team at Jones Springs. Left to Right; Brad
Newell, Chris Millard, Wendy Beech, Duncan
Short, Dennis Dale, Brad Edmonds, Rob
Pattison, Wendy Davies, Carl Jones, Paul Hale,
Kevin Partridge
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JUNE 2017 85
86 JUNE 2017
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JONES SPRINGS
UK maufacturers of Landrover
springs to Original Landrover
Specifications made with
British rolled steel
LAND ROVER
? Service ? Repairs ? Restoration
? Chassis Replacement ? MOT Prep
? Welding ? Diagnostics ? Air Con ? Tyres
We can create accurate and precise
springs for all Land Rovers as we have
the original multileaf specifications
for all models and builds
We have the experience and expertise to
help keep your vehicle on the road.
Contact us today for a friendly and helpful service.
NORTH EAST 4 BY 4 LTD
The Independent Land Rover Specialists
Hindwell, Fetteresso, Stonehaven AB39 3UT
Call: 01569 766296
Email: northeast4x4@btconnect.com
www.neast4by4.co.uk
Call: 0121 568 7575
E: sales@jones-springs.co.uk
www.jones-springs.co.uk
STEVE PARKERS LTD
Independent Specialist for Land Rovers� and Range Rovers�
PART AND MAIL ORDER 01706 854222
Discovery 200 TDI conversion into Series & 90/110
Discovery 300 TDI conversion into Series & 90/110
NEW 300 TDI CONVERSION, BOLT ON ENGINE BRACKETS FOR 90/110 & SERIES
WE MANUFACTURE CONVERSION EXHAUSTS SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS
Classic 90
Rustproo?ng
From �0
+ vat
GENUINE & NON GENUINE PARTS
AND ACCESSORIES
Service Kits - Batteries - Engine Parts
- Clutch Kits & Parts - Suspensions Arms Bushes & Bolts - Polybush Kits
- Springs, Brakes & Electrical Parts
- Mild Steel Exhausts
- Performance Brakes Suspension Lift Kits
Side Steps - Alternators & Starters
Full workshop facilities for Servicing and Repairing Defenders 90 and 110
Engine conversions and chassis replacements carried out
as well as general repair work
For more information please ring Kevin Direct on 01706 854223
or Email service@steveparkers.com
Courtesy Hire car available, whilst your vehicle
is being repaired in our workshop
ONLINE ORDERING www.steveparkers.com
Lloyd Street, Whitworth, Rochdale, Lancashire OL12 8AA
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JUNE 2017 87
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We can restore your old brake and clutch cylinder by sleeving them with
stainless steel.
This process is suitable for all hydraulic Brake and Clutch Cylinders,
Remote Servos and Dunlop Pods.
Please visit www.pastparts.co.uk
Please quote CL06/17 to receive 10% discount expires 31/12/17
Component parts for all types of older and Classic Cars, Trucks, Buses, Motorcyles,
Industrial, Plant and Agricultural vehicles.
Units are finished to as near original finish as possible.
Gold and Silver Zinc Plating and Black or Blue Powder Coating is also available.
Our Product range covers:
Brake Master Cylinders
Wheel Cylinders
Brake Servos Remote and
Direct Acting.
Seal Kits and Spares.
Brake and Clutch Hoses
Brake Pads & Shoes
Brake Discs & Drums
3 in 1 Clutch Kits
Clutch Covers
Clutch Plates and Bearings
Water Pumps
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For further information please
contact us at:
Past Parts
Unit 4 Chase Road
Northern Way Industrial Estate
Bury St Edmunds
Suffolk IP32 6NT
(T) 01284 750729
(F) 01284 756240
(E) restore@pastparts.co.uk
(W) www.pastparts.co.uk
JUNE 2017 91
13/04/2017 10:39
SERIES II
Bargain of
the century
Jeff Gaisford of Hilton in KwaZulu ?Natal has
a beautiful example of a 1959 Series II Station
Wagon with a most interesting history
WORDS AND PICTURES ROGER GAISFORD
I
n early 1972 a friend from
Johannesburg mentioned he had
heard of a World War Two Jeep
lying on a farm near Nigel, south east of
Johannesburg. Now World War Two Jeeps
are as rare in South Africa as an honest
politician, and he was going to grab the
relic before someone else did. A day or so
later he reported he had gone to see the
Jeep, only to find it was a Land Rover, a
vehicle he detested. I was a student at the
University of the Witwatersrand at the time
and money was as scarce as a smile from
my brother when asking for a loan.
I managed to beg, borrow and scrape
together R200 in old notes and change, and
persuaded Leigh, a partner in misdemeanour
to accompany me to see the Land Rover.
Leigh was a useful customer. Unlike me
having to rely on footwork, waving a
thumb, buses or the railways to get around,
he had a car, a zed-backed Anglia, a blue
and white job, a car he still has.
The farmer was found to be a real Boer,
the sort the British chased around the
veld a hundred and some years ago. Clad
in slippers, a grubby vest, baggy brown
flannels and drooping Homburg, he was
found with a quart of beer on the back
verandah of his put-together of a farmhouse
listening to rugby on the radio. He indicated
that the Land Rover stood behind the shed
and that we could go and look at it. He
would see us at half-time.
The Land Rover was found as part of a fowl
run - the accommodation part. In faded dark
blue it stood on sagged springs and perished
tyres devoid of air. There was little left of the
once red upholstery. Some windows were
intact, though the gearbox was nowhere to
be seen, and the interior was awash with fowl
manure. Along with scrap farm implements
and rusty drums, the floor panels, gear lever
and seat box were found in the yard. Opening
the bonnet gave hope, for with the exception
of the battery, generator and spark plugs,
everything seemed in order. The fan belt still
hung from the water pump pulley. Affixed to
the radiator grille, a cast aluminium badge
proclaimed the vehicle to be a Land Rover,
and in smaller letters, asserted it was built
in Solihull, Warwickshire, England,
and further, that it was a Four Wheel
Drive Station Wagon. So it was.
Spot on half-time the old fellow
?In the guise of
a police car the
Land Rover had
been fitted with
a searchlight and
mesh screens to
protect windows?
ABOVE: Jeff
Gaisford taking refreshment;
young Jeff examining the R25
Land Rover presented to his father
RIGHT: A
92 JUNE 2017
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Crossing the Mzinyathi River, Old Trucks 2010
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 93
SERIES II
emerged and explained that the ?Lenroverr,?
was in good condition and had been used
by the police in Kenya. He had taken the
generator to charge a battery so he could
listen to rugby on the radio. ?Here is lots of
winds blowing,? he said in his best English.
?So I jus put a propeller on the generator
and fixed it up on a pole, it charges good,?
he declared. The spark plugs had been
used as fishing sinkers and he had sold
the ?gareboks,? to a friend. Somewhat
hesitantly I asked what the old man wanted
for the vehicle. Without blinking he said,
?twenty fife rands.?
In those distant days that was 12 pounds,
10 shillings - a rand being valued at ten
bob. I could hardly believe it. Convention
demanded me giving the motoring marvel
before me another once over, kicking tyres,
and shaking my head and saying, ?Man, this
is a lot of work.? Without letting him see the
wads of money in my pocket, I scratched out
25 rand, and with a ?Dankie seun,? (Thank
you boy) he took the notes and signed a
receipt. There were no documents.
A week or so later our new acquisition,
on borrowed wheels, was towed behind a
friend?s Land Rover home to Pretoria. A
perusal of the Land Rover Owners Workshop
Manual showed that according to engine
and chassis numbers, the vehicle was a 1959
Series II Station Wagon. While cleaning
and rubbing down the bodywork, I found
an old painted-over Kenyan registration
number, KBR 149. In the guise of a police
car the Land Rover had been fitted with
a searchlight and mesh screens to protect
94 JUNE 2017
?This must be one of
the most economical
and cost-effective
vehicles on the road?
Busy with a head overhaul
A lugubrious view
windows, the mountings still intact. The left
hand windscreen pane was made of two
sheets of perspex which could be slid aside to
permit the front passenger extra ventilation,
the ability to shout at miscreants through a
loud hailer, or in more dire circumstances, to
open withering fire with a Webley.
With some ceremony, the Land Rover was
presented to our father on Father?s Day.
It took a year?s work and R300 rand
from the Old Man?s pocket to get the Land
Rover up and running. A secondhand
All as it should be - diesel throttle control a later
adition
www.classiclandrover.com
gearbox was found at Central Used Spares
in Pietermaritzburg, a reconditioned Lucas
generator was fitted, as were new plugs, tie
rod ends, and retreaded 7.50x16 tyres on
wider Forward Control rims. The springs
were reset and upholstery seen to. After a
respray with one of those little diaphragm
spray guns it looked grand in a dark bluey
sea green, the colour of my mother?s dinner
service. Registration and roadworthy COF
was straightforward, and the Old Man?s
Land Rover was on the road.
A maiden voyage of 400 miles was made
to Sodwana Bay on the Zululand Coast, to
visit brother Jeff who had recently joined
the Natal Parks Board as a field ranger.
Cruising at 50mph, the Land Rover ran
like a watch, giving a smidge over 20
miles to the gallon. It was light to handle,
though the un-boosted 10in drums needed
considerable use of the right foot to slow it
down. Runs on the beach the 50 miles from
Sodwana Bay to Cape Vidal showed it quite
able to tackle hard going with ease.
The Old Man used the Land Rover for
Sundowners on Matchstick Hill near Eshowe, Zululand
Jeff and Miranda at Cars in the Park,
Pietermaritzburg 2013
some years before deciding that his sons,
working in the bush, should take it over.
I was then, and still am, dyed in the Jeep
wool, and so brother Jeff took over the
Land Rover for which he had plenty of use.
On a trip from Durban one night a short
while later, he ran a bearing and had to
redo the engine. It was not long after this
that his own car, a Triumph Chicane, was
stolen and so the Land Rover became his
main transport. That was in 1985, and as of
2017, the Land Rover is still his only car.
Although the Land Rover?s petrol
consumption might be deemed heavy,
he owes not a penny on the vehicle,
does his own repairs and maintenance,
and compared to what one must pay for
modern 4x4 vehicles, this must be one of
the most economical and cost-effective
vehicles on the road.
Old Codgers. Paul?s 1963 109in Series IIA and
Jeff?s 1959 Series II
www.classiclandrover.com
JUNE 2017 95
SERIES II
?The original onepiece doors rusted
badly and were
replaced by twopiece units from a
pick-up?
The Land Rover is now running on its
fourth engine, the previous one having been
good for 18 years. It has had its gearbox and
transfer case overhauled, has new springs
and prop shafts and years ago had the 10in
brakes replaced by 11in units from a 109
pickup, so braking has improved greatly.
A clutch plate disintegrated on a trip to
the Transkei Coast some years ago and was
riveted together using a large rock and a
four-pound hammer. The original one-piece
doors rusted badly and were replaced by
two-piece units from a pick-up. Continual
trouble with rear side shafts breaking on the
original Rover back axle had him replacing
it with a much stronger Salisbury unit from
a Series III pick-up. That was the end of side
shaft problems, but the new axle brought a
rumble at a certain speed.
Replacing the axle with one said to be
as new, made no difference, the rumble
apparently having to do with the acute
angle of the rear drive shaft brought about
by fitting the different axle. Jeff finally
solved the rumble by fitting an ENV axle
from an early IIA Forward Control, an
axle with a shorter pinion. However, as
everybody knows, getting spares for an ENV
axle is almost impossible. The ENV may yet
Jeff?s Series II on the beach between nfgh g
fhCape Vidal and Sodwana Bay 1975
A pleased and proud owner
prove to be a quick fix.
This venerable Land Rover still sports
individual Lucas windscreen wiper motors, a
hooter button mounted on an arm attached
to the steering column, a combination
ignition and light switch, a starter push rod
on the scuttle below the instrument panel,
screw out windshield vents, sliding side
windows with push and twist locks, radiator
grille mounted headlights, a double skinned
tropical roof and twin ten-gallon petrol
tanks beneath the front seats, filled by
removing the seat cushions.
Over the years, in fair weather and foul,
the little Land Rover has carried Jeff safely
and reliably around the country. From
St Lucia to Kosi Bay on the Mozambique
border by beach, up and down Sani Pass
and places round about. It has sheltered him
while snowbound in a blizzard, been up and
about the Transkei Coast and to the Great
Babanango Back Road Rallies and Old Trucks
Babanango gatherings held since 1981.
Jeff?s 1959 Land Rover Series II, testimony
to a strong car.
a
On the Old Trucks Babananjo meeting
Buffelshoek near Rorkes Drift 2010
96 JUNE 2017
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Events
June 17 - 18
Bolnhurst Vintage & Country Fayre.
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Tel: 07912 862460
www.bolnhurstrally.org.uk
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YORKSHIRE SPECIALISTS
Traditional Motor
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WE ALSO HAVE
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Hilltop, Burley-in-Wharfedale, ILKLEY, West Yorkshire LS29 7JW
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Contact Michelle Toner for all your
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JohnRichards
surplus
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Ex-Military parts & general surplus including
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Land Rover, Discovery, Range Rover parts
Original, Ex MOD & Pattern parts for all models
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Retail outlet THE SMITHY, WOOD LANE, HINSTOCK, SHROPS. TF9 2TA
Tel No./Fax: 01952 550391
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Contact Roger James
Email: randjjames55@gmail.com
Tel: 01531 820381
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Station Road, Little Bytham,
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01780 410450
david@davidharby.co.uk
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CLASSIC LANDROVERS
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Tel/Fax: 01775 750223
JUNE 2017 97
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Magnetic and Governor
LOOKING BACK
1971: The Major?s Trial
WORDS JOHN CARROLL PICTURES ARCHIVE
Additional notes
L
and Rover?s connection to the
Eastnor Castle estate in Herefordshire
began in late 1960. ?The Major?,
as Major Benjamin Alexander Frederick
Hervey-Bathurst (1920-1997), was
generally known, heard of the Land Rover
engineering department?s requirement for
somewhere secret to test its new 129in
Land Rover, and offered his assistance.
This gradually led to the Eastnor estate
becoming a world-renowned venue for
Land Rover testing. Later, Major HerveyBathurst became the president of the
Midland Rover Owners? Club and this,
indirectly led to the inauguration of the
noted Major?s Trial.
While presenting the prizes at the 1969
National Rally at Eastnor, the major
overheard comments to the effect that ?the
trial was too easy and not challenging
enough because of the dry ground.? He
is reputed to have continued with the
prize-giving before issuing a challenge to
all the clubs to bring their best drivers and
return to Eastnor in October to see if the
sections were still too easy. That October
he laid out the trial himself setting out
?this, indirectly led
to the inauguration
of the noted Major?s
Trial.?
testing sections across the varied ground of
the estate. He donated the much-coveted
Rose Bowl and the Major?s Trial was born.
Midland Rover Owners? Club have run it
ever since although it is now the Major?s
Memorial Trial.
Of this photograph, Land Rover Series
One Club (LRSOC) member Barry Clark,
writes: ?The photograph shows me and
co-driver, Tony Hesketh, competing in
the 1971 Major?s Trial. I have many fond
memories of those heady days. I joined
the Land Rover Club in 1963 when it
was run from Lode Lane by a guy called
Tim Harding. At that time, with about 25
members, the first trial I remember was
in Engine Hole Pit in Bingles Wood near
Coppers End, Hertfordshire. I am still a
member of the LRSOC and served as a
Since 1961, Land Rover engineers
have been using the woodland tracks
and steep slopes of the estate to test
all the mechanical elements of every
Land Rover and Range Rover model.
It started with the assessment of the
prototype 129in wheelbase pick-up
being developed as Land Rover?s
alternative to the Dodge Power Wagon
for use in the oilfields in the Gulf States.
Land Rover still use the estate for
testing, press events and a Land Rover
Experience centre (www.eastnor.
landroverexperience.co.uk). Much of
the estate is carefully managed for
conservation reasons and, it is believed,
that this particular gully was last
used in Land Rover Club trials at the
1998 ARC National. Midland ROC is
celebrating its 50th anniversary this
year (www.mroc.co.uk).
committee member for many years for the
Peak and Dukeries LRC with Pete Wilford of
cartoon fame, ?Killer? Bill Hopkinson, Harry
Jefferys, Roger Fell, John Clayton, Brian
Pedley and we organised many events all
over the country.?
a
Barry Clark driving and co-driver
Tony Hesketh competing in the
1971 Major?s Trial in Barry?s Serie
s
II Land Rover, 303 JTB
98 JUNE 2017
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Landroverheritage.indd 1
31/03/2017 12:09
VintageTyres.indd 1
11/04/2017 09:10
nd? competition
as part of the company?s 50th Anniversary
celebration. First place went to diplomat
Hugh Leach and his Series II called Martha,
though many thought Pollyanna would
have been a worthy winner. Land Rover
itself is still highly proud of the incredible
achievements of this famous vehicle. ?The
Pollyanna Expedition? appears on the
company?s official website and the page even
invites you to share your own ?Defender?
journey. Also as part of the 50th Anniversary
celebrations, Tom and a couple of friends
drove Pollyanna to an event in Samedan in
Switzerland during August 1998.
Miss Toy died in 2001 aged 93 and it was
her wish that Pollyanna should remain in
the Pickford?s care. Guy has now retired to
rural Shropshire so Tom has taken over the
JUNE 2017 63
SERIES ONE
mantle of guardian and has continued to
use, enjoy and share the vehicle with fellow
Land Rover enthusiasts.
He regularly attends shows throughout the
year and has even loaned her out for use
on Peter Wales? Annual Charity Land Rover
Run from Kent to Northern France, the
Netherlands and Belgium.
Tom has recently carried out essential
maintenance including repairs to the
bulkhead top rail and a sympathetic
re-spray ? a slightly controversial move
to some but Tom explained that he saw
the new paint as part of his essential
maintenance. She certainly looks and drives
beautifully; the engine is exceptionally
quiet despite the huge mileage (it has been
rebuilt a couple of times) and the steering
very light and manoeuvrable.
The bodywork is still pretty much
original today with a number of holes
showing evidence of the coach-built hard
top built for the 1952 trip and which
stayed on throughout all of Miss Toy?s
expeditions. It was probably removed
when Rover passed it on to the Chesterfield
technical college and was no doubt
scrapped. Before becoming one of the
country?s top Series One restorers, Tom?s
professional background was in carpentry
so he plans at some point to fabricate a
new top based on historical photographs,
returning Pollyanna?s iconic
silhouette with
side windows and
1,595cc engine has been rebuilt a couple of times
Miss Toy?s first aid box
Bodywork is pretty much original
wooden door trims. The sturdily-built
spares box is still in the back with a typed
list of contents and Tom refers to this as an
?umbrella box? ? you hope you won?t need
it but if it rains you?ll be very glad of it!
Pollyanna has been in the media spotlight
since the earliest days and still continues
to be a ?poster? vehicle. Last year its image
was used on MAC Tools Land Rover
tool chest, continuing its role as a brand
ambassador. Today Land Rover prides itself
on the adventurous image of its products
but most people?s expeditions will pale into
insignificance in comparison to the
indomitable Pollyanna
and Miss Toy.
a
Pollyanna has been
driven round the
world twice
64 JUNE 2017
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Comptons2000.indd 1
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VINTAGE ESSENTIALS
THE ROAD GOES EVER ON
John Carroll?s enthusiasm for old road maps can be traced back to his childhood
WORDS AND PICTURES JOHN CARROLL
I
t might be the long highways of 1950s
America that spring to mind when
fuel branded road maps are discussed.
Certainly such ?gas station? memorabilia
does conjure up the America of Jack
Kerouac and Johnny Cash but there?s
similar ephemera to be collected closer to
home. The terminology might be different
- petrol stations and dual carriageways
rather than gas stations and freeways
- but the branded road map wasn?t an
exclusively American thing.
My enthusiasm for maps may well have
started in those ?are we there yet?? days of
my Morris Minor childhood. I was eager
to know where we were going and my
parents - patient as always - explained the
differences between the different coloured
roads and all the symbols used on printed
maps. Like many fondly-remembered
things from my childhood, it was the roads
of North Wales where it started. The petrol
stations on the A543 and the A5 had
rotating racks of maps for sale and their
illustrated covers offered tempting views
of places that I hadn?t yet seen.
Looking back it seems that all the
petrol companies offered them; National
Benzole, Shell, Mobil, Esso and BP and,
to be of use to motorists, covered whole
regions. This meant the size of the map
would cover lengthy journeys in sufficient
detail to allow accurate navigation in
those pre-satnav years. Different editions
were printed and reflect the advent of
motorways, bypasses and ever-extending
dual carriageways.
When I look at the selection pictured
here, they sub consciously but
?As collectors?
items they are more
curiosities than
things of value?
unashamedly, allude to the 20th century
road poems of G K Chesterton and John
Betjeman, The Rolling English Road
and Meditation on the A30 respectively.
The American maps of this type may
reek of Route 66 and pink Cadillacs but
these of the British Isles offer a glimpse
into ancient corners of the old shires
and border towns with welcoming
cover images of Ludlow, Cornwall and
Tarbert Castle.
As collectors? items they are more
curiosities than things of value and they
turn up regularly in charity shops and
secondhand bookshops. A glance at eBay
suggests that those advertised at �95
each are unlikely to sell. I can?t say that I
have deliberately sought any of these out
or consciously collected them. Somehow
I have ended up with a box full and they
appeal to the cartologist in me and my
enthusiasm for the decades that my Series
Land Rovers belong to.
The pictured selection contains, at bottom
left, a National Benzole map with a mustard
cover from the 1950s. The majority of the
remainder date from the 1960s especially
the two different red top editions of the
same Esso maps and the National Benzole,
BP, Mobil and Shell maps, centre top,
belong to the Series III 1970s.
Some are dog-eared, some have been
written on and others are hardly used so
I?d estimate that there?s not much more
than � value in the pictured selection.
However memories of those red-topped
Esso maps in a Morris Minor glovebox are
priceless; I unfolded a couple of them in
the mid-sixties and started to follow them
down the road that, in Tolkien?s words
?goes ever on and on.?
a
66 JUNE 2017
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P.A BLANCHARD & CO.
EX MILITARY LANDROVER SPECIALISTS, CLAY LANE, SHIPTONTHORPE, YORK, UK YO43 3PU
TEL: +44 (0)1430 872765 | FAX: +44 (0)1430 872777
www.pablanchard.co.uk | email: info@pablanchard.co.uk
EX MOD SPARES,
SURPLUS STORES
& EQUIPMENT
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14/02/2017 11:57
SERIES III
Early
Retirement
WORDS AND PICTURES SARAH LEAMY
Thom Moran?s daily worker, a 1971 Series
III 109in Military GS, has finally earned itself a rest
68 JUNE 2017
www.classiclandrover.com
Series 109in at work
?
I
?ve done everything on that 109in for
the past 14 years, from every oil change,
suspension and new springs, brakes,
driveshaft, everything to keep it running
off-road in the Ortiz Mountains. I need a
break too, you know?,? says Thom Moran.
It?s true. I?ve known Thom and Elisa for
more than a decade in this tiny mountain
town of 350 in rural New Mexico and he
has been working on, and taking care of,
this daily driver all that time, although at
one point he realised he didn?t have to do
every repair.?
That was a mistake though, the local
mechanics who were working on a new
driveshaft didn?t get him the greased fittings
for the U-bolts as requested, and in the
process they also broke the yoke, leaving a
hairline crack, but didn?t tell him.
His Land Rover journey began in the late
nineties with a Defender 90 NAS, an allblack 1994, that he and Elisa bought while
living in Colorado. They added a winch,
suspension kit, and double batteries and an
extra seat in the back for seven-year-old
daughter, Claire.
The first time they went out in it they
drove into the hills through the snow and
slipped into a ditch. Embarassing? Yes,
Thom grins at the memory. ?Elisa walked
to the nearest town to get help, it was
probably half a mile away. I sat in the
Defender. Then I realised that this vehicle
could do much more than I?d given it
credit for. In low four, I plowed deeper
into the snowbank, up through the ditch
and then kept going until I was out onto
the highway.?
They then joined a few local Land Rover
clubs, explored Moab and Colorado, and
learnt much more about what they could
tackle with such a vehicle. His childhood
dreams of owning a Land Rover were
satisfied, it took some 20 years to find and
afford one, but that Defender 90 was just
what he needed.
He also found a 1966 Series IIA Land
Rover for sale online, one that ran but
was bashed up from a rough life in the
mountains, a hard life, but Thom bought
it and stored it at a friends' place in New
Mexico until they moved there shortly after.
The Defender ended up being used fully in
its new home, for his work as a carpenter
and for other jobs that came up. He tells me
of towing a caravan out of the back roads.
It had been sitting on some flat high desert
land for decades and needed to be moved.
The only way to reach it on the 16,000
acres was driving down a dried-up riverbed,
avoiding the quicksand, and following
the tracks until they got closer, a mile or
so of desert ahead of them, full of juniper
and cacti. With some metal ladders to get
Thom in the 109in
Thom
driving
the 10
9in
www.classiclandrover.com
109in as a workhorse
?Tuning the
109in was
another testing
moment as the
timing was set
for sea level
in Georgia?
JUNE 2017 69
SERIES III
109in Series
Time for some work
Thom
, NM
Sands
White
t
a
in
109
Elisa in 109in
70 JUNE 2017
it down the steep sandy
drop, they slowly towed
it out and back down the
riverbed to the highway,
some four miles or more.
Thom also used it as a
hoist to take out an engine
from an old Toyota, with
chains over the thick wooden
beam across their gate, he winched out the
motor only to find a handful of locals had
turned up to watch. That was one aspect
of having such a unique vehicle that made
both Thom and Elisa uncomfortable; the
attention sometimes would be too much.
They sold the 1966 Series Station Wagon
after playing with it locally, trundling
around the dirt roads but Thom never
invested too much time or energy into
improving it. They then sold the Defender.
He had a short period without any Land
Rovers but then he found a 1971 Series III
109in Military GS for sale in Georgia. After
seeing the paperwork and photographs, he
bought it and had it shipped cross country.
This is the Land Rover I know. He?s had it
for 14 years now and put more than100,000
miles on it, nearly all off-road. Thom
wanted a work truck, a daily driver, it?s just
that for him, his jobs mostly take him down
really rough back roads, and so he keeps
the hubs locked to shift on the fly, ready for
those river beds, rocky lined hills and along
washed out dirt tracks to get to the many
homes hidden in the Ortiz Mountains in and
around Madrid.
Shortly after bringing the 109in to New
Mexico, Thom and his daughter Claire
were paid to drive it to White Sands for a
photoshoot, some five hours south, a huge
national park that covers 144,000 acres
of gypsum sand dunes. It?s a breathtaking
setting and while the photographers and
model worked, Claire played in the sand
dunes with her dad.
Since then, the Series has worked hard and
reliably. ?It has never left me stranded in 14
years,? adds Thom. Although, one challenge
to owning a vehicle with a carburetor at
elevations ranging from 6000-8500 feet is that
vapour lock in summer is a constant hassle.
Thom?s solution was to keep the fuel pump
wrapped in a flannel and whenever he had
to drive to Santa Fe, 30 miles each way,
he?d pour cold water on the rag and keep
it moist. The Land Rover?s unpressurised
www.classiclandrover.com
1971 Series III
109in Military
British market yet LHD
TCL 528K
Chassis #91100220A
If anyone knows anything more about
this 109in, Thom would love to hear
from you.
Thom Moran, the proud owner
system doesn?t like the ethanol heavy gas
for sale these days.
He only recently put in an electric fuel
pump inline so now there is always a
back-up. Tuning the 109in was another
testing moment as the timing was set for
sea level in Georgia and the military timing
marks are slightly different to civilian
Series IIIs which was the only manual
he had originally. Like with everything
else mechanical, Thom read his manuals,
checked forums, talked to other owners via
email, and finally just tackled it himself,
working it out by trial and error and his
confidence has built over the y
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