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Business Traveller UK June 2017

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JUNE 2017 �30
Jet pack
Payment plans for flying private
In the bag
The latest hold luggage reviewed
Fully charged
Could an electric car work for you?
Downtime in Denver
Taking a break in the Colorado capital
Sailing ahead
Hong Kong?s waterfront transformation
JUNE 2017
8 I UPFRONT
Airline and hotel news worldwide
16 I INBOX
Your letters and online posts
20 I TRIED & TESTED
Vietnam Airlines B789-9
premium economy
22 I PAY IT FORWARD
Why prepaid private jet cards
could work for you
ON THE COVER:
32 I HARBOUR HIGHLIGHTS
Large-scale regeneration is bringing new
life to Hong Kong?s Kowloon waterfront
22
28
38
COVER IMAGE: WORLDWIDE CRUISE TERMINALS
28 I ON THE HOME FRONT
The lowdown on UK and European
domestic aviation
54
38 I ON THE CASE
Essential check-in bags for your next trip
44 I BEST OF BOTH WORLDS
Business Traveller readers discuss why
combining work with holiday makes sense
46 I LOYALTY
Hotel and airline scheme news and offers
48 I YOUR EVENTS CHECKLIST
Key things to keep in mind when staging
a meeting or gathering
businesstraveller.com
62
52 I NEWS
62 I BALI
54 I CARS
66 I EDINBURGH
58 I WATCHES
68 I DENVER
61 I BUY AND FLY 74 I SNAPSHOT
JUNE 2017
4 I Check-in
A
t the time of going to press, we don?t know if the laptop
ban is about to be extended to flights between Europe
and the US. It?s understandable that such a significant
change to security procedures is being much debated behind closed
doors ? the stakes are high.
No one who flies would want safety and security to be
compromised, and the authorities must react if they have
intelligence about an increased threat. But, equally, banning large
electronic devices from the hundreds of flights between Europe and
the US each day would cause huge disruption if introduced.
How should we react? I am the sort of old-school business
traveller who still travels with a laptop. And often an iPad as well.
And a phone. Only the last of these would be allowed in the cabin
if the ban takes effect.
The proposals would mean I could either leave the laptop at
home or perhaps work on it at the airport and then surrender it at
the gate, as is currently
allowed in some
Middle East airports, or
be forced to pack it into
checked luggage, with
all the worries ? and
personal security
concerns ? that would
entail. Would it be
insured? And if it was
damaged, might the
lithium battery inside
create further problems
as a fire risk?
Whatever happens,
I?m sure we would all
cope, just as we did
with previous unexpected restrictions such as the liquid ban. Few
stand to gain ? airlines, airports, tourism authorities and business
leaders would all suffer significant disruption ? but, really, measures
like this are about minimising the chances of far more significant
losses. As we stand in line, we are standing together in other ways
as well. We just have to realise it.
Tom Otley
Editorial director
JUNE 2017
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Wear it well
Stylish looks for life
on the road
Good timing
This year?s finest
new watches
Cheers to that
Munich?s legendary
JUNE 2017 �30
beer scene
Jet pack
Payment plans for flying private
In the bag
The latest hold luggage reviewed
Fully charged
Could an electric car work for you?
Downtime in Denver
Taking a break in the Colorado capital
Capital adjustm
ent
Adapting to the Trump
001 OFC MAY cov.indd
era in Washington
DC
1
18/04/2017 12:46
Sailing ahead
Hong Kong?s waterfront transformation
001 OFC JUNE cov.indd 1
16/05/2017 14:53
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6 I Contributors
VALERIAN HO is a staff writer for
Business Traveller Asia-Pacific and
Business Traveller China, who focuses
on trends in aviation, hospitality and
lifestyle. Based in Hong Kong, this
month he takes a look at the mammoth
developments transforming the
harbourfront on the Kowloon side of
the city ? traditionally referred to as
?the Dark Side?. (Page 32.)
JUNE 2017 �30
NAT BARNES is motoring editor of the
Daily Express and Sunday Express and
has been writing about the motor
industry for more than 25 years. Fresh
from the recent Shanghai Motor Show,
where electric cars dominated the news,
we asked him to give a plug to batterypowered motoring in all its forms, and
tell us what?s on the horizon for the
technology. (Page 54.)
Jet pack
Payment plans for flying private
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Save 5% on a two-year
Managing editor Michelle Harbi
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Sailing ahead
United Kingdom and
Art director Annie Harris
Republic of Ireland:
Staff writer Marisa Cannon
One year, �.95; two years, �.60;
Contributors Nat Barnes, Mark Caswell,
three years, �5.90.
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Managing director Julian Gregory
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Group publisher Rania Apthorpe
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One year, �.75; two years, �9.65;
Advertisement manager, travel Rebecca Randall
three years, �2.65.
Key accounts manager Stephen Berthier
In the bag
The latest hold luggage reviewed
Fully charged
Could an electric car work for you?
Downtime in Denver
Taking a break in the Colorado capital
Hong Kong?s waterfront transformation
001 OFC JUNE cov.indd 1
Circulation manager Jamie Halling
Head of events Emma Gordon
Events assistant Isis Gouveia
Marketing executive Kirsty Clark
CONTACT
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JUNE 2017
As editor of luxury watch site
SalonQP.com, CHRIS HALL is used
to hearing about ?disruption? in the
watch industry. In this issue, he
reminds us that Seiko was the original
disruptor, beating the Swiss at their
own game six decades ago. Nowadays,
the Japanese giant is a master of both
� bargains and six-figure works of
art. (Page 58.)
Business Traveller � is published ten times a year at our address
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in the UK, has the largest net sale of any magazine in its field in the
UK and Europe. Audited average circulation, per issue, JanuaryDecember 2016: 65,858 copies. The magazine is entirely independent
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manuscripts will not be accepted for publication. The opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers,
who cannot accept responsibility for any errors or omissions.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulations
16/05/2017 14:53
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businesstraveller.com
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NOVEMBER 2014
8 I Upfront
Michelle Harbi compiles the latest news from businesstraveller.com
BA to revamp JFK
Terminal 7
BRITISH AIRWAYS HAS UNVEILED details of a
multimillion-pound redesign of New York JFK Terminal 7.
Set for completion by the end of next year, the revamp
will cost more than � million. It will include a new
check-in concourse with a separate Club World and First
area, updated lounges, and a refresh of the Concorde
Room, available to First customers.
There will also be new gate seating with additional
power outlets, new shops and an ?authentic New
York culinary experience, with local food and beverage
concepts? inspired by the city?s street-food scene.
British Airways operates 20 flights a day between New
York and Heathrow, Gatwick and London City. ba.com
Qatar Airways to serve Cardiff
QATAR AIRWAYS HAS ANNOUNCED PLANS to fly to Cardiff, along
with a raft of new destinations.
The Doha-Cardiff route will launch next year. Deb Barber, chief
executive of Cardiff airport, said: ?More than one million passengers
per year from our region are travelling to destinations on the Qatar
Airways network. Over 90 per cent of [them] are currently travelling via
London and this new service will give them the opportunity to fly more
conveniently from Cardiff.
?Over the coming months we will work with the team at Qatar Airways
to confirm the details of the service and look forward to the flights being
on sale in the near future.?
Other Qatar Airways routes for 2018 include Abidjan (Ivory Coast), Accra,
Chittagong (Bangladesh), Kiev, Lisbon, Malaga, Mombasa, Mykonos,
Prague, Utapao (Thailand) and San Francisco. qatarairways.com
H魌el de Crillon to
reopen next month
THE HISTORIC HOTEL DE CRILLON in Paris is to reopen on
July 5 following a four-year renovation.
Located on Place de la Concorde, the 124-room palace
hotel was taken over by Rosewood Hotels and Resorts in
December 2013.
Few details have been released about the renovations but
Rosewood said the revamp would ?both honour the past
and confidently embrace the future, fusing 18th-century and
modern spirit?.
When Business Traveller checked online in mid-May, rooms
at H魌el de Crillon, a Rosewood Hotel, were available from
�159 per night for a 35 sqm Executive King room, which
comes with Rivolta Carmignani Italian linens, DR Harris toiletries
and a Nespresso machine. rosewoodhotels.com
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
INTRODUCING
ALL- NEW FORD
FIESTA
MOVING YOUR FLEET FORWARD
To find out more search: All-New Ford Fiesta
Official fuel consumption figures in mpg (l/100km) for the All-New Ford Fiesta range: urban 40.9-80.7 (6.9-3.5),
extra urban 67.3-94.2 (4.2-3.0), combined 54.3-88.3 (5.2-3.2). Official CO 2 emissions 118-82g/km.
The mpg figures quoted are sourced from official EU-regulated test results (EU Directive and Regulation 692/2008), are provided
for comparability purposes and may not reflect your actual driving experience.
10 I Upfront
Bombardier CS100 cleared
for take-off at London City
AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURER BOMBARDIER?S CS100 jet has
been granted ?steep approval certification? from Transport Canada and
the EASA (European Aviation Safety Agency), clearing it for use at
London City airport (LCY).
In March, the CS100 undertook a number of test flights at LCY,
culminating in the aircraft flying nonstop to New York (albeit with
a reduced weight). London City chief executive Declan Collier said:
?It?s fantastic news that one of the quietest and most fuel-efficient
aircraft in its class has
been granted regulatory
approval. It provides
opportunities for nonstop
services to destinations
including the US East
Coast, Russia, West Africa
and the Middle East.?
Swiss is the only
European operator of
the CS100, offering
125 seats in a two-class
layout configured 2-3.
bombardier.com
Viceroy Chicago to open
in September
VICEROY HOTEL GROUP IS TO OPEN a Chicago property in September. Located on the
site of the 1920s-era Cedar hotel on North State Street in the Gold Coast neighbourhood,
north of Downtown, the Viceroy Chicago will be part of the luxury group?s Icon Collection.
The 180-room property is keeping the fa鏰de of the original hotel while adding an
18-floor new-build section, which will house a rooftop bar and a pool with views of the
skyline and Lake Michigan.
Rooms will start from 31 sqm and offer free wifi, Nespresso machines and 55-inch
Samsung smart TVs. The property will also have a gym, a ballroom and a restaurant serving
?approachable American cuisine?, which will be led by chef Lee Wolen, who oversees the
city?s Michelin-starred Boka. viceroyhotelsandresorts.com
JUNE 2017
HOTEL NEWS
IAN SCHRAGER is bringing his Public brand
to New York this month. The 367-room
hotel opens on Chrystie Street in Lower
Manhattan on June 7. It has landscaped
gardens, a restaurant headed up by JeanGeorges Vongerichten, a coffee shopcum-grocery, a performance space, and
three bars, including a rooftop venue with
360-degree views.
HYATT has opened the 211-room Hyatt
Regency Amsterdam in the De Plantage
district, south-east of Amsterdam Centraal
station. It has a 24-hour gym and sauna, a
restaurant and bar, and event space.
MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL has launched
a Moxy property at Frankfurt airport. The
hotel has 305 rooms, a self-service food
kiosk, meeting space and the brand?s
signature ?Living Room? lounge.
HILTON has opened its largest ever
Hampton by Hilton property. The newbuild Hampton by Hilton Berlin City Centre
Alexanderplatz has 344 rooms with free wifi
and is located on the corner of Otto-BraunStrasse and Mollstrasse.
MOTEL ONE has opened the Motel One
Berlin Upper West, its ninth property in
the German capital. Located near the
Kurfurstendamm metro station in west
Berlin, it has 582 rooms, a lounge, bar and
roof terrace.
CITADINES is to make its US debut next
year with the renovation and rebranding of
the Hotel Central Fifth Avenue New York,
located at 15 West 45th Street. Citadines?
parent group, the Ascott Limited, is to
invest close to US$50 million in the
125-unit property, which will be renamed
the Citadines Fifth Avenue New York.
IHG will open the Intercontinental
Minneapolis St Paul Airport in summer
2018. The 291-room hotel will be connected
to Terminal 1-Lindbergh via a skybridge, and
will have two restaurants, a spa and more
than 1,800 sqm of meeting space.
MANDARIN ORIENTAL has announced
plans for a second property in Dubai,
located on Sheikh Zayed Road in the
63-floor Wasl Tower development.
Scheduled to open in 2020, it will have
257 rooms across floors 16 to 38, and
144 residences on the upper levels. It will
join the Mandarin Oriental Jumeirah Beach,
which is due to open late next year.
businesstraveller.com
12 I Upfront
United to add New YorkBuenos Aires route
UNITED WILL LAUNCH A NEW
year-round daily service between
New York Newark and Buenos Aires
on October 28.
Flights will depart Newark at
2150, arriving in Buenos Aires at
1050 the following day, before
returning at 2100, landing in New
York at 0610 the next day. The route
will be operated by a B767-300 with
30 United Polaris business class
seats, 49 Economy Plus seats and
135 in economy.
The airline already serves the
Argentine capital daily from
Houston. From June 8 to August 14,
United will also boost its NewarkBogota service to twice daily.
united.com
American Airlines to
cut economy legroom
on B737 Max
Hotel Eden
reopens in
Rome
DORCHESTER COLLECTION?S HOTEL EDEN in Rome has
reopened following nearly 18 months of renovations.
The property?s 98 redesigned rooms and suites have Bang and
Olufsen TVs and marble bathrooms stocked with Bottega Veneta
products. Entry-level Classic rooms measure 30 sqm, while suites
are 60 sqm upwards.
The interior design of the lobby and bedrooms was overseen by
Bruno Moinard of 4BI and Associates, who also worked on Paris?s
H魌el Plaza Ath閚閑.
A spa has been added to the property with four treatment
rooms, a nail salon and a blow dry bar.
The Hotel Eden originally opened in 1889 and joined Dorchester
Collection in 2013. dorchestercollection.com
JUNE 2017
AMERICAN AIRLINES IS TO REDUCE
economy class seat pitch in three rows of
its new B737 Max aircraft to 29 inches.
These economy rows will have two inches
less legroom than in the carrier?s existing
B737-800s (31 inches). The rest of the
cabin?s seats will have a pitch of 30 inches.
American has ordered 100 B737 Max
aircraft. The first are due to arrive this
autumn and will be used mainly on North
American routes. They will have 172 seats,
compared with 160 on the current B737s.
An AA spokesperson said: ?We?re also
considering something similar for our 737800s beginning at a later date.? aa.com
businesstraveller.com
PUT YOUR HANDS TOGETHER
FOR GET TING MORE FROM
YOUR STAY
Applause is the new loyalty scheme from
Principal Hotel Company that starts rewarding
you with exclusive perks and increasing
discounts from the very first time you stay.
Start experiencing Applause for free at
PHCOMPANY.COM/APPL AUSE
14 I Upfront
Travelodge launches ?Super room?
TRAVELODGE HAS ADDED
a ?Super room? category
featuring extra amenities.
The room is now available in
five hotels ? London Waterloo,
Euston, Farringdon, City Road
and Heathrow Central. It will be
on sale in Covent Garden later
this month and by the autumn
there will be about 1,000 of
the rooms across 17 hotels,
including elsewhere in the
capital, Heathrow T5, Gatwick
and Bath.
Located on quieter ?business floors?, the rooms cost about �-� more than standard
guestrooms and have a more stylish, residential feel, with a blue and grey colour scheme. There are
extra plug sockets and USB ports by the bed and desk, as well as mood lighting controlled by a
bedside control panel. The desk is set up with a swivel chair and reading lamp.
Rooms also come with Lavazza coffee machines, open-plan wardrobe areas, iron and ironing
boards, hairdryers and more powerful showerheads. travelodge.co.uk
Win
Manchester airport
opens T3 lounge
MANCHESTER AIRPORT HAS OPENED its new
paid-for lounge in Terminal 3.
The 1903 lounge is open to adults only, and seats
71 guests. It offers runway views, free wifi and charging
points ?in abundance?.
The free hot and cold food menu includes made-toorder omelettes and poached eggs at breakfast, and buffet
options such as pies, sliders and curries.
Alcohol including Jacques Bardelot Brut champagne
is also complimentary, along with local drinks such as
Manchester Pale Ale and Manchester Gin.
Open from 0415 to 2030 (1930 on Saturdays), it costs
� per person for up to two hours when booked in
advance, or � for turn-up entry. Fast-track security is
included. manchesterairport.co.uk/1903
JUNE 2017
ANA LONDON-TOKYO
FLIGHTS IN PREMIUM
ECONOMY
COMPETITION
THIS MONTH, one lucky reader
could win a pair of premium
economy tickets with ANA from
London Heathrow to Tokyo Haneda.
For further details and to enter, visit
businesstraveller.com/competitions
AIRLINE
NEWS
NORWEGIAN will launch nonstop
flights between Gatwick and
Singapore Changi on September
28. The service will fly four-times
weekly, increasing to five during the
winter season, using a 344-seat,
two-class B787-9 Dreamliner.
Fares start from �0 each way in
economy class and �0 for the
premium cabin.
ETIHAD?S twice-daily Abu DhabiSydney route will become an
all-A380 service from October 29.
The superjumbo will be removed
from its Melbourne route on the
same day.
EMIRATES is to drop one of its
three daily services between
Birmingham and Dubai. Flights
EK041 (departing Dubai at 0320)
and EK042 (leaving Birmingham
at 0940) will be suspended from
September 1. The carrier will add a
third daily flight to its Brisbane route
on December 1.
BRITISH AIRWAYS has confirmed
pricing for its long-haul wifi service,
which is initially being rolled out on
its B747s. One aircraft has so far
been equipped, with a second to
follow next month. Two speeds are
available: Simply Connect for basic
browsing and the faster Connect
Plus. One hour?s access costs
�99 (Simply Connect) or �99
(Connect Plus), four hours is �.99
or �.99, and the whole flight is
�.99 or �.99.
AIR FRANCE has rostered the
B787-9 on to its first transatlantic
route, Paris CDG-Montr閍l,
following the delivery of its second
Dreamliner. The aircraft now
operates flight AF344, departing
Paris at 1335 and arriving at 1455,
and AF345, departing Montr閍l
at 1650 and landing at 0530 the
following day.
PHILIPPINE AIRLINES will
upgrade its Heathrow-Manila route
to a B777-300ER service when it
receives delivery of its ninth and
tenth B777s in December, replacing
two A340-300s.
businesstraveller.com
16 I Inbox
Tell us about your travels at talktous@businesstraveller.com
Star letter
PRAISE WHERE IT?S DUE
I never fail to peruse readers? letters in your excellent and informative
publication. However, I am often saddened at the level of criticism rather than
praise which emerges from much, if not most, of the correspondence.
I have flown nearly three million miles with Oneworld carriers in business
class and have almost never encountered less than excellent service and comfort.
Most of the miles flown are with American Airlines, which is a truly outstanding
carrier. The food may not be the best in the sky, but the service and comfort
cannot be faulted.
I use British Airways rarely, preferring to travel to the Far East and India with
Finnair ? another class act ? in no way inconvenienced by a change of plane in
Helsinki, one of the world?s most user-friendly airports. Royal Jordanian, Qatar
Airways, Qantas and Sri Lankan Airlines are other favourites, all providing the
very best of customer service.
I am sorry that I write without a moan or a gripe, thus obviating the necessity
for what appears to be your excellent ?problem-solving? service! Nigel Beale, Poole
? This month?s Star Letter winner will receive one of the new branded Business Traveller cabin-size
suitcases from Timothy Travel Essentials (timothytravelessentials.co.uk). For your chance to win the
Star Letter, email us at talktous@businesstraveller.com and include your full postal address and daytime
telephone number. We reserve the right to edit letters.
JUNE 2017
LOST IN TRANSIT
ETIHAD AIRWAYS REPLIES:
I am still seriously cranky about Etihad Airways? claims process and the lack
of reimbursement for lost baggage as promised in a Facebook response on
April 29, 2016, and a subsequent email, after the airline lost my husband?s
wheelchair footplates during the transfer of the chair from one plane to
another during our connection.
We flew in business class from Sydney in April 2016, with a connecting
flight on to Amsterdam. When the wheelchair was brought out, the
footplates were missing. We registered a lost luggage claim after Amsterdam
Schiphol?s ground staff searched the luggage hold to no avail.
As my husband has a muscle weakness disorder and cannot walk,
spending five weeks holding his legs up from the ground when seated
in a wheelchair is pretty impossible, so we rang Etihad customer service
twice at great expense, completed paperwork over the phone with
them, and then heard nothing. After four days, I wrote a
Facebook post to the airline, saying that they should be
ashamed, to which we received an apology, urging us to
put in a claim.
In May 2016, they emailed to ask us to buy more footplates ?
which are only available in Australia ? and that they would reimburse us. We
had to get our son to drive miles to purchase some and post them via DHL
and then hope they arrived before we moved on again.
On our return to Australia in June, I sent off all of the paperwork with
receipts for AU$330 (�0) and sent it to Etihad?s Sydney office as requested.
No word since. I emailed them again in October and not a peep. No money
has been deposited in our account. Julie Arnheim, Sydney
Etihad Airways is currently
in touch with the guest and
working to resolve the issue as a
matter of priority.
businesstraveller.com
Inbox I 17
BRITISH AIRWAYS REPLIES:
On a recent British Airways flight back from Copenhagen, there was a virtual
scrum at the gate. Passengers jockeying for position just to make sure they
could get their elephantine wheelie suitcases in the overhead lockers ? plus, of
course, a laptop bag and anything else they could get away with. Not a single
bag was checked by BA staff for weight or size. The overhead lockers were full
long before half the passengers had boarded. The cabin crew were stressed; the
passengers were stressed; the pilot must also have been stressed. It was not a
pleasant start to the flight.
Don?t get me started on the preferential treatment hand baggage-only
(HBO) passengers get with BA. Apparently my wife is not allowed a few cubic
inches in the overhead lockers for her handbag. She has to keep it on her
feet for the whole flight, despite the fact that we?ve paid more for our ticket
than HBO passengers. Their hippo hand baggage takes precedence for some
obscure reason.
The introduction of HBO fares by BA, while a good idea in itself, has a very
unfortunate by-product. As BA refuses to regulate the size and weight of
hand baggage carried on board, it makes flying short-haul a really unpleasant
experience. If passengers are prepared to accept buy-on-board catering then
surely they?ll accept some sensible checks on the size and weight of their bags?
Once passengers realise that they can?t take the entire contents of
their house into the cabin, everyone on board will enjoy a less stressful
flight experience. Andrew P Nelson, Harrogate
We are proud to fly more than 100,000
customers across the world every day and
our colleagues work extremely hard to
deliver consistently high standards in the
air and on the ground.
We introduced our hand baggage-only
fares on short-haul flights as we know
that many of our customers want us to
offer them the lowest possible fare. Our
colleagues do make regular checks for
oversized hand-baggage at check-in,
at the gate, and often again ahead of
boarding. One of the reasons we do this
is because we know that punctuality is
important to our customers, and they want
their flights to depart on time.
We appreciate customer feedback and
will continue to make sure we?re doing all
we can to make their journeys comfortable
and stress free.
REFUND REFUSED
EASYJET REPLIES:
I was supposed to fly from Venice to Paris Orly with Easyjet on April 20.
I reported to the gate on time and was told that the flight would be slightly
delayed owing to technical issues.
After several further announcements, we were told that the aircraft would
not be departing and that another, coming from Geneva, was expected to take
us to our destination at 1420. Our original departure time was 0925. As I had a
meeting scheduled at 1300 in Paris, to fly back to Venice the same day at 1720,
I requested a full refund but to my surprise and disbelief was told that the
airline?s refund policy applied only to a delay of five hours or more.
You and I know very well that EU regulation says three hours, but it looks
like they are trying to cheat us. Luca Benatti, Mirandola, Italy
Easyjet is sorry that Mr Benatti?s flight was
delayed as a result of a technical issue. A
refund of his ticket was initially incorrectly
declined. Our customer team has been
in touch with Mr Benatti and provided a
refund in addition to EU261 compensation.
businesstraveller.com
?
HAND BAGGAGE HASSLE
JUNE 2017
18 I Inbox
Posts from our online forum businesstraveller.com/forum
POST
stevescoots
DATE
May 11, 10:01
MartynSinclair
May 11, 10:24
CALIFORNIA SHORT TRIP
ADVICE PLEASE
I am taking a short break in June, staying in San
Francisco over the weekend, leaving Monday
and ending up in Las Vegas on the Friday. The
plan is to drive down from San Francisco to
Los Angeles and then across to Vegas on the
Friday. I have been to San Francisco many
times but have only transited through LA. I
would appreciate any suggestions on where to
stay halfway between the two for a night (Post
Ranch Inn at Big Sur is booked out) and where
to stay and go in LA over three days ? places to
visit, good but casual places to eat, and maybe a
vineyard visit?
I used to enjoy Santa Catalina Island. Take a
boat across and it takes you away from the
humdrum of LA. Wonderful Ox burgers and
one of the must-dos is people-watching at
caf閟 along Rodeo Drive. You never know
who you are going to see. Sunday lunch in
one of the many beach restaurants is fun.
After a couple of swipes, the guy gave me my
card back and said: ?Mr Smith, they are now saying
that I cannot process your Visa card because of an
internal system error. I am therefore overriding
the system and confirming your booking, with no
admin fee. If our reservations department cannot
even do simple things properly, why should you
have to go through this process?? The whole effort
added about 40 minutes to our check-in procedure
but full credit to the desk officer.
capetonianm
May 7, 10:37
A lot of BA?s customer-facing staff are
outstanding, as this shows. They are let down by
shoddy IT systems and support, badly designed
by ?programmers? who have inadequate
knowledge of the realities of what the customerfacing staff are exposed to in the course of their
duties. Changing everything to ?point and click?
idiot boxes is a disaster.
IanFromHKG
May 10, 06:01
I agree. Computer systems, generally, don?t
have common sense. It?s lovely to hear stories
like this ? inconvenient and annoying at the
time, of course, and avoidable (since clearly you
should have been charged a while before) ? but
how nice to know that sometimes, when things
go wrong, a staff member takes time to put
things right.
POST
peter19
DATE
May 10, 11:49
ZANZIBAR HOTELS ? ANY
RECOMMENDATIONS?
Charles-P
May 10, 12:19
We stayed at the Doubletree by Hilton last year,
right on the beach. Not really a business hotel
but wonderful to stay at.
Stowage222
May 11, 13:41
The top tourist hotels are mainly Italian-run and
can be found along the east coast of the island.
I?ve stayed a couple of times in the Tembo
hotel, which is right on the beach in Stone
Town and has a lot of history. When I was there
in the late 1990s it was a dry hotel (the only
disappointment for me) but it gives you a real
feel for the island. Not high-end, more authentic.
Andy
May 14, 09:13
Hideaway of Nungwi ? I?ve stayed there three
times now. Excellent, high-quality, all-inclusive,
with very nice sparkling wine. Great food,
especially the seafood. About an hour?s drive
from Stone Town.
FDOS_UK Have a look in the Monterey/Carmel area
May 11, 10:59 ? not too far from Big Sur and, if you are a
fan of John Steinbeck, you can look at the
Cannery Row area of Monterey. Also, hire
a drop-top Mustang for the Pacific Coastal
highway drive.
Charles-P
May 11, 11:31
POST
DavidSmith2
DATE
May 7, 01:12
JUNE 2017
The Getty Centre has Impressionist art, Greek
sculpture, French royal furniture and a lovely
garden. Have dinner at its restaurant, which
has a fantastic view. Venice Beach boardwalk
has magicians and bohemian types. Reel Inn
restaurant on 18661 Pacific Coast Highway
? best seafood ever. Stay at the Queen Mary,
docked at Long Beach. Hotel Figueroa is a
Moroccan oasis, and the Charlie hotel is said
to have once been Charlie Chaplin?s home.
BA RESERVATION SYSTEM
VERSUS REAL BA STAFF
We attempted to check in for our flight this
afternoon from Gatwick to Tirana. There was no
open desk at First and only one for Club Europe,
but the floating BA rep quickly directed us to
a free economy desk. It seemed that a change
in the return date had never been properly
processed and charged to my Visa. The guy
at ticketing was extremely good ? explaining,
phoning and checking ? and I finally got an
answer that I still owed them a � admin fee
(on two Club Europe return tickets) for the
booking change.
I?m looking to draw some experience from
forum members to recommend Zanzibar
accommodation. I am looking for somewhere
five-star/higher-end but, aside from this, there is
no direct requirement apart from good food and
overall experience.
businesstraveller.com
Korea Tourism Organisation London | Tel +44 207 321 2535 | london@gokorea.co.uk
Anne Ridyard, Appointed representative Korea MICE
Tel +44 1628 526184 | Fax +44 1628 521116 | KoreaMice@moulden-marketing.co.uk
20 I Tried & Tested Flight
Vietnam Airlines B787-9 premium economy
London-Ho Chi Minh City
BACKGROUND Vietnam Airlines began operating
the Dreamliner on daily flights from London
Heathrow to Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City in
September 2015, flying four-times weekly to Hanoi
and three to Ho Chi Minh City. Flights to Hanoi
operate on Sundays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Fridays, departing from Heathrow at 1110 and
arriving at 0430 the next day, while the Ho Chi
Minh service flies on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Saturdays, also departing at 1110 and arriving at
0520 the next day. These are the only direct services
between London and Vietnam.
CHECK-IN I had tried to check in online the night
before and was able to get as far as seat selection a
number of times, but no further, owing to a technical
glitch. I tried calling customer support but the lines
were closed for the day, so I crossed my fingers that
there would still be some aisle seats (my preference)
available. The following day, I arrived at Heathrow
Terminal 4 at 0935, and went to Zone E, where
premium economy passengers have their own
check-in desk. After I explained my difficulty with
JUNE 2017
checking in online, the attendant assured me that
there were only 80 passengers on the flight, so I could
have a whole row to myself. Security was extremely
quiet and I was airside by 0950.
BOARDING At 1040, I headed to Gate 11, a fiveminute walk from the main concourse. There was
no queue as everyone had already boarded. On the
aircraft, I was quickly offered a hot towel and a choice
of juice or water. I was also given an amenity kit
containing socks, a dental kit and an eye mask, along
with a pair of slippers. We pushed back at 1115, and
weren?t airborne until 1140.
THE SEAT The B787-9 has five rows of premium
economy configured 2-3-2 (A-C, D-E-F, G-K). There
is a galley and washrooms at the front of the cabin,
while the back row is separated from the economy
cabin by a curtain. With the option of a row to myself,
I chose 11K, a window seat near the front of the
cabin. It was spacious and comfortable, upholstered
in teal fabric with lotus flower-shaped stitching and
a cushioned headrest that provided extra support.
businesstraveller.com
Tried & Tested Flight I 21
D
A
G
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
A C D E F GK
10
11
12
14
15
ABC DEG HJK
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
There was plenty of legroom (42 inches, compared
with 32 inches in economy) and seven inches of
recline (six in economy). A footrest unfolded from
the seat in front and a legrest was released from a
lever on the right armrest. The 10.6-inch touchscreen
IFE monitor was stowed in the left armrest with a
handset recessed underneath, while the tray table
unfolded from the right armrest. It was a little rickety,
and just about large enough to hold a slim laptop.
There was a USB port beside the screen, plus two
universal sockets under the middle armrest.
WHICH SEAT TO CHOOSE? Seats in the
middle and back of the cabin avoid noise from the
washrooms and galley, but besides that, there is
no huge difference between any of the seats. The
bulkhead offers slightly more legroom, although
there are bassinets in place here, so seats are
allocated on the day as appropriate. It is not possible
to pre-book or pay extra for these.
THE FLIGHT Fifteen minutes after take-off,
cabin crew came around with menus and
businesstraveller.com
BUSINESS
PREMIUM
ECONOMY
ECONOMY
headphones, which were the same as those
distributed in economy class and were a
little uncomfortable to wear over long periods. The
drinks trolley appeared shortly afterwards, offering
a variety of wines, spirits and cocktails alongside
juices, soft drinks, Vietnamese green tea and
coffee. Lunch was served at 1225, with a choice of
beefburger with mash or Szechuan-style chicken
and steamed rice. I chose the burger, which was
tender and flavoursome.
After dinner, I settled down to watch a film ?
there was a good selection of new releases, classics
and TV shows along with a number of new albums.
Vietnamese subtitles feature on all programmes,
but I didn?t find this too distracting. There was no
wifi on board.
At 1250, the windows turned to dark blue,
plunging the cabin into darkness. This was offputting, as I had hoped to do some work while
there was still daylight and I was unable to adjust
the tint of the window either. Instead, I worked
with my individual light on. Later on in the flight,
sandwiches and juices were brought around, and
pot noodles were available from the galley.
At 0315 local time, the lights came on and
breakfast was served 15 minutes after. I was offered
a choice of poached egg with hollandaise sauce,
grilled bacon and hash browns, or chicken with
stir-fried vermicelli. The Asian option was tasty and
featured fresh, succulent mushrooms and bok choy,
served alongside strawberry yoghurt and fresh
fruit. The crew were friendly and responsive.
ARRIVAL The lights went out for another
40 minutes before the captain announced at
0440 that we would be starting our descent.
Headphones were collected, so I read until we
landed at 0510. After taxiing for ten minutes, we
disembarked at a remote stand and boarded an
air-conditioned bus. Fifteen minutes later, I had
cleared passport control and passed my bag on
to Vietnam Airlines staff, who loaded it on to the
domestic flight I was about to take to Da Nang.
Marisa Cannon
VERDICT An excellent product
with a number of features that
made long stints seated quite
comfortable. Most notable,
however, was the service,
which was exceptional thanks
to a number of minor yet
thoughtful touches such as
slippers, hot towels and regular
offers of food and drink.
DEPARTURE TIME
1110
FLIGHT TIME
11hrs 57mins
AIRCRAFT TYPE
B787-9
CONFIGURATION
2-3-2
SEAT PITCH
42in/107cm
SEAT RECLINE
7in/18cm
PRICE Internet rates for a
return premium economy
flight from London to
Ho Chi Minh City in July
ranged between �013
and �579 depending
on flexibility.
CONTACT
vietnamairlines.com
JUNE 2017
22 I Private jets
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Private jets I 23
Pay it
forward
Jenny Southan investigates the pros
and cons of prepaid private jet cards
Left: Skytime Jets?
Legacy 500
businesstraveller.com
JUNE 2017
?
J
oe is a Silicon Roundabout entrepreneur
based in London. His new job as chief
executive will see him travelling more for
work, especially in the US. He?s happy to use
commercial airlines to make transatlantic
hops, but when it comes to domestic flights in America
he is concerned that the hassle of using conventional
carriers and airport security will be counterproductive.
In the US, if you fly more than 400 hours a year on
a private jet, you?re better off buying your own aircraft,
but Joe?s not going to be that guy. Instead, a business
acquaintance of his has recommended a ?jet card?,
which means he can prepay for a block of hours or
load up an account with credit to use as and when he
likes on a predetermined aircraft of his choice.
If Joe decides this is right for him, he will require a
chunk of cash upfront (this is not for travellers who
prefer a pay-as-you-go approach to jet charter). The
benefits of a subscription will mean he gets to lock
in a fixed hourly rate (he only pays for scheduled
flight time ? not diversions, delays, fuel, landing fees,
de-icing or aircraft positioning, for example). He
has guaranteed availability, there are no peak-hour
restrictions and the booking process is speedy.
Private jet cards represent 20-25 per cent of charter
revenue for boutique broker Skytime Jets, which
launched in 2012. Some 60 per cent of its business
comes from Europe, 30 per cent from the US and
10 per cent from the Middle East and Asia.
James Shotton, its co-founder and director, says:
?We work with individuals who appreciate that
buying a private jet card is not the cheapest way to fly
but who want very high quality, personalised service.
Customers can either negotiate on every single
charter trip and have multiple conversations about
24 I Private jets
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Private jets I 25
FIRST OFF THE BLOCKS
Sentient Jet claims to have been the inventor of
the private jet card, with 100 per cent of its revenue
coming from this model even after 20 years. Its
president and CEO, Andrew Collins, says: ?About
60 per cent of our flights are related to business and
40 per cent to leisure. Whether it?s a top executive
looking to make an important board meeting in
Cleveland after closing a deal with a client in New
York, or a family member looking to get home in
time for the holidays, flying private is a viable way to
beat the clock.?
Below and left:
Sentient Jet
PROS AND CONS OF PREPAID CARDS
PROS
CONS
? You always know how much you
are going to pay for your flights.
? You are guaranteed availability of
your aircraft type (or an upgrade).
? There are no extra fees to worry
about for the likes of delays,
diversions and de-icing.
? You can manage your travel
spend more easily as a company.
? There are no blackout periods or
peak days.
? Rates are typically the same for
one-way and round-trip flights.
? It costs more than ad hoc charter.
? You need a lot of capital upfront
to buy one.
? Choosing a card is complicated.
? Unless your money is in escrow,
you could lose it if the company
goes bankrupt.
? Not all jet cards allow you to roll
over hours or credit.
? A daily-minimum requirement
of 90 minutes would mean
you?re charged double for a
45-minute flight.
businesstraveller.com
Although private jet cards have been around since
the late 1990s, jet charter broker Privatefly didn?t
start offering one until two years ago. Carol Cork,
its marketing director and co-founder, says: ?Our jet
card works very much like an Oyster card, allowing
customers to prepay for their travel. Feedback from
some of our more frequent flyers showed us they
wanted all of the same on-demand cost benefits and
global coverage but with the increased speed and
convenience of a prepaid account.?
What does it cost? The minimum credit you can
buy with Privatefly is �,000 (in this case, you do not
buy a bundle of hours). In return, you get the ?best
possible charter market price every time you fly, the
fastest response speeds possible when booking, flight
credits on your jet card balance, aircraft upgrades,
preferred cancellation terms, a dedicated flight
advisor 24/7, and no blackout periods or peak days?.
How quickly can you go from booking to boarding?
Cork says:?We had a jet card customer go from enquiry
to airborne in 31 minutes last week from Miami
to Chicago. On average, almost a third fly within
24 hours of booking, and 66 per cent within a week.?
As we reported last year (?From the ground up?,
June 2016), Delta Air Lines is targeting the private
market with its Delta Private Jets subsidiary. As well
as selling regular charters, it offers private jet cards
from US$100,000 upwards, and you can earn ten
Delta Sky Bonus points per dollar spent. The flights
can also work in conjunction with regular Delta
services, with chauffeur-driven Porsche cars taking
you from one domestic flight to the next, missing out
the terminal experience altogether.
Other companies that sell cards include Air
Partner, Magellan Jet, Vistajet and Flexjets. Netjets
says its Marquis card is ?ideal for anyone who flies
under 50 hours per year and prefers a short-term
commitment?. Crewing, scheduling, maintenance
and catering are all part of the package. Philip Baer,
Netjets? senior vice-president of the UK and Nordics,
says the card ?is intended as a trial programme or for
those who fly infrequently? (the company?s main focus
is on fractional ownership of its fleet of 700 jets).
Cork says: ?In general, jet cards came about as a
natural evolution of the private jet market. First, you
could own your own private aircraft, then fractional
ownership was created for those who wanted a share
in a specific fleet, then a jet card became desirable,
offering a block of flying time, but without the full or
part-share financial investment of the aircraft asset.?
COMPARE AND CONTRAST
Journalist and jet expert Doug Gollan says doing
your research is essential, which is why he founded
privatejetcardcomparisons.com, a site designed to
help you work out what suits you best. He says: ?Do
rich people really buy these programmes without
?
price, or have a fixed price agreed at the beginning so
they know exactly what they are getting.?
That certainty comes at a cost. The cheapest tenhour package for a six-seat light jet is �,000, or
�700 an hour, compared with ad hoc charter of a
six-seat Cessna Citation, which might be �500 an
hour. There is a level of security against bankruptcy,
too, as all payments are put into a dedicated escrow
account so Skytime can only access it when you want
to book. It lets you roll over unused hours to the next
year, although not all companies will. Being eligible
for a refund of your balance at any time is also
something you will need to ensure you are entitled to.
JUNE 2017
26 I Private jets
10 CARD PROVIDERS
magellanjets.com
aircharter.co.uk
privatefly.com
skytimejets.com
airpartner.com
sentient.com
vistajet.com
luxaviationuk.com
netjets.com
deltaprivatejets.com
reading the fine print? All the time. What happens?
They get very upset after they see their first invoice.?
A lot of people choose a card based on a friend?s
recommendation, he says. ?But they might be doing
a lot of two- or three-hour flights, whereas I want to
do 20 flights to Boston, which take 40 minutes. One
of the jet card variants is ?daily minimums? ? if your
provider has a 90-minute daily minimum they will
charge my 40-minute flight as an hour and a half.?
One key benefit of jet cards is that the rate that you
lock in is typically good for both one-way and round
trips. Gollan says: ?One provider might be willing
to keep the jet for Nice in two days so they will give
you a round-trip rate, but another will need it back
in London the next day so will give you a one-way
rate. The advantage of buying a card is that whether
you do a round-trip or one-way flight, you know your
rate is US$8,000 dollars an hour and you don?t have
to negotiate every time.? You may also get aircraft
upgrades when your contracted jet is not available.
JUNE 2017
Clockwise from
top: Luxaviation?s
Embraer Legacy 600;
Privatefly?s jet card;
Privatefly aircraft
The downside of ?on-demand? charter (when you?re
not using a jet card) is that the ?bargain? price you
nabbed with the latest ?Uber? of private jets may not
be so cheap at the end of your journey. Gollan says:
?When you charter a jet to Nice and there is fog so
your plane has to divert, who pays for that diversion?
You do. Jet cards cover diversions and de-icing, for
example, as part of your inclusive rate. But if you think
of four couples getting together to split a charter, and
suddenly they find out their flight is getting diverted,
costs can be in the multiple thousands of dollars.?
Patrick Margetson-Rushmore, chief executive
of private jet operator Luxaviation UK, says: ?It?s
important to have a close look at the type of card
you?re buying into before you sign the contract. All
good jet card providers are flexible. Certainly, with
the card that we provide, while your membership is
based on a specific aircraft type, you can trade up or
down within our fleet, as required. Jet cards are an
easy, economical solution for regular charter flyers.?
If you don?t think a jet card is for you, Stratajet has
a different kind of proposition. Instead of prepaying
for a bundle of hours, which requires a large amount
of capital to be tied up elsewhere, it has set about
providing jets in the cheapest way possible ? by selling
seats on empty legs (private jets are usually booked
one-way so return journeys tend to be scheduled
without passengers). Given these trips can cost
75 per cent less than a typical charter, when people
talk about the democratisation of private aviation,
this is what they have in mind. The downside is
that you don?t have the jet to yourself. What did
Joe choose? He?s still making up his mind. ?
businesstraveller.com
T H E F A S T E S T W AY T O
THE BEST PRICE
Don?t wait for quotes, find the largest choice of
private jets available for charter with Stratajet.
Search and compare the best prices instantly.
As fast and easy as booking a private jet should be.
G E T T H E A P P A N D S E A RC H F L I G H T S TO DAY
+44 (0)203 397 4999 | S T R ATA J E T.CO M
28 I Domestic aviation
On the
home front
Alex McWhirter reports on the
changing face of the often ignored, yet
essential, domestic aviation market
JUNE 2017
A
ll too often, domestic flying is an
overlooked part of the aviation
business, as carriers the world
over devote their energies to more
glamorous international services.
This has always puzzled me. It is true that
domestic air service is rarely profitable, but
conversely it delivers millions of passengers to the
airlines? global route networks, which are more
lucrative at the same time as being prestigious.
Domestic aviation also plays a vital role in developing
international business with the regions and
connecting travellers to the outside world.
There is no better example of this than the UK.
Domestic services to and from London Heathrow
have been cut back over the decades owing to a slot
businesstraveller.com
shortage. Today, there are only domestic flights linking
Heathrow with Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow,
Inverness, Leeds, Manchester and Newcastle.
Business travellers need only peruse airline
timetables to recall the days when there were air
services not just from these cities but also from
Birmingham, Carlisle, Dundee, East Midlands,
Guernsey, Jersey, Liverpool, Newquay, Norwich,
Plymouth and Teeside. These were either scrapped or
diverted to other London airports, such as Gatwick or
Stansted, meaning flight connections became a chore.
Until recently, BA seemed content with the situation.
After all, its Heathrow services tend to operate at T5
so passengers can make easy transfers. And with the
exception of routes to Edinburgh and Aberdeen, the
airline holds a domestic monopoly at Heathrow.
businesstraveller.com
Still, April saw a change. For the first time, BA
introduced a business class (Club Europe) service
on its six domestic routes. It means high-fare paying
passengers now get better treatment both in the air
and on the ground.
Why the change? Previously, the only part of the
airline?s network that you couldn?t book a business
class seat on were flights within the UK. A British
Airways spokesperson says: ?We know that many of
our customers who connect between our short-haul
and long-haul services prefer to travel in business
class and we want to offer them a consistent
experience throughout the journey.? BA also recently
added buy-on-board food and drink in economy
class, providing another reason to offer a full service
to premium customers.
?
Domestic aviation I 29
JUNE 2017
30 I Domestic aviation
In the past, BA was content to offer a one-class
domestic service (like its counterparts elsewhere) as
it learnt to live with the competition provided by the
likes of Air France, KLM, Lufthansa and Swiss. All of
these airlines ? and a few more ? have for decades
enticed UK regional passengers to fly globally via
their hubs in Paris CDG, Amsterdam, Frankfurt and
Zurich. For passengers in first or business class, the
above carriers would offer only the lower standard of
business class such as is found in Europe.
What has really changed BA?s thinking is the way
that the Gulf airlines and some US and Asian carriers
have begun to build up their regional presence in
search of new market opportunities.
The US carriers operate nonstop services to the
East Coast and Midwest from several regional
UK airports. But it is the Gulf airlines that provide
the biggest challenge. Emirates, Etihad and Qatar
Airways now operate ? either individually or en
masse ? from Birmingham, Edinburgh, Glasgow,
Manchester and Newcastle.
Because they operate wide-body aircraft and offer
long-haul business class standards throughout the
journey (some flights also feature first class), they
are strong competitors for BA?s premium long-haul
passengers bound for the Middle East, Africa, Asia
and Australia via London. It is true that a plane
change is required, but a change is needed anyway
when travelling via London.
Two of Asia?s leading carriers, Cathay Pacific and
Singapore Airlines, are limited to Manchester because
of its long runway. Again, both are sixth-freedom
carriers in the business of carrying passengers to
JUNE 2017
destinations (in Asia and Australasia) beyond their
Hong Kong and Singapore hubs.
What about other foreign airlines operating out of
Heathrow, or Virgin Atlantic? Aren?t they even more
disadvantaged by having to use terminals other than
T5? Virgin and those foreign carriers not operating
from the regions (although Virgin now operates a
few US routes from these airports) realise that their
travellers face a terminal change, which adds to the
connecting time.
Little Red (now defunct) was Virgin Atlantic?s
attempt to look after the needs of regional passengers
making connections to airlines other than BA at
Heathrow. It made use of so-called ?remedy slots?
that the regulators instructed IAG (International
Airlines Group) to make available, citing competition
fears at Heathrow following the demise of Bmi.
Some of these slots were taken over by regional
airline Flybe at the end of March this year. Flybe
operates three daily flights from Aberdeen and four
a day from Edinburgh into Heathrow T2. These
flights are aimed at making connections easier for
passengers connecting on to Virgin Atlantic and
foreign airlines. To keep costs under control, Flybe is
using a smallish Q400 turboprop aircraft that has
half the number of seats of the larger A320 jets that
Little Red operated.
It is too early to say whether or not Flybe will make
a success of its entry into one of the world?s leading
aviation hubs. One wishes it success, although I can?t
help wondering what the long-haul premium class
traveller will think after arriving on an overnight
flight from Dubai, Singapore or Los Angeles. ?
businesstraveller.com
Domestic aviation I 31
EUROPE?S DOMESTIC MARKET
What?s the situation like in mainland Europe? Much
the same, although long-haul foreign carriers do not
have the same level of presence in the regional longhaul market as they do in the UK.
The main difference is that a greater variety of
domestic routes can be operated. Plus, almost all
hub airports are directly linked to the national rail
network and, in some cases, by high-speed train.
In contrast, Heathrow is served only by a spur
running off the Great Western Railway mainline
to Paddington. A link from Heathrow to the
planned HS2 route linking London with Birmingham
was proposed, but that has been ruled out for the
time being.
Where long-distance rail links exist, as they do
in Amsterdam, Frankfurt and Paris Charles de
Gaulle, to take three examples, most travellers
still want to connect by air rather than rail. Partly
it?s because they feel ?safer? linked into the
airline?s network and, if they wish to drive, it?s
easier to park at an airport than at a downtown
train station.
When France opened its TGV line between
Lyon and Paris in 1981, it was thought that
the high-speed train would eliminate air
service altogether. But nothing could be
farther from the truth. Even though the
TGV now also runs directly between Lyon
and Paris CDG, there are still five daily Air
France flights (duration one hour), despite
the fact that the rail journey time is two
hours and there are regular services
throughout the day.
The situation is similar in Germany.
Only on the short Cologne-Frankfurt
airport ICE line has air competition been
vanquished. Lufthansa flights remain on
ICE routes between Frankfurt airport and
Dusseldorf, Nuremburg and Stuttgart.
Between Frankfurt and Dusseldorf there
are no fewer than seven daily flights,
while there are five to Nuremburg and
six to Stuttgart.
There?s an even more extreme
example in the ?domestic? Benelux
market. KLM, so keen to snare
connecting passengers to fuel its
global network, operates four flights
daily on the 158km hop between
Brussels and Amsterdam. And
yet there are hourly Thalys trains
between Brussels and Schiphol
airport that take about 90 minutes
? only half an hour or so more than
taking the plane.
32 I Spotlight on... Hong Kong
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Spotlight on... Hong Kong I 33
Harbour
highlights
ISTOCK
businesstraveller.com
Left: West
Kowloon
s any visitor to Hong Kong will tell you,
booking a hotel room with a view of the
city?s Victoria Harbour is expensive. Property
along the waterfront is in high demand, and
finding space to build is not easy.
On Hong Kong Island, development has been
aggressive, with the government reclaiming about
10 per cent of the island?s total area to make room for
new projects. Much of this is now prime real estate,
within walking distance from key hubs such as Hong
Kong station and landmark five-star hotels including
the Grand Hyatt and the Four Seasons.
Across the harbour in Kowloon, growth has been
slower, save for a few major developments in the
districts of Tsim Sha Tsui and Austin, such as the
108-storey International Commerce Centre, which
also houses the Ritz-Carlton across its top 16 floors.
East Kowloon has remained fairly underdeveloped,
with local industries rooted in manufacturing, and
high-rise apartment blocks and shopping centres
scattered throughout.
Kowloon has famously been described by expats as
?the Dark Side? owing to issues such as overcrowding
and less spoken English, but, mainly, because of
a lack of interest from international investors ?
until now. Over the past few decades, both the
government and private companies have embarked
on several regeneration projects, leading to a raft
of new hotels, a dedicated cultural precinct and the
reinvention of formerly disused facilities.
One of the largest single developments has been
going on for some time at Kai Tak in Kowloon Bay.
Once the site of Hong Kong?s runway, the area was
left idle for many years while plans were discussed on
how best to utilise the long, thin stretch of land that
juts out into Kowloon Bay.
The answer seems obvious now ? a striking new
cruise terminal designed by Foster and Partners
(captured on our cover). Alongside this, extensions to
the Mass Transit Railway (MTR) network have made
the area more convenient to access and navigate,
encouraging major new hotels to move in.
Lastly, projects such as the West Kowloon Cultural
District are putting the Kowloon waterfront on the
map, making it a desirable place to live and work.
JUNE 2017
?
A
Kowloon?s waterfront is being
transformed thanks to investment
in some cutting-edge projects.
Valerian Ho reports from Hong Kong
34 I Spotlight on... Hong Kong
WORLDWIDE CRUISE TERMINALS
REVAMPING THE RUNWAY
Kai Tak International airport was demolished in 1998.
Hong Kong moved its aviation facilities to Chek Lap
Kok, on the far side of Lantau Island, and the huge
area of land that remained, spanning 320 hectares,
became the highly complex Kai Tak Development
project, representing the largest available plot of
land fronting Victoria Harbour. Roll forward 20 years,
and it now comprises government, institutional and
community facilities, residential and commercial
areas, and open green spaces.
The first of the major projects to be completed
was the Kai Tak Cruise Terminal, which launched in
2013 and is managed by Worldwide Cruise Terminals
(WCT). Built on the former airport?s famous old
runway, the three-storey terminal can accommodate
two mega-cruise ships of up to 200,000 tonnes.
Since opening, the terminal has served 730,000
holidaymakers and, last year, it welcomed 18 cruises.
JUNE 2017
The facility is more than just a cruise terminal,
however ? its impressive harbour views also make
it appealing for meetings and events. WCT provides
space for a range of gatherings, regularly hosting
more than 20 corporate dinners and weddings each
month. It has four flexible indoor venues covering
in excess of 3,000 sqm and catering to up to 3,000
guests, and can also make use of on-site food and
drink outlets and outdoor areas, including its rooftop
garden. Major events last year included functions for
Volkswagen, Austrian Airlines and Tesla.
A vital boost for business in this section of the
Kowloon harbour district is the development of the
MTR network. Last year, an extension of the Kwun
Tong Line opened from Yau Ma Tei station to Ho Man
Tin and Whampoa. Since 2012, a link between Shatin
and Central on Hong Kong Island has been under
construction; the first phase of the 17km-long railway
project ? set to open in mid-2019 ? will connect Tai
businesstraveller.com
Wai with Hung Hom, passing through new stations
including Kai Tak, Ma Tau Wai and Ho Man Tin. The
remaining Hung Hom to Admiralty cross-harbour
section is targeted to start operation in 2021.
CHECKING IN
Just opened is Shangri-La?s Kerry hotel ? the first
for this brand in Hong Kong ? taking advantage of
the MTR?s new extension to Whampoa, and with an
enviable location right at the water?s edge next to the
Hung Hom Star Ferry pier.
Designed by Andr� Fu, known for his work on
the Upper House hotel and Singapore?s Fullerton
Bay hotel, more than 60 per cent of the property?s
546 rooms have harbour views. It also boasts the
largest pillar-less ballroom in the city, holding up to
2,100 people for a reception. It features rock crystal
chandeliers, a 15-metre LED video screen and an
extensive harbour-view foyer.
businesstraveller.com
From left: Kai Tak
Cruise Terminal;
Rosewood Hong Kong
Sharon Foo, director of communications for the
Kerry Hotel Hong Kong, says: ?Next door we have
the two new Wheelock office towers, and the terrace
in front of our International Market Place will be
open to the public. We want to be part of the Hung
Hom community.?
Opening next year, is the Rosewood Hong
Kong, which will also enjoy a great location. The
luxury hotel will occupy 27 upper-level floors of a
mixed-use tower on Salisbury Road in Tsim Sha
Tsui, right beside Victoria Harbour on the site of
the former New World Centre, which has belonged
to Rosewood?s owning company, New World
Development, since the 1970s.
The 398-room property will feature eight
restaurants and a spa, while the top 19 floors
of the tower will house 199 long-stay luxury
apartments with their own dedicated lounge,
indoor pool and gym.
JUNE 2017
?
Spotlight on... Hong Kong I 35
36 I Spotlight on... Hong Kong
CULTURAL CATALYST
In the second half of the 20th century, the Kowloon
Peninsula?s western shoreline was so packed with
tower blocks that the only way to create new business
possibilities was to reclaim land from the sea. The
buildings now occupying new foundations include
the International Commerce Centre and the huge
Elements shopping mall, next to the W hotel.
One 40-hectare plot of land remained, providing
the space to develop the West Kowloon Cultural
District, a complex of theatres and performance
spaces that will produce and host world-class
exhibitions, performances and cultural events, and
provide 23 hectares of public open space, including a
2km waterfront promenade.
Construction started in late 2013, and the
headland area and Nursery Park have opened to
the public, with events and festivals taking place
throughout the year. Last September, the M+ Pavilion
opened, a new space for artists and designers to
present their work as part of small-scale exhibitions
and events in the Art Park.
Next to M+, another significant development
is planned. When it is complete in 2021, the Lyric
Theatre Complex will comprise three theatres, as well
as a Resident Company Centre ? a ?creative lab? for
performers to collaborate and rehearse.
Last year, the West Kowloon Cultural District
Authority also announced a partnership with the
Beijing Palace Museum ? a UNESCO World Heritage
site ? to launch a new attraction, the Hong Kong
Palace Museum. Rocco Design Architects will draw
up the blueprint ? award-winning architect Rocco
Yim designed the Yunnan Provincial Museum and
JUNE 2017
Above: Kerry hotel
Guangdong Museum in China, both of which are
renowned for their striking, abstract aesthetics.
Expected to open in 2022, the Hong Kong Palace
Museum?s permanent galleries will present 5,000
years of Chinese art, shared from the Beijing
Palace Museum.
Hong Kong locals will welcome the recent
funding of artistic and cultural sites for the
Kowloon Peninsula, which will hopefully create
another layer to a metropolis best known for its
gleaming skyscrapers and business opportunities.
As investment continues to pour into the area,
Kowloon?s new hotels and infrastructure will no
doubt open up a new, exciting side to Hong Kong
that many tourists and business people have yet
to experience. ?
businesstraveller.com
A Smarter Partnership
that?s on time
With convenient, seamless
connections to over 200
destinations in the US,
Virgin Atlantic?s partnership
with Delta Air Lines� offers
customers great benefits.
*In 2016, Delta was No.1 and Virgin Atlantic
was No.2 for On Time Performance from
London Heathrow.
? Easier, convenient travel planning due to combined schedules
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undisturbed sleep
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access and reward flights
38 I Hold luggage
On
the
case
Marisa Cannon puts the
latest crop of larger suitcases
through their paces to help
you prepare for your next
long-haul trip
Tumi V3 Short Trip
Packing Case
A new polycarbonate case from
Tumi?s lightest hard-side collection,
this case weighs only 3.8kg ? light
given its size, and larger than its
?short trip? description suggests.
It is easy to handle when filled,
requiring little effort to manoeuvre
thanks to four wheels. There are
two main compartments, with a
large zip-up pocket containing a
plastic hanger bracket for storing
suits. The other section is open and
covered with dark grey lining, with
X-shaped tie-down straps and a
third compartment on the outside
of the flap which is useful for
storing documents. A three-stage
telescoping handle allows for good
control when handling. It also has
an integrated TSA lock.
VERDICT A solid, spacious
DIMENSIONS
66cm x 44.5cm x
25.5cm
VOLUME
59 litres
WEIGHT
3.8kg
COLOUR
Hunter, Pacific
blue, magenta,
blur print, banana
leaf print, black
WHEELS
Four
PRICE
�5
uk.tumi.com
case that is easy to handle. Best
for trips lasting several days.
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Hold luggage I 39
Made from Bayer polycarbonate,
this hard-shell case is streamlined
and sturdy, with four wheels and
a retractable handle that can be
set at three different positions.
Separate grips on the side and
top make it simple to lift. It has
two zip-up dividing walls made
out of mesh and nylon fabric,
plus two elasticated Y-shaped
compression straps to help
keep clothes in place. It also
expands to allow up to 27 per
cent more volume. A welcome
layer of security comes from
the Access lock combination
recovery programme, whereby
owners can register their security
codes online and retrieve them
if forgotten.
VERDICT Stylish and
good value for money, with
utilitarian interiors that help
to keep items in place.
businesstraveller.com
DIMENSIONS
67cm x 45cm x
30cm
VOLUME
65 litres
WEIGHT
4kg
COLOUR
Rose gold, silver,
gold, Evergreen,
Deep Lake
WHEELS
Four
PRICE
�0
victorinox.com
Antler Oxygen Medium
The soft, polyester Antler
Oxygen is a new ultra-light
case with a strong, ripresistant frame, as well as
corner protectors designed to
withstand the ravages of rough
ground handling. Along with
the expandable zip, the flexible
material allows some give. It
also has four wheels, top and
side grip handles, an outer zip
pocket concealed under a flap,
plus TSA combination locks.
Inside there is a mesh zip-up
pocket and X-shaped straps
for keeping items in place,
although, when full, it can be a
little unsteady. Cabin cases from
the range come with a removable
transparent toiletry bag.
DIMENSIONS
70cm x 43cm x
27cm
VOLUME
74 litres
WEIGHT
2.2kg
COLOUR
Blue, red, black
WHEELS
Four
PRICE
�5
antler.co.uk
VERDICT An extremely
lightweight case made with
durable fabric, although this
picks up dirt easily.
?
Victorinox Etherius Medium
JUNE 2017
40 I Hold luggage
w
Briggs and Riley Torq
Large Spinner
This hard-shell case is extremely
resilient, made with three layers of
ultra-strong Makrolon polycarbonate.
Inside, the front mesh pocket
contains an adjustable loop for
hanging suits, while the main
compartment has two slender zipup pockets on either side ? good
for holding small loose items ? and
a panel that attaches to the frame
with clips, helping to compress the
contents. Recessed double spinner
wheels provide a decent level of
control, while top and side grab
points and moulded side feet keep
the bag unscathed when placed on
its side. It is on the heavier side, but
comes with a lifetime guarantee.
VERDICT Although weighty, the
case is strong, with a number
of compartments and panels to
keep clothes wrinkle-free.
JUNE 2017
DIMENSIONS
76.2cm x 50.8cm x
30.5cm
Samsonite Fuze Spinner
PRICE
�9
The name of this collection draws
on its combination of hard and
soft shell features, with the case
boasting a robust, moulded frame
alongside soft, woven nylon panels
that allow greater flexibility. It
has double tube handles, top and
side grab points, four smoothrunning wheels, and front and
back pockets that are handy for
holding documents. There are
interior straps to keep clothes in
place, plus a zip-up compartment
with an extra pocket to keep loose
items. An outer zip allows the case
to expand a further 4cm, with TSA
locks and a telescope handle that
releases at two levels.
briggs-riley.com
VERDICT A good-sized
VOLUME
106.1 litres
WEIGHT
5.9kg
COLOUR
Cobalt, ruby,
graphite
WHEELS
Four
DIMENSIONS
82cm x 53cm x
34cm
VOLUME
122 litres
WEIGHT
4.1kg
COLOUR
Blue Nights, black
WHEELS
Four
PRICE
�5
samsonite.co.uk
check-in case with plenty
of pockets to help you stay
organised. Black is best for
hiding stains.
businesstraveller.com
Hold luggage I 41
An inventive case that splits into
two, with a zip-on outer bag that
detaches to create a cabin-size
rolling duffel. A clip-on strap also
allows the outer section to convert
to a separate over-the-shoulder
bag. Although confusing at first, the
design is impressive, with segments
attaching and detaching via a series
of zips and fastenings. When all
parts are attached to the trolley,
plastic clips help to compress the
contents. It has two wheels, a
telescoping handle, top, side and
bottom grab points, plus internal
straps to keep clothes in place.
An interior mesh pocket along
the length of the bag is good for
carrying keys and currency.
VERDICT The case holds just
enough for a three- to four-night
trip, but its design is great if you
want a number of bag options.
businesstraveller.com
DIMENSIONS
55cm x 37cm x
36cm
VOLUME
56 litres
WEIGHT
3.5kg
COLOUR
Mineral, Dark
Shadow
WHEELS
Two
PRICE
�0
thule.com
Delsey Montsouris
This expandable trolley case
has a hard-shell underside and
a soft top, with two capacious
compartments inside. Available
only in black, it?s not the most
attractive of the bunch, although
it is roomy and durable, with a
patented Securitech expandable
zip (apparently 41 times more
resilient than conventional zip
fasteners), two interior horizontal
straps, and heavy-duty outer clips
for extra compression. What it
lacks in looks, it makes up for in
practicality, with anti-tilt stability
feet, two large outer pockets,
hardwearing wheels, TSA locks,
Smart zip pullers and a soft-touch
side handle for a smooth grip.
DIMENSIONS
68cm x 43cm x
29cm
VOLUME
76 litres
WEIGHT
3.9kg
COLOUR
Black
WHEELS
Two
PRICE
�9
delsey.com
VERDICT A robust case
with a number of useful
storage features and plenty
of expandable space.
?
Thule Subterra 3-in-1
JUNE 2017
42 I Hold luggage
TRAVEL ACCESSORIES
Ted Baker Ricase textured
laptop case
This polyester case has a
padded main compartment plus
three external pockets suitable
for holding travel documents.
Available in red with a textured
finish, it can hold a 13-inch
laptop. �; tedbaker.co.uk
Smythson Mara
currency case
Made from crocodile and calf
leather, the Mara has four zip
sections with a satin-finish lining.
Available in Ocean Blue and
Poppy, you can personalise it with
gold lettering and monograms.
�5; smythson.com
Bric?s Life Rolling Duffel
This lightweight duffel markets
itself as being environmentally
friendly, made with synthetic
suede and vegetable-tanned
Tuscan leather finishes.
Alongside its trolley handle, the
case?s two wheels and anti-tilt
feet are useful if you don?t want
to use it as a holdall. If you
do, the handle can be hidden
with a zip closure, and the two
slender grips can be joined
with a button fastening for easy
carrying. Inside, the duffel has
two zip-up compartments and
compression straps made from
durable ribbon, while the top of
the case has another pocket for
extra storage.
VERDICT Elegant and
functional, if perhaps not
the most hardwearing.
Great for a weekend trip.
JUNE 2017
DIMENSIONS
72cm x 37cm
x 32cm
VOLUME
73 litres
WEIGHT
3.9kg
COLOUR
Camel, olive,
blue, brown
WHEELS
Two
PRICE
�0
brics.it
Samsonite Cityscape Tech
laptop backpack
The Cityscape?s RFID-protected
pocket guards against skimming
and identity fraud thanks to
a blocking material placed
between the outer layer and
internal lining. It comes in three
sizes, with the largest able to
carry a 17-inch laptop.
�9; samsonite.co.uk
Tumi Patrol packable travel
puffer jacket
Made from water-resistant nylon,
this puffer jacket converts to a
travel pillow thanks to a hidden
pouch in the collar. Available in
navy, green and black, it is filled
with down insulation and has a
number of hidden pockets.
�5; uk.tumi.com
Trace Me luggage tracker
In partnership with the SITA
global bag-tracing system,
this luggage tracker contains
technology so that if your case is
lost or stolen, it can be identified
by its serial number. Once the
number is entered into the SITA
system, you will be informed
where your bag is and who
to contact by text or email.
�.50; tmlt.co.uk
businesstraveller.com
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44 I Editor?s lunch
Best of both
worlds
Adding a weekend or holiday on to a business
trip has become the norm. Jenny Southan
reports from our recent editor?s lunch
ISTOCK
M
ore and more of us are
combining business trips
with leisure time. Recent
data from Carlson Wagonlit Travel
showed that between 2011 and
2015, 20 per cent of travellers
combined work with time off
(indicated by trips of two nights
or more that started or ended
with a Saturday-night stay). Our
own latest survey showed that
readers added an average of two
holidays to business trips a year.
The subject was discussed
during a recent editor?s lunch in a
private dining room of the Royal
Exchange Grand Caf� in London,
hosted by our sponsor, Japanese
airline ANA. One of the courses
served was award-winning dish
?Piero Donburi N7? (calamari,
scallops and prawns seared in
sesame oil with ponzu sauce),
which was available earlier this
year in ANA?s business class
JUNE 2017
cabins between London and Tokyo,
and was created by Piero Leone,
head chef of Sauterelle, the Royal
Exchange?s other on-site restaurant.
We asked readers for their views
on ?bleisure? and started with the
obvious question ? ?Have you ever
combined a work trip with holiday??
The answer was a resounding ?yes?.
One person said: ?I travel to
Geneva quite often for work
? earlier this year I stayed on for the
weekend to go skiing. Last year I
made sure my trip coincided with the
Geneva Motor Show. In fact, I have a
separate calendar for events around
the world so I can time my trips to fit
in with them.?
Another reader pointed out:
?Adding on some holiday usually
means employees return happier,
more relaxed and productive.?
It also gives them more time to
overcome jet lag. One participant
said: ?Business trips are there to
collect miles and points, while
leisure trips are to spend them.
How our staff use their miles is up
to them ? it?s a tax-free bonus.?
Combining work and pleasure
isn?t a recent phenomenon. One
reader reminisced about the
era of round-the-world tickets:
?You could fly from London to
Tokyo, spend Tuesday to Thursday
working and then jet off to Hawaii
for a few days before starting work
on Monday in New York.?
He added: ?These days, if you
include a Saturday-night stay,
flights are usually cheaper, so why
not stay the weekend? Even if you
?Adding on some holiday usually means employees
return happier, more relaxed and productive.?
businesstraveller.com
Editor?s lunch I 45
fly your partner out to join you,
by paying for a few extra nights in
a hotel with points, it can still be
cost-effective.?
For ANA, the interest comes
as a result of Japan hosting the
Rugby World Cup in 2019 and
the Olympic Games in 2020.
With nonstop flights from
London taking longer than
11 hours, there?s the possibility
for travellers to combine meetings
with sporting events, or simply
to experience the attractions of
Tokyo and locations further afield
such as Hakone, Kamakura,
Mount Fuji and Kyoto.
On the other hand, sometimes
you?d rather escape a city as soon
as possible. One reader said: ?If
I am doing business in Lagos
then there is no chance my wife
will want to come out. But when
working in Milan, combining it
with a weekend in Lake Como is
wonderful.? In Europe, CWT says
the most popular ?bleisure? cities
are Barcelona, Istanbul, Lisbon
and Nice. In the US, it?s Las Vegas,
Orlando, Miami and Honolulu.
One reader said: ?I go to India
a lot on business and my wife
and I have combined it with a
visit to the Taj Mahal, popped up
to Jodhpur from Delhi or down
to Kerala. To experience all that
is amazing and it?s all done on
the back of a fully expensed
business trip.?
However, if your
partner cannot join
you it can create
resentment. Another
reader said: ?My wife
and I have agreed to use
our holiday allowance
?You could fly from London to
Tokyo, work Tuesday to Thursday,
then jet off to Hawaii for a few
days before starting work on
Monday in New York?
From top: Royal
Exchange Grand
Caf� Business
Traveller?s Tom Otley
with ANA?s Yoshimi
Ogura, Julie Murphy
and Akira Nakamura
together ? so if I take five days off
and she doesn?t, then we are out of
sync.?Also, while it may seem like
a no-brainer to combine work and
play, your company?s travel policy
might not agree. One reader said:
?There is a big difference between
being an employee and being a
business owner. If you?re the boss
then you can do what
you want. Within an
organisation, it can
be difficult to set rules
as to who can benefit
from adding on time
to business trips and
who can?t.?
This is an issue that
has been bothering
travel managers for some
time. As reported by our
sister publication Buying
Business Travel, a recent study
by American Express Global
Business Travel showed that
managers reported a 70 per
cent year-on-year increase
in enquiries about combining
business and leisure.
Still, as one person said: ?We
found that adding leisure travel
coverage to our policy could be
done for a nominal amount.?
Another added: ?I just buy annual
worldwide travel insurance for any
personal trips I take.?
As remote working and
work-life balance become
key priorities for the modern
business person, it may not be long
before the distinction between
travelling for work and pleasure
disappears altogether.
? If you would like to attend a future editor?s lunch, email
events@panacea publishing.com, stating your name, job
title, company and topics of interest.
businesstraveller.com
JUNE 2017
46 I Loyalty
Marisa Cannon rounds up airline and hotel scheme news and promotions
British Airways updates Executive Club benefits
British Airways has reinstated the ability for Executive Club members to reserve
seats without charge, and introduced the freezing of membership tiers during
paternity or maternity leave.
From June 14, bronze, silver and gold members will be able to reserve their
seat on a basic fare for free. Members who have paid to select their seat and
are due to travel from that date can receive a refund on the cost of the seat
reservation. In addition, members who travel less as a result of maternity,
paternity or adoption leave will now be eligible for a ?status freeze?, whereby
their membership will be preserved for a year. ba.com
Principal Hotel Company launches
Applause Rewards scheme
The owner of the Principal and De Vere hotel
brands has launched a new loyalty programme.
Applause Rewards offers members 10 per cent
off best available room-only rates when booking
direct (rising to 15 per cent for customers who have
stayed nine nights across the group).
Other benefits include an advance check-in
service, �credit to use in the restaurant, bar or
on room service, and an extra hour added to the
normal check-out time. phcompany.com
Air Canada to launch new scheme
Air Canada is to replace its Aeroplan programme in 2020
with the aim of offering ?additional earning and redemption
opportunities, more personalised service and a better digital
experience for Air Canada customers?.
Specific details of the new scheme have yet to be revealed,
but the carrier confirmed that from June 29, 2020, miles earned
from Air Canada and Star Alliance flights would be credited to
the new programme but that miles earned through the current
Aeroplan scheme would not be transferred across.
The airline said that it ?intends to continue to offer Aimia
redemption seats for Aeroplan members after June 2020, with
pricing competitive with other third-party rewards programmes?.
aircanada.com
Triple miles up for grabs with
Emirates and Minor Hotels
Skywards members will receive triple miles
and special offers when staying at Minor
Hotels worldwide (such as Per Aquum Huvafen
Fushi in the Maldives, pictured). These include
20 and 25 per cent off rooms at the ?best
flexible rate?, single room upgrades, plus
special rates on spa treatments and discounts
at participating restaurants. Members of Minor
Hotels? Discovery programme can also earn
status through stays. Valid until December 31.
emirates.com
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Loyalty I 47
Singapore Airlines offers
quadruple miles with Hilton
Earn triple miles with
Lufthansa and Movenpick
Miles and More members can take
home 1,500 miles plus a US$20
voucher when booking stays at
Movenpick Hotels and Resorts
in Asia (such as the Movenpick
Sukhumvit 15 Bangkok, pictured).
Reservations must be made
through movenpick.com, while
the voucher can be used at
restaurants in the booked hotel.
Valid until July 15. lufthansa.com
Members of Singapore Airlines? Krisflyer
programme can earn quadruple miles for
stays at Hilton properties in Asia (such as
the Hilton Mumbai International Airport,
pictured) and double points at hotels
everywhere else. The offer excludes
Hampton by Hilton properties in Greater
China and Mongolia, and members must be
part of Hilton Honors. singaporeair.com
Norwegian Reward introduces
points-earning e-shop
Norwegian Reward has launched a new UK
e-shop allowing members to earn Cashpoints
when making online purchases at nearly 1,000
UK retailers.
The shop is similar to the online store offered by
British Airways and Avios. The Norwegian carrier
already operates an e-shop in its home market,
but is the first low-cost airline in the UK to launch
such a service.
Members can earn Cashpoints (redeemable
against Norwegian flights or ancillary services
such as checked luggage and seat reservation) at
retailers including John Lewis, Marks and Spencer,
Tesco and Argos. norwegian.com
48 I Meetings
Marisa Cannon lists the
essentials for seamless
event planning
1
CHOOSE YOUR
VENUE WISELY
Picking the right venue is
crucial for setting the tone of
your event. Ask yourself, does
the venue suit the style of
your gathering? Will the room
layout work for the number
of people? How easy will it be
for attendees to get to? Make
sure the venue can cater for
dietary requirements and that
audio-visual equipment is
available if needed.
2
UNDERSTAND
YOUR BUDGET
Knowing how far your
budget will get you can be
tricky, especially if you?re
hosting overseas. But you can
make shrewd savings that
don?t come at the expense of
the event, such as employing
a talented student to take
photos; printing documents,
JUNE 2017
name tags and brochures
yourself; and working with
smaller suppliers for signage
and catering.
3
KNOW YOUR
AREA
Use on-the-ground
resources to help you make
decisions if you?re unfamiliar
with the destination. Get
recommendations from
locals on good restaurants
and bars to take clients to
after meetings, and show
them that you?ve done
your research.
4
BE CULTURALLY
AWARE
If you?re holding an event
abroad, being aware of local
etiquette and customs will
help get you on side with
staff and guests, and smooth
over any hiccups on the day.
5
CARRY LOCAL
CURRENCY
Always have a supply of
cash in local currency in
case something goes wrong,
or to cover any unexpected
or last-minute incidentals.
6
PLAN YOUR
RESOURCES
If planning an event overseas,
it could make sense to order
from suppliers based in the
destination. If you decide to
use a home distributor and
transport materials, arrange
postage and shipping well
in advance so that you?re not
caught out on the day.
7
ANY POLITICAL
ISSUES?
Find out if there are any
sensitivities that you should
be aware of before drawing
up the content of the event.
Guidance from a local
destination management
company can help you avoid
making any faux pas.
8
PRINT BACK-UPS
AND CHECKLIST
Make copies of all receipts
and travel documents, plus
attendee lists and supplier
details to take to your event.
9
GET FEEDBACK
Organise feedback
surveys with a prize. Make
sure your questions are
punchy, and that they prompt
detailed, specific answers.
10 NEVER ASSUME
ANYTHING
Double-check orders, remind
attendees of their agenda,
brief staff thoroughly, and
build plenty of leeway into
the schedule. ?
businesstraveller.com
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businesstraveller.com
Lifestyle Contents I 51
54
52 I NEWS
The latest in leisure and luxury
66
54 I POWERED UP
From hydrogen to hybrid, a buyer?s
guide to electric cars
58 I QUALITY AND QUANTITY
Seiko?s impressive range of watches
61 I BUY AND FLY
Tax-free airport shopping
62 I BALINESE BEAUTY
An escape to the jungles of Bali, and
a run-in with some monkeys
businesstraveller.com
ALILA VILLAS ULUWATU, BALI
59
62
64
68
66 I 4 HOURS IN EDINBURGH
A walking tour of the Scottish capital
68 I DENVER DELIVERS
A weekend in the Colorado city, in
easy reach of the Rocky Mountains
74 I SNAPSHOT
1957: the opening of Bristol airport
JUNE 2017
52 I Lifestyle News
Michelle Harbi rounds up what?s new in leisure and luxury
DESIGN MUSEUM
HOSTS CARTIER EXHIBITION
LUXURY
LONDON?S DESIGN MUSEUM is now hosting an exhibition on Cartier and
design curated by Norman Foster. Cartier in Motion explores themes such as
the birth of the modern wristwatch and the evolution of the French luxury
brand?s watch designs. Its 170 exhibits are drawn from Cartier?s own collection,
as well as the Mus閑 de l?Air et de l?Espace at Paris Le Bourget airport, the
Monaco royal collection and the Rockefeller Centre. Among the more unusual
pieces on show is a 1969 gold replica of the NASA lunar module (pictured).
The Design Museum recently reopened in its new home on High Street
Kensington. Until July 28; free. designmuseum.org
WINE
Comptoir Caf� and
Wine opens in Mayfair
RESTAURATEUR AND SOMMELIER Xavier Rousset
has opened Comptoir Caf� and Wine on Weighhouse
Street, behind Bond Street station. A sister venue to
Marylebone?s Blandford Comptoir, the all-day caf� and bar
serves breakfast and light dishes, while the subterranean
wine shop sells about 1,000 bottles, including up to 100
types of champagne, which you can drink upstairs for
a � corkage fee. Rousset says the list ranges ?from
classic Burgundies to quirkier and rare varieties from
Sicily ? all ready for drinking now, at extremely reasonable
prices?. Up to 30 wines are on offer by the glass. Open
8am until late. comptoir-cafe-and-wine.co.uk
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Lifestyle News I 53
TECH
Montblanc launches
Summit smartwatch
MONTBLANC HAS INTRODUCED its first smartwatch. Montblanc
Summit offers a choice of four 46mm cases, including titanium and black
PVD coated stainless steel, as well as a curved sapphire crystal, classic
or sporty digital faces, and eight different straps, such as rubber, calfskin
and alligator. It uses Google?s Android Wear 2.0 operating system, which is
compatible with both iOS and Android phones. Heart rate, steps, calories
burnt, distance and active time are displayed on a progress bar shaped like
a mountain summit. Other features include a Worldtimer micro-app, built-in
Google Assistant and 4GB Flash storage. From �5; montblanc.com
ESCAPE
Anantara
arrives in
the Algarve
MINOR HOTELS? LUXURY ANANTARA brand has
made its European debut with the opening of the
Anantara Vilamoura Algarve Resort in Portugal. A
15-minute drive from Faro airport, it is a rebrand and
refurbishment of the Tivoli Victoria, the Thai-based group
having acquired Tivoli Hotels and Resorts last year.
The 280-room property overlooks the Arnold Palmerdesigned Oceanico golf course and has six restaurants
and bars, a spa and tennis courts. anantara.com
businesstraveller.com
WHISKY
Laphroaig
adds 1815
Legacy
Edition
ONE OF TWO NEW TRAVEL RETAIL
EXCLUSIVES from Islay distillery
Laphroaig (the other being Laphroaig Four
Oak), the 1815 Legacy Edition is a complex
whisky from the famous Islay malt brand,
noted for its peat smoke aromas. It also
features notes of soft oak and a touch
of caramelised dark fruit and nuts. ?104;
laphroaig.com
JUNE 2017
54 I Electric cars
Powered up
Could an electric car be for you? Nat Barnes
looks at advances in the industry and the
best new options on the market
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Electric cars I 55
E
its forms. Those last four words
are crucial if you?re considering
battery power for your next car.
Electric cars come in numerous
shapes and sizes, from those that
run on electricity alone (EVs), have
assistance from a petrol or diesel
engine (hybrids or range extended
vehicles) or even run on hydrogen
(see panel below).
None of them are without
their drawbacks. For all-electric
cars, there?s the thorny subject of
range. At present, most EVs can
cover around 120-150 miles on a
full charge (which usually costs
�2.50), but then can require up
to eight hours to recharge after
being plugged in. That makes them
ideal for urban use if you have easy
access to a charging point, but not
if you don?t have off-street parking
or need to travel further in a hurry.
Away from home, charging
points are run by different
companies and with different
charging rates, meaning you might
need to have multiple accounts
with multiple firms. Rather
illogically, you can?t just turn up
and swipe your credit card as you
might think. The cost of fitting
a charging point at home can
vary, too, from �0 to nothing
depending on the manufacturer
and their offers.
Thackery Davis, a teacher from
East Sussex, bought his Renault
Zoe in 2015.?We originally
planned to use the Zoe as our
second car, but we?ve ended up
?
ISTOCK
lectricity. We use it to
light our homes, cook our
food and make a cup of
tea, so why not to power
our cars?
Last year, sales of alternatively
fuelled new cars in the UK ?
hybrids, electric and fuel cell cars
? rose by more than a fifth, which
was on top of a 40 per cent rise
in 2015. After a somewhat slow
start, British drivers are finally
beginning to embrace electric
powered motoring.
Electric cars have been around
a lot longer than you might think.
British inventor Thomas Parker
built the first production electric
car as long ago as 1884, and they
enjoyed considerable popularity
in the early days of motoring.
It was only the arrival of cheap
petrol and the greater range and
speed of cars powered by internal
combustion engines in the early
1900s that would seal the fate for
electric-powered motoring.
Until now, that is, because
electric motoring is back in all
KNOW YOUR
ELECTRIC
CARS
Electric vehicles
can come in
many different
forms ? here?s how
to differentiate
between them.
businesstraveller.com
Electric Vehicles
(EVs) ? eg, Nissan
Leaf, Renault Zoe,
Tesla Model S.
As their name
suggests, these
are purely batterydriven with
electric motors.
Electric Vehicles
with Range
Extenders ? eg,
BMW i3 REX.
The same as fully
electric cars but
with small extra
petrol engines to
provide more range
when required.
Hybrids ? eg,
Lexus RX450h,
Toyota Prius. Has
a petrol or diesel
engine for longer
or faster journeys,
plus a battery
pack for extra
power or slower,
urban driving.
Plug-In Hybrids
(PHEVs) ? eg,
Audi A3 e-tron,
Mitsubishi
Outlander PHEV.
Like standard
hybrid cars but
with larger battery
packs for a longer
electric-only range.
Fuel-cell vehicles
? eg, Toyota Mirai
(pictured above
left). The same as
EVs but with an
onboard hydrogen
fuel cell to generate
electricity. Can only
be refuelled by
hydrogen alone.
JUNE 2017
56 I Electric cars
The real benefits of a fuel cell car are that its only
emissions are water ? so clean you could actually drink it
using it far more than we imagined,?
he says. ?We?d definitely recommend
it, although you do have to plan
ahead in terms of charging it up for
longer journeys. For us, the range
anxiety isn?t a problem as we?ve got
another car, but it might be limiting
if it was our only transport.?
Still, there are multiple answers to
that range anxiety. Some electric cars
can use rapid-charging points, while
Tesla has a network of superchargers
that can provide 170 miles of range
in 30 minutes. Alternatively, there
are models such as BMW?s i3, which
is sold either in purely electric form
(with a 125-mile range) or with a
small range extender petrol engine
for an extra �000, which provides
electricity when your range is low
and increases distance to 206 miles.
Then there are the ever-popular
hybrids. In standard form, hybrids
use their batteries for slow-speed
urban driving and recharge them as
you brake or slow down. However,
the recent fashion, especially at the
premium end of the market, is for
plug-in hybrids. These have larger
batteries and, therefore, a longer
electric-only range. They also boast
considerably lower emissions,
meaning much-reduced company
car tax bills.
Ah, yes, the thorny issue of tax
and politics. At present, there are
JUNE 2017
three levels of government grant
for electric cars, ranging from
�500 up to �500 depending
on its price, range and emissions.
Purely electric vehicles obviously
get the most, but any plug-ins
over �,000, such as Volvo?s
XC90, don?t get anything at all.
What?s more, as exposed in
our previous feature on fleet cars
Above: Toyota
Mirai Below:
Hyundai Ioniq
(?Value driven?, November 2016),
those plug-in hybrids are only
cheap to run if you actually plug
them in and utilise their electriconly range. HMRC has yet to
address how it will tax electricity
for motoring, too. Fully charge your
electric car for 150 miles and the
government sees next to nothing,
whereas an equivalent 150 milesworth of petrol or diesel (or indeed
any amount) sees it earn about
60 per cent of the pump price.
Therein lies the rub for future
governments, too. They want us
to drive cleaner cars and move to
battery power, but are reducing
the grants provided as it becomes
more popular, and, in turn, will be
forced to look at other motoring
taxes to recoup the lost revenue
from traditional fossil fuels.
The Netherlands? big tax
incentives saw car buyers flock
to electric cars in 2015, making
the country Europe?s biggest
plug-in hybrid market. But when
the Dutch government reduced
those incentives last year, sales of
plug-ins dropped by 47 per cent.
businesstraveller.com
Electric cars I 57
?While the electric car market
has progressed, there are still
hurdles to overcome and the
experience in the Netherlands
shows that electric cars are
still dependent on incentives
for sales,? says Nick Gibbs, UK
correspondent for Automotive
News Europe.?Battery technology
is making some gains but
certainly isn?t leaping ahead, and
many manufacturers are quoting
2019 or beyond for when electric
cars will have a good range and
prices equivalent to petrol and
diesel models.?
Then again, like Betamax video
players, compact discs or the pop
career of Martha and the Muffins
after Echo Beach (apologies to
those under 40), the days of plugin electric cars could be numbered
when they?ve only just begun.
Toyota has already introduced
its Mirai fuel cell car, which uses
hydrogen to produce electricity
to power its cars, so doesn?t need
recharging (just refilling). Hyundai
and Mercedes are also tapping
into this market, having both
already had fuel cell models under
development for some time.
Unlike charging via a plug,
hydrogen can be provided via
a forecourt pump in exactly the
same process and virtually the
same time as a petrol or diesel
pump. The real benefits of a fuel
cell car are that its only emissions
are water ? so clean that you could
actually drink it. The big downside
is the lack of filling points ? the
UK will have a grand total of 14 by
the end of this year.
With all of hydrogen?s ease of
use and similarities to today?s
filling pumps, it would certainly
seem to be the logical next step,
although the Toyota Prius has been
on sale for 20 years and motorists
are only now getting comfortable
with hybrid technology.
Electricity may well be powering
your car in the future, but perhaps
not quite in the way that you
might think? ?
businesstraveller.com
FIVE OF THE BEST
RENAULT ZOE
From �,845
Renault?s superb Zoe supermini
looks cute, drives even better and
a new, bigger battery provides a
186-mile range. You can buy the
battery outright with the car or hire it
separately for a monthly charge.
BMW i8
�4,660
With looks straight out of a science
fiction film, the i8 boasts supercar
performance but with tree-loving
emissions. Expect a convertible
version to be available at some
point next year.
VOLVO XC90 T8 PLUG-IN
HYBRID
From �,715
Volvo?s XC90 is undoubtedly one
of the hottest seven-seater SUVs
on the market. This flagship T8
version only makes it even more
desirable. A 2.0-litre petrol engine
combines with an electric motor for
an electric-only 30-mile range.
HYUNDAI IONIQ
From �,995
In a single swoop, Hyundai has
effectively out-Priused the Toyota
Prius. A smart five-door hatchback,
at present the Ioniq comes in either
fully electric or petrol-electric hybrid
forms, with a plug-in hybrid due
later this year.
TOYOTA MIRAI
�,000
The UK?s first commercially available
fuel cell car that runs on hydrogen.
The only downsides are looks that
only its mother could love, and that
it?s easier to find unicorn tears than
a UK filling station.
JUNE 2017
58 I Watches
Grand Seiko
Reissue 2017
in stainless steel
Offering arguably the
world?s widest choice of
watches, Japan?s Seiko
has been playing the
venerable Swiss brands
at their own game for
decades, says Chris Hall
Quality
and
quantity
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Watches I 59
S
Credor Fugaku Tourbillon 2016
Credor Eichi II 2016
1960s Seiko 5
businesstraveller.com
ome of you will already be
wondering what we are doing
writing about Seiko in what is
supposed to be a luxury watch column.
True, you can buy a Seiko on Amazon
for � and, being Japanese, the company
has never been sniffy about digital or
quartz technology in the same way as the
Swiss brands. But there?s nothing wrong
with its entry-level watches ? the Seiko 5
is hands-down the cheapest way to own
a mechanical watch (versions abound,
starting at about �) and is an icon in its
own right, having been on sale since 1963.
What?s remarkable is that the company
behind this humble ticker also produces
minute repeaters and tourbillons; highend mechanical watches adorned with
masterful decoration and fine movements
within. It is no exaggeration to say that
Seiko offers one of the widest choices of
watches in the world.
It?s not all perfect ? the recently
introduced Grand Seiko Sport range
leaves a lot to be desired stylistically, and
the Astron collection, with its GPS link-up,
feels rather 1990s ? but with its Grand
Seiko and Credor watches, Seiko can
match up to any mainstream Swiss brand
in terms of quality and craftsmanship.
For many, here lies part of its charm.
Seiko has been getting up the noses
of the Swiss since the 1960s, when it
started turning up to official timekeeping
competitions and ? within a couple of years
? sweeping the board. The Swiss hadn?t
even contemplated a foreign entrant, let
alone one so competent, and promptly took
their ball away in a fit of national pique.
Undeterred, Seiko continued to innovate
at a rapid pace. It made a name for itself in
the world of professional dive watches in
the 1970s ? becoming, along the way, the
first company to use titanium in a watch
case, a full decade before IWC and Porsche
Design would make the same claim.
It developed the quartz watch
movement (something that would at a
stroke cripple the Swiss watch industry)
and went on to create multiple ingenious
hybrid movements ? the Kinetic and
Spring Drive, both worth articles in their
own right ? ensuring it had something of
good value at every level of the market.
You could be excused a level of
ignorance over Seiko?s more interesting
watches and history ? the brand is not the
best at getting the story out there, and for
decades has not marketed Grand Seiko,
Credor or even its coolest dive watches to
a UK audience. That is changing, slowly
? at Seiko, everything is very deliberate
? and, later this month, it is opening its
first dedicated UK store, in London?s
Knightsbridge. That in itself has been a
long time coming ? everything had to be
just right ? but it should herald a period of
greater attention for watch fans in the UK.
Perfectionism comes at least as
naturally to the Japanese as to the Swiss,
and the obsession over hand-finishing
is equally strong. Seiko?s high-end
pieces benefit from zaratsu polishing ?
techniques honed over centuries of knife
and sword creation, miniaturised for the
hands or indexes of a watch. The lines of
a Grand Seiko case are as crisp and clean
as anything around ? not for nothing do
connoisseurs hold them up as Rolex rivals.
This year, Seiko has given the Grand
Seiko sub-brand a bit more of its own
identity (after nearly 60 years), removing
?Seiko? from the dials and letting it go out
with just ?Grand Seiko? at 12 o?clock.
Yes, this is letting one?s hair down,
Seiko style, but you can?t scoff at the
results. The move is being marked by the
release of three limited-edition watches
that hark back to the first Grand Seiko
designs from 1960. Available in stainless
steel, 18-carat gold and platinum (itself a
nod to the past, as the first Grand Seiko
watches, intended as they were to rival
the finest Swiss watches, were cased in
platinum), they are some of the simplest,
most elegant watches released this year.
Each is powered by a hand-wound
mechanical movement ? made in-house
by Seiko, naturally ? and measures 38mm
across. The steel model (�000) is a little
thicker than the other two, and stands
out from the platinum with its blued steel
seconds hand. A total of 1,960 pieces
will be produced; there will be 353 of the
gold (�,000) and 136 of the platinum
(�,000). If that?s not motivation to visit
the new boutique, I don?t know what is.
? Chris Hall is editor of SalonQP.com
JUNE 2017
AS SEEN IN YOUR
DREAMS.
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rent a car
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Buy and fly I 61
On sale now tax-free at the airport
1
4
7
2
3
5
6
8
9
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Raymond Weil Tango 300 watch WHERE? World Duty Free Heathrow and Gatwick all terminals; �6 SAVE �9 raymond-weil.com
Elemis Luxury Gentleman Traveller set (shave gel, face wash, day cream, body wash, reviving gel) WHERE? World Duty Free Heathrow
all terminals, Gatwick South, Stansted, Manchester T1, T2, Newcastle, Edinburgh, Glasgow; �.40 SAVE �10 worlddutyfree.com
3 Thomas Pink Lions Bennetti woven tie in blue and yellow WHERE? Thomas Pink Heathrow all terminals; �.50 SAVE �.50
thomaspink.com 4 Maui Jim Pilot aviator sunglasses with gold frames WHERE? Sunglass Hut Heathrow all terminals; �4 SAVE �
sunglasshut.com 5 Lalique Amethyst Eclat eau de parfum WHERE? World Duty Free; 100ml � SAVE �lalique.com 6 Ermenegildo
Zegna triple stitch slip-on sneakers WHERE? Harrods Heathrow T5; �6 SAVE � harrods.com 7 Orlebar Brown Bulldog Riviera Gilot
print mid-length swim shorts WHERE? Harrods Heathrow T5; �0 SAVE � orlebarbrown.com 8 Paul Smith monkey print credit card
holder WHERE? Paul Smith Heathrow T2, T3, T5; �0 SAVE � paulsmith.co.uk 9 Cr鑝e de la Mer Blue Heart moisturising cream
WHERE? World Duty Free; 100ml �0.50 SAVE �.50 worlddutyfree.com 10 Van Cleef and Arpels Precious Oud eau de parfum
WHERE? World Duty Free; 75ml �0.80 SAVE �.20 worlddutyfree.com
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businesstraveller.com
JUNE 2017
62 I Escape to... Bali
I
n Ubud?s Sacred Monkey Forest, there are
signs warning people not to touch, feed
or make eye contact with the animals,
but no one takes any notice. There are
bananas for sale and staff hand out fistfuls
of peanuts to tourists. It doesn?t take much to attract
the monkeys ? I see one tear open a shopping bag,
and another peel fruit while sat on a child?s shoulder.
They especially like glittery earrings ? on the stone
steps of an amphitheatre, one leaps on to a woman
and snatches at her jewelled lobe, making her scream,
before running off with his prize.
Tentatively making our way through the jungle,
keeping an eye on the squabbling macaques in
the trees, we pass ancient, moss-covered temples,
statues of grinning apes, and ornate winged dragons
guarding a stone bridge high above a ravine. Officially
a nature reserve (open daily 8.30am-6pm), its 700 or
so monkeys are fed on sweet potato three times a day,
but this doesn?t suppress their appetite for mischief.
While I pose for a photo, a juvenile springs from
nowhere and grabs my face, leaving two neat sets of
scratches (albeit faint) across
my temples. I spend the next
hour googling: ?Can you
catch rabies from a monkey
scratch?? (the answer is yes
so I am freaking out) and
ordering bottles of Bintang
beer from the nearby
Habitat Caf�, which has free
wifi (habitatubud.com).
Next door is hipster
co-working space Hubud
(hubud.org). The bamboo
house has an organic caf�
where flip-flopped writers
sit with laptops looking
out on to paddy fields, and
eager entrepreneurs spend
hours coding while drinking
kombucha (fermented tea).
This summer, Hubud will
host a Google-sponsored
Startup Weekend for tourism
and hospitality ventures.
Last year, almost five million people visited Bali,
a 23 per cent increase on 2015. Joining high-end
international brands such as Aman, Four Seasons,
W, Anantara and Oberoi have been two hotels from
Ritz-Carlton (the Mandapa, a Reserve property, and
the Ritz-Carlton Bali, opened in 2015), the Hoshinoya
(January 2017) and the Capella Ubud, which will feature
22 luxury tents when it launches at the end of the year.
Asian chain Alila has four properties on the
5,780 sq km island of Bali ? the Seminyak, Manggis,
Uluwatu and Ubud, where I am staying. The resort is
JUNE 2017
Balinese
beauty
Bali offers a
wonderfully
atmospheric
setting for
relaxation ? just
watch out for
monkey business,
says Jenny
Southan
Pictured:
Ubud Sacred
Monkey Forest;
Alila Ubud
businesstraveller.com
Escape to... Bali I 63
businesstraveller.com
JUNE 2017
JENNY SOUTHAN
64 I Escape to... Bali
about 20 minutes? drive from the town of Ubud itself,
popular over the years with hippies and backpackers.
Along the sides of the streets, which are strewn with
tiny trays of flowers and rice as offerings to the gods,
are shops selling phallic bottle openers, knock-off
Ray-Bans and leering masks. In the evening we stop
at Hujan (hujanlocale.com), a stylish cocktail bar and
restaurant that also does cooking classes. Opposite
is Fair Warung Bale, a simple set-up serving delicious
food in generous quantities. All of its profits go
towards providing free healthcare for locals.
While Ubud is fun for a day, the main draw for me
is escaping to the steamy climes of the Alila Ubud,
set high above the tree canopy, with a jade infinity
pool that offers a staggering panorama of the misty,
verdant valley. (If you?re after sun, bear in mind that
the dry season is between April and September.)
Apart from the squawk of monkeys and birds,
the resort is wonderfully peaceful, days beginning
with a traditional breakfast on the terrace ? chilled
watermelon and red chilli juice, and a bowl of nasi
goreng ayam (fried rice with chicken, a fried egg and
pickles). While standard rooms are comfortable (the
outdoor rainshowers
are the highlight), the
palapa-roofed villas
with private pools are
very special.
If you are staying for
more than a couple
of days, you may be
tempted to book one of
the excursions that the
Alila organises, such as
quad biking, VW jungle
safaris or morning bird
watching. You can even
hike to the summit of
active volcano Mount
Batur. The on-site
spa specialises in
traditional massages
to leave even the most
stressed-out business
traveller feeling reborn
after meetings in hectic
Jakarta, just under two hours? flight away.
We take the hotel shuttle 55km to the Alila
Uluwatu, perched on cliffs at the southerly tip of
the island (only 35 minutes from the international
airport). The focal point of the minimalist, all-villa
resort is the enormous pool and gravity-defying
cantilevered Sunset Cabana bar, although guests also
have the pleasure of their own personal plunge pools
and hyper-modern residences, accessed by golf cart.
Apart from a perilous hike down hundreds of
narrow steps to the beach, there is nothing to distract
JUNE 2017
Pictured:
Alila Uluwatu
you from relaxing. During the day, staff
set down poolside hampers of iced
water, menus and sunscreen (although
I?d advise you to use your own factor
30 as the ozone layer is thin in these
parts). In your personal 291 sqm villa,
you can lounge on a day bed and have
a butler wait on you around the clock.
In contrast to more rustic eating
in Ubud, the Uluwatu opts for fine
dining. Alone in concept restaurant
Quila, we embark on a ten-course ?sensory journey?
that starts with us being blindfolded while eating
a cube of rock lobster covered in green foam, then
consuming a mushroom meringue enclouded in
dry ice. By now, I can safely say that my traumatic
experience in the monkey forest feels far behind me.
? A two-night weekend stay at the Alila Ubud starts
from US$370 for a Superior room in July. The Alila
Uluwatu starts from US$884 for a one-bedroom villa.
Visit alilahotels.com, destination-asia.com,
garuda-indonesia.com
businesstraveller.com
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66 I 4 hours in...
Edinburgh
Marisa Cannon strolls through the Scottish capital
1
GREYFRIARS KIRKYARD
Begin at Greyfriars Kirkyard,
an eerie, often mist-shrouded
cemetery where a number of famous
Scots are interred, including James
Craig, architect of Edinburgh?s
New Town, and Robert Adam,
who designed the first minister?s
residence, Bute House, and London
member?s club Home House.
cemetery?s visitors. The chamber
has since been sealed by the city
council, but guides will tell you not
to get too close?
2
G&V ROYAL MILE
HOTEL
Leaving the Kirkyard via
Candlemaker Row, take a left on
to Cowgatehead and climb Victoria
2
ISTOCK/NATIONAL GALLERIES OF SCOTLAND
In the late 18th and early 19th
centuries, the cemetery was regularly
plundered by Edinburgh?s notorious
?resurrectionists?, who, under the
cover of night, would pry open
coffins and hijack their contents
to sell to surgeons and medical
students for dissection. More ghastly
still is the tale of George Mackenzie,
a ruthless 17th-century judge who
persecuted hundreds of Protestant
Covenanters, imprisoned them in
the Kirkyard?s grounds and then
sentenced them to public hanging at
nearby Grassmarket Square.
When he eventually died,
?Bluidy Mackenzie?, as he is more
commonly known, was buried in
the same cemetery in his very own
mausoleum. Following an incident
where the tomb was broken into,
Mackenzie?s ghost is said to have
?woken?, provoking reports of
violent, paranormal attacks on the
JUNE 2017
Street until you reach George IV
Bridge. Turn left and you?ll see
the G&V Royal Mile. Formerly
a Missoni hotel, the 136-room
property is home to the Epicurean
bar, one of Edinburgh?s most
fashionable watering holes.
Opened last November, the
bar has already won a prestigious
regional title of Best Bar at the
Scottish Hotel Awards, and offers
an inventive drinks menu inspired
by the Scottish Colourists, a group
of post-Impressionist painters.
It?s a sleek, atmospheric space
featuring fuchsia leather booths,
monochrome floor tiling and
Scandi furniture. Try Le Manteau
Chinois (�, inspired by the
1
3
businesstraveller.com
4 hours in... I 67
works of JD Fergusson and made
with Dewar?s 12-year-old Scotch,
Amer Picon (an orange-flavoured
liqueur), beetroot, rhubarb, orange
blossom oolong and orange and
ginger marmalade.
Upstairs on the mezzanine
level, Italian restaurant Cucina
was refurbished in July last
year and features beautiful wall
murals, colourful throw pillows
and flamboyant crockery. On
the menu is a range of rustic
pastas and risottos alongside
heavier meat and fish dishes
that champion Scottish produce.
G&V Royal Mile, 1 George IV
Bridge; tel +44 (0)131 220 6666;
quorvuscollection.com
3
PRINCES STREET
The city?s main shopping
thoroughfare stretches
past Waverley train station,
extending a mile westward toward
the district of Haymarket and
Edinburgh?s imperious Castle.
The street itself is flanked with
statues of historic Scottish figures,
from 19th-century explorer
David Livingstone to Adam
Black, an early publisher of the
Encyclopaedia Britannica, while the
world?s largest monument to a
writer (at 61 metres) stands beside
the boulevard ? the imposing,
soot-stained Scott Monument,
commemorating Sir Walter Scott.
A raft of high-street shops line
along the overgrown pathway,
passing under the stone arches
of Dean Bridge and the stately
Rhema Church on the hillside
above. Away from the city?s
bustle, wander through the lush
woodland, where geese probe the
riverbank for morsels and rabbits
dart under wild, unkempt bushes.
5
SCOTTISH NATIONAL
GALLERY OF
MODERN ART
Carry on alongside the river until
you reach Belford Road, taking a
right on to Belford Terrace. Further
along, you?ll find the Scottish
National Gallery of Modern Art,
the main collection of which is
5
CARLTON
HILL
SCOTTISH
NATIONAL
GALLERY OF
MODERN ART
5
WATER
OF LEITH
4
Edinburgh
PRINCES
STREET
3
WAVERLEY
STATION
2
EDINBURGH
CASTLE
1
G&V ROYAL
MILE HOTEL
GREYFRIARS
KIRKYARD
the road, but the quirky caf閟 and
independent retailers nearby are
also worth peeking into. Check
out 21st Century Kilts on Thistle
Street nearby for current tweed
and tartan fashion, or Social Bite
on Rose Street, a lively sandwich
shop that donates all of its profits
to good causes.
4
WATER OF LEITH
From the end of Princes
Street, walk westward for
ten minutes to Dean Gardens
? the closest point from the city
centre to the Water of Leith. This
is Edinburgh?s main river, which
bends and curls through the
city?s outskirts until it reaches
the coastal town of Leith,
before pouring into the North
Sea. Follow the river upstream
businesstraveller.com
housed in a grand neoclassical
building with the words
?Everything is going to be alright?
installed in blue neon across the
fa鏰de?s frieze.
For contemporary art lovers,
the museum has an impressive
programme of temporary
exhibits, as well as a wideranging permanent display
ranging from post-war European
figure painting to pop art and
abstract pieces. Dotted across the
museum?s grounds you?ll also
find a number of installations,
and a stroll around will reveal
works by the likes of Tony Cragg,
Damien Hurst, Henry Moore and
Rachel Whiteread. Open daily
10am-5pm; free entry (there is
a charge for some exhibitions).
nationalgalleries.org ?
? Virgin Trains
East Coast
operates 24
weekday
services between
London and
Edinburgh.
virgintrains
eastcoast.com
JUNE 2017
68 I Weekend in... Denver
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Weekend in... Denver I 69
Lively attractions and easy access to the
Rocky Mountains make the Colorado capital
well worth your time, says Philip Watson
F
VISIT DENVER/STEVE MOHLENKAMP
businesstraveller.com
Left: 16th Street
Mall Above:
Heading into the
Rocky Mountains
riday morning at 7.30am,
the Crawford hotel,
downtown Denver. I am in
the epicentre of the city; the
elegant hotel forms part of
the recent redevelopment of the
historic Union Station terminal,
at one time the main railway
hub for the Colorado capital. I?m
waiting for the lift to take me
down for breakfast in one of the
1914 Beaux-Arts building?s many
buzzing caf閟 and restaurants.
Because of the hotel?s unrivalled
location, and the hour, I expect the
doors to open to a fellow business
traveller, or maybe a jet-lagged
BOOM TOWN
In many ways, my ?ski lift?
experience is emblematic of a
city that is thrillingly active and
wholly surprising. The US Bureau
of Statistics ranked Denver as the
fastest-growing major city in the
US in 2015, and, everywhere you
look, it has the feel of a boom
town ? the cityscape is dominated
by cranes and new tower blocks.
The metropolitan area is now
home to more than three million
people; it?s claimed by Rich Grant
and Irene Rawlings in their book
100 Things To Do In Denver Before
JUNE 2017
?
Denver
delivers
tourist. I do not expect to see
a young couple in full, colourcoordinated ski gear, complete with
skis, poles, boots, gloves, goggles,
helmets and Go Pro cameras.
They look like they?ve stepped
off a ski lift in Switzerland?s
upmarket Gstaad ? not into an
urban US elevator. They tell me a
waiting minibus will be whisking
them and some friends off to the
Loveland Ski Area, 90km and
about an hour and a half west
of the ?Mile-High City?, in the
glorious Rocky Mountains.
If it was a weekend during the
ski season, they wouldn?t even
need the private shuttle ? they
could take the newly relaunched
ski train direct from Union Station
to another popular Denver ski
destination, Winter Park, a couple
of hours away.
VISIT DENVER/STEVE CRECELIUS/RICH GRANT
70 I Weekend in... Denver
Clockwise from
top: Denver
Art Museum;
Rockmount
Ranch Wear;
riverfront cycle
paths; Denver
International
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Weekend in... Denver I 71
You Die that ?the Mile-High City is
growing on average by a thousand
new residents a week?.
It?s certainly true that every
millennial you meet seems to be
from somewhere else, attracted
to Denver by the three ?Ms?:
money (well, job opportunities ?
the unemployment rate hovers
at around 3 per cent and is one
of the lowest in the country);
mountains (as well as first-class
skiing, the Rockies offer superb
hiking, biking, climbing, kayaking
and rafting); and marijuana (in
2005 it became the first major US
city to legalise cannabis, leading to
a mini-boom in weed cultivation,
medical use and tourism).
Dubbed the ?Wall Street of the
West? at the beginning of the 20th
century owing to the rise of a small
financial district along 17th Street,
Denver has always had a strong
business culture. Major companies
in the area include Molson Coors,
Lockheed Martin and United. Its
geographical location has also
made it a focus for the telecoms
industry; communication with
both North American coasts,
South America, Europe and Asia is
possible in the same business day.
direct rail link to Union Station;
the journey takes 37 minutes and
costs US$9 each way.
ART OF THE CITY
That kind of accessibility, and the
fact that Denver is a relatively
compact walking city claiming a
remarkable 300 days of sunshine a
year, makes it perfect for extending
your trip across a weekend. The
weather can be changeable, and,
at exactly one mile above sea level,
you need to protect yourself from
the sun?s intensity. Yet Denver is
an extremely easy place to enjoy.
There is even a free electric shuttle
bus along the 16th Street Mall, a
mile-long pedestrian promenade
designed by architect IM Pei, now
fronted mostly by tacky general
stores and tourist shops.
Near to the southern end of
the mall is the Golden Triangle
Museum District. Attractions
here range from the Denver
Art Museum (10am-5pm
Tues-Sun, 8pm Fri; US$13;
denverartmuseum.org), with its
eye-catching Daniel Libeskind
extension, to a museum dedicated
to the expansive paintings
of Clyfford Still (10am-5pm
collection of contemporary works
by the likes of Sol LeWitt and
Tracey Emin in its dramatic public
spaces and 165 rooms.
If you prefer your culture
live then Denver also delivers.
It has the one of the largest
performing arts complexes in
the US, with ten venues housing
everything from theatre to
Broadway shows and a symphony
orchestra (denvercenter.org). The
76,000-seater Sports Authority
Field at Mile High is home to
2016 Super Bowl champions the
Broncos, although tickets are hard
to come by ? every Sunday home
game since 1970 has sold out
(season runs Sept-Feb).
The city also boasts two
legendary music venues along East
Colfax Avenue (part of the longest
commercial street in the US) ? the
Bluebird and Ogden theatres, both
concert halls that are symbolic of
Denver?s eclectic music scene.
Denver International airport,
with its landmark multiple-peaked
roof canopy ? said to echo both
Native American teepees and
the Rockies ? is now the sixthbusiest in the US, with more than
58 million passengers in 2016.
Since April last year, it also has a
businesstraveller.com
Tues-Sun, 8pm Fri; US$10;
clyffordstillmuseum.org), one
of the Abstract Expressionist
movement?s most influential, if
relatively unknown, artists.
The district even has its own Art
hotel (thearthotel.com), opened
in 2015, which displays a private
Head to LoDo (Lower
Downtown Denver) to explore
regenerating and newly hip
historic neighbourhoods with a
range of worthwhile diversions
? the excellent Tattered Cover
bookshop (tatteredcover.com),
the sumptuous Art Deco Cruise
Room bar at Denver?s oldest hotel,
the Oxford (theoxfordhotel.com)
and the cool bars and restaurants
along Larimer Square. Don?t
miss the ?brewpub? that sparked
Denver?s justly famous craft
beer and microbrewing scene,
Wynkoop (wynkoop.com).
There is also LoHi (Lower
Highlands), just across the
South Platte River, worth
?
LODO OR LOHI?
JUNE 2017
72 I Weekend in... Denver
DENVER?S GREAT OUTDOORS
It?s only when you leave the city that you realise
the sprawling metropolitan area is but a speck
in the monumental Midwestern landscape:
to the west is the soaring backdrop of the
magnificent Rocky Mountains, while to the east
lies the big skies and slow, flat, endless slide of
the Great Plains. Here are three ways to get a
whole new perspective on the Mile-High City:
? Hire a car and head about half an hour west
to the naturally formed Red Rocks Amphitheatre
(open 7am-7pm April-Oct, 8am-4pm NovMarch; free; redrocksonline.com), the striking
9,000-seat location of U2?s Under a Blood Red
visiting for the Williams and
Graham ?speakeasy? alone
(williamsandgraham.com) ? its
wood-panelled backroom bar is
hidden behind a tiny ?bookshop?.
Another way to check out
Denver is to jog or cycle ? there
are a remarkable 137km of paved
trails around the city.
And then there is always
shopping. As well as more than
160 upmarket stores at Cherry
Creek Shopping Centre, 5km
south-east of the city centre,
there is one downtown flagship
store that is not to be missed:
Rockmount Ranch Wear
(rockmount.com). The Western
outfitters that introduced the
snap-button cowboy shirt to the
world ? and to Elvis, Bob Dylan,
Robert Plant and Eric Clapton ?
was founded in 1946 by ?Papa?
Jack Weil, a businessman who
worked until the age of 107.
Weil is said to have coined the
phrase: ?The West is not a place,
it is a state of mind.? Denver
today may be a hip, forwardthinking city, but it?s still very
much connected to that history
and belief. It?s a state of mind
that, even for a weekend, is well
worth entering.
? For more information on
Denver, including the MileHigh Culture Pass to various
attractions (US$30 for three
days), see visitdenver.org,
colorado.com
JUNE 2017
From top: Buffalo
Bill Museum;
Red Rocks
Amphitheatre;
Emerald Lake,
Rocky Mountain
National Park
Sky concert video. Tens of thousands come
here every year to work out, hike, visit the
museum, or simply to relive meaningful musical
moments. The long view back to the city and
airport beyond is extraordinary.
? On the way, drive the twisting, climbing Lariat
Loop road to the Buffalo Bill Museum (9am5pm daily May-Oct, Tues-Sun Nov-April; US$5;
buffalobill.org). Well-presented galleries tell the
story of the army scout, buffalo hunter, cowboy
showman and western pioneer. His grave is
nearby on Lookout Mountain. The Colorado
Sightseer provides half-day tours to both of the
above (US$50; coloradosightseer.com).
? For the ultimate outdoor adventure, head
to the spectacular Rocky Mountain National
Park, 115km north-west of Denver. The vast
1,075 sq km park has countless peaks,
alpine lakes, deep glacial valleys, pine forests,
565km of trails, and wildlife such as eagles,
elk and even moose; it?s like Switzerland ? on
a very good day. Aspire offers scenic day-trips
(US$115; aspire-tours.com).
businesstraveller.com
?T !
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IS
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74 I Snapshot
Bristol airport opens
Alex McWhirter looks back at the launch
of the airport, which is celebrating its
60th anniversary this year
1960s
1980s
1950s
B
ristol has come
a long way in 60
years. Back in 1957,
when it opened on
its current site, its
routes were few and far between
and were often flown by Douglas
DC-3s. That year, the number of
passengers totalled 33,000.
Today, it boasts a multitude
of flights across Europe with
a variety of airlines serving
120 destinations in 30 countries.
Bristol expects eight million
passengers this year. It now also
boasts its own hotel (a Hampton
by Hilton).
It is the low-cost airlines that
have really put Bristol on the map
over the past 16 years, making it
England?s third-largest regional
airport. Go, a subsidiary of British
Airways, set the ball rolling in
JUNE 2017
2001, to be followed by Easyjet
(which later absorbed Go),
Ryanair and Wizz Air.
Business airline Bmi Regional is
based at Bristol. Its routes include
Brussels, Frankfurt, Munich
and Paris CDG with onward
connections. Aer Lingus and
KLM also link with Bristol from
Dublin and Amsterdam. And now,
with a few seasonal routes, BA
has returned this summer after an
absence of ten years.
It is disappointing that Bristol
never managed to sustain any
long-haul services, apart from
Continental?s B757 flights to New
York Newark between 2005 and
2010. Expect nearby Cardiff to
draw the publicity when Qatar
Airways launches a global service
in 2018. But for now Bristol is set
for another busy year. ?
2000s
2010s
businesstraveller.com
interior straps to keep clothes in
place, plus a zip-up compartment
with an extra pocket to keep loose
items. An outer zip allows the case
to expand a further 4cm, with TSA
locks and a telescope handle that
releases at two levels.
briggs-riley.com
VERDICT A good-sized
VOLUME
106.1 litres
WEIGHT
5.9kg
COLOUR
Cobalt, ruby,
graphite
WHEELS
Four
DIMENSIONS
82cm x 53cm x
34cm
VOLUME
122 litres
WEIGHT
4.1kg
COLOUR
Blue Nights, black
WHEELS
Four
PRICE
�5
samsonite.co.uk
check-in case with plenty
of pockets to help you stay
organised. Black is best for
hiding stains.
businesstraveller.com
Hold luggage I 41
An inventive case that splits into
two, with a zip-on outer bag that
detaches to create a cabin-size
rolling duffel. A clip-on strap also
allows the outer section to convert
to a separate over-the-shoulder
bag. Although confusing at first, the
design is impressive, with segments
attaching and detaching via a series
of zips and fastenings. When all
parts are attached to the trolley,
plastic clips help to compress the
contents. It has two wheels, a
telescoping handle, top, side and
bottom grab points, plus internal
straps to keep clothes in place.
An interior mesh pocket along
the length of the bag is good for
carrying keys and currency.
VERDICT The case holds just
enough for a three- to four-night
trip, but its design is great if you
want a number of bag options.
businesstraveller.com
DIMENSIONS
55cm x 37cm x
36cm
VOLUME
56 litres
WEIGHT
3.5kg
COLOUR
Mineral, Dark
Shadow
WHEELS
Two
PRICE
�0
thule.com
Delsey Montsouris
This expandable trolley case
has a hard-shell underside and
a soft top, with two capacious
compartments inside. Available
only in black, it?s not the most
attractive of the bunch, although
it is roomy and durable, with a
patented Securitech expandable
zip (apparently 41 times more
resilient than conventional zip
fasteners), two interior horizontal
straps, and heavy-duty outer clips
for extra compression. What it
lacks in looks, it makes up for in
practicality, with anti-tilt stability
feet, two large outer pockets,
hardwearing wheels, TSA locks,
Smart zip pullers and a soft-touch
side handle for a smooth grip.
DIMENSIONS
68cm x 43cm x
29cm
VOLUME
76 litres
WEIGHT
3.9kg
COLOUR
Black
WHEELS
Two
PRICE
�9
delsey.com
VERDICT A robust case
with a number of useful
storage features and plenty
of expandable space.
?
Thule Subterra 3-in-1
JUNE 2017
42 I Hold luggage
TRAVEL ACCESSORIES
Ted Baker Ricase textured
laptop case
This polyester case has a
padded main compartment plus
three external pockets suitable
for holding travel documents.
Available in red with a textured
finish, it can hold a 13-inch
laptop. �; tedbaker.co.uk
Smythson Mara
currency case
Made from crocodile and calf
leather, the Mara has four zip
sections with a satin-finish lining.
Available in Ocean Blue and
Poppy, you can personalise it with
gold lettering and monograms.
�5; smythson.com
Bric?s Life Rolling Duffel
This lightweight duffel markets
itself as being environmentally
friendly, made with synthetic
suede and vegetable-tanned
Tuscan leather finishes.
Alongside its trolley handle, the
case?s two wheels and anti-tilt
feet are useful if you don?t want
to use it as a holdall. If you
do, the handle can be hidden
with a zip closure, and the two
slender grips can be joined
with a button fastening for easy
carrying. Inside, the duffel has
two zip-up compartments and
compression straps made from
durable ribbon, while the top of
the case has another pocket for
extra storage.
VERDICT Elegant and
functional, if perhaps not
the most hardwearing.
Great for a weekend trip.
JUNE 2017
DIMENSIONS
72cm x 37cm
x 32cm
VOLUME
73 litres
WEIGHT
3.9kg
COLOUR
Camel, olive,
blue, brown
WHEELS
Two
PRICE
�0
brics.it
Samsonite Cityscape Tech
laptop backpack
The Cityscape?s RFID-protected
pocket guards against skimming
and identity fraud thanks to
a blocking material placed
between the outer layer and
internal lining. It comes in three
sizes, with the largest able to
carry a 17-inch laptop.
�9; samsonite.co.uk
Tumi Patrol packable travel
puffer jacket
Made from water-resistant nylon,
this puffer jacket converts to a
travel pillow thanks to a hidden
pouch in the collar. Available in
navy, green and black, it is filled
with down insulation and has a
number of hidden pockets.
�5; uk.tumi.com
Trace Me luggage tracker
In partnership with the SITA
global bag-tracing system,
this luggage tracker contains
technology so that if your case is
lost or stolen, it can be identified
by its serial number. Once the
number is entered into the SITA
system, you will be informed
where your bag is and who
to contact by text or email.
�.50; tmlt.co.uk
businesstraveller.com
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comfort and service
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aeromexico.com
44 I Editor?s lunch
Best of both
worlds
Adding a weekend or holiday on to a business
trip has become the norm. Jenny Southan
reports from our recent editor?s lunch
ISTOCK
M
ore and more of us are
combining business trips
with leisure time. Recent
data from Carlson Wagonlit Travel
showed that between 2011 and
2015, 20 per cent of travellers
combined work with time off
(indicated by trips of two nights
or more that started or ended
with a Saturday-night stay). Our
own latest survey showed that
readers added an average of two
holidays to business trips a year.
The subject was discussed
during a recent editor?s lunch in a
private dining room of the Royal
Exchange Grand Caf� in London,
hosted by our sponsor, Japanese
airline ANA. One of the courses
served was award-winning dish
?Piero Donburi N7? (calamari,
scallops and prawns seared in
sesame oil with ponzu sauce),
which was available earlier this
year in ANA?s business class
JUNE 2017
cabins between London and Tokyo,
and was created by Piero Leone,
head chef of Sauterelle, the Royal
Exchange?s other on-site restaurant.
We asked readers for their views
on ?bleisure? and started with the
obvious question ? ?Have you ever
combined a work trip with holiday??
The answer was a resounding ?yes?.
One person said: ?I travel to
Geneva quite often for work
? earlier this year I stayed on for the
weekend to go skiing. Last year I
made sure my trip coincided with the
Geneva Motor Show. In fact, I have a
separate calendar for events around
the world so I can time my trips to fit
in with them.?
Another reader pointed out:
?Adding on some holiday usually
means employees return happier,
more relaxed and productive.?
It also gives them more time to
overcome jet lag. One participant
said: ?Business trips are there to
collect miles and points, while
leisure trips are to spend them.
How our staff use their miles is up
to them ? it?s a tax-free bonus.?
Combining work and pleasure
isn?t a recent phenomenon. One
reader reminisced about the
era of round-the-world tickets:
?You could fly from London to
Tokyo, spend Tuesday to Thursday
working and then jet off to Hawaii
for a few days before starting work
on Monday in New York.?
He added: ?These days, if you
include a Saturday-night stay,
flights are usually cheaper, so why
not stay the weekend? Even if you
?Adding on some holiday usually means employees
return happier, more relaxed and productive.?
businesstraveller.com
Editor?s lunch I 45
fly your partner out to join you,
by paying for a few extra nights in
a hotel with points, it can still be
cost-effective.?
For ANA, the interest comes
as a result of Japan hosting the
Rugby World Cup in 2019 and
the Olympic Games in 2020.
With nonstop flights from
London taking longer than
11 hours, there?s the possibility
for travellers to combine meetings
with sporting events, or simply
to experience the attractions of
Tokyo and locations further afield
such as Hakone, Kamakura,
Mount Fuji and Kyoto.
On the other hand, sometimes
you?d rather escape a city as soon
as possible. One reader said: ?If
I am doing business in Lagos
then there is no chance my wife
will want to come out. But when
working in Milan, combining it
with a weekend in Lake Como is
wonderful.? In Europe, CWT says
the most popular ?bleisure? cities
are Barcelona, Istanbul, Lisbon
and Nice. In the US, it?s Las Vegas,
Orlando, Miami and Honolulu.
One reader said: ?I go to India
a lot on business and my wife
and I have combined it with a
visit to the Taj Mahal, popped up
to Jodhpur from Delhi or down
to Kerala. To experience all that
is amazing and it?s all done on
the back of a fully expensed
business trip.?
However, if your
partner cannot join
you it can create
resentment. Another
reader said: ?My wife
and I have agreed to use
our holiday allowance
?You could fly from London to
Tokyo, work Tuesday to Thursday,
then jet off to Hawaii for a few
days before starting work on
Monday in New York?
From top: Royal
Exchange Grand
Caf� Business
Traveller?s Tom Otley
with ANA?s Yoshimi
Ogura, Julie Murphy
and Akira Nakamura
together ? so if I take five days off
and she doesn?t, then we are out of
sync.?Also, while it may seem like
a no-brainer to combine work and
play, your company?s travel policy
might not agree. One reader said:
?There is a big difference between
being an employee and being a
business owner. If you?re the boss
then you can do what
you want. Within an
organisation, it can
be difficult to set rules
as to who can benefit
from adding on time
to business trips and
who can?t.?
This is an issue that
has been bothering
travel managers for some
time. As reported by our
sister publication Buying
Business Travel, a recent study
by American Express Global
Business Travel showed that
managers reported a 70 per
cent year-on-year increase
in enquiries about combining
business and leisure.
Still, as one person said: ?We
found that adding leisure travel
coverage to our policy could be
done for a nominal amount.?
Another added: ?I just buy annual
worldwide travel insurance for any
personal trips I take.?
As remote working and
work-life balance become
key priorities for the modern
business person, it may not be long
before the distinction between
travelling for work and pleasure
disappears altogether.
? If you would like to attend a future editor?s lunch, email
events@panacea publishing.com, stating your name, job
title, company and topics of interest.
businesstraveller.com
JUNE 2017
46 I Loyalty
Marisa Cannon rounds up airline and hotel scheme news and promotions
British Airways updates Executive Club benefits
British Airways has reinstated the ability for Executive Club members to reserve
seats without charge, and introduced the freezing of membership tiers during
paternity or maternity leave.
From June 14, bronze, silver and gold members will be able to reserve their
seat on a basic fare for free. Members who have paid to select their seat and
are due to travel from that date can receive a refund on the cost of the seat
reservation. In addition, members who travel less as a result of maternity,
paternity or adoption leave will now be eligible for a ?status freeze?, whereby
their membership will be preserved for a year. ba.com
Principal Hotel Company launches
Applause Rewards scheme
The owner of the Principal and De Vere hotel
brands has launched a new loyalty programme.
Applause Rewards offers members 10 per cent
off best available room-only rates when booking
direct (rising to 15 per cent for customers who have
stayed nine nights across the group).
Other benefits include an advance check-in
service, �credit to use in the restaurant, bar or
on room service, and an extra hour added to the
normal check-out time. phcompany.com
Air Canada to launch new scheme
Air Canada is to replace its Aeroplan programme in 2020
with the aim of offering ?additional earning and redemption
opportunities, more personalised service and a better digital
experience for Air Canada customers?.
Specific details of the new scheme have yet to be revealed,
but the carrier confirmed that from June 29, 2020, miles earned
from Air Canada and Star Alliance flights would be credited to
the new programme but that miles earned through the current
Aeroplan scheme would not be transferred across.
The airline said that it ?intends to continue to offer Aimia
redemption seats for Aeroplan members after June 2020, with
pricing competitive with other third-party rewards programmes?.
aircanada.com
Triple miles up for grabs with
Emirates and Minor Hotels
Skywards members will receive triple miles
and special offers when staying at Minor
Hotels worldwide (such as Per Aquum Huvafen
Fushi in the Maldives, pictured). These include
20 and 25 per cent off rooms at the ?best
flexible rate?, single room upgrades, plus
special rates on spa treatments and discounts
at participating restaurants. Members of Minor
Hotels? Discovery programme can also earn
status through stays. Valid until December 31.
emirates.com
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Loyalty I 47
Singapore Airlines offers
quadruple miles with Hilton
Earn triple miles with
Lufthansa and Movenpick
Miles and More members can take
home 1,500 miles plus a US$20
voucher when booking stays at
Movenpick Hotels and Resorts
in Asia (such as the Movenpick
Sukhumvit 15 Bangkok, pictured).
Reservations must be made
through movenpick.com, while
the voucher can be used at
restaurants in the booked hotel.
Valid until July 15. lufthansa.com
Members of Singapore Airlines? Krisflyer
programme can earn quadruple miles for
stays at Hilton properties in Asia (such as
the Hilton Mumbai International Airport,
pictured) and double points at hotels
everywhere else. The offer excludes
Hampton by Hilton properties in Greater
China and Mongolia, and members must be
part of Hilton Honors. singaporeair.com
Norwegian Reward introduces
points-earning e-shop
Norwegian Reward has launched a new UK
e-shop allowing members to earn Cashpoints
when making online purchases at nearly 1,000
UK retailers.
The shop is similar to the online store offered by
British Airways and Avios. The Norwegian carrier
already operates an e-shop in its home market,
but is the first low-cost airline in the UK to launch
such a service.
Members can earn Cashpoints (redeemable
against Norwegian flights or ancillary services
such as checked luggage and seat reservation) at
retailers including John Lewis, Marks and Spencer,
Tesco and Argos. norwegian.com
48 I Meetings
Marisa Cannon lists the
essentials for seamless
event planning
1
CHOOSE YOUR
VENUE WISELY
Picking the right venue is
crucial for setting the tone of
your event. Ask yourself, does
the venue suit the style of
your gathering? Will the room
layout work for the number
of people? How easy will it be
for attendees to get to? Make
sure the venue can cater for
dietary requirements and that
audio-visual equipment is
available if needed.
2
UNDERSTAND
YOUR BUDGET
Knowing how far your
budget will get you can be
tricky, especially if you?re
hosting overseas. But you can
make shrewd savings that
don?t come at the expense of
the event, such as employing
a talented student to take
photos; printing documents,
JUNE 2017
name tags and brochures
yourself; and working with
smaller suppliers for signage
and catering.
3
KNOW YOUR
AREA
Use on-the-ground
resources to help you make
decisions if you?re unfamiliar
with the destination. Get
recommendations from
locals on good restaurants
and bars to take clients to
after meetings, and show
them that you?ve done
your research.
4
BE CULTURALLY
AWARE
If you?re holding an event
abroad, being aware of local
etiquette and customs will
help get you on side with
staff and guests, and smooth
over any hiccups on the day.
5
CARRY LOCAL
CURRENCY
Always have a supply of
cash in local currency in
case something goes wrong,
or to cover any unexpected
or last-minute incidentals.
6
PLAN YOUR
RESOURCES
If planning an event overseas,
it could make sense to order
from suppliers based in the
destination. If you decide to
use a home distributor and
transport materials, arrange
postage and shipping well
in advance so that you?re not
caught out on the day.
7
ANY POLITICAL
ISSUES?
Find out if there are any
sensitivities that you should
be aware of before drawing
up the content of the event.
Guidance from a local
destination management
company can help you avoid
making any faux pas.
8
PRINT BACK-UPS
AND CHECKLIST
Make copies of all receipts
and travel documents, plus
attendee lists and supplier
details to take to your event.
9
GET FEEDBACK
Organise feedback
surveys with a prize. Make
sure your questions are
punchy, and that they prompt
detailed, specific answers.
10 NEVER ASSUME
ANYTHING
Double-check orders, remind
attendees of their agenda,
brief staff thoroughly, and
build plenty of leeway into
the schedule. ?
businesstraveller.com
ISTOCK
Your events checklist
WITH THE CHANCE OF ALMOST
ANYTHING HAPPENING
With over 30 years? experience of insuring
events, we can help organisers with everything
from weather and security reports to arranging
alternative transport for speakers.
Hiscox Underwriting Ltd is authorised and regulated
by the Financial Conduct Authority. 17384 05/17
+44 (0)1206 773 851
hiscox.co.uk/events
businesstraveller.com
Lifestyle Contents I 51
54
52 I NEWS
The latest in leisure and luxury
66
54 I POWERED UP
From hydrogen to hybrid, a buyer?s
guide to electric cars
58 I QUALITY AND QUANTITY
Seiko?s impressive range of watches
61 I BUY AND FLY
Tax-free airport shopping
62 I BALINESE BEAUTY
An escape to the jungles of Bali, and
a run-in with some monkeys
businesstraveller.com
ALILA VILLAS ULUWATU, BALI
59
62
64
68
66 I 4 HOURS IN EDINBURGH
A walking tour of the Scottish capital
68 I DENVER DELIVERS
A weekend in the Colorado city, in
easy reach of the Rocky Mountains
74 I SNAPSHOT
1957: the opening of Bristol airport
JUNE 2017
52 I Lifestyle News
Michelle Harbi rounds up what?s new in leisure and luxury
DESIGN MUSEUM
HOSTS CARTIER EXHIBITION
LUXURY
LONDON?S DESIGN MUSEUM is now hosting an exhibition on Cartier and
design curated by Norman Foster. Cartier in Motion explores themes such as
the birth of the modern wristwatch and the evolution of the French luxury
brand?s watch designs. Its 170 exhibits are drawn from Cartier?s own collection,
as well as the Mus閑 de l?Air et de l?Espace at Paris Le Bourget airport, the
Monaco royal collection and the Rockefeller Centre. Among the more unusual
pieces on show is a 1969 gold replica of the NASA lunar module (pictured).
The Design Museum recently reopened in its new home on High Street
Kensington. Until July 28; free. designmuseum.org
WINE
Comptoir Caf� and
Wine opens in Mayfair
RESTAURATEUR AND SOMMELIER Xavier Rousset
has opened Comptoir Caf� and Wine on Weighhouse
Street, behind Bond Street station. A sister venue to
Marylebone?s Blandford Comptoir, the all-day caf� and bar
serves breakfast and light dishes, while the subterranean
wine shop sells about 1,000 bottles, including up to 100
types of champagne, which you can drink upstairs for
a � corkage fee. Rousset says the list ranges ?from
classic Burgundies to quirkier and rare varieties from
Sicily ? all ready for drinking now, at extremely reasonable
prices?. Up to 30 wines are on offer by the glass. Open
8am until late. comptoir-cafe-and-wine.co.uk
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Lifestyle News I 53
TECH
Montblanc launches
Summit smartwatch
MONTBLANC HAS INTRODUCED its first smartwatch. Montblanc
Summit offers a choice of four 46mm cases, including titanium and black
PVD coated stainless steel, as well as a curved sapphire crystal, classic
or sporty digital faces, and eight different straps, such as rubber, calfskin
and alligator. It uses Google?s Android Wear 2.0 operating system, which is
compatible with both iOS and Android phones. Heart rate, steps, calories
burnt, distance and active time are displayed on a progress bar shaped like
a mountain summit. Other features include a Worldtimer micro-app, built-in
Google Assistant and 4GB Flash storage. From �5; montblanc.com
ESCAPE
Anantara
arrives in
the Algarve
MINOR HOTELS? LUXURY ANANTARA brand has
made its European debut with the opening of the
Anantara Vilamoura Algarve Resort in Portugal. A
15-minute drive from Faro airport, it is a rebrand and
refurbishment of the Tivoli Victoria, the Thai-based group
having acquired Tivoli Hotels and Resorts last year.
The 280-room property overlooks the Arnold Palmerdesigned Oceanico golf course and has six restaurants
and bars, a spa and tennis courts. anantara.com
businesstraveller.com
WHISKY
Laphroaig
adds 1815
Legacy
Edition
ONE OF TWO NEW TRAVEL RETAIL
EXCLUSIVES from Islay distillery
Laphroaig (the other being Laphroaig Four
Oak), the 1815 Legacy Edition is a complex
whisky from the famous Islay malt brand,
noted for its peat smoke aromas. It also
features notes of soft oak and a touch
of caramelised dark fruit and nuts. ?104;
laphroaig.com
JUNE 2017
54 I Electric cars
Powered up
Could an electric car be for you? Nat Barnes
looks at advances in the industry and the
best new options on the market
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Electric cars I 55
E
its forms. Those last four words
are crucial if you?re considering
battery power for your next car.
Electric cars come in numerous
shapes and sizes, from those that
run on electricity alone (EVs), have
assistance from a petrol or diesel
engine (hybrids or range extended
vehicles) or even run on hydrogen
(see panel below).
None of them are without
their drawbacks. For all-electric
cars, there?s the thorny subject of
range. At present, most EVs can
cover around 120-150 miles on a
full charge (which usually costs
�2.50), but then can require up
to eight hours to recharge after
being plugged in. That makes them
ideal for urban use if you have easy
access to a charging point, but not
if you don?t have off-street parking
or need to travel further in a hurry.
Away from home, charging
points are run by different
companies and with different
charging rates, meaning you might
need to have multiple accounts
with multiple firms. Rather
illogically, you can?t just turn up
and swipe your credit card as you
might think. The cost of fitting
a charging point at home can
vary, too, from �0 to nothing
depending on the manufacturer
and their offers.
Thackery Davis, a teacher from
East Sussex, bought his Renault
Zoe in 2015.?We originally
planned to use the Zoe as our
second car, but we?ve ended up
?
ISTOCK
lectricity. We use it to
light our homes, cook our
food and make a cup of
tea, so why not to power
our cars?
Last year, sales of alternatively
fuelled new cars in the UK ?
hybrids, electric and fuel cell cars
? rose by more than a fifth, which
was on top of a 40 per cent rise
in 2015. After a somewhat slow
start, British drivers are finally
beginning to embrace electric
powered motoring.
Electric cars have been around
a lot longer than you might think.
British inventor Thomas Parker
built the first production electric
car as long ago as 1884, and they
enjoyed considerable popularity
in the early days of motoring.
It was only the arrival of cheap
petrol and the greater range and
speed of cars powered by internal
combustion engines in the early
1900s that would seal the fate for
electric-powered motoring.
Until now, that is, because
electric motoring is back in all
KNOW YOUR
ELECTRIC
CARS
Electric vehicles
can come in
many different
forms ? here?s how
to differentiate
between them.
businesstraveller.com
Electric Vehicles
(EVs) ? eg, Nissan
Leaf, Renault Zoe,
Tesla Model S.
As their name
suggests, these
are purely batterydriven with
electric motors.
Electric Vehicles
with Range
Extenders ? eg,
BMW i3 REX.
The same as fully
electric cars but
with small extra
petrol engines to
provide more range
when required.
Hybrids ? eg,
Lexus RX450h,
Toyota Prius. Has
a petrol or diesel
engine for longer
or faster journeys,
plus a battery
pack for extra
power or slower,
urban driving.
Plug-In Hybrids
(PHEVs) ? eg,
Audi A3 e-tron,
Mitsubishi
Outlander PHEV.
Like standard
hybrid cars but
with larger battery
packs for a longer
electric-only range.
Fuel-cell vehicles
? eg, Toyota Mirai
(pictured above
left). The same as
EVs but with an
onboard hydrogen
fuel cell to generate
electricity. Can only
be refuelled by
hydrogen alone.
JUNE 2017
56 I Electric cars
The real benefits of a fuel cell car are that its only
emissions are water ? so clean you could actually drink it
using it far more than we imagined,?
he says. ?We?d definitely recommend
it, although you do have to plan
ahead in terms of charging it up for
longer journeys. For us, the range
anxiety isn?t a problem as we?ve got
another car, but it might be limiting
if it was our only transport.?
Still, there are multiple answers to
that range anxiety. Some electric cars
can use rapid-charging points, while
Tesla has a network of superchargers
that can provide 170 miles of range
in 30 minutes. Alternatively, there
are models such as BMW?s i3, which
is sold either in purely electric form
(with a 125-mile range) or with a
small range extender petrol engine
for an extra �000, which provides
electricity when your range is low
and increases distance to 206 miles.
Then there are the ever-popular
hybrids. In standard form, hybrids
use their batteries for slow-speed
urban driving and recharge them as
you brake or slow down. However,
the recent fashion, especially at the
premium end of the market, is for
plug-in hybrids. These have larger
batteries and, therefore, a longer
electric-only range. They also boast
considerably lower emissions,
meaning much-reduced company
car tax bills.
Ah, yes, the thorny issue of tax
and politics. At present, there are
JUNE 2017
three levels of government grant
for electric cars, ranging from
�500 up to �500 depending
on its price, range and emissions.
Purely electric vehicles obviously
get the most, but any plug-ins
over �,000, such as Volvo?s
XC90, don?t get anything at all.
What?s more, as exposed in
our previous feature on fleet cars
Above: Toyota
Mirai Below:
Hyundai Ioniq
(?Value driven?, November 2016),
those plug-in hybrids are only
cheap to run if you actually plug
them in and utilise their electriconly range. HMRC has yet to
address how it will tax electricity
for motoring, too. Fully charge your
electric car for 150 miles and the
government sees next to nothing,
whereas an equivalent 150 milesworth of petrol or diesel (or indeed
any amount) sees it earn about
60 per cent of the pump price.
Therein lies the rub for future
governments, too. They want us
to drive cleaner cars and move to
battery power, but are reducing
the grants provided as it becomes
more popular, and, in turn, will be
forced to look at other motoring
taxes to recoup the lost revenue
from traditional fossil fuels.
The Netherlands? big tax
incentives saw car buyers flock
to electric cars in 2015, making
the country Europe?s biggest
plug-in hybrid market. But when
the Dutch government reduced
those incentives last year, sales of
plug-ins dropped by 47 per cent.
businesstraveller.com
Electric cars I 57
?While the electric car market
has progressed, there are still
hurdles to overcome and the
experience in the Netherlands
shows that electric cars are
still dependent on incentives
for sales,? says Nick Gibbs, UK
correspondent for Automotive
News Europe.?Battery technology
is making some gains but
certainly isn?t leaping ahead, and
many manufacturers are quoting
2019 or beyond for when electric
cars will have a good range and
prices equivalent to petrol and
diesel models.?
Then again, like Betamax video
players, compact discs or the pop
career of Martha and the Muffins
after Echo Beach (apologies to
those under 40), the days of plugin electric cars could be numbered
when they?ve only just begun.
Toyota has already introduced
its Mirai fuel cell car, which uses
hydrogen to produce electricity
to power its cars, so doesn?t need
recharging (just refilling). Hyundai
and Mercedes are also tapping
into this market, having both
already had fuel cell models under
development for some time.
Unlike charging via a plug,
hydrogen can be provided via
a forecourt pump in exactly the
same process and virtually the
same time as a petrol or diesel
pump. The real benefits of a fuel
cell car are that its only emissions
are water ? so clean that you could
actually drink it. The big downside
is the lack of filling points ? the
UK will have a grand total of 14 by
the end of this year.
With all of hydrogen?s ease of
use and similarities to today?s
filling pumps, it would certainly
seem to be the logical next step,
although the Toyota Prius has been
on sale for 20 years and motorists
are only now getting comfortable
with hybrid technology.
Electricity may well be powering
your car in the future, but perhaps
not quite in the way that you
might think? ?
businesstraveller.com
FIVE OF THE BEST
RENAULT ZOE
From �,845
Renault?s superb Zoe supermini
looks cute, drives even better and
a new, bigger battery provides a
186-mile range. You can buy the
battery outright with the car or hire it
separately for a monthly charge.
BMW i8
�4,660
With looks straight out of a science
fiction film, the i8 boasts supercar
performance but with tree-loving
emissions. Expect a convertible
version to be available at some
point next year.
VOLVO XC90 T8 PLUG-IN
HYBRID
From �,715
Volvo?s XC90 is undoubtedly one
of the hottest seven-seater SUVs
on the market. This flagship T8
version only makes it even more
desirable. A 2.0-litre petrol engine
combines with an electric motor for
an electric-only 30-mile range.
HYUNDAI IONIQ
From �,995
In a single swoop, Hyundai has
effectively out-Priused the Toyota
Prius. A smart five-door hatchback,
at present the Ioniq comes in either
fully electric or petrol-electric hybrid
forms, with a plug-in hybrid due
later this year.
TOYOTA MIRAI
�,000
The UK?s first commercially available
fuel cell car that runs on hydrogen.
The only downsides are looks that
only its mother could love, and that
it?s easier to find unicorn tears than
a UK filling station.
JUNE 2017
58 I Watches
Grand Seiko
Reissue 2017
in stainless steel
Offering arguably the
world?s widest choice of
watches, Japan?s Seiko
has been playing the
venerable Swiss brands
at their own game for
decades, says Chris Hall
Quality
and
quantity
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Watches I 59
S
Credor Fugaku Tourbillon 2016
Credor Eichi II 2016
1960s Seiko 5
businesstraveller.com
ome of you will already be
wondering what we are doing
writing about Seiko in what is
supposed to be a luxury watch column.
True, you can buy a Seiko on Amazon
for � and, being Japanese, the company
has never been sniffy about digital or
quartz technology in the same way as the
Swiss brands. But there?s nothing wrong
with its entry-level watches ? the Seiko 5
is hands-down the cheapest way to own
a mechanical watch (versions abound,
starting at about �) and is an icon in its
own right, having been on sale since 1963.
What?s remarkable is that the company
behind this humble ticker also produces
minute repeaters and tourbillons; highend mechanical watches adorned with
masterful decoration and fine movements
within. It is no exaggeration to say that
Seiko offers one of the widest choices of
watches in the world.
It?s not all perfect ? the recently
introduced Grand Seiko Sport range
leaves a lot to be desired stylistically, and
the Astron collection, with its GPS link-up,
feels rather 1990s ? but with its Grand
Seiko and Credor watches, Seiko can
match up to any mainstream Swiss brand
in terms of quality and craftsmanship.
For many, here lies part of its charm.
Seiko has been getting up the noses
of the Swiss since the 1960s, when it
started turning up to official timekeeping
competitions and ? within a couple of years
? sweeping the board. The Swiss hadn?t
even contemplated a foreign entrant, let
alone one so competent, and promptly took
their ball away in a fit of national pique.
Undeterred, Seiko continued to innovate
at a rapid pace. It made a name for itself in
the world of professional dive watches in
the 1970s ? becoming, along the way, the
first company to use titanium in a watch
case, a full decade before IWC and Porsche
Design would make the same claim.
It developed the quartz watch
movement (something that would at a
stroke cripple the Swiss watch industry)
and went on to create multiple ingenious
hybrid movements ? the Kinetic and
Spring Drive, both worth articles in their
own right ? ensuring it had something of
good value at every level of the market.
You could be excused a level of
ignorance over Seiko?s more interesting
watches and history ? the brand is not the
best at getting the story out there, and for
decades has not marketed Grand Seiko,
Credor or even its coolest dive watches to
a UK audience. That is changing, slowly
? at Seiko, everything is very deliberate
? and, later this month, it is opening its
first dedicated UK store, in London?s
Knightsbridge. That in itself has been a
long time coming ? everything had to be
just right ? but it should herald a period of
greater attention for watch fans in the UK.
Perfectionism comes at least as
naturally to the Japanese as to the Swiss,
and the obsession over hand-finishing
is equally strong. Seiko?s high-end
pieces benefit from zaratsu polishing ?
techniques honed over centuries of knife
and sword creation, miniaturised for the
hands or indexes of a watch. The lines of
a Grand Seiko case are as crisp and clean
as anything around ? not for nothing do
connoisseurs hold them up as Rolex rivals.
This year, Seiko has given the Grand
Seiko sub-brand a bit more of its own
identity (after nearly 60 years), removing
?Seiko? from the dials and letting it go out
with just ?Grand Seiko? at 12 o?clock.
Yes, this is letting one?s hair down,
Seiko style, but you can?t scoff at the
results. The move is being marked by the
release of three limited-edition watches
that hark back to the first Grand Seiko
designs from 1960. Available in stainless
steel, 18-carat gold and platinum (itself a
nod to the past, as the first Grand Seiko
watches, intended as they were to rival
the finest Swiss watches, were cased in
platinum), they are some of the simplest,
most elegant watches released this year.
Each is powered by a hand-wound
mechanical movement ? made in-house
by Seiko, naturally ? and measures 38mm
across. The steel model (�000) is a little
thicker than the other two, and stands
out from the platinum with its blued steel
seconds hand. A total of 1,960 pieces
will be produced; there will be 353 of the
gold (�,000) and 136 of the platinum
(�,000). If that?s not motivation to visit
the new boutique, I don?t know what is.
? Chris Hall is editor of SalonQP.com
JUNE 2017
AS SEEN IN YOUR
DREAMS.
RENT FROM
�
PER DAY*
rent a car
VISIT SIXT.CO.UK TO RENT IN 105 COUNTRIES.
*Price based on a prepaid minimum 7-day rental from Sixt London Heathrow for vehicle group LDAR (includes Jaguar XF) in the UK from e.g. 22/06 - 29/06/2017. Incl. VAT.
Subject to availability and driver qualification. Standard Sixt terms and conditions apply.
FEBRUARY 2017
businesstraveller.com
Buy and fly I 61
On sale now tax-free at the airport
1
4
7
2
3
5
6
8
9
10
Raymond Weil Tango 300 watch WHERE? World Duty Free Heathrow and Gatwick all terminals; �6 SAVE �9 raymond-weil.com
Elemis Luxury Gentleman Traveller set (shave gel, face wash, day cream, body wash, reviving gel) WHERE? World Duty Free Heathrow
all terminals, Gatwick South, Stansted, Manchester T1, T2, Newcastle, Edinburgh, Glasgow; �.40 SAVE �10 worlddutyfree.com
3 Thomas Pink Lions Bennetti woven tie in blue and yellow WHERE? Thomas Pink Heathrow all terminals; �.50 SAVE �.50
thomaspink.com 4 Maui Jim Pilot aviator sunglasses with gold frames WHERE? Sunglass Hut Heathrow all terminals; �4 SAVE �
sunglasshut.com 5 Lalique Amethyst Eclat eau de parfum WHERE? World Duty Free; 100ml � SAVE �lalique.com 6 Ermenegildo
Zegna triple stitch slip-on sneakers WHERE? Harrods Heathrow T5; �6 SAVE � harrods.com 7 Orlebar Brown Bulldog Riviera Gilot
print mid-length swim shorts WHERE? Harrods Heathrow T5; �0 SAVE � orlebarbrown.com 8 Paul Smith monkey print credit card
holder WHERE? Paul Smith Heathrow T2, T3, T5; �0 SAVE � paulsmith.co.uk 9 Cr鑝e de la Mer Blue Heart moisturising cream
WHERE? World Duty Free; 100ml �0.50 SAVE �.50 worlddutyfree.com 10 Van Cleef and Arpels Precious Oud eau de parfum
WHERE? World Duty Free; 75ml �0.80 SAVE �.20 worlddutyfree.com
1
2
businesstraveller.com
JUNE 2017
62 I Escape to... Bali
I
n Ubud?s Sacred Monkey Forest, there are
signs warning people not to touch, feed
or make eye contact with the animals,
but no one takes any notice. There are
bananas for sale and staff hand out fistfuls
of peanuts to tourists. It doesn?t take much to attract
the monkeys ? I see one tear open a shopping bag,
and another peel fruit while sat on a child?s shoulder.
They especially like glittery earrings ? on the stone
steps of an amphitheatre, one leaps on to a woman
and snatches at her jewelled lobe, making her scream,
before running off with his prize.
Tentatively making our way through the jungle,
keeping an eye on the squabbling macaques in
the trees, we pass ancient, moss-covered temples,
statues of grinning apes, and ornate winged dragons
guarding a stone bridge high above a ravine. Officially
a nature reserve (open daily 8.30am-6pm), its 700 or
so monkeys are fed on sweet potato three times a day,
but this doesn?t suppress their appetite for mischief.
While I pose for a photo, a juvenile springs from
nowhere and grabs my face, leaving two neat sets of
scratches (albeit faint) across
my temples. I spend the next
hour googling: ?Can you
catch rabies from a monkey
scratch?? (the answer is yes
so I am freaking out) and
ordering bottles of Bintang
beer from the nearby
Habitat Caf�, which has free
wifi (habitatubud.com).
Next door is hipster
co-working space Hubud
(hubud.org). The bamboo
house has an organic caf�
where flip-flopped writers
sit with laptops looking
out on to paddy fields, and
eager entrepreneurs spend
hours coding while drinking
kombucha (fermented tea).
This summer, Hubud will
host a Google-sponsored
Startup Weekend for tourism
and hospitality ventures.
Last year, almost five million people visited Bali,
a 23 per cent increase on 2015. Joining high-end
international brands such as Aman, Four Seasons,
W, Anantara and Oberoi have been two hotels from
Ritz-Carlton (the Mandapa, a Reserve property, and
the Ritz-Carlton Bali, opened in 2015), the Hoshinoya
(January 2017) and the Capella Ubud, which will feature
22 luxury tents when it launches at the end of the year.
Asian chain Alila has four properties on the
5,780 sq km island of Bali ? the Seminyak, Manggis,
Uluwatu and Ubud, where I am staying. The resort is
JUNE 2017
Balinese
beauty
Bali offers a
wonderfully
atmospheric
setting for
relaxation ? just
watch out for
monkey business,
says Jenny
Southan
Pictured:
Ubud Sacred
Monkey Forest;
Alila Ubud
businesstraveller.com
Escape to... Bali I 63
businesstraveller.com
JUNE 2017
JENNY SOUTHAN
64 I Escape to... Bali
about 20 minutes? drive from the town of Ubud itself,
popular over the years with hippies and backpackers.
Along the sides of the streets, which are strewn with
tiny trays of flowers and rice as offerings to the gods,
are shops selling phallic bottle openers, knock-off
Ray-Bans and leering masks. In the evening we stop
at Hujan (hujanlocale.com), a stylish cocktail bar and
restaurant that also does cooking classes. Opposite
is Fair Warung Bale, a simple set-up serving delicious
food in generous quantities. All of its profits go
towards providing free healthcare for locals.
While Ubud is fun for a day, the main draw for me
is escaping to the steamy climes of the Alila Ubud,
set high above the tree canopy, with a jade infinity
pool that offers a staggering panorama of the misty,
verdant valley. (If you?re after sun, bear in mind that
the dry season is between April and September.)
Apart from the squawk of monkeys and birds,
the resort is wonderfully peaceful, days beginning
with a traditional breakfast on the terrace ? chilled
watermelon and red chilli juice, and a bowl of nasi
goreng ayam (fried rice with chicken, a fried egg and
pickles). While standard rooms are comfortable (the
outdoor rainshowers
are the highlight), the
palapa-roofed villas
with private pools are
very special.
If you are staying for
more than a couple
of days, you may be
tempted to book one of
the excursions that the
Alila organises, such as
quad biking, VW jungle
safaris or morning bird
watching. You can even
hike to the summit of
active volcano Mount
Batur. The on-site
spa specialises in
traditional massages
to leave even the most
stressed-out business
traveller feeling reborn
after meetings in hectic
Jakarta, just under two hours? flight away.
We take the hotel shuttle 55km to the Alila
Uluwatu, perched on cliffs at the southerly tip of
the island (only 35 minutes from the international
airport). The focal point of the minimalist, all-villa
resort is the enormous pool and gravity-defying
cantilevered Sunset Cabana bar, although guests also
have the pleasure of their own personal plunge pools
and hyper-modern residences, accessed by golf cart.
Apart from a perilous hike down hundreds of
narrow steps to the beach, there is nothing to distract
JUNE 2017
Pictured:
Alila Uluwatu
you from relaxing. During the day, staff
set down poolside hampers of iced
water, menus and sunscreen (although
I?d advise you to use your own factor
30 as the ozone layer is thin in these
parts). In your personal 291 sqm villa,
you can lounge on a day bed and have
a butler wait on you around the clock.
In contrast to more rustic eating
in Ubud, the Uluwatu opts for fine
dining. Alone in concept restaurant
Quila, we embark on a ten-course ?sensory journey?
that starts with us being blindfolded while eating
a cube of rock lobster covered in green foam, then
consuming a mushroom meringue enclouded in
dry ice. By now, I can safely say that my traumatic
experience in the monkey forest feels far behind me.
? A two-night weekend stay at the Alila Ubud starts
from US$370 for a Superior room in July. The Alila
Uluwatu starts from US$884 for a one-bedroom villa.
Visit alilahotels.com, destination-asia.com,
garuda-indonesia.com
businesstraveller.com
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66 I 4 hours in...
Edinburgh
Marisa Cannon strolls through the Scottish capital
1
GREYFRIARS KIRKYARD
Begin at Greyfriars Kirkyard,
an eerie, often mist-shrouded
cemetery where a number of famous
Scots are interred, including James
Craig, architect of Edinburgh?s
New Town, and Robert Adam,
who designed the first minister?s
residence, Bute House, and London
member?s club Home House.
cemetery?s visitors. The chamber
has since been sealed by the city
council, but guides will tell you not
to get too close?
2
G&V ROYAL MILE
HOTEL
Leaving the Kirkyard via
Candlemaker Row, take a left on
to Cowgatehead and climb Victoria
2
ISTOCK/NATIONAL GALLERIES OF SCOTLAND
In the late 18th and early 19th
centuries, the cemetery was regularly
plundered by Edinburgh?s notorious
?resurrectionists?, who, under the
cover of night, would pry open
coffins and hijack their contents
to sell to surgeons and medical
students for dissection. More ghastly
still is the tale of George Mackenzie,
a ruthless 17th-century judge who
persecuted hundreds of Protestant
Covenanters, imprisoned them in
the Kirkyard?s grounds and then
sentenced them to public hanging at
nearby Grassmarket Square.
When he eventually died,
?Bluidy Mackenzie?, as he is more
commonly known, was buried in
the same cemetery in his very own
mausoleum. Following an incident
where the tomb was broken into,
Mackenzie?s ghost is said to have
?woken?, provoking reports of
violent, paranormal attacks on the
JUNE 2017
Street until you reach George IV
Bridge. Turn left and you?ll see
the G&V Royal Mile. Formerly
a Missoni hotel, the 136-room
property is home to the Epicurean
bar, one of Edinburgh?s most
fashionable watering holes.
Opened last November, the
bar has already won a prestigious
regional title of Best Bar at the
Scottish Hotel Awards, and offers
an inventive drinks menu inspired
by the Scottish Colourists, a group
of post-Impressionist painters.
It?s a sleek, atmospheric space
featuring fuchsia leather booths,
monochrome floor tiling and
Scandi furniture. Try Le Manteau
Chinois (�, inspired by the
1
3
businesstraveller.com
4 hours in... I 67
works of JD Fergusson and made
with Dewar?s 12-year-old Scotch,
Amer Picon (an orange-flavoured
liqueur), beetroot, rhubarb, orange
blossom oolong and orange and
ginger marmalade.
Upstairs on the mezzanine
level, Italian restaurant Cucina
was refurbished in July last
year and features beautiful wall
murals, colourful throw pillows
and flamboyant crockery. On
the menu is a range of rustic
pastas and risottos alongside
heavier meat and fish dishes
that champion Scottish produce.
G&V Royal Mile, 1 George IV
Bridge; tel +44 (0)131 220 6666;
quorvuscollection.com
3
PRINCES STREET
The city?s main shopping
thoroughfare stretches
past Waverley train station,
extending a mile westward toward
the district of Haymarket and
Edinburgh?s imperious Castle.
The street itself is flanked with
statues of historic Scottish figures,
from 19th-century explorer
David Livingstone to Adam
Black, an early publisher of the
Encyclopaedia Britannica, while the
world?s largest monument to a
writer (at 61 metres) stands beside
the boulevard ? the imposing,
soot-stained Scott Monument,
commemorating Sir Walter Scott.
A raft of high-street shops line
along the overgrown pathway,
passing under the stone arches
of Dean Bridge and the stately
Rhema Church on the hillside
above. Away from the city?s
bustle, wander through the lush
woodland, where geese probe the
riverbank for morsels and rabbits
dart under wild, unkempt bushes.
5
SCOTTISH NATIONAL
GALLERY OF
MODERN ART
Carry on alongside the river until
you reach Belford Road, taking a
right on to Belford Terrace. Further
along, you?ll find the Scottish
National Gallery of Modern Art,
the main collection of which is
5
CARLTON
HILL
SCOTTISH
NATIONAL
GALLERY OF
MODERN ART
5
WATER
OF LEITH
4
Edinburgh
PRINCES
STREET
3
WAVERLEY
STATION
2
EDINBURGH
CASTLE
1
G&V ROYAL
MILE HOTEL
GREYFRIARS
KIRKYARD
the road, but the quirky caf閟 and
independent retailers nearby are
also worth peeking into. Check
out 21st Century Kilts on Thistle
Street nearby for current tweed
and tartan fashion, or Social Bite
on Rose Street, a lively sandwich
shop that donates all of its profits
to good causes.
4
WATER OF LEITH
From the end of Princes
Street, walk westward for
ten minutes to Dean Gardens
? the closest point from the city
centre to the Water of Leith. This
is Edinburgh?s main river, which
bends and curls through the
city?s outskirts until it reaches
the coastal town of Leith,
before pouring into the North
Sea. Follow the river upstream
businesstraveller.com
housed in a grand neoclassical
building with the words
?Everything is going to be alright?
installed in blue neon across the
fa鏰de?s frieze.
For contemporary art lovers,
the museum has an impressive
programme of temporary
exhibits, as well as a wideranging permanent display
ranging from post-war European
figure painting to pop art and
abstract pieces. Dotted across the
museum?s grounds you?ll also
find a number of installations,
and a stroll around will reveal
works by the likes of Tony Cragg,
Damien Hurst, Henry Moore and
Rachel Whiteread. Open daily
10am-5pm; free entry (there is
a charge for some exhibitions).
nationalgalleries.org ?
? Virgin Trains
East Coast
operates 24
weekday
services between
London and
Edinburgh.
virgintrains
eastcoast.com
JUNE 2017
68 I Weekend in... Denver
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Weekend in... Denver I 69
Lively attractions and easy access to the
Rocky Mountains make the Colorado capital
well worth your time, says Philip Watson
F
VISIT DENVER/STEVE MOHLENKAMP
businesstraveller.com
Left: 16th Street
Mall Above:
Heading into the
Rocky Mountains
riday morning at 7.30am,
the Crawford hotel,
downtown Denver. I am in
the epicentre of the city; the
elegant hotel forms part of
the recent redevelopment of the
historic Union Station terminal,
at one time the main railway
hub for the Colorado capital. I?m
waiting for the lift to take me
down for breakfast in one of the
1914 Beaux-Arts building?s many
buzzing caf閟 and restaurants.
Because of the hotel?s unrivalled
location, and the hour, I expect the
doors to open to a fellow business
traveller, or maybe a jet-lagged
BOOM TOWN
In many ways, my ?ski lift?
experience is emblematic of a
city that is thrillingly active and
wholly surprising. The US Bureau
of Statistics ranked Denver as the
fastest-growing major city in the
US in 2015, and, everywhere you
look, it has the feel of a boom
town ? the cityscape is dominated
by cranes and new tower blocks.
The metropolitan area is now
home to more than three million
people; it?s claimed by Rich Grant
and Irene Rawlings in their book
100 Things To Do In Denver Before
JUNE 2017
?
Denver
delivers
tourist. I do not expect to see
a young couple in full, colourcoordinated ski gear, complete with
skis, poles, boots, gloves, goggles,
helmets and Go Pro cameras.
They look like they?ve stepped
off a ski lift in Switzerland?s
upmarket Gstaad ? not into an
urban US elevator. They tell me a
waiting minibus will be whisking
them and some friends off to the
Loveland Ski Area, 90km and
about an hour and a half west
of the ?Mile-High City?, in the
glorious Rocky Mountains.
If it was a weekend during the
ski season, they wouldn?t even
need the private shuttle ? they
could take the newly relaunched
ski train direct from Union Station
to another popular Denver ski
destination, Winter Park, a couple
of hours away.
VISIT DENVER/STEVE CRECELIUS/RICH GRANT
70 I Weekend in... Denver
Clockwise from
top: Denver
Art Museum;
Rockmount
Ranch Wear;
riverfront cycle
paths; Denver
International
JUNE 2017
businesstraveller.com
Weekend in... Denver I 71
You Die that ?the Mile-High City is
growing on average by a thousand
new residents a week?.
It?s certainly true that every
millennial you meet seems to be
from somewhere else, attracted
to Denver by the three ?Ms?:
money (well, job opportunities ?
the unemployment rate hovers
at around 3 per cent and is one
of the lowest in the country);
mountains (as well as first-class
skiing, the Rockies offer superb
hiking, biking, climbing, kayaking
and rafting); and marijuana (in
2005 it became the first major US
city to legalise cannabis, leading to
a mini-boom in weed cultivation,
medical use and tourism).
Dubbed the ?Wall Street of the
West? at the beginning of the 20th
century owing to the rise of a small
financial district along 17th Street,
Denver has always had a strong
business culture. Major companies
in the area include Molson Coors,
Lockheed Martin and United. Its
geographical location has also
made it a focus for the telecoms
industry; communication with
both North American coasts,
South America, Europe and Asia is
possible in the same business day.
direct rail link to Union Station;
the journey takes 37 minutes and
costs US$9 each way.
ART OF THE CITY
That kind of accessibility, and the
fact that Denver is a relatively
compact walking city claiming a
remarkable 300 days of sunshine a
year, makes it perfect for extending
your trip across a weekend. The
weather can be changeable, and,
at exactly one mile above sea level,
you need to protect yourself from
the sun?s intensity. Yet Denver is
an extremely easy place to enjoy.
There is even a free electric shuttle
bus along the 16th Street Mall, a
mile-long pedestrian promenade
designed by architect IM Pei, now
fronted mostly by tacky general
stores and tourist shops.
Near to the southern end of
the mall is the Golden Triangle
Museum District. Attractions
here range from the Denver
Art Museum (10am-5pm
Tues-Sun, 8pm Fri; US$13;
denverartmuseum.org), with its
eye-catching Daniel Libeskind
extension, to a museum dedicated
to the expansive paintings
of Clyfford Still (10am-5pm
collection of contemporary works
by the likes of Sol LeWitt and
Tracey Emin in its dramatic public
spaces and 165 rooms.
If you prefer your culture
live then Denver also delivers.
It has the one of the largest
performing arts complexes in
the US, with ten venues housing
everything from theatre to
Broadway shows and a symphony
orchestra (denvercenter.org). The
76,000-seater Sports Authority
Field at Mile High is home to
2016 Super Bowl champions the
Broncos, although tickets are hard
to come by ? every Sunday home
game since 1970 has sold out
(season runs Sept-Feb).
The city also boasts two
legendary music venues along East
Colfax Avenue (part of the longest
commercial street in the US) ? the
Bluebird and Ogden theatres, both
concert halls that are symbolic of
Denver?s eclectic music scene.
Denver International airport,
with its landmark multiple-peaked
roof canopy ? said to echo both
Native American teepees and
the Rockies ? is now the sixthbusiest in the US, with more than
58 million passengers in 2016.
Since April last year, it also has a
businesstraveller.com
Tues-Sun, 8pm Fri; US$10;
clyffordstillmuseum.org), one
of the Abstract Expressionist
movement?s most influential, if
relatively unknown, artists.
The district even has its own Art
hotel (thearthotel.com), opened
in 2015, which displays a private
Head to LoDo (Lower
Downtown Denver) to explore
regenerating and newly hip
historic neighbourhoods with a
range of worthwhile diversions
? the excellent Tattered Cover
bookshop (tatteredcover.com),
the sumptuous Art Deco Cruise
Room bar at Denver?s oldest hotel,
the Oxford (theoxfordhotel.com)
and the cool bars and restaurants
along Larimer Square. Don?t
miss the ?brewpub? that sparked
Denver?s justly famous craft
beer and microbrewing scene,
Wynkoop (wynkoop.com).
There is also LoHi (Lower
Highlands), just across the
South Platte River, worth
?
LODO OR LOHI?
JUNE 2017
72 I Weekend in... Denver
DENVER?S GREAT OUTDOORS
It?s only when you leave the city that you realise
the sprawling metropolitan area is but a speck
in the monumental Midwestern landscape:
to the west is the soaring backdrop of the
magnificent Rocky Mountains, while to the east
lies the big skies and slow, flat, endless slide of
the Great Plains. Here are three ways to get a
whole new perspective on the Mile-High City:
? Hire a car and head about half an hour west
to the naturally formed Red Rocks Amphitheatre
(open 7am-7pm April-Oct, 8am-4pm NovMarch; free; redrocksonline.com), the striking
9,000-seat location of U2?s Under a Blood Red
visiting for the Williams and
Graham ?speakeasy? alone
(williamsandgraham.com) ? its
wood-panelled backroom bar is
hidden behind a tiny ?bookshop?.
Another way to check out
Denver is to jog or cycle ? there
are a remarkable 137km of paved
trails around the city.
And then there is always
shopping. As well as more than
160 upmarket stores at Cherry
Creek Shopping Centre, 5km
south-east of the city centre,
there is one downtown flagship
store that is not to be missed:
Rockmount Ranch Wear
(rockmount.com). The Western
outfitters that introduced the
snap-button cowboy shirt to the
world ? and to Elvis, Bob Dylan,
Robert Plant and Eric Clapton ?
was founded in 1946 by ?Papa?
Jack Weil, a businessman who
worked until the age of 107.
Weil is said to have coined the
phrase: ?The West is not a place,
it is a state of mind.? Denver
today may be a hip, forwardthinking city, but it?s still very
much connected to that history
and belief. It?s a state of mind
that, even for a weekend, is well
worth entering.
? For more information on
Denver, including the MileHigh Culture Pass to various
attractions (US$30 for three
days), see visitdenver.org,
colorado.com
JUNE 2017
From top: Buffalo
Bill Museum;
Red Rocks
Amphitheatre;
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