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Canadian Geographic Summer 2017

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CANADA’S
SUMMER 2017
canadiangeographic.ca/travel
ISLAND
BEST
GETAWAYS
SUPER
9 SUMMER
CELEBRATING
HOT SPOTS
including an exclusive
photo essay on
HAIDA GWAII
+
Cover_May17.indd 1
First Nations CULTURE
near SASKATOON
EXPLORING
the ARCTIC with astronaut
CHRIS HADFIELD
CANADA DAY in Ottawa,
the nation’s best museums
and MUCH MORE
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CONTENTS
Features
23
CANADA’S BEST ISLAND GETAWAYS
32
ISLANDS OF THE PEOPLE
38
ASTRONAUT MEETS ARCTIC
Celebrating the magnificent sights
of Haida Gwaii, B.C.
Photography by Javier Frutos
with text by Nick Walker
Insights on Canada’s Far North from the country’s
most-famous spaceman, Chris Hadfield
Interview by Alexandra Pope
with photography by Paul Colangelo
32
OF THE LAND
Wanuskewin Heritage Park near Saskatoon
is working to connect non-Indigenous and
Indigenous people to 6,000 years of the
region’s First Nations heritage
By Aaron Kylie
Departments
4 NOTEBOOK
Dream trips
By Aaron Kylie
9 GATEWAY
Celebrating Canada in Ottawa, Get up, stand up, Haliburton,
Vancouver’s Trump Hotel & Tower and On our radar
19 ONECITY
Superb seafood, ziplining over treetops and cliffs,
and dune discovery in Moncton, N.B.
By Andrew Gunadie
50 TENBEST
From big and well-known to small hidden treasures, check
out these picks of the nation’s top museums
By Canadian Geographic Travel staff
44
On the cover: An aerial view of Cap Alright, on the central
east coast of Quebec’s beautiful Îles de la Madeleine.
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
Contents_May17.indd 3
COVER: ALL CANADA PHOTOS. THIS PAGE, TOP: JAVIER FRUTOS/CAN GEO; BOTTOM: WANUSKEWIN HERITAGE PARK
44
Eight super summer hot spots to satisfy
your craving for sun, fun and surf
By James Little, Steve Paikin, Karen Pinchin,
Alexandra Pope, Bob Ramsay, Michela Rosano,
Nick Walker and Harry Wilson
3
2017-04-21 3:09 PM
NOTEBOOK
chief executive officer John G. Geiger
chief operating officer and publisher Gilles Gagnier
chief development officer André Préfontaine
photographers-in-residence Neil Ever Osborne, Michelle Valberg
editor Aaron Kylie
director, production Mike Elston
new media manager Paul Politis
project manager Roisin O’Reilly
program manager Soha Kneen
senior editor Harry Wilson
managing editor Nick Walker
associate editor Michela Rosano
new media editor Sabrina Doyle
social media editor Alexandra Pope
special projects editor Tanya Kirnishni
creative director Javier Frutos
graphic designer Jenny Chew
contract designer Kathryn Barqueiro
production coordinator Kendra Stieler
cartographer Chris Brackley
copy editor Stephanie Small
proofreader Judy Yelon
colour technician Glenn Campbell
photo researcher Geneviève Taylor
design intern Shannon Hawn
editorial intern Sabrina Nemis
director of circulation Nathalie Cuerrier
newsstand consultant Scott Bullock
Dream trips
PAUL COLANGELO
M
MY VERY LONG bucket list just got a
whole lot longer.
I’ve long dreamt of travelling to
Canada’s Far North, well above the Arctic
Circle, and the interview with astronaut
Chris Hadfield about his cruise through
the eastern Arctic last summer and the
phenomenal accompanying pictures by
Paul Colangelo (see “Astronaut meets
Arctic,” page 38, and ABOVE) in this issue
have only heightened my interest.
Then there’s our cover feature on
Canada’s best island getaways (page 23),
which is largely responsible for the additions to my dream trips. I have visited
just one of the nine islands — Manitoulin,
eons ago as a very young child, and I
don’t remember it at all — and I’m now
tempted by all of them. Newfoundland’s
Fogo Island and the renowned inn there
were already on my list, as were Quebec’s
Magdalen Islands and British Columbia’s
Haida Gwaii. Indeed, I’ve heard and seen
so many good things about that archipelago (check out the images, page 32, by
our art director Javier Frutos) for years
now that it keeps moving up my list.
4
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
Notebook+Mastheads_May17.indd 4
You undoubtedly have your own destination wish list, and if you’re like me, it gets
longer and longer, even as you strike places
off. I’d previously visited every province and
territory except Saskatchewan, and I was
eager to see at least part of the province. I
got my chance last summer with a trip to
Saskatoon. It didn’t disappoint.
I think it’s a hugely underrated destination, with great restaurants, super outdoor
activities and a diverse cultural scene (see
last issue’s “One city”). In particular, I was
mesmerized by Wanuskewin Heritage
Park, a national historic site that celebrates
and protects artifacts of some 6,000 years
of Indigenous culture just northeast of the
city (see “Of the land,” page 44). Now to
tick off visits to Saskatchewan’s Grasslands
National Park, home to one of the nation’s
most endangered habitats, and Athabasca
Sand Dunes Provincial Park, the site of the
largest active sand surface in Canada.
I hope you’ll find destinations in this
issue to add to your own bucket list. After
all, that’s what Canadian Geographic
Travel is here for.
Aaron Kylie
vice-president, finance and administration Catherine Frame
senior accountant Christine Chatland
accounts payable/accounts receivable clerk Lydia Blackman
executive assistant Sandra Smith
receptionist/office coordinator Diane Séguin
logistics coordinator Emma Viel
advertising sales
director of sales Valerie Hall Daigle
Phone (416) 360-4151 ext. 380
email: halldaigle@canadiangeographic.ca
adventures Lisa Duncan Brown
Phone (905) 702-0899 or toll-free (888) 445-0052
Fax (905) 702-0887 email: brown@canadiangeographic.ca
111 Queen Street East, Suite 320, Toronto, ON M5C 1S2
Phone (416) 360-4151; fax (416) 360-1526
Canadian Geographic Travel is published by Canadian Geographic
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Date of issue: May 2017 Copyright ©2017. All rights reserved.
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SUMMER 2017
2017-04-20 1:56 PM
G
AVAILABLE ON
THE ROYAL
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ROYALE DU
CANADA
Founded in 1929, the Society is a non-profit
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better known to Canadians and to the world.
Canadian Geographic, the Society’s magazine, is
dedicated to reporting on all aspects of Canada’s
geography — physical, biological, historical, cultural
and economic — and on major issues of concern to
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C.C., C.M.M., C.O.M., C.D.
Governor General of Canada
honorary president
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honorary vice-presidents
Roberta Bondar, O.C., O.Ont.
Pierre Camu, O.C.
Arthur E. Collin
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explorer-in-residence
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president
Gavin Fitch, Q.C., Calgary
vice-presidents
Wendy Cecil, C.M., Toronto
Connie Wyatt Anderson, The Pas, Man.
secretary
Joseph Frey, C.D., Toronto
treasurer
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immediate past president
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counsel
Andrew Pritchard, Ottawa
governors
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Glenn Blackwood, St. John’s
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chief executive officer John G. Geiger
chief operating officer and publisher Gilles Gagnier
chief development officer André Préfontaine
vice-president, finance and administration Catherine Frame
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ADVENTURES
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ONLINE
Best of Baffin
See photos that will inspire you to put
Baffin Island on your list of summer getaways, and read a review of the camera
equipment (provided by Vistek) used
to capture them.
cangeo.ca/may17/baffin
Arctic beauty
Gain appreciation for the places and
faces that make up the Arctic through
Paul Colangelo’s spectacular photos.
cangeo.ca/may17/arctic
Moncton’s magic
YouTube star Andrew Gunadie (known
best as “Gunnarolla”) has travelled the
world, but chose Moncton, N.B., as
one of his favourite Canadian destinations. Watch his take on this charming
Maritime city.
cangeo.ca/may17/moncton
Digital issue
Take Canadian Geographic wherever you
go, while also accessing bonus videos and
photos with the digital issue for tablets.
cangeo.ca/digital
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OTTAWA
Surviving
Ottawa
on July 1
BY FATEEMA SAYANI
IF YOU HAVEN’T been to Parliament
Hill since your eighth-grade civics trip,
you’re in for an adventure this year as
the annual Canada Day party gets amplified for the country’s sesquicentennial,
which, by July 1, you should be able to say
five times fast. Here’s a local’s wisdom on
navigating the big bash.
To go to the Hill or not to go to
the Hill? If you’re venturing to the heart
of the party, take transit and be prepared to
wait as crammed OC Transpo articulated
buses pass you by. Your ride will eventually
come; to pass the time you can play Six
Degrees of Tony Clement, which will last
about 45 seconds because if you work in
certain sectors — media, arts or politics,
say — Ottawa can feel like a small town
where everyone goes to the same parties.
Except on Canada Day, that is. This time
it’s a party with 500,000 of your sweaty
besties — and their dogs. But if that’s not
your cup of Timmie’s, you can always
attend the smaller community celebrations in the ’burbs (check ottawa2017.ca/
civic-events for more information). They
have petting zoos, bearable porta-potties
and that distinct fear-of-missing-out
AY
For Canada Day 2017 in Ottawa, expect some
500,000 people on Parliament Hill (above),
and plenty of Canadiana (bottom).
feeling one gets when the biggest party
in town is so close, yet so far away.
The view from Nepean Point Ah,
Nepean Point. It’s known for its panoramic
view of Parliament Hill and as a capital
make-out spot. Head to the point, located
behind the National Gallery, to get an amazing view of the fireworks reflecting off the
Ottawa River. Or, head south of the Hill to
Confederation Park to catch a few wisps and
high-flying sparks. If you have a friend who
lives in one of the many high-rises in
Centretown, you may enjoy a balcony or
rooftop view, or you can simply linger along
Wellington or Rideau streets and crane your
neck. This is the day where the sidewalks
don’t roll up at 5 p.m. and everyone has
shed the pallor and malaise of long winters.
The geeky, the tenured and the truant come
together to beam with civic pride. In a place
known as a hub of public policy and the
nexus of four layers of government (those
three, plus the National Capital
Commission), this is saying something.
C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L
Gateway-Ottawa_May17.indd 9
OTTAWA TOURISM
GATE
9
2017-04-19 2:42 PM
plenty, in my humble opinion. However,
I can think of about 900,000 people who
might disagree with me. There is a reason that they serve these on the Rideau
Canal every winter. This flattened doughnut will give you much needed blubber
and energy, and you can pick one up on
Canada Day. It will hold you through
hours of heartland rock on the Hill
(“Hellloooooo Ottawaaaaaaaaah!”) and
allow you to excel at the galumphing
splayed arms and knees movement that
seems to dominate on this particular day.
Some people refer to this as “dancing.”
Be prepared You can whinge about the
weather and feel like a true local. That’s
because it can go from burning hot to massive rain downpours on Canada Day. Bring
those touristy pocket raincoats or a backpack with gear — and don’t forget to be
ready for sun. Many have removed a temporary tattoo only to reveal a maple-leaf
10
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
Gateway-Ottawa_May17.indd 10
outlined sunburn which, while patriotic, is
still painful. Perhaps this is what author,
columnist and professional crank Andrew
Cohen was referring to when he called
Canada Day a time of “crushing banality, a
renunciation of the past ... and a misreading of history, laden with political correctness and historical ignorance.” Sheesh. I
think he could use a Beavertail.
Go with it The tacky Canadiana is out
in full force on Canada Day because it’s
a long weekend and it’s summer and
everyone is feeling those warm vibes and
forgetting that we’re the country that
produced Nickelback. And that’s on a
good year. This being the big birthday
— lordy, lordy, look who’s 150 — expect
even more sightings of Maple Leaf boxer
shorts worn as outerwear, or people busting out into group singalongs of “Bye
Bye Mon Cowboy.” I mean, it could be
worse. Imagine a stage production of The
Full Mountie or a tribute piece called 50
Shades of Herb Gray. In comparison, that
Great vantage points are at a premium
during Canada Day in Ottawa, such as
the Rideau Canal locks (above) and
Parliament Hill for fireworks (top).
makes the big party seem not too shabby.
So go with it: head to the Hill, rock out
and get down for the Dominion!
For an interactive map of Ottawa’s Canada 150
attractions, visit cangeo.ca/may17/ottawa.
OTTAWA TOURISM
Street food for the faint of heart (and
stomach) One Beavertail per lifetime is
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-19 2:42 PM
ON AV
NE A I L
W AB
SS L E
TA
ND
S
COLOURING
CANADA
CANGEO.CA/COLOURINGCANADA
COLOUR 26 AMAZING
PHOTOGRAPHS OF CANADA
shot by Michelle Valberg, Canadian Geographic’s award-winning
Photographer-in-Residence. From coastal fishing villages to Arctic
wildlife to Prairie landscapes and everything in between, Valberg’s
work will inspire you to create your own masterpiece.
SIPPromo-ColouringBook_May17.indd 11
2017-04-19 9:34 PM
GATEWAY
BACKCOUNTRY ADVENTURE
Get up, stand up
12
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Gateway-Yukon_May17.indd 12
good for a sedate half-day on the lake.
“You can run rivers on these things, you
can surf, you can tour.” Hann was one of
the paddleboarders who braved that first
River Quest (in which the SUPers thrived,
by the way, some finishing well ahead of
more traditional paddlers). He’s a longtime guide in British Columbia, where he
has paddleboarded through hundreds of
kilometres of the Great Bear Rainforest
and now offers SUP tours and training.
Hann credits paddleboarding’s deepening incursions into the backcountry to
evolving design. Earlier stand-up boards
were big, wide and stable. But as a racing
scene developed, the boards got narrower, longer and deeper — and paddlers realized that these new boards were
not only faster but also much more efficient, allowing travel over vast distances
even with a pile of gear. Now there are
SUP participants in the 2016 Yukon
River Quest (top and above).
boards built specifically for expeditions
and touring.
Stand-up paddleboarding also offers
convenience and a low bar to entry. “One
of the great things about the sport is that
it’s pretty user-friendly,” says Hann.
“People can get into the sport and have
success pretty early.” Inflatable boards
can easily be packed into the wilderness
by plane, by foot or even by bike.
“I think touring is going to be one of
the biggest parts of paddleboarding,”
Hann predicts. “It’s a pretty amazing
way to travel.”
—Eva Holland
Watch an interview with a stand-up paddleboarder at cangeo.ca/may17/standup.
TOP: JOEL KRAHN/YUKON NEWS; BOTTOM: HARRY KERN
ON A SUNNY MORNING last June, a
crowd gathered on the banks of the Yukon
River where it flows, fast, clear and cold,
through downtown Whitehorse. The 2016
Yukon River Quest was about to begin.
Dozens of boats were pulled up on a long
gravel bar; in a few minutes, life-jacketed
competitors would run down through the
trees, dive into their vessels and set off for
Dawson City, 715 kilometres of roundthe-clock paddling downstream through
the wilderness. The fastest would take
fewer than 48 hours to arrive.
The race is an annual ritual, but this
year something was different. Alongside
the canoes and kayaks were 11 stand-up
paddleboards, which looked flimsy next
to the bigger boats. Stand-up paddleboarders, or SUPers, had been permitted to enter the race for the first time, a
test to see whether they could handle
the competition’s rigours. One of the
boards was marked with affirmations in
black Sharpie: “Embrace the suck,” and
“Discomfort is my muscles cheering.”
But the SUPers presence was also a test
of a broader premise: that stand-up paddleboards are good not just for yoga or for
tooling around at the cottage, but as vehicles for travelling deep into the Canadian
backcountry. It’s an idea that’s increasingly
being embraced by adventurers.
“That’s probably one of the biggest
misconceptions of the sport,” says Norm
Hann — that it’s relatively stationary,
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-21 3:10 PM
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ALLEN DOUGLAS/CAN GEO PHOTO CLUB; VLADISLAV KAMESNKI/CAN GEO PHOTO CLUB;
LISE SIMONEAU/CAN GEO PHOTO CLUB; IAN MCGREGOR/CAN GEO PHOTO CLUB
ENTER OUR PHOTO COMPETITIONS
ANNUAL PHOTO
COMPETITION
Canadian Geographic’s Annual Photo Competition is the
perfect way to celebrate Canada in all its beauty. This
year’s categories will highlight five classic Canadian
themes: landscapes, flora and fauna, weather, outdoor
activities, and urban scenes.
WILDLIFE PHOTO
COMPETITION
Our beloved Wildlife Photo Competition is coming
back bigger and better than ever, with new categories
and exciting prizes. Stay tuned for updates, and start
snapping your best wildlife photos!
PHOTOCLUB.CANGEO.CA
PhotoContest-Annual+Wildlife_May17.indd 13
2017-04-20 2:18 PM
GATEWAY
ONTARIO
Haliburton heats up
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O t t
a w Q U E B E C
a
R
iv
e
North Bay
17
Pembroke
Algonquin
Park
60
11
0
25 km
Haliburton
Forest and
Wild Life Reserve
Huntsville
HALIBURTON
COUNTY
Haliburton
Minden
35
118
Tory Hill
ONTARIO
Enlarged
area
O N TA R I O
Terry Craig shapes molten glass into a
paperweight at his glass-blowing studio in
Tory Hill, in Ontario’s Haliburton Highlands.
By the end of the weekend, we feel as
though we’ve been coming back to the
highlands every summer for years — and
we understand why so many from the
city do. Now that’s cool.
—Alexandra Pope
Read why the Canopy Tour at Haliburton
Forest and Wild Life Reserve is a Highlands
must-do at cangeo.ca/may17/forest.
ALEXANDRA POPE/CAN GEO; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO
small-town success story. Their chic
tableware, made of recycled beer and
wine bottles and emblazoned with
cheeky sayings, retails in more than 200
stores worldwide and was included in
the swag bags for the 2015 Emmy
Awards. The duo are often on the road
for trade and craft shows, yet in spite of
their busy schedule, they still set aside
select weekends to host private smallgroup workshops like this one for visitors to the area, organized by local tour
operator Yours Outdoors.
This pride of place is evident throughout Haliburton County — better known
as the Haliburton Highlands — a
4,000-square-kilometre quasi-wilderness
region of lakes, rivers and forests punctuated by small communities that are
havens for artists and free spirits. Every
business is a small business; everyone
knows and supports everyone else. Our
guide for the Canopy Tour at Haliburton
Forest and Wild Life Reserve turns out
to be part of a group including Craig
that meets for regular Scotch tastings.
When my husband forgets his sandals
at the bed and breakfast, the owner
tracks us down at a roadside barbecue
joint 30 minutes away to return them.
r
IT’S 32 DEGREES under murky skies
when my husband and I step out of our
car in front of Artech Glass Blowing
Studios in tiny Tory Hill, Ont., three
hours northeast of Toronto, yet even
this scorcher of a summer day could not
have prepared us for what awaits inside
glassblower Terry Craig’s workshop.
The furnace must burn at 1,150 degrees
Celsius to keep glass molten for blowing; even standing two metres back, the
heat thrown from its glowing maw is
almost unbearable. I’d promised my
husband a hot date in the Haliburton
Highlands, but I’m not sure he realized
I was being literal.
Craig guides us through the process
of creating a few treasures — paperweights shot through with swirls of
colour, luminous glass balls, a tiny
whisky tumbler (Craig is a Scotch devotee). We take turns gathering glass
from the bottom of the furnace with
the long blowpipe, our bare arms stinging as if we’ve been sunburned. Mostly
we watch Craig work, entranced by the
alchemy of shaping liquid fire into
solid matter.
Artech, run by Craig and his wife
Jennifer Wanless-Craig, is a bona fide
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-11 3:23 PM
Lifetime
It made me realize how much I take
experience ‘ living in the North for granted.
’
ANGULALIK PEDERSEN
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—Candice Sudlovenick
Conservation officer in Cambridge Bay and guide
aboard the One Ocean Voyager, 2016
on
OneOcean-LifetimeExperience51_May17.indd 15
whales here and when they bring one ashore, they take
what they need and leave the carcass, which attracts
polar bears. When we were there, we must’ve seen about
10 to 15 polar bears all along the shoreline digging into a
beluga carcass.
Growing up in Iqaluit, it’s not a good thing if you see a
polar bear and you try to get it away from you. So, I’ve never
seen a bear that’s not being deterred. That was the first
time I just enjoyed watching these amazing creatures.
THE ROYA
I was a
polar bear guide aboard One Ocean
Expeditions’ One Ocean Voyager in the summer of 2016,
travelling from western Greenland through the Northwest
Passage to Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. I’m a conservation
officer and have been hunting and camping on the land
since I was little, but this was my first time guiding on an
expedition ship. My job, along with my fiancé’s, was to go
ashore first and ensure the area was clear of polar bears
before the guests arrived. I also guided hikes and provided
information about the flora and fauna.
This experience made me realize how much I take living in the North for granted: the landscape, vegetation,
wildlife. I see these things every day, but others from the
south have never seen them and might not see them
again in their lifetimes.
A really exciting moment for everyone was when we
went into Coningham Bay off Prince of Wales Island,
Nunavut. It’s really shallow, so you have to time your entry
with high tide (at low tide, even a Zodiac will hit bottom).
In this giant bay, the rocks are smooth and whales will
come and rub against them. People from the region hunt
e a n ex p e di
ti
2017-04-19 9:23 PM
GATEWAY
VANCOUVER TRUMP INTERNATIONAL HOTEL
Making hotels great again
16
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
Gateway-Trump_May17.indd 16
Albert soaker tubs. He didn’t cite the sparkling blue, chauffeur-driven Rolls-Royce
(licence plate: TRUMP) available to guests
and residents for outings.
In fact, Posch made it clear that there
was nothing particularly notable about the
hotel’s amenities: “The Four Seasons,
Mandarin, Ritz-Carlton, Hyatt Regency,
Fairmont, Shangri-La — we’re all similar
square footage size,” he said. “Similar nice
beds. Twenty-four-hour room service.”
These, he suggested, along with “beautiful
mirrors,” “some marble” and lobby bellmen and doormen were elements of every
five-star hotel. So it was service, said Posch,
that would set them apart.
The Vancouver hotel had been unofficially open for only four weeks, so Posch’s
examples of extraordinary efforts made to
please big-spending guests — ceiling
projections of the Batman signal in a lucky
child’s room, a country-music star’s spare
guitar, signed and waiting for his biggest
fan — were necessarily cribbed from his
seven years working at the Chicago Trump
hotel. But he was certain his new staff
would rise to similar heights.
Perhaps the Vancouver staff was feeling the pressure of these expectations. Or
maybe the anxiety of the grand opening,
mixed with lingering echoes of the “Love
trumps hate!” chants from protesters,
put the service crew off its game. Over
the course of a four-night stay that was
part of a media-familiarization tour of
A view from the new Trump International
Hotel & Tower in Vancouver.
the hotel, there were times when the
happy, efficient facade displayed by lobby
staff seemed to sway on a wobbly foundation, a bit like the computers sitting
unsteadily on not-quite-hidden cardboard boxes at the otherwise sleek black
granite front desk.
At 8:19 one morning, for example, a
maid rang the doorbell of a sleeping
guest, waking him to ask when he would
like housekeeping service. Told 2 p.m.,
she arrived unexpectedly before noon,
then blamed the fact that the guest hadn’t
lit the control panel’s “Do Not Disturb”
light. The next evening, the regular turndown service never occurred. When a
different maid finally arrived at 9:30 p.m.,
in a fluster, after the guest had called
housekeeping, she blamed the “Do Not
Disturb” light the guest had activated for
twenty minutes after dinner.
Still, most of the staff at Vancouver’s
Trump Hotel seemed to be reaching hard
for that next level in service, wherever it
was. No doubt when it’s finally located, it
won’t be the guest’s fault when things go
awry. An average nightly tariff of roughly
$500 per room surely buys that much.
—Trevor Cole
See more images of the Trump International
Hotel at cangeo.ca/may17/trumphotel.
COURTESY TRUMP INTERNATIONAL HOTEL & TOWER
THERE WAS NOTHING terribly festive
about the mood in Vancouver’s Trump
International Hotel & Tower on the day of
its official grand opening. Early in the
morning on Feb. 28, dark-suited men and
women from four agencies — the RCMP,
the Vancouver Police, the U.S. Secret
Service and GuardTeck Security Co. —
prowled the champagne lounge and other
public spaces, passing watchful eyes over
everyone entering the gleaming $360-million twisting tower. They, like the approximately 200 protesters gathering in the rain
on West Georgia Street, anticipated some
important guests: the Trump scions,
Donald Jr. and Eric, with their wives and
sister, Tiffany Trump.
When they appeared before the media
and guests in the grand ballroom, the male
Trumps perched on tall chairs — backs
ramrod straight, chests outthrust, faces
tensed into smiles — and, along with the
young developer, Joo Kim Tiah, gave crisp,
self-congratulatory speeches about taking
hotel service in the city “to the next level.”
Heroic service does seem to be the hill
on which the newest Trump-branded hotel
hopes to plant its golden flag. Asked in an
interview to identify the hotel’s signature,
demonstrably “Trumpish” attributes, general manager Philipp Posch ignored the
muted, masculine decor. He didn’t mention the gold-bar-shaped TRUMP chocolate bars, the computerized control pads or
the wraparound terraces and Victoria &
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-11 4:44 PM
CANADIAN
PHOTOS
DANIELA MITRACHE
150
ULTIMATE
CANGEO.CA/INSTAGRAM
SEE CANADA through the eyes of 150 Instagrammers! Take a
visual journey from coast to coast to coast and discover the
beauty and diversity of Canada’s wildlife and birds, its cities and
parks, its weather and most iconic landmarks. Many of these
scenes will be instantly recognizable; others will get you dreaming of new adventures. We think you’ll be inspired to join our
growing Instagram community and share your corner of Canada
with Canadians and the world!
#ShareCanGeo
@CanGeo
SIPPromo-InstaSIP17_May17.indd 17
2017-04-21 11:47 AM
GATEWAY
DESTINATIONS
On our radar
VIRUNGA LODGE, RWANDA There is
perhaps no better time to see mountain
gorillas than 2017, the 50th anniversary of
the Karisoke Research Center, founded by
celebrated primatologist Dian Fossey to
protect the critically endangered apes. And
there is arguably no better place from
which to set out to see these magnificent
animals than Volcanoes Safaris’ Virunga
Lodge, a 10-room “bush-chic” retreat atop
a ridge with spectacular views of lakes
Bulera and Ruhondo and the surreally lush
countryside. When you’re not out on a
gorilla-tracking safari, visit the lodge’s new
Diane Fossey Map Room, home to a fascinating exhibition on the exploration and
conservation of the region from the 1860s
to 1985, the year Fossey was murdered.
volcanoessafaris.com
—Harry Wilson, senior editor
18
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
Gateway-OnOurRadar_May17.indd 18
OMNI MOUNT WASHINGTON
RESORT, NEW HAMPSHIRE You can’t
ignore the storied history of this grand
old luxury hotel at the foot of Mount
Washington, N.H. After all, for 115 years
it has hosted the powerful and prestigious, including three U.S. presidents,
countless celebrities and the grandees
who established the World Bank and
International Monetary Fund in 1944.
But you’d be even more remiss if you
neglected the slew of superb outdoor
activities that await beyond its manicured
grounds in the surrounding White
Mountain National Forest, whether traversing the treetops on New England’s
longest zip-line canopy tour, tubing on
the Ammonoosuc River or blazing down
mountain biking trails on the slopes of
Mount Washington. brettonwoods.com
—Michela Rosano, associate editor
APRÈS IN THE AIR If sipping champagne and savouring the finest Canadian
cuisine in a pinecone- and antler-bedecked
chalet sounds like your après-ski dream,
Clockwise from above left: Virunga
Lodge; inside the Après in the Air charter
plane; Omni Mount Washington Resort.
imagine doing it at 837 kilometres per
hour. And at an altitude of 10,000 metres.
That’s what Fairmont and Air Canada
have concocted for Canada’s 150th. On the
“Après in the Air” experience, a ski lodgethemed Air Canada Jetz charter whisks you
and up to 57 others between Ottawa, MontTremblant and Montebello, where, cold
weather willing, your customized itinerary
includes ice skating, skiing, dogsledding,
ice fishing and a spa, not to mention overnighting in Fairmont chateau style.
The starting price tag? A mind-boggling
$300,000. But divide by 58, and $5,172 a
head sounds borderline feasible. Now to
make a few more friends to fill those furlined seats before winter 2017 arrives.
—Nick Walker, managing editor
Tell us what destination is on your
radar this summer via
or
(fb.com/cangeo).
(@CanGeo)
CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: COURTESY VOLCANOES SAFARIS; STEPHANIE STERJOVSKI;
COURTESY OMNI MOUNT WASHINGTON RESORT
GORILLA-TRACKING in the mountains
of Rwanda, a New Hampshire holiday
and a jet-set Canadian excursion are the
top travel experiences chosen by Canadian
Geographic Travel staff this summer.
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-11 4:50 PM
ONECITY
3 VENUES
Moncton
By Andrew Gunadie
1 . FOOD
S
OME MIGHT SAY Moncton is a city you just pass through,
but you should consider it instead as a perfect hub for
exploration — that goes beyond famed Magnetic Hill. To start,
the city and surrounding area have a lot to offer when it comes
to seafood, thanks to their proximity to the Atlantic, and in
particular the town of Shediac, Canada’s lobster capital
(where you can see the “World’s Largest Lobster,” a statue
and popular photo op, by the way). Share a charcuterie board
(right) inspired by the tide or boar (or both!) and a barrelaged cocktail or a local craft beer on Moncton’s Main Street
at Tide & Boar Gastropub. For a more intimate setting, make
a dinner reservation at Catch 22 Lobster Bar, where you can
find every type of seafood served seemingly every way imaginable. Top it off with an extravagant flambé prepared right
at your table. Fresh and inventive seafood menus coupled
with Maritime hospitality make Moncton’s culinary scene one
worth sinking your teeth into. shediac.ca, tideandboar.com,
catch22lobsterbar.com
2 . ADVENTURE
ADVENTURE-SEEKERS can spend a halfday at TreeGO, an aerial adventure course
for all ages where you can zip and climb
your way through the forests of Moncton’s
Centennial Park while safely attached to a
network of cables. For a day trip, drive an
hour south of Moncton to Cape Enrage,
where you’ll find a zip line and rappelling
for individuals and groups. There’s also a
lighthouse (left), shipwrecks, beaches, fossil cliffs and spectacular views of the Bay of
Fundy. treegomoncton.com, capeenrage.ca
3 . OUTDOORS
TOP: ANDREW GUNADIE; OTHERS: TRAVEL NEW BRUNSWICK
JUST LESS THAN AN HOUR north of Moncton is the town of
Bouctouche, where you’ll find lighthouses, golf and a number of cycling
and hiking trails. Stop into the Irving Eco-Centre, home to saltwater
beaches and a boardwalk that stretches along part of a 12-kilometre sand
dune. A variety of displays and tours teach visitors more about the plants,
animals and birds that live on the dune. An hour south of Moncton,
meanwhile, is Hopewell Rocks (right), a self-directed park where you
can observe the world’s highest tides. During high tide, you can kayak
around the flowerpot rocks, and during low tide, you can walk among
them on the ocean floor. Make sure to pay close attention to the posted
hours, though, because the tide can come back surprisingly quickly.
villedebouctouche.ca, thehopewellrocks.ca
Watch Andrew Gunadie (also known as YouTube sensation Gunnarolla) share more
on his favourite Moncton and area spots at cangeo.ca/may17/moncton.
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
OneCity_May17.indd 19
19
2017-04-19 2:38 PM
RCGS EXPEDITIONS SERIES
I M A G I N E A N TA R C T I C A
E D U C AT I O N
SOCIOECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
E X P L O R AT I O N
D I S C O V E R C A N A D A’ S E A S T C O A S T
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCE
OF A LIFETIME AND TO BOOK PLEASE CALL:
WORLDWIDE QUEST
1.800.387.1483
T H E R E I S O N LY O N E O C E A N
W W W. O N E O C E A N E X P E D I T I O N S . C O M
Photo credit: Parks Canada, One Ocean Expeditions
One Ocean DPS.indd 20
2017-04-20 1:59 PM
IMAGINE.
EXPLORE.
DISCOVER.
SCIENCE
EXPLORE THE ARCTIC
N
T R AV E L
One Ocean DPS.indd 21
2017-04-20 1:59 PM
SP
I
C
E
I
L
A
S
E
U
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THE STORY OF
CANADA IN
150 OBJECTS
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC AND THE WALRUS are joining forces
to celebrate a milestone in Canadian history!
One hundred and fifty years, 150 stories, one issue. What better way for
two of Canada’s best magazines to celebrate the nation’s sesquicentennial? That’s right — two magazines, one issue. Canadian Geographic
and The Walrus have partnered to publish The Story of Canada in
150 Objects, a 132-page collection of items, ideas and icons that have
shaped the country’s past, are influencing its present and will define
its future.
Featuring writing by the likes of Will Ferguson, Alanna Mitchell and
Charlotte Gray, it’s the one magazine that you’ll want to keep on
your coffee table as 2017 unfolds and Canada’s 150th approaches.
ORDER YOURS TODAY! CANGEO.CA/CANADA150
SIPPromo-Canada150_May17.indd 22
2017-04-20 2:04 PM
CANADA’S BEST
ISLAND
getaways
Eight super summer hot spots to satisfy
your craving for sun, fun and surf
T
HERE’S A REASON private islands are the definition of enviable extravagance. And while we can’t all be Bransons, Spielbergs or Dions (Céline
recently sold one of her private-island properties, near Montreal), many
of us still return to our favourite islands year after year. Sunbathed, sandy
strips or rugged fortresses, Canada has an island for every type.
Maybe it’s the extra effort required to reach them that adds a layer of the exotic: there’s
payoff in getting across. Or perhaps it’s because you can really know an island. Their firm
boundaries seem to magnify the thrill of those water-meets-land panoramas, experiences
with local characters, the taste of island dishes and the comfort of lodgings.
Whatever it is, the islands in the following pages have it in spades. From a scrap of
rainforest rising out of a whale-patrolled Pacific strait to a rocky retreat off Newfoundland,
these spots will make you want to jump on the next plane, ferry or water taxi.
Did we miss your favourite island? Let us know
on
(@CanGeo) or
(fb.com/cangeo).
C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L
BestIslands_May17.indd 23
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2017-04-19 8:19 PM
A pair of orcas swim off
Bere Point, on Malcolm
Island’s north shore.
Malcolm Island, B.C.
Pacific
BRITISH
MALCOLM ISLAND IS A UTOPIA — at least that’s what Finnish
settlers hoped when they started a commune there at the turn of
the last century. Their dream was short-lived, but it’s easy to see
why they chose this sliver of idyllic wilderness off Vancouver
Island’s northeast coast, long the territory of the ‘Namgis First
Nation. At Bere Point Regional Park on the island’s north shore,
orcas glide through Queen Charlotte Strait to rub their black-andwhite bodies on the smooth pebble bottom — a rarely seen behaviour displayed by the threatened northern resident orcas and best
viewed from the platform high above the point. On the east end,
meanwhile, harbour seals, Pacific white-sided dolphins and humpback whales ply the waters around Mitchell Bay and Donegal Head,
while trails and old logging roads wind through the moss-plastered
red cedars and giant sword ferns of the island’s interior. Luckily,
Malcolm Island is just 24 kilometres long, so grab a bike from the
free community bicycle program in Sointula, a charming seaside
community just 25 minutes by ferry from Port McNeill, and get to
know this under-the-radar piece of paradise.
—Michela Rosano
2 4 C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L S U M M E R 2 0 1 7
VANCOUVER
ISLAND
COLUMBIA
Ocean
TASTE THIS Wild salmon at the Sointula Salmon
Days festival, August 11-13, 2017. If you can’t make
that weekend, the Burger Barn at the marina has
Vancouver Island beef burgers and crispy, locally
caught fish and chips.
DO THIS See more of Malcolm Island’s wildlife by
booking a whale-watching, bear-viewing or fishing
charter from North Island Adventures.
KNOW THIS Sointula is Finnish for “place of harmony.” Learn more about the island’s roots at the
Sointula Museum.
CANADA’S BEST
Hecla Island is part of
Hecla/Grindstone
Provincial Park.
ISLAND
getaways
CANADIAN ROAD TRIPS
Gull Harbour
Lake
Winnipeg
Hecla
MANITOBA
PREVIOUS PAGE: M.BONATO/TOURISME ÎLES DE LA MADELEINE; THIS SPREAD, LEFT: DARRYL LUSCOMBE/
SOINTULART; RIGHT: CLAUDE ROBIDOUX/ALL CANADA PHOTOS; ALL MAPS: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO
Hecla Island, Man.
HECLA? Heck, yeah!
This cheeky little slogan might yet tumble forth from an ad copywriter’s lips, but — for now, anyway — it seems too boisterous for a
place as sedate as Hecla.
But the easy-going pace of life is just part of what makes this
island in Lake Winnipeg in Hecla/Grindstone Provincial Park
so appealing. Add rugged limestone cliffs, Grassy Narrows
Marsh (a prime spot to see wildlife such as bald eagles, otters
and grey wolves), Gull Harbour Beach’s shallow waters and
sandbars, and a thriving Icelandic heritage, and you’ve got a
winning blend of outdoor adventure and culture that won’t
overwhelm you. In fact, the most boisterous the place gets is
the first long weekend in August, when there’s spillover from
the Icelandic Festival of Manitoba in nearby Gimli. “That’s
when we have our annual parade, which is one of the
province’s best, if I do say so myself,” says Sharon Holtz, who
runs Hecla’s Solmundson Gesta Hus B&B. “And it’s followed
by our annual traffic jam.”
—Harry Wilson
0
5 km
TASTE THIS Pönnukökur, an Icelandic crepe. At
Gesta Hus, they’re served with brown sugar, cinnamon and Greek yogurt or skyr, an Icelandic yogurt-like
dairy product.
DO THIS Birdwatching. Hecla is the northernmost
point on the international Pine to Prairie Birding Trail,
the southern end of which is in northwest Minnesota.
Watch for boreal species such as the great grey owl
and spruce grouse.
KNOW THIS Hecla is named after Mount Hekla, one
of Iceland’s most famous volcanoes.
C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L
BestIslands_May17.indd 25
25
2017-04-20 2:20 PM
Swimming under Bridal
Veil Falls, near the
village of Kagawong.
Manitoulin Island, Ont.
I’M NOT SURE I have ever seen anything as beautiful as the sun rising
over the North Channel of Manitoulin Island in Lake Huron. I’m also
not sure I’ve ever seen anything as frightening as a huge black bear
walking across the shoreline of my camp, right toward me, searching
for food (particularly since I’d only recently seen The Revenant). In
between those moments, Manitoulin Island has even more to offer.
If you like the water, swimming underneath the spectacular Bridal
Veil Falls or jumping off the dock of the Austin H. Hunt Marina in
Kagawong are musts, and the sandiest beaches are on the south side of
the island, right near where the massive Chi-Cheemaun ferry drops you
off. You won’t see any franchises on Manitoulin (they don’t allow them),
so we prefer to stop at Turners’ department store in Little Current, which
now has a sixth generation of Turners running it.
And the 10,000-year-old presence of Indigenous people is there for all
to see, at either the annual Wikwemikong powwow or Lillian’s souvenir
store in M’Chigeeng, where an impressive young chief named Linda
Debassige heads the First Nation council. I may only get there a few
weeks a year, but Manitoulin Island is my favourite place in all of Canada.
—Steve Paikin
2 6 C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L S U M M E R 2 0 1 7
Lake
Huron
ONTARIO
TASTE THIS The whitefish sandwiches at Buoy’s
Restaurant in Gore Bay.
DO THIS Trek the Cup & Saucer Trail in
Sheguiandah. It affords spectacular views of the
Niagara Escarpment.
KNOW THIS The mayor of Billings Township is
Austin Hunt. He’s 91 years old and has been the
mayor almost non-stop since 1950. He was Lester
B. Pearson’s campaign manager when the prime
minister represented Algoma East (which includes
Manitoulin Island) from 1948 to 1968.
CANADA’S BEST
An aerial view of GrosseÎle, the northern end of
Les Îles de la Madeleine.
ISLAND
getaways
CANADIAN ROAD TRIPS
LEFT: TERRY WURDEMANN/CAN GEO PHOTO CLUB; RIGHT: M.BONATO/TOURISME ÎLES DE LA MADELEINE
ong
Îles de la Madeleine, Que.
WHEN JACQUES CARTIER visited the
Magdalens back in 1534, he noted in
his diary that they were “very sandy.”
Happily, the Maggies are still very sandy, which is why this
small archipelago in the middle of the Gulf of St. Lawrence
remains a beach-lover’s dream, especially if you prefer your sand
without crowds. On my first visit, I walked for three
blissful hours along a 12-kilometre beach and barely saw another
soul. But the beaches — and the jagged red coastal cliffs — are
just part of the attraction. If you hop in a car (or on a bike), you
will quickly discover Instagram-worthy lighthouses, harbours and
villages scattered throughout the six main interconnected islands.
You’ll also meet some of the 12,000 Madelinots, most of whom
speak with an Acadian-infused French accent heard nowhere else
in Quebec, and many of whom still make their living from the
sea. On my final evening, I strolled to a wharf and watched excited
local fishermen unloading huge slab-sided halibut. Fantastique.
—James Little
QUEBEC
Gulf of
St. Lawrence
P.E.I.
T
N O VA S C O
IA
TASTE THIS Lobster at La Moulière in the Domaine
du Vieux Couvent hotel. May, June and July are the
best times to sample it.
DO THIS Swim in sea caves — La Salicorne inn
offers guided trips.
KNOW THIS There have been more than 400 shipwrecks off the islands’ shores.
C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L
BestIslands_May17.indd 27
27
2017-04-20 2:20 PM
SLUG TK
The iconic Swallowtail
Lightstation, at Grand
Manan’s northeast tip.
NEW BRUNSWICK
MAINE
Grand Manan Island, N.B.
WITH ITS RUGGED COASTS and charming fishing communities,
Grand Manan is an island-lover’s dream. Best visited in summer
and early fall, this 34-kilometre-long island is accessible via a ferry
that runs a couple times a day from Blacks Harbour, N.B. (and
should be booked in advance). Enjoy fresh lobster, scallops and
herring, along with a variety of edible seaweeds harvested on the
island, and watch for some of the more than 240 species of birds,
including puffins and razorbills, that brought ornithologist and
artist John James Audubon here in 1933. Or beachcomb for shells
and sea glass, kayak on the Bay of Fundy, explore craft shops and
cafés, and take in the annual Summer’s End Folk Festival in
August. Grand Manan has a mix of inns, cottages and bed and
breakfasts, but the adventurous stay at the Hole-in-the-Wall
park and campground. Named for the nearby egg-shaped archway
rising out of the ocean, the windswept cliffside campsites deliver
spectacular views, including frequent sights of finback, minke
and humpback whales feeding offshore and seals lazing on
nearby rocks.
—Karen Pinchin
2 8 C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L S U M M E R 2 0 1 7
Bay of
Fundy
NOVA
SCOTIA
NEW
BRUNSWICK
TASTE THIS Crispy sourdough, baguettes and brioche, as well as croissants, doughnuts and cookies
from the North Head Bakery, a seasonal family run
shop in business since 1988.
SEE THIS Climb to the top of the historic Swallowtail
Lightstation, a rare pre-Confederation wooden tower
first lit in 1860, and ring its rooftop fog bell.
KNOW THIS Bring a magnet and play with the magnetic sand, or magnetite, at Red Point Beach’s low
tide. Other rocks found on the island include jasper,
agate, amethyst, zeolites, copper and marble.
CANADA’S BEST
The harbour at West
Arichat, off the scenic
Fleur-de-lis Trail.
ISLAND
getaways
CANADIAN ROAD TRIPS
LEFT: PETE HECK/TOURISM NEW BRUNSWICK; RIGHT: BARRETT & MACKAY/ALL CANADA PHOTOS
Isle Madame, N.S.
YOU COULD BE FORGIVEN for never having heard of Isle
Madame. The small island, in Nova Scotia’s Chedabucto Bay, is
often overshadowed by its larger and more famous neighbour
to the northeast, Cape Breton Island. But those who make the
jaunt to Isle Madame — a 30-minute drive from the Canso
Causeway — will find ample reward in the island’s unspoiled
beauty and fascinating history.
After the fall of Louisbourg in 1758, many exiled Acadian
families made their way to Isle Madame and built new homes
and churches in its secluded coves, away from the prying eyes of
the British. By the turn of the 19th century, the island’s main
settlement, Arichat, with its deepwater harbour, was one of the
busiest Atlantic ports in North America and a hub for fishing and
shipbuilding. Drive the scenic Fleur-de-lis Trail around the island
today and you will meet the descendants of Isle Madame’s
original families at the helm of inns and cafés that blend graceful
hospitality with the thoughtful preservation of the island’s
Acadian heritage.
—Alexandra Pope
TIA
SCO
VA
NO
Atlantic
Ocean
TASTE THIS Enjoy a cup of locally roasted coffee
and a homemade treat at La Goélette à Pépé in
Arichat and learn about some of the families who
settled Isle Madame.
DO THIS Take a guided driving or walking tour of
Isle Madame’s many lighthouses and hear exciting
tales of wrecks and rescues.
KNOW THIS The specific Madame for whom the
island is named? Françoise d’Aubigné, Marquise
de Maintenon, the second wife of King Louis XIV
of France.
C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L 2 9 The Fogo Island Inn stands
on the island’s rugged north
shore next to Joe Batt’s Arm.
Fogo Island, N.L.
FOGO IS AN ISLAND OFF AN ISLAND in northern Newfoundland.
It’s bleak, windblown and hard to get to — the ferry sometimes
gets stuck in the channel ice. Yet Fogo’s now an “it” place for global
trend-seekers.
Fogo? Whose villages have names such as Joe Batt’s Arm,
Tilting, Seldom and, of course, Little Seldom? The same. True,
there’s great berry-picking in September. I went for a quick hike
and came back four hours later with a garbage bag full of blueberries and blue lips.
But what makes Fogo so beguiling is that the locals are the
experience. None of your fancy folks here. Even at the upscale
Fogo Island Inn authenticity trumps luxury. It’s the creation of
tech multi-millionaire Zita Cobb, who was born on the island and
started the Shorefast Foundation to help bring back its people
and culture when the cod dwindled. The foundation’s motto is
“Finding new ways for an old continuity,” and both the inn and
the island are that, for sure.
—Bob Ramsay
3 0 C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L S U M M E R 2 0 1 7
NEWFOUNDLAND
AND LABRADOR
Atlantic
Ocean
TASTE THIS “The caribou and what it eats,” a dish
at the Fogo Island Inn’s award-winning restaurant.
DO THIS Hike to Brimstone Head, a small mountain
near town, for a selfie.
KNOW THIS The Flat Earth Society considers Fogo
Island one of the four corners of Earth.
CANADA’S BEST
The rolling landscape
around Cape Dorset,
the “capital of Inuit art.”
ISLAND
getaways
CANADIAN ROAD TRIPS
Cape Dorset
0
Dorset Island, Nunavut
BAFFIN
ISLAND
LEFT: COURTESY NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR TOURISM/MEGAN MCLELLAN;
RIGHT: LEE NARRAWAY/NUNAVUT TOURISM
NUNAVUT
YOU MAY BE FAMILIAR with Dorset prints — often stark and
stunning, linear stylizations of Arctic wildlife — and carvings
created in the island hamlet of Cape Dorset, but nothing beats
setting foot in what is arguably the most artistic community north
of 60 and seeing them with your own eyes. Yes, it takes an extra
bit of cash to reach a place so remote, but the return is a rare
opportunity to explore the community and the fruits of the West
Baffin Co-operative, which many credit with igniting the international obsession with Inuit art.
Of course, you don’t have to have the soul of an artist to be
bowled over by Cape Dorset. You can boat or hike, at low tide,
from Dorset Island into Mallikjuaq Territorial Park on Mallik
Island, where you’ll see foundations of the ancestral Thule
people’s squat stone-and-whale-rib houses as well as traces of
the even more ancient Dorset culture. Time your visit for midsummer and you’ll encounter a landscape spattered with purple
saxifrage and other tough, bright wildflowers. It’s enough to
bring out the artist in anyone.
—Nick Walker
2 km
Hudson
Strait
TASTE THIS Raw seal. If you’re lucky enough to attend
a community feast, this frozen delicacy is tender and
clean, with a rich flavour that hints of iron and ocean.
DO THIS Hire a local outfitter. They provide tours
covering 3,500 years of local history, not to mention
the know-how should a polar bear wander too close.
KNOW THIS The late Kenojuak Ashevak, possibly
the most renowned Inuit artist of all time, created
her world-famous works here.
C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L
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2017-04-19 8:21 PM
IS L A N D S
O F THE
A traditional Haida canoe rests on the
grounds of the Haida Heritage Centre
at Kay Llnagaay in Skidegate, B.C.
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SUMMER 2017
2017-04-21 3:13 PM
Celebrating the magnificent
sights of Haida Gwaii, B.C.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAVIER FRUTOS
WITH TEXT BY NICK WALKER
C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L
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2017-04-13 3:26 PM
HAIDA GWAII
Old Massett
Masset
G R A H A M
I S L A N D
Haida House
at Tllaal
Skidegate
Kay Llnagaay
Sandspit
SB
RE
MO
Y
IS
T’aanuu
Llnagaay
LA
25 km
ND
0
GWAII
HAANAS
NATIONAL
PARK
RESERVE
Swan Bay
Rediscovery
Camp
Clockwise from this image: The remains
of a 19th-century mortuary pole in SGang
Gwaay (Ninstints); a human figure carved
into a pole at Kay Llnagaay (Haida
Heritage Centre); a sea lion haul-out on
the Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve
coast; sunset at the Haida House at
Tllaal, a lodge on Graham Island.
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MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO
SGang
Gwaay
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-21 3:14 PM
HAIDA GWAII
O
MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO
F ANY PART OF HAIDA GWAII, you’re most likely
to know about the mortuary poles. The Haida
raise these seaside memorials, each 10 metres tall
and carved from a single giant red cedar, knowing they
will decay, collapse and return to the Earth, often within
100 years. The most renowned poles, at UNESCO World
Heritage Site SGang Gwaay in Gwaii Haanas National Park
Reserve, are already approaching two centuries — powerful
but fleeting expressions of a proud people.
Think of them as a gateway into almost 13,000 years of
habitation and culture. “But it’s not just about visiting
ancestral sites and our past,” says James Cowpar, who
owns Skidegate-based Haida Style Expeditions with his
identical twin, Shawn. “We’re also talking about today,
because we’re living and thriving.” As the Cowpars tour
visitors through the national park reserve in their
8½-metre rigid-hull Zodiac, they convey the ancient principle of Yah’guudang — a respect for all living things still
at the root of the Haida’s symbiotic relationship with the
archipelago, long believed to be a deeply spiritual place.
Haida Style’s excursions are layered with traditional
salmon feasts, songs and storytelling. Visits to ghost villages speak to how nearly 95 per cent of the Haida — once
8,000 strong — were wiped out in decades by smallpox
and tuberculosis, the former brought ashore by Europeans
in the 1860s. The resurrection of the Haida (they number
in the thousands once again) is nothing short of miraculous, and has yielded a renaissance in arts and politics.
Like the many historians, language experts, guides and
lodge owners, carvers and other artists in the archipelago,
the Cowpars are living proof of their people’s vitality.
Today, the words “Haida Gwaii” are spoken with reverence by adventurers and researchers alike, and Gwaii
Haanas is in the same sacred league as the Serengeti,
Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Galapagos reserves. And it can
take a pilgrimage to get to this roadless, wild collection
of 138 islands and endemic wildlife, split from the mainland by the famously rough, 100-kilometre-wide Hecate
Strait. Some fly Vancouver to Sandspit, joining Haida
Style guides across the inlet in Skidegate before travelling south into the park; others wheel onto the eighthour ferry from Prince Rupert, B.C., to Skidegate.
Those who journey are rewarded. “We welcome the
world to our backyard,” says Cowpar. “After visiting Haida
Gwaii, people go home feeling like they’ve had a supernatural experience, but they also want to come back
because here, they are treated like family.”
Javier Frutos (@Javiers_wonderplanet) is Canadian
Geographic’s creative director. Nick Walker (@CanGeoNick)
is the magazine’s managing editor. Both live in Ottawa.
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HAIDA GWAII
Clockwise from left: The Haida Style
Expeditions Zodiac at T’aanuu Llnagaay,
a former Haida settlement; longhouses
at Swan Bay Rediscovery Camp in Gwaii
Haanas National Park Reserve; local artist
Thomas Arnatt’s Haida Gwaii Community
Futures mural in Masset; Balance Rock,
near Skidegate; Haida artist Reg Davidson
at his studio in Old Masset.
See more of Javier Frutos’s stunning images
of the islands at cangeo.ca/may17/haida.
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SUMMER 2017
2017-04-13 3:26 PM
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Shell - CEDC.indd 37
2017-04-19 10:03 PM
Greenland’s Ilulissat Icefjord, one of
many sights experienced when astronaut
Chris Hadfield (right) took his Generator
program to the Arctic in 2016.
ASTRON
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SUMMER 2017
2017-04-19 7:46 PM
ONAUT
MEETS ARCTIC
Insights on Canada’s Far North from the
country’s most famous spaceman, Chris Hadfield
INTERVIEW BY ALEXANDRA POPE
WITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL COLANGELO
C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L
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2017-04-19 7:46 PM
C
CHRIS HADFIELD BELIEVES in the
power of ideas.
Since retiring from the Canadian Space
Agency, the Canadian astronaut — who
rocketed to global fame in 2013 thanks to
his multimedia dispatches from orbit as
commander of the International Space
Station — has dedicated his seemingly
boundless energy to the promotion of ideas
that challenge and excite.
Two years ago, at the urging of his son
Evan, Hadfield organized the first instalment of what has come to be known as
Generator, a sort of 21st-century salon
bringing together artists, musicians,
inventors and thinkers for a celebration of
creativity. The first show sold out Toronto’s
Massey Hall and set in motion discussions that would ultimately see Hadfield
bring the Generator concept to the Arctic.
For 18 days in August and September
2016, the astronaut and a team of 10
multimedia storytellers from around the
world, including Canadian photographer
Paul Colangelo, traversed the Arctic
Ocean, from southern Greenland to
Resolute, Nunavut, aboard a cruise ship.
Their goal? To create art that portrays the
Arctic not as a symbol of climate catastrophe or a prize to be claimed, but simply as it is: a region of surprising beauty
with a unique culture, worthy of exploration and understanding.
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Hadfield_May17.indd 40
Here, Colangelo shares his photography
from the trip for the first time in print,
while Hadfield discusses his experience
with Generator Arctic and why Canadians
should strive to know their North.
Keep is still writing about it. Simone
Bramante in Italy is doing a travelling
show based on it. And all sorts of people
saw the Arctic through this work and realized that to visit it is an option.
On the impact of
Generator Arctic
On what surprised Hadfield about
the Arctic
It’s gone better than I ever hoped it would.
We put on a show at the Art Gallery of
Ontario. Danny Michel released an album
that he wrote and recorded on board. Elmo
The lushness of it, and the richness and
success of the life there. It was amazing,
at 80 degrees north, to be walking across
a meadow that was absolutely teeming
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-19 7:46 PM
HADFIELD
with life. It was like walking across a
barnyard — there was so much animal
manure in this big, mossy field, with
muskox and rabbits and wolves and
smaller dogs. At sea, we saw all sorts of
wildlife as well, polar bears, whales, seals
and narwhals and almost all the different
breeds of birds that live up there. I was
amazed at the prevalence of life everywhere and the ancient nature and balance of it. It’s not as broad or deep as life
in the south, but it’s extremely evolved
and much more intense. The Arctic
doesn’t feel barren at all. It feels incredibly rich and beloved, and that wasn’t
something I was expecting.
On the shared experience
of exploring
You get a chance to get to know people and
look into their lives. One of the ladies on
the cruise was lovely, in her 70s; her husband had recently died, and she was kind
of gathering herself and wondering what
to do with the rest of her life. She swam in
each place we stopped, in the super-cold
Alexandra Pope (@XelaEpop) is Canadian
Geographic Travel’s social media editor.
Paul Colangelo (paulcolangelo.com) is a
member of the International League of
Conservation Photographers.
water, and treated it almost like a pilgrimage. As part of the evening lectures, each
member of my Generator crew would get
up and talk about their own experiences,
what they’d seen so far and also where else
they had been. To have all those different
mirror reflections of the whole thing I
think deepened it for everybody.
Clockwise from opposite bottom: An
old building at Eureka Weather Station
on Ellesmere Island; Qilaqitsoq, in west
Greenland, a former Inuit settlement where
500-year-old mummies were found in the
1970s; Chris Hadfield and musician Danny
Michel jam on board the cruise ship.
On connecting with the past
We visited Beechey Island and stood at
the graves of the three men who died
early in the Franklin expedition. There
are not many places on Earth that give
you the sense of eternity, of patience, of
implacable geology and of beautiful time
that you feel there. We get so frantically
worried about the hurried nature of each
of our individual existences that it’s
lovely to be in a place that reminds you
of eternity. The Arctic helped put that
back into my soul. I long to go back.
On why Canadians should care
about the North
Many Canadians are the lucky beneficiaries of an extremely successful civilization: we are raised with an expectation of
stability, we have one of the top education systems in the world, we have a
great social welfare system. With that
level of privilege also comes responsibility, and I think our number-one
‘IT’S LOVELY
to be in a place
that reminds
you OF
ETERNITY.
The Arctic
helped put that
BACK INTO
MY SOUL.’
C A N A D I A N G E O G R A P H I C T R AV E L
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HADFIELD
‘We NEED TO
KNOW the
Arctic exists.
Then we can
START
THINKING
about how it’s
going to become
PART OF
THE FUTURE
of all of us.’
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Hadfield_May17.indd 42
responsibility is not to just understand
the neighbourhood that each of us lives
in, but to actually get to know the country
and see how it all fits together. We’re the
second biggest country on Earth, and it’s
because of the enormous amount of
Canada that is the Arctic. As the climate
continues to change and sea ice becomes
less prevalent, those waters are going to
become more and more important.
There is enormous untapped potential in
the North — mineral and petrochemical
wealth, tourism wealth and navigational
wealth. We need to know it exists and see
it in as multifaceted and complete a way
as we can. Then we can start thinking
about how it’s going to become part of
the future of all of us as Canadians over
the next generations.
Clockwise from top left: Uummannaq,
a community of 1,500 in northwest
Greenland; McKinley Bay, on northern
Ellesmere Island off Tanquary Fiord; ice floes
in Jones Sound, north of Devon Island.
unique or complete, but we did our
absolute best to try to let people see the
Arctic as it is, not through a filter.
Much as I did with the photos I shared
from the International Space Station, I
want people just to see it and draw their
own conclusions based on what they see,
not on someone feeding them what
they’re supposed to be thinking about
this part of the world. I think the more of
that we can do, the healthier we’ll be and
the better we’ll treat the Arctic.
On striving for objectivity with
Generator Arctic
See more of Paul Colangelo’s photo-
What we did with the Generator concept in the Arctic is by no means
other work from the Generator project at
graphy from the Arctic and some of the
cangeo.ca/may17/arctic.
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-19 7:46 PM
The Great Trail
PHOTOGRAPHY
JAMESVANCOUVER/ISTOCK
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PhotoContest-TransCanadaTrail_May17.indd 43
2017-04-20 3:53 PM
Of the
LAND
Wanuskewin Heritage Park near Saskatoon is working
to connect non-Indigenous and Indigenous people to
6,000 years of the region’s First Nations heritage
BY AARON KYLIE
B
“
OTH FIRST NATIONS and non-First Nations people come to this
park, and a lot of them say, ‘When I come out here I feel different,’ ” says Ernie Walker.
He’s standing amid prairie grass near the edge of the
Opamihaw Buffalo Jump, used some 2,300 years ago by Indigenous
Peoples of the northern plains at the confluence of the South Saskatchewan
River and Opimihaw Creek, a big cloud-filled, blue prairie sky overhead.
“I’m a hard scientist,” he continues. “I believe in the As and Bs and
Cs of things. But I do recognize that there are other stories here. Lots
of other stories.”
Looking more farmhand than world-renowned archeologist in his green
University of Saskatchewan ball cap, plaid shirt, dusty blue jeans and
cowboy boots, Walker is touring a group of visitors around Wanuskewin
Heritage Park, an Indigenous cultural site a 15-minute drive from downtown Saskatoon that has a history dating back more than six millennia.
It’s not unusual in the summer to find Walker stooping over a one-squaremetre excavation unit here. There are likely few, if any, more qualified to
share stories from this 240-hectare national historic site.
A professor in the department of archeology and anthropology at the
University of Saskatchewan, Walker was, in 1982, the first to identify 19
pre-European-contact archeological sites in the terraces and point bars in
the creek valley bottom and coulee depressions that now form the bulk of
the park, which opened in 1992. Despite being one of its founding board
members, Walker hasn’t lost his taste for fieldwork, spending the past 35
years meticulously digging artifacts out of Wanuskewin’s dirt.
Wanuskewin_May17.indd 44
2017-04-11 5:01 PM
T.J. Warren, a prairie chicken dancer,
and his daughter Omiyosiw
Nazbah Warren, a jingle dress
dancer, visit Wanuskewin
Heritage Park for a ceremony.
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2017-04-11 5:02 PM
There are countless treasures from this site on the west bank
of the South Saskatchewan River that promise a transformative
experience during any visit — tours and cultural programs, six
kilometres of trails, teepee encampments and an interpretive
centre with galleries showcasing the work of local and international Indigenous artists. But visitors who have the great
fortune of running into Walker while exploring Wanuskewin
are sure to gain an even greater appreciation for the sacred
place that in Cree means “being at peace with oneself.”
After all, Walker’s knowledge of Wanuskewin’s past is so
great that local First Nations people named him Miyo Teyasew
(Red Thunderbird) and made him an honorary chief.
“IF YOU WERE STANDING here 12,000 years ago and looked
off to the northeast, you would see a mile-high block of ice.
That would be the waning Wisconsin Glacier,” says Walker,
setting the scene for how this dried-up creek valley became a
hot spot for Indigenous Peoples for thousands of years before
Europeans arrived on the continent.
As the glacier melted, Lake Saskatchewan formed in the
vicinity of present-day Saskatoon. As ice dams in the area
melted in subsequent centuries, meltwater and lake water cut
through the landscape in a series of water channels that created
a braided river system. About 7,000 years ago, explains Walker,
the present-day Saskatchewan River dug deeper into its trench,
and other small channels dried up, further shaping the distinct
geography of the park’s centrepiece Opimihaw Valley, because
where an important tributary of the mighty South Saskatchewan
once ran there is now just a minor creek.
Opimihaw Creek, which means “flying man” in Cree, has
meandered over the years, eroding its way across the valley and
carving out new banks. It’s those steep banks, with their 40- to
50-metre drops from the lip of the surrounding prairie, that
provided good shelter, particularly in winter, and created ideal
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Wanuskewin_May17.indd 46
buffalo jump sites, precipices that drew almost every preEuropean-contact Indigenous group known to inhabit the Great
Plains here — Blackfoot, Cree, Ojibwa, Assiniboine, Nakota
and Dakota. Year after year they followed the bison.
“Bison are a critical part of the story,” says Walker, noting
that by 2018, the park expects to reintroduce a herd of genetically pure plains bison as part of its larger expansion plans,
which include a campaign to be named a UNESCO World
Heritage Site.
“Bringing plains bison back to the park is a symbol of resilience and adaptation,” says Walker. “It’s a good analogy for
what First Nations cultures have gone through — signing treaties, being moved off to reservations, disease, residential
schools and all of that.”
The return of bison to Wanuskewin is also symbolic in
another way. The very animals that brought Indigenous Peoples
to this land in the first place are essentially responsible for the
amazingly intact and complete record of cultural development
in the region.
“It’s a phenomenal archeological resource,” says Walker of
the ongoing discoveries being made at Wanuskewin. “We
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-11 5:02 PM
Saskatoon
Regina
Trail
Archeological site
0
PREVIOUS SPREAD: TOURISM SASKATOON. OPPOSITE PAGE: WANUSKEWIN HERITAGE PARK.
THIS PAGE: TOURISM SASKATOON; MAP: CHRIS BRACKLEY/CAN GEO
Medicine
wheel
Cr e ek
Wanuskewin
Heritage Park
ihaw
SASKATCHEWAN
Dog Child
site
Opim
WANUSKEWIN HERITAGE PARK
WANUSKEWIN
Wolf Willow
site
Interpretive
Centre
250 m
s
Sa
u
So
t
ka
ch
ewan
Riv
er
th
realized in the very early days that this is about First Nations
culture and history, and we wanted First Nations people to be
a fundamental part of this. And that’s how it got built.”
Clockwise from opposite bottom: The park’s medicine wheel; trails
wind around archeological sites and a teepee encampment; the
Wanuskewin dance troupe performs near the Interpretive Centre.
“WANUSKEWIN BRINGS PEOPLE together,” says park elder
Jake Sanderson, 70. “It’s not only First Nations people but
people from around the world. It’s nice to see other nations
come and shake hands and tell us their stories.”
No artifact illustrates the longstanding historical and cultural
importance of Wanuskewin as a meeting place better than the
medicine wheel. One of the site’s most interesting archeological finds, the wheel is on a ridge in the southwest corner of the
park that overlooks the South Saskatchewan River and offers a
360-degree view of the surrounding plains.
The wheel consists of a seven-metre-diameter central stone
cairn and a 13-metre-wide outer ring of rocks. There are also
at least five smaller stone cairns, spaced between one and 17
metres away in all directions and many boulders scattered
within the larger structure itself.
One of fewer than 100 known medicine wheels on the northern plains — and the northernmost of them all — it’s believed
to have been created about 1,500 years ago. Unlike many medicine wheels, there are no spokes connecting the central cairn
and the outer ring.
“I describe it as a gift from a creator,” says Sanderson, who
was born and raised on the James Smith Cree Nation near
Prince Albert and still lives in the area. “The spirit gave us this
medicine wheel, to all the people, to all the animals and everything in this world and in this universe.”
Cultural experts believe medicine wheels served a range of
religious and ceremonial activities, which may have included
sun dances, medicine lodge ceremonies, vision quests, burials,
alignment with astronomical phenomena (although there
appear to be none associated with the Wanuskewin wheel) and
calendrical purposes. The presence of the medicine wheel at
Wanuskewin is extremely important.
“The keepers of the stories of ancient times were connected
to spiritual places here on Mother Earth,” says Sanderson. “And
one of them, the main one, was the medicine wheel. The
spokes were points to different sacred places on Turtle Island
and the world.”
Local Indigenous Peoples use the wheel today as a site for
offerings, ceremonies and songs. And the larger park continues
to be a meeting place for these and other First Nations from
across North America. At the end of June each year, it hosts a
major celebration that kicks off the northern plains powwow
season. About 50 sweat ceremonies are held here annually, as
are numerous blessings, smudge ceremonies and other Native
cultural art events. Saskatchewan’s Federation of Sovereign
Indigenous Nations holds meetings and ceremonies at
Wanuskewin, which has also hosted Indigenous groups from
Nunavut, Haida Gwaii and Arizona interested in implementing
similar preservation initiatives.
“This is arguably one of Canada’s top high-priority cultural
projects,” says Walker. “We’re about the arts. We’re about First
Nations’ interests. We’re about science. We’re about ecology
and stewardship.”
Aaron Kylie (@aaronkylie) is Canadian Geographic Travel’s editor.
MORE THAN ANYTHING, Wanuskewin seems to be about
connecting people — both Indigenous and non-Indigenous
from any background — to the cultures and history of the
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WANUSKEWIN
THE OLDEST OF ARTIFACTS
MANY OF THE OLDEST radiocarbon-dated artifacts found
in Wanuskewin Heritage Park come from “Dog Child,” a flat
terrace on the west bank of the Opimihaw Creek at the park’s
north end and the eighth archeological site to be excavated.
Between 2004 and 2009, archeologists at the 71-squaremetre site uncovered six “cultural levels,” or distinct
extraction layers corresponding with habitation periods. The
deepest, and therefore oldest level, known as 3b, contained
24 projectile points — stone objects most likely used on the
heads of spears, arrows or darts — as well as numerous
bone and stone tools, and bones from what are believed to
be 10 individual bison, including one of the oldest
radiocarbon-dated artifacts from Wanuskewin, the left distal
metacarpal of a bison estimated to be about 5,900 years old.
Archeological finds from this time period are rare. Walker
has identified 115 sites on the Great Plains, though only a
handful are well documented.
Archeologist Ernie Walker (left), one of the park’s co-founders,
has overseen much of the excavation work (right) at Wanuskewin.
To date, nine of 19 pre-European-contact sites have been explored.
The discoveries come with a bonus lesson from Walker. Wolf
Willow is believed to have been a campsite, occupied by northern plains peoples who were likely chasing bison and/or holing
up for the winter, during at least four distinct periods: 500,
1,000, 3,300 and 4,600 years ago. Many of the artifacts found at
this spot are similar to those I’ve located — broken animal
bones and stone tools, though archeologists also analyze the
soil for bits of charcoal and pollen to help them piece together
habitat conditions from each era. Could there be a better way
to make history and culture hit home?
Walker, of course, can do better still. As I scrape my trowel
gently across the patch of uneven ground, he explains that
he has actually put me to work “cleaning up” an excavation
plot he’d allowed a young, local Indigenous visitor to have
his hand at. After all, Walker notes, directly or indirectly the
artifacts lying here belong to the boy’s ancestors, and how
could he let the youngster stop by without an opportunity to
literally connect with his past? So, although Walker coaches
careful, patient scraping of the dirt from each plot to keep
the ground as level as possible, the boy got excited as he
started to discover artifacts and aggressively dug them out.
Renowned archeologist Walker submitted to the imperfect
excavation exuberance.
“It’s about our community,” says Walker. “It’s about First
Nations and non-First Nations, and if you know anything about
Truth and Reconciliation and where we’re going in this country,
I see Wanuskewin as a beacon, showing the rest of Canada that
we’re one. This is the Canadian way.”
Read more observations on the importance of Wanuskewin from park
elder Jake Sanderson at cangeo.ca/may17/elder.
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LEFT: AARON KYLIE/CAN GEO; RIGHT: WANUSKEWIN HERITAGE PARK
northern plains of North America. And the place does make
you feel different, even if you can’t explain why.
That’s certainly how I feel, my hands dusty from digging in
a one-metre-square excavation unit, as I discover a bison toe in
the small section of dirt I’m clearing. Walker has allowed me
the privilege of working at Wolf Willow, the ninth and latest of
the park’s 19 pre-contact archeological sites to be examined.
Trowel and bucket in hand, I help excavate the last part of the
110-square-metre site at “cultural level one,” which is estimated
to be about 500 years old. Soon, I also find an end scraper (a
small stone tool used to clean hides), then a piece of Swan River
chert (a type of hard rock found in Saskatchewan believed to
have been used to make other stone tools). I’m the first person
to hold these artifacts in half a millennium — and in the case
of the bison toe, maybe the first person ever.
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-11 5:02 PM
Quebec’s Far North
NUNAVIK
kNF4
To help you plan an authentic Inuit adventure in Quebec’s Far North,
contact us for your free copy of the Nunavik Official Tourist Guide:
NUNAVIK TOURISM
1-819-964-2876 • 1-855-NUNAVIK
WWW.NUNAVIK-TOURISM.COM
Nunavik.indd 49
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TENBEST
Treasure troves
Engage your curiosity and fuel your
imagination with a visit to one of
Alexandra Pope’s picks for the top
museums in Canada
VISIT TO A MUSEUM is more than
a pleasant way to while away an afternoon; it offers us a chance to discover
something new about our world and ourselves. Whether you’re planning a first visit
to a new region or looking for things to do
in your hometown, here are 10 museums
to add to your summer fun itinerary.
The Rooms, St. John’s The Rooms brings
Newfoundland’s archives, art gallery and
museum together under one roof for a
comprehensive and eloquent showcase of
what it means to be a Newfoundlander.
Permanent exhibits include artifacts and
testimonies from the First World War
Battle of Beaumont-Hamel and an introduction to the Irish who settled the island
beginning in the late 1600s. therooms.ca
Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic,
Lunenburg, N.S. The Bluenose exhibit will
give you a new appreciation for the schooner on the dimes in your pocket, while the
rooms devoted to Nova Scotia’s fishing
heritage will make you see this brightly
painted seaside town with new eyes. Take
a break from the aquariums, wharf-side
touch tanks and preserved fishing vessels
to enjoy a bowl of chowder or local oysters
at the Old Fish Factory, the on-site restaurant. fisheriesmuseum.novascotia.ca
Anne of Green Gables Museum, P.E.I. As
a young girl, author Lucy Maud
Montgomery called the white clapboard
home of her Aunt Annie and Uncle John
Campbell a “wonder castle,” and it’s easy
to see why. Explore Montgomery memorabilia, including the author’s own handtinted photos, then take a horse-drawn
carriage ride around the picture-perfect
grounds that inspired some of her most
beloved stories. annemuseum.com
50
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC TRAVEL
TenBest_May17.indd 50
Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa It’s
hard to pinpoint what makes this national
museum so cool. It could be that it’s
housed in a castle built in the early 1900s,
or its groundbreaking research on
Canadian species, or the way it mixes
learning and fun, for example with afterhours Nature Nocturne parties that transform the place into the capital’s nerdiest
nightclub. Whatever it is, you’ll want to
keep coming back to marvel at Canada’s
spectacular biodiversity. nature.ca
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto It’s almost
impossible to fully appreciate Canada’s
largest museum of natural history and
culture in just one visit, but if one is all you
have time for, spring for the extra $10 for
the Out of the Depths exhibit, on until
September. It tells the story of a blue whale
that washed up in Newfoundland in 2014
and the herculean efforts to turn tragedy
into opportunity by unlocking the secrets
of Earth’s largest animal. rom.on.ca
Bata Shoe Museum, Toronto When was
the last time you gave serious thought to
what you put on your feet? This offbeat
museum will give you a new appreciation
for the social, cultural and economic role
of footwear in civilizations spanning 4,500
years. Highlights from its 13,000 artifacts
include ancient Egyptian sandals, Queen
Victoria’s silk slippers and Elton John’s
bedazzled platforms. batashoemuseum.ca
Itsanitaq Museum, Churchill, Man. Housed
in a space the size of a school gymnasium
in a nondescript building, this hidden gem
is jam-packed with Inuit artifacts dating
from about 1700 BC to modern times. Part
of its appeal lies in the surprise of discovering such an important collection up North
rather than in a southern museum. Plan to
spend a couple of hours exploring the
room’s many treasures. 204-675-2030
Royal Tyrrell Museum, Drumheller, Alta.
Your trip back to prehistory begins the
moment you enter the Canadian badlands,
a semi-arid moonscape of ancient riverbeds and bizarre rock formations. At the
museum, come face-to-face with the giant
creatures that roamed Alberta 75 million
years ago (above), and learn how paleontologists piece together the past from bone
fragments and fossils unearthed in the
surrounding canyons. tyrrellmuseum.com
Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver
Museum of Anthropology architect
Arthur Erickson described the building as
“a work of light and shadows … designed
to resonate to the metronome of the seasons.” Linger in the Great Hall, which
features towering totem poles and other
artifacts of the Kwakwaka’wakw, Nisga’a,
Gitxsan, Haida and Coast Salish peoples
set against panoramic views of the mountains and Salish Sea, and keep an eye out
for the many contemporary works displayed on the grounds. moa.ubc.ca
U’mista Cultural Centre, Alert Bay, B.C.
To the Kwakwaka’wakw peoples, u’mista
means “the return of something important” — in this case, dozens of masks and
artifacts used in potlatch ceremonies
seized during a period of government
repression in the 1920s and sent east to
museums and private collectors. Recent
repatriation efforts resulted in the creation
of the cultural centre, which is keeping the
potlatch tradition alive through displays
and dance performances. umista.ca
Did we miss your favourite museum? Let us know
on
(@CanGeo) or
(fb.com/cangeo).
© ROYAL TYRRELL MUSEUM
A
SUMMER 2017
2017-04-11 4:01 PM
Take a walk on the wild side in the heart of polar bear country with Churchill Wild, the premier provider of on-the-ground
Arctic safaris for more than 20 years. Combine the thrill of walking with polar bears and the exhilaration of snorkeling with
beluga whales for a summer Arctic experience like no other.
Enjoy life changing wildlife encounters along with world-class service, accommodations and cuisine at the only fly-in
polar bear eco-lodges on the planet.
churchillwild.com
Churchill Wild.indd 51
2017-04-19 5:19 PM
adventure seekers
come find your
Island
To the bold, brave and daring. To those who leap at the chance to make each day more invigorating than the
last. This is your island. A breathtaking destination, filled with wandering trails, endless beaches and unique
experiences everywhere you look. Pack your gear and your curiosity. Come find Prince Edward Island.
One amazing Island. Endless possibilities. Book your Prince Edward Island vacation today at ExplorePEI.com
Let us take you there with the most flights to Charlottetown. Book now at aircanada.com/PEI or contact your travel agent.
PEI.indd 52
2017-04-19 5:20 PM
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