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Clean Eating June 2017

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THE QUICK
& EASY ISSUE
Clean Eating
Real food for a healthy, happy life.
45
JUNE 2017
A
WEEK OF
15-MINUTE
MEALS
SUMMER RECIPES
EACH 30 MINUTES OR LESS!
o
w
B
l
s
t
i
rF u
Breakfast,
Snack or
Dessert:
MEDITERRANEAN EATING
MEGA
MEAL
SALADS
BALANCE YOUR
BLOOD SUGAR
WITH FOOD
Introducing Garden of Life® SPORT
The Cleanest Performance Line Ever
Never before have we seen so much excitement about a new
product launch. We have been talking about launching a Sport
Nutrition Line for a VERY long time. As the number one selling
supplement brand in the Natural Products Industry, we already
have many active and athletic people using our great products,
especially our organic plant-based proteins. However, we
believed that it was time to raise the bar in the sports arena
and provide those dedicated to improving their physical
performance—whatever the level—truly CLEAN sports
nutrition formulas. So many sports supplements contain really
junky ingredients, including synthetic amino acids, chemical
vitamins produced industrially, artificial colors, flavors and
sweeteners and dangerous stimulants—often contaminated
with banned substances.
We believe that athletes, who treat their bodies as their
temples, deserve much cleaner and better products. And who
better to raise the bar than Garden of Life?
The new Garden of Life Sport Line is designed to be used as
a Complete Sport System, depending on the type of sport
intensity and duration. It includes a Pre-Workout drink, PostWorkout drink, Refuel Plant Protein, Refuel Whey Protein plus
delicious New Performance Protein bars.
Truly Clean Means
Everyone
Is An Athlete
Garden of Life SPORT
I’ve partnered with Garden of Life on their new Sport line because I believe
they’re doing everything right. The entire Sport product line is certified “clean”
by being Certified USDA Organic, Non-GMO Project Verified, certified by NSF
for Sport® and Informed-Choice for Sport. That’s quadruple assurance that these
products are clean and free of any banned substances!
What if You’re Not an Athlete
Every human being is an athlete. We have to do things every day like move, carry
things and change direction. A woman carrying a baby, a man hauling a bag or someone
running across the street—these are the exact same patterns an athlete needs to
perform. Garden of Life’s Sport line is an incredibly tasty, convenient and effective
way to bring the best nutrition to anyone that is looking to improve or be their best.
DON SALADINO
Certified trainer and owner of Drive495 in
New York; Fitness expert in Men's Fitness
and on major television shows; Trainer to pro
athletes, celebrities and everyday people.
Complete 4-STEP System for Clean
Performance
From pre-workout to post-workout and everywhere in between, Garden of Life
Sport has you covered. Here’s a breakdown of the hottest, cleanest products to
ever hit the sports nutrition industry.
Complete 4-Step Performance System
Organic Plant-Based Energy + Focus
PRE
WORKOUT
Sharpen Mental Focus with 85mg natural caffeine from organic coffeeberry and get a Fast Burst of Energy
from Organic Kale, Spinach & Beets to Boost Nitric Oxide. Get an Additional Boost from whole food vitamin
B12 & organic cane sugar.†
Organic Plant-Based Recovery
POST
WORKOUT
Reduce Muscle Soreness with organic high-antioxidant blend and Reduce Oxidative Stress with organic
turmeric/rooibos. Jump Start Muscle Repair with direct energy from organic sugar cane; cellular energy
from magnesium & B vitamins.†
Organic Plant-Based Performance Protein & Performance Protein Bars
REFUEL
PLANT
Build and Repair muscles and feed metabolism with 30g of complete protein and 5.5g BCAAs,
5g Glutamine & Glutamic Acid. Convenient Performance Bars contain 20g of protein and 10g of fiber.
The ONLY Certified Organic, Non-GMO Project Verified plant protein certified clean by both
NSF Certified for Sport® and Informed-Choice.
Truly Grass-Fed Whey Protein
REFUEL
WHEY
Build and Repair muscles and feed metabolism with 24g of Truly Grass Fed Whey and 6g BCAAs,
4g Glutamine & Glutamic Acid. The ONLY Certified Truly Grass-Fed, Non-GMO Project Verified,
clean whey also certified by both NSF Certified for Sport and Informed-Choice.
†
These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
contents
JUNE 2017
FEATURES
44
56
SALAD CLUB
Shake up your summer greens
routine with these quick, easy and
entirely meal-worthy salads.
By Pamela Salzman
MEDITERRANEAN
REDUX
Reap the health benefits of the
Mediterranean diet, revamped
using the latest research for hearthealthy, flavor-packed recipes.
By Ivy Manning and Jessie Shafer
68
FAST & FRESH
FRUIT SALADS
These colorful fruit creations
use fragrant herbs, fresh
melons, berries and stone
fruits for antioxidant-rich bowls.
By Ivy Manning
56
Keep your mind and body
strong with CE’s sciencebacked updates to
Mediterranean eating.
40
Fanciful and functional kitchen
trinkets, cooking appliances
and serveware to keep you
on the healthy track.
MEAL PLANNING
FOR EASY WEEKDAYS
74
TIME-SAVING DINNERS
82
YOUR 15-MINUTE
MEAL PLAN
Weekday cooking can
be a snap with these tasty,
budget-friendly plates.
By Ivy Manning
Dive into a week of scrumptious
meals with Clean Eating’s
speedy meal plan – each meal
and snack takes 15 minutes or
less to prepare!
By Heather Bainbridge
JUNE 2017
contents
42
LIVE BETTER
16
18
44
Five globally inspired salads
that offer blood sugar–
regulating fiber and a wealth
of vitamins and minerals.
24
30
36
88
Beat the heat with these free
radical–fighting fruit bowls.
Food, health and nutrition
news you can use.
3 WAYS WITH
FAT BOMBS
These delectable bites contain
wholesome fats from cashews
and coconuts to keep you
singing a sweet tune all day long.
34
68
From propane
to gas, find
the grill that
works for you.
BITS & BITES
96
HEALTH MUST-HAVES
20
SUPERMARKET GUIDE
26
FOODIE FAVES
CLEAN LIVING
Ditch chemical perfumes
in lieu of two alluring body
mists made with essential oils.
A GREENER YOU
With pollinator decline
threatening the world’s food
supply, Kate Geagan outlines
four eco-friendly ways to save
the bees and our crops.
COMPLEMENTS
Discover five natural methods
to balance blood sugar.
VEG FOR A DAY
Lower your carbon footprint with
three meatless recipes to take
you from breakfast to dinner.
SWEET TOOTH
Standout kitchen releases
to keep your health on track.
42
TOOLS
92
MIND & BODY
BOOSTERS
THE QUIC K
Clean Eating
Real food for a health
Heavenly cherry chocolate
almond clusters that make the
perfect health-conscious dessert.
y, happy life.
& EASY ISSUE
45
JUNE 2017
SUMMER RECIPES
A
WEEK OF
15-MINUTE
MEALS
EACH 30 MINUTES OR
LESS!
THE REGULARS
ON THE COVER
CE Online ................................................. 6
Editor’s Letter ....................................... 8
Letters & Advisory Board ...........12
Recipe Index .......................................14
Recipes featured are from
“Sweet-Meets-Savory Fruit
Bowls,” p. 68.
Photographer: Darren Kemper
Food Stylist: Nancy Midwicki
Prop Stylist: The Props
cleaneating.com
Turn up the heat with these
tried, tested and true grills.
Find out how to support
prostate health and balance
testosterone with CE’s guide
to male health.
Bo
Fruit wls
Breakfast,
Snack or
Dessert:
P.
56
MEDITERRANEAN EATI
NG
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017 $5.99
Please display until
4
When Father Time isn’t on your
side, these convenient snacks
and meals can be prepped or
ready to go in minutes.
40 GEAR AND GADGETS
ASK THE DOC
Jonny Bowden breaks down
the latest research on MCT oil,
matcha and gene-edited foods.
Thirst-quenching juices,
smoothies and drink boosters
that will up the nutrient ante!
US
6/27/17
MEGA
MEAL
SALADS
BALANC YOUR
BLOOD SUEGA
R
WITH FOOD
P.
34
P.
P.
82
68
GREAT TASTING
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ANTI-CAVI
ANTI-CAVITY
EASY TO
T USE
COMPLETE SYSTEM
CO
YOU’RE DOING IT. MAKE IT COUNT.
YOU’R
THE SPRY 5 SYSTEM IS THE MOST COMPLETE, EASY TO USE AND GREAT TASTING LINE OF ORAL CARE PRODUCTS ON THE MARKET
Make the switch to Spry products and
Using products from the Spry5 system
make it easy to get the dentistrecommended five daily exposures
of xylitol. Research has shown over
and over that using xylitol products
five times throughout the day is the
The Spry5 System is simple to use, in
fact you’re probably going through the
motions, just not with products that
use mouthwash, chew gum, eat mints
or candy you should make it count.
Available at fine retailers
1 Brush and rinse with Spry toothpaste
and oral rinse when you wake up.
2 After meals chew Spry gum or mints.
3 Brush and rinse with Spry toothpaste
and oral rinse before bed.
The goal of the Spry5 system is
to make oral care easy, tasty and
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4 Use Spry Dental Probiotics before bed.
5 Other exposures to 100% xylitol
products throughout the day are
added bonuses and will help.
ce online
DIG INTO MORE CE at cleaneating.com
A Better Way to Lose Weight
Crash dieting is no way to welcome summer. Instead, join us online
for our nine-week holistic program, A Whole Life–Guide to Lasting
Weight Loss, with CE’s resident dietitians Erin Macdonald and Tiffani
Bachus. You’ll learn mindful eating practices as well as exercises
and stress-reduction techniques to achieve your goals. Sign up for
success at cleaneating.com/lastingweightloss.
EAT IN SEASON
THE THRILL OF THE GRILL
NO-FUSS
MEAL PLANS
Heed the call of your patio and dust off the grill. With
innovative recipes (even dessert!), you’ll be cooking
outdoors all summer long. cleaneating.com/grill
NEWSLETTER
Did you know you can receive the best of Clean Eating every week in your
inbox? Don’t miss our top recipes, step-by-step tutorials, the latest health
news and tested tips from our expert contributors. Maximize your clean-eating
lifestyle. Sign up for our newsletter at cleaneating.com/newsletter.
Follow us on:
Facebook.com/cleaneatingmag
Pinterest.com/cleaneatingmag
6
cleaneating.com
Eating clean just got easier.
We’ve taken the guesswork
out of what to cook by
carefully curating dozens of
downloadable meal plans to fit
your diet, from Paleo to glutenfree to vegetarian. Get them all
at cleaneating.com/mealplans.
Twitter.com/cleaneatingmag
Instagram.com/cleaneatingmag
YouTube.com/cleaneatingmag
JUNE 2017
ERIN & TIFFANI PHOTO BY DARREN KEMPER, SALAD PHOTO BY DARREN KEMPER, BURGER PHOTO BY RYAN SZULC, MEAL PLAN IMAGES BY BEATA LUBAS
Farmers’ markets are
brimming with fresh
bounty, and it’s time to take
advantage. We’ve created
a stunning collection of fiberand protein-rich salads that
can be made in 30 minutes
or less. cleaneating.com/
summersalads
ADVERTISEMENT
cheat your way
to lean
Break Through Your Weight
Loss Plateau By Amber Rios
B
eing a health and nutrition
correspondent means that companies
frequently send me their products, and
ask for my stamp of approval. Most of the
time I dive into research, give the product a
try, and send the company honest feedback
about what they’ll need to change before
I’ll recommend it. Plus my hectic job and my
determination to stay fit means I’m always
hunting for a quick and nutritious way to
fill up on nutrients my body needs. So I can
confidently say, “I’ve tried it all”.
Last Tuesday work was especially hectic,
but I’d booked with my $200 an hour personal
trainer, Tony, a triathlon winning, organicto-the-bone fitness guy with a ten mile long
track record of whipping the “who’s who”
into shape in record time, so I had to go. He
noticed that my set count was down and
playfully asked, “Feeling a little tired today?”,
as he handed me a bottle from his gym bag.
After one sip I figured that there was no way
this could be healthy because the creamy
chocolate flavor was just too delicious. Still,
he’d never risk his reputation.
With more than a healthy dose of scepticism
I decided to investigate this shake he’d called
INVIGOR8.
Turns out, it’s a full meal replacement
shake, which stunned me because virtually
every other shake I’d researched had tasted
chalky, clumpy and packed with hidden
“no-no’s” like cheap protein, tons of artificial
ingredients, not to mention harmful synthetic
dyes, additives, sugars, preservatives, and
hormones. And even though INVIGOR8’s full
meal replacement shake cost more than many
of the shakes I’ve tried, it was about half the
price of my favorite salad, and the nutrition
profile looked second to none.
Wanting to know more, I reached out to
a few of the people who were talking about
it on trustworthy fitness forums. By the next
morning three people got back to me saying,
“As a trainer I love Invigor8. It’s definitely
helped me to have more all-day energy, plus
build the kind of lean sculpted muscle that
burns more fat.”
“Yes, I’ll recommend it, it tastes great, and
I really like how it keeps me feeling full for
hours.”
“I’m a marathon runner and a friend
recommended it to me. Drinking it has
become a part of my regular training
routine, because my time has improved, my
energy is up, and I’m thinking more clearly
than ever before.”
I decided to take my investigation one step
further by researching the development of
INVIGOR8. I was pleasantly surprised to find
out that the company went to great lengths
to keep INVIGOR8 free of harmful ingredients.
The makers of INVIGOR8 were determined
to make the first 100% natural, non-GMO
nutritional shake & green superfood. The
result is a meal replacement shake that
contains 100% grass-fed whey that has a
superior nutrient profile to the grain-fed whey
found in most shakes, metabolism boosting
raw coconut oil, hormone free colostrum to
promote a healthy immune system, Omega
3, 6, 9-rich chia and flaxseeds, superfood
greens like kale, spinach, broccoli, alfalfa,
and chlorella, and clinically tested cognitive
enhancers for improved mood and brain
function. The company even went a step
further by including a balance of pre and
probiotics for optimal digestive health,
uptake, and regularity and digestive enzymes
so your body absorbs the high-caliber
nutrition you get from INVIGOR8.
As a whole-foods nutritionist with a
thriving practice I understand the importance
of filling my body with the best Mother Nature
has to offer. I have always been reluctant to
try new products because I was never sure of
the impact they would have on my energy,
and weight. INVIGOR8 is different, not only
because it’s delicious, but because it helps
me to maintain the energy I need to run my
busy practice, while helping me to stay fit
and toned. Considering all of the shakes I’ve
tried, I can honestly say that the results I’ve
experienced from INVIGOR8 are nothing
short of amazing.
A company spokesperson confirmed an
exclusive offer for Clean Eating readers: if you
order this month, you’ll receive $10 off your
first order by using promo code “CLEAN10”
at checkout. You can order INVIGOR8 today
at www.DrinkInvigor8.com or by calling
1-800-958-3392.
editor's letter
What Is Clean Eating?
Welcome to everyone’s favorite issue of the
year: The Quick and Easy Issue, celebrated
for its dazzling selection of fresh, flavorful,
seasonal meals ready in a snap. Our goal is
to help you shift a little time from stove to
backyard hammock so you can stretch and
savor the season a little better. Start on page
82 with the easiest iteration of our popular
meal plan yet, “The 15-Minute Meal Plan.” For
an entire week, enjoy spending no more than
15 minutes on each meal, truly freeing up
some precious sun-soaked leisure time. And
back by popular demand is our annual meal
salads feature on page 44. Each hearty veg
bowl passed our rigorous test-kitchen panel
and resoundingly met our criteria including,
“Would definitely make this at home,” and
“Even though I’m about to burst, I cannot stop eating this!” These salads
are colorful, creative and supremely satisfying – a great addition to your
dinner rotation for an easy, energizing meal that won’t weigh you down.
While we’re on the topic of nutritious bowls, meet our fruit bowls on page
68, the latest take on the still-booming bowl trend. They’re stunning,
sweet and savory, adorned in herbs and every bit delicious. Enjoy them
for breakfast, dessert or a midday snack. Finally, what screams summer
more than bright, coastal Mediterranean-style dishes? A favorite cuisine
among CE readers (and its staff!), this life-extending style of eating gets
a refresh with some new “rules” and a slew of new recipes to add to your
collection. Check out “The New Rules of Mediterranean Eating” on page
56. From our chaise lounge to yours, we hope you enjoy a delightfully
simple summer and lean on these irresistibly easy meal hacks to get you
through, without ever breaking a sweat.
Psst!
What’s easier than grilling up a meal
al fresco on one easy, dish-free surface? Check
out our top grill picks of the season on page 42.
Alicia Tyler
Editor-in-Chief
Write to us! We’re listening.
CEeditorial@aimmedia.com
8
Eat five to six times a day – three
meals and two to three small snacks.
Include a lean protein, plenty of fresh fruit and
vegetables, and a complex carbohydrate with
each meal. This keeps your body energized
and burning calories efficiently all day long.
Choose organic whenever possible.
If your budget limits you, make meat, eggs,
dairy and the Dirty Dozen (ewg.org/
foodnews) your organic priorities.
Drink at least 2 liters of water a day,
preferably from a reusable canteen,
not plastic; we’re friends of the
environment here! Limit your alcohol
intake to one glass of antioxidant-rich red
wine a day.
Get label savvy. Clean foods contain
short ingredient lists. Any product with a
long ingredient list is human-made and not
considered clean.
Avoid processed and refined foods
such as white flour, sugar, bread and
pasta. Enjoy complex carbs such as whole
grains instead.
Know thy enemies. Steer clear of trans
fats, fried foods or foods high in sugar. Avoid
preservatives, color additives and toxic binders,
stabilizers, emulsifiers and fat replacers.
Consume healthy fats (essential
fatty acids, or EFAs) every day.
Learn about portion sizes and work
toward eating within them.
Reduce your carbon footprint. Eat
produce that is seasonal and local. It is less
taxing on your wallet and the environment.
Shop with a conscience. Consume
humanely raised, local meats and oceanfriendly seafood. Visit seachoice.org for a
printable pamphlet.
Practice mindful eating. Never rush
through a meal. Food tastes best when
savored. Enjoy every bite.
Take it to go. Pack a cooler for work or outings
so you always have clean eats on the go.
cleaneating.com
cleaneating.com
PHOTO BY PIERRE GAUTREAU, HAIR STYLING & MAKEUP BY VALERIA NOVA, FASHION STYLIST (REPRESENTED BY JUDY INC.) RACHEL MATTHEWS BURTON
Ease into
Summer
The soul of clean eating is consuming
food the way nature delivered it, or as
close to it as possible. It is not a diet;
it’s a lifestyle approach to food and its
preparation. It's about eating real food,
for a healthy, happy life.
OWN THE MORNING
™
Start your day with more!
Alive!® complete multi-vitamin
gummies include Orchard
Fruits™ and Garden Veggies™‡
and a full B-vitamin complex to
support metabolism and energy.*
Available in Women’s, Women’s
50+, Men’s, Men’s 50+ and
Children’s formulas.
*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration.
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
‡Alive!® Multi-Vitamins provide 150 mg fruit/vegetable powder in each serving.
ISSUE 70 • PRINTED IN THE USA
VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL MANAGER Kim Paulsen
GROUP PUBLISHER Joanna Shaw
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alicia Tyler
SENIOR ART DIRECTOR Stacy Jarvis-Paine
DIGITAL DIRECTOR Mandy Major
Mediterranean eating
gets an update – turn to
page 56 to discover the
new rules of this most
healthy way of eating.
Editorial
Head Office
FOOD EDITOR Andrea Gourgy
ASSOCIATE EDITOR & RESEARCH CHIEF Laura Schober
COPY EDITOR Angie Mattison
DIGITAL EDITOR Jennifer Davis-Flynn
WEB PRODUCER Samantha Trueheart
DIGITAL EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Jes Zurell
DIGITAL INTERN Sola Lawal
NUTRITION CONSULTANT Antonina Smith
CONTRIBUTING CULINARY NUTRITIONIST Pamela Salzman
GROUP PUBLISHER CLEAN EATING, VEGETARIAN TIMES,
BETTER NUTRITION AND AMAZING WELLNESS
Joanna Shaw | 800.443.4974, x 709
jshaw@aimmedia.com
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Lisa Dodson
800.443.4974, x 703 | ldodson@aimmedia.com
SUBSCRIPTION CUSTOMER SERVICE: 1.800.728.2729
Art
SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Alaina Greenberg
CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Brian Britt
SENIOR ELECTRONIC IMAGE SPECIALIST Allan Ruhnke
Recipe Creators
Stacy Adimando, Heather Bainbridge,
Kathrin Brunner, Lily Kunin, Ivy Manning,
Julie Morris, Pamela Salzman, Marianne Wren
Contributors
Tiffani Bachus, Jonny Bowden, Sarah Tuff Dunn,
Jensine Eckwall, Kate Geagan, Theona Layne,
Erin Macdonald, Ashlea Miller, Jessie Shafer, Lisa Turner
Recipe Tester
Dorothy Vo
Photographers
Sarah Aldrich, Meaghan Eady, Darren Kemper, Beata Lubas,
Ellen Charlotte Marie, Vincenzo Pistritto, Ronald Tsang
Food Stylists
Bernadette Ammar, Heather Shaw, Nancy Midwicki
Prop Stylists
The Props
Editorial Office
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Toronto, ON M6K 3P6
Business Office
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Marketing & Web
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Consumer Marketing
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CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER & PRESIDENT
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OFFICER & TREASURER Michael Henry
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS
Patricia B. Fox
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AIM BOARD CHAIR Efrem Zimbalist III
© 2017 by Active Interest Media, Inc. All rights reserved.
No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any
manner without written permission from the publisher.
* Vitamins, Herbs, Minerals, Supplements
Distribution Clean Eating (ISSN 1913-7532, USPS 003-610) is published nine times per year (Jan/Feb, March, April, May, June, Jul/Aug, Sept,
Oct, Nov/Dec) by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc., an Active Interest Media company. Advertising and business offices at 5720 Flatiron Pkwy, Boulder, CO 80301.
The known office of publication is 5720 Flatiron Pkwy, Boulder, CO 80301. Periodicals postage paid at Boulder, CO and at additional mailing offices.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Clean Eating, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235.Subscription rates in the United States are one year $24.97. Canada: $34.97. Foreign: $54.97 (US funds only). The publisher and editors
will not be responsible for unsolicited material. Manuscripts and photographs must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. To remove your name from promotion lists, write to the address above. Please Note: All readers are advised to
consult their physician before beginning or adding a new fitness regimen or changing their diet. Clean Eating does not accept any responsibility for injury sustained as a result of following the advice or suggestions contained within the content of this magazine.
ILLUSTRATION BY JENSINE ECKWALL
Production
Our sugar cane is sustainably grown in the heart of Florida
knowing it ends up at the heart of your home.
florid
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letters & advisory board
Q/ How do I keep the tears away when cutting onions?
– AMANDA DAVIS, NASHVILLE, TN
A/ When onions are chopped, they release enzymes that transform into an
acid that can irritate eyes. Most methods boil down to either slowing or
minimizing the chemical reaction that happens when you cut an onion. You can
prevent the resulting gasses by freezing the onion for 15 minutes before cutting or
using a sharp knife (a clean, quick cut releases fewer acids). You can also work
near a fan or vent that will blow the gases away from you, breathe through your
mouth or even wear swim goggles. All have varying degrees of success, so you
have to experiment and see what works for you. As for myself? I wear contacts
and have never had a problem.
– JILL SILVERMAN HOUGH
We Hear You!
Meet Our Experts
jill silverman hough
Recipe developer, culinary instructor
and author of the 100 Perfect Pairings
series and co-author of The Clean Plates
Cookbook (Running Press, 2012).
erin macdonald RDN
tiffani bachus RDN
Clean Eating Academy instructors,
co-owners of the U Rock Girl nutrition
and training program (URockGirl.com),
registered dietitians and nutrition,
fitness and wellness experts.
heather bainbridge
BSc, MA, EdM, RD, CDN
RECIPE REQUEST
DINNER IS
A WINNER
Broccoli, Kale & Cheddar
Quiche with Savory Quinoa
Crust (p. 56, Jan/Feb 2017).
Smells and looks amazing!
Love that color!
– Dawn McGrath,
via Facebook
Insta Love ♥
I’m a long-time reader of
Clean Eating. I love that you
are shifting towards more
plant-based recipes. I am
finding lots of interesting
new twists on food. Please
consider confining each
recipe to one page. It’s so
much easier for me to pull
out one page and keep it in
my recipe folder than to try
to find the stapler or paper
clips to hold a two-pager
together. In fact, unless
those recipes are amazing,
I forgo them.
– Amy Tharakan
YES TO VEG!
I love Clean Eating because
it has a lot of recipes for
those of us who do not eat
meat. So many other
magazines have only
one or two recipes for
vegetarians or vegans.
– Carla Gregor, Alexandria, VA
EDITOR’S NOTE:
Thanks for your feedback,
Carla! You’ll be happy to hear
that CE has recently launched
a one-day vegetarian meal
plan column “Veg for a Day”
that will appear in each issue
(see p. 36) so you can eat
meatless for breakfast,
lunch and dinner!
TAG US IN YOUR POSTS WITH HASHTAG
#CLEANEATINGMAG
@ E L L I E LU KAI T I S
#sweetpotatopieparfait (p. 34,
Jan/Feb 2017) #cleaneating
#cleaneatingmag
#coconutwhippedcream
#candiedpecans
#homemadebestmade
#birthdaylove
@ M O RGAN RO E S E
Enjoying a little cleaning break on our day off.
#cleaneatingmagazine #coldbrew #puppylove
Tell us what you thought of this issue by emailing us at CEeditorial@aimmedia.com.
Plus, get bonus recipes and more clean-eating content on social media.
12
cleaneating.com
Certified dietitian-nutritionist and
registered dietitian who specializes in
counseling clients to achieve a healthier
weight and improve conditions including
type 2 diabetes and heart disease.
jonny bowden
PhD, CNS
Board-certified nutrition specialist,
motivational speaker, author and
expert in the areas of weight loss
and health.
kathrin brunner CNP
Clean Eating's “Clean Living” columnist,
nutritionist and yoga teacher. Brunner
teaches at The Institute of Holistic
Nutrition and has a private practice that
offers a variety of workshops, corporate
talks and yoga classes.
pamela salzman BA, MBA
Clean Eating’s Contributing Culinary
Nutritionist, natural foods cooking
instructor and holistic health counselor. Her
food blog, pamelasalzman.com, offers
healthful recipes and time-saving tips.
james smith MBA
Clean Eating Academy instructor and
the Culinary Programs and Operations
chair at Centennial College with more
than 25 years of experience. He
completed his culinary training at
George Brown College.
marianne wren BA, CC
As both a recipe developer and food
stylist, Wren has worked with print and
advertising clients. She completed her
culinary training at Dubrulle French
Culinary School and The Culinary
Institute of America.
JUNE 2017
AMERICA’S
1SELLING
#
ORGANIC
e
h
go pr ot
t
n
o
c
i
e
n
i
a
n•
g
rO
t
Excel len sourc
•De
e of
f
i
b
Act ive pr obiotics •
PLANT-BASED PROTEIN
er •
l ic
ious
fruit &
d
n
e
l
b
veggie
fuel your life,
ORGANICALLY
20g
PLANT-BASED
PROTEIN
2g 7g
ONLY
OF SUGAR
OF FIBER
No Artificial Flavors, Colors or Sweeteners
Gluten Free Non-GMO
¨
purelyinspired.com
Facebook logo is owned by Facebook Inc.
Based on AC Nielsen FDM sales data for plant-based proteins. © 2017
ALSO
LOOK FOR
recipe index
Your CE
Recipe Guide
With the days of summer come these simple recipes
ready in 30 minutes or less. Now you can spend more
time in the sunshine and less time in front of a hot stove!
grains & vegetables
• Freezable
• Quick
under 45 minutes
• Vegetarian
may contain
eggs and dairy
• Gluten-free
it
• Make
gluten-free
Recipe contains
soy sauce, miso,
Worcestershire
sauce and/or
tamari. All of
these ingredients
are available in
gluten-free and
regular varieties.
•••
Make-Ahead
Coconut
Oatmeal Bake
with Blueberries
& Almonds
P. 37
••
Grilled Veggie
Flatbread
P. 66
•••
Spiced
Tempeh Tacos
with Creamy
Cashew Sauce
P. 38
•••
with Crispy Tofu
& Sesame Seeds
with Plantain Chips
P. 78
Lemon Tahini–
Smothered Broccolini
Gluten-Free
Cauliflower
Pizza Crust
P. 39
••
Garlic Ginger
Noodle Stir-Fry
•••
••
with Crunchy Seeds
P. 64
•••
••
••
•
••
with Beet Moutabel
with Herb Drizzle
with Artichoke Salad
Cuban Black Bean
& Quinoa Bowls
P. 79
Green Onion
Quinoa
P. 83
Warm Tomato &
Mozza Sandwich
P. 85
poultry
••
Indian
Coconut
Chicken
Curry
with Spinach
& Quinoa
Dukkah
Chicken Breasts
P. 62
Lemony Turkey
Kofta on Bulgur
P. 76
Chicken
Bruschetta
P. 85
P. 74
14
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
seafood
•
Whole-Grain
Spaghetti
Trapanese
with Shrimp
salads & fruit bowls
•
Shrimp Penne
with Creamy Vodka
Tomato Sauce
P. 77
••
Coconut &
Curry Scallops
P. 83
••
•••
with Mint Chile
Dressing
with Chunky
Pico Dressing
Vietnamese
Shrimp Salad
P. 47
P. 65
Vegetarian
Taco Salad
P. 48
••
Middle Eastern
Chicken & Rice
Salad with Tahini
Dill Dressing
P. 48
••
Roasted
Grape &
Salmon
Kale Salad
••
Shredded Carrot
& Chicken Salad
with Raisins, Jicama &
Citrus Yogurt Dressing
••
Superfood Salad
P. 54
•••
Saturday
Chopped Salad
P. 55
with Cider
Maple
Vinaigrette &
Gorgonzola
P. 50
P. 52
desserts & snacks
•••
•••
•••
with LemongrassInfused Coconut
Cream
with Basil &
Lime Drizzle
Yogurt Dressing
Mango & Red
Banana Bowl
P. 70
Honeydew &
Blackberry Bowl
P. 72
Granola-Topped
Apricot & Plum
Bowl with Tahini
•••
Raspberry
Cheesecake Bites
P. 18
••
Salted Almond
Butter Fudge Cups
P. 18
•••
Lemon Chia Bars
P. 18
P. 72
nutritional
values The
••
White Bean
Bagna Cauda Dip
with Crudités
P. 61
••••
Cherry Chocolate Almond Clusters
P. 96
•••
Strawberry Parfait
P. 83
•••
Thai-Spiced
Power Smoothie
P. 83
nutritional values
used throughout
Clean Eating are
calculated with the
use of The Food
Processor SQL (Esha
Research) and are
provided by food
manufacturers
or found in the
USDA National Nutrient Database.
cleaneating.com
15
bits & bites
3 WAYS WITH
High-Energy Fat Bombs
Indulge your cravings – and get a boost of
energy while you’re at it – with these decadent,
naturally sweetened treats filled with healthy fats.
BY LILY KUNIN, PHOTOGRAPHY BY BEATA LUBAS
Raspberry Cheesecake Bites
GUTTER CREDITS HERE
HEALTH BENEFIT: Did you know that
raspberries are high in fiber? One cup is higher
in fiber (at 8 grams) than the same serving
of grains such as cooked whole-wheat
spaghetti and brown rice!
16
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
Lemon Chia Bars
HEALTH BENEFIT: Chia seeds are tiny powerhouses
filled with omega-3s, fiber, protein and antioxidants.
Thanks to the protein and fiber they contain, chia
seeds can help keep you satiated throughout the day.
Salted Almond Butter Fudge Cups
HEALTH BENEFIT: Cacao is a superfood that
provides a mood-boosting, energy-enhancing
effect by triggering the release of the “love drug”
neurotransmitter phenethylamine (PEA),
which also helps improve focus.
Lily Kunin
GUTTER
LILY
PHOTO
CREDITS
BY GEMMA
HERE + ANDREW INGALLS
RECIPE DEVELOPER,
COOKBOOK AUTHOR
& HEALTH COACH
NEW YORK CITY, NY
& LOS ANGELES, CA
For “3 Ways with HighEnergy Fat Bombs,”
plant-based cook Lily
Kunin strove to showcase
each recipe’s versatility
and nutrition. “I try to
stay active so I am always
looking for an energizing
pre- or post-activity
snack – a fat bomb is
the perfect solution,”
she says. Find more of
Kunin’s recipes in her
cookbook, Good Clean
Food (Abrams, 2017).
cleaneating.com
17
bits & bites | 3 ways with
Lemon Chia Bars
MAKES 20 BARS.
¾ cup + 1 tbsp unsweetened
coconut flakes, divided
Salted Almond Butter
Fudge Cups
Raspberry
Cheesecake Bites
MAKES 12 FUDGE CUPS.
MAKES 16 BITES.
5 tbsp coconut oil, divided
¾ cup coconut butter
½ cup raw almond butter,
divided
2 tbsp raw honey
1/3 cup coconut butter
2 tbsp BPA-free canned full-fat
coconut milk
1/3 cup raw unsweetened
cacao powder
2 tbsp raw honey
3 tbsp pure maple syrup,
divided
½ cup blanched almond flour
2 tbsp lemon zest + 1 tbsp
fresh lemon juice,
divided
6 drops liquid stevia
2 tsp pure vanilla extract
1/8 tsp + pinch sea salt, divided
¾ cup raw unsalted cashews
2 tsp pure vanilla extract
¼ cup raspberries, halved
1/8 tsp fine sea salt or
Himalayan pink salt
¼ cup raw unsalted pecans
1 tbsp chia seeds
1/8 tsp sea salt
¼ tsp ground cinnamon
6 drops liquid stevia
1 tbsp cacao nibs
½ tsp flaked sea salt
1.Line a 8½ x 4½-inch loaf pan
with parchment paper; set aside.
2. To a food processor, add ¾ cup
coconut flakes and pulse until
finely ground. Add almond flour,
coconut butter, coconut milk,
honey, 1½ tbsp lemon zest, lemon
juice, chia seeds, salt and stevia.
Pulse until well combined.
3. In loaf pan, spread out mixture
evenly and top with remaining
1 tbsp coconut flakes and ½ tbsp
lemon zest. Refrigerate for at
least 1 hour, then remove from
pan and cut into 20 squares.
Store leftovers in the fridge for
up to a week or freezer for up to
2 months.
PER SERVING (1 bar): Calories: 75,
Total Fat: 7 g, Sat. Fat: 4 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 1 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1 g, Carbs: 4 g,
Fiber: 2 g, Sugars: 2 g, Protein: 1 g,
Sodium: 16 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
1.Line a mini muffin tin with
12 paper liners; set aside.
2.In a small saucepan on mediumlow, melt 3 tbsp oil. Whisk in
2 tbsp almond butter and remove
from heat. Whisk in cacao powder
until smooth, then mix in 2 tbsp
maple syrup, vanilla and fine sea
salt. Spoon into muffin tins and
freeze for 10 minutes.
3. In another small saucepan
on medium-low, melt remaining
2 tbsp oil. Whisk in remaining
6 tbsp almond butter, remaining
1 tbsp maple syrup and cinnamon
until smooth. Spoon on top of
chocolate layer, then sprinkle
with cacao nibs and flaked salt.
Freeze for 1 hour or until solid.
Store in an airtight container in
the refrigerator for up to
2 months.
PER SERVING (1 fudge cup): Calories: 155,
Total Fat: 13 g, Sat. Fat: 6 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 4 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 2 g, Carbs: 7 g,
Fiber: 2 g, Sugars: 4 g, Protein: 3 g,
Sodium: 119 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
1/8 tsp ground cinnamon
1. To a food processor, add coconut
butter, honey, stevia, vanilla extract and
1/
8 tsp salt. Pulse until smooth. Scrape
down the sides of the processor to push
the mixture back near the blades, then
add cashews. Process until the nuts are
partially broken down or the size
of small gravel.
2. Transfer mixture to a bowl and add
raspberries. Gently stir raspberries to
incorporate – some of the berries will
partially smash, while others remain
whole. Cover and refrigerate for
30 minutes to partially firm.
3. Finely chop pecans into an almost
flour-like consistency. Transfer to a
small bowl and mix with cinnamon and
remaining pinch of salt. Use a melonballer to scoop a compact tablespoon
of cheesecake mixture. Press open side
into pecans lightly to dust, then release
ball from the scoop onto a plate with
the flat (pecan) side down. Repeat with
remaining mixture to form 16 bites.
Refrigerate for a minimum of 1 hour
before serving. Store in the fridge for up
to 4 days, or freeze for up to 2 months.
PER SERVING (1 bite): Calories: 120, Total Fat: 10 g,
Sat. Fat: 7 g, Monounsaturated Fat: 2 g, Polyunsaturated
Fat: 1 g, Carbs: 7 g, Fiber: 2 g, Sugars: 3 g, Protein: 2 g,
Sodium: 27 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
JUNE 2017
bits & bites
EARLY RISERS TEXT BY ASHLEA MILLER, PREBIOTIC TEXT BY THEONA LAYNE, FAMILY PHOTO BY MONKEY BUSINESS IMAGES/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, GARLIC PHOTO BY ELOVICH/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, KETTLE ILLUSTRATION BY KAISSA/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
PREBIOTICS
ENHANCE SLEEP,
BUFFER STRESS
Why Early Risers Eat Better
Early birds could hold the secret to living healthier lives. A recent study
published in Obesity revealed that morning people tend to eat a more
balanced diet and choose healthier foods throughout the day than evening
people, lowering their risk of obesity. The study, led by PhD candidate Mirkka
Maukonen of the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland, looked
at data from nearly 2,000 randomly selected people to determine whether
being a morning or evening person affected their diets. The researchers
found that morning people ate more protein and less sugar in the mornings,
followed by less sugar and fat in the evenings. On the weekends, morning
people maintained a more regular eating schedule and didn’t splurge on as
many extra meals as evening people. Morning types also slept better and
were more physically active overall. While other studies have shown that
your “chronotype,” or biological clock, can affect metabolism, this is the first
study to suggest that your biological clock can influence what and when you
eat, too. This doesn’t mean you’re stuck eating whatever your internal clock
craves, however. Maukonen says whether you’re an early bird or a night
owl is influenced half by your genes and half by choice. “It is possible for an
evening person to adapt to earlier schedules, but the thing that could really
benefit evening persons is a greater flexibility in working time schedules so
that evening persons may live more according to their internal biological
time and not against it,” says Maukonen.
CHEW ON THIS
#166
Mounting evidence on
the benefits of healthy gut
bacteria continues to surface.
Nevertheless, many studies fail
to focus on the unsung heroes
of gut health. According to a
study conducted by University
of Colorado at Boulder
researchers, prebiotics – the
fibers that feed beneficial
gut bacteria – are linked to
enhanced brain function and
resilience to stress. As part of
the study, male rats were fed
either prebiotic-rich foods or
foods lacking this component.
The prebiotic food group had
improved cognitive function,
maintained normal body
temperature and greater
resilience to stress. The study
links these unexpected health
benefits to improved non-rapid
eye movement (NREM) sleep,
and rapid eye movement (REM)
sleep after stressful events.
While prebiotic supplements
offer a convenient option, you
can also get prebiotic foods in
your diet. Jerusalem artichokes,
raw garlic and onions are
excellent choices that can
easily be incorporated into
soups, pastas, stir-fries and
omelettes. Lead researcher
Robert Thompson, PhD, of
the University of Colorado at
Boulder, confirms that studies
involving human participants
are on the horizon.
Clean your electric kettle and other metal items
prone to lime scale by scrubbing the non-electrical
elements with equal parts white vinegar and water.
You can also fill a kettle with an equal ratio of
vinegar to water and let it sit overnight.
cleaneating.com
19
bits & bites | supermarket guide
Glow-Getters
Nourish your body with these refreshing beverages and smoothie boosters.
BY LAURA SCHOBER
Pre-made,bottledjuicesandsmoothiesareagreatwaytomeetyourdailyfruitandvegetablequota.Butnotevery
bevvieisthesame;somemasqueradeas“healthy”yetcontainaddedsugar,artificialingredientsorprocessed
thickeners.Instead,optforoneofthesewholesomeoptionsthatarenaturallyrichinvitaminsandminerals.
2. THE PROTEIN
QUEEN
Spoon in a scoop
of VegiDay Raw
Organic PlantBased Protein in
French Vanilla
for 20 grams of
protein. This pea
and rice protein
powder keeps
your body in top
shape by building
lean muscle
and aiding in
weight loss or
maintenance.
$33 per 19 oz,
myvegiday.com
3. THE
ANTIOXIDANT
POWERHOUSE
Make a standout
acai bowl or
smoothie with
Tambor Acaí pack
in Traditional.
Wild-harvested,
unsweetened and
certified organic,
this Brazilian super
fruit offers loads
of antioxidants,
protein, omegas
and essential
amino acids.
$8 per 4 pack,
tamboracai.com
4. THE THIRST
QUENCHER
Cold-pressed
watermelon and
lemon juices
mingle for a
naturally sweet
and hydrating
beverage.
Evolution Fresh
Watermelon Juice
is a source of
the electrolyte
potassium,
which helps
control nerve and
muscle function.
$5 per 15 oz,
evolutionfresh.com
2
5. THE SKIN
BOOSTER
NeoCell
Derma Matrix
Collagen Skin
Complex targets
the skin with
hyaluronic acid,
vitamin C and
bioactive collagen
to promote cell
turnover, reduce
the look of fine
lines and assist in
collagen formation
for smooth,
youngerlooking skin.
$25 per 6.5 oz,
neocell.com
6. THE BOTTLE
OF RADIANCE
Mangos are
added to the mix
of Florida oranges
in this freshly
squeezed, nonGMO juice. Each
8-ounce serving
of Natalie’s Orchid
Island Juice
Company in Orange
Mango provides
160% of your daily
value (DV) of skinsupportive vitamin C.
$3 per 16 oz,
orchidislandjuice.com
5
1
4
3
6
PHOTO BY SARAH ALDRICH
1. THE
ENERGIZER
Daily Greens
Harmony Sweet
Greens blends
organic celery,
pear, apple, kale,
fennel, ginger
and lemon for a
lightly sweet and
earthy beverage
containing
energizing
nutrients such
as iron and B
vitamins. $5,
drinkdailygreens.com
AddBlue
Majiktoyour
smoothiesfor
abrightburst
ofnatural
color!
20
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
Allergies?
“I couldn’t be happier”
“I changed to this from a popular saline-only rinse and
I couldn't be happier. It works so much better with the
xylitol which adds to the cleansing and healing qualities
of saline.” - SATISFIED XLEAR CUSTOMER
Xlear Sinus Rinse
Easy-to-use
ergonomic bottle
Pre-measured
packets with xylitol
ANY ONE (1)
XLEAR® SINUS
RINSE OR XLEAR®
1.5 NASAL SPRAY
MANUFACTURER’S COUPON EXPIRES 8/31/2017
XLEAR PRODUCTS AVAILABLE AT THESE AND OTHER FINE HEALTH FOOD RETAILERS
CUSTOMER: REDEEM ONLY BY PURCHASING THE BRAND
AND SIZE INDICATED. MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED. VOID IF
TRANSFERRED TO ANY PERSON, FIRM, OR GROUP PRIOR TO
STORE REDEMPTION. LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PURCHASE.
RETAILER: XLEAR INC., WILL REIMBURSE YOU THE FACE
VALUE OF THIS COUPON PLUS 8 CENTS HANDLING IN
ACCORDANCE WITH OUR REDEMPTION POLICY (COPY
AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST). CUSTOMER MUST PAY ANY
SALES TAX. SEND COUPON TO: XLEAR, MANDLIK & RHODES,
PO BOX 490 DEPT. #1112, TECATE, CA 91980 CASH VALUE:
1/100 CENT. X LE A R. CO M
0700596-009335
S A V ES A V E
bits & bites
You may want to think twice before buying conventional
pears for your clean-eating recipes: Both pears and
potatoes are new additions the Environmental Working
Group (EWG)'s 2017 Dirty Dozen list of the top pesticidecontaminated produce. The EWG found that nearly 70%
of samples of 48 types of conventional produce contained
residues of one or more pesticides. “Eating plenty of
fruits and vegetables is essential no matter how they're
grown, but for the items with the heaviest pesticide
loads, we urge shoppers to buy organic,” says Sonya
Lunder, a senior analyst at EWG. Clean Eating suggests
making organic a priority when it comes to produce on
the Dirty Dozen list and buying nonorganic for produce
on the Clean 15 list (foods with the lowest amounts of
pesticide residues), which includes sweet corn, avocado,
cauliflower and onions. For the full list, download the
EWG’s shopping guides at ewg.org.
Higher potency fast-acting liquid soft-gels
for Women
NEW PRODUCTS!
Available at Fine Health Food Stores Everywhere.
is a registered trademark of Sabinsa Corporation.
DIRTY DOZEN TEXT BY LAURA SCHOBER, PEARS BY MORINKA/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
THE NEW DIRTY DOZEN
bits & bites
TWEET TEXT BY LAURA SCHOBER, ALMOND BY GAIDAMASHCHUK/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Tweet Your Way to Diet Success
Health and fitness apps can be a helpful weight-loss tool, but just how effective
are they? It turns out that linking your apps to your social media accounts – while
maintaining a positive mindset and engaging with social media communities – can
make a huge difference. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology examined
over 2 million tweets and 100,000+ daily MyFitnessPal (MFP) entries from nearly 700 users.
They found that there is a direct correlation between a person’s attitude toward their fitness and health
goals on their social media accounts and the likelihood of dieting success. Researchers were able to
analyze the sentiment of words and phrases a person uses on Twitter with an accuracy rate of 77%.
Lead researcher Munmun De Choudhury, PhD, assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology,
says successful dieters are focused on future results, are generally more engaged on social media (for
example, exchanging more tweets with others) and have larger social networks and support systems.
“They tend to post more positively, exhibit high cognitive functioning in the language of their tweets,
and demonstrate collective attention (using more of ‘we’ and ‘us’ over ‘I’ and ‘me’),” says De Choudhury.
De Choudhury suggests their new method could be used in the future to provide greater insights and
benefits to overall health and well-being.
CHEW
ON THIS
#145
To extend the shelf life of nuts, which contain fats that can
easily go rancid if stored in a pantry for too long, refrigerate or
freeze them in their shell. This helps preserve their natural oils.
Refrigerate for up to 6 months and freeze for up to 1 year. For over 20 years, Irwin Naturals has formulated “best-in-class” supplements for women that address a wide
spectrum of health needs. Our extensive line uses an all-liquid soft-gel delivery that offers superior advantages over
hard-to-digest tablets and capsules. Plus, our signature BioPerine Complex enhances nutrient absorption and potency.
Check out some of the latest additions to our family of products below. If you are not yet familiar with
the entire breadth of this amazing health-conscious brand, check us out at www.IrwinNaturals.com, and put
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Save $2.00 on any product at
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Consumer: Redeemable at retail locations only. Not valid for online or mail-order purchases.
Retailer: Irwin Naturals will reimburse you for the face value plus 8 (cents) handling provided
it is redeemed by a consumer at the time of purchase on the brand specified. Coupons
not properly redeemed will be void and held. Reproduction by any party by any means is
expressly prohibited. Any other use constitutes fraud. Irwin Naturals reserves the right to
deny reimbursement (due to misredemption activity) and/or request proof of purchase for
coupon(s) submitted. Mail to: CMS Dept. 10363, Irwin Naturals, 1 Fawcett Drive, Del Rio, TX
78840. Cash value: .001 (cents). Void where taxed or restricted. ONE COUPON PER PURCHASE.
Not valid for mail order/websites. Retail only.
These statements have not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration.
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
Follow Us On...
bits & bites | clean living
Orange
Blossom
Body Mists
1/3 cup neroli floral water (also
called neroli hydrosol)
r
e
m
m
Su in a Bottle
Go ahead and spritz yourself silly with
these sunny, chemical-free scents.
BY KATHRIN BRUNNER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEAGHAN EADY
Bursting with bright notes of citrus and light florals, these uplifting
body mists are noteworthy for what they don’t contain. According to
the Environmental Working Group, the average store-bought perfume
contains 14 fragrance chemicals not listed on the label, including hormone
disruptors. Instead, blend your own scents using neroli (orange blossom)
floral water and essential oils for two fresh and natural body mists.
1
24
cleaneating.com
2
1/4 cup alcohol-free witch hazel
2 tsp vegetable glycerin
FRESH CITRUS
60 drops pink grapefruit
essential oil
5 drops vanilla essential oil
BRIGHT FLORAL
45 drops blood orange essential oil
18 drops jasmine essential oil
1. Using a funnel, add neroli floral
water, witch hazel and glycerin to
a glass spray bottle.
2. Choose either the Fresh Citrus
or the Bright Floral essential oil
blend and add ingredients to bottle.
Seal tightly.
3. Shake before use and spray
onto skin. Store in a cool place
for up to 6 months.
3
JUNE 2017
Saving Skin
Baby your skin and fight the signs of aging with these face and body beautifiers.
BY LAURA SCHOBER
BRIGHTEN UP
SMOOTH AS VELVET
BALANCING ACT
DERMA E Vitamin C
Concentrated Serum
contains hyaluronic
acid to hydrate skin
and vitamin C for a
dose of antioxidants.
Layer this underneath
moisturizer to boost
radiance, even tone
and reduce fine
lines and wrinkles.
In Ancient Egypt,
Cleopatra preserved her
luminous skin by taking
rose and milk baths on
the regular. Lucky for us,
Nubian Heritage Goat’s
Milk and Chai Body Lotion
contains rose and chai
extracts to defend against
aging free radicals and
moisturizing shea butter
to leave skin luxurious –
just like a queen’s.
Using tropical flower
extracts as well as
banana and aloe
to soothe skin,
plus clay to draw
out impurities, Ola
Tropical Apothecary
Pua: Hibiscus
Volcanic Mask
keeps skin healthy
while preventing
breakouts. $37.50,
PRODUCTS PHOTO BY VINCENZO PISTRITTO
$24.50, dermae.com
$13, nubianheritage.com
hawaiianbodyproducts.com
KATHRIN BRUNNER is a Toronto-based nutritionist and yoga teacher. She has a passion for holistic living and is a
super-avid DIYer who has created several lines of natural body-care products. Brunner teaches at The Institute of
Holistic Nutrition and has a private practice that offers a variety of workshops, corporate talks and yoga classes.
Visit her website at fortheloveofbody.com.
bits & bites | foodie faves
Shortcuts
Real-Food
No time to cook? Turn to these healthy and
wholesome foods to sate hunger fast.
BY LAURA SCHOBER
1. SUPERFOOD COOKIES
Containing pure ingredients like coconut and
Vermont maple syrup, Coco-Roons Chocolate
Chip is a low-glycemic snack that satisfies your
sweet tooth without that dreaded sugar crash.
$4 per 3 oz, sejoyia.com for where to buy
1
2
2. FALLING FOR FLAX
Wildway Grain-Free Instant Hot Cereal Blueberry
Flax may be the answer to your grain-free
breakfast prayers. Available in grab-and-go
pouches, this morning meal makes a heavenly
pairing with fresh berries and maple syrup.
$6, wildwayoflife.com for where to buy
3. HIT REFRESH
On sunny days, we like to cool down with Tio
Gazpacho Fresa chilled soup. Best of all, you can
down this fruity and lightly sweet strawberry,
romaine and basil blend right out of the bottle.
$5, tiogazpacho.com for where to buy
3
4. PORTABLE POUCH
Add some sustainably sourced protein and
omega-3s to your salads or bowls with Blue
Harbor Fish Co. Albacore Tuna in Water,
No Salt Added. It comes in a convenient
pouch so you can take it to go. $3 per 3 oz,
blueharborfishco.com
5
6
5. READY IN A FLASH
When you're just too busy to cook, 365 Everyday
Value Organic Quinoa with Vegetables (with
zucchini and sweet potato) can be ready on the
stove top in 5 minutes flat. $4, Whole Foods
Markets nationwide
6. SMOOTHIE BOWL FTW
A smoothie bowl that eliminates the step of
chopping veggies and fruits? Check. Superfood
boosts like lucuma, maqui berry and goji berry?
Check, check and check. Simply blend Leap
Smoothies Red Power packets with milk and
fresh fruit then add your favorite toppings.
$3, leapsmoothies.com
26
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
PHOTO BY VINCENZO PISTRITTO
4
Chew
something
awesome.
Your new favorite snack
isn’t just delicious; it helps
increase organic farmland.
Learn more at Kashi.com/Transitional
®, TM, © 2017 Kashi Co.
bits & bites | the happening
Heal
y Buzz
Feed your mind, body and soul with the
most-talked-about food developments,
reads and health inspo. BY LAURA SCHOBER
EAT RIGHT
Employing a modern spin on traditional
favorites, Eat Right: The Complete
Guide to Traditional Foods with 130
Nourishing Recipes and Techniques
spotlights wholesome, ethically sourced
foods using raw and cultured dairy,
pastured animal foods, soured whole
grains, fermented foods and beverages,
and local and seasonal produce. Using
old-world techniques and methods
inspired by global cuisines, author
Nick Barnard brings an exciting
wealth of real foods to his recipes,
including ones for kefir, sourdough
and sauerkraut. You’ll also find
nutritional benefits and the stories on
the origins of the dish. While some of
Barnard’s recipes take some time, the
mouthwatering results are well worth it. By Nick Barnard (Kyle Books, $40)
THE LAURA LEA BALANCED COOKBOOK
In The Laura Lea Balanced Cookbook: 120+ Everyday Recipes for
the Healthy Home Cook, holistic chef Laura Lea dishes out over 120
gluten-free, healthy spins on beloved recipes. Using her “LL Balanced”
approach to food, Lea includes plenty of quick and easy recipes (many
under 30 minutes) that include both meat and meat-free options, serving
suggestions and swaps to accommodate vegan, dairy-free or Paleo diets.
She also provides a weekly menu to help you plan out your meals, tips to
build a healthy pantry and a list
of basic kitchen equipment to
get you started. While the book
is user-friendly for beginner
cooks, any level of home chef
is sure to find recipes for their
dinner table. Gluten-free grains
like quinoa and oats, pastureraised beef, sustainable seafood
and plant-based foods culminate
for a truly balanced, mindful
and happy approach to eating
healthy. By Laura Lea Goldberg
($30, Spring House Press)
28
cleaneating.com
If a dietary rejig
isn't enough to
fix what ails you,
then a specialized
supplement may
help – no prescription required.
(However, as always, CE recommends
speaking to your health-care professional
before taking any new supplements.)
Companies like goop Wellness and
DAO Labs recently introduced functional
vitamin and supplement regimens that
address a myriad of health concerns ranging
from hormone health to energy levels and
stress management. Made with traditional
Chinese herbs that have been rigorously
tested for safety and purity, DAO Labs
(mydaolabs.com) offers four different formulas
tailored to specific health needs. Gwyneth
Paltrow's goop Wellness line (goop.com)
offers four doctor-formulated options to help
with issues such as slow metabolism, lack of
energy and extreme fatigue.
A NOVEL
BIODEGRADABLE
SOLUTION
Sustainable food storage
is being taken a step further
by scientists at Kaunas
University of Technology
(KTU) in Lithuania. From cellulose
composites, they have developed
biodegradable food-packaging materials
that keep foods fresher for longer, thereby
reducing food waste. And, compared to
plastic containers that end up in landfills,
lead researcher Paulius Pavelas Danilovas,
PhD, of KTU’s Department of Polymer
Chemistry and Technology says their
packaging is fully compostable, which
would result in less packaging waste.
The team used active components in the
form of free radical–fighting clove ethereal
oil for an antioxidizing effect that maintains
freshness of food for longer, and ionic
silver particles for an antimicrobial effect.
The latter would aid in preventing foodborne illnesses by inhibiting the growth of
microorganisms. While the product isn’t yet
ready for consumers, the KTU team says
they aim to introduce it to the United States
market in the near future.
JUNE 2017
BIODEGRADABLE LOGO YE LIEW/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
The
VITAMIN
PARADE
bits & bites
ASK OUR DIETITIANS
Got a food question? We have the answers.
Q/ Should I be drinking coffee to help reduce
my risk of cancer?
CUP AND PLATE PHOTO BY JIRI HERA/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, COFFEE SVETLANA CHERRUTY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, WHEAT ILLUSTRATIONS BY SVSTUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
/
A Good news for coffee lovers: A 2016 study published in Cancer
Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention found that drinking coffee may
decrease risk of colorectal cancer. Participants who drank one to two
servings a day saw a 26% decrease in risk while those who consumed
more than 2½ servings a day experienced a 54% decrease in risk. The
amount of caffeine didn’t seem to matter as researchers looked at
all types of coffee consumed (including decaf). They speculated that
coffee’s antioxidant polyphenols are to credit, as they may help limit
growth of colon cancer cells. Additionally, a class of compounds in
coffee called diterpenes may prevent cancer by protecting against
oxidative damage. This research piggybacks on a 2015 study from Lund
University that found that drinking at least 2 cups of coffee a day may
protect against breast cancer and recurrence in women who have been
diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with tamoxifen. So keep
getting your coffee fix, but keep your consumption to between two
and three servings per day.
Q/ What is non-celiac
gluten sensitivity?
Is it a medically
recognized condition?
/
A Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS)
is a condition where the ingestion
of gluten triggers in people similar
symptoms as celiac disease. When
people with celiac disease eat gluten – a
protein found in wheat, rye, barley and
triticale – their immune system mounts
an attack on their small intestine.
This reaction causes damage to the
intestine, interrupts the absorption
of nutrients, and leads to sometimes
painful and debilitating symptoms such
as bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea,
headache and fatigue. Celiac disease
affects about 1% of the population and
is diagnosed with a blood test as well
as an endoscopic biopsy of the small
intestine. However, the symptoms of
celiac sometimes occur in people who
do not have the disease. The findings of
a recent study published in the journal
Gut showed that people with NCGS did
show evidence of an acute systemic
immune activation that does not occur
in celiac disease, accompanied by signs
of intestinal cell damage. There is much
about this condition that isn’t yet fully
understood, including how much of
the population is affected by it, but
this study helps increase credibility of
NCGS as an independent condition. The
next step would be the development
of a blood test that can confirm the
diagnosis of NCGS.
Registered dietitians Tiffani Bachus and Erin Macdonald are the
co-founders and creators of URockGirl.com, a website dedicated to
promoting wellness and a healthy, balanced lifestyle.
cleaneating.com
29
a greener you
Where have all
the bees gone?
It’s time to give bees their due – find out
why pollinators are vital to a thriving
and healthy ecological system.
Bees communicate with one
another using dance – such as
the “waggle” – and chemical
scents called pheromones.
30
cleaneating.com
Bees have two
stomachs: one for
eating and another
for storing nectar.
LEAD PHOTO © ELENATHEWISE/MASTERFILE, ILLUSTRATION JENSINE ECKWALL
BY KATE GEAGAN
There are three
types of bees in the
hive: queen, worker
and drone.
Honeybees have five
eyes: three small
ones on the center
of the head and two
compound eyes on
the front.
To make 1 pound of honey,
it takes an average of 556
worker bees to collect nectar
from about 2 million flowers!
The average lifespan of a
worker bee is 3 to 6 weeks.
What do Clean Eating
favorites like almonds,
strawberries, pumpkins,
blueberries and mango
have in common?
Without pollinators, they
couldn’t exist. While
that may sound like a
quaint elementary school
science lesson, you might
be surprised to discover
that bees are one of the
biggest topics buzzing
around “good food”
conversations today.
Here’s why they matter
for a healthy diet and a
greener world.
Why Pollinators Are
the Bee’s Knees
Bees do far more for your diet
than create delicious honey. As
pollinators, they are the hidden
heroes of the food system, playing
a crucial role in producing more
than one-third of the world’s food
crops. The economic value of the
services they perform reaches into
the billions (they pollinate more
than $15 billion worth of crops) –
though they do it free of charge.
In practical terms, one in every
three bites of the food you eat
depends on bees, including crops
such as certain fruits, vegetables
and nuts that are the cornerstone
of a healthy diet. And, if you’re a
coffee drinker, well, guess what:
Coffee beans depend on bees, too.
In fact, bees are so fundamental
to the food chain that they have a
special name: They’re known as a
cleaneating.com
31
a greener you
“keystone species,” meaning they
play a disproportionately large
(and environmentally critical) role
in an ecosystem relative to their
abundance in that ecosystem.
“To estimate their total value to our
planet would be like trying to put a
price on water or oxygen,” says Eric
Mader, co-director of the Pollinator
Program at The Xerces Society.
Why Are Bees in
Such Decline?
Here’s where the challenge comes
in. Worldwide, the numbers
of honeybees and native bee
populations are dropping at an
alarming rate. According to The
Xerces Society, there are three
main reasons for this: habitat
loss, pesticide use and introduced
diseases. In addition, protecting
pollinators requires a fundamental
shift in how we grow our food.
Conventional agriculture typically
relies on single-crop farming,
which means that outside of crop
bloom periods, food sources for
pollinators are scarce. Even when
crops are in bloom, however,
they may be contaminated with
pesticides. Without a robust
population of native bees, many
farms now must bring in large
numbers of bees seasonally
to pollinate crops. However,
transporting bees around the
country creates other problems,
such as making it easier for
disease to spread between hives.
While the exact role each of these
modern-day factors plays on bee
health is still being worked out
by researchers, experts seem to
agree on another key point: When
bees don’t have access to a variety
of diverse food sources, they have
weaker immune systems and are
more susceptible to other stress
factors such as pesticides and
disease. (If humans ate the exact
same few foods day after day, we
would create nutrient deficiencies
that sap our health.)
Thankfully, a growing chorus
of large-scale food companies,
researchers and government
officials have started to sound the
alarm that we must fundamentally
change the way ingredients are
grown to help bring back native bee
populations. And many are working
to create more bee-friendly habitats
on farms and in our communities.
4 THINGS YOU CAN DO NOW
Here are four steps you can take to help restore
and protect the health and resilience of local bees.
1 / Plant native flowers. Creating a more diverse supply of nectar and
pollen sources, as well as year-round habitat for bees is key to helping them
thrive. This summer, plant a wildflower window box, a rooftop or container
garden or a patch of local flowers to provide bees with sources of food and
shelter. (Visit xerces.org for more information on what works in your area.)
/
2 Keep some untidy areas. Leave a bit of “mess” in your yard this
season. Tree stumps, brush piles, sandy soils and other unkempt areas of
your yard help create a natural pollinator haven that helps local bees thrive.
/
3 Minimize pesticides and insecticides. When purchasing
plants for your garden or choosing lawn care products, look for options that
avoid pesticides and insecticides. At the grocery store, prioritize products
that have a Certified Organic or Biodynamic seal, as both prohibit the use of
pesticides such as neonics, which can harm bees. (Biodynamic also requires
at least 10% of the farm is set aside for biodiversity.) Many sustainableminded food companies have started partnering with The Xerces Society
to make large-scale, public commitments to bee health, so read labels and
check websites.
Kate Geagan, MS, RD, is an award-winning dietitian and
internationally recognized leader in sustainable eating and nutrition.
She is the author of Go Green, Get Lean: Trim Your Waistline with
the Ultimate Low Carbon Footprint Diet, and she’s regularly
appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and Katie Couric’s show Katie.
32
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
BEE PHOTO STUDIOSMART/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
/
4 Spread the word. Ask the farmers at your local farmers’ market
what they are doing to boost pollinator health on their acreage. Talk with
neighbors, your local garden clubs and school groups about how they can
help restore pollinator habitat in your area. And for your next dinner party
or birthday celebration, consider gift packets of local wildflower seeds.
Discover the Dr. Ohhira Difference!™
Why I Recommend This Whole-Food Probiotic
Superior health requires humans to have the correct balance of vigorous, beneficial bacteria.
The same holds true for plants and animals and is a common thread that connects us all.
Unfortunately this balance is often disturbed due to modern living, stress, bad food choices
and medication. This is where Dr. Ohhira’s Probiotics® come in. A ‘Whole Food’ supplement, it
is nurtured through a three-year, natural temperature fermentation process that includes
all-natural, seasonally harvested ingredients. It is the only gut health supplement that
incorporates prebiotics, probiotics and postbiotics. I take Dr. Ohhira’s myself and recommend
them to my family and friends. Experience homegrown health with Dr. Ohhira’s entire line of
probiotic formulations including Propolis PLUS®, and the Kampuku Beauty Bar™.*
Naturally Yours,
Howard Garrett
“The Dirt Doctor”
National Talk Show Host
President of the Texas Organic Research Center
Find these formulas at better health food stores nationwide. www.EssentialFormulas.com • (972) 255-3918
* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
complements
Balance Your
Blood Sugar
From getting more Zs to savvy supplementing, we’ve unearthed the
top nutrients for even-keel blood sugar to help reduce your risk
of inflammation, a precursor to many health conditions. BY SARAH TUFF DUNN
It’s summertime, which means you need even
more energy for the longer days of work and play.
The secret? Maintaining the right blood sugar, or blood
glucose levels, in order to deliver optimal cellular functioning.
But getting the right balance is more complicated than skipping
refined carbohydrates and other processed foods. It comes
down to choosing the right nutrients and supplements in
order to avoid the highs and lows.
“Everyone knows that elevated blood sugar leads to diabetes,
but before this diagnosis is made, often people can experience
glucose dysfunction where they fluctuate between high and
low blood sugar and can feel weak, lightheaded and shaky –
referred to as reactive hypoglycemia,” says Jennifer Stagg, ND,
a naturopathic physician and author of Unzip Your Genes:
5 Choices to Reveal a Radically Radiant You (Post Hill Press,
2016). “The goal is to achieve a balanced glucose level where
there are not high peaks of blood sugar. Elevations in blood
sugar and, in turn, insulin, lead to inflammation, which
impacts every body system.”
Stagg helps weigh in on five ways to get the right glucose
going for the greatest summer yet.
1. PICK YOUR PROTEIN
Switching to protein over carbs for
just 5 weeks can result in a significant
improvement in total blood glucose
response over a 24-hour period in people
with type 2 diabetes, according to a study
in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Subjects in the high-protein-diet group
consumed protein sources that included
one 9-ounce portion of baked chicken,
8-ounce servings of yogurt and milk, and
3-ounce servings of cottage cheese. (The
study used low-fat dairy, so make sure to
swap in full-fat instead.)
2. NOSH ON NUTS
Pasta with pine nuts? Yes, please. Researchers
have found that adding tree nuts – including pine
nuts, walnuts, almonds, cashews, macadamia
nuts and Brazil nuts – to high-carb meals can
help manage the blood-sugar drop that might
otherwise come from such a meal. “Nuts are low
in carbohydrate, have a healthy fatty acid profile
and are high in vegetable protein, fiber and
magnesium,” add the authors of the Asia Pacific
Journal of Clinical Nutrition study.
Get this mint and pine
nut–topped pasta that
fits the bill at
cleaneating.com/
pappardelle
34
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
PASTA PHOTO BY RONALD TSANG, WOMAN PHOTO BY ANTONIO GUILLEM/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
3. GET AHOLD OF YOUR GLYCEMIC LOAD
“To stay balanced, it’s important to eat meals that are balanced
in their glycemic load. This means that in response to the meal,
glucose levels don’t spike,” says Stagg. “In general, sweets and
starchy foods have a higher glycemic load, while foods high in
protein, healthy fats and fiber lower the glycemic response to a
meal.” A 1-cup serving of peanuts has a glycemic load of 1.6 while a
1-cup serving of white rice has a glycemic load of 43.
4. TURN TO Bs, Cs & Ds
Berberine, biotin, D-chiro-inositol and vitamin D – these are some of
the key supplements with the most evidence of reducing blood sugar,
either alone or in combination with other nutrients, explains Stagg.
“Chromium is more effective for people who are insulin-resistant
because it makes insulin more active by helping it bind to the insulin
receptor more effectively,” says Stagg. “But without a healthy diet, one
can’t expect dietary supplements to ‘fix’ dysregulated blood sugar.”
5. TURN OUT THE LIGHTS
When the sun rises earlier and sets
later, it’s natural to stretch the days
for as long as you can, sometimes
jeopardizing sleep patterns. But getting
extra Zs can be as critical as those
Bs, Cs and Ds. As the National Sleep
Foundation reports, people who slept
only 4 hours per night for six nights had
a 40% reduced ability to break down
blood sugar versus those who slept
for longer periods of time. Your brain
needs deep sleep in order to decrease
cortisol and restore blood glucose
levels to normal.
cleaneating.com
35
NEW COLUMN
Plant Powered
You can do anything for a day
– even go vegan! Bring a little
newness to your routine and
experiment with eating purely
plant-based plates for an
invigorating 24 hours.
Clean Eating readers are all about
balance when it comes to eating,
which is why it’s no surprise that more
than half of you consider yourselves
plant-focused flexitarians. Lately,
your requests for more plant-based
recipes have been flooding in, so we’re
answering with this new column full of
meatless meal inspiration that allows
you to throw a vegetarian or vegan day
into your weekly mix.
So why eat more plants? Well, for
one, you’ll save money. Eating more
vegetables, grains and fruits – even
just once or twice a week – could wind
up saving a thousand dollars or more
per year. Another plant perk is that
your dinner plate will be full of color.
Disease-fighting phytochemicals give
fruits and veggies their rich, varied hues.
Carotenoids and anthocyanins are two
of the main phytochemical classes.
All rich yellow and orange fruits and
vegetables – carrots, oranges, sweet
potatoes, mangoes, pumpkins, butternut
squash – owe their color to carotenoids.
Although leafy green vegetables contain
the carotenoid lutein, they get their
green pigment from chlorophyll. Red,
blue and purple fruits and vegetables
– such as plums and berries – get their
color from anthocyanins.
Cooking by color is a wonderful way to
ensure you’re eating a variety of naturally
occurring substances that boost
immunity and protect against a range of
illnesses. Enjoy this daily dose of vibrant,
cost-effective meals and we’ll see you
next month for more.
36
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
RECIPES BY STACY ADIMANDO AND JULIE MORRIS, LEAD 464745035/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
RECIPE PHOTOGRAPHY
BY ELLEN CHARLOTTE MARIE
veg for a day
BREAKFAST
Make-Ahead Coconut Oatmeal Bake with Blueberries & Almonds
SERVES 8. HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 40 MINUTES.
1 large egg
2 cups full-fat coconut milk
6 tbsp coconut sugar, divided
½ tsp pure vanilla extract
½ tsp ground cinnamon
¼ tsp sea salt
3 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
1 heaping cup fresh
blueberries, divided
6 tbsp sliced unsalted
almonds, divided
coconut or full-fat Greek
yogurt, optional
1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Mist an
8-inch-square baking dish with
cooking spray.
2. In a medium bowl, beat egg until
lightly frothy. Whisk in coconut
milk, ¼ cup coconut sugar, vanilla,
cinnamon and salt. Stir in oats, all
but 2 tbsp blueberries, and 5 tbsp
almonds. Spread oatmeal mixture in
prepared baking dish, and sprinkle
with remaining 2 tbsp each coconut
sugar and blueberries and 1 tbsp
almonds. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes,
until lightly golden on top and
cooked throughout.
3. Serve warm or at room
temperature with yogurt (if using).
Cover and refrigerate for up to
four days; reheat or bring to room
temperature before serving.
PER SERVING (1/8 of recipe): Calories: 312,
Total Fat: 17 g, Sat. Fat: 11 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 3 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 2 g, Carbs: 37 g,
Fiber: 4 g, Sugars: 14 g, Protein: 7 g,
Sodium: 81 mg, Cholesterol: 23 mg
cleaneating.com
37
RECIPES | veg for a day
Spiced Tempeh Tacos
with Creamy Cashew Sauce
SERVES 4.
HANDS-ON TIME: 25 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 25 MINUTES.
CASHEW SAUCE
½ cup raw unsalted cashews
⅓ cup fresh lime juice
1½ tsp ancho chile powder
½ tsp garlic powder
Pinch each sea salt and ground
black pepper, or to taste
TACOS
2 tbsp coconut oil
1 yellow onion, thinly sliced
1 tsp chile powder
½ tsp each ground cumin and
sea salt
1/8 tsp ground black pepper
1 8-oz pkg organic tempeh, cubed
8 5-inch corn tortillas, warmed
optional garnishes: red
cabbage, avocado, pico
de gallo, lime wedges,
hot sauce
1. Prepare sauce: In a blender, purée
all sauce ingredients and 5 tbsp
water until smooth.
2. In a large skillet on medium-high,
heat oil. Add onion, and cook for 3 to
4 minutes. Add chile powder, cumin,
salt and pepper and cook, stirring
for 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add
tempeh and cook 3 to 4 minutes,
until golden, stirring frequently.
Divide tempeh mixture among
tortillas, top with cashew sauce and
optional garnishes of your choice.
PER SERVING (2 tacos): Calories: 341, Total
Fat: 20 g, Sat. Fat: 8 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 6 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 4 g, Carbs: 29 g,
Fiber: 4 g, Sugars: 4 g, Protein: 17 g,
Sodium: 331 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
38
cleaneating.com
LUNCH
JUNE 2017
Gluten-Free
Cauliflower Pizza Crust
MAKES 1 9-INCH CRUST.
HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR.
3 cups coarsely chopped
cauliflower (about
1 medium head)
DINNER
1 tbsp olive oil
¼ tsp sea salt
⅛ tsp ground black pepper
¼ cup ground flaxseed meal
¼ cup brown rice flour
¼ cup arrowroot flour
2 tbsp nutritional yeast
¾ tsp garlic powder
2 tbsp tahini paste
1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a large
baking sheet with parchment paper.
2. In a food processor, pulse
cauliflower until cut into very
small, rice-sized bits. Transfer
to a large bowl, and toss with oil,
salt and pepper. Spread cauliflower
on prepared baking sheet and roast
20 minutes, tossing halfway
through and smoothing back out
on baking sheet.
3. In large bowl, combine flaxseed
meal, rice flour, arrowroot, yeast
and garlic powder. Add cooked
cauliflower and toss to combine. In
a small bowl, whisk together tahini
and 2 tbsp water. Add tahini mixture
to cauliflower, then knead by hand
to fully incorporate. Shape into a
compact ball.
4. Turn baking sheet facedown.
Lay parchment paper on back side,
and mist with cooking spray. Place
dough ball in center of sheet, and
lay second piece of parchment on
top. Press to slightly flatten, and use
a rolling pin to smooth out into a
9-inch circle. Peel away top layer of
parchment (reserve for next step),
and use your fingers to smooth and
round dough edges. Bake 18 to
20 minutes, or until edges are
slightly browned and crispy.
5. Remove pizza crust from oven,
and cover with reserved parchment.
Place a second baking sheet on
top, right side up. Sandwich the
crust between baking sheets, flip
everything over, and remove hot
baking sheet and top parchment.
Top crust with desired toppings –
here we’ve added pesto, zucchini,
red onion, mushrooms and pine
nuts – and bake 5 minutes more,
or until toppings are hot and
bubbly. Cut into 8 slices.
PER SERVING (2 slices): Calories: 213,
Total Fat: 11 g, Sat. Fat: 1 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 5 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 4 g, Carbs: 24 g,
Fiber: 6 g, Sugars: 2 g, Protein: 7 g,
Sodium: 151 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
cleaneating.com
39
y
h
t
l
a
e
H
gear & gadgets
Kitchen
Helpers
Keep your wellness goals on track
with these eye-catching accessories
and tools. BY LAURA SCHOBER
CLEAN & COMPACT
Available in a striking charcoal gray, the
Umbra UDRY Drying Mat with Rack features
a dishwasher-safe rack and machinewashable absorbable mat that conveniently
separates for cleaning. $15, umbra.com
FRIENDLY NAPKINS
Japanese cherry
blossoms are a symbol of
international friendship,
which makes these softdraped cotton-linen napkins
a welcoming and fitting
choice for any dinner
party or casual gathering.
$29 per set of four,
williams-sonoma.com
HERB HOME
Featuring a sliding
center and green silicone
stoppers, the Artland
Glass Herb Keeper stores
a wide variety of herbs
to keep them fresher for
longer. $25, wayfair.com
STEAM IT
The Gourmia SteamTower 300 Digital 3-Tier Vegetable
and Food Steamer makes it super easy to cook foods like
fish, rice and veggies in tandem with one another. It has
a multi-level design and “Flavor Lock” steam system to
preserve nutrients. $51, bedbathandbeyond.com
40
cleaneating.com
TEA FOR ONE
Perfect for solo
sipping, the
charming Spots of
Tea Set includes a
ceramic teapot,
cup and saucer.
$40, modcloth.com
GORGEOUSLY
GLAZED
Designed for both food
preparation and serving,
this beautiful two-tone
Aqua Dip Mixing Bowl
with Spout is made out of
Portuguese earthenware.
$30, crateandbarrel.com
SLOW DOWN
& SAVOR
editors' pick
The Juice and
Smoothie Preserving
Bottle has a lid
equipped with
a vacuum pump
mechanism that
slows down fruit and
vegetable oxidization,
preserving more of its
vital nutrients, so your
drink will last for up to
7 days in the fridge.
$30, givesimple.com
HAVE A WHALE
OF A TIME
The Marble Whale Board
measures a generous 2 feet
long, making it a great choice
for cheese or charcuterie
spreads meant to feed a
crowd. We also love that
it was made in India using
Makrana marble – the same
material that was used in the
construction of the Taj Mahal!
$240, burkedecor.com
GOURMET FLAVOR
With the stainless steel Soup Pot Flavor
Infuser, your inner chef will appreciate
the ability to add a burst of garlic or
herb flavor to stews and soups. $25,
uncommongoods.com
GEOMETRIC DELIGHT
DRESS UP YOUR SALAD
However you want to toss it, these glitzy
24-karat gold and crystal ANNA by RabLabs’
Scossa Salad Servers are guaranteed to add
glamour and sophistication to your dinner
parties. $225, annanewyork.com
Alessi’s Twisted measuring
jug features a descending
spiralized scale of
measurements (in both cups
and centiliters) that makes it
easy to read by looking into
the pitcher. The jug can also
be used for serving. $35,
alessi.com for where to buy
cleaneating.com
41
Where
There’s
Smoke
There’s
Flavor
Light a fire
under your clean
cooking routine
with five of the
best grills on
the market.
42
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JUNE 2017
tools
THE INDOOROUTDOOR
OPTION
EXCELVAN PORTABLE 1350W
ELECTRIC BARBECUE GRILL
WITH 5 TEMPERATURE SETTINGS
Beginner grillers, apartment dwellers and
people who entertain will all find something
to love about this portable electric grill.
Roomy enough to feed a small crowd, it
can also be used indoors, which will come
in handy once cooler weather rolls around.
It has a removable, washable plate, and
there’s no fussing with propane tanks or
charcoal – just plug it in and go.
$86, walmart.com
THE CAMPER’S
FRIEND
GEORGE FOREMAN CAMP
AND TAILGATE PORTABLE
PROPANE GRILL
Camping is hungry business, but this
roomy portable propane grill is up to the
challenge. It comes with a strap and is
fairly lightweight, making it easy to stow
in a car or carry to the park. Helpfully, the
nonstick grill pan flips over to reveal a flat
griddle – perfect for making eggs the
next morning. It’s a moveable feast!
$130, georgeforemancooking.com
THE
PLUSH
BACKYARD
GRILL
WEBER GENESIS II
E-410 GAS GRILL
There’s a reason the name Weber is synonymous with grilling, though you
will pay a premium for it. With 48,000 BTUs (translation: really, really hot),
this gas grill, which works with a propane tank or a natural gas hookup, is
great for making anything from perfectly juicy meats to beautifully tender
vegetables and crispy thin-crust pizza. It’s also huge: With four burners and
844 square inches of cooking surface, let’s just say you’ll be able to host the
block party this year. $1,049, weber.com for where to buy
THE SAVVY
SMOKER
MASTERBUILT 30-INCH DIGITAL
ELECTRIC SMOKER
Smoking food may sound intimidating,
but it doesn’t have to be. And it’s not just
for meat! Veggies, fish and even fruit
would benefit from a stint in this pushbutton smoker. Just plug in, set the
temperature and time, load it up with food
(with four racks, it fits a lot), place some
wood chips in the drawer, and let it
smoke. It’s like a slow cooker, only
yummier. $250, masterbuilt.com
THE TEMPERATURE
MASTER
BIG GREEN EGG CHARCOAL GRILL
One reason this distinctively shaped charcoal
grill is a cult favorite is that it gives you
exceptional temperature control; no matter
if you’re going low and slow or hot and fast,
you’ll get the results you’re looking for. It even
holds its heat when the weather is chilly. And
it fits a fair amount: The large size (shown) can
fit eight steaks or six whole chickens, so no
one will go hungry.
$859, biggreenegg.com for where to buy cleaneating.com
43
Meet your new favorite
one-dish dinners!
These 5 substantial salads are
just the ticket for weeknights
when you need something super
nutritious that’s ready fast.
BY PAMELA SALZMAN, PHOTOGRAPHY BY RONALD TSANG
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JUNE 2017
FOOD STYLING BY NANCY MIDWICKI, PROP STYLING BY THE PROPS
s
d
a
l
Sa
easy, breezy salads | RECIPES
Vegetarian
Taco Salad
(SEE RECIPE, P. 48)
Flip to p. 54 for even more salad
recipes from CE’s Contributing Culinary
Nutritionist Pamela Salzman’s new
book, Kitchen Matters.
cleaneating.com
45
A Dressing
for Every
Occasion
Citrus Yogurt
With notes of orange and
lemon, this creamy dressing
doubles as a dip for fresh
vegetables or clean chips.
Use these fresh, bright blends to
adorn salads, or get creative and
use them to add bold flavor to
just about any dish.
Tahini Dill
Drizzle this herby Middle
Eastern–style dressing
over grilled vegtables
and meats.
Chunky Pico
Add zip to your
sandwiches and tacos
with this slightly spicy
pico de gallo dressing.
Cider Maple
This versatile blend with shallot, apple
juice and maple syrup can be used as
a marinade for veggies or for a lighter
take on pasta or potato salad.
Mint Chile
Try using this sweet, sour and spicy Vietnamesestyle dressing as a dip for veggie-filled spring
rolls. It also works well brushed or drizzled
over grilled chicken or shrimp kebabs.
easy, breezy salads | RECIPES
Vietnamese Shrimp Salad with Mint Chile Dressing
SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME: 30 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
This salad has a nice bit of heat to it thanks to the fresh chile. Fiery, sweat-inducing capsaicin is found mostly
in the white pith (and the seeds that come into contact with the pith), so devein and seed the chile if you want to cut
back on spiciness. For added flavor, you can add chopped fresh mint, cilantro or Thai basil to the salad.
DRESSING
1/3 cup fresh mint
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 tbsp diced red onion
2 tbsp fresh lime juice
1 tbsp rice vinegar
1 tsp fish sauce
1 small clove garlic, peeled
¼ tsp raw honey
1/8 tsp chile paste
SALAD
1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
12 oz medium shrimp, peeled
and deveined
¼ tsp sea salt
Pinch ground black pepper
6 cups chopped romaine or
butter lettuce
2 cups bean sprouts or
julienned zucchini
2 Persian cucumbers
(or 1/2 English cucumber),
diced or thinly sliced
1 large carrot, julienned
or grated
1 red Thai bird’s-eye
chile or red finger chile,
thinly sliced
1/2 cup raw unsalted
peanuts, toasted
1. Make dressing: In a blender or
food processor, purée dressing
ingredients until smooth. (Or, for
a chunkier texture, mince the
garlic, chop the mint and whisk all
ingredients together.) Set aside.
2. Make salad: In a medium skillet on
medium, heat oil. Add shrimp and
sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook,
turning halfway, until shrimp are
pink and opaque, about 4 minutes.
3. In a large bowl, combine lettuce,
sprouts, cucumbers, carrot, chile
and peanuts. Top with shrimp and
drizzle with dressing; toss to coat.
PER SERVING (1/6 of salad): Calories: 234, Total
Fat: 17 g, Sat. Fat: 2 g, Monounsaturated Fat: 11 g,
Polyunsaturated Fat: 3 g, Carbs: 9 g, Fiber: 4 g,
Sugars: 4 g, Protein: 14 g, Sodium: 205 mg,
Cholesterol: 68 mg
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47
1 avocado, sliced or cubed
1 oz whole-grain corn tortilla
chips, crumbled, optional
Vegetarian Taco Salad
with Chunky Pico Dressing
SERVES 6.
HANDS-ON TIME: 25 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 25 MINUTES.
You definitely won’t miss the
chicken or beef in this substantial
vegetarian version of a taco salad.
We use pico de gallo in the dressing
for a chunkier texture, but you can
pulse it in the food processor if you
prefer a smoother dressing.
VINAIGRETTE
1 cup fresh pico de gallo
or salsa
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2–3 tsp raw honey or pure
maple syrup
¾ tsp sea salt
¼ tsp chile powder
Pinch ground black pepper
SALAD
8 cups chopped romaine lettuce
1 15-oz BPA-free can unsalted
pinto beans, drained and
rinsed (or 1½ cups drained
home-cooked beans)
1 cup thinly sliced radishes
of your choice
(4–6 medium)
1 cup shredded Monterey
Jack or Mexican cheese
blend, optional
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1. Make vinaigrette: In a small
bowl, whisk together all dressing
ingredients until combined.
Set aside.
2. Make salad: To a large bowl,
add lettuce, beans, radishes, cheese
(if using), cilantro and avocado.
Drizzle with dressing and toss to
coat. Sprinkle tortilla strips (if using)
over top.
PER SERVING (1/6 of recipe): Calories: 208,
Total Fat: 12 g, Sat. Fat: 2 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 9 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1 g, Carbs: 22 g,
Fiber: 8 g, Sugars: 5 g, Protein: 5 g,
Sodium: 467 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
Middle Eastern
Chicken & Rice Salad
with Tahini Dill Dressing
SERVES 6.
HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
A key ingredient in many Middle
Eastern salads, mint gives this
recipe a wonderful freshness.
Simply seasoned chicken bumps up
the protein content, making this
a filling main dish. Using leftover
cooked rice speeds up dinner prep
— just make extra the night before.
DRESSING
¼ cup fresh dill
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 tbsp fresh lemon juice
2 tbsp fresh mint
2 tbsp tahini paste
¾ tsp sea salt
Pinch ground black pepper
SALAD
2 6-oz boneless, skinless
chicken breasts
½ tsp paprika
½ tsp sea salt
Pinch ground black pepper
6 cups lightly packed
baby spinach
1 cup diced roasted red peppers
1 cup cooked and cooled
brown rice (TIP: Use a
frozen cooked brown
rice, thawed.)
½ cup pitted green
olives, halved
¼ cup unsalted pine nuts,
optional, toasted (TRY:
NOW Real Food Raw
Organic Pine Nuts)
6 Medjool dates, pitted
and chopped
1. Make dressing: In a blender or
food processor, blend together all
dressing ingredients until smooth.
Set aside.
2. Make salad: Preheat a grill to
medium-high. Sprinkle chicken
with paprika, salt and pepper. Grill
until no longer pink inside, about
5 to 6 minutes per side. Transfer to
a cutting board.
3. In a large bowl, combine spinach,
red peppers, rice, olives, pine nuts
(if using) and dates. Slice chicken
and add to bowl. Drizzle with
dressing; toss to coat.
PER SERVING (1/6 of recipe): Calories: 299,
Total Fat: 15 g, Sat. Fat: 2 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 10 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 3 g, Carbs: 28 g,
Fiber: 4 g, Sugars: 14 g, Protein: 14 g,
Sodium: 661 mg, Cholesterol: 31 mg
JUNE 2017
TACO PHOTO BY DARREN KEMPER
1/3 cup fresh cilantro,
roughly chopped
easy, breezy salads | RECIPES
THE BENEFITS OF DATES:
As a staple Middle Eastern food, Medjool dates offer a natural
sweetness that comes with plenty of nutrients, including fiber,
potassium and manganese. Fiber regulates blood sugar levels;
potassium helps control blood pressure by thwarting the
effects of sodium; and manganese plays a key role in the
metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids and cholesterol.
cleaneating.com
49
RECIPES | easy, breezy salads
Roasted Grape & Salmon Kale Salad
with Cider Maple Vinaigrette & Gorgonzola
SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
To keep your prep quick, here we roast the salmon at the same time as red
grapes - and we do it all on one baking sheet for quick cleanup. The cooked
fruit gives the salad a sweet-tart tang that balances the richness of the
cheese and fish. Sprouts or microgreens make a nice garnish on this dish.
VINAIGRETTE
1 small shallot, minced
5 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
3 tbsp apple cider vinegar
(TRY: Bragg Organic
Apple Cider Vinegar)
2 tbsp unsweetened apple juice
2 tsp pure maple syrup
(TIP: We prefer
Grade A maple syrup
here for its light flavor
that won't overpower
other ingredients in
the dressing.)
1 tsp Dijon mustard, optional
½ tsp sea salt
Pinch ground black pepper
SALAD
2 cups red grapes
1 tbsp olive oil, divided (TIP:
Remember when choosing
olive oils for high-heat
cooking, you can go with a
regular olive oil or a highquality extra-virgin that
can withstand the heat.)
¼ tsp + pinch sea salt, divided
1/8 tsp ground black
pepper, divided
1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Make
vinaigrette: In a small bowl, whisk
together all vinaigrette ingredients.
Set aside.
2. Make salad: Line a large rimmed
baking sheet with parchment paper.
In a medium bowl, toss grapes with
2 tsp oil; sprinkle with pinch each
salt and pepper. Transfer onto half
of prepared pan. Arrange salmon
on other half of pan; drizzle with
remaining 1 tsp oil and sprinkle
with remaining ¼ tsp salt and pinch
pepper. Roast until salmon is rare in
center but edges flake easily when
tested with a fork, 10 to 13 minutes.
Remove salmon from pan; let cool.
Continue roasting grapes until
slightly shrivelled, 7 to 10 minutes
more. Let cool.
3. Meanwhile, in a large bowl,
massage kale with half of vinaigrette
until well coated.
4. Break salmon into chunks; add
to kale mixture along with roasted
grapes, almonds and cheese. Drizzle
with remaining vinaigrette.
PER SERVING (1/6 of salad): Calories: 359, Total
Fat: 23 g, Sat. Fat: 4 g, Monounsaturated Fat: 15 g,
Polyunsaturated Fat: 3 g, Carbs: 16 g, Fiber: 3 g,
Sugars: 11 g, Protein: 22 g, Sodium: 401 mg,
Cholesterol: 45 mg
1 18-oz wild salmon fillet
12 cups stemmed, sliced and
lightly packed kale
1/2 cup sliced unsalted almonds
1/3 cup crumbled Gorgonzola
cheese
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HEART HELPERS:
Both almonds and salmon provide heart-healthy fats to this kale
salad. Almonds are high in monounsaturated fats that support
your ticker while studies have shown that omega-3s, such as
those found in salmon, may reduce your risk of cardiovascular
disease because of their ability to reduce inflammation.
JUNE 2017
cleaneating.com
51
RECIPES | easy, breezy salads
Shredded Carrot & Chicken Salad
with Raisins, Jicama & Citrus Yogurt Dressing
SERVES 6. HANDS-ON TIME: 30 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
Jicama is a crunchy, mild vegetable that’s common in Mexican
cuisine. It looks a little intimidating because of its size and odd shape,
but once you peel it, the cool flesh is easy to slice and adds a crisp texture to
salads. Use any cooked chicken you have on hand in this salad – make some extra
next time you have the grill going. We love this salad with a drizzle of sriracha sauce.
DRESSING
½ cup whole-milk plain
Greek yogurt
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 tbsp fresh lemon juice
2 tbsp white wine vinegar
1 tbsp fresh orange juice
1 tbsp Dijon mustard, optional
1 small clove garlic, minced
½ tsp sea salt
Pinch ground black pepper
SALAD
1 ear corn (grilled, boiled or
fresh), kernels removed
½ jicama, peeled
and julienned
3 cups shredded or
grated carrots
1½ cups shredded red cabbage
1/2 cup unsulfured green raisins
or organic golden raisins
⅓ cup fresh flat-leaf
parsley, chopped
¼ cup fresh mint, chopped
1. Make dressing: In a small
bowl, whisk together all dressing
ingredients until combined.
Set aside.
2. Make salad: In a large bowl,
combine corn, jicama, carrots,
cabbage, raisins, parsley, mint
and hemp hearts. Add chicken
and dressing; toss to coat.
PER SERVING (1/6 of recipe): Calories: 296,
Total Fat: 15 g, Sat. Fat: 3 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 8 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 4 g, Carbs: 27 g,
Fiber: 5 g, Sugars: 14 g, Protein: 16 g,
Sodium: 241 mg, Cholesterol: 29 mg
¼ cup hemp hearts
10 oz cooked chicken breast
(preferably grilled)
52
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JUNE 2017
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*This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
BONUS RECIPEs from Kitchen Matters
We're excited to announce that our very own Contributing Culinary Nutritionist,
Pamela Salzman, is coming out with her first book, Kitchen Matters: More than
100 Recipes and Tips to Transform the Way You Cook and Eat – Wholesome,
Nourishing, Unforgettable (Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2017). From creative
breakfasts to energy-boosting snacks and twists on vegetables, this book has
you covered with healthy meals and cooking tips. We love that the recipes have
suggested modifications for various allergens and classifications for dietary
choices such as gluten-free, dairy-free, vegetarian and vegan. In addition to
creating mouthwatering recipes for Clean Eating, Salzman is a holistic health
counselor and sought-after cooking instructor in Los Angeles.
SERVES 4 to 6.
This gorgeous medley includes a combination of Salzman's favorite
superfoods – berries, Brazil nuts, spinach and more – for maximum flavor
and nutrient value. To keep this salad plant-based, you can easily omit the
salmon and replace with beans or lentils.
DRESSING
6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
2 tsp pure maple syrup or
raw honey
1 clove garlic, minced
1∕2 tsp Dijon mustard
1∕2 tsp sea salt
ground black pepper,
to taste
SALAD
8 cups baby spinach leaves
2 cups finely chopped
red cabbage
11∕2 cups cooked quinoa
1 cup blueberries
1 cup broccoli sprouts or
sprouts of choice
1∕4 cup chopped unsalted
Brazil nuts
1 6–7-oz BPA-free can wild salmon,
preferably without bones
1 large avocado, peeled, pitted
and cubed
1. Prepare dressing: In a medium bowl
or jar with lid, whisk or shake together
all dressing ingredients.
2. Combine all salad ingredients in
a large bowl and toss to coat with
the dressing.
54
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JUNE 2017
EXCERPTED FROM KITCHEN MATTERS BY PAMELA SALZMAN. COPYRIGHT © 2017. AVAILABLE FROM DA CAPO LIFELONG, AN IMPRINT OF PERSEUS BOOKS, LLC, A SUBSIDIARY OF HACHETTE BOOK GROUP, INC. PHOTOS BY AMY NEUNSINGER
Superfood Salad
easy, breezy salads | RECIPES
Saturday Chopped Salad
SERVES 6.
The key to this salad is to cut the
veggies into extra-small pieces – about
the size of a pea – so that you get a
variety of flavors and textures in every
bite. Salzman uses her Everyday Salad
Dressing to dress this fresh salad.
1 head romaine lettuce,
finely chopped
3 cups diced red cabbage
(or a mix of cabbage
and chopped endive)
5 pepperoncini, seeded
and finely chopped (or
try making your own
pickled shallots*)
3 radishes of your choice,
finely diced
2 Persian cucumbers,
finely diced
2 carrots, finely diced or
julienned and finely
chopped
1/2 pint cherry tomatoes,
quartered, optional
1/2 bunch chives, finely chopped
2/3 cup Everyday Salad Dressing,
or as needed
1 avocado, peeled, pitted,
and diced
3 oz full-fat feta cheese
In a large bowl, combine lettuce and
cabbage. Add pepperoncini, radishes,
cucumbers, carrots, tomatoes and
chives. Toss with enough dressing to
coat lightly. Add avocado and feta and
drizzle with a small amount of dressing.
Toss very gently with your hands to
incorporate into the salad.
BOOST IT WITH PROTEIN: Feel free to add a
protein such as chopped hard-boiled eggs, chicken,
tuna or chickpeas to make this salad a meal.
Everyday Salad Dressing
Salzman's staple salad dressing, this blend hits just the right balance of acidity,
sweetness and pungency. She makes a double batch every week to have on
hand for salads throughout the week.
1 small shallot, minced
3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
(or 1/2 cup olive oil +
1/4 cup flax oil)
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
or red wine vinegar
2 tbsp rice vinegar
2 tsp raw honey or pure
maple syrup
1 tsp Dijon mustard
3/4–1 tsp sea salt
ground black
pepper, to taste
In a small bowl or glass jar with a lid,
whisk or shake all ingredients until
emulsified. Cover and refrigerate for
5 to 7 days.
NOTE: Because olive oil solidifies
when chilled, you will need to remove
it from the refrigerator well before you
want to use it for it to become pourable.
*Pickled Shallots: In a small saucepan, combine 1 cup water, 2 tbsp red wine vinegar, 1 tbsp organic evaporated cane
juice, raw honey or pure maple syrup, and 1/2 tsp sea salt or kosher salt and bring to a boil. Add 2 shallots, thinly sliced,
and simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from the liquid and set aside in a bowl to cool.
cleaneating.com
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JUNE 2017
FOOD STYLING BY BERNADETTE AMMAR, PROP STYLING BY THE PROPS, ILLUSTRATIONS BY JENSINE ECKWALL
mediterranean | RECIPES
We dig into the
latest research
to bring you
an update on
the rules of
Mediterranean
eating, helping
you navigate this
proven hearthealthy plan in
today’s world.
TEXT BY JESSIE SHAFER, RD, RECIPES BY IVY MANNING
PHOTOGRAPHY BY DARREN KEMPER
In the mid-20th century, at a time
when heart disease had surpassed
pneumonia and tuberculosis as
the leading cause of death for
both women and men, researchers
studying the epidemic noticed
a striking pattern: People in
certain countries around the
Mediterranean Sea, such as Italy
and Greece, had very little heart
disease compared to Americans.
The Seven Countries Study, led
by Ancel Keys, examined the diet
patterns in those countries, which
were high in plant foods, including
fruits and vegetables, whole grains,
legumes, nuts and seeds, as well as
red wine and hefty amounts of olive
oil. Fish, poultry, dairy and eggs
were eaten in moderate amounts,
and red meat was a rare occurrence
on the dinner plate.
The researchers also noted the
habits of those in Mediterranean
countries, such as eating with
others, making lunch the main meal,
little to no snacking, frequent daily
walking and regular siestas.
While there were limitations to
their study, Keys’ findings suceeded
in bringing to light the eating
patterns and lifestyle habits of 1950s
and 1960s Italy and Greece, which
would later form the basis of the
Mediterranean Diet.
Over the last 60 years, much has
been revealed about the affinities of
a Mediterranean eating plan. In fact,
the research is so hefty that we’ve
given the rules of the Med diet
an update, incorporating the best
of what we now know about food
choices, quality and sustainability
to help you incorporate the wisdom
of Mediterannean eating into
modern-day life for optimal health
and well-being for years to come.
cleaneating.com
57
RECIPES | mediterranean
8
Rules of
Mediterranean
Eating to live by
1.
Eat full-fat dairy
2.
Embrace plant-based
fiber foods
3.
Eat plenty
of organic fruits
and vegetables
4.
Use EVOO as
your main oil
5.
Eat yogurt
and other
fermented foods
6.
Eat whole grains,
focus on
ancient grains
7.
Be a good steward
of the earth
8.
Eat sustainable
fish, rich in omega-3
fatty acids
58
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1. EAT FULL-FAT DAIRY
Drinking nonfat milk and eating
low-fat yogurt and cheese used to
symbolize the healthful choice for
dairy lovers who wanted the calcium
without the fat, but new research
has many health-conscious people
returning to full-fat dairy. Dairy fat is
the main dietary source of odd-chain
saturated fats, which have been linked
to a 50% lower risk of type 2 diabetes,
according to a 2016 study published in
the journal Circulation.
Another recently released longterm study of 18,438 middle-aged
women published in The American
Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed
that consumption of full-fat dairy,
but not low-fat dairy, was associated
with reduced likelihood of becoming
overweight as the women aged. This
may be due to the fact that people
who consume full-fat dairy often
report feeling more satiated and tend
to eat fewer refined carbohydrates
and less sugar.
Good to know: When buying organic
dairy, you’re assured the cows were
raised without growth hormones
and antibiotics; however, you’re not
assured what the cows were fed.
Buying milk that comes from 100%
grass-fed cows is the only way to
ensure they’ve been exclusively grassfed, which increases levels of hearthealthy omega-3 fats in milk, plus
it’s a less energy-intensive and more
humane way to raise the animals.
2. EMBRACE PLANT-BASED
FIBER FOODS
Diets that skew toward plant foods,
whether flexitarian or full-on
vegan, have ample research to back
up their benefits, mostly due to the
increase in fiber that many plantbased foods – think nuts, seeds and
beans – provide.
After research showed that
African-Americans have 13-timeshigher rates of colon cancer than
rural South Africans, a 2015 study
published in the journal Nature
Communications honed in on diets
in the two groups. Researchers
swapped diets of healthy
volunteers from each community.
After just two weeks, the AfricanAmericans who switched to the
South African diet that was high
in fiber from maize (corn) and
beans and low in animal fat had
reduced biomarkers of cancer risk.
Conversely, the South Africans who
adopted a low-fiber Westernized
diet heavy on beef and fries had
drastically increased biomarkers
of colon cancer.
In addition to the fiber in plant
foods, experts agree that plantbased fatty foods, such as nuts
and seeds, are most beneficial to
your cardiovascular system. This
is often attributed to the holistic
nutritional makeup of nuts and
seeds, including fatty acids, fiber,
plant sterols, vitamin E and amino
acids that all play a role in reducing
plaque buildup in blood vessels.
While snacking on the usual
varieties such as almonds, walnuts
and pumpkin seeds is a good way
to take advantage, don’t forget
about the benefits of omega-3-rich
seeds such as chia seeds, flaxseeds
and hemp seeds.
JUNE 2017
3. EAT PLENTY OF ORGANIC FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
There’s no arguing the benefits that eating plenty of produce can bring. No
single food group has been studied as in-depth, and consensus reveals that diets
containing abundant fruits and vegetables are associated with a lower risk of
every major disease, including obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, coronary
heart disease, stroke and most cancers.
The benefits of choosing organic fruits and vegetables, however, are
sometimes harder to drive home. While studies have shown that organic produce
often contains higher levels of antioxidants and fewer pesticide residues, the
biggest boon to your health and that of future generations is the positive impact
organic farming has on soil health.
A 2015 study published by the Canadian Center of Science and Education found
that organic farming practices have the potential to contribute significantly to
ecosystem preservation through more biodiverse growing environments, less
erosion of microbial organic matter in topsoil where root systems thrive plus less
(and cleaner) water runoff into nearby streams.
Another major benefit of organic farming is the protection of pollinators,
insects or other animals that help fertilize plants. In fact, over a third of global
food crop production is dependent on such pollinators, mostly bees. Organic
farming practices promote healthy and thriving pollinator communities and
diverse pollinator food sources while eschewing the use of synthetic pesticides
and toxic seed treatments. (Flip to page 30 to read about the decline of pollinator
habitats and four nature-friendly ways you can help improve pollinator health.)
4. USE EVOO AS YOUR MAIN OIL
One unwavering tenet of Mediterranean eating is the regular use of olive oil. One
of the largest studies of the Mediterranean diet, the PREDIMED study, included
nearly 8,000 people with at least three risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
Participants followed one of three eating plans without restricting calories: a
low-fat diet, a Mediterranean diet with additional nuts and a Mediterranean diet
with additional extra-virgin olive oil. After four years, researchers observed a
30% reduction in risk of strokes, heart attacks and death in those who consumed
either of the Mediterranean diets compared with the low-fat diet. Additionally,
the Mediterranean diet groups with either added olive oil or added nuts reduced
the occurrence of developing type 2 diabetes nearly twice as much as the
low-fat diet group.
Seek out a high-quality, cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil, which means
the oil has been extracted mechanically rather than chemically and at a
temperature that doesn’t damage the delicate aromas. Higher-quality extravirgin oils can withstand heat due to the antioxidants they contain – however,
if you're not going with a high-quality one, opt for regular olive oil for cooking.
Also, consider recent research about the health benefits of medium-chain
triglycerides (MCTs), such as those found in coconut oil and ghee, which are
good choices for high-heat cooking. A 2015 study printed in the Journal of the
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics notes the potential of MCTs in the diet to
induce weight loss without raising triglycerides.
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5. EAT YOGURT AND
OTHER FERMENTED FOODS
Without fermentation, parties
would lack cheese and pickles,
not to mention wine and beer.
Thank goodness for this ancient
preservation method, which
converts carbohydrates to organic
acids or alcohol and saves us from
sober soirees.
Though fermentation has been
around for ages, it wasn’t until
relatively recently that researchers
started to uncover the benefits of
eating fermented foods including
yogurt, sauerkraut, kefir, miso,
kombucha and kimchi (sadly, while
wine and beer are fermented, they
are not good sources of probiotics).
Naturally occurring bacteria in
probiotic foods can “predigest”
certain food components, making
them easier on your gut and
increasing nutrient absorption.
Understanding the link between
probiotic-rich foods and digestive
health has expanded with new
discoveries about the human
microbiome, the community of
microorganisms living in and on
your body. Diet is one of the main
influences on your microbiome, and
fermented foods have been shown
to help the good bacteria in your
gut thrive to help ward off disease.
Be aware that many fermented
foods don’t contain probiotics
due to pasteurization. Seek out
fermented dairy with live active
bacterial cultures and fermented
foods sold in the refrigerated
section (look for ones that indicate
they haven’t been pasteurized), or
make your own. We’ve got product
recommendations and recipes at
cleaneating.com.
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6. EAT WHOLE GRAINS, FOCUS ON ANCIENT GRAINS
Whole grains are composed of an outer shell (the bran), a middle layer
(the endosperm) and an inner layer (the germ). When you eat whole
grains, you reap the benefits of the full nutrition profile of a grain,
which include vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, protein and
healthful plant compounds. Refined grains, such as white flour used to
make bagels, breads and desserts, don’t contain the bran or the germ,
stripping away the majority of grains’ nutrients.
Recently, research has brought attention to a special type of whole
grain called ancient grains, a group of grains that have been little
changed by selective breeding over millennia. Ancient grains include
quinoa, amaranth, farro, teff, freekeh and Kamut. Eating ancient
grains could help lower cholesterol and blood glucose, according to
a 2016 randomized, double-blind trial. The study showed that, when
compared with modern grain varieties that are often heavily refined,
ancient grains offer antioxidant and anti-inflammatory profiles, as well
as vitamins that protect against cardiovascular disease.
7. BE A GOOD STEWARD OF THE EARTH
When you think about making eco-friendly choices, the focus is often
on the car you drive or the energy you use in your home and office. But
you may be surprised to learn that the biggest impact you make on the
environment comes from the foods you eat.
It’s easy to understand that shopping for locally produced food helps
support growers and manufacturers in your community. Additionally,
it’s not hard to see the life cycle of food – from growing and processing
to transporting and selling – produces a smaller carbon footprint when
those items travel just a few miles versus thousands.
But it’s not just shipping that matters. A new study published in
Nature Plants broke down the environmental cost of producing a loaf
of bread, from wheat field to bakery. While many stages in the process,
such as transporting grains, were energy intensive and involved
emissions, the majority (66%) was attributable to growing the wheat.
Of that, over 40% were from the use of ammonium nitrate fertilizers.
By choosing more organically grown, plant-based foods, you can
reduce demand for chemical fertilizers and meat and dairy production,
industries that account for the majority of emissions. Also, being a
more mindful eater, both when shopping for and preparing food, can
help minimize waste, a drag on sustainability in our food system.
JUNE 2017
mediterranean | RECIPES
8. EAT SUSTAINABLE
FISH, RICH IN OMEGA-3
FATTY ACIDS
A steady recommendation of the
Mediterranean diet for decades has
been to include moderate amounts
of protein from fish. But new rules
have you seeking out seafood that is
healthy for both you and the ocean.
The best choices for well-being
are those high in heart-healthy,
anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty
acids (sardines and salmon are top
sources), while the sustainability
of the oceans relies on selecting
seafood that preserves ocean
diversity and regeneration.
To achieve both, it’s imperative
to know where your seafood comes
from, how it was raised or caught,
and whether the species is at risk.
One of the best resources to help
is the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s
Seafood Watch guide, available
through the seafoodwatch.org
website, its downloadable app and
printable guides tailored to each
state. Look for choices that are
green or yellow, and avoid red.
Remember, it’s all about making
the best choices based on where
you live. For example, if you live in
California, opt for wild salmon from
Alaska, but avoid Atlantic farmed
salmon. Though wild salmon will
cost you more, it’s worth making
the more sustainable choice.
After verifying sustainability, it’s
also important to limit your intake
of fish that are high in mercury.
Species that are higher in mercury
are usually larger fish such as tuna
and swordfish.
White Bean Bagna Cauda Dip with Crudités
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 15 MINUTES.
Bagna cauda, or “hot bath” in Italian, is an olive oil and anchovy dip popular
in northern Italy. We add white beans to the dip to boost protein and fiber.
It's typically served with a rainbow of vegetables, so choose your favorites.
You can also make your own whole-grain pita chips (see below) for dipping.
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
5 canned anchovies
(TRY: Wild Planet
White Anchovies)
6 cloves garlic, halved lengthwise
1 tsp minced fresh rosemary
1 15-oz BPA-free can unsalted
cannellini or great
northern beans,
drained and rinsed
½ tsp ground black pepper
1. In a medium saucepan on low,
heat oil, anchovies, garlic and
rosemary. Cook, stirring frequently,
until garlic is softened but not
browned, 5 minutes. Add beans
and cook until mixture is heated
through, about 2 minutes.
2. Transfer mixture to a food
processor along with black pepper;
process until smooth. Pour dip into
a serving bowl and serve warm with
fresh vegetables and/or pita chips.
PER SERVING (1/3 cup): Calories: 269,
Total Fat: 20 g, Sat. Fat: 3 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 14 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 2 g, Carbs: 16 g,
Fiber: 5 g, Sugars: 0 g, Protein: 7 g,
Sodium: 198 mg, Cholesterol: 4 mg
HOMEMADE WHOLE-GRAIN PITA
CRISPS (OPTIONAL): Cut 4 wholegrain pita rounds into chip-size
triangles and split the triangles into
two pieces. Arrange on a baking sheet,
mist with olive oil and bake in a 350°F
oven until crisp, about 20 minutes.
Dukkah Chicken Breasts with Beet Moutabel
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
Dukkah (pronounced DOO-kah) is a savory Egyptian blend of dried seeds,
herbs, spices and nuts. It's used as a coating for meat or fish or mixed with
olive oil and served as a dip – here we use it as a flavorful crust for chicken.
Moutabel is a Middle Eastern dip traditionally made with eggplant, though
other vegetables can be used. In this version, grated beets and Greek
yogurt are combined for a vibrant topping for the chicken.
¼ cup whole-milk plain
Greek yogurt (TRY:
Stonyfield Organic WholeMilk Greek Plain Yogurt)
1 tsp finely grated orange zest
1 small clove garlic, peeled
½ tsp sea salt, divided
2 tbsp hemp hearts
1 tbsp each coriander and
cumin seeds
1 tsp each dried oregano
and mint flakes
½ tsp ground black pepper
¼ cup toasted hazelnuts,
roughly chopped
2 egg whites, beaten
4 6-oz boneless, skinless chicken
breasts, pounded to
½-inch thickness
1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Prepare
moutabel: In a food processor,
process beet, yogurt, orange zest,
garlic and ¼ tsp salt until mostly
smooth; set aside.
2. Prepare dukkah: Using a mortar
and pestle or spice grinder, combine
hemp hearts, coriander seeds, cumin
seeds, oregano, mint, pepper and
remaining ¼ tsp salt; pound or pulse
until seeds are finely ground. Add
chopped hazelnuts and pound or
pulse a few more times until nuts
are finely ground.
3. To a shallow dish, add egg
whites. To a second shallow dish,
add dukkah mixture. Dip 1 chicken
piece first in egg white, allowing
excess to drip off, and then into
dukkah, pressing to coat all sides.
Repeat with remaining chicken.
4. In an ovenproof skillet on
medium-high, heat oil. Add chicken
and cook about 3 minutes, until
browned on one side; flip chicken
over. Place skillet in oven and bake
until chicken registers 165°F on
an instant-read thermometer
inserted into thickest part of largest
breast, 8 to 10 minutes. Serve
with moutabel.
PER SERVING (1 breast and ¼ of moutabel):
Calories: 341, Total Fat: 15 g, Sat. Fat: 3 g,
Monounsaturated Fat: 8 g, Polyunsaturated
Fat: 4 g, Carbs: 8 g, Fiber: 3 g, Sugars: 4 g,
Protein: 41 g, Sodium: 388 mg, Cholesterol: 96 mg
Jessie Shafer
EDITOR, FREELANCE WRITER & REGISTERED DIETITIAN, BOULDER, CO
“The New Rules of Mediterranean Eating” writer Jessie Shafer developed her
love of food after working at a cookbook publisher fresh out of journalism school.
She has since covered healthy cuisine for a variety of publications, including
Oxygen and Better Homes and Gardens. “When I found the combination of
nutrition and journalism, I knew I had hit the sweet spot,” says Shafer.
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PHOTO BY RONALD TSANG, FOOD STYLING BY NANCY MIDWICKI, PROP STYLING BY THE PROPS, JESSIE PHOTO BY ERIN MANNING
1 beet (8 oz), roasted then
peeled and halved
mediterranean | RECIPES
A RECIPE FOR BETTER GUT HEALTH:
The beet moutabel in this recipe contains a combination of probioticrich yogurt and prebiotic-rich garlic – a perfect combination for
intestinal health. While yogurt is a fermented food that supports
your microbiome, prebiotic foods such as garlic actually support the
probiotics, or good bacteria, by acting as their food source.
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Lemon Tahini–
Smothered
Broccolini
with Crunchy Seeds
SERVES 4.
HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 25 MINUTES.
The long, slender stems of
broccolini are completely edible, so
don’t ditch them. Add a serving of
whole grains such as freekeh, bulgur
or millet to complete this vegetarian
meal, or serve the vibrant greens
alongside grilled fish or chicken.
1 tbsp unsalted sunflower seeds
2 tsp sesame seeds
1½ tbsp chia seeds (TRY: Navitas
Organics Chia Seeds)
1/3 cup tahini paste
1½ tsp finely grated lemon zest +
2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
½ tsp sea salt
Pinch ground cayenne pepper
1½ tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 bunches (7 oz each)
broccolini, trimmed, or
14 oz broccoli crowns
cut into long slices with
stems attached
1. In a small skillet on medium,
toast sunflower and sesame seeds,
stirring frequently, until golden,
3 minutes. Add chia; set aside.
2. In a small bowl, whisk together
tahini, ¼ cup boiling water, lemon
zest, lemon juice, salt and cayenne
until smooth. Whisk in olive oil
and set aside. (NOTE: If mixture is
very thick, add more water to
adjust consistency.)
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JUNE 2017
mediterranean | RECIPES
3. In a steamer basket over boiling
water, steam broccolini until crisptender, 4 to 5 minutes. Arrange
broccolini on a platter. Drizzle with
tahini dressing and sprinkle with
toasted seed mixture.
PER SERVING (¼ of recipe):
Calories: 246, Total Fat: 19 g, Sat. Fat: 3 g,
Monounsaturated Fat: 9 g, Polyunsaturated
Fat: 7 g, Carbs: 14 g, Fiber 4 g, Sugars: 3 g,
Protein: 8 g, Sodium: 276 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
Whole-Grain
Spaghetti
Trapanese
with Shrimp
¼ tsp each sea salt and ground
black pepper
1/8 tsp red pepper flakes
¼ cup finely chopped fresh
flat-leaf parsley
2 tbsp grated Pecorino Romano
or Parmesan cheese
1. Cook pasta according to package
instructions, reserving ½ cup pasta
cooking liquid.
2. Meanwhile, prepare pesto:
In a food processor, combine basil,
½ cup almonds, 3 tbsp oil, sun-dried
tomatoes, garlic and 4 to 5 tbsp
water; pulse until mostly smooth.
Set aside.
3. In a large sauté pan on mediumhigh, heat remaining 1 tbsp oil.
Add cherry tomatoes, shrimp, salt,
black pepper and pepper flakes and
cook until shrimp turn pink, about
4 minutes. To sauté pan, add pesto,
drained pasta and reserved ½ cup
cooking liquid; toss to combine.
Divide pasta among bowls and
sprinkle with parsley, cheese and
remaining 1½ tbsp chopped almonds.
PER SERVING (¼ of recipe):
Calories: 578, Total Fat: 28 g, Sat. Fat: 4 g,
Monounsaturated Fat: 19 g, Polyunsaturated
Fat: 5 g, Carbs: 52 g, Fiber: 7 g, Sugars: 6 g,
Protein: 31 g, Sodium: 301 mg, Cholesterol: 141 mg
SERVES 4.
HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 25 MINUTES.
This tomato, herb and almond
pesto is named for the sunny
fishing port of Trapani in western
Sicily, where almonds and olive
oil figure prominently in the
cuisine. The sauce is traditionally
served with busiate, a type of thick
handmade corkscrew pasta, but
we’ve substituted whole-grain
quinoa spaghetti for a healthy
dose of whole grains.
8 oz quinoa spaghetti (or other
whole-grain spaghetti)
3 cups loosely packed
fresh basil
½ cup + 1½ tbsp unsalted
almonds, toasted and
chopped, divided
¼ cup extra-virgin olive
oil, divided
3 tbsp chopped sun-dried
tomatoes, drained
3 cloves garlic, peeled
1½ cups halved cherry tomatoes
12 oz medium shrimp, peeled
and deveined
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65
RECIPES | mediterranean
Grilled Veggie Flatbread
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
This fork-and-knife flatbread is spread with herby, creamy ricotta and
then loaded with sweet and savory veggies for a fresh take on Middle
Eastern street food. Be sure to buy a good-quality full-fat ricotta for
the best results. The vegetables are adaptable, so use whatever
looks good at your farmers’ market this week!
¾ cup whole-milk ricotta cheese
½ cup chopped fresh basil
¼ cup pitted and chopped
Kalamata olives, divided
¼ tsp ground black pepper
1/8 tsp red pepper flakes
1 12-inch refrigerated unbaked
whole-grain flatbread crust
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive
oil, divided
1 small red bell pepper,
thinly sliced
1 8-oz pkg frozen artichoke
hearts, defrosted, patted
dry and quartered (or
substitute for artichoke
hearts jarred in water,
drained and patted dry)
1 tomato, thinly sliced
3 cups baby spinach
and/or arugula
2 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese
1. Preheat oven to 425°F or prepare
a grill for indirect grilling, heating
one side to medium-high. In a
medium bowl, combine ricotta,
basil, 2 tbsp olives, black pepper
and pepper flakes. Place flatbread
on a baking sheet, brush with 1 tbsp
oil and then spread ricotta mixture
evenly over top.
2. Arrange bell pepper, artichoke
hearts, tomato and remaining
2 tbsp olives over ricotta on
flatbread. Bake on the baking
sheet or place flatbread directly to
unheated side of grill. Bake or grill
until flatbread is crisp on bottom
and vegetables are heated, 12 to
15 minutes.
3. Sprinkle spinach over flatbread,
drizzle with remaining 1 tbsp oil and
top with cheese. Cut into 8 wedges.
PER SERVING (2 wedges): Calories: 429,
Total Fat: 17 g, Sat. Fat: 6 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 9 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 2 g, Carbs: 63 g,
Fiber: 10 g, Sugars: 2 g, Protein: 17 g,
Sodium: 591 mg, Cholesterol: 26 mg
HEART-HEALTH WINNERS:
This flatbread contains a rainbow of heart-healthy fresh produce
including spinach. Spinach is an excellent source of folate, or
vitamin B9, a nutrient that is essential to keeping your levels of
homocysteine in balance. (High blood levels of the amino acid
homocysteine increase your risk of heart disease.)
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JUNE 2017
FOOD STYLING BY HEATHER SHAW, PROP STYLING BY THE PROPS
fruit bowls | RECIPES
GRANOLATOPPED APRICOT
& PLUM BOWL
(SEE RECIPE, P. 72)
HONEYDEW &
BLACKBERRY BOWL
(SEE RECIPE, P. 72)
MANGO & RED
BANANA BOWL
(SEE RECIPE, P. 70)
SWEET-MEETS-SAVORY
Fruit Bowls
Tired of the same old fruit routine? Try combining naturally sweet
fruit with unexpected savory ingredients like fragrant basil, subtly
spiced homemade granola and fresh ginger and lemongrass
to take your in-season fruit bowls to the next level.
BY IVY MANNING, PHOTOGRAPHY BY RONALD TSANG
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69
RECIPES | fruit bowls
MANGO & RED BANANA BOWL
with Lemongrass-Infused Coconut Cream
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.*
*PLUS COOLING TIME.
A creamy ginger and lemongrass–infused dressing makes this bowl a tropical treat. Hemp hearts and toasted
unsweetened coconut add a bit of crunch. Red bananas are smaller, sweeter cousins to the big yellow
ones we’re all used to, but regular bananas work just as well if you can't find them.
1/3 cup full-fat coconut milk
(TRY: Native Forest
Organic Coconut Milk)
1 tbsp minced fresh lemongrass
(TIP: Trim ends and
remove tough outer layer
then mince inner portion.)
2 tsp peeled and minced
fresh ginger
1/3 cup unsweetened
coconut flakes
1½ cups sliced red bananas
(or regular bananas)
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1 cup peeled and
chopped mango
1 tbsp hemp hearts
1. In a small saucepan on medium,
combine coconut milk, lemongrass
and ginger. Bring to a gentle simmer
then reduce heat to low, cover and
cook, stirring occasionally, for
10 minutes, to infuse coconut milk
with flavor. Strain through a fine
mesh sieve and discard solids. Set
aside to cool to room temperature.
2. Meanwhile, in a small nonstick
skillet on medium-low, toast
coconut flakes, stirring frequently,
until golden brown. Pour into a
small bowl.
3. In a serving bowl, combine
bananas, mango and hemp
hearts. Toss gently with coconut
milk mixture. Sprinkle with
coconut flakes.
PER SERVING (¼ of recipe): Calories: 168,
Total Fat: 9 g, Sat. Fat: 7 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 1 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1 g, Carbs: 21 g,
Fiber: 4 g, Sugars: 15 g, Protein: 2 g,
Sodium: 5 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
JUNE 2017
GRANOLA-TOPPED
APRICOT & PLUM BOWL
with Tahini Yogurt Dressing
(SEE RECIPE, P. 72)
cleaneating.com
71
RECIPES | fruit bowls
HONEYDEW &
BLACKBERRY BOWL
with Basil & Lime Drizzle
SERVES 4.
HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 20 MINUTES.*
*PLUS COOLING TIME.
The herbal taste of basil with lime
juice and a touch of salt and pepper
make the fruits in this bowl taste
even sweeter. Mix and match with
your favorite melons and berries.
GRANOLA-TOPPED APRICOT & PLUM BOWL
with Tahini Yogurt Dressing
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
Inspired by the Middle Eastern tradition of mixing sweet fruits with savory
foods like tahini, this summer bowl is ideal for serving at your next
barbecue. Garnish with a little citrus zest for extra brightness.
GRANOLA
1/2 egg white (about 1 tbsp)
1 tsp raw honey (TRY:
Wholesome! Organic
Raw Honey)
1 tsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup unsalted shelled
pistachios, chopped
3 tbsp rolled oats
1 tbsp sesame seeds
1/2 tsp ground coriander
1/4 tsp sea salt
Pinch ground cayenne pepper
BOWL
1½ tsp tahini paste
2 tbsp full-fat plain yogurt
2 tsp fresh lemon juice
2 apricots or peaches, pitted
and cut into thin wedges
2 plums, pitted and cut into
thin wedges
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1. Prepare granola: Preheat oven to
350°F. Line an 8- or 9-inch pie plate
with parchment paper. In a medium
bowl, whisk egg white, honey and
oil until combined. Add pistachios,
oats, sesame seeds, coriander, salt
and cayenne. Spread evenly on pie
plate and bake, stirring halfway, until
golden brown, about 15 minutes.
(MAKE AHEAD: Granola can be made
up to 1 week ahead and stored in an
airtight container.)
2. Meanwhile, prepare dressing: In a
medium bowl, whisk together tahini
and 4 tsp water until smooth. Add
yogurt and lemon juice; whisk
until smooth.
3. Divide apricots and plums among
bowls. Drizzle with dressing and
sprinkle with granola.
PER SERVING (¼ of recipe): Calories: 129,
Total Fat: 8 g, Sat. Fat: 1 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 4 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 2 g, Carbs: 13 g,
Fiber: 2 g, Sugars: 1 g, Protein: 4 g,
Sodium: 132 mg, Cholesterol: 1 mg
1 lb honeydew melon,
seeded, peeled
and cut into chunks
(about ½ small melon)
1 cup blackberries, divided
1 tsp finely grated lime zest
+ 2 tbsp fresh lime juice
1 tbsp organic evaporated cane
juice (aka organic sugar)
1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
leaves, divided
Pinch each sea salt and ground
black pepper
1. To a serving bowl, add melon and
½ cup blackberries (or divide among
individual bowls); refrigerate.
2. To a small saucepan on low, add
lime zest and juice, cane juice and
2 tbsp water, stirring occasionally,
until cane juice dissolves, about
5 minutes. Cool to room temperature.
3. In a small bowl, combine
remaining ½ cup blackberries, lime
juice mixture, 2 tbsp basil, salt
and pepper. Mash until berries are
broken down and mixture looks
saucy; drizzle over fruit. Garnish
with remaining 2 tbsp basil.
PER SERVING (¼ of recipe): Calories: 48,
Total Fat: 0 g, Sat. Fat: 0 g, Carbs: 12 g, Fiber: 2 g,
Sugars: 9 g, Protein: 1 g, Sodium: 39 mg,
Cholesterol: 0 mg
JUNE 2017
THE OTHER MEMORY-BOOSTING BERRY:
Blueberries usually get all the glory when it comes to brain
health, but blackberries deserve some attention too. They
contain the same dark-pigmented flavonoids that blueberries do,
called anthocyanins, which protect the brain from free radical
damage and therefore may help prevent cognitive decline.
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73
Be er
RECIPES | fresh for less
FAST
FOOD
What’s the
ultimate
convenience?
We say it’s
weeknight
dinners that
are clean,
budget-friendly
and ready in
30 minutes
or less.
BY IVY MANNING,
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
BEATA LUBAS
Indian Coconut Chicken Curry with Spinach & Quinoa
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
For this recipe, we love the flavor of vadouvan, a mild
French-style curry powder that usually contains shallots and garlic.
Look for it at specialty spice shops and online – but if you can’t find it,
any mild curry powder will work. We chose to serve the curry on
a bed of quinoa instead of brown rice for quicker cooking.
1 lb boneless, skinless
chicken thighs, cut into
bite-size pieces
4 tsp mild curry powder
(such as vadouvan)
1 tbsp coconut oil
½ yellow onion,
finely chopped
1 tbsp peeled and minced ginger
3 cloves garlic, minced
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FOR LESS
THAN $3.50
A PLATE
1 cup frozen peas
1 cup cherry tomatoes
⅔ cup low-sodium chicken broth
½ cup full-fat coconut milk
½ tsp sea salt, divided
1 cup quinoa (red or
white), rinsed
3 cups loosely packed
baby spinach
JUNE 2017
MONDAY
COST PER PLATE:
$
2.44
TOTAL COST:
$
9.74
1. In a bowl, toss chicken with
curry powder; set aside. In a large
sauté pan on medium-high, heat oil.
Add onion and sauté until softened,
2 to 3 minutes. Add chicken, ginger
and garlic and sauté until chicken
begins to brown, 2 minutes. Add
peas, tomatoes, broth, coconut milk
and ¼ tsp salt. Reduce heat to low
and maintain a simmer, partially
covered, until chicken is cooked
through, 15 minutes.
3. Stir spinach into curry and
heat just until leaves start to wilt,
1 minute. Divide quinoa among
plates and top with curry.
2. Meanwhile, prepare quinoa
according to package directions
with remaining ¼ tsp salt. Fluff
with a fork, cover and set aside.
PER SERVING (¾ cup quinoa and 1 cup
curry): Calories: 446, Total Fat: 17 g, Sat. Fat: 10 g,
Monounsaturated Fat: 3 g, Polyunsaturated
Fat: 3 g, Carbs: 39 g, Fiber: 6 g, Sugars: 3 g,
Protein: 33 g, Sodium: 402 mg, Cholesterol: 107 mg
cleaneating.com
75
RECIPES | fresh for less
Lemony Turkey Kofta on Bulgur with Herb Drizzle
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 20 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 25 MINUTES.
These oval-shaped patties are moist and flavorful, thanks to grated zucchini,
oregano and lemon zest. If you’d like to serve them as kebabs, shape the
patties around skewers and chill at least 30 minutes before grilling.
1 cup fine whole-wheat bulgur
¼ red bell pepper,
finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced, divided
1 lb lean ground turkey
1 zucchini, grated
½ cup whole-wheat
bread crumbs
1 lemon, zested and
juiced, divided
1 tsp dried oregano flakes
½ tsp + pinch sea salt, divided
½ tsp ground black
pepper (TRY: Frontier
Organic Black Pepper
Fine Ground)
1½ tbsp olive oil, divided
1 bunch fresh flat-leaf
parsley, chopped
½ cup loosely packed
fresh mint
TUESDAY
COST PER PLATE:
$
2.21
TOTAL COST:
$
8.83
1. Place oven rack 6 inches below
broiler and preheat broiler to
high.* Line a baking sheet with foil.
Prepare bulgur according to package
instructions, adding bell pepper and
1 tsp garlic to cooking liquid.
2. In a large bowl, combine
turkey, remaining minced garlic,
zucchini, bread crumbs, lemon
zest, oregano, ½ tsp salt and black
pepper. Mix well and form mixture
into 16 oval-shaped patties, each
about 3 inches long.
3. Brush patties with 1½ tsp oil
and arrange on prepared baking
sheet. Broil until cooked through,
about 5 minutes per side.
4. Meanwhile, to a blender, add
lemon juice, remaining 1 tbsp oil,
parsley, mint and remaining pinch
salt. Blend, adding a few tbsp water
if necessary, until smooth.
5. Fluff bulgur with a fork and
divide among plates. Top each
serving with 4 koftas and drizzle
herb sauce over top.
* To use a grill instead of a broiler,
preheat grill to medium-high and oil
grill racks well. Grill patties, covered,
until meat is no longer pink in center,
about 5 minutes per side.
PER SERVING (4 koftas and ¼ of bulgur and
sauce): Calories: 412, Total Fat: 16 g, Sat. Fat: 3 g,
Monounsaturated Fat: 8 g, Polyunsaturated
Fat: 4 g, Carbs: 39 g, Fiber: 7 g, Sugars: 2 g,
Protein: 31 g, Sodium: 380 mg, Cholesterol: 88 mg
76
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
Shrimp Penne with Creamy Vodka Tomato Sauce
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
Vodka brightens the flavor in this classic creamy tomato sauce,
but you won’t taste the alcohol – it simmers off during cooking.
8 oz whole-wheat penne pasta
1 tbsp olive oil
1 small yellow onion,
finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, sliced
1 18-oz BPA-free jar unsalted
crushed tomatoes
¼ cup vodka
PER SERVING (1¼ cups): Calories: 434,
Total Fat: 12 g, Sat. Fat: 5 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 5 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1 g, Carbs: 54 g,
Fiber: 7 g, Sugars: 8 g, Protein: 32 g,
Sodium: 502 mg, Cholesterol: 180 mg
WEDNESDAY
COST PER PLATE:
$
Pinch red pepper flakes
1 lb medium shrimp, peeled
and deveined
3.22
TOTAL COST:
12.86
$
¼ cup heavy cream
½ tsp sea salt
¼ tsp ground black pepper
½ cup chopped fresh basil
¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
1. Cook pasta according to package
instructions; drain and set aside.
2. Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan
on medium-high, heat oil. Add
onions and sauté until translucent,
4 minutes. Add garlic and sauté until
fragrant, 30 seconds. Add tomatoes,
vodka and pepper flakes and bring to
a simmer. Reduce heat to low, cover
and cook, stirring occasionally, until
flavors meld, 10 minutes.
3. To sauce, add shrimp, cream,
salt and black pepper. Continue
to cook, uncovered, stirring
occasionally, until shrimp are
cooked through, 5 minutes. Stir
in cooked pasta, basil and cheese.
cleaneating.com
77
THURSDAY
COST PER PLATE:
$
2.58
TOTAL COST:
10.32
$
1. Cook pasta according to
package directions.
Garlic Ginger Noodle Stir-Fry
with Crispy Tofu & Sesame Seeds
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 30 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
Pan-seard tofu pairs beautifully with fresh veggies and
teriyaki-style noodles in this quick takeout fake-out. You can
substitute whole-grain linguine or brown rice noodles.
12 oz whole-grain spaghetti
2 tbsp olive oil, divided
14 oz extra-firm organic tofu,
drained, patted dry and
cut into ¾-inch cubes
1 yellow onion,
finely chopped
1 cup low-sodium vegetable
broth, warmed
3 tbsp raw honey or
coconut sugar
3 tbsp reduced-sodium
soy sauce
2 cups thinly sliced carrots
2 tbsp rice vinegar
2 cups sliced or quartered
white mushrooms
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 cups trimmed and halved
green beans
1∕4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
2 tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1 lime, sliced into wedges
for garnish
78
SAUCE
cleaneating.com
1 tsp peeled and minced ginger
1 tsp chile-garlic sauce (such as
sambal oelek)
½ tsp sesame oil
1∕8 tsp ground black pepper
1 tbsp arrowroot mixed with
2 tbsp water
2. Meanwhile, prepare sauce: To a
bowl, add broth and honey; whisk
until honey dissolves. Whisk in soy
sauce, vinegar, garlic, ginger, chilegarlic sauce, sesame oil and black
pepper; set aside.
3. In a large skillet on medium-high,
heat 1 tbsp olive oil. Working in
two batches, sear tofu, turning to
brown all sides, until crispy, about
5 minutes per batch. Transfer to a
paper towel–lined plate.
4. In same skillet, heat remaining
1 tbsp olive oil on medium-high; add
onions and carrots and sauté for
2 minutes. Add mushrooms and
beans and sauté for 2 minutes more.
5. To sauce mixture, stir in
arrowroot-water mixture. Add
sauce to stir-fry. Cook until heated
through and sauce bubbles and
thickens, 1 to 2 minutes. Add noodles
and tofu, toss to coat. Divide among
plates and garnish with cilantro,
seeds and lime wedges.
PER SERVING (¼ of recipe): Calories: 683, Total
Fat: 19 g, Sat. Fat: 2 g, Monounsaturated Fat: 7 g,
Polyunsaturated Fat: 6 g, Carbs: 107 g,
Fiber: 16 g, Sugars: 24 g, Protein: 30 g,
Sodium: 560 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
JUNE 2017
fresh for less | RECIPES
Cuban Black Bean & Quinoa Bowls with Plantain Chips
SERVES 4. HANDS-ON TIME: 30 MINUTES. TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
Crispy baked plantain chips and creamy cilantro sauce top this easy layered bowl for a variety
of textures and a tropical salty-spicy, savory-sweet flavor combination. Use a paring knife to peel the
plantains by cutting along the natural ridges and peeling the strips off with your knife.
BEAN & QUINOA BOWLS
1 unripened plantain
(about 6 oz), peeled
and sliced crosswise
into ⅛-inch slices
2 tbsp coconut oil, divided
¾ tsp sea salt, divided
1 cup quinoa, rinsed
1 green bell pepper, diced
½ yellow onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp dried oregano flakes
1 tsp each ground cumin
and paprika
¼ tsp ground cayenne pepper
1 15-oz BPA-free can unsalted
black beans, drained
and rinsed
1 mango, peeled and diced
1 avocado, peeled
and diced
1. Preheat oven to 350°F and
line a baking sheet with parchment
paper. Add plantains to sheet. Melt
1 tbsp coconut oil and toss with
plantains. Sprinkle with ¼ tsp salt.
Spread in an even layer on sheet.
Bake, flipping halfway, until golden
brown and crisp around edges,
about 25 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, prepare quinoa
according to package directions,
using ¼ tsp salt. Fluff with a fork,
cover, and set aside.
3. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan
on medium, heat remaining 1 tbsp
coconut oil. Add bell pepper and
onion and sauté until tender, about
4 minutes. Add garlic, oregano,
⅓ cup plain whole-milk yogurt
4. Prepare sauce: In a blender, blend
all sauce ingredients until smooth.
Divide quinoa among bowls. Top
with bean mixture, mango, avocado,
tomatoes and plantain chips. Drizzle
with sauce before serving.
PER SERVING (1/4 of recipe): Calories: 631,
Total Fat: 29 g, Sat. Fat: 9 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 15 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 4 g, Carbs: 89 g,
Fiber: 18 g, Sugars: 17 g, Protein: 16 g,
Sodium: 513 mg, Cholesterol: 3 mg
FRIDAY
COST PER PLATE:
$
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
SAUCE
cumin, paprika and cayenne and
cook, stirring constantly, until
fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add
beans, 1 cup water and remaining
¼ tsp salt. Bring to a simmer, reduce
heat to low, cover and simmer for
10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
2.56
TOTAL COST:
10.25
$
¼ cup fresh lime juice
¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 clove garlic, peeled
Pinch sea salt
cleaneating.com
RECIPES | fresh for less
Your ready-made grocery list for five 30-minute weeknight meals.
FRIDAY
MONDAY
WEDNESDAY
Shrimp Penne with Creamy
Vodka Tomato Sauce
Cuban Black Bean & Quinoa Bowls
with Plantain Chips
■ 1 lb boneless, skinless
chicken thighs ................................ $3.95
■ 8 oz whole-wheat
penne pasta .................................... $0.74
■ 1 unripened plantain (6 oz) ..........$0.76
■ ½ yellow onion .................................$0.13
■ 1 small yellow onion ...................... $0.26
■ 1 1-inch piece fresh ginger.......... $0.05
■ 2 cloves garlic ................................ $0.08
■ ½ yellow onion .................................$0.13
■ 3 cloves garlic ..................................$0.12
■ 2 oz vodka ....................................... $0.99
■ ½ BPA-free can full-fat
coconut milk .................................... $0.74
■ 1 lb medium shrimp ........................$7.99
■ 1 cup frozen peas .......................... $0.58
■ ½ bunch fresh basil ....................... $1.00
■ 1 15-oz BPA-free can
unsalted black beans .....................$2.12
■ 1 oz grated Parmesan cheese ......$1.31
■ 2 limes .............................................. $0.66
Indian Coconut Chicken Curry
with Spinach & Quinoa
■ 1 cup cherry tomatoes ...................$1.49
■ 1 cup dry quinoa ..............................$1.68
■ 2 oz heavy cream ...........................$0.49
Total: $12.86
■ 4½ oz baby spinach....................... $1.00
Total: $9.74
■ 1∕2 pint cherry tomatoes .................$1.49
■ 1 mango ............................................ $0.99
■ ¼ bunch fresh cilantro ................. $0.09
■ Ground black pepper
■ Low-sodium chicken broth
■ Jarred crushed, unsalted tomatoes
■ Sea salt
■ Red pepper flakes
Total: $10.25
PANTRY STAPLES:
■ Coconut oil
■ Mild curry powder (such as vadouvan)
■ Extra-virgin olive oil
THURSDAY
■ Sea salt
Garlic Ginger Noodle Stir-Fry with Crispy
Tofu & Sesame Seeds
■ Dried oregano flakes
■ 12 oz whole-grain
spaghetti .............................................$1.10
■ Paprika
■ 14 oz extra-firm organic tofu ...... $5.23
■ 1 bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley.....$0.79
■ 4 cloves garlic ..................................$0.16
■ ¼ red bell pepper............................$0.19
■ 1 tsp fresh ginger ........................... $0.02
■ 1 lb lean ground turkey ................ $3.50
■ 5 oz white mushrooms ................. $1.56
■ 1 zucchini........................................... $0.41
■ 8 oz green beans............................$1.09
■ 1 lemon ............................................. $0.89
■ 1∕4 bunch fresh cilantro ................. $0.09
■ 3 cloves garlic ..................................$0.12
■ 1 lime ................................................. $0.33
■ 1 bunch fresh mint ......................... $1.99
■ 1 yellow onion ................................. $0.26
Total: $8.83
■ 3 cloves garlic ..................................$0.12
■ 1 avocado ........................................ $0.94
■ Coconut oil
■ 1 cup dry fine
whole-wheat bulgur ..................... $0.94
■ 1 green bell pepper ...................... $0.39
■ Olive oil
■ Sea salt
Lemony Turkey Kofta on Bulgur
with Herb Drizzle
■ 3 oz plain whole-milk yogurt ..... $0.88
PANTRY STAPLES
PANTRY STAPLES:
TUESDAY
■ 1 cup dry quinoa ..............................$1.68
■ Ground cumin
■ Ground cayenne pepper
■ 9 oz carrots ..................................... $0.48
Total: $10.32
PANTRY STAPLES:
■ Olive oil
PANTRY STAPLES:
■ Whole-wheat bread crumbs
■ Reduced-sodium soy sauce
■ Sea salt
■ Olive oil
■ Ground black pepper
■ Sesame oil
■ Dried oregano flakes
■ Low-sodium vegetable broth
■ Ground black pepper
■ Sesame seeds
■ Raw honey
■ Rice vinegar
■ Arrowroot powder
■ Chile-garlic sauce
(such as sambal oelek)
80
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
COOKING
WITH
COLLAGEN
beauty enhancing
PERSONAL
PIZZA
AWARD
WINNING
BRAND
**
*BASED ON 52 WEEKS SPINS DATA ENDING 10/2016
© 2017 NeoCell corp.
FOR MORE COLLAGEN INFUSED RECIPES VISIT NEOCELL.COM/RECIPES
RECIPES | meal plan
The
15-Minute
meal plan
A week of healthy eating without
spending more than 15 minutes on any
meal? With a little advance weekend
prep and our quickest and easiest
meal plan yet, it’s absolutely possible.
BY HEATHER BAINBRIDGE, RD, CDN
PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELLEN CHARLOTTE MARIE
Prep Ahead
Sunday
One hour of prep
on Sunday can spell
effortless weekday
cooking. Here are a
few ways to get ahead:
• Boil eggs (2)
• Make Green Onion
Quinoa (p. 83)
• Make bruschetta for the
Chicken Bruschetta with
Artichoke Salad (p. 85),
or buy one from your
local grocery store or
Italian market.
• If making your own
cauliflower rice, prepare
and freeze.
82
cleaneating.com
Coconut & Curry Scallops
MAKES 4 SERVINGS.
HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 15 MINUTES.
1 tbsp
coconut oil
1½ tbsp peeled and minced ginger
1 clove
garlic, minced
1 tbsp
curry powder
1 tsp
½ tsp
1 lb
ground turmeric
ground cinnamon
bay scallops, defrosted overnight in
fridge if frozen, rinsed and patted
dry (TIP: Rinsing the scallops helps
remove some of the sodium.)
Strawberry Parfait
Top 1 cup yogurt with 1 cup
strawberries and sprinkle
with 1 tbsp chia seeds.
1 cup
trimmed green beans
Green Onion Quinoa
1 cup
cubed orange or red bell pepper
Bring 1 cup quinoa and 1½ cups
unsalted vegetable broth to a boil.
Cover and reduce heat to low until
softened, about 12 minutes. Let sit
for 5 minutes off the heat and fluff
with a fork. Stir in 2 green onions,
chopped. (MAKE AHEAD: Make quinoa
the weekend prior to starting the
meal plan; freeze. Transfer to fridge
to thaw Wednesday morning.)
¾ cup
full-fat coconut milk
½ cup
plain whole-milk yogurt
½ cup
quartered button
mushrooms
½
1∕4 cup
lemon, juiced
fresh basil, thinly sliced
1. In a large skillet on medium-high,
heat oil. Add ginger, garlic, curry, turmeric
and cinnamon and sauté until fragrant,
30 seconds to 1 minute. Add scallops,
green beans and bell pepper and sauté
for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
2. Stir in coconut milk, yogurt and
mushrooms. Reduce to medium heat and
simmer for 4 minutes. Turn off heat and stir
in lemon juice. Garnish with basil.
TIP: If following our Meal Plan, refrigerate
leftovers and reheat when called for. Serve
with quinoa or cauliflower rice as directed
in the plan.
PER SERVING (1 cup): Calories: 278, Total Fat: 14 g,
Sat. Fat: 11 g, Monounsaturated Fat: 1 g, Polyunsaturated
Fat: 1 g, Carbs: 15 g, Fiber: 3 g, Sugars: 5 g, Protein: 27 g,
Sodium: 545 mg, Cholesterol: 51 mg
Thai-Spiced Power Smoothie
Blend 12 oz kefir, ¼ cup arugula,
1 frozen banana, 1½ tbsp nut butter,
1 tbsp chia seeds, 2 tsp each honey
and chopped ginger, ½ tsp each
ground cardamom, cinnamon and
nutmeg and ¼ tsp each ground
cloves, turmeric and ice as desired.
Your 15-Minute Meal Plan
MONDAY
TUESDAY
BREAKFAST: Raspberry Parfait: Top 1 cup
yogurt with 6 oz raspberries, 1 oz walnuts
and 1 tbsp chia seeds
WEDNESDAY
BREAKFAST: Thai-Spiced Power
Smoothie (p. 83)
SNACK: 1 oz walnuts
SNACK: 1 hard-boiled egg; 2 tbsp hummus
LUNCH: 1 serving Chicken Bruschetta with
Artichoke Salad (leftovers, p. 85) tossed
with 2 cups arugula; drizzle with 1 tbsp
lemon juice, 1 tsp each honey and EVOO
LUNCH: Tuna, Arugula & Avo Sammie:
Mix 6 oz canned tuna with 1/2 avocado,
mashed, 1 tbsp each lemon juice and diced
onion and 1/8 tsp oregano; spread 1/2 of
tuna mixture between 2 slices bread with
1 oz mozzarella and ½ cup arugula (save
remaining 1/2 of tuna salad)
1 cup strawberries
SNACK: 1 cup grapes; 1 oz blue cheese
½ cucumber, sliced, with 2 tbsp hummus
SNACK: 1 banana with 2 tbsp nut butter
DINNER: 1 serving Chicken Bruschetta with
Artichoke Salad (p. 85; save leftovers)
DINNER: Tuna & Chickpea Salad: Toss
3 cups lettuce, ¼ cup sliced cucumber and
5 grape tomatoes; drizzle with 1 tbsp
red wine vinegar, 2 tsp EVOO and pinch
oregano; top with remaining 1/2 of tuna
salad (leftovers), ½ cup chickpeas and
¼ avocado, sliced
BREAKFAST: Mushroom & Arugula Omelette: In
1 tsp EVOO, sauté ¼ cup chopped mushrooms,
½ cup chopped arugula, pinch each garlic
powder and oregano; add 2 eggs whisked with
1 tsp water; when mixture begins to set, add
3 tbsp feta; cook until set; fold over;
1½ cups cantaloupe
SNACK: Strawberry Parfait (p. 83)
LUNCH: Between 2 slices bread, place chicken
(chopped) and bruschetta from
1 serving Chicken Bruschetta with Artichoke
Salad (leftovers, p. 85) and 1 oz mozzarella; serve
artichoke salad on the side
SNACK: 1 oz roasted chickpeas
DINNER: 2 reserved cooked chicken tenders
(leftovers, p. 85); 3/4 cup Green Onion Quinoa
(p. 83), thawed; 1 cup green beans sautéed in
1 tsp EVOO topped with 2 tsp pine nuts
NUTRIENTS: Calories: 1,858, Fat: 97 g, Sat.
NUTRIENTS: Calories: 1,749, Fat: 90 g, Sat.
NUTRIENTS: Calories: 1,885, Fat: 78 g, Sat.
Fat: 24 g, Carbs: 145 g, Fiber: 42 g, Sugars: 50 g,
Fat: 24 g, Carbs: 169 g, Fiber: 36 g, Sugars: 86 g,
Fat: 28 g, Carbs: 162 g, Fiber: 37 g, Sugars: 51 g,
Protein: 107 g, Sodium: 1,511 mg, Cholesterol: 385 mg Protein: 99 g, Sodium: 1,820 mg, Cholesterol: 201 mg Protein: 137 g, Sodium: 2,101 mg, Cholesterol: 678 mg
THURSDAY
BREAKFAST: Banana Chia
Bowl: Mix 1 cup yogurt with
1 mashed frozen banana with
2 tbsp chia seeds and 1/2 oz
walnuts, chopped
SNACK: 1 hard-boiled egg;
1 cup cantaloupe
LUNCH: In a bowl, add 2 cups
arugula, ½ cup chickpeas and
chicken (chopped), bruschetta
and artichokes from 1 serving
Chicken Bruschetta with
Artichoke Salad (leftovers,
p. 85); drizzle with 1 tsp each
red wine vinegar and EVOO
FRIDAY
BREAKFAST: Coconut Milk
Smoothie: Blend ¾ cup
coconut milk, ½ cup yogurt,
2 apricots, peeled and
sliced, ½ tsp cinnamon and
ice as desired
SNACK: 1 oz roasted
chickpeas; 1 cup grapes
LUNCH: Leftovers Special:
2 cups arugula, 3/4 cup Green
Onion Quinoa (p. 83), thawed,
¾ cup chickpeas, ¼ cup sliced
mushrooms, 1/3 cup bruschetta
(leftovers, p. 85), ¼ cup feta
cheese, 2 tsp EVOO
1 cup grapes
1 cup strawberries
SNACK: Mash ¼ avocado
with 1/2 tsp lemon juice and
pinch salt; spread on 1 slice
toasted bread
SNACK: 1 cup cucumbers with
¼ cup hummus
DINNER: Coconut & Curry
Scallops (p. 83; save
leftovers) with 1½ cups
riced cauliflower, heated
NUTRIENTS: Calories: 1,697,
Fat: 70 g, Sat. Fat: 25 g, Carbs: 171 g,
Fiber: 40 g, Sugars: 81 g,
Protein: 106 g, Sodium: 2,367 mg,
Cholesterol: 380 mg
DINNER: Coconut & Curry
Scallops: (leftovers, p. 83)
with 1½ cups riced cauliflower
SATURDAY
BREAKFAST: Bruschetta & Mushroom
Scramble: In ½ tsp EVOO, sauté
¼ cup chopped mushrooms; add 2 eggs
whisked with 1 tsp water; when mixture
begins to set, add 1/3 cup bruschetta
(leftovers, p. 85) and 3 tbsp feta; cook
until set, fold over; 1 cup cantaloupe
SNACK: 12 oz kefir with 1 tbsp honey
and ½ tsp cinnamon; 1 cup grapes
LUNCH: Coconut & Curry Scallops
(p. 83; save leftovers) with ¾ cup Green
Onion Quinoa (p. 83), thawed
1 oz walnuts
SNACK: 1 cup grape tomatoes;
1 oz mozzarella
DINNER: Chicken & Blue Cheese
Sandwich: Spread 1 tbsp Blue Cheese
Dressing* on one side of each of
2 slices bread; top with 2 reserved
cooked chicken tenders, thawed,
(leftovers, p. 85), 1 lettuce leaf, 1 slice red
onion and 5 halved grape tomatoes
cleaneating.com
BREAKFAST: Nut Butter &
Berry Sammy: Spread
2 tbsp nut butter on 2 slices
toasted bread, then sprinkle
1 tbsp chia seeds and 1/2 cup
strawberries, halved
1 cup kefir with 1 tbsp honey
Additional 1/2 cup strawberries
SNACK: 2 oz roasted
chickpeas
LUNCH: Warm Tomato
& Mozza Sandwich (p. 85)
1 cup grapes
SNACK: 1 cup carrot sticks;
2 tbsp Homemade Blue
Cheese Dressing (leftovers)
DINNER: Coconut & Curry
Scallops: (p. 83; save leftovers)
with ¾ cup Green Onion
Quinoa (p. 83), thawed
2 cups lettuce, 5 sliced cucumber rounds
with 2 tbsp Blue Cheese Dressing*
NUTRIENTS: Calories: 1,827,
Fat: 95 g, Sat. Fat: 54 g, Carbs:
183 g, Fiber: 34 g, Sugars: 72 g,
Protein: 77 g, Sodium: 1,950 mg,
Cholesterol: 112 mg
NUTRIENTS: Calories: 1,880,
Fat: 87 g, Sat. Fat: 38 g, Carbs: 152 g,
Fiber: 22 g, Sugars: 72 g, Protein: 124 g,
Sodium: 2,104 mg, Cholesterol: 652 mg
*Blue Cheese Dressing: Mix ½ cup yogurt, ¼ cup blue cheese, 1 tsp Dijon mustard and 1 crushed garlic clove
84
SUNDAY
NUTRIENTS: Calories: 2,015,
Fat: 79 g, Sat. Fat: 34 g, Carbs:
238 g, Fiber: 44 g, Sugars: 78 g,
Protein: 98 g, Sodium: 2,480 mg,
Cholesterol: 150 mg
EVOO = extra-virgin olive oil
JUNE 2017
meal plan | RECIPES
Brian Britt GRAPHIC DESIGNER TORONTO, ON
Chicken Bruschetta
“I have always been into art, drawing and creating,” says “The 15-Minute Meal Plan”
designer Brian Britt, who studied both art foundation and graphic design. Now with over
16 years of design experience, Britt’s work has appeared in digital and print media. In his
spare time, he enjoys playing competitive baseball and spending time with his two sons.
with Artichoke Salad
SERVES 4.
HANDS-ON TIME: 15 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 15 MINUTES.
CHICKEN
3
12 skinless, boneless
chicken breast tenders
(about 13/4 lb)
1⁄2
3⁄4 tbsp
¼ tsp
lemon, juiced
Pecorino Romano
cheese, finely grated
ground black pepper
SALAD
24 oz
quartered artichoke hearts
in water, drained and rinsed
1⁄3 cup
full-fat feta cheese
¼ cup
fresh basil, thinly sliced
1⁄2
BRIAN PHOTO BY MARIA PAPADAKIS
1 tbsp
BRUSCHETTA (yields 2 cups)
lemon, juiced
extra-virgin olive oil
2 tsp
red wine vinegar
1 tsp
dried oregano
¼ tsp
ground black pepper
4 tsp
unsalted pine nuts
1⁄2 cup
plum tomatoes, diced
fresh basil, finely chopped
4 tsp
extra-virgin olive oil
1 tsp
red wine vinegar
2 cloves
1⁄4 tsp
garlic, minced
sea salt
1. Prepare bruschetta: In a small
bowl, combine all bruschetta
ingredients. Cover and place in the
refrigerator. (MAKE AHEAD: Make the
bruschetta on Sunday and keep in
the fridge so it’s ready for use in the
recipe on Monday.)
2. Prepare chicken: Adjust oven rack
to 6 inches below broiler and
preheat broiler to high. Place
chicken on a large rimmed baking
dish. Drizzle with lemon juice and
sprinkle cheese and pepper evenly
over the tenders. Broil chicken for
6 minutes. On a lower rack, bake
11/3 cups bruschetta in an uncovered
ovenproof dish, until warmed.
3. Meanwhile, prepare artichoke
salad: In a medium ovenproof dish,
combine all salad ingredients except
pine nuts. Add to oven with chicken
and bake for 2 to 3 minutes, until
warmed. (NOTE: If following our
Meal Plan, reserve 4 cooked chicken
tenders separately.)
4. On a plate, layer ¾ cup artichoke
salad, 2 chicken tenders and 1/3 cup
bruschetta. Top with 1 tsp pine nuts.
TIP: If following our Meal Plan,
refrigerate 2 reserved chicken
tenders and freeze 2 reserved chicken
tenders. Store remaining servings
with extra bruschetta in the fridge
for later in the week.
PER SERVING (2 tenders, ¾ cup artichoke
salad, 1∕3 cup bruschetta, 1 tsp pine nuts):
Calories: 379, Total Fat: 14 g, Sat. Fat: 4 g,
Monounsaturated Fat: 6 g, Polyunsaturated
Fat: 2 g, Carbs: 24 g, Fiber: 8 g, Sugars: 6 g,
Protein: 40 g, Sodium: 524 mg, Cholesterol: 110 mg
Warm Tomato
& Mozza Sandwich
On each of 2 slices of bread, place
¼ cup arugula, 2 slices tomato,
1 oz mozzarella cheese and 4 basil
leaves. Drizzle each with ½ tsp
EVOO. Sprinkle salt and pepper as
desired. Broil for 2 minutes to melt.
RECIPES | meal plan
SHOPPING LIST
PROTEINS & DAIRY
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½ dozen large eggs
2 oz blue cheese
5 oz feta cheese
5 oz fresh mozzarella cheese
½ oz Pecorino Romano cheese
1 32-oz container plain wholemilk yogurt
1 32-oz container plain wholemilk kefir
12 boneless, skinless chicken
breast tenders (about 13/4 lb)
1 lb bay scallops
(fresh or frozen; if fresh, freeze
until needed)
VEGGIES & FRUITS
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
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

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
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2 apricots
3 bananas (freeze 2)
1 cantaloupe
1 lb grapes
2 pints strawberries
1 6-oz pkg raspberries
3 lemons
1 head garlic
1 large bunch fresh basil
1 2-inch piece fresh ginger
2 avocados
6 oz arugula
2 green onions
8 oz green beans
1 small orange or red bell pepper
5 oz carrots
1 large cucumber
6 oz button mushrooms
1 small red onion
1 head romaine lettuce
1 pint grape tomatoes
4 plum tomatoes
WHOLE GRAINS
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86
1 box tricolor quinoa
1 loaf sprouted whole-grain bread
cleaneating.com
NUTS, SEEDS & OILS
 1 jar natural unsalted nut butter
of choice
 1 bottle extra-virgin olive oil
(TRY: O-Live & Co. Extra Virgin
Olive Oil)
 1 jar unrefined virgin coconut oil
 11/2 oz unsalted pine nuts
 3½ oz unsalted walnuts
 1 bag chia seeds
EXTRAS
 2 12-oz jars quartered artichoke
hearts in water
 1 13.5-oz BPA-free can full-fat
coconut milk
 1 6-oz BPA-free canned or
pouch tuna (TRY: Look for a
low-mercury option such as
Safe Catch brand; or substitute
with canned salmon)
 1 bag frozen riced cauliflower
(TIP: Or make your own by
pulsing cauliflower florets in a
food processor until pieces reach
the size of rice.)
 1 15-oz BPA-free can chickpeas
(aka garbanzo beans)
 1 bottle ground black pepper
 1 bottle ground cardamom
 1 bottle ground cinnamon
 1 bottle ground cloves
 1 bottle curry powder
 1 bottle garlic powder
 1 bottle ground nutmeg
 1 bottle dried oregano flakes
 1 bottle ground turmeric
 1 bottle sea salt
(TRY: Eden French Celtic Sea Salt)
 1 jar Dijon mustard
 1 bottle raw honey
 1 bottle red wine vinegar
 1 6-oz bag roasted chickpeas
(TRY: The Good Bean Sea Salt
Roasted Chickpeas)
 1 8-oz container hummus
5 Ways to
Master Meal Prep
1. STAY SHARP: Well-maintained
knives will allow you to quickly
and safely cut through produce
and meats. Hone your knife
before each use and sharpen
periodically.
2. LOOK FOR SHORTCUTS:
Buying pre-quartered artichokes
instead of whole, grated cheese
or minced garlic (or doing it
yourself in advance) can save
precious minutes.
3. QUICK-COOKING PROTEINS:
Use smaller and thinner cuts
of protein for faster cooking such
as chicken tenders or shellfish
such as shrimp and scallops.
4. VEG PREP: Washing and
cutting produce before putting
it in the fridge makes meal prep
a breeze – plus it tends to cut
down on food waste since you’re
more likely to eat foods that are
prepped and ready.
5. READ AHEAD: Read recipe
instructions from start to finish
before starting so you have an
idea of the flow and what needs
to be prepared in advance.
JUNE 2017
Take Us With You!
Need inspiration?
Shopping by recipe?
cleaneating.com
has you covered!
Test Kitchen–Approved
Clean Recipes
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Meal Plans
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Advice from Top
Nutrition Experts
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Shopping Guides
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Your Bath, Body & Home
Visit us at cleaneating.com
Our new
site is faster,
mobile responsive,
and more beautiful
than ever.
The
Doctor
Is In
Jonny Bowden
parses the
latest nutrition
crazes, from
MCT oil and
matcha to
gene-edited
foods.
JONNY BOWDEN, PhD, CNS Board-certified
nutrition specialist, motivational speaker, author
and expert in the areas of weight loss and health.
88
cleaneating.com
ask dr. jonny
MATCHA PHOTO BEATA LUBAS, MCT OIL PHOTO BY VINCENZO PISTRITTO
Is matcha really
better than green tea?
Matcha is to green tea as Kobe beef
is to steak. Both matcha and green
tea come from the plant Camellia
sinensis, but matcha tea bushes are
shielded from direct sunlight for
roughly a month before the leaves
are harvested. After harvesting, the
leaves are hand ground into a fine
powder and sold as matcha.
Shade growing increases the
amount of chlorophyll in the tea
leaves. In addition, it preserves
the amount of other beneficial
compounds in tea like L-theanine,
a compound that is known to
have a calming effect on the brain.
Another reason matcha is so
potent is that you actually consume
the whole tea leaves (in powder
form). You don’t have a teabag or
loose tea leaves to discard after
you’re finished steeping the way you
do with ordinary tea. Instead, matcha
powder is whisked in a bowl with hot
water until it foams, at which point
you pour it into your teacup to drink.
Nothing gets thrown out, which
makes it by definition a more
concentrated source of beneficial
compounds than ordinary steeped
green tea.
There are different “recipes” for
the perfect matcha, but traditionally
it involves 1 teaspoon of high-grade
ceremonial matcha powder and
about 2 ounces of hot water, placed
in a bowl and whisked until the
matcha dissolves and foams. There
are plenty of other creative ways to
enjoy it beyond tea. Try it in lattes,
smoothies, oats, puddings, baked
goods, yogurt and even frozen in
homemade ice cream or popsicles.
The possibilities are endless.
It’s a strong taste, but many
people, myself included, love it.
What’s MCT oil?
I’m hearing about it
everywhere I go.
MCT stands for medium-chain
triglycerides, which is a form of
saturated fats that have some
interesting features. They’ve long
been used by bodybuilders as a
supplement due to their tendency
to be burned by the body as energy
rather than stored as fat around your
waist. And there’s a lot of ongoing
research on MCTs and the brain.
First, some background. All fatty
acids are chains of carbon molecules,
and they are categorized by the
number of carbons in their chain.
Short-chain fatty acids are fatty
acids with six or fewer carbons;
long-chain fatty acids are those
with 12 or more carbons; and
medium-chain fatty acids are
those with eight to 10 carbons.
Many integrative neurologists –
such as David Perlmutter, MD –
recommend diets high in MCTs
because of their positive effect on
the brain. Indeed, ketogenic diets
with MCTs are an accepted
treatment for childhood epilepsy
at many of the top hospitals around
the country because MCTs produce
ketones, which help stabilize brain
waves. Ketones are a wonderful
alternative to glucose (sugar) as a
source of fuel for the heart, brain
and skeletal muscles. There are even
MCT-based drugs and medical foods
being tested in clinical trials that
may help Alzheimer’s patients by
creating ketones that help brain
neurons become better able to
utilize glucose in order to fuel and
energize the brain.
The main fat in coconut oil is
actually lauric acid, which, at a
carbon length of 12, doesn’t really
qualify as an MCT even though
many manufacturers call it one
(and include it in the percentage of
MCTs they claim for their coconut
oil). Meanwhile, a true MCT oil
supplement – such as Bulletproof
Brain Octane – won’t contain any
lauric acid, only one or both of the
two true medium-chain fatty acids,
caprylic acid (eight carbons) and
capric acid (10 carbons).
Both coconut oil and MCT oil have
their advocates, and many people use
both. MCT oil is a good, fast-burning
source of calories and a very healthy
fat that apparently has some nice
benefits for the brain because it
stabilizes brain waves and fuels
the brain with energy. But you
can’t cook with it because it is very
unstable at high heat. On the other
hand, coconut oil is terrific for
cooking. And its main fat, lauric acid,
may not technically be an MCT, but
it’s highly antimicrobial and good for
the immune system. I see uses for and
like both of them, so incorporate both
into your clean-eating diet.
cleaneating.com
89
ask dr. jonny
The first thing to know about
gene editing (which uses a
technology called CRISPR-Cas9) is
that, like it or not, it’s here to stay.
It’s being used in every genetic lab
in the country. Industry is already
making use of it for laundry
detergents, water treatment
and the development of droughtresistant and pest-resistant plants.
Gene editing is entirely different
from genetic modification. With
GMO foods, scientists transplant
genes from one species into another
– theoretically, they can put genes
from a fish into a pig. Gene editing
doesn’t introduce anything new, it
just makes little tweaks to existing
DNA at specific locations. If you had
a word processing document open
on your computer, gene editing
would be like moving a comma or a
period; genetic modification would
be like pasting in a YouTube video.
Is gene-edited food safe? Let’s
be honest: No one knows. The
assumption is that it is, but that’s
been the assumption with GMO for
years, despite quite a lot of evidence
that indicates otherwise. With gene
editing, though, we’re not talking
about putting an oyster gene into
a goat. We’re talking about little
tinkerings that theoretically could
90
cleaneating.com
produce an awful lot of good. It’s
hoped that one day gene editing will
allow us to do things like remove the
mutation of the BRCA breast-cancer
gene from a child’s genetic code.
Right now, gene editing is being
used to ward off livestock disease
and to lower the amount of gluten
in wheat. Additionally, it’s being used
in potatoes to keep them fresher for
longer and to lessen the amount of
carcinogens formed by the process
of frying potatoes. It’s also been
used to change the mix of fatty acids
in soybeans for a healthier soybean
oil and to make mushrooms that
don’t brown, although most of these
food developments have yet to hit
the market.
One problem is that industry is
already on board with gene editing,
and that means there are enormous
financial stakes in the whole geneediting enterprise. It’s certain that
the arguments on both sides of
the gene-editing question will be
heavily influenced by financial,
business, regulatory and marketing
considerations, and it will be much
harder to know what’s really true
and what isn’t.
The fact is that gene-edited foods
could be hugely valuable in many
ways. Or they could be a disaster in
ways no one could have anticipated.
No one knows for sure, and no one
can know for sure because they’re
too new, there are few independent
studies and gene-edited foods
haven’t been around long enough
for anyone to really know what the
long-term effects are.
JUNE 2017
MUSHROOM PHOTO VINCENZO PISTRITTO
I keep hearing about
gene-edited food. It
sounds frightening.
Should I be worried?
TUNE IN TO
TUNE UP
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in to Talk Healthy Today podcasts.
Get cutting-edge, healthy living
info anytime, anywhere.
Totally free!
Among the
TOP 5
Listen on the go as radio
host Lisa Davis, MPH,
interviews some of the best
brains in health and wellness.
Each week brings two new
inspirational podcasts: one on
healthy living, the other on
healthy eating. Plus, there’s an
impressive, searchable archive
with a huge range of topics, like:
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mind & body boosters
It’s a Guy
Prostate Health and
Thing: Testosterone Boosters
SANDWICH PHOTO BY EDWARD POND, GINGER RIMMA RII/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, TOMATO N_ERI/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, COLLARD GREENS VASILKOVS/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, OYSTERS DAVOODA/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM,
TUNA AND MACKEREL KURYANOVICH TATSIANA/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, POMEGRANATE SUDOWOODO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, SPINACH ZIZI_MENTOS/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, PUMPKIN SEED TRIBALIUM/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
Men have some specific needs when it comes to diet,
and many studies suggest that eating the right foods can
keep the prostate healthy and testosterone levels
balanced. Here are 9 foods with protective powers to include
in your clean-eating rotation. BY LISA TURNER
Roasted Gingered
Pork & Nectarine Panini
WITH SPINACH & TOMATO JAM
cleaneating.com/porkpanini
92
cleaneating.com
JUNE 2017
Spinach. Spinach is rich in magnesium,
which can lower the body’s levels of sex
hormone binding globulin (SHBG), a protein that binds
to free testosterone and makes it inactive. In a study
published in the International Journal of Andrology,
boosting magnesium intake resulted in a 24% increase
in free-testosterone levels; optimal magnesium status
has also been linked with higher testosterone levels in
observational and intervention studies. Other foods rich
in magnesium include pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds,
Swiss chard, halibut and almonds.
Tomatoes. Tomatoes are loaded with
lycopene, an antioxidant that’s been shown to
reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Better than raw: cook
them with olive oil (as in pasta sauce); research shows the
absorption of lycopene is greatest when tomatoes are
cooked with olive oil. And add some chopped broccoli to
that sauce; in a study published in Cancer Research,
researchers noted “the combination of tomato and
broccoli was more effective at slowing tumor growth
than either tomato or broccoli alone.”
Ginger. In addition to reducing
inflammation, ginger may also increase
testosterone levels and improve sexual function. In a
controlled study conducted on men undergoing
infertility treatment, published in the International
Journal of Reproductive BioMedicine, researchers found
that ginger helped decrease levels of sperm DNA
fragmentation (lower levels are linked to improved
fertility and less chance of miscarriage). Animal studies
have found testosterone levels nearly doubled after
ginger intake; as the amount of ginger increased, so did
testosterone levels. However, further studies on humans
are needed to verify the testosterone-doubling benefits.
Pumpkin seeds.
Pumpkin seeds can
help prevent benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH),
a common condition that enlarges the prostate gland
and can cause problems with urination and, occasionally,
sexual function. In several studies, pumpkin seed oil
reduced symptoms of BPH, improved urinary function in
men with overactive bladders, and improved quality of life.
Mackerel. Mackerel, a fatty fish, is one of
the best food sources of vitamin D; studies have
shown vitamin D can increase testosterone levels, often
dramatically. In a study conducted at Medical University
of Graz in Austria, people who spent more time in the
sun showed increased levels of both vitamin D and
testosterone. In a follow-up study, men who took vitamin
D daily saw an average increase of testosterone levels by
almost 25%. The sun is still the best source of vitamin D,
but if you don’t get outside much – or can’t tolerate fatty
fish – you’ll find D in pork, beef liver, caviar and eggs.
Pomegranate. Prostate specific
antigen (PSA) is a blood marker for prostate
cancer. Men whose PSA levels double in a short period of
time have a higher risk of death from prostate cancer,
and pomegranate appears to slow PSA increases. In a
study published in Clinical Cancer Research, 1 cup of
pomegranate juice per day significantly reduced PSA
doubling time after surgery or radiation among men with
prostate cancer. Studies show pomegranate extract can
slow the growth of prostate cancer cells and may lead to
apoptosis – or cell death – in cancer cells.
Tuna. Tuna is high in omega-3 fats, which
have powerful immune-enhancing and antiinflammatory effects and may reduce the risk of prostate
cancer. (Though one study suggested omega-3 fats
increased prostate cancer risk, that research has been
largely discredited.) Eat tuna sandwiches with a slice of
avocado, and you’ll increase your prostate protection:
Avocados are rich in both vitamin E and lutein, a
carotenoid antioxidant. Both the vitamin E and lutein
in avocado have been shown to inhibit the growth of
prostate cancer cells.
Oysters. Oysters are the number-one
food source of zinc, which blocks the enzyme
that converts testosterone to estrogen. Deficiencies are
linked to low testosterone, and boosting zinc leads
to a significant increase in testosterone levels. Zinc is
especially important if you work out, since intense
exercise can deplete testosterone; in a study published
in Neuroendocrinology Letters, wrestlers who took zinc
daily maintained testosterone levels after a month of
high-intensity training. Other good sources: red meat,
chicken, crab, lobster, beans and nuts.
Collard greens. Collard greens are
one of the best dietary sources of vitamin K,
which protects prostate health. In one study of over
11,000 men, high intake of vitamin K2 was linked to
a 63% lower risk of prostate cancer.
cleaneating.com
93
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95
sweet tooth
Cherry
Chocolate Bites
Ten minutes and five ingredients are all it takes to make
these sweet, chewy clusters – no oven required!
RECIPE BY MARIANNE WREN,
PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELLEN CHARLOTTE MARIE
Cherry Chocolate
Almond Clusters
MAKES 20 CLUSTERS.
HANDS-ON TIME: 10 MINUTES.
TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES.
8 oz dark chocolate (70%
or greater), broken or
chopped into small pieces
1 tbsp smooth unsalted
almond butter
(TRY: Artisana Organics
Raw Almond Butter)
1 cup large flake rolled oats
1/3 cup raw unsalted
almonds, chopped
1/3 cup dried unsweetened
cherries, chopped
1. To a large heat-proof bowl over
a pot of gently simmering water,
add chocolate and almond butter.
Stir occasionally for 2 to 3 minutes,
until chocolate is melted. Remove
from heat and stir in oats, almonds
and cherries.
2. Drop mixture by rounded
teaspoonful onto a large
parchment-lined baking sheet,
forming 20 mounds. Place sheet
in the refrigerator until set, 20 to
25 minutes.
PER SERVING (1 cluster): Calories: 113,
Total Fat: 7 g, Sat. Fat: 3 g, Monounsaturated
Fat: 3 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1 g, Carbs: 11 g,
Fiber: 2 g, Sugars: 4 g, Protein: 2 g,
Sodium: 4 mg, Cholesterol: 0 mg
96
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JUNE 2017
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