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Conde Nast Traveler USA August 2017

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08.17
F E AT U R E S
60
Corsica and Sardinia
Bareboat chartering means
you can sail where you
want, when you want. Rebecca
Misner tries it out.
72
Water to Wine
Paul Brady uncovers a new
spirit in the vineyards and kitchens of New York’s Finger Lakes.
82
Drink the World
How some of our favorite
cocktails put their birthplaces
on the map.
88
Drift Back
Sailing through Indonesia, Sean
Hotchkiss encounters Komodo
dragons, otherworldly landscapes...
and his long-lost stepbrother.
The Cover
Shot by Alex Grossman
on Corsica.
Capo Caccia headland,
in northwest Sardinia.
6
Condé Nast Traveler
photograph by ALEX GROSSMAN
08.17
W H E R E + W E A R (21)
WO R D O F M O U T H (31)
22
32
44
What I Pack
Checking In
Reconsidered
Aerin Lauder on
how one khaki Orvis
cargo jacket took
her on safari and back.
Malibu gets two new
properties; a surprisingly modern retreat
on the Côte d’Azur;
waterfront openings.
Bilbao goes way
beyond a day
at the museum.
24
The Upgrade
36
Go big or go home—
bold accessories
for maxi summer style.
Hotel Breakfast
Rome’s Hotel de
Russie is one place in
Italy where you can
get a proper breakfast.
26
Journey
Sailing around
Australia’s Macquarie
Island, a.k.a. the
Galápagos of the
Southern Ocean.
48
Just Back From
26
Jeweler Aurélie
Bidermann reveals her
favorite place to
buy sandals in Positano.
41
Cruise 2017
Primer
From Thomas Keller
menus to docking on
the Seine, going by
boat may be the best
way to travel now.
Canada’s Haida Gwaii
archipelago conjures
the beginning of time.
28
Plane Clothes
42
Accessories designer
Kendall Conrad always
flies in Italian denim
and cashmere.
Out in the World
14
16
Editor’s Itinerary
96
Intel
98
Souvenir
32
Condé Nast Traveler
48
Clockwise from top: Juliette Charvet; Paul Brady; Nicole Franzen
Some of our favorite
hoteliers are getting
into the boat business.
Editor’s Letter
8
46
08.17
CONTRIBUTORS
Adam H. Graham
Maggie Shipstead
Henry Leutwyler
The Zurich-based
writer revisits the city
of Bilbao, p. 44
The Seating Arrangements author sailed
the subantarctic, p. 46
The noted portrait
photographer shot our
cocktails story, p. 82
What city has surprised
you? Kosovo’s buzzy
capital, Pristina, has a
contagious, upbeat
energy (and makes the
meanest macchiato in
the Balkans).
Where are you
embarrassed to say you
have never been?
I’m a California native
and have never been
to Yosemite. It’s shameful. One day I will just
get in my car and go.
What dish, from what
restaurant, would
you travel for? Café de
L’Union in Bursins,
Switzerland, does this
cheese-on-toast dish
called Malakoff that will
blow your mind.
Favorite hotel on earth?
The Park Hyatt Tokyo,
for its calming tealgreen carpets, deep tubs
with violet bath salts,
and views of Shinjuku
and Mount Fuji.
Window or aisle seat?
Window all the way—
the perspective you get
on the planet from an
airplane fascinates me.
What would the airplane of your dreams
come with? A Steinway
grand piano and
Keith Jarrett improvising in first class.
What one place
tops your bucket list?
Kalmykia, a semiautonomous republic
in Russia that is home
to Europe’s only
Buddhist-majority
population.
Any particularly
memorable layovers?
En route to meet a
friend in Rome I took
an optional three-day
layover in Reykjavík.
It was my first time
traveling alone, which
I found empowering
and formative.
12
Condé Nast Traveler
Follow Us
What is the best souvenir you ever picked up?
The friends I made
on my first visit to Japan
when I was 16; they
were my hosts for two
and a half months.
Forty years later, we are
still close.
Deep Dive
Stay Here Now
From urban swimming
in Berlin (it’s practically a religion) to vanishing beaches and
the healing properties
of the Ganges, we
cover all things water
this month on
cntraveler.com.
At video.cntraveler
.com, we tour
New York’s hottest
new waterfront
hotel (which happens
to be in Brooklyn).
Talk to Us
Subscribe
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and tips to letters@
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subscribe, email
subscriptions@conde
nasttraveler.com,
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Tune In
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Ombudsman
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Email ombudsman@
cntraveler.com.
From left: Ralph Meury; courtesy of Maggie Shipstead; Sharon Suh; Yolanda Edwards
@cntraveler
EDITOR’S LETTER
08.17
Here, Here!
It feels like a rookie (if irresistible) move to ask Colin Field, head bartender at the Ritz
Paris’s Bar Hemingway and well-versed raconteur of all things cocktail, to name his
favorite drink. “It depends on the shoes I’m wearing and what beautiful lady is in front
of me,” he quips. His response is as nuanced as the ingredients of his desert-island pick:
a Champagne-topped apple brandy Calvados called The Serendipity (a.k.a. “France in a
glass”), which he created in 1994 and remains one of the bar’s most popular drinks. As for
why you don’t order your go-to dry French red in Singapore, and why you do crave the
sweet-citrus alchemy of, say, a Singapore Sling in 95-degree heat? “What you drink has
to adapt to where you are,” he says—and also play to the strengths of the establishment.
(Field advises, for example, that you stick to wine in a brasserie, where, he insists, “you
can’t get a decent cocktail.”) The just-right tipple, which is appropriate to climate, culture,
and environment, and served in the perfect vessel, can be so evocative that it becomes hard
to separate drink from place, and therefore from experience.
Here at Traveler we have a weakness for those experiences, particularly at storied hotel
bars whose names evoke both wanderlust and nostalgia. Like, say, Bar Hemingway at
the Ritz Paris or La Mamounia in Marrakech, whose hulking carved mahogany altars
of good spirit, worn from nearly a century’s worth of elbows, inspire us to sit up a little
straighter. In cities like Paris and New York, they’ve always been the ultimate expression
14
Condé Nast Traveler
of urbane elegance, a stage for preening and
people watching. To those pioneering Brits in
wilting white linen suits in the farthest reaches
of India and Africa during the early 20th century, the grand hotel bar—with all of its polished
brass, cut crystal, and sterling—served as a home
away from home, a reprieve from the heat, and
a reminder of a world they’d left behind. To this
day, these hallowed watering holes make men
want to hold doors open and women want to
play the coquette, if only for one drink.
And while there isn’t really the same commitment to booze or bar culture in the Mediterranean as in the rest of Europe, Southern Italy’s
version—with its cheerful red and orange
liquors and small open bars often located in
sunny lounge areas or on cliffside terraces—is
synonymous with summer itself. In “Drink the
World” (page 82), which celebrates cocktails
and the places that inspired them, we spotlight
the lesser-known Etna Spritz. The cocktail was
created by bar manager Alfio Liotta at Belmond’s
Grand Hotel Timeo in Taormina. Served on the
terrace with a view of the sea and volcanic Mount
Etna at the end of a hot day of Greek ruins and
13th-century-church hopping, it was one of my
most enduring memories of the trip. That’s not
because of the drink, per se; it’s more about the
ability of setting, season, and a fittingly breezy
cocktail to deliver on the promise of la dolce vita.
But no matter where you are, whether ending the
day with a glass of shockingly good local riesling
on a dock in New York’s Finger Lakes (“Water to
Wine,” page 72), or a bottle of rosé off the coast of
Corsica at sunset (page 60), vacation should, at its
core, feel like a celebration of life. Cheers to that.
Pilar Guzmán, Editor in Chief
@pilar_guzman
Photograph by Slim Aarons/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
For many of us, drinking out
of a coconut shell is still virtually
synonymous with vacation.
E D IT O R ’ S IT I N E R A RY
08.17
Perito Moreno glacier, in
Patagonia’s Lago Argentino.
Go Now
Plan Now
Remote Argentina
Custom has it that if you’re going to long-haul it all the way to Buenos
Aires for vacation, you should tack on some kind of backcountry
adventure before heading home. I get the appeal of Mendoza’s wine
country and the cactus fields of the north, but for something truly
otherworldly, consider the primeval setting of southern Patagonia in
spring (its fall). Last year I flew three hours to El Calafate airport in
Santa Cruz, then drove 30 minutes to Eolo, a 17-room whitewashed
estate built on a 10,000-acre estancia set against glaciers, fjords, and
turquoise Andean lakes. Eolo’s gauchos took me on horseback through
the steppeland, where flamingos, guanacos, and horses roam around
the lagoons. But the most spectacular outing was sailing the glacier-fed
Lago Argentino, then hiking into the Valley of the Fossils, where dinosaur
bones and Jurassic-era plants are time-capsuled in the rocks. And
you’re not so beat at the end of the day that you can’t enjoy the grilled
cordero and martini waiting for you back at Eolo. G I A N L U C A L O N G O
16
Condé Nast Traveler
ALSO KEEP
IN MIND . . .
Adirondacks in Winter
For the first time, the
Boathouse cabin at The
Point on Upper Saranac
Lake will be open all year.
Lake Como for Foliage
September and October
are still warm enough to
be on the water (if not in
it), and the balconies at
Villa d’Este, in Cernobbio,
have broad views of the
flaming chestnuts.
Summer’s Solar Eclipse
It sounds a bit Leftoversish, but Northeasterners
we know are heading to
Charleston and Nashville
to best view the August
21 event, while Angelenos
are booking rooms in Newport, on Oregon’s coast.
I grew up in Yarmouth,
on the coast between
Kennebunkport and Boothbay Harbor, so come
summer, I’m used to the
collective Northeast
descending on the area’s
rocky coves and sailing
around its islands. That’s
when the lines outside
the lobster shacks become
epic (even I can’t score a
table at Eventide Oyster Co.)
and swimming in Casco
Bay requires keeping one
goggled eye peeled for
boaters. Instead, my family
and I head inland to the
lakes about an hour northwest of Portland, where
long days are spent watching smelt and shiners
jump over the gunwales of
your canoe and quiet, pinescented nights are pierced
by wailing loons. Stay in the
open-plan timber cabin at
Wolf Cove Inn on Tripp
Lake in Poland, where you’ll
return from afternoons
of hiking over just-toughenough Rattlesnake
Mountain to a glass of wine
by your in-room fireplace,
waking up to blueberrystuffed French toast—and,
in August, blueberry everything. B R A D R I C K M A N
Photograph by Caleb Bennett
Maine’s
Other
Shores
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MARKETING
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THE
THINGS WE CAN’T
L E AV E
WITHOUT
Marmont, gucci.com; Stowaway, tourparavel.com; Costa, Valextra boutiques nationwide
Back to
the Future
Miami’s Faena hotel—like some of
this season’s standout luggage—
is doing retro-chic to near perfection.
from top:
Gucci GG Marmont bag .................... $3,100
Paravel Stowaway suitcase ................. $275
Valextra Costa
luggage ........................... $6,750 and $7,350
photograph by MATT HR ANEK
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
21
AERIN LAUDER
THE CASE
FOR SORT OF
BLENDING
IN ON SAFARI
22
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
“I wouldn’t wear my boots at night,” Aerin
Lauder says about the lace-up North Face
boots she wore from 5:30 A.M. until sunset
for 12 days straight on a family safari at the
Singita Grumeti Reserve in Tanzania and Sabi
Sands Game Reserve in South Africa. Instead,
after six hours in the back of a dusty Land Rover
and a quick shower, she’d slip into a pair of
suede Aquazzura ballet flats. “It still felt nice to
get dressed for dinner.” A good piece of packing advice, though not at all surprising coming
from the beauty-empire scion and style icon.
Lauder is, after all, the founder of her five-yearold namesake lifestyle brand, Aerin, which
draws on her personal style and a life lived in
New York, East Hampton, and Palm Beach,
where, no matter what, she dresses for dinner.
Lauder filled her duffel with pieces that
were “comfortable and unfussy, but a few things
I feel really good in.” For game drives, she
wore olive-green jeans from Frame and J Brand
with fitted oxford shirts and a khaki cargo
jacket from Orvis that’s still getting plenty of
play post-safari. For sundowners, which
were served tailgate-style on the hood of the
Landy, and dinners at camp, Lauder stayed
in jeans but would swap her button-down for a
Stella McCartney ruffled lace blouse, which
she dressed up with her gold charm necklace.
For efficiency’s sake, she deliberately stuck
to a single color palette, one that mimicked the
earthiness of the African landscape. “I think
it’s fun to embrace the style of the place you’re
in,” Lauder says. Still, after nearly two weeks,
she says, “I was ready to wear something other
than beige or brown.” K A R I M O LVA R
Weekender, aerin.com; scarf, hermes.com; jacket, orvis.com. Clockwise from top left: Photograph courtesy of Aerin Lauder. Josephine Schiele; styled by John Olson for
Halley Resources. Tom Gorman; styled by Paul Petzy. Courtesy of Orvis. Josephine Schiele; styled by John Olson for Halley Resources. Tom Gorman; styled by Paul Petzy
W H AT I PA C K
Aerin Mini
Weekender.............. $1,590
Hermès Maîtres de la
Forêt scarf ................... $395
Orvis Heritage Safari
Jacket ........................... $179
Charm necklace ..................
...................... Lauder’s own
THE UPGR ADE
MORE
IS MORE
Chrysoprase, ireneneuwirth.com; Sayu Asmara, John Hardy, N.Y.C.; Cascade, Verdura, N.Y.C.; Serpenti, bulgari.com
At La Posta Vecchia,
Hotel Il Pellicano’s
sister property in a
17th-century castle
about an hour west
of Rome, proprietor
Marie-Louise Sciò
hosted her annual
Mini Maxi ball
(#lpvminimaxi).
Here, some decidedly
maxi options that
we shot poolside.
clockwise from
top left:
Irene Neuwirth
Chrysoprase ........................
........... price upon request
John Hardy Sayu
Asmara .................. $25,000
Verdura Cascade ................
............................... $107,500
Bulgari Serpenti .. $52,000
24
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
photograph by MATT HR ANEK
J U ST BAC K FRO M
From left: Terraced houses in the
main part of town; spaghetti
at Da Adolfo; Spiaggia Grande.
HAPPY
RETURNS
JEWELRY
DESIGNER
AURÉLIE
BIDERMANN
ON THE
QUIET SIDE
OF POSITANO
26
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
“We eat and drink all day long.” That’s how
New York–based, Paris-born jewelry designer
Aurélie Bidermann sums up her vacations in
the Italian resort town of Positano. For almost
a decade, she’s spent the first two weeks of
August with friends and family in the former
estate of the film director Franco Zeffirelli,
now the luxury hotel Villa Treville. “I grew up
going to Ibiza in the ’70s, where we’d boat
and swim until sunset, then walk back to our
house barefoot, in just a T-shirt,” Bidermann
says. “In many ways, Positano reminds me of
that time. It’s authentic.” That is, if you know
the secret spots far from the packs of tourists,
which Bidermann does, to have an Aperol
spritz with the best view of the coastline (it’s
on the terrace at Belmond Hotel Caruso) or to
score the most beautiful white lace sundresses.
“There’s really not much to do,” she says,
“so it’s very relaxing.” And isn’t that the point?
The Ultimate Home Base
What to Bring Home
The designer only stays at
Villa Treville, which is made
up of five cliffside villas.
In fact, she has a standing reservation at the retreat’s
garden-terrace Turandot
suite, named after the
Puccini opera and decorated
with Lisa Corti textiles.
For made-to-order leather
sandals (with a one-day turnaround), Bidermann heads
to Pepé Positano. “I’ll put my
initials on the sole, or add
tiny jewels to the straps.” At
La Bottega di Brunella, in
the center of town, she picks
up ultrasoft white lace
tunics that she wears to the
beach (“very Positano—you
can’t find them anywhere
else”). And Bidermann
always makes a pilgrimage
to Vietri sul Mare, on
the outskirts of Positano,
for new ceramic pieces
from Ceramica Vietri Scotto,
Ceramica Solimene, and
Ceramica Pinto. Orders
are delivered in four to six
weeks, she says, “and it’s
always such a nice surprise
when everything finally
arrives.” K A R I M O LVA R
Where to Eat
Forget the Vespa. You’re taking a boat to lunch. Da Adolfo,
a casual awning-covered
seafood shack that opened in
1966 (and hasn’t changed
much in the decades since),
sits right on Laurito Beach,
and is a five-minute ride from
the Positano pier (the boat
with the red fish sign on its
mast acts as a free shuttle).
“I love the sea urchin, and the
view is so beautiful,” says
Bidermann. Twenty minutes
by gozzo, Conca del Sogno
is the place to go if you’re craving zucchini blossoms.
Clockwise from top left: Photographs by Carol Sachs; Juliette Charvet (2). Bidermann: Courtesy of Aurélie Bidermann
BIDERMANN’S
SECRET
POSITANO
W E L L T R AV E L E D
“I EMBRACE THE CULTURE OF
WHEREVER I AM. IF THEY TAKE A
SIESTA, I’M TAKING A SIESTA.”
As the daughter of a bullfighter,
Kendall Conrad traveled the world as a
child. The Santa Barbara native and
lifelong equestrian still makes regular
trips to Mexico with her husband and
two daughters. “We love San Miguel de
Allende and Chiapas. We stick to the
mountains; the beaches are too touristy.”
Her saddlery-inspired pieces, made
of napa and bridle leather with brass
hardware, are designed to withstand
the test of time and adventure.
ACCESSORIES
AND JEWELRY
DESIGNER
KENDALL CONRAD
Checked bag or carry-on? Always
carry-on: a large leather-and-suede tote
and a cross-body from my line, plus a
wristlet for my iPhone and credit cards.
What’s in your dopp kit? Weleda Skin
Food, John Masters Organics citrus Lip
Calm, and a roll-on aromatherapy oil
from L’Oeil du Vert. It calms me when
things get stressful.
Favorite place in the world? Chiapas.
We stay with friends in the town of
San Cristóbal de las Casas and go on
incredible hikes to the Agua Azul
waterfalls and the ruins of the Palenque
Temple of the Inscriptions.
Best trip ever? The Maldives. It felt like
a dream state. The light, the water—
it all seemed different. It was like we’d
gone to the moon. A S T O L D T O
ANDREA WHITTLE
28
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
photograph by DEWEY NICKS
Hair and makeup by Jamie Greenberg at the Wall Group
Describe your travel uniform. I love
these ’70s-inspired jeans from The
Seafarer, an Italian brand that uses the
softest denim. I’ll throw on a Club
Monaco cashmere sweater and a linen
scarf. This one is from our collaboration
with Cathryn Collins of I Pezzi Dipinti.
live life luxuriously
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08.17
T H E T H I N G S W E C A N ’ T S T O P TA L K I N G A B O U T
Making
A Splash
On the
French
Riviera
pg.
34
Hôtel Les Roches
Rouges, the most
stylish new property
on the Côte d’Azur.
photograph by NICOLE FR ANZEN
Condé Nast Traveler
31
CHECKING IN
Carbon Beach
With the opening of two new hotels along
California’s most prized stretch of coastline, you
might never leave this corner of Malibu.
From left: A teak
soaking tub
in one of Nobu
Ryokan Malibu’s
beachfront
rooms; on the
shore at the
Malibu Beach Inn.
As a Los Angeles native, I’ve always been grateful for the glacial pace of
Malibu’s transformation. Since the iconic Alice’s Restaurant on the Malibu
Pier reopened under new management as Malibu Farm Restaurant in 2015,
with Helene Henderson’s breezy elevated surfer menu, it seems that everything along the cove between the pier and Carbon Canyon has upped its
game. The chic coastal outpost of Soho House opened, and then something
miraculous happened: The Malibu Beach Inn, once a ho-hum motel-style
property with nothing but views, was transformed by visionary veteran hotelier Gregory Day, whom the Mani Brothers smartly lured from Shutters on the
Beach, into just the kind of quietly luxurious ocean hideaway every Angeleno
dreams about. The 47 rooms with private terraces that cantilever over this
gentle cove master that elusive Scando art of the cozy, or hygge: They are minimal yet warm, with strong Danish Modern–meets–California beach design
references, and upscale in that plush-bedding,
Toto-toilets sort of way. An appropriate avocado-, egg-, and seafood-forward menu from
Gato alum Cody Dickey (not to mention great
cheese and charcuterie platters and burgers)
served on the terrace overlooking the ocean
means you’ll never have any reason to leave
the property. Just east, the impressive if considerably pricier Nobu Ryokan Malibu opened
16 ample rooms in April with spare-no-expense
teak-and-ipe-wood millwork, some of which
have traditional timber soaking tubs. At press
time, there was no on-site restaurant. Of
course, guests have special access to the nearby
Nobu Malibu. P I L A R G U Z M Á N
WHERE TO EAT
Hip and Healthy
Malibu Farm Restaurant for best-of-Cali
grain salads, tacos, and sandwiches.
Upscale Italian
Giorgio Baldi, a delicious but slightly
too expensive icon on West Channel
Road, is as far as you’ll need to venture
for authentic Italian.
Fish Shack
Reel Inn, with its hanging surfboards
and chalkboard menus, is as old
Malibu as it gets. So is Malibu Seafood
and its no-frills but superfresh
seafood platters.
Pasta, Pizza, Playground
Tra di Noi at the Malibu Country Mart
is easy Italian. Order for the kids first,
let them loose in the sand-filled playground within eyeshot, and tuck into
a bottle of something.
Family Beach Day
Park your car in the lot at Paradise
Cove, and then seat yourself in an
Adirondack chair right on the water.
The beachfront restaurant serves
slightly trashy but delicious chilaquiles
and a nice Worcester-and-Tabascoheavy Bloody Mary. Or you can just
pick up sandwiches and ice-cold beer
at the takeout place next door.
Classic Roadside Burger
Patrick’s Roadhouse has been serving
a solid burger in the P.M. and fried
eggs and potatoes in the A.M. to surfers
since time immemorial.
32
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
photographs by LAUR E JOLIET
CHECKING IN
Riviera Revival
A modern resort on the quieter
Côte d’Azur is stealing attention
from its glitzier neighbors.
For decades, St-Raphaël was that rare Riviera
town that appealed more to families coming
by car than to A-listers pulling in by boat. Since
the effortlessly cool Hôtel Les Roches Rouges
reopened here in May, though, you’re seeing
more of the Missoni-draped vacationers you’d
expect to find in nearby Cannes than Peugeots
packed with sand toys. When reimagining
this former 1950s retreat, the hot young Paris
design firm Festen channeled the Côte d’Azur’s
glamorous past while delivering the kind of
seaside hotel you want to stay in today. It kept
the look appropriately beachy but modern:
breezy white curtains and hits of azure, ocher,
and sunny yellow offset by polished cement,
raw-oak furniture, and ceramic side tables
from artist Guy Bareff that you’ll want for your
own home. Zeitgeisty design aside, the real
draw is outdoors, where a seawater pool carved
right into the rock is surrounded by crashing
waves, and an intuitive waitstaff top off your
Champagne Fleury before you have to ask.
And though St-Raphaël is a while away from
having the nightlife of neighboring St-Tropez
(this town still dies down when the sun does),
with Dean Shury, formerly of Chiltern Firehouse,
shaking up peach Rinquinquin cocktails at
the hotel’s La Terrace bar, you just won’t care.
Above: The lobby at Hôtel Les Roches Rouges. Below: Restaurant Emile at Hotel Emiliano.
ALEC LOBR ANO
34
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
By the Lake
By the Beach
By the Bay
By the Harbor
Of the four new lakeview hotels at
Lucerne’s Bürgenstock
Resort, our fave is
The Waldhotel, Matteo
Thun’s terraced stoneand-timber wellness
retreat with an indoor/
outdoor spa.
São Paulo’s oh-sochic Hotel Emiliano
has opened a Rio
outpost with a rarefor-Copacabana
guests-only pool and
outdoor bar.
Tours in mid-century cars,
walls hung with portraits
by Claudia Corrales,
and the best Havana Club
Añejo daiquiri in town
(at colorful Bar Constante)
are some perks of Old
Havana’s new Gran Hotel
Manzana Kempinski.
Tasmania’s MACq 01
on the Hobart waterfront (sister property
to the luxe Saffire
Freycinet lodge) nods
to all things Tazzy,
from indigenous art
to crisp rieslings.
From top: Nicole Franzen; Juliano Colodeti
IT’S ALWAYS BETTER
NEAR THE WATER
HOT E L B R E A K FA S T
Hotel
de Russie,
Rome
Every June, for all of my 26 years,
I’ve taken an overnight flight
from JFK to Rome to visit my
mother’s side of the family.
As soon as we touch down, all
I can think about is a panino
stuffed with paper-thin slices of
prosciutto. But when I walk
into my grandmother’s house,
jet-lagged, with a roaring,
empty belly, I’m met with an
espresso, a bowl of apricots,
and a single dry biscotto. The
truth is, despite the fact that
Italians are the world’s reigning
food champs, they don’t
do breakfast. It’s usually taken
standing up at the nearest bar,
if it’s eaten at all. The only place
to find a truly decent spread
(and a comfortable seat) is at a
hotel, and the paragon of the
form is served in the garden at
Rocco Forte’s de Russie. The
pastel-pink staircase in its courtyard opens onto a sprawling
terrace shaded by palms and
potted lemon trees where you’ll
get your frothy cappuccino,
crostini, freshly squeezed orange
juice, and aperitivo-worthy
salumi. Next time, I’m taking a
detour on the way in from
Fiumicino. A N D R E A W H I T T L E
36
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
photograph by ODDUR THOR ISSON
PRIMER
THE HAIDA
HOW-TO
Getting There
The coastline and forest of Haida Gwaii.
Pacific Coastal Airlines flies
daily between Vancouver
and Masset; Air Canada has
service from Vancouver
to Sandspit; and there are
seasonal flights on Inland
Air from Prince Rupert to
Masset. Or take an eighthour ferry ride from Prince
Rupert on BC Ferries.
When to Go
One Step Beyond
Clockwise from top left: Photographs by Grant Harder (3);
Ann Johansson/Getty Images. Map by Peter Oumanski
The islands of Haida Gwaii take you
back to, oh, the beginning of time.
“Yes, I know it,” my Vancouver cab driver said
when I asked him about Haida Gwaii, the
torch-shaped archipelago flung some 70 miles
off the coast of British Columbia, across the
choppy Hecate Strait. “It’s out there.”
The 175-mile-long chain has benefited from
its extreme isolation, with some of the largest
and oldest spruce trees on the planet; 20 kinds
of whale, dolphin, and porpoise; and animal
subspecies that exist nowhere else—like the
Haida Gwaii black bear, which has developed
especially large teeth and jaws due to a steady
diet of crabs and salmon. Only a dozen visitors
at a time are allowed to set foot on some of
the islands. (Though Prince William and the
Duchess of Cambridge did manage to swing a
visit to the area last September.)
Aside from the Imax-like wildlife encounters—
Sitka black-tailed deer flit across your path,
and sputtering gray Minke whales surface off your
boat’s bow—much of the archipelago’s almost
mystical energy owes to the fact that it’s the ancestral home of the Haida First Nation, which
comprises roughly half the islands’ population
of 5,000. Haida culture thrives in the towns of
Old Massett (pop. 555) and Skidegate (837) on
Graham Island, where street signs are in English
and X̱aat Kíl; the Haida Heritage Centre in Skidegate stages dance performances in a longhousestyle theater. On Anthony Island in Gwaii Haanas,
I wandered through an ancient, mossy forest
and peered up at 19th-century carved cedar mortuary poles housing remains of bygone chiefs.
It all conjured a neck-tingling echo of an old Haida
proverb I’d scribbled down: “When you walk
this earth, you must walk carefully. Underneath
your feet is the knife’s edge, and you could fall
off this world.” K A T H E R I N E L A G R AV E
May, June, and July see
between 18 and 20 hours
of sunlight, and July to
mid-August is busiest, with
daily temps between 60
and 70 degrees.
Shacking Up
The 8,000-square-foot,
cedar post-and-beam Haida
House at Tllaal has clean
and cozy rooms, and is halfway between Masset and
Skidegate. Its sister property, the floating 12-room
Ocean House at Peel Inlet
(formerly a luxury fishing
camp), opens May 2018 and
is now accepting bookings.
Remote Access
Gwaii Haanas, where nature
puts on its best show, can
only be reached via boat
or floatplane, and all visitors
need a permit. Call 1-877559-8818 for reservations.
Maple Leaf Adventures,
Bluewater Adventures, and
Outer Shores Expeditions
offer sailings into the park.
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
41
OU T I N TH E WO R LD
Grand Floatels
Some of the industry’s greatest hoteliers
are getting into the boating game. We are
totally on board with that.
Thread counts and that got-to-’gram-it dish that your equally
’grammable salmon toast came on don’t make a hotel spectacular. The visionary who decided on the sheets, the china,
and all those other details you remember long after your
stay does. Which is why we’re excited that some of our favorite brands and property owners, from a stylish château in
the Dolomites to Aman, are setting their expertise afloat with
custom schooners, dhows, and catamarans. (Even RitzCarlton just announced that it’ll launch three cruise yachts
in 2019.) Here, the floating lodges we’re loving now.
ALEX ANDR A KIRKMAN
42
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
Photograph by Stuart Pearce
Satori runs private charters through the Med.
OU T I N TH E WO R LD
The Mothership
Tusitiri
Eleven Experience’s foray into boating
has those destination-specific luxe touches
we expect of the brand (like the floating
pods in its Icelandic spa). Sailing in southern
Florida, after a day of bonefishing in the
Marquesas Keys or sportfishing for tarpon
in the Everglades, you’ll eat snapper
ceviche and wagyu tenderloin aboard your
74-foot, three-stateroom Hatteras motor
yacht. If the fish aren’t biting, you can always
take the boat’s stash of snorkel gear
and paddleboards to explore historic Fort
Jefferson in the Dry Tortugas.
This 60-foot wooden dhow was found abandoned on a Kenyan beach by its new
Norwegian owners (who also run Enasoit
Game Sanctuary in Laikipia) and restored
over eight years. It sails with up to 10 guests
from August through March alongside the
humpbacks, dolphins, and eagles of the
Lamu Archipelago (specialists are on board
to school you on the surroundings). At
night, brass lanterns cast a glow on linen
bedrolls out on deck as you fall asleep
to the dull cries of egrets and terns. (Yup,
you’re literally sleeping under the stars.)
Blue Deer
Amandira
Satori
Stefano and Giorgia Barbini—former CEO
of Escada France and Italy and scion of Brioni,
respectively—own this 74-foot custom catamaran, which sails the Italian Med from
June through October and the Caribbean
from December through April. Like their
White Deer San Lorenzo Mountain Lodge in
the Dolomites, every detail of the vessel
(marine-chic blue palette; flybridge with a
table for 10) feels especially considered.
And then there’s the food: Stefano keeps
the wine cellar stocked with Piedmont reds
that go perfectly with that uni pasta made
with urchin scooped from the sea that day.
Since early 2016, Aman has been chartering weeklong voyages into Raja Ampat
on its handcrafted 170-foot phinisi, a twomasted Indonesian ship. Having 14 staff on
hand means the up-to-10 guests can get
in-cabin massages and bubbly top-offs
around the clock. The real draw, though,
is the specialty Nitrox diving, which
allows for longer dives alongside wobbegong and reef sharks off Kawe Island.
Novices, not to worry: An onboard scuba
instructor can train you for mid-level
plonks into the coral reefs.
The rose-lined pathways at Borgo Santo
Pietro are alone worth a trip to Tuscany.
So it’s not surprising that we fell hard for
the property’s five-month-old sister ship
on first glimpse of its 121-foot mast. Danish
owners Claus and Jeanette Thottrup
gave this high-style Turkish yacht five staterooms with marble baths (the master
has a to-die-for freestanding walnut tub),
high ceilings, and a cozy on-deck cinema. Though our favorite touch is the
salon, constructed eight inches below
deck, ensuring clear views of the Spanish
Med from every leather-saddled seat.
THE BOATS
WE WANT TO
BOOK
illustrations by VALERO DOVAL
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
43
RECONSIDERED
Bilbao Now
Yes, the Guggenheim Bilbao is still wondrous
20 years after opening. But perhaps the
museum is to Bilbao as the Flatiron Building
was to New York City: only the beginning.
A DA M H . G R A H A M
44
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
HIT LIST
Don’t Miss
On-site exhibits
commemorating the
Guggenheim’s 20th
anniversary include a
new film by Pierre
Huyghe and a Bill Viola
retrospective.
Go Big
At Azurmendi, chef
Eneko Atxa’s threeMichelin-starred
temple to modern
Basque gastronomy,
start with a cider in
the greenhouse before
sitting down to mains
like quail-egg tempura
nesting in king oyster
mushroom “noodles.”
Keep it OG
Lamb brochettes
are the thing to order
at the century-old
Café Iruña, a paradigm
of neo-Mudejar design
with rust-and-mustard
tiles, stained-glass
transoms, and long
marble counters.
Your Home Base
Gran Hotel
Domine Bilbao has
bird’s-eye views
of the Guggenheim
and, after a total
refurb last year, Javier
Mariscal–designed
interiors and furniture,
and Starck bathtubs.
From top: The old-school
Café Iruña; Bilbao’s
Guggenheim Museum.
From top: Photographs by Aran Goyoaga; Gallery Stock
Long before Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Bilbao put Spain’s
little-known northern Basque city on the bucket-list tour,
and with it coined terms like “starchitecture” and the “Bilbao
effect,” there was the city of Bilbao—a 19th-century industrialized maritime stalwart that had fallen on harder economic
times in the latter half of the 20th century. What hasn’t
changed since this port town was founded, in 1300, despite
Spanish Civil War bombings and the decline of shipbuilding,
are its undercelebrated rolling hills, superior sheep’s-milk
cheese, and sparkling wine. We say make your pilgrimage to
the deconstructivist, titanium monument to postindustrial
optimism, and then eat your way through the rest of your stay.
The best way to understand the region’s “a little bit often”
philosophy is to go on a txikiteo, a Basque pub crawl: You’ll
sip small glasses of txakoli, the region’s slightly effervescent
white wine, and nibble pintxos—the Basque
tapa, which, according to locals, you have to be
able to eat while standing up and in two bites.
If you start early, you’ll have time to hit one of
the city’s rustic taverns or siderías (hard-cider
houses), which crank out traditional—and more
substantial—tortillas de bacalao and grilled
steak. Or go the modernist route and check out
the city’s gastro scene that, long the bridesmaid to those of neighboring San Sebastián and
the Rioja, has come into its own.
To get your mind around the insanely highlevel architecture that’s cropped up post-Gehry,
take a walk along the winding Nervión River.
From the Guggenheim, head south past Santiago
Calatrava’s cantilevered Zubizuri footbridge.
Turn inland to the affluent Indautxu neighborhood and Philippe Starck’s 2010 Azkuna
Zentroa, a 1909 wine warehouse turned cultural
center. Walk northwest toward Cesar Pelli’s
glass Iberdrola tower, Álvaro Siza Vieira’s Bizkaia
Aretoa hall, and cross the river and head west
to the late Zaha Hadid’s Zorrozaurre, a massive
urban-renewal project converting a 148-acre
peninsula to a live-work island complex.
JOUR NEY
The Southern Wild
It’s cold, it’s far, and the rough water is no joke. Still, New Zealand’s
subantarctic hooked Maggie Shipstead with an elemental rawness and natural
abundance that felt like some kind of last Darwinian frontier.
A baby elephant seal was making eyes at me. True, I must
have looked alluring in my rubber boots and layers of down
and Gore-Tex, almost as plump as the mother seal that had
recently weaned my admirer and returned to sea. Here on
Macquarie Island, a lonely sliver of upthrust seafloor halfway
between New Zealand and Antarctica, the beach was littered
with these young seals, most at an age when they’re called—I’m
not kidding—weaners. Hundreds of blubbery tubes with smiling, whiskered faces lay in clumps and piles, flippers draped
over one another, emitting a chorus of grunts and raspberries.
Dapper king penguins waddled purposefully among them
like impatient business commuters.
But my weaner was all alone on the charcoal-gray sand,
uncuddled, gazing at me. Miraculously, it began to scoot closer,
until it was near enough to arch up and snort in my face. Then,
it heaved its damp, velvety bulk across my lap.
You’re probably thinking you’d like to cuddle a weaner.
You can, too, but it takes effort. First you have to get yourself to the bottom of New Zealand’s South Island, board a
ship, and bash south for several days through the notoriously
46
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
windswept latitudes known as the Roaring Forties and the
Furious Fifties. Once at Macquarie, you will need to clamber
into a Zodiac raft and motor across a short but ornery stretch
of water amid curious, swimming, head-swiveling penguins.
Wind and swell are the norm, so a successful landing is by no
means guaranteed. But if you do get your wellies on that gray
beach and find yourself among the crowds of penguins and
heaps of seals, even if your arrival doesn’t coincide with the
brief period in November and December when the weaners
miss their moms and will settle for a girl from California, take
a good long look around, because you are in a wonderland.
But unless you happen to be an extremely intrepid sailor, a
climate scientist, or an actual elephant seal, you aren’t getting to
Macquarie on your own. I went on a 13-day, multi-island voyage offered by New Zealand–based Heritage Expeditions. The
trip is billed as “the Galápagos of the Southern Ocean” and, in
addition to Macquarie, an Australian territory, includes several
of New Zealand’s most remote and windy island groups: the
Snares, the Auckland Islands, and Campbell Island. Although
these subantarctic islands have never had a chronicler of
illustration by DENISE NESTOR
Cahaba Brewing Company, Birmingham
IS IS
H
T
Alabama
And from the harmonic waves of Singin’ River Brewing
to the bitter waters of the Cahaba Brewing Company,
you can take it all in.
aste
notes of chocolate,
coffee and rye
Feel
the heart of Alabama
encased in amber
Smell
the warmth from
the freshest hops
Get the full view at
SeeAL360.com/CraftBeer
A D V E R T I S E M E N T
THE ALLURE OF ALABAMA
Alabama’s Gulf Coast is a vacation
2,448-feet of prime Gulf Coast fishing space.
Break for dinner Upstairs at Fisher’s, another of
Cast your line over the pier for a chance to reel
Johnny Fisher’s famed restaurants. Here, savor
in local fish such as Atlantic croaker, red snapper,
a seasonally inspired menu. From seared jumbo
relaxing and exhilarating. With
flounder, and king mackerel.
scallops over roasted cauliflower and a ginger
its beautiful beaches and all the
Pause your day for a delicious meal at one of
exciting and entertaining activities
restaurateur Johnny Fisher’s renowned local
destination that is equal parts
that go along with Gulf-side living,
establishments. If you are in need of family
friendly fare—and atmosphere—try The Gulf,
it is an essential getaway for those
a laid-back, waterfront restaurant that features
looking for an enriching cultural
more casual cuisine. After satisfying your culinary
and culinary experience.
appetite, head over to The Wharf at Ocean Beach—
a 220-acre destination with upscale shopping,
dining, a world-class marina, and open-air
herb salad to BBQ-spiced swordfish with orzo and
Brussels sprouts in a lemon vinaigrette, each plate
is a composed beautifully by an executive chef
who celebrates local ingredients. Cap off your day
by taking in the sound-and-light show, SPECTRA
at The Wharf. It is a mesmerizing, state-of-the-art
installation delivering popular surround-sound
music set to choreographed lighting effects on
the palm-lined Main Street.
amphitheater—to quench your thirst for adventure.
After a long day of exploring unwind in your own
Start your day with a serene walk along the shore,
Try zip lining and revel in the amazing waterfront
space. Wyndham Vacation Rentals has condos
a 32-mile stretch of breathtaking Gulf water and
scenery or charter a boat to explore the region
that provide the perfect home-away-from-home
sugar-white sand that will allow you to meditate
further, at your own pace. Get to see dolphins
experience—and will become the base for the
and take in the sites of the gorgeous area. From
in the wild or head to more secluded areas for
memories you build along the Alabama Gulf Coast
there, you might want to explore Gulf State Park,
great bird watching.
for years to come.
Plan your next vacation at alabama.travel/beach
JOUR NEY
Charles Darwin’s stature, the comparison to their more famous
Pacific cousins is made apt by the remarkable abundance and
diversity of plants and animals adapted to thrive in that harsh
climate, including some 35 plant species and 28 bird species
that exist nowhere else.
Our home was a 235-foot converted Russian research vessel
that plies the tourist trade as The Spirit of Enderby but bears
its official name, Professor Khromov, in Cyrillic lettering on its
hull. Inside, the ship had a certain no-frills Cold War charm, a
seriousness of purpose. Forty-nine passengers were on board
when we sailed one December morning from Dunedin, a
university city on New Zealand’s South Island, as well as nine
staff from Heritage (mostly Kiwis) and 22 Russian crew. As we
entered open water, albatrosses and petrels glided alongside.
Dusky dolphins played in our bow wave. The water lumped
up into a swell, and the ship began to roll.
Along the shore, small, shy yellow-eyed penguins scurried
out of the sea and into the bush. Sea lions snoozed in grassy
nooks and crannies. A rare (and ill-tempered) New Zealand
falcon swooped down to steal someone’s beanie. We skirted
forests of gnarled, red-flowered rata (or ironwood) trees, traversed long expanses of waist-high tussock grass that grabbed
at our ankles like trip wires, and pressed through gusty wind
back to the beach where we’d started. A diligent tour mate
with a GPS device announced that our walk had indeed been
eight miles. Rodney shrugged and twinkled. “Must have been
a slip of the tongue,” he said. Don’t sell yourself short, was his
philosophy. Get out and see what you can.
I’ve already mentioned my date with the weaner, but there’s
more to know about Macquarie, where we sailed next. It is a
geological wonder: the only island in the world made of rocks
from the earth’s mantle and oceanic crust that have been thrust
above sea level, providing an opportunity to study the ocean
ur first landing was at Enderby Island, at the north
floor without descending several miles in a submersible. Also
end of the Auckland group. A few dozen male
worth noting is Macquarie’s ecological resilience after a sad
New Zealand sea lions were lounging on the beach,
history of 19th-century exploitation, when the wildlife was
some sleeping, some squabbling over territory,
systematically slaughtered and boiled down for oil—fur seals,
all of them waiting for the females to arrive. In a week or so,
then elephant seals, then penguins, until almost none were
those ladies would haul out to give birth and, excitleft. Sinister, rusted tanks still stand
ingly, be ready to mate again soon afterward. The
near the beach: digesters that once
largest males, alpha beachmasters sometimes
processed up to 4,000 penguins per
weighing more than 900 pounds, propped themday. Today around 80,000 elephant
THE
selves on their flippers and regarded us with grave
seals and more than a million penLUMINOUS
hauteur. The younger males, smaller and insecure,
guin pairs from four species (king,
were more unpredictable, and occasionally one
royal, gentoo, and rockhopper)
BEAUTY
would hustle in our direction, roaring and surbreed there.
WASN’T A
prisingly quick on his flippers but easily deterred
As the ship turned for home, I
PERFORMANCE
by a guide’s gentle poke in the chest with a branch.
sat in the bridge and watched the
FOR MY
We walked up a hill carpeted with sphagnum
waves. Sunlight caught the foamy
BENEFIT;
peaks, suffused the water with a sapmoss, and punctuated with wildflowers resemWEATHER AND
bling gigantic fluffy yellow Q-tips, to look out over
phire glow, glanced off the snowy
Enderby’s northern cliffs, worn to sheerness by
white bodies of gliding albatrosses.
WILDLIFE
the same prevailing winds currently abrading
This luminous beauty wasn’t a perREQUIRE NO
our faces. Our leader, Rodney Russ, who founded
formance for my benefit; weather
HUMAN
Heritage Expeditions in 1985, presented us with
and wildlife require no human
WITNESSES
witnesses. I was simply seeing the
our options: We could go back down and watch
by-products of a planet orbiting a
the sea lions, or we could walk eight kilometers
star, the movement of clouds, the
around the island’s eastern perimeter.
whims of pelagic birds, the propa“Isn’t it eight miles?” asked one of the guides.
“No, eight kilometers,” Rodney said with emphatic authority.
gation of disturbances through water.
For a time, we followed the cliffs’ edge. Below, tangles of glossy
Did you know royal and wandering albatrosses don’t touch
black kelp washed back and forth in the surf, each strand thick
land for up to four years after they fledge? Riding the westeras a fire hose. Occasional rain squalls blew quickly past. The
lies on 10-foot wingspans, they begin their lives by circling
birders and their Hubble-size telephoto lenses were kept in a
Antarctica, eventually returning home from the opposite direcstate of feverish vigilance by albatross, skua, shag, petrel, prion,
tion. Think of what they see—all that water and sky.
bright-green parakeets, and the island’s six endemic land birds:
I watched the bow rock up and over the swells. Look at
rail, pipit, tomtit, dotterel, teal, and snipe, all of which sound like
this ocean that belongs to none of us. Look at this world that
obscure Victorian slang words to me but thrilled the birders.
belongs to us all.
O
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
47
C RU I S E
N A DREAM
VACATION YOU W ULD
COOK WITH JACQUES PÉPIN. SEE BLUE-FOOTED
BOOBIES IN THE GALÁPAGOS. FALL ASLEEP
IN GENOA AND WAKE UP IN MONACO. STAY ON
THE SEINE. WALK INTO A THOMAS KELLER
RESTAURANT WITHOUT A RESY. NAIL CROW
POSE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE OCEAN.
MEET UP WITH MONKS IN A 12TH-CENTURY
PAGODA IN MYANMAR. CUT THE LINE
AT THE VATICAN MUSEUMS. SKIP THE
HOUR-LONG CAB RIDE AFTER
A DELAYED OVERNIGHT
FLIGHT. APPROACH
BUDAPEST LIKE YOU
WERE REALLY
MEANT
TO.
48
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
illustrations by TIM ENTHOVEN
GET
THERE
BY
BOAT!
C RU I S E
TAKE THE TRIP OF
A LIFETIME
No Planning Required
Thomas Keller
sets the menu at his
namesake restaurants on Seabourn
ships, requires they
buy from the same
purveyors (like
Elysian Fields Farm)
that he does, and
even picks the background music.
Nobu Matsuhisa,
a.k.a. the man who
christened the
yellowtail sashimi–
jalapeño combo,
opens his new sushi
restaurant aboard
the Crystal
Symphony and
Serenity this fall.
Patrick Henriroux
and Sylvestre Wahid,
Live a
Planet Earth
Episode
“I knew I’d see blue-footed boobies in the Galápagos—
something I’d always wanted to experience. But
when I was snorkeling off Isla Bartolmé, I suddenly
reaized there were penguins swimming below me
and iridescent parrot fish, white-tip reef sharks, and bright
orange and red starfish to my left and right. I was
totally overwhelmed. Tears of joy filled my mask.”
—Sunshine Flint, on the Lindblad Expeditions
National Geographic Endeavour II
50
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
Michelin-starred
French chefs,
will prepare dinner
on Ponant’s Le
Lyrial, which will
make stops
in Dubrovnik and
Amalfi.
Renee Erickson,
of Seattle’s the
Walrus and the
Carpenter, hosts a
whiskey-centric
Windstar Cruises
trip from Scotland
to Ireland.
Earn
BRAGGING
RIGHTS
by exploring the world’s most remote
islands in the South Atlantic, including Ascension, South Georgia, and
Tristan da Cunha, on a monthlong
Quark Expeditions odyssey that leaves from
Ushuaia, Argentina, on March 10, 2018.
From left: Photographs by Matthew Porter; Paul Brady. Portraits by Denise Nestor
Have a
Five-Star Meal
Without
Worrying About
Reservations
When I took my first cruise, 30 years ago, a ship
was noteworthy only if it measured three football fields long and was filled with enough
brass and neon to make Circus Circus Las Vegas
look like the Ritz Paris. Nowadays, ships nab
the world’s top designers and chefs, and sail to
places you never thought you’d set foot in.
What hasn’t changed is that we’ll handle it ethos
that high-end cruises so expertly deliver. Case
in point: I caught up with the Seabourn Encore
in Aqaba, Jordan, midway through a 19-day
voyage from Dubai to Athens. It was one of the
first sailings of the Adam Tihany–designed
marvel. (Tihany has restored iconic properties
like the Beverly Hills Hotel and the Breakers
Palm Beach.) I stayed in an oceanview balcony
suite, had the best crab cakes I’ve ever tasted
at the Grill by Thomas Keller, explored ancient
Petra, and wandered the back alleys of
Jerusalem’s Old City. Best part? I planned none
of it. After my sail, I checked myself in to the
Dan Carmel Haifa hotel, which was lovely. But
all I really wanted was to get back on the
Encore. That was a vacation. M A R K O R W O L L
C RU I S E
Sip Champagne
All Day and All Night
Small cruisers have long plied the canals of
wine regions like Bordeaux and Burgundy, but
now you can see Champagne and Alsace the
same way, aboard Belmond’s brand-new fourstateroom Pivoine and Lilas. Their guides
will get you into top producers like BillecartSalmon, Domaine Frédéric Mochel, and Sipp
Mack—all you have to do is tip back glasses of
bubbles and riesling while gazing out at châteaux and rolling hills (and figure out a way to
do this more often).
Jean-Michel Cousteau
Do the Caribbean
Learn about ocean
conservation and
underwater filmmak-
Whenever the Heck You Want
Usually the islands are a no-go during hurricane
season (June through November), but a ship can
simply outmaneuver any storm. Regent’s
490-passenger Seven Seas Navigator may well do
just that when it sails to Martinique,
St. Lucia, St. Barts, Antigua, and Grenada this fall.
Jacques Pépin
Master French basics
like tarte Tatin
with the expert himself aboard the
Oceania Riviera on
September 14, 2018.
DITCH
THE AIRP RT
On the last morning of our
cruise down the Danube,
my wife and I woke up at 7 A.M.,
just as the Viking Atla was
approaching the spiky neoGothic towers of the Hungarian
Parliament Building (left).
It was November, and cold, and as
mist rose off the water, we
shivered on our terrace, snapping
as many photos as we could
to capture the feeling of a bygone
era of travel, approaching the
city by water as travelers have done
for centuries, before passing
just beneath the Chain Bridge and
docking at Budapest’s front door.
PAU L B R A DY
Iris Apfel
Talk fashion with the
icon on Cunard’s Queen
Mary 2 as it crosses
from England to New
York on August 31.
Bill Bryson
Hear tales from the
Appalachian Trail
from the Walk in the
Woods author
on Cunard’s Queen
Victoria on
September 23.
C RU I S E
Do Cuba Better (and Smarter)
than Everyone Else
The roads on the island aren’t great, so if
you’re looking to explore all parts (not just the
ones where the tourists swarm), conside the
46-passenger Lindblad Expeditions Harmony
V. She cruises around the southern coast of
the island, which means you’ll get to see the
Bay of Pigs, Cienfuegos, and Trinidad. Keep
in mind, it’s an 11-day sail—you may need to
be retired or on sabbatical to pull this off.
Can’t get away for that long? The Norwegian
Sky’s five-day tour of the Caribbean, from
Miami, makes stops in Havana and the Bahamas.
Plenty of big ships visit Cuba for a few hours,
but the 2,004-passenger Sky stays for two days.
Pro tip: On your first morning aboard, wake
up by 7 A.M. to watch the dramatic arrival into
Havana Harbor, through the narrow Canal
de Entrada. I did, alongside a group of CubanAmericans who never thought this day
would come. F R A N G O L D E N
G O FA R , FA R AWAY
You can pull off these five remote itineraries in a week or less.
Myanmar
D A T E S: J A N U A R Y 2 4 – 2 7, 2 0 1 8
R O U T E: M A N D A L AY TO B A G A N O N T H E B E L M O N D R O A D T O M A N D A L AY
M A J O R S E L L I N G P O I N T: I T ’ S A N E A S Y TA C K- O N TO A LO N G E R T R I P TO S O U T H E A S T
A S I A A N D A H A S S L E- F R E E W AY TO E X P LO R E T H E E P I C T E M P L E S O F B A G A N .
The Svalbard Archipelag
D A T E S: J U LY 2 – 9 , 2 0 1 8
R O U T E: R O U N D T R I P F R O M LO N G Y E A R B Y E N , N O R W AY, O N P O N A N T ’ S L E B O R É A L
M A J O R S E L L I N G P O I N T: YO U ’ L L G O A B O V E T H E A R CT I C
C I R C L E— R E A L F R O Z E N T E R R I TO R Y—A N D A CT U A L LY S E E P O L A R B E A R S
A N D N A R W H A L S I N H I D D E N FJ O R D S .
The Indian Ocean
D A T E S: F E B R U A R Y 1 4 – 2 1 , 2 0 1 8
R O U T E : M U M B A I TO D U B A I O N S I LV E R S E A’ S S I LV E R S P I R I T
M A J O R S E L L I N G P O I N T: W H AT OT H E R T R I P A L LO W S
YO U TO S Q U E E Z E I N O M A N , F U J A I R A H , A N D P O R B A N D A R , I N W E S T E R N I N D I A
(BET TER KNOWN AS THE BIRTHPLACE OF GANDHI)?
Ind nesia’s Gili Islands
D A T E S: O CTO B E R 7– 1 4 , 2 0 1 7
R O U T E: R O U N D T R I P F R O M B A L I O N T H E STA R C L I P P E R
M A J O R S E L L I N G P O I N T: KO M O D O D R A G O N S O N KO M O D O I S L A N D ! H O W A W E S O M E
D CK
ON THE SEINE
Uniworld’s S.S. Joie de Vivre ties
up at the Quai de Grenelle, in the 15th,
so you’re just 15 minutes by foot
from the Eiffel Tower and a nine-minute
cab ride from Chez L’Ami Jean,
one of our fave Paris bistros. (Be sure
to order the roast pigeon.)
52
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
I S T H AT ? T H O S E P I N K S A N D B E A C H E S A R E N ’ T TO O S H A B B Y E I T H E R .
The Mek ng
D A T E S: M A R C H 2 7–A P R I L 3 , 2 0 1 8
R O U T E: H O C H I M I N H C I T Y TO K A M P O N G C H A M , C A M B O D I A ( A N D A B U S
T R A N S F E R TO A N G KO R W AT ) , O N T H E S C E N I C S P I R I T
M A J O R S E L L I N G P O I N T: E V E R Y S U I T E H A S A P R I VAT E B A LC O N Y, A N D T H E TO P - D E C K
P O O L I S P E R F E CT F O R C O O L I N G O F F P O S T– S T R E E T F O O D TO U R .
C RU I S E
Get Marathon-Ready
Keep your training
on track with running
coaches, Technogym
treadmills and ellipticals, and joggersonly excursions on
the MSC Meraviglia.
Do Nothing at All
There’s admittedly little
to see besides deep
blue while you’re crossing the Atlantic on
the Queen Mary 2, so
use those sea days to
nap and make a dent in
the to-be-read pile
on your nightstand.
Come Home
Happier, Healthier, and
Totally Chilled Out
Cruise ships are investing millions of dollars into wellness
programs to ensure you step off their vessels a new person.
Because that’s what’s supposed to happen on vacation.
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Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
Take the Plunge
Scandinavia is filled with
geothermal lagoons,
swimming pools, and
saunas—all of which
you can hit on the Viking
Sky as she makes her
way through Iceland,
Greenland, and
the Faroe Islands (left).
Turn Off Your Phone
Dr. Andrew Weil, the
integrative-medicine
guru, will lead mindfulness meditation sessions
aboard the Seabourn
Ovation next year. And
who couldn’t benefit
from some quiet time?
New, smaller yachts are blurring the line
between traditional cruise ships and chartered
expedition vessels, meaning you get luxe
digs and off-the-radar adventures (the 62-passenger Crystal Esprit jump-started the trend
back in 2015 with her minisub and Zodiac
trips to deserted beaches). This fall, the 148passenger National Geographic Explorer sets
out for penguin colonies in the Falklands,
while the Silver Cloud Expedition scouts for
humpback and Minke whales off Antarctica. In
2018, Ponant’s Le Champlain will sail up the
Brazilian Amazon, and the Scenic Eclipse will
zip through Chilean fjords. But we’re most
amped for the Crystal Endeavor and her James
Cameron–worthy “remote-operated vehicle,”
which will examine the wreck of the Titanic.
Imagine the Instagram potential.
HELICOPTER OVER THE
JUNEAU ICE FIELD
for a hike across glaciers while the Ruby
Princess is in port (April–September 2018).
Photograph by Oivind Haug
Firefly Pose with
the Best of Them
If you’re stuck in oncea-week beginners’
classes, kick off your
new yoga routine
with a Canyon Ranch–
certified instructor
on the top deck of the
Oceania Marina.
GET L ST
D O VODK A S HOT S
with Ukrainian climatologists at their Antarctic research station. Eyos Expeditions
can get you there on the Hanse Explorer, November through February.
3 COUPLES,
ONE
45-FOOT
CATAMARAN,
9 MEDITERRANEAN
ISLANDS,
6 PORTS,
COUNTLESS
EMPTY BEACHES,
AND 7
NIGHTS
SPENT SIPPING
ROSE AND
BLASTING
THE
SMITHS
UNDER
THE STARS
So What If the Wind Didn’t Cooperate?
by
Rebecca Misner
Grossman
photographs by Alex
61
S
strangely enough, this story about chartering a sailboat in the Mediterranean started with
a hack for the ever-increasing cost of a summer
rental in Montauk.
For the past 20 years, my husband, Alex, and
I—West Coast transplants and die-hard beach
people—have spent a ridiculous amount of
money to rent a mildewing summer house on the
tip of Long Island. Last spring, reality (in the form
of a Brooklyn mortgage) set in, and we took a bye
on the beach rental. But then Alex, who grew up
racing Lasers in the Pacific Northwest, and I, who
grew up waterskiing on a man-made lake and
always longed for a classier nautical pedigree,
became obsessed with buying a vintage sailboat
to moor somewhere on Montauk’s bayside. We
thought this was a brilliant cheat until, about to
make an offer on a beautiful 1960s Hinckley sloop,
we did the sobering math on the cost of winterizing, launching, mooring, and inevitable repairs.
Still, months of searching the Yacht World website and driving around the mid-Atlantic looking
at boats had planted a watery daydream in our
minds. We decided to make a trip of it.
We wanted to be somewhere in the Med where
we’d have access to port towns with good food
and wine, while avoiding the crowded marinas
and party vibe that plague the region’s boating
hubs, like the Amalfi Coast, many of the Greek
islands, and the Côte d’Azur. After polling friends,
travel specialists, and charter companies, we
62
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
landed on Corsica and Sardinia—rocky, maquis-covered islands in the
Tyrrhenian Sea, bound by mainland France and Italy on the north and east,
North Africa on the south, and Spain on the west.
We made a rough plan to pick up the boat in the town of Sari-Solenzara
on the east coast of Corsica, a French island that could have just as easily
ended up Italian. For centuries, it was under Pisan and then Genoan control,
and didn’t come under the French flag until 1769. (Its most famous native
son was Buonaparte before he became Bonaparte; meanwhile, Corsican,
which much of the population still speaks, is closer to medieval Tuscan
than to French.) Then we’d explore Corsica’s eastern coast before crossing the Strait of Bonifacio to reach the northern coast of Sardinia—which,
like Corsica, defies its nominal nationality: 400 years of Spanish rule gave
its food and dialect a distinct Spanish flair. Next, we’d take a few days to
poke around the Maddalena archipelago, seven mostly uninhabited windswept islands and countless islets with empty beaches and clear water more
reminiscent of Antigua than nearby Antibes. From there, we’d sail back to
Corsica and return the boat.
This seemed a refreshingly—and a tad frighteningly—loose agenda. There
was no real schedule aside from the boat rental deadlines, no rushing from
one town to the next in fear of forfeiting a prepaid hotel room or hard-toscore dinner reservation. Surprisingly, going by luxury sailboat in my early
40s felt more like backpacking around Europe in my early 20s than any
traveling I’d done in between. If we pulled into a marina and didn’t like the
vibe, or a certain cove had too many sea urchins to swim in, we could move
on. And, like the train travel of my youth—winding up in Budapest after a
12-hour ride smoking cigarettes out the window while chatting with a semipro Spanish soccer team—travel by boat is rarely about the destination. This
isn’t to say we totally winged it. In fact, we gave certain aspects of the trip a
lot of thought so we could fully give in to wandering once we were there.
PREVIOUS SPREAD: A BIRD’S-EYE
VIEW OF OUR GROUP—MINUS ALEX,
WHO CLIMBED THE MAST TO GET
THE SHOT. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE
FROM TOP LEFT: SIGNAGE IN
BONIFACIO; THE ISLAND OF CAPRER A
IN THE MADDALENA ARCHIPELAGO;
A DESERTED COVE NORTH OF
BONIFACIO; ME ON DOLPHIN WATCH.
SIZE
MATTERS:
GET THE
CATAMARAN
We really wanted the sexy monohull with polished teak decks, a towering mast, and elegant
lines, but were strongly encouraged by everyone
who’d done this kind of trip to go with the roomier catamaran (the nautical equivalent of road
tripping with a GMC Yukon instead of a vintage
Alfa Romeo). Cats are a bit like floating South
Beach condos: light and airy with easy-to-wipedown surfaces; a little soulless, but also really
comfortable. And, when there’s no wind and
you have to motor, they go faster than a monohull. (This ended up being no small thing—we
got skunked on the wind a lot.) With six people
on a weeklong sail, the cat was the right, if less
romantic, call.
A lovely intimacy develops when you travel
by boat with friends—one that easily could have
turned tense on a smaller vessel. Our group
included Jason and Kelley, our hard-core sailing friends who live full-time on a sailboat in New
Jersey while commuting into Manhattan, and
who spent months cruising the Caribbean a few
years back; and Lee and Gillian, who, while having
little sailing experience, are desert-island people:
game for everything, quick studies, and really
fun. There’s a lot of passive time when you’re
on a boat for a week. If you can learn to be with
a group while doing your own thing, it can be
deeply restful—reading, fishing off the back of
the boat, jumping in for a swim, or just watching
for hours as the water cycles from cyan blue to a
deep, rich purple. (I like to think it’s what Homer
meant when he referred to the Mediterranean’s
wine-dark sea.) Even though our cat, a brandnew 45-foot Lagoon, was spacious by sailboat
standards—four bedrooms with private baths, a big open galley and living area, and two levels of outdoor seating—we were still six adults constantly sharing space in a way that you just don’t in other forms of group
travel. (There’s no ducking out for a solo walk or a drink at the bar.) Perhaps
because of this, rhythms and routines were established quickly, and nooks
throughout the boat nonverbally claimed. Lee would wake up and make
the first early-riser round of coffee. An hour later Alex would fry some eggs.
Gillian would plow through stacks of unread New Yorkers at the back table,
while I would sit at the bow with my coffee on the lookout for dolphins.
OPPOSITE: LEE WITH
THE BIGGEST CATCH OF
THE TRIP. ABOVE: THE
12TH-CENTURY
ROMANESQUE BASILICA,
SANTISSIMA TRINITÀ
DI SACCARGIA, OUTSIDE
OF SASSARI IN
NORTHWESTERN
SARDINIA.
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
65
WALKING DOWN THE
THIGH-BURNINGLY STEEP
ESCALIER DU ROI
D’AR AGON IN BONIFACIO.
OPPOSITE: CORSICAN
WINES AND OLIVES FOR
APERITIVO HOUR ON
THE BOAT.
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
67
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Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
IF YOU
CAN,
DITCH
THE
CAPTAIN
AND
CREW
FANTASTIC SWIMMING
AND SNORKELING,
AND PLENTY OF PRIVATE
SPOTS FOR BASKING,
AT TAHITI BEACH ON
CAPRER A ISLAND IN THE
MADDALENA ARCHIPELAGO.
There’s an implicit freedom to sailing.
It’s hard to talk about without sounding
cliché, but anyone who has ever sailed
has felt that undeniable giddiness, a spiritual or emotional untethering that mirrors the physical one as you leave land
behind and put yourself largely at the mercy of the elements. Bareboat chartering—meaning, you’re in charge of the sailing and the provisioning—ups
the freedom factor. Various countries and charter companies have different
requirements for bareboating. Some ask that you have American Sailing
Association or NauticEd certification, but most just want to verify that you
have experience with a similar-size boat. If you’re a little rusty or the boat is
bigger than what you’re used to, you can usually hire a captain for a day to
get you up to speed. (Though with sophisticated navigation systems alerting you to everything from shallow water to low fuel, bareboating is a lot
less intimidating than it sounds.)
For us, the freedom we sought was being able to go wherever we wanted
at whatever pace felt right, and to have control over our meals—we were
looking forward to shopping the local markets and preparing elaborate
alfresco dinners almost as much as the sailing. I’m certain we would have
had a great trip had we gone the captain-and-crew route. But I’m not sure
we would have felt as free to spend half a day exploring one tiny cove, follow a 1970s yawl for an hour because the wind had finally picked up and
the yawl looked magnificent under full sail, or have a cutthroat tuna tartare–off with the enormous bluefin Alex and Kelley caught one morning
when everyone else was still sleeping. And, not that a captain would have
judged, but I doubt we would have held a ridiculous men’s synchro-diving
contest off the hull, and we certainly wouldn’t have stayed up quite so late
drinking rosé and blasting The Smiths.
Some of the technical aspects of the boat would surely have been easier
with a captain and crew. But then I wouldn’t have the beautiful memory
of Lee, just as the sun dipped below the horizon, diving with a flashlight in
his mouth to manually set the anchor that kept slipping. Or the one where,
after another anchor incident, when the only mooring ball we could find
in the deep black of 1 A.M. didn’t have a rope attached to it, I held Kelley
by the ankles as she hung overboard and tied our rope to the float. Or the
image of all of us sweating it out as we did our first Med moor of the trip—
the equivalent of backing a semi without brakes or a rearview mirror into
a tight parking spot with an audience watching—and then breaking out
into very American locker-room cheering and high-fiving as the humorless Swiss couple in the neighboring boat looked on.
CHOOSE
YOUR PORTS
WISELY
When you dock to refuel and stock up on groceries, pick a port that has more to offer than a
SPAR and a gas station. We were most excited
about Bonifacio—a medieval town with its 13thcentury Bastion de l’Etendard on the southern
tip of Corsica—based largely on photos (outside
of the fictional King’s Landing, I’ve never seen a
more impressive town and one so meant to be
viewed from the sea); it also has a wine bar cum
grocery store called Roba Nostra that multiple
friends had raved about.
After our first full day of sailing, stopping every
so often to swim or explore a sea stack or a rare fingernail of sandy beach by dinghy, we approached
Bonifacio. From a distance, the striated limestone
promontory looked like an enormous bar code—
but as our eyes adjusted, the fortress walls and a
whole town built right into the rock came into
focus. We moored in the marina and hiked up
through centuries-old ramparts to the haute ville,
or “upper town,” with its 12th-century cathedral
and warren of cobblestoned streets lined with
cafés, shops, and restaurants (as a rule, the best
of these are never in the marina). We ducked into
Roba Nostra for what we thought would be a
quick glass of wine in the back of the cramped
store, where you have to duck to avoid hitting
the cured meats and cheeses hanging from the
ceiling, and shelves holding Corsican-made preserves, olive oil, honey, and liqueurs line the walls.
We chatted with the handsome twentysomething
Tony Piro, who now runs the family business,
while snacking on whisper-thin slices of marbled
coppa and lonzu; gamy and pungent rounds of
salami cured on the island’s north side and smoky
ones from the south (all from native black pigs
who graze on chestnuts); wedges of nutty sheep
and tangy goat cheeses; and glass after glass of
stony vermentinu, the local white wine. Three
hours later we left with jarred figs, clementine
marmalade, rounds of cheese, a whole ham, and
several bottles of mirto, a local liqueur made from
myrtle—which, if you ever drank Jägermeister out
of peer pressure and not love, you can skip. The
plan was to leave Bonifacio at sunrise, but when
70
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
we woke up, no one wanted to go. We spent half a day wandering around
town, stopping in at Ceccaldi, a family-run knife store with an international
cult following and a Paris outpost that makes beautiful traditional Corsican
vendetta knives (a folding knife often with a horn or wood handle), and
climbing down the Escalier du Roi d’Aragon, a medieval and insanely steep
stairway hewn right into the side of the cliff.
We were similarly charmed by the sherbet-hued town of Maddalena on
the island of Maddalena in the mostly uninhabited archipelago. We were
coming off of two full days of sailing, swimming, and snorkeling; we hadn’t
seen many boats, and all of the beaches we floated into were empty except
for Tahiti Beach on Caprera. It wasn’t exactly crowded, but it did have a
vibrant local beach scene that looked straight out of a Slim Aarons photograph: perfectly bronzed topless women who must have swum or hiked in,
but still looked coiffed; old men in sandals and sun-bleached Speedos; and
gorgeous Italian teenagers dunking one another in the shallow water. After
too much sun, a few epic dinners on the boat (cleanup without a dishwasher
gets old), and two nights with minor anchor issues, we were happy to dock
in Maddalena town, to wander the streets, popping into cheese stores to
buy just one more wedge of the perfectly salty and smoky pecorino Sardo
to sneak into our suitcases, and to go out for dinner. We weren’t so lucky,
though, with Castelsardo on the northwestern coast of Sardinia. It turned
out to be a relatively ugly port town made memorable by the only horrible
meal we had on the trip, and even more memorable by Alex intentionally
ordering horse and the “nay and hay” jokes that followed.
RENTING
A CAR
ISN’T
CHEATING
I wouldn’t change the ramble of our
trip, but it did mean that we didn’t
get to see as much of Sardinia as we’d
hoped. When we were in Castelsardo,
it became clear that we would not
have enough time to sail farther south
and still be able to hit the Maddalenas
before returning the boat in Corsica.
So we rented a car for the day, cutting inland to see a 12th-century
Romanesque church before heading south to the town of Alghero, where we had lunch and chatted with
the owner in Catalan, which roughly a quarter of inhabitants speak. Then we
drove northwest to the Capo Caccia headland and hiked down to an enormous cave (named, naturally, the Grotta di Nettuno). We passed through
a dozen villages, sped by countless century-old homes and churches, and
paralleled a beautiful stretch of jagged coastline on the drive back. In just a
few hours, we covered ground that would have taken days to sail—without
any anchor issues, without lamenting the lack of wind, or worrying about
water depth. And yet, despite this ease and efficiency, I couldn’t wait to get
out of the car. When we pulled into the harbor and I saw our boat—what
had been our transportation, our kitchen, and our hotel for almost a week—
I had the undeniable sense of arriving home.
Sailing How-To’s
WHEN TO GO
Like much of the Med,
Corsica and Sardinia are
crowded in July and
August. We picked up
our boat in Corsica
during the last week of
September, which is
the tail end of the season (some businesses
close in October). The
weather and water
were warm, the marinas
weren’t crowded, and
the restaurant and shop
owners had time to chat
with us.
CHARTER OPTIONS
We used Dream Yacht
Charter, which operates
around the world and
has a large range of
boats. Note: When you
charter a boat for a
week, it’s more like five
days—you typically
don’t sail the first day,
which is spent learning
about the boat, and
many companies require
you to have the boat in
the marina the night
before you’re due back.
Prices vary depending
on boat size, season, and
whether you have a
captain. To bareboat
charter a four-cabin
catamaran for a week in
Corsica costs $4,000
to $15,000. Add $2,000
for a captain and
$1,600 for a host who
will handle meals.
DOCKING UP
Unless it’s high summer,
you can usually radio
the marina the day of
and reserve dock space.
We paid $50 to $90
to overnight. In the
Maddalena archipelago
you pay a daily park
fee; ours was around
$40, which you can
pay in advance online,
or the park ranger
will pull up to your boat
so you can pay (with
credit card) on the spot.
THE BUSTLING
PORT TOWN OF LA
MADDALENA,
WHERE YOU CAN
GO FROM BOAT TO
SHOPPING FOR
PROSCIUTTO AND
PECORINO IN
UNDER A MINUTE.
Water
toWine
NEW YORK’S
FINGER LAKES ARE
EXPERIENCING
A QUIET
TRANSFORMATION
by
Paul Brady
photographs by Paola
& Murray
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
73
“This is why we’re here,”
says Susan Higgins, standing amid yellow wildflowers and pinot noir vines on a ridge
overlooking Cayuga Lake. In the shade of a maple tree, she’s showing me the hunks of
limestone she and her husband, Tom, pulled from the ground. A huge vein of the stuff,
deposited here roughly 400 million years ago, balances the pH of the soil—and makes it
possible to coax quality fruit from their three-and-a-half acres despite Upstate New York’s
reputation for brutal winters and a short growing season. The Higginses, whose Heart
& Hands Wine Company released its first vintage in 2006 and who are now some of the
region’s most lauded winemakers, were onto something. There’s a special alchemy to this
place, where rolling hills frame glacial lakes, clear streams carve deep gorges through the
shale, and plucky, self-reliant entrepreneurs are turning what was a Rust Belt backwater
into one of the country’s most appealing summertime destinations.
At a time when everyone seems to have their own short list of restaurants in Mexico
City and their favorite hotel in Tokyo, the hidden-in-plain-sight Finger Lakes remain largely
undiscovered, a 14-county sweep of forests and farmland, four to five hours northwest of
New York City by car. The 11 long, skinny lakes, formed by advancing glaciers 2 million years
ago, don’t just inspire the name but dictate the slow, rural pace of life. There are no bridges
or ferries crossing the lakes, so you always seem to be driving the long way around. Not
that you’ll mind: When I first started coming here, as a college student, my buddies and I
would set out from Rochester with a cooler of cheese and charcuterie, and buy a few bottles
of wine at whatever vineyard had a picnic table set out. Back in those pre-Sideways, presocial-media days, tasting rooms were little more than a corner of a barn where someone
had slapped a piece of lumber over two old barriques, and you could get a flight of pours
for a dollar or two, or maybe for nothing at all if you promised to tell your friends to visit.
In the 15 or so years since, the fresh-from-the-farm vibe has remained largely the same,
but the wine has vastly improved. “The region is more exciting than it’s ever been,” says
Thomas Pastuszak, the wine director at the NoMad Hotel in New York City, who started
making his own label, Empire Estate, in the region in 2014, collaborating with Kelby
Russell, a winemaker at Red Newt Cellars. “There’s a push in quality that the region’s
never really seen before,” Pastuszak adds. You find it at Bloomer Creek Vineyard, where
74
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
PREVIOUS SPREAD, FROM
LEFT: WATERFALLS AT
WATKINS GLEN STATE
PARK; CABERNET
SAUVIGNON GR APES
AT THE SHELDR AKE
POINT WINERY. THIS
PAGE: CHATEAU
FRANK, THE HISTORIC
STONE BUILDING
AT DR. KONSTANTIN
FR ANK’S WINERY.
Map by Peter Oumanski
husband-and-wife team Kim Engle and Debra Bermingham pour electric
single-vineyard whites and Bordeaux-inspired reds in a tiny tasting room
you’d drive right past if you didn’t know to look for it. At Boundary Breaks, a
small-batch producer run by Bruce Murray, who used to host tastings in his
own kitchen, they’ve just built a new space overlooking Seneca Lake, where
you can geek out on clone-specific rieslings. And at Shaw Vineyard, where
the wood-beamed tasting room is still as lo-fi as they come, owner Steve
Shaw is making outré orange wines and seriously good cabernet sauvignon.
Yet as far as the wines have come, the true appeal of the Finger Lakes is
that its small towns retain their white-picket-fence “Norman Rockwell–
painting” feel, as bartender and manager Matt Stevenson puts it over lunch at
Fargo Bar & Grill, the wood-paneled pub not far from Heart & Hands in the
tiny town of Aurora, on Cayuga Lake. The ethos of the village owes largely
to Pleasant Rowland, who graduated from Wells College, the 600-student
school here, and went on to sell her American Girl empire to Mattel for a
reported $700 million. She’s since spent a healthy chunk of that to convert
several historic buildings into the Inns of Aurora, a network of guesthouses.
(My favorite is Rowland House, which feels more like the lakeside retreat of
a lovable eccentric great-aunt than a stilted B&B.) Skaneateles, a tidy lakeside
village with a gazebo bandstand at waterfront Clift Park, is another holdover
from the Leave It to Beaver era: Pontoon boats and Chris-Craft bowriders tie
up at the municipal dock; the soft-serve machines at Doug’s Fish Fry whir
FROM LEFT: CRUISING KEUK A LAKE;
DINNER AT LE CAFÉ CENT-DIX
IN ITHACA; A LEMON-BLUEBERRY
DESSERT AT THE ELDERBERRY
POND FARM RESTAUR ANT.
all afternoon; and local institutions like Sherwood Inn serve
(thankfully) updated versions of country-club cuisine—shrimp
cocktail, Yankee pot roast, big Bloody Marys—to locals dressed
head to toe in Syracuse University gear. It’s the sort of place
where you’ll find a dinghy regatta underway, though most
people won’t care much who wins, as long as the race is over
in time for Gibsons at The Krebs, an ambitiously formal restaurant that’s been here, in one location or another, since 1899.
For all the nostalgia, though, the Finger Lakes are today at
an inflection point that felt almost unimaginable back when
my friends and I were in college, renting ramshackle share
cottages on the waterfront. We’d spend the mornings hiking through the region’s state parks, like Watkins Glen (with
its 19 waterfalls) or Taughannock Falls (with its impressive
Gorge Trail), before an afternoon of swigging riesling and fishing, at dusk, from a beat-up aluminum Jon boat. “It’s always
been a good place for outdoor activities, for camping, for
summering,” says Pastuszak, “but it was less accessible before—
people didn’t know what to look for. Social media has helped
a lot.” That’s enabled not just winemakers but chefs, distillers, innkeepers, craftspeople, and designers to connect with
bigger markets—and lure more tourists than ever to places
like Geneva, a small town at the north end of Seneca Lake,
where, Pastuszak says, “Linden Street has blown up and
become this little restaurant alley.” It’s now getting a national
profile thanks in large part to FLX Table, an innovative, almostexperimental restaurant that opened in 2016.
One warm summer evening last September, Christopher
Bates was there in his open kitchen, wearing his chef’s whites
and a topknot, prepping a one-night-only tasting menu of
dishes like an “über-BLT” (a deconstructed version made with
local tomatoes, corn, and lamb bacon) and “lots of duck,”
which is exactly what it sounds like. His wife, Isabel Bogadtke,
in a gingham floral-print shirt, was handling the wines, which
are drawn from a wildly deep cellar and served by the ounce
with a Coravin that makes possible pairings like one I had, a
1981 Olga Raffault Chinon Les Picasses with a course of potato
raclette. But as good as the food is, the most remarkable thing
about FLX Table is its vibe: on trend without being trendy,
interesting without being overdone, ambitious without being
pretentious. There are just 12 seats, all of them around a farmhouse table, so I ended up sharing the meal with a group of
staffers gearing up for the school year at Geneva’s Hobart and
William Smith Colleges, and a couple from nearby Hornell,
New York, out on what, thanks to the seating arrangements,
must’ve started as one of their more peculiar dates. But when
the first pours of riesling arrived, and the crudités—a riot of
local peppers, squash, beans, and berries—hit the table, we all
fell into easy conversation. It’s supposed to feel like a dinner
party, Bogadtke says. “That’s why we have these mismatched
chairs. When you go to someone’s place, they’ve always got
an odd chair.” It was the sort of night you could only have
here, where nothing much changes and yet things are getting
better all the time.
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
77
A BARN AT THE
ELDERBERRY
POND FARM.
OPPOSITE:
A SUNFLOWER
FIELD IN
CAMILLUS.
78
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
you like, buy a bunch. Empire
Estate is a newish label from Thomas
Pastuszak; chef Christopher Bates
is also making his own wine under
the Element label. One of the best
places to stock up on Finger Lakes
wine (and spirits from local operations like Myer Farm Distillers) is
the Costco-esque Northside Wine
& Spirits in Ithaca.
The Restaurants Worth Hitting
Making the Trip
FIGURING
OUT
THE
FINGER
LAKES
80
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
The Finger Lakes are four to five
hours by car from New York City,
depending on where you’re
going. You can fly any major carrier
into Rochester or Syracuse, which
bookend the area. There’s a small
airport in Ithaca, but fares there are
often quite high; Skaneateles has
an airfield for small private planes.
The Best Home Base
Ithaca, at the south end of Cayuga
Lake, has lots of hotels, solid restaurants, and easy access to the top
vineyards. Post up at the Argos Inn,
in a meticulously restored 19thcentury mansion in the heart of
the walkable downtown, or spend
your nights in a safari-style tent at
Firelight Camps, a “glamping” operation that opened near Buttermilk
Falls State Park in 2014. Farther north,
the Inns of Aurora are a collection
of renovated historic buildings, many
overlooking Cayuga Lake; their newest addition, Wallcourt Hall, occupies
a one-time Wells College dormitory.
There are countless home rentals in
the region listed on sites like Airbnb
and HomeAway; Finger Lakes Premier
Properties is a local agency with
many waterfront options.
What You’re Drinking
Dr. Konstantin Frank and Hermann
J. Wiemer are two of the oldest and
best known wineries here, and both
make outstanding rieslings and
other varieties. Next-gen winemakers
like Bloomer Creek, Boundary
Breaks, Heart & Hands, Sheldrake
Point, and Ravines have relatively
small productions, meaning it can
sometimes be hard to source
their more esoteric wines outside
the region; if you find something
FLX Table is the region’s most inventive restaurant, with not-quite-molecular cooking served at a communal
table; reservations are required, but
jackets certainly aren’t. Its even
more casual offshoot, FLX Wienery, is
a roadhouse-style joint with housemade brats and sausages, kimchi fries,
low-brow beer (Genesee Cream Ale),
and high-end wines (this is probably
the only hotdog place in New York
serving Dom Pérignon). The Krebs
is an old-school classic with up-to-theminute New American set menus.
Dano’s Heuriger on Seneca channels
Austria with schnitzel and spaetzle
served in a clean-lined modernist dining room overlooking the water.
Le Café Cent-Dix does a perfect friséeand-lardon salad, as well as fresh
oysters and other French-bistro classics. Sticky Rice feels like a find,
hidden at the back of a strip mall, and
does fiery curries, Thai larb, and
Laotian pork salad in a bare-bones
room. And you can’t get more
field-to-fork than at Elderberry Pond,
on a 36-acre organic farm between
Auburn and Skaneateles.
Getting Outside
The area is filled with state parks,
waterfalls, and trails that follow
dramatic gorges. Some of the most
scenic include Buttermilk Falls
State Park, Taughannock Falls State
Park, and Watkins Glen State Park;
most hikes are a few miles, tops, and
only moderately challenging.
You can rent boats of all kinds from
the Sailboat Shop in Skaneateles
or get a kayak or stand-up paddleboard at Puddledockers in Ithaca.
OPPOSITE: THE COURTYARD
AT THE ARGOS INN, ITHACA.
THIS PAGE: CAPPUCCINO AND
DOUGHNUTS AT
SK ANEATELES BAKERY.
drink world
the
83
Cocktails by Damon Boelte
of Grand Army in Brooklyn.
Produced by Matt Hranek
Henry Leutwyler
photographs by
Backlit through bottles of
spirits and cut crystal, the
warm glow of a proper hotel
bar has long served as a port
in the storm for world
travelers. These spots have
also been the birthplaces of
some of the most iconic
cocktails since the dawn of
the Grand Tour. Colin Field,
head bartender at the Ritz
Paris’s Bar Hemingway,
and Damon Boelte, head
bartender and co-owner of
Grand Army in Brooklyn,
help us trace the history of a
handful of classic cocktails
that put their namesake on
the map.
2
Serve up with
a twist of orange.
oz. Louis Royer
Cognac (106 proof)
1
Orgeat
2 oz.
3
Dashes of bitters
21
“It’s a brandy old-fashioned
of sorts,” says Damon Boelte
of one of the first cocktails
in the 1862 edition of Jerry
Thomas’s How to Mix Drinks
to be listed by name rather
than by ingredients. Though
the drink dates from the
1860 Japanese diplomatic
mission to the United States
and is thought to have
been inspired by the representatives who lived near
and drank at Thomas’s bar
in downtown Manhattan,
there is nothing even
remotely Japanese about
the ingredients. The moniker,
however, presages the ebb
and flow of America’s fascination with Japanese culture
in subsequent years.
The Japanese Cocktail
Queen’s
Park Swizzle
It’s no wonder that this
mojito-like cocktail,
which originated in Portof-Spain’s now-defunct
Queen’s Park Hotel, was
invented in the 1920s.
That was the height of
Prohibition and Trinidad’s
heyday as an upscale
winter escape—a moment
when Americans would
travel far and wide to
booze liberally.
8–12
2 oz.
3
3
4
4
oz.
oz.
Muddled mint
leaves
Aged gold
rum (the higher
the proof, the
better)
Lime juice
Simple syrup
Pour over mint
and ice and
swizzle; serve
with several
dashes of bitters.
Singapore Sling
The Frisco
“A very beautiful example of how a bartender or a
bar can become the lighthouse of a hotel,” says Bar
Hemingway’s Colin Field of the iconic mixture
invented in 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon, the Hainaneseborn barman at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore.
The drink is so popular at the property’s Long Bar
that the staff makes some 1,200 of them a day.
The origins of the drink have, unfortunately,
been lost to time. “All I can say about the Frisco is
that I love whiskey, I love Benedictine, and I love
that town,” Boelte says. It is often served as a sour
(with lemon juice) and shaken.
1 1 2 oz.
1 oz.
3
4 oz.
1 oz.
1
4 oz.
Gin
Orange juice
Lemon juice
Curaçao
Benedictine
A splash of seltzer
A drizzle of
Cherry Heering
11
11
2
2
oz. Rye whiskey
oz. Benedictine
A dash of bitters
Stir and serve up
with a peel of
orange or lemon.
Shake and serve
over ice.
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
85
The Etna Spritz
The French 75
So called for the unobstructed view of Mount Etna
from the seaside terrace of the Belmond Grand Hotel
Timeo in Taormina, the cocktail is bar manager
Alfio Liotta’s decidedly Sicilian riff on the Aperol Spritz.
Named after the 75-millimeter field artillery cannon
used during the First World War, the original French 75
was created in Paris in 1915 by “a chap called Henry of
Henry’s Bar,” Field says, at a now-shuttered hotel by the
same name. As with cocktails themselves, which,
he adds, were “invented by Brits but made famous by
Americans,” it was the Stork Club in New York that
popularized the drink.
11
11
11
2
2
2
oz. Campari
oz. Sicilian orange
liqueur
oz. Sicilian sparkling
wine
A splash of soda
Stir with ice; garnish
with a slice of Sicilian
orange and its zest.
11
3
1
86
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
4
2
oz. Gin
oz. Lemon juice
oz. Simple syrup
2
Shake with ice and
top with Champagne
and a lemon twist.
The Bronx
In the early 1900s, the
Waldorf-Astoria’s bartender
Johnnie Solon enhanced the
traditional martini’s orange
bitters with a splash of orange
juice. The name is said to
have come from Solon’s visit
to the newly opened Bronx
Zoo, whose wild creatures
reminded him of some of his
own patrons after too much
drink. The Bronx, which once
rivaled the Manhattan, was
made popular, according to
Field, by legendary barman
Frank Meier, who started
at the Hoffman House Hotel
on Broadway and 25th,
later ending up at Paris’s
Bar Hemingway.
2 oz.
1
2 oz.
1
2 oz.
1 oz.
Gin
Sweet vermouth
Blanc vermouth
Freshly squeezed
orange juice
Serve up.
The Manhattan
The drink is reputed to have
been created in New York
for American socialite Jennie
Jerome, a.k.a. Winston
Churchill’s mother, for a party
she supposedly threw at the
Manhattan Club in honor of
Samuel Tilden’s gubernatorial
election in 1874. But according to Field, “she was about to
give birth to the future prime
minister, so she couldn’t have
been in the club.” More
likely is that it was invented
by a bartender there, “for,
but not in the presence of,
Jerome,” Field says.
2 oz.
1
2 oz.
1
3
2
oz.
Rye whiskey
Sweet
vermouth
Blanc
vermouth
Dashes of bitters
Serve up, stirred.
SAILING AN
OLD-WORLD-STYLE
SUPERYACHT
THROUGH EASTERN
INDONESIA,
SEAN HOTCHKISS
ENCOUNTERS
KOMODO DRAGONS, TINY VILLAGES,
EMPTY BEACHES, AND FULFILLS A REUNION
A DECADE IN THE MAKING
88
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
photographs by Ben
Stockley
of mystical interference, I accepted an assignment to sail seven
days with Robba, his family, and a few friends, roughly 300
miles to Komodo National Park from Bali, the tropical island
paradise where my now-expat stepbrother, Alex, had moved
four years earlier. Our parents’ divorce and my father’s death
had splintered communication between us, but he offered to
let me stay at his villa. We would talk.
the heat in southern Indonesia is unyielding, even in April. It hangs on
you, becomes a permanent state. The nights, however, are soft and sweet,
and it’s on such an evening that I’m standing on a pristine beach at Pulau
Muang, in Komodo National Park, watching what feels like the world’s
most remote soccer match. It’s a casual pickup game between two teams of
blue-shirted crew members from Dunia Baru, the wooden yacht I’ve spent
the last week on, sailing through West Nusa Tenggara. The game features
quick, scrambling legs, stray driftwood fashioned into goalposts, and frequent yelps of laughter. Someone scores, but I hear it more than see it, as
I’m caught trying to fully digest the happy scene: Key lime–colored peaks in
the distance, low-hanging clouds, the cinnamon glow of the players’ arms
in the fading sun, the cool sand.
Later that night, after a beach bonfire and a barbecue fit for a visiting dignitary—buttery Kobe steaks expertly grilled on a hibachi—Dunia Baru’s owner,
Mark Robba, is jonesing for fireworks. Fifty feet or so down the beach, the
same crew I’d watched curl corner kicks are bent over on the sand, lighting
rockets that hiss into the sky and explode in bursts of red, yellow, and white,
sizzling down toward the sea and illuminating the boat—strong lined and
bold masted—anchored in a cove like some kind of pirate ship. After the
fireworks come the Chinese wishing lanterns, dozens of them, ignited by
blowtorch and sent soaring out over this tiny island like dreams, until they
vanish, snuffed out among the milky stars.
My arrival in Indonesia had felt no less otherworldly. After nearly a decade
of grief and reconciliation, I’d begun, several weeks before, digging into the
circumstances surrounding my father’s 2005 death—he jumped from a bridge
and drowned in the sea. I’d made plans to return to Maine, where I’d grown
up: I’d sent emails and made phone calls to my father’s lawyer, ex-wives, family friends, and old drinking buddies, gathering information about his life.
I’d recovered a lockbox with his watch and his wedding ring, and a former
roommate of mine had shown up in New York with childhood mementos I’d
left in his attic after college. Everything was coming up Dad. In a final stroke
“the locals avoid this place after dark,” Dunia Baru’s Swiss
cruise director, Sebastien, tells me as we hoist my luggage from
a taxi at the beach in Serangan. It is my first night in Southeast
Asia, and the mist hangs like a shroud. He explains that many
Indonesians believe in ghosts, spirits of the dead that can take
possession of living people, driving them mad. After a week
spent poring over photo albums, letters, and other Dad-related
ephemera, I can understand the concern. We load my things
onto a tender and zip out to the yacht, which is massive and
lit up with blue LEDs. In the blackness it looks like a floating
nightclub. On board, Robba has waited up, nursing brown liquid in a mason jar. A New England salt, he spent his childhood
summers on Cape Cod and began sailing in his teens. He skippered a yawl during college and moved to Indonesia in 1998,
where he bought a glove factory and made his fortune. He began
construction on Dunia Baru in 2006, and after
seven and a half years of commuting from Jakarta
by plane, river speedboat, and over ragged roads
PREVIOUS
to the boatbuilding site on Borneo to check on
SPREAD,
the progress, he had a 167-foot wooden phiniFROM LEFT:
A SAILOR ON
si—a modern superyacht in an old-world shell.
THE BOWSPRIT
OF DUNIA
He also had a retirement plan. “That was the idea,”
BARU; SUNSET
he says. “The boat being a way to force me away
OFF THE
ISLAND
from the business, to pass it down to my son, to
OF KOMODO.
get out here and enjoy the ocean with my family.”
OPPOSITE:
BEACHES IN
My bed in the master suite is big and soft, but
KOMODO
NATIONAL
the sea is unforgiving that first night; motoring
PARK.
east from Bali to Lombok, waves beat against
the hull. My sleep is agitated. “Top five roughest
nights on the boat I’ve seen,” Robba’s 31-year-old
daughter, Courtney, chuckles the next morning at breakfast,
unfazed. We’re sipping tea on the plush aft deck, surrounded by
the calmest, most glasslike water—as if the recently thrashing
ocean had been playing a practical joke. Over Robba’s shoulder, his five-year-old son, Colby, constructs a makeshift fort
out of throw pillows, diving gleefully beneath them when Dad
looks his way. In the pink predawn, a towering volcano, Mount
Rinjani, spits fat, benign clouds into the blue sky. The silence
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
91
is brilliant, broken only occasionally by cries of the fishermen
who orbit us, the outriggers of their pump boats like mantis
legs spread out over the sea.
Over the week, we will sail through some of Southeast Asia’s
most stunning landscapes. Sitting on the bow of the boat, it’s
possible to imagine slack-jawed early-16th-century Portuguese
sailors setting eyes on the place for the first time: limitless
stretches of cerulean water; pristine reefs with whales, manta
rays, and tropical fish; jungle forests and pink sand beaches
framed by craggy mountain switchbacks; and lakes cut by
tectonic plates, tsunamis, and glaciers. It’s a place so rich with
natural wonder that sighting “breakfast dolphins” becomes
something I expect alongside poached eggs and avocado.
Excursions begin the same way each day on Dunia Baru,
with Sebastien nervously checking his watch. “We’d better be
going,” he’ll say, with just a trace of a singsongy French accent.
The anemic farming outpost we’re touring on morning three
is a shake-your-head contrast to the five-star flavor of the boat.
But its beauty is a more organic kind of astounding: Within 50
yards of the beach we notice that what had appeared to be only
a smattering of sand dunes is actually dozens of grazing, chomping cows. In an open hut, a few aging herdsmen in flip-flops sit
nursing their cigarettes in the shade, and a cluster of women
in hijabs smile self-consciously through broken
teeth. The smoke from small trash fires hangs in
a hazy layer over the beach, and rickety wooden
OPPOSITE,
dwellings, connected by crisscrossing laundry
CLOCKWISE FROM
TOP LEFT: DUNIA
lines, hunch in the high grass. We walk the beach
BARU SUPERYACHT;
silently, in awe or reverence—something about
SCHOOLGIRLS
ON WEST NUSA
the austerity of the place borrows your breath.
TENGGAR A; DUNIA
On Rinca, villagers contend regularly with carBARU’S REAR
SUNDECK WITH A
nivorous lizards known as Komodo dragons. A
VIEW OF LOMBOK;
MOTORBIKES ON
trip to relieve myself in the bush requires a chapAMLAPUR A, BALI.
erone wielding a pitchfork-like stick, and when
we spot a 10-foot turtle-like reptile lurking in a
nearby graveyard, I am grateful for the escort.
Catching my surprise, Sebastien quickly Googles “Komodo
dragon attack” and laughs from his belly as I watch on his
smartphone, horrified, while the creature disembowels a goat.
Then on Komodo, we encounter a decidedly different scene:
beaming schoolchildren in green-and-gold uniforms lined up
on the dock to ferry newly delivered desks and chairs to their
island classroom. The mood couldn’t be higher. Eager to practice their English, they chirp at us: “Miss!” they shout. “Hey, mister!” They wave in unison from the dock, lit up by sunshine, as
we retreat back to our big wooden ship.
92
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
even without knowing this epic journey will lead me to Alex, it’s impossible to be aboard Dunia Baru without thinking of my father. A middle-class
kid from Connecticut who aspired to New England affluence, my dad was
enamored with boats, and with the leisurely lifestyle they connoted. Toward
the end of his life, he had an ill-fated stint in the marine-brokerage business,
specializing in “boats of character.” A boat of character, according to him, had
to be made entirely from wood and handcrafted painstakingly by master
boatbuilders using traditional methods. By these standards, Dunia Baru is
the ultimate ship, a creation honed by carpenters wielding only saws and
hammers to shape its hulking beams—28,000 cubic feet of dense ironwood.
The detailing alone would make my dad weep: every door hinge, window
latch, and knob carved by hand. I can see his hand following the smooth
slope of a teak rail: Can ya even believe it?
One afternoon, napping on deck while serenaded by the hum of prayer
calls from a village mosque, I remember a late-spring evening during my
childhood when my dad and stepmother loaded up an Igloo with diet soda
and Coors, and piled Alex and me into our 30-foot Southport for the trip
from Yarmouth to Freeport for twilight lobster rolls. After what seemed
like hours of boring, very cold cruising between the pine-dotted islands of
Casco Bay, we arrived, windblown and salt crusted. My family seemed to
relish the adventure in these voyages, but I wasn’t swayed. Wouldn’t it have
been easier to drive? Now, 25 years later, sailing through the Indonesian
islands, I feel regret for my failure to understand the untethered freedom
of the open ocean, the natural miracles available to us.
But then I amble on deck during our sixth stunning sunset in a row
and pass Colby, his eyes averted toward the floor, happily distracted by a
Lego truck. He studies the pieces carefully, attaching each colorful block
to the next as the panoramic blue-green views of the island of Flores and
the Mount Sangeang Api volcano hover over the horizon. What do boys
know about regret?
After a short flight from Labuan Bajo to Denpasar, a taxi drops me at
94
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
GET
ON BOARD
THE PLACES
YOU’LL GO
Dunia Baru runs private
charters throughout the
Indonesian archipelago
from April through
November, accommodating
up to 14 guests in six staterooms and a master suite
with a crew of 20. Voyages
through Myanmar and
Thailand are available yearround upon request. Full
charters for one week start
at $102,500, all-inclusive.
duniabaru.com
GETTING THERE
Major carriers including
American Airlines and
Qatar Airways fly into Bali
Denpasar with one connection from New York and
Los Angeles. From there it’s
a short transfer to the dock.
BACK ON LAND
Map by Peter Oumanski
If you’ve had your fill of
beaches, head inland for
a few days once in Bali
before flying home. Japanbased Hoshino Resorts
opened its thatched-roof
Hoshinoya Bali eight
months ago in the hills of
Ubud, known for traditional Balinese dancing
and Hindu temples.
Alex’s villa. He is brown, healthy, chatty, a slightly
wiser version of the post-college know-it-all I last
saw. He inspects me for signs of wear. “Your beard,”
he says, grinning. “You look just like him.” I laugh,
running a palm over my stubbly cheek.
We pick up our rhythm effortlessly, like an old
habit, catching up over drinks at a beach club in
Canggu. With the wine and nostalgia urging us
along, we speak about friends we’ve lost to the
years, our childhood, and the common loss we’d
shared. “I think a big part of my not being proactive about seeing you,” Alex tells me, “was I didn’t
know if I wanted to go wading back into that pool.”
I nod, looking out at the beach, the
wild sea beyond it, the schools of
surfers paddling, the kids screechOPPOSITE: THE
ing as the waves lap at their ankles.
SUNRISE OVER
As night falls, we tour the island,
RINCA ISLAND,
IN KOMODO
traversing tiny Balinese roads on
NATIONAL PARK.
Alex’s scooter. I ride on the back,
gripping tightly, yelling little details
about my life in New York over the
hum of the engine. “I want to show you my favorite road,” he says, cutting a hard left and swerving the bike onto a rocky path between two rice
paddies, a hint of silver moon glowing overhead.
Otherworldly. I hold onto my brother, and we agree
to stay in touch this time, which we had done many
times before. But in this meeting, in a place across
all the world’s oceans, the promise feels different.
Intel
O U R T R AV E L
TIPS, TRICKS, AND
MISCELLANY
GOOD NEWS
Seems like every month
brings a new, too-goodto-be-true airfare sale. Next
up: Barcelona! Thanks to
upstart airlines like Level,
Norwegian, and Wow Air,
round trips are crazy cheap—
less than $500. “And it’s
not just new airlines with
lower fares,” says Amanda
Festa of Cheap Flights.
“You’ll find similar rates on
Aer Lingus, American,
British Airways, Finnair,
Iberia, Lufthansa,
Swiss, and TAP Portugal.”
A GUIDE
T O T R AV E L I N G B E T T E R
THIS MONTH
BAD NEWS
96
Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
HOW TO DO IT
Oslo
In 2008, the Oslo Opera House
opened, establishing the harbor
area of Bjørvika (above) as
the city’s cultural hub. Four years
later, Renzo Piano’s Astrup
Fearnley museum cemented its rep.
You’ll see works by Eliasson, Koons,
and Sherman at the Fearnley,
but make a plan to go back in 2020
for the openings of the National
and Edvard Munch museums.
Spend the night next door to
the Fearnley at Norway’s best design
hotel, The Thief. (A planned sister
property by hotelier Petter Stordalen
should arrive by 2019.)
Rio’s city council spent eight years
(and $2.5 billion) to transform
an old Guanabara Bay pier into the
Porto Maravilha museum quarter.
Santiago Calatrava’s cantilevered,
straight outta sci-fi Museum of
Tomorrow has impressive interactive
exhibits on the Anthropocene era.
After hitting the Museum of
Tomorrow, walk across Mauá Square
to the four-year-old Museu de
Arte do Rio for a look at Debret portraits—and a caprioska at the
rooftop bar at sunset.
The once-industrial Millers Point
area north of Darling Harbor is now
a stunning stretch of parkland
that’s been renamed Barangaroo in
honor of an Aboriginal leader.
This area was once home to the
Gadigal people, and it’s filled
with both petroglyphs and contemporary works by native artists.
Hit Manly Beach in the morning, then
hop a ferry to Barangaroo’s new
terminal before walking northwest to
the Walumil Lawns, overlooking
the world’s most ’grammable harbor.
Locals avoided the underutilized
Southwest Waterfront for
years, but that’ll change when the
first phase of a $2 billion
private development, The Wharf,
opens this fall.
At least 20 restaurants are planned,
many by D.C.’s hottest chefs like
Fabio Trabocchi and Nick Stefanelli.
Expect outdoor seating and
menus heavy on Chesapeake seafood.
Go after a day on the National Mall, a
few blocks north. Start with East
Coasters on the half shell at Hank’s
Oyster Bar, then do dinner at Del
Mar as the sun sets over the Potomac.
Photograph by Iwan Baan
WHY IT ’S WORTH THE TRIP
Rio de
Janeiro
Prepare to be squished
beyond belief. American is
about to cram seats even
closer together in an effort
to sell more tickets. The
“seat pitch,” or distance
between a point on one seat
and the same on another,
will shrink from 31 inches to
29 in some rows of the airline’s new 737 planes (makes
you really appreciate
JetBlue and its dignified 33
inches). There’s more: The
bathrooms on these new
jets will be smaller too. Not
cool, American. Not cool.
WHAT ’S HAPPENING
Sydney
UNBELIEVABLE NEWS
Our Fave New Neighborhoods Are on the Water
These forward-thinking cities are investing billions to turn old docklands from
no-go zones to the places you’ll actually want to hang out.
Washington,
D.C.
Well, it was good while it
lasted. After years of adding
flights between the U.S.
and the Gulf—and on to
Africa, India, and Southeast
Asia—Emirates has cut
back on service to five U.S.
cities, including Boston
and Seattle. It’s blaming the
new in-cabin electronics
ban, which it says impacted
“consumer interest.” At
least Emirates is keeping
the much-loved New
York–Milan and the new
Newark–Athens flights
for summer.
Ombudsman: Keeping Your Cool
Last summer, I booked a Mitsubishi Outlander from
Advantage Rent a Car at Newark International and
drove off before discovering the air conditioning didn’t
work. All weekend I tried contacting the office to report the
problem but never got through to anyone. When I returned
the car, I mentioned the issue, and they made a note to
have the AC fixed. A month later, they hit me with a $757.71
repair charge—even though I was the one sweating it
out in their busted car. Shouldn’t they be apologizing for
the hassle—not sending me a bill? —Samir D., Joplin, Mo.
Q
Sure seems that way, but consider Advantage’s
perspective: Without a prompt report of the
problem—your unanswered calls notwithstanding—
there’s no way for the company to know when
exactly the AC stopped working (and no way to quickly
rectify the problem). Ombudsman, however, uncovered a work order regarding the vehicle’s broken AC that
predated your rental. Presented with this information,
Advantage dropped its charge and apologized “for any
inconvenience” this claim may have caused.
A
TRAVEL SMARTER
THIS SUMMER
Beat That Electronics Ban
The Microsoft Universal
Foldable Keyboard, which
connects via Bluetooth
to just about any device
(including iPhones),
is just small enough to
be allowed on flights
that don’t permit laptops
aboard ($99).
Take Way Better Photos
They sound geeky, but
360-degree cameras—like
the supersimple-to-use
Ricoh Theta S—capture
insanely detailed panoramas
with a single click of the
shutter ($350).
30
Jean-Michel Cousteau, president of
the Ocean Futures Society and son
of Jacques, on what he’ll never fly
without and the best drinks spot in
his hometown of Santa Barbara.
DOLLARS
THAT’S HOW MUCH U.S. CASH
YOU’LL NEED, PER PERSON,
WHEN YOU LAND IN BOTSWANA
TO COVER A NEW TOURISMDEVELOPMENT LEVY. CREDIT
CARDS ARE ACCEPTED,
BUT SAFARI EXPERTS WE’VE
SPOKEN WITH SAY YOU’LL
GET THROUGH THE LINE FASTER
WITH EXACT CHANGE.
MY FAVORITE AIRLINE HAS TO BE Air Tahiti
Nui. Because I’ve flown them four times
a year for the last 15 years, I know
many of the crew by their first names.
I NEVER FLY WITHOUT my reusable Hydro Flask
water bottle, so I can avoid those
single-use plastic ones. It even has
a filter, which comes in handy in
remote places where the water might not
be safe to drink.
NO MATTER HOW LONG THE FLIGHT, I’D NEVER
watch a movie. I’d much rather catch
up on reading. I just finished my good
friend John Englander’s High Tide on
Stay Connected Anywhere
The Skyroam hotspot lets
you get online from just
about everywhere—on ski
slopes in the Andes, on a
train in Peru’s Sacred Valley,
on an ATV in the desert
outside Marrakech. We know
because we actually road
tested it in all three places
($99, service from $8 a day).
Be Party-Ready
’Tis the season for beach
picnics and impromptu grill
sessions. Stock up on
Union Wine Co.’s new fizzy
rosé—it’s cleverly packed
in pool- and beach-friendly
aluminum cans and tastes
just as good as the stuff that
comes in bottles ($7 a can).
CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF
ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2017
CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.
VOLUME 52, NO. 7, CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER (ISSN 08939683) is published monthly (except for a combined issue
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Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast,
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123242885-RT0001.
Illustrations by DENISE NESTOR
85,000 Miles Logged
in the Last Year
Main Street. It’s about the realities
of a drastically changing climate
TWO TRIPS IN ONE,
VIA SEAPLANE
Haven’t made Labor Day plans
yet? Gurney’s, which has
chic waterfront properties in
Montauk, New York, and
Newport, Rhode Island, has
you covered with a turnkey
weekend itinerary out of
New York that includes one
night in an oceanview
room at each hotel and flights
there and back by Cessna
Caravan Amphibian seaplane
($2,250 per person).
POSTMASTER: SEND ALL UAA TO CFS. (SEE DMM 507.1.5.2.);
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It’s a call to action.
WHEN I’M HOSTING OUT-OF-TOWNERS, we’ll
do cocktails on the deck at the Belmond
El Encanto in Santa Barbara. On the
clearest of days, you can see three of
the four northern Channel Islands.
When it’s just my better half, Nan, and
I, we’ll go to Chaucer’s Bookstore,
then walk next door to our favorite
Italian restaurant, Via Maestra 42. The
ricotta gnocchi is outstanding.
are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know.
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Condé Nast Traveler / 08.17
97
SOUVENIR
08.17
On the
House
Before 1978, airline ticket prices
were heavily regulated in the
United States, and incentives like
frequent-flier miles and other
perks were illegal. In 1952, KLM
Royal Dutch Airlines found a
way around this policy by gifting
first-class passengers a Delft
blue porcelain keepsake in the
form of a Dutch house—filled
with Bols Genever gin—before
landing. (After all, there was
no law saying a drink had to be
served in a glass.) The Civil
Aeronautics Board’s regulations
are long gone, but the little
houses are still given out in business and first class. KLM is now
up to 96 models, with a new one
added each October for the
airline’s anniversary. What’s not
immediately obvious is that
most are based on actual Dutch
landmarks. (No. 79, top, is the
old Jenever Museum; No. 35, far
left, is a house in Delft dating
from 1631.) There are regular travelers who try to assemble the
whole set, making their own tiny,
tidy Amsterdam. Canals, presumably flowing with gin, are not
included. C H R I S T O P H E R B O N A N O S
98
Condé Nast Traveler
photograph by STEPHEN LEWIS
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