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Your guide to responsible pet ownership
THE PSYCHOLOGY BEHIND
Why people
love or hate
animals
R
#272
www.animaltalk.co.za
AUGUST 2017
animaltalk
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CUTENESS OVERLOAD
The charm of baby animals
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ED’SNOTE
your guide to responsible pet ownership
OUR EXPERTS
KAREN SINOVICH
I am a COAPE-qualified animal
behaviourist and trainer, co-owner of Dog
Hub SA and offer behaviour consultations
in Cape Town.
Finding all the
interesting information
made me realise how
much more there is to
be learnt about animals
DR LETITIA SWARTZ
I am a qualified veterinarian from
Sasolburg. I have been in private practice
since 2005 and completed my veterinary
honours degree in 2012. I am the proud
owner of two Golden Retrievers, and am
actively involved in the care and re-homing
of stray, neglected and abused animals.
WENDY WILSON
I qualified as a Ttouch practitioner in
2009, but decided there was so much
more to learn and went on to complete
my COAPE Diploma in Companion Animal
Behaviour and Training. I am one of the
founding members of COAPE SA.
DR AMANDA HAECHLER
I’m a practising companion animal
veterinarian with a special interest in
small mammals. I share my home with
my husband and my three four-legged
children – Sam, Mali and Boris.
SAMMY
I am Sammy, Animaltalk’s editorial
assistant. I have a lifetime’s experience
in everything dog related! I am getting
older, but I stay in great shape as I am
sponsored by Hill’s Pet Nutrition.
If you can’t find the magazine at your
local bookstore or supermarket, visit
this link: www.panoramamedia.net/
cannot-find-favourite-magazine/
or scan this QR code
Welcome
What a wonderful privilege it is to be
the new editor of Animaltalk. Putting my
first edition together and finding all the
interesting information made me realise
how much more there is to be learnt
about animals.
One of the most difficult subjects to
photograph is animals, and don’t think
that photographing your own pets is
any easier. When your pets are the
sole subject of a photograph, and you
are trying your best to get them to sit
still long enough, you do need a lot of
patience. Pets find it awkward to sit still
when it is normally not required of them.
Do keep in mind that they may be more
energetic, curious or even nervous when
something is out of the ordinary.
To photograph animals in the wild can
be even trickier. Photographing animals
in their natural environments is normally
AUGUST 2017 VOLUME 23 NUMBER 08
ON THE COVER
Winter time!
(photo: Sundays Photography)
Animaltalk | August 2017
PUBLISHER Urs Honegger
EDITOR Mientjie Kleinhans | mientjie@panorama.co.za
STAFF WRITER Gina Hartoog
SENIOR SUB-EDITOR Vanessa Koekemoer
SUB-EDITOR Nicolette Els
OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION MANAGER Paul Kotze
DTP STUDIO MANAGER Cronjé du Toit
TRAFFIC & PRODUCTION Juanita Pattenden
SENIOR DESIGNER Mauray Wolff
DESIGNER Perpetua Chigumira-Wenda
SALES MANAGER: Gillian Johnston
SALES EXECUTIVE:
Jackie Browning | jackie@panorama.co.za
Tel: 011 468 2090
BREEDERS & CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING:
ADVERTISING SALES EXECUTIVE
Nora de Vries | nora@panorama.co.za
SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@panorama.co.za
Tel: 011 468 2090 | Fax: 086 677 7100
ACCOUNTS accounts@panorama.co.za
DISTRIBUTION Republican News Agency
ISSN 1023-9251
PRINTERS Business Print
easiest when they are relaxed.
The best advice to photograph your
own pets is to get them used to cameras,
and then when they are posing at their
cutest, quickly take a couple of pictures.
Then, please send in all those crazy and
cute pictures to Animaltalk, so that we
can share them with all our readers.
In our main article this month, we
explore why certain people love animals
while others don’t. Have you ever
wondered why animal babies are so
adorable? Then you should definitely
read the article about animal psychology.
Mientjie
Mientjie Kleinhans | Editor
FOLLOW US ON
www.facebook.com/
AnimaltalkMagazine
Animaltalk.co.za
Visit Animaltalk ’s new comprehensive website:
http://animaltalk.co.za/.
COPYRIGHT
Animaltalk is published monthly (12 issues per annum) and is available by subscription nationally
as well as at retail outlets countrywide. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this magazine in
whole or in part is prohibited without prior written permission of Panorama Media Corp (Pty)
Ltd. Copyright © 1994-2017 Panorama Media Corp (Pty) Ltd. The views expressed in Animaltalk
are not necessarily those of Panorama Media Corp and the acceptance and publication of editorial
and advertising matter in Animaltalk does not imply any endorsement or warranty in respect of
goods or services therein described, whether by Animaltalk or the publishers. Animaltalk will not
be held responsible for the safe return of unsolicited editorial contributions. The Editor reserves
the right to edit material submitted and in appropriate cases to translate into another language.
Animaltalk reserves the right to reject any advertising or editorial material, which may not suit the
standard of the publication, without reason given. Animaltalk published by Panorama Media Corp.
Jul - Dec 2016
9,678 (certified)
Published By Panorama Media Corp (Pty) Ltd.
Private Bag X4, Kyalami, 1684, South Africa.
92 Campolino Road, Kyalami.
Tel: 011 468 2090 | Fax: 011 468 2091
www.panorama.co.za
1
OF ANIMALTALK | TWO DECADES OF MAKING A DIFFERENCE ...
thismonth
AUGUTS 2017 | VOLUME 23 NUMBER 08
FOCUS ON
08 Why we love or hate animals
The psychology behind our emotions for animals
12 Baby animals – say ‘aww!’
Cuteness overload: the science of being adorable
REGULARS
04 Your letters
Reader comments
06 Bits and bites
News you should know
33 Cat breeders’ gallery
36 Crazy critters
Your pets in the spotlight!
ON THE COVER
THE PSYCHOLOGY WHY SOME
PEOPLE LOVE ANIMALS, AND
OTHERS DON’T
PG 08
38 10 cool things
About dung beetles
40 Your FREE poster
42
Kids’ pages
fun facts and activities!
46 WILDTHINGS
The fast and intelligent, yet sometimes
forgetful, squirrel
62 Agility
2017 KUSA Nationals
64 Animaltalk Top Dog 100 Ratings
66 Book reviews and pet products
69 Dog breeders’ gallery
71 Pet mall
74 Classifieds
80 In the next issue
DOGTALK
18 Raising puppies for GDA
What you should know before applying
2
THE AMERICAN SHORTHAIR
A QUIET AND CALM
PEOPLE-LOVER
PG 30
Animaltalk | August 2017
20 Those terrible teens
This is why your cute pup sometimes
acts like a monster
ON THE COVER
THE CHARM OF
BABY ANIMALS
PG 12
ROSE-RINGED PARAKEETS
THE INTELLECTUAL AND
FRIENDLY FAMILY BIRD
PG 58
BREED PROFILES
22 Miniature Schnauzer
26 Toy Fox Terrier
28 A Guide Dog in the mist
Guide and Service Dogs
changing lives
CATSLIFE
30 Breed profile
American Shorthair
32 Diabetes in cats
Be aware of the symptoms
34 Why do cats purr?
For more reasons than you may think
48 The caracal
A fast and agile wild cat
VETS Q&A
50 Your questions answered
How serious is my pet’s cough? • Why
does my dog chew rocks? • Does my
cat have worms? • How do I care for
my rabbit’s teeth? • What colour is a
healthy tongue?
56 Careers with animals
A day in the life of a holistic
veterinarian acupuncturist
PETTALK
ON THE COVER
THE MYSTERY OF JUVENILE
BEHAVIOUR REVEALED
PG 20
Animaltalk | August 2017
58 Rose-ringed parakeet
A family bird
WELFARE
60 Welfare news • Animal shelters
• How you can help
3
yourletters
Special care
ING
WINNER
LETT
One day a 2kg Schnauzer puppy came into our
lives unexpectedly. He was minutes away from
being euthanised after the vet had diagnosed him
with megaesophagus. His owner was not in a
position to take care of him as she worked shifts.
It would have been extremely time consuming to
feed him, and thereafter have him sit in a Bailey
chair for 30 minutes in order for gravity to take
over and allow his food to flow into his stomach.
I could not help falling in love with baby
Benedict, and being a pensioner and animal
lover, I asked her to consider giving him to
me, which she agreed to. That same day my
daughter built Benedict’s first Bailey chair, after
researching his condition. She also took him to
another vet for a second opinion. This vet also
did a sonar and confirmed the first diagnosis.
My dearest daughter bought baby bottles,
bibs and a bottle brush. It was like having a
baby in the house. Fortunately, no diapers were
necessary! Each day’s pellets are soaked in warm
water and then liquidised and divided into five
baby bottles. Benedict gets very excited when he
sees his bottle and will rush to his Bailey chair.
After his feed, he sits in his chair and takes a
nap until the half hour has expired.
He is five months old now and weighs 6.7kg
and is a bundle of joy. He attends puppy day care
during weekdays to socialise and play with other
pups. He is healthy and such a happy pup, and I
do not have to worry that he does not get all the
nutrients that he requires, as I follow the feeding
instructions to the letter and Hill’s does the rest.
Christina Myburgh
Via email
Rescued twice
I would like to introduce my rescue baby,
Raven. She is a Dobermann cross and
she has been rescued twice in her short
15-month life. As a newborn pup, Raven’s
mom was killed in a township and she was
rescued by Pets in Witbank (along with her
sister and two brothers). They bottle fed the
pups until they grew bigger and stronger
and at eight weeks old, Raven was adopted
by a woman who thought that Raven would
be the size of a dachshund. When Raven
was three months old, the woman dropped
her off at the vet and just never went back.
Fast forward two months, my boyfriend
and I were at the very same vet where Raven
was abandoned, with our four-month-
4
old Husky cross, Oracle. She had been
diagnosed with canine distemper and we
had just put her down when I heard about
Raven (who was known as Pippa back then).
She was in a horrific state. She had faeces in
her fur, had never been held or walked on
a lead, and she would scream when anyone
touched her.
After much hard work, bonding, many
tears, but lots of smiles too, Raven and I
are currently doing obedience and agility,
and competing at SADAA shows.
Adopting Raven was the best thing I could
have ever done.
Alicia Breytenbach and Raven
Via email
HAVE YOUR SAY
Send your letters to:
The Editor, Animaltalk, Private Bag X4, Kyalami, 1684
or email: animaltalk@panorama.co.za
Please include your name and address.
We reserve the right to edit letters for space and clarity.
WIN!
The letter of the month wins
a prize hamper worth R500
from Hill’s, the pet food
brand recommended by
veterinarians worldwide.
What the cats think
An agitated froth of fur
has plopped into our view;
Jesse thinks it’s his new toy
and tries to share his stew.
The cats are spitting, acting wild
“What THING is that, that fluffy child?
A Maltese pup – oh what a laugh
we’d rather have a tall giraffe.
It skitters here, it skitters there,
which end is front and where’s the rear?
His name is Codi – the cowboy dog
paint him green he’s Kermit Frog.
We’ll let him live within our herd
in case he turns into a bird.
Still, he is quite cute, you know,
he could become the best in show.
Welcome Codi, stay a while
you cheer us up with your sweet smile.”
By Irene Emanuel
Animaltalk | August 2017
FOLLOW US ON
bits&bites
www.facebook.com/AnimaltalkMagazine
Fake news
We have all seen it – Facebook plights, WhatsApp group
notifications and email requests to please support a
specific welfare organisation that may be closing due
to the lack of funds. One such a recent message was
supposedly on behalf of the Germiston SPCA. According
to the message, about 250 animals would have to be put
down if the organisation didn’t receive funds soon.
In certain cases, the message is from individuals who
mean well, and want to raise awareness and funds for
a specific organisation. Unfortunately, they would blow
things out of proportion to get more attention for the cause.
Most of the SPCA branches are in financial difficulty
and would appreciate financial assistance. But, be aware
of false rumours. In the case of the message that was
sent out about the Germiston SPCA, it was claimed that
250 animals, including dogs, cats, birds, hamsters and
horses, will be euthanised. The message also claimed that
other centres are supported by the Germiston SPCA, and
would therefore also have to close their doors, affecting
over 1,000 animals.
It is completely untrue. First of all, while some SPCAs do
take care of other animals, such as horses and donkeys,
most branches mostly handle cats and dogs, and secondly,
the SPCA is not affiliated to other centres. Messages like
these, together with ‘scamsters’ who would post their own
banking details, and people who would abuse a natural
disaster, such as in the case of the Knysna fires, spread
rumours that are false.
Fake news is a real phenomenon these days, and
unfortunately, there are many honest people who believe
other people, and thereby fall into their traps. The best
advice is to use logic when receiving a message. Rather
check with the organisation whether the information is true.
Be careful and first find out how real the situation is
before forwarding the message to other people. Don’t
believe everything you read on the internet – there are
many fake news websites and social media accounts that
look legit, but spread fake news.
SOURCE: SCIENCEDAILY.COM
6
Inspiring animal care
Every year the AACL Johannesburg hosts
a drawing competition for primary school
pupils where the children can win a prize,
and at the same time raise money for the
organisation and create awareness about
animal welfare. The posters need to portray
in each of the three categories: Grade 1
and 2, Grade 3, 4 and 5, and Grade 6
and 7. The participating school with the
top donation will be rewarded with a
colour printer that is sponsored by Canon
South Africa.
how people show compassion and kindness
to animals, care for animals, and how
animals affect their lives in a positive way.
Learners stand a chance to win R2,000
The closing date is 31 October 2017. To
enter or for more information, send an email
to educate@aacl-jhbnb.co.za or look out for
the September edition of Animaltalk.
Animaltalk | August 2017
BITS&BITES
news from the animal world
Photo: Bronwyn Katzke Photography
From left are Andries du
Preez (CANSA Highveld
Care Centre), Thaddeus
(German Shepherd) and
Chris Chameleon
Learning from others
Not only do wild capuchin monkeys
learn new skills from each other, and
even other primates, they also realise
the benefits of learning new skills. This is
according to a study by Brendan Barrett,
a graduate student in animal behaviour
at the University of California.
According to the study of the social
learning of the monkeys, it is the first
demonstration of ‘payoff bias’ in wild
animals. “When animals learn, they can
learn very quickly,” said Barret. He added
that the population of wild capuchin
monkeys he worked with explore their
world and harvest food from it.
The wild monkeys had to figure out ways
to open fruit unfamiliar to them, and they
managed to open it by watching other
monkeys do it. One of the findings from
the study revealed that the most efficient
technique was quickly copied by the
monkeys in the group in as little as two
weeks. While the older monkeys tended
to stick to techniques from their personal
experience, the younger monkeys watched
other monkeys to see how they did it.
SOURCE: DOGINGTONPOST.COM
Wagging tails against cancer
At the annual Wags 4 CANSA, guest star
Chris Chameleon, 25 furry friends, local
beauty queens and ambassadors took to the
stage to create cancer awareness. The event,
recently held at Event City in Middelburg,
Mpumalanga, also showcased how dogs
are possibly one of the best caregivers to
cancer patients.
All the dog and cat food that were collected
at the event were delivered to the local SPCAs
Motors Middelburg. Wags 4 CANSA would
like to thank the sponsors and everyone that
contributed toward the success of the evening,
including:
• Bronwyn Katzke Photography
• Tupperware by Sherral
• Animaltalk
• Middelburg Mall
• Yum Yum Cuisine/Event City
• Wimpy Middelburg Mall
in Middelburg and Witbank. Wags 4 CANSA
was proudly presented by CANSA Highveld
Care Centre together with their partners,
Supreme Pet, One Fine Beginning and Renault
• Witbank K9 Club
• Annique
• Miss and Mrs Middelburg, Witbank,
Nkangala Organisations
Animaltalk | August 2017
7
PETTALK
lifestyle
Some people have
developed an intense
love for animals
Text: Gina Hartoog | Photography: Shutterstock
f
o
e
v
o
l
e
h
t
r
o
F
animals
While many of
us humans love
them, some don’t
Our emotions surrounding animals start with our interactions with
them during childhood, or the relationships or experiences we
share in later years
W
hen Elizabeth-Anne Bailey sees a
movie in which a beloved animal
dies, her heart breaks as she
remembers her own pets who have passed on.
“When a pet dies, it always feels as if a family
member has passed away,” says Bailey. “I feel
very emotional and overwhelmed with such a
loss. Not having your best friend shadowing
you or being together anymore is a great
sadness that you can only understand if you
have lost a pet.”
Bailey has very strong feelings towards
animals and reacts with deep emotion if faced
with a cruelty or abuse situation on social
media. She says her four siblings all care very
deeply about animals and suffer extreme grief
at the loss of a pet.
8
Humanity, childhood
experiences and culture
In his book Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some
We Eat, anthrozoologist Hal Herzog explores
the paradox of the human-animal relationship.
He asks a pertinent question: “Why is it so
hard to think straight about animals?”
Why are some animals showered with
love, others treated with disdain and others
relegated to the dinner plate? Even those
of us who love our pets deeply and provide
them with the best care possible may dislike
certain animals or have a deep-seated fear or
phobia of them.
Kim Kidson, a clinical psychologist and
chairlady of the Equine Assisted Psychotherapy
Institute of South Africa (EAPISA), says
although there are psychological reasons
for how we respond to or perceive animals,
a predominant reason is related to our
upbringing and how animals were viewed in
our childhood homes. This is behaviour we
learned by observing our parents, family and
friends in their interaction with animals. Some
perceptions are also defined by culture or what
is considered socially acceptable.
Like the Bailey siblings, many people develop
a deep bond with their animals. In some
instances, the relationship shared with an
animal companion may be deeper than those
shared with other humans. “On the one hand
some people are generally more emotional
than others, not just regarding animals but
life in general, and then you have those who
have developed an intense love for animals
– the reason why they react so emotionally,”
says Kidson. “Some people who have poor
self-esteem or social skills tend to lean more
Animaltalk | August 2017
PETTALK
lifestyle
DID YOU KNOW?
A fear of dogs is called cynophobia
and a fear of cats is called
ailurophobia or gatophobia.
towards animals, as they don’t judge as
humans do. This may also be the case if a
person has been deeply hurt by other people
and no longer trusts people. Animals accept
you just as you are, unconditionally!”
Some people have a bond with animals
that isn’t of a personal nature. They believe
that animal life is sacred and that animals
should not be owned, used by humans or
eaten as food. They may join animal rights
groups to protest against the use of animals
in testing laboratories or the culling of
animals. Emotions may be so strong that
otherwise peaceful individuals may resort
to violence to let animals out of cages at
laboratories or universities.
“In some human-animal relationships, the lines become blurred
as the animal takes on the role of surrogate child”
mammals all share the capacity to create
social bonds, and Panksepp identified this
neural circuitry as the CARE system, a system
involved in the nurturing of offspring and how
we love and bond with our pets. “We can show
our pets that we love them by making sure that
their species-specific welfare needs are met,
not only on a biological level through food,
water, shelter, veterinary care and exercise,
while working on problems or challenges. The
psychologist and horse specialist will observe
the horse’s body language to gain insight
into what the person is thinking and feeling,
something the horse exactly mirrors.
“Horses don’t lie and don’t accept incongruent
behaviour, so being in the presence of a horse
during therapy does not allow the person to
‘hide’ their feelings,” says Kidson. “If they
Love: a powerful emotion
In some human-animal relationships, the lines
become blurred as the animal takes on the
role of surrogate child. These pets are often
smothered in human expressions of love like
kissing and hugging. Some extremes include
dressing up the pet in outfits or letting the
animal ride in a baby pram.
COAPE SA-qualified companion animal
behaviourist Jessica Prinsloo says her own
pets tolerate being hugged, as she has
conditioned them to do so. “Hugging is
primate-based behaviour,” says Prinsloo.
“It is usually regarded by canines or felines
as a form of entrapment. Wearing outfits that
change the ‘outline’ of the animal can be met
with anything from slight suspicion to fullblown terror, depending on the socialisation
history of the pet, so I would rather leave
dressing up to humans and dolls.”
This isn’t to say that all expressions of our
human love for our pets are unhealthy – we
just need to learn to channel our love better.
Animals are very capable of feeling emotion,
as seen through the scientific work of Jaak
Panksepp, a neuroscientist at the College of
Veterinary Medicine at Washington State
University in America.
Panksepp describes seven emotional
networks found deep in specific parts of the
mammalian brain, with each system releasing
brain chemicals that govern how and what
we feel at a specific time. Prinsloo says that
Animaltalk | August 2017
but also on an emotional and behavioural
level through social bonds, play, exploration,
novelty and learning,” says Prinsloo.
Animals: a link with human
emotions
Kim Kidson uses equine-assisted
psychotherapy (EAP) as part of therapy in her
psychology practice. The presence of a horse
makes the session less formal and helps the
person relax, have fun and enjoy the outdoors
Animals have become an integral
part of the family
▲
try, the horse will expose this in a very direct
manner. This is an incredibly useful and
powerful tool for the therapeutic team, as in
traditional talk therapy you can only work with
what the person is prepared to share with you.”
Dr Leigh Tucker is a clinical psychologist
and volunteer therapy dog handler with Pets
as Therapy (PAT), currently co-ordinating
9
PETTALK
lifestyle
Animals accept humans
just as we are
▲
A lack of education
sometimes causes
unintentional neglect
visits in the Durban area. Volunteers will visit
hospitals or old-age facilities to allow residents
to interact with the companion animals.
“It is always important as a volunteer
to establish the comfort of those we visit,
especially for those approached in their
private rooms,” says Dr Tucker. “It is an
absolute privilege to witness these moments
of interaction. Most of the time, few words
are spoken, but simply smiles or tears of
appreciation are observed. These signs are
particularly powerful when people have
speech difficulties or other impairments
that may impact communication. People
may also reminisce about their own animal
companions, which often results in a mix of joy
and sadness. It is disappointing when residents
do not want to engage with the dogs or cats,
but we are fully respectful of that decision.”
Having witnessed these interactions as a
professional, Dr Tucker says that from her
observances, there are more similarities than
10
differences in how people respond to the
PAT animals. “I do note some interesting
reactions in terms of gender stereotypes,” says
Dr Tucker. “For one, I have seen first-hand
how men and boys tend to ‘drop their guard’
around animals, where they start to respond in
a more open and caring way and become more
communicative with the people around them.”
Warning!
ers
Not for sensitive read
Unintentional neglect
Just as many animals are loved and cared for
by dedicated guardians, others are subjected
to unspeakable abuse and cruelty – even death
– at the hands of humans.
Karin Botes, a social worker in private
practice, has worked with the SPCA in
several animal abuse cases. Botes says that
she believes it is important to differentiate
between people who do not wilfully neglect
animals and another group who intentionally
harm them.
Botes says that unintentional neglect may
result from a lack of education on the correct
and proper care of the animal. “A good
example here would be people who keep exotic
pets,” she says. “To care for an animal outside
of his natural habit can be a big responsibility,
and if you are not properly educated about the
animal’s specific needs, you can cause a lot of
unintentional suffering.”
A change in the person’s capacity to care for
the animal is another reason for unintentional
neglect. Botes says that this may be due to
someone not having the financial resources
to care for the pet anymore, or emotional
trauma where they are barely able to look after
themselves properly, or the person suffering
from cognitive decline and being unable to
look after the animal correctly.
The latter is a situation that may occur with
elderly pet owners. Botes explains that an
elderly person may refuse to move to a care
Animaltalk | August 2017
PETTALK
“People who hurt animals intentionally are
probably suffering from a serious untreated
mental health illness.” – Karin Botes, a social
worker in private practice.
lifestyle
Much of how we treat animals
stems from our childhood homes
▲
WHY DO PEOPLE HURT ANIMALS?
CAT SUPERSTITIONS
Cats feature in a number of
superstitions across countries and
cultures. Many of these beliefs cause
a deep-rooted fear of cats or even
outright hatred. However, not all
cat superstitions are negative: in
some cultures cats are revered and
are believed to bring good luck.
Superstitions around cats are often
linked to changes in the weather or
bad or good luck.
facility because their pets are not allowed and
they do not want to give them up. Sadly, the
pet may end up suffering with a number of
health issues because of the person’s inability
to cope with living independently anymore
and to care for themselves or their animals.
“It is my professional
opinion that people who
hurt animals intentionally
are probably suffering
from a serious untreated
mental health illness”
Warning!
ers
Not for sensitive read
Purposeful pain and suffering
On the other side of the coin are people who
would purposefully inflict pain and suffering
on an animal. The abuse may take place over
a short period of time or over longer periods,
and there is a definite intention to harm. The
abuser may be a young teenager who doesn’t
understand the severity of their actions or
someone with poor emotional intelligence or
intelligence in general. “I would like to believe,
especially in younger abusers, that as soon as
they are properly educated and informed about
the effects of their abusive actions, the negative
behaviour will cease,” says Botes.
Kim Kidson says if a person has been hurt by
another person and does not have the capacity
or insight to work through their emotions or
experiences more appropriately or effectively,
they may take their frustrations and hurt out
on ‘something’ below them in the ‘hierarchy’
of life. “The inappropriate behaviour may
also have been learnt through observing
others,” says Kidson. “Or the animal may have
hurt them somehow and they are protecting
themselves, or sadly ‘paying him back’.”
Animaltalk | August 2017
An even darker, more sinister character
may lurk in the shadows – the person who
will harm or kill to intimidate others or
for thrill-seeking. “It is my professional
opinion that people who hurt animals
intentionally are probably suffering from
a serious untreated mental health illness,”
says Botes. “Literature seems consistent in
stating that a common thread in this group
would be that they are experiencing extreme
anger and a need to dominate.”
Kidson says that children with conduct
disorder are known to hurt animals and
even kill them without showing any signs
of remorse.
In conclusion
For animal lovers like ourselves, reports
of abuse and neglect or the exploitation of
animals may draw out strong emotions.
We can channel this to assist welfare
organisations to care for abandoned or abused
animals – to give of our time or resources to
assist them in their mammoth task.
We can also make sure that our own pets
are properly cared for and loved. Jessica
Prinsloo says that she believes if our pets
could share anything with us, it would be a
plea to learn to speak their language. “Our
pets have become masters at interpreting our
actions and intentions, but we humans are
failing miserably by comparison at returning
the favour,” says Prinsloo. “Learning how
to properly read a pet’s body language and
behaviour will prevent a myriad of risks,
from illness to aggression to unintentional
acts of abuse, which will ultimately improve
the human-animal relationship.”
11
PETTALK
lifestyle
Text: Noleen Fourie | Photography: Shutterstock
I AM TOO CUTE
TO HANDLE!
Say ‘aww!’
The science of being adorable
I
magine the following: fluffy, silly little
kittens. Cuddly lambs. Playful baby
elephants. Puppies. Fragile little deer.
Do you feel all warm and fuzzy inside yet?
Baby animals have this effect on people,
and it’s completely normal. We discover the
reasons behind the charm of baby animals.
12
Nature’s grand plan
Plenty of studies have been done about the
reaction of people when they are shown
pictures of human babies, with these reactions
being mostly positive. Looking at babies
makes us feel all kinds of positive emotions,
such as a bigger sense of tenderness, less
aggressiveness and a sense of wanting to
protect the little one. We are programmed to
react this way towards the young of our own
species, as this encourages us to take care of
them as best possible, hence ensuring the
survival of our species. Interestingly, though,
seeing a baby animal elicits the same type of
Animaltalk | August 2017
PETTALK
lifestyle
MORE CUTENESS OVERLOAD
Send us the cutest pictures of your pets, and we will feature the
best ones in the October edition of Animaltalk. Include your
name, telephone number and email address to stand a chance
to win a copy of The Royal Canin Dog Encyclopedia, Volume 2.
CAN YOU HANDLE THE CUTE?
Don’t you just want to hug these animals?
There is a good reason for it!
response in humans. This is thought to be
mainly because baby animals typically share
the same characteristics as human babies, such
as large eyes, a rounded face with a small nose
and a plump body with that typical newborn
clumsiness. These features release a host of
feel-good chemicals in our brains, recreating
the feeling of being in love.
“I could just eat you up!”
Watching a few videos of kittens online will
no doubt put a smile on your face after a long,
frustrating day. But have you ever looked at
videos or pictures of adorable animals and
thought that you just want to hug and squeeze
them? Or, how many times have you seen
human babies getting their cheeks pinched?
Yes, overwhelming cuteness makes us feel
great – so much so that the brain tries to
Animaltalk | August 2017
compensate for it with feelings of aggression.
Disturbing as it may sound, this is called
‘cuteness aggression’ and it’s actually quite
normal. Despite how you are feeling, you do
not in this case mean to really harm the baby in
question. The reasoning behind this reaction
is that it helps you to keep your emotions in
control – which you need to be able to do if
you are raising a small person. In essence
the positive and negative emotions cancel
each other out, helping you to regain your
emotional equilibrium.
An interesting experiment was used to
demonstrate cuteness aggression in 2015.
In this study participants were given bubble
wrap to hold while they looked at pictures of
cute baby animals. The study found that they
popped more bubble wrap while looking at the
images of baby animals than when looking
We sometimes get exploited by our
tendency to find certain characteristics
irresistibly cute. The manufacturers of
a certain vehicle brand, for example,
have designed their cars to have large,
rounded headlights that face forward
and mimic a pair of sweet baby
eyes ... enticing us into being rather
charmed with the look of the car!
at adult animals. This shows that there is
an impulse to squeeze something when you
are exposed to something adorable, but the
researchers stressed that it is not with any real
intent to cause harm.
13
PETTALK
lifestyle
HOW MUCH IS THAT DOGGY IN THE WINDOW?
While having the kind of charm that only
baby animals have is part of how nature
ensures the survival of the species, it can
backfire when we as humans can’t resist
the cuteness. It happens so often: you
walk past a pet store and see sad pups
or kittens in a cage,
waiting for someone
to give them a home.
You feel sorry for
them, and you can’t
resist their charm,
so it’s easy to simply
give in and take one
home. Sad as it is, in
these times you have
to resist that impulse.
As a responsible pet
owner, it’s vital that
you plan properly
before adding a
new animal to your
family. And yes, you
might feel that you are rescuing a sad little
guy. But by doing that you are leaving open
a space for the next one, and in that way
possibly supporting a puppy mill.
When getting an animal from a pet shop,
you don’t know where he comes from. You
might end up with health problems,
leading to massive veterinary expenses.
It might also happen that the animal
simply doesn’t fit into your household.
Some pet store owners will claim to sell
pedigree animals from breeders, but the
truth is that no responsible breeder who
really cares about his or her breed will
sell animals in this way. A responsible
breeder wants to know where his or her
animals go, and will make sure that they
go to the right homes. This, along with
adoption, is the only responsible way
to acquire a pet. If you want to adopt,
once again research is important.
Know what type of animal will suit your
lifestyle before you go to the shelter.
This will help you to focus and not fall
for cute puppy dog eyes on a dog who
might just be wrong for you. If you need
advice on choosing the perfect pet for
your lifestyle, it is advisable to contact a
qualified animal behaviourist.
The ones who are not so cute
Tadpoles – not
quite as cute
14
All animals are beautiful in their own way, but
to be honest, not all babies have that distinctive
cuteness factor. The reason for this is how
animals experience vastly different childhoods
among the species. Some animals are born,
and then simply go on with their lives without
needing parental care. These are typically the
babies who don’t really have the characteristics
that are considered cute, like insects, reptiles
and fish. Other species need to be cared for by
their parents while they are young in order to
survive. Mammals are mostly born needing
to be cared for in order to grow up with the
skills they need to survive, and they will tend
to score higher on the adorable scale. Humans
need to find their babies cute, as it assists in
the stresses that come with raising them. The
same goes in the animal kingdom – the bond
between baby and mother needs to be so
strong that mom will do anything to ensure
her child’s survival, for the simple reason of
survival of the species.
Animaltalk | August 2017
They might be
turning grey, but their
last years can be golden.
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18
22
Consider raising puppies
for GDA
The Miniature Schnauzer and
Toy Fox Terrier
20
28
It is part of their development
Guide and Service Dogs changing lives
PUPPY RAISERS
THOSE TERRIBLE TEENS
BREED PROFILES
SOUTH AFRICAN GUIDE-DOGS ASSOCIATION
dogtalk
These pages help you
decide on the ideal breed
of dog for you, deal with
behavioural issues, improve
your dog’s wellbeing and
provide you with
training tips
Sleeping puppies
are just so cute.
Best to leave
them to rest
5 FACTS
about puppies sleeping
1 | Puppies sleep between 18 and 20
hours a day.
2 | It takes a lot of energy for puppies
to develop physically, therefore they
need to rest.
3 | When awake, puppies play and are
active, which uses even more energy.
4 | White noise, like a fan, helps them to
relax and sleep.
5 | Play with your puppy before bedtime,
so that he will be tired.
SA Guide-Dogs Association for the Blind breeds and trains dogs to be assistants to humans.
For more info visit www.guidedog.org.za or phone 011 705 3512.
Animaltalk | August 2017
17
DOGTALK
lifestyle
Who doesn’t love
playing with puppies?
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Shutterstock
▲
Raising puppies for Guide-Dogs
What you need to consider before applying to become a Puppy Raiser. It is more than just a hobby!
D
on’t we all just love playing with
puppies, cuddling them and
watching them sleep? These supercute bundles of joy bring so much happiness
into our world. Now, imagine being a fulltime Puppy Raiser. The South African GuideDogs Association for the Blind (GDA) is
always looking for Puppy Raisers, but before
you rush off to apply, you do need to consider
a few facts first.
18
Consider this
Before committing yourself as a Puppy Raiser,
the first fact to consider is that you will get
extremely attached to the puppy. It will be
difficult to hand over this dog eventually,
and it is important to keep this in mind at all
times. The reward will be the pride you feel
when you see him wearing his harness or
working jacket, and knowing the important
role he will play in somebody’s life who is
visually or physically impaired, or a child
with autism.
Can you commit?
You will need to commit 12 to 18 months of
your time to raise the puppy. This means you
have to house-train the puppy, look after him,
take him for training, and never leave him
with someone else for long periods of time
without permission from GDA. However,
Animaltalk | August 2017
DOGTALK
lifestyle
DID YOU KNOW?
Dogs who don’t make it as working dogs for
the visually or physically impaired can be
adopted by their Puppy Raiser
As a Puppy Raiser you will
be provided with dog food
▲
PUPPY-PROOF
YOUR HOUSE
Whether you want to
become a Puppy Raiser
for GDA or simply want to
puppy-proof your house,
follow these guidelines:
there is the option to leave the pup at the
kennels, but it has to be arranged in advance.
Instead of a full-time Puppy Raiser, you can
also consider becoming a weekend-homer
instead. Most of the principles for a Puppy
Raiser apply to a weekend-homer.
Other factors to keep in mind before
committing as a Puppy Raiser are that you
will have to take your puppy to the vet if he
gets ill, and you will have to look after him.
You are also responsible for deworming,
parasite control and grooming. There is
support available from the Puppy Raising
Supervisor or Kennel Manager, so you will
never be alone on this journey.
fencing, an enclosed swimming pool and any
other dangers the puppy may be exposed to.
A family environment
As GDA wants the puppies to become balanced
adults, they would like to see their puppies
go to homes with sociable dogs, cats and
children. The more animals a puppy comes
into daily contact with, the better chance
he has of becoming comfortable with them.
You can only raise one puppy at a time, due
to the amount of time, planning, focus and
dedication required to expose the puppy to
different environments, situations and people.
Support network
Training requirements
You will be required to take the puppy to the
Gladys Evans Training Centre once a week
for 13 weeks. This is where the training and
socialising takes place, with you handling the
puppy. After that, monthly walks will take
place with the puppy’s siblings, the Puppy
Raisers and the Supervisors.
At home, your puppy has to sleep inside,
which means house-training is required. You
will also have to puppy-proof your house,
as the property will be checked for secure
Animaltalk | August 2017
Being a Puppy Raiser opens up a new
world of social interactions with other
Puppy Raisers and Supervisors. This support
network also extends to Kennel Managers
and to the veterinary hospital that GDA has
a relationship with.
You won’t have to buy your puppy’s food
or pay for medical and vaccination costs. The
food will be supplied to you via the Puppy
Raising Scheme.
So, if you love dogs, are willing to teach
the pup according to GDA philosophy, have
1 | Make sure the puppy’s environment
is clean and tidy. If it lies around, it
will become a toy or chewing object.
2 | Crawl around the house at the
puppy’s level to see what is lying
around or could potentially be a
hazardous object.
3 | Puppies can jump up, so do look out
for objects hanging within your pup’s
reach, such as tablecloths or throws
on a couch.
4 | Open bar heaters and fireplaces are
dangerous for puppies, so ensure
that the fireplace has a grid in front
of it, and rather don’t use the open
bar heater until a much later stage.
5 | Wiring should be out of the puppy’s
reach, as this is extremely dangerous
for anybody.
6 | Household cleaning chemicals must
be locked away in a place where
your puppy can’t open any door.
7 | Toxic household plants should be
removed.
8 | While cooking in the kitchen, rather
move the puppy to a safer place, or
place him in a crate with his favourite
blanket and toys. This will ensure that
you don’t trip and fall over him while
your focus is on cooking.
9 | Keep all plastic objects out of your
puppy’s reach.
10 | Consider getting child-proof locks for
any doors and cupboards, especially
where medicine and poisonous items
are kept.
the time and energy to socialise and play
with a young puppy, and can commit to the
above, then definitely apply to become a
Puppy Raiser.
19
DOGTALK
behaviour
Text: Anlé Allison | Photography: Shutterstock
Terrible
teens
The fundamental period of development: revealing the
mystery of the dog’s juvenile behaviour
B
elieve it or not, like humans,
dogs also go through that terrible
teenager stage. For dogs, the stage
is between the ages of 18 and 20 weeks
and it is called the juvenile period. It
is during this period when the onset of
sexual maturity takes place. The length of
the period depends on the specific breed
and his individual personality.
20
Ever wonder how it happens that young dogs
are best friends one day, and then the next
day they will be fighting? Blame it all on
testosterone during the dog’s juvenile stage
▲
both males and females, and assist the pup to
develop physically. These hormones also play
a role in certain potential personality traits
and behaviour patterns, and is the cause of
big changes in the puppy.
Those hormones
Big changes
Have you ever experienced how young dogs
are best friends one day, and the very next
day they will be fighting? This is typical of
the teenage stage and can be blamed on
hormones, which from about 16 weeks start
to play a role in their development.
Two of the well-known hormones,
testosterone and oestrogen, are found in
One such a change in dogs is where they
start challenging other pets in the household.
This is where testosterone plays a big role, as
it is necessary to give the dog confidence. If
the dog is ‘successful’ in the challenge, the
testosterone level increases and the behaviour
will be repeated.
Although hormones can be blamed for the
Animaltalk | August 2017
DOGTALK
behaviour
DID YOU KNOW?
Hazard avoidance behaviour starts at around 12
weeks for German Shepherds, while Labrador
Retrievers only start at about 20 weeks
Hormones help dogs
to develop physically
▲
▲ Testosterone plays a big role
in a dog’s confidence
many changes the pup goes through, genes
and learning experiences that the puppy is
exposed to add to the adult behaviour of a dog.
Therefore, proper training is crucial during the
teenager stage.
Hazard avoidance behaviour
Hazard avoidance behaviour is when a dog
suddenly ‘questions’ certain situations, and
depending on the guidance and exposure
he receives, it can have a lasting effect on
adult behaviour. In most cases, the hazard
avoidance behaviour would have already set
in during the juvenile period. While some
breeds have a much earlier onset, others take
a little longer.
Changes that can be expected during this
stage include:
• Pulling on the leash and lunging
• Hyperactivity
• Jumping up
• Attention-seeking behaviour
• Lack of focus on the handler and being
easily distracted
Animaltalk | August 2017
• General disobedience
• Separation-related behaviour
(barking, destructiveness)
• Inappropriate mounting
who needs guidance towards acceptable
behaviour, which includes bite inhibition,
no bullying, rules in the household and
adaptation to change.
Guidance
The next step
To ensure that you ‘raise’ a well-balanced
pup with proper behaviour skills, it is
of utmost importance that the puppy
attends socialisation classes between
10 and 18 weeks of age. This will also
teach you how to guide your dog in the
correct manner. The development of the
pup’s personality during this stage is very
malleable, and that is why constructive
learning and adaptation experiences will
ensure good emotional development.
Even more so for the ‘strong-willed’ pup
After a good socialisation course, a basic
obedience course will reinforce social
behaviour and training. A reputable
instructor will guide you through the
different behaviour problems and teach
you how to deal with them without
making the situation worse. A ny
suspected behaviour problem should be
addressed through the help of a qualified
animal behav iour practitioner who
understands all the influences impacting
the behaviour.
21
DOGTALK
breed profile
3
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Shutterstock
2
E
BREED PROFIL
The Miniature
Schnauzer
The dog with beauty and brains
4
1
FACT FILE
MINIATURE
SCHNAUZER
Germany
He can adapt to a smaller living space if
taken for daily exercise
12-14 years
Weight: 5-8kg; height: 33-36cm
The Miniature Schnauzer is a ‘people’s
person’ and loves the entire family
Good with other pets provided he received
the correct training and socialisation from
puppyhood
He needs exercise on a regular basis
He needs regular grooming
The Miniature Schnauzer is highly intelligent,
playful and quick to learn new tricks
22
Animaltalk | August 2017
DOGTALK
AWESOME DOGS ALL YEAR ROUND!
breed profile
Look out for more awesome breed profiles in Animaltalk during
the course of 2017. We will focus on the popular breeds that you
know and love, and will introduce you to breeds that you might
not have heard of before. In this issue, we take a look at the
Miniature Schnauzer and the Toy Fox Terrier.
1 | Strong jaw with complete scissor bite
2 | Bushy eyebrows with medium-sized,
dark, oval eyes
3 | V-shaped ears set high and dropping
forward to temple
4 | Moderately long, strong and slightly
arched neck
5 | Harsh, wiry and short coat with dense
undercoat
Cutenessd!
overloa
5
▲ Due to their high
intelligence, these
dogs train fairly easily
>>>
Animaltalk | August 2017
23
DOGTALK
breed profile
Miniature Schnauzers are
known for their massive
moustaches, which need
some grooming
T
he Miniature Schnauzer has bushy
eyebrows, a heavy moustache and
a beard that make him easily
identifiable. Not only does this dog have
the looks, but he is smart too. Add a good
measure of big personality traits, and this
dog will steal the entire family’s heart.
Centre of attention
This dog is playful and alert, and enjoys
the company of people. He is particularly
good with children and loves playing
with them. He is also extremely loyal to
his family. When it comes to other dogs,
the Miniature Schnauzer has no idea how
24
small he is and will take on any dog if
need be.
Originally bred as a ratter, this dog
is energetic and lively, and can be
mischievous. This intelligent breed learns
fast, and can learn just about anything,
especially if it involves jumping – which
is why the Miniature Schnauzer excels in
agility competitions. His easy-learning
nature means he learns obedience fast,
which is something that doesn’t come
naturally to this breed. The Miniature
Schnauzer can be stubborn and take
over the household if not trained from
an early age.
It is crucial to enrol your Miniature
Schnauzer puppy in puppy school at a
reputable training centre that uses kind
methods, and you should learn how to
train him from a young age.
Appearance
Although his coat doesn’t shed much, the
Miniature Schnauzer does need regular
grooming, especially around the face. This
dog has a double coat that consists of a close
undercoat and a wiry, hard outercoat.
He is almost square, with the length of his
body equal to the height of his shoulders. His
neck is moderate, strong and slightly arched.
Animaltalk | August 2017
DID YOU KNOW that the Miniature
Schnauzer is number eight on the Kennel
Union of Southern Africa’s list of most
popular dog breeds? Get your copy of
Dog Directory 2017 to find out which
other breeds feature in the top 10.
▲
Miniature Schnauzers are
highly adaptable and will
entertain you, whether it is
indoors or outdoors. They
need daily exercise to keep
them in shape
Health
Although the Miniature Schnauzer is
generally in good health, typical illness
could include mycobacterium av ium
infection, cataracts and retinal dysplasia.
The Miniature Schnauzer’s personality
is bigger than his appearance. He simply
loves people and won’t think twice about
jumping onto your lap. This dog loves to
be touched and to be in your company.
Always make sure that this lovely dog has
enough toys to occupy him when you are
unable to play with him.
DOGTALK
breed profile
DOGTALK
breed profile
The Toy Fox Terrier is an
energetic, alert dog who
loves playing around
Text: Magda Pieters | Photography: Shutterstock
▲
E
BREED PROFIL
The Toy Fox Terrier
2
Toughest little toy dog
1
3
FACT FILE
4
TOY FOX TERRIER
England
Suitable to smaller spaces
13-14 years
Height: 22-29cm
He loves people and thrives on attention
Good with other pets provided he is properly
socialised
He needs exercise on a regular basis
Minimal grooming required
Energetic, alert and highly intelligent
26
Animaltalk | August 2017
DOGTALK
breed profile
For more information on the breeds
featured in this issue or to find
breeders, see the Animaltalk classified
advertisements, Animaltalk breeders’
gallery or Dog Directory 2017.
1 | The eyes are full, round and somewhat
prominent
2 | Pointed, V-shaped and erect ears
3 | The coat is short, satiny and shiny
4 | The predominant body colour is white, with
or without a few coloured spots
5 | The tail is set high
5
T
he Toy Fox Terrier is a highly intelligent
dog and is also adaptable. These alert
dogs hear every sound, and make
sure that you are aware of it as well. New to
South Africa, the Toy Fox Terrier was recently
registered with the Kennel Union of Southern
Africa (KUSA), and there is currently only
one registered breeder in South Africa.
Always alert
Their huge, erect ears hear every sound and
they are always on alert. They are not yappers,
and when he barks you can be sure that there
is a reason for it. These dogs are adaptable
and can live in a smaller apartment without
any hassle.
Family friend
Their energetic and playful natures make
them children’s best friends. Originally bred
as circus dogs, they are easy to train. The
Toy Fox Terrier also loves playing around,
chasing balls or running around with a toy in
his mouth. Classified as earth dogs, they love
hunting and you will never have a mouse, rat
or snake on your property again. They should
be socialised and trained from a young age.
Toy Fox Terriers don’t need much grooming
– you can brush them to rid them of loose
hair, cut their nails, and clean their teeth
once in a while.
Animaltalk | August 2017
27
DOGTALK
South African Guide-Dogs Association
info@guidedog.org.za or fundraising@guidedog.org.za
011 705 3512/0860 100 922
W
S A Guide-Dogs Association for the Blind
W
WW
WW
WW
WW
CONTACT INFORMATION
W
W
www.guidedog.org.za
Text: Neville Clarence | Photography: Supplied
A GUIDE DOG
IN THE MIST
Guide and Service Dogs changing lives
exuberant, child-like high.
I had last undergone Guide
Dog training at the age of
22, a mere two years after
having lost my eyesight in a
bomb explosion.
New acquaintances
Neville Clarence with Opera
W
ith excitement and anticipation,
I boarded the plane that
was destined for OR Tambo
International Airport in Johannesburg to
begin training with my second Guide
Dog. For much of the 70-minute flight, my
mind fluctuated from a somewhat anxietyfilled and depressive low, to a nervous yet
28
Now, some 34 years later,
I was once again off to
spend two weeks in the
caring hands of the staff at
SA Guide-Dogs Association
for the Blind (GDA). With
some apprehension for what
lay ahead, I collected my
duffel bag from the baggage
carousel and took the elbow
of the ground assistant. Half
a minute later a friendly voice
greeted me, and Mandla
Nxumalo, head of training,
shook my hand. Within a
minute or two all self-doubt
as to whether I was going
to enjoy the next 14 days in
Johannesburg dissipated into
the hot and dry Highveld air.
The training presented by
GDA is split into two phases:
the ‘residential’ phase of two weeks in
Johannesburg and the ‘domicile’ phase at
home. The syllabus has been developed and
perfected over the last 60 years.
At the training centre
The first day and a half of training at
the training centre is spent learning basic
obedience cues and dog communication
techniques. The instructors use this time
to confirm their initial matching based
on the interviews at the time of applying
for a Guide Dog. Matching is a gruelling
process – demanding an accurate assessment
of both the physical and psychological
characteristics of the available dogs and
the prospective owner. Guide Dogs, like
all dogs, vary in size, level of energy and
personality and need to be matched with a
compatible owner.
One of the many emotional highlights
during training is when owner and allocated
dog meet for the first time. Personally,
I was at a loss for words. Even today,
some eight weeks later, whenever I touch
Opera, my beautiful black Labrador/Golden
Retriever cross, I find myself momentarily
overwhelmed. Her ever-friendly and loveable
nature, unsurpassed loyalty and eagerness
take me well beyond my every expectation.
Going for a walk
Yesterday morning was misty and overcast.
I decided to take Opera to Trafalgar Beach.
En route to the boardwalk, she suddenly
hesitated. Fine drizzle formed tiny droplets
on my face and arms, while the two of us
stood silently, listening intently. I heard the
soft sound of small branches being pushed
aside with the shuffle of leaves underfoot.
Opera stared, undoubtedly intrigued by the
bushbuck or waterbuck gracefully strolling
past us. I drew in a deep breath, drank in the
wonderful mustiness of the dense foliage,
and with a somewhat reluctant ‘hup-hup’
we continued on our way.
Animaltalk | August 2017
30
34
The American Shorthair
The reasons you didn’t
know about
BREED PROFILE
WHY DO CATS PURR?
32
DIABETES IN CATS
Know what the symptoms are
For people who share their
homes with cats. These
pages will help you choose
the breed that suits you and
your lifestyle best, make life
with your cat more rewarding
and give you the information
you’ll need to keep your cat
in tip top condition
Cats can be
found sleeping
and playing in
the most bizarre
confined spaces
Why do cats love confined spaces?
Animaltalk | August 2017
Photo: Ana Josefa Cardenas
1 | Naturally, cats like to hide from the rest of the world,
whether it is to sleep, play or just be a predator.
2 | Curling up in confined spaces helps them to save valuable
body heat.
3 | Smaller spaces make cats feel safer.
4 | Due to their spine configuration, they get into tight spaces,
because they can!
5 | Always be mindful of dangerous objects, such as plastic
bags, and rather place such objects out of your cat’s reach.
29
CATSLIFE
breed profile
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Shutterstock
The
AMERICAN
SHORTHAIR
A quiet and calm people-lover
I
f you are looking for a cat who is calm,
quiet and content to be on your lap,
you can seriously consider the American
Shorthair. These cats are generally healthy and
easy-going. Due to their soft nature, these cats
are affectionate to family members and social
with strangers.
Originally from England, these cats found
30
their way to America by ship around 300 years
ago. Sailors took the cats along to get rid of
rodents on the ships, and the cats went ashore
with the early settlers.
Keeping in mind that these cats were bred
to hunt rodents on farms, it is no wonder that
the American Shorthair is such an athletic and
well-built cat, having earned the reputation of
being a hard worker. These days, of course, she
doesn’t need to work hard, and only has to laze
around, pleasing everyone in the family with
her soft-natured existence.
She’s got the look
The American Shorthair has a distinctively
patterned coat that ranges between 60 different
Animaltalk | August 2017
CATSLIFE
breed profile
DID YOU KNOW?
The American Shorthair is
originally from England
1
colours and patterns. While sterling silver with
black markings is the most popular, her coat
can vary in white, black, blue, red, cream and
silver. Due to her short coat, little grooming
is necessary, but she definitely won’t mind
you stroking her ego with love and affection.
These cats are medium to large in build, and
the males are typically larger than the females.
While the males weigh up to 7kg and are about
35cm tall, the females weigh up to 5kg and
grow up to about 30cm.
5
1
2
3
4
5
| Medium to large in size
| Males are larger than females
| Short coat
| More than 60 colour variations
| Athletic build
3
Temperament
Not only are these cats good with the entire
family, but they also get along with cat-friendly
dogs, and will even socialise with strangers.
They are quiet and calm animals with an
adjustable nature, and can be easily trained.
Their life expectancy ranges between 15 and
20 years.
4
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CATSLIFE
health
WHICH CATS ARE MORE SUSCEPTIBLE?
Older cats • Neuters • Males • Obese cats
s
e
t
e
b
Dia
in cats
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Shutterstock
D
We tell you what to look for
iabetes in people is quite common, and we have a good
idea of what to look out for. The question is: do you know
that cats also suffer from diabetes? Even more important:
do you know what the symptoms are? If you suspect that your cat
suffers from diabetes, have a look at the symptoms and consult with
your vet as soon as possible. It could be a life changer for both you
and your beloved cat.
Never assume that you know the health status of your cat. Rather visit
the vet and make certain that your cat is as healthy as she can be. Also,
follow the vet’s instructions – they know what is best for your pet.
TYPES OF DIABETES
There are two types of diabetes:
TYPE 1 DIABETES: the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin.
TYPE 2 DIABETES: the body’s cells don’t respond well to insulin.
IN BOTH INSTANCES your cat will suffer from high blood sugar levels, as
the body can’t process the available glucose.
DIET MANAGEMENT
While underweight cats may need an energy-dense diet, overweight
cats should be placed on a weight-loss programme. In both instances,
a vet should oversee the diet programme and the animal’s progress.
Low-carbohydrate diets have been recommended, as they can assist
to reduce the requirement of insulin.
CHECKLIST
Does your cat show these main signs?
Weight loss
Increased appetite
Increased urination
Straining to pass urine and/or passing bloody urine
associated with a bacterial urinary tract infection
Poor coat
Enlargement of the liver that will be evident when
examined by a vet
32
Animaltalk | August 2017
1
23/06/2017
11:20
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Animaltalk | August 2017
L’Exquisite Snowflake NQ
33
CATSLIFE
behaviour
Text: Saskia Steyn | Photography: Shutterstock
Cats purr when they are
happy, or if they want
your attention
s
t
a
c
o
d
why
purr?
Cats purr for more reasons than you may think
34
Animaltalk | August 2017
CATSLIFE
behaviour
A cat might
even purr
while giving
birth to relieve
her pain
Cats w
becau ho roar can
surrou se the str ’t purr
uct
nd
aren’t ing their la ures
rynxe
stiff e
allow nough to s
purrin
g
attention and to indicate when it is time to
be fed. Sometimes cats even purr to ensure
they receive their food faster.
Healing properties
I
s it not the best feeling when your feline
hops onto your lap and cuddles right
into your arms? When this wonderful
creature starts purring, you feel even
more content thinking that your pet is
happy. Cats purr when they are happy,
when they want your attention and for
multiple other reasons. Not only domestic
cats purr – some wild cats have the same
ability. Among wild cats, purring is used
for communicating and comforting.
Not all of the reasons domestic cats purr
are as pleasing as you think. When cats are
in the presence of another cat, it can purely
be a form of greeting. Cats also purr to attract
the attention of their owners. Studies have
shown that a certain pitch in their purring
is purely to irritate their owners, asking for
Animaltalk | August 2017
Another reason for purring is because it has
healing properties. Cats purr when they
are injured, as it rejuvenates muscles and
ligaments. The purring of a cat has shown
to increase bone regeneration, making it
obvious as to why they purr while injured.
Cats also use the healing property of a purr
when they are sick, usually with infections –
purring helps to get rid of inflammation and
pain. When a cat is frightened, the purring
calms her down and eases respiration, helping
her to think clearly. It can also be used as a
coping mechanism when a cat is stressed.
Almost like humans biting their nails when
stressed, cats prefer purring to keep them calm.
Cats also purr when they give birth to get
rid of the pain associated with bringing
new life into this world. Sadly, cats even
purr while dying. This helps the cat to cope
with what she is going through, be it pain or
sadness. The purring releases endorphins,
helping the cat to keep calm.
But how does a cat purr? A cat uses
her larynx and diaphragm to produce a
purr. Veterinarians suggest that a cat’s purr
starts in the brain and makes it way down
to the laryngeal muscles. This causes the
muscles to vibrate at a frequency of 25 to 150
vibrations per second in wild and domestic
cats, meaning the vocal cords separate when
the feline inhales and exhales, leading to
a purr. Different pitches of the purr could
suggest different moods. The pitch of a purr
to gain attention is slightly higher than a
normal, content purr.
Stress reliever
Not only does the lovely sound of purring
heal the cat, but it also relieves the owner of
stress. Studies show that cats can reduce the
likelihood of a heart attack in cat owners by
an astounding 40%. Our muscles also tend
to heal at a frequency of 25 to 50 vibrations
a second, meaning the purring of your feline
pet could heal your aching muscles. The
purring of a cat also reduces blood pressure,
not only in her own body, but in yours as
well. So, if you are feeling stressed or angry,
petting your cat is not such a bad idea.
Cats are considered to be self-healers.
Researchers have found that cats have less
post-operative complications than dogs. It
was also found that cats have a lower rate
of bone and joint infections, and this can be
contributed to their ability to purr.
35
®
Like I said, these are con
fidential documents
Tracy Korsen
Dreamland is Houdini’s favourite destination
Preena Sivsankar
every
A selfie from
angle (Ben)
Zuzette Buteux
36
ling
oves cudd
o
o
o
l
t
s
u
Ranger j uren Visser
La
Animaltalk | August 2017
ers
that matt
g is all
n
i
g
p
r
e
u
e
b
l
n
s
te
When
ikita Wij
(Wiwiwi) N
Poppy is
ge
ready for tting herself
movi
Kiara Mah e night
oney
Double cuteness, Milo and
Scarlett,
driving around, safe and
sound
Gabriella Schumann
reserved
This table is s
Uy
us
Bert
I’m almo
st ther
e, wait
for me!
Hannes
Halgryn (Puppy Parker)
Send in your picture!
Send your digital pictures to: animaltalk@panorama.co.za with ‘Animaltalk Crazy Critter’ in the subject line.
Please include full contact details. If your picture does not appear in the magazine, look out for it on www.animaltalk.co.za.
Animaltalk | August 2017
37
KIDSTALK
fun facts
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Mientjie Kleinhans and Shutterstock
THINGS ABOUT
DUNG BEETLES
3. Incubating
poop
1. Have your poop and
eat it!
Imagine eating other animals’ poop every day
as your main meal. That is the diet of most
dung beetles. But they are picky eaters – they
don’t eat just any poop. Most dung beetles
prefer poop from herbivores or omnivores. Just
imagine what a feast elephant poop is to dung
beetles – enough for a huge party!
Not only do dung beetles eat
poop, but they also lay their
eggs in poop. Once they have
rolled dung balls to a specific
place, they dig a hole to place
the dung ball in. They then lay
their eggs in the dung ball, and
some beetles dig tunnels beneath
it. Once the larvae hatch, they
feast on the poop supplied by
their parents.
4. Extended family
2. Why eat
poop?
Grass eaters don’t always
digest all the nutrients
from the food they eat,
and the undigested food
ends up in their dung.
Dung beetles dig into this
leftover nutritious poop
and find it healthy and
yummy.
38
There are reportedly over 370,000 species and
subspecies of dung beetles. They are found on
all the continents, except Antarctica. Fossilised
dung balls found by palaeontologists were as
big as tennis balls.
5. Rolling or dwelling?
The way dung beetles handle the poop
determines whether they are rollers, tunnellers
or dwellers. Rollers shape dung into a ball that
they roll away. Tunnellers dig tunnels beneath
the dung pile. Dwellers don’t even bother with
much effort: they simply stay in the pile, lay
their eggs in the pile, and feed from the pile.
Animaltalk | August 2017
U KNOW?
DO
YO
9. World’s strongest animals
Not only are dung beetles considered the strongest of all the insects, but
in relation to their body weight, they are the strongest animals on the
planet. They have to roll balls of dung that can be 50 times their own
weight. A beetle can roll and bury a total of dung that is 250 times its
weight in one night. In one case, a dung beetle has even been seen to
roll a ball that is 1,141 times its own body weight.
WIN A
SUBSCRIPTION
Do you know in which book the
famous mistake was printed that
the dung beetle pushes its dung ball
with its front legs? If you do, email
your name and contact number to
mientjie@panorama.co.za before
31 August 2017 and you could win
one of six annual subscriptions
to Animaltalk.
10. Small packages
6. Fight night
These insects are small, and vary from less than 1mm to 6cm. Dung
beetles are covered in hard shells, which can be metallic in colour. They
have six strong legs that dig into the ground, and have wings that they
can use to fly away.
Some species of dung beetles have horns, almost like
rhinos, at the end of their noses. They use these horns
to fight off other dung beetles who may try to steal
their dung balls.
7. Moonlight guidance
Dung beetles use polarised patterns of moonlight to
know where to go. They need to escape from the dung
pile as soon as they can, so that other beetles don’t
steal their loot. Due to polarised patterns created by
the moonlight, they are able to run in a straight line.
When it is overcast, with no moonlight, they don’t move
in straight lines.
8. Fresh from the animal
Some dung beetles will stay on top of the animal
whose dung they like the most. Once the animal has
done its number two, the dung beetle will move in
quickly, as they like dung to be fresh.
Animaltalk | August 2017
39
interesting
VERY
quest for knowledge
Crested barbet
Photography: Mientjie Kleinhans
the magazine that surprises
Refresh your mind
The
aggre crested b
a
s
away sive bird a rbet is an
other
nd wi
ll c
bir
attac
k rats ds. He wi hase
ll
or kil
l snak even
es.
’
s
d
i
K es
Pag
WORD SEARCH
WE HAVE HIDDEN 15 WORDS IN THE GRID BELOW.
CAN YOU FIND THEM ALL?
MANE • LION • LIONESS • HORNS • BULL • COW
• UDDER • HEN • ROOSTER • PEACOCK • PEAHEN •
GORILLA • FEATHER • COMB • SILVERBACK
A
M
C
L
M
J
D
K
F
P
C
B
42
G J B
A N E
B H L
F N D
I C F
H O R
A W N
I H L
N M D
E A H
H G F
A K C
U
F
M
H
P
N
O
E
C
E
E
A
L
A
I
E
T
S
A
I
S
N
A
B
L
I
O
N
J
K
R
M
G
S
T
R
O
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A
C
O
C
K
J
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H
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N
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B
G
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I
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A
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V
L
U
D
D
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R
P
H
Q
I
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L
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R
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O
S
T
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F
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K
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D
B
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C
D
S
Animaltalk | August 2017
Text: Kriszti Bottyan | Photography: Shutterstock and Mauray Wolff
MATCH THE MALE WITH THE FEMALE
THEN FIND OUT WHAT THE DIFFERENCES ARE?
Male
Female
A cow also
has an udder.
An udder is
where the
cow’s milk
comes out of.
A lion has a
mane while
a lioness
does not.
Rooster tail
feathers
curve.
Roosters are
more colourful than hens.
Roosters have thicker
legs than hens.
Peahens have
brown, grey
or cream
feathers,
which makes
them better at
camouflage.
Depending on
the breed of
cattle, a bull
usually has
horns while a
cow usually
does not.
A lioness is
also much
smaller
than a
male lion.
Peacocks have bright
blue feathers. A
peacock has long tail
feathers. A peacock’s
tail feathers also have
individual ‘eyespots’.
They usually fan out
their tail feathers
during mating season.
Hens have
smaller
combs than
roosters do.
Animaltalk | August 2017
A hen’s spurs
aren’t as sharp
as a rooster’s.
43
KIDSTALK
join the dots
JOIN THE DOTS
AND COLOUR IN THE PICTURE!
44
Animaltalk | August 2017
GIRL POWER!
Do you know what the female of each of
these animals is called?
KIDSTALK
fun with barbie
Write the nam
e
of the female
in the space
provided.
1
PIG
Colour in th
picture of B is
arbie and
her horse!
Male: Boar
Female:
2
SHEEP
Male: Ram
Female:
3
COW
Answer: 1. Sow, 2. Ewe, 3. Cow or Heifer, 4. Mare
Male: Bull
Female:
4
HORSE
Male: Stallion
Female:
Animaltalk | August 2017
For more cool puzzles and games, learn with
Barbie! Get the August issue of Barbie Magazine
at leading retailers now or go to www.coolmags.com.
45
wildthings
DID YOU KNOW?
Squirrels forget where they hide
their food and therefore have been
unwillingly planting many trees
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Shutterstock
The quirky
SQUIRREL
Intelligent and energetic
bushy-tailed rodents
Squirrels can jump
as far as 6m
▲ Ground squirrels are one of the
many species of squirrels found
D
on’t we all just love squirrels?
These rodents have such cute,
big round eyes, bushy tails,
and have featured in many movies as
adorable characters.
In the movie Ice Age, the character Scrat is a
sabre-toothed squirrel forever running after
the evasive acorn. We all feel the sadness
when he loses the acorn yet again, which
makes us wonder – do squirrels do this in
the wild as well, and why do we love these
adorable animals?
Squirrels love eating various nuts, fruits
and seeds, and they also enjoy eating insects
and worms, which make them omnivores.
It is said that certain squirrels hang
mushrooms in trees to dry out to eat later.
They collect food for the winter months,
which they hide in places or bury in the
ground. Unfortunately, for squirrels, they
don’t always remember where they hid all
their food – causing more trees to grow from
the buried seeds than what they intended.
In a way, it is a good thing, because most
squirrels live and nest in trees.
46
▲
Species
There are about 280 species of squirrels
and they can be found all over the world,
except in Australia. These mammals have
big round eyes and pointed ears, with four
front teeth that never stops growing, which
is a great help, as these rodents are always
nibbling. They have excellent reflexes and
are energetic, not sitting still for a moment
and jumping from branch to branch, or
running fast on the ground. Their doublejointed hind legs are longer than their
forelegs, and there are many different
colours of coats to be seen globally.
South Africa has four types of squirrels:
1 | Striped ground squirrel
2 | Cape ground squirrel
3 | Damara ground squirrel
4 | Unstriped ground squirrel
Breeding
While some species of squirrels stay and
nest in trees, others dwell in underground
tunnels. Female squirrels give birth to
litters that range between two and eight
kittens at a time, and can have several
litters a year. Nests are made up from twigs
and leaves and can be up to 30cm wide.
The kittens are born blind, without coats
and teeth, and will suckle up to three
months. In the wild, the average lifespan of
a squirrel ranges between five and 10 years,
if they make it through their first year.
Enemies
These energetic little creatures try to
confuse their enemies when they sense
danger. They might stand dead still for a
short while, and will then almost certainly
climb the nearest tree they can find. On
the ground, the squirrel will run in erratic
patterns to confuse the enemy, which could
be hawks, snakes, owls and jackals.
Animaltalk | August 2017
WILDTHINGS
280
The approximate number of species
2 to 8
The number of babies born at a time
squirrel
7 to 10cm
The length of the African pygmy squirrel
1 to 2
Breeding periods a year
▲
Squirr
intelli els are fas
gent a
t,
n
on the d always
alert
Squirrels nest in
trees, and have
adapted to live in
urban areas
FACT FILE
SQUIRREL
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Sciuridae
DIET: Omnivore
HABITAT: Woodlands, urban and suburban areas
CONSERVATION STATUS: Not listed
Animaltalk | August 2017
Squirrels love nuts,
but don’t always
remember where
they hid them
▲
47
WILDTHINGS
wildcat
DID YOU KNOW?
The caracal is also known as a desert
lynx, and a rooikat in Afrikaans
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Shutterstock
The black tufts
on the ears
are distinctive
identification
marks on
caracals
The nam
e
derived ‘caracal’ is
from a T
word me urkish
an
‘black-e ing
ared’
THE CARACAL
Fast and agile
6 to 19kg About 12 years
the average weight of the caracal
T
he caracal has lynx-like features, but
is genetically not related to the lynx
family. Due to his diet, this agile cat
is hated by many farmers and is often killed
for livestock predation, but at least the cat
has managed to survive and stay off the
endangered list. Being the largest of Africa’s
small cats, the caracal is easily identified, if
you can find this nocturnal animal in the wild.
Identification
The caracal has very distinctive markings.
The first marking is black tufts on the tips of
black ears. There are also black lines above
the eyes, with a black nose with white around
and under the mouth. Like cheetahs, caracals
48
the caracal’s life expectancy
also have a black line from the inside of the
eye to the nose. The black line between the
ears can vary in size, and the furry coat can
vary between tawny-brown and brick-red.
Caracals have a medium build with strong
and lengthy hind legs, enabling them to
jump 3m into the air with exceptional
timing, balance and precision, to catch
prey. Caracals are fast cats and can run up
to 80km/h, which means they can outrun
antelopes and ostriches.
This almost fearless cat will even
attack animals three times his own size.
Sometimes the caracal will hide his prey
in a tree to return to at a later stage – just
like leopards do.
Reproduction
These solitary animals have large territories
that are clearly marked on bushes, trees
and logs. Faeces is also clearly left for other
FACT FILE
CARACAL
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Caracal caracal
DISTRIBUTION: Africa; West, Central and South Asia
DIET: Hares, rodents, birds and larger prey
VOCALISATIONS: Coughing, growling, purring and hissing
CONSERVATION STATUS: Least concern
Animaltalk | August 2017
WILDTHINGS
wildcat
PREY
Caracal prey includes a
variety of animals, from
rodents to small antelope.
Rodents
▲ Caracals are picky eaters, and they
don’t digest hair or feathers
▲ These carnivores prey on anything from birds to small
antelope and will even take on prey larger than themselves
Caracal cubs
are so cute
Birds
Poultry
cats to find, and the males have larger
territories than the females.
After a gestation period of about 80
days, normally a litter of up to six kittens
is born. The mother prepares a den
in an abandoned burrow to keep the
kittens away from other predators and
environmental elements. Although the
kittens start to open their eyes on the
first day, it takes between six and 10 days
to open completely. At about two months
the mother will introduce the kittens to
the outside world, and will look after
them until the age of about one year.
These offspring will reach sexual maturity
between 12 and 16 months.
Animaltalk | August 2017
Senses
Caracals have great hearing due to 29 muscles
that enable them to rotate their
ears in various directions
to locate prey. They are
also very vocal animals,
and will easily meow,
to
growl, purr and hiss.
bility ch
a
’
s
l
It is said that these
aca r to cat
o car
i
cats even purr while
Due t into the a Indian
p
nd
u
a
drinking water –
leap Persian them to
,
y
not that they drink
pre y trained ds
r
t
much water, as their
royal t game bi
n
u
h
prey’s bodily fluids can
be enough to sustain them
Small
antelope
over long periods.
49
WILDTHINGS
wildcat
PREY
Caracal prey includes a
variety of animals, from
rodents to small antelope.
Rodents
▲ Caracals are picky eaters, and they
don’t digest hair or feathers
▲ These carnivores prey on anything from birds to small
antelope and will even take on prey larger than themselves
Caracal cubs
are so cute
Birds
Poultry
cats to find, and the males have larger
territories than the females.
After a gestation period of about 80
days, normally a litter of up to six kittens
is born. The mother prepares a den
in an abandoned burrow to keep the
kittens away from other predators and
environmental elements. Although the
kittens start to open their eyes on the
first day, it takes between six and 10 days
to open completely. At about two months
the mother will introduce the kittens to
the outside world, and will look after
them until the age of about one year.
These offspring will reach sexual maturity
between 12 and 16 months.
Animaltalk | August 2017
Senses
Caracals have great hearing due to 29 muscles
that enable them to rotate their
ears in various directions
to locate prey. They are
also very vocal animals,
and will easily meow,
to
growl, purr and hiss.
bility ch
a
’
s
l
It is said that these
aca r to cat
o car
i
cats even purr while
Due t into the a Indian
p
nd
u
a
drinking water –
leap Persian them to
,
y
not that they drink
pre y trained ds
r
t
much water, as their
royal t game bi
n
u
h
prey’s bodily fluids can
be enough to sustain them
Small
antelope
over long periods.
49
vetiquette
Y
our veterinarian is not just a
doctor, he is a SUPER doctor!
He is an all-in-one doctor of different
disciplines, not to mention the fact that his
patients can’t speak!
Therefore Animaltalk brings you a feature
Text: Gina Hartoog | Photography: Shutterstock
called vetiquette. The concept of vetiquette
refers to the pet and owner and their behaviour
in the vet’s rooms. This feature will contain
feedback from a veterinarian who will comment
and advise with regard to matters that will assist
in making your visit to the vet go smoothly.
Persistent coughing
Understand your pet’s coughs
Does your
pet cough
persistently?
FAST FACTS
There are two common
causes for a cough in
dogs:
1 | Kennel cough is dry and hacking, and
is contagious.
2 | Congestive heart failure is more
common in older small breed dogs,
and at night when lying down.
50
Animaltalk | August 2017
VETIQUETTE
your guide to working with your vet
▲
!
Coughing is common
in cats and dogs
Never give your pet
medicine intended for
humans, unless the vet
approves it.
THE SYMPTOMS
It will help the veterinarian
to have answers to the
following questions:
W
e all know how it feels to get the
flu virus and how irritating the
constant coughing can be. The
same goes for our beloved pets, and there are
various reasons why animals cough. Rather
consult a veterinarian to ensure that your pet
is fine than ignoring a persistent cough. Make
a note of the type of cough, how the cough
sounds and when your pet coughs to assist the
vet in diagnosing accurately.
To understand more about your pet’s
coughing, Animaltalk spoke to Dr Helen
McLean, a veterinarian in private practice.
She explains that a cough is caused by a forceful
expiration against a closed glottis. “The glottis
opens suddenly and the subsequent turbulent
airflow causes the ‘cough’ sound,” she says.
Reasons behind coughing
Inflammation, infection, tumours, foreign
bodies, allergic reactions, trauma or other
mechanical factors can cause an irritation
within the respiratory tract, which causes your
Animaltalk | August 2017
• Does your cat or dog cough up
secretions?
• Is the secretion bloody, purulent,
foamy, watery or thick?
• What does the cough sound like?
• Is the cough dry or hacking?
• Does the cough sound like a goose
honking?
• Is the cough wet and soft?
• At what time does your animal cough?
• Is the cough worse at night?
• Does the cough get worse with exercise
or excitement?
• Does the cough occur when he drinks
or eats?
pet to cough. Coughing serves to protect the
respiratory tract from foreign and harmful
objects.
Dr Helen explains that coughing can also be
a sign of an underlying disease process within
the respiratory tract and/or the surrounding
tissues. “Diseases of the heart, oesophagus,
thoracic cavity, tonsils or sinuses can also lead
to coughing in dogs.”
necessary to do further tests. Your vet may
decide to take x-rays or an ultrasound, have
blood tests done, or even do a bronchoscopy
or lung biopsy.
Consult the vet
Treatment
Dr Helen says: “If an animal is struggling to
breathe, wheezing, standing with an elongated
neck to maximise air intake, exercise intolerant,
depressed, has a lack of appetite, or is feverish,
it is necessary to see the vet as soon as possible.
Even if your pet seems healthy, but the cough
persists for over 24 hours, you should make an
appointment to see the vet.”
Dr Helen says that your pet will be treated
depending on the diagnosis. “Where
eosinophilic pneumonia may be treated with
a prolonged course of cortisone, infectious
pneumonia should definitely not be treated
as such.”
Your vet will be able to provide more
information, and always remember to finish
all the medicine that the vet has prescribed. The
specific medication is prescribed for a reason
and often is only effective in the long run once
the course has been completed.
Diagnosis
Although all the information will help the vet to
diagnose the animal’s condition, it is sometimes
51
vettalk
HAVING PROBLEMS WITH YOUR PET’S HEALTH, BEHAVIOUR,
OR JUST HAVE A QUESTION? Write to our panel of expert vets who will
endeavour to answer as many questions as possible.
Send your questions and a photograph of the ailment, if possible, to:
Animaltalk Vet’s Advice, Private Bag X4, Kyalami, 1684 or
email: animaltalk@panorama.co.za
&
QA
YOUR HEALTH, BEHAVIOUR AND NUTRITION QUESTIONS ANSWERED
NUTRITION, HEALTH AND BEHAVIOUR
SAY
AHHHH!
Sore tooth
Q How can I tell if my rabbit has dental disease, and how can I prevent it?
A One of the most common problems balanced diet that consists of unlimited
seen by veterinarians in pet rabbits is dental
disease. The most valuable key to treatment
and management of dental disease is early
detection. Therefore, regular check-up visits
to the veterinarian is fundamental in keeping
your animal healthy, as well as your keen
observation of your pet. Although it is not
possible to prevent all types of dental disease,
dental problems caused strictly by diet can
be avoided.
Healthy diet
Make sure that your rabbit gets a healthy,
52
grass hay and a good amount and variety
of fresh leafy greens daily. Also offer other
items for the rabbit to chew on, such as
fresh tree branches from trees not sprayed
with chemicals, untreated wood pieces and
unvarnished, unpainted wicker baskets.
Avoid feeding an exclusive diet of commercial
pellets. A healthy diet will ensure adequate
wear of all the teeth.
Once a month have a good look at your
pet’s teeth, although you may only be able
to see the incisors. Report any changes in
shape, colour or texture of the teeth to your
Some indicators of
dental problems
• Loss of appetite (anorexia)
• More selective about the food he eats
• Food dropping out of his mouth
• Excessive tear production (a common
sign when dental disease involves the
upper incisors)
• Nasal discharge
• Salivating excessively
• Tooth grinding
• Bulging of the eye
veterinarian as soon as possible.
Dr Maril Grewar, veterinarian
Animaltalk | August 2017
NUTRITION, HEALTH AND BEHAVIOUR
FOCUS
your questions answered
Healthy signs
Q What colour is a healthy
tongue?
A With the exception of the Chow Chow
and Shar Pei, most dogs have pink tongues,
which make it easy to check for mouth
disorder symptoms.
• Some dogs have speckles on their tongues,
but it is new black spots that you should be
worried about. This could be a sign of
melanoma, a type of cancer.
• Light or white marks can be a reaction to
a toxin or allergen.
Chewing rocks
Q My dog chews rocks that he finds in the garden.
Is there a reason why I should be worried?
A Yes, you should be worried, as this a
very dangerous habit that can potentially
lead to the death of your dog. There are a
few reasons why your dog eats or chews
something that is not food. A deficiency of a
specific nutrient is often to blame, but it can
also be an obsessive compulsive disorder, or
due to curiosity or boredom. Watch your dog
and see if you can pick up any signs. Is he
bored, with nothing to do? Distract your dog
and see if the behaviour continuous.
To know if your dog is chewing rocks, look
out for broken teeth, constipation and/or
vomiting. Rocks can cause an obstruction in
the intestinal tract, which can lead to damage
to the intestines and bleeding, or tearing of
the intestinal wall. This can lead to infection
Animaltalk | August 2017
of the abdomen and subsequently the death
of the animal. Broken teeth and damage to
the gums due to chewing rocks can cause
severe pain and lead to tooth root infection.
Take your dog to the veterinarian as soon as
possible if you suspect that a rock is causing
an obstruction in your dog. Your veterinarian
will then perform x-rays or an ultrasound to
determine if there is an obstruction. If there
is an obstruction, the vet will need to operate
to remove the rock surgically.
To stop your dog from chewing rocks, you
need to ensure that you feed him a balanced
diet. If it is a behavioural problem, a vet or an
animal behaviourist can help you to change
this behaviour.
• A bluish tongue means a shortage of
oxygen. Cyanosis is more noticeable in the
gums and other mucous membranes, and
can be a symptom of a number of underlying
causes, including heart disease, respiratory
disease or exposure to a toxin.
If you are not sure, consult your veterinarian,
but before you rush off, just check if your
dog didn’t chew on a toy or something that
transferred the dye to his tongue.
Small animal veterinarian
Dr Maril Grewar, veterinarian
53
NUTRITION, HEALTH AND BEHAVIOUR
your questions answered
DON’T FORGET!
To deworm
yourself
As loving pet
owners, we often
forget to deworm
ourselves. The
easiest way is
to take broadspectrum
medication to
get rid of all
possible worms.
Time to deworm
Signs to look out for:
Q How do I know my cat has worms?
A In both cats and dogs, there may not
be any clinical signs that they have worms,
while other animals show recognisable
symptoms. Different types of worms
show different signs of ‘worm burden’ or
verminosis, and the animal’s age, immune
status and the severity of the parasite load
also have an influence on the symptoms.
Look at your pet’s faeces and the fur around
the anus for visible worms. It is not always
visible with the naked eye.
The four major worm groups that affect
dogs and cats are roundworm, tapeworm,
whipworm and hookworm.
Roundworms are long and look like
spaghetti, and are the easiest to see in
the stool.
54
Tapeworms are passed in segments in
the faeces and look like grains of rice.
These worms often stick to the fur around
the anus.
Whipworms are smaller, thin at the one
end and thick at the other end.
Hookworms are some of the more
dangerous worms and not easily identified.
They are tiny, usually around 2cm long and
less than 0.5mm wide.
Worm eggs can be passed in the faeces
and survive for long periods of time in the
environment. It is strongly recommended
that you pick up and discard the faeces,
because it can infest another animal who
picks it up.
Prevention is better than cure, therefore
• Scooting
• Biting or licking around the anal area
• Diarrhoea with/without blood
• Faeces covered in mucus
• Weight loss
• Dull coat
• Unthrifty pups/kittens who don’t put
on weight
• Inappetence/extreme hunger
• Weakness and lethargy
• Vomiting (sometimes worms can
be seen)
• Coughing
• Pneumonia
• Itchy skin rashes
deworm adult cats and dogs at least four
times a year. Your veterinarian will give
you the best treatment options for your pet.
Dr Helen McLean, veterinarian
Animaltalk | August 2017
NUTRITION, HEALTH AND BEHAVIOUR
FOCUS
your questions answered
Healthy diet
Q What should I keep in mind when choosing a healthy diet for my parrot?
A There are a couple of dos and don’ts when
it comes to feeding your parrot a healthy
diet. Different breeds of parrot have different
dietary needs, and therefore it is important
to research or ask a veterinarian.
Don’ts
The following is a list of what you NEVER
should feed your parrot:
• Alcohol
• Coffee
• Tea
• Chocolate
• Avocado
• Lettuce
• Rhubarb
• Salty foods
• Seeds only
Dos
Feed your parrot twice a day to ensure
the food is always fresh. Also, include the
following:
• Seeds and nuts should make up 15% of the
total diet
• Fresh fruit
• Raw and cooked vegetables
• Fruit and vegetables make up 10 to 15% of
the daily intake
• Cooked parrot dinner made up of corn,
beans, lentils and rice
• Scientifically formulated, good-quality
pelleted diets that are nutritionally complete
• Vitamin and mineral supplement
Small animal veterinarian
Baby teeth
Q When do puppies and kittens lose their baby teeth, and how do I deal with it?
A In general, puppies and kittens start to
lose their baby teeth, also referred to as milk
teeth, from the age of about three months.
This varies with each individual animal,
and the period ends by the time the puppy
or kitten is six to nine months old. This is
the time when puppies and kittens seek
Animaltalk | August 2017
anything they can to chew on to possibly reduce
the discomfort they feel during the teething
process – anything from shoes, sticks and toys
to whatever else they can find to chew. It may
also be part of their exploration process.
You may find a baby tooth on the carpet, but
generally, the teeth are swallowed, making it
difficult to find. After loss of the baby teeth,
your puppy or kitten’s gums should heal
quickly. Once the adult teeth appear, it is time
to start taking care of those teeth. Getting pets
used to a dental care routine while young is
the best way to ensure dental health later on.
Small animal veterinarian
55
PETTALK
careers with animals
R EE R S
A
C
▲
LS
W
I
TH
Text: Compiled by Wietske Lentink | Photography: Shannon Sweetman
Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese health
technique to treat various conditions
ANIM
A
nary
Veteri ted
y
r
a
t
n
e
ura
mplem was inaug ges
o
C
e
Th
ra
oup
encou
ine Gr
d
Medic 2000, and training an
y
l
f
u
o
ve
in J tandard
egrati
t
n
i
s
e
h
h
a hig ency in t
t
nimals
compe atment of a
tre
A day in the life of a
holistic veterinarian
acupuncturist
Is this the job for you?
F
irst of all a love for animals, and then the
desire to heal them, are the two crucial
characteristics a holistic veterinarian
acupuncturist requires. A holistic veterinarian
acupuncturist will carefully place very fine
needles on certain points on an animal’s body
to treat specific problems. It is a study that has
56
been perfected over many years.
The needles stimulate specific energy points
to promote healing of various disorders. The
needles are very fine and often not felt by the
animal, but only a specialist can perform this
delicate process.
Dr May Maritz is a doctor at Pet Wellness
Worx who moves between her veterinary
practice where she does a combination of
physiotherapy and normal consultation, and
Pet Wellness Worx. Her life’s mission is to treat
pets so that they are able to live as pain free
as possible and have restored function after
major operations.
Animaltalk | August 2017
PETTALK
careers with animals
Dr May Maritz also
does physiotherapy
▲
Dr May Maritz diagnoses medical
and musculoskeletal problems
▲
What are your qualifications and what
qualities do you need to be great at this job?
I obtained a Bachelor of Veterinary Science
(BVSc) degree at the University of Pretoria
and trained at Onderstepoort and with the
Complementary Veterinary Medicine Group.
Biology, mathematics and science are the
three fundamental subjects required to study
in this field.
You can expect to work different hours, but
usually we work about eight hours a day,
depending on the emergencies that take
place, and remuneration is dependent on
years of experience.
Contrary to belief, you need to be a people’s
person, compassionate towards the needs of
both people and animals.
What does your job entail?
Typically, I diagnose conditions, both medical
and musculoskeletal problems, and discuss
the animal’s diet and general wellbeing
with the owner. I also have to deal with pain
management and surgery, which mostly
involves spaying and neutering.
What is the best part of the job?
The highlight of any day is when a dog is
unable to walk into the practice rooms for
some or other reason, and he is able to walk
out after I treated him. The delight is when
the patient is happy, because then the owner
is also happy.
Animaltalk | August 2017
What is the most challenging part of
the job?
The worst part of my job is when I am
unable to treat an animal, and I have to
euthanise him, or if we lose a patient.
On the other hand, diagnosing soft
tissue injuries and treating it accordingly
drives me.
Tell us more about yourself.
I am a compassionate and passionate animal
lover. I love the outdoors and hiking with
my dogs. I love my family, I own two dogs
and two cats, and my dog, Boss, makes me
laugh. I live by the quote: “It is what it is,
fake it till you make it.”
What is the best advice that you
have received?
Treat your client like you would like to be
treated if that was your pet being seen, and
this is what I always keep in mind.
57
BIRDCHIRP
Rose-ringed parakeet
Text: Mientjie Kleinhans | Photography: Shutterstock
Rose-ringed
parakeets can say
up to 250 words
The rose
parakee ringed
t is a sm
parrot a
a
nd is orig ll
in
a
lly
green in
colour
a
y
l
i
m
a
f
bird
dly
Intellectual and frien
58
Animaltalk | August 2017
BIRDCHIRP
Rose-ringed parakeet
DID YOU KNOW?
Only the male parakeet has
a ring around the neck
R
ose-ringed parakeets are highly
intelligent birds who make ideal
pets. They are also social birds in
that they don’t only bond with one person.
They do require daily human interaction
and toys that will stimulate them mentally,
like solving puzzles in exchange for a treat.
Many years ago, the people of India kept
these birds as pets, and it was considered
a status symbol to have them. The birds’
popularity grew, and later on they were
bred by the Greeks.
These birds can also
be blue or yellow
Taking care of your bird
Rose-ringed parakeets are naturally social
animals who flocked together in the wild.
Therefore, they bond well with people
from a very young age. In fact, the younger
the bird, the better he will adapt to his
new family.
It is important to spend a lot of time with
these birds, feeding them, teaching them
new tricks, and challenging their minds
with various puzzle games. These smart
birds are capable of performing a variety of
tricks. Although it does take some patience
to train them, you will be rewarded with
a vocal bird. Whatever you do, just don’t
leave these birds to their own devices, as
they can become nippy and unfriendly.
Rose-ringed parakeets have long tails
and therefore need a large cage, and the
longer the bird spends in the cage, the
larger the cage needs to be. Remember
that the cage will also have to house many
toys and perches placed all over. Ideally,
the cage should be bigger than 60cm wide,
45cm deep and 90cm high.
These birds are avid chewers, and it is
advisable to supply the bird with various
chewable wood toys that he can chew to
his heart’s content. Be sure to sterilise
these toys often, and when buying the
toys, ensure that they are safe to chew.
They also love toys they can climb on,
such as ladders and swings, and toys
that they can push around in the cage. It
goes without saying that it is advisable
to keep the cage, food and water bowls
and toys clean.
Animaltalk | August 2017
FACTS
Food and water
In the wild, rose-ringed parakeets stay
in areas with adequate supplies of nuts,
seeds and fruit, and they love wheat,
maize, coffee beans, dates, figs and
guavas. Therefore, these birds need a
variety of these in their food bowl. They
should receive a nutritionally balanced
diet that includes pellets, seeds, fruit and
vegetables. Familiarise yourself with the
content of the pellets and supplement your
bird’s diet accordingly.
As with other birds, make sure that these
birds have fresh drinking water that is
placed away from perches. They also need
shallow bowls with clean water to bathe in.
So, if you don’t have enough time in a
day to spend with these birds, then rather
consider another type of bird or pet. These
Rose-ringed parakeet
1 | They are also known as ring-necked
parakeets.
2 | Rose-ringed parakeets are social birds
and naturally bond with most members
of the family.
3 | These parakeets are highly intelligent
and need a lot of mental stimulation.
They need intellectual toys that will
keep them occupied.
4 | They need daily human attention.
5 | It is easier to bond with these birds
before they reach maturity.
6 | Because these birds are so intelligent,
they can learn up to 250 words.
birds can be very loud with shrill screams
– do keep that in mind. And if you have
a lot of patience, then you can train this
lovely bird into an adorable pet.
59
welfare
SHELTER PROFILE
Text and photography: Supplied
The UWC Feral
Cat Project
Looking after feral cats on campus
Old man (10- to 12-year-old feral)
called Chong – lives at Eduardo
Dos Santos residence at UWC
O
ne day, 20 years ago, staff at the
University of the Western Cape (UWC)
started the TUFCAT programme to
take care of the feral cats on the 160-hectare
property. Despite many setbacks the programme
survived, and today the programme also offers
advice to other companies and institutions that
need information on feral cats.
What does your organisation aim to do?
The overall aim and objective of the project is to
change commonly held, negative perceptions
about cats through education and research.
Our immediate goal, though, is to continue
60
controlling population numbers and provide
care for our resident feral cats. However, we
also assist the UWC cleaning and security staff
with their pets, such as sterilisations, food and
veterinary support.
In addition, we operate the small Home for Life
sanctuary for ex-ferals and other cats and dogs
on a smallholding near Villiersdorp – a fruitfarming region in the Western Cape. As part of
our outreach we arrange spay days and assist
farmworkers in the area with free sterilisations,
pet food and kennels, and we have recently
started the Unchain Campaign to liberate dogs
who spend their entire lives on short chains
out in the elements. We provide properly fitting
collars, leashes for them to be walked, as well as
fencing to enable this.
The UWC Feral Cat Project aims to accomplish
the following:
• Our immediate goal is to control population
numbers (by sterilisation) and to provide food
and veterinary care for the resident feral cat
colonies at UWC. We aim for zero population
growth within colonies.
• Educate UWC students, staff and the public
about the important and often supportive roles
played by cats in human societies throughout
history.
• Counter misinformation about cats in general
and feral cats in particular.
• Demonstrate the efficiency of feral cats as
rodent catchers.
• Instil respect and compassion for animals,
nature and the environment and cultivate a
‘culture of caring’ on our campus.
• Enhance the ethical status of animals and
enhance their welfare through academic
research, teaching and publication.
• Actively fundraise and generate income by
selling second-hand books and magazines,
thereby helping to promote a ‘culture of reading’
on campus.
• Further enhance the profile of UWC as a
model for humane cat control and demonstrate
the compatibility between human and animal
welfare issues.
• Offer advice where possible and draw on
campus-based expertise to conduct research
and develop resource materials, so that this
information can be shared and made available
to the broader community.
• Provide permanent sanctuary for unwanted
cats and dogs.
• Do outreach work and offer pet services and
support for indigent farmworkers.
What are the daily tasks that keep
you busy?
A significant amount of time is spent on admin;
emails; phoning for fundraising and trying to
obtain food and other donations; following
up on complaints, queries and requests for
information; keeping records; and writing
reports and newsletters.
Animaltalk | August 2017
WELFARE
▲
#AnimaltalkCares
A former UWC feral dumped
outside the SAIAMC building and
taken to the TUFCAT sanctuary
I used to do all the feeding (along with my
partner), but it took up too much time, so four
years ago I took the plunge and hired a UWC
cleaner to do this. He feeds the cats (estimated
180 – spread out in 30 colonies over 160 hectares)
both on campus and in the residences.
Other tasks include collecting donated food
and other goods for resale (especially books),
having book sales on campus, arranging spay
days (this includes collecting and delivering
all the animals back home again afterwards)
in Villiersdorp, dropping off food and other
supplies on various farms, and hosting visitors to
both campus and the sanctuary. The sanctuary
animals – 15 dogs and 45 cats – also need to be
fed and taken care of.
WW
Animaltalk | August 2017
W
Who are the people behind the scenes – do
you have full-time staff or volunteers?
• Sharyn Spicer, who founded TUFCAT in 1997.
Works full-time as a sociology lecturer at UWC.
• Janine Nepgen helps both at UWC and in
Villiersdorp.
• Frank Davids, employed as a cleaner at UWC
since 1976, works after hours as a feeder for the
feral cats. He also ensures they have fresh water
daily, that their shelters and living areas are kept
clean, and he reports any dumped, sick or injured
cats and dogs to us.
• Magrieta Oktober, employed at the TUFCAT
sanctuary. Magrieta also works as our ‘person on
the ground’ and informs us about any animals
needing to be spayed or requiring any other form
of assistance on the farms.
We are actively trying to recruit student
volunteers this year to assist in our proposed
research and annual cat audit and to work in our
recently acquired campus bookshop.
What can the Animaltalk reader do to
assist you?
• Readers can donate cash, cat food, unwanted
books or any goods that can be sold as well
as dog collars, fencing, old gates and bedding
for the sanctuary animals, such as duvets and
cushions.
• Help us organise events, fundraisers, open
days, kitten parties, and distribute and collect
donation tins in your area.
• Share ideas of ways in which we can celebrate
our 20th birthday.
WW
FOR MORE INFORMATION
W
www.tufcat.co.za
www.facebook.com/
W
TUFCAT-185864518133590/
082 433 0932
W
WW
WW
WW
What are the highlights of working on this
project?
Our major achievements and highlights include
the following:
• Being officially recognised as the only welfare
allowed to humanely manage the feral cat
population on the UWC campus.
• UWC receiving the Green Campus award
twice (2012 and 2013) – one of the six pillars of
sound environmental management that was
considered included the use of feral cats rather
than toxins to keep the campus free of rats.
• Being used as an example/model of successful
feral cat management and thus being emulated
by other institutions.
• At the end of last year, Ashrick Alexander,
a UWC Honours student (registered in the
Department of Geography, Environment and
Tourism), used TUFCAT as the subject for his
2016 Honours thesis titled Transgressing the
Boundaries of Social Exclusion: Reflecting on the
Inclusion of the Feral Cat at the University of the
Western Cape. The study found that the project
is seen as a success and positive views about
the feral cats are increasingly widespread. Even
the adjacent nature reserve had changed its
views about the cats and no longer saw them
as a threat to the wildlife. Most interestingly,
the UWC students interviewed indicated that
they were keen to become more involved with
caring for the animals who share their campus.
Several mentioned that there needed to be more
awareness on campus. We are thus focusing
on doing this as part of our 20th birthday
celebrations.
W
sspicer@uwc.ac.za or info@tufcat.co.za
The UWC Feral Cat Project, Nedbank, account
number: 2011093155, branch code: 101109
(FNB clients may need to add two zeros at the
end of this code)
www.animaltalk.co.za
If you would like to find
out more about various
fundraisers in your area,
where to adopt or how you
can get involved with your
local animal shelter, visit
http://animaltalk.co.za.
Animaltalk partners with and supports
these welfare organisations through
fundraising and promotional efforts.
SPCA
Tel: 011 907 3590/1/2/3 Fax: 011 907 4013
South African Veterinary Association
Tel: 012 346 1150 Fax: 012 346 2929
Domestic Animal Rescue Group
Tel: 021 790 0383 021 790 2050
PDSA
People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals
Tel: 011 726 6100 Fax: 011 726 8513
South African Guide-Dogs Association
Tel: 011 705 3512
Animals in Distress
Tel: 011 466 0261 Fax: 011 466 0262
Ark Animal Centre Cell: 082 334 7596 Email: info@
arkanimalcentre.co.za Website: www.arkanimalcentre.co.za Blog: www.arkanimalcentre.wordpress.com
Cart Horse Protection Association
Tel: 021 535 3435
Animal Anti-Cruelty League
Tel: 011 435 0672 Fax: 011 435 0693
The Pet Food Institute of Southern Africa
Tel: 033 343 2874 Fax: 033 343 4669
These organisations do not accept any liability whatsoever
with regard to any statement, fact, advertisement or
recommendation made in this magazine and do not
necessarily agree with the viewpoints expressed by
contributors to Animaltalk.
61
TOPDOG
agility
Text: Carolyn Chelchinskey | Photography: Tamryn White Photography
2017 KUSA Nationals
T
he KUSA Nationals took place at the 2017 KUSA Classic
Weekend on 26, 27 and 28 May at Durban Shongweni Club,
Hillcrest, and the sponsor for the agility and dog jumping was
WUMA Dog Food.
For the disciplines of agility and dog jumping, in order to compete
in the KUSA Nationals, a dog must have won at least one Qualifying
Certificate (QC) per discipline anytime previously. There are three
disciplines: contact agility, non-contact agility and dog jumping.
A dog wins a QC by winning a class at a championship show with
a clear round in the highest-level grades, in his respective height
category. By winning any of the three disciplines at Nationals,
the dog gains the title, which can be included on the pedigree
registration certificate.
THE 2017 KUSA
NATIONALS WINNERS
WERE:
Contact agility
LARGE: Pat Tutton and Speedy
MEDIUM: Ansie Minnaar and Jack
SMALL: Samantha Wainwright and Brandi
Non-contact agility
LARGE: Pat Tutton and Speedy
MEDIUM: Taryn Murphy and R-Tic
SMALL: Ninette Smith and Swish
TOP CRUFTS QUALIFIER: Pat Tutton
Dog jumping
LARGE -GRADE 1: Yolan Friedmann and Diva
MEDIUM - GRADE 5: Susan Kleijnhans and Lexi
SMALL - GRADE 3: Samantha Wainwright
and Brandi
1
2
3
4
6
5
1 | Volt (merle Sheltie) – handler Alett Reed
2 | N-V (Mini Aussie) – handler Taryn Murphy
3 | Diva (Belgian Malinois) – handler Yolan Friedmann
4 | R-Tic (Mini Aussie) – handler Taryn Murphy
5 | Bowie (Kooikerhondje) – handler Annaret Meintjes
6 | Achilles (Staffie) – handler Christine Broadbent
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62
www.bravecto.co.za
Animaltalk | August 2017
This set of points shows you who the current agility front runners in South Africa are
in the small, medium, large and junior handler categories. Agility will be a permanent
category in the Animaltalk Top Dog Awards going forward and participants can look
forward to a competitive points ranking, keeping them at their most competitive levels.
For more agility updates head to animaltalk.co.za.
RANK
DOG
HANDLER
PROVINCE
HEIGHT
AGILITY
POINTS
NON CONTACT
POINTS
TOTAL
1
Milo
R. Hall
Gauteng
Large
267,86
272,66
540,52
2
Bright
N. Pretorius
Gauteng
Large
194,34
196,56
390,9
3
Sassy
T. Lander
Gauteng
Large
185,00
192,11
377,11
4
China
T. Murphy
KwaZulu-Natal
Large
176,21
196,44
372,65
5
Kwik
R. Wright
Gauteng
Large
176,50
192,84
369,34
6
Speedy
P. Tutton
Gauteng
Large
187,49
167,84
355,33
7
Charm
J. Yates
Gauteng
Large
169,65
180,15
349,8
8
Esprit
T. Lander
Gauteng
Large
163,95
182,98
346,93
320,81
9
Jet
A. Meintjes
Western Province
Large
165,42
155,39
10
Akira
L. van der Merwe
Western Province
Large
165,48
150,16
315,64
11
Codie
N. Pretorius
Gauteng
Large
150,16
151,49
301,65
12
Chrisri Blu
B. Clark
SC
Large
143,44
124,51
267,95
13
Bella
W. Arneil
Gauteng
Large
110,59
147,29
257,88
14
Jag
J. Van Der Nest
Gauteng
Large
126,73
121,16
247,89
15
Stardust
R. Prinsloo
Gauteng
Large
131,76
110,71
242,47
236,42
16
Pixi
K. White
KwaZulu-Natal
Large
104,73
131,69
17
Epic
B. van Dyk
Gauteng
Large
76,77
136,15
212,92
18
Rocket
V. Taylor
Western Province
Large
78,22
119,86
198,08
19
Rage
W. Arneil
Gauteng
Large
85,83
110,2
196,03
20
Jess
P. Tutton
Gauteng
Large
53,13
119,52
172,65
RANK
DOG
HANDLER
PROVINCE
HEIGHT
AGILITY
POINTS
NON CONTACT
POINTS
TOTAL
1
T
R. Hall
Gauteng
Medium
228,42
227,48
455,90
2
Sumo
R. Compaan
Western Province
Medium
187,55
166,51
354,06
3
Nikki
L. Plekker
Gauteng
Medium
104,80
198,92
303,72
4
Lollie
G. Grohovaz
Gauteng
Medium
115,96
102,60
218,56
5
R-The
L. King
Eastern Province
Medium
99,04
111,97
211,01
6
Lexi
S. Kleijnhans
Gauteng
Medium
66,15
141,20
207,35
7
Bowie
A. Meintjes
Western Province
Medium
103,82
97,05
200,87
8
R-Tic
T. Murphy
KwaZulu-Natal
Medium
87,43
86,61
174,04
9
Nav-ah
C. Segal
Gauteng
Medium
62,81
79,60
142,41
10
Jack
A. Minnaar
Western Province
Medium
43,33
78,31
121,64
RANK
DOG
HANDLER
PROVINCE
HEIGHT
AGILITY
POINTS
NON CONTACT
POINTS
TOTAL
1
Q
N. Shortland
EP
Small
161,51
204,48
365,99
2
Kimberley
G. Killian
GAU
Small
143,42
162,18
305,60
3
Noodle
N. Perold
EP
Small
91,67
127,53
219,20
4
Rossi
G. Killian
GAU
Small
75,78
141,24
217,02
5
Brandi
S. Wainwright
EP
Small
61,00
125,90
186,90
6
Pop Corn
N. Perold
EP
Small
50,21
109,35
159,56
7
Zoom
K. Taylor
WP
Small
51,14
101,23
152,37
110,56
8
Kylie
G. Frey
KZN
Small
36,00
74,56
9
Sonic
H. Jordaan
WP
Small
35,7
62,59
98,29
10
Zoom
V. Taylor
WP
Small
35,91
52,14
88,05
RANK
DOG
HANDLER
PROVINCE
HEIGHT
AGILITY
POINTS
NON CONTACT
POINTS
TOTAL
1
Pixie
K. White
KZN
Large
84,37
172,61
256,98
2
Gunner
B. Engelbrecht
KZN
Small
99,63
102,37
202,00
3
Vite
K. Taylor
WP
Large
56,02
96,09
152,11
4
Slick
R. Shephard
EP
Large
37,34
32,98
70,32
Animaltalk | August 2017
FUN DAY FOR ALL
The Gauteng members of the South
African agility team competing at
the Agility World Champs in Czech
Republic will be holding a dog agility
fun day at Kyalami Equestrian Park.
The event is to raise funds to go towards
some of the team expenses.
All are welcome to attend and support,
but do note that dogs should be on lead
when not participating.
Events will include beginners’ and
advanced tunnelling, jumping, agility
and recall. There will be various
categories based on skill level and the
dogs’ height.
For more information, contact rob.
hall@lantic.net.
Photography: Shannen Jacoby
JUNIOR
HANDLER
SMALL
MEDIUM
LARGE
As at 30 June
63
TOPDOG
2017
100 ratings
The Animaltalk Top Dog 100 Ratings are hugely popular with
dog show enthusiasts, and the coveted title of Top Dog is highly
sought after. The winners will, as usual, be honoured at the
Top Dog function which will be held in early 2018.
As always, the Top Dog, Top Bitch, Top SA Bred Dog and the
Group winners will all be individually recognised.
Check out the latest Top 100
results and show events online at
www.animaltalk.co.za
Queries should be addressed to
Carol Immelman by fax 086 671 9956 or
email cruella@iafrica.com
BOLD print indicates group leaders
RED indicates imported dogs
Rnk Pts NAME
1
*2
*3
*4
*5
6
7
*8
9
10
11
*12
*13
14
*15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
*24
*25
*25
25
*28
28
*30
*31
32
*33
*34
35
*36
*37
38
39
40
41
*41
43
*44
*45
46
47
47
49
49
51
64
2855
2461
2202
2163
1706
1531
809
695
621
605
561
556
532
482
477
389
379
377
370
341
312
273
265
260
254
254
254
241
241
235
230
223
222
213
211
200
198
194
191
184
180
180
179
176
172
171
170
170
169
169
168
WHITE SQUALL SEASYDE OLIVERO
GENTLY BORN HOT KISS
WINDS OF FORTUNE VALENTINA’S MAGIC
ELAMIR CLASSIC DESIGN AT FLEETWIND
SARANGRAVE UR THRONE AWAITS OF MORNINGHUNT
MYSTICLIGHT LOVE ME FOREVER
EUKLEIA AURORA SPARKLE OF SIVHANA
SYMARUN’S CAN’T BUY ME LOVE
CROCVALLEY NEW EDITION OF BRORO
KELEV MORNING STAR
TRACESTAR RING LEADER
STAFFYFRIENDS FANTASMA NEGRO DE SHARRAZAR
CANYONLANDS MONKEY BUSINESS OF NORTHWIND
MORNINGHUNT ROYAL SECRET
BANSTOCK G I JOE OF LA GRATITUDE
KONPARA ALTA MODA OF CAPREESE
GONDWANA DELAIRE SUNRISE
ASHVALE BARISTA OF DU VENTOUX
VENRON MONARCH OT GLEN
KAMCHATKA A GOLDEN STAR
CHAVERAINE KALINKA
FLEETWOOD TICKET TO RIDE
DONNEHAUS CABOODLE
CARO VALENTINO OF DANIEN
BUBBLETON POLICY OF TRUTH AT MERRYMEAD
ASHLAREN AMAZING GRACE AT GATEBEAUTIFUL
CELTICLIGHT ASLAN CRUSADER OF TODDINGTON
BELLEFLEET DON’T PASS ME BY
KEYSTONE SKYDANCE
THE BEST MODELS TATAI OF XAMNER
UN LOVE STORY VON SHINBASHI OF KAIKOURA
TANJO JEDI KNIGHT
RIPICCA D’AMORE BREAK THE RULES OF TANGLEHOOD
PIPER PAUL VON SHINBASHI
COTTONCOVE DANCE WITH ME
HARADWATER GET UP STAND UP
KOKOMO ANYTHING GOES OF ARYLLMAR
ANNAN BURNING AMBITION
DALLMALLI DUCKS IN A ROW
MOCHAVULIN CATCHA STAR OF CRANIGGAN
NORTHWIND TICKET TO RIDE
JEUNE-CHAMP D’OR DU CLOS DES HUREAUX OF MERVANDER
SCARAMOUCHE THE OUTLAW
KASAAN’S RACE ‘N TO T’FORTUNE
KETCHER TRAIV KRASH
DALLMALLI GOTTA HAND IT TO LABYRINTH
DREAMRIDGE MYSTICAL HOLLY
TULLAMORE AUGUST RUSH
VON GISERO HEIDI
AZULAY AZAWAKH
TODDINGTON DONEGAN OF BALLYASKETILL
sponsored by:
As at 27 April 2017
BREED
POINTER
GIANT SCHNZR
MALTESE
SALUKI
BEAGLE
AUST SHEP
STAFFORD
SHIH TZU
SCOTTIE
STAFFORD
POMERANIAN
STAFFORD
SIBERIAN
BEAGLE
BULLMASTIFF
AFGHAN
RIDGEBACK
BEARDIE
BORDER
SIBERIAN
PEM CORGI
CRESTED
DOBERMANN
SPINONE
PULI
WEIMARANER
WOLFHOUND
MIN POODLE
MIN SCHNAUZER
YORKIE
CRESTED
ENGLISH SPRINGER
BEARDED COLLIE
CRESTED
WHIPPET
COCKER
LHASA APSO
SAMOYED
DALMATIAN
GOLDEN
SIBERIAN
BULLDOG
AFGHAN
MALAMUTE
WELSH TERRIER
DALMATIAN
HAVANESE
GSP
ST BERNARD
AZAWAKH
WOLFHOUND
Rnk Pts NAME
52
*53
54
55
55
*57
*58
*59
60
61
62
63
64
*65
66
67
*68
69
70
*71
71
73
74
74
74
77
78
79
80
81
*81
*81
84
*84
86
87
87
89
89
91
92
92
94
94
96
96
98
*99
100
100
167
157
149
143
143
139
135
134
132
130
126
124
120
116
115
113
109
106
105
104
104
103
102
102
102
101
100
98
97
95
95
95
93
93
88
87
87
86
86
83
82
82
81
81
80
80
79
78
77
77
DAMARANLOR DREAM DANCER OF MONTETI
HUFFISH SHUT UP AND DANCE WITH DOTCOM
STELIZANE DANIEL CRAIG
DUNSTARS DIAMONDS N DUST OF CAPREESE
HAZELMERE LORD FINLEY
SEASYDE SUNSET STRIP
PBJ’S TALK DIRTY TO ME OF ALRIC
HERONSWAY SILVER DOLLAR OF EVERLEIGH
DENOVA NO REGRETS
XANTAH DIXIE RHYTHM
SUMMERSIM MAN IN BLACK
RAVILAIS THE PEWTER MOTH
BRAGANZA BEFORE MIDNIGHT
FURST BISMARCK BLUE OF BRUKKAROS
STORMWAVE GILES OF TIDALWAVES
CALMADY PLAY IT AGAIN SAM
BLACK MAJESTY GO LOONEY TUNES OF BALLYASKETILL
KIMEKAI SON OF SAMURI
QUILLQUEST MOWGLI
FIN DE SIECLE FANDANGO POLAND
JESRAE GAME OF CHANCE
MONTETI TOUCH OF ARIEL
TOULOUSE OF MERVANDER
CHADAMYLE CALIFORNIA CRUZ
LIFRE MARKUS OF WILMERON
GLENGARRIF NAINSI
CALMADY THE WIZARD OF SEAWIND
NONSUCH MEET JOE BLACK AT BELLSTONE
KEYSTONE ANDANTE DANTE
MANITOKA APHRODITE
CIROC OF MALABO APD AT GONDWANA
YAW ADYUBA ROC A FELLA FOR GONDWANA
FAIRMOOR PIPING HOT
CASMIRO SYKSTUS OF ROWANIA
TRACESTAR ZORRO OF DAINTARANIANS
AVRONDEL WILD HORSES
LARUMO DUKE MASTER OF SHAKINAT
RAVILAIS PATRICIA’S MOTH
HAZELMERE LADY BRIDGET
XANTAH DANCE AWAY
ERINDEL MERLIN OF BATAIREACHT
RAMINARTUS SALTAN OF SWAT
MIDNIGHTDREAM THRILL ‘F VICTORY
NORXCANE BELLATRIX FREAK
BALLYLANE ADRIADNE OF DANLYN
MARCONN BLACK JAGUAR
MIDNIGHTDREAM BEST BEST
PITLOCHRY’S UNCLE STING OF DUROSS
STILYSH NEXT TOP MODEL
THUNDARIDE FIRE AND ICE OF SENJIBA
BREED
PHARAOH
STD POODLE
STD POODLE
SHIH TZU
PEM CORGI
POINTER
AM COCKER
PEM CORGI
AM COCKER
POMERANIAN
PUG
IG
MIN POODLE
GREAT DANE
BASSET HOUND
PEKINGESE
PBGV
CHOW CHOW
GOLDEN
GIANT SCHNZR
WHIPPET
MS DACHS
BULLDOG
LH DACHS
BULL TERRIER
WOLFHOUND
PEKINGESE
SKYE TERRIER
MIN SCHNZR
BOXER
RIDGEBACK
RIDGEBACK
GREAT DANE
LABRADOR
POMERANIAN
WHIPPET
STAFFORD
IG
PEM CORGI
POMERANIAN
KERRY BLUE
STAFFORD
SHIH TZU
AFGHAN
STD POODLE
STAFFORD
SHIH TZU
WOLFHOUND
MIN POODLE
FR BULLDOG
Animaltalk | August 2017
Welcome to the...
B ddies
LOYALTY PROGRAMME
Keep this card on you at all times. When you purchase
Comfortis® or Milbemax® your Vet/Vet Shop will stamp
the card. On your first purchase you will receive a FREE
bracelet from your participating Vet/Vet Shop. With each
additional purchase, your card will be stamped and you
will receive a charm to add to your loyalty bracelet. Once
you have 6 stamps/charms, place your loyalty card in the
Elanco Loyalty Box and we will send you your final charm
inscribed with your pets name. On your 6th purchase you
will also receive a FREE Comfortis® or Milbemax® tablet
from your Vet/Vet Shop. *While stocks last.
Get your
charm bracelet
when you purchase
Comfortis® or Milbemax®
chewable tablets.
There is no limit to the amount of cards a pet owner
can have. Offer is valid on any dispensing pack/strength.
Comfortis® or Milbemax® to have its own card. Different
strengths of Comfortis® or Milbemax® cannot be mixed
on the same card.
Com f ortis
®
(spinosad)
COMFORTIS® Chewable Tablets, 140 mg, 270 mg, 560 mg, 810 mg, 1620 mg, Reg. No’s. G4011/G4012/G4013/G4015/G4014 (Act 36/1947). Active Ingredient: Spinosad. Milbemax® Chewable for Puppies and Small Dogs 1-5TMkg.
Reg. No.: G3834 (Act 36/1947). Milbemycin oxime (2,5 mg); Praziquantel (25,0 mg). Milbemax® Chewable for Dogs more than 5 kg. Reg. No.: G3833 (Act 36/1947). Milbemycin oxime (12,5 mg); Praziquantel (125,0 mg). Milbemax®
Tablets for Puppies and Small Dogs 0,5-5 kg. Reg. No.: G3187 (Act 36/1947). Milbemycin oxime (2,5 mg); Praziquantel (25,0 mg). Milbemax® Tablets for Dogs more than 5 kg. Reg. No.: G3185 (Act 36/1947). Milbemycin oxime (12,5
mg); Praziquantel (125,0 mg). Milbemax® Tasty for Cats more than 2 kg. Reg. No.: G3855 (Act 36/1947). Milbemycin oxime (16 mg); Praziquantel (40 mg). Milbemax® Tasty for Kittens and Small Cats 0,5-2 kg, Reg. No.: G3856 (Act
36/1947). Milbemycin oxime (4 mg); Praziquantel (10 mg).
ELANCO ANIMAL HEALTH,, a division of Eli Lilly (SA) (Pty) Ltd. (Co. Reg. No.: 1957/000371/07). Private Bag X119, BRYANSTON, 2021, Republic of South Africa. Tel.: (012) 657-6200 Fax: (012) 657-6216. www.
elanco.co.za. Elanco Animal Health will not use the information you provide for other commercial purposes and will not sell, rent, lease or forward it to any third party. Elanco™, Milbemax®, Comfortis® and the diagonal bar are
trademarks owned or licensed by Eli Lilly, it’s subsidiaries or affiliates. ZACACCMF00068(1)a
Elanco Helpline: 0861 777 735
shoptalk
Animaltalk’s news hound found these
products and books for you
BEST OF BREED: THE MINIATURE SCHNAUZER
The Miniature Schnauzer, featured in this issue of Animaltalk, is one of South Africa’s most popular
breeds. If you think this dog is perfect for you, then you have to get a copy of Best of Breed: The
Miniature Schnauzer. In this book you will learn all you need to know about this dog, going back
to his origins and background, and it will also assist you in being the perfect owner. This specialist
book will guide you on raising your puppy, exercise, training, health and everything else you need
to know about caring for your Schnauzer. Get your copy today at coolmags.com.
HELP SAVE THE AFRICAN PENGUINS
There is a way for everybody to do their bit to help save the Africa penguins, and that is by
spending a small amount on handmade beaded bracelets.
The initiative is a partnership between non-profit social enterprise the Relate Trust, the Southern
African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (SANCCOB) and retailer Woolworths.
Proceeds will contribute to SANCCOB’s African Penguin Chick Bolstering Project, which focuses
on rescuing and rehabilitating weak and abandoned African penguin chicks, including handrearing chicks from eggs.
The African penguin is the only penguin species endemic to the African continent. But the
population is declining dramatically. From one million breeding pairs in the early 20th century,
fewer than 23,000 breeding pairs remain in the wild today.
Relate’s core philosophy is that a lot of small purchases add up to make a big difference. All
bracelets made by the Relate Trust don’t just contribute to the cause they are sold for, but also assist
the senior citizens who thread the beads, the young Relate staff who are upskilled in their chosen
future careers, and various other enterprise development initiatives.
For more information on the Relate Trust, please visit www.relate.org.za.
66
SOUTHERN AFRICA’S DOG
DIRECTORY 2017
Love dogs? Then you are going to love
this year’s issue of Dog Directory – the
must-have directory for every dog owner.
This issue takes you on a special journey
through the first year of your puppy’s life,
starting with the way he develops in the
womb. You can also read about choosing
the right breed for your lifestyle, along with
all the expert advice you need to raise your
puppy, setting you and your puppy up for a
great future together.
• Can’t find Dog Directory on shelf? Send
an email to animaltalk@panorama.co.za or
order your copy now on coolmags.com.
Animaltalk | August 2017
SHOPTALK
goodies
NUTRITIOUS TREATS
Nutritionists at Probono have developed healthy biscuits
for your dog with added benefits. The new low-fat treats
come in three different varieties to treat your best friend
without any guilt. Appetite Control contains satiating fibre
and helps reduce voluntary food intake. Bedtime aids in
a good night’s sleep and contains honey, chamomile and
passion flowers. It is baked with honey and yoghurt for
nutrition, and the chamomile and passion flowers help
your dog to have a good night’s sleep.
Rise and Shine contains beef, carrots and botanical
herbs. Added liver and blackstrap molasses, vitamins,
minerals, alfalfa and turmeric assist in keeping your dog
healthy with a shiny coat. For more information, contact
011 608 2910 or email Bridget@petsnacks.co.za
LONG-LASTING
COLLARS
For the next 32 weeks, you won’t have
to worry about replacing your beloved
pet’s collar to protect him against ticks
and fleas. With Seresto’s new collars,
dogs, puppies, cats and kittens are
protected while being able to swim,
bath and play in the rain. The new
long-lasting collars are odour-free and
the active ingredients are stored within
the collar. Once the collar is applied
to your pet, the active ingredients are
transferred to the lipid layer of the skin
and hair. The actives remain on the
lipid layer and are not systematically
absorbed by the body. The company
even has an app that is downloadable
to remind you when you need to
replace the collar.
For more information, contact
011 921 5736 or go to
www.bayeranimalhealth.co.za.
Animaltalk | August 2017
67
I believe I can fly!
www.coolmags.com
Make 2017 your best year ever with your furry friends! Browse
a large range of books and find the right one to help you explore
hidden talents in your dog and yourself. Breed, training and other
books available at the touch of a button. So make sure you visit
coolmags.com today!
DOG BREEDERS' GALLERY
Montessa Gundogs
ingrid@montessa-gundogs.co.za
www.montessa-gundogs.co.za
+27 82 218 9906
If you’re a breeder looking for serious buyers, the
2018 issue of Southern Africa’s Dog Directory is
the best place to advertise.
BOOKINGS NOW OPEN!
Contact our SALES TEAM
on 011 468 2090 or
email sales@panorama.co.za
Animaltalk | August 2017
69
LEARN
A
WITH BOUT PETS
BARB
IE!
PET TIP #01
MAKE SURE TO TAKE YOUR
PETS TO THE VET TO GET
ALL THEIR SHOTS AND
CHECKUPS.
W IT H BARBIE !
N
R
A
E
L
S
L
IR
S M AR T G
AU GU ST ISSUE
E
H
T
R
O
F
T
U
LO OK O
ICH IS ALL
H
W
E
IN
Z
A
G
A
OF BARBIE M
PE T S , W IT H
R
E
H
D
N
A
IE
B
ABO UT BAR
IT IES TO
IV
T
C
A
D
N
A
N
U
LO T S O F F
Y.
KE E P YO U BU S
Don’t miss the August issue of Barbie Magazine! It’s an issue all
about pets and how to be a good pet owner, just like Barbie! On sale
31 July 2017 at Checkers, CNA, Pick n Pay, Spar and Woolworths or
subscribe at www.coolmags.com.
PET MALL
Animaltalk | August 2017
71
PET MALL
Keeping your hound off the ground...
Prices anadnge
Product Rebsite
on W
Sizes Available:
Contanctdining
Dawn Gle
PRO-PET
Employment Opportunity
We are looking for an animal lover to join our team to call on Pet
Stores and Vets Nationwide to sell our brand of dog products.
Existing sales experience in the pet market is essential.
Sales Representatives/Agents welcome to submit CV to:
rafik@tridentsaddlery.co.za or call 011 493 8514
DOGGIE TREATS
...the Xtreme in
natural feeding
It’s timoeticteod!
get n
TO ADVERTISE CONTACT:
Nora de Vries
011 468 2090 | nora@panorama.co.za
72
Trade Enquiries:
Email: Info@pro-pet.co.za
Web: www.pro-pet.co.za
Tel: 011 673 9921 | Cell: 082 573 0694 | Fax: 011 673 9921
Animaltalk | August 2017
PET MALL
Ensure a dignified end
for your faithful friend.
Return of ashes | Memorial Park
Wall of Remembrance | LifeGem
Visit legacypet.co.za for more information.
Gauteng: 011 875 2099 | KwaZulu Natal: 031 782 1384
Previously
Est. 1996
䰀椀欀攀 栀甀洀愀渀猀 愀氀氀 愀渀椀洀愀氀猀
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愀瀀瀀爀攀挀椀愀琀攀 昀漀爀 礀攀愀爀猀 琀漀 挀漀洀攀
愀渀搀 礀漀甀 挀愀渀 栀愀瘀攀 瀀攀愀挀攀 漀昀
洀椀渀搀 琀栀攀礀 眀椀氀氀 愀氀眀愀礀猀 戀攀
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愀渀琀椀ⴀ愀氀氀攀爀最攀渀椀挀 愀渀搀 愀渀琀椀ⴀ戀愀挀琀攀爀椀愀氀
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眀椀琀栀 琀栀攀 眀愀爀洀琀栀 漀昀 愀 戀氀愀渀欀攀琀
Animaltalk | August 2017
椀渀昀漀䀀猀攀猀氀椀⸀挀漀⸀稀愀
㄀㄀ 㘀㜀㐀 㔀㄀㄀㐀 眀眀眀⸀猀攀猀氀椀⸀挀漀⸀稀愀
73
CLASSIFIEDS
200 SERVICES
202 ANIMAL BEHAVIOURISTS & TRAINING
Canine Behaviour
Foundation Courses
All you need to start a career with dogs!
Practical & Correspondence Behaviour Courses:
Puppy Instructors - Clicker Instructors
206 BOARDING KENNELS & CATTERIES
✓ Luxurious Kennels in
Austinview, Midrand
✓ Beautiful Surroundings
✓ Owner Managed
Tel: 011 057 5577 | Mobile: 084 777 5577
Email: info@austinviewkennels.co.za
www.scottysdogs.co.za
Scotty Valadao
Dog Box - Animal Talk Advert 55x25.pdf
073 735 0469
admin@fods.co.za
www.austinviewkennels.co.za
1
02/06/2017
14:05
LANSERIA BOARDING KENNELS
AND CATTERY, FOR POSH PETS.
C
M
WWW.DOGSDOGS.CO.ZA
Sharron Brown
082 830 7291
Y
CM
MY
CY
Home from home for your
pampered pets.
CMY
K
Oppistal
(Pty) Ltd
• Animal Communication Sessions
• Western Riding Lessons
082 829 9003
www.oppistal.co.za
TELLINGTON TTOUCH TRAINING work gently
with your own animals or professionally: cats, dogs,
equine, etc. www.ttouch.co.za, 011 884 3156,
info@ttouch.co.za private consults & workshops
DID YOU KNOW?
Some pet medical aid insurance policies
even provide cover towards preventative
care such as vaccinations, flea, tick
and worm control, sterilisation and teeth
cleaning.
Doggypaddle Animal
Hydrotherapy
Centre.
Sr.Alison Fantin (dip vet nurse; Certified
Canine Rehabilitation Practitioner)
Doggypaddle offers physical therapy for:
•
Recovery after an operation.
•
Recovery after an injury.
•
Relief from arthritis.
•
Weight loss.
Doggypaddle also offers boarding for post
operative recovery.
Website: www.doggypaddle.co.za
Email: alison@doggypaddle.co.za
Tel: 011 708 6628
Cell: 082 787 2680
224 VET DELIS
Centurion Pretoria East
Collection & Deliveries
0860 536 635 (kennel) 083 268 1249
www.labriekennelsandcattery.co.za
PETS PARADISE. Pet Boarding, Grooming Parlour
and Pet Shop. Cell: 073 308 4673 Email:
petspar@iafrica.com Web:www.petparadise.co.za
KATMANDU. A specialised boarding cattery.
Lammermoor, near Lanseria. 083 457 3381
www.katmandu.co.za. Also see KATMANDU CAT
HOTEL on facebook.
400 CATS
212 ONLINE PET & VET SHOPS
ST D
BE S AN
ICE IER
PR OUROR
C O OR
D O Y
D R
TO LIVE
DE
401 CLUBS
SACC
SOUTHERN AFRICA CAT COUNCIL
For Cattery / Stud / Kitten Registrations
Forms in connection with the above
Information on Breeders and Studs
Availability of Kittens
Show related enquiries
Affiliated Cat Club Information
203 ANIMAL HYDROTHERAPY
To advertise, contact Nora on 011 468 2090
223 TRAVEL
Online shopping
for all your pet
and vet supplies
THE SOUTH AFRICAN CAT REGISTER
P.O. Box 28732, Kensington, 2101. 5 Stanmore Rd, Kensington
Tel:- 011-616 7017; Fax 011-622 6301;
e-mail: sacatreg@iafrica.com
www.tsacc.org.za
(Office Hours: Mon. to Thurs.:- 09h00 - 16h00. Fri 09h00 - 13h00)
Tel 033 263 1608 • Fax 086 573 6184
www.vetproductsonline.co.za
thevet@vetproductsonline.co.za
403 BREEDERS
BENGALS
217 PET-FRIENDLY ACCOMMODATION
LIMPOPO
MAGOEBASKLOOF
KURISA MOYA NATURE LODGE: Forest Cabins,
Farmhouse sleeping 10 or Cottage with views.
7 walking trails through forests and mountains, rivers
and dams. Lisa 071 658 6980 / 082 200 4596 /
www.krm.co.za
MPUMALANGA
Hydrotherapy
Acupuncture & Physiotherapy
Chiropractic & Shockwave Therapy
Rehab, Recovery & Exercise
Laser Therapy
0215584518
74
www.petwellnessworx.co.za
reception@petwellnessworx.co.za
DULLSTROOM
THE 6 SLEEPER FARMSTEAD & 2 SLEEPER
THE NEST is nestled among rolling hills, waterfalls &
streams on THE FARM FIELD & STREAM. Fishing,
hiking, mountain biking & clay-pigeon shooting.
Greg 083 443 4567 fieldandstream@mweb.co.za
"A cat is domestic only as far as suits its
own ends." Saki
With audited,
guaranteed circulation,
our advertisers
get results!
Animaltalk | August 2017
BULL TERRIERS
Pearl Burmese
Busherhill Bull Terriers
600 DOGS
SACC Cat of the
Year 2015
KUSA registered puppies available
Champion Bloodline
603 BREEDERS
Penny Steyn
082-443-9323
penny@psa.org.za
BEAGLES
CHRISBE BEAGLES
MAINE COON
Top quality registered puppies.
Imported and Champion bloodlines.
MAINE EMBLEM CATTERY
CAIRN TERRIERS
Chris 083 258 9970
chrishartman0@gmail.com Pretoria
Photo: Ronnie Magic
Thalu Kennels
Registered Cairn and West
Highland Terrier pups available
Thariza van Rensburg
Cell 083 379 7111
Email 1969thariza@gmail.com
PERSIANS AND EXOTICS
BIEWER TERRIERS
CUUMBA CATTERY
Irmadu Kennels
Photographer: Ronnie Magic
SPECIALIZING IN:
Himalayan Persians (colourpoints)
and Persians in all colours including
Chocolate & Lilac
Biewer Terriers &
Yorkshire Terriers
Contact Cheryl
Tel: 011 435 6972
Cell: 082 261 4860
Photo: Bellstone
Dr Irma Bailey
Cell 083 276 5069
Tel 012 664 5774
Email animals@icon.co.za
www.irmadubiewers.co.za
&
Photo: Linn Currie
EL’Vee Persians
Exotics
CFSA Registered
Kittens sometimes available.
Contact Lisa Venter
Cell 071 602 0515
www.el-vee.com
Ryn’s Persians
CFSA registered.
Maryna Beukes
Tel 011 814 6071
Cell 083 307 9930
rynspersian@telkomsa.net
www.persiancatparadise.co.za
500 EXOTIC PETS
503 BREEDERS
Mini Teacup
Piglets
Bronties Chihuahuas
Long and Smooth coat
Chihuahua Breeders
www.bronties.co.za
Hettie – 072 478 3471
Marieza – 071 013 5612
Email – hettiev@gmail.com
People have been breeding dogs for
the last 5,000 years.
ChiPupski
Chihuahuas
BOXER
FEDERATION OF BOXER CLUBS
OF SOUTHERN AFRICA
Breeders of smooth coat
Chihuahuas
Calling all Boxer lovers, breeders and owners!
Contact Debbie or Elize (KUSA Nr 1020247)
011 753 3820 / 083 283 0380
elizechrz@webmail.co.za | debbiepeyper1@gmail.com
Come join the Federation of Boxer Clubs of
Southern Africa (FBCSA) and become
part of our Boxer community!
Who we are:
The FBCSA is currently the only legal
Breed Society for Boxers in South Africa
Chitem
Why not join us today?
Long & Smooth
Coat Chihuahuas
Do you need advice on any
puppy related matters?
Please visit our website www.fbcsa.net or
contact our FBCSA secretary
(012 664 2156; secretary@fbcsa.net)!
Please also join our
FBCSA Facebook page!
082 897 9820
www.chitem.co.za
salome@ergolinesa.co.za
Louise: 082 888 1248
Toshiro Kennels
Chihuahua en
Yorkshire Terrier BULLDOGS
www.healthybulldogs.co.za
Animal Talk Classified
Ad March 17.indd 1
PIGLETS
CHIHUAHUAS
Kusa Member No 49934
501 CLUBS
SA CAVY COUNCIL. Breed registry for pedigree
guinea pigs. Email sacavycouncil@gmail.com
Join our advice group on FB “Guinea Pigs South
Africa”. Like Our FB Page South African Cavy
Council. Gauteng: Pieter 082 648 8414
KZN: Anita 061 024 2167 MP: Lucinda 084 586 5897
In Chinese culture, dogs represent
faithfulness.
2017/03/16 8:06 AM
Healthy
English
Bulldogs
4 Families
Ronita 082 850 4806 Spotty or black ones.
Bred by us since 1995.
www.teacuppigs.webnode.com
elvengold@icloud.com
081 534 7122 /
081 464 2237
Animaltalk | August 2017
Free range
breeding
techniques
75
Booking deadline for November 2017 – 05 September 2017
For pedigreed Maine Coon Kittens
Contact: Joos or Barendina
Cell: 082 333 7231 or 074 201 5187
Tel: 012 800 1296
E-Mail:joos.esterhuizen@up.ac.za
www.mainecoonkittens.co.za
Bullterriers Busherhill
Contact Leon 0832620748
leonbester01@gmail.com
CLASSIFIEDS
BURMESE
CLASSIFIEDS
SILBERSCHATTEN
GSDs
• Federation registered, vacc.& dew. pups:
SANTITIA Chihuahuas - KUSA registered, long
coat and smooth coat out of imported and champion
stock. Vaccinated and dewormed. Puppies occasionally
available. Contact Sandra Nieuwoudt at 082 550 2476.
DACHSHUNDS: LONG-HAIRED & MINIATURE
Mark von Sendling VA (SA)
LABRADOR RETRIEVER
• SABLE, PITCH-BLACK, BLACK & TAN;
• Lovingly home-reared for superb
temperament as ideal family companions;
• Our GSDs' HIPS AND ELBOWS “A” GRADE;
• Excellent imported German Show and
Working bloodlines;
• Pre- & post-sales advice & support;
• Pups placed with approved dog-lovers only.
GISELA: 072 555 7123 / 072 080 3278 (near JHB)
Von Kazandi
German Shepherd Dogs
Christel Zimmermann
C: 083 440 5626
E: gsd@kazandi.co.za
W: www.kazandigsd.com
DIAMOND BREEDER
"It’s funny how dogs and cats know the
inside of folks better than other folks do."
Eleanor H Potter
SANTITIA Miniature dachshund puppies. KUSA
registered. Long haired and smooth haired from
imported stock. Vaccinated and dewormed. Contact
Sandra Nieuwoudt at 082 550 2476
ZILLENBERG DACHSHUNDS miniature smooth
haired. Kusa Registered Tel Caroline Barclay
011 967 2350 / 082 325 3521
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
Kusa membership number 042897
Conkasha
LABRADORS
Pups
sometimes
available
all three
colours.
www.dogsdogs.co.za
Sharron Brown – Lanseria
LAMBRADA LABRADORS
For Type & Temperament
DALMATIANS
Barbara Cell 082 255 1635 Fax 0866961438
Website: www.dogsdogsdogs.co.za
Lizette 083 555 5480
lambrada@telkomsa.net
GREAT DANES
Marsabet
BROLLOXON GREAT DANES. Quality registered
puppies occasionally available. Contact Estelle Nienaber
083 793 0403. Email brolloxongreatdanes@icloud.com
The Great Dane is the largest of all
dog breeds.
Labrador Retrievers
Contact
Annette
083 375 1565
NEAPOLITAN MASTIFFS secdogs@mweb.co.za
IRISH TERRIER
To advertise, contact Nora on 011 468 2090
Alfonsia Dogo
Argentino’s
Neil Carr
Cell 071 102 1890
Email neilgarth@gmail.com
www.alfonsiadogs.co.za
FRENCH BULLDOG
FRENCH BULLDOG Network Rescue Organisation
SA. NPC(2016/076310/08). Cell 083 326 1819
Email info@frenchienetworksa.co.za
www.frenchienetworkrescue.co.za
ROSTEL FRENCH BULLDOGS. KUSA registered
puppies occasionally available. Contact Jan Vorster:
082 929 9024 / jan.vrstr@gmail.com.
GERMAN SHEPHERD DOGS
CORNFIELDS KENNELS
offer OLDERHILL GSDs
England’s top police dogs for
30 years. Huge brave dogs
with healthy flat backs. Also
solid blacks. Love children.
We also train dogs and owners
and sell obedience, tracking
and protection dogs.
JACK RUSSELL TERRIERS
THE JACK RUSSELL TERRIER Club of SA
Home of the Original Jack Russell.
www.jackrussellsa.co.za
CHARLMAR KENNELS. Registered pups. Short leg.
Imported bloodlines. Tan & White, Innoc, Springs
073 162 2624
JAPANESE CHIN
Japanese Chins
Stephanie D Olivier
(YukiSan Team Leader)
A heart beat at my feet. Edith Wharton
76
PUPPIES OCCASIONALLY
AVAILABLE TO APPROVED
HOMES.
PHONE ANNE 021 671 8463
082 575 1000
Delightful companion
dogs, only bred on order
0815347122 / 0814642237
We breed since 1994, for
quality and distinction and
strive for excellent true
Italian type and sound
temperament. We recently
imported various new dogs
from Italy and Belgium, to
enhance our breeding.
MUIREND IRISH
TERRIERS.
DOGO ARGENTINO
Cell: +27 (83) 387 3575
E-mail: solivier@telkomsa.net
Web: www.YukiSan.co.za
YukiSan
Japanese Chins
www.lambrada.co.za
Bookings essential.
Contact
Linda @ 072 650 2726 or
info@delpicasso.com
visit us at
NEAPOLITAN MASTIFFS
MASTIFFS www.neapolitan.co.za
NEAPOLITAN
Picasso
PAPILLON
Ardmore Papillons
Our aim has always been excellence
and intend to remain tops.
43 years experience. Mostly Imported bloodlines.
Contact Melanie de Jongh
Cell 082 785 6007
Email meldejongh@gmail.com
Web www.ardmorekennels.co.za
SOLPOSTE KENNELS
Papillon puppies occasionally
available to approved
homes only
Contact Michael/Theresa
Tel: 011 673 9921
Cell: 082 374 5251
Email: info@pro-pet.co.za
Animaltalk | August 2017
Daintaranians
Puppies available occasionally
Kusa registered
Michelle 076 580 1053
“A House is Not a Home Without a Pommy!”
FORSAN POMERANIANS
www.deliemersrottweilers.co.za
Bernardina 083 268 4917
MUTTERLIEBE KENNELS
SINCE 1990
Follow us on facebook.com/deliemersrottweilers
50km from Pretoria and 50km from Johannesburg
e of
Lov
the ers...
r
o
F
weil
all
Rott us a C
!
e
Giv y time
an
Breeder of happy and healthy Black and Silver, and Salt and
Pepper Miniature Schnauzer puppies. KUSA Registered
Anneli du Preez Cell nr. 082 567 8093
Email address: anneli.dupreez.adp1@gmail.com
Website address: www.mutterliebeschnauzers.com
KUSA registered
KEYSTONE. Miniature Schnauzer puppies from the
best show lines in the world occasionally available to
approved homes. Raised in a loving home.
www.miniatureschnauzers.co.za 0833423734 – Francois
Puppies from imported and local
champion bloodlines sometimes available.
Susan Lombaard 0824494491
Email: susan@forsantoypoms.co.za
Website: www.forsantoypoms.co.za
CLASSIFIEDS
POMERANIANS
SHAR-PEI
XANTAH
SHAR PEI CLUB OF GAUTENG. Anneke
082 927 9577, Jenny 083 654 6764
Website www.sharpei.org.za
Pomeranians since 1967
Home of South Africa’s
No 1 Pom since 2003!
“for that special companion
in your life”
SHIBA INUS
SHILUAN SHIBA INUS. KUSA Registered
Puppies sometimes available to approved homes.
Anita 021 856 3231 Cell 082 659 3231
rottlerhof@webmail.co.za
www.shiluanshiba.moonfruit.com
Renee Fourie 083 268 2417
rcfourie@intekom.co.za
www.xantah.co.za/poms.htm
DID YOU KNOW?
Rottlerhof Rottweilers
Pursuance of excellence a breed of dignity
POODLES
KUSA registered puppies
sometimes available
Contact Details
Anita Esterhuizen
T: 021 856 3231 | C: 082 659 3231
Email rottlerhof@webmail.co.za
www.rottlerhof.co.za
WAYLOR
TOY & MINIATURE POODLES
All dogs are KUSA registered
Breeders of top quality pups.
Lorraine 083 459 9785
waylorpoodles@hotmail.com
RHODESIAN RIDGEBACKS
Kulima Rhodesian Ridgebacks
Most of today’s dog owners describe their
dogs as part of the family.
SHIH TZU
IRMADU ROTTWEILERS. Beautiful KUSA registered
puppies available from top breeding lines. HD/ED
certificates available. Dr Irma Bailey 083 276 5069.
animals@icon.co.za.
KUSA Reg No 150315
SCHNAUZERS
Bred for quality
and temperament
KISSAKI
SHIH TZU
Obrè van Heerden
Tel 082 859 2790
obre@isat.co.za
www.kulima.co.za
ROTTWEILERS
www.kissaki.co.za | kissaki.shihtzu@gmail.com
Martin Erwee Cell: 072 200 7212
STAFFORDSHIRE TERRIER
KARUSCHKA KENNELS
FOR ALL STAFFIE LOVERS
KUSA Registered puppies
now available with a
champion blood line.
Visit http://animalchannel.co.za/ to find
out which are the most popular breeds of
dog in South Africa.
Animaltalk | August 2017
Contact Annamarie
Cell 083 698 0400
kameel@webmail.co.za
Traveling throughout South Africa can be arranged.
77
Booking deadline for November 2017 – 05 September 2017
BROWDEEN POMERANIANS. White, Cream and
Parti colours is our priority in our breeding program.
Local and imported bloodlines available. Call Erica
082 730 5807 Corrie 082 462 3106.
www.browdeentoypomeranians.com
CLASSIFIEDS
WANDRASKI
STAFFORDS
LOVETHEMALL
YORKIE BREEDERS
KUSA registered
Breed to perfection
Bred and raised with love
ROELF NAGEL
0726114781
goelie10@hotmail.com
www.wandraski-staffords.co.za
KUSA Registered
Contact: Ina Jansen Van Vuuren
Cell: 072 267 3527
love.them.all.yorkies@gmail.com
www.lovethemall.co.za
YORKSHIRE TERRIER
IRMADU KENNELS
YORKSHIRE TERRIERS
& BIEWER TERRIERS
DR IRMA BAILEY
CELL 083 276 5069
TEL 012 664 5774
www.yorkie.co.za
"Tis sweet to hear the watch dogs’
honest bark.
Bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw
near home;
Tis sweet to know there is an
eye will mark
Our coming and look brighter
when we come."
Lord Byron, Don Juan
MIJOY
Yorkshire & Biewer Terriers
Kusa Member No 49934
Imported Biewer Terriers
i al
ec
Sp
s
All pups are registered and carry
health guarantees.
r
ize
072 234 0791
Email mijoy@wam.co.za
es
is
p • Pocket •
eacu
M in
n T Call Joyce
i
iat
u
ing
When
only the
BEST will do
www.mijoy-yorkies.co.za • www.mijoybiewerterriers.co.za
To advertise, contact Nora on 011 468 2090
"A dog is not ‘almost human’, and I know
of no greater insult to the canine race than
to describe it as such."
John Holmes
Expose your breed to
136,000 people nationwide
Contact Nora 011 468 2090
There is no better way to keep your kennel
foremost in potential puppy buyers' minds than
with a regular advertisement and high quality
picture of your dogs in Animaltalk
78
www.barkingmad.co.za
Animaltalk | August 2017
CLASSIFIEDS
CLASSIFIED/ONLINE CATEGORIES
201
202
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207
208
209
210
211
212
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215
216
217
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225
Alternative therapy
Animal behaviourists and training
Animal hydrotherapy
Animal rescue schemes
Animal welfare
Boarding kennels and catteries
Dog walkers
Genetic testing
Grooming parlours
Insurance
Obituaries
Online pet and vet shops
Pet / house sitters
Pet cremation / funerals
Pet portraits
Pet shops
Pet-friendly accommodation
Pet-friendly eating
establishments
Pet-friendly jobs
Pet-friendly property for sale /
to let
Photography
Quarantine stations
Travel
Vet delis
Veterinarian practices
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
Microchipping
Pet containment (fencing)
Pet doors and steps
Pet food suppliers
Pet leads, collars and harnesses
Pet strollers
Sleeping / bean bags
Software
Thundershirts
Toys
Trailers
Trophies and rosettes
400 CATS
401
402
403
Clubs
Associations
Breeders
500 EXOTIC PETS
501
502
503
Clubs
Associations
Breeders
Booking deadline for November 2017 – 05 September 2017
200 SERVICES
600 DOGS
601
602
603
Clubs
Associations
Breeders
300 ACCESSORIES /
PRODUCTS
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
Animal deterrents
Bedding
Books
Bowls and stands
Cat litter and trays
Clothes
Feeders
First aid kits
Food containers
Gifts
Kennels, carriers, crates and motor
vehicle seats
For your bookings contact Nora de Vries 011 468 2090
www.animalchannel.co.za
Animaltalk | August 2017
79
nextissue
DOG BREED PROFILES
NASTY SPRING BUGS
Shiba Inu
Pomeranian
• What are the
viruses I need to
look out for?
• Which bugs can
cause my pet to
become ill?
• How can I protect
my animals
against it?
INTRODUCING YOUR CAT TO OTHER PETS
Oriental
CAT BREED PROFILE
We look at the fundamental dos and don’ts
PLUS
▲
Disclaimer: Please note that articles on this page are subject to change.
PLANNING A HOLIDAY WITH YOUR PET
Dog and cat breeders’ gallery | Classifieds | News from the
animal world | Everything your dog wished you knew!
CAN’T FIND US?
Animaltalk is available at all good news agents
or retailers near you.
CAN’T FIND YOUR COPY?
Be sure to ask the store owner to order you
a copy from RNA or send an email to
animaltalk@panorama.co.za and let us know
where your magazine isn’t stocked.
SEPTEMBER ISSUE ON SALE 26 AUGUST 2017
80
Pet-frie
accomm ndly
odation
Animaltalk | August 2017
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