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Chemical Society of Japan Awards.

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T. Osaka: Electrochemistry
The Chemical Society of Japan (CSJ)
presents a number of awards annually,
including six CSJ Awards for significant
contributions to chemistry in terms of
both applications and basic research. In
the following we present the recipients
for 2003 and their award-winning
research.
Y. Iwasawa: Heterogeneous
Catalysis
Yasuhiro Iwasawa is a recipient of a CSJ
Award for his studies on active structures and dynamic catalysis on surfaces. His recent
research includes
kinetic studies on
the
elementary
steps in the COinduced
disintegration of rhodium
clusters on surfaces.[1] For the characterization
of
these clusters he
employs a wide
range of modern
Y. Iwasawa
methods for surface
analysis:
EXAFS, XPEEM,
ESDIAD, STM, AFM, IR, XRD, and
solid-state NMR spectroscopy.
Iwasawa completed his chemistry
studies at Tokyo University in 1973
with a PhD. He then taught and carried
out research at Yokohama University
until he was appointed professor at
Tokyo University in 1984. He has authored books on catalysis and surfaces
and is Executive Editor of the journal
The Chemical Record.
3508
Tetsuya Osaka has been recognized with
a CSJ Award for his work on the preparation of multifunctionalized materials
by electrochemical processes. The work
of his research
group includes the
development
of
batteries based on
polymers and lithium ions, sensors,
thin films, and
materials for magnetic recording, as
well as electrochemical
separation processes. He
T. Osaka
recently described
“Metallic bismuth
on strontium–bismuth tantalate thin
films for ferroelectric memory application”.[2]
Osaka completed his studies at
Waseda University in Tokyo with a
PhD in 1974. He carried out postdoctoral research at Georgetown University
(Washington, DC) from 1976 to 1978,
then returned to Waseda University,
where he has been Professor of Applied
Physical Chemistry since 1986. He
became dean of the Graduate School
of Science and Engineering at this institution in 1998. Osaka has received several awards, including the Pergamon
Gold Medal of the International Society
of Electrochemistry.
ductive, and magnetic properties as
well as systems with neutral–ionic
phase transitions or proton or chargetransfer interactions. He recently
reported on “The Interaction of C60,
C70, and C60(CN)2 Radical Anions with
Cobalt(ii) Tetraphenylporphyrin in
Solid Multicomponent Complexes”.[3]
Saito completed his PhD at Hokkaido University in Sapporo in 1972.
After several years as a postdoctoral
researcher with F. M. Menger (Atlanta,
GA, USA), A. K. Colter (Guelph, ON,
Canada), and J. P. Ferraris (Richardson,
TX, USA) he returned to Japan to work
as a scientist at the Institute of Molecular Science in Okazaki. In 1984, he
became a professor at the Institute for
Solid State Physics of Tokyo University.
He has been at Kyoto University since
1989 and was a visiting professor several
times in Rennes (France).
S. Shinkai: Supramolecular
Chemistry
Gunzi Saito has been recognized for his
contributions to the development of
conductive molecular organic materials
through self-assembly. The design, synthesis, and characterization of the
physical properties
of
functional
organic molecules
and self-assembled
systems form the
central
research
interests of his
group.
Further
interests
include
organic solids with
G. Saito
metallic, supercon-
Seiji Shinkai completed his PhD in 1972
at Kyushu University in Fukuoka. After
postdoctoral studies at the University of California,
Santa
Barbara
in the research
group of Thomas C. Bruice, he
returned
to
Kyushu University in 1975 and
was made a professor there in
1988. He leads
S. Shinkai
several international collaborations.
The research of Shinkai and his
group is focused on host–guest chemistry, molecular recognition, gels, saccharides, and nucleotides. He has received
the CSJ Award in recognition of his
work on functional supramolecular systems based on molecular recognition.
In a recent Communication in Angewandte Chemie he reported a light-harvesting organogel composed of cholesterol-based perylene derivatives.[4] Shinkai has been a member of the International Advisory Board of Angewandte
Chemie since 2000.
DOI: 10.1002/anie.200460847
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 3508 – 3509
G. Saito: Organic Conductors
2004 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
Angewandte
Chemie
H. Nakatsuji: Quantum
Chemistry
A further CSJ Award goes to the quantum chemist Hiroshi Nakatsuji (Kyoto
University), whose research is concentrated on the development of methods
in quantum chemistry. He is interested
in the calculation of
excited
states
(SAC-CI: symmetry-adapted cluster/configuration
interaction),
the
direct determination of the density
matrix, the strucH. Nakatsuji
ture of exact wave
functions, as well as electronic mechanisms and relativistic effects in the calculation of chemical shifts. He has now
been recognized with this award for his
contributions towards the application
of quantum mechanics in chemistry. He
recently described the electronic excitation of the protonated form of the GFP
chromophore.[5]
Nakatsuji studied chemistry at
Kyoto University, completed his PhD
there in 1971, then took up a teaching
position there. From 1973 to 1975 he
undertook postdoctoral studies in New
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2004, 43, 3508 – 3509
York with J. I. Musher and in Chapel
Hill (North Carolina, USA) with R. G.
Parr, after which he returned to Kyoto.
He has been a professor at Kyoto University since 1988, and since 2004 he
has also been director of the Fukui Institute for Fundamental Chemistry. Nakatsuji is one of three editors of the Journal
of Computational Chemistry.
M. Hirama: Natural-Product
Synthesis
Masahiro Hirama (Tohoku University,
Sendai) is the recipient of a CSJ Award
for his work on the total synthesis of
ciguatoxins
and
bioactive natural
products.
His
research is concerned with natural-product synthesis, including that
of chromoprotein
antitumor antibiotics and marine neurotoxins based on
polyether
structures.
In
this
M. Hirama
research molecular
recognition
and
the mechanism of interactions between
these molecules and biopolymers play
www.angewandte.org
a crucial role. He recently reported the
total synthesis of the proteasome inhibitor TMC-95A in Angewandte Chemie.[6]
Hirama completed his PhD in 1977
at Tohoku University under the guidance of S. Ito. After periods of postdoctoral research in the groups of S. Danishefsky in Pittsburgh and S. Masamune
at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology he returned to Japan to work
with K. Nakanishi at the Suntory Institute for Bioorganic Research. Since
1983 he has been a professor at
Tohoku University.
[1] A. Suzuki, Y. Inada, A. Yamaguchi, T.
Chihara, M. Yuasa, M. Nomura, Y. Iwasawa, Angew. Chem. 2003, 115, 1325;
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 4795.
[2] K. Asami, T. Osaka, T. Yamanobe, I.
Koiwa, Surf. Interf. Anal. 2000, 30, 391.
[3] D. V. Konarev, S. S. Khasanov, G. Saito,
R. N. Lyubovskaya, Y. Yoshida, A.
Otsuka, Chem. Eur. J. 2003, 9, 3837.
[4] K. Sugiyasu, N. Fujita, S. Shinkai, Angew.
Chem. 2004, 116, 1249; Angew. Chem. Int.
Ed. 2004, 43, 1229.
[5] A. K. Das, J. Hasegawa, T. Miyahara, M.
Ehara, H. Nakatsuji, J. Comp. Chem.
2003, 24, 1421.
[6] M. Inoue, H. Sakazaki, H. Furuyama, M.
Hirama, Angew. Chem. 2003, 115, 2758;
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 2654.
2004 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
3509
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