close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The_Artist_s_Magazine_-_May_2017

код для вставкиСкачать
Try Something New: Painting Acrylic on plexiglas
the
On Location
in the Arctic
p.11
magazine
Mix It Up!
Drawing
with More
Than Pencils
How to Paint
the Hardest
Feature:
the Mouth
p.22
Plein Air
Survival
Give Ticks the
Brush Off
p.62
with Julio Reyes
The Art of Excess
Teresa Oaxaca and Patti Brady
Plus
Portraits
in Gold
Greetings in
Woodcuts
Maps of
Imagined
Places
The First Impressionist
Frédéric Bazille
Summer Evening by Julio Reyes
who works on drafting film.
May 2017
artistsmagazine.com
vk.com/stopthepress
FRESH MAGAZINES EVERYDAY
СВЕЖИЕ ЖУРНАЛЫ НА АНГЛИЙСКОМ ЯЗЫКЕ В ГРУППЕ
VK.COM/STOPTHEPRESS
FROM OUR HANDS
TO YOURS.
UTRECHT ARTISTS’ ACRYLIC COLORS
CADMIUM GREEN
2 FL OZ • 59 ML
CADMIUM YELLOW LEMON PURE
5.07 FL OZ • 150 ML
For more than 50 years, Utrecht's been handcrafting professional-quality
Artists' Colors in Brooklyn, New York. Skilled craftspeople use only the finest
pigments to create each and every color. These acrylics offer superior intensity
and opacity, a buttery texture, outstanding lightfastness, and excellent tinting
strength. You can count on Utrecht Artists' Acrylic Colors to maintain their
consistency, quality, and performance from batch to batch and year to year.
BLICK
®
DickBlick.com
800.828.4548
*Cerulean Bllue is
is formul
formulated
ated usi
using
ng
popp
py oil. Ivory Black, Mars Black, and
Sepia are formul
Sepi
formul
rmulated
rm
a d with linseed oil.
ate
MUSÉE D’ORSAY, PARIS, ON LONG-TERM LOAN AT MUSÉE FABRE/MONTPELLIER, BEQUEST OF MARC BAZILLE, 1924 MUSÉE FABRE DE
MONTPELLIER MÉDITERRANÉE MÉTROPOLE - PHOTOGRAPH BY FRÉDÉRIC JAULMES ©PATRICE SCHMIDT/MUSÉE D’ORSAY DISTRIBUTION RMN
the
magazine
EDITOR
Maureen Bloomfield
SENIOR ART DIRECTOR
MANAGING EDITOR
SENIOR EDITOR
Brian Roeth
Brian Riley
Holly Davis
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Michael Woodson
McKenzie Graham
SENIOR ONLINE EDITOR
Cherie Haas
ADVERTISING
Advertising Sales Team Leader, Fine Art Division Mary McLane
970/290-6065; mary.mclane@fwmedia.com
Carol Lake
385/414-1439; carol.lake@fwmedia.com
Advertising Specialist
Barb Prill
800/283-0963 ext. 13435
barb.prill@fwmedia.com
Media Sales Coordinator
F+W, A CONTENT + ECOMMERCE COMPANY
Thomas F.X. Beusse
Debra Delman
Chief Operating Officer Joe Seibert
Chief Content Officer Steve Madden
Chief Technology Officer Joe Romello
SVP, General Manager-F+W Crafts Group John Bolton
Chief Executive Officer
Chief Financial Officer
SVP, General Manager-F+W Outdoors and
Small Business Group Ray Chelstowski
VP, Manufacturing & Logistics
Phil Graham
Newsstand Sales, contact:
Scott T. Hill, scott.hill@procirc.com
THE ARTIST’S MAGAZINE EDITORIAL OFFICES
10151 Carver Road, Suite 200,
Cincinnati OH 45242
Tel: 513/531-2222 E-mail: tamedit@fwmedia.com
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES
P.O. Box 421751, Palm Coast FL 32142-1751
Tel: 800/333-0444 (U.S. and Canada)
Tel: 386/246-3370 (international)
Website: artistsmagazine.com
Love & Honor
INTERNATIONAL NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION
ABOVE:
Frédéric
Bazille
(1867; oil
on canvas,
41x29)
by Pierre
Auguste
Renoir
“Writing is play in the same
way that playing the piano is
‘play’ or putting on a theatrical
play is ‘play,’’’ says Margaret
Atwood. “Just because something’s fun doesn’t mean it
isn’t serious.” In this issue,
we are delighted to showcase
the work of artists who take
play seriously: Sally
Strand’s theatrical
evocations of daily
life (“The Moment InBetween,” page 28);
Julio Reyes’s sporting desire to try new
materials (Drawing
Board, page 14), and
Candice Bohannon’s
exultant, abundant imagination (Brushing Up, page 22).
And two artists, who
still love to dress up, Patti
Brady and Teresa Oaxaca,
demonstrate that the origins
4 artistsmagazine.com
4 artistsmagazine.com
of art often lie in the joys
of childhood. Brady loved
sitting on the floor as she
cut out paper dolls and costumes (“The Barb Beneath
the Beauty,” page 36), and
Teresa Oaxaca, in her dazzlingly Baroque tableaux,
plays with and paints pictures
of actual dolls, culled from
her collection (“The Art of
Excess,” page 44).
Say “Renoir” and we think
“frivolity and fun,” but his
painting of Frédéric Bazille at
work (above) is a somber study
in gray. Bazille died at 28 on a
battlefield; his father claimed
his body. Jerry Weiss tells the
story in “I Have Too Many
Things To Do In Life,” page
52. The solace? Bazille’s 60
pictures that celebrate light.
Maureen Bloomfield
EDITOR
Curtis Circulation Co.
730 River Road, New Milford NJ 07646
Tel: 201/634-7400 Fax: 201/634-7499
ATTENTION RETAILERS
To carry The Artist’s Magazine in your stores,
contact us at sales@fwmedia.com.
PRIVACY PROMISE
Occasionally we make portions of our customer list
available to other companies so they may contact
you about products and services that may be of
interest to you. If you prefer we withhold your name,
simply send a note with the magazine name to
List Manager, F+W, 10151 Carver Road, Suite 200,
Cincinnati OH 45242.
Printed in the USA
Copyright © 2017 by F+W Media, Inc.
All rights reserved.
The Artist’s Magazine is a registered trademark of F+W.
The Artist’s Magazine (ISSN 0741-3351) is published 10 times per
year (January, March, April, May, June, July, September, October,
November and December) by F+W Media Inc., 10151 Carver Road,
Suite 200, Cincinnati OH 45242; tel: 386/246-3370. Subscription
rates: one year $25. Canadian subscriptions add $15 per year postal
surcharge and remit in U.S. funds. Foreign subscriptions add $20 per
year postal surcharge and remit in U.S. funds. The Artist’s Magazine
will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or
artwork. Only submissions with a self-addressed, stamped envelope
will be returned. Volume 34, No. 4. Periodicals postage paid at
Cincinnati OH and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send all
address changes to The Artist’s Magazine, P.O. Box 421751, Palm
Coast FL 32142-1751. F+W Media Inc. Back issues are available. For
pricing information or to order, call 855/842-5267, visit our online
shop at www.northlightshop.com/category/artists-magazine, or send a
check or money order to The Artist’s Magazine/F+W Media Products,
700 E. State St., Iola WI 54990. Please specify The Artist’s Magazine
and the issue month and year. Canada Publications Mail Agreement
No. 40025316. Canadian return address: 2835 Kew Drive, Windsor,
ON N8T 3B7.
SUPERIOR COLORS: VIBRANCY & INTENSITY
Capture vivid & bright colors with the first
application. No need to reapply paint to get
proper color intensity. Dry Lifting
Wet Lifting
I M P R O V E D W E T & D RY C O L O R L I F T I N G
Non-gelatin sizing allows for easy corrections
when lifting both staining and granulating
pigments whether paper is wet or dry. A beautiful 100% cotton
premium watercolor paper made
on a traditional cylinder mould
machine.
Offers ideal absorbency, exceptional
rendering, perfect washes, superior
strength, and color intensity.
EXCELLENT COLOR CONTROL
Achieve a wider expanse of surface
responsiveness and hard edge detail. Soft edge color is more easily achieved. Available at Fine Art Retailers
heritage.canson.com
The Salmagundi Club | 47TH Fifth Avenue | New York, New York
FIRST PRIZE
$5,000
63rd ANNUAL
NATIONAL JURIED EXHIBITION OF THE
NATIONAL SOCIETY OF PAINTERS
in CASEIN
&
ACRYLIC
Be a part of the National Society of Painters in Casein and Acrylic’s
63rd National Juried Exhibition at the Salmagundi Club in New York.
We are proud to feature the Robert Sanstrom Prize—$5,000 and
Gold Medal, as well as over $15,000 in cash awards and medals.
Entry fee: non-members, $20. Deadline: May 13, 2017.
For a copy of the prospectus, visit our website or send sase to:
D. Wels, Corr. Secy., 1710 First Ave., #245, New York, NY 10128
Juried by digital submission only. Online entries accepted.
Visit www.nationalsocietyofpaintersincaseinandacrylic.com for details.
perspective
NEWS, INSTRUCTION, INSPIRATION
TRENDING ARTISTS
ABOVE:
A Gathering,
A Confrontation
(Self-Portrait
in the Garden)
(charcoal,
acrylic, 23-karat
gold leaf and
black ink on
coffee-stained
paper, 24x44)
RIGHT:
Theia I (charcoal,
23-karat gold
leaf, black ink,
10x8), influenced
by Leonardo da
Vinci.
THE ARTIST’S LIFE 10
DRAWING BOARD 14
BRUSHING UP 22
ALESSANDRA MARIA
ALTHOUGH
YOUNG,
Alessandra
Maria makes
paintings
that are
imbued with a spiritual frankness and exploration more
often found in the confidence
of a seasoned artist. Her past
schooling at a Catholic girls’
high school and her interest in
Buddhism influence her subject matter. She uses black
ink for its staining power—a
meditation on what’s permanent and what’s fleeting. “In
Abrahamic religions, feminine
power has been embodied
with few exceptions in three
forms: the virgin, the whore,
and the mother,” she says. “A
woman’s most virtuous role
was defined insofar as her
being an object or vessel for
someone else.” Alessandra
Maria aims to create her
own narrative for women.
She says of A Gathering, A
Confrontation (Self-Portrait in
the Garden): “It tells the story
of the artist coming to terms
with her whole being.”
See more of her work at
alessandramaria.com.
May 2017
MAY 2017
7
7
Richeson
e
h
t
Product Project
15 Days of FREE Products!
enter every day!
Visit win.artistsnetwork.com for details!
Shipping included to all U.S.A. and Canada.
Any Lyptus
Easel up to
Retail
Value
$300
ICE!
O
H
RC
YOU
14
Retail Value $150.00
BEST
Stretcher
Bars
Retail Value $300.00
May
Retail Value $200.00
11
Richeson
Handrolled
Pastels
Retail Value $150.00
15
May
Any BEST
Oak Easel,
Taboret or
Print Rack
!
OICE
H
C
R
YOU
Richeson
Caseins
Retail Value $200.00
Gessoed
Panels
Retail Value $200.00
8
up to Retail Value $500.00
May
May
7
4
Asst. Quiller
Watercolors
12
Retail Value $200.00
May
Richeson
Pastel
Surfaces
Richeson Oils
Assortment
May
May
10
up to Retail Value $500.00
3
May
May
11" Press
Package
Retail Value $965.00
May
Any BEST
Oak Easel,
Taboret or
Print Rack
!
OICE
H
C
R
YOU
Retail Value $200.00
13
6
Retail Value $100.00
May
May
9
Paintstik ®
Assortment
St. Petersburg
Watercolors
Full Pan
May
5
Retail Value $300.00
2
May
May
1
Grey MattersTM
Brushes
Enter to Win a Richeson Product
Every Day! win.artistsnetwork.com
Richeson
Paper Asst.
Retail Value $300.00
Manufacturer
of Fine Art
Materials
in this issue
May 2017
Volume 33 Number 4
Columns
4Letter from the Editor
7Perspective
10The Artist’s Life
14Drawing Board
22Brushing Up
62Ask the Experts
66Road Test
72 Competition Spotlight
28
Features
28
The Moment In-Between
Portraying scenes from everyday life, Sally Strand concentrates
on what happens before and after. By robert K. Carsten
36
The Barb Beneath the Beauty
An artist defies expectations by layering sheets of Plexiglas
painted with glitz, glitter—and acrylic. By Patti Brady
44
The Art of Excess
Teresa Oaxaca casts her characters from commedia dell’arte,
classical music, doll factories and carnivals. By Judith Fairly
52
“I Have Too Many Things To Do In Life”
on the cover
36Acrylic on Plexiglas
14Drawing with Mixed Media
44, 36The Art of Excess:
Teresa Oaxaca & Patti Brady
52The First Impressionist
11On Location in the Arctic
22 Painting the Mouth
62 Plein Air Survival
7 Portraits in Gold
10 Greetings in Woodcuts
12 Maps of Imagined Places
Summer Evening (oil on
linen, 40x48) by Julio Reyes
Cover:
Called “the first Impressionist,” Frédéric Bazille painted with
Claude Monet and died on a battlefield. By Jerry N. Weiss
online:
After the Rush (oil on canvas,
36x48) by Sally Strand
above:
More inspiration and instruction at
artistsnetwork.com.
Subscriptions/renewals: artists
network.com/artists-magazine-2
The Artist’s Life
Edited by McKenzie Graham
Carving Out Time for Hellos
Woodblock letterpress prints become poignant greeting cards at Heartell Press.
What is your history in
art making?
Rachel Kroh: I discovered
printmaking as an undergrad
at Sarah Lawrence College.
After getting a master’s
degree in art and religion
at Yale Divinity School, I
realized that printmaking is
TAM:
10 artistsmagazine.com
10 artistsmagazine.com
my true calling and returned
to school for an MFA in print
media from the School of the
Art Institute of Chicago.
How did you get started
with woodcuts?
RK: I always came back to
relief printing because it
works well with my drawing
style, and I love the meditational aspect of carving. I
chose wood-block printing for
Heartell cards because the
obvious mark of my hands
in the images is a good fit
for the relational, personal
nature of stationery. I think
woodblock is the most
TAM:
elemental and intimate of the
printmaking processes.
How did you name your
company?
RK: Heartell is a made-up
word inspired by the colloquial
phrase “hear tell.” I wanted
a name that would evoke
a sense of connection and
sharing. Speaking from the
heart can be challenging, but
it’s so rewarding, and my hope
is that my work makes that
kind of communication easier.
TAM:
What kinds of emotions
are you trying to elicit with
your work?
TAM:
ABOVE: Letterpress
cards printed
with hand-carved
woodblocks line
the shelves at
Heartell Press.
LEFT: Kroh mixes
ink in preparation
for printing in
her studio.
OPPOSITE TOP: A
woodblock is
poised, ready
for printing on
the letterpress.
ARCTIC PAINTING with Cory Trépanier
The first cards I made
were sympathy cards. My
mom was sick at the time,
and I found that sympathy
cards tended to be either
too formal or used humor to
lighten things up. I wanted a
card that was warm and sincere and would let the giver
acknowledge the pain the
receiver was feeling without
trying to fix or minimize it.
Not that everything has to be
somber or tinged with gray,
but I want to design images
and words that honor the full
spectrum of emotions.
RK:
What is your process?
RK: Each card begins as a
word or phrase. Then, I make
thumbnail sketches while
I’m thinking about how to
arrange the image and the
words. Once I’ve worked out
an idea, I do a bigger drawing with graphite and felt tip
pens. Recently, I bought a
Wacom tablet, and I’m having
a lot of fun drawing with that
these days. I set the type
in Illustrator or Photoshop
and print it on a laser printer.
Then I use a blender pen
to transfer the design onto
a block of shina plywood
(a soft, strong wood grown
and harvested especially
for woodblock printing in
Japan). I carve the wood with
hand tools and then print
the resulting image using my
Chandler & Price Pilot Press.
Each color in a design has a
separate carved block, so if
there’s more than one color,
I’ll do another print run for
each color. It’s a lot of work,
but it’s a labor of love, and
I feel so lucky to be making
prints for a living!
TAM:
ABOVE: Along the
Plein air painting usuIce (oil on linen,
ally evokes images of the
19x40) was painted
warm sun, a breeze, a
at Coronation Fiord
quiet meadow—not so for
on Baffin Island in
Canadian landscape artNunavut, Canada.
ist Cory Trépanier who
LEFT: Trépanier
braves freezing temperapaints a picture
tures to paint the arctic. “In the North, I found a raw and
of an iceberg from
vast natural world, much of it seemingly untouched, with
Inuit-guide Billy
landscapes that are so primeval that it’s like stepping back
Arnaquq’s boat.
Photo by Marten
in time to the beginning of creation,” says Trépanier whose
Berkman
Into the Arctic exhibition will begin touring the U.S. in 2017.
Although it’s cold, he says the temperature isn’t his biggest
BELOW: Trépanier
obstacle. Extreme weather patterns and wild animals like
lays the final
polar bears and wolves present a more dramatic possibility
brushstrokes on his
15-foot wide Great
as Trépanier traverses the tundra.
Glacier (oil on linen,
Working in the arctic hasn’t just pushed Trépanier
66x180), a scene
physically, it’s also been a challenge artistically. His palette
from Ellesmere
has had to reflect new colors and lighting, and the landIsland in Canada.
scape’s shapes have more hard lines and edges. “It took a
while to study what the sun was doing to the land, how
it accentuated the forms of the mountains,” says Trépanier. “I did begin to see
the subtle shift in color temperature throughout the day and would find myself
returning hours later. I even got up almost every hour one night, to my brother’s
chagrin, to see what the sun was doing.”
SEE TRÉPANIER’S TOUR STOPS AT INTOTHEARCTIC.CA/EXHIBITIONTOUR.
May 2017
MAY 2017
11
11
The Artist’s Life
MAPPING NEW TERRAIN
INTERIOR ILLUSTRATION FROM LEVIATHAN BY SCOTT WESTERFELD ILLUSTRATED BY KEITH THOMPSON;
FROM SIMON PULSE, AN IMPRINT OF SIMON & SCHUSTER CHILDREN’S PUBLISHING DIVISION
Every two years, the best cartographers and artists in the world are
chosen and represented in the Atlas
of Design. Volume 3 sold out almost
as quickly as it was published. Here
are two of our favorite designs. ■
Mars Cartography (ink on parchment paper, 24x36) by Michael Allen
Nesmith was made with references from
NASA and the Europe Space Administration (ESA). After creating the map with
a thick-point pen, Nesmith started over
with a fine-point to make the map look
antiquated. He studied antique maps
along the way to adopt certain detailing
(like the script font). He says in the Atlas,
“Given that the landscape of Mars is both
new to cartographers and very old, it
seemed fitting to tell the planet’s story in
the style of an antique New World map.”
ABOVE:
Caricature Map of Europe 1914
by Keith Thompson was created for
Scott Westerfeld’s novel Leviathan. The
novel portrays an alternate world history:
Clanker Powers, Darwinist Powers and
Neutral Nations (color coded).
LEFT:
READ MORE AT ATLASOFDESIGN.ORG.
12 artistsmagazine.com
12 artistsmagazine.com
TRY FLUID FOR FREE!
$25
WatercolorWatercolor
Paper Collection
Paper Collection
n
VALUE
FREE*
Purchase any 3 of your
favorite Fluid products*
and receive a FREE sample
pack of Fluid papers.
Includes samples of all Fluid & Fluid 100 watercolor papers
Sample pack includes
20 – 8x10 assorted sheets
of the complete Fluid
product range.
*SELECT FROM
$25
VALUE
FREE*
20 Assorted Sheets
FREE with purchase of
any 3 Fluid products*
SAMPLE PACK CONTENTS
100
100% COTTON
100% COTTON
4 sheets 140 lb. / 300 gsm Cold Press
4 sheets 140 lb. / 300 gsm Hot Press
2 sheets 300 lb. / 640 gsm Cold Press
Rolls
Packaged Sheets
Pochettes
HIGH ALPHA CELLU-OSE
5 sheets 140 lb. / 300 gsm Cold Press
5 sheets 140 lb. / 300 gsm Hot Press
ACID FREE
Available only at participating art
supply stores or online retailers.
Visit globalartmaterials.com to
find a list of participating retailers
and to see the complete range of
and
products.
2 SHEETS–300 LB/640 GSM COLD PRESS
4 SHEETS–140 LB/300 GSM HOT PRESS
4 SHEETS–140 LB/300 GSM COLD PRESS
Kansas City, Missouri 64108
find out more at globalartmaterials.com
5 SHEETS–140 LB/300 GSM COLD PRESS
5 SHEETS–140 LB/300 GSM COLD PRESS
Drawing Board
By Julio Reyes
Leave No Media Behind
One artist explores drafting film and mixed drawing media for a
contemporary twist on traditional techniques.
to break the rules, it’s good to know
what the rules are. Once those are
established, it’s time to incorporate
new techniques!
ABOVE: Deliverance
(mixed media
on drafting film,
16x161⁄2)
14 artistsmagazine.com
14 artistsmagazine.com
WE LIVE IN A TIME of great technological innova-
tion, and I feel fortunate to be making art when so
many new means and materials are at our fingertips.
The trick is to understand what you want out of your
materials and what it is you’d like to achieve by using
them. Learning how to use traditional materials (paper
made of cellulose, wood panels, real gesso, etc.) and
traditional approaches makes a good foundation for
understanding how to experiment in the studio and
how to incorporate innovative new materials into
your body of work. Learning to make things well is
paramount. Many of history’s masterpieces are the
result of innovations in thought and execution, but
they’re made so exquisitely and with such expertise as
to survive the centuries. Hence, in order to know how
WATER-BASED MEDIA IN
DRAWINGS
In my recent work, I’ve been experimenting with introducing waterbased media into my drawing process.
I’ve always loved the draftsmanship
and calligraphy of pencil, charcoal
and other dry media and thought it
would be interesting to combine those
with expressive and atmospheric
washes of media like ink, gouache
and acrylic. Some of my favorite
drawings by Käthe Kollwitz and
Vincent van Gogh combine various
media such as charcoal, pastel, ink
and lithographic crayon. There are
also exquisite examples in history of
watercolor and/or gouache being used
in concert with graphite and other dry
media by masters such as Albrecht
Dürer and Hans Holbein. Many of
these works, however, were done on
what we would now consider traditional materials, such as vellum, paper
and prepared wood panels, all of
which have certain strengths (which
I love), but also limitations that don’t
always align with my own propensities, work habits or degree of patience.
I’ve done drawings that combined the use of different media—
even wet media—but not without
incredible restraint and careful
planning. This time, I wanted to see
if there were materials that might
allow me to be more spontaneous and
aggressive in the way I constructed
a drawing. I wanted materials that
wouldn’t warp with time and/or
moisture; that would hold up against
Pigments
pulverized
perfectly.
Milling is just another word for grinding, crushing or pulverizing. Each
pigment (or combination of pigments) has a different breaking point.
Go past it, and the pigment loses its character. Fall too far short, and
the color is clumsy and unrefined. Some paint makers put a particular
paint consistency ahead of color. We choose to balance working
properties with the best expression of color in each pigment.
Williamsburg makes paint with personality, with history and integrity;
the same qualities you strive for in your art. Look for Williamsburg in
your art supply store or visit williamsburgoils.com.
©2017 Golden Artist Colors, Inc., 188 Bell Rd., New Berlin, NY 13411
607-847-6154
Drawing Board
repeat washes; that wouldn’t crumble
or dissolve under a stiff brush or tear
when I scrubbed or sanded the surface. I wanted materials that would
allow me to interchange, at will, the
hard dry point of a carbon pencil, the
sooty black powder of charcoal and
the deep saturating veils of black ink,
without having to be so restrained by
the intrinsic limitations of paper. I
needed to experiment with new materials in search of a solution that better
suited my needs, but I didn’t want to
compromise the “soundness” of my
drawings in terms of conservation.
DURA-LAR AND MYLAR
Drafting fi lm has been around for
some time; years ago, I’d heard of
16 artistsmagazine.com
16 artistsmagazine.com
some contemporary painters like
Alex Kanevsky using drafting fi lm as
a paint surface for oils, and it wasn’t
until recently that I decided to give it
a try. Drafting fi lm is a nonabsorbent
polyester fi lm that can be purchased
in either a transparent or matte
(“frosted”) finish. The kind I use is
frosted on both sides. It’s semitransparent and is called Dura-Lar.
Traditional paper is essentially a
thin layer of intermingled cellulose
fiber, and depending on what kind of
paper you’re using, it’s susceptible to
moisture and will tear when saturated
with enough water or when erased
too vigorously. This is not the case
with drafting fi lm. The surface is
smooth, consistent and translucent.
a selection of drawing tools
and applicators kept close at hand
TOP LEFT:
Washes and light veils
of black gesso define the darks in
this small preparatory study for
Moonlight Moth.
BOTTOM LEFT:
Moonlight Moth (mixed
media on drafting film, 36x171⁄2)
TOP RIGHT:
Essentially, it’s plastic: tough, nonyellowing and waterproof, so it will last
forever. The frosted Dura-Lar is what
you want; the matte surface is created by very fine irregularities in the
surface that reflect light by scattering
it in all directions and allowing for a
mechanical bond to occur between
the fi lm and your media. Graphite,
The New ARTristic Easel
Put your artwork Exactly where you want it
Enjoy the
Enjoy
fre
dom
freedom
to sit...
Our newest
ARTristic Easel still
lets you position
your canvas or
board precisely
where you want
it...at will.
Work at your
table...
...or stand
while
e
painting
paintting
g
...or lock
the legs
wide for
Plein air
stability
Looks
expensive
doesn’t it?
It isn’t!
Visit or call right now!! www.artristic.com
t i ti
715-891-3221
Drawing Board
I use semitransparent,
frosted drafting film, shown here to
demonstrate the level of transparency.
TOP LEFT:
BOTTOM LEFT: I painted abstract shapes
on the back of the film so they would
show through.
carbon pencil and charcoal will
adhere to it, and ink, acrylic gesso
and gouache can be used generously
and without excessive beading. Th is
surface is a unique option but with
special attributes that you really
have to want in order to use it in
place of paper. The look, feel and
texture of a drawing made on drafting fi lm are different than those of a
drawing on paper. Marks made on
drafting fi lm are smoother and more
uniform, and will lack the character
of marks made on quality paper. As
with every choice in materials, there
are pros and cons you must weigh
for yourself.
18 artistsmagazine.com
18 artistsmagazine.com
MIXED DRAWING MEDIA ON
DRAFTING FILM
I wanted to take advantage of drafting fi lm’s semi-opaque qualities
in Moonlight Moth and Deliverance.
Before gluing the fi lm to a panel, I
used thin veils of ink to paint very
careful, intentional abstract forms
onto the reverse side of the drafting
fi lm (i.e., the side that would be glued
to the panel). I knew these shapes
would be visible on the front once
the fi lm was mounted, acting as a
kind of tone on which I could begin
my drawing and out of which I could
pull and define my initial forms. The
ghostly and layered quality achieved
by this technique lends an added
dimension to the finished drawing.
Drafting fi lm, like paper,
requires no special prep in order
for you to get started. Once I had it
mounted to a panel, I proceeded as I
would with any other drawing. First, I
used a combination of charcoal, paper
stubs, charcoal powder and Colorfin
PanPastel in order to loosely define
my forms and edges; however, because
drafting fi lm makes blending, erasing and making corrections so easy, I
moved more freely and with greater
ease when blocking in. Then, with
the rough structure in place, I further
defined my darks with washes and
light veils of black gesso. Depending
on the piece, I’m either trying to
be very careful at this stage or very
expressive and gestural with my
mark-making, using everything from
sponges, fingers, toothbrushes, sumi
brushes, bristle brushes, sandpaper,
etc., in order to achieve the textures
and tones I want. Black gesso is great
because it’s matte and has a little tooth,
which works well with charcoal and
carbon pencil, making it easier to
build on for further interest or value.
At the next stage, I began to use
more refined drawing and crosshatching techniques with charcoal and
carbon pencil in order to refine gradations, resolve structural issues and give
added dimensionality to my forms. I
tried to bring each stage up evenly,
never obsessing on any one passage
over another. For me, approaching
the last stage of finishing a drawing
is entirely intuitive. I try everything
until the piece feels finished.
MIXING IT UP
Once the entire surface of my drawing had at least some level of attention and coverage, I felt the qualities
National
N
i
lP
Portrait
i & Figurative
Fi
i Artist’s
A i ’ C
Conference
f
•A
April
il 20
20-23,
23 2017
oin us in Atlanta, Georgia for our 19th annual The Art of the Portrait®
conference. The conversations and camaraderie will begin on Thursday
evening during the ever popular Face-Off demonstrations and flow
throughout the weekend with a diverse array of demonstrations,
illustrated lectures, portfolio reviews, Art Materials room, the 6x9 Mystery Art Sale, the
International Portrait Competition paintings...and so much more.
C o n f e r e n c e T u i t i o n : $495 Members - $595 Non-Members
Richard Schmid
2017 Excellence in Fine Art
Education Recipient
2017
Distinguished
Faculty
Sam Adoquei
Kathy Anderson
Juliette Aristides
Anna Rose Bain
Scott Burdick
Judith Carducci
Casey Childs
Michelle Dunaway
Daniel Greene
Jeffrey Hein
Edward Jonas
Scott Jones
Ann Manry Kenyon
Daniel Keys
Everett Raymond Kinstler
Bart Lindstrom
Susan Lyon
Beverly McNeil
Ricky Mujica
Michael Shane Neal
Alicia Ponzio
Tony Pro
Kate Sammons
Mary Sauer
Molly Schmid
Daniel Sprick
Katherine Stone
John Howard Sanden
Sadie Jernigan Valeri
Dawn Whitelaw
Mary Whyte
To l l - f re e 1 - 8 7 7 - 7 7 2 - 4 3 2 1
i n f o @ p o r t r a i t s o c i e t y. o r g
w w w. p o r t r a i t s o c i e t y. o r g
PAINTING & DRAWING WORKSHOPS
2017 Painting &
Drawing Faculty
Rebecca Campbell • Charlie Ciali
Stephanie Lee • Robert Dvorák
David Reid-Marr • Margaret Scanlan
Marie Thibeault • and more!
Register Now!
summer@idyllwildarts.org
951.468.7265
idyllwildarts.org
BLEND SOFTLY, AND CARRY A BIG TUBE OF WHITE.
While supplies last, your favorite GOLDEN retailers are
giving artists more of the only truly slow-drying acrylic
paints available. OPEN lets you take your time and use
techniques usually reserved for oils. OPEN can be
painting te
mixed with regular acrylic paints, cleans up with soap and
water, and doesn’t need solvents or harsh fumes. Ask your
DUWVXSSO\VWRUHDERXW23(1$FU\OLFVRU¿QGRXWPRUHDW
DUWVXSSO\
goldenpaints.com/OPEN.
golden
BUY ANY THREE 2 OZ. OPEN COLORS
GET 5 oz. OPEN TITANIUM WHITE FREE!
May 8 through June 30, 2017, while supplies last at participating retailers.
©2017 Golden Artist Colors, Inc., 188 Bell Rd., New Berlin, NY 13411
©2
ʄ
#goldenpaints
Drawing Board
Two exciting new
releases to sharpen
your skills!
Amery
BOHLING
Seascape Painting Secrets™
!
NEW
Michele
BYRNE
Painting
Impressionistic Figures
of drafting fi lm shone. It handled the
rough treatments like heavy markmaking, blending and even light
sanding with sandpaper. It stood
up superbly to heavy washes with
black gesso and vigorous applications
in which I used coarse brushes (i.e.
bristle brushes and house-painting
brushes). I found I could switch
between media, layering one on top
of the other almost immediately, and
the effect was organic and cohesive.
At times, I would take a heavily
loaded wet sponge and pull every
layer off, down to the raw fi lm, or
push it around, creating a soup of
washed-out charcoal, graphite and
pastel. The drafting fi lm didn’t ripple
or buckle. I sprayed patterns by dipping a toothbrush in black gesso and
Carbon pencil refines
gradations, resolves structural issues
and gives added dimension to forms.
ABOVE:
running my finger over the bristles,
or by dripping a sponge loaded with
black ink over the drawing. I dusted
the surface with charcoal powder and
sprayed it with isopropyl alcohol or
acetone. I mixed charcoal powder
with acetone and painted with it,
which I could then blend and erase
once the acetone evaporated out of
the charcoal. I tried everything. It
was a big experiment, and it was a
success. ■
JULIO REYES is a highly awarded artist
whose work has appeared in numerous
publications and exhibitions nationwide.
Find more of his work at julioreyes.com.
NEW!
1-877-867-0324
LiliArtVideo.com
May 2017
MAY 2017
21
21
™
Brushing Up
By Candice Bohannon
The Mouth Tells All
With so many revelations flickering across the lips, the mouth
is sure to betray something entrancing about your subject.
THE MOUTH isn’t typically the fi rst
thing we think of when viewing or
creating a portrait; it regularly plays
second fiddle to the eyes and is often
overlooked. Let’s take a moment to
celebrate the mouth and all of its
expressive potential. If the eyes are
windows to the soul, then perhaps
we can consider the mouth to be the
gateway, the threshold through which
the body is nourished and the mind
expressed. Food, sustenance, air;
words, laughter, moans of pleasure
and pain—all these pass through
the mouth’s parted gates. A person’s
mouth can reveal a dour personality, inherent optimism or inveterate
anger; it can express sadness, joy,
sensuality, frustration, disapproval,
desire, deception, doubt, suppressed
emotion, disgust, dishonesty, anticipation, anxiety or concern. Its various
forms of communication, verbal and
nonverbal, are something we all learn
to read well, making the mouth an
important part of a portrait.
POSITIONING OF THE MOUTH
I find painting the mouth, especially
the lips, to be a difficult part of the
Placing the mouth at the correct angle was essential in portraying
the feeling of repose in my painting
Bed of Gold (oil on panel, 8x14).
Misaligning or extending the mouth
corners can create an odd expression
and, in this case, would have added
tension, changing the dynamic of this
painting. The lips are a light-value,
soft pink, which helps them blend into
the surrounding flesh. I painted the
centerline in a more vibrant red, connoting warmth and drawing attention
to the lips.
LEFT:
22 artistsmagazine.com
22 artistsmagazine.com
Taught by Tim Laman & Michael Melford
70%
O
RD
off
E R BY M
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PHOTOGRAPHERS
LECTURE TITLES
Landscape
31
LIM
TIME O
F
R
FE
ED
IT
The National Geographic
Guide to Landscape and
Wildlife Photography
AY
1.
Landscape Photographer, Landscape Artist
2.
Seeing the Way the Camera Sees
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
What’s in My Bag?
Four Kinds of Light in Landscapes
Landscape Color Variation and Combinations
Nighttime and Daytime Skyscapes
Above- and Below-Surface Waterscapes
Landscape Photography Site Research
Drive-By Photography: Travel Photos
Computer Editing: Review and Cataloging
Computer Editing: Development
Five Ideas for Successful Landscape Photos
Wildlife
Photograph Landscapes and
Wildlife like an Expert
Our world is filled with so much beauty that demands to be
photographed. The only problem: the perfect landscape or wildlife
shot is so tricky that if you don’t know how to shoot what you’re
seeing, you’re likely to let these natural wonders pass you by.
In The National Geographic Guide to Landscape and Wildlife
Photography, popular National Geographic photographers Michael
Melford and Tim Laman reveal their tips and secrets about what
makes for great landscape and wildlife photography. Taking you
around the world from the comfort of your home, they’ve created
24 visually-rich, adventure-packed, and practical lessons. Learn to
take unforgettable photos of desert cliffs, penguin colonies, dramatic
waterfalls, birds of paradise, and so much more. With their expert
insight, you’ll come away with empowering ideas the next time you
find yourself in the perfect spot at the perfect time of day, or up-close
with a curious animal.
Offer expires 05/31/17
THEGREATCOURSES.COM/8 TA
1-800-832-2412
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
Wildlife Photography
Photographing Winter Wildlife
Photographing Island Wildlife
Nighttime Wildlife Photography
Documenting Biodiversity
Photographing Life in the Sea
Camera Traps for Elusive Wildlife
Antarctica: A Photographer’s Paradise
Photography on the Road
Orangutans: Photographing
Animal Communities
23. Birds of Paradise: Ultimate Photo Challenge
24. Getting Your Best Wildlife Photo
The National Geographic Guide to
Landscape and Wildlife Photography
Course no. 7941 | 24 lectures (30 minutes/lecture)
SAVE $190
DVD $269.95 NOW $79.95
+$10 Shipping, Processing, and Lifetime Satisfaction Guarantee
Priority Code: 140004
For over 25 years, The Great Courses has brought
the world’s foremost educators to millions who want
to go deeper into the subjects that matter most. No
exams. No homework. Just a world of knowledge
available anytime, anywhere. Download or stream
to your laptop or PC, or use our free apps for iPad,
iPhone, Android, Kindle Fire, or Roku. Over 600
courses available at www.TheGreatCourses.com.
Brushing Up
LEFT AND ABOVE: In Portrait of Louise de
Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth (oil on
canvas, 491 ⁄4x40), by Peter Lely (English,
1618–1680), the mouth is small and
full, portraying a youthful and intoxicating desirability. The rich color draws the
viewer’s eyes to the subject’s lips first,
setting the mood for the portrait.
DIGITAL IMAGE COURTESY OF THE GETTY’S OPEN CONTENT
PROGRAM
Despite the obvious allusions to death with the positioning of the subject’s body in Amaranth (oil on linen, 41x21), Julio Reyes used
the lips to tell another story altogether. Upon peering at the roseate flush of those youthful lips, we realize the young girl is full of vitality
and health. The warm red color intensifies toward the center of the mouth and dissipates towards the edges, creating drama and energy.
ABOVE:
24 artistsmagazine.com
24 artistsmagazine.com
ANNOUNCING…
portrait. This complicated section of
a face needs to feel uncomplicated
and natural, or I risk accidentally
creating tension in that area, a place
we examine to read the emotion of
another human being; any mistakes
are sure to make the portrait seem
off in a big way.
To paint a mouth, I start by laying the proper foundation. I make
sure that the width of the cheekbones, the length of the nose and
the shape and set of the chin are in
their proper places before moving on
to place the mouth. The corners of a
relaxed mouth often line up directly
below the center of the eyes’ pupils
when the subject faces forward.
I start the mouth by marking
the corners, being careful to observe
whether one side is higher or lower
than the other, pulled evenly or
irregularly. Frequently, people don’t
have perfectly symmetrical features,
and one corner of the mouth might
be doing something slightly different
from the other corner. These details
can add to the character of the
mouth. It’s also important to ensure
that the tilt of the head is reflected in
the mouth’s placement.
Then I put time and care into
describing the centerline of the mouth,
articulating how it dips and curves.
This dark line or area is essential in
setting the expression of the lips. I
then set the shadow under the bottom lip to give it a sense of fullness.
Wi t h a p ro fe s s i o n a l & a ffo rd a b l e
we b s i te yo u w i l l b e b e t te r
e q u i p p e d to p ro m o te & s e l l yo u r
wo r k . A r t s p a n’s n e we s t te m p l a te s
p rov i d e a f u l l y e q u i p p e d l i n e o f
l ayo u t s & ve r s a t i l e d e s i gn s.
A l l s i t e s i n c lu de :
Fu l l Ec omme r c e Pack age
*P R I N TS - ON -DE M AND*
EASY TO USE - FR EE TRIAL
a r t - p e te r ke tc hum
For additional instruction
from Candice Bohannon, go to
bit.ly/Painting-the-Mouth.
artspan.com
working for artists since 1999
www.artspan.com / join
FORM AND COLORS OF LIPS
When painting the lips, remember
that they’re wrapping around the
curvature of the teeth and that the
light will change across the length
of both top and bottom lips as they
stretch around the bulge of the teeth.
Think of the planes of the upper lip
as generally pushing outward in the
center of the mouth and progressively
turning inward toward the corners.
May 2017
MAY 2017
25
25
Brushing Up
With his economical application of paint, Travis Schlaht managed
to fully articulate the expressive
potential of the mouth in Chris (oil on
canvas, 25 4 ⁄5x19¾). You can feel how
the upper lip pushes outward in the
center of the mouth and turns inward
toward the corners. The loosely
established facial hair catches light
and falls into shadow, articulating
the fine curvature of the area as well.
The dark shadow under the bottom
lip accentuates the fullness of the lip
above, and the corners of the mouth
convey that the subject is a relaxed
and composed individual.
ABOVE:
The upper lip is usually shadowy due
to overhead lighting. The bottom lip
also curves inward at the corners of
the mouth and typically catches a
highlight; the exact shape and placement of that highlight is important in
describing the form of the lower lip.
I find that, unless the subject
is wearing lipstick, the lips are
similar in color and value to the
fleshtones I’ve mixed for the rest of
the face, with a hint more warmth
and saturation. Everyone is different, so I pay close attention to the
subject before me. I’ve seen lips that
are the same value as the flesh of the
cheek, and lips that are naturally
much darker, and some people have
a more pigmented upper lip than
26 artistsmagazine.com
26 artistsmagazine.com
“A portrait is a painting
with something wrong with
the mouth.” JOHN SINGER SARGENT
bottom lip. The colors in the lips will
have warmer areas and cooler areas.
THE SKIN AROUND THE LIPS
Having soft edges between the lips
and surrounding flesh is critical. Th is
cannot be overstated. The two areas
bleed together gently, especially on
the edges of the bottom lip.
I pay particular attention to the
value and hue of the skin surrounding
the lips. The delicate changes of value
from the bottom of the nose to the
corners of the mouth and from the
corners of the mouth to the dip of the
chin reveal the dimensional projection of the mouth area. Without these
value shifts, the mouth area appears
flat and pasted on. I’ve found that
the flesh between the nose and the
lips tends to be a touch less saturated
in color than the cheeks or forehead,
often having a trace more greenish
gray or neutral umber hue as it cuts
inward toward the corners of the
mouth. The shadow directly under
the lip is also often less saturated and
cooler than other facial shadows.
TEETH AND CORNER LINES
When painting an open mouth,
beware of making that shadowy
cavern too dark; this can give a
frightening appearance. Teeth are
usually a warm gray that is dimmer
in value than you may at first believe;
I typically start with a bit of flesh
color and gray it out with black and
white or raw umber to get the right
hue. Be aware that if you define the
teeth distinctly in a painting, all that
minute detail within the relatively
small area inside a mouth will draw
intense attention. Also, painting
teeth too light or highly detailed may
make them look more alarming than
natural. I recommend painting them
softly defined and shadowy.
Finally, the lines at the corners of
the mouth tell the tale of thousands
of smiles and frowns, and can add
dimension to your subject’s character.
A FINE-TUNED FEATURE
The portraits in this article provide a
small sampling of the revelatory capabilities of the mouth. We see etched
into its shape and set a person’s vitality, affections, character, disposition,
age, joys and sorrows. This is a rich
area for expression—a fine-tuned
feature, worthy of your attention. ■
CANDICE BOHANNON is a highly awarded
figure/portrait artist. Visit her website at
candicebohannon.com.
i
Follow Us on Instagram
instagram.com/artistsmagazine
Colored
Pencil
Make Your Mark
I keep renewing my
membership because I
owe my career to CPSA.
—CPSA charter member Linda Wesner
The Surrogates
Jeffrey Baisden, CPSA, CPX (Florida)
BXBSEt$14"
International Exhibition
Since 1990
If you create art in colored pencil
and you aren’t a member of the
Colored Pencil Society of America
yet, it’s time to cross that fine line.
CPSA is where colored pencil
artists can network, learn—and
make their mark.
Special Offer: Artists who join
CPSA by May 31 as first-time
members will have their
membership extended through
0DU+VTUFOUFSi5".
ad offer” in the blank for how
you learned about CPSA.
Join CPSA
Become a positive voice
for colored pencil fine art
www.cpsa.org
Prussian Blue,
now available for
civilian use.
PB27 or Prussian Blue was the first modern
synthetic pigment. Remarkably lightfast compared
to other blue pigments of the time, one of the first
applications was as the primary colorant for the uniform
of the Prussian Army. If your needs are less regimental, we
have 17 other blues in our palette of 178 colors.
Williamsburg makes paint with personality, with history and
ook
integrity; the same qualities you strive for in your art. Look
for Williamsburg in your art supply store or visit:
williamsburgoils.com
w
illia
m
Watch artist, David Jon Kassan, draw Artisan Pencil Maker,
John Casey, on location in our factory in Jersey City, NJ.
David’s artwork has been featured in the National Portrait Gallery in
Washington, DC and the National Portrait Gallery in London, England.
GeneralPencil.com/Videos
Pencil Makers in the USA Since 1889
GENERAL PENCIL COMPANY, INC.
Factory Jersey City, NJ USA
Info PO Box 5311 Redwood City, CA 94063
GeneralPencil.com
Made in the USA
©2017 Golden Artist Colors, Inc., 188 Bell Rd., New Berlin, NY 13411 ʄ 607-847-6154
The Moment
In-Between
HAVING ESTABLISHED A HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL PAINTING CAREER, CALIFORNIA ARTIST
SALLY STRAND RISKED IT ALL TO SEEK A DIFFERENT VISION OF WHAT ART CAN BE.
BY ROBERT K. CARSTEN
is why
some artists, already at highly accomplished and
successful points in their careers, choose to make
a dramatic change of method or style and set out
in a new direction. Perhaps even more intriguing is when those changes result in a new, higher
pinnacle in their art. Sally Stand is one such artist, and her recent work offers elegant solutions
and insights into the purpose of art.
A MATTER WORTHY OF ATTENTION
Metamorphosis
“I had painted for decades, but I was feeling
increasingly restless. I sensed that there was
much, much more to know about art than I
knew,” Strand recounts. “So I decided to enroll
part-time in a nearby MFA program. Laguna
College of Art and Design has one of the very
few graduate programs in the country with an
emphasis on representational art. At my stage
in life, it was a risk to leave a career behind in
order to go forward. But I did, and it felt good to
be among younger people in a wholly different
environment: one that was
academia-based. Instead
LEFT: Interval (oil on
of being technique-driven,
canvas, 59x47)
it was concept-driven, questioning why and how
you paint what you do. Importantly, we learned
how to look at and generate ideas from historical
art and also to recognize artistic lineage. It was
really challenging for me and proved to be just
what I was searching for.”
Delving Into the Past
One of the historical artists that continues to
be of keen interest to Strand is Fairfield Porter
(1907–1975). “Porter had the ability to balance
representational verisimilitude with abstract
structure. Also, he influenced me to paint people
and places most significant to me. Painting from
his own life, Porter was drawn to his immediate
visual surroundings: family, friends, home and
neighborhood,” says Strand. This knowledge
and recognition of how artists have worked and
reworked ideas throughout history excites and
inspires Strand to engage in a deeper, broader
vision of what art can be.
For example, when she wanted to paint a
portrait of her mother, she posed her in front
of a mirror, enabling the viewer to see not only
Strand’s subject, but also the artist at work and
May 2017
MAY 2017
29
29
30 artistsmagazine.com
30 artistsmagazine.com
darkened spaces and sunlit rooms,” says Strand. “I also
the deeper space of the room behind (see Mother, Myself,
wanted to work with perspective. The viewer is lookopposite). “Rooms in paintings can signify the inner
ing down at the scene, and I wanted to bend the edges
mind and self, whereas exterior views reflect the world,”
in this wide-angle view. I had studied the work of
says Strand. “I placed our faces close together because
Rackstraw Downes (b. 1939), who
of the deep bond and friendship we
makes paintings and drawings
share as artists and human beings.
“Rooms
in
paintings
can
with horizons that bend and who
Emotionally, as I was painting her, I
features single scenes from muljust needed my face to be almost a
signify the inner mind and
tiple angles. The curvatures in my
reflection of hers. I see her in myself.
self,
whereas
exterior
views
painting serve to create a sense of
So much of what I am is because of
movement, sweeping you into the
our relationship. Mother, Myself is a
reflect the world.”
complex arrangement of space.”
painting of pictures within pictures,
SALLY STRAND
Movement plays a significant
of artists looking at each other and
role in Lose No Time (page 32).
also seeing each other through the act
Strand explains how she captured just the right action
of creating art. My mother is a multimedia artist. In fact,
of the figure: “We had guests visiting, and I saw the
I spent much of my life growing up in her studio, and I
light beautifully streaming into the room, so I made
wouldn’t be an artist today if not for her.”
myself inconspicuous and watched them the whole
While working on Mother, Myself, Strand recollected
morning. I particularly try not to have people look
a similar idea presented in Fairfield Porter’s painting, The
posed. I prefer real life, as it’s happening. It’s the idea
Mirror, which is a portrait of Porter’s daughter as much
of fi nding a motif in the midst of life so that my art
as it is, by reflection, a self-portrait, a view of the interior
and life merge. I am painting everyday life, which conof the artist’s studio and an exterior view from a window.
nects me to a whole, historical lineage, but I’m painting
my own time, instead of some other time. Watching
Movement-Filled Spaces
people drink coffee, moving around the room, doing all
Vacation (below) is a major work in which Strand wanted
kinds of things interests me. I’ve always been drawn to
to challenge herself. “I made lots of preliminary studthe moment in-between, not the moment, for example,
ies, trying different things to piece together a multitude
when you’re stepping down a stairway fi rmly onto a
of concepts, such as deepened space; passage of time;
step. I prefer the act of stepping when you are just off a
and opposites like young and old, male and female, or
MATERIALS
SURFACES: oils: linen, cotton
duck canvas or lauan board;
pastels: UART 500 pastel paper
OILS: Sennelier, Gamblin, Utrecht
OIL MEDIUM: Winsor & Newton
Liquin, M. Graham Walnut Alkyd
Medium; mixture of Grumbacher
damar varnish, Gamblin refined
linseed oil and turpentine
BRUSHES: Richeson Grey Matters
brights; Trekell red sable filberts;
bristle filberts by Princeton,
Robert Simmons, Grumbacher
and Da Vinci; Rosemary & Co.
synthetic filberts; various flats
PASTELS: Girault, Unison, Terry
Ludwig, Sennelier, Rembrandt,
Cretacolor, Nupastel, Richeson
OPPOSITE TOP: Mother, Myself (oil
on canvas, 17½x26½)
LEFT: Vacation (oil on canvas,
32½x103½)
May 2017
MAY 2017
31
31
She explains that her way of stroking
the paper has changed over the years.
In the past she used a more linear
approach, crosshatching and building
forms accurately by mostly using the
tips of the pastels and allowing the
undercolors to show through. Now
she combines linear techniques with
loosely applied scumbling. Although
her mastery of technique in both pastel and oil is readily apparent, Strand
now views technique and accuracy as
a part of, but not the most important,
qualities of a painting.
“What I am trying to do at this
phase is mine deeper emotions in my
art rather than make a nice, technically adept piece, which is what I
felt I’d been doing,” says Strand. “In
pursuing my MFA, I didn’t have to
paint so much for a gallery. I could do
things that had more meaning to me.
That takes on a whole different flavor
for an artist with respect to content
than coming at it from the standpoint
of accuracy.”
Harriet Studio (opposite top)
bears testimony to the effectiveness
of Strand’s earnest aspirations in her
art. “My mom is a beautiful woman,
but I didn’t choose to do a painting
like that,” she explains. “We were in
the process of clearing out her studio
because, at 87, she was moving to a
senior residence. There was a lifetime
of work and things she had collected. I
grew up in her studio, so it was a very
sad time for both of us. I created this
painting as I remembered the studio from my childstep. So the figure in my painting is not down, yet he’s
hood, from the viewpoint of a child looking up. The
not completely up. He’s going through the movement
shelves are empty and form diagonals pointing toward
of getting up.
her hands, signifying she is an artist. The only thing left
“Also,” Strand continues, “what always makes
on the shelves in back is a clock,
something more interesting is the
representing time. I utilized the
light. I try to use it to extract the
abstract shapes and the interior
subject from the commonplace,
“In pursuing my MFA, I didn’t have
in a different way than I had
the mundane. So the light coming
to paint so much for a gallery.
before by including more of the
from a high window adds contrast
I
could
do
things
that
had
more
ceiling. It’s a different approach
and accentuates the forms.”
than a straight-on portrait like
meaning to me.” SALLY STRAND
those I’ve done in the past.”
Mining Emotions
Strand takes many photos of her
subject; however, she often changes things around,
Exploring Pictorial Design
building her compositions by combining elements from
It’s apparent that Strand is pursuing different conceptual
several images. In addition, the way the artist uses
ideas. “I’m trying different compositions and not necespastel strokes and textures contributes to the palpable
sarily abiding by all the rules I had learned,” she remarks.
sense of light and movement, as seen in Lose No Time.
Napster (opposite bottom) and Shower (page 34) evince
32 artistsmagazine.com
32 artistsmagazine.com
OPPOSITE TOP: Lose No Time
(pastel on paper, 17½x12)
LEFT: Harriet Studio (oil on
canvas, 30x24)
Napster (pastel on
paper, 16x24)
LEFT BELOW:
her courageous experimentation in
this area, lending a contemporary
quality to her work.
In Napster, Strand crams the
figure up front and boldly crops him
off the right side. She flattens the
background elements of sky and
grass by not including transitions in
value or saturation, and the result is
a play on spatial depth. The background simultaneously appears to
recede and compress forward against
the foreground elements, creating a
dynamic tension, pushing and pulling forms through the illusory space.
The surprising compositional
daring in Shower (page 34) places a
figure, essentially in shadow, against
light and facing out of the picture.
Our eyes are at first attracted to
the figure at far right. Strand then
deftly employs a complex interplay of
planes and abstract shapes of light, as
well as a partial view out a window,
to entice viewers’ eyes left, away
from the figure through space. It is
somewhat uncommon in Western art
to visually read a painting seemingly
backwards, from right to left, opposite of the way we read text. Strand
makes this compositionally difficult
task look both easy and natural.
The artist emphatically
addresses the perception and passage of time in Front Page (page 34).
“I had learned about historical paintings that show multiple time periods,
telling different parts of the story
simultaneously,” Strand explains.
“Th is painting of my son, depicted
repeatedly in the foreground, and
my husband, in the doorway, does
this. The front figure engages the
audience. He is moving and turning; multiple things are happening.
Forms are overlapping and edges are
May 2017
MAY 2017
33
33
ABOVE: Front Page (oil on board,
23x32)
LEFT: Shower (oil on canvas,
24x36)
RIGHT: Light Fare (oil on canvas,
24x18)
the head on one of the figures and
just left it, creating a sort of double
image. Moving things around
and leaving residual images is very
freeing. Everything doesn’t have to
be so precise and prescribed. Then
a painting can take on a quality of
its own,” she concludes.
blurred; nothing is overly defined to halt your attention.
I wanted to leave space for viewers to have their own
interpretations. Th is is something new that I’m thinking about, namely, leaving enough room for a viewer’s
imagination to fi ll in the story. I altered the position of
34 artistsmagazine.com
34 artistsmagazine.com
A Profound Essence
Light Fare (opposite), in which a family member is
engaged in an everyday activity, encapsulates many
of the explorative ideas and new territory Strand has
embarked upon. The painting seamlessly combines
A professional artist
for more than 35 years,
SALLY STRAND has
had her work in both
pastel and oil featured
in many solo exhibitions,
including a one-person
retrospective at the
Bakersfield Museum
of Art (Calif.). She was
inducted into the Pastel
Society of America’s
Hall of Fame in 2007.
Widely published, her
work has garnered
many top awards and
is represented in many
private, corporate and
museum collections.
Strand studied at the
American Academy
of Art (Chicago), the
Art Students League
of New York and the
National Academy
of Design (New York
City), and holds a bachelor of fine arts degree
from the University of
Denver and a master of
fine arts degree from
Laguna College of Art
and Design (Calif.). She
teaches workshops
and master classes
internationally.
Visit Strand’s website
at sallystrand.com.
different genres of still life, the figure, an interior and
even a hint of an exterior. Opposing values, large shapes,
deliberate color and edge qualities are all orchestrated
to grand effect. There is as much meticulous attention
to depicting space as there is to pictorial organization:
relating the abstract shapes to the flatness of the picture
plane and to the four edges of the canvas.
“There are a lot of concepts of abstraction going on
in these realistic interiors,” explains Strand. “I just see
shapes, and I’m very aware of trying to draw the eye
through the composition. I find that being more intentional with color is a part of that: for example, the way
the red violet of the flowers catches viewers’ attention
and the way the yellows move their eyes through the
composition and contrast with the violet, and the use of
red in the far room. Essentially though, I want to try to
say something. That’s where the realism comes in. I want
to make just a suggestion of a narrative, and I want all
of these elements together to create a mood. That’s very
important to me. I want my paintings to cause viewers
to stop and see something beyond the obvious—to show
the usual in an unusual way, a much deeper way.” ■
Artist, exhibitions juror and workshop instructor,
ROBERT K. CARSTEN has written extensively on art
and artists. Visit his website: robertcarsten.com.
May 2017
MAY 2017
35
35
the
Barb
Beneath the
Beauty
One of the most
original artists
working today has
an array of acrylic
mediums at her
disposal, as well as
sheets of Plexiglas
and fragments of
glitz and glitter.
By PATTI BRADY
LEFT: Blue Plate
Special (acrylic on
Plexiglas, 59x36x2)
I Broach
the Subject (acrylic
and flocking on
Plexiglas, 47x28x2)
RIGHT: Can
36 artistsmagazine.com
36
artistsmagazine.com
MINE IS A SIMPLE AND
UNIVERSAL ARTIST’S STORY:
I would sit on the floor as a child, scissors in
hand, surrounded by cheap paper—cutting
snowflakes or paper dolls, for which I had
a stronger obsession than for weather or
nature. I am still playing with dolls, just
doing it with more expensive materials.
I have a magpie’s eye, obsessively collecting patterns, colors and
just about anything with a glint
of glitz. I am not restrictive about
what I collect: My fi xations roam
through Alexander McQueen’s
baroque fabric sculptures with
their beautiful folds and gilded
embellishments; historical and
midcentury wallpaper; 14thcentury Netherlandish paintings (must be the brocade
and ermine); vinyl toys—and
I have a thing about rabbit
heads, too.
Dichotomies in Design
I will admit to being unabashedly feminist about my work.
Yeah, it’s embracing all that
decorative, ornamental
stuff that has been labeled
frivolous, froufrou, Rococo—
embellishments unnecessary
to function. I am not
drawn to Brutalist or
Minimalist, Formalist
or severely streamlined anything, in
architecture, in fashion or in art.
It is my belief
that beauty, which
I define as embracing multiplicity and
abundance, is necessary
for the soul. We all need
that momentary gasp when we
stop for a moment and recognize
delight for the eyes. I love flourishes
of color and cutout shapes that look
frothy and confectionary and odd.
Beauty can also be dangerous, and I
think of this work as embracing both: a
barb (a sharp projection extending backward, as from the point of an arrow)
beneath the beauty.
May 2017
MAY 2017
37
37
Rorschach Symmetries
There is just something primal about
Rorschachs, something delightful about the
symmetry and something a bit weird about
the inkblot. I love that the shapes are reminiscent of dissection, of heads, of animals
like stingrays and elephants, and also of
Minnie Mouse, chandeliers and hairpins.
The works in this series were all created at
Vermont Studio Center last summer. I packed
up 40 shaped, clear and mirrored Plexiglas
pieces, stacked them on plastic bins fi lled
with various Golden Fluid Acrylics, boxes of
beads, resin flowers, bags of flock, and various stencils, plus tools like hammers, nails
and more, in the back of my Honda Element
and drove to Johnson, Vermont, for four
weeks of concentrated studio work.
More Than One Dimension
My starting point or plan was that the piece
would be layered, stacked using inch-long
Plexiglas dowels. The back layer is typically
the mirrored Plexiglas (extending an inch off
the wall) and the top layer is clear Plexiglas
extending an inch from the mirrored
Plexiglas. Most of these constructions are a
combination of three separate pieces.
Each piece encompasses more than one
dimension. I wanted to magnify the impact of
each piece by creating patterns on the wall and
patterns in the reflections. Each layer complicates the image below it, and the viewer can
see through two layers. All these aspects are
part of the work’s meaning and effect.
How I Do It
In a way, each piece is like a beautiful sandwich. I work on one piece of Plexiglas at a
time. I simply allow myself to go forward
with some quirky urge, knowing that I have no
idea if my impulse will make its way into the
finished piece. It is definitely a leap of faith to
apply paint to clear plastic, as mistakes can’t be
painted over, or I will lose what I most desire,
the transparence of each layer and portion.
I create the shapes two ways: using an
iPad or paper and scissors. I have the shapes
laser cut to specific sizes by a plastics company.
For instance, Blue Plate Special (page 36)
simply developed from my looking at toile
patterns, then loving the blue and white
ABOVE: Buggy
(acrylic and resin
rosettes on Plexiglas, 40x24x2)
OPPOSITE: Camo
Lizzie (acrylic on
Plexiglas, 36x32x2)
It is my belief that beauty, which I define as
embracing multiplicity and abundance, is
necessary for the soul. PATTI BRADY
38 artistsmagazine.com
38
artistsmagazine.com
sequences, which led to Googling blue and
white plates, which led to searching for
“kitschy” patterns, which led to a history lesson about Spode Blue Italian, Chinese porcelain, and Delft blue china.
For the back piece of Blue Plate Special,
I couldn’t resist the pleasure of graffiti mark
making and accompanying drips, using
a fat refi llable paint marker fi lled with
Golden High Flow fluorescent pink (I used
the Witches Brew mop, Smash Supreme (a
paint-fi lled bottle that contains a refi llable
mop applicator)—you need to use it, too, just
because of its name!)
Of course I know that this pink (High
Flow fluoresent pink) is highly fugitive, but
Rorshach
The Rorschach
test, created
by Hermann
Rorschach
in 1922, is a
psychological
test in which
the subject
interprets an
inkblot design.
The subject’s
analysis reveals
the degree
and sophisitication of his
intelligence,
as well as his
personality and
predisposition.
In the 1960s,
the Rorschach
was the most
widely used
projective test.
toile “Toile
de Jouy,” cloth
of Jouy-ens
Joyas. In 18thcentury France,
toile de Jouy
described a
scenic pattern
printed on
cotton or silk.
Such patterns
were usually
idyllic scenes
of pastoral
pleasures.
I did spend a considerable amount of time
patiently painting two layers of Golden
Gloss MSA Varnish over the marks and the
drips. (This MSA varnish acts as a protection
from the ravages of ultraviolet light.)
Painting the Pieces
When I started working on Blue Plate Special,
I experimented with several ways to apply
the paint. I wanted to “paint” the plates on
the top layer of Plexiglas, but the Plexiglas
needed to remain somewhat transparent
so that the viewer would see the mirrored
Plexiglas underneath. I settled on a base coat
of thinned Golden Pastel Ground applied in
a circle. The ground is frosty, but translucent.
I outlined the images, such as the birds, beehive and basket, with a Fineline Applicator
fi lled with Golden Fluid Acrylics. When
that surface had dried, I used Golden QoR
Watercolors for the actual painting.
Adding watercolor to this mix was a bit
crazy, as the watercolor is so easily lifted
by a splash of water, but I fi xed these pieces
with Golden Archival Spray Varnish, so
they’re safe.
As for the Blue Plate Special title: I
love the contradiction implied: a homey,
American lunch special (like meat loaf and
mashed potatoes) at a diner, countered by the
intricate and evanescent toile traceries in fabric and blue patterns in porcelain and china.
May 2017
MAY 2017
39
39
Why Not Excess?
Can I Broach the Subject (page 37) is an experiment in excess: the dualistic design, wherein
the bottom echoes and amplifies the top. I
don’t remember when I had the inspiration
to try flocking, but I love extreme contrasts
in my work, and the densely pink, soft, furry
flock against the hard, clear plastic was perfect. Working with flock in these detailed
shapes is quite challenging, and the glue that
works best requires the artist to use a respirator. Flock loves to be airborne, and it has
great static electricity, making it fun to wipe
clean off the clear parts of the Plexiglas.
Another instance of flocking appears
in Buggy (see page 38), whose insect pattern
was created by hand, not technology. As
a result, the patterning is a bit funky, not
always perfect and shows the artist’s hand.
The bugs are flocked and adorned with pink
resin rosettes, originally designed for making jewelry.
I don’t believe in any aesthetic hierarchies; I love jewelry, and the inspiration
for the ostrich shapes in Can I Broach the
Subject came from a broach designed by Elsa
Schiaparelli, fashion designer and friend of
Salvador Dali’s. The lower back mirror is an
actual lace pattern decorated strategically
with tiny googly eyes. (Yeah, I’m watching
you!) Finally, I added a dose of camouflage
at the top, as a comment on the extinction of
endangered species.
Another camouflage pattern appears
in Camo Lizzie (page 39) as a raised section
that I created by using Heavy Gel Gloss and
Fluid (Liquid) stainless steel, a very cold
color against the silver of the mirror. The
“Lizzie” portion of the title refers to the top
shape, which looks like a lizard skin to me.
In addition, there is a stencil pattern that
is very thick and very dark, and this dark,
almost black pattern is only seen in the mirror, because the top layer is gently slathered
with a Golden Interference glaze.
Stencils and Spray Paint
Of the three pieces of Totem (at left), one
is a mirror painted yellow so it resembles a
Spanish-style hair pin that I own. The back
mirror is painted teal with black sprayed
stencils. The top piece started with a thick,
translucent stencil of Heavy Gel Gloss and
Interference orange, with a touch of iridescent bronze. Interference paints always
sing out over a dark background. Golden
Interference colors “fl ip,” changing color
40 artistsmagazine.com
40
artistsmagazine.com
flock: a tuft of
wool or cotton
fiber; woolen or
cotton refuse
used for stuffing furniture
or mattresses;
pulverized fiber
used especially to form
a velvety pattern on cloth
or paper or a
protective covering on metal
(MerriamWebster)
OPPOSITE: Totem
(acrylic on Plexiglas, 50x20x2)
LEFT: Cirque
(acrylic on Plexiglas, 46x32x2)
when viewed from different angles; thus, the
viewer sees a color and its complement, compounding the visual array. The Interference
paints also pick up and reflect the underlying
teal patterns, providing some spectacular
color variants and variations.
Sometimes the bottom layer is a mirror,
but sometimes I use two layers of mirrors,
as I did for Cirque (above), which alludes to
Cirque du Soleil with its image of a clown’s
squirting flower, drawn with a Fineline
applicator. This squirting flower has recurred
in my work; it suggests the barb within
the beauty: The flower allures the spectator
whose revery is broken when he receives a
jolt/joke. The stripes were a challenge, to say
the least. Taping is a slow process, requiring that you measure; tape; coat with a clear
acrylic to prevent bleeding; mix a translucent
color; figure out how to spray without drips,
remove tape while the surface is still wet,
without messing the whole thing up! I can
guarantee, you can see the artist’s hand in
the stripes.
Beauty can
also be
dangerous,
and I think
of this
work as
embracing
both: a
barb (a
sharp
projection
extending
backward,
as from
the point of
an arrow)
beneath
the beauty.
PATTI BRADY
May 2017
MAY 2017
41
41
LAYER
ON TOP OF
LAYER
Red Velvet (acrylic on Plexiglas,
18x24x2) doesn’t fit my original scheme of
things. I reversed the layering of this piece
with mirrors on top and clear Plexiglas on the
bottom. As a general rule, I try to keep the areas
of the clear Plexiglas clear, but that didn’t happen
here. The airbrushed pattern actually was meant to resemble snake
skin, but it reads as tire tracks to me.
saw Vera in
That Dress (acrylic
on Plexiglas,
49x24x2)
RIGHT: I
OPPOSITE: Glenn,
Dot, Dot, Dot
(acrylic on Plexiglas,
47x33x2)
The Right Moment
When I was working on one of the backing
mirrors in I Saw Vera in That Dress (at right),
I neglected to test my mixture, and the
result was that I almost obliterated the mirror. (I know better: You should always let a
new mixture (acrylic and gloss medium) dry
before applying it, as acrylic is white when
wet and clear when dry!). The piece sat in
my studio for more than a year. Eventually, I
used a bright pink spray paint with a barbed
wire stencil and a few small, cut round mirrors to finish it. The bottom mirror piece is
encrusted with resin roses, and the top clear
Plexiglas piece exhibits a woodgrain pattern
that I created with Golden Fluid (iridescent
bronze) acrylic.
Another pattern I love and am obsessesed with (it’s also recurrent in jewelry, fashion
and even nature) is polka dots, and Glenn,
Dot, Dot, Dot (at far right) is a thank you to
the wonderful Glenn Goldberg, who was a
visiting artist at Vermont Studios, while I
was working on this series. Glenn, Dot, Dot,
Dot follows the pattern: two mirrored pieces
It is definitely a leap of faith to apply paint to a
clear plastic, as mistakes can’t be painted over,
or I will lose what I most desire, the transparence
of each layer and portion. PATTI BRADY
42 artistsmagazine.com
42
artistsmagazine.com
PATTI BRADY
is the author
of Rethinking
Acrylic: Radical
Solutions for
Exploiting the
World’s Most
Versatile Medium
(available at
northlightshop.
com). She is
the director of
the Working
Artist Program
for Golden
Artist Colors.
Her paintings
and prints have
been exhibited
nationally and
reviewed by The
New York Times.
She has exhibited at the ARC
Gallery, Chicago,
Ill.; Mills College,
Oakland, Calif.
and University
of California,
Berkeley. Her
work is in the
collections of
the Greenville
County Museum
of Art and
the Greenville
Museum of Art,
and also in the
Mark B. Coplan
Collection at the
South Carolina
State Museum.
Visit Brady’s
website at
pattibrady.com.
of Plexiglas and one, clear. I moved the polka
dot stencil into different positions to warp
the rigid grid, and thus generated diverse patterns. The sprayed, smoky gray area defined
the shape of the top piece, but it also added a
mysterious, flickering depth to the middle.
Each of my works is a compendium of
what, at any moment, I’m interested in. I follow the way one thing leads to another, and I
see no reason to pare down, simplify or stop
playing. That’s the joy, isn’t it, after all? ■
May 2017
MAY 2017
43
43
Her technique and influences firmly established in the
Baroque and Victorian eras, Teresa Oaxaca assimilates
elements from other periods in art history to fashion her
modern—and exuberant—worldview.
THE ART OF
EXCESS
By Judith Fairly
“My work is about pleasing the eye,” says Teresa Oaxaca. Indeed,
though her oeuvre includes conventional portraits in charcoal and
oil and straightforward still lifes, Oaxaca’s portfolio is dominated by
large canvases where every centimeter is filled with a riotous array of
objects (many from her collection of antique dolls, Venetian masks,
nutcrackers, China teapots and skulls that have become repertory
players in these paintings) and her trademark cascade of flowers
in full bloom strewn carelessly around a central figure, which is
often costumed in period attire and makeup. At first glance, these
paintings seem like an amusement park for the eye. With time for
contemplation, however, the visual overload, the unusual pairing
of objects and figures, the high-key saturated pigments and hyperexpressive subjects in sometimes inelegant poses find a deeper resonance with traditional realism, albeit a slightly transgressive version
of what one might find among the old masters on a museum wall.
OPPOSITE: Venetian Carnival
(oil on canvas, 60x40)
May 2017
MAY 2017
45
45
DREAMS & DOLLS
The genesis of Oaxaca’s singular style was a
calendar of Michelangelo’s frescos she saw
around the age of 5 that left her daydreaming
about the Sistine Chapel; further inspiration
was provided by a Leonardo da Vinci exhibition
when she was 13 and, by the age of 15, she was
thinking of an art career. Oaxaca often wears
period clothing that she has made or found
online, not as an affectation or as an element of
performance art but as an integral and seamless
aspect of her life as an artist. She is enamored
of 19th-century art and craftsmanship, of historical architecture, of Old World traditions
and influences. She inhabits her work. She lives
among the objects that make their way into her
paintings. The dolls in her paintings are
ABOVE: The Party (oil
on canvas, 38x56)
from her own collection from 19th-century
France and Germany.
RIGHT: Standing
“These dolls contain the spirit of another
Pierrot (oil on
age, and some have witnessed a period of
canvas, 60x34)
art history very dear to me,” she says. In
2012, she embarked on a four-month-long
self-guided Grand Tour of the art capitals of Europe—visiting
Budapest, Stockholm, Madrid, Prague, Vienna, Amsterdam and
Berlin. She views her activity in the studio as recording her experience, and travel provides “narrative” to her work.
Shunning “photographic paint application,” Oaxaca’s painterly style is consonant with her belief that figural representation
and realism were at their peak during the Baroque and Victorian
eras, though she was inspired to paint the figure by Italian painters of the Renaissance. Other influences: William Adolphe
Baroque: a style of art and architecture of the 17th and 18th century; nurtured by the Catholic Church during the CounterReformation, it depicted religious themes in a dramatic, dynamic and sensually rich style. (Baroque painting in Northern
Europe was less concerned with religious subject matter.) Advancements in science and philosophy gave rise to an interest in
the natural world, and landscape paintings cast humans in a secondary role to nature. Baroque architecture conveyed grandeur through massive scale and elaborate ornamentation. (Baroque is not to be confused with Rococo, which refers to ornate
and sometimes excessive embellishment in the decorative arts.)
46 artistsmagazine.com
46 artistsmagazine.com
LESSONS IN CRAFT
by Teresa Oaxaca
Organizing the
Palette
I prefer to lay out
my colors from light
to dark and warm to
cool. I’ve become
used to this arrangement, so I can send
my brush or palette
knife to the appropriate pile for mixing
without having to
think about it too
consciously, thus
freeing my mind for
drawing and for
working on values.
Earth Colors
I use a large number of earth colors,
umbers and lead
pigments. The earth
pigments, as well
as the oils that bind
them, have quick
drying times.
In Darkness Visible
Bouguereau (1825-1905), Aimé Nicolas Morot (1850-1913),
Antonio Mancini (1852-1930), John Singer Sargent (1856-1925)
and Gustav Klimt (1862-1918). Oaxaca has said in interviews
that her evolution from the atelier to her own painting style
was affected by the 1987 fi lm Alice, a surrealistic adaptation of
Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, by the Czech fi lmmaker
Jan Švankmajer. As is the case with surrealism, Oaxaca’s paintings often convey viewers to a dreamlike plane where identity
is unmoored, leaving the viewer to question what is real. She
My palette has been
getting larger and
brighter, in part due
to all my colorful
props like flowers
and fabrics and face
paint, but also to a
change in style from
tenebrism (from the
Italian tenebroso,
murky and the Latin
tenebrae, darkness),
denoting a style
of painting of pronounced chiaroscuro,
to a more direct
approach, wherein
I build color, not
by glazing, but by
heavier applications
of paint.
Underpainting
I like to work on oilprimed canvas. In
the past I used a dry
warm brown or cool
gray mid-tone; now I
also use Maya blue.
When beginning an
alla prima painting
or one-day sketch,
I prefer to rub raw
umber or Maya blue
onto the canvas and
then paint a mediumheavy wash over the
entire canvas. I then
start working directly
into that application. I find that I can
rub out my lights
easily and not commit, in the beginning
stages, to any sharp
lines that would distract me later. This
method also helps
me to work in terms
of mass, because
I can use light and
dark to sculpt the
features broadly.
I don’t stay at this
stage for long; after
about half an hour to
an hour, I am ready
for color.
Unifying Color
Using color on a
slightly wet and raw
umber- or blue-toned
surface also has the
advantage, at least
for me, of giving my
paint something to
work into and “overcome.” I find that
I tend to key my
lights and chromas
very high and that
the slightly swampy
underpainting brings
them back down to
earth and gives all
the colors a unity that
is only apparent when
I compare the work to
another similar pose
done straight onto a
dry surface.
More information on Teresa Oaxaca’s palette
and materials at www.naturalpigments.com/artsupply-education/teresa-oaxaca-palette/
May 2017
MAY 2017
47
47
views the dolls as “little personalities” who play
a supporting role to the subject; in paintings
such as The Dollmaker and The Sleepwalker (at
teresaoaxaca.com), however, humans and dolls
have interchangeable roles. “Dolls and miniature human sculptures go back a long way, into
the roots of human civilization,” she notes. “So
much psychology, design and craftsmanship
have gone into these artifacts.” The inanimate
objects she incorporates among her figures
also function as symbols whose meaning is
ambiguous, open to interpretation.
CARNEVAL E / CARMINA BURANA
Oaxaca is a versatile painter with a solid foundation in classical atelier technique acquired
over four years in Italy at the Angel Academy
and the Florence Academy, followed by a yearlong apprenticeship with Odd Nerdrum in
Norway. A recent series, In Taberna, inspired by
a performance of Carl Orff ’s cantata Carmina
Burana, includes lush, romantic paintings with
a darker palette, the yin to the yang of Oaxaca’s
high-chroma and celebratory Neo-Baroque
48 artistsmagazine.com
48 artistsmagazine.com
and Carnevale paintings. In Taberna (In
ABOVE: Yule (oil on
canvas, 40x60)
the Tavern) is the second of three parts in
Carmina Burana, a favorite in the classical
OPPOSITE TOP:
music repertoire based on bawdy drinking
Summer (oil on
songs attributed to the ordo vagorum, travcanvas, 32x46)
eling clerical students/scholars from the
Middle Ages who wrote “vagabond songs”
celebrating excess in all things. In paintings like Night Scene (not
shown), Oaxaca’s raging and intoxicated subjects give expression
to Orff ’s “Estuans Interius”—a “burning inside.” By contrast, her
cheerier versions of clowns—which she regards as both “timeless”
artifacts of the Baroque era with their powdered faces and also
vestigial figures with roots in commedia dell’arte and the carnival
tradition—allow her to explore the commonality of human emotion. In paintings like Laughing Queen (page 51) Oaxaca blurs the
social divide between nobility and commoner, what she cheekily
refers to as her “Aristocrat/Clown genre.”
ART HISTORICAL INFLUENCES
“I paint light,” says Oaxaca, “using multiple layers to build a
convincing illusion.” The setup is an important component of
her process; she meticulously arranges her subjects and props
to create a composition that is both planned (using her familiar
repertory of objects) and spontaneous. She prefers a naturalist
MATERIALS
BASIC PALETTE: RUBLEV COLOURS
ARTIST OILS: ultramarine blue (green
shade), antica green earth, lemon ochre,
chrome yellow primrose, lead-tin yellow dark, orange molybdate, Pozzuoli
red, vermilion, alizarin crimson, Cyprus
umber raw dark, lead white #1, bone
black
EXTENDED PALETTE: Maya blue, cobalt
chromite blue, Verona green earth,
French umber
OTHER COLORS: WINSOR & NEWTON:
cadmium yellow medium, dioxazine
purple
MICHAEL HARDING: cadmium red deep
OLD HOLLAND OR GAMBLIN: viridian
MEDIUMS: Oleogel, Epoxide Oil, aged
Washington Baroque, a.k.a. Man With A Pipe (oil on canvas, 36x56) is a wink at my new
Washington, D.C.-inspired series of portraits of locals; it will be on view at The Arts Club of
Washington, starting in November 2017.
refined linseed oil, Rublesol (odorless
mineral spirits)
SURFACES: Claessens oil-primed linen
rolls, Artefex oil-primed linen on aluminum composite panel (ACM)
May 2017
MAY 2017
49
49
THE ART OF
THEATRE
Dionysus is the ancient
Greek god of wine, revelery, ecstasy and fertility.
Theatre had its origins in
his worshipers’ festivals
that included music and
dancing.
Theatre, deriving from
thea (Greek, seeing),
means “a place for seeing.” Thaúma is Greek for
“miracle.” The characters
in Medieval mystery plays
were devils and clowns.
Pantomime started in
Rome. Players tell a
story through actions and
expressions, accompanied
by music.
Pierrot is a mime, a
stock character of the
Commedia dell’Arte; his
demeanor is sad; he
wears a white clown’s
costume.
Carnival derives from
the Italian carnevale,
“removing the meat.” It
describes a festival of
merrymaking before Lent
and/or a traveling show.
approach—the depiction of realistic objects in
a natural setting. Her cluttered canvases are a
nod to the flattened picture plane characteristic
of Medieval art and especially to the altarpieces
from that period. Usually framed by elaborate
carving that is a masterwork in itself, the twodimensional altarpieces lend themselves to
stylization and the use of pattern to eliminate
negative space. In Gustav Klimt’s devotion
to pattern and the integration of decorative
elements into his paintings—reconciling the
natural and the artificial—Oaxaca has found
a kindred spirit and an obvious inspiration for
Standing Pierrot (see page 47).
Oaxaca constructs frames for some of her paintings, casting a
sort of artistic holism over the viewing experience. Pairing carousel
frames, hand painted in pastel cotton-candy hues after the painted
ponies of 19th-century merry-go-rounds, with her Carnevale and
clown and doll paintings seems like a cheery confluence of art and
artisan, until one notices that the dainty bisque doll with the delicate features in Relic (above) has a human skull in its lap.
THE PAST IS ALWAYS ALIVE
“All my evolution is taking place on the canvas and in my head—
in what I see in nature and interpret in two dimensions on the
picture plane,” says Oaxaca. She views her art as an expression of
her need for beauty and order. At times, Oaxaca sounds like an
old soul. She laments the decline in aesthetics in livable public
Aesthetic Movement: a 19th-century philosophy which decreed that art’s value resides in its beauty and aesthetic
appeal rather than in any deeper meaning (“art for art’s sake”); sometimes regarded as a revolt against the ugliness and materialism of the Industrial Age, aestheticism is a subjective approach to experience that urges adherents to seize the moment—
“To burn always with this hard gemlike flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life.” (Walter Pater: The Renaissance)
50 artistsmagazine.com
50 artistsmagazine.com
TERESA OAXACA
received a diploma
from the Angel
Academy of Art in
Florence, Italy and did
her graduate studies at
the Florence Academy.
She apprenticed
with Odd Nerdrum in
Norway and trained
with Robert Liberace
at the Art League of
Alexandria, Va. Her
awards include First
Honor at the Portrait
Society of America
(2015) and accolades
from the American
Museum of the Cowboy,
the former Corcoran
Gallery of Art, the Art
Renewal Center, the
Elizabeth Greenshields
Foundation, the
Posey Foundation,
the Portrait Society
of America, and the
Museu Europeu d’Art
Modern in Barcelona.
Teresa Oaxaca exhibits
her work and teaches
workshops throughout
the United States and
in Europe.
ONLINE:
Visit Oaxaca’s website
at teresaoaxaca.com.
spaces and the marginalization of artists by society. Following
David Brooks’s opinion piece in the March 8, 2011 New York
Times, she champions the teaching, in the art curriculum, of little-known qualities such as equipose, attunement, metis, sympathy and limerence. She feels a deep
fellowship with artists who “embrace
OPPOSITE: Relic (oil
any era, any movement instead of being
on canvas, 20x16)
tied to their own era,” citing the 19thcentury Aesthetic Movement and artists
ABOVE: Laughing
who “capture feelings in a decorative way.”
Queen (oil on
She values beauty over meaning. In
canvas, 56x38)
a classical atelier education, based on 19thcentury French-method academies, artists have
always looked backward in history for inspiration. In that way, the past is always alive. “I
do not think that art has a linear history,” says
Oaxaca, “or that it continually improves.” ■
JUDITH FAIRLY writes about the visual arts and is a
frequent contributor to The Artist’s Magazine.
May 2017
MAY 2017
51
51
52 artistsmagazine.com
52 artistsmagazine.com
In the art of plein air, a
pioneer who was integral
to the development of
French Impressionism,
Frédéric Bazille died
too young.
“I have
too many
things to
do in life”
By Jerry N. Weiss
Family Gathering (1867;
oil on canvas, 5913 ⁄16x90 9 ⁄16)
depicts Bazille’s family; his parents are seated in the foreground,
while the artist himself stands
at far left. This work serves as a
bridge between the formal traditions of group portraiture and a
new vision of plein air painting.
LEFT: The
MUSÉE D'ORSAY, PARIS, PURCHASED WITH THE
ASSISTANCE OF MARC BAZILLE, 1924; © PATRICE
SCHMIDT/MUSÉE D'ORSAY DISTRIBUTION RMN
May 2017
MAY 2017
53
53
Frédéric Bazille holds a unique, if forever
unresolved, place in 19th-century art history.
He was present at the inception of French Impressionism,
and his major works show him shadowboxing with his
young friend Claude Monet, particularly in experiments that integrated the figure and landscape. Bazille
was a talented artist in the right place at the right
time whose eminently promising career was cut short
by being in the wrong place at the wrong time. As
the exhibition "Frédéric Bazille and the Birth of
Impressionism" (opening in April at the National Gallery
of Art in Washington, D.C.) reminds us, the young man
of financial means painted a handful of masterworks
before he was killed in the Franco-Prussian War in 1870.
Falling in With the Right Crowd
Born in Montpellier, France, in 1841, Bazille was the
son of Gaston Bazille, an attorney and senator. The son
54 artistsmagazine.com
54 artistsmagazine.com
initially pursued a traditional career path; in 1862 he moved
to Paris to study medicine, but he was soon attracted to
music, theater and the visual arts. By the spring of 1863,
he was enrolled in the studio of Charles Gleyre, a conservative Swiss artist who nonetheless allowed some leeway
for young artists. In Gleyre’s atelier, Bazille met Monet,
Auguste Renoir and Alfred Sisley. Though a novice,
Bazille took critical aim at the art of the 1863 Salon, writing, “My overall opinion is that there are very few painters
alive today who are really in love with their art, most are
only out to make money… .” Bazille continued his dual
studies until the summer of 1864, when he flunked his
exams and left medical school. His family may not have
welcomed the news, but Monet congratulated him.
At the beginning of 1865, Bazille and Monet took
a studio together in a building where Eugène Delacroix
white, punctuated by pearly skin tones,
a flush ear and the chromatic palette
he holds in one hand.
MUSÉE D'ORSAY, PARIS
In 1866, Bazille moved into a
new studio with Renoir and wrote
ABOVE LEFT: Bazille’s Self-Portrait (1865–66; oil on canvas, 427⁄8 x28 3⁄8), at once
his father for more money so as to
elegant in dress and severe in effect, is an impressively confident declaration of
purpose, given that the artist had begun studying in Paris little more than two
continue to hire models, pleading
years earlier.
with some humor, “Don’t condemn
THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO; RESTRICTED GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. FRANK H. WOODS IN MEMORY OF MRS. EDWARD
me to the still life for life.” All the
HARRIS BREWER
same, Bazille proved to be an excelABOVE RIGHT: The large painting Still Life with Heron (1867; oil on canvas,
lent painter in that genre, as shown
39 9 ⁄16x3011 ⁄16), with its restrained color and attention to the birds’ plumage, refers
by Still Life with Heron (above right), a
to a venerable tradition of paintings on the theme of hunting. It was done in the
largely monochromatic canvas that’s
studio Bazille shared with Renoir, while Sisley also painted the setup from a
nonetheless a vibrant studio exerdifferent angle.
cise. Sisley sat alongside and painted
MUSÉE FABRE, MONTPELLIER MÉDITERRANÉE MÉTROPOLE
the same setup while Renoir, who
couldn’t afford to hire models, turned
his sights on Bazille, portraying his friend in the act of
had once lived. “Monet,” he wrote his father, “takes the
painting (see page 4). Though he didn’t take part in this
trouble to call in and wake me up every morning and
shared venture, Monet did crash temporarily at their
I spend all my days in his studio painting from a live
studio. Given to chastising Bazille for laziness, Monet
model.” During the summer he posed as one of the figures
also frequently entreated him for financial assistance. The
for an ambitious outdoor canvas by Monet; when the latscenario speaks to camaraderie and tensions in the years
ter injured his leg, Bazille tended to him and left a painted
that preceded Impressionism.
record of his friend recuperating in The Improvised Field
Hospital (opposite). That same year, Bazille painted several
notable plein air landscapes in the forest of Fountainbleu
Open-Air Portraiture
that evidence an appreciation for the previous generation
At the beginning of 1868, Bazille and Renoir moved to a
of painters, Camille Corot and Théodore Rousseau. He
larger studio. The next few years would be an ambitious
also painted Self-Portrait (above left), an essay in gray and
time, marked by a series of canvases in which Bazille
Improvised Field Hospital (1865; oil on canvas, 187⁄8 x259 ⁄16)
shows Monet recuperating at an inn at Chailly, France, where Bazille had been
posing for his friend’s painting, Luncheon on the Grass (not shown).
OPPOSITE TOP: The
May 2017
MAY 2017
55
55
SEE THE SHOW
The exhibition “Frédéric
Bazille and the Birth of
Impressionism” is showing
at the National Gallery of
Art in Washington, D.C.,
from April 9 through July 9, 2017.
Painted just after The
Family Gathering (pages
52–53), View of the
Village (1868; oil on canvas,
541 ⁄8x3311 ⁄16) successfully reconciles conventional
notions of portraiture—in
this case, a pretty girl seated
in a fine dress—with the
sort of richly colored summer landscape that would be
emblematic of Impressionism. The town in the distance is Castelnau, France.
LEFT:
MUSÉE FABRE, MONTPELLIER MÉDITERRANÉE MÉTROPOLE; PHOTOGRAPH BY
FRÉDÉRIC JAULMES
RIGHT: In Summer Scene
(Bathers) (1869; oil on
canvas, 63x63¼), Bazille
attempted an even more
complex balance between
academic and plein air
modes than in the previous
year’s View of the Village (at
left). The sunlit landscape
suggests a full-throated
response to Monet’s outdoor
experiments while the artist
retained an interest in carefully modeling the anatomy
of the human form.
HARVARD ART MUSEUMS/FOGG MUSEUM,
GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. F. MEYNIER DE
SALINELLES; PHOTO: IMAGING DEPARTMENT © PRESIDENT AND FELLOWS OF
HARVARD COLLEGE
set figures in outdoor settings. First came The Family
Gathering (pages 52-53), with 11 formally attired members
of the artist’s family arranged on a sun-dappled terrace.
One of the exhibition’s curators declared it to be French
art’s “first ever group portrait painted—at least partly—in
the open air.” This was followed by an ostensibly less
challenging but more successful composition, View of the
Village (above), featuring a young woman seated beneath a
56 artistsmagazine.com
56 artistsmagazine.com
shade tree, a brilliantly illuminated townscape in the
distance. Where The Family
Gathering is stilted and even
slightly primitive in effect,
the drawing, vibrant color
and illusion of deep space
in View of the Village are
thoroughly accomplished. When the artist Berthe Morisot
saw the painting, she wrote, “He is trying to do something
we have tried so often to do: portray a figure in the open
air; and this time, I do believe he has pulled it off.”
The Figure En Plein Air
In early 1869, Bazille was able to write, “I am working
like a slave. I have a model every day.” That summer he
vacationed in Montpellier and worked on a large canvas
of men bathing, wrestling and relaxing in the landscape.
By July he was discouraged with Summer Scene (Bathers)
(above), writing to a friend, “If I am forced to stop I shall
arrive in Paris with just one painting that you may well
find atrocious, for I have no idea where I am up to. It’s my
male nudes… .” He finally completed it in the winter after
returning to Paris. It is perhaps Bazille’s most famous
and important work, a combination of academic, traditional passages—the carefully drawn figures, foreground
detail and tightly ordered composition—with a true
premonition of full-blown Impressionism in the colorful,
tactile handling of the sunlit clearing. Just a year later,
the naïveté of The Family Gathering was gone, replaced
by a far more assured and energetic approach, one that
reconciled classical influences and a modern vision.
As he finished Summer Scene (Bathers), Bazille began
work on La Toilette (page 58), a response to the male
nudes of the previous canvas. To his mother he wrote, “I
have found a gorgeous model who is going to cost me an
arm and a leg.” She is the centerpiece of the composition,
a semirecumbent figure amid maidservants. Soon thereafter, Bazille was delighted to have procured models for
the other women, writing “The only trouble is that they
cost the earth.” The setting’s exotic decor is in keeping
with the influence of Delacroix, yet Bazille managed to
add elaborate striped fabric, as he had in Summer Scene
(Bathers). In the spring of 1870, he continued working
with the model who sits at the left of La Toilette, using
her as the principal for two paintings of a woman handling flowers. In Young Woman with Peonies (page 59), the
artist again delighted in painting sumptuous material
May 2017
MAY 2017
57
57
and color, this time in the model’s skin tones, kerchief
and, especially, her basket of flowers, culminating in the
pink blossoms she holds for our admiration. “I Am On My Way”
At the Salon in the spring of 1870, Summer Scene
(Bathers) received much attention, and Bazille felt justified in writing, “... I am on my way and from now on,
anything I exhibit will be looked at.” On July 19, France
declared war with Prussia. Bazille was relaxing at his
58 artistsmagazine.com
58 artistsmagazine.com
family’s summer home in Meric, when in August he
unexpectedly enlisted to serve in the war. On November
27 he was made a sergeant-major and, at dinner that
evening, proclaimed with stunningly poor foresight, “I
know for myself I won’t get killed; I have too many
things to do in life.” On the battlefield the next day he
died after being hit twice by gunfi re. Bazille was 28.
As early as 1867, Bazille wrote of the frustrations
of exhibiting via the conventional jury system and that
he and his colleagues would, but for want of money,
begin with its first exhibition in 1874,
which he would not live to see.
The brevity of Bazille’s life
makes critical assessment difficult;
it’s impossible to imagine the loss
MUSÉE FABRE, MONTPELLIER MÉDITERRANÉE MÉTROPOLE
had, say, his friends Monet or Renoir
ABOVE: Completed in the last year of his life, Young Woman with Peonies (1870;
been cut down so young. In the wake
oil on canvas, 235⁄8x29½) is one of two canvases Bazille painted using the same
of Bazille’s brutally truncated career,
model and theme. Though the young woman’s portrait is the focal point, the
we’re compelled to extrapolate what
strongest contrasts and most vivid colors are reserved for the flowers, and the still
might have been, based on a small
life that she holds in her right hand is an especially beautiful piece of painting.
sample; he never abandoned convenManet’s Olympia (not shown) of 1865 offers an obvious point of comparison, but so,
too, does Degas’s Woman Seated beside a Vase of Flowers (not shown) of the same
tional modeling of form in favor of
year, wherein the floral abundance threatens to engulf the female presence. Bazille
painterly gesture, as did Monet, and
may have been inspired by his colleagues, but his expression was entirely his own.
it’s useless to speculate as to what
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON, D.C.; COLLECTION OF MR. AND MRS. PAUL MELLON
direction his work would have taken
in the 1870s. What is known is that
in a mere seven years, Bazille moved from a traditional
show as an independent group. Writing in the same
foundation to the vanguard, at the verge of a movement
vein two years later, he claimed that a number of artists
that changed art and would have ramifications well into
agreed to rent space together, and that “Courbet, Corot,
the 20th century. ■
Diaz, Daubigny and many others … have promised to
send work and heartily support our idea. With these
JERRY N. WEISS (jerrynweiss.com) is a frequent contributor to
people, and Monet, the best of them all, we are certain of
The Artist’s Magazine. He teaches at the Art Students League of
success. You will see how much attention we will get.” He
New York.
anxiously envisioned the movement that would formally
LEFT: Following Summer Scene (Bathers) (page 57), Bazille determined to paint a
female nude for exhibition. Though influences as diverse as Rembrandt, Delacroix
and Manet have been noted in La Toilette (1870; oil on canvas, 513 ⁄16 x503⁄8), the
atmosphere, coloring and arabesque indolence of the nude may also be seen as
precursors to the odalisques of Matisse.
May 2017
MAY 2017
59
59
The Best in Art Instruction at
NORTH LIGHT SHOP
Watercolor 365
By Leslie Redhead
Make watercolor a part of your daily life, while turning every day into inspiration for your art. Designed
to fit your life, Watercolor 365—the first watercolor
book of its kind—provides a complete education in
the medium one bite-sized bit of information at a
time. Open it daily to find a new tip, idea, technique
or challenge ... all aimed at getting you into the
habit and mindset of an artist.
4t
CHECK OUT
THESE GREAT
TITLES ALSO!
Art Journey Animals: A Collection of Inspiring Contemporary
Masterworks, Jamie Markel
3t
Think Big Paint Small Oil Splash 17 Inspiring Subjects,
Rachel Rubin Wolf
Painting, Easier, Faster and
5t
Better, Joyce Washor
3t
4BWF on your purchase of these titles and more when you use code
"3516# during checkout in the North Light Shop.
TAKE ANOTHER LOOK | Favorites from North Light
Pastel Painting: Light and Color,
Desmond O’Hagan
3t
4USPLFTPG(FOJVT&YQSFTTJWF
Texture, Rachel Rubin Wolf
5t
Paul Jackson’s Watercolor Workshop:
The Color of Sunset By Paul Jackson
4t
Abstract Explorations in
Acrylic Painting, Jo Toye
5t
Texture in Colored Pencil,
Ann Kullberg
3t
How to See, How to Draw,
Claudia Nice
3t
Watercolor Masters and Legends:
Secrets, Stories and Techniques,
#FUTZ%JMMBSE4USPVEt5t
John Salminen Master of the
Urban Landscape, John Salminen
3t
Exploring Color Workshop,
UI"OOJWFSTBSZ&EJUJPO
/JUB-FMBOEt4t
These and many other North Light products are available at your favorite art & craft
retailer or bookstore. You can also order online at NorthLightShop.com or by phone
at 1-800-258-0929. Online prices may differ on listed titles; prices are as marked on
store pages in the North Light Shop.
an imprint of F+W Media, Inc.
Ask the Experts
By Walter Weiss, M.D.
Tick Tips
Give ticks the brush-off on your plein air excursions.
Q
As a plein air artist, I’d like to
know more about tick-borne
diseases. How are these diseases
contracted? Is the risk restricted to
certain seasons or regions?
A
Ticks are small, eight-legged
creatures that live on grasses
and other vegetation. As they grow
bigger during the warmer months of
April to September, they go through
four stages, from nymphs, which are
almost too small to see, to adults. For
each of these stages, the tick must
have blood.
Ticks sense people by their
breath, vibrations, moisture or body
odor. Since these insects can’t fly or
jump, they climb plants and grab
onto people who brush by. Seeking
warmth, ticks climb up arms and legs
looking for cozy spots to settle in for
a feed. Some ticks attach to the skin
quickly while others wander for hours
looking for a good spot to take blood.
In the United States, ticks carry
15 different diseases that can be
passed to people through the insects’
bite. The best known of these diseases are Lyme disease and Rocky
Mountain spotted fever. Although
many tick-borne diseases are concentrated in certain parts of the U.S.,
these illnesses can occur throughout
the country, and plein air painters
everywhere should take steps to minimize their chances of getting bitten.
Q
How can I lower my risk of
infection from tick-borne
diseases?
ABOVE: Plein
air painter Michael Chesley Johnson avoids tick bites by standing at least
a couple of feet away from the tall grass and wearing long sleeves, full-length pants
and socks. An application of DEET adds further protection. Should an ambitious tick
still approach, it would be easy to spot, before it bites, on the light-colored pants.
PHOTO COURTESY OF TRINA STEPHENSON
62 artistsmagazine.com
62 artistsmagazine.com
A
The first step in preventing
tick-borne illnesses is to avoid
ticks. When walking to that perfect
painting spot, stay on the path and
ONLINE:
For more information on
tick-borne diseases, go to
cdc.gov/ticks.
away from brush, leaf litter and high
grasses. When setting up your easel,
look for a bare patch of ground, not a
grassy meadow.
The right clothing can also help.
Avoid flip-flops and shorts; wear socks,
long pants and long-sleeved shirts.
Insect repellants deter ticks. Use
one with 20 to 30 percent DEET,
and apply it liberally on clothes and
exposed skin. DEET can be harmful to babies, but it’s safe for adults.
Be aware that repellants containing
DEET can sometimes dissolve plastic
so, if you wear rubber gloves when
you paint, you might want to avoid
getting DEET on them.
Permethrins, another repellant that works against ticks, aren’t
applied to skin but on shoes and
clothing. Clothes can be dipped in
0.5 percent permethrin solutions and
allowed to dry, and the repellant will
continue working through several
washings, which is an advantage
for painters who go out frequently.
You can buy clothes pretreated with
permethrins, whose effects may last
longer. Unfortunately, no “natural” or
“organic” repellants have been proved
to work against ticks.
When you return from painting en plein air, make sure you check
yourself for ticks (use a mirror or ask
a friend). Look under your arms, in
and around your ears, inside your
navel depression, behind your knees,
between your legs, around your waist
1
2
3
and in your hair. Then take a shower
to wash away any of the tiny forms
that may be too small to see. Ideally,
you should do this within two hours
of your plein air excursion. Ticks can
hitchhike into your house and bite
you later, so also look at your pets,
painting gear and daypack. Tumble
dry your painting clothes on high
heat to kill any hidden ticks. If your
clothes are wet, you may need to set
the dryer for an hour or more.
Q
What should I do if I find a tick
on my body or suspect I’ve been
bitten?
A
Don’t panic. The most important thing is to remove the
tick as soon as possible, as some
tick-borne diseases may pass from
the tick to a human in a few hours
(although others may take a few
days). Don’t try the old strategies
of using nail polish, heat or alcohol
on the tick to get it to leave. Even if
these methods work, they take too
long. Use a pair of tweezers (and
maybe your reading glasses) to grab
the tick as near to the skin as possible and gently lift until the tick
comes free. Don’t twist or jerk. If
parts of the tick’s mouth remain
in the skin, remove these with the
tweezers. Clean the skin, using soap
and water, alcohol or an iodine scrub.
Dispose of the tick by dropping it in
alcohol, flushing it down a toilet or
sealing it in a bag. Don’t crush the
tick with your fingers.
A small area of redness may
appear within a few hours at the site
of a tick bite. Th is is like a bump
from a mosquito bite, and it doesn’t
mean that the tick has infected you
with an illness.
4
5
1. brown dog tick 2. black-legged tick 3. American dog tick 4. Rocky Mountain wood tick
5. Western blacklegged tick
What About Zika?
Zika is a disease primarily spread
by mosquito bites, but it can also
be transmitted sexually and from
a pregnant mother to her unborn
child, causing birth defects. As of
the writing of this article, locally
acquired cases in the United States
have been few—mostly in Florida;
the number of travel-associated
cases is significantly higher. For
up-to-date information about travel
risks, preventive measures and
more, go to cdc.gov/zika.
Q
What are the symptoms of a tickinduced infection?
A
If a rash appears in the days or
weeks after you’ve removed a tick
from your body, you should see your
medical provider even if you feel well,
as this may be the fi rst sign of infection. In fact, if you get a rash in the
days or weeks after painting outside,
you should get it checked even if you
never saw a tick on your body. Since
many ticks are too small to notice,
you may have been bitten without
realizing it.
Some illnesses passed by ticks
don’t result in a rash, so be aware of
these other symptoms of many tickborne illnesses: aches, pains, fevers
and headaches. If you get ill in the
weeks after a plein air painting session, remember to tell your health
care provider that you might have
been exposed to ticks. He or she will
need to know the region of the country where you painted in order to narrow down the possibilities. For most
tick-borne diseases there are blood
tests that will help make a diagnosis.
The good news is that most illnesses transmitted by ticks can be
easily cured with antibiotics; however,
starting treatment as early as possible
is important. So take a few cautionary
measures—and enjoy your plein air
sessions. ■
WALTER WEISS, a physician and artist
who enjoys plein air painting, lives in
Bethesda, Md.
ALL TICK PHOTOS BY JAMES GATHANY; CONTENT PROVIDER CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PROTECTION (CDC)
May 2017
MAY 2017
63
63
Find Great Artists at
NORTH LIGHT SHOP
Sonoran Morning / Michaelin Otis / Acrylic and
mixed media on canvas / 36" × 48" (91cm × 122cm)
Create Perfect Paintings
By Nancy Reyner
Create Perfect Paintings shows how to push your work
to the next level by strengthening your perception,
technical skill and visual thinking. Exercises and examples show how to critique your own creations and then
evaluate them step by step for further improvement.
You will compare illustrations and learn to identify and
modify artistic choices — from negative space and color
ratio to controlling eye movement, depth and contrast
— to see their impact and help you use them to the
best effect in your work.
4t
Save 10% on your purchase of these titles and more when you use code
ARTPUB10 during checkout in the North Light Shop.
TAKE ANOTHER LOOK | Favorites from North Light
Creative Color, Nancy Reyner
3t
Perfect Color Mixing, Nancy Reyner
3t
Perfect Painting Solutions, Nancy Reyner
3t
AcrylicWorks: The Best of Acrylic Painting,
/BODZ3FZOFSt6t
These and many other North Light products are available at your favorite art & craft
retailer or bookstore. You can also order online at NorthLightShop.com or by phone
at 1-800-258-0929. Online prices may differ on listed titles; prices are as marked on
store pages in the North Light Shop.
an imprint of F+W Media, Inc.
Road Test
By Kevin Muente
Palette Matters
Ergonomically designed and crafted by hand, New Wave Artist Palettes—
tabletop and hand-held—are put to the test.
BEFORE I LAUNCH INTO MY APPRAISAL
of two of New Wave’s (newwaveart.
com) new palettes, I should discuss
my own history with palettes, in
order to give this Road Test a context. I’ve used hand-held palettes in
the past, but they put pressure on
my thumb. For that reason, I’ve been
using tabletop, disposable paper pad
palettes for years.
New Wave is a family business,
operated by two brothers who oversee
product development, production and
marketing, while the idea for an ergonomic palette originated with their
father, an artist. Handcrafted by the
Amish in Lancaster County, Penn.,
the wooden palettes have a satin
finish that is easy to clean; palettes
are available in both handheld and
tabletop models.
DISPOSABLE PAPER TABLETOP
PALETTE
The wooden handheld palettes are
beautiful, but I first tried a tabletop
palette with disposable paper, because
that’s the type I typically use. The
New Wave Grey Pad (rectangular
LEFT TOP: I’ve wanted to paint an abandoned
amusement park for a while. When I saw
this one, Joyland, in rural Tenn. I knew it
would work as inspiration. The patriotic
colors have lost their luster, and we viewers
are left with a sense/state of disappointment in Joyland (State of the Nation), (oil
on canvas, 36x48), for which I used the
New Wave Grey Pad tabletop (gray paper), a
disposable palette.
LEFT BOTTOM: The New Wave Highland plein
air palette is lightweight and rests easily on
my arm, due to its smart design that allows
multiple points of weight distribution.
66 artistsmagazine.com
66 artistsmagazine.com
It was a breeze to clean the wet
palette, with only a palette knife and a
rag dipped in odorless mineral spirits.
LEFT:
BOTTOM:
Twilight Maine (oil on canvas,
16x48)
model) has palette papers in a shade
of gray that allows the artist to assess
color and gauge values more accurately. The pad is 11x16 inches, has
a strong back, and is glued on three
edges to ensure a stable and sturdy
mixing area.
At the end of my painting day,
I folded the top sheet of paper over
and taped it down, and some acrylic
paint remained usable the next day.
Using this palette made for easy color
matching when working with muted
tones, as in my painting Joyland (State
of the Nation) (opposite).
Next, I tried the New Wave
Grey Pad (handheld model). The pad
is 11x16 inches, has a strong back,
and is glued on three edges (like the
tabletop paper palette) to ensure a
stable and sturdy mixing area.
HIGHLAND PLEIN AIR PALETTE
I was especially impressed with the
Highland plein air palette (opposite
and above). This handheld, handcrafted palette feels and looks like
a work of art itself. It is lighter than
other palettes I’ve handled, and
its ergonomic design alleviates the
thumb pain I’ve experienced. The
balanced design distributes the
weight against the lower arm, thumb
and body.
I did not use the Highland plein
air palette in the field but in my studio, as well as at Manifest Gallery’s
(manifestgallery.org) open figure
drawing and painting sessions. I
marveled at the Highland palette’s
lightweight versatility. At the end
of the session, I cleaned the palette
with ease because of its slick, nonabsorbent surface.
Typically I use a white disposable
palette to paint on white canvas. The
Highland’s reddish brown surface
presented a challenge while painting
on a white canvas. The paint appeared
differently on the warm toned palette
versus the cool white surface; however, the palette worked well when
painting on a toned surface similar in
value to the tone of the palette, as I
did during a figure session.
A THING OF BEAUTY
With proper care, New Wave’s handcrafted Highland turns this everyday artist’s tool into a work of art.
Wielding this dynamic instrument
might make it easier to paint your
own elusive masterpiece! ■
KEVIN MUENTE is a professor of fine art at
the University of Northern Kentucky. He
is currently represented by Heike Pickett
Gallery in Versailles, Ky.; Gross McCleaf
Gallery in Philadelphia; Marta Hewett Gallery
in Cincinnati and RJD Gallery, newly reopening in Bridgehampton, N.Y. To see more of
his work, visit artsy.net/artist/kevin-muente.
May 2017
MAY 2017
67
67
SUBSCRIBE
Belenos by Marion Tubiana
Market Street Reflection by Hsin-Yao Tseng
to The Artist’s Magazine,
the definitive source of
inspiration, instruction
and advice for artists
working in all media, at
artistsnetwork.com/
artists-magazine-2.
sponsored by
See your artwork shine on the cover of Southwest Art,
pocket $2,000, and revel in the prestige of your win!
Prizes:
First Place: $2000
Second Place: $1000
Third Place: $500
10 Honorable Mentions: $100 gift certificate to North Light Shop
The 13 winning artists will be published in the December 2017 issue of Southwest Art,
and one lucky artist will see their masterpiece on the magazine’s cover. Each of the
13 winners will see their work in an online gallery on www.southwestart.com.
EARLY-BIRD DEADLINE: JUNE 15, 2017
Visit www.southwestart.com for complete guidelines and to enter today!
Carol Lake • carol.lake@fwmedia.com • 385/414-1439
Mary McLane • mary.mclane@fwmedia.com • 970/290-6065
ARTIST’S MARKETPLACE
HUDSON RIVER VALLEY
ART WORKSHOPS
Learning, Laughter,
and Friendships in a
Relaxing, Inspiring, and
Inviting Environment
Call Toll-Free 1-888-665-0044
Lisa Pressman
Susan Ogilvie
Jane Davies
Barbara Nechis
Patti Mollica
Robert Burridge
Liz Kenyon
Paul Leveille
Paul George
Tony van Hasselt
Gerald Brommer
David Daniels
Alvaro Castagnet
Kim English
Self-Directed Retreat
Ann Lindsay
David Taylor
Leah Lopez
Skip Lawrence
John MacDonald
Fran Skiles
Mar 19-25, 2017
Mar 26-Apr 1, 2017
May 7-13, 2017
May 17-21, 2017
May 21-27, 2017
Jun 4-10, 2017
Jun 18-24, 2017
Jun 25-Jul 1, 2017
Jul 5-9, 2017
Jul 9-15, 2017
Jul 16-22, 2017
Jul 23-29, 2017
Aug 2-6, 2017
Aug 6-12, 2017
Sep 3-9, 2017
Sep 10-16, 2017
Sep 17-23, 2017
Sep 24-30, 2017
Oct 1-7, 2017
Oct 8-14, 2017
Oct 15-21, 2017
artworkshops.com
Workshop DVDs
³3UHPLHU'HVWLQDWLRQ:RUNVKRSV´
:RUNVKRSV
0DU\:K\WH
1HZ2UOHDQV/$0DUZF
/DJXQD%HDFK&$-XOZF
$OYDUR&DVWDJQHW
6DQ)UDQFLVFR0DUZF
6DQ)UDQFLVFR0DUZF
.DUO\Q+ROPDQ
&UXLVH$SU0D\ZF
6DQWLDJR&KLOH6DQ)UDQFLVFR&$
5LFKDUG0F.LQOH\
%HQG25-XO$XJSDVWHO
+HUPDQ3HNHO
%HQG25$XJZF
%HQG25$XJZF
)DELR&HPEUDQHOOL
%HQG25$XJZF
-DQH'DYLHV
%HQG25$XJ6HSWDFU\OLF
'DYLG7D\ORU
0RQWHUH\&$6HSWZF
&KDUOHV5HLG
&KDUOHVWRQ6&2FWZF
&KDUOHVWRQ6&2FWZF
1RZDFFHSWLQJUHJLVWUDWLRQVRQOLQH
&RPHYLVLWXVWRGD\DW
ZZZDUWLQWKHPRXQWDLQVFRP
AARON
SCHUERR
The Destroyer - Bev Jozwiak, AWS, NWS
2017 Plein Air and
Studio Workshops
Wash-n-Dry - Alexis Lavine, NWS
See Video Clips
of the above artists and Video Clips of
Chris Unwin, NWS &
Nita Engle, AWS
ChrisUnwin.NET
WWW.
Montana, California,
Washington, Morrocco
www.aaronschuerr.com
aaronschuerr@gmail.com
(406)539-8393
May 2017
MAY 2017
69
69
ARTIST’S MARKETPLACE
Robbie Laird
WATERCOLOR WORKSHOPS
Watermedia Artist, Teacher, Juror
May 13-16, 2017 BWCS, Melbourne, Florida
Brenda Hutchinson 321-693-0587
webmaster@brevardwatercolorsociety.com
*NEW-FIRST TIME! September 17-21, 2017
Creative Rhythms Retreat,
Calistoga, California
Robbie@robbielaird.com
Sept. 28-Oct. 1, 2017 MTWS, Kalispell, Montana
Margo Voermans
mtwoman23@gmail.com
Contact Robbie 530/259-2100
robbie@robbielaird.com
www.RobbieLaird.com
Branson MO, April 24-27
St. Simons Isl GA, May 15-18
Newport RI, June 5-8
Parker CO, June 26-29
Frankfort MI, Aug 7-10
Lac du Flambeau WI, Sept 4-7
Available for a workshop at your location
Learn at home Books and DVDs
(678) 513-6676 www.tonycouch.com
Canvas Floater Frames
Our
classes
last a
lifetime.
What you learn at the
Folk School stays with you.
JOHN C. CAMPBELL FOLK SCHOOL
folkschool.org
BRASSTOWN
1-800-FOLK-SCH
NORTH CAROLINA
Best Quality - Selection
Price - Service
Low Wholesale Prices
Over 50 styles - custom sizes ok
framersoutlet.com 800.228.8527
made in our facility in Georgia
CALL FOR ENTRIES
DEADLINE: MAY 19, 2017, NOON
97th NWS International Exhibition, October 21 December 17, 2017. Call for Entries: Online Entries
Only. Open April 1 - May 19, 2017. Jurors: Mike Bailey,
NWS, AWS; Carol Pickle, NWS, AWS D.F.; Cathy
Hegman, NWS, AWS. Awards Juror: Malcolm Warner,
PHD., Executive Director, Laguna Art Museum. Upload
Prospectus: nationalwatercolorsociety.org
Information: 760/908-3389.
DEADLINE: MAY 31, 2017
Breckenridge Fine Arts Center’s 26th Annual Juried Art
Show and Competition. Entry Fee: $25 each. Accepting
2D and 3D original artwork no older than 3 years,
no photography or computer generated art. $6,000
in awards. For hard copy prospectus send SASE to
Breckenridge Fine Arts Center, 207 N Breckenridge Ave,
Breckenridge, TX 76424, 254/559-6602, email:
info@breckenridgefineart.org or
www.breckenridgefineart.org
DEADLINE: JUNE 2, 2017
Cape Cod Art Association The National Open Juried
Exhibition & Sale. July 10 - August 13, 2017. Submit
digital images through https://client.smarterentry.com/
capecodart before June 2 deadline. Accepted work
received by July 10. Reception: 5-7pm Thursday, July
13. Pickup August 14. Over $3,000 cash awards.
www.CapeCodArtAssoc.org
planesofthehead.com
760.809.3614
SEE ALL 7 HEADS
DEADLINE: JUNE 5, 2017
70 artistsmagazine.com
70 artistsmagazine.com
St. Augustine, Florida. The St. Augustine Art Association
presents the 8th Annual Nature & Wildlife Exhibition
July 22 - August 27, 2017. This juried exhibit features
2D & 3D original works of fine art depicting the beauty
and diversity of the natural world, incl. landscapes,
plants, birds, wildlife, etc. All media. No giclees. $5,000
in awards; $2,000 top prize. Entry fee: $45 for 3
images. Contact 904/824-2310. Apply online
www.staaa.org
DEADLINE: JUNE 16, 2017
Pastel Society of America. The 45th Annual Open Juried
Exhibition: Enduring Brilliance! at the National Arts Club,
New York City, September 5-30, 2017. Soft pastels only.
More than $40,000 in awards. Online digital entries
only. Download prospectus after March 15th at
www.pastelsocietyofamerica.org or send SASE (#10) to
Pastel Society of America, 15 Gramercy Park South,
New York, NY 10003. Info 212/533-6931 or
psaoffice@pastelsocietyofamerica.org
DEADLINE: JUNE 18, 2017
Placerville Arts Assoc. 51st Annual Mother Lode
National Art Exhibition at the Shakespeare Club,
Placerville, CA, August 6-20, 2017. Juror of Entries
and Judge of Awards, Diana Coco Russell, Art professor
Academy of Art University, San Francisco. Anticipate
$4,000 in awards. Entry guidelines available at
www.motherlodeshow.com or www.placervillearts.com
MEL STABIN, AWS
2017 Watercolor Workshops
Huntsville, AL – Apr 3-7
Newport, RI – Aug 7-11
New York, NY – Apr 30
Norcross, GA – Aug 21-24
Guilford, CT – May 19-21
Fairfield, NJ – Oct 7
Allentown, PA – June 5-7
Sugar Loaf, NY – Oct 10-12
Belfast, ME – July 10-14
BELLAGIO, LAKE COMO, ITALY – June 18-28
www.melstabin.com
melstabin@optonline.net • 201-746-0376
VAN HASSELT, AWS
PAINTING WORKSHOPS
Jul: Discover the Catskills, NY
Jul: Paint verdant Vermont
Aug/Sept: Coastal ME scenes
Oct: Villages of the Provence
vanhasseltworkshops.com
DEADLINE: JUNE 29, 2017
49th Watercolor West International Juried Exhibition.
Call for Entries. Online only. Juror: John Salminen.
Approximately $20,000 Cash and Merchandise Awards.
Entry Fee for 1-2 entries is $50 Members and $60
Non-Members. Only Transparent Watercolor. Exhibition
from: October 14 - December 17, 2017. City of Brea
Art Gallery, Brea, CA. Visit www.watercolorwest.org for
prospectus and information.
DEADLINE: JULY 15, 2017
SALI National Abstract Art Exhibition XIII,
October 3-27, 2017. Over $2,000 in cash awards.
Prospectus: SASE to Southside Art League Inc.,
299 E. Broadway, Greenwood, IN 46143. Entry fee $40
members, $50 non-members for up to three entries.
www.southsideartleague.org
DEADLINE: JULY 27, 2017
ART321 announces our 2017 23rd Annual International
Miniature Art Show, August 1-31, 2017. For prospectus,
mail SASE to Art321, 321 W. Midwest, Casper, Wyoming
82601. www.art321.org for online entry form/prospectus.
More info-Connie, 307/258-5106, cheqer@q.com
DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 3, 2017
Pastel Society of New Hampshire Ninth Annual National
Juried Exhibition, October 21 - November 26, 2017
at Discover Portsmouth Center Gallery, Portsmouth, NH.
Juror of Selection: TBD, Juror of Awards: Christine Ivers.
Awards: $5,000+, $1,000 Best in Show. Members $35/
Non-members $45, up to 3 entries. Soft pastels only.
Online entry. Submit your entries at
www.showsubmit.com. Prospectus:
www.pastelsocietynh.com
WORKSHOPS
ALABAMA
Huntsville Museum of Art
4/3-4/7/17, Huntsville. Mel Stabin, Watercolor: Simple,
Fast and Focused!
8/24-8/26/17, Huntsville. Michael Story, Understanding
Skies & Reflections: Landscape Painting in Oil or Pastel.
9/15-9/16/17, Huntsville. Gary Chapman, CHARCOAL:
Expressive Mark Making, A Painter’s Approach to
Drawing.
10/2-10/6/17, Huntsville. Brian Bomeisler, Drawing on
the Right Side of the Brain.
10/9-10/12/17, Huntsville. Tony Couch, Watercolor
Painting.
11/8-11/11/17, Huntsville. Liz Haywood-Sullivan,
Pastels – Inside/Outside: The Best of Both.
Contact: Laura E. Smith, Director of Education/Museum
Academy, 256/535-4350 x222
lsmith@hsvmuseum.org or http://hsvmuseum.org/
museumacademy/master-artist-workshop
CALIFORNIA
Aaron Schuerr
6/11-6/13/17, Plein Air Pastel, Idyllwild Arts.
Carol Lake • carol.lake@fwmedia.com • 385/414-1439
Mary McLane • mary.mclane@fwmedia.com • 970/290-6065
Contact: 406/539-8393, aaronschuerr@gmail.com or
www.aaronschuerr.com
MAINE
Frank Bruckmann
6/3-6/9/17, Monhegan Island. Pack up your easel and
jump aboard the ferry for picturesque Monhegan Island.
Paint dramatic rocky shoreline, seascapes or the fishing
village in oils, acrylics or pastels. Six days of instruction
to focus on getting paint onto the canvas, concentrating
on design, color relation, value and paint quality. Two
lunches, equipment transport and critiques with wine
and cheese included for $500. You’ll choose your own
accommodations at the sumptuous Island Inn.
Contact: www.fbruckmann.com
MONTANA
ADVERTISER INDEX
Aaron Schuerr ...................................69
Jack Richeson & Co Inc ....................8, 9
American Watercolor Society ..............25
Jerry’s Artarama ..........................25, 68
Art In The Mountains .........................69
John C. Campbell Folk School .............70
Artristic America ............................... 17
Karlyn’s Gallery .................................69
Artspan.com .....................................25
Liliedahl Fine Art ............................... 21
Blick Art Materials ........................ IFC, 1
Mel Stabin ........................................70
Breckenridge Fine Arts .......................70
National Society Of Painters In Casein &
Camille Przewodek .............................69
Aaron Schuerr
3/24-3/26/17, Color and Composition Intensive.
6/22-6/24/17, Plein Air Pastel and Oil.
Contact: 406/539-8393, aaronschuerr@gmail.com or
www.aaronschuerr.com
NEW JERSEY
Ocean County Artists’ Guild
Canson ...............................................5
Cape Cod Art Association ...................70
Casper Artists’ Guild ..........................70
Colored Pencil Society Of America ......27
4/17-4/21/17, Island Heights. Charles Reid,
Painting Watercolor Landscapes.
7/10-7/14/17, Island Heights. Michael Story,
Mastering Reflections: Oil, Acrylic or Pastel.
9/7-9/9/17, Island Heights. Pat Dews,
Abstracts with Zing, Mixed Media.
Contact: 732/370-6814, www.ocartistsguild.org
Creative Art Workshops ......................69
WASHINGTON
Frank Bruckmann ........................ 70, 71
Aaron Schuerr
Emerald Art Center ............................27
F+W ............ 60, 61, 64, 65, 68, 71, IBC
Framers Outlet ..................................70
Acrylic ..............................................6
National Watercolor Society ................70
Ocean County Artists Guild ................. 71
Pastel Society Of America ..................70
Pastel Society Of New Hampshire .......70
Placerville Arts Association .................70
Planes Of The Head ...........................70
Portrait Society Of America ................ 19
Robbie Laird Art Studio ......................70
General Pencil ...................................27
Savoir-Faire .........................................3
Global Art Materials ........................... 13
Southside Art League .........................70
Golden Artist Colors ............... 15, 20, 27
St. Augustine Art Association ..............70
Hahnemuhle USA ..............................BC
The Teaching Company ......................23
MORROCCO
Hudson River Valley ...........................69
Tony Couch .......................................70
Aaron Schuerr
Huntsville Museum Of Art ..................70
Tony van Hasselt ...............................70
Idyllwild Arts .....................................20
Watercolor West ................................70
8/16-8/19/17, Plein Air and Studio,
Dakota Art Workshops.
Contact: 406/539-8393, aaronschuerr@gmail.com or
www.aaronschuerr.com
INTERNATIONAL
10/3-10/13/17, Morroco Painting and Culture Tour.
Contact: 406/539-8393, aaronschuerr@gmail.com or
www.aaronschuerr.com
strokes
of genius | 10
THE BEST OF DRAWING
inspiring subjects
Shine a spotlight
on your art
Infuse your artistic flair into this year’s
theme—Inspiring Subjects. Everything
from a rough contour sketch to intricate
drawings will be accepted. You may use
pencil, charcoal, Conté, crayon, pen, ink
or any dry medium that would be
considered a drawing.
For more information or to enter online:
artistsnetwork.com/strokesofgenius
Questions? Email: art-competition@fwcommunity.com
Credits: Ady (detail) by Mike Barret Kolasinski. Screened back: Let’s Go Home (detail) by Annette Randall,
The Blue Motorcycle (detail) by J. Kay Gordon, Minotaur (part 1) (detail) by Albert Ramos Cortes,
DEADLINE:
Enter your art
by April 14, 2017
May 2017
MAY 2017
71
71
The Artist’s Magazine Annual Art Competition 2016 Finalist
COMPETITION SPOTLIGHT
LEFT: Carla in the Gallery
(oil on canvas, 24x18)
My advice for other
artists is just to keep
working. Don’t expect
every piece to be perfect.
Diane Chandler
Wallingford, Connecticut
IN MY CHILDHOOD I LOVED
TO DRAW and even dabbled
in oil painting. After college
I worked as a lab technician
and took drawing classes at
night. Eventually, I decided
to study art more seriously
and attended Paier College of
72 artistsmagazine.com
72 artistsmagazine.com
Art in Hamden, Conn.
Creative people often
make great models, and
Carla, a fellow painter, is a
perfect example of this. I
planned the composition
before I began painting
Carla in the Gallery, but I
didn’t do a detailed drawing. Instead, I sketched right
onto the canvas with a brush
and then laid in colors and
values using paints thinned
with odorless mineral spirits. I kept the underpainting
simple, adding more details
and adjusting values with
each subsequent layer. I
used a combination of Winsor
& Newton and Williamsburg
oil paints. My white is a
titanium-zinc blend, which
is neither too chalky nor too
transparent. I used yellow
ochre, raw sienna, cadmium
yellow, cadmium red, quinacridone magenta and ultramarine blue, as well. The scarf
was my biggest challenge;
it hung differently at each
sitting!
The best advice I’ve been
given is simply to think.
Think about composition,
think about what you want
to say, and stop thinking like
a student and start thinking
like an artist! ■
COMPETITION SPOTLIGHT ARTISTS ARE CHOSEN FROM COMPETITION
FINALISTS. TO ENTER THIS YEAR’S CONTEST, HEAD OVER TO
BIT.LY/TAMANNUAL2017.
The Alley EFUBJM
t8JMMJBN7STDBLY
Motion Capture Studio 05 EFUBJM
t"OESFX$POLMJOY
Blue Bicycle EFUBJM
t7JODFOU(JBSSBOPY
See your work in The Artist’s Magazine!
EARLY-BIRD DEADLINE: APRIL 3, 2017
Compete and Win in 5 Categories!
ANIMAL/WILDLIFE t STILL LIFE t ABSTRACT/EXPERIMENTAL t LANDSCAPE t PORTRAIT
Jurors: Julie Askew t Jaye Schlesinger t Betsy Dillard Stroud t Jerry N. Weiss t David Jon Kassan
$24,000 IN CASH AND PRIZES!
YOUR ART IN PRINT
YOUR STORY IN ITS PAGES
YOUR WORK ONLINE
Winners will be featured
in the Jan/Feb 2018 issue
of The Artist’s Magazine.
Student winners will be
featured in the December
2017 issue.
Nine finalists will be showcased in the magazine’s
Competition Spotlight
feature. Let fans of your
work learn a bit more about
you—and your inspiration.
Twelve finalists will be
featured as Artist of the
Month on our website, which
attracts hundreds of thousands
of visits per year—more eyes
on your work!
For complete prizes, guidelines and to enter online, visit
artistsnetwork.com/the-artists-magazine-annual-competition
Finest Artist Paper since 1584
DS
OF THE CE
G
E
RM
N
DS
N
RY
TU
BR A
Hahnemühle Traditional Fine Art Papers have been produced using old world
recipes with high quality materials and spring water since 1584!
AN
S TA N D
AR
www.hahnemuehle.com
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
11
Размер файла
17 562 Кб
Теги
The Artist's Magazine, journal
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа