close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Digital dermatoglyphics of 107 Bengalis.

код для вставкиСкачать
Digital Dermatoglyphics of 107 Bengalis
LESLIE Y. MORGAN
Colby College, Waterudle, Maine 04901 and Department of Medical Genetics, The
Children's Medical Center, 1735 Chapel Street, Dayton, Ohao 45404
K E Y WORDS Dermatoglyphics . Bengalis
ABSTRACT
I analyzed the finger prints of 59 male and 48 female unrelated Bengalis in a rehabilitation camp of Dacca, Bangladesh. The most common pattern type in the Bengalis was the ulnar loop (53x1, then whorls (40%);
arches (5%)and radial loops (2%)were the least common. Radial loops occurred
most frequently on the index fingers. I have shown the archlwhorl, whorl/loop,
and pattern intensity indices, and I have presented ridge counts by individual
digits and by total digital ridge count. Digital dermatoglyphics in the male
Bangladeshis were similar to previous findings in male Brahmins of Bengal.
However, there were more whorls and arches, fewer loops, and a higher mean
total digital ridge count in the female Bangladeshis than in female Brahmins.
Bengalis occupy both the Indian district of
Bengal and the new country of Bangladesh.
The Bengalis of India are primarily Hindu;
those of Bangladesh, Muslim. Previous reports
on the dermatoglyphics of Bengalis have been
confined to the Indian groups (Chattopadhyay and Sharma, '69; Mukherjee and
Saha, '70; Sarkar, '70). However, the dermatoglyphics of the Bengalis of Bangladesh, a
country with over 83 million people, have
never before been investigated.
I analyzed the finger prints of 107 Bengalis
who were either patients or employees a t the
Christian Health Service Center, in the Dattapara Rehabilitation Camp, 15 miles north of
Dacca, Bangladesh. This clinic is sponsored
and directed by the Bangladesh Mission of the
Presbyterian Church in the United States.
The study group of 59 males and 48 females
represented some of the refugees who migrated back into Bangladesh after the war for
independence from Pakistan.
The purpose of this study was to investigate
the digital dermatoglyphics of the Muslim
Bengalis of Bangladesh and to compare the results with previous findings in Hindu Bengalis of India.
MATERIALS A N D METHODS
After printing all of the fingers with black
printer's ink using the rolled print technique,
I followed the methods of analysis described
AM. J. PHYS. ANTHROP. (1979) 50: 259-262
by Cummins and Midlo ('61). Having classified the patterns as ulnar loop, radial loop,
whorl, or arch, I set out the pattern distribution for each finger of each sex and then calculated the frequency of each pattern for the
sexes separately and together. I used this
information to derive the arch/whorl index
(Dankmeijer, '341, t h e whorl/loop index
(Furuhata, '271, and the pattern intensity
index for the males and for the females. After
setting out the ridge counts by individual digits, I calculated the mean total digital ridge
count (TDRC) for each sex.
RESULTS
Tables 1and 2 present the digital dermatoglyphic pattern distribution for males and for
females respectively. The most common pattern type in the Bengalis was the ulnar loop
(males 55%, females 50%).Whorls occurred on
40% of the male digits and on 41% of the
female digits. Arches (males 3%,females 6%)
and radial loops (males 2%,females 3%)were
the least common pattern types. Radial loops
occurred most frequently on the index fingers
(males 10112, females 8/13).
Female Bengalis showed a frequency of
arches twice that of the males, and this difference is reflected in the arch/whorl index
(males 8.1, females 15.9). There was a greater
' Correspondence to Leslie Y Morgan, B A , Children's Medlcal
Center, 1735 Chapel Street, Dayton, Ohlo 45404
259
260
LESLIE Y. MORGAN
TABLE 1
Digital dermatoglyphic pattern distribution i n 59 male Bengalis
Left
Ulnarloop
Radial loop
Whorl
Arch
Right
I
11
111
IV
V
Total
I
11
111
IV
V
Total
29
1
29
0
24
39
7
0
18
27
0
31
24
0
33
2
24
3
28
4
39
0
14
6
45
1
13
1
168
8
112
7
25
0
34
2
49
0
10
0
157
4
122
2
24
4
0
0
1
TABLE 2
Digital dermatoglyphic pattern distribution in 48 female Bengalis
Left
Ulnarloop
Radial loop
Whorl
Arch
Right
I
11
111
IV
V
Total
1
11
I11
IV
V
Total
16
20
4
19
5
25
0
17
6
17
0
29
2
35
113
6
106
1 5
18
0
27
3
18
4
18
8
34
1
10
3
17
1
29
41
1
5
128
7
89
6
1
30
1
1
11
1
Mean digital ridge counts i n 59 male Bengalis
Digit
I
I1
I11
IV
V
DISCUSSION
Mean
ridge
count
Standard
deviation
Mean
ridge
count
Standard
deviation
16.8
10.5
13.2
16.0
13.9
5.5
5.6
4.8
5.1
4.2
18.0
11.8
11.3
16.4
13.0
5.9
5.3
6.3
4.4
4.5
=
141.1
S.D. = 38.6
TABLE 4
Mean digital ridge counts i n 48 female Bengalis
Right
Left
I
I1
I11
IV
V
1
Right
Mean total digital ridge count
Digit
1
Tables 3 and 4 present ridge counts for individual digits along with the mean TDRC for
males and for females respectively.
TABLE 3
Left
1
Mean
ridge
count
Standard
deviation
Mean
ridge
count
Standard
deviation
15.7
11.6
12.1
15.8
14.1
6.0
7.0
6.7
6.0
5.0
16.2
11.6
12.4
16.2
12.9
6.6
6.7
5.7
5.1
4.7
Mean total digital ridge count
=
138.8
S.D.
=
47.6
frequency of ulnar loops in the males than in
the females, and this difference is reflected in
the whorlfloop index (males 69.4, females
76.8). Males and females showed similar pattern intensity indices (males 13.6, females
13.4).
Previous reports on the dermatoglyphics of
Bengalis have been confined to the Indian
groups (Chattopadhyay and Sharma, '69;
Mukherjee and Saha, '70; Sarkar, '70). Two
of these studies (Chattopadhyay and Sharma,
'69; Mukherjee and Saha, '70) concentrated
on the Brahmin caste of the Hindu population.
Digital pattern frequencies in the males in the
Muslim group were similar to the frequencies
reported for Brahmin males. However, there
was a higher frequency of whorls in the
Muslim females (41%) than in Brahmin females (31% reported by Chattopadhyay and
Sharma, '69; 37% reported by Mukherjee and
Saha, '70). There was a corresponding lower
frequency of loops in the Muslim females
(53%)than in Brahmin females (64%reported
by Chattopadhyay and Sharma, '69; 59% reported by Mukherjee and Saha, '70). The 6%
occurrence of arches in the Muslim females
was higher than the 4%reported for Brahmin
females by both Chattopadhyay and Sharma
('691, and Mukherjee and Saha ('70).
The mean TDRC of the males in the Muslim
group was 141.1, which compared with a mean
TDRC of 140.6 in Brahmin males (Chattopadhyay and Sharma, '69). However, there
was a higher mean TDRC in the Muslim
females (138.8) than in Brahmin females
DERMATOGLYPHICS OF BENGALIS
(125.8 reported by Chattopadhyay and Sharma, '69). This was due in part to higher whorl
frequency.
In conclusion, the male Bengalis of Bangladesh showed digital pattern frequencies and a
mean TDRC which were similar to the findings in male Brahmins in India. However,
Bangladeshi females tended to have more
whorls and arches, fewer loops, and a higher
TDRC.
LITERATURE CITED
Chattopadhyay, P. K., and P. D. Sharma 1969 Finger der-
261
matoglyphics of Rarhi Brahmins of Bengal. Am. J. Phys.
Anthrop., 30: 397-401.
Cummins, H., and C . Midlo 1961 Finger Prints, Palms and
Soles. An Introduction to Dermatoglyphics. Dover Publications, Inc., New York.
Dankmeijer, J. 1934 De Beteekenis van Vingerafdrukken voor het anthropologisch Onderzoek. Dissertation,
University of Utrecht, L. E. Bosch & Zoon.
Furuhata, T. 1927 The difference of t h e index of finger
prints according to race. Jpn. Med. World, 7: 162-164.
Mukherjee, D. P., and K. C . Saha 1970 Dermatoglyphics in
normal Bengalee population. J. Indian Med. Assoc., 54:
405-411.
Sarkar, D. 1970 Dermatoglyphic study among three
Bengal castes. Man in India, 49: 80-92.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
1
Размер файла
168 Кб
Теги
107, bengalis, dermatoglyphic, digital
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа