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Barber Evo - December 2017

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JODY
TAYLOR
t BARBER TRADE MAGAZINE.
LEAH
HA yDE N
CA SSid y
MENSPIRE
SLIDER CUTS
TORI GILL
TJ GUZZARDI
JA NUARY/ F EBRUARY 20 18// ISSUE # SE V EN
BARBER CULTURE. BARBER EVOLUTION.
£ 5 //€ 6
JArrED LiDDiNGTON
CELESTRIAL COLLECTION
Hair//
Jarred Liddington.
Models//
Mason Clutterbuck,
Chris Lewis,
Keegan Skelton,
Jordan Sutton,
Louis Turner,
Declan Worgan.
Products//
Manic Panic.
Photography//
Liam Oakes.
Stylist//
Toni&Guy
Artistic Team,
Global Creative
Director Sacha
Mascolo-Tarbuck.
Models//
Sonny Walker,
Matt C.
Products//
label.m.
Photography//
Jack Eames.
TONi&GU y
FUTUREWISE
LONDON SCHOOL OF BARBERiNG
KOMODO COLLECTION
Hair//
Michael Kontos,
Henry Stevens.
Fashion Stylist//
Rachel Witter.
Clothes//
Komodo.
Models//
Jose Barrientos,
Nicholas Barno,
Aidan Owen,
Dominik Sanchez.
Photographer//
Kenny McCracken.
Hair//
Henry Stevens.
Fashion Styling//
Rachel Witter.
Leather Jackets//
Cameron Charles.
Models//
Ryan Laughton,
Gabo Lefalman,
Sean Prakash,
Tomas Moore.
Photography//
Kathryn Younger.
LONDON SCHOOL OF BARBERiNG
CAMERON CHARLES COLLECTION
LUKA’S BARBERS
THE DAY COLLECTION
Hair//
Callum Marks,
Sian Mooney,
Amelia Osborne,
Charlie Palfrey,
Mikey Sanders,
Josh Sargent.
Models//
Chris Brady,
Patrick Doherty,
Harry Matthews,
CJ Miles,
Neal Stathers,
Sam Wells.
Photography//
Matt Round.
EMP E R OR
SEL E C T
T h e L an cas h i re Ro s e
The Emperor Select Barbers Chair is designed and manufactured in Britain by REM.
With a 3 year warranty. Part of the REM Barbers Collection.
sales@rem.co.uk
www.rem.co.uk
01282 619977
Hair//
Allan Stone.
MUA//
Ellie Gibson.
Models//
Dan Ward,
Paul Mort.
Photography//
John Donoghue.
ALLAN STONE
BLUE MONDAY COLLECTION
Hair//
Emma
Richardson.
Models//
Tom Faden,
Liam Stelling,
Piers O’Riordan,
Jacob Walsh.
Photography//
Rhiannon
Jones.
CAVALiER CLUB BARBER SHOP
COGNISANCE II COLLECTION
21
Hair//
Siobhan
Richardson.
Models//
Huw Jones ,
Triv Novakovic,
Pablo Perez.
Photography//
Rhiannon Jones.
Hair/Styling//
Eloise Ashcroft,
Dan Rix,
The Company of
Master Barbers.
Products//
American Crew.
Models//
Aaron Hanmer,
Jim Knee,
Philip Woolley. .
Photography//
Dave Brown.
CoMB
GOING UNDERGROUND
COLLECTION
74
ISSUE #SEVEN
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
ART/SALES DIRECTOR
Andrew Brewster//
andrew@barberevo.co.uk
****
BUSINESS MANAGER
David Foster//
david@barberevo.co.uk
****
EDITOR
Steven Green//
steven@barberevo.co.uk
****
FEATURES MANAGER
Ken Hermes//
ken@barberevo.co.uk
****
FEATURE WRITERS
Larry ‘The Barber Man’ Campbell
info@larrythebarberman.com
Scott Lowe//
scott@barberevo.co.uk
****
COLUMNISTS
Tom Baxter, Kevin Hamm,
Tony Haresign, Vikki Harrison-Smith,
Liam Oakes, Jack Robinson-Pullen,
John Ripsher, Dan Wild, Mike Taylor.
****
PHOTOGRAPHS
A N D R E W B R E W S T E R // E D I T O R - I N - C H I E F
HAPPY NEW YEAR, ALL! I HOPE YOU ALL ENJOYED YOUR THOROUGHLY
WELL-EARNED (AND PROBABLY SHORT-LIVED BREAK), BUT IF YOU LOVE
WHAT YOU DO YOU’LL NEVER WORK A DAY AN’ ALL THAT.
The turn of the year
heralds another exciting
twelve months for the
barbering industry.
2017 was another huge
year for the male grooming
revolution and it shows
no sign of slowing in
2018. Once again, we’ll
be bringing you interviews
with some of the industry’s
leading figures, discussing the issues that
matter to you and delving deeper in the
multi-faceted subcultures that make the
barbering industry so special.
This year’s barbering calendar looks
similarly jam-packed and you’ll find us at
Barber Connect, Barber
UK, Scottish Hair & Beauty
and Barber Bashes (across
the UK and further afield).
We’ll also be making
our maiden voyage to the
States to launch our new
magazine – BarberEvo
North America at the CT
Expo in April. We’ve told
you their story for the past year so it’s time
we told them yours. As media partners, we
felt there was no better place to reveal our
latest offering.
Here’s to an incredible 2018.
Dave Brown, Liam Oakes,
Mark Shirley, Jerome Warburton.
B E S H A R P. B E C O N N E C T E D .
BarberEvo
BarberEvoMag
72
www.barberevo.co.uk
COPYRIGHT All work in this publication is copyright
BarberEvo Magazine and Evo Enterprises Ltd.
No part of this magazine may be reproduced
without the permission of the publisher.
56
© Information and product prices are correct at time of
printing. Some products may not be available in all stores.
Evo Enterprises Ltd.
26
32
48
36
S T E V E N G R E E N // E D I T O R
NEW YEAR, NEW ME. REALISTICALLY
NEW YEAR, SAME ME BUT SLIGHTLY
FATTER AND A LITTLE MORE BITTER.
Anyway, we’ve got quite the issue for you to kick
off what could be one of the most important years
for barbering and male grooming.
Kicking off – you’ll understand the poor pun
later – we have everybody’s favourite Irish, barber
battling, travelling barber, Ms Leah Hayden
Cassidy and the similarly nomadic Edinburgh-born
Australian Men’s Hairdresser of The Year Tori Gill,
whom recently collaborated with Kevin Luchmun
in New York. You can read his diary from the Big
Apple on page, well, check the contents.
Interviewer extraordinaire Larry The Barberman
manages to pin down (not literally) all three
directors of Menspire and Jody Taylor, and I finally
get to interview Mark Maciver, AKA Slider Cuts –
barber to two of my favourite human beings on
the planet, AJ and Stormzy.
41
We also dive into the dichotomy of fashion
in the industry, the artwork that has been
inspired by it and the Bloody Butcher himself
gives us a tour of his tattoos. There is, of
course, also some factual-based stuff that may
be of interest to you all.
Oh, and don’t turn to page 83 if you’ve just
eaten. Ok, do it, but you’ve been warned.
80
66
62
60
52
27
44
NEWS DESK
UK BARBERS DONATE £7,500 WORTH OF
TREATMENTS TO HELP OLDER MEMBERS
OF THE COMMUNITY FEEL LESS ISOLATED
IN THE LEAD-UP TO CHRISTMAS
A festive campaign launched by
fragrance brand TABAC in aid of
Age UK took place last month and
saw more than 50 UK based barbers
donate around £7,500 worth of
free treatments to older gentlemen
in local communities who would
otherwise face a period of loneliness
in the lead up to Christmas.
As well as the 50+ UK
barbers taking part, the TABAC
#ShaveTheDay campaign also saw
participants in countries as varied as
Australia, Cyprus, Italy and Portugal.
All those taking part offered
complimentary shaves, haircuts
and grooming treatments to older
generations who would otherwise be
denied much-needed conversation
and interactions from a friendly ear
during the notoriously lonely festive
period.
The figure of £7,500 has been
calculated based on feedback given
to TABAC that the average barber
offered treatments to around 10
older gentlemen on December 7th,
with the typical cost of treatments
equating to approximately £15.00
per customer.
One barber that took part in
#ShaveTheDay was Luke Dolan,
owner of Luke’s Barbershop in both
Ruislip and Watford, and a TABAC
UK ambassador. As well as inviting
members of The Geezers, a group
supported by Age UK, that meet
weekly in the Bow area of London to
his Ruislip shop, Luke also donated
50% of his takings for the day across
both shops to his local Age UK.
Discussing his views on last week’s
#ShaveTheDay, Luke said:
“Well, what can I say?
#ShaveTheDay was amazing! We
saw and spoke to lots of elderly
communities and gave them a good
old pampering. We personally
raised £1,200 for Age UK and I’ve
received hundreds of messages from
barbers globally showing support
and solidarity to the campaign. On
top of this, I’ve also received a huge
number of enquiries from members
of the public stating how much they
loved the campaign and asking how
they can get involved next time!”
Ruth Morgan-Evans, Marketing
Manager of TABAC Fragrances UK,
said:
“We’re absolutely delighted with
how well the first ever #ShaveTheDay
went and I want to extend a huge
thank you to all the barbers who
took part and registered interest on
our Facebook pages. We won’t have
the official numbers of the amount
of barbers that globally took part for
a while yet, but to be able to say that
£7,500 worth of treatments were
offered to gentlemen facing a lonely
Christmas is a great achievement.
If we were able to make just
one older persons Christmas a
bit brighter and happier through
#ShaveTheDay, then we’d count
this campaign a triumph. Roll on
#ShaveTheDay 2018!”
HARD GRIND SAY IT’S
OKAY NOT TO BE OKAY
See Me is Scotland’s
national programme to end
mental health stigma and
discrimination. They are
working to change the way
people think and behave when
it comes to mental health,
whether that is on social
media, in schools, workplaces,
communities or in health and
social care. They want to make
sure that people who struggle
with their mental health have
just as much chance to live a
fulfilled life as anyone else.
See Me partnered with
Abandon Ship to launch a
digital campaign aimed at
starting conversations on
mental health and as part of
this campaign met with Hard
Grind Barbers in Dundee to chat
about mental health and some
of their experiences.
More and
more people
are finding
it easier to
talk publically
about their
mental health
and struggles
they have had.
However there
are still a lot of
areas where
people don’t want to speak out,
as they are worried about the
reaction they will face.
28
For many this is social media.
The fear over how people will
react still persists. On the other
side, with continually increased
dialogue on mental health in the
public eye, there are people who
know it is important to talk about
it, but don’t feel they can as
they may not consider they have
experienced any problems with
mental health themselves.
However, if we as a society
are to fully remove the stigma
around mental health, this means
everyone feeling comfortable
to talk about it in a helpful,
supportive and caring way.
With this campaign, See
Me aim to create a safe space
online for people to share
their experiences and ask
people questions about mental
health which normally they
may not feel
comfortable
doing.
With
participation
from the
barbering
community,
See Me can
reach new
audiences,
help new
people to start talking, and
most important, show everyone
that it is okay not to be okay.
EUROPE’S L ARGEST
BARBER EXHIBITION
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OFFERS & DISCOUNTS • NETWORK WITH SUPPLIERS • LIVE BARBERING
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TELFORD INTERNATIONAL CENTRE
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ENTRY
3RD + 4TH
JUNE 2018
FREE TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE AT WWW.BARBERCONNECT.CO.UK
+44 (0)800 644 0231
INFO@BARBERCONNECT.CO.UK
BARBER PRO FACE PUTTY MASK WINS BEAUTY AWARD
BARBERPRO’s Face Putty PeelOff mask fought off tough
competition to scoop the
award of ‘Best New Male Facial
Product at the 2017 Beauty
Award with OK!
The star-studded event,
hosted by Amanda Holden and
OK! Magazine received record
breaking entries and votes,
making the victory all the more
impressive.
BARBERPRO’s Face Putty Mask
helps to loosen blackheads,
purify skin and remove the top
layer of dead skin cells and is
available in a 90g tube and a 7g
pouch.
2018 ALL-STAR
CHALLENGE
10K TUNE INTO SEE APOTHECARY 87 FOUNDER
BRAVE THE SHAVE AS SAM W MARTIN RAISES
AWARENESS FOR CAUSES CLOSE TO HEART
Over 10,000 people within 24hrs tuned in to
watch entrepreneur and founder of worldwide
mens grooming brand Apothecary 87, Sam
W Martin, shave off his beard. The ‘brave the
shave’ event was created to raise awareness of
mental health issues and prostate cancer.
Back in late 2013 and 24-years old at the time,
Sam W Martin, founded Apothecary 87, the
’87’ in Apothecary 87, actually pays homage to
his Grandad, who unfortunately died at the age
of 87 due to prostate cancer. The brand is now
sold is 130 countries across the globe.
Sam commented: “No-one in the industry has
ever seen me without a beard, and more to the
point, I hadn’t seen the bottom half of my face
for a very long time. I was honestly very nervous
about the face it would reveal.
It’s true that Apothecary 87 may have not
even existed if I had not grown my beard all
NEW
CUT
ON
THE
BLOCK
those years ago, so again it was going to be
strange to see how people would react to me
getting rid of it. All that being said, it was all
done to help raise awareness for both mental
health issues and prostate cancer.
I have no problem in saying that throughout
my 20’s I have suffered from depression on
different occasions and it is so important that
we break through the stigma surrounding this
issue. It is also well documented that the 87 in
Apothecary 87 is to pay homage to my grandad
who sadly lost his life to prostate cancer back in
2013. It was well worth it to raise awareness for
two causes which are close to my heart. I am so
humbled by the amazing comments of support
I received.”
Entry for one of the industry’s most coveted
competitions – the American Crew All-Star
Challenge is now open for 2018! Last year, Adam
Mir was crowned UK champion and took the global
prize in Brussels.
Not only will this year’s winner receive the
prestigious title of All-Star champion but also a
hefty prize. The global winner receives a huge
$10,000 in cash and the UK and Ireland winners
£500 plus other prizes.
The aim of the game? To create a look that best
represents the classic American Crew man. Here’s
how to go about it:
Cut and style your model using American Crew
products and select make-up and wardrobe that is
appropriate for the overall look and theme.
Capture two black and white photos in front of a
white background, one face forward and a profile shot.
Images should show models from chest-level and
above and finally, prepare a brief explanation of the
inspiration behind the look and the products used.
Enter your submission via
americancrew/allstarchallenge.
Visit movember.uk.com to
show your support.
CONNOISSEUR BARBER CLUB
KIDZ SHACK HAIR STUDIO
MENS INC BAREBRING
STANDOUT BARBERS
EDINBURGH
15 E Market St,
Edinburgh EH8 8FS
LISBURN
24 Lisburn Square,
Lisburn BT28 1AA
IPSWICH
22A Fore Street,
Ipswich IP4 1J
BIRMINGHAM
12 Lonsdale Road,
Harborne B179RA
30
BA R BER EQU I PM EN T C EN T R E BR I NG S YOU
T H E BRON X PLUS
A division of SEC
Leicester Road, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, LE17 4HF | Tel 01455 553 558
www.barberequipmentcentreuk.co.uk
SA L E
NOW
ON
TOOLED UP
COMPANY TITANIC DENIM
BARBER APRONS
The Ethical Fashion Company Titanic
Denim has brought something new to
the industry with their newly designed
denim aprons.
ANDIS FADE PROFESSIONAL
HAIR CLIPPER
Each apron is handmade in Belfast
using reclaimed vintage denim.
Every barber demands reliable,
heavy-duty tools for everyday
cutting, which is why the Fade
Professional Hair Clipper is essential
in every tool kit.
All aprons are ethical and eco
friendly and adhere to the brand’s
ethos: “Created with a Heart and a
Conscience”
To master the sharpest cuts and
the most defined fades, Fade
provides outstanding performance,
durability and versatility.
www.titanicdenim.com
Finished in a robust gold metal
casing, this clipper is ergonomically
designed with an easy grip
finish that’s perfectly balanced
and weighted for comfortable allday use.
BARBER EQUIPMENT CENTRE ALUM BLOCKS
The natural alum block has antiseptic properties and soothes sensitive skin
and reduces irritation to the head and neck after shaving.
Fade features a powerful, smooth
running magnetic motor that makes
light work of cutting through wet, dry,
thick or thin hair. It’s equipped with a
high speed stainless steel fade blade
that adjusts for #00000 (0.2mm) to
#000 (0.5mm), which can be zero
gapped for the closest cut yet.
£15// www.barberequipmentcentreuk.co.uk
RRP: £39.99 + vat// www.andis.com
TAKARA BELMONT THE DAINTY
Strikingly attractive, functional and
versatile, the Dainty grooming chair
features 360º (lockable) rotation and
a reclining backrest to ease your client
into the most comforting position for
their service. As a classic from Takara
Belmont’s traditional collection, the
Dainty also features an adjustable
and removable headrest, upholstered
padded armrests and a footrest.
BARBERSHOP ORIGINALS
ANTIQUE BARBER CHAIRS
Koken, Theo Kochs, E. Berninghaus
and Archer are all available at
Barbershop Originals.
Head to Barber Shop Originals
Instagram - @barbershoporiginals for incredibly unique furniture.
www.barberequipmentcentreuk.co.uk
Dainty is aesthetically timeless and
adds a premium touch to your salon,
which you can coordinate from a range
of upholstery colours and customisable
options including contrasting piping
for a truly distinctive look. Upgrade to
hydraulic or motorised base options
to enhance the overall experience and
assist in providing client services.
On SL-85B hydraulic base £1,045 + VAT,
On SL-85C hydraulic base £1,075 +VAT,
Contrast piping + £80 + VAT//
www.takarahairdressing.co.uk
32
REUZEL FIBER GEL
Fiber Gel is an alcohol-free, non-flaking gel with
a firm pliable hold and low shine. It offers firm
holding power all day, while adding thickness,
fullness and texture to the hair.
The alcohol-free formula keeps the hair from
feeling crunchy or sticky while still maintaining
the characteristics that appeal to the avid gel user.
Begin with a dime sized amount of Fiber Gel and
apply to towel dried hair.
Add more Fiber Gel as needed for longer, thicker
hair. Comb through and allow to dry naturally
or blow-dry into hair after application for added
volume and lift.
RSP: £12.99// www.reuzel.co.uk
KING BROWN CREAM POMADE
BARBERISM BEARD OIL
Made in collaboration with Sid Sottung,
Barberism Beard Oil boasts a timeless &
yet refreshingly elegant scent with top
notes of Lime & Orange, mid notes of
Rose & Galbanum along with the earthier
base notes of Cedarwood, Patchouli &
Musk. In truth a simply delightful alchemic
concoction then fused with Sweet Almond,
Jojoba & Vitamin E carrier oils.
A modern, fresh take on the lightweight product of
yesteryear provides a low to medium hold and natural sheen.
The soft setting formula is ideal for creating a natura,
textured look and can be applied with either the fingers or a
wide tooth comb.
King Brown Cream pomade is 100% water soluble and
is scented with captivating notes of native Australian
lemon myrtle and sandalwood.
RRP £34.00// www.captainfawcett.com
Wholesale £7.50, RRP £15.00 // www.kingbrownpomade.com
GREAT BRITISH BARBER
LIQUID TEXTURE
Great British Barber Liquid Texture
Sea Salt Spray is the perfect
answer to achieving the maximum
in messy, texturized, beachylooking hair. Whether it’s waves
or individuality you’re looking for
this product delivers – creating
amazing separation with the
added benefit of volume and
fullness. Even with all this texture
your condition remains and your
hair feels healthy.
OSMO® MATTE CLAY EXTREME
AND FIBRE SCULPT
Available in new 25ml travel sizes,
experience the ultimate in dry, textured
control for powerful hold with natural
matte expression with Matte Clay Extreme.
Fibre Sculpt is a lightweight, fibrous sculptor
to characterise your style with flexible
definition and enviable hold.
Easy to apply, simply dampen
your hair and spray …(do not soak
your hair! — you want a nice even
dampness from roots to ends).
RRP: £3.55 (Also available in 100ml)// www.osmo.uk.com
Great British Barber was created
with both the professional barber
and their clients in mind. Our new
range offers today’s modernclassic barber a succinct range
of 7 products that answers the
demanding needs of your clients,
at a price point (£9.95) that’s
affordable to all.
TABAC AFTER SHAVE BALM
Ideal for sensitive skin and engineered to
sooth and relax the skin following a close
shave, Vitamin E strengthens the skin
barrier while Bisabolol helps to heal nicks
and reduces inflammation.
RRP £8.20// www.tabac-original.com
£9.95// www.greatbritishbarber.com
33
OSIS+
WIND TOUCH
CLUBMAN RESERVE AFTER SHAVE
COMPETITION
Clubman Reserve After Shaves put the bar in
barbershop with masterfully crafted blends of
your favourite liquor-inspired aromas to make
you feel all right. Comes in Brandy Spice,
Gents Gin and Whiskey Woods.
Post a photo of Clubman in your shop.
(Most creative photo wins)
£7.50 177ml//wwwbarberblades.co.uk
Tag/follow BarberEvo & Clubman Grooming,
use a #ClubmanxEvo hashtag on the post.
10 most creative photos win a care package
worth over £50 each.
Each care package includes:
The latest edition
to the OSiS+ Made
To Real Collection is
the first elastic paste
from Schwarzkopf
Professional, allowing
for remouldable,
windswept looks,
even when air-dried.
£13.50//
www.schwarzkopf.co.uk
6x Clubman Reserve after shaves (2 of each),
1x whiskey woods talc.
BARBER PRO FACE PUTTY
Winner of the ‘Best New Male Facial
Product’ at the 2017 Beauty Award with
OK. The Black Peel Off Mask helps to
loosen blackheads and purify skin.
££4.95// www.barberpro.com
AMERICAN CREW
FIRM HOLD STYLING
CREAM
A moisturizing formula that
tames hair and adds style
with low shine and a flexible
finish. It also washes out
easily without leaving residue
behind.
The formula acts as a long
lasting moisturizer, prevents
from hair damage, thickens
hair and improves luster
and shine all while creating
reworkable styles.
KOBE GALAXY
The distinctive shape of the sword blades
puts extra weight behind the hollow-ground
and super-sharp convex edges, meaning you get more
power into each cut. It’s not just about power though,
as the Kobe Galaxy’s black titanium finish gives it a
stylish elegance that few other scissors can match.
Underneath that black coating is forged Japanese steel
for superb durability and a long-lasting edge.
£9.95// www.americancrew.com
THE VANTAGE BY REM
£119 (Saving 20% in January)// www.coolblades.co.uk
Classic styling for the
Modern Barber. Available in
over 20 different fabrics from
the REM range.
WAHL CORDLESS SENIOR
The adjustable thin profile blade with a flat bottom allows for
precision fades and close cutting.
The aluminium cover – providing a solid weighty feel - houses
the most powerful motor Wahl have ever put in a cordless clipper and a
battery that can run for 70 minutes on just 70 minutes charge.
£150// www.barberblades.com
34
From £1205 +vat// www.rem.co.uk
BA R BER EQU I PM EN T C EN T R E BR I NG S YOU
BA RBER SHOP
Originals
OUR PRODUCTS ARE NOT COPIES AND NOT REPRODUCTIONS,
BU T HU N DR EDS OF OLD I T E MS COL LE C T ED OV ER T HE Y E A R S .
This advertising card for J. B. razor blades started life in a barbershop 70-80 years ago.
The John Bull figure, first appeared in the 1700’s and personified the British.
FOLLOW OUR DAILY INSTAGRAM FEED V@BarbershopOriginals
We want to help you transform
your shop, just call Imogen or Lee
on 01455 553 558 for a chat.
Something to sell? Email
john@salonequipmentcentre.co.uk
with photos and details.
Barber Shop Originals... keeping the history of the barbering trade alive.
E XC L U S I V E I N T E R V I E W
H
A
LE
HAYDEN CASSIDY
36
Photographer//
Jerome Warburton
MOST STRIVE TO BE COMFORTABLE IN LIFE; NOTHING
MORE OR LESS. LEAH HAYDEN CASSIDY, HOWEVER, HAS
CONTINUED TO SHUN FAMILIARITY AND TAKEN EVERY
OPPORTUNITY TO IMMERSE HERSELF FULLY IN HER CRAFT.
T
here comes a time in most kid’s lives when they
accept ‘professional footballer’ is probably not
a viable career option. Sometimes because they
couldn’t hit a cow’s arse with a banjo but more
often than not, they’ll assure you, a phantom knee
injury robbed them of a nailed on Ballon d’Or.
Leah came closer than most. Aged seventeen,
she won a scholarship to the US – the mecca of
women’s football – but a quadruple leg break left
her unable to play the beautiful game.
Leah bounced between jobs – from bar work
to a break dance instructor – but struggled to fill
the void left by football. Her fortunes changed,
however, after a chance meeting with future
GBBB collaborator Conor Taaffe, who had only
been cutting hair a year himself. The improvised
barbershop in his house provided the setting for
her first venture into barbering.
“I just jumped up and said, ‘Conor, can I take
the clippers and let me do one side and you do
37
the other?’. I really put him on the spot. Luckily I
knew the guy in the chair really well!” Leah smiles.
“So he took me step-by-step through a skin fade.
I did it with him and it actually turned out to be
ok. Conor looked at me and said, ‘you can hold
a clipper well; did you enjoy it?’. It was fun so on
the drive home I thought maybe I should just do it:
invest in a little clipper and see where it takes me.”
After purchasing a basic clipper from TK Maxx
she began to cut hair around her job as a dance
instructor. Leah recalls travelling to Newry – a
two-hour drive from Dublin – to Ryan Cullen Hair
to watch him and Conor cut for two days. At the
end of day two, Conor gave Leah her first pair of
scissors. They may have been a cheap pair from
Sally’s but the value was far greater. “From there I
was just fascinated and I found the same passion
that I had in football that I thought I was never
going to find again,” she says.
Leah heard a job was going at Dublin’s Cut
and Sew and demonstrating the same gung-ho
attitude she had in Conor’s make-shift shop
asked Sean Bryan for a chance. Now, ‘a while’ is
of course an arbitrary measurement of time, but
you feel she may have purposely omitted that it
had only be a matter of weeks since she had first
picked up a clipper. He agreed to give her a shot
and Leah stepped in for one of the barbers on the
busiest day of the year – New Year’s Eve.
“At the end he kind of laughed and said, ‘it’s a
bit obvious that you haven’t been doing this for a
while but I’ll start you off as a junior stylist. We’ll
give you an opportunity’. I left the dance teaching
– which I was earning a good bit of money doing
– and came back at the lowest level, but it was
something I loved again. Adam ‘Sunny’ Johns, Ste
Mooney and Sean just took me and showed me
everything.”
For the next six months, Leah worked on
bringing her skills up to the level of her self-belief
and willingness to learn. Her Instagram page - @
hayden_cassidy – acts as a virtual diary and to
this day you can see from her very first cuts to her
latest. Throughout her progression, the young
barber has continued to unlock and understand
the many facets and levels of barbering. Before
entering the trade, she saw haircuts as a necessary
chore; now she understood it as an art form. The
next ‘level’, so to speak, was discovered at Dublin’s
Ink Factory.
“It was craftsmanship. It was customer service.
It was everything,” she says. “I worked with an
amazing barber, Tom Behan, and he just had a whole
different vision of barbering. He was, and still is, an
amazing shaver and it was a proper treat to go to
his shop. From there, I got this whole other side of
barbering, where it’s not just cutting school boys
for £15 on a Wednesday. You can give someone
a service and they step out of your chair and feel
amazing. From there I realised I wanted to go a bit
deeper.”
Leah’s next opportunity would come from a barber
she was quite familiar with: Miguel Gutierrez, or
as many of you will know him, The Nomad Barber.
She had been captivated by his stunning videos –
learning his techniques and seeing the opportunities
the craft could afford. Leah had never been to Berlin,
but boarded a plane knowing it was the next step in
her career.
“I was getting itchy feet in Dublin. I’m a bit of a
traveller; aren’t all Irish?” Leah laughs. “I wanted to
find a new city, find new inspiration, and the best
place I could kind of find shaves, the services and
everything like that was the Nomad Barber. If I was
going to learn shaving it was going to be from the
best. I remember on my first day in the shop Miguel
was in the middle of a shave and I was just in awe. It
was like the blade was attached to him. It brought a
little passion and fire into me.”
While learning of a world beyond cutting hair, Leah
says working alongside Nick Barford – a talented
38
barber and hairdresser – taught her more of the
theory behind techniques. Previously, she could
“see where she wanted to put the hair and put the
hair where I wanted” but didn’t know the terms.
As anybody will know who is self-taught in any
discipline, once you have training there will always
be ‘oh, so that’s what that’s called’ moments. After
a year in the wildly successful shop, Leah began to
feel that all too familiar feeling of uncomfortable
comfortableness.
“I felt like I’d done what I set out to do and I was
ready to leave Berlin. I wanted to get myself out
there. A client I had – he’s a barber in England – he
told me that he did London School Of Barbering and
then a hairdressing apprenticeship for two/three
years, then he went to Turkish barbershop to learn
to shave and then to an afro shop. It just kind of got
into my head: that’s the way to do it - throw yourself
in at the deep end and just learn from it.”
Afro hair was next on her list and, in true Leah
fashion, she approached the best. Ebony and Ivory
is one of the city’s most celebrated barbershops and
boasts impressive clients like Wu Tang. A pattern’s
now beginning to emerge. Does having a small
handful of previous clients with afro hair count as
‘experience’…? Either way, Leah was confident she
could get by with her fading and freehand clipper
work and then learn the nuances of afro hair that
only specialists would know. She had found the
much-wanted feeling of being an apprentice again.
Leah gained the respect of the afro barbering
community in what one would imagine looked like a
scene from Eight Mile – well, if Rabbit were Irish, and
a woman. She took to the stage at a barber battle in
an underground hip hop club and caused quite a stir.
Papa Doc, once again, didn’t have a reply.
“There were probably five-hundred people in
there. I was up there with three other barbers. I
knew a handful of people in the club and they were
all established barbers. I got up on stage being the
only female barber and that was a big deal to them.
They were all afro barbers and I was going up and
I’m white and a female. They were kind of looking.
Every now and then I’d see a head creep around. So
I cut this guy’s hair at like 2am and at the end we
all presented our models and the crowd chose, so
whoever got the most screams or cheers won. They
went along and left me until last and not even on my
birthday have I heard my name screamed so much!”
Leah smiles.
The barber battle now plans to tour German cities
with Leah travelling as their reigning champion. Her
whole story is a testament to self-belief and having a
fearless attitude when it comes to finding something
you love. Throw yourself in wholeheartedly, focus on
what matters to you and you’ll find success.
This year, Leah will be sharing not only her
knowledge but her outlook as part of the JRL
education team. The innovative US-based product
company - who are making waves with their
futuristic approach to traditional tools - said Leah
was “one of those talents we couldn’t let slip
through our fingers”. Education remains at the core
of the brand’s ethos and Leah also speaks of her
unrelenting desire to expand her understanding in
men’s hair.
“Social media is a great tool if used correctly but
take yourself back to the barbershop and just realise
that your clients are the people that are there for
you. Focus on your clients, stay true to yourself and
I think the opportunities are limitless and as I said,
gain as much knowledge as you can. I don’t think
there’s ever room to know enough in this industry.
You’ll never know ‘enough’. I’ll be ninety years old
and still looking to learn what I can do next. Don’t
worry so much about the bigger picture. Just take
yourself into you, the chair and your client.”
CARLIE FIRTH// RUGER BARBER
PAUL SKERRITT// BARBERCODE
A lot of clients are getting comfortable with using different styling
products. At the shop, we demonstrate to our clients how to recreate
looks at home with the blow-drying and Ruger product combination.
I’m seeing more shoulder length cuts, too. If a style icon like David
Beckham has a particular cut, a lot of men will follow trend. Add a little
salt spray to the ends to give texture and allow the hair to tuck behind
the ear more naturally. The taper is just my favourite. A taper and crisp
outline can smarten up any hair, long or short.
With my shop being in a
quiet village in North Wales,
it’s usually a case of clients
wanting to play it safe. 2017
saw a transition with clients
wanting to push boundaries
and experiment with new ideas.
Trends often take a little longer
to take off her.
I’ve seen, on many occasions,
guys have struggled to
breakaway from skin fades as
they feel scruffy when it grows
out. I think it’ll continue to lead
to more modern skin tapers and
longer styles on top.
I found myself doing a lot
@carliefirth88
more crops as the year went on.
I think for 2018, clients could
be adding in disconnections for
a more edgy look and possibly
more detailed work like razor
lines or even reverse fades.
I also see this year being the
year for colour to become a lot
more mainstream. We saw in
2017 the emergence of people
wanting the silver look. I can
see this continuing in popularity
as well as perhaps the more
creative minded clients wanting
to add in some bold colours for
contrast.
@paul_barbercode
EMMA RICHARDSON//
CAVALIER CLUB BARBERSHOP
Men are becoming more in tune with current fashion and hair
trends. Men were once reluctant to grow their hair longer, but now
they come in with images of slightly longer, more versatile styles.
Longer hair can be worn straight back or parted wherever the
client’s hair growth patterns will allow. It can be worn loose with lots
of volume for a softer, undone look, or slicked back and pomped for
a sleeker, more vintage feel. Finishing these styles with contrasting
tight tapers and sharp edging can be really effective.
With the younger crowd, skin fades are being paired with masses
of texture on top. The styles are relatively easy to maintain using salt
spray and a diffuser.
Classic styles are showing no sign of dying out and I think they will
remain predominant through the New Year. Personally, I’m really
pleased about as they are my favourite to cut and style.
@emma_ccbs
2018
TRENDS
PREDICTING TRENDS IS BIG BUSINESS.
FORECASTERS ACROSS ALL
INDUSTRIES, USING NOTHING MORE
THAN COMPILED OBSERVATIONS AND
INTUITION, ATTEMPT TO DECIPHER
AND DECODE OUR ADJUSTABLE
ATTITUDES TO WHAT’S IN AND
WHAT’S OUT…
Well that sounds
familiar. In fact, we
said exactly the same
thing twelve months
ago and it still rings as
true today. The male
grooming revolution
showed no signs of
slowing in 2017 but
the question remains,
what’s going to
happen in 2018?
Will the fade remain?
Will colour reign
supreme? We asked
four barbers/ men’s
stylists what they think
gents will be wearing
in the coming year.
CHARLIE CULLEN// TONI & GUY
or point cutting to give that irregular texture throughout. We take from the past
but don’t copy. The modern take won’t be over styled but given a light hold
with matte products.
I work with a lot of longer men’s hair and each year we release a creative
collection. I’ve began to see a change in direction. This year we’ve seen more
heavy, less layered shapes, either worn forward with a fringe to give a 70s Mick
Jagger feel or back into a bob shape that was more Kurt Kobain. But for 2018, I
think we’ll see much more texture and layered shapes, hair worn forward with a
fringe cut above the eyebrow creates that strong image and paired with a much
more layered crown gives off that Liam Gallagher vibe.
So, trends I think will continue… Low tapers. I think low tapered cuts will
continue to be extremely popular amongst guys that want to grow their hair
out through the sides, whether it’s slicked shapes dressed away from the face or
guys wanting to move away from the high fade.
Natural texture. Men’s hair needs to be styled quickly and with the
development of men’s hair products we’ll continue to see guys embrace that
natural wave or curl. Natural texture needs a product with moisture to avoid a
frizzy look, working it in wet and partially dry on a low speed setting helps.
Looking to next year, I think 90s texture will be huge. Think Brad Pitt. It’s a
short-layered haircut that’s similar length all over with the front being worked
up but not cleanly coiffed more random with a few pieces dropping down. Cut
the sides through the fingers to give that soft perimeter outline then use a razor
@charliecullen17
41
USED BY PROFESSIONALS
SINCE 1919
THE
HIGH &TIGHT
POMPADOUR
WITH FRANK RIMER
wahl.co.uk
step 1
Use the Wahl Cordless Senior
with closed guarded grade 2 to
remove the bulk off the sides.
Using the temple, mastoid bone,
and the occipital bone as a map
for the contour for the initial
shape guide.
step 2
Tighten the upper areas
of the guide using a free
hand clipper over comb
technique. Be sure not to
angle the comb into the
head shape to avoid
rounding the shape
of the cut.
step 3
Put in the first guide for the
fade line with the Wahl Beret,
again following the natural
curve of the head shape.
Then remove any bulk below
the line to ensure an even
exposure of scalp.
step 4
Finish the edges of the hair
cut with the Wahl Finale
using paintbrush motions,
ensuring a smooth blend. If
lines persist to show, try using
the finale with the grain to
get a softer finish over those
hard to blend areas.
step 5
With the lever pulled back, use
the fully extended 0.5 that the
Senior offers and start to remove
the upper bulk by the parietal
ridge. This creates a super high
but very square shape. Sticking to
the contour, continue to drop the
weight at the back.
Then move the lever forward
and use the 0 to blend from the
exposed scalp into the 0.5 creating
a smooth blend between grades.
step 6
Drop the top section and cut to desired length.
I like to cut short to long for a more prominent
pompadour and to emphasise the shape.
Blow-dry and style.
You could lightly graze the Finale over the top
until you “feel the bite”. This will remove those
tiny loose ends that appear after styling.
find out more at wahl.co.uk
BE IT MUSIC, FASHION OR HAIR, EVERY CREATIVE
INDUSTRY HAS ITS ‘GO-TO GUYS’ – A-LIST
PROFESSIONALS THAT ARE TRUSTED TO JOIN THE
ARTISTIC PROCESS FROM THE OUTSIDE.
T
hey’re versatile and work quickly without fuss.
Session workers are highly-respected in their
industry but maintain a sense of anonymity
to wider audiences. You will, however, be
familiar with their work but may not realise it.
Jody Taylor is one of the hair industry’s most
in-demand session stylists. You’ll likely have seen
his work gracing the cover of GQ and throughout
Vogue magazines around the globe. Talent alone
is not enough in the world of a session stylist:
the ability to understand the vision and react
accordingly is as highly valued. Jody will often be
seen lugging two suitcases of equipment across
London so he’s fully prepared for the demands of
a shoot.
“I’m being asked to create hair that I don’t
know I’m going to be doing until I get there,”
reveals Jody. He’s a notoriously busy man, but
I manage to catch him before he heads to the
BaByliss stage at Salon International. “So if it’s a
brand, it’s to coincide with what the brand is. If
it’s for a magazine, then they’re trying to create
a character. I don’t know what I’m going to be
doing until I turn up on the day and I’m briefed,
and they take me through a mood board and
explain their ideas.”
Unlike in the salon – where you have just one
person to appease – a session stylist works within
a pool of creatives to realise an overall vision.
There’s certainly no room for being highly strung.
“You need to work quickly and you need to
have thick skin. If I do something and it’s not
right I need to accept that. I need to come up
with another idea straight away, try something
different and not get caught up that they didn’t
like my first idea. I need to be on my toes and
ready for whatever they give me. It’s a lot of
pressure but it’s a lot of fun as well and it’s very
rewarding,” he says.
Jody’s portfolio, alongside his reputation, has
landed him gigs with some of the biggest brands
in publishing and fashion. On many occasions,
a portfolio will be a potential client’s first
introduction to you. He explains the importance
of carefully composing a body of work that
reflects you as an artist. Working in an industry
with imposed creative limits means not all your
work will be representative.
“People hire you based on your portfolio of
work, so if I’ve not met somebody face to face
and there’s going to be ten different versions
of me to choose from then they’re just going to
EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW
y
d
O
J
R
O
L
TA y
44
look purely at your work and the variety of what
you do. They’re obviously looking and they have
an idea in mind of what they want. My portfolio
has to be really varied but also tasteful. There’s a
lot of stuff I do that I don’t put in there because I
don’t think it shows my work in the way I want to
be perceived. I don’t really know otherwise why
they’d book me… banter?” Jody laughs.
If you’re familiar with his work – which most
are to some extent – you’ll notice a strong
dichotomy between his work in the salon and
in session. Working in high fashion allows him
to create without the limits of practicality. I ask
him to explain his current style and the concept
behind it.
“I suppose there’s a lot of rawness to what I do
now, really kind of anti-perfect hair,” he replies
thoughtfully. “Everybody does perfect hair, so my
thing is make it not perfect but make it look good
at the same time. So really anti-hairdressing,
really anti-barbering, which sounds stupid. To
learn you have to make things perfect. But my
thing is kind of the opposite of that. If I’m in the
shop and I’m cutting hair I’m trying to make it
perfect but If I’m on the job, I’m trying to do the
opposite in a way.”
As a session stylist, Jody assumes a unique
position of trend observer and influencer. Much
of his work with fashion brands is done up to a
year in advance, so he must predict where our
adjustable attitudes to fashion will turn next.
He, like all artists, draws from an eclectic range
of inspiration to create his work. The stylist cites
the rebellious youth and their tendency to go
against their predecessors as one of his greatest
influences.
“I really like to look and see what the youth of
today are doing. Hopefully they’re sticking their
middle fingers up to what’s happened before
them and want to do something that hasn’t
been done. Trends come and trends go, and it’s
great that we have them, but once everyone’s
doing it it becomes really boring. I’m looking at
everything, always studying and trying to get
ideas. It could be films, could be music, could be
other cultures or looking into the past.” „
45
It’s refreshing to listen to Jody reflect on
the craft itself and his own work. Despite his
prominence, he remains humble and aware of
his own limitations as a stylist. It’s a trait that I
would say the majority of successful barbers, and
successful people in all professions, poses. Without
a realisation of weaknesses, there’s no motivation
for improvement.
“It’s not about trying to do something first, it’s
about trying to do something different. I think that’s
the great thing about barbering and hairdressing:
you’ll never be as good as you want to be. I don’t
know anybody that knows everything. Well, some
might think they do but it’s really sad because you
can always get better. There are some sixteen,
seventeen-year old’s cutting hair and I wish I could
cut like them, and I can’t I’m now like old. We’ve all
got things we can improve on.”
Jody does however feel he has knowledge he
can share and is making a long overdue return to
education. He felt now was the right time, both in
terms of personal experience and also the way in
which the industry has changed.
“There’s been a really nice link between
barbering and hairdressing for the last three or four
years. I think people used to be very closed-minded
about one or the other, you know. Now barbers
want to know how to be a hairdresser, hairdressers
46
want to know how to barber. I think I’ve got things
that I can share that people don’t necessarily know,
or have the opportunity to. I’ve got something to
bring to the table in that sense. Instead of trying to
teach a barber to barber because they do it fifteen
hours a day and I don’t, I think I’ve got something
new to share.”
Finally, I have to ask Jody what steps one must
take to become a session stylist. It’s an enviable
position but certainly not one he’s just fallen in
to. Winning Men’s Hairdresser Of The Year may
have been the catalyst but it was paired with an
awful lot of tenacity. It’s not a case of just being
in the industry for x amount of years; for reasons
previously mentioned, being a session stylist is an
entirely separate discipline than working in the
salon.
“You have to create your own portfolio of work.
I contacted so many agencies and didn’t even get
emails back before I got signed to my agency. I was
shooting for three years just with friends, contacting
photographers and even colleges just to work with
photographers. I didn’t just land in this position;
I got here because I really wanted to. I did loads
of shoots and I hated them and the pictures were
terrible but it was a learning process. I’ve had to
rebuild and start again and it’s been hard but now
I’m starting to fall on my feet,” he smiles.
47
E
R
i
P
S
N
E
M
MENSPIRE, HAVING BEEN
FORERUNNERS OF THE MOVEMENT
ITSELF, EXEMPLIFY THE BARBERING/
MALE HAIRDRESSING REVOLUTION.
BORN FROM A FRACTURED
INDUSTRY, THE ST ALBAN’S BASED
BRAND IS A TOOL TO ASSIST THE
PROGRESSION OF THE INDUSTRY
AND DEEPEN THE UNDERSTANDING
OF MALE HAIR. I HAVE THE RARE
OPPORTUNITY TO SIT DOWN WITH
MENSPIRE’S THREE DIRECTORS,
JOSH LAMONACA, SAM PALMER AND
GLENN MCGOLDRICK, AT ONCE.
“So, to start off, I want to take you on a journey
about where it started,” says Josh in his usual
measured and considered delivery. He explains that
himself and Sam went to school together and later
reconnected after impressing each other in their
respective disciplines, Josh in barbering and Sam
in hairdressing. In 2012, the former school friends
agreed they would open a shop in two year’s time.
Later that year, Josh and Sam incorporated the
company and began building a digital brand.
Although still working from their own homes, the
brand started to gain traction, in part, due to the
Irish’s love of the morally reprehensible actions of
Geordies. Josh began cutting Garry Beadle, better
known as ‘Gaz from Geordie Shore’, and posted
the cut on the Menspire Twitter page. “Some say
that’s why you’re famous,” chimes Glenn. Eager
to emulate the style, Josh received a message from
Craig Murtagh asking him to travel to Dublin to cut
his own and his friend’s hair.
“After a couple of times that I went, a couple
of these guys started doing barbering, some were
already doing barbering and started saying, ‘would
you do a course here? Would you come and teach
us to cut hair?’. I started to attract more barbers
than the layman, so we ended up doing a course
in November 2013 and on that course was Craig
and Glenn McGoldrick. And that was our first ever
educational experience in Dublin,” explains Josh.
In the first month of 2014, just as the duo had
planned two years prior, they opened their first
shop. The property in Hatfield Road was far smaller
48
than they wanted, but Josh and Sam knew working
at their homes was no long sustainable due to
sheer demand.
“We were there for about eighteen months but
I’d probably say three of four months into working
there we were looking at each other saying, ‘this
is too small’,” Sam explains. “During the time we
were building Menspire, myself and Josh were the
two busiest barbers/ hairdressers in our area, so we
were confident wherever we went it was going to
be busy from day one.”
Josh had previously joked about a far larger unit
around the corner as a potential location. Shortly
after, however, the space became available and
they decided to take it. While renovating the floor,
they unexpectedly found a set of stairs leading to a
basement. The two-storey property could now hold
eight chairs and was ideal for the ambitious pair.
“It felt a lot more us,” Sam continues. “We say
it humbly, the first shop was very, very small. It was
almost like our brand was bigger than the shop.
So people would travel down from wherever and
they’d show up – and it’s a very beautiful shop but
very small – and they’d seen us on the internet,
seen Josh and my names and walk in and be like,
‘oh’. When we did get into the bigger shop we
felt very comfortable. This is now basecamp; this is
somewhere we can really grow.”
And grow they did, both in terms of stature and
team size. Josh and Sam decided they wanted
somebody from afar, somebody completely fresh
and able to establish themselves from scratch. One
of the emails they received was from an eighteenyear-old Glenn. He wasn’t quite the man they
wanted, but he was friends with the man they did.
“That got me thinking about Glenn, and then
Glenn’s friend, Craig. I said to Glenn, ‘yeah, it’s
open, just send us a CV and whatnot’. In the
meantime, I contacted Craig and he didn’t really
want to do that at the time because he was quite
set and happy where he was [he now works in the
Dublin shop]. So we had Glenn knocking on the
door constantly and, in my mind, it was a case of
we just want your friend mate to be honest. He
kept knocking and knocking, private messages,
when can I come see you? Is it possible to come
over? Eventually I just said, ‘yep, cool, just come
Monday.”
He forgot, right up until the point he received
a message, “Hey mate, just landed, be there
in fifteen minutes.” Josh hadn’t even told Sam
– assuming the teenager wouldn’t make the
journey – but quickly ushered him down to the
salon. Impressed by his ambition, the pair quickly
considered the young Irishman a legitimate option.
Glenn left Dublin on the 27th of October 2015.
“Glenn came with one vision,” adds Josh.
“He came and did a course in 2013 with us. He
continued progressing with his work and he had
one vision: his vision was to come over to Menspire,
learn the fundamental principles of technique and
vision and trend and eventually take that back to
his salon. But you’ll have to ask him why.”
“The standard in Ireland was crap,” he replies,
although he does note there were many great
barbers, he explains the general standard was
below par. A cut, he says, would cost between
€8 – 10. For the first time, Instagram collated cuts
from barbers across the world and gave a sort of
yardstick to see where everybody was.
“I suppose at that point I was looking at
everything that was going on in London and then
Menspire came about. I was really inspired to
bring the level that was in London back to Dublin
because it really hadn’t been there yet. I was
looking at haircuts at Menspire and thinking why
can’t I get this? Where can I go to get this haircut?”
Glenn says. He would achieve this four years later
as the director of Menspire Dublin.
“You’d have had to go to a hairdressers to get
that shape,” says Sam. “It wasn’t unheard of a few
years ago you’d go to the Caribbean barbershop to
get your fade and salon for your scissor cut. People
would actually have their hair cut in two different
places.”
Not only was it an inconvenience for the client,
but also hugely indicative of the fragmented
state of the industry at that time and the divide
between barbering and hairdressing - a divide that
some were eager to keep in place. To hairdressers,
barbering seemed crude; to barbers, hairdressing
seemed over-elaborate. Sam and Josh, however,
reconnected over an admiration for each other’s
skillsets and a desire to blur the two disciplines. u
We use goPanache for appointment
booking and marketing automation.
goPanache recently completed a custom
app for us and all of our growing locations.
The custom app sends out SMS auto
reminders and really helps decrease our
no-shows and more clients show up on
time. Also, with our app clients can just
open their phone and book with us 24/7
without waiting in line or calling ahead to
the salons. In early 2018, we are adding
our product range and merchandise to our
app so clients can order with us faster from
anywhere.
This will allow us to launch new items
faster and communicate with our clients
easier using PUSH notifications directly to
the phone. “I’d go through these pictures and I was so
puzzled how you had skin tapers, skin fades, this
blur and my training as a hairdresser never went into
clipper work or anything barbering. In fact, it was
very much frowned upon. ‘Barber’ wasn’t necessarily
a good word to be associated with. So I was
watching Josh do all this – the lines, the patterns and
shape ups. Everything I was taught was very soft. So
I was like how is this guy putting a bald bit here and
blending it through?” Sam explains.
“We [Craig Murtagh and he] used to get criticised
for the work we’d do,” agrees Glenn. There were
numerous times where people that worked there
really hated the way we were working. Even so
far as sectioning the hair was like, ‘why are you
doing this? It’s a waste of time’ and you do kind of
50
doubt yourself in the early stages. Well everybody
is thinking this way, I’m trying to do it this way but
everybody is saying it’s wrong. Why are they saying
that? And then obviously as time went by we
learned this is definitely the way it has to be done.”
Menspire Academy courses are some of the
most heralded in the industry. The courses,
ranging for a single day to six months, deal with
the ‘why’ as much as the ‘how’. Anybody can
hold and manoeuvre a pair of scissors, but a deep
understanding of shape will allow you to manipulate
the hair almost without thought.
“They’d learn how to cut hair, quite clearly, but
what they won’t expect in what we deliver is how
we train them mentally. Because it’s not necessarily
about which haircut they want to learn but more
so about learning what techniques will go into the
haircut that they want to create. And the only way
that we can do that is enabling and allowing them
to discover how to think and not what to think,”
says Josh.
“We’ve seen it when somebody gets the
understanding and actual understanding of the
haircut,” says Sam. “We’ve seen it click and their
whole career can change. Because they might be
able to use their tools and do haircuts in however
long it took them, but when they figure it out and it
clicks, that can be a career changer,” Sam says.
“So I challenge everyone that comes on our
courses and anyone in the industry to just keep
practising because there’s nobody out there that’s
perfect, but you can be close to it and by reaching
for it naturally you’ll feel that you’re progressing, and
if you’re progressing you’re going to be more fulfilled
and happier. That’s what It comes down to, if you’re
progressing you’re going to be happier,” adds Josh
thoughtfully.
On the theme of progression, it’s clear that Josh
and Sam, from day one, knew Menspire was going
to be more than just a salon. They aim to be for
to barbering what Vidal Sassoon was and is for
hairdressing.
“The intention was to help the industry develop.
It’s not about Josh and Sam or it would be
Palmonaca across the door. LP Creative. It’s not about
us. And that’s what I think people get confused
about sometimes. Menspire is about the industry
as a whole. It’s about how we can help the industry
around us grow because if they grow, we grow. So
by that, our intention was to become a revolutionary
system that people can tap into so that effectively
we, as an industry, increase the value.”
BROGUES OR BOOSTS?
SAVILE ROW OR
SELFRIDGES? NOT
ONLY IS BARBERING
A FASHION-LED
INDUSTRY BUT HAS
ALSO DEVELOPED
ITS OWN POLARISED
SUBCULTURE AND
BIRTHED ITS OWN
BRANDS.
DEE GRAHAM
True love is hard to
find but not as hard, or
arguably important, as a good tailor. Hailing from
Dungannon, Northern Ireland, Dee Graham has
outfitted some of the barbering industry’s most
well-known figures in his custom couture.
Your work is just exquisite and I can’t
wait to own one of your pieces, but how
did you get into such a traditional craft?
Much appreciated, my man. I look forward to
seeing you in the shop. We can have a whiskey too
while creating some fine threads. It’s a question I
get asked a lot… how did I get into tailoring? Well,
for me I’ve always had my own style and wanted
to have my own brand. I could never buy what I
wanted to wear off the shelf so I created clothing
that reflected me. Tailoring is very personal, so it’s
a way to introduce yourself without saying a word.
N
O
I
H
S
FA
E
R
U
T
L
CU
52
ABANDON SHIP
Your style is certainly distinctive.
How would you describe your style of
tailoring and have you been inspired by
any other designers in particular?
Unique. I have great love for the art of tailoring
and its traditions, but I do like to break boundaries
and put my spin on it. So yeah, if I had one word
to describe my style of work it would be ‘unique’.
I fully focus on myself and what I’m doing, not in
a selfish way but if you start to delve into trends
or whatever designers are doing or not doing
you lose your own individual style. It says ‘Dee
Graham’ above my shop and that’s what I offer.
When did you start collaborating with
figures in the barbering industry?
The barbering scene seems to go hand in hand.
I’ve featured a lot in that game. My good friend
and master barber Garry Jackson of Garry’s Barber
Shop… you’ll see we do a lot together - be it
videos, photoshoots and different ventures. He’s a
top man with a great image that fits my style.
And you also tailor the
suits for the Wahl Artistic Team?
Simon Shaw, absolute gentlemen that cracks me
up… a real funny fucker who I’ve got a lot of time
for. 5ive, Michael Damiano and Carl Blake, those
guys hit me up last year before Andrea came along
and I tailored some suits for their onstage antics.
Simon’s a regular customer of mine and every time
I see him now he’s getting skinnier. It’s bollocks
because I keep having to tailor them in but he’s
looking great. He’s promised to spar me for a few
rounds in the boxing club I run. He’s cocky now
he’s thin, so let’s go, Shaw, ye handsome bastard.
Founder and owner
Richard Davies
discusses the origins
of the alternative
lifestyle brand, its
ties to the barbering
industry and the
opening of the
flagship Abandon
Ship store.
Abandon Ship, Dundee
is the latest expansion
of a brand that has
been going since 2011.
It started its life as a
‘bedroom brand’ in
Glasgow with £300 and
the aim to make visually
striking designs without
being “logo reliant”.
Six years on and we’ve
become an established
lifestyle brand in the UK
and beyond, having sold
hundreds of thousands of pieces over the
years across the globe. In the last year the
concept of the brand has moved forward
massively. We have become advocates of
mental wellbeing through our artwork and
social messages and have refined our visual
signature to create a truly unique brand.
With the new store, we wanted to create a
home for the brand that visually reflected the
artwork of the clothing and the atmosphere
we’ve cultivated over the years. The store is
pink and we have a “flash wall” of brandrelated artwork along with personal artwork,
toys and books from our personal collection.
We want our customers to feel like they’re
walking into the mind of Abandon Ship.
We opened the store in Dundee because
of the success of our brother company; we’re
situated directly across the road from Hard
Grind. It’s helped us create a destination for
customers of both brands to visit easily and
for us to expand our presence and concept in
our home city. Although both brands share
a similar visual they are both very distinct.
What are your thoughts on fashion in the
barbering industry. You’re as likely to
see a pair of Yeezys as Paul Smiths?
Yeezys are brutal, I’ll just clear that up. The
barbering world has some really slick guys. For me,
the likes of clean cut double breasted blazers, tie
pins, wingtips, the old school barber is top notch.
But again, the beauty about barbering and the guys
in it are individual so their style reflects this. Old
school for me all day long, though!
And finally, how should be people get in
touch for a custom piece?
If somebody is interested in custom tailoring, you
can contact me on any of the social media. Visit
the website www.deegrahamtailormade.com or
there’s no school like the old school, lift the blower
and give me a call.
53
Abandon Ship is very
much the brain child of
myself, and Hard Grind is
very much that of Colin
Petrie, although you
can see the cross over
in both. Separating the
clothing and barbershop
made perfect sense to us.
The Abandon Ship store
is also home to our Hard
Grind Apparel range.
The main difference
between HG Apparel
and Abandon Ship is
that HG is built with
the ethos and lifestyle
of the barbershop in
mind and geared much
more towards barbers.
Most days our team in
both the Dundee and
Aberdeen shops can be
seen wearing a Hard
Grind item. The brand is created by barbers
who understand the trials of the job and also
the atmosphere of the industry, creating visual
messages that resonate with people who live
the lifestyle. It can be seen in the ‘Fuck Egos’,
‘Humble and blessed but tired and stressed’
and ‘First In, Last Out’ pieces.
That’s not to say that Abandon Ship
doesn’t have a long-standing relationship
with barbering. In fact, the brand was the
first to sell Uppercut Deluxe online in the
UK along with other barbering products.
We also established the concept of taking a
pop-up barbershop to fashion events at the
beginning of the new wave of barbering that
hit the UK five years ago. Having worked
with other barbershops over the years and being on the edge of the industry so
long - it was an easy jump to team up with
Colin in 2014 to launch Hard Grind and then
become partners in Abandoned Ship in 2015.
Since then we have united the brands and
businesses to push both forward and create
something special.
JULIUS CAESAR
Fashion. How do you define
something that changes its
identity constantly? Style.
What’s the difference? Does
the statement, “it’s not what
your wear, it’s how you wear
it” still hold true today? Fashion
and style has played a vital role
in how hair trends come into
fruition.
When leather jackets and
ripped jeans found their way
back into everyday wear, hair
moved in that direction as well
with strong hold pomades, laserlike side parts and pompadours
as high as one can get it.
Men’s barbering and grooming
currently finds itself focused
on pure details - a mixture of
traditional barbering practices,
a focus on strong Sassoon
principles and channelling
innovative millennial creativity.
54
In the fashion world, brands
are currently mixing high-end
design with strong streetwear
silhouettes. Anything and
everything is considered fair-play
– from skateboard culture led
by Supreme (who continually
boast sold out collections) to the
quality European garments of
Raf Simons and Balenciaga and
forward styles of Japanese labels
like A Bathing Ape and Yohji
Yamamoto. The vision of what’s
“on trend” is vast and varied.
Quality over quantity. Pieces are
in high demand, hard to attain
and expensive.
But Balenciaga sneakers can
be scuffed, that gold chain can
be lost, and that Goyard wallet
may never truly be seen by most.
Believe me, I know. The point is,
fashion will not always be with
you throughout the day. One
thing than an individual will wear
every day is their hair.
Hair, like fashion, can convey
the feelings and emotions of
an individual. You have new
sneakers and a matching shirt,
usually a fresh cut. Looking and
feeling good is a whole package.
Wherever hair goes, fashion
follows. Whenever fashion
pushes forward, hair trends are
there to compliment. No matter
what, classic or modern, vintage
or millennial. The best way to be
on trend is to be your own trend.
We all have that same pair of
jeans that, no matter how many
other pairs we have, we will
always wear. It’s just like “the
usual” when our barber asks us
what cut we want. Sometimes
it’s time to pull out that fancy
coat, and sometimes we ask our
barber to change up the cut and
style. It’s all about what you feel
comfortable in. Nothing is worse
than walking around in an outfit
that looks like it’s trying too hard
or a haircut that looks forced.
Fashion and hairstyles will come
and go. Don’t aspire to chase
the trend; set the staple for your
own with every day individuality.
Yoiscissors.co.uk
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MODERN BARBERING
PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS
Our workshops feature some of the top names
in the industry preforming demonstrations of
the freshest on-trend techniques.
If you would like to host or attend a GBBB
workshop in your own salon or barbers, please
call Garry Spencer.
Full list of workshops available on the website.
For tickets call - 01704 548881 Office hours Tues-Sat
greatbritishbarberbash.co.uk/workshops
55
GO CREAT E!
COLOUR
DOESN’T
HAVE TO BE
BORING
Tom Baxter
gets creative
with the
OSMO®
Color Psycho®
range
56
Color Psycho® Wild Cerise and
Wild Cobalt combine to create
the ultmate metallic purple before
rinsing and dragging through the
ends for the perfect reverse fade.
www.osmo.uk.com
57
Hair// Kieron Price.
Jessica Zeinstra,
Andis Education
Manager.
HOW TO
STYLE…
Executing Efficient Fades
with the Andis US Pro Li
Today, executing Fade styles smoothly and
efficiently is a technique that the men’s grooming
specialist must master. Andis Education Manager,
Jessica Zeinstra, takes you step-by-step on
how to incorporate a clean fade into a modern
Pompadour style using the US Pro Li cordless
clipper and iconic T-Outliner trimmer.
For information visit: www.andis.com
or call 01227 713 311 for nearest stockists
STEP 1: Start with the cordless US Pro Li, ergonomically designed for precision
clipping with an adjustable blade. Begin on the left-hand side with a #2
attachment, blade closed, and cut up to the parietal ridge using C strokes. Ensure
you work all the way round the head before moving on to step 2.
STEP 2: Change attachment to a 1 ½ to allow for
efficient fading of the hair. Again, using C strokes, work
your way around the head. Fade side burns into the rest
of the hair with #1 attachment (blade closed).
STEP 3: To finish the fade and achieve an
exceptionally close shave, use the hypoallergenic Pro
Foil shaver. Its staggered-head shaver blades assist in
perfecting your fade to ensure an ultra-smooth finish.
STEP 4: Switch to the T-Outliner trimmer with a carbon steel T-blade for detailing. Locate the
natural part in the hair and gently cut in a rough shape. Point the trimmer head down using a tap
and wiggle motion to fine-tune the part. This
trimmer can be zero gapped and is also ideal
for defining beard shapes and for dry shaving.
58
STYLE
TO GO!
matte clay
extreme™ 25ml
fibre sculpt ™ 25ml
Experience the ultimate in dry
textured control for powerful hold
with natural matte expression.
(Also available in 100ml)
A lightweight fibrous sculptor
to characterise your style with
flexible definition and enviable
hold. (Also available in 100ml)
With an amazing melon
fresh fragrance!
With an incredible toffee
scent!
www.osmo.uk.com
Years ago, an enthusiasm for barbershops turned into a blog - That Little
Barbershop. I wanted to experience and write honestly about many
incredible, and often unknown, barbershops. Times and indeed the industry
may have changed but that interest certainly hasn’t waned. In this series,
we’ll be exploring different regions across the UK and hopefully unearthing
some hidden gems. Let’s start where it all began for me, the capital.
LONDON
BARBERS
CUT & GRIND//
COVENT GARDEN
AND SOHO
Cut & Grind is more than your
traditional barbershop.
Hari Efthymiades built the brand
on a desire to “dive into people’s
habits, fashiont preferences and
aspirations and help them reach
their desired lifestyle, including
anything from cigar selection to suit
type.”
The store at 37 Drury Lane –
opened in June of last year – was
stripped back to its original 1800s
features before being transformed
BUCK BARBERS//
HACKNEY WICK & SHOREDITCH
A reimagining of the traditional barbershop
where all men are equal.
The brand may have been born in
Shoreditch, but Hayley Wallace says Bucks
Barbers is based on the on the idea of
inclusion. Four months ago, Bucks opened a
second branch in Hackney Wick and their ten
barbers rotate between the two.
“We like to think of ourselves as every man’s
barbers. We cater to men of all types and ages
- not just for the ‘cool kids’: from city works to
creatives, young lads to the retired. We make
sure that everyone feels comfortable as soon
as they walk in. It’s a big thing for us.”
The feel of the shop remains quite masculine.
Black and red runs throughout the stores and
exposed brick, varnished wood and copper
makes for a cosy yet contemporary feel.
“Aspiration wise, as long as the bills and
wages are paid, anything else is a bonus. We’re
just riding the Bucks wave and seeing where it
takes us. We were approached by Here East to
open our second branch in Hackney Wick, so
who knows, we could be approached again!”
60
into a menagerie of antique
splendour. Tom Dixon lights and
Moroccan crockery, amongst other
trinkets, adorn the walls above the
reclaimed wooden stations.
Downstairs, businessmen and
creatives alike meet in the coffee
lounge over a cup of Cut & Grind’s
own blend. The brand are constantly
in talks with tailors, photographers,
musicians and other brands on how
to utilise the space and collaborate
on projects.
Sights are set on a third store - this
time across the Atlantic - but the
primary aim is to continue to grow
as a lifestyle brand, utilising the
vast wealth of talents their barbers
possess.
“The company has a plethora of
talented barbers who offer more
than just simply the ability to cut
hair; many of them are part-time
photographers, designers, actors
and all sorts of creatives with ideas.”
THE GREAT BRITISH BARBER BASH
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GREATBRITISHBARBERBASH.COM
SLIDER CUTS//
HOLLOWAY
S
T
U
C
R
SL iDE
MARK MACIVER
A
s an avid fan of his Insta stories and many of
his celebrity clients, I’ve been eager to speak
to Mark for some time. We arrange a call for
11:00am – nothing too ambitious. Best make
it 10:58am, I think. If Mark’s taught me anything,
it’s that “early is on time, on time is late and late
is unacceptable”. He’s approached his career with
single-minded professionalism and broken through
the glass ceiling of the barbershop. Most would
assume – and in many cases would be correct – that
to grow a successful brand you must own a shop, but
Mark has done it from a North London institution,
D&L’s Barbershop.
Mark’s fascination with barbering, he explains,
began at a young age. When most of us were
drawing a crush’s name in our textbooks – or male
appendages on those of others – Mark was sketching
line-ups. Unable to afford a trip to the barbershop,
he had no choice to admire precisely etched lines and
crisp fades from afar. One day, however, unsatisfied
with the one-level cuts his mother and brother were
giving him, fourteen-year-old Mark decided to pick
up a pair of clippers.
“It went very, very wrong.” Mark laughs. “But
it didn’t put me off because I still didn’t have any
money to go to the barbershop. If I’d have had
money from a young age I’m not sure if I would be a
barber now.”
It wasn’t until the age of fourteen that he set
foot in a barbershop. He’d previously only seen the
finished results and improvised the method; now
he was seeing the process for the first time. “I was
like ooh, that’s how they do that. So that’s how
they create the fade. So, I then grabbed my little
cousin and practiced on him at home - I put the line
in and tried to fade it out. I’m not sure what I was
doing previously but it wasn’t working,” he says. At
fifteen he was introduced to D&L’s Barbershop – a
cornerstone of the Holloway community. A friend’s
brother worked there, giving Mark the opportunity
to study the barbers’ every move while his friend got
a cut.
Armed with the new knowledge, Mark continued
to hone his craft by cutting his friends and family in
between college. It was just a hobby at this time;
he wasn’t getting paid. His younger brother – who
would usually go to D&L’s but sometimes let him
shape him up – planted the seed that it was time
to step up to the professional ranks in no uncertain
terms.
“My brother said to me, ‘you know what? There’s
a barber in the shop and you’re better than him, you
should take his place’. I saw the manager in the street
and walked up to him and said, ‘yo, I’m better than
a barber that works in your shop’. And I was just
seventeen and saying it as a joke and being cheeky.
62
Then he said, and I was shocked: “Ok, if you’re better
than him, come in and take his place’. I kind of went
shy and was like nah, nah, nah.”
Mark’s youthful brazenness may have outweighed
his confidence, but the manager wasn’t going to let
him off easily. “When are you going to replace him?
When are you going to replace him?”, he’d jibe each
time he saw Mark. After a couple of months, they
took the choice away from him, but that, he thought,
gave him mitigating circumstances. After all, if he
botched a cut it was technically their fault.
“So which client am I cutting?” Mark asked on his
first day. Unsurprisingly, the sterling recommendation
of an eighteen-year-old – specifically himself – wasn’t
enough to convince the manager of his ability. He
would be observing for now.
Over the coming years, he would develop his craft,
drawing the occasional approving nod and “why did
you do that? Don’t do that again” from his mentors.
The young barber always had greater ambitions than
turning up, putting hair on the floor and going home.
He may still be at D&L’s Barbershop almost two
decades after first crossing the threshold, but his own
brand has gone from strength to strength.
Aged twenty-five, Mark adopted the moniker
SliderCuts. He wanted to bear a name that lacked
ambivalence; Slider has been his nickname since
thirteen, but ‘Slider The Barber’, his wife and brother
“GOOOD MORNING, INSTA!” A FAMILIAR WELCOME FOR MARK MACIVER AKA
SLIDERCUTS’ FIFTY-TWO THOUSAND FOLLOWERS, USUALLY AT AN UNGODLY
HOUR OF THE MORNING. THE SHUTTERS ARE UP, THE TV IS ON, MARK’S GLOVES
ARE WARMED-UP, THE CLIPPERS ARE ON AND REGGIE YATES IS ALREADY LATE
FOR HIS APPOINTMENT LONG BEFORE I’M BEGINNING TO STIR.
thought, lacked originality and suggested ‘Cuts’ as
a suffix. Originally, the name SliderCuts was coined
for a website he planned to promote himself with
– something he says wasn’t common in the black
barbering community at the time. From a young age,
Mark viewed himself as a business rather than an
individual and conducted himself accordingly.
The North London barber has grown SliderCuts
over the last seven years, honing his craft and
projecting it out via a mastery of social media.
Followers can join him ‘in the cut’ and feel like a part
of the shop’s community. Unfortunately, I haven’t
been to D&L’s, but I feel an instant familiarity when
speaking to him. I ask him about the experience of
growing a brand within a brand.
“The barbershop is a collaborative environment so
the experience of growing my brand here has been
nothing but positive. There was never any resistance
because everybody has their own plans; not
everybody wants the same thing. People are pursuing
different business avenues. For me, it was about
actively pushing harder to grow my business. I’ve
always worked long hours but I would spend time on
social media, and reading about social media to make
sure people would see the foundations of my brand –
the craft and my work ethic.”
Hard work inspires some and irks others, even if
they don’t have the same objectives. Some people
just don’t ‘get it’, so to speak. Although Mark admits
he’s conscious of being a ‘busy body’ – always
pushing and trying new things – his individual success
has not caused any sort of friction or resentment.
“I can’t speak for what everybody else is thinking in
their head,” he laughs. “But no, from the guys in the
shop, there isn’t any ‘oh, you’re doing that again’ or
‘oh, you’re trying that again’. There have been a few
things said from outsiders, but from the people that
really matter, it’s nothing but respect. Like Damon,
who I look up to. I’ve never had anything like that
from him; he’s happy for my success. And I’ve learned
so much from watching him. He’s one of the best
barbers I’ve ever seen. He’s just naturally one of the
best faders I’ve seen and I’m still learning from him. I
never think I’m too big to learn.”
The demand for the SliderCuts brand is obviously
huge, and Mark shares his plans to open his own
shop next year – tentatively citing the first quarter
but revising it to the second to be safe. Considering
Mark’s drive, I’m almost surprised that it’s taken
this long. His ambition, however, is paired with
thoughtful self-awareness and respect for D&L’s.
“I was talking to some people about it when I was
twenty-four, but I just didn’t think I was ready. It was
just about timing, about being ready and experienced
enough. I was honest with myself that I wasn’t ready
but I do believe I’m ready now. Whether it’s the truth
or not, we’ll find out. It’s always been my business
ethic to be honest with where I’m at. I don’t ever
want to be in that place where I’m deluded.”
Something I do want to talk to him about is
something that most barbers aspire to – a celebritystrewn clientele list, that includes two of my favourite
people on the planet. WBA and IBF heavyweight
champion Anthony Joshua and wicked skengman
himself, Stormzy.
“I’m actually writing something at the moment,”
Mark says. “I don’t know if it’s going to be a very
short book or a kind of look book but it’s talking
about all these things because a lot of people ask me
and I feel like a lot of barbers go about it the wrong
way. The question isn’t how do I get these people, it’s
how do you make yourself known to these people.”
Mark views life as a continuous interview; project
yourself out into the world in the correct manner
and you just don’t know who will discover you. I ask
him if he has any interesting stories about how he
came across any of his well-known clients. He says
that there had been some back and forth regarding
cutting Stormzy, but the first meeting came after he
received a somewhat ominous message.
“I was getting out the shower and got a text: ‘Yo,
Bro I need you to save me’. But there’s no name.
Ok, I look at the picture and it’s Stormzy and David
Beckham. So, I messaged him back, and you know on
WhatsApp it tells you the name? It said Michael. I’ve
gone onto Google and that’s Stormzy’s first name,
so I’m thinking it could be Stormzy but might not be.
I end up having a conversation with him, arranged
the haircut, gone to meet him, given him the cut. The
whole time I’m thinking, ‘I’ve not asked who it is’ – it
could have been you, Steve,” he laughs.
If you follow SliderCuts, you’ll know that Mark
63
doesn’t use his celebrity clients for shameless
self-promotion. Whoever you are and whatever
you do, you’re not exempt from a starring role on
Mark’s social media – something he thinks they
acknowledge and respect. You’ll also know that
many of his high-profile clients will come to the shop
rather than rely on call-outs.
“In a black barbershop, people grew up here. I
think they feel comfortable and enjoy coming here.
They can interact with the public in a good way.
Not in a “what are you doing” kind of way. “Can I
get a picture?” That has happened but they can get
into normal conversations about politics or music or
football or girls or whatever it is. And I think it’s the
way I treat them. I’m always going to put stuff on my
Insta stories whether a celebrity walks in or not. I’m
always going to post and I think they gauge that and
understand that. I’m not just dusting off the camera
because Anthony Joshua has walked in.”
Finally, I want to ask Mark what advice he has
for young barbers that want to make a name for
themselves even if working inside somebody else’s
shop.
“Focus on your craft and understand that you’re
a business. Your craft isn’t limited to only cutting
hair but everything that goes with it: your service,
your attitude. In order to keep pushing yourself - in
whatever you’re doing – remain a student of your
craft. Whether you’re a barber, builder or banker, you
can always learn and better and perfect your craft.
That will always pay off.”
ROCKERFELLA BARBERS//
WHITECHAPEL
Rockerfella Barbers, just a three minute
walk from Liverpool Street, has finally found
its place as a metropolitan retreat for city
workers.
“The place was a unisex salon for many
years but kept closing down,” says Michael
Joannou. I took over and had seven or
eight staff and five treatments room in the
basement. I found women in the city didn’t
have time for a cut and blow dry in their
lunch break. So after four years I changed to
what I know best and that’s barbering.”
Unfortunately, a flood in the basement left
hundreds of pounds of damages, leaving
Michael little money to reinvest in the
business. The brick walls were sandblasted
and the floorboards stripped and varnished
to create a stripped back city vibe. Film stage
lighting illuminates the frost dressing tables
and frosted mirrors.
“We have two types of clients. One that
want a fulls rocker service - a consultation,
shampoo, scalp massage, cut and style,
ready to go on a night out on the town, or
fellas that just want a quick haircut, no wash,
no fuss, so with the New York/ London vibe
going on, what better way to rename as
Rockerfella Barbers?”
BARBER + BLOW//
ST MARY AXE & BROADGATE
You’ll find Barber + Blow tucked inside high-end
fitness boutiques 1Rebel.
1Rebel isn’t your average metal mecca. The “high
intensity, dual studio fitness concept” crams as
much body-altering exercise into hellish 45-minute
sessions as possible. You can certainly bet
Londoners willing to put themselves through that
torrid experience want to look good.
“We decided opening within an existing space
made most sense. It could be involved with a
brand that was already had a buzzing clientele
and then we’d have a better chance of building a
brand ourselves. We needed to think outside the
box a little and that’s how we came together with
1Rebel,” says Benjamin May.
The shops themselves follow 1Rebel’s industrialchic styling and house two barbers and four stylists
between them, catering to their eclectic range
of clients. This month will see the brand expand
further with the launch of a third store along The
Southbank.
64
QUYEN DINH//
@parlor_tattoo_prints
E
R
U
T
L
U
C
ART
IS HAIR ART? IT SERVES A FUNCTIONAL PURPOSE SO THEREFORE CANNOT BE
CONSIDERED FINE ART. DECORATIVE ART, PERHAPS. THERE’S CERTAINLY ARTISTIC
EXPRESSION AND, LIKE ART, HAIR CAN REFLECT TIMES AND CULTURAL CHANGE. ONE
THING IS FOR SURE: BARBERING AS BOTH A CRAFT AND SUBCULTURE IS RESPECTED BY
THE WIDER CREATIVE COMMUNITY AND EVEN ACTS AS A SOURCE OF INSPIRATION.
So much has happened! The Thy Barber painting you had
on the cover was made into a limited-edition print and has
been in the windows of galleries up and down the country.
Same for Gentleman & Rogues Club. I think both of them
have nearly sold out.
I actually saw the Thy Barber portrait in the front
window of Whitewall in Manchester! I believe I sent
you a photo.
I was also lucky enough to have one of my paintings in
Captain Fawcett’s Quintessential Grooming Guide for the
Modern Gentleman and Iain Crockart made short film
about me, Painter, other than that, everything I’m painting
at the moment seems to be sold before it has a chance
to be hung on the gallery wall. I sound like a right selfcongratulatory c**t but it’s been bloody hard work. I’m at it
seven days a week and the hours are long. I’m loving it.
At the time of your feature you’d just been signed to
the Clarendon Fine Art. How has working with such a
prestigious company been?
VINCENT KAMP//
@vincekamp
I’m a self-taught artist and my influence
mostly comes from the lowbrow culture
of tattoos and pop surrealism in Southern
California. My work over the years, though,
has been very eclectic, with everything from
hyper-realism charcoal portraits to sci-fi
sculptures.
I’ve had two small shows with them, one at their Mayfair
gallery and one at Clarendon’s new gallery in Richmond.
Both shows sold out on the night which is nice and many of
the people I painted were at the show. Frank and the Thy
Barber guys, the Gentleman & Rogues Club and then at the
latest show, Frank, Sid Sottung, Joth Davies and of course
Matt Robinson.
There’s a section dedicated to barbering
prints on your website. When and
how were you first introduced to the
industry?
Far from just being incredible pieces of art, your ‘Fear
and Loathing in East London’ series follows a dark
and twisted narrative. What was your inspiration?
I’ve always been the barber of my family ever
since I was a kid. I enjoyed cleaning up hair
on men and self-taught myself the scissorover-comb technique. I got my cosmetology
license in 1997 but never did much with it.
Art was my calling.
The inspiration started with Thy Barber and wondering
and what might be going on in the barbershop other than
getting a haircut or a shave. All sorts of shady deals, a
backroom poker match for high stakes, a drug deal that ends
badly. My mind is always whirring with stories, and I just
keep meeting more and more people that inspire paintings.
I first came across your work when
speaking to Joth about the now
ubiquitous Savills logo. How did that
come about and how does it feel to have
created possibly the most recognisable
logo in the industry?
It’s strange to think people now have portraits of
barbers hanging up in their homes. Would it be fair
to say the interest is more in the unique characters in
the craft than the craft itself?
It’s the characters in the painting that people like. I could
paint a really good barber that looks like a regular Joe
and nobody would give a toss. I think barbering attracts
creative people that like to work with their hands and have
a distinct style and look, but that isn’t always the case.
Joth reached out early on for a commission.
I wasn’t taking any at that time but I love
Savills’ old-school aesthetics so much that I
couldn’t say no. Plus, Joth is such a good guy.
The actual portrait was based off one of his
haircuts and the rest is history. I’m honoured
to be acknowledged for my work because it’s
a community that I respect and love.
When we first spoke, you yourself were exploring
the industry for the first time and seemed amazed by
the whole subculture. Has your view of the industry
changed?
Why do you think your style resonates
with the barbering community?
Well it’s been more of the same, just lots of really creative
people doing what they love. I have a lot of time for
barbers and I’ve made lots of really good friends. It’s too
bad I’ve got no hair.
I think it’s fair to say 2017 was a
breakthrough year for yourself.
What have you got planned for
2018?
I’ve got a big solo show in November
2018 that will feature many of the
guys I’ve already painted. I can’t say
much more than that as it will be a
big surprise. Let’s just say it will be
so much more than the usual art
show of oil paintings.
FRA NK RiMER
Do you have any more plans to
work within the industry?
I have no plans ever, really! I just go
where the wind takes me. But I will
always have more barbering prints to
paint.
ViNCENT
KAMP
ARTiST
DIEGO
JOSH LAMONACA
BRAID BARBERS
TARIQ HOWES
SAM MARTIN
HARRY PIRATE
66
I think because we have that mutual
fondness of the vintage, the antique, the
original. Today’s traditional tattoo art and
modern barbering have a shared
history of 1920s aesthetics. The art
resonates because it’s familiar. It’s
classic.
2 0 1 7// I S S U E #
TWO
First of all, congratulations! It appears to have been
quite the year since we first spoke at London.
You certainly have a very distinctive
style. Could you tell me about your
background and the inspiration behind
your work?
M A R C H /A P R I L
Featured on the cover of issue two, the portrait artist
explores the underground world of urban subcultures. His
gritty ‘Fear & Loathing in East London’ series casts some
of the industry’s most interesting characters in a nefarious
world of betrayal and underhand deals.
Hailing from the The Golden State, Quyen
Dinh has amassed an impressive 105k
following from her pop culture-inspired and
often playful prints. You will be familiar with
a least one piece of her work even if you
don’t know her by name.
£ 5 //€ 6
67
TJ GUZZARDI// @tjguzzardi
FOR MANY YEARS, IT LOOKED AS IF THE ART OF
TRADITIONAL BARBERING WOULD BE LOST UNTIL THE FINAL
BASTION OF BARBERS SAVED THE CRAFT. AUSTRALIAN
ARTIST AND UPPERCUT DELUXE AMBASSADOR TJ GUZZARDI
IS DOING THE SAME FOR THE TIME-HONOURED TRADE OF
SIGN PAINTING, ONE STROKE OF HIS BRUSH AT A TIME.
“I’m not a sign writer by trade,” he says. “I’m an
artist that loves painting signs that look like they
came from another time. I first picked up a brush
at the age of fifteen, pinstriping hot rods at my
dad’s shop. Over the years, I’ve painted vintage
cars, old tools, brick walls, glass bottles, old
timber, rusty tin panels, and I’m designing an art
piece for the back of an old boat.”
His eclectic body of work has also included
pieces for the barbering industry, and TJ’s
appreciation for classic aesthetics attracted the
interest of Australian grooming giants Uppercut
Deluxe, who have featured the artist in their
68
campaigns.
“In 2016, they launched the Mini Styling
Collection and the campaign they created
featured four different videos, each revolving
around old world trades – one of which was
signwriting,” he explains.
Since then, TJ has become one of the
company’s highly-valued lifestyle ambassadors
and collaborated with the brand further.
“I guess that kind of highlighted how
complimentary the brand and my artwork were,
and showcased our mutual appreciation for
timeless style which paved the way for a more
official working relationship. Last year, they
approached me to be an ambassador and since
then they’ve kept me busy painting bespoke point
of sale items for select stores and their barber
ambassadors. I’ve also worked on campaign
videos and hung out at social functions, all fun
stuff!”
Like barbering, TJ says sign writing is making
a resurgence down under. He believes there will
always be gentlemen, like himself, that shun
technology and continue to work with their
hands. Social media, however, a very modern
phenomenon, is key to preserving traditions.
“Well sign writing has been coming back with
a bang! There are traditional sign writing classes
around now for people wanting to learn the
craft. For me to keep the craft alive, social media
is great for getting my work out there and to
be seen by many people around the world. I’ll
always be there with my brushes to preserve the
tradition. I prefer to work with my hands as I’m
not too fond of computers.”
For TJ, his greatest sense of pride comes from
being able to provide for his family plying his
traditional trade.
“I’m just proud that I can support my family
while doing what I love as a full-time job. I’m
grateful for every job I do. Running a small
business is the hardest I’ve ever worked at, like
they say… “Never hope for it, work for it.”
Uppercut
Deluxe makes
timeless
grooming easy
with EASY HOLD
Uppercut Deluxe are now a force
to be reckoned with in the global
men’s grooming market. A position
guaranteed to be further strengthened
with the introduction of their sixth
styling product - Easy Hold.
Easy Hold is a water-soluble
formulation that acknowledges the
shift in global trends towards lighter
more textured finishes. Guaranteed
to deliver a fuss free solution to both
modern and traditional styling needs
textured, curly, straight.
It really is one of those products you
can use in just about any hair type. It’s
great for my clients – when they style
their hair it looks natural and hardly
like they’ve used any product at all” –
Dane Hesse - Eagle & Pig Barbershop,
California.
69
Image//
Kevin
Luchmun
TORi GiLL
“Have you heard of Tori Gill? She just won Australian
Barber Of The Year 2017,” Kevin Luchmun asked me.
I hadn’t, but after looking through her work I could
quickly see why he holds her in such high regard.
Her blend of traditional barbering and contemporary
hairdressing, not too dissimilar to his own, lends itself
perfectly to high fashion and editorial work. Tori’s
artistic approach to hair is unsurprising given her
path into the trade.
“I was set on going to Art College,” she reveals.
When I turned fifteen I wanted to earn money and
the only jobs available at that age were a paper
round or an assistant in a salon. This introduced me
to the industry and it was then I realised how much
art and hairdressing were linked and I could put my
creative ideas into hair. After two years of being a
Saturday girl I ended up leaving school a year early to
go full time and qualified in just over a year.”
72
DECIDING WHETHER TO UPROOT YOUR ENTIRE LIFE AND MOVE TO THE
PROMISED LAND DOWN UNDER TAKES A LOT OF THOUGHT, LIKE HOW MUCH
SPF50 YOU’RE GOING TO NEED. IT JUST SEEMS LIKE A MORE PLEASANT
EXISTENCE - PROVIDING YOU DISREGARD THAT ALL THE WILDLIFE IS OUT TO
GET YOU. EDINBURGH-BORN TORI GILL MOVED TO AUSTRALIA FOUR YEARS
AGO AND HAS ALREADY MADE QUITE THE NAME FOR HERSELF.
Most have an intrinsic desire to travel and
experience new things but are often shackled by
the necessities of modern day living. Jobs, mainly.
A career in hair, however, is incredibly freeing. Not
only does it allow you to look how you want but
also lead a nomadic lifestyle should you choose
to. Tori trained at Cheynes in her native Edinburgh
but had her eyes set further afield. “I loved being
a hairdresser but from a young age I wanted to
travel and I knew I was lucky enough that I had a
skill I could take anywhere,” she reveals.
After returning from her first jaunt down under
in 2011, the young stylist transitioned to barbering
somewhat unintentionally. Tori agreed to help in
a friend’s barbershop and quickly found that not
only did she prefer the atmosphere but also what
she perceived to be greater creativity in men’s hair.
She now had a second trade she could ply when
she returned to Australia.
“At the end of 2011, after spending the summer
in Ibiza, I wasn’t ready to go back to Scotland, I
booked a flight to Australia. I was backpacking
around Australia, working in different salons along
the way. I instantly fell in love with Melbourne
and knew that one day I’d end up there. Twelve
months later I was ready to make the move and
hoped the barber scene had hit it off as I didn’t
want to go back to working in a salon. After trying
out a couple of other barbershops I came across
Kings Domain who then sponsored me to live in
the country.”
Kings Domain is a high-end brand with five
shops in Melbourne and one in Sydney. The shops
retain the customer service of award-winning sister
salon Joey Scandizzo. Each gentleman that graces
the chair is treated to a hair wash, head massage
and cold beer – you can’t imagine licensing being
so stringent in Aus… Tori explains that, like in the
UK, a shift in attitudes towards male grooming led
to a transitional phase in barbering, pioneered by
Kings Domain.
“When I first got to Australia there were mostly
traditional barbershops around: no appointments
needed, no hair wash and it was a quick job. Kings
Domain was the only shop that was different; it
really was a men’s hairdressing salon. We were
booked out every day and had a waiting list if
some got cancelled. It was only a matter of time
until someone else was doing the same thing.
More and more shops started to open around
Melbourne and other cities in Australia as the
beard and fades became more popular. Men had
no choice but to return from the salons.
“Most shops here offer a free beer, some run on
appointments while others still stick to the walk-in
basis. The most popular shops in Melbourne and
the ones giving the best cuts are mostly run by
ex-hairdressers. Over the past two years, the new
thing is men’s cutting studios. It’s not labelled as a
73
barbershop or men’s hairdressers. These are more
warehouse orientated with a minimalistic feel and
only a few barber chairs and freestanding mirrors.
There are now a handful with this concept in
Melbourne and are working well.”
Last year, Tori won the coveted title of AHFA
Men’s Hairdresser. Much like the BHA Awards,
entrants have to submit six images along with a
biography detailing their work within the industry.
She approached the competition with the usual
artistic flair that has afforded her success in similar
competitions – she’s currently planning her shoot
for the 2018 Hair Expo. Creating an overall look
rather than just a hairstyle has always been at the
forefront of Tori’s work.
“I’ve always been into fashion, being brought up
surrounded by it with both parents in the fashion
industry. I decided how I wanted my models to
be styled before I decided on the cuts. Normally
people leave that to a stylist but I needed it to be
exactly what I wanted to get my vision across. I
spent a lot of time researching and creating mood
boards months before the shoot. My dad used
to be in a band when he was young in the New
Romantic era so I looked at a lot of pictures of him
and his band mates. I knew that I wanted to create
something that was original and cool. I wanted the
hair styles to be wearable so it was important to
have a bit of a commercial edge to each style.”
Naturally, Tori was delighted to win such a
prestigious title.
“The competition is judged in London and
is narrowed down to six finalists, there’s then
a huge award night that takes place in Sydney
a couple months later. I was so excited when I
was announced as a finalist, so to actually win
was unbelievable! It makes all the hard work
worthwhile. At this current time, it’s an honour to
hold that title as there are so many amazing men’s
hairdressers and I’m so grateful to be part of the
growing community.”
The barbering community may be growing
but, due to social media, has never been closer.
Not only are trends being transmitted faster but
industry figures are now to share their ideas and
passion with one another. Tori recently had the
opportunity to shoot with the man that first
introduced me to her work, Mr Kevin Luchmun.
The results of which can be seen on the next
pages.
“I was recently in New York for the Fellowship
Show where I got to meet some of the best in
the industry and shoot with Kevin Luchmun. It’s
amazing how you can fly to a different country
and meet like-minded people who share the same
passion as you, learn from each other and make
amazing friends along the way.”
THE FELLOWSHIP
EDUCATIONCOMMUNITYS
NOVEMBER 13TH SAW AN
ALL-STAR CAST TAKE TO
THE STAGE AT THE ICONIC
BROOKLYN BOWL FOR THE
FELLOWSHIP SHOW. THE
EVENT, HOSTED BY FELLOW
BARBER NYC, FILLED THE
VOID OF SHOWS FOCUSED
PURELY ON BARBERING AND
MALE GROOMING.
JULIUS CAESAR, SOFIE POK, ROB THE
ORIGINAL, MATTY CONRAD AND MARK
BUSTOS REPRESENTED NORTH AMERICA,
AND KEVIN LUCHMUN – IN MANY WAYS TO
EPITOME OF BRITISH MALE HAIRDRESSING
– FLEW THE FLAG FOR THE UK. KEVIN
RECALLS HIS TRIP TO THE BIG APPLE.
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
After hurtling through the air in a pressurised
metal tube for seven hours I touched down at
John F. Kennedy and thankfully so did my cases.
Coincidentally, Tori Gill – who I’d been speaking
to before the trip – landed from Australia at the
same time, so we jumped in an iconic yellow cab
and headed to the New York’s home of artists
and artisans, Brooklyn. Once checked in to the
hotel, we got a cab to Little Italy to meet up with
some of my American friends for dinner.
We were introduced to the guys from
Hairbrainded and spoke of the different trends
and culture in NYC. It’s great to meet people with
different views of what’s currently happening
within men’s hairdressing and barbering. After
dinner, we all walked across Roebling’s Brooklyn
Bridge to gaze at the skyline that has inspired
artists, poets, songwriters and filmmakers.
There’s no rest for the wicked. I had to tear
myself from my slumber and stave off jet lag for
a few early morning meetings before discussing
June’s BarberCon with founder Lee Resnick in the
afternoon. Pete Nguyen, a close friend and LAbased photographer and creative producer, joined
me after my first set of meetings. We’re currently
working on a project together so he was filming
throughout the trip.
The evening proved to be a little more relaxed.
I ended up meeting with a model friend from
London and cutting his hair in my room. The
characterful hotel provided the perfect backdrop
for a little impromptu photoshoot. Afterwards,
we met with everybody’s favourite Canadian and
coffee connoisseur Matty Conrad. We had a few
drinks and food at the hotel and spoke about the
weekend ahead.
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
So good they named it twice. We spent Saturday
taking in the sights and doing a spot of shopping
in New York, New York before meeting Mark
Bustos in the familiarly named Chelsea. That
evening we joined up with Richard Manner and
went for a few drinks at the Soho Grand. The
hotel in lower Manhattan celebrates two periods
in the district’s history: the 1870s Gilded Age and
the luxury of the 1970s. Well I say a few, but the
evening got pretty heavy. It was just nice to be in
New York with like-minded people.
The morning after the night before. Tori Gill and I
had a shoot planned for the supposed day of rest.
The concept was kept simple. I’d already scouted
locations around Brooklyn and wanted to really
capture the beauty of the borough. Fortunately, I’d
been introduced to one of the agencies in NYC and
had four professional models, each with different
hair types and different textures and shot them in a
high-end fashion shoot around Brookyln.
That evening I headed back to Soho with the
other artists. The Mexican restaurant doubled
as a speakeasy, harking back to the 1920s
Prohibition era. From the outside, it looked like an
unassuming Mexican takeaway, but once telling
the doorman your name you’re lead through the
kitchen to a huge room with a great vibe.
SHOW,
NYC
INSPIRATION
75
MONDAY
Show day. Myself and Mark had to pick up some
lightning as not only was I to cut on stage but also
set up a live photoshoot to happen throughout
the show. We wanted to add another element to
the show and shoot all the models that came off
stage. After prepping our models at Fellow Barbers
Brooklyn branch, it was almost time for myself and
Mark Bustos to take to the stage.
We went up in pairs: myself and Mark, Julius
Caesar and Rob The Original and finally Matty and
Sofie Pok. We each had around fifty minutes on
stage to showcase a diverse range of skills in men’s
hairdressing and barbering. Turnout was great and
the audience so interactive. The focus remained
on education, with live videos and dissection of
techniques and styles.
After the show, we all stayed around for a few
games of bowling and to just hang out. The
photoshoot quickly extended from the day’s models
to everybody. It really brought everyone together;
there was no ego in the room and everybody was
just showing love for each other.
TUESDAY
Home time. The seven-hour flight gave me a
chance to reflect on another charming trip to
what is quickly becoming a second home for me.
The foundations are firmly set for an even bigger
and better show next year and I feel so blessed
to be asked to be a part of it by Mark Bustos and
Richard Manner.
BARBERCON, THE PREMIER GLOBAL FESTIVAL OF THE BARBERING
COMMUNITY, ANNOUNCES ITS ANNUAL DESCENT ON NEW YORK CITY
Barbercon has announced its annual
descent on New York City on June 10
& 11, 2018 at the Knockdown Center
in Queens. Barbercon is doubling
in size by expanding to two days
and adding many new elements.
Barbercon 2018 has also partnered
with iHeartMedia’s Power 105.1 FM,
“New York’s Hip Hop and R&B.”
“Barbercon first and foremost
is an educational opportunity for
aspiring barbers to learn from the
best in the business.”
Barbercon will be comprised
of three stages for live
haircutting tutorials and product
demonstrations, education classes,
an expanded indoor/outdoor
76
Barbercon Marketplace, the
prestigious Barbercon Awards, a
barber themed art gallery, and many
more unique surprises and guests.
Added for 2018 is the outdoor
festival area that will feature artisanal
food trucks, drinks, music, games,
and an exclusive VIP Lounge with a
private bar, comfortable lounge area,
activations, gift bags and more. Past
celebrity appearances include hiphop artist Fat Joe presenting Rich The
Barber a Barbercon Award in 2016.
Tickets to Barbercon 2018 are
available December 4 at www.
barbercon.com.
BARBEREVO MAGAZINE ARE PROUD UK MEDIA PARTNERS OF CT BARBER EXPO 2018
ROME
ITALIA, IT MUSTERS THOUGHTS OF DA VINCI, TUBER PICO MAGNUM
AND PADUA. OK, FOR MANY IT’S PIRLO, PIZZA AND A SLIGHTLY
SKEWIFF TOWER, BUT THEY ARE STEREOTYPES THAT SPAGHETTIS
BARBERSHOP CERTAINLY AREN’T AFRAID TO PLAY ON.
N
estled in an Etruscan town in Rome, founders
Tonino Esposito and Cesare Morabito wanted
an obvious name that pointed to their proud
heritage for when the brand expands beyond
their homeland.
“We were undecided between various names,
like Mafia Barber Shop, Piazza Barber Shop or
Ciao Barber Shop. Thinking of the future, they’re
all names that allow customers to recognise us as
Italians, real Italian barbers. Spaghettis won in the
end because it was amongst the simplest of words
and not yet used by any large companies,” says
Cesare.
Twelve barbers and four salespeople tend to
the two stores (soon to be three), the latter giving
a clue that Spaghettis is more than just a place
gentlemen can go for a trim. Tonino and Cesare
offer an emporium of grooming and garments and
fragrances. Alongside their own handmade brand,
SBS, customers can pick up elegant Italian pieces to
the latest street styles and crepes.
“We have always sold more than cuts…
perfumes, handmade Italian shaving products and
clothing. We’re ambassadors for Pomp and Kasho,
and we have an exclusive contract with Levi Strauss
and they fully support our SBS clothing line.”
Spaghetti’s diverse customer base may enjoy the
diversity on offer, but underpinning the brand is
a real passion to bring barbering back to Italy. He
speaks passionately about the history of the craft in
his beloved homeland.
He explains that ‘real’ Italian barbering culture was
lost as many barbers emigrated after the Second
World War. The post-war period was a time of great
social change for Italian Americans and over six
hundred thousand – many professionally trained or
skilled - emigrated in the following decades. Italian
Americans are the fourth largest European ethnic
group in the USA. Today, Cesare says, there is a
fusion of the two traditional styles.
“After the war, around 1946, true Italian barbers
were forced to emigrate due to the poverty of the
78
period. Old Italian families moved to the US and
began to form shops. Over the time the styles
fused – American barbers, perhaps a little less
CESARE’S GUIDE
TO ROME....
elegant. Today in Italy the figure of the old romantic
barber does not exist. Ninety percent are former
hairdressers are opening a salon but calling it a
barbershop and not even knowing the origins. They
only open because it’s now become fashionable.”
Far from stuck in the past, Spaghettis don’t aim to
revive a craft through nostalgia but bring back a real
interest and understanding in men’s hair. All their
barbers are trained in both traditional and modern
methods, and they intend to spread their message
through Spaghettis Metodo, an academy set to
open in 2018.
“Training courses will include appearances from
some of the best educators in the world like Kevin
Luchmun and Richard Mannah. The Spaghettis
Metodo will be a real academy and focus on the
skills and techniques of barbers. We won’t forget
the origins of this trade and its elegance, but always
look to the latest techniques and trends.”
TO STAY
Navona Palace Residenze di Charme
After drinking, eating, siteseeing and getting
tattooed, you need only the best place to stay.
Navona Palace offers a 5 star luxury stay.
Located at - Via della Pace, 36, 00186 Roma
RM, Italy
TO GET TATTOOED
Angeli O Demoni A contemporary tattoo
studio in the heart of Rome.
Located at - 43 lg. Cossa, Roma, RM 00148,
00148 Roma RM, Italy
TO BE A TOURIST
Sistine Chapel Look in awe at
Michaelangelo’s delicately painted ceiling.
Located at - 00120 Vatican City
TO MEET AND DRINK
Bar Del Fico offers a late night and
contemporary atmosphere to unwind and
drink in the city centre
Located at - Piazza del Fico, 34/35,
00186 Roma RM, Italy
TO EAT
Beer & Salt (Birra e Sale) Time is tight
when visiting such an amazing city. Why waste
it sitting down? Beer & Salt offers an amazing
selection of sandwiches complimented by a
vast range of craft beer.
Located at - Via del Governo Vecchio, 90,
00186 Roma RM, Italy
TAT TOO TOUR
y
d
O
O
L
T HE B
S
’
R
E
H
C
T
U
B
BRIE F BA R BE Ri
& TAT TOO H iSTORNG
y
“Back in the day, barbers
were also surgeons and
dentists. Being used to
bloodletting, leeching,
extracting teeth and
even amputations,
barbers were very
welcome on the ships
that sailed out to
explore the globe.
Now when these
ships hit islands like
Borneo, Tahiti, New
Zealand etc they
were encountered
with the native’s
body adornments
such as tattoos
and piercings.
Since “bloody
chores” were the
expertise of the
barbers on board,
it was them who
watched and
learned and it was
the barbers who
gave the first little
souvenirs to the sailors on
board of the ships to remind
them of their travels and have
something to talk about in bars and
brothels along those journeys.
It was also the barbers that took this
strange “new” ancient form of art back to the
shores of the west where tattooing was (illegally)
practised, usually in the backroom of barbershops. Fun
fact, the first electrical tattoo machine was invented by a
barber. Since then, tattooing and barbering have always gone
hand in hand. Ask any barber in the world to show their tattoos, if
they have them, he or she will always have a little barber pole, clipper
or straight razor somewhere. We have a very, very proud trade. Even
nowadays it’s a symbol of where both barbers and tattooists are experts
on how to stretch the skin, whether you stick a needle in or try to give the
cleanest shave in town.”
80
The Bloody
Butcher on…
his own tattoos.
The Bloody
Butcher on…
barber tattoos.
The Bloody
Butcher on…
Schorem tattoos.
“I have no idea how
many but I’m working
on a full, mostly
Japanese bodysuit.
I’ve got to be honest
though, the older I
get the more it hurts,
especially because all
the ‘good spots’ are
gone so I’m left with
armpit, backside of the
knees, ass-crack and
other spots you just
not want to stick
needles in.”
“It’s a way of showing
respect and pride for your
craft. I’ve got a barber
pole on my thumb, a
straight razor under my
eye and on my calf and
blow dryer on my neck
with “love thy barber” –
a little wink to the classic
knuckle duster with “love
they neighbour tattoo.”
Oh, and of course, a little
piglet above my ear as
a tribute to our Reuzel
brand and the Schorem
gang tattoo.”
“It kind of started as a
joke but we’ve always
been a gang, a family.
We built this shop
together, we’ve had a
lot of success but we’ve
also been backstabbed
and getting this tattoo
is a way of showing that
love. You’re branded
for life, it shows you’ve
been part of something
special. And to that
fucking backstabber, the
tattoo will remind you of
who you truly are.”
CREATED BY BARBERS.
USED BY GENTLEMEN.
REUZEL.CO.UK
0 1 3 9 2
3 6 5 1 7 7
REUZEL UK
@reuzel
@reuzeluk
EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW
BARBERSHOP
With Tracy Walker MIT, Director of Education for the Institute of Trichologists.
TO THIS DAY, THE HAIR INDUSTRY REMAINS
UNREGULATED IN THE UK. IT’S A
HIGHLY CONTENTIOUS POINT AND MANY
ORGANISATIONAL BODIES ARE PUSHING FOR
REGULATION, CITING INDUSTRY STANDARDS AND
CLIENT SAFETY AS THEIR MAIN CONCERNS.
Sanitation is often a subject that is left unspoken but what are the risks in the barbershop?
Tracy Walker MIT is the Director of Education for the Institute of Trichology, an organisation
set up in 1902 by a group of hairdressers, doctors and scientists. Clinical trichology is the
diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the human hair and scalp.
Tracey, a former hairdresser herself, gives her thoughts and advice on sanitation in
the busy barbershop environment.
ARE YOU USING BARBICIDE THE RIGHT WAY?
A TRICHOLOGIST’S THOUGHTS ON…
The correct way is really important. It’s great
Gloves…
having a Barbicide jar but people will put the
“I have a little bit of a problem with them.
Obviously, we need to wear gloves if the
situation requires them, but if you’re sitting
down to have your haircut and you’re all
gloved up they might wonder what on earth
you’re about to do to them.
I think it’s really important that we touch
people’s heads. If there’s the slightest bump
or abrasion we might miss it just by looking
through and wearing gloves you don’t always
feel what’s happening on the scalp. Plus, if
we’re wearing gloves we might get a little
complacent about washing hands. I don’t
particularly feel that it’s the way to go.
comb straight in and that’s not good.
You have to clean it first. You can imagine
there’s oil and dirt on the comb. Putting it
straight in isn’t going to remove that oil or dirt.
You have to clean things first with a
detergent, rinse it well and then put it in the
jar with fresh Barbicide for that day. Ideally
use hot water, the Barbicide will then be more
effective.
It’s ideal to have two Barbicide jars so you
can put used combs in one and all staff know
what’s used and what’s ready to be used.
82
Industry regulation…
It’s very similar to hairdressing where anybody can
set up a salon or barbershop and not necessarily
know the ins and outs of how to run that particular
business and look after the customer’s safety. I
think it would be a good idea to try and regulate
the business or even have inspections. We have
them in the food industry. I think that would be a
really good idea for salons too.
Of course, you could do it yourself but we all
sort of put those things off. But it would helpful
if there was some kind of regulation. When we
think about the chemicals – some really strong –
electrical equipment, sharp equipment. You have
to be trained in those areas. These problems arise
because people are unsure that they’re doing
or have not been taught what to do. We can’t
expect people just to know these things.”
FOLLICULITIS
Folliculitis is inflammation or infection of one
or more hair follicles (openings in the skin that
enclose hair).
“It’s not contagious. We see it a lot when
people have very short haircuts or have their
head shaved, particularly in black males. Black
hair is very curly and when shaved it may go
lower than the surface. When the hair starts to
grow it bends over and scratches the scalp. It’s
very itchy so then the client will start scratching.
Once they start scratching it can cause secondary
infection around the follicle.
It can also be caused by any cuts or abrasions
on the skin, so again, if somebody was having a
shave or even the clippers can scratch the surface
of the skin. It could cause the scalp to become
very itchy, they’d go home and begin to scratch
and that would cause the infection we’d call
folliculitis. Anything ending in ‘itis’ is infection
and the follicle encloses the hair hence the term
folliculitis. It can look like a cluster of bumps but
what we term them is keloids – they’re raised
scars and hair won’t grow through scars.”
Reducing the risk… Washing the hands
between every client and making sure your
equipment is clean/ sterilised. You need enough
combs and brushes where you can sanitize them
afterwards. The best way to do that is you have
your Barbicide jars. It takes around ten minutes
so if you have two or three of everything you can
sanitise after every client.
BACTERIAL INFECTIONS//
IMPETIGO
FUNGAL INFECTIONS// RINGWORM
Ringworm is a fungal infection caused by
organisms termed dermatophytes. They target
skin, hair and nails. In addition to the circular skin
lesions that give it its name, the infection causes
other related conditions, including athlete’s foot.
“There are various types of ringworm. One
of them can be what we call ordinary scaly
ringworm – it can look like a patch of scaling on
the scalp which can be put down to a dandruff
or eczema condition. It’s actually a type of yeast,
a fungus called a dermatophyte that actually
targets hair and skin. These dermatophytes can
easily be transfered from person to person as well
by infected tools. If it’s something inanimate like
a tool or brush it’s called a fomite.
There’s also black dot ringworm. We wouldn’t
know what the infection was caused by unless it
was sent to the pathology lab and identified. You
do get circular bald patches and short broken hair
but sometime it’s not visible until you look under
a magnifying glass. It can also look like another
condition called alopecia areata which is very
common and that’s not infectious.”
A superficial bacterial infection of the
skin. Nonbullous impetigo is caused by
Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus
species, or both organisms; it mainly affects
young children and is highly contagious and
presents as honey-yellow adherent crusted
papules or plaques. Bullous impetigo is
caused by Staph. aureus and can occur at any
age. Treatment of impetigo is with topical or
systemic antibiotics. NB: Both are contagious.
“It’s almost like a crusting of the skin. What
happens is the bacteria from the nose, and
you can imagine children when they’ve got a
cold, drips down onto the top lip. When the
bacteria is in a different environment it can
become pathogenic and cause infection.
It can look a bit like a rash or dry skin and
it could easily be missed if somebody is not
expecting it. It’s extremely contagious and
could be transmitted if the barber’s moving a
child’s head and touching the area and then
touches another client.
ADVICE TO BARBERS…
First of all, hairdressers and barbers are people that care about people. They want to work
with them to give them the latest style and generally make them feel good. I feel that looking
after your client means looking after their health as well. Simple little things like remembering
to wash your hands in between each client. We don’t know what they have, they may not
have anything but it’s good practice to wash them and dry them well so you don’t end up
with irritation yourself.
83
Luke
Dolan
WE ALL HAVE THOSE GO-TO PAGES FOR
INSPIRATION. WELL, WHAT STARTS AS
A SEARCH FOR INSPIRATION QUICKLY
MORPHS INTO ‘HOW THE %$!& DO THEY
DO THAT?’. ANYWAY, YOU GET MY POINT.
L
uke Dolan, proprietor of Luke’s
Barbershop, has been one of those
figures for me for quite some time. If
I wanted to see the crispest of fades,
that’s where I’d go.
Luke has been cutting hair since he trained
as a hairdresser in the 90s but has worked
many other jobs, including a stint in the muchloved real estate industry. Although he says he
felt he’d “sold his soul to the devil” at the time,
Luke admits he was surprised at how many
transferable skills he learned. The transition to
business owner, he says, was a smooth one.
He now runs two hugely successful
barbershops in North West London. The
second opened early mid 2015 in Ruislip and
features a bar but, much to the dismay of his
customers, has never served a drop of alcohol.
As many of you know, local councils are now
clamping down on shops that give alcohol to
customers.
“As soon as I put in the pump I had a licensing
officer come in and ask questions,” he says.
“We didn’t even have beer in at that time; it was
just a pump and I explained what the business
model was going to be. Since then I’ve been
going through the process to acquire a premises
licence, but as of yet we’ve not been allowed one
by the council. I will endure and prevail with
one!”
When he’s not grappling with the local
council, Luke can be found taking his craft
outside of the barbershop. If you follow him
on Instagram, which I imagine you will, you’ll
have seen he was part of the Anchored Cruise
this summer. It’s basically a floating mega-club
where revellers can have a fantastic time making
awful life decisions. The liner docks at stunning
places across Europe - Rome, Santorini,
Monte Carlo, Mykonos this year - and features
performances from some of the world’s best DJs
and MCs. Sign me up for 2018.
84
An interview
with//Ken Hermes
“It was insane!” Luke says. “I know some of the
partners that put the cruise together and I was
lucky to be part of it from the inception of the
idea. I took a four-chair barbershop to the port
of Rome and got it onto the deck of the biggest
boat I’ve ever seen, let alone been on and cut
hair. I brought two of my guys, Louie Hamon
and Calum Rowan, and Danny Robinson, Tariq
Howes and Champ came too.”
Last time I spoke to Luke we discussed his
pop-up shop at sneakerhead mecca, Crepe City,
and particularly the logistical issues of running
such a popular stand. Considering they have been
involved for nearly four years, I ask if the process
has become any easier.
“People have come to expect us to be there now.
It was my first pop-up shop and it’s grown to be
the most fun. I take five chairs with me now and
invite barbers to join me for the day. The set up
and breakdown is the toughest part but now we’ve
got a process and logistically we know exactly what
to do!”
There are even rumours that Luke is in talks
about a collaboration with the F1 division of
Dietrich Mateschitz’s Red Bull Racing. Although
he won’t confirm or deny the rumours, his answer
of things are “right on track” when I question
him about it would suggest there may be some
substance to the claims. It would certainly be an
impressive addition to the long list of brand’s he
already works with. You’ll often see him at events
cutting on stands.
“I don’t know how this came about really! I feel
humbled that I get asked to and that people think
85
I’m good enough to do it. I just love to cut hair
and I love all aspects of what I do. I find now I
get asked more about business than I do about
cutting hair. Maybe I should start doing business
seminars!”
Like many other barbershops, Luke has
recently taken the business decision to use the
Booksy app in both of his shops. A decision that,
he says, has already had a positive effect on his
business.
“It was recommended to me by Champ and
then Alan Beak. I spoke to Adrian – who runs
the UK and Europe team - and we talked about
my business model and how it could help. The
main factor for the change was no-shows and the
capability for taking card details so we can start
charging for no shows to stop people doing them.
It’s been a huge success!”
It’s clear Luke clearly believes in the brand that
is sweeping through barbershops across the globe.
Eager to help others, the London-based barber
now acts as a brand ambassador for Booksy –
sharing his experience with the app and how it
can save time and create additional revenue.
“The app is so comprehensive and immersive
that we are now seeing new customers that have
found us through the app alone. Amazing stuff.
Using mail blasts and text messages we can
contact customers directly telling them of new
offers and services.”
BARBERSOCIAL
EVO EDITOR AND OWNER OF
MARKETING COMPANY IVY MEDIA,
STEVE GREEN, DISCUSSES THE SIMPLE
PRINCIPLE OF SOCIAL MEDIA.
I started my marketing company, somewhat
accidentally, in the barbering industry. You can
read the full story in my intro to issue one should
you wish to. Since then I’ve worked with many
barbering brands from bookings apps to events and
academies, amassing well over 200k followers on
Instagram alone.
People often ask, “how do you do it?” and I
always say the same thing: In principle, social media
is simple – post good content at the right time.
That’s it. Admittedly Facebook adverts have taken
hundreds of hours to learn, but I’m going to talk
about a key principle behind strong organic growth.
For one of my earliest clients (whom I no longer
work with) – a barbering alliance – I added over
110k followers on Instagram and 40k on Facebook.
I did it without any bots or any background
in barbering. No, I might not have known the
mechanics of the cuts but I was representative of
who your social media should appeal to, potential
clients. I picked images purely based on if the image
was appealing and if I’d want them to cut my hair.
That leads me to my main piece of advice: you
must be realistic and objective. Does the image
you’re about to post look good? Does the image
show off your product in the best possible light?
I’d spend a lot of time scrolling through tagged
photos and tags (always the former first) and see
so many badly taken, badly lit, badly cropped
images. If anything, it was frustrating. People had
put such effort into honing their craft but weren’t
doing themselves justice.
I know barbers are critical of their own work, so
why not images? Now I know that not everybody
is a photographer but one, you can learn, and
two, you can take a pretty decent image on a
phone nowadays. Our resident photographer
Liam Oakes gives some simple to use tips in his
Scissors & Shutters column.
I’m a big believer in if you look at somebody or
something that is successful you can figure out
why – apart from Bitcoin, I haven’t a Scooby what
that’s about. When I started my company I’d
never even used Instagram, but looked through
successful pages to figure out what made them so
– from travel pages to car blogs and fashion labels.
The answer was always simple: good content
posted at the right time.
Contact steve@ivymedia.co.uk for bespoke
marketing packages.
@trendformenUK
@captainfawcett
@juliuscaesar
Consistency is key and The Hornchurch-based stored
has mastered it. Reminiscent of a high-fashion feed,
Trend For Men clean and crisp photography show the
brand at its best.
From the musings of the delightful Muriel Lavender
each Sunday to Curio Corner, Captain Fawcett’s
Facebook page offers charming hirsute themed content
each day of the week.
As Byrd said, it’s important to create balance on
your page. Julius’ mixture of cuts, travel and fashion
maintains professionalism while building an investable
brand.
86
TYRIK JACKSON
FREE INSTAGRAM SEMINARS SHOWING BUSINESS, LIGHTING,
PHOTOGRAPHY AND CUTTING. OFFERS A Q&A WITH FREE INTERACTION.
Hair Talk Live – Fantastic feeds on Instagram showcasing a blend of hairdressing and barbering.
They broadcast informative events live for free.
Master-barberschool.com - Register as a stylist and you have access to amazing videos
and demonstrations. I have had my students looking at it this week.
SHARPFADE
TONY HARESIGN
BYRD MENA, FOUNDER OF SHARPFADE
AND CO-CREATOR OF THE SHARPFADE
ACADEMY, BREAKS DOWN THE KEY VALUES
TO EXPANDING YOUR ONLINE PRESENCE.
Growing your social media takes a lot of time but after
a while it becomes part of the daily routine. it’s also
important to physically travel to shows, expos and
networking events to increase your online exposure.
There are two main rules that I’ve followed
throughout the process, and are applicable to life in
general – self-discipline and consistency. Establish your
goals and you can move forward to achieve them.
SEPARATE
It’s important to separate your personal life and business
life from your page. Of course, somethings will be
relevant to building your brand but you also want to
maintain professionalism. So pictures of you at the bar
probably aren’t appropriate. You must find the balance
– and it won’t be the same for everybody – between
being an investable character and a professional that can
deliver a service.
THEME
Have you ever seen a photo and knew exactly who has
uploaded it before checking out the username? Well
that person is certainly doing something right. You want
people to be able to identify your work instantly. Create
a theme, whether it’s a (very, very light) filter, pattern of
uploading or just consistent photography.
INVESTMENT
You want to showcase your product (your haircuts) in
the best possible way. Firstly, I suggest you purchase a
camera. Instagram is obviously a visual app so you need
to create strong images. Having the correct lightning will
also help your photos stand out. There are many light
stands available for a low cost.
POSTING
Now you have great quality photos you can start posting.
I’d recommend posting a minimum of one video or
photo a day. Consistency is key. Also, utilise all of the
features on offer – use hashtags, geotags, tag relevant
pages. The caption can be as important as the image.
Use it to keep your following engaged and give them a
reason to comment.
LINKING
Linking your social media platforms to Instagram is
key. Not only will it allow you to push posts between
platforms but, more importantly, you will unlock
analytics when you add your Instagram to your business
FB page. That’s right, you’ll be able to know when the
best time is for you to post, where your followers are
from, gender, age and many more details that will allow
you to manage your Instagram correctly.
So these are just five tips to set you on the right path
with your Instagram page. There’s so much more but
for now let’s get you working on those. If you have any
questions, feel free to contact me at @sharpfade. For
more consistent mentoring/educating from myself and
industry leading educators on a range of topics – from
live haircutting tutorials to seminars on business growth
and social media.
Sign up to our online academy at
www.sharpfadeacademy.com.
87
Recently I felt very privileged to be one of very few
journalists to be given exclusive access behind the
digital doors of the Sharpfade Academy.
The academy consists of both a closed
Facebook group and a private website which
are both accessible when you sign up via a
PayPal subscription. Various guest features and
discounted subscriptions can also be found at the
academy’s instagram page - @sharpfadeacademy.
Upon access you’ll see a pinned schedule that
shows what is happening each day. There are three
to four presentations a week via live Facebook
feeds which are saved and can be viewed at a later
date if necessary.
Mark Gaye from Notorious gave a brilliant
lesson on social media strategy. It was really simple
and included elements that could be implemented
immediately after the video. The strategies were
fantastic and I saw immediate results. Even if that’s
all you learned that month, the subscription fee of
$25 would certainly be worth it.
Tyrik Jackson also did a fantastic Q&A on
opening multiple shops and gave some great
advice on scaling up a business. The seminar
included downloadable content from his website
to help develop business strategies. Every Tuesday,
Tyrik hosts a live Instagram feed where you can
ask him questions.
You may know M.R.K The Barber (Michael
Kelly) for his superb fading, patterns, razor
work and enhancements. He applies hair fibres
with a paint brush or a pump to enhance work.
Throughout his online seminar he was not only
demonstrating but also answering questions on
how and why he does everything. Interaction is a
key theme with the academy.
Both Mark and Michael both put links
underneath their videos to show where they
bought the products they were using rather than
marking products up themselves.
The private website currently consists of a shop
that offers heavy discounts on a variety of brands
and products, from pomades to combs and
scissors. The discount on scissors is particularly
impressive and they are currently looking to add
electrical products too.
For just $25 a month I’d certainly recommend
the Sharpfade Academy. In terms of online
education, it’s like nothing else out there.
LIAM OAKES
PHOTOGRAPHY// PART#4
PHOTOGRAPHY, PARTICULARLY
IN THE HAIR INDUSTRY, IS A
LARGE PART OF MARKETING
EFFORTS. YOU PHOTOGRAPH
YOUR CUTS FOR SOCIAL MEDIA,
COLLECTIONS FOR PUBLICATIONS
AND THE BARBERSHOP TO SHOW
CLIENTS WHAT TO EXPECT. I
HOPE THAT AFTER A FEW ISSUES
OF SCISSORS & SHUTTERS YOUR
PHOTOGRAPHY KNOWLEDGE AND
SKILLS HAVE BEEN IMPROVING.
KNOWING HOW TO PRESENT
YOUR IMAGES IS THE NEXT STEP.
SOC iAL MED iA
Alongside my photography, I was
once working for a leading men’s
grooming brand as their marketing
and social media manager. In
this article, I’ll try to pass on my
knowledge and give you some simple
and effective advice that you can
utilise to get your work noticed and
attract more potential clients.
Social media, as we all know, is one
of the biggest and most successful
marketing tools. Instagram has over
seven-hundred million monthly users
and Facebook over two billion. The
good thing about social media is it’s
free, at least for the most part, and
we all use it daily. Differentiating
yourself on very saturated platforms
is the hard part.
The first, and perhaps most
important, consideration is
consistency. Along with posting
great haircuts (that’s your domain
not mine), your photography should
be consistent. Don’t play about with
different filters and colours as the
page will look cluttered and not
visually pleasing. You want people to
look at your page and be impressed
and inspired.
As well as consistency, you
also have to post regularly and
strategically. Try not to post too many
images at once and stagger your
content. Say you have a lot of great
content from a photoshoot, try to
save some of the images for the days
you don’t have much content.
Posting at different times of the day
will also affect engagement. Consider
what your audience will be doing
at different times of the day and
how likely they are to be using social
media. If you’re a business, change
Black Label
Grooming
shoot with
Tom Baxter.
info@liamoakesphoto.com
@liamoakesphoto
www.liamoakesphoto.com
88
your Instagram and Facebook to a
business account to access analytics
and insights. You can then see who
your followers are, where they are
and when they’re online.
Instagram’s algorithm works by
showing your content to more people
if it does well when it’s first posted.
Instagram acknowledges that it is
good content and shows it to more
people. If it doesn’t do well initially it
may never get the reach it deserves,
perhaps down to the timing of post
etc. Don’t be scared to take an image
down that isn’t doing well as you can
always post later and it may do much
better.
Using hashtags gets your image
posted in more than one place. If
somebody searches for a hashtag
you’ve used it will come up in that
search. Use hashtags that apply to the
audience you are wanting to reach.
Also, don’t use the same hashtags for
every image, try and mix them up.
Engage with your audience
and target audience. If someone
comments on an image saying “great
work” then thank them, if someone
asks you a question then answer it.
It will keep people engaging with
you and your work is more likely to
show up on their feed. Also, do the
same with others. Let somebody
know if you appreciate their work.
A comment is more likely to get a
person to check out your page than
a like.
By applying these tips to your social
media accounts your engagement
and following will improve. My
next article will again focus on
photography skills with an insight into
camera angles and focal lengths.
If only finding a barber was as easy as swiping right…
Presenting the only barber matchmaker service: The Barber Agency
A revolutionary recruitment service dedicated to bringing barbers and brands together.
Pre screening | Interviewing | Career advice | Full and Part Time Jobs
Don’t hesitate, get in touch today for a confidential
conversation with one of our expert recruitment advisors.
thebarberagency.com
The Barber Agency can help you find the right barber for your shop, or the right shop for your skills.
THE BARBER AGENCY MAKING THE MATCH
THE BARBER AGENCY IS A GAME-CHANGING RECRUITMENT COMPANY
FOR HAIR PROFESSIONALS THAT MATCHES BARBERS WITH BRANDS.
Born out of the frustration and difficulty of finding the
right talent, The Barber Agency is set to revolutionise the
recruitment of barbers.
Founded by Lilly Dillon, with over 25 years’ experience
in the hair industry (and previously the manager of a
successful group of barbershops), Lilly has a unique
understanding of the challenges and issues recruiting the
right staff in the fickle world of barbering.
“Most people think that it’s all about money,” says Lilly,
“but it’s not. Yes, salary plays a big part in any career but it’s
also about finding a barber that suits your environment,
culture and type of services.” Lilly explains that restaurants
and bars recruit in a different way, finding the right
person to fit their ideas. She wants to add this ethos to the
recruiting of barbers.
Experience has taught Lilly that barbers and barbershops
are unique and the reasons why people leave their jobs
are wide and varied. She knows that losing staff and staff
changes are both time consuming and have a negative
impact on business and the individual’s career. For this
reason she wanted to take a new approach to connecting
barbers with the shop or salon that best suits their skills
and their personality. Advertising for staff is hit or miss and
often you find out too late that a barber just doesn’t click.
The Barber Agency offers a reliable resource for barbers
and barbershops with the aim of connecting the right
barber to the right shop or barbering project.
Whether it’s a full time or part time position, education
assignment or photoshoot, the Barber Agency provides the
best person for the job.
To do this, The Barber Agency carries out detailed
research into the barber and the position that needs to
be filled to understand the type of shop, the position or
the project – all before recommending a barber. Equally
important is that all barbers are fully interviewed to make
sure that their claims are genuine.
TBA has a strict interview process that looks at a
prospective barber’s training, career history and skill set.
89
Trade tests are conducted to ensure that the barber’s skills
are fit for purpose.
If you are tired of the stresses that recruitment brings,
or skilled and willing, looking for the perfect job, be sure
to get in touch with The Barber Agency, where you will
receive a warm and honest approach.
Find out more at www.thebarberagency.com
TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS OF
OWNING A BARBERSHOP IN
SO, WE NOW STRIDE INTO 2018 BUT I WANT TO REFLECT ON SOME
2017T
OF THE MAJOR PROBLEMS SHOPS FACED OVER THE PAST TWELVE
MONTHS AND HOW TO AVOID THEM IN THE COMING YEAR.
T
Natural curiosity will draw customers
he first major problem is
staff. Now before you - as
into new shops and it may influence
an employee - hate me,
your business. What I see, however,
just consider the difficulty
is too many people focusing on other
of a manager’s position, particularly
shops instead of on their own. You
if they’re in charge of a big team
have no control over what other people
and multiple salons. You need to
or shops do, so focus on what you can
juggle schedules, holidays, sick days,
affect and not what you can’t. Look to
performance reviews etc, but your focus
differentiate yourself instead of worrying
remains on retaining and incentivising
about them.
Words//
staff.
Jack Robinson Pullen,
The third issue I find is social media,
As a manager, you need to understand
MBA Educator
particularly Instagram. Now don’t get
people. Everybody is pushed or pulled
me wrong, I often speak highly of social
by different motives and vices: money,
media platforms as a powerful tool to establish yourself and
personal development, future opportunities, time… You need
find a place in the market. I have, however, found that young
to understand what makes each person ‘tick’; it can’t simply
barbers in particular are looking at social media within the
be one rule and reward for each person. Creating a tailored
reward scheme will motivate your staff by providing them
wrong light. They’re more concerned about followers and
with consistent training, opportunities to earn pay rises or
likes than their paying customers. Since when did it become
commission and extra holidays if they perform well.
important if Raul from Puerto Rico likes your work more
Creating the right atmosphere and building a culture can
than Dave the local builder?
also go a long way in your shop. You must make your staff feel
Look, you don’t need to seek clarification from anybody
like they’re doing things for the right reasons and make them
other than your customers. Putting your work on Instagram
feel comfortable and excited. If work becomes boring and
and hash-tagging barber or barbershop isn’t going to get your
monotonous your staff will eventually want to find something
locals to see it. My top tip is to run a Facebook ad and target
more satisfying. Building a culture and finding a balance takes
within a small radius of your shop – 10km is the minimum
times, but once you do, don’t allow anybody to damage it.
Facebook allows. You don’t have to spend a lot, but it’s a more
A second difficulty shop owners faced was the additional
direct way of attracting clients in your area.
competition caused by the opening of new shops. As I’ve
I’m going to use the phrase I use a lot once again, adapt
stated in previous columns, the ‘barber boom’ has not been
or fail. People are often far too happy to rest on their laurels
universally beneficial. The current state of regulation (or lack
but in business you need to adapt, evolve and innovate to stay
of, should I say) within the industry allows anybody, regardless
relevant and in demand. So go forward, do what you have to
of skill or qualification, to open a barbershop just feet away
from others.
and have a great 2018.
THE NHF BACKS CALLS
FOR CHANGES TO VAT
T
he Office for Tax
Simplification (OTS) has
recommended that the
government examines ‘the
level and design of the VAT registration
threshold.’ The UK’s threshold of
£85,000 is the highest in the EU, where
the average is £20,000. Around 55%
of all UK small businesses are not
VAT registered. Many labour-based
businesses, like barbering, can operate
on turnover below the threshold, but
the OTS provides evidence that trying
to stay below the threshold distorts
growth and activity.
The review considered some radical
options including raising the threshold
significantly, perhaps to £500,000
which would make VAT much simpler,
reduce competition between business
which pay VAT and those which don’t,
and reduce the administration burden.
However, this would cut government
funds by as much as £6bn per year.
The report also looked at reducing
the threshold from £85,000 to £43,000
which would generate up to £1.5bn per
year, or even reducing the threshold
to £26,000 (the national average
wage) which would raise up to £2bn.
While these measures would level the
playing field between registered and
unregistered small businesses, they
would significantly increase costs.
The OTS also considered options
for reducing the ‘cliff edge’ effect of
the current threshold. As soon as a
business goes over £85,000 they have
to pay VAT on all their turnover, which
leaves a trader £17,000 worse off.
Hilary Hall, chief executive of
the NHF, said, “In the current
political climate, it’s unlikely that the
government will want to make a radical
change to VAT in next week’s budget.
However, we welcome the renewed
focus on VAT and recognition that
the current system is unfair. We want
to see a level playing field between
businesses who do have to pay VAT and
those who don’t.”
90
WINNERS OF
THE NHF’S
BUSINESS
AWARDS
REVEALED AT
GLITTERING
CEREMONY
Finalists for the NHF’s
Business Awards gathered at
a glitzy ceremony last night
in Birmingham to crown the
winners. The NHF launched
its Business Awards in 2017 to
mark its milestone 75th year
and recognise the success of
some of the best hair, barber
and beauty businesses in the
industry. The NHF hosted the
awards ceremony at its 75th
anniversary event at the VOX
conference centre. Business
Awards finalists from across
the country found out who had
won each of the nine categories,
before partying the night away
and celebrating their success.
THE NHF’S BUSINESS
AWARDS WINNERS ARE:
•Bestindependenthair
or beauty salon
Richard Wallace Hair
•Bestindependent
hair or beauty salon
(highly commended)
Anthony John Salons
•Bestindependent
barbershop or male
grooming business
The Master Barber’s Shop
•Bestgroupofbusinesses
Mr Barbers
•Bestnewbusiness
Melissa Timperley Salons
•Bestclientexperience
Elements Lifestyle
•Bestcommunitysupport
The H.A.I.R Foundation,
Martyn Maxey Hairdressing
& Beauty
•Bestapprentice
Charlotte Blower, Exceed Salon
•Bestfrontofhouse
AKA Professional Hairdressing
•Bestenvironmentally
friendly business
Anne Veck Hair
For further information
on the NHF’s Business
Awards, visit www.nhf.
info/nhfbusinessawards
ARE BARBERSHOPS
AND HAIRDRESSING
SALONS SAVING THE
HIGH STREET?
BIGGEST YOUTH
MINIMUM WAGE
RISES IN A DECADE
WILL CAUSE
‘REAL PAIN’ FOR
BARBERSHOPS,
WARNS NHF
NEW SURVEY SHOWS 95% OF MEN STILL
VISIT THE HIGH STREET TO GO TO THEIR
BARBERSHOP OR HAIRDRESSER
H
N
air and beauty salons and barbershops will
be hit hard by today’s announcement in the
Budget that both the National Living Wage
and National Minimum Wage rates will be
rising sharply from April, the NHF has warned.
Chancellor Philip Hammond announced the National
Living Wage for over-25s is to rise by 4.4% from £7.50 to
£7.83 an hour from April t2018.
Equally concerning for salon and barbershop
owners are the steep increases announced in National
Minimum Wage rates, as recommended by the Low Pay
Commission, including the biggest increase in youth rates
for a decade.
The rate for 21- to 24-year-olds will rise by 4.7% to
£7.38 an hour. For 18- to 20-year-olds it will be £5.90 an
hour from April, up 5.4%, and for 16- to 17-year-olds, the
wage will rise to £4.20 an hour, or an increase of 3.7%.
The rate for apprentices will go up 5.7% to £3.70.
NHF chief executive Hilary Hall said: “We are
disappointed the government has seen fit to push ahead
with such big minimum wage increases. Salons and
barbershops are already under intense pressure – prices
are rising, and consumer confidence appears to be
slipping. These increases will cause real pain for many
small business owners.
“Our only consolation is that the increase in the
National Living Wage is less than we had feared, and
is a sign the government was prepared to listen to our
warnings on this at least.”
Hilary gave a cautious welcome to the government’s
decision to consult on changing the VAT registration
threshold from its current £85,000, although it will be
held unchanged for the next two years.
“The NHF has long argued that, for a very labourintensive industry such as hair and beauty, a more flexible
VAT system would be beneficial, and so the fact the
government has said it plans to look at this is potentially
positive,” Hilary said.
The announcement of changes to business rates was
also potentially positive, Hilary said. This includes
increasing the frequency of revaluations from five years to
three, and bringing forward a plan to use the main CPI
measure of inflation for calculating increases rather than
the higher RPI measure, so potentially reducing bills in
future.
“Anything that helps to bring certainty to how
businesses can plan and budget for business rates is
welcome,” Hilary said.
ew research
from male
grooming brand
The Bluebeards
Revenge has suggested that
the humble barbershop
could be the secret weapon
in the fight back to save the
high street.
Ninety five per cent of
men said they visit the
high street to go to their
barbershop or hairdresser,
with the pub coming second
on 76% and the restaurant/
coffee shop third on 54%.
The gym took fourth spot
on 39%, while the bank was
fifth on 35%.
From the 2,126 surveyed
men living in the UK, 93%
declared that they visit their
barbershop or hair salon
at least once per month.
33% even admit to making
fortnightly trips to smarten
up their styles and socialise
with like-minded regulars,
91
while 10% see their barber
once a week.
Overall, only 12% of men
surveyed now visit the high
street on a daily basis, 21%
make the trip once a week
and just 27% go once a
fortnight.
When asked to identify
the biggest challenges
facing the high street, the
overwhelming majority
(84%) cited the rise of
online shopping. The lack
of available car parking
(67%) and the convenience
offered by the out of town
supermarkets (63%) were
two other challenges that
were identified.
Nick Gibbens,
spokesperson for The
Bluebeards Revenge, said
the findings highlighted how
important the hair industry
is to the local economy.
“Barbers and hairdressers
offer services that you can’t
buy online so they have
survived the online boom.
The industry is also thriving
here in the UK as men
spend more money than
ever on male grooming
services such as wet shaves,
haircuts, beard trims and
facials.”
Keith Conniford, the
CEO/Registrar of the Hair
& Barber Council, said
that hairdressing salons
and barbershops were still
the mainstay of the high
street and as such played a
hugely significant role in the
economic prosperity of our
cities and towns.
He explained: “It’s great
to see the hairdressing and
barbering industry thriving
in today’s difficult economic
environment but we are keen
to raise the professional
standards of the industry,
and therefore we encourage
all barbers and hairdressers
to become state registered
so we can properly regulate
the sector.”
Tom Chapman, an
award-winning barber from
Torquay in Devon said:
“We have an ever increasing
amount of male custom
making its way through our
doors as every guy wants
their part of the barber
boom. The standard is
risings at a fast rate and top
barbers are raising the bar.
Along with the barbers skill
set their products have also
improved, being lucky to
work with The Bluebeards
Revenge I have seen what
goes into the development
of these products and they
never stand still. With ever
improving skills and tools,
men’s hair is going to keep
on getting better and better.”
OXFORDSHIRE’S MULTI-AWARD
WINNING BARBER SHOP
Traditional Barbering
with a Modern Twist
10 Cutting Stations • Hot Towel Shaves
VIP Area • No appointment necessary
01869 244 488 | info@andysbarbers.biz
C4 Pioneer Square, Bicester,
Oxfordshire OX26 6FA
andysbarbers.biz
HOW DO YOU MAKE A SUCCESS OF
OPENING YOUR OWN BARBERSHOP?
WE ASKED ANDY WILLIS, OWNER OF THE MULTI AWARD WINNING ANDY’S BARBER SHOP
TO SHARE HIS KNOWLEDGE OF OWNING ONE OF ENGLAND’S BUSIEST BARBER SHOPS
A
ndy had been in barbering for 15 years before
taking the plunge and opening Andy’s Barber
Shop. Ten years later his shop is multi-award
winning, has moved premises to a larger bespoke
shop boasting ten cutting stations and a VIP room.
It hasn’t all been plain sailing and there have been many
bleak times, including a break-in just weeks after opening,
staff shortages and competition but passion, attention to
detail and willingness to take a risk has seen him through.
Owning his own barber shop was a natural progression from
managing a shop for five years.
“It was a fantastic opportunity, the owners wanted a highend barber shop and completely left it to me. We had one
barber when I started and ten when I left. It was the best of
both worlds – being a manager but with no financial burden,
but I knew I wanted to bring high-end barbering to my home
town of Bicester and offer a different experience. I found
a small shop right in the town centre. A lot of barber shops
were tucked away but this 250-year-old building was visible
and gave us two floors.”
Despite being armed with detailed business plan, Andy
and Emma were refused bank loans, even being told by one
bank, “Bicester doesn’t need another barber shop”. Instead,
they took the brave decision of mortgaging their house at
possibly the worst time – the banking crisis. Andy’s Barber
Shop, despite the struggle opened in January 2007.
“Ten years ago there were five barber shops and now
there are nine. It was the hot-towel shaves that gave us the
competitive edge in early years, but the team grew and the
full ‘Andy’s Barber Shop experience’ evolved. When you’re
at capacity on a Tuesday or Wednesday you know there’s
room for growth. Now ten years later, we’ve ten cutting
stations and eight full time barbers with an equal male/
female split.”
In terms of work ethic, Andy acknowledges that his shop is
fast paced and busiest in town, meaning there’s no room for
passengers. “In a three-seat barber shop you can carry a weak
link, but with ten cutting stations and seven hundred and fifty
people a week coming through the door, there is no-where to
92
hide. We essentially work at £1 a minute. Our wage structure
is simple in that our barbers need to be taking three times
their wage. We then pay a weekly bonus on top. We pay well,
no-one has ever left due to salary, and it’s usually that they
can’t cope with the pressure cutting in a busy salon.”
When it comes to recruiting staff, Andy knows what he’s
looking for. He says: “The real test is when it gets crazy busy.
Do they keep composed or hide out the back? We always
offer a three-month trial, after all anyone can have a bad
week, but to have a bad three months takes some doing. We
can teach the flicks and tricks, but a genuine passion for the
trade and desire to improve has to be inherent.“
Whilst Andy’s core business is barbering, he has also taken
what he terms ‘a bit of a punt’ by opening Oxfordshire’s
first gents only grooming centre. Gent’s Groom Room is
located at the original Andy’s Barber Shop site offering high
end treatments at affordable prices including pedicures,
manicures, threading, waxing and sports massage. “I know
there is a gap in the market for this and whilst we’ll support
the manager, I want to give them the freedom to manage
just as I did fifteen years ago. The male grooming market
doesn’t need to be in the shadows of beauty salons and we’re
looking forward to be part of the male grooming revolution,”
says Andy.
KEEP YOUR IMPORTANT DATES SAFE WITH THE
2018 BRITISH MASTER BARBERS CALENDAR.
E
arly last year, BMB members from
across the UK congregated in
Dorking, Surrey to create images for
BMB’s inaugural
calendar. Working
from founder Tony
Copeland’s Golden
Scissors, the selected
members recreated
styles from defining
ARBERS.COM
British subcultures
WWW.BRITISHMASTERB
from mods to
rockers, Britpop
to skinheads. The
market town of
Dorking and its
historic buildings
provided the
perfect backdrop
for the day-long
shoot.
In a repeat
of October’s
MB Live show, Sam Arthur
and Phil Jarman oversaw the creation
of mods vs rockers. Sam – known by
many as ‘the modfather’ – travelled
from Northern Ireland with close friends,
all adorned in their mod finery and
riding beautiful
scooters. Phil
Jarman’s model
represented the
rockers, sporting
2018
an impressively
grafted DA.
BMB’s shoot
certainly attracted
the attention
locals as models
– including four
#LETSWO
94
RKTOGETH
skinheads – strutted
ER
through the town’s
historic streets.
The results are truly
High Quality
NEOCAPE
Hair Product
s
stunning.
The 2018
calendar is now available at
britishmasterbarbers.com/shop
for just £14.99.
JOIN THE BRITISH
MASTER BARBERS
ALLIANCE TODAY
THE UK’S LARGEST
BARBERING SUPPORT NETWORK
The British Master Barbers Alliance (BMB) is a membership
based organisation that has been created to support and
create a suitable platform for qualified and highly skilled
barbers across the whole UK that will allow them to
showcase their talent and promote their Barbershops.
Barbering only begins when you qualify. You never stop
learning! In our profession the consumer is key & needs a
quality mark they can trust & be able to recognise.
Being a member of the largest UK Barbering network has
its benefits and more worthwhile Membership Benefits are
being added. Visit the official BMB website for more details
on membership benefits.
WWW.BRITISHMASTERBARBERS.COM
INFO@BRITISHMASTERBARBERS.COM
BRITISHMASTERBARBERS
UKMASTERBARBERS
BRITISHMASTERBARBERS
MODEL
BARBER
Image//
Liam Oakes
THE MAN ONCE DUBBED AS HAVING ‘BRITAIN’S MOST INFLUENTIAL HAIRCUT’ IS NOW THREE
MONTHS INTO HIS TRANSITION FROM IN FRONT OF THE CAMERA TO BEHIND THE CHAIR. KEN
HERMES SPOKE TO RICKI HALL AND HIS MENTOR TO CHECK HIS PROGRESS IN THE CRAFT.
96
Ken Hermes Gentlemen, how’s it all been going
since we last spoke? Ricki, how are you finding fitting
your training into your schedule?
Wez Jones It’s been great, man. Ricki’s really a
dab hand and has massive potential. His calmness
in front of the camera gave him a head start when
it comes to being cool and in control. We’ve started
small and slow and are working our way up, but
the further we go down the rabbit hole the more
intense It’s going to get.
Ricki Hall It’s going solid, dude. Like you said, I
have a lot of other things going on as well as my
barbering so it can be a little tricky sometimes but
we’re making it work. Obviously, if any modelling
work comes in on my barbering days I have to take
it as that’s my job but we’re just making plans to get
around when that happens.
KH How has having Ricki in the shop been? His
training has already gained quite a lot of attention.
WJ It’s been interesting to say the least. I’ve had
people calling up wanting to come in just to meet
Ricki, let alone for a haircut. This is all business so
I’m taking this as seriously as I would with anyone.
This isn’t a meet and greet opportunity!
RH I’ve had a lot of brands approach me but I’m
just holding back now and concentrating on my
training, not letting any of that get in my head
and blur things. Wez and myself are building a
foundation and I need to concentrate on that. I’ll be
learning from some other exciting people as well in
the near future.
KH Before Christmas, Paul Taylor-Clinch, or Pirate
Paulus, came over from Schorem. How was it to get
a different perspective on cutting?
RH It was great to have Paul come over. He taught me
some great things – particularly the little details. How
he tidies up the edges of the hair to make it pop is
basically art. He’s a wonder with a cutthroat as well.
KH As soon as I started cutting hair I just became
obsessed, to the point of studying people’s cuts in
the street. Has it been the same for you?
RH One hundred percent! I said to my mate earlier
that the guy sitting on the table next to us had a
terrible fade. I nearly got my clippers out and tidied
it up for him, the poor sod.
KH You both expressed an interested an interest
in learning/ teaching the classics. What techniques
have you covered so far?
WJ So fair we’ve covered basic clipper and scissor
work, going over the fundamentals of creating
shapes, angles and clean lines. Ricki is very much a
lover of the classic cuts so we’ve looked at keeping
square shapes and masculine lines throughout a
cut. Tool wise, to be honest he’s nicked a lot of
mine, but we’re still using our Hunt & Hustle sheers
and basic equipment!
KH When we first spoke you discussed the idea of
creating an authentic barbershop experience for
Ricki. Are you bringing in models for certain styles
or catering to what comes through the door?
WJ We’re treating it like a real-life, working
barbershop scenario. We cater to whatever comes
in. There are obviously the more classic cuts that we
may need models to cover. We do between three
and four clients at a time. It may not sound a lot
but it can take time when you’re breaking down
each cut. Eventually we’ll extend it to five or six.
KH In closing, can you both just sum up how
you’ve found the last couple of months. And Wez,
in which area do you think Ricki has improved the
most?
RH The past few months have been intense and
fun. I’m being trained in a real barbershop and Ben
and Lewis at THBC have had me in absolute stiches.
They’re a proper pair of lads. I love this kind of the
environment and really excel in these situations.
WJ I’ve seen Ricki change from looking at a haircut
from a consumer’s point of view to an artist’s point
of view. He’s seeing what’s within a haircut rather
than what’s been put on top of it to make it look
good. I’ve been able to find strong and weak points
about his skills and adapt for the month’s to come.
97
JOHN RIPSHER
CHANGES
LIKE MOST, I FELL
INTO MY CAREER; IT
WASN’T A CHILDHOOD
AMBITION, BUT
HERE WE ARE OVER
THIRTY YEARS LATER
AND I’VE SEEN MY
FAIR SHARE OF
CHANGES TO THE
INDUSTRY.
L O L LY L O U B O U T I Q U E
I
n 1985 at the age of seventeen,
quite by chance, I found myself
embarking on a traditional
apprenticeship in hairdressing,
working in a shop that offered both
male and female services in two very
different, very separate environments.
A customer would walk through the
main entrance and literally either turn
left into the lady’s salon or right into a
traditional barbershop.
I suppose I naturally gravitated
towards the barbershop because it
was just more familiar to me – the
noises, the scents. The women’s side
seemed far more alien. My education
began straight away and I loved
watching the traditional craftsmen
go about their work, but was also
amazed by the creativity next door.
Twelve months later when I was asked
to choose which discipline I wanted
to pursue I knew the time had come
for me to move on to a more unisex
hairdressers where I could do both.
So, over the last three decades what
have I noticed? What are the big
changes? The most immediate and
obvious (and in fact the whole point
of this column) are the changes in
barbering. Ladies hairdressing has not
changed so dramatically. Yes, styles
and techniques have developed, but
the skills are similar and the people
continue to go to shows, read trade
magazines and network.
The barbers of my youth didn’t
have that. They were staider, more
reserved. No trade shows, no
networking and, as far as I’m aware,
no trade magazines. The techniques
and craft were classic, passed from
one generation to the next. They
were men, they went to work, did a
day’s graft and left the ‘other stuff’ to
hairdressers.
The men who visited the barbers
would invariably go to the nearest
or most convenient shop, take their
seat, wait their turn and see the first
available barber for their regular cut.
No creativity, just a good, solid cut
and maybe a shave. Then came the
shift; men wanted more. It was the
advent of men’s hairdressing.
It was almost as if a new industry
was born – more options, more
awareness and more products.
Salon International included a
section aimed purely at the male
market. Male grooming had begun
and the barbershops of old were
being left behind. Yes, of course
they would always exist and retain a
core following, but with the rise of
metrosexuality they were becoming
dinosaurs and sadly the skills were
dying with them.
Move forward thirty years and see
how it has changed. Yes, we still
have the classic cuts (more than ever
in fact). Yes, the shops are still those
wonderfully familiar spaces full of the
sounds and smells of years gone past
but there the similarity ends.
Barbering is now a trade that
people aspire to, to be a part of the
scene and the lifestyle and they are
prepared to work for it and put in
the graft to master the craft. You
have kids straight from school, older
98
people having a career change and
more and more women – something
that was never seen years ago. We
share our knowledge and our work
on a daily basis, constantly looking
to learn. We network and formulate
relationships. We have barbering
heroes who we aim to emulate.
But who benefits most? It’s the
clients! Those men who recognise
the beauty of the barbershop and
can return from the salons to get a
great service. Now they can get the
creativity and the service - from a
haircut to a full head of colour via
a wet shave or a facemask – often
available via an online booking
system. Barbers truly care about the
work they produce and the standard
of their shops. And then there’s the
variety – from classic cuts from the
likes of Thy Barber and Rebel Barbers
to the incredible creativity of Alan
Beak and Josh Lamonaca.
Our clients have a world of options.
As an industry we’re constantly
driving ourselves forward, pushing
harder and wanting to become better.
We are becoming more aware of
our work; we are no longer “just
a barber”. Barbering is the second
oldest profession and our value is
currently being recognised and that
is undoubtedly the biggest change I
have seen in our fine, noble industry.
VIKKI HARRISON-SMITH
The Next
generation
W
hat happened to the tradition
of mentoring new barbers?
Have we lost the mechanism
for training employees to suit
the needs of a specific business?
Building a level of trust between the
employer and employee was key to
building staff loyalty and, in some
cases, crucial to the well-being of the
business. Is this no longer the case?
Many successful people, across
all professions, credit one or more
mentors that were heavily influential
during their formative years. In fact, I
think most of you reading this could
probably name at least one figure
that was key to early development.
All the staff at Smiths Barbers
have been through our mentoring
programme. It’s essentially a neverending process of development and
refinement. Some were apprentices
and other graduates of our VTCT
courses at the academy, but all have
benefited from this tried and tested
process. We truly believe it allows
quicker development than if they had
been set adrift as ‘newly-qualified
barbers’ in the increasing closed-door
world of barbering.
We’re currently mentoring an
outstanding talent called Shai-Dee
Wild. He’s the current Business
Portfolio Apprentice of the Year and
will be the next barber to graduate
from our programme. The seventeenyear-old is employed by the academy
and divides his time between his
apprenticeship, fulfilling various
roles at the academy and working in
Smiths Barbers under Ryan.
Shai started at SB in the September
of 2016 and is a studious individual
who carries with him immense pride.
He’s already a standout student and
a popular figure with our clients. In
just a short amount of time, Shai has
grown in both stature and ability and
continues to excel during his Level 3
education and work-based training.
The young barber is a shining
example of what can be achieved if
experienced barbers take the time to
train their own staff.
Training with a credible learning
institution that offers industryrecognised qualifications is an
O W N E R // S B B A R B E R I N G A C A D E M Y
I OFTEN HEAR AND READ THAT THERE IS A LACK OF
BARBERS IN THE INDUSTRY. SHOPS OFTEN REQUIRE
A MINIMUM OF A TWO YEARS’ EXPERIENCE FROM
POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES BUT FEW SHOPS HAVE THE
TIME TO TRAIN NEW BARBERS. IT CERTAINLY DOESN’T
BODE WELL FOR THE FUTURE OF THE INDUSTRY.
100
essential component of any barbering
education, but what happens when
they have graduated? At SB, the
barbers who stay on with us after
their course or apprenticeship get to
experience the mentoring process but
what of the others?
They leave SB as very competent
and skilled individuals but where can
they get the mentoring we’ve spoken
about if nobody is willing to put that
initial effort in for long term gains?
Who wouldn’t want to instil the skills
and qualities that would improve the
individual and, in turn, improve the
business. It’s a bit of a no-brainer
really and is historically proven to
produce great barbers that will also
have some emotional investment in
the shop.
There is a talk of a skills deficit
emerging in the industry which I
personally attribute partly to the
lack of mentoring opportunities and
the emergence of furtive ‘training
establishments’. These places
are offering unregulated, nonqualification based courses at often
extortionate prices. SB often takes in
students who have passed through
these courses and arrive at the
academy totally demotivated, underskilled and seriously out of pocket.
Every student that graduates from
SB International Barbering Academy
is added to our Grad Club support
network. This group is partly intended
as a remote mentoring system where
students can ask for advice and post
their work for review. I often give
individual direct feedback and advice
and hope all our students feel that
we are always here to support their
development. For most of them it’s
the nearest thing to a mentoring
system they will ever experience,
which is worrying.
I call upon all experienced barbers/
barbershop owners to embrace the
traditional idea of mentoring. It will
improve your business and who
knows, it might even give you a sense
of fulfilment and pride to know you’re
helping preserve the craft. I worry
that we’re in danger of losing that
connection with the next generation
of skilled professionals.
Image//
Quyen Dinh
DAN WILD
FORGERy
AS SOME OF YOU MAY
OR NOT KNOW, I COME
FROM AN ENGINEERING
AND CONSTRUCTION
BACKGROUND. USING THE
RIGHT TOOL FOR THE JOB
MAKES LIFE EASIER AND
YOU KNOW YOU CAN RELY
ON A HIGH-QUALITY TOOL
WHEN YOU NEED TO.
Words//
Kevin
Hamm
DECEMBER AND CHRISTMAS ARE
OVER. ALL THE PARTIES HAVE
TAKEN PLACE AND WE START
A NEW YEAR THAT WILL HOLD
ANOTHER SET OF CHALLENGES.
So, what should your considerations be at this
time of the year?
Training: We know January and February are
the most challenging and quietest salon business
months, so if you need staff training either in
salon, or, sending staff out on courses, this
would be the best time.
Look at your overheads and make sure you are
getting the best deals out there. Gas, electricity,
stock – most suppliers will be increasing their
prices (see if you can negotiate a lower annual
rate?), business insurance, accountancy fees etc.
Make sure you have completed your tax return
- we pay enough in tax without having to also
pay a penalty!
Price Rise: So many barbers and hairdressing
salons introduce a price increase at the
beginning of the year, I always recommend that
businesses should do this twice a year: April
(new tax year and October) however, these
should be small rises. When raising your prices, I
am a big believer in not making a big deal!
I see notices saying “we apologise for the price
increase etc.” You don’t walk into Tesco and see
a big sign saying “we apologise” and yet their
prices are going up all the time. People just get
on with it.
In my previous articles, I have said that before
looking to engage new clients, consider how
many we are losing and why, so, that done, we
now need to concentrate on getting new clients,
or, see the return of old clients’.
Whatever you decide, get the staff on board
and tell them that when you get the bums
on seats, it’s down to them to make sure the
experience and hair cut is so good that the
customer will not want to go anywhere else - full
stop!
And finally, ask your staff if they have any
good ideas for getting people in, and if you use
their idea and it works reward them, sometimes
we forget that our staff can be an asset.
T E C H N I C A L E D U C AT O R // Q U A R T E R E D S T E E L S
F
or this reason, my business partner, Andrew
Mearns, and I decided to develop Quartered
Steels. We’re a design and manufacturing
company that studies what stylists require and
then have it made to our specification.
The manufacturing process of a scissor starts with
the steel. It’s the most important part; get this right
and the rest of the process is plain sailing. So here is
an oversight as to how scissors are produced from
a scissor nerd.
The steel is made in a furnace and is a liquid
base. It’s then poured into an ingot form where
it’ll cool and solidify. After solidification, it is hot or
cold rolled into sheet metal. There are two ways to
go from here: It can either be wire cut into scissor
blades directly or wire cut into steel rods and then
forged into scissor shape.
If wire cut directly, ten sheets are layered and
cut into smaller pieces and each of those pieces
are welded together at one end. The blocks are
now wire cut into the desired shape – in this case,
scissor blades (without handles). A hole is drilled
for the screw and then the blades tempered for
desired hardness. The handles are welded on and
the scissor is ready for shaping, sharpening and
polishing.
The other method involves heating the steel rods
up to the red glowing stage and then forging them
with a large industrial forging block (hammer). The
forging block will form the rod into the desired
shape, a scissor. Sometimes two rods are welded
together – one is high quality steel for the blade
and a lower quality steel for the handle. The raw
scissor is sometimes forged again when cold – ‘cold
forged’ is considered to be the best steel available.
101
Again, the scissor is tempered for hardness and
shaped, sharped and polished.
Be aware that around ninety to ninety-five
percent of scissors on the market today are not
forged. Most are wire cut simply because they are
cheaper to make. Unfortunately many sellers are
claiming to have forged scissors but they aren’t. Use
this knowledge when purchasing your next pair!
You’ll also see the term ‘hand forged’ on some
websites. Sadly, this just isn’t possible as it would
cost thousands of pounds to produce one scissor.
Only a small number of highly-skilled smiths are
making hand forged blades nowadays. Samurai
swords can start at about £50,000 and take six to
twelve months to make. It’s merely distributors and
exporters/ importers who will use fancy superlatives
to make their scissors sound better.
So there’s a brief insight into a how a scissor is made.
Don’t hesitate to get in contact at
info@quarteredsteels.com for any
further information.
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I
t would have been hard to miss on social media
as it had nearly one million hits in the first week.
It perhaps didn’t show the industry in the best
light, showing the public we’re an unregulated
industry and warning of the dangers.
When I started the British Barbers’ Association
my main aims were for barbers to be recognised
in their own right and to help raise the standard
of barbering in the UK. I have always been a huge
supporter of the Hair Council and their aim to get
the hairdressing and barbering industry licensed. I
went to the House of Commons with Sally Styles the previous Registrar of the Hair Council - to help
form the Barber Council as a subcommittee so that
barbers could be recognised.
Licensing in our industry has always been a
hot topic of debate between barbers and many
people believe that the problem isn’t always with
the individual barber but instead with the college
or training provider. There is a serious issue in our
industry right now and that is with the quality of
training in the UK.
I have spoken to a lot of colleges across the
UK that are crying out for barbering assessors especially now the new barbering apprenticeship
standards includes shaving, but there are not
many barbers that want to do their teaching
qualifications and complete the everyday
paperwork that comes with government funded
courses. Instead of choosing to not run the course,
colleges often get their hairdressing teachers to
run the courses instead. These teachers usually
have no barbering qualifications and have also
never worked in a barbershop a day in their life.
You would not see barbers teaching hairdressing
so why is it ok for hairdressers to teach barbering? I also see training academies and barbering
courses popping up everywhere right now, often
being taught by barbers with little experience in
barbering and no experience in teaching. I think
it’s outrageous that absolutely anyone can offer
barbering training to the public and not even give
them a certificate that would be recognised in the
industry.
I’m not suggesting that only official NVQ
qualifications should be delivered. There are
some amazing educators and training academies
in the UK that don’t deliver NVQ qualifications
but their certificates would still be recognised by
barbershops and insurance companies. Something
does however need to be done to stop the
individuals who just think about the money and
don’t take the training seriously.
Image//
Liam Oakes
102
My advice to anyone wanting to get into
barbering is to do your homework. Look at the
training school first, talk to the trainers to ensure
they do have experience and make sure you will
leave with a valid accredited qualification or you
will be doing yourself a misjustice and maybe
closing the door to employment, working abroad,
teaching, gaining proper insurance and being
known as a professional.
In my view, the most important thing is for the
training to be regulated - this would be a great
start on improving new barbers coming into the
industry. Barbering to me is not just a job it is a
passion and I am so happy to be a part of this
industry but we all need to look after our craft and
not cheapen it.
BY
Credit: Mike Taylor for hair and Liam Oaks for photography
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