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Glamour USA July 2017

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All About
Ashley
page 78
(Fun fact: That
tattoo? It’s her
sign, Scorpio.)
L•Space one-piece,
$169. See Glamour
Shopper for more
information.
Cover
Reads
& Hot
Topics
GRAHAM: NATHANIEL GOLDBERG
Summer of Sex
In this issue, we get
down to business:
• Radical honesty:
What we should learn
in sex ed (page 64)
• Orgasms: Emma
Koenig on women’s
personal stories
(page 66)
The
• sex-positive
women of Instagram
(page 88)
• The new tech
of “teledildonics”
(page 75)
• Plus: the lowdown
on those HPV rumors
(page 57) and sex
things that still confuse
us (page 109)
17 Unedited
New ways to
wear a buttondown, friendship
ponytails, and
six beach reads
36 Body-Positive
Fashion
Inspo for your
look—here
and throughout
the issue
45 Hair Dare
Now’s the time to
be adventurous
with color. Or by
cutting bangs
(page 50)
78 Ashley Graham
The barrierbreaking model
is a sexual
revolutionary!
94 Modern Love
Model, newlywed,
and now intersex
hero—meet Hanne
Gaby Odiele
Fashion
21 Alexa’s New Gig
At last: Alexa
Chung has
launched
her first fashion
collection
24 Athleisure Remix!
Wear your
workout clothes
everywhere
30 If You Like It…
…then you know
what to do:
Put a ring on it!
Choices here
32 Outfits for Days
Babba Canales
was named to
Forbes’ 30 Under
30, and her style
is equally #goals
glamour.com 5
Night-Out
Beauty
Inspo
page 84
36 What Makes
You Feel Sexy?
Four fashion
influencers on
the clothes that
empower them
38 Fashion Insider
Allison Williams
shares the perfect
packing list
for any vacay
100 Give ’Em the Boot
Margaret Qualley
takes on up-tothere footwear
110 Glamour Dos
& Don’ts
No more blackout
shades! Use your
eyewear to show
off your mood
Beauty
50 Your Hair
Lookbook
How to style bangs
at every length
52 Sunny Side Up!
These summer nail
polishes transform
your vibe
55 Is Beauty
Self-Care?
Adding mindfulness to your
routine has some
big payoffs
84 All Night Long
Statement makeup
means rich colors,
modern textures,
and an all-aboutme attitude
Wellbeing
58 The #TBT
Workout
The old-school
trick to make
workouts fun
Get Ashley’s Look
These three made-for-everyone
dresses will help you slay summer.
60 Meet the
Avo Bowl
You’re going
to be obsessed
with it
Everything
Else You
Need
12 From Me to You
14 @Glamourmag
Prabal Gurung
camisole ($595,
sizes 0–22)
and dress
($1,095, sizes
XS–XL, prabal
gurung.com)
108 Glamour Shopper
109 The Glamour List
12 sex things
we still don’t
understand
Michael
Michael Kors
dress ($175,
sizes XXS–XL,
Michael Kors
Lifestyle stores,
866-709-5677)
57 About Those
HPV Rumors
Don’t get scared,
get informed
ON OUR COVER Ashley Graham was photographed at The Moorings Village in
Islamorada, Florida, by Nathaniel Goldberg. Fashion editor: Jillian Davison; hair: Shon
at Julian Watson Agency; makeup: Sir John; manicure: Andrea Escorcia; production:
Select Services. Victoria Beckham dress ($2,470, sizes 1–3, victoriabeckham.com).
La Blanca bikini top ($75, sizes 34D–38DD, everythingbutwater.com). Lana Jewelry
hoops ($430, lanajewelry.com). For Graham’s natural look, try Maybelline New York
Dream Fresh BB Cream ($9), Color Sensational Inti-Matte Nudes in Honey Pink ($7.50),
Brow Precise Fiber Volumizer ($10, all at drugstores), and Sexy Hair Style Sexy
Hair Slept In Texture Crème ($18, sexyhair.com). See Glamour Shopper for more
information. Read all about Graham on page 78.
6 glamour.com
Theory
dress ($895,
sizes 0–16,
theory.com)
BEAUTY: OLIVIA MALONE. GRAHAM: NATHANIEL GOLDBERG. STILLS: TIM HOUT; STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS
34 Fashion
Masterpiece
Louis Vuitton’s
new collab
with artist
Jeff Koons is
museumworthy
®
(Incorporating Self and Mademoiselle)
CYNTHIA LEIVE
Editor-in-Chief
Creative Director PAUL RITTER
Executive Editor WENDY NAUGLE
Senior Executive Digital Director ANNIE FOX
Fashion Director JILLIAN DAVISON Executive Beauty Director YING CHU
Entertainment and Special Projects Director ALISON WARD FRANK
Digital Editorial Director LAUREL PINSON
Managing Editor ERIN HOBDAY
FASHION
Deputy Fashion Director SASHA IGLEHART
Bookings Director RICHARD BLANDINO Fashion News Director FLORENCE KANE Accessories Director ELISSA VELLUTO
Senior Fashion Market Editor SHILPA PRABHAKAR NADELLA Bookings Editor CAITLIN COYLE
Fashion Features Editor LAUREN CHAN
Associate Market Editors AMY HOU, MONICA MENDAL Associate Accessories Editor JACLYN PALERMO
Fashion Assistants IRENE HWANG, ANASTASIA WALKER Bookings Assistant KELSEY LAFFERTY
Senior Credits Editor DENISE GORDON Credits Editor CHRISTINA DRAPER
FEATURES
Deputy Editor ANGELA BURT-MURRAY Digital Deputy Editor PERRIE SAMOTIN
News Director LIZ BRODY Features Director EMILY MAHANEY
Senior Editors JUSTINE HARMAN, CADY DRELL (Sex & Relationships), SARA GAYNES LEVY (Health)
Digital News & Politics Editor MEREDITH CLARK Digital Staff Writer MAGGIE MALLON
Assistant Editors ALANNA LAUREN GRECO, JESSICA MILITARE
Digital Editorial Assistant KATE FRIEDMAN
ENTERTAINMENT
Senior Entertainment Editor KATE BRANCH Digital Entertainment Editor ANNA MOESLEIN
West Coast Editor JESSICA KANTOR Digital Entertainment Correspondent JESSICA RADLOFF
Entertainment Writer CHRIS ROSA Pop Culture Writer ELIZABETH LOGAN
BEAUTY
Associate Beauty Director SIMONE KITCHENS Senior Digital Beauty Editor LINDSAY SCHALLON
Beauty Writers KATHERYN ERICKSON, RACHEL NUSSBAUM
Assistant Beauty Editor JENNIFER MULROW Beauty Assistant ERIN REIMEL
ART
Art Directors NOAH DREIER, VICTORIA RAVEST
Senior Designer SARAH EVANS Digital Designer EMILY KEMP Art Assistant MAUREEN DOUGHERTY
PHOTO
Deputy Photo Editor KATHRYNE HALL
Photo Director ASHLEY CURRY TALIENTO
Senior Digital Photo Editor KATIE FRIEDMAN Senior Photo Research Editor MICHELLE ROSE SULCOV
Associate Photo Editor MORRIGAN MAZA
DIGITAL & VIDEO
Director of Engineering KENTON JACOBSEN
Digital Managing Editor ABIGAIL MC COY
Branded Content Editor KIMBERLY FUSARO Branded Content Associate JULIA MERENDA Social Media Manager SMRITI SINHA
Developers GILES COPP, SLOBODAN DABOVIC, MICHELLE AUSTRIA FERNANDEZ, GURPREET SINGH Digital Producer MAGGIE BURCH
Associate Director, Audience Development ALIX HENICK
Producer/Editors JOANNE PARK, JUSTIN WOLFSON Producer LINDSEY V THOMPSON
OPERATIONS
Production Director KEVIN ROFF Copy Chief TALLEY SUE HOHLFELD Research Director PATRICIA J. SINGER
Production Manager ALEXANDRA KUSHEL Deputy Research Director SYLVIA ESPINOZA
Senior Copy Editor DAMIAN FALLON Production Associate SARAH RATH
Communications Associate TEGAN REYES
Senior Director, Business EILISH MORLEY
Deputy Director, Editorial Partnerships SAMANTHA STORCH
Executive Assistant to the Editor-in-Chief JENNIFER LANCE
Contributors JANE BUCKINGHAM, PATRICK DEMARCHELIER, SHAUN DREISBACH,
ELISABETH EGAN (BOOKS), MARK LEIBOWITZ, KATHARINE O’CONNELL WHITE, M.D.
THE GIRL PROJECT
Executive Director TARA ABRAHAMS
Special Projects Manager JENAE HOLLOWAY
ANNA WINTOUR
Artistic Director
8 glamour.com
®
(Incorporating Self and Mademoiselle)
KIMBERLY KELLEHER
Chief Business Officer
VP-Revenue LAURA SEQUENZIA
VP-Revenue AMY OELKERS
VP-Revenue HEDDY SAMS PIERSON
Executive Director, Finance & Business Operations CHRISTINE DI PRESSO MORRA
INTEGRATED ADVERTISING SALES
Executive Beauty Director JANA HOLLINGSHEAD
Executive Beauty & Lifestyle Director MELISSA CONSORTE Executive Account Director DEBORAH B. BARON
Beauty Account Director LINDA KENNEDY Account Executive ALISON GLUCK
Southwest Director JEANNE MILLIGAN, MILLIGAN MEDIA, 214-368-2001
Digital Planner ALLIE JOESTER, KENZIE RAINONE Campaign Analyst CHRISTINA TOUHY
Sales Assistants ZUIE BILLINGS, LAUREN PERNAL, MORIAH RAPAPORT
CREATIVE RESOURCES
Head of Creative Resources JENNY RYAN BOWMAN
Executive Director, Integrated Marketing LINDSAY SPEROS
Special Projects Director JENNIFER MA
Manager, Integrated Marketing LESLIE D EL MASTRO
BRANDED CONTENT STUDIO
Branded Content Editor ANNIE DALY Branded Content Video Producer JOANNE PARK
Branded Content Associate JULIA MERENDA
MARKETING
Associate Marketing Director CARA WOLF
Marketing Manager DANIELLE RUBINO
BUSINESS OPERATIONS
Senior Director, Business JENNIFER JACKSON Senior Director, Finance TOM MORRIS
Associate Business Manager CHARLOTTE KWON
ART
Associate Creative Director MELISSA MELNIK POLHAMUS
Design Director MORGAN REARDON WRAPP Digital Director ALEXANDER RATNER
Designer ANGELO TIRAMBULO
PUBLISHED BY CONDÉ NAST
Chairman Emeritus S.I. NEWHOUSE, JR.
President & Chief Executive Officer ROBERT A. SAUERBERG, JR.
Chief Financial Officer DAVID E. GEITHNER
Chief Business Officer, President of Revenue JAMES M. NORTON
EVP/Chief Digital Officer FRED SANTARPIA
Chief Human Resources Officer JOANN MURRAY
Chief Communications Officer CAMERON R. BLANCHARD
Chief Technology Officer EDWARD CUDAHY
EVP-Consumer Marketing MONICA RAY
SVP/Managing Director-23 Stories JOSH STINCHCOMB
SVP-Network Sales & Partnerships, CN & Chief Revenue Officer, CNÉ LISA VALENTINO
SVP-Financial Planning & Analysis SUZANNE REINHARDT
SVP-Ad Products & Monetization DAVID ADAMS
SVP-Licensing CATHY HOFFMAN GLOSSER
SVP-Research & Analytics STEPHANIE FRIED
SVP-Digital Operations LARRY BAACH
SVP-Human Resources NICOLE ZUSSMAN
General Manager-Digital MATTHEW STARKER
CONDÉ NAST ENTERTAINMENT
President DAWN OSTROFF
EVP/General Manager-Digital Video JOY MARCUS
EVP/Chief Operating Officer SAHAR ELHABASHI
EVP-Motion Pictures JEREMY STECKLER
EVP-Alternative TV JOE LABRACIO
EVP-CNÉ Studios AL EDGINGTON
SVP-Marketing & Partner Management TEAL NEWLAND
CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL
Chairman & Chief Executive JONATHAN NEWHOUSE
President NICHOLAS COLERIDGE
Condé Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than 263 million consumers in 30 markets.
www.condenast.com
www.condenastinternational.com
10 glamour.com
From Me to You
21 Ways to Please
Your Man
w
hen I was 11,
my mother
plopped down
on the edge of my bed
on Charlbury Road in
Oxford, England, and
proceeded to tell me all
about orgasms, desire,
a nd ma st u rbat ion.
She was a scientist and
given to precision, so
her talk included a very
specific description of why the vulva and the vagina were different and what each did. It was the most excruciating four
and a half minutes of my life…and I have been grateful for it
ever since.
My mom’s attitude—that sex was a physical function and
that enjoying it was normal for both men and women—was
a fairly radical one at the time, and as a result she became
the go-to parent in my circle of friends for confessions, questions, and occasional health scares other girls couldn’t take
to their parents. My mother had seen too many women of her
generation make poor, even life-threatening choices out of
sexual ignorance; for her, understanding sex was crucial to
being able to make your own way in life.
I think my mom would have been pleased with this issue,
full of unashamed talk by women about sex today. Everyone
from cover star Ashley Graham (page 78) to writer Lindsay
King-Miller (page 64) lays down her personal bedroom laws,
so in the spirit of sharing, or potentially oversharing, here are a
few of mine, gleaned from years of interviewing women, men,
and therapists (and also being a living, breathing human):
First, remember the statistics. Only about one in five
women regularly have orgasms during intercourse. If you’re a
confident adult female still stuck on wishing you were one of
them, ask yourself why, and remember…
12 glamour.com
Zero-Shame Zone
French illustrator
@Regards_Coupables
makes no-holdsbarred scenarios
look…sweet.
Faking it is normal—but not always helpful. About two out
of three women have done it (some female fish fake it too, science tells us!), but honesty draws people closer. If you do want
to be close to the person you’re sleeping with, fake less. The
world will not collapse if you woman up and say what you need.
But being in the zone is helpful. As women, we’re so
often encouraged to look sexy that it’s difficult, in bed, to keep
the how-do-I-look, how-do-I-sound tape from playing in your
head. Still, any therapist will tell you sex gets better when you
get out of watching your body and begin to actually inhabit it.
One friend of mine has sex after yoga for exactly this reason!
Finally, there is no one “normal” sex life. You’ll meet
women throughout this issue pushing back on traditional
slut-shaming norms, which have condemned women (but
high-fived men) for trying whatever they like in bed. But
“prude-shaming”—the new practice of making anyone who’s
not keeping up with the pack feel left out—isn’t much better.
Feminism means we all get to do what’s right for us, in and out
of bed. I hope this issue helps.
Cindi Leive, editor-in-chief
@cindi_leive
ILLUSTRATION: ©REGARDS COUPABLES/INSTAGRAM @REGARDS_COUPABLES. LEIVE: BRYAN BEDDER/GETTY IMAGES FOR GLAMOUR
This issue has exactly zero tricks for making him (or anyone else) hot.
It’s all about making you happy.
@Glamourmag
Wisdom for
Decades
In April, Glamour’s College Women of
the Year Awards celebrated its 60th
anniversary. Our guests were serving
up some seriously good advice.
Glamour’s May issue
included life lessons
from trailblazing
women ages 17 to 89.
We’re all for that.
Thank you @kerrywashington for your
unending compassion and inspiring
wisdom! #WalkingTheTalk #KerryOn
Glamour —@ScandaLuscious, via Twitter
These pictures of @yarashahidi and her
gorgeous family for @glamourmag make
me so happy! #blackgirlmagic #blackboy
joy —@hauteheaven25, via Twitter
Wow, loving this month’s @glamourmag
for its pieces on Elizabeth Warren and Katy
Tur/Andrea Mitchell. Hope to see more of
this. —@7thInningSteph, via Twitter
@glamourmag Thanks for the Jean E.
Sammet piece. I’m a female COBOL programmer! #ladynerds #yesitsstillaround
—@MikiKohi, via Twitter
My roommate just made me read
@camila_cabello and @sinucabello’s
article in @glamourmag aloud to her and
now I’m crying again. —@deadmansdollar, via Twitter
Props to @glamourmag—your May issue
is everything a modern woman’s mag
should be: inclusive, inspiring, progressive. Thank you! #fangirl —@ladyogrady,
via Twitter
And Elsewhere in the Issue…
As a graduate of a tiny liberal arts college
in western Illinois, I was surprised to
read about a fellow alumna in May’s
issue. Monmouth College is a long way
from Aleppo, Syria, and I was so moved
by Mariela Shaker’s story about her family struggling to survive in Syria. I’m so
happy for the opportunities she’s earned
in the U.S., but I am heartbroken for her
too. I hope she makes it home one day.
—Allyson Behm, Evanston, Ill.
Got May @glamourmag. Spread w/
numerous models of all sizes in swimsuits.
Kinda emotional. I guess my 13-year-old
self has been waiting…
—@aliasmscookie, via Twitter
I feel this from “You’ve Got a Job. And a
Baby…And You’re Gonna Be Fine”: “At
home I picked fights with my husband
over little things that were really about
one big thing: He didn’t feel as completely at the end of his rope as I did 24/7.”
This sentence puts into exact words
how I feel as the major breadwinner,
cook, housekeeper, etc. Thank you for
the advice and thoughts and for writing
such a relatable piece. —Elisa Krapcha,
Littleton, Colo.
Missed any of the stories in our May
issue? Download the digital edition
from your device’s app store.
GOT AN OPINION? Sure you do—and we want to hear it. Email us at letters@glamour.com; tweet to
@glamourmag; comment on facebook.com/glamour; or write us at Glamour, One World Trade Center,
New York, NY 10007. Submissions and comments become the property of the magazine and won’t be
returned; they may be edited and can be published or otherwise used in any medium.
14 glamour.com
“Change will always be good. When
you’re through changing, you’re through.”
—keynote speaker Martha Stewart (a
Glamour honoree in 1961, back when she
was a sophomore at Barnard College)
“Be more concerned with your character
than your reputation. Reputation is what you
think you are; character is what you truly are.”
—Robin Roberts, left, coanchor of ABC’s
Good Morning America, with 2017 winner Kia
Nurse, right, and 1968 winner Katiti Kironde
“We say, ‘Each one, teach one.’ We live off
our mentors, and it’s good to pass that on.”
—Maxwell Osborne, far left, cofounder of
the fashion brand Public School, with
cofounder Dao-Yi Chow, far right and 2017
winners Nishiki Maredia, left, and Angela Jin
WASHINGTON: STEVEN PAN. CWOTY IMAGES: BRYAN BEDDER/GETTY IMAGES FOR GLAMOUR
This
Is
Our
Time
Un·edited by Justine Harman
LOGO: TIM HOUT; CREATED AND STYLED BY GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS. PONIES, FROM LEFT: TIMUR EMEK/GETTY IMAGES. ESTROP/GETTY IMAGES. MATTEO SCARPELLINI/IMAXTREE.COM
Everything we’re binge-talking about this month
Friendship
Ponies
They’re back! But some of
them are a two-woman job.
a
s a kid, few things gave me more joy
than getting a multicolor hair wrap
woven into my ponytail. This summer
the so-called friendship braid returns, but
with an anything-goes ethos: “Play around
and enjoy,” says Eugene Souleiman, who
created rainbow-hued plaits for Maison
Margiela by securing silk yarn at the hairline. “Mistakes may lead you to something
new and fabulous.” But while some versions
are low-fuss, like the model’s bungee-cord
braid at far left, others, like the rope-andvelvet extensions above, from the Honee fall
2017 presentation, may require an extra pair
of hands. (We’re breaking down all three at
glamour.com.) “This style is something you’d
do with a friend,” Souleiman says. “Hence
the name.” —J.H.
glamour.com 17
1
The 6 Juiciest
Summer
Reads
The Bright Hour, by
Nina Riggs: Inspired by
an unforgettable New York
Times Modern Love
column, this memoir by
a young mother with
terminal cancer is touching and wickedly funny.
Do Not Become Alarmed,
by Maile Meloy: A cruise
vacation goes oh-sowrong. Stressful and yet
still sexy, complete with
jaw-droppingly beautiful
imagery.
What We Lose, by Zinzi
Clemmons: Poetic
coming-of-age debut
about the black experience,
told in vignettes. You’ll
feel like you’ve climbed
into the narrator’s
head—in the best way.
—Elisabeth Egan,
books editor
The End of
Terrible Toasts
After witnessing far too many “clever, witty, accomplished” people
choke when handed a microphone in public, New York City book
editor Marisa Polansky and writer Kristine Keller, both 30,
dreamed up Speech Tank (speechtank.com; prices start at $250) to
coach you through any terrifying spotlight moment. Here, just in
time for peak wedding season, their toast tutorial. Brevity is the
soul of wit: “Yes, it’s your moment, but that’s all it is—a moment,”
18 glamour.com
2
3
Oxford
University
The best part of this season’s trend of
button-downs worn in deconstructed,
unconventional ways? You can nail
the look with what’s already in your
closet. Three ways to do it: 1. Who
needs pants? Step into a forwardfacing oxford and button up to create a
sheath; tie sleeves around waist. 2. As
inspired by Tamu McPherson, above:
Slip into one sleeve and fasten a few
buttons under the opposite armpit.
Wrap the loose sleeve around your
midsection and knot with unbuttoned
fabric at hip. 3. Turn your top backward and unbutton as low as you dare.
Day-to-night just got easier. —Monica
Mendal, associate market editor
Bomb like Rachel McAdams in
Wedding Crashers? Nope, not you.
Keller says. “Don’t hold the audience hostage.” Resist the inside
joke: “We bet it was cry-laugh funny when the wrong chicken
wings got delivered to your dorm room,” Polansky says, “but a joke
is much funnier when everyone understands the punch line.” And
don’t play favorites: Says Keller: “If your wedding speech answers
only one question, make sure it’s this: What makes them such a
good two?” Other than being friends with you, of course. —J. H.
BOOKS, LOGO: TIM HOUT; STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS. HAY THROW, $225, MOMA DESIGN STORE, NYC; MOMASTORE.ORG. ILLUSTRATIONS:
MAUREEN DOUGHERTY. MCPHERSON: NABILE QUENUM/ BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM. WEDDING CRASHERS: ©NEW LINE CINEMA/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION.
Everybody knows that
after SPF, a book is the
most important thing in
your beach bag. But which
one to pack? You can’t go
wrong with one of these six
page-turners—summed up
here in 25 words or less.
Into the Water, by Paula
Hawkins: Two women
turn up dead in a river.
What follows is as thrilling
as Hawkins’ debut,
The Girl on the Train.
Touch, by Courtney
Maum: A trend forecaster
predicts the scary future of
tech. It’s fiction, but you’ll
never look at your devices
the same.
Saints for All Occasions,
by J. Courtney Sullivan:
Irish sisters take different
paths in this family drama
of secrets and resilience.
Cheers for
MOMOA: ©MARK TWIGHT 2016. SNEAKERS, LOGO, BRAID: TIM HOUT; STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS
Meaty Men
My taste in men typically skews toward cerebral
podcast snobs with dad bods. But recently, while
watching Moana on a flight, I was surprised to
find myself thinking, Damn, that demigod Maui
is hot as hell! Yes, I was drinking a Bloody Mary,
but I don’t think it was the alcohol or the altitude.
Beefcakes—including animated ones voiced by
boulder-bodied Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson—
are back: Johnson himself was recently named
People’s Sexiest Man Alive; Chris Hemsworth
got many women interested in superhero movies
using only his pectoral muscles; and don’t forget
the carved-from-marble artistry that is future
Aquaman Jason Momoa, right. The sexiest
part? These megahunks are self-aware, funny,
and surprisingly woke (recent Momoa hashtags:
#defendourqueens #vivavaginas). Plus, when a
guy takes care of himself this meticu lously, it
tells me he’ll give other things the same level of
thought. Like, you know, where a buff animated
demigod and a 26-year-old journalist should go
on their first date. —Cady Drell, senior editor
Rope Lace
Supply (red
leather, $25 per
pair, ropelace
supply.com)
Lacorda Threads
belt, used as lace
(yellow or blue-green,
$8 each, lacorda
threads.com)
Anz Clothing
laces (multicolor or
black-and-white,
$20 per pair,
anzclothing.com)
A 10-Second
Shoe Hack
Adidas Originals
sneakers ($120,
adidas.com)
This summer’s sneaker trend is super easy: Just grab the
white shell-toe kicks in your closet (I know you have them)
and switch out the now-grubby laces for a colorful set. The
bolder the better—I’m into Rope Lace Supply’s red leather
pair, top. Now there will never be more than one pair of shoes
quite like yours. —Alanna Lauren Greco, assistant editor
glamour.com 19
Fashion
Edited by Florence Kane
“Mus ician s aren’t
think ing of their
cloth es in term s
of bein g judg ed
by fashi onistas,”
says Chun g,
near right , here
with the auth or.
“They’re just bein g
themselves.”
AlexaChu ng
T-shi rt, $115, jeans ,
$295 , dress , $685 .
Supe rga snea kers
(on both), $65.
Alexa’s New Gig
This is the celeb fashion line we’ve been waiting for:
Alexa Chung’s first collection. Naturally, we tried it!
By Kate Branch
Photographs by Zackery Michael
glamour.com 21
Fashion / Designer Crush
“It’s the greatest- hits album ,”
says Chun g of her new line.
Jacket, $875 . On Bran ch: shirt,
$460 , jeans , $320 . On Chun g:
shirt, $260 , skirt, $260 .
Overalls ($445,
matchesfashion.com)
22 glamour.com
Photograph
by Name Here
lexa Chung is known as fashion’s cool Brit,
so when I heard the news that she was
starting her own clothing line, I immediately thought two things: One, how does
she not have her own collection already?
After all, at just 33 years old, the former model has interviewed countless
major designers as a TV host and created splashy, sold-out collabs with brands
like Madewell and AG Jeans. My second
thought: I’m so down with that!
Which is unusual for me. As an entertainment editor, I work with musicians,
celebrities, and influencers, and I’m skeptical when it comes to all the shoes-by or
smells-by or shades-by lines from famous
people who I’ve seen firsthand don’t know
or care a ton about making fashion. But to
me Alexa Chung has always been authentic; you get the sense she actually went to
the concert of the band whose tee she’s
wearing. And she makes her high-low
style look refined; it’s probably the high
collars or lace details she mixes in with her
vintage jeans.
Those feminine details are usually not
my thing, however, so when Glamour’s
fashion news director asked if I’d let
Chung style me in her new clothing line,
AlexaChung, which launches this month
at stores like Bergdorf Goodman, Opening Ceremony, and Neiman Marcus, I was
hesitant. And, truth: I was somewhat
mortified to stand next to this 5'9" goddess; I’m barely 5'3". Then I saw the
clothes. A white maxidress (previous page)
would be perfect for a work event into a
night out with my friends at a dive bar. I
could live in her big striped sweater; it’s the
thing for when I just want to wear jeans
with ballet flats (every day, in other words).
I was impressed. So my first question for
Chung was, “What took you so long?”
“I had an inkling [launching my line]
wasn’t something to do lightly,” Chung
says. But after interviewing heavyweights
like Clare Waight Keller (now of Givenchy)
and Joseph Altuzarra for The Future of
Fashion, her British Vogue documentary
series, she got more optimistic. The designers worked hard to get where they are, but
“it was encouraging to find out most people
are making it up as they go along.”
When you get her talking about specific
AlexaChung styles, she speaks a language I get: music. “It’s the greatest-hits
album,” Chung says of her first collection,
which ranges from $100 for a basic tee to
$1,600 for a sequined gown. There’s a red
and pink striped blazer inspired by Brian
Jones from the Rolling Stones, a Johnny
Rotten–esque sweater, and go-to miniskirts and overalls. What’s the favorite
track? Chung doesn’t hesitate: “A plastic lilac dress that I made with Rihanna’s
good-girl-gone-bad scenario in mind.”
And that’s the genius of Chung’s
clothes: She believes they should help
you become who you want to be. It’s the
essence of how she approaches style. I try
her white maxidress with the high collar and ask whether I can really wear it
to work. “It depends what you’re trying to
say about yourself,” she says. “Are you the
cool girl? Pair it with sneakers. Or are you
a senior person in charge?” She tosses me
some white kicks: Cool girl it is (for personin-charge, she’d recommend a suit). I tell
her I never thought about styling myself
in those terms—about who I’m trying to
be. I always just looked at my heroes, like
Debbie Harry, whose ’70s Canadian tuxedo look has become a uniform for me.
There’s a lesson in that too. “Patti
Smith, Florence Welch—musicians aren’t
thinking of clothes in terms of being
judged by fashionistas,” Chung says.
“They’re just being themselves.”
George Harrison
T-shirt ($115,
neimanmarcus.com)
All clothing AlexaChung. See Glamour Shopper for more information.
HAIR: ANH CO TRAN AT TRACEY MATTINGLY; MAKEUP: JAMES K ALIARDOS AT ART + COMMERCE. STILLS: COURTESY OF ALEXA CHUNG. POLAROID FRAMES: GETTY IMAGES
Classic loafers get the
Alexa touch. Loafers ($400,
matchesfashion.com)
Fashion / Shop the Trends
Edited by Amy Hou
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WILLIAMS: @LAJOY224. NECKLACE, SPORTS BRA: COURTESY OF BRAND.
STILLS: TIM HOUT; STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS
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ALEXANDER: MARISEL SALAZAR. SPORTS BRA: COURTESY OF BRAND. STILLS: TIM HOUT; STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS
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Fashion / The Accessory Edit
9
2
8
1
...
If You Like It
10
…then you
know what
to do: Put
a ring on it!
The more
the better.
7
3
4
6
5
30 glamour.com
Shop our picks: 1. Solange
Azagury-Partridge ($2,600,
Solange Azagury-Partridge,
NYC). 2. Jennifer Fisher
($225, top, $265, bottom,
jennifer fisherjewelry.com).
3. Metalepsis Projects ($165,
metalepsis projects
.com). 4. Legier ($375, legier
.la). 5. Tuleste ($50 for set of
two, tuleste.com). 6. French
Connection ($18, french
connection. com). 7. Jennifer
Fisher ($215, jennifer
fisherjewelry.com). 8. Monica
Vinader ($135, gold, $195,
amazonite, Monica Vinader,
NYC). 9. Uncommon Matters
($150, quietstorms.com).
10. Lizzie Fortunato ($220,
lizziefortunato.com).
Photograph by Anairam
MODELS: ASHLEY TURNER AT SUPREME MODELS, NIAMH ADKINS AT THE LIONS. HAIR: THOMAS DUNKIN AT BRIDGE ARTISTS; MAKEUP: STEVIE HUYNH AT BRYANT ARTISTS; MANICURE: GINA V AT ARTISTSBYTIMOTHYPRIANO.COM
Edited by Elissa Velluto
Outfits
for
Days
Babba Canales,
26, helped launch
Uber in Sweden,
was named to
Forbes’ 30 Under
30’s marketing list,
and just started
her own company.
Her style is
equally #goals.
32 glamour.com
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
This outfit is as comfortable
as my workout gear but still
looks sharp—which means
I can take my dog, Blue, for a
walk and then hit the office.
For really important things,
I throw a blazer on top.
This dress is a perfect
example of what I love to
wear when strolling
around New York City.
But plain white can be a
bit boring, so I added
a bag with emoji eyes to
make it more fun.
I like that this look feels
like a work uniform but is
still light and easy to wear.
Plus, the hem length is
office-appropriate, and the
sandals are more tailored
than a beach sandal.
Hilfiger Collection pants
($230, select Tommy Hilfiger
stores, 212-223-1824). All
other items, Canales’ own.
Dolce Vita dress
($150, dolcevita.com)
Rodebjer dress
($420, rodebjer.com)
Photographs by Kathy Lo
STYLIST: PEJU FAMOJURE; HAIR: TAK ASHI YUSA FOR ORIBE HAIR CARE; MAKEUP: MIN MIN MA AT HONEY ARTISTS. NYC LOCATIONS: TICTAIL MARKET, ZUCKER BAKERY, FLOWER POWER, JUICY LUCY, LE BOUQUET
Fashion / Style Trial
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
I would wear this
millennial-pink suit every
day if I could! It’s more
casual than a traditional
one thanks to the loose
culottes. I matched it with
a tee and Adidas Sambas
to make it sporty.
I am loving orange for the
summer. But on its own,
it can sometimes be too
bright. The black in
this dress keeps it from
being vacation-y, and
the neutral sandals bring
down the boldness.
I’m not a sweatpants
person, but when
I’m hanging out, I still like
to wear something
super comfortable. With
this knit top, I can put
on sneakers and jeans,
and run out for coffee.
This is my go-anywhere
look. My thinking
was that the metallic bag
and sleek booties add
some edge—and
keep the eyelet top from
being too cutesy.
Tibi blazer ($595) and
culottes ($395, tibi.com)
Diane von Furstenberg
dress ($498, saks.com)
Armani Exchange pullover
($90, armaniexchange.com
for stores)
Ann Taylor top and
pants ($98 each,
anntaylor.com)
glamour.com 33
Fashion / The Accessory Edit
Edited by Elissa Velluto
Fashion Masterpiece
Louis Vuitton’s new collab with Jeff Koons, the pop artist famous for his giant balloon-dog
sculptures, is so ogle-worthy it went viral on Instagram—with 1.5 million likes—within
days of being announced. Our favorite, for anyone out there with a richly deserved bonus
burning a hole in her pocket: Mona Lisa (iconic women all the way!). While it will set you
back $4,000, you’d own a bag with art by Koons and Da Vinci. So it’s kind of a deal, right?
34 glamour.com
Photograph by Michelle Rose Sulcov
PAINTING: JOE REIHSEN, “DILEMMA…PLS HELP” (2017), ACRYLIC ON PANEL, 60 X 47 INCHES. LOCATION: THE HOLE NYC/THEHOLENYC.COM. JULIANNA RAE TOP. GAP JEANS. SEE GLAMOUR SHOPPER FOR MORE INFORMATION
Louis Vuitton
bag, $4,000,
louisvuitton.com
Fashion / Style Your Size
Edited by Lauren Chan
What Makes
You Feel Sexy?
Four fashion influencers on
the clothes that empower them
“I’m the queen of floral
dresses! Being trans means
I had to change everything I
had been taught about gender
just to be who I know I am.
Now I live in extreme
femininity.” —Shay Neary,
@shadeyshay, model, 29
“Things like crop tops that
show skin. People have told me
that being immodest is harmful to the feminist movement.
But one of the pillars of feminism is body autonomy, so I
celebrate my body.” —Myla
Dalbesio, @myladalbesio,
model, artist, and writer, 30
36 glamour.com
RICHARDSON: LUMIA NOCITO @LUMIA.NOCITO. ABOULHOSN: AMANDO ALMONTE. NEARY: EMILY KEMP. DALBESIO: K AVA GORNA
“I actually feel sexiest
wearing pants—track
suits are my signature—
because I’m most
comfortable embracing
masculine and feminine
qualities. Sexiness isn’t
about femininity—that’s
a dangerous notion.”
—Gabrielle Richardson,
@fridacashflow, model
and student, 22
“I’ve always worn T-shirts as
dresses—and I’ve always had
comments on my cellulite.
But I stopped giving a f-ck
what people think, and wearing them now makes me feel
like there are no more fashion
‘rules’ for curvy women.”
—Nadia Aboulhosn,
@nadiaaboulhosn, blogger
and designer, 28
Fashion / Insider
And don’t forget...
2
4
3
Away
You
Go!
6
7
10
8
9
11
1. Keds sneakers ($40, keds.com). 2. Solid & Striped one-piece swimsuit ($168, solidandstriped.com). 3. Only Hearts by Helena Stuart bra ($69, onlyhearts
.com). 4. Paravel suitcase ($275, tourparavel.com). 5. Lexicon of Style scarf ($60, lexiconofstyle.co). 6. Neely & Chloe convertible minibag ($148,
neelyandchloe.com). 7. Levi’s jeans ($98, levi.com). 8. Fresh Sugar Candy Tinted Lip Treatment Sunscreen SPF 15 ($24, fresh.com). 9. Raen sunglasses ($150,
anthropologie.com). 10. Supergoop! Super Power Sunscreen Mousse ($34, sephora.com). 11. La Vie Rebecca Taylor dress ($350, rebeccataylor.com).
38 glamour.com
Photograph by Tim Hout
WILLIAMS: @AW INSTAGRAM. STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS. POLAROID FRAME: GETTY IMAGES
When we
heard actress
Allison
Williams
writes a mean
packing list
for any friend
going on
vacation, we
asked her to
make one for
us. Here, a
sampling of
her essentials
for a getaway
weekend.
(See the
full list at
glamour
.com.)
5
1
Beauty / Try the Trends
Your
DIY Color
Guide
Direct Dye
This is basically tinted
conditioner (shockingly
user-friendly), like Manic
Panic or the L’Oréal at
bottom left. It’s used
to create most of today’s
Crayola-color hair.
r
Dusty Color
A color that’s got gray
undertones. “One trick
that I do on bleached
hair is tone it slightly gray
before adding color,”
Wood says. “When you
layer pink or a plum
on top, you then get a
more subdued, sober
kind of color.”
emember when pink hair
was considered extreme? We
barely can either; it’s become
that mainstream. The thing
that’s different now: “People want
faded, in-between colors instead of
brights,” says London-based colorist
Josh Wood, the go-to guy for models
like Edie Campbell and Suki Waterhouse. “Someone may have had a
bright blue, and as it washes out, they
get that kind of gray, sky blue. It’s
like a patina. Now we’re out to create
those shades from the start.” Here,
Wood maps out the before, during,
and after of your new pastel hair….
Blorange
A Creamsicle-y, blondorange hybrid first
popularized by Georgia
May Jagger. Use
one part orange direct
dye mixed with
four parts clear (see
the next page).
Plavender
You’ll probably need to bleach your hair.
FOR SUBTLE
STREAKS
L’Oréal Paris
Colorista SemiPermanent Hair
Color in, from
top, Aqua, Blue,
Burgundy, and
Peach ($11 each,
at drugstores)
Let’s be clear: True pastel hair isn’t the result of a single color process. You have to first lighten to somewhere
between baby blond and platinum, then tone it with a violet
hue (to cancel out yellow), and then apply your final desired
color. “Getting [a pale result] on a brunette without any prelightening is virtually impossible,” says Wood, adding this
caveat: Leave the bleaching and toning to the pros, especially if you have dark hair, which takes longer to lighten;
then once you’re bleached (just do the areas you want to
color), you can try the rest of the process at home. Not into
bleaching? The L’Oréal line at left offers four deeper shades
for brunettes (the colors read more like stains than pastels).
FIND YOUR HUE
Want a specific rose-gold shade?
This is where a photo comes
in handy. Bring an image of your
inspiration to your colorist—
whether it’s a sunset, an ice cream
flavor, or a Pantone swatch—and
let the color play ensue.
46 glamour.com
Greige
Like the nail color! A subtle
beige-gray shade. Mix
one part platinum,
one part gray, and three
parts conditioner.
Strawberry
Rhubarb
A muted blend of pinky
red, orange tones, and
blond (see Irene Kim,
previous page). Mix one
part baby pink direct dye
with a half part red and
add five parts of clear.
Pistachio mint
Pale minty green
(see it above left).
Mix equal parts of teal
and indigo with four
parts clear and apply
on baby blond hair.
TOP: @SASHABELYAEVA A. FIND YOUR HUE: GETTY IMAGES. STILLS: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
Step 1: Prep
Platinum hair with a
lavender stain. Mix one
part each of blue and
violet direct dyes with
four parts clear, and
apply to platinum hair.
Beauty / Try the Trends
Step 2: Color
Now that you’re bleached and toned, and
you’re at home: Add your desired colors to a
plastic bowl, mixing to create a custom tone
(see previous page for ideas). Then paint the
mixture on freshly washed, dry hair wherever
you want color. Comb through, leave it on for
about 30 minutes (longer for darker hair), and
rinse clean with cool water. Apply all over, at
the ends for a pretty ombré (like the peach tips
at right), or try Wood’s “invisible” color: “Concentrate on the layers underneath,” he says.
“At night you can wear it down, and the color
will peek out when you move, but if you wear it
in a low bun during the day, nobody can see it.”
TO DILUTE COLOR
Step 3: Maintenance
Manic Panic Manic
Mixer/Pastel-izer
($11, rickysnyc.com)
Keep hair looking its best.
FOR A TEMPORARY TINT
Clairol Color Crave Hair
Makeup in Shimmering
Rose Gold ($10, target
.com); Bumble and
Bumble Bb. Color Stick
in Lilac and Ballet
($26 each, bumbleand
bumble.com)
Endless Color Inspo
Good news first: Direct dyes contain no ammonia or peroxide, so you can switch from rose to
teal to orange with little to no damage; just wait
for the previous tone to fade completely (approximately one month) to avoid muddy hues. To
speed up fading, use a clarifying shampoo or add
a teaspoon of baking soda to your regular shampoo. Alternatively, keep color looking fresh by
washing less often and avoiding hot water. What
has taken its toll on your hair? That bleach treatment. So use a deep-conditioning mask, like
the one at right, after you shampoo to keep hair
shiny and healthy—and all the better for your
next shade.
FOR RESTORING
MOISTURE
IGK Prenup Instant
Spray Hair Mask
($32, igkhair.com)
Need a few ideas? Here are the pastel-filled feeds to follow now.
@joshwoodcolour
@auracolorist
@pravana
@bleachlondon
@guy_tang
Wood is the fashion
world’s favorite
for playful hues.
Aura Friedman is
a master of inventive,
shimmering pastels.
The hair brand is at
the forefront of daring
hair color.
The U.K. salon is a hub
for rainbow hair. (Georgia
May Jagger is a fan.)
The L.A. colorist can
do every imaginable
variant of lavender.
48 glamour.com
STEP 3: COURTESY OF BLEACH LONDON. COLOR INSPO FROM LEFT: @JOSHWOODCOLOUR. @AURACOLORIST. JOSH MCCAGHREN WITH PRAVANA. BLEACH LONDON. GUY TANG. STILLS: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
Time to apply your pastel.
ADVERTISEMENT
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Shop online for an unparalleled
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Beauty / Love Your Hair
Tip: Enhance naturally
curly bangs with
cream gel or seal
in a blowout
with serum,
à la model
Dilone.
Tip: Long fringe?
Mix up your part
like Felicity Jones,
right. Split bangs down
the center for a
French-girl feel, sweep
to the side, or brush
it all forward.
Tip:
Spray dry
shampoo at roots
to keep secondday styles fresh.
Your Hair Lookbook
Tip: If you go
shorter, use a
comb to guide
micro bangs
to one
side.
Tip: On
a grown-out
pixie like Michelle
Williams’, use waxy
pomade to style
piecey or sleek bangs.
50 glamour.com
Tip: With
curls like poet
Cleo Wade’s, apply curl
cream to damp hair,
twist strands with
fifingers to shape spirals,
and let air-dry.
Or brush for extra
volume.
olume
GETTY IMAGES (9). SHUTTERSTOCK (4)
All about bangs! Styling cues from fringe-forward notables here. By Jennifer Mulrow
Beauty / Impulse Buy
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Beauty / Insight
FIND BEAUTY ZEN
Yoga teacher
Lauren Ash,
near left, with
artist Zakkiyyah
Najeebah.
Into the red lips?
Try Kosås
Lipstick in Electra
($24, kosas
cosmetics.com).
a
Is Beauty Self-Care?
Absolutely, says Simone Kitchens, who’s all about being more present in her routine.
s I write this sentence, I’m thinking about what food I have
in the house for dinner and what emails I have to return.
I make to-do lists when I meditate. I rewind podcasts
because my mind drifts. Present, I am not. But as any Zen master
will tell you, the key to being more present is to focus. When you’re
eating, just eat. When you’re talking to friends, just talk (put down
that phone). While self-care—the act of prioritizing time for yourself—is a buzzword these days, I’ve learned that being present in
your beauty routine has benefits too. Some ways I’ve tried:
NAJEEBAH AND ASH: DEUN IVORY/@DEUNIVORY. STILLS: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
Find your beauty tribe. Self-care doesn’t have to be a solo act.
“Women often say how uplifting it is to move and breathe with
others,” says Lauren Ash (@blackgirlinom), above right, who holds
Self-Care Sundays (stretching with guided affirmation) in Chicago.
You can take the same group approach. I make time to do something good for myself with friends—a hike, an evening in with
masks (the talk doesn’t have to be about serious life goals).
Try yoga…for your face. “Yoga gets oxygen pumping, even to
our biggest organ, our skin,” says Atlanta yoga teacher Chelsea
Jackson Roberts, Ph.D. (There’s science there: Studies show
regular yoga may help increase circulation, which leads to glow.)
Her favorite move for relaxing facial tension and upping radiance
is Lion’s Breath. Start by breathing deeply through the nose, then
exhale widely, sticking out your tongue and sighing. I do this five
times in a row a couple of times a day.
Work a mantra into your routine. When I had a facial with
aesthetician and spiritual healer Mashell Tabe (of New York and
New Mexico), which was a mix of micro-needling and guided meditation, I was struck by the idea of setting an intention with your
skin care. At home, Tabe suggests starting with a mantra (something like “I am enough”) before whatever your routine is; it helps
the time feel healing and not just like a chore. “When you’re feeling
more connected to yourself,” she says, “that inner glow is real.”
How Glamour Editors Go Deep With Beauty
My coworkers and I find moments of calm with our favorite products.
A MIDDAY MEDITATION
WITH FACE OIL
Monk Oil Dawn City Skin
Potion ($52, monkoil.com)
“I drop oil into my hands,
swing my chair away from
my computer, and inhale
deeply.” —Simone Kitchens
A SOUND BATH
Tierra Santa Sound Bowl
Set ($55, 786-655-5570)
“Circling the bowl with
the wand creates a
hypnotic, relaxing hum.”
—Ying Chu
A ZEN SHOWER WITH
CRYSTAL SOAP
Wild Medicine Soap ($22,
wildmedicine.us)
“This crystal soap infused
with essential oils turns the
morning into a spa moment.”
—Katheryn Erickson
glamour.com 55
STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS. LIGHT + PAPER LASER-CUT PAPER ARTWORK ($34, LIGHTANDPAPERSHOP.COM)
Edited by Sara Gaynes Levy
About
Those
HPV
Rumors...
Don’t get scared;
get informed.
By Bari Lieberman
Cervical cancer has been making headlines lately: A report earlier this year found
that more people die of the disease than we
originally thought. Add the news that the
disease is deadlier for certain women and
there was a bit of a collective freak-out,
especially since 99 percent of all cervical cancer cases are caused by the human
papillomavirus (HPV), an STI 85 percent
of sexually active women will contract in
their lifetime. So let’s clear a few things up.
Photograph by Tim Hout
Protect your
cervix—it’s a
beautiful thing.
Rumor: HPV means
you’ll get cancer.
Visit any online women’s health forum
and you’ll read concerns that HPV dooms
you to cervical cancer. But that’s not how
it works: There are more than 120 types of
HPV; many are “low-risk” and don’t cause
any adverse effects or need treatment.
Nearly all cases of cervical cancer come
from two particular strains, HPV-16 and
-18, which can also lead to cancers of the
throat, vulva, vagina, and anus. If you test
positive for a high-risk strain, your doctor may take a wait-and-see approach and
simply suggest more frequent Pap smears,
because your body may clear the infection
on its own. (This approach is safe, since
it can take between five and 10 years for
high-risk HPV to cause cervical cancer—
it’s one major reason most doctors don’t
even screen for HPV until age 30.) But
if you test positive and your Pap smear
shows more-severe abnormalities, doctors can operate to remove those cells and
prevent cancer from developing, explains
Shree Chanchani, M.D., an ob-gyn and
assistant clinical professor at NYU Langone Medical Center. In other words,
there are many scenarios where high-risk
HPV doesn’t progress into cervical cancer, and your doctor can help you find the
approach that’s right for you.
Rumor: Cervical cancer is
getting more common.
Not true. There’s been chatter about rates
increasing, likely stemming from a 2017
study that found that death rates are actually 47 percent higher for white women
and 77 percent higher for black women
than previously believed. But that doesn’t
mean cancer is on the rise—this
➻
glamour.com 57
Wellbeing / Health Report
After triceps
dips, we’re
hitting the slide.
study excluded women who’d had hysterectomies, who had been counted in earlier
death rates even though they were not at
risk. So the study offers a more accurate
picture of women dying from the disease
but doesn’t mean that the cancer is more
dangerous or widespread than before.
Which brings us to another rumor…
Rumor: Cervical cancer is
deadlier for black women.
Rumor: You can get HPV
from oral sex.
Message boards have this right, and
HPV-related oral, nasal, and neck cancers are slightly up. Sadly, there’s no easy
way to diagnose this form of HPV. “So go
for annual wellness visits and don’t smoke,
which is an additional risk factor for these
cancers,” says Brian Slomovitz, M.D., the
coleader of the gynecologic cancer group
at the University of Miami’s Sylvester
Comprehensive Cancer Center in Florida.
Rumor: You can’t get the
vaccine if you’re older than 26.
This myth likely started because most
insurers don’t cover the vaccine for those
over age 26. But you can still ask for it, and
you might want to. The CDC recommends
women and men get the vaccine starting
at age 11; it’s most effective when given
before HPV exposure, says Dr. Slomovitz.
“The reason we suggest getting vaccinated
before 26 is to allow the body time to
generate an immune response,” he says.
But while the vaccine may be less effective after 26, it can still protect you. Says
Dr. Slomovitz, “If you’ve been in a long
monogamous relationship and now you’re
not”—as in, you’ll have new partners—“it’s
worth the cost.”
58 glamour.com
The #TBT Workout
The hottest trend in fitness? Throwing it back
to your playground days. By Emily Abbate
So metimes being an adult is hard.
So fitness studios are taking
workouts back to a simpler time:
elementary school. My House
Fitness, in 10 states, divvies up
attendees into teams, field day
style. The P. E. Club in New York
City builds on moves learned in
phys ed. These routines are blowing up for a simple reason: They’re
fun, says P. E. Club founder Nedra
Lopez. She devel oped this routine
for Glamour; you can do it anywhere, but it’s most effective on a
playground since you’ll develop
extra balance skills. Grab a towel
and do the circuit three times, resting 30 seconds between each
circuit. Do the workout three times
a week and you’ll feel stronger in
a month. Don’t forget to ask for
your turn with the swing! (I only
got the side-eye from a kid once.)
Swinging Abs
Where: swing set
Works: abs and shoulders
Start in a plank position with
forearms on a swing’s seat
and feet on ground. Squeeze
glutes and push swing away
from you. Return to start. Do 10.
(At home use something
with wheels, like a desk chair.)
Hovering Plank Walk
Where: swing set
Works: abs and shoulders
Start in a plank with feet on swing,
hands on a towel on ground.
Keeping feet still and hips level,
walk hands back toward feet,
so your body makes an L-shape.
Return to start. Do 10. (At home
put feet on a couch or table.)
Swing Hamstring Curls
Where: swing set
Works: glutes, hamstrings, core
Lie on a towel on your back with
heels planted on swing, legs
bent. Squeeze your butt and lift
hips up, then extend legs straight,
pushing the swing away. Bend
knees and drag swing back to
start. Do 15. (At home use something with wheels, like a desk chair.)
Bench Dips
Where: park bench
Works: triceps, shoulders, back
Start sitting with hands on edge
of bench, fingers facing forward.
Scoot butt off and lower body
by bending elbows to 90 degrees
(be sure movement comes from
arms, not hips). Push back to start,
above. Do 12. (At home use the
edge of a chair.)
Tire Elevated Lunge
Where: tire swing
Works: hamstrings, quads, calves
Start standing with back to swing,
left foot lifted behind you and
resting on tire. Bend front knee
90 degrees and lower down
into a lunge. Push through right
heel to return to start. Do 15 per
side. (At home use a rolling chair.)
WORKOUT: MOLLY CULVER PHOTOGRAPHY FOR AN ORIGINAL POST ON CAMILLESTYLES.COM
This, unfortunately, is true, but not
because of any biological differences.
Black women are nearly twice as likely to
die from cervical cancer, the study showed,
often because they are diagnosed at later
stages than white women. (Researchers
separated only white and black women,
with one “other” category for all other
races, a shortcoming the study author
acknowledged to Glamour.) “This is why
equal access to preventive health care [like
Pap smears] is so important, particularly
for women who have the least access to
care,” says Cecile Richards, president of
Planned Parenthood. Bottom line: Women
of any race should get a Pap every three
years (after age 30, it can be every five years
as long as your Pap includes an HPV test).
Wellbeing / Eat, Drink, Repeat
Meet the
Avo Bowl
You’re going to be obsessed.
By Shaun Dreisbach
Spiced Egg Salad
Avocado Bowl
2 avocados
Seasoned rice vinegar
3 hard-boiled eggs (peeled, yolks
and whites separated)
½ lime, juiced
Salt and pepper to taste
Chili flakes to taste
Microgreens, paprika, and edible rose
petals (optional, for garnish as shown
above; find rose petals on Amazon)
Halve avocados lengthwise; remove pits.
Remove the skin from one avocado, keeping the f lesh of each side intact as your
bowls; rub with a bit of vinegar to prevent
60 glamour.com
Tip: Slice a small
piece off the bottom
of each bowl to
stabilize, says Dike.
browning. Scoop the f lesh of remaining
avocado into a bowl and mash in egg yolks
to combine. Add lime juice and season with
salt and pepper. Chop whites into small
pieces and fold into avocado mixture. Fill
centers of avocado bowls with egg salad
and top with chili flakes, greens, paprika,
and rose petals, if using. Serves 2.
Crab Avocado Bowl
2 tbsp. mayonnaise
2 tbsp. truffle oil (optional)
1 tsp. seasoned rice vinegar, plus
more for rubbing
3 ½ oz. lump crabmeat (finely chopped
imitation crabmeat works too)
Salt and pepper to taste
1 slice day-old bread
1 tbsp. olive oil
Pinch of onion powder
1 avocado
Handful of small-leaf greens, like
microgreens or pea shoots (optional)
Smoked paprika
Combine mayo, truffle oil (if using), and
vinegar in a bowl. Add crabmeat and season with salt and pepper. Dice bread; toss
with olive oil, onion powder, and salt and
pepper; toast in skillet or toaster oven
until golden brown. Cut avocado in half
lengthwise, and remove pit and skin,
keeping f lesh intact as your bowls. Rub
avocado halves with vinegar to prevent
browning and spoon crab salad into center.
Add croutons and layer on greens, if using.
Sprinkle with paprika. Serves 2.
Nut-Crusted
Avocado Bowls
3 ½ oz. shelled pistachios and almonds,
mixed (about ½ cup)
1 tsp. chili flakes
Zest of half a lime
Salt and pepper to taste
2 avocados
Seasoned rice vinegar
3 ½ oz. goat cheese, at room temperature
Pulse nuts, chili flakes, and zest in a food
processor until coarsely crumbled. Season
with salt and pepper. Cut avocados in half
lengthwise and remove pits and skins,
keeping f lesh intact as your bowls. Rub
avocado halves with vinegar to prevent
browning. Fill centers with goat cheese
and put halves back together. Spread nut
mixture on a parchment-lined surface and
roll avocados in the nuts, pressing gently.
Split halves apart again and sprinkle with
remaining nut mixture. Serves 4.
AVOCADO: COLETTE DIKE/@FOODDECO
a
vocado has been a star
lately, and with good
reason: The fruit (yes,
fruit) can reduce your
risk for heart disease
and DNA damage. Yet up until now it’s
been an ingredient, not the vessel. Enter
food blogger Colette Dike (@fooddeco),
who has introduced a new way of enjoying
avocados: in edible-bowl form, holding
everything from hummus to crab salad.
(Whatever you fill them with, she advises,
“decorate the bowls with unexpected
ingredients like sesame and poppy seeds
or chili f lakes, to make them look even
more beautiful.”) Here, Dike shows just
how versatile the avo bowl is.
Sex in
2017
special
section!
INFINITY SELFIE OR SFSM (SAFE FOR SOCIAL MEDIA). 2016. DIGITAL C-PRINT
We understand you have
a few questions.
Magic Stick
Artist Leah Schrager
exploring her own
sexuality in a self-portrait
called Infinity Selfie
Photograph by Leah Schrager
glamour.com 63
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We all want to
have great sex.
To follow our desires.
To figure out what feels
good, and how to ask for it.
To be present. Connected.
At peak firework emoji. The
search for all that, though,
can be complicated, and
most of us have questions:
WTF do I like? Why do I
know more about what gets
a guy off than what gets
me off? Is everyone doing
that thing I saw in a porno
on my phone? In this special
section, we’re going after
answers—starting with
12 queries on all our minds
now. Read, respond—and
shake off any shame you feel
about going after whatever it
is you want. Fun times await.
How Did We
Get Here?
Meet (and thank!) the women
who helped normalize our desires,
whatever they may be.
64 glamour.com
Why Didn’t
Anyone
Teach Us the
Good Stuff?
Here’s what sex ed for
women should really include.
By Lindsay King-Miller
1971
1973
1976
The Boston Women’s Health
Book Collective gives an
early clitoris how-to.
Our Bodies, Ourselves
demystifies the clit: “Feel your
outer genitals until you hit
upon the most sensitive spot,”
it reads. And if you don’t
orgasm during intercourse?
“You should not feel
inadequate or ashamed.”
Erica Jong coins the
phrase zipless fuck.
Her book Fear of Flying
immortalizes a rip-offyour-clothes kind of sex,
pioneering the idea of
liberation for women.
“Zipless because when you
came together…underwear
blew off in one breath like
dandelion fluff,” she wrote.
Joani Blank hails sex toys.
A year before opening her sex-toy shop,
which became a trusted resource for
women, Blank wrote Good Vibrations, a
guide to orgasming with a vibrator—or,
in seventies-speak, “buzzing off.” She
suggested the Hitachi Magic Wand, then
the brand-new Cadillac of vibrators.
Vintage Fun The 1968
Hitachi Magic Wand; the
toy is still popular today.
17.4%
of women report having a same-sex sexual
experience at least once in their life.
Source: CDC National Center for Health Statistics, 2016
COUPLE: OLIVIA BEE/TRUNK ARCHIVE. MASSAGER:
COURTESY OF GOOD VIBRATIONS ANTIQUE VIBRATOR
MUSEUM. MADONNA: RON DAVIS/GETTY IMAGES
The sex ed at my artsy middle school was probably the best an
American kid could hope for: I actually heard the word condom. But a lot was left out—desire, consent, LGBTQ issues. As
a result I ended up adrift in a sea of hormones with no idea what
to do with myself. Here are seven things I wish someone had
taught me before I had to learn them the awkward way:
Women want sex. This was never mentioned to me by anyone, ever. I learned about erections, but nothing about my own
body’s potential for arousal. At 12 I was told that if a guy moved
too fast, I should tell him to stop. At 16 I started to wonder:
Where are these guys who move too fast? Can I get their numbers? I had never been told that I might want sex.
And men can say no to sex. Guess what: Guys don’t always
want it! I was floored by my first experiences with sexual
rejection, because I thought saying no to sex was something
only girls did, like going to the bathroom in groups and wishing their dresses had pockets. An understanding of consent is
crucial to having sex with people of any gender.
Desire is important, but so is communication. Most
of my early sexual experiences were fumbling and unsatisfying because I hadn’t learned to talk about what I wanted with
a partner. I just tried to beam my thoughts into their brain—
or whatever characters in movies do when they have beautiful,
romantic sex in silence. In real life, though, you have to say
what you want and what your boundaries are. The first time a
partner said, “Tell me what you want to do,” I was like, “Um…
sex?” Not a sufficient answer, folks.
Sex shouldn’t be painful. If penetration hurts, either
you’re not turned on, you need additional lubrication, or you
have a condition that you should talk to your gynecologist
about. Usually, though, the answer to uncomfortable sex is to
go slower and use more lube. Always more lube.
Queer and trans people exist! At least a couple of kids in
every sex ed class are going to grow up and learn firsthand that
there are ways to have sex that don’t involve one penis and one
vagina. I was one of them. Wouldn’t it have been awesome if
my sex ed class had acknowledged my existence?
Which reminds me: Vaginas are acidic. This seems like
an interesting but inconsequential piece of trivia until you try to
finger-bang someone while you have a hangnail. I keep a box of
latex gloves around—your partner should too.
Masturbation is always there for you instead of bad
sex, unsafe sex, or sex with someone you don’t want to have sex
with. I remember being 20 and on a date with a boring dude,
gritting my teeth through uninspiring conversation because
there was a chance I’d get laid, when it dawned on me: I have a
vibrator! I can just leave! The clouds opened and angels sang. If
I’d been taught earlier in life that I was not only capable of but
actually entitled to safe, healthy, and enjoyable sex on my own,
I might not have suffered through the boring date at all.
Lindsay King-Miller is the author of the book Ask a Queer
Chick. Follow her @AskAQueerChick on Twitter.
1982
1992
2004
2017
Audre Lorde gets real
about sex with women.
Her autobiography, Zami:
A New Spelling of My
Name, helped normalize
lesbian sex simply by
describing it: “Her body
answered the quest of my
fingers, my tongue, my
desire to know a woman,
again and again.”
Madonna praises anal.
The Queen of Pop’s eroticphotography book shows
her simulating sex with
men and women in many
of the photos. But raciest
of all is her edict on the
joys of anal sex: “The
most pleasurable way to
[have sex],” she wrote.
“It hurts the most too.”
Jenna Jameson pulls
back the curtain on porn.
Her memoir How to
Make Love Like a Porn Star
is explicit about her sex
scenes. In one, a costar
“slammed” her so fast and
hard that “trying to maintain
eye contact with him was
like trying to read Dostoevsky
[sic] on a roller coaster.”
Slutist touts shameless
sex positivity. The feminist
website has become one
of many elevating young
women’s voices on pleasure
and consent as well as sexual
expression and freedom.
How will female sexuality
evolve in the next decade?
That’s for you to decide.
—Abby Haglage
Madge, #NoJudge
Owning her sexuality,
as always
glamour.com 65
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Come One, Come All
One meh experience
inspired Koenig to start
an orgasmipedia.
of the endless ways a woman can achieve
climax. Some women told me they can
come like that [snaps fingers in cool, West
Side Story way]. Some women have never
had an orgasm. And while that spectrum
must be acknowledged and explored,
editing 83 essays on everything from masturbation to squirting did reveal a few
universal truths, including:
Sex doesn’t live in a vacuum.
While plenty of the essays riff on physicality—see “Tongue plus fingers makes me
shake all night”—nearly all explore the
emotional reverb of hooking up. Makes
sense: You’re human, so having sex with
another human will impact you in some
way, and how we treat one another during
the nonsexual moments affects the sexual
moments. So many women wrote about
how basic, being-a-nice-person things
can pay off in bed. As one put it: “Chivalry
is the best lube.”
Narrating your hookup is hot.
Emma Koenig—the anonymous
(till now!) editor of the popular
Tumblr feed How to Make Me
Come—has heard it all.
I am not a sex expert. I’m not even a professional pussy
whisperer (although how cool would that business card
be?). But recently one of the focuses of my life has been
trying to understand the modern female orgasm. A while
back, after an uncomfortable sexual experience left me
thinking a lot about intimacy, I started asking women for
anonymous entries to a Tumblr I called How to Make Me
Come (howtomakemecome.tumblr.com). I asked them:
Imagine you could give this essay to a past or future sexual partner, free of judgment or repercussion. What would
you say? The result became something of an orgasmipedia
66 glamour.com
SOUND
FAMILIAR?
1 in 4
contributors to
Koenig’s
project used
words
like slow, soft,
or gentle
to describe
what they
like in bed.
If you build it, you will come.
So much of being able to climax is about being vulnerable and trusting your partner to take care of you in that
moment. Many women who shared their stories said that
writing about what they like, dislike, and need in order to
orgasm gave them the courage to have real conversations
about those subjects with their partner. And they almost
always reported that their sex life improved overall.
So what do all of these truths have in common? What
really gets women off? Communication. I know, it’s not
the sexiest concept of all time, but it is so, so important.
If we talk about our orgasms, other areas of our lives will
improve. And if we talk about other areas of our lives, our
chances at orgasm will improve. You just gotta trust me on
this one: I’m an amateur pussy whisperer.
Emma Koenig is an author in L.A. whose book of essays
about women coming is (ahem) coming in May 2018.
COUPLE: CARSTEN WITTE/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM
What Really
Gets Women
Off?
There’s no such thing as a dumb question
during sex. It can be as simple as “Does
this feel good?” or as specific as “Does
it feel good when I do x to your y?” And
don’t forget to cheer on the stuff you like.
Not only does it get all parties on the same page, a little
voiceover can be fire: “There’s nothing hotter than telling
you what I want and you listening,” wrote one contributor. Another recalled a night that began with her partner
whispering, “Nuh-uh. You’re not going anywhere until I
make you come.”
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YONI EGG: TIM HOUT; STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS. COURTESY OF GEM STONE YONI EGGS/GEMSTONEYONIEGGS.COM. TORSO: COURTESY OF CRITIQUE MY DICK PIC
Should
You Try a
Yoni Egg?
Writer Liza Murphy
road tests the controversial
vaginal gemstone.
After a Tinder date last
fall, I was watching a
video on the “twin flame”
theory on YouTube—was
my date mine?—when it
eventually autoplayed into
an explainer about the yoni egg
practice: Slip this polished crystal
inside your vagina and get better, stronger
orgasms. Wha?! It seemed freaky—good
freaky. I’m able to orgasm with partners,
but it takes a long time (and often one specific position). Anyway, I ordered one.
Before the egg ($60) arrived, I
brought it up with my gyno. She told me
to look up Layla Martin, a yoni egg advocate, to learn the basics. Here goes: A yoni
egg supposedly activates and strengthens your vaginal muscles. Some people
wear one during the day; others, at night.
There are plenty of cons to the idea (some
of which you may have read about after
Goop’s controversial yoni-egg post last
winter): Many pelvic-floor experts say
the benefits are just hype, and there are
no studies to determine efficacy or safety.
And the egg (like other things inserted
into the vagina) could cause toxic shock
Why Aren’t
Dick Pics
Ever Good?
Madeleine Holden has more
than 4,000 penis photos
in her inbox. No, it’s not a bad
dream—she asked for them,
through her Tumblr “Critique
My Dick Pic.” Men send
images like the one below,
seeking feedback, and
Holden delivers. Let’s discuss.
Why did you start the site?
“One day, after getting a
good dick pic, I realized I’d
never been happy to receive
one before. I joked that there
should be a public service
telling men what they’re
doing wrong and made the
site that afternoon. It blew up.”
syndrome, especially if you leave it in too
long. Some users complain of cramping. But my gyno wasn’t against it, so I
decided to go for it.
I started putting in my egg (similar in
size to a quail egg) at night—no more than
eight hours—and taking it out in the morning. Each time it inspired me to get more
in touch with my body: I would ask myself,
What do I want, sexually, right now? Not
long after, on a trip to Israel, I hooked up
with this guy pretty much every day and
orgasmed every time. I’m not naive; maybe
the yoni egg was a placebo, and the real
reason for the orgasms was my being much
more in touch with my sexuality. But one
thing is for sure: I was more tuned in to my
pleasure, and that is a good thing.
How Real Is Porn Sex?
Not very. Lynsey G., adult entertainment journalist and author of
Watching Porn, reveals what it takes to get to the money shot.
WHAT
YOU
SEE
Men are
always
hard.
Anal sex is just
slip anything in there
any old time.
No
embarrassing
farts.
Nothing but
serious mmms
and ohhhs.
WHAT
YOU
DON’T
SEE
“Most male
performers
pop a Viagra
before filming.”
“Butt plugs and major
lube loosen things
up; enemas ensure a
clean, pretty shot.”
“Farts! Queefs!
Even poop. They
just get edited out
of the final cut.”
“A lot of laughter.
And plenty of
orgasms—real
and not so real.”
What have you learned
overall about men through
their submissions?
“Men go through a lot of the
body insecurities we do—
around weight or hairiness—
in addition to concern about
dick size. Often men send
their exact measurements,
like ‘4.55 inches in girth.’
They really overthink it!”
What do you think women
want to see in a dick pic?
“We’re looking for more than
one body part—a clean
setting, a narrative. It doesn’t
have to be complex, but
it should be more thoughtful
than a dick in a hot dog
bun (I’ve seen it).”
Any suggestion for how
to respond when the image
is welcome and good?
“That’s when you get
out a string of heart-eyes
and clap emoji.”
—Alanna Lauren Greco
glamour.com 67
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Who
Are You
Sexually?
These questions—from
a sex therapist who
knows her stuff—will
help you find out.
On her way to becoming a sex therapist, Brittany Lacour has racked up quite a résumé. She
has studied lab rodents humping (rat porn is her
phrase), worked as a dominatrix at the Dungeon
of Mistress Jasmine in New York City (just for
research!), and done comedy at the Dangerous
Theatre (known for its sexually charged shows)
in Denver, where she now lives. As part of her
therapist certification, she also completed the
Sexual Attitude Reassessment (SAR), a seminar
designed to help counselors uncover their own
biases before they treat others. It was so revealing she agreed to adapt it for Glamour.
This is not a test; there are no right or
wrong answers, Lacour says. The questions are
intended to spark your thinking about how you
decide what kind of sex you want. “We have our
culture, our past, our friends, our family—an
exponential number of influences,” she says.
“These can knowingly or unknowingly create
‘rules’ that stop you from having a lasting and
satisfying sex life. The truth is, great sex comes
from really listening to yourself and your own
body. As you answer these questions, take the
chance to pause so you can make conscious decisions about what you want to keep doing and
what you want to change.” —Liz Brody
68 glamour.com
During sex, how much do you focus on what
your partner may be thinking about you?
“If your answer is ‘never,’ that’s great. But many of us worry, Am I doing
it right? Does my partner like this? Does my partner like me? Judging
yourself during sex almost always interferes with your pleasure. If that’s
the case, I suggest doing this before things get steamy: Take three
deep, slow breaths—in through your nose and out your mouth—and
place your hand over your heart. Acknowledge that you’re giving
yourself love, and keep that warm feeling as you enjoy your partner.”
Why do you do
what you do?
QUIZ, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: EMMANUEL ROSAIO/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM.
ROBERT WHITMAN/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM. K ATE SWEENEY. ACE: TIM HOUT
“The biggest reason people end up
in my office is because of perceived
rules about sex—for example:
‘Men don’t like giving oral sex,’ ‘If he
doesn’t come, he’s not enjoying it,’
or ‘No way I’d ever do a threesome.’
Rigid thinking about sex can harm
your relationships, and being stuck
on what an experience should be
can mean missing what it could be.
If any of this resonates with you, try
bending one of your rules a little—
maybe ‘no threesomes’ becomes ‘I
could fantasize about that with my
partner.’ You don’t have to do a 180;
just soften a hard belief and see
what happens with your sex life.”
Do you have a
sexual personality?
“ ‘I’m a try-sexual. I’ll try anything
once,’ Samantha on Sex and the
City famously said. Many women
have a sexual persona they live
up to without realizing it: ‘I’m
the girl who gives great head’ or
‘I’m the prude.’ If you do, ask
yourself: Do I like my label? What
is it about—attracting partners?
avoiding intimacy? And most
important: Does it keep me from
being in the moment so I can
make honest choices? If yes,
pause. Now imagine what it would
take to show up as yourself. That
may feel hard and risky, but great
sex often takes a leap of faith.”
Could You Be
an Ace?
That’s short for asexual, and Beth
Damiano knows what it’s like.
I came out as bisexual when I was 15 and have
slept with both men and women. But at 28 I still
don’t understand why everyone is like, “Oh my
God, sex is so great.”
I can masturbate and orgasm, but I’ve never
wanted sex with someone else. It’s not for lack of
foreplay—I’ve had plenty!—or because my partners are clueless (I know my body well enough
to help, thank you). Nor is it about “finding the
right person.” I’ve been so in love I was practically hyphenating my partner’s name with
mine, wondering how many kids we’d adopt.
And still, during sex I lay there, looking for patterns on the ceiling. It’s like, Is it really going to
take you this long? Nothing is happening for me.
Two and a half years ago I came across an
explanation for my disinterest on Tumblr: I
learned I am asexual. Asexuality is on a spectrum, from people like me who feel sexual
attraction only once in a blue moon to those who
are totally repulsed by sex. As with any other sexual orientation, asexuality is not a disorder or a
pathological problem; there is no medical test
or treatment for it. When women in a relationship ask me, “Well, I’m not big on sex either; am
I asexual?” I tell them: “If sex has always been
a chore or obligation, maybe. But if there’s an
actor, a guy at a bar—anyone—you do want to
have sex with, you’re probably not asexual; you’re
just not feeling it for the person you’re with.”
I have to admit, dating has been tricky. I let
anyone know upfront I’m asexual (I’ll say, “I’m
comfortable kissing and cuddling, but anything further would need to be discussed”).
But I look at it this way: My grandparents
have been together 68 years. Even without sex
(he’s in hospice), they share a deep and abiding
love. Someday I hope to find that. —as told to
Steph Fairyington
glamour.com 69
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What’s Up With the
Orgasm Double Standard?
A Glamour report
Try to count the examples of femalecentric sex scenes in f ilms, where a
woman’s desire leads the encounter, where
a woman achieves orgasm. Try hard.
Chances are, you haven’t filled an entire
hand. In film, sexuality and desire are still
mostly coded as male.
“Women feel desire all the time; it’s
just not represented in film,” says Sarah
Barmak, author of Closer: Notes From
the Orgasmic Frontier of Female Sexuality. “Sexy women have been a building
block of cinema since the silent era, but
women’s experiencing pleasure or, God
forbid, an orgasm in film, is much more
rare…. Mainstream film is a reflection of
the language our culture has around sexuality. In the narrative now, men push sexual
encounters forward, and women are the
objects of sexual desire.” Or as director Dee
Rees sums it up: “A woman’s pleasure is
always framed as her submission.”
The studios founded what is now the
Motion Picture Association of America
in 1922; its ratings board self-regulates
movies in lieu of government interference.
Most films that get released in theaters are
rated by a panel of primarily anonymous
reviewers—all of them parents—who Joan
Graves, chairman of the ratings board,
says are representative of America. Filmmakers aim for PG-13 or R ratings (the
more explicit NC-17 limits audience size
and financial success). The board has one
rule around sexuality: “Any sex-related
nudity is usually an R rating,” says Graves.
But otherwise, she says, “there are no written guidelines.”
Critics of the ratings board say it has a
double standard—favoring male pleasure
over female, heterosexual sex over samesex sex (which Graves denies). “I don’t see
them as evil, but I don’t see them as trying to change anybody’s mind, either,” says
Jon Lewis, distinguished professor of film
studies at Oregon State University, who
has studied the ratings board. “They are a
reflection of American values.”
And the ratings process impacts what
makes it to screen. Let’s start in 1999:
That year, two first-time female directors put out boundary-breaking films
about female sexuality and faced pushback. Director Jamie Babbit says the
Self-Service PSA
Female-masturbation
scenes: still rare in 2017
70 glamour.com
SARAH BAHBAH/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM
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ratings board suggested she
trim down a fully clothed
masturbation scene in her
comedy But I’m a Cheerleader, about a teen who
goes to gay rehab. (She
made edits so that she could
receive an R rating.) “It’s
very discouraging,” she says,
“when you’ve made a movie
to target women like yourself so they can
feel OK about their bodies and about
themselves, and you basically get told,
‘Actually, we don’t want to let them know
any of this is OK.’”
Director Kimberly Peirce faced similar obstacles during the rating of Boys
Don’t Cry, which explored the life of trans
teen Brandon Teena. Peirce says the ratings board gave her three major notes
to move her film from NC-17 to her contractually required R. Top of the list:
They didn’t like that Brandon wipes his
mouth after going down on his girlfriend
Lana. “I burst out laughing,” Peirce said.
“That’s what you do! There’s nothing
offensive about that—that’s just cleanliness.” (Let’s remember that a year earlier,
in There’s Something About Mary, Ted’s
cum appeared in his date’s hair.) She said
the ratings board also thought Lana’s
orgasm went on too long. “I was like,
‘Damn straight, that was my goal,’” says
Peirce. “During filming, I was asking, ‘Is
there a special camera where we could go
inside her mouth, inside her desire, inside
the orgasm? Who has ever been hurt by
an orgasm that lasts too long?’ ” By contrast, she says, the ratings board didn’t
weigh in on the film’s violent murder.
Peirce trimmed down both sex scenes for
the R rating. “I began to realize,” she says,
“that the world is scared of female desire.”
l
ike with LGBT women, seeing black
women as fully developed sexual
beings in film is rare—which made
director Dennis Dortch’s 2008 film,
A Good Day to Be Black & Sexy,
groundbreaking. It opens with a black
woman spinning like a record in orgasmic
rapture. The camera observes her face,
making us think she’s self-pleasuring.
After two whole minutes a man’s head
appears. He’s been eating the woman
out, and now she wants her sleep. But he
persists, and she orgasms a second time.
“Black and sexy in the same sentence was
a problem for some viewers,” says Dortch,
who has two daughters. “This is the way I
raise my kids, to be authentic. No reason
to be afraid of us. Sexuality is part of us.”
Niecy Nash delivers “overthe-moon” orgasms in Claws.
In certain ways it could seem the culture, and thus film, is changing: Female
directors like Marielle Heller, who
helmed 2015’s The Diary of a Teenage
Girl, keep portraying female sexuality
in new ways. In the opening scene of her
film, the narrator, age 15, announces, “I
had sex today.” “It’s so rare,” Heller said,
“that a young woman is the real protagonist of a sexual story. More frequently
we see the Lolita story, where she’s some
type of receptacle for male desire.” Graves
argues that the ratings board’s attitudes
toward sexuality have evolved with the
times; Babbit, for her part, believes that
enough has changed that But I’m a Cheerleader would be rated PG-13 today.
Television, though, is where you’ll see
the most progress. For one, there are so
many shows. TV moves faster, is more
nimble, and has more women writing
and directing. Plus, premium channels
and streaming services aim to please subscribers, not advertisers. So creators like
Michaela Coel can capitalize on demand:
In her debut Netf lix comedy, Chewing
Gum, Tracey, a woman of color, fantasizes
about losing her virginity, training her
female gaze on male objects of her desire.
For Amazon, Peirce directed an episode
of Jill Soloway’s new show, I Love Dick, in
which the lead character (Kathryn Hahn)
has sex with her husband while fantasizing about Dick (Kevin Bacon), whom she
imagines to be watching. She tells her husband her pleasure: “Squeeze my nipples,
not so hard.” For Peirce, “It’s a scene about
female desire on every level, two men satisfying her, a fantasy man. I don’t think I
could have that scene in a movie.”
But in film or TV, it’s clear that who calls
the shots matters. Nicole Kassell directed
the pilot of TNT’s new show Claws, in
which Niecy Nash’s character has “incredibly mutual sex” with a young man in her
office. “Niecy goes for it,” Kassell says. “She
delivers over-the-moon.” But the script
wasn’t written that way. Originally, only
the man received pleasure—until Kassell
told the male writer, ‘Wait a second. This
needs to be good for both of them.’ ” And it
was. —reporting by Sarah M. Broom
Is Tech Making
Our Sex Lives
Better or Worse?
In the new Netflix
docuseries Hot Girls
Wanted: Turned On,
coproducer Rashida
Jones explores how
technology is transforming sex. (The
series drew controversy after some subjects said they
hadn’t given filmmakers consent to feature them, which Jones disputes: “We
take consent very seriously, and I understand that these are deeply personal
issues,” she says. “That said, all footage
on the series was obtained legally.”)
Here, her thoughts on a world with
porn- and Tinder-equipped phones:
Q
One episode features a man
who ghosts on the women he
met on Tinder. “This is a
superficial app, so therefore my
behavior is incredibly superficial,”
he says, but “it does not represent me
as a person.” What is that disconnect? Technology has made it OK to
not be accountable. We don’t have to
face the reality of what we’re doing….
It’s [also] dehumanizing. Your Tinder
app is next to your Amazon cart. So
you’re putting toilet paper and razors
in your cart, then flipping through profiles. It creates a marketplace feeling.
Q
You directed an episode on
female porn creators. How
does porn change when
women direct? In most porn you’re
concentrating on the female character
by design. Men would rather have a
“floating dick”; it’s easier to project
themselves onto the sexual act if they
don’t see the actor’s face or hear him
talk. A woman behind the camera is a
different gauge. She’s going to focus on
what she considers arousing.
Q
What tech can women use in
a sexually empowering way?
Indulge in porn as a way to discover your own sexuality. [A glamour
.com porn favorite: lustcinema.com.]
I think women should do that more. It’s
a great tool to explore what turns [you]
on. —Danielle Friedman
glamour.com 71
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Content Warning
Possible side effect of
early exposure to sexy
TV: self-confidence.
Can Dirty TV &
Movies Ruin You?
Actually, Justine Harman
found the adult programming of her
youth to be rather enlightening.
As a kid I watched a lot of television and
movies intended for adult audiences. And
I mean a lot. Though my parents drove a
hard line on things like making my bed or
eating only two Oreos in one sitting, there
was little regulation on the amount and
type of entertainment my older brother
and I consumed. Dan and I were the
second wave of offspring for both of our
parents, and any preciousness in their
child-rearing methods had been long
eroded. A move to Los Angeles after my
mom’s older kids went off to college in 1991
left me, Dan, and the cable box to our own
devices. Mom and Dad worked late.
By seven I was hooked on Beverly Hills,
90210. Though references to suicide and
drug use often went over my head, I was
very aware of the series’ linchpin plot: Kelly
and Brenda both wanted to ride Dylan’s
72 glamour.com
surfboard. By third grade I was heavy into
Æon Flux, a dialogue-free cartoon about a
scantily clad lady assassin who was
unabashed in her pursuit of sex and justice. Rated-R films I screened included
Kalifornia, Poetic Justice, and My Own
Private Idaho. In 1994, when I was 10 and
Dan was 12, Playboy TV (yes, it was a
thing) switched to 24- hour
programming. From matching
futons we spent hours drinking
diet soda and watching women
strip down for an ahead-of-itstime cam show.
Though I hadn’t yet developed a feminist radar or even a
social-weirdness one (what do
you mean it’s strange to watch
soft-core porn with your
brother?!), I’d argue that this
early exposure did not mess
up my worldview, as you
might assume—it was actually quite beneficial to my
development. With each
version of sexuality I saw, I
picked up another morsel of
information about what it
means to be a desired
female being. Sure, some
takeaways were not so good
(for one, that my developed
body should be like the
women onscreen, both
impossibly sinewy and supple). But I also encountered
things I couldn’t yet make
sense of. So whether it was
Fergus’ lust for a trans
woman in The Crying
Game, Dawn Wiener’s curiosity about rape in Welcome
to the Dollhouse, or Dionne’s
“technical” virginity in Clueless, I filed it away the same way I had the
90210 love triangle: automatically and
without bias. When I recently emailed
Mom for her take on my juvenile viewing
habits, 20 years after the fact, she wrote
back: “Yikes! Did not know. Feeling sad
that it didn’t occur to me to block stuff, but
frankly don’t like the idea of censoring.”
Then: “I’ve never watched the Playboy
Channel. Had to be pretty yucky, right?”
Yes and no, I guess.
Unlike freshmen who get to college
never having chugged a beer and end up
puking all over the quad, by the time I
entered my own experimentation years, I
had seen everything, so I was surprised by
nothing. As a result of my highly visual sex
education, I actively took learning my body
into my own hands. I asked my mom to
help me get birth control, because
I’d seen what happens when young
women don’t. I didn’t balk when I
saw a dick in real life. Hell, my very
first real sexual encounter was my
idea. And when the boy I was on my
bed with said, “You don’t have to,”
I was able to look at him and say,
confidently, “I want to.”
Justine Harman is a senior editor
at Glamour.
Æon Flux in all her
leather glory
BEAUTY STUDY 1019: HOWARD SCHATZ. AEON FLUX: MTV
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Is This the
Future of Sex?
TELEDILDONICS: TIM HOUT; STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA FOR R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS
Teledildonics—that’s the science of app-connected
sex toys—promises to let you feel your
partner from thousands of miles away. One couple
put it to the test. By Jessica Wakeman
My husband, Kale, and I
And as for the experience?
pride ourselves on our willWhile it was refreshingly
For her:
exotic, The Matrix this ain’t.
ingness to try pretty much
The vibrating
I started by gripping my
anything in bed at least once.
Pearl
Pearl to “stimulate” Kale’s
Now, thanks to some pretty
Onyx. Our experiment went
futuristic sex toys, we can
something like this:
even say we’ve had sex without touching each other.
ME: Can you feel that?
The tech is called teleKALE: Yup, it’s squeezing me
For him: The
in 10 different spots.
dildonics, and it has the
Onyx, with its
potential to let people truly
ME: What is that noise? It
Pleasure Core
engage in virtual-reality sex
sounds like a dentist’s drill.
when they’re apart. At its
K ALE: That’s the Pleasure
most basic level, teledildonCore, honey.
ics connects corresponding
ME: Sexy.
toys via the Web; each toy
KALE: [Strokes the touch pad
uses haptic feedback (simon top of his Onyx.] How
does that feel?
ilar to your smartphone’s
touch screen) to respond to
ME: Like a vibrating dildo?
touch, so your partner feels
I kinda miss your actual
what you’re doing and vice
penis. [Pause.] Yeah, and
versa. But can the technolI also kinda miss my actual
vibrator.
ogy mimic real intimacy? Or
does it feel more like sleeping
K ALE: It’s probably better
with a sex robot? Kale and I
than the heavy breathing
•
•
•
•
were game to find out.
over a staticky long-distance
Kale used the Onyx by
line for three bucks a minute
/noun/: The use of sex toys, connected via the Internet,
Kiiroo ($249), a large boxthat our parents had to do.
to stimulate another person remotely
shaped “sleeve” lined with
M E : Um, can we not talk
10 responsive silicone rings, which the company hilariously
about our parents right now?
insists on calling the Pleasure Core (pictured above, on the
After maybe 10 minutes of play, I was able to orgasm. It
bottom). I used the company’s Pearl ($149), a silicone G-spot
took Kale a bit longer—perhaps not surprising, considering
vibrator with nine settings (also pictured, on top). Gripping
he was having sex with what felt like “a silicone sock filled
the shaft of my Pearl makes his Onyx Pleasure Core constrict
with lube.” Would we do it again? Maybe, but it definitely
and contract; similarly, when he stimulates a touch pad on top
made me miss other trappings of the sexual experience, like
of his Onyx, my Pearl vibrates—he can even control the speed
touching and kissing. Kale summed it up pretty accurately:
and pattern of the vibrations, though in what seems like a bit
KALE: As impressive as the tech is, its limitations are pretty
of a double standard, my Pearl doesn’t directly react to what’s
obvious to anyone who’s actually been naked with a human.
going on inside his Onyx.
ME: Can you come to the bedroom now?
After registering for the FeelConnect app and syncing the
KALE: Um, I have this tube full of cum here, and dealing with it
toys (which took a lady-boner-killing amount of time), we
needs to be my top priority. I don’t want to find this later.
finally got them up and running and turned on FaceTime
so we could see each other from opposite sides of the house.
Jessica Wakeman is a writer in Brooklyn.
te le dil don ics
glamour.com 75
MALIA MILLS BIKINI. SEE GLAMOUR SHOPPER FOR MORE INFORMATION
We’ve got bona fide sexpert Ashley Graham taking
your questions (and seriously rocking that bikini), plus a
summer’s worth of ideas to get you feeling sexy AF.
glamour.com 77
You know Ashley Graham as the
world’s most glorious, body-positive
model. Now get ready to meet
her as a sexual revolutionary (who gives
laugh-out-loud bedroom advice).
By Lauren Chan
Photographs by Nathaniel Goldberg
Fashion editor: Jillian Davison
78 glamour.com
Rule Breaker
“My mom and dad always
told me, ‘Don’t do drugs.
Don’t have sex. And don’t lie,’ ”
says Graham. “And so of
course, what did I do? I did
drugs, I had sex, and I lied.
But [making mistakes] is how
I learned who I am.”
Lana Jewelry hoops. Opposite page:
InHouseAtelier top. Balmain skirt.
Jennifer Fisher earrings. For full,
brushed-up brows, try Maybelline
New York Brow Drama Shaping
Chalk Powder ($10, at drugstores).
glamour.com 79
Change Agent
“Some days I feel like I have
superpowers, but some days
I feel like I’m the fattest girl in
the world,” says Graham.
“And I talk about my back fat
and my cellulite because it’s
important to have women in the
media addressing the things
that society has called flaws.”
T by Alexander Wang dress.
Jennifer Fisher earrings. Eva
Fehren ring. Into her beachy hair?
Try Garnier Fructis Beach Chic
Texturizing Spray ($4, at drugstores).
80 glamour.com
i
’m running late,” I text Ashley Graham. “I ripped my jeans
in the car and had to run upstairs to find something to
tie around my waist.” If I’m being honest, the “rip” was
more of a full-on, cheek-baring split. And in that moment,
bare-assed in the back of an Uber, I could not have been more
relieved to be on my way to this interview. Graham is a friend
from my former life as a model—and I’ll neither confirm nor
deny that she’s seen my goods before. “No wayyyyyyy,” she texts
back. “I’m cool, come whenever.” Eleven minutes later I arrive at
Ludlow House in Manhattan and bend over to prove my embarrassing claim, and she says, “Girl, that’s nothing!” I assure you it
was not nothing. But that’s part of the Ashley Graham charm:
making you feel like your self-consciousness is straight-up loco.
And that’s not the first time I’ve experienced it.
When I met Graham in 2012, I had just joined the plus-size
division of Ford Models and was reluctant to be categorized as
“bigger than normal.” But listening to her, the agency’s soon-to-be
supermodel, speak with conviction about herself and her achievements made our plus-size label feel irrelevant. Now, 17 years into
her career, the 29-year-old from Lincoln, Nebraska, has hit peak
fashion stardom—no qualifier necessary. She has landed the cover
of Vogue, walked in Michael Kors’ runway show, and shot advertising campaigns for H&M. Each time she has succeeded, she’s
made the 67 percent of American women who are above a size
14, myself included, more visible.
And she’s used her personal platform to help us feel confident in
our bodies, both by talking to us
(via her TED Talk, Lenny Letter
essay, and book, A New Model:
What Confidence, Beauty &
Power Really Look Like) and by
dressing us (with her lingerie,
swim, and dress collections). In
fact, for working to make women of all sizes feel valued, Glamour
named her a 2016 Woman of the Year—a look-alike Barbie, with
no thigh gap per her instructions, included with the trophy.
But one thing that we don’t talk about enough is how Graham
is expanding the definition of what we, as a culture, consider
sexy. How? By stepping out in sheer, short, skintight outfits. By
posting cellulite-baring bikini pictures on Instagram. By starring as the object of Joe Jonas’ lust in DNCE’s “Toothbrush”
music video. By landing the cover of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition. By being the face of this very Sex Issue. With each
move she’s helping the world see that non-sample-size bodies
aren’t just tolerable; they’re desirable. And the best part about
Graham’s sex-symbol status: It was women who put her there.
“When I met with Eva Chen from Instagram, she told me that 75
percent of my followers are women,” she says. “So if anyone wants
to call me a sex symbol, it’s women. We are redefining sexy.”
Back at Ludlow House we talk about all of this—her life as a
model, body activist, and sexual revolutionary. Oh, and I surprise
her with bedroom questions from you, Glamour readers, which
she answers with her signature candor. Listen in!
GLAMOUR: A record 27 plus-size models walked runways at New
York Fashion Week this season. Who—besides us—do you think
is positively affected by fashion’s growing size inclusion?
AG: Well, Michael [Kors] pulled me aside at his show and told me,
“We invite customers, and there was a mother who said to me,
‘Thank you for including size diversity.’ ” Her daughter is curvy,
and she got tears in her eyes when she saw herself represented.
That meant a lot to him because it’s really about the customers.
GLAMOUR: You’ve been on quite a journey with Michael. He first
put you in an off-the-rack dress for the 2016 CFDA Awards, and
then you walked his fall 2017 runway in a custom look. Behind the
scenes, are you educating the brands you work with?
AG: Of course. At the fitting for the show, there was a long fur
coat that he wanted to dress me in. But I was like, “Why don’t we
do the short fur? You’re going to want to show my body. You’re
going to want that press.” And he goes, “You’re right.” People listen because they know that I’ve been doing this for 17 years. They
want to know, “Would you wear this [in real life]?”
GLAMOUR: What’s it really like to get to a job like that and be the
only non-size-2 model? Does it ever feel like tokenism?
AG: I felt like a token in the beginning [of my career]. But now
there are so many curve models—and more opportunities. I feel
like a queen [on those jobs] because I’m the only one like me. I’m
like, “Yes, I’m the curve ruler!” [Laughs.] At the Kors show I was
the only one standing around naked in front of everyone.
GLAMOUR: That sounds like a bad dream to me…tell me about it.
AG: I ripped off my clothes, put on my Spanx, and was just hanging
out. Kendall [Jenner] was right behind me obsessing over the fur
I was wearing in the show. Joan
[Smalls] was saying, “I want your
look.” Then I put on my jersey
knit dress and walked.
G L AM O U R : Speaking of nakedness, you’ve told me before that
you wouldn’t ever show nipple or
bush, but in this year’s SI Swimsuit Edition, there was nipple.
What changed?
AG: You know, my thing is: If it’s
vulgar, and it’s, like, me grabbing
my breasts and showing nipple, I’m not going to do it. When I said,
“I don’t do nip and bush,” I didn’t feel like I had to be specific as
to what kind. So you might even see more nipple coming up. But
trust me: You will never see my vagina! [Laughs.]
G L AMOUR: Have you ever had any internal qualms about your
work in fashion and being traditionally Christian? About
appearing so sexualized and then—
AG: And then going to church on Sunday?
GLAMOUR: Yes. How do you keep it straight?
AG: It’s a gut intuition. I ask myself, “Is this right for me, my brand,
my career, and my relationship?” Doing the music video with Joe
Jonas—and making out with him—was something that I talked
to [my husband] Justin about before I went in. And he understood
I was playing a role. There are reasons to set boundaries for yourself, but there are also reasons to keep doors open. With that video
I wanted to let the world know that love comes in all sizes.
GLAMOUR: What’s it like to kiss another man when you’re married?
AG: It was a bit weird to go home after because I wanted to be like,
“Babe, guess what I did today?” And Justin was like, “Do I really
want to hear about you making out with another guy?”
GLAMOUR: I’m dying to know: Is Joe Jonas a good kisser?
AG: Yeah. He is. [Laughs.]
G L AMOUR: So how do you know your boundaries on set? I was
once pushed to pose naked, and I didn’t know how to say no, so
I did it.
“Sexy is being redefined
by women. We have
control over our bodies
and our voices.”
➻
glamour.com 81
82 glamour.com
ERVIN AND GRAHAM: COURTESY OF ASHLEY GRAHAM
AG: There was an incident on set of a camnot used to seeing a size 16 woman that way?
paign job when I was 17 years old—I haven’t
AG: Yeah. I don’t think there are a lot of curtold this story—and there was a photo assisvier celebrities dressing übersexy. People on
social media actually get pissed when I have
tant who was into me. He was like, “Hey,
my body covered. They’re like, “Why would
come here,” and he led me into a closet. And
you cover your beautiful curves?” And it’s
I was like, “What?” I thought he was going
like, “Maybe I felt like wearing a sack today!”
to show me something. And he pulled me in,
and he pulled his penis out. And he was like,
G L AM OU R: Well, since it’s our Sex Issue, I
“Grab it.” And I was like, “No! That’s dishave some personal questions from readgusting.” I freaked out. And thank God I was
ers. Taylor from Landenberg, Pennsylvania,
closer to the door, and I just bolted out.
who’s 26, asks, “What do I say to men who
say they don’t like condoms in the moment?”
GLAMOUR: I’m so sorry. Did you tell anyone
at the time?
AG: “Screw you.” And get out of bed. Unless
you’re married. Then it’s like, “Bring it on,
AG: No. And sure enough, I’ve seen him at
daddy.”
jobs since. I even knew a girl he dated. I
Throwback! Graham and her husband, GLAMOUR: [Laughs.] Caitlin from Minneapdidn’t tell her because there was a voice in
Justin Ervin, on their 2010 honeymoon
me that said, “Maybe he’s changed.” It was
olis, who’s 26, says, “Women are supposed to
my young mentality. But I told myself, ever
be beautiful, working women, good mothsince that incident, that I wasn’t going to allow someone at work
ers, but in the bedroom, vixens. How do I switch into that?”
to manipulate what I wanted to do on set. So any image that you
AG: It’s such B.S.! You don’t have to turn into a vixen. I’m a nerd in
see out there is one that I wanted to take.
bed. My hair looks crazy. My husband sometimes says I look a little
cross-eyed. [Laughs.] It’s really about being you.
GLAMOUR: One part in your book that surprised me was when you
were 10, an 18-year-old boy made you grab his erection while he
G L AMOUR: OK, this one hits home for me: Bray, from Portland,
was over at your parents’ house. Do you look back at those situaOregon, who’s 37, asks, “How do I maintain body confidence after
gaining weight? Especially when I’m seeing someone who’s fit.”
tions and fully register that they were sexual assault?
AG: Now I know that. At the time I didn’t. Then, it was like, “Did I
AG: It’s always difficult. As women gain weight, they start judging
do something to provoke that?” Or, “Did I give them a signal that it
themselves. But who cares! Embrace what you have. Say, “Belly,
was OK?” The insecure girl inside me was like, “Well, maybe I did
you might be poking out today, but I’m going to choose to love you
something.” To all those girls out there: No, you didn’t do anything.
and nurture you.” The more you talk to him about how you don’t
like yourself, the more you’re training him to not like you.
GLAMOUR: You talk a lot about sex and relationships in the book.
Why did you make the latter such a big focus?
G L AMOUR: Wallis, 37, from L.A., says, “Last time I was single, I
cared more about what men thought. Now I don’t, and I stopped
AG: Well, when you sit down with your girlfriends, what do you
getting Brazilians. Am I the only single woman with a bush?”
talk about? Dating. So to tell my story is to share my highs and
lows of dating, finding Justin, and abstaining from sex [with
AG : She sounds like my kind of lady. Honey, I have a full bush.
him] before marriage.
Period. It’s about your preference and your partner’s preference.
GLAMOUR: What was behind that decision?
GLAMOUR: Meghan, from Brooklyn, who’s 33, asks, “Is married sex
different? How does it change, and how can I keep it exciting?”
AG: There was a point in my life where I had dated a terrible guy.
Our whole relationship was based on sex. And I was letting him
AG: Married sex is a little different because it becomes very availdictate who I was by his behavior, drinking problem, and abuse.
able. You have to make it a little unavailable, so go on dates that
One night he chased me around the kitchen with a butcher knife,
are out of the norm. We’ll rent a crazy car and drive down the
and I ran into the bathroom and called my mom. I feared for my
Pacific Coast Highway and then, you know, have fun in the car.
life. I was like, “He’s going to slice my face open and I’m not going
GLAMOUR: [Laughs.] Isn’t that dangerous if you’re driving?
to have a career.” That was an eye-opening experience for me. So
AG: Park. [Laughs.]
with my next relationship, I didn’t want it to be based on sex.
GLAMOUR: Victoria, 38, from Chicago, says, “My husband became
too much of a gentleman in bed. And while I appreciate his sensiGLAMOUR: How did you know that Justin should be your husband?
tive side, I miss playing rough. How do I get him to go back to that?”
AG: He was different. He was consistent. He’s safe and a little nerdy.
But there’s nothing basic about him. He’s the adventurous one in
AG : Just tell him! Men are so easy. You feed them, you support
the relationship. If we’re in another country, he’s pushing me to go
them, and you have sex with them. That’s all.
hiking, and I’m like, “Can we lie in bed and order room service?”
G L AMOU R: So—last thing—I still owe you for suggesting that I
make a vision board a few years ago. What’s left to cross off on the
GLAMOUR: You and me both. [Laughs.] Do you have any rituals to
one you made yourself then?
keep your relationship on point?
AG: He tells me, “You’re the hardest-working woman I know.” And
AG: Only a few things—which are in the works. Isn’t that wild?
to hear it from your man is, like, a whole other thing. We don’t go to
But, you know, I’m a woman of faith. And I really believe that if I
bed mad at each other. We play the Nice Game—after a fight, when
say, “God, this is what I want,” He says, “I’ll give you your desires,
we’re done arguing but there’s still a weird energy, whoever says,
as long as they line up with My will.” And why wouldn’t it line up
“Let’s play the Nice Game,” the other person has to say something
with His will for me to let women know that they should love the
nice about them. Then [we go back and forth and] we remember
skin they’re in?
why we love each other. And we have a lot of sex. [Laughs.]
GLAMOUR: Amen.
GLAMOUR: It all goes back to sex. Why do you think people respond
to seeing you through a sexy lens? Do you think it’s because they’re
Lauren Chan is Glamour’s fashion features editor.
Pathfinder
“Being a girl who waited until
she was married to have sex
with her husband but who is
also a Sports Illustrated model
is confusing for people,” says
Graham. “But I set standards
for myself. And I want my
message to women to be
‘Do what is right for you.’ ”
Michael Kors Collection bralette
and skirt. Jennifer Fisher earrings.
See Glamour Shopper for more
information. Model: Ashley Graham
at IMG Models; hair: Shon at Julian
Watson Agency; makeup: Sir
John; manicure: Andrea Escorcia;
production: Select Services.
glamour.com 83
Life resolution: Getting
ready should be fun.
These four provocative
makeup ideas do it.
By Simone Kitchens
Photographs by Olivia Malone
Stylist: Henna Koskinen
Make It Glossy
Want to add depth to your lip
look? Do it in three steps:
First exfoliate lips, next add
a colored stain, then add a
sheer, reflective gloss like
Nars Lip Gloss in Misbehave
($26, narscosmetics.com).
Aesa earring.
84 glamour.com
Go for Gold
What’s sexy makeup? “You’ve
got to feel good in it,” says
model Amilna Estevao. “It’s
not too much or too little.”
To get this yellow-gold eye,
apply shadow (like Urban
Decay Moondust Eyeshadow
in Stargazer, $21, urban
decay.com) in a graphic
shape on top lids. Add
mascara but keep lips bare.
Area dress and gloves.
glamour.com 85
“This lash look seems daring,
but I was so comfortable in it,”
says Estevao. “I love anything
that plays up my eyes.” To get
this effect, coat lashes with
primer before applying two
coats of colored mascara. Try
NYX Color Mascara in Blue
($7, nyxcosmetics.com).
Balenciaga coat. Model: Amilna
Estevao at Society Management.
Hair: Dennis Gots at The Wall
Group; makeup: Karo Kangas at
Opus Beauty; manicure: Michelle
Saunders at Forward Artists;
production: Viewfinders.
86 glamour.com
SYREN GLOVES. SEE GLAMOUR SHOPPER FOR MORE INFORMATION
You Do Blue
Blush for Days
Give a classic flush a modern
update by applying cream
color all the way to temples,
says makeup artist Karo
Kangas, who created these
looks. Try Clinique Chubby
Stick Cheek Balm in Robust
Rhubarb ($23, clinique.com).
Issey Miyake stole (worn as dress).
Agmes earring. See Glamour
Shopper for more information.
glamour.com 87
“People should be less scared of sex.”
—Karley Sciortino, 31, @karleyslutever
Ten years ago, feeling that an honest conversation about female
sexuality was missing online, Karley Sciortino founded slutever
.com. “Pre-Instagram, depictions of female bodies were airbrushed pictures and idealistic sex in Hollywood movies,” she
remembers. “Now women are saying, ‘This is the way I actually
am.’ I admire women who are being overtly sexual on Instagram
88 glamour.com
because there’s an amazing reverence in posting slutty photos
of yourself in a way that’s self-aware. You can’t be slut-shamed
if you don’t care. My feed plays with provocative imagery, and
the image of me in animal print reminds me of something that
Samantha Jones [on Sex and the City] would wear—to this day
she’s my sex power icon.” —Alanna Lauren Greco
DELACROIX: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. SCIORTINO: PETER K A ADEN
How do you change the way the world looks at women and sex?
One selfie at a time. Meet six Instagrammers shattering the
norms—and redefining what sexual power looks like.
glamour.com 89
What really makes a sex-positive InstagramKD: You know how everybody was posting picmer tick? Lena Dunham sat down with Kiara
tures when they changed the Hollywood sign?
Delacroix (shown on previous page and at
In architecture, topography is the way that the
“I’ve created this sexual character with
right) to find out.
land behaves. So I was like, “My boobs are the
zero nudity,” says Kiara Delacroix.
topography for this sign.”
At first glance the Instagram of @eatingboys (the Insta-moniker
LD: They really are. For me, being naked on television—and being
of 26-year-old Kiara Dela croix, a name which itself is a pseudnaked in a way that I control—is really empowering. It’s allowed
me to reclaim my body. Do you feel empowered taking these
onym of sorts) appears to be a portal into the inner sanctum of an
images of yourself?
anime sex object. Colors are brighter, lips are wetter, and standard emotions—heartbreak, rage, jealousy—are translated into
KD: I do. Because, if you really look at my Instagram, I never show
witty, barbed captions. But at the center of this curated universe,
much skin, except for my cleavage—
where milky self-portraits commingle with screen grabs of The
LD: It’s so true. You also make faces that could imply you’re expeVirgin Suicides and empowered former porn performer Sasha
riencing sexual pleasure but could also imply something else. It’s
Grey, is Delacroix herself: thoughtful, thrillingly odd, with as
all about what people read into it.
much wit as she has porcelain cleavage and Bambi eyelashes.
KD: Yeah! That, to me, is the most amazing part: I’ve created this
She also has a flair for subverting her own image, with a selfie
sexual character with zero nudity. I identify a lot with Hollyof Catholic-school-inspired sexiness captioned “Patron Saint of
wood’s idea of artificial intelligence: Samantha in Her, Ava in Ex
‘please don’t let me be pregnant.’ ” To quote the kids, LOLOLOL.
Machina, and Lisa in Weird Science. Each was created for a male
I recently got dumplings and ginger ale with Delacroix, whom I’d
protagonist but inevitably became self-aware and evolved past
connected with over Instagram, to discuss the dualities of art,
the guys. At first my following was mostly boys, and I liked the
sexuality, and what men expect after they slide into her DMs.
LENA DUNHAM: Can you explain to the readers of Glamour how
your EatingBoys persona differs from who you are in real life?
KIAR A DE L ACRO IX: My Instagram is all those thoughts I can’t
express in real life to friends, and it’s where I show very submissive sides of myself. In my day job [something Delacroix doesn’t
reveal, but it’s not in the arts], I have to be direct, and pretend
to be more powerful than I am. I’m OK with not showing this
[softer] side of myself at work, because it wouldn’t help me progress in any way. On the Internet I can say, “Hey, I’m soft. Treat
me gently.”
LD: But there’s a trick in there: You’re showing your submissive
side, but you’re also in complete control of your image.
KD: Yes. I’m submissive, but only because I’m allowing you to
treat me submissively.
LD: Do you feel as though your Instagram community really
understands you? Because it’d be easy for someone to be like,
“Hot girl with big eyes and gorgeous boobs.”
KD: The message definitely flies over some people’s heads. Some
people are like, “Oh, this is just a slut Instagram. And I’m here to
see boobs.” But then someone commented, “Came for the boobs,
stayed for the weirdness.”
LD: That’s amazing. “Came for the boobs, stayed for the weirdness!”
I want that on a T-shirt. How do you make the images you post?
KD: I usually take the photos with my phone or my computer. I’ll
take, like, 10 and see which one looks best. My bedroom is like a
photo studio: I have a white wall, a gray wall, and a pink wall and
soft lights that I got on Amazon.
LD: You recently posted one where you’ve hiked up a “Hollywood”
T-shirt to reveal your bra. What was the thinking there?
90 glamour.com
“In my day job I have to
be direct. On the Internet
I can say, ‘Hey, I’m soft.
Treat me gently.’ ”
—Kiara Delacroix, @eatingboys
validation. But once I started posting introspective, sometimes
self-deprecating content, that’s when my popularity grew.
LD: Do you feel like the guys you date, especially ones you meet
online, expect you to be this wild and crazy sex lunatic?
KD: Actually, guys that I have met on the Internet usually say, “This
is exactly what I pictured. I knew you were gonna be a prude.”
LD: No way!
KD : They’re like, “I knew you were all talk.” First date, I’ll be
like, he’s expecting some version of me, so I have to play up the
EatingBoys part. But then, after we start dating, he’ll be like, “Is
this EatingBoys or is this Kiara talking?” It always becomes this
thing: “Calm down, EatingBoys. I want to talk to Kiara right now.”
LD: “Calm down, EatingBoys.” I think that’s the most perfect ending we could have imagined.
Lena Dunham is a writer, actress, and director living in New
York City.
KELLY: CHRISTIAN COPPOLA. DELACROIX: COURTESY OF SUBJECT
“I feel sexually powerful always.”
—Eileen Kelly, 21, @killerandasweetthang
“I lost my mom young, so I had to figure out puberty on my own,”
says Eileen Kelly, founder of the site killerandasweethang.com.
“That shifted to an interest in sex and sexual health. All my friends
would come to me with questions! I realized talking about that
stuff is what I love to do.” Now Kelly is on a mission to guide millennials and Gen Z navigating their sexuality in the digital age. “There
is so much misconstrued information out there,” she says. Her feed
clears it up, on subjects from vagina maintenance (don’t douche)
to abstinence-only sex ed (it’s ineffective). “In this image I’m not in
sexy lingerie; it’s a training bra I got when I was 15. But it’s something I’m comfortable in; knowing exactly what I want and am
comfortable with makes me feel sexually powerful.” —A.L.G.
glamour.com 91
“Sexual power is
valuing yourself enough
to say what you want.”
“Your sexuality and
your naked body are
not shameful.”
—Torraine Futurum, 21, @torraine
—Vex Ashley, 27, @vextape
Around three years ago model and artist Torraine Futurum, who
is trans, decided she wanted to “push beyond what is deemed
respectable” on social media. Now her feed is sprinkled with
provocative images—sometimes playfully censored with emoji. “I
get lots of enthusiastic comments,” she says. “I have insecurities
about my face and body, but the most recent person I dated made
me feel like the hottest girl. They helped me become more confident, and this portrait shows that. It’s my internal spirit: Black
Panther Barbie. It’s a mix of being hyperfeminine but also able to
bite someone’s head off if I need to.” —A.L.G.
Vex Ashley was an art school student and “camgirl” before founding, in 2013, Four Chambers, an independent creative porn
project whose films are as stylized and artistic as they are titillating. The same can be said of Ashley’s Instagram, where she posts
film stills and erotic selfies. “This image is me on set,” she says.
“I can put my sexuality on film in my own way, and it’s taught me
to be more confident and communicate better in bed. I’ve gotten good at asking for what I want. I hope that sharing my work
encourages more people to explore sex in a way that’s personal to
them.” —A.L.G.
92 glamour.com
FUTURUM: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. HAIR: SEAN BENNETT; MAKEUP: SLATER STANLEY. ASHLEY: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. BOODRAM: COURTESY OF SUBJECT; ARTWORK: RAY PATRICK @RAYRAYISHAPPY
“I like to fashion myself as the Walmart
greeter of sex ed.”
—Shannon Boodram, 31, @shanboody
When Shannon Boodram, a sexologist, author, and YouTuber,
started out, “my mom said boys were going to masturbate to my
work,” she says. “Now she’s my biggest supporter.” And about this
picture? The matching necklaces are actually vibrators. “My partner and I wear them to say, ‘I’m not ashamed of what makes me
feel good.’ It works for us, and I always try to represent myself in
an accessible way, but you shouldn’t look at somebody else as a
sexual-empowerment role model. Instead, it should be: ‘That’s
cool, they figured out what works for them, now I feel empowered
to see what works for me.’ It’s not all going to be the same.” —A.L.G.
glamour.com 93
Model, newlywed, and
now intersex hero: Meet
Hanne Gaby Odiele.
By Abigail Tarttelin
Photographs by Billy Kidd
Fashion editor: Jillian Davison
Support System
Hanne Gaby Odiele, 29,
and her husband, John
Swiatek, 29, lean
on each other. “[John]
has known from the
beginning [that I am
intersex],” says Odiele.
“He really encouraged
me in this coming out.”
Calvin Klein 209W39NYC
pants. Twine & Twig
necklace, $85, bracelet,
$40. Melet Mercantile
necklace. Prada necklace,
$480. Avocet Jewelry
scarab ring, $140. Aoko
Su rings, $125, $150. On
Swiatek: Calvin Klein
209W39NYC pants, shirt.
Twine & Twig necklace, $85.
94 glamour.com
Fashion in Motion
Nail Odiele’s signature
mash-up by pairing
sleek, modern
silhouettes with
vintage accessories.
Balenciaga dress, boa.
The 2 Bandits earrings, $48.
Lost Art necklace, $300.
Melet Mercantile necklace.
Twine & Twig necklace,
$125, bracelet, $40. Regime
NY bracelet, $170. What
Goes Around Comes
Around bag, $650. Chloé
sandals, $835.
glamour.com 95
#Throwback
Get in on fall’s seventies
resurgence with earthtone corduroys and
old-school sandals.
Prada bra, pants, $980,
hat, necklace, $480, belt.
The 2 Bandits earrings, $48.
Melet Mercantile necklace.
Twine & Twig necklace, $85,
bracelet, $40. Chan Luu
shell bracelet, $80. Aoko Su
ring, $150. Dion Lee sandals,
$995. On Swiatek: Prada
blazer, pants, $980, scarf,
$690. Melet Mercantile
necklace. Twine & Twig bead
bracelet, $40. Chan Luu
bracelet, $70. Tory Burch
belt, $258. Teva sandals, $50.
f
or years intersex activism didn’t have a face. In 2013, when my
novel Golden Boy, about a sweet teenager, Max, who is struggling
to hide his intersexuality from his friends and love interest, came
out, public knowledge of the condition was embryonic, even
though it affects up to 1.7 percent of the population. (That means
it’s as common as being a redhead.)
Intersex readers wrote to me saying how much it meant to see
a protagonist who was like them. I emailed back and forth with
these kids; most had been suicidal. But they felt less alone just
knowing there was a fictional character out there who understood what they were going through. Still, it was fiction: Intersex
remained largely invisible on the real-world stage. Young people
were scared of coming out; there was no one for them to gather
behind, no wider community for them to be a part of.
Then, in January, the well-known Belgian model Hanne Gaby
Odiele, 29, revealed she is intersex in an interview with USA Today
and announced a partnership with InterACT, an advocacy group,
taking aim at the genital surgeries performed on intersex children to make them appear either male or female. I knew from my
research that these surgeries often result in infertility, additional
surgery, hormone therapy, and loss of sexual pleasure. They are
performed on children, sometimes shortly after birth, and parents
are put under extreme pressure to consent to them, to give their
child a “normal” life. In 2015 the U.N. deemed such nonconsensual
genital surgeries a human rights violation.
Overnight after Odiele shared her story, intersex had a new
face, a new “Max,” but this time she was a real person, and she was
96 glamour.com
speaking out for them. I remember thinking how chill and happy
she seemed in a video for InterACT. I am a big believer in constructive activism—not raging against the machine but, with positivity
and cooperation, building a new one. Odiele wasn’t angry; she
wasn’t self-shaming. She talked about intersex in a way that was
just another kind of “normal,” and in doing so she’s helping others
come forward. I caught up with her to see how her life has changed.
G L AM O U R : First, let’s tackle something: People often confuse
intersex with trans.
HANNE GABY ODIELE: Intersex is about sex characteristics [such as
genitalia], whereas trans is more about gender [identity]. You can
be both! I don’t want to speak about differences, though. At the end
of the day, we all want to be ourselves and to be loved.
GLAMOUR: Beautifully put. And when did you first start to know
you were different?
H G O : Doctors discovered pretty early on that I was intersex,
but I only learned when I was 17. I was reading an article in a
teen magazine about a girl who’d had surgeries, couldn’t have a
period, and I thought, Hmm, that sounds a lot like me. I actually
showed it to my doctor, who confirmed it for me: That’s what you
are. But I always kind of knew too—other kids didn’t have to go to
the doctor and pull their pants down.
GLAMOUR: And how did your parents talk to you about that?
HGO: They never really got the whole story. The doctors were just
like, “Oh, we’re just going to have a surgery, she’s going to have
to take medicines, then it’s going to be OK.” They never really
explained the whole concept [to my parents]. This was
➻
Pair Down
This season’s patchwork is less folksy
and more graphic—
and it’s the perfect
complement to
jeans and sneakers.
Melet Mercantile vest.
Prada hat. On Swiatek:
Prada sweater. Lost Art
necklace, $150. Twine &
Twig necklace, $85. Into her
kohl-rimmed eyes? Try
CoverGirl Liquiline Blast
Eyeliner ($8, at drugstores).
glamour.com 97
Self-Love
“I hope I can share my
story and [create]
change,” says Odiele
of being intersex.
“[Speaking out] has
made me stronger and
happier than ever.”
St. Roche cardigan, $444.
Etro bralette, $355. Gucci
pants. Prada scarf, $690. Lost
Art necklace, $300. Melet
Mercantile necklace. Twine &
Twig necklace, $125. For her
easy texture, try Tresemmé
Fresh Start Volumizing Dry
Shampoo ($5, at drugstores).
98 glamour.com
Share Wear
Stealing your partner’s
style à la Odiele? Tuck a
menswear-inspired shirt into
high-waisted pants and
unbutton as low as you like.
Maison Margiela shirt, shorts.
Stella McCartney hooded scarf,
$545. The 2 Bandits earrings,
$48. Melet Mercantile necklace.
Twine & Twig necklace, $85,
bracelet, $40. Prada necklace,
$480. Chan Luu shell bracelet,
$70. Aoko Su ring, $150. On
Swiatek: Stella McCartney
cardigan. Twine & Twig necklace,
$85. See Glamour Shopper for
more information. Models: Hanne
Gaby Odiele and John Swiatek,
both at Women Management; hair:
Bok-Hee at Streeters; makeup:
Kristi Matamoros at Frank Reps;
manicures: Rica Romain at
LMC Worldwide; production:
Wei-Li Wang.
the nineties; it was like, whatever the specialist said, that’s what
you’re going to do…. When I found out the full truth, it was a relief.
Because I’m intersex, sometimes a doctor would say, “Don’t tell anyone.” So you feel a lot of shame, and you feel very alone. From 17 on,
I was able to meet other people like me, and things got a lot better.
GLAMOUR: Did you have to have hormone therapy? And how does
that affect you?
HGO: Yes, because of the surgeries. I [was born with] androgen
insensitivity syndrome, which means I’m XY chromosome like
typical boys but with internal undescended testes; my body looks
female. Surgery removed the testes, [but that impacts your] hormones, which affect your mood, your development, your bones.
You need hormones, so since age nine I’ve basically been on birth
control. For someone who can’t have babies, it’s ironic!
GLAMOUR: Was there an exact moment you felt ready to go public?
Were you nervous at all? You seemed really cool and calm!
HGO: I’d just gotten married last year, and then I was reading some
stuff online that kids were still going through surgery. That’s just
wrong. We’ve ignored this long enough—it’s time that we can talk
about this. It’s 2017, why not?
GLAMOUR: There’s been a big wave of activism about being more
accepting of people’s sexual identity. Do you think it would have
been possible for you to go public even five years ago?
HGO: Personally, I wasn’t there. I was working so much; I was not
in the mental space either. It was something that I always wanted
to do, but I didn’t want to be overwhelmed. Like, right now I have
more—time, everything. I’ve been very lucky. Without my friends,
my family, my husband, and their support, I would have not been
able to come forward. I was just ready, personally ready.
GLAMOUR: How has your relationship with your husband helped
you get to this point?
HGO: He’s a great support for me. He really encouraged me in this
coming out. We’ve been together eight years, and he’s known from
pretty much the beginning. For him it’s never been an issue. Also,
he’s adopted, and the only point I was struggling with a bit was that
I can’t naturally have babies. He was like, “We can adopt! I’ve been
adopted; I had a great childhood. Maybe one day we can do that.”
G L AMOU R: You’ve been working with InterACT. Have intersex
teenagers written to you about your activism?
HGO: Many, many, many. I also know parents who just found out
their child is intersex. They were considering surgery, and now
they’re like, “Oh, we’ll wait.” That’s one of the best reactions.
GLAMOUR: And what do you hope for the future for intersex people?
HGO: I want to end the irreversible surgeries on kids who don’t
know what’s going on. I don’t want kids to go through the same
thing that happened to me. Every day these surgeries still happen. I think by being able to talk freely and openly, more and more
intersex people can have their own identity and won’t have to hide
their struggles. Being intersex is actually really wonderful. I feel
very happy. Sharing my story has made me stronger. Right now I’m
stronger than ever.
Abigail Tarttelin is the author of the Alex Award–winning novel
Golden Boy. She lives in London.
glamour.com 99
Well caption here tktk hed
here tktk tktk
Tkphoto caption Haritasp
edipsa am, escienduntem re
nonsed utatia aliasped quuntur,
The Backstory
100 glamour.com
The images on this page
were taken in 1937 and 1938 in
Australia by John A.S. Coutts
(who went by the name John
Willie); for more, check out
Possibilities: The Photographs
of John Willie, available at
belierpress.com.
Mood Dressing
“Wardrobe is a huge part of
feeling like the character,”
Qualley, 22, says. “Stepping
into somebody else’s shoes
changes the way you feel.”
Altuzarra dress, gloves. Echo scarf,
$39. Schutz boots, $450. Gabriela
Artigas & Company necklace, $420.
Pinup girl? Please! Actress Margaret
Qualley takes 1930s-inspired images and
puts her own modern twist on them.
Photographs by Robbie Fimmano Fashion editor: Jillian Davison
glamour.com 101
Where She’s Coming From
“My style is pretty simple,”
Qualley says. “I wear jeans and
T-shirts. I love a backpack,
because you can fit lots of
things in it, like books—and
dental floss. I’m an avid
flosser.” We love this girl.
Isabel Marant leather top, blouse,
$665, skirt, $790. Sherry
Accessories belt, $150. Echo scarf,
$39. Robert Lee Morris Soho
bracelet, $68. Robert Clergerie
boots. Altuzarra bag (on car).
102 glamour.com
Who Runs the World?
On her upcoming drama
Novitiate: “It was a female writer,
a female DP, a female director,
and an almost entirely female
cast,” Qualley says. “I feel really
lucky that it happened, because
it’s not so common.”
Valentino top, $470. & Other Stories
blouse, $115. A.P.C. skirt, $310.
Rockins scarf, $195. Robert Lee
Morris Soho link bracelet, $68. Camilla
Dietz Bergeron charm bracelet.
Chloé bag. Louis Vuitton boots.
glamour.com 103
Does She Contradict Herself? Very Well Then
In some ways Margaret Qualley, a classically trained ballerina and the youngest daughter of Andie MacDowell and
model Paul Qualley, was destined for Novitiate, the Sundancewinning drama about a young nun struggling to stay pure in a
strict 1950s convent. More than halfway through the film, the
internal conf lict manifests itself physically: Qualley, dressed
in a nightgown, looks on in fear as her spiderlike fingers twitch
with desire for another sister. “I think there is a common thread
between ballet and [devout] Catholicism,” she says, “this sense
of wanting to be perfect.” Born on a ranch in Montana and
104 glamour.com
raised as a debutante in North Carolina, Qualley, now 22, was
a model before making her career playing conf licted women
(see also: HBO’s The Leftovers and next month’s Netflix thriller
Death Note). But despite her affinity for dark material, she
doesn’t take herself too seriously. “With fashion events and acting and stuff, I think sometimes people forget that it’s supposed
to be fun,” she says. “I think it’s good to allow yourself to goof
off.” —Justine Harman
Loewe blouse, skirt. KatarinaHats beret, $20. Ben-Amun by Isaac
Manevitz bracelet, $345. Echo scarf, $39. Casadei boots, $995. Like her
rosy lip? Try Clarins Rouge Eclat in Woodrose ($29, clarins.com).
glamour.com 105
Nobody’s Object
“I don’t think I was fully in
[pinup] character,” Qualley
says, “but I did have fun
playing with the animals.”
Jed sweater, $795. Erdem blouse.
Karl Lagerfeld Paris skirt, $100.
Bracelets, from top: Stephen
Russell, Camilla Dietz Bergeron.
Echo scarf, $39. Diane von
Furstenberg bag, $468. Sam
Edelman boots, $200. For her
boosted pony, try Nexxus Maxximum
Finishing Spray ($13, at drugstores).
106 glamour.com
The Margaret Method
To get inside the head
of her Novitiate character,
Qualley avoided human
contact throughout the sixweek filming. “I’m a very
touchy-feely person,” she
says. “Doing that was
something to reckon with.”
Balenciaga dress, boots. Rockins
scarf, $110. Gabriela Artigas &
Company necklace, $420. Gaspar
Gloves gloves, $235. See Glamour
Shopper for more information.
Hair: Ben Skervin, makeup and
manicure: Justine Purdue, both at
Streeters; prop stylist: Holli
Featherstone at Mary Howard
Studio; production: Mary-Clancey
Pace at Hen’s Tooth Productions.
glamour.com 107
Glamour / Shopper
The Get-It
Guide
All the info you need to buy the
stuff you love in this month’s issue
Cover
Victoria Beckham dress,
$2,470, sizes 1–3, victoria
beckham.com. La Blanca
bikini top, $75, sizes
34D–38DD, everything
butwater.com. Lana
Jewelry hoops, $430,
lanajewelry.com.
Table of Contents
Page 5: L*Space onepiece, $169, sizes 4–12,
lspace.com.
Glamour Fashion
Page 21: From left: AlexaChung T-shirt, $115, jeans,
$295, neimanmarcus.com.
Superga sneakers (on
both), $65, superga-usa
.com. AlexaChung dress,
$685, neimanmarcus
.com. Page 22: From left:
AlexaChung shirt, $460,
jeans, $320, platforms,
$550, bergdorfgoodman
.com. AlexaChung skirt,
$260, openingceremony
.com; shirt, $260, jacket
(on hanger), $875, net-a
-porter.com.
The Accessory Edit
Page 34: Louis Vuitton
bag, $4,000, louisvuitton
.com. Julianna Rae top,
$192, juliannarae.com.
Gap jeans, $80, gap.com.
Queen of Everything
Page 77: Malia Mills bikini
top, $240, sizes 32D–
38DD, bottom, $170, sizes
2–16, maliamills.com. Page
78: InHouseAtelier top,
$650, inhouseatelier.com.
Balmain skirt, $2,080,
French sizes 34–42,
balmain.com. Jennifer
Fisher earrings, $155,
jenniferfisherjewelry.com.
Page 79: Lana Jewelry
hoops, $430, lanajewelry
.com. Page 80: T by Alex-
ander Wang dress, $145,
sizes XS–L, alexander
wang.com. Jennifer Fisher
earrings, $155, jennifer
fisherjewelry.com. Eva
Fehren ring, $2,145, Barneys New York. Page 83:
Michael Kors Collection
bralette, $395, sizes XS–
XL, skirt, $695, sizes
XS–XL, select Michael
Kors stores. Jennifer
Fisher earrings, $155,
jenniferfisherjewelry.com.
All Night Long
Page 84: Aesa earring,
$375 for pair, aesajewelry
.com. Page 85: Area
dress, $950, area.nyc.
Page 86: Balenciaga coat,
$2,550, Balenciaga, NYC.
Syren gloves, $27, syren
.com. Page 87: Issey Miyake stole (worn as dress),
$890, tribecaisseymiyake
.com. Agmes earring,
$380, agmesnyc.com.
Modern Love
Page 94: Calvin Klein
209W39NYC pants,
$2,495, calvinklein.com.
Twine & Twig necklace,
$85, beaded bracelet,
$40, twineandtwigstyle
.com. Melet Mercantile
necklace, similar styles at
Melet Mercantile, NYC.
Prada necklace, $480,
select Prada stores. Avocet Jewelry scarab ring,
$140, avocetjewelry.com.
Aoko Su rings, $125, $150,
aokosu.com. Calvin Klein
209W39NYC pants,
$2,495, shirt, $2,495,
calvinklein.com. Twine &
Twig necklace, $85, twine
andtwigstyle.com. Page
95: Balenciaga dress,
$1,995, Balenciaga, NYC;
boa, $495, balenciaga
.com. The 2 Bandits ear-
rings, $48, the2bandits
$690, select Prada stores.
.com. Lost Art crystal
Lost Art necklace, $300,
necklace, $300, lostart
lostart.com. Melet Mer.com. Melet Mercantile
cantile necklace, similar
necklace, similar styles at
styles at Melet Mercantile,
Melet Mercantile, NYC.
NYC. Twine & Twig neckTwine & Twig necklace,
lace, $125, twineandtwig
$125, bracelet, $40, twine
style.com. Page 99: Maiandtwigstyle.com. Regime
son Margiela shirt, shorts,
NY bracelet, $170, regime
select Maison Margiela
ny.com. What Goes
stores. Stella McCartney
Around Comes Around
hooded scarf, $545,
bag, $650, whatgoes
select Nordstrom. The 2
aroundnyc.com. Chloé
Bandits earrings, $48,
sandals, $835, select Neithe2bandits.com. Melet
man Marcus. Page 96:
Mercantile necklace, simiPrada bra, pants, $980,
lar styles at Melet Merhat, $1,200, necklace,
cantile, NYC. Twine & Twig
$480, belt, $1,050, select
necklace, $85, beaded
Prada stores. The 2 Banbracelet, $40, twineand
dits earrings, $48, the2
twigstyle.com. Prada
bandits.com. Melet Mernecklace, $480, select
cantile necklace, similar
Prada stores. Chan Luu
styles at Melet Mercantile,
shell bracelet, $70, chan
NYC. Twine & Twig neckluu.com. Aoko Su ring,
lace, $85, bracelet, $40,
$150, aokosu.com. Stella
twineandtwigstyle.com.
McCartney cardigan,
Chan Luu shell bracelet,
$1,295, stellamccartney
$70, chanluu.com. Aoko
.com. Twine & Twig neckSu ring, $150, aokosu
lace, $85, twineandtwig
.com. Dion Lee sandals,
style.com.
$995, dionlee.com.
Prada blazer,
Give ’Em
the Boot
$2,980, scarf,
Page 101:
$690, select
?
Altuzarra
Prada stores.
dress,
Melet MerHave trouble finding
$2,495,
cantile necksomething? Email us at
select Saks
lace, similar
personalshopper
Fifth Avestyles at
@glamour.com.
nue stores;
Melet Mercangloves, altu
tile, NYC. Twine
zarra.com. Gabri& Twig beaded
ela Artigas & Company
bracelet, $40, twineand
necklace, $420, gabriela
twigstyle.com. Chan Luu
artigas.com. Echo scarf,
bracelet, $70, chanluu
$39, echodesign.com.
.com. Tory Burch belt,
Schutz boots, $450,
$258, toryburch.com.
schutz-shoes.com. Page
Teva sandals, $50, teva
102: Isabel Marant leather
.com. Page 97: Melet Mertop, $1,085, blouse, $665,
cantile vest, similar styles
skirt, $790, Isabel Marant,
at Melet Mercantile, NYC.
NYC, L.A., San Francisco.
Prada hat, $1,200, select
Sherry Accessories belt,
Prada stores. On him: Pra$150, Sherrya12@aol.com
da sweater, $2,270, select
to special order. Echo
Prada stores. Lost Art
scarf, $39, echodesign
necklace, $150, lostart
.com. Robert Lee Morris
.com. Twine & Twig neckSoho bracelet, $68, robert
lace, $85, twineandtwigleemorris.com. Robert
style.com. Page 98: St.
Clergerie boots, $1,750,
Roche cardigan, $444,
robertclergerie.com.
st-roche.com. Etro
Altuzarra bag, $1,295,
bralette, $355, etro.com.
altuzarra.com. Page 103:
Gucci pants, $1,600,
Valentino top, $470, Valengucci.com. Prada scarf,
tino stores. & Other Stories
blouse, $115, & Other Stories, NYC. A.P.C. skirt, $310,
A.P.C., NYC. Rockins scarf,
$195, rockins.co.uk. Robert Lee Morris Soho link
bracelet $68, robertlee
morris.com. Camilla Dietz
Bergeron charm bracelet,
$3,250, Camilla Dietz
Bergeron, NYC. Chloé bag,
$1,190, similar styles at
Chloé stores. Louis Vuitton
boots, select Louis Vuitton
stores. Pages 104–105:
Loewe blouse, $1,150, skirt,
$2,350, Bergdorf Goodman, NYC. KatarinaHats
beret, $20, katarinahats
.com. Ben-Amun by Isaac
Manevitz bracelet, $345,
ben-amun.com. Echo
scarf, $39, echodesign
.com. Casadei boots,
$995, casadei.com. Page
106: Jed sweater, $795,
jedgroup.com. Erdem
blouse, $1,090, select
Saks Fifth Avenue stores.
Karl Lagerfeld Paris skirt,
$100, lordandtaylor.com.
Bracelets, from top:
Stephen Russell bracelet,
stephenrussell.com.
Camilla Dietz Bergeron
bracelet, $3,950, Camilla
Dietz Bergeron, NYC. Echo
scarf, $39, echodesign
.com. Diane von Furstenberg bag, $468, dvf.com.
Sam Edelman boots, $200,
samedelman.com. Page
107: Balenciaga dress,
$2,050, Balenciaga, NYC;
boots, $1,575, similar style
at Balenciaga, NYC. Gabriela Artigas & Company
necklace, $420, gabriela
artigas.com. Rockins scarf,
$110, rockins.co.uk. Gaspar Gloves gloves, $235,
gaspargloves.com.
Dos & Don’ts
Page 110: Garrett Leight
California Optical red sunglasses, $365, garrett
leight.com. Lensabl yellow
sunglasses, $77, lensabl
.com. Selima Optique blue
sunglasses, $250, selima
optique.com.
All prices are approximate.
GLAMOUR IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2017 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 115, NO. 7. GLAMOUR (ISSN 0017-0747) is published monthly by Condé Nast, which
is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President & Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner,
Chief Financial Officer; James M. Norton, Chief Business Officer, President of Revenue, Condé Nast. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian
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printed on most recent label. Subscribers: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the
magazine becomes undeliverable or you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address all
editorial, business, and production correspondence to GLAMOUR Magazine, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. For reprints, please contact reprints@condenast.com or 717-505-9701 ext. 101. For re-use permissions, please contact
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GLAMOUR IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RETURN OR LOSS OF, OR FOR DAMAGE OR ANY OTHER INJURY TO, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, UNSOLICITED ARTWORK (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DRAWINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND TRANSPARENCIES), OR
ANY OTHER UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. THOSE SUBMITTING MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ARTWORK, OR OTHER MATERIALS FOR CONSIDERATION SHOULD NOT SEND ORIGINALS UNLESS SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY GLAMOUR IN WRITING.
MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED, STAMPED ENVELOPE.
108 glamour.com
By Kimberly Bonnell & Pamela Redmond Satran
The Glamour List
12 Sex Things We Still
Don’t Understand
Why
that intense
sex dream
starring your dry
cleaner
happened.
Why selling sex
toys is banned in
Alabama. (But
guns? A-OK.)
Why sex
can feel like a
thrill ride with
one person and
jury duty with
another.
Why dudes are
born with penis
pride, but pussy
pride is still a work
in progress.
Who
discovered
oral sex? And
how can we
possibly thank
them?
Why anyone
would have sex
with a blow-up
doll, ever.
Who
decided
everybody
has to have
anal???
How you can
conceive a baby
without fireworks—
or at least warning
flares—going off.
What to
say when the
sex. Just.
Sucked.
DOG: TOD K APKE/STOCKSY
Why
you can get
seriously hot
watching some porn
thing that would
require Cirque du
Soleil training in
real life.
How rare
(yet perfect!)
laughing
during sex is.
What
your dog’s
thinking over
there,
watching.
glamour.com 109
Nice to
See You
Sunglasses were once a barrier between the
wearer and the world. These days, women
like Bella Hadid (above, in red) and
Nicki Minaj (left, in violet) are using
eyewear to show off their mood.
Blackout shades, take a seat.
110 glamour.com
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: JACOPO RAULE/GC IMAGES. MICHAEL IP/RUNWAY MANHATTAN. WAYNE TIPPETTS/BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM. BG001/BAUER-GRIFFIN/GC IMAGES. ZACH CHASE/RUNWAY MANHATTAN. VINCENZO GRILLO/IMAXTREE
.COM. MICHAEL IP/RUNWAY MANHATTAN. ALO CEBALLOS/GC IMAGES. BRAD BARKET/GETTY IMAGES. SWAN GALLET/WWD/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK. CHRISTIAN VIERIG/GETTY IMAGES. THEURBANSPOTTER/BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM.
SUNGLASSES: TIM HOUT; STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS. SUNGLASSES, FROM TOP: GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL. LENSABL. SELIMA OPTIQUE. SEE GLAMOUR SHOPPER FOR MORE INFORMATION
Glamour Dos & Don’ts
®
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