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GlutenFree Living JulyAugust 2017

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27+ RECIPES INSIDE | ROCKING THE RAW DIET
AL
LY
RAW: Spicy
Noodle Bowl
with Beet, Carrot,
Zucchini + Sweet
Tamarind Sauce
page 45
CELIAC AND YOUR SKIN
Dealing With Dermatitis Herpetiformis
G!
YO
U
UIDE TO LI
V
RG
G
IN
FAB FINDS
For Your
Beach Cooler
EAR LON
eating cake again.
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Number 4/2017
EDITORIAL
DIETETIC ADVISORY BOARD
Ann Whelan
PAMELA CURETON, RD
Center for Celiac Research, Massachusetts
Hospital for Children á Boston, MA
FOUNDER
Joan Edgett
EDITOR
Julia Aparicio
FOOD EDITOR
Van Waffle
RESEARCH EDITOR
Anna Sonnenberg
TRAVEL EDITOR
Toni Fitzgerald
COPY EDITOR
Jennifer Harris
NEWS EDITOR
NANCY PATIN FALINI, MA, RD
Consulting Dietitian á West Chester, PA
AMY JONES, RD
Chair, Dietitians in Gluten Intolerance Group,
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
CYNTHIA KUPPER, CRD
Executive Director, Gluten Intolerance Group
Seattle,WA
MARY KAY SHARRETT, MS, RD
Clinical Dietitian Specialist áColumbus, OH
ADVERTISING
Stuart Crystal
VP, MEDIA SOLUTIONS
Miene Smith
CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS
MEDIA SOLUTIONS MANAGER
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DIRECTOR, SALES & MARKETING
Briana Balboni
New for 2017
GLUTEN FREE ORGANIC WAFFLE FLAVORS AND
GLUTEN FREE ORGANIC STRAWBERRY ENERGY CHEWS
For our full line of gluten free products,
Check out HONEYSTINGER.COM
Quickly detect
gluten down to
10 ppm in food
samples
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Carolyn V. Marsden
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GRAPHIC DESIGNER
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER
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SVP, SALES & MARKETING
SVP, CONTENT
Jason Pomerantz
PETER H.R. GREEN, MD
Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University
New York, NY
DIRECTOR, CUSTOM CONTENT
IVOR DENNIS HILL, MD
Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Winston-Salem, NC
Courtney Whitaker
KAROLY HORVATH, MD, PHD
Center for Pediatric Digestive Health and
Nutrition, Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children
Orlando, Fla
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, OPERATIONS
CYNTHIA RUDERT, MD
Medical Advisor, Celiac Disease Foundation and
Gluten Intolerance Group of North America;
Medical Director of GIG Atlanta á Atlanta. GA
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
Susan Fitzgerald
ALESSIO FASANO, MD
Center for Celiac Research, Massachusetts Hospital
for Children á Boston, MA
MICHELLE MARIA PIETZAK, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles áLos Angeles, CA
2
CHAIRMAN & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
Cheryl Rosenfeld
JOSEPH MURRAY, MD
Celiac Disease Research Program and Clinic,
Mayo Clinic á Rochester, MN
FAST, SENSITIVE, EASY TO USE
Jeffrey C. Wolk
MEDICAL ADVISORY BOARD
SYLVIA HSU, MD
Baylor College of Medicine á Houston,TX
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EXECUTIVE
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gluten-Free Living, P.O Box 8507, Big Sandy, TX 75755-8507. Subscribers
allow 4-6 weeks for change of address to become effective.
Subscriptions ordered are noncancelable and nonrefundable unless otherwise promoted. Return postage must
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Gluten-Free Living is not intended to provide medical
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VP, STRATEGY
Lee Mergner
OPERATIONS
VP, BUSINESS OPERATIONS
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JUL / AUG 2017
MainMenu
RECIPES
F E AT U R E S
DE PAR TME NT S
4
6
EDITOR’S NOTE
MIX IT UP
News, tips, advice and more
14
36
40
YOUR FIRST GF SUMMER
25
GLUTEN-FREE TABLE
4 tips for surviving the season
without sacrificing fun
26
GF GOES VEGETARIAN
Alice M. Ojeda explains the raw
diet and how to incorporate it
30
COOKBOOK CORNER
32
MAGNIFICENT MACARONS
CELIAC AND YOUR SKIN
38
CHEAP & CHEERFUL
20
NOT JUST GLUTEN FREE!
60
STUDY SESSIONS
Mild virus guilty, c-section
not guilty in celiac
KIDS' KITCHEN
Ombre frozen yogurt popsicles
Dermatitis herpetiformis is the
first symptom for some people
56
GLUTEN-FREE TRAVEL
Your guide to food and
fun in Seattle
Raw-some recipes
48
FAMILY MATTERS
Tips for summertime
day trips
Scrumptious summer spread
A Mediterranean menu to
savor at home
Three fabulous macaron recipes
for your summer soirée
54
16
MAKE IT IN MINUTES
OFFICE HOURS
Safeguards for preventing
cross-contamination
Keep cool with these refreshers
RAW VEGAN DIET 101
Gluten-free recipes from two
raw cookbooks
50
12
62
NEW FOR YOU
Beach drinks for adults,
snacks for everyone
BACKPACK ADVENTURE
64
Use these tricks to conquer an
extended backpacking trip
COOKING CLASS
Baking a summer fruit tart
64
56
Cover photo by Emily von Euw. Recipe featured on page 45.
26
glutenfreeliving.com
twitter: @gfliving
facebook.com/gflivingmag
pinterest.com/gflivingmag
´
NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS
Nutritional analysis for recipes is created using
Food Processor SQL nutrition and fitness software
by ESHA. Recipes are analyzed per serving (unless
otherwise indicated) for calories, fat, cholesterol,
sodium, carbohydrates, fiber and protein. Nutrient
amounts are approximate due to variations in
brands, manufacturer, preparation and ingredient
substitutions. When ingredient choices are listed,
we use the first one. Nonspecific amounts, for
example “to taste,” and garnishes are not included.
www.glutenfreeliving.com 3
Editor's Note
(IEV6IEHIVW
After slogging through a wet, dreary spring here in the northeast,
I'm still finding it hard to believe that I don't have to put on any
waterproof gear to go outside. Welcome, summer! If you're new
to the gluten-free diet, don't be intimidated into staying secluded.
There is no reason to avoid seasonal events like cookouts and
bonfires. Our four tips to surviving your first gluten-free summer
will help you not only survive, but truly enjoy yourself—and your
food (page 14)! And even if you're an old pro at living gluten free,
Family Matters provides helpful packing pointers for summer day
trips and overnight camps for kids (page 16).
For anyone tempted to take a late summer holiday, Anna Sonnenberg shows you around Seattle, a fun and funky city chock
full of gluten-free goodies (page 20). Don't let the Emerald City's
reputation for clouds keep you from this gem—July and August
are its sunniest months. But if you're more the “roughing it” type,
Danielle Miller has got you covered with her guide to conquering
a gluten-free backpacking excursion (page 56). No matter your
style, the gluten-free diet does not have to hold you back, so get
out there and have an adventure!
If the thought of planning and packing for a trip sounds more
like work than play, why not stay home and host a summertime
soirée. When Angela and Anna Sackett held their own gluten-free
get-together, they featured three delectable varieties of macarons.
If you have ever wanted to try your hand at baking these classic
confections, the recipes provided by the Sackett ladies will surely
satisfy your sweet tooth (page 50).
We all know that it's especially important to take care of your
skin during the intense sunshine of summer, but did you know
celiac symptoms manifest on the skin for some? Known as dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), this condition presents as intensely
itchy bumps and blisters. Susan Cohen spoke with experts on the
subject to help clarify the relationship between DH and celiac and
find out how people finally find relief (page 54).
Now, be honest—did you wrinkle your nose or roll your eyes
the first time you heard someone mention the raw diet? Then our
current Not Just Gluten Free section is for you! I learned a few
things myself, thanks to Frieda Wiley's interview with Alice M.
Ojeda of the Living Light Culinary Institute, who explains the
basics of the raw vegan diet and dispels common myths (page
36). Even for those who prefer their food cooked, the raw vegan
diet follows healthful tenets that can be incorporated into any
eating regimen. If you want to give it a whirl, we bring you a
collection of raw recipes from Laura Hahn (page 38) featuring a
refreshing avocado lunch and a flavor-packed poke bowl. Check
out Cookbook Corner (page 40) for even more inspiration with
gluten-free offerings from two raw cookbooks.
This issue's Gluten-Free Table contains sensational summertime spreads. From Jilly Lagasse’s Cheap & Cheerful taste of the
Mediterranean (page 32)—including delectable falafels and a
simply delicious watermelon dish—to Elizabeth Barbone's Make
It In Minutes easy seasonal recipes (page 30), you'll have all the
elements you need to create the ideal meal. And Isadora Lassance's
fabulous frozen refreshers are perfect for those times when you
need to beat the heat (page 26).
Finally, if you're home with the kids for the summer or looking
for a fun weekend activity that everyone can enjoy, check out Kids'
Kitchen. Contributor Holly Vine gives step-by-step instructions
on how to whip up a batch of beautiful and tasty Ombre Frozen
Yogurt Popsicles (page 48)!
Stay cool, everyone!
Yours truly,
JOAN EDGETT
EDITOR
4
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Mix it up
«
NEWS, TIPS, REVIEWS, ADVICE AND MORE
GF RESTAURANTS
ACROSS THE U.S.
Dedicated dining halls
6
CORNELL UNIVERSITY in Ithaca, New York, began
converting its Risley Dining Room to an entirely glutenfree eatery two years ago, said Michele Lefebvre, Cornell’s
director of nutrition management. Initially, small changes
were made, like replacing lo mein with rice noodles
and gluten-free tamari in lieu of wheat-laden soy sauce,
according to Chef Manager Kevin Grant. Then polenta
was used for pizza bases and pasta was phased out in
favor of flavor-forward options such as huevos rancheros
and roasted cauliflower graffiti, said Grant. In fall 2016,
the school removed gluten from baked goods and items
prepared in the grill area, substituting treats like glutenfree apple pie, banana cheesecake and Black Forest cake.
Grant also launched new concepts for tostadas and
smashburgers—patties made with beef and vegetables
served on arugula with house-made aioli.
Cornell brought in one of its alumna, Amy Fothergill, to
train the kitchen staff and develop a grand-opening menu
comprised of gluten-free recipes from her cookbook, The
Warm Kitchen. Fothergill, who also pens a popular glutenfree cooking blog, said she was thrilled to help the school
formally launch the gluten-free dining hall in January
2017. “There was an amazing amount of energy in the
room,” she enthused. “What was interesting was that not
everyone was there because the food was gluten free.
They were there because the food was good.”
Risley’s official change-over to its dedicated gluten-free
status coincided with a formal certification from Kitchens
With Confidence, said Lefebvre, adding that the dining hall
is also entirely peanut and tree-nut free.
“It’s important for
students who have
celiac disease or
gluten intolerance
to be able to have a safe location where they can go eat
and not have to worry,” explained Megan Brzuski, Kent
State’s dining services dietitian. “There are many different
menu items and options available for students to choose
from at Prentice Café.” In addition to every item being
gluten free, the menu also features a variety of vegan
and vegetarian dishes. For breakfast, students can choose
from omelets, pancakes and French toast. Dinner options
include flatbread pizzas, chicken tenders and grilled cheese
sandwiches. Prentice Café earned its certification from the
Gluten-Free Food Services Certification Program, a food
safety program offered by the Gluten Intolerance Group
of North America.
Ohio’s KENT STATE UNIVERSITY became the first
university in the country to feature an entirely gluten-free
dining hall on campus in fall 2016. The school restructured
Prentice Café after administrators noticed a yearly
increase in the number of students arriving on campus
with gluten-related dietary restrictions.
This fall, PENN STATE UNIVERSITY is set to open its
first kosher and allergen-free kitchen on its main campus.
At Pure, food will be served buffet-style on disposable
dinnerware to prevent cross-contamination, and no
outside food or drinks will be permitted.
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
LIBERTY UNIVERSITY, which has offered a Simple
Servings allergen-free station at its highly ranked ReberThomas Dining Hall food court for several years, recently
expanded its distribution of gluten-free baked goods
throughout the Lynchburg, Virginia, campus, including retail
outlets and catered events. A dedicated gluten-free bakery
on campus produces more than 100 different items,
from muffins, coffee cakes and cereal bars to brownies,
cookies and flourless chocolate cakes. “The response
from the student body—those with and without a gluten
intolerance—has been incredible,” said district manager
Anthony Delligatti.
–Michael Savett
DENK CREATIVE / SHUTTERSTOCK
High school juniors and seniors following a gluten-free diet not only need to consider
traditional factors when researching college options but also each school’s ability to provide
safe, hassle-free dining. Several institutions of higher learning in the United States provide
seamless opportunities for students to eat gluten free at their dining halls. Beyond that, four
universities have gone one step further by creating dedicated gluten-free eateries.
TOP 5: Tips for Successful
Gluten-Free Baking
What does it take to produce a loaf of bread that rises and
doesn’t sink or cookies that spread properly? How annoying is it
to spend time and money following a recipe only to pull a baking
fail out of the oven? Being a graduate of The Culinary Institute
of America with a degree in pastry and baking arts, Elizabeth
has seen her fair share of flops, as have I, which prompted us to
compile our top five tips for successful baking.
ree
F
n
e
Glut
1. SWAP SOLID FAT FOR SOLID FAT
There is a difference between solid and liquid fats and how
they work in recipes. If a recipe calls for butter, replace it with
another solid fat such as shortening, lard or coconut oil. In
cookie and cake recipes, solid fats work with the sugar to lighten
the recipe. Those same recipes made with a liquid fat could turn
out heavy and greasy.
One
2. DON'T SKIP THE SALT
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When making a yeast bread, don't omit the salt. It might seem
like a small amount, but that salt plays the key role of controlling
yeast growth to prevent it from collapsing. Plus, it adds flavor.
A loaf made without salt can sink and end up flavorless. Unless
kosher or another type of salt is specifically called for in a recipe,
use table salt. Its fine texture makes it the best choice for baking.
3. WEIGHT VERSUS VOLUME
To measure ingredients, you have two choices: weight
or volume. For weight, use a kitchen scale. For volume
measurements, use two sets of measuring cups—one for
liquid ingredients and one for dry. Pour the ingredient into
the cup and get down to eye-level to ensure it's accurate. For
dry ingredients like flour, oats and sugar, use a set of nested
measuring cups. Scoop the dry ingredients into the cup,
overfilling a little. Then swipe a straight-edged tool such as a
butter knife across the top to level it out.
4. CHECK DATES
Ingredients don't last forever. Baking soda, baking powder and
yeast all have expiration dates. Be sure to check them before
using in a recipe to ensure cakes, cookies and breads will rise.
Check spices, too, because they lose flavor over time. To test a
spice, put a little between two fingers and rub it together. If it
has a nice aroma, you're set. If you can't smell anything, toss it.
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5. GET THE GRIT OUT
Grittiness is one of the most common complaints about glutenfree baked goods. When shopping for ingredients, look for
superfine rice flour or whole-grain flours, like sorghum or millet,
which tend to be fine and grit free. Experiment with different
brands, because some are gritty and some aren't.
#JŶLYLQJ
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Follow Gluten-Free Living magazine to stay
current on the latest gluten-free trends,
recipes and giveaways!
–Jennifer Harris and Elizabeth Barbone
www.glutenfreeliving.com 7
Mix it up
GF all over the map
Whether you're venturing out in your hometown or across the country, use this map of
dedicated gluten-free restaurants to find the ideal place for a worry-free bite.
ALABAMA
GEORGIA
MICHIGAN
OHIO
• Consider It Joy,
Hoover
• Mason Dixon
Bakery and
Bistro, Huntsville
• Good Karma
Coffee House,
Avondale Estates
• Mediterranea,
Atlanta
• Live Gluten Free
Bakery & Café,
Muskegon
• Ma & Pa’s Gluten
Free Café, Free Soil
• Café Avalaun,
Warrensville Heights
• Sinfully GlutenFree, Dayton
ARIZONA
HAWAII
MINNESOTA
• Blooming Beets
Kitchen, Chandler
• Dedicated glutenfree bakery and
coffee shop, Tucson
• Maui Brick Oven,
Kihei
• Sassy Spoon,
Minneapolis
IDAHO
STORE
BREWERY
• Stars & Dreams
Gluten-Free
Paradise, Ashland
• Sundial Café,
Eugene
• Dempsey Bakery,
Little Rock
CALIFORNIA
• 2Good2Be Bakery
& Café, Encinitas
• Zest Bakery &
Deli, San Carlos
COLORADO
• Aime’s Love
Bakery and Café,
Longmont
• Grabbagreen,
Denver and Greenwood
Village
CONNECTICUT
• Gluten Free Oasis,
Brookfield
• Pure Love Gluten
Free Bakery, Avon
DELAWARE
• At Melissa’s Bed
& Breakfast,
Rehoboth Beach
• The Birch Tree
Café, Ocean View
• Longdrop Cider
House, Boise
ILLINOIS
MONTANA
• Flùr, Riverside
• Original Fingers,
Marion
• Rae Rae’s Bakery,
Billings and Whitefish
INDIANA
• Haven On Earth
Bread & Bakery,
Reno
• Bread 4 Life
Bakery & Eatery,
Mishawaka
IOWA
• Gud-n-Free,
Sioux City
KANSAS
• Shana Cake, Topeka
KENTUCKY
• Gluten Free
Miracles, Lexington
• WheatLess,
Bowling Green
LOUISIANA
• Truly Free
Bakery and Deli,
Baton Rouge
• The Little Beet
MAINE
FLORIDA
• Tripp’s Farmhouse
Café, Auburn
MARYLAND
• One Dish Cuisine,
Ellicott City
MASSACHUSETTS
• Twist Bakery and
Café, Millis
8
MISSOURI
• New Day Gluten
Free, Clayton
• Range Free,
Columbia
BREWERY
DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA
• Serendipity Café,
Dunedin
• White Star Café,
Miami
• Burning Brothers
Brewing, St. Paul
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
NEVADA
NEW JERSEY
• Glenda’s Kitchen,
Leonardo
• WildFlour
Bakery and Café,
Lawrenceville
PENNSYLVANIA
• Gluten Free Goat
Bakery and Café,
Garfield
BREWERY
• Blueprint Brewing
Co., Harleysville
RHODE ISLAND
• Lifestyle Café At
Poliquin Group,
East Greenwich
SOUTH CAROLINA
• Exchange
Company Coffee
Bar and Bake
Shop, Simpsonville
TENNESSEE
• Vangie’s Gluten
Free, Rio Rancho
• A Matter Of Taste
Eatery: AMOT,
Nashville
• Grabbagreen,
Franklin
NEW YORK
TEXAS
NEW MEXICO
• Bare Buns Bakery
& Café, Plainview
• Senza Gluten,
New York
NORTH CAROLINA
• Crêperie & Café,
Weaverville
BREWERY
• Urban Orchard
Cider Company
and Bar, Asheville
• Grabbagreen,
Dallas and Killeen
• Powerhouse
Bakery and café,
San Antonio
VIRGINIA
• Choices By Shawn,
Fairfax
• Kickshaws Kitchen,
Fredericksburg
WASHINGTON
• Cole’s Bakery &
Café, Spokane
• Hugo’s Organic
Restaurant, Redmond
SHUTTERSTOCK
ARKANSAS
• Mom’s Place
Gluten-Free LLP,
Ammon
OREGON
WE COULDN’T FI
T THEM ALL!
For more gluten
-free restaurant
listings, visit glute
nfreeliving.com
www.glutenfreeliving.com 9
INDIA
REVISITED
Journey to the exotic Indian
Subcontinent on a deluxe,
fully escorted gluten-free
tour that retraces the
footsteps of our successful
2015 adventure, featuring
2EHURL¶VPDJQL¿FHQWKRWHOVLQ
Mumbai, Jaipur, Delhi
and the spectacular tiger
reserve at Ranthambore.
All meals (non-spicy available),
fascinating tours and game
drives, visits to all the famous
sights such as Taj Mahal, Red
Fort, the Rajasthan desert,
Hindu & Tibetan temples,
Gandhi’s Memorial and more.
Mix it up
STAY ON
TRACK: GF
Travel Apps
Gluten Free Restaurant Cards
from CeliacTravel.com
This app provides gluten-free
restaurant cards in 54 languages that
can be shown to a server and/or chef
to explain the restrictions of your
gluten-free diet.
AllergyEats
A guide to food-allergy-friendly
restaurants across the United Sates,
AllergyEats provides peer reviews
regarding how well a restaurant
accommodates the needs of foodallergic and food-intolerant guests.
Dine Gluten Free
Browse restaurants and read peer
reviews of gluten-free-friendly
businesses around the world in
this easy-to-use app.
Find Me Gluten Free
Dec 5-16
Escorted by Dr. Simran Sani
of London & New Delhi, dietary
consultant to India’s leading
gluten-free organization
Call, click or email today for
reservations & information:
(800) 221-7179
pdt@pacificdelighttours.com
www.pacificdelighttours.com
10
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
This app allows you to search by
location for gluten-free pizza, bakeries,
fast food, local busineses and more.
Access user reviews, tips and other
useful information.
Gluten-Free World
Whether in your hometown or
traveling abroad, the Gluten-Free
World app aims to help you find
pubs, restaurants, bakeries, cafes and
even stores so you can relax and
enjoy yourself instead of wasting time
researching. The app provides the
hours and directions to each spot.
Please note that not every app will
be available on all platforms.
—Heather Burdo
A WORLD OF
“GLUTEN FREE”
Traveling abroad?
Here’s how to say
“gluten free” in six
languages. If you’re
not going to an area
that speaks one of
these languages, you
can easily access
apps with phrases
and other details to
help you eat worry
and gluten free
while you’re away
from home.
SPANISH:
sin gluten
FRENCH:
sans gluten
ITALIAN:
senza glutine
PORTUGUESE:
livre de glúten
DANISH:
glutenfri
TURKISH:
glütensiz
SHUTTERSTOCK
GLUTEN-FREE
PHOTOGRAPHY: ALISHA GRIMM
11-year-old Creates Stunning
Celiac Awareness Bracelets
FOR SOME KIDS, having celiac disease can make them
bashful or self-conscious, resentful that they have to be
different at a time in their lives when all they want to do is fit
in. For others, it can feel like a badge of honor—something
that makes them unique, and propels them to help others in
the celiac community. Over the course of the five years since
she was diagnosed, Skylar Weitz, now 11, has undergone
a metamorphosis from the former to the latter. “I used to
be shy about having celiac, but now I just want people to
know about it and realize how it affects people on a day-today basis,” she says. So last fall, the Long Island-based 5thgrader started making and selling gorgeous celiac awareness
bracelets. Her goal is to increase awareness for celiac disease
while raising money for Celiac Disease Foundation (CDF).
“Skylar’s commitment to raising awareness of celiac disease
and the need for a cure is an inspiring example of how every
child has the power to make a difference,” says Marilyn G.
Geller, CDF’s CEO. “Ending the needless suffering of millions
with celiac disease is a massive undertaking. Through efforts
like Skylar’s, together we can improve the quality of life and
the long-term prognosis for those we love.” Since last fall,
Skylar has raised about $3,000 to support CDF’s goal of
finding a cure; looking
ahead, she plans to
donate proceeds to
the Celiac Disease
Center at Columbia
University in New York,
as well.
And Skylar’s not
messing around when
it comes to style: Her wares are a far cry from de rigeur
rubber charity bands. She—along with the help of her
squad: her mom Shari, sister Hailey, aunt Jaime, cousins and
grandmother—hand-makes each bracelet out of a range of
colored gemstones in both adult and kid sizes. Skylar’s aunt,
Alisha Grimm, a jewelry designer, lends her exper tise. “So
many people—myself included, prior to Skylar’s diagnosis—
are naïve about how much of an impact celiac disease has
on a person’s day-to-day life,” Alisha says. “And it upsets me
that there are people who think it’s not a legitimate disease.
So when Skylar asked me if we could make bracelets to
raise awareness and funds, I said absolutely. I’m just so
proud of her.”
“I just want to help find a cure,” says Skylar. You can find
out more about the bracelets and how to order them by
emailing poshstones1@gmail.com.
—Jessica Press
GF Living in
Pictures
ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATOR
Jordan Middlebrook
hails from Ontario,
Canada, where in
addition to his roles
of husband and
father, he is always
preparing for the
eventual existence of
time travel and the
possibility of endless French fries suddenly
appearing at the mere thought of them.
Diagnosed with celiac disease and aware
of what following the gluten-free diet really
entails, he blogs at kingglutenfree.com and
co-hosts a local television show.
He also loves pancakes. A lot. Even more
than time travel.
www.glutenfreeliving.com 11
OfficeHours
Safeguards for preventing
cross-contamination
BY STEVE PLOGSTED
Steve Plogsted, a
pharmacist at Columbus
Children’s Hospital, is
an expert on gluten in
medications. His website,
glutenfreedrugs.com, is
widely recognized as
the most reliable source of information
on prescription and over-the-counter
drugs. Have a question about gluten
and medications? Send it to
glutenfreedrugs@gmail.com.
Q
A
Q
What steps are taken to
minimize or prevent crosscontamination in a pharmaceutical
manufacturing facility?
There are numerous requirements
and precautions employed by any
pharmaceutical manufacturer who plans
to sell their product in the U.S. market.
This includes plants in other countries that
manufacture for a U.S. distributor. They
must maintain the same standards and are
required to undergo examination by an FDA
inspector. People who work with the drug
products wear suits similar to what you
might see in an operating room. All facilities
and production procedures must be ap-
A
12
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
Pharmaceutical manufacturing line, Glenmark Pharmaceuticals
proved by the FDA. Here are excerpts from
the FDA manual on manufacturing practices:
“All utilities that could affect product
quality (e.g., steam, gas, compressed air,
heating, ventilation and air conditioning)
should be qualified and appropriately
monitored and action should be taken
when limits are exceeded. Drawings for
these utility systems should be available.
Adequate ventilation, air filtration and
exhaust systems should be provided, where
appropriate. These systems should be
designed and constructed to minimize risks
of contamination and cross-contamination
and should include equipment for control of
air pressure, microorganisms (if appropriate),
dust, humidity and temperature, as
appropriate to the stage of manufacture.
“Particular attention should be given to
areas where APIs [active pharmaceutical
ingredients] are exposed to the environment. If air is recirculated to production
areas, appropriate measures should be
taken to control risks of contamination and
cross-contamination. Permanently installed
pipework should be appropriately identified. This can be accomplished by identifying
individual lines, documentation, computer
control systems or alternative means.
“Pipework should be located to avoid
risks of contamination of the intermediate
or API. Drains should be of adequate size
and should be provided with an air break or
a suitable device to prevent back-siphonage,
when appropriate. Equipment should be
constructed so that surfaces that contact
raw materials do not alter the quality of
the intermediates and APIs beyond the
official or other established specifications.
Closed or contained equipment should be
used whenever appropriate. Where open
equipment is used, or equipment is opened,
appropriate precautions should be taken to
minimize the risk of contamination.”
The manufacturers predominantly use
materials that are easy to clean and sterilize,
such as stainless steel (see photo), and employ specific cleaning processes. I spoke with
a generic drug manufacturer and learned
that a precise cleaning and sterilization procedure is used in a production room where
a single drug product is manufactured. If
more than one type of drug product is produced in that room, additional cleaning steps
are employed, and the room is quarantined
until the results are thoroughly evaluated.
The cleanliness and sterility of these facilities is a crucial point of emphasis.
PHOTOGRAPHY: GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS
I have celiac and am also being
treated for myasthenia gravis.
My physician wants to start me on
immunoglobulin therapy and told me
that it was “mostly gluten free.” Of
course, I am concerned, and I can’t
seem to find any answers.
Rest assured, this treatment is fine for
people with celiac. There are numerous brands of immunoglobulin therapy
currently on the market, but they share
many of the same characteristics. There are
two important issues to remember when
using these products: none of them contain
any gluten material, and for you to experience a gluten reaction, the gluten must first
be absorbed through the gut. As a side note,
no intravenous products currently on the
market contain any form of gluten.
SURVIVING
YOUR FIRST
summer
DARIA VOSKOBOEVA / SHUTTERSTOCK
BY HEATHER BURDO
With summer finally here, people are eager for bonfires and
get-togethers. Although you may look forward to spending
time with family and friends, you can’t help but wonder how
you will survive summer get-togethers while maintaining your
gluten-free lifestyle. Luckily, you can enjoy yourself and stay
safe by keeping the following four tips in mind.
1. WHO SAYS YOU CAN’T HAVE
A BURGER OR HOT DOG?
Hot dogs and burgers are two of the
most common summer go-to foods,
and you can still enjoy them. However,
some varieties of hot dogs contain
wheat gluten. If you can't confirm
whether the proferred frankfurter is
gluten free, it's best to steer clear. Also
ask whether the burger has been mixed
with any sauce or seasoning, which
could contain gluten.
Note: Put tinfoil down on the grill while
your burger is cooking to avoid any
gluten cross-contamination.
2. OFFER TO HOST THE GETTOGETHER AT YOUR HOUSE.
If you’re hesitant about eating at
someone else’s home, host your own
shindig. You would be in complete
control of making sure the food is safe.
It’s possible to make almost any food
in a gluten-free version so that you
could create a whole summer feast of
everyone’s favorite dishes.
3. BRING YOUR OWN DISH.
If having the get-together at your
home is out of the question, you have
other options. Bringing your favorite
summertime gluten-free dishes would
be ideal, so you won’t miss out. Ask
the hostess or host ahead of time what
will be on the menu so you can plan
accordingly. Even if you don’t want to
make large separate dishes for everyone
at the party, you could bring just a plate
for yourself to eat when everyone else
sits down to feast.
4. YOUR BELOVED S’MORES ARE
NOT OUT OF THE QUESTION!
Most people enjoy sitting around a
bonfire, roasting marshmallows and
enjoying a s’more. Because traditional
graham crackers have gluten, people
think they should go without.
Fortunately, gluten-free graham
crackers do exist, such as those made
by Schär, Kinnikinnick or Pamela’s
Products. GF
BEWARE
barbecue
sauce
Keep in mind that
not all barbecue
sauces are gluten
free. Be sure to read
the label.These
brands offer glutenfree varieties:
Annie’s Naturals
Bone Suckin’ Sauce
Organicville
Stubb’s
Heather Burdo is a health content writer
from New York. Visit her at heatherburdo.com.
FOOD IDEAS:
• BBQ chicken
• Buffalo chicken
BBERNARD / SHUTTERSTOCK; OLGA MILTSOVA / SHUTTERSTOCK
• Chicken and veggie skewers
• Hamburgers
• Gluten-free hot dogs
• Pulled pork
• Baby back ribs
• Corn on the cob
• Grilled jalapeño poppers
• Baked beans
• Gluten-free macaroni
and cheese
• Gluten-free pasta salad
• Potato salad
www.glutenfreeliving.com 15
Family Matters
.D., L.D.
NES, M.S., R
LORELYN MEDINA / SHUTTERSTOCK
BY AMY JO
16
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
The end of another school year
has arrived! Day trips to zoos,
theme parks, baseball stadiums
and water parks are all fun ways
to relax and enjoy the weather.
Other kids may be getting ready
for what is for many a summer
rite of passage—summer camp.
Trips like these are part of
what makes for great summer
memories, but the gluten-free
diet presents a set of challenges
for both kids and parents. With
a little planning and research,
however, these trips can be the
highlight of your family’s summer.
A WEEK WITHOUT WORRY
Gluten-free day or sleepaway camps can
provide peace of mind to parents that food
won’t be an issue when their kids are away
from home. For the kids, it also provides a
chance to take a break from being different than others due to their diet. “Glutenfree kids are used to being the odd ones
out at school or birthday parties,” shares
Laura Hahn Carroll, chef at Camp Celiac
in Rhode Island. “At our camp, they don’t
have to think about being gluten free the
whole week. They just get to enjoy.”
Since July 2000, Camp Celiac has
been treating gluten-free kids to a week
without worries about food. “We don’t
talk about being gluten free at all. The
kids don’t take seminars or classes,” Hahn
Carroll shares. “They hike and fish and
boat and play fun team-oriented games.”
Hahn Carroll also relishes watching the
bonds that campers create over the week:
“There are no cliques here with cool kids
or jocks. The kids are all best friends; it’s
such an awesome thing to see.”
While gluten-free food isn’t the focus of
the week, that’s not to say it isn’t important.
“Kids who are new to the camp are surprised at their choices,” says Hahn Carroll.
“For example, we have a pizza party, a pasta
bar and cookies at any time of day.” She
recalls one little girl sharing that this was
the first time she could ever safely steal a
donut off a friend’s plate.
Hahn Carroll has been gluten free herself
for many years and understands what goes
into providing safe dining experiences for
the campers. Because the camp hosts other
groups over the summer, advanced planning goes into making sure the kitchen is
ready to go when kids arrive. “We sanitize
the kitchen top to bottom twice before the
camp begins, and we bring all our equipment—our pots and pans, strainers and
spatulas. They are all wrapped in plastic
in a separate room,” she says. “We have
exclusive use of the kitchen that week.” She
also selects her staff carefully. “My assistant
chefs are all former campers who know
what it takes. It’s an amazing experience
for them to come back as an adult and see
what camp does for these kids.”
Research supports the positives that
Hahn Carroll sees at the camp. A 2010
study found that children who attended
gluten-free camps showed improvements
in quality of life, specifically how they
viewed themselves, emotional adjustment
and well-being. The study found the most
positive effects in kids who had been gluten
free for fewer than four years.
FINDING SOLUTIONS
If a dedicated gluten-free summer camp
isn’t in the cards, it’s still possible for kids to
have a safe, fun experience. Start researching options early, encourages Mary Kay
Sharrett, registered dietitian nutritionist at
Nationwide Children’s Hospital Celiac Disease Center in Columbus, Ohio. “I advise
parents to do a little homework and call
the camp to see what ability they have to
do gluten free. In this day and age, they’ve
probably been asked that already.”
If the camp personnel you speak with
have had experience with gluten-free
campers, ask to review the menu for the
week to see what options might work or
where you can provide similar items:
• Can your child enjoy the fruit,
vegetables, salads and beverages that
other kids enjoy?
• Are there some specifically glutenfree-labeled cereals available at breakfast time?
• If you send food along with your
child, can it be kept in an area of the
PACKING FOR YOUR
GLUTEN-FREE CAMPER*
• Shelf-stable meals
(like GoPicnic)
• Nuts (if allowed by camp rules)
• Snack bars (i.e., Kind, Lärabar)
• Cold cereal
• Oatmeal
• Pudding and/or fruit cups
• Pretzels and/or chips
• Cookies
• Pop-tab cans or pouches of
chicken or tuna
• Beef jerky (check label to
ensure it’s gluten free)
*All shelf-stable
GLUTEN-FREE
SUMMER CAMPS
There are several gluten-free-specific
camps all over the country. For more
information, visit:
Gluten-Free Living online:
glutenfreeliving.com/camps
The Gluten Free Travel Site:
glutenfreetravelsite.com
Camp Celiac:
campceliac.org
Pack your family’s cooler for a day
trip with a variety of these safe and
satisfying options.
• Hummus and gluten-free
pretzels or sliced veggies
• Chips and salsa
• Fresh fruit, either whole
or sliced
• Applesauce
• Pudding cups
• Protein bars (keep them cool,
especially when it’s hot outside)
• Pop-tab or pouches of tuna
or chicken
• Yogurt tubes (freeze them
before you go)
• Sliced lunch meat; try rolling
them up with veggies inside
(sliced peppers work great)
• Cheese sticks or cubes
• Sandwiches made with
gluten-free bread or tortillas—
or skip the bread and use
lettuce as a wrap
• Trail mix (make your own with
your favorite nuts, gluten-free
cereal, gluten-free pretzels,
dried fruit and chocolate chips)
Don’t forget to stock your cooler
with plenty of ice or ice packs,
water bottles (add ice or freeze
them), hand sanitizer and wet wipes,
silverware, napkins, plates and a
small bag for trash.
“IN RECENT YEARS, NEARLY ALL MAJOR
LEAGUE BASEBALL PARKS HAVE EXPANDED
THEIR GLUTEN-FREE OPTIONS.”
freezer or refrigerator separate from
other food?
• Is there a staff member who can
assist your child in getting those
items at mealtime?
• Are there special activities involving food that you should be aware
of, such as cookouts, s’mores or
craft projects?
It is also a good idea to get in touch
with camp medical staff. Consider sending an information packet along with
medical history and a list of symptoms
your child might exhibit if he or she
is accidentally exposed to gluten. Just
like on any other day, it is important to
remind your child not to trade food with
other kids or eat foods that he or she is
unsure about.
For little ones who may not be ready
to stay away from home overnight, day
camps can offer wonderful experiences.
As with sleepaway camps, getting in touch
beforehand is important. “Many day
programs have kids bring their lunch,”
says Sharrett. “Still, for really little ones, I
recommend considering a pin or a button
that says ‘I’m gluten free’ to help remind
the staff.” She also advises parents to ask if
food is part of craft projects, recalling one
camp that had kids make cereal necklaces
and allowed them to eat their creations.
“If there is any doubt, provide a safe alternative item.”
PARKING IT GLUTEN FREE
A day trip to a theme park or water park
can be a fun getaway when time is short,
but some parks are more accommodating
to gluten-free customers than others. For
Tracie Baker from Bellefontaine, Ohio,
planning ahead is the key to making sure
her 15-year-old daughter, Dharma, can
eat safely. “The worst thing is to arrive
at your destination and find out that
you have little to no options. That will
make for a miserable trip for everyone,”
she says.
Baker and her family have visited
several water parks in Ohio and found
that Great Wolf Lodge in Sandusky had
menu options: “Dharma has food allergies beyond celiac disease, so we always
18
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
have fewer choices than other families
might have, but we make it work.” Baker
always requests a room with a refrigerator
or microwave for her family if they are
staying overnight, and they pack most of
their food. “Great Wolf had fruit options
for breakfast that could supplement what
we brought along and even had a nice restaurant that had eggs,” Baker says. “They
had cleaned everything before they fixed
her breakfast so as not to contaminate.”
Great Wolf locations feature the Lodge
Wood Fired Grill restaurant with clearly
labeled gluten-free items on its menu,
from entrées to side dishes, appetizers
and Mason jar salads. French fries, sweet
potato fries and calamari are all prepared
in dedicated gluten-free fryers. Deemed a
“gold standard” destination by the website
Allergy Eats (allergyeats.com), Great
Wolf has 13 locations in the U.S. and one
in Canada.
Several theme parks can accommodate gluten-free guests, most notably
Disney World. “Disney was doing it right
long before anyone knew about gluten
free,” states Pamela Cureton, registered
dietitian nutritionist at the Center for
Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital. “Twenty years
ago, a child could go to Disney and get
treated with meals that were safe and delicious.” Cureton experienced the magic
of Disney’s gluten-free meals herself
when she recently attended a workshop
at the park. “They had a regular buffet
and a gluten-free buffet. The chef came
out to speak with me when I had questions and even showed me what brand of
pasta they used. They do a fantastic job.”
Cureton also recommends Hersheypark in Pennsylvania: “They have lots
of selections, such as gluten-free buns,
chicken tenders, pizza and French fries,
in several places in the park.”
MAKING IT WORK
Many well-known theme parks across
the country can easily serve gluten-free
guests, but how should you deal with a
park or a zoo that offers limited options?
Sharrett recommends calling ahead to
see whether food can be brought in a
LORELYN MEDINA / SHUTTERSTOCK
KEEPING IT COOLER
cooler. “The Columbus [Ohio] Zoo will
allow you to bring in food if you have a
medical reason,” Sharrett says. “They don’t
have a lot of gluten-free options at the zoo
beyond the GoPicnic meals available in the
kiosks.” Zoombezi Bay, the water park adjacent to the zoo, has different rules than the
zoo itself. “Zoombezi will hold the coolers
at the gate and then let you go back and eat
in the zoo. It’s a good reminder to know
what the rules are, even for parks that are
right next door to each other,”
instructs Sharrett.
Baker also suggests not going
to a theme park or zoo too hungry. “We always try to get Dharma a good meal before going to
the parks just to be safe,” she says.
“If we plan to be there all day, we
take food with us.” (For tips on
stocking your day trip cooler, see
“Keeping it cooler” sidebar.)
Cureton also recommends
checking if there is a local celiac
support group in the area of
the theme park or zoo that may
have suggestions on gluten-free
food options in the park or
conveniently located restaurants.
“Utilize the websites of the parks,
utilize phone apps, even old issues of
gluten-free magazines that feature individual cities or destinations,” she says.
League Baseball parks have expanded
their options. Some are located in specific
gluten-free carts, like at Coors Field, home
of the Colorado Rockies, which offers hot
dogs, hamburgers, chicken sandwiches,
cookies, brownies and Redbridge beer.
Nationals Park, home of the Washington
Nationals, sells its gluten-free items in one
section of the park. Others sprinkle glutenfree options throughout the stadium. Research where to find these items before the
game—it may even help you determine the
best place for your family to sit. Visit the
website of the individual ballpark or other
resources such as Urban Tastebud (urbantastebud.com) for more information.
No matter how you plan to spend the
lazy days of summer—whether it be fun in
the sun at a water park, a visit to the zoo,
or behind home plate—planning ahead for
safe gluten-free eating can make relaxation
the most important point on your agenda.
PLAY BALL!
What would summer break be without the
nation’s favorite pastime? Ballparks carry
naturally gluten-free items like cotton
candy, Cracker Jacks, nuts, bottled water
and soda. In recent years, nearly all Major
Amy Jones is a registered dietitian and celiac
support group leader in Ohio. She is the chair
of the Dietitians in Gluten Intolerance Diseases
practice group for the Academy of Nutrition
and Dietetics. She also serves on the dietetic
advisory board of Gluten-Free Living.
www.glutenfreeliving.com 19
736-2'30%'7,988)6783'/46)1-91:)'8367,988)6783'/
Gluten-Free Travel
20
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
WORDS BY ANNA SONNENBERG
PHOTOS BY LOREN SONNENBERG
SEATTLE MAY HAVE A REPUTATION for gray skies and dreary weather, but don’t let
that scare you away from visiting. Each time I’ve traveled to Seattle, sunshine and blue skies
have been waiting right around the corner. Since July and August are the Emerald City's
sunniest months of year, I can’t recommend a summer visit enough.
Whether you like outdoor adventures, cultural activities or exploring neighborhoods,
you’ll find something to love in this northwest destination. To top it off, the city’s cuisine is
wonderfully creative.You’ll find gluten-free options virtually everywhere—even in one of
the city’s top breweries.
www.glutenfreeliving.com
21
Niche
Pike Place Market
ALWAYS GO DOWNTOWN
Sprawling markets are some of my favorite
spots to spend time, so I love starting any
Seattle visit with a walk through Pike Place
Market. Here, vendors have sold an impressive range of produce, seafood, flowers and
many other goods for over a century. I love
picking up some seasonal fruit when I’m
here, but even if you aren’t in the market
for anything in particular, Pike Place is still
a fun hub of activity.
While there’s no longer a dedicated
gluten-free bakery in Pike Place Market,
you don’t have to go far to satisfy your
appetite. Just east of the market, in Seattle’s
vibrant First Hill neighborhood, Niche
Gluten-Free Café and Bakery has all the
gluten-free goodies you desire.
This funky spot is completely gluten
free, so you can feel comfortable enjoying anything that catches your fancy. The
Paleo-inspired hash bowls, which can
come loaded with veggies, Alaskan salmon,
Applewood bacon or a veggie burger, are
one of the most popular brunch items,
while the Niche Club stands out on the
sandwich menu. Like a lot of menu items,
both of these are dairy free, so they’re great
for other allergy-conscious diners, too.
My top pick at Niche is the signature
Cheesy Egg Waffle-ini. This ingenious
creation is a gluten-free waffle sandwich
made panini-style to ensure that the cheese
is perfectly melted. You can also get yours
with Applewood bacon and apple butter or go for a sweet version slathered
with Nutella.
If you really want to treat yourself,
though, save room for one of Niche’s
scrumptious homemade ice cream sandwiches, a delightful combination of choco22
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
I Love My GFF
EVEN IF YOU AREN'T IN THE MARKET FOR
ANYTHING PARTICULAR, PIKE PLACE IS
STILL A FUN HUB OF ACTIVITY.
late chip cookies and vanilla ice cream.
Owner and Chef Toby Matasar has over
20 years of experience as a French pastry
chef. When she cut gluten out of her diet a
few years ago, however, she put her expertise to the test as she experimented with
rice and tapioca flours and potato starch.
When you visit, you’ll see her creativity
shining throughout the menu, whether
you’re ordering brunch, lunch or an afternoon pick-me-up.
At Niche, you’ll also feel the love. After
all, the motto here is “Eat, drink, smile.”
Chef Toby opened this intimate spot to
feed people well, and Niche’s deliciously
gluten-free meals and treats do just that.
SOAK IN THE WATERFRONT
Seattle boasts some impressive stretches of
waterfront, and taking a harbor cruise in
Elliott Bay is one of my favorite ways to see
the city. If you’d rather stay on dry land, the
waterfront is also home to plenty of familyfriendly activities, like the Seattle Great
Wheel and the Seattle Aquarium.
Not far from Elliott Bay, don’t miss some
of the city’s top cultural destinations. The
Seattle Public Library’s central branch is
known for its eye-catching architecture
and stunning top-floor views, and it also
hosts events every day of the year. A couple
blocks away, the Seattle Art Museum is
home to edgy exhibitions and collections
of historic art. If you prefer seeing your
art in nature, take a wander through the
museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park, which
is northwest of Pike Place.
When you’re ready for a hearty meal,
head straight for Pier 54, where you’ll find
Ivar’s Acres of Clams, a Seattle institution.
Ivar’s has held down this prime real estate
for more than 75 years, but the menu here
is surprisingly fresh, thanks to the vision of
Executive Chef Chris Garr.
Over the past decade, Chef Garr has
revamped the seafood shack’s longstanding
menu, finding countless opportunities to
remove gluten from recipes and add more
sustainable seafood to the mix. Today, Ivar’s
menu features almost exclusively wildcaught and local fish and seafood, ethically
raised pork, and countless gluten-, soy- and
peanut-free dishes.
Share an order of the perfectly crunchy
gluten-free calamari, which is cooked in a
separate fryer and comes with a zesty dipping sauce. Try a bowl of the wonderfully
rich and creamy smoked salmon chowder that is made with a rice flour roux.
Save plenty of room for the main course,
though. You won’t want to miss Ivar’s halibut, which comes wrapped in smoky bacon
that takes this dish to a whole new level.
GET YOUR FILL IN SODO
Seattle has a long history as a center of
industry, but the city’s industrial neighborhoods have changed significantly over the
years. Just south of Seattle’s downtown, the
city’s SoDo neighborhood has put a trendy
spin on this once-gritty area.
You’ll visit the north end of SoDo if you
catch the Seahawks or Sounders play at
CenturyLink Field or if you see a Mariners
game at Safeco Field. If you want to try
the neighborhood’s best food and drink,
however, head further south.
For a quick bite, seek out I Love My
GFF. This roving food cart sticks to a
weekly schedule, and certain days of the
week you’ll find it outside the Starbucks
headquarters in SoDo. During the summer, you’ll also find owner Andrea Ramos
Moore and her team serving up gluten-free
eats at the First Hill Farmers Market, the
Queen Anne Farmers Market and other
spots around town.
No matter where you find I Love My
GFF, the menu will always be completely
gluten free. Both the Fiesta Bowl and the
Sunshine Bowl, the two main menu items,
have quinoa bases piled high with beans,
seeds, veggies, chicken and cheese. The
team can accommodate vegetarian, vegan
and Paleo requests, and you can’t go wrong
with either bowl. This is healthy fast food at
its finest and one of the tastiest food truck
meals I’ve had anywhere.
Firmly anchored in SoDo, Ghostfish
Brewery takes a decidedly new approach
to beer. Rather than brewing with barley or
wheat, Ghostfish relies on millet, buckwheat, rice and a range of other glutenfree ingredients. To say that the Ghostfish
team is creative would be an understatement. Though the dedicated gluten-free
taproom has been open for just over two
years, Brewmaster Jason Yerger has already
produced nearly 200 different gluten-free
brews. If you’ve been less than impressed
by mass-produced gluten-free beers in
the past, the varieties and flavor profiles
at Ghostfish will blow
you away.
When visiting Ghostfish,
you’ll find flagship brews
like Vanishing Point Pale
Ale and Meteor Shower
Blonde Ale on tap. Depending on the season, you
might also find Kai Dog
Red IPA, Co-Conspirator
Apricot Sour Ale, Watchstander Stout or countless
other creative brews on
draft. All Ghostfish beers
are gluten free, and the
brewery also serves up
cider from other dedicated facilities.
If you work up an appetite after sampling a
flight or two, Ghostfish has
you covered. The brewery
serves up everything from
pub snacks such as beerbattered pickles to small
plates like street tacos
to full plates, including
bratwurst and pulled pork
sandwiches. On weekends,
you can even indulge in
chilaquiles or the Country
Burger Benedict. All of the
comfort food here is gluten
free, making Ghostfish a
must for any Seattle visit.
DON’T MISS
THE QUIRKIEST
NEIGHBORHOODS
Seattle offers tons of opportunities for getting
away from the urban
sprawl. You can hop on a
ferry to scenic Bainbridge
SEATTLE
RESOURCES
FLYING
APRON
3510 Fremont
Avenue North
Seattle, WA 98103
flyingapron.com
GHOSTFISH
BREWING
COMPANY
2942
1st Avenue South
Seattle, WA 98134
ghostfishbrewing.com
I LOVE MY GFF
Various Locations
ilovemygff.com
IVAR’S ACRES
OF CLAMS
Pier 54,
1001 Alaskan Way
Seattle, WA 98104
ivars.com
NICHE
808 12th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
nicheseattle.com
Island, spot orcas off the coast of
the nearby San Juan Islands or take
a hike up Mount Rainier, all within
a few hours of the city.
But if you’re short on time like
I usually am, you’ll find plenty of
places to escape just a few minutes
from the city center. Grab a bike or
hop in a car, and you can be in Ballard or Fremont in minutes.
Located northwest of downtown
Seattle, Ballard blends its Nordic history with hip dining and
shopping. Peek into some of the
unique boutiques along Old Ballard Avenue, grab a table at one of
the city’s hottest new restaurants or
shop for local produce at the yearround farmers market.
Just south of Ballard, Fremont
is home to the extensive Fremont
Sunday Market, some of my favorite coffee at the Fremont Coffee
Company and one of Seattle’s best
gluten-free bakeries. Flying Apron
makes a mind-boggling range of
sweet and savory goodies that are
both gluten free and vegan, which
makes this bakery a smart choice
for just about everyone. Make sure
you arrive hungry, because you’re
probably going to want to order
one of everything.
My veggie-packed calzone was
piping hot and big enough for two
people, but that didn’t dissuade me
from ordering an enormous, gooey
cinnamon roll to complete the
meal. My only regret was not loading up a to-go bag with gluten-free
donuts and pastries to enjoy later.
Flying Apron’s motto is, “It’s not
about what you can’t eat,” and it
shows. Whether you’re looking for
something that’s just gluten free
or a treat that’s also corn free and
soy free, you won’t feel like you’re
missing out.
From world-class attractions
to outdoor adventures to fantastic food, Seattle truly has it all.
Whether you’re planning a quick
getaway to see what the Emerald
City is all about or you want to
dig in and find some new favorite things to do and eat, Seattle
won’t disappoint.
Travel Editor Anna Sonnenberg is a food
and travel writer who has journeyed
around the world gluten free since
being diagnosed with celiac disease
in 2012. She launched her website,
glutenfreejetset.com, in 2013.
www.glutenfreeliving.com 23
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Gluten-Free Table
BONUS
COOKBOOSK
RECIPE
„
GF Goes Vegetarian
„Make
It In Minutes
„Cheap
„ Not
Just Gluten Free!
Kitchen
PHOTOGRAPHY: EMILY VON EUW
„Kids'
& Cheerful
www.glutenfreeliving.com 25
ANNA42F / SHUTTERSTOCK
GF Goes Vegetarian
GLUTEN-FREE
REFRESHERS
BY ISADORA LASSANCE
Mixed Berry Milkshakes
MAKES 2 LARGE MILKSHAKES
Ingredients
2 cups vanilla ice cream
2 cups mixed berries, frozen or fresh
1½ cups milk
Directions
Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until
smooth, about 1 minute. Enjoy immediately.
Nutrition Analysis: 690 cal, 38 g fat, 210 mg chol,
220 mg sodium, 72 g carbs, 5 g fiber, 63 g sugar,
15 g protein
Breakfast Smoothie
Popsicles
MAKES 4 TO 6
Ingredients
2 large bananas, peeled
½ cup curly kale leaves
½ cup milk, any kind you like
½ cup plain yogurt (I use Greek nonfat yogurt)
Directions
Place all ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth,
30 to 60 seconds.
Pour smoothie mixture into popsicle molds. This recipe
makes 4 to 6, depending on the size of your molds.
Freeze popsicles for at least 6 hours, until frozen.
Nutrition Analysis: 60 cal, 0.5 g fat, 5 mg chol, 15 mg sodium,
11 g carbs, 1 g fiber, 6 g sugar, 3 g protein
www.glutenfreeliving.com 27
Orange Cream
Macaroon Ice
Cream Sandwiches
MAKES ABOUT 8
Ingredients
3 large egg whites
½ cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons orange zest
1 teaspoon orange juice
teaspoon salt
1 14-ounce bag shredded coconut
8 large scoops vanilla ice cream
(about 3 cups)
Directions
Preheat oven to 375° F. In a large bowl,
beat together the egg whites, sugar,
orange zest and juice, and salt. Beat for
about 2 minutes and then carefully
fold in the shredded coconut.
Line a large baking sheet with
parchment paper and scoop heaping
tablespoons of coconut mixture about
1 inch apart onto the baking sheet.
With your hand, flatten each scoop into
a 2-inch disk.
Bake for about 25 minutes, or until
macaroons are golden brown on
the edges. Let cool completely on
a wire rack.
Once macaroons are completely
cooled, soften the vanilla ice cream and
sandwich it between two macaroons.
Place back into the freezer for about 20
minutes and enjoy.
Nutrition Analysis: 500 cal, 31 g fat,
75 mg chol, 240 mg sodium, 54 g carbs,
2 g fiber, 51 g sugar, 6 g protein
28
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
A
DELICIOUS
Addition to Your
Gluten-Free
Summer Menu
SUGAR
FREE
SERVES
8
SOUTHERN-STYLE
SWEET TEA
INGREDIENTS:
10 packets SweetLeaf®
Stevia Sweetener
Black tea
2 quarts water
Easy Pineapple
Banana Ice Cream
Place all fruit into a zip-lock bag or
freezable container, and freeze for at
least 6 hours.
SERVES 4
Once fruit is frozen, add it to a food
processor with the yogurt and blend until
it becomes creamy, 2 to 3 minutes.
Ingredients
1 whole pineapple
2 bananas
1 small container
(about 5.3 ounces) yogurt
(I used coconut flavored)
Directions
Cut the top off the pineapple and carefully
cut the skin off each side. Cut the
pineapple into bite-sized chunks, cutting
around the core in the middle. Peel each
banana and cut them into small slices.
Ice cream is best when eaten immediately
but can also be refrozen in a freezer-safe
container for up to 5 days. It may need to
thaw for a few minutes before eating after
it’s been frozen.
Nutrition Analysis: 190 cal, 0.5 g fat,
0 mg chol, 15 mg sodium, 45 g carbs,
5 g fiber, 31 g sugar, 6 g protein
DIRECTIONS:
Directions: Bring 2 quarts water
to a boil; remove from burner
immediately. Add black tea and
steep for 10 minutes. Remove tea
and cool. Pour into glass pitcher
and stir in 10 packets SweetLeaf®
Stevia Sweetener. Stir until
sweetener has dissolved. Let cool.
Sweetened tea is more perishable
than unsweetened; store it, wellsealed, in a glass (not plastic)
container in the refrigerator.
NUTRITION FACTS PER 1 SERVING:
Calories 0, Carbs 0g, Fats 0g, Protein
0g, Sodium 1mg, Sugars 0g
For more recipes, visit
www.SweetLeaf.com
BUY:
ShopSweetLeaf.com,
health food and grocery stores,
or online retailers
www.glutenfreeliving.com 29
Make It In Minutes
Simply scrumptious
SUMMER SPREAD
BY ELIZABETH BARBONE
SERVES 8
Corn Salad
SERVES 4
This chilled corn salad makes
a great side dish on a hot
summer night. If you have a
slice or two of bacon, cook
and crumble over the salad
right before serving.
Ingredients
6 ears of corn, shucked,
or 5 cups of frozen corn
(two 12-ounce bags)
1 tablespoon vegetable
or olive oil
1 small red pepper,
cored and diced
1 small onion, diced
Kosher salt and freshly
ground black pepper,
to taste
¼ cup chopped cilantro,
optional
Directions
Bring a large pot of water to
a boil. Cook the corn for 3
minutes. Remove the corn from
the water and immediately
immerse it in a bowl of ice
30
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
water. This stops the cooking.
When the corn is cool, cut
the kernels off the cob, cutting
close to the cob. (If using frozen
corn, thaw according to package
directions.) Place the corn in a
large bowl.
Heat the oil in a small frying
pan over medium heat. Add the
red pepper and cook until soft,
about 3 minutes. Add the onion
and cook until soft and aromatic,
about 4 minutes.
Toss the corn with the cooked
peppers and onions. Be sure to
scrape all the oil from the frying
pan into the bowl with the corn.
Season with salt and pepper
to taste.
Cover and chill for four hours
or overnight. Before serving,
season with salt and pepper to
taste. Stir in chopped cilantro,
if using.
Nutrition Analysis: 240 cal,
5 g fat, 0 mg chol, 10 mg sodium,
51 g carbs, 6 g fiber, 1 g sugar,
7 g protein
Want the juiciest burgers for
your next cookout? Try these
meatloaf burgers. They cook
up tender and flavorful.
Ingredients
1 pound ground chuck
or ground sirloin
1 pound ground pork
½ cup dried gluten-free
breadcrumbs
1 large egg
1 small onion, finely diced
1 clove garlic, minced or
put through a garlic press
1 teaspoon salt
½ cup ketchup
2 teaspoons oil, if using
frying pan to cook
8 gluten-free hamburger
buns, optional
Directions
Combine the ground chuck
and ground pork in a large
bowl. Stir to combine or
gently squeeze together
using your hands. Add the
breadcrumbs, egg, onion, garlic,
salt and ketchup.
Gently form into eight 1-inchthick patties. Put a slight
indentation in the center
of the patty.
If using an outdoor grill: Heat
a gas grill to high or heat
coals in a charcoal grill until
they glow bright orange and
ash over. Place the burgers
on the grill and cook for 3-4
minutes per side. The internal
temperature of the burgers
should be 160° F.
If using a grill pan: Heat a
lightly greased grill pan over
high heat on top of the stove.
Place the burgers on the pan
and cook for 3-4 minutes per
side. The internal temperature
of the burgers should be
160° F.
If using a sauté (frying) pan:
Heat 2 teaspoons oil in an
8-inch frying pan over high
heat. Place four burgers in
the pan and cook for 3-4
minutes per side. The internal
temperature of the burgers
should be 160° F. Repeat with
remaining burgers.
Serve on gluten-free
hamburger buns, if desired.
Nutrition Analysis: 460 cal,
19 g fat, 125 mg chol, 870 mg
sodium, 51 g carbs, 0 g fiber,
9 g sugar, 25 g protein
ZSSCHREINER / SHUTTERSTOCK ; PRIMOPIANO / SHUTTERSTOCK
Meatloaf
Burgers
chini and Onions
uc
Z
h
it
w
a
st
Pa
er
m
m
Su
Directions
SERVES 4
dish makes for a
This quick and easy pasta
your local farmer’s
If
al.
me
ight
perfect weekn
, replace half
market offers yellow squash
ount of yellow
am
al
the zucchini with an equ
great in this
es
tast
or
flav
squash. Its delicate
.
dish
simple pasta
Ingredients
¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons
olive oil, divided
1 large onion, sliced into
thin strips
1 pound small zucchini,
thinly sliced into coins
tti, cooked
¾ pound gluten-free spaghe
package;
on
ns
ctio
dire
to
ing
accord
er
wat
g
kin
coo
ta
reserve pas
1 cup shredded Parmigiano re
mo
s
plu
,
ese
che
o
gian
Reg
for serving
Freshly ground pepper
Blueberry
Cobbler
SERVES 10
Satisfy your summer sweet
tooth with a pan of classic
blueberry cobbler. Lemonscented blueberries hide
under a generous pastry
topping. Serve warm with a
scoop of vanilla ice cream
(traditional or dairy free).
FILLING
Ingredients
Butter, for greasing
baking dish
4 pints blueberries,
washed, dried and
picked over to remove
any steams
¾ cup granulated sugar
(reduce to ½ cup if your
blueberries are very
sweet)
2 teaspoons cornstarch
Zest of one lemon
Juice of one lemon,
about 2 tablespoons
TOPPING
Ingredients
2 cups xanthan gum-free
gluten-free flour
¼ cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon baking
powder
½ teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons cold butter,
cut into pieces
¾ cup milk plus
1 tablespoon
Directions
Preheat oven to 425° F.
Butter a 9 x 13-inch
baking dish.
In a large bowl, toss together
blueberries, granulated sugar
and cornstarch. Stir until
well combined. Add the
lemon zest and juice.
Pour berry mixture into the
prepared pan. Set aside.
In a large bowl, whisk
together the gluten-free
flour, sugar, baking powder
and salt. Add the butter.
Using your fingers or a
in a large nonstick
Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil
d the sliced
skillet over medium heat. Ad
t and golden
sof
y
ver
onions and cook until
uently.
freq
Stir
s.
ute
min
brown, about 8
and place in
pan
the
m
fro
on
oni
Remove the
1 tablespoon
ng
aini
a small bowl. Heat the rem
t and tender,
sof
il
unt
i
oil and cook the zucchin
about 5 minutes.
cup oil oil. Add the
Toss the pasta with the ¼
onions and zucchini.
shredded cheese.
Toss to combine. Add the
the pasta cooking
of
s
Add 2 to 3 tablespoon
dry, add more
water. Stir. If the pasta seems
ded, about two
pasta cooking water as nee
tablespoons at a time.
pepper to taste.
Season with freshly ground
Serve.
g fat, 15 mg chol,
Nutrition Analysis: 600 cal, 28
2 g fiber,
350 mg sodium, 74 g carbs,
4 g sugar, 15 g protein
pastry cutter, cut the butter
into the dry ingredients
until no large pieces of
butter remain.
Add the ¾ cup milk. Stir
with a wooden spoon until a
dough forms. If the mixture
is dry, add the additional
tablespoon of milk.
Drop the dough onto the
berries, leaving a little space
between the biscuits. (This
recipe makes a generous
amount of biscuit topping.
There won't be much room
between the biscuit pieces.)
Bake for 35 minutes or
until the biscuit topping is
golden brown and the filling
is boiling.
Remove from the oven and
place on a wire rack to cool.
Nutrition Analysis: 320 cal,
8 g fat, 20 mg chol, 280 mg
sodium, 64 g carbs, 3 g fiber,
33 g sugar, 3 g protein
www.glutenfreeliving.com 31
Cheap & Cheerful
A TASTE OF
e are summer ready with this edition of Cheap & Cheerful...and in my mind, we are all sailing around the Greek
islands, gazing at the turquoise water, drinking rosé, sunning ourselves and feasting on all the bright and lively flavors the
Mediterranean has to offer! There is something about the summer
months that just makes me crave light, bright and simple meals
and flavors like these. Plus, you don’t actually have to be on a Greek
island to eat like you’re on one. Still, a gal can dream...
For this issue, I wanted to keep things light, clean and simple,
because summer should be spent playing in the sun and having
fun rather than spent cooking for five hours in a kitchen. These
dishes are quick and easy to make, and require minimal effort and
ingredients. They also
use a lot of ingredients
that abound during the
summer months, like
watermelon, fresh mint,
cucumbers, tomatoes
and citrus. Most of these
dishes just happen to
be vegetarian or vegan.
I wanted to keep it that
way and give you lovely
readers the freedom to add whatever you might be grilling tonight.
So, please have fun with these dishes and personalize them to
your tastes.
The first recipe is for a big ol’ bowl of goodness, my Minty Mediterranean Salad. I guess this is my gluten free version of a tabbouleh salad, just Jilly-fied. I’ve used quinoa instead of the traditional
bulgur wheat, and I add in all my favorites: cucumbers, tomatoes
and olives, not to mention tons of fresh mint and parsley. This to me
is summer in a bowl. It’s even better with good-quality Greek olives
if you can find them. To dress this salad, I like to keep it simple with
just good-quality olive oil, fresh lemon juice, salt and pepper. You
can’t go wrong with this salad to accompany any of your summertime meals. Feel free to add some grilled shrimp, steak or chicken to
it as well, or some feta cheese crumbles or grilled halloumi cheese
slices would be divine. Truly, the sky is the limit with this fresh and
W
lively salad. This recipe is gluten free and vegan.
For my second recipe, I tried to lighten up a personal favorite—the mighty falafel. I’ve made my Herby Gluten-Free Falafels
with Zingy Greek Yogurt Dip. These babies are baked instead of
deep fried, and I use a tiny bit of baking powder, no flour, so they
really are just mighty protein-packed balls of goodness. The lemon
juice and olive oil help to keep them moist, but since they aren’t
deep fried, they can be a bit on the drier side, so dunk away in the
zingy Greek yogurt dipping sauce. I LOVE these, and even my
lil’ 10-month-old baby seemed to enjoy the flavors, so definitely a
crowd pleaser. Score for Mom! For a more filling meal, serve with
some of my Minty Mediterranean Salad. The falafels in this recipe
are gluten free, dairy
free and vegan. The
dip is gluten free and
vegetarian.
Finally that brings
us to my Watermelon
with Feta, Mint and
Lime Salsa. Sounds odd,
but trust me, the salty,
almost brininess of the
feta cheese and the tartness of the lime just do something magical to that plain ol’ summer
watermelon you probably have lying around. Also, a pinch of salt on
the watermelon really helps to bring out its sweetness. If you have an
outdoor gas or charcoal grill, try grilling the watermelon for a few
minutes on each side before serving for an even better take on this
simple yet delicious dish. This recipe is gluten free and vegetarian.
Please keep in mind that I shop around for the best deals and prices,
including going to my local farmers market, produce stand and Asian
market. These products I found to be especially cheap at my local
farmers market and produce stand, so do try to find your local one as
well for extra savings. I also swear by shopping at Aldi’s, so see if you
have one in your area. One more tip is to try getting your grains at
stores where you can just buy only what you need from bulk dispensers
that sell by the pound. I always recommend you doing the same to save
the most you can.
YOU DON'T ACTUALLY HAVE TO
BE ON A GREEK ISLAND TO EAT
LIKE YOU'RE ON ONE.
32
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
SYRYTSYNA TETIANA / SHUTTERSTOCK ; DARIA VOSKOBOEVA / SHUTTERSTOCK
BY JILLY LAGASSE
Minty Mediterranean Salad
SERVES 4 TO 6
Ingredients
1 cup quinoa (yields 3 cups quinoa
cooked)
¼ cup red onion, finely diced
1 medium cucumber, chopped
(about 2 cups)
2 medium Roma tomatoes, chopped
(about 2 cups)
1 cup black olives, halved
cup fresh mint, roughly chopped
cup fresh parsley, roughly chopped
2 tablespoons good-quality olive oil
Juice of 1 large lemon
(about 2 tablespoons)
Salt and pepper to taste
Directions
Prepare the quinoa as directed on package
and allow to cool.
Put the quinoa in a large bowl and add the
onions, cucumbers, tomatoes, olives, mint and
parsley. Drizzle the olive oil over top and add
the lemon juice.
Season with a bit of salt and lots of freshly
ground black pepper, and stir well to
incorporate all of the ingredients. Serve
either straight away or cover with cling film
and chill in the refrigerator until needed.
Nutrition Analysis: 180 cal, 9 g fat, 0 mg chol,
170 mg sodium, 23 g carbs, 4 g fiber,
2 g sugar, 5 g protein
COST BREAKDOWN:
Minty Mediterranean Salad
Considering you have the following
pantry items: olive oil, salt and pepper.
Shopping List:
Quinoa
$4.69
1 small red onion
$0.83
1 cucumber
$0.79
2 Roma tomatoes
$1.26
1 can black olives
$0.89
Fresh mint
$0.99
Fresh parsley
$0.99
1 lemon
$0.50
Total
$10.94 ÷ by 6 servings = $1.82
per serving
www.glutenfreeliving.com 33
Herby Gluten-Free
Falafels with Zingy
Greek Yogurt Dip
SERVES 8
FALAFELS
Ingredients
Cooking spray
3 15-ounce cans low-sodium
chickpeas, drained
2 large garlic cloves, roughly chopped
cup fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons good-quality olive oil
cup chopped fresh mint
1 large handful fresh parsley
( cup chopped)
1 tablespoon ground cumin
Pinch of cayenne pepper,
more if desired
Salt and pepper to taste
3 teaspoons baking powder
Salad greens and tomato slices
to serve, if desired
ZINGY GREEK YOGURT DIP
Ingredients
1 cup Greek yogurt, any percentage
you like
Zest and juice from 1 fresh lime
1 tablespoon fresh mint, finely chopped
Salt and pepper to taste
COST BREAKDOWN:
Herby Gluten-Free Falafels with
Zingy Greek Yogurt Dip
Assuming you have the following pantry
items: olive oil, ground cumin, cayenne
pepper, salt and pepper, baking powder.
Shopping List:
3 15-ounce cans chickpeas
($0.89 per can)
$2.67
Fresh garlic
$0.19
2 lemons
$1.00
Fresh mint
$0.99
Fresh parsley
$0.99
1 cup Greek yogurt
$2.00
1 lime
$0.19
Total
$8.03 ÷ by 8 servings = $1.00
per serving
34
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
Directions
Preheat the oven to 375° F. Grease 2
12-cup muffin tins with cooking spray and
set aside.You can bake on sheet pans as
well, but I find that the muffin tins help to
hold the falafels’ shapes.
In a large food processor bowl, combine
the chickpeas, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil,
mint and parsley. Close the lid and pulse all
together well until no large chunks remain
and you have a mealy consistency that
stays together.You may need to do this in
batches, taking time to scrape down the
sides and pulsing again.
Once well combined, put mixture in a large
mixing bowl and add the cumin, cayenne
pepper, a bit of salt and pepper, and the
baking powder. Mix together well until the
baking powder is well mixed in.
Using a measuring cup, scoop out ¼ cup
of the falafel batter and roll into a ball as
you would a meatball. Place into the wellgreased muffin tins, one falafel ball per cup.
Repeat until all the falafels are in the muffin
tins and bake at 375° F for 25 minutes. The
tops should be nice and brown. Allow to
cool fully in the tin before serving, this will
ensure they firm up and stay together.
While they are baking or cooling, mix
together the dipping sauce.
In a medium bowl, combine all the
ingredients for the dip and a bit of salt
and pepper to taste. Stir well to combine.
Cover with cling film and keep refrigerated
until needed.
To serve, if desired, place a bit of salad
greens on a plate along with some slices of
tomatoes. Place a few falafels on top and
either serve the dipping sauce on the side
or drizzle some over top.
Nutrition Analysis: 200 cal, 7 g fat, 0 mg chol,
220 mg sodium, 25 g carbs, 7 g fiber,
5 g sugar, 11 g protein
Watermelon with Feta, Mint and Lime Salsa
SERVES 6
Ingredients
6 pieces of watermelon,
quarters preferably
½ fresh lime, halved
½ cup feta cheese crumbles
1 tablespoon fresh mint,
chiffonade, with a bit
reserved for garnish
Salt and pepper to taste
Directions
Place the slices of watermelon
on a platter or plate. Squeeze
a bit of fresh lime juice over
top from ¼ of a lime.
and season with a pinch
of salt and fresh ground
pepper. Scatter a few pieces
of mint for garnish and serve
straight away.
In a small bowl, combine the
feta crumbles, mint and the
lime juice from the remaining
lime slice, and stir to combine.
*For a delicious take on
this dish, try grilling the
watermelon slices for one to
two minutes on each side on
a piping hot outdoor gas or
charcoal grill.
Scatter the feta mixture over
top of the watermelon slices,
Nutrition Analysis: 120 cal, 3 g
fat, 10 mg chol, 120 mg sodium,
23 g carbs, 1 g fiber, 18 g sugar,
4 g protein
COST BREAKDOWN:
Watermelon with Feta, Mint and Lime Salsa
Assuming you have the following pantry items: salt and pepper.
Shopping List:
Quarter fresh watermelon
$2.49
Feta cheese crumbles
$2.29
Fresh mint
$0.99
1 lime
$0.19
Total
$5.96÷ by 6 servings = $0.99 per serving
RECIPE PROVIDED BY TITO'S HANDMADE VODKA
Tito’s TIPSY GUGELHOPF
More gluten-free goodness from Blackbird Bakery and Tito’s
Handmade Vodka! Nothing is more gorgeous than a scalloped bundt
cake in the summer and many of the bundt cakes you see are loaded
with spirits! The alcohol bakes off in the oven, but the sugar in the
cake absorbs all the liquid leaving you with a sinfully moist crumb.
INGREDIENTS:
DIRECTIONS:
•
•
Preheat oven to 325 F. Coat the inside of a 7.5” x 4” (10 cups) bundt pan with non-stick spray. Beat the egg yolks,
lemon zest, sugar and 2 tablespoons Tito’s Handmade Vodka until pale and creamy.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
4 tblsp. Tito’s Handmade Vodka
2 ¼ cups Blackbird Bakery
Cake & Muffin Blend
4 eggs, separated
1 ¼ cups sugar
Zest of 1 lemon
Zest of 1 orange
1 tblsp. vanilla
1 ½ tsp. baking powder
1 cup half and half
½ cup cocoa powder
1 tblsp. instant coffee
1/2 cup water
Sift the Blackbird Bakery Cake & Muffin Blend with the baking powder. Alternating with the half and half, add the sifted
flour and baking powder to the yolk mixture and mix on medium until the batter is very smooth and well combined. In a
clean bowl, beat the egg whites with a pinch of salt and 2 teaspoons sugar until glossy peaks form. Fold into the batter.
Spoon half of the batter into a separate bowl. In a measuring cup, whisk the cocoa powder, with the instant coffee. Zest
the orange into the cocoa powder. Stir in the water and remaining 2 tablespoons of vodka. Mix until smooth.
Spoon a small amount of the blonde batter into the bottom of the pan. Then add a layer of the chocolate batter. Repeat
until all of the batter has been used. The cake will marble as it bakes.
Bake for 30 minutes, then rotate the pan and bake for 30 minutes more. The cake is done when it pulls from the sides
of the pan and a wooden skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean.
Allow the cake to cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then invert on a wire rack to cool completely. Dust with powdered sugar
and serve with freshly whipped cream. Serves 12.
www.glutenfreeliving.com 35
Not Just Gluten Free!
Raw vegan diet 101
Alicia M. Ojeda, culinary programs manager at Living Light
Culinary Institute, explains the raw vegan diet and how to
safely incorporate it into your daily life.
THE RAW FOOD DIET may seem like a new trend, but it’s technically not
when you consider that all the food prehistoric humans ate was uncooked—at least
until the discovery of fire. Many people credit the 19th-century Swiss nutritionist
Maximilian Bircher-Benner with establishing the foundation for what has evolved into
today’s raw vegan diet. But what exactly is a raw vegan diet, and is it safe?
Gluten-Free Living turned to Alicia M. Ojeda of the Living Light Culinary Institute in
Fort Bragg, California, to learn more about the raw vegan diet, dispel common
myths and uncover potential pitfalls.
ITS_AL_DENTE / SHUTTERSTOCK
BY FRIEDA WILEY, PHARMD, BCGP, RPH
FRIEDA WILEY: What exactly is a
raw vegan diet, and why do people
adopt it?
ALICIA M. OJEDA: A raw vegan diet is
a diet primarily based on fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds to the exclusion
of dairy—all in its natural state and
minimally processed. Some people actually consume raw meat and eggs in some
raw diets, but a raw vegan diet is 100
percent plant based. People adopt these
diets for a variety of reasons, including to
detoxify the body, improve their overall
health, help lower their cholesterol, lose
weight, reduce their carbon footprint,
improve their athletic performance, etc.
There have been many athletes who have
adopted vegan or raw vegan diets who
have reported significant improvements
in their athletic performance.
FW: Is it possible to eat a 100
percent raw food diet and be completely healthy? Why or why not?
AM: That question has mixed answers even
within the raw food community. I believe
being fully raw is possible, but we do need
to consider supplementation when it comes
to vitamin B12 and vitamin D, depending
on the climate in which you live (vitamin D
shouldn’t be an issue in tropical climates).
There have been some studies showing
it’s always a good idea to have your B12
levels checked—whether you’re a vegan or
raw vegan.
My understanding is that B12 comes
from the soil, but because our soil is depleted and, as a society, we wash our produce,
we don’t get the B12 we once did. People
who eat an animal-based diet are said to
get B12 from eating meat, but there have
been some studies comparing carnivores
and herbivores side by side that found both
groups had B12 issues.
I also believe the bioindividuality and
Ayurvedic doshas (an Indian principle that
different mind-body types have varying dietary, spiritual and environmental needs to
achieve balance) come into play here, too.
For example, people who have digestive
challenges may need to lightly steam their
vegetables to digest them more easily.
PHOTO: BLAKE GARDNER
FW: Where do raw foodists get
their calcium from?
AM: According to the acid-alkaline theory,
the body is in its healthiest state when it is
slightly alkaline. When we eat processed
foods, sugar, red meat, etc., we make ourselves susceptible to disease because these
foods form acid in the body. The body’s
goal is to achieve and maintain homeostasis, but when the body is in an acidic situation, it will leech calcium from our bones.
Plant-based food
such as oranges and
sesame seeds are rich
in calcium, and it’s a
form that’s bioavailable.
This means the form
of calcium these foods
contain can be easily
absorbed by the body.
Spinach is also high in
calcium, but it contains
compounds called oxalates that bind calcium
and make it difficult
for the body to absorb
the calcium found in
spinach. To get around
this, it’s important to
eat spinach with citrus
foods, because the
combination of the two
together makes the calcium more absorbable.
There are also some
other ways to help
strengthen your bones.
Getting sun exposure—the best form of
vitamin D—will help with bone formation,
too. Dark leafy greens, natural sea salt and
sea vegetables are highly mineralizing and
support bone health.
FW: Where do raw foodists get
their protein from?
AM: Every nut, seed and vegetable has a
percentage of fat, protein and carbohydrates. We get our proteins from nuts,
seeds and legumes. It’s very much a misnomer that you cannot get enough protein on
a raw vegan or vegan diet.
There’s a high protein content in broccoli, legumes and hemp seeds. In fact,
hemp seeds contain protein in the form
of amino acids, which is a more bioassimilable form, so the body doesn’t have to
adjust for that. When you consume other
protein, the body has to expend energy to
break that protein down into amino acids
the body can readily use.
For those who are interested in learning more, there’s a book called Becoming
Raw by Brenda Davis, Vesanto Melina and
Rynn Berry that actually shows you how
to calculate the exact amount of protein
you need.
FW: Isn't it expensive to eat a raw
food diet or become a vegan?
AM: I would say no, as long as you eat with
the seasons and eat the food that is locally
grown within your community as much
as possible. It also helps if you use fresh
fruits and vegetables more than nuts and
seeds and are sprouting your own seeds
and legumes.
Grow foods indoors and fortify your soil
with kelp to help replenish the nutrients
in the soil. It’s more important to eat
freshfruits and veggies. And better to eat
fresh fruits and veggies even if they’re not
organic than to not eat them at all because
of the nutrients they provide. Fruit in itself
varies, and if you look at the whole rainbow
array of fruit, you get so many antioxidants
and nutrients, I think fruits are nature’s
superfoods.
I’ve found these last few years I’ve
focused on eating more fresh fruits and
greens, and it’s more affordable. It’s when
you get into using a lot of the superfoods
or exotic foods that it becomes expensive.
It’s kind of like when you’re a carnivore and
you buy high-end meats.
FW: What advice do you have for
readers who still may feel adopting a raw vegan diet is extremely
difficult or impossible?
AM: It’s not about being 100 percent raw.
It’s about adding more fresh whole foods to
your diet. Start with a few vegetables and
fruits, and then keep adding more over
time. Your palate will change, and you’ll
start desiring more fresh fruits, vegetables,
nuts and seeds.
Frieda Wiley is a freelance health writer and
consultant pharmacist based in the piney woods
of East Texas. Twitter: @Frieda_Wiley
www.glutenfreeliving.com 37
Not Just Gluten Free!
BY LAURA HAHN
PHOTOS BY ANGELA SACKETT
Raw food diets are becoming more and more common with the increasing
popularity of cold-pressed juice, veggie noodles and the overall desire to eat
more wholesome and less processed foods.There are many different schools of
thought about what is classified as raw. Some believe that raw foods are those
that are never exposed to heat. Some believe that raw foods are those not
heated past 120° F. Others include foods that have been fermented or dried.
The following recipes are a great selection of raw items to try. I have included
a fancy green juice, an easy-to-make snack bar, a simple avocado lunch and a
flavor-packed poke bowl.These recipes can be adjusted to put your own spin on
them. Get creative, experiment and have fun trying something new.
38
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
Ingredients
50 hazelnuts, raw
½ cup sunflower seeds, raw
15 prunes, dried, pit removed
15 seedless dates
10 figs, raw or dried preferred
cup cacao powder, plus
2 tablespoons, raw
Green Juice
MAKES 3 SERVINGS
Cold-pressed juice is such a huge
craze nowadays. A 12-ounce bottle
can cost $4 and up. Making it at home
can be easy. Simply toss everything in
a blender.
Ingredients
1 apple, sliced
2 stalks celery
2 cups spinach
1 -inch cube fresh ginger
2½ cups water
Directions
Place all ingredients in blender and
blend until smooth. Place a coffee
strainer or cheese cloth over a
large bowl. Pour mixture into the
strainer or cheese cloth, and collect
juice in bowl.
Directions
In a food processor, blend the
hazelnuts and sunflower seeds into a
fine mixture. Place mixture in a large
bowl. Next, add the prunes, dates
and figs to the food processor and
blend until they start to form a ball.
Place the fruit in the bowl with the
nuts and mix well by hand. Slowly
add the cup cacao powder and
knead it into the mix. Gently sprinkle
the 2 tablespoons of cacao powder
evenly on the bottom of a baking dish
to form a thin layer, which will help
prevent the bars from sticking. Place
the mix into a square baking pan and
push evenly to fill the dish. I used an
empty mason jar to help roll it to all
edges. Slice and enjoy.
Nutrition Analysis: 450 cal, 14 g fat, 0 mg
chol, 0 mg sodium, 84 g carbs, 17 g fiber,
52 g sugar, 7 g protein
Stuffed Avocado
SUDOWOODO / SHUTTERSTOCK
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
MAKES 8 SERVINGS
Grab-n-go snacks are a must to keep
me going all day. These bars are easy to
make and packed with nutrition.
Nutrition Analysis: 190 cal, 18 g fat, 0 mg
chol, 200 mg sodium, 9 g carbs, 6 g fiber,
1 g sugar, 1 g protein
Poke Bowl
MAKES 2 SERVINGS
Poke bowls are becoming increasingly
popular. Normally rice makes up the
base for them, but I have substituted
veggie noodles to keep the raw
theme going.
Ingredients
2 seedless cucumbers
½ avocado
½ cup cherry tomatoes,
sliced in half
½ jalapeño, chopped
½ cup chopped mango
½ pound raw salmon
½ pound raw tuna
4 tablespoons chives, minced
Nutrition Analysis: 45 cal, 0 g fat, 0 mg
chol, 65 mg sodium, 10 g carbs, 3 g fiber,
6 g sugar, 1 g protein
Fruit and Nut Bars
Directions
Slice avocados in half. Remove the
peel and pit, then set aside. Slice
cherry tomatoes in half and place in
a bowl. Add olive oil, salt and pepper.
Chop basil and combine with tomato
mixture. Fill avocado with tomato
mixture and serve fresh.
Ingredients
2 avocados
1 cup cherry tomatoes
2 tablespoons olive oil
teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
½ cup basil
Directions
Use a spiral slicer or julienne peeler
to make cucumber veggie noodles.
Divide the noodles into two bowls.
Next, slice the avocado neatly and
distribute in both bowls on top of
the noodles. Do the same with the
tomatoes, jalapeño and mango. Slice
the salmon and tuna into even cubes
and distribute into each bowl. Top
each bowl with chives and serve.
Nutrition Analysis: 430 cal, 16 g fat,
125 mg chol, 135 mg sodium,
18 g carbs, 7 g fiber, 10 g sugar,
53 g protein
Not Just Gluten Free!
Cookbook Corner
Whether you have never heard of the
raw diet, are just starting it or have been
following it for years, the fabulous recipes in
this edition of Cookbook Corner from two
raw vegan cookbooks will open your eyes to
a whole new world of yummy possibilities.
40
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
Rawsome Vegan Baking
By Emily von Euw
(Page Street Publishing Co., 2014)
Rawsome Vegan Baking by Emily von Euw, creator of the popular blog This
Rawsome Vegan Life, is filled with more than 100 creative and delicious raw,
vegan and gluten-free sweet treats that are easy to make and beautiful to
the eye. Some people think that making raw food recipes requires a lot of
expensive equipment. For her dessert recipes Emily says the most important
piece of equipment needed is a good-quality food processor
Fresh Berry Tarts
with Whipped Vanilla
Coconut Cream
MAKES 4 TARTS
I absolutely adored whipped cream with fresh
berries when I was younger and before I was vegan.
When I chose to take dairy out of my diet, I was
pretty bummed to say “bye” to the deliciously
sweet combination. But then I discovered whipped
coconut cream. It is honestly way better than the
dairy version because it tastes like coconut, and is
loads healthier. Although strictly speaking it is not
raw, it’s without a doubt still worth making. These
would be perfect for a summer party outdoors,
and are fun for everyone to make. Enjoy the simple
delights nature provides.
CRUST
½ cup (135 g) raw hazelnuts
½ cup (73 g) raw almonds
1 cup (175 g) pitted dates
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
VANILLA COCONUT CREAM
1 14-ounce (400-ml) can full-fat coconut milk,
refrigerated for 48 hours
Seeds from 1 vanilla pod
Pinch of stevia or raw sugar
PHOTOGRAPHY: EMILY VON EUW
TOPPING
Fresh, local, organic berries!
TO MAKE THE CRUST: Pulse the nuts into
flour in your food processor, then add the dates
and vanilla and process until a crumbly dough is
formed. Press into parchment paper–lined tart tins
and put in the fridge.
TO MAKE THE COCONUT CREAM: After
your coconut milk has chilled in the fridge, there
should be a layer of solid coconut fat on top when
you open the can; scoop this off and put into a
chilled mixing bowl, then whip until stiff peaks form,
adding the vanilla seeds and sweetener, as you like.
Spread the whipped cream into your tart crusts
and top off with your berries.
Strawberry Cheesecake Pops
with Coconut Flakes
MAKES 10 POPS
These will stop you in your tracks and
make you say, “Oh my goodness.” My
friend said they taste like strawberry
cheesecake, so that’s what I named
them. I’m logical like that.
1 cup (80 g) fresh young
coconut meat
1 cup (175 g) pitted dates
1 cup (145 g) raw cashews
1 cup (236 ml) coconut water
or vegan milk
1 cup (145 g) hulled strawberries
Seeds from 1 vanilla pod
¼ cup (21 g) unsweetened shredded
coconut
Blend all the ingredients until smooth.
Pour into your pop molds and put in
the freezer. When they are frozen solid,
take them out of their molds (run hot
water over the outside to help get
them out), coat them in coconut, then
nom them up!
www.glutenfreeliving.com 41
Blueberry Strawberry Banana Ice-Cream Cake
MAKES 1 CAKE (8 SERVINGS)
This cake was so delicious I couldn’t wait
for it to completely freeze before I started
eating it . . . #YOLO
DECORATION
10 strawberries, hulled and cut in half
BERRY LAYER
1 cup (155 g) frozen blueberries
1 cup (255 g) frozen strawberries
1 cup (236 ml) vegan milk or coconut
water, or as needed
1 cup (175 g) pitted dates or (100 g) raw
walnuts, or another banana
TO MAKE THE FIRST LAYER: Place the
halved strawberries around the edge of a
springform pan. Set aside. Now blend all the
vanilla ice-cream cake ingredients together
until smooth, adding as little vegan milk or
coconut water as possible (I used about ¼
cup [59ml]). Spread into the bottom of the
pan; this should press the berries to the
inner edge. Put in the freezer.
TO MAKE THE BERRY LAYER: Blend it
all up until smooth. Carefully spread over top
of the vanilla ice-cream cake layer and put
in the freezer for 2 or 3 hours, until it’s set.
Then cut and serve with other berries! Let it
soften a little before eating, because it makes
it creamier.
PHOTOGRAPHY: EMILY VON EUW
VANILLA ICE-CREAM CAKE LAYER
2 cups (290 g) raw cashews
2 bananas
1 cup (175 g) pitted dates
¼ cup (59 ml) melted coconut oil
Seeds from 1 vanilla pod
Vegan milk or coconut water
42
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
Chocolate Molten
Lava Cakes
with Goji Berries
MAKES ABOUT 4 LARGE LAVA CAKES
This is still an all-time favorite on my blog,
and I can’t say I’m surprised. Just look at the
gooey chocolate goodness. Can YOU resist?
CAKE
cup (30 g) buckwheat groats
cup (79 ml) raw walnuts
¼ cup (59 ml) cacao powder
cup (175 g) pitted dates
cup (59 g) raisins
MOLTEN LAVA MIDDLE
cup (79 ml) melted cacao butter
cup (115 g) pure maple syrup
cup (59 g) pitted dates
cup (40 g) cacao powder
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
¼ teaspoon Himalayan sea salt
¼ teaspoon chili powder
Vegan milk
GARNISH
Cacao nibs
Goji berries
TO MAKE THE CAKES: Pulse the oats,
walnuts and cacao powder in your food
processor until they become a coarse flour.
Add the dates and raisins and process until
it all starts to stick together. Using about
two-thirds of the mixture (you have to save
some for the tops), press into the bottom
and sides of parchment paper–lined cupcake
tins and put in the fridge. Use the rest of the
mixture to make the tops by pressing it into
cookie molds the same diameter of your
cupcake tins. Put those in the fridge as well.
TO MAKE THE MOLTEN MIDDLE:
Blend all ingredients until smooth, adding
the milk, as needed, to make it creamy and
a “molten” consistency (whatever that
means…hopefully you know). Take the
cakes out of the cupcake molds and pour
the molten mixture into each one, filling up
almost to the top. Now carefully press the
tops onto the cakes, gently pressing together
the edges. Flip over and decorate with cacao
nibs and goji berries. Eat da lava, mohn.
A FEW SUBSTITUTION OPTIONS: If
you don’t want to use cacao, use coconut oil
instead of cacao butter and carob instead of
cacao powder.
www.glutenfreeliving.com 43
The Rawsome Vegan Cookbook
By Emily von Euw
(Page Street Publishing Co., 2015)
The Rawsome Vegan Cookbook by Emily von Euw features mouthwatering raw and
lightly cooked savory recipes to delight any palate, whether you’re vegetarian, a raw
vegan or just looking for something healthy, interesting and delicious to add to your
repertoire. The wide selection of stunning main dishes are easy to make and so tasty
that you’ll be celebrating veggies instead of missing meat and dairy.
Epic Portabello Yam Burgers
with Parsley, Herb Cheeze + Shredded Veg
MAKES 2 BURGERS
The name says it all.
BUNS
2 teaspoons (10 mL) extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons (10 mL) gluten-free tamari
4 Portabello mushroom caps
BURGERS
1 medium yam
1 cup (50 g) chopped
green onion
1 tablespoon (14 g) miso paste
1 teaspoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon paprika powder
½ teaspoon dried rosemary
½ teaspoon dried savory
½ teaspoon chili powder
½ cup (76 g) hulled
hemp seeds
To make the burgers: Wash and peel the
yam, then chop into ½-inch (13-mm) pieces.
Throw the chopped yam along with the rest
of the ingredients in your food processor
and process until it becomes a mushy paste
(albeit really yummy). Form into ¼-cup
(53-g) patties using a cookie mold or your
hands. Dehydrate at 115° F (46° C) in the
dehydrator for 1 hour, flip them over, then
bake for 1 more hour or until they can
hold their shape when you pick them up.
Alternatively, use your oven at its lowest
temperature ‘til you get the same result,
about 1 hour.
To make the cheeze: Blend all the
ingredients together until smooth and
delicious!
Layer up on a Portabello cap: the shredded
veg, parsley, a patty, some cheeze and more
shredded beets and carrots. Top it off with
another mushroom cap and sprinkle with
sesame seeds. Repeat with the other patty.
EPIC.
ADD-ONS
¼ cup (25 g) shredded carrot
¼ cup (25 g) shredded beet
½ cup (20 g) fresh parsley
2 teaspoons (7 g) white
sesame seeds
To make the buns: Rub the olive oil and
tamari into the mushroom caps, then
marinate in a dehydrator at 115° F (46° C)
for 2 hours, or until they have darkened
and are soft and juicy. Alternatively, use your
oven at its lowest temperature until you get
the same result, around 1 hour.
44
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
PHOTOGRAPHY: EMILY VON EUW
HERB CHEEZE
½ cup (76 g) Brazil nuts
1 tablespoon (15 mL) fresh
lemon juice
½ teaspoon sea salt, as desired
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
1 teaspoon dried basil
Spicy Noodle Bowl
with Beet, Carrot, Zucchini + Sweet Tamarind Sauce
This is inspired by pad thai, but tastes a
billion times fresher. Everyone in the house
wanted a bite.
SWEET TAMARIND SAUCE
2 tablespoons (28 g) tamarind paste
½ cup (118 ml) hot water, as needed
2 tablespoons (29 g) chunk peeled
ginger
4 peeled garlic cloves
2 teaspoons (10 ml) maple syrup
2 teaspoons (10 ml) gluten-free tamari
2 tablespoons (28 g) tahini
NOODLES
2 beets
2 zucchinis
2 large carrots
To make the sauce: Blend everything
together until smooth, adding water
as needed.
TOPPINGS
1 cup (161 g) chopped baby tomatoes
1 cup (40 g) cilantro leaves
½ teaspoon white sesame seeds
(optional)
½ teaspoon black sesame seeds
(optional)
To make the noodles: Wash, peel and slice
all the veg using a mandolin, a vegetable
spiral slicer or a vegetable peeler.
Adjust the flavor as you like.
Toss the noodles with the sauce and then
garnish with the toppings.YUMMAY.
www.glutenfreeliving.com
45
Summer Rolls
with Shredded Veg,
Avocado, Basil, Mint
+ Dipping Sauce
MAKES 6 SUMMER ROLLS
Crunchy, light, fresh and flavorful, I could
eat these all year long. Well, I kinda do
that already.
FILLINGS
2 large carrots
1 cup (341 g) purple cabbage
1 avocado
1 cup (40 g) lightly packed basil leaves
1 cup (40 g) lightly packed mint leaves
WRAPS
6 rice papers (or large collard leaves)
DIPPING SAUCE
3 tablespoons (44 ml) water
2 tablespoons (30 ml) fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons (5 g) mint leaves
2 tablespoons (5 g) basil leaves
1 tablespoon (14 g) miso paste
1 tablespoon (11 g) almond butter
Chili powder, to taste (optional)
1 tablespoon (15 g) white sesame
seeds (optional)
Shred the carrots and cabbage. Slice the
avocado meat into strips.
Fill a large bowl with warm water. To soften
the rice papers, simply dip them (one at a
time) into the water for around 10 seconds.
Then use like a tortilla: assemble the veggies
and herbs on it and wrap up.
To make the dipping sauce: Blend all
ingredients until smooth. Sprinkle with
sesame seeds. Enjoy!
46
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
Sushi: Maki Rolls
with Avocado,Carrot,
Bell Pepper +
Cauliflower Rice
Rice-free sushi? Huh? Yeah, baby. We are using
cauliflower instead. Oh and by the way, when
“sushi” is rolled like this, it’s actually called
maki. Personally I love cooked rice, and I
think it is part of a healthy diet, but there are
days when I want a lighter meal, and that is
where raw dishes come in.
CAULIFLOWER RICE
1 small head cauliflower
1 teaspoon dried dill
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
teaspoon stevia powder
FILLINGS
1 avocado
½ bell pepper
1 large carrot
4 nori sheets
Peanut Lime Sauce (recipe below)
To make the rice: Process the cauliflower in
a food processor until it becomes a bunch of
little crumbs. In a bowl, stir in the rest of the
ingredients by hand with the cauliflower.
Julienne all the vegetables (in other words,
cut into thin strips).
For each nori sheet, spread on ¼ of the rice
evenly, leaving one edge of about ½-inch
(1-cm) without rice. Sprinkle a little water
on this edge when you roll up the sheet,
starting from the opposite side. This will
help everything stick together. Arrange a few
slices of avocado, pepper and carrot. Roll up
tightly and cut with a sharp knife. Serve with
the peanut sauce.
PHOTOGRAPHY: EMILY VON EUW
Peanut Lime Sauce
PEANUT LIME SAUCE
2 tablespoons (22 g) peanut butter
2 tablespoons (22 g) almond butter
2 peeled garlic cloves
2 teaspoons (10 ml) fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon (15 ml) gluten-free tamari
3 tablespoons (44 ml) water
4 fresh mint leaves
4 fresh basil leaves
To make the sauce: Blend all the ingredients
together until smooth, adding more water if
you need to.
www.glutenfreeliving.com 47
Kids' Kitchen
KEEP
WITH THE
BY HOLLY VINE
Ombre Frozen Yogurt Popsicles
MAKES 6 POPS
While plain yogurt is naturally
gluten free, some flavored
yogurts can contain gluten,
so it’s best to stick with plain
and check the yogurt has been
manufactured in a gluten-free
environment.
Ingredients
1 cup blackberries
14 ounces plain Greek yogurt
1 cup raspberries
6 ice pop molds
Directions
Crush the blackberries with a
fork into a smooth puree.
Divide the puree into
three bowls. Add about 2
tablespoons of puree to
the first bowl and about 4
tablespoons to the second
bowl. The third bowl (the one
you mashed the fruit in) will
contain the remaining puree.
Divide the yogurt in half. Set
half aside for the raspberry
pops.
Add small amounts of yogurt
to the first and second bowls,
mixing more into the first
48
bowl than the second. Put the
remaining plain yogurt in a
fourth bowl.
You should have four bowls
in total, ranging in fruit and
color strength from “all fruit”
through to “all yogurt.”
Add the pure fruit puree to
the bottom of the ice pop
molds evenly. Tap the mold to
level out the mixture. Add a
layer of the mixture with more
fruit than yogurt, distributing
evenly to the molds. Then use
the final yogurt and fruit mix
before finishing with a final
yogurt-only layer.
Add the popsicle sticks
and place in the freezer for
8 hours.
Repeat with the raspberries.
You can use any soft fruit to
make these pops, but those
with a deep color give the
best visual effect. Try kiwi,
strawberry or mango for
other flavor ideas.
Nutrition Analysis: 60 cal,
0.5 g fat, 5 mg chol, 25 mg
sodium, 7 g carbs, 3 g fiber,
4 g sugar, 7 g protein
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
www.glutenfreeliving.com 49
PHOTOGRAPHY: HOLLY VINE ; KATYA BOGINA / SHUTTERSTOCK
A MACARON MENU
for your
summer soiree
With the sun shining and flowers blooming, it’s a lovely time
to host a get-together, and the perfect time to try your hand
at baking a classic French treat.
BY ANGELA SACKETT
MY DAUGHTER, ANNA, and I love to bake together. Our personalities are pretty opposite—I tend to be the experimental one who
can’t ever leave a recipe alone, and she’s a rule-following, precisemeasuring stickler for details. This makes for a perfect partnership
LQWKHNLWFKHQ,UHOLVKFRPLQJXSZLWKZLOGÁDYRUFRPELQDWLRQV
(and fun names for those recipes!), and she’s the chemist-perfectionist who helps make sure the recipes will actually work, and that
we record them accurately so we can make and share them again
and again.
We also love to open our home to share the recipes we make,
and this soiree for ladies and their daughters (from elementary age
to teens) was a perfect way to cheer our spirits as we looked forward to the school year wrapping up and the beach days of summer
ÀQDOO\DUULYLQJ
Because Anna and I are both gluten intolerant, we like to make
sure our menu is “safe” for others as well. Then, when friends
bring their yummy recipes, if we can’t indulge, we have offerings
to share. For our party, Anna created these three macaron recipes,
50
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
and we served them with gluten-free champagne-and-strawberry
cupcakes that I created. We had a simple make-your-own-drink
station with sparkling wine and sparkling water, fresh orange
juice and fruit-infused still water. For those who wanted a bit
PRUHRIDPHDOÀUVWZHVHUYHGDVZHHWDQGVDYRU\FDUURWGLOO
soup and a fresh salad with fruit, nuts, goat cheese and a homemade balsamic dressing.
Your own soiree can be anything you want it to be. The fun
part is coming together with loved ones in a festive, fun and safe
atmosphere to enjoy one another’s company—and some fabulous
gluten-free food! GF
Angela Sackett is a photographer at Legacy Seven Studios and writer
at saletlux.com and dancingwithmyfather.net, where she shares heartthoughts, recipes and hospitality tips. She and her 16-year-old daughter,
Anna, join together for photography and other creative projects, and
Angela is working to secure Anna’s input in the process of writing her
first cookbook.
Strawberry Lemonade Macarons
Ingredients
145g almond flour
110g confectioners’ sugar
3 tablespoons freezedried strawberry
powder (about ½ cup
before crushing)
115g egg whites at room
temperature
130g granulated sugar
teaspoon burgundy gel
food coloring (optional)
Sprinkles (optional)
Strawberry Buttercream
(see recipe, page 53)
Lemon Curd
(see recipe below)
Directions
Place almond flour,
confectioners’ sugar and
freeze-dried strawberry
powder in food processor
and pulse until very fine. Sift
twice, then set aside. Prepare
a baking sheet lined with a
Silpat or parchment paper (I
think parchment works best).
In a stand mixer with the
whisk attachment, beat egg
whites on medium speed
until foamy. Increase speed to
medium-high and gradually
add in granulated sugar. Add
food coloring if using, increase
speed to high and whip until
egg whites form stiff, glossy
peaks when you lift the whisk,
about 3 more minutes. Egg
whites shouldn’t move when
bowl is tilted.
Pour the twice-sifted dry
ingredients on top of the egg
white mixture and gently
fold together with a silicone
spatula until combined. This
step is crucial to the texture
of the finished macarons.
TIP: Every few folds, drop a
small amount from the spatula.
If the mixture settles into the
rest of the bowl within about
15 seconds, it is ready. If not,
fold a few more times.
bottoms. If the bottoms
stick, continue baking.
Place into a pastry bag with
a circular tip (such as Wilton
1A) and pipe evenly sized
circles, about 1½ inches in
diameter. The circles should
spread, but only slightly.
TIP: Bang the pan on the
countertop a few times to
release air bubbles. This will
prevent the macarons from
cracking in the oven. Set aside
pan in a safe place for 45
minutes to an hour, depending
on the humidity of the room.
You want the tops to dry out
so the batter doesn’t stick to
your finger when touched.
TIP: If you plan to use
sprinkles, now is the time
to gently apply them to the
tops of the dried macarons
before baking.
LEMON CURD
After they are dried, preheat
the oven to 300° F. Bake for
12-20 minutes, checking to
make sure that the macarons
peel off the pan fairly easily
and rise to form a small
layer (called “feet”) on the
Stir in butter and lemon
zest. Refrigerate for at least
20 minutes.
Cool completely, then flip
half the shells over and fill
with Strawberry Buttercream
and Lemon Curd. TIP: For
best results, pipe a circle of
buttercream along the edge of
the cookie, then add a small
amount of Lemon Curd in the
center before topping with a
second cookie.
Ingredients
½ cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
¼ cup water
½ cup lemon juice (from
about 1-2 lemons)
2 egg yolks
2 tablespoons butter
1½ teaspoons lemon zest
Directions
In a medium saucepan, stir
together sugar, cornstarch
and water. Turn the heat to
medium-low and gradually add
in lemon juice and egg yolks.
Constantly stir until thickened.
It will thicken somewhat
suddenly; remove from heat
immediately.
If using for macaron filling,
scoop lemon curd into a
piping bag with a 1A tip.
MAKING
MARVELOUS
MACARONS
ANNA’S TIPS FROM
THE TRENCHES
Be sure macarons are
completely dry to the
touch (lightly touch the
tops) before baking.
While most recipes can
easily be made without
weight-based measurements, many baked goods
and especially macaron recipes require measuring by
weight for the best results.
To perfectly prepare these
elegant cookies, invest in a
digital baking scale.
Temperature is crucial
when baking these delicate
treats. It’s a good idea to
buy an inexpensive oven
thermometer to make sure
your temperature is accurate. We bought ours at the
grocery store, and it hangs
from the oven rack.
If you’re serious about
consistent sizing, you can
create a template with
permanent marker and
place it underneath parchment paper for piping your
cookies. While you can buy
specialty macaron baking
mats, I find the cookies
tend to stick to them.
www.glutenfreeliving.com 51
Ingredients
3 black teabags of choice
(Irish breakfast, English
breakfast)
145 g almond flour
110 g confectioners’ sugar
115 g egg whites at room
temperature
130 g granulated sugar
teaspoon black food
coloring (optional)
Sprinkles (optional)
Honey Buttercream
(see recipe, page 53)
Directions
Cut open tea bags and blend loose tea
in food processor with almond flour and
confectioners’ sugar. Pulse until very fine. Sift
twice, then set aside.
Prepare a baking sheet lined with a Silpat or
parchment paper (again, I think parchment
works best).
52
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
In a stand mixer with the whisk
attachment, beat egg whites on medium
speed until foamy. Increase speed to
medium-high and gradually add in
granulated sugar. Add food coloring if
you are using, increase speed to high and
whip until egg whites form stiff, glossy peaks
when you lift the whisk, about 3 more
minutes. Egg whites shouldn’t move when
bowl is tilted.
Pour the twice-sifted dry ingredients on
top of the egg white mixture and gently
fold together with a silicone spatula until
combined. This step is crucial to the texture
of the finished macarons. TIP: Every few
folds, drop a small amount from the spatula.
If the mixture settles into the rest of the
bowl within about 15 seconds, it is ready. If
not, fold a few more times.
Place into a pastry bag with a circular tip
(such as Wilton 1A) and pipe evenly sized
circles, about 1½ inches in diameter. The
circles should spread, but only slightly.
TIP: Bang the pan on the countertop a few
times to release air bubbles. This will prevent
the macarons from cracking in the oven. Set
aside pan in a safe place for 45 minutes to
an hour, depending on the humidity of the
room.You want the tops to dry out so the
batter doesn’t stick to your finger when
touched. TIP: If you plan to use sprinkles,
now is the time to gently apply them to the
tops of the dried macarons before baking.
After the macarons are dried, preheat the
oven to 300° F. Bake for 12-20 minutes,
checking to see that the macarons peel off
the pan fairly easily. If the bottoms stick,
continue baking.
Cool completely, then flip half the shells over
and fill with Honey Buttercream, and top
with a second cookie. Enjoy!
PHOTOGRAPHY: ANGELA SACKETT; ANASTASIIAM / SHUTTERSTOCK
Tea and Honey Macarons
Salted Caramel Latte Macarons
Ingredients
145 g almond flour
110 g confectioners’ sugar
2½ teaspoons espresso powder
115 g egg whites at room temperature
130 g granulated sugar
Sprinkles (optional)
Espresso Buttercream
(see recipe below)
Salted Caramel (see recipe below)
Directions
Place almond flour, confectioners’ sugar and
espresso powder in food processor and
pulse until very fine. Sift twice, then set aside.
Prepare a baking sheet lined with a Silpat or
parchment paper (I always use parchment).
In a stand mixer with the whisk attachment,
beat egg whites on medium speed until
foamy. Increase speed to medium-high and
gradually add in granulated sugar. Turn speed
up to high and whip until egg whites have
glossy stiff peaks when you lift the whisk up,
about 3 more minutes. Egg whites shouldn’t
move when bowl is tilted.
Pour the twice-sifted dry ingredients on
top of the egg white mixture and gently
fold together with a silicone spatula until
combined. This step is crucial to the texture
of the finished macarons. TIP: Every few
folds, drop a small amount from the spatula.
If the mixture settles into the rest of the
bowl within about 15 seconds, it is ready. If
not, fold a few more times.
Place in a pastry bag with a circular tip (such
as Wilton 1A) and pipe evenly sized circles,
about 1½ inches in diameter. The circles
should spread, but only slightly. TIP: Bang
the pan on the countertop a few times to
release air bubbles. This will prevent the
macarons from cracking in the oven. Set
aside pan in a safe place for 45 minutes to an
hour, depending on the humidity of the room.
You want the tops to dry out so the batter
doesn’t stick to your finger when touched.
TIP: If you plan to use sprinkles, now is the
time to gently apply them to the tops of the
dried macarons before baking.
After they are dried, preheat the
oven to 300° F. Bake for 12-20
minutes, checking to see that the
macarons peel off the pan fairly
easily. If the bottoms stick, continue
baking.
Cool completely, then flip half the
shells over and fill with Espresso
Buttercream and Salted Caramel.
TIP: For best results, pipe a circle
of buttercream around the edges,
then lightly fill the center with Salted
Caramel.
SALTED CARAMEL
Ingredients
280g granulated sugar
½ cup heavy cream
10 tablespoons butter
½ teaspoon sea salt (optional)
Directions
Place half the sugar in a medium saucepan
over low-medium heat. Stir fairly often until
melted. Add in remaining sugar and continue
to stir until melted.
Once sugar has reached a golden amber
color, gradually add heavy cream. Be careful,
as the caramel will rapidly bubble and is
hotter than boiling water.
Once cream is incorporated, remove from
heat and add butter. This will stop the
caramel from cooking any further. Add
sea salt and stir to combine.
If using for macaron filling, let cool and
scoop into a piping bag with a 1A tip.
Caramel can be refrigerated for up to
three months.
BUTTERCREAM
(Espresso, Honey, Strawberry)
Ingredients
½ cup softened butter
2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1-3 tablespoons heavy cream (for texture)
VARIATIONS
For Honey: ¼ cup honey
For Espresso: 1 teaspoon vanilla extract and
2 teaspoons instant granulated coffee or
espresso powder
For Strawberry: 2½ tablespoons crushed
freeze-dried strawberries
Directions
In bowl of a stand mixer with the whisk
attachment, whip butter until light and
creamy.
Gradually add confectioners’ sugar and
continue beating until combined.
Add in flavoring of your choice, or skip to
adding cream.
For Honey Buttercream: Add in honey and
whip on high speed until fully incorporated.
For Espresso Buttercream: Mix together
vanilla extract and espresso powder until
fully dissolved, then add liquid mixture to
buttercream.
For Strawberry Buttercream: Crush freezedried strawberries in a zip-top storage bag
with a rolling pin, then blend into frosting.
Slowly add heavy cream until you reach
desired texture. Use immediately or
refrigerate for up to a week.
If using for macaron filling, scoop into a
piping bag with a 1A tip.
www.glutenfreeliving.com 53
MILOS DJAPOVIC / SHUTTERSTOCK; CURLY PAT / SHUTTERSTOCK
Skin
Symptoms
OF CELIAC
DISEASE
BY SUSAN COHEN
C
eliac can manifest in many ways. For
some individuals, their symptoms occur on the skin in a condition known as
dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). In these
instances, the path to a celiac diagnosis
begins with the diagnosis of DH.
DH has a specific set of symptoms. Patients will have
“bumps or blisters…clustered together… [that] appear
bilaterally on the forearms, elbows, knees, buttocks and
hairline,” explains Robyn Gmyrek, M.D., board-certified dermatologist at Union Square Laser Dermatology
in New York. The “bilateral” appearance she refers to
means that a patient’s DH symptoms will develop, for
example, on both knees.
According to Nicole Seminara, M.D., assistant
professor in the Ronald O. Perelman Department of
Dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Center, the
bumps and blisters characteristic of DH are “intensely
itchy [and] people usually scratch them off before they
ever present to a doctor.” As a result, Seminara says, “It’s
uncommon to see an intact blister with this disorder.”
Instead, patients’ skin will “look like [it has] been
scratched to pieces,” notes Seminara. When no bumps
or blister are present, “it’s more the history of intense
itch coupled with the distribution that leads us to the
diagnosis. The diagnosis [of DH] is then confirmed
with a biopsy.” Another important aspect of DH is
age—it tends to develop in patients who are in their
30s or 40s.
The connection between DH and celiac is something
dermatologists “are very aware of...and take very seriously,” says Seminara. “If I have a patient with DH,” she
says, he or she is “always sent to [a gastroenterologist]”
to be tested for celiac.
“The great majority of patients with DH have celiac
disease as defined by a duodenal biopsy showing villous
atrophy," explains Benjamin Lebwohl, M.D., M.S., director of clinical research at The Celiac Disease Center
at Columbia University. “The remainder may have a
normal- or near-normal-appearing duodenal biopsy
but nevertheless have their DH triggered by dietary gluten, which is why DH is sometimes referred to as ‘celiac
disease of the skin.’”
As is often the case with celiac symptoms, the po-
tential for misdiagnosis is high. “This is because not all
people with DH will have typical lesions, and the rash
may come and go,” explains Gmyrek. The rash can be
misidentified and “is commonly diagnosed as eczema
or an allergic contact dermatitis by both patients and
physicians.” She says that “if you have been diagnosed
with eczema, have a lot of itching and you are not
responsive to topical treatments…you should consider
getting tested for celiac disease and skin biopsied to
rule out DH.”
When it comes to healing DH, the gluten-free diet
is key—as is patience. “[Patients] have to be very
strictly gluten free, and [the healing is] a slow process,”
says Seminara.
Gmyrek also emphasizes the importance of patients
being aware of the healing timetable. “Patients need
to know this because they expect that within a week
or two of being gluten free, the rash will be gone or
they will stop getting new lesions,” explains Gmyrek.
That expectation can cause problems because when
the lesions have not gone away soon after starting the
diet, patients think “that they must somehow be getting gluten in their diet because the rash is not gone
yet.” In fact, Gmyrek says, “It can take one to two years
even with a strictly gluten-free diet for the skin rash to
totally resolve.”
The drug Dapsone can help ease discomfort caused
by the rash. “[Dapsone] decreases the body’s immune response and therefore the rash,” says Gmyrek.
“Patients feel relief within 48 to 72 hours of taking
this medication.” However, the drug does not replace
a gluten-free diet. “Taking Dapsone does not cure DH
[because] only a gluten-free diet forever will rid the
patient of DH,” says Gmyrek.
Even when strictly adhering to the diet, skin lesions
may still appear. Gmyrek points out that iodine, which
is important to normal thyroid health, “will often cause
skin lesions in patients with DH.” She emphasizes that
“iodine does not adversely affect patients with celiac
disease who do not have DH and should not be eliminated in those patients.” For those with DH, Gmyrek
recommends that “patients use non-iodized table salt
or sea salt, which has less iodine than iodized table salt,
until their DH has resolved.” GF
www.glutenfreeliving.com 55
56
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
A BACKPACKING TRIP
ON THE GLUTEN-FREE DIET
BY DANIELLE
MILLER
Hiking in Torres del
Paine National Park,
Patagonia, Chile
BEFORE YOU HIT THE ROAD
I was sure that Italy, with its pizza and pasta
staples, would be off limits, so I was ecstatic
to learn that the country is actually very clued
up on eating gluten free. It's quite easy to find
restaurants that cater to gluten-free travellers
(mainly in the larger cities) and indulge in
delicious gluten-free pasta and pizza—absolute heaven.
India also surprised me. While awareness is very low, a lot of the
food is naturally gluten free, with rice the staple instead of bread
(especially in southern India). Food preparation there also employs alternative flours, like gram and lentil, as thickeners instead
of wheat. Just stay away from those temping naans and chapatis.
If you're backpacking through Europe, look for the crossed
grain symbol that indicates gluten free. In South America, the sin
T.A.C.C. symbol translates to “without wheat, oats, barley, rye.”
There are quite a few gluten-free symbols around the world, so
learn to recognize them before your excursion.
If you're traveling to countries that don't speak English, first
learn some useful vocabulary and phrases. It's not just wheat,
barley and rye that you need to learn but also terms like noodles,
breadcrumbs and soy sauce that might appear on a menu.
Download gluten-free dining cards in the language of the
country you're traveling to. They list ingredients that contain
gluten and also provide instructions on food preparation and
cross-contamination. Whenever I'm in a country where I don't
speak the language, I just hand over the card to the waiter. I don't
know how I would have survived traveling without these—I always
have them in my wallet.
GIVE ADVANCE WARNING
Always contact airlines in advance. Most of them
can arrange a gluten-free meal if you give more
than 48 hours' notice. What you're served will
be hit and miss—I was once presented with a
bowl of apple slices with a side of orange slices
as an evening meal on a long-haul flight—but
it's better than having nothing to eat for eight hours.
Get in touch with hostels in advance. If breakfast is included,
ask what it is and if they can provide a gluten-free option. I often
get told, “We don't have any gluten-free food here.” Just be patient,
and provide suggestions—I always say that I'd be happy with some
fresh fruit and plain yogurt for breakfast, or ham and cheese that I
can put on my own rice crackers.
If you're worried about the constant risk of cross-contamination,
ask the hostel if they have a kitchen where you can cook your own
58
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
food. I've done this a few times—it means less to worry about
because you're in control of what you're eating, and it saves you
lots of money on eating out. A good trick is to buy a bag of rice or
lentils to carry from place to place in your backpack, and then just
grab some fresh meat and veggies along the way.
BE PREPARED
You've got to accept that a good portion of your
backpack needs to hold a hoard of gluten-free
supplies. So forget the wetsuit you’re tempted to
pack just in case you suck up the courage to go
diving with sharks. I always pack toaster bags
and some foil to avoid cross-contamination in
hostel kitchens and take as many gluten-free staples as I can fit.
Every time I get to a large city or town, I head to health shops
and large supermarkets. It’s a great chance to stock up on glutenfree essentials like cereal bars and rice crackers. You'd be surprised
what you might find.
A lesson I learned the hard way is to check which foods are allowed to cross international borders. I once had to empty my entire
backpack at the border between Chile and Argentina to have all
my food supplies inspected, with quite a few things confiscated.
Leave items in their original packaging rather than transferring
them to suspicious looking zip-lock bags.
Of course, Murphy's Law entails that if you head off into the
wilderness carrying a ton of gluten-free supplies, you're going to
come across the most amazing gluten-free food. One of the most
remote regions I've backpacked to is Patagonia in the southern
tip of South America. In a tiny Argentinian frontier town called
El Chalten, walking along the deserted main street, I gawped
open-mouthed at a beautiful little deli displaying the crossed-grain
symbol. To my amazement they were selling homemade glutenfree empanadas. Later that day I had a picnic lunch on a glacier
enjoying the classic Argentinian takeaway snack of empanadas
like everyone else. What a surreal moment!
ENJOY THE JOURNEY THROUGH
YOUR TASTE BUDS
One of my favorite aspects of traveling is trying new food. And as I said at the beginning,
by doing your research, you can really enjoy
discovering local flavors. Try searching online
for local gluten-free Facebook groups, and ask
for recommendations of restaurants that can cater to gluten-free
diners or offer dishes that are naturally gluten free. That's how I
found the most amazing gluten-free Chinese restaurant in London
and fell in love with ceviche in Lima, Peru.
A gluten-free diet restricts what we can eat, but don't let it
restrict where the wind takes you or hold you back from experiences you'll never forget. GF
Danielle Miller is a travel writer and blogger currently based in Lima,
Peru, and exploring South America. Follow her travel tales at pelicantales.com and on Instagram @pelicantales.
SHUTTERSTOCK
living free on the open road and going where the moment takes
you—that's what backpacking is all about, right? Wrong. For
me, it's all about meticulous planning. But that's allowed me to
have some fantastic experiences traveling on a gluten-free diet,
something that I never thought would be possible when I was
diagnosed with celiac. Planning ahead has meant I've been able
to relax and enjoy some incredible journeys around the world.
Clockwise, from
top left: gluten-free
pastry and coffee at
Buenos Aires airport;
Machu Picchu, Peru;
Surquillo market,
Lima, Peru; gluten-free
meal in Patagonia;
Perito Moreno glacier,
Argentina; Amazonian
shrimp; girls in
traditional Andean
garb with their pet
lambs; Dead Woman's
Pass, Inca Trail
PHOTOGRAPHY: DANIELLE MILLER
“PLANNING AHEAD
HAS MEANT THAT
I'VE BEEN ABLE
TO RELAX AND
ENJOY SOME
INCREDIBLE
JOURNEYS AROUND
THE WORLD.”
Study Sessions
Mild virus guilty, c-section not guilty
BY VAN WAFFLE
1
Celiac disease can be triggered by a
common virus so mild people might not
even notice they have it. The immune
system soon eliminates this reovirus but it
leaves its mark. One event like this may not
be enough, but in predisposed people the
accumulation of several similar insults may
provoke an autoimmune response such as
celiac disease.
U.S. researchers made this discovery
by studying the effects of two strains of
the virus with slight genetic differences.
One was capable of provoking celiac in
susceptible mice and the other was not.
A comparison of how mice responded to
both strains identified how their immune
systems behaved differently as they lost
tolerance to gluten. In particular, the
mice with celiac produced higher levels
of a protein called interferon regulatory
factor 1 (IRF1).
Then researchers looked for evidence
of the same activity in humans. They
identified people with high levels of
reovirus antibodies from previous
infection. Celiac disease was unexpectedly
common in this group. Further, celiac
patients who had high levels of reovirus
antibodies also produced more IRF1. This
implicated the virus as a contributing
factor in onset of their disease.
Future research might reveal a viral
vaccine that can protect people at risk
for celiac.
„ No CD risk from c-section
2
Babies born by cesarean section do not
have an increased risk for celiac, according
to a new study from Italy.
Cesarean births do not provide babies
with the same microbes as those who pass
through the birth canal. Their gut microbiome matures more slowly and includes
fewer of certain bacteria that assist digestion. Disturbances in the microbiome are
implicated in celiac disease. For this reason, some experts believe vaginal delivery
might protect babies at risk.
This study focused on 431 children born
between 2003 and 2009 who had a high
risk for celiac based on genetic tests. Nearly
60
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
half (198) had a cesarean birth. In the study
group, 71 children were diagnosed with celiac by age 10. The disease was just as likely
regardless of how they were born.
This was the first study on this topic to
follow a group of at-risk children from
birth, providing stronger data than previous research. It did not distinguish between
elective and emergency cesarean delivery.
„ Drugs impair recovery
3
The gut lining had healed in a majority
of celiac patients who reported ongoing
symptoms like abdominal pain and bloating in a new U.S. study. However, those
taking certain acid reducer, anti-inflammatory or antidepressant drugs were at risk
for poor recovery.
Previous research has found an alarming
rate of failure to heal in people with celiac:
up to 43 percent. The new study looked for
ways to predict the outcome. It recruited
1,345 previously diagnosed celiac patients
with stubborn symptoms who had enrolled
in a drug trial.
All underwent a biopsy to detect damage
in the small intestine. Only 38 percent were
found to still have active celiac disease,
including 7 percent with severe damage.
Participants who had followed a glutenfree diet for less than two years had a lower
chance of complete healing. These results
show symptoms to be a poor indicator
of recovery.
The study also noted prescription drugs
used by the participants. Incomplete healing was more likely in patients who used
proton-pump inhibitors (acid reducer
drugs), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory
drugs or selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitors used to treat depression and
anxiety. This is the first study to identify an
effect from these medications. The authors
KOMSAN LOONPROM / SHUTTERSTOCK
„ Virus can trigger CD
called for further research to understand
the interaction.
„ CD’s north-south divide
4
Americans living above 35º north have
three times the risk of developing celiac
compared to those in the south. While scientists have noticed autoimmune diseases
are more common in northern countries
around the world, this study from Mayo
Clinic and the National Institutes of
Health was the first to observe a pattern
within the United States.
The data came from the United States
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data collected between 2009
and 2014. It included 22,277 individuals
age 6 or over who answered questions
about their health and diet and provided
blood samples. The study identified people
as having celiac disease if they reported
a previous diagnosis or gave a positive
blood test as part of the survey.
Celiac was less common among nonHispanic blacks and more common
among those of higher socioeconomic
status. However, these factors—along
with age, sex and body mass index—did
not fully account for the north-south
pattern. Less sunlight leading to vitamin
D deficiency might increase the risk for
autoimmune diseases.
The study found people with celiac
following a gluten-free diet did not differ
nutritionally from healthy individuals.
However, those with undiagnosed celiac
detected by blood analysis showed decreased levels of vitamin B12 and folate.
„ To screen or not to screen?
5
Celiac is one of the most common diseases in the world, but most people affected
still don’t know they have it. Silent celiac
disease can have long-term consequences.
The United States Preventive Services
Task Force is investigating whether
screening programs could detect more
cases, treat them and lead to better
outcomes. However, a review of existing research found scarce evidence to
show whether widespread screening
would benefit people with asymptomatic
celiac disease.
Researchers at Oregon Health & Science
University, Portland, found hardly any
data that met rigorous statistical standards. Only one small Finnish study examined the outcome of a gluten-free diet
in patients identified through a screening
program. These findings point to an important gap in the scientific literature.
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808-875-7896 | MAUIBRICKOVEN.COM
DID YOU KNOW?
Gluten-free vitamin supplements can
help celiac patients make a faster recovery
after diagnosis.
Untreated celiac damages the gut lining and impairs absorption of nutrients.
Deficiencies in iron, calcium and vitamin
D commonly affect new patients. Iron-deficiency anemia is one condition that can
alert doctors to the possibility of celiac
disease. Other deficiencies might include
vitamin B12, folate, riboflavin, magnesium, niacin, zinc, copper and vitamin B6.
Patients should consult a doctor or
dietitian to find out whether supplements
are needed. A gluten-free diet normally
restores gut lining health over a period of
time. Then the body can absorb nutrients
properly again so supplements are no
longer necessary.
Look closely for any gluten content, especially in the non-medicinal ingredients
of vitamins and supplements.
Van Waffle has a Bachelor of Science degree in
biology and lives in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
He is research editor for Gluten-Free Living.
He blogs about nature, gardening and local food
at vanwaffle.com.
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1
Bouziat R, Hinterleitner R, Brown JJ, Stencel-Baerenwald JE, Ikizler M, Mayassi T, Meisel M, Kim SM, Discepolo V,
Pruijssers AJ, Ernest JD, Iskarpatyoti JA, Costes LMM, Lawrence I, Palanski BA,Varma M, Zurenski MA, Khomandiak
S, McAllister N, Aravamudhan P, Boehme KW, Hu F, Samsom JN, Reinecker H-C, Kupfer SS, Guandalini S, Semrad
CE, Abadie V, Khosla C, Barreiro LB, Xavier RJ, Ng A, Dermody TS and Jabri B, “Reovirus infection triggers inflammatory responses to dietary antigens and development of celiac disease,” Science, 7 April 2017;356:44-50, doi:
10.1126/science.aah5298.
2
Lionetti E, Castellaneta S, Francavilla R, Pulvirenti A and Catassi C, “Mode of delivery and risk of celiac disease: risk
of celiac disease and age at gluten introduction cohort study,” Journal of Pediatrics, 10 Feb 2017;184:81-86.e2, doi:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.01.023 [Epub ahead of print].
3
Mahadev S, Murray JA, Wu TT, Chandan VS, Torbenson MS, Kelly CP, Maki M, Green PH, Adelman D and Lebwohl
B, “Factors associated with villus atrophy in symptomatic coeliac disease patients on a gluten-free diet,” Alimentary
Pharmacology and Therapeutics, April 2017;45(8):1084-93, doi: 10.1111/apt.13988.
4
Unalp-Arida A, Ruhl CE, Choung RS, Brantner TL and Murray JA, “Lower prevalence of celiac disease and glutenrelated disorders in persons living in southern vs northern latitudes in the United States,” Gastroenterology, 14
Feb 2017, doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2017.02.012 [Epub ahead of print].
5
Chou R, Bougatsos C, Blazina I, Mackey K, Grusing S and Selph S, “Screening for celiac disease: evidence report
and systematic review for the US Preventive Services Task Force,” JAMA, 28 March 2017;317(12):1258-68, doi:
10.1001/jama.2016.10395.
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www.glutenfreeliving.com 61
New
foryou
DRINKS FOR GROWN-UPS,
SNACKS FOR EVERYONE
COMPILED BY JULIA APARICIO
Refreshing Summer Beverages
Truly one of a kind
At only 100 calories and one
gram of sugar per bottle, Truly
Spiked & Sparkling is the perfect
way to enjoy a cool summer
drink without compromising
your waistline. Available in a
variety of crisp, clean flavors
like Sicilian Blood Orange and
Colima Lime, you'll want to keep
your cooler stocked with these
spiked waters all beach season.
´trulyspikedsparkling.com
You vodka be kidding me
Deep Eddy’s line of flavored vodkas makes for the perfect addition to
any fun summer cocktails. With bright, seasonal flavors like sweet tea,
ruby red grapefruit and peach, there is no end to the concoctions you
can create at your next outdoor get-together. ´deepeddyvodka.com
No troubles,
just bubbles
On a hot summer day,
there is nothing quite
like a thirst-quenching
beverage to help you kick
back and relax. Whether
you are at the beach or
having a barbecue with
friends, Spiked Seltzer
drinks are delicious all on
their own or used in
a fun mixed drink.
´spikedseltzer.com
Don’t worry, beer happy
Traditional ginger beer gets a grownup makeover with Farmer Willie’s
Alcoholic Ginger Beer. This tasty drink
has not only all the revitalizing flavor
of a regular ginger beer but also about
four times less molasses than its nonalcoholic counterparts, so you can
enjoy all the taste without the added
sugar. ´thefarmerwillies.com
7 If you’d like us to consider your new product for New for You, send information to products@glutenfreeliving.com.
62
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
Easy Beach Snacks
Don’t skip the chips
Think potato chips have to be bland? Think
again! These new flavor-packed kettle-cooked
chips from Cape Cod are infused with fresh
ingredients that will forever change how you
look at everyone’s favorite sandwich side.
From robust Mediterranean to spicy jalapeño,
these bold varieties are sure to tantalize your
taste buds. ´capecodchips.com
One smart cookie
Something sweet is just
what you’ll need after
spending a day by the
salty sea. These gluten-free
Archway Cookie Thins are
perfect to pack in your
beach bag for snacking
between invigorating dips
in the ocean and lively
volleyball games.
´archwaycookies.com
Fan-ta-stick snacks
These flavorful pretzel
sticks from Snyder’s are
the perfect on-the-go
snack for busy summer
afternoons. Grab one or
both of the new flavors,
Hot Buffalo Wing and
Honey Mustard & Onion.
´snydersofhanover.com
Bounty of bites
For an indulgent treat that will satisfy your sweet tooth, try these
truffle-like bites from Larabar. Ideal for a beach day or picnic,
these tasty vegan and dairy-free delights contain just five to six
simple ingredients. ´larabar.com
www.glutenfreeliving.com 63
Cooking Class
Tart it up
WITH THE LARGE VARIETY OF SUCCULENT FRUIT AVAILABLE IN THE WARMER
MONTHS, TARTS PROVIDE FOR PERFECTLY SCRUMPTIOUS SUMMER DESSERTS.
Remember
1-2-3, the
common
reference
ratio for
a shortdough
type of
crust.
64
T
he summer months bring
out many more fresh fruits
for us to savor. Pies are great
but more associated with fall and
winter. So how about baking—and
enjoying—a summer-season tart?
Tarts are similar to pies but feature
a sweeter, shorter and crispier crust.
They tend to be lower in height than
pies and often open face, without
a top crust. The fillings range from
savory, such as quiche or pecan pie
fillings, to sweet, including ganache,
pastry cream, rich curd-like custard
and citrus-flavored custard.
Let’s get to the dough.You might
find a sweet pastry dough flour
mixture or simply make your own.
It’s quite simple. Remember 1-23, the common reference ratio
used when making a short-dough
type of crust. By weight reference,
1 part granulated sugar, 2 parts
unsalted butter and 3 parts flour.
So, approximately ½ cup (4 ounces)
of sugar, two sticks (8 ounces) of
unsalted butter, and 1½ to 1¾ cups
(12 to 14 ounces) of flour. Oh, and
yes—there is one more number. It’s
Gluten-Free Living July/August 2017
an assumed amount: a few whole
eggs (less the shells, of course).
Approximately one egg for each
½ cup of sugar used. The eggs are
the only true liquid, which acts as
a primary binding substance and
provides the rich, yellow color of
the dough. For gluten-free crusts,
consider using two egg whites
instead, which can cause more
binding in the dough. Either way, this
differs from pie dough, which contains
skim milk or water as a binding liquid.
Another gluten-free technique that
I developed is melting the butter
before mixing. Why? Because it is
gluten free there’s no true need for
fat pieces to be present. They just
interfere with the texture of the
dough. The flour can be almost any
gluten-free all-purpose flour.
Mixing is very straightforward.
Place all the ingredients in a bowl. Mix
by hand or via a stand mixer with a
paddle attachment. The dough should
form rather quickly and be slightly
sticky. Next, place in the refrigerator
on a clean plate, uncovered for at
least one hour. The cooling process
will help set up the dough. For
continued storage, thoroughly wrap
in plastic wrap. Refrigerate up to one
week or keep frozen.
When rolling out the dough,
use a bottom sheet of wax paper
or—better yet—a food-grade
polyethylene sheet. I also roll with a
second sheet on top of the dough
to reduce the need for glutenfree dusting flour. Try not to roll
the dough to less than ” thick.
Remember, gluten-free dough is more
fragile than a gluten-based version.
Consider refrigerating the rolledout dough for a few minutes before
transferring to the tart or pie pan. A
traditional tart pan has straight side
walls or fluted vertical walls.You can
also use a pie pan, but don’t press the
dough all the way up the sides.
The crust can either be filled
while still raw or partially baked,
then finished baking along with the
filling, or fully baked, then filled with
a ganache or pastry cream, which
firms up inside the fully baked shell.
Pastry cream- or ganache-filled tarts
are commonly decorated with fresh
fruits on top, such as local summer
berries to provide color and unique
flavors. In an oven preheated to 375°
F, partially bake the crust for 15 to
20 minutes or fully bake for 30 to 35
minutes, depending on size.
The 1-2-3 dough tends to not
bubble up as much as pie dough
because of the much smaller fat
particles and less overall water used.
If I notice any severe bubbling, I’ll
pierce the surface with a fork. The
nice thing about using a 1-2-3 dough
shell, par- or fully baked, is that it can
sit out at room temperature for a
few days. The sugar helps to preserve
it. Par-baked shells allow you to fill
them with a bakeable filling, like pecan
pie, pumpkin pie or a baked custardtype filling such as flan or, better yet,
crème brûlée—yum! Bake these
at a lower temperature than usual
so as not to burn the crust. Fully
cooled shells are great to fill with
your favorite gluten-free vanilla or
chocolate pastry cream or pudding.
Simply place in the refrigerator, then
garnish with fresh fruit segments and
keep stored in the refrigerator. Or
use one cup of boiled cream with
2½ cups of chopped semisweet
chocolate stirred in off the heat to
make a simple chocolate ganache.
Once the ganache begins to cool,
pour into the baked shell and allow
to set in the refrigerator before
decorating the top.
Richard Coppedge Jr. is an award-winning chef and professor of baking and
pastry arts at The Culinary Institute of
America. He is the author of GlutenFree Baking with the Culinary Institute of America: 150 Flavorful Recipes
from the World’s Premier Culinary
College and Baking for Special Diets.
ILLUSTRATION BY DANIEL VASCONCELLOS, WWW.VASKY.COM
BY RICHARD COPPEDGE JR.
Gluten Free, Sugar Free,
Amazingly Delicious
CERTIFIED
CERTIFIED
PALEO
PALEO
The American Heart
Association recommends
no more than 25 grams/100
calories of added sugars
for women and 36 grams/150
calories for men daily.
No Sugars
No Aftertaste
Zero Calories
No Artificial Ingredients
Non-Glycemic Response
SERVES
SERVES
4
SweetLeaf® Homestyle Lemonade
1 cup fresh lemon juice
(about 6 lemons)
6 cups cold water
10 packets SweetLeaf® Stevia Sweetener
Ice cubes
Lemon for garnish
Directions: Combine ingredients in a pitcher and
stir until well blended. Pour into ice-filled glasses,
garnish with lemon slices, and serve. Enjoy!
NUTRITION FACTS PER 1 SERVING: Calories 10,
Carbs 4g, Fats 0, Protein 0g, Sodium 0mg, Sugars 1g
For more recipes, visit
1
Citrus Cooler
1 whole lime, cut into 6 pieces
6 mint leaves
5 drops SweetLeaf® Liquid Stevia Lemon
Drop Sweet Drops™
8 oz. sparkling water
Directions: Muddle lime and mint in glass until
flavors are mixed together. Add Sweet Drops, ice,
and sparkling water, serve and enjoy.
NUTRITION FACTS PER 1 SERVING: Calories 30,
Carbs 9g, Fats 0, Protein 1g, Sodium 6mg, Sugars 1g
www.SweetLeaf.com
BUY: www.ShopSweetLeaf.com, health food and grocery stores, or online retailers
My American vodka beats
the giant imports every day.
Try American! It’s better.
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