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GQ South Africa October 2017

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OC O
0 7
E entials
14 | EDITOR
16 | FEEDBA
G
Z k
Featu
ON OUR MIND
Patel is on fire
OF THE
GQ MA
66 John
Boy
M
W
Al
is one o
Hollywo d
least
‘Hollyw d
stars
f under
d r Fourie
6 P
p
G
72 COVER
Will sup
IEW
h ll to summer the
ay
28
C NOLOGY
eye in the sky
DJI Mavic Pro
G
Baywat h
lifeguar
Alexand
Daddar o e c e
this sum e ?
30 G OOMING
lking eye bags
76 REPORT
The futu e o
G
LEMAN’S
CO
air travel
clear th
literally
loud shirts
What h pp
when m
s
go Afric n
72
COV
GIR
Alexandra
10 GQ.CO.ZA OC
dd
7
PHOTOGRAPHS BY RICHARD RAMOS, SEBASTIAN KIM AND KARL ROGERS
82 COMEDY
SPECIA
52
DRIVE
50 Years of AMG
66
GQ MAN
John Boyega
Wealth
59 PROFILE
PropertyFox founder Ashley James
34 THE TALK
61 BUSINESS CLASS
What’s hiding in your history?
8 ways to future-proof your career
38 TASTE
62 FINANCE
This summer go for all things rum
How healthy is your life cover?
40 DESTINATION
64 ADVICE
We check into the newest hotels
Embracing change in business
45
THE
EDIT
Flume is
in town
42 SEX
If she has a vibrator in
cabinet, why shouldn’t
Style
45 THE EDIT
Music, movies, games, b
89 FASHION
ks
What to wear, now
50 GQ&A
We spoke to Don Che dl o e
a glass of whisky
Motor
52 DRIVE
102 GROOMED
How to degrease your oily skin
STATUS
SYMBOL
106 FITNESS
LV’s Tambour
Horizon
108 HEALTH
8 ways to step up your running game
Why is everyone suddenly fasting?
Half a century of histo
lies behind the beasts
from AMG
110 DIRECTORY
56 GQ&A
The Rolls-Royce Dawn
112 BACK PAGE
The most iconic sneakers in history
Where to get it
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 11
EDITOR 526:0@(;02/<4(36
EXECUTIVE FASHION EDITOR
1HZVU(SL_HUKLY)HZZVU
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
7H\S:LWO[VU
SENIOR COPY EDITOR :[HJL`5LS
ART DIRECTOR
.HYL[O.YL`
SENIOR CONTENT PRODUCER
(GROOMING & FEATURES)
)LYUK-PZJOLY
SYNDICATION MANAGER
3H\YLU4HU\LS
MANAGING EDITOR
*VSSLLU.VVZLU
CONTENT PRODUCER
:PTHTRLSL4H[\U[\[H
JUNIOR DESIGNER
2LLUHU1LWWL
FASHION ASSISTANT
3\RL9\P[LYZ
*65;90)<;05.,+0;69:
*H`SLPNO)YPNO[ (Books),,]LY[3VTIHLY[ (Film),
+PL[LY3VZZRHYU(Motoring), (Sta6KLUKHHS( Games)
*65;90)<;69:
Zach Baron, Bruce Cameron, Noel Ceballos, Adam Hurly, Dayle Kavonic, Jon Mooallem,
Garrett Munce, John Naughton, Anna Peele, Conrad Quilty-Harper, Michael Salzwedel,
John Sanei, Jeff Vrabel, Caity Weaver
7/6;6.9(7/,9:(5+033<:;9(;69:
Leanne Botha, James Fox, Glam Fuel, Sebastian Kim, Rami Niemi,
Mark Oliver, Christopher Patey, Richard Ramos, Teri Robberts, Karl Rogers, Antonia Steyn
ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTORS
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One year’s
subscription to the
digital edition of GQ
for only R318
DIRECTORS: CHAIRMAN+Y0XIHS:\Y]t
Michelle Fenwick Cherie Hendricks Takudzwa Hove
DEPUTY CHAIRMAN/FOUNDING DIRECTOR ,SPaHIL[O9LLZ1VULZ
*(7,;6>5/,(+6--0*, Condé Nast Independent Magazines (Pty) Ltd,
2nd floor, 220 Loop Street, Cape Town, 8001. PO Box 16414, Vlaeberg, 8018.
Tel: 021-480-2300; Fax: 021-424-6222; Email: gq@condenast.co.za
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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR | FEEDBACK | GQ ONLINE
AIM
HIGH
T
hey say there’s not a lot
of room at the top, but
if this month’s cover stars
are anything to go by,
these days it’s about creating
room rather than waiting for an
open spot. It’s that clarity of
mind that propelled John Boyega
through to the role of a lifetime,
one that’ll forever place him in
a new galaxy of acting talent –
and an energy which he’s smartly
matched with a feet-on-theground realness that we’re hoping
will spread throughout the
Hollywood machine. A machine,
by the way, he’s clearly trying to
repair: ‘I ain’t paying money to
always see one type of person
on screen – we can ruffle some
feathers,’ he tells Anna Peele
on page 66.
Of course, we can’t all inhabit
the Star Wars universe, but in this
issue we also look at ways to
future-proof your career with
advice from innovation strategist
John Sanei, whose latest book
What’s Your Moonshot? details
how to get shift your mindset
from one of victim to victor (p64).
The view from the top is ever
changing, and the biggest
names in commercial aviation
are rethinking the way we
experience travel at 30,000ft –
experimenting with transparent
skins, acupressure seats and
even wood floors (p76).
Every now and then, though, we
could use some pressure relief,
and we spoke to a few comics
about how to stay sane in times
when the truth is harder to find
(p82). One tip? Don’t let someone
else dictate the telling of your
story – make sure to proofread
your memoir.
Nkosiyati Khumalo
Editor
Noel Ceballos
Writer
Page 72-75
Ceballos is the
As a content
As a graphic
With long-time
resident expert
producer on
designer, Botha
experience in
in pop culture,
GQ.co.za,
first fell in love
the media, Peele
humour and the
Matuntuta
with magazines
oversees pop
secret nooks
relishes sharing
after seeing
culture coverage
and crannies of
what she learns.
Fabian Baron’s
and the monthly
the internet at
While fashion,
perfect
entertainment
GQ Spain. He’s
entertainment
typography in
also hosts
Simamkele
Matuntuta
Content
producer
and pop culture
Leanne Botha
Designer
Vogue Paris.
Anna Peele
Writer
Page 66-71
section for GQ
US. She also
are her staple
She has worked
beats, she also
on a host of
and write about
a novel and
values topics
fashion and
high-profile
claims to know
on diversity,
retail mags, and
celebs, like this
about five
inclusion and
now weaves
month’s GQ
different types
women’s
her magic on
Man, John
of cheese.
empowerment.
GQ’s pages.
Boyega.
a podcast,
has published
14 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
gets to meet
EDITOR’S PHOTOGRAPH BY TERI ROBBERTS
CONTRIBUTORS
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR | FEEDBACK | GQ ONLINE
inside
THE HIT LIST
The warm weather is here
so get outside and party!
1
@GQDOTCOZA
#GQSOUTHAFRICA
268
FLOAT AWAY
CHEERS TO THAT
It’s a party so things are bound to get out of
hand. Keep your friends from breaking your
glasses – while staying classy – with plastic
beer and wine glasses from Govino.
R349 (4 wine glasses) and R399 (4 beer glasses)
at yuppiechef.com
Does anything scream
tropical, summer and fun
more than this inflatable
pineapple lilo? Picture yourself
lounging away for hours at
a time, sipping on cocktails,
working on your tan, a hand
dangled in cool water. Yup,
that sounds like a party to us.
MapsMaponyane
Don’t forget to
do your grocery
shopping
R639 at superbalist.com
SEND OUT
THE BEATS
You’ve picked the
tunes, now play them
throughout your
house on Samsung’s
R7 Wireless 360°
Multiroom Speaker,
hich disperses sound evenly in
ll directions. The Multiroom app
akes streaming and sharing
music seamless. R7 499
SUMMER GROOVES
Ease into the mood with
Khalid’s smooth, breezy
grooves, eighties synths
and tales of high school
raging off his studio
debut American Teen.
16 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
5
adumblameman
Exciting to see the
final product!
30
southafricanizedbavarian
Driving the new
Porsche Panamera
Sport Turismo
in Canada
AND IF YOU OVERDO
BEING OUTSIDE
Remember that you’ve been in
hibernation for the last few
months, so take it easy when you
do expose your skin to the sun. And to make
sure you’re not groaning in agony later, La
Roche-Posay’s Thermal Spring Water will
sooth sensitive skin, while helping to prevent
skin ageing. R150
16
simamkelem
@palesamasiteng is
a GEM. A wonderful
human being
WORDS BY STACEY NEL. POSTS EDITED FOR GRAMMAR AND LENGTH
4
180
ENJOY RESPONSIBLY. NOT FOR SALE TO PERSONS UNDER THE AGE OF 18.
Get to know our Cover
Girls, the models
heating up your
Instagram and the
female celebrities you
can’t get enough of.
Get advice on your
sex life and keeping
your relationships
fresh and fun.
Expect up-to-the-minute fashion and runway
news, daily style upgrades and more exclusive
shoots and interviews with the people you
care about.
Stay abreast of the latest
developments in the entertainment
world, the who’s who in the business
industry, plenty of fast cars, the best
of food and drink, fitness tips and
what to know about the booming
tech evolution.
18 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
We’ve narrowed down
all your grooming
concerns so you can
face them head-on.
PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRYCE THOMPSON AND GAVIN KLEINSCHMIDT
You may
have
noticed that
GQ.co.za’s
had a bit of
a facelift.
We’ve
worked
hard to
bring you
all the style,
culture and
grooming,
content
you’ve
come to
know and
love – now
it’s in a
smarter
and
sharper
way
2 3 O C TO B E R
GIRL ON OUR MIND
WORDS BY DAYLE KAVONIC. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES FOX AND GLAM FUEL
A
ctress Zakeeya
Patel is, in her
own words, ‘like
a spinning top’.
She’s tireless, feisty, wildly
driven. ‘I grew up in Durban
and studied in Cape Town,
but I’m much more of a
Jo’burger than anything else,’
she admits. ‘I drive like one,
I move at the pace of one.’
Her restless approach to
life is no doubt a key reason
why she’s achieved almost
everything she’s aimed
for so far (other than her
childhood dream to become
a mermaid, of course). In
fact, she’s shaped a career
for herself that’s currently
so jam-packed with
opportunities, she barely has
time for anything else, let
alone planning her November
nuptials with financial expert
Rob Price, a man she calls,
‘the cool to her fire’.
Since she broke onto
the acting scene with her
performance as Riaad Moosa’s
younger sister in Material,
Zakeeya has had role after role
come her way: in major local
TV series like The Wild and
High Rollers, in Eve Ensler’s
Emotional Creature theatre
production, and even as a
contestant in the sixth season
of Strictly Come Dancing,
which she went on to win (no
surprise there).
She’s also produced an
educational lifestyle show
focused on making health
sexy and accessible –
‘producing was the scariest
thing I’ve ever done’ – and is
a presenter on the show >>
ZAKEEYA
PATEL
This spirited Jo’burg
actress, presenter
and producer doesn’t
do ‘can’t’
MAN OF THE MOMENT
PREVIEW
TECHNOLOGY
GROOMING
GENTLEMAN’S CORNER
THE TALK
STATUS SYMBOL
TASTE
DESTINATION
SEX
MUSIC
MOVIES
GAMES
BOOKS
GQ&A
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 21
essentials
GIRL ON THE MIND
Mela. The feature film 3 Days to Go, which she recently
finished shooting, hits screens in early 2018, and in the
future we’ll also see her play the role of a fiery reporter
in new TV series The Docket.
‘I’m not interested in balancing anything right now,’
Zakeeya says when asked how she juggles her personal
and professional lives. ‘At the moment, my career is my
top priority and I’m putting all my energy into that.’ She
allows herself just one weekend a month to reboot with
a little yoga, a hike and perhaps a Friday night dinner
with friends at her Illovo apartment. But then it’s
straight back to those dreams of hers, pursued with the
Find out 5 things
you didn’t know
about Zakeeya at
GQ.co.za
‘I’ V E G O T HOL LY WO OD A N D
B OL LY WO OD I N M Y S IG H T S .
I WA N T T O W I N O S C A R S’
tenacity of a woman who’s taking charge of her future.
‘I believe we create every situation we find ourselves
in, both good and bad. I’ve got Hollywood and
Bollywood in my sights. I want to win Oscars.
I want all those things, and I’m not going to stop
until I get there,’ she says. And there’s that spinning top
again.
22 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
TAG Heuer Boutiques; Sandton City & V&A Waterfront. Also at selected fine jewellers nationwide. For further information please call 011.669.0500. www.picotandmoss.co.za
TAG HEUER CARRERA RED BULL RACING SPECIAL EDITION
TAG Heuer is the Official Timekeeper and Team Performance Partner of Red Bull Racing.
Two teams who #DontCrackUnderPressure both on and off the track.
essentials
MAN OF THE MOMENT
Nurtured
back
to life
weFix founder Alexander
Fourie has shifted the tech
business paradigm
Words by Simamkele Matuntuta
Photographs by Teri Robberts
24 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
self-proclaimed
risk taker,
impulsive doer
and internal
optimist, Alexander Fourie
built a franchise that has,
a decade later, become South
Africa’s leading smart device
repair hub, weFix.
Soon after realising his
entrepreneurial aptitude at the
age of 18, Fourie set up a host
of mini businesses, trying his
hand at music promoting and
band tour management. ‘I had
a stupid self-confidence, where
I could simply talk my way into
getting things done,’ he says.
But it wasn’t until he refused
to part with his broken iPod,
which was deemed ‘impossible
to fix’, that the groundwork for
his now successful business
was laid out. He taught himself
how to fix it through YouTube
tutorials and then went on to
fix university friends’ broken
iPods. Word-of-mouth and
a simple advertisement led to
an increase of clients, and with
that iFix was born.
Now relaunched as weFix
and boasting 36 stores with
over 300 employees across the
country, the 29-year-old feels
grateful and fortunate to have
built a remarkable business.
Fourie admits that it hasn’t
been an easy journey, but
despite being listed as one
Jimmy Nevis is
doing something
cool. Find out more
at GQ.co.za
‘SUCCESS IS
R ELATIVE.
I THINK THE
MOMENT YOU
START TO
CONSIDER
YOURSELF
SUCCESSFUL,
YOU STOP
TRY ING’
of Forbes Magazine’s 30 most
promising entrepreneurs in
Africa in 2014, he doesn’t think
of himself as successful.
‘Success is relative. I think
the moment you start to
consider yourself successful,
you stop trying. So no, I don’t
think I’m successful.’
The company has grown
to be embraced by industry
heavyweights and has vast
collaboration opportunities,
such as the recent partnership
with Drone Racing Africa that
provides products, training,
support and repair services
to drone racing aficionados.
Looking forwards and
placing himself in line
with the changing global
entrepreneurship trajectory,
Fourie is determined to
leverage new technologies
for public benefit. Watch
this space.
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 25
essentials
PREVIEW
Country club style
Say hello to summer the preppy way
Words by Jason Alexander Basson
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
With the months beginning to warm up, it’s time to get out and get active, by which we mean get your G&T on at the club while
wearing your finest outdoor preppy attire. Go for bold, solid colours, lightweight knitwear, open-collared shirts and polos, chinos
and chunky soled brogues. Don’t be afraid of colour and be sure to keep everything neat and club-appropriate.
1 Tissot at Swatcj Group Everytime watch R3 400 2 J Crew at Queenspark golf shirt R 250 3 Scotch & Soda belt R899
4 Burberry at Styling Concepts eyewear R2 400 5 Toeporn socks R99 6 Kurt Geiger chino R995 7 Pringle of Scotland cardigan R1 450
8 Scotch & Soda wallet R2 199 9 Superga sneakers R999
26 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
essentials
TECHNOLOGY
Eye
in the
sky
The DJI Mavic Pro democratises
the view from the clouds
f it’s not a drone selfie,
does it even count
anymore? That’s the
message we’re getting
in 2017, and as woke as your
Instagram game might be, life just
looks better from above.
No one knows this better than
DJI. Once the preserve of serious
filmmakers, drones are now
firmly entrenched in consumer
playgrounds, and everyone is
drinking the Kool-Aid of aerial
photography. And while
something like the Phantom 4
is still considered an industry
mainstay, what you see on
this page is the Mavic Pro, the
Phantom’s little sibling and what is
widely considered to be the best
drone on the market, period.
The Mavic Pro’s major weight
and size sheddings are a key part
of its mass market appeal: you’re
getting a 743g foldable drone
that comfortably fits into your
backpack but boasts the quality of
a professional rig. When you
consider that you can control it
with your iPhone (or the pocketsized remote), shoot stable 4K video
Vision
sensors and
ultrasonic
range finders
3-axis gimbal
for stabilised
shooting at
high speeds
28 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
12-megapixel
camera with
Adobe DNG
RAW support
PHOTOGRAPH BY KARL ROGERS
Words by Paul Sephton
BRING THE SCENE
INTO GRAND VIEW
If you want an iMAX-stamping live
flight, DJI’s new Goggles can give
you that, and then some. Sit back
and see the view from above with
the high-def long-range live
viewing or get involved on the
controls, with head-tracking
modes allowing your head
movements to control the Mavic’s
yaw and tilt. Combined with
Intelligent Flight Mode, the drone
will beeline across the sky,
allowing your head movements to
rotate only the camera gimbal,
making your eye-in-the-sky
filming entirely intuitive.
R9 800 at wefix.co.za
thanks to DJI’s renowned 3-axis gimbal and take to the air for up to 27 minutes,
the Mavic Pro quickly stacks up as a no-brainer for travellers and amateur
photographers alike.
Above all else, you no longer need to be a professional to fly it. The Mavic Pro’s piloting
system means you can confidently send this tech into the air without the fear of seeing
R20k crashing spectacularly back to earth. With an arsenal of intelligent tech and flying
systems, the Mavic Pro is a videomaker’s dream in the sky, and another smooth move
from the drone-making giant that asserts their industry-leading status.
R19 995 at wefix.co.za
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 29
essentials
GROOMING
HIDE THIS
FROM YOUR
GIRLFRIEND
We need to talk about
your eye bags
Marketed to women but
just as good for men,
La Mer is the most imost
If your eyes are the windows to your soul, the areas around
your eyes are the windows to your age and sleep habits (and
hangover intensity). Fortunately, we’ve got the antidote for
every conceivable droop, wrinkle and puffy spot
effective eye cream. The
founder of the company
was an aerospace
scientist trying to treat
his chemical burns, and
the idea with this cream
Words by Garrett Munce
T
he thin sensitive skin around your
eyes is the most damning part of
your entire body; the hardest
place to hide your vices. If you
drink, smoke, eat salt, stay out late or
spend too much time staring at a screen,
you’re going to have eye problems. Even if
you somehow do none of these things, the
years will still show. We’re constantly
testing fountain-of-youth eye products –
many make big promises but don’t really
work. These do. Consider them your best
defence against the ticking clock.
is to soften and repair
rough, discoloured skin.
THE PROBLEM:
You need only a dab to
You’ve gazed into your computer screen
all day, and now your eyes are fatigued.
see results, so as long as
no one finds your stash,
the tiny super-pricey tub
will last a decent while.
THE SOLUTION:
Kiehl’s Facial Fuel Eye De-Puffer
5g R415
I contains hibiscus extract (which
ools your face) and caffeine (which
mulates your eyes). It goes on like
ice; apply it in the back of a taxi
d no one will know you’ve worked
0-hour week
La Mer The Moisturising
Soft Cream
60ml R4 300
THE PROBLEM:
You’ve got circles so dark, you’re back in your
goth phase.
THE SOLUTION:
Tom Ford Anti-Fatigue Eye Treatment
15ml R1 291
Dark circles are essentially a sleep issue (as in,
you’re not getting enough), but they have to be
treated differently from puffiness or sagging. This
gel smooths and tightens the skin under your eyes,
making them appear more alert. It’s basically a nap
in a tube.
THE PROBLEM:
Bags under your eyes make you look tired
and sullen, like a basset hound.
THE SOLUTION:
Nivea Cellular Anti-Age Eye Cream
5ml R219
Cream can often feel heavy and oily, but
s one’s somehow light and luxurious –
s whipped cream for your face. For
g-term improvements, use it daily.
THE PROBLEM:
Crow’s-feet have infiltrated
the corners of your eyes.
THE SOLUTION:
Elizabeth Arden Prevage
Anti-Aging + Intensive
Repair Eye Serum
15ml R1 195
Serums are highly
concentrated, like liquor,
whereas cheaper eye
creams are more akin to
watery beer. Apply the
serum before bed – when
you wake up, your skin will
be more elastic and less
prune-like.
30 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Send your questions to
style@condenast.co.za
Witloft
apron
R2 499
STEP-BY-STEP
LEATHER CARE &
STORAGE GUIDE
1. Remove dirt: Use your
fingernail or a clean, damp
microfibre cloth.
STYLE
SHRINK
2. Deeper cleaning: Use a
specialised cleaner appropriate
to the type and colour of the
leather. Follow the instructions
on the product and only use
brushes when specified.
Sick of seeing those
expensive leather pieces
get stained, worn and out
of shape? With the right
care your leather goods
will last for life
3. Oiling or preserving: This
is essential and needs to be
done every so often. This is like
applying moisturiser to your
skin and will increase the
longevity of the leather and
make it more supple.
READER: Is there a way to get
rid of that foul leather watch
strap smell?
Plush
plush.co.za
READER: Can you recommend a
leather care brand that can clean,
restore and polish all types of leather?
GQ: No. Not all leather is the same, so
you will need different cleaning and care
products for different types of leather.
However, if you are looking for an
affordable brand that stocks in most
stores nationwide, offers specialised cloths
and brushes, and also stocks a variety of
speciality products for several types of
leather, including nubuck and suede, go
for Plush. It’s an old-school household
favourite and is a good place to start. For
more fragile, coloured or exotic leathers,
you will have to go to a specialist.
32 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
GQ: Yes, but first understand that
leather soaks up everything it comes
into contact with, so to prevent the
smell in the first place avoid wearing
the watch in the bath, shower or while
perspiring. Take it off to air it out while
you sleep, and clean it each week
using a microfibre cloth with a little
water and saddle soap, or a special
leather cleaner. Now, to get rid of the
smell, simply make a paste of equal
measures of baking soda and water
(a tablespoon). Rub this on both sides
of the strap and allow to soak in for
an hour. Gently remove with a damp
cloth and leave to dry completely.
4. Conditioning: This is an
additional layer of protection,
but will also bring the colour
and patina of the leather to the
surface. Always condition in
a circular motion.
5. Hanging: Wire hangers will
stretch and create shoulder
grooves in a leather jacket.
Use thick, padded and
rounded hangers. Always zip
closed to avoid sagging.
6. Packing: Shoes and bags
need to be stuffed to help
retain their shape. Never pack
other items on top of them. It’s
best to store leather goods in
breathable plastic containers
or fabric bags.
7. Storage space: Dark, cool,
dry and well ventilated is best.
Wood cupboards work well.
READER: I’ve ruined so many pairs of suede shoes by getting caught in
the rain. Is there anything you can do to revive suede once it’s wet?
GQ: You can buy water and stain repellents for suede, which will minimise the threat
of water – though not if you fall into a pool. If your shoes do get wet, don’t let the
suede dry on its own. Use a microfibre towel to dab dry the leather and soak up as
much water as possible. Next, use a soft bristle brush to stroke the leather back and
forth for a few minutes. The point of this is to revive the nap (the soft fuzzy surface
of the leather) before it becomes hard. Continue this process under a hand or hair
dryer, and you should save your suede.
PHOTOGRAPH BY ANTONIA STEYN
Words by Jason Alexander Basson
essentials
G E NTLE MAN ’ S CORNE R
WHAT IT IS
These casual button-down
shirts are moody, vivid and
decidedly retro, featuring
old-world prints ranging
from florals to paisley and
retro upholstery motifs.
The collar and button
details are also something
of a statement, which
makes them more of
a focal piece.
LIVE
OUT
LOUD
SHIRTS
Who needs
a statement anything
when you have
shirts like these?
WHY WE LIKE THEM
From top:
Ben Sherman shirt R673.
Diesel shirt R1 699.
Scotch & Soda shirt
R2 199. Ben Sherman
shirt R538. Billionaire
shirt R10 050
The second a man ditches
his tees for one of these, he
instantly looks polished.
These are statement shirts
that offer a high style
without the requirement of
excessive styling or layering.
These shirts will keep for
longer, will be harder to
stain and will never go out
of style. Roll up the sleeves,
wear the collar unbuttoned,
pair with dark suit pants or
chinos and a pair of chunky
brogues or sandals.
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 33
essentials
TH E TA LK
There it is, two
easy clicks away:
your browser
history. Is it okay
for your partner to
sneak a peak at
your online
wanderings?
Words by Jon Mooallem
IS MY BROWSER
HISTORY FAIR
GAME FOR MY
SPOUSE?
Before there were browser
windows, there were regular
windows – ones you could
see through. One day back in
1914, Florence Carman saw
too much.
Florence’s husband, Edwin,
a local physician on Long
Island, had an office on the
ground floor of their home. One
of its windows faced the yard.
Through it, Florence apparently
spotted Edwin canoodling with
a nurse, or so the story goes.
She hired technicians to install
a clandestine listening device
in a baseboard of his examining
room. A small microphone led
to an ingeniously camouflaged
wire, which ran upstairs to
Florence’s bedroom, where
a speaker was hidden in a desk
drawer. Now she had a way to
keep tabs on Edwin. Turns out,
34 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
nothing particularly dramatic
happened. Until one evening
in June when, as Edwin
ushered a certain Mrs Lulu
Bailey into his office for an
appointment, someone
shattered the garden window,
reached in with a revolver,
and shot Mrs Bailey dead.
The office became a crime
scene; detectives swarmed in.
Two bloodhounds sniffed the
ground below the window,
circling about before tearing
off on a fruitless search. Yet,
without anyone noticing,
Florence somehow managed
to rip out the listening device
and stash it in the attic.
‘I thought it was best,’
she later told police. She
understood that her
suspicions of her husband
would bring suspicion on her,
and she didn’t want to get tied
up in a murder investigation.
Realising she was ensnared
in a tangled web of distrust,
Florence had started snipping
the threads. It didn’t work.
She was eventually charged
with the murder. In secreting
away her surveillance device,
it appeared to some observers,
Florence had been covering
her tracks, destroying
evidence of her motive.
The trial was a high-profile
circus, with many sensational
twists and turns, ultimately
resulting in a hung jury. In
a second trial, Florence was
acquitted. The murder was
never officially solved, leaving
suspicions to fester. ‘I would
hate to carry the burden that
rests upon the shoulders of
Mrs Carman,’ Lulu Bailey’s
aggrieved widower told
a reporter. ‘If she did the
shooting, she will never have
a happy moment in her life.’
Now, on to you. You
deserve all the happy
moments in the world,
I can tell. So does your
spouse. Fortunately, your
predicament isn’t nearly as
complicated: your browser
history is not fair game for
your spouse. I say this
because, as the very fact that
you’re asking the question
makes plain, you yourself
do not consider it fair game.
If you don’t feel comfortable
with your spouse having
open access to your online
wanderings, then your spouse
can’t claim any extrinsic,
inalienable right to it.
There are, inevitably,
idiosyncratic lines of
openness and privacy
drawn through every
marriage; this can be one of
yours. The end. Case closed.
Except for one thing: Why?
Why does your spouse feel
compelled and entitled to
look at your browser history,
as your question implies
they do, and why don’t you
feel comfortable with it?
Am I wrong to detect an
erosion of trust in your
relationship – some slippage
of confidence in each
other? If my suspicions
are correct, then I advise
you to be careful. Such
a disturbance can provoke
other disturbances and
further slippages, until, in
an absolute worst-case
scenario, a hand slips
through a window and
someone winds up dead.
Yours isn’t a worst-case
scenario. It’s probably not
even a particularly bad-case
scenario. Still, it’s worth
getting to the bottom of
whatever caused this impasse.
I’d encourage you to ask
yourselves why it is that you’re
asking me this question in the
first place. The answer will be
somewhere in your history,
I’m sure. I suggest you search
through it together.
ILLUSTRATION BY GARETH GREY
What’s
hiding
in your
history?
essentials
S TAT U S SY M B O L
NEW
HORIZONS
Louis Vuitton’s heritage of marrying art
and travel in its range of luggage, bags
and accessories now shines through in
its striking new smartwatch
Words by Michael Salzwedel
THE COVETABLE NEW TAMBOUR HORIZON
combines the technical prowess of a smartwatch
with the elegance and grace of an original Tambour
– the iconic watch that began Louis Vuitton’s
watchmaking story in 2002. The luxury maison has
always had strong ties with the world of travel
and the Tambour Horizon is no exception,
having been fitted with dedicated functions.
‘My Flight’, a feature found on no other
smartwatch, keeps air travellers informed
of key flight information such as flight
times, terminal and gate information,
reports of delays and the number
of hours remaining before landing.
The second exclusive
function, ‘City Guide’,
extends to the smartwatch
the services of the guides
edited by Louis Vuitton and
their apps for tablets and
smartphones. The very best
addresses and unmissable
sights of seven of the most
visited cities are revealed on the
Tambour Horizon’s touchscreen.
The watch also boasts a geolocation
function that indicates nearby hotels,
restaurants, historical landmarks and
tourist attractions in real time.
louisvuitton.com
TAMBOUR HORIZON GRAPHITE
• 42mm Stainless steel brushed case with sapphire
glass caseback printed with Louis Vuitton logo
• 1.2 inch full round AMOLED touchscreen with
390x390 resolution
• Android Wear 2.0 operating system
• 300mah battery. Average battery life between
charges: estimated all day
• 512MB RAM and 4GB Flash
36 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
SANDTON CITY
MALL OF AFRICA
CLEARWATER
GATEWAY
V&A WATERFRONT
essentials
TA S TE
um on
d B e s t R at SA
te
o
v
y
a
g
Mou nt G d pa nel ta s tin
n
li
b
iv
t
in
es al
S h ow
erture F
R u m Ov
RUM
FOR
THE
HILLS
Leave the
cognac and
whisky for
cooler evenings,
your summer
mandate is all
things rum
Words and styling by
Paul Sephton
Photograph by
Karl Rogers
Mount Gay
Black Barrel
R450
38 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
YOU MIGHT BE ASKING
what rum is, but let’s first talk
about what it isn’t. Rum is not
what you mixed with Coke, nor
is it Spiced Gold. At least not
the kind we’re talking about.
With little regulation, rum can
be many things, light or dark,
rounded and rich like the
Guatemalan, easy-to-drink
Cuban, or off-beat Jamaican.
‘What makes rum rum, is that
it’s a fermented and distilled
by-product of sugar that is then
aged in casks – usually oak;
it’s not as strict as whisky or as
loose as something like gin,’
says Mount Gay brand
ambassador Caitlin Hill.
The plus side of this
deregulation? Rum can
age anywhere, which gives
producers a lot of flexibility and
creativity. What that means
for you is a rum for every
occasion. Read on to learn
everything you need to know.
SIP
TIP
DARK
RUM
It’s also known as black
rum and has been aged
the longest of any of
these types of rum. The
extended time it spends
in wooden casks gives it
a dark colour and deep,
smoky-sweet flavour.
If you want to swap out your Scotch for something more
equatorial, sipping rums are now a thing. Here’s what to
ask for: Mount Gay Black Barrel, XO or 1703, Ron Zacapa
XO, Bacardi 8, Diplomático, Pyrat Rum or Appleton
Estate VX. Think it’s not up to scratch? Something like
Zacapa uses ex Bourbon, Oloroso and Pedro Ximénez
wine casks to add complexity.
Appleton
Estate Reserve
R300
SPICED
RUM
Sailor Jerry
R200
This is typically aged for
the same length of time
as black rum but with
added spices and
caramel colourings
to give it a signature
sweet spice taste.
GOLD
RUM
Also known as Oro,
it’s aged in wooden
casks which gives the
spirit its characteristic
colour and sweeter,
richer flavour.
Spytail
R330
Ron Zacapa Solera
Gran Reserva
R500
Bacardi 8
R340
THE DARK & STORMY
DEATH TO THE
FROZEN DAIQUIRI
2 shots Mount Gay Black Barrel rum
Fresh squeeze of half a lime
3 dashes Angostura bitters
Ginger beer
Hemingway would shudder
at the frozen strawberry purée
you call a good night out.
Drink a daiquiri the way it
was meant to be.
2 shots Mount Gay Black Barrel rum
1 shot fresh lime juice
1 barspoon of vanilla castor sugar
Pour rum into your shaker, add
vanilla castor sugar and give it a
good stir. Add the lime juice, top
up with ice and shake hard until
your hands can no longer handle
the cold. Serve in a coupe.
THE BOURBON OLD
FASHIONED IS DEAD
Swap out the whisky for
rum this summer for a
lighter, slightly sweeter take
on the Old Fashioned.
50ml Ron Zacapa
10ml port reduction
3 dashes of orange bitters
Stir the rum, port reduction
and orange bitters together
and serve in a tumbler with
a large ice cube. Garnish
with a twist of fresh
orange zest.
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 39
essentials
D E S TI N ATI O N
CHECKING IN
We travelled the world to find some of the newest hotels
in the biggest cities to meet any budget
Nobu’s first hotel in Europe drops into the heart of London’s
heaving Shoreditch, staying true to the brand’s affinity of
locating their calming hotels in otherwise highly energised
spaces. The striking exterior of Nobuyuki Matsuhisa’s
five-storey 150-room London property boasts interiors by
Studio Mica; tranquil minimalism with a Japanese aesthetic
is evident in details like a shoji screen, and the herringbone
headboards add a British touch. Eat at the hotel’s Nobu
restaurant (of course) but head out into the suburb to grab
breakfast at Dishoom, explore Box Park and sip a rare cask
whisky at Bull in a China Shop. nobuhotelshoreditch.com
40 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
DUBAI THE ROVE DOWNTOWN
Opening its doors this month, the Radisson Red plants itself
in the V&A’s Silo District next to the newly-opened Zeitz
MOCAA. We think it’s arguably the best value offering in the
Waterfront precinct. It’d be hard to find a better location for
your stay, and the unorthodox culture of the hotel
unshackles the uppity hospitality industry; do some rooftop
yoga next to the pool, sip on a craft beer with the hotel
manager or just chill out in your suite catching a movie on
the 55-inch flat screen. radissonred.com/cape-town
NEW YORK PUBLIC
LONDON NOBU HOTEL SHOREDITCH
CAPE TOWN RADISSON RED
Words by Paul Sephton
Though the rest of your stay might differ, your hotel need not
break the bank in the notoriously pricey Middle Eastern mecca.
Whether you’re looking for a layover spot or staying a while for
business, The Rove Downtown should be the only hotel you
check into. It offers ultra-modern rooms (with fast internet) that
sit above a 24-hour gym, laundry service and convenience store.
Take in the hotel’s public spaces, designed by a collective of
artists commissioned to create spaces reflective of Dubai’s
contemporary melting pot of culture. rovehotels.com
Ian Schrager (hotel godfather and a co-creator of the boutique
hotel concept) opens up his latest Public in New York’s Lower
East Side. Making Public’s luxury accessible from around
$150 a night, the space is a microcosm of New York’s offerings,
intentionally allowing guests everything within one set of walls.
While the rooms are within an inch of perfection, other spaces
in Public also warrant your time. Don’t miss Diego, one of three
bars on site, with its gentleman’s club aesthetic, or Public Arts,
the transforming basement level space that plays host to film
screenings and comedy by day before morphing into a dance
club late into the night. publichotels.com
I.N.O.X. TITANUM #241779
LIFE IS YOUR ADVENTURE
For further information contact Picot & Moss 011.669.0500. www.picotandmoss.co.za
MAKERS OF THE ORIGINAL SWISS ARMY KNIFE | ESTABLISHED 1884
essentials
SEX
GUYBRATORS
If she has a jackhammer
hiding in her bedside cabinet,
why shouldn’t you?
Words by Jason Alexander Basson
IT’S TIME TO
ROUSE TH AT
ANCIENT
SER PEN T
FROM ITS
MY THIC
SLUMBER SO
IT MIGHT
SLITHER OFF
INTO NEW AND
UNCHARTED
WOR LDS
42 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Of course it was only in the ’90s
(thanks to Charlotte’s Rabbit
from Sex and the City, as well as
Oprah Winfrey’s subsequent
endorsement thereof) that these
scandalous bedside companions
came out of their drawers and
into mainstream consciousness.
The history of the pocket
pussy, on the other hand, is not
quite as glamourous. I won’t
upset you with the details, but
rest assured in knowing that
men have been quite resourceful
(read desperate) in transforming
every natural or unnatural
opening in the world into
a substitute orifice of some kind.
We’ve done some research and
concluded that one of the best
places to buy your high-end
wholesome sexcessories is
a little e-store called Matildas.
There you will find a classy
selection of toys for him, for her,
for him and her, for him and
him, and whomever else you
might want to throw into the
equation. In fact, they’re so
classy that most will double
up as designer objects for
your mantlepiece should you
accidentally leave something
for your in-laws to discover
upon their next surprise visit.
The Pulse III guybrator
(my personal favourite) is
a revolutionary bit of tech that,
unlike any other sex toy for
men, uses an oscillator to
produce its stimulating effect.
The technology was specifically
designed to help men with
spinal injuries activate the
nerves in their genitals and
stimulate the previously
starved blood capillaries, in an
effort to help them procreate.
The Pulse guybrator can be
used with or without lube, on
a flaccid or erect penis, and is
completely waterproof. It is
particularly effective for
men suffering from erectile
dysfunction, but is also great
for improving the blood flow
and nervous response in
fully functioning penises.
That means stronger erections
and better quality orgasms.
Fact. Everybody masturbates.
Even couples. It’s a healthy
habit. Mutual masturbation is
an important part of growing
and cultivating a sexual
relationship. Luckily, the Pulse
III comes in solo and couple
versions, meaning you can both
have fun with this toy, together
or alone. It has five separate
pulses and a mechanism for
increasing or moderating the
intensity, which means you
have options to play with.
Now, I believe the only thing
left to say is, ‘You’re welcome!’
It’s time to leave your shame at
the front door and rouse that
ancient serpent from it’s mythic
slumber so it might slither off
into new and uncharted worlds.
Now carry on, Columbus.
Pulse 3 Duo Couples Vibrator
R2 695 at matildas.co.za
ILLUSTRATION BY GARETH GREY
W
omen have had a
close relationship
with sacred sex
objects since time immemorial.
Don’t believe me? Try visiting
your local museum of ancient
artefacts. Still not convinced?
Ask your handheld showerhead what he’s been up to for
the last few years.
Mechanical vibrators aren’t
a recent phenomenon, either.
They were introduced in the
late 1800s, but only penetrated
the commercial market at the
dawn of the 20th century.
They were designed as medical
instruments used to help
women combat hysteria. By
the ’40s and ’50s they were
being sold as personal massage
devices, many of which were
unmistakably phallic in shape
and size. Some even appeared
in vintage porn or nudies from
the era.
O&M CAPE TOWN 96139/E
Because we built it.
Keep your Audi in the hands that designed it.
Extend your Audi Freeway Plan.
At Audi, the same dedication to excellence that went into conceptualising your vehicle
also goes into its long-term maintenance. To continue to benefit from this demand for
technical perfection, you can now extend your Audi’s 5-year/100 000 km maintenance
and service plan by an additional 2 years/100 000 km. An extension comes with free
24-hour roadside assistance for permanent peace of mind, along with the knowledge
that your vehicle is receiving only Audi Genuine Parts and Audi-quality care.
To find out more, visit audi.co.za or contact your nearest dealer.
SOUTH AFRICA
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essentials
THE EDIT
GQ: Tell us
about your work
on Lorde’s new
track ‘The
Louvre’?
HARLEY
STRETEN:
Ella [Lorde’s real
name] is a friend,
and she was stuck
on a track so she
sent me some
ideas on what
she was doing and
I basically helped
her finish it and
got it to a place
where she was
happy with it.
I really enjoyed
working on it.
MUSIC
TEXTURED
AND TONED
We caught up with Harley Streten,
better known as Flume, ahead of his
Oppikoppi and Rocking the Daisies
gigs this month
Words by Paul Sephton
E
ffortlessly blending genres, pioneering future bass
and winning this year’s Best Dance/Electronic Album
at the Grammys are just some of the things Flume
has become known for. Following his knockout 2016
track ‘Never Be Like You’ and subsequent Grammy-winning
album, here’s a taste of what it’s like inside the mind of one of
this generation’s most rule-bending musicians.
GQ: Are you
wanting to
work more on
producing other
albums or
focus on your
own music?
HS: I think I’m
50/50 right now
and trying my
hand at working
with other people.
I also did a track
with Vince
[Staples], and
I just got a place
in LA and am
spending a lot
of time there
which is good for
connecting and
working with others.
It’s kind of like the
music hub of the
Western world in
that everyone is
there. >>
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 45
‘How am
I going to
make this
feel like
music?’
GQ: Sound design, samples and
being able to record sounds and
edit them is fairly limitless. How
do you put borders on your
imagination to create a track?
HS: I really like sound design because
it’s a huge part of what a producer does;
it’s probably my favourite part of
music. For me, the actual melody and
songwriting and all that comes second.
What I’m most excited about is the
textures and the tones. I spend a lot of
time scouring the internet for all sorts
of weird plugins and a lot of my tracks
start from me just finding sounds online.
I don’t really record that much, I feel like
online there’s always a better recording
of the same thing I would record. Once
I’ve found the weirdest sounds, I’m like,
‘Now how am I going to make this into
a song and how am I going to make this
feel like music?’
GQ: Do you then build songs from
frameworks or just play around?
HS: When it comes to the sound design
sort of stuff it’s really just luck and
chance. I’m totally just fucking around
and playing with sliders – I don’t
really know what they actually do.
The sound design element is what’s
totally random, but when it comes to
the melodic and songwriting part,
that’s when a lot of the habits come
out – I just know what works and how
a song works.
46 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Catch Flume live at
Oppikoppi and
Rocking the Daisies
on 5-8 October
GQ: Your production has
a complexity of layers that gives
each song a longevity and sense of
journey – is that deliberate?
HS: I just do what sounds right and f
eels interesting and exciting. I usually
approach music with a theory or idea
I want to experiment with. With ‘Never
Be Like You’, for example, the idea that
kind of sparked the overall effect of
making the song was synth formations
– synths and volume fluctuations that
create a flutter and give the song
a unique quality that’s off kilter.
Album artwork by
Jonathan Zawada
from top left: Skin
Companion EP I,
Skin Companion EP
II and Skin. Follow
@zawhatthe on
Instagram for more.
GQ: Jonathan Zawada has been
behind all of your new album
artwork and live show creative
direction. What was important
about matching your music to
those visuals?
HS: The second record came around
and I was hoping he would be up for
working together and luckily he was.
With my music, it’s really precise and
involves a lot of attention to detail, but it
feels organic and I try and make sure that
it doesn’t feel like everything’s on the grid
and perfectly timed. There may be some
imperfections and it may sound like I’m
not paying attention to them, but I really
am. What I really like about Jonathan’s
style is that his work is really synthetic,
just like my work, but it’s also got this
organic feel to it. It’s hard to tell if his art
is actually real or computer generated,
and he kind of rides that line, which
I really like about his work.
GQ: Given how artists are far less
secular than they used to be, have
you considered any collaborations?
HS: There are a lot of avenues nowadays
and it feels like things have been blurred
and mashed together; I’ve wanted to do
some kind of installation for a while, to
create synthesisers out of organic
materials. I’ve got a lot of ideas and
it’s something that I’d like to do with
Jonathan as well. I’m excited to be in LA
around different people doing different
things in the arts.
GQ: The live reaction to your music
has changed the way you write –
what anticipation do you have
ahead of your South African shows?
HS: For me, I find it tough to feel creative
in a routine and everyday life, so travelling
is a huge part of what drives my creativity
and especially travelling to new countries
like South Africa; I’ve never been before.
So I’m very excited to come and hoping
to get a surf in, but hopefully without too
many sharks.
GQ: Any new albums on the way?
HS: I’m constantly creating, but I don’t
think I’ll do another album anytime soon.
I’m going to put new music out more
regularly in smaller bites.
essentials
M OV I E S
It’s all action from
here on out
Edited by Evert Lombaert
THE SNOWMAN
Directed by Tomas Alfredson; with
Michael Fassbender, Rebecca
Ferguson, JK Simmons
Fassbender is perfectly cast as
Norwegian author Jo Nesbø’s
popular detective Harry Hole.
The script, co-written by Hossein
Amini and Matthew Michael
Carnahan, is a tense adaptation
of the seventh of 11 Hole stories.
The mystery kicks off simply,
yet intriguingly enough: a missing
woman’s scarf is discovered
wrapped around an eerie
snowman. The Norwegian
landscapes are captured by
Australian-South African
cinematographer Dion Beebe,
whose work on 2005’s Memoirs of
a Geisha earned him an Academy
Award. Scandinavian thrillers are
underrated modern gems, as
anyone who has seen the original
Girl With the Dragon Tattoo trilogy
or The Hunt will testify. This is a
tense, moody and intelligent work.
BLADE RUNNER 2049
Directed by Denis Villeneuve; with
Ryan Gosling, Harrison Ford
THOR: RAGNAROK
Directed by Taika Waititi; with
Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston,
Cate Blanchett
If you haven’t seen the original, your
viewing is well-overdue. While this is
a perfect continuation of the original’s
universe, it stands perfectly well on
its own. Villeneuve (the man behind
Prisoners, Sicario and Arrival) displays
his technical capabilities and original
approach, and Roger Deakins’
cinematography here is sublime.
The first two Thor films were
criticised for being too moody and
self-important. That Marvel handed
over directorial duties to Waititi,
known for quirky comedies Hunt for
the Wilderpeople and What We Do
In The Shadows, shows they’re
willing to bring back the mirth.
+++++
Released 6 October
+++++
ased 27 October
+++++
Released 13 October
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 47
essentials
BOOKS
HOME AND AWAY
Three very different books
take a look at relevant-rightnow issues through the lens
of personal stories – all of
them touring through time
and place
Words by Cayleigh Bright
GAMES
LET’S GET
SERIOUS
Games are far more than play –
they can enact social change
Words by Aléz Odendaal
he world is woke. Millennials
and the Gen Zs that follow
are bringing about a new
era of social responsibility, and
with it, new standards of business
ethics. Clients and consumers
expect accountability, and thriving
in business requires investing in
social change through authentic
engagement. Serious games (yup,
they’re an actual thing) are one way
of doing this – we spoke to local
experts to find out more.
T
WHAT ARE SERIOUS GAMES?
‘Serious games are still recognisable as
video games, but they differ from other
games in that they are not made solely
for entertainment or for financial gain. The
intention of serious games, in contrast, is
to educate; to generate academic data
(such as scientific or medical information);
to enact social change by enabling
attitude, perception and behaviour
modification; and/or to assist with
physical or psychological rehabilitation.’
– Nicholas Hall, Interactive Entertainment
South Africa, CEO, lawyer, and game
industry development lobbyist
WHY DO YOU THINK SERIOUS GAMES
ARE EFFECTIVE FORMS OF BRAND
AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT?
‘In the South African context, a company
can’t just exist solely to make a profit.
48 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Serious games present a very novel
opportunity to develop products that are
aligned with a social good but also spread
brand awareness for the agency creating
the game.’ – Shane Marks, MD at
RenderHeads, expert in managing and
programming serious games for the
museum industry
WHERE DO YOU THINK SERIOUS
GAMES ARE GOING IN SOUTH AFRICA?
‘Serious games are rarely profitable, so
they need strong funding, marketing and
support. If South Africa drives education
via serious games as a policy to reach
our population that’s underserved by the
traditional education model, perhaps
we’d be able to produce enough serious
games to create a viable ecosystem.’
– Danny Day, game designer, CEO,
specialist in systems design of learning
for QCF Design
ARE SERIOUS GAMES SOMETHING
THAT ONLY MAKES SENSE FOR
BIGGER BUSINESSES?
‘Absolutely not. Serious games can
be used by high schools, by smaller
companies to train their teams and upskill
staff in needed soft skills, or by local
governments to teach citizens how to save
water... the question is the development
budget.’ – Lars Espeter, course manager,
Friends of Design - Academy of Digital
Arts, Cape Town
THE ESSAYS
Firepool by Hedley
Twidle (Kwela Books,
R250 at loot.co.za)
In his debut essay
collection, Hedley
Twidle presents
critique through
nostalgia: his warmest
memories are funny
and entertaining, but
ultimately offer a look
at how memory should be a starting point
for change, not stagnation. From the
everyday bigotry of an all-boys boarding
school to the UCT steps during
#FeesMustFall, the scenes are set for fresh
thought about South Africa’s transformation.
THE THEMED
COLLECTION
Migrations: New
Short Fiction From
Africa edited by
Efemia Chela,
Bongani Kona &
Helen Moffett
(Short Story Day,
R179 at loot.co.za)
The Short Story Day
project continues with more excellent
fiction from a continent with plenty to tell.
Contributing writers like Fred Khumalo,
Sibongile Fisher and Megan Ross address
internationally relevant issues of movement
and belonging in the time of refugee crises.
THE NOVEL
The Wangs vs The
World by Jade
Chang (R199 at
takealot.com)
The story of a family,
a road trip, a lost
fortune and plenty
of questions about
‘home’, The Wangs
vs The World is as
funny as it is smart.
For generations who have grown up in the
midst of a financial crisis and quick-shifting
politics displacing many without ceremony,
it’s also highly relatable.
essentials
GQ&A
‘I’ve always been
someone who’s
tried to be platform
agnostic. I gravitate
towards the things
that are interesting
to me’
FINDING
YOUR VOICE
We spoke to Don Cheadle over a glass of whisky
about working with Kendrick, how to influence people
and where Hollywood is going
Words by Paul Sephton
GQ: You recently starred in Kendrick Lamar’s new music video
for ‘DNA’. How did that come about?
DON CHEADLE: I’ve known Kendrick for a while. I met him through
Dr Dre, and I was actually thinking of casting him in Miles Ahead, which
ultimately didn’t work out, but that was good for both of us because
he got to go and do To Pimp A Butterfly and we got Keith Stanfield. He
wasn’t ready, and I was very impressed that he knew where his priorities
were and understood that it wasn’t something he just wanted to take on
to say he did it; he wanted to bring everything he could to it. So he said,
‘I’m kind of doing this album right now and I gotta focus on it,’ and I said
that’s fine. But Kendrick and I just stayed in touch over the years and we’d
hit each other up out of the blue and he’d be touring and I’d be on set.
50 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
He literally hit me up out of the
blue and goes, ‘What are you
doing, do you want to shoot this
video next week?’ So I said yeah
and he said ‘I’ll send you the
concept and the song.’ I loved
the song and I was like ‘This is
great,’ so I said, ‘What do you
want me to do?’ He was like,
‘Oh, I need you to spit this lyric,
this whole verse,’ and I was like,
‘That’s insane, that’s too much.’
And he said, ‘No, just learn as
much of it as you can.’ I didn’t
really have any concept of what
it was going to be and I got to
the set and he walked me
through it and then we just
launched into it.
He’s really creative and very
committed and we just talked
the other day and I asked,
‘What’s going on with you?’
and he said, ‘You know, I’m just
trying to figure out what I’m
going to do next with my
creativity and what kind of
stories I want to tell,’ and I don’t
even know if he meant
album- wise; you know, he may
take up painting, who knows.
He’s very Miles Davis in that he’s
just a font of creativity and he’s
always looking for some way to
express himself.
GQ: Do you think that these days artists
are more versatile and happier to
experiment with different career
projects and collaborations rather than
following narrow career paths?
DC: I think in general, the world’s opened
up. Social media obviously has a lot to
do with that, and people can speak and
communicate with one another directly in
a way that wasn’t possible before. We get
to see a lot of similarities where people are
artistically complementary in ways that we
didn’t imagine before. In my industry it used
to be a real sort of no-no to do television
or a music video if you wanted to have any
sort of theatrical career. You would never
be considering series or a commercial, but
I think those sorts of imaginary lines have
disappeared and people aren’t taking
themselves as seriously and they’re also just
looking for different modes of expression.
You see a lot of ‘A-list’ actors doing Funny or
Die and really just trying to flex every kind
of muscle and play with all kinds of media.
I think that’s raised all of the creative bars.
GQ: Has it changed your thinking
around your creative output?
DC: I’ve always been someone who’s tried
to be platform agnostic because it doesn’t
matter to me. I gravitate towards the things
that are interesting to me. Here, today, what
we’re talking about is thanks to Chivas
Regal. The commercial I did with them
wasn’t strictly a commercial, it was an
opportunity for me to do something
altruistic that fitted in with my philosophy
and philanthropic interests. I try to gravitate
towards things I can bring something to,
and which bring something to me as well.
GQ: What was the specific parallel
that made you want to be a part of
this campaign?
DC: Well this is about altruism and working
with people who are coming into the space
as entrepreneurs and attempting to better
the world. They’re not just on some sort of
a craven move to make as much money as
they can; they’re attempting to better their
lot and leave this place better than they
found it. That’s the entirety of it for me.
When I understood that, it was a no-brainer.
It wasn’t simply about getting involved with
the product to ingratiate myself, but about
working with people who were trying to
really change the world in substantive ways.
five single malts and it’s really balanced and
premium. You can taste the difference, and
that’s something. I was a neophyte before
and it’s a fun way to learn.
GQ: You’re prolific on Twitter and even
today by the time I got here you’d
fired off probably over 15 tweets.
DC: I was tired with jet lag so I was like
‘Let me just hit these people up.’ What was
I saying today? You see, it’s already gone,
it’s like it’s disposable.
GQ: Have you shifted what you choose
to speak about over time, or is it
a knee-jerk reaction?
DC: If I see something that sparks a thought,
I’ll voice that. It’s often supportive, but clearly
with our political climate in the US right now
it gives rise to a lot of reaction, and I think it’s
important to be a part of that voice.
GQ: How do you think people can add
their voice to issues they care about but
may not be the best representative for?
DC: That’s interesting, especially having
come back here where we shot Hotel
Rwanda, where a lot of my activism began.
It’s where I was introduced to people who
were working on issues around genocide
around the world and was invited to join
a congressional delegation that went to
visit Chad, Darfur and Sudan to see
first-hand what was happening there. I think
that was one of the questions I was asking
myself with my supposed platform: how do
I fit in and what am I supposed to do?
Where can I influence people and sort of
drive this in a positive direction in any way
that I possibly can? I think that’s one of
those questions that individuals have to ask
themselves and take stock of themselves
and see where they have influence: is it in
school, or church, or your community?
I think people more often than not devalue
their ability to have a voice and it’s a shame
because it’s just not so. Now more than
ever, especially with social media, there’s an
ability to find like-minded people who are
working on issues you’re interested in. You
don’t have to reinvent the wheel; you can
become part of a movement that’s already
begun and then you can always look to
these people if you have some issue that
you don’t feel has the kind of trajectory that
you want it to, to learn how they did it.
GQ: You’re working on Prince of
Darkness now – what drew you to and
excited you about that project?
DC: We’re talking about a black man in the
1800s who was a millionaire, and in those
days that was very unusual. It’s about
looking at the issues we have today and
how they reflect and refer to a time
hundreds of years ago. It’s also around this
character who had maybe three identities
and was incredibly litigious – he never
backed down from fights and is not really
a ‘good guy’ by any means.
GQ: Have you long been a whisky
drinker?
DC: I’m newer to whisky, especially Chivas,
but it’s really good. When you’re young it’s
just like ‘Oh it’s booze, right?’ and it’s all the
same. Then you taste it – Ultis is a blend of
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 51
Half a century of motoring
history lies behind the
beasts from Affalterbach.
We hit the world’s most
demanding race track
to pay homage to the
silver arrows
Words by Dieter Losskarn
E
ntering the green hell with
the bright yellow SLS Black
Series brings back some
of my fi nest motoring
memories. Exactly nine
years ago I was here with a SL63 AMG,
taking part in a four-day AMG Pro Driver
training. It was an epic experience with
the added advantage of driving the
car for a couple of days afterwards
through the Alps.
I remember the famous bends:
Hatzenbach, Adenauer Forest,
52 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Bergwerk, Flugplatz (where I lifted off
and deployed my roll bar with a
frightening bang) and my favourite, the
bone-shattering Karussel. The inside
half of the corner is steeply banked with
a concrete surface. It’s actually a hairpin
turn, but the banking allows for a much
higher cornering speed.
Th is time around I was not allowed to
race in anger, although the SLS Black
Series would have been perfect for it. I
am allowed one (rather slow) lap
through the green hell this time.
I am taking part in a birthday parade
of AMG superstars, prior to the start of
the famous 24-hour Nürburgring race.
AMG has never been more successful in
its 50-year history. It all started in 1967
with two motoring enthusiasts, HansWerner Aufrecht and Erhard Melcher, in
a workshop in an old mill. Initially
Mercedes-Benz wasn’t happy with these
grease monkeys fiddling with a ‘perfect
product’. They even refused to let the
former Daimler mechanics use the
three-pointed star on their creations.
MERCEDESAMG
GT R
POWER
4.0-l. V8 twin turbo
430kW and 700Nm
BASE PRICE
PERFORMANCE
0-100km/h 3.6 seconds;
top speed 318km/h
R2 689 900
mercedes-benz.co.za
Even after the surprising and
unexpected racing success with the red
pig in 1971, official collaboration with
Mercedes-Benz only started in 1990. The
C36 AMG, launched in 1993, was the fi rst
result of this cooperation. In 2005
Mercedes-AMG became a wholly owned
subsidiary of the Daimler AG.
And in 2009 the SLS was the fi rst
vehicle entirely developed by MercedesAMG. The company now has 1 600
employees and is synonymous with
emotionally appealing sports cars and
driving performance. Almost 100 000
AMG cars were sold in 2016. There are
now 50 different models available, from
the entry-level A45 to the 12-cylinder
monster G65 (currently the most
expensive Mercedes model). AMG is
present in the compact segment as well,
with the world’s most powerful seriesproduction four-cylinder 45/43 AMGs
attracting younger customers.
AMG development engineers
spend about 17 weeks each year at
Nürburgring, as the stress profi le of the
20.8km track covers every possible
driving state of a car. Ring time will most
probably increase when Project One,
the highly anticipated Mercedes-AMG
hypercar, gets into full flow. It is not just
inspired by F1 technology, it is actually
going to be the fi rst ever roadworthy F1
car – a high-performance plug-in hybrid
with a 1.6-l. V6 engine, plus four electric
motors and an output of about 745kW.
It will bring AMG fi rmly back to the
future. Here’s to many more years of
roaring thunder.
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 53
NÜRBURGRING’S
FASTEST
1. Lamborghini
Huracán
Performante
2. Mercedes-AMG
GT R
3. Porsche 918
POWER
MERCEDESAMG E63 S
PERFORMANCE
4.0-l. V8 (9-speed auto
and AWD)
450kW and 850Nm
0-100km/h in 3.4 seconds;
top speed 250 km/h (limited) or
300 km/h (with AMG driver training)
BASE PRICE
R1 868 400
mercedes-benz.co.za
AMG highlights over the decades
1971 The Red Pig – 300 SEL 6.8-l.
With its limo engine, the ‘red pig’ put out 320kW
and behaved like a wrestler doing gymnastics.
.
This wide coupé boasted huge torque (566Nm)
and simply annihilated its competition.
1995 The Modern Gullwing – 300SL HWA
The Sultan of Brunei asked AMG to put a 6.0-l.
V8 into a classic 1954 SL 300 Gullwing. Lovely!
2013 The Electrifying Ride – SLS Electric Drive
Near-silence at 250km/h. A motor at each wheel.
1 000Nm. 7m56s on the ’Ring. Electric perfection.
54 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
The most famous
AMG racing car,
the Red Pig (left),
couldn’t have asked
for more appropriate
offspring. Meet the
most muscly E-class
ever: the E63 AMG S.
Left foot on the
brake, right one on
full throttle. The
wide rubbers on
20-inch wheels claw
into the tarmac, and
the all-wheel-drive
four-door limousine
is catapulted
forward in an orgy
of glorious sound
and spectacular
acceleration.
I am pressed
deeply into the
beautifully stitched
leather seats. In
a sports car you
expect this kind of
raw performance;
in a two-ton luxury
sedan it almost
blows your mind.
0-100km/h in 3.4
seconds brings
a grin to your face
that almost has
to be surgically
removed.
The new E63
AMG not only
features launch
control, but
something else
that clearly
proves German
engineers have a
sense of humour:
drift mode.
Select race mode,
switch ESP off, go into
manual and pull both
paddles towards you.
When you’re sure, give
it one more tug of the
right paddle. A clutch
in the transmission
decouples drive to the
front wheels and all
850Nm of torque is
sent to the rear axle
- wave goodbye to
your rubber! The new
E63 AMG is conclusive
proof that genius is
wonderfully close to
insanity.
The Nürburgring
turns 90 this year
See (and hear)
the AMG GT R
in action at
GQ.co.za
G&Ts all round!
After adding an
‘R’ to the GT,
Mercedes-Benz
may have to adapt
its catchy slogan
‘Best or nothing’ to
‘Beast or nothing’.
There’s a topless
AMG GT version
available as well.
The GTR is the
most pointed silver
arrow ever. It’s very
much a reflection
of the changed
times at MercedesBenz, where
CEO Dieter
Zetsche makes
appearances in
jeans and sneakers.
The R takes the
AMG GT family up
to five, with two
new roadsters on
the way. The
four-door GT is
planned and
a Black Series is
already on its way.
What they all
have in common,
besides enormous
power, is the new
grille, named
Panamericana. It
looks like Hannibal
Lecter’s mask,
a muzzle to contain
the green hulk
and its brethren.
The GT R beat
Porsche’s 918 with
a lap time of
07:11:00, only to
be dethroned by
the Lamborghini
Huracán
Performante,
which lapped
Nürburgring in
6m52s. Let’s see
what the Black
Series will do, or to
make absolutely
sure, the
Mercedes-AMG
hyper car.
Note8
Do bigger things
DRIVE Q&A
SILENT
MIGHT
Quiet convertibles are
a rarity, but it’s precisely
that kind of pleasant
surprise that makes the
Rolls-Royce Dawn as
serene as it is sumptuous.
Rolls’ Director of Design,
Giles Taylor, tells us more
Words by Paul Sephton
GQ: The roof of the Dawn can only be
described as a triumph – what is the
inspiration for this design?
Giles Taylor: The multi-layers, French
seam and shape of the roof all contribute
to the finesse, luxury and silence of the
experience inside the Dawn. This highly
complex craft technique takes inspiration
from the world of fine tailoring and
mirrors the endeavours of London’s Savile
Row tailors. The craftspeople who work
on the roof come from such backgrounds.
GQ: It is by far the quietest closed-roof
convertible ever – how was this achieved?
GT: Two key techniques were employed
to ensure the roof not only appears
beautiful and sensuous in its form, but also
contributes to the silence of the car in its
56 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
function. A perfectly smooth surface,
GQ: How do you go about developing
combined with an innovative tailored
innovative vehicle designs for a younger
‘French seam’ ensures that the airflow over
audience while staying true to the
the car with the roof up creates no noticeable
marque’s strong heritage?
wind noise. Inside, the Rolls-Royce Dawn is
GT: Our focus has been on modernising
as silent as a Rolls-Royce Wraith – a first in
the form language to suit a younger
convertible motoring.
customer who is increasingly
Secondly, the actual
attracted to Rolls-Royce, while
opening and closing of the
respecting the classical,
Fast facts
roof mechanism is both
timeless qualities that are
beautiful and unobtrusive
essential to our brand identity.
Around 2 000
Rolls-Royces are
at the same time. Silence
Since the launch of the Wraith
cruising SA’s roads.
and seclusion may be
in 2013 and the Dawn in 2015
exchanged for the sounds,
we have noticed the average
The average age
light and aromas of the
age of our patrons decrease
of an Rolls owner
outside world, with the roof
by as much as 10 years.
has decreased to 45.
opening in complete
These younger customers
silence in just 22 seconds,
are often entrepreneurs who
Most Rolls-Royce
and at cruising speeds of up
commission a Rolls-Royce
owners have at
least five other cars.
to 50km/h.
to mark their success.
GQ: Given the endless
customisation option list,
how do you recommend fi rst-time buyers
create a vehicle that will feel truly
personal but remain classic?
GT: A bespoke commission can include
anything from the relatively simple
application of a hand-painted coachline
or tread-plate expressing a family name
or business insignia, to more elaborate
collaborations like paint perfectly
matched to a favourite garment or even a
wood set sourced from a customer’s
private estate.
GQ: CEO of Rolls-Royce Torsten
Müller Ötvös speaks about the business
of selling rarity. How meticulous is the
entire production process?
GT: It takes 60 pairs of hands to design,
craft and construct a Rolls-Royce motor
car. For example, an astonishing 20 000
wood veneer combinations are available
in each and every Rolls-Royce car. Each
car has 120 different wooden parts which
are created with individual decorative
veneers, making them unique to every
customer, and it can take up to 40 pieces
of quality wood to create each veneer.
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QUICK
AS A
FOX
Tech entrepreneur
Ashley James co-founded
PropertyFox in 2016,
promising an easy,
cheap and fast option
for selling property
Words by Nkosiyati Khumalo
T
he process of selling your home
can be peppered with frustrations
and unexpected costs, like high
commissions from real estate agents.
Disrupting this traditional model, online
platform PropertyFox’s ease of use and
low commission feels almost too good to
be true. A year into operations, James
offers a lowdown on the model that may
forever change the real estate game.
GQ: It’s been about a year since
PropertyFox launched. What’s the
uptake been like?
Ashley James: The uptake has been
overwhelming. We’ve been able to help
South Africans from all nine provinces
sell their homes. To date our model, which
charges much lower commissions than
traditional estate agencies without
compromising on service, has saved South
African home sellers around R9m in agent
commission. Our customer-focused model
is being very well received. So it’s been
a positive start for PropertyFox.
GQ: What kind of growth has the
company experienced?
AJ: Taking into account that PropertyFox
was only launched in
experienced exponen
listed over 600 homes
total sales valued at R
provinces of South Af
g
ld
GQ: What have been
being a disruptor wi hi h
space? Have you had y
from more traditiona
y
h
ll
?
AJ: We’ve had natural
traditional players, bu
l b l
our model because we k
h
ll
in South Africa have b
much to sell their hom
h
been unswayed. It has b
b
a pioneer in the space Th
l d
were our first clients a d h
d
into a space where we h
b
able to be a major influ
on converting
traditionalists to the
new model. When
people hear there is a
more affordable and
quicker option for
selling their homes it’s
not an overly hard sell
GQ: How have you
approached your
marketing strategy,
and how has that
changed as the
business has
grown?
Starting off, this
was a challenge
because our brand
was unknown and
we were trying to
sell a solution that
sounded too good
to be true. Before
we knew it, we had so
traction from below-th l
and performance mark
channels (social medi
etc.). Analytics from th
channels allowed us t
understand our audie
well. Having a strong
presence from the get
>>
AJ:
PropertyFox
co-founder
Ashley James
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 59
wealth
PROFILE
brought credibility to PropertyFox and we
are now at a point where we can extend
our marketing channels into the abovethe-line space.
GQ: Tell us about the actual client
journey. Have you found that clients
have enjoyed the home selling process
more because they’ve been more
directly involved with showing and
other steps?
AJ: Our client journey is simple and
efficient. We allow home sellers to be part
of the process, from ‘art directing’ their
professional photos to receiving live
analytics and competitor updates in the
market. Sellers confirm bookings,
showcase their own home and leave
absolutely everything else up to us. So not
only do sellers meet their potential buyers,
but they can now understand the level of
supply and demand in their immediate
areas at the present time.
There’s a commonly held understanding
that a buyer should never meet a seller in a
home sale. We’ve turned that completely
on its head. There’s now truth and
transparency behind the sale. No one
knows their home better than the sellers
do, bringing complete authenticity to the
sale. The transaction process is handled by
the team and technology at PropertyFox.
GQ: Do you plan on adding any
additional features or services to the
portfolio, for example a flatmate
finder? Is it something that could
extend to commercial real estate?
We will always continue innovating
our offering. Quite recently we introduced
a drone offering to our premier product on
a national scale, which allows us to take
our representation of homes to another
AJ:
‘When you’re on the side of the consumer, you’re bound for
success. The models of the future will be those that offer
complete transparency, affordability and speed’
level. We’ve made residential property
sales our core focus, although commercial
sales have been an easy spin-off for those
that battle to sell traditionally. The rental
market, developments and commercial
space is something that we could focus on
in the future, but not for now. We’ll always
be evolving our technology so our offering
is always as good as it can possibly be.
GQ: You are a bit of a serial
entrepreneur – what do you find unique
about doing business in South Africa?
AJ: I am an eternal optimist – so despite
the political problems we face, I totally
believe in our country. South Africa’s
bearish position gives rise to many
opportunities for entrepreneurs to step in
and provide solutions to help consumers.
Bearish conditions open up the need for
people to save money allowing for models
like PropertyFox to really show their
potential. South Africa is filled with
opportunities and talent. The success of
PropertyFox is the passion of the team. We
truly believe that what we are doing for
local home sellers is revolutionary.
GQ: A few of your businesses
(like Oishi Sushi) have utilised
technology as the primary platform
instead of a customer-facing
physical space. What advantages
and disadvantages does that kind
of setup offer?
AJ:
It allows for you to really decrease
input costs, with an unlimited output. You
can invest all your time and money into a
product that serves the consumer, rather
than into expensive physical setups that
aren’t necessarily proportionate to brand
growth or revenue.
Our Property Managers travel over
35 000km every week without even leaving
their desks. The internet gives every
business the potential to become a global
brand. It’s an incredibly exciting time to be
an entrepreneur. Access to the internet and
data allows for industries to truly reinvent
themselves. Tech businesses can feel
slightly impersonal so this can be seen
as a disadvantage. But our whole model
is geared towards building relationships
through exceptional, personalised
communication at every level. For instance,
we communicate with our sellers and
buyers on Whatsapp, we make sure our
staff have a ‘face’ by ensuring they have
a photo attached to all communications,
and we hire warm, friendly people who
genuinely want to give sellers a better deal.
It’s working for us.
GQ: Do you think most businesses
will start to migrate to this model?
AJ: Businesses need to start focusing on
solutions that speak for the people. When
you’re on the side of the consumer, you’re
bound for success. The models of the
future will be those that offer complete
transparency, affordability and speed.
HOW PROPERTYFOX WORKS
Sign up online at
propertyfox.co.za
Use the platform
to schedule
a photographer
for your property.
You select the
final images.
60 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Get your photos
back within 48
hours, and edit/
approve your
listing’s content.
PropertyFox
publishes your listing
on every property
site in the country,
and international
portals on request.
All potential buyers
are verified before
being introduced to
you. You schedule
your own viewings.
The PropertyFox
team helps with
all the legal stuff.
You’ll only pay the
platform a 1.5%
commission.
wealth
BUSINESS CLASS
1. COMMIT TO
LIFELONG LEARNING
‘It used to be the case that when
you left university you had
sufficient education to sustain
yourself in the workplace for 30
years. That’s absolutely not true
any longer. The pace of change
is such that you have to be in a
constant cycle of both formal
and informal learning.’
2. GET USED TO CODING
‘It’s not about becoming
a computer scientist,’ says Ross.
‘It’s understanding the basis on
which the future is being built.
It’s like knowing how to read
a spreadsheet – a form of basic
literacy in the economy. Think
of coding in the same way.’
3. TRAVEL
‘If you’re at the start of your
career, get as many stamps in
your passport as possible,’ Ross
counsels. But he’s thinking
emerging economies rather
than the gap-year standards.
‘There are many countries that
are going to see expansions of
their economy and you can be
a part of that.’
8 WAYS TO
FUTURE-PROOF
YOUR CAREER
Here’s how to make sure you’re not left
out in the cold when the robots take over
Words by John Naughton
Illustration by Mark Oliver
S
o, do you want the good news or the bad news? The bad
news is that the robots are coming for our jobs, and not just
blue-collar production-line jobs – they’ve got those already.
Bank of England governor Mark Carney warned last year of new
technology ‘hollowing out’ traditional middle-class service
industries, and most experts agree. One of them is Alec Ross, a
former aide to Hillary Clinton, who now advises corporations,
investors and governments on technology and innovation.
Thankfully, he also has the good news.
‘I don’t think it’s time to curl up in the foetal position,’ says
Ross, whose book The Industries Of The Future has been described
as a portable TED conference. But we’re going to have to change.
So, if you’re not yet ready to work for our new metallic overlords...
4. LEARN ACROSS
DIFFERENT FIELDS
‘It’s important to understand
things that are scientific and
technological. However, to be
a leader in the future industries
you will need to combine it
with skills associated with
the humanities, from emotional
intelligence to communication.’
People think of Facebook
as the product of a brilliant
computer scientist, but it is as
much the product of expertise
in behavioural psychology.’
5. HEAD FOR THE
NEW HORIZONS
Key areas of expansion over
the next 20 years are robotics,
artificial intelligence, big data,
the commercialisation of
genomics, cyber security and
the codification of money and
trust. But there will also be
less-expected ones. ‘In a world
where we’re handing over so
much of our humanity to
computer code, I think that
there is something human that
rebels against this. We’re going
to need to almost repair in the
face of this. So the demand for
psychologists will shoot up.’
6. MASTER A NEW
LANGUAGE
‘In 10-15 years’ time we will
have earpieces that will allow
us to understand what’s being
spoken to us in 100 different
languages,’ states Ross. ‘But in
that time period great fortunes
are going to be made by people
who understand how to
navigate frontier marketplaces.’
Yet there’s a significant
difference between translation
and communication. ‘If you
want to be a real dealmaker
it sure helps if you can connect
and engage with a person
in their mother tongue.’
7. KNOW THAT NOT
EVERYONE WILL BE A
SLAVE TO THE ALGORITHM
‘Creativity will become more
important, not less. ‘As our
world becomes more
consumed by zeroes and ones
we all need art more, so the
skills that go into being a
great artist are going to be
more cherished.’
8. DON’T PANIC
‘I take an optimistic but well
short of utopian view of what
this technology means,’ muses
Ross. ‘Is the future going
to look like Mad Max or Star
Trek? Neither. It’s going to be
somewhere in the middle.’
‘In a world where we’re handing over so much
of our humanity to computer code, I think that
there is something human that rebels against this’
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 61
HOW
HEALTHY
IS YOUR
LIFE
COVER?
Here’s how to
make sure your
dependants aren’t
left in the lurch
when you’re six
feet under
Words by Bruce Cameron
T
here you are. You are not the perfect GQ
male specimen. You suffer from a
serious congenital heart condition, your
liver is failing from all the alcohol you’ve fed it,
you have a wracking cough from smoking 30 a
day, you are diabetic, obese and have high
blood pressure. You are a sad case. Frankly,
you’re unlikely to get a life assurance company
to give you assurance on your life to provide
for your spouse and two ex-spouses and 10
children when you drop dead. Even if you do,
you’ll pay a high premium and have certain
conditions (possible causes of death) excluded
as a benefit payout to your dependants.
But if you are employed and there is group
life assurance attached to your retirement
fund, you will get life assurance cover at the
same premium as Jill, who sits at the desk
next to yours. She is perfectly healthy and has
a six-pack you can only dream about.
Jill is subsidising you.
These are extremes, but it highlights a very
important benefit that many employees
receive: life assurance without any need, in
most cases, to have a medical check-up, or
even declare that you are a moderately, let
alone dreadfully, unhealthy person.
Group risk cover is priced by an assurance
on the anticipated deaths of the group as
a whole – not on you as an individual. So,
if you work for, say, an IT company with
high-income employees who are aware of the
need to and can afford to live healthy lives, the
premiums for the employee group will be
62 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
lower than those for
low-income security
company employees,
who face a much
higher risk from both
the nature of their
lifestyles and the
dangers of their jobs.
In both groups,
those in low-risk
categories subsidise
those who can be
classed as high-risk,
either from a health
or job point of view.
Group life
assurance covers you
and your dependants
against death and
disability (and being
unable to earn a
living). Generally
group life cover will
pay out between two
and four times your
annual pensionable
income or salary, and
either pay a capital
amount or an
ongoing income
(between 75 and 100
per cent) if you are
disabled. Group life
cover, particularly
when it comes to disability, is a lot more
complex than this. If you do not understand
the group life cover you have you may leave
your dependants very out-of-pocket.
Group life cover can be approved or
unapproved; the latter is taken out by your
employer on your behalf, and the premiums
are paid with after-tax money. This means any
benefits paid are tax-free, and you decide who
will benefit from the proceeds when you die.
Approved group cover is held in the name
of your retirement fund and is subject to the
rules of your fund. This means:
1. The premiums are added to the total
retirement fund contributions that you are
permitted to deduct from your taxable income
(27.5 per cent capped at R350 000 a year). At
death, the assurance benefits are combined
with your accumulated retirement pension
benefits and any portion taken as a cash lump
sum is subject to retirement fund lump sum
tax, or the dependants can take the money as
an income flow, taxed at their marginal rate.
2. The trustees of your fund decide who is
entitled to the proceeds of these benefits. The
trustees are obliged by the Pension Funds Act
to consider your legal (direct family) and
financial (for example, an unemployed third
cousin you have
been supporting)
dependants and
the extent of the
dependency – past,
present and future.
Beneficiaries who are
not dependants are
considered last.
The fact that
you have group life
assurance does not
mean you can sit back
and relax. It is unlikely
that your group life
cover will be sufficient
to cover the needs of
your dependants.
Here’s what to do:
1. Update your
beneficiaries annually,
stating how much you
believe each of your
dependants should
receive and why.
2. Get the details of
your group life cover,
particularly whether it
is approved or not, as
the tax consequences
will affect how much is
paid as a benefit.
3. Ask your financial
adviser to draw up
a financial plan to
determine whether you
need any additional life
or disability cover.
4. Check if there is
a continuation option
that will allow you to
keep the cover in place.
If you resign, are
retrenched or fired,
your group life cover
falls away, but you
may be able to continue
as an individual
policyholder, meaning
you will not have to
undergo a health
check-up to get new
cover.
If you don’t understand the group life cover
you have you may leave your dependants
very out-of-pocket
ILLUSTRATION BY GARETH GREY
FINANCE
NEW
COLOGNE
JUST ONE SPRAY
RAY FOR ALL DA
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AYY FRAGRANCE
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ADVICE
SHOOT
FOR
THE
MOON
The way the world does
business – even the very
nature of business – is
changing fast. We asked
John Sanei, trend specialist,
innovation strategist and
author of What’s Your
Moonshot?, to offer up
some tips on how to make
sage business moves
in it. Change and innovation begin with
self-awareness and stepping out of your
comfort zone.
GET YOUR MIND STRAIGHT
You are either a victim or a victor. Your
mindset and internal dialogue play a big
role in shaping the habits and patterns of
thinking that can turn you into a ‘victim’,
hindering both personal and professional
success. The ability to become self-aware
is by far the most important tool when it
comes to realising that you are a victim
and when you are (perhaps unknowingly)
keeping yourself confined to running on
autopilot instead of exploring your
opportunities. If habits are formed by
Words by John Sanei
I
f you want to thrive rather than survive,
you will need the mindset and business
tactics to embrace change. The first
step is to get your internal strategy right:
do you see yourself as a victim of the
future or an architect of it? The second
step is to decipher which business
strategies, trends and innovations are
relevant to you in this era of disruption as
you start developing and implementing
your ‘Moonshot’ idea.
PRISONERS AND WARDENS
Don’t get stuck in the rut of success
wherein you become both the prisoner
and the warden. My personal story is the
textbook case of why businesses fail if
they’re not prepared for the future. Are
you holding yourself ransom and
scrambling to keep the ball rolling? If your
business is thriving, you need to ask
yourself if it’s because you are cutting
costs, pushing sales harder and looking for
ways to save money, or because you are
fundamentally growing your business.
Getting stuck in an ironic rut of success
means that you haven’t truly responded to
the changes around you or found new
ways of doing things. By forcing yourself to
stay afloat, you aren’t breaking free from
the shackles of the rat race, you’re just lost
64 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Do you see yourself as a victim of
the future or an architect of it?
learning, this suggests that we can also
unlearn our victim mindset. Do you feel
easily bullied or are you the bully? Do you
feel like things never go your way? If you
are blaming anybody and everybody for
what’s happening in your life, then you are
in victim mode and need to become aware
of how your internal dialogue is shaping
your reality.
BE A VICTOR
A victor is someone who doesn’t take
anything personally. When we are victors,
we see opportunity everywhere, and we’re
not afraid to knock on its door. It’s also
about making sure we remain best friends
with ourselves and our victor character. To
be a victor, you need to focus on success,
not failure; move through the world with
reverence and a sense of humanity, and see
everyone as equals in order to access
unlimited opportunities and potential.
Follow your highest excitement, and catch
yourself when the victim starts talking.
LEARN A DIFFERENT KIND
OF LANGUAGE
To understand the future, we need to learn
a new language that defines our rhetoric.
My Forever Profitable methodology helps
organisations and governments around
the world to dissect, anticipate and be
excited about the future, rather than be
scared of it. It starts with evaluating the
trends and future of technology, your
industry, your consumer and your
employee. To be forever profitable, you
also need a solid internal culture in which
people and ideas can grow, a place to
innovate with purpose. Lastly, you can
turn to ramification tactics to sustain
a future-proof business. You don’t need to
be an oracle to see what your future might
look like. Anticipation is preparation.
FIND YOUR MOONSHOT
Moonshots take you out of your comfort
zone and place you firmly on the
trajectory that you want to create
for yourself. Every individual has
a different skillset and their own unique
experiences. To find your Moonshot, you
need to pinpoint your natural inclinations
or talents that will help you develop an
idea within your field of expertise and
familiar environment. Achieving your
Moonshot must come naturally to you.
What excites you?
What’s Your
Moonshot? by
John Sanei
(Burnet Media
R240)
Stone Harbour
Shirts from
449
www.edgars.co.za
@EDGARSFASHION
95
Exclusive to
Ralph Lauren suit.
Polo Ralph Lauren
T-shirt. Hermès watch.
Tom Ford sneakers
66 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
GQ MAN
HOLLY
WOOD’S
NEXT
WAVE
ACTOR
Before he became the face of Star Wars, JOHN
BOYEGA was just some impossibly talented,
humble and exuberant kid from South
London. Now he’s talking shop with Robert
Downey Jr and making more movies – and
he’s still humble. Anna Peele went to Boyega’s South London home to hang with one of
Hollywood’s least ‘Hollywood’ stars
Photographs by Sebastian Kim
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 67
‘I AIN’T
PAY I NG
MONEY
TO
A LWAY S
SEE ONE
T Y PE
OF
P E R S O N ON
SCREEN…
WE CAN
RUFFLE
SOME
F E A
THERS’
Stormtrooper lay
in the sand,
sealed in the
white plastic shell
of a uniform
better suited for
a climatecontrolled area:
l i ke a Deat h St a r.
This particular Stormtrooper had defected
and crashed on the desert planet Jakku.
It was the fiercely shielded first shot of
the fiercely hyped first teaser of the
fiercely anticipated first Star Wars movie
in a decade, so no one without a Disney
contract knew who or where this
Stormtrooper was as he fought to get off
the dusty ground of what was actually Abu
Dhabi. The story behind that image in
the The Force Awakens was less fierce,
more… awkward.
‘Every time I’d move, the plastic would
pinch my armpits,’ the Stormtrooper says
a few years later, reminiscing in his South
London apartment. ‘I’d rolled onto my
bum, pushed up with my arms, then got
onto my knees, struggling to get my thighs
68 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
up. The sand was moving, and it was
a struggle. I was out of breath. It was
hot as hell. But I got my back up. And
then I came into shot.’
The Stormtrooper had been No One
until The Force Awakens. Unnamed. Rarely
heard. Then the Stormtrooper removed
his helmet and became John Boyega.
‘I thought they were going to keep
Stormtroopers taking helmets off
a mystery for a while,’ Boyega says.
‘I thought they were going to hold that
back, but they put you bang right in the
middle of the narrative.’
The face we were seeing held warm
deep-set eyes darting around the desert
while sweat dripped down his forehead.
Lips parted to reveal clenched teeth. It was
very human – and he seemed convincingly
terrified. Boyega’s talent was so obvious
that you see him on the screen and
think, yeah, that guy belongs here. When
he took off the helmet, Boyega became
part of Hollywood’s next wave, a swell
that would carry him through Kathryn
Bigelow’s new film, Detroit, and nudge him
into the top tier of leading men. And, yeah,
onto the cover of GQ.
But the moment we – the world –
realised Boyega was going to be a star was
not the same moment when he realised
it. That took longer. And you can actually
YouTube the exact second he got it. On the
red carpet of the 2015 London premiere
of The Force Awakens, a reporter asked
him how he felt. Boyega looked shocked
as he yelled, seemingly without permission
from his brain, and definitely not from
his publicist, ‘I’m a boy from Peckham’ –
a mostly immigrant, mostly working-class
district of South London – ‘and I’m in
a Star Wars movie!’
Boyega turned to the 15 hometown
friends he’d brought on the red carpet with
him. ‘We gotta get a camera to my people!’
Boyega beckoned the lens with both arms
and walked over to his people with the
smile of someone who suddenly realised
this was the coolest thing ever. His friends
draped their arms over him, and the whole
scrum of Peckhamites danced. His arms
started pumping, ending in pointed
fingers, then fists, then palms turned
upward to take in the glory of the moment.
This is the kind of thing you never see.
An expression of genuine happiness at
a contractually obligated, stage-managed
professional function. But it doesn’t feel
arrogant – closer to an offering of gratitude
to the forces that brought him there.
Two years after that premiere, we’re in
his flat playing Nintendo. I marvel at how
momentous that premiere was. It must
have just felt like everything had changed,
all at once – he was a star! Eyes fixed on the
Mario Kart race that he is about to win,
Boyega very politely corrects me, putting
everything in perspective: ‘Star Wars will
always be the star of Star Wars.’
HOW DOES A 25-YEAR-OLD actor
come to have that kind of perspective?
Because he knows he doesn’t have all the
answers and is confident enough to go
looking for them. At Robert Downey Jr’s
house. Over waffles.
It was just before Star Wars: The Force
Awakens opened in theatres. ‘It was time
for me to sit down with someone who’s
been through the extremes of Hollywood,’
Boyega says, ‘and to be given some tips as
to how to stay stable.’ Boyega asked his
agent at the time if he could ask Downey’s
agent if Downey wouldn’t mind briefly
filling Boyega in on how to just, like, be
famous correctly. How to not become so
overwhelmed by attention that, as RDJ
briefly did, you squander your talent and
get busted for heroin. Boyega was hoping
to skip to the part where you maintain
a healthy relationship with your ego and
ambition, so that you’re able to make
fulfilling and lucrative creative decisions,
as RDJ now does. Sure, that’s kind of
embarrassing to ask about, but how else
would you find out? >>
GQ MAN
Coach 1941 jacket.
Salvatore Ferragamo
rollneck
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 69
not going to be his life. So, how do you
find that kind of partnership when you’re
famous enough to casually arrange
a mentorship with Robert Downey Jr?
Boyega is borderline wistful as he imagines
this ideal woman, equally comfortable in
Peckham and Hollywood, going through
tough times and dancing on red carpets.
‘It’s nice to survive with your companion
by your side. I’m sure it’s a good thing,’ he
says. ‘But I’ve never experienced it. And
people advise you as a celebrity, “Make
sure you get someone who doesn’t care
about your career.” I disagree,’ Boyega told
Downey and Bloom. They concurred:
‘She has to care about it to understand it.’
Eidos suit. Thom
Browne shirt.
Alexander Olch tie.
Georg Jensen watch
Then, mid-waffle, Orlando Bloom
dropped by. Just unannounced, like it
was a regular thing. ‘I’m not used to any
of that stuff, hanging out with Iron Man
on a day-to-day basis.’
It was the best-case scenario for
someone seeking a crash course in fame.
He’s getting advice from one of the most
famous actors in the world, someone who,
against all odds, has wound up solid and
sane, and suddenly a second one shows
up. So while Boyega had the opportunity,
there was something kind of crazy he
wanted to ask these huge celebrities about.
‘Women. Women, women, women.’
But this wasn’t some gross thing where
a nascent star asks reformed hounds how
to assemble a Pussy Posse. It was more
70 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
gentlemanly than that. He was asking
a man seemingly in a blissful marriage
(Downey) and one of the dudes who
inspired Katy Perry’s latest album (Bloom)
about relationships. ‘My mom and dad
have been together for 25 years, so that’s
the system I will follow,’ Boyega says. On
the other hand, his parents met in Nigeria,
immigrated to London, and brought up
three children in a small apartment while
making a modest living preaching and
aiding the disabled. Boyega knows that’s
JJ ABRAMS KNEW he was going to
give Boyega the part. He’d known all along.
But Boyega had no idea how this meeting
was going to go. There was no way Abrams
had called Boyega to tell him he didn’t get
the role, right? Not after the ‘interminable
auditioning’, months of work, returning to
the Disney lot six, seven, eight times. On
the other hand, Boyega thought, if he’s
gonna let me off, he would want to do it
face-to-face. Or perhaps he would offer me
another role or a walk-on. Would Boyega
have done that? ‘I’m not watching the next
man do it with a front-row seat,’ he says.
Abrams had loved Boyega since he saw
him in Joe Cornish’s Attack the Block, in
which Boyega plays a teenager defending
a housing project from space invaders.
And then Abrams asked him to be ‘the
star of Star Wars’. This is the moment when
the actor jumps up and down and gives his
new boss a hug. But Abrams kept talking.
He began a cautionary speech laying out
that this role, in addition to altering
Boyega’s entire career, forever, would
occasionally kind of suck, forever. ‘The job
isn’t just to be an actor in a movie when
you’re doing something like Star Wars,’
Abrams told Boyega. ‘It’s a significant
lifetime commitment to this thing.’ Did
Boyega understand that this would be
a load he would carry for as long as he
lived? Had Abrams mentioned that Boyega
would never, ever escape Star Wars? ‘It
could be an enormous burden.’
‘I’M A B OY F ROM PE C K H A M A N D
I’M I N A STA R WA R S MOV I E! ’
GQ MAN
But Boyega had already gone through all
this in his own head, already asked himself
all of Abrams’s questions. So he cut the
director off halfway: ‘Thanks, man. I’m in.’
BOYEGA’S NEW MOVIE Detroit is set
during the city’s 1967 riot, the bulk of the
action taking place during one horrible
night in a hotel, when a group of white
police officers tormented a group of young
black men and two white women under the
guise of keeping the city safe. The film
manages to marry the unrelenting tension
of The Hurt Locker with the unrelenting
cruelty of 12 Years a Slave. Boyega plays
Melvin Dismukes, a black security guard
who bore petrified, and mostly paralysed,
witness to the savagery of the police.
Bigelow describes him as being caught
in an ‘impossible situation’ somewhere
between the terrorised and the terrorisers,
unable to help the former by doing
anything more than hoping his presence
would curb the brutality of the latter.
In the movie, Boyega is the naturalistic
foil to the chaos of the violence happening
around him and has what Bigelow calls
a ‘charged strength, a magnificent power
held in check by a fraught political climate’.
It’s a stoic dignity that makes the rest of the
movie seem even more out of control by
contrast. After watching the film, Boyega
told Bigelow, ‘Yeah, I’d probably only be
able to watch this every 10 years.’ Not just
because it’s painful to watch. But because,
as he says, ‘being black, going through what
we’ve been through… the past is still
hanging over our heads’.
WHEN THE STORMTROOPER took
off his helmet in Episode VII, it didn’t just
matter that there was a real person under
there. It mattered that the face you saw
belonged to John Boyega, son of Samson
Adegboyega and Nigeria and Peckham.
‘There are no black people on Game of
Thrones,’ Boyega says. (To be fair, there are,
like, three.) ‘You don’t see one black person
in Lord of the Rings.’ (That is true.) And
though Star Wars had featured a few black
characters – Billy Dee Williams, Samuel L
Jackson as a peripheral Jedi – they were less
represented in the galaxy than Ewoks.
‘I ain’t paying money to always see one
type of person on-screen,’ says Boyega.
‘Because you see different people from
different backgrounds, different cultures,
every day. Even if you’re a racist, you have to
live with that. We can ruffle some feathers.’
When we watched that first moment of
the Episode VII teaser trailer, we didn’t
see who we were expecting to see. We got
someone who simultaneously understood
his insignificance in the scope of the
multi-billion-dollar franchise he was
inhabiting and could blow up everything
we thought we knew about it. Han Solo is
the obvious choice for that trailer – Ford
is the icon in the movie. But Abrams
reintroduced Star Wars through Boyega
because Boyega’s performance was the
one that defined his movie.
But, yeah, Star Wars is bigger than
Boyega. So are Hollywood and fame.
There’s racism in film, and in the world,
and in Peckham. And obviously nobody
in Hollywood is bigger than Ford or Robert
Downey Jr. But Boyega is at peace with his
place in a much larger system – it’s probably
not a coincidence that he’s religious. This
sense of smallness, this humility, brings
him the kind of joy that spurs spontaneous
red-carpet dancing and allows him to hold
the weight of the galaxy on his shoulders.
Boyega struggled to his feet in the desert,
thighs burning as he got his back up and
came into shot. And in that moment, his life
changed. Well, it did and it didn’t. ‘People
were saying that,’ he says. ‘But it truly didn’t
feel that way. It just felt like this would give
me the opportunity. To make stuff happen.
To make my dreams come true.’
To use the film to do it himself. Let Star
Wars be the star of Star Wars. John Boyega
can take it from here.
Michael Bastian
Gray Label jacket.
Todd Snyder +
Champion sweatshirt
Will super sexy
Baywatch
lifeguard
Alexandra
Daddario rescue
you this summer?
Probably not,
but dreaming
is for free
A
lexandra Daddario laughs when we ask her if she had any kind of emotional connection to
Baywatch, that monument of ‘90s TV kitsch, before participating in the new (and irreverent)
version that hit cinemas in June. ‘What’s strange is that I knew all about it but I never
watched a single episode. So in some way I was an expert even before doing this movie.’
These days remembering David Hasselhoff’s famous series always comes with a smile, something
the movie plays with deliberately: ‘I think its iconography is so universal that it is almost impossible
for anyone not to know it. I watched some episodes in preparation for this role, and I can say that we
got the tone we were looking for spot on.’ That tone is somewhere between nostalgic celebration and
Words by Noel Ceballos
Photographs by Richard Ramos
72 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
COVER GIRL
a demythologising parody; a balance
that the New York-born actress
considers crucial.
‘As soon as I started reading the script
I realised what I wanted to do with the
idea of Baywatch. The film takes the
series to another level and, in my opinion,
it speaks to another generation. Of
course we laughed at the slow motion
runs on the beach! What’s great about
this is that nothing is sacred: it’s such
a fun concept that you can play with
as you wish.’
You may know Daddario from the
Percy Jackson saga, her stints in the
horror genre or her brief (but memorable)
role in the first season of True Detective,
for which she was nominated for
a Golden Globe award. She insists, >>
‘In the universe we
have created, to be
a lifeguard and work
under the orders of
Mitch Buchannon
is the best thing you
can do with your
life. There is no
greater honour’
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 73
however, that comedy is her natural habitat.
Her character in Baywatch, Summer Quinn,
has given her the opportunity to play the clever
clown. ‘She is a young recruit on the team,
which she is dying to be a part of. The most
absurd and delicious part of it all is that, in the
universe we have created, to be a lifeguard
and work under the orders of Mitch
Buchannon [played by Dwayne Johnson] is
the best thing you can do with your life. There
is no greater honour.’
Preparing physically for her role was hardly
a stroll in the sand. ‘We all had to go through
very intense physical training,’ she admits. ‘I’m
not exaggerating when I say sometimes I just
wanted to throw up, lie down on the ground
and let everything go on without me.
‘So, yes, I would like to steer my career in
the direction of less demanding projects, but
I wouldn’t swap the opportunity of doing this
movie for anything in the world. What I love
most about doing comedy is the freedom you
have as an actress. For example, to improvise
anything you come up with and see with the
rest of the team whether it works or not, if you
manage to make them laugh.’
So now you know: you can get in the water
without a worry. The lifeguards are on duty.
Visit GQ.co.za for
9 reasons why
we’re in love with
Alexandra
74 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
COVER GIRL
‘I wouldn’t
swap the
opportunity
of doing this
movie for
anything in
the world’
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 75
THE CONCEPT
Here, Airbus imagines what flying first class
might look like in 2050. Say goodbye to being
holed up in a rigid tin tube in the sky and hello
to a leisurely journey on a beautifully designed
aircraft. Inspired by avian anatomy, the concept
has a super-strong skeleton that supports a
membrane that can become completely
transparent, enabling stunning views of
landmarks on take-off and landing, as well as
stargazing at night. The future of flying
(according to Airbus) is all about enjoying the
ride and getting to your destination in a relaxed
state of mind, body and soul.
The ‘skin’ of the
aircraft can become
completely transparent
and automatically
adjusts the temperature
inside the cabin – no
more fiddling with
those awkward airconditioning nozzles.
Pop-up holographic
projections appear in
front of passengers for
-style
in-flight entertainment.
76 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
THE DOORS
The doorways are double the size of those
on existing passenger jets, making it easier
to enter and exit the aircraft and step
around dawdling passengers.
REPORT
To capture the attention – and the business – of flyers who value the flexibility,
speed and comfort of first class cabins and private jets, top aeronautical
minds are seeking to achieve ever-higher feats of ambition and luxury. From
transparent planes and projection-screen ceilings to striking interiors and the
Champagne-popping return of supersonic passenger planes, hit the recline
button and take a tour from the top of the world. Words by Conrad Quilty-Harper
THE ZONES
Inside, the jet is divided into distinct
areas. The ‘vitalising zone’ at the front is
energised with antioxidant-enriched air
and acupressure-enabled seats that
morph to respond to passengers’ bodies;
the ‘interactive zone’ in the centre allows
for virtual-reality business meetings or
games of golf; and the ‘smart-tech zone’
at the back is adaptable to other
activities, such as watching a movie on
the giant holographic touch-display or
catching some zeds in the sleeping pod.
Th e co n ce pt h a s a f l at te r, m o re
aerodynamic shape, which
has the additional benefit of
creating more room in the cabin.
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 77
THE CEILING
THE CONCEPT
Inspired by Pagani’s Huayra hypercar, the Infinito concept
interior has a unique design that projects a view of the sky
outside onto the ceiling. This is the tech geek’s private jet,
combining exposed carbon fibre with natural materials,
such as the wooden floor, allowing the designers to reduce
the weight without sacrificing the visuals.
Peering out of tiny
portholes is a thing
of the past with the
Infinito concept,
thanks to panoramic
windows in the
entertainment zone
and an incredible view
from the meeting room.
THE INNOVATION
Pagani has lent
the Infinito its
new material
CarboTitanium.
It’s super light,
super strong and
sounds a little like
something James
Cameron thought
up for his latest
movie.
Impressive.
78 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
The display works in
tandem with the mood
lighting to set the tone
for every trip, whether
it’s for work or play.
REPORT
Every element
of the interior is
precision tooled,
from the LED
light fittings
to the carbon
fibre that adorns
surfaces from
the bar to the
bathroom sinks.
THE WALLS
The dividers between
the work and relaxation
spaces can become
transparent or opaque
at the touch of a button.
No tacky dividing
curtains here.
A wooden corridor
forms a smooth
path through the
cabin and there
are several distinct
areas, so each of
your passengers can
maintain their own
personal space.
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 79
THE CONCEPT
The SkyDeck gives you a seat at the top of the
world and will turn any long-haul flight into
the ultimate sightseeing trip. The perfect place
to propose to your partner (unless they’re
afraid of flying or heights), the SkyDeck can be
retrofitted to your existing private jet for a cost
of R117-335 million. It’ll even fit on smaller
jets, although the dual seat option is the
perfect excuse to upgrade to a new widebodied aircraft, don’t you think?
A UV-protective coating
will shield you from the
sun’s harmful rays and
is lined with an
anti-condensation film.
The entire SkyDeck can rotate
360 degrees so you can watch
la n d m a rk s as you zoom by.
80 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
REPORT
THE LIFT
Larger jets will allow the
installation of a lift, so
you can take a seat,
press a button and slowly
elevate yourself into the
stratosphere.
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 81
Kumail
Nanjiani
(The New
and Improved)
These days, almost everything can
make you cry – or at the very least,
drive you to build an underground
bunker and hide until the eventual
nuclear apocalypse. Until then,
thankfully, there’s also enough to
make you laugh. We’ve gathered a
few legends and few new innovators
to give us the low-down on comedy
in (an ever-more terrifying) 2017
Edited by Nkosiyati Khumalo
82 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
If you recognise the caped
man above, it’s probably from
his role as the dryly brilliant
engineer Dinesh on Mike
Judge’s tech satire Silicon
Valley. He’s the Pied Piper
employee who starts wearing
an unfortunate necklace in a
tragic attempt at coolness and
justifies the purchase thusly:
‘I’ve been working hard. I’m
making money for the first
time. I was like, [I’ll] buy
myself something nice.’
Born in Karachi, Pakistan,
Kumail Nanjiani moved to
America at 18, then started his
career in stand-up, making
dryly brilliant Seinfeldian
observations delivered with
understated underdog effect.
His appeal broadened as his
focus narrowed to the
personal, exploring tragic
attempts at childhood
coolness (including, yes,
COMEDY
SPECIAL
WORDS BY ANNA PEELE. PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER YANG
wearing an unfortunate
necklace) and what it’s like to
start questioning your faith in
a strict Shiite family (tricky!).
Writing gigs begat acting gigs,
which begat Silicon Valley.
Since the 38-year-old
Nanjiani arrived in Hollywood
seven years ago, there have
been approximately zero great
romantic comedies and zero
first-generation South Asian
immigrants playing
mainstream romantic leads.
Seeing this as both an affront
and an opportunity, Nanjiani
decided to produce a great
rom-com and star in it himself.
Which apparently wasn’t
enough of a challenge, because
he also decided to co-write the
movie with his wife, Emily V
Gordon. (Don’t feel bad that
you and your spouse barely
made it through the assembly
of an Ikea barstool).
The fi lm is about the
beginning of their
relationship, when Nanjiani’s
devout parents were
pressuring him into an
arranged marriage and
Gordon got so sick that she
was put into a medically
induced coma. Funny story,
right? Judd Apatow thought
so. And The Big Sick is
hilarious. And dryly brilliant.
And genuinely moving. We
spoke with the brand-new
movie star and future
comedy god about putting
himself in the spotlight and
changing Hollywood.
GQ: Who were your
comedy heroes growing
up in Pakistan?
Kumail Nanjiani: There was
a comedy team called Bud
Spencer and Terence Hill.
I thought they were an
American comedy duo like
Abbott and Costello. But they
were Italian dudes who took
on American-sounding
names. One of their big
movies was Who Finds a
Friend Finds a Treasure. Who
would name a movie that?
Somebody who had English as
The GQ
comedy
survey
Seth
Rogen
Former Apatow
acolyte, executive
producer and director
of upcoming series
Future Man
Who’s your
comedy god?
Bill Murray. He is
just the funniest
person ever to be
on this planet.
What’s the best
joke you’ve
ever heard?
Wha’s the last
thing you want to
hear while getting
a BJ from Willie
Nelson? ‘I’m not
Willie Nelson.’
Who’s the next
great comedian?
Why?
John Mulaney is
someone who is
getting funnier and
funnier, which is
amazing, because
he’s always been
funny. And Nathan
Fielder is another
person I’m just
consistently blown
away by – I look
forward to few
things in life more
than new episodes
of Nathan for You.
a second language. And
I watched Office Space
and Beavis and Butt-Head
all the time. Until then,
you didn’t see nerdy,
unpopular people who are
assholes but presented with
a tremendous amount of
affection for the world that
those characters live in.
GQ: The Big Sick is
about your family,
your wife, and your
actual career. Your
character is literally
named Kumail. Will it
be hard to bring that
kind of honesty to
something that’s not
your own story?
KN: Anything that’s really
good has pieces of the
people who made it in them.
With Get Out, I’m sure
Jordan Peele put himself in
there, even if he doesn’t have
the experience of somebody
trying to put a white man’s
brain into his body.
GQ: You’ve mentioned
wanting to play a
superhero. Who would
be the dream?
KN: How exciting would it
be if there was a Captain
America looking like
someone that we haven’t
traditionally thought of as
the American ideal? That
could be really interesting.
Dalin Oliver
Good Hope FM co-host; star of nationwide
comedy show Face for Radio
What was the last thing that made
you laugh?
I
t was during my recent one-man
show Face for Radio at the Baxter
theatre. There’s a segment where
I speak about Crack-a-Snack and
hand out a few packets to the audience
members. It’s the chips we’d buy from
the house shop while growing up.
Everyone who grew up in the hood ate
it or its equivalent – basically 50 cent
chips. Former Springbok legend
Chester Williams was in the audience.
There was a point when he had a few
packets in his hand and was passing
them on to people sitting
around him. I chirped
him and said that
this is what nation
building was all
about. Who
needs Francois
Pienaar to hand
out Lay’s when
Chester Williams
is giving
everyone
Crack-a-Snack.
He was a good
sport. It was
a picture-perfect
moment. >>
ER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 83
What did your family
think of the way Chris’s
family was portrayed on
the show?
CR: My family is pretty cool
with it, because it’s loosely
based. I’ve got six brothers
and a sister; we’re like a team.
There’s only three [kids on the
show], so all the characters
became combinations of
different people.
Legend
Chris
Rock
promises
that he
can still
bomb
One of comedy’s
greatest returns
with two new
specials. GQ’s
Caity Weaver
talked to him
about the
relationship
between standup and sermons,
bombing on stage
and fast food
Words by Caity Weaver
As an entertainer, Chris
Rock can pull off just about
anything: SNL, sitcoms,
documentaries, kids’ movies
– this guy even made the
Oscars compelling. Now,
after an eight-year hiatus,
Rock’s returning to his
stand-up roots (with
a reported $40-million
incentive from Netflix for
two new specials). We caught
up with the greatest living
stand-up from the road.
GQ: Your grandfather
was a preacher. What
can preachers teach
stand-up comedians?
Chris Rock: It’s kind of the
same gig: a sermon and a set
84 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
are the same in front of an
audience, but they’re going
for an ‘Amen’ or a clap, and
we’re going for a laugh. I
think I watch more preachers
than comedians sometimes.
When I’m on tour, all the big
preachers come to see me.
They usually come in the
back, and they don’t want to
take any pictures. But we talk
shop and talk about crowd
control and talk about
working an audience – I love
talking to a preacher about
working his audience.
Is there anything from
your childhood that
you wanted to film on
Everybody Hates Chris
but had to scrap?
CR: We got most of it. I think
I went easy on some people.
I went easy on some of the
bullying and racist crap that
would happen when I was in
school – [comments] by
teachers and maintenance
men and stuff. People would
say unbelievable things to you.
It’s like, ‘Wow, you said that to
a kid.’
Do you ever visit
touring preachers?
CR: I’ve seen Joel [Osteen],
and I’ve seen TD [Jakes]. Joel
Osteen plays Yankee
Stadium. Any person that
can play Yankee Stadium,
you have to go see them.
Did you ever hear from
those people after you
became famous?
CR: Yeah, there was a teacher
– I won’t name her – who sent
me a letter of apology about
how horrible she feels that she
let certain things happen.
Who has a harder gig:
preachers or stand-ups?
CR: Comedians. It’s hard to
bomb as a preacher – people
definitely wait until the end
and go, ‘That guy was boring’.
And there’s a book. I wish
there was a book of comedy
I could refer to.
How did it feel to get it?
Was it too little too late?
CR: I’m way over it. I’ve
channeled it into something
else, so I’m fine. But if you
contributed to a kid having
a bad experience, and you’re
the adult, that’s got to eat at
you a little bit.
Danny
McBride
Creator and star
of HBO’s Vice
Principals; nascent
action hero in
Alien: Covenant
Who’s your
comedy god?
The comedy god
I would serve would
be a multi-headed
beast composed of
Bill Murray, Eddie
Murphy, Lucille Ball,
Redd Foxx and
Steve Coogan.
What’s the best
joke you’ve ever
heard?
This joke sucks, but
it makes me smile:
Which came first,
the chicken or the
egg? Neither. The
rooster came first.
What’s the last
thing that made
you laugh?
A video of a man
exploding two
firecrackers up
his nose.
COMEDY
SPECIAL
Shame
of Thrones
One SA comedian’s take on why famous people
and autobiographies don’t always go together
Words by Mamello ‘Mum-z’ Mokoena
I thought
celebrities only
wrote memoirs
when their
career in the
limelight was
over, they had
received that
career-ending
‘Lifetime
achievement
award’, they
wanted to make
a public
apology where
140 characters
on Twitter was
just not enough
or they were
diagnosed with
some kind of
life-threatenin
disease that
compelled
them to have to
reflect on the
achievements
of their life,
while
expressing
some kind of
existential
realisation that
they felt they
needed to share
with the world
before they
kicked the
proverbial
bucket.
However, this
particular type
of book is a bit
predictable
because you
know how the
story ends.
#spoileralert
They die!
Now it seems as if writing memoirs is
a form of initiation into some kind of
celebrity super-wealth fraternity. The
younger you are when you write your
book, the wealthier you become over time.
The age-old adage of old-aged authors is
no more. Justin Bieber was 16 when he
wrote First Step 2 Forever: My Story and is
now worth an estimated $225 million.
Miley Cyrus, worth $160 million, was
16 when she wrote Miles to Go. Britney
Spears, worth $185 million, was 18 when
she wrote Heart to Heart. Hundreds of
celebrities around the world have joined
the ranks of the memoir-millionaires club
and now it seems as if our very own
humiliation as a way of
initiating a person into a club.’
I have taken it upon myself to
evaluate the amount of
humiliation each of our South
African candidates has gone
through and if it will be enough
for them to make it into this
prestigious club. Only one
candidate will be selected for
the club, we will have to see
who of the three will be the
best candidate for the Shame
of Thrones.
So let’s start off with the most
prolific of the three candidates.
Trevor Noah
suffered
a confusing
childhood
fraught with
identity crisis and racial
taunts, and endured a long,
awkward, occasionally tragic
and frequently humiliating
education in the affairs of
the heart.
LGBT personality
Somizi Mhlongo
stormed out of
Grace Bible
Church because
the pastor
publically condemned
homosexuality. He was
accused and found guilty of
sexual assault in 2007. His
hairstyles have been ridiculed
for years (and rightly so).
Now for Queen
B. Being a black
African female
coconut with
bad grammar
definitely gives her
exponential shame points.
When Black Twitter criticises
a coconut on how dodgy her
sentence structure is, you
know it’s bad.
Bonang Matheba, Somizi
Mhlongo and Trevor Noah
are pledging for this super
exclusive fraternity.
But much like any
fraternity, not all the
pledges will make the cut.
First they need to survive
the ‘hazing’. The pedia of
Wiki explains hazing as
‘the practice of rituals
involving abuse or
Paul W
Downs
Writer and star of
Rough Night and
Broad City
What’s the last thing that
made you laugh?
A
clip of Naomi
Ekperigin doing
stand-up I had
already watched
three times. After watching
10 000 hours of procedurals
on TV, Naomi has a tip for
white women: ‘All you Megans,
Sarahs and Lindsays – if you
want to avoid a serial killer,
you got to stop with the
jogging at dawn and dusk. >>
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 85
COMEDY
SPECIAL
Legend
The
rebirth
of Tracy
Morgan
After surviving
a car accident
three years ago,
the SNL and
30 Rock alum is
back with a new
stand-up concert
on Netflix, a new
TV series and
some choice
words for
‘the trolls’
Words by Zach Baron
Fourteen years ago, Tracy
Morgan left Saturday
Night Live. Four years ago,
the final episode of 30
Rock aired. Three years
ago, Morgan survived an
accident that killed one of
his best friends and left
him with the seemingly
impossible task of
rebuilding himself and
his life. And yet he’s still
here. Doing comedy. He’s
got a special coming on
Netflix and then a TV
show, executive-produced
by Jordan Peele, arriving
after that. He’s got a shark
tank in his house. He’s got
more hope than the rest
of us put together.
86 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Tituss
Burgess
Star of Netflix’s Unbreakable
Kimmy Schmidt
What was the last thing
that made you laugh?
GQ: This is unfair,
but I’m hoping you
can make me feel
better about the fact
that it seems like
we’re all about to
die in a nuclear war.
Tracy Morgan: You feel like
we’re about to die? Let me
straighten you out, man.
The governments ain’t
running this shit. God is
still running it, man. This
world ain’t going to be over
until there’s no more love
left. You got love, I got love,
so we ain’t going nowhere.
Do you think
comedians have
a special role to
play in dark times?
TM: Yeah! Why do you
think we’re here? We here
to make y’all laugh and
forget about the pain.
What’s your stance on
political jokes?
TM: I don’t do political
jokes. I’m not into politics,
man. I never voted one day
in my life. I’m down with
the king. God is still on the
throne. I don’t care about
no fucking politics.
Where do you get
your news from?
TM: From the streets! From
the people. I hear the
jungle drums. I’m listening.
Politicians always make
promises to the people that
they don’t keep. You come
see Tracy Morgan in
concert, you’re going to
laugh, I promise you.
Because I will tell the truth.
Page Six recently
ran a story with the
headline ‘Tracy
Morgan Gushes About
His Kids to Random
Strangers.’ True?
TM: Page Six said what?
They don’t matter to me.
If I want to talk good about
my children, then I’ll talk
good about them. So
fucking what? Those people
who said that shit need to
mind their own fucking
business. People who don’t
gush about their own
children should burn in
hell, that’s what I think.
How long does it take
you to write a joke?
A second. It’s all
observation, man.
One of those YouTube
videos where people
keep falling – they don’t
know it‘s coming and the
shock and look of horror
on their faces makes me
kiki. Another one with this
guy who goes around the
mall literally just lightly
touching people’s hands,
and some of them are so
livid and filled with rage.
Rage is funny.
Siv Ngesi
Actor and star of SIV-ilized at
the Baxter Theatre this month
What was the last thing
that made you laugh?
Definitely has to be the
young lady who was
supposed to get R1 400
in her student account,
and then they screwed
up the zeroes and ended
up giving her R14m.
She lived the dream for
a while. She should have
spent more; if it was
me it would have been
in overdraft.
O&M CAPE TOWN 95089/E
Audi
Genuine Accessories
Audi
Progressive Partner
Genuine Accessories. Legendary prizes.
Stand to win a lunch experience with the Proteas,
and your share of cricket memorabilia.
Enhance your Audi, and your luck. Every R1 000 you spend on Audi Genuine Accessories will
earn you one entry towards winning a lunch with the Proteas, and your share of signed cricket
memorabilia. Visit your nearest Audi Dealership to explore our range of Audi Genuine Accessories
and enter. Competition ends 31 August 2017. Terms and conditions apply.
Visit your nearest dealership for more.
GQ COMPETITION
A two-night stay for
two at Cape Town’s
new Radisson RED
hotel worth
TO ENTER
Rocketeer by
Russ Mills
SMS ‘GQ RadissonRED’,
your name and email
address to 32697. SMS
charged at R1.50.
Competition ends 31
October 2017. Terms and
conditions apply; see
page 110.
Stand a chance to win one
of three packages worth
R20 000 each
THE PRIZE INCLUDES:
• A two-night stay for two in a Studio Suite
• A three-course dinner and bottle of bubbly
for two
• A welcome drink on arrival and a chance
to meet Baxter, the resident Boston Terrier
• Free unlimited WiFi
• Access to the RED Roof
• Boston Terrier care package with T-shirts
and caps
• In-room chilled deck with Cape craft beers
The prize is valid for six months from the date the winner is
informed, is subject to availability (and cannot be claimed
during peak season), excludes all travel costs and additional
food and beverages, and cannot be transferred or exchanged
for cash. The competition is open to South African readers
aged 18 or older only. Additional terms and conditions on
page 110.
Spaceman by
Matt Taylor
eighbour to the new Zeitz
MOCAA in the V&A Waterfront’s
Silo District, Africa’s first
Radisson RED hotel is
anything but standard accommodation.
Bold, exuberant and a little rebellious, the
hotel, which opened in September, caters to
the millennial mindset with up-to-the-minute
technology, vibrant design and a focus on
fun and flexibility. Some would say it’s like
sleeping in an art gallery... only with highspeed internet and craft beer.
This month three lucky people stand
a chance to win a getaway in one of the
hotel’s 252 progressive studios with a partner.
Aside from keyless entry, a fully equipped
gym and the convenience of a hotel app,
a stay comes with Instagram-worthy harbour
and mountain views, as well as access to the
RED roof pool and OUIBar and Ktchn.
As part of the prize, you’ll also enjoy
a three-course dinner on the house, and
thanks to a pet-friendly philosophy, you can
even bring your four-legged friends (under
8kg) along for the ride.
k h p
Live smart
1Luxe
tote bag
Your high d
update on h
shopping g
Gucci tote g
R16 800
WH
,
The defi
!
f
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Creative direction and styling by Jason Alexander Basson Photographs by Antonia Steyn
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 89
2
Less
is more
Tieless.
Sockless.
The clean,
modern look.
H&M blazer
R1 899.
Studio W at
Woolworths
shirt R450.
H&M pants
R799. Arthur
Jack at
Tread+Miller
shoes R1 599
3
Checked
& striped
suits
All widths and
combinations.
Woolworths waistcoat R499,
shirt R450, pants R599.
Arthur Jack at Tread+Miller
shoes R699
90 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Style
4’80s
icons
Striped tees, denim
overshirts and circle
lenses. Womack &
Womack, anyone?
Calvin Klein shirt
R1 399. Ben Sherman
T-shirt R749. Giorgio
Armani at Styling
Concepts sunglasses
R3 690
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 91
5
Side-arching
lenses
Odd geometrics are in.
Emporio Armani at Styling
Concepts sunglasses R2 490
6
Tou
gh A
s
l
i
a
sN
be
uld
o
h
ys
.
nic
iro
r
o
gy
ed
ld
go
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w
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rti
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de
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r
Ec
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we
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j
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98
tR
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ac
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0
50
7
Woven tees
Less fl
imsy,
more e
legant.
G-Sta
r RAW
jacket
Calvin
R4 89
Klein
9.
T-shir
t R1 39
9
92 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Style
8
Millennial
pink
The softer the
hue, the better.
Woolworths sweater
R399, T-shirt R180.
H&M shorts R229. Puma x
Han cap R469
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 93
9
Nuevo retro
Zara Man top R649. Scotch & Soda
pants R2 699
10 Mock turtlenecks
Clean, minimalist cuts in
’60s-inspired graphic
styles and colours.
alth clinic.
e free men’s he
neckline to th
Take your high
94 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Style
1 2 y ja m a
P ma
ra
ed
pir
ins nd ts.
a ir
m
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oo ar
dr ewe yle s
e
B sur -st
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29
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OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 95
13 A f r o - p u n k
R1 099
print….
print on
print on
print on
aturing
leisure fe
Edgy ath
l T-shirt
Nature
Puma x
14
Safety
colours
Alarming reds,
traffic cone
orange and
construction
site yellows.
G-Star RAW
jacket R2 999
15
Pharrell’s
pants
G-Star RAW.
’Nuff said.
G-Star RAW pants R2 299
96 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
16
Modern
rock
Animal print shirts, edgy jackets, designer denims and killer ankle boots.
Topman shirt R699. Dolce & Gabbana pants R12 000. H&M jacket R1 199
17
Splattered
From actual paint
to bleach drip
dying, this is the
textile effect of
the season.
Billionaire blazer
R41 000.
H&M shirt
R629. Prada
pants R9 150.
Europa Art
shoes R4 290
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 97
19
Transition
’90s
18
Red
sneakers
The racier, the better.
from left: Zandre wears
Versace shirt R8 250.
Calvin Klein jeans
R2 299. Billionaire
sneakers R13 599
Lucas wears Emporio
Armani jacket R11 995.
Billionaire shirt R14 880.
Woolworths jeans R599.
Lacoste sneakers R1 499
98 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Ra
y
sun -Ban
gla
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sse t Sty
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90 onc
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100
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 99
Style
22
Get stoned
Concrete and cool rock
tones, worn with a pop of
white to freshen up.
From left: Lucas wears Versace jacket R11 195,
jeans R4 695. Puma x Han T-shirt R799.
Diesel sneakers, R4 399
Zandre wears Guess jacket R1 599, sweater
R1 299. Diesel jeans R2 999.
Call it Spring sneakers R999
100 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
21
Simple, functional, sporty.
From left: Zandre wears
Puma x Han sweater
R1 599
Lucas wears Puma x
Han shirt R1 599
Click through to
GQ.co.za
for the hottest
fashion trends
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OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 101
Edited by Bernd Fischer
What’s in store: Degrease an oily face /// Know your spa treatments
EXCLUSIVE!
THE GOOD, THE BAD,
THE NEW AMERICANA
James Franco is the new face of Coach for Men. He’s cool, he’s creative and
he’s unapologetic, and with his handsome James Dean looks, he embodies the
new American dream, but with a New York attitude to match
102 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
GQ: The fragrance campaign
is inspired by a road trip and
a guy returning home to New
York City. What do you think
about the concept?
James Franco: The idea behind
the campaign of the Coach guy
travelling around America is
a very personal idea to Stuart
Vevers, Coach’s executive
creative director. I love the
idea of a road trip and coming
home to New York. The city has
everything I’m interested in:
theatre, film, art, people.
GQ: What was your first
impression of NYC?
JF: I was in my early twenties
filming and I remember the city
feeling so big, like I was going to
be lost in it. Over the years, I’ve
worked here, lived here, gone to
school here, and it’s become my
favourite place.
GQ: Have you ever been on a
road trip? Where did you go
and how was the experience?
JF: About four years ago
a couple friends and I went on
a road trip to see a bunch of
land art. We started in Vegas
and then continued on to see
the Spiral Jetty in Utah, a piece
by Michael Heizer called
Double Negative in Nevada
and the Lightning Fields in
New Mexico. That’s one of the
biggest road trips I’ve taken.
It was insane.
GQ: What would your ideal
road trip be?
JF: I would love to drive from
PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF COACH
New York to Los Angeles. Maybe
one day when I have the time.
GQ: What was your first
experience with fragrance?
JF: My first experience with
fragrance was when I was in
junior high. My friends and
I got into a lot of trouble taking
the testers from department
stores. We would keep them in
our lockers and sell the bottles.
We were very popular during
school dances.
Coach for Men opens with top notes of green Nashi
pear, bergamot and kumquat, resulting in an energetic
citrus accord. The hearty cardamom, coriander and
geranium notes add fresh spiciness, with the base
of Haitian vetiver, suede and ambergris ending off
the woody scent. 100ml R995
GQ: What are some of your
favourite scents?
JF: My backyard (lilacs and
honeysuckle), chamomile tea,
my lady’s neck.
GQ: How did you get involved
in other projects apart
from acting?
JF: When I was younger all
I did was act and I loved it but
I couldn’t express everything
I wanted to. I had stories I really
wanted to tell and I couldn’t
quite do that with just acting so
I began to do other things like
writing and directing. Now I feel
like I can make the form match
the content of what I want to do.
GQ: What do you do for fun?
JF: Whenever I have a free
moment I’ll go to the theatre
or museums and galleries. If
I have a day off I’ll usually go
to the beach.
GQ: Do you have a
grooming/health routine?
JF: Gym, tennis, surfing.
GQ: Some guys are fragrance
wearers and others just
aren’t. What is your
relationship with fragrance?
JF: I use a little every day.
GQ: What do you think
attracted you to this project?
JF: Stuart is what attracted me.
GQ: What inspires you?
JF: Literature is a really big
I love his style.
inspiration for me. I’ve adapted
a lot of classic American novels
into films, taking something
traditional and putting a spin
on it.
GQ: What was the most fun
part of this project for you?
JF: Working with Stuart and
Steven Meisel [American
fashion photographer].
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 103
Grooming
SKINCARE
How to
degrease
your oily skin
You know how you can pat your pizza
with a napkin to soak up the grease?
Apply that technique to a shiny face
Words by Adam Hurly
’m a guy with oily
skin who likes to
not look like a guy
with oily skin, even
if I know I’m only
taking off the top layer of sebum
– the stuff that causes you to
look oily – when I address the
matter. The problem isn’t just
the sebum, though – it’s that it
reflects light, which causes you
to look greasy. Somehow, it
always seems to get worse after
a hearty meal.
We’ve got solutions for this.
There are a few products and
steps you can take to balance
your skin’s oil levels without
drying it out. If you have oily
skin (or ‘combination’ skin),
then try these tips.
Get your skin toned
After cleansing your skin
(or after shaving), pat some
toner onto your entire face –
just a few drops in the palms,
or onto a cotton pad should do.
It absorbs deep into the pores
to balance pH levels, preventing
excess oil production without
drying out the skin. We like
[1] Kiehl’s Men’s Oil Eliminator
Refreshing Shine Control Spray
Toner (180ml R365), which
works double-time to prevent
any post-shave irritation, and is
a great pick-up for dry-skinned
gents, too. It uses plant-based
extracts to preserve moisture
levels so that the skin doesn’t
get parched.
Mattify while you
moisturise
Guys with oily faces sometimes
think that they don’t need to
moisturise, since their skin
produces so much sebum. This
natural oil is nourishing, yes,
but it can clog pores and needs
to be kept under control. That’s
why a cleansing routine is so
important (see the next two
tips). As this isn’t an article
about how to stay moist, but
rather how to look less greasy,
I’m telling you to cleanse a lot.
For that reason, you need to
moisturise a lot, too.
Snag an oil-free, mattifying
moisturiser for your postcleanser, post-toner
nourishment. A lightweight,
non-greasy moisturiser absorbs
easily and won’t clog pores
(which would otherwise
aggravate the situation by
making you sweat). Pick up a
neutral one, such as [2] Clinique
for Men’s Oil Control Mattifying
Moisturiser (100ml R510). Apply
it morning and night, at least,
and following any cleansing.
Cleanse daily
Frequent canvas clearing
is necessary for us greasy
people. Wash your face when
you wake up, since your body
had plenty of time to produce
sebum while you slept. You’ll
need a fresh slate before doing
the rest of your skincare
regimen. Wash your face at
night, too, to flush away toxins
and sebum that accumulated
throughout the day. No need to
let your pillowcase absorb all
that grease, or to risk clogging
your pores while you sleep.
Cleanse after any particularly
sweaty activity.
Use a gentle cleanser
Since you are cleansing
so much, pick a gentle, oil-free
product that keeps pH levels in
check. You don’t want to risk
drying out the skin, which can
happen even though you
produce lots of sebum. We like
[3] Team Dr Joseph Purifying
Cleansing Gel (200ml R400).
Pack a pocket wipe
Since toting a cleanser is
a pain, stock up on face wipes,
like [4] Garnier Pure Active
Purifying Cleansing Wipes (R32),
which work as an on-the-go
cleanser (especially good for the
gym, if you prefer to shower at
home and thus risk letting the
sweat dry inside your pores).
In warm weather, go
for oils and serums
In warmer weather, I actually
sweat less when I swap my
moisturiser for a face oil. It’s not
necessarily that the oil prevents
oil production – that’s what
I use toner and cleansers for –
but it makes me sweat less,
since it doesn’t sit atop my
skin and cover my pores. Oils
and serums allow my skin to
breathe more, and since they
absorb so rapidly, they don’t
make me any oilier than I’d
otherwise be. I’m just sure to
apply them to a cleansed and
toned canvas, otherwise I’m
applying it to the layer of excess
sebum. [5] Dermalogica Phyto
Replenish Oil (30ml R1 290)
104 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Grooming
SPA
Spa
etiquette
101
What to bring
with you?
SPA SPEAK
To make use of spa
facilities, bring your
swimsuit and arrive
45 minutes before
your appointment.
Deciphering a spa menu is a roulette of choices, which is
why we got the experts at Lume Beauty Atelier to decode
Bio-reflex
(in a massage)
A safe and very
effective hands-on
technique whereby
a gentle sustained
pressure is
delivered into
myofascial
connective tissue.
Ayurveda
An ancient healing
methodology
using traditional
techniques to
treat illness
and encourage
wellbeing. There
are three body
types (the tridosha
theory) which lie
at the very core
of Ayurveda
wisdom, equipping
you to live a
healthy lifestyle.
Reflexology
Here pressure is
applied to reflex
points located on the
feet, hands and ears.
These nerve zones
correspond to
organs and the
pressure enhances
the overall wellbeing
of organs. A trained
reflexologist applies
pressure on different
energy lines (body
meridians) on reflex
points to establish
any imbalances,
which will then be
the focal point to
bring the body back
into balance.
first-time massage
treatment. It can
be viewed as the
foundation for most
Western-centric
massage, including
sports, deep tissue
and aromatherapy
massages.
Thai massage
You are fully
clothed, and
the massage is
performed on a
futon/floor mattress.
It incorporates
stretching, pulling
and rocking to
relieve tension and
enhance flexibility
and range of motion.
Swedish massage
The most popular
type of massage in
spas around the
world, and a good
Dry-brush
treatment
This removes dead,
dry skin, improving
How long to
set aside?
the appearance of
skin and allowing
it to hydrate more
efficiently when
moisturiser is
applied. Helps move
lymph fluid into the
lymph nodes so
this waste can then
be eliminated,
thereby detoxifying
the body.
Heat is applied to
relax tense
muscles and
improve
circulation. Heated
Basalt river rocks
are most often
used as they
become smooth
from the current.
Hammam
Hydrotherapy
Also known as
a Turkish Bath, it
is cleansing and
relaxing. Your body
is doused with warm
water as a Tellak
exfoliates away
impurities using
a Kessa glove and
Savon Noir, a soap
made from crushed
olives, olive oil and
eucalyptus.
Based on its
mechanical and/or
thermal effects,
hydrotherapy
makes use of the
body’s reaction to
hot and cold
stimuli. Heat is
used to relax and
soothe the body.
Cold is used to
invigorate and
energise the body.
Hot stone
therapy
What’s the difference between...
Contouring
Enhances the
Deep
exfoliation
Manual method with
with a granular
Removes dead skin
a granular product.
product that removes
and debris on
Enhances the
dead skin from the
a deeper level,
appearance of
skin’s surface, leaving
enhancing uneven
Either a manual or
adipose tissue
skin brighter.
and energy levels.
aids skin firming.
Conditioning
Sculpting
Exfoliation
The spa will provide
you with the correct
attire, like
disposable
underwear, or you
may wear your own.
Choose what is
most comfortable
for you. The
therapists will
always use towel
draping techniques
to respect your
privacy.
Any do’s and
don’ts that guys
should know
about with spa
etiquette?
»
Respect all spa
client privacy.
»
»
... 3. SCRUB AND
EXFOLIATION
A manual technique
improving immunity
appearance of loose
skin and cellulite, and
... 2. EXFOLIATION AND
DEEP EXFOLIATION
Do you keep
underwear on or
strip down to
just a towel?
Anyone under 16
years of age must
be accompanied by
an adult
Lume Beauty Atelier, 40 Chiappini St, Cape Town; lumebeauty.com
.... 1. BODY CONTOURING,
CONDITIONING AND SCULPTING
Arrive at least 15
minutes before your
appointment to
check-in, if you are
not making use of
the spa facilities.
Scrub
Turn off your
cellphone upon
arrival and keep
your voice down.
»
Exfoliation
skin texture. This is
chemical technique
Cleanses the body
deposits, and targets
a chemical exfoliation
(body peel with alpha
of toxins, thereby
specific areas.
like a body peel.
hydroxy acids).
Inform your
therapist about
health conditions
such as high blood
pressure, allergies
or any other
concerns you may
have when booking
your slot.
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 105
Body FITNESS
Usain Bolt swears
by the fit of Puma’s
running gear
Ways
to step
up your
running
game
Build
your core
The key to being a better runner is
not just putting one foot in front of
the other and hoping for the best
– here’s what Puma shoe specialist
Rae Trew-Browne suggests paying
attention to if you’re looking to
improve your swift-striding prowess
Edited by Paul Sephton
It’s all in
the hips
The foot will always
follow what the
rest of the body is
doing. If a runner’s
hips are out of
alignment, their
body will always
try to compensate
for the imbalance.
To check how
balanced you are,
stand with your
hands on your hips
and your back
against a wall. Slide
your right hand
down your leg while
keeping your back
against the wall.
Get a friend to
mark how far you
can go. Do the
same on the other
side and compare.
Analyse those ankles
Get a friend to film your feet from behind
(ideally in slow-mo) as you run on a treadmill.
If your ankles stay straight your form would
be classed as neutral. If they collapse inward
you would need to look at a shoe with
added support. This doesn’t always fix the
problem though, as the ankle is collapsing
because of weak supporting muscles and
ligaments. A stability shoe will just give the
runner a temporary fix whereas the ideal
approach would be to train and strengthen
the ankles and supporting muscles in the
calf and shin area with targeted exercises.
106 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Far too many runners
try to change the way
they run before making
their bodies strong and
flexible enough to
handle it long-term
Pace your lace
With a shoe like Puma’s Netfit, you can
adjust the lacing to help support the
ankles, while still doing the
strengthening exercises in conjunction
with your running. As the muscles
strengthen, the runner can then
transition to a more neutral or standard
lacing system. By providing minimal
support it forces the foot to become
stronger over time, yet with the various
lacing options it can still provide some
support where needed.
The goal of any
runner should be to
be as balanced and
strong as possible in
their core and hips,
since this is where
the actual running
motion is stabilised
and controlled. The
more balanced the
muscles in these
areas, the more
neutral the runner
will be, resulting in
fewer form-related
injuries. It’s thus
imperative to train
your core and
hips, focusing
on the weaker
side to
minimise any
discrepancy.
KETTLEBELL WALKING LUNGES
Kettlebells are more effective than dumbbells,
working a wider range of muscles. The kettlebell
walking lunge will work your hamstrings, glutes
and quadriceps.
Strong before long
If your hips and ankles are balanced it
will be much easier to run in an efficient
and economical way. Far too many
runners try to change the way they run
before making their bodies strong and
flexible enough to handle it long-term.
Once the smaller supporting muscles are
strong the general rule of thumb is to aim
for 180 steps per minute. Start on the
treadmill and count the steps on your
right foot for 15 seconds; you should be
hitting about 23 steps on the right foot in
those 15 seconds.
One step at a time
Focusing on the step turnover
automatically fixes other posture issues
as your foot will naturally land closer to
your centre of mass, as this is the easiest
point from which to take another step.
The treadmill is a great way to practise
this because it keeps you at a consistent
pace. More steps doesn’t necessarily
have to mean more speed, it just means
your feet are on the ground for less time
during each step, which also means less
force going back up through the body.
STANDARD PLANKS
Planks are excellent for strengthening not only
a host of abdominal muscles but also your hips,
back and glutes.
Gym
exercises
to make
you a
stronger
runner
Watch your landing
PUMA IGNITE Netfit
running shoes R2 799
The number of steps a runner takes per
minute will usually determine where they
land on their foot. It is quite difficult to
land with a heel strike if you’re running
at more than 180 steps per minute.
A runner who sees themselves as
a jogger who likes to stick to slow
speeds can still have a high step count.
Though debated, a mid-foot strike is best
for fitness and weight-loss. Sprinters will
tend to be more forefoot strikers and
heel striking is mostly down to the types
of shoes runners choose to run in.
SIDE PLANKS
Count your max reps on each side and then
swop that number around. So if you can do 30
on the right and 20 on the left, then do 30 in
two sets on the left and 20 on the right. This
will strengthen the weak side and maintain
the strong.
BOSU BALL SQUATS
The squats don’t need to be too deep, just low
enough that you feel like you are losing your
balance. These are excellent for balance,
proprioception and strengthening the supporting
muscles in the ankles, shin and calf.
OCTOBER 2017 GQ.CO.ZA 107
Body HEALTH
Eight is enough
The 16:8 Diet
Eat only during an
eight-hour window
every day, which
shouldn’t be too hard
if you sleep.
Willpower required
Low to moderate.
Who’s done it
Hugh Jackman followed the
16:8 Diet for the X-Men
movies, because the
world is not ready for
what a 40-something
Wolverine really looks like.
How it works
For eight hours a day, you
eat however you normally
do. For the other 16, you
fast. You can drink water,
black coffee and herbal tea.
That’s it. You’re giving your
body time to digest.
How it feels
Doable. If you time it right,
this essentially means
skipping breakfast and
Why is
everybody
suddenly
fasting?
(And how
can I fast
better than
them?)
At first, fasting sounded less like
a health plan and more like
a prison protest, but we kept
hearing that it works, so we
scrutinised two rival approaches
Words by Jeff Vrabel
Illustrations by Rami Niemi
108 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
Of all the fad diets
to come down the pike,
the simplest was the one
we never saw coming:
just don’t eat food. The
idea of intermittent
fasting (i.e. regimented
periods of eating and
not eating) has gone
mainstream. Fans say it
works by training your
body to burn its fat
reserves, and it’s said to
decrease the risk of
cancer, diabetes and
cardiovascular disease.
The main downside is
the gruelling first two
weeks, during which
there’s a good chance
you’ll feel dizzy, act like
a dick and be really
tempted to quit.
If you do manage to
stick it out, you’ll join a
lineage of fasters dating
back to Aristotle and
Plato, who proved that
even humanity’s deepest
philosophers sweat their
beach bodies.
after-dinner snacks, which
many of us do anyway.
Upside
You’ll be conveniently
unconscious for much of
your fasting time. Also, you
don’t have to do it every
day: the popular how-to
book The 8-Hour Diet says
you’ll see beneƂts if you eat
16:8-style as few as three
days a week.
Biggest catch
A militant budgeting of time.
If you raid the fridge after
midnight, wave goodbye to
breakfast. If you feast at
lunch, it’s water for dinner.
How it works
For Ƃve days a week, eat
normally. For the other two,
‘fast’ by limiting yourself to
600 calories a day (yes,
booze counts). A typical
breakfast: a slice of ham
and two scrambled eggs.
Dinner is a protein-packed
chicken salad.
Fast and furious
The 5:2 Diet
Take a day off from
food. Better yet, take
two, but prepare to
get hangry.
Willpower required
Advanced to Shaolin monk.
Who’s done it
Jimmy Kimmel did it well
enough that he can no
longer make fat jokes about
himself. Miranda Kerr and
Jennifer Aniston reportedly
like it too, and neither of
them has seen a gram of
body fat since 1996.
How it feels
I won’t lie: by 4pm I was
running purely on black
coffee, which meant I was
both over-caffeinated and
irritable. Plus, 600 calories
(nearly a quarter of my daily
recommended intake) feels
like a handful of peanuts,
which speaks to the insanity
of our usual portion sizes.
Upside
You can pick any two
fasting days your heart
desires and split them up
any way you like.
Biggest catch
The Ƃrst few days are the
hardest, but your body will
soon start adapting. Ideally,
you’ll begin feeling satiated
and eating less on your
normal days.
ADDS YEARS
TO LIFE
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nutritional ingredients and plant extracts, sourced from trusted raw material suppliers.
Every batch of raw material is tested to ensure quality, purity and consistency, this process is called QualiSafe™.
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Dırectory
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Back Page LAST KICK
NIKE AIR MAX 97
With its reflective
fluid lines and shiny
silver tone, this shoe
was inspired by
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and remains
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GERMAN ARMY TRAINERS
Used by German soldiers for fitness
training in the ’30s, these sneakers
remain a popular design style.
19 3 6
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STAN S
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which were endorsed
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The next retro
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The Pump was the first shoe to
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The Air Max was re-released
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19 6 6
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After many years in development,
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These were the first shoes to
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From basketball and tennis courts to
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at the most iconic sneakers to step into 1 9 6 8
the game over the last century.
SUPERGA
PANATTA
Italian tennis ace
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wore these when
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The first American shoe to
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k b ders in mind.
PUMA SUEDE
The tough suede used in
this shoe was a popular
step away from typical
leather- and canvasbased shoes of the day.
19 8 1
SAUCONY JAZZ
A cult favourite among female
runners in the ’80s, the Jazz is
still Saucony’s best-selling model.
112 GQ.CO.ZA OCTOBER 2017
96
19 7 6
ADIDAS SUPERSTAR
Within a few years of their
launch, the shell-toed
Superstars were worn by
75 per cent of NBA stars.
19 6 9
WORDS BY MICHAEL SALZWEDEL
2000
NIKE SHOX
19 17
These top secret
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Widely popular with top
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the iconic All Stars still enjoy
19 9 7
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