close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Gun World July 2017

код для вставкиСкачать
HS SHOWDOWN: GLOCK G17 VS. SIG P32
SINCE 1959
R UG E R
P R EC I S I O N
RIFLE
LONG-DISTANCE SHOOTER
W I L SO N
COOMBAT EDC-9
PERFECTING THE 1911
HUMOR
DANGEROUS-GAME
BIG-BORE RIFLES
GUNNBLAST’S
JEFFF QUINN
JOINS TEAM
GUN WORLD
N GUNS
GUNWORLD
JULY 2017 VOLUME 58, NO. 7
07
0
74808 03105
WHHAT WE
CANN LEARN
FROM BARBIE
4
U.S. $4.99
DISPLAY UNTIL :
7/4/17
ANDERSON MFG.
8-SHOOTER
RUGER’S
REDHAWK .357
THE WORLD’S MOST BATTLE-PROVEN FIREARMS.™
1 MILLION ROUNDS OF TESTING IS HERE.
on the cover
GUN: FN FNS9
U.S. FLAG CERAKOTE BY S3 GUNSMITHING
CONTACT: (970) 342-1258
SPARKSNSPLINTERS@YAHOO.COM.
FACEBOOK: STEVENSON’S SPARKS N’ SPLINTERS
PHOTO: ROBB MANNING
DESIGN: JULIAN AVIÑA
06
08
10
14
18
80
84
88
92
96
98
UP FRONT
KIT UP!
OPTICS
HUNT
ARTEMIS ARMED
EDC
TRAIN
PREPS
CLEARED HOT
CHEWING THE FAT
DOWN RANGE
GUN WORLD (ISSN 0017-5641) is published monthly in January, February, March,
April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November and December by
Engaged Media Inc., LLC, 17890 Sky Park Circle, Suite 250, Irvine,
CA 92614. Periodical postage paid at Irvine, CA, and additional mailing ofices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GUN WORLD c/o Engaged Media Inc., VSI, Inc., 905
Kent Street, Liberty, MO 64068. © 2017 by Engaged Media, Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction of any material from this issue in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.
GST#855050365RT001. Canadian Post: Publications Mail Agreement Pitney Bowes,
Inc., P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2, Canada.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
GUN WORLD
JULY I 2017
happy birthday, america!
22
MHS FINALIST SHOWDOWN
The Army declared the SIG P320 as winner of the Modular
Handgun System program. We pit it against the other
inalist, the Glock G17, to see which is really the best.
By Chuck Taylor
30
HAIL TO THE EIGHT-SHOOTER!
.357 revolvers have traditionally been six-shooters,
whether you need more shots or not. The new Ruger
Redhawk 8-Shot ups the ante by giving you two more
in the cylinder.
By Garrett Lucas
38
FUN GUNS
Some guns are categorized best by the smile they
put on your face when you shoot them. Here are the
top 10 fun guns.
By Brad Fitzpatrick
46
NO-LUBE AR
Anderson Manufacturing has turned the world of ARs
on its ears. With the RF85 treatment, its rifles never
need lubrication.
By Frank Jardim
56
64
WILSON COMBAT EDC-9
Hitting the “sweet spot” of pistolcraft, Wilson Combat
stays true to its roots by focusing on perfecting the 1911.
By Andy Massimilian
72
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
LONG-DISTANCE RUGER
The Ruger Precision Rifle can reach out to 1,600
yards out of the box, no problem. For an MSRP of
$1,600, that’s a bargain.
By Sean Curtis
SO, YOU WANT A DANGEROUS-GAME RIFLE
If you’ve ever dreamed about owning a large-bore
dangerous-game rifle but have no real-world use for
it, don’t let that stop you.
By Jim Matthews
BY ROBB MANNING RMANNING@ENGAGEDMEDIAINC.COM
GUN WORLD
JULY 2017
Volume 58 • Number 7
EDITORIAL
Robb Manning Editor
Amy Maclean Managing Editor
DESIGN
Julian Aviña Art Director
CONTRIBUTORS
Steven Barlow, Brian Berry, Michelle Cerino, Sean Curtis, Brad Fitzpatrick, Frank Jardim, Steven Ledin,
Garrett Lucas, Andy Massimilian, Jim Matthews, Jeff Quinn, Chuck Taylor, Beckey Yackley
ADVERTISING
Gabe Frimmel Ad Sales Director
(714) 200-1930 gfrimmel@engagedmediainc.com
Casey Clifford Senior Account Executive
(714) 200-1982
Mark Pack Senior Account Executive
(714) 200-1939
Danny Chang Senior Account Executive
(714) 200-1900 ext. 1948
Charles Dorr Account Executive
(714) 200-1931
John Bartulin Account Executive
(866) 866-5146 ext. 2746
John Cabral Advertising Design
Eric Gomez Advertising Traffic Coordinator
Gennifer Merriday Advertising Traffic Coordinator
INDEPENDENCE DAY
W
e have no idea what it’s really like to live under an
oppressive authoritarian regime. At least most of us
here in America don’t, but perhaps some who have
recently immigrated here do.
MARKETING
Elise Portale Content Marketing Manager
Brooke Sanders Content Marketing Specialist
Eric Surber Content Marketing Specialist
Michael Chadwick Digital Marketing & Media Coordinator
Andrew Dunbar Videographer
We like to make comments about how the president (current or previous,
depending on which side of the aisle we fall on) rules like a dictator or does
something that’s the same thing that Adolf Hitler did back in his day. But when
we really put some thought into it, we realize what a silly thing that is to say
when we compare it to the things an actual authoritarian dictator does.
What shouldn’t be forgotten is the important role privately owned irearms
played in our freedom. If not for guns in the hands of Americans, the
Revolutionary War would have been over before it even got started. Can
you imagine if unarmed colonists had declared themselves independent
from British rule? King George III would have said, “Yeah, right!” just before
sending in more Redcoat regiments or Hessian mercenaries.
In fact, after a series of affronts from the crown that involved unfair
taxation without representation, the inal straw was a gun ban and the
announced coniscation. British Redcoats were marching toward Concord,
Massachusetts, to coniscate weapons when American militiamen engaged
them with what are recognized as the irst shots ired of the war.
It’s important for us to remember the importance of irearms, not only contributing
to gaining our freedom in the past, but also in keeping it in the future. Throughout
history, and—as sure as I’m standing here—in our future,there will be bad individuals
somewhere in the world who try to impose their wicked will on the populace. Only
those populaces that are armed will be able to preserve their freedom … which leads
one to ask, Is a populace that is unable to arm itself truly free?
OPERATIONS
Robert Short IT Manager
Parveen Kumar Newsstand and Circulation Analyst
Shailesh Khandelwal Subscriptions Manager
Alex Mendoza Administrative Assistant
Melinda Magde Project Coordinator
Victoria Van Vlear Intern Program Manager
EDITORIAL, PRODUCTION & SALES OFFICE
17890 Sky Park Circle, Suite 250, Irvine, CA 92614
(714) 939-9991 • Fax (800) 249-7761
www.gunworld.com
www.facebook.com/gunworldmagazine
www.facebook.com/eembybeckett
www.instagram.com/gunworldmagazine
GUN WORLD (ISSN 0017-5641) is published monthly in January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August,
September, October, November and December by Engaged Media Inc., LLC, 17890 Sky Park Circle, Suite 250, Irvine, CA
92614. Periodical postage paid at Irvine, CA, and additional mailing oices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
GUN WORLD, c/o Engaged Media Inc, VSI, Inc., 905 Kent Street, Liberty, MO 64068.
© 2017 by Engaged Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material from this issue in whole or in part is
strictly prohibited. GST#855050365RT001.
Canadian Post: Publications Mail Agreement Pitney Bowes, Inc., P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2, Canada
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Engaged Media, Inc.
17890 Sky Park Circle, Suite 250, Irvine, CA 92614
Subscriptions, Address Changes, Renewals,
Missing or Damaged Copies
(800) 764-6278
(239) 653-0225 Foreign Inquiries
subscriptions@engagedmediainc.com
customerservice@engagedmediainc.com
Back Issues: www.engagedmediamags.com
Books, merchandise, reprints
(800) 764-6278 • Foreign (239) 653-0225
Letters to editor, new products or to contribute a story or photo: rmanning@engagedmediainc.com
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
$17.95/1 year, $29.95/2 years. Outside the U.S.: $40.95/1 year, $75.95/2 years. Payable in U.S. funds. Single copy price is $4.99.
Please allow 6 to 8 weeks for new subscriptions to begin.
You also have to wonder that perhaps an unarmed populace invites in those with
evil intent. A country full of subjects and those who are used to be ruled over give
rise to notions that “these people should be ruled over; and I’m the one to do it!”
Critics of the Second Amendment like to say that an authoritarian
government would never happen in America, so we don’t need to be armed.
But could it happen? What guarantee do we have that it won’t?
We do have a guarantee, and it’s simple: The Second Amendment … and an
armed citizenry.
www.gunworld.com
ENGAGED MEDIA, INC.
Mike Savino CEO
Jason Mulroney Content Director
Pinaki Bhattacharya Vertical Manager
Philip Trinkle Newsstand Sales Director
Bob Hulsy Business Development Director
Sabra Morris Director of Content Marketing
This magazine is purchased by the buyer with the understanding that information presented is from various
sources from which there can be no warranty or responsibility by Engaged Media Inc., as to the legality,
completeness or technical accuracy.
GST #855050365RT001
Canada Post: Publications Mail Agreement #40612608
Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: PITNEY BOWES, INC., P.O. Box 25542,
London, ON N6C 6B2, Canada
JULY I 2017
All New DR® CHIPPERS
Larger Capacity, Lower Prices!
CHIP BIG BRANCHES up to
5.75" thick!
SELF-FEEDING models
available. No more forcefeeding!
POWERFUL ENGINES spin
big flywheels (up to 62 lbs.),
generating massive chipping
force!
PTO MODELS TOO!
Starting
at just
96604A © 2017
LOWEST
PRICES
EVER!
MODELS THAT SHRED yard
and garden waste as well as
CHIP branches.
79999
$
DRchipper.com
SY DR Way to
d MOW!
®
!
The DR® TRIMMER MOWER
Gives You 5X the power and
NONE of the backstrain of
handheld trimmers!
TRIMS & MOWS thick grass and weeds without bogging
down—the only trimmer guaranteed not to wrap!
ROLLS LIGHT AS A FEATHER on big, easy-rolling wheels!
PLUS, NEW TOW-BEHIND MODELS FOR TRACTORS, AND ATVS!
DRtrimmer.com
FREE
EASY
SHIPPING TRIAL FINANCING
SOME LIMITATIONS APPLY. CALL OR GO ONLINE FOR DETAILS.
r a FREE DVD and Catalog!
Includes product specifications and factory-direct offers.
TOLL
FREE
888-208-5684
96604B © 2017
THICKEST, LONGEST-LASTING cutting cord (up to 225 mil)
takes seconds to change.
MAKE: Suunto
MODEL: Traverse Alpha Stealth
(tested: SIG Legion branded)
URL: www.Suunto.com
(for SIG Legion-branded model:
www.SIGSauer.com)
MSRP: $570
This feature-rich watch comes
packed with tools to help you
master the outdoors. Designed for
hunters, fisherman and hikers, the
alpha series uses GPS to give you
location-based information on the
moon phase calendar, sunrise and
sunset, and barometric pressure.
Weather alerts keep you
informed of incoming hazards.
Hunting-specific POI types help
you mark locations and trails
while scouting. This watch also
features automatic shot detection,
which tracks your coordinates
when shooting and number of
shots taken. It uses Bluetooth
to sync with a computer and/or
smartphone to create routes using
topographic maps. The digital
compass keeps you heading in
the right direction. With all of that,
if you still get lost, an automatic
breadcrumb trail is second
lieutenant-proof and will help you
retrace your steps.
The red backlight is NVG
compatible. This watch has passed
19 different tests according to
military standards (MIL-STD 810G).
It is rechargeable and lasts well
over a week. Made in Finland.
MAKE: Yeti
MODEL: Hopper Flip 12
URL: www.Yeti.com
MSRP: $280
In testing the original Hopper,
there were a couple of drawbacks:
The opening was tight, which
made it hard to see what you were
grabbing, and it made it difficult to
pull your hand out with a bottle in
your grasp.
Now, the Flip 12 comes in a
traditional cooler form, with a lid
that lifts open for easy access to
contents. Its soft shell makes it
more comfortable to carry and
more versatile on long road/
boat trips. The Hopper Flip 12’s
cubed body with a flat top make
it stackable, unlike the original.
It’s made of Dryhide Shell, a
waterproof, high-density fabric
that’s as tough as they come,
and an FDA-approved food-grade
liner. It uses closed-cell rubber
foam insulation to provide the
“keeps cold, longer” that Yeti is
famous for.
The HydroLok zipper is 100 percent
leak proof for keeping the cold in
and the elements out. The Flip 12
has two handles for lifting and a
shoulder strap for carrying and is
available in Fog Gray/Tahoe Blue or
Field Tan/Blaze Orange (tested).
www.gunworld.com
MAKE: 5
MODEL:
URL: www.511Tactical.com
MSRP: $80
Whether you are man enough
to wear this to the gym, range
or even for tactical training, the
Tactical Duty Kilt is literal to
the term, “going commando,”
and gives new meaning to “free
range.” ( Ba-da, ching! ... we
“kilt” it!)
With great airflow/ventilation
and a large range of motion, this
kilt is comfortable for everyday
wear. It has generously deep
front pockets and removable,
TDU-styled cargo pockets with
slots for both handgun and rifle
magazines. It uses heavy-duty
snaps and comes equipped
with two D-rings for attaching
carabiner or other accessories.
The kilt is constructed of TACLITE
rip-stop fabric, features reinforced
triple-stitching and is coated with
a Teflon finish. Heavy-duty belt
loops accommodate a 1.75-inch
belt. It comes in black, TDU Green,
Moss, TDU Khaki, Stone, Burnt and
Multi-Cam (tested).
JULY I 2017
MAKE: Franklin Armory
MODEL: Binary Firing System
(BFS) III Trigger
URL: www.FranklinArmory.com
MSRP: $430 (Trigger kit only; does not
include lower receiver or magazine)
The BFS III is a three-position
trigger with “safe,” “semiauto”
and “get some” (aka “binary”)
modes. In binary mode, it fires one
round at squeeze and one round
upon release for a fast double-tap.
The result is nearly instantaneous
follow-up shots and a tighter
two-shot group. Operationally,
it’s not that different from the
three-round burst found in military
rifles, except it has two rounds
and is civilian legal. Our sample
averaged 4.4 pounds, with a crisp
break and positive reset.
The BFS III Trigger is easy to install and
works with most AR-platform riles:
AR15, AR10, .22LR (for uppers that
work with standard lowers), 9mm and
SIG MPX. We haven’t used this trigger
for competing yet, but it’s loads of fun.
MAKE: TruGlo
MODEL: Tritium Pro Handgun
Night-Sight
URL: www.Truglo.com
MSRP: $108
This well-designed and durable
sight features a large front
sight ring that draws the eye to
it for fast acquisition. The rear
sight is subdued black with a
U-notch to facilitate front sight
focus. For use at night, three
Swiss tritium capsules work in
low-light conditions and even in
complete darkness.
The rear sight front edge is angled
for one-handed slide charging.
It is CNC-machined of steel for
tough duty, and its proprietary
Fortress Finish provides
permanent protection from
corrosion and damage resulting
from rough use. There are more
than 25 models to choose from for
most popular handguns.
MAKE: Browning
MODEL: Socks (assorted: for men,
women and kids)
URL: www.SPGOutdoors.com
MSRP: $6–$20
These are the best thing since
… well, socks. As any groundpounding grunt can tell you, good
socks are critical when your feet
are your taxi. The other gear loses
importance if your puppies are
barking. It is critical to keep your
feet dry and comfortable.
We’ve been extremely impressed
with the entire sock line from
Browning. Redesigned in 2017,
they feature greater moisturewicking, breathable mesh panels,
seamless toes, arch support and
mapped cushioning. These socks
are extremely comfortable for all
day in the ield and while kicking
back afterward, as well. They are
made of top-quality materials and
are designed for rugged outdoor
use in any climate, from hot to
cold, wet to dry. They’re built well
(most of them are manufactured in
the U.S.A.) and will last a long time.
www.gunworld.com
MAKE: TangoDown/Vickers
Tactical
MODEL: Grip Plug Takedown Tool
for Glock Gen4
URL: www.TangoDown.com
MSRP: $18
The Glock frame cavity bothers
some people, while others don’t
care. (We fall into the second
category.)
But because it’s there, it might as
well be put to good use … such
as storing an armorer’s takedown
tool. This device from TangoDown
does just that. It comprises three
parts: the base insert and two
armorer’s takedown tools, one
of which is for use with the back
strap and one for use without.
Simply snap the insert into the
frame cavity, then snap in one of
the two tools. Whenever you need
the tool, it will be there. It also
serves to keep your palm cleared
of the magwell for quicker
reloads. This tool is especially
useful with compact grips, such
as those found on the G19. It
is made of stainless steel and
polymer.
JULY I 2017
MAKE: Wheeler
MODEL: Armorer’s Handgun Sight Tool
URL: www.BTIBrands.com
MSRP: $230
We’ve used inferior sight tools—
even expensive ones—that have
damaged the sights and have even
had the drive knob break.
There’s something to be said for a
large hunk of machined metal to
get the job done right. Adjustable
for all semiauto handguns, it
installs, removes and adjusts all
front and rear dovetail sights.
It’s precision machined to tight
tolerances using a high-quality,
heavy-duty anodized aluminum
body and high-tensile-strength
steel screws and nuts.
The slide is fully and firmly
supported so that the slide won’t
be damaged. We lined the contact
points with electrical tape to
prevent marring the slide’s finish.
It’s also reference-marked for
precision sight adjustment. The
drive knob is large and extremely
sturdy—great for powering off
some hard-to-remove sights. This
tool is a must-have if you want to
swap out your own sights.
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY STEVEN K. LEDIN
This is the
Leupold VX-3
4.5-14x40 that
started the
experiment.
“Look, ma—no
parallax knob!”
TAKE A PARALLAXATIVE!
PARALLAX CORRECTION
IS REQUIRED FOR
ULTRA-CLOSE SHOOTING,
PARTICULARLY WITH HIGH
MAGNIFICATION.
A
However, if I move my head any amount at all, the ly no longer
stays in the right place; instead; it moves all around and over
the squirrel, varying by the amount I move my head.
This, then, is “parallax”—when the target (the squirrel) is on a
different plane (distance) than my reticle (the ly).
This Bushnell Elite 3200
Tactical 5-15x40 would
not be appropriate on
this Beeman R-1 air
rifle without a 10-meter
parallax adjustment.
THE “GIANT” WHEEL
Now, let’s imagine your sight picture of the squirrel and ly is
exactly the same as previously described, but you’re in a giant
tube many feet in diameter. On the side of the tube there is a
s I sit here, drinking coffee at my kitchen table, I
notice a gray squirrel licking its tail in the crook
of a tree in my backyard, about 30 yards away.
The window screen I’m looking through across
the room has a ly on it. It is superimposed in line so exactly
over the tiny vital zone of the tree rat that I could imagine it as
a rilescope reticle mounted over a gun and could squeeze the
trigger for a perfect kill shot. My focus is on the insect, and the
rodent is blurry.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
giant wheel, and when it is turned, the squirrel gets closer or
farther away and less or more in focus, depending on which
The RV1 with the 3XP and
way you move the wheel.
#78 A.R.M.S. mount are
Not all side-focus turrets
have distances marked.
The numbers are meant
to be just guides.
perfect mates.
If you move the wheel so the squirrel (target) is very close to
the ly (reticle), no matter where you move your head when you
are staring at the animal, the ly does not move away from the
vital zone of the squirrel.
The giant wheel is your rilescope’s parallax adjustment
turret. It adjusts the furry target to a close distance to the ly.
As a result, it also puts the rodent in focus and eliminates the
possibility of the reticle moving away from your exact intended
point of impact, even though your head position has changed.
When your target is close to the same distance as your reticle,
parallax is removed, and your focus is sharp on both the reticle
and the target.
Does that mean that if you can keep your eye directly centered
in the rilescope, parallax error will not be noticeable? Yes.
That’s why a solid and consistent cheek weld is so important.
Parallax adjustment is especially crucial for precision shooting,
such as 10-meter air gun shooting or benchrest, because scores
and groups are often measured to hundredths of an inch. Every
tiny bit matters. But for most shooters (hunters, in particular)
who won’t shoot much farther than several hundred yards, it
doesn’t matter too much, so don’t get overly concerned.
The adjustment wheel might be on the side of the scope (side
focus) or in the front, surrounding the objective lens (adjustable
objective). On the side is much more convenient to the shooter,
because he doesn’t have to move his head from his cheek
weld. However, the adjustment wheel on the front objective
is much larger in diameter and might be easier to adjust in
micro-increments. These adjustment wheels are often marked
in distances—which might or might not be true readings but
can be taken as an estimate.
PARALLAX AND SCOPES
My irst quality hunting scope was an old Leupold Vari-X III 3.510x40 with an adjustable objective. I generally kept it set at 200
yards and killed over a dozen various deer and speed goats up
to 400 yards without troubling over the adjustments too much.
(When moving your head around, parallax error is most apparent
at close distances, rather than far.)
PARALLAX ADJUSTMENT
Preparing for an antelope hunt years ago, I wanted to use a
Leupold VX 3 4.5-14x40 scope on my bicentennial Ruger 77,
which had been rechambered for the superb .270 Weatherby
cartridge. But I was concerned I might have a parallax issue with
a non-parallax-adjustable 14x scope at long range. At least that’s
what I was told by other shooters, and it was often in print.
Parallax can also be described as “the apparent movement of
the reticle on your target when moving your head away from
exact center of the rilescope.”
Most of the rotation on a
parallax dial is devoted
to close ranges.
This Nikon M-223
3-12x42 has a lockable
side focus turret and
marked yardages.
I’m more of a minimalist; the fewer the parts and things I have
on my equipment, the happier I am. A parallax dial is just one
more thing to worry about. Some people are so concerned
about adjusting their equipment and the “stuff” attached to
their guns that they forget what their job is at the range or in
the ield: that is, to use proper form, cheek weld, breathing,
trigger control and sight picture so they can take a well-aimed
shot. And shoot quickly. How many missed opportunities for
shots I’ve seen because people were futzing with their focus,
magniication, bipod or some other unnecessary interruption!
Animals don’t often wait or offer do-overs.
I secured a variety of scopes on tripods and taped a 1-inch grid
sight-in target on the rear window of my Jeep. A friend carrying a
Motorola radio drove the Jeep to different distances and stopped
where I said, using a laser rangeinder to conirm yardages.
I centered the reticle on the bullseye and moved my head off
center in all directions. This allowed me to count how many
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
SIG clearly marks parallax
yardages on its new
Tango 6 5-30x56 scope,
shown here in the Kinetic
Development Group QR
modular SIDS-141 34mm
mount. As of this writing,
a custom elevation
turret with your ballistic
information is orderable
with all Tango rilescopes,
price included.
LEUPOLD CDS
The Leupold Custom Dial System (CDS) is one of the
simplest ways to shoot at distance. These custom dials
are available from the Leupold Custom Shop and replace
the elevation turret on many of that company’s scopes.
They can be engraved with the ballistic information of
any conceivable factory cartridge or handload, as well as
for any atmospheric conditions.
inches the reticle moved off center. It’s a pretty crude test, and
there’s not room here to print all my conclusions, but here were
some results that I found interesting.
With the Leupold VX-3 4.5-14x40 scope (parallax set at Leupold
Use your rangeinder to determine distance, dial the
yardage, and hold right on. It’s one of the irst and best—
and still my favorite.
for 150 yards) turned up to 14x, the movement of my head
from side to side until the picture blacked out resulted in the
following approximate rounded-off number of inches that the
reticle moved off center:
The CDS’s MSRP is $59.99, but VX-3 CDS models come
with a coupon redeemable for a free dial.
100 YARDS: Zero movement
150 YARDS: Zero movement
CONTACT INFORMATION
200 YARDS: Less than 1 inch
300 YARDS: 1 inch
400 YARDS: Less than 2 inches
500 YARDS: About 2 inches
Adjustable objective scopes
can often be adjusted in
iner detail than side focus
models.
600 YARDS: Fewer than 3 inches
LEUPOLD OPTICS
1-800-LEUPOLD
www.Leupold.com
Again, these numbers are approximate. What has to be realized
here is that to induce this maximum amount of parallax error, I
had to move my head until I lost the sight picture because my
head was so far off center. And you would never shoot a scoped
gun like this! Even being anywhere around the center of the
scope would keep your shots within a couple of inches from
your point of aim.
PARALLAX PRESCRIPTION
Parallax correction is required for ultra-close shooting, particularly
with high magniication, such as a target air gun scope. Even at 25
yards with a lower-powered 3-9 scope at 9x, you might need to
adjust parallax in order to achieve a sharp picture.
The vital zones of large animals offer such large targets that the
maximum parallax error possible will not result in a missed shot.
And if you keep your head centered through your scope with the
aid of a solid cheek weld, most parallax issues are moot.
Long-range precision scopes beneit from parallax adjustments
also, because you need everything stacked in your favor for hits
at 1,000 yards and farther. But for 90 percent of shooters and
hunters using magniications up to about 14x, parallax is not
something to cloud your brain with.
There’s enough data to write volumes about the subject, but if
your shooting and hunting are pretty mainstream, and your head
is dizzy from countless articles and information about the subject,
prescribe yourself a cleansing parallaxative and just know that
the gun and scope will do their jobs … if you do yours. CW
Steven K. Ledin is a former U.S. Navy nuclear gunner’s mate and current
director of a prominent online optics retailer. He’s a CCW and NRA instructor
and has been a sponsored competitive shooter and private investigator. He has
hunted (and gotten lost) from Alaska to Africa.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY BRAD FITZPATRICK
OLDIES BUT GOODIES
I don’t know what happened. Maybe he caught our scent, but
the deer hadn’t spooked. Odds are, he simply lost interest in
us as a doe made a run through the cat claw thorn to our left.
I could hear her hooves clicking on the icy ground, and there
was no pulling the mature buck away from her. If I was going
to shoot, it had to be now. I cocked the hammer.
T HES E R I F L E D ES IG N S H AV E
BEEN AROUND FOR OVER
A CENTURY, BUT THEY’RE
EFFECTIVE GAME-GETTERS.
T
Blake called the range: “One ifty-nine.” The range was no
problem, but the buck was quartering away and was about to
vanish into the frozen thorn. I found the curve of the trigger
just as the deer turned fully broadside and stopped. It was my
only opportunity, and I took it.
he big Texas whitetail buck slipped out of the
thorns 350 yards down a clear cut and stood
surveying the frozen landscape.
The trigger broke, and the big rile thundered, the shot catching
the buck just behind the foreleg and dropping him in his tracks.
And we still had 18 minutes to spare.
My guide, Blake Osteen, gave another gentle
grunt, and the buck started moving slowly in our direction,
his head bobbing as he tried to catch the scent of his enemy.
Normally, an old deer like that wouldn’t expose himself in the
middle of the day, but the rut was in full swing, and a sudden cold
snap had intensiied the breeding action. Now, I needed him to
close the gap a bit more.
There are a lot of brand-new rile designs on the market. Admittedly,
some of them are very good. We live in an era of CNC machining
and lightweight synthetics; a time when $500 will buy you a brandnew MOA bolt gun. In addition, the rise in popularity of AR riles
has made these guns widely available, and new hunting cartridges
such as the 6.5 Creedmoor are perfectly adapted to the platform.
If you are looking for a hunting rile, there are plenty of options.
“Two-ifty, Blake said.
The deer was closing fast, but it was the last morning of the
hunt, and we had less than a half-hour before we needed to
leave for the airport in El Paso. I slid the long-barreled Uberti
1885 single-shot through the small port hole in the side of the
blind and watched as the deer kept moving in our direction.
“Two hundred.”
I waited for the deer to close the gap a bit more. I felt
comfortable with the big .45-70 to 200 yards, and I felt sure I
could make the shot if I had to. But each step brought the deer
closer and upped my odds of placing the shot perfectly. We could
wait. The deer was coming on a direct line. And then, he turned.
One of the advantages
of the 1873’s design is
that it was both reliable
and fast to operate. In the
right hands, these guns
offer very fast follow-ups,
especially with lowrecoiling pistol cartridges.
But not all new riles have luted bolts and threaded barrels.
There are many rile designs that have been around a long
time that make superb big-game hunting riles just as capable
of taking game in 2017 as they were in 1917. These guns are
now considerably more-potent hunting weapons than they
were back in their day, thanks to new materials and improved
cartridges and bullets. If you’re a history lover, there are plenty
of classic designs available today. Here are ive rile designs that
have stood the test of time. GW
THERE ARE MANY RIFLE DESIGNS
THAT HAVE BEEN AROUND A
LONG TIME THAT MAKE SUPERB
BIG-GAME HUNTING RIFLES JUST
AS CAPABLE OF TAKING GAME IN
2017 AS THEY WERE IN 1917.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
WINCHESTER 1873
The 1873, also known simply as the ’73 or the “gun
that won the West,” was a technological marvel
when it was introduced. The robust design was fast
to load, operated lawlessly in tough conditions and
allowed for fast follow-up shots. Between 1872
and 1923—when original production ceased—
more than 700,000 of these riles were produced.
The Big Horn Armory
Model 90 is a hybrid of
the Winchester 1892 and
Winchester 1886 that
is built using modern
machining technology.
There are a number of
caliber options, as well as a
host of available upgrades.
The most popular chambering in the ’73’s heyday
was the .44-40, in particular, because the owner
could use that same load in both their revolver and
rile. This would eliminate the need to carry two
different cartridges on long horseback journeys
through wild country. Other chamberings included
the .38-40 and the .32-20, and standard barrel
lengths were 24 inches and 20 inches on carbine
versions.
BIG HORN ARMORY MODEL 89/90
Okay, the Big Horn Armory riles aren’t original century-old
designs, but they share elements from Winchester’s 1892 and
1886, making them a sort of updated hybrid hunting rile for
the modern age. But the machining and manufacturing of these
riles are superb, and there are a number of high-end upgrades
available, such as a matte stainless inish and walnut stocks
that are breathtakingly beautiful.
Winchester is once again offering the ’73 in its
line of production riles, and Italian maker Uberti
also offers a long list of 1873 clones in various
forms with various inishes.
Winchester currently offers ive variants, and
Uberti offers nine different ’73s, so options
abound. The riles are chambered in cartridges
such as the .357 Magnum, the original .44-40 and
the .45 Colt. These caliber options and the 1873’s
iron sights do limit effective range, but for closerange hogs, deer or when following cougars with
hounds, there are few better options.
MSRP: Winchester: $1,299 and up
Uberti: $1,219 and up
www.WinchesterGuns.com
www.Uberti-USA.com
These guns are also chambered in some pretty potent,
modern-day revolver cartridges: the .500 and .460 Smith &
Wesson Magnums, as well as the .454 Casull. And, with their
adjustable iron sights (a ghost ring rear and bead front), you’d
be surprised at the effective range of these weapons.
The Model 90 .460 Smith & Wesson I tested produced great
groups out to 100 yards, and the rile’s weight and stock design
kept recoil manageable.
Gone are the days when
hunters were limited to
black powder cartridges.
Modern loads make
lever actions formidable
weapons capable of
excellent accuracy at
extended ranges. This
Big Horn Model 90 is
chambered in the potent
.460 Smith & Wesson
Magnum.
Plus, if you’re hunting big game in bear country, it’s comforting
to know you’ve got a potent weapon in your hands. They aren’t
cheap—but guns of this ilk never are.
MSRP: $2,500 and up
www.BigHornArmory.com
nchester’s 1873, the
that won the West,”
s as good today as it
when it was released.
s Winchester comes
color case-hardened
ish, 24-inch octagon
and a pistol grip. It is
rrently in production.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
Winchester still offers the 1894 in a variety of calibers, including .3030, .450 Marlin, .38-55 and the often-overlooked .25-35. Mossberg’s
464 riles are also variants of the 94 design with modern features,
and they are available at a relatively bargain price.
This hunter
took a mature
Texas whitetail
using the
Uberti 1885
High Wall
in .45-70.
Large bullets
traveling
at modest
velocities do
very little meat
damage, so
the .45-70 is
actually a great
option for deer
hunters.
MSRP: Winchester 94: $1,199.99 and up
Mossberg 464: $518 and up
www.WinchesterGuns.com
MAUSER 98
The Mauser 98 is still the basis for a number of the most
popular hunting riles in production today. It inspired the
Winchester Model 70’s action, as well as the Kimber 84,
Montana Rile Company 1999 and Ruger M77, and there are
still a number of 98 sporter conversions being carried aield
each year. In addition, CZ’s popular 550 is closely patterned
after the original Peter Paul Mauser design.
UBERTI 1885 HIGH WALL
The Winchester 1885 was the irst successful commercial
design of John Moses Browning, and the robust falling-block
action is still regarded as one of the toughest and most durable
rile designs of the time. In the days when buffalo and elk were
abundant on the Great Plains and were fair game, having an
’85 made long shots possible. Although these riles offered just
one shot, that’s all that was required—in the right hands.
Today, Uberti offers a number of different 1885 riles in .45-70,
.45-90 and .45-120. If these cartridges seem like overkill for deer,
keep in mind that heavy bullets at modest velocities are lethal,
yet they destroy very little meat. In addition, the .45-caliber hole
creates a heavier blood trail than smaller calibers.
Uberti’s newest offering is the 1885 Big Game rile, which
comes with a 22-inch barrel and accepts a scope. If you
prefer to shoot without magniied optics, there’s an option to
purchase Creedmoor-style lip-up sights, as well.
The Mauser gave rise to the controlled-round feed action,
incorporating a large claw extractor and a ixed-blade ejector
that are still the benchmark of reliability. In fact, these riles
have become the standard for African dangerous game.
Winchester is still
producing 1894s, and these
modern guns are extremely
well-constructed. This is
Winchester’s 1894 Trail’s
End Takedown model.
Mauser is still importing the M98 Magnum, but you’ll pay
dearly for one of these guns: north of $13,500. But the grade V
wood (with an optional upgrade, if that isn’t quite good enough
for you), seamless action it, robust folding express sights and
careful attention to detail truly set this rile apart.
MSRP: $13,500-plus
www.Mauser.com
MSRP: $1,009–$1,279
www.Uberti-USA.com
There’s a reason the Mauser 98 set the
standard for bolt actions and has inspired a
number of modern rile designs:
The Mauser M98 Magnum is a beautifully
crafted rile that is the ideal dangerous-game
gun. This one is chambered in .375 H&H
Magnum.
WINCHESTER 1894
The Winchester ’94 needs no introduction. During the early
20th century, this rile was extraordinarily popular—even as
bolt guns and magniied optics came into vogue. In fact, it’s
believed the ’94 might have taken more deer than any other
single rile design, and that’s certainly possible.
The 1894 continued to hang on, despite competition from moremodern designs, simply because no other gun could match its
pointing and handling characteristics. In the right hands, these
riles can handle relatively long shots, and for fast shooting in
dense cover, there are still few options that are better.
Brad Fitzpatrick is a full-time freelance writer based in Ohio. His works have appeared in
several print and online publications, and he is the author of two books: The Shooter’s Bible
Guide to Concealed Carry and Handgun Buyer’s Guide 2015. He has hunted on four continents
and was a collegiate trap and skeet shooter before becoming a writer.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
30MM RED DOT SIGHT
WITH CANTILEVER MOUNT
YOUR RIFLE’S
NEW BATTLE BUDDY
DIGITAL PUSH-BUTTON
CONTROLS
WIRE LANYARDS
retain windage and
elevation caps
ABSOLUTE
CO-WITNESS
HEIGHT
with A2 or
standard-height
backup iron sights
30MM
OBJECTIVE
LENS
for a wide field
of view
CRISP 2-MOA
RED DOT
for precise aiming
MOTION-SENSING WAKE / SLEEP
move or tap the gun to wake up the dot. After sitting
idle for a programmable amount of time the dot will
sleep to save power, waiting for your next move
WWW.TRUGLO.COM
INCLUDED
CANTILEVER MOUNT
machined from aircraft-grade
aluminum for maximum
strength with minimum weight
Scan to learn more
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY BECKY YACKLEY
GUNBARBIE
VS.BARBIE
THE UNDISCOVERED LINK
DOLLSTOMENGETTINGONTO THEWOMENSAMEANDPAGE
WHEN TALKING GUNS
take a picture in his mind of every gun he sees, it’s like when I
look at a pair of running shoes … and I want them.
I make a mental note of the way the laces run, the amount
of cushioning and whether they are made for trails or the
road. He’s doing the same thing but is making notes about the
magwell, hammer, slide cuts, the frame and grip angle—all
the distinctive parts.
The way I felt about my son’s ability to see the minutia in
guns is probably the same way some guys feel when their
gals talk about purses (Louis Vuitton, Coach, Fendi): The only
thing these guys see is a bag. But is it a bag for the night or
the day? Are there pockets inside? Are there places for your
phone and wallet? Little things. Tiny details. Those little things
that are designed to make a purse unique.
Those “little things” are what guys see in guns. And one of the
best ways to understand this is to revisit your childhood and
the ultimate female pastime in accessorizing: Barbie.
“TO BARBIE”—A VERB
But we’re not going to talk about Barbie as a noun as much as
we are going to refer to her as a verb. This might be one of the
simplest ways to share with the opposite sex how similar our
differences truly are.
At some point, everyone has held, looked at or played
with a Barbie doll. Whether you love them, hate them or
are “agnostic,” Barbie serves a greater good: She is the
ultimate example of human beings’ love of accessorizing; our
fascination with what is novel and new.
“Barbie” might be thought of as a noun/thing to some,
but the real part of speech that “Barbie” fits is a verb. “To
Barbie” something is an action verb—one of those parts of
speech you learned about in grade school but never quite
cared to understand.
B
elieve it or not, a Barbie doll—the iconic little
girl’s toy—can change the way your significant
other and you communicate about guns.
BARBIE-SPEAK
Every woman loves a good pair of shoes and a new purse.
When looking at shoes or purses, we agonize over the details
of what each new designer and type offers. Yet, I used to
wonder how my 12-year-old son could look at a photo of a
gun and immediately identify the make and model.
Women who are truly
into guns tend to think
of “Barbie” as a label
applied to a speciic
type of girl. But the
appropriate way to
use the term, “Barbie,”
around gun girls is to
refer to it as an action.
“Barbie-ing up” is
accessorizing—but
with guns!
One day, I was talking to him about the Sears catalog of my
youth; that everything I ever wanted was inside. It was the
Amazon Prime of the 1980s. While explaining this, I told him
about the one thing I wanted as a kid and had hinted at for
Christmas but never got. It was then that I unlocked the mystery
of my son’s gun obsession. I realized that not only does my son
www.gunworld.com
However, the reason you should care to understand what it
means “to Barbie” something is that it’s the undiscovered link to
getting women and men onto the same page when talking guns.
GUN BARBIE IS A GAME
Everyone had their favorite childhood games. Some played
hide-and-seek, some liked playing video games, and others
liked their Barbie dolls. Ladies, what you did with Barbie dolls
is exactly what guys are doing with guns. However, the cool
thing is that guns can do more than sit there and look pretty.
Guns serve a purpose, and maybe a Barbie’s true purpose is
in the way we can use her to talk about things that men and
women tend to miscommunicate about. Most girls had Barbie
dolls. They enjoyed dressing them up and styling their hair.
For some guys, guns are just like dolls—but manlier.
JULY I 2017
Of course, guns are tools, first and foremost, but if you must
have a new blender, are you buying the cheap, $10 blender
that just blends or the good one that can create smoothies and
margarita ice? It’s just a tool, but you want to get the most out
of it. You want to invest in a tool that lasts a lifetime, can do
more than one single task, and has accessories and options.
UNDERSTANDING THAT
WOMEN AND MEN WANT
“TO BARBIE” DIFFERENT
THINGS IN LIFE IS A
MAJOR COMPONENT
OF INTERPERSONAL
RELATIONSHIPS.
ACCESSORIZE!
How many pairs of shoes a woman needs is proportionate to the
number of ARs any guy owns ... right? And just as a girl would put
a different outit on a Barbie, a different scope, handguard, stock or
optic on a gun are all ways to dress it up.
Accessorizing guns isn’t
about buying more toys.
It’s about making sure
each gun its the person
using it and the task it’s
designed for. From mag
pouches to magazine
base pads, stocks and
springs, “Barbie-ing up”
something that its the
owner’s taste and task
is integral to enjoying
your irearms.
Explain that an SBR with a silencer is for her, too, because
you’re thinking about a light, easy-to-maneuver, quiet gun she
can use easily when she wants to have fun at the range—or,
heaven forbid, she has to use it to protect herself. Another
tactic is to explain that you want the gun to teach the kids.
Back to this verb thing: Guns are about actions and purpose. They
can be long-range guns, a truck gun, hunting gun, competition gun,
etc. Guns are accessorized based on their use. It’s very utilitarian.
Guys: What you can take away from this is how to explain
to your significant other just why you need the Costa Carry
Comp or an SBR (short-barreled rifle) or even that AK you
really want. Use this to find the common ground.
If you tell her you want it because you’ve always wanted
it, maybe she says she’s always wanted a Coach purse,
but she’s not spending the money on it. You’re going to
get shut down.
Instead, tell her why having a pistol with an integral comp
holds value as a personal-protection gun (she wants you to be
safe, right?). And that the hand-fit pistol from STI will retain its
value over time, just like her Coach bag. Explain that an SBR
and the required tax stamp are like getting a Dyson—nobody
needs a British designer vacuum, but darn it if everyone
shouldn’t have access to the best tools to do a job.
When you need
to convince your
signiicant other to
buy quality, you talk
about purchases as
investments. You pick
the blender that does
it all. Guns should
be the same. While a
blender or a vacuum
cleaner will never be an
heirloom, guns will!
When my youngest was 11 years old, he ran my 14.5-inch,
pinned, comp Adams Arms rifle for competition. He did so like
a boss, because it was manageable for his small stature.
I LIKE THE LOOK OF IT!
Women buy a lot of things men can’t stand. For instance,
skinny jeans are not meant for everyone, but they’re stylish,
so a lot of people buy them. The same goes for a foregrip on
an AR. It is awkward and ugly, but someone likes the look of it.
The point is that we live in world with lots of choices, and
choosing “to Barbie” an item into something we like the look
of is our own prerogative. Understanding that women and men
want to Barbie different things in life is a major component of
interpersonal relationships. Just as men want to Barbie-up
something in the house, on the car or on their guns, your right to
accessorize is only limited by your imagination.
BARBIE AND WORLD PEACE
What if there were a place where Barbie and GI Joe could
meet and see eye to eye on things in order to end the war
between the sexes and end the misconnection? If there
were a happy place where opposing world views of fashion
and function meet, where looks meet utility or style meets
deliverable performance, it would be guns.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
A precision rifle equates
to a ine leather purse:
If you’re going to invest,
buy the best.
But guys, use the things she knows to share what you love,
whether that is plinking in the backyard or hunting coyotes
in the dark. There’s something to be said for having skin
in the game, and when you help your gal Barbie-up a gun,
set it up just for her, and the work building it becomes part
of the accomplishment.
If women could see what it is about guns that “clicks” with
men and speaks to them (as a new pair of shoes does for
themselves), and men could see just how a new pair of shoes
makes women feel (just as a gun does for them), maybe we’d
all look at the things each holds dear with a little less mystery
and a little more understanding.
Remember, you’re Barbie-ing more than the physical objects;
you’re “accessorizing” your relationship. You’re adding
some highlights and spending time to tweak the status quo
with which most couples operate into one that’s got all the
bells and whistles.
Guys wouldn’t hide their gun purchases from their wives, and
women would know just what to equate their additional pair
of shoes to: those four ARs that are “basically the same” but
are really worlds apart and have a separate purpose.
Ladies: Just as guns are about action and purpose (hunting,
truck gun, long range, competition, etc.), explain to your man
that the boots for everyday wear are like an AK. And the
expensive leather ones? Those are the precision rifle. They’re
not cheap, and if you’re going to invest, buy the best.
THE BARBIE REVOLUTION
A gun isn’t an item you see Barbie rocking; it’s probably
because most women grew up in a house in which guys did
“guy things” and girls had their Barbies. But Barbie didn’t
stay pinned into one corner—there were Skipper and Malibu
Barbies, and Barbies had children and careers.
don’t understand. Let them show you how they can “Barbie
something up” for you to let you experience the pure joy of a new
mount arriving for your optic or the elation of shooting an AR with a
stock set up just for you. Your Barbie-ing could be as simple as
new springs on a Glock 34 so the slide is easier to work or an
oversized mag release to facilitate small hands. Maybe your
duck-hunting husband buys that $500 Stoeger shotgun, cuts
the stock off and puts a limb-saver pad on so you can shoot
ducks with a gun that its you.
Women pick shoes
for speciic uses. The
fact that guns can
be considered via
the same framework
should help guys paint
the correct picture of
just why they actually
need all those different
guns. People have
perpetuated the myth
that they need to
hide gun purchases
from their wives. This
doesn’t have to be.
Shown here is an AK
(in “Barbie-speak,” it
equates to boots for
everyday wear).
Don’t let your wife, daughter, girlfriend or mother be
pinned into the category of an “observing female gunowner” who just takes what she’s handed. Don’t let them
miss out on the feeling of putting together their very own
gun to suit their preferences.
Tell your daughter that other kids can go to Build-a-Bear
Workshops, but she’s going to build an AR. Tell your wife that
other couples can pick out new furniture, but you’re getting
her a custom pistol so she can shoot matches with you.
And ladies, just imagine guns as the purses and shoes that men
Author Becky Yackley competes in action shooting (3 Gun, USPSA, Bianchi and IPSC)
with her husband and three sons. When she isn’t shooting matches or writing, she
is busy with her camera. Becky is the founder of the 2A Heritage Junior shooting
camps and works in social media for several irearms industry companies. www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY CHUCK TAYLOR
MODULAR HANDGUN SYSTEM
SHOOTOUT
GLOCK G17 GEN4VS.
SIG P-320/M-17
O
n January 17, 2017, virtually in the middle of the
SHOT Show, the U.S. Army announced the results
of its highly controversial Modular Handgun
System Program (MHS). The announcement
caught the whole world of combat handgunning
off guard, not to mention the program’s participants, who hadn’t
any idea the announcement was forthcoming.
www.gunworld.com
To the winner, the MHS contract was worth a hefty $580
million over the next decade, with the potential via additional
service adoption of hundreds of millions of dollars more. So,
naturally, the two actual finalists in the program—SIG Sauer
and Glock—were vitally interested.
CONTROVERSY
After many years, during which the MHS program had been
severely criticized (including by the U.S. Army chief of staff
and the secretary of defense) for being unnecessary, too
costly and taking too long, the winner was finally announced:
The SIG Sauer entry, a variant of the P-320 designated during
the program as the P-320/XM-17, was the winner and is
being officially adopted in both its full-sized and compact
versions as the M-17.
JULY I 2017
Naturally, Glock immediately protested; after all, 287,000plus pistols is a huge order, with commensurate prestige
and profit. However, as we saw back in 1985 with the
Joint Service Small Arms Project (JSSAP) adoption of the
Beretta M9/M92SF, the protestation process has occurred
before—with few results. The decision of the judges is
final, regardless of the complaints of the participants.
Like it or not, that’s the way it works in the military
weapon procurement world.
Since then, rumors have abounded, the most amazing of
which is that “the powers that be” within the MHS program
never actually tested the XM-17 and that the whole thing
was rigged, etc. Without a doubt, history has shown us
that U.S. government programs are hardly immune from
skullduggery or incompetence, but I simply cannot bring
myself to subscribe to such an outrageous claim.
MHS SPECIFICATIONS
From the outset, the MHS program clearly specified what
was needed: a handgun that could be adapted into different
configurations and calibers, handle a sound-suppressor
and, in every way, provide superior performance to the
The Glock G17 Gen4 9mm
was the inal contender
against the P-320/
XM-17. Exceptionally
popular among military
and police organizations
around the world,
it wasn’t selected
due to insuficient
“adaptability” and
price, as compared with
the XM-17/P-320. Not
surprisingly, as with the
adoption of the Beretta
M-9/92SF in 1985, great
controversy has resulted,
the inal result of which
remains unclear.
M-9/M-92SF. Interestingly enough, one of the major goals
of the project was to adopt a cartridge with better terminal
ballistics than the M882 9mm 124-grain FMJ. The .40 S&W
was a leading contender, but when the dust finally settled,
the Army chose to stay with the 9mm, mentioning that it
might also adopt some form of frangible or JHP load.
SIG Sauer’s approach to the modular concept was to utilize
a central trigger group that could be switched back and
forth to different grip frames, which it calls “grip modules.”
This ability, along with different combinations of slides and
Several years ago, the
Glock G17 and G19 were
authorized for use by
both the U.S. Marine
Corps and U..S Army. This
was viewed by many
as an indication of their
subsequent adoption on
a wider basis. (Photo:
U.S. Marine Corps)
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
Another issue was the ability to easily mount an optical sight;
and the XM-17 has that capability, whereas the standard Glock
Gen4 does not, except in its MOS version. Information on this
particular point is vague, but I’m guessing that the Gen4 version
Glock submitted to the tests did, indeed, have this ability.
Either way, the only ones who might mount an optical sight
on their handguns are a few Special Ops operators. Regular
Army soldiers certainly would not have such a capability.
The Glock’s reputation
for ruggedness and
reliability is legendary.
These photos are of the
author’s Gen 2 Glock
17 during a long-term
torture test conducted
to determine the
Glock’s true toughness.
Purchased new in 1988,
it has digested more
than 365,000 rounds
and been subjected to a
phenomenal amount of
abuse. That’s 29 years of
highly strenuous use, but
it’s still in service.
barrels, allowed the weapon to take different forms (full sized,
compact, etc.) and utilize different cartridges, the three most
common of which were the 9mm, .357 SIG and .40 S&W.
The Beretta M9/M92SF
was the U.S. service
handgun from 1985 to
January 2017 and was
reaching the end of its
controversial service
life, making it due for
replacement. Although
Beretta submitted an
updated version—the
M9A3—it was rejected.
(Photo: U.S. Marine
Corps)
The paramount issue, of course, was the per-unit price. SIG
Sauer managed to outbid Glock, with a final price of $207 per
gun. No doubt, this warmed the cockles of the MHS’s heart.
And why not? That’s a terrific price for any handgun these
days, much less for one that’s supposed to satisfy all needs.
This particular feat surprised me—and probably many
others, as well—because for decades, Glock has consistently
demonstrated an ability to provide its guns to military and
police agencies for very low per-unit prices.
And will the U.S. military adopt some form of frangible or JHP
9mm load to enhance terminal ballistics? Who knows? But
if it does, it would be legal, because the United States didn’t
re-sign the last ratification of the Hague Accords. Moreover,
the countries we’ve fought since World War II either didn’t
exist at the time or didn’t sign it either. The continuing use
of the 9mm suggests that in lieu of the .40 S&W or .357
SIG, some form of frangible or JHP load might well be in the
offing. Time will tell.
MODULARITY
Glock responded to the modular requirement by adapting its
highly successful Glock G17 Gen4 to accept four differently
configured backstraps, which are snapped onto the gun and
held in place by one of the takedown pins. Unfortunately,
although the idea is remarkably ingenious, it wasn’t enough
to sway the folks at MHS.
Yet, when it came right down to it, the Army stayed with the
9mm, making this requirement an interesting, but entirely
theoretical, concept, because there hasn’t been a case since
the Civil War in which the Army adapted an existing weapon
platform to a new cartridge. Still, in these days of tight
military budgets, it’s difficult to escape the tendency for the
procuring agency to try to get the most “bang for its buck”
with such one-size-fits-all criteria.
From a civilian self-defense and/or law enforcement
standpoint, the ability to reconfigure the weapon and the
cartridge it utilizes is, for obvious reasons, a boon. However,
inasmuch as the U.S. military is hardly likely to stockpile a
variety of barrels, slides and grip modules in its arms rooms
to allow this to happen, from a military perspective, this
approach rings hollow.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
In every other respect, however, the Gen4 Glock matches
the P-320/M-17 feature for feature: Both are simple and
easy to field strip and clean. Both have a roughened grip
texture to allow a good grip with wet or cold hands. Both
are available with 3-dot, horizontally patterned, tritium,
high-visibility sights. Both have heavy-duty extractors and
a relieved ejection port. Both have provisions for mounting
a tactical light. And both feature a well-located and nicely
configured magazine-release button and an easy-to-access
magazine well for rapid reloading or freeing a stuck magazine.
Even so, both have small slide lock levers made of stamped
sheet metal that needs bearing surface polishing to remove
bearing surface burrs. Otherwise, manipulation is difficult
and can cause problems during a speed reload or clearance
of a type 3 (feedway) stoppage.
Both also have a small ridge beneath the lever, itself, which is
intended to protect it from inadvertently being pressing upward
into the slide notch, causing it to lock open when it shouldn’t.
Unfortunately, in conjunction with the lever’s small size, the
ridge can interfere with accessing when it is appropriate. The
best solution for this is to replace the lever with an extended
version. But at this time, while there are several available for
the Glock, there isn’t one available for the P-320/M-17.
My initial impression of the P-320/M-17 is also that its
manual (thumb) safety, although ambidextrous, is located a
bit too far to the rear for efficient operation. It’s also a little
too close to the slide lock lever for my tastes. Under the
stress of deadly action, this is an open invitation for trouble.
All things considered, I’m not surprised that the military
would stipulate a manual safety, but with the standard
commercial P-320, it is optional, and I prefer to do without it.
The XM-17 9mm, as
selected by the U.S.
Army (the compact
model is also included
in the selection). It is
based on the P-320 and
designated as M-17. Note
the ambidextrous thumb
safety, which is included
on the XM-17 version.
The slide lock levers of
both guns are small and
not easily operated under
stress. Although intended
to prevent inadvertent
engagement of the
lever, the protective
ridge beneath both also
hampers fast access
to lock the slide open
during a type 3 (feedway)
stoppage.
substantial amount of ammo through it before attempting
to use it for the HCM qualification. Inasmuch as the actual
military M-17 is unobtainable at the present time, I procured
a full-sized P-320 in 9mm as being representative.
However, during my initial sessions with it, I discovered a couple
of disconcerting issues: First, the takedown lever, while well
located, was so stiff that I couldn’t conveniently operate it. Both
thumbs were required, and it took nearly a minute of fumbling
around with it to generate the leverage needed to rotate it.
Gunsmithing was required to correct the problem. Conversely,
the Glock’s dual takedown lever posed no such problem. It was
manipulated in seconds, and the slide was easily removed.
PERFORMANCE
As for the Glock G17 Gen4 and P-320/M-17’s actual
performance against each other, I chose to utilize the
CTASAA Handgun Combat Master Qualification course as an
evaluative mechanism. I was already thoroughly familiar with
the Glock, but in order to ensure objectivity and complete
familiarity with the P-320/M-17, I spent a week carrying it,
dry-practicing every aspect of its operation and running a
www.gunworld.com
Second, to ensure it was well broken-in, I ran 200 rounds
each of a variety of ammunition through it, discovering that it
wouldn’t function reliably with many loads that used light bullet
loads and some lighter-loaded factory FMJ practice ammo.
These weren’t feedway stoppages; they were type 2s (failure
to eject). The slide would not reciprocate far enough rearward
JULY I 2017
The easily removable
modular trigger group
of the P-320/M-17
makes cleaning faster
and simpler than on the
Glock.
The P-320/M-17 also
allows easy installment
of an optical sight. The
standard Glock 17 Gen4
does not, but the feature
is available on the
commercial Glock G17
Gen4 MOS coniguration.
ejected clear of the gun, resulting in a horizontal stovepipe.
the Gen4 Glock and P 320. The Glock s pull was a hefty
8 pounds, while the P-320’s was 8.25 pounds. Both are
way too heavy to expect either gun to reach its highest
performance level.
Investigation disclosed the culprit to be the 20-pound factory
recoil spring. Fortunately, I was able to correct the problem
with an aftermarket 15-pound spring and new guide rod
from Gray Guns (www.GrayGuns.com), which is the go-to
place for anything SIG.
Further investigation showed that the problem wasn’t
unique to my particular P-320. There is also considerable
discussion about this issue on a number of Internet sites.
Once the new spring and guide rod were installed, the
weapon functioned without further mishap with whatever
type of ammunition I cared to feed it. Presumably, this
problem will not be an issue with the M-17 version!
The P-320/M-17’s
takedown lever is well
located, but on the test
gun, it was so stiff that
its rotational operation
was dificult. The Glock
17’s takedown lever is
also well located but
requires the gun to be
uncocked to operate,
whereas the P-320/M-17
does not.
At this point, it needs to be said that Glocks have a proven
record of functioning with virtually any kind of ammo you
stick into them in nearly any kind of environment and have
a service life far in excess of the 35,000-round requirement
stated in the MHS program.
For example, I have a Gen 2 Glock 17 that has so far
fired more than 365,000 rounds of assorted ammo, been
subjected to 29 years of phenomenal abuse (including six
months’ submergence in the Pacific Ocean) and is still
quite functional. The P-320, on the other hand, has only
been on the scene for a couple of years; its toughness and
longevity remain to be proven.
www.gunworld.com
I solved this problem by installing a new Zev Industries
3.5-pound connector in the Glock (bringing its pull down
to a crisp 4.5 pounds) and one of the new Gray Guns
trigger kits in the P-320. This kit claims to reduce the
P-320’s trigger pull by 2 to 2.25 pounds. Mine ended up
being a clean 4.25 pounds. Both guns were then capable of
performing to their best potential.
I also noted that the P-320 was muzzle heavy, even with
a fully loaded 17-round magazine in it, and that it had
considerable slide mass well above the shooting hand. Still, I
thought that perhaps its muzzle heaviness would aid in highspeed controllability. Unfortunately, this premise turned out
to be incorrect.
The CTASAA Handgun Combat Master Qualification course is
very tough and has long been known to bring out not only
errors in operator gun-handling and shooting technique, but
the design deficiencies of the weapon used, as well. I’ve
long used it to analyze and evaluate handguns; and, without
question, in that role, it has been exceptionally effective. It
consists of 11 stages and includes virtually all the relevant
gun-handling and combat shooting skills. (For information
on the CTASAA HCM Qualification Course, check out www.
ChuckTaylorAmericanSmallArmsAcademy.com.)
JULY I 2017
Each of the guns
has a large, easily
accessed magazine
well with provision to
easily remove a stuck
magazine or one that
fails to fall free when the
magazine release button
is pressed.
Both guns feature a
heavy-duty extractor
relieved ejection por
enhanced operation w
a wide variety of bull
designs. However, the
P-320/M-17 features
ambidextrous slide lo
lever, which the Gloc
does not.
With a factory 20-pound recoil spring, the P-320 repeatedly had type 2 (failure
to eject) malfunctions with lightweight bullets or lighter-loaded 115-grain FMJ
factory loads. Subsequent installation of a 15-pound spring/guide rod unit from
Gray Guns corrected the problem. The weapon then functioned normally.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
THE RESULTS
When the smoke cleared, and both guns had finished the
qualification course, the Glock’s score exceeded the 90
percent (360 points) threshold needed to qualify—compared
to a score of 84 percent (338 points) for the P-320.
The P-320’s muzzle heaviness didn’t aid in reducing muzzle lip.
During high-speed, multiple-shot sequences, it was noticeably
greater than the Glock, and its tendency to point low without
“cocking” the iring wrist upward to compensate hindered fast
sight acquisition. At the super-fast time levels of the CTASAA
HCM Qual, these tendencies were a deinite handicap. The
Glock suffered no such issues, allowing faster sight acquisition
and more of each available timeframe to be spent actually
shooting. It “lipped” far less with each shot ired. This was
more than proven by its 93.5 percent (374 points) score.
SIG P-320 vs. Glock G17 Gen4
CTASAA Handgun Combat Master Qualiication Course
The magazine release
buttons of both guns are
well located and easy to
operate under stress. The
sides of the grip frame of
both guns are also well
textured for better grip
with wet hands.
STAGE
P-320
G17
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
68
25
63
33
26
41
30
50
OK
OK
OK
76
25
75
37
34
45
30
50
OK
OK
OK
Standard exercises
Presentation evaluation
Responses L, R and rear
Small targets
Hostage situations
Multiple targets
Ambidextrous shooting
Targets at odd angles
Speed reloads
Tactical reloads
Malfunctions, type 1, 2, 3
TOTALS:
SPECIFICATIONS
374/93.5%
AMMUNITION:
Federal American Eagle 9mm 124-grain FMJ
WEATHER CONDITIONS: Excellent
(clear and sunny; sun behind shooter; calm)
ELEVATION: 1,312 feet above sea level
TEMPERATURE: 72 degrees (F)
HUMIDITY: 28%
CALIBER: 9x19mm
WEIGHT: 29.4 ounces (empty)
LENGTH: 8.0 inches
BARREL LENGTH: 4.7 inches
WIDTH: 1.4 inches
HEIGHT: 5.5 inches
ACTION: Striker-ired, DAO
MAGAZINE CAPACITY: 17/21 rounds
SIGHTS: Fixed; blade front with white dot or tritium
insert; notch rear with white dots or tritium inserts
MANUAL SAFETY: Yes; optional ambidextrous
MODULAR CAPACITY: Yes; the modular
trigger group can be swapped out into various grip frame
conigurations and caliber conversions.
OPTICAL SIGHT CAPABILITY:
Optional for commercial; integral to XM-17 military variant
NOTES: The P-320’s muzzle lip was noticeably greater
than that of the Gen4 Glock 17. Performance was
signiicantly affected on all stages for which fast, twoshot strings were required.
Having said this, I must also suggest that at less than
HCM speeds, these issues wouldn’t be as serious. In fact,
at the basic or intermediate levels, they wouldn’t even be
apparent. Only at the advanced or master level do they exert
such serious influence.
The front straps of both
guns are textured to
allow better grip under
stress or when wet.
SPECIFICATIONS
336/84%
CALIBER: 9x19mm
WEIGHT: 25.06 ounces
LENGTH: 7.95 inches
BARREL LENGTH: 4.48 inches
WIDTH: 1.18 inches
HEIGHT: 5.43 inches
ACTION: striker-ired, DAO
MAGAZINE CAPACITY: 17 rounds
SIGHTS: Fixed; blade front with white dot or tritium
insert; notch outline rear with white outline or tritium dots
MODULAR CAPACITY: Yes; four variablesized backstrap panels
OPTICAL SIGHT CAPABILITY:
Yes: Available commercially on MOS model; probably
integral on MHS-submitted version. (Conirmation
unavailable at this time due to lack of data release by the
U.S. Army)
www.gunworld.com
So, am I saying that the P-320/M-17 is an unsatisfactory
gun for military adoption? No, I am not, because
performance, alone, isn’t the only criterion involved
here. Remember that the MHS project’s original criteria
stipulated that the gun selected had to outperform the
M-9/M-92SF in every respect.
Both the Glock and the P-320 easily satisfy that
requirement, and the SIG’s low unit price and, in theory at
least, its superior “modularity” gives the Army just what it
wants. As a result, it’s easy to see why SIG Sauer walked
away with the contract.
Simply put: In business parlance, that’s called “the art of
the deal,” so congratulations to SIG for its win. And let’s
not forget that part of that win is the fact that American
soldiers will have a better handgun than they’ve had for the
past 30-odd years.
JULY I 2017
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY GARRETT LUCAS
HAIL TO THE
EIGHT-SHOOTER!
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
RUGER’S NEW REDHAWK
UPS THE ANTE IN REVOLVER
CAPACITY.
E
ven with the advent of semiautomatic pistols,
there are those who still view the .357 Magnum
revolver as the king of the streets.
Sure, there are more-powerful revolvers, but
when considering felt recoil and the ability to obtain fast
follow-up shots, the power of those larger calibers is
negated by increased recoil—unless you’re a master of
big-bore magnums.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
Understanding this, Ruger decided to up the ante with
capacity, instead of caliber, with the latest “snub-nose”
addition to the Redhawk family. More specifically: Ruger
took the larger-framed revolver, reduced the caliber size to
.357 Magnum and then increased the cylinder capacity by
33 percent to eight cartridges, instead of six.
TALES OF THE REDHAWK
Production of the original Redhawk began in 1979, and its
design intent was to create a revolver that could stand up to
the pressures of big-bore rounds such as the .44 Magnum.
Borrowing from the design of the Security-Six, the new Ruger
Redhawk had a one-piece frame that made it much stronger
than similar offerings on the market.
Practicing at the range
using the moon clips
helped speed up the
loading process and
started building muscle
memory for quicker
reloads in the future.
THE NEW MEMBER OF THE FAMILY
Ruger’s newest .357 Magnum Redhawk is almost identical
to the Talo Distributor Exclusive Redhawk that’s currently
being offered in .44 Magnum. The only real differences are
the caliber, the non-fluted cylinder and the fact that this latest
Redhawk bears a capacity of eight rounds.
Although the Redhawk was initially designed for the .44
Magnum in two barrel lengths (5.5 and 7.5 inches), over the
years, the Redhawk line has been offered in .45 Colt, .357
Magnum, .41 Magnum and even .45 ACP. Additionally, Ruger
later offered more barrel lengths, including 4 inches, 4.2
inches and, as seen with this new iteration, 2.75 inches.
While the Redhawk was previously chambered for the .357
Magnum load, those early samples were six-shooters.
And because the smaller caliber required less metal to be
removed from the cylinder and barrel, the .357 offerings were
substantially heavier than their big-bore siblings.
Throughout its storied history, the Ruger Redhawk received
much praise for its strength and durability, along with its
accuracy. In fact, the cylinder on the Ruger Redhawk is
slightly longer than other brands’ large-framed cylinders,
which allow boutique ammunition companies (Buffalo Bore
and Garrett Cartridges, for instance) to create more-powerful
loads for rounds such as the .44 Magnum.
Like the Talo Model, the .357 Magnum Redhawk weighs 44
ounces, has a 2.75-inch barrel and has an overall length of
8.25 inches. The sight system also includes the red-ramp
front sight and an adjustable rear sight with a white outline.
The Ruger Redhawk
has clean lines, a nice
inish and packs 33
percent more irepower
than the standard sixshooter.
www.gunworld.com
The eight-shot Redhawk comes in a satin stainless finish
and offers rounded hardwood grips for more concealability.
The bonus with this model is that the cylinder is relief-cut to
accept full-moon clips for faster reloading.
The average DA trigger pull was a manageable 10.75 pounds,
with an SA pull of 7 pounds. The SA pull was quite a bit heavier
JULY I 2017
New for 2017 is Ruger’s
.357 Magnum Redhawk,
which offers an
eight-shot cylinder in a
compact proile.
A hallmark of Ruger’s
robust build quality is
the extra-beefy steel
frame, including the
reinforced top strap.
IN TYPICAL RUGER
FASHION, IT’S A
FIREARM YOU CAN
DEPEND ON …
The eight-shot cylinder
is wide—1.78 inches,
to be exact—making
concealed carry a
challenge for some
body types.
The sight system on
the Ruger Redhawk
is a ramp front sight
with red insert and an
adjustable rear sight
with a white outline.
The compact Redhawk
comes dressed with
slim, hardwood grips.
JULY I 20
There was no time to lose; I got right down to the fun part and
started blasting away. SIG Sauer provided its 125-grain Elite
ball ammunition for general practice, so I started out with it and
ran two boxes of it through the Redhawk at various distances
to get acclimated to the revolver and get a feel for any issues.
The Redhawk’s eightshot cylinder is cut for
the use of moon clips
for faster reloading.
The accuracy of the Redhawk firing the SIG loads offhand was
very good, although I noticed a bit of an issue cropping up
after about 30 rounds: The wood grips are designed to allow
the Redhawk to roll in the hand a bit so the recoil doesn’t
stove up the shooter’s hand. In my case, those smooth grips
were letting the revolver roll too much.
This resulted in the squared-off top of the back strap—where
it mates up with the left grip panel—slamming back into the
webbing of my thumb at the bottom knuckle. At the time, it
wasn’t a huge problem, but I did notice it. This is the difference
between slim wood grips and recoil-absorbing rubber grips.
As mentioned, the cylinder is relief-cut to allow the use of fullmoon clips, and Ruger includes three in the box with the Redhawk.
I made good use of these during my drill sessions at the range.
Obviously, it’s not as quick to charge a revolver with moon clips
as it is a pistol with magazines, but with a little practice, it’s
much better than reloading by hand. With hundreds to thousands
of repetitions to develop appropriate muscle memory, you can
do it extremely fast—and blindfolded, as well (although the
shooting part will require removing the blindfold!).
ACCURACY TRIALS
than I expected, although it was a crisp break with no discernible
pre-travel. The trigger pull in both cases was very smooth, even
though I would have preferred a lighter single-action pull.
Despite its more “compact” profile in comparison to standard
Redhawks, Ruger’s latest copy is still a hefty little beast. As
mentioned, it weighs 44 ounces, which is just a little more
than a standard, full-sized 1911. Also, including the cylinder,
the eight-shot marvel is 1.78 inches wide, so if you’re going to
make this your concealed-carry piece, you will have to really
want the two extra rounds. I’m a big guy and could make it
work, but a robust platform (i.e., a belt and holster) would
be needed to keep this revolver secure and stable for any
extended period of time.
Three moon clips
come in the box with
the Redhawk. They
dramatically increase
the speed of reloads,
especially after
extensive practice.
After getting through the preliminary shooting, it was time
to do some accuracy testing. Fortunately, there was a good
variety of premium ammunition on hand. The loads used
for accuracy testing included SIG’s 125-grain Elite V-Crown,
THE REDHAWK’S LANDING
Out of the box, the Redhawk impressed me positively
overall. The compact grip doesn’t provide much to hang
onto, considering the gun’s forward-heavy bias. But, that’s
to be expected, given that the revolver is made to be more
concealable—even with its large frame. One thing I wasn’t
really prepared for was the very smooth hardwood grips.
They seemed to slip around in the hand a bit, even just
handling the firearm.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
Winchester’s PDX1 loads, Buffalo Bore’s 125-grain J.H.C.,
Hornady’s 158-grain XTP and Double-Tap Ammunition’s
200-grain Hard-Cast rounds.
Despite the shorter sight radius of the 2.75-inch barrel, the
accuracy testing was done from at 15 yards from a standing
rest. The .357 Magnum Redhawk is built for maximum
concealment for its size, but it can still do double duty on the
trail, so it was worth keeping the distance at 15 yards and
putting some heavier loads into the mix, as well.
The accuracy results were very consistent between the lighter
and heavier loads. The average group size ranged from 2.02
inches to 2.33 inches. The best group size was with Buffalo
Bore’s 125-grain J.H.C. load, coming in at 1.50 inches; but
the best average for three groups was obtained by Hornady’s
158-grain XTP load, with an average of 1.94 inches.
While the ramp front sight with red insert has been around for
a while and is used by a few companies for their revolvers, I
much prefer the fiber-optic sights, such as the one that was
on the Ruger .44 Special GP100 I recently reviewed. It allowed
for more-precise shots—and that’s especially important on a
handgun with just a 2.75-inch barrel.
A sample of the ammo
that was tested—some
premium loads from
SIG Sauer, Hornady and
Winchester that were
tried with the Redhawk
during the accuracy
session and that will
serve well as defensive
loads
taking a toll when I was shooting the 158- and 200-grain
loads. Even the extra-spicy 125-grain Buffalo Bore loads were
making the Redhawk hammer home.
But the harsher recoil results happened while I shot from the
rest, where the hand and arms don’t give as much as they do
when shooting offhand. For most people, shooting from a rest
isn’t going to be a common activity, so it’s not really going to
be an issue. Plus, I passed it around to a few shooters, none
of whom had an issue with it. It could simply be the size or
shape of my hand.
While firing from the rest, the top of the back strap beat
against my thumb as if that was its job. Geez! It really started
Rough Rider Series
Rough Rider rimfire revolvers are authentically
crafted and made in the USA. They are
available in six and nine-shot options
in .22 LR and .22 Mag. Big Bore
offerings include .357 Mag
and .45 LC.
STARTING AT: $199 MSRP
See our complete line of revolvers and accessories at:
WWW.HERITAGEMFG.COM
THE LAY OF THE LAND
With the newest addition to the Redhawk family, Ruger
replicates all the factors it has become known for in the
first place. The Redhawk is built Hell-for-stout, is accurate,
and has a great finish and a beautiful set of grips to make it
stand out in a crowd. The MSRP of $1,079 isn’t exactly chump
change, but you do get a lot of bang for your buck.
Velocity (fps)
Ammunition
Even so, it’s still a bit of a niche gun. First, it’s a large-framed
revolver originally designed for the .44 Magnum. However,
both the grip and the 2.75-inch barrel are designed to work for
concealed carry. If concealed carry is a consideration, there’s
only a certain segment of the population that can make it work.
The user will need to have a large enough body frame to carry it
off—and even then, it will only work with the right gear.
Accuracy (inches)
Average
Best
SIG Sauer 125-grain Elite V-Crown
1,382
2.25
2.00
Hornady 158-grain XTP
1,198
1.94
1.69
Buffalo Bore 125-grain J.H.C.
1,473
2.02
1.50
Winchester 125-grain PDX1
1,190
2.33
1.75
Double Tap 200-grain Hard Cast
1,166
2.09
1.63
NOTE: Bullet weight was measured in grains, velocity in feet per
second 15 feet from the muzzle by a Competition Electronics
ProChrono Digital Chronograph, and accuracy in inches for three
five-shot groups at 15 yards.
If concealed carry isn’t a concern, and hefting the 44 ounces
all day isn’t a problem, have at it! It would make a great field
gun or open-carry piece that’s fairly unobtrusive, despite the
amount of firepower at the user’s disposal. In addition, having
an eight-shot .357 Magnum revolver is a nice step up from the
standard six-shooter.
THE REDHAWK IS BUILT
HELL-FOR-STOUT, IS
ACCURATE, AND HAS A GREAT
FINISH AND A BEAUTIFUL
SET OF GRIPS TO MAKE IT
STAND OUT IN A CROWD.
The simplicity of a
revolver for selfdefense makes using
one almost intuitive for
the novice shooter.
SPECIFICATIONS
ACTION: DA/SA revolver
CALIBER: .357 Magnum
FINISH: Satin stainless steel
GRIP: Hardwood
FRONT SIGHT: Ramp with red insert
REAR SIGHT: Fully adjustable, white outline
BARREL LENGTH: 2.75 inches
OVERALL LENGTH: 8.25 inches
WEIGHT: 44 ounces
CAPACITY: 8 rounds
TWIST: 1:18.75 inches, RH
MSRP: $1,079
This 1.5-inch group
was the best of the
accuracy trials and was
obtained using Buffalo
Bore’s 125-grain J.H.C.
load.
There’s a lot to like about the new .357 Magnum Redhawk,
and if its design criteria meet your specific needs, I’d heartily
recommend picking one up when it’s available.
CONTACT INFORMATION
STURM, RUGER & CO.
(603) 865-2442
www.Ruger-Firearms.com
In typical Ruger fashion, it’s a firearm you can depend on, and
it will be around for generations to come.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY BRAD FITZPATRICK
FIREARMS FOR COMPETITION,
HUNTING AND PERSONAL DEFENSE
GET A LOT OF ATTENTION. OTHERS
JUST BEG TO BE TAKEN OUT FOR
A LEISURELY AFTERNOON ON THE
RANGE.
S
ome firearms serve very specific functions. It
might be the compact carry pistol that rides on
your hip each day that you’re counting on to save
your life in the worst circumstances. Other guns
are built strictly for competitive shooting. That
might be a highly tuned, long-range chassis rile or a purposebuilt trap gun with a high rib and adjustable comb.
But other guns, while useful for a variety of real-world
applications, are just plain fun. They’re affordable to shoot,
easy to carry and put a smile on your face each time you pull
the trigger. I like to print tight groups at a quarter-mile as
much as anyone, but sometimes, I also want to toss a pop
bottle downrange and make it dance.
Here’s a nod to 10 of my favorite fun guns—the firearms I
go to when a little leisure time on the range is called for. You
might have your own list of such guns, and it might look very
different than mine, but if you need a break from the office
or simply want to ventilate last year’s rotting jack-o’-lantern,
these are my weapons-of-choice.
RUGER 10/22
There’s no better place to start a fun guns discussion than with
the 10/22. Bill Ruger’s archetype fun gun utilizes a blowback
action that has withstood decades of abuse. It’s affordable to
buy and shoot, and even the most basic versions come with an
excellent trigger, reliable action and clever rotary magazine and
are capable of superb accuracy.
Plus, if you want to dress up your 10/22, there are buckets of
aftermarket accessories—from target stocks and barrels to extended
magazines, drop-in triggers and much more. As far as factory options
go, I like the Takedown Lite. It features a cold hammer-forged barrel
with alloy barrel sleeve, a threaded muzzle and adjustable stock
inserts. It can easily be broken down to it in a compact carry bag.
MSRP: $309–$339
Bill Ruger knew a thing or two about fun guns.
After all, he gave us the 10/22, one of the
most fun guns of all time. Modern 10/22s are
available in a wide range of conigurations, and
there are plenty of aftermarket accessories to
customize your Ruger.
Do fun guns have to be accurate?
No, but it helps. Guns such as the
Ruger 10/22 are both fun to shoot
and extremely accurate, so no
gun collection is really complete
without one.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
RUGER MARK IV
BROWNING BUCKMARK
SMITH & WESSON VICTORY
I’m cheating by listing three guns here, and I understand that.
But these three semiauto blowback .22 pistols are all so much
fun that they deserve a shout.
In terms of design, they’re similar in the most basic sense, but
they all have their nuances. I have my personal connection
to each: I’ve found the Ruger to be the most accurate of the
bunch; I love the cool configurations and ergonomics of the
Browning; and the S&W is affordable and easy to customize.
Regardless of the maker, these three guns offer a lot of low-cost
shooting fun, and you’ll be astounded by how accurate they can be.
Ruger’s Mark I/II/III/IV pistols are extremely reliable (a key ingredient to any fun gun) and
superbly accurate. The new Mark IV has an added advantage the previous-gen pistols don’t: onebutton disassembly for trouble-free cleaning. (Photo: Veronica Gettinger)
Browning’s Buckmark .22 is another classic blowback semiauto rimire that is available in a wide
range of conigurations. Build quality is high, as is the fun quotient when you’re shooting this gun.
MSRPs: Ruger: $409–$799; Browning: $389–$599;
Smith & Wesson: $409
Accurate guns
are fun to shoot,
and the Smith &
Wesson Victory
is certainly
accurate.
In addition,
it’s easy to
disassemble for
basic cleaning.
And if these
groups aren’t
tight enough
for you, there
are aftermarket
barrel options
that will shrink
things even more.
AR
ARs are fun to shoot in all their forms.
Despite being the whipping boy of the
media, the AR is reliable, accurate, safe
and loads of fun at the range, whether
your target is at 50 yards or 500.
The whole bunch are fun! Some are better
than others, and some have high-end
furniture. Some have pistons, some offer
gas impingement systems. But at the end
of the day, all ARs are fun to shoot. That’s
part of the reason for their sudden boost in
popularity.
Sure, you can hunt with them; and sure,
they make great home-defense guns; and
they can help you win shooting matches.
However, digging into a canister of budget
5.56 ammo and ringing steel or punching
paper with an AR is all sorts of fun. You
can shoot them at close range, shoot them
at long range and, with scant recoil, even
new shooters can quickly master the AR.
(Just don’t forget your ear protection.)
MSRPs: $599 and up
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
UBERTI 1873 RIFLE/CARBINE
The Uberti ’73 is a nod to the rifle that was popular among early
western American ranchers, hunters, lawmen and outlaws.
There’s no mistaking the stylish proile of these guns
(some say there hasn’t been a more beautiful rifle
crafted since), and in an era when many shooters were
still loading up black-powder guns, the ’73 was quite a
weapon. Even though other designs have come along and
eclipsed it, getting behind a ’73 rifle or carbine is a treat.
With pistol-caliber cartridges, the recoil is minimal, and
you can run through a whole case of ammo pretty quickly
once you start working that lever and sending hot brass
whirling through the air.
Fun guns don’t need a practical task to justify their
existence, but the ’73 in all its forms (Uberti offers nine)
is still darned effective for keeping two- and four-legged
predators away from camp.
MSRP: $1,219–$1,499
Uberti’s clone of the Winchester ’73 puts the “fun” in functional. Sure, it works just ine for home-defense, and yes, you can hunt hogs and small game with this rifle or compete in SASS
matches. But you really don’t need a reason to take this rifle to the range … it’s just fun to shoot.
TAURUS JUDGE
When the Judge broke cover just
over a decade ago, there were a lot
of shooters scratching their heads. The naysayers brushed off
the design, but within a few years, they went from crying,
“Gimmick!” to saying, “Gimme!”
The Judge, for those of you unfamiliar with Taurus’ most
groundbreaking firearm, is a double-action revolver that fires
both .45 Colt pistol cartridges and .410 shotshells.
The Judge’s size precludes it from concealed-carry duties,
but that heft makes it very comfortable to shoot at the
range, where you can obliterate watermelons, pumpkins and
cantaloupes with your choice of loads. I’ve tried to break
hand-thrown clay targets with this gun—with varying (okay,
low) levels of success—using .410 shells, but it’s a safe bet
that sometime this summer, I’ll be trying once again.
(There’s also a .454 Casull version of this boomer,
which seems cool, but I’m not including the .454
on any list of guns I consider “fun” to shoot.)
MSRP: $514–$1,037
Shooting the Judge, especially with .410 loads, is lots of fun. Recoil is
manageable, and trying to break clay targets with a shotgun presents a
whole new challenge.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
The Marlin 39A is a
timeless classic and
one of Fitzpatrick’s
favorite fun guns.
These sleek, little lever
actions are perfect
for popping tin cans
and punching holes in
paper. Lever actions
are timeless, and
while they might not
dominate the hunting
ield as they once did,
they are still tons of fun
to shoot.
MARLIN 39
HENRY GOLDEN BOY .22
Recoil isn’t worth mentioning, and with high tube capacities,
you can shoot and shoot and shoot before reloading, especially
with .22 shorts.
MSRPs: Used Marlins: about $350 and up (the 39A is not
currently in production, but there’s hope the company will
revive it … fingers crossed); Henry: $550–$610
I’m cheating again, and I get that. Don’t care.
The Henry and Marlin are two of my go-to guns for a fun
day of shooting. They differ slightly in design: The 39 has
that unmistakable Marlin profile, and the Golden Boy has a
characteristic brass receiver. But ultimately, these two rimfire
lever guns operate in much the same manner.
And man, are they fun to shoot! A box of .22s (scratch that—a
case), a few soda bottles and cans, and maybe a bag of halfrotten apples will provide hours of shooting fun.
The classic Marlin 39,
shown here at the top,
and Henry’s Golden
Boy are both guns that
easily earn a spot on
the author’s list of fun
guns.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
REMINGTON 572
I will go to my grave singing the praises of the 572—the gun I
consider to be the most underrated in Remington’s line.
Yes, it’s a pump .22; and yes, those dropped in popularity
sometime after the days of traveling carnivals with shooting
galleries. But I don’t care. When you actually get behind one
of these guns, you’ll be impressed with what it has to offer: a
nice stock, sleek design, decent trigger and a crossbolt safety,
among other things.
However, the sights are one of this gun’s greatest features.
Unlike some other rimfire manufacturers that try to skate
by with subpar irons, the 572 gets real-gun sights. They’re
sturdy, easy to use and easy to adjust. And once you get the
hang of shucking and shooting, it’s possible to shoot this gun
very accurately and very quickly.
MSRP: $723
.22 rimires are fun to shoot, but
few guns are more deserving
of the “fun gun” title than
Remington’s underrated 572. It
offers high-quality iron sights, a
smooth action and is extremely
accurate.
COLT NEW FRONTIER
Some of you are probably already shaking
your fist at me for not including the Single
Action Army. However, I consider this gun and
the SAA close kin, so I think they both fit.
The New Frontier is a single-action revolver—
the flattop target version of the original SAA.
It’s chambered in .44 Special and .45 Colt, two
big revolver cartridges that don’t have the
painful recoil of Magnum loads.
The New Frontier is undoubtedly a formidable
weapon, but it’s also loads of fun to shoot. The
adjustable sights are accurate, and the fit and
finish on current guns are superb—so much
so that you’ll need to stop admiring it long
enough to shoot it.
And if you happen to buy one in .45 Colt, you
might as well just go ahead and get the Uberti
1873 in .45, too. Makes sense to me.
MSRP: $1,599
If you are a history buff, just holding
a Colt single action is enough to make
you long for the old days. When it comes
to wheelguns, double-action rules the
modern marketplace. Nevertheless, there
should always be room in your safe for a
gun like this.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
HARP-TAIL
ns are often modern takes on historical
and while I am a fan of classically styled
side shotguns, I don’t have the desire to pay
mium for a new Italian or German double.
arp-Tail by CZ is a good-looking, smoothg double gun that’s available in a variety of
rings (12, 20 and 28 gauge and .410) that
d for everything from hunting to backyard
get-breaking.
I shot was a 28 gauge—a svelte, light little
could easily tote on afternoon walks through
irrel woods. (And it looked great in pictures!)
just something special about breaking the
and dropping two shells into a good-looking
gun that brings a smile to your face.
$1,022–$1,299
Classic side-by-sides are beautiful guns,
and they are fun to shoot. CZ’s Sharp-Tail
is a well-constructed side-by-side that
will look good above the mantle … but
it begs to be carried to the range or ield.
BEYOND MAINSTREAM.
www.gunworld.com
THE FUN RANGE
You probably have a bunch of free targets in your home in the form of
empty milk jugs and an avocado no one is ever really going to eat. So,
why would you spend money on a target range?
Good question. While I’m a frugal backyard shooter, I did spend the
$15 bucks required to own the Right Now Range, a clever target
system made of heavy cardboard that offers a wide array of targets
and target stands.
There is a shelf for shooting apples and grapefruits (and avocados—
if you never really made the guacamole you intended to), along with
cutouts in the top that hold 108mm (standard) clay targets.
There are also hanging toggles
that support the most popular of all
rimire targets: the aluminum can.
Best of all … when the shooting
is over, there isn’t a giant mess to
clean up.
MSRP: $15
732.493.0333
|
JULY I 2017
eagleimportsinc.com
CONTACT INFORMATION
… SOME GUNS JUST
BEG TO BE TAKEN
OUT FOR A LEISURELY
AFTERNOON ON THE
RANGE.
BROWNING ARMS COMPANY
www.Browning.com
COLT’S MANUFACTURING COMPANY
www.Colt.com
CZ-USA
www.CZ-USA.com
HENRY REPEATING ARMS
www.HenryUSA.com
MOSSBERG BLAZE-47
MARLIN FIREARMS CO.
www.MarlinFirearms.com
If shooting this gun doesn’t make you smile, check your pulse.
O.F. MOSSBERG & SONS
www.Mossberg.com
The light, AK-ish Blaze-47 (also called the “Blaze-Nikov” by
the clever marketing team at Mossberg) is a blowback .22
rimfire dressed in wolf’s clothing. Even so, it’s comfortable to
shoot, affordable to own, has great fiber-optic sights and is
surprisingly accurate.
REMINGTON ARMS
www.Remington.com
RIGHT NOW RANGE
www.RightNowRange.com
No, you probably won’t see a lot of them in the squirrel woods,
but the one I own is called upon regularly when there is a gang
of apples sitting on the nearby fenceposts and they all look ...
well, rotten to the core.
STURM, RUGER & CO.
www.Ruger.com
SMITH & WESSON
www.Smith-Wesson.com
TAURUS INTERNATIONAL MFG., INC.
www.TaurusUSA.com
Despite its look, the Blaze-47 is a very light gun, and kids will
have a great time with this rifle.
UBERTI USA
www.UbertiUSA.com
MSRP: $408
Based on the Blaze .22
action, the Mossberg
Blaze-47 looks and feels
like an AK but shoots
like a rimire. Plus, it’s
affordably priced.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY FRANK JARDIM
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
THE FIRST AND ONLY
NO-LUBE AR
ANDERSON MANUFACTURING
TAKES THE CLASSIC PLATFORM W
hen I first heard that Anderson made
an AR that never needed lubrication,
my immediate thought was, I’ve got to
see this!
TO THE TOP RUNG.
www.gunworld.com
After all, everybody knows an AR won’t run unless it’s
lubricated, right? Whether it’s CLP, cooking oil or some
fabulously expensive “propriety” blend, traditional wisdom
from decades of use dictates you keep your upper receiver and
bolt carrier group wet with lube if you want to avoid stoppages.
JULY I 2017
The rile comes with a nice Anderson tactical sling.
That was the gospel truth until Anderson became the new
prophet of the AR. Based on my background research and
testing, I am convinced its claims are completely true.
A NEW PARADIGM
The Anderson RF85-treated rifle will change the way you look
at ARs. In addition to running bone, desert-with-blowingtumbleweed dry, it also runs faster (23 percent faster in
government laboratory tests), and it cleans up in a third of the
time needed for a standard AR.
In my opinion, the RF85 treatment is the most important
development for the AR platform in 50 years. It is much more
significant than the evolution of piston-driven guns.
Whereas the gas piston was a workaround for the AR’s original
dirty and hot direct-impingement (DI) system, the lubricity of
the RF85 treatment makes a traditional DI rile run cleaner and
cooler than Eugene Stoner could have dreamed of, because it
has no oily lubricant to attract dirt and clog up the moving parts.
Don’t try this at home
without checking to see
that your wife is not
around. As long as you
aren’t caught in the act,
she will never know,
because no solvents are
needed.
SOAP AND WATER CLEANUP?
Cleaning Anderson’s RF85-treated rile is not the laborious ordeal
associated with cleaning an ordinary AR. With sustained shooting
and no cleaning, yes, you’ll still build up thick carbon fouling
in the usual places (the back of the bolt head area, under the
extractor claw, etc.) that has to be scratched and scraped off with
www.gunworld.com
pointy metal instruments. However, the rest of it cleans up with
soapy water and a toothbrush. Lacking that, just plain water will
remove the majority of the carbon residue.
In a regular AR, the carbon fouling and oil get baked into a varnish
that’s hard to remove—not unlike what happens inside your car
engine. Because the RF85-treated rile runs dry, the carbon
fouling stays dry, too, and wipes off the metal more easily.
You don’t even need to use solvent inside the barrel. It’s more
like brushing soot out of your chimney than what we traditionally
JULY I 2017
MaxArmory.com
WE SHIP
WORLDWIDE
Dealer
Inquiry
Welcomed
60+ Page Catalog Free to Download ■ maxarmory.com/catalog
R1 2.5 STARTER REVOLVER
MILITARY STARTER GUNS
No license required ■ !
All of our replicas are perfect for safe training,
reenactments, films, and canine training.
Used by many military and police organizations
for realistic training scenarios.
M906 ZORAKI STARTER GUN
SRP $169
SRP $189
$
$
99+s/h
95+s/h
■ Capacity: 6 Rds
■ Length: 5.5”
■ Caliber: 9mm PA
■ Capacity: 6 Rds
■ Length: 7.3”
■ Caliber: .380 or 9mm
FLAMES ■ RECOILS ■ EJECTS ■ LOUD 9MM FRONT FIRING ■ TOP FIRING
SEMI/FULL AUTO MACHINE GUN POLICE DOG TRAINER
DOES NOT COMPROMISE ANY SOUND
AND IS AS LOUD AS LIVE FIRE GUNS
ASI UZI BLANK MACHINE GUN W/ FAKE SUPPRESSOR
FOLDING SHOULDER STOCK INCLUDED
SR
SRP $459
$
9
$
375+s/h
■ Capacity: 15 & 25 Rds
■ Length: 13.6” (Base)
INCLUDES 15 & 25 RD MAGAZINE
■ Caliber: 9mm PA
FREE 150 ROUNDS
OF 9MM PA AMMO
■C
■L
■C
BLANK AMMO IN STOCK ■ 9MM PA ■ 8MM ■ .380 ■ BOD
Armorquick Includes Front Armor.
Back Panel Available (Add $100).
POLICE QUALITY BADGES
Includes FREE ID Badge Case 5,000 badges in stock
"
an Agent
SRP $79
Mon-Friday 9-5
$
39 +s/h
2.5” x 1.75”
SRP $499
$
SRP $79
+s/h
$
49+s/h
&%$ "! !
HR218
3” x 2”
SRP $59
Military Issue
And Civilian Models
$
3 Colors Available
3” x 2”
39+s/h
#■ Black ■ Coyote
POLICE TACTICAL
55,000,000 STUN FLASHLIGHT
LED Flashlight ■ Warranty 5 Years
RETIRED POLICE
ALSO AVAILABLE
MX-101
435-CHP
SRP $69
INSTANT TAKEDOWN
Rechargeable ■ ! $
38+s/h
Se Habla Espanol y Portugese ■ Military & Civilian C
MAXSELL CORPORATION ■ MAXARMORY.COM ■ 1-877-332-2343 ■ 6601 LYONS RD STE D1
REEK, FL 33073
Anderson’s Ambi Latch
charging handle
National Laboratory to evaluate the RF85-treated rile. Highspeed cameras documented the dry rile’s bolt cycling at 23
percent faster than that of an ordinary lubricated rile.
WHAT IS “RF85”?
The name, “RF85,” originates from this treatment’s ability to
reduce surface friction between steel components by 85 percent.
(If both parts are treated with RF85, the friction is reduced even
more.) It is nanotechnology of the molecular-scale (super-duper
small) engineering type, rather than the science iction (tiny,
self-replicating robot) kind. The treatment involves soaking the
riles for a period of time in a patented, heated, chemical bath
containing certain calcium and carbon molecules. The calcium
molecules attach themselves to the metal’s surface—but not
in the mechanical manner of a coating (such as Duracoat or
Cerakote) or a plating (such as hard chrome or nickel boron).
think of as “cleaning” a rile. In fact, you could easily clean the
RF85-treated rile in the bathroom while you shower, with no
stinky solvent to aggravate your domestic circumstances. Two
important cautions related to that: Don’t drop the bolt carrier
group on your foot (this hurts much more than a new bar of
soap), and thoroughly dry the rile after cleaning it.
Calcium molecules in the RF85 become part of the metal,
Itself, by forming a strong ionic bond with all the metal, deeply
penetrating its pores to create an ultra-thin, permanent outer
layer. The test reports from Oak Ridge National Laboratory
showed that the RF85 wouldn’t chip or lake off. You can’t even
see it with the naked eye. When subjected to pressure and heat
(for instance, friction), the calcium molecules elongate and act
as a lubricant. You never have to lubricate an RF85-treated rile,
because it makes the surface of the metal into a lubricant. The
amazing thing is that the RF85 doesn’t appear to wear off the
metal it’s applied to, even though surface inish does.
Anderson says solvents don’t harm the RF85 but that they aren’t
needed for cleaning. There’s no need to carry oil or cleaning
solvent aield anymore. You can clean this rile in a stream.
After running 2,000 rounds of various Federal ammunition
through the test rile, I got it washed up in 10 minutes
(excluding the ive minutes I pre-soaked the bolt carrier group
in a plastic coffee can of hot soapy dishwater). After a good
tooth-brushing, everything rinsed off except the thick, cookedon carbon previously mentioned. It’s like cleaning a black
powder rile without the smell. One old black powder cleaning
trick I employed was to rinse with near-scalding water from the
tap, because the hot water evaporates quicker off the hot metal.
According to Anderson, the RF85-treated rile passed 160 hours
in a salt spray test for corrosion. That result is equivalent to
chrome, but Anderson doesn’t advertise RF85 as a rust inhibitor.
In fact, although it’s as good or better than the typical anodized
and parkerized rile inish, Anderson recommends you make
sure it’s dry before putting it back together.
Using my air compressor, I blew all the water from the rifle’s
nooks and crannies in about a minute. (I got finished cleaning
this rifle so quickly, I had to lay low for the rest of the day to
avoid getting saddled with a load of household chores.)
THE ONE AND ONLY
An RF85-treated rile
receiver will be engraved
as such. Anderson
makes both standard and
lubeless riles.
The broader commercial implications of the RF85 process
are a lot bigger than the gun industry. This is the stuff that
billionaires are made of. The company that owns the RF85
technology is called Better Than New, LLC (BTN). Anderson
advertises that it has a proprietary agreement with that
company regarding the firearms applications of RF85.
To get the straight dope on how Anderson Manufacturing
“caught the golden goose,” I interviewed Tom Steffner, the
company’s VP of sales. He confirmed the claim and informed
me Anderson already treats parts for three major firearms
manufacturers—but it will never allow a competing RF85treated commercial AR platform. If you are waiting patiently
The included Magpul
MBUS aperture rear sight
is rugged, fully adjustable
for windage and folds up
or down easily.
IT’S FASTER, TOO
Because the RF85 treatment provides superior lubricity and
removes the drag of conventional liquid lubricants, it actually
speeds up the rile’s cycle time during iring. Anderson hired the
respected and impartial U.S. government-operated Oak Ridge
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
for the day your favorite AR maker releases its own lubeless
rifle, I’ve got sad news for you: It’s not happening.
I speculated that a huge firearms company was sure to offer
BTN a mint to break its agreement with Anderson. Steffner
confirmed that it had already happened, but BTN didn’t do it
and never would. I asked him how he could be so sure, and
he told me:
His dad owns BTN. Steffner and the Andersons are more than
just business associates; they are old friends. He was the guy
who came up with idea of using RF85 on guns while fishing
with his dad. After he successfully tested the concept, he
acted as the middle man to bring Anderson and BTN together,
and the first and only lubeless rifle was born—at least the
first and only civilian lubeless rifle, that is.
The Department of Defense is currently evaluating the
Anderson RF85-treated rifle for military use.
The rile ships with a
Magpul MOE ive-position
buttstock.
THE TEST SPECIMEN
The rifle I tested was a new product that targeted 3-gun
competitors. The AM15-M4-TAC is mechanically a
conventional DI carbine with Magpul flip-up sights, stock
furniture, trigger guard and B.A.D. (battery assist device)
lever. Its unique features include Anderson’s RF85 treatment
on all metal parts; its machined aluminum, rifle-length, 15inch EXT free-float, ventilated handguard solidly joined to the
receiver by a proprietary long barrel nut; a low-profile steel
glass block; the company’s DR20 No-Rise muzzle brake; and
its Ambi-Latch tactical ambidextrous charging handle.
The Anderson EXT
free-loat handguard
allows the user lexibility
to decide where and
how much tactical rail
to install.
The EXT handguard has a Picatinny rail machined along the full
length of the top, with lats on the sides and bottom and tapped holes
for attaching additional rails as desired. This rile had a 5.5-inch rail
on each side and a 10.5-inch rail on the bottom for mounting the
competition angled foregrip. I like the EXT handguard, because it
gives the shooter the option of adding rails on the sides and bottom.
It also has a detachable sling swivel that uses a ball detent lock to
solidly attach to the handguard where it meets the receiver.
Unlike old-school, shielded plastic military-style handguards,
the EXT gets pretty hot in prolonged firing. After a rapid-fire
test of 250 rounds, there was so much heat coming off the
barrel, it was steaming in the light rain. I couldn’t comfortably
hold the handguard.
IN MY OPINION, THE RF85
TREATMENT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT
DEVELOPMENT FOR THE AR PLATFORM
IN 50 YEARS.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
Johnstone
Country.
IN TERMS OF
MAINTENANCE,
THIS IS AS CLOSE
AS ANY AR IS
EVER GOING TO
GET TO AN AK.
The Jensen Brand Series
Patriots
Welcome.
ABOUT ANDERSON
MANUFACTURING
Anderson Manufacturing is a privately owned, hightech machining business that got into making ARs in
2008, when Barrack Obama was elected president. It
quickly established a reputation for high-quality, wellmade and reasonably priced rifles.
Producing most of the company’s parts in house allowed
it to maintain quality control. Anderson’s receivers are
machined from forged billets for maximum strength.
Metal injection-molded (MIM) parts, such as the
trigger and safety, are subcontracted locally and made
on tooling that Anderson designed and built. Springs,
magazines, sights and stock hardware are sourced
outside from American vendors. Anderson also
manufactures parts, including receivers, for numerous
firearms companies.
I let the rile cool down to a toasty, but tolerable, temperature
before doing my accuracy testing. I didn’t notice any signiicant
muzzle climb in rapid ire, which suggests that the No Rise
brake was doing its job. It should be noted that this rile weighs
8 pounds and is rather muzzle heavy, which would also tend to
make it less susceptible to muzzle rise.
The Kerrigans: A Texas Dynasty Series
The greatest Western writers
of the 21st Century
invite you to follow
the next generation of the
legendary Jensen family...
A dirty bolt and charging handle after the
endurance test … not too bad, really
The bolt inish was starting to show shiny
wear spots on the bearing surfaces.
The RF85 doesn’t protect the inish from
friction; instead, it penetrates and protects
the underlying metal.
To save her West Texas
ranch, the fearless
Kerrigan matriarch prepares
for war...and surrender
is not an option.
Available Everywhere Books Are Sold
Although the Magpul B.A.D. lever is a somewhat fragile-looking
thing, I found that it simpliied my gun handling once I got
accustomed to pushing it down with my trigger inger (rather than
www.gunworld.com
ENSINGTONBOOKS.COM
JULY I 2017
relexively reaching for the bolt release lever with my left hand after
changing magazines). This lever is actually made of aluminum and
proved quite sturdy in use. The one critique I offer is that as a point
of safety, there is an argument to be made for keeping controls
that aren’t the trigger outside the trigger guard. You be the judge.
Ammunition
Shooting prone with the front of the rifle resting on sandbags,
I did all my testing with the excellent Magpul MBUS iron
sights. The square front sight post is exceptionally easy to
adjust, requiring only some pointy object (bullet, stick, etc.)
to depress the lock and your fingernail to turn the sight post,
itself, up or down. The elegantly simple MBUS sights are
locked up or secured down with a single push.
I shot 2,000 rounds without any cleaning and no oil—and no failures
of any kind; I left an old microwave and tin bucket so full of holes
that they were virtually transparent. The Anderson performed as
advertised and shot accurately, as one would expect from a quality
rile. The trigger broke at 5 pounds, but with the usual creep one
inds in traditional AR triggers. Some might prefer to put in a quality
aftermarket drop-in target trigger, but using the OEM trigger allows
you to keep the rile completely free of dirt-attracting oil.
Average Velocity
(fps)
Average Group
(inches)
Smallest Group
(inches)
Federal Premium
Gold Medal Match
69-grain Sierra
MatchKing BTHP
2,596
2.9
1.5
Federal American Eagle
55-grain FMJ
2,852
3.2
2
Federal 5.56mm M193 Ball
(White Box) 55-grain
FMJ Boat Tail
2,981
4.3
3.5
Hornady Black 62-grain FMJ
2,703
2.7
1.7
Hornady Steel Match
55-grain JHP (steel case)
2,749
3.3
2.2
Winchester 5.56mm Match
Competitive Target 77-grain
Match BTHP
2,589
3.8
2.7
NOTE: Velocity testing was five rounds at 15 feet from the muzzle. Accuracy
testing was done with three five-shot groups.
After those 2,000 rounds, there was inish wear on the spots
you would expect: the body of the bolt cam pin, the edges of the
bolt lugs and the raised tracks along the bolt carrier body and
their corresponding contact points in the upper receiver.
Inquiring minds might wonder, “If RF85 is so slick, why isn’t it
protecting the inish?” The simple answer is that it doesn’t bond with
the inish; it bonds with the underlying metal.
Tom Steffner explained, “Those calcium molecules penetrate pretty
deep through surface inishes and into the underlying metal structure,
just like rain would penetrate your clothes. Wearing off the inish is
like taking off those wet clothes. Your skin still gets thoroughly soaked.
Those bare-metal areas are protected by the RF85.” TYPE: Gas operated (direct impingement)
CALIBER: 5.56mm/.223 Rem.
MAGAZINE CAPACITY: Accepts all AR
magazines; supplied with a 30-round ACS
RECEIVER: Milled 7075 T6 aluminum forgings
BARREL: 16-inch 4150 steel M4 contour ⅛-inch
twist with Anderson DR20 No-Rise muzzle brake
SIGHTS: Magpul MBUS lip-up front and rear
STOCK: Magpul ive-position adjustable buttstock,
pistol grip and angled foregrip
TRIGGER: 5 pounds
WEIGHT: 8 pounds, 1.5 ounces
ACCESSORIES: Plastic foam-padded transport
case; Anderson-branded, 2-to-1 point, black nylon, tactical
sling
MSRP: $1,400 (For those who want a tactical rile,
Anderson offers basic RF85-treated M4-style carbines with
military stock furniture and without sights starting at $850)
IT JUST KEEPS GOING AND GOING …
The RF85 treatment adds $200 to the cost of the rile. Is it worth it?
Anderson uses its
non-adjustable, steel,
low-proile gas block on
this rile—the same one
the company uses on its
select ire guns. (Photo:
Robb Manning)
Consider that an RF85 rile should last a lot longer. Anderson
conducted a test and found that a standard (non-chrome-lined)
barrel will start showing signiicant signs of wear at the 7,000- to
8,000-round mark. The RF85-treated rile barrel didn’t show the
same level of wear until 14,000 to 15,000 rounds (if Anderson ever
starts treating chrome-lined barrels, it will take a DoD budget line
item to pay for all the ammo needed to wear-test them).
The Anderson RF85 rifle is the “Energizer Bunny” of ARs: It just
keeps going and going: 2,000 rounds in one day with no oil, no
cleaning, no failures. In terms of maintenance, this is as close
as any AR is ever going to get to an AK.
CONTACT INFORMATION
If you are lazy, uninformed about how to maintain a rile or are perhaps
too busy evading cannibalistic raiders while leading your family to
safety in the aftermath of a massive EMP attack—or maybe you’re
just tired of laboriously cleaning ARs— this is the AR for you.
ANDERSON MANUFACTURING
(859) 869-4085
www.AndersonRifles.com
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
No handgun
in history has flourished
and continued to earn as many accolades
as the iconic John Browning-designed 1911 pistol.
Until now.
Les Baer Custom has been the unchallenged leader in rewriting firearms history by bringing the time honored
1911 pistol into the twenty-first century. Starting with Browning's classic design, we have introduced state-ofthe-art manufacturing methods, real hand assembly, and top of the line accessories and other enhancements
to ensure that all forty plus models and permutations are high performance, superior quality history makers.
And, with multiple barrel lengths and frame sizes, several popular finishes and a choice of five calibers, there's
a Les Baer custom 1911 for virtually every purpose, regardless what kind of history you want to create.
Some of our most popular models include:
Baer 1911
Premier II©,
5" or 6"
.45 ACP, 9mm,
.38 Super, .40 S&W
The flagship of our
1911 line.
New! Baer 1911
Premier II©
Hunter, 6"
New! Baer 1911 Thunder
Ranch Special, 2nd
Generation, 5"
Baer 1911
Ultimate Tactical
Carry Model, 5"
10mm
A superb big game
powerhouse.
.45 ACP
Product improved version of
one of our most
popular favorites.
.45 ACP, 9mm,
.38 Super
Serious, practical
defense pistol.
Baer 1911
BOSS .45, 5"
Baer 1911
Black Bear, 4 1/4"
.45 ACP
A high performance,
visually stunning tribute
to the 1970s muscle car
that inspired it: The Boss
429 Mustang.
9mm
Perfect compact carry size
with shortened slide. 9mm
chambering for increased
capacity over standard 1911s.
See our entire line of
high performance custom rifles and pistols at…
www.lesbaer.com
Office Hours: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Central Time
Baer 1911 Stinger, 4 1/4"
.45 ACP, 9mm, .38 Super
Small, efficient and full featured.
Comes with night sights.
Performance. It’s Everything.
1804 Iowa Drive • LeClaire, Iowa 52753
Ph: 563-289-2126 • Fx: 563-289-2132
Email: info@lesbaer.com
TEXT BY ANDY MASSIMILIAN
PHOTOS BY STEVE WOODS AND ANDY MASSIMILIAN
WILSONCOMBAT
EDC-9
PROFESSIONAL
HITTING THE “SWEET SPOT” OF
PISTOLCRAFT, WILSON COMBAT STAYS
TRUE TO ITS ROOTS BY FOCUSING ON
PERFECTING THE 1911.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
W
ith so many gunmakers flooding the
market with yet another plastic-framed,
striker-fired pistol, Wilson Combat stays
true to its roots by focusing instead on
perfecting the 1911.
Although the 1911 is probably the most customized and
improved pistol of all time, the design has its vulnerabilities.
This became apparent to Bill Wilson through decades
of experience with this iconic pistol as a
shooter, manufacturer and instructor.
Knowing how even the best-made 1911s
can fail from design shortcomings and faults
of the end user, Wilson incorporated new
features into the EDC-9 that make it well
suited to those who want a tightly itted,
accurate and reliable 1911 for daily carry
www.gunworld.com
but don’t have the time or inclination to properly inspect, clean
and lubricate it. And because Bill Wilson understands that
intangibles such as pride of ownership are as inseparable to a
Wilson Combat 1911 as high performance and craftsmanship,
the design and execution of these new features go beyond the
purely functional aspects and give the EDC-9 a striking look.
GUN DETAILS
The EDC-9 Professional is a leading example of Wilson
Combat’s focus on the finer details of pistolcraft, both in form
and function. It starts with a strong foundation: a forged 4140
carbon steel frame and forged 416R stainless slide. Wilson
then fits the slide to the frame so there is no discernible sideto-side movement. Wilson pistols are made to retain this fit
over their lifetimes, rather than building them too tightly to
function easily and then letting them break in to an acceptable
fit. Bill once told me that the steel he uses is so hard that if he
fit them that tightly, they would probably stay that way.
JULY I 2017
The EDC-9 Professional is a compact 1911, at 7.6 inches in
overall length and 5.6 inches in height. It is fed with a singlecolumn, 10-round magazine. The “Professional” designation
signifies a full-sized grip and 4-inch barrel. Its weight of 39.6
ounces is more than a similarly sized Colt Commander, but
the Wilson is more substantial, with a Picatinny rail, larger
magazine and flared steel mag well. Customers who want a
lighter version can have the EDC-9 made with a type 7075 T6
aluminum frame, which weighs about 28 ounces. (Customers
can also order one with a stainless frame.)
The magazine is Wilson’s own and holds 10 rounds, compared
to most others that hold nine. This mag is a third-generation
design with improved springs and a follower that prevents the
bullets from nose-diving.
I have used these mags extensively and consider them the
best available for a 9mm 1911—not only because they work
so well and hold more, but because of the sensible design
features, such as a bumper pad and polished stainless steel
construction for easier insertion, along with large numbers
with an easy-to-see cutaway window to determine how many
rounds are loaded. It’s also the mag the Smith & Wesson
custom shop includes in its 9mm 1911.
Bill Wilson designed
the X TAC slide pattern
for shooters who
found sharp, pointed
checkering too abrasive
for their hands. It is
unique to the Wilson
Combat line. (Photo:
Steve Woods)
The Bushingless
design on the Wilson
barrel (right) allows
for a larger-diameter
barrel. The deep crown
protects the muzzle
from damage that
would hurt accuracy.
(Photo: Steve Woods)
Wilson Combat pistols use material of unimpeachable
quality, starting with forged, instead of cast, frames and
slides; CNC-milled small parts (instead of MIM or stamped);
flat recoil springs made of chrome silicon spring steel with
a long lifespan; and extractors made of S7-hardened tool
steel used on metal stamping dies and the tip of concrete
breakers. The barrel is made from 416R stainless steel and
is made oversized so it can be fitted tightly to the slide for
best accuracy. The finish is Wilson’s Armor-Tuff, a two-finish
process with Cerakote applied over a phosphate finish that is
first applied to the base metal.
Weight matters with a carry pistol, and steel-framed 1911s
are heavy by contemporary standards, so Wilson shaved
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
ounces by trimming the slide into a triangular profile on its top
and ball end milling grooves on the barrel. The slide’s reduced
mass is also intended to improve function.
ENHANCED RELIABILITY SYSTEM
The EDC-9 Professional is one of two new Wilson Combat
pistols made with a collective called the Enhanced
Reliability System (ERS), which consists of a modified
frame, match-grade barrel, simplified locking system,
external extractor and new sights. The ERS makes the
1911 more reliable under adverse conditions, more user
friendly, better suited for combat fire and less maintenance
intensive than the original design.
The 1911’s design has been considerably improved over
its 100-plus-year run, but it still has a locking system that
needs cleaning and lubrication much more frequently than
contemporary pistols.
In particular, the locking lugs that mate the barrel to the slide,
as well as the slide rails, are friction areas that need proper
lubrication. Without it, they will cycle sluggishly or not at all.
Just ask Bill, who has seen students, customers and lessexperienced 1911 shooters create problems for themselves
as a result of improper maintenance.
A spacer at the rear
of the Wilson mag
(bottom) consistently
positions the round
without a gap between
cartridge and magazine
wall. (Photo: Andy
Massimilian)
The Wilson mag on the
left eliminates bullet
nose-dive compared to
the standard mag on
the right. (Photo: Andy
Massimilian)
A REVOLUTIONARY GUN CLEANING SYSTEM
AVAILABLE IN MOST COMMON CALIBERS
FOR HANDGUNS, RIFLES AND SHOTGUNS
HIGHLY ABSORBENT, LOW-LINT COTTON HEADS
3" AND 8" FLEXIBLE BAMBOO HANDLES
NO DRIP, MESS OR HASSLE
855-GUNSWAB (855-486-7922)
www.ramrodz.com • sales@ramrodz.com
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
There are no lugs
milled on the barrel or
the slide—as would be
found on a traditional
1911. With the EDC-9,
the barrel locks into
the slide just ahead
of the chamber with
the top front of the
slide’s ejection port.
Note that the flared
proile of the muzzle
centers the barrel in
the slide without need
for a separate bushing.
(Photo: Steve Woods)
A totally reliable extractor is necessary for any combat pistol,
and although the internal design of the 1911 works well, it
tends to accumulate debris between the extractor and slide,
thereby potentially affecting its function. Internal extractors
also require more machining to the slide and are more
complicated to fit and replace. A pivoting external extractor
also works over a wider range of spring tension and with more
case rim thicknesses than the internal design, according to
Bill. The recurrent themes of reduced user maintenance and
increased mechanical reliability permeate this pistol’s design.
The EDC 9 addresses these issues by eliminating the 1911’s
twin locking lugs in favor of a much simpler system via which
the top front of the barrel just ahead of the chamber locks
with the rear of the slide’s ejection port. This is a reliable
system used on many pistols and is far easier to clean than
the interlocking lugs.
Another vulnerability consists of the frictional forces from the
1911’s slide-frame contact. Wilson addresses this issue by
eliminating about 1⅜ inches of frame rail in the area of the
magazine well. The shorter rail surface reduces friction and
mitigates the risk of a sluggish slide when using a gun oil that
is too viscous in cold weather or as a result of dirt buildup.
Some might wonder if trimming the slide rail reduces
accuracy; it doesn’t … for two reasons. First, slide-to-frame
fit is a minor portion of what makes a 1911 shoot accurately,
according to Bill Wilson (slide-to-barrel fit at the front and
rear are much more important). Second, the rails are removed
Changing the front
sight is easier
than working with
dovetail mount
sights. Simply use
the supplied tool
to unscrew the
hexhead screw.
(Photo: Steve
Woods)
A Wilson Combat
10-round magazine
next to the industrystandard eight-round.
Which is more
functional? (Photo:
Andy Massimilian)
The final element of the ERS are sights designed for quick
acquisition and simple removal. Up front is a green fiberoptic sight that can be easily changed by removing an Allenhead screw, instead of drifting out of a dovetail using a sight
pushing tool (Wilson sells a red fiber-optic and a tritium front
sight for night fire).
At the rear is Wilson’s new Tactical Adjustable Battlesight
(TAB) that is click-adjustable for elevation using a
screwdriver and can be drifted by hand for windage by
ews. This sight blade has a wide U
lective finish.
tates racking the slide by catching
ster or belt buckle should one hand
g how Wilson Combat makes a pistol
, the front sight surrounding the green
e rear sight blade have fine, 40-LPI
al grooves to reduce glare and make
n.
TAILS; EASY TAKEDOWN
l are strictly custom shop enhancements
with the functional.
ance appearance, there are fine, 40 lpi
lled on the rear of the slide.
s inside a countersunk hole, instead of
me.
the slide are chamfered to break an
is held to the sight base with a steel
rap. Even the G10 grips show custom shop quality by using
ilson Combat medallions made of pewter, instead of plastic,
us a unique texture in Wilson’s own sunburst pattern.
speed reloading, the EDC-9 has a flared steel magazine well
tegral to the mainspring housing that is rounded to reduce
e chance of the pistol’s butt printing under lightweight
arments. The slide top has been re-contoured to reduce
eight and has 30-LPI serrations.
pin that is prevented from drifting outward from recoil by a
fine Allen-head screw on either side (many gunmakers ignore
this pin drift problem or peen the ends of the pin, which often
fails to stop drift).
This ield-stripped
pistol shows simplicity
of design. Note the fulllength guide rod, flat
recoil spring and fluted
barrel flared near the
muzzle to mate tightly
with the slide. (Photo:
Steve Woods)
One of this pistol’s more unusual aspects is the X TAC-patterned
gripping surface on the slide, mainspring housing and front
www.gunworld.com
he EDC-9 offers more enhancements to the 1911—and no
eater one to me than eliminating the barrel bushing that
ates the muzzle end of the barrel with the slide. Instead
a partial-length guide rod and bushing, the EDC-9 uses a
ne-piece stainless steel guide rod and a barrel flared at its
nd to ensure a consistently tight fit to the slide (a critical
ement of accuracy).
Disassembly of the EDC-9 is easier, quicker and without the
very real hazard of a spring-tensioned guide rod plug being
ejected, as on a traditional 1911. As an added touch that
no other maker I know of includes in its 1911s, the EDC-9
has Wilson’s Shok-Buff poly-fiber washer on the guide rod,
which cushions the recoiling slide and reduces battering
of the frame. It can also slightly reduce perceived recoil. I
JULY I 2017
recommend trying a properly designed buffer; they are inexpensive,
easy to install, effective and won’t hurt function on most pistols.
THE EDC-9 PROFESSIONAL
HAS AN ACCURACY
GUARANTEE OF FIVE
SHOTS INTO A 1.5-INCH
GROUP AT 25 YARDS
USING MATCH
AMMO.
RANGE TIME
I shot the EDC-9 Professional for accuracy from a Caldwell
rest, followed by offhand, in ive loadings made by Wilson
Combat, Black Hills and SIG Sauer. There were no malfunctions
throughout more than 300 rounds.
The mag well is fluted
for easier loading.
(Photo: Steve Woods)
The EDC-9 Professional has an accuracy guarantee of ive shots
into a 1.5-inch group at 25 yards using match ammo. This claim
was validated with Winchester USA 115-grain FMJ practice ammo.
Because this pistol’s accuracy was obvious, and the EDC-9 is not
intended for bullseye target-shooting, I dispensed with bench rest
testing of all loads and focused instead on practical use. If you’ve
ever shot a Wilson Combat, you can attest to its accuracy.
Moreover, the green iber-optic front sight works best for
its intended use as a combat sight. It is quickly acquired in
daylight but doesn’t work as well for precision target-shooting.
The TAB’s rear sight, with its nonglare inish and large U notch,
allowed me to easily see and quickly align the front sight.
This pistol was very easy to manage, even when shooting with
one hand, using Black Hills 124-grain +P loads (which are not
throttled down on velocity as so many other brands are). The
texture on the G10 grips cemented my hold to the pistol as
intended. I could access the mag release, thanks to a groove
milled into the G10 grip. Follow-through was easy, and the
sights were rapidly reacquired after recoil.
rail at the magazine
well has been removed
without affecting
accuracy or reliability,
according to Wilson
Combat’s testing. Our
own testing supports
this. (Photo: Steve
Woods)
The EDC-9 Professional is a custom quality pistol with parts,
fit, accuracy, reliability and aesthetics that are a given in a
pistol in its price range. However, what elevates this pistol
above its custom shop 1911 peer group are Wilson Combat’s
many additional engineering enhancements that make it a
much better carry and combat pistol.
The trigger on my test pistol broke at 3 pounds, 11 ounces using
a Lyman electronic scale. It had slight creep and zero overtravel
consistent with the factory specs of 3.5 to 4.5 pounds.
Although the EDC-9 Professional is offered in one basic design,
Wilson Combat is a custom shop and can make pistols to
customers’ specs. My preference would be to order the larger slide
stop and safety levers an
THE RECURRENT
THEMES OF
REDUCED USER
MAINTENANCE
AND INCREASED
MECHANICAL
RELIABILITY
PERMEATE
THIS PISTOL’S
DESIGN.
SPECIFICATIONS
CALIBER: 9mm
ACTION TYPE: Semiauto
SLIDE: 416R Stainless
FRAME: 4140 Carbon Steel
BARREL: Stainless
MAGAZINE CAPACITY: 10
TRIGGER: Single action
SIGHTS: Adjustable
BARREL LENGTH: 4.0 inches
OVERALL LENGTH: 7.6 inches
HEIGHT: 5.6 inches
WEIGHT: 39.6 ounces
MSRP: $3,695
The rear sight has a
cocking ledge and is
elevation-adjustable
with a screwdriver.
Note the triangular
slide proile. (Photo:
Steve Woods)
CONTACT INFORMATION
WILSON COMBAT
(800) 955-4856
www.WilsonCombat.c
JULY I 2017
Dillon Precision’s
XL650
STANDARD FEATURES:
• Automatic Indexing
• Uses Standard 7/8” x 14 Dies
• Loading Rate: 800-1000 Rds./Hr.
• Comes With One Caliber Conversion
• 5-Station Interchangeable Toolhead
• Automatic Powder Measure
• Automatic Primer System
• Lifetime “No-B.S.” Warranty
• RISK FREE 30-Day Trial!
Pictured with optional accessories:
Electric Casefeeder
Powdercheck System
Low Powder Sensor
Aluminum Roller Handle
Strong Mount (550/650)
Aluminum Bullet Tray
K91-210**
K91-21044
K91-16306
K91-17950
K91-22051
K91-22214
XL 650 DVD
Instruction Manual
K91-19484 $19.95
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY SEAN CURTIS
LONG-DISTANCE
RUGER
THE RUGER PRECISION RIFLE IS AN
HONEST-TO-GOODNESS, LONG-DISTANCE
SHOOTER WITH THE MODULARITY OF
A SET OF LEGOS.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
The Ruger Precision
Rifle opens up a world
of customizable, longdistance shooting at an
affordable price.
T
he quote listed on the Ruger webpage for its
precision rifle comes from Mike Fifer, CEO. It
reads only four words, but it explains so much:
“1,600 yards. Enough said.”
I’ve made a living for nearly 20 years carrying a gun but
only recently got into shooting anything out past 100 yards.
Inured to the ways of iron sights and rifles with short barrels made
for cornering in buildings, the idea of a weapon that you could lie
down behind and deliver shots like artillery is novel to me.
I had just completed some training in long-distance
shooting. Upon hearing news of the Ruger Precision Rifle’s
release, I was eager to test this weapon. Was the quote
from Fifer braggadocio, or had the company created an
affordable long-range rifle?
www.gunworld.com
I was enthralled when the Precision Rifle arrived—even
before opening the box. My eyes crave and seek out
symmetry, so I was puzzled by the handle placement on
the box: about two-thirds down the length, as opposed to
right in the middle. I picked it up and noticed it balanced
perfectly. Someone had taken the time to find the balance
point and had all the boxes designed with this detail in
mind. I was immediately impressed and intrigued about
what might follow.
JULY I 2017
BOTH BEAUTIFUL AND MENACING, THE BLACK
STEEL AND ALUMINUM SHAPED WITH ANGULAR
LINES WHISPERED OF FUNCTIONALITY
AND PURPOSE.
UNVEILING
I found an absolute treasure when I opened this wellbalanced package. Both beautiful and menacing, the black
steel and aluminum shaped with angular lines whispered of
functionality and purpose.
I removed the rifle from the box and unfolded the stock,
locking it into place with an audible click. From stem to stern,
the Precision Rifle was a thing to behold—nearly 40 inches
long, with half that length consisting of just the barrel, and
chambered in .308.
The Ruger Precision
Rifle shown with Atlas
monopod and optional
sun shade for the
Burris
The Atlas’s separate
legs allow the unit
to mount irmly to
differing surfaces, such
as a barricade, with a
modiied C-clamp.
The barrel might seem a tad short to optimize the use of the
.308 round, but upon testing, it absolutely works. The 4140
chrome-moly steel barrel is cold forged, giving it durability.
It is covered by a KeyMod handguard, further adding to the
capability of accessories that can be added to satisfy the
shooter’s needs. The dazzling silver bolt intriguingly breaks
up the sea of flat black. The three-lug design throws neatly
and firmly once you master the action. It is manipulated by an
oversized handle—which I appreciated.
The eye marvels to travel down from muzzle break to buttstock
and note all the utility in between. I mean, if a standard
bolt-action rifle is “functional,” this thing is a customizable
“multi-tool.” My initial impression was that the rifle was very
similar to an AR, replete with a top rail, pistol grip and other
accoutrements common to that style. This design proved
intentional and thematic throughout the build.
The Hybrid Muzzle Break initiates the business end of the rifle
and does an excellent job of reducing recoil. It also comes
with a thread protector, which implies a wealth of options.
Many precision rifle series (PRS) competitors use muzzle
breaks or suppressors, so this capability is important: You can
simply screw in your favorite option or use the stock break.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
The Key Mod handguard
offers a variety of
conigurations based
on shooter need.
I was still new to long-range shooting, so I quickly began to
appreciate how much difference this made when considering
parallax. At the range, I have seen many a wonderful rileand-scope combination with cheek risers cheaply taped on to
compensate for proper eye level with the optic. Ruger has this
locked in; no adhesive required.
In addition, the butt pad is adjustable, allowing the user
to have the proper length of pull. This measurement is
considered to be the distance between the middle of the
trigger finger to the end of the gun’s butt. It is critical and
should not be overlooked.
Beneath the bolt, the mag well exhibits even
more options: It accepts AICS, M110/SR-25/
DPMS and some M-14 magazines. The Precision
Rile ships with two Magpul Gen3 PMAG 10-round
magazines. (Being from Colorado, I handled
these with reverence and a bit of shame.) Ruger
was wise to choose such an esteemed magazine
to consistently feed its long-range beast.
The pistol grip, trigger guard and safety are all
reminiscent of the AR-15, so for me, this was like
reuniting with an old lover: My thumb matched
to the safety, and my trigger inger landed easily
alongside the guard. The trigger has an easily
adjustable range of 2.25 to 5 pounds. Mine broke
smoothly and consistently at 2.5 pounds—an
optimal weight that allows you to ind your mark
in the scope, squeeze and bang.
Moving further astern, the Ruger Precision MSR
stock is more akin to a tailored suit than a rifle.
Adjustment abounds. The comb height, or where
you rest the full weight of your head on your rile
via the cheek, is capable of rising signiicantly.
A sub-MOA group shot at 100 yards during zeroing process
As I have learned, the challenge of shooting long distances
in part means eliminating variables that can cause mistakes.
This includes the human body (as much as possible) and
means all efforts should be taken to remove chances for error
caused by a poorly fitted rifle. A small mistake at 500 to 1,000
yards is greatly amplified farther downrange.
AN EYE FOR ACCURACY
Nearly 40 inches long,
the folding stock can be
shortened to 31 inches
for easy transport of
the Precision Rifle.
(Photo: Sturm, Ruger
& Co.)
Ruger set a frenetic pace, packing design features into the
stock. This also included a folding capability that shortens the
rifle down to roughly 31 inches for transport. Ruger also set
up the Precision Rifle to accept any AR-style stock to its buffer
tube. Again, the capability for customization is the hallmark
of this rifle.
I was challenged to choose suitable accessories for the
rifle—items that would help wring out every bit of accuracy
I could muster for testing. Despite my normal career-based
inclinations to add a light and sling, I thought about longrange shooting and therefore, stability and accuracy. Burris
provided an XTR II 5-25x50 scope (an amazing optic), while
Atlas Bipods contributed its BT46-LW17 model, as well as a
BT12-QK01 monopod to steady the operation.
The Burris XTR II boasts Hi-Lume—multi-coated lenses
that allow excellent light-gathering and sharp sight
pictures. The scope tested came with the SCR MOA reticle
on a first focal plane; this means that when you dial up
the magnification, the reticle also increases in size. This
is wonderful for viewing your mils on distant targets,
particularly out beyond 500 yards, where normal vision
begins to falter with smaller targets.
The optics are durable, being fog- and waterproof, and come
with the Burris Forever Warranty. Using this scope to shoot out
to 1,000 yards was a breeze. The turrets give tactile feedback
during adjustments and are rugged enough to not get bumped
from settings if glanced off a table or barrier.
The grip and trigger
guard feel just like your
favorite M4/AR15.
www.gunworld.com
Parallax modification was easy and much appreciated by this
novice distance shooter. The reticle also has an illuminated
portion that activates with the turn of a dial. This knob has
“off” detents in between every brightness setting, allowing
shooters to choose their favorite and switch in, as opposed to
dialing up through the whole reel.
JULY I 2017
STRETCHING OUT TO 600, 800 AND
FINALLY 1,000 YARDS, IT BECAME CLEAR
THE RIFLE REALLY IS THAT GOOD.
The Auto-Advance Remote Control Target System
scrolls the included 50 foot Bullseye target roll with
the push of a button. So spend less time walking and
more time where you need to be – on target.
200 Yard Remote Range
Control target scrolling with the touch of a button
AR400 Steel Construction
Interchangeable
Silhouette, Small
Bore Rifle, and
Varmint target rolls
sold separately.
For all rimfire calibers and air rifles
Quick Setup
Easy assembly and break down
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
SPECIFICATIONS
CALIBERS: .308 Winchester (tested), 6.5
Creedmoor, 6mm Creedmoor, 5.56 NATO/.223 Remington
ACTION TYPE: Bolt action, push feed
BARREL: 20 inches
MAGAZINE: Two 10-round Magpul PMAG
magazines
TRIGGER: Adjustable (2.25–5 pounds)
SIGHTS: None (full-length optics rail)
STOCK: Folding synthetic with adjustable length of
pull and comb height
WEIGHT: 9.8 pounds
OVERALL LENGTH: 42.75 inches (folded:
39.25 inches)
MSRP: $1,599
Cheek weld and
parallax can be sources
of frustration on long
shots. Ruger combats
these with a highly
adjustable stock.
STAND AND DELIVER: ATLAS BIPOD AND MONOPOD
The Atlas BT46-LW17 bipod supported the front of this
weapon and provided an incredibly stable platform. Shooters
will truly appreciate the diversity of this bipod and the ease
with which it mounts.
CONTACT INFORMATION
STURM, RUGER & CO.
(603) 863-3300
www.Ruger-Firearms.com
Crafted of T6061 aluminum, the unit is beefy and weighs
around 13 ounces. Mounting it to the Ruger’s lower Picatinny
rail was a snap (literally). The ADM-S lever on the Atlas allows
it to slide up and lock on quickly. It can be removed just as
easily. The legs of the bipod move independently of each
other and have to be adjusted one at a time. This separation
is different from similar products and creates possibilities. In
situations when barriers must be used to fire from, having one
leg vertical while the other is horizontal allows the shooter
great stability. The bipod’s adjustable height ranges from 4.75
to 9 inches.
B&T INDUSTRIES, LLC
(316) 721-3222
www.Accu-Shot.com
BURRIS OPTICS COMPANY
(888) 440-0244
www.BurrisOptics.com
windage. While not a solution for every shooting scenario, this
piece will stabilize most prone or other flat shooting.
RANGE TO TARGET: REALLY THAT GOOD
The Atlas monopod has an elevation range of 3.75 to 4.65
inches and is mounted neatly to the rail under the buttstock.
This small feature packed a huge value into the end of the
gun by allowing me to set my elevation from the rear. The
only variables I needed to control at that point were recoil and
With everything mounted to the Ruger, the last challenge was
finding a range capable of allowing it to “stretch its legs.”
I arrived at the range and deployed the Ruger with all the
aforementioned trappings.
Ammunition
100 Yards
Smallest Avg.
Group
Group
Federal Premium
MatchKing 168 grain
.56
.61
1.02
1.34
9 of 9
Winchester Super X
180 grain
.78
.84
1.61
1.82
7 of 9
Hornady American
Whitetail 165 grain
.59
.63
1.41
1.49
9 of 9
200 Yards
Smallest
Avg.
Group
Group
NOTE: All groups in inches; three-shot groups
www.gunworld.com
Steel Plate
(20-inch)
The rifle lived up to its name. After bore-sighting and during
zeroing, I shot a sub-MOA group with Federal Premium
168-grain MatchKing. Switching to long range, I began at 400
yards and delivered consistent and predictable hits on target.
Stretching out to 600, 800 and finally 1,000 yards, it became
clear the rifle really is that good.
The range I used for testing did not allow target inspection and
only used steel plates, so grouping information beyond 100 yards
is estimated only. However, the Ruger delivered dependable hits on
a 20-inch target at that distance. Another shooter with the same rile
described it as “boringly accurate.” I couldn’t disagree more with the
“boring” part; I felt a thrill each time I sent one downrange, waiting
those seconds before hearing the ringing steel conirm my hits.
JULY I 2017
The Hybrid Muzzle Brake does an
excellent job of taming the .308
recoil. The threaded barrel provides
customization for those wanting a
different brake or suppressor.
The ADM-S lever
on the Atlas means
that installation and
removal take seconds.
CONCEALED
CONFIDENCE
The Burris provided clear images of the target and allowed me to dial my
elevation adjustment in order to hit my progressively farther goals. Like its
namesake, the Atlas (trio) held up stoically and supplied crucial stability
from different shooting positions. Thus equipped, the Ruger Precision Rifle
is an honest-to-goodness, long-distance shooter with the modularity of a
set of LEGOS. GW
The “control center”
of the XTR II includes
elevation, range,
reticle light, parallax
and range controls—
making for a great
pairing with the Ruger.
Using state of the art design,
injection molding and high
density polymer, Fobus has
created a holster which
cannot be duplicated in
leather or any other material.
With over 160 different
passive and active retention
holsters & pouches, Fobus lets
you carry with confidence.
LIFETIME
WARRANTY
WWW.FOBUSHOLSTER.COM
267-803-1517
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY JIM MATTHEWS
SO,YOU
WANTA
DANGEROUSGAMERIFLE?
E
very gun nut worth his bruised shoulder has, at
some point in his shooting career, had a hankering
for a big, booming elephant or buffalo killer.
When I was a kid, one of my shooting and hunting
mentors, Ray Morgan, traded off his .270 Winchester for a
.458 Winchester. I discovered three things about that big gun.
First, it kicked hard, but it wasn’t all that bad. Second, it shot
itty, bitty, tiny groups. Well, that’s not true. The groups were
big because of the size of the holes in the paper, but they
were clustered together tighter than his .270 ever shot. Third,
shooting it was a blast.
Every time we went to the range, that .458 would come out,
and we’d shoot gongs offhand, giggling and laughing the
whole time. The sound a big bullet makes hitting steel plates
is inspiring. People would watch in awe as the muzzle rolled
up to a 45-degree angle in recoil.
Ray never went to Africa. A poor man, he eventually traded
the .458 off so he could buy a different gun for his shooting.
But for the couple of years he owned that rifle, he used it to
shoot running jackrabbits.
OVERKILL?
He would laugh and smile at me, pointing out that hares were
good practice. Then, he would add, “You never know when
you’ll have to shoot an angry Ford and stop it dead, right there.”
The .416 Taylor is just
a necked-down .458
Winchester Magnum. It
has heft and feels nice
in the hand ... but when
you pull the trigger, it
doesn’t feel so nice on
your shoulder.
MOST OF US WILL NEVER HUNT CAPE BUFFALO OR
ELEPHANT, BUT THAT DOESN’T MEAN WE DON’T
WANT TO OWN A DANGEROUS-GAME GUN. THEY HAVE
PLENTY OF PRACTICAL USES … SHOOTING DANGEROUS
KITCHEN APPLIANCES, FOR EXAMPLE.
If you think a small
rodent could run down
the bore of the rifle
barrel, then you are
on the right track in
selecting an appropriate
appliance gun. Here,
R.G. Fall is struggling to
keep the muzzle-heavy
.416 Taylor aligned on a
delinquent refrigerator
seriously needing
execution.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
EVERY GUN NUT WORTH
HIS BRUISED SHOULDER
HAS, AT SOME POINT IN HIS
SHOOTING CAREER, HAD
A HANKERING FOR A BIG,
BOOMING ELEPHANT OR
BUFFALO KILLER.
We shot holes in engine blocks with solids at a dump in the
desert to conirm that the gun could handle that task if the need
ever arose. The abandoned appliances also took a beating from
those big bullets.
QUALIFYING AS “BIG BORE”
The author reacts to
the .416 Taylor in full
recoil after shooting
a murderous toaster.
That’s not a grimace;
it’s a look of sheer joy.
(OK. That’s a lie.)
How big do you have to go to have an honest-to-gosh big-bore
appliance gun?
For me, the standard is simply that you’d have to have a gun
big enough to be adequate for African buffalo or elephant.
Fast forward some 40 years, and the desire for my own big-bore
gun inally got the better of my pocketbook. Gunsmith and friend
Jim Gruning of Riverside, California, screwed a .416 Taylor barrel
onto a Howa bolt action for me. The gun was transformed from a
boring, old 7mm magnum into an elephant-killer.
I know famous hunters of the past have used everything down
to a 7mm Mauser for elephants, but most hunters draw the
bottom line at the .375 H&H Magnum. And most like bigger.
I was ecstatic and showed it off to everyone.
So, that’s what I go with—something that really doesn’t have
any practical hunting use in the lower 48 states. (Not that you
couldn’t use them; they will all kill jackrabbits and ground
squirrels handily. I have proven that.)
“Why, in heaven’s name would you need a .416 Taylor?”
A hunting buddy asked when I showed him my latest gun
project. He rolled a cartridge around in his fingers.
“Appliances,” I said authoritatively, but with tongue in cheek.
He and I both knew I would never go to Africa or Australia
to shoot elephants or buffalo, but I remembered my days at
that desert dump with Ray. “This gun will knock a charging
refrigerator back onto its haunches.”
I bring the .416 out anytime someone starts talking about recoil or
to ring the 200-yard gong at a local range so even deaf shooters
can hear the bullet smack. I have been known to shoot ground
squirrels and jackrabbits with the gun, but if the truth were told,
kills with high-velocity varmint riles are more dramatic.
Most big bores are
incredibly accurate—
that is, if you can
squeeze off three shots
without flinching. This
1¼-inch group was
shot with the author’s
.416 Taylor. It would
have been a three-shot
cloverleaf, but the
author’s anticipation of
the recoil for that last
shot didn’t do the group
any good.
www.gunworld.com
Ideally, if you have lots of money, a .470 Nitro Express
double rifle would be ideal. I have written a novel about a
slightly deranged man who creates a traffic jam on Southern
California’s Interstate 5 in downtown Los Angeles. He shoots
vehicles (not people, mind you) to a standstill with a bandolier
filled with .470 cartridges and a classic Wesley Richards
double rifle, jumping from hood to rooftop of dead cars to stop
those still charging and creating a horrific traffic jam. (He, of
course, is an endearing character.)
So, I don’t think guns such as a .338 Win Mag or even an
esoteric 9.3x62—both of which I have and consider legitimate
JULY I 2017
hunting guns for elk and wild hogs—would qualify here.
You need a big gun. A .375 H&H is the smallest that qualifies. A
.458 Winchester or .458 Lott would be better. A .460 Weatherby
will strike awe into your hunting and shooting friends and
dislocate shoulders on the smaller ones.
DISSECTING THE
.416 TAYLOR
The new and already-dying .375 Ruger might be a gun you
could pick up for a song. If you could find a .416 Rigby, that
would be cool, and it might even be easier to find than a .416
Ruger or .416 Remington. And, of course, any of the classic
double cartridges would be wonderful. Ruger made a run
of No. 1 single shots in .404 Jeffrey a few years ago, and
Hornady still loads ammo. You get what we’re after here.
The .416 Taylor is a wildcat cartridge that has been
around nearly as long as its parent round, the .458
Winchester, which was introduced in 1956. It was
even rumored to have been considered as a factory
cartridge by Winchester.
According to John Wootters, the .416 was developed by
Bob Chatield-Taylor in the late 1960s or early 1970s for
African hunting. I decided it would be ine for shooting
dangerous appliances in this century.
I’m sorry, but anything that will run through an AR platform
doesn’t qualify. It has to be big, but a semiauto mitigates recoil,
so it’s cheating. The .50 BMG and its class of rounds also don’t
make the list, because it’s just to big to carry for hunting.
My rifle was built by Jim Gruning, a Riverside, California,
gunsmith who now specializes in custom tactical
rifles and accessories—mostly for military and law
enforcement. It was made up on a standard long-action
Howa 1500 with a magnum bolt face, and it wears a 27inch Walther barrel that has very little taper at the muzzle.
My requirement is also that it can’t have porting to reduce
recoil. We are shooting these guns to feel the recoil,
experience the boom and muzzle rise of a big bore, and see
the dust cloud rise from where the bullet strikes Mother Earth.
I went with the .416 Taylor, because it’s as odd as my desire to
own a boomer. The wildcat round is merely a .458 Winchester
necked down to shoot .416-inch-diameter bullets. With hot
loads, it will match the classic .416 Rigby’s ballistics without
needing to go to the bigger bolt action required for that old
round. It will hurl a 400-grain bullet at more than 2,300 fps, and
my standard appliance load is a 350-grain bullet at 2,550 fps.
OK; I admit that it’s on the bottom end of the boomer list, but
after torching off 10 or so of my reloads, you would agree it
meets the criteria.
NOTES ON RECOIL
I have a confession to make: My .416 Taylor weighs 15 pounds.
The gun will shoot 1-inch groups at 100 yards with
full-power loads—that is, if I don’t start flinching. Most
of my reduced loads with cast bullets shoot around 2
inches at that distance.
Appliance guns usually
have big bullets.
These .416 slugs—a
350-grain Speer (top)
and 400-grain cast
bullet (bottom)—
dwarf an entire .223
Remington cartridge
(middle).
The .416 Taylor is still a wildcat cartridge (sort of), but you
can get factory-loaded ammunition from Norma and a
number of smaller custom loaders; and brass is available
from Norma, Quality Cartridge and Jamison. It can also be
made—and much more cheaply—by necking down the
.458 Winchester or necking up the .338 Winchester to .416.
I use Hornady Custom Grade New Dimension dies, and the
tapered expander will accomplish either mission in one
pass. Unfortunately, these dies have been discontinued.
Dies are still available from RCBS, including one with
a tapered expander, and Lee makes runs of .416 Taylor
Pacesetter dies from time to time. In addition, many mailorder sources have them in stock.
I shoot mostly 350-grain bullets—either Barnes Tipped
Triple Shocks, Speer Mag Tips or cast lead bullets with
gas checks. Cast lead bullets are available from Montana
Bullet Works and Western Bullet Company (as well as
some others). There is a wide range of jacketed .416
slugs available from makers around the world in both
solid and expanding conigurations, and they range in
weight from 340 to 450 grains.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
Institute] website: www.saami.org). I don’t know who came
up with that term, but recoil is never “free.” You pay for it one
way or the other—scope cuts over the eye, nosebleed, deep
bruises, permanent flinch, mild concussion … the list goes
on and on.
When the gun was irst being planned, gunsmith Jim Gruning
suggested that an average-weight hunting rile might kick a little.
I did the math. A little? In a gun that weighed the same as
my brother-in-law’s 9-pound .308 Winchester, the .416 would
have more than three times the recoil of the .308. As a result,
we left the .416 barrel long and heavy.
For example, my .416 Taylor, when loaded with 350-grain
bullets at 2,550 fps, has about 32 pounds of recoil in my
15-pound rifle. If the gun weighed a more-normal 11 pounds,
it would have around 43 pounds of recoil. It would have 53
pounds of backward wallop in a 9-pound rifle.
The laminated wood stock we used was also pretty heavy.
I was happy with the finished gun at 15 pounds, knowing it
would help absorb some of the jolt.
The first time I shot it was to fireform some brass. After three
shots in fairly quick succession, I grinned at a hunting partner
who was at the range with me.
By way of comparison, a basic 9-pound .308 shooting a
168-grain bullet at 2,700 fps has about 15 pounds of recoil,
while a .223 shooting a 55-grain bullet at 3,100 fps—also
from a 9-pound gun—has just a little more than 3 pounds of
recoil. My belches have more recoil than that.
“It’s not that b-b-ba-ad,” I said.
“You realize you just stuttered, right?” He smirked, refusing
to shoot the gun.
I’m not great at math and probably even less great after
shooting big guns a lot over the years and jolting around my
few functioning brain cells. Yet, math can be illustrative.
You can download the formula for computing “free recoil” (go
to the SAAMI [Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers
No, really: The .416
Taylor cartridge is that
big. There is no illusion
here caused by a wideangle lens. And yes, the
author’s brother-in-law
and long-time friend,
R.G. Fann, both have
enormous hands.
I own a 9-pound .338 Winchester Magnum that is less
pleasant to shoot than my 15-pound .416 Taylor. With standard
250-grain bullets at 2,700 fps, that .338 has nearly 36 pounds
of recoil. But on appliances, the .338 is a firecracker, compared
to my .416 stick of dynamite.
Some guns are just painful. I will never forget the time I was
at a friend’s ranch in Montana, along with several other gun
fanatics. My buddy had traded for a .460 Weatherby that had
“I MADE A CHOICE,”
THE SHOOTER SAID,
NOT LOOKING UP
FROM THE RIFLE.
“DEATH BY BUFFALO
OR FROM SHOOTING
THIS DAMNED GUN
AGAIN. I CHOSE THE
BUFFALO.”
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
85% SIZE. 100% BROWNING.
Browning 1911-380
Scaled at 85% of
John M. Browning’s
original 1911 .45
If you can it the tip of
your pinky inger into
the bore of the rifle,
it’s usually a good sign
the gun will kick the
stufing out of you and
earn you an honorary
membership in the Gun
Loons Hall of Fame.
“You’re dead!” he said. “The buffalo has been dancing on your
body and tossing you on his horns.”
“I made a choice,” the shooter said, not looking up from the
rifle. “Death by buffalo or from shooting this damned gun
again. I chose the buffalo.”
We all shot the .460 at the “charging buffalo” that day, but the rest
of us did it with light, cast bullet loads that kicked about like a .308.
This is author
Matthews’ “appliance
gun”—a 15-pound
.416 Taylor made
up on a Howa 1500
action. Lifting this
brute provides a good
workout over the
course of a shooting
session.
You will want to shoot your boomer all the time once you
have one. And you will keep some full-power loads on hand
to occasionally torch off. Most of the time, however, you will
shoot light loads to tame the recoil and save money (and
to stop the possibility of a nosebleed and reduce flinching).
But whatever you decide to buy or put together, a big-bore
boomer will earn you a spot in the Gun Loon’s Honorary Hall
of Fame.
been built as a true lightweight safari rifle. The gun weighed
just a tick more than 8 pounds with a scope. The basic
factory Weatherby .460 will weigh 9½ to 10 pounds. Add to
that another 1½ pounds or more with a scope and heavy,
steel mounts. So, figure 11 to 12 pounds total weight. Even
at that weight, the recoil is fearsome (in my book). No one
in their right mind would shoot an 8-pound .460 Weatherby
with full power loads.
Yet, there we were, out at the range my friend had built
adjacent to his barn. The range had what he called three
“charging buffalo” gongs that were set up at 50, 35 and 20
yards, stair-stepping toward the firing line. The game we had
been playing while shooting with a .375 H&H was simple:
Load three rounds in the bolt gun, and then shoot the three
gongs as fast as possible, farthest to closest, from the offhand
position. We used a stopwatch. If accomplishing this task
took more than 10 seconds, or you missed a gong, you could
consider yourself “dead” from the “charging buffalo.”
The lightweight .460 Weatherby was there, and ammunition
was on the table. One of our friends picked up the .460, loaded
three rounds, one in the chamber, and stepped up to the line.
Someone started the stopwatch when he snapped the rifle up
to his shoulder. The gun roared once, staggering the shooter
backward two steps, the muzzle rising to nearly a 90-degree
angle, and the farthest buffalo gong swung backward sharply.
There was no effort to cycle another round. The shooter
simply rolled his shoulder a couple of times (presumably to
make sure it was still in its socket) and then looked at the rifle
for a long time. The stopwatch kept whirring away. Finally, the
gun’s owner—my buddy—stepped up to the shooter.
www.gunworld.com
w w.g nw rld
m
JULY
UL I 2017
2 17
TUCKER
GUNLEATHER
HF1
SO GOOD-LOOKING
YOU’LL HATE TO CONCEAL IT.
The Tucker Gunleather HF1 belt holster conceals like a pancake holster, but will never collapse.
The HF1 is the choice of 13 Texas Rangers for daily carry.
We answer emails and phone calls promptly.
www.tuckergunleather.com
800-308-6628 rob@tuckergunleather.com
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY STEVEN PAUL BARLOW
Traveling with weapons
can get you into trouble
if you aren’t acquainted
with the local laws.
TRAVELING N
ARMED
KNOWING WHERE YOU
CAN LEGALLY CARRY
CONCEALED ISN’T
ALWAYS EASY.
www.gunworld.com
o one I know who carries concealed goes around
looking for trouble.
When you are traveling, however, you’re more
likely to stumble into places you’d otherwise avoid.
At those times, you want to be armed.
The problem when traveling is that you also have to navigate the
confusing maze of complex irearms laws.
It’s your responsibility to know the local laws when traveling
with firearms. Federal buildings are off limits. Even the parking
lots of post offices are forbidden. From there, state and local
authorities might enact further restrictions. School property is
usually a no-no.
Even in states with constitutional carry laws, where permits are
not required, there are still some restrictions on where you can
carry. In some places, you can carry openly; in others, your gun
must always be concealed. Some laws prohibit carrying in a
restaurant that also serves alcohol.
JULY I 2017
e in a separate, locked container. That doesn’t make your gun
lable for self-defense, but at least it allows you to get your gun
our inal destination.
A lock box secured
with a cable—out of
sight—in your car
provides you with a
place to store your
gun if you must go
into a place where
you can’t carry.
OSA
Law Enforcement Oficers Safety Act (LEOSA) was passed in
4 and has been updated twice, most recently in 2013. It allows
ve and retired police oficers to carry nationwide. For retirees,
ddition to photo identiication from your former agency, you
have to show documentation that you’ve qualiied with the
of irearm you’re carrying.
LICE UNAWARE
y local police oficers are oblivious to many federal laws. So, if
re changing a tire on the side of the road in a state unfriendly
un owners and a police oficer sees the lockbox in your trunk
aining your properly unloaded irearm, you might be charged
way and forced to bring up the federal laws in court as part
our defense.
wise when traveling to carry printouts of the appropriate
s, FOPA, LEOSA or reciprocity agreements between states.
t way, if you’re lucky, you can immediately resolve any
issues with law enforcement.
During the course of your day on various errands, it’s likely you’ll
be someplace where you can’t carry.
THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT
STORE IT
I don’t like to keep a gun in a vehicle—you’re just one smashed
window away from losing your gun. But there are times when
you have no choice. In my car, I have a padded lockbox with a
touchpad combination lock and a steel cable that allows it to be
secured to a stationary object out of sight. But that won’t stop
someone with bolt-cutters.
CROSSING STATE LINES
If you’re handy with your smart phone, there are apps designed to
help you stay current with concealed-carry laws.
You have a pistol permit,
so you’re good to go, right?
Before traveling, you’d also
better check the knife laws
to make sure the blade on
your knife—such as this
CRKT Homefront—isn’t
too long.
CCW—CONCEALED CARRY 50-STATE GUIDE: This app costs a mere $1.99 and
provides key information regarding irearms laws in all 50 states,
as well as pertinent federal laws. The app is updated regularly and
gives you the language of the laws, themselves, not someone’s
interpretation of them. It includes a reciprocity map and quick
Some states honor the pistol permits of some other states. This
reciprocity comes with the stipulation that you must obey the
speciic gun laws of the state you’re in (which might be different
from your home state).
FOPA
What happens when you’re traveling to a state that offers
reciprocity, but you must pass through an unfriendly state that
does not recognize your permit? That’s where the Firearms
Owners’ Protection Act (FOPA) comes into play.
This federal law allows you to transport your irearms from a place
where you’re legally able to possess them to another place where
you can legally possess them, even if that means passing through
jurisdictions with restrictions.
However, there are stipulations: You have to transport the irearm
unloaded in a locked, hard-sided container in your vehicle’s trunk
or other place that is not accessible to those in the passenger
compartment. It cannot be in the glovebox or console. Ammo has
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
access to common regulations, such as whether you can carry
in a restaurant that serves alcohol and whether you must notify
a police oficer that you’re carrying if you happen to get stopped.
Your car’s glovebox
won’t sufice as a place
to store your gun when
traveling through a
restricted rights state.
The CCW Concealed
Carry 50-State app
provides a handy way to
double-check gun laws
when traveling.
LEGAL HEAT: This app features carry law summaries (these are written
by attorneys) for all 50 states. Any updates are instantly uploaded
whenever you open the app, and you receive notiications so you
will be aware there are changes in the laws. The app includes
some video overviews of key laws and costs just 99¢.
LEGAL BLADE: If you think sorting out all the gun laws is confusing,
try untangling the boondoggle of knife laws, which can vary
greatly, even within a state. Legal Blade provides a color-coded
quick reference to the knife laws across the country, with detailed
explanations available. The trouble is that many knife laws are
vague and open to interpretation. This app costs $1.99.
The app includes
a color-coded map
showing the states that
honor your carry permit.
Tucking your gun
unsecured under a car
seat is not a good idea
and is illegal when
transporting it through
a jurisdiction in which
your permit isn’t
honored.
It gives you quick
answers to where you
can or can’t carry
within a jurisdiction and
whether you have to
inform a police officer if
you are stopped.
HOMEWORK
I wouldn’t rely on any smart phone app—or even this column—as
a legal defense. Laws and the interpretation of those laws often
change with little notice. If you plan to travel with a weapon of any
kind, you have to do your research in advance.
RECIPROCITY LEGISLATION
In January of this year, U.S. Representative Richard Hudson (R-NC)
introduced a bill, H.R. 38, the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of
2017. It would mandate that your state concealed-carry permit is
recognized in all 50 states—similar to your driver’s license.
Hopefully, there has been more progress on this bill from the time I
write this to the time you’re reading it. But even with support from
the legislature and the president, you can count on obstruction
and court action from the opposing party. GW
Steven Paul Barlow is a retired sergeant/station commander and former firearms
instructor with the New York State Police. He has been writing on outdoor topics
for more than 30 years and has served as the editor for a number of Engaged
Media special publications, including Gunslingers.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
© 2017 O.F. Mossberg & Sons
REACH OUT AND PUNCH SOMETHING
with long-range rifles from Mossberg. As
America’s oldest family-owned and operated
firearms manufacturer, we’ve been building
dependable, hardworking rifles and shotguns
since 1919. American built. American strong.
ARM YOURSELF WITH MOSSBERG.
MVP LR (LONG RANGE) RIFLE
#27697 – ADJUSTABLE-COMB, MOSSCOTE CHEEKREST
M O S S B E R G . C O M / ARM YOURSELF
Safety Tip: Store firearms securely, inaccessible to children and unauthorized users.
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY MICHELLE CERINO
Drawing from a purse should be practiced with an unloaded handgun.
T
OFF-BODY
PURSE
CARRY
IF THAT’S HOW SHE
CARRIES, LEAVE HER ALONE!
www.gunworld.com
he constant debate over women carrying a handgun
in their purses never seems to end. With just a little
online forum research (which I usually avoid—
except when working on an article), I found the
following quotes:
“The irst thing a thief is going to grab is a woman’s purse.”
“Drawing from a purse takes longer than drawing from a
holster on your belt.”
“If she shoots through her purse, she will only get one shot off
before her gun jams.”
Often during a training class, a man will ask me how he can get
his signiicant other to carry concealed on her body instead of
in her purse. The woman then comes to me, frustrated, almost
asking permission to purse-carry, because so many people tell
her it’s not safe.
Honestly, I don’t see the big deal. If it means she will carry a gun,
let her carry it in her purse. Before you read further, let me fully
disclose that I carry … off-body, in a purse.
ISSUE 1: THE FIRST THING A
THIEF IS GOING TO GRAB IS A
WOMAN’S PURSE.
JULY I 2017
Sure, in a given situation, if there is a purse thief, he is going to grab
your purse. So, let him, and report it stolen, along with your handgun.
Pull your purse strap
tight with your weak
hand, and punch out
toward the threat with
your pistol.
Let’s think about the big picture: Are you carrying a gun to defend
yourself from a thief? Probably not. It’s important to differentiate
between a common thief who’s going to snatch a purse and run
and someone who is a true danger. I carry a concealed handgun
to defend myself, my family and others against a person who
intends to do them or me harm.
ISSUE 2: DRAWING FROM A
PURSE TAKES LONGER THAN
DRAWING FROM A HOLSTER ON
YOUR BELT.
I haven’t timed it yet, but common sense tells me drawing from a
purse and coming to a full presentation takes longer than drawing
from a holster. How much longer depends on several factors: the
location of the gun compartment and types of closure; the size of the
compartment; and if the gun is in a holster within the compartment.
down, you can reach into your purse, put your hand on your gun,
and keep it there. It’s ready to use in a second’s notice, and no
one is the wiser that you have a gun in your hand.
With on-body carry, you can’t do this, because bystanders will
know you have a gun and might even think you’re an attacker.
Plus, if the gun is exposed, this is considered “brandishing a
irearm,” which is illegal in most jurisdictions.
Now, let’s compare drawing from a purse to drawing from under
a full-length coat during the winter. Which one do you think will
take more time? If my long coat is buttoned all the way, I now
have to get under that, as well as my shirt layers, to get to my
handgun. Carrying in my purse now becomes a faster option.
However, just because your gun is in your purse doesn’t mean
you have to draw to a full presentation before iring. Yes, you can
shoot from within your purse. This might become necessary when
your target is in close proximity and you have no time for sighted
ire. You know—when you have a strange feeling that something
just isn’t “right.” You reach into your purse to orient the gun in
your hand in preparation. Firing through the purse might now be
necessary if the suspect is close and time is of the essence.
In certain situations, off-body carry in a purse can be better and
faster than on-body carry. If you’re ever in a situation and you get
an uncomfortable feeling that something could be about to go
A handgun should always
be kept in a separate
pocket to keep foreign
objects from entering the
trigger guard.
ISSUE 3: IF SHE SHOOTS
THROUGH HER PURSE, SHE
WILL ONLY GET ONE SHOT OFF
BEFORE HER GUN JAMS.
If you decide to attempt this tactic, the type of gun you carry is
very important.
Yes, a semiautomatic gun has a very good chance of jamming. A
lack of space and a variety of hang-ups will keep the slide from
operating properly. Most likely, you will ire your irst shot and
then ind yourself with a malfunction.
For shooting through a
purse, you should carry a
hammerless revolver.
Unfortunately, your best choice requires giving up capacity by
choosing a lightweight, hammerless revolver.
The Smith & Wesson Model 442, Bodyguard 38 or Ruger LCR
are options if you want to be able to ire from within your purse.
Unlike semiautomatic handguns, these hammerless, snub-nosed
revolvers will cycle reliably from a purse or even your pocket.
So, you have to decide if having ive or six rounds ready at hand
is better than having a high-capacity magazine that might not
meet your needs. Remember, you can always carry extra rounds
for your revolver in a Bianchi Speed Strip or HKS Speed Loader.
PRACTICE IT
The body won’t go where the mind hasn’t been. If you think you
will improvise a new tactic when your life depends on it, you
are probably wrong. You have to open your mind and train. I
had the opportunity to learn how to shoot through a purse while
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A
CONCEALED-CARRY PURSE
Kate Woolstenhulme, owner of Designer Concealed Carry,
spent many years designing her handbags to be functional
and safe for those who carry.
Sure, you want an elegant purse that carefully hides the
irearm. But there are other factors to consider that make
a purse usable as a tool for concealed carry. The following
are features of Kate’s Designer Concealed Carry purses:
participating in the online series, First Person Defender, by
Gun Talk Media.
You should always practice new techniques on a range so
you know what to expect should you need to use it in a reallife situation. Buy a couple of inexpensive purses from a
garage sale or Good Will, grab your revolver, and head out
to the range.
On the range, place a threat target close to you, simulating
a threat moving toward you. Grab the purse’s shoulder strap
with your weak hand, making it taut. This helps you get a good
shooting grip on your gun with your strong hand. Punch out
into the purse toward the threat. Once you pull the trigger, the
first round will create a big hole in the purse. On consecutive
shots, the muzzle pokes through. Your whole hand could
eventually come through the purse.
If you decide to carry in a purse, never allow your gun to mix
with the items inside. Keys, pens and other small objects
can get into your trigger guard and cause an unintentional
discharge or render the gun inoperable. It’s best to use a
purse specifically created for concealed carry. This keeps the
gun in a separate compartment and sometimes even offers
multiple access points to retrieve your gun.
The lockable zippers on an exterior pocket are carefully
hidden within the design and are equally accessible for
both right- and left-handed wearers;
A fully adjustable holster to secure various-sized handguns;
Adjustable straps to assure proper it and access to the
holster pocket;
An inside key clasp, slots for hotel key or cards, three
open pockets and a slim one for pens, as well as a long,
zippered pocket.
As you shoot through the
purse, your irearm will
eventually poke through.
Practice shooting
through a purse with live
ire so you know what
to expect.
When it comes to inding a purse for concealed carry,
make sure you do your homework. Find something that
is functional and doesn’t scream, “There’s a gun inside!”
The Santa Fe and Cubic
purses from Designer
Concealed Carry are both
stylish and functional.
And, of course, be sure to practice your draw with an
unloaded irearm.
CONTACT INFORMATION
DESIGNER CONCEALED CARRY
(972) 672-9437
www.DesignerConcealedCarry.com
Filming First Person
Defender and shooting
through a purse with
Simunition non-lethal
training ammunition
SIMUNITION
www.Simunition.com
Shooting through your purse works extremely well.
Nevertheless, sighted, aimed fire from full presentation is
always your best and safest choice.
If carrying in a purse means you will carry your gun, I highly
recommend it. Make sure you have the proper gun to meet
your needs, and then become comfortable with it. And
remember: Practice is essential!
Michelle Cerino is both a irearms trainer and the president of Cerino Consulting and
Training Group, LLC—a irearms training company she built with her husband, Chris,
in 2011. She writes, hunts and competes in major 3-gun matches nationwide.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY GARRETT LUCAS
THE SURVIVE AND THRIVE KIT
THIS KIT HAS ALL
THE BASIC SURVIVAL
BASES COVERED—AND
THEN SOME.
www.gunworld.com
or serious preppers and survivalists, the occupation
of being prepared is just as much a passionate
hobby as coin collecting, hunting, ishing or hiking.
Many of us enthusiasts often forget that most
folks who buy or pack survival gear do it because
it’s necessary. They don’t pour hours (or months and years) of
research into what they use.
F
In fact, most folks who pack some kind of survival gear for a hunt or
a day hike really don’t know much about surviving in the wild. So,
the gear options and the available training are a bit overwhelming.
That’s why it’s nice to keep things simple for the beginners or those
who really don’t have an interest in the subject but need the gear.
JULY I 2017
SURVIVE AND THRIVE
… THE MORAKNIV
KANSBOL IS AN
EXCELLENT CUTTING
TOOL THAT CAN BE USED
FOR VARIOUS TASKS,
INCLUDING CUTTING
CORDAGE, PROCESSING
GAME, PREPARING
FOOD AND PROCESSING
MATERIAL FOR A FIRE.
Industrial Revolution has introduced a new basic survival kit for 2017
as part of the Canterbury Collection called the Bushcraft Survive and
Thrive Kit. For basic survival situations such as getting lost or getting
stranded overnight some place, the Survive and Thrive kit is a great
solution for those not interested in doing the extra homework but
still want their bases covered with quality gear. Additionally, it can
serve as the foundation for a more comprehensive kit once the user
decides to build it out.
When it comes down to the absolute necessities for a short-term
survival situation, as far as a kit goes, there are three basic things
needed: a knife, the ability to start a ire and a method to collect and
purify water. Those three things will go a long way in helping an
individual make it for a few days if necessary.
The Survive and Thrive kit has those bases covered—and then
some. The kit includes the following pieces of gear:
The blade is 2.5mm thick, is made of stainless steel and has a Scandi
grind. There are a couple of proiles worked into the blade, making it
extremely eficient as a skinning knife or working with other media,
as well. It’s not to be used for batoning large splits, but for an allaround cutting tool, it’s hard to beat the Kansbol for the work that
can be done with it. Additionally, the spine has a 90-degree angle, so
it can be used with ire steels to get the sparks lying.
1 MoraKniv Kansbol knife
1 large, waterproof container of UCO Stormproof Matches
1 UCO Original Candle Lantern
1 32-ounce, wide-mouth Pathinder steel water bottle
1 25-ounce nesting cup/pot with lid
1 stainless steel bottle hanger
The fire-starting part
Dave Canterbury’s book, Bushcraft 101
of the kit includes
1 box of SWEETFIRE strikeable ire starters SWEETFIRE strikeable
MSRP: $99
Second, the nesting cup/pot and steel Pathinder water bottle make
a great combination for collecting and storing water, along with also
purifying water. In addition, the pot can be used around the camp to
make a stew or simply cook your dinner—whatever it might be. The
combo comes with a lid for the cup/pot and a hanger that can be
used for the cup/pot and the water bottle, as well.
fire starters, along
with a waterproof
container of UCO’s
Stormproof matches.
The new Bushcraft
Survive and Thrive
kit comes with the
basic items needed for
the beginner or nonenthusiast in order
to be ready for an
unplanned overnight
in the wild.
The kit does come with a container of UCO Stormproof matches,
which are handy. However, the standout in the ire group are the
SWEETFIRE strikeable ire starters. These are a little like matches, in
that they can be struck to ignite them, but they are much larger. Also,
the material that burns is made from resin left over from processing
sugar cane, and it will burn for around eight minutes. That makes it
an ideal tool to help the user get a ire started in inclement conditions.
MAJOR COMPONENTS
In some ways, the Bushcraft Survive and Thrive kit feels like a
beginner’s camp kit—not for lack of quality (because it’s there),
but in the simplicity of the included components. So, aside
from using it only as survival kit, it’s a great way to introduce
a novice to camping in the outdoors. Either way, there are a few
components that really stand out in regard to saving your bacon
if your outing takes a wrong turn.
First, and foremost, the Morakniv Kansbol is an excellent cutting
tool that can be used for various tasks, including cutting cordage,
processing game, preparing food and processing material for a ire.
The Kansbol is a bit of an update to Morakniv’s 2000 model and, like
its predecessors, it’s extremely sharp.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
Purifying water is a simple
matter, even on the go,
with a small fire and the
Pathfinder pot.
The kit’s packing material
makes great tinder for
a fire, and a wad can be
stuffed into a pack or a
pocket before you head out
into the woods.
The SWEETFIRE fire
starters burn for
approximately eight
minutes and work well
for stubborn tinder or
getting fire going in
inclement conditions.
I timed three of the SWEETFIRE ire starters to see how long they
would burn, and the average came out to 7 minutes, 42 seconds.
After being struck, the phosphorous helped the tip burn bright; but
I did notice that I had to protect it from the wind to make sure the
rest of the ire starter got burning well. There was a breeze that
blew out one in the beginning, but once the body of the ire starter
had a good lame working, it was much more wind resistant.
The Morakniv Kansbol
is an updated version
of the Morakniv 2000.
It has multiple edge
profiles to make it a
versatile cutting tool
for processing wood,
game or for food
preparation.
The inal major component that brings it all together is Dave
Canterbury’s Bushcraft 101 book. It lays out a lot of good
general information that will inform the unexperienced on tips
and techniques to make the best of their time out in the wild. I
especially appreciated the inclusion of the book in the kit, because
it helps address a primary part of surviving the outdoors: building
or improvising shelters.
THE KIT DOES COME
WITH A CONTAINER
OF UCO STORMPROOF
MATCHES, WHICH ARE
HANDY. HOWEVER,
THE STANDOUT IN THE
FIRE GROUP ARE THE
SWEETFIRE STRIKEABLE
FIRE STARTERS.
CONTACT INFORMATION
INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
(888) 297-6062
www.IndustrialRev.com
Although it is a basic
kit, the Bushcraft
Survive and Thrive kit
contains all quality
gear that’s been
designed and tested to
ensure its effectiveness
in the field.
LAST THOUGHTS
The Bushcraft Survive and Thrive kit does not have a wide variety
of gear to address every need, but it drills in on the most crucial
items to keep you going for at least a few days. The target audience
is novices or folks who aren’t interested in building their own kit by
hand. The gear that it does include, however, comprises some of the
most respected products on the market and is a great starter kit for
those just getting into the game.
If you ind yourself looking for a quick and simple way to get a
buschraft kit together or something to put in the pack the next time
you go hiking or on a hunt, the Survive and Thrive kit will deinitely
serve you well. GW
Garrett Lucas has been a member of the prepper community for more than 20
years. He has served as editor for American Survival Guide and has written
on topics that include firearms, cutlery, long-term preparedness, wilderness
survival, first aid and personal/home security. He currently resides in
Kentucky, where he continues his learning process each and every day.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY BRIAN BERRY
The author
demonstrates
the El Presidente
drill setup.
MAKE THE
MOST
OF YOUR
SHOOTING
TIME
IMPROVING
YOUR
TECHNIQUE
WON’T
HAPPEN
WHILE YOU SIT
AT HOME.
www.gunworld.com
I
try to shoot as much as I possibly can and still get all the
other things I have to do accomplished. However, when
life’s complications take hold, getting to the range is
usually one of the first things to get cut. Because of this,
I need to make the most of my range time and also try
to squeeze in some training that doesn’t require me to pack up
and head to the range.
With all the modern technology out there, I have found a couple
of ways to augment my range time that are also complementary
to my range drills.
Unless you are a professional shooter, you have to work a “real”
job to pay for your guns, ammo and all those accessories. That
time, along with your family responsibilities and everything else,
takes up precious waking hours, and dreaming about being a
better shot won’t make it so.
TRAINING OPTIONS
I am always on the lookout for something to make me a
better shot—and a faster one—and maybe even save me
some money, as well. Several years ago, I bought my first
S.I.R.T. pistol (www.NextLevelTraining.com) while attending
JULY I 2017
SNAPCAPS
an NRA annual meeting. During the instructor seminar, I
saw the demonstration and decided to take the plunge and
purchase one. Since then, I have bought several more and
use them regularly in my classes. I have the Glock 17 model,
which feels the same as my real one, fits my holster and even
accepts the magazines. The downside: There’s no recoil.
During the 2016 NRA Annual Meeting, I went the extra step
and bought a compatible laser program from the folks at
L.A.S.R. (www.LASRApp.com). It allows me to configure
my targets in the same manner as my live-fire drills, and
I can shoot two to 300 shots in a session—without any
additional cost—while still getting the instant feedback
that is so important.
DRILLS
El Presidente: This drill was good enough for Jeff Cooper,
so it’s good enough for you! Having an alternate to live fire
is important, especially if I am training on a drill such as the
El Presidente. For the El Pres, you place three USPSA or IPSC
targets 3 feet apart from each other. Using the USPSA classifier
rules, stand 30 feet from the targets. Starting with your back
to the targets, you turn at the buzzer, draw, fire two rounds at
each target from left to right, reload and fire two more rounds
at each target.
This one string of fire uses a total of 12 rounds. I will normally
do 10 to 15 strings in a session practicing the El Presidente
drill. That’s between 120 and 180 rounds. The cost could add
One of the least-talked-about tools for improving
your overall shooting experience is snapcaps.
There are several manufacturers of these “dummy”
ammunition rounds; and, for a few bucks, you can
use them for more than just dry-iring.
When choosing your snapcap, make sure it is
easily identifiable as a practice round and avoid
those that look too similar to live ammunition.
Below are some good reasons to keep some of
these in your range bag:
1. You can use them to practice loading and
unloading magazines and revolvers.
2. They can identify issues with your trigger
pull: Mix some in with your live ammo at the
range and have someone watch you to see if you
are dipping your gun in anticipation of recoil.
3. You can mix them in with your ammo to
work on your immediate-action drills. Get
used to clearing jams and misfires. If you
are nonchalant at the range, you will also be
nonchalant during the real thing.
4. They can save wear and tear on your iring
pin. Check your gun manual to see if you should
be dry-iring without something for your iring
pin to fall on.
up quickly with live ammo—not to mention having to pick up all
that brass. I still run the drill live, but using the S.I.R.T and the
L.A.S.R program saves me money and still allows me to work on all
my fundamentals … except recoil. (I might have to break down and
buy one of the several training pistols on the market that do provide
recoil. After all, it’s only money!)
Seek Cover (Getting off the “X”): Another drill I like to use
that works well with both live and S.I.R.T is to use two targets
with the distance adjusted to your skill level. I set the targets
about 3 feet from each other, with one target 3 to 6 feet farther
away. I also set up something I can use to simulate cover. From
the draw, I engage the close target with two rounds, followed
by a single shot to the head. Then, I engage the second target
in the same manner.
The combination of
a S.I.R.T. training
pistol and the L.A.S.R.
computer program
comprises a great costsaving tool. It can also
help you work on your
fundamentals and get
instant feedback.
www.gunworld.com
When loading for this drill, it is best to have someone else load
your magazines. Have them insert a dummy round to simulate an
immediate-action response (that is, tap the magazine, pull back
on the slide, observe the fault, and re-engage the target). If no
one is available to load for you, the other option is to load only
two rounds in one of the magazines. In both cases, you can seek
cover, correct the malfunction and then re-engage the target.
JULY I 2017
MUSCLE MEMORY
Use multiple targets. Why? Because bad guys tend to travel in
multiples; and if your muscle memory is just one target, it could
be troublesome.
Not all muscle memory is good. I remember hearing of an incident
during which an assailant killed a law enforcement oficer while
he was reloading. During the investigation, they found the oficer’s
expended ammunition in his pocket. A habit he had developed during
range training cost him precious time to reload. The end result was
tragic. Get used to dropping magazines on the ground, getting your
knees dirty while taking cover and scanning for additional threats.
Those are habits that can save your life.
I AM ALWAYS ON
THE LOOKOUT FOR
SOMETHING TO MAKE
ME A BETTER SHOT—
AND A FASTER ONE …
Seeking cover should
be included in your
training regimen if
you carry a handgun
for self-defense. Look
for something that
will protect you from
small-arms ire. Car
doors and interior walls
will not protect you in
most cases.
When coming back out from cover, make sure to “pie” around
any corners to avoid immediately exposing yourself to return
fire. When reloading, keep the gun up in front of your face and
between you and the threat so you can still maintain awareness
of what is going on. Fatal mistakes come from dropping your
weapon to waist level or other locations that don’t allow you to
maintain awareness of your surroundings.
Move to Cover: This last drill involves a bit more movement. I set up
three targets about 2 feet apart and staggered in depth 2 to 4 feet each.
Starting distance is 10 to 15 feet from the closest target. I also set up
barricades to simulate cover at 20 feet and 25 feet from the irst target.
From the draw, I engage the closest target with two rounds and
then move rearward to the first covered position. From behind
cover, I engage the next farthest target with two rounds and then
move to the last position of cover at 25 feet. Again from cover,
I engage the farthest target with two rounds and then scan and
access the area for any additional targets.
For added training, continue to maintain awareness, and try to get
out your phone to call for help. This will give you an idea of how
dificult it might be to maintain awareness of your targets while
trying to contact 911.
These are intermediate drills and are not meant for beginners.
However, if you carry a irearm every day for protection, you should
be working toward at least this level of proiciency. Going to the
static range and iring a full magazine, one after the other, without
practicing reloads or immediate-action drills could be a mistake you
pay for: You don’t want to do a rapid reload or conduct immediateaction drills for the irst time in a real-life situation.
www.gunworld.com
Each of these drills requires you to maintain safe gun-handling
procedures. If the drills seem too advanced for you, slow down a
bit. Start from the high- or low-ready stance instead of the draw.
Moving from cover to cover doesn’t require running on your irst day
of training; walk irst. You should also run through these in dry-ire
mode to prevent accidents until you are ready for the full-up version.
TRAIN FOR THE UNEXPECTED
Vary your training sessions; it will give you more experience for what
might happen. There is no way to train for every situation. Getting
better won’t happen while you sit at home, watching John Wick.
Some ranges will not let you conduct these drills—which also
makes training dificult. This is especially true of most indoor ranges.
But I don’t blame them. I would be a little worried if someone I didn’t
know started shooting these drills next to my shooting lane.
If you have the capability, film yourself while you practice. It
can help you identify weaknesses and areas that might not be
working the way you want them to.
You will never get better unless you train. Find a good instructor,
and get some help. Avoid bad habits, and train as if your life
depended on it!
Brian Berry is a retired Army Special Forces Command
sergeant major. He is a former Special Forces Weapons
sergeant and has multiple combat tours under his belt. Brian
is the co-founder of Spartan Defensive Concepts, at which
he teaches concealed carry and defensive marksmanship
courses. Brian retired in 2014 and is now a consultant currently
working for the Special Operations community, as well as a
senior instructor for American Survival Guide University.
JULY I 2017
Made in USA
MAKE RELOADING EASY
Fits
GSG-1911
and
SIG SAUER
1911-22
Mags
MAKE RELOADING EASY
www.mygtul.com
757-647-0805
ADVERTISER .......................................................................................................... PAGE
BROWNING ................................................................................................................ 77
CONNECTICUT SHOTGUN ......................................................................................41, 61
COUNTRY HOME PRODUCTS, INC.................................................................................. 7
CRIMSON TRACE CORP............................................................................................... 87
CZ-USA ...................................................................................................................... 67
DAVIDSON’S .............................................................................................................. 99
DEFENSE MARKETING GROUP .................................................................................... 51
DEL-TON .................................................................................................................... 45
DILLON PRECISION .................................................................................................... 63
DOUBLETAP AMMUNITION ........................................................................................... 2
EAGLE IMPORTS ........................................................................................................ 43
FNH, USA ..................................................................................................................... 3
FOBUS U.S.A. ............................................................................................................. 71
GTUL.......................................................................................................................... 95
HERITAGE .................................................................................................................. 35
HOGUE GRIPS ............................................................................................................ 95
KENSINGTON PUBLISHING CORP. ............................................................................... 53
LES BAER CUSTOM,INC.............................................................................................. 55
LYMAN PRODUCTS CORP. ........................................................................................... 69
MAXSELL CORPORATION ........................................................................................... 49
MILITARY 1ST ............................................................................................................ 13
O.F. MOSSBERG FIREARMS ........................................................................................ 83
RAMRODZ INC ........................................................................................................... 59
RIO GRANDE CUSTOM GRIPS, LLC .............................................................................. 95
SAFARILAND.............................................................................................................. 91
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY .............................................................................................. 21
STURM, RUGER & COMPANY, INC. ............................................................................ 100
TACTICAL SOLUTIONS ................................................................................................ 27
TAURUS INTERNATIONAL ........................................................................................... 37
TRUGLO ..................................................................................................................... 17
TUCKER GUN LEATHER ............................................................................................... 79
WILSON COMBAT ....................................................................................................... 29
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
TEXT BY JEFF QUINN
GUN SHOWS
BACK IN THE DAY, THESE EVENTS WERE RARE—AND SPECIAL.
T
he Gun Show. Just the name brings a smile to my
face. In my younger days, a gun show—any gun
local show had lost its magic, and I could see everything it
had to offer in a half-hour. The thrill was gone, at least for me.
show—was a reason to get excited.
My first experience with gun shows were those
held at the local National Guard armory. They were not large
shows; maybe 100 tables or so. But as the day approached,
I would get as nervous as a new father awaiting the birth of
his first child. Back in those days, newly married, we were as
poor as church mice, but we always managed to scrape up
some cash to take to the Gun Show.
There, one could see irearms that were seldom, if ever,
encountered at local gun shops: guns such as the Ruger Mini-14
and Number 1 rifles, Colt Single Action Army six-guns, as well
as the high-dollar shotguns about which I had only read. Also
present were big-bore rifles suited for Africa, Anschutz target
guns and pistols from foreign lands.
Like a cocaine addict looking to re-experience that feeling of
his first time, I started traveling farther, seeking out bigger
and better gun shows. What was once a quick run into town
to see the Gun Show had now become an all-day trip—and it
was worth it.
The larger shows usually held more variety and had a lot
more tables to peruse and seek out the latest and greatest,
as well as some old relics. Of those relics, many were very
good firearms. I recall a time when a person could buy SKS
rifles in great condition for 50 bucks a piece, Egyptian Hakim
8x57mm rifles with excellent bores for 80 bucks and MosinNagant Russian bolt guns priced at three for $100.
INCREDIBLE DEALS
I have run across some great deals at gun shows.
Gun shows were a magical getaway, and it was difficult to
keep from breaking into a sprint while heading for the front
door to gain entrance to such a place. In those days, gun
shows were rare—and special.
THE THRILL IS GONE
The years passed, and the gun show changed (or maybe I just
became jaded). It seemed that as these shows increased in
frequency, the excitement abated. What was once an annual
event became a quarterly event and then a monthly event. The
local gun shows seemed to always have the same dealers and
the same inventory they displayed at the previous shows. The
… THE MAIN LESSON I HAVE
LEARNED IN MY MANY
YEARS OF GUN SHOW
ADVENTURES IS TO NEVER
RIDE A MOTORCYCLE TO A
GUN SHOW.
www.gunworld.com
I once bought a like-new Freedom Arms Model 83 .454 Casull
revolver at a great price. This revolver had every factory
option (along with an invoice to prove it). The dealer said that
it came with a “spare .44 Magnum cylinder.” I tried explaining
that the extra cylinder was for .45 Colt ammunition, but he
would hear none of it, insisting that the revolver could fire
both .454 and .44 Magnum ammunition.
Even so, I left there with the gun, accessories and a fitted
case for $1,000. (I quickly resold everything for three
times that amount.)
Another great deal was encountered at a large gun show on
a Sunday afternoon. I ran across a table that held only three
long guns and a few pistols. What caught my eye like a giant
fish hook was an old Winchester Model 1894. It showed some
wear, but I stopped for a look.
The owner was busy haggling with another fellow, so I
impatiently waited my turn. Finding a break in their conversion,
I inquired about the price. The place was noisy, but I heard the
JULY I 2017
man price the rifle at $1,350. Nevertheless, I figured I was
going to leave there with the old rifle. It was pretty special.
nothing that I figured I needed, and I was traveling alone, so I
decided to ride my Harley.
The low serial numbered indicated it was a first-year gun
for the .30 WCF cartridge, and it wore a half-octagon/round barrel and a crescent buttplate. It was to be mine,
but I only had $1,200 bucks in my left boot, so it was time
to do some dickering.
Big mistake. While I had not intended to buy anything, I left Tulsa
with three long guns, a revolver, lots of reloading equipment
and a cowboy hat that occupied an entire saddlebag.
From that time forward, I knew to always take the truck. GW
I LEFT THERE WITH
THE GUN, ACCESSORIES
AND A FITTED CASE
FOR $1,000. (I QUICKLY
RESOLD EVERYTHING
FOR THREE TIMES THAT
AMOUNT.)
I asked the man for his rock-bottom cash price. He looked
me square in the eye and stated, “I told you, young fellow:
$350—not a penny less!” I couldn’t believe the low price, but
I quickly paid the man and latched onto that rifle.
GUN SHOWS VIA A HOG
Many other good deals have been made over the years, but
the main lesson I have learned in my many years of gun show
adventures is to never ride a motorcycle to a gun show.
I once rode about 450 miles to a large gun show. There was
Jeff Quinn is a full-time writer/reviewer on Gunblast.com, an online gun
magazine started in 2000. He has also written for the Gun Digest Annual and
enjoys living life in the woods of Tennessee, where he raises Longhorn cattle
… and his grandkids.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
PHOTO BY ROBB MANNING
JULY 4, 1776:
A few brave patriots
declared America’s
independence; then,
rough men armed
with guns and grit
made it so.
www.gunworld.com
JULY I 2017
TM
Simple, ONE BUTTON
Takedown
While the heavily redesigned Ruger® Mark IV™ maintains the same classic outward appearance
as the Ruger® Mark III™, it incorporates a significant improvement customers will love – a simple,
one-button takedown for quick and easy field-stripping. A recessed button in the back of the frame
allows the barrel-receiver assembly to tilt up and off of the grip frame without the use of tools. The
bolt simply slides out of the receiver and the barrel can be properly cleaned from chamber to muzzle.
Accurate, Adjustable Sighting System
Available in a Variety of Grip Configurations
Ambidextrous Manual Safety Positively
Locks the Sear When Applied
Simple, One-Button Takedown for Quick and Easy
Field-Stripping (No Tools Required)
Available in Multiple Barrel Configurations
© 2017 Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. 041317
RUGER .COM/MARKIV
Find Ruger:
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
10
Размер файла
20 565 Кб
Теги
journal, Gun World
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа