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Highlights for Children - November 2017

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NOVEMBER 2017
www.Highlights.com
What’s a
B L I P PO ?
Page 30
Spinning
Superheroes
Page 36
Follow
the
!
N
FU
h
t
n
o
M
s
Fun Thi
Word
Art
r
e
l
z
z
u
P
e
k
a
Cupc
school’s
akes at her
You’ve probably
written a story
before, but have
you ever written
a drawing?
ing cupc
Daisy is sell
akes have
of the cupc
ll
A
.
le
sa
e
k
t for
ba
mon excep
m
o
c
in
g
in
someth
pcake
spot the cu
u
o
y
n
a
C
.
e
on
nt?
that’s differe
Using only
words, see what
clever images
you can create.
Send
us your
drawings!
Answer on page 38.
Tongue Twister
King Cauliflower.
Mystery
P
to
ho
A n s we r o n
pa
38
.
Can you fin
this magazine?
at another place in
ge
icturectsures
Find tdheaech P
of these 12 pi
Veterans
Day
Decoration
By Edna
Harrington
ribbon
Make this
star frame
to honor a
veteran.
craft foam
Veteran
s
Day is
Novemb
er
11.
photo of a
service member
Dear Reader
NOVEMBER 2017 • VOLUME 72 • NUMBER 11 • ISSUE NO. 793
By Christine French Cully
Editor in Chief
Founded in 1946 by Garry C. Myers, Ph.D.,
and Caroline Clark Myers
Editor in Chief: Christine French Cully
Vice President, Magazine Group Editorial: Jamie Bryant
Creative Director: Marie O’Neill
Editor: Judy Burke
Art Director: Patrick Greenish, Jr.
Senior Editor: Joëlle Dujardin
Associate Editor: Linda K. Rose
Assistant Editor: Allison Kane
Copy Editor: Joan Prevete Hyman
Editorial Assistant: Channing Kaiser
Senior Production Artist: Dave Justice
Contributing Science Editor: Andrew Boyles
Editorial Offices: 803 Church Street, Honesdale, PA 18431-1895.
E-mail: eds@highlights.com.
To submit manuscripts, go to Highlights.submittable.com.
(Writers younger than 16: please use the postal address above.)
CEO: Kent S. Johnson
Vice President, International: Andy Shafran
Senior Editor, International: Julie Stoehr
Business Offices: 1800 Watermark Drive,
P.O. Box 269, Columbus, OH 43216-0269.
Copyright © 2017, Highlights for Children, Inc.
All rights reserved.
HIGHLIGHTS FOR CHILDREN is published monthly.
ISSN 0018-165X (print)
ISSN 2330-6920 (online)
Designed for use in the classroom.
Sometimes we make our list of customer names and addresses
available to carefully screened companies whose products and
services might be of interest to you. We never provide children’s
names. If you do not wish to receive these mailings, please contact
us and include your account number.
Printed by RR Donnelley, Glasgow, KY.
Periodical postage paid at Columbus, Ohio;
Toronto, Ontario; and at additional mailing offices.
U.S. Postmaster: Send address changes to Highlights for Children,
P.O. Box 6038, Harlan, IA 51593-1538.
Canada Post: Publications Mail Agreement No. 40065670. Return
undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 99 Stn. Main, Milton,
ON L9T 9Z9.
To order, make a payment, change your address,
or for other customer-service needs, such as changing
your contact preference, please contact us:
• Online: www.Highlights.com
• Call: 1-800-255-9517
• Write: P.O. Box 5878, Harlan, IA 51593-1378
As part of our mission to help make the world a better place
for the children of today and tomorrow, Highlights is committed
to making responsible business decisions that will protect our
natural resources and reduce our environmental impact.
AWARDS Highlights has been given awards by The Association
of Educational Publishers, The Education Center, LLC, Family
Choice Awards, Freedoms Foundation, Graphic Arts Association,
iParenting Media, Magazine Design and Production, National
Association for Gifted Children, National Conference of Christians
and Jews, National Parenting Center, National Safety Council,
Parents’ Choice, Parent’s Guide to Children’s Media Awards, and
Printing Industry Association. HighlightsKids.com is a participant in
the Kids Privacy Safe Harbor program of the Children’s Advertising
Review Unit (CARU) of the Council of Better Business Bureaus.
A Helping
Hand
Earlier today, I was coming to work
with my hands full of books and bags.
One of our editors, Joan, was walking
behind me. She called “Wait!” and rushed
ahead to open the door for me. I was glad I didn’t have to put
everything down and pick it all up again.
It was a small gesture, but it put a big smile on my face.
If you read “Goofus and Gallant” every month (page 10), you
know that’s how Gallant acts. He’s always ready to lend a
hand. Joan is that kind of person, too.
I believe most of us want to be kind and helpful—even
Goofus. Sometimes we just need to be reminded to pay
attention to others and what they might need. The more
we practice kindness, the easier it becomes.
If you’re interested in
practicing kindness, don’t
miss this month’s “Gallant
Challenge” (page 11). And to
learn what other kids think
about kindness, be sure to visit
HighlightsKids.com for the
results of our annual State of
the Kid survey.
Your friend,
Write to me!
Christine@Highlights.com
This magazine of wholesome fun
is dedicated to helping children grow in basic skills and knowledge,
creativeness, in ability to think and reason,
in sensitivity to others, in high ideals and worthy ways of living—
®
for children are the world’s most important people .
in
VOLUME 72 • NUMBER 11 • ISSUE NO. 793
Dear Highlights,
YUM
—Ross, Texas
It’s easy to get excited when we want to share
something, Ross. We hope these tips help.
1 When you
feel like blurting
something out,
write it down.
2 Would the
teacher want you
to share it? If so,
raise your hand.
3 Take deep
breaths or count
silently as you wait
to be called on.
Novem !
be
is Nat r 28
ional
French
Toast
Day.
4 For more
ideas, talk to
your parents
or teacher.
32
12
28
6
BrainPlay
8
What do you think
puppies dream about?
7
Autumn
When runaway leaves
dance in the
breeze.
You’re the
Cover Artist!
Highlights covers from kids.
10
Goofus and Gallant®
Where are those cleats
when you need them?
11
Gallant Challenge
Brighten someone’s day!
12
The Way Things
Used to Be
Thanksgiving will be
different for James this year.
14
Hidden Pictures®
Puzzle
Talk about a feast!
15
Jokes
A strange dream about
a door that won’t open.
4
NOVEMBER 2017
16
A Final Touch
of Color
Red autumn leaves posed
a mystery to scientists.
18
Your Own Pages
See more drawings from
creative kids like Elliot.
20
The Sweet-Treats
Schoolhouse
School in a gingerbread
cottage isn’t always easy.
TOASTY
W
hat’s the
sea otter’s
secret
to staying
warm
in chilly w
aters?
A thick co
at
of fur!
22
34
Gobble Up
the Garden
U.S. Army veteran
Melissa Stockwell
loves a challenge.
Know your veggies? Dig
into this quiz and find out.
24
27
36
Game On!
Devin has a tough decision
to make.
28
30
Planet Zlippo’s
Blippos
You Can Be Coo
l,
Too!
Elliot Park
Age 7 • Colorado
Riddles
39
Paws and Think
Working in a car factory.
The Timbertoes
®
The kids want to reach the
last good apple on the tree.
32
38
What is a hot dog’s
favorite hairstyle?
How many Blippos are
in the space garden?
31
Crafts
Make Pinecone Owls, a
Thankful Turkey, Spinning
Superheroes, and more.
My Sci
A giant dino from Argentina,
black holes, and more.
Divvy Up Desserts
Help Katie Cater rearrange
the Thanksgiving treats.
Standing Strong
Balancing the Books
Bike riding with a basketful
of books can be tricky!
40
Ask Arizona®
Is it possible to outgrow
a friend?
42
Dear Highlights
Feeling out of place.
NOVEMBER 2017
5
STAR
T
Take
you
on a r brain
hike!
Why do
peo
keep pla ple
nts
indoors?
What is the
smallest dot or
spot you see
every day?
ions
Which decis
are EASY
to make?
Which are
difficult?
W HAT
I S TH E
LARGEST
O N E?
od
These fo me:
y
words rh
B E E TS
CAN A G
N
DRIPPIM
AKE
FAUCET
MUSIC?
M EATS
SW E ETS
WHY OR
WHY NOT?
What name
would you create
for a funny monster
character?
For a scary one?
o you s
d
t
a
Wh puppie
think about?
dream
A pen
can run
out of
ink.
Name
other
things
that can
run out.
Why might
engineers
put pipes
for a town’s
water system
underground?
quick
“She’s as
g!”
as lightnin
could
What else e
someone b
as”?
“as quick
If your
family had a
theme song,
what would
it be?
name
Can you g
rhymin
other
things in s?
categorie
TH
ENDE
Autumn
By Charles Ghigna
Art by Edwardian Taylor
When owls hide in the treetops,
When fields are stubbly and bare,
When geese f ly high in the cool, clear sky,
And the days are sunny and fair,
When pumpkins appear on the porches
And shadows chase after the day,
When runaway leaves dance in the breeze—
Autumn is on display.
NOVEMBER 2017
7
You’re the
Cover Artist!
We asked you what you’d draw if you could illustrate a
Highlights cover. Here are some of your fantastic creations.
8
Samantha Patton
Age 9 • Minnesota
Ella Gardner
Age 11 • Virginia
Auri Marcrum
Age 7 • Missouri
Chayne Shevalier
Age 7 • Colorado
Rowen Harary
Age 9 • New Jersey
Owen Smalley
Age 9 • Kansas
NOVEMBER 2017
Sawyer Reed
Age 11 • Montana
Aubrey Hairr
Age 10 • North Carolina
Alessandra Canzoneri
Age 9 • New York
Leslie Garcia
Age 10 • Texas
Kaitlynn Masson
Age 9 • Virginia
Alexander Tallentire
Age 11 • Colorado
Mia Zielinski
Age 7 • California
Olivia Jensen
Age 9 • Utah
Winston Zhuang
Age 8 • Kentucky
NOVEMBER 2017
9
Goaondfus
Gallant
There’s some of Goofus and Gallant in us all.
When the Gallant shines through, we show our best self.
®
“Be right there. I’ll just grab my
skates,” says Gallant.
“Dad, help me find my cleats!”
says Goofus.
Gallant tries not to stare so that he won’t
make others feel uncomfortable.
Goofus stares at people.
YOUR Goofus and Gallant Moments
“I felt like Goofus when I
“I felt like Gallant when
got into the chocolate chips
after Mom told me not to.”
I didn’t pout after the
other team scored.”
Carolina, Age 8, Ohio
10
NOVEMBER 2017
Zan, Age 7, New York
Art by Leslie Harrington.
T
GALLAN GE
N
CHALLE
World
Kindne
ss Day
is Nove
mber
13.
I’m
getting worried
about soccer
tryouts.
I can
help you
practice.
Brighten
Someone’s Day!
A kind word, a thoughtful
gesture, or a helping hand can
be all it takes to make someone’s
day a little brighter. Give it a
try! Notice the people around
you, think about what you can
do for them, and take action.
Tune In and Help Out
As you go about your day,
challenge yourself to “tune
in” to your friends and family.
Notice what they’re doing and
how they’re feeling. Then ask
yourself if there’s something
you can do for them. Here are
some ideas:
“Just four more bags of
groceries to go.”
“I’ll carry these two in.”
Art by Keith Frawley.
“I’m not ready for my
math test!”
“Want me to help you study?”
“I’m having the worst day.”
“I heard the funniest joke.
Maybe it’ll cheer you up.”
“I’ll be finished with this work
in a half hour.”
“I’ll play with the baby
to keep him quiet.”
Everybody Wins
The more you think about
what you can do for others,
the easier it becomes. And
when you lend a hand, two
things often happen: the
people you’ve helped feel
good, and you do, too!
Did You
Brighten
Someone’s
Day?
What did you do recently to
help out a friend or a family
member? We’d love to know!
Send your response, along
with your name, age, and
address, to
Brighten Someone’s Day!
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
In a future issue, we’ll
publish a few responses.
NOVEMBER 2017
11
The Way
Things
“I miss
Grandma
so much!”
Used to Be
By Susan Kneib Schank
Art by Andy Elkerton
James heaved a bag of groceries into
the car. “So much food for one meal!”
“I know. Imagine if we were having a
real turkey, too,” said Mom.
“We’re not?” said James.
“Aunt Amy is a vegetarian. She’ll
make ‘turkey’ out of tofu,” said Mom.
James groaned. “Tofu turkey?”
Mom smiled. “You might like it.”
James didn’t want to try
vegetarian Thanksgiving at
Aunt Amy’s house.
James didn’t want to try vegetarian
Thanksgiving at Aunt Amy’s house. He
wanted things to be the way they used
to be, at Grandma’s. James would
always help Grandma cook the meal,
and she’d tell him about Thanksgiving
when she was a girl. He’d laugh as she
told about the time she fell in the mud
12
NOVEMBER 2017
while picking pumpkins for pie.
That night, Mom and James started
preparing food for the next day’s feast.
“Why don’t you make the corn
muffins?” said Mom. “Grandma always
said you made them best.”
“I miss her so much!” James said.
“I do, too,” said Mom. “But she’d be
happy to know we were cooking her
favorite recipes, right?”
“I guess,” said James. But what about
Grandma’s turkey recipe? he thought.
Mom chatted while they worked.
James stayed quiet.
“Will you tell me Grandma’s story
about Thanksgiving when she was a
kid?” James said before he went to bed.
Mom smiled. “You would tell it better.
And I found something at Grandma’s
that might help you.” She left the room
and came back with a small book.
James read the tag on the journal.
It said: For James, who loves stories as
much as I do. Write what’s in your
heart. Love, Grandma.
“She meant it for your birthday, but I
think you need it early. Why don’t you
write her story in here?” said Mom.
James opened the journal and stared
at the blank page for a while. Then he
began to write.
“Happy Thanksgiving!” Mom sang
the next morning.
James sat up. “Tofu turkey. Yippee.”
“We’ll have lots to eat,” Mom said.
James got ready slowly. He was
about to head downstairs when he
saw the journal. He slipped it into
his pocket.
James’s cousin, Amber, answered the
door. “You’re here!” she cried. “We can’t
wait for you to try our tofu turkey!”
“I can’t wait either,” James said
He took
a small
bite.
“Why
don’t you
write her
story in
here?”
politely. “I keep thinking about it.”
James felt a lump in his throat when
he saw the table set with Grandma’s
china. Soon the family sat down. Food
was passed. Plates were filled. James
looked at the tofu turkey Aunt Amy put
on his plate. It didn’t look like turkey.
He took a small bite anyway and was
surprised. “It’s not bad,” he said.
Amber smiled. “Glad you like it.”
James looked around. It wasn’t
Grandma’s house, but it was family. He
patted the journal in his pocket. “Hey,
Amber. Want to hear a story later?”
Want ae?
challeng
Scarecrow’s Night Off
5
k page 1
Fold bac the
e
to hid
clues.
picture
By Neil Numberman
In this big picture, find the artist’s brush, straw hat, waffle, canoe, ruler, teacup, tent, caterpillar,
high-heeled shoe, pitcher, golf club, cauliflower, megaphone, drinking straw, and candle.
14
NOVEMBER 2017
Check out our Hidden Pictures app!
Picture Clues
artist’s
brush
straw hat
canoe
waffle
ruler
JOKES
“Knock, knock.”
“Who’s there?”
“Annie.”
“Annie who?”
”
“Annie body home?
Tatum, Oregon
teacup
Doctor: How are you feeling?
Doughnut: Well, kind of empty.
Doctor: Hmm, that’s unusual.
You’re a Boston cream!
Emma Duerr, Massachusetts
tent
A book never written: Walking to
School by Misty Bus.
caterpillar
high-heeled
shoe
pitcher
Darby, Iowa
Dangling Earring #1: Want to go
to the movies?
Dangling Earring #2: No thanks.
Let’s just hang around.
Fernando Farfan, Quebec, Canada
Stephen: I had a dream and I don’t
don t
know what it means.
Grace: What was it about?
Stephen: There was a door with
a sign on it, and no matter how
hard I pushed, it wouldn’t open.
Grace: What did the sign say?
Stephen: “Pull.”
Jaelyn Lindquist, Wisconsin
Make us laugh!
Send a joke or riddle, along with your
name, age, and address, to
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
golf club
cauliflower
megaphone
candle
drinking
straw
BONUS
Can you also
find the envelope,
needle, peanut,
and hairbrush?
Answers on HighlightsKids.com.
Walking
the Dog
Each afternoon, I walk my dog.
Did I say walk? I mean we jog.
Did I say jog? I mean we run,
Six feet f lying! Oh, what fun!
Every day, just after three,
I walk my dog—and she walks me.
—Sandi Leibowitz
NOVEMBER 2017
15
of
h
c
u
o
T
l
a
n
i
F
A
PRONOUNCE
THE PIGMENTS
O
R
O
L
C
The pigment that makes
plants green is chlorophyll
(KLOR-oh-fill).
Yellow and orange
colors are carotenoids
(kah-RAWT-en-oyds).
Reds are anthocyanins
(AN-thoh-SIGH-ah-nins).
Why
h does nature paint some autumn leaves red??
By Andy Boyles
Contributing Science Editor
The red
e is
maple tre
r the
named fo
ins in
anthocyan es
v
its fall lea
it
and in s
we rs .
spring f lo
When Missy Eppes was
young, she loved to climb her
family’s maple tree during
the fall. “It turned the most
amazing colors of orange
and red and yellow,” she
says. “I would sit up in that
tree in the fall and feel like
I was sitting inside the sun.”
Today, she is Dr. Eppes, a
scientist at the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte.
She and her students have
worked to help solve a puzzle
about autumn leaf colors.
Scientists understand
why summer leaves are
16
NOVEMBER 2017
green and why they change
to yellow or orange in the
autumn. But autumn reds
are different. Some leaves
turn red. Others don’t. It’s
a mystery.
Inside all leaves, all
summer long, a green
pigment (colored chemical)
called chlorophyll catches
energy from sunlight for
photosynthesis, a process
that makes food for the
plant. Yellow and orange
chemicals called carotenoids
are there through the
summer, hidden by the
chlorophyll. These lighter
colors help catch sunlight
and pass the energy to
chlorophyll. In the autumn,
photosynthesis stops, and
the green chlorophyll breaks
down. Then the yellow and
orange carotenoids show
through in the leaves.
But for most plants, the
red color, anthocyanin, has
not been hiding. The leaf
doesn’t start making this
red pigment until the fall.
Dr. Eppes says, “Trees use
up a lot of energy to make
anthocyanin. So it has
Sweet-gum
rn
leaves may tu
some
yellow, red, or
n,
hue in betwee
ow
h
depending on
t
much sunligh
hits them.
Leaves of
the yellow
birch can’t
make antho
cyanin. Wh
en
the green ch
lorophyll
breaks dow
n, the yello
w
carotenoids
show
through.
always been a mystery why
they would go to all of that
trouble at a time when they
should be ‘going to sleep’ for
the winter.”
Anthocyanins may help
a leaf save nutrients that
it stored up in the growing
season. Dr. Eppes and her
students ran a study to test
that idea. In a protected area
in North Carolina, they
counted the kinds of trees
that live in rich soil low on
the hillsides, and the types
that live in poor hilltop soils.
Low on the hillsides, they
Watch
for Reds
nlight
Notice how su
uch of red,
helps give a to
le plant. For
even on a sing
,
e anthocyanins
plants that mak
nd
get more sun te
the leaves that
ade.
sh
in
than those
to turn redder
found more birches, beeches,
and other trees that can’t
make anthocyanins. These
trees have yellow or brown
fall leaves. On the hilltops,
most of the trees were red
maples, sweet gums, and
others that can make
anthocyanins, giving them
red leaves in the fall.
“Trees that don’t make
anthocyanins seem to
naturally live in places with
lots of ‘food,’ like f loodplains
where nutrients get added
to the soil each time the
river f loods,” Dr. Eppes
says. “Trees that make
anthocyanins seem to live
in places that don’t have
this buffet.”
Dr. Eppes suspects the
anthocyanins may lie in the
soil after the leaves drop,
fertilizing the tree in the
spring. Other scientists think
the chemical works like
sunscreen, protecting the
leaf while it moves nutrients
into the tree and stores them
for the winter.
The mystery isn’t solved
yet, but scientists are a few
steps closer!
NOVEMBER 2017
17
Your Own
Pages
Jacob Katz
Age 6 • New York
Tess Dunphy
Age 7 • Massachusetts
Seashore
me
air surrounds
the salty ocean
d crash
waves swirl an
ys
beach da
end
so
fast
but i stare at
ls play ing,
thieving seag ul
ng good
salty air smelli
s
my hear t grow
s
tear drip
and a saltwater
y
on
k to my sand
down my chee
legs.
re
fa well,
seashore
Flower
Deer
Rowan Hassler
Age 6 • Illinois
Branson Rhone
Age 12 • Texas
Mia Vakoc
chusetts
Age 10 • Massa
Rosy Mama
Mama is a rose.
Her face is the f lower.
Her body is the stem.
Her hands are the leaves.
Her feet are the roots.
Mama is a rose.
Abhijeet Ghosh
Age 7 • Georgia
18
NOVEMBER 2017
Baseball
I play ball.
A mitt waiting for a f ly ball.
A bat waiting for a home run.
The bases waiting for players.
Home plate waiting for runs.
Pitcher waiting for strikes.
Fans waiting for wins.
And that is what I like about ball.
Ben Wiltrout
Age 7 • Indiana
Hailey Smith
Age 11 • Washington
A Galaxy
Far away, I wonder what
Lies beyond the Milky Way.
Do aliens live?
Does another race exist?
I wonder when
We will know.
Or if we will ever know.
Skating at the Rink
I see the skates in different colo
rs.
Red, black, and blue.
I see the lights dancing.
I love to skate with you!
I hear music in the air,
And just smile at the rink,
Thinking of things
No one else can think.
Alex Hancock
Age 9 • Kentucky
Madison Stringer
Age 8 • Louisiana
Cats
Ahnna Rogalewicz
Age 8 • Pennsylvania
ey
Peaceful Vall
sweet.
I love cats, they ’re so
s so nice and neat.
They keep themselve
paws and feet.
They have such nice
at next to the creek.
They always take a se
et!
They always love to me
ay valley.
elf in a faraw
Picture yours
ine
ls of nice jasm
dew
The air smel
ith morning
s is glazed w
as
gr
e
th
d
n
A
ight.
ers are so br
A nd the f low
ss valley.
ugh the endle
ro
th
g
in
n
n
You, ru
ll of joy
Your spirit fu
rt open wide.
A nd your hea
James Athos
Age 6 • Oregon
New England
Patriots Helmet
Jack Ragosta
Age 7 • Rhode Island
Olives are juicy,
Olives are sweet,
And I love to have
Olives for a special treat.
My friend does not like them,
But I surely do.
And if you try them,
You might like them, too.
e
Gabriel Sass
ia
rn
Age 9 • Califo
If I Were a Bear . . .
If I were a bear,
I would eat fish and
I would hunt for honey.
But,
If I were a bear,
What kind of bear would
I be?
If I were a bear,
I would not dare to be scared,
And I would sleep in my lair,
And I would like to hibernate.
I would be a
Cuddly bear.
Sohana Gulati
Age 6 • California
Natalie Miner
Age 8 • Missouri
Share Your
Creative Work
We’d love to see it!
Art must be on unlined paper.
Poems must have fewer than
75 words. All submissions
must be created by you.
“Meat
You
There”
Alex Harvey
Age 9 • Tennessee
We can t
return y r
so ou
ght wa t to
keep a c py.
Include your name, age,
and address. Mail to
Your Own Pages
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
“In here, all I can
think about is
eating cookies.”
The
Sweet-Treats
Schoolhouse
By Maggie Murphy • Art by Scott Soeder
Little Pig sat on a shortbread
bench, trying to ignore his
schoolhouse’s mouth-watering
fresh-baked smell. He turned
to his brother Middle Pig and
said, “I can’t wait until Big Pig
starts building our new school.
In here, all I can think about is
eating cookies.”
“Resisting the treats is better
than watching the whole class
yawning all day,” said Middle
Pig. “The weird sleeping spell
that hit the castle near our old
school sure was strong.”
20
NOVEMBER 2017
Little Pig agreed. “We had to
move! Who wants to nap during
recess? And I’m glad everyone
is awake to see the model of my
playhouse.” Happily, he peeked
into a bag that held a small,
fancy straw house.
“Quiet for roll call, please,”
said their teacher, Mama Bear.
“Red Riding Hood?”
“Here,” said Red Riding Hood.
“Hang up your pretty scarlet
cloak on a candy cane, dear,” said
Mama Bear. “Thumbelina?”
“Here!” said a small voice.
Mama Bear looked around.
“Where are you, darling?”
“Over here!”
Sharp-eyed Little Pig spotted
his tiny classmate and pointed.
“She’s on the lemon-drop
lampshade, Mrs. Bear.”
“Hop to a front desktop, would
you, Belina? Good. Baby Bear?”
Baby’s shaggy paw waved
wildly. “Grrr. I mean, here! Mama,
someone’s sitting at my desk.”
“Baby, you know that in this
temporary location, students
share desks. Of course Goldilocks
is allowed to sit with you.”
“But she’s eating my desk
all up!” cried Baby Bear.
“Now that is a problem,”
Mama Bear admitted.
“Goldilocks, dear, if you break
off one more chocolate square
from that desk’s lid, I’ll have
to give you a timeout in the
sugar-free corner. Students, I
know it’s a great temptation to
sip the gummy-fish aquarium’s
lemonade, to snap pretzels off
the picture frames, and to sneak
jelly beans from the beanbag
chairs. Still, you mustn’t. Right
now, Fairywoods School District
has no other classroom available
but this abandoned gingerbread
cottage. Until money is somehow
raised to purchase the materials
Big Pig needs to build a brick
schoolhouse, we can’t eat
this one.”
Mama Bear finished roll call,
then said, “Who would like to
share for show-and-tell?”
Just before Jack eagerly
raised his hand, Little Pig’s hoof
shot up.
“Go ahead, Little Pig,” said
Mama Bear.
Beaming, Little Pig held up
his pint-sized house. “This is
a model of the awesome straw
playhouse Big Pig will build
for me. I saved my pennies for
months to buy the straw, and
I even helped Big Pig with
the design.”
“My, what a wonderful
playhouse,” said Mama Bear.
“It will have everything from
towers to balconies. You’re lucky
your oldest brother is a master
craftspig. I hope it won’t be long
before we can get him that load
of bricks. Thank you, Little.
Jack, it’s your turn now.”
Jack whipped out a harp.
“Look, everybody, at this neat
magic harp I . . . uh, found.
Harp, play!”
To Little Pig’s delight, the
harp plucked out a tune. Soon
Mama Bear was leading the
class in a lively song perfect for
growling and oinking.
But Little Pig’s merry oink
rose to a squeal as the door f lew
open so hard that—bloof!—
powdered sugar puffed like
a genie’s smoke. A short man
clutching a fistful of straw
ran in, yelling, “I’m mad
enough to stomp through
this peanut-brittle f loor!”
“Mine is a rare talent,”
said Rumpelstiltskin.
“I spin straw into
gold.”
“Rumpelstiltskin! Good
morning, neighbor,” said
Mama Bear.
“Don’t call me
Rumpelstiltskin! My name is a
secret. What’s all this ruckus?”
“Jack has brought his magic
harp for show-and-tell,” said
Mama Bear.
Rumpelstiltskin shook
his hat in the air. “I need it
quiet, kids! I’m busy making a
very special product from straw.”
Shyly, Little Pig said, “I like
to make things out of straw, too,
Mr. Rumpel—um, sir.”
“But mine is a rare talent,
young pig. I spin straw into
precious gold.”
“You do? Wow.” Little Pig
looked at his model thoughtfully.
Should he? It had taken ages to
save up for the straw to build his
playhouse, but . . .
Little Pig cleared his throat.
“Mrs. Bear, I have an idea. Let’s
have Rumpelstiltskin spin the
straw I bought for my playhouse
into gold for us. We can pay
Rumpelstiltskin for his work
with some of the treasure—”
“Half,” Rumpelstiltskin said.
Little Pig nodded. “Half. Then
we could use the rest of the gold
to buy the bricks for our school.”
So that’s exactly what
happened. And that’s why,
in honor of Little Pig’s straw
playhouse, the new yellow brick
school has everything from
towers to balconies.
“I have
an idea.”
Gobble Up
the Garden
Art by Helena Bogosian
et
MarkU
p
Mix-cket would you
d pa umbers?
h se e
c
Wh i c p l ant cu
o
t
y
bu
A.
B.
2
Sprouter
Space
Which o
f th
grown in ese has been
s
Internati pace, on the
on al S pa
ce Statio
A . L e t us s
n?
ay lettuc
e!
B. Orange
you
it’s orang thinking
es?
C . Positiv
e it’s pop
corn.
22
NOVEMBER 2017
Chomp
through
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questions!
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Just two o he other is a sweet
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s an d b e
et s .
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p e pp e rs
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e
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ments.
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ientific
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wild rab ge to hide from
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coloring
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Answers on page 38.
n
De
v
Ta
r
Br y
a
in
an
d
an
GAME
ON!
J or
Bright
Lights
Devin has led his
team to the big
game. Now he
faces a tougher
challenge.
By Rich Wallace
Art by Gerald Kelley
Devin’s heart sank.
“Corner kick!” Devin yelled
as the ball rolled out of bounds.
He rushed to the corner of the
soccer field.
Players in red jerseys and
players in blue bunched up
near the goal. A few seconds
remained in the game, and the
score was tied.
Devin kicked the ball hard
and watched it loft toward the
goal. He sprinted onto the field.
Tara trapped the ball and
pivoted. A swarm of opponents
blocked her path.
24
NOVEMBER 2017
“Right here!” Devin called.
Tara nudged the ball in
Devin’s direction. He outraced
a boy in blue and swept the ball
to the side. For a split second he
saw a clear opening to the goal.
He struck the ball hard and held
his breath as it f lew toward the
upper corner of the net.
Goal!
“Championship
game, here we
come!”
Seconds later, the referee
blew the whistle. Game over.
“We won!” hollered Jordan,
leaping into the air.
“Championship game, here we
come!” said Tara, slapping hands
with Devin. “Can’t wait till
Thursday.”
Devin grinned. Thursday
would be huge—the big soccer
game in the afternoon, and the
school’s autumn concert in the
evening. Ms. Poltis had chosen
Devin to sing a brief solo.
“Great work,” Coach said as
Devin sat on the bench
and pulled off his cleats. His
teammates were super excited.
They were on the verge of a title,
and Devin was a big reason why.
He led the league in scoring, and
his soccer knowledge made him
like a coach on the field. He
couldn’t let his team down by
skipping the game.
Jordan patted Devin’s
shoulder. “You’re the MVP,” he
said. “You kept us in that game
and then you won it.”
“Thanks, but no player wins
anything alone,” Devin said.
“Eleven of us were on the field.
Remember that.”
Devin frowned. He’d tell
Ms. Poltis in the morning. There
were other kids who could sing
the solo. He wasn’t the best
singer anyway, and he knew it.
the team gathered. “Be here by
6:30 on Thursday to warm up.”
“Six thirty?” Devin said.
That didn’t sound right.
“It’s a night game,” Coach
explained. “Under the lights.”
Devin’s heart sank. The
concert was at 7:00. Same time
as the game. He couldn’t
possibly do both.
“Playing at night will be so
cool,” Tara said. “It’ll feel like
a pro game.”
“Yeah,” said Bryan. “Under
the bright stadium lights.”
That night, Devin lay in bed,
staring at the ceiling. Finally,
he turned on his light. Trophies
and ribbons from races, baseball
leagues, and free-throw contests
lined his shelves. He looked at
them for a moment, then picked
up a sheet of paper from his
desk. After reading the words,
he shut his eyes and sang them:
“‘No matter how hard the
struggle, I will never let you
down. . . .’ ”
The solo was only four lines
in the middle of a song the
entire choir would sing. Devin
knew the words by heart, but
the thought of singing alone
made him shiver. Sometimes he
was nervous about participating
in sports, too, but that always
went away as soon as a game
started. He’d never sung a solo
before. It was a relief to know he
didn’t have to now. The soccer
game was a perfect excuse. His
team was counting on him.
But so was Ms. Poltis.
Devin crawled back into bed.
It was a long time before he
fell asleep.
In the morning, Devin hardly
ate any breakfast.
“Feeling all right, honey?” his
mother asked.
Devin shrugged. “I’m just not
that hungry.”
“You had a big day yesterday,”
Mom said. “And you’ll have a
bigger one tomorrow.”
Devin nodded and took a bite
of toast.
At school, he went straight
to the music room. He felt
sorry to tell Ms. Poltis that
he’d miss the concert.
“Good morning, Devin,”
said Ms. Poltis.
“Good morning.” Devin looked
at the f loor.
(Continued on next page)
A Tip from
the Author
Develop your soccer skills
by juggling the ball. Bounce
it up a few inches with the
top of your foot, then put
your foot under it and pop
it up again. You may be
able to do only one or two
juggles at first, but you’ll
improve quickly. Practice
this skill with both feet!
Rich Wallace is the author of
dozens of sports novels for
kids, including the books in the
Winning Season and Kickers
series. He has played and
coached a lot of sports, too.
NOVEMBER 2017
25
“I chose you because you work hard.”
(Continued from page 25)
“All set for tomorrow night?”
Ms. Poltis asked.
Devin squirmed. He was
ready, but not for the concert.
“You look worried,” Ms. Poltis
said. “You’ll do fine, Devin.”
“I . . .” Just tell her, Devin
thought. Be brave.
“Would you like to practice
some more?” she asked gently.
“Maybe once,” Devin replied.
He liked the song, and he
appreciated how kind Ms. Poltis
always was. He looked up at her
and his eyes filled with tears.
“Sit down for a moment,”
Ms. Poltis said. “You know, I
didn’t choose you for the solo
because you’re the best singer.”
She smiled warmly.
All eyes would
be on him.
Devin smiled, too. It was no
secret that several other choir
members had stronger singing
voices than he did.
“I chose you because you work
hard, like the person in the song.
And you have a very nice voice.
So don’t be nervous. Be proud.”
Devin stood taller. He and Ms.
Poltis sang together, and Devin
handled the solo perfectly. Then
his heart sank again. He hadn’t
told her about the soccer game.
The one under those bright
stadium lights.
On Thursday evening, Devin
warmed up slowly. He was very
excited, and he needed to contain
that energy or he’d start too fast
and run out of steam.
26
NOVEMBER 2017
Once those bright lights
come on, you’ll be fine, he told
himself. Like always.
Devin took a deep breath.
So many people had come
to watch tonight. In a few
moments, all eyes would
be on him.
He’d made a difficult choice.
There would be other concerts.
And other championship
games.
The bright lights came on.
Devin stayed calm. He sang
with confidence. “‘No matter
how hard the struggle . . .’”
Devin finished the solo and
smiled at Ms. Poltis. He was
proud of the choice he’d made.
A Tip from a Kid
When playing a team
sport, always look out
to help your teammates,
and always be ready to
receive a pass.
Nina Ramsumair
Age 12 • Pennsylvania
Share a sports tip!
Send it to
Sports Tips
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
Divvy Up
Desserts
By Clare Mishica • Art by Josh Lewis
Katie Cater is hosting a big Thanksgiving
meal for her friends and family, and
it’s time for dessert! Katie wants to
rearrange the treats on the trays
so that each of the red trays has the
same number of cookies, each of the
yellow trays has the same number of
pumpkin-pie slices, and each of the
orange trays has the same number
of caramel apples. How many treats
should be on each tray?
Katie Cater’s cousins Ava,
Brayden, and Carter made
the desserts for their
Thanksgiving gathering.
Katie wants to write thankyou notes, but she can’t
remember which cousin
brought each treat. Use the
clues to help her figure out
who made each dessert.
CLUES
B O N US
!
Find tw
o
• Carter’s dessert starts with
the same letter as his name.
match
in
caram g
e
apples l
.
• Ava did not make cookies.
• Brayden’s treat is served on
a stick.
Answers on page 38.
NOVEMBER 2017
27
MY SC
A sea otter can close
its ears and nostrils
when it dives
underwater to find
food or to play.
Otter
Hair
Traps
Air
The sea otter, unlike its smaller cousin, the
river otter, is almost always in the water. It
even sleeps in the sea, floating on its back.
The Pacific Ocean waters where sea otters
live are often very cold. Otters don’t have
a layer of blubber, as seals and other sea
mammals do, to insulate them from the cold
water. Instead, they have a special blanket:
a thick fur coat with two layers to trap air.
Barbs (jagged edges)
on each hair make the
fluffy undercoat tangle
together, trapping air
that keeps the skin
warm and dry. Long,
thick “guard” hairs
clump together to form
a waterproof outer coat.
The sea otter spends a lot of its
time cleaning and fluffing its
fur to keep air in it.
Its dense undercoat has more
hairs in a square inch than you
have on your whole head!
By Dougal Dixon
Art by Robert Squier
Sarmientosaurus
sahr-me-EN-toe-SAWR-us
“Lizard from Sarmiento” (the town
near where the fossils were found)
Large eye sockets,
so probably had
large eyes
The head and neck
More than 60 different species of
were found, but
titanosaurs (a late group of large
the
rest of the
plant eaters) have been discovered in
body was
Argentina, but most of them included
not.
very little of the skull. Sarmientosaurus
was found with a nearly complete skull.
That gave scientists a better idea
Thick teeth,
of what a titanosaur head was like.
good for
28
slicing tough
plants
NOVEMBER 2017
Where
do
things
that go into
a black hole go?
When its feet
are held out of
the water, they
stay warmer
and can absorb
heat from
the sun.
A Highlights Reader (by e-mail)
Things that are pulled into the
enormous gravity of a black hole
become part of it.
Unlike a hole in your sock, a
black hole is not an opening; it’s
the term for a dead star with a
very strong gravitational pull.
When a big star—much more
massive than our Sun—uses up
all its fuel after a few million years,
it collapses, which means
that it squeezes its core tightly
together and crushes down
to almost nothing. In the small
region around this super-dense,
super-small object, nothing
can escape. Things
pulled in by its gravity
become part of the
compressed mass.
Thinking Challenge
Murray is in a hurry! He’s dashing out the door,
but he wants to give two friends matching lollipops.
He has five lime lollipops and five strawberry
lollipops in a jar, but the wrappers all look alike.
What’s the fewest he should grab to be sure he’ll
have two pops of the same flavor?
Answer on page 38.
NuUreShee
BO
b e s lim s
To s two hat’
get ops, wst he
p
lolli e fewetake?
th ould
sh
Based on its inner-ear cavity,
scientists believe Sarmientosaurus
may have heard low rumbling sounds
better than its relatives did.
WHERE:
Argentina
Likely held
ld
d its
head facing down,
based on neck
bones and position
of ear canals
HOW LONG:
40 feet
WHAT IT ATE:
Low-growing
plants
WHEN:
95 million years ago
252
Triassic
201
Jurassic
145
66
Cretaceous
Present
Cenozoic
Planet
Zlippo’s
Blippos
By Clare Mishica
Small creatures called Blippos live on Planet
Zlippo. When it rains, each Blippo splits into
two every hour. When it snows, each Blippo
splits into three every hour.
One day, it rained for six hours. Before the rain
began, there was only one Blippo in the space
garden. How many were in the garden after the
rain stopped? How many would have ended up
in the garden if it had snowed instead?
Word
Hideand-Seek
By Teresa A. DiNicola
Within each pair of
words below, there are
two words that sound
exactly alike but have
different spellings and
meanings. Can you
find them?
Example: chair share
BON US!
Are ther
e more
Blippos
with polk
a
dots or w
ithout
polka do
ts?
1. seed
2. date
3. planet
4. bleak
5. mildew
6. jewel
7. learn
8. wonder
seal
weight
explain
sleek
duel
your
turn
bone
Answers on page 38.
30
NOVEMBER 2017
Answers on
page 38.
The
The apples had fallen.
Timbertoes
®
By Rich Wallace • Art by Ron Zalme
It was up too high.
There’s
a good
one!
They shook the tree.
They threw old apples.
It’s too
strong.
How can
we get it?
Mabel had an idea.
Wait right
here.
It was as good as it looked.
It worked!
Balancing
the Books
By Teresa Bateman • Art by Susan Batori
On Monday, Becca biked to the
library. She found a book on horses.
“Great!” she said. She checked it out
and home she sped.
One book.
One basket.
One girl on a bike—pedaling home
with a book that she’ll like.
The book was so good that she
finished it fast. Good books are like
that. They just don’t last.
The next Monday, Becca biked back
to the library. She knew just what she
had to do. Get TWICE as many. She
found two. Mummies and monsters.
“Perfect!” she said. She checked them
out and home she sped.
Two books.
One basket.
One girl on a bike—pedaling home
with some books that she’ll like.
The books were so good that she
finished them fast. She waited around
until a whole week had passed.
The next Monday, Becca biked to
the library again. This time she knew
she would need more. TWICE as
32
NOVEMBER 2017
many—that made FOUR.
Four books.
One basket.
One girl on a bike—pedaling home
with some books that she’ll like.
The books were so good, they seemed
to f ly. Then she waited and sighed until
a week had gone by.
The next Monday, Becca biked back
to the library. She hurried in, could
hardly wait. Twice more again. She
checked out EIGHT!
Eight books.
One basket.
One girl on a bike—pedaling home
with some books that she’ll like.
The books were so good that she
finished them fast. (Though she tried,
really tried, to make the books last.)
The next Monday, Becca biked back
to the library. Reading was great!
Amazing. Keen. She’d get TWICE as
many. She checked out 16.
Sixteen books.
One basket.
One girl on a bike—pedaling home
with some books that she’ll like.
But with books stacked so high,
In three weeks,
she’d need 128!
Then 256! What
could she do?
she could just barely see. And the bike
started weaving alarmingly.
She made it home—whew!—without
causing a crash. She read all the books
in sort of a dash.
But now Becca thought of the two
weeks ahead. Twice 16 would be 32,
and twice 32 would be so much more.
Her bike basket just couldn’t hold 64!
Then it hit her. Her horrible fate. In
three weeks, she’d need 128! Then 256!
What could she do? She thought and
she thought for a day, maybe two.
Finally, her sister decided to speak.
“Don’t you know that the library’s open
all week?”
The next day, Becca biked back to the
library. She loved to read. That much
was true. She found good books and
checked out . . . two.
Two books.
One basket.
One girl on a bike—pedaling home
with some books that she’ll like.
The books were so good that she
finished them fast. Good books are
like that. They just don’t last.
But now, when she’s done, Becca hops
on her bike and hurries to pick out
more books that she’ll like.
She’s there every day, her joy
guaranteed—for as everyone knows,
readers just have to read.
NOVEMBER 2017
33
STAN DI NG STRONG
U.S. Army
veteran Melissa
Stockwell loves
a challenge.
By Marty Kaminsky
O
n a bright, warm day in Rio
de Janeiro, Brazil, eight athletes
from six countries sprint toward
the finish line. The date is
September 11, 2016, and they
are competing in the first-ever
women’s paratriathlon, a threerace event in the Paralympic
Games. They have completed
the 750-meter swim and the
20-kilometer bicycle race. Now
they are closing in on the finish,
the end of the 5-kilometer run.
Melissa Stockwell, whose
left leg was amputated above
the knee, is one of the
front-runners. Her
husband, Brian, and
their 18-month-old son,
Dallas, urge her on.
With her teammates waiting
at the finish line, she pushes
through her exhaustion and
pain. Melissa says, “I saw my
two teammates standing at the
finish line with an American
f lag and told myself to GO, GO,
GO!” With a burst of energy,
she crosses the line, winning
a bronze medal to go with
Allysa Seely’s gold and Hailey
Danisewicz’s silver. Americans
have won all three top spots!
The three wave the f lag and
share a joyous hug as the
crowd roars.
Proud to Wear the
Army Uniform
Growing up in Michigan,
Georgia, and Minnesota, Melissa
was a talented gymnast. As a
student at the University of
Colorado, she joined the United
States Army ROTC (Reserve
Officer Training Corps). “I was
born a patriot,” she explains.
“I was dedicated to serving
my country and to wearing an
Army uniform.”
Photos: page 34 by Getty Images/Raphael Dias; page 35 (left)
Getty Images/Harry How, (right) courtesy of Dare2tri.
She was wearing that
uniform on April 13, 2004, two
years after she graduated. She
was a second lieutenant, riding
in a Humvee in Baghdad, Iraq.
As the armored vehicle
drove under an overpass, it
struck a roadside bomb. The
explosion spun the vehicle into
a guardrail, severely injuring
Melissa’s left leg. A helicopter
rushed Melissa to a hospital,
where an emergency operation
“Continue to believe
in yourself and find
a way to succeed.”
saved her life. Eventually,
Melissa found herself back
in the United States, where
complications from her injury
required another 15 surgeries.
She received a Bronze Star for
her bravery and a Purple Heart
in recognition of her injury.
Strength Through Sports
Her spirit remained strong.
“I could either accept the loss
of my leg or live in a constant
state of ‘why me?’” she says.
“But I knew I wouldn’t be
myself until I could get back
to athletics of some kind.”
Melissa’s mother, Marlene,
recalls her daughter’s attitude
as she regained strength
through swimming. “Seeing so
many patients with injuries far
worse than hers, she realized
that she was lucky to have the
chance to live a life again and
became more determined to live
in honor of those soldiers who
would not.” Only 52 days after
her injury, Melissa took her
first steps on a prosthetic leg.
One day, Melissa saw
a presentation about the
Paralympic Games—athletic
events for people with
disabilities. Inspired, she
ramped up her swimming
to a competitive level.
Although she was considered
a long shot, Melissa made the
2008 USA Paralympic Team
and represented her country
in Beijing, China. She was
disappointed with her
performance but was chosen
to carry the United States f lag
at the closing ceremonies. “It
was a moment I want to relive
over and over, representing
my country,” she says.
After the 2008 Olympics,
Inspiring Others
Melissa Stockwell coaches
with Dare2tri, an organization
she co-founded with Keri
Serota and Dan Tun. Based
in Chicago, the nonprofit
group encourages people with
physical disabilities and visual
impairments to participate
in triathlons.
Melissa was invited to try
paratriathlon. She loved the
challenge. She trained and went
on to win the International
Triathlon Union Paralympic
World Championships in 2010,
2011, and 2012. She won
numerous championships and
was named the women’s USA
Paratriathlete of the Year in
2010 and 2011. She counts
her 2016 bronze-medal win
in Rio de Janeiro as one of the
best moments of her life.
Today, Melissa keeps training
and gives inspirational talks
based on her experiences. “Don’t
take no for an answer,” she says.
“Continue to believe in yourself
and find a way to succeed.”
NOVEMBER 2017
35
Crafts
Ma
hi
Next Montth!
Locker
Organizer
By Heather Boltz
1. Cut the top off a snack box. Cut
3–5 inches off both sides and the
front. Leave a rectangular basket
at the bottom.
2. Glue magnets on the back.
Decorate the box with scrapbook
paper and stickers. Hang it in your
locker or on your refrigerator.
Did you hear
the one about
the owl? It was
a hoot!
Pinecone
Owls
By Anne Renaud
1. Cut wings, eyebrows, a beak, and
a face shape from craft foam.
2. Glue them to a pinecone. Add
wiggle eyes.
Spinning
Superheroes
Save
some feathers
and have your
Thanksgiving gu
ests
write what they
’re
thankful
for!
By Caroline Hatton
1. On an index
card, draw the
pattern shown
at right. Draw
and color a
superhero
using
markers.
2. Cut along
the red
dotted
lines. Fold along the
black lines. Hold the
bottom panels back with
a paper clip.
3. Gently bend the cape—
one panel forward, one
panel backward. Drop
your superhero from
up high and watch it
spin to the ground.
Thankful Turkey
By Jennifer Hill
1. Cut a turkey’s head,
body, wings, and feet from
poster board. Decorate
them with cardstock, yarn,
and markers.
2. Cut 15 feathers from
cardstock. Write something
you’re thankful for on each
feather. Glue them onto
the turkey.
Craft Challenge! Create a self-portrait out of colored paper and glue.
Craft samples by Buff McAllister.
Photos by Guy Cali Associates, Inc., except locker by iStock/RichLegg.
NOVEMBER 2017
37
Feathered Fun
S
L
E
D
RI D
What do you call two
birds in love?
1
Lydia, California
“I didn’t think they
could fly.”
“I’ve been following
your tweets.”
cross
Why did the robot
the road?
Lucia Ma
What fish helped the
knight underwater?
3
Answer
page 2
Fun This Month
Cupcake Puzzler
The frosting and
wrapper don’t match.
Mystery Photo —Tree bark.
page 22
Gobble Up the Garden
1. A 2. A 3. B 4. B 5. C 6. C 7. B 8. C
page 27
Divvy Up Desserts
There should be eight cookies on
each red tray, seven pumpkin-pie
slices on each yellow
low tray,
tray and nine
caramel apples on
n
each orange tray.
BONUS:
grab three pops. That way,
even if the first two he grabs
are different flavors, the third
will give him a matching pair.
BONUS: To be sure he gets two
that are both lime, he needs to
grab seven pops. That way, even
if the first five he grabs are all
strawberry, he’ll still have two
pops that are lime.
Leo Mohlenkamp, Ohio
g
Why didn’t the do
ll?
ba
ot
play fo
4
Jolee, Illinois
What is
5
page 30
a
Planet Zlippo’s Blippos
hot dog’s
favorite
There were 64 Blippos in the
space garden after the rain. If it had
snowed, there would have been
729 Blippos in the space garden.
BONUS: There are more Blippos
without polka dots.
hairstyle?
Sadie Zipser, Texas
Word Hide-and-Seek
How do you stay dry
in the shower?
1. see, sea. 2. ate, eight. 3. plane,
plain. 4. leak, leek. 5. dew, due.
6. ewe, you. 7. earn, urn.
8. won, one.
6
Jenna Ross, New Hampshire
page 43
Picture Puzzler
2
sylvania
rtin-McCann, Penn
7
Thanks for the Treats
Carter made cookies, Ava made
pumpkin pie, and Brayden made
caramel apples.
What do you get when you
cross a frog and a rabbit?
Amber, Colorado
How far can a fox
run
into the woods?
Reagan Pettis, Ala
page 28
8
bama
My Sci
Thinking Challenge —To be sure he
gets two of the same flavor, he should
9
Lincoln Cain, Misso
uri
Answers: 1. Tweethearts. 2. It was
programmed like a chicken. 3. A swordfish.
4. Because it was a boxer. 5. A bun.
6. Don’t turn on the water. 7. A bunny ribbit.
8. Halfway. After that, it is running out of the
woods. 9. Because they’re always spotted.
Covers: Follow the Fun! by Howard McWilliam; What’s Wrong?® by David Helton
Illustration credits: Page 2: Kevin Zimmer; 6: Erin Mauterer; 15: Jokes by Rich Powell, “Walking the Dog” by Lee
Cosgrove; 29: (black hole) Victor Davila; 30: Planet Zlippo’s Blippos by Joe Rocco, Word Hide-and-Seek by Joey
Ellis. Photo credits: Page 2: iStock/ghostdom; 3: Gina Lenz; 4: (french toast) iStock/JMichl; 4–5: (otter) iStock/
only_fabrizio; 6: (ladybug) iStock/Antagain, (plant) iStock/Chansom Pantip, (beets) iStock/pjohnson1, (meats)
iStock/fcafotodigital, (sweets) iStock/Issaurinko, (girl) iStock/shapecharge, (pen) iStock/mludzen, (puppy) iStock/
master1305, (pipes) iStock/stuartbur, (boy) iStock/JBryson; 8–9: (bookshelves background) iStock/ikopylov;
16–17: (background) iStock/Thanrada1988, (maple leaves) iStock/Ramaboin, (birch leaves) MiRafoto.com/Alamy
Stock Photo and iStock/ginton, (sweet-gum leaves) Jochen Tack/Alamy Stock Photo, (leaves on branches)
iStock/Johnrob; 28–29: (otter) iStock/AKauroraPhotos; 29: (lollipops) iStock/mayakova.
ns play
Why don’t Dalmatia
k?
ee
hide-and-s
Making Cars
d
n
s
w
a
a
P
Think
Why is it faster to make cars on an
assembly line than to make each
car separately from start to finish?
Why might people use robots to do
certain tasks?
Why do you think car companies
change the designs of their
vehicles from time to time?
If you could design your own
vehicle, what features would
you give it?
Art by David Coulson.
I’ll take a
convertible!
Ask
izona
®
Growing Apart
By Lissa Rovetch • Art by Amanda Morley
Dear Growing Up,
I never even thought about
that question until last week.
And believe me, last week I
thought about it a lot. A couple
of my mom’s friends have kids
my age, and we’ve been playing
together since the time we
were babies. Even though we
went to different schools, we
continued to see each other
every few months. And for many
years, we got along great. Until
last Saturday.
For many years,
we got along great.
Until last Saturday.
40
NOVEMBER 2017
Megan and Sylvie arrived
at my house around noon. It
had been longer than usual
since I’d seen them, so I was
very excited.
“What do you want to play?”
I asked, opening my family’s
game cupboard.
“Let’s play Go Fish,”
said Sylvie.
“No way! Go Fish is a baby
game,” said Megan. “Let’s play
something with more strategy.”
“Ugh, strategy games are so
much work,” Sylvie grumbled.
“Can’t we please just play a
fun game?”
“I’m sorry. I happen to think
games that make you figure
stuff out are fun,” Megan said.
“How about this memory
match-up game?” I suggested.
“It’s kind of in the middle. Not
too easy, not too hard.”
Sylvie shrugged. “How about
we take out your costume trunk
and make up a play instead?”
That sounded fun to me, but
Megan didn’t like the idea at all.
“You really want to play dressup?” Megan said. “I haven’t
played dress-up in years.”
I needed to change the
subject. “Hey, look! The sun
“You really want
to play dress-up?”
“Lunchtime! Who
wants spaghetti?”
came out. Want to go kick the
soccer ball around for a while in
the backyard?”
They both agreed, and for a few
minutes it seemed like the perfect
activity—until it wasn’t.
“Hey, ’Zona,” Megan said,
kicking the ball my way, “do you
think your mom would be up for
taking us to the mall later?”
“Ooh, that sounds great. My
friend Maddy says Connor’s Toy
Store is having a huge sale on
Puny Pets,” Sylvie said.
“To be honest,” said Megan, “I
was thinking more along the lines
of shoe stores than toy stores.”
As you might imagine, I
was finding it hard to think of
an activity that would make
everybody happy. “What
happened to us?” I asked.
“We used to get along like three
peas in a pod.”
“I know! This is the worst day
ever,” said Sylvie. “It’s like all
Megan wants to do is prove how
cool and grown up she is.”
“Well, it seems to me that all
Sylvie wants to do is prove she’s
still a little kid,” Megan replied.
Luckily, that’s when my
brother, Tex, ran outside
hollering, “Lunchtime! Who
wants spaghetti?”
I don’t know if Megan and
Sylvie had run out of stuff to
disagree about or if their mouths
were just too full of spaghetti to
talk, but lunch was by far the best
part of our visit.
As soon as Megan and Sylvie
left, I told my parents how the
visit had gone. We agreed that
Sylvie, Megan, and I all happen to
be growing up in different ways at
different rates. And since I seem
to be somewhere in the middle, I
should probably get together with
each of them separately, at least
for a little while.
So, dear Growing Up, I do
think it’s possible to feel as if
you’re growing up faster than
your friend. If it’s too tough to
find activities you both enjoy,
maybe you could take a little
break from hanging out for now.
But remember, that doesn’t mean
your friendship has to end once
and for all. People change over
time, and in a few months or
even a few years, who knows?
You might be best friends forever.
Ciao for now,
Arizona
NOVEMBER 2017
41
Dear
Highlights
I am the
shortest and
youngest
person in my
class, and my
classmates call
me “Tiny Mouse.”
How can I make
them stop?
Stella, North Carolina
We often hear from kids who are teased about their height,
whether they are short or tall. But there are advantages and
disadvantages to being any size. If you start to feel upset
about being small, it might help to make a list of the benefits
of being the shortest and youngest. For example, perhaps you
find that you bump your head less often!
The next time someone calls you “Tiny Mouse,” try not to
let it bother you. Your classmates probably don’t mean to
hurt your feelings. You might even play along and come up
with a funny reply. However, if the teasing feels hurtful, try
talking to a parent or teacher.
I’m supposed to bring
my eyeglasses to school,
but sometimes I forget.
Can you help me?
I play in a homeschool
orchestra where everyone
else is a different religion
than I am. Sometimes I
feel a little out of place.
What can I do to feel better?
Sydney (by e-mail)
Nobody likes to feel out of
place. Sometimes we’d rather
just blend in. But when you
think about it, the world would
be boring if we were all the
same. Take your orchestra, for
example. If everyone played
the same instrument, the music
would probably sound pretty
dull. Like an orchestra, life is
interesting because of its variety.
We are all unique individuals
with our own talents, beliefs,
appearances, and personalities.
When we work together, we can
make beautiful music.
When you feel out of place,
try thinking about the things
you have in common with your
fellow musicians. You all share
a love of music, for instance!
It may also be helpful to talk
to your parents about how
you’re feeling.
Jasper (by e-mail)
You might try leaving yourself
a note or a drawing of your
glasses on your backpack, the
bathroom mirror, or some other
place you’re sure to see it before
school. You could also work to
develop a habit of packing your
42
NOVEMBER 2017
glasses at the same time
every day, such as right after
breakfast or before putting
on your shoes. It can take
a little time to develop new
habits, but you can do it if
you keep working at it.
Write to us!
Please include your name, age,
and full address. Mail to
Dear Highlights
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
Or e-mail us at Letters@Highlights.com.
Art by Keith Frawley.
r
e
l
z
u
z
P
Picture
Art by Kelly
Kennedy
r
, the elevato
le
p
m
a
x
e
r
o
tel. F
is scene?
Blunder Ho
th
e
in
th
t
t
a
h
g
y
ri
b
b
e
lo
ot quit
miss in the
things are n
r
e
th
o
Things are a
t
a
h
” arrows. W
has two “up
Answers on pa
ge 38.
What’s
Wrong?
®
Which things in this
picture are silly?
It’s up to you!
Visit our Web site!
Find each object below in
the big picture. Number the
circles under the objects as
you find them. Then read
the silly story using the
numbered objects!
y!
And a Silly Stor
Weird Science
Today was the school __________ fair, and I was so excited
1
to reveal the project I’d been working on for months:
bird
golf club
mitten
sailboat
banana
envelope
pizza
ruler
car
magnifying glass
cane
scarf
my Robotic __________ 2000—Robo for short. I had some
2
finishing touches to make. All I had left to do was tighten
the __________ and wind up the __________ on the left side of his
3
4
head and he’d be ready. But right then, something strange
happened. My friend Abby’s pet __________ went running by.
5
All of a sudden, Robo seemed to have a __________ of his own.
6
He set his __________ in motion and rolled off. “Stop, Robo!” I
7
called. I pressed the green __________ on my remote, but Robo
8
kept on rolling. He bumped into a __________ , then he ran over
9
my teacher’s __________ . When he had crossed the room, I
10
thought he was about to run right into a __________ . Ouch!
11
But, to the amazement of the whole room, he had caught
Abby’s pet and saved the __________ . Go, Robo!
12
(Hidden objects are larger
than objects shown above.)
Art by Dave Klug.
Ask
izona
®
y
s
s
o
B
McBossyboss
By Lissa Rovetch • Art by Amanda Morley
Dear Bothered,
First of all, I think you just set
the record for most B words in a
row! Second—and this is kind of
embarrassing to admit—my
little brother and sister could
probably relate to your situation.
They were always saying that
I was bossy. And it wasn’t until I
met a very bossy person that I
understood how they felt!
My school was holding a fundraiser called the Fall Fling Fair,
and everyone was going to help
out. I was pretty excited about
it. But my excitement quickly
turned into complete and utter
miserability! I know miserability
probably isn’t in the dictionary, but
just wait—you’ll see what I mean.
“I won’t be the
leader,” said Bossy.
“I’ll just tell everyone
what to do!”
There were lots of committees
to choose from: music and
entertainment; tickets and
advertising; refreshments; party
decorations; games and activities.
I chose the last one because games
and activities sounded like fun.
“OK, everybody,” said
Mr. Pinsky, the Fall Fling
organizer, “we have a lot to do
and not much time. So you’ll need
to cooperate with your team.”
Unfortunately, cooperate and
team seemed to be foreign words
to one particular member of
my group. For the purpose of
this letter, I’ll refer to him as
Bossy McBossyboss.
“I’ll be the leader!”
he announced.
“We’re not supposed to
have leaders,” my friend
Mareya Becker reminded him.
“Remember what Mr. Pinsky
said? Each person is an equal
member of the committee.”
“OK, I won’t be the leader,”
said Bossy. “I’ll just tell everyone
what to do!”
I laughed, thinking that he
was joking.
“Should we start by making
a list of possible games?” said
Jackson. “How about that duck
pond one?”
Mareya took out a notebook
and wrote Duck Pond. “I always
like Go Fish,” she said, adding it
to the list.
“Isn’t that a card game?” I said.
Mareya shook her head. “This
is a different kind of Go Fish. In
this one, people put fishing poles
in the pretend water and pull
out surprises.”
“That’s a game for babies!”
Bossy blurted. “We need
challenging games that test
people’s skills.”
“How about we have hard
games and easy games?”
suggested Jackson.
“Yeah,” I said. “Something
for everybody!”
“Let me see that.” Bossy
grabbed the list, then put a big
X through Go Fish and wrote
Balloon Darts.
“Excuse me,” said Mareya.
“Don’t you think that was a little
rude—just grabbing the list
without asking?”
“Relax,” Bossy said. “Everyone
loves Balloon Darts. Trust me.
I’ve been to lots of fairs!”
Every time we got together,
Bossy McBossyboss did the same
thing. Whether we were choosing
games, trying to figure out
prizes, or setting up booths,
he never seemed to realize
that he was part of a team
with three other people.
At last, it was the day
of the Fall Fling Fair, and
we were all running around
getting ready.
“You need to make the
horseshoes sign hang straighter,”
Bossy commanded. “It’s way
too crooked.”
“Would you please do it
yourself ?” I said. “I’m kind of
busy organizing the prizes.”
“There are way too many
pink balloons on the wall,”
Bossy complained. “You should
add more blue ones.”
“Feel free to go ahead and
add them,” Mareya said.
The best (or maybe the worst)
example of Bossy McBossyboss’s
bossiness happened when the
Fall Fling Fair finally started.
This adorable little girl was
fishing for a prize at our Go Fish
booth, and Bossy grabbed the
fishing pole right out of her hands!
It took an adorable
little kid to put
Bossy in his place.
“You’re holding it all wrong,”
he told her. “Do it like this!”
If that had happened to me
when I was four or five, I would
have stood there silent and
confused. But this little girl
looked up at him, took a big
breath, and said, “That may be
the right way for you to do it,
“You need to make
the horseshoes sign
hang straighter.”
but it’s not the right way for me.”
And that, dear Bothered, was
probably the best thing this little
girl could have said. Bossy people
aren’t bad people—they just
may not realize that their way
doesn’t have to be the right way
for everyone.
The good part of this experience
is that it helped me understand
how my brother and sister felt
when I told them what to do and
didn’t stop to be polite or consider
their feelings. Now that I try to act
more patient and less bossy, we get
along much better.
So if I were you, I think I’d
nicely ask your brother to stop
acting like Bossy McBossyboss
and remind him that you’re much
more likely to listen when he
suggests things in a friendly way.
Ciao for now,
Arizona
Paws and
Think
Backstage at the Play
What are these people
doing behind the scenes?
What do you notice about the
way members of the stage crew
are dressed? Why might they be
dressed that way?
What are some differences
between the jobs people do
onstage and backstage? What
are some similarities?
Art by David Coulson.
Is it time
to take a
bow-wow?
Report
Cards
By Joan Stevenson
Art by Robert Squier
James rode the
to
bus
.
school
Jake rode in the
to
car
dog-obedience
.
school
James learned to read
and do math.
books
Jake learned to sit, stay, and fetch.
One morning, James said, “I get my
today.”
report card
Mom said, “Jake gets his
today, too!”
report card
That afternoon, James rode the
home from
bus
He dashed into the
.
school
.
house
Mom was having a
of coffee. Jake was under the
cup
“I got a good
.
table
,” said James. “How did Jake do on his
report card
“I don’t know,” said Mom. “He ate it!”
?”
report card
Building
a School
The kids in the village of Mhangeni came
together and used determination, smarts,
and strength to build their own school.
Story and Photos by Cecil Dzwowa
I
f the nearest school were
10 miles from your home, how
would you get there? Perhaps
your mom or dad would drive, or
a school bus would take you.
But what if your parents did
not have a car, or there wasn’t
even a road from your house to
the school? What would you do?
Just stay at home and forget
about your studies?
Hard work and many hands were
needed to clear bushes and grasses
and to fill pits.
The children in the new village
of Mhangeni in Zimbabwe, Africa,
were faced with a somewhat
similar challenge. Mhangeni was
created by villagers who moved
from different parts of Zimbabwe.
When they arrived, it was
summer and there was no school.
All the families were busy
building their huts. “Nobody
thought about the school,” said
Matsa, one of the village elders.
“We realized very late that
there was no nearby school
for the kids.”
The villagers, along with the
children, panicked. The parents
held an emergency meeting but
couldn’t come up with a solution.
Nobody in the village had a
car. And between Mhangeni and
the nearest school was a game
preserve with wild animals—
too dangerous for the children
to travel through.
Then someone came up
with an idea. Near the village
stood an old, abandoned farm
warehouse. It could be cleaned,
renovated, and turned into
classrooms.
The parents repaired the
leaking roof. Using scrap wood,
they divided the warehouse into
three classrooms.
Still, there was much more
work to do. The walls were dirty
and needed to be scrubbed. The
grasses and bushes outside
needed to be cleared. And pits
left by miners needed to be filled.
But the parents had run out of
time. The rains were coming, and
the village elders had to go to
work in the fields. Most of the
families survive by growing and
selling maize (corn).
The children of Mhangeni
decided to finish the warehouse
themselves. They brought
tools—slashers, to cut the grass,
and spades and wheelbarrows.
They needed to get busy.
Summer had ended and other
schools had already opened.
The younger kids slashed the
grasses. Those a little older
In Mhangeni,
school means
sharing books
and benches,
reading outside,
and using
plastic bottles
for science
experiments.
cleared the bushes. And those
without tools filled the pits
with sand.
Things improved when
two teachers who worked for
the country’s Department of
Education arrived to help out—
first with the construction and
then with the teaching. Two
Swedish visitors were also
impressed by the children’s
determination. They donated
textbooks, pens, and pencils.
After 10 days of hard work,
the new school was ready. For the
kids, it was catch-up time. They
were behind in their studies.
But even more challenges
were waiting for them. There
were too many students and too
few rooms. The three classrooms
couldn’t hold them all. Some of
the boys and girls had to study
outside. During science lessons,
plastic bottles had to serve as
beakers. Four kids had to sit at
benches designed for two. And
as many as four students had
to share one book.
Despite these problems, the
children in Mhangeni village
are happy to be in school—
their school.
They know their school might
not be the most modern in the
district, but they are proud of it.
Their dream of having a school
near their home has come true.
Founded in 1946 by Garry C. Myers, Ph.D.,
and Caroline Clark Myers
Editor in Chief: Christine French Cully
Vice President, Magazine Group Editorial: Jamie Bryant
Creative Director: Marie O’Neill
Editor: Judy Burke
Art Director: Patrick Greenish, Jr.
Senior Editors: Joëlle Dujardin, Carolyn P. Yoder
Associate Editor: Linda K. Rose
Copy Editor: Joan Prevete Hyman
Editorial Assistant: Allison Kane
Senior Production Artist: Dave Justice
Contributing Science Editor: Andrew Boyles
Editorial Offices: 803 Church Street, Honesdale, PA 18431-1895.
E-mail: eds@highlights.com.
To submit manuscripts, go to Highlights.submittable.com.
CEO: Kent S. Johnson
Vice President, International: Andy Shafran
Business Offices: 1800 Watermark Drive,
P.O. Box 269, Columbus, OH 43216-0269.
Copyright © 2017, Highlights for Children, Inc.
All rights reserved.
HIGHLIGHTS FOR CHILDREN is published monthly.
ISBN 978-1-62979-786-1
Designed for use in the classroom.
Sometimes we make our list of customer names and addresses available
to carefully screened companies whose products and services might be of
interest to you. We never provide children’s names. If you do not wish to
receive these mailings, please contact us and include your account number.
Printed by Webcrafters, Inc., Madison, WI.
Periodical postage paid at Columbus, Ohio;
Toronto, Ontario; and at additional mailing offices.
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P.O. Box 6038, Harlan, IA 51593-1538.
Canada Post: Publications Mail Agreement No. 40065670. Return
undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 1255, Georgetown, ON L7G 4X7.
To order, make a payment, change your address,
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• Write: P.O. Box 5878, Harlan, IA 51593-1378
As part of our mission to help make the world a better place
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to making responsible business decisions that will protect our
natural resources and reduce our environmental impact.
AWARDS Highlights has been given awards by The Association
of Educational Publishers, Family Choice Awards, Freedoms
Foundation, Graphic Arts Association, iParenting Media, Magazine
Design and Production, National Association for Gifted Children,
National Conference of Christians and Jews, National Parenting
Center, National Safety Council, Parents’ Choice, Parent’s Guide
to Children’s Media Awards, and Printing Industry Association.
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Council of Better Business Bureaus.
HL1117B
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