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Highlights for Kids September 2017

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SEPTEMBER 2017
www.Highlights.com
e
s
i
u
Crinto
Fall!
Tracking
DINOS
Page 12
4
Sweet
S’mores
Page 18
h
t
n
o
M
s
i
h
T
n
u
F
Sights
to See
Helpful
Homework
Habits
1 . Make a “to do”
Marissa and her dad just hiked 8.6 miles!
Can you figure out which landmarks they
visited? (Assume they walked back to the
sign after visiting each location.) Answer on page 38.
list. Put the most
important items
first. Check
things off as
you complete
the tasks.
Super-Silly
Story Time
2. Tidy up your
workspace.
Less mess means
fewer distractions.
Choose one of the topics below
and write your own silly story.
3. Take a short
1. A dinosaur dance party
2. A kid who turns invisible
break. Stand
up, stretch, and
do a couple of
jumping jacks to
get your blood
pumping.
y Photo
ter
s
y
An
sw
er
on p
4. Hang up a quote
a ge 38 .
icturectsures
Find theaech P
of these 10 pi
M
when she or he sneezes
3. Magical chicken nuggets
Can you find
this magazine?
at another place in
Tongue Twister
Prank-playing
pigeons.
or photo that
inspires you to
keep going!
Dear Reader
SEPTEMBER 2017 • VOLUME 72 • NUMBER 9 • ISSUE NO. 791
By Christine French Cully
Editor in Chief
Founded in 1946 by Garry C. Myers, Ph.D.,
and Caroline Clark Myers
Editor in Chief: Christine French Cully
Vice President, Magazine Group Editorial: Jamie Bryant
Creative Director: Marie O’Neill
Editor: Judy Burke
Art Director: Patrick Greenish, Jr.
Senior Editor: Joëlle Dujardin
Associate Editor: Linda K. Rose
Assistant Editor: Allison Kane
Copy Editor: Joan Prevete Hyman
Editorial Assistant: Channing Kaiser
Senior Production Artist: Dave Justice
Contributing Science Editor: Andrew Boyles
Editorial Offices: 803 Church Street, Honesdale, PA 18431-1895.
E-mail: eds@highlights.com.
To submit manuscripts, go to Highlights.submittable.com.
(Writers younger than 16: please use the postal address above.)
CEO: Kent S. Johnson
Vice President, International: Andy Shafran
Senior Editor, International: Julie Stoehr
Business Offices: 1800 Watermark Drive,
P.O. Box 269, Columbus, OH 43216-0269.
Copyright © 2017, Highlights for Children, Inc.
All rights reserved.
HIGHLIGHTS FOR CHILDREN is published monthly.
ISSN 0018-165X (print)
ISSN 2330-6920 (online)
Designed for use in the classroom.
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ON L9T 9Z9.
To order, make a payment, change your address,
or for other customer-service needs, such as changing
your contact preference, please contact us:
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S’more,
Please!
As a kid, I loved to camp. I still do.
My favorite part is the campfire.
Over the years, I’ve sat around a lot
of campfires, as a Girl Scout and as part of
a camping family. I’ve sung a lot of songs, laughed at skits,
listened to ghost stories—and enjoyed a few s’mores.
A s’more, as you probably know, is a sweet, gooey dessert.
It’s made by squashing a warm marshmallow and a square of
chocolate bar between graham crackers. This treat earned its
name because after you’ve had one, you want “some more.”
Mmm . . .
If you like s’mores, try our recipes for
s’mores with a twist (pages 5 and 18).
You won’t need a campfire—but you
may find yourself wishing for one.
Let me know which recipe sounds
yummiest to you: Berries ’n’ Creme,
Banana Sandwich, Confetti Fudge,
or Stuffed Apple. Or come up with a
twist of your own! I’d love to hear about it.
Your friend,
As part of our mission to help make the world a better place
for the children of today and tomorrow, Highlights is committed
to making responsible business decisions that will protect our
natural resources and reduce our environmental impact.
AWARDS Highlights has been given awards by The Association
of Educational Publishers, The Education Center, LLC, Family
Choice Awards, Freedoms Foundation, Graphic Arts Association,
iParenting Media, Magazine Design and Production, National
Association for Gifted Children, National Conference of Christians
and Jews, National Parenting Center, National Safety Council,
Parents’ Choice, Parent’s Guide to Children’s Media Awards, and
Printing Industry Association. HighlightsKids.com is a participant in
the Kids Privacy Safe Harbor program of the Children’s Advertising
Review Unit (CARU) of the Council of Better Business Bureaus.
Write to me!
Christine@Highlights.com
This magazine of wholesome fun
is dedicated to helping children grow in basic skills and knowledge,
creativeness, in ability to think and reason,
in sensitivity to others, in high ideals and worthy ways of living—
®
for children are the world’s most important people .
in
September
VOLUME 72 • NUMBER 9 • ISSUE NO. 791
Dear Highlights,
Cards
and Hugs!
—Avery, Pennsylvania
It’s wonderful that you care so much about animals,
Avery! Setting small goals can help toward a bigger goal.
1 With your parents, 2 Ask a librarian to
list some ideas, such as
collecting supplies for
an animal shelter.
help you find children’s
books and information
about helping animals.
3
Clean, sliced
strawberry
September 10 is
ay.
Grandparents D
arents
Let your grandp
h
know how muc
n
ea
m
they
to you!
Share your thoughts
with your classmates and
teacher. Maybe you can plan
a project or form a club.
16
Graham
cracker
18
20
6
BrainPlay
Name some sounds
that foods make.
7
Bea and Hank
10
Goofus and Gallant®
11
Gallant Challenge!
What is your wish? Write
about it in a poem.
Ballroom-dancing fish?
8
Do You Know YOU ?
Someone is wasting food. . . .
12
This quiz is about
every (human) body!
I Dig Dinosaurs!
Dr. Steve Brusatte found
hundreds of dino footprints.
14
Hidden Pictures®
Puzzle
18
Yummy twists on a classic.
19
Jokes
16
Deepa’s Navratri Dress
“Have you ever seen
a medieval cow?”
Oh no! Deepa has outgrown
her favorite dress.
Paws and Think
Find sea lions, monkeys,
and more at the zoo.
What kinds of perfume
would skunks like?
15
S’more Makeover
20
Magic Marty
The new kid has a bunch
of tricks up his sleeve.
22
A Milkweed Story
Their seeds float on
silky parachutes.
Mini
chocolate chips
Make this
BERRIES ’n’
CREME S’MO
RE
by Alic
ia Anderson.
Then find mo
re
s’more recipe
s
on page 18!
Greek yogurt and
marshmallow creme
24
The Pepper Caper
30
A spicy mystery.
27
What’s That
SNOUD?
The sounds at this block
party are all mixed up!
28
My Sci
Why do our stomachs
growl?
Everything
He Needs
Ethan’s brother is missing
only one thing at college.
32
Your Own Pages
See more creative work
by kids like Anastasia!
34
Back-to-Back
Classes
When two classes share
a room, how do the
students stay focused?
35
36
Your Ideas, Please!
Anderson
Anastasia
a
rth Carolin
Age 11 • No
38
What do you call a rich lizard?
39
The Timbertoes®
A picnic surprise.
Boredom, friendship,
jealousy—share your
advice!
40
Crafts
42
Guatemalan worry
dolls and more.
Riddles
Ask Arizona®
Embarrassment-survival tips.
Dear Highlights
“I don’t have enough time!”
SEPTEMBER 2017
5
ld
What wou ove at
to m
it be like sual speed?
u
half your
in
w
ind of
What k o you
d
puzzle ost?
like m
WHY?
er.
Take y
brain on our
a hike!
le do for fun
at
START
pe op
s
g
th i n
e
e
r
th
N a me
They
call me
Swifty!
What superpower would
you give each member
OF YOUR FAMILY?
Why do actors iny
a movie or a pla
wear costumes?
What is the best
..
thing to teach .
A B IRD?
Why do people
often wrap
presents?
A PE RSON
?
A HORSE?
“I have butterflies in
my stomach!” said Zane.
WHAT DID HE MEAN BY THAT?
Name some
sounds that
foods make.
What different jobs did
people do to get you the
foods you ate today?
THE
END
What
would it
be like if
the ground
were a
trampoline?
Polly
wants a
cracker!
Bea
and
By Carol L. MacKay
Art by Marco Bucci
Hank
In the library, in a tank,
You’ll find two goldfish, Bea and Hank.
They hold each other’s fins and prance
And perform an amazing ballroom dance.
Ms. Tomes never glances over there,
But I can see the dancing pair,
And whenever I say, “Oh, look! Please look!”
Ms. Tomes is slow to shut her book—
And she only sees plain goldfish.
SEPTEMBER 2017
7
K
u
now
o
Y
o
D
YOU ?
How well do you know that body
you carry around with you every day?
Travel through this quiz to find out!
Art by Jason Tharp
Teacher’s Pet
Where on your body is the pupil?
Itty-Bitty Bones
To find the smallest bones
in the human body, look
A
B
A
In the brain’s On the belly (where
memory, to help it’s also called the
belly button)
you on tests
B
C
in the pinkie toe at super-small ribs
of each foot.
that twirl when
you hiccup.
In the eye, to let in light
C
in the ears.
In a Heartbeat
Each time your heart beats, it pumps
another 1/4 cup of blood through its four
parts. What are the heart’s parts called?
Amazing
Muscles
Your body has more than
600 muscles. Which
of these things don’t
muscles do?
A
Help you swallow
B
Help your hair grow
C
Help you
somersault
A
B
C
Right atrium,
left atrium, right
ventricle, and
left ventricle
The north,
south, east,
and west
wings
Leonardo,
Donatello,
Raphael, and
Michelangelo
The Nose Knows
cartilage
The tip of your nose is made of
too?
is,
se
the
of
ich
(CAR-till-ij). Wh
B
A
The outer ear
(under a layer
of skin)
The Award
Goes to . . .
Which is the largest and
strongest single bone
in the body?
The orbital (OR-bit-ul)
cavity is an opening in your
skull that’s also called ___.
The funny
bone
The shoulder
blade
C
Fingernails
and
toenails
Inner-Space
Orbit
B
A
Your
baby
teeth
C
A
The thigh bone
B
a whole lot of
tooth decay
the eye
socket
C
where the
nose goes
Power Puller
Of all the energy your body uses,
20 percent of it gets used by this,
whether you’re active or resting.
A
Your blinking
eyelids
B
Your busy
brain
C
Your twitchy
fingers
Down the Pipes
Two tubes go down through your throat.
The esophagus (ih-SOFF-ugh-iss) is
for what you eat, and the trachea
(TRAY-key-uh) is for what you ___.
A
B
C
drink
breathe
think
SEPTEMBER 2017
Answers on page 38.
9
Goaondfus
Gallant
There’s some of Goofus and Gallant in us all.
When the Gallant shines through, we show our best self.
®
“I’ll try just a little in case I
don’t like it,” says Gallant.
“Relish tasted bad on that. Now
I’ll try mustard,” says Goofus.
When things fall, Gallant
picks them up.
When things fall, Goofus leaves
them on the floor.
YOUR Goofus and Gallant Moments
“I felt like Goofus when
“I feel like Gallant when I
I said ‘That was a terrible
serve’ to my friend.”
help my brother even if I do
not want to.”
Ava, Age 8, Ohio
10
SEPTEMBER 2017
Vincent, Age 6, California
Art by Leslie Harrington.
GALLANT CHALLENGE!
What Is Your
“Wish”?
Dr. Garry Cleveland
Myers, who co-founded
Highlights® in 1946,
wrote many poems
that he called
“wishes.” He used
these poems as
a way to share
things he wished
for—especially
his hopes for
becoming his
best self.
In this poem, Dr. Myers
wrote about his wishes:
The wishes
that I wish
Are not of things
to sell or buy
But of those things
that I
Can make come true
myself.
Of things
that perish never,
Of things
that last forever.
Some wishes told of habits he
wanted to change, like this one:
I wish I were like you
And didn’t put off jobs
I hate to do.
Other wishes were about
getting along with people. In the
poem below, he wrote about how
he wanted to feel about others—
and how he wanted others to feel
about him:
Share Your Wish
What is your wish? We’d love to know! Write a
wish poem (up to 75 words long). Please include
your name, age, and address, and mail to
Wishes
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
In a future issue, we’ll publish a few
wish poems from kids.
Photo by iStock/andresr.
I wish I always felt kindly
Toward others different from me
In any way—
The color of their skin,
The houses they live in,
The clothes they wear,
The enjoyments they share,
The money they have to spend,
The place of worship they attend,
I also wish that they
Felt the very same way
Toward me.
SEPTEMBER 2017
11
!
s
r
u
a
s
o
n
i
D
g
i
D
I
It takes work . . .
and a bit of luck.
By Dr. Steve Brusatte
Tom and I were
thrilled to find
these dinosaur
footprints!
F
ossils can tell us stories from
long ago. As a paleontologist
(pay-lee-on-TAHL-uh-jist), I
hunt for dinosaur fossils to learn
their stories and to see how our
planet has changed over time.
Sometimes that search turns
up something big.
Skye Quest
Two years ago, I took some of
my university students and my
friend and fellow paleontologist
Tom Challands to look for signs
of dinosaurs on the Isle of Skye,
off the shore of Scotland. We
drove to a lonely coastline in the
far north, miles from any town.
It was not a nice day to work
outside. The sun stayed hidden,
rain fell, and violent ocean
waves splashed us. We spent
the day crawling over cold, wet
rocks, looking for fossil bones.
Finally, as it was getting dark,
we decided to call it quits.
12
SEPTEMBER 2017
The temperature dipped close to
freezing, and we were tired. Tom
and I packed up our gear, put a
few fossils we’d collected that
day into our backpacks, then
started back toward our cars.
That’s when we spotted
something strange.
Prehistoric Path
There in front of us, in the
rock, lay a big, shallow hole. It
was circular and two feet across.
We hadn’t seen it earlier, maybe
because the lighting had been
different. But now, it was so
obvious. And up ahead a few
feet, slightly off to the side,
was another. Then another, and
another. They made a zigzag
pattern: left, right, left, right.
Tom and I glanced at each
other and smiled. We’d seen
TOP: My camera-lens cap
shows the size of this footprint
cast. BOTTOM: Hundreds of
dinosaurs once walked here.
something similar on other digs.
The big holes were footprints
made by giant dinosaurs! And
in every direction, we saw
more prints. Hundreds.
We had found a huge
dinosaur trackway from
170 million years ago!
Photos: pages 12 and 13 courtesy of Dr. Steve Brusatte.
Illustration: page 13 by Jon Hoad, Art of Ancient Life.
Is that a bone in this rock?
I use my pocket magnifier
to take a closer look.
Where Dinosaurs Roamed
Was it a lucky find? Yes—but
finding the trackway wasn’t all
luck. Like detectives, we use
clues to tell us where to look.
Most dinosaur fossils
are either:
• the skeleton or egg of an
unlucky dinosaur that died and
got buried by sand or mud,
which over millions of years
turned into stone, or
• a footprint or other
impression that a dinosaur left
in sand or mud, which also
turned into rock.
So to find fossils, we need to
search rock that was made when
dinosaurs roamed Earth (in the
Mesozoic Era, from 252 million
years ago until 66 million years
ago). And we look in types of
rock that formed where they
lived. The rock on Skye formed
in that era and in such a place—
in ancient rivers and beaches,
where dinosaurs would have
found plenty of water and food.
We also choose sites where we
can get to that rock! Unlike
cities and towns, where rock is
covered by streets and buildings,
Skye has few towns and many
accessible, rocky hills.
These clues told me that
fossils could be found on the Isle
of Skye. But I had to actually go
there and walk around to look
for footprints, eggs, or bones
sticking out of rock. I don’t use
fancy equipment—just eyesight.
Our eyes did well on the day
we found the trackway—thanks
to detective work, effort, and
that bit of luck.
What’s Their Story?
From the size of the
trackway prints, the distance
between them, and bones
and other fossil evidence we
have discovered, we pieced
together the fossils’ story.
The dinosaurs that
made these tracks were
sauropods—long-necked,
big-bellied plant eaters.
These early relatives of
Diplodocus were bigger
than a bus! At 50 feet long
and weighing 15 tons,
they were among the largest
animals to roam this region.
Each footstep across this
trackway would have caused
the ground to shake.
But these gentle giants likely
wouldn’t have seemed very
scary. They ate ferns and pine
trees and hung out in groups,
not only on land but also in
lagoons and on beaches, at a
time when Scotland was much
warmer than it is now.
The dinosaurs that left their
fossilized tracks on Skye have
been gone a long time. But I’m
glad they left their story behind
for us to discover.
Want ae?
challeng 15
Skunky Scents for Sale
By Kelly Kennedy
In this big picture, find the ring, fish, butterfly, glove, dog dish, wedge of lemon,
saucepan, fishing pole, banana, needle, golf club, saltshaker, ruler, and candle.
14
SEPTEMBER 2017
Check out our Hidden Pictures app!
k page
Fold bac the
to hide
clues.
picture
Picture Clues
fish
ring
butterfly
dog
dish
glove
“Knock, knock.”
“Who’s there?”
“Fairy.”
“Fairy who?”
“It’s fairy nice
to meet you.”
Vlad: Have you ever seen a
medieval cow?
Bruce: No, I haven’t. Have you?
Vlad: Yes, it was legend-dairy!
Vlad, Texas
Carla Saborido, New York
wedge of
lemon
saucepan
JOKES
Jake: Why are you taking a
ruler to bed with you?
Jane: To see how long I sleep.
Jaelyn Smith, Pennsylvania
fishing
pole
A book never written: Staring
Contest by Kent Blink.
Chameleon #1: Sorry, do I
know you?
Chameleon #2: I’m your friend,
remember?
Chameleon #1: Oh, how you’ve
changed!
Madison, Minnesota
Mackensie Rhan, Tennessee
banana
needle
Alaina: Emily made fun of my
hair. I felt bad at first.
Ben: But not anymore?
Alaina: No—I built a bridge and
got over it!
Ben Grossman, Illinois
golf
club
Make us laugh!
Send a joke or riddle, along with your
name, age, and address, to
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
saltshaker
“Helicopter” Haiku
ruler
candle
maple whirligigs
land in one year . . . rise as trees
into another
— Michael J. Rosen
BONUS
Can you also
find the seashell,
bowling pin,
screwdriver, and
baseball?
Answers on HighlightsKids.com.
SEPTEMBER 2017
15
Navratri was almost here! Deepa
couldn’t wait for the party in the dance
hall. She’d wear her special two-piece
dress with tiny bells on the hem. She’d
jump and skip and twirl just to hear
those bells jingle.
“I think you should try it on,” Mom
said, handing Deepa the skirt. “You’ve
grown a lot this year. It may not fit.”
Deepa stepped into her skirt and
tried pulling it up. She yanked,
wiggled, and twisted. She even tried
pulling the skirt down over her head.
Mom frowned. “It’s too small. Try
the blouse.” But that was small, too.
Deepa’s throat tightened.
“It’s
too
small.”
She’d jump and skip and twirl
just to hear those bells jingle.
Deepa’s
Navratri
Dress
By Anita Nahta Amin
Art by Hatem Aly
16
SEPTEMBER 2017
Last year, Deepa and Mom had f lown
to India to visit Deepa’s aunt, or Masi,
for Navratri. Masi had taken Deepa
shopping for a holiday dress. Deepa
had loved the way the bells on Masi’s
anklets jingled as they walked through
the bazaar. When Deepa found a dress
that jingled, too, she cried, “That one!”
For nine nights, she and her aunt
had laughed and danced in the village
with their sparkling skirts.
And now the dress no longer fit.
“Can we have it altered?”
Deepa asked.
“We can try,” said Mom.
But when the tailor looked at the
dress, he shook his head. He said it
could only be made smaller.
That afternoon, Deepa and her mom
went to an Indian store in the mall and
picked out a dress covered with little
mirrors. It didn’t feel special. But it fit.
Deepa tried getting into the holiday
spirit as they drove to the Navratri
party. But her dress was too quiet.
In the parking lot, Mom opened the
car trunk to put away her purse.
Deepa noticed a familiar bundle.
“Is that my dress?” she asked.
“I forgot to put it away,” Mom said,
closing the trunk.
No one will ever see it again, Deepa
thought sadly.
As they neared the dance hall, Deepa
heard drums beating, people laughing,
bells clanging.
Inside, hundreds of whirling dancers
clacked colorful sticks together in a
circle. The room felt warm and alive.
A lady swayed past and her little girl
followed, hopping along holding sticks
tied with bells.
Deepa smiled. It was like watching
herself with Masi.
Later, paper plates thick with potato
curry were served. The girl squeezed
past Deepa, gripping a plate. “Be
careful, Sylvie,” the lady warned.
Suddenly, someone backed into
Navratri is a nine-night Indian holiday
that celebrates the Hindu deity Durga.
During the festival, people like to dance
and wear colorful clothing.
Sylvie. Deepa cried, “Watch out!”
But it was too late.
Sauce splashed onto Sylvie’s skirt.
“My favorite dress!” Sylvie sobbed.
My favorite dress. The words stuck.
Deepa tapped Mom’s arm. “I can help
her,” she whispered.
My favorite dress.
The words stuck.
They hurried to the car. Deepa
scooped out her dress, and the bells
jingled in the wind. She carried it to
Sylvie. “I want you to have this.”
“I love it! Thank you!” Sylvie cried.
After changing into the dress, she
hugged Deepa and offered her the
jingle sticks.
Deepa laughed as they jumped,
skipped, and twirled their way into the
dance circle. Navratri was more fun
with a little jingle. And a new friend.
“I want
you to
have this.”
e
r
o
S’m
Makeover
Try these tasty twists
on the classic treat!
Find
one m
or
on pag e
e 5!
Ask an a
d
to help w ult
ith
anything
sharp or
hot.
Graham cracker
Banana
Sandwich
By Alicia Anderson
Banana
Chocolate
syrup and
peanut butter
Marshmallow
creme
Confetti Fudge
Stuffed Apple
By Shelly Vaughan James
With a spoon,
scoop out the core
of a small apple.
(Leave some apple
at the bottom.)
Combine melted
butter, crushed
graham crackers,
brown sugar, mini
marshmallows,
chocolate chips, and butterscotch chips.
Fill the center of the apple. Bake in a
small baking dish until the apple is soft.
Over low heat, combine
14 ounces of sweetened
condensed milk and
12 ounces of chocolate
chips. Stir until melted.
Remove from the
heat, and gently stir
in 1–2 cups of mini
marshmallows and 1/2 cup of broken graham
crackers. Pour into a square pan lined with
parchment paper. Chill until firm, then cut.
18
SEPTEMBER 2017
Photos by Guy Cali Associates, Inc.
At the Zoo
d
n
s
w
a
a
P
Think
What are some ways an animal’s life
in the zoo is different from an
animal’s life in the wild?
What kinds of skills and knowledge
might zookeepers need for their jobs?
Why is it important to respect a
zoo’s rules, such as not feeding
the animals?
If you were visiting this zoo, which
animal would you be most interested
in learning about?
Art by David Coulson.
Yikes! Those
are some
big cats.
Magic
Marty
By Chris Low
Art by Marty Kelley
I knew Marty’s magic was fake,
but I just couldn’t prove it.
Marty was new at school.
Usually when you’re the new
kid, you lay low, but not Marty.
On his first day, he made a
toothpick disappear. One second
he was holding the toothpick,
and the next second it was gone!
Everyone was asking him how
he did it.
“It’s magic!” Marty said
proudly. “At my old school, they
actually called me Magic Marty.”
“Is he serious?” I whispered to
my friend Brian. “Magic Marty?
And does he always bring
toothpicks to school?”
“I don’t know, but that was
pretty cool,” Brian said, still
watching Marty.
I turned to walk away. It’s not
magic. He’s tricking everyone,
and I’m going to find out how
he does it.
He’s tricking
everyone!
That night at home, I found
a box of toothpicks. I sat at the
kitchen table for almost an hour
trying to figure out how Marty
had made one disappear. The
only thing I learned was how
to poke my hand 11 times with
a toothpick.
20
SEPTEMBER 2017
“Matt, it’s getting late. What
are you still doing down here?”
my mom asked.
“A new kid at school is doing
magic tricks and everyone
thinks it’s amazing. I’m just
trying to figure out how he did
this one trick.”
“How do you know it’s not real
magic?” my mom said, grinning.
“There’s no such thing as
magic,” I said, shaking my head.
But the next day at school,
Marty made me think twice.
“It’s hot today!” Marty said to
a crowd around his locker. “So
for today’s trick, I’ll turn this
water into ice!” Marty pulled
a water bottle out of his bag,
along with a red plastic cup. He
carefully poured water from his
bottle into the cup. I watched
from the back, hoping to catch
a mistake.
“Now I’ll perform the magic
wave!” Marty looked as if he was
playing an invisible piano just
above the cup.
“Ta-da!” As Marty tipped over
the red cup, I waited for water to
pour out. Instead, Marty got a
handful of ice cubes! Applause
filled the hallway, and Brian
reached over to give Marty a
high five.
“How did you do that?”
someone asked.
Marty smiled. “Sorry, but
that’s the first law of magic.
A magician never reveals
his secrets.”
Well, he won’t have to,
I thought to myself. I’ll reveal
his secrets for him.
“At it again, honey?” My mom
watched me wiggle my fingers
hopelessly over a cup of water.
“Ugh. I just don’t get it,” I
said. “How’d he turn it into ice?”
“I’m curious. Why is this so
important?” my mom asked.
“Because he’s tricking
people!” I cried.
“Sounds as if he’s trying to
make friends.” My mom patted
“It’s
magic!”
my arm. “It’s your bedtime.”
I poured the water into a
plant, said good night to my
mom, and headed upstairs.
Magic Marty had me
stumped, but the next day I
caught a lucky break. At lunch,
Marty was going on about how
he could make things f loat. He
had a ring in one hand and a
pencil in the other.
That’s when I saw it: a
thin piece of fishing line tied
around the end of the pencil and
attached to a button on Marty’s
shirt! Sure enough, he made the
ring “f loat” by sliding it over the
“I just
don’t
get it.”
pencil and hanging it from the
line. No one else noticed, and
soon the whole cafeteria was
clapping. When the crowds
were gone, I walked over. It
was time to put an end to the
Magic Marty show.
that make him feel?
“Nah,” I finally said.
“I won’t say anything.”
Marty let out a relieved sigh,
and I turned to walk away.
“Wait!” Marty jumped in front
of me. “You’ve got a pretty good
eye for magic. If you’re
interested, I have an idea.”
That’s how the Magic Marty
and Mysterious Matt Lunch
Show began.
We’ve been a magic team for
three months now. And since I
became a fellow magician, Marty
has let me in on some of his
other tricks. (For example, to do
that water trick, you need a
special cup with two separate
compartments.) It turns out that
instead of a fake magician,
Marty is a real friend.
“Are you
going
to tell
people?”
The next day I caught
a lucky break.
“I know how you did it,”
I said, folding my arms.
“Maybe,” Marty replied. “But
the first law of magic is that—”
“It was fishing line.”
Marty went silent. He
looked nervous. Without all his
confidence, he seemed more
normal. I suddenly felt bad.
“So, are you going to tell
people?” he asked.
I thought about it for a
moment. If I told, I’d finally be
able to prove that Marty’s magic
was fake. But then Marty might
lose his new friends. How would
SEPTEMBER 2017
21
A Milkweed
Story
By Pat Lessie
In fall, I wait for milkweed pods
to crack wide open when they’re dry.
Seeds float on silky parachutes
that ride the wind. They seem to fly.
In spring, new milkweed grows big leaves
where monarch butterflies lay eggs.
The eggs hatch into caterpillars
crawling on their little legs.
During summer, flowers grow.
Their nectar has a strong, sweet smell.
It draws the pollinators—bees
and butterflies and ants as well.
In several weeks, the flowers wilt.
Then fruits, or pods, begin to swell.
Again seeds ripen in the pods.
The pods split lengthwise, stiff and dry,
with blizzards of white-tufted seeds
for me to catch as they drift by.
22
SEPTEMBER 2017
Photo by iStock/MRaust.
SEPTEMBER 2017
23
The
Pepper
r
e
p
a
C
By Elizabeth Pagel-Hogan
Art by Neil Numberman
The countertop
was full of
commotion
when Inspector
Spoon arrived
on the scene.
Pepper had
taken a nasty
spill off the
spice rack.
Salt seemed
especially
shaken.
How could
this happen?
Not so fast. I think
someone pushed
Pepper!
Whoever it
was had to be
an unsavory
character.
Oh, dear. Spoon is
always stirring up trouble.
24
SEPTEMBER 2017
Evidence!
Pepper is fine.
She was probably
just trying to
spice things up.
Spilled salt?
That’s bad luck.
I’m in
hot water—
and no one’s
making pasta!
Simmer down. Let’s dig into
the facts. Salt, where were
you last night?
But it doesn’t make sense.
Why would Salt push
Pepper? Salt and Pepper
are such taste buds!
On the table,
as usual.
What’s the scoop,
Inspector Spoon?
And where were you
last night?
I was around. Anyway,
um, I have to dash.
Stay right there. It’s time to
serve up some justice.
(Continued on next page)
(Continued from page 25)
The real culprit
dropped these.
OK! It was me! I pushed
Pepper. But it was
Cinnamon’s fault.
Sugar, you’re in a heap
of trouble. You and
Cinnamon are toast.
26
SEPTEMBER 2017
Salt crystals?
This isn’t Salt. The one
who pushed Pepper
seems sweet. . . .
The family uses Salt too much!
I told Sugar to give Salt a pinch.
But right then someone grabbed Salt, and
Sugar accidentally bumped into Pepper. . . .
What’s That
SNOUD?
By Radha HS
Something is odd about the
sounds at this party. For
example, the goose should be
saying HONK instead of KOHN.
Can you unscramble the other
sound words below? For hints,
find the words in the scene.
1. OPP
2. HOCU
3. LOWGR
4. UGGL
5. GIRN
6. OMORV
7. ZELSIZ
8. OPFO
9. RURP
10. PIRCH
11. COOHA
12. ZUBZ
Answers on page 38.
Petal Patterns
A
Answers on page 38.
The numbers in each set of flowers follow a pattern. Can you
find the patterns and figure out which numbers are missing?
By Clare Mishica
B
C
SEPTEMBER 2017
27
M
A hummingbird’s
long tongue can
reach nectar that
is deep within
a flower.
Its tongue has a
forked tip that
grabs more
nectar with each
lick than an
unforked tongue
could get.
Speedy
Beauty
The tiny hummingbird is a giant
among fliers. With wings that move
so fast they hum and blur, it zips
from one food source to another
to fuel its speed.
It can fly in all directions, as well
as backward, upside down, and
in a hover. Considering the bird’s
size, its large brain and heart and
impressive speed outshine those of
many other birds and mammals.
In just one second, it can fly a
few hundred times the length of
its body. That would be like you
running a few football fields in
one second. Speedy, right?
Its tiny feet
grip branches
as it rests,
but it doesn’t
walk much.
Spinophorosaurus
By Dougal Dixon • Art by Robert Squier
SPINE-oh-FOR-oh-SAW-rus
“spike-bearing lizard”
Spinophorosaurus was one of few
known sauropods, or long-necked
plant eaters, that had a weapon on
its tail. It was more closely related to
the sauropods of Asia than to those
nearby in Africa at that time.
28
SEPTEMBER 2017
Two pairs of spikes
on its tail, likely used
as a weapon
Weighed about as much as
14 modern-day polar bears
Why do our stomachs growl
when we are hungry?
Each wing moves
in a figure 8,
beating 70 to 80
times a second.
Doctor
s
rumbl call that
ing so
und
borbo
(boar- ryg mus
bo-RIG
-mus)
.
Lynlee (by e-mail)
Your stomach and intestines make sounds
often, but you’re more likely to hear them when
your digestive tract is empty.
This tract is made up of tubes. Muscles in
the tubes squeeze to keep foods, liquids,
and gases moving along. Your body
absorbs what it needs and gets rid of
what it doesn’t.
As foods move, they make churning
sounds. The sounds are muffled when
there’s a lot of food in the tubes. When the
tubes are empty, the sounds are amplified.
If your stomach has been empty for a while,
the muscles squeeze more, which causes even
more rumbling. Time to eat!
A hummingbird’s
iridescent colors can
vary, because tiny
structures on the
feathers reflect
light differently at
different angles.
Muffled
Rumbles
To see why an empty digestive
tube sounds louder than a full
one, try this. Put your mouth to the
end of an empty paper-towel tube. Make a rumbling
sound. Now stuff the tube with socks or a bandanna.
Rumble into the tube again. Which sounds louder?
WHERE:
Niger
Thick,
sturdy legs
Teeth with jagged
edges, good for
shredding tough plants
HOW LONG:
40 feet
RU M B L
E
RU M
B
WHAT IT ATE:
Plants
WHEN:
180–165 million years ago
Scientists can’t be certain of its age. Rocks around its
fossils didn’t hold enough clues to be more precise.
252
201
Triassic
Jurassic
145
66
Cretaceous
LE
Present
Cenozoic
Check out “I Dig Dinosaurs!” on pages 12–13.
Everything
He Needs
By Annette Bay Pimentel
Art by Mike DeSantis
Ethan poured the milk slowly so that
his corn f lakes rose above the rim of
the bowl, just like Nick’s. Mom didn’t
fuss about it. Instead, she reached over
and patted Nick’s hand. “It’s our last
breakfast together before you start
college,” she said.
“What will you eat for breakfast
at college, Nick?” Ethan asked his
big brother.
“I don’t know.” Nick hugged the
corn f lakes box. “I’d better take this.”
Mom smiled. “Nick is teasing. He’ll
have everything he needs at college.”
“Not everything.” Nick pointed at
Ethan. “I won’t have my little brother!”
Mom looked at her watch. “Oops.
We need to get going, boys.”
In the car, Ethan shared the
backseat with Nick’s suitcases. “I wish
I could go to the airport with you,” he
said. But it was class photo day.
When they arrived at Ethan’s school,
Nick reached over the seat and hugged
Ethan good-bye. “Smile big for the
camera,” he said.
“Good luck at college!” said Ethan.
Ethan got out of the car. Nick waved
at him until the car turned the corner.
30
SEPTEMBER 2017
Ethan missed seeing his brother at
breakfast every day. Sometimes Nick
sent photos. One was of him and his
friends. They were all splattered with
mud from playing soccer.
Mom said, “I hope he has figured out
how to do laundry.”
Nick sent another photo of himself in
the library with a tall stack of books.
Mom said, “I hope Nick is finding
time to get enough sleep.”
Sometimes Nick sent photos.
“What will
you eat for
breakfast at
college?”
When Mom and Ethan arrived at
Nick’s college, Nick was happy to see
them. He took them to the dining hall
and handed Ethan a tray. “Pick
whatever you want. Even corn f lakes
for lunch!” But Ethan made a sandwich
just like Nick’s.
“I bought plane tickets so we
can visit Nick for his birthday.”
Ethan stared at the photo. Nick was
smiling, but he looked tired. Maybe it
was hard to get enough sleep at college.
A couple of months later, Mom said,
“I bought plane tickets so we can visit
Nick for his birthday.”
Ethan pulled out his backpack. He
packed a box of corn f lakes and a bottle
of laundry detergent. He found Nick’s
pillow and tried to squish it into the
backpack, too.
Mom walked into the room and
smiled. “You’re so thoughtful, Ethan.
But you don’t have to pack all that.
Nick has everything he needs there.”
Everything? Ethan wondered.
Ethan found some scissors. He cut
out one of his new school photos and
slid it into the pocket of his backpack.
“Come see my dorm room,” said Nick.
He had to move a pile of clean laundry
from the chair so Mom could sit down.
“Think fast!” Nick threw his f luffy
pillow to Ethan.
Ethan caught the pillow. “You have
almost everything you need at college.”
“Almost?” said Nick. “What am
I missing?”
Ethan reached into the pocket of his
backpack and pulled out the photo.
“Just me.”
“What am I
missing?”
SEPTEMBER 2017
31
Your Own
Pages
Colossal Squid
Because I am
a squid
I stay away from
sperm whales.
I want to live another day,
not end up in their tummies.
Mikey Sandberg
Age 6 • North Carolina
Cooper Loucks
Age 6 • New York
ually pets.
Dogs and cats are us
in nets.
Shrimp sometimes go
tanks.
Fish sometimes go in
th some bait.
You can catch them wi
the sky.
Birds like to f ly up in
really great,
s
One more thing that’
nnecticut state.
Some moose live in Co
s.
with antlers, not horn
They ’re the animals
.
ns
or
th
ves near
They like to feed on lea
Azuka Moemeka
Age 10 • Connecticut
Pig in Mud!
Eleanor Sharp
Age 8 • Louisiana
Melanie Ball
Age 7 • South Carolina
The Cat
Waterfalls
Hear the waterfall
Rushing white water
comes down
Vibrant blue and green
Declan Oswald
Age 7 • Idaho
32
SEPTEMBER 2017
Little cat,
Tiptoe and that,
Chasing a ball of ya
rn.
Floating feather
Sunshiny weather
You follow it into th
e barn.
Play all day
Sweet, soft hay
Purring, whiskered
cat.
At the end of the da
y
You’re done with pl
ay
And of f you go to na
p.
Julia Pfeiffer
Age 11 • Missouri
The Dark
Night
The world is
spinning so fast,
The moon makes
a f lash.
When the animals
are sleeping,
The darkness is
creeping.
Samuel Mankowski
Age 5 • Texas
Flowers
I take you to Mom.
Flowers pretty, colorful.
My mom loves them.
Elias Chandler
Age 8 • Georgia
Tea at Two
.
Sip your tea at two with me
.
ase
ple
you
if
,
kie
Use your pin
cry
not
If you leave, I will
y.
But you better tell me wh
the
To shop, to play, to spend
.
.
day away .
Together we can go
Maybe see a movie show!
Be my friend, all the way,
stay.
Or please go home, do not
Ellie LaVarta
Age 11 • Florida
Emma Carpenter
Age 10 • Illinois
te
Hot Chocola
rops,
It drips, it d
lops.
It plips, it p
y thing
y, chocolate
m
m
A hot, yu
me feel
That makes
n or k ing.
Like a quee
s me up
ing that fill
The only th
in my cup.
ly goodness
Is some love
Listen to Music
Summer Lay
Age 8 • California
y
Paige Purifo
o
ah ma
Age 9 • Okl
I Do Like a Rainy Day
Inspired by “Rainy Day”
by William Wise
Chicago Bears
Football Player
Rock y Johnson
Age 7 • Iowa
Share Your
I do like a rainy day,
Creative Work
Even if the road is wet, the
sky is gray.
We’d love to see it!
I get to wear my warm, coz
Art must be on unlined paper.
y parka
From day to night, no ma
Poems must have fewer than
tter what.
75 words. All submissions
And Mom would walk me
to the school.
must be created by you.
I think that’s really cool.
We
cannot
Include your name, age,
Well, it might sound a litt
le weird,
return your
and address. Mail to
But I DO like a rainy day
work, so you
!
Tim Xu
Age 11 • Washington
might want to
keep a copy.
Your Own Pages
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
Back-to-Back
Classes
Story and Photos by Cecil Dzwowa
“You just ignore
what the class behind
your back is doing.”
Imagine that your teacher is talking
while another class is singing in the
same room. Would you be able to pay
attention to the teacher? At a school
I visited in my country of Zimbabwe,
students have found a way to make
such a situation work.
Students at the school are used to
sharing supplies. Two kids might share
a chair, and three kids sometimes
share a reading book. And two whole
classes often share one room.
To make it easier for those classes to
focus, the teachers have come up with
a smart solution. They have placed
the students so they face in opposite
34
SEPTEMBER 2017
directions. Kids in the last rows
actually rest their backs on
the backs of kids from the
other class.
“You just ignore what the
class behind your back is doing,”
Stanley, a sixth-grader, told me.
Once in a while, it is
impossible to ignore the class
behind your back. When the
fifth-graders sang a popular folk song,
their singing and dancing was too
exciting for the sixth-graders to ignore.
So most sixth-graders turned to see
what was happening. Their teachers
had no choice but to let them join in
the singing.
But usually the two classes are not
disturbed by each other. For example,
I saw fifth-graders working smoothly
on math problems while sixth-graders
had a reading lesson.
“You just focus on what you’re
supposed to do,” said a student
named Fania. “It’s much easier when
something that might disturb you
is behind your back.”
Busting
Boredom
I get bored very
I
easily. How can
t
ou
do things with
d?
becoming bore
Isabella, Virginia
Your
Ideas,
Please!
Real kids sent these letters
to us. We’ve responded
already, but we want to
know what you would tell
them. Choose a letter to
answer and put its title at
the top of your response.
Send your reply to
Curing
Jealousy
Your Ideas, Please!
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
Sometimes
I am jealous of
ever yone, even
people in books.
Can you help?
Please include your name,
age, and complete address.
We must receive your reply
by October 1, 2017, to
consider it for publication.
Ari (by e-mail)
d
Separate
Friends
re
friends a
All of my class!
rent
in a diffe o play with
tt
I only ge ess. What
rec
them at
do?
)
should I
y e-mail
Samaya
(b
Calcul8or
Words
1.
2.
By Teresa A. DiNicola 3.
4.
When you turn a calculator
5.
upside down, some combinations 6.
of numbers look like words.
7.
What words do you see when
8.
you turn this page upside down?
9.
Use the clues if you need a hint. 10.
Answers on page 38.
snakelike fish
makes honey
ring this
not he
not hers
footwear
baggy
turkey talk
crack this to find the yolk
what fish use to breathe
SEPTEMBER 2017
35
Crafts
Baobab
Tree
Bookends
By James W. Perrin, Jr.
1. Fill a plastic bag with sand
and place it inside a round
container. Cover the top
with paper.
2. For the trunk, use markers
to decorate a piece of
paper. Wrap it around
the container so that it
extends 1 inch higher
than the top. Tape it
in place.
3. Cut out branches
from cardstock. Add
paper leaves. Glue the
branches inside the
paper trunk.
Color-Shape Hopscotch
By Judith Dale
1. Cut out 10 shapes from different-colored
craft foam: five sets of two that match
in shape. Decorate one from each set with
craft foam or markers.
36
SEPTEMBER 2017
2. For a spinner, cut a large circle and an
arrow from cardstock. Write rules on
different sections of the circle, as shown.
Attach the arrow with a metal fastener.
Craft samples by Buff McAllister. Photos by Guy Cali Associates, Inc.
Safari
Bookmarks
By Sheila M. Hausbeck
1. Cut out an animal from cardstock.
To create a f lap, cut out an extra
head, mouth, or trunk. Glue the top
edge of the flap to the animal.
2. Decorate the animal with paper
and markers.
3. To use the animal as a bookmark,
place the f lap over a page.
Guatemalan
Worry Dolls
By Elizabeth Pagel-Hogan
Make
These
Next
Month!
In Guatemala, worry
dolls are made from
paper, cloth, and string
wrapped around a bent
wire. According to legend,
children tell their worries
to a worry doll and then
tuck it under their pillow
in hopes that the doll will
take away the worries
while the children sleep.
1. For clothing, wrap and
glue yarn, string, or fabric
around a non-spring
clothespin.
2. For hair, glue on yarn. Use
markers to draw a face.
To Play: Create a path by
laying the shapes outside
or on a carpeted floor. Spin
the spinner. Hop on one
foot from shape to shape,
following the rule the arrow
pointed to. Rearrange the
shapes to create new paths.
CRAFT
CHALLENGE!
Create a game
using a pencil,
paper, and
chenille sticks.
S
L
E
D
RI D
Busy Bugs
1
When do eggs hatch?
Layla, Louisiana
say to the
What did the violin
et?
viola when they m
on, New Yo
Clara Rose Samuels
“I get a lot of
bee mail.”
“Did you always want
to be a fire ant?”
3
2
rk
Why did the rooster go
to the doctor?
Isaac Morowitz, Illinois
Answers
Petal Patterns
Calcul8or Words
Fun This Month
Sights to See
They hiked to the waterfall
and the summit.
Mystery Photo— Bicycle tire.
page 8
Do You Know YOU?
Itty-Bitty Bones: C.
Amazing Muscles: B.
In a Heartbeat: A.
Teacher’s Pet: C.
Down the Pipes: B.
The Award Goes to . . . : C.
The Nose Knows: A.
Power Puller: B.
Inner-Space Orbit: B.
1. eel. 2. bee. 3. bell. 4. she. 5. his.
6. shoe. 7. loose. 8. gobble.
9. eggshell. 10. gills.
page 43
Picture Puzzler
TUBA GEAR (Trumpet, Ukulele,
Bagpipes, Accordion, Gong,
Electric guitar, Acoustic guitar,
Recorder).
Bonus!
at kind of
h
W
5
burgers
the
t
a
d
e
v
r
e
s
e
ar
North Pole?
Isabella Ashness, Rhode Island
What do you call a rich lizard?
Zion, Oregon
6
Which are the strongest
days of the week?
7
Jude Fleming, North Carolina
page 27
What’s That SNOUD?
1. POP. 2. OUCH. 3. GROWL.
4. GLUG. 5. RING. 6. VROOM.
7. SIZZLE. 8. POOF. 9. PURR.
10. CHIRP. 11. ACHOO. 12. BUZZ.
What did the sign
outside
the pig motel say?
Liam Sapan, Califo
Covers: Cruise Into Fall! by Guy Porfirio; What’s Wrong?® by David Arumi
SEPTEMBER 2017
9
rnia
8
want to
Why did the cow
be an astronaut?
Kristian, Kentuc
ky
Answers: 1. At the crack of dawn. 2. “Cello.”
3. It had the cock-a-doodle-flu. 4. Because
chickens didn’t exist yet. 5. Iceburgers.
6. A chameleonaire. 7. Saturday and Sunday;
all the rest are weakdays. 8. No Bacon-cy.
9. She wanted to jump over the Moon.
Illustration credits: Page 2: Kevin Zimmer; 6: Erin Mauterer; 15: Jokes by Rich Powell, “‘Helicopter’ Haiku” by
Mike Boldt; 27: What’s That SNOUD? by Barry Gott, Petal Patterns by Merrill Rainey; 29: Mike Petrik; 35: Your
Ideas, Please! by Keith Frawley, Calcul8or Words by Scott Soeder. Photo credits: Page 2: iStock/kamkar; 3: Gina
Lenz; 4: (grandfather and grandson) iStock/Flairimages; 4–5: (s’more) Guy Cali Associates, Inc.; 6: (turtle) iStock/
Lepro, (water) iStock/PLAINVIEW, (puzzle piece) iStock/aluxum, (bird) iStock/cynoclub, (graduate) iStock/
Rawpixel, (horse) iStock/GlobalP, (dog) Allison Kane, (present) iStock/skodonnell, (truck) iStock/macroworld, (girl)
iStock/gradyreese; 28–29: (hummingbird) iStock/SteveByland; 29: (cardboard tube) Guy Cali Associates, Inc.
38
4
ticut
Kassidy, Connec
A. 14, 6. B. 21, 6. C. 10, 8.
page 35
page 2
x cross
Why did the T. re
the road?
The
It was a great day for a picnic.
Timbertoes
®
By Rich Wallace • Art by Ron Zalme
There’s a
nice place!
Everyone was hungry.
They were juicy and ripe.
Blueberries!
The birds were hungry, too.
Time for
sandwiches.
They taste
so sweet.
Their lunch was gone!
At least we had a
berry good treat!
SEPTEMBER 2017
39
Ask
izona
“I’d like to do an
act in the talent
show,” I said.
®
How to Survive
Extreme
Embarrassment
By Lissa Rovetch • Art by Amanda Morley
Dear Embarrassed,
Even though the queasy,
heart-racing, hot-faced feeling
might seem like the worst thing
imaginable, I 100-million-percent
promise that it will not kill you!
I know that for sure because I
just had the most embarrassing
experience ever.
My parents run a small
grocery store near my house in
San Francisco. They always keep
a big box by the entrance where
people can donate cans of soup
and stuff to our local food bank.
“For some reason, our fooddonation box just isn’t filling up
lately,” said my dad.
“Maybe it’s time to think of
a way to remind folks about the
40
SEPTEMBER 2017
food bank,” said my mom.
“We could have fireworks!”
said my little brother, Tex.
“Yeah—fireworks!” said my
little sister, Indi.
“That’s a little outside our
budget,” my mom said, smiling.
“What about a talent show?”
my dad suggested.
“That’d be fun!” I said. “And
people could pay for tickets with
food donations.”
“Let’s get the word out!” said
my mom.
So while my parents posted
information online about the
event, we kids made some signs.
My friend Mareya came over to
help out.
“I’d like to do an act in the
show, but I don’t know what to
do,” I told Mareya.
“Well, since the food-bank
thing is about sharing,” said
Mareya, “why not write a song
about that?”
“Writing a song is not a
problem,” I said. “But I’d be too
nervous to sing it!”
She shrugged. “What if we
sang it together?”
Since Mareya has the world’s
prettiest voice and also happens
to play guitar, I agreed.
You wouldn’t believe how
many people came by the store
over the next week to sign up to
perform: dancers, Hula-Hoopers,
banjo players, comedians, poets,
and a boy who does tricks
with his adorable poodles
Salt and Pepper!
Mareya and I practiced and
practiced, and I was feeling
pretty good about our act. But
the morning of the performance,
Remember the
queasy, heartracing, hot-faced
feeling I was
talking about?
Mareya called with bad news.
She had come down with a
stomach bug and was not in
any shape to perform.
“There’s no way I’m going on
without you,” I told her.
“You’ve worked so hard,” she
said. “You’ll be great!”
But great is the last word
anyone would choose to describe
my performance! Without
Mareya’s guitar and voice to
guide me, I completely messed up
“What if
we sang
the song
together?”
“If anyone teases
you, just laugh it
off,” said Ollie.
the song. I forgot half the words,
and the words I did remember
sounded more like a frog croaking
than a girl singing.
Remember the queasy, heartracing, hot-faced feeling I was
talking about? Well, that’s what
I was experiencing—more than I
ever had before.
Once I was off the stage, my
mom wrapped me in a big hug.
“I want to disappear! I’ve never
been so embarrassed in my life,”
I said between sniff les.
“I think you were really brave,”
said my friend Ollie, who had
been sitting in the audience with
my family.
“But I sounded ridiculous!”
I cried.
Ollie smiled. “Everyone will
probably forget about the show by
tomorrow. And if anyone teases
you, just laugh it off.”
Indi chimed in, “My friend
Kate says that if people tease you,
you should imagine they’re just
three inches tall.”
The next day, when a kid in
my class actually did tease me,
Ollie’s and Indi’s advice worked
surprisingly well. It’s much easier
to laugh off snarky comments
when you imagine that the person
saying them is about the size
of a crayon.
So, dear Embarrassed, two
good things came from the talent
show: 1. It inspired a whole bunch
of neighbors to donate to our local
food bank; 2. I now know that
you truly can survive a lot more
embarrassment than you think.
So I recommend that you
be brave and go back to your
swimming pool. If people tease
you about the belly f lop, imagine
they’re three inches tall, and
laugh it off. Then have fun
swimming the day away!
Ciao for now,
Arizona
SEPTEMBER 2017
41
Dear
Highlights
My friend and I
have sleepovers a
lot. She always
wants to stay
up and I want
to go to sleep.
What should I do?
Sasha (by e-mail)
The next time you’re planning a sleepover, you might
explain to your friend that even though you have lots of fun
with her, you’d rather not stay up too late. Maybe you can
compromise. For example, the two of you might agree to a
bedtime that’s a bit earlier than she’d like to go to sleep and
a bit later than you usually go to sleep, as long as it’s OK with
your parents and hers.
You might also give your friend ideas for things she can do
at your house while you snooze. Maybe she would like to read
a book or watch a video until she drifts off to sleep.
I love to play music on the
MP3 player, but my little
sister likes it, too. She takes
it and I never get a turn.
Eric, Ohio
One thing you could do is sit
down with your sister to create a
schedule so that each of you gets
equal time on the MP3 player.
Perhaps you can both agree to
hand it over without complaining
when your time is up. The two of
you could even sign the schedule
to make the agreement “official.”
You could also ask your parents
to help you work out a fair
sharing system.
42
SEPTEMBER 2017
School is starting in two
weeks. I don’t have
enough time to do
everything I want to do,
like finish my reading list,
clean my room, and earn
money. Please help!
A Highlights Reader (by e-mail)
Summer always seems to fly
by, doesn’t it? The good news
is that you still have two weeks
left! If you pay close attention
to how you spend your days,
you may find that you can fit in
more than you think. If you’re
used to watching TV every day,
you might choose to turn it off
and grab a book that’s on your
reading list instead. If you’re
used to sleeping in, you might
wake up 30 minutes earlier
and spend that time cleaning
your room.
Perhaps you can find time
here and there to do chores or
odd jobs to earn money. Your
parents may be able to help
you think of ideas for earning
money after school or on the
weekends, too.
Write to us!
Please include your name, age,
and full address. Mail to
Dear Highlights
803 Church Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
Or e-mail us at Letters@Highlights.com.
Art by Keith Frawley.
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l
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P
Picture
driguez
By Annie Ro
Cleland
Art by Josh
ale
nts on the s
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Answers on pa
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What’s
Wrong?
®
Which things in this
picture are silly?
It’s up to you!
Visit our Web site!
SEPTEMBER 2017
BO
NUS!
A Day to Play
with Clay
Can you find these
objects in the
big picture?
By Kevin Rechin
fish
baseball
cap
hat
envelope
heart
ring
banana
bell
hat
horseshoe
comb
spoon
muffin
fishhook
paper
clip
canoe
sailboat
baseball
bat
kite
Check out our Hidden Pictures app!
spatula
ruler
carrot
Yum!
Art x
in a
o
b
h
c
n
u
L
By Teresa V. Mitchum
What’s fun about lunchtime
in Japan?
Japanese kids eat a good-looking
lunch. They carry lunches to school
in bento boxes. Their boxed lunch is
called obento (oh-BEN-toe).
Bento boxes are small containers
made out of plastic, wood, or metal.
Sometimes they have sections to
separate the food.
The bento boxes are usually
decorated with cartoon characters,
animals, or f lowers. They have
matching chopsticks or silverware
containers, bags, cups, and lunch mats.
Pretty Food
Inside the bento box, the obento is
just as colorful. Many Japanese people
believe that all food should taste good
and look pretty. There is a Japanese
saying: Food should be made so that you
could eat it with your eyes.
Japanese mothers often choose foods
Photos: (left) iStock/jreika, (middle) iStock/kazoka30, (right) Teresa V. Mitchum
oxes
Bento b ith
come w ats,
ng m
matchi and
cups,
.
k cases
c
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s
p
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ch
Kids eat their obento at a classroom table.
with different colors, textures,
shapes, and tastes. They arrange
the food in the bento boxes.
Mrs. Sato, who lives in Tokyo,
makes obento for her son Koki.
She says, “I want Koki’s obento
to be colorful. I try to include foods
that are red, green, yellow, and brown.
I make the obento look nice but also
make sure it’s healthy.”
What do Japanese kids eat as their
obento? Rice and side dishes.
Koki likes a layer of rice in the bottom
of his bento box. Sometimes Mrs. Sato
puts shogayaki, stir-fried pork, on top
of the rice. Sometimes she sprinkles it
with furikake. These are sprinkles
made from nori (seaweed) or dried fish.
Japanese children love them.
Giri, another boy, brings onigiri.
These are sticky rice balls or triangles
wrapped in dried, pressed seaweed.
Sometimes the onigiri have a pickled
plum, small bits of cooked salmon, or
f laked fish in the middle.
The side dishes include pickled,
boiled, or steamed vegetables; omelets
with salt and sugar; small sausages;
fish; or meat. Umeboshi (pickled
Japanese apricot) is a treat. The dessert
is fresh fruit.
Before You Eat
Obento time is special. First, children
wash their hands and gargle with a
kind of mouthwash. Then they get their
obento from their bags. In the winter,
the sensei (teacher) may put the obento
in a warmer for them.
Kids put their obento, chopsticks, and
cups on their lunch mats. They sit at
classroom tables.
Before eating, they sing a fun song
about obento:
We are so happy because it’s
obento time.
Our hands are washed and clean.
Everybody is here now,
So let’s say, “Thank you for the
food, Mommy and Daddy.”
Try This!
s
’
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n
n
e
P
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n
O
Time to
Shine
By Carey Krieger
Art by Andy J. Smith
What You’ll Need
• three dull pennies
• two paper cups
• vinegar
• liquid soap
What to Do
Try to guess which liquid will
make a penny shine!
1 . Set one penny aside.
2 . Place each of the other two
pennies into its own paper cup.
3. Into one cup, pour enough
vinegar to cover the penny.
4. Into the other cup, pour
enough liquid soap to
cover that penny as
well.
5. Wait at least 10
minutes.
6. Remove the
pennies, rinse them
in water, and rub
them with a paper
towel.
7. Compare the two pennies
with the one you set aside
at the beginning.
How It Works
The vinegar made its penny
shine. New pennies are shiny.
But they become dull over time
as copper on the surface
reacts with oxygen
from the air. The two
elements combine to
form dark chemicals
called copper oxides.
The acetic acid in
vinegar dissolves
these chemicals and
leaves the copper
surface of the penny
looking shiny. Soap is
great for cleaning many things,
but it can’t dissolve copper oxides.
Photos: (stack of pennies) by Corbis Premium RF/Alamy, (hand holding penny)
Photodisc/Alamy, (three pennies) Brand X Pictures/Jupiterimages Unlimited.
Quiz Me, Quiz You!
ow much do you kno
ow
w about
iend
ends?
?
How much do they know about you?
Answer these questions about yourself, then guess how a friend might
answer them. Have your friend do the same—then compare your answers!
avor
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9. My fav
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6. How
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Planet
-Savin
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Summer Vacation
By Lori Anastasia • Art by Marcelo Baez
I chewed on my pencil as I
paced back and forth across my
bedroom. What was I going to
do? It was bad enough that I was
the new kid. But now I
was sure to get laughed
right out of fifth grade.
How could my first
homework assignment
be such a disaster?
I sat at my desk and
stared at the computer
screen. “My name is
Anna Kincaid, and this
summer I—” I stopped. How
could I stand in front of my class
and say that I’d spent the entire
summer handling something
that most people don’t even
like to talk about? Manure.
Otherwise known as poop. I’d
spent three months shoveling,
collecting, and analyzing
cow manure on my
grandparents’ farm in
Oklahoma. I tried to
think of a different
adventure I could share.
Maybe I could say I’d
spent the summer on the
Weather Control Team
preventing tornadoes in
the Midwest.
“Time for dinner,” my
mom called.
I trudged down the stairs
I was sure
to get
laughed
right out of
fifth grade.
“Be proud of the
work we did.”
and slid into my chair.
“You’ve been in your room
since you came home from
school,” Mom said. “What are
you working on?”
I groaned. “I have to tell the
class what I did this summer.”
My younger brother, Seymour,
started giggling uncontrollably.
“No one will want to sit next to
you after they hear you were
covered in cow poop all summer!”
“OK, that’s enough, Seymour,”
Dad said.
“Anna,” said Mom, putting
green beans in a bowl, “be proud
of the work we did this summer.
Our planet would be in sad shape
without scientists like your
grandfather.”
It’s true that my grandfather
does important work. Back in
2019, he developed an easy way
to use manure as a source of fuel,
and he’s spent the last couple of
decades perfecting the method.
Using the manure is now easy,
economical, and environmentally
safe.
“I know, Mom,” I said, staring
at my meatloaf. “But it’s not
exactly something people want
to hear about before lunch.”
“Or during dinner,” Dad said,
chuckling as he also studied his
meatloaf.
That night I dreamed about
more glamorous adventures:
scuba diving in Australia as I
restored the Great Barrier Reef;
I took my classmates on a virtual tour.
swinging from vines as I
protected the rain forests in
Brazil. I tossed and turned.
At school the next day, I
hunched over my desk, listening
to each kid speak. My palms
were sweaty, and the knot in my
stomach grew tighter. I prepared
myself for total humiliation.
“And that was my voyage to
the moon’s first Lunar Hotel and
Day Spa,” Ember Adams said,
finishing her report. She bowed
and took her seat.
Back in 2019,
Grandpa developed
an easy way to
use cow manure
as fuel.
“It’s your turn, Anna,”
Ms. Hammond said.
I breathed quickly. Clutching
my micro-mobile computer, I
stepped to the front of the room
and cleared my throat. “This
summer I—well, I . . .” I stared
at the f loor. This was my last
chance to save my dignity with
a tale of fake adventure.
Then I thought about Grandpa
and how hard he works to save
our planet. “I spent the summer
collecting cow manure,” I blurted.
I looked around the room.
No one seemed completely
disgusted, although there were
some confused faces.
I went ahead and hit a few
keys on my computer, and a
three-dimensional image of
a cow eating alfalfa appeared in
the middle of the classroom. I
proceeded to take my classmates
on a virtual tour that started
with the cow in the pasture and
ended with a man fueling his car
at the local methane-gas pump.
To my amazement, my classmates
were fascinated.
Toward the end, I decided to
throw in one of Grandpa’s corny
jokes for good measure. “What
did one gas pump say to the
other gas pump after an
exhausting day of fueling cars?”
I paused, then said, “‘I’m totally
pooped out.’ ”
Laughter and a few goodnatured groans filled the room.
I finished by saying, “I guess
my family’s work this summer
helped fuel Ember’s trip to the
moon and Max’s underground
express train to the deep-sea
adventure park.”
The class applauded as I
returned to my desk.
The boy seated behind me
tapped my shoulder. “Hey, I’m
Josh,” he said. “I guess you’re
responsible for my family’s
agonizing eight-hour road trip
to visit my great-aunt Ethel in
Maine.” He laughed. “Anyway,
some of us are playing kickball
after school. Want to come?”
Who would have thought that
I’d make my first friends at this
school thanks to Grandpa and
my stinky summer vacation—I
mean, my fabulous planet-saving
adventure!
BACK TO SCHOOL FUN 2016 • COLLECTOR’S EDITION
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Editor in Chief: Christine French Cully
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