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IN New York - December 2017

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NEW YORK
SHOP ALERT
Gift-Buying Tips
From the Experts
HIPSTER’S
GUIDE TO OPERA
UMA
Thurman
STEPS INTO HER BROADWAY DEBUT
DECEMBER 2017
INNEWYORK.COM
DECEMBER 2017
24
departments
6
SKYLINE
Big happenings around town
8
FLAVOR OF THE MONTH
Hot trends in dining
10
NIGHT SPOTS
The after-dark scene
12
7
ON EXHIBIT
This month, give the gift of art
14
FOOTLIGHTS
Theater news
30
OUT & ABOUT
Events around the city with
our favorite hotel people
features
18
On the Cover
What does Uma Thurman really think about
motherhood? To find out, see p. 18.
29
Uma’s Grand Debut
Uma Thurman is ready for her Broadway closeup in the new play, “The Parisian Woman.”
20
Buyers Rejoice
Stuck on what gifts to get friends and family?
Here come the experts to the rescue.
26
Opera 101
Nope, opera is not the expensive snooze
fest you thought it was.
32
Borough Beat
listings
36 ENTERTAINMENT | 50 DINING+DRINKING
56 SHOPS+SERVICES | 60 MUSEUMS+ATTRACTIONS
63 GALLERIES+ANTIQUES | 66 TRANSPORTATION+TOURS
information
68
72
NYC STREET MAP
SNEAK PEEK: Special dates of note in January
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COVER PHOTO: UMA THURMAN, GIAMPAOLO SGURA/TRUNK ARCHIVE
Must-visit spots in Brooklyn and Queens.
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December skyline
HOT HAPPENINGS AROUND TOWN
by Francis Lewis
OK, “Tesseract,” the name of the dance/theater/
film piece at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s
Harvey Theater, is a brainteaser. In geometry, a
tesseract is a four-dimensional shape made up
of eight cubes, 24 squares and 32 edges. But
enough math. The onstage “Tesseract” is art: a
3-D dance video and live performance with video
capture and projection. Very layered and very of
the moment. | bam.org, also Dec. 14–16
6
13
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
PHOTOS: “TESSERACT,” MIKE BELLO; A CUSTOM MOTORCYCLE BY NICK BEAULIEU, © AND COURTESY PROGRESSIVE INTERNATIONAL MOTORCYCLE SHOWS, PHOTO: MANNY PANDYA; PAUL WINTER’S WINTER SOLSTICE, CLIFF SOBEL; SHAUN LEANE FOR ALEXANDER MCQUEEN,
“COILED CORSET,” THE OVERLOOK COLLECTION, AUTUMN/WINTER 1999–2000, COURTESY SOTHEBY’S
1
(ALSO DEC. 2 & 3)
Time to hit the open road,
folks. Parked inside the Jacob
K. Javits Convention Center is
the 37th annual Progressive
International Motorcycle Show.
motorcycleshows.com
(THRU NOV. 12)
The Big Apple busts a gut when stand-up
comedians, like self-proclaimed nerd Chris
Hardwick (below), tickle the humerus (aka
funny bone) at the 14th annual New York
Comedy Festival. nycomedyfestival.com
7
It’s New Year’s Eve. You can
brave the throngs in Times
Square, or better yet go for
a four-mile Midnight Run in
Central Park, with music,
dancing, fireworks—and
room to breathe. nyrr.org
31
14
4
Art? Fashion? Jewelry? Goldsmith
Shaun Leane’s work for iconoclastic
couturier Alexander McQueen was
all three. Now, Sotheby’s auctions
Leane’s archive, including “Coiled Corset”—estimated to sell for $250,000$350,000. That’s haute! sothebys.com
(ALSO DEC. 15 & 16)
Sound the gong: Paul Winter’s annual
Winter Solstice Celebration fills the
Cathedral Church of Saint John the
Divine, the world’s largest cathedral,
with music, dance and pageantry.
solsticeconcert.com
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
7
MAKIMAKI (1369 Sixth Ave., 212.245.4550) was, frankly,
not what I expected. Usually restaurants with a public relations firm behind them are fairly elaborate affairs: at the very
least, sit-down spots with waiter service. But Kevin Takarada’s
650-square-foot takeout is a mere slip of a space, with just a
counter and a few stools for the lucky few who can nab them.
The sushi, however, was worthy of a four-star affair. Maki rolls
(cut-up or hand-held sushi rolls) were exquisitely fresh: The
rolls came wrapped in a tight, twist-off cellophane (with directions) “to keep each roll as fresh as possible until the moment
it is eaten,” explains Takarada. Besides the standards (spicy
tuna, eel avocado, etc.), you can also customize your own roll.
Sushi-aholics, don’t miss this place! Elsewhere, an American
bistro, Esther & Carol (341 Broome St., 646.355.1840), has
gained a following since opening last May. The decor is sleek
WHAT’S TRENDING ON THE FOODIE SCENE
by Lois Levine
and contemporary (gray leather banquettes, metallic drop
lights), while the menu runs the gamut from traditional (chicken
noodle soup, fried chicken) to trendy (wheat berry and quinoa
grain bowl). Who, by the way, are Esther and Carol? The owners’
mothers. Actor Chazz Palminteri (“A Bronx Tale”) has moved his
namesake restaurant from Second Ave. to the Theater District (30
W. 46th St., 212.355.5540) where you can expect white tablecloth
service and classic Northern Italian dishes (prosciutto and melon,
mushroom risotto, veal parmigiana). At Lincoln Ristorante (142
W. 65th St., 212.359.6500), Chef Shea Gallante takes a wider view
of Italy, borrowing from both northern and southern traditions.
The restaurant’s wraparound glass windows offer a great view of
Lincoln Center’s sweeping plaza, while the open kitchen provides
a steady stream of inventive dishes (fluke crudo with watermelon
radish, pappardelle with lamb bacon, Tuscan crustacean stew).
3
2
1
1. The bar area at Esther & Carol
2. MakiMaki sushi hand rolls
3. The dining room at Chazz Palminteri
4. A sampling of dishes at Lincoln Ristorante
4
8
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
PHOTOS: ESTHER & CAROL, COURTESY ESTHER & CAROL; MAKIMAKI, MICHAEL TULIPAN; CHAZZ PALMINTERI, COURTESY CHAZZ PALMINTERI ITALIAN RESTAURANT NYC; LINCOLN RISTORANTE, COURTESY GHOST MEDIA
flavor of the month
Bring the Bubbles
THE AFTER-DARK SCENE by Daniel Fridman
Hundreds of bottles—including sparkling wines from
France, Italy, Austria, Greece, Spain, Germany and the
United States—as well as varietals of Champagne ranging from single grapes to blends, to Champagne rosés
and sparkling rosés, make up the long and informative
book of wines at the first MacDougal St. restaurant
venture from New York born-and-bred owner and Wine
Enthusiast “40 Under 40 Tastemaker,” 29-year-old Ariel
Arce. | Air’s Champagne Parlor, 127 MacDougal St.,
212.420.4777
A Drink to Experience
Locally sourced produce and
ingredients are procured
daily to be incorporated
into handcrafted cocktails,
prepared in a “drink kitchen”
by a staff of bartenders
whipping up inventive,
intricate concoctions, or
offering modern takes on
classic libations, such as the
hot toddy, reimagined with
graham flour, cinnamon,
mocha chai and bourbon,
forming “Cloche Encounters
of the 46 Kind.” |
The Aviary, Mandarin
Oriental New York, 80
Columbus Cir., at W. 60th
St., 212.805.8800
Friday Night Is Party Night
When the clock strikes 10 pm on a Friday evening at the NYC outpost
of this global, luxe Japanese restaurant, the upstairs lounge—serving
signature cocktails, spirit bottle specials and Champagne (including plenty
of magnums)—transforms into a buzzing, reservation-only celebration
of the weekend to come. Live DJ sets and instrumental performances
soundtrack the night until close, while an all-night menu of Izakaya-style
street-food bites supplement the 9 pm pre-party omakase dinner. |
Zuma, 261 Madison Ave., 212.544.9862
10
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
PHOTOS: ASSORTED WINES AT AIR’S CHAMPAGNE PARLOR, NOAH FECKS; CLOCHE ENCOUNTERS OF THE 46 KIND, SARAH AND ALLEN HEMBEGER; ZUMA BAR INTERIOR AND STAIRCASE, COURTESY ZUMA NEW YORK
night spots
REVOLUTIONARY
LINGERIE STYLING
VISIT A BOUTIQUE OR BOOK AN APPOINTMENT TO EXPERIENCE
A PERSONALIZED FIT AND STYLE SESSION
LINGERIE | SWIMWEAR | NIGHTWEAR | SHAPEWEAR
B R A S AVA I L A B L E I N A-K C U P S
NYC BOUTIQUES
104 Fifth Ave. (between 15th and 16th St.)
1051 Third Ave. (between 62nd and 63rd St.)
1252 Madison Ave. (at 90th St.)
W W W . R I G B YA N D P E L L E R . C O M
on exhibit
1
Who wouldn’t love to find a work of art under the tree? Jampacked with galleries, New York offers something at almost any
price for the art enthusiast on your list (or for yourself). Besides,
it doesn’t cost anything to look.
(1) With over 50 works, “Ardent Nature: Arshile Gorky Landscapes, 1943-47” is a gift for aficionados of the groundbreaking
artist, whose enigmatic Surrealism prefigured Abstract Expressionism. Inspired by summers spent on a farm, lyrical paintings
like “Pastoral” (1947) show how Gorky (1904-1948) liberated
himself from artistic conventions. Hauser & Wirth, 32 E. 69th
St., 212.794.4970, thru Dec. 23
(2) Can’t spring for a grand-scale flower sculpture by art’s
indomitable 88-year-old Japanese polymath Yayoi Kusama
(pictured in her studio)? Join the line for a selfie with or without
a friend in her hallucinatory “Infinity Mirror Rooms” during the
exhibit “Festival of Life,” which spills through two Chelsea galleries. David Zwirner, 525 & 533 W. 19th sts., thru Dec. 16
(3) Collecting work by younger artists lets you watch a career
develop and often sidestep stratospheric prices. In “HotSpots,”
his first New York solo show, Los Angeles artist Brian Rochefort
unveils irresistibly tactile ceramic “craters,” including “Chumbe”
(2017). Rochefort’s travels to volcanoes, rain forests and barrier
reefs inspired these bold sculptures that blast past traditional
ceramics. Van Doren Waxter, 195 Chrystie St., 212.982.1930,
thru Dec. 22
(4) Born into a Yoruba family in London, Tunji Adeniyi-Jones is
fascinated by the enduring influence of ancient West African
aesthetic traditions on present-day diasporic communities. In
“Flash of the Spirit,” the 25-year-old New York artist creates
his own mythologies of ancient royalty and Yoruba deities in
vibrant, color-field paintings like “Red Twins” (2016). Nicelle
Beauchene, 327 Broome St., 212.375.8043, thru Dec. 17
2
3
1
12
4
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
PHOTOS: ARSHILE GORKY, “PASTORAL,” ©2017 THE ARSHILE GORKY FOUNDATION/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK, COURTESY THE ARSHILE GORKY FOUNDATION AND HAUSER & WIRTH; PORTRAIT OF YAYOI KUSAMA, IMAGE ©YAYOI KUSAMA. COURTESY DAVID
ZWIRNER, NEW YORK. OTA FINE ARTS, TOKYO/SINGAPORE/SHANGHAI. VICTORIA MIRO, LONDON. YAYOI KUSAMA INC.; BRIAN ROCHEFORT, “CHUMBE,” 2017, COURTESY THE ARTIST AND VAN DOREN WAXTER; TUNJI ADENIYI-JONES, “RED TWINS,” 2016, COURTESY THE ARTIST
Artful Giving
FASCINATING ART DISPLAYS by Terry Trucco
footlights
THEATER NEWS by Francis Lewis
Truth is, we New Yorkers don’t get to see live theater from
abroad as often we would like. Certainly not on the grand scale
of Théâtre du Soleil’s “A Room in India (Une chambre en Inde)”
(right), which has its North American premiere here this month.
Under the visionary direction of Ariane Mnouchkine, whose
1978 film ‘Molière” is required viewing for every theater buff,
the Paris-based company of 35 multinational actors performs a
story about a touring theater troupe stranded in India following
a European terrorist attack. Timely to be sure, with issues of religious extremism, climate change and gender equity addressed.
But thrillingly exotic, too, with interludes of terukkuttu, an
ancient and elaborate form of theater practiced in South India.
| “A Room in India (Une chambre en Inde),” Park Avenue
Armory, 643 Park Ave., 212.933.5812, Dec. 5–20
The Doctor Is In
When I spoke on the phone to singer/songwriter Jason Mraz, he was
walking to rehearsals for the hit Broadway musical “Waitress,” in which he
stars (with Betsy Wolfe, below) through mid-January. What prompted the
Grammy Award winner to take on the challenge of his first extended role
as Dr. Pomatter, the romantic lead? “I thought that dramatic roles would
come to me in my 50s [he just turned 40], when I had more life experience and more facial hair,” he said. ”So, when Sara [Bareilles, writer of the
show’s songs] asked if I would consider the gig, I felt uncomfortable, which
was a sign that I should do it.” Always one to say yes to life, Mraz summed
up his new adventure this way: “If it goes really bad, I’m going to want to
do it again to redeem myself. If it goes really great, I’m going to want to
do it again because it went really great.” It’s going great. | “Waitress,”
Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th St., 877.250.2929
1
Beautiful Music
Ask me what play I’m most looking forward to
seeing and, without hesitation, I’ll say Claire van
Kampen’s “Farinelli and the King.” The plot is drawn
from life: Borderline loony and insomniac Philippe
V of Spain finds comfort and healing in the dulcet
tones of Italian castrato Farinelli. Playing these two
mentally and physically wounded soul mates are
Mark Rylance and Sam Crane (left to right, above).
Crane is new to me, but Rylance … he can do no
wrong, whether in the theater, on TV or in the movies. Students of acting, and anyone else who wants
to get up close to a masterful performance, should
consider buying a ticket for a special onstage seat.
| “Farinelli and the King,” Belasco Theatre,
111 W. 44th St., 212.239.6200
14
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
PHOTOS: JASON MRAZ AND BETSY WOLFE IN “WAITRESS.” JASON BELL; MARK RYLANCE AND SAM CRANE IN SHAKESPEARE GLOBE’S PRODUCTION OF “FARINELLI AND THE KING,” ©MARC BRENNER; THÉÂTRE DU SOLEIL’S “A ROOM IN INDIA (UNE CHAMBRE EN INDE),” MICHELE LAURENT
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COACH | HUGO BOSS | STUART WEITZMAN | MAC COSMETICS
MORE THAN 60 SHOPS AND RESTAURANTS
Uma
s
’
GRAND
DEBUT
Uma Thurman, the alluring blonde star of the silver
screen, finally comes to Broadway. BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON
18
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
“I’VE BEEN CHOMPING at the bit to get back to acting,” says
Uma Thurman. While the 6-foot-tall actress has appeared in
dozens of movies and television shows over the first 25 years of
her career, from “Dangerous Liaisons” (1988) to “Pulp Fiction,”
(1994) to “The Producers” (2005) to “Smash” (2012)—earning
Oscar, Golden Globe and Emmy nominations along the way —
she has worked far more sporadically since her daughter Luna
(from actor-director Arpad Busson) was born five years ago.
In her 47 years, Uma Thurman has seemingly lived numerous lifetimes. Born in Boston, she grew up in Amherst, Massachusetts—along with siblings, Ganden, Dechen, and Mipam—
where the Dalai Lama would visit her father, the famed Buddhist
scholar, Robert Thurman, and her mother, Nena, a fashionmodel-turned-psychotherapist who had been previously married
to Timothy Leary.
She came to New York as a teenager, where after a brief modeling career, she began acting in films at age 16. For all her prodigious talent, though, her personal life has made the statuesque,
startlingly beautiful actress almost as famous as her films; most
notably, her marriages to actors Gary Oldman and Ethan
Hawke and her romance with hotelier André Balazs But now,
Thurman (also mother to Maya, 19, and Levon, 15, from exhusband Ethan Hawke) is back in the spotlight. She has four
films in production and is taking her first turn on Broadway as
Chloe, the deceptively smart political wife in “The Parisian
Woman,” by Beau Willimon (“House of Cards), about political
maneuvering in Washington, D.C.
How did you make the transition from modeling to acting?
I was in boarding school in Boston and needed spending money,
so my mother suggested I become a model. And then it just happened that my modeling agent decided to open an acting agency
and asked me to join it. So I thought, “that’s perfect.” By the
time I was 16, I had already made a couple of movies, and then
everything changed when I made “Dangerous Liaisons.” I was
only 18 when that film came out.
Of course. I am terrified about the results. Even before rehearsals started, I had all those famous actors’ nightmares and woke
up in the sweat of anxiety. Some people have tried to scare me
about Broadway, but I figure if you get torn to pieces, it should
be by the finest people in the world. But I also often forget what
I can do until I do it. I also know I am the luckiest person alive
to be directed by Pam, to have Beau writing this script and to be
working with great actors like Josh Lucas and Blair Brown.
Tell me what you love most about your character, Chloe?
I think she is fascinating, because she is so liberated in her life, in
a way not many women are. It’s not often you see women pictured in such a multidimensional way. I also love the unusual
depiction of marriage and what the play says about love.
The play is set during the Trump presidency, and Beau is going to constantly update the script as things happen in real
life. How do you feel about that idea?
That’s an added pressure. With all the things going on, there’s no
telling if the play will just be adjusted a little every week or if it
could turn into large, even full-scale renovation. It’s possible
things will get so crazy that we’ll just have a TV on the stage
running CNN, and we all will just be talking back to it!
Do you have role models in your profession?
Don’t laugh, but Doris Day was one of my true heroes. If I could
have lived in any other time in history, and if I could’ve been
Doris Day, I would have taken it. Of course, I admire so many
working actresses, especially Meryl Streep and Sissy Spacek.
How does being a mother affect playing a woman like Chloe?
Motherhood has been my master in the best sense of the
word. But I believe that the concept of living for yourself is
just as valid. I admire Chloe, who hasn’t suffered over the
decision she made in not having had children.
Now, it’s almost 30 years later, and you’re finally making your
Your daughter Maya is following in your professional foot-
Broadway debut. What took so long?
steps. Are you happy about that?
First of all, this is something I’ve wanted to do for years; in many
ways, it was just circumstances that prevented it from happening. But I admit some of it was my own hemming and hawing
about getting onstage. Ultimately, all of my life experiences have
delivered me here right now. My youngest child is now 5, and I
feel it’s finally the right time to take back my passion for acting.
She’s conquering the world and having this meteoric rise in
acting. I will admit I wanted her to get a bachelors of arts
from a traditional college rather than going to Juilliard,
and I was not listened to. As a parent, you have to guess
what’s best for your children, and I may have guessed
wrong. In fact, I’ll be happy if she proves me wrong. I am
not the author of her life, and, as a mother, I know deep
down I have to be fluid and flexible and provide support.
So how did you actually end up in “The Parisian Woman”?
PHOTO: RUVEN AFANADOR
Are you scared at all about taking on this challenge?
A couple of years ago, my lawyer suggested I meet this great
stage director, Pam MacKinnon, who was also his client. And
we got along enormously well and talked a lot about me making
the transition from film acting to stage acting. At the end of our
meeting, I told her, if you have any ideas, just point me to something. And then she paused and said she was working on something with a great writer. She didn’t say what it was. And I
couldn’t believe it when she sent me the Beau Willimon script. I
read it in one gulp and knew I wanted to do it.
Many people think of you as a quintessential New Yorker,
even though you were raised in New England.
What I most love about New York is its diversity. It forces
an integration that some other places don’t. People here all
feel they’re New Yorkers, no matter where they started. Ultimately, whether you’re standing in the rain at the Lincoln
Center fountain or just driving by the statue of Duke Ellington in Central Park, you feel the magic of New York.
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
19
MET STORE AT
THE METROPOLITAN
MUSEUM OF ART
Luxury Linen
Watercolor Set.
NEW-YORK
HISTORICAL
SOCIETY STORE
Vintage Vietnam Marine
Aviator’s Jacket and book,
“When Jackie Saved
Grand Central.”
Buyers Rejoice
Insiders from NYC’s top retail stores
pick their favorite holiday gifts.
PHOTOS: WATERCOLOR SET, COURTESY THE MET STORE; VINTAGE AVIATOR JACKET, COURTESY COCKPIT USA; “WHEN JACKIE SAVED GRAND CENTRAL,” COURTESY HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT; PLYWOOD SHOULDER BAG AND
CUCINA COLORI DINNERWARE, COURTESY MOMA DESIGN STORE
by Tracy Kaler
’Tis the season for sugar plums, holiday parties and
last-minute shopping. If you’re one to scurry around
town on Christmas Eve leaving hardly enough time to
wrap, tag and tuck those presents under the tree, this
holiday gift list will inspire an NYC spree and leave
time to spare. We’ve curated a diverse lineup in various price ranges from some of the city’s top merchandising pros. Get shopping!
THE MET STORE
Leave it to The Metropolitan
Museum of Art to masterfully
MoMA
merge art with giving. Leanne
DESIGN STORE
Graeff, Senior Product Design“Plywood” Shoulder Bag
er for the Met Store, lends us
and Cucina Colori
her holiday gift suggestions.
Dinnerware bowls.
The Cloisters Playing Cards
Pocket Square ($55) will dress up
the man in your life. This handkerchief was adapted from a 15th-century
set of playing cards in The Met Cloisters.
Graeff says, “The rich colors will look wonderful
peeking out of a suit pocket.”
For ladies, she likes the Quimbaya Pendant Necklace ($178). Influenced by the pre-Columbian section
of the museum, this hammered gold necklace’s lusTHE WHITE COMPANY
trous finish will spruce up any outfit. “It brings an
Filled with comforting finds, the furniture, clothing
instant sense of style and polish.”
and homewares store, The White Company exudes
Handcrafted by a family-operated workshop in Itsumptuousness, and there’s no better time for a
aly, the Florentine Trivet in green and blue ($95) is
splurge here than at the holidays. British Founder and
sure to brighten almost any kitchen. According to
Owner Chrissie Rucker gives us her must-buys.
Graeff, the ceramics are painted the same way they
Guys deserve their share of luxury, too, and Ruckhave been for centuries and reflect the techniques seen
er believes you should “treat him to the comfiest and
in The Met’s maiolica collection.
best loungewear around.” The men’s Cashmere Zip
Older kids can get their creative juices flowing with
Hoodie ($325) works well for a yoga class, casual
the Luxury Linen Watercolor Set ($150), complete
weekend brunch or a quiet night in.
with paint, brushes, a pad of acid-free paper and a
For the ladies, Rucker claims that it doesn’t get
teal linen case. Dressing up the pad’s cover is a repromore indulgent than the luxe Shawl Collar Cashmere
duction of German artist Paul Klee’s famous 1915
Robe ($475). (Rucker is keeping her fingers crossed
watercolor, “Movement of the Vaulted Chambers,”
that her husband reads this gift guide because she’d
which Graeff tells us is what gives this gift an “essenlove to find it under her tree come Christmas.)
tial tie to The Met collection.”
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
21
Glass is timeless, which is why the vintage Etched
Mercury Tea Light Holder ($19) and the Mercury
Bowl Vase ($55) make exquisite home furnishings
gifts. Rucker suggests grouping several on shelves or
decorating holiday tables with candles and flowers.
The Little White Company (the children’s department) has a cute Reindeer Romper ($48), snug and
comfy on any tiny tot. “This fun all-in-one is just perfect for baby’s first Christmas,” says Rucker.
Erica Russo, Bloomingdale’s Operating Vice President
and Fashion Director of Accessories and Beauty, assures us that style and gift giving go hand in hand.
According to Russo, nothing says cozy chic quite
the way that Bloomingdale’s Cashmere Crewneck
Sweaters ($198) do. Available in The Men’s Store, the
pullovers come in 10 different colors including slate,
coal and dusk-blue.
“Show the woman in your life just how much she
sparkles and shines,” suggests Russo, with Bloomingdale’s exclusive Roberto Coin 18-karat yellow gold
Princess Chiodo Bangle Bracelet ($6,500), with openwork detail and capped with pavé diamonds.
Oenophiles will adore the Üllo Wine Decanter Set
($149.99). Holding one full bottle of wine, the borosilicate handblown glass carafe includes a removable
purifier that filters out artificial preservatives.
Russo says to “indulge your little musician” and
celebrate “The Greatest Showman”—20th Century
Fox’s film about P.T. Barnum, scheduled for release on
Christmas Day—when you give the limited-edition
Melissa and Doug Learn-to-Play Piano ($139.99).
The hardwood little piano has 25 color-coded keys.
MoMA DESIGN STORE
We turn to The Museum of Modern Art for choices
that keep us thinking right up until we purchase and
THE WHITE
COMPANY
Shawl Collar Cashmere
Robe and Mercury
Bowl Vase.
PHOTOS: CASHMERE ROBE AND MERCURY BOWL VASE FROM THE WHITE COMPANY, COURTESY THE WHITE COMPANY; BLOOM FRAGRANCE, GIANT BEAR AND SMOKING SLIPPERS, COURTESY MACY’S
BLOOMINGDALE’S
even more so afterward. Emmanuel Plat, Director of
Merchandising for the MoMA Design Store, divulges
his preferred holiday gift picks.
Named after Einstein, the wall-mountable Albert
Clock ($340) displays unsolved math equations that
require cracking to read the time, so geeky guys and
gals can work their minds and tell time simultaneously. Plat refers to the gadget, which features a white
LED display and six different levels of difficulty, as “a
clock like no other.”
For women, Plat selected the Origami-inspired
“Plywood” Shoulder Bag ($250) because it’s “a wonderful ‘trompe l’oeil’ bag that looks just like plywood,
but is made from one piece of leather.” Wearable on
the shoulder or as a cross-body purse, it has slots and
pockets on the interior to stay organized.
“This German dinnerware brings a cheerful touch
to any dinner party,” says Plat of the elegant and dishwasher-safe Cucina Colori Dinnerware ($180). Each
white porcelain set consists of six dinner plates and
six salad plates that don a slim ring of color around
the edges. A six-piece bowl set ($108) can be purchased separately.
Your little one can “stay warm and see in the dark”
when he or she sports the Kids X-Cap Light Up Hat
($30) in pink or blue. The beanie contains a removable lamp that shines three levels of light up to four
continuous hours and can be recharged via USB.
MACY’S
Gucci’s Bloom Fragrance;
FAO Schwarz Giant Bear
and Steve Madden
Smoking Slippers.
MACY’S
There’s no store with the history of the 2-millionsquare-foot Macy’s Herald Square (the first store to
have a real “Santa,” among other firsts). Cassandra
Jones, Senior Vice President of Macy’s Fashion Office,
lets us in on her No. 1 choices.
Jones suggests giving him “the gift of style with
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
23
BLOOMINGDALE’S
classic pieces like varsity jackets and smoking slippers, reinvented for the modern man,” such as the
Tommy Logo Capsule Item Varsity Jacket ($129) and
Steve Madden Smoking Slippers ($100).
Ladies who appreciate fresh floral scents will love
Gucci’s Bloom Fragrance (3.3 oz. for $124). For a
more whimsical present, opt for fun plus sparkle with
a Bow and Drape Sweatshirt ($68-$78).
Outstanding host gifts include Thirstystone Barware ($15-$85) and Studio Mercantile Bar Games
($20-$120). Jones says that “gorgeous barware and
games will help celebrate any occasion.”
Sometimes, life can feel like a movie for grownups,
but children will think they’re living in one when they
catch sight of FAO Schwarz’s 93-inch Giant Bear
($500) on Christmas. Jones says, “Make their wishes
come true” with this supersize stuffed animal.
THE NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY
MUSEUM & LIBRARY NYHISTORY STORE
The New-York Historical Society Museum & Library
gift store offers NYC-centric presents for all ages.
Ione Saroyan, Director of Merchandise Operations,
shares her favorite items from the shop.
The Vintage Vietnam Marine Aviator’s Jacket
24
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
($230 to $270) is perfect for stylish men with a penchant for history. Referred to as the “Marine Corps
Harrier Pilot’s Second Skin,” the army green jacket
pays tribute to the garment worn by Navy and Marine fighter pilots from the 1950s through the 1970s.
Saroyan says she favors the Well Behaved Women
Seldom Make History Tote ($19.95) because “it gives
me hope.” Printed with the noteworthy phrase by
Lauren Thatcher Ulrich, the purple, white and gold
canvas satchel is a gentle reminder of the American
suffrage movement and the women’s movement that
prevails today.
Diehard fans of the Big Apple will adore the 35-by14-inch wool New York Skyline Pillow Cushion
($150) that pictures the iconic cityscape in all its glory. The wide-angle image showcases New York City
from the Hudson to the East River.
For kids, the book “When Jackie Saved Grand
Central” ($17.99) tells the remarkable story of how
the famed first lady fought to protect one of New
York’s most beloved landmarks and ultimately change
history. Written by Natasha Wing with illustrations
by Alexandra Boiger, the 48-page read is excellent for
ages 6 to 9. Saroyan claims this book as one of her
favorites because “Despite it all, she persisted.”
PHOTOS: DECANTER SET AND BANGLE BRACELET, COURTESY BLOOMINGDALE’S AND BLOOMINGDALES.COM
Üllo Wine Decanter Set
and Roberto Coin 18-karat
yellow gold Princess
Chiodo Bangle Bracelet.
Snake Chain Bracelet System (U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,507) • © 2017 Pandora Jewelry, LLC • All rights reserved
O
101
PERA
Everything you
want to know about
opera: And why you
(yes, you) will love it.
Time to debunk
a few false
assumptions
about the grandest
of art forms.
By David Cote
Options for live entertainment in the city are varied, but
you can easily check off the top ones: Broadway shows, a
concert at Carnegie Hall, a rock band at the Beacon or
maybe ballet at Lincoln Center. But what about opera? For
many, opera is a forbidding realm, where you can’t understand what anybody is saying, but they say it real loud. It’s
expensive, you won’t get it, it sounds boring or worse—you
may laugh. Not true! After you read through our mythbusting items below, we hope you’ll treat yourself to a night
at the opera. No tux required.
PHOTO: MARTY SOHL/METROPOLITAN OPERA
THE ONLY GAME IN TOWN IS THE
METROPOLITAN OPERA
It’s true that the Met is New York’s only opera company
with its own theater (3,800 seats and lots of crystal starburst chandeliers). A $280 million annual budget means
the Met dominates the landscape in terms of ads and name
recognition, but it’s definitely not alone. Just as there is
more to theater than Broadway, there are several small
companies presenting work all year. The scrappy and irreverent troupe Opera on Tap belts high notes in bars such
as the Brooklyn watering hole Barbès. Two roving companies, On Site Opera and LoftOpera, go site-specific: staging
classic (and new) work everywhere, from a Brooklyn chocolate factory to the American Museum of Natural History.
Every January, the funky downtown venue HERE Arts
Center and indie opera producer Beth Morrison mount
Prototype, a festival devoted to experimental opera and
daring hybrids. But perhaps the Met’s biggest competitor is
New York City Opera. The storied company has a long and
rocky history: Founded in 1943, it went bankrupt in 2013
and was resurrected by entirely new management three
years later. Now, NYCO presents opera in various venues,
balancing new titles with war horses such as “Tosca.”
YOU NEED TO KNOW ITALIAN, FRENCH
OR GERMAN
An exterior view of the
Metropolitan Opera House.
Non! Nein! Nyet! Although the world’s best-known operas
tend to be in Romance languages, people have been singing
opera in our mother tongue since opera’s birth in the 1600s.
English was good enough for Henry Purcell (“Dido and
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
27
The story of a town trying to find a rich
widow a husband (pre-Match.com) is
both hilarious and touching. Although
it’s at the Met, Franz Lehár’s 1905
chestnut is technically an operetta, not
an opera. What’s the difference? You
can laugh at an operetta.
28
Anthony Roth Costanzo and Ambur
Braid in the Ferus Festival production of “Aci, Galatea e Polifemo.”
THE ECHO DRIFT
Baruch Performing Arts Center
Jan. 10-20
FERUS FESTIVAL 2018
National Sawdust
Jan. 10-16
CRUZAR LA CARA DE LA LUNA
Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater
Jan. 25-28
Fans of David Lynch and Nine Inch
Nails might dig this surreal head-trip
by Swedish composer Mikael
Karlsson. A convicted murderer is
visited in his cell by a mysterious
moth, who promises him escape. Is
the killer’s mind just playing tricks?
Located in Brooklyn’s hipster
enclave Williamsburg, the cool
new-music venue National
Sawdust presents a red-hot annual
showcase for daring new
collaborations between composers, singers and multimedia artists.
Mariachi: It’s not just for Cinco de Mayo or
birthday parties anymore! The lively musical
style informs Leonard Foglia and José
“Pepe” Martinez’s heartbreaking tale of
families split along the U.S./Mexico border.
A dying immigrant recalls the life he
left behind.
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
PHOTOS: SCENE FROM “ACI, GALATEA E POLIFEMO,” JILL STEINBERG; SCENE FROM “CRUZAR LA CARA DE LA LUNA,” COURTESY OF HOUSTON GRAND OPERA
THE MERRY WIDOW
The Metropolitan Opera
Dec. 14-Jan. 11
Aeneas”) and it’s good enough for Jennifer Higdon (“Cold
Mountain”) today. As for new opera, American composers
outstrip their European counterparts in terms of volume and
popularity. Renowned poets such as Robert Pinsky and playwrights like Pulitzer Prize-winner Lynn Nottage (“Sweat”)
have dabbled in libretto writing. And anyway, if you do find
yourself at “La Bohème” or “Don Giovanni,” it’s standard
practice now to have supertitles projected on a wall or the
back of the seat in front of you. If you can handle translations
at the movies, you can handle them at the opera.
IT’S WAY TOO EXPENSIVE
Yes, orchestra seats at the Met can make Broadway seem like
a bargain. If you’re on a budget and willing to take a risk, try
rush tickets, only $25 and offered daily on the Met website.
Some of the tickets are in prime locations, and they can be
yours on a first-come, first-served basis for all performances
(except the New Year’s Eve gala). Other than that, if you’re
only there for the great music (or have a handy set of binoculars), you can purchase Family Circle and Balcony seats starting at $27 or $35. Naturally, smaller opera outfits are more
affordable: $30 to $75 at January’s Prototype festival, which
compares to the ranges at New York City Opera.
IT’S ALL MIDDLE-AGED, ROTUND
EUROPEANS
This is probably the, ahem, biggest misconception of all, that
opera stars are plus-size behemoths in ridiculous robes and
horned helmets. Yes, legendary diva Maria Callas struggled
FELLOW TRAVELERS
Gerald W. Lynch Theater
Jan 12-14
with weight loss, and American soprano Deborah Voigt didn’t
hide the fact that she underwent gastric bypass surgery in
2004. But the truth is, opera sees itself as a showbiz industry
in the same universe as pop and Broadway musicals, and that
means looks matter. Singers are often cast to fit the role, and
American training programs are turning out younger, fitter
singers—who can even act! (A rarity in the “park and bark”
standard of many performances.) Of course, a great voice
trumps any dress size. Still: The talent pool hasn’t been this
ethnically diverse and good-looking in a long time. Amerian
mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard and soprano Julia Bullock are
magazine-cover gorgeous, and two of the world’s hotterst tenors are Jonas Kaufmann and Juan Diego Flórez. There’s even
a blog (“barihunks”) to track opera’s sexiest baritones.
IT’S ABOUT KINGS AND WIZARDS AND HAS
NOTHING TO DO WITH THE REAL WORLD
True, many of the classics of the genre—Wagner’s music dramas, Ring Cycle, Mozart’s “Marriage of Figaro” and Strauss’
“Salome”—do involve magical creatures and naughty aristocrats, but operas have evolved like the rest of culture over the
past century. Just as 19th-century Western dramatists like
Henrik Ibsen explored social realism, opera started focusing
on ordinary folks. American opera over the decades has dramatized suburban discontent (“A Quiet Place”), a civil-rights
icon (“X, The Life and Times of Malcolm X”) and the transgender experience (“As One”). Living composers and librettists know that to attract an audience, the issues must be hot
and the stakes high.
A scene from the opera “Cruzar la
Cara de la Luna” (To Cross the Face
of the Moon).
This opera is set in 1950s Washington
during the height of McCarthyism. An
anti-Communist college grad enters
into a clandestine affair with another
man—a dangerous passion which
could expose both of them.
COSÌ FAN TUTTE
The Metropolitan Opera
March 15-April 19
Broadway diva Kelli O’Hara (“The King
and I”) has been showing off her
classical chops at the Met, and we
can’t wait to see her in Mozart’s
naughty tale of romantic confusion.
The colorful directorial concept locates
the action in 1950s Coney Island.
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
29
Out & About
CONCIERGES MIXED & MINGLED AT SEVERAL POSH EVENTS AROUND NEW YORK CITY!
BLACK TAP CRAFT BURGERS & BEER hosted
a concierge dinner at its newest Lower East Side
location. Concierges got a chance to try out the
restaurant’s “viral” burgers and “crazy” shakes.
Clockwise from bottom left: John Paul Palace, Hotel Mela Times Sqaure; Kareem Anglin, Four Seasons
Hotel New York Downtown; David Rahner, JW Marriott Essex House New York; Adam Nunez, 11
Howard; Enrich Reveil, Four Seasons Hotel New York Downtown; German Guevara, W New YorkDowntown; Spencer Howard, W New York-Times Square; Paige Siegwardt, The Standard, East Village.
Center: Interior of Black Tap Lower East Side. Right, from left to right: Adam Perabo, Hotel 50 Bowery
NYC; Robert Butt, Ritz-Carlton Battery Park; Florence Li, Four Seasons Hotel New York Downtown.
GULLIVER’S GATE welcomed concierges to one of Times Square’s newest exhibits. Where
they, their friends and family experienced the real world in a miniature version.
Left, from left to right:
Miniature version
of the Guggenheim
museum. Center,
from left to right:
David Almada, W New
York; Renaldo Moore,
Gansevoort Park
Avenue. Right, from
left to right: Guest of
Johannes Schaafsma;
Johannes Schaafsma,
Four Seasons Hotel
New York.
SWATCH hosted a concierge event
at its new location in Times Square.
Attendees had the opportunity to
meet store managers, try on over
100 watches and test out an Andy
Warhol inspired photo wall.
Left, from left to right: Franziska Maeder, The
Beekman, a Thompson Hotel; Guest of Franziska
Maeder. Center: Interior of Swatch. Right, from
left to right: Kevin Howard, New York City Association of Hotel Concierges; Stanley Wong, New
York Marriott Marquis.
30
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
BOROUGH BEAT
Check out these exciting neighborhoods for top-shelf eats, shops, art and more.
brooklyn bound
PROSPECT HEIGHTS
swath of meticulously maintained
Prospect Heights is one of Brooklyn’s
gardens, visit the Brooklyn Botanic
tiniest neighborhoods, but don’t let
Garden (990 Washington Ave.,
its size fool you. The neighborhood
718.623.7200). Barclays Center
packs a serious punch in terms of
(620 Atlantic Ave., 917.618.6100)
shopping, sights and great food. The
hosts Brooklyn Nets basketball and
Brooklyn Museum (200 Eastern
New York Islanders hockey games as
Pkwy., 718.638.5000) is both a grand
well as entertainment events. As far
cultural institution, with a gift shop
as eats go, Tom’s Restaurant (782
stocked with unusual souvenirs. For
Washington Ave., 718.636.9738), a
more small gifts, and cards by local
diner beloved for its killer pancakes
designers, check out Planet Cute
and egg creams, has been a neigh-
(704 Washington Ave., 347.425.8464).
borhood staple since 1936. At Chuko
A fun collection of vintage wear is at
Ramen (565 Vanderbilt Ave.,
1 of a Find Vintage (633 Vanderbilt
347.425.9570), dig into the ramen
Ave., 718.789.2008). For a 52-acre
bowls, beer and sake.
32
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
Above: The Conservatory at the
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Top: An
event at Barclays Center.
PHOTOS: BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN, COURTESY BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN; BARCLAYS CENTER, BRUCE DAMONTE
By Daniel Fridman, Kate Hooker and Pamela Mitchell
BROOKLYN HEIGHTS
Williamsburg’s skyrocketing rents have
With its proximity to Manhattan, expan-
driven a lot of the demographic to
sive New York Harbor views and magnifi-
Bushwick. Explore this vibrant community,
cent Victorian-era brownstones, it’s no
and you’ll see why Vogue deemed it one of
wonder that notables from Walt Whitman
the top 15 coolest neighborhoods in the
to Truman Capote have called Brooklyn
world. Stroll around Bushwick’s Troutman
Heights home. First stop is the Prom-
Street and St. Nicolas Avenue for the
enade, a boardwalk overlooking the
outdoor art gallery, Bushwick Collec-
Statue of Liberty and Downtown Manhat-
tive, with bright murals covering every
tan. Enjoy a flight of beers, dinner, brunch
wall and roll-up garage door in sight.
or lunch at the functioning brewery/
Shoppers interested in vintage wear
restaurant, Circa Brewing Co. (141
should explore Urban Jungle (120
Lawrence St., 718.858.0055). Men will find
Knickerbocker Ave., 718.381.85110), with
sophisticated clothing at Goose Bar-
endless racks of $5 flannel shirts. Bush-
nacle (91 Atlantic Ave., 718.855.2694). At
wick’s SHOPS at the Loom (1087
Colonie (127 Atlantic Ave., 718.855.7500),
Flushing Ave., 718.417.1616) has a skate-
have a first-class dinner in a space with a
board shop, espresso bar and tattoo shop.
lush vertical garden wall. Those interest-
Your trip to Bushwick should include
ed in trains love the NYC Transit
Roberta’s (261 Moore St., 718.417.1118)
Museum (Boerum Pl., 718.694.1600).
for its famous pizza. For down-home
Learn about the city’s subway system and
Southern eats, its Montana’s Trail
climb aboard vintage cars from the early
House (445 Troutman St., 917.966.1666).
1900s, festooned with period advertising.
Bottom: The Promenade in
Brooklyn Heights. Below:
The popular paparizza pizza
from Roberta’s.
PHOTOS: BROOKLYN HEIGHTS PROMENADE, ISTOCK; ROBERTA’S PAPARIZZA PIZZA, DEIDRE SCHOO
BUSHWICK
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
33
queens bound
LONG ISLAND CITY
ASTORIA
CORONA
LIC’s commercial warehouses have been
The lively, diverse neighborhood of
Corona borders Flushing Meadows Park,
repurposed as art galleries, studio spaces
Astoria, Queens, has ethnic eats, a
the site of the 1939 and 1964 World’s
and great spots to eat and shop. One of
bustling bar scene and fine arts attrac-
Fairs. The park houses the New York Hall
the area’s highest-profile restaurants is
tions. Anyone with a love of film, TV or
of Science (718.699.0005), with 450
funky, cavernous M. Wells Steakhouse
digital media should peruse the Museum
permanent and rotating exhibits; the
(43-15 Crescent St., 718.786.9060). Or,
of the Moving Image (36-01 35th Ave.,
Queens Museum (718.592.9700), which
chow down on top-flight sushi at Hibino
718.777.6800). Socrates Sculpture Park
includes the Panorama, a scale model of
(10-70 Jackson Ave., 718.392.5190) or
(32-01 Vernon Blvd., 718.956.1819),
New York City featuring all 895,000
hand-pulled noodles at Mu Ramen (1209
located on the waterfront, is an outdoor
buildings constructed before 1992; Citi
Jackson Ave., 917.868.8903). The Brick-
museum, open studio and rotating
Field, home of the New York Mets
house Ceramic Art Center (10-34 44th
exhibition space. Astoria is known for its
(718.507.8499); and the USTA Billie Jean
Dr., 718.784.4907) houses studio spaces
Greek cuisine, and one of the best-loved
King National Tennis Center
and classes for potters and ceramicists.
places is Taverna Kyclades (33-07
(718.760.6200), where the US Tennis Open
LIC is also known for its world-class
Ditmars Blvd., 718.545.8666). Gaijin
is played. Many musicians have called
museums, like MoMA PS1 (22-25 Jackson
(37-12 31st Ave., 929.328.2890) is
Corona home, from Louis Armstrong to
Ave., 718.784.2084). The edgier, younger
thoroughly Japanese, where cooked foods
Madonna. Fans can pay homage to the
sibling of the Museum of Modern Art in
are slow-grilled with Japanese charcoal
former at the Louis Armstrong House
Midtown Manhattan is in the vanguard of
and the sushi is divine. Beer lovers should
Museum (34-56 107th St., 718.478.8274).
the contemporary art scene. Elsewhere,
check out The Beer Garden at Bohe-
For one of the best Cubano sandwiches
visit The Noguchi Museum (9-01 33rd
mian Hall (2919 24th Ave., 718.274.4925),
north of Miami, check out Rincon Criollo
Rd., 718.204.7088), created by Japanese-
an authentic beer garden with equally
(40-09 Junction Blvd., 718.458.0236); and
American sculptor/designer Isamu
authentic Czech food. In a shopping state
stop by family-run Lemon Ice King of
Noguchi to display his most representa-
of mind? Lockwood Shop (32-15 33rd St.,
Corona (52-02 108th St., 718.699.5133),
tive works. The museum includes 10
718.626.6030) has curated jewelry, gifts
which has been making Italian ices for
galleries and a sculpture garden.
and Queens-themed merchandise.
over 60 years.
34
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
PHOTOS: NEW YORK HALL OF SCIENCE, COURTESY NEW YORK HALL OF SCIENCE; UNI AND IKURA DONBURI FROM GAIJIN, JASON GREENSPAN
Left: Outdoor, interactive
exhibits at the New York
Hall of Science. Below: Uni
and ikura donburi (quail egg,
uni, salmon roe, rice and
mushrooms) from Gaijin.
Famed entrepreneur and quintessential host Giuseppe
Cipriani brings his family’s renowned history of service to
New York City’s Financial District with Cipriani Club 55.
Located in the historic Merchants Exchange building at 55
Wall Street, the restaurant is open noon to 10PM, Monday
to Friday. Already a hot spot for power lunches, Cipriani
Club 55 offers breakfast from 7AM to 10AM. An open-air
terrace among the buildings granite columns is the
perfect spot for a cocktail or a relaxed dinner with friends,
overlooking the most powerful address in the world.
Cipriani Club 55 features the signature Bellini, invented at
Harry’s Bar in Venice by Giuseppe Cipriani Sr., as well as
the original Carpaccio alla Cipriani, Baked Tagliolini with
Ham, Calf’s liver alla Veneziana, the classic Vanilla
Meringue cake and many other Venetian and Italian
specialties.
The bi-level restaurant seats up to 120 people, with room
for 60 additional guests on the spacious outdoor terrace.
On the main floor beautiful “La Murrina” Murano glass
chandeliers, Peter Beard artwork on cork-paneled walls
and travertine marble floor complete the luxe European
experience.
The upper level of the restaurant offers intimate dining
with a Russian white oak wood floor and brilliant-green
Dominique Kieffer-upholstered chairs. Both the terrace
and upper level of the restaurant are available for private
functions.
Monday to Friday
Breakfast
7AM-10AM
Lunch and Dinner
Noon-10PM
55 Wall Street
New York, NY 10015
212-699-4098
entertainment
FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC
2
3
3
1
4
1 Electronic music group ODESZA brings its A World
Apart Tour to Brooklyn for one night only. | Barclays
Center, p. 47 2 December in New York just wouldn’t
be the same without the Rockettes. | Radio City
Christmas Spectacular, p. 48 3 Veteran standup comedian Tom Papa returns to the city where
he started his career and this Chelsea nightspot.
| Gotham Comedy Club, p. 45 4 Since 1954, the
dance company has ushered in the holidays with
choreographer George Balanchine’s family-favorite
version of Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker.” | New
York City Ballet, p. 48
36
BROADWAY OPENINGS
The Children Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261
W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave.,
212.239.6200. manhattantheatreclub.com. (In
previews, opens Dec. 12, closes Feb. 4)
Following a power-plant disaster brought on by
an earthquake, a married couple, both retired
nuclear engineers, are living in a country
cottage when a former colleague turns up with
a surprising request. Francesca Annis, Ron
Cook and Deborah Findlay star. H14
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
Farinelli and the King Belasco Theatre, 111 W.
44th St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway,
212.239.6200. farinelliandthekingbroadway.com.
(Previews begin Dec. 5, opens Dec. 17, closes
March 25) Three-time Tony Award winner Mark
Rylance returns to Broadway as King Philippe V
of Spain in a play with music by Claire van
Kampen. The king, a seemingly incurable
insomniac, falls under the spell of Farinelli, a
celebrated castrato with a hypnotic voice, and
entreats him to become a member of his court.
Will Farinelli say yes? H14
PHOTOS: ODESZA, ©DANI HANSEN; THE ROCKETTES, COURTESY MSG PHOTOS; TOM PAPA, COURTESY GOTHAM COMEDY CLUB; NEW YORK CITY BALLET IN GEORGE BALANCHINE’S THE NUTCRACKER, PAUL KOLNIK
The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).
LET YOUR FANTASIES
UNWIND
entertainment
John Lithgow: Stories by Heart American
Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh &
Eighth aves., 212.719.1300. roundabouttheatre
.org. (Previews begin Dec. 21, opens Jan. 11,
closes March 4) John Lithgow puts on his
storyteller’s hat in this solo show, weaving a
narrative about his family and career while
bringing to life classic short stories that were
first read to him as a child. H14
Once on This Island Circle in the Square
Theatre, 235 W. 50th St., btw Broadway & Eighth
Ave., 212.239.6200. onceonthisisland.com. (In
previews, opens Dec. 3) (1 hr 30 mins, no
intermission) The revival of the 1990 musical by
Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty is set on an
idyllic Caribbean island devastated by a great
storm. A peasant girl from one side of the
island falls in love with a wealthy boy from the
other side of the island. Will true love win out
over cultural differences? I13
SpongeBob SquarePants Palace Theatre,
1564 Broadway, at W. 47th St., 877.250.2929.
spongebobbroadway.com. (In previews, opens
Dec. 4) When the undersea world of Bikini
Bottom is threatened with extinction,
SpongeBob SquarePants comes to its rescue in
the family-friendly musical comedy based on
the Nickelodeon TV program. H14
BROADWAY
Ph
h oto: Matt Crockett
Aladdin C0L46N
7 ew Amsterdam Theatre, 214 W. 42nd
St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 866.870.2717.
aladdinthemusical.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The
musical comedy is an exotic magic carpet ride,
filled with romance, special effects and the
Academy Award-winning songs from Disney’s
1992 animated feature. H14
Anastasia Broadhurst Theatre, 235 W. 44th St.,
btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.
anastasiabroadway.com. (2 hrs 25 mins) A young
woman with amnesia travels from Russia to
1920s Paris in search of her family and identity.
Is she the sole surviving daughter of the slain
czar? Or is she an imposter? Two Twentieth
Century Fox movies inspired the musical. H14
The Band’s Visit Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 243
W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave.,
212.239.6200. thebandsvisitmusical.com. (1 hr 30
mins, no intermission) An Egyptian police band
is in Israel to give a concert, when, through a
mix-up at the border, it is sent to an isolated
village in the desert. Tony Shalhoub leads the
band in the new musical, which is based on the
2007 movie of the same name. H14
Beautiful–The Carole King Musical C0L421Stephen
Sondheim Theatre, 124 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth &
Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. beautifulonbroad
way.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The long-running hit
musical traces the rise of the singer/songwriter, from her early days as Carole Klein, an
aspiring composer from Brooklyn, to her
international success as Carole King, charttopping sensation. H14
MAJESTIC THEATRE | 247 West 44th St.
Telecharge.com | 212.239.6200
phantomboradway.com
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
37
entertainment
The Book of Mormon C0L97231Eugene O’Neill Theatre,
230 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave.,
877.250.2929. bookofmormonthemusical.com.
(2 hrs 30 mins) Two Mormon boys are on a
mission to save souls in Africa in an irreverent,
politically incorrect, Tony Award-winning
musical comedy that only Trey Parker and Matt
Stone, the creators of Comedy Central’s “South
Park,” could dream up. H13
A Bronx Tale Longacre Theatre, 220 W. 48th St.,
btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.
abronxtalethemusical.com. (2 hrs 10 mins) In the
1960s Bronx, a gangster takes a young boy
under his wing and introduces him to the mob
life, much to the disapproval of his loving,
hard-working father. Chazz Palminteri has
written the book for the musical, while the
original doo-wop score is by Alan Menken and
Glenn Slater. H13
Cats Neil Simon Theatre, 250 W. 52nd St., btw
Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. catsbroad
way.com. (Closes Dec. 30) (2 hrs 15 mins) The
family-friendly musical juggernaut is revived on
Broadway. Based on T.S. Eliot’s “Old Possum’s
Book of Practical Cats” and composed by
Andrew Lloyd Webber, the show first opened in
1982 on Broadway, where it played for 18 years
and 7,485 performances. H13
WINNER! BEST MUSICAL
ALL ACROSS NORTH AMERICA
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, 205 W. 46th St., btw
Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. charlieon
broadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Roald Dahl’s
classic semi-dark children’s book is now a
family-friendly musical. When Willy Wonka,
inventor of the Everlasting Gobstopper, opens
his candy factory to five lucky Golden Ticket
winners, young Charlie Bucket goes on a
life-changing journey that turns his world from
sour to sweet. H14
Chicago Ambassador Theatre, 219 W. 49th St.,
btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.
chicagothemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) In the
Tony Award-winning revival of the vaudeville
musical, two alluring jailbirds named Roxie Hart
and Velma Kelly attain stardom while singing
about sex and corruption. “Chicago” is the
longest-running American musical in Broadway
history. H13
Come From Away Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre,
236 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave.,
212.239.6200. comefromaway.com. (1 hr 40 mins,
no intermission) On Sept. 11, 2001, following
the terrorist attacks in New York City,
Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C., 38
commercial airplanes were diverted to Gander,
Newfoundland; when the 6,579 passengers
landed, they found themselves stranded in a
small town with a population half their size.
How they and the town adjusted to a changed
world on Sept. 12 is the basis of the upbeat
musical. H14
COME FROM AWAY Book, Music and Lyrics by Irene Sankoff and David Hein
Directed by Christopher Ashley
THE REMARKABLE TRUE STORY NOW ON BROADWAY
TELECHARGE.COM (212) 239-6200
O Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45 TH STREET I COMEFROMAWAY.COM
38
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
OFFICIAL AIRLINE
Dear Evan Hansen Music Box Theatre, 239 W.
45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave.,
212.239.6200. dearevanhansen.com. (2 hrs 30
mins) In the Tony Award-winning musical, a
socially awkward high-school senior goes from
outsider to cool guy when he comforts the
parents of a troubled teenager who commits
suicide. Although the boys did not know each
other well, Evan, the titular hero, takes to social
media and fabricates emails between them
that idealize their friendship. Will the lie eventually undo him? H14
entertainment
Hamilton Richard Rodgers Theatre, 226 W. 46th
St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929.
hamiltonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 45 mins)
Lin-Manuel Miranda has written the book, music
and lyrics for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize-winning
musical about political mastermind Alexander
Hamilton. Expect the unexpected when
America’s past is told through the hip-hop sounds
of today. H14
Hello, Dolly! Shubert Theatre, 225 W. 44th St.,
btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.
hellodollyonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 35 mins) The
first new production of the musical comedy
since its premiere on Broadway in 1964 stars
Tony Award winner Bette Midler. H14
Home for the Holidays August Wilson
Theatre, 245 W. 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth
Ave., 877.250.2929. holidayonbroadway.com.
(Closes Dec. 30) Singers from “American Idol”
(Candice Glover), “The Voice” (Josh Kaufman)
and “America’s Got Talent” (Bianca Ryan)
perform contemporary takes on perennial
holiday favorites, backed by an eight-piece
rhythm and brass band. Also starring Danny
Aiello, who shares stories about Christmas in
New York. H13
Kinky Boots C0L4751Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 302 W. 45th
St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 877.250.2929.
kinkybootsthemusical.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) Cyndi
Lauper has written the music and lyrics and
Harvey Fierstein the book for the musical about
a down-on-its-heels shoe factory given a
transfusion of style, thanks to a drag queen. I14
T:9.75”
Junk Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center,
150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam
Ave., 212.239.6200. lct.org. (2 hrs 30 mins)
Money makes the world go ’round in Ayad
Akhtar’s play about a charismatic investment
banker and his hostile take over of an iconic
American manufacturing company. The time is
1985. I12
“A magical
Broadway musical with
BRAINS, HEART
and COURAGE.”
Time Magazine
Latin History for Morons Studio 54, 254 W.
54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave.,
212.239.6200. latinhistorybroadway.com. (Closes
Feb. 4) (1 hr 35 mins, no intermission) When his
son needs to find a Latin hero for a school
project, writer/actor John Leguizamo, the
ever-helpful parent, does some research,
embarking on a journey through 3,000 years of
Latino history in the Americas. H13
The Lion King C0L41896Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th
St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717.
lionking.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Theatergoers sing
along at the runaway hit stage version of
Disney’s beloved animated movie, enjoying
such songs by multiple Grammy winner Elton
John as “Circle of Life,” “Can You Feel the Love
Tonight” and “Hakuna Matata,” as well as
spectacular masks and dazzling puppets. H14
Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St.
For more information: WickedtheMusical.com
Audio translations available in 7 languages.
M. Butterfly Cort Theatre, 138 W. 48th St., btw
Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. mbutterfly
broadway.com. (2 hrs) Clive Owen stars in this
story of a 20-year love affair between a married
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
39
entertainment
French diplomat and a Chinese opera singer.
Full of intrigue, espionage, betrayal and
scandal, this is the first Broadway revival of
David Henry Hwang’s gender-bending 1988
Tony Award-winning play. H13
Meteor Shower Booth Theatre, 222 W. 45th St.,
btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.
meteoronbroadway.com. (1 hr 30 mins, no
intermission) When space rocks streak across
the California sky in Steve Martin’s comedy, a
quiet dinner between two diametrically
opposed married couples turns on anything but
small talk. Amy Schumer heads the cast. H14
Miss Saigon Broadway Theatre, 1681 Broadway,
btw W. 52nd & W. 53rd sts., 212.239.6200.
saigonbroadway.com. (Closes Jan. 14) (2 hrs 40
mins) During the last days of the Vietnam War,
a Saigon bar girl falls in love with an American
GI in the new production of the tragic musical
that first opened on Broadway in 1991. As the
city falls and American personnel are hastily
evacuated, the lovers are torn apart. When they
reunite three years later, their lives have
irrevocably changed. H13
The Parisian Woman Hudson Theatre, 139-141
W. 44th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves. parisian
womanbroadway.com. (Closes March 11) (1 hr
30 mins, no intermission) Set in Washington,
D.C., after the 2016 election, socialite Chloe
(Uma Thurman) maneuvers her way through a
changing political landscape, her past, her
marriage and an uncertain future. Josh Lucas
and Blair Brown co-star in the timely new play
by Beau Willimon (“House of Cards”). H14
The Phantom of the Opera C0L64M
187 ajestic Theatre,
247 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave.,
212.239.6200. phantombroadway.com. (2 hrs 30
mins) Broadway’s longest-running show,
featuring a score by Andrew Lloyd Webber, tells
the tragic story of a disfigured composer who
falls in love with a young soprano, whisking her
away to his mysterious chambers beneath the
Paris Opera House. H14
The Play That Goes Wrong Lyceum Theatre,
149 W. 45th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves.,
212.239.6200. broadwaygoeswrong.com. (2 hrs)
Everything that could comically go wrong does
when the Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society
puts on a 1920s murder mystery. H14
School of Rock Winter Garden Theatre, 1634
Broadway, btw W. 50th & W. 51st sts.,
212.239.6200. schoolofrockthemusical.com.
(2 hrs 30 mins) It’s only rock ‘n’ roll, but the
kids at a prestigious prep school love it when
their wannabe rock star substitute teacher
turns them into a rock band in the musical with
a score written by Andrew Lloyd Webber and
Glenn Slater. H13
Springsteen on Broadway Walter Kerr
Theatre, 219 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth
Ave. brucespringsteen.net/broadway. (Closes
Feb. 3) (2 hrs, no intermission) “The Boss”
makes his Broadway debut in a solo acoustic
show. H13
Waitress Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th
St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929.
waitressthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) A
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IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
waitress, with an exceptional talent for baking,
dreams of opening her own pie shop, but a
loveless marriage and unexpected pregnancy
threaten to hold her back. Sara Bareilles has
written the songs for the musical. H14
entertainment
Wicked C0L418Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St., btw
Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. wickedthe
musical.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) Based on the book
by Gregory Maguire, this hit musical with a
score by Stephen Schwartz—a prequel to “The
Wizard of Oz”—imagines Oz as a land of strife,
where a young, green-hued girl named Elphaba
is branded the Wicked Witch of the West. I13
OFF-BROADWAY+BEYOND
Avenue Q C0L4185New World Stages, Stage 3, 340 W.
50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200.
avenueq.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) People and
puppets live together on a fictitious New York
City block in this uproarious Tony Award-winning musical for adults. I13
The Black Glove Gene Frankel Theatre, 24 Bond
St., btw Bowery & Lafayette St., 212.868.4444.
strindbergrep.com. (Nov. 30-Dec. 16) (1 hr 15
mins) An August Strindberg Christmas play for
children? The August Strindberg Rep has
unearthed the rarely performed, lyrical fantasy
about a black glove, lost on Christmas Eve, that
bestows the Christmas spirit on all who find it.
Recommended for audiences 8 and up. E19
A Christmas Carol Merchant’s House Museum,
29 E. 4th St., btw Bowery & Lafayette St.,
212.868.4444. summonersensemble.org. (Nov.
30-Dec. 27) (1 hr) One hundred and fifty years
ago, Charles Dickens arrived in New York for a
month of performances of his holiday classic,
“A Christmas Carol.” For the fifth year in a row,
actor John Kevin Jones recreates those
performances in the festively decorated Greek
Revival parlor of the Merchant’s House
Museum. E18
Cruel Intentions: The Musical (Le) Poisson
Rouge, 158 Bleecker St., btw Thompson & Sullivan
sts., 212.505.3474. cruelmusical.com. (In
previews, opens Dec. 11, closes Jan. 29) (1 hr 45
mins) Step-siblings play the cruelest game of
all, love, when they set out to destroy an
innocent young girl in this musical stage
adaptation of the 1999 cult movie. The score is
composed of pop and rock hits of the 1990s.
Audiences 13+, theatergoers under 18 admitted
only if accompanied by an adult. G19
The Dead, 1904 The Irish American Historical
Society, 991 Fifth Ave., btw 80th & 81st sts.,
212.727.2737. irishrep.org. (Closes Jan. 7) Pulitzer
Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon and novelist
Jean Hanff Korelitz have adapted James Joyce’s
short story, “The Dead,” into an immersive
experience, which takes place in a ca. 1900
WINNER
6 TONY AWARDS
®
INCLUDING
BEST MUSICAL
Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St. • Telecharge.com • 212-239-6200 • DearEvanHansen.com
@DearEvanHansen
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
41
T:4.75”
A Clockwork Orange New World Stages, Stage
4, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves.,
212.239.6200. aclockworkorangeplay.com.
(Closes Jan. 6) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission)
Anthony Burgess’ 1962 novel about a dystopian
future—in which rebellious young thugs, called
Droogs, run rampant—has been adapted for the
stage. The production includes stylized but
intense violence and sexuality. I13
T:4.625”
ON
BROADWAY
THROUGH
DECEMBER 30
ONLY!
entertainment
town house. During a holiday party in Dublin,
guests sing, dance, eat and drink, while Gabriel
Conroy (Rufus Collins) and his wife (Melissa
Gilbert) ponder their life and ultimately death.
During the performance, a meal is served to the
cast (and audience members who have bought
premium tickets). F10
Early Shaker Spirituals: A Record Album
Interpretation The Performing Garage, 33
Wooster St., btw Grand & Broome sts.,
212.966.3651. thewoostergroup.org. (Dec. 7-10,
12-17) (1 hr) The piece, presented by the
Wooster Group, is based on a 1976 album of
Shaker songs recorded by the sisters of the
Shaker community in Sabbathday Lake, Maine.
Five singers, including Frances McDormand,
channel the album’s voices via in-ear receivers.
Dances complement the songs. F20
Friends! The Musical Parody St. Luke’s
Theatre, 308 W. 46th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves.,
212.239.6200. friendsmusicalparody.com. (Closes
Dec. 31) (2 hrs 10 mins) Ross, Rachel, Chandler,
Monica, Joey, Phoebe and Gunther: The gang’s
all here in the unauthorized, but loving musical
parody of the hit TV sitcom about twentysomethings living and loving in 1990s NYC. I14
CATSBROADWAY.COM
Neil Simon Theatre · 250 W. 52nd St.
ORIGINALLY PRODUCED BY CAMERON MACKINTOSH AND THE REALLY USEFUL GROUP LIMITED
PHOTO OF GEORGINA PAZCOGUIN BY MATTHEW MURPHY
TM © 1981 RUG LTD
Harry Clarke Vineyard Theatre, 108 E. 15th St.,
btw Irving Pl. & Union Sq. E., 212.353.0303.
vineyardtheatre.org. (Closes Dec. 10) (1 hr 15
mins, no intermission) Billy Crudup stars in the
one-man thriller by David Cale. Harry Clarke is a
shy Midwestern man who moves to NYC, where
he passes himself off as a cocky Londoner. Will
his double life prove to be his undoing? E17
Hot Mess The Jerry Orbach Theater at The
Theater Center, 210 W. 50th St., btw Broadway &
Eighth Ave., 212.307.4100. hotmesstheplay.com.
Max and Elanor are soul mates in the new
romantic comedy by Dan Rothenberg and
Colleen Crabtree. They tell each other
everything. Well, almost everything. While
Elanor freely discusses her ex-boyfriends, Max
is mum about his. H13
The Imbible: A Spirited History of
Drinking New World Stages, The Green Room,
340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves.,
212.239.6200. imbible.org. (1 hr 45 mins)
Audiences (21+) drink their way through the
10,000-year history—and science—of alcoholic
beverages, tutored by a knowledgeable
bartender, who is also an engaging storyteller
and amusing entertainer. Music accompanies
the imbibing and revelry. I13
In & Of Itself Daryl Roth Theatre, 101 E. 15th St.,
at Union Sq. E., 800.745.3000. inandofitselfshow
.com. (1 hr, no intermission) Magic meets
storytelling in this paradoxical theater piece,
written and performed by Derek DelGaudio,
directed by Frank Oz and produced by Neil
Patrick Harris. Audiences 16+. F17
Jersey Boys New World Stages, Stage 1, 340 W.
50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200.
jerseyboysnewyork.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The
Tony Award-winning Best Musical of 2006 tells
the behind-the-scenes story of pop sensations,
Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, and
includes the group’s greatest hits, such as “Big
Girls Don’t Cry” and “Oh What a Night.” I13
42
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
entertainment
The Last Match Laura Pels Theatre, Harold and
Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre, 111 W. 46th
St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.719.1300.
roundabouttheatre.org. (Closes Dec. 24) (1 hr 35
mins, no intermission) During the semifinals of
the US Open, two tennis rivals face off against
each other: The aging American favorite is out
to prove to himself, his family and the world
that he’s still a champion, while his muchyounger opponent wants to defeat his idol. H14
The Portuguese Kid Manhattan Theatre Club
at New York City Center-Stage 1, 131 W. 55th St.,
btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.581.1212.
manhattantheatreclub.com. (Closes Dec. 10) (1
hr 40 mins, no intermission) Billed as a “feisty
romantic comedy,” the new play by John Patrick
Shanley, Pulitzer Prize winner for “Doubt” and
Oscar winner for “Moonstruck,” stars Jason
Alexander (“Seinfeld”) as a two-bit lawyer
called in to settle the estate of a much-widowed client’s latest husband. H13
Puffs New World Stages, Stage 5, 340 W. 50th
St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200.
puffstheplay.com. (1 hr 45 mins, no intermission) Any similarity to a fictional school for
gifted-in-a-certain-way children (think:
Hogwarts) is strictly intentional as Wayne, an
average boy from New Mexico, and his mates
(known as Puffs) study to be wizards. A young
wizard with a scar on his forehead makes
things challenging—and interesting. I13
BEAUTIFULLY VISUALIZED,
DELICIOUSLY QUIRKY.
IT MIGHT JUST BE THE YELLOW TONIC THAT BROADWAY NEEDS.
CHRIS JONES, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Sleep No More C0L4T
59 he McKittrick Hotel, 530 W.
27th St., btw 10th & 11th aves., 866.811.4111.
sleepnomorenyc.com. (up to 3 hrs) In this
immersive, interactive theater piece, maskwearing audiences wander at will and at their
own pace through a 100,000-square-foot
environment—an abandoned 1930s luxury
hotel—eavesdropping on scenes and characters that conjure up Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley
Kubrick and Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.” J16
Spamilton 47th Street Theater/Puerto Rican
Traveling Theater, 304 W. 47th St., btw Eighth &
Ninth aves., 212.279.4200. spamilton.com. (1 hr
15 mins, no intermission) If you can’t get tickets
to Broadway’s biggest hit (“Hamilton”), this
spoof written and directed by Gerard Alessandrini, creator of “Forbidden Broadway,” is the
next best thing. I14
PALACE THEATRE, 47TH & BROADWAY SpongeBobBroadway.com
@SpongeBobBway
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
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T:4.75”
Shame of Thrones: The Rock Musical—An
Unauthorized Parody The Theater Center,
1627 Broadway, at W. 50th St., 212.921.7862.
gotthemusical.com. (Closes Dec. 30) (1 hr 40
mins) The unauthorized musical comedy parody
of the hit HBO series follows the adventures of
Ned Stark as he does battle with tap-dancing
direwolves and an assortment of Lannisters,
Arryns, Tullys, Greyjoys, Tyrells, Martells and
Targaryens. Will Ned sit on the Iron Throne or
will he lose his head? H13
T:4.625”
©2017 Viacom. Created by Stephen Hillenburg.
A Room in India (Une chambre en Inde)
Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., at E. 67th St.,
212.933.5812. armoryonpark.org. (Dec. 5-20)
(3 hrs 35 mins) Théâtre du Soleil, under the
direction of Ariane Mnouchkine, presents the
North American premiere of its new work
about a touring French theater company
stranded in India without a director following a
terrorist attack in Paris. F11
entertainment
Stomp C0L94O
1 rpheum Theatre, 126 Second Ave., at E.
8th St., 800.982.2787. stomponline.com. (1 hr 40
mins) In a dazzling percussive performance, the
cast conjures rhythm out of brooms, dustbins,
hubcaps and more. The family-friendly hit has
played in the same theater since 1994. E18
Sweeney Todd Barrow Street Theatre, 27
Barrow St., at Seventh Ave. So., 866.811.4111.
sweeneytoddnyc.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) The
Tooting Arts Club revival of the Stephen
Sondheim musical takes place in a working
pie-shop environment in which bloodthirsty
barber Sweeney Todd can wreak vengeance
and Mrs. Lovett, his partner in crime, can bake
“the worst pies in London.” H19
Tiny Beautiful Things The Public Theater, 425
Lafayette St., at Astor Pl., 212.967.7555.
publictheater.org. (Closes Dec. 10) (1 hr 30 mins,
no intermission) Nia Vardalos (“My Big Fat
Greek Wedding”) is Sugar, an anonymous online
columnist who draws on her own life experiences when giving advice. E18
Torch Song Tony Kiser Theatre at Second Stage,
305 W. 43rd St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves.,
212.245.4422. 2st.com. (Closes Dec. 9) (2 hrs 40
mins) Can the drag-queen son of a domineering
Jewish mother find romance and a family in
1979 New York? Michael Urie and Mercedes
Ruehl star in the new production of Harvey
Fierstein’s play. I14
T:4.625”
20th Century Blues The Alice Griffin Jewel Box
Theatre at The Pershing Square Signature Center,
480 W. 42nd St., btw, 212.279.4200. 20thcentury
blues.com. (Closes Jan. 28) Four women meet
once a year for a photo shoot. As they
chronicle their changing and aging lives, the
private photos may end up going public. How
the women deal with the situation is the crux
of the new play by Susan Miller. J14
YOUR
HOLIDAY
WISH IS
GRANTED
The Wolves Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater at
Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway &
Amsterdam Ave., 212.239.6200. lct.org. (Closes
Jan. 7) (1 hr 30 mins) A girls indoor soccer team
warms up in Sarah DeLappe’s play. As these
nine teenage warriors practice their sport, they
also navigate life’s big questions, all in the
pursuit of scoring some goals. I12
CABARETS+COMEDY CLUBS
T:4.75”
Café Carlyle C0L9431The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel
New York, 35 E. 76th St., at Madison Ave.,
212.744.1600. rosewoodhotels.com/en/carlyle/
dining/cafe_carlyle. One of the swankiest supper
clubs in town serves French cuisine and boasts
whimsical murals by Oscar winner Marcel
Vertès. Nov. 28-Dec. 31: Steve Tyrell. Every
Monday thru Dec. 11: Woody Allen & the Eddy
Davis New Orleans Jazz Band. F10
New Amsterdam Theatre, Broadway & 42nd Street • 866-870-27 17
AladdinTheMusical.com
44
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
©Disney
T H E H I T B R O A D WAY M U S I C A L
Carolines on Broadway C0L941
318 626 Broadway, btw
W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.757.4100. carolines
.com. Performances by some of the nation’s
hottest headliners and up-and-coming comics.
Highlights: Nov. 30-Dec. 2: Kevin Nealon. Dec.
7-10: Tiffany Haddish. Dec. 27-30: Dave Attell.
Dec. 31: New Year’s Eve Spectacular. H13
Feinstein’s/54 Below C0L52138254 W. 54th St., btw
Broadway & Eighth Ave., 646.476.3551. 54below
entertainment
.com. The subterranean nightclub, restaurant
and cocktail lounge underneath the former
Studio 54 disco. Several shows nightly.
Highlights: Dec. 1-2, 6: Alice Ripley & Emily
Skinner. Dec. 5 & 12: Christine Pedi. Dec. 8-9: Don
Scardino with John Miller. Dec. 13: A Well-Strung
Christmas. Dec. 15-17: Joe Iconis Christmas
Extravaganza. Dec. 18-23: Norm Lewis: “Santa
Baby!” Dec. 18-23, 24-25, 27-30: Michael
Feinstein: “Christmas Crooners.” Dec. 31: Lee Roy
Reams at 7 pm and Caissie Levy at 11 pm. H13
Gotham Comedy Club 208 W. 23rd St., btw
Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.367.9000. gotham
comedyclub.com. Jerry Seinfeld, Dave Chappelle, Louis CK and Amy Schumer are among
the big-name stand-ups who have performed in
the 10,000-square-foot space, known for its Art
Deco ambience. In addition to headliners, New
Talent Showcases are a staple of the club’s
calendar. Food and drink menus available.
Highlights: Dec. 1-3: Adam Ray. Dec. 8-9: Roy
Wood Jr.. Dec. 15-16: Tom Papa. Dec. 22-23:
Robert Kelly. Dec. 29-30: Adam Ferrara. I16
Joe’s Pub C0L9431425 Lafayette St., at Astor Pl.,
212.539.8778. publictheater.org. This performance space boasts eclectic entertainment.
Highlights: Dec. 11: The Skivvies: “Sleigh My
Name.” Dec. 12: Tori Scott: “Vodka Is the Reason
for the Season.” Dec. 14-17: “A Murray Little
Christmas” starring Murray Hill. Dec. 14-17, 19-23:
Justin Vivian Bond: “Manger Danger!” Dec. 21-23:
“Alan Cummings Sings Sappy Songs.” Dec. 26-31:
Sandra Bernhard: “Sandemonium.” E18
DANCE+MUSIC
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater C0L891N
6 ew
York City Center, 131 W. 55th St., btw Sixth &
Seventh aves., 212.581.1212. alvinailey.org. (Nov.
29-Dec. 31) The renowned dance troupe is in
residence for its annual season, featuring more
than two dozen works, including world
premieres by Spanish choreographer Gustavo
Ramirez Sansano and Ailey dancer Jamar
Roberts, and new productions by Twyla Tharp,
Jawole Willa Jo Zollar and Talley Beatty. H13
Carnegie Hall C0L9541Seventh Ave., at W. 57th St.,
212.247.7800. carnegiehall.org. The 2017–2018
season is the concert hall’s 127th. Highlights:
Dec. 3: Vienna Boys Choir. Dec. 7: Orchestra of St.
Luke’s. Dec. 8: The Philadelphia Orchestra. Dec.
13: “Sing Along: The Music of Stevie Wonder.”
Dec. 15-16: The New York Pops. Dec. 18: Oratorio
Society of New York: Handel’s Messiah. Dec. 21:
Musica Sacra: Handel’s Messiah. Dec. 23: The
Masterwork Chorus and Orchestra: Handel’s
Messiah. Dec. 24 & 28: New York String
Orchestra. H13
Jazz at Lincoln Center C0L74T
53 ime Warner Center,
10 Columbus Cir., Broadway & W. 60th St.,
212.721.6500. jalc.org. The 2017–2018 season is
Jazz at Lincoln Center’s 30th season. Dec. 1-2 in
the Appel Room: Peter and Will Anderson: “The
Fabulous Dorsey Brothers.” Dec. 1-2 in the Rose
Theater: Steve Miller: “The Blues Triangle.” Dec.
13-17 in the Rose Theater: Jazz at Lincoln Center
Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis: “Big Band
Holidays.” I12
Joyce Theater C0L1
9541 75 Eighth Ave., at W. 19th St.,
212.242.0800. joyce.org. The respected venue
Celebrate the holiday season at the Met
with enchanting productions of The Magic
Flute, Hansel and Gretel, The Marriage of
Figaro, and The Merry Widow.
Tickets start at $25
metopera.org | 212.362.6000
Illustration: Mei Kanamoto / Metropolitan Opera
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
45
entertainment
GLO
BAL
SPO
NSO
R
welcomes renowned modern-dance companies
from the U.S. and abroad. Nov. 30-Dec. 3: Liz
Gerring Dance Company: “Horizon.” Dec. 12-17:
Trisha Brown Dance Company. Dec. 19-31:
Dorrance Dance. H17
Metropolitan Opera C0L3572Metropolitan Opera
House at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., btw W.
63rd & W. 64th sts., 212.362.6000. metopera.org.
The world-famous opera company presents its
2017–2018 season, featuring new productions
as well as repertory favorites. Dec. 1, 5, 8, 11, 16
(matinee): “Norma.” Dec. 2 (matinee): “Verdi’s
Requiem.” Dec. 2 (evening): “Thaïs.” Dec. 4, 7, 9
(matinee): “The Magic Flute.” Dec. 6, 9 (evening),
12, 15, 19, 23 (matinee), 29: “Le Nozze di Figaro.”
Dec. 14, 16 (evening), 20, 23 (evening), 27, 30
(matinee): “The Merry Widow.” Dec. 18, 22, 26, 28
(matinee), 30 (evening): “Hansel and Gretel.” Dec.
31: “Tosca.” I12
New York Philharmonic C0LD
1964 avid Geffen Hall at
Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 64th St.,
212.875.5656. nyphil.org. The 2017–2018 season
is a momentous one, as New York’s preeminent
orchestra honors Leonard Bernstein, its former
Music Director and Laureate Conductor, on the
occasion of the centennial of his birth.
Concerts: Nov. 30, Dec. 1, 2: Christoph von
Dohnányi conducts the world premiere of Bent
Sorensen’s “Evening Land,” Brahms’ Symphony
No. 2 and Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 27, with
Emanuel Ax, piano. Dec. 6-8: The Philharmonic’s
175th Birthday Concert: Alan Gilbert conducts
Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5. Dec. 12-16: Andrew
Manze conducts Handel’s Messiah. Dec. 17:
Holiday Brass. Dec. 27-30: Bramwell Tovey
conducts Smetana, Bartók and Musorgsky, with
Yefim Bronfman, piano. Dec. 31: Bramwell Tovey
conducts the New Year’s Eve concert: “Bernstein
on Broadway.” I12
The Town Hall C0L1
96451 23 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth Ave. &
Broadway, 212.840.2824. thetownhall.org. “The
People’s Concert Hall” boasts an eclectic lineup
of performers. Highlights: Dec. 2, 9, 16: “A
Prairie Home Companion” with Chris Thile. Dec.
3: Steve Earle & The Dukes with Emmylou Harris
and Lucinda Williams. Dec. 5: NEEDTOBREATHE.
Dec. 6: Robert Earl Keen: “Merry Christmas From
the Fam-O-Lee” Show. Dec. 7: Jake Bugg. Dec. 12:
“Taylor Mac’s 24-Decade History: Holiday Sauce.”
Dec. 22: The Tenors: “Christmas Together.” H14
JAZZ CLUBS
Now
through
December 31
TICKETS START AT JUST $40
nycballet.com
������������
David H. Koch Theater
at Lincoln Center
46
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
Birdland C0L9641315 W. 44th St., btw Eighth & Ninth
aves., 212.581.3080. birdlandjazz.com. “The jazz
corner of the world” is how Charlie Parker
described this club. Highlights: Nov. 28-Dec. 2:
Marcus Roberts Trio. Dec. 12-26: Stacey Kent.
Dec. 19-25: Freddy Cole Quartet. Dec. 26-31: The
Birdland Big Band with special guest vocalist
Veronica Swift. Dinner served nightly. I14
Blue Note Jazz Club C0L1
79641 31 W. 3rd St., btw
MacDougal St. & Sixth Ave., 212.475.8592.
bluenote.net. The best and brightest perform
here. Highlights: Nov. 28-Dec. 3: Fourplay. Dec.
7-10: Jimmy Heath Big Band. Dec. 11-Jan. 7: Chris
Botti’s 13th Annual Holiday Residency. G18
Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola C0L96418Jazz at Lincoln Center,
10 Columbus Cir., Broadway & W. 60th St.,
entertainment
212.258.9595. jazz.org/dizzys. This intimate club
boasts a stunning stage backdrop: the glittering
Manhattan skyline. Highlights: Dec. 1-3: Paula
West Quintet. Dec. 7-10: Renee Rosnes. Dec.
15-17: Riley’s Red Hot Holidays. Dec. 20-23:
Sherman Irby: “A New Christmas Story.” Dec.
26-30: Carlos Henriquez Octet. Dec. 31: Carlos
Henriquez and Paquito d’Rivera: “A Latin Jazz
Celebration.” Dinner served nightly. I12
Jazz Standard C0L31
627 16 E. 27th St., btw Lexington
Ave. & Park Ave. So., 212.576.2232. jazzstandard
.com. An eclectic lineup of world-class artists
performing classic jazz to funk, R&B, blues and
more, plus Blue Smoke restaurant’s awardwinning barbecue. Every M: “Mingus Mondays”
concert series. Highlights: Nov. 30-Dec. 3:
Danilo Pérez Trio: Panamonk. Dec. 7-10: Bill
Frisell/Thomas Morgan Duo. Dec. 12-17: Joe
Lovano Classic Quartet. Dec. 21-23: Spanish
Harlem Orchestra. Dec. 28-31: René Marie. F16
Village Vanguard C0L1
9471 78 Seventh Ave. So., btw
Perry & W. 11th sts., 212.255.4037. villagevan
guard.com. Since 1935, one of New York’s most
prestigious jazz clubs. Highlights: Nov. 28-Dec. 3:
Christian McBride & Tip City. Dec. 5-10: Christian
McBride & Inside Straight. Dec. 12-17: Kenny
Barron Trio. Dec. 19-24: Kenny Barron Quintet.
Dec. 25-31: The Bad Plus. H18
POP/ROCK CLUBS+VENUES
B.B. King Blues Club & Grill C0L9421237 W. 42nd St.,
btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.997.4144.
bbkingblues.com. Dedicated to the musical
legend, who died on May 14, 2015, this intimate
space has been in Times Square for 15 years
and counting. Highlights: Dec. 15: Aaron Neville.
Dec. 17: Blood Sweat & Tears. Dec. 21-23: A
Darlene Love Christmas. Dec. 26: Petula Clark.
Every Saturday at noon: Beatles Brunch. Every
Sunday at 1:30 pm: Gospel Brunch. H14
Barclays Center C0L46
7 20 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush
Ave., Brooklyn, 800.745.3000. barclayscenter
.com. A state-of-the-art entertainment/sports
arena. Highlights: Dec. 6-7: Disney Tim Burton’s
“The Nightmare Before Christmas” in concert
live-to-film, starring Danny Elfman. Dec. 9: Chris
Rock. Dec. 15: Odesza. AA24
Beacon Theatre C0L2
941 124 Broadway, at W. 74th St.,
866.858.0008. beacontheatre.com. Pop-music
concerts and other acts. Highlights: Nov. 27-28,
Dec. 4-5: Mariah Carey: “All I Want for Christmas
Is You.” Dec. 8: Jerry Seinfeld. Dec. 9: Cyndi
Lauper & Friends. Dec. 10: Aquarium. Dec. 17:
The K-Love Christmas Tour. Dec. 19-21: Pentatonix. Dec. 30-31: Gov’t Mule. J111
Madison Square Garden C0L95461Seventh Ave., btw
W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 866.858.0008. thegarden
.com. Concerts and live events in the arena and
The Theater. Highlights in the Arena: Dec. 8:
Z100’s Jingle Ball. Dec. 13-14: Andrea Bocelli. Dec.
20: Billy Joel. Dec. 28-31: Phish. Highlights in The
Theater: Dec. 2: Morrissey. Dec. 6-8: Chris Rock:
Total Blackout Tour 2017. H15
SPECIAL HOLIDAY EVENTS
Big Apple Circus Damrosch Park, Lincoln
Center, W. 62nd St., at Amsterdam Ave.,
ESTABLISHED IN 1994 NYC
or 800-982-2787 · ORPHEUM THEATRE, 2nd Ave. at 8th St.
#StompNYC
/StompOnline
@StompNYC
@StompNYC
StompOnline.com
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
47
a ted talk.
a photoshoot.
a test of friendship.
entertainment
646.793.9313. bigapplecircus.com. (Thru Jan. 7)
NYC’s very own intimate one-ring circus—no
seat is more than 50 feet away from the
action—marks its 40th anniversary season with
a new ringmaster, Nik Wallenda and The
Fabulous Wallendas, and the return of
fan-favorite clown Grandma. I12
Elf The Musical The Theater at Madison Square
Garden, Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts.,
866.858.0008. theateratmsg.com/elf. (Dec.
13-29) Buddy, a human orphan, is brought up as
one of Santa’s elves at the North Pole, but
when he grows to be bigger (and clumsier) than
the other elves, it’s time for him to find out who
he really is. In this family-favorite holiday
musical, Buddy heads to New York in search of
his real father and the true meaning of
Christmas. H15
a new play by
two time obie® winner
susan miller
Directed by two time
obie® winner
®
& tony award nominee
emily mann
TicketCentral.com | 212-279-4200 | 20thCenturyBlues.com
The Alice Griffin Jewel Box Theatre at The Pershing Square Signature Center, 480 W. 42nd St, NYC
New Year’s Eve Ball Drop C0L372T8 imes Square, W.
42nd to W. 47th sts., btw Broadway & Seventh
Ave. timessquarenyc.org. (Dec. 31) The
Waterford crystal ball makes its descent down
the flagpole atop 1 Times Square at 11:59 pm.
Spectators are welcomed into the revelry area
starting at 6 pm. H14
New York City Ballet: George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker C0L467David H. Koch
Theater at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W.
63rd St., 212.496.0600. nycballet.com. (Nov.
24-Dec. 31) Toy soldiers, sugar plum fairies and
more dance their way across the stage in the
holiday favorite, choreographed by George
Balanchine to music by Tchaikovsky. I12
Paul Winter’s Winter Solstice Celebration
C0L372T
84 he Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, 1047
Amsterdam Ave., btw W. 110th & W. 111th sts.,
866.811.4111. solsticeconcert.com. (Dec. 14-16)
The 38th annual festival of music and dance
pays homage to the return of the sun after
December’s longest night. J6
ROY
WOOD JR.
TOM
PAPA
Fri. Dec. 8 –
Sat. Dec. 9
Fri. Dec. 15 –
Sat. Dec. 16
A VERY
JEWISH
CHRISTMAS
Sun. Dec. 24
ADAM
FERRARA
Fri. Dec. 29 –
Sun. Dec. 31
Purchase tickets online at
www.GothamComedyClub.com
Radio City Christmas Spectacular C0L49Radio
City Music Hall, 1260 Sixth Ave., at W. 50th St.,
866.858.0007. radiocitychristmas.com. (Nov.
10-Jan. 1) (1 hr 30 mins) The holiday variety
show features the high-kicking Rockettes and
enhanced special effects in 2017. G13
Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree
C0L623Rockefeller Plz., btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., btw
Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.632.3975. rockefellercent
er.com. (Nov. 29-Jan. 7) Arguably the world’s
most famous holiday tree has lit up Midtown
Manhattan since 1931. The tree is lit daily 5:30
am-11:30 pm (until 9 pm on Jan. 7). G13
Who’s Holiday! Westside Theatre Upstairs, 407
W. 43rd St.,, btw Ninth & 10th aves.,
212.239.6200. whosholiday.com. (Closes Dec. 31)
(1 hr 15 mins, no intermission) Cindy Lou Who is
now middle-aged, down on her luck and living
in a trailer. As she prepares to host a Christmas
Eve party, she reminisces about the night she
met the Grinch 40 years ago. Lesli Margherita is
Cindy in the world premiere of Matthew
Lombardo‘s comedy in couplets. J14
The Yorkville Nutcracker C0LT6917 he Kaye Playhouse
at Hunter College, 695 Park Ave., btw E. 68th & E.
69th sts., 212.772.4448. dancespatrelle.org. (Dec.
7-10) In this version of the Tchaikovsky ballet,
48
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
performed by Dances Patrelle, the setting has
been transported to New York City in 1895. Set
pieces include a holiday party at Gracie
Mansion, home of the city’s mayor; dancing at
the Crystal Palace in the New York Botanical
Garden; and ice skating in Central Park. F11
entertainment
SPORTS
Brooklyn Nets C0L47Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic
Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, 800.745.3000.
nba.com/nets. The professional basketball team
has the home-court advantage. Dec. 2: Atlanta
Hawks. Dec. 12: Washington Wizards. Dec. 14:
New York Knicks. Dec. 17: Indiana Pacers. Dec.
20: Sacramento Kings. Dec. 22: Washington
Wizards. AA24
New York Giants C0L513M
4 etLife Stadium, East
Rutherford, New Jersey, 800.745.3000. giants
.com. The 2012 Super Bowl champions are at
home at state-of-the-art MetLife Stadium. Dec.
10: Dallas Cowboys. Dec. 17: Philadelphia Eagles.
Dec. 31: Washington Redskins.
New York Islanders Barclays Center,
620 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn,
917.618.6700. newyorkislanders.com. The
NHL franchise plays home games in Brooklyn.
Dec. 1: Washington Senators. Dec. 11: Washington Capitals. Dec. 13: Dallas Stars. Dec. 16: Los
Angeles Kings. Dec. 19: Detroit Red Wings. Dec.
21: Anaheim Ducks. Dec. 23: Winnipeg Jets. Dec.
27: Buffalo Sabres. AA24
New York Jets C0L5143MetLife Stadium, East
Rutherford, New Jersey, 800.745.3000. newyork
jets.com. New York’s Men in Green tackle the
opposition on their home turf. Dec. 3: Kansas
City Chiefs. Dec. 24: Los Angeles Chargers.
New York Knicks C0L6M
9471 adison Square Garden,
Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts.,
877.465.6425. nba.com/knicks. Hometown hoop
action. Dec. 3: Orlando Magic. Dec. 6: Memphis
Grizzlies. Dec. 10: Atlanta Hawks. Dec. 12: Los
Angeles Lakers. Dec. 16: Oklahoma City Thunder.
Dec. 21: Boston Celtics. Dec. 25: Philadelphia
76ers. H15
New York Rangers C0L395Madison Square Garden,
Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts.,
212.465.6741. nyrangers.com. The hockey team
laces up its skates. Dec. 1: Carolina Hurricanes.
Dec. 9: New Jersey Devils. Dec. 11: Dallas Stars.
Dec. 15: Los Angeles Kings. Dec. 19: Anaheim
Ducks. Dec. 23: Toronto Maple Leafs. Dec. 27:
Washington Capitals. H15
SERVICES
BroadwayHD broadwayhd.com. The online,
on-demand streaming service brings live
theater—more than 200 recent as well as
classic musicals, plays and comedies—and
exclusive live-stream content to at-home or
on-the-go audiences located in the United
States (as IN New York went to press).
BroadwayHD is currently available on Amazon
Channels, all compatible Amazon Video
devices, and Android and iOS mobile devices.
Access is via a monthly package, yearly
subscription or on a per-show basis.
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
49
dining+drinking
FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC
The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).
2
1
4
1 This kitchen at this rustic resto, with a
wood-finished bar and wooden dining room
tables, stays open until 1 am nightly. | The
Wren, p. 51 2 Three tiers of traditional
omakase are available from Chef Inoue,
after whom this Michelin-starred restaurant
is named. | Sushi Inoue, p. 53 3 For a
password to this resto’s speakeasy-style,
after-hours holiday party on Dec. 15, email
socialmedia@eataly.com. | BAITA, p. 51 4
Red and golden beets with arugula, cashews,
ricotta cheese and balsamic dressing form
the vegetarian, gluten-free dish: Vegan
Ricotta Beets. | Nisi Estiatorio, p. 52
50
Pricing Legend:
$=inexpensive (average meal under $25)
$$=moderate ($25-$50)
$$$=expensive ($50-$80)
$$$$=luxe ($80+)
41st St., 646.214.1000, I14. heartlandbrewery
.com. Handcrafted beers, housemade sodas
and a hearty steakhouse menu, including bison
burgers and certifi ed Black Angus New York
strip steak. L & D (daily). $$
CENTRAL PARK SOUTH+
Le Bernardin—French 155 W. 51st St., btw
Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.554.1515. le-bernardin
.com. This internationally acclaimed restaurant—a leader in New York City’s French
cuisine landscape, with a menu crafted by Chef
Eric Ripert—serves fresh, simply prepared fi sh
dishes in an elegant space. L (M-F), D (M-Sa).
Jackets required, ties optional. $$$$ G13
THEATER DISTRICT+HELL’S KITCHEN
Heartland Brewery & Chophouse—
American 127 W. 43rd St., btw Broadway &
Sixth Ave., 646.366.0235, H14; 350 Fifth Ave., at
34th St., 212.563.3433, G15; 625 Eighth Ave., at W.
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
PHOTOS: MAIN BAR, COURTESY THE WREN; ASSORTED SUSHI, COURTESY SUSHI INOUE; BAITA CABIN AT LA BIRRERIA, RON CAPISTRANO; VEGAN
RICOTTA BEETS SALAD FROM NISI ESTIATORIO, WANDA PEREZ
3
Rouge Tomate Chelsea—Contemporary
American C0L5321
97 26 W. 18th St., btw Sixth & Seventh
aves., 646.395.3978. rougetomatechelsea.com.
Locally sourced and health-oriented culinary
offerings, as well as more than 200 wines,
including biodynamic, international and
certified organic bottles, from a team that
earned a 2018 Michelin star less than a year
after opening. L (Tu-F), D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Sa &
Su) $$$$ G17
Valbella—Italian C0L1944
6 21 W. 13th St., btw Ninth
Ave. & Washington St., 212.645.7777, I17; 11 E.
53rd St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.888.8955,
F13. valbellarestaurants.com. Northern Italian
dishes are paired with rich wines in a sleek,
tiered space. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). $$$$
CHINATOWN+LITTLE ITALY
Ajisen Noodle—Japanese 14 Mott St., btw
Bowery & Pell St., 212.267.9680, E21; 136 W. 28th
St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 646.638.0888,
H16. ajisenusa.com. This noodle house is known
for its impressive ramen dish selection. Other
dishes include grilled eel, beef yakitori and
various sushi rolls. L & D (daily). $$
Planet Hollywood—Contemporary
American C0L631
52 540 Broadway, at W. 45th St.,
212.333.7827. planethollywoodintl.com. Huge
sandwiches, burgers, pizza and salads are the
main attractions at this Times Square staple,
with decor and a menu devoted to film and
television history. L & D (daily). $$ H14
Sardi’s—Continental 234 W. 44th St., btw
Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.221.8440. sardis
.com. A Theater District staple since 1921, this
restaurant has been catering to pre- and
post-theater crowds for almost a century, and
is famous for its walls, lined with celebrity
caricatures. L & D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Su). $$$ H14
Utsav Indian Bar & Grill—Indian 1185 Sixth
Ave., entrance on W. 46th St., btw Sixth & Seventh
aves., 212.575.2525. utsavny.com. There is a cozy
bar and outdoor seating on the lower level and,
on the upper level, elegant decor and floorto-ceiling windows, where you can enjoy
savory traditional Indian flavors during a lunch
buffet, on a prix fixe dinner menu, or à la carte.
Convenient for pre-theater dining. L & D (daily).
$$$ G14
CHELSEA+MEATPACKING DISTRICT
Catch—Asian Fusion C0L4195321 Ninth Ave., at W. 13th
St., 212.392.5978. catchrestaurants.com
/catchnyc. “Top Chef” Season 3 winner Hung
Huynh creates a seafood-centric menu with
Asian and Mediterranean influences—broken into
categories such as “rolled” (sushi roll with
lobster, kiwi, pickled jalapeño and spicy mango),
“cold” (salmon belly carpaccio) and “big fish”
La Mela—Italian 167 Mulberry St., btw Grand &
Broome sts., 212.431.9493. lamelarestaurant.com.
Traditional family-style meals of shrimp
marinara, rigatoni pomodoro, cannoli and more.
L & D (daily). $$ E20
Lombardi’s—Italian C0L52133
6 2 Spring St., at Mott St.,
212.941.7994. firstpizza.com. America’s first
pizzeria has been serving New Yorkers and
tourists with its New York-style, coal-oven-fired
pizza pies for more than 100 years. L & D
(daily). Cash only. $$ E20
Wo Hop—Chinese C01
L714 7 Mott St., btw Worth &
Mosco sts., 212.962.8617. wohopnyc.com.
Established in 1938, this subterranean
Cantonese joint is a popular NYC late-night
hangout, staying open 24 hours a day and
serving roasted duck lo mein, vegetable chow
fun, chicken with oyster sauce over rice and
other classic dishes. For those seeking less
“buzz” and more intimacy, a dining room is
available upstairs. L & D (daily). $ E20
The Wren—Contemporary American
C0L74213
9 44 Bowery, at Great Jones St., 212.388.0148.
thewrennyc.com. Cockles and mussels with
bacon, beer and leeks; Guinness-braised steak
and Stilton pie; and fish ‘n’ chips constitute this
much-praised, modern pub menu. L (M-F), D
(nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$ E19
FINANCIAL DISTRICT+TRIBECA
Cipriani Club 55—Contemporary Italian C0L81742
55 Wall St., btw William & Hanover sts.,
212.699.4099; and three other NYC locations.
cipriani.com. Inside a building with monolithic
Greek columns, guests dine on Italian classics
such as spinach sage ravioli and veal milanese
while sipping on signature bellinis. B, L & D
(M-F). $$$$ E22
Graffiti Earth—Contemporary Indian
190 Church St., at Duane St., 212.542.9440.
graffitiearthny.com. Persian and Indian
influences run wild on the menu inside Chef/
owner Jehangir Mehta’s elegant 20-seat dining
room. Dishes include shiitake panna cotta with
long pepper squid and garlic coconut soup with
chickpea caviar. D (Tu-Sa). $$$ F21
Jung Sik—Contemporary Korean C0L2
147 Harrison
St., at Hudson St., 212.219.0900. jungsik.com.
French and Spanish influences shape the
cutting-edge cooking techniques of Michelinstarred, Seoul-born Chef Yim Jung Sik, on a
menu with a range of omakase experiences.
D (M-Sa). $$$$ G21
EAST VILLAGE+LOWER EAST SIDE
Brindle Room—American 277 E. 10th St., btw
Ave. A & First Ave., 212.529.9702. brindleroom
.com. Duck confit poutine can start a meal of
pan-roasted salmon, blackened pork loin or the
spot’s most popular dish: the steakhouse
burger, topped with caramelized onions and
American cheese. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch
(Sa & Su). $$ D18
Famous Sammy’s Roumanian—Jewish/
Steak House 157 Chrystie St., at Delancey St.,
Katz’s Delicatessen—Jewish-American
205 E. Houston St., at Ludlow St., 212.254.2246.
katzsdelicatessen.com. This iconic spot has
been serving pastrami, corned beef, knishes,
housemade pickles and other classics since
1888. Tickets are given for purchase and
seating; don’t lose them! L & D (daily). $$ D19
Nobu Downtown—Japanese 195 Broadway,
btw Vesey & Fulton sts., 212.219.0500. nobu
restaurants.com. Celebrated dishes on Chef
Nobu Matsuhisa’s menu include yellowtail with
jalapeño and black cod with miso, while newer
menu additions include bigeye tuna tataki with
truffle eryngii mushrooms. L (M-F), D (nightly).
$$$ G22 Nobu Fifty Seven—Japanese 40 W.
57th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.757.3000.
noburestaurants.com/fifty-seven. The flagship’s
grandiose Uptown sister. L & D (daily). $$$ G12
FLATIRON+UNION SQUARE+GRAMERCY
BAITA by Birreria—Contemporary Italian
200 Fifth Ave., roof, btw W. 23rd & W. 24th sts.,
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
51
dining
212.673.0330. sammysromanian.com. A subterranean dining room zealously decorated with
balloons, streamers and photographs recalls a
midcentury bar mitzvah and old-time service
provides Jewish delicacies: stuffed cabbage,
breaded veal cutlet, broiled chicken liver,
housemade pickles and potato pancakes.
D (nightly). $$$ E20
(crispy whole snapper) —in a warm, expansive
space with copper, marble and wood details. L
(M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ I17
dining+drinking
212.937.8910. eataly.com/us_en/stores
/nyc-flatiron/nyc-baita. This enclosed, heated La
Birreria winter pop-up cabin atop Eataly food
hall is dressed as a Piedmont ski lodge, with
wooden walls and a retractable roof. Familystyle beef shank, a polenta bar, aged cheeses
and a variety of pastas fill out a menu
complemented by house-brewed beers in an
unusual space with excellent views of the
Flatiron Building. L & D (daily). $$$ E16
Cosme—Contemporary Mexican 35 E. 21st
St., btw Park Ave. So & Broadway, 212.913.9659.
cosmenyc.com. Chef Enrique Olvera crafts small
dishes using avant-garde ingredients, such as
uni and hazlenut mole. Entrées include
black-garlic-rubbed New York strip steak tacos
with shishito peppers and avocado-tarragon
puree. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$ F17
Cote—Korean Steak House 16 W. 22nd St.,
btw Broadway & Fifth Ave., 212.401.7986. cotenyc
.com. A wide array of prime and specialty cuts
are served as part of a daily rotating “butcher’s
feast,” alongside seasonal ban-chan and
housemade stews, at this Korean steak house
led by the team from Michelin-starred West
Village fixture, Piora. D (M-Sa). $$ F16
Eleven Madison Park—American C
094211 Madison Ave., btw E. 24th & E. 25th sts.,
212.889.0905. elevenmadisonpark.com. Seasonal,
refined dishes on a customizable tasting menu
are enhanced by a lengthy international wine
list at this Gramercy Park gem, which was
named the greatest resto in the world by The
World’s 50 Best Restaurants Organization in
2017. L (F-Su), D (nightly). $$$$ F16
Union Square Cafe—Contemporary
American 101 E. 19th St., at Park Ave. So.,
212.243.4020. unionsquarecafe.com. Danny
Meyer’s hot spot is known for such classics as
ricotta gnocchi, tagliarini with summer squash
and mushrooms, and olive-oil-poached halibut
with squash ribbons, chanterelles and sungold
tomatoes. L & D (daily). $$$ F17
GREENWICH+WEST VILLAGE
Chefs Club Counter—Contemporary
American 62 Spring St., at Lafayette St.,
646.780.5456. chefsclubcounter.com. A bustling
counter-service space introduces “fine-fast”
dining, offering guests the opportunity to try
oft-rotating dishes conceptualized by worldrenowned chefs (e.g., Jean-Georges Vongerichten, Magnus Hansson) and brought to fruition
by the Chefs Club team in the restaurant’s open
kitchen. B, L & D (daily). $$ E20
Kiin Thai—Contemporary Thai 36 E. 8th St.,
btw Greene St. & University Pl., 212.529.2363.
kiinthaieatery.com. An expansive menu is
highlighted by an appetizer of Thai pandan
wings, served with honey-chili sauce. This
fast-casual restaurant also offers a hefty
cocktail list. L & D (daily). $$ F18
Nisi Estiatorio—Greek 302 Bleecker St., btw
Barrow & Grove sts., 212.727.7463. nisinyc.com.
Housemade Greek dips—melitzanosalata,
tirokafteri, skordalia, fava, skordalia—with
classic Greek-style grilled fish and lamb dishes,
alongside such modern menu offerings as
paper-thin zucchini and eggplant chips served
with housemade tzatziki and mushrooms
stifado: wild mushroom ragout with polenta. D
(nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$ H18
2nd City—Filipino 525 Hudson St., btw W. 10th
& Charles sts., 917.639.3262. 2ndcityusa.com.
Dishes such as the Flip-N-Out burger—a double
cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato, onion and a
secret Filipino-style banana pepper ketchup—
and a sushi-grade tuna poke bowl with steamed
coconut rice, from celebrity Chef/owner Jordan
Andino (“Chopped”). Twelve bar seats and a
four-seat table fill the restaurant; reservations
are recommended. L & D (daily). $$ I18
The Warren—Contemporary American 131
Christopher St., btw Hudson & Greenwich sts.,
212.243.1311. thewarrennyc.com. In this candlelit
restaurant with a brick-walled bar, popular
starters include East and West Coast oysters,
followed by entrées such as steelhead salmon
and spring lamb with artichokes, spring onion,
nettle soubise (sauce made with slow-cooked
nettle leaf and onion) and black trumpet
mushroom sauce. A rotating boozy house
punch is made fresh daily with an owner’s
choice recipe. D (nightly), Brunch (Su). $$$ H18
• OVER-THE-TOP DECORATIONS • HOLIDAY MOVIE MEMORABILIA
• SPECIAL HOLIDAY MENU ITEMS • SPECIAL VISITS FROM SANTA
NOVEMBER 1 - JANUARY 1, 2018
NOVEMBER 1 - JANUARY 1, 2018
Entrance on 45th between Broadway & 6th
open daily for lunch + dinner212.333.7827
52
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
dining+drinking
HARLEM
Barawine—French 200 Lenox Ave., at W.
120th St., 646.756.4154. barawine.com. French
bistro classics, from hanger steak with
mushrooms and fingerling potatoes to branzino
Provençal, can be paired with international or
domestic wines selected by sommelier Fabrice
Warin. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ G5
dining
Le Baobab Restaurant—Senegalese 120 W.
116th St., btw Malcolm X Blvd. & Seventh Ave.,
212.864.4700. lebaobabrestaurant.com. Thick
stews of fish, lamb and vegetables are ladled
over rice at this cozy locale. L & D (daily). $$ H5
Streetbird Rotisserie—Soul Food 2149
Frederick Douglass Blvd., btw W. 115th & W. 116th
sts., 212.206.2557. streetbirdnyc.com. Celebrity
chef Marcus Samuelsson cooks up soul food
(red velvet waffles with chicken and bourbon
maple syrup) in an open space accented with
vibrant art by Cey Adams, Anthony Vasquez
and others. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa &
Su). $$ I5
Sushi Inoue—Japanese 381 Lenox Ave., at W.
129th St., 646.706.0555. sushiinoue.com. Simple
plates of sushi, sashimi and other varieties of
fish, in a space with traditional Japanese decor
and authentic fare, at Harlem’s only Michelinstarred restaurant. D (Tu-Su). $$$ G3
MIDTOWN EAST+WEST+
MURRAY HILL+TURTLE BAY
Ai Fiori—French/Italian C0L814
7 00 Fifth Ave., 2nd
fl., btw 36th & 37th sts., 212.613.8660. aifiorinyc
.com. Chef/owner Michael White serves French
and Italian Riviera-inspired dishes such as
pan-seared sea scallops with smoked eggplant,
olives and radishes at his Michelin-starred
restaurant inside the Langham Place Hotel.
B & D (daily), L (M-F). $$$$ G15
Benjamin Steakhouse—Steak House
Dylan Hotel, 52 E. 41st St., btw Park & Madison
aves., 212.297.9177. benjaminsteakhouse.com.
Executive Chef Arturo McLeod prepares six
cuts of USDA prime steaks—dry-aged on the
premises—at this classic chophouse. B (M-F),
L & D (daily). $$$ F14 Benjamin Steakhouse
Prime—Steak House 23 E. 40th St., btw Park
& Madison aves., 212.338.0818. benjaminsteak
house.com. Sister restaurant of Benjamin
Steakhouse, this Midtown restaurant serves up
USDA prime steaks, succulent seafood and
more from the grill. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). $$$ F14
Delegates Dining Room—Various C0L61United
Nations Building, visitors’ entrance at E. 46th St. &
First Ave. Lunch reservations: call 917.367.3314.
For special event info, call 212.963.7029.
delegatesdiningroom-un.com. Dine alongside
delegates and dignitaries at an international
prix fixe buffet with wide views of the East
River. L (M-F). $$$ D14
L’Adresse American Bistro—Various
5 Bryant Park, 1065 Sixth Ave., at W. 40th St.,
212.221.2510. ladressenyc.com. This Moscowbased chain opens its first American outpost,
across from Bryant Park, serving a variety of
specialty coffee concoctions—including the
THE SEA FIRE GRILL
158 E. 48th St. | btw Lexington & Third aves. | 212.935.3785
BENJAMIN PRIME
23 E. 40th St. | btw Park & Madison aves. | 212.338.0818
NOW OPEN: BENJAMIN STEAKHOUSE, TOKYO JAPAN
B1F Remm Roppongi Building 7-14-4 | Roppongi Minatoku, Tokyo | 03-5413-4266
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
53
LUNCH &
DINNER
DAILY
dining+drinking
Bumble: fresh orange, caramel and espresso—
alongside an eclectic food menu featuring
items ranging from seared, honey crusted duck
breast to a rabbit burger, and svekol’nik:
traditional housemade beetroot soup with
marinated beef. B & L (M-F), D (M-Sa), Brunch
(Sa & Su). $$$ G14
Nerai—Greek 55 E. 54th St., btw Park &
Madison aves., 212.759.5554. nerainyc.com. In a
chic, all-white space with a sleek, intimate bar,
Executive Chef Chris Christou crafts a
contemporary Greek menu with such dishes as
Alaskan king crab linguine with Neapolitan
cream sauce, roasted red peppers and
moschofilero. B & L (M-F), D (nightly),
Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ F13
SINCE 1995
TIMES SQ
127 43 ST
AT B’WAY
MIDTOWN W
625 8TH AVE
AT 41 ST
EMPIRE STATE
350 5TH AVE
AT 34 ST
HB BURGER
127 43 ST
AT B’WAY
P.S. Kitchen—Vegan 246 W. 48th St., btw
Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.651.7247. ps-kitchen
.com. This plant-based eatery serves gourmet
vegan fare in a brick-walled space, and donates
all of its profits to charities—The Bowery
Mission, The Doe Fund —devoted to providing
resources for marginalized communities.
Specialties include ginger rice congee with
sautéed oyster mushroom, spinach and crispy
yuba. $$ H13
Sparks Steak House—Steak House 210 E.
46th St., btw Second & Third aves., 212.687.4855.
sparkssteakhouse.com. Opened in 1966 and
housed inside its current elegant dining room
since 1977, this locally and nationally renowned
chop house serves conventional favorites that
can be complemented by wines from an
elaborate, lengthy wine list featuring upward of
a thousand bottles from a wide range of
regions and vintages, including hundreds of
large-format and half bottles. L (M-F), D (M-Sa).
$$$$ D14
Turntable Chicken Jazz—Korean 20 W. 33rd
St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.714.9700.
turntablenyc.com. This newly renovated
Midtown fixture known for wings and
drumsticks—soy garlic or hot—also has a
variety of house specialties on offer, including a
burger of thinly sliced marinated beef (bulgogi),
pork fat edamame and a savory kimchi and
scallion pancake. L & D (daily). $$ G15
ROCKEFELLER CENTER
Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steakhouse
New York—Steak House C0L41
1836 221 Sixth Ave., at
W. 49th St., 212.575.5129. delfriscos.com.
Specialties at the NYC branch of this bustling
chophouse chain include a 22-oz. bone-in
prime rib eye, seared rare wagyu beef
carpaccio and potatoes au gratin with bacon.
L (M-F), D (nightly). $$$ G13
Il Gattopardo—Italian 13-15 W. 54th St., btw
Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.246.0412. ilgattopardonyc
.com. Southern Italian fare—pan-seared veal
loin scented with wild fennel pollen from
Felitto, with porcini mushrooms and fingerling
potatoes—on a menu offering housemade
pastas, more than 10 dessert items and a
lengthy rotating wine list. L (M-F), D (nightly),
Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ G13
Morrell Wine Bar & Café—Contemporary
American 1 Rockefeller Plz., btw Fifth & Sixth
54
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
aves., 212.262.7700. morellwinebar.com. More
than 150 wines offered by the glass and a
52-page, 1,000-plus bottle list complement a
food menu of coconut curry mussels, classic or
country charcuterie, and crab and avocado
salad. L (daily), D (M-Sa). $$ G13
NYY Steak—Steak House C0L57
89 W. 51st St., btw
Fifth & Sixth aves., 646.307.7910, G13; 1 E. 161st
St., at River Ave., Bronx, 646.977.8325. nyysteak
.com. The upscale restaurant owned by the
New York Yankees features USDA prime
dry-aged beef, fresh seafood and other dishes
by Executive Chef John Schafer, served
alongside an impressive list of by-the-glass
wines. Business attire recommended. L & D
(daily). $$$
SOHO+NOLITA
Antique Garage—Contemporary
Mediterranean C0L735255 E. Houston St., at Mott St.,
212.274.8881. antiquegaragesoho.com. A collection of antiques lends a charming, romantic
ambience to a brick-walled space that was
once a mechanic shop, in which diners enjoy
meze, salads and traditional entrées, such as
spicy beyti (ground lamb grilled on skewers)
and manti (beef dumplings with yogurt sauce
and mint). Call for live jazz schedule. L (M-F), D
(nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ F20
Emilio’s Ballato—Italian C0L735255 E. Houston St.,
at Mott St., 212.274.8881. No website. Family
photographs and antique mirrors punctuate the
unfinished walls of this cozy spot that presents
hearty, classically prepared Italian dishes. L & D
(daily). $$$ F20
Esther & Carol—American 341 Broome St.,
at Bowery, 646.355.1840. eshterandcarolnyc.com.
Conventional American classics like seared
king salmon with asparagus puree and a 20-oz.
grilled rib eye steak, alongside starters of
grilled oysters and lobster crab cake, in a cozy,
elegant space with black leather couches and
wood-finished tables and floor. L & D (daily).
$$$ F20
Raoul’s—French 180 Prince St., btw Thompson
and Sullivan sts., 212.966.3518. raouls.com. The
nationally ranked burger is offered off-themenu as soon as the kitchen opens at 5:30 pm,
but only 12 burgers are served up nightly. The
Parisian-style bistro also offers a variety of
entrées and features its own wines, and serves
its esteemed burger in unlimited quantities during weekend brunch. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa &
Su). $$$ G19
UPPER EAST SIDE
Antonucci—Italian C0L651
82 70 E. 81st St., btw Third &
Lexington aves., 212.570.5100. antonuccicafe81
.com. Traditional Italian fare includes salads and
homemade pastas, alongside a respectable list
of wines by the glass. L & D (daily). $$$ E9
Areppas—Venezuelan 954 Third Ave.,
at E. 57th St., 212.355.3901. areppas.com.
Corn patties, fluffy and made fresh daily, are
stuffed with herbs and spices and varietals of
meat, vegetables and cheeses, or served on
their own with housemade salsa and garlic
sauce offerings. B, L & D (M-F). $$ D12
Imli—Contemporary Indian 1136 First Ave.,
btw E. 61st & E. 62nd sts., 212.256.0073.
imlirestaurant.com. Recipes from various
regions in India, alongside unusual housemade
specialty plates, such as the Imli spicy burger, a
patty blended with three kinds of beef; and
seven types of naan—including mushroom with
truffle. L & D (daily). $$ D12
UPPER WEST SIDE
Awash—Ethiopian 947 Amsterdam Ave., btw
W. 106th & W. 107th sts., 212.961.1416; and two
other NYC locations. awashny.com. Authentic
Ethiopian dishes at this restaurant named after
a river in Ethiopia include kitfo (steak tartare
seasoned in Ethiopian butter and mitmita), doro
wat (chicken simmered in berbere sauce) and
yabeg alicha (lamb cooked in butter with onions
and green peppers). L & D (daily). $$ J6
Bustan—Israeli C0L453487 Amsterdam Ave., btw W.
83rd & W. 84th sts., 212.595.5050. bustannyc
.com. Eclectic dishes from Israel with a
contemporary Mediterranean twist—many of
which are cooked in the restaurant’s domeshaped, wood-fired taboon oven. L (M-F), D
(nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ J9
Marlow Bistro—Mediterranean 1018
Amsterdam Ave., at W. 110th St., 212.662.9020.
marlowbistro.com. Homemade squid ink
cavatelli and octopus with French beans,
cherry tomatoes, kalamata olives and
lemon-potato espuma are specialties on this
high-end Mediterranean menu, in a cozy, chic,
brick-walled space across from the storied
Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine. L (M-F),
D (nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$ J6
Nice Matin—French C0L642
18 01 W. 79th St., at
Amsterdam Ave., 212.873.6423. nicematinnyc
.com. Provençal specialties include soupe à
pistou and herb-crusted Atlantic cod. B, L & D
(daily), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$$ J10
THE OUTER BOROUGHS
Casa Enrique—Contemporary Mexican
5-48 49th Ave, Long Island City, Queens,
347.448.6040. henrinyc.com. Tucked just above
the LIC side of the Midtown tunnel, this
under-the-radar Mexican gem has maintained a
Michelin star since 2010. Specialties include
cochinito chiapaneco (roasted pork ribs
marinated in guajillo chilies, rice and beans)
and mole de piaxtla, a Puebla-style chicken
dish served over rice in mole sauce, housemade with mixed dry peppers, almonds, raisins,
plantain, sesame seeds and chocolate sauce. D
(nightly), Brunch (Sa & Su). $$ B14
Dominick’s—Italian 2335 Arthur Ave., btw
Crescent Ave. & E. 186th St., Belmont, Bronx,
718.733.2807. There are no menus at this NYC
institution with casual, communal tables and a
familial vibe—just heaping portions of daily
specials. Cash only. L & D (W-M). $$
Enoteca Maria—Italian 27 Hyatt St., at
Stuyvesant Pl., St. George, Staten Island,
718.447.2777. enotecamaria.com. A daily rotation
of female chefs, the “Grandmas,” each from a
different region of Italy, ensure a handmade
menu of total freshness, variety and authenticity. Free one-on-one afternoon cooking classes
taught by the rotating women are held W-Su.
D (W-Su). $$$
dining
Grünauer Bistro—Austrian 1578 First Ave.,
at E. 82nd St., 212.988.1077. grunauernyc.com.
Traditional Austrian and Viennese dishes, such
as Tafelspitz (root vegetables, creamed
spinach, rösti potato, apple horseradish), are
complemented by a lengthy by-the-glass
Austrian wine list and live piano music Th-Sa 9
pm. D (M-Sa). $$$ D9
Il Falco—Italian 21-50 44th Dr., btw 21st &
23rd sts., Long Island City, Queens, 718.707.0009,
718.707.0023. ilfalcolic.com. Classic, homestyle
Italian fare—mushroom ravioli, veal chops,
seafood over angel hair pasta—in an elegant
space in Long Island City spearheaded by the
chefs behind Manhattan’s Il Mulino. L (M-F), D
(nightly). $$$ A13
Karczma—Polish 136 Greenpoint Ave., btw
Franklin St. & Manhattan Ave., Greenpoint,
Brooklyn, 718.349.1744. karczmabrooklyn.com.
Hearty portions of authentic Polish cuisine are
on offer, including white borscht served in a
bread bowl alongside mashed potatoes with
bacon. L & D (daily). $$ BB16
BARS+LOUNGES
Air’s Champagne Parlor 127 MacDougal St.,
btw W. 3rd & W. 4th sts., 212.420.4777. airschamp
agneparlor.com A list of 125 sparkling and
champagne bottles feature 50 priced under
$50, in a space with a 40-seat marble-topped
bar, banquette, bar and living room-style seating. G19
The Aviary 80 Columbus Cir., at W. 60th St.,
212.805.8800. aviarynyc.com. This Chicagobased specialty cocktail penthouse atop the
Mandarin Oriental New York hotel offers innovative cocktail inventions, such as the Wake
and Bake: a mix of rye, coffee-and-orangeinfused vermouth and coffee liqueur, served in
a glass inside a clear plastic bag filled with an
everything-bagel aroma. I12
Fat Cat C0L727
85 5 Christopher St., btw Seventh Ave. So.
& Bleecker St., 212.675.6056. fatcatmusic.org.
Jazz bands energize this underground
beer-and-soju bar and table-tennis hall, which
also offers 10 billiards tables, shuffleboard,
massive chess tables, checkers and backgammon, and stays open until 5 am daily. H18
JIMMY The James New York Hotel, 15 Thompson
St., rooftop, btw Canal & Grand sts., 212.201.9118.
jimmysoho.com. It’s cocktails and socializing at
this swanky hotel rooftop bar, situated at the
intersection of SoHo and TriBeCa. The specialty
cocktail pad boasts modular furniture, glazed
tile walls, a working fireplace and killer
Downtown views. F20
One Mile House 10 Delancey St., btw Bowery &
Chrystie St., 646.559.0702. onemilehousenyc
.com. In a vintage taproom located next door to
Bowery Ballroom, 30 craft beers rotate on tap.
The beer list boasts 60-plus bottles and cans.
$$ E19
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
55
shops+services
FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC
The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).
2
3
1
1 Loriann Jewelry earrings are included in this
museum store’s fine jewelry winter catalog, called
RE:FINE Holiday 2017. | The Store at MAD thestore
.madmuseum.org 2 Thom Browne’s TriBeCa shop, a
huge, newly renovated space, now stocks a women’s
collection, alongside his knitwear, outwear and
accessories for men. | Thom Browne thombrowne
.com 3 The Portugieser Perpetual Calendar has an
18-karat white gold face and a black alligator leather
strap. | IWC Schaffhausen Flagship Boutique iwc
.com 4 The Alvar Aalto 80-mm Christmas glass
ornament is available at Abode’s Brooklyn store.
| Abode New York abode-newyork.com 5 These
stainless steel shades, called “Preston,” boast
titanium nose pads. | Billy Reid billyreid.com
56
ACCESSORIES+FOOTWEAR
Adidas Originals C0L1
5147 15 Spring St., btw Mercer &
Greene sts., 212.966.0954. adidas.com/us
/originals. The Adidas offshoot specializes in
streetwear and fashionable variations of the
brand’s classic looks. F19
Barton Perreira 42 E. 66th St., btw Park &
Madison aves., 212.628.2013. bartonperreira.com.
This California-based brand creates designdriven optical eyewear and sunglasses. F11
Billy Reid C0L6254 Bond St. Ste. 2, btw Bowery &
Lafayette St., 212.598.9355, E19; 94 Charles St.,
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
btw Bleecker & W. 4th sts., 646.461.6427, H18.
billyreid.com. The menswear boutique carries
Southern-inspired eyewear designs in a space
decorated with antiques and heirlooms.
Citishoes C0L4
17945 45 Park Ave., btw E. 56th & E. 57th
sts., 212.751.3200. citishoes.com. Casual and
dress shoes for men from such brands as
Alden, Cole Haan, Mephisto and Rockport. F12
NYC Sole C0L4257384 Fifth Ave., btw 35th & 36th sts.,
917.351.1484, E15; 738 Broadway, at Waverly Pl.,
212.229.4790, F18. nycsole.com. For more than
30 years, this shoe store—formerly known as
David Z—has provided the latest kicks from top
PHOTO: THOM BROWNE STORE INTERIOR, COURTESY THOM BROWNE
5
men and women from top designers, such as
Marc Jacobs, Givenchy and Fendi; also shoes,
accessories, cosmetics and housewares. F12
Bergdorf Goodman C0L7
32749 54 Fifth Ave., btw 57th &
58th sts., 212.753.7300, 888.774.2424. bergdorf
goodman.com. Designer labels, accessories and
cosmetics for men and women in this iconic
New York department store. G12
BEAUTY+HEALTH
Linhart Dentistry C0L52
8731 30 Park Ave., Ste. 1164, at
E. 46th St., 212.682.5180. drlinhart.com. A
favorite among celebrities, Dr. Linhart
specializes in cosmetic and restorative
procedures and offers his own Pearlinbrite™
laser tooth whitening. Other treatments include
Invisalign, color restorations, veneers, crowns,
bridges, implants and iBraces. F14
4
footwear brands, including Adidas, Asics, Nike,
Puma and Converse.
Molton Brown 635 Madison Ave., at E. 59th St.,
212.755.7194, F12; 128 Spring St., btw Greene &
Wooster sts., 212.965.1740. F20. moltonbrown
.com. This beauty and body-care company
brings its luxurious perfumes, shower gels,
body lotions, candles and hand creams from its
London base to two New York City stores.
Vans DQM General 93 Grand St., btw Mercer &
Greene sts, 212.226.7776. vansdqm.com. NYC
contemporary streetwear, skateboarding and
fashion brand DQM teams up with the
Californian skatewear professionals at Vans to
open this surfi ng, skateboarding and casualwear boutique in SoHo. E20
Osswald 311 W. Broadway, btw Canal & Grand
sts., 212.625.3111. osswaldnyc.com. With a brand
that dates back to 1921, this family-owned shop
boasts an array of high-end fragrances,
skin-care products and makeup for men and
women. F20
APPAREL
BOOKS
Cockpit USA C0L3281
5 5 W. 39th St., 12th fl., btw Fifth &
Sixth aves., 212.575.1616. cockpitusa.com. Classic
American clothing for men, women and
children inspired by military and aviation garb is
available at the line’s showroom. Appointments
are advised. G14
Amazon The Shops at Columbus Circle, 10
Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., I12;
7 W. 34th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., F15. Phone
number for both locations: 206.266.2992.
amazon.com. Amazon’s brick-and-mortar locations in NYC sell books exclusively, which are
categorized by customer ratings and curators’
assessments. Gadgets, including the electronic
personal assistant, Alexa, are also available.
rag & bone C0L1
3871 19 Mercer St., btw Spring & Prince
sts., 212.219.2204; and various other NYC
locations. rag-bone.com. Rooted in Kentucky,
but infl uenced by British tailoring, the designer
duo behind this emerging label creates classic
yet modern collections for men and women,
as well as footwear and accessories. F19
Rigby & Peller 1252 Madison Ave., at E. 90th
St., 212.860.8366, F8; 1051 Third Ave., at E. 62nd
St., 646.395.3885, F11; 104 Fifth Ave., btw 15th &
16th sts., G17. rigbyandpeller.com. This British
lingerie and swimwear brand has been a leader
in luxury women’s undergarments since 1939.
Fitting and styling available by appointment.
Thom Browne C0L427100 Hudson St., at Franklin St.,
212.633.1197. thombrowne.com. This chic
designer’s collection includes 1950s and
1960s-inspired menswear, including overcoats
that come in a palette of neutral colors. A
2,000-square-foot space in the same storefront
(attached via a passageway) offers women’s
clothing and accessories, as well as handbags,
eyewear and the brand’s own tennis collection.
Century 21 C0L962
87 2 Cortlandt St., btw Broadway &
Church sts., 212.227.9092, 877.350.2121; and
various other NYC locations. c21stores.com. Deep
discounts on everything, from designer apparel
to cosmetics, shoes and electronics. F22
Lord & Taylor C0L964
1 24 Fifth Ave., btw 38th & 39th
sts., 212.391.3344. lordandtaylor.com. Classic
and contemporary clothing and accessories for
all ages from over 400 designer brands are at
the oldest specialty store in the U.S. G15
Saks Fifth Avenue C0L48156611 Fifth Ave., btw 49th &
50th sts., 212.753.4000. saksfifthavenue.com. A
luxury department store carrying designer
apparel, cosmetics and fragrances. G13
Book Culture C0L41392536 W. 112th St., btw Amsterdam
Ave. & Broadway 212.865.1588, J6; 2915
Broadway, btw. W. 114th & W. 115th St.,
646.403.3000, K5; 450 Columbus Ave., btw W.
66th & W. 67th St., 212.595.1962, I12. bookculture
.com. This independent bookseller carries
literature, poetry, nonfi ction and children’s
books and hosts in-store events.
Barneys New York C0L32496660 Madison Ave., btw E.
60th & E. 61st sts., 212.826.8900; and three other
NYC locations. barneys.com. Luxe couture for
Brookfield Place 230 Vesey St., btw Liberty &
West sts., 212.978.1698. brookfieldplaceny.com.
The shopping center brings apparel brands for
men, women and kids, along with bookstores,
beauty shops and dining options. G22
Macy’s Herald Square C0L961
3 51 W. 34th St., btw
Broadway & Seventh Ave., 212.695.4400. macys
.com. This fl agship department store spans a
city block with designer clothing, shoes,
accessories, beauty items and cookware. G15
Fur Vault at Macy’s 151 W. 34th St., btw Sixth
& Seventh aves., 212.494.1227. macys.com
/furvault. Furs for every occasion can be found
at this elegant fur salon. G15
Barnes & Noble C0L3
961 3 E. 17th St., btw Park Ave.
So. & Broadway, 212.253.0810; and various other
NYC locations. bn.com. Thousands of titles are
housed in a New York City landmark building,
suitable for reading and browsing, with events
such as lectures by authors and storytelling
hours for children. F17
DEPT. STORES+CENTERS
Bloomingdale’s C0L421
5 000 Third Ave., at E. 59th St.,
212.705.2000; and two other NYC locations.
bloomingdales.com. A fashion hub since the
late-19th century, carrying designer clothes,
shoes, handbags, accessories and more. E12
The Shops at Columbus Circle C0L36Time Warner
Center, 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th
sts., 212.823.6300. theshopsatcolumbuscircle
.com. This high-end retail and dining complex
features more than 40 stores, the world-class
Restaurant and Bar Collection, a park-view
atrium and art installations. I12
Westfield World Trade Center
185 Greenwich St., btw Vesey & Barclay sts.,
212.284.9982. westfield.com/westfieldworldtrade
center. This shopping center features well over
125 retail shops, including Breitling, Cole Haan,
John Varvatos and Roberto Coin. G22
GIFTS+HOME
Abode New York 42 West St., Grd. fl. 2, btw
Oak & Noble sts., Greenpoint, Brooklyn,
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
57
shops+services
Uniqlo C0L5
6913 46 Broadway, btw Spring & Prince sts.,
F20
F20; 31 W. 34th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., G12;
666 Fifth Ave., at 53rd St., F13. Phone number for
all locations: 877.486.4756. uniqlo.com. Chic,
casual basics in bold and vibrant hues,
including T-shirts, jeans, coats, sweaters and
accessories by the Japanese brand.
shops+services
718.388.5383. abode-newyork.com. Premium
home furnishings and unusual decor, as well as
kitchen and tableware and year-round and
seasonal accessories, in a cozy space in
Brooklyn or on the web. BB16
Davidoff of Geneva C0L675
94 15 Madison Ave., at E.
53rd St., 212.751.9060, F13; 1390 Sixth Ave., btw
W. 56th & W 57th sts., 212.757.3167, F13;
Brookfield Place, 225 Liberty St., at West St.,
212.897.2866, G22. davidoffmadison.com.
Premium lighters, cigars and other smoking
accessories fill this store and cigar lounge.
Museum of Arts and Design Store
2 Columbus Cir., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave.,
212.299.7700. thestore.madmuseum.org. This
museum store sells gifts and small sculptures
reflecting its arts and crafts exhibitions, many
from NYC artists and designers. I12
JEWELRY
IWC Schaffhausen C0L4531535 Madison Ave., at E.
54th St., 212.355.7271. iwc.com. This Swiss
manufacturer, founded in 1868, offers an array
of precise, sophisticated watches for men, limited-edition tickers and a selection of women’s
timepieces at its flagship boutique in NYC. F12
Martinique Jewelers C0L727
6 50 Seventh Ave., btw
W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.262.7600. martinique
jewelers.com. In Times Square since 1963, this
fine jeweler offers a vast selection of jewelry,
including Alex and Ani bangles, a full Pandora
boutique with exclusive NYC charms, the Thomas Sabo collection, and timeless
diamond and 18-karat gold pieces. Watch
battery replacement is also available. H13
Maurice Badler Fine Jewelry C0L4
72 85 Park Ave.,
btw E. 58th & E. 59th sts., 800.622.3537. badler
.com. Fine jewelry from famous designers fill
this established jewelry shop. F12
Tiffany & Co. C0L727
6 27 Fifth Ave., at 57th St.,
212.755.8000; and two other NYC locations.
tiffany.com. The world-famous jewelry store
carries diamonds, pearls, gold, silver, timepieces, crystal and more—all wrapped in signature
robin’s-egg blue boxes. G13
Wempe Jewelers C0L347
15 00 Fifth Ave., at 55th St.,
212.397.9000. wempe.com. Fifth Avenue’s only
official Rolex dealer also carries other
prestigious brands such as Jaeger-LeCoultre,
Patek Philippe, Chopard and Baume & Mercier,
plus jewelry that includes 18-karat gold
earrings, brilliant diamond rings, silver charms,
pearl necklaces, classic cameos and precious
gemstones. G13
SPORTING GOODS+FAN APPAREL
Burton Flagship Store C0L63269 Greene St., btw
Broome & Spring sts., 212.966.8070. burton.com.
The hip and trusted snowboard apparel
company provides warm layers and accessories, as well as tools and tuning. F20
NBA Store C0L3575
1 45 Fifth Ave., at 45th St.,
212.515.6221. nba.com/nycstore. Team jerseys,
gifts and footwear fill this sports emporium of
National Basketball Association merchandise
and memorabilia. G14
58
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
TECH+MUSIC
A-1 Record Shop C0L687439 E. 6th St., btw Ave. A &
First Ave., 212.473.2870. a1recordshop.com.
Shoppers at this record store can browse a
massive selection of records from all genres.
The shop also buys and sells records, and
produces its own radio show. D18
B&H Photo, Video & Pro Audio C0L79468420 Ninth
Ave., at W. 34th St., 800.606.6969, 800.221.5743.
bhphotovideo.com. One-stop shopping for the
newest technology at discount prices, including
cutting-edge cameras, hard drives, audio and
video equipment, laptops and accessories. I15
42nd Street Photo C0L33
21 78 Fifth Ave., btw 35th &
36th sts., 888.810.4242. 42photo.com. This
electronics hub specializes in digital cameras
and videography equipment like camcorders,
microphones, lenses and flashes. G15
Halcyon C0L45
6127 7 Pearl St., at Water St., DUMBO,
Brooklyn, 718.260.9299. halcyontheshop.com. A
music store/gallery offering current electronica, soul, funk and avant-garde.
Second Hand Rose Music C0L63848 E. 12th St., btw
Broadway & University Pl., 212.675.3735.
shrosemusic.com. This Union Square shop’s
expansive inventory includes used, vintage and
rare vinyl in fine condition. F18
Cosmetic Dentistry
Veneers (2 days)
LINHARTTM Laser
Whitening
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Implants
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T-Mobile Times Square C0L6451
82 535 Broadway, at W.
46th St., 646.350.4645. t-mobile.com. The
wireless provider’s flagship store in NYC sells
internet devices, tablets, accessories and
cellphones powered by iOS, Android, Windows
and other operating systems. H14
TOYS+GAMES
kidding around C0L486260 W. 15th St., btw Fifth &
Sixth aves., 212.645.6337, G17; Grand Central
Terminal, 42nd St. Passage, E. 42nd St., at Park
Ave., 212.972.8697, F14. kiddingaroundtoys.com.
This family-owned store specializes in toys and
board games, costumes, clothes and gifts for
children of all ages. The 15th St. location boasts
a Victorian design and mobile toy train traveling
throughout the shop.
Kidrobot C0L461
73 18 Prince St., btw Greene & Wooster
sts., 212.966.6688. kidrobot.com. Artist-created
collectible and limited-edition toys, made in the
United States or imported from Japan, Hong
Kong and Europe, as well as art, apparel and
accessories reflecting urban culture, street
fashion and pop culture. F19
Nintendo® World C0L5110 Rockefeller Plz., at W.
48th St., 646.459.0800. nintendoworldstore.com.
A 10,000-square-foot interactive gaming
paradise that features Nintendo Wii kiosks,
branded merchandise, exclusive items and all
the latest Nintendo video games. F13
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
59
shops+services
Paragon Sporting Goods C0L48
317 67 Broadway,
at E. 18th St., 212.255.8889. paragonsports.com.
This only-in-New-York sports mecca carries
equipment and clothing from major brands,
including Timberland, Patagonia, Nike and
Reebok. E17
museums+attractions
FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC
2
1
5
1 The Wiener Werkstätte, 1903–1932, epitomized
luxurious beauty, as this photograph from an
exhibition devoted to the artists’ collective attests.
| Neue Galerie New York, p. 61 2 David Hockney’s
iconic “Portrait of an Artist (Pool With Two Figures)”
is a highlight of the artist’s major retrospective.
| The Metropolitan Museum of Art, p. 61 3
“Holiday Express: Trains and Toys From the Jerni
Collection” delights young and old. | New-York
Historical Society, p. 61 4 Who invented Christmas
as we know it? “Charles Dickens and the Spirit of
Christmas” has the answer. | The Morgan Library
& Museum, p. 61 5 Kenny Scarf’s painting, “Having
Fun,” sums up the essence of the exhibit “Club 57:
Film, Performance and Art in the East Village, 1978–
1983.” | Museum of Modern Art, p. 61
60
MUSEUMS
American Folk Art Museum C0L5482 Lincoln Sq.,
Columbus Ave., at W. 66th St., 212.595.9533.
folkartmuseum.org. The museum specializes in
works created by self-taught (as opposed to
formally trained) artists working in a variety of
mediums and dating from the 18th century to
today. Tu-Th, Sa 11:30 am-7 pm, F noon-7:30
pm, Su noon-6 pm. Free. I11
American Museum of Natural History
C0L365Central Park West, at W. 79th St., 212.769.5100.
amnh.org. Guests explore halls filled with
full-scale dinosaur skeletons, fossils, dioramas,
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
4
artifacts, gems and minerals, meteorites and
more. The Hayden Planetarium’s immersive
space show is here, too. Daily 10 am-5:45 pm.
General admission: $23 adults, $18 seniors
(60+)/students (with ID), $13 ages 2-12. I10
Brooklyn Museum C0L5948200 Eastern Pkwy., at
Washington Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn,
718.638.5000. brooklynmuseum.org. Ancient
Egyptian artifacts, photography and European,
Asian and American art are housed in a grand
Beaux Arts building. W 11 am-6 pm, Th 11
am-10 pm, F-Su 11 am-6 pm. Suggested
admission: $16 adults, $10 seniors (62+)/
students, age 19 and under free.
PHOTOS: DETAIL OF A PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY THE ATELIER D’ORA STUDIO OF EMILIE FLÖGE WEARING A DRESS DESIGNED BY EDUARD JOSEF WIMMER-WISGRILL AND JEWELRY FROM THE WIENER WERKSTÄTTE, 1910, COURTESY NEUE GALERIE NEW YORK; DAVID
HOCKNEY, “PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST (POOL WITH TWO FIGURES),” 1972, ©DAVID HOCKNEY, PHOTO: ART GALLERY OF NEW SOUTH WALES/JENNI CARTER; A 360-DEGREE MOUNTAINOUS LANDSCAPE SHOWCASING TOY TRAINS, MINIATURE FIGURES AND MODEL
BUILDINGS EVOKING THE 1890S, THE JERNI COLLECTION, NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY; “CHARLES DICKENS,” WOOD ENGRAVING, THE MORGAN LIBRARY & MUSEUM
The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).
National Museum of the American Indian
C0L561
2 Bowling Green, at Broadway, 212.514.3700.
nmai.si.edu. A branch of the Smithsonian
Institution, this museum in the Alexander
Hamilton U.S. Custom House promotes Native
American history, culture and arts. Su-W, F-Sa
10 am-5 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. Free. F23
The Jewish Museum 1109 Fifth Ave., at
92nd St., 212.423.3200. thejewishmuseum.org.
Art and artifacts showcase Jewish culture and
identity. Su-Tu, Sa 11 am-5:45 pm, Th 11 am-8 pm,
F 11 am-4 pm. $15 adults, $12 seniors (65+), $7.50
students, under 18 and Sa free, pay what you
wish Th 5-8 pm. G8
PHOTO: GRAHAM HABER, 2011; KENNY SCHARF, “HAVING FUN,” 1979, COLLECTION BRUNO TESTORE SCHMIDT, COURTESY THE ARTIST AND HONOR FRASER GALLERY, LOS ANGELES
3
Cooper Hewitt 2 E. 91st St., at Fifth Ave.,
212.849.8400. cooperhewitt.org. Located in the
former residence of Andrew Carnegie, this
Smithsonian museum uses groundbreaking
technology to create interactive exhibits on
historic and contemporary design. Su-F 10
am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-9 pm. $18 adults, $12
seniors (62+), $9 students, under 18 free, pay
what you wish Sa 6-9 pm. F9
Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration05 libertyellisfoundation.org. Visitors seeking
their immigrant heritage are welcomed on this
historic island in New York Harbor, adjacent to
the Statue of Liberty, to view exhibits and search
archives. Open daily. Free.
Fraunces Tavern Museum 0316 54 Pearl St.,
at Broad St., 212.425.1778. frauncestavern
museum.org. Built in 1719, the building showcases Revolutionary War-era manuscripts, art,
memorabilia and meticulously recreated period
rooms. M-F noon-5 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-5 pm. $7
adults, $4 seniors (65+)/children 6-18/students,
children 5 and under free. F23
The Frick Collection 1 E. 70th St., btw
Madison & Fifth aves., 212.288.0700. frick.org.
Paintings by old masters are on display in the
palatial former home of industrialist Henry Clay
Frick. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. $22
adults, $17 seniors (65+), $12 students, pay what
you wish W 2-6 pm. Children under 10 are not
admitted. G11
Guggenheim MuseumC0L136 1071 Fifth Ave., at
89th St., 212.423.3500. guggenheim.org. A major
architectural icon of the 20th century, Frank Lloyd
Wright’s spiraling landmark building houses a
collection of modern and contemporary art, as
well as temporary exhibitions. Su-W & F 10
am-5:45 pm, Sa 10 am-7:45 pm. $25 adults, $18
seniors (65+)/students (with ID), under 12 free,
pay what you wish Sa 5:45-7:45 pm. G8
The Metropolitan Museum of Art 1000 Fifth
Ave., at 82nd St., 212.535.7710. metmuseum.org.
Renowned for its encyclopedic collections of
American, European, Oriental, Oceanic, Islamic
and ancient arts. Su-Th 10 am-5:30 pm, F-Sa 10
am-9 pm. Suggested admission (which includes
same-day admission to the museum’s two
satellites: The Met Breuer and The Met Cloisters):
$25 adults, $17 seniors (65+), $12 students,
children under 12 with an adult free. G9
The Morgan Library & Museum 225 Madison
Ave., at E. 36th St., 212.685.0008. themorgan.org.
An Italian Renaissance-style palazzo, once the
library of financier Pierpont Morgan, contains rare
books, manuscripts, drawings, prints and other
treasures. Tu-Th 10:30 am-5 pm, F 10:30 am-9
pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. $20 adults,
$13 seniors (65+)/students/ages 13-16, under 12
with adult and F 7-9 pm free. F15
The Museum at FIT C0L531S
6 eventh Ave., at W. 27th
St., 212.217.4558. fitnyc.edu/museum. Fashion is
celebrated through public programs and
exhibitions of contemporary and historic
clothing, avant-garde accessories, textiles and
other visual materials. Tu-F noon-8 pm, Sa 10
am-5 pm. Free. H16
The Museum of Modern Art 11 W. 53rd St.,
btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.708.9400. moma.org.
World-renowned modern and contemporary
works, including masterpieces of sculpture,
drawing, painting, photography and film, are in
the permanent collection. M-Th, Su 10:30
am-5:30 pm, F-Sa 10:30 am-9 pm. $25 adults, $18
seniors (65+), $14 students, children under 16
and F 4-9 pm free. G13
Museum of the City of New YorkC0L5914 1220 Fifth
Ave., at 103rd St., 212.534.1672. mcny.org. NYC is
on display in paintings, photographs and artifacts.
The permanent exhibition, “New York at Its Core,”
is a three-gallery, high-tech look at the city’s
400-year history. Daily 10 am-6 pm. Suggested
admission: $18 adults, $12 seniors/students,
under 19 free. F7
National September 11 Memorial &
MuseumC0L415879 Museum entrance at 180 Greenwich
St., btw Liberty & Fulton sts., 212.312.8800.
911memorial.org. The memorial features
waterfalls set within the footprints of the Twin
Towers, which were destroyed in terrorist attacks
on Sept. 11, 2001. Memorial: Daily 7:30 am-9 pm.
Free. Museum: Su-Th 9 am-8 pm (last entry 6
pm), F-Sa 9 am-9 pm (last entry 7 pm). Museum
admission: $24 adults, $18 seniors (65+), U.S.
veterans, college students, $15 children 7-17,
children under 6 and Tu 5-8 pm free. G22
Neue Galerie New York C0L1
457 048 Fifth Ave., at
86th St., 212.628.6200. neuegalerie.org. The
elegant town-house museum is dedicated to
20th-century German and Austrian fine and
decorative art and design by Gustav Klimt, Egon
Schiele, Otto Dix and others. Th-M 11 am-6 pm.
$20 adults, $15 seniors (65+), $10 students,
first F of the month 6-8 pm free. Children under
12 not admitted, children 12-16 must be
accompanied by an adult. G9
New Museum C0L57235 Bowery, btw Rivington &
Stanton sts., 212.219.1222. newmuseum.org.
Contemporary cutting-edge art in a variety of
mediums by American and international artists.
Tu-W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm. $18
adults, $15 seniors (65+), $12 students, under
18 free, pay what you wish Th 7-9 pm. D20
New-York Historical Society Museum &
Library C0L51
8 70 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder
Way (W. 77th St.), 212.873.3400. nyhistory.org.
Objects and works of art with a focus on the
rich history of New York. Tu-Th, Sa 10 am-6 pm,
F 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. $21 adults, $16
seniors/educators/active military, $13
students, $6 children 5-13, children under 4
free, pay what you wish F 6-8 pm. I10
Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort St., btw Greenwich & West sts.,
212.570.3600. whitney.org. More than 50,000
square feet of indoor galleries and 13,000
square feet of outdoor exhibition space are
devoted to American art and artists. M, W-Th,
Su 10:30 am-6 pm, F-Sa 10:30 am-10 pm. $25
adults, $18 seniors (65+)/students, children under
18 free, pay what you wish F 7-10 pm. I18
ATTRACTIONS
Downton Abbey: The Exhibition 218 W.
57th, btw Seventh Ave. & Broadway, 866.811.4111.
downtonexhibition.com. The Emmy Award-winning television show comes alive in an
exhibition that transports fans to post-Edwardian England and the iconic country house.
Featured are memorable moments from the
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
61
museums+attractions
museums+attractions
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum C0L3276Pier 86,
12th Ave., at W. 46th St., 212.245.0072. intrepid
museum.org. A national historic landmark, the
USS Intrepid aircraft carrier offers access to
several decks featuring historic aircraft,
multimedia presentations, interactive exhibits
and flight simulators, plus the guided missile
submarine USS Growler, the British Airways
Concorde and the space shuttle Enterprise.
Daily 10 am-5 pm. General admission: $33
adults, $31 seniors (65+), $24 children 5-12,
children 4 and under, veterans and active-duty
personnel free. K14
museums+attractions
show’s six seasons and displays devoted to the
characters, their clothes and way of life, as well
as the social history and culture of the period.
Daily 10 am-8 pm. $30 adults, $28 seniors
(65+), $15 children 4-12. H12
Empire State Building ExperienceC0L3487 350 Fifth
Ave., btw 33rd & 34th sts., 212.736.3100. esbnyc
.com. Views of New York City and beyond from
the 86th- and 102nd-floor indoor and outdoor
observatories. Daily 8 am-2 am. Main deck (86th
floor) admission: $36 adults, $34 seniors (62+),
$30 children 6-12, children under 5 free. Main &
top decks (86th floor & 102nd floor) admission:
$56 adults, $54 seniors (62+), $50 children 6-12,
children under 5 free. G15
Encounter: Ocean Odyssey 226 W. 44th St.,
btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 646.308.1337.
natgeoencounter.com. National Geographic’s
immersive experience is an underwater
walk-through adventure that takes explorers
into the depths of the Pacific Ocean, where
they encounter humpback whales, great white
sharks, sea lions and other creatures. The
journey, using state-of-the-art digital technology, animation and projections, lasts approximately 90 minutes. Su-Th 10 am-10:30 pm, F-Sa
10 am-midnight (last ticket sold one hour
before closing). Reserved tickets (buy in
advance and choose guaranteed entry time):
$39.50 adults, $36.50 seniors (65+), $32.50
children (12 and under). H14
The High Line C0L568G
1 ansevoort to W. 34th sts., btw
10th & 12th aves., 212.500.6035. thehighline.org.
The 1.45-mile-long elevated park and promenade, reclaimed from derelict freight railway
tracks, is one of the city’s most popular
attractions, offering views of the skyline and
Chelsea neighborhood, plus perennial gardens
and art displays by notable contemporary
artists. Daily 7 am-7 pm. Free. J15-J18
One World Observatory One World Trade
Center, 285 Fulton St., entrance to the observatory is on West St., at Vesey St., 844.696.1776.
oneworldobservatory.com. The indoor observatory is located on the 100th, 101st and 102nd
floors of the tallest building in the Western
Hemisphere—1,250 feet above street level.
Dining options available, plus a gift shop. Daily
9 am-8 pm (last ticket sold at 7:15 pm). $34
adults, $32 seniors (65+), $28 children 6-12,
children 5 and under free. G22
Statue of Liberty libertyellisfoundation.org.
The copper-clad neoclassical statue in New
York Harbor, designed by Frédéric Auguste
Bartholdi and a gift from France to the United
States in 1886, is a symbol of freedom and
democracy. Open daily. Free.
Top of the Rock C30
0L57 Rockefeller Plz., W. 50th St.,
btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.698.2000. topofthe
rocknyc.com. Panoramic vistas of the city some
70 floors above the ground. Daily 8 am-midnight
(last elevator ascends at 11:15 pm). $34 adults,
$32 seniors (62+), $28 children 6-12. The “Sun &
Stars” combination ticket allows visitors to enjoy
Top of the Rock twice in one day: $49 adults, $47
seniors, $43 children 6-12. G13
62
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
galleries+antiques
FOR MORE ART, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC
PHOTOS: KÄTHE KOLLWITZ, “WORKING WOMAN WITH BLUE SHAWL,” 1903, COURTESY GALERIE ST. ETIENNE; DANA OLDFATHER, “PORCH LIGHTS ON,” 2017, COURTESY KATHRYN MARKEL FINE ARTS; HAYV KAHRAMAN,
“MNEMONIC ARTIFACT 6,” 2017, COURTESY THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY
galleries+antiques
The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).
2
1
3
1 The exhibition, “All Good Art Is Political: Käthe
Kollwitz and Sue Coe,” on view thru Feb. 10,
includes more than 30 drawings and prints
by Kollwitz (1867–1945), including “Working
Woman With Blue Shawl” (pictured, 1903); and
in excess of 30 paintings, drawings and prints
by Coe (b. 1951). | Galerie St. Etienne, p. 64
2 Participating in the group show, ”Echoes,”
thru Dec. 23, is Dana Oldfather, whose frenetic
abstract forms in “Porch Lights On” from
2017 echo her energetic, often chaotic inner
life. | Kathryn Markel Fine Arts, p. 64 3
“Re-weaving Migrant Inscriptions,” thru Dec.
20, is Baghdad-born, Los Angeles-based Hayv
Kahraman’s third solo show at this gallery’s W.
24th St. space. | Jack Shainman Gallery, p. 64
ANTIQUES
Argosy Book Store C0L31
8 16 E. 59th St., btw
Lexington & Park aves., 212.753.4455. argosy
books.com. This family-owned shop offers
antiquarian and out-of-print books, antique
maps and historical autographs. Specialties
include modern first editions, Americana,
autographs and the history of science and
medicine. M-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-5 pm. F12
Hyde Park Antiques C0L658
7 36 Broadway, btw E.
12th & E. 13th sts., 212.477.0033.hydeparkan
tiques.com. Fine English furniture from the 18th
and early 19th centuries, with an emphasis on
the Georgian and Regency periods. Comple-
menting the furniture are examples of Chinese
export porcelain and English ceramics, plus
sporting and marine art, landscapes and still
lifes. M-F 9 am-5 pm. F18
James Robinson Inc. C0L58480 Park Ave., at E. 58th
St., 212.752.6166. jrobinson.com. English and
Continental silver, porcelain and glass
(16th-18th centuries), antique and Art Deco
jewelry. Handmade sterling silver flatware is
also available. M-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa 10:30
am-4:30 pm. F12
Karl Kemp Antiques C0L58236 E. 10th St., btw
Broadway & University Pl., 212.254.1877.
karlkemp.com. Biedermeier, Art Deco and
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
63
galleries+antiques
neoclassical furniture and accessories. M-F 10
am-5:30 pm, Sa noon-5 pm. F18
Lost City Arts C0L961
3 8 Cooper Sq., btw E. 4th & E.
5th sts., 212.375.0500. lostcityarts.com.
Internationally sourced 20th-century furniture,
lighting and accessories are the stock-in-trade
at this store, in business since 1982. M-F 10
am-6 pm, Sa noon-6 pm. E18
Macklowe Gallery C0L28164
5 45 Park Ave., btw E. 56th
& E. 57th sts., 212.644.6400. macklowegallery
.com. Museum-quality Tiffany lamps, floor
lamps and chandeliers; French Art Nouveau
treasures, including cameo glass, ceramic
earthenware and furniture; antique and estate
jewelry. M-F 10:30 am-6 pm. F13
Maison Gerard C0L59343-53 E. 10th St., btw
Broadway & University Pl., 212.674.7611.
maisongerard.com. Fine French Art Deco
furniture, lighting and objets d’art. M-F 10 am6 pm. F18
The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center
C0L51
9 050 Second Ave., at E. 55th St., 212.355.4400.
the-maac.com. More than 100 established
galleries on three levels offer an encyclopedic
selection of antiques, fine art, decorative
accessories, silver and jewelry from the
Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia. M-Sa 10:30
am-6 pm, Su noon-6 pm. E13
Mantiques Modern C0L4151
87 46 W. 22nd St., btw Sixth
& Seventh aves., 212.206.1494. mantiquesmod
ern.com. An inventory of mostly 20th-century
design and industrial objects, such as a 1920s
French mail-sorter desk, as well as vintage
jewelry, luggage and home decor and
accessories. M-F 10:30 am-6:30 pm, Sa-Su 11
am-7 pm. G16
Ralph M. Chait Galleries, Inc. C0L11
5 6 E. 52nd St.,
10th fl., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.397.2818.
rmchait.com. A large inventory of fine antique
Chinese porcelain works of art. M-F 10 am-6
pm, Sa by appointment. F13
Showplace Antique + Design Center C0L194
5 0 W.
25th St., btw Broadway & Sixth Ave.,
212.633.6063. nyshowplace.com. More than 200
antiques dealers on four floors exhibit
European and American furniture, art glass,
textiles, silver, fine and costume jewelry,
pottery, vintage clothing and more. M-F 10
am-6 pm, Sa-Su 8:30 am-5:30 pm. G16
ART GALLERIES
Booth Gallery 325 W. 38th St., btw Eighth &
Ninth aves., 646.902.4566. paulboothgallery.com.
The gallery represents and shows local and
international artists who strike a balance
between content and form, research and
communication. On exhibit thru Jan. 13: “The
New Baroque.” Tu-Sa 1-9 pm. I15
Castelli Gallery C0L531
4 8 E. 77th St., btw Madison &
Fifth aves., 212.249.4470. castelligallery.com.
Founded by the late Leo Castelli in 1957, the
gallery remains committed to postwar pop,
minimal and conceptual American art. On
exhibit thru Feb. 10: “Found, Made, Cast:
Sculptures by Nancy Graves, Jasper Johns and
Roy Lichtenstein.” Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. F10
64
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
Company 88 Eldridge St., 5th fl., btw Hester &
Grand sts., 646.756.4547. companygallery.us. The
contemporary art gallery represents Yve Laris
Cohen, Barbara Hammer, Raúl de Nieves and
Cajsa von Zeipel. On exhibit Dec. 3-Jan. 21:
“Troy Michie.” W-Su noon-6 pm. D20
Forum Gallery C0L4
5127 75 Park Ave., at E. 57th St.,
212.355.4545. forumgallery.com. Modern
(1900–1945), postwar and contemporary
figurative art by artists such as William
Beckman and Tula Telfair. On exhibit thru Jan. 6:
“Favorite Things: A Holiday Exhibition.” Tu-Sa 10
am-5:30 pm. F12
Franklin Parrasch Gallery C0L694253 E. 64th St., btw
Park & Madison aves., 212.246.5360. franklin
parrasch.com. Many of the artists represented
are from California and rose to prominence in
the 1960s and 1970s. On exhibit thru Dec. 23:
“Tony DeLap: A Career Survey, 1963–2016.”
Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. F11
Gagosian Gallery C0L155
3 22 W. 21st St., btw 10th &
11th aves., 212.741.1717. gagosian.com. The New
York outpost of a global gallery—owned by
Larry Gagosian, considered by many to be a
kingmaker in the art world—holds exhibitions
of paintings, sculpture, photography and
installations by postwar American and
European artists. On exhibit thru Dec. 22:
“Douglas Gordon: Back and Forth and Forth and
Back.” Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. J17
Galerie St. Etienne C0L522
18 4 W. 57th St., 8th fl., btw
Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.245.6734. gseart.com.
Specializing in Austrian and German Expressionist artists, such as Otto Dix, Egon Schiele
and Emil Nolde, this gallery is also a showcase
for self-taught and outsider artists like
Grandma Moses. Tu-Sa 11 am-5 pm. G13
Hauser & Wirth C0L46532 E. 69th St., btw Park &
Madison aves., 212.794.4970, F11; 548 W. 22nd
St., btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.790.3900, J16.
hauserwirth.com. With branches in Zürich,
London and L.A., this gallery represents artists
such as Paul McCarthy, Ian Wallace, Pipilotti
Rist and Dan Graham. On exhibit thru Dec. 23 at
32 E. 69th St.: “Ardent Nature: Arshile Gorky
Landscapes, 1943–47.” On exhibit thru Dec. 23
at 548 W. 22nd St.: “David Smith: Origins &
Innovations” and “Geta Bratescu: The Leaps of
Aesop.” Both galleries: Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm.
Jack Shainman Gallery C0L3264513 W. 20th St., btw
10th & 11th aves., J17; 524 W. 24th St., btw 10th &
11th aves., J16. Phone for both: 212.645.1701.
jackshainman.com. Photographs, videos,
paintings and sculpture by artists from Africa,
East Asia and North America. Both galleries:
Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm.
Kathryn Markel Fine Arts C0L643529 W. 20th St.,
Ste. 6W, btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.366.5368.
markelfinearts.com. Abstract and contemporary
paintings and works on paper from emerging
and established artists, including Lisa Breslow
and Tracey Adams, are exhibited here, with
compositions ranging from bold, colorful and
geometric to minimal, sinuous and organic.
Tu-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 11 am-6 pm. J17
Leila Heller Gallery 568 W. 25th St., btw 10th
& 11th aves., 212.249.7695. leilahellergallery.com.
Opera Gallery C0L67
5741 91 Madison Ave., at E. 67th St.,
646.707.3299. operagallery.com. The international gallery, with branches in New York,
Miami, London, Dubai, Hong Kong and other
capitals, showcases 19th- and 20th-century
masterworks by Picasso, Dubuffet, Warhol and
Chagall, as well as works by emerging
contemporary artists. M-Sa 10 am-7 pm, Su 11
am-6 pm. F11
Shoot the Lobster 138 Eldridge St., btw
Broome & Delancey sts., 212.560.0670. shootthe
lobster.com. The semi-subterranean project
space is located in a former fish market. On
exhibit thru Dec. 22: “To a Body.” Th-Su noon-6
pm. D20
Staley-Wise Gallery C0L651
2 00 Crosby St., Ste. 305,
btw Spring & Prince sts., 212.966.6223. staley
wise.com. Historical and contemporary fashion
photography and celebrity portraiture by such
artists as Bert Stern, Steven Klein, Herb Ritts,
David LaChapelle, Lillian Bassman and Slim
Aarons. On exhibit thru Jan. 20: “Sheila
Metzner: From Life.” Tu-Sa 11 am-5 pm. F19
Susan Eley Fine Art C0L649146 W. 90th St., 2nd fl., btw
Central Park West & Columbus Ave., 917.952.7641.
susaneleyfineart.com. This townhouse gallery
provides a salon setting in which to view
paintings, prints, photographs and sculpture by
emerging and midcareer artists. On exhibit thru
Dec. 28: “The Colors of Jazz: New Paintings by
Carlos Puyol.” Tu-Th 11 am-5 pm, and by
appointment. I8
Van Doren Waxter C0L463723 E. 73rd St., btw Madison
& Fifth aves., 212.445.0444, F11; 195 Chrystie St.,
btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 212.982.1930, D19.
vandorenwaxter.com. The gallery, located in an
Upper East Side town house and on the Lower
East Side, offers a multigenerational program of
established and emerging international artists.
On exhibit thru Jan. 20 at 23 E. 73rd St.:
“Richard Diebenkorn: Works on Paper
1955–1967.” Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. On exhibit thru
Dec. 22 at 195 Chrystie St.: “Brian Rochefort:
HotSpots.” Tu-Sa 11 am-6 pm.
AUCTION HOUSES
Bonhams C0L5
1574 80 Madison Ave., btw E. 56th & E.
57th sts., 212.644.9001. bonhams.com. An
esteemed auction house dealing in the
appraisal and sale of fine art, antiques and
more. Dec. 4: The Art of Time; Fine Jewelry. Dec.
5: Modern & Contemporary Prints & Multiples.
Dec. 6: History of Science and Technology. Dec. 6:
Voices of the 20th Century. Dec. 11: Coins and
Christie’s C0L5724120 Rockefeller Plz., btw Fifth & Sixth
aves., 212.636.2000. christies.com. A prestigious
auctioneer of fine art and antiques since the
18th century. Dec. 5: Fine Printed Books and
Manuscripts, including Americana. Dec. 6:
Magnificent Jewels. Dec. 7: Watches; Russian
America Polar Exploration: Highlights From the
Martin Greene Library. Dec. 8: Finest and Rarest
Wines: A Study in Distinction. Dec. 9: Finest
Wines and Spirits, featuring an exceptional collection and rarities from the cellars of Champagne
Charles Heidsieck. Dec. 12-13: Interiors. Dec. 14:
Design. G13
galleries+antiques
Marlborough Contemporary C0L648545 W. 25th St.,
btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.463.8634. marlbor
oughcontemporary.com. This is the downtown
location of a leading international dealer in
modern and contemporary art with galleries in
London and Spain. On exhibit thru Dec. 23:
“Brian Fahlstrom: Truth in the Night.” Tu-Sa 10
am-6 pm. J16
Medals. Dec. 14: Modern Decorative Art &
Design. F13
Doyle New York C0L51
7431 75 E. 87th St., btw Third &
Lexington aves., 212.427.2730. doylenewyork
.com. The auction house sells fine art, jewelry,
furniture and more. Dec. 6: Doyle at Home. Dec.
13: Important Jewelry. Dec. 14: Photographs. E9
Phillips C0L968450 Park Ave., btw E. 56th & E. 57th sts.,
212.940.1300. phillips.com. This well-established
auction house, founded in London in 1796,
specializes in contemporary art, photographs,
editions, design, watches and jewelry. Dec. 12:
Design and “Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Eye of the
Century—Personal Photographs From the
Collection of Peter Fetterman.” F13
Sotheby’s C0L1
2315 334 York Ave., at E. 72nd St.,
212.606.7000. sothebys.com. Fine art and
collectibles go on the block at this longstanding
auction house. Dec. 2: Finest and Rarest Wines.
Dec. 4: Couture Fashion Jewelry: The Personal
Archive of Shaun Leane. Dec. 5: Magnificent
Jewels. Dec. 6: Important Watches. Dec. 7: Fine
Jewels. Dec. 11: Fine Books & Manuscripts. Dec.
12: History of Science and Technology. Dec. 13:
Tiffany: Dreaming in Glass; Important Design;
Masterworks by Tiffany Studios: The William A.
Richardson Collection. Dec. 20: Important
Judaica; Israeli and International Art. C8
Swann Auction Galleries C0L1
4687 04 E. 25th St., btw
Lexington & Park aves., 212.254.4710. swanngal
leries.com. A family-owned auction house
specializing in rare and antiquarian books and
works on paper. Dec. 5: Maps and Atlases,
Natural History and Color Plate Books. Dec. 14:
Illustration Art. F16
SPECIAL SHOWS
Holiday House NYC Academy Mansion, 2 E.
63rd St., btw Madison & Fifth aves. holidayhouse
nyc.com. (Thru Dec. 6) More than 15 interior
designers, inspired by holiday themes,
transform a four-story limestone mansion and
its 20 rooms into a luxuriously appointed
showcase. The show benefits The Breast
Cancer Research Foundation. Daily 11 am-5 pm,
Th 11 am-8 pm. $40. F12
McDermott & McGough: The Oscar Wilde
Temple The Church of the Village, 201 W. 13th
St., at Seventh Ave. oscarwildetemple.org. (Thru
Dec. 7) The installation by collaborative artists
David McDermott and Peter McGough honors
one of the earliest heroes of gay liberation and
equal rights. Tu-Sa noon-7 pm. Free. H17
Jewelry from Kenneth James Collection
Gallery 47 (212) 888-0165
The gallery, which also has a location in Dubai,
represents Western and Middle Eastern artists;
it is also active in the American, European and
Middle Eastern secondary art markets. On
exhibit thru Dec. 24: “Ran Hwang: Sacred
Space.” Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. J16
Historical Design
Fine Art | Jewelry
Contemporary Art
Silver | Antiques
and more...
1050 2nd Ave b/t 55th St & 56th St.
New York | NY 10022
212.355.4400 | info@the-maac.com
www.the-maac.com
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
MAAC_INNY_OCT_2017_thirdpage.indd 1
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30.10.17 18:18
transportation+tours
FOR MORE ON WHAT TO DO, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC
The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 68-70).
M & V Limousines 631.543.0908,
800.498.5788. mvlimo.com. This limousine
company offers transportation for weddings,
nights on the town, airports and more. Choose
from a variety of vehicles, including antique
cars and luxury buses.
Metro-North Railroad C0L52
18 12.532.4900. mta
.info/mnr. Commuter trains operate daily from 4
am to 2 am, arriving and departing from Grand
Central Terminal. F14
New Jersey Transit C0L4851 973.275.5555. njtransit
.com. Trains, buses and airport connections, all
with online ticketing options to various cities
and towns throughout New Jersey, including
most cities on the Jersey Shore.
New York Water Taxi C0L2
\5246 12.742.1969.
nywatertaxi.com. Commuter taxis cruise the
Hudson and East rivers daily. All-Day Access
Pass: $31 adults, $19 children 3-12. Routes/
times vary.
NYC Ferry ferry.nyc. This ferry service,
operated by Hornblower, offers transportation
along the East River to and from Lower
Manhattan and Midtown and also parts of
Brooklyn and Queens, with more routes being
developed. Vessels offer charging stations,
Wi-Fi and concessions. Adult one-way ticket,
$2.75. Tickets can be bought through the NYC
Ferry app, the website or at a ticket vending
machine, available at all of the ferry landings.
Clark Griswold has nothing on The Original
Christmas Lights Tour of Dyker Heights.
The bus ride to Dyker Heights entertains
with vintage Christmas television specials
including Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby,
and, once there, you‘ll be wowed by the
over-the-top holiday decorations. | A Slice
of Brooklyn Bus Tours, p. 67 .
TRANSPORTATION
Amtrak C0L800.872.7245. amtrak.com. Penn
Station, Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts.,
212.630.6400. Guests travel in comfort on these
passenger trains, stopping at stations throughout
the country. Refreshments are available on most
trains. I15
Carmel Car & Limousine Service C0L5234
212.666.6666. carmellimo.com. Luxury sedans
(late-model Lincoln Town Cars), limos, minivans
and large passenger vans (that can hold up to
40 customers) are all available by the hour and
for airport transportation.
Charge & Ride, Inc. C0L4137
8 18.392.5200. charge
andride.com. Passengers can ride in luxury
sedans, SUVs, limos and buses to any
destination in the New York metro area.
Services are available 24/7.
Commonwealth Limo C0L48
7162 00.558.5466.
commonwealthlimo.com. Luxury chauffeured
transportation throughout the NYC metro area
66
offering a variety of vehicles, such as stretch
limousines and executive vans.
Empire CLS C0L419 888.826.3431. empirecls.com.
Uniformed drivers chauffeur executives,
dignitaries and celebrities around town and to
and from airports. The fleet includes the latest
models of Lincoln Town Cars, Navigators,
Mercedes-Benz sedans, stretch limos, buses
and minivans, many of which are hybrid and
alternative fuel vehicles.
Go Airlink NYC C0L212.812.9000.
6154
goairlinkshuttle
.com. Door-to-door shuttles and rides in
late-model vans, SUVs and sedans to and from
JFK, LaGuardia and Newark terminals for
individuals, groups and charters. For reservations, call 877.599.8200.
Lincoln Limousine 718.728.5466. lincolnlimou
sine.com. Pick from a fleet of vehicles that
include luxury sedans, stretch and superstretch limos, chauffeured SUVs and more for
trips to various tristate area destinations.
Private tours of the city’s most well-known
sights and attractions are also available.
Long Island Rail Road mta.info/lirr. Operates
24 hours a day, seven days a week (including all
holidays), taking visitors from Penn Station or
Jamaica, Queens, to more than 100 destinations throughout Long Island. For pricing and
schedules, go online or call 511 and say “LIRR”
at any time.
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
Penn Station C0L5E
213 ighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W.
33rd sts., 212.630.6401. amtrak.com. Subways
converge with commuter rail and bus services
to New Jersey and Long Island and national rail
services. I15
Port Authority Bus Terminal C0L526
13 25 Eighth Ave.,
btw W. 40th & W. 42nd sts., 800.221.9903. panynj
.gov/bus-terminals/port-authority-bus-terminal
.html. Bus carriers available at this terminal
include New Jersey Transit, Greyhound and
ShortLine Bus. Three levels include shops and
restaurants. H14
Statue Cruises C0L511
4 .877.523.9849. statuecruises
.com. Ferries carry visitors to the Statue of
Liberty National Monument 100 times a week.
Daily departure times from Battery Park vary.
Crown reserve tickets: $21 adults, $17 seniors
(62+), $12 children ages 4-12. Audio tour
included. F24
TOURS
Big Apple Greeter C0L9b
518 igapplegreeter.org. Local
volunteers highlight the ins and outs of New
York City when they lead free two-to-four-hour
jaunts tailored to your interests. Tours must be
booked three weeks in advance. For more
information, call 212.669.8159.
Big Bus Tours bigbustours.com. Visitors can
see NYC’s most famous attractions, including
the Empire State Building and the Statue of
excursions offer visitors an inside look at
Lincoln Center. Daily; times vary. $25 adults,
$20 students under 30. I12
Citifari citifari.com. Visitors can strap on a
camera and capture the Big Apple’s most
stunning sites on 2 1/2-hour walking tours. The
professional photographers who guide the
tours scout out the best vantage points and
share tips and techniques for getting the best
shot, day or night. Tour locations include SoHo,
Central Park and several other picturesque
points. $69-99 per person. Dates/times vary.
Madison Square Garden All-Access Tour
C0L64589Seventh Ave., at W. 33rd St., 212.465.6080.
thegarden.com. This tour goes behind the
scenes of the revamped arena, including the
locker rooms and a gallery of famous photos
from the Garden’s photo archives. Check
website for varied hours and prices. H15
Citysightseeing Cruises New York Pier 78,
455 12th Ave., at W. 38th St., 212.445.7599.
citysightseeingnewyork.com. Sightseeing cruises
include a twilight sail, a skyline cruise and a
hop-on, hop-off sightseeing ferry. Times/prices/
packages vary. K15
Foods of NY Tours C0L7914 212.913.9964. foodsofny
.com. These walking, tasting and cultural tours
offer a look at NYC’s various neighborhoods,
restaurants and markets. Tours include Original
Greenwich Village (historic mom-and-pop
specialty food shops), Chelsea Market and the
High Line (NYC’s famous indoor food market,
the Meatpacking District and the High Line),
Gourmet Chinatown (sit-down dining featuring
upscale Asian eats) and The Best of Brooklyn (a
history and gastronomy lesson complete with
Brooklyn Bridge views). Times/prices vary.
Grand Central Terminal Audio Tour C0L4588
37 9 E.
42nd St., at Park Ave., 917.566.0008. grand
centralterminal.com. Learn the secrets and
compelling history of the famous transportation hub with this one-hour, self-guided audio
tour, available on a device from Orpheo. $9
adults, $7 seniors/disabled, students/children.
Pickup from GCT Tour Window on the Main
Concourse. F14
Gray Line New York C0L516Buses leave from the
Gray Line New York Visitor Center, 777 Eighth
Ave., btw W. 47th & W. 48th sts., 212.445.0848.
newyorksightseeing.com. Sightseeing tours by
bus, boat and helicopter let visitors discover
NYC’s iconic sites. Prices vary. H14
Ground Zero Tour 646.801.9113. 911ground
zero.com. Guided, two-hour walking tours offer
a deeper understanding of the Sept. 11, 2001,
terrorist attacks. The stroll includes skip-theline access to the National September 11
Memorial & Museum. Daily tours at 10:30 am
and 2 pm. Prices vary. G22
Harlem Gospel and Jazz Tours C0L4835690 Eighth
Ave., btw W. 43rd & W. 44th sts., 212.391.0900.
harlemspirituals.com. Visitors take in Manhattan’s largest neighborhood, touring a Baptist
church and hearing inspiring spirituals. Times/
prices vary. I14
Lincoln Center Tours C0L68942David Rubenstein
Atrium, Broadway, btw W. 62nd & W. 63rd sts.,
212.875.5350. lincolncenter.org/tours. Guided
visit the former sites of rock clubs like DBGB’s)
and The Beatles Tour (where you will visit
Strawberry Fields—the memorial to John
Lennon—and Carnegie Hall, where the Beatles
performed. Times/prices vary.
Metro NYC Tours C0L5846 516.652.4527. metronyc
tours.com. This tour company, founded by Robin
London, a third generation native New Yorker
and professionally licensed New York City tour
guide, offers a wide variety of tours around the
city, including all-day private tours, half-day
vehicle tours, a Gangster and Crime Tour,
Greenwich Village, Lower East Side and
Chinatown Food Tours and others.
New York Holiday Lights and Movie Sites
Bus Tour 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W.
60th sts. getyourguide.com. Take a two-and-ahalf-hour guided bus tour of New York to see its
spectacular holiday lights and movie sites. See
the apartment where Buddy the Elf stayed in
“Elf;” relive a “Home Alone Christmas” moment
outside Rockefeller Center, plus lots more.
Meet your tour guide at 10 Columbus Cir., right
above the Williams Sonoma store on the 2nd
floor, facing the main entrance windows
overlooking the Visitor’s Desk on the left side.
Prices/times vary. I12
Onboard New York Sightseeing Tours
Seventh Ave. & Broadway at W. 53rd St.,
212.852.4821. newyorktours.onboardtours.com.
Guests and guides explore Central Park, Wall
Street, Times Square and other areas, both on
the tour bus and off. Times/schedules/prices
vary. H13
Real New York Tours realnewyorktours.com.
This highly rated tour offers up close and
personal tours of the city, including the Lower
East Side and Williamsburg, Brooklyn;
Morningside Heights and Harlem; six-hour tours
of the entire island from Central Park to
Chinatown; and more. Group tours are available
by subway and foot, and private tours are also
available. Prices and schedules vary.
Rockefeller Center Tours C0L586430 Rockefeller Plz.,
at W. 50th St., 212.698.2000. rockefeller
center.com The skating rink, statue of
Prometheus and more are featured on this
75-minute walking tour of the historic venue.
Opt for a scheduled or unscheduled tour. $25.
Times vary.
Rock Junket New York City’s Original
Rock ‘n’ Roll Walking Tour C0L4695 212.209.3370.
rockjunket.com. These tours take visitors to
famous rock music sites around NYC. Tours
include the East Village Punk ’n’ Rock Tour
(where you will learn about punk groups
including The Ramones, the New York Dolls and
Shady Ladies Tours 1000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd
St., 646.201.4848. shadyladiestours.com. This
tour group offers several tours, including the
Shady Ladies Tours and the Nasty Women Tour.
Tours take in a number of collections at the
Metropolitan Museum of Art and meet in the
lobby of the museum. For prices, meeting times
and more information, visit the website. G9
A Slice of Brooklyn Bus Tours C0L796 212.913.9917.
asliceofbrooklyn.com. Tours depart from
Manhattan and take visitors to iconic locations
and sites around this famous borough. This
month, you can see the most extravagant
display of Christmas lights in the country in the
Dyker Heights section of Brooklyn, now known
as the “Dyker Lights,” visited by over 100,000
people every year to view the over-the-top
decorations.
Style Room C0L4326225 W. 34th St., btw Seventh &
Eighth aves., 646.245.5316. styleroom.com.
Fashion expert Karen Parker O’Brien creates
personalized shopping tours that include VIP
access to designer showrooms. H15
Turnstile Tours 347.903.8687. turnstiletours
.com. Two-hour walking tours of Manhattan’s
Financial District or Midtown include some of
the finest street food the city has to offer. Each
tour includes 5-6 tastings from trucks and carts
that offer dishes such as falafel and lamb off
the bone, Korean short ribs, and Belgian
waffles. Prices, schedules/locations vary.
Viator Tours 888.651.9785. viator.com. This
huge tour company offers a wide variety of
tours. Choose from such tours as Mornings at
MoMA and EmptyMet Tour at the Metropolitan
Museum of Art, NYC Evening Helicopter Flight
and Statue of Liberty Cruise, and many others.
Walks of New York C0L4582 888.683.8671. walksofnewyork.com. This group offers immersive
walking explorations of New York City for
history and architecture buffs, along with
activity-driven excursions, such as photography
and dining tours. Price/dates/times/departure
points vary.
Woolworth Building 233 Broadway, New York,
NY 10007, 203.966.9663. woolworthtours.com.
Designed by architect Cass Gilbert between
1910 and 1912 as Frank W. Woolworth’s NYC
headquarters, the landmarked Woolworth
Building was once the tallest building in the
world. Long closed the the public, tours of the
magnificent vintage lobby are available. You
can opt for 30, 60 or 90-minute tours. Custom
tours and private group photographer tours are
also available. $20-$45. E21
INNEWYORK.COM | DECEMBER 2017 | IN NEW YORK
67
transportation+tours
Liberty, on this bus service, which offers fixed
loops and a hop-on, hop-off tours with 30
stops. Times/prices vary.
PARK
137 St
1
125 St
Claremont Ave
Riverside Dr
Henry Hudson Pkwy
Riverside Dr
RIVERSIDE PARK
1
New-York
Historical Society
The
Delacorte
Theater
Loeb
Boathouse
CENTRAL PARK
The Great
Lawn
85th St Transverse
Metropolitan
Museum of Art
Jewish Museum
Cooper Hewitt,
Smithsonian
Design Museum
Guggenheim
Museum
6
110 St
East Harlem
116 Street
6
103 St
6
77 St
E 79 St
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r
Gracie
Mansion
FD
JEFFERSON
PARK
RD
Triborough
Tri
Tr
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gh B
Br
Bridge
rid
idg
ge
ER
E 116 St (Luis Muñoz Marin Blvd)
E 118 St
E 120 St
RIV
E 76 St
UPPER EAST SIDE
Yorkville
86 St
Q
4•5•6
86 St
Carnegie
Hill
96 St
Q
96 St
6
6
M
E 125 St (Martin Luther King Blvd)
HA
RLE
THE BRONX
First Ave
W 77 St
1
79 St
Broadway
W 79 St
B• C
81 St
Central Park West
American Museum
of Natural History
/ Rose Center for
Earth & Space
B• C
86 St
Fifth Ave (Museum Mile)
W 82 St
Amsterdam Ave
WEST SIDE
Columbus Ave
UPPER
W 86 St
El Museo del Barrio
Museum of the
City of NY
Madison Ave
86 St
4•5•6
125 St
E 127 St
E 129 St
Park Ave
W 88 St
The Reservoir
Ave
CARL
SCHURZ
PARK
Dr
W 90 St
South Meadow
Tennis Courts
97th St Transverse
North Meadow
on
E 131 St
dis
138 St
Grand Concourse
e 4• 5
Third Ave
W 94 St
B• C
96 St
The
Pool
The Loch
Harlem
Meer
Conservatory
Garden
(110 St)
2•3
Central Park N
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Brid
Second Ave
W 92 St
West End Ave
1• 2 • 3
W 96 St
W 100 St
B• C
103 St
Block
House
Central Park North
MARCUS
GARVEY
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ridg
Madison Ave
96 St
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103 St
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2•3
116 St
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125 St
St B
Park Ave
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Amsterdam Ave
Lexington Ave
W 102 St
Morningside Ave
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Frederick Douglas Blvd
e
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A
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Av
1
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Cathedral
Pkwy (110 St)
las
o
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W 110 St Cathedral
Church
of St John
W 108 St The Divine
B• C
St
MORNINGSIDE
PARK
Studio
Museum
in
Harlem
Malcolm X. Blvd (Lenox Ave)
(110 St)
Broadway
116 St
Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd
W 113 St
125 St
A • B• C • D
Manhattan Ave
Morningside
Heights
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d)
145
Grand Concourse
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149 St
Lexington Ave
W 116 St
g Blv
Apollo
Theater
2•3
135 St
3
145 St
Fifth Ave
Columbia
University
r Kin
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Third Ave
Cathedral Pkwy
uthe
K
S PAR
CHOLA
ST. NI
Ave
Second Ave
Columbia Univ
1
tin L
HARLEM
Schomburg
Center for
Research in
Black Culture
Malcolm X. Blvd (Lenox Ave)
W 123 St
(Mar
W 129 St
B• C
135 St
148 St
3
Harlem
First Ave
116 St
145 St
A • B• C • D
City
College
nv
5 St
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Manhattanville
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Co
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City College
1
RIVERBANK
STATE
1
145 St
JACKIE
W 149 St
ROBINSON
PARK
W 147 St Hamilton Grange
Historic Monument
W 151 St
ird
ge
id
Broadway
Br
Amsterdam Ave
Th
icholas T er
.N
St
Av
e
Hamiolton Ter
ge
holas
Brid
St. Nic
Ave
Bradhurst Ave
Wil
lis
Frederick Douglas Blvd
Randall’s
Island
33 Rd
35 Ave
ND
N•W
N•W
N•W
36 Av
30 Av
Broadway
30 St
vd
Astoria Bl
Astoria Blvd
SO
U
34 Ave
31 Rd
31 Dr
30 Rd
30 Dr
NG
Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd
LO
H
21 St
Edgecomb Ave
r
ND
ve
Ri
ISL
A
m
FDR
31 St
32 St
le
ar
Dr
Bridge
Moving Imag
33 St
34 St
Robert F. Kennedy
11 St
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Ro
East End Ave
Seco
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Jogging Track
Amsterdam Ave
West End
Lincoln Tunnel
New York Water
W 44 St
Hell’s
Kitchen
W 23 St
Chelsea
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Meatpacking
District
Tenth Ave
A•C•E
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Joyce
Theater
C•E
23 St
34 St
Penn Station
A•C•E
Port Authority
Bus Terminal
A•C•E
42 St
Bethesda
Fountain
Loeb
Boathouse
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57 St
7 Av
8 Av L
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14 St
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18 St
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Madison
Square Garden
1•2•3
34 St-Penn
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Garment
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3•7
Sq
42 St
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14 St-Union Sq
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Lex Av/59 St
N•Q•R
Turtle Bay
E 28 St
Rose Hill
Murray Hill
Chrysler
Bldg
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3 Av
Gramercy
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GRAMERCY Park
PARK
23 St
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E 68 St
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Kips Bay
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Irving Pl
Park Ave S
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Ninth Ave
United
Nations
Br o
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dwa
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Forsyth
University Pl
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Pitt St
Ren
shi
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t
St
St
Norfolk
t
Essex S
St
Ave
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ric
Gay St
wic
ngt
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on
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St
Go
Chrystie
in
ry S
Willett
East BroadwayCl
Hen
Ja
ck
so
t
SEWARD PARK
n
e
50 Av
St
e
7
e
Paidge Av
n Ave
Borde
William
sburg
Bridge
N•W
39 Av
N • W• 7
T hom
Blv
d
Expwy
int A
ve
Grand St
S 1 St
N1 St
St
S8
St
S9
St
S 10
Ave
St
ion
S 11 D i v i s
S 4 St
S 2 St
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Williamsburg
N 5 St
N 4 St
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Lor
ime
r St
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bin y St
Ban
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ay
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Qu
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McCARREN
N 13 St
PARK
N 12 St
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Bedford Av
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Eck
Leo ford S
nar
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Long Island
Greenpoint
ens
rs Po
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Hunte
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Queensboro Plaza
E • M• R
45 RdCourthouse Sq
7
31 St
32 St
N•W
36 Av
Rev
BROOKLYN
he
iew
rt
No
33 St
34 St
QU E E N S
Queens
Plaza
Mc
Gu
ine
ss
St
Bl
y
vd
Cla nt St
o
t
p
S
Du gle n St
Ea ema St
Fre reen n St t
G ur o a S
H Indi St
t
va
Ja nt S Ave
Ke oint t
p
en lton S t
e
r
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Mi ble S
t
No
kS
Oa
St
h
As x St
Bo
Vernon Blvd
Jackson Ave
7
41 Ave
Hunterspoint Ave
P.S.
1
E•M
23 St Ely Ave
t Ave
44 Dr
e
45 Av
45 Rd
44 Av
Poin
47 R e
nters
48 Av Hu
Delancey St
Lower
East
Side
43 Ave
21 Street
Queensbridge
F
40 Ave
39 Ave
38 Ave
37 Ave
36 Ave
35 Ave
ve
e
uv
M
Ludlow
Canal St
Ridge St
Broome St
a St
Grand St
e
46 Av
46 Rd
e
47 Av
44 Rd
EAST
RIVER
PARK
Lewis S
Hester St
F• J • M• Z
Delancey StEssex St
St
Attorney
St
Clinton
Delancey St
Columbi
HAMILTON
FISH PARK
FDR Dr
Little Italy
Nolita
St
Rivington St
St
Orchard
t
Allen S
St
Eldridge
Suffolk
Stanton St
E Houston St
Alphabet
City
Ave D
Noho
Ave B
TOMPKINS
SQUARE
Ave A
East
Village
Queens-Midtown Tunnel
Queensboro Bridge
Ave C
GREENWICH VILLAGE
L
1 Av
F
Roosevelt
Island
Long
Island
City
t
tS
es
W
Soho
urt
West Village
Sutton
Place
Roosevelt Island Tram
E 63 St
E 65 St
Lenox Hill
72 St
Q
E 72 St
E 74 St
E 76 St
UPPER EAST SIDE
Lex Av/63 St
Third Ave
14 St
6 Av
Flatiron
District
F •M
23 St
6
68 St
42 St
S•4•5•6•7
UNION
SQUARE
MADISON
SQUARE
23 St PARK
W•R
Flatiron
Building
Empire
State Bldg
Midtown
South
B• D • F • M
W• N•Q•R
34 St
New York
Public Library
The Morgan
Library &
Museum
NY Waterway
Tours Bus Stop
5 Av
Midtown West
7
B• D • F • M BRYANT
PARK
42 St
Bryant Pk
District
6
10 St
77 St
Grand Central Terminal
Midtown
East
6
51 St
E•M
Lex Av/53 St
St. Patrick’s
Cathedral
Rockefeller
NY Waterway
50
Center
Tours Bus Stop
St
Radio
City
1
49 St
Music Hall
47-50 Sts
N • W• R
Diamond Rockefeller Ctr
District B• D • F • M
Times Theater
B• D • E
7 Av
F
57 St
4 5 6
•
59 St
•
The Met Breuer
Frick Collection
Museum of 5 Av/
Modern Art 53 St
(MoMA)
E•M
Central Park South
N • W• R
5 Av/59 St
Park
Zoo
Conservatory
Water
The
Pond
Carousel Wollman
Skating
Rink
Sheep
Meadow
Strawberry
Fields
The
Lake
Second Ave
Little W 12 St
E 12 St
Gre
W 12 St
t
Wa enwi
Whitney Museum sevoort S
ver ch A
ly P ve
Gan ratio St t
E 10 St
W
10
St
t
S
Ho ane S
l
Pier 52
Ble
J
W
Astor Pl yvesant
St
ec
4S
W 12 St
tu
6
k
S
t
e
e
t
W
8
St
n
St.
Mark’s
Pl
8 St-NYU
W 4 St
rS
kS
Bethu
t
Washington Mews W • R Astor Pl Cooper
Wash Sq
Ban 11 St
W
t Christopher St Washington Pl A • B• C • D WASHINGTON Waverly Pl
Union
E
6
St
S
ry
Sheridan Sq
E•F•M
t
Per les St
t
SQUARE
r
1 rce S es S t W 4 St
Cha 10 St
E 4 St
St
e on
t
S
New Broadway
S
W 3 St
e
m
W
r
a
J
liMinetta La
ov om
he
Great Jones St
e
r
p
o
York Lafayette St
G
C Bed
rn
Pier 46
ist
for Co
Chr
Bond St
E 2 St
St
University B• D • F • M
d
St
e
w
Barro
in St
Pier 45
Bleecker St
Bleecker
rm g
n St
Ca wninSt
Morto
St
t
S
Do
2 Av
Leroy
6
W Houston St
Houston St
Jersey St
ICP F
n St
Prince
St
1
Clarkso
Prince St
Museum
uston g St
o
H
St
W
Kin
t
Bowery
Spring
W•R
ton S
Pier 40
Charl
Spring
J•Z
t
Spring St
St
am S
St
Vand
C•E
St
are
Kenm
6
ick St
Broome St
Hornblower Cruises & Events
Domin
Grand St
Grand St
B• D
Map is not to scale.
Canal
tts St
a
S
t
W
nel
n
u
t
T
d
S
Canal
St
t Canal St
S
k
s
How
r
e
Hollan
ard
ss
St
Pier 32
1 Canal Yo W •J • N • Q • R • Z• 6
Desbro
St
Lispenard St
St
Vestry
Pier 61
Pier 60
Chelsea
Pier 63 Piers
Pier 64
34th St
Hudson Yards
7
Jacob K. Javits
Convention
Center
Pier 78
50 St
C•E
Gray Line
New York Sightseeing
Clinton
Circle Line Sightseeing 42nd St W 42 St
World Yacht Dining Cruises
W 40 St
NY Waterway Commuter Ferry
CitySightseeing Cruises
Pier 84 Taxi West 44th St
W 46 St
W 48 St
Intrepid Sea-Air-Space
Museum
W 53 St
W 50 St
DEWITT
CLINTON
PARK
W 55 St
W 57 St
1
66 St
B• C
72 St
American
Folk Art
Museum
Lincoln Center
1•2•3
72 St
DAMROSCH
PARK
59 St
Columbus Circle
A • B• C • D • 1
Museum
of Arts &
Design
Pier 90
Pier 96
W 60 St
W 62 St
W 65 St
W 70 St
W 72 St
W 74 St
New-York
Historical Society
First Ave
MacDougal St
13 St
1
Eighth Ave
Sullivan St
Sixth Ave
La Guardia Pl
24 St
Blvd
Vernon
9 St
10 St
21 St
22 St
23 St
St
Wooster St
e
Av
an
W 77 St
Fifth Ave
Thompson St
Dyer Ave
R
Kent A
Greene St
FDR Dr
Mercer St
ST
R
E
IV
Ave
Crosby St
2 St
Wythe
ay
l
ve
Cr
26 St
Ja
ck
so
nA
23 St
24 St
esce nt St
27 St
28 St
29 St
30 St
illm
12 St
l St
rcia
me
Twelfth Ave
Com
Eleventh Ave
Sk
Tenth Ave
t
Ninth Ave
rS
d
lye
Second Ave
Ca
Eighth Ave
EA
A
Central Park West
ad
n
le
West Side Hwy
Seventh Ave
Bro
y
wa
kli
ro
West End Ave
Sixth Ave
an
se
oa
Fifth Ave
Fr
Me
Madison Ave
Vanderbilt Ave
e
ve
Columbus Ave
Br
y
wa
Park Ave
Av
Berry
St
am Ave
Park Ave
n
Ave
Fifth Ave
Lexington Ave
ta
s Ave
Lexington Ave
Third Ave
at
Drigg
Third Ave
M
h
an
Bedford
Second Ave
First Ave
t
me
rS
t
Tay
lo
First Ave
Sutton Pl
5 St
tS
Cly
York Ave
n Blvd
rn
Blv
ve
Roosevelt Island
Verno
os
nA
9 St
11 St
ov
ma
12 St
t
21 S
Pr
No
r
11 St
Pl
30
St
30
St
29
rn
on
eu
tg
rS
om
St
Bowery
St
Elizabeth St
Mulberry S
Mott St
Baxter St
kS
t
dso
Hu
e
list
Col n
e
Gre
d
sneak peek
JANUARY’18 HIGHLIGHTS
1
10th Annual NHL Winter Classic:
Buffalo Sabres at New York Rangers,
Citi Field, Flushing, Queens, nhl.com
19
Winter Antiques Show
(thru Jan. 28),
Park Avenue Armory,
643 Park Ave.,
winterantiquesshow.com
10
New York Jewish Film
Festival (thru Jan. 23), Film
Society of Lincoln Center and
The Jewish Museum, nyjff.org
72
16
NYC Broadway Week
(thru Feb. 4),
various theaters,
nycgo.com/broadway-week
IN NEW YORK | DECEMBER 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM
26
BroadwayCon
Convention
(thru Jan. 28), Jacob K. Javits
Center, broadwaycon.com
27
Beer, Bourbon & BBQ
Festival, 608 W. 28th St.,
beerandbourbon.com/
new-york/show-info
PHOTOS: FIREWORKS AT CITI FIELD, COURTESY CITI FIELD; GIO PONTI CABINET ON DISPLAY AT 2018 WINTER ANTIQUES SHOW, COURTESY LOBEL MODERN EXHIBITORS; PARTICIPANTS IN IMPROV EVERYWHERE’S NO PANTS SUBWAY RIDE IN NEW YORK CITY, ARIN SANG-URAI
7
17th Annual No Pants Subway Ride
Various NYC subways and streets,
improveverywhere.com/missions/
the-no-pants-subway-ride
THE DAY-DATE 40
The international symbol of performance and success, reinterpreted with
a modernized design and a new-generation mechanical movement.
It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.
OYSTER PERPETUAL DAY-DATE 40
rolex
oyster perpetual and day-date are ® trademarks.
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