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Elle UK — February 2018

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,
FEBRUARY 2018
�99
HE NEW SEASON:
10
9 770269 259242
K
BE
MORE
ELLE
STARRING
LO
OREN
NA
MARASCHI
MAR
C
STARRING
NEELAM
GILL
AS THE
NEW ROMANTIC
FEBRUARY 2018
�40
STARRING
LILI
SUMNER
AS THE
EIGHTIES
PARTY GIRL
AS THE
NEW
INDIVIDUALIST
THE
D
THE NEW SEASON:
FEBRUARY 2018
�40
BE BOLD
DRESS UP
GO PUNK
THE NEW SEASON:
U
WHAT?S YOUR FASHION TRIBE ?
STARRING
ODETTE
PAVLOVA
WHAT?S YOUR FASHION TRIBE ?
AS THE
GOOD SPORT
THE NEW SEASON:
BE BOLD
DRESS UP
GO PUNK
RY 2018
�40
STARRING
RILEY
MONTANA
AS THE
GLITTER GIRL
WHAT?S YOUR FASHION TRIBE ?
THE NEW SEASON:
BE BOLD
DRESS UP
GO PUNK
WHAT?S YOUR FASHION TRIBE ?
THE
COVERS
Photographer: Liz Collins.
Styling: Anne-Marie Curtis.
Hair: Samantha Hillerby at
Premier Hair and Make-up
using Oribe. Make-up: Sharon
Dowsett at CLM Hair &
Make-up using Chanel
Neapolis: New City and Blue
Serum Eye. Nails: Ama
Quashie at CLM Hair &
Make-up using Dior Capture
Totale Dreamskin and Dior
Christmas Collection 2017.
Models: Neelam Gill, Lorena
Maraschi, Riley Montana,
Odette Pavlova and Lili Sumner
at Next Models London,
all wearing Miu Miu
(newsstand cover).
MARKET
42
Shop a new trend ?
whether it?s PVC, pretty
lace or sexy snakeskin
EVERY
MONTH
19
SPECIAL COVERS
Lorena wears Saint Laurent by
Anthony Vaccarello.
Neelam wears Balmain.
Odette wears Michael Kors
Collection.
Riley wears Valentino.
Lili wears Christopher Kane.
PLAY
EDI T OR ? S LET T ER
MOOD
BOARD
Editor-In-Chief Anne-Marie
Curtis on the power of
being kind ? to others
as well as ourselves
ON THE SUBSCRIBERS? COVER
Neelam, Lorena and Riley
wear Saint Laurent by Anthony
Vaccarello.
Bus: Red Routemaster.
With thanks to Marriott
County Hall Hotel.
M AR K E T P L ACE
29
27
1 0 T H I NGS
ZOOM
1 3 8 LO V E LET T ER
Peter Dundas writes a
heartfelt note on love
and friendship for his
partner Evangelo Bousis
36
NINETIES
M O N O G R AM S
They?re back, and they
come with signature
prints, bum bags and
old-school knits
41
JEWELLERY
When it comes to
necklaces, this season it?s
about quality and quantity
GET IN!
ELLE chats to rising star
Daniel Kaluuya about
race and his role in
the upcoming Marvel
blockbuster Black Panther
TREND REPORT
Our A-Z compendium
of the new season, from
Adesuwa to Zeitgeist, via
Fringing and Resistance
Bespoke hot chocolate,
silk pillowcases and
drumming fitness classes:
all in our top 10 things
to try this month
51
54
MY WORLD:
C AM I L L E C HARRI� RE
The Parisian-born
blogger on why she?s
taking her time to furnish
her London home
57
E L L E B O O K CL U B
Books to read now, plus
artist Phoebe CollingsJames?s book shelf
THE
FEATURES
60
90
SOFT ROCK
Feminine frills, oversized
tailoring and knee-high
boots ? this is a look that
comes filtered through
a vintage lens
102
S T E AD Y AS S H E G O E S
Simone Rocha hadn?t set
out to make a statement
? it just happened, over
time. This is her story
119
BEAUTY
107
E YE S W I D E S H UT
121
Preen your peepers with
spring?s hottest new looks
67
ON: T H E P O W ER
OF P R A I SE
Are looks-based
compliments really
something to welcome
with open arms?
THE
FASHION
46
MOOD BOARD
123
This month?s key updates
from ELLE?s beauty team
117
I AM M AD E M O I S E L L E
R E AL T AL K
Model Winnie Harlow
shares her beauty regime
125
Our columnist uncovers
the truth behind her DNA
S O P H I E S AYS
Our beauty director
fields your questions
TRAVEL
127
DR ESS QU EENS
P AL M S P R I N GS
Where to sleep, eat
and hang out for a retro
Californian getaway
with glamour in spades
This season, fashion
goes big on the best
kind of drama. Our five
cover stars show you
how it?s done
1O2
1O9
B E AUT Y S H E LFIE
Tiffany-blue is February?s
coolest colour
BEY OND R ET R O
Sporty shapes and
relaxed trenches
70
114
B E AUT Y E XP E RT
Chanel?s make-up
director Lucia Pica
reveals the items she
can?t live without
W H O? S T H A T GI RL ?
Are you an Eighties party
girl, a Sloane Ranger or a
Good Sport? Introducing
the new-season tribes?
U
CLASS OF 2018
This issue?s cover stars
talk about the changing
face of modelling
U OK, H U N?
From positive self-talk
to eating spoonfuls
of mole negro , eight
successful women tell
us how they cope with
challenging times
64
86
Photograph: Kai Z Feng
As I write this,
the world is embroiled in talk
about #MeToo
and the abuse
of power in the
worlds of politics, film, music,
TV and fashion.
The collective mood is that a seismic
shift is taking place, with women and
men collectively adopting a zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment
and assault. And hurrah to that.
As we take a stand against the
wrongs being brought to light, I also
think now is the time to highlight and
celebrate the positive aspects of the
fashion industry ? a field filled with
strong, dynamic and enterprising women ? which I have been lucky enough
to be part of for my entire working life.
Our February issue is a celebration of
all this, and I hope you enjoy it as much
as we did making it.
For our biannual Collections story
(p70), we shot five up-and-coming
models who are, unquestionably, stars
of the future. Interestingly, we had an
almost all-female crew, headed up by
the brilliant and always-inspiring photographer Liz Collins. (Fashion remains
one of the few industries where women
outnumber men and, now more than
ever, are rising to positions of power.)
One of the interesting things that happens on shoots where there is more than
one model is everyone quickly takes
on a ?role?, rather like in a big family:
?I want
MORE
KINDNESS?
the quiet one, the funny one,
the quirky one, the leader?
I wonder whether you can
work out from the interview
(p86) which one was which.
But my point is everyone was
looking out for everyone else,
and as a result the feeling
was very sisterly. As the shoot
wrapped, we cheered each
model out. It was a wonderfully positive example of how
teamwork, kindness and the
creation of beautiful images
are not mutually exclusive.
I hope you agree the pictures
really show that.
Simone Rocha is definitely
a woman who celebrates
other women. As witnessed
by the number of ELLE staffers
currently wearing her earrings (I have three pairs on
rotation), her brand appeal
crosses all ages and types.
I often wear her subversive,
feminine dresses to events
because they make me feel
glamorous, strong and ready
for anything. Like the women
behind our Collections shoots, Simone?s
design team is almost exclusively female.
?There?s a strength that comes from being a woman designing for women,? she
says in her compelling interview with
Kenya Hunt (p102). Simone?s work has
soft power and kindness that celebrates
femininity in all its forms.
And talking of kindness, Susie Boyt?s
insightful piece on the power of compliments (p67) shows how the act is
sometimes as simple as telling someone they look great in a dress. ?You are
so Ginger Rogers in space, if space
was Italian? is probably my favourite
line of the issue ? though, as she points
out, it?s also important to go beyond
appearances and note achievements
rather than just looks. Though, hey,
I?ll take both. Susie?s essay is a timely
reminder that a small word at the right
moment can really lift someone.
After all, we all need a boost sometimes, as illustrated in our feature
U OK, Hun? (p60). Writer Phoebe
Luckhurst explores how powerful,
brilliant women, from Hillary Clinton
to Uber chief brand officer Bozoma
Saint John, cope when life becomes
challenging. My personal coping
mechanism now involves a new-found
habit of daily meditation (which, by
the way, I strongly recommend), as
well as taking the time to meet a friend
for lunch, take our dog for a walk on
the heath, or have a family movie
night on the sofa with my husband and
teenagers. In my case, simple pleasures are the most effective stress busters and laughter the most powerful
medicine (really). But whatever your
coping mechanism in times
of stress, embrace it and
do more of it, not less.
In that spirit, fashion this
season celebrates the full
breadth of womanhood,
and finding your fashion
tribe has never been more
fun. Laura Craik?s brilliant
piece Who?s That Girl?
(p64) investigates the season?s most unforgettable
personas, from the revived
Sloane Ranger (my personal favourite) to the Eighties
Party Girl and the utterly
cool Good Sport. Whether you pick one or adopt
a different character each
day, it?s all about a playful
spirit of individuality and
not taking oneself too seriously ? again, an attitude
we could all probably use
a little more of right now.
So as a new season begins, let?s celebrate how brilliant it is to be a woman
today ? whatever shape that takes. And,
to paraphrase Hillary Clinton, let?s all
aim for a little more kindness in our lives.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Tom Meredith
DEPUTY EDITOR/FASHION FEATURES DIRECTOR
Kenya Hunt
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF?S PA/EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Rachel Macbeth
fashion@elleuk.com
EXECUTIVE FASHION DIRECTOR
Kirsty Dale
ACCESSORIES EDITOR
Donna Wallace
ASSOCIATE FASHION EDITOR
Harriet Stewart
JUNIOR FASHION EDITOR
Felicity Kay
FASHION WRITER
Billie Bhatia
FASHION ASSISTANTS
Clemmie Brown
Roberta Hollis
FASHION INTERNS
Caterina Ospina
Jessica Skeete Cross
Eni Subair
FASHION PRODUCTION
& BOOKINGS DIRECTOR
Rachael Evans
BOOKINGS ASSISTANT
Clio Cooper
CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS
Alison Edmond
Robert Rydberg
Joanna Schlenzka
Natasha Wray
Melanie Huynh
Solange Franklin
features@elleuk.com
FEATURES DIRECTOR
Hannah Nathanson
TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE DIRECTOR
Susan Ward Davies
CULTURE DIRECTOR
Lena de Casparis
WITH THANKS TO
Shannon Mahanty
EDITOR-AT-LARGE
Stacey Duguid
BEAUTY DIRECTOR
Sophie Beresiner
BEAUTY EDITOR
Joely Walker
BEAUTY ASSISTANT
Emily Pritchard
art@elleuk.com
DESIGNER
Kelsey Freeman
PICTURES ASSISTANT
Jameela Elfaki
WITH THANKS TO
Jo Bell
Rebecca Rhodes
Muffie Sproat
Rachel Bailey
Claire Pennington
WORKFLOW DIRECTOR
Christina Simone
CHIEF SUB-EDITOR
Eirwen Oxley Green
WITH THANKS TO
Lucy Douglas
Lisa Morgan
David Rothon
MANAGING EDITOR
Debbie Black
ACTING GROUP MANAGING EDITOR
Connie Osborne
FINANCE BUSINESS PARTNER, ELLE
Emma Jones
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
OF DIGITAL STRATEGY
Betsy Fast
DIGITAL EDITOR
Natasha Bird
DEPUTY DIGITAL EDITOR
Louise Donovan
DIGITAL BEAUTY EDITOR
George Driver
SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER
Unsah Malik
DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR
Katie O?Malley
JUNIOR DIGITAL WRITER
Daisy Murray
PRESIDENT AND CEO
James Wildman
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER/
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER
Claire Blunt
CHIEF STRATEGY OFFICER
Robert Ffitch
CHIEF BRAND OFFICER,
LUXURY, WELLNESS
& YOUNG WOMEN
Duncan Chater
CHIEF OPERATIONS DIRECTOR
Clare Gorman
CHIEF AGENCY OFFICER
Jane Wolfson
CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER
Paul Cassar
HR DIRECTOR
Surinder Simmons
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
Lisa Quinn
HEAD OF PR
Fay Jennings
DIRECTOR, HEARST LIVE
Victoria Archbold 020 7312 4105
MD, HEARST BRAND SERVICES
Judith Secombe
MARKETING & CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
Reid Holland
HEAD OF CONSUMER
SALES & MARKETING
Matt Blaize-Smith
HEAD OF SUBSCRIPTIONS
Justine Boucher
HEAD OF MARKETING PROMOTIONS
Aoibheann Foley
DIGITAL MARKETING DIRECTOR
Seema Kumari
PR MANAGER
Ben Bolton
MANAGING DIRECTOR, BEAUTY
Jacqui Cave
MANAGING DIRECTOR,
FASHION & LUXURY
Jacqueline Euwe
HEAD OF BEAUTY
Jayne Ellis, Steven Miles
HEAD OF FASHION & LUXURY
Lee Brown, Miles Dunbar, Zoe Willis
WATCHES & JEWELLERY DIRECTOR
Anna O?Sullivan
WATCHES & JEWELLERY MANAGER
Shannon Hollis
MANAGING DIRECTOR,
FITNESS & HEALTH
Alun Williams
DIRECTOR OF AUTOMOTIVE
Jim Chaudry
CLIENT DIRECT DIRECTOR,
FASHION & BEAUTY
Emma Barnes
DIRECTOR OF TRAVEL
Denise Degroot
DIRECTOR OF HOMES
Julia Goodwin
CLIENT DIRECTOR, PERSONAL FINANCE
Jacqui Duckworth
LUXURY DIRECTOR
Charlotte Hollands, Sharon Davis-Ridgeway,
Lee Bailey, Jhan Rushton
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Lucy Porter, Rosalie Atkinson-Willes
HEARST DIRECT MANAGER, CLASSIFIED
Lucy Penny
HEAD OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Alexander Stanhope
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT/CFO
AND GENERAL MANAGER
Simon Horne
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT/
INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING DIRECTOR
Jeannette V Chang
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT/
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
Kim St Clair Bodden
ellearoundtheworld.com
CHAIRMAN &
CEO LAGARD萊E ACTIVE
Denis Olivennes
CEO ELLE FRANCE & INTERNATIONAL
Constance Benqu�
CEO ELLE INTERNATIONAL
MEDIA LICENSES
Fran鏾is Coruzzi
SVP/INTERNATIONAL
DIRECTOR OF ELLE
Valeria Bessolo Llopiz
SVP/DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL
MEDIA LICENSES, DIGITAL
DEVELOPMENT & SYNDICATION
Mickael Berret
ELLE INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTIONS
Charlotte Deffe, Virginie Dolata
DEPUTY SYNDICATION MANAGER
Marion Magis
SYNDICATION COORDINATORS
Ana Afonso, Sophie Duarte
COPYRIGHTS MANAGER
& DIGITAL SYNDICATION
S関erine Laporte
SVP INTERNATIONAL ADVERTISING
St閜hanie Delattre
For all advertising queries, call 020 7439 5615
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Cover printed by Westdale, Cardiff. Distribution by Frontline Ltd, Peterborough (01733 555161)
JACOB LILLIS
@jacoblillis
SUSIE BOYT
Words: Rachel Macbeth. Photographs: Instagram/@hlucynat, Instagram/@winnieharlow,
courtesy of Jacob Lillis, Clay S Gardner and Susie Boyt
@SusieBoyt
If author and
columnist Susie could
have dinner with
anyone, it would be
her late parents,
Lucian Freud and
Suzy Boyt: ?I miss
them both so much,
and always want to
tell them about the
things I?ve seen and
heard and what
I?m thinking.? After
studying English at
Oxford University,
she had several
part-time jobs ? in
a bookshop, at a
catering-equipment
shop and with a
literary agency.
Having gone on to
publish six novels
and write a column
for the Financial
Times for nearly
14 years, Susie says
she starts writing
each day by 8am:
?The earlier I work,
the better it goes,
as you?re closer to
your unconscious.
I keep going until
somebody needs
me to do their
homework.? Susie
writes about the
power of praise
on page 67.
An eccentric fact not
many people know
about photographer
Jacob is that when
it?s cold, he puts two
freshly boiled eggs
in his coat pockets
to keep his hands
warm. His interest
in photography
started as a teenager
growing up in
Huddersfield, where
he?d take photos of
his friends skating:
?I ended up doing
photography A-Level,
then a photography
degree.? While
working at Boots,
Jacob was asked
to do his first shoot
for Vice, and moved
to London shortly
after. Having gone
on to shoot for
Dazed & Confused
and The New York
Times? T Magazine,
he frequently
collaborates on
projects with Simone
Rocha: ?She?s an
amazing person, and
we share a lot of the
same values. We are
both very close to
our families, and are
very much inspired
by that.? See Jacob?s
shoot with Simone
on page 102.
HANNAH
NATHANSON
WINNIE
HARLOW
@hlucynat
@winnieharlow
A typical working
day for ELLE?s
features director
Hannah usually
involves reading
magazine articles,
commissioning
writers and editing
copy while standing
up in the middle
of the office: ?I hate
sitting down for
too long.? Starting
her career at ES
Magazine, Hannah
spent most evenings
interviewing
celebrities for the
party pages: ?My
biggest coup was
catching Kate Moss
alone perusing the
rails at the launch of
her Topshop line.?
One fact that not
many people know
about Hannah is that
she can tap dance
(jazz hands emoji).
?Know what you
want from whatever
career you?re going
to strive for and
make a game plan?
is the career advice
model Winnie
would give to young
creatives. Having
been discovered
by supermodel Tyra
Banks on Instagram,
Winnie became a
contestant on the
US television series
America?s Next
Top Model before
going on to star in
campaigns for Diesel
and Desigual, as
well as shooting
for i-D, Dazed and
Vogue Italia. Born
in Toronto, Canada,
she now lives in
London and says
her greatest career
achievement is being
nominated for Model
of the Year at the
2017 British Fashion
Awards. Winnie
says her plan-B
career would be
to become an
actress: ?Everything
I do I want to do
well, so I would need
to take acting classes
first.? Winnie talks
beauty on page 123.
CLAY S
GARDNER
@claysgardner
Born in California,
photographer Clay
learnt the ins and
outs of the darkroom
during college, and
then saved enough
money to move to
New York and work
his way into assisting.
While working as a
full-time first assistant
to Mikael Jansson,
he began building
his own portfolio:
?The objective now
is the same as when
I began ? rarely say
no to assignments,
and try to at least
make one picture
for yourself, no
matter the job.? Clay
describes himself as
?curious, optimistic
and focused ?
which really means
stubborn?. See his
work on page 90.
THE
FEBRUARY
ISSUE
*
*
*
SUBSCRIBE
FOR
!
DON?T MISS OUT ? order today at elleuk.com/subscribetoelle
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INDULGE
READ
Words: Rachel Macbeth. Femojis available from the App Store
?LOVE TRUMPS
HATE? was the
message that
resonated among
the five million
people who
protested against
the Trump
administration
during the 2017
inauguration.
Capturing history?s
largest peaceful
demonstration,
which spanned
80-plus countries,
Why I March
(Abrams Books) is
a photographic
book documenting
the worldwide
Women?s Marches
and their messages
of unity and
inclusion. Out
21 February
1
T
MAKE GETTING
ENOUGH SLEEP
one of your New
Year?s resolutions.
Treat yourself to
silk pillowcases for
softer, smoother
skin and glossier
hair, and snooze
January away.
Slipsilkpillow
case.com
LISTEN
IF YOU?RE A FAN
OF RAY BLK and
Jorja Smith, then
Jessie Reyez is
one for your
playlist. She
features on the
latest Calvin Harris
album, alongside
the likes of Pharrell
and Frank Ocean
? her own debut
EP, Kiddo, has
been hailed for its
mellow vocals.
Artwork by
FEMOJIS
EXPLORE
EAT
EXPERIENCE
THE HUMBLE
T-SHIRT finally gets
the recognition it
deserves with
a new exhibition at
London?s Fashion
and Textile Museum.
T-shirt: Cult | Culture
| Subversion will
map out its
progression from
men?s underclothes
to a luxury fashion
item. The exhibition
also features
some of Vivienne
Westwood?s
most iconic and
politically charged
slogan T-shirts,
from the Seventies
to her most
recent collections.
Opens 9 February
PURPLE IS THE
NEW COLOUR
du jour in the
wellness world,
and it?s here in the
form of yams
(AKA ube) ? in
everything from
cakes to coffee.
Seoul?s Cafe de
Bona serves
all-purple desserts,
but for a taste of
purple closer to
home, try ube ice
cream at Romulo
Caf� Kensington.
Sweet potatoes
are so last season.
WHETHER YOU
HAVE ALL THE GEAR
or simply no idea,
Club Med?s newest
ski resort, Grand
Massif Samo雗s
Morillon, offers
250km of slopes fit
for both seasoned
skiers and nervous
first-timers. For
apr鑣-ski, drink in
panoramic views of
the French Alps from
the spa, or dine on
Michelin-starred
food in Gourmet
Lounge, one of the
three on-site
restaurants.
WEAR
WHEN IT COMES
TO EYEWEAR for
2018, bigger isn?t
necessarily better.
Throwing shade at
the aviator and
oversized cat-eye
are sci-fi specs.
Prada?s Matrixstyle angular
sunglasses are the
perfect finishing
touch for all
your spaceinspired outfits.
SEE
DRINK
HOW DO YOU
LIKE YOUR HOT
CHOCOLATE?
Thirty-four per cent
milk chocolate
with a hint of
rosemary and
orange, or 67%
dark with chilli
flakes? Both are
options at Knoops
in Rye, East
Sussex, which
specialises
in bespoke
hot drinks.
DON?T MISS
?MOLLY?S GAME?,
this month?s
blockbuster, about
Molly Bloom,
Olympic-class skier
by day, leader of
an illustrious
underground poker
empire by night.
Starring Jessica
Chastain and Idris
Elba, the Aaron
Sorkin-directed film
follows an FBI
investigation that
seeks to uncover the
illegal gambling
ring, and Molly?s
ensuing moral
dilemma. In cinemas
5 January
MOVE
NEVER MISS A
BEAT with Pound,
the cardio and
conditioning class
that turns drumming
into a high-intensity
workout. The
45-minute class
takes you through
HIIT sequences
while you beat
drumsticks to the
music. Expect to
burn up to 900
calories per hour.
Poundfit.com
Photographs: Getty, Imaxtree, Jason Lloyd-Evans
mood
rd
bo
Edited by
KENYA HUNT
THE NEW SEASON
R E A L I S E YO U R T R U E FA S H I O N P OT E N T I A L W I T H T H I S
C O M P L E T E G U I D E TO T H E LO O K S , FA C E S , L A B E L S
A N D H A P P E N I N G S TO K N O W F O R S P R I N G /S U M M E R 18
Clear vision
Plastic, traditionally the
stuff of grocery bags,
water bottles and rain
ponchos, is having a real
high-fashion moment,
appearing everywhere
from the functional rain
coats at Burberry in
London through to
Valentino?s futuristic
moto jackets and
Chanel?s glamorous
capes and boots.
It?s a trend loaded
with irony: in the process
of elevating the synthetic
stuff to luxury status,
designers used it to dress
down glamour and add
an element of sport.
Eighties
ELLE
3O
FEB
A L E X A ND E R Mc QU E E N
ST E L L A Mc CA R T NE Y
DIOR
O SC A R D E L A R E NT A
B A C K T O TH E
F U T UR E , 1 985
MM6
BA L EN C IA G A
Denim
Feel-good nostalgia
ruled the spring shows
as Eighties trends were
seen at Isabel Marant,
Stella McCartney,
Givenchy and more. The
original supers broke the
internet, stonewashed
denim returned and
Cindy Crawford?s
daughter Kaia Gerber
(see ?K?) emerged as the
biggest new star. All that
was missing was the
My Little Pony reference.
Oh, that happened, too
(thanks, Moschino).
PACO RABANNE
C HA N EL
is for...
is for...
Stonewashed and
brightly coloured at
Stella McCartney,
paint-splattered at
Oscar de la Renta, and
tailored and two-toned
at Dior, the new update
to denim is old-school.
G I VE NCH Y
PARI S , 1 9 8 1
VAL E N TI N O
is for...
E MPORI O
ARMAN I
D
R O CH AS
C
C HAN E L
is for...
Bum bags
B O T T E G A VE NE T A
is for
M AR C J ACO B S
S E CR E T G AR DE N PAR T Y
T O M M Y H I LFI G E R
B
The fanny pack you once judged middle-aged tourists for wearing
is now the look of choice for fashion-credible arbiters of taste, from
Adwoa Aboah to A$AP Rocky. Go for a logoed luxe version by
Gucci, reissued nylon original by Prada or a brocade cocktail
option by Rochas. And for a more lo-fi, wallet-friendly and totally
authentic take, there?s always Eastpak.
L ON D ON, 1 9 80s
is for...
Glamour
P ARI S FAS HI ON W E E K S S 1 8
S AI N T L AURE NT
It?s no longer just for
red carpets ? after
percolating as a trend
throughout 2017, the
ubiquity of eveningwear
this season signals a
real shift. It?s time to get
the heels back out and
give in to the pull of
dressy, flamboyant,
un-ironic glitz, as seen
on virtually every
catwalk, red carpet and
guest at the British
Fashion Awards. The
industry has spoken.
S AI NT L AURE N T
I
O F F - WH IT E
1 99 0
19 81
19 94
The Sloane Ranger is back. Whether it was Erdem?s
exploration of the Queen?s jazz-club-hopping youth or
Off-White?s love letter to Princess Diana, the royals are
having a moment for spring. But it was Lady Di?s influence
that seemed to have the biggest impact, surfacing in the
Eighties-style, puff-sleeved blouses and high-waistline
denim that appeared throughout the season.
is for...
In excess
BA L E NC IA G A
High society
1 9 83
1 983
CALVI N KLE I N
G
MO SCH I NO
is for...
S E S AM E S T R E E T ?S
B AR KLE Y
CH ANE L
BOTTEGA
V ENE T A
C� LI NE
E R DE M
ACNE
is for...
Fringing
LO E WE
G U CCI
S T E LLA M cCAR T NE Y
G I VE NCH Y
Fringing is to spring/summer 18 what feathers were to autumn/winter 17:
everywhere. The season?s new It decoration made an appearance at
C閘ine, Calvin Klein, Chanel, Loewe and many, many more.
Bejewelled candycoloured plastic jackets
at Valentino, feathered
flying-saucer-shaped
dresses at Saint
Laurent and lethalweapon spikes at
Balenciaga: the word
for spring is extra.
M AR C J ACO B S
J
PRADA
AL E XAN D E R W AN G
COACH 1 9 4 1
VAL E N TI N O
S AI N T L AURE NT
FE N D I
is for...
Jumbo
CHANEL
C AL VI N KL E I N
I S AB E L MARANT
MIU MIU
MOS C H I NO
FE NTY PUMA
MARC J AC OB S
Kaia
With Cindy Crawford
for a mother and a
birthday that falls at the
start of fashion month
(she turned 16 on
3 September),
Kaia Gerber was
predestined for
supermodel status. She
may have walked in
only 16 shows, but they
were all the good ones
(Calvin Klein, Versace,
Burberry, the list goes
on), sealing her place
as fashion?s girl of
the moment.
C HL O�
MAI S ON MARGI E L A
C HRI S TOPHE R KANE
is for...
ilill nnial
S
VUITT
O
The millennial has been a hot topic for spring:
what she wears; how much she?ll spend on it.
This means you?ll be seeing lots of upbeat skirts,
shorts and dresses with pert, micro hemlines.
There?s a youthquake bubbling, from Dior
lo�, Carven, Lanvin and Givenchy.
EW
LO
LINE
M
A
RN
KA
NE
CHRIS
TO
PH
I
ER
BA
LENCI
n the unanimous hit on the street-style
was out in full force. From the oversized
dad trainers at Louis Vuitton to the exaggerated, turned-up elf shoes at Loewe
and tricked-out Crocs at Christopher Kane (and, later, Balenciaga), the more
over-the-top the footwear, the better.
OT
is f
is for...
C�
GA
FENTY PUMA
RC J
A
C L UE L E SS , 19 95
MA
B
CO S
When designers weren?t
revisiting the Eighties,
they were looking to the
Nineties, reviving some
of its biggest hits. At
Burberry, this meant the
classic check. While at
Versace, Donatella
celebrated founding
designer Gianni?s
archive, bringing back
his most famous designs.
Other Nineties ideas
coming your way: cargo
denim, pastels, grunge
and, yes, cycling shorts.
E
A
Nineties
nostalgia
N
LOUI
HAL PE RN
OS C AR D E L A RE N TA
As in, bejewelled AF. This was the runway season in which Kirakira+,
an app that adds a glittery filter to your photos on Instagram, started
trending. Not that the clothes needed any help shining. From Maison
Margiela?s mirrored trench to Michael Halpern?s shimmery, sequinned
dresses, glittery embellishments got bigger and bigger.
C H E R, 1 9 8 8
Lit
is for...
Oversized headscarves
and knits at Marc Jacobs,
giant poufs at Saint Laurent
and enormous graphics
at Junya Watanabe. This
spring, make your presence
known by going large
and in charge.
K
is for...
is for...
C HRI S TOPHE R
KAN E
GU CC I
GUCCI
is for...
Resistance
H
Tarot
is for...
A S H IS
ELLE
Is it in the stars or in the cards? Or maybe that embroidered graphic
print on your skirt? A little bit of all three? Gucci?s Alessandro Michele
and Dior?s Maria Grazia Chiuri wove tarot references through the
prints on their garments, while Givenchy hired an actual tarot reader
to give psychic predictions at its Paris Fashion Week after-party.
33
FEB
B URB E RRY
C � L I NE
VE RS AC E
MARY
KATRANTZ OU
S AI N T
L AURE N T
OS C AR D E L A
RE N TA, 2 0 0 0
D I OR
M IU MI U
D I OR
G U CCI
May your skirts be long
and transparent come
spring. Dries Van Noten,
Christopher Kane and
Dior all made strong
cases for sheer dressing,
giving new meaning to
the words light and airy.
This was the season in
which Phoebe Philo
out-Philoed herself at
C閘ine, and Versace
and Burberry went
back to their roots, all
creating clothes that
epitomised the qualities
that made them famous
in the first place.
R
After a year of
political outspokenness
on the runway, it?s not
surprising to see the
return of sartorial tropes
of resistance. At
Balenciaga, Demna
Gvasalia epitomised
this in his collection,
which borrowed
elements of punk.
Rebelliousness also
marched through Miu
Miu, Junya Watanabe,
Kenzo and more.
is for...
Sheer
madness
is for...
Quintessential
J U NY A WA TA N A B E
E R DE M
OS C AR D E L A
RE N TA, 1991
S AI NT
LAU R E NT
M AR Y
KAT R ANT ZO U
Pouf
The shape du moment
for cocktail hour (yes,
that?s a thing again)
is big, short and round.
Last year?s Crist骲al
Balenciaga
retrospective exhibition
at the V&A, a show filled
with this innovative
bubble hemline, clearly
had some sway, with
Erdem, Mary Katrantzou
and Saint Laurent all
revisiting the shape.
G ALL I ANO
VE R S ACE
DI O R
C OMM E D E S
GARC O N S
S I MONE ROC H A
L OE W E
is for...
THE VI RGI N
S UI C I D E S , 1 9 9 1
PR E E N
X-rated
is or...
Zeitgeist
PRADA
R OK S AND A
One of the biggest
colour stories of the
year is the palest,
with Simone Rocha,
Roksanda and Isa Arfen
all making a case for
head-to-toe white. But
it?s much less princess
bride and a lot more
subversive ? see the
Preen collection, where
Thea Bregazzi and
Justin Thornton?s
opening ivory looks
were very middle-fingerto-the-patriarchy.
BA L E N C IA G A
You
The key takeaway from
this season?s trends is:
individuality rules. As new
faces became street-style
queens and the runways
celebrated inclusivity, the
message was that fashion
should always be about
what works best for you.
PRADA
is for...
C A L V I N K L EI N
Y
CA L V IN K L E IN
The ?freakum dress?, thhe
stuff of Beyonc� songs
and camp music-video
wardrobes, now hass
serious fashion cred.
Thank Anthony
Vaccarello?s tiny leatherr
skirts and dresses for
Saint Laurent.
B A L EN CIA GA
X
is for...
Words: Kenya Hunt. Photographs: Alamy, Gett y Images, Rex Features, Jason Lloyd - Evans, Imaxtree
J I L S ANDE R
PR ADA
M AR NI
Upgrade
What happen
, a child?s toy
and a pair of household cleaning gloves, then put them in the
hands of John Galliano, Jeremy Scott and Christopher Kane?
Some of the season?s biggest Insta-bait. The banalities
b
l t off
the everyday got an upgrade for spring, with designers
elevating the mundane to works of luxury.
S AI N T L AURE NT
is for...
dest dressing is
going
g nowhere, tha
anks
to thee voluminous skkirts
on shhow in collectio
ons
including Calvin Kleein,
C殚line and Marni.
E R DEM
Volume
CALVI N
KLE I N
C� LI NE
is for...
The fashion world has never been more woke, responding to all
corners of the zeitgeist. At Calvin Klein, Raf Simons alluded to the
horror of America?s status quo with blood-splattered skirts. Demna
Gvasalia referenced Trump at Balenciaga when he described
creating ?good fake news?. And both Maria Grazia Chiuri and
Miuccia Prada?s collections were steeped in feminist messaging,
destroying the myth that beauty and substance can?t co-exist.
ZO
OM
!
Styling by
DONNA
WALLACE
Photographs by
FRANKIEWICZ
& ROZNIATA
Wool cardigan,
�5; wool top, �5;
leather bag, �285;
leather trousers,
�536; bronze
earrings, �0, all
B AL E N CI A G A
ELLE
36
FEB
Cotton top, �5,
R ICHAR D M ALO N E at
M AC HINE-A . Canvas
and leather bag (worn
across body), �050;
canvas and leather bag
(held in hand), �250,
both DIO R . Denim
trousers, �0, ISABEL
M AR ANT ET O ILE .
Rhodium-plated rings,
� each, SWAR OVSK I
ZO
OM
ICONIC
SWAROVSKI
!
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OM
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CHECK
SOCKS
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cotton sandals, �5,
both B URB E RRY . Denim
jeans, �0, F R A M E .
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viscose bag (worn over shoulder), �0;
viscose trousers, �5, all VERSUS
BY V ER SAC E. Leather bag (held in
hand), �320, BALMAIN. Palladiumplated hoop earrings, �9, ATELIER
SWAR O V SKI BY CHRISTOPHER KANE.
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!
ELLE
39
FEB
Wear your PRECIOUS
pieces every day ? and
layer white, rose and
yellow GOLD for impact
Pink-gold and pearl
star necklace (top),
�820, L O U I S
V U I T T O N . Pink-gold
panther pendant
(second from top),
�660; pink-gold and
diamond circle pendant,
�800; pink-gold
cactus pendant, �800,
all CA R T I E R . Silk top,
�265, A G N O N A
Photographs: Frankiewicz & Rozniata. Hair: Adam Garland. Make-up: Valeria Ferreira. Model: Razan Nassar at Storm
at HARRODS
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diamond star pendant (top),
�860, LO UI S VUI TTON .
18ct pink-gold and pav�
diamond pendant (small),
�900; 18ct pink-gold and
diamond pendant (large),
�720, both B UL GARI .
18ct rose-gold and green
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�580, RI H AN N A L OVE S
at CHOPAR D . Silk shirt, �5,
GUCCI at N E T-A-PORTE R
18ct gold wrap necklace (top),
�,600, TIFFANY CITY HARDWEAR .
18ct rose-, white- and yellow-gold
pendant (middle), �410, BULGARI .
18ct yellow-gold and black rhodium
star pendant, �950, NOOR FARES .
Silk shirt, �5, RAG & BONE
LAYER
GOLD
ELLE
CHAIN
41
FEB
White-gold and diamond
earring (top, sold with ribbon),
�600, D I O R J O A I L L E R I E .
18ct white-gold and diamond
bow necklace, �600;
18ct white-gold and diamond
feather necklace (bottom),
�400, both CH A N E L F I N E
J E W E L L E R Y . 18ct white-gold
and diamond ?G? pendant,
�160, M E S S I K A B Y G I G I
H AD I D . 18ct white-gold
bar necklace, �300, I CE
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42
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45
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ELLE
46
FEB
Photographs by
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& ROZNIATA
retro
Viscose hat, �0; wool waistcoat, �2, and
wool trousers, �0, all VERSUS VE RS AC E
Styling by
FELICITY
KAYE
ELLE
47
FEB
Suede jacket, �595,
L ONGC HAMP. Viscose-mix
top, �, HAL L H UB E R .
Cotton trousers, �5,
I S A ARFE N . Leather
trainers, �0, C AMPE R .
Gold ring (just seen),
�, N U & MI I
Go for a coordinate
ELLE
48
FEB
Photographs: Frankiewicz & Rozniata. Styling: Felicity Kay. Hair: Hiroshi Matsushita using Bumble & bumble.
Make-up: Celia Evans using Tom Ford Beauty. Model: Irene T at M+P Models
Cotton jacket, �.99, MANGO. Polyester
sports jacket, �0, and polyester
trousers, �0, both THE KOOPLES S PORT
ELLE
49
FEB
a
pl y
elle
Edited by
LENA DE
CASPARIS
Collage by
PATRICK
Photographs: Jason Hetherington
WAUGH
!
WHY 2018 IS GOING TO BE ACTOR DANIEL KALUUYA?S YEAR, PLUS INSIDE
THE HOME OF A SUPER-INFLUENCER AND THE BOOKS WE?RE READING
G
D
THIS IS
Words by
EVE
BARLOW
He?s the SKINS and BLACK MIRROR alum who
starred in last year?s surprise horror hit GET OUT
and features opposite Lupita Nyong'o in next
month?s Marvel blockbuster BLACK PANTHER.
2O18 is set to be the year of Daniel Kaluuya
says fuck a lot.) On the subject of waking people up to hard truths, I ask if he was surprised by the revelations of sexism in his industry following the Harvey Weinstein scandal. He takes a moment. ?A lot of men are raised in a mad way,? he says. ?I?d be lying
to you if I said I was shocked. Everyone knows. Everyone knows. Now it?s time to listen
to people?s stories, to do things properly. Make it a criminal case as opposed to a
public shaming. Make sure there are repercussions.?
Kaluuya went to his local sixth form in Camden and, after joining a small theatre
group, by 18 he?d been brought in to write on the first series of Skins, a show about
teenagers, for teenagers, by teenagers. The producers loved the character he wrote
? Posh Kenneth ? so much, they had Kaluuya act the part himself. A cult success, the
show was notorious for its depiction of sex, drug use and adolescent pressures, as well
as its cast of then-unknowns who were living parallel lives to the on-screen storylines.
The rave continued off-set. ?It was our uni,? he says of the experience. ?And yeah, it
got a bit crazy.? Today, the cast keep in touch, go to each other?s weddings, even
sometimes do Christmas together. Fun aside, the freedom and exposure of Skins
birthed a new breed of Hollywood breakout stars (Nichoulas Hoult, Jack O?Connell,
Dev Patel, Joe Dempsie) who didn?t need
private-school connections to make it.
?There are so many people I know from London in LA now, and we all started together,?
he says. ?We used to go raving at Cameos
night club. Sometimes you have to appreci?Got any nibbles?? Daniel Kaluuya
ate that ?cos when it gets low, it gets low.
asks very loudly. We?re sitting in a siYou have to enjoy the wins.?
lent, very LA restaurant next to a West
When Kaluuya was starting out, it was
Hollywood art gallery. You might think
grime MCs like Skepta and JME, and actor
the fact that Kaluuya?s become an inAshley Waters (formerly Asher D in So Solternet sensation (his expressive face in
id Crew) that he looked up to; people from
record-breaking box-office hit Get Out
his ?ends? who made him realise he didn?t
need to minimise his lower economic expeinspired a stream of GIFs), and one of
rience to pursue success. He sees the rise of
cinema?s most coveted young actors,
grime as a sign that the people he grew up around are getting
would make him a little more reserved in public. Maybe quieter, avoidtheir dues now. ?Everyone was late to the party,? he says. ?Sysing recognition? No. Unapologetic and unaffected by his success,
tematic blocks were put in place to stop grime artists from beKaluuya, 28, doesn?t put on any new-fame affectations, nor does he
coming the Oasis of our time. That?s who they are. It?s so inspirstray far from his London roots.
ing. You don?t understand how subconsciously we?ve been told
Having grown up on an estate in Camden, North London, with
that we can?t. [Now] we can just be us and we can thrive.?
Ugandan parents, he keeps all the same friends, listens to the same
Kaluuya is careful about the films he signs up to, preferring
grime artists and wears his jeans like the boys outside Camden Town
to convey real-life experiences and portray characters he sees
Tube station ? below the arse. The waitress clearly doesn?t have a clue
himself in. When talking about his upcoming role in Marvel?s
what ?nibbles? are, but hazards a guess. Kaluuya has a charmed way of
making you understand exactly where he?s coming from.
Black Panther, an all-black cast blockbuster, he says, ?That story
There?s a lightness and humour to Kaluuya, which is a deep contrast
resonated with me because I know that [character]. The sensito his onscreen roles. He?s drawn to rebellious, provocative projects;
bilities are aligned.? The film also stars another British rising star,
whether that?s the first cast of Channel 4?s Noughties teen drama Skins,
Letitia Wright, whom Kaluuya used to record plays with for BBC
an episode of Charlie Brooker?s dark sci-fi Black Mirror, or 2017?s cult
Radio 4. ?And now she?s got a phat Marvel poster of herself!?
horror smash Get Out, which made more than $175 million at the box
he says in disbelief. Last night, the poster with his own face came
office and has earned a Golden Globe nomination.
out. ?I?m in a Marvel film? Holy fuck? This is a brother from Cam?I?ve always been looking to fuck shit up,? he says. ?I was a shit in
den Town! It just doesn?t compute ?cos I know my life. All my
school. When I got into acting a teacher said to my mum, ?He needs to
boys say to me, ?Yo, you don?t understand what?s about to haplet out some energy.??
pen. After Black Panther, you can?t get a bus any more.? But I?m
When he got the part of Chris in Get Out, an African American who
still going to get the bus.?
goes home to meet the parents of his white girlfriend (played by Allison
With his winning optimism, and the year he?s set to have ?
Williams, better known as Marni in HBO?s Girls), he ignored director
he is a favourite for this year?s EE Rising Star BAFTA and at the
Jordan Peele?s advice to do his horror-film homework. Instead, he drew
Golden Globes ? it?s difficult to believe there?s ever a bad day
on his own experience of everyday racism. ?I lived it. I live it. I live this.
for Daniel Kaluuya. He assures me there is. ?This industry?s hard,?
I just read the script, so it was in me.? The themes of outsiderdom and
he says. ?The world is hard. Being young and black is tough.
otherness have made Get Out almost documentarian in its realness.
You can?t complain about it, so you need a safe place to moan.
?I go through racism every day, man,? says Kaluuya. ?Probably the same
When I need a reality check, I call my mum. She gives me the
for you with sexism, no? Every day someone says some sick stuff. Racrealness and says, ?You were born in England. Shut up!??
ism?s horrifying. People end up dead, mothers lose their kids. This shit?s
Black Panther is out 9 February 2018
fucked up. You have all these experiences and you have to keep going
for your dreams, but you?re carrying this.? (If you haven?t noticed, Kaluuya
?RACISM?S
horrifying.
People end up
DEAD, mothers
lose their kids?
ELLE
53
FEB
Words by
BILLIE
BHATIA
Photographs by
RICCARDO
RASPA
?You?ll often
find me at The
Cock & Bottle
in Notting Hill.?
MY
WORLD
CAMILLE CHARRI萊E
?I love visiting the
Neue Galerie
in New York, then
walking through
Central Park.?
Hair and make-up: Helen Walsh
?My karaoke
song is I?m Every
Woman by
Chaka Khan.?
?Plonger, a
French novel by
Christophe
Ono-dit-Biot.?
PARISIAN-BORN BLOGGER CAMILLE CHARRI萊E, 30, first moved
to London six years ago. ?I moved to London for a boy, as you?re told
not to do, and when we broke up, I was still so in love with the city that
I didn?t want to move back to Paris.? In the time since, she?s moved
around a lot ? the South Bank, Marylebone, Shoreditch, Notting
Hill and South Kensington. Then, two months ago, she finally laid
down roots in a bright two-bedroom flat in Westbourne Grove.
?I didn?t even see the flat before I signed
the contract,? Camille explains; ?I was sat at
the Chanel show in Paris when my assistant
called and said she?d found me the perfect
place. I came to see it the next day and,
even with someone else?s furniture dotted
around, it immediately felt like home.?
Having made a name for herself in the
style stakes, Camille has turned being one
of the most photographed women on the
street-style circuit into a lucrative business.
With such a clear sense of personal style,
it?s no great surprise that she holds a similar
decisive aesthetic with interiors. Tonal
brown and beige shades pepper the
white walls of a large living space, with wicker chairs making a
statement around a heavy steel table. Loewe, Chanel and Mango
hang side by side in her walk-in wardrobe, with Aegean-blue Tom
Ford fragrance bottles lining the dressing table in the bathroom.
Everything is stylish, but nothing over-thought.
You might imagine that her not obviously trendy but still very
stylish pieces of furniture had been shipped over from her French
family home, but a lot of it has in fact come from French Connection.
The older pieces, meanwhile, are from Sunbury antique market:
?It?s an inexpensive place for furniture, and it feels good to buy
secondhand; my mum says things are nicer when they have a story.?
There are still a couple of key pieces missing in her home ?
most obviously, a sofa. ?It?s not so convenient when you have a
date round and the only place you have to offer them to sit is the
bed! But I am taking my time. I am keen to make sure my home
doesn?t look like an Instagram flat.? She also refuses to pin her
interiors life to a board on Pinterest, and instead asks friends such
as Frances Loom (purveyor of antique rugs) and jewellery designer
Anissa Kermiche for advice on how to finesse her new home.
She stresses there is no rush to finish the flat ? you have to
be patient to find the perfect piece ? but that hasn?t stopped her
entertaining in her new space. ?I love food, and it?s great having
people over,? she says. Her fridge is stocked with Petits Filous,
dark chocolate digestive biscuits and the ingredients needed for
her signature dish ? ratatouille and couscous. Camille says: ?In the
same way everyone in England is obsessed with curry, all Parisians
are in love with couscous. In fact I love both; just before you arrived,
there were still remnants of last night?s vindaloo in the kitchen.? See,
no home is entirely Insta-perfect; everything is a work in progress.
But crop it well and stick a filter on it, and no one will ever know.
?I moved
to LONDON
for a boy, as
you?re told
NOT TO DO?
ELLE
55
?Stranger Things 2,
or Sense and
Sensibility ? the
Kate Winslet one.?
FEB
BOOK
CLUB
KINTU
by Jennifer Nansubuga
Photographs: Graham Walser at Hearst Studios. Dancehall: The Rise Of Jamaican Dancehall Culture by Beth Lesser (Soul Jazz Books)
Makumbi
FEEL FREE
by Zadie Smith
Smith?s voice
lends itself to
insightful popculture criticism.
From references to
the film Get Out to
the author Karl Ove
Knausg錼d via
Jay-Z and social
media, her collated
essays inspire
us to be smarter,
wittier and more
compassionate.
This novel, which
has already won
awards in the US
and Africa, tells the
history of Uganda
through the story
of one family.
THE WORD FOR
WOMAN IS
WILDERNESS
by Abi Andrews
Tired of reading
about male
explorers, 19-yearold Erin sets off on
a journey from
England to Alaska,
all by herself.
A gripping feminist
reimagining of
Into the Wild.
by Imogen
Hermes Gowar
THE MONK
OF MOKHA
A true tale about a
Yemeni-American
man who travels to
the country of his
ancestors looking
for the ancient art of
Yemeni coffee.
EVERYTHING
I KNOW
ABOUT LOVE
by Dolly Alderton
THE MERMAID
AND MRS
HANCOCK
by Dave Eggers
MY
SHELF
Literary Editor Marta Bausells picks
the books to devour this month
This epic and
intricately
researched
historical novel
evokes 1780s
London ? an era
of spectacle,
Soho courtesans,
lavish parties
and dark secrets.
In this hilarious
and honest account
of London life as a
twentysomething
woman, Alderton
? columnist and
co-host of podcast
The High Low ?
charts her awful
dates, great
friendships,
romantic partners,
grimy flat, fears,
daily pleasures
and, most
importantly,
her path to
self-love.
I LOVE YOU
TOO MUCH
by Alicia Drake
Teenage boy Paul
has a seemingly
perfect life. He is
lonely, though, so he
observes the selfabsorbed lives of
the adults around
him ? until he sees
too much?
NO PLACE TO
LAY ONE?S HEAD
by Fran鏾ise Frenkel
A memoir that was
lost for decades
and rediscovered
recently tells of
the writer?s
incredible escape
from the Nazis.
?MY DREAM BOOKSHELF WOULD BE FULL OF WORK BY THE ARTISTS WHO INSPIRE ME MOST ?
MY LOVE FOR THEIR CREATIVITY IS WHAT KEEPS ME GOING IN MY OWN.?
PHOEBE COLLINGS-JAMES, ARTIST
ELLE
57
FEB
U OK ,
HUN?
Collage by
SIDUATIONS
Words by
PHOEBE
LUCKHURST
When HILLARY CLINTON admitted she turned
to YOGA and CHARDONNAY to weather the
bruising shock of her election DEFEAT, she
proved that no one is too important to see the
value of SELF-CARE. In that spirit, EIGHT inspiring,
powerful women open up about how they
COPE when they?re at their most VULNERABLE
SETBACKS STING.
Whether they are the tiny,
private defeats of dashed hopes, or the big missed
opportunities that become torturous what-ifs, coping
requires a stiff upper lip when yours is feeling wobbly.
No matter how you square it in your head, you can?t
quite chalk the disappointment up to experience.
But coping is like a muscle: the more you use it,
the stronger your instincts become. While no one
ever savours disappointment, you can learn to manage it ? and to draw lessons from your negative experiences so that you really emerge from the other
side stronger and thicker-skinned.
On this theme, we asked eight powerful and determined women how they overcome adversity: their
rituals, mantras and lessons learned.
DINA
ASHER-SMITH
Photographs: Getty Images
OLYMPIC MEDALLIST AND RECORDHOLDING TEAM GB SPRINTER, 22
I broke my foot in February 2017, with
less than six months to go before my home
World Championships in London. It was
one of the biggest events of my career so
far, and I wasn?t sure I was going to make
it. All this was made more difficult as I had
to graduate from my history degree at
King?s College London at the same time.
This period was pretty intense ? I
would do two training sessions per day,
gym and then running on an underwater
treadmill. I would work out in the morning, then go to the library to study until my
second session. Being able to graduate
with my peers and perform as I did at the
World Championships made it all worth it.
I cope with pressure by tuning out
from the world. I?ll gradually reduce or
completely stop going on social media
and I?ll take a break from messaging people to reduce negative influences.
The best advice I?ve received from
my coach John is to be patient and have
faith in yourself. You might work really
hard, you might do everything right, but
something just doesn?t happen the way
you want it to. Sometimes, there?s no reason why: you?ve just got to be patient and
believe in all the work you have done before. Eventually, it will be your time.
ELLE
61
FEB
LEANDRA
MEDINE
FOUNDER OF MAN REPELLER, 29
At the end of 2016 I lost a pregnancy
at 14 weeks. It was easily the most
difficult experience I have been confronted with. My initial instinct was to
begin keeping a gratitude journal to
push away the grief, so that?s what
I did, but it didn?t work: grief doesn?t
just go away. I started yoga and meditation and even tried hypnosis and
acupuncture ? essentially, anything
I had read about that could help temper grief. But to be honest, nothing really worked until
I forced myself to really, really reflect inward.
Some days that meant literally talking to myself,
entertaining the negative voices but challenging them
with logic. Other days, it was as simple as giving myself permission to abandon my daily routine: skip a
workout class, avoid an encounter I didn?t want to be
in. The tension between being hard on myself and cutting myself some slack was key. It?s become an integral part of how I talk to and treat myself.
What I have found is that seeking outward help
to cope only works for me for so long. If you really
want to let a wound breathe before you stitch it up,
you?ve got to do some tedious mental work.
SARAH
WOOD
CO-FOUNDER AND CEO
OF UNRULY, 44
Before going into anything, I smile at myself
in the mirror. I?m a big fan of my reflection:
when I smile at it, it always smiles back! My
eight-year old daughter has a similar ritual. If
she has a difficult thing coming up, she looks
at herself really intently and says, ?You?ve got
this, Sunday!? So I?ll often look in the mirror
and say, ?You?ve got this!? Or say it to other
people when they need encouragement.
I also make sure my inner voice is kind.
I treat myself as my own best friend. If I?m being hard on myself, I think, ?What would I say
to my best friend in this situation?? I wouldn?t
say, ?Oh, you fool, you muppet, how could
you do that, what were you thinking?? I?d say,
?OK, never mind, it?s not the end of the world,
don?t worry about it. Don?t beat yourself up.?
Being kind to yourself is so important for getting through hard times: we?re often our own
worst enemies.
JESS PHILLIPS
MP FOR BIRMINGHAM YARDLEY, 36
Having trusted colleagues who you can just howl at the moon with is really
important. I have a network of brilliant women who I rely on in parliament:
Alison McGovern, Stella Creasy, Lucy Powell. I know I can be my worst self
with them, completely and utterly unreasonable. And when I feel too sorry for
myself, my husband is the greatest antidote because he is the most plainspeaking human being in the world, telling me, ?Stop your moaning, you?ll be
alright.? You need a bit of both.
I?m not particularly girly and I never thought that I would have this particular ritual, but I definitely feel different when I put make-up on. It?s war paint to
me. I didn?t start wearing it until I was in my mid-20s, but I do feel like if I give
myself 10 minutes before I go out to put on red lipstick, I can take on the world.
BROADCASTER AND HOST OF THE
PODCAST WHEN LIFE
Being an MP is not like any other
GIVES YOU MELONS, 23
job. There are people who don?t want
you to have the position, so spread ruIf I don?t wake up on the right side of the bed,
mours about you. When I was standing
I?ll list off everything I?m grateful for. For examas a candidate, somebody wrote to my
ple, I have a house, a nice job I enjoy, lots of
then boss at Women?s Aid saying
ACTRESS AND WRITER, 35
good friends, my family are healthy? And by
I wasn?t to be trusted. I face a lot of adversity day to day: death threats, peothe end of that I usually feel a little bit better ?
ple writing horrible emails about my
if not a whole lot better. I can carry on with my
Managing disappointment is part of my job
children being hanged. The worst was
day. That?s a little ritual.
? I can audition ten times and not get the
hearing the news that my colleague Jo
I also talk myself out of a bad mood if
gig. You never brush things off completely,
Cox had been murdered. It was the
I can ? work out why I feel the way I feel, and
but you get better at coping. If I have a big
same week we voted to leave the Eurowhat I can do to change that. Or if I can?t
disappointment, I try to clear my schedule.
pean Union. I can?t say I coped very
do anything, then how long am I going to
Playing with my daughter helps. And don?t
well. I?d go home and vomit every night.
let myself just wallow. I try to coach my mind
react to the person who is rejecting you in
My mum used to say to me, ?Worry
? which works half the time! I think positive
the heat of the moment. Let yourself heal.
only ruins today ? it never changed
thoughts bring positive things. I?m very con?This too shall pass? is a classic mantra, but
anything tomorrow?. I try to keep that in
scious of when I?m thinking bad stuff and try to
so true. Will you remember this conflict a
my head. And the brilliant Labour womtrain myself out of that thought process.
few years from now? Probably, but it won?t
en who went before me, like Margaret
hurt in the same way.
Hodge and Harriet Harman, are alI once heard Hillary Clinton went to
ways on hand to give you a kick up the
give a big talk and only one person was in
arse and say, ?What are we bloody gothe audience. She delivered the speech as
ing to do about this??
if it were a full house, and that person left,
totally life-changed. I try to remember that.
CHIEF BRAND OFFICER AT UBER, 41
I was asked to do a talk at a Women in Hollywood event ? I?d just moved to LA and no
Years ago, in a performance review, a male
one knew who I was. There were only four
executive told me I needed to ?hit more home
people in the room. I moved the chairs into
runs?. This was extremely tough to hear, bea circle and did my speech. Afterwards,
GOURMET CHEF AT ELLA CANTA, 47
cause that year was one of my best profeswe all had the most amazing conversation
sional years ever, and I helped make history
about our favourite film-makers, motherat the company. I also had the results to prove
hood and how we want the industry to
I think women more than men have to
it. Now, I keep a baseball bat in my office to
change ? our vision for the future.
show that we can do a lot of things;
remind myself that, when I hit home runs, I need
I work all day in the kitchen, and I have
to showcase and celebrate them so there?s no
110 employees to look after. I give a lot
mistake come next performance review.
of hours to my kitchen, to my people.
I also make it a priority to take time for myself, to reset and reflect after
The first restaurant I ran had to close. Can you imagine losing
being disappointed at work. I?ve learnt it?s OK (maybe even necessary) to
your work of ten years? A friend came to my house ? I was
get emotional. Cry it out, be frustrated, yell! I?ll call my girlfriends to talk it out
crying and crying; I said, ?I?ve lost everything?. And she said to
-- or I?ll even talk about it with my eight-year-old daughter Lael, who gives the
me, ?You haven?t lost anything ? you have it in your soul. It?s in
best pep talks and advice.
you, not outside of you.? That was beautiful advice: if you have
Every woman should have their feel-good activities and a squad to recreated once, you can do it again.
mind them they?re a badass. I get my nails done, and I have a weakness for
Now, I cope in a very strange way: I go to my kitchen and
bags. I live down the street from my mum, so we?ll have a spa day together.
have a big spoon of mole negro [a classic Mexican sauce].
The moment that flavour goes through me, I feel the power of
I took a trip to Morocco to celebrate my best friend?s 40th birthday. There?s
Mexico. I feel the power in me, I feel it will bring the power of
always a new day and a new challenge ahead, and it?s so important to take
these six ingredients to my blood, to my soul. It changes me.
care of yourself first so you can be the best colleague at work, too.
MAYA
JAMA
SARAH
SOLEMANI
BOZOMA
SAINT JOHN
MARTHA
ORTIZ
ELLE
62
FEB
Ceelebrate the new
seeason at London
Fasshion Week Festival
Get a head-start on the key spring/summer
trends at London Fashion Week Festival,
a four-day showcase of new collections, plus an
exciting line-up of extras. Here?s
what to expect from spring?s hottest ticket.
JOIN THE
FROW
Photographs: Jason Lloyd - Evans, Gett y Images, Imaxtree, St yle
Du Monde, Graham Walser at Hearst
Studios
a s S
ud os, Alamy
a y
Ever wondered
what it would be like to
o
sit front-row at an
exclusive show? Now
w
you don?t have to:
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Meet the industry movers
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their secrets to success.
The schedule includes a
series of Q&A interviews
and panel discussions
with both leading industry
experts and rising stars.
THE INFORM
NFORMATION
TION
When: 22-25 February 2018. Where: The Store
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dios, 180 Strand, London WC2R. Tickets: from �;
lonndonfashionweekfestival.com. Get 20% off Festival
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GET THE
LOOK
Recharge with
a pampering session
with beauty pros
courtesy of Maybelline
New York and
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o try
no better time to
out a fresh new look,
safe in the hands
of the expertss.
?THE GIRL? ? and who, precisely, she is ? is the
starting point for many designers embarking
on their new collections. Where once inspiration tended to come from exotic travels ? the
vibrant colours of Marrakech, the magnificent
architecture of Athens ? increasingly, designers are drawn to the idea of a person, not a
place. It?s not necessarily a specific muse, although Christopher Kane did cite Cynthia
Payne in his SS18 show notes, Erdem the
Queen, and Giambattista Valli the Italian artist
Nancy Ruspoli. But just as often, the muse is
more nebulous. She?s a composite, a mood, a
rendering or an attitude. She?s The Girl.
Strictly speaking, of course, she?s any
number of girls: fashion wouldn?t be fashion if
it only presented the opportunity to be one
single type of person. After all, isn?t the best
part of any new season the choosing? Scanning a gimlet eye over the catwalk, what fun it
is to seek out the girl whose look dovetails
with yours, or whose attitude accords most
closely with your own. Conversely, you might
be drawn not to your mirror image but to your
future, and to the girl you want to be.
If this is true, then the new season will
delight you. Rarely has there been such a
large number of different ? and equally compelling ? fashion tribes. Which one are you?
And remember, you don?t have to be just one
? you can be as many girls as you want to be.
Collages by
BORIS
PEIANOV
Who?s that
GIRL?
Words by
LAURA
CRAIK
KALE JUICE? What even is that? For
the Eighties Party Girl, it?s bubbles all
the way, from her drink to her skirt to
her personality. Minimalism was her
b阾e noire: now that sequin leggings
(Paco Rabanne), leather puff dresses
(Saint Laurent) and red stilettos (everyone) are back in style, EPG?s mood is
absolutely fabulous, darling. She
thrills at the wide-gauge fishnets at
Moschino, as well as Givenchy?s
black suede pixie boots.
She can?t wait to get her
FIND HER:
(titanium-hued) claws into
At the bar,
the crazier reaches of the
drinking Bolly
beauty trends. ElectricPOSTER GIRL
blue mascara? She?s all
THEN: Vintage
over it. And if you?re too
Madonna
young to remember the
POSTER GIRL
Eighties, all the more reaNOW: Edie
son to have fun with them
Campbell
now. Which is what the
Eighties were all about. If you don?t
want to go full Desperately Seeking
Susan Madonna, make a nod with a
fuchsia lip, a metallic trouser or just a
spindly stiletto. For a more casual
take, Stella McCartney?s stonewash
boilersuits have the era all sewn up.
FIND HER:
At the gym, or
looking like she?s
going to the gym
POSTER GIRL
THEN:
Gwen Stefani
POSTER GIRL
NOW: Gigi Hadid
TWO WORDS: Lady Di. Was there
ever a more compelling or enduring
fashion template than the late Princess Diana? Twenty years after her
death, the catwalks
FIND HER:
were more proof that,
Buying crockery at although this wonderful
department store
woman may be gone,
Peter Jones
she is not forgotten. OffPOSTER GIRLS
White?s collection was
THEN: Diana,
a love letter to her, comJemima Khan
plete with pie-crust colPOSTER GIRLS
lars and ruched floral
NOW: Meghan
dresses with a side split
Markle, Duchess of to show off one?s leg.
Cambridge (obvs)
All Sloane Rangers
have great legs ? just
like their horses. One of the easiest
takes came courtesy of Erdem, who
was inspired by a young Queen (the
woman, not the band) to create a
raft of ladylike floral dresses. Instant
Sloane Rangerdom could also be
achieved by donning a classic
Chanel boucl� jacket ? worn with
slim jeans, flat pumps and a string of
pearls. Those with lesser budgets
could consider a waxed jacket: bonus points for wearing it with a plaid
skirt. Take one trope ? pearls, a grosgrain bow flat pump, a cashmere
jumper draped over the shoulders ?
for a nod to Sloanedom without lookTHE GOOD NEWS: you can still get
ing OTT. Real Sloanes have a phoaway with trackie bottoms. The better
bia about looking OTT: dishevelled
news: you can experiment with so much
poshness is the desired look, accentmore. The catwalks threw up myriad
ed with lashings of black eyeliner.
new ways to accommodate sports influences in your wardrobe. No matter if
you never set foot in a gym: one glance at the satin sports shorts at Louis Vuitton (worn
with a bejewelled dandy jacket) and you?ll be filled with inspiration. Vuitton and Prada both showed that sporty elements can be mixed with formal tailoring, while at Valentino and Isabel Marant, the interpretation was more piecemeal, with windcheaters
and cagoules given a deluxe spin. Fabrics to look out for: neoprene (Christian Dior),
parachute silk (Marni) and nylon (Junya Watanabe). The simplest way to get the
look? With a bum bag, as seen at Gucci and Marc Jacobs. Wear it like a holster if
you don?t want to string it round your waist. And what better excuse to bounce around
in trainers for another six months: spring?s are more imaginative than ever.
ELLE
65
FEB
ON
the power
of praise
Illustration: Jo Bell
Compliments are SUSIE BOYT?s biggest vice, and while she craves
the high they give, she knows they?re not always good for her
Is there anything more mood-altering than a beautifully timed compliment, delivered with style, wit and grace from someone you
admire? Or quite like. Or even a stranger. Is there anything more
likely to guarantee a good night out? Some people can?t relax at
a party until they?ve had two and a half units of fizzy alcohol; for
me, it?s praise that helps me come into my own. One ?Look at your
lovely dress!? and my conversation flows. My jokes get funnier. My
cheeks grow rosy. Sometimes, when I feel anxious, I think of the time
I was standing in front of Bill Nighy in a queue at the theatre and he
murmured ?Beautiful skirt? as he passed. (It was my best one.)
Of course, the more original the compliment, the deeper in it
goes. ?I won?t forget it, not even after I am dead? my daughter said
on her third birthday when she saw the castle cake, complete with
horse-drawn carriage and turrets made from inverted ice-cream
cones dusted with edible lustre. I had been cursing the piping bag
long into the small hours, but maybe it was worth it after all? We all
know the damage a vivid insult can do, but elaborate compliments
can stay with you forever, too. In a pistachio-green silk dress printed all over with robots, and black lace at the collar and cuffs, I was
greeted recently by a friend who said, ?You are so Ginger Rogers
in space, if space were Italian.? I nearly curtsied. Thousands of likes
on Instagram or Facebook can?t compete with a moment like that.
Although by day, when I?m writing, I generally live in a grey
or navy skirt and jumper, by night, the allure of flattery influences
my look: rose silk dresses, polka-dot ruffles, black velvet with white
lace, midnight-blue satin frills, apple-green knits with white hearts.
For perfection, I choose clothes that have some kind of emotional charge, and I am often drawn to items that express the faded
glamour of the past. Woe betide a dress that nobody notices. It?s
straight to the back of the wardrobe: the rack of shame.
I can see it?s a failing to require a thumbs up from the world in
this way, but it?s hardly unusual. Mark Twain said a good compliment could keep him going for two months. Of course, we should
provide our own pats on the back and not put our happiness in others? hands. You don?t have to be Sigmund Freud to detect I may be
compensating for something: being the youngest of a large family,
I was the square one, all homework and tap shoes and ?Remember
me?? (Freud declared he was ?defenceless? in the face of praise.)
Because I love receiving praise, I try to be lavish when dishing
it out. ?How do you manage to look 19?? is generally a hit with
fresh-faced friends. ?Superlatives fail me!? goes down well, too. But
it?s important to be careful. I eschew anything time-related, such
as ?You look wonderful tonight.? And praise that suggests overfamiliarity with a look ? ?I always love you in that dress? ? is best
ELLE
avoided. Now and then, compliments misfire ? I don?t love it when
people say to me, ?You could maybe make it as a hand model.? But
occasionally an insult can give you a colossal boost, so perhaps it
evens out in the end. ?All you care about is books and grilled fish!?
my teenager yelled at me last night. Wounded I wasn?t!
My new novel, Love & Fame, is partly set in the theatre, where
the economy of praise is at its most fraught. ?That was wonderful?,
when said in a dressing room, can sound like you didn?t think much
of the show. ?You were magnificent? is an entry-level greeting in
the greasepaint world. And what do you say if you didn?t enjoy it?
My heroine, Eve, an actress from a theatrical family, muses
on this in chapter one. ?I?m thinking of that thing Dad said once
about people visiting people backstage when the show wasn?t
working and that they found themselves in a state of paralysis,
wanting to be warm but not wanting to tell actual lies and the things
they came up with, like ?Good just isn?t the word!? or ?My word!
You?ve done it again!??
?What kind of job, what kind of world, makes people have to
develop a rotten language like that, just to exist?? her mother asked.
The world of writing isn?t a million miles from this. ?I liked your
book,? a friend said recently, before changing the subject. When
you hear ?like?, it?s difficult not to hear ?I didn?t love?. You have to be
strict with yourself at these moments. I cheer myself up with compliments of old. A book I wrote 10 years ago made someone wake
up from a coma, his girlfriend wrote to tell me.
A strange thing has occurred recently, however: post-HarveyWeinstein, perhaps, my attitude to appearance-based compliments
is starting to waver. I have two daughters now, and people dwelling
on their looks sometimes makes me feel queasy. Their appearance
is the least of it, I want to protest. ?Yes, but did you see her drawing
of a pineapple?? or ?Cute? She does so much taekwondo we have
a trained assassin in the house now.? For many people, both male
and female, the most interesting thing about women will always be
the way they look. That?s unacceptable. I feel more unsettled, these
days, when complimenting my friends on their appearance.
I sometimes attend a board meeting for a charity I?m involved
with, and before the meeting starts, the women might say things like,
?Love those boots.? Do the men say, ?That tie is to die for?? They do
not. It feels unprofessional to me now. It didn?t used to.
I still soar a little when complimented, and I?m not above wilting if they?re not forthcoming, but in the past few months, the only
compliment that feels safe, because it is always welcome, is ?How
lovely to see you.? I?m going to stick with that from now on.
Love & Fame by Susie Boyt is published by Virago
67
FEB
TH
FEB UA Y
FA H
HERE.
,
BALENCIAGA
THI S PAGE
Lorena (left) wears: wool jumper, �0;
polyamide-mix T-shirt, �0; silk and lace skirt,
�050; leather bag, �990; resin earrings, �0,
all BALENCIAGA . Leather shoes, �5, TABITHA
SIMMONS . Ode tte ( ri ght) we ars : cotton-mix shirt,
�0; wool trousers, �050; leather bag, �350;
bronze earrings, �0, all B AL E N CI A G A . Leather
boots, �5, MAN OL O B L A H N I K
SAINT LAURENT
OPPOS I TE
Ne e lam ( le ft) we ars: lace and tulle jumpsuit,
�570; palladium and crystal earring, �5,
both S AI NT L AURE N T B Y A N T H O N Y
VAC C ARE L L O . Cotton socks, �,
PAN THE RE L L A . Leather shoes, �5, R U S S E L L
& B ROML E Y . Lore na ( mi ddl e) w ears : silk
playsuit, �,855; leather belt, �4, both
S AI NT L AURE N T B Y ANTH ON Y V A CCA R E L L O .
Socks and shoes, as before. R il ey (righ t )
we ars: silk dress, �285; ruthenium earrings,
�5, both S AI NT L AURE N T B Y A N T H O N Y
VAC C ARE L L O . Socks and shoes, as before
Photographs by
LIZ
COLLINS
DRESS
QUEENS
Styling by
ANNE-MARIE
CURTIS
SASSY, shit hot, CLASSY, fabulous, flossy,
glossy ? this season, prints are bold, SEQUINS
are big, pouf skirts are bigger. No plain
surfaces. No natural looks. It?s FASHION, baby
LIZ COLLINS
DIOR
L E FT TO RI GH T
Odette wears: silk-mix
coat, �700; tulle shirt,
�300; silk-mix
trousers, �050; suede
boots, �150, all D I O R .
Riley wears: denim
beret, �0; tweed
coat, �300; cotton
shirt, �0; denim
trousers, �050;
leather shoes,
�0, all D I OR . Lorena
wears: denim blazer,
�600; tulle shirt,
�200; denim trousers,
�450; leather shoes,
�0, all D I OR . Nylon
tights, �99,
S OC KS HOP. C O . U K .
Neelam wears:
georgette shirt, �250;
leather trousers,
�500; leather shoes,
�0, all D I OR . Nylon
tights, as before.
Lili wears: lambskin
coat, �700; tulle shirt,
�300; cotton-mix bra,
�0; silk-mix trousers,
�150; leather boots,
�150, all D I O R .
Beret, stylist?s own
Brocade dress, �720;
cotton shirt, �0;
denim trousers, �020;
leather shoes, price on
application, all PRADA
LIZ COLLINS
ERDEM
L E FT TO RI GH T
Neelam wears: tulle
dress, price on
application; brass and
pearl earrings, �0,
both E RD E M .
Lorena wears: fil-coup�
dress, price on
application; brass and
crystal earrings, �0,
both E RD E M .
Headband, stylist?s
own. Odette wears:
tulle dress, �160;
brass, crystal and pearl
earrings, �0, both
E RD E M . Lili wears:
organza dress, �790;
metal earrings, �0,
both E RD E M . Riley
wears: wool cardigan,
price on application;
jacquard bralet, �0;
tulle skirt, �890; brass
and pearl earrings,
�0, all E RD E M
Odette (left) wears:
cotton-mix redingote,
price on application;
silk trousers, �5, both
LO UIS V UIT T O N .
Riley (right) wears:
cotton-mix redingote,
price on application;
silk shirt, �900;
silk shorts, �0,
all LO UIS V UIT T ON
DOLCE & GABBANA
Neelam (left) wears:
white cotton and lace
shirt, �273; black tulle
and lace skirt, �0;
gold and blue crystal
earrings, �008, all
D OL C E & GAB B AN A .
Black cotton socks,
�99, S OC KS HOP.
C O. UK . Black leather
boots, �0,
D R MARTE NS .
Lili (right) wears: black
chiffon-silk dress,
�415; gold and
crystal headband,
�557; gold and black
earrings, �447, all
D OL C E & GAB B AN A .
Black leather jacket,
�200, AC N E
S TUD I OS . Socks and
boots, as before
LIZ COLLINS
ALEXANDER
McQUEEN
L E FT TO RI GHT
Lili wears: cotton-mix dress with
belt, �795; black leather and
Perspex boots, similar from
�290; silver and crystal
earrings, �195 for pair; silver
and crystal necklace, �5,
all AL E XAND E R McQUE E N .
Nylon tights, �99,
S OC KS HOP. C O. UK .
Odette wears: organza dress,
price on application; leather belt,
�5; silver and siam necklace,
�5; silver and siam earrings,
�195, all AL E XAN D E R
McQUE E N .
Neelam wears: organza dress,
price on application; leather belt,
�5; silver and siam necklace,
�5; silver and siam earrings,
�195, all AL E XAN D E R
McQUE E N .
Lorena wears: organza dress,
�245; leather belt, �5; silver
and crystal earrings, �195;
silver beaded necklace, �5;
silver charm necklace, �495,
all AL E XAND E R McQUE E N . Riley
wears: cotton-mix dress with belt,
�795; leather and Perspex
boots, similar from �290; silver
and crystal earrings, �195;
silver and crystal necklace,
�5, all AL E XAN D E R
M C QUE E N . Tights, as before.
Headband, stylist?s own
LIZ COLLINS
Lorena (left) wears:
cotton top, �100;
cotton-mix skirt, �0,
both FENDI . Leather
boots, �695,
C HR IST IAN
LO UBO UT IN .
Headband, stylist?s
own. Riley (right) wears:
denim dress, �670,
FENDI . Boots, as before.
Headband, stylist?s own
LIZ COLLINS
Lorena (left) wears:
techical fabric poplin
jacket, �150; silk top,
�060; leather
shorts, �575,
all VAL E NTI NO .
Leather shoes,
�5, VAL E N TI N O
GARAVANI . Headband,
stylist?s own. Neelam
(right) wears: technical
fabric poplin jacket,
�650; silk T-shirt,
�0; silk skirt, �5,
all VAL E NTI NO .
Suede shoes, �5,
VAL E N TI N O GARAVANI
Lili (left) wears:
cotton-mix jacket,
�520; cotton-mix
top, �710; cotton-mix
trousers, �440,
all GUCCI . Felt
earrings, �0,
R ANJ ANA KHAN .
Odette (right) wears:
cotton-mix jacket,
�490; cotton skirt,
�0; brass and pearl
necklace, �710,
all GUCCI
SIMONE
ROCHA
L E FT TO RI GH T
Odette wears: cotton shirt, �5; cotton
dress, �695; sequin apron, �375;
beaded hair slides, �5 each; beaded
necklace, �5, all S I MONE ROC H A .
Leather boots, �0, D R MARTE N S .
Lorena wears: tulle and lace jacket,
�5; cotton dress, �0; tulle skirt,
�5; beaded hair slides, � each;
pearl earring (left ear), �0; pearl
earring (right ear), �5, all S I MON E
ROC HA . Headband, stylist?s own.
Riley wears: cotton dress, �995;
silk blouse, �5; beaded flower hair
slides, � each; beaded bow hair
slide, �5; beaded earrings, �5, all
S I MON E ROC H A . Boots, as before.
Headband, stylist?s own.
Lili wears: cotton dress, �5; satin
skirt, �5; tulle and lace skirt, �5;
pearl hair slides, � each; pearl
earring (left), �5; pearl earring
(right), �5, all S I MONE ROC HA .
Boots, as before
LIZ COLLINS
Silk top, �770;
elastic and Plexiglas
belt, �0; silk-satin
skirt, �950; leather
bag, �800; leather
boots, �0;
satin and Swarovski
earrings, �0,
all GIO R GIO ARMANI
Lili (top) wears: black
mohair coat, �470;
white cotton vest, �5;
white cotton shorts,
�5; grey nylon dress,
�060; pink and grey
socks, �5; silver
leather sandals,
�5, all MIU MIU .
Lorena (bottom) wears:
black nylon headband,
�; brown, black and
purple wool cardigan,
�0; brown satin shirt,
�0; brown leather
belt, �0; navy wool
trousers, �5; orange
nylon socks, �5;
white leather sandals,
�5, all MIU MIU
M O DELS: ODETTE
P AV LO V A, LILI SUMNER,
R ILEY M O NTANA,
LO R ENA M ARASCHI
AND NEELAM GILL AT
NEX T M O DELS LONDON
HAIR : SAMANTHA
HILLER BY AT PREMIER
HAIR AND MAKE- UP,
USING ORIBE.
M AKE-UP : SHARON
DO WSET T AT CLM HAIR
& M AKE-UP USING
C HANEL NEAPOLIS
NEW C IT Y AND BLUE
SER UM EY E . NAILS:
AM A Q UASHIE AT CLM
HAIR & M AKE- UP USING
DIO R C AP T URE TOTALE
DR EAM SKIN AND DIOR
C HR IST MAS
C O LLECT IO N 2 0 1 7 .
BUS: RED
R O UT EM ASTER. WITH
T HANKS T O MARRIOTT
CO UNT Y HALL HOTEL
LIZ COLLINS
?MODELLING EXPOSES YOU
TO SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE
LILI SUMNER
?I SUCK AT INSTAGRAM
RILEY MONTANA
ODETTE PAVLOVA
C ASS
Words by
A
PARIS
LORENA MARASCHI
?I WANT TO MAKE
A POSITIVE IMPACT
NEELAM GILL
2O18
- NEELAM GILL
THE SETTING: five opinionated models of the moment, three curious ELLE staff members and six bottles of wine around a sprawling
banquet table in a private dining room at a bustling East London
restaurant. We?re already on our second (OK, third) bottle of
wine, with a few Moscow mules for starters, and the beginnings
of a feast of fried squid, tacos and mounds of salsa has just
landed in front of us. But all Neelam Gill, the only British model at
the table, wants is some avocado.
She?s joined by Detroit-born campaign girl Riley Montana,
Brazilian top runway walker Lorena Maraschi, Saint Laurent face
Lili Sumner of New Zealand, and Odette Pavlova, one half of Russia?s most celebrated model twins (her sister is Lia Pavlova).
These are the new girls who have been dominating the big
shows (Miu Miu, Loewe, Valentino, the list goes on), campaigns
(Prada, Saint Laurent and Burberry, to name a few) and internet
rankings (Lili and Lorena are fixtures on the Models.com Hot List,
while Odette features on the site?s Top 50) ? the most in-demand
newcomers in the business. And now, halfway through a mammoth
two-day ELLE Collections shoot, capturing more than 70 of this season?s biggest looks, we?ve decided, perhaps unwisely, to go ?out
out?. A fleet of cars takes us to Coya, a Peruvian restaurant in the
City, with plenty of vibe and very low lighting, and the wait staff,
visibly intimidated by the beauty in the group, promptly seat us at a
corner table. With our glasses full, the conversation begins?
says between mouthfuls of, yes, avocado. ?But as I got older and
started to wear contact lenses, I got scouted. Then, at 18, I got a
call from my agency saying, ?Burberry wants to see you.? I booked
a train ticket and got my nails done in hot pink. And with my hair
past my arse, I met Christopher. He liked that I was from Coventry
and that I had no clue. He booked me as an exclusive for the show.?
This prompts all the models to talk about the designers who
launched their catwalk careers. For Riley it was Riccardo Tisci, the
former creative director of Givenchy who also helped make supers
Lara Stone and Joan Smalls. For Lili Sumner it was Hedi Slimane,
who booked her as a campaign and show exclusive for Saint Laurent in 2013. ?It?s wild to think that if you hadn?t met that one person
when you were younger, your life would be very different,? Lili says.
?MY LIFE wouldn?t be
what it is now without
CHRISTOPHER BAILEY?
? NEELAM GILL
The conversation moves on to which models they each fan-girled
when they were growing up. ?I don?t want to be a clich� and
say I only looked up to black models, but they?re definitely who
I identified with,? Riley says in her Michigan drawl. ?It was Naomi
Campbell and also Jourdan Dunn, Joan Smalls, Chanel Iman.
These women are still killing it.?
Neelam says she didn?t see Indian models growing up, which
had a big impact on how she viewed herself: ?I hated my skin colour because I thought that being lighter was what was beautiful.
I feel so happy that my sisters don?t have to go through that. It?s
what I feel most proud of in modelling; that it?s having an impact
on other people in a positive way.?
It?s rare to read a model story that doesn?t start with getting scouted
on the denim floor of Topshop. But for Neelam, it was a meeting
with Christopher Bailey that started a career of Burberry billboards
and L?Or閍l campaigns. ?I?m from Coventry, and never thought I?d
be a model. I had glasses and braces ? I was not a cute kid,? she
?Back in the day, NAOMI?S
CREW used to say, ? We?re
NOT WALKING this show if
you don?t book NAOMI.? I feel like
that sense of unity among
models is BACK RIGHT NOW?
? RILEY MONTANA
Riley wears: silk jacket, �900; silk T-shirt, �000; silk skirt, �5, all Valentino. Pearl earrings, �0, Valentino Garavani. Lili wears: chiffon dress, �145, Christopher Kane. Bronze earrings, �7, Konplott.
Odette wears: linen hat, �0; linen blazer, �275; wool jumper, �0; cotton shirt, �0; linen shorts, �0, all Michael Kors Collection. Neelam wears: faux leather hat, �, ASOS. Cotton sweatshirt, �7;
leather belt, �415; cotton-mix skirt, �020, all Balmain. Lorena wears: lace and leather dress, �,990; leather belt (just seen), �5, both Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello
? I just really want
this AVOCADO; I?m
dying for it.
I can?t go ONE
DAY without eating
AVOCADO?
Photographs: Liz Collins. Hair: Samantha Hillerby at Premier Hair and Make-Up using Oribe. Make-up: Sharon Dowsett at CLM Hair & Make-Up using Chanel Neapolis
New City and Blue Serum Eye. Nails: Ama Quashie at CLM Hair & Make-Up using Dior Capture Totale Dreamskin and Dior Christmas Collection 2017
?RIGHT NOW, MODELS are
more conscious of THEIR RIGHTS
than ever before?
? LILI SUMNER
?I think it?s really cool what Cameron Russell?s doing. It?s great
now when one model speaks up ? especially with social media ?
and everyone comes together,? Neelam says. In case you missed
it, in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, model Cameron
Russell has been sharing anonymous models? experiences of
sexual harassment and abuse on her Instagram feed to bring
attention to the issue within the fashion world. Neelam continues,
?I was shocked at how many stories there are. It?s important that
people are talking about it now, because we?re not letting it happen, and we?re not letting it slide.?
Everyone seems to agree that making the industry a safer,
more caring and inclusive place ? particularly for younger girls
coming up ? is a priority. ?I was at the C閘ine show and I did notice
small things, like signs saying you have the right to change in a private place,? Lili says. Talk turns to James Scully, the top casting director who has worked with Stella McCartney and Tom Ford,
among others. He became big news last year when he called out
a string of influential houses, including Balenciaga and Lanvin, for
mistreating and discriminating against models during Paris Fashion
Week. The dialogue he inspired led to the creation of the landmark Model Wellbeing Charter between LVMH and Kering. ?To
know that you are an adult working with another adult, and you?re
both equal ? these are things you don?t realise when you?re younger. [The charter] is a really good thing,? Lili says.
For the first time this evening, the models are having a disagreement. The hot topic: is social media good or bad for the
fashion industry? The power of the Insta-girl is undeniable, and
everyone agrees that being cast for a show or campaign is now
based as much on followers as it is on one?s look or star quality.
?I?m more like the models of the Nineties, when a model was a
model,? says Odette, who is a rarity in fashion ? a model who abstains from Instagram. But Lili sees the other side: ?Social media
has been a massive game-changer. There are so many models,
and now every single one can say something, get noticed and actually bring about a lot of change.? Riley isn?t sure. ?I suck at Instagram sometimes ? I feel like it?s so much work,? she says. ?When
I started out, I was scared to be me, but now I?m like, you have to
accept me or it?s your loss. It?s a weight off my shoulders.?
?OH MY GOD, the season
when I did 62 SHOWS,
and MY SISTER did 71, we slept
for like TWO HOURS?
? ODETTE PAVLOVA
The table moves to talking about the cyclical nature of fashion
and how fast the industry moves. The models long for the career
longevity of the Nineties, when models were supers for decades
rather than seasons. ?Now, if you?re at a casting and it?s your sixth
or seventh season, you are old,? Odette
says. ?Even if you are still working, you are
old. Because now there are a lot of new
faces coming through.?
If this can?t last for ever, then what?s
next? ?I look at women such as Natasha
Poly, who have been here for so long, and
it makes me feel encouraged. She went
through 10 years of work and now look
where she is,? Odette says. ?Personally, I?ve
got other things I want to do, but there?s
hope.? Lili sees a future in the film business:
?Modelling exposes you to people who
are really good at what they do and also
really successful. They inspire you to have
that mentality, even if you don?t use it.?
Neelam?s sights are set on a future in
philanthropy: ?I love my job of being a
model, but I also love knowing that I can
help others,? she says. ?I don?t think I?d enjoy modelling if I couldn?t do things on the
side, such as charity work. You do have
such a big platform to influence as a
model, so what?s the point of just being silent?? But Lorena?s not ready to give up
modelling just yet: ?I always dreamed of
being a model, I?m just going to let life
show me what?s next, and not worry about
it.? And with that, there?s one last round of
drinks to enjoy. The call time for tomorrow?s ELLE shoot is 7am. But these girls
have a whole night of chat left in them.
? In the Nineties,
FASHION was
a mystery. Now,
models show off
their day on
SOCIAL MEDIA,
and it?s not
INTERESTING ?
-
LORENA MARASCHI
COACH 1941
THIS PAGE AND O PPOS I TE Mia (left) wears: suede jacket, �250, C OAC H X KE I TH H ARI N G . Cotton shirt, �5; wool trousers,
all L A D Y G R E Y . Massima
Photographs by
CLAY S
GARDNER
SOFT
ROCK
Styling by
SOLANGE
FRANKLIN
�5, both CO ACH 1941 . Leather boots, �0, ACNE STUDIOS . Silver ring (worn on ring finger), �8; gold ring (worn on middle finger), �9; gold ring (worn on index finger), �8,
(right) wears: leather jacket, �300; lace skirt, from a selection, both COACH 1 9 4 1 . Pony-hair boots, �209, L UC C HE S E . Silver earrings, �2, J E NNI FE R FI S HE R . Briefs, stylist?s own
CLAY S GARDNER
C蒐INE
Massima (left) wears: wool-mix jacket, �183; wool-mix skirt, �183, both C � L I N E . Pony-hair boots, �209, L UC C H E S E . Mia (right) wears:
leather coat, �009; wool shirt, �8; wool trousers, �3, all C � L I NE . Leather boots, �270, L U CCH E S E
CALVIN
KLEIN 2O5W39NYC
Satin shirt, �5; cotton top (worn underneath), �5; satin trousers, �5; leather boots,
�065, all C AL VI N KL E I N 205W39N YC
CLAY S GARDNER
MAX
MARA
Black silk and organza jacket, �0; black silk and organza trousers, �0, both MAX MARA . Black leather boots, price on application,
OFF-W HI TE . Silver earrings, �0, C L OS E R B Y W W AKE . Silver cuff, �4, A G M E S
MICHAEL KORS
COLLECTION
Wool-mix jacket, �190, MI C H AE L KORS C OL L E C TI ON . Silver earring, �0; silver double ring,
�8, both ANNE L I S E M I CH E L S O N
CLAY S GARDNER
BALMAIN
Massima (left) wears: cotton-mix jacket, �550; leather skirt, �120; leather boots, �040, all B ALM AI N . Mia (right) wears: viscose-mix coat,
price on application; leather boots, �040, both B AL M AI N . Leather belt, �, S T E T S O N. CO M . Briefs (just seen), stylist?s own
CLAY S GARDNER
CHLO�
Lace jacquard top, �683; denim jeans, �5, both C H L O� . Leather boots, �5, AL C H I MI A D I B AL L I N . Silver earrings, �0, A G M E S
EMPORIO
ARMANI
Massima (left) wears: organza top, �0, E MPORI O ARMANI . Silver earrings, �2, J E N N I FE R FI S H E R . Mia (right) wears: satin-mix
jacket, �0, E MPORI O ARMANI . Silver earring, �7, L A D Y G R E Y
CLAY S GARDNER
CHANEL
White silk-mix shirt, �,225; black wool-mix skirt, �320; transparent PVC and grosgrain boots, �115, all CH A N E L
HAIR : T ET SUY A YAMAKATA
AT AR T LIST NY USING
KER AST ASE. M AKE- UP:
Y UM I M O R I AT THE WALL
G R O UP USING MAC.
NAILS: Y UKIE M I YAKAWA
AT KAT E R YAN INC, USING
DEBO R AH LIP P M ANN.
M O DELS: M IA SPEICHER AND
M ASSIM A DESIR E AT NEXT
M O DELS LO NDON. LOCAL
P R O DUCT IO N: URBAN NYC
BOTTEGA
VENETA
Cotton playsuit, �0; leather coat, �295, both B OTTE GA VE N E TA . Leather boots, �270, L U CCH E S E
STEADY
AS
SHE
GOES
Photographs by
JACOB LILLIS
i
n R
r n
hr
Words by
KENYA HUNT
ELLE
103
FEB
imone Rocha hadn?t set out to make a statement in this way.
It just happened, over time.
At the reception desk in her East London headquarters, a
lithe, terribly attractive woman with light brown hair answers
phones, accepts courier packages and greets incoming guests
while dressed in Simone?s neoprene midi dress, oversized cardigan and furry slides. A few feet away, an equally gorgeous
woman, arms full of binders, strolls towards a nearby desk,
wearing Simone?s beaded faux-fur stole over a cotton dress and
Perspex faux-fur mules, the light catching the Lucite on her shoes
just so. Further back in the atelier, I spy another stunner bent over
a table in Simone-designed tulle and beaded drop earrings. The
place is filled with women of varying heights and backgrounds,
all blessed with killer bone structure, all wearing Simone?s quietly glamorous clothes and shoes, all going about their work day.
It feels like I?ve stumbled into some kind of fashion-based performance art. However, this is just an average day in the 31-yearold?s world.
?It?s been this way from the beginning ? my design team has
been the same for the past six years,
and it?s completely female,? Simone
says later in her office, which overlooks one of the leafier corners of
De Beauvoir, a neighbourhood with
a fashion fanbase (Craig Green and
Peter Pilotto have studios nearby).
Her soft Irish lilt gives away her
Dublin upbringing, but everything
else about her ? her slightly skewed
sense of polish, and eccentric cool ?
is all London, where she?s lived for
the past 10 years.
Her black reclaimed Fifties tableturned-desk looks out over a sleepy
canal and idyllic ivy-covered building. Behind her, three enormous, heaving bookcases sourced from the Oxford Library,
painted black and filled with books about Eva Hesse, Francis
Bacon and Julian Schnabel, stand guard. Simone, who?s also
dressed in black (with two crystal clips in her hair), adds,
?We?re like a family.?
An incredibly chic family. ?It?s really nice that the team?s uniform comes from things they?ve been working on,? she says.
?That?s important because, for me, everyone is involved in the
design process. You want people to be a part of that. They all
wear it with their own style, and they always look amazing. Everyone has a totally different take on it.?
Femininity has been central to Simone?s work since she
launched her business in 2010. That was the same year she
graduated with an MA from Central Saint Martins, where she
studied under the late Louise Wilson, the lecturer who taught
and mentored many of Britain?s fashion design A-list, including
John Galliano, Phoebe Philo and Alexander McQueen. Back
then, Simone had a team of five. Now, she has 27 employees,
two stores (one in Mayfair, London, and another in SoHo, New
York), an ELLE Style Award (she also won the first ever ELLE/
Cointreau Bursary, a prize of �0,000, in 2013), three British
Fashion Awards, and an ever-growing list of famous clients, including Rihanna, Julianne Moore, Chlo� Moretz and Alexa
Chung. But her dedication to exploring womanhood remains.
?It?s not like one day I thought, ?I want to focus on women,??
she explains. ?But there?s a strength that comes from being a
woman designing for women and putting my personality and
emotions into my pieces ? but also having the awareness that
it?s not just about me,? Simone says. ?Louise always said my
work is very feminine, strong and modern, so I?ve strived to
keep those three things in place.?
When Simone had her London Fashion Week debut, during Lulu Kennedy?s Fashion East, a launch pad for designers
including JW Anderson, Gareth Pugh and the late Richard
Nicoll, her work had a youthful, organic fragility that was the
polar opposite of the bold, digital graphic prints reigning at the
time (think the late Noughties work of Peter Pilotto, Mary
Katrantzou and Basso & Brooke). ?My aesthetic at the time
was very much going against the grain. But it was something
that felt very natural to me,? she says. Hugely influential retailers
such as Dover Street Market, Colette and Ikram took note.
And Simone began to broaden her study of womanhood,
diving deeper into Victoriana (a recurring theme in her work),
and refining her trademark sense of shape and volume. She?s
also developed the idea of romanticism and femininity beyond the
young ing閚ue. For AW17, she
made headlines and earned nods
of approval from women?s magazines, such as this one, when she
?There?s a strength
that comes
from being a
woman designing
for women?
Simone?s SS18
collection, pictured
here backstage, is
both feminine and
firmly modern
cast silver-haired legends, including 72-year-old Jan de Villeneuve, to walk alongside younger girls-of-the-moment Adwoa
Aboah and Yasmin Wijnaldum in her show. Her SS18 collection that followed was softer and, in her words, ?the antithesis of
the season before, which was all about armour and protection
and camouflage?.
Simone says her far-reaching
idea of femininity began with her
family: her mother, Odette, with
whom she works closely, her grandmothers, Margaret Gleeson and
Cecila Rocha, and her two-yearold daughter, Valentine. ?I?ve learnt
about respect and gusto from my
mother. Her mother was a very
strong-minded, practical and funny
character, whereas my Chinese
grandmother, who lived in Hong
Kong, taught me all about grace,?
she says. As a small child, she
honed her personal sense of girlhood as one of three in a class with 13 boys. ?It was nearly all
lads in tracksuits. So it made me really girly ? dresses, skirts and
knee socks. Femininity has always been important to me.?
You?d think that Simone?s world is a real-life Themyscira, the
fictional matriarchal, Amazon-only island in Wonder Woman.
But that would be too clich閐. ?The irony is that all of my
external collaborators are men!? she says. ?People such as
photographers Jacob Lillis and Colin Dodgson, stylist Robbie
Spencer, and James Pecis, who does the hair for my shows.?
Then there is, of course, her father, the Hong Kong-born
British designer John Rocha CBE. ?He?s my earliest memory of
fashion. I remember being in my dad?s studio, in this fabric room
that had rows and rows of fabric, which I thought were the most
amazing climbing frames. It was all very tactile: my dad used a
lot of tweed and wool, very traditional Irish fabrics, so there was
a real weight and texture to everything. I used to just crawl up
and down the fabrics. Years later, I thought, ?That was probably
really important stuff.??
It was her dad who coached her when she decided to
study fashion design at the National College of Art and Design
in Dublin. ?He sat me down and said, ?If you want to do this
for real, you really need to get the absolute best education in
?For me, the most
important thing is
your own identity.
If you have that, the
rest will follow?
ELLE
this you can, and you have to do a
master?s degree.??
The fashion business has radically changed since her school days.
And that?s why, in part, Simone clings
to what she knows: family and her
singular creative vision. ?For me, the
most important thing is your own identity. If you have that, the rest will follow. It will be easier to grow
your business because you know what you want rather than
struggle with what other people think you should be doing,? she
says. So she doesn?t waver from her two collections per year or
give in to fashion?s angst-filled changes in direction. ?I am very
committed to two collections a year. When I started, a lot of
young designers were under pressure to do pre and cruise collections. But it never felt right for my business. And now, quite a
few are dropping pre and cruise. People were doing ?see now
buy now? and I was like, ?No, that?s not my customer.? I want
her to see the dress in the show, and then in the press and finally
in the story. I want it to feel special, a commitment. In five years?
time, I want you to still be able to wear it. You can?t give too
much too soon, because it devalues that commitment,? she says.
She also doesn?t see herself giving up her independence
and taking on a creative director role at a big house anytime
soon. ?The people I admire are independents, like Rei Kawakubo, Miuccia Prada, Dries Van Noten, Rick Owens; people
who have their own labels and still produce exciting, signature
work,? she says. Does that mean she?d say no if a luxury titan
came calling? Who?s to say one hasn?t already? ?You can
never say never. It?s always nice to be asked, but at this moment I?m proud to run my own brand. It?s really important that
you hold on to what you?re about.?
It?s time for Simone to join the women at work in her studio,
where they are already producing her next collection. ?The
world is a funny place right now,? she says, thoughtfully. ?That
and being a mum has made me realise how much of a privilege
it is to get to have an amazing team that feels like a family and
have my own family, too. Life is good; it evolves.?
105
FEB
a
be uty
elle
Beauty direction by
SOPHIE
BERESINER
Photographs by
SASCHA
HEINTZE
eyes wide shut
THE EYE IS THE SEASON?S UNDISPUTABLE FOCAL POINT, SO MAKE
A STATEMENT. INTRODUCING ALL THE NEW BRIGHT IDEAS YOU NEED?
GRAPHIC
The new take on a feline eye involves elongated graphic wings and flicks that float above the
lash line. ?For an intense, inky black, use pencil kohl to map out the shape in dashes
and dots, then apply a fluid line of liquid or gel,? advises the artist responsible, Sharon Dowsett.
LEFT TO RIGHT: BENEFIT They?re Real! Lengthening Mascara in Jet Black, �. 50. LANC訫E Le Crayon
Kh鬺 in Noir, �. 50. RIMMEL Wonder Wing Eyeliner, �99. DIOR Diorshow Ar t Pen in Cat walk Black, �. 50.
BOBBI BROWN Long -Wear Gel Eyeliner in Black Ink, �. 50
ELLE
108
FEB
SILVER
Glitter is absolutely going mainstream. Formulations have finally caught up with
the catwalk and now offer a proper glitter hit without the mess (or the need
for pro-level skills). Like dressing your eyes with diamonds. Interested? Thought so.
LEFT TO RIGHT: CHANEL Illusion D?Ombre in Fantasme, �. STILA Magnificent Metals Glitter & Glow
Liquid Eyeshadow, � . TOPSHOP Eyeshadow Mono in Silver Fox � 50 . GYPSY SHRINE Glitter in Ice
Queen, � 50. ILLAMASQUA Af termath Embellishing Eye Gel in Silver, �
GLOSS
If you haven?t succumbed to the transformative power of eye gloss, rectify that
immediately. The season?s texture trend of choice, it lends any colour that?s
layered underneath instant coolness. ?The shine makes all the difference,? says Sharon.
Murky, mossy green shine ? sounds like you shouldn?t, but you really should.
LEFT TO RIGHT: CHANEL Ombre Premi鑢e in Verde, �. CHARLOTTE TILBURY Eyes to Mesmerise in Veruschka,
�. MAC Mixing Medium Shine, �. 50. TOM FORD Eye Colour Quad in Last Dance, �
Words: Joely Walker. Model: Camille Linnea at The Squad Management. Make-up: Sharon
Dowsett at CLM Hair & Makeup using Chanel Neapolis New City and Blue Serum Eye
DUSK
DAWN
Burnt orange, tempered tangerine, fiery amber? find the orange that works with your skin
tone and surprise yourself with its complexion-boosting effects. Dubious?
?Orange is flattering because it contains red, which makes every eye colour pop,? says Sharon.
LEFT TO RIGHT: EST蒃 LAUDER Double Wear Stay- In - Place Eyeshadow Base, �. L?OR葾L Infallible Paint Chubby
Blush in Tangerine, �99. GUERLAIN Eye - Stay Primer, �. 50. MAC Eyeshadow in Red Brick, �. 50. E.L.F. Aqua
Beaut y Molten Liquid Eyeshadow in Liquid Gold, � NARS Blush in Intensely, �
ELLE
111
FEB
No one-size-fits-all situation
going on here. Clarins has
devised a six-part priming
squad ? all colour coded to
suit your most pressing
concern. Redness? Go green.
Dark spots? Choose coral.
A bit sallow? Lilac is your
hero. The list goes on. Clarins
SOS Primers, �.5O each (left).
MAKEUP
PROBLEM SOLVED
BEAUTY LEXICON:
?CAR-CRASH CLASH?
?The colour rules have
changed. Take red and twin
it with anything it?s not meant
to work with ? like pink or
orange ? for a twisted take.?
MAC DIRECTOR OF MAKE-UP ARTISTRY TERRY BARBER (@TERRYBARBERONBEAUTY)
PROJECT LIP
Properly matte,
incredibly
longwearing and
with all the pigmentpopping prowess you
could want, Buxom
Plumpline Lipliners in
(from left) Confidential,
Stealth and Espionage,
� each, and
Givenchy Le Rouge
Mat Lipstick in (above,
from left) Nude
Androgyne, Poupre
D閒il� and Rose
Graphique, � each,
deserve a place
on your lips.
Compiled by Joely Walker & Sophie Beresiner.
Photographs: Graham Walser at Hearst Studios, Jason Lloyd-Evans
BY SOPHIE BERESINER
My relationship with foundation
is, at best, turbulent. Yes, OK,
I need it, but it doesn?t like me.
So, just as I?m thinking I have
to make a clean break and
approach life unencumbered
by an even skintone, Cover FX
introduces me to its Natural Finish
Foundation, � (above), a
water-based, oil-free formulation
that?s flexible, so I still look like
me, but kind of in soft focus. It?s
like the hybrid perfection my skin
(but not only mine ? there are 25
shades) wants to start over with.
THE NEW WAY TO SCRUB
Just when you thought your obsession with Le Labo
couldn?t be topped, the brand launches the
most Instagrammable, skin-softening, beautifully
scented Coffee Body Scrub, � (right), imaginable.
GYM-BAG
BEAUTY?
CliniqueFIT?s
Post-Workout
Neutralizing Face
Powder, � (left),
is gym-bag gold.
Dab the colourcorrecting powder
on post-workout skin
to reduce redness
and shine.
FROM THE BEAUTY
CUPBOARD?
BY JOELY WALKER
SKIN
The new beauty vernacular
avoids the outdated term ?antiageing?, opting for a far more
positive (and realistic) approach
that we can all get behind. Early
adopters of the movement,
bareMinerals has caught my
attention once again with its new
Ageless Genius Firming & Wrinkle
Smoothing Serum (left). It?s a
collagen-boosting, vitamin
A-renewing, antioxidant-savvy
combination that leaves my skin
looking and feeling fresh, properly
rested and glowy. Confidenceboosting skincare at its best.
THE DIY FACIAL
TRENDING:
GLASS SKIN
A Korean beauty term
describing the holy grail
of K-beauty: poreless,
luminous, translucentlike skin that reflects
light like a pane of
glass. It sounds wholly
unrealistic in our view.
We?ll stick with a clever
base and highlighter
combo, thanks.
ELLE
There is little more satisfying than an
at-home facial that looks like you?ve just
emerged from a salon. These will help:
1.
2.
Elizabeth Arden
Ceramide Lift and Firm
Sculpting Gel, �
(left), blends three
ceramides to
strengthen skin?s
moisture barrier and
peptides to plump.
The Philips VisaPure,
�9.99 (left),
has three genius
attachments to
cleanse and massage
like a pro. An added
boon: it can be used
in the shower, too.
115
FEB
I AM
MADEM
-OIS
ELLE
Our columnist
Through my loud tinnitus, I hear,
?All normal, except for G ? Glycation.? REALLY? My X (matrix), relating to collagen, suggests I?m ageing ?normally?. My T (tone) shows
no sign of pigmentation; I would
hope not ? raised in Scotland, I?m
allergic to the sun. But the bit I am
most surprised at, given the fact
that I live on a busy road in central
London, is A (antioxidant). Appartly, I have a ?normal inflammary response to stress and pollun?. I make up for being so bloody
ormal? (boring) with category G.
the top end of the scale, I run a
k of ?advanced glycation? and ?
ULP ? ?internal ageing?. I?m ageing on the inside!
Out from behind the comfy seat
I?ve been uncomfortably sitting on
for the past hour appears a large,
luxurious black box. I prize it open
to find a three-month supply of
vitamin supplements, a slender
tube of eye cream, a serum, a pot
of face cream and a foam cleanser, all chosen to work specifically
with my DNA. I ask the two doctors
whether further DNA testing could
provide me with the perfect set of
instructions for other stuff, like what
I should be eating and what type of
exercise I should be doing. In a flash, the
medical duo produces two further DNA
test swabs, which I scrape around the
insides of my cheeks in the manner of
someone who no longer suffers from a
morbid fear of test results.
When the second lot of DNA tests
return from the lab in Sweden, the results
show I have ?an increased risk of obesity?.
Oh. ?People who carry this gene variant
can decrease the risk of obesity through
physical activity and with the help of a
proper diet and strong exercise.? I take to
my bed with a bar of Green & Black?s and
slather myself in All閘 serum. I reckon it?s the
serum that?s giving my skin that ?post-shag
glow? everyone keeps commenting on ?
honestly, my skin looks and feels incredible. It?s better t
y additional
DNA tests, I g
?strong exercise?. I?m work
orking on it.
comes face
to face with
the bare truth
of her DNA
area of a swish
central-London hotel, awaiting a set of test
results. Clammy hands, sweaty brow, twisted stomach? God knows why I agreed
to have a DNA test. What if I carry a degenerative disease? What if my head is
scheduled to fall off at some point in 2018?
What if, what if, what if, WHOA!
Of course, I haven?t been tested for
any underlying health issues (#drama)
? the test I?ve had will figure out how I?m
ageing. I?m nervous, but styling it out fairly
well, or so I think, as Dr Anne Wetter, dermatologist, and Dr Elisabet Hagert, professor of orthopaedics and hand surgery, flip
Illustration by
JO
RATCLIFFE
open a laptop and shuffle a set of papers
towards me. The best friends are over from
Sweden for the day to launch All閘, a range
of skincare products and supplements that
are specifically blended to match their
client?s DNA. ?Sixty per cent of how we
age is determined by our DNA,? it says on
a sheet of paper in front of me. And the
rest? Lifestyle. Oh dear. Wine, anyone?
Mine?s a large one, thanks.
X ? Matrix, G ? Glycation, T ? Tone,
A ? Antioxidant, C ? Calming. I?m staring
at my test results: ?With each individual?s
report, we look at 16 verified and reliable
DNA markers and identify five key drivers
in ageing,? says Dr Hagert. Have ?The Rave
Years? finally caught up with me? Sensing
my fear, Dr Hagert begins to speak s-l-ow-l-y. ?We look at the skin?s pigmentation
and photo-ageing caused by UV damage,
and we look at ageing caused by free radicals and oxidative stress, as well as a lack
of antioxidants. Then we check the skin?s
energy, or glycation ? which is how sugar
is metabolised in the skin, which can affect
skin stiffness and deep wrinkles. And finally, the skin?s sensitivity to inflammation.?
ELLE
117
FEB
See th
llel.com
BEAUTY
LUCIA
PICA
THE FIRST THING I DID TODAY WAS?
drink coffee. It?s a daily ritual and puts me
in the right frame of mind for the day ahead.
MY RECIPE FOR SUCCESS?
Focus, hard work, love.
Collage by
PATRICK
I FIND BEAUTY IN?
Monica Vitti in Antonioni?s L?Eclisse,
Cy Twombly?s photographs, and nature.
WAUGH
Interview: Joely Walker. Photographs: Graham Walser at Hearst Studios. Collage: Patrick Waugh
I?D RATHER BE?
underdressed.
THE PLACE I LOVE THE MOST?
is Naples. It?s where I feel I belong.
MY SIGNATURE LOOK IS?
bold colours and flawless skin, such as
Imaan?s look in Chanel?s Neapolis: New
City SS18 campaign (far right). Powerful,
strong, joyful ? this is feel-good make-up.
HOW TO GET THE LOOK...
1. Use the Palette Essentielle (far right),
�, for the base, highlighter for the
cheekbones and bridge of the nose, a tiny
bit of lip and cheek colour on the cheeks.
2. Apply the Ombre Premi鑢e in
Verderame, �, over the eyelid, creating
an oversized almond shape. On top,
blend together the two colours from the
Les 9 Ombres palette 蒬ition N�
Affresco, �, using the dark grey-green
on the crease for depth.
3. Swipe Chanel Rouge Allure Vibrante
Lipstick (above right), �, over the lips.
Dab Poudre � L鑦res Rosso Pompeiano,
� (above), on top for a bold, velvety
finish. Complete the look with Le Vernis
in Nuvola Rosa (right), �.
ELLE
119
FEB
TOP SHELF, LEFT TO RIGHT: ASPINAL OF LONDON Cosmetic Case, �. TOM FORD Fleur de
Portofino EDP, �8 for 50ml. YSL Touche 蒫lat Neutralizer, �.50. L?OCCITANE Shea Butter
Hand Cream, �. CLINIQUE Turnaround Revitalizing Facial, �. HAIR BY SAM MC KNIGHT
Lazy Girl Dry Shampoo, �. CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Pop Nail Colour in Baraboum, �.
LINKS OF LONDON Essentials Sterling-Silver Chain, �, and Love Note Charm, �.
DERMALOGICA Stress Positive Eye Lift, �.50. NAILBERRY L?Oxyg閚� in Hope, �.50
THIRD SHELF, LEFT
TO RIGHT: TIFFANY &
CO EDP, � for 50ml,
� 0 for 75ml. NARS
Aqua Infused Makeup
Removing Water, �.
SISLEY PARIS Express
Flower Gel Mask,
�. PERRICONE MD
Blue Plasma Cleansing
Treatment, �. EOS
Organic Lip Balm in
Sweet Mint, � DR
PAWPAW Shea Butter
Balm, �95.
SMYTHSON Panama
Notebooks in Nile
Blue and White, �
each. TIFFANY & CO
EDP, � for 30ml
BOTTOM SHELF,
LEFT TO RIGHT:
LA ROCHE-POSAY Ef faclar
Cleansing Cream,
�. SACHAJUAN
Texturizing Spray, �.
H&M Vase, �99.
REAL TECHNIQUES Bold
Metals 20 0 Brush, �,
and 201 Brush, �.
TIFFANY & CO E D P � for
50ml. NARS Eye Makeup
Remover �. 50. REAL
TECHNIQUES 20 0 Brush,
�, and 203 Brush, �.
SECOND SHELF,
LEFT TO RIGHT:
NARS Nail Polish in
Thasos, �. MAYVEDA
Jeweller y Box, �.
NAILBERRY L?Ox yg閚�
in Baby Blue and
Hope, �. 50 each.
YSL Touche 蒫lat
Neutralizer in
Green, �. 50.
Bottle, st ylist?s own.
ZELENS Lip Enhancer,
�. URBAN DECAY
Eyeshadow in
Narcotic, �.
TOM FORD Fleur de
Por tofino All Over
Body Spray, �
B
Blue is the coolest colour.
Go iconic on your bathroom shelf
Styling by
SOPHIE
BERESINER
ATELIER SWAROVSKI BY
CHRISTOPHER KANE,
Photograph: Peter Guenzel
Cr ystal Ring, �9.
DR VRANJES Acqua Room
Dif fuser, � for 50 0ml.
MAYVEDA Box, �.
BEAUTY BLENDER , �.
REAL TECHNIQUES 302
Brush, par t of a set. E.L.F.
Sculpting Brush, �. 50.
TOM FORD Fleur de
Portofino EDP, �8 for
50ml. RMK Eyeshadow
Palette, �
ELLE
121
FEB
Di
o
ma rsho
sc w P
ara um
, � p?N
25
.50 ?Vo
lum
e
MY TOP SKINCARE BUYS?
are natural tea tree oil,
Fresh Sugar Face Polish,
GlamGlow Supermud Mask
and, more recently, Gold
Bond Eczema Relief cream,
�.73, which is great as the
weather gets colder.
R
FRE S H Sugar
Face Polish, �
O
I?M SUCH A HOARDER OF?
Av鑞e Skin Recovery Cream
and Smith?s Rosebud Salve.
The cream is one of the only
things that properly soothes
my sensitive skin and the
salve is so multipurpose; I
use it for my lips, hands and
cuticles, and to take off makeup backstage.
MY FAVOURITE MASCARA
OF ALL TIME? would have
to be a toss-up between Dior
Diorshow
Pump?N?Volume
and Benefit They?re Real!,
�.50. They do completely
different things, so they?re
amazing when used together.
DI
I LOVE TO SPRAY? Miss Dior
fragrance in my hair when
it?s curly. As I move around,
I get wafts of its light, summery
smell. I?m also into candles
in a big way ? everything
from musky Le Labo Santal
to super-sweet pumpkin and
cinnamon smells.
BEAUTY
PROFILE
LE LABO
Santal 26
candle, �
G L A MGLO W
Supermud
Mask, �
, �lve
Sa
AV 萅E
Skin Recovery
Cream, �.50
From clever skin cheats to
realistic workouts, the top model
shares her beauty regime
u
d
Photographs: Instagram/@winnieharlow, Graham Walser at Hearst Studios
WINNIE
HARLOW
SMITH?S
Ros
eb
MY FAVOURITE CHEAT FOR
TIRED SKIN? is a raw manuka
honey mask, applied three
days in a row. Honey is a
natural humectant, so it draws
moisture to the skin and helps
kill the bacteria that can give
me breakouts.
AS A TOTALLY NATURALHAIRED GIRL? I can?t swear
by one product, but if I could
use only one brand I?d go
for Moroccanoil or Aphogee.
I?ve used both for as long as
I can remember.
DIOR Miss
Dior Eau de
Parfum,
� for 30ml
ELLE
123
FEB
THE TWO WORDS THAT
DESCRIBE
MY
FITNESS
PHILOSOPHY ARE? cardio
bunny. I actually hate cardio,
but if I throw on a few YouTube
videos, 90 minutes zoom right
past. If I do this, drink black
coffee, nap and eat lots of
seafood and veggies, I feel
like Superwoman.
I?M CURRENTLY READING?
Emotional Intelligence 2.0
by Travis Bradberry and Jean
Greaves. I was recently in a
relationship where I struggled
to control my emotions ?
positive or negative. I wanted
to learn more about how my
mind works when it comes
to emotions so I could better
handle my relationships.
IF I COULD GO BACK IN
TIME? I?d tell my 15-year-old
self to put the straightening
iron down!
ON SALE 7 FEBRUARY
WO R T H
JOELY WALKER, BEAUTY EDITOR:
JO
?I SWEAR BY THESE BEFORE ANY BIG
EVENT. POP THEM ON AND WAIT
15 MINUTES FOR BRIGHTER UNDEREYES
AND SOFTER, SMOOTHER LIPS.?
SOPHIE
SAYS
ELLE beauty director
Q
Is ?sculpting? different from using
blusher or bronzer? I know the clue
is in the name, but I have no idea
what to use to sculpt. SHIRLEY, SOUTHSEA
Sophie燘eresiner tackles
your skincare woes and
make-up dilemmas
Would your skin cast a bronze or pink shadow beneath
your cheekbones? No. I love Rodial Instaglam Contouring
Powder ? it?s greyish and matte, like a real shadow shade.
37
Q
,�
ESSIE
RD
E ye Primer Duo
Gel Couture in
Diamond In
The Cuf f, �99
M
FO
AMAZING
COSMETICS
TO
a
S
rm
c u l p t i n g Po w
A
�
EG
O
DA L
7. 50
L A PA L M
BELLA, YORKSHIRE
As much as I?d like to take the credit
for the following slice of genius,
I can?t. Overheard at Orly nail polish HQ (we beauty people
hang out in unusual places): if you use polish remover with an
old pair of tights instead of cotton wool, it works much better
? the fibres are more closely knitted together in tights, so they
don?t get caught up in the glitter.
Q
ing
Shap
S k i n . 50
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i
d
9
Stu
�OX
tick,
SHB
on S
S M A undati
Fo
de
r,
W
Amazing
Concealer, �
What?s the easiest
way to remove
glitter nail polish?
I keep getting cotton wool
stuck in the glitter, which
makes it even more difficult.
leur
s
u
5 Co K haki
IOR
DI
r in
�
igne
Des Design,
D
Want to know a secret? Here it is, handed down through
the Beresiner glasses-wearing generations (or a hack learnt
from a recent convo with a friend ? you decide): after you?ve
applied your base, dot eyelid primer on the bridge of your
nose and where your glasses sit on the sides, then dust with
loose powder, and your glasses will be less inclined to
slide and disrupt your make-up. Voila!
Foundation and vision maintained.
Q
RODIAL
39
ran
slus cent L oos
o
eP
How can I apply
eyeshadow without
getting it all over my
face? SHANNAN, OXFORD
r, �
S
IT
w
N
CHANEL
Nail Colour
Remover, �
de
SE
Photographs: Graham Walseer at Hea
arst Studios
Instaglam Contouring
Powder in Dark, �
A
What?s the best way to prevent
my foundation from becoming oily
under my glasses? DEBORAH, LONDON
CLINIQUE
Chubby Stick
Sculpting
Highlight, �.50
Make-up artist trick: brush a thick layer
of loose powder under the eyes, apply
your eyeshadow, let the powder catch
the eyeshadow excess, then dust the
whole thing away. Beauty director cheat: do your eye makeup first. Make a mess, wipe it off and then do the rest of your
face. Note that this only works for real-life make-up; not
recommended for achieving Kardashian-level perfection.
G E T I N TO U C H W I T H S O P H I E
@ E L L E S O P H I E # S O P H I E S AY S
B O B B I B R O W N Glow Stick, �
ELLE
125
FEB
o
ex l re
Edited by
SUSAN WARD
DAVIES
Collages by
GUS
& STELLA
AS AWARDS SEASON GETS UNDERWAY,
LOTTE JEFFS CHECKS OUT HOLLYWOOD?S FAVOURITE LA ESCAPE
EXPLORE
I NEVER DID GET TO SING CHER?S
?Believe?, because we?d made some
enemies at The Ace Hotel?s karaoke
night, and it was clear we had to leave,
fast. There was a trio of septuagenarian ladies on a table at the front of
the basement bar, near the makeshift
stage. The women had pouffy hairdos
and wore more sequins than there are
on Broadway; for them, the legendary Tuesday-night singing session was
serious business. They had no time for
drunk out-of-towners guffawing their
way through ironic Nineties R?n?B. They
had requested Rat Pack classics mainly,
and were looking daggers at the visiting hipsters taking up their stage time.
Cher would not have gone down well,
so we downed our margaritas and ran
for it before the comp鑢e called me up
again. Laughing wildly, we tumbled up
the stairs into the hot desert night.
My best friend Joe and I were in
Palm Springs to recharge after a heavy
few months at work, and to reconnect
ELLE
128
FEB
as friends since the inevitable drifting apart
that happens when one BFF is single (him)
and the other married (me). We lived
together in a tiny flat during our last two
years at university in Leeds, 17 years ago,
and developed the
easy rapport of an
old married couple. We ate pasta
and pesto together
almost every night,
balancing plates on
our knees as we sat
on Joe?s bed watching Will & Grace.
?Look at us
now!? I cry as we
drift on lilos in The
Parker hotel?s pool (there?s a second
pool for families and a third inside the
spa). Around the water are loungers with
yellow-and-white-striped sun umbrellas,
which look cartoonishly upbeat against the
bright, cloudless sky. Eyeing the hot guys
in the cabanas and contemplating whether
11am is too early for a cocktail, Joe and
I can?t help but feel the 20-year-old us
would be thrilled that we?d finally arrived.
Palm Springs is all good times ? bar
the threat of a catastrophic earthquake at any moment (if you?ve
seen the movie San Andreas, you?ll get my drift). Hedonism
rules. At the foot of the San Jacinto
Mountains, the sun always shines
and the city is famed for its Hollywood legacy, with Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley to Leonardo
Di Caprio and Angelina Jolie all
making the 100-mile trip east of
LA to kick back without judgement. Joe and I take a leaf out
of their books and eat, drink and
party like the glitterati, our morn-
ing gym trips the only sign ?consequences?
had crossed our mind.
Palm Springs beats with my favourite
kind of people: beautiful gay men on retreat from their Hollywood jobs as actorsslash-waiters, Glam-mas ? Iris Apfel lookalikes staying in their holiday homes and
drunk-driving their mobility vehicles down
palm-shaded boulevards, the mix of lost
souls who never
quite made it in LA,
and jobbing writers
hunkering down in
a quiet hotel to finish off their latest
screenplays.
The
Parker
makes its intentions
very clear: from the
moment you check
in there?s an ?anything goes? attitude
that permeates the place as much as the
scent of jasmine. From the eclectic, laidback furnishings that are just asking to be
flopped on, to the cucumber-infused vodka
? Palm Springs
BEATS with
my favourite
kind of
PEOPLE ?
shot you?re offered when you arrive at the
newly renovated spa The Palm Springs
Yacht Club (?We believe in the American
Country Club experience: mixed doubles,
a long steam and a stiff cocktail? declares
the website) ? this is somewhere to seriously let off steam.
The hotel opened in 2004, when designer Jonathan Adler?s luxurious and playful interiors marked a new era of hospitality
in Palm Springs. The resort originally
launched as California?s first Holiday Inn in
1959, but after various renovations, it was
its reincarnation as the Parker that really
put it on the map. There are 144 rooms, so
it?s a testament to the landscape of the resort that there?s a feeling of seclusion; you
need barely see another guest if you so
2019). We also spent a night on the town,
culminating in our karaoke showdown, but
starting with a stroll to observe the quirky
mid-century architecture, and dinner at
wish. Pathways turn in on themselves, high Truss & Twine (trussandtwine.com), a hip
hedgerows making every area feel deli- new spot serving the best cocktails in Palm
ciously private. We loved the Lemonade Springs and a menu of small plates using
Stand, which served icy lemon press� near ingredients from the Coachella Valley, 15
the p閠anque court. Meanwhile, inside, the miles south east of town.
The night took in the A-list favourites:
gilt mirrored Mini Bar was the perfect
place for a nightcap after dinner in Counter Seymours, a dimly lit cocktail bar where
Reformation, the Parker?s newly opened many a celebrity has been known to bed
speakeasy of a restaurant. Multiply the in for the night (seymoursps.com), Bootlegger Tiki (bootleggercoolest place you?ve been in
tiki.com), all plush
London or New York by ten
reds and sophistiand you?ve got some idea of
cated Tropicana (try
how thrilling this fantastically
THE PARKER
the Acid Drop cockquirky Mediterranean tapas
has doubles from around
tail), before dancing
joint is (they even shipped in a
�0 per night, room only,
theparkerpalmsprings.com
the night away at the
priest?s confessional booth
from Italy). We ate well at the
Parker ? breakfast at Norma?s,
the casual terrace diner, was
MR LYONS STEAKHOUSE
Instagrammable
perfection.
High-end, retro-style
Why not order the Zillion Dolsteakhouse
lar Lobster Frittata with a side of
caviar? Really, why not?
THE ROOSTER AND
We ventured out of the
THE PIG
Cool Vietnamese food and
Parker?s sanctuary a few times,
an even cooler clientele
once to check out artist Doug
Aitken?s incredible mirrored
house installation in the desert
? part of the Desert X Art FestiVIRGIN ATLANTIC
val, which sees pieces of work
has return flights from London
dotted around Palm Springs
Heathrow to LAX from around
(the next one is in February
�0, virginatlantic.com
STAY
EAT
GET THERE
UNITED AIRWAYS
has return flights between LAX and
Palm Springs from around �0,
united.com. Alternatively, it?s
a three-hour drive. Hertz has
three days? car hire from around
�0, hertz.co.uk
ELLE
130
FEB
legendary gay club Toucans Tiki Lounge
(toucanstikilounge.com).
We were there off-season, in March,
so it was cooler than the 90 degrees it gets
up to in summer and quieter than it is during
events such as the Palm Springs Film Festival (January) and Coachella (April), when
hordes of movie-industry bigwigs and bareskinned party people roll into town.
By the end of our four-night stay, Joe
and I had fallen into that easy rhythm of
our old friendship. We lay in hammocks
discussing our idea for a screenplay. We
toasted marshmallows on the fire pit, read
our books in happy silence, swam, ate and
occasionally toppled into those fits of uncontrollable laughter only your very best
friend (and three cucumber vodka shots
before midday) can provoke.
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love letter
Photograph: courtesy of Peter Dundas
DE SI GNE R PETER DUNDAS ON A L OVE A N D FRIEND SHIP S HA RED
WI T H PA RTN ER EVANGELO BOUSIS
ELLE
138
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lothes that have some kind of emotional charge, and I am often drawn to items that express the faded
glamour of the past. Woe betide a dress that nobody notices. It?s
straight to the back of the wardrobe: the rack of shame.
I can see it?s a failing to require a thumbs up from the world in
this way, but it?s hardly unusual. Mark Twain said a good compliment could keep him going for two months. Of course, we should
provide our own pats on the back and not put our happiness in others? hands. You don?t have to be Sigmund Freud to detect I may be
compensating for something: being the youngest of a large family,
I was the square one, all homework and tap shoes and ?Remember
me?? (Freud declared he was ?defenceless? in the face of praise.)
Because I love receiving praise, I try to be lavish when dishing
it out. ?How do you manage to look 19?? is generally a hit with
fresh-faced friends. ?Superlatives fail me!? goes down well, too. But
it?s important to be careful. I eschew anything time-related, such
as ?You look wonderful tonight.? And praise that suggests overfamiliarity with a look ? ?I always love you in that dress? ? is best
ELLE
avoided. Now and then, compliments misfire ? I don?t love it when
people say to me, ?You could maybe make it as a hand model.? But
occasionally an insult can give you a colossal boost, so perhaps it
evens out in the end. ?All you care about is books and grilled fish!?
my teenager yelled at me last night. Wounded I wasn?t!
My new novel, Love & Fame, is partly set in the theatre, where
the economy of praise is at its most fraught. ?That was wonderful?,
when said in a dressing room, can sound like you didn?t think much
of the show. ?You were magnificent? is an entry-level greeting in
the greasepaint world. And what do you say if you didn?t enjoy it?
My heroine, Eve, an actress from a theatrical family, muses
on this in chapter one. ?I?m thinking of that thing Dad said once
about people visiting people backstage when the show wasn?t
working and that they found themselves in a state of paralysis,
wanting to be warm but not wanting to tell actual lies and the things
they came up with, like ?Good just isn?t the word!? or ?My word!
You?ve done it again!??
?What kind of job, what kind of world, makes people have to
develop a rotten language like that, just to exist?? her mother asked.
The world of writing isn?t a million miles from this. ?I liked your
book,? a friend said recently, before changing the subject. When
you hear ?like?, it?s difficult not to hear ?I didn?t love?. You have to be
strict with yourself at these moments. I cheer myself up with compliments of old. A book I wrote 10 years ago made someone wake
up from a coma, his girlfriend wrote to tell me.
A strange thing has occurred recently, however: post-HarveyWeinstein, perhaps, my attitude to appearance-based compliments
is starting to waver. I have two daughters now, and people dwelling
on their looks sometimes makes me feel queasy. Their appearance
is the least of it, I want to protest. ?Yes, but did you see her drawing
of a pineapple?? or ?Cute? She does so much taekwondo we have
a trained assassin in the house now.? For many people, both male
and female, the most interesting thing about women will always be
the way they look. That?s unacceptable. I feel more unsettled, these
days, when complimenting my friends on their appearance.
I sometimes attend a board meeting for a charity I?m involved
with, and before the meeting starts, the women might say things like,
?Love those boots.? Do the men say, ?That tie is to die for?? They do
not. It feels unprofessional to me now. It didn?t used to.
I still soar a little when complimented, and I?m not above wilting if they?re not forthcoming, but in the past few months, the only
compliment that feels safe, because it is always welcome, is ?How
lovely to see you.? I?m going to stick with that from now on.
Love & Fame by Susie Boyt is published by Virago
67
FEB
TH
FEB UA Y
FA H
HERE.
,
BALENCIAGA
THI S PAGE
Lorena (left) wears: wool jumper, �0;
polyamide-mix T-shirt, �0; silk and lace skirt,
�050; leather bag, �990; resin earrings, �0,
all BALENCIAGA . Leather shoes, �5, TABITHA
SIMMONS . Ode tte ( ri ght) we ars : cotton-mix shirt,
�0; wool trousers, �050; leather bag, �350;
bronze earrings, �0, all B AL E N CI A G A . Leather
boots, �5, MAN OL O B L A H N I K
SAINT LAURENT
OPPOS I TE
Ne e lam ( le ft) we ars: lace and tulle jumpsuit,
�570; palladium and crystal earring, �5,
both S AI NT L AURE N T B Y A N T H O N Y
VAC C ARE L L O . Cotton socks, �,
PAN THE RE L L A . Leather shoes, �5, R U S S E L L
& B ROML E Y . Lore na ( mi ddl e) w ears : silk
playsuit, �,855; leather belt, �4, both
S AI NT L AURE N T B Y ANTH ON Y V A CCA R E L L O .
Socks and shoes, as before. R il ey (righ t )
we ars: silk dress, �285; ruthenium earrings,
�5, both S AI NT L AURE N T B Y A N T H O N Y
VAC C ARE L L O . Socks and shoes, as before
Photographs by
LIZ
COLLINS
DRESS
QUEENS
Styling by
ANNE-MARIE
CURTIS
SASSY, shit hot, CLASSY, fabulous, flossy,
glossy ? this season, prints are bold, SEQUINS
are big, pouf skirts are bigger. No plain
surfaces. No natural looks. It?s FASHION, baby
LIZ COLLINS
DIOR
L E FT TO RI GH T
Odette wears: silk-mix
coat, �700; tulle shirt,
�300; silk-mix
trousers, �050; suede
boots, �150, all D I O R .
Riley wears: denim
beret, �0; tweed
coat, �300; cotton
shirt, �0; denim
trousers, �050;
leather shoes,
�0, all D I OR . Lorena
wears: denim blazer,
�600; tulle shirt,
�200; denim trousers,
�450; leather shoes,
�0, all D I OR . Nylon
tights, �99,
S OC KS HOP. C O . U K .
Neelam wears:
georgette shirt, �250;
leather trousers,
�500; leather shoes,
�0, all D I OR . Nylon
tights, as before.
Lili wears: lambskin
coat, �700; tulle shirt,
�300; cotton-mix bra,
�0; silk-mix trousers,
�150; leather boots,
�150, all D I O R .
Beret, stylist?s own
Brocade dress, �720;
cotton shirt, �0;
denim trousers, �020;
leather shoes, price on
application, all PRADA
LIZ COLLINS
ERDEM
L E FT TO RI GH T
Neelam wears: tulle
dress, price on
application; brass and
pearl earrings, �0,
both E RD E M .
Lorena wears: fil-coup�
dress, price on
application; brass and
crystal earrings, �0,
both E RD E M .
Headband, stylist?s
own. Odette wears:
tulle dress, �160;
brass, crystal and pearl
earrings, �0, both
E RD E M . Lili wears:
organza dress, �790;
metal earrings, �0,
both E RD E M . Riley
wears: wool cardigan,
price on application;
jacquard bralet, �0;
tulle skirt, �890; brass
and pearl earrings,
�0, all E RD E M
Odette (left) wears:
cotton-mix redingote,
price on application;
silk trousers, �5, both
LO UIS V UIT T O N .
Riley (right) wears:
cotton-mix redingote,
price on application;
silk shirt, �900;
silk shorts, �0,
all LO UIS V UIT T ON
DOLCE & GABBANA
Neelam (left) wears:
white cotton and lace
shirt, �273; black tulle
and lace skirt, �0;
gold and blue crystal
earrings, �008, all
D OL C E & GAB B AN A .
Black cotton socks,
�99, S OC KS HOP.
C O. UK . Black leather
boots, �0,
D R MARTE NS .
Lili (right) wears: black
chiffon-silk dress,
�415; gold and
crystal headband,
�557; gold and black
earrings, �447, all
D OL C E & GAB B AN A .
Black leather jacket,
�200, AC N E
S TUD I OS . Socks and
boots, as before
LIZ COLLINS
ALEXANDER
McQUEEN
L E FT TO RI GHT
Lili wears: cotton-mix dress with
belt, �795; black leather and
Perspex boots, similar from
�290; silver and crystal
earrings, �195 for pair; silver
and crystal necklace, �5,
all AL E XAND E R McQUE E N .
Nylon tights, �99,
S OC KS HOP. C O. UK .
Odette wears: organza dress,
price on application; leather belt,
�5; silver and siam necklace,
�5; silver and siam earrings,
�195, all AL E XAN D E R
McQUE E N .
Neelam wears: organza dress,
price on application; leather belt,
�5; silver and siam necklace,
�5; silver and siam earrings,
�195, all AL E XAN D E R
McQUE E N .
Lorena wears: organza dress,
�245; leather belt, �5; silver
and crystal earrings, �195;
silver beaded necklace, �5;
silver charm necklace, �495,
all AL E XAND E R McQUE E N . Riley
wears: cotton-mix dress with belt,
�795; leather and Perspex
boots, similar from �290; silver
and crystal earrings, �195;
silver and crystal necklace,
�5, all AL E XAN D E R
M C QUE E N . Tights, as before.
Headband, stylist?s own
LIZ COLLINS
Lorena (left) wears:
cotton top, �100;
cotton-mix skirt, �0,
both FENDI . Leather
boots, �695,
C HR IST IAN
LO UBO UT IN .
Headband, stylist?s
own. Riley (right) wears:
denim dress, �670,
FENDI . Boots, as before.
Headband, stylist?s own
LIZ COLLINS
Lorena (left) wears:
techical fabric poplin
jacket, �150; silk top,
�060; leather
shorts, �575,
all VAL E NTI NO .
Leather shoes,
�5, VAL E N TI N O
GARAVANI . Headband,
stylist?s own. Neelam
(right) wears: technical
fabric poplin jacket,
�650; silk T-shirt,
�0; silk skirt, �5,
all VAL E NTI NO .
Suede shoes, �5,
VAL E N TI N O GARAVANI
Lili (left) wears:
cotton-mix jacket,
�520; cotton-mix
top, �710; cotton-mix
trousers, �440,
all GUCCI . Felt
earrings, �0,
R ANJ ANA KHAN .
Odette (right) wears:
cotton-mix jacket,
�490; cotton skirt,
�0; brass and pearl
necklace, �710,
all GUCCI
SIMONE
ROCHA
L E FT TO RI GH T
Odette wears: cotton shirt, �5; cotton
dress, �695; sequin apron, �375;
beaded hair slides, �5 each; beaded
necklace, �5, all S I MONE ROC H A .
Leather boots, �0, D R MARTE N S .
Lorena wears: tulle and lace jacket,
�5; cotton dress, �0; tulle skirt,
�5; beaded hair slides, � each;
pearl earring (left ear), �0; pearl
earring (right ear), �5, all S I MON E
ROC HA . Headband, stylist?s own.
Riley wears: cotton dress, �995;
silk blouse, �5; beaded flower hair
slides, � each; beaded bow hair
slide, �5; beaded earrings, �5, all
S I MON E ROC H A . Boots, as before.
Headband, stylist?s own.
Lili wears: cotton dress, �5; satin
skirt, �5; tulle and lace skirt, �5;
pearl hair slides, � each; pearl
earring (left), �5; pearl earring
(right), �5, all S I MONE ROC HA .
Boots, as before
LIZ COLLINS
Silk top, �770;
elastic and Plexiglas
belt, �0; silk-satin
skirt, �950; leather
bag, �800; leather
boots, �0;
satin and Swarovski
earrings, �0,
all GIO R GIO ARMANI
Lili (top) wears: black
mohair coat, �470;
white cotton vest, �5;
white cotton shorts,
�5; grey nylon dress,
�060; pink and grey
socks, �5; silver
leather sandals,
�5, all MIU MIU .
Lorena (bottom) wears:
black nylon headband,
�; brown, black and
purple wool cardigan,
�0; brown satin shirt,
�0; brown leather
belt, �0; navy wool
trousers, �5; orange
nylon socks, �5;
white leather sandals,
�5, all MIU MIU
M O DELS: ODETTE
P AV LO V A, LILI SUMNER,
R ILEY M O NTANA,
LO R ENA M ARASCHI
AND NEELAM GILL AT
NEX T M O DELS LONDON
HAIR : SAMANTHA
HILLER BY AT PREMIER
HAIR AND MAKE- UP,
USING ORIBE.
M AKE-UP : SHARON
DO WSET T AT CLM HAIR
& M AKE-UP USING
C HANEL NEAPOLIS
NEW C IT Y AND BLUE
SER UM EY E . NAILS:
AM A Q UASHIE AT CLM
HAIR & M AKE- UP USING
DIO R C AP T URE TOTALE
DR EAM SKIN AND DIOR
C HR IST MAS
C O LLECT IO N 2 0 1 7 .
BUS: RED
R O UT EM ASTER. WITH
T HANKS T O MARRIOTT
CO UNT Y HALL HOTEL
LIZ COLLINS
?MODELLING EXPOSES YOU
TO SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE
LILI SUMNER
?I SUCK AT INSTAGRAM
RILEY MONTANA
ODETTE PAVLOVA
C ASS
Words by
A
PARIS
LORENA MARASCHI
?I WANT TO MAKE
A POSITIVE IMPACT
NEELAM GILL
2O18
- NEELAM GILL
THE SETTING: five opinionated models of the moment, three curious ELLE staff members and six bottles of wine around a sprawling
banquet table in a private dining room at a bustling East London
restaurant. We?re already on our second (OK, third) bottle of
wine, with a few Moscow mules for starters, and the beginnings
of a feast of fried squid, tacos and mounds of salsa has just
landed in front of us. But all Neelam Gill, the only British model at
the table, wants is some avocado.
She?s joined by Detroit-born campaign girl Riley Montana,
Brazilian top runway walker Lorena Maraschi, Saint Laurent face
Lili Sumner of New Zealand, and Odette Pavlova, one half of Russia?s most celebrated model twins (her sister is Lia Pavlova).
These are the new girls who have been dominating the big
shows (Miu Miu, Loewe, Valentino, the list goes on), campaigns
(Prada, Saint Laurent and Burberry, to name a few) and internet
rankings (Lili and Lorena are fixtures on the Models.com Hot List,
while Odette features on the site?s Top 50) ? the most in-demand
newcomers in the business. And now, halfway through a mammoth
two-day ELLE Collections shoot, capturing more than 70 of this season?s biggest looks, we?ve decided, perhaps unwisely, to go ?out
out?. A fleet of cars takes us to Coya, a Peruvian restaurant in the
City, with plenty of vibe and very low lighting, and the wait staff,
visibly intimidated by the beauty in the group, promptly seat us at a
corner table. With our glasses full, the conversation begins?
says between mouthfuls of, yes, avocado. ?But as I got older and
started to wear contact lenses, I got scouted. Then, at 18, I got a
call from my agency saying, ?Burberry wants to see you.? I booked
a train ticket and got my nails done in hot pink. And with my hair
past my arse, I met Christopher. He liked that I was from Coventry
and that I had no clue. He booked me as an exclusive for the show.?
This prompts all the models to talk about the designers who
launched their catwalk careers. For Riley it was Riccardo Tisci, the
former creative director of Givenchy who also helped make supers
Lara Stone and Joan Smalls. For Lili Sumner it was Hedi Slimane,
who booked her as a campaign and show exclusive for Saint Laurent in 2013. ?It?s wild to think that if you hadn?t met that one person
when you were younger, your life would be very different,? Lili says.
?MY LIFE wouldn?t be
what it is now without
CHRISTOPHER BAILEY?
? NEELAM GILL
The conversation moves on to which models they each fan-girled
when they were growing up. ?I don?t want to be a clich� and
say I only looked up to black models, but they?re definitely who
I identified with,? Riley says in her Michigan drawl. ?It was Naomi
Campbell and also Jourdan Dunn, Joan Smalls, Chanel Iman.
These women are still killing it.?
Neelam says she didn?t see Indian models growing up, which
had a big impact on how she viewed herself: ?I hated my skin colour because I thought that being lighter was what was beautiful.
I feel so happy that my sisters don?t have to go through that. It?s
what I feel most proud of in modelling; that it?s having an impact
on other people in a positive way.?
It?s rare to read a model story that doesn?t start with getting scouted
on the denim floor of Topshop. But for Neelam, it was a meeting
with Christopher Bailey that started a career of Burberry billboards
and L?Or閍l campaigns. ?I?m from Coventry, and never thought I?d
be a model. I had glasses and braces ? I was not a cute kid,? she
?Back in the day, NAOMI?S
CREW used to say, ? We?re
NOT WALKING this show if
you don?t book NAOMI.? I feel like
that sense of unity among
models is BACK RIGHT NOW?
? RILEY MONTANA
Riley wears: silk jacket, �900; silk T-shirt, �000; silk skirt, �5, all Valentino. Pearl earrings, �0, Valentino Garavani. Lili wears: chiffon dress, �145, Christopher Kane. Bronze earrings, �7, Konplott.
Odette wears: linen hat, �0; linen blazer, �275; wool jumper, �0; cotton shirt, �0; linen shorts, �0, all Michael Kors Collection. Neelam wears: faux leather hat, �, ASOS. Cotton sweatshirt, �7;
leather belt, �415; cotton-mix skirt, �020, all Balmain. Lorena wears: lace and leather dress, �,990; leather belt (just seen), �5, both Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello
? I just really want
this AVOCADO; I?m
dying for it.
I can?t go ONE
DAY without eating
AVOCADO?
Photographs: Liz Collins. Hair: Samantha Hillerby at Premier Hair and Make-Up using Oribe. Make-up: Sharon Dowsett at CLM Hair & Make-Up using Chanel Neapolis
New City and Blue Serum Eye. Nails: Ama Quashie at CLM Hair & Make-Up using Dior Capture Totale Dreamskin and Dior Christmas Collection 2017
?RIGHT NOW, MODELS are
more conscious of THEIR RIGHTS
than ever before?
? LILI SUMNER
?I think it?s really cool what Cameron Russell?s doing. It?s great
now when one model speaks up ? especially with social media ?
and everyone comes together,? Neelam says. In case you missed
it, in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, model Cameron
Russell has been sharing anonymous models? experiences of
sexual harassment and abuse on her Instagram feed to bring
attention to the issue within the fashion world. Neelam continues,
?I was shocked at how many stories there are. It?s important that
people are talking about it now, because we?re not letting it happen, and we?re not letting it slide.?
Everyone seems to agree that making the industry a safer,
more caring and inclusive place ? particularly for younger girls
coming up ? is a priority. ?I was at the C閘ine show and I did notice
small things, like signs saying you have the right to change in a private place,? Lili says. Talk turns to James Scully, the top casting director who has worked with Stella McCartney and Tom Ford,
among others. He became big news last year when he called out
a string of influential houses, including Balenciaga and Lanvin, for
mistreating and discriminating against models during Paris Fashion
Week. The dialogue he inspired led to the creation of the landmark Model Wellbeing Charter between LVMH and Kering. ?To
know that you are an adult working with another adult, and you?re
both equal ? these are things you don?t realise when you?re younger. [The charter] is a really good thing,? Lili says.
For the first time this evening, the models are having a disagreement. The hot topic: is social media good or bad for the
fashion industry? The power of the Insta-girl is undeniable, and
everyone agrees that being cast for a show or campaign is now
based as much on followers as it is on one?s look or star quality.
?I?m more like the models of the Nineties, when a model was a
model,? says Odette, who is a rarity in fashion ? a model who abstains from Instagram. But Lili sees the other side: ?Social media
has been a massive game-changer. There are so many models,
and now every single one can say something, get noticed and actually bring about a lot of change.? Riley isn?t sure. ?I suck at Instagram sometimes ? I feel like it?s so much work,? she says. ?When
I started out, I was scared to be me, but now I?m like, you have to
accept me or it?s your loss. It?s a weight off my shoulders.?
?OH MY GOD, the season
when I did 62 SHOWS,
and MY SISTER did 71, we slept
for like TWO HOURS?
? ODETTE PAVLOVA
The table moves to talking about the cyclical nature of fashion
and how fast the industry moves. The models long for the career
longevity of the Nineties, when models were supers for decades
rather than seasons. ?Now, if you?re at a casting and it?s your sixth
or seventh season, you are old,? Odette
says. ?Even if you are still working, you are
old. Because now there are a lot of new
faces coming through.?
If this can?t last for ever, then what?s
next? ?I look at women such as Natasha
Poly, who have been here for so long, and
it makes me feel encouraged. She went
through 10 years of work and now look
where she is,? Odette says. ?Personally, I?ve
got other things I want to do, but there?s
hope.? Lili sees a future in the film business:
?Modelling exposes you to people who
are really good at what they do and also
really successful. They inspire you to have
that mentality, even if you don?t use it.?
Neelam?s sights are set on a future in
philanthropy: ?I love my job of being a
model, but I also love knowing that I can
help others,? she says. ?I don?t think I?d enjoy modelling if I couldn?t do things on the
side, such as charity work. You do have
such a big platform to influence as a
model, so what?s the point of just being silent?? But Lorena?s not ready to give up
modelling just yet: ?I always dreamed of
being a model, I?m just going to let life
show me what?s next, and not worry about
it.? And with that, there?s one last round of
drinks to enjoy. The call time for tomorrow?s ELLE shoot is 7am. But these girls
have a whole night of chat left in them.
? In the Nineties,
FASHION was
a mystery. Now,
models show off
their day on
SOCIAL MEDIA,
and it?s not
INTERESTING ?
-
LORENA MARASCHI
COACH 1941
THIS PAGE AND O PPOS I TE Mia (left) wears: suede jacket, �250, C OAC H X KE I TH H ARI N G . Cotton shirt, �5; wool trousers,
all L A D Y G R E Y . Massima
Photographs by
CLAY S
GARDNER
SOFT
ROCK
Styling by
SOLANGE
FRANKLIN
�5, both CO ACH 1941 . Leather boots, �0, ACNE STUDIOS . Silver ring (worn on ring finger), �8; gold ring (worn on middle finger), �9; gold ring (worn on index finger), �8,
(right) wears: leather jacket, �300; lace skirt, from a selection, both COACH 1 9 4 1 . Pony-hair boots, �209, L UC C HE S E . Silver earrings, �2, J E NNI FE R FI S HE R . Briefs, stylist?s own
CLAY S GARDNER
C蒐INE
Massima (left) wears: wool-mix jacket, �183; wool-mix skirt, �183, both C � L I N E . Pony-hair boots, �209, L UC C H E S E . Mia (right) wears:
leather coat, �009; wool shirt, �8; wool trousers, �3, all C � L I NE . Leather boots, �270, L U CCH E S E
CALVIN
KLEIN 2O5W39NYC
Satin shirt, �5; cotton top (worn underneath), �5; satin trousers, �5; leather boots,
�065, all C AL VI N KL E I N 205W39N YC
CLAY S GARDNER
MAX
MARA
Black silk and organza jacket, �0; black silk and organza trousers, �0, both MAX MARA . Black leather boots, price on application,
OFF-W HI TE . Silver earrings, �0, C L OS E R B Y W W AKE . Silver cuff, �4, A G M E S
MICHAEL KORS
COLLECTION
Wool-mix jacket, �190, MI C H AE L KORS C OL L E C TI ON . Silver earring, �0; silver double ring,
�8, both ANNE L I S E M I CH E L S O N
CLAY S GARDNER
BALMAIN
Massima (left) wears: cotton-mix jacket, �550; leather skirt, �120; leather boots, �040, all B ALM AI N . Mia (right) wears: viscose-mix coat,
price on application; leather boots, �040, both B AL M AI N . Leather belt, �, S T E T S O N. CO M . Briefs (just seen), stylist?s own
CLAY S GARDNER
CHLO�
Lace jacquard top, �683; denim jeans, �5, both C H L O� . Leather boots, �5, AL C H I MI A D I B AL L I N . Silver earrings, �0, A G M E S
EMPORIO
ARMANI
Massima (left) wears: organza top, �0, E MPORI O ARMANI . Silver earrings, �2, J E N N I FE R FI S H E R . Mia (right) wears: satin-mix
jacket, �0, E MPORI O ARMANI . Silver earring, �7, L A D Y G R E Y
CLAY S GARDNER
CHANEL
White silk-mix shirt, �,225; black wool-mix skirt, �320; transparent PVC and grosgrain boots, �115, all CH A N E L
HAIR : T ET SUY A YAMAKATA
AT AR T LIST NY USING
KER AST ASE. M AKE- UP:
Y UM I M O R I AT THE WALL
G R O UP USING MAC.
NAILS: Y UKIE M I YAKAWA
AT KAT E R YAN INC, USING
DEBO R AH LIP P M ANN.
M O DELS: M IA SPEICHER AND
M ASSIM A DESIR E AT NEXT
M O DELS LO NDON. LOCAL
P R O DUCT IO N: URBAN NYC
BOTTEGA
VENETA
Cotton playsuit, �0; leather coat, �295, both B OTTE GA VE N E TA . Leather boots, �270, L U CCH E S E
STEADY
AS
SHE
GOES
Photographs by
JACOB LILLIS
i
n R
r n
hr
Words by
KENYA HUNT
ELLE
103
FEB
imone Rocha hadn?t set out to make a statement in this way.
It just happened, over time.
At the reception desk in her East London headquarters, a
lithe, terribly attractive woman with light brown hair answers
phones, accepts courier packages and greets incoming guests
while dressed in Simone?s neoprene midi dress, oversized cardigan and furry slides. A few feet away, an equally gorgeous
woman, arms full of binders, strolls towards a nearby desk,
wearing Simone?s beaded faux-fur stole over a cotton dress and
Perspex faux-fur mules, the light catching the Lucite on her shoes
just so. Further back in the atelier, I spy another stunner bent over
a table in Simone-designed tulle and beaded drop earrings. The
place is filled with women of varying heights and backgrounds,
all blessed with killer bone structure, all wearing Simone?s quietly glamorous clothes and shoes, all going about their work day.
It feels like I?ve stumbled into some kind of fashion-based performance art. However, this is just an average day in the 31-yearold?s world.
?It?s been this way from the beginning ? my design team has
been the same for the past six years,
and it?s completely female,? Simone
says later in her office, which overlooks one of the leafier corners of
De Beauvoir, a neighbourhood with
a fashion fanbase (Craig Green and
Peter Pilotto have studios nearby).
Her soft Irish lilt gives away her
Dublin upbringing, but everything
else about her ? her slightly skewed
sense of polish, and eccentric cool ?
is all London, where she?s lived for
the past 10 years.
Her black reclaimed Fifties tableturned-desk looks out over a sleepy
canal and idyllic ivy-covered building. Behind her, three enormous, heaving bookcases sourced from the Oxford Library,
painted black and filled with books about Eva Hesse, Francis
Bacon and Julian Schnabel, stand guard. Simone, who?s also
dressed in black (with two crystal clips in her hair), adds,
?We?re like a family.?
An incredibly chic family. ?It?s really nice that the team?s uniform comes from things they?ve been working on,? she says.
?That?s important because, for me, everyone is involved in the
design process. You want people to be a part of that. They all
wear it with their own style, and they always look amazing. Everyone has a totally different take on it.?
Femininity has been central to Simone?s work since she
launched her business in 2010. That was the same year she
graduated with an MA from Central Saint Martins, where she
studied under the late Louise Wilson, the lecturer who taught
and mentored many of Britain?s fashion design A-list, including
John Galliano, Phoebe Philo and Alexander McQueen. Back
then, Simone had a team of five. Now, she has 27 employees,
two stores (one in Mayfair, London, and another in SoHo, New
York), an ELLE Style Award (she also won the first ever ELLE/
Cointreau Bursary, a prize of �0,000, in 2013), three British
Fashion Awards, and an ever-growing list of famous clients, including Rihanna, Julianne Moore, Chlo� Moretz and Alexa
Chung. But her dedication to exploring womanhood remains.
?It?s not like one day I thought, ?I want to focus on women,??
she explains. ?But there?s a strength that comes from being a
woman designing for women and putting my personality and
emotions into my pieces ? but also having the awareness that
it?s not just about me,? Simone says. ?Louise always said my
work is very feminine, strong and modern, so I?ve strived to
keep those three things in place.?
When Simone had her London Fashion Week debut, during Lulu Kennedy?s Fashion East, a launch pad for designers
including JW Anderson, Gareth Pugh and the late Richard
Nicoll, her work had a youthful, organic fragility that was the
polar opposite of the bold, digital graphic prints reigning at the
time (think the late Noughties work of Peter Pilotto, Mary
Katrantzou and Basso & Brooke). ?My aesthetic at the time
was very much going against the grain. But it was something
that felt very natural to me,? she says. Hugely influential retailers
such as Dover Street Market, Colette and Ikram took note.
And Simone began to broaden her study of womanhood,
diving deeper into Victoriana (a recurring theme in her work),
and refining her trademark sense of shape and volume. She?s
also developed the idea of romanticism and femininity beyond the
young ing閚ue. For AW17, she
made headlines and earned nods
of approval from women?s magazines, such as this one, when she
?There?s a strength
that comes
from being a
woman designing
for women?
Simone?s SS18
collection, pictured
here backstage, is
both feminine and
firmly modern
cast silver-haired legends, including 72-year-old Jan de Villeneuve, to walk alongside younger girls-of-the-moment Adwoa
Aboah and Yasmin Wijnaldum in her show. Her SS18 collection that followed was softer and, in her words, ?the antithesis of
the season before, which was all about armour and protection
and camouflage?.
Simone says her far-reaching
idea of femininity began with her
family: her mother, Odette, with
whom she works closely, her grandmothers, Margaret Gleeson and
Cecila Rocha, and her two-yearold daughter, Valentine. ?I?ve learnt
about respect and gusto from my
mother. Her mother was a very
strong-minded, practical and funny
character, whereas my Chinese
grandmother, who lived in Hong
Kong, taught me all about grace,?
she says. As a small child, she
honed her personal sense of girlhood as one of three in a class with 13 boys. ?It was nearly all
lads in tracksuits. So it made me really girly ? dresses, skirts and
knee socks. Femininity has always been important to me.?
You?d think that Simone?s world is a real-life Themyscira, the
fictional matriarchal, Amazon-only island in Wonder Woman.
But that would be too clich閐. ?The irony is that all of my
external collaborators are men!? she says. ?People such as
photographers Jacob Lillis and Colin Dodgson, stylist Robbie
Spencer, and James Pecis, who does the hair for my shows.?
Then there is, of course, her father, the Hong Kong-born
British designer John Rocha CBE. ?He?s my earliest memory of
fashion. I remember being in my dad?s studio, in this fabric room
that had rows and rows of fabric, which I thought were the most
amazing climbing frames. It was all very tactile: my dad used a
lot of tweed and wool, very traditional Irish fabrics, so there was
a real weight and texture to everything. I used to just crawl up
and down the fabrics. Years later, I thought, ?That was probably
really important stuff.??
It was her dad who coached her when she decided to
study fashion design at the National College of Art and Design
in Dublin. ?He sat me down and said, ?If you want to do this
for real, you really need to get the absolute best education in
?For me, the most
important thing is
your own identity.
If you have that, the
rest will follow?
ELLE
this you can, and you have to do a
master?s degree.??
The fashion business has radically changed since her school days.
And that?s why, in part, Simone clings
to what she knows: family and her
singular creative vision. ?For me, the
most important thing is your own identity. If you have that, the rest will follow. It will be easier to grow
your business because you know what you want rather than
struggle with what other people think you should be doing,? she
says. So she doesn?t waver from her two collections per year or
give in to fashion?s angst-filled changes in direction. ?I am very
committed to two collections a year. When I started, a lot of
young designers were under pressure to do pre and cruise collections. But it never felt right for my business. And now, quite a
few are dropping pre and cruise. People were doing ?see now
buy now? and I was like, ?No, that?s not my customer.? I want
her to see the dress in the show, and then in the press and finally
in the story. I want it to feel special, a commitment. In five years?
time, I want you to still be able to wear it. You can?t give too
much too soon, because it devalues that commitment,? she says.
She also doesn?t see herself giving up her independence
and taking on a creative director role at a big house anytime
soon. ?The people I admire are independents, like Rei Kawakubo, Miuccia Prada, Dries Van Noten, Rick Owens; people
who have their own labels and still produce exciting, signature
work,? she says. Does that mean she?d say no if a luxury titan
came calling? Who?s to say one hasn?t already? ?You can
never say never. It?s always nice to be asked, but at this moment I?m proud to run my own brand. It?s really important that
you hold on to what you?re about.?
It?s time for Simone to join the women at work in her studio,
where they are already producing her next collection. ?The
world is a funny place right now,? she says, thoughtfully. ?That
and being a mum has made me realise how much of a privilege
it is to get to have an amazing team that feels like a family and
have my own family, too. Life is good; it evolves.?
105
FEB
a
be uty
elle
Beauty direction by
SOPHIE
BERESINER
Photographs by
SASCHA
HEINTZE
eyes wide shut
THE EYE IS THE SEASON?S UNDISPUTABLE FOCAL POINT, SO MAKE
A STATEMENT. INTRODUCING ALL THE NEW BRIGHT IDEAS YOU NEED?
GRAPHIC
The new take on a feline eye involves elongated graphic wings and flicks that float above the
lash line. ?For an intense, inky black, use pencil kohl to map out the shape in dashes
and dots, then apply a fluid line of liquid or gel,? advises the artist responsible, Sharon Dowsett.
LEFT TO RIGHT: BENEFIT They?re Real! Lengthening Mascara in Jet Black, �. 50. LANC訫E Le Crayon
Kh鬺 in Noir, �. 50. RIMMEL Wonder Wing Eyeliner, �99. DIOR Diorshow Ar t Pen in Cat walk Black, �. 50.
BOBBI BROWN Long -Wear Gel Eyeliner in Black Ink, �. 50
ELLE
108
FEB
SILVER
Glitter is absolutely going mainstream. Formulations have finally caught up with
the catwalk and now offer a proper glitter hit without the mess (or the need
for pro-level skills). Like dressing your eyes with diamonds. Interested? Thought so.
LEFT TO RIGHT: CHANEL Illusion D?Ombre in Fantasme, �. STILA Magnificent Metals Glitter & Glow
Liquid Eyeshadow, � . TOPSHOP Eyeshadow Mono in Silver Fox � 50 . GYPSY SHRINE Glitter in Ice
Queen, � 50. ILLAMASQUA Af termath Embellishing Eye Gel in Silver, �
GLOSS
If you haven?t succumbed to the transformative power of eye gloss, rectify that
immediately. The season?s texture trend of choice, it lends any colour that?s
layered underneath instant coolness. ?The shine makes all the difference,? says Sharon.
Murky, mossy green shine ? sounds like you shouldn?t, but you really should.
LEFT TO RIGHT: CHANEL Ombre Premi鑢e in Verde, �. CHARLOTTE TILBURY Eyes to Mesmerise in Veruschka,
�. MAC Mixing Medium Shine, �. 50. TOM FORD Eye Colour Quad in Last Dance, �
Words: Joely Walker. Model: Camille Linnea at The Squad Management. Make-up: Sharon
Dowsett at CLM Hair & Makeup using Chanel Neapolis New City and Blue Serum Eye
DUSK
DAWN
Burnt orange, tempered tangerine, fiery amber? find the orange that works with your skin
tone and surprise yourself with its complexion-boosting effects. Dubious?
?Orange is flattering because it contains red, which makes every eye colour pop,? says Sharon.
LEFT TO RIGHT: EST蒃 LAUDER Double Wear Stay- In - Place Eyeshadow Base, �. L?OR葾L Infallible Paint Chubby
Blush in Tangerine, �99. GUERLAIN Eye - Stay Primer, �. 50. MAC Eyeshadow in Red Brick, �. 50. E.L.F. Aqua
Beaut y Molten Liquid Eyeshadow in Liquid Gold, � NARS Blush in Intensely, �
ELLE
111
FEB
No one-size-fits-all situation
going on here. Clarins has
devised a six-part priming
squad ? all colour coded to
suit your most pressing
concern. Redness? Go green.
Dark spots? Choose coral.
A bit sallow? Lilac is your
hero. The list goes on. Clarins
SOS Primers, �.5O each (left).
MAKEUP
PROBLEM SOLVED
BEAUTY LEXICON:
?CAR-CRASH CLASH?
?The colour rules have
changed. Take red and twin
it with anything it?s not meant
to work with ? like pink or
orange ? for a twisted take.?
MAC DIRECTOR OF MAKE-UP ARTISTRY TERRY BARBER (@TERRYBARBERONBEAUTY)
PROJECT LIP
Properly matte,
incredibly
longwearing and
with all the pigmentpopping prowess you
could want, Buxom
Plumpline Lipliners in
(from left) Confidential,
Stealth and Espionage,
� each, and
Givenchy Le Rouge
Mat Lipstick in (above,
from left) Nude
Androgyne, Poupre
D閒il� and Rose
Graphique, � each,
deserve a place
on your lips.
Compiled by Joely Walker & Sophie Beresiner.
Photographs: Graham Walser at Hearst Studios, Jason Lloyd-Evans
BY SOPHIE BERESINER
My relationship with foundation
is, at best, turbulent. Yes, OK,
I need it, but it doesn?t like me.
So, just as I?m thinking I have
to make a clean break and
approach life unencumbered
by an even skintone, Cover FX
introduces me to its Natural Finish
Foundation, � (above), a
water-based, oil-free formulation
that?s flexible, so I still look like
me, but kind of in soft focus. It?s
like the hybrid perfection my skin
(but not only mine ? there are 25
shades) wants to start over with.
THE NEW WAY TO SCRUB
Just when you thought your obsession with Le Labo
couldn?t be topped, the brand launches the
most Instagrammable, skin-softening, beautifully
scented Coffee Body Scrub, � (right), imaginable.
GYM-BAG
BEAUTY?
CliniqueFIT?s
Post-Workout
Neutralizing Face
Powder, � (left),
is gym-bag gold.
Dab the colourcorrecting powder
on post-workout skin
to reduce redness
and shine.
FROM THE BEAUTY
CUPBOARD?
BY JOELY WALKER
SKIN
The new beauty vernacular
avoids the outdated term ?antiageing?, opting for a far more
positive (and realistic) approach
that we can all get behind. Early
adopters of the movement,
bareMinerals has caught my
attention once again with its new
Ageless Genius Firming & Wrinkle
Smoothing Serum (left). It?s a
collagen-boosting, vitamin
A-renewing, antioxidant-savvy
combination that leaves my skin
looking and feeling fresh, properly
rested and glowy. Confidenceboosting skincare at its best.
THE DIY FACIAL
TRENDING:
GLASS SKIN
A Korean beauty term
describing the holy grail
of K-beauty: poreless,
luminous, translucentlike skin that reflects
light like a pane of
glass. It sounds wholly
unrealistic in our view.
We?ll stick with a clever
base and highlighter
combo, thanks.
ELLE
There is little more satisfying than an
at-home facial that looks like you?ve just
emerged from a salon. These will help:
1.
2.
Elizabeth Arden
Ceramide Lift and Firm
Sculpting Gel, �
(left), blends three
ceramides to
strengthen skin?s
moisture barrier and
peptides to plump.
The Philips VisaPure,
�9.99 (left),
has three genius
attachments to
cleanse and massage
like a pro. An added
boon: it can be used
in the shower, too.
115
FEB
I AM
MADEM
-OIS
ELLE
Our columnist
Through my loud tinnitus, I hear,
?All normal, except for G ? Glycation.? REALLY? My X (matrix), relating to collagen, suggests I?m ageing ?normally?. My T (tone) shows
no sign of pigmentation; I would
hope not ? raised in Scotland, I?m
allergic to the sun. But the bit I am
most surprised at, given the fact
that I live on a busy road in central
London, is A (antioxidant). Appartly, I have a ?normal inflammary response to stress and pollun?. I make up for being so bloody
ormal? (boring) with category G.
the top end of the scale, I run a
k of ?advanced glycation? and ?
ULP ? ?internal ageing?. I?m ageing on the inside!
Out from behind the comfy seat
I?ve been uncomfortably sitting on
for the past hour appears a large,
luxurious black box. I prize it open
to find a three-month supply of
vitamin supplements, a slender
tube of eye cream, a serum, a pot
of face cream and a foam cleanser, all chosen to work specifically
with my DNA. I ask the two doctors
whether further DNA testing could
provide me with the perfect set of
instructions for other stuff, like what
I should be eating and what type of
exercise I should be doing. In a flash, the
medical duo produces two further DNA
test swabs, which I scrape around the
insides of my cheeks in the manner of
someone who no longer suffers from a
morbid fear of test results.
When the second lot of DNA tests
return from the lab in Sweden, the results
show I have ?an increased risk of obesity?.
Oh. ?People who carry this gene variant
can decrease the risk of obesity through
physical activity and with the help of a
proper diet and strong exercise.? I take to
my bed with a bar of Green & Black?s and
slather myself in All閘 serum. I reckon it?s the
serum that?s giving my skin that ?post-shag
glow? everyone keeps commenting on ?
honestly, my skin looks and feels incredible. It?s better t
y additional
DNA tests, I g
?strong exercise?. I?m work
orking on it.
comes face
to face with
the bare truth
of her DNA
area of a swish
central-London hotel, awaiting a set of test
results. Clammy hands, sweaty brow, twisted stomach? God knows why I agreed
to have a DNA test. What if I carry a degenerative disease? What if my head is
scheduled to fall off at some point in 2018?
What if, what if, what if, WHOA!
Of course, I haven?t been tested for
any underlying health issues (#drama)
? the test I?ve had will figure out how I?m
ageing. I?m nervous, but styling it out fairly
well, or so I think, as Dr Anne Wetter, dermatologist, and Dr Elisabet Hagert, professor of orthopaedics and hand surgery, flip
Illustration by
JO
RATCLIFFE
open a laptop and shuffle a set of papers
towards me. The best friends are over from
Sweden for the day to launch All閘, a range
of skincare products and supplements that
are specifically blended to match their
client?s DNA. ?Sixty per cent of how we
age is determined by our DNA,? it says on
a sheet of paper in front of me. And the
rest? Lifestyle. Oh dear. Wine, anyone?
Mine?s a large one, thanks.
X ? Matrix, G ? Glycation, T ? Tone,
A ? Antioxidant, C ? Calming. I?m staring
at my test results: ?With each individual?s
report, we look at 16 verified and reliable
DNA markers and identify five key drivers
in ageing,? says Dr Hagert. Have ?The Rave
Years? finally caught up with me? Sensing
my fear, Dr Hagert begins to speak s-l-ow-l-y. ?We look at the skin?s pigmentation
and photo-ageing caused by UV damage,
and we look at ageing caused by free radicals and oxidative stress, as well as a lack
of antioxidants. Then we check the skin?s
energy, or glycation ? which is how sugar
is metabolised in the skin, which can affect
skin stiffness and deep wrinkles. And finally, the skin?s sensitivity to inflammation.?
ELLE
117
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See th
llel.com
BEAUTY
LUCIA
PICA
THE FIRST THING I DID TODAY WAS?
drink coffee. It?s a daily ritual and puts me
in the right frame of mind for the day ahead.
MY RECIPE FOR SUCCESS?
Focus, hard work, love.
Collage by
PATRICK
I FIND BEAUTY IN?
Monica Vitti in Antonioni?s L?Eclisse,
Cy Twombly?s photographs, and nature.
WAUGH
Interview: Joely Walker. Photographs: Graham Walser at Hearst Studios. Collage: Patrick Waugh
I?D RATHER BE?
underdressed.
THE PLACE I LOVE THE MOST?
is Naples. It?s where I feel I belong.
MY SIGNATURE LOOK IS?
bold colours and flawless skin, such as
Imaan?s look in Chanel?s Neapolis: New
City SS18 campaign (far right). Powerful,
strong, joyful ? this is feel-good make-up.
HOW TO GET THE LOOK...
1. Use the Palette Essentielle (far right),
�, for the base, highlighter for the
cheekbones and bridge of the nose, a tiny
bit of lip and cheek colour on the cheeks.
2. Apply the Ombre Premi鑢e in
Verderame, �, over the eyelid, creating
an oversized almond shape. On top,
blend together the two colours from the
Les 9 Ombres palette 蒬ition N�
Affresco, �, using the dark grey-green
on the crease for depth.
3. Swipe Chanel Rouge Allure Vibrante
Lipstick (above right), �, over the lips.
Dab Poudre � L鑦res Rosso Pompeiano,
� (above), on top for a bold, velvety
finish. Complete the look with Le Vernis
in Nuvola Rosa (right), �.
ELLE
119
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TOP SHELF, LEFT TO RIGHT: ASPINAL OF LONDON Cosmetic Case, �. TOM FORD Fleur de
Portofino EDP, �8 for 50ml. YSL Touche 蒫lat Neutralizer, �.50. L?OCCITANE Shea Butter
Hand Cream, �. CLINIQUE Turnaround Revitalizing Facial, �. HAIR BY SAM MC KNIGHT
Lazy Girl Dry Shampoo, �. CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Pop Nail Colour in Baraboum, �.
LINKS OF LONDON Essentials Sterling-Silver Chain, �, and Love Note Charm, �.
DERMALOGICA Stress Positive Eye Lift, �.50. NAILBERRY L?Oxyg閚� in Hope, �.50
THIRD SHELF, LEFT
TO RIGHT: TIFFANY &
CO EDP, � for 50ml,
� 0 for 75ml. NARS
Aqua Infused Makeup
Removing Water, �.
SISLEY PARIS Express
Flower Gel Mask,
�. PERRICONE MD
Blue Plasma Cleansing
Treatment, �. EOS
Organic Lip Balm in
Sweet Mint, � DR
PAWPAW Shea Butter
Balm, �95.
SMYTHSON Panama
Notebooks in Nile
Blue and White, �
each. TIFFANY & CO
EDP, � for 30ml
BOTTOM SHELF,
LEFT TO RIGHT:
LA ROCHE-POSAY Ef faclar
Cleansing Cream,
�. SACHAJUAN
Texturizing Spray, �.
H&M Vase, �99.
REAL TECHNIQUES Bold
Metals 20 0 Brush, �,
and 201 Brush, �.
TIFFANY & CO E D P � for
50ml. NARS Eye Makeup
Remover �. 50. REAL
TECHNIQUES 20 0 Brush,
�, and 203 Brush, �.
SECOND SHELF,
LEFT TO RIGHT:
NARS Nail Polish in
Thasos, �. MAYVEDA
Jeweller y Box, �.
NAILBERRY L?Ox yg閚�
in Baby Blue and
Hope, �. 50 each.
YSL Touche 蒫lat
Neutralizer in
Green, �. 50.
Bottle, st ylist?s own.
ZELENS Lip Enhancer,
�. URBAN DECAY
Eyeshadow in
Narcotic, �.
TOM FORD Fleur de
Por tofino All Over
Body Spray, �
B
Blue is the coolest colour.
Go iconic on your bathroom shelf
Styling by
SOPHIE
BERESINER
ATELIER SWAROVSKI BY
CHRISTOPHER KANE,
Photograph: Peter Guenzel
Cr ystal Ring, �9.
DR VRANJES Acqua Room
Dif fuser, � for 50 0ml.
MAYVEDA Box, �.
BEAUTY BLENDER , �.
REAL TECHNIQUES 302
Brush, par t of a set. E.L.F.
Sculpting Brush, �. 50.
TOM FORD Fleur de
Portofino EDP, �8 for
50ml. RMK Eyeshadow
Palette, �
ELLE
121
FEB
Di
o
ma rsho
sc w P
ara um
, � p?N
25
.50 ?Vo
lum
e
MY TOP SKINCARE BUYS?
are natural tea tree oil,
Fresh Sugar Face Polish,
GlamGlow Supermud Mask
and, more recently, Gold
Bond Eczema Relief cream,
�.73, which is great as the
weather gets colder.
R
FRE S H Sugar
Face Polish, �
O
I?M SUCH A HOARDER OF?
Av鑞e Skin Recovery Cream
and Smith?s Rosebud Salve.
The cream is one of the only
things that properly soothes
my sensitive skin and the
salve is so multipurpose; I
use it for my lips, hands and
cuticles, and to take off makeup backstage.
MY FAVOURITE MASCARA
OF ALL TIME? would have
to be a toss-up between Dior
Diorshow
Pump?N?Volume
and Benefit They?re Real!,
�.50. They do completely
different things, so they?re
amazing when used together.
DI
I LOVE TO SPRAY? Miss Dior
fragrance in my hair when
it?s curly. As I move around,
I get wafts of its light, summery
smell. I?m also into candles
in a big way ? everything
from musky Le Labo Santal
to super-sweet pumpkin and
cinnamon smells.
BEAUTY
PROFILE
LE LABO
Santal 26
candle, �
G L A MGLO W
Supermud
Mask, �
, �lve
Sa
AV 萅E
Skin Recovery
Cream, �.50
From clever skin cheats to
realistic workouts, the top model
shares her beauty regime
u
d
Photographs: Instagram/@winnieharlow, Graham Walser at Hearst Studios
WINNIE
HARLOW
SMITH?S
Ros
eb
MY FAVOURITE CHEAT FOR
TIRED SKIN? is a raw manuka
honey mask, applied three
days in a row. Honey is a
natural humectant, so it draws
moisture to the skin and helps
kill the bacteria that can give
me breakouts.
AS A TOTALLY NATURALHAIRED GIRL? I can?t swear
by one product, but if I could
use only one brand I?d go
for Moroccanoil or Aphogee.
I?ve used both for as long as
I can remember.
DIOR Miss
Dior Eau de
Parfum,
� for 30ml
ELLE
123
FEB
THE TWO WORDS THAT
DESCRIBE
MY
FITNESS
PHILOSOPHY ARE? cardio
bunny. I actually hate cardio,
but if I throw on a few YouTube
videos, 90 minutes zoom right
past. If I do this, drink black
coffee, nap and eat lots of
seafood and veggies, I feel
like Superwoman.
I?M CURRENTLY READING?
Emotional Intelligence 2.0
by Travis Bradberry and Jean
Greaves. I was recently in a
relationship where I struggled
to control my emotions ?
positive or negative. I wanted
to learn more about how my
mind works when it comes
to emotions so I could better
handle my relationships.
IF I COULD GO BACK IN
TIME? I?d tell my 15-year-old
self to put the straightening
iron down!
ON SALE 7 FEBRUARY
WO R T H
JOELY WALKER, BEAUTY EDITOR:
JO
?I SWEAR BY THESE BEFORE ANY BIG
EVENT. POP THEM ON AND WAIT
15 MINUTES FOR BRIGHTER UNDEREYES
AND SOFTER, SMOOTHER LIPS.?
SOPHIE
SAYS
ELLE beauty director
Q
Is ?sculpting? different from using
blusher or bronzer? I know the clue
is in the name, but I have no idea
what to use to sculpt. SHIRLEY, SOUTHSEA
Sophie燘eresiner tackles
your skincare woes and
make-up dilemmas
Would your skin cast a bronze or pink shadow beneath
your cheekbones? No. I love Rodial Instaglam Contouring
Powder ? it?s greyish and matte, like a real shadow shade.
37
Q
,�
ESSIE
RD
E ye Primer Duo
Gel Couture in
Diamond In
The Cuf f, �99
M
FO
AMAZING
COSMETICS
TO
a
S
rm
c u l p t i n g Po w
A
�
EG
O
DA L
7. 50
L A PA L M
BELLA, YORKSHIRE
As much as I?d like to take the credit
for the following slice of genius,
I can?t. Overheard at Orly nail polish HQ (we beauty people
hang out in unusual places): if you use polish remover with an
old pair of tights instead of cotton wool, it works much better
? the fibres are more closely knitted together in tights, so they
don?t get caught up in the glitter.
Q
ing
Shap
S k i n . 50
o
i
d
9
Stu
�OX
tick,
SHB
on S
S M A undati
Fo
de
r,
W
Amazing
Concealer, �
What?s the easiest
way to remove
glitter nail polish?
I keep getting cotton wool
stuck in the glitter, which
makes it even more difficult.
leur
s
u
5 Co K haki
IOR
DI
r in
�
igne
Des Design,
D
Want to know a secret? Here it is, handed down through
the Beresiner glasses-wearing generations (or a hack learnt
from a recent convo with a friend ? you decide): after you?ve
applied your base, dot eyelid primer on the bridge of your
nose and where your glasses sit on the sides, then dust with
loose powder, and your glasses will be less inclined to
slide and disrupt your make-up. Voila!
Foundation and vision maintained.
Q
RODIAL
39
ran
slus cent L oos
o
eP
How can I apply
eyeshadow without
getting it all over my
face? SHANNAN, OXFORD
r, �
S
IT
w
N
CHANEL
Nail Colour
Remover, �
de
SE
Photographs: Graham Walseer at Hea
arst Studios
Instaglam Contouring
Powder in Dark, �
A
What?s the best way to prevent
my foundation from becoming oily
under my glasses? DEBORAH, LONDON
CLINIQUE
Chubby Stick
Sculpting
Highlight, �.50
Make-up artist trick: brush a thick layer
of loose powder under the eyes, apply
your eyeshadow, let the powder catch
the eyeshadow excess, then dust the
whole thing away. Beauty director cheat: do your eye makeup first. Make a mess, wipe it off and then do the rest of your
face. Note that this only works for real-life make-up; not
recommended for achieving Kardashian-level perfection.
G E T I N TO U C H W I T H S O P H I E
@ E L L E S O P H I E # S O P H I E S AY S
B O B B I B R O W N Glow Stick, �
ELLE
125
FEB
o
ex l re
Edited by
SUSAN WARD
DAVIES
Collages by
GUS
& STELLA
AS AWARDS SEASON GETS UNDERWAY,
LOTTE JEFFS CHECKS OUT HOLLYWOOD?S FAVOURITE LA ESCAPE
EXPLORE
I NEVER DID GET TO SING CHER?S
?Believe?, because we?d made some
enemies at The Ace Hotel?s karaoke
night, and it was clear we had to leave,
fast. There was a trio of septuagenarian ladies on a table at the front of
the basement bar, near the makeshift
stage. The women had pouffy hairdos
and wore more sequins than there are
on Broadway; for them, the legendary Tuesday-night singing session was
serious business. They had no time for
drunk out-of-towners guffawing their
way through ironic Nineties R?n?B. They
had requested Rat Pack classics mainly,
and were looking daggers at the visiting hipsters taking up their stage time.
Cher would not have gone down well,
so we downed our margaritas and ran
for it before the comp鑢e called me up
again. Laughing wildly, we tumbled up
the stairs into the hot desert night.
My best friend Joe and I were in
Palm Springs to recharge after a heavy
few months at work, and to reconnect
ELLE
128
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as friends since the inevitable drifting apart
that happens when one BFF is single (him)
and the other married (me). We lived
together in a tiny flat during our last two
years at university in Leeds, 17 years ago,
and developed the
easy rapport of an
old married couple. We ate pasta
and pesto together
almost every night,
balancing plates on
our knees as we sat
on Joe?s bed watching Will & Grace.
?Look at us
now!? I cry as we
drift on lilos in The
Parker hotel?s pool (there?s a second
pool for families and a third inside the
spa). Around the water are loungers with
yellow-and-white-striped sun umbrellas,
which look cartoonishly upbeat against the
bright, cloudless sky. Eyeing the hot guys
in the cabanas and contemplating whether
11am is too early for a cocktail, Joe and
I can?t help but feel the 20-year-old us
would be thrilled that we?d finally arrived.
Palm Springs is all good times ? bar
the threat of a catastrophic earthquake at any moment (if you?ve
seen the movie San Andreas, you?ll get my drift). Hedonism
rules. At the foot of the San Jacinto
Mountains, the sun always shines
and the city is famed for its Hollywood legacy, with Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley to Leonardo
Di Caprio and Angelina Jolie all
making the 100-mile trip east of
LA to kick back without judgement. Joe and I take a leaf out
of their books and eat, drink and
party like the glitterati, our morn-
ing gym trips the only sign ?consequences?
had crossed our mind.
Palm Springs beats with my favourite
kind of people: beautiful gay men on retreat from their Hollywood jobs as actorsslash-waiters, Glam-mas ? Iris Apfel lookalikes staying in their holiday homes and
drunk-driving their mobility vehicles down
palm-shaded boulevards, the mix of lost
souls who never
quite made it in LA,
and jobbing writers
hunkering down in
a quiet hotel to finish off their latest
screenplays.
The
Parker
makes its intentions
very clear: from the
moment you check
in there?s an ?anything goes? attitude
that permeates the place as much as the
scent of jasmine. From the eclectic, laidback furnishings that are just asking to be
flopped on, to the cucumber-infused vodka
? Palm Springs
BEATS with
my favourite
kind of
PEOPLE ?
shot you?re offered when you arrive at the
newly renovated spa The Palm Springs
Yacht Club (?We believe in the American
Country Club experience: mixed doubles,
a long steam and a stiff cocktail? declares
the website) ? this is somewhere to seriously let off steam.
The hotel opened in 2004, when designer Jonathan Adler?s luxurious and playful interiors marked a new era of hospitality
in Palm Springs. The resort originally
launched as California?s first Holiday Inn in
1959, but after various renovations, it was
its reincarnation as the Parker that really
put it on the map. There are 144 rooms, so
it?s a testament to the landscape of the resort that there?s a feeling of seclusion; you
need barely see another guest if you so
2019). We also spent a night on the town,
culminating in our karaoke showdown, but
starting with a stroll to observe the quirky
mid-century architecture, and dinner at
wish. Pathways turn in on themselves, high Truss & Twine (trussandtwine.com), a hip
hedgerows making every area feel deli- new spot serving the best cocktails in Palm
ciously private. We loved the Lemonade Springs and a menu of small plates using
Stand, which served icy lemon press� near ingredients from the Coachella Valley, 15
the p閠anque court. Meanwhile, inside, the miles south east of town.
The night took in the A-list favourites:
gilt mirrored Mini Bar was the perfect
place for a nightcap after dinner in Counter Seymours, a dimly lit cocktail bar where
Reformation, the Parker?s newly opened many a celebrity has been known to bed
speakeasy of a restaurant. Multiply the in for the night (seymoursps.com), Bootlegger Tiki (bootleggercoolest place you?ve been in
tiki.com), all plush
London or New York by ten
reds and sophistiand you?ve got some idea of
cated Tropicana (try
how thrilling this fantastically
THE PARKER
the Acid Drop cockquirky Mediterranean tapas
has doubles from around
tail), before dancing
joint is (they even shipped in a
�0 per night, room only,
theparkerpalmsprings.com
the night away at the
priest?s confessional booth
from Italy). We ate well at the
Parker ? breakfast at Norma?s,
the casual terrace diner, was
MR LYONS STEAKHOUSE
Instagrammable
perfection.
High-end, retro-style
Why not order the Zillion Dolsteakhouse
lar Lobster Frittata with a side of
caviar? Really, why not?
THE ROOSTER AND
We ventured out of the
THE PIG
Cool Vietnamese food and
Parker?s sanctuary a few times,
an even cooler clientele
once to check out artist Doug
Aitken?s incredible mirrored
house installation in the desert
? part of the Desert X Art FestiVIRGIN ATLANTIC
val, which sees pieces of work
has return flights from London
dotted around Palm Springs
Heathrow to LAX from around
(the next one is in February
�0, virginatlantic.com
STAY
EAT
GET THERE
UNITED AIRWAYS
has return flights between LAX and
Palm Springs from around �0,
united.com. Alternatively, it?s
a three-hour drive. Hertz has
three days? car hire from around
�0, hertz.co.uk
ELLE
130
FEB
legendary gay club Toucans Tiki Lounge
(toucanstikilounge.com).
We were there off-season, in March,
so it was cooler than the 90 degrees it gets
up to in summer and quieter than it is during
events such as the Palm Springs Film Festival (January) and Coachella (April), when
hordes of movie-industry bigwigs and bareskinned party people roll into town.
By the end of our four-night stay, Joe
and I had fallen into that easy rhythm of
our old friendship. We lay in hammocks
discussing our idea for a screenplay. We
toasted marshmallows on the fire pit, read
our books in happy silence, swam, ate and
occasionally toppled into those fits of uncontrollable laughter only your very best
friend (and three cucumber vodka shots
before midday) can provoke.
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BIJOUX EDIT
DISCUS EARRINGS
Minimal silver jewellery with freshwater rice pearls.
With focus in minimal luxury through craftsmanship, DE-CO
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Each piece is handcrafted and finished by the maker herself,
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SHEIDA FARROKHI
Sheida Farrokhi is a GIA graduate jewellery designer with a
family history of jewellery design and manufacturing. Sheida
launched her contemporary jewellery line in 2012, and her
distinctive brand is known for carving modern designs by
pairing geometric shapes in unexpected ways, to give the
feeling of 21st century fashion to its wearer.
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LAURA HAYWARD
BRIGITTE ADOLPH
18ct yellow gold jewellery set ?Miss Medea?with champagne
diamonds. The fine filigree and uncompromisingly feminine aura
of Brigitte?s design jewellery looks like finely woven lace ? an
illusion that dissolves to the touch, revealing the true nature of
her precious pieces in gold and silver.
Discover the collection on brigitte-adolph.de
Handmade in London but inspired by the jewellery of the
Classical world there is an air of timelessness to the beautiful,
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Usi
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