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Downloaded from http://adc.bmj.com/ on October 25, 2017 - Published by group.bmj.com
Abstracts
view of medicine that intersex is an abnormality requiring correction. This symbiotic relationship promotes an approach to the
child’s best interests that is based on parental welfare and fails to
consider the child’s future autonomous interests. Furthermore,
the breach of the child’s rights in infant genital-normalising surgery requires that the law has an implicit obligation to safeguard
these rights. I propose that a shared decision-making approach be
legally and professionallyrequired to allow the child to make the
decision to undergo or refuse genital-normalising surgery, with
support from parents and healthcare professionals through a
process based on education, information and protection of the
child’s physical integrity.
G45
PARENTAL FEVER KNOWLEDGE: A RANDOMISED
CONTROLLED TRIAL TO ASSESS THE EFFECTIVENESS OF
AN EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION TO INCREASE
PARENTAL KNOWLEDGE
1,2
M Kelly, 1,3S McCarthy, 4,5R O’Sullivan, 2,6F Shiely, 1A McGillicuddy, 2,6D Dahly,
LJ Sahm. 1Pharmaceutical Care Research Group, School of Pharmacy, University College
Cork, Ireland; 2HRB Clinical Research Facility, Mercy University Hospital, Cork, Ireland;
3
Department of Pharmacy, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland; 4School of Medicine,
University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 5National Children’s Research Centre, Crumlin
Children’s Hospital, Dublin 12, Ireland; 6Department of Epidemiology and Public Health,
University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 7Department of Pharmacy, Mercy University Hospital,
Cork, Ireland
1,7
10.1136/archdischild-2017-313087.44
G44
EARLY START IN EARLY YEARS: EVALUATING A
VULNERABLE FIRST TIME PARENT PROGRAMME
TC Redwood, J Callagham, J Alexander. Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of
Northampton, Northampton, UK
10.1136/archdischild-2017-313087.43
Background and Purpose An evaluation of an outreach service
programme for vulnerable first time parents with a focus on
parental well-being to assist the family. It is delivered by health
visitors, early childhood practitioners and family nursing support
staff in Central England. The programme is transformative in
that it addresses family health issues by enabling support to
centre on the lives of those children born at a disadvantage
through education of their parents.
Evaluation This paper considers the review process including the
operational aspects from the family nurses’ perspective. It incorporated an analysis of parental self-efficacy tools used within the
programme.
Methods A mixed methodology (Frost, 2011) was proposed to
draw on appropriate outcome measures. The qualitative component of the research involved recorded individual semi-structured
telephone interviews, analysed thematically (Braun & Clark
2006) to reveal patterns of response in participants’ experience
of the intervention and its impact. The outcome measures were
then analysed statistically, using SPSS to explore the impact of
the Early Start Programme. Descriptive statistics were used to
describe service elements while demographic and descriptive
information on age, ethnicity, referral source, number of sessions
attended enabled a description of the service.
Findings The study explored the perceptions and experiences of
the parents and the professionals co-ordinating and facilitating a
programme focussing on vulnerable families. In exploring the
impact of the programme, socio-economic outcomes (e.g.
removal into care and relative costs benefits), parental, professional experiences and course completion were explored. Professional dedication, flexible working patterns and adaptive measures
enabled these families to thrive often despite difficult physical,
mental and economic factors.
Conclusions This research provided an understanding of the outcomes of the intervention for families. It enabled an exploration
of the intervention at a service delivery level and an overview of
the impact of the programme.
Arch Dis Child 2017;102(Suppl 1):A1–A218
Aims Despite the existence of guidelines from national organisations, parental knowledge of fever and management of fever in
children is incomplete. The aim of this study was to assess the
effectiveness of an educational intervention to increase parental
knowledge of fever.
Methods A prospective, multi-centre, randomised, two-parallel
arm, controlled trial with blinded outcome ascertainment was
conducted. A convenience sample of parents presenting at purposively selected GP practices, urgent and emergency care treatment
centres and pharmacies in Cork, Ireland were invited to participate. An information leaflet for use in the trial was designed
based on two previous studies with parents. Parents in the control
arm were asked to complete a short questionnaire at randomisation (time-point 1) and again two weeks after randomisation
(time-point 2). Parents in the intervention arm were asked to
read an information leaflet on fever and management of fever in
children, complete a short questionnaire at randomisation (timepoint 1) and again two weeks after randomisation (time-point 2).
Results A total of 100 parents participated at time-point 1 of the
study, with 50 participants in each arm. After time-point 2, 39
parents from the control group and 34 parents from the intervention group had been successfully contacted. A greater proportion
of the intervention group (76%) than the control group (28%)
selected the correct temperature to recognise fever (38OC) at
time-point 1. At time-point 2, 82.4% of the intervention group
and 30.8% of the control group selected the correct temperature.
When answers from the intervention and control groups were
compared at both time points using simple logistic regression,
participants in the intervention group were more likely to give
the correct answer at both time points (initial questionnaire OR
8.143 CI 95% 3.325–19.943; after two weeks OR 10.5, CI 95%
3.448–31.972). Management practices were also positively influenced by the information leaflet (reduction in alternating between
antipyretics and use of tepid sponging).
Conclusions An educational intervention can improve parental
knowledge of fever and correct management strategies. The
effect of the intervention was sustained over-time. This study
highlights the need for public health authorities to consider incorporating this leaflet into resources for parents.
A19
Downloaded from http://adc.bmj.com/ on October 25, 2017 - Published by group.bmj.com
G45 Parental fever knowledge: A randomised
controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of
an educational intervention to increase
parental knowledge
M Kelly, S McCarthy, R O'Sullivan, F Shiely, A McGillicuddy, D Dahly and
LJ Sahm
Arch Dis Child 2017 102: A19
doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2017-313087.44
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