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j.ijantimicag.2017.10.005

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Accepted Manuscript
Title: Virtual special section “new challenges in antifungal therapy”
Author: Stéphane Ranque, Fadi Bittar
PII:
DOI:
Reference:
S0924-8579(17)30369-2
https://doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2017.10.005
ANTAGE 5278
To appear in:
International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
Please cite this article as: Stéphane Ranque, Fadi Bittar, Virtual special section “new challenges
in antifungal therapy”, International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents (2017),
https://doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2017.10.005.
This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service
to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will
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Editorial
Virtual special section “New challenges in antifungal therapy”
Stéphane RANQUE, Fadi BITTAR
Comment [A1]: AUTHOR: There are two
different Article title provided and the ones in
the manuscript has been used.Please check and
confirm that it is correct.
Aix Marseille Université, CNRS 7278, IRD 198, Inserm 1095, AP-HM, URMITE, IHU
Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France.
This virtual special section on new challenges in antifungal therapy aimed at focusing on
antifungal therapy and resistance in the fungal taxa of major clinical importance. Farmakiotis
and Kontoyanis [1] reviewed the current epidemiology of antifungal resistance in human
pathogenic yeasts, in particular they highlighted an increasing trend in antifungal drug
resistance, chiefly associated with the species Candida glabrata and C. kefyr. They also
pointed out the recent worldwide emergence of C. auris, a species characterized by both a
multidrug drug resistance phenotype and the propensity to cause health-care-associated
infection outbreaks. Morio et al. [2] reviewed the latest available methods for in vitro
antifungal susceptibility testing and the detection of mutations associated with resistance in
yeast. They comprehensively assessed the up-to-date key molecular mechanisms associated
with antifungal drug resistance in yeast, especially pathogenic Candida spp.
This themed issue particularly featured the little-recognized and neglected burden of
antifungal resistance in filamentous fungi, which is yet critically increasing amongst high-risk
patients. Sharma et al. [3] comprehensively reviewed the mechanisms of either intrinsic or
acquired antifungal resistance in filamentous fungi; with a special focus on the recent
emergence of acquired azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus. Danaoui [4], and Al-Hatmi
Page 1 of 3
et al. [5] presented the current knowledge on the dramatic issue of antifungal resistance in
two particularly life-threating and difficult to treat opportunistic fungal infections,
mucormycoses and fusariosis, respectively. Pellon et al. [6], focused on Lomentospora
(Scedosporium) prolificans, an opportunistic pathogen filamentous fungus that, like Fusarium
spp., has a propensity to cause blood stream infections. Because of its intrinsic resistance to
all currently available antifungal agents, these authors proposed this species as a candidate
model for studying antifungal agents’ resistance mechanisms aiming at providing new
insights into future antifungal drugs targets and antifungal arsenal. Indeed, because the
current antifungal armamentarium remains ineffective against some of the growing numbers
of species involved in invasive fungal diseases, many authors who collaborated in this virtual
special section emphasized the need to develop novel antifungal drug candidates. Widerhold
[7] concluded the broad overview of the new challenges in antifungal therapy discussed in
this virtual special section by reviewing investigational antifungal agents currently under
development, including those that target ergosterol and 1,3-beta-D-glucan, as well as agents
with novel mechanisms of action.
References
[1] Farmakiotis D, Kontoyiannis DP. Epidemiology of antifungal resistance in human
pathogenic yeasts: current viewpoint and practical recommendations for management. Int J
Antimicrob Agents. 2017 Sep;50(3):318-324.
[2] Morio F, Jensen RH, Le Pape P, Arendrup MC. Molecular basis of antifungal drug
resistance in yeasts. Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2017 Jun 29. pii: S0924-8579(17)30205-4.
[3] Sharma C, Chowdhary A. Molecular bases of antifungal resistance in filamentous fungi.
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2017 Jul 10. pii: S0924-8579(17)30267-4.
Page 2 of 3
[4] Dannaoui E. Antifungal resistance in mucorales. Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2017 Aug 9. pii:
S0924-8579(17)30302-3.
[5] Al-Hatmi AMS, Bonifaz A, Ranque S, de Hoog GS, Verweij PE, Meis JF. Current antifungal
treatment of fusariosis. Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2017 Jul 10. pii: S0924-8579(17)30266-2.
[6] Pellon A, Ramirez-Garcia A, Buldain I, Antoran A, Martin-Souto L, Rementeria A, et al.
Pathobiology of Lomentospora prolificans: could this species serve as a model of primary
antifungal resistance? Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2017 Jun 29. pii: S0924-8579(17)30219-4.
[7] Wiederhold NP. The antifungal arsenal: alternative drugs and future targets. Int J
Antimicrob Agents. 2017 Sep 7. pii: S0924-8579(17)30334-5.
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