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j.jaac.2017.07.046

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CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES
8.1 — 8.3
Methods: Media use can provide both risks and benefits for children,
adolescents, families, and professionals. A developmental framework will
be provided to help understand media use. Well-developed online resources and tools from AACAP, AAP, and Common Sense Media will be
reviewed. Case studies and a video of family therapy will illustrate how
primary care providers and mental health professionals can collaborate
and integrate these conversations into appointments. Legal concerns
pertaining to children and adolescents will be discussed in the context of
how professionals may become involved in the legal system through the
population with whom they work. In addition, AACAP’s ethics guidelines
will help provide a structure through which professionals can evaluate
their own use of media and possible implications this may have on eProfessionalism.
Results: Clinicians will be presented with a developmental framework, online
resources, clinical vignettes, a family therapy session video, legal issues, and
e-Professionalism guidelines that they can use to improve their understanding
of media use and incorporate into their clinical practices.
Conclusions: Practical, collaborative, legal, ethical, and professional considerations pertaining to media use are all important topics that clinicians can
integrate into their daily interactions with children, adolescents, and families.
ETH, MED, COMP
Sponsored by AACAP's Triple Board and Post Pediatric Portal Programs
Committee, Media Committee, and Ethics Committee
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.07.044
8.1 MEDIA AND VIDEO GAME TRENDS ACROSS
DEVELOPMENT
Roslyn Gerwin, DO, Maine Medical Center, rgerwin@
mmc.org
Objectives: The goals of this session are 1) to gain a more understanding
of the online world in which children and adolescents are immersed;
and 2) to outline general use patterns of digital media and games for
children and adolescents, as well as how video game use differs across
development.
Methods: A literature search was conducted with emphasis on three major
reviews: 1) a recent technical report by AAP addressing digital media use in
children and adolescents; 2) a 2015 Pew Research Center publication overviewing adolescent social media and technology use; and 3) a 2013 Common
Sense Media report on the media use of children. The author’s experience
exploring media use will be incorporated, including multimedia examples.
Results: Television is still the most common mode of screen use for children
<8 years of age, with a rise in desktop computer use around age five years,
and common video game use. Sixty-eight percent of children and adolescents have a home-gaming console, with recent trends showing a dramatic
shift toward mobile devices and tablets. Children are fairly evenly engaging
in educational, gaming, and creative-based applications. As expected, by
adolescence, desktops, video game consoles, and mobile devices are all
widely accessible and used, with 92 percent of teenagers going online daily
and 24 percent reporting “almost constant” use. The desire for social
interaction dominates their media trends in many ways, such as texting,
streaming, social media, and online gaming. Children have a natural tendency toward exploration, experimentation, and fantasy. Video games they
are drawn to reflect these tendencies. Many games, such as the widely
popular Minecraft, have limited goals and many ways to progress in the
game but still offer opportunities to achieve a sense and success. Adolescents are drawn to games with competition and goals to achieve a sense of
mastery. They are able to grasp complex story lines and engage in the
ability to experiment with customizable identities. Risk-taking behavior is
possible in an immersive virtual world without real-life responsibility or
consequences.
Conclusions: Media use is rising across all ages, with distinct patterns seen
across developmental stages. Providers have the task of providing effective
online guides within the clinical setting. Therefore, digital knowledge and its
relation across different ages are essential.
MED, COMP, DEV
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.07.045
S12
www.jaacap.org
8.2 A HEALTHY MEDIA DIET:
RECOMMENDATIONS AND TOOLS
Kristin A. Dalope, MD, University of Pittsburgh Medical
Center, dalopek@upmc.edu
Objectives: The goals of this session are to 1) review the AAP digital media
use recommendations updated in 2016; and 2) illustrate how the AAP Recommendations and Media Use Plan can be incorporated into clinical care.
Methods: In October 2016, the AAP updated their 1999 guidelines for media
use, based on a developmental perspective. From ages 0 to 18 months, 2 to 5
years, and 6 years and up, the recommendations were changed to factor in
the developmental research pertaining to media use by children, as well as
the realities of living in a digital era. These policy statements and technical
reports discussing the relevant research will be reviewed, along with the AAP’s
new Family Media Use Plan.
Results: The AAP has created a wealth of up-to-date reviews, which are excellent
resources for physicians. In particular, the free, interactive Family Media Use Plan
is a practical tool that helps parents set boundaries for media use within their
families and sets the stage for family conversations about a variety of topics. The
media plan prioritizes sleep and physical exercise, introduces the topic of highquality programming, incorporates limit setting pertaining to time with media,
and designates media-free times and locations at home. It also begins the discussion of online citizenship and safety. Clinical examples of a triple boardtrained physician having these discussions with families of children and adolescents, with various DSM-5 diagnoses, in a variety of settings will be given.
Conclusions: Digital media use is a complex and difficult to navigate issue for
families with children and adolescents. The AAP has created helpful recommendations and an online, interactive media plan. This presentation will
provide clinicians with a review of the AAP resources and recommendations to
empower families through this body of work.
MED, PSC, PAT
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.07.046
8.3 WEAVING THE EFFECTS OF MEDIA USE
INTO COLLABORATIVE CARE
Wei Song, MD, University of Utah School of Medicine, wei.
song.2012@gmail.com
Objectives: The goals of this session are to 1) describe the potential benefits
of encouraging healthy media use within collaborative care between child and
adolescent psychiatrists and primary care physicians (PCPs); and 2) present
useful resources that all child and adolescent psychiatrists can use when
working collaboratively with primary care.
Methods: The expert panel of Media Committee members collected a small list of
the most important and clinically useful resources when working with primary care.
This included psychoeducational materials on AACAP’s website and the plethora of
content reviews and technology assessments available on Common Sense Media.
The author will draw upon experience in working with PCPs to incorporate clinically
relevant examples and live demonstrations of these resources.
Results: With the advent of new technologies, media use of many kinds is
becoming more prevalent among children and adolescents. In cases of
depression, substance use, and other common mental health issues, collaborative care interventions have been found in studies to be helpful at the
point of primary care. Likewise, with regard to technology, PCPs appear well
positioned to identify problematic media use earlier and to provide preventative care before they come to our offices, and this can be another focus of
intervention in collaborative care. For successful collaboration with PCPs, we
as child psychiatrists can add the knowledge and expertise for screening,
treatment, and follow-up for children in the area of media use.
Conclusions: As various kinds of media use become more widespread among
children and adolescents, education of families on healthy use of media becomes increasingly important. Collaboration between child psychiatrists and
PCPs on this topic may reach a wider population and potentially help with
prevention and early identification of problematic use. Various resources can
give families and care providers more means to guide youth through a world
of increasing technological complexity and connectivity.
MED, PAT, PRE
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.07.047
J OURNAL
OF THE
AMERICAN A CADEMY OF CHILD & ADOLESCENT P SYCHIATRY
VOLUME 56 NUMBER 10S OCTOBER 2017
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