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O
RAL S ESSIONS
W EDNESDAY, M AY
9, 9,2012
oral
sessionswednesday,
may
2012
O RAL S ESSIONS
Wednesday, May 9, 2012
Basic Science Session: Nutrition and Obesity
100 invited speaker
OMEGA 3 AND OBESITY
J. Kopecky1
1
, I NSTITUTE OF P HYSIOLOGY ACADEMY OF S CIENCES OF THE C ZECH
R EPUBLIC V. V. I ., Department of Adipose Tissue Biology, Prague, Czech
Republic
Abstract Text: Development of obesity comorbidities could be delayed
by lifestyle modifications, while both dietary and pharmacological
interventions are required for the therapy.
n-3 long-chain PUFA
(Omega-3) act as hypolipidaemics, reduce cardiac events and may
decrease the progression of atherosclerosis. In animals, Omega-3
prevent obesity, hepatic steatosis and dyslipidaemia, as well as impaired
glucose tolerance, while exerting pronounced anti-inflammatory effects.
However, Omega-3 fail to improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients.
Experiments in mice fed high-fat diet revealed that (i) liver, adipose tissue
(AT) and muscle represent the targets for Omega-3, and (ii) Omega-3
effects include changes in fatty acid composition of phospholipids, in
formation of Omega-3-derived lipid mediators, in gene expression, and
in the activity of both, adiponectin-AMPK axis and endocannabinoid
system. Omega-3 augment effects of other treatments: (i) a combination
with mild calorie restriction efficiently reduced obesity, while inducing
a metabolic switch toward lipid catabolism in AT; and (ii) a combination
with TZDs exerted additive effects in the amelioration of dyslipidaemia
and insulin resistance, while preserving muscle insulin sensitivity and
metabolic flexibility. Both combination treatments strongly suppressed
low-grade inflammation of AT. Combination treatment using Omega-3
and a low dose of rosiglitazone reduced obesity.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
102 invited speaker
DIET, OBESITY AND GENES
W. Saris1
1
M AASTRICHT U NIVERSITY, Dept. of Human Biology, NUTRIM - School
for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht, Netherlands
Abstract Text: Given our genetic background it is essential infeasible
for humans to self-regulate food intake under current environmental
circumstances with cheap but tasteful food with no expenses of energy
due to labor. On macronutrient distribution of the energy intake there is
much debate. Although a number of meta-analysis on the relationship
between fat intake and body weight control clearly showed a direct
association, the scientific evidence has been seriously challenged in
recent years. These doubts have dramatically posed the question
whether we should focus explicitly on energy density or more to the
macronutrient composition.The EU NUGENOB study has showed again
that a calorie is still a calorie whether it comes from fat or carbohydrate.
Of more importance is to observe body weight maintenance under
less well controlled ad lib situations. Under such circumstances the
science tells us clearly that one should reduce in the first place fat and
not carbohydrate intake. Recently the attention has been focused on
the level of protein in the diet.Ad libitum diets with high protein content
have been shown to enhance satiety and increase thermogenesis,
and also produce better weight control and weight loss than diets in
which the protein is replaced by carbohydrate given a low fat diet.
Moreover the recent EU DiOGenes study showed the positive effects of
a high protein/low Glycemic Index diet on long-term weight control after
considerable weight loss. However the human regulatory system has an
enormous redundancy developed during evolution to keep body weight
at a desired level, which needs a multi target approach in order to be
effective.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed.
Funding:
101 invited speaker
FATTY ACID AND ADIPOSITY
R. Nogueiras1
1
U NIVERSITY OF S ANTIAGO DE C OMPOSTELA, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Abstracts Book Page 33
32
Obes Facts 2012;5(suppl 1):1–280
Abstracts
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Abstract: The central nervous system (CNS) plays an essentials
role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. In addition to endocrine
signalling and nutrient sensing, there is an important neuronal network
that connects the CNS with peripheral metabolic processes. Many
neuroanatomical studies have shown that the white adipose tissue is
innervated by the autonomic nervous system. For instance, specific
neuronal circuits within the CNS respond by adjusting ongoing autonomic
nervous system activity to a wide spectrum of organs. During the last
years, several reports have demonstrated that signals from the CNS
directly control the amount of fat by modulating the storage or oxidation
of fatty acids in WAT and also in liver. Importantly, some CNS pathways
regulate these processes independent of food intake, suggesting that
those signals possess alternative mechanisms to regulate energy
homeostasis. Different neuronal circuits within the hypothalamus, such
as leptin- ghrelin- insulin- or GLP1-responsive neurons, as well as
melanocortins or NPY exert their direct actions on fatty acid metabolism
in peripheral tissues. Finally, new systems that control fatty acid
metabolism and adiposity continue to be discovered and have potential
implications in human obesity. Dissecting the complicated interactions
between peripheral signals and neuronal circuits regulating fatty acid
metabolism might open new avenues for the development of new
therapies preventing and treating obesity and its associated disorders.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
W EDNESDAYmay
, M AY
9, 2012
O RAL S ESSIONS
wednesday,
9, 2012oral
sessions
FOOD CHARACTERISTICS IN RELATION TO APPETITE REGULATION
I. Björck1 , A. Nilsson1 , E. Östman1 , E. Johansson1
1
L UND U NIVERSITY, Antidiabetic Food Centre Applied nutrition and
food chemistry, Lund, Sweden
Abstract Text: Introduction: Limited information is available concerning
to what extent food characteristics such as the type and amount of
indigestible carbohydrates may affect human metabolism and appetite
regulation through pathways involving the gut microbiota. The purpose
of the present work was to evaluate the potential relation between
gut fermentation and markers of metabolism and appetite regulation
in healthy humans provided with starchy foods rich in endogenous
indigestible carbohydrates. Methods: Healthy humans were provided
equicarbohydrate evening meals; based on white wheat bread, or
starchy test foods rich in indigestible carbohydrates e.g. barley based
products. Plasma levels of glucose, insulin, incretins, appetite regulating
hormones, inflammatory tonus, as well as indicators of gut fermentation
were measured during the course of breakfast and lunch meals the
subsequent day. The impact on voluntary food intake and perceived
satiety the subsequent day was also measured. Results: Compared with
evening meals with white bread, evening meals based on certain starchy
foods rich in indigestible carbohydrates lowered blood glucose levels the
subsequent day through a mechanism involving gut fermentation. Also,
indicators of subclinical inflammation were reduced, and anorexigenic
hormones increased e.g. GLP-1, peptide YY, oxyntomodulin. Evening
meals promoting gut fermentation were found to be more satiating,
and a barley kernel evening meal promoted a lower voluntary energy
intake at lunch the following day.
Conclusions; Certain indigestible
carbohydrates may infer benefits on metabolism, appetite regulating
hormones and voluntary food intake in healthy subjects in the perspective
from a late evening meal to over the course of the next day. The
results indicate that interactions between the gut microbiota and host
metabolism may occur within a short time frame.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
CO:OS1 - Parental Influence on Obesity
104 accepted oral
PARENT FOCUSED INTERVENTION IMPACTS OBESITY RISK
BEHAVIOURS IN INFANTS: RESULTS OF THE MELBOURNE
INFANT PROGRAM CLUSTER-RANDOMISED CONTROLLED
TRIAL
S. Lioret1 , K. Campbell1 , S. McNaughton1 , D. Crawford1 , J. Salmon1 , K.
Ball1 , Z. McCallum2 , B. Gerner3 , A. Spence1 , A. Cameron1 , J. Hnatiuk1 ,
O. Ukoumunne4 , L. Gold5 , K. Hesketh1
1
D EAKIN U NIVERISTY, Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition
Research, C-PAN, Burwood, Melbourne , Australia
2
T HE U NIVERSITY OF M ELBOURNE, Department of pediatrics
3
R OYAL C HILDREN ’ S H OSPITAL, Center for Community Child Health
4
U NIVERSITY OF E XETER, Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry,
Exeter, United Kingdom
5
D EAKIN U NIVERISTY, Senior Research Fellow in Deakin Health
Economics, Burwood, Melbourne , Australia
Abstract Text: Introduction: Overweight is common as early as
preschool ages, suggesting that associated lifestyle behaviours may be
entrained from infancy. Evidence from interventions aiming to improve
obesity-related behaviours or weight trajectories in infancy is extremely
limited. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of
a parent-focussed intervention on infants’ obesity risk behaviours and
BMI.Methods: The Melbourne InFANT Program is a cluster-RCT involving 542 first-time parents from when their infants were 3 to 18 months
of age. The intervention was delivered in pre-existing social groups
and focused on providing mothers with knowledge and skills to support
development of positive diet and physical activity behaviours and reduced
sedentariness in infants. The effect of the intervention was assessed
for the following outcomes: intakes of fruits, vegetables, sweetened
beverages, water, sweet and savoury snacks (3x24-hour diet recalls),
television viewing (parent report), physical activity (accelerometry), and
zBMI (measured). Linear and logistic regression analyses were used
to assess the effect of the intervention. Results: There was evidence
that compared to controls, intervention group children consumed less
non-core sweet snacks (OR 0.60, 95%CI 0.39;0.92) and viewed less
television (OR 0.67, 0.40;1.10) at program conclusion. There was less
evidence for differences with respect to consumption of fruit, vegetables
and water and little evidence for differences on zBMI and physical
activity.Conclusion: An intervention targeting first-time parents resulted
in improvements in toddler’s diet and reductions in television viewing.
This low dose intervention holds promise as a means of influencing
behavioural determinants of overweight in infancy.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed.
Funding: The Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial
(InFANT) Program was funded by an Australian National Health and
Medical Research Council Project Grant (number 425801
105 accepted oral
FAMILY-BASED INTERVENTION PREVENTS EARLY ADULTHOOD OBESITY: 10-YEARS FOLLOW UP OF THE FAMILY
CHECK-UP, A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
M. J. van Ryzin1 , P. Nowicka2 3
1
U NIVERSITY OF O REGON, Child and Family Center, Eugene, USA
2
K AROLINSKA I NSTITUTE, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention
and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm, Sweden
3
U NIVERSITY OF O REGON, Department of Psychology, Eugene, USA
Abstract Text: Introduction: The Family Check-Up (FCU), a familybased intervention, has been shown to reduce escalations of antisocial
behavior and depression in adolescence by supporting the use of
positive family management practices. However, little research has
examined the processes by which the FCU influences outcomes in early
adulthood, including obesity and health-related attitudes and behaviors
that would reduce the likelihood of obesity.Methods: Participants were
998 adolescents (n=526 male; n=423 European American) and their
families, recruited in 6th grade from 3 middle schools in the Pacific
Northwest of the United States. We hypothesized that the FCU, by
improving family connectedness in early adolescence, would have
positive cascading effects on adolescent health-related attitudes and
behaviors that would carry forward into early adulthood and reduce
the likelihood of obesity. Results: The FCU led to improved family
connectedness across ages 12-15; in turn, these improved relationships
led to enhanced health-related behavior, reduced maladaptive attitudes
about eating, and reduced depression among adolescents at age 17.
Maladaptive attitudes about eating, increased odds of obesity at age
22; health-related behavior and depression were not significant. The
indirect effect of the FCU on obesity by way of family connectedness
and maladaptive eating attitudes was significant. Conclusions: This
study extends current research by demonstrating that the FCU can
have salutary effects on family processes and on adolescent and early
adulthood health-related outcomes. This study also illustrates how family
processes can influence health and highlights their importance when
developing prevention and intervention programs for obesity.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed.
Funding: Research related to this abstract was funded by grants
DA07031 and DA13773 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to
Thomas J. Dishion. Support for Mark J. Van Ryzin was provided by grant
T32 MH200012 from the National Institute of Mental Health to Elizabeth
A. Stormshak. Support for Paulina Nowicka was provided by grant from
the Sweden-America Foundation.
106 accepted oral
ENTERING PARENTS’ BED DURING NIGHT AND THE RISK OF
OVERWEIGHT AMONG 2-6 YEAR OLD CHILDREN PREDISPOSED TO OVERWEIGHT. RESULTS FROM THE SUND START
STUDY.
N. J. Olsen1 , T. Buch-Andersen1 , M. Stougaard1 , M. Trærup1 , C.
Seeger1 , J. Pedersen1 , M. N. Händel1 , L. M. Østergaard1 , E. L.
Mortensen2 , B. L. Heitmann1
1
I NSTITUTE OF P REVENTIVE M EDICINE , C OPENHAGEN U NIVERSITY
H OSPITAL, Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Copenhagen, Denmark
2
U NIVERSITY OF C OPENHAGEN, Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen,
Denmark
Abstract Text: Introduction: Research suggests that children’s
entering their parents’ bed after nightly awakenings is associated with
short sleep duration and sleep fragmentation. Obesity has moreover
been found to be associated with low sleep quality and quantity. We
examined if entering parents’ bed during night was associated with
an increased risk of child overweight.Methods:The Sund Start study
included 645 children aged 2-6 years predisposed to overweight due to
high birth weight, maternal pre-pregnancy overweight or maternal low
socioeconomic status. Of these, 497 children had complete information
on BMI, whether the child enters the parents’ bed during night, and if
so, how often. International cut-offs for overweight according to age and
Abstracts Book Page 34
Abstracts
Obes Facts 2012;5(suppl 1):1–280
33
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103 invited speaker
O
RAL S ESSIONS
W EDNESDAY, M AY
9, 9,2012
oral
sessionswednesday,
may
2012
gender was applied. Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals
(CI) were estimated from logistic regression analyses.Results:Children
entering parents’ bed during night had OR = 0.5 (95% CI 0.28-0.95) of
being overweight, compared to children not entering parents’ bed during
night. Children entering parents’ bed every night had OR = 0.3 (95% CI
0.09-0.88) compared to children never entering parents’ bed during night.
All analyses were adjusted for factors such as gender, child’s age and
parental educational level.Conclusion:Those children never entering
parents’ bed during night had a more than 3-fold higher risk of obesity
than those entering every night, suggesting that elements of parental
social support or other types of positive psychosocial responses if being
allowed to enter parent’s bed during night may protect against obesity.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by TrygFonden,
Danish Medical Research Council and Helsefonden.
107 accepted oral
EFFECTIVENESS OF A HOME-BASED EARLY INTERVENTION
ON CHILDREN’S BMI AT AGE TWO YEARS: RANDOMISED
CONTROLLED TRIAL
L. Baur1
1
U NIVERSITY OF S YDNEY, School of Public Health, Sydney, Australia
Abstract Text: Authors: Wen LM, Baur LA,* Simpson JM, Rissel
C, Wardle K, Flood VM *Presenter: School of Public Health,
Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia
Introduction: The importance of early intervention in the first few years
of life to prevent the onset of obesity has become evident. However,
no early childhood obesity prevention programs have been effectively
implemented and rigorously evaluated. In 2007-10, we commenced the
Healthy Beginnings Trial to address this evidence gap. The trial aimed
to test the effectiveness of an early childhood obesity intervention in
children aged up to two years. Methods: We conducted a randomised
controlled trial with 667 first-time mothers in socially disadvantaged areas
of south-western Sydney, Australia. The intervention group received
eight home visits from a specially trained community nurse delivering
the staged intervention, which comprised one home visit at gestational
age 30-36 weeks, and seven visits at 1, 3, 5, 9, 12, 15 and 24 months
after birth. The timing of the visits corresponded to milestones in early
childhood development. The primary outcomes included children’s
BMI, infant feeding practices, and TV viewing time when children were
two years of age.Results: At 12 months, the intervention significantly
improved some infant feeding practices, including longer duration of
breastfeeding, delayed introduction of solids. The 24 months results
indicate significant improvements in children’s vegetable consumption,
food not being used as a reward, less TV viewing time and a mean
reduction in BMI of 0.38 kg/m2 for children in the intervention group.
Conclusion: The home-based early intervention delivered by trained
community nurses significantly reduced mean BMI and TV viewing time
and improved vegetable intake for children at age 2 years.
Conflict of Interest: Nil
Funding: This trial was funded by the Australian National Health and
Medical Research Council (NHRC ID number: 393112)
sampling were performed to study kinetics of ghrelin, glucose, insulin
and non esterified fatty acids (NEFA). Indirect calorimetry measurements
were done. Results: After F4, at t240, acylated ghrelin concentration
(p=0.003) and hunger ratings were lower (p<0.001). Subjects consumed
(mean ± SEM) 88 ± 61 kcal less (p=0.08) and significantly less lipid
(p=0.04) at the buffet after F4. Differences in consumption were observed
during the last temporal quarter of the buffet meal for total energy and
lipid intake (p=0.03). Mixed models highlighted differences between
F1 and F4 for the kinetics of glucose, insulin and NEFA (p<0.0001).
Area under curve was lower for NEFA in F4 (p=0.006). No difference
was demonstrated for lipid oxidation (p=0.28).Conclusion: This study
demonstrated the beneficial short-term effect of increasing EF on control
of appetite in lean men.
Conflict of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by Fondation
Nestlance
109 accepted oral
INFLUENCE OF FAT AND FAT-FREE MASS ON HOMEOSTATIC
AND HEDONIC CONTROL OF APPETITE
G. Finlayson1 , P. Caudwell1 , C. Gibbons1 , M. Hopkins1 , J. Blundell1
1
U NIVERSITY OF L EEDS, Leeds, United Kingdom
Abstract Text: Introduction: Obese individuals are able to eat too much
of some foods due to either excessive activation of hedonic processes,
or a defect in homeostatic processes that fail to inhibit the drive to eat.
Both systems are affected by tonic signalling from enlarged body tissues.
We examined the specific roles of fat (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) on
food intake and appetite control.Methods: Forty-nine overweight/obese
adults (BMI=31.2±3.8 kg/m2 ; age=43.6±6.8 years) took part in six
total-day appetite assessments during a three-month supervised exercise
intervention. Food intake and profiles of hunger were assessed by
objectively measured test meals. Hedonic measures included liking and
wanting for food and trait measures of food craving and binge eating.
FM and FFM were measured by 2-compartment body composition
analyser (BodPod, life Measurement Inc.).Results: A large variability in
body composition was observed: FM:19.3-58.4kg(22-54%); FFM:33.575.8kg(46-78%). FFM but not fat mass was associated with meal size
(β=.41-.63, p<0.001) and post-meal hunger (F=4.2-6.7, p<0.05). FM
but not FFM was associated with wanting (β=.39, p<0.01), trait craving
(r=.43-.63, p<0.01) and binge eating (r=.38-.42, p<0.01).Conclusion:
We hypothesise that signals related to (metabolically active) FFM set a
minimum threshold for the homeostatic drive to eat. Signals from FM
then disrupt the normal inhibition of food intake, in part mediated by
hedonic controllers of eating behaviour. This research has implications
for understanding of long term food intake regulation.
Conflict of Interest: No conflicts of interest.
Funding: Funding: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research
Council (BB/G005524/1)
110 accepted oral
RESPONSES IN APPETITE AND EATING BEHAVIOUR TO 16
WEEKS OF ENERGY RESTRICTION IN OBESE MALES
N. King1 , R. Wood1 , A. Hills2 , N. Byrne1 , A. Salsibury-Salis3
108 accepted oral
INCREASING EATING FREQUENCY: EFFECTS ON APPETITE
CONTROL AND METABOLISM
X. Allirot12 , J. Graeppi-Dulac2 , L. Saulais1 , E. Disse2 , H. Roth2 , K.
Seyssel2 , M. LAVILLE2
1
C ENTRE DE RECHERCHE DE L’I NSTITUT PAUL B OCUSE, Ecully, France
2
CRNH-R HÔNE A LPES AND C ENTER FOR E UROPEAN N UTRITION ,
S AFETY AND H EALTH , U NIVERSITY OF LYON, F-69310 PIERRE BENITE,
France
Abstract Text: Introduction: Studies assessing the effects of eating
frequency (EF) on human health led to contradictory results. We
aimed at assessing the consequences of increasing EF on appetite
and metabolism.Methods: 20 normal weight men participated to: (i) 2
sessions consisting in a breakfast consumed in 1 intake at t0 (F1), or
in 4 intakes at t0, t60, t120, t180 (F4), and followed by an ad libitum
buffet meal (t240) in an experimental restaurant. Participants rated their
appetite all experiment long. (ii) 2 sessions consisting in the same 2
breakfasts F1 and F4, followed by a standardized meal (t240). Blood
Abstract Text: Introduction: The overall aim of this study was to
compare weight loss and a range of adaptive compensatory responses
between a traditional continuous (CONT) and an intermittent energy
restriction (INT). Only the appetite responses are reported here.
Methods: Forty-one obese males (mean body weight= 109 ±11.0kg)
were randomly assigned to either 16 weeks of CONT (n=21) or INT
(n=19) energy restriction (ER). During ER both groups were prescribed a
33% reduction in energy intake based on individual weight maintenance
requirements calculated monthly. Appetite probe days at weeks 0, 8 and
16 assessed subjective appetite sensations (Visual Analogue Scales),
energy intake (ad libitum test meal) and eating behaviour characteristics
(Three Factor Eating Questionnaire - TFEQ). Results: Despite identical
ER the CONT and INT groups experienced different relative weight
loss (7.6 ±3.8% and 12.3 ±4.5% respectively) at the end of ER
(p<0.001). TFEQ Dietary Restraint increased significantly, and to the
same degree in both the CONT (7.0 to 10.8) and INT (7.7 to 11.5) groups
(p<0.0001), while TFEQ Disinhibition remained unchanged. Fasting
hunger increased in the CONT group and decreased in the INT group;
the difference between groups approached significance (p=0.08). There
Abstracts Book Page 35
34
Obes Facts 2012;5(suppl 1):1–280
Abstracts
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SS:OS1 - Nutrition and Behaviour (Human)
1
Q UEENSLAND U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY, Institute of Health and
Biomedical Innovation, Kelvin Grove, Australia
2
M ATER M EDICAL R ESEARCH I NSTITUTE, Mater Mother’s Hospital,
Brisbane, Australia
3
T HE G ARVAN I NSTITUTE, Endocrinology
W EDNESDAYmay
, M AY
9, 2012
O RAL S ESSIONS
wednesday,
9, 2012oral
sessions
111 accepted oral
BEHAVIOURAL AND METABOLIC CHARACTERISATION OF
OBESE MEN WITH WEAK SATIETY RESPONSE
V. Drapeau12 , H. Arguin3 , J. Blundell4 5 , A. Tremblay6 2
1
L AVAL U NIVERSITY, Department of Physical Education, Quebec,
Canada
2Q UÉBEC R ESEARCH C ENTER I NSTITUTE OF C ARDIOLOLOGY AND
P NEUMOLOGY, Quebec city, Canada
3
FACULTY OF M EDICINE , L AVAL U NIVERSITY, Department of Kinesiology
4
U NIVERSITY OF L EEDS , I NSTITUTE OF P SYCHOLOGICAL S CIENCES
5
I NSTITUTE OF M EDICINE AND H EALTH, Leeds, United Kingdom
6
L AVAL U NIVERSITY, Department of Kinesiology, Quebec, Canada
2
Abstract Text: Introduction: Individual differences exist in the capacity
to detect appetite sensations. The objective of this study was to use
the satiety quotient (SQ) to classify obese individuals on the basis of
the satiety signal responses and to characterize their behavioural and
metabolic profile.Methods: Seventy-two obese men (BMI 33.8 ±3.0
kg/m2 ) aged 41.3 ± 5.7 years were recruited to participate in this study.
Appetite sensations were measured before and after a standardized
meal test in order to calculate SQ. Behaviours were assessed with
the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), the Beck Depression
Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Body Esteem scale,
the Binge Eating Questionnaire (BEQ), the Night Eating Questionnaire
(NEQ), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Perceived Stress Scale.
Blood samples were taken before and at 0, 30 and 60 min following the
meal test to measure glucose/insulin, leptin, cortisol, T3/T4 and lipid
profile.Results: Results showed a fairly good reproducibility of the SQ
(Paired T-tests p>0.05 and intra-class correlation coefficient values for SQ
indicators ranged between 0.61 and 0.69: p<0.05). Mean SQ score was
positively correlated with TFEQ flexible and strategic restriction scores
(p = 0.29 and 0.31, respectively: p<0.05) and negatively correlated with
TFEQ external susceptibility for hunger, BEQ and NEQ scores (p = -0.30,
-0.33, -0.27, respectively: p<0.05). None of the metabolic variables were
correlated with the SQ. Conclusion: The SQ seems to be a reliable tool
to characterize low satiety phenotype which is associated with eating
behaviours that increase the risk of overeating.
Conflict of Interest: No conflict of interest
Funding: This study was funded by the Canadian Institute of Health
Research
SS:OS2 - Obesity & Reproductive Health
112 accepted oral
NEONATAL OVER-NUTRITION HAS SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC
EFFECTS ON BODY COMPOSITION AND SERUM INSULIN
LEVELS AS EARLY AS 10 DAYS OF LIFE
P. Argente-Arizón123 , D. Castro-González1 23 , E. Fuente-Martín1 23 ,
C. García-Cáceres123 , M. Granado2 3 , F. Díaz1 3 , V. Barrios1 3 , L.
Frago123 , J. Argente1 2 , J. Chowen1 3
1
H OSPITAL I NFANTIL U NIVERSITARIO N IÑO J ESÚS, Endocrinology,
Madrid, Spain
2
FACULTAD DE M EDICINA . U NIVERSIDAD AUTÓNOMA DE M ADRID,
Madrid, Spain
3
CIBER OBN, Madrid, Spain
Abstract Text: Introduction: Over-nutrition during early life is known
to have long-term effects on metabolism, with some of these out-comes
being sexually dimorphic. However, little is known regarding the early
effects of over-nutrition on body composition and circulating metabolic
factors and cytokines and if males and females are differentially affected.
Methods: At birth, Wistar rats were organized into litters of 4 (L4; overnutrition) or 12 (L12; control) with equal numbers of males and females
in each litter. Rats were weighed, measured and sacrificed on day 10.
Serum levels of leptin, insulin, interleukins (IL) 6 and 1β and TNF↵ were
measured by using a multiplexed bead immunoassay. Results: Neonatal
over-nutrition significantly increased body weight and length in both males
and females. This was associated with increased subcutaneous fat mass
in both sexes, which was significantly greater in females. Serum glucose,
leptin and insulin levels were also significantly increased in L4 rats of
both sexes, with the increase in insulin significantly greater in males. In
contrast, neonatal over-nutrition significantly decreased IL1β levels, with
no change in IL6 or TNF↵.Conclusions: Neonatal over-nutrition induces
rapid modifications in body composition that may be associated with a
state of insulin resistance, but not systemic inflammation, even at a very
early age. These early differences observed between males and females
could be involved in development of the sexually dimorphic long-term outcomes in metabolism, as well as other systems affected by early weight
gain.
Conflict of Interest: The authors have nothing to declare.
Funding: This work was funded by Fondo de Investigacinitaria
PI10/00747, CIBERobn, and Fundaci Endocrinolog Nutrici
113 accepted oral
COMPARING EFFECTS OF DIET- AND EXERCISE-INDUCED
WEIGHT LOSS ON SEXUAL FUNCTION, URINARY TRACT
SYMPTOMS AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN NON-DIABETIC OBESE
MEN WITH ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION
J. Khoo1 , R. Chen1 , T. L. Tay1 , E. Tan1 , L. Cho1 , V. Au1 , S. B. Soh1 , B.
Ng1
1
C HANGI G ENERAL H OSPITAL, Endocrinology, Singapore, Singapore
Abstract Text: Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) in obese men
is associated with hypogonadism, urinary dysfunction, and reduced
quality of life (QoL). We aimed to compare the effects of weight loss,
induced by either dietary modification or exercise, on sexual function,
lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and QoL in non-diabetic obese
men with ED. Methods: Abdominally obese Asian (body mass index ≥
30 kg/m2 , waist circumference [WC] ≥ 90 cm) men (mean age 43.9
years, range 30-61) with newly diagnosed ED (International Index of
Erectile Function 5-item IIEF-5 score  21) were randomized to diet
modification (500 kilocalories/day below basal metabolic rate) (n=25);
or moderate-intensity exercise to expend ~3000-3500 kilocalories/week
(n=19). Plasma sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone,
IIEF-5, Sexual Desire Inventory (SDI), International Prostate Symptom
(IPSS) and 36-item Short Form Survey Instrument (SF-36) scores were
measured at baseline and 12 weeks later. Results: Weight loss in the
diet (3.8 ± 2.4%) and exercise (5.2 ± 4.4%) groups reduced WC by
~3.5%. Exercise produced greater increases than diet in testosterone
(25.9% vs.16.0%) and calculated free testosterone (23.6% vs. 11.8%),
IIEF-5 (23.3% vs. 21.3%), SDI (42.9 vs. 23.0%), and SF-36 physical
(13.4% vs. 9.8%) and mental (13.9% vs. 9.5%) component scores,
and reduction in IPSS (28.7% vs. 22.1%), but these differences were
not statistically significant. IIEF-5 score normalized in ~40% of subjects
in both groups. Conclusions: Weight loss induced by diet or exercise
improves androgen levels, sexual function and quality of life, and reduces
LUTS, in non-diabetic obese men with ED.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by grants from
the SingHealth Foundation and Changi General Hospital.
114 accepted oral
RESTORING TESTOSTERONE TO NORMAL LEVELS IN ELDERLY MEN IS EFFICACIOUS IN WEIGHT REDUCTION. A
FOLLOW-UP STUDY OVER 5 YEARS.
F. Saad1 2 , A. Haider3 , L. Gooren4
1
B AYER P HARMA AG, Scientific Affairs Men’s Healthcare, Berlin,
Germany
2
G ULF M EDICAL U NIVERSITY S CHOOL OF M EDICINE, Research
Department, Ajman, United Arab Emirates
3
P RIVATE U ROLOGY P RACTICE
4
VUMC A MSTERDAM, Department of Endocrinology
Abstract Text: Introduction: Obesity is associated with reduced
testosterone, and low testosterone induces weight gain. This study
analysed the effects of normalization of serum testosterone in mainly
elderly, hypogonadal men. Methods: A cumulative, prospective study of
251 men (aged 38 83 years, mean 60.6 ± 8.0 years), with testosterone
levels between 0.14 3.5 ng/mL. Cut-off point for testosterone treatment
was serum testosterone  3.5. ng/mL). 214 men were studied for at
least 2 years and 115 for at least 5 years. They received parenteral
testosterone undecanoate 1000 mg/12 weeks. Results: After 5 years
the following changes were observed: weight (kg) from 106.27 ± 17.02
(minimum) 70.0, maximum) 139.00) to 90.04 ± 9.55 (min 74.00; max
115 ). Waist circumference (cm) from 107.21 ± 9.16 (min 86.00; max
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were no differences in changes in intra-meal suppression of hunger or
test meal energy intake. Conclusions: These data suggest that INT and
CONT ER exert differential effects on the orexigenic increase in fasting
hunger typically associated with weight loss, but not on other appetite
responses. Therefore, an intermittent ER is potentially more effective
and tolerable than continuous ER.
Conflict of Interest: None
Funding: This project was funded by a National Health and Medical
Research Council project grant (497223).
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129.00) to 98.43 ± 7.42 (min 84.00; max 117.00). Body mass index
from 33.95 ± 5.57 (min 21.91; max 46.51) to 29.17 ± 3.11 (min 22.7;
max 36.71). Serum cholesterol (mg/dL) from 281 ± 40 to 188 ± 1; LDL
(mg/dL) from 163 ± 41 to 109 ± 35; Triglycerides (mg/dL) from 276 ± 51
to 189 ± 11. Glucose (mg/dL) from 103 ± 14 to 94 ± 2. Systolic blood
pressure from 153 ± 17 to 137 ± 11; diastolic from 93 ± 11 to 79 ± 7
mm Hg. Conclusions: Raising serum testosterone to normal produced
loss of body weight / waist circumference and improved metabolic profile
/ blood pressure. These improvements were progressive over the full 5
years of the study.
Conflict of Interest: Farid Saad is an employee of Bayer Pharma.
Ahmad Haider has received travel grants from Bayer Pharma and Takeda
Pharma. Louis Gooren has received speaker fees and travel grants from
Bayer Pharma and Organon.
Funding: The present study has not received any funding. Bayer
Pharma paid for structuring and analysing the database.
115 accepted oral
WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVES REPRODUCTIVE OUTCOMES FOR
OBESE WOMEN UNDERGOING ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE
TECHNOLOGY
K. Sim1 , G. Denyer2 , I. Caterson1
1
T HE B ODEN I NSTITUTE OF O BESITY, N UTRITION , E XERCISE & E ATING
D ISORDERS, The University of Sydney, Australia
2
T HE U NIVERSITY OF S YDNEY, University of Sydney, Australia
Abstract Text: Introduction: For women, obesity reduces fertility and
is an independent risk factor for obstetric complications for both mother
and fetus. Methods: 49 subjects on an assisted reproductive technology
programme with a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2 , aged  37 years,
were recruited. Participants were randomised to either: a 12-week
intervention (n = 27) consisting of a very-low-energy diet for the initial
six weeks followed by a hypocaloric diet, combined with a weekly group
multidisciplinary programme; or a control group (n = 22) who received
recommendations for weight loss and the same printed material. Anthropometric, cardiometabolic, reproductive and psychological parameters
were measured at baseline and 12 weeks. All subjects were assessed
12 months after the intervention to ascertain whether pregnancy had
occurred. Results: The intervention group lost 6.6 ± 4.6 kg and waist
circumference decreased 8.7 ± 5.6 cm compared to 1.8 ± 3.6 kg and 1.0
± 6.3 cm for the control group, p = 0.001 for both. The intervention group
had a significant improvement in clinical pregnancy rates (intervention:
48.1%; controls: 14.3%; p = 0.014). Additional beneficial outcomes in
terms of assisted reproductive technology factors, a decline in maternal
and fetal risk factors, and cardiometabolic, hormonal and psychological
improvements were found. The intervention resulted in a cost-effective
saving of AU$9,035 (e6,900) per pregnancy achieved. Conclusion: A
weight-loss intervention, incorporating dietary, exercise and behavioural
components, is associated with significant pregnancy and economic
outcomes in a group of obese women undergoing assisted reproductive
technology.
Conflict of Interest: There are no potential conflicts of interest.
Funding: There were no external sources of funding.
of diabetes in Australia. Strategies modelled included 1) a reduction
of BMI across the whole population 2) high risk intensive lifestyle
prevention strategy among those at high risk of developing diabetes;
and 3) surgically induced weight loss among severely obese individuals
with newly diagnosed diabetes. Interventions were applied to the model
from the year 2010 and flow-on effects were projected to 2025.Results:
We estimate that intensive lifestyle intervention on those at high risk
of developing diabetes would be the most effective strategy to reduce
the future prevalence of diabetes in Australia. Under this scenario the
prevalence of diabetes could be reduced to 10.1% in 2025 (compared to
the estimated 11.4% if future trends continue unchanged), and prevent
over 210,000 cases of diabetes in 2025. Population prevention and
surgically induced weight loss prevented approximately 40,000 and
80,000 cases of diabetes in 2025 respectively. Conclusion: Intensive
lifestyle prevention of diabetes has the greatest potential to reduce the
future public health burden of diabetes
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: AP is supported by a Vic Health Fellowship. DM is supported
by a Vic Cancer Council Fellowship.
117 accepted oral
DEVELOPMENT OF AN OBESITY PREVENTION STRATEGY
FOR AUSTRIA
M. Koller1
1
K ARL F RANZENS U NIVERSITY, Sociology, Graz, Austria
Abstract Text: Introduction: The developed obesity prevention strategy
for Austria has an important addition to the scientific and practical
relevance to curb the obesity epidemic.Methods: Systematic literature
research regarding physical activity and nutrition for effective action, goal
definitions and concepts for evaluation. Research of important Austrian
stakeholders and institutions and a legislative analysis were conducted
and qualitative semi structured interviews were led with international
experts with the aim to explore the practical field for the strategy development and its implementation examine the connectivity of the international
results in Austria.Results: The protection of children and young people
from aggressive marketing and promotional activities for harmful foods
and beverages and encouragement towards sedentary lifestyles is a
big target area. To achieve these goals especially high political will
is essential to fund and implement a comprehensive approach. The
training of health experts and raise of public awareness are important
components in the strategy implementation. Conclusions: All measures
have to be multidimensional and have to focus on the different target
groups. Incentives to create a physical activity enhancing environment
must be set. A central coordination authority should particularly focus on
resources and their efficient use and also control all activities regarding
physical activity and nutrition.
Conflict of Interest: The authors received no financial support for this
manuscript. The authors have no conflicts of interests to declare.
Funding:
118 accepted oral
DOES SCALING UP A FAMILY-BASED COMMUNITY INTERVENTION FOR CHILDHOOD OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY IMPACT
SOCIO-ECONOMIC INEQUALITIES IN HEALTH?
J. Fagg1 , C. Law1
T1:OS1 - Large Scale Interventions
1
UCL I NSTITUTE OF C HILD H EALTH, MRC Centre of Epidemiology for
Child Health, London, United Kingdom
THE EFFECT OF OBESITY PREVENTION AND TREATMENT
STRATEGIES ON THE FUTURE POPULATION PREVALENCE OF
DIABETES AMONG AUSTRALIAN ADULTS
K. Backholer1 , A. Peeters1 , J. Shaw2 , D. Magliano2
1
B AKERIDI H EART AND D IABETES I NSTITUTE, Obesity and Population
Health, Melbourne, Australia
2
B AKERIDI H EART AND D IABETES I NSTITUTE, Clinical Diabetes and
Epidemiology, Melbourne, Australia
Abstract Text: Introduction: Current upwards trends in obesity are
driving an increase in the prevalence of diabetes. Interventions that
prevent weight gain or promote weight loss can reduce the incidence
and prevalence of diabetes. However the potential long-term effects
of obesity prevention and treatment strategies on the future population
prevalence of diabetes are unknown.Methods: We used a multistate life
table model, developed to project the prevalence of diabetes in Australian
adults between 2005-2025, to estimate the potential effect of obesity
prevention and treatment strategies on the future population prevalence
Abstract Text: Childhood overweight and obesity vary by socioeconomic position (SEP). Differential access to effective weight
management interventions could potentially widen health inequalities.
We examined this using service data from the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition,
Do It! (MEND) intervention, which has been scaled up to population
level.MEND participants from 2007-2010 (n=14,097) were eligible
for the 10-week intervention if BMI exceeded the 91st UK90 centile
(i.e. overweight).SEP in MEND participants was compared with SEP
in overweight respondents from three routinely collected nationally
representative datasets: Health Survey for England (HSE, n=3,382),
Millennium Cohort Study (MCS, n=1,708) and National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP, n=379,756).MEND participants were more
likely to be obese than overweight (89% exceeded the 98th UK90 centile
compared to 47% of overweight HSE respondents). MEND participants
were as likely to reside in deprived neighbourhoods (15% in top decile
of neighbourhood deprivation versus 14% in HSE), less likely to live
with a lone parent (34% versus 44%), more likely to live in social rented
accommodation (34% versus 26%) and more likely to live in families with
an unemployed primary earner (26% versus 22%). Similar patterns were
found in comparisons with MCS and NCMP.The best indicator of SEP
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116 accepted oral
T HURSDAYmay
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119 accepted oral
LOW PARENTAL INTENTION TO EXERCISE IS ASSOCIATED
WITH A HIGHER IMPACT OF A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAM
IN ADOLESCENTS: RESULTS FROM ICAPS, A 4-YEAR MULTILEVEL RANDOMIZED STUDY.
N. Kellou1 , B. Schweitzer2 , J. Dugas1 , D. Schontz3 , V. Pitchon3 , J.
Drai4 , F. Hausser3 , S. Blanc5 , C. Simon4 1
1
CARMEN, INSERM U1060/U NIVERSITÉ LYON 1/INRA U1235,
O ULLINS , F RANCE, Lyon, France
2
I NSPECTION ACADÉMIQUE DU B AS -R HIN , F-67000 S TRASBOURG
3
EA 3424, U NIVERSITÉ DE S TRASBOURG , F-67000 S TRASBOURG,
Strasbourg, France
4
CRNH-RA, U NIVERSITÉ DE LYON , F-69600, O ULLINS
5
I NSTITUT H UBERT C URIEN , UMR 7178, CNRS, U NIVERSITÉ DE
S TRASBOURG , F-67000 S TRASBOURG, Strasbourg, France
Abstract Text: Introduction: Parents’ practice and attitude towards
physical activity (PA) have been associated with the decline of
PA at adolescence. In this study we evaluated if parents’ PA and
intention to practice PA moderated the impact of a PA program in
adolescents.Methods: The interaction of parents’ PA and intention to
increase PA with the program was evaluated in 489 students of the
initial cohort (n= 954) for which baseline parents’ questionnaires were
available. At baseline the students were aged (initially aged 11.5±0.5
years). Measured BMI, reported PA (MAQ) and TV/Video viewing were
obtained at baseline, annually during the intervention and two years
after its end. Analyses used linear mixed models taking into account
cluster randomization, repeated data and the interactions with parents’
characteristics.Results: Two thirds of the parents (63.3% of the fathers;
68.8% of the mothers) did not practice regular moderate-intensity PA.
One third (31.3% of mothers and 28.8% of fathers) reported no intention
to increase PA. Intention to increase PA but not PA was inversely
associated to socio-economic status (SES) (p<0.001). After adjustment
on SES, ICAPS impact did not differ according to parental PA. Students
with neither parent reporting willing to increase PA had a significantly
higher impact of the program on BMI (interaction p=0.06), both during
and at distance of the intervention.Conclusions: These results indicate
that by offering a social and physical environment facilitating PA practice,
ICAPS program may have partly compensate for absence of or low
parental support for PA.
Conflict of Interest: None
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by the French
National Research Agency (ANR-08-ALIA); INSERM; INRA; Regional
Health Insurance of Alsace-Moselle; French Public Authorities within the
National Nutritional Health Program and through the Youth and Sports
Ministery; Conseil General du Bas-Rhin; Municipalities of Drusenheim,
Illkirch-Graffenstaden, Obernai and Schiltigheim; and Pfizer foundation.
Thursday, May 10, 2012
T2:OS1 - Epidemiology in Childhood Obesity
Prevention
120 accepted oral
TRENDS IN CHILDREN’S EXPOSURE TO FOOD AND BEVERAGE MARKETING ON TELEVISION IN CANADA 2008-2011
M. Potvin Kent1 , M. de Groh2 , A. Wanless2
1
P UBLIC H EALTH AGENCY OF C ANADA, Centre for Chronic Disease
Prevention and Control, Ottawa, Canada
2
P UBLIC H EALTH AGENCY OF C ANADA, Ottawa, Canada
Abstract Text: Introduction: The marketing of foods and beverages
high in fats, sugar and sodium has been identified as a factor that
influences children’s rates of obesity. Advertising to children in Canada
is mostly self-regulated by industry by the Children’s Food and Beverage
Advertising Initiative (CAI). This study aimed to determine whether
children’s exposure to food/beverage advertising decreased between
May 2008 (before the CAI was fully implemented) and 2011. Methods:
Data examining children (2-11 years) and youth’s (12-17 years) exposure
to food/beverage advertising was purchased from Neilson Media for
the month of May 2008 through May 2011. Children’s exposure to
breakfast cereals, beverages, snacks and fast food restaurants was
examined in the Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto and Montreal broadcasting
markets. The percentage change in children’s average exposure to
the food/beverage categories was calculated.Results: Children and
youth’s average exposure to breakfast cereal, fast food and soft drink
advertisements per month was greater in May 2011 compared to
May 2008. On average, children 2 to 17 years saw more breakfast
cereal, fast food, and soft drink advertisements per month in May 2011
compared to May 2008. Children and youth’s increased exposure to
food and beverage advertisements in 2011 compared to 2008 was due
to increased exposure on generalist stations (and decreased exposure
on children’s specialty channels.)Conclusion: The CAI has not reduced
children’s exposure to food and beverage advertising in Canada.
Alternatives to the current advertising policy model need to be sought to
protect the health of children.
Conflict of Interest: none disclosed.
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was provided by the Public
Health Agency of Canada.
121 accepted oral
LONGITUDINAL ANALYSES OF INDOOR TEMPERATURE AND
BMI IN CHILDREN; THE PIAMA BIRTH COHORT STUDY
F. Scheffers1 , M. Bekkers2 3 , M. Kerkhof4 , U. Gehring2 , J. de Jongste5 ,
H. Smit6 , A. Haveman-Nies1 , A. Wijga3
1
WAGENINGEN U NIVERSITY, Department of Human Nutrition, Wageningen, Netherlands
2
I NSTITUTE FOR R ISK A SSESSMENT S CIENCES , U TRECHT U NIVERSITY,
Bilthoven, Netherlands
3
N ATIONAL I NSTITUTE FOR P UBLIC H EALTH AND THE E NVIRONMENT,
Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, Bilthoven,
Netherlands
4
U NIVERSITY OF G RONINGEN , U NIVERSITY M EDICAL C ENTER G RONIN GEN , Department of epidemiology and bioinformatics
5
E RASMUS U NIVERSITY M EDICAL C ENTER , S OPHIA C HILDREN ’ S
H OSPITAL, Department of Pediatrics
6
J ULIUS C ENTRE FOR H EALTH S CIENCES AND P RIMARY C ARE ,
U NIVERSITY M EDICAL C ENTER U TRECHT, Utrecht, Netherlands
Abstract Text: Background: A recent review hypothesized an
association between thermal comfort and increased obesity prevalence
[1]. Experimental studies show decreased energy expenditure at higher
ambient temperatures. However, the effect of thermal exposure on
body weight is still unknown. Therefore, we investigated the association
between indoor temperature (living room and bedroom) and BMI z-scores
in children in a real life setting.Methods: The study population of this
longitudinal observational study included 3963 children from the Dutch
Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) birth
cohort that started in 1996. These children were followed from birth up to
the age of 11 years. Winter indoor temperature was reported at baseline
and BMI z-scores were available at 10 consecutive ages. Associations
between indoor temperature and BMI z-scores were analyzed using
generalized estimating equations (GEE), adjusted for confounders
and stratified by gender. In a subgroup of 119 children bedroom
temperatures were also measured with data loggers every 30 minutes
during 2 weeks in 1997, 1998 or 1999.Results: Mean reported living
room and bedroom temperatures were 20.3◦ C and 17.4◦ C respectively.
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(neighbourhood deprivation) shows that access to MEND does not vary
by SEP. Family level variables are less clear. On balance, the evidence
suggests that scaling up MEND is unlikely to widen socio-economic
inequalities in childhood overweight and obesity due to differential
access. We are also exploring SEP and related social inequalities in
qualitative work.
Conflict of Interest: Three members of the project management group
(Sacher, Chadwick and Radley) are employees of MEND Central Ltd.
Sacher and Chadwick are also shareholders. They therefore have an
interest in MEND Central’s success. The MEND Programme aimed at
7-13 year olds was based on research undertaken at UCL Institute of
Child Health. Under a contractual relationship, UCL Institute of Child
Health receives a small proportion of the revenues generated from this
programme. UCL ICH uses these funds to support nutrition research and
none of the authors of this paper have access to these funds, nor work in
the department where they are held.
Funding: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research programme (project number 09/3005/05).
The views and opinions expressed therein are those of the authors and
do not necessarily reflect those of the NIHR PHR programme or the
Department of Health.
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Reported and measured temperatures were positively correlated (r =
0.40, p < 0.001). Neither reported indoor temperatures nor measured
indoor temperatures were associated with BMI z-scores (all β’s  0.01
per 1◦ C).Conclusion: This study in children did not provide evidence
supporting the hypothesized association between indoor temperature
and BMI in a real life setting. 1. Johnson, F., et al., Obesity Reviews,
2011. 12(7): p.543-551.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed.
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by the
Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development, the
Netherlands Asthma Foundation, the Netherlands Ministry of Spatial
Planning Housing, and the Environment, the Netherlands Ministry of
Health, Welfare and Sport, and the National Institute of Public Health and
the Environment.
On P90 rebound of FMI was about 2-3 years later when compared with
that of BMI (at age 4.2 years (BMI) and 5.8 years (FMI) in boys and at
3.0 years (BMI) and 6.0 years (FMI) in girls). The slope of P90 of BMI at
AR was explained by changes in FFMI rather than FMI. Only after the
FMI reached its rebound P90 of BMI was determined by FMI and showed
a steeper increase. Conclusion: AR should be defined as FMI rebound
rather than BMI rebound.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed.
Funding: This work was supported by the Competence Network on
Obesity funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (FKZ:
01GI0821) and the German Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and
Consumer Protection.
124 accepted oral
122 accepted oral
INHERITED BEHAVIORAL SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ADIPOSITY IN
INFANCY: A MULTIVARIATE GENETIC ANALYSIS OF APPETITE
AND WEIGHT IN THE GEMINI BIRTH COHORT
C. Llewellyn1 , C. van Jaarsveld1 , R. Plomin2 , A. Fisher1 , J. Wardle1
1
U NIVERSITY C OLLEGE L ONDON, Health Behaviour Research Centre,
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, London, United Kingdom
2
K ING ’ S C OLLEGE L ONDON, Social Genetic and Developmental
Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry
Abstract Text: Introduction: The behavioral susceptibility model
proposes that inherited differences in traits such as appetite confer
differential risk of weight gain and contribute to the heritability of weight.
Evidence that the FTO gene may influence weight partly through its
effects on appetite supports this model, but testing the behavioral
pathways for multiple genes with very small effects is not feasible. Twin
analyses make it possible to get a broad-based estimate of the extent
of shared genetic influence between appetite and weight. This study
used multivariate twin analyses to test the hypothesis that associations
between appetite and weight are underpinned by shared genetic effects.
Methods: Data were from Gemini, a population-based birth cohort of
twins (n=4804) born in 2007. Infant weights at 3 months were taken
from health professional records. Appetite was assessed at 3 months for
the milk-feeding period using the Baby Eating Behavior Questionnaire
(BEBQ), a parent-report measure of appetite (’enjoyment of food’
(EF), ’food responsiveness’ (FR), ’slowness in eating’ (SE), ’satiety
responsiveness’ (SR) and ’appetite size’ (AS)). Multivariate quantitative
genetic modeling was used to test for shared genetic influences.
Results: Significant correlations were found between all BEBQ traits
and weight. Significant shared genetic influence was identified for weight
with SE, SR and AS; genetic correlations were between 0.22 and 0.37.
Shared genetic effects explained 41% to 45% of these phenotypic
associations. Conclusions: Differences in weight in infancy may be due
partly to genetically determined differences in appetitive traits that confer
differential susceptibility to obesogenic environments.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by Cancer
Research UK (C1418/A7974).
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PUBERTAL TEMPO AND BODY
FAT – A 7YEAR LONGITUDINAL STUDY
A. Streeter1 , J. Hosking1 , B. Metcalf1 , M. Mostazir1 , A. Jeffery1 , L.
Voss1 , T. Wilkin1
1
P ENINSULA C OLLEGE OF M EDICINE & D ENTISTRY, Endocrinology and
Metabolism, Plymouth, United Kingdom
Abstract Text: IntroductionPuberty is associated with fat re-patterning,
but it is unclear how its timing impacts on body fat accumulation. The
question can only be addressed with longitudinal data. MethodsBody
fat (%BF, DEXA) was measured annually and height (in blind duplicate,
Leicester height measure) every six months from 9-16y in a longitudinal
study of 307 healthy children. Pubertal tempo was adduced from age
at peak height-velocity (APHV), derived from the maximum tangential
gradient at the midpoint of three consecutive measurements. Covariance
pattern modelling was used to explore the longitudinal effect of APHV on
%BF. ResultsAn age associated fall in %BF for boys (p<0.001) with an
APHV of 15y was delayed by ~2y compared with those whose APHV was
12y. Furthermore there was a greater accumulation of fat in boys who
reached puberty later: The maximum %BF for those with an APHV of
15y was 28% compared to 24% for those of 12y. In girls, the interaction
between APHV and age on %BF though significant (p=0.02) was less
remarkable. Girls’ %BF increased on average from 27% to 36% from
9 to 16y. Those who matured earlier were fatter throughout, although
%BF converged to around 30% at around 11y irrespective of pubertal
tempo. ConclusionsThe data suggest an inverse association between
pubertal timing and body fat in boys, where late developers gain more
fat. Pubertal age varies widely, and may have a significant impact on
age-related obesity rates in boys.
Conflict of Interest: none
Funding: Bright Future Trust, EarlyBird Diabetes Trust, Kirby Laing
Foundation, Nestlsearch, Peninsula Foundation.
125 accepted oral
GROWTH PATTERN IN EARLY CHILDHOOD AMONG OVERWEIGHT VERSUS NON- OVERWEIGHT 8-9 YEARS OLD IN
NORWAY. A PROSPECTIVE LONGITUDINAL STUDY
R. Hovengen1 , K. Glavin2 , M. Roelants3 , P. Jùlìusson4 , B. H. Strand1
1
123 accepted oral
N ORWEGIAN I NSTITUTE OF P UBLIC H EALTH, Epidemiology
O SLO AND A KERSHUS U NIVERSITY C OLLEGE OF A PPLIED S CIENCES ,,
Nursing
3
F REE U NIVERSITY OF B RUSSELS, Anthopogenetics
4
U NIVERSITY OF B ERGEN, Pediatrics, Bergen, Norway
ADIPOSITY REBOUND IS MISCLASSIFIED BY BMI REBOUND
S. Plachta-Danielzik1 , A. Bosy-Westphal1 , M. I. Gehrke1 , B. Kehden1 ,
K. Kromeyer-Hauschild2 , M. Grillenberger3 , C. Willhöft3 , M. Müller1
1
C HRISTIAN -A LBRECHTS -U NIVERSITY OF K IEL, Institute of Human
Nutrition and Food Science, Kiel, Germany
2
F RIEDRICH S CHILLER -U NIVERSITY OF J ENA, Institute of Human
Genetics
3
M AX RUBNER -I NSTITUT, Institute of Nutritional Behaviour, Karlsruhe,
Germany
Abstract Text: Introduction: The adiposity rebound (AR) is defined as
the minimum value or nadir of BMI in childhood and is seen as a critical
period for the development of overweight. The aim of this study was (i)
to examine the development of fat mass index (FMI) and fat free mass
index (FFMI) during AR and (ii) to analyse if FMI and FFMI also show
a rebound (at P90).Methods: 19,264 representative data of children
aged 3-11 years were pooled from 3 German studies (Kiel Obesity
Prevention Study (KOPS), project "Besser essen. Mehr bewegen.
KINDERLEICHT-REGIONEN", examination of Jena schoolchildren).
Height and weight were measured. FM and FFM were obtained from
bioelectrical impedance analysis and analysed using a population
specific algorithm. Percentiles of BMI, FMI [kg/m] and FFMI were
constructed by the LMS method.Results: BMI and FMI showed a
rebound; by contrast, percentiles of FFMI increased steadily with age.
Abstract Text: Introduction: Identification of critical ages where children
are at particular risk for becoming overweight is most relevant for primary
prevention. Rapid infant growth and early onset of overweight has been
associated with overweight at 7-9 years. Population based longitudinal
studies addressing differences in growth curves between overweight
and not overweighed children at 8-9 years are however scarce. The
objectives of the present study are to explore characteristics of early
childhood growth for becoming overweight or obese at 8-9 years; and
identification of critical ages for the onset of overweight and gender
differences. Methods: Child Growth in Norway is a nationwide monitoring
study of weight, height and waist circumference in third graders (8-9
years). The participating rate is 90%. From 3214 participants in 2010, up
to 13 measurements of height and weight between birth and 8-9 years of
age were collected from health records. Growth curves were compared
between children with overweight and children with a normal BMI at age
8-9. Growth curves were modelled with regression splines, and analyzed
using multi-level techniques. Results: The growth curves from birth
indicate that the overweight group at 8-9 years already the first year (3-6
months) had significantly higher BMI than those not being overweight
at 8-9 years. The difference excelled from 4 years. The group having
waist to height ratio (W/Hr) ≥0.5 at 8-9 years showed similar results.
Abstracts Book Page 39
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, M AY
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2012oral
sessions
T2:OS2 - Longitudinal Perspectives
index, length of the intervention, and the change in total energy intake.
Furthermore, we observed that a better sleep quality at baseline was
associated with greater fat mass loss. Conclusion: This study provides
evidence that sleeping habits can significantly impact the success of a
weight-loss intervention and should be taken into consideration when
one decides to start a diet.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed.
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by Wyeth
Consumer Healthcare Inc., the Dairy Farmers of Canada, the US
National Dairy Council and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
126 accepted oral
128 accepted oral
OCCUPATIONAL SITTING, OBESITY AND MORTALITY: A LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS OF THE NORWEGIAN HUNT 2 COHORT
A. Grunseit1 , J. Chau1 , H. Van Der Ploeg1 , T. Holmen2 , J. Holmen2 , K.
Midthjell3 , A. Bauman1
1
U NIVERSITY OF S YDNEY, Prevention Research Collaboration, School
of Public health, Sydney, Australia
2
N ORWEGIAN U NIVERSITY FOR S CIENCE AND T ECHNOLOGY, HUNT
Research Center, Department of Community Medicine and General
Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway
3
N ORWEGIAN U NIVERSITY OF S CIENCE AND T ECHNOLOGY, HUNT
Research Center, Department of Community Medicine and General
Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway
INCREASING GENETIC VARIANCE OF BODY MASS INDEX
DURING THE SWEDISH OBESITY EPIDEMIC
B. Rokholm1
1
I NSTITUTE OF P REVENTIVE M EDICINE, Copenhagen K, Denmark
Abstract Text: Introduction: Sedentary time is a risk factor for obesity
and cardiovascular disease (CVD) independently of physical activity.
Sitting at work is a major contributor to sedentary time. Prospective
analyses examining the effect of occupational sitting on mortality over
and above the effect of overweight/obesity are rare. This analysis
examines occupational sitting and mortality using longitudinal data from
Norway.Method: Nord-Trndelag residents aged ≥20 years self-reported
occupational sitting in 1995-1997. Categories were: 1) mostly sedentary
work (SW), 2) much walking at work (W), 3) much walking or lifting (WL),
4) heavy physical labour (HPL). Cox proportional hazards regressions
with age as time axis were performed for all cause and CVD/metabolic
mortality. Along with BMI category, effect of occupational sitting was
adjusted for gender, education, light and hard exercise, general health,
smoking status, and cardiometabolic(CMD) disease.
Results: Of
43278 respondents with complete data, 3039 had died at 12-14 years
follow-up.After adjusting for BMI category and other variables, sedentary
work carried a higher (p<.01) all cause mortality (vs W: 1.15, vs WL:
1.27, vs HPL: 1.22) and CVD/CMD mortality hazard (vs W: 1.33, vs
WL: 1.45, vs HPL: 1.37). Among overweight respondents, all-cause
and CVD/CMD mortality hazards were 1.23 to 1.32, 1.21 to 1.45
respectively, and 1.28 to 1.60 and 1.28 to 1.74 for obese respondents
respectively.Conclusion:Occupational sitting appears to be a risk factor
for premature death even adjusted for BMI and other risk factors.
Individuals and workplaces could substantially lower risk by reducing
sitting time at work.
Conflict of Interest: None to declare
Funding: Australian National Health and Medical Research Council
Program Grant #301200
127 accepted oral
SLEEPING HABITS PREDICT THE MAGNITUDE OF FAT LOSS IN
ADULTS EXPOSED TO MODERATE CALORIC RESTRICTION
J. P. Chaput1 , A. Tremblay2
1
CHEO R ESEARCH I NSTITUTE, Healthy Active Living and Obesity
Research Group, Ottawa, Canada
2
L AVAL U NIVERSITY, Social and Preventive Medicine
Abstract Text: Introduction: The aim of this study was to verify whether
sleep quantity and quality at baseline predict the magnitude of fat loss
in adults subjected to moderate caloric restriction. Methods: A total of
123 overweight and obese men and women (mean ± SD age, 41.1 ±
6.0 years; mean ± SD body mass index, 33.2 ± 3.6 kg/m2 ) underwent a
weight loss intervention consisting of a targeted 600-700 kcal/d decrease
in energy intake supervised by a dietician. The length of the intervention
varied between 15 weeks and 6 months. Body fat mass (dual-energy
X-ray absorptiometry), sleep quality (total Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index
score) and sleep duration (h/night, self-reported from the Pittsburgh
Sleep Quality Index) were assessed at both baseline and at the end of
the weight loss program. Results: The mean weight loss over the dietary
intervention was 4.5 kg (SD 3.9), 76% of which came from fat stores.
Using a multiple linear regression analysis, we observed a significant
positive relationship between sleep duration and the loss of body fat, both
in absolute (adj. β = 0.72 kg/h; P<0.05) as well as in relative terms (adj.
β = 0.77 %/h; P<0.01), after adjusting for age, sex, baseline body mass
Abstract Text: Background: Studies show that the genetic effects on
body mass index (BMI) may be stronger when combined with presumed
risk factors for obesity. We tested the hypothesis that the genetic
variance of BMI has increased during the obesity epidemic. Methods: In
data including height and weight measurements of 1,474,065 Swedish
conscripts at age 18-19 y born between 1951 and 1983 264,796
full-brother pairs, 1,736 monozygotic (MZ) and 1,961 dizygotic (DZ) twin
pairs were identified. The twin pairs were analysed to identify the most
parsimonious model for the genetic and environmental contribution to
BMI variance. The full-brother pairs divided into subgroups by year of
birth to investigate trends in the genetic variance of BMI. Results: The
twin analysis showed that BMI co-variation could be explained by additive
genetic factors. On the basis of the analyses of the full-siblings, the
additive genetic variance of BMI increased from 4.3 [95 % CI 4.04-4.53]
to 7.9 [95 % CI 7.28-8.54] within the study period, as did the unique
environmental variance, which increased from 1.4 [95 % CI 1.32-1.48]
to 2.0 [95 % CI 1.89-2.22]. The BMI heritability increased from 75 %
to 78.8 %. Conclusion: The results confirm the hypothesis that the
additive genetic variance of BMI has increased strongly during the
obesity epidemic. This suggests that the obesogenic environment has
enhanced the influence of adiposity related genes.
Conflict of Interest: No conflicts of interest
Funding: The project is funded by the Danish Agency for Science,
Technology and Innovation (http://en.fi.dk/* )
129 accepted oral
TWO PATTERNS OF ADIPOKINE AND OTHER BIOMARKER
DYNAMICS IN A LONG TERM WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTION
R. golan1 , M. Blüher2 , A. Rudich3 , N. Klöting4 , Y. Henkin5 , E. Rubin6 ,
D. Schwarzfuchs7 , Y. Gepner8 , M. J. Stampfer9 , M. Fiedler4 , J. Thiery4 ,
M. Stumvoll4 , I. Shai6
1
B EN G URION U NIVERSITY OF THE N EGEV, Epidemiology, Beer Sheva,
Israel
2
U NIVERSITY OF L EIPZIG, Medicine
3
B EN -G URION U NIVERSITY, Beer-Sheva, Israel
4
U NIVERSITY OF L EIPZIG
5
S OROKA M EDICAL C ENTER
6
B EN G URION U NIVERSITY OF THE N EGEV, Beer Sheva, Israel
7
N UCLEAR R ESEARCH C ENTER N EGEV
8
B EN G URION U NIVERSITY OF THE N EGEV, Beer-Sheva , Israel
9
H ARVARD M EDICAL S CHOOL, Boston, USA
Abstract Text: Introduction: Long-term dietary intervention frequently
induces a rapid weight decline followed by weight stabilization/regain.
Here, we sought to identify adipokine biomarkers that may reflect
continued beneficial effects of dieting despite partial weight regain.
Methods: We analyzed the dynamics of fasting serum levels of 12
traditional metabolic biomarkers and novel adipokines among 322
participants in the 2-year Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled
Trial (DIRECT) of low-fat, Mediterranean or low-carbohydrate diets for
weight loss. Results: We identified two distinct patterns: Pattern-A
includes biomarkers [insulin, triglycerides, leptin, chemerin, monocytechemotactic-protein-1(MCP-1), and retinol-binding-protein-4(RBP4)]
whose dynamics tightly correspond to changes in body weight, with the
trend during the "weight loss phase" (months 0-6) going in the opposite
direction to that in the "weight maintenance/regain phase" (months
7-24) (p<0.05 between phases, all biomarkers). Pattern-B included
biomarkers [high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin, HDL-cholesterol,
high-sensitive C-reactive protein(hsCRP), fetuin-A, progranulin, and
vaspin] that displayed a continued, cumulative improvement (p<0.05
* http://en.fi.dk/
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Conclusion: The study indicates early infancy to be the first critical period
for the onset of overweight at 8-9 years.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
O
RAL S ESSIONS
T HURSDAY, M AY
10,10,2012
oral
sessionsthursday,
may
2012
130 accepted oral
THE IMPACT OF CHANGING OBESITY-HEALTH OUTCOME
RELATIONHIPS OVER TIME ON THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN
OBESITY AND HEALTHY LIFE EXPECTANCY
A. Peeters1 , K. Backholer2
1
M ONASH U NIVERSITY, Epidemiology Preventive Medicine, Melbourne,
Australia
2
B AKERIDI H EART AND D IABETES I NSTITUTE, Melbourne, Australia
Abstract Text: Introduction: While the strength of the relationship
between increasing bodyweight and mortality appears to be decreasing
over time, that with disability appears to be increasing. This study
analyses the impact of these trends on the association between obesity
and life expectancy with (LED) and free of (DFLE) disability.Methods: A
Sullivan life table model incorporating age-specific mortality transitions
and disability prevalence was constructed for each of the weight groups:
normal weight, overweight and obesity. The relative risk (RR) of mortality
and the odds of disability associated with obesity were taken from a
range of studies and the impact on DFLE and LED analysed.Results:
Based on data from early cohorts, when obesity was associated with a
large increase in mortality (RR 2.0), obesity was predicted to decrease
DFLE (-5.6y) but not alter LED. When RR of mortality (1.0) and disability
(1.7-2) from more contemporary cohorts are used, both a decrease
in DFLE (-4.0y) and an increase in LED (+4.0y) are predicted. These
differences in RR explain the differences in outcomes described between
studies. If the most contemporary RR for mortality (1.3) and disability
(2.8) are used, even larger decreases in DFLE (-6.6y) and increases
in LED (+4.6y) as a consequence of obesity are predicted.Conclusion:
As the relative risk of mortality associated with increasing bodyweight
decreases we can expect a greater burden of disability associated with
current obesity trends. If the relative risk of disability is also increasing,
this burden will be greater than predicted by recent analyses.
Conflict of Interest: None
Funding: A.P. supported by VicHealth fellowship, K.B. partially supported
by National Health and Medical Research (Grant no. 465130).
131 accepted oral
CHILDHOOD BODY SIZE AND THE RISK OF LIVER CANCER IN
ADULTHOOD
T. Landsvig Berentzen1 , M. Gamborg1 , C. Holst1 , T. I. Sørensen1 ,
J. L. Baker1
1
I NSTITUTE OF P REVENTIVE M EDICINE , C OPENHAGEN U NIVERSITY
H OSPITAL, Copenhagen, Denmark
biliary diseases.Conclusion: Childhood BMI is positively associated
with the risk of liver cancer in adulthood. The epidemic of childhood
overweight is alarming because, in addition to the adverse health effects
in childhood, the epidemic may translate into adverse health effects in
adulthood, including liver cancer.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by and carried
out as a part of FLIP (fatty liver inhibition of progression) under the
Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013, grant agreement n◦
Health-F2-2009-241762.
T3/T4:OS1 - Adipose Tissue, Gut Microbiota and
Inflammation
132 accepted oral
ROLE OF ENDOGENOUS ENDOTOXIN ABSORPTION AND
ENDOTOXIN RECEPTORS IN METABOLIC INFLAMMATION
ASSOCIATED WITH EXCESSIVE LIPID INTAKE
M. C. MICHALSKI1 , F. LAUGERETTE1 , C. VORS1 , M. ALLIGIER2 , G.
PINEAU1 , S. LAMBERT-PORCHERON3 , B. Morio4 , C. SOULAGE1 , A.
Geloen1 , C. DEBARD2 , M. LAVILLE3 , H. Vidal2
1
C AR M E N INSERM U.1060/U NIVERSITÉ LYON 1/INRA U. 1235/INSA
LYON /H OSPICES C IVILS LYON, Villeurbanne, France
2
C AR M E N L ABORATORY, INSERM U1060 / U NIVERSITY OF
LYON 1/INRA U1235, F-69621 OULLINS, France
3
CRNH-R HÔNE A LPES AND C ENTER FOR E UROPEAN N UTRITION ,
S AFETY AND H EALTH , U NIVERSITY OF LYON, F-69310 PIERRE BENITE,
France
4
INRA-UMR1019, Clermont-Ferrand, France
Abstract Text: Introduction: Low-grade inflammation is recognized
as a major metabolic feature in obesity, leading to increased risks of
insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Among possible causes
triggering such inflammation, the role of gut endotoxin absorption
during the digestion of lipids in a meal has recently been revealed.
However, the impact of increased lipid intake and of lipid composition on
endotoxin-related metabolism remained to be elucidated.Methods: 56
healthy normal weight to obese humans were characterized regarding
endotoxemia. Non-obese volunteers (BMI<30; n=36) were then subjected to a dietary overfeeding intervention with a 70 g-increase of daily
fat intake. Moreover, mice were fed diets enriched with 20 wt% rapeseed
oil, sunflower oil, palm oil or milkfat. In both studies, we measured
endotoxemia, endotoxin receptors LBP and sCD14, IL-6 and MCP-1.
Gene expression of TLR4, CD14 and cytokines was analysed by PCR
in white adipose tissue.Results: In humans, markers of endotoxemia
increased with BMI. Moreover, in part of the cohort, increased lipid intake
resulted in altered markers of endotoxemia and increased postprandial
absorption of endotoxins associated with increased inflammation. In
mice, palm oil-diet provoked the greatest inflammatory outcomes, high
plasma LBP, low sCD14 and increased expression of TLR4 and CD14
in adipose tissue. In contrast, rapeseed oil-diet resulted in an endotoxin
metabolism driven towards less inflammatory pathways.Conclusion:
Mechanisms involving endotoxin metabolism appear to contribute to
the development of low-grade inflammation during excessive fat intake.
Moreover, lipid composition can contribute to modulate the onset of
inflammation through the quality of endotoxin receptors.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by ANR
FLORINFLAM, ANR METAPROFILE, Institut Carnot LISA
Abstract Text: Introduction: Childhood overweight may increase the
risk of liver cancer in adulthood as a result of early establishment of
NAFLD and the associated metabolic complications. We therefore
investigated if childhood body size from the ages of 7 to 13 years was
associated with the risk of liver cancer in adulthood.Methods: Individuals
were 326,423 boys and girls born between 1930 and 1989 from the
Copenhagen School Health Records Register. Information on liver cancer was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. Anthropometry was
measured by school doctors or nurses. Body mass index (BMI) z-scores
were calculated from internal age- and sex-specific references. Hazard
ratios (HR) (95% confidence intervals) of liver cancer were calculated
from Cox proportional hazard models. Results: During follow-up, there
were 392 cases of liver cancer. The HR of liver cancer in adulthood was
1.14 (1.02-1.29) per 1-unit increase in BMI z-score at 7 years of age,
and 1.24 (1.10-1.39) per 1-unit increase in BMI z-score at 13 years of
age. Associations were similar for hepatocellular carcinoma, in boys
and girls, consistent across date of birth and essentially unchanged
by exclusion of individuals with hepatitis B, C, alcoholic conditions and
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compared to baseline, all biomarkers) throughout the intervention.
These patterns were consistent across gender, diabetes groups, and
diet groups, although the magnitude of change varied. Hierarchical
analysis suggested similar clusters, revealing that the dynamic of leptin
(pattern-A) was most closely linked to weight change, and the dynamic of
hsCRP best typifying pattern-B. Conclusions: hsCrP, HDL-cholesterol,
adiponectin, fetuin-A, progranulin, and vaspin levels display a continued
long-term improvement despite partial weight regain. This may likely
reflect either a delayed effect of the initial weight loss, or a continuous
beneficial response to switching to healthier dietary patterns.
Conflict of Interest: None
Funding: A. The Israeli Ministry of Health, Chief Scientist Office (Project
no. 300000-4850); B. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) of the
Clinical research group "Atherobesity" KFO 152-2 (project BL 833/1-1 to
MB); C. The Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Research Foundation. D.
The German-Israeli Science Foundation (project 995-41.2/2008).
T HURSDAYmay
, M AY
2012
O RAL S ESSIONS
thursday,
10,10,
2012oral
sessions
GUT MICROBIOTA TRANSPLANTATION DEMONSTRATES ITS
CAUSAL ROLE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF TYPE 2 DIABETES
AND FATTY LIVER.
T. Le Roy1 , M. Llopis1 , A. Bruneau1 , S. rabot1 , C. bevilacqua2 , P.
Martin2 , F. Walker3 , A. Bado3 , G. PERLEMUTER4 5 , A. M. cassarddoulcier45 , P. Gérard1
1
INRA, UMR 1319 M ICALIS, 2
INRA, UMR 1313 GABI, “I SO C ELL E XPRESS ”,, 3
INSERM U773, 4
INSERM U996, CLAMART, France
5
U NIV PARIS -S UD, Kremlin-Bicêtre, France
Abstract Text: Introduction: Obesity predisposes people to Type 2
diabetes and NAFLD (Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease), characterized
by liver inflammation and metabolic disorders like insulin resistance.
Recent studies indicate that modulation of gut microbiota composition
has beneficial effects on NAFLD. Here, we developed a strategy based
on gut microbiota transplantation to demonstrate its causal role in these
pathologies.Methods: Mice were fed a HFD for 16 weeks. Two of them
were selected based on their opposite response to HFD. Although
both mice were the same weight, one displayed low fasting glycemia
and weak steatosis (Non-Responder). The other one displayed insulin
resistance and marked steatosis (Responder). Two groups of germ-free
mice were colonized with their microbiota and were given the same
HFD. After 16 weeks of HFD, weight, glycemia, hepatic lipid metabolism,
inflammation and gut microbiota composition were assessed. Results:
The responder-receiver (RR) group developed fasting hyper-glycemia
and insulin resistance whereas the non-responder-receiver (NRR)
group remained normo-glycemic and sensitive to insulin. Only RR
mice developed hepatic steatosis and showed an increased expression
of genes involved in lipogenesis. Analysis of the fecal microbiota
revealed a lower percentage of Lactobacillus-Enterococcus, Bacteroides,
Atopobium and Akkermansia muciniphila in RR mice. Conversely, a
species of Lachnospiraceae was identified in the colonic mucus of RR
mice, suggesting that this bacterium could be involved in the pathological
response.Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that different gut
microbiota lead to different responses to HFD, demonstrating a causal
role of the microbiota in the development of diabetes and NAFLD
independently of obesity.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
134 accepted oral
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE GUT MICROBIOTA, DIET,
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND OBESITY IN CHILDREN
L. Bervoets1 , K. Van Hoorenbeeck2 3 , I. Kortleven4 , C. Van Noten4 , N.
Hens56 , C. Vael7 , H. Goossens8 , K. Desager9 2 , V. Vankerckhoven8
1
U NIVERSITY OF H ASSELT, Department of Medicine, Diepenbeek,
Belgium
2
A NTWERP U NIVERSITY H OSPITAL, Paediatrics, Edegem, Belgium
3
U NIVERSITY OF A NTWERP, Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and
Paediatrics, Antwerp, Belgium
4
U NIVERSITY OF A NTWERP, Department of Medicine and Health
Sciences, Antwerp, Belgium
5
U NIVERSITY OF H ASSELT, Center for Statistics, Diepenbeek, Belgium
6
U NIVERSITY OF A NTWERP, Department of Vaccinology, Antwerp,
Belgium
7
U NIVERSITY OF A NTWERP, Department of Microbiology, Antwerp,
Belgium
8
U NIVERSITY OF A NTWERP, Department of Medical Microbiology,
Antwerp, Belgium
9
U NIVERSITY OF A NTWERP, Paediatrics, Antwerp, Belgium
Abstract Text: Introduction: Recent studies suggest the importance
of the gut microbiota in the pathophysiology of obesity. The aim of our
study was to determine whether the composition of the gut microbiota is
related to diet, physical activity and obesity in children.Methods: In this
cross-sectional study 26 obese and 27 non-obese children aged 6-16
years were included. Fecal samples were analyzed to determine the
composition of the gut microbiota by quantitative plating and quantitative
real-time PCR. MALDI-TOF MS identified species of the Bacteroides
fragilis group. All children completed a dietary and physical activity
survey.Results: Both quantitative techniques showed a negative association between BMI SDS and concentration of Bacteroides fragilis group
(β = -0.41 and -0.82; P = 0.033 and 0.013, respectively). MALDI-TOF
MS analysis demonstrated a positive association between BMI SDS and
B. fragilis colonization (β = 0.02; P = 0.049). B. vulgatis colonization was
inversely associated with BMI SDS (β = -0.02; P = 0.033). BMI SDS
was also positively associated with the Firmicutes/Bacteroides ratio (β
= 1.87; P = 0.006). A higher intake of proteins (g/kg body weight) was
associated with a higher colonization of Bacteroides fragilis group (β =
0.50 ; P = 0.043) and a lower presence of B. fragilis (β = -12.01; P =
0.032) in the gut. No significant associations were found for the level of
physical activity.Conclusion: Our results suggest that low concentrations
of Bacteroides fragilis group together with a low protein intake during
childhood could lead to the development of obesity.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed
Funding: No funding
135 accepted oral
ADIPOSE TISSUE FOAM CELLS IN HUMAN OBESITY
H. Shapiro1 , O. Nov2 , R. Shaco-Levy3 , B. Kirshtein4 , M. Blüher5 , N.
Bashan2 , A. Rudich6 2
1
B EN G URION U NIVERSITY OF THE N EGEV, Department of Clinical
Biochemistry, Beer-Sheva , Israel
2
B EN G URION U NIVERSITY OF THE N EGEV, Department of Clinical
Biochemistry, Beer Sheva, Israel
3
S OROKA M EDICAL C ENTER, Pathology
4
S OROKA M EDICAL C ENTER, Surgery
5
U NIVERSITY OF L EIPZIG, Internal medicine
6
B EN G URION U NIVERSITY OF THE N EGEV, National Institute of
Biotechnology in the Negev, Beer-Sheva , Israel
Abstract Text: Introduction: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs)
are now recognized as a common signature of adipose inflammation
in obesity. Since they were proposed to participate in the clearance of
triglyceride droplets from dead adipocytes, we hypothesized that lipidladen ATMs may develop in adipose tissue in response to obesity and
its associated morbidities. Methods: Histological sections of human fat
biopsies were stained with CD68 and hematoxylin-eosin. Flow cytometry
analysis was developed to detect and quantify lipid-laden ATMs by gating
CD45+, CD14+, CD64+ cells and analyzing their lipid content by Bodipy
staining. Results: Lipid-laden ATMs resembling atherosclerotic foam
cells (FC) were identified in human fat biopsies. Adipose FC were mostly
visualized in large crown-like structures surrounding the adipocytes. FC
were usually absent from adipose tissue of lean persons, were more
abundant in omental than subcutaneous fat, in patients with predominant
intra-abdominal fat, and in males and diabetic patients. Flow cytometry
analyses demonstrated that the number of adipose FC correlated
with BMI and significant higher number of FC were found in omental
compared to sub-cutaneous fat. Intriguingly, high-fat diet-IL-1β-KO mice
exhibited a marked decrease in adipose FC compared to wild-type mice.
Moreover, IL-1β enhanced intracellular lipid accumulation in cultured
macrophage cell line incubated with linoleic acid.Conclusions: We
discovered adipose FC in crown-like structures of adipose tissues that
may correlate with clinical markers of obesity-associated morbidity.
Increased adipose tissue production of IL-1β may locally contribute to
generation of adipose FC.
Conflict of Interest: Conflict of interest: none
Funding: Funding: NIBN, Israel-Germany bi-national Science Foundation (GIF)
136 accepted oral
IMPLICATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY KINASE TPL2 IN THE
DELETERIOUS EFFECTS OF CYTOKINES AND MACROPHAGES
ON ADIPOCYTES FUNCTIONS
J. F. TANTI1 2 , F. CEPPO1 2 , J. JAGER1 2 , T. GREMEAUX1 2 , A. TRAN3 2 ,
H. Vidal4 , P. GUAL3 2 , M. CORMONT1 2
1
INSERM U895, Team 7, NICE, France
2
U NIVERSITY OF N ICE S OPHIA A NTIPOLIS, Faculty of Medicine, NICE,
France
3
INSERM U895, Team 8, NICE, France
4
INSERM U1060/U NIVERSITÉ LYON 1/INRA 1235, Oullins, France
Abstract Text: Introduction: Obese adipose tissue (AT) is infiltrated by
macrophages and a cross-talk between macrophages and adipocytes
contributes to AT inflammation and dysfunction that participate in the
insulin resistance. Thus, the identification of inflammatory pathways
involved in this cross-talk may provide new insights into mechanisms
promoting metabolic diseases. We hypothesized that MAP3 kinase
kinase kinases (MAP3K) that link MAP kinases to receptors involved
in innate immunity could be attractive candidate.Methods: 3T3-L1
adipocytes and macrophages were cultured separately or together. The
expression and secretion of cytokines were measured by real-time PCR
and ELISA. Western blot was used to assess the activation of insulin
signaling.Results: We found that the MAP3K Tpl2 was expressed in
adipocytes and that IL-1β and TNF-↵ activated Tpl2 and regulated its
expression through NFB pathway. Tpl2 inhibition prevented the lipolysis
and down-regulation of insulin signaling induced by these cytokines.
Abstracts Book Page 42
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133 accepted oral
O
RAL S ESSIONS
F RIDAY, M AY
11,11,2012
oral
sessionsfriday,
may
2012
137 accepted oral
DETERMINING
THE
ROLE
OF
SKELETAL
MUSCLE
MACROPHAGES IN TYPE 2 DIABETES
1
1
1
1
D. patsouris , J. Ji , A. Durand , M. A. Chauvin , M. C. Michalski2 , H.
Vidal3 , J. Rieusset1
1
C AR M E N LABORATORY, Glucolipotoxicity, metabolic stress and
diabetes
2
C AR M E N LABORATORY, INgénierie et FOnction des LIpides lipoProtéines
3
C AR M E N LABORATORY, Adaptations nutritionnelles, environnement et
diabètes
Abstract Text: Introduction: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is nowadays
considered a low grade inflammatory disease characterized by adipose
tissue macrophages (ATMs) accumulation.
Whereas secretion of
pro-inflammatory cytokines by ATMs interferes with insulin signaling,
this is skeletal muscle tissue which is reponsible for most of whole
body glucose disposal. However so far, there is very little information
describing the inflammatory status of this tissue in the context of T2D.
The aim of our project was hence to determine the role of skeletal muscle
inflammation in the disease. Methods: We used three mice models
of T2D. A genetic model (ob/ob), and two nutritional models. The first
nutritional model consisted of mice fed a high fat diet (HFD, 45%) in
absence or presence of rosiglitazone, an insulin sensitizing agent. The
second nutritional model were mice fed with specific fatty acids such
as palmitate (20%). In vitro chemotaxis assays were performed with
macrophages cells exposed to myotubes conditioned media.Results: we
observed a striking correlation between intra-muscular pro-inflammatory
cytokines (TNFa, IL1b) or macrophages markers (F4/80, CD11b, CD11c)
and insulin resistance in mice. Skeletal muscle macrophages might
be recruited in response to the secretion of chemoattractants (MCP1)
by myotubes exposed to excess fatty acids. Conclusions: Our study
indicate that T2D is associated with the recruitment of pro-inflammatory
macrophages in skeletal muscle tissue, which may in turn induce or
worsen the disease.
Conflict of Interest: No conflicts of interest are reported by the authors.
Funding: David Patsouris is funded by l’Agence Nationale de la
Recherche (grant ANR-09-RPDOC-018-01).
Friday, May 11, 2012
T1:OS2 - Social and Physical Determinants
138 accepted oral
DOUBLE JEOPARDY FOR CHILDHOOD OBESITY: EARLY
CHILDHOOD RISK FACTORS AND LACK OF PERCEPTION IN
SOCIALLY DISADVANTAGED AREAS
K. Gibbons1 , G. Naughton2
1
M URDOCH C HILDRENS R ESEARCH I NSTITUTE , R OYAL C HILDREN ’ S
H OSPITAL, Nutrition
AUSTRALIAN C ATHOLIC U NIVERSITY, Exercise Science, Melbourne,
Australia
2
Abstract Text: Introduction: Childhood obesity is over-represented in
socially disadvantaged communities. Families living in these areas in
Australia have high proportions of parents with low levels of education,
government supported needs, and culturally and linguistically diverse
backgrounds. Methods: To understand more about early risk factors
for childhood obesity in socially disadvantaged areas, we asked parents
(n = 796) and health/education professionals (n=45) of children aged
0 to 8 years about children’s nutrition and physical activity practices,
and perceptions of their child’s weight status. Parents and carers
completed questionnaires and a small number of carers also consented
to interviews. Local interpreters assisted parents of pre-school children,
where appropriate.Results: Despite a national prevalence of childhood
overweight and obesity of 20 to 25% among children 4 to 8 years of
age, only 5% of parents reported concerns about excessive weight in
their child. More carers than parents expressed greater concerns about
children’s risk of obesity. Approximately three in every four children
aged 2-6 years averaged less than two hours of outdoor active play.
The recommended one hour of ’screen’ time for preschool children was
exceeded by 80% of children. In children 6-8 years, television viewing
doubled and computer time tripled on weekends. Reports of food
insecurity, consumption of take away foods and requests for lower cost
healthy foods, indicated complexities facing some families.Conclusion:
Early obesity prevention strategies may be a low priority for socially
disadvantaged families. Broader base supports and strategies assisting
families to translate knowledge into practice are required.
Conflict of Interest: None to disclose
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by the Department of Health, Victoria, Australia.
139 accepted oral
IMMEDIATE AND LONG-TERM CHANGE IN WELL-BEING
AMONGST PARTICIPANTS IN A FOUR-MONTH PEDOMETERBASED WORKPLACE HEALTH PROGRAM
R. Freak-Poli1 , R. Wolfe1 , E. Wong1 , A. Peeters1
1
M ONASH U NIVERSITY, Epidemiology, Melbourne, Australia
Abstract Text: Aim: To evaluate whether participation in a four-month,
pedometer, workplace health program results in an improvement in
well-being, immediately after the program and eight months after
the completion of the program. Methods: 762 adults employed in
primarily sedentary occupations and voluntarily enrolled in a four-month
workplace program aimed at increasing physical activity were recruited
from ten Australian worksites in 2008. Data included the WHO-Five
Well-being Index (WHO-5) at baseline, four-months and twelve-month
collection. WHO-5 is a self-administered five-item scale that can be
categorised into ’poor’ and ’positive’ well-being. Change was assessed
by multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses. Results: At
baseline, 75% of participants were achieving positive psychosocial
WHO-5 scores (mean 60+19 units). On average, well-being improved
immediately after completion of the health program (3.5 units, p<0.001;
6.2% more with ’positive’ scores, p<0.001) and was sustained at eight
months post program (3.4 units, p<0.001; 2.5%, p=0.1). Immediate and
long-term benefits were seen in those with poor well-being at baseline
(immediate: 14.9 units, p<0.001; sustained 16.1 units, p<0.001) with
50% moving to the ’positive’ well-being category at baseline (p<0.001)
which was sustained at twelve-months (p<0.001). Conclusions: The
majority of employees were achieving positive well-being scores at
baseline. Clinically relevant immediate and sustained well-being benefits
associated with the health program were observed in those with ’poor’
well-being at baseline. These results suggest that there are not only
anthropometric and biomedical benefits but also psychosocial benefits
associated with participation in pedometer, physical activity, workplace
health programs.
Conflict of Interest: The study design; analysis and interpretation of
data; the writing of the manuscript; and the decision to submit the for
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Tpl2 mRNA expression was up-regulated in AT of obese mice and
patients both in adipocytes and in pro-inflammatory CD11c+ cells. In a
co-culture system between adipocytes and macrophages, we found that
pharmacological inhibition of Tpl2 decreased inflammatory cytokines
expression and fatty acids release. Silencing of Tpl2 in macrophages
reduced the level of inflammatory mediators in the co-culture highlighting
an important role of Tpl2 in the inflammatory effect of macrophages.
Further, Tpl2 inhibition decreased the alterations in adipocytes insulin
signaling induced by macrophages.Conclusions: We propose that
Tpl2 pathway is involved in the crosstalk between adipocytes and
macrophages that could contribute to AT inflammation and dysfunction in
obesity.
Conflict of Interest: None
Funding: Research related to this abstract was funded by by the
European Commission (Brussels, Belgium) as an Integrated Project
under the 6th Framework Programme (Contract HEPADIP, LSHM-CT2005018734), by the French National Research Agency (ANR, contract
ANR-2010-BLAN-1117-01), by the Region Provence Alpes Cote d’Azur
and by grant form ALFEDIAM-Takeda.
F RIDAYmay
, M AY
2012
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2012oral
sessions
presentation were solely at the discretion of the Monash researchers,
R
The Foundation’s involvement. The authors
independent of GCCor
declare that they have no further competing interests.
Funding: This data was collected as part of the Global Corporate
R
Study conducted through Monash University.
ChallengeEvaluation
We would like to acknowledge the Australian Research Council (ARC)
and the Foundation for Chronic Disease PreventionTM in the Workplace,
R for partially
which is associated with the Global Corporate Challenge,
funding this study. RFP, RW, EW & AP are affiliated with Monash
University. RFP is supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award and a
Monash Departmental Scholarship. AP is funded by a VicHealth Public
Health Fellowship.
140 accepted oral
SOCIOECONOMIC DISPARITIES IN TRAJECTORIES OF OVERWEIGHT IN INFANCY AND EARLY CHILDHOOD
C. Schmidt Morgen1 , L. Hvas Mortensen1 , P. Due2 , L. D. Howe3 ,
M. Rasmussen2 , P. kragh Andersen4 , T. I. Sørensen5 , A. M. Nybo
Andersen1
1
I NSTITUTE OF P UBLIC H EALTH, social medicine, Copenhagen,
Denmark
2
N ATIONAL I NSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Child and adolescent health
3
M EDICAL R ESEARCH C OUNCIL C ENTRE FOR C AUSAL A NALYSES IN
T RANSLATIONAL E PIDEMIOLOGY
4
I NSTITUTE OF P UBLIC H EALTH, Department of Biostatistics, Copenhagen, Denmark
5
I NSTITUTE OF P REVENTIVE M EDICINE, Copenhagen, Denmark
Abstract Text: Background:Childhood obesity is inversely related
to parental socioeconomic position in cross sectional studies, but few
studies have investigated this in a longitudinal design leaving it uncertain
when the social gradient emerges. Methods: We examined whether
maternal and paternal educational level and household income affected
the risk of giving birth to a large for gestational age (LGA) child, and being
overweight at 5 months, 12 months and at 7 years of age, according
to WHO 2006 and 2007 standards. The associations were analysed in
a dataset of 25,902 children participating in the Danish National Birth
Cohort with baseline between 1998 and 2003 and follow-up during 2003
to 2010. We used logistic and linear regression analysis and Generalized
Estimating Equation models.Results:A total of 13.0% were born LGA,
1.9 % of the 5 months old children, 5.6 % of the 12 months old and
15.4% of the 7 year old children were overweight. Maternal educational
level below 12 years was associated with decreased risk giving birth to a
LGA child (OR’s between 0.79 (0.68-0.91) and 0.89 (0.82-0.96). A Low
parental educational level and a low household income was associated
with an increased risk of overweight at age 7 years (OR’s between 1.19
(1.09-1.31) and 1.82 (1.63-2.04)). At age 5 and 12 months there was no
socioeconomic inequality. Conclusions: LGA increases and prevalence
of overweight at 7 years, but not at 5 and 12 months, decreases by
socioeconomic position.
Conflict of Interest: none disclosed
Funding: Research related to this abstract was funded by the University
of Copenhagen, Denmark and the Health Insurance Foundation,
Denmark.
children.Method: 952 girls and 933 boys aged 3-10 yrs living in Coimbra
were observed between 03.2009 and 07.2010. Children’s weight and
height were measured. Parents filled out a standard environmental
questionnaire (IPS, 2002). Age and sex-specific BMI cut-off points were
used (IOTF). Environmental characteristics were combined into two
neighborhood dimensions, used as predictors in logistic models. Results:
Girls had higher values for overweight and obesity than boys. Parental
perceptions of both the social and built neighborhood dimensions were
significantly associated with girls’ obesity. The odds of being obese
increase with negative perceptions of the physical environment (OR =
1.47; p<0.005) and perceptions of an unsafe environment (OR = 1.339;
p<0.005). These relations were not evident for boys.Conclusion: It is
possible to revert the prevalence of childhood obesity via environmental
interventions, improving urban design and promoting mixed land uses,
as well as the social environment, especially safety. The increased
environmental susceptibility found in girls makes these interventions
even more relevant, given the higher prevalence of obesity in girls.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by Funda para a
Ciia e Tecnologia FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-007483.
142 accepted oral
ATTACHMENT AS PREDICTOR OF EATING PATHOLOGY AND
WEIGHT GAIN IN PREADOLESCENT BOYS AND GIRLS
L. Goossens1 , C. Braet1
1
G HENT U NIVERSITY, Gent, Belgium
Abstract Text: Introduction: The present study examined the role of
attachment towards mother and father as a predictor of eating pathology
and weight gain among preadolescent boys and girls.
Methods:
Self-report questionnaires and Adjusted Body Mass Index (BMI) were
administered from a community sample of 601 preadolescents (8-11
years; 48% female) at baseline and once again one year later. Results:
Significant baseline associations were found between attachment
towards both parents and several features of eating pathology. No
baseline correlations were found between the attachment variables
and Adjusted BMI. However, after controlling for gender and baseline
levels of eating pathology and weight, an insecure attachment towards
mother significantly predicted increases in dietary restraint, eating,
weight and shape concerns, and in Adjusted BMI in the children one
year later. An insecure attachment towards father was predictive for
persistence in children’s subjective binge eating episodes. Conclusions:
The present study provides preliminary evidence for the longitudinal
association between attachment and eating pathology and weight gain in
preadolescents. Moreover, attachment towards mother and attachment
towards father appear to be differently associated with their children’s
disordered eating attitudes and Adjusted BMI. Future research should
further elucidate the mechanisms underlying this differential association.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding: This research was supported by a post-doctoral research
grant awarded to the first author by the Special Research Funds of Ghent
University (Belgium)
143 accepted oral
EXPLORING THE LINKS BETWEEN PERCEPTIONS OF BUILT
AND SOCIAL NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENTS AND SEXSPECIFIC CHILDHOOD OBESITY IN PORTUGUESE SCHOOL
CHILDREN
H. Nogueira1 , M. Ferrão2 , A. Gama3 , I. Mourão4 , V. Marques5 , C.
Padez6
R ESEARCH C ENTER FOR A NTHROPOLOGY AND H EALTH, Geography
Department, Coimbra, Portugal
2
R ESEARCH C ENTER FOR A NTHROPOLOGY AND H EALTH, Life Science,
Coimbra, Portugal
3
R ESEARCH C ENTER FOR A NTHROPOLOGY AND H EALTH, Faculty of
Sciences, Coimbra, Portugal
4
R ESEARCH C ENTER FOR A NTHROPOLOGY AND H EALTH, University of
Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Coimbra, Portugal
5
R ESEARCH C ENTER FOR A NTHROPOLOGY AND H EALTH, Instituto
Investigação Científica Tropical, Coimbra, Portugal
6
R ESEARCH C ENTER FOR A NTHROPOLOGY AND H EALTH, Department
of Life Sciences, Coimbra, Portugal
1
Abstract Text: Introduction: Studies found associations between
parental perceptions of neighborhood and children’s health. Objectives:
We investigate the links between parents’ perceptions of their social and
built residential environment and overweight/obesity among Portuguese
JAPANESE STUDY OF VISCERAL ADIPOSITY AND LIFESTYLE
INFORMATION: UTILIZATION AND EVALUATION 2
N. Sakane1 , Y. Yanagisawa2 , M. Katashima3 , S. Dohi4 , K. Sakata5 , S. I.
Hagiwara6
1
K YOTO M EDICAL C ENTER, Division of Preventive Medicine, Kyoto,
Japan
2
KAO C ORPORATION , Tokyo, Japan
3
K AO C ORPORATION, Tokyo, Japan
4
M ITSUI C HEMICALS , I NC, Health Management
5
S UMITOMO M ETAL I NDUSTRIES LTD., Safety and Health Dept.
6
H ONDA E NGINEERING C O., LTD., EG Health Care Centre
Abstract Text: Introduction: A reduction of visceral fat reportedly leads
to the improvement of metabolic risk factors. A new medical device
to measure visceral fat has been under development; it is handy and
easy to use. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a
web-based weight -loss program alone or together with measurement
and awareness of visceral fat on weight loss, the waist circumference
(WC), dietary and physical activity behaviors. Methods: The study
included 216 overweight and obese males (BMI > 23 kg/m2 based on
WPRO criteria; mean age of 45 years) in 8 healthcare offices of 3 enterprises. Exclusion criteria included having a pacemaker and participation
advised against by a doctor. Subjects were randomly allocated into
the following 3 groups: Control group, Web-based weight-loss program
(Web), and Web+VFA group with the addition of visceral fat measured
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141 accepted oral
O
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by bioelectrical impedance and awareness of visceral adiposity. The
primary endpoint was reduction of the WC, which is simple indicator of
visceral adiposity. Results: The completion rate was 81%. The mean
3-month weight losses were 0.7, 1.9, and 2.8 kg, respectively. The
decreases in WC were -0.1, 1.7, and 3.3 cm, respectively. Dietary and
physical activity behaviors in the Web+VFA group improved compare
with the Web and control groups.Conclusion: Our findings suggest
that measurement and awareness of visceral fat are effective in weight
reduction in overweight and obese males in the workplace.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed.
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by Kao
Corporation.
included a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. The
second visit included a functional neuroimaging session with visual
stimulation tasks. Blocks of images (high calorie (HC), low calorie (LC)
and non-food (NF)) were presented in randomized order. Results: For
the comparison HC with NF, SI was inversely associated with activation
in the anterior cingulate (r2 = 0.65; p < 0.005), the insula (r2 = 0.69; p <
0.005), the orbitofrontal cortex (r2 = 0.74; p < 0.005), and the frontal and
rolandic operculum (r2 = 0.76; p < 0.001). Associations stayed significant
after adjustment for body adiposity. No differences in brain activation
were observed comparing LC and NF.Conclusion: Peripheral insulin
sensitivity is associated with cerebral activation in response to food cues.
Insulin resistance may lead to overeating and the exacerbation of the
development of obesity through over-activation of brain reward circuits.
Conflict of Interest: The authors report no conflict of interest.
Funding: This study was supported by the National Cancer Institute
(U54 CA 116848), and by a Pfizer Fellowship in Health Disparities
awarded to Tanja C. Adam
T3/T4:OS2 - Mechanism of Insulin Resistance
146 accepted oral
144 accepted oral
ROLE OF CB1 LOCATED IN THE VENTROMEDIAL NUCLEUS OF
THE HYPOTHALAMUS IN ENERGY AND GLUCOSE HOMEOSTASIS
P. Cardinal12 , L. Bellocchio3 2 , M. Elie1 2 , S. Clark1 2 , G. Marsicano3 2 ,
D. Cota12
1
INSERM, U862, team "energy balance and obesity", Bordeaux, France
2
U NIVERSITY OF B ORDEAUX, Talence, France
3
INSERM, U862, team "Endocannabinoids and neuroadaptation",
Bordeaux, France
Abstract Text: Introduction: Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors
are present in several hypothalamic nuclei involved in energy balance
regulation, with the highest expression in the ventromedial nucleus
(VMN).Methods: Using the Cre/loxP system, we generated mice lacking
CB1 in steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1)-expressing neurons, which are
selectively present in the VMN. Behavioral, metabolic and molecular
analyses were performed.Results: CB1 deletion was verified by PCR
and in situ hybridization. On standard diet, male mice lacking CB1 in
the VMN (SF1-CB1-KO) and SF1-CB1-WT littermates had comparable
food intake and body weight. However, SF1-CB1-KO mice had less fat,
decreased respiratory quotient and higher expression of UCP1 mRNA,
a marker of thermogenesis, in the brown adipose tissue as compared
to WT. SF1-CB1-KO mice also had improved glucose tolerance and
insulin sensitivity, as well as increased leptin sensitivity and increased
VMN phospho-STAT3 immunostaining. Conversely, under high-fat diet
(HFD), SF1-CB1-KO gained significantly more weight than WT and had
worsened glucose tolerance. Changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides
were also observed. Females did not differ in any of the parameters
studied.Conclusions: CB1 in VMN neurons of male mice exerts
diet-dependent differential roles. Under standard diet, it favors fat
accumulation and controls glucose responses. While under HFD, VMN
CB1 protects against diet-induced obesity.
Conflict of Interest: No conflict of interest
Funding: Supported by INSERM Avenir, Aquitaine Region, INSERM/Aquitaine Region doctoral Program, European Federation for the
Study of Diabetes-Sanofi Aventis grant.
REDUCED C5L2 PROTEIN EXPRESSION IS ASSOCIATED WITH
ELEVATED SKELETAL MUSCLE LIPID ACCUMULATION AND
INSULIN RESISTANCE
S. Paglialunga1 , C. Roy2 , G. Schaart3 , E. Moonen-Kornips1 , M.
Hesselink3 , K. Cianflone2 , P. Schrauwen1
1
M AASTRICHT U NIVERSITY, Human Biology, Maastricht, Netherlands
2
H ÔPITAL L AVAL R ESEARCH C ENTER, Obesity
3
M AASTRICHT U NIVERSITY, Human Movement Sciences, Maastricht,
Netherlands
Abstract Text: Introduction: Acylation stimulating protein (ASP)
stimulates fatty acid uptake and storage in adipose tissue via its receptor
C5L2. C5L2 is also expressed in muscle, yet its function is unknown.
In the present study we aimed to investigate the role of C5L2 in the
muscle under conditions of lipid surplus and insulin resistance. Methods:
Male wildtype (WT) and C5L2 knockout (KO) mice were fed a low (LF)
or a high (HF) fat diet for 10 weeks. Intramyocellular lipids (IMCL)
accumulation was measured by oil red O staining. Mitochondria were
isolated from hindleg muscles for high-resolution respirometry. Insulin
sensitivity was assessed by an insulin tolerance test (ITT). In addition,
C5L2 protein expression was measured in skeletal muscle biopsy
samples from type 2 diabetes (T2D) subjects and age- and BMI-matched
obese controls. Results: On the HF-diet, IMCL was increased by 6-fold
in C5L2KO mice compared to WT (P<0.05). C5L2KO-HF displayed
increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidative capacity (WT: 2477±151
vs. KO: 3018±115 pmol/sec/mg, P<0.05). Furthermore, plasma
insulin levels were significantly increased in C5L2KO-HF mice (WT:
3.23±0.48 vs. KO: 8.87±2.70 ng/ml, P<0.001) and C5L2KO-HF mice
displayed altered ITT response (P<0.05). Similar results were obtained
for C5L2KO mice on the LF diet. Interestingly, C5L2 protein expression
was significantly reduced by 37% in T2D subjects compared to controls
(P<0.05).Conclusion: In skeletal muscle, C5L2 deficiency (mice) or low
levels (T2D subjects) are associated with increased IMCL levels and
insulin resistance. Furthermore, diet-induced IMCL accumulation and
hyperinsulinemia are exaggerated in C5L2KO mice despite increased
fatty acid oxidation.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded CIHR and FRSQ
145 accepted oral
Abstract Text: Introduction: Insulin resistance is thought to be a
link between obesity and the associated increased disease risk. In
addition to its role as an energy regulatory signal to the hypothalamus,
insulin acts to decrease food reward possibly through a direct alteration
of dopaminergic signaling. In the current study we examined the
association of insulin sensititvity (SI) with cerebral activation in response
to food and non-food cues. Methods: Twelve Hispanic girls (age: 8-11;
BMI (kg/m2 ): 29.9 ± 5.7) participated in two study visits. The first visit
147 accepted oral
DIFFERENT SKELETAL MUSCLE FATTY ACID HANDLING IN
SUBJECTS WITH IMPAIRED FASTING GLUCOSE AND IMPAIRED
GLUCOSE TOLERANCE
C. Moors1 , G. Goossens1 , N. van der Zijl2 , A. Jans1 , E. Konings1 , M.
Diamant2 , E. Blaak1
1
M AASTRICHT U NIVERSITY, Department of Human Biology, Maastricht,
Netherlands
2
VU U NIVERSITY, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Abstract Text: Introduction: To determine fasting and postprandial
skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) handling in subjects with impaired
fasting glucose (IFG) and combined IFG/impaired glucose tolerance
(IGT).Methods: 12 IFG and 14 IFG/IGT subjects matched for age
and BMI were examined during fasting and postprandial conditions
by combining the forearm balance technique with stable isotopes of
palmitate. [2 H2]-palmitate was infused intravenously to label endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free FA (FFA) in the circulation and
[U-13 C]-palmitate was incorporated in a high-fat mixed-meal (2.6 MJ,
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INSULIN SENSITIVITY IS ASSOCIATED WITH ACTIVATION OF
BRAIN REWARD CIRCUITS IN OVERWEIGHT HISPANIC GIRLS:
A PILOT STUDY
T. Adam1 , S. Tsao2 , K. Page3 , H. Hu4 , R. Hasson5 , M. Goran6 , M.
Singh2
1
M AASTRICHT U NIVERSITY, Human Biology, Maastricht, Netherlands
2
U NIVERSITY OF S OUTHERN C ALIFORNIA, Biomedical Engineering
3
U NIVERSITY OF S OUTHERN C ALIFORNIA, Endocrinology
4
C HILDRENS H OSPITAL L OS A NGELES, Radiology, Los Angeles, USA
5
U NIVERSITY OF C ALIFORNIA, Family and Community Medicine, San
Fransisco, USA
6
U NIVERSITY OF S OUTHERN C ALIFORNIA, Preventive Medicine
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61E% fat) to label chylomicron-TAG. Muscle biopsies were taken to
determine muscle TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), FFA, and phospholipid (PL)
content, their fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and degree of saturation,
as well as the mRNA expression of genes involved in oxidative lipid
metabolism.Results: Peripheral and postprandial insulin sensitivity were
lower in IFG/IGT compared with IFG. Chylomicron-TAG concentrations
were increased in IFG/IGT, which was accompanied by a higher net
extraction of chylomicron-TAG and VLDL-TAG by forearm muscle.
Furthermore, IFG/IGT showed a higher muscle TAG content, a lower
TAG FSR, a higher saturation of the FFA pool and a lower saturation in
the DAG and TAG pool in skeletal muscle. Genes involved in oxidative FA
metabolism were reduced in IFG/IGT.Conclusion: The reduced insulin
sensitivity in IFG/IGT is accompanied by an increased postprandial
TAG extraction, a reduced TAG fractional synthesis and a reduced
expression of oxidative genes. The present data indicate that a reduced
lipid turnover, rather then DAG content per se is associated with insulin
resistance.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
148 accepted oral
IMPLICATION OF LIPID DROPLET PROTEINS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEPATIC STEATOSIS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE
K. Minehira Castelli1 , T. Bouduban1 , F. Mange1 , G. Wilemin1
1
U NIVERSITY OF L AUSANNE, Department of Physiology, Lausanne,
Switzerland
Abstract Text: Introduction: Hepatic steatosis is a state of innocuous
lipid droplets accumulation in the liver. This pathology is frequently linked
to insulin resistance without clear mechanisms. Proteins existing on a
surface of lipid droplets such as perilipins (Plin) are increased in the
hepatic steatosis. However the roles of these proteins are uncertain
in the liver. We studied roles of lipid droplet proteins in hepatic insulin
resistance.Method: Lipid droplet proteins such as Plin5, Fat specific
protein 27 (Fsp27), and Seipin, were downregulated by siRNA-technique
in alpha mouse liver-12 cells. Cellular insulin signaling was judged by
phosphorylation of Akt, Pdk, and Insulin receptor. We also studied mice
overexpressing Plin5 in the liver by adenoviral injection. Insulin sensitivity
was studied by glucose and pyruvate tolerance test, and Akt signaling
in the liver.Results: Hepatocytes with siRNA-knockdown of Fsp27,
Plin5, and Seipin significantly reduced sensitivity to insulin. This was
accompanied by a formation of smaller fractionated lipid droplets. On
the other hand, mice overexpressing Plin5 developed massive hepatic
steatosis compared to control mice. Despite the fatty liver, these mice
remained insulin sensitive.Conclusion: Liver requires lipid droplet
proteins to form normal lipid droplets and insulin sensitivity. These
proteins, when overexpressed, induced massive hepatic steatosis but
dissociated from the development of insulin resistance. These results
imply that the absence of lipid droplet proteins renders liver towards
insulin resistance.
Conflict of Interest: Conflict of Interest: None
Funding: Funding: Swiss National Foundation, Soci Francophone de
Diab, Swiss Society of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Fondation Romande
pour la Recherche sur le Diab
149 accepted oral
p<0.001). Changes in adipose tissue inflammation and fibrosis were
associated to the deterioration of insulin tolerance. In TLR4 mutated
mice fed HFD for 8 weeks, adipose tissue fibrosis and macrophage
content were significantly reduced whereas insulin tolerance was higher
compared to wild-type mice.Conclusion: Together, these data show an
association between adipose tissue fibrosis, inflammation and insulin
resistance. HFD induces adipose tissue macrophage accumulation and
fibrosis in a TLR4-dependent manner. The causal link between adipose
tissue fibrosis and insulin resistance needs to be further explored.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding: European Project ADAPT , Midi-Pyres Region
T5:OS1 - New Pharmacological and Surgical
Approaches
150 accepted oral
WEIGHT LOSS (WL) BY DEGREE OF COMORBIDITY IN
SUBJECTS RECEIVING CONTROLLED-RELEASE PHENTERMINE/TOPIRAMATE (PHEN/TPM CR) AS ASSESSED BY THE
EDMONTON OBESITY STAGING SYSTEM (EOSS)
S. Rössner1 , A. Sharma2 , J. M. Oppert3 , R. Padwal4 , B. Troupin5
1
K AROLINSKA I NSTITUTET, Stockholm, Sweden
2
U NIVERSITY OF A LBERTA, Obesity Research Management, Edmonton,
Canada
3
I NSTITUTE OF C ARDIOMETABOLIC D ISEASE AND N UTRITION, Department of Nutrition, Paris, France
4
U NIVERSITY OF A LBERTA, Department of Medicine, Edmonton, Canada
5
V IVUS , I NC.
Abstract Text: Introduction: Body mass-index (BMI) categories denote the presence of overweight/obesity; however, they do not provide
information on weight-related comorbidities that may affect overall health.
The EOSS was proposed to assess obesity-related morbidity based on
presence and magnitude of weight-related comorbidities and has been
validated against NHANES data. In the CONQUER study, PHEN/TPM
CR demonstrated significant WL vs placebo in overweight/obese subjects with ≥2 weight-related comorbidities. In this post-hoc analysis, WL was assessed according to baseline EOSS category.Methods:
CONQUER, a double-blind, 56-week trial, randomised 2487 subjects
to placebo, PHEN 7.5mg/TPM CR 46mg (7.5/46), or PHEN 15mg/TPM
CR 92mg (15/92). EOSS was scored as follows: 0=no apparent risk
factors (n=1); 1=weight-related subclinical risk factors (n=97); 2=established weight-related chronic disease (n=2170); 3=established end-organ
damage (n=180). Results: PHEN/TPM CR treatment significantly increased WL vs placebo across all baseline EOSS categories at 56 weeks
in a dose-related manner (P<.05, all comparisons; Table). Also, significantly more subjects receiving PHEN/TPM CR achieved ≥5% WL
when stratified by baseline EOSS score (P.001 vs placebo). The most
common adverse events were dry mouth, constipation, and paraesthesia.Conclusions: In this study, subjects with established comorbidities
treated with PHEN/TPM CR showed significantly greater WL than placebo
regardless of baseline EOSS. Analyses of treatment-related changes in
EOSS score are ongoing.
Abstract Text: Introduction: In the kidney and the liver, Toll-Like
Receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated activation of macrophages plays a major
role in the development of fibrosis. Here, the role of TLR4 in the development of adipose tissue fibrosis during high fat feeding in mice was
investigated. Methods: 5-weeks old C3H wild type (HeOuJ) and mutated
TLR4 (HeJ) mice were fed 45% kcal fat High Fat diet (HFD) for 2, 4, 6
and 8 weeks. At each timepoint, insulin tolerance test was performed.
Picosirius red staining was used as an index of adipose tissue fibrosis.
Expression of adipose tissue markers of inflammation and fibrosis was
measured by RT-qPCR. Stroma-vascular cell types was also quantified
by flow cytometry.Results: Levels of Markers of inflammation (TNFa),
macrophage accumulation (F4/80) and fibrosis (TGFβ1, Collagen I and
Collagen VI) progressively increased from 4 weeks of HFD in wild-type
mice. There was a strong relationship between macrophage (F4/80)
and fibrosis (TGF-β1) marker expression at each time point (r2 =0.9,
Conflict of Interest: Stephan Rssner, MD, PhD - Consultant for Vivus,
Inc.Arya M. Sharma, MD, PhD, FRCPC - Advisor and investigator for
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HIGH FAT DIET-INDUCED ADIPOSE TISSUE FIBROSIS IS
DEPENDENT ON TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 IN MICE
I. Vila1 , M. A. Marques1 , P. Gui1 , L. Monbrun1 , A. Zakaroff-Girard2 , A.
Bouloumié2 , G. Tavernier1 , D. Langin1
1
INSERM U1048 / I2MC, laboratoire de recherche sur les obésités ,
Toulouse, France
2
INSERM U1048 / I2MC, Team 1, Toulouse, France
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2012
Novo Nordisk; consultant for Vivus, Inc., and Boehringer Ingelheim;
investigator for OrexigenJean-Michel Oppert, MD, PhD - Advisor for
Vivus, Inc., and investigator for Novo NordiskRaj S. Padwal, MD Investigator for Novo Nordisk and CVRxBarbara Troupin, MD, MBA Employee of Vivus, Inc., manufacturer of the study drug
Funding: Vivus funded clinical studies and data analyses, and provided
editorial support for authors.
151 accepted oral
NON-SURGICALLY INDUCED INTENTIONAL WEIGHT LOSS
DOES REDUCE CARDIOVASCULAR OUTCOMES AND MORTALITY – RESULTS FROM SCOUT.
I. Caterson1 , N. Finer2 , W. Coutinho3 , L. Van Gaal4 , A. Maggioni5 , C.
Torp-Pedersen6 , A. Sharma7 , P. James8
1
U NIVERSITY OF S YDNEY, The Boden Institute, University of Sydney,
Australia
2
UCLH, Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery, London, United Kingdom
3
C ATHOLIC U NIVERSITY, Department of Endocrinology
4
A NTWERP U NIVERSITY H OSPITAL, Endocrinology and Metabolism,
Antwerp, Belgium
5
AMNCO R ESEARCH C ENTRE, Cardiology
6
G ENTOFTE U NIVERSITY H OSPITAL, Cardiology
7
U NIVERSITY OF A LBERTA, Obesity Research Center, Edmonton,
Canada
8
L ONDON S CHOOL OF H YGIENE AND T ROPICAL M EDICINE
and, after 2-week run-in, equally randomised to once-daily subcutaneous liraglutide (1.2,1.8,2.4 or 3.0mg), placebo, or open-label orlistat
(120mg/day).Results: Of 398 extension participants (n=5972/arm, age
46.8±10.1 years, BMI 34.8±2.7 kg/m2 [mean±SD]), 356 completed
52 weeks. 75%(49/65) of completers on the most effective liraglutide
dose (3.0mg) had ≥5% 12-week WL versus 32% (20/62) on placebo
and 38% (21/55) on orlistat. Those early responders on liraglutide
3.0mg had greater mean 52-week WL (10.3%) compared with placebo
(6.4%)(difference 3.9% [95%CI 0.96.8%]; p=0.01), but not orlistat (9.6%).
EWL ([BMI-25]/25x100) with liraglutide 3.0mg was 35.6% at week 52,
25.7% [95%CI 14.037.4] more than placebo (p<0.0001) and 13.3%
[1.125.5] more than orlistat (p=0.03). 3/92 (3.3%) gained weight on
liraglutide 3.0mg, 32/98 (33%) on placebo and 19/95 (20%) on orlistat
(intention-to-treat, last-observation-carried-forward).
The numbers
needed to be treated to achieve 10% 52-week WL were 2 with liraglutide
3.0mg, 5 with orlistat and 7 with placebo (completers).Conclusion:
75% of completers on liraglutide 3.0mg had WL ≥5% at 12 weeks, and
subsequent 52-week WL was 10.3%. Liraglutide 3.0mg resulted in 35.6%
mean EWL, which could provide a more meaningful, clearly-defined WL
target.
Conflict of Interest: NF and AA have been advisory board members
and done paid lecturing and commercially-sponsored research for Novo
Nordisk A/S. MLL and BC are employed by and own stock in Novo
Nordisk.
Funding: Research for this abstract was funded by Novo Nordisk A/S,
Denmark. www.clinicaltrials.gov* ID: NCT00422058
153 accepted oral
152 accepted oral
ADDITIONAL MEASURES TO EVALUATE THE EFFECT
OF LIRAGLUTIDE 3.0 MG ON WEIGHT LOSS IN OBESE
ADULTS WITHOUT DIABETES: A RANDOMISED PLACEBOCONTROLLED TRIAL
N. Finer1 , M. Lindegaard2 , B. Claudius3 , A. Astrup4
1
UCLH, UCLH Centre for Weight loss, Metabolic and Endocrine
Surgery , London, United Kingdom
2
N OVO N ORDISK, GLP-1 Medical Affairs, Obesity, Copenhagen,
Denmark
3
N OVO N ORDISK A/S, GLP-1 Medical Affairs, Obesity, Soeborg,
Denmark
4
U NIVERSITY OF C OPENHAGEN, Department of Human Nutrition,
Copenhagen, Denmark
Abstract Text: Introduction: A 20-week trial, extended to 52 weeks,
investigated liraglutide’s effect on weight (primary outcome) in obese
adults. Here we explore, post hoc, 52-week weight loss (WL) in
responders achieving ≥5% WL at 12 weeks, and how much excess WL
(EWL), as proposed by Bray (Obesity,2009;17:619) completers achieved
with liraglutide 3.0mg.Methods: Participants (n=564, 1865 years, BMI
3040kg/m2 ) were prescribed a 500-kcal/day deficit diet plus exercise
GASTRIC PLICATION TREATMENT IN OBESE TYPE 2 DIABETIC
PATIENTS – TWO YEAR FOLLOW UP RESULTS OF THIS NOVEL
BARIATRIC PROCEDURE.
M. Fried1
1
OB KLINIKA , C ENTRE FOR T REATMENT OF O BESITY AND M ETABOLIC
D ISORDERS , P RAGUE . 1 ST FACULTY OF M EDICINE , C HARLES U NIVER SITY, P RAGUE , Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery, Prague, Prague, Czech
Republic
Abstract Text: Gastric plication treatment in obese type 2 diabetic
patients two year follow up results of this novel bariatric procedure. Introduction: Gastric plication (LGCP) is a novel operation in
bariatric/metabolic field, anatomically similar to sleeve gastrectomy,
however less invasive. After the LGCP, similar weight reduction and
T2DM improvement is expected as after other gastric restrictive bariatric
procedures. Methods: Weight changes and development/change of
T2DM parametres in diabetic patients were recorded 24 months after the
LGCP operation. 160 patients were followed-up, 46 (37 female, 9 male)
type 2 diabetics. Weight, BMI change, %EWL, glycaemia, HbA1c, IRI,
HOMA-IR, fat mass, waist circumeference, triglycerides and cholesterol
changes were analyzed.Results: LGCP resulted inmeanweight loss
(-13.3± 8.6kg p<0.1), BMI decrease (41.6±6.2 to 35.7±4.1 /p<0.1/),
mean % EWL (51.9±10.2%), glycaema decrease (9.3±2.8mmol/l to
5.2±1.3mmol/l /p<0.1/), HbA1c decrease (6.1±1.2% to 4.7±0.8%
/p<0.1/), IRI change from (27.2 ± 2.8µmol/l to 11.2 ± 4.4µmol/l /p<0.1/),
HOMA-IR decrease (11,1 ± 1,3 to3,5± 2,0 /p<0.1/), fat mass (49.2
to 40.6%), waist circumference from mean 114±1cm to 98±2cm,
triglycerides (1.9 to 1.3 mmol/l, p<0.1), no change in cholesterol levels.
One month after LGCP T2DM remission (discontinuation of anti-diabetic
medication) occured in 45.8% and in 46.6% it was possible to cut the
anti-diabetic medication to half. 75% of insulin dependent diabetics were
off insulin in one month after LGCP. One year after LGCP remission and
improvement in T2DM was observed in 94% of patients.Conclusion:
LGCP is a new, so far promising bariatric procedure in regards of both,
statistically significant weight loss and metabolic effects. However
larger/long-term studies are needed to be able to draw firm conclusions.
Conflict of Interest: Consultant to EES
Funding: None
154 accepted oral
EVIDENCE OF METABOLIC ADAPTATION 2 MONTHS AFTER
GASTRECTOMY IN OBESE INDIVIDUALS
L. Redman1 , C. Tam1 , F. Greenway1 , J. Rood1 , E. Ravussin1
1
P ENNINGTON B IOMEDICAL R ESEARCH C ENTER, Baton Rouge, USA
Abstract Text: Weight loss often results in ’metabolic adaptation’ or
a greater than expected decrease in energy expenditure which may
predispose to weight regain. Preclinical data suggest that metabolic
* http://www.clinicaltrials.gov
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Abstract Text: Introduction: SCOUT is the first trial to assess the
combined effects of a pharmacologic agent and weight management
on cardiovascular outcomes in overweight/obese subjects at high-risk
of cardiovascular events. Methods: 9804 overweight/obese high-risk
subjects ≥55 years with known cardiovascular disease + type 2 diabetes
were treated with sibutramine plus individualised weight management
programmes during a 6-week Lead-in Period and then randomised
to either placebo or sibutramine with continued weight management
programmes. Results: Mean weight loss during Lead-in was 2.54kg;
12 months from randomisation those on placebo or sibutramine had
mean weight loss of 1.87kg or 4.18kg, respectively. Throughout the
trial (mean follow-up 4.1 years) Lead-in weight loss was maintained
in the placebo group; additional loss on sibutramine was achieved
during the first 12 months and was maintained thereafter.Although there
was an overall increase in non-fatal myocardial infarction and strokes
without increased deaths in the sibutramine group, weight loss in both
groups either at the end of the Lead-in Period or at 12 months after
randomisation was directly and proportionately related to reductions in
both cardiovascular outcome events and mortality.Even when subjects
were categorised on the degree of pre-existing cardiovascular disease
(mild, moderate or severe), a modest weight loss on the order of 3-10kg
reduced cardiovascular deaths in all three groups. Conclusion: The
"obesity paradox" was not demonstrated in this trial which shows for the
first time that intentional weight loss decreases cardiovascular events
even in high, as well as low and moderate, risk cardiovascular patients.
Conflict of Interest: As members of the SCOUT Executive Steering
Committee the authors were in receipt of funding from Abbott Laboratories.
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by Abbott
Laboratories
F RIDAYmay
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adaptation may be blunted in response to bariatric surgery. Seventeen
morbidly obese subjects (BMI:49.5±9.9kg/m2 ) underwent sleeve
gastrectomy (SG) (n=9, 7 females, 42±13y) or an 800kcal/d low-calorie
diet (LCD) (n=8, 7 females, 48±2y) for 7 weeks. Energy expenditure
was measured in sedentary (24-hr energy expenditure in a metabolic
chamber) and free living (7-day doubly-labeled water study) conditions.
Metabolic adaptation was calculated as the difference between the
measured energy expenditures and energy expenditures predicted
from body composition, sex and age. After 2 months, SG subjects
had lost 10% of their body weight (143±25 to 130±31kg, P=0.11)
compared to 6% weight loss (137±33 to 128±36kg, P=0.04) in the LCD
group. Both groups had significant reductions in fat mass and fat-free
mass (all P<0.05). 24-hr EE (chamber) was decreased significantly
more than expected on the basis of changes in body composition (SG:
-257±165; LCD:-185±169 kcal/day, both P<0.02) indicative of metabolic
adaptation in both groups Even more pronounced metabolic adaptation
was observed when EE was measured in free-living conditions (SG:
-708±472; LCD:-282±148 kcal/day, both P<0.005). There was no
change in physical activity level (calculated as TDEE/Sleeping EE or
activity related energy expenditure) in either group. Contrary to our
hypothesis, our results similar metabolic adaptation in morbidly obese
subjects 2 months after sleeve gastrectomy or low-calorie diet.
Conflict of Interest: None
Funding: Research related to this abstract was funded by Ethicon
Surgery
155 accepted oral
ALCOHOL ABUSE AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY IN THE
SWEDISH OBESE SUBJECTS (SOS) STUDY
P. A. Svensson1 , Anveden1 , S. Romeo2 , M. Peltonen3 , L. Sjöström2 , L.
Carlsson2
1
S AHLGRENSKA C ENTER FOR C ARDIOVASCULAR AND M ETABOLIC
R ESEARCH , I NSTITUTE OF M EDICINE , U NIVERSITY OF G OTHENBURG,
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden
2
S AHLGRENSKA C ENTER FOR C ARDIOVASCULAR AND M ETABOLIC
R ESEARCH , I NSTITUTE OF M EDICINE , U NIVERSITY OF G OTHENBURG,
Gothenburg, Sweden
3
C HRONIC D ISEASE E PIDEMIOLOGY AND P REVENTION U NIT, N ATIONAL
I NSTITUTE FOR H EALTH AND W ELFARE
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Abstract Text: Introduction: Some patients undergoing gastric bypass
surgery report increased sensitivity to alcohol, and alcohol metabolism
has been shown to be altered in such patients. The aim of this study
was to investigate whether bariatric surgery is associated with altered
alcohol consumption and alcohol abuse.Methods: The non-randomized,
prospective, controlled Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study involved
2010 obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery (68% vertical
banded gastroplasty, 19% banding and 13% gastric bypass) and 2037
contemporaneously matched obese controls receiving usual care. Age
was 37-60 years and BMI was ≥34 kg/m2 in men and ≥38 kg/m2 in
women. Alcohol-related data were collected from two independent
sources. Data on alcohol-abuse diagnosis during hospitalization were
obtained from the National Patient Register. Self-reported alcohol
consumption and alcohol problems were obtained from questionnaires
during follow-up. Follow-up time was up to 22 years.Results: Compared
to controls, individuals in the gastric bypass group had increased risk of
alcohol abuse (adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR)=4.97, 95% CI 2.70-9.15),
medium risk alcohol consumption (adjHR=5.91, 95% CI: 3.40-10.39)
and alcohol problems (adjHR=2.69, 95% CI 1.58-4.57). Similarly, the
vertical banded gastroplasty group was associated with increased risk of
these conditions as compared to controls with adjHR=2.23 (1.38-3.59)
for diagnosed alcohol abuse, adjHR=1.52 (1.09-2.11) for medium risk
alcohol consumption, and adjHR=2.30 (1.45-3.66) for self-reported
alcohol problems. These risks were not significantly increased after
banding (adjHR 1.57, 1.22 and 1.44, respectively.Conclusions: This
study shows that self-reported alcohol problems and alcohol abuse are
increased after gastric bypass and vertical banded gastroplasty surgery.
Conflict of Interest: None
Funding: Swedish Research Council, Swedish Foundation for Strategic
Research, Swedish Federal Government under the LUA/ALF agreement, The Sahlgrenska Academy, the VINNOVA-VINNMER program,
Hoffmann La Roche, Cederoths, AstraZeneca, Sanofi-Aventis, Ethicon
Endosurgery.
O
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sessionssaturday,
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2012
T2:OS3 - Body Composition, Metabolic Syndrome and Related Prospective Outcomes
156 accepted oral
EFFECT OF AGE ON LOSS AND REGAIN OF LEAN BODY MASS
IN TYPE 2 DIABETES: FOUR-YEAR RESULTS FROM THE LOOK
AHEAD DXA SUBSTUDY
G. Bray1 , L. Wagenknecht2 , M. Walkup3 , S. Heshka4 , J. Hill5 , V.
Hubbard6 , K. Johnson7 , S. Kahn8 , D. Nathan9 , H. Pownall10
1
P ENNINGTON B IOMEDICAL R ESEARCH C ENTER, Clinical Research,
Baton Rouge, USA
2
WAKE F OREST U NIVERSITY S CHOOL OF M EDICINE, Department of
Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
3
WAKE F OREST U NIVERSITY S CHOOL OF M EDICINE, Biostatistics
4
S T. L UKES -R OOSEVELT H OSPITAL C ENTER, Obesity Research Center
5
U NIVERSITY O F C OLORADO H EALTH S CIENCES C ENTER, Center for
Human Nutrition
6
NIDDK, Nutritional Sciences
7
U NIVERSITY OF T ENNESSEE H EALTH S CIENCE C ENTER, Department
of Preventative Medicine
8
U NIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, Department of Medicine
9
M ASSACHUSETTS G ENERAL H OSPITAL, DIABETES
10
B AYLOR C OLLEGE OF M EDICINE, Behavioral Medicine Research
Center
Abstract Text: Introduction: Aging accelerates loss of lean mass
in diabetes and may impair accumulation of lean mass as weight is
regained. Methods: Lean body mass (LBM) and body fat (BF) were
measured by DXA at baseline, 1 and 4 years in Look AHEAD, a
randomized controlled trial of obese/overweight adults with diabetes
comparing an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) with diabetes support
& education (DSE) on cardiovascular events.Results: Participants
(N=1,274) were aged 58.4 years with BMI of 35.2 kg/m2 . At 1 year, ILI
lost 8.25 kg of weight with 2.48 kg of LBM (30% of loss) and 5.76 kg BF
(70% of loss) compared to 0.33 kg weight lost in DSE (0.22 kg of LBM
and 0.10 kg BF). Weight loss was greater in those aged ≥ 60 vs <60 yrs,
but % LBM lost did not differ by age. Loss of LBM varied by region [trunk
(27%), legs (35%), arms (30%)]. Between years 1 and 4, ILI regained
4.06 kg, with 0.71 kg of LBM (17% of the gain) and 3.36 kg of BF (83%).
Weight regain was greater in those aged ≥ 60 yrs; however, they had
less gain of LBM (0.57 kg or 13%) compared to those < 60 yrs (0.82 kg
or 21%) (p=0.02). Overall, there were not regional differences in regain
of LBM [trunk (21%), legs (20%), arms (17%)].Conclusion: Loss of LBM
differed by body region but not by age. Regain of LBM was lower in older
participants but did not differ by body region.
Conflict of Interest: None
Funding: Source of Support: National Institutes of Health
157 accepted oral
ENERGY DENSITY AND 3-YEAR OBESITY INCIDENCE IN EPICSPAIN: INFLUENCE OF MISREPORTING IN PROSPECTIVE
STUDIES
M. Mendez1
1
U NIVERSITY OF N ORTH C AROLINA -C HAPEL H ILL, Nutrition, Chapel
Hill, USA
Abstract Text: Introduction: Reducing energy density (ED) is thought
to be effective for preventing weight gain. However, there is limited
prospective observational data linking energy density to weight gain
or obesity incidence, and results are conflicting. Dietary misreporting
may contribute to these inconsistencies, as subjects who have experienced weight control difficulties may be more likely to underreport
intakes.Methods: This study examines associations between dietary
energy density (foods and milk) and 3-year obesity incidence among
28,266 participants in the Spanish European Prospective Investigation in
Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study not obese at baseline. Multivariate
logistic regression was used to estimate associations between energy
density and incident obesity, exploring the influence of additionally
accounting for energy intakes misreporting. Misreporters were identified
using doubly-labeled water prediction equations to estimate energy
needs relative to reported intakes, applying methods described in the
literature.Results: Incidence of obesity was 7.5%. Mean±sd energy density was 1.37±0.30 kcals/g. In multivariate models that did not account
for misreporting, energy density was not significantly associated with
incident obesity (OR highest vs. lowest quartile 1.11, 95% CI 0.89-1.38 in
women; 1.23, 0.95-1.59 in men). Adjusting for misreporting substantially
strengthened these associations (OR 1.41, 1.11-1.79 in women; 1.45,
1.11-1.75 in men). Excluding subjects who stopped smoking or adjusting
for dietary factors such as fiber intake and percent calories from fat had
no meaningful added effect.Conclusion: Findings suggest misreporting
may substantially influence diet-obesity associations even in prospective
analyses, and accounting for misreporting may be fundamental for
identifying dietary predictors of adult weight gain.
Conflict of Interest: None.
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded byThe project
was financed by the European Commission (agreement SPC.2002332)
and participating regional governments, including the Health Research
Fund of the Spanish Ministry of Health (exp. 96 0032). Centers from
Barcelona, Granada, and Murcia received funding from the Epidemiology
and Public Health Centers Network sponsored by the Carlos III Health
Institute.
158 accepted oral
WAIST-TO-HEIGHT RATIO IS A BETTER SCREENING TOOL
THAN WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE OR BMI FOR ADULT CARDIOMETABOLIC RISK FACTORS: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND
META-ANALYSIS: “KEEP YOUR WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE TO
LESS THAN HALF YOUR HEIGHT”.
M. Ashwell1 , S. Gibson2
1
A SHWELL A SSOCIATES, Ashwell, United Kingdom
2
S IG -N URTURE LTD
Abstract Text: Aims To differentiate the screening potential of waist
circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) for adult cardiometabolic risk in people of different nationalities. To compare both
with body mass index ( BMI). To suggest a suitable boundary value
for WHtR.MethodsSystematic review and meta-analysis of studies that
used receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for assessing
the discriminatory power of anthropometric indices in distinguishing
adults with hypertension, type-2 diabetes, dyslipidaemia, metabolic
syndrome and general cardiovascular outcomes (CVD). Results31
papers met the inclusion criteria. Using data on all outcomes, averaged
within study group, WHtR had significantly greater discriminatory power
compared with BMI. Compared with BMI, WC improved discrimination of
adverse outcomes by 3% (p<0.05) and WHtR improved discrimination by
4-5% (p<0.01).Most importantly, statistical analysis of the within-study
difference in AUC showed WHtR to be significantly better than WC
for diabetes, hypertension, CVD and all outcomes (p<0.005) in men
and women.ConclusionsFor the first time, robust statistical evidence
from studies involving more than 300 000 adults in several ethnic
groups, shows the superiority of WHtR over WC and BMI for detecting
cardiometabolic risk factors in both sexes. Waist-to-height ratio should
therefore be considered as a screening tool. A separate analysis of
suggested WHtR cut off values from ROC analyses (Caucasian, Asian,
Afro-Caribbean and Central American ethnic backgrounds) showed that
the mean of proposed values (the first risk level), weighted for study
size, in men and women respectively, was 0.5 i.e. "Keep your waist
circumference to less than half your height".
Conflict of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest. MA
R
Chart which is distributed
devised and copyrighted the Ashwell Shape
to health professionals on a non-profit making basis.
Funding: This study was undertaken without funding from any external
source.
159 accepted oral
WEIGHT LOSS AND SUBSEQUENT MORTALITY - IS THE
ASSOCIATION INFLUENCED BY THE UNDERLYING METABOLIC
PROFILE?
E. Zimmermann1 2 , C. Holst1 , T. I. Sørensen1
1
I NSTITUTE OF P REVENTIVE M EDICINE , C OPENHAGEN U NIVERSITY
H OSPITAL, Copenhagen, Denmark
2
I NSTITUTE OF B IOMEDICAL S CIENCES , U NIVERSITY OF C OPENHAGEN,
Copenhagen, Denmark
Abstract Text: Introduction: Several studies have suggested that weight
loss (WL) - even after careful control of underlying disease confounding
- is associated with increased mortality, whether the WL was intentional
or not. Based on the assumption that the metabolic consequences of
obesity arise when the ability to expand the fat tissue and store the
triglyceride is exceeded, we hypothesized that those individuals who
start off with an unfavourable metabolic profile would benefit from a
subsequent WL. Methods: Among 362200 Danish draftees, examined
between 1943 and 1977, all obese (BMI≥31.0 kg/m2 ; n=1930), and a
random 1% sample of the others (n=3601) was identified at mean age
20 years. Two follow-up surveys were conducted at mean ages of 35 and
46 years. Weight and height were measured at all surveys. Metabolic
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S ATURDAYmay
, M AY
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160 accepted oral
WEIGHT CHANGE AND CHANGE IN HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN THE DOETINCHEM COHORT STUDY
I. Milder1 , E. de Hollander1 2 , S. Picavet1 , M. Verschuren1 , L. de Groot2 ,
W. Bemelmans1
1
N ATIONAL I NSTITUTE FOR P UBLIC H EALTH AND THE E NVIRONMENT,
Prevention and Health Services Research, Bilthoven, Netherlands
2
WAGENINGEN U NIVERSITY, Department of Human Nutrition, Wageningen, Netherlands
Abstract Text: Background: Obesity is associated with lower healthrelated quality of life (QoL), and weight loss interventions can lead to
improvements. However, data on changes in weight and QoL in the
general population are scarce. We assessed the association between
changes in weight and QoL in the population-based Doetinchem Cohort
Study for different age categories. Methods: Data were collected three
times: t1:1995-1999, t2:2000-2004, t3:2005-2009 for 2003 men and
2130 women, aged 26 to 70 at t1. Weight change was categorized as
stable (change  2 kg), weight-loss, or weight gain 2-4 kg, 4-6 kg, or ≥
6 kg. QoL was assessed with the SF-36 questionnaire for 8 domains.
Results: Mean (SD) weight gain was 2.0 (4.6) kg in the first period, and
0.6 (4.6) kg in the second period. Weight gain was associated with
declines in physical functioning, physical role limitations, pain, general
health perceptions, and vitality. On average, persons with a stable weight
declined 0-9 points on these domains, whereas persons who gained
at least 6 kg declined 1-15 points. Persons who lost weight had larger
declines in social functioning, mental health, and physical role limitations
(men) and emotional role limitations (women), than persons with a
stable weight. For men ≥60y this was observed for all domains of QoL.
Conclusion: Compared with persons with a stable weight, persons who
gained weight had larger declines in QoL, particularly for the physical
domains. In contrary to results for interventions, weight-loss was also
associated with larger declines in Qol, especially for men ≥60y.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed
Funding: This study was financed by the Dutch Ministry of Health,
Welfare and Sport.
161 accepted oral
COMPONENTS OF THE METABOLIC SYNDROME IN MEN
AND WOMEN WITH AN APPARENTLY “HEALTHY WAIST” ARE
NEVERTHELESS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED VISCERAL
ADIPOSITY: RESULTS FROM INSPIRE ME IAA
J. A. Nazare1 , J. Smith1 , A. L. Borel2 1 , S. Haffner3 , B. Balkau4 , R.
Ross5 , C. Massien6 , N. Alméras1 , J. P. Després1
1
C ENTRE DE R ECHERCHE DE L’I NSTITUT U NIVERSITAIRE DE C ARDI OLOGIE ET DE P NEUMOLOGIE DE Q UÉBEC , Québec, Canada
2
H ÔPITAL UNIVERSITAIRE DE G RENOBLE, Grenoble, France
3
B AYLOR C OLLEGE OF M EDICINE
4
I NSERM , CESP C ENTER FOR R ESEARCH IN E PIDEMIOLOGY AND
P OPULATION H EALTH U1018, Villejuif, France
5
Q UEEN ’ S U NIVERSITY
6
S ANOFI -AVENTIS
Abstract Text: Introduction: High waist circumference (WC) is
recognized as a key criterion in the metabolic syndrome (MetS), related
to higher visceral adiposity (VAT) and cardiometabolic risk (CMR).
The objective of this study was to investigate whether other MetS
components were associated with VAT, liver fat and inflammatory
markers in non-abdominally obese individuals.
Methods: In the
INSPIRE ME IAA study, 297 primary care physicians, cardiologists,
endocrinologists/diabetologists recruited 4504 patients worldwide. VAT
and liver attenuation (inversely correlated to liver fat) were assessed by
computed tomography, together with CMR profile including adiponectin
and C-Reactive Protein (CRP). The present cross-sectional analyses
were performed in 382 men and 393 women free of type 2 diabetes
or CVD, with a low WC (WC102cm for men, 88cm for women
(90cm and 80cm for Asians)) and presenting 0 to 4 NCEP-ATPIII
MetS components. Results: Compared to individuals with low-WC
and no MetS components, subjects with low-WC and MetS (≥3 MetS
components) were characterized by higher BMI, WC, VAT (117±3 vs
141±6 cm2 in men, 86±2 vs 112±7 cm2 in women), liver fat content,
CRP and lower adiponectin (p<0.05). When subjects were stratified
by having 1,2,3 or 4 MetS components, WC, VAT and liver fat (only in
men) significantly increased with the number of MetS components (p
for trend<0.001). Conclusion: Individuals with an apparently "healthy
WC" and with at least one MetS component are characterized by higher
VAT, liver fat and inflammation compared to individuaIs without MetS
components. These results question the current WC thresholds used to
diagnose abdominal obesity.
Conflict of Interest: B Balkau and JP Desprre members of the advisory
board for Sanofi-Aventis, Robert Ross has received a research grant
from Sanofi-Aventis and C Massien is an employee of Sanofi-Aventis.
Funding: This study was funded by Sanofi-Aventis.
T3/T4:OS3 - Ectopic Fat and Inter-Organ
Crosstalk
162 accepted oral
FATTY ACID BINDING PROTEIN 4 INDEPENDENTLY PREDICTS
LEFT VENTRICULAR MASS AND LONGITUDINAL CONTRACTILITY IN OBESE WOMEN
S. Engeli1 , W. Utz2 , S. Haufe1 , V. Lamounier-Zepter3 , M. Pofahl2 , J.
Traber2 , F. C. Luft4 , M. Boschmann4 , J. Schulz-Menger2 , J. Jordan1
1
H ANNOVER M EDICAL S CHOOL, Clinical Pharmacology, Hannover,
Germany
2
C HARITÉ U NIVERSITY M EDICAL FACULTY, Working Group Cardiac MRI
at The ECRC
3
U NIVERSITY C LINIC C ARL G USTAV C ARUS, Medical Clinic III Endocrinology
4
C HARITÉ U NIVERSITY M EDICAL FACULTY, Experimental and Clinical
Research Center
Abstract Text: Introduction: Adipocyte or heart specific fatty acid
binding proteins (FABP4 and FABP3) induced contractile dysfunction
and cellular hypertrophy in isolated rat cardiomyocytes. We hypothesized
that excessive circulating FABP4 predisposes to cardiac remodelling
and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in obese women.Methods: In 108
obese non diabetic women, we assessed serum FABP4 concentrations,
glucose metabolism, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABPM), and
body composition including measurements of visceral and subcutaneous
abdominal adipose tissue. We studied cardiac structure and function by
cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. We stratified women into serum
FABP4 tertiles (49.5±9.6 vs. 34.1±3.5 vs. 22.9±4.4 ng/ml), and conducted a multivariate analysis including all samples. Results: LV mass
was 92±16g, 86±13g and 81±12g in women with high, intermediate,
and low serum FABP4 concentrations (p<0.01). LV end-diastolic volume,
systolic ABPM and FABP4 serum concentrations independently predicted
LV mass (all p<0.001). BMI was significantly higher in the highest FABP4
tertile (34.4 ± 5.2 vs. 33.0 ± 4.4 vs. 31.4 ± 3.4 kg/m2 ), but had no
independend influence on LV mass. Longitudinal LV fractional shortening
was 8% lower amongst women in the upper two tertiles of FABP4
compared to those in the lowest FABP4 serum concentrations (p<0.05).
Radial LV fractional shortening and ejection fraction were similar among
groups. Heart rate, systolic ABPM, and FABP4 serum concentrations
independently predicted longitudinal LV fractional shortening.Conclusion:
Excessive FABP4 serum concentrations contribute to LV hypertrophy
and contractile dysfunction in obese women. FABP4 may represent a
link between adipose tissue mass accumulation and obesity-associated
cardiac disease.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
Abstracts Book Page 50
Abstracts
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profiles were computed based on total- and HDL-cholesterol, glucose,
systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and diabetes status at the two
follow-up surveys. Vital status was ascertained from registers up to 2011.
Results: Overall, WL was associated with 12-14% increased mortality
per BMI-unit lost. However, when taking the individuals’ metabolic profile
into account, WL had no detectable effect on mortality in individuals
with an unfavourable metabolic profile. WL increased mortality by 52%
(95% confidence intervals: 10-75%) per BMI-unit lost among individuals
with a favourable metabolic profile. Conclusions: Our a priori hypothesis
was not confirmed, as WL did not reduce mortality in metabolically
unhealthy individuals. Conversely, WL increased mortality remarkably in
metabolically healthy individuals. Thus, WL may predict early death in
metabolically healthy adults.
Conflict of Interest: None declared
Funding: The work was supported by grants from the Cluster for
Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
This work is also part the research activities in the Danish Obesity
Research Centre (DanORC, see http://www.danorc.dk/), supported by
the Danish Council for Strategic Research
O
RAL S ESSIONS
S ATURDAY, M AY
12,12,2012
oral
sessionssaturday,
may
2012
163 accepted oral
165 accepted oral
EPICARDIAL ADIPOSE TISSUE: INDUCER OF MYOCARDIAL
REMODELLING?
V. Guglielmi123 , N. Venteclef1 23 , E. Balse4 2 , F. Atassi4 2 , J. Amour2 5 ,
IMPACT OF METABOLIC STRESS ON ADIPOSE TISSUE, MUSCLE AND LIVER OF WILD TYPE AND IMMUNODEFICIENT RAG2
(-/-) MICE
K. Lolmède1 , A. Zakaroff-Girard1 , C. Dray2 , M. L. Renoud1 , D. Daviaud2 ,
C. Vinel2 , J. Galitzky1 , P. Valet2 , A. Bouloumié1
1
INSERM U1048 / I2MC, Team 1, Toulouse, France
2
INSERM U1048 / I2MC, Team 3, Toulouse, France
P. Leprince25 , A. Dutour6 , K. Clément1 25 3 , S. Hatem4 25
INSERM U872, INSERM, U872, Team 7 Nutriomique, Cordeliers
Research Center, paris, France
2
I NSTITUTE OF C ARDIOMETABOLISM AND N UTRITION (ICAN), Paris,
France
3
U NIVERSITÉ P IERRE ET M ARIE C URIE -PARIS 6, C ORDELIERS R E SEARCH C ENTER , UMR_S 872, Paris, France
4
INSERM UMR_S956
5
A SSISTANCE P UBLIQUE -H ÔPITAUX DE PARIS (APHP), P ITIÉ
S ALPETRIÈRE H OSPITAL, Heart and metabolism division
6
INSERM U626; U NIVERSITÉ DE LA M ÉDITERRANÉE, Marseille, France
1
Abstract Text: Introduction: Recent studies have reported a relation
between adipose tissue deposition and the incidence and severity of atrial
fibrillation (AF). However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. With
this study we tested the hypothesis that adipose tissue could promote
atrial myocardial remodelling, an important determinant of the substrate
of AF. Methods: We developed an organo-culture model of rat atria which
allowed to investigate the effects of secretome of human fat depot on
atrial myocardium maintaining its histological and structural integrity.
Epicardial, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissues were tested in this
organo-culture model. After 1 week incubation, tissue remodelling was
determined by histological assays, quantified using histomorphometry
software and characterized by immunofluorescence analysis. Results:
Interestingly, we observed that the visceral adipose tissue secretome
induced marked remodelling of rat atria in organo-culture conditions.
In addition, immunofluorescence revealed the increased deposition of
collagen types I, III and VI at the periphery of trabeculae and in the
interstitium.Conclusion: This study constitutes the first evidence that the
secretome from human visceral adipose tissue can induce remodelling
of the atrial myocardium. Given the role of fibrosis in the substrate of AF,
this work could provide a mechanism that may explain the relationship
between adipose tissue deposition and the risk of arrhythmia.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
Abstract Text: Introduction : Obesity is associated with accumulation
of immuno-inflammatory cells in the adipose tissue (AT) including
macrophages and T lymphocytes, a process involved in the genesis
of obesity-associated pathologies. The objective of this study was
to determine the impact of metabolic stress, i.e. fasting/re-feeding
approaches on wild-type (WT) and immunodeficient rag2(-/-) mice after
diet-induced obesity on the adipose tissue depots, liver and muscle as
well as glucose tolerance. Methods : After 12 weeks under high fat diet
(40% fat), WT, rag2(-/-) and rag2(-/-) mice with WT splenocyte transfer
were submitted to fasting (48h)/re-feeding (1 to 3 weeks) periods. Oral
glucose tests were performed. The number and diameter of mature
adipocytes from AT were determined as well as lipid accumulation in AT
and liver. The cellular composition of the stroma-vascular fraction (SVF)
of AT and liver were analyzed by flow cytometry. Inflammatory markers
and genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism were studied
by real-time PCR. Glucose transport was studied in isolated muscle.
Results : Under fasting/re-feeding conditions, WT and Rag2(-/-) mice
displayed distinct profile of weight loss/gain associated with changes
in glucose tolerance, quantitative and qualitative alterations in mature
adipocytes, hepatic lipid accumulation, muscle glucose transport but
also in the AT and liver SVF cell subsets. WT splenocytes transfer
into rag2(-/-) mice modulated some studied parameters. Conclusion
: Metabolic stress in obese mice is associated with marked and rapid
changes in cellular composition and metabolic activity in adipose tissue,
liver and muscle that might involve in part T lymphocytes.
Conflict of Interest: No conflict of interest relevant to this abstract was
reported
Funding: Research related to this abstract was funded by INSERM and
ANR Transflora
166 accepted oral
DEFECT IN SUBCUTANEOUS ADIPOSE TISSUE MAY CONTRIBUTE TO VISCERAL FAT ACCUMULATION IN HEALTHY MEN
DURING A 2-MONTH HIGH-FAT OVERFEEDING
M. Alligier1 , L. GABERT1 , E. Meugnier2 , C. DEBARD3 , S. LAMBERTPORCHERON1 , B. Morio4 , H. Vidal3 , M. LAVILLE1
C ENTRE DE R ECHERCHE EN N UTRITION H UMAINE - R HÔNE A LPES,
PIERRE BENITE, France
2
I NSERM U1060 I NSTITUT C AR M E N
3
INSERM U1060, Oullins, France
4
INRA, Clermont-Ferrand, France
1
Abstract Text: Introduction: Obesity is related to a cluster of metabolic
abnormalities generally associated with increased visceral adipose
tissue. Mechanisms leading to accumulation of visceral fat are largely
unknown. Overfeeding experiment is a unique tool to study the early
processes of adipose tissue development. Methods: 44 healthy male
subjects were studied before (D0) and after 56 days (D56) of overfeeding
with a high-fat diet (750 Kcal daily excess). The metabolic fate of
postprandial lipids and the expression of key genes coding of lipid
metabolism in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) were
measured at D0 and D56. Results: Body weight (+2.5kg, p=0.001) and
fat mass (p=0.001) increased during overfeeding. Despite weight gain,
change in visceral adipose tissue volume (VAT) displayed important
inter-individual differences (from 29% to +104%). During test meal with
labelled triglycerides, exogenous plasma fatty acid concentration in
the non-esterified fatty acid fraction was increased at D56, supporting
a higher spill-over rate after overfeeding.
The amplitude of this
phenomenon was positively correlated with the changes in VAT volume
(r=0.728, p=0.0055). Comparing gene expression in SCAT of subjects
with low versus high VAT volume gain revealed a defective induction
of DGAT2, SREBP1c and CIDEA in the tertile of the high visceral fat
gainers. Conclusion: Development of VAT during controlled overfeeding
in healthy individuals seems associated with a defect in the regulation
of genes related to lipid deposition in SCAT. This suggests that a limited
expansion of SCAT during positive energy balance may contribute to
visceral fat deposition.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
NEW ANTITHROMBOTIC FUNCTION OF APELIN PRESERVED
IN METABOLIC SYNDROME
F. ADAM1 , C. vatier2 , J. LOPEZ1 , A. MUSCAT2 , S. TURPIN1 , I.
Castan-Laurell3 , R. BOBE1 , P. Valet3 , B. Féve2 45 , G. SIEGFRIED1
1
INSERM U770, Biology
2
INSERM UMRS_938, Biology, paris, France
3
INSERM, Biology, Toulouse, France
4
S AINT A NTOINE H OSPITAL AP HP, Endocrinology, Paris, France
5
P IERRE ET M ARIE C URIE U NIVERSITY, Paris, France
Abstract Text: Context: Thrombotic risk is strongly increased in obese
and/or in type 2 diabetic patients. Apelin is an adipokine involved in diabetes and exerts favorable effects on glucose homeostasis Methods: In
vitro and in vivo approaches were used to study apelin effects on platelet
function in human and murine models.Results: Human and murine
platelets expressed apelin and its receptor APJ. In murine models, in vivo
studies show that apelin injection increased bleeding time both in wild
type and obese mice. In a chemical-induced model of arterio-veinous
thrombosis, apelin markedly delayed vessel occlusion time. The actions
of apelin on homeostasis were confirmed in vitro: apelin decreased the
size of thrombi in a perfusion room coated with collagen. Pretreatment
with apelin reduced the proaggregant properties of thrombin and collagen, and delayed thrombin-induced clot retraction. It strongly inhibited
the thrombin or collagen activated signaling pathways (Ca++ transients,
Erk1/2, p38 MAPkinase, Akt). Apelin effects on platelets aggregation
were mediated by the APJ receptor as assessed by pharmacological
approaches. Finally, APJ receptor was over expressed in platelets
derived from obese individuals and mice and the anti-aggregant function
of the hormone was preserved in obese.Conclusion: We show for the
first time, that apelin, an adipocyte-secreted factor, has a new function
for inhibiting platelet aggregation and that this effect is preserved in
metabolic syndrome. This offers new therapeutic opportunities to reduce
cardiovascular risk in obese and type 2 diabetic patients.
Conflict of Interest: No conflict of interest
Funding:
Abstracts Book Page 51
50
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164 accepted oral
S ATURDAYmay
, M AY
2012
O RAL S ESSIONS
saturday,
12,12,
2012oral
sessions
EFFECTS OF BARIATRIC SURGERY ON CARDIAC ECTOPIC FAT
B. GABORIT1234 , A. JACQUIER3 5 , F. KOBER3 , I. ABDESSSELAM3 1 ,
T. CUISSET16 , S. BOULLU-CIOCCA1 7 , O. EMUNGANIA8 , M. C.
ALESSI1 , K. CLEMENT9 , M. BERNARD3 , A. DUTOUR1 7
1
I NSERM U626, Marseille, France
2
A SSISTANCE P UBLIQUE DES H OPITAUX DE M ARSEILLE , CHU N ORD,
Department of Endocrinology, Metabolic Diseases and Nutrition, ,
Marseille, France
3
C ENTRE DE R ÉSONANCE M AGNÉTIQUE B IOLOGIQUE ET M ÉDICALE
(CRMBM), UMR CNRS NO. 6612, Marseille, France
4
U NIVERSITÉ DE LA M ÉDITERRANÉE, Marseille, France
5
A SSISTANCE P UBLIQUE DES H ÔPITAUX DE M ARSEILLE, department of
radiology, Marseille, France
6
A SSISTANCE P UBLIQUE DES H ÔPITAUX DE M ARSEILLE , CHU T IMONE,
Department of Cardiology, Marseille, France
7
A SSISTANCE P UBLIQUE DES H OPITAUX DE M ARSEILLE , CHU N ORD,
Department of Endocrinology, Metabolic Diseases and Nutrition,
Marseille, France
8
A SSISTANCE P UBLIQUE DES H OPITAUX DE M ARSEILLE , CHU N ORD,
Department of digestive surgery, Marseille, France
9
INSERM U872, Nutrition, Paris, France
Abstract Text: Introduction: Heart disease is one of the leading
causes of mortality and morbidity in obese patients. Cardiac ectopic
fat deposition has been related to an increased heart risk. Whether a
sustained weight loss can modulate epicardial fat or myocardial fat is
unknown. We aimed to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery (BS)
induced weight loss on cardiac ectopic fat using 3T MRI in severely
obese subjects.Methods: Twenty three morbidly obese patients underwent 1 H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine myocardial
triglyceride content (MTGC), MRI to assess epicardial fat volume (EFV),
cardiac function, CT visceral abdominal fat (VAT) measurements at
baseline and 6 months after BS.Results: BS reduced BMI significantly
from 43.1±4.5 to 32.3±4.0kg/m2 , subcutaneous fat from 649±162
to 442±127cm2 , VAT from 190±83 to 107±44cm2 , and EFV from
137±37 to 98±25mL, all p<0.0001, whereas there was no significant
change in MTGC: 1.03±0.2vs1.1±0.2%, p=0.85. A significant reduction
in left ventricular mass (118±24vs101±18g) and cardiac output
(7.1±1.6vs5.4±1.0L/min) was also observed and was linked to weight
loss. Surprisingly, the loss in EFV was less important than that of VAT,
and was not correlated to the percentage of BMI or VAT loss, suggesting
that the two depots decreased in different proportions according
to patients (p=0.007). The percent change in epicardial fat versus
visceral fat decreased with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS, 1.34±0.3vs
0.52±0.08,p<0.05).Conclusion: Six-month BS modulates differently
cardiac ectopic fat deposition with a significant decrease in epicardial fat
and no change in myocardial fat. We observed a "resistance" to EFV
loss in patients with SAS.
Conflict of Interest: No conflict of interest
Funding: None
T3/T4:OS4 - Adipobiology
168 accepted oral
METABOLIC PROGRAMMING OF SIRT1 EXPRESSION BY
MODERATE CALORIC RESTRICTION DURING GESTATION IN
RATS MAY BE RELATED WITH OBESITY SUSCEPTIBILITY IN
LATER LIFE
M. Palou12 , T. Priego1 2 , J. Sánchez1 2 , A. Palou1 2 , C. Picó1 2
1
U NIVERSITY OF THE B ALEARIC I SLANDS (UIB), Laboratory of
Molecular Biology, Nutrition and Biotechnology (Nutrigenomics), Palma
de Mallorca, Spain
2
CIBER F ISIOPATOLOGIA DE LA O BESIDAD Y N UTRICION, ISCIII, Spain
Abstract Text: Introduction: 20% gestational caloric restriction
programs offspring for higher food intake, which in adulthood results in
higher body weight in males but not in females. We aimed to assess
whether the effects of moderate caloric restriction during gestation
and the gender-dependent outcomes on adult body weight may be
related with metabolic programming of sirtuin (SIRT) expression in
different tissues. Methods: 25-day-old offspring of control and 20%
caloric-restricted rats (from days 1-12 of pregnancy) (CR) were studied.
Body weight and weight of retroperitoneal WAT (rWAT) and liver were
recorded and mRNA expression of SIRT1 and other selected genes in
rWAT, liver, skeletal muscle and hypothalamus were analyzed. Results:
No differences were found in body weight or weight of rWAT and liver
between control and CR animals. Interestingly, a similar pattern of
SIRT1 mRNA expression was found in rWAT, liver and muscle in CR
animals, but in a sex-dependent manner: CR males showed lower
SIRT1 mRNA levels than controls, while no differences were found in
females. A sex-different pattern was also observed in hypothalamus.
CR males, but not females, also showed lower mRNA levels of ATGL
and UCP2 in rWAT and of SREBP1c and SCD1 in liver. Both male and
female CR animals showed lower AMPK and ATGL mRNA levels in liver.
Conclusion: 20% maternal caloric restriction during gestation programs
a gender-dependent gene expression profile of SIRT1 in different
peripheral tissues, which may be related with obesity predisposition in
adulthood; therefore SIRT1 expression emerges as a potential early
biomarker of obesity susceptibility.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: The research leading to these results was supported by the
Spanish Government (grant AGL2009-11277) and the European Union’s
Seventh Framework Programme FP7 2007-2013 under grant agreement
n. 244995 (BIOCLAIMS Project). The Laboratory is a member of
the European Research Network of Excellence NuGO (The European
Nutrigenomics Organization, EU Contract: n. FP6-506360). The CIBER
de Fisiopatologe la obesidad y nutrici an initiative of the ISCIII.
169 accepted oral
RETINALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE 1 IS A NOVEL REGULATOR OF BROWN FAT FUNCTION IN WHITE ADIPOSE TISSUE
F. Kiefer1 , C. Vernochet2 , P. O’Brian1 , S. Spörl1 , J. Brown1 , C. R. Kahn2 ,
J. Plutzky1
1
H ARVARD M EDICAL S CHOOL , BWH, Department of Medicine,
Cardiovascular Division, Boston, USA
2
H ARVARD M EDICAL S CHOOL, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, USA
Abstract Text: Introduction: Promoting a brown adipose tissue (BAT)
phenotype can counteract obesity. Recent data link retinoids to the
regulation of energy balance, but a specific role in white versus brown
fat function is unknown. Retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (Aldhs) are the
rate-limiting enzymes in retinoid metabolism converting retinaldehyde
(Rald) to retinoic acid.Methods & Results: Here we show that Aldh1a1
is expressed predominately in white adipose tissue (WAT) but not BAT.
Genetic Aldh1a1 deficiency significantly induced expression of classic
BAT markers in WAT. Aldh1a1-deficient mice manifested increased
mitochondrial activity in WAT and were resistant to cold exposure. Using
antisense approaches, WAT-selective Aldh1a1 knockdown inhibited
weight gain and improved glucose metabolism in obese mice by
inducing expression of a similar thermogenic program. In investigating
mechanisms, we found that Rald, whose endogenous concentrations
are elevated in Aldh1a1 deficiency, regulated transcription of uncoupling
protein-1 (UCP-1) in white adipocytes through retinoic acid receptor
(RAR)-dependent mechanisms. Rald selectively activated RAR, induced
UCP-1 promoter activity, and recruited the co-activator PGC-1↵ to the
UCP-1 promoter region. Conclusion:These data establish Aldh1a1
and its substrate Rald as novel regulators of adipocyte function and
adaptive thermogenesis in WAT with potential therapeutic consequences
for obesity.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed.
Funding: This study was supported by the grants HL048743, AR05460403S1 and the Austrian Science Fund (FWF): J3107-B19.
170 accepted oral
REGULATION OF G0/G1 SWITCH GENE 2 (G0S2) EXPRESSION
IN HUMAN ADIPOSE TISSUE
A. Skopp1 , M. May1 , J. Janke2 , H. Nave3 , R. Flade-Kuthe4 , A. Kuthe4 ,
J. Jordan1 , S. Engeli1
H ANNOVER M EDICAL S CHOOL, Clinical Pharmacology, Hannover,
Germany
2
C HARITÉ U NIVERSITY M EDICAL FACULTY, Experimental and Clinical
Research Center
3
M ARTIN L UTHER U NIVERSITY, Anatomy Cell Biology
4
C LEMENTINENHAUS, Surgery
1
Abstract Text: Introduction: G0S2 is a target gene of PPARγ
and attenuated ATGL activity and lipolysis in rodent adipocytes. We
determined depot-specificity, and the influence of adipogenesis, BMI,
weight reduction, and glucose on G0S2 mRNA expression in human
white adipose tissue.Methods: SGBS cells were differentiated in vitro.
Subcutaneous (SAT) and omental adipose tissue (OAT) samples were
obtained from control and obese patients during laparoscopic surgery.
SAT samples from participants in several clinical studies were obtained
by needle biopsy. Immunohistochemistry and TaqMan-RT-PCR were
performed. Results: G0S2 mRNA increased during in vitro adipogenesis
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167 accepted oral
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of SGBS preadipocytes until day six. Accordingly, G0S2 mRNA was
7x stronger expressed in isolated mature adipocytes compared to
preadipocytes (n=7; p<0.001). Immunhistochemistry demonstrated cytoplasmatic localization of G0S2 in adipocytes as well as in mononuclear
and endothelial cells. G0S2 mRNA was 60% higher in SAT compared to
paired OAT samples (n=36, p< 0.0001). We detected 75% higher G0S2
gene expression in SAT of lean (n=11) compared to obese subjects
(n=22; p<0.05). A similar trend in OAT was not significant. Two weeks of
high or low fat intake (n=30), 5% body weight loss (n=13), and glucose
ingestion after an overnight fast (n=10) did not change G0S2 mRNA
expression in SAT.Conclusion: G0S2 is expressed in mature human
adipocytes. Short time nutritional manipulation did not influence G0S2
mRNA levels in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Comparable to mice,
we found decreased expression of G0S2 in adipose tissue of obese
individuals. The precise physiological role of G0S2 in humans needs to
be further defined.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding:
vitro using 2D and 3D coculture system and in vivo (fat pads from
GFP- preadipocytes implanted into nude mice, human breast tumours).
Results: We demonstrate for the first time, using in vitro and in vivo
approaches (including human tumours), that tumour cells are able to
force mature adipocytes towards fibroblast-like cells, named ADF for
Adipocyte-Derived Fibroblasts. These cells express some CAF markers,
like FSP-1, and display invasive and migratory capacities as well as a
profibrotic phenotype. We show that the ADF phenotype depends on the
reactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in adipocytes. Finally, ADFs
promote breast cancer cells spreading in a 3D mixed spheroids model.
Conclusion: Altogether, our data show that ADFs are key players in
breast cancer progression. Our results might provide an explanation for
the poor prognosis observed for breast cancer in obese women, since of
the number and the secretion pattern of ADF might be altered in obesity
condition.
Conflict of Interest: None disclosed
Funding: INCA, Ligue Contre le Cancer, Universit TOULOUSE
173 accepted oral
171 accepted oral
CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN MYOCYTE AND ADIPOCYTE
PROGENITOR CELLS FROM OBESE MUSCLE
V. Bourlier1 , K. Louche1 , D. Garandeau1 , C. Laurens1 , C. Dani2 , D.
Langin1 , C. Dechesne2 , C. Sengenes3 , C. Moro1
1
INSERM U1048 / I2MC, Laboratoire de recherche sur les obésités,
Toulouse, France
2
CNRS/UNS UMR6543, laboratoire cellules souches et différenciation
3
INSERM U1048 / I2MC, Team 1, Toulouse, France
Abstract Text: Introduction : Obesity and type 2 diabetes are
characterized by fatty muscles. Muscle fat includes both intramyocellular
triglycerides (IMTG) and intra/intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), the
origin of which is poorly understood. Therefore, a characterization of
satellite cells and adipocyte progenitor cells from obese muscle was
performed.Methods : Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies from obese
volunteers were digested and stroma vascular (SV) cells were cultured
and immunoselected using the satellite marker CD56. The nature of cells
present within the 3 fractions (SV (unsorted), CD56+ and CD56- cells)
and the purity of the cell sorting were investigated by flow cytometry
analysis. The 3 fractions were cultured in a myogenic medium (MM) or
in an adipogenic medium (AM) for 6 days. Myogenic and adipogenic differentiation was evaluated by qPCR and immunocytochemistry.Results :
Our data indicate that SV and CD56+ cell fractions cultured both in MM
and AM generate myotubes and express myogenic markers. Conversely,
the CD56- cell fraction does not generate myotubes (MM) but forms
lipid droplets and expresses adipogenic markers (AM). This cell fraction
includes a large proportion of CD15+ cells, recently identified as muscle
adipocyte progenitors in human.Conclusion : Two different progenitor
cell populations giving rise to mature muscle fibers and adipocytes
can be found in human obese muscle. Further investigation of their
metabolism and in situ microenvironment will provide new mechanistic
insight on the link between skeletal muscle lipids and insulin sensitivity.
Conflict of Interest:
Funding: Research related to this abstract was funded by grants from
the National Research Agency ANR-09-JCJC-0019-01 and from the
European Federation for the Study of Diabetes/Novo Nordisk (CM), and
from Association Franse contre les Myopathies (Contract# 15294-2011)
(CAD).
HIGH DENSITY ARRAY (SNPS/CNVS) IN GENETIC DIAGNOSIS
OF SYNDROMIC MORBID OBESITY: CHARACTERIZATION OF
NEW ALTERATIONS
R. Rodríguez-López1 , P. Méndez2 , M. González-Carpio1 , T. Herrera1 ,
M. García de Cáceres1 , P. Sánchez-Giralt3 , J. M. Carbonell1 , J.
Sáenz-Hurtado1 , E. Galán4 , M. Núñez-Estévez2
1
H OSPITAL I NFANTA C RISTINA , S ERVICIO E XTREMEÑO DE S ALUD,
Genetics Unit, Badajoz, Spain
2
H OSPITAL M ATERNO I NFANTIL, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit
3
H OSPITAL I NFANTA C RISTINA , S ERVICIO E XTREMEÑO DE S ALUD,
Nutrition, Badajoz, Spain
4
H OSPITAL M ATERNO I NFANTIL, Pediatrics Service
Abstract Text: Introduction: Study of extreme childhood obesity associated with mental retardation and/or birth defects (SMO). Molecular characterization of new alterations in susceptibility to overweight. Methods:
35 patients were referred to our Genetics Unit for undetermined SMO.
We carried out high-resolution karyotype, methylation test, the molecular
study of the Fragile X Syndrome and/or the technique of high-density arR
Whole-Genome 2.7M. Four patients were
rays Affymetrix Cytogenetics
candidate to automatic sequencing of high susceptibility genes to SMO.
Results: 2 patients showed the karyotypes 48, XXYY and 46, Xpsu idic
(X) (q11.1). 4 patients had Prader Willi syndrome. 6 carrying mutant
alleles of the FMR1 gene (2 Prader Willi-Like phenotypes). 7 patients
with abnormal karyotype showed the results of arrays SNPs / CNVs: arr
3q25.3-26.2 (156458348-169628863) x1; arr 6q25.2-25.3 (153209158156742509) x1; arr 10p14-15.1 (6293340-11996059) x1 ; arr10q26.2-qter
(127,593,771-qter) x1; arr 11p12p15.1 (18631687-39398819) x1 (Figure) and 17q11.1-11.2 arr (22,366,810 to 28,354,219) x3. In 12 patients
was not found any alteration; sequencing of the BDNF genes identified
the V66M polymorphism. 4 cases are still under study for suspected
Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Sotos and Kallmann, respectively.Conclusions:
We identified the causal genetic basis in 51% of our series. Array techniques allowed the accurate description of the genetic defect in 6 cases,
identifying new variants of susceptibility to obesity including the candidate genes: PTX3, BCHE, Serpin, SHOX, OPRM1, GATA3, BDNF and
TMEM97. Added to tagging sequencing will constitute an efficient alternative to the seeking a diagnosis, evaluation and management with higher
rates of prevention and curability in obesity.
172 accepted oral
Abstract Text: Introduction: In breast cancer, a dense layer of cancerassociated fibroblasts (CAFs) is formed around malignant epithelial
cells. These cells provide structural and functional support for tumour
growth but their origins remain debated. We have recently demonstrated
that surrounding adipocytes participate to tumour progression (Dirat et
al, Cancer Research 71:2455, 2011). Our current hypothesis is that
peritumoral adipocytes undergo reorientation into fibroblast-like cells and
may account for a part of the CAFs population. Methods : Cross-talk
between breast cancer cells and mature adipocytes was studied in
Abstracts Book Page 53
52
Obes Facts 2012;5(suppl 1):1–280
Abstracts
Downloaded by:
University of Florida, Gainesville and Jacksonville
128.227.24.141 - 10/26/2017 5:56:54 PM
ADIPOCYTE-DERIVED FIBROBLASTS CONTRIBUTE TO THE
DESMOPLASTIC REACTION IN BREAST CANCER: A NEW LINK
BETWEEN BREAST CANCER AND OBESITY?
C. Lehuédé1 , L. Bochet1 , S. Dauvillier1 , S. Le Gonidec2 , G. Escourrou3 ,
P. Valet2 , C. MULLER1
1
I NSTITUTE OF P HARMACOLOGY AND S TRUCTURAL B IOLOGY, Cancer
Biology, TOULOUSE, France
2
INSERM U1048 / I2MC, Toulouse, France
3
CHU R ANGUEIL, Service d’Anatomo-Pathologie
S ATURDAY, M AY 12, 2012
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by FIS, Health
Spanish Ministery, Spain and Fundesalud, Extremealth Public System,
Extremadura, Spain.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Research relating to this abstract was funded by FIS, Health
Spanish Ministery, Spain and Fundesalud, Extremealth Public System,
Extremadura, Spain.
T5:OS2 - Behaviour, Physical Activity and Nutrition
T5:OS2
- oral
Behaviour, Physical Activity and Nutri174 accepted
tion
CHANGE OF FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF ADIPOSE
TRIGLYCERIDES AFTER LOW CALORIE DIET AND WEIGHT
174
accepted oral - DIOGENES PROJECT
MAINTENANCE
M. Kunesova1 , P. Hlavaty1 , E. Tvrzická2 , B. Staňková2 , N. viguerie3 , D.
CHANGE
OF FATTY
ACID
COMPOSITION OF ADIPOSE
4
5
Langin3 , A. Astrup
, W. Saris
TRIGLYCERIDES
AFTER LOW
CALORIE
AND WEIGHT
1
I NSTITUTE OF E NDOCRINOLOGY
, Prague,
CzechDIET
Republic
MAINTENANCE
- DIOGENES
PROJECT
2
4 TH D EPT I1NTERNAL
M EDICINE
1
2
2
3
M.
3 Kunesova , P. Hlavaty , E. Tvrzická , B. Staňková , N. viguerie , D.
INSERM,
Toulouse,
France
3
4
4
Langin
, A. Astrup
, W. Saris,5IPM
C
OPENHAGEN
U
NIVERSITY
1
5 I NSTITUTE OF E NDOCRINOLOGY , Prague, Czech Republic
M AASTRICHT U NIVERSITY M EDICAL C ENTER, NUTRIM
2
4 TH D EPT I NTERNAL M EDICINE
3
INSERM, Toulouse, France
4
C OPENHAGEN
NIVERSITY , IPM
Abstract
Text: U
Background:
Fatty acid (FA) composition of adipose
5
M AASTRICHT
U NIVERSITY
M EDICAL
ENTER
triglycerides
(ATG)
reflects dietary
fat Cbut
also, NUTRIM
metabolic processing of
fatty acids. FA composition of ATG in obesity is influenced by weight
loss and maintenance. Objective: To assess the changes in fatty
Abstract
Text: Background:
Fattycomposition
acid (FA) composition
adipose
acid composition
of adipose FA
after weightofloss
and
triglycerides
reflects
dietary fatinbut
also metabolic
processing
of
maintenance(ATG)
in subjects
participating
DIOGENES,
paneuropean
study
fatty
acids. inFA
composition
of Europe
ATG in for
obesity
is influenced byAfter
weight
performed
8 centers
across
8 months.Methods:
an
loss
andlow
maintenance.
Objective:
assess
the changes
fatty
8-week
calorie diet (LCD)
subjectsTo
were
randomized
to 5 adinlibitum
acid
composition
adipose
FA composition
afterlipids
weight
loss and
diets for
6 months. of
Fatty
acid composition
in adipose
was assessed
maintenance
in subjects in
participating
in DIOGENES,
paneuropean
study
by gas chromatography
266 subjects.Results:
Significant
decrease
in
performed
centers across
Europe for
8 acids
months.Methods:
After
an
percentageinof8saturated
and monoenic
fatty
after LCD was
found,
8-week
calorie diet
(LCD)(14:0,
subjects
were 18:1n-7,
randomized
to 5 ad18:3n-3,
libitum
followedlow
by modest
increase
14:1n-5,
18:2n-6tt,
diets
months.
Fattychange
acid composition
in adipose
lipidsct)
was
assessed
20:0) for
or 6no
significant
(16:0, 16:1n-7,
18:2n-6
after
weight
by
gas chromatography
in 266 subjects.Results:
in
maintenance
diet and significant
decrease after 8Significant
months in decrease
comparison
percentage
of saturated
and monoenic fatty
LCD was
found,
with initial values
in all aforementioned
fatty acids
acids.after
Significant
increase
followed
by diet
modest
(14:0,
14:1n-5,
18:2n-6tt,
after LCD
wasincrease
observed,
followed
by18:1n-7,
decrease
(18:0, 18:3n-3,
18:1n-9,
20:0)
or nonosignificant
change (16:0,
16:1n-7,
18:2n-6
ct) after22:5n-3)
weight
20:3n-6),
change (20:1n-9,
20:2n-6,
20:4n-6,
22:4n-6,
maintenance
diet and significant
decrease
after 8 months
in comparison
or increase (22:6n-3)
after weight
maintenance.
In these
fatty acids
with
initial values
in after
all aforementioned
fatty
acids.
Significant
increase
significant
increase
the total 8 month
diet
was found
in comparison
after
LCD values.
diet was
observed, The
followed
byshow
decrease
(18:0,
18:1n-9,
with initial
Conclusion:
results
decrease
in saturated
20:3n-6),
no change (20:1n-9,
20:2n-6,
20:4n-6,
22:4n-6, (14:1n-5),
22:5n-3)
and monounsaturated
FA myristate
(14:0),
myristoleate
or
increase(16:0),
(22:6n-3)
after weight
maintenance.
In these(18:1n-7)
fatty acids
palmitate
palmitoleate
(16:1n-7)
and vaccenate
in
significant
increase after
theweight
total 8loss
month
diet was
found inmaintenance.
comparison
adipose triglycerides
after
followed
by weight
with
initial values.
Conclusion:
The
results show
decrease(18:0),
in saturated
Significant
increase
was found in
percentage
of stearate
oleate
and
monounsaturated
(14:0), myristoleate (14:1n-5),
(18:1n-9),
and PUFA n-6 FA
and myristate
n-3.
palmitate
palmitoleate
(16:1n-7) and vaccenate (18:1n-7) in
Conflict of(16:0),
Interest:
None Disclosed
adipose
by weight maintenance.
Funding:triglycerides
Funded byafter
EC weight
contractloss
no. followed
FP6-2005-513946
and Internal
Significant
increase
was
found in
percentage
Grant Agency
Ministry
of Health
IGA
NS 9830-4of stearate (18:0), oleate
(18:1n-9), and PUFA n-6 and n-3.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Funded by EC contract no. FP6-2005-513946 and Internal
Grant
Agency oral
Ministry of Health IGA NS 9830-4
175 accepted
BREAKFAST CONTAINING EGG PROTEINS INDUCES GREATER
SATIETY COMPARED TO A BREAKFAST WITH LOWER PROTEIN
175 accepted oral
BREAKFAST
EGG PROTEINS INDUCES GREATER
Abstracts BookCONTAINING
Page 54
SATIETY COMPARED TO A BREAKFAST WITH LOWER PROTEIN
Abstracts
Abstracts Book Page 54
175
accepted oral
O RAL S ESSIONS
QUALITY
N. Dhurandhar1 , B. Bayham1 , F. Greenway1 , W. Johnson1
BREAKFAST
PROTEINS INDUCES GREATER
1
P ENNINGTONCONTAINING
B IOMEDICAL REGG
ESEARCH C ENTER
SATIETY COMPARED TO A BREAKFAST WITH LOWER PROTEIN
QUALITY
1
1
1
N.
Dhurandhar
B. Bayham1 , F. Greenway
, W. Johnson
Abstract
Text: , Background:Weight
loss diets
containing high protein
1
Abstracts
Bookhave
Page
54 short-term
P ENNINGTON
B IOMEDICAL
R ESEARCH
C ENTER
quantity
(HP)
only
success.
Increasing protein quality
vs protein quantity remains under-investigated for long-term weight loss
success. Given the high quality of egg proteins, we compared the satiatAbstract
Text:
Background:Weight
diets containing
high protein
ing effect of
an egg
breakfast(EB) to aloss
ready-to-eat
cereal breakfast(CB)
quantity
have only
short-term
Increasing
proteinbut
quality
matched(HP)
for energy
density(ED)
andsuccess.
macronutrient
composition
with
vs
proteinprotein
quantity
remains
under-investigated
for long-term
loss
differing
quality.
Methods:Using
a crossover
design,weight
20 healthy
success.
Given
the high
quality
of egg
proteins, to
weeat
compared
overweight
or obese
subjects
were
randomized
an EB orthe
CBsatiatdaily
ing
effect
of an eggfor
breakfast(EB)
to aaready-to-eat
cerealperiod
breakfast(CB)
under
supervision
one week with
2-week washout
between
matched
for energy
density(ED)
andeach
macronutrient
butlunch
with
cross-over.
On days
1 and 7 of
test week,composition
a structured
differing
proteinadquality.
a crossover
design,scores,
20 healthy
was provided
libitum.Methods:Using
Food intake, hunger
and satiety
and
overweight
or obese
subjects
were before
randomized
to eat
an EB or
CBlunch.
daily
blood parameters
were
measured
and after
breakfast
and
under
supervision for
withlunch(p=0.02),
a 2-week washout
between
Results:Subjects
felt one
fullerweek
before
and period
their lunchtime
cross-over.
On days
days 11 and
and 77 was
of each
week,
structured lunch
food intake for
lowertest
during
thea EB-week(p=0.05)
was
provided
adCB-week.
libitum. Food
intake,
hunger
satiety scores,
and
compared
to the
On days
1 and
7, the and
EB significantly
reduced
blood
parameters
were
measured
before and
after
breakfast
and lunch.
acylated
ghrelin and
increased
PYY3-36
before
lunch
compared
to the
Results:Subjects
felt180
fuller
beforepost-EB,
lunch(p=0.02),
CB. Before lunch at
minutes
subjectsand
had their
lowerlunchtime
acylated
food
intake for days
and 7 PYY3-36(p=0.001)
was lower during the
EB-week(p=0.05)
ghrelin(p=0.005)
and 1higher
concentrations
which
compared
to the
the feeling
CB-week.
On days
1 and 7, the EB significantly
may explain
of satiety.
Conclusions:Diets
with higherreduced
protein
acylated
ghrelin
and satiety,
increased
PYY3-36
before
lunch compared
to the
quality may
enhance
leading
to better
compliance
and success
of
CB.
Before
minutes
had lower
acylated
a weight
losslunch
diet. at
By180
obviating
thepost-EB,
need for subjects
higher protein
quantity,
such
ghrelin(p=0.005)
PYY3-36(p=0.001)
concentrations
which
an approach mayand
alsohigher
alleviate
concerns about their
potential adverse
may
explain
the feeling
of satiety.
Conclusions:Diets
with
higher protein
effects.
Long-term
weight
loss trials
to compare the
manipulation
of
quality
enhance
leading
to better
compliance
and
success of
protein may
quality
withoutsatiety,
increasing
protein
quantity
should be
explored.
a
weight loss
diet. ByNone
obviating the need for higher protein quantity, such
Conflict
of Interest:
an
approach
may also
Funding:
American
Eggalleviate
Board concerns about their potential adverse
effects. Long-term weight loss trials to compare the manipulation of
protein quality without increasing protein quantity should be explored.
Conflict of Interest: None
Funding:
American
176 accepted
oral Egg Board
PSYCHO-EDUCATION REDUCES GESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN
IN OBESE PREGNANT WOMEN: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED
176
accepted oral
TRIAL
A. Bogaerts1 , R. Devlieger2 , E. Nuyts3 , I. Witters4 , W. Gyselaers5 , I.
PSYCHO-EDUCATION
REDUCES GESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN
Guelinckx6 , B. Van den Bergh7
IN
1 OBESE PREGNANT WOMEN: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED
KHL
IM -PHL, Healthcare Research, Hasselt, Belgium
TRIAL
2
U NIVERSITY
OSPITALS
Department
of Obstetrics
1
2 KUL EUVEN
4
5
, R. HDevlieger
, E. Nuyts3 , ,I. Witters
, W. Gyselaers
, I.
A. Bogaerts
Gynaecology,
Leuven, Belgium7
6
3
Guelinckx
, B. Van Research
den Bergh
PHL,
Healthcare
1
4 KHL IM -PHL, Healthcare Research, Hasselt, Belgium
E AST L IMBURG H OSPITAL, Prenatal diagnosis
2
5 U NIVERSITY H OSPITALS KUL EUVEN , Department of Obstetrics
E AST L IMBURG H OSPITAL, Department of Obstetrics Gynaecology
6
Gynaecology,
Belgium
C ATHOLIC ULeuven,
NIVERSITY
OF L EUVEN , Department of Public Health and
3
PHL, Healthcare
Research
Clinical
Nutrition, Food
and Health Research Centre
4
7 E AST L IMBURG H OSPITAL , Prenatal diagnosis
T ILBURG U NIVERSITY, Department of Psychology
5
E AST L IMBURG H OSPITAL, Department of Obstetrics Gynaecology
6
C ATHOLIC U NIVERSITY OF L EUVEN, Department of Public Health and
Clinical
Nutrition,
Food and Health
Research
Centre
Abstract
Text: Introduction:
In order
to reduce
perinatal complications
7
ILBURGpregnant
U NIVERSITY
, Department
of Psychology
in Tobese
women,
guidelines
for adequate gestational weight
gain(GWG) were developed. The study aim was to evaluate how a
prenatal psycho-educational program for obese pregnant women affects
Abstract
Text: of
Introduction:
In weight
order toasreduce
perinatal
GWG, method
delivery, birth
well as
levels ofcomplications
anxiety and
in
obese pregnant
women,
for adequate
weight
depression.
Method:
205 guidelines
obese pregnant
women gestational
were randomized
gain(GWG)
were
developed.
The group
study and
aim was
to evaluate how
a
into a control
group,
a brochure
an experimental
group,
prenatal
program for obese
pregnant
women affects
receivingpsycho-educational
4 prenatal psycho-education
sessions.
Anxiety(STAI)
and
GWG,
method
of delivery,
birthmeasured
weight asduring
well asthe
levels
anxiety and
depressed
mood(EDS)
were
first,of second
and
depression.
205 obeseMultivariate
pregnant women
were randomized
third trimesterMethod:
of pregnancy.
linear regression(GWG),
into
a control
group, a brochure
groupproportional
and an experimental
group,
logistic
regression(method
of delivery),
odds models(birth
receiving
4 prenatal
psycho-education
sessions. Anxiety(STAI)
weight) and
linear mixed
effects models(STAI/EDS),
controlling and
for
depressed
mood(EDS)
were
measured
during the
first,
second
and
demographic
variables and
medical
complications
were
used.
Results:
third
trimester
of pregnancy.
Multivariate
linear
regression(GWG),
We found
a significant
reduction of
GWG in the
brochure
and prenatal
logistic
proportional
odds
models(birth
session regression(method
group compared to of
thedelivery),
control group.
Moreover,
high
motivation
weight)
andeating
linearbehavior,
mixed effects
controlling
for
to change
higher models(STAI/EDS),
parity, stressful events
in history
demographic
variables
and medical
were on
used.
Results:
and no alcohol
consumption
had acomplications
negative impact
GWG,
while
We
foundwith
a significant
reduction
of GWG in
the brochure
and trimester
prenatal
women
higher levels
of depressed
mood
in the third
session
group higher
compared
to the
group.
Moreover,
high motivation
demonstrated
GWG.
No control
differences
were
demonstrated
between
to
change
eating
behavior,
higher parity,
stressful
events
history
three
groups
for method
of delivery
and birth
weight.
For inevolution
and
no alcohol
consumption
had amood,
negative
impact on GWG,
in levels
of anxiety
and depressed
no differences
betweenwhile
the
women
with higher
levels
depressed mood
in the
thirdGWG
trimester
three groups
of obese
wereof mentioned.
However,
higher
and
demonstrated
higher GWG.
differences
were
between
parity had significant
positiveNo
effects
on levels
of demonstrated
anxiety and depressed
three
for interdependence
method of delivery
and birth weight.
Forand
evolution
mood,groups
indicating
of psychological
variables
GWG.
in
levels of anxiety
depressed
mood,
differences
between of
the
Conclusion:
These and
findings
can justify
the no
clinical
implementation
a
three
groups of obese
wereinmentioned.
However,
GWG and
psycho-educational
program
order to reduce
GWG higher
and psychological
parity
had significant
on levels of anxiety and depressed
vulnerability
in obese positive
pregnanteffects
women.
mood,
indicating
interdependence
of psychological
variables and GWG.
Conflict
of Interest:
Conflict of interest:
none
Conclusion:
These AB
findings
can justifyby
the
clinicalproject
implementation
of a
Funding: Funding:
was supported
a PWO
from Flanders.
psycho-educational
program
in order
reduce
GWG and
psychological
RD is senior clinical
researcher
for toFWO
Flanders
(2010-2015)
and
vulnerability
in obese
BVDB is funded
bypregnant
a grant women.
of the European Science Foundation
Conflict
of Interest:
Conflict
of interest:
none Health) and by EU 7th
(EuroSTRESS
programme
’Stress
and Mental
Funding:
was supported
by a PWO project from Flanders.
FrameworkFunding:
Program AB
BrainAGE
(2012-2017).
RD is senior clinical researcher for FWO Flanders (2010-2015) and
BVDB is funded by a grant of the European Science Foundation
(EuroSTRESS programme ’Stress and Mental Health) and by EU 7th
Framework Program BrainAGE (2012-2017).
Obes Facts 2012;5(suppl 1):1–280
53
psycho-ed
vulnerabil
Conflict o
Funding:
RD is se
BVDB is
(EuroSTR
Framewo
Downloaded by:
University of Florida, Gainesville and Jacksonville
128.227.24.141 - 10/26/2017 5:56:54 PM
(18:1n-9), and PUFA n-6 and n-3.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: Funded by EC contract no. FP6-2005-513946 and Internal
Grant Agency Ministry of Health IGA NS 9830-4 O RAL S ESSIONS
S ATURDAYmay
, M AY
2012
saturday,
12,12,
2012oral
sessions
LT can be maintained after significant weight-loss if cardiorespiratory
adaptations have been achieved through exercise training.
Conflict of Interest: NONE
O
RAL S ESSIONS
S ATURDAY, M AY
12,12,2012
Funding: NONE
oral
sessionssaturday,
may
2012
O RAL S ESSIONS
S ATURDAY, M AY 12, 2012
177 accepted oral
SEVERELY OBESE CHILDREN, BUT NOT SEVERELY OBESE
ADOLESCENTS,
177
accepted oral RESPOND TO BEHAVIORAL
P. Danielsson1 , J. Kowalski1 , O. Ekblom1 , C. Marcus1
1
SEVERELY
OBESE
CHILDREN,
NOT SEVERELY
K AROLINSKA
I NSTITUTET
, DisciplineBUT
of Paediatrics
and ChildOBESE
Health,
ADOLESCENTS,
Stockholm, SwedenRESPOND TO BEHAVIORAL
1
1
1
1
P. Danielsson , J. Kowalski , O. Ekblom , C. Marcus
1
K AROLINSKA I NSTITUTET, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health,
Abstract Text:
Objective: To investigate the extent to which the degree
Stockholm,
Sweden
of obesity predicts the efficacy of long-term behavioral treatment and
to explore any interaction with age.Subjects: Children aged 616 who
started behavioral
obesity To
treatment
at the
Abstract
Text: Objective:
investigate
theNational
extent toChildhood
which the Obesity
degree
Center
during
19982006.Method:
In a three-year
longitudinal
of
obesity
predicts
the efficacy of long-term
behavioral
treatmentstudy,
and
obese
children
were divided
three age Children
groups (69,
and
to
explore
any interaction
withinto
age.Subjects:
aged1013,
616 who
1416 years)
and further
two groups,
depending
on the Obesity
degree
started
behavioral
obesity into
treatment
at the National
Childhood
of obesity,
as 19982006.Method:
moderately obese, In
BMIa SDS
< 3.51.6,
and severely
Center
during
three-year
longitudinal
study,
obese, children
BMI SDSwere
≥ 3.5.Results:
(313 females
and and
330
obese
divided into 643
threechildren
age groups
(69, 1013,
males)years)
met the
criteria.
In the group
of moderately
obese
1416
andinclusion
further into
two groups,
depending
on the degree
children
theas
youngest
age obese,
group showed
a clinically
good
in
of
obesity,
moderately
BMI SDS
< 3.51.6,
anddecline
severely
BMI SDS.
efficacy was643
lesschildren
pronounced
in the older
age
obese,
BMITreatment
SDS ≥ 3.5.Results:
(313 females
and 330
groups, met
but still
significant
treatment
effect
could
observed.obese
The
males)
the ainclusion
criteria.
In the
group
of be
moderately
severely obese
young children
showed
an even
larger effect
of treatment,
children
the youngest
age group
showed
a clinically
good
decline in
whereas
adolescents
showed
change
in BMI inSDS
all after
BMI
SDS.the
Treatment
efficacy
was no
less
pronounced
the atolder
age
three years.
In the
1013-year-old
age group,
the severely
obese boys
groups,
but still
a significant
treatment
effect could
be observed.
The
showed obese
a significantly
greatershowed
mean decrease
in BMI
SDS
than girls
severely
young children
an even larger
effect
of treatment,
(P < 0.001).The
severely showed
obese children
withinnormal-weight
whereas
the adolescents
no change
BMI SDS at mothers
all after
had a years.
larger mean
in BMIage
SDS
compared
to thoseobese
with obese
three
In thedecrease
1013-year-old
group,
the severely
boys
mothers a
(Psignificantly
= 0.04). Conclusion:
Behavioral
treatment
is successful
showed
greater mean
decrease
in BMI
SDS thanwhen
girls
initiated
early in life
both for
moderately
obese children.
(P
< 0.001).The
severely
obese
children and
withseverely
normal-weight
mothers
Adolescents
with severe
obesity
effect attoall
of behavioural
had
a larger mean
decrease
in BMIshow
SDSno
compared
those
with obese
treatment.
mothers
(P = 0.04). Conclusion: Behavioral treatment is successful when
Conflict early
of Interest:
Nonefor
Disclosed
initiated
in life both
moderately and severely obese children.
Funding: No with
Funding
Adolescents
severe obesity show no effect at all of behavioural
treatment.
Conflict of Interest: None Disclosed
Funding: No Funding
178 accepted oral
IS THE ENERGY COST OF EXERCISE TRAINING REDUCED AFTERaccepted
A DIET-PLUS-EXERCISE
WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTION?
178
oral
N. Byrne1 , R. Wood1 , A. Hills2
1 THE ENERGY COST OF EXERCISE TRAINING REDUCED AFIS
Q UEENSLAND U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY, Institute of Health and
TER
A DIET-PLUS-EXERCISE
WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTION?
Biomedical
Innovation, Brisbane, Australia
2 Byrne1 , R. Wood1 , A. Hills2
N.
M ATER M EDICAL R ESEARCH I NSTITUTE, Griffith University, Brisbane,
1
Australia
Q UEENSLAND U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY, Institute of Health and
Biomedical Innovation, Brisbane, Australia
2
M ATER M EDICAL R ESEARCH I NSTITUTE, Griffith University, Brisbane,
Abstract Text: Introduction: It is well recognised that the energy cost
Australia
per unit movement decreases with weight loss. However, the influence
of diet-plus-exercise induced weight loss on the energy cost of exercise
training remains
unclear.Methods:
Forty-two
sedentary
but otherAbstract
Text: Introduction:
It is well
recognised
that obese
the energy
cost
per
movement
decreases with
weight
However,
influence
) were
randomlythe
assigned
to
wiseunit
healthy
adults (43±11yrs;
30-56
kg/m2loss.
of
diet-plus-exercise induced
weight(VLED+Ex),
loss on thelow-fat-diet
energy cost
of exercise
very-low-energy-diet
plus exercise
plus
training
unclear.Methods:
Forty-two
sedentary
obese butgroups
other(LF+Ex),remains
and control
(C) groups. Exercise
training
for intervention
2
included
fouradults
aerobic
sessions30-56
at the
lactate
threshold
(LT)
and two
) were
randomly
assigned
to
wise
healthy
(43±11yrs;
kg/m
resistance training sessions
per week.
Assessments
of maximal
aerobic
very-low-energy-diet
plus exercise
(VLED+Ex),
low-fat-diet
plus exercise
power (VO2max;
indirect
calorimetry)
andtraining
LT (finger-prick
blood)groups
via a
(LF+Ex),
and control
(C) groups.
Exercise
for intervention
graded treadmill
test and
body composition
(viathreshold
DXA) were
undertaken
included
four aerobic
sessions
at the lactate
(LT)
and two
during energy
balance
pre- and
There were
no
resistance
training
sessions
per post-intervention.Results:
week. Assessments of maximal
aerobic
significant
changes
in weight,
VO2maxand
or LT
the C group.
VLED+Ex
power
(VO2max;
indirect
calorimetry)
LTin(finger-prick
blood)
via a
lost more
weight and
than LF+Ex
vsundertaken
5.7±2.4kg
graded
treadmill
test fat
andmass
body(FM)
composition
(via(18.6±5.2
DXA) were
and 15.9±5.1
vs 3.9±3.0kg;
P<0.001). Both VLED+Ex
andwere
LF+Ex
during
energy balance
pre- and post-intervention.Results:
There
no
displayed significant
(P<0.05)
in VO2max
4.2±3.6
significant
changes in
weight, increases
VO2max or
LT in the(7.6±5.8
C group. vsVLED+Ex
ml/kg/min),
whereas
increase
in than
LT was
significant
for VLED+Ex
only
lost
more weight
and the
fat mass
(FM)
LF+Ex
(18.6±5.2
vs 5.7±2.4kg
(3.9±1.8
vs 1.3±1.5
ml/kg/min).
Despite Both
substantial
weight
the
and
15.9±5.1
vs 3.9±3.0kg;
P<0.001).
VLED+Ex
andloss,
LF+Ex
absolute energy
cost(P<0.05)
of exercise
at LTindid
not change
overvsthe
interdisplayed
significant
increases
VO2max
(7.6±5.8
4.2±3.6
vention (VLED+Ex:10.2±1.9
vs 11.0±2.2
LF+Ex:10.3±2.5
vs
ml/kg/min),
whereas the increase
in LT waskcal/min;
significant
for VLED+Ex only
10.5±2.9 vs
kcal/min).
despite
marked
increases
in mechanical
(3.9±1.8
1.3±1.5 Further,
ml/kg/min).
Despite
substantial
weight
loss, the
work to achieve
LT, the
perceivedat effort
and
absolute
energy cost
of exercise
LT didwas
notcomparable
change overbefore
the interafter the(VLED+Ex:10.2±1.9
intervention: VLED+Ex
(12.7±1.6
vs 12.5±1.2)
and LF+Ex
vention
vs 11.0±2.2
kcal/min;
LF+Ex:10.3±2.5
vs
(12.1±1.6 kcal/min).
vs 12.9±1.6).Conclusion:
The energy
cost of
exercise at
10.5±2.9
Further, despite marked
increases
in mechanical
LT can
maintained
significant
if cardiorespiratory
work
to be
achieve
LT, theafter
perceived
effortweight-loss
was comparable
before and
adaptations
have been achieved
exercise
training. and LF+Ex
after
the intervention:
VLED+Exthrough
(12.7±1.6
vs 12.5±1.2)
Conflict of vs
Interest:
NONE
(12.1±1.6
12.9±1.6).Conclusion:
The energy cost of exercise at
Funding:
LT
can beNONE
maintained after significant weight-loss if cardiorespiratory
adaptations have been achieved through exercise training.
Conflict of Interest: NONE
Funding: NONE
179 accepted oral
179
accepted
oral STUDY WITH REGISTER LINKAGE
TIONAL
COHORT
E. Hemmingsson1 , K. Johansson1 , J. Sundstrom2 , M. Neovius1 , C.
DROPOUT
DURING COMMERCIAL WEIGHT LOSS: OBSERVAMarcus3
1
TIONAL
COHORT
STUDY
WITH REGISTER
LINKAGE
K AROLINSKA
I NSTITUTE
, Department
of Medicine,
Stockholm, Sweden
2 Hemmingsson1 , K. Johansson1 , J. Sundstrom2 , M. Neovius1 , C.
E.
U PPSALA U NIVERSITY, Department of Medical Sciences
3
3
K AROLINSKA
I NSTITUTE, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention
Marcus
1
and
Technology,I NSTITUTE
Stockholm,
Sweden of Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden
K AROLINSKA
, Department
2
U PPSALA U NIVERSITY, Department of Medical Sciences
3
K AROLINSKA I NSTITUTE, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention
Abstract
Text: Stockholm,
Introduction:
Dropout during commercial weight loss
and
Technology,
Sweden
is unclear. Methods: Observational data on weight loss and dropout
from the commercial weight loss company Itrim (Sweden) were
linked withText:
national
health registers.
The cohort
consisted
of 8361
Abstract
Introduction:
Dropout during
commercial
weight
loss
consecutively-enrolled
on adata
1-year
(cost:
is
unclear. Methods: participants
Observational
on weight
weightloss
lossprogram
and dropout
$1300/e1000).
Weight loss
was induced
by 6-10 weeks
VLCD (n=3773;
from
the commercial
weight
loss company
Itrim (Sweden)
were
2
linked
with national
health
registers.
The cohort
consisted
of 8361
, 80%
women;
age 45±12y)
or meal
replacements
BMI 34±5kg/m
2
consecutively-enrolled
participants
on a 1-year
weight loss
program
(n=4588; BMI 30±4kg/m
, 86% women,
age 50±11y),
followed
by (cost:
a diet
$1300/e1000).
Weight loss program.
was induced
by 6-10 weeks
VLCDtreated
(n=3773;
and exercise maintenance
At baseline,
18% were
for
2
, 80%
women; age
45±12y)
or for
meal
replacements
BMI
34±5kg/m
hypertension,
12%
for depression,
8% for
CVD, 7%
dyslipidemia,
3%
2
for diabetes,
for cancer,
andwomen,
1% for age
psychosis.
Logistic
regression
(n=4588;
BMI2%
30±4kg/m
, 86%
50±11y),
followed
by a diet
was exercise
used to identify
predictors
of dropout
at 1 year.
In crude
and
maintenance
program.
At baseline,
18%Results:
were treated
for
analysis, weight
change
for VLCD8%
(completers)
was
hypertension,
12%
for depression,
for CVD, 7%
for -13.9±8.1kg
dyslipidemia,with
3%
18%
dropout.2%
Weight
change
for1%
meal
(completers)
was
for
diabetes,
for cancer,
and
for replacements
psychosis. Logistic
regression
-8.8±5.9kg
23%predictors
dropout. ofIndropout
multivariable
analysis,
use In
of crude
meal
was
used to with
identify
at 1 year.
Results:
replacements
remained
with dropoutwas
compared
to VLCD
analysis,
weight
change associated
for VLCD (completers)
-13.9±8.1kg
with
(oddsdropout.
ratio, OR:Weight
1.5). Independent
predictors
of dropout(completers)
within the VLCD
18%
change for meal
replacements
was
2
-8.8±5.9kg
23% <40y
dropout.
In multivariable
analysis,
use of meal
vs
group were with
low age
vs ≥60y
(OR: 4.4), low
BMI <30kg/m
replacements
remained
associated
with1.4),
dropout
compared (OR:
to VLCD
≥40kg/m2 (OR:
1.6), depression
(OR:
and psychosis
2.6).
(odds
OR: 1.5).
Independent
predictors
of of
dropout
within
the
VLCD
Withinratio,
the meal
replacement
group,
predictors
dropout
were
low
age
2
2
2
vs
group
were
low(OR:
age 2.6),
<40y low
vs ≥60y
(OR: 4.4),
BMI <30kg/m
<40y vs
≥60y
BMI <30kg/m
vslow
≥40kg/m
(OR: 2.2),
2
≥40kg/m
(OR: (OR:
1.6), 1.4).
depression
(OR: for
1.4),CVD,
and cancer,
psychosis
(OR: 2.6).
and depression
Treatment
hypertension,
Within
the meal
group,
predictors with
of dropout
low age
dyslipidemia,
andreplacement
diabetes was
not associated
dropout.were
Conclusion:
2 increased risk
While vs
dropout
we<30kg/m
noted an
of dropout
<40y
≥60ywas
(OR:generally
2.6), lowlow,
BMI
vs ≥40kg/m2 (OR:
2.2),
with low
age, low(OR:
BMI, 1.4).
depression
and psychosis.
and
depression
Treatment
for CVD, cancer, hypertension,
Conflict of Interest:
Erik Hemmingsson
has received
consultancy
fees
dyslipidemia,
and diabetes
was not associated
with dropout.
Conclusion:
from Itrim.
Martin
Neovius, low,
Johan
and Claude
are
While
dropout
was generally
we Sundstrm
noted an increased
riskMarcus
of dropout
members
of Itrim’s
Scientific
Advisory
with
low age,
low BMI,
depression
andBoard.
psychosis.
Funding:ofThis
studyErik
wasHemmingsson
funded by Itrim
The funding
Conflict
Interest:
hasInternational.
received consultancy
fees
source
was Martin
not involved
in the
analysis
of data,
did not
readare
or
from
Itrim.
Neovius,
Johan
Sundstrm
and and
Claude
Marcus
comment
on
any
version
of
the
abstract.
members of Itrim’s Scientific Advisory Board.
Funding: This study was funded by Itrim International. The funding
source was not involved in the analysis of data, and did not read or
comment on any version of the abstract.
DROPOUT DURING COMMERCIAL WEIGHT LOSS: OBSERVA179 accepted oral
Abstracts Book Page 55
54
Obes Facts 2012;5(suppl 1):1–280
Abstracts
Abstracts Book Page 55
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