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National Geographic Kids May 2017

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I
U
G
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HELP SET D RECORD!
WORL
DARE TO EXPLORE
natgeokids.com
Cheetah
REVEALED!
MAY 2017
See page
9.
stopthepress
In This Issue
Executive Vice President, Kids and Family
Melina Gerosa Bellows
Vice President, Content
Jennifer Emmett
Editor in Chief and Vice President, Kids Magazines & Digital
Rachel Buchholz
Vice President, Visual Identity
Eva Absher-Schantz
Design Director, Magazines Eileen O’Tousa-Crowson
Editorial Andrea Silen, Senior Editor / Digital Producer;
Kay Boatner, Senior Editor / Digital Producer;
Allyson Shaw, Associate Editor / Digital Producer;
Rose Davidson, Assistant Editor / Digital Producer
Art Kathryn Robbins, Senior Designer;
Meghan Irving, Assistant Designer
Photo Shannon Hibberd, Senior Photo Editor;
Hilary Andrews, Associate Photo Editor
Production Sean Philpotts, Director
Digital Laura Goertzel, Director;
Natalie Jones, Senior Product Manager;
Tirzah Weiskotten, Video Manager
Administration Michelle Tyler, Editorial Assistant
WINNERS!
p. 14
Turbo-Cheetah
Scientists use cutting-edge
technology to investigate
this cat’s mysterious skills.
16
PUBLISHED BY NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PARTNERS, LLC
Chief Executive Officer
Declan Moore
Chairman of the Board of Directors
Gary E. Knell
Executive Vice President, Consumer Products
Rosa Zeegers
SUBSCRIBE TO NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS!
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20
Future World:
Transportation
Find out how you might get
around in the year 2060.
Advertising Offices Kim Connaghan, Vice President, Publisher
(212) 822-7431; Bob Amberg, National Brand Director
(212) 822-7437; Detroit Karen Sarris (248) 368-6304;
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Strategy and Business Development
Nathan Moore, Vice President
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Senior Vice President; Jennifer Jones, Business Manager;
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Manufacturing Phillip L. Schlosser, Senior Vice President,
Production Services; Rachel Faulise, Manager
Finance Jeannette Swain, Senior Budget Manager;
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Richard J. Brown, New Business Director
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Advertising Production Kristin Semeniuk, Director;
Julie A. Ibinson, Specialist
Publicity Caitlin Holbrook, Publicist (202) 912-6714
Parents, contact us online: kids@natgeo.com
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS (ISSN 1542-3042) is published ten times a year
by National Geographic Partners, LLC, Washington, DC 20036. For more
information contact natgeo.com/info.
Periodical postage paid at Washington, DC, and additional mailing
offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
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The submission of photographs and other material to NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
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accept liability for loss or damage.
PHOTO
CONTEST
22
Scaly Superheroes
Discover the hidden powers
of the pangolin.
LOL Science
24
Get the scoop on some
hilarious experiments.
Buried Secrets
26
Who built the Sphinx, an
ancient Egyptian monument?
Departments
4 Weird But True!
5 Incredible Animal Friends
6 Awesome 8
A Note to Parents
7 What Would Happen?
8 Guinness World Records
10 Bet You Didn’t Know
11 Cool Inventions
12 Amazing Animals
28 Fun Stuff
Parents: Follow us on Twitter @NGKids and like us on Facebook. For
corrections and clarifications, go online. natgeo.com/corrections
National Geographic Kids occasionally makes its member and subscriber
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in this manner, you can remove it by returning this coupon.
Do not make my name and address available to other organizations.
Please note that Nat Geo Kids will not disclose your child’s name
for marketing or promotional purposes.
Please include a current magazine
label with this coupon, and mail
your request to:
National Geographic Kids
Customer Service
P.O. Box 62135
Tampa, FL 33662-2135
COVER: ARCO IMAGES GMBH / ALAMY (CHEETAH); ANDY ROUSE / MINDEN PICTURES (PENGUIN); MONDOLITHIC (DRONE), ECCO / SHUTTERSTOCK (SKY), (IMAGE
DIGITALLY COMPOSED). PAGE 3: © STEPHEN BELCHER / MINDEN PICTURES (CHEETAH); MONDOLITHIC (FUTURE WORLD ART); CHRISTIAN BOIX / AFRICA GEOGRAPHIC
(PANGOLIN); KARL WEST (LOL SCIENCE ART); PIUS LEE / SHUTTERSTOCK (SPHINX)
BY JEANNETTE SWAIN AND AVERY ELIZABETH HURT
outrageous facts.
Bonobos
raspberries
for attention.
RCH
RESEATS THAT
S
SUGGEPUSES HAVE
OCTO BRAINS.
9
ONE SPECIES
OF BIRD
TAP-DANCES
cue the
music!
rld’sg
o
w
The speedin
first
t
e
k
c
ti otorist
a moing
g
8
s
to
given
s
a
w
mile
TO ATTRACT
our.
an h
MATES.
YOUR BODY’S SMELL—OR
AS
— IS
UNIQUE AS
“ODORPRINT”
YOUR FINGERPRINTS.
TOMATOES
CAN BE
PURPLE.
4
MAY 2017
nd
The entire la ed States
nit t in the
area of the U
could fi
GET MORE!
Sahara .
o an
n
CYRIL RUOSO / MINDEN PICTURES (BONOBOS); ZIGZAG MOUNTAIN ART / SHUTTERSTOCK (TOMATOES); OCEANBODHI / GETTY IMAGES (OCTOPUS); JURGEN AND CHRISTINE SOHNS / FLPA / MINDEN PICTURES (WOLF); WUTTICHOK PANICHIWARAPUN / SHUTTERSTOCK (SAND); JOHN
KARMALI / FLPA / MINDEN PICTURES (BIRD), © YURIY CHABAN / DREAMSTIME (TOP HAT), IMAGE DIGITALLY COMPOSED
A
ediblneds
BY ELISABETH DEFFNER
Frie
KILDARE ANIMAL FOUNDATION (MAIN IMAGE, INSET OF PAIR); THOMAS HINSCHE / GETTY IMAGES (RABBIT
IN SIDEBAR); MATHIAS SCHAEF / MCPHOTO / ULLSTEIN BILD VIA GETTY IMAGES (PIGEON IN SIDEBAR)
BIRD HANGS OUT
WITH BUNNY
EUROPEAN
RABBIT
WEIGHT
up to 5 pounds
DIET
grass, bark, buds,
and roots
ALL GROWN UP
Bunnies become
independent after
about a month.
DISTRESS SIGNAL
They thump their feet
when threatened.
Kildare, Ireland
Bunny the European rabbit and Pidg the common pigeon didn’t
let anything come between their friendship—even a wall!
The animals were found weak and alone, and were brought separately to Kildare Animal Foundation Wildlife Unit. Both needed to
stay warm to survive, but volunteer Aideen McGee only had one
incubator. So she put the rabbit and the bird inside together, setting a cardboard wall between them so they’d each have their own
space. Later when McGee went to check on the duo, she saw that
Bunny had knocked down the barrier and was cuddling with Pidg!
McGee took away the cardboard wall so the animals could
snuggle 24/7. Shortly after, Bunny became sick, and Pidg refused
to leave the rabbit’s side.“The bird comforted Bunny and kept
him going,” Kildare wildlife manager Dan Donoher says. Once
Bunny recovered, the friends spent their time eating together,
grooming each other, and curling up at naptime. About six months
after arriving at the rescue, Pidg and Bunny were released back
into the wild. They may no longer be side by side. But, when they
needed it most, these guys had each other’s backs.
COMMON
PIGEON
LENGTH
13 inches
DIET
seeds, grains, and fruit
EGG ALERT
It takes about 17 days
for their eggs to hatch.
ROCK ON
They’re sometimes
called rock doves.
you’re my
bff: bird
friend
forever!
PIDG AND BUNNY
COZY UP TO EACH
OTHER.
5
ANIMYNANLS
Y
L
G
U
Y
L
B
A
R
ER FL
ADO
BY SARAH WASSN
1
2
TURTLE HEAD
TURTLE NECK
What stands out about the mata mata turtle?
Nothing, really—unless you count its needlelike nose, bumpy body, long neck, and flat head.
Commonly found in the Amazon River, these
animals have awesome camouflage skills and
are often mistaken for a pile of leaves and mud.
BY A NOSE
My, what a big nose you have! The proboscis
monkey’s huge schnoz can grow to be up to a
quarter of the animal’s body length. These creatures are also some of the quickest swimmers in
the jungles of Borneo: Webbed feet help them
out-paddle predators like crocodiles.
3
FISH FACE
Sporting a permanent frowny face and
lumpy body, the endangered blobfish is one
weird-looking animal. Mostly found off the
coast of Australia, the fish has been voted
the official mascot of the Ugly Animal
Preservation Society.(For real!)
6
4
WORLD-FAMOUS PUP
With beady eyes and stringy whiskers, Mugly, a
Chinese crested from England, has a less-thanperfect appearance. That didn’t prevent lawmakers from choosing Mugly to turn on the
holiday lights at London’s Houses of Parliament.
5
GENTLE GIANT
With a manatee’s body andd a whale’s
whale s tail
tail, a
dugong looks like a peculiar mash-up of
mammals. These slow-moving sea-dwellers—
typically found in warm waters from Africa
to Australia—prefer a diet of sea grass.
CHECK OUT
THE BOOK!
7 SWEET BIRD
About 125 kakapos are left in New Zealand,
the only place where you can find these
flightless birds. Kakapos are parrots, but
their mossy feathers and plump bodies
make them look more like owls. Another
rare feature: They smell like honey!
6
MAY 2017
ODD DUCK
Muscovy ducks are recognizable
by the wartlike red growths that
cover their faces. But it’s only the
male Muscovy—which grows to be
twice as big as the female—that
sports this distinguishing mask.
SKIN AND BONES
8
TREVOR WATCHOUS / EYEEM / GETTY IMAGES (1); CYRIL RUOSO / NATURE PICTURE LIBRARY (2); KERRYN PARKINSON / NORFANZ / ZUMA PRESS / NEWSCOM (3); REX / SHUTTERSTOCK (4);
REINHARD DIRSCHERL / GETTY IMAGES (5); GSIMAGES / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO (6); TUI DE ROY / NATURE PICTURE LIBRARY (7); JOEL SARTORE / NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE (8)
e
awe
Whether it’s their hairless skin, their large
front teeth, or the fact that they eat each
other’s poop, naked mole rats aren’t going
to win any beauty competitions. But the
rodents are valued in the medical world:
Highly resilient to cancer, they’re helping
scientists research a cure for the disease.
BY CRISPIN BOYER
ART BY JOE ROCCO
What would happen if Earth
had rings like Saturn?
It’s good that Earth doesn’t have rings. Saturn’s rings are made
of countless pieces of rock and ice that can be as tiny as a grain
of sand or as big as a house. If Earth had similar rings, they’d be
positioned in a way that would block sunlight and cast a shadow
over the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during each
region’s winter. (That’s when the hemispheres are tilted away
from the sun.) Both areas would be darker and colder at these
times. With less light coming in, crops and plants that depend
on the sun to survive the season might die out. No thanks!
What would happen if
humans had tails?
If our tails were prehensile (meaning they could grip things), we
could use them as a third arm to carry groceries or open doors.
They’d change the way we communicate too. We’d make gestures
with our tails to express happiness, anger, and other emotions,
just as we do with our hands. In fact having tails might make it
harder for us to hide our feelings! Tails would also give us better
balance as they do with animals such as cats and monkeys. This
would make activities like climbing trees way easier.
wanna
play
marco
polo?
What would happen
if we could talk
with dolphins?
CHECK
OUT THE
BOOK!
Dolphins could give us the lowdown on the ocean,
describing some areas we’ve never been to.
That’s important, because humans have explored
less than five percent of the ocean. We could also
discover cool secrets about the animals, such
as how they produce the high-frequency clicks
they make for echolocation.(That’s when they
listen for their echoes to bounce off objects;
that determines if any obstacles are in their
path.) And dolphins and humans could coordinate
efforts to rescue travelers lost at sea or track
down people who harm the ocean by overfishing.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
7
HINGM
S
I
N
O
AST IES FRO F
STOR FILES O
THE
s
s
e
n
n
i
u
G
World
CANINE
CATCHER
Talk about going around in
circles. Zooming across
a airfield at more than
an
61 miles an hour, engineer Kevin Scott set
the record for fastest
monowheel motorcycle.
The monowheel, which
Scott helped build, is a
motorized wheel that has
a metal rim with a seat
attached at the bottom
so the driver can sit in
t wheel’s center. The bigthe
geest challenge was to avoid
doing “gerbils”— that’s when
the driver spins upside down
insidee the wheel instead of
staying at the bottom. Yikes!
MAY 2017
who
wants
to play
fetch?
SUPER
SWAB!
Purin the beagle holds the world record for
catching the most balls with her paws—14
catches in one minute. “People ask me why
soccer teams aren’t scouting her yet,”
owner Makoto Kumagai says. Purin, whose
name is the Japanese word for “pudding,”
practices her soccer moves for 15 minutes a
day at her home in Tokyo, Japan. In addition
to fielding goals, the four-pawed sports star
can do about a hundred other tricks, including jumping rope and skateboarding. This is
one dog that’s really
on the ball.
8
BY JAMIE KIFFEL-ALCHEH
Got a lot of earwax? Maybe
this will help! The world’s
largest cotton bud measures
18 feet 8.3 inches long. To
build the swab, Russell Lowe
used a giant tube for the
stick and bags of cotton
wrapped around Styrofoam
for the tips.“Once it was done,
it didn’t fit into my elevator,”
Lowe says.“So I had tocarry it
down 14 flights of stairs.” He
managed to walk the object
17 blocks to the middle of
New York City, where it was
measured beneath a statue
of Christopher Columbus.
“People thought we were
there to clean his ears!”
Lowe says.
GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS (PURIN, COTTON BUD, MONOWHEEL); INFORMATION PROVIDED BY © 2017 GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS LIMITED.
!
y
t
r
a
P
h
c
Laun o Ki a
e
d b t
Help Nat Ge
0
oll tubes
toilet-paper-rro
to build a rrocket
enough
sculpture big e
record.
to set the re
WORLD
RECORD!
So send us lots!
end us yo
1
2
3
4
FOLLOW THESE RULES TO HELP US SET THE RECORD:
Collect some toilet-paper-roll tubes.
They should not have any toilet paper on them.
The tubes can be any size or brand but must
have been used for toilet paper.
If you decorate your tubes, send in the permission
form below. (You don’t need to fill out the form if
you’re not decorating your tubes.)
Send as many tubes as you wish to
Nat Geo Kids/Set a Guinness World Record
1145 17th St.NW
Washington,DC 20036
Thanks to these
organizations
for their support:
National Geographic
Education
natgeoed.org
Girls Who Code
girlswhocode.com
FILL THIS OUT IF YOU DECORATED YOUR TUBE!
CHILD’S NAME:
DATE OF BIRTH:
themarsgeneration.org
DIY
diy.org
DreamUp
dreamup.org
DAY
YEAR
PARENT OR GUARDIAN NAME:
ubes!
Help
Nat Geo Kids and
Toyota Highlander
create the
world ’s largest
toilet-paper-roll
sculpture.
It’ll be
built in the
shape of a
rocket!
TUBES
MUST BE
RECEIVED BY
MAY 5,
2017.
ADDRESS:
MONTH
The Mars Generation
natgeokids
.com/
launch-party
Go online
to findout how to
build your own
model rocket, take
fun space quizzes,
and more!
natgeokids.com/
launch-party
PARENT OR GUARDIAN SIGNATURE:
By mailing in this form you verify this is your child’s original artwork. All
submissions become property of National Geographic Partners, and all rights
thereto are transferred to National Geographic Partners. Submissions cannot be
acknowledged or returned.
MRTNMCCN / DREAMSTIME (RED ROCKET); ECCO / SHUTTERSTOCK (SKY); FREEDOM_STUDIO /
SHUTTERSTOCK (TOILET-PAPER-ROLL TUBES); ROCKET IMAGES DIGITALLY COMPOSED
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
9
BY MICHELLE HARRIS
6
1
about bugs
4
Dragonflies
Mosquitoes
prefer to
appeared on
bite
Earth 140
people
before the first
smelly feet.
million years
who have
birds.
2
Raw termites
taste like
3
pineapple.
Tiny bugs called
mites live in your
eyebrows.
10
MAY 2017
5
A housefly
can turn
somersaults
in the
air.
6 Most female
fireflies can’t fly.
© CISCA CASTELIJNS / MINDEN PICTURES
BY C.M. TOMLIN
The
Th Perlan
P l 2 pllane will
ililll sweep you 17 miles off
the ground to the edge of space—and it doesn’t
even have an eengine, jets, or propellers. What
the two-passeenger glider does have is an 84-foot
wingspan, about the length of two school buses. To
take off, this liightweight craft is connected by cable
to another plaane and towed 10,000 feet into the air.
Then it’s released over mountainous regions where
extra-strong aair currents buoy the plane under its
large wings annd carry the craft 90,000 feet high. Here,
data is collected
ted on the atmosphere before pilots use
the glider’s airbrakes to descend. Glide on!
BATTER GOES HERE
THE MACHINE
MADE THESE
PANCAKES!
PILOT
RAIN ALERT!
AIRBUS (PERLAN 2 FLYING); MARTIN HELTAI OF PERLAN PROJECT (PERLAN 2 ON RUNWAY);
PANCAKEBOT (PANCAKEBOT, PANCAKE CREATIONS); OOMBRELLA (UMBRELLA, PHONE ALERT)
PREDICTS
WEATHER
PANCAKE ART
Create art with pancake mix! The PancakeBot produces flapjacks shaped as the Eiffel Tower, George
Washington, Scooby-Doo, and more. First, use the
PancakeBot computer program to trace over a design
with the drawing tool. The movements are translated
into step-by-step instructions for the PancakeBot
to follow. Now just pour batter into the machine. The
bot’s electronic nozzle will squeeze the mixture onto
a heated griddle below, shifting as it follows the directions to create the flapjack formation. The result?
Pancakes that look almost too good to eat.
G tti caught
Getting
ht iin th
the rain
i iis no ffun. Th
That’s
’ where
h
the Oombrella comes in. This umbrella’s handle
contains a device that measures temperature,
air pressure, and humidity to predict exactly
when it’s ggoingg to rain. Connecting wirelessly to
your phone, it aleerts you about
15 minutes
m
before
the first drops fall.
Andd don’t worry
aboout accidentally
leaving this gear
at a friend’s house
oncce the skies clear.
The Oombrella
O
pings
your phhone if you’re
more thaan 130 feet away
from it. Thhat’s one unforgettable um
mbrella.
11
i rock
... and
roll.
KITTEN
WHEE
NEEDS
CASSIDY NO LONGERUND
.
WHEELS TO GET ARO
CHECK
OUT THE
BOOK!
Fort Langley, Canada
When the TinyKittens Society found a starving nine-week-old kitten
suffering from a terrible injury to his back legs, they were shocked he
was still alive. But his rescuers refused to give up on him. After amputating the cat’s back legs, his medical team constructed slings, splints,
and eventually a set of mini wheels to give his back end a lift and keep
him mobile.
Throughout the process, the team documented the cat’s progress
on social media. He had tons of fans! People from all over the world
sent ideas to help the kitty’s mobility. Nobody would have guessed that
after seven months of intensive physical therapy, the miracle cat—now
called Cassidy—would be able to get around without the help of his
wheels. These days he scoots around on his two front paws. Except
when he’s tired, of course—then he hitches a ride on his new family’s
robotic vacuum cleaner.
12
MAY 2017
Cat
FORT LANGLEY,
CANADA
Dogs
MECHANICSBURG,
PENNSYLVANIA
Horse
ATHENS,
GREECE
BY KITSON JAZYNKA
i hope the
wedding
cake is beefflavored.
DOGS GET “MARRIED”
Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
This inseparable pit bull pair met at Speranza Animal Rescue and
became friends for life. Abbey’s shyness was a barrier to adoption, but that changed when Zeus came along. He was missing an
eye—but excited to meet Abbey. Once the pups became pals,
their confidence grew and they began to interact more with
humans who visited them at the rescue center.
Soon a couple offered to adopt them as a pair. Before the
dogs left for their new home, the shelter hosted a wedding for
the canine couple. Abbey and Zeus dressed up in their finest
attire for the outdoor ceremony as an officiant read wedding
vows. Instead of rings, the duo exchanged
new collars. After reading their wedding
Like dogs?
vows, the officiant declared the pair
You’ll love
“husband and wife,” telling Zeus,
“You may now lick your bride!”
BARKFEST!
ABBEY(LEFT) AND
ZEUS PREPARE TO ”
SAY, ER, BARK, “I DO.
o online for d t
i
ut videos, fun l
facts, and more.
na
tgeokids.com/bar
HORSE SAILS
TO SAFETY
kfest
i love
my new
“neigh”-bors.
Atthens, Greece
Gisele the miniature horse was
boorn in a ramshackle pen at a gas
staation on a small Greek island.
Her
H mo
h was a foal.
f l Gisele spent eight years living
in isolated and unhealthy conditions. The founder of Gentle
Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses heard about the horse’s situation and went into action, convincing Gisele’s owner to give her up.
Gisele had never left her pen or worn a halter, but she let her rescuer take her on a 10-hour boat ride to safety. She hadn’t seen
another horse since her mother died, but Gisele whinnied with excitement to see the herd of miniature horses at her new home. Gisele has
since regained her health and even works as a therapy horse, visiting
children with special needs. This little horse has a big heart!
BEFORE
AFTER
SHELLY ROCHE (CASSIDY, BOTH); CB2 / ZOB / SUPPLIED BY WENN / NEWSCOM (ABBEY
AND ZEUS); GENTLE CAROUSEL MINIATURE THERAPY HORSES (GISELE, BOTH)
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
13
Wınners!
L
6
ast year, we asked you to show us your world through
photographs—and many of you did. More than 46,064
readers of nine Nat Geo Kids editions from around the
world participated in the contest, co-sponsored by Nat
Geo Kids and Animal Jam. First-place winners from all the countries
moved on to the international competition to compete for the
grand prize—a trip to Washington, D.C. Check out the international grand-prize photograph (below), along with the first-place
winners for each category from the United States.
WORLDWIDE
WINNERS!
Go online to see photo contest
winners from around the world.
natgeokids.com
/photo-contest
INTERNATIONAL
GRAND PRIZE
Check out Nat Geo Kids My Shot on page 35 to see other readers’ photos, then
get tips on taking your own awesome pictures. natgeokids.com/photo-tips
14
MAY 2017
Dewi Baggerman, 11
Zoetermeer,
Netherlands
FIRST
PLACE
FIRST
PLACE
Kate Anderson, 12
Shelley, Idaho
FIRST
PLACE
David Hopkins, 13
Gig Harbor,
Washington
Riley Harlan, 12
Fruit Heights, Utah
FIRST
PLACE
Ryan Hughes, 14
Albuquerque,
New Mexico
THESE PICTURES ARE AMAZING TO LOOK AT. OTHER PHOTOGRAPHS CAN ALSO MAKE A DIFFERENCE.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PHOTOGRAPHER JOEL SARTORE IS TAKING PICTURES OF CAPTIVE
SPECIES IN ZOOS AROUND THE WORLD FOR A PROJECT CALLED PHOTO ARK. GO ONLINE
TO GET MORE INFO AND LEARN HOW YOU CAN HELP. natgeokids.com/photo-ark
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
15
A JUVENILE CHEETAH
DASHES ACROSS THE
SAVANNA.
Scientists use cutting-edge technologytouncover the chee
BY AVERY ELIZABETH HURT
cheetah crouches in the grass
of the African savanna, observing an antelope that’s strayed
from its herd. The cat creeps
closer and closer
closer. Then it bursts toward
its target, accelerating so rapidly that its
legs appear to blur. Seeing the cat, the
antelope takes off. It sprints behind a
A S I A
CUTTING-EDGE COLLARS
A F R I C A
ATLANTIC
OCEA
Where
cheetahs
live
16
MAY 2017
thicket with the cheetah in pursuit. As
they emerge from the bushes, the cheetah catches up to its prey and pounces.
It’s dinnertime.
Cheetahs are excellent hunters, and
they know how to hustle.
hustle The fastest land
animal, they’ve been clocked going over
60 miles an hour. Naturally, scientists
attributed the cheetah’s hunting success
to its speediness—until recently. Using
top-notch technology to research the
feline’s movements and hunting techniques, scientists found surprising
answers to the question of what makes
the cheetah a first-rate predator.
INDIAN
OCEAN
In 2012, Alan Wilson of the Royal
Veterinary College in London, England,
launched a project to learn more about
how cheetahs move while hunting. Until
then, scientists had mostly studied the
speed of cheetahs in captivity by using a
car to drag an object such as a stuffed animal on a rope and watching the big cats
chase it. People assumed that the animal’s
swiftness was what allowed it to snag prey
so effectively in the wild. Wilson wanted to
know for sure. So he and his team trekked
to Botswana, a country in Africa with one
ne
of the world’s
world s largest cheetah populations.
popul
pulations
Driving across vast plains in search of
the felines, the scientists soon encountered a 90-pound female ambling along
the grassy terrain. Leaning out the car
window, one team member zapped the cat
with a tranquilizer dart. She dropped to
the ground, going into snooze mode. Then
the scientists hopped out of their car and
got to work. After giving the animal a
checkup, they fitted her with a special
fashion accessory: a tricked-out radio collar.“It was equipped with technology to
monitor her movements,” Wilson says.
The researchers found and placed collars on four other cheetahs. Over the next
18 months, the gadgets sensed when each
cheetah was running(which meant that it
was hunting), then recorded the cat’s
location and speed. The collars could also
© ANUP SHAH / NATURE PICTURE LIBRARY (RUNNING, SIDE PROFILE); © MICHEL AND CHRISTINE DENIS-HUOT / BIOSPHOTO /
MINDEN PICTURES (JUVENILES PLAYING); © STEPHEN BELCHER / MINDEN PICTURES (RUNNING, HEAD-ON); MARTIN WALZ (MAP)
Cheetah brothers
often remain together
for life. A female is
usually solitary unless
she has cubs.
A cheetah can
cover 26 feet
in one stride.
YOUNG CHEETAH
SIBLINGS PLAYFULLY
CHASE EACH OTHER.
These cats
sometimes chirp
to communicate
with each
other.
ta
ah’s big secret.
detect when the cats made turns to
change the direction in which they
were running.
After 367 runs, the scientists began
analyzing the data they’d collected. They
knew that the cheetahs were chasing
prey. If a cat’s run ended with quick, jerky
movements and then mostly stillness,
they could tell that it had wrestled with
and taken down its target.
Looking at the cats’ speed and the
paths in which they ran, the scientists figured out something that stopped them in
their tracks: It isn’t just speed that
makes the cheetah a talented hunter—
it’s the animal’s ability to slow down
quickly and make sharp turns.
SMOOTH MOVES
An antelope, the cheetah’s favorite
snack, runs in a zigzag in an attempt to
lose its pursuer. But the study showed
that, like the antelope, the cheetah is
also a talented twister that doesn’t
simply travel in a straight line.
RUNNING
CHEETAHS USE
THEIR TAILS
TO HELP THEM
BALANCE.
17
THE FELINE
HAS POWERFUL
SHOULDER
MUSCLES THAT
HELP IT CRANK
UP ITS SPEED.
A CHEETAH’S
CLAWS STICK
OUT ALL THE
TIME.
CAT STRATEGY
T HE
BOOK!
Although cheetahs are excellent hunters,
they’re threatened. Only up to 7,000 exist
in the wild. But Wilson’s finds might help.
“Our research also tells us where these
cats are most successful at hunting,”
Wilson says. The cats in the study mostly
did well on flat, open grassland. This data
can help conservationists create nature
reserves where cheetahs can thrive.
It turns out that cheetahs have more
tricks than just speed. And now humans
have more tricks to protect these cats.
© SUZI ESZTERHAS / MINDEN PICTURES (RUNNING WITH ARM EXTENDED, CLAWS, CUDDLY CUB); ROYAL VETERINARY COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY
OF LONDON (COLLAR); © ANDY ROUSE / NPL / MINDEN PICTURES (HUNTING WITH FAMILY, ROLLING ON GROUND); CHRIS WARE (GRAPHIC)
The cat’s large
nose lets in
plenty of air,
which helps it
quickly recover
from a sprint.
After spotting an antelope, the cat
inches within striking distance and then
erupts toward its target. The antelope
flees, winding across the ground. When
the charging cheetah sees its prey
change course, the feline slows down,
makes a tight turn, and speeds off in the
same direction—all within seconds.
“We know that cheetahs are incredibly
athletic,” says researcher Tatjana Hubel,
who worked on Wilson’s team. But scientists had no idea the cats could decrease
their pace so quickly, which allows them
to swerve without skidding. They also
didn’t realize that their turning radius, or
ability to curve, was so tight. It’s similar
to the sharp turns a pro skier can make
as he or she zigzags down a slope. “This
maneuverability is what really makes a
difference,” Wilson says. “Without these
skills, the cats wouldn’t be able to keep
up with weaving prey as well as they do.”
Cheetahs start to develop their moves
as cubs. By two months of age, siblings
spend much of the day playfully chasing
and dodging each other, which helps them
practice their turning skills. And with
claws that act like running cleats and a
long tail to keep them balanced, a cheetah’s body is built for making difficult
hairpin turns. All of this makes the cheetah a champion predator.
TR ONLINE
TRY
April 19-26.
natgeokids.com/may
COLLAR CONNECTION
The high-tech collars used by Alan Wilson’s team had accelerometers
to measure increases and decreases in the feline’s speed, gyroscopes that could sense when a cheetah twisted or turned to change
direction, and GPS to allow the scientists to pinpoint the felines’
exact location on the savanna.
AND
THEY’RE
OFF!
In a race between different
species of land animals,
cheetahs would totally win.
Here are some critters that’d
come in close behind. Check
out how fast they
can go.
30MPH
RED FOX:
18
MAY 2017
WITH HER BABIES
IN TOW, A CHEETAH
HUNTS FOR FOOD.
A SEVEN-DAY-OLD
CUB CUDDLES
WITH ITS MOM.
A cheetah
can take four
strides in one
second.
WHICH
WILD CAT
ARE
YOU?
FEMALES
SOMETIMES
ROLL ON
THE GROUND
DURING
MATING
DISPLAYS.
natgeokids
.com/may
BROWN HARE:
48MPH
LION:
50MPH
SPRINGBOK:
55MPH
CHEETAH:
65 MPH
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
19
FUTURE WORLD
BY KAREN DE SEVE
ART BY MONDOLITHIC
t’s the year 2060, and you’re
ready for school. It’s raining,
so you decide not to take the
drone. Instead you ride in your
driverless cube car.
“The sky’s no longer the limit in
terms of where transportation is
headed,” says Tom Kurfess, a
mechanical engineering professor at the Georgia Institute of
Technology. Take a peek at
these wild rides of the future.
I
T
GOING UP … WAY UP!
The space elevator doors
open—welcome to the
space station lobby. It’s
possible that people will
one day ride a space elevator from Earth to a space
station that orbits our
planet from 22,370 miles
above. The elevator will
carry passengers and
cargo into space without
burning huge amounts of
fuel, unlike today’s rockets.
Aboard the station, travelers might stay in a hotel
room with a truly out-ofthis-world view. Then those
heading to, say, Mars, can
transfer to a spaceship to
continue their journey.
T
NO DRIVER NEEDED
You exit your high-rise
apartment balcony into
your own private glass
elevator, take a seat, and
say your destination. The
elevator car descends
205 floors to street level
before detaching from the
building and moving to the street. It’s now a cube-shaped car. Another cube carrying your friends is nearby; the vehicles connect
while in motion, transforming into one bigger car. The cube drops you off at school and parks itself. According to Tommaso Gecchelin,
founder of NEXT Future Transportation, driverless cars will work together to end traffic jams and improve safety.
20
MAY 2017
D: Transportation
NOW SHOWING!
TRANSPORTATION
PLAYLIST
natgeokids.com/may
T
POWER PLANE
Passenger planes will
still be around in the
future—they’ll just
travel much faster.
Today flying 6,850
miles from New York
City to Beijing, China,
takes about 14 hours.
But thanks to future
technological advancements such as sleeker,
more lightweight aircrafts, a passenger
plane could make the
same trip in just under
two hours.
T
FLOWN BY DRONE
“One day soon drones
and robots will deliver
our meals,” Gecchelin
says. But further into
the future, helicoptersize drones could also
deliver people. Some
experts even think that
cargo drones will be able
to lift small houses from
a city and carry them to
scenic vacation spots.
T
TOTALLY TUBULAR
Your friend invites you
to her birthday party. It’s
today—and across the country. No prob. You can tube it from the West Coast to the East Coast in just two hours. You sit in a capsule
that looks like a train without rails. Whoosh! The capsule’s sucked into a vacuum tube. Like a bullet train, the capsule uses magnets to
fly forward in the tube without friction, or resistance. The result: a smooth, fast ride that never slows down from 750 miles an hour.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
21
.
n
i
l
o
g
n
a
p
e
h
t
f
rs o
e
w
o
p
n
e
d
d
i
h
Discover the
SPIDER-MAN
WOLVERINE
N
BY DAVID BROW
C
lark Kent and Peter Parker—
the alter egos of Superman
and Spider-Man—don’t really
stand out.And neither do pangolins
in the tropical forests or grasslands
of Africa and Asia where they live.But
like your favorite movie heroes,this
animal has a few hidden superpowers.
Check them out here.
STICKINESS!
CLAWS!
«
A
S
I
A
A F R I C A
ATLANTIC
OCEAN
INDIAN
OCEAN
AUSTRALIA
Where
pangolins live
GET MORE!
FREAKY C EATURES
Watch binturongs, termites, and others.
natgeokids.com/may
Spider-Man shoots
out sticky strands
of webbing from his
wrists to swing from
SPIDER-MAN
one skyscraper to
another. When a pangolin is hungry, it shoots out its
sticky tongue(which extends up to 16
inches past its mouth). Coated in
gluey saliva, the licker scoops up ants
and termites, the pangolin’s favorite
snacks. In all, the mammal can eat
some 70 million insects a year. Makes
sense that this superhero-like creature would have a super-appetite.
During fights with
villains, Wolverine
defends himself with
long, sharp claws that
WOLVERINE
pop out of his knuckles. Pangolins have
long, sharp claws on each of their front
feet. They use them to rip up ant and
termite nests as they search for dinner.
Some species that spend time in trees
also clutch onto branches with their
claws. Pangolins that stay mostly on the
ground use the claws to dig burrows for
sleeping. Whether you’re a superhero or
a pangolin, claws really come in handy.
SHOULDER BLADE
BACKBONE
TONGUE TIME
Up to 28 inches in all, a pangolin’s tongue can be almost as
long as its body(minus the tail)! How does it fit inside the
mammal? The tongue runs from its mouth down its sternum(or breastbone). The back end curves around organs
in the lower abdomen, arching toward the backbone. At
rest, the tongue’s front end is coiled inside the pangolin’s
mouth. The animal flicks out its licker to snag grub.
22
MAY 2017
TONGUE
STERNUM
LOWER ABDOMEN
J DENNIS NIGEL / GETTY IMAGES (SCALES IN TITLE, CURLED IN A BALL,PANGOLIN SIDE PROFILE); MARIA DIEKMANN / REST (TONGUE); JAMIE TRUEBLOOD / © COLUMBIA PICTURES / COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION (SPIDER-MAN);
SUZI ESZTERHAS / MINDEN PICTURES (CLAWS); 20TH CENTURY FOX / ENTERTAINMENT PICTURES / ZUMA PRESS (WOLVERINE); KEITH & LIZ LAIDLER / ARDEA (HANGING FROM TAIL); JAY MAIDMENT / © WALT DISNEY STUDIOS
MOTION PICTURES / COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION (GAMORA); CHRISTIAN BOIX / AFRICA GEOGRAPHIC (PANGOLIN, BIG); IMAGEBROKER / ALAMY (SCALE CLOSE-UP); © WALT DISNEY STUDIOS MOTION PICTURES / COURTESY
EVERETT COLLECTION (IRON MAN); COLLECTION CHRISTOPHEL / ALAMY (ANT-MAN); RANDALL SCOTT / NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE (BRYAN CHRISTY); CHRIS PHILPOT (TONGUE GRAPHIC); MARTIN WALZ (MAP)
OE
Eight
species of
pangolins
exist in all.
Moms carry
babies around
on their tails.
ES
GAMORA
AGILITY!
The animal
emits a stinky
odor when
threatened.
IRON-MAN
ARMOR!
ANT-MAN
MOVES!
CLOSE-UP OF OVERLAPPING SCALES T
Gamora’s martial
arts skills of climbing, kicking, and
leaping have helped
get her Guardians of
GAMORA
the Galaxy teammat
out of dangerous sit
ations. Pangolins are also agile. One
species raises its front feet slightly
off the ground and walks on just its
hind legs so its front claws won’t get
in the way. Certain pangolin species
can also hang upside down from tree
limbs by their tails and curl their
bodies as if they’re doing sit-ups!
Iron Man sports a
high-tech suit of
armor that shields
the superhero from
IRON MAN
weapons hurled by
enemies. Pangolins
wear armor too. Their “suits” consist
of rows of overlapping scales that
resemble a pinecone. Made out of
keratin—the same substance in your
fingernails—the pangolin’s armor is
so tough that predators such as lions
can’t bite through it. It’s too bad
that this armor doesn’t come with
built-in jets!
When he senses
trouble, Ant-Man
shrinks to the size
of, well, an ant.
Pangolins, which ca
ANT-MAN
be almost six feet
long from head to
tail tip, have their own way of shrinking. If the mammal notices that a
predator is nearby, it’ll curl into a
small ball less than half its normal
size. By rolling up, the pangolin
shields its stomach and face, the two
areas not covered in protective
scales. Unable to find a vulnerable
part of the pangolin to strike, many
enemies give up. Tiny can be tough.
Pangolins may resemble superheroes. But right now they’re
ones that need help. Targeted by poachers for their scales
meat, pangolins are threatened. Luckily real-life heroes suc
as National Geographic explorer and investigative journalis
Bryan Christy are helping. Christy exposes methods poache
use to capture animals. By spreading awareness, Christy
hopes to prevent these criminals from harming pangolins.
BRYAN CHRISTY
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
23
BY SCOTT ELDER KARL WEST
ART BY
Get the scoop on some hilarious experiments.
D
o cows with names produce more milk? Can birds recognize different painting
styles? Believe it or not, scientists have done real tests to answer wacky questions like these. But the silly investigations have a serious side, helping make life
better. Check out five experiments that’ll make you laugh—and learn.
FLEA POWER
GET MORE!
SCIENCE
LAB
24
MAY 2017
Try coo
o exper
xperiim
iments
natgeokids.com/may
Funny Findings: Leaping high
Sidesplitting Experiment: Fleas enough to clear a nine-inch tube,
dog fleas won. This makes them one
can jump onto the coats of dogs or
of the world’s best jumpers.
cats, where they like to burrow. To
learn which are better leapers—dog Not-So-Silly Uses: Scientists can
use the findings to make more lifefleas or cat fleas—French scientists
put both at the base of tubes ranging like machines. For instance, a group
from about a half inch to 12 inches in of engineers in New Zealand developed jumping robots, modeling their
height. Then they noted which fleas
design after fleas.
jumped above the rim of each tube.
i
could
totally
paint
that.
PEELING OUT
THE MILKIER WAY
Sidesplitting Experiment:
Many dairy farmers in Great
Britain suspected that giving
cows TLC—naming them, petting them, and talking to
them—caused the animals to
make more milk. So scientists
tested the theory. They surveyed 516 farms to see if their
cows had names, then compared
how much milk each animal
generated over 10 months.
Funny Findings: During the
time period, each named cow
produced about 68 more gallons
of milk than unnamed ones—
enough to fill a large bathtub!
Experts think cows with names
form stronger bonds with their
owners. That likely decreases
their stress, which can interfere
with milk production.
Not-So-Silly Uses: Naming
cows seems to be good for cattle. It’s also a way for farmers to
produce more milk—and more
moo-la.
CHRISTOS GEORGHIOU / DREAMSTIME (TEST TUBE)
Sidesplitting
Experiment: Cartoon
characters often wipe
out on banana peels. To
find out how slick the
yellow skins really are,
Japanese scientists
analyzed what happened
when volunteers placed
one foot on the peels
and pushed forward.
Funny Findings:
Under the weight of a
person, the peels slid
across the floor with
almost the same ease as
skis over snow! Using a
high-powered microscope, the team learned
the peel’s slick trick:
Crushed skins release
an ultra-greasy gel.
Not-So-Silly Uses:
Scientists hope to use
this substance as lubricant for machines.
BIRD BRAINS
Funny Findings: When the
new art was shown, the birds
Sidesplitting Experiment:
continued to peck at the correct
Japanese scientists showed
artist’s paintings to get their
eight pigeons a set of paintings
treats. This meant that they had
by Pablo Picasso and Claude
Monet multiple times. They gave learned to notice the difference
half of the birds treats for peck- in the artists’ painting styles.
ing only at Picasso art and the
Not-So-Silly Uses: The results
other half treats for pecking only gave more proof that pigeons
at Monet art. Then the scientists are brainy. They also showed that
showed the birds art they’d never practice and rewards can shape
seen before by both painters.
behavior.
TUMBLING TOAST
Sidesplitting Experiment:
Why does dropped toast
always seem to hit the floor
buttered-side down? A team
of researchers from England
decided to investigate. They
got some not-so-high-tech
tools for the experiment—
toasted slices of bread and
some butter—and dropped a
hundred buttered slices from
a table, one at a time.
Funny Findings: When
buttered toast slips off a plate
you’re carrying, it doesn’t spin
fast enough or have the distance to complete a full rotation. So it turns halfway and
lands on its buttered side.
Not-So-Silly Uses: Dropping
toast can be sticky, but here’s
some good news: These findings
could help us design smartphones that are less likely to
land on their screens when
dropped.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
25
Who built this ancient
Egyptian monument?
ER
MER
IMM
EN DRIM
REN
NIE WARR
ANIE
PHA
TEPH
BYY STE
A
huge stone lion looms over the passing boats on
Egypt’s Nile River. It serves as a giant guardian
to some of the country’s famous pyramids,
man-made tombs that seem to stretch all
the way to the sun. The ancient sand-colored statue
known as the Sphinx is as tall as the White House, with
paws longer than a city bus.
An air of mystery has always surrounded the
Sphinx. Why was it built? How many hidden chambers
are inside? Scientists are still digging up clues to
those questions, but they might have an answer
for one of the monument’s biggest mysteries:
Who built it?
SET IN STONE
In ancient Egypt, people worshipped
sphinxes as mythical creatures with the
power to ward off evil. Some think the
Sphinx was built as a protector of the
pyramids, which were once used as burial
places for Egyptian kings.
Nobody’s sure when the Sphinx was
built, but experts believe it was already
ancient when Egyptian queen Cleopatra
saw it around 47 B.C. Since then, many
other historical figures have visited the
monument. But which historical figure
built the monument?
26
MAY 2017
FACE OFF
Historians’ two top suspects are Pharaoh
Khufu, who ruled Egypt from 2589 B.C. to
2566 B.C., and his son, Pharaoh Khafre, who
reigned from 2558 B.C. to 2532 B.C. Most
experts agree that one of these rulers
oversaw the construction of the statue and
had his own face carved atop the giant lion.
But which one was it—Khufu or Khafre?
Some think the Sphinx is the work of
Khufu. They say the statue’s face matches a
sculpture of the king discovered in 1903.
But most experts, including Egyptologist
Mark Lehner, think Khufu’s son, Khafre,
built the Sphinx. As father and son, the pair
shared a resemblance. But Lehner says the
most convincing evidence lies in a temple
that was built in front of the statue. Lehner
believes that the temple and the Sphinx
are part of the same master building plan
overseen by one person. Ancient workers
built the temple on top of part of another
structure that’s been proven to be the
work of Khafre. Lehner believes that this
means the Sphinx and its temple must
have been constructed after Khafre’s first
structure was built—Khufu wouldn’t have
been around to build on top of Khafre’s
PIUS LEE / SHUTTERSTOCK (MAIN); © PROVIDENCE PICTURES (SPHINX ILLUSTRATION); HOPE PRODUCTIONS / YANN ARTHUS BERTRAND /
GETTY IMAGES (PYRAMIDS); HULTON ARCHIVE / GETTY IMAGES (BLACK-AND-WHITE SPHINX); MARTIN WALZ (MAP)
THE SPHINX SITS
NEAR SIX PYRAMIDS,
INCLUDING THE GREAT
PYRAMID OF GIZA.
HISTORIANS
THINK THE
SPHINX MIGHT’VE
LOOKED LIKE
THIS, BEFORE
WIND AND WATER
WORE AWAY ITS
COLORS.
THE STATUE
WASN’T FULLY
UNCOVERED
UNTIL 1936,
ABOUT 70 YEARS
AFTER THIS PIC
WAS TAKEN.
In Egypt, camels
are called “ships
of the desert.”
Like ships, they
carry goods and
people.
EUR
OPE
A
A
EA TI
N
C
AS
N
C ED I A
AN N
E
I
A
I
O
AN
Mediterranean S
lower structure. “To me, that’s strong
evidence that the Sphinx couldn’t have
been Khufu’s,” Lehner says.
WHAT LIES BENEATH
Scientists have been solving the Sphinx’s
mysteries for a long time. The biggest
question about the structure used to be
what was buried underneath it. One legend
said the library of the lost city of Atlantis
was below the statue. Archaeologists went
looking for it in 1926 and did discover a
secret tunnel under the Sphinx—but it led
nowhere. Experts think treasure hunters
ANCIENT !
WONDERS
natgeokids.com/may
dug it long ago, searching for hidden riches.
But in 1999, Lehner and fellow Egyptologist
Zahi Hawass found a different kind of lost
city under the Sphinx: an ancient settlement
larger than 10 football fields. Lehner believes
it was home to workers who lived there
some 4,500 years ago. These workers likely
hauled different types of stone blocks to
build the pyramids and chisel the Sphinx
out of limestone.
DISAPPEARING ACT
Today the ancient Egyptians’s work is
crumbling. Centuries of wind and water
EGYPT
r
ea
Egypt’s Nile River is
the world’s longest
river, flowing over
4,400 miles through
eastern Africa.
AUDI
ABIA
ve
Ri
GET
MORE
L I B Y A
Sphin
N il e
Early
Egyptians named
their land
k
Kemet, or “black
land,” for its
rich river mud.
S U D A N
have ground away at the Sphinx’s limestone,
and shifting sands have threatened to
cover much of it. Archaeologists work
tirelessly to repair the structure to keep
it from completely disappearing, leaving
them little time to search for more hidden
chambers. “Think of the Sphinx as the
oldest sick person on Earth,” Hawass says.
“It needs a doctor on call at all times.”
By preserving the Sphinx, experts are
also protecting clues that might still be
hidden in the statue’s stone. Someday,
these could be the keys that unlock even
more of the Sphinx’s secrets.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
27
JAMES YAMASAKI
Color Coded
.
ngs that are the wrong co
color. Find 12 thi
28
MAY 2017
eriously changed
ANSWERS ON PAGE 35
CREATURE
CLOSE-UPS
JOEL SARTORE, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC PHOTO ARK / NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE (ALL)
These photographs show
close-up views of zoo animals.
Unscramble the letters to
identify what’s in each picture.
Bonus: Use the highlighted
letters to solve the puzzle
below.
ANSWERS ON PAGE 35
m
These pictures are fro
d
lle
ca
ct
oje
pr
ial
a spec
Nat Geo
Photo Ark, in which Sartore
photographer Joel ptive
is documenting ca ound
species from zoos aris to
the world. The goal save
lp
inspire people to heanimals.
ed
er
ng
da
en
’s
Earth
more info.
Go online to get/p
to-ark
natgeokids.com ho
ERD XFO
AUCTNO
OMNO ARCB
IFFHESLI
BZRAE
DMOILRAAL
I D K Y TA D
RPTEAIRN
ELHACENOM
CHECK OUT
the full images in
our online gallery.
natgeokids.com/may
HINT: What do elephants wear to the beach?
ANSWER:
W
———
— ——————S
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
29
ball bounced off a(n)
dinosaur and went
color
air. My family scrambled to hide behind the
relative’s name
a giant plastic
ball
the
past-tense verb
type of liquid
another relative’s name
on the top of the
food
down a
verb ending in -ing
as the ball zipped past them. It hit
noun
another body part
,
, and smacked into a fake
noun
through the
against
past-tense verb
. Finally the
animal
and landed with a(n)
funny noise
pond. As the ball sank to the bottom, everyone started to
joked that I needed putting lessons from a professional
before we got to the hole with the
adjective
noun
verb
noun
mill.
in
.
BLACK-TAILED
PRAIRIE DOG
PlainsPup
Lives in: Grasslands of Canada,
the United States, and Mexico
Likes: Digging and dozing
W
BY ALLLYSON SHA
BY
If wild animals used social media, what
would they say? Follow this prairie
dog’s day as it updates its feed.
6 a.m.
FRIENDS
Coyote
Burrowing Owl
CoolCanine
Western Diamondback Rattlesnake
UnderOwl
SnakeRattleNRoll
11:37 a.m.
GERRY ELLIS / GLOBIO / MINDEN PICTURES (PRAIRIE DOG PROFILE, ALL); NATURESDISPLAY / GETTY IMAGES (COYOTE PROFILE, ALL); ROB TILLEY / NATURE PICTURE LIBRARY (OWL PROFILE, ALL);
ROLF NUSSBAUMER / GETTY IMAGES (SNAKE PROFILE, ALL); GAMEGFX / SHUTTERSTOCK (CARTOON FACES, ALL); INGO ARNDT / MINDEN PICTURES (PRAIRIE DOG NEAR BURROW); JURGEN AND
CHRISTINE SOHNS / FLPA / MINDEN PICTURES (OWL NEAR BURROW); JASPER DOEST / MINDEN PICTURES (SNAKE TAIL); ROLAND SEITRE / MINDEN PICTURES (COYOTE)
PlainsPup
Ugh, that was an
early alarm! But I’m
on dirt-moving duty
today. Got to keep
my colony’s burrow
entrances clean—all
70 of them!
PlainsPup
PREDATOR UPDATE: It was
just a very hawk-shaped cloud.
SnakeRattleNRoll
I nearly shook my
rattle off! It usually
shakes about 60
times a second to
scare predators,
but I think it just
broke a hundred!
SnakeRattleNRoll
Hey, thanks! It’s so thoughtful of you
to clear out the house from time
to time since I like to hang out
in abandoned prairie dog holes.
PlainsPup
You’re such a den crasher.
CoolCanine
At least SnakeRattleNRoll doesn’t
move in and then cover the entrance
with dung from other animals! Cough
... UnderOwl ... cough ...
UnderOwl
Only when I’m
nesting! It’s not like
I can leave my eggs,
so I use the poo to
lure dung beetles
to my door. It’s like
ordering dinner in!
11:35 a.m.
PlainsPup
HAWK! HAWK! Run for cover!
#WatchDog
SnakeRattleNRoll
Slither for your lives!
UnderOwl
Us too! My chicks can imitate
SnakeRattleNRoll’s sound when they
feel threatened. It sounded like the
burrow was a snake shack!
5:45 p.m.
PlainsPup
Aw, man! My sister ate my dinner again.
Living with family can be rough. I have to
share everything—my burrow, my food.
SnakeRattleNRoll
At least you don’t live in that prairie
dog colony that has, like, 400
MILLION members!
CoolCanine
400 million
pack mates?
That sounds
awooooooo-ful.
Get it?
#CoyotePuns
UnderOwl
But with so many members maybe
it would be a party owl the time.
#OwlPunsAreBetterThanCoyotePuns
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
31
Z:
From the pages of QUIZ HI
STUMP
If your parents can’t
answer these questions,
maybe they should go to
school instead of you!
ANSWERS ON PAGE 35
1
Trained rats use their supersense of _____________
to find hidden land mines in Africa.
A. sight
C. hearing
B. smell
D. taste
2
Which artist painted views of the water lilies in the
gardens of Giverny, France?
A. Pablo Picasso
C. Claude Monet
B. Jackson Pollock
D. Georgia O’Keefe
3
The Valley of the Kings, the burial
area of many Egyptian pharaohs,
is located in which modern-day city?
A. Luxor, Egypt
B. Paris, France
C. Cairo, Egypt
D. Marrakech, Morocco
4
5
In which city would you most likely travel by rickshaw?
A. Edinburgh, Scotland
C. Quito, Ecuador
B. Nuuk, Greenland
D. Beijing, China
Africa’s Lake Malawi has more _____________ than
any other lake in the world.
A. tropical fish
C. venomous snakes
B. freshwater sharks
D. water bugs
6
Which predators do gentoo penguins watch out for in
the icy waters around Antarctica?
A. polar bears
C. tigers
B. orcas
D. eagles
7
The pointed nose of Japan’s Shinkansen bullet train
was designed to reduce noise. It was inspired by which
speedy animal?
A. cheetah
C. sailfish
B. dolphin
D. kingfisher
8
La Tomatina, which takes place in Spain,
is the world’s biggest tomato fight. The
event cannot begin until someone climbs
up a greased pole to retrieve which item?
A. salad dressing
B. a ham
C. salt shaker
D. a pizza
9
About how many elephants were used
to transport materials during the Taj
Mahal’s construction in 17th-century India?
A. 10
C. 1,000
B. 100
D. 100,000
10
The Via Alpina is a hiking trail in the Alps, a European
mountain range. How many countries does the trail
go through?
A. three
C. six
B. four
D. eight
BEE SMART!
TIO
NA N
PHIC
RA
A
L GEOG
BEE
32
ography
Watch kid ge te in the
pe
m
co
es
us
geni
raphic Bee,
National Geog quiz show
ed
a turbocharg ographic and
on National Geon May 19.
Nat Geo WILD
l Listings
Check Loca
PAKHNYUSHCHY / SHUTTERSTOCK (RAT); KENNETH GARRETT / NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
CREATIVE (KING TUT MASK); DESIGN PICS INC / NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE (LAKE
MALAWI); ANDY ROUSE / MINDEN PICTURES (PENGUIN); OKEA / GETTY IMAGES (TOMATO)
YOUR PARENTS
Cute spots
Not so cute spots
©2017 Mentholatum Company, Orchard Park, NY 14127
Target Acne
with the New OXY®
On-The-Go Acne Stick
for Spot Free Skin.
TRY THESE OTHER PRODUCTS,
ALL WITH CLINICALLY PROVEN
ACNE FIGHTING INGREDIENTS.
CLEAR SKIN. GUARANTEED*.
oxyskincare.com
*
TEXT BY S
STEPHANIE WARREN DRIMMMER PUZZLES BY JULIE K. COHEN
Br
s
r
e
l
g
g
Bo
CHECK
OUT THIS
BOOK!
The most amazing thing about your brain is that the
more you use it, the stronger it gets. Play these games
and puzzles to hit the mental gym and bulk up your
brainpower!
ANSWERS ON PAGE 35
A rebus is a riddle made up of letters, pictures, and symbols.
Can you solve these four animal-themed rebuses?
OutoftheBox
(
- EE )
The answers to these riddles require some extra
thought. Examine each word carefully and try to
think of other ways it might be used when thinking
about the solutions.
When the dog sits on a railroad, his owner’s frieend
receives money.What is the friend doing?
+
+
A
+T
its
The police officer told the adult to
t move
away from the saw so the kids could
c
play
with it. Where are they?
Mr. Martin and Ms. Duncan just finished
building the tallest buildinng in the city.
Just as everyone cheeredd this great
accomplishment, a dog came along and with
one swipe of its tail deestroyed the building.
How could this happeen?
.
of the
these
puzzles
are driving
me batty!
Why don’t bats need good eyesight?
t? To
T find out
out, flip twoo letters
from the top line to the bottom and threee letters
le
from the bottom
line to the top without moving any letters to the left
lef orr right. It’s
OK if there are spaces between letters in the same worddd.
U
T H R
L
34
MAY 2017
S O R N I
E A A
I N C G
© DNY59 / GETTY IMAGES (BRAIN); © RON CHAPPLE STOCK / ALAMY (OFFICER); © ANTAGAIN / ISTOCKPHOTO (BIRD); © ARLINDO71 / ISTOCKPHOTO
(BEE); VIZERSKAYA / ISTOCKPHOTO (RAIN); © MARI_ART / ISTOCKPHOTO
(HORSE); © ELDAD CARIN / ISTOCKPHOTO (PENNIES); © GLOBALP / ISTOCKPHOTO (LEOPARD); © SPAULN / ISTOCKPHOTO (CAN); © ELDAD CARIN /
ISTOCKPHOTO (COINS); JAN_NEVILLE / ISTOCKPHOTO (SHEEP);
LAFLOR / ISTOCKPHOTO (PEOPLE); MICHAEL DURHAM / GETTY IMAGES (BAT)
ty
asses naturekit
teer.
Sunset Sungl
a DIY photo fililt
te
ea
r
cr
o
t
es
s
nglasss
ouugh your suu
oott phottoos thr
Shhoo
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC KIDS
Rubber Ducky
Watermelo
n
35
Snapshot 16
Gone Fishing
m
Ice Crea
d
CrocodileGatorKi
AquaSparks
ile
Ailuroph
“Color Coded” (page 28):
front
“I filled a clear glass with fizzy water in
in the
ils
penc
red
colo
of a piece of paper. I put
the
shot
I
Then
.
form
les
bubb
water and let the
als
eanim
ethos
—lov
”
e.
mod
ro
photo in mac
Fizzy Rainbow
lovethoseanimals
“What in the World?” (page 29):
Top row: red fox, toucan, moon crab.
Middle row: filefish, zebra, armadillo.
Bottom row: katydid, terrapin,
chameleon.
Bonus: swim trunks
“Stump Your Parents” (page 32):
1. B, 2. C, 3. A, 4. D, 5. A, 6. B, 7. D,
8. B, 9. C, 10. D.
“Brain Bogglers” (page 34):
Out of the Box: 1. The friend is
playing Monopoly. 2. They are at a
playground, and the kids want to play
on the see-saw. 3. They’re building
a city out of building blocks. Beastly
Phrases: 1. bird brain, 2. horse sense,
3. A leopard can’t change its spots.
4. black sheep of the family. Flip Out:
ultrasonic hearing
hs
These photograp s
id
were taken by k
like you!
Sh t
Answers
©2015 Pepperidge Farm, Incorporated.
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