close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Boston Globe – November 09, 2017

код для вставкиСкачать
abcde
Th u r s d a y, N o v e m b e r 9 , 2 0 17
Abuse allegations surface at Berklee
Teachers accused of harassment allowed to leave quietly
Spacey
faces more
sex assault
claims
By Kay Lazar
GLOBE STAFF
She woke up naked and unnerved. Her professor, her mentor at Berklee College of Music,
was groping her as she tried to push him away
while fighting off waves of nausea. Jeff Galindo,
a popular jazz musician and instructor at the
school, had walked her home from a party the
night before to make sure she arrived safely because she was so drunk.
All she wanted was to banish memories of
that nightmarish experience in the spring of
2012. But weeks later Galindo, who had been
on tour much of the time since that night,
Former Channel
5 news anchor
Heather Unruh
says the actor
touched her
18-year-old son
inappropriately
at a Nantucket
bar in 2016. B1.
begged forgiveness from his student in a series
of bizarre texts.
“I’m truly sorry for hurting you. I promise I
will never again,” Galindo said in texts shared
with the Globe by the woman, then a junior and
one of the few female students in her department. “By the way, just to let you know, we never [had intercourse],” said another text in the
mea culpa. “I never got it up. I was too drunk. It
doesn’t excuse anything, but I thought I’d let
you know what a loser I am.”
A Globe investigation has uncovered a culture of blatant sexual harassment at Berklee
BERKLEE, Page A8
GOP’s Va. loss
exposes perils
of relying on
Trump’s recipe
Voters resoundedly reject
appeals to white identity
By Astead W. Herndon
GLOBE STAFF
WASHINGTON — The hazards of Trump-inspired appeals to white nationalism were laid
bare for Republicans this week in a closely
watched Virginia election, exposing dangers for
the GOP as it fights to extend control of Congress
in 2018.
Ed Gillespie, an adviser in the George W. Bush
White House and former chairman of the national party, was soundly defeated in the governor’s
race after running a campaign that focused on
protecting Confederate monuments and eliminating safe havens for undocumented immigrants.
Gillespie’s strategy shocked establishment Republicans but was seen as a grand experiment by
some GOP strategists, testing whether President
Trump’s playbook of explicit appeals to racial resentment could spell victory in a key swing state.
The result: Districts with higher-income, better-educated voters handily dispatched Gillespie
in favor of the Democrat in the race, and turnout
among nonwhites was significantly higher than
RACE POLITICS, Page A12
Women turn
2016 anger into
success at polls
Across US, female candidates
win municipal elections
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Landscapers say they are being accosted by people in Newton who are angry about noise from their leaf blowers.
they’re worried about their ability to respond to more serious crime. Meanwhile, a
few residents have taken to the streets to
confront yard maintenance companies they
believe are in violation of a recently imposed noise ordinance.
Last year, as the debate began to crescendo, the tensions disturbed even the normally sedate proceedings of city government, as
LEAF BLOWERS, Page A10
WOMEN, Page A11
Armed with a new noise law, Newtonites go to battle against leaf blowers
GLOBE STAFF
NEWTON — In his 14 years of public service, Ted Hess-Mahan has dealt with no
shortage of controversial issues. There have
been tax overrides and zoning reform, sanctuary city status and affordable housing.
But the Newton city councilor isn’t sure
any one of them has generated quite the
contentiousness now overtaking his com-
munity — brought on by the blast from leaf
blowers.
Tempers have been building for more
than a year, residents and city officials say,
but with fall leaf cleanup in full swing in a
suburb that prizes both pristine lawns and
tranquility, incensed neighbors are turning
on one another — in at least one instance,
allegedly, with violence. Police have been
overrun with complaints, to the point
What would make you slow down?
In the news
Red Sox catching prospect
Daniel Flores, 17, died
Wednesday due to complica-
tions from treatment for cancer, the Red Sox said. C1.
The Trump administration
tightened the economic embargo on Cuba, restricting
Americans from access to hotels and other businesses tied
to the Cuban military. A2.
VOL . 292, NO. 132
*
Suggested retail price
$2.00
GLOBE STAFF
Last November, Manisha Bewtra was just another frustrated voter whose notion of running
for office someday took on new and sudden urgency.
Today, she’s a Melrose alderman-elect — one
of the legions of women who converted political
angst into action this year and vaulted into electoral offices, from school committees to mayor’s
offices.
After a year of indignities, from the stinging
defeat of the nation’s first female major-party
presidential nominee to devastating revelations
of sexual harassment by men in power, women
this week made dramatic strides in municipal
elections across the country.
In New Hampshire, former alderman Joyce
Craig toppled a four-term incumbent, making
her the first woman ever elected mayor of Manchester. Framingham voters, choosing a mayor
AUTUMN ANGST
By Dugan Arnett
By Stephanie Ebbert
Painted optical illusions on roads are a creative way of curbing speeds
Cool change
Thursday: Sunny, milder.
High: 49-54. Low: 37-42.
Friday: Sunny, cold.
High: 37-42. Low: 20-25.
Sunrise: 6:27. Sunset: 4:28.
Complete report, C8
Neurosurgeons can safely run
two operations at once without
endangering patients, a study
from Emory University in Atlanta concluded. B1.
Panera Bread said it would acquire Au Bon Pain, the Bostonbased bakery-cafe. B10.
By Matt Rocheleau
GLOBE STAFF
Here’s a creative way to get speeding drivers
to slow down: Deceive them and then scare the
heck out of them.
A handful of cities around the
THINGS world have painted optical illusions
THAT
on roadways — think raised beams
and even images of children — that
WORK
appear, at first glance, to be blocking motorists’ paths.
The idea is to get lead-footed drivers to put
on the brakes. After all, if you think you’re going to hit a steel beam or a little girl chasing her
ball, you’re going to slow down.
Popular from New Delhi to a tiny town in
Iceland, the most prevalent of these illusions
are the striped lines made to look like they’re
three dimensional blocks floating in the middle
Take your business to the next level
by optimizing your energy use.
Connect with an energy efficiency expert today at 844-887-1400 or visit Eversource.com.
Eversource, #1 Energy Efficiency Provider in the Nation
— According to Ceres, 2016 Benchmarking Utility Clean Energy Report
of the road. Similarly, in London, officials have
painted what look like speed bumps, even
though the road is flat.
And, in Canada, a 3-D image known as
THINGS THAT WORK, Page A4
RALF TRYLLA/TOWN OF
ÍSAFJÖRÐUR, ICELAND
A town in Iceland
installed this 3-D
painted sidewalk to
catch drivers’ eyes.
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
The Nation
Trump tightens
Cuba embargo,
restricts access
Many businesses
tied to military
now off­limits
By Gardiner Harris
NEW YORK TIMES
WA S H I N G T O N — T h e
Trump administration on
Wednesday tightened the economic embargo on Cuba, restricting US residents from access to hotels, stores, and other
businesses tied to the Cuban
military.
A l e n gt h y l i s t o f r u l e s ,
which President Trump promised in June to punish the communist government in Havana, came just as Trump was
visiting leaders of the communist government in Beijing and
pushing business deals there.
Wednesday’s announcement
was part of the administration’s gradual unwinding of
parts of the Obama administration’s détente with the Cuban government.
US residents wishing to visit Cuba will once again have to
go through authorized tour operators, and tour guides will
have to accompany the groups
— making such trips more expensive.
People who already have
booked and paid for a trip on
their own will be allowed to go,
and transactions with businesses on the barred list can be
completed, the administration
said. The new rules, which go
into effect Thursday, apply only to future travel and commerce. Eighty-three hotels are
on the banned list.
While the rules will discourage some travel and business dealings between the
countries, they do not ban
them. Indeed, much of President Obama’s opening to Cuba
remains in place, including
diplomatic ties.
In a conference call with reporters, senior administration
officials said the new rules
were intended to direct money
and economic activity away
from the Cuban military and
security services and toward
businesses controlled by regular Cuban citizens. Officials
said the widespread practice of
renting rooms and eating
meals in private homes in Cuba would continue to be allowed, as would renting cars
from private citizens.
Among the hotels left off
the banned list was Marriott
International’s Four Points Havana Hotel, owned by the Cuban government, while a competitor operated by a foreign
rival, the Gran Hotel Manzana
Kempinski La Habana, is on
the banned list.
L ast month, Trump expelled 15 Cuban diplomats in
the wake of mysterious afflictions that have stricken two
dozen US Embassy personnel
in Havana, casting a Cold War
chill over ties between the
countries. Last week, Bruno
Rodriguez, the Cuban foreign
minister, said reports of attacks on American diplomats
in Havana were “deliberate
lies” intended to roll back
warmer ties.
US officials said the new
rules had nothing to do with
the diplomatic dispute over
the afflictions.
Obama had sought to end
the hostility and mistrust that
had long characterized relations between countries 90
miles from each other. Obama
argued that nearly a half-century of hostility had done little
to change Cuba and much to
tarnish the United States’ image in Latin America.
But opposition to the reconciliation was fierce among
parts of the Cuban émigré
community in Florida, and
Trump’s promise to undo the
policy may have contributed to
his victory over Hillary Clinton
in Florida, a crucial part of his
electoral win.
Trump has warmly embraced such autocrats as King
Salman of Saudi Arabia and
praised the lethal antidrug
campaign of President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines,
in addition to embracing President Xi Jinping of China.
But in June, the president
promised in a speech that “we
will not be silent in the face of
communist oppression any
longer” in Cuba.
Jose Miguel Vivanco, head
of the Americas division of Human Rights Watch, said the
changes would not improve
conditions in Cuba.
“To insist on an approach
that has shown to be a total
failure for decades is not going
to be helpful,” he said.
JOSHUA LOTT/GETTY IMAGES
DUTY CALLS — Barack Obama reported to a Chicago courthouse for jury duty on Wednesday and even sat
through a 20-minute video about what it could involve before he was ultimately dismissed. For his troubles,
Obama was scheduled to receive $17.20 — the daily rate for jury duty.
Officials identify Texas shooting victims
Among fatalities
were 7 children
age 14 or younger
By Mark Berman
and Peter Holley
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — Authorities in Texas on Wednesday
identified the 26 victims of the
church massacre in Sutherland
Springs, Texas, three days after
a black-clad gunman stalked
through the pews of First Baptist Church and killed or
wounded nearly every member
of the congregation during services.
The attack tore through the
small community outside San
Antonio, with the shooter targeting children, a pregnant
woman and senior citizens
alike. Among the victims in the
church were eight men and 17
women. Seven of those killed
were 14 or younger. Officials
said the toll of 26 dead included the fetus of Crystal Marie
Holcombe, who was pregnant.
The other victims were between 1 and 77 years old.
Some of those killed in the
massacre had already been
identified, their painful stories
related by friends, relatives,
and public officials. The full list
MARK RALSTON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
People unloaded crosses outside the First Baptist Church
in Sutherland Springs, Texas, on Wednesday.
captured the full scale of an attack in which mothers threw
themselves atop children to
protect them, and one family
— the Holcombes — suffered
losses spanning three generations.
Authorities have reviewed
video from inside the church,
and footage shows the gunman, Devin P. Kelley, shooting
victims in the head, a US official. That account is consistent
with statements made by survivors of the attack. The official
was not authorized to discuss
the matter publicly and spoke
to the Associated Press on the
condition of anonymity.
Investigators have spent the
days since the shooting probing the background of Kelley,
the 26-year-old who left behind
a volatile, sometimes violent
life riddled with warning signs
before entering the church.
Kelley, who killed himself
after the rampage Sunday, had
a string of troubling incidents
in recent years, including a
conviction for domestic assault, an escape from a mental
health facility, and reports that
he made death threats against
his military superiors.
Law enforcement officials
in Texas, while not publicly
identifying a motive for the attack, said it occurred while Kelley was having a conflict with
his relatives, particularly his
mother-in-law, who attended
the church but was not there
during the rampage. Kelley
had sent her threatening text
messages, said Freeman Martin of the Texas Department of
Public Safety.
Martin said more information about the dispute might
be found on Kelley’s phone,
which was recovered after the
shooting, but so far, investigators say they have been unable
to see what is on the device.
The FBI said it has taken
the phone to its facility in
Quantico, Va., but have been
unable to unlock it. According
to people familiar with the
matter, Kelley had an iPhone,
the same type of phone that
was at the center of a protracted fight between the FBI and
Apple over encryption after the
December 2014 attack in San
Bernardino, Calif., which killed
14 people. The FBI said it was
unable to access an iPhone
used by one of the two shooters
in that attack. The federal government sought to force Apple
to help unlock the phone but
the tech giant refused.
That particular fight was resolved not by the courts, but
when the bureau said an outside group helped them access
the phone’s data.
Daily Briefing
Gag order imposed in Manafort case
Environmental nominees grilled
WASHINGTON— The federal judge overseeing the criminal trial of former Trump
campaign chairman Paul
Manafort and business partner Rick Gates imposed a gag
order Wednesday in the case
ordering all parties, including
potential witnesses, not to
make statements that might
prejudice jurors.
US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson of Washington
issued the order five days after
signaling her intention to do
so.
Jackson barred any prejudicial statements ‘‘to the media
or public settings’’ to safe-
WASHINGTON — A Senate
hearing on nominees for two
top environmental posts on
Wednesday quickly turned testy over the Trump administration’s ambivalence on climate
change science.
Andrew R. Wheeler, a lobbyist for Murray Energy, which
is owned by Robert E. Murray,
an Appalachian coal mining
magnate and prominent backer of President Trump, has
been nominated to be the
deputy administrator of the
Environmental Protection
Agency.
Kathleen Hartnett White, a
former Texas environmental
regulator who has described
guard the defendants receiving a fair trial, ‘‘and to ensure
that the Court has the ability
to seat a jury that has not been
tainted by pretrial publicity.’’
Manafort, 68, and Gates,
45, remain under home confinement on pledges to pay
$10 million and $5 million, respectively, if they fail to return
to court after pleading not
guilty Oct. 30 to charges of
conspiracy, money laundering,
and making false lobbyist registration statements in connection with their work advising a Russia-friendly political
party in Ukraine.
WASHINGTON POST
Woman sentenced in fiance’s death
NEW YORK — A woman
who pleaded guilty to sabotaging her fiance’s kayak shortly
before he drowned on the couple’s 2015 trip on the Hudson
River was sentenced Wednesday to 16 months to four years
in jail.
The woman, Angelika Graswald, had faced manslaughter
and murder charges in the
death of Vincent Viafore. Prosecutors said she had watched
him drown, even moving a
paddle out of his reach as he
flailed in the water. In July, she
pleaded guilty to a lesser
charge of criminally negligent
homicide as part of a deal with
prosecutors.
Graswald, 37, will be given
credit for 2½ years she has already spent in jail since her arrest.
What had begun as a distress call to 911 from a devastated fiancee reporting a tragic
accident on the water ended
with the police zeroing in on
Graswald for orchestrating Viafore’s death. Prosecutors said
she had removed the craft’s
plug and was aware that a clip
to lock the kayak paddles in
place was gone.
NEW YORK TIMES
belief in global warming as “a
kind of paganism,” has been
tapped to lead the White
House Council on Environmental Quality.
Democratic members of the
Environment and Public
Works Committee focused
much of their hostility on
White, assailing her past writings on climate change.
“Your positions are so far
out of the mainstream, they
are not just outliers, they are
outrageous,” said Senator Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts. “You have a fringe voice
that denies science, economics, and reality.”
NEW YORK TIMES
Ross lied about worth, Forbes says
WASHINGTON — Forbes
magazine said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross ‘‘lied’’
about his net worth, exaggerating it by billions of dollars to
make the widely cited ‘‘Forbes
400” list of richest people in
America. Ross was dropped
from the list for 2017 after being a presence for 13 years.
In an article Dan Alexander
posted Tuesday, Forbes said it
discovered a discrepancy after
examining Ross’s government
financial disclosure forms, on
which Ross, a Wall Street investor before President Trump
put him in his Cabinet, listed
his assets at $700 million.
That’s not even close to
qualifying for the magazine’s
list. Nor was it close to what
Ross had told the magazine he
was worth in 2016, about $3.7
billion, or to what he told
Forbes recently, that his net
worth was about $2.7 billion.
When Forbes asked Ross
about the wide gap, he said he
had put ‘‘more than $2 billion’’
into trusts for his family.
But he declined to provide
documentation, Forbes said.
WASHINGTON POST
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A3
The World
China fetes Trump in Beijing
Fearing Russia threat,
NATO to expand its
scope of operations
Tour precedes
tough talks over
N. Korea, trade
By Michael Birnbaum
WASHINGTON POST
By Jonathan Lemire
and Jill Colvin
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING — President
Trump nodded appreciatively
as China’s Xi Jinping showcased a centuries-old temple in
Beijing’s Forbidden City. He
clapped along as the two leaders watched a Chinese children’s opera. And the pair
shared a traditional tea and salutations of friendship.
Trump’s two-day visit to China opened with diplomatic
niceties aplenty Wednesday.
But thorny issues await the two
world leaders behind closed
doors, including potential tensions over trade and China’s
willingness to put the squeeze
on North Korea over its nuclear
weapons program.
Ahead of his arrival, Trump
delivered a stern message to
Beijing, using an address to the
National Assembly in South Korea to call on nations to confront the North.
‘‘All responsible nations
must join forces to isolate the
brutal regime of North Korea,’’
Trump said. ‘‘You cannot support, you cannot supply, you
cannot accept.’’
He called on ‘‘every nation,
including China and Russia,’’ to
fully implement UN Security
Council resolutions against
North Korea enforcing sanctions aimed at depriving its
government of revenue for its
nuclear and ballistic missile
programs. The latest measure,
adopted after a September
atomic test explosion, the
North’s largest yet, banned imports of its textiles and prohibited new work permits for overseas North Korean laborers. It
also restricted exports of some
petroleum products.
Trump’s words drew a caustic response from North Korean
state media, which issued a
statement Wednesday saying
the United States should ‘‘oust
the lunatic old man from power’’ and withdraw its ‘‘hostile
policy’’ toward Pyongyang ‘‘in
order to get rid of the abyss of
doom.’’
White House officials said
Trump would underscore his
public messages about North
Korea when he and Xi sit down
for private talks on Thursday.
China is North Korea’s largest
ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump, with his wife, Melania, joined Chinese President Xi Jinping on a tour of
the Forbidden City Wednesday in Beijing. Trump is on a five-country trip through Asia.
trading partner and Trump is
expected to demand that the
nation curtail its dealings with
Pyongyang and expel North Korean workers from its borders.
Trump has praised China for
taking some steps against
Pyongyang, but he wants them
to do more.
China is increasingly disenchanted with North Korea over
The deals are ‘a
way of distracting
from the fact that
there’s been no
progress in China
on structural
reform.’
ELIZABETH ECONOMY, of
the Council on Foreign Relations
its nuclear weapons development but remains wary of using
its full economic leverage over
its traditional ally. It fears triggering a collapse of the North’s
totalitarian regime that could
cause an influx of refugees into
northeastern China and culminate in a US-allied unified Korea on its border.
China poured on the pomp
and pageantry for Trump’s arrival. The president and first lady Melania Trump were greeted
at the airport by dozens of children who waved US and Chinese flags and jumped up and
down. The couple spent the
first hours of their visit on a private tour of the Forbidden City,
Beijing’s ancient imperial palace. It’s usually teeming with
tourists but was closed to the
public for the presidential visit.
The Trumps walked alongside Xi and his wife through the
historic site and admired artifac ts from centuries pas t .
Trump posed for photos and,
with a wave of his hand, joked
to Xi about the reporters watching. And he laughed and
clapped along during an outdoor opera featuring colorful
costumes, martial arts, and
atonal music.
Trump said afterward he’s
‘‘having a great time’’ in China.
But much of the remainder of
his stay in Beijing will revolve
around deep negotiations over
trade with Pyongyang and other matters.
The president also is expected to showcase a round of business deals signed Wednesday
by Chinese and US companies
that the two sides say are valued at $9 billion.
Among them: a pledge by
China’s biggest online retailer
to buy $1.2 billion of American
beef and pork. Such contract
signings are a fixture of visits by
foreign leaders to China and are
aimed at blunting criticism of
Beijing’s trade practices.
It’s ‘‘a way of distracting
from the fact that there’s been
no progress in China on structural reform, market access, or
the big issues that the president
has tried to make progress on
with regard to China,’’ said Eliz-
abeth Economy, the director for
Asia Studies at the Council on
Foreign Relations.
Trump has made narrowing
the multibillion-dollar trade
deficit with China a priority for
his administration — and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross
said Wednesday the deals were
a step in the right direction.
‘‘Achieving fair and reciprocal treatment for the companies
is a shared objective,’’ Ross said.
‘‘Today’s signings are a good example of how we can productively build up our bilateral
trade.’’
China’s trade surplus with
the United States in October
widened by 12.2 percent from a
year earlier, to $26.6 billion, according to Chinese customs data released Wednesday. The total surplus with the United
States for the first 10 months of
the year rose to $223 billion.
Daily Briefing
Strike in Catalonia jams traffic
MADRID — A general
strike in Catalonia was muted
Wednesday, but pro-independence protesters blocked
roads and stopped trains in
Spain’s northeastern region to
protest the jailing of ousted
Catalan government officials
and secessionist activists.
Big traffic jams were reported on roads leading to
Catalan cities, including the
regional capital Barcelona,
and on major highways.
But the strike wasn’t
backed by Spain’s two main
unions and wasn’t reported to
be having any major effect on
industry or in the region’s
prized tourism sector.
National railway operator
Renfe said services were halted on dozens of local lines as
protesters blocked railway
lines.
Several national highspeed lines were also affected.
Intersindical CSC, a platform of pro-independence
workers’ unions, had called
the strike for labor issues. But
separatist parties and civil society groups asked workers to
join the stoppage to protest
the Spanish government’s
moves against the Catalan bid
for independence.
At midday, several thousand pro-independence protesters packed a central
square in Barcelona, waving
separatist flags and chanting
‘‘Freedom’’ for the 10 people
in custody in a judicial probe
into rebellion and sedition in
the days before and after Catalonia’s Parliament ignored
Spanish court rulings and declared independence Oct. 27.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Prosecutor’s death called murder
BUENOS AIRES — An Argentine prosecutor formally
declared for the first time that
the man probing the country’s
biggest terror attack was murdered rather than possibly
committing suicide, a member
of his team said Wednesday.
The opinion presented to a
judge by Eduardo Taiano reignites a case that shook Argentine politics with suspicions of
high-level homicide in the
2015 death of crusading prosecutor Alberto Nisman.
Judge Julian Ercolini will
decide whether to declare the
case a murder investigation.
Nisman’s death came four
days after he formally accused
then-president Cristina Fernandez of covering up Iranian
officials’ role in a 1994 bombing that killed 85 people at a
Jewish community center.
Fernandez has always insisted she had nothing to do
with a coverup or with Nisman’s death.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRUSSELS — As tensions
with Russia loom over Europe, NATO defense ministers
decided Wednesday to expand
the alliance’s operations for
the first time since the Cold
War, sharpen its focus on cyber operations, and boost
their powers to respond to
Kremlin aggression.
The moves came as tensions with Russia remain the
highest they have been in the
nearly three decades since the
end of the Cold War. Defense
Secretary Jim Mattis briefed
fellow defense ministers
Wednesday morning about
Russian violations of the Intermediate Range Nuclear
Forces Treaty, underlining the
nuclear risk that is a worstcase consequence of the bitter
back-and-forth.
De fens e minis ters approved plans that would bolster their ability to keep an
eye on Russian submarines in
the Atlantic Ocean, where
crucial undersea communications are at risk of being cut.
They committed to establishing a command dedicated to
sweeping away barriers preventing their forces from being deployed quickly across
Europe in the event of war.
A n d t h e y s a i d t h at c y b e r
weapons would now have as
big a role in NATO planning
as ordinary guns and tanks.
The efforts seek to revamp
a war-fighting structure that
atrophied in the peacetime
years after the end of the Cold
Wa r. N A T O w a s o n c e a
sprawling organization of
22,000 people and 33 commands. Following cuts earlier
this decade, it shrunk to 7,000
people and seven commands.
‘‘Those decisions will ensure that NATO continues to
adapt for the 21st century so
that we can keep our people
safe in a more challenging
world,’’ NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said
Wednesday at the meeting of
ministers.
The holes that opened in
NATO’s defense came as the
alliance shifted in the years
following the 1991 demise of
the Soviet Union. Until Russ i a’s 2 0 1 4 a n n e x at i o n o f
Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula,
NATO had turned into an alliance focused on limited deployments and operations far
from its own territory. Now,
with a conflict in eastern
Ukraine still burning alongside NATO borders, leaders
have returned to planning for
a conventional war with Russia.
NATO commanders worry
that even though their militaries are significantly stronger than those under the command of the Kremlin, Russia’s
ab ili ty t o ru s h i t s t ro o ps
across its own territory give it
a formidable practical advantage. US tanks were held up
for hours over the summer as
they waited for border clearance in Central Europe on the
way to a military exercise. In
some countries, requests to
move troops and equipment
need to be submitted up to 30
days in advance.
‘‘We are now much more
focused on moving heavy
equipment across Europe, because after the Cold War, we
didn’t pay so much attention
to that,’’ Stoltenberg said.
A timeless pearl strand
updated with 14kt gold beads
Ex­official says
he faced threats
We renewed our classic cultured pearls with
Former Zimbabwean vice
president Emmerson Mnangagwa fled the southern African nation because of ‘‘incessant threats’’ against him and
his family two days after he
was fired by President Robert
Mugabe.
Mnangagwa, 75, said
Wednesday in a statement that
he never planned to harm
Mugabe, who he’s been supporting for more than four decades. Mnangagwa fled to
neighboring South Africa, according to a source.
Mugabe said he fired
Mnangagwa because he was
plotting against the government.
the gleam of 14kt gold beads. Then, gave it a
fresh wraparound style and an adjustable fit.
The result? A whole new way to wear pearls.
BLOOMBERG NEWS
99
$
Take a tip from
rabbits, Poland says
WARSAW — The Polish
government is encouraging
citizens to go forth and multiply like rabbits.
The health ministry of Poland, which has one of the
lowest birth rates in Europe,
put out a short video saying,
‘‘If you ever want to be a parent, follow the example of rabbits.’’
It is the latest step by the
mostly Catholic country of 38
million to reverse a shrinking
population.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Plus Free Shipping
Cultured Pearl Bypass Collar Necklace
13 ⁄2"-151⁄2" for an adjustable fit. 7-9mm oval cultured
freshwater pearls. 14kt gold beads. Strung on stainless
steel for durability. Clasp-free. Shown actual size.
1
Ross-Simons Item #885380
To receive this special offer, use offer code: FRESH20
1.800.556.7376 or visit www.ross-simons.com/FRESH
A4
Nation/World
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Can an optical illusion slow down drivers?
Saudis cause
of Lebanon’s
strife, Iran’s
president says
uTHINGS THAT WORK
Continued from Page A1
“Pavement Patty” that depicts a
girl chasing a ball into the
street was temporarily painted
on a road near a school to raise
awareness about cautious driving.
But could these cartoonish
images improve roadway safety
in Boston? Local officials are
intrigued.
Officials in the other countries say the markings have
contributed to better driving.
And while they can add an element of surprise, officials in
other locations said they haven’t seen any reports of drivers
stopping so quickly that they’ve
caused an accident.
New Delhi
Initial measurements by the
city’s traffic police found speeds
dropped by 15 percent in the
areas where 3-D crosswalks
were installed last year, according to Yogesh Saini, founder of
Delhi Street Art, which painted
the crosswalks on the municipal council’s behalf.
“As people got accustomed
to seeing them, the speeds appear to have crept up some,”
Saini added in an e-mail.
Even so, he said, there are
clear benefits.
“They surely created an
awareness in the public,” a reminder to drive safely, he said.
And, drivers are more likely to
notice pedestrians because
“they appear to be walking on
floating concrete blocks.”
Saini said there are now
nearly 20 such crosswalks
across New Delhi.
But he acknowledged there’s
a potential downside — a problem that has occurred elsewhere, too.
“Pedestrians started using
the crossings to take selfies
when there was no traffic,” he
said, though “this trend now
appears to have tapered off.”
Ísafjörður, Iceland
In this small, scenic town, a
recently installed 3-D crosswalk
on a centrally located street certainly got people talking.
By Sarah El Deeb
ASSOCIATED PRESS
THE COMMUNITY AGAINST PREVENTABLE INJURIES
YOGESH SAINI / DELHI STREET ART
In Canada, a 3-D decal on a road raises awareness about school zones. In New Delhi, 3-D crosswalks slow drivers.
Officials said they don’t have
statistical proof, but believe it is
has caused drivers to slow
down, just as it did in a major
city halfway across the world.
“We feel like it did,” said an
e-mail from Gautur Ívar Halldórsson, managing director of
Vegamálun GÍH, the company
that installed the Iceland crosswalk.
The 3-D crosswalk costs only a bit more than a standard
one and officials there plan to
install more, using different
colors and effects.
But as in New Delhi, the effect may be waning.
“For sure drivers are getting
used to it and (probably) don’t
pay too much attention to that
crossing in the long run,” Ralf
Trylla, the town’s environmental officer, wrote in an e-mail.
Even so, “when they drive
over it, they always get reminded that there is something different than just a normal crossing,” said Trylla.
London
A series of markings that
look like speed bumps — officials call them “2-D road cushions” — were first tested in late
2014.
The trial period showed “average speeds reduced by 3
m.p.h. nine months after installation,” said Danny Keillor,
a spokesman for Transport for
London, which oversees the area’s transportation network.
Encouraged by those results,
the agency expanded the effort.
There are now 45 road cushions installed across roads it
manages around London, he
said.
“Even if some drivers become accustomed to 2-D road
cushions, if one driver slows for
the 2-D cushions, they will help
slow all traffic behind them,”
Keillor said.
West Vancouver, Canada
In Western Canada, officials
took the optical illusion even
further when a nonprofit called
The Community Against Preventable Injuries installed a
3-D decal on a road near a
school to raise awareness about
speeding in school zones.
The decal, called “Pavement
Patty,” looked like a girl was in
the street chasing a ball. It was
installed temporarily during
the 2010 back-to-school season,
said Jennifer Smith, the organization’s senior program manager.
Because it was a short-term
initiative, the nonprofit didn’t
try to measure whether drivers
slowed, Smith said.
The goal “was to highlight
the issue in a novel way, and
generate public conversation,”
she said via e-mail. “The idea
behind this installation, and all
Dedicated to keeping
Fred living safely at home
and out of a nursing home.
of Preventable’s work, is to get
people’s attention and get them
thinking about their behavior.”
Smith said the decal was
“highly successful in generating
conversation in the community,
the local media, and garnering
attention worldwide. Although
this installation was done in
2010, Preventable still receives
questions about the decal to
this day.”
She said the public’s response was “overwhelmingly
positive.’’
“Some people expressed
concern that the decal would
startle or distract drivers, potentially increasing the risk of a
crash,” she added.
But, as with the crosswalk illusions elsewhere, no collisions
occurred, she said.
United States
So could these illusions
work here?
Officials from several national transportation safety organizations said they were not
aware of any currently in use in
this country. And some experts
expressed skepticism, saying
the concepts at least require
further study.
At least one, albeit limited,
study has been done in the
United States. A 2012 study by
a Western Michigan University
graduate student looked at the
effects of adding lightning bolt-
shaped, 3-D markings just
ahead of a pair of crosswalks in
Chicago. It found the markings
initially caused drivers to yield
more often, but the effects wore
off soon after.
In the United States, experts
said such markings violate existing national roadway standards governed by the Federal
Highway Administration. But
the agency can grant approval
for such ideas to be tested and
approved.
Federal highway agency officials said they were aware of
the use of such road markings
in other countries but were not
aware of any proven benefits
compared to standard markings.
But others, including Boston’s transportation head, said
the ideas seem promising.
“They are all really terrific
elements in terms of roadway
design,” said Boston Transportation Department Commissioner Gina Fiandaca. “We’re
really intrigued, and communities really welcome these innovative designs.”
Fiandaca said city officials
will review the markings more,
and are open to asking the federal highway agency for permission to test them in Boston.
Matt Rocheleau can be reached
at matthew.rocheleau@
globe.com.
BEIRUT — Iran’s President
Hassan Rouhani criticized
Saudi Arabia on Wednesday
over what he called ‘‘unprecedented’’ interference in Lebanese affairs, adding his voice
to those who suspect the Gulf
kingdom forced Lebanon’s
prime minister to resign.
R o u h a n i ’s r e m a r k s f o l lowed a phone call to his Lebanese counterpart the previous
day, in which the Iranian president pledged support for Lebanon’s stability following the
resignation of Saudi-backed
Prime Minister Saad Hariri.
The surprise resignation,
announced on TV from Saudi
Arabia, threw the Lebanese
government into disarray and
dragged Lebanon back into
the increasingly tense regional
rivalry between Sunni-led Saudi Arabia and Shi’ite Iran. Lebanese President Michel Aoun
said Hariri’s resignation will
not be considered until he
hears from him directly.
Rouhani’s official website
quoted the Iranian president
as saying ‘‘there is no case in
history that a country forces
another one’s authority to resign only to interfere (in) their
internal affairs.’’
‘‘You are making mistake if
you thi nk Iran is no t yo ur
friend and the US and Israel
are your friends,’’ Rouhani
said, according to the semi-official ISNA news agency.
In his announcement Saturday, Hariri accused Iran of
meddling in Arab affairs and
t h e Ir a n - b a c k e d m i l i t a n t
group Hezbollah of holding
Lebanon hostage. Hezbollah
has members in the Lebanese
government Hariri formed last
year.
Saudi Arabia meanwhile
accused Hezbollah of declaring war on the kingdom
through its alleged support for
Yemen’s Houthi rebels.
Our health plans are designed to improve care for people with
multiple chronic conditions, many with disabilities. So although
Commonwealth Care Alliance
Fred qualifies for a nursing home, he can live independently at
home with our care and support. Our comprehensive approach
brings together primary care, behavioral health and social
services, even medical care at home as needed. Because home
means the world to Fred.
Care that brings it all together.
That’s uncommon care.
That’s Commonwealth Care Alliance.
Learn more about CCA’s
MassHealth and Medicare health plans.
800-CALL-CCA (800-225-5222) TTY 711
8 am – 8 pm, 7 days a week
commonwealthcarealliance.org
2017_CCA_7
© 2017 Commonwealth Care Alliance
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A5
T h e
A6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
GARY’S
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
SALE THRU
THRU DECEMBER
NOVEMBER 31,
30,2013
2017
SALE
TELECHECKYour check is welcome
20%OFF
ANY PREPARED“FOOD” PURCHASE!
(SANDWICHES INCLUDED
We feature Boar’s Head Meats. Try Our Homemade corned Beef, Pastrami,
Roast Beef, Homemade Salads, Breads, Desserts, Soups and more!
PRICES
VALID
THROUGH
30, 2017
• Not valid for
items sold
by the
pound or NOVEMBER
catering Coupon
expires 12/31/13
VODKA
VODKA
ABSOLUT 1.75
$25.99
ABSOLUT
VODKA 1.75
$24.99
ABSOLUT LITER *AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$17.99*
BELUGA GOLD LINE VODKA 750ML
$84.99
BELUGA RUSSIAN VODKA 750ML
$23.99
BELUGA RUSSIAN VODKA 750ML
$22.99
BULLY BOY “FROM BOSTON” 750ML
$24.99
BELUGA TRANSATLANTIC VODKA 750ML
$29.99
BURNETT’’S 1.75ALL FLAVORS *AFTER $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE $8.99*
BELVEDERE VODKA 1.75
$44.99
CHOPIN ORIGINAL, RYE, OR WHEAT 750ML*AFTER $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE$21.99*
CIROC ORIGINAL, PEACH, COCONUT, BERRY, APPLE,
CIROC ORIGINAL, AMARETTO, PEACH, COCONUT, BERRY 750ML $29.99
MANGO 750ML
$29.99
COSSACK 1.75
$10.99
CRYSTAL HEAD VODKA (SKULL BOTTLE)
$34.99
DOUBLE CROSS 750ML
$29.99
GORAL
SLOVAKIAN
VODKA 750ML
$15.99
FINLANDIA
1.75
$26.99
GORDON’S
1.75
$15.99
GORDON’S 1.75
$15.99
GREEN
MARK “RUSSIAN”
VODKA
1.75
GREEN MARK“RUSSIAN”
1.75 *AFTER
$5.00
MAIL IN REBATE$17.99
$11.99*
GREY
GOOSE1.75
1.75
$49.99
GREY GOOSE
$49.99
HANGAR
1 STRAIGHT
$36.99
GREY GOOSE
750ML VODKA 1.75
$25.99
KETEL
ONE
VODKA
1.75
GREY GOOSE LITER
$31.99
*AFTER
$5.00
MAIL-IN
REBATE
$22.99*
HANGAR
750ML
ALL FLAVORS
$23.99
ONE
NEW
*
KEEL AMSTERDAM
750ML
$17.99
“LIGHT” VODKA1.75
AFTER
$13.99*
KETEL$4.00
1.75 REBATE
$37.99
ONEMAIL-IN
1.75 *AFTER
NEW AMSTERDAM
PLATINUM
7X DISTILLED
1.75 $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE$12.99*
NUVO$5.00
SPARKLING
VODKA 750ML ALL FLAVORS $5.99*
$19.99
*AFTER
MAIL-IN REBATE
PINNACLE
1.75 ALL FLAVORS *AFTER $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE$19.99
$12.99*
REYKA
750ML
REYKA 750ML
$18.99
RUBINOFF
1.75 ALL FLAVORS
$10.99
RUBINOFFSTANDARD
1.75 ALL FLAVORS
RUSSIAN
1.75
RUSSIAN STANDARD
STANDARD 1.75
RUSSIAN
PLATINUM 1.75
$10.99
$23.99
$24.99
$29.99
RUSSIAN STANDARD
PLATINUM
1.75
SMIRNOFF
VODKA 1.75
***WOW PRICING***
SMIRNOFF
1.75 *AFTER
AFTER
$8.00 MAIL-IN
REBATE $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$34.99
*
750ML
STOLICHNAYA
ELIT
STOLI
RAZBERI,
BLUEBERI,
SVEDKA
1.75
*AFTER
$4.00 MAIL IN REBATE
OHRANJ, OR VANIL 1.75
$49.99
$14.99*
$9.99*
SMIRNOFF
RASP.,
WHIPPED,
MELON,
ICED
CAKE,
SMIRNOFF VODKA,
ROOTBEER
*AFTER
$5.00 MAIL 750ML
IN REBATE
$14.99*
APPLE,
VANILLA,
RASPBERRY,
$11.99
STOLICHNAYA
1.75
$29.99
SOBIESKI 1.75
$16.99
$13.99*
$26.99
THREE OLIVES 1.75
1.75ALLFLAVORS*AFTER$5.00MAILINREBATE $16.99*
STOLICHNAYA
1.75MAIL-IN REBATE
TITO’S$7.00
*AFTER
$27.99
$19.99*
TRIPLE EIGHT
750MLVODKA
FROM NANTUCKET,
ALL FLAVORS$17.99
$19.99
SVEDKA
ORIGINAL
1.75
TAAKA
1.75
UV 1.75VODKA
ALL FLAVORS
TITO’S
VODKA
VOLI LIGHT
-ALL1.75
FLAVORS 750ML
$8.99
$17.99
$26.27
$16.99
FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SPECIALS AND
DRIVING1.75DIRECTIONS, TO TO
NEW AMSTERDAM
GIN
WWW.GARYSLIQUORS.COM
BEEFEATER 1.75
$27.99
BLUECOAT “PHILADELPHIA” 750ML
$22.99
BOMBAY SAPHIRE
1.75 $8.00
*AFTERMAIL
$5.00IN
MAIL-IN
REBATE$20.99*
$26.99*
BEEFEATER
1.75 *AFTER
REBATE
750ML
$20.99
BLUECOAT
“PHILADELPHIA”
BROCKMANS
750ML
$29.99
1.75
$25.99
BOMBAY
GORDON’S 1.75
$16.99
BOMBAY SAPHIRE 1.75 *AFTER $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE $29.99*
MONKEY 47 SCHWARZWALD 375ML
$39.99
BOODLES “LONDON” 1.75
$27.99
CITADELLE 1.75 *AFTER $10.00 MAIL IN REBATE $19.99*
$21.99
COLD RIVER “MAINE” 750ML
RUM
RUM
BACARDI SILVER OR GOLD 1.75
$13.99*
BACARDI SILVER OR GOLD 1.75 *AFTER $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE $16.99*
CANE RUM 1.75
BLUE CHAIR BAY WHITE, COCONUT, OR SPICED 750ML$15.99
*AFTER $10.00 MAIL-IN REBATE
$5.99*
$26.99
BULLY BOY “BOSTON RUM” 750ML
CAPTAIN MORGAN SPICED 1.75
$21.99*
CAPTAIN MORGAN SPICED 1.75*AFTER$5.00MAILINREBATE$15.99*
*AFTER $5.00 MAIL-IN REBATE
$27.99
GOSLING’S BLACK SEAL 1.75
$19.99
HURRICANE “NANTUCKET” 750ML
*AFTER $5.00 MAIL-IN REBATE
TEQUILA
TEQUILA
CAMARENA
SILVER OR REPOSADO 1.75
$31.99
1800 SILVER OR
REPOSADO750ML
1.75*AFTER$5.00MAILINREBATE $29.99*
CAMPEON
REPOSADO
$74.99
$45.99
AVION ANEJO 750ML
CAMPEON
$64.99
$29.99
CAMARENASILVER
SILVER 750ML
OR REPOSADO 1.75
CAMARENA SILVER
REPOSADO 750ML
CAZADORES
SILVEROR
750ML
$21.99
$14.99*
*AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE
CLASE
AZUL BLANCO
REPOSADO
750ML
$84.99
CASA NOBLE
“CARLOS
SANTANA”
$29.99
750ML
CASAMIGOSBUFFALO
REPOSADO
CORAZON
TRACE
REPOSADO 750ML $42.99
$59.99
$39.99
CASAMIGOS SILVER 750ML
DON JULIO 70TH ANNIVERSARY 750ML
$54.99
$119.99
DON JULIO 1942 750ML
750ML750ML
$49.99
DON JULIO
ANEJO
GRAND
MAYAN
ANEJO
$74.99
$43.99
DON JULIO BLANCO 750ML
$47.99
DON JULIO REPOSADO 750ML
$38.99
HERRADURA ANEJO 750ML
$34.99
HERRADURA REPOSADO 750ML
1792 FULL PROOF (STORE BARREL PICK) 750ML $39.99
$31.99
HERRADURA SILVER 750ML
BAKER’S 7 YEAR 750ML
$40.99
BOURBON & RYE
BOURBON & RYE
BASIL HAYDEN’S 750ML
$34.49
BIB
& TUCKER
750ML FINISHED” 750ML
$43.99
ANGEL’S
ENVY “PORT
$44.99
BAKER’S
7
YEAR
750ML
$34.99
BOOKER’S 750ML
$49.99
BASIL HAYDEN’S 750ML
$29.99
BULLEIT 10 YEAR OLD 750ML
$42.99
BERKSHIRE MTN. SAM ADAMS CASK FINISHED 750ML $59.99
BULLEIT
BOURBON
1.75
$47.99
BERNHEIM
WHEAT 750ML
$31.99
750ML
$37.99
BLANTON’S
SINGLE
BARREL
BULLEIT BOURBON 750ML
$28.99
BOOKER’S 750ML
$39.99
BULLEIT RYE 1.75
$47.99
BULLEIT BOURBON 1.75
$46.99
BULLEIT
RYE 750ML750ML
$28.99
BULLEIT BOURBON
$27.99
BULLEIT
RYE
750ML
$27.99
CLYDE MAY’S STRAIGHT BOURBON 750ML
$37.99
CLYDE MAY’S 750ML
$27.99
CLYDE MAY’S WHISKEY 750ML
$32.99
DAD’S HAT RYE 750ML
$31.99
GENTLEMAN
JACKRYE
750ML
$24.99
DAD’S HAT WHITE
750ML
$27.99
EAGLE
RARE
10
YEAR
750ML
$24.99
HANCOCK’S SINGLE BARREL 750ML
$49.99
ELIJAH CRAIG 12 YEAR 1.75
$47.99
HIGH
WEST
CAMPFIRE
750ML
$55.99
ELIJAH
CRAIG
12 YEAR 750ML
$29.99
HIGH
RYE, 750ML
FOURWEST
ROSESDOUBLE
SINGLE BARREL
$29.99
FOUR
ROSES
SMALL
BATCH
750ML
$22.99
OR AMERICAN PRARIE 750ML
$29.99
GENTLEMAN JACK 1.75
$48.99
GENTLEMAN JACK 750ML
$26.99
HUDSON FOUR GRAIN, OR RYE 375ML
$36.99
JACK DANIEL’S 1.75
$39.99
*AFTER $4.00 MAIL-IN REBATE
$13.99*
ST.
GEORGE
GALE
FORCE BOTANIVORE,
“NANTUCKET 750ML
GORDON’S 1.75
TERROIR, DRY RYE GIN 750ML
HENDRICK’S 750ML
TANQUERAY
1.75 750ML
MARTIN MILLER’S
NEW AMSTERDAM 1.75
*AFTER $5.00 MAIL-IN REBATE
NOLET’S “HOLLAND” 750ML
PRIVATEER
“MASS.”
750ML750ML
UNCLE
VAL’S
BOTANICAL
SEAGRAM’S 1.75
TANQUERAY “MALACCA” LITER
GUBBA
RUM1.75
GOLD
OR SILVER 750ML
TANQUERAY
*AFTER $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE
THE
REAL
MCCOY1.75
3 YEAR 750ML
MALIBU
COCONUT
$19.99
$16.99
$26.99
$28.99
$22.99
$18.99
$22.99*
$37.99
$22.99
$29.99
$16.99
$32.99
$19.99
$25.99*
$14.99
$24.99
750ML
MOUNT
GAYMCCOY
“OLD CASK”
THE
5 YEAR
750ML
REAL
MOUNT GAY 1.75
THE REAL MCCOY 12 YEAR 750ML
MYERS’S DARK 1.75
TWENTY
BOAT
SPICED 750ML
RON ZACAPA
750ML
SAILOR
ZAYA
12JERRY
YEAR SPICED
750ML 1.75
THE KRAKEN 750ML
ZAYA 12MAYAN
YEAR 750ML
GRAND
SILVER 750ML
$84.99
$23.99
$27.99
$44.99
$39.99
$39.99
$36.99
$31.99
$27.99
$15.99
$24.99
$59.99
JOSE
1.75
JOSE CUERVO
CUERVO RESERVA
DE LA FAMILIA 750ML $119.99
*AFTER
$4.00 MAIL-IN
REBATE
$25.99*
IN
JOSE CUERVO
SILVER
OR GOLD1.75* AFTER $4.00 MAIL
$28.99*
REBATE ANEJO 750ML
MILAGRO
$34.99
750ML*AFTER
IN
JOSE CUERVO
SILVER
OR GOLDSILVER
MILAGRO
BARREL
RESERVE
750ML $4.00 MAIL
$38.99
$17.99*
REBATE
MILAGRO REPOSADO 750ML
$22.99
$19.99
JOSE CUERVO TRADICIONAL SILVER 750ML
MILAGRO
SILVER
1.75
$44.99
$32.99
MILAGRO ANEJO 750ML
MILAGRO
SILVER 750ML
$22.99
750ML
$24.99
MILAGRO REPOSADO
750ML
$22.99
MILAGROANEJO
SILVER750ML
PATRON
$52.99
PATRON
“GRAN
BURDEOS”
ANEJO
$449.99
PATRON REPOSADO 750ML
$46.99
$46.99
PATRON ANEJO 750ML
PATRON SILVER 750ML
$39.99
$159.99
PATRON PLATINUM 750ML
750ML 750ML
$42.99
PATRON
REPOSADO
$64.99
HIGH
WEST
YIPPIE KI-YAY
$79.99
PATRON SILVER 1.75
I.W. HARPER 15 YEAR
$79.99
$39.99
PATRON SILVER 750ML
JACK DANIEL”S SINATRA LITER
$154.99
$25.99
SAUZA SILVER OR GOLD 1.75
$39.99
JACK DANIEL’S 1.75
JACK DANIEL’S SINGLE BARREL 750ML
$42.99
JACK DANIEL’S SINGLE BARREL
$39.99
JACK DANIELS’S HONEY 1.75
750ML
$44.99
“WICKED
OAK SOCIETY”
750ML
$34.99
JEFFERSON’S
CHEF’S COLLABORATION
$24.99
JIM
BEAM 1.75RESERVE 750ML
$46.99
JEFFERSON’S
750ML
$29.99
JEFFERSON’S
RYE
$37.99
JOURNEYMAN FEATHERBONE 750ML
$31.99
JEFFERSON’S SMALL BATCH 750ML
$34.99
MAKER’S MARK “46” 750ML
$33.99
JIM BEAM “BLACK LABEL” 1.75
$46.99
MAKER’S MARK 1.75
$22.99
JIM BEAM 1.75
750ML
$24.99
MAKER’S
1.75CASEOF6BTLS.*AFTER$35.00MAILINREBATE
$102.94*
JIM BEAMMARK
$26.99
KNOB CREEKBOURBON
“SMOKED750ML
MAPLE” 750ML
$36.99
MICHTER’S
1.75
$45.99
KNOB
CREEK
9
YEAR
$49.99
OLD FORESTER 1920 750ML
$26.99
KNOB CREEK 9 YEAR 750ML
$24.99
SAZERAC RYE 750ML
$31.99
KNOB CREEK SINGLE BARREL 750ML
$28.99
TEMPLETON
$43.99
LARCENY 1.75RYE 750ML
$44.99
TIN
CUP 1.75
750ML
$23.99
LARCENY
$33.99
MAKER’S
MARK “46” 750ML
$26.99
TIN
CUP 750ML
MAKER’S MARK 750ML
$24.99
$59.99
WOODFORD RESERVE 1.75
OLD SCOUT “SMOOTH AMBLER” 750ML
$29.99
$33.99
WOODFORD RESERVE 750ML
$29.99
SAZERAC RYE 750ML
$53.99
WOODFORD RESERVE “DOUBLE OAKED” 750ML
$56.99
WOODFORD RESERVE 1.75
$29.99
WOODFORD RESERVE 750ML
Like us on
MON-SAT 8AM-11PM, SUN 10AM-6PM
CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY
OPEN M0N-SAT 8AM TIL 11PM
OPEN CHRISTMAS EVE 8 AM - 8 PM
OPEN SUNDAYS 12:00-6:00PM Follow
OPEN CHRISTMAS
EVE UNTIL
CLOSED CHRISTMAS
DAY 9 P.M.
CLOSED CHRISTMAS DAY
OPEN
NEWYEARS
YEARS EVE
8 AM
- 8 PM9 P.M
OPEN
NEW
EVE
UNTIL
OPEN
DAY
OPENALL
NEW DAY
YEARSNEW
DAY 8YEARS
AM - 8 PM
A WHOLE LOT MORE THAN A LIQUOR STORE
GREAT FOOD TO GO
AT GARY’S DELI & GRILL!!!
GIN
OPEN
us on
$319.99
GLENLIVET 25 YEAR XXV 750ML
GLENMORANGIE 10 YEAR 750ML
$31.99
GLENMORANGIE 18 YEAR 750ML
$79.99
ABERLOUR 12 YEAR 750ML
$38.99
ABERLOUR 16 YEAR 750ML
$52.99
GLENMORANGIE LASANTA “SHERRY” 750ML
$37.99
ABERLOUR 18 YEAR 750ML
$79.99
GLENMORANGIE NECTAR D’OR “SAUTERNES” 750ML$54.99
ABERLOUR A’BUNADH 750ML
$58.99
GLENMORANGIE QUINTA RUBAN”PORT” 750ML
$37.99
ARDBEG 10 YEAR 750ML
$45.99
HIGHLAND PARK 12 YEAR 750ML
$36.99
BALLANTINE’S 1.75
$22.99
BALVENIE 14 YEAR CARRIBEAN CASK 750ML
$59.99
HIGHLAND PARK 15 YEAR 750ML
$53.99
CAOL ILA 12 YEAR 750ML
$46.99
INVER HOUSE 1.75
$12.99
CHIVAS REGAL 12 YEAR 1.75
$52.99
J&B SCOTCH 1.75
$34.99
CHIVAS REGAL 12 YEAR 750ML
$27.99
JOHNNIE
WALKER
“DOUBLE
BLACK”
750ML
$49.99
CHIVAS REGAL 12 YEAR LITER
$38.99
JOHNNIE WALKER BLACK 1.75
$59.99
CHIVAS REGAL 18 YEAR 750ML
$62.99
CHIVAS REGAL 21 YEAR ROYAL SALUTE 750ML $159.99
JOHNNIE WALKER BLACK 750ML
$32.99
CLUNY
1.75
$15.99
JOHNNIE
WALKER
BLACK
LITER
FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SPECIALS AND DRIVING DIRECTIONS, TO $43.99
TO
CRAGGENMORE 12 YEAR 750ML
$42.99
JOHNNIE WALKER BLUE LABEL 200TH ANNIVERSARY
CU’ DHUB “BLACK” SINGLE MALT 750ML
$36.99
$2,699.99
EDITION 750ML
CUTTY SARK 1.75
$24.99
JOHNNIE
WALKER
BLUE
LABEL
750ML
$183.99
DALWHINNIE 15 YEAR 750ML
$47.99
GLENMORANGIE
“SIGNET”
750ML
$189.99
DEWAR’S 12 YEAR 1.75
$56.99
JOHNNIE WALKER GOLD “18 YEAR” 750ML
$72.99
DEWAR’S 12 YEAR 750ML
$29.99
GLENMORANGIE
18
YEAR
750ML
$94.99
JOHNNIE WALKER GREEN LABEL 15 YEAR MALT 750ML $59.99
DEWAR’S
12
YEAR
LITER
$35.99
ABERLOUR 12 YEAR 750ML
$46.99 JOHNNIE
GLENMORANGIE
WALKER LASANTA,
PLATINUM 18 YEAR 750ML
$82.99
DEWAR’S WHITE LABEL 1.75
$31.99
JOHNNIE
WALKER
RED
LABEL
1.75
$30.99
ABERLOUR
16
YEAR
750ML
$76.99
OR
QUINTA
RUBAN
750ML
$44.99
FAMOUS GROUSE 1.75
$29.99
LAGAVULIN
16
YEAR
750ML
$61.99
GLANFARCLAS
40 YEAR
750ML
$399.99
ARDBEG 10 YEAR
750ML
$46.99 GLENMORANGIE NECTAR D’OR
GLENFIDDICH 12 YEAR 1.75
$69.99
MACALLAN 12 YEAR 1.75
$94.99
$59.99
BALLANTINE’S
$23.99 “SAUTERNES” 750ML
GLENFIDDICH
12 1.75
YEAR 750ML
$32.99
MACALLAN 12 YEAR 750ML
$42.99
$42.99
GLENFIDDICH
YEAR“DOUBLE
750ML WOOD” 750ML
$45.99
BALVENIE 1215
YEAR
$44.99 HIGHLAND PARK 12 YEAR 750ML
MACALLAN 18 YEAR 750ML
$154.99
GLENFIDDICH 18 YEAR 750ML
$74.99
HIGHLAND PARK 15 YEAR 750ML
$79.99
$219.99 MACALLAN
BALVENIE 21 YEAR “PORT WOOD” 750ML
21 YEAR 750ML
$199.99
GLENFIDDICH 21 YEAR 750ML
$129.99
HIGHLAND
PARK
18
YEAR
750ML
$149.99
BALVENIE TUN
$339.99 MACALLAN 25 YEAR SHERRY CASK 750ML
$669.99
GLENFIDDICH
40 1509
YEAR NO.4
750ML750ML
$1,999.99
GLENKINCHIE
12
YEAR
750ML
$46.99
INVER
HOUSE
1.75
$55.99
CAOL ILA 12 YEAR 750ML
$59.99 OBAN 14 YEAR 750ML
GLENLIVET 12 YEAR 1.75
$71.99
SPEYBURN
YEAR
SINGLE MALT 750ML
$19.99
*AFTER $3.00 10
MAIL-IN
REBATE
$9.99*
COMPASS12
BOX
PEAT
MONSTER 750ML
$48.99
GLENLIVET
YEAR
750ML
$33.99
SPRINGBANK
10
YEAR
750ML
$49.99
JOHNNIE WALKER “KING GEORGE V” 750ML
$579.99
GLENLIVET
16 YEAR
750ML
$58.99
CRAGGENMORE
12NADURRA
YEAR 750ML
$49.99
TALISKER
10
YEAR
750ML
$49.99
GLENLIVET 18 YEAR 750ML
$79.99
JOHNNIE WALKER BLACK 1.75
$54.99
CUTTY SARK
1.75
$24.99 USQUABEACH FLAGON 750ML
GLENLIVET
21 YEAR
750ML
$134.99
$99.99
JOHNNIE WALKER BLACK 750ML
$25.49
DALMORE 12 YEAR 750ML
$49.99
JOHNNIE WALKER BLUE LABEL
$36.99
DALMORE 15 YEAR (GIFT SET) 750ML
$79.99 KNAPPOGUE 12 YEAR 750ML
200TH ANNIVERSARY
EDITION 750ML
$2,699.99
750ML
$49.99
KNAPPOGUE
14
YEAR
DALMORE CIGAR MALT 750ML
$139.99
BUSHMILLS 1.75
$39.99
BLUE
LABEL
750ML
JOHNNIE
WALKER
$183.88
$74.99
KNAPPOGUE 17 YEAR 750ML
DALWHINNIE
YEAR
750ML
$54.99
750ML
$35.99
BUSHMILLS
1015
YEAR
MIDDLETON
JOHNNIE WALKER PLATINUM 18 YEAR 750ML $109.99
$87.99
750ML
$61.99
BUSHMILLS
16 YEAR
DEWAR’S WHITE
LABEL
1.75
PADDY
LITER
$29.99
JOHNNIE WALKER RED LABEL 1.75
$27.99
$34.99
BUSHMILLS BLACK BUSH 750ML
$23.99* POWERS 750ML
*AFTER $5.00 MAIL-IN REBATE
$21.99
LAGAVULIN 16 YEAR 750ML
$67.99
$28.99
CLONTARF 1.75
$43.99
FAMOUS GROUSE
1.75
$29.99 RED BREAST 12 YEAR 750ML
JAMESON
1.75
$39.99
MACALLAN 12 YEAR 1.75
$99.99
$69.99
JAMESON
12 YEAR
750ML1.75
$36.99
GLENFIDDICH
12 YEAR
$79.99 RED BREAST 15 YEAR 750ML
MACALLAN 12 YEAR 750ML
$46.98
$37.99
TULLAMORE DEW 1.75
750ML
$22.99
JAMESON
GLENFIDDICH
12 YEAR 750ML
$35.99 MACALLAN 18 YEAR 750ML
$199.98
TULLAMORE DEW 12 YEAR 750ML
$37.99
$29.99
JAMESON BLACK BARREL 750ML
GLENFIDDICH
15
YEAR
750ML
$59.99
MACALLAN DEW
EDITION
NO. 2 750ML
$89.99
TULLAMORE
$63.99
750ML
$19.99
JAMESON GOLD RESERVE 750ML
GLENFIDDICH 18 YEAR 750ML
$96.99 MACALLAN EDITION NO. 3 750ML
$89.99
CROWN ROYAL “BLACK” 750ML
$29.99
GLENKINCHIE 12 YEAR 750ML
$56.99 MACALLAN
FINE OAK 10 YEAR 750ML
$42.99
CROWN ROYAL 1.75
$43.99
GLENLIVET 12 YEAR 1.75
$74.99 MACALLAN
RARE
CASK 750ML
$224.99
CROWN ROYAL
750ML
$25.99
BLACK VELVET 8 YR. RESERVE 1.75
$17.99
CROWN
ROYAL
LITER
$33.99
GLENLIVET 12 YEAR 750ML
$37.99 OLD PULTENEY
CANADIAN CLUB 1.75
$18.99
CROWN ROYAL MAPLE 1.75
$44.99
GLENLIVETCLUB
16 YR.
40
YEARROYAL
OLD “VERY
$2,999.99
CANADIAN
1.75NADURRA
CASE OF 6 BTLS.*AFTER $35.00 MAIL IN
CROWN
MAPLERARE”
750ML 750ML
$25.99
REBATE
$78.94*
SEAGRAM’S10“7”
1.75750ML
*AFTER $4.00 MAIL IN REBATE $13.99*
CASK STRENGTH 750ML
$79.99 TALISKER
YEAR
$58.99
CANADIAN MIST 1.75
SEAGRAM’S V.O. 1.75 *AFTER $4.00 MAIL IN REBATE $15.99*
$16.99
JAMESON 18 YEAR OLD 750ML
$119.99
SCOTCH
WWW.GARYSLIQUORS.COM
SCOTCH
IRISH WHISKEY
WHISKEY
IRISH WHISKEY
COGNAC - BRANDY
$39.99
BUSHMILLS 1.75
CHRISTIAN BROTHERS VS 1.75
BUSHMILLS BLACK BUSH 1.75
COURVOISIER VS 1.75
BUSHMILLS BLACK
BUSH 750ML
COURVOISIER
VS 750ML
COURVOISIER
JAMESON 1.75VSOP 750ML
DELAMAIN XO 750ML
E&J VS 1.75 *AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE
E&J VSOP 1.75 *AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE
E&J XO 1.75 *AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE
CANADIANPARADIS
CLUB 1.75
HENNESSY
750ML
HENNESSY
PRIVILEGE
VSOP 750ML
*AFTER $7.00 MAIL-IN REBATE
HENNESSY VS 1.75
CROWN ROYAL 1.75
HENNESSY VS 750ML
CROWN ROYAL
750ML
HENNESSY
XO 750ML
HINE “H” VSOP 750ML
HINE RARE VSOP 750ML
KELT XO 750ML
LANDY VS 750ML
E&J VS 1.75
WHISKEY
$18.99
$41.99
$59.99
$29.99
$25.99
$35.99
$39.99
$79.99
$16.99*
$17.99*
$19.99*
$799.99
$50.99
$11.99*
$59.99
$37.99
$28.99
$24.99
$199.99
$39.99
$46.99
$119.99
$17.99
$19.99
COGNAC - BRANDY
E&J VSOP 1.75
$22.99
CORDIALS
-COCKTAILS
$23.99
E&J
XO 1.75
1800 ULTIMATE
MARGARITA
$15.99
750ML
$51.99
HENNESSY
PRIVILEGE
VSOP1.75
ALLEN’S COFFEE BRANDY 1.75
$13.99
$64.99
HENNESSY VS 1.75
B&B 750ML
$24.99
750ML 1.75*AFTER $10.00 MAIL IN REBATE$34.99
HENNESSY
VSCREAM
BAILEYS IRISH
$19.99*
BARENJAGER
$24.99
750ML
$162.99
HENNESSY
XO750ML
BENEDICTINE 750ML
$24.99
750ML
$39.99
HINE
“H” VSOP
CACHACA
#51 LITER
$15.99
CAMPARI
$24.99
$51.99
HINE
RARE750ML
VSOP 750ML
CAMPARI LITER
$29.99
CHAMBORD 750ML
$23.99
CHARTREUSE VEP GREEN OR YELLOW 750ML
$169.99
COINTREAU 750ML
$29.99
B&B
LIQUEURAMARETTO
750ML
$26.99
DISARONNO
1.75
$35.99
DISARONNO
AMARETTO
750ML
$20.99
BAILEYS
IRISH
CREAM 1.75
DOMAINE DE CANTON GINGER 750ML
$28.99
*AFTER $5.00 MAIL-IN REBATE
$25.99*
DRAMBUIE 750ML
$24.99
BAILEY’S
CREAM750ML
750ML
$17.99
FABRIZIA IRISH
LIMONCELLO
$15.99
FERNET
BRANCA
750ML
$21.99
BENEDICTINE LIQUEUR
$26.99
GALLIANO 750ML
$27.99
750ML
$15.99
BORGHETTI
GRAN GALA ESPRESSO
1.75
$29.99
GRAN GALA
750ML
$15.99
CAMPARI
750ML
$28.99
GRAND MARNIER 1.75
$59.99
CAMPARI
LITER 750ML
$33.99
GRAND MARNIER
$28.99
GRAND MARNIER
CINQUANTENAIRE
“150” $169.99
CHARTREUSE
VEPCENT
GREEN
OR YELLOW 750ML
750ML
$179.99
COINTREAU
750ML
$28.99
GRAND MARNIER
CENTENAIRE “100” 750ML
$109.99
GRAND
MARNIER
LITER
$35.99
FERNET BRANCA 750ML
$25.99
GRAND MARNIER RASPBERRY/PEACH “NEW”
$28.99
HPNOTIQ 750ML
$19.99
IRISH MIST 750ML
$22.99
JAGERMEISTER “SPICE” “NEW” 750ML
$15.99
CORDIALS - COCKTAILS
LANDY VSOP
750ML
SLANE
TRIPLE
CASKED 750ML
LANDY XO 750ML
TULLAMORE
DEW
1.75750ML
MAISON ROUGE
VSOP
MARTELL VS 750ML
TULLAMORE DEW 750ML
MARTELL VSOP 750ML
750ML750ML
METAXA
5 STAR
WEST
CORK
10 YEAR
METAXA GRAND FINE 750ML
750ML
METAXA
CROWN SEVEN
ROYALSTAR
APPLE,
OR VANILLA 750ML
MEUKOW VS 750ML
RICH & RARE
CANADIAN
MEUKOW
XO 750ML
PIERRE
FERRAND
*AFTER $3.00
MAIL-IN1840
REBATEFORMULA 750ML
PIERRE FERRAND AMBRE 750ML
SEAGRAM’S “7” 1.75
PIERRE FERRAND RESERVE 750ML
750ML
REMY
MARTINV.O.
1738
SEAGRAM’S
1.75
REMY MARTIN LOUIS XLLL 750ML
REMY MARTIN
VSOP 750ML
LANDY
VS 750ML
REMY MARTIN XO 750ML
LANDY VSOP 750ML
ST. REMY XO 750ML
MAISON ROUGE VSOP 750ML
$28.99
$24.99
$99.99
$33.99
$19.99
$28.99
$23.99
$39.99
$15.99
$32.99
$34.99
$18.99
$19.99
$26.99
$99.99
$32.99
$10.99*
$32.99
$17.99
$51.99
$47.99
$18.99
$2,199.99
$36.99
$21.99
$119.99
$28.99
$12.99
$19.99
750ML
$16.29
METAXA
5 STAR 1.75
$36.99
JAGERMEISTER
JAGERMEISTER
$15.99
METAXA
7 STAR 750ML
750ML
$19.29
$12.99
JOSE CUERVO MARGARITA 1.75
$49.99
REMY MARTIN 1738 750ML
JOSE CUERVO ULTIMATE MARGARITA 1.75
$14.99
REMY
MARTIN
KAHLUA
1.75 *AFTER $10.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$23.99*
KAHLUA
750ML
$17.99
$249.99
1989
GRAND
CHAMPAGNE 750ML
KAHLUA LITER
$25.99
REMY MARTIN LOUIS XLLL 750ML
$2,599.99
KINKY 750ML
$15.99
750ML ROYAL 750ML
$37.99
REMY
MARIEMARTIN
BRIZARDVSOP
CHOCOLATE
$19.99
MOLINARI
SAMBUCA
750ML
$19.99
$134.98
REMY
MARTIN
XO 750ML
$21.99
MOZART CHOCOLATE CREAM 750ML
OUZO #12CINNAMON
750ML
$14.99
FIREBALL
WHISKY 1.75
$26.99
OUZO CAMBAS 750ML
$10.99
GALLIANO
750ML750ML
$27.99
OUZO METAXA
$12.99
750ML
$22.99
PALLINI
LIMONCELLO
GRAN GALA 1.75
$29.99
PATRON CITRONGE 750ML
$16.99
GRAN
GALA
750ML
$15.99
PATRON
XO CAFÉ
750ML
$19.99
PATRONMARNIER
XO CAFÉ DARK
$19.99
GRAND
750ML 750ML
$24.99
$26.99
PAVAN MUSCAT /ORANGE 750ML
JAGERMEISTER 750ML
$15.99
RAMAZOTTI AMARO 750ML
$14.99
RHUM CHATA
$15.99
KAHLUA
1.75 CREAM 750ML
$35.99
$20.99
ROMANA SAMBUCA 750ML
KAHLUA 750ML
$19.99
ROMANA SAMBUCA LITER
$26.99
KAHLUA
LITER
$25.99
$16.99
SAMBUCA
SECOLARE 750ML
SKINNY
GIRL
COCKTAILS
“ALL
TYPES”
750ML
$10.99
OUZO METAXA 750ML
$13.49
SOLERNO BLOOD ORANGE 750ML
$29.99
SAMBUCA
750ML
*AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE$16.99
$23.99*
SOUTHERN SECOLARE
COMFORT 1.75
ST.GERMAIN
ELDER 750ML
$13.99
ST.
750ML
$29.99
$29.99
ST. GERMAIN 750ML
$18.99
THE KNOT “IRELAND” 750ML
TIA MARIA 750ML
$20.99
WHISPER CREEK TENESSEE SIPPING CREAM 750ML $18.99
This is our 75th year in business.... 1942 - 2017
FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SPECIALS, VISIT...
Case prices are for one type of wine...
NO ASSORTING!
WWW.GARYSLIQUORS.COM
655 V.F.W. PARKWAY, ROUTE ONE • WEST ROXBURY
617-323-1122 • FAX: 617-323-6024
Coupons available while they last.
See coupons for details and limitations.
Not responsible for typographical errors.
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
GARY’S
A7
SALETHRU
THRU DECEMBER
NOVEMBER 31,
30, 2013
2017
SALE
TELECHECKYour check is welcome
A WHOLE LOT MORE THAN A LIQUOR STORE
Like us on
OPEN M0N-SAT 8AM TIL 11PM
SUNDAYS12:00-6:00PM
10:00-6:00
OPENOPEN
SUNDAYS
Follow us on
OPEN
CHRISTMAS
EVE
UNTIL
9 P.M.
OPEN MON-SAT
8AM-11PM,
SUN
10AM-6PM
CLOSED THANKSGIVING
DAYDAY
CLOSED
CHRISTMAS
OPEN CHRISTMAS EVE 8 AM - 8 PM
CLOSED
CHRISTMAS
OPEN NEW
YEARS
EVE DAY
UNTIL 9 P.M
OPEN NEW YEARS EVE 8 AM - 8 PM
OPEN
DAY NEW
YEARS
OPENALL
NEW YEARS
DAY 8 AM
- 8 PM DAY
EXTRA BIG SAVINGS ON CASES WITH MAIL IN
REBATES
SCOTCH
*NET CASE COST *NET BOTTLE COST
*NET CASE COST *NET BOTTLE COST
FRANCE
$319.99
GLENLIVET 25 YEAR XXV 750ML
GLENMORANGIE 10 YEAR 750ML
$31.99
B&G SANCERRE 750ML
$14.98
AFTER REBATE
AFTER REBATE
AFTER
REBATE750ML
AFTER REBATE
GLENMORANGIE
18
YEAR
750ML
$79.99
ABERLOUR
12
YEAR
$38.99
CRISTALINO BRUT CAVA
$139.98
BOUCHARD
CORTON-CHARLEMAGNE 2013 750ML
KIM CRAWFORD SAUVIGNON BLANC
ABERLOUR
16
YEAR
750ML
$52.99
GLENMORANGIE LASANTA “SHERRY” 750ML
$37.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$64.00*
$5.33*
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $48.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$95.64*
$7.97*
$89.98
BOUCHARD
MEURSAULT PERRIERES 2013 750ML
ABERLOUR 18 YEAR 750ML
$79.99
GLENMORANGIE
NECTAR
D’OR
“SAUTERNES”
750ML
$54.99
EDNA
VALLEY
VINEYARDS
CHARDONNAY
KUNG FU GIRL RIESLING
$8.98
CHAPOUTIER
BELLERUCHE COTES DU RHONE 750ML
ABERLOUR A’BUNADH 750ML
$58.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $40.00 MAIL IN REBATE
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$67.64*
$5.64*
$80.00*
$6.67*
GLENMORANGIE
QUINTA
RUBAN”PORT”
750ML
$37.99
ARDBEG 10 YEAR 750ML
$134.98
CHATEAU$45.99
LEOVILLE BARTON 2009 750ML
7 DEADLY ZINS
FREIXENET CORDON NEGRO CAVA
HIGHLAND PARK 12 YEAR 750ML
$36.99
BALLANTINE’S 1.75
$22.99
750ML
$199.98
CHATEAU
LEOVILLE
DE
LAS
CASES
2011
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$89.76*
$7.48*
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$64.00*
$5.33*
BALVENIE
14
YEAR
CARRIBEAN
CASK
750ML
$59.99
HIGHLAND
PARK
15
YEAR
750ML
$53.99
CAMPO VIEJO RIOJA TEMPRANILLO
$3,994.00
CHATEAU PETRUS 2009 “100 POINTS” PARKER 750ML
JACOB’S
CREEK
“CLASSIC
WINES”
CAOL
ILA
12
YEAR
750ML
$46.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
INVER HOUSE 1.75
$12.99
$60.00*
$5.00*
DOMAINE$52.99
DE LA ROMANEE CONTI
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$48.00*
$4.00*
CHIVAS REGAL
12 YEAR 1.75
CLINE CELLARS ANCIENT VINES ZINFANDEL
J&B
SCOTCH
1.75
$34.99
$999.98
GRANDS ECHEZEAUX
2013 750ML
CHIVAS REGAL 12 YEAR 750ML
$27.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
KAIKEN MALBEC
$84.00*
$7.00*
JOHNNIE
WALKER
“DOUBLE
BLACK”
750ML
$49.99
$14.98
DOMAINES
SCHLUMBERGER PINOT GRIS 750ML
CHIVAS REGAL
12 YEAR LITER
$38.99
KENWOOD CHARDONNAY
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$95.76*
$7.98*
JOHNNIE
WALKER 750ML
BLACK 1.75
$59.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
CHIVAS REGAL 18 YEAR 750ML
$62.99 ROSE
$84.00*
$7.00*
$12.98
ESPRIT GASSIER
PROVENCE
MATUA SAUVIGNON BLANC NEW ZEALAND
LUCIEN ALBRECHT CRÉMANT D’ALSACE BRUT
CHIVAS
REGAL
21
YEAR
ROYAL
SALUTE
750ML
$159.99
JOHNNIE
WALKER
BLACK
750ML
$32.99
$12.98
GUIGAL COTES DU RHONE ROUGE 750ML
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$72.00*
$6.00*
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$132.00*
$11.00*
CLUNY 1.75
$15.99
JOHNNIE
WALKER
BLACK
LITER
$43.99
HOB NOB CHARDONNAY, CABERNET,
SEBASTIANI CHARDONNAY SONOMA
MUMM NAPA SPARKLING WINE
CRAGGENMORE 12 YEAR 750ML
$42.99
JOHNNIE WALKER BLUE LABEL 200TH ANNIVERSARY
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$72.00*SINGLE$6.00*
$7.98
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$156.00*
$13.00*
CU’ DHUB “BLACK”
MALT 750ML MERLOT, PINOT
$36.99 NOIR 750ML
750ML
$2,699.99
EDITION
STELLINA DI NOTTE PINOT GRIGIO
RODNEY STRONG CHARDONNAY
750ML
$9.98
LOUIS
JADOT
BEAUJOLAIS
VILLAGES
CUTTY SARK 1.75
$24.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$76.00*
$6.33*
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$88.00*
$7.33*
JOHNNIE
WALKER
BLUE
LABEL
750ML
$183.99
$11.98
MACON LUGNY
DALWHINNIE 15 YEAR 750ML
$47.99 “LES CHARMES” 750ML
RUTHERFORD RANCH MERLOT
BARONE FINI PINOT GRIGIO
DEWAR’S 12 YEAR 1.75
$56.99PROVENCE
JOHNNIE
WALKER
GOLD
“18
YEAR”
750ML
$72.99
MINUTY
ROSE
$14.98
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$132.00*
$11.00*
CASE OF 12 750ML BTLS.*AFTER $18.00 MAIL IN REBATE
DEWAR’S 12$86.00*
YEAR 750ML $7.17*
$29.99
750ML
$41.98
OTT
CH.
ROMASSAN
ROSE
PROVENCE
JOHNNIE
WALKER
GREEN
LABEL
15
YEAR
MALT
750ML
$59.99
SANTA
SAUVIGNON
WeCAROLINA
featureRESERVA
Boar’sCABERNET
Head Meats.
Try
Our Homemade
corned
Beef,
Pastrami,
DEWAR’S 12 YEAR LITER
$35.99
CAVIT PINOT
GRIGIO
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$59.76*
$4.98*
750ML
$9.98
TALMARD MACON-CHARDONNAY
JOHNNIE WALKER PLATINUM 18 YEAR 750ML
$82.99
LABEL 1.75
$31.99
BTLS.*AFTER
$18.00 MAIL IN REBATEDEWAR’S WHITE
OF 6-1.5LT and
$36.42*
$6.07*
Roast
Beef, Homemade Salads, Breads, Desserts,CASESoups
more!
STARMONT
CHARDONNAY
750ML
$13.98
TRIMBACH
PINOT
GRIS
JOHNNIE
WALKER
RED
LABEL
1.75
$30.99
FAMOUS GROUSE 1.75
$29.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $36.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$13.00*
CK MONDAVI WINE
• Not valid for items sold by the$156.00*
pound or catering
Coupon
Couponexpires
expires12/31/13
12/3/2014
750ML
$14.98
TRIMBACH
RIESLING
LAGAVULIN
16
YEAR
750ML
$61.99
GLANFARCLAS 40 YEAR 750ML
$399.99
COPPOLA CLARET
CASE OF 6-1.5LT BTLS.*AFTER $18.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$30.00*
$5.00*
GLENFIDDICH 12 YEAR 1.75
$69.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $32.00 MAIL IN REBATE
MACALLAN 12 YEAR 1.75
$94.99
$123.64*
$10.30*
CLIFFORD
BAYMAIL
SAUVIGNON
BLANC NEW ZEALAND
*AFTER $5.00
IN REBATE$12.99*
NEW AMSTERDAM 1.75
GLENFIDDICH 12 YEAR 750ML
$32.99
TERRA D’ ORO ZINFANDEL
MACALLAN
12
YEAR
750ML
$42.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $18.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$78.00*
$6.50*
SPARKLING VODKA
750ML ALL FLAVORS
$19.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $30.00 MAIL IN REBATE
GLENFIDDICH
15 YEAR 750ML
$45.99
$89.76* NUVO $7.48*
MACALLAN
18
YEAR
750ML
$154.99
19 CRIMES$74.99
BLEND 750ML
$7.98
HOB NOB PINOT NOIR
ABSOLUT
BARTON 1.75
& GUESTIER, CAB., CHARD., OR MERLOT$25.99
PINNACLE 1.75 ALL FLAVORS *AFTER $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE $12.99* GLENFIDDICH 18 YEAR 750ML
CASE
OF
12-750ML
BTLS.
*AFTER
$18.00
MAIL
IN
REBATE
MACALLAN
21
YEAR
750ML
$199.99
$78.00*
$6.50*
CASE
OF
12-750ML
BTLS.*AFTER
$30.00
MAIL
IN
REBATE
INSURRECTION
SHIRAZ/CABERNET
750ML
$11.98
$26.00*
$2.17*
GLENFIDDICH
21
YEAR
750ML
$129.99
ABSOLUT LITER *AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$17.99*
REYKA 750ML
$18.99
ESTANCIA
CHARDONNAY
SUTTER HOME WINES
MACALLAN
25 YEAR SHERRY CASK 750ML
$669.99
JACOB’S
CREEK WINES
750ML
$5.98
GLENFIDDICH 40 YEAR 750ML
$1,999.99
BELUGA
VODKA 750ML
$23.99
RUSSIAN
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $30.00 MAIL IN REBATE
1.75 ALL FLAVORS
$65.76* RUBINOFF
$5.48*
CASE OF 6-1.5LT BTLS. *AFTER $18.00$10.99
MAIL IN REBATE
GLENKINCHIE
12
YEAR
750ML
$46.99
$28.62*
$4.77*
LAYER
CAKE
SHIRAZ
750ML
$11.88
OBAN 14 YEAR 750ML
$55.99
BULLY BOY “FROM BOSTON” 750ML
$24.99
RUFFINO PROSECCO
RUSSIAN STANDARD WOODBRIDGE
1.75
$24.99
GLENLIVET 12 YEAR 1.75
$71.99
WINES
LINDEMAN’S
BIN
WINES
750ML 10 YEAR SINGLE MALT 750ML
$4.98
SPEYBURN
$19.99
BURNETT’’S
1.75ALL
FLAVORS
$5.00INMAIL
IN REBATE $8.99*
CASE OF 12-750ML
BTLS.
*AFTER *AFTER
$25.00 MAIL
REBATE
$87.00*
$7.25*
GLENLIVET 12
YEAR 750ML$6.98*
$33.99
OF 6-1.5LT
BTLS. *AFTER $18.00$34.99
MAIL IN REBATE
$41.88*
RUSSIAN STANDARD CASE
PLATINUM
1.75
MOLLYDOOKER “THE SPRINGBANK
BOXER” SHIRAZ
750ML750ML
$21.98
CHOPIN
ORIGINAL,
RYE, OR WHEAT
750ML*AFTER
$5.00 MAIL IN REBATE$21.99*
10 YEAR
$49.99
GABBIANO
CHIANTI
OR PINOT
GRIGIO
GLENLIVET 16 YEAR NADURRA 750ML
$58.99
CARLO
ROSSI
“GENERICS”
CASE OF
12-750ML
BTLS. *AFTER
$25.00
MAIL INBERRY
REBATE750ML $29.99
1.75 *AFTER $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE $14.99*
$31.00* SMIRNOFF
$2.58*
CIROC
ORIGINAL,
AMARETTO,
PEACH,
COCONUT,
TALISKER 10 YEAR 750ML
$49.99
GLENLIVET 18 YEAR 750ML
$79.99
CASE OF 4-4LT. BOTTLES*AFTER $15.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$38.12*
$9.53*
19 CRIMES
RED BLEND
SMIRNOFF RASP., WHIPPED, MELON, ICED CAKE,
COSSACK
1.75
$10.99
GLENLIVET
21
YEAR
USQUABEACH
FLAGON
750ML
$134.99
750ML
$99.99
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$59.64*
$4.97*
HESS SELECT CHARDONNAY
DOUBLE
750ML
$29.99
CROSS
ROOTBEER
*AFTER
$5.00
MAIL
IN
REBATE
$14.99*
BELCREME DE LYS CHARDONNAY OR PINOT NOIR
CLEAN SLATE RIESLING 750ML
$8.28
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS. *AFTER $12.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$95.76*
$7.98*
FINLANDIA
1.75 BTLS. *AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$26.99
CASE OF 12-750ML
$80.00* STOLICHNAYA
$6.67* 1.75
$29.99
750ML
$36.99
KNAPPOGUE
12
YEAR
750ML
$8.48
DR.
L
RIESLING
BERINGER WHITE ZINFANDEL
BLACK INK1.75
RED BLEND
GORDON’S
$15.99
STOLICHNAYA ELIT 750ML
750ML
$49.99
750ML
$39.98
J.J.
PRUM
WEHLENER
SONNENUHR
SPATLESE
2012
KNAPPOGUE
14
YEAR
CASE OF 6-1.5LT. BTLS.*AFTER $12.00 $49.99
MAIL IN REBATE
$38.88*
$6.48*
CASE OFMARK“RUSSIAN”
12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER
$24.00 $5.00
MAIL IN
REBATE
$83.76*
$6.98*
GREEN
1.75 *AFTER
MAIL
IN REBATE $11.99*
BUSHMILLS 1.75
$39.99RIESLING
750ML
$9.98
SCHLINK
HAUS
SPATLESE
SVEDKA
1.75
*AFTER
$4.00
MAIL
IN
REBATE
$13.99*
$74.99
KNAPPOGUE 17 YEAR 750ML
YELLOW TAIL WINES
BV COASTAL
WINES
GREY
$49.99
GOOSE 1.75
$35.99
BUSHMILLS 10 YEAR 750ML
750ML
$9.98
VILLA WOLF
DRY RIESLING
CASE OF 6-1.5LT BTLS.*AFTER $12.00$16.99*
MAIL IN REBATE
CASE OF 12-750ML BTLS.*AFTER $24.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$42.00*
$7.00*
$64.00* THREE$5.33*
MIDDLETON
$109.99
OLIVES 1.75ALLFLAVORS*AFTER$5.00MAILINREBATE
GREY GOOSE 750ML
$25.99
$61.99
BUSHMILLS 16 YEAR 750ML
PADDY LITER
$29.99
$27.99
TITO’S 1.75
HOUSE WINES 5LT
$12.98
GREY GOOSE LITER
$31.99 FRANZIA
$34.99
BUSHMILLS BLACK BUSH 750ML
750ML
$21.99
POWERS
TRIPLE EIGHT
750MLSELECT
FROM NANTUCKET,
$19.99
$28.99
CLONTARF 1.75
HANGAR ONE 750ML ALL FLAVORS
$23.99 FRANZIA
VINTNER
WINES 5LT ALL FLAVORS$14.48
750ML
$43.99
BREAST
YEAR
UV 1.75 ALL FLAVORS
$17.99
JAMESON
1.75BRUT NV 750ML
$39.99
MOET
ROSE12
2004
GRAND
VINTAGE 750ML
$69.98
$49.98 RED
BOLLINGER
ALMADEN
BURGUNDY,
CHABLIS, RHINE 5LT
$14.98
KEEL “LIGHT”
VODKA 750ML
$17.99 FRONTERRA
WINES 1.5LT
$7.48
750ML
$69.99
RED
BREAST
15
YEAR
JAMESON
12BRUT,
YEAR ROSE,
750MLBLANC DE NOIRS 750ML $36.99
BAREFOOT
WINES 1.5LT
$8.97 HARDY’S
CHANDON
$15.98 MUMM NAPA BRUT, ROSE, CUVEE M 750ML
KETEL ONE 1.75
VOLI LIGHT
-ALL FLAVORS
$37.99
750ML
$16.99
WINES
3LT
$9.98
$15.98
$37.99
BELLA SERA WINES 1.5LT
$9.98 LINDEMAN’S BIN WINES 1.5LT
750ML
$22.99
JAMESON
CRISTALINO
BRUT CAVA 750ML
$7.48 TULLAMORE DEW 1.75
$8.98
750ML
$28.98
NICOLAS
FEUILLATTE
BRUT
NV
FORBOX
A COMPLETE
LIST OF SPECIALS
AND DRIVING
DIRECTIONS, TO TO
$37.99
BLACK
WINES 3LT
$16.98 MEZZACORONA
750ML
$29.99
JAMESON
BLACK BARREL
DOM PERIGNON
2006 750ML
$135.98 TULLAMORE DEW 12 YEAR 750ML
WINES 1.5LT
$9.98
PERRIER JOUET
BELLE
BOTA BOX WINES 3LT
$14.98
DEW 750ML
750ML750ML
$63.99
$19.99
JAMESON
GOLD
RESERVE
FREIXENET
CORDON
NEGRO
$8.48 TULLAMORE
OZEKI SAKE 1.5LT
$9.98
CARLO ROSSI GENERICS 4LT
$13.28
$119.98
G.H. MUMM CORDON ROUGE NV 750ML
$36.98 EPOQUE FLOWER BOTTLE 750ML
$9.98
PAUL MASSON WINES 3LT
CARLO ROSSI RESERVES 4LT
$14.28
ROYAL “BLACK”
750ML
$29.99
GAMBINO PROSECCO 750ML
$12.98 CROWN
GALE FORCE “NANTUCKET 750ML
$19.99
$37.98
PERRIER-JOUET
GRAND
BRUT NV 750ML
PETER VELLA WINES 5LT
$15.98
$43.99
CARLO ROSSI WINES 5LT
$15.98
$16.99
GORDON’S 1.75
J VINEYARDS BRUT 750ML
$19.98 CROWN ROYAL 1.75
PIPER-HEIDSIECK
HOME
$7.98
WINES 1.5LT
$25.99
CAVIT
PINOT1.75
GRIGIO
1.5LT
$9.08 SUTTER
HENDRICK’S
750ML
$28.99
KORBEL
BRUT8 OR
DRY
750ML
$9.98 CROWN ROYAL 750ML
BEEFEATER
*AFTER
$8.00 MAIL IN REBATE $20.99*
BLACK
VELVET
YR.EXTRA
RESERVE
1.75
$17.99
$29.98
BRUT OR
EXTRA
DRY NV 750ML
VENDANGE
WINES
1.5LT
$7.48
CROWN
ROYAL
LITER
$33.99
MARTIN
MILLER’S
750ML
$22.99
CK
MONDAVI
WINES
1.5LT
$8.98
LAURENT-PERRIER
BRUT
NV
750ML
$31.98
$20.99
BLUECOAT “PHILADELPHIA” 750ML
CANADIAN CLUB 1.75
$18.99
CROWN
ROYAL
MAPLE
1.75
$44.99
1.751.5LT
$18.99
NEW AMSTERDAM
WOODBRIDGE
WINES
$9.98
CORBETT
CANYON WINES 3LT
$10.99
$35.98
POMMERY BRUT NV 750ML
LAURENT-PERRIER
ROSEOF750ML
$59.98
$25.99
BOMBAY 1.75
CANADIAN
CLUB 1.75 CASE
6 BTLS.*AFTER $35.00 MAIL
IN
CROWN ROYAL MAPLE 750ML
$25.99
NOLET’S TAIL
“HOLLAND”
$37.99
WINES750ML
1.5 LT
$8.98
FETZER ANTHONY’S HILL WINES 1.5LT
$9.98 YELLOW
LOUIS ROEDERER BRUT PREMIER 750ML
$37.98 ROEDERER ESTATE BRUT NV 750ML
$18.98
BOMBAY SAPHIRE 1.75 *AFTER $5.00 MAIL IN REBATE $29.99* PRIVATEER “MASS.” 750ML
REBATE
$78.94*
SEAGRAM’S “7” 1.75 *AFTER $4.00 MAIL IN REBATE $13.99*
$22.99
LOUIS ROEDERER CRISTAL 750ML
$184.96 ROEDERER L’ERMITAGE 2006 750ML
BOODLES “LONDON” 1.75
$27.99
$36.98
CANADIAN MIST 1.75
SEAGRAM’S V.O. 1.75 *AFTER $4.00 MAIL IN REBATE $15.99*
$16.99
SEAGRAM’S 1.75
$16.99
TOWN SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$8.98
MARTINI & ROSSI ASTI 750ML
$9.98
CITADELLE 1.75 *AFTER $10.00 MAIL IN REBATE $19.99* HARBOR
$32.99
TANQUERAY “MALACCA” LITER
$14.98
SCHARFFENBERGER BRUT 750ML
MOET IMPERIAL NV
CRAWFORD
SAUVIGNON
BLANC
750ML
$11.97
TANQUERAY
$21.99 KIM
1.75 *AFTER
$5.00 MAIL
IN REBATE
$25.99*
COLD RIVER “MAINE” 750ML
VSOP 750MLBLANC DE BLANC 2012 750ML $28.99
$25.98
SCHRAMSBERG
“DOUBLE MAGNUM “GLOW BOTTLE” 3 LITER
$449.98 LANDY
ALLAN SCOTT SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$10.98 LOVEBLOCK SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$14.98
$24.99
MALIBU COCONUT 1.75
750ML
$99.99
LANDY
XO
MOET IMPERIAL NV 750ML
$43.47
$36.88 VEUVE CLICQUOT BRUT NV 750ML
BABICH SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$9.98 MATUA SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$9.98
$19.99
MAISON ROUGE VSOP 750ML
$84.99 CHRISTIAN BROTHERS VS 1.75
MOUNT GAY “OLD CASK” 750ML
$18.99
BRANCOTT
SAUVIGNON
BLANC
$8.98 OYSTER
BAY1.75
SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$8.96
BACARDI SILVER
OR GOLD 1.75
*AFTER750ML
$5.00 MAIL IN REBATE $16.99*
COURVOISIER VS 1.75
$59.99
750ML 2011 750ML
$28.99
MARTELL
VSPORTO
FONSECA
$89.98
MOUNT GAY
$27.99
COURVOISIER
VS
750ML
$25.99
CLIFFORD
BLANC
$8.98 RANGA-RANGA
SAUVIGNON
BLANC
750ML
$8.98
BLUE CHAIRBAY
BAYSAUVIGNON
WHITE, COCONUT,
OR750ML
SPICED 750ML$15.99
750ML
$39.99
MARTELL
VSOP
$39.99
MYERS’S DARK 1.75
GAZELA VINHO VERDE 750ML
$4.98
COURVOISIER
750ML
$35.99
$15.99
750ML 750ML
$26.99 STARBOROUGH
BULLY BOY
“BOSTON
RUM” BLANC
CLOUDY
BAY
SAUVIGNON
$24.98
SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$7.48
CABRIZ DAOVSOP
750ML
$8.98 METAXA 5 STAR 750ML
RON ZACAPA 750ML
$36.99
QUINTA DO NOVAL 2011 750ML
$89.98
DELAMAIN
XO 750ML
$79.99
$34.99
CASAL GARCIA
VINHO VERDE 750ML
$4.98 METAXA GRAND FINE 750ML
1.75*AFTER$5.00MAILINREBATE
$21.99*
CAPTAIN MORGAN
SPICED
CUPCAKE
SAUVIGNON
BLANC
750ML
$7.88 WHITEHAVEN
$14.98
SAILOR JERRYSAUVIGNON
SPICED 1.75 BLANC 750ML
$31.99
$16.99*
E&J VS 1.75 *AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE
TAYLORSEVEN
FLADGATE
40 YR. TAWNY 750ML
$199.98
$18.99
STAR 750ML
CONFIDENCIAL RESERVA TINTO 750ML
$7.98 METAXA
$27.99
GOSLING’S BLACK SEAL 1.75
$15.99 E&J
THE KRAKEN 750ML
VSOP 1.75 *AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE $17.99*
750ML
$26.99
MEUKOW
VS
FONSECA BIN 27 PORTO 750ML
$12.98
TAYLOR FLADGATE PORTO 2000 750ML
$119.98
ZAYAPINOT
12 YEAR
$19.99 KRIS
750ML750ML
$24.99
HURRICANE “NANTUCKET” 750ML
GRIGIO
$8.88
E&J XO 1.75 *AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE
$19.99*
$99.99
MEUKOW XO 750ML
HENNESSY PARADIS 750ML
$799.99
LAYER
CAKE
PRIMITIVO
750ML
$11.88
CAMPO
VIEJO
GARNACHA
750ML
$7.98
$32.99
PIERRE FERRAND 1840 FORMULA 750ML
JOSE CUERVO RESERVA DE LA FAMILIA 750ML $119.99
HENNESSY PRIVILEGE VSOP 750ML
$50.99
ALLEGRINI AMARONE 2012 750ML
$59.98
CAMPO
VIEJO
RIOJA
GRAN
RESERVA
750ML
$17.98
$32.99
PIERRE FERRAND AMBRE 750ML
AFTER $4.00 MAIL
IN
JOSE CUERVO
GOLD1.75*
RUFFINO
GOLDSILVER
LABELOR
CHIANTI
750ML
$29.98
HENNESSY VS 1.75
$59.99
ALLEGRINI PALAZZO DELLA TORRE 750ML
$13.98
CUNE RIOJA
2012
750ML 750ML
$9.98
$51.99
PIERRE
FERRAND
RESERVE
$28.99*
REBATE
1800 SILVER OR REPOSADO 1.75*AFTER$5.00MAILINREBATE$29.99* RUFFINO
BORSAO VS
GARNACHA
$7.98
750ML 750ML
$28.99
HENNESSY
TAN LABEL CHIANTI 750ML
$16.98
ALTESINO TOSCANA ROSSO 750ML
$15.98
E LOCATIONS
BY DAVE
PHINNEY 750ML
$13.98
750ML
$47.99
REMY
MARTIN 1738
JOSE CUERVO SILVER OR GOLD 750ML*AFTER $4.00 MAIL IN
$45.99
AVION ANEJO 750ML
HENNESSY
750ML
$199.99
BORSAO XO
TRES
PICOS 750ML
$14.98 MARQUES DE MURIETTARRIOJA RESERVA 750ML $17.98
BANFI BRUNELLO DI MONTALCINO 2011 750ML $57.98 SANTA MARGHERITA PINOT GRIGIO 750ML
$16.97
REMY MARTIN LOUIS XLLL 750ML
$2,199.99
$29.99
CAMARENA SILVER OR REPOSADO 1.75
$17.99*
REBATE
HINE “H” VSOP 750ML
$39.99
BARONE
FINISILVER
PINOTOR
GRIGIO
750ML
$8.98
CAMPO
750ML
$7.98 REMY
RAMON
BILBAO
ALBARINO
$9.98
750ML 750ML
$36.99
MARTIN
VSOP
750ML
CAMARENA
REPOSADO
ST.
MICHAEL-EPPAN
PINOT GRIGIO
$10.98
HINE
RAREVIEJO
VSOP CRIANZA
750ML
$46.99
750ML
$19.99
JOSE
CUERVO TRADICIONAL
SILVER 750ML
BRANCAIA
TRE
750ML
$14.98
$14.99*
*AFTER $3.00 MAIL IN REBATE
750ML
$119.99
REMY
MARTIN
XO
KELT
XO
750ML
$119.99
$32.99
MILAGRO ANEJO 750ML
$9.98
$99.98
LAPOSTOLLE
“CLOS APALTA” 2010 750ML
ECCO
PINOT“CARLOS
GRIGIO 750ML
$8.68 STELLINA DI NOTTE PINOT GRIGIO 750ML
CASA DOMANI
NOBLE BLANCO
SANTANA”
$29.99
LANDY VS 750ML
$17.99
$12.99
ST.
REMY XO 750ML
$24.99
MILAGRO REPOSADO 750ML
IL
POGGIONE
ROSSO
DI
MONTALCINO
750ML
$19.98
TIGNANELLO
2014
750ML
$89.97
$42.99
CASAMIGOS REPOSADO 750ML
LAYER CAKE MALBEC 750ML
$11.88
$22.99
MILAGRO SILVER 750ML
$39.99
CASAMIGOS SILVER 750ML
CASILLERO DEL DIABLO WINES 750ML
$7.98 JAGERMEISTER
1.75
$36.99
LOS VASCOS CABERNET
SAUVIGNON 750ML
$6.98
PATRON “GRAN BURDEOS” ANEJO
$449.99
$119.99 KEN FORRESTER CHENIN BLANC 750ML
DON JULIO 1942 750ML
$14.98 JAGERMEISTER 750ML
CATENA MALBEC 750ML
$7.98
$15.99
$46.99
PATRON ANEJO 750ML
MONTES
ALPHA
SYRAH
750ML
$14.98
$49.99
DON JULIO ANEJO 750ML
CLOS DE LOS SIETE “MICHEL ROLLAND”
$13.98 JOSE CUERVO MARGARITA 1.75
$12.99
750ML
$159.99
PATRON PLATINUM
SAUVIGNON
BLANC 750ML
$12.98
1800 ULTIMATE MARGARITA 1.75
$15.99
$43.99 MULDERBOSCH
DON JULIO BLANCO 750ML
PRIMUS
THE ULTIMATE
BLEND 750ML
$12.98
750ML
$13.98
EL
FELINO
MALBEC
JOSE
CUERVO
MARGARITA
1.75
$14.99
HILL & DALE SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$5.98
ALLEN’S COFFEE BRANDY 1.75
$13.99
$42.99
PATRON REPOSADO 750ML
$47.99 RIB
DON JULIO REPOSADO 750ML
SHACK PINOTAGE/SHIRAZ 750ML
$9.98
VERAMONTE
SAUVIGNON
$10.98 KAHLUA
$7.98
GASCON
MALBEC 750ML
1.75 *AFTER
$10.00BLANC
MAIL IN750ML
REBATE
$23.99*
IMMORTAL
SHIRAZ
750ML
$9.98
B&B
750ML
$24.99
$79.99
PATRON SILVER 1.75
750ML
$38.99
HERRADURAHERO
ANEJO
KAHLUA
750ML
$17.99
BAILEYS IRISH CREAM 1.75*AFTER $10.00 MAIL IN REBATE$19.99*
INDABA
SAUVIGNON
BLANC
$7.98 THE
BEACH
HOUSE
SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$8.98
750ML
$39.99
PATRON
SILVER
HEITZ CABERNET SAUVIGNON 750ML
$39.98
750ML750ML
$34.99
HERRADURA
REPOSADO
KAHLUA LITER
$25.99
BARENJAGER
750ML
$24.99
$31.99
$25.99
HERRADURA SILVER 750ML
SAUZA SILVER OR GOLD 1.75
750ML
$15.98
J
“BLACK
LABEL”
PINOT
NOIR
KINKY 750ML
$15.99
BENEDICTINE 750ML
$24.99
GRGICH HILLS CHARDONNAY 750ML
$32.98
APOTHIC#51
INFERNO
750ML
$11.97 MARIE
750ML
$45.98
JORDAN
CABERNET
SAUVIGNON
BRIZARD
CHOCOLATE
ROYAL
750ML
$19.99
CACHACA
LITER
$15.99
JACK DANIEL’S SINGLE BARREL 750ML
$42.99
HANNA SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$12.98
BEAR FLAG
ZINFANDEL 750ML
$19.98 MOLINARI
SAMBUCA
750ML SAUVIGNON 750ML $19.99
JOSH CELLARS
CABERNET
$10.98
CAMPARI
750ML
$24.99
$39.99
JACK DANIELS’S HONEY 1.75
BERINGER PRIVATE RESERVE CHARDONNAY 750ML $29.98 HESS COLLECTION CHARDONNAY 750ML
$15.98
CHOCOLATE
750ML
$21.99
CREAM
BLACK INK
BLEND 750ML
$8.98 MOZART
CAMPARI
LITER
$29.99
750ML
$8.98
LINE
39
CABERNET
ANGEL’S ENVY “PORT FINISHED” 750ML
$44.99
$34.99
JEFFERSON’S CHEF’S COLLABORATION 750ML
OUZO
#12
750ML
$14.99
CHAMBORD
750ML750ML
$23.99
BOGLE
CHARDONNAY
$7.98 HESS SELECT CHARDONNAY 750ML
BOGLE
MERLOT
$7.98
$8.98
BAKER’S
7 YEAR 750ML750ML
$34.99
LOUIS MARTINI SONOMA CABERNET 750ML
$13.28
$46.99
JEFFERSON’S RESERVE 750ML
CHARTREUSE
VEP GREEN
$169.99
CAMBAS 750ML
$10.99
BOGLE PHANTOM
750MLOR YELLOW 750ML
$15.98 OUZO
BASIL HAYDEN’S
750ML
$29.99 KENDALL
CHALK
HILL CHARDONNAY
750ML
$34.98
JACKSON
CHARDONNAY 750ML
$10.57
MACMURRAY PINOT NOIR CENTRAL COAST 750ML $13.98
$29.99
JEFFERSON’S
RYE 750ML
OUZO METAXA 750ML
$12.99
COINTREAU
750ML
$29.99
BERKSHIRE MTN. SAM ADAMS CASK FINISHED 750ML $59.99
BV TAPESTRY
2012 750ML
$42.98 MARK WEST PINOT NOIR 750ML
CHALONE ESTATE CHARDONNAY 750ML
$19.98 KUNG
750ML
$31.99
JEFFERSON’S
BATCH
$7.98
FU GIRL SMALL
RIESLING
750ML
$8.98
DISARONNO
AMARETTO
1.75
$35.99
750ML
$22.99
PALLINI
LIMONCELLO
BERNHEIM WHEAT 750ML
$31.99
CHATEAU MONTELENA NAPA CABERNET 750ML $41.98
1.75
$33.99
JIM
BEAM
“BLACK
LABEL”
MCMANIS
CABERNET
750ML
$8.98
DISARONNO AMARETTO 750ML
$20.99
CHATEAU
MONTELENA
CHARDONNAY
750ML
$39.98
PATRON
CITRONGE
750ML
$16.99
$14.98
750ML
$37.99 MARKHAM CHARDONNAY 750ML
BLANTON’S
SINGLE BARREL
CHIMNEYDEROCK
CABERNET
SLD 750ML
$49.98
1.75
$22.99
JIM BEAM
DOMAINE
CANTON
GINGER
750ML
$28.99
PATRON
XO
750ML
$19.99
CAFÉ
MEIOMI
PINOT
NOIR
750ML
$18.97
BOOKER’S
750ML
$39.99
CLOS
DU BOIS
CHARDONNAY 750ML
$9.98 MINER
SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$15.98
CLOS DU BOIS
$9.98 PATRON XO CAFÉ DARK 750ML
DRAMBUIE
750MLCABERNET SONOMA 750ML
$24.99
JIM BEAM1.75CASEOF6BTLS.*AFTER$35.00MAILINREBATE$102.94*
$19.99
BULLEIT BOURBON
1.75 750ML
$46.99
OPUS ONE 2014 750ML
$299.98
COPPOLA
CHARDONNAY
$9.98 NEWTON RED LABEL CHARDONNAY 750ML
$18.98
COPPOLA
CLARET
750ML
$12.97
FABRIZIA
LIMONCELLO
750ML
$15.99
$26.99
PAVAN MUSCAT /ORANGE 750ML
$26.99
KNOB CREEK “SMOKED MAPLE” 750ML
BULLEIT BOURBON 750ML
$27.99
PETITE PETIT / MICHAEL DAVID 750ML
$11.98
DARK
HORSE
CHARDONNAY 750ML
$7.98 PATZ & HALL SONOMA CHARDONNAY 750ML
$24.98
FERNET
BRANCA
750ML
$21.99
COPPOLA
MERLOT
750ML
$10.98 RAMAZOTTI AMARO 750ML
$14.99
BULLEIT
RYE 750ML
$27.99
$45.99
KNOB CREEK 9 YEAR 1.75
QUILCEDA
CREEK
CABERNET
2011
750ML
$199.98
GALLIANO
$27.99
$15.99
DRY
CREEK
BLANC 750ML
$8.98 RODNEY
COPPOLA750ML
ROSSO 750ML
$6.98 RHUM CHATA CREAM 750ML
STRONG
CHARDONNAY
750ML
$9.98
CLYDE
MAY’SFUME
750ML
$27.99
750ML
$26.99
KNOB CREEK
9 YEAR
QUINTESSA
750ML 750ML
$129.98
GRAN
GALA
1.75
$29.99
$20.99
ROMANA
SAMBUCA
DAD’S HATCHARDONNAY
RYE 750ML 750ML
$31.99
DUCKHORN NAPA MERLOT 750ML
$39.98
ESTANCIA
$7.98 SEBASTIANI
$9.98
750ML
$31.99
KNOB CREEKCHARDONNAY
SINGLE BARREL750ML
GRAN GALA 750ML
$15.99
RUTHERFORD
HILLLITER
MERLOT 750ML
$19.98
ROMANA
$26.99
SAMBUCA
DAD’S HAT WHITE RYE 750ML
$27.99
FEDERALIST
CABERNET
SAUVIGNON
750ML
$11.98
1.75
$43.99
LARCENY
FEDERALIST CHARDONNAY 750ML
$11.98 SIMI CHARDONNAY 750ML
$13.67
GRAND MARNIER 1.75
$59.99
750ML
$16.99
SAMBUCA
SECOLARE
EAGLE RARE 10 YEAR 750ML
SEBASTIANI
PINOT
NOIR
750ML
$12.98
$24.99
FERRARI-CARANO
SIENA 750ML
$14.98
$23.99
LARCENY 750ML
GRAND
MARNIER 750ML
$28.99
FERRARI-CARANO
CHARDONNAY
750ML
$17.98
$19.98
SKINNY
GIRL
COCKTAILS
“ALL
TYPES”
750ML
$10.99
ELIJAH CRAIG 12 YEAR
1.75
$47.99 TREFETHEN CHARDONNAY 750ML
GRGICH
HILLS CABERNET
SAUVIGNON “150”
750ML
$46.98 STAGS LEAP ARTEMIS CABERNET SAUVIGNON 750ML $46.98
GRAND
MARNIER
CENT CINQUANTENAIRE
$33.99
MAKER’S MARK “46” 750ML
SOLERNO
ORANGE750ML
750ML
$29.99
BLOOD
ELIJAH CRAIG
12 YEAR 750ML750ML
$29.99
FETZER
GEWURZTRAMINER
$7.98 WENTE MORNING FOG CHARDONNAY 750ML
$9.98
750ML
$179.99
STARMONT
CABERNET
$19.98
GROTH
CABERNET
NAPA
750ML
$44.98
MAKER’S MARK 750ML
$24.99
1.75
*AFTER
$3.00
MAIL
IN
REBATE
$23.99*
SOUTHERN
COMFORT
FOUR
ROSES
SINGLE
BARREL
750ML
$29.99
GRAND
MARNIER
CENTENAIRE
“100”
750ML
$109.99
FREI BROTHERS CHARDONNAY 750ML
$14.98 WENTE
RIVA
RANCH
CHARDONNAY
750ML
$14.98
TALBOTT
KALI
HART
PINOT
NOIR
750ML
$16.98
GROTH RESERVE CABERNET 2013 NAPA 750ML $89.98 ST. ELDER 750ML
OLD SCOUT “SMOOTH AMBLER” 750ML
$29.99
FOUR ROSES SMALL BATCH 750ML
$22.99
$13.99
GRAND MARNIER LITER
$35.99
GEYSER PEAK SAUVIGNON BLANC 750ML
$7.48 WILLIAM
HILL
NORTH
COAST
CHARDONNAY
750ML
$10.98
$29.99
SAZERAC RYE 750ML
GUNDLACH BUNDSCHU MTN. CUVEE 750ML
$15.98 ST.
THEGERMAIN
PRISONER
750ML
$32.98
GENTLEMAN JACK 1.75
$48.99
750ML
$29.99
GRAND MARNIER RASPBERRY/PEACH “NEW”
$28.99
$53.99
WOODFORD RESERVE “DOUBLE OAKED” 750ML
GENTLEMAN JACK 750ML
$26.99
$18.99
THE KNOT “IRELAND” 750ML
HPNOTIQ 750ML
$19.99
$56.99
WOODFORD RESERVE 1.75
HUDSON FOUR GRAIN, OR RYE 375ML
$36.99
TIA MARIA 750ML
$20.99
IRISH MIST 750ML
$22.99
JACK DANIEL’S 1.75
$39.99
$29.99
WOODFORD RESERVE 750ML
WHISPER CREEK TENESSEE SIPPING CREAM 750ML $18.99
JAGERMEISTER “SPICE” “NEW” 750ML
$15.99
GREAT FOOD TO GO
AT GARY’S DELI & GRILL!!!
20%OFF
ANY PREPARED“FOOD” PURCHASE!
(SANDWICHES INCLUDED)
INCLUDED
(SANDWICHES
AUSTRALIA
VODKA
GERMANY
IRISH WHISKEY
CHAMPAGNE & SPARKLING WINES
BIG STUFF
WWW.GARYSLIQUORS.COM
GIN
WHISKEY
NEW ZEALAND
RUM
COGNAC - BRANDY
PORTUGAL
ITALY
SPAIN
TEQUILA
CHILE - ARGENTINA
SOUTH AFRICA
CORDIALS -COCKTAILS
DOMESTIC RED WINES
DOMESTIC
WHITE
WINES
BOURBON
& RYE
This is our 75th year in business.... 1942 - 2017
FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SPECIALS, VISIT...
Case prices are for one type of wine...
NO ASSORTING!
WWW.GARYSLIQUORS.COM
655 V.F.W. PARKWAY, ROUTE ONE • WEST ROXBURY
617-323-1122 • FAX: 617-323-6024
Coupons available while they last.
See coupons for details and limitations.
Not responsible for typographical errors.
A8
The Region
T h e
Holiday
Warehouse Sale
Great prices on handmade, eco-friendly, fair trade textiles!
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Assault allegations at Berklee
uBERKLEE
‘If I didn’t report
him [to other
schools], it would
be on me if he did
this again.’
Continued from Page A1
FRI 11/10 - 10-8 • SAT 11/11 10-5 • SUN 11/12 - 10-5
71 Chapel St., Newton, MA
Access your Globe account online at bostonglobe.com/subscriber
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
with at least three male professors, including Galindo, allowed to quietly leave since
2008, after students reported
being assaulted, groped, or
pressured into sex with their
teachers, according to court
documents and interviews with
more than a dozen people. Administrators at the renowned
music school tolerated lecherous behavior, former Berklee
students and employees said,
and often silenced the accusers
through financial settlements
with gag orders attached.
Berklee administrators defended the school’s track record, saying in a statement that
Berklee has rigorous policies
and procedures to deal with
claims of sexual harassment.
“Although we do not discuss
specific matters publicly out of
respect for all involved and limitations on what we are legally
permitted to share, we take
matters that impede the learning or working environment of
our students, faculty, and staff
seriously and act promptly to
address them,” the school said.
The allegations against the
Berklee professors come at a
time of heightened attention to
sexual harassment following
revelations about Hollywood
producer Harvey Weinstein,
who faces accusations of groping, raping, and harassing
women for decades. Since the
scandal became public last
month, women have felt empowered to speak up about alleged abuse, especially when
they believe their abusers remain free to victimize others.
The woman who reported
being assaulted by Galindo said
that when she initially spoke
with Berklee administrators in
2012, they discouraged her
from pressing forward with a
court case because, she said,
they assured her Galindo
would never work at another
school.
Ye t G a l i n d o w e n t o n t o
teach at the New England Conservatory in Boston. The wom-
FORMER BERKLEE
STUDENT WHO HAS
ACCUSED JEFF GALINDO
(LEFT) OF ASSAULTING
HER
an, who asked to remain anonymous because she fears professional reprisals, was
horrified to discover in 2016
that Galindo was teaching
again and notified the conservatory. His contract there was
not renewed, according to the
school. But he continued working at the Longy School of Music of Bard College in Cambridge until last week, when
the woman found out he was
employed there, contacted administrators, and the school
severed ties with him. Galindo
had worked there since 2009.
“If I didn’t report him [to
other schools], it would be on
me if he did this again,” the
woman said.
Still, Galindo has continued
teaching. He is listed as a parttime faculty member at the Rivers School, a college prep
school in Weston. Christine
Martin, a Rivers spokeswoman,
said Tuesday that Galindo has
been affiliated with the school
since 2015, and that he arrived
with positive references. She
was unable to say who had provided those references. On
Wednesday, another spokeswoman called the Globe after
this story was published online
to say that Galindo had been
terminated, effective immediately.
Berklee, in a statement, said
one institution requested a reference regarding Galindo and
“we provided the termination
letter which included an explicit statement that explained the
reasons for his departure from
the college.” A Berklee spokesman declined to say when that
correspondence happened or
which institution requested the
information.
O n We d n e s d a y, w i t h i n
hours of this story going online, a student-led change.org
petition had already gathered
more than 290 signatures demanding Berklee “properly address” these types of allegations.
Galindo did not return calls
and text messages from the
Globe seeking comment.
‘I am not an idiot’
But another former Berklee
professor accused of sexual
misconduct, prominent jazz
saxophonist Greg Osby, did
speak with the Globe. A woman
accused Osby in 2012 of pressuring her to have sex while she
was a student at Berklee. The
woman, who also asked to remain anonymous, had graduated several years earlier and established a successful music career, but later reported him to
Berklee administrators after
growing concerned he might
still be preying on students.
“I could not bear the feeling
that I had a responsibility to do
something about this,” said the
woman about her decision to fi-
nally contact Berklee.
Osby, in an hourlong interview with the Globe, disputed
the woman’s claims. He also
said that he received a severance package from Berklee that
included a gag order.
“Only an idiot would sleep
with students, and I am not an
idiot,” Osby said. “I would not
do that. But after they graduate, it’s open season.”
Osby said Berklee did not
give him a chance to defend
himself against the claims, but
he decided not to contest the
charges because he was burned
out teaching there.
“Bottom line is, and this is a
bit harsh, if anyone saw my
girlfriend at that time and saw
[his Berklee acc user] that
would probably end the argument,” Osby said. “Why would I
jeopardize my career for somebody like that?”
The statement issued by
Berklee said the school is committed to a “fair and thorough
process for both complainant
and respondent,” and that not
every case leads to a finding.
“As evidenced by our past
practices, where an investigation reveals a serious violation
of our sexual misconduct policy, we act swiftly and decisively
to remove the individuals from
our community,” Berklee said.
Complaint filed with MCAD
Yet a case filed earlier this
year with the Massachusetts
Commission Against Discrimination, or MCAD, raises questions about Berklee’s commitment to address the issue.
A 2012 Berklee grad who
was hired to run the school’s
audio production lab accused a
male co-worker of predatory
behavior, according to a complaint she filed with MCAD in
January. She described unwanted sexual advances by her
co-worker toward female students in the lab in mid-2015
and then retaliation against
her — leaving condoms in the
lab and suggesting sexual liaisons — when she reported his
Continued on next page
THE RUDERMAN FAMILY FOUNDATION IS PROUD TO HOST
THE GREATEST DISABILITY INCLUSION EVENT OF THE YEAR!
2
Days
Senator Maggie
Hassan
United States Senator
Dr. Joyce Banda
Former President of Malawi
Marlee Matlin
Academy Award-winning Actress
over
1,000
1AAttendees
Richard Marriott
Chairman, Host Hotels & Resorts
Foundation For People With
Disabilities
550
Top
p Speakers
Mandy Harvey
Deaf Singer-Songwriter
America’s Got Talent Finalist
November 19th & 20th, 2017
Seaport Hotel & World Trade Center
Boston, MA
#Inclusion2017
@RudermanFdn
Register Today at inclusion2017.org
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Region/World
A9
Saxophonist Greg Osby
(left) was accused of
pressuring a student to
have sex. Aruan Ortiz was
accused of touching a
student inappropriately.
Continued from preceding page
behavior to their boss. But
Berklee administrators waited
weeks to act, and then failed to
monitor the co-worker, who repeatedly violated an order they
issued for him to stay away
from her, the complaint states.
The woman also accused
Berklee of brushing off her concerns about inappropriate sexual behavior by a professor in
the school’s music production
department last year.
She “continued to observe
and experience a pattern, practice, and pervasive culture of
tolerance of sexual harassment
at Berklee,” according to the
MCAD complaint.
Berklee settled the case in
April, and that settlement is
sealed, too. The woman and
her attorney, North Reading
lawyer John W. Davis, declined
en. She declined to comment.
One of the student’s former
professors, Tom Plsek, now
chair emeritus of the brass department at Berklee, also confirms the woman’s story.
“She confided first in a female faculty member . . . and
then I found out about it from
that female faculty member,”
Plsek said. Galindo “was made
to take his things and go. I
don’t know the exact process,
but he was gone [from Berklee]
in a few days.”
Plsek retired as department
chair in 2013 but still teaches a
few courses.
Another account
His wife, Stephany Tiernan,
a professor and chair emerita
of the school’s piano department, has also borne witness to
sexual harassment allegations.
‘I wanted to be believed so bad. I
thought if I ever said anything about
money, no one would ever believe me.’
FORMER BERKLEE STUDENT
to comment.
The former student who accused Galindo of assaulting her
when she was too drunk to
fend him off said she worked
up the nerve to report him to
Berklee administrators about
six months later. He was let go
shortly after. There was no notice to students, no apology to
the woman, and no financial
settlement.
The woman, who was receiving a partial scholarship,
said she was afraid even to apply for additional financial aid
from Berklee after she reported
the assault because Galindo accused her of concocting the story to gain more scholarship
money.
“I wanted to be believed so
b a d ,” t h e w o m a n s a i d . “ I
thought if I ever said anything
about money, no one would ever believe me.”
Instead, she sought and received private therapy, paid for
by Berklee, to help her deal
with the trauma. She showed
the Globe e-mails from Angela
F. F. Davis, then Berklee’s associate dean of students, authorizing these payments. Davis,
now an executive director in
the state’s Executive Office of
Public Safety and Security, recently led the agency’s initiative to secure funding for preventing violence against wom-
In one case, a freshman alleged
her keyboarding professor, Aruan Ortiz, decided she needed
more help with her technique
and phoned her late one evening in February 2008, asking
to come over to her apartment
and offer instructions.
The woman had a friend
staying with her and “therefore
felt safe, and otherwise did not
wish to refuse assistance from
an instructor,” so she agreed,
according to a 2009 lawsuit
filed in US District Court in
Boston.
But that instruction quickly
turned sour, as soon as the
woman’s friend left the room,
the suit states, with Ortiz licking the woman, grabbing her,
and repeatedly attempting to
kiss her. The woman freed herself and ran to her friend in the
bathroom.
Ortiz then acted as if nothing happened but repeated the
behavior as the woman walked
him to the door and asked him
to leave, according to the lawsuit.
She went home to Ohio to
tell her parents, but came back
a week later only to find a voice
message from Ortiz asking her
if she was free that evening.
That’s when the woman reported his behavior to Berklee administrators. They waited two
weeks to start investigating —
and only after two of the woman’s instructors urged them to
act, according to the lawsuit. It
took another two months for
Berklee to hold a meeting with
Ortiz and the student to review
the allegations. Tiernan, who
attended that meeting, according to the lawsuit, declined to
comment for this story.
In that meeting, Ortiz admitted to grabbing the woman’s face, attempting to kiss
her, and blowing in her ear. He
claimed “it was simply part of
his [Cuban] culture,” according
to the lawsuit.
It would take Berklee another two weeks — after classes
had ended for the semester —
to inform the woman Ortiz
would no longer be teaching at
Berklee. The lawsuit, which alleged civil rights violations, and
assault and battery, was settled
in 2010. The woman, citing a
gag order on the settlement,
declined to comment. So did
her Boston attorney, Paul F.
Wood.
But Woburn attorney David
Fried, who initially represented
Ortiz in the case, said in a statement to the Globe that a “single
clumsy attempt at a kiss, although certainly improper
from a teacher to student, was
not ‘sexual harassment’ within
the meaning of any relevant
statute.”
Fried said that Ortiz hired
him because Berklee’s insurance company initially declined to represent him.
“Eventually they stepped up
to the plate, probably because
they wanted to settle the whole
thing, and I withdrew in their
favor,” Fried said. The case was
then settled, with terms confidential.
The woman who reported
Galindo’s alleged assault to
Berklee said it took her several
years to come to terms with
what happened. She is now in
her late 20s and a full-time musician.
“I came to a point where I
could let this ruin my career or
just move on,” she said.
But there is one constant reminder of that dark experience
— her school loans for tuition
at Berklee.
“I got [screwed] in every
way and will be paying Berklee
for the next seven years,” she
said, but Galindo was allowed
to walk away.
Kay Lazar can be reached at
kay.lazar@globe.com Follow
her on Twitter
@GlobeKayLazar.
Under fire, British minister quits
Unauthorized
talks with Israel
sealed her fate
By William Booth
WASHINGTON POST
LONDON — British Prime
Minister Theresa May is being
buffeted by November storms:
a go-nowhere negotiation over
Britain’s departure from the European Union, upstart rivals in
her Conservative Party, and embarrassing sex scandals swirling around her government.
And now she has had to deal
with a cabinet minister who
held talks with more than a
dozen Israeli officials in off-thebooks meetings while allegedly
on vacation.
As controversies go, the case
of Britain’s international development secretary, Priti Patel, is
an odd one. Some see a mundane reporting error, others an
effort to conceal, even deceive.
May ordered Patel to return
immediately from an official
trip to Uganda on Wednesday.
Just a few hours after arrival,
Patel submitted a letter of resignation, apologizing for having
become a distraction.
‘‘ While my actions were
meant with the best of intentions, my actions fell below the
standards of transparency and
openness that I have promoted
and advocated,’’ she wrote. In
reply, May said in a letter to her:
‘‘Now that further details have
come to light, it is right that you
have decided to resign.’’
As her international flight
wound its way on Wednesday
from Nairobi to London, the
BBC regularly posted updates
of its progress. At one point,
some 22,000 people were tracking the journey on the
Flightradar24 app.
Political reporters wrote that
Patel would be fired by May
soon after she arrived at the
prime minister’s offices.
One of the top leaders of the
Liberal Democrat party, Jo
Swinson, said Patel had ‘‘rightly
been forced to step down for
her coverup of meetings with
foreign officials and the inappropriate requests for aid to be
sent to the Israeli military in
the Golan Heights.’’
Her wrongdoing? Patel held
meetings with a dozen Israeli
leaders, including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, in August without notifying the British Embassy in Tel Aviv or the
Foreign Office in advance.
These kinds of talks are often
sensitive and require consultation by Britain’s diplomats.
Pat e l , 4 5 , c o n c e d e s s h e
broke protocol. Government
secretaries in Britain are sent
on missions abroad; they do not
freelance their own foreign pol-
icy while on vacation.
In a statement before her
resignation, Patel admitted her
mistake. ‘‘In hindsight, I can
see how my enthusiasm to engage in this way could be misread, and how meetings were
set up and reported in a way
which did not accord with the
usual procedures. I am sorry for
this and I apologize for it.’’
But as political intrigues go,
the real problem is often not
the crime, but the coverup.
Patel did not re veal her
schedule of meetings in advance, and she was vague about
when Foreign Secretary Boris
Johnson and his deputies were
made aware of the talks.
In an interview she gave to
the Guardian newspaper, she
strongly suggested that Johnson knew of her schedule beforehand.
In her statement, Patel explained, her quoted remarks
may have given the impression
that she had informed the foreign secretary about the visit
beforehand. She said she
‘‘would like to take this opportunity to clarify that this was
not the case. The foreign secretary did become aware of the
visit, but not in advance of it.’’
Patel, born in London to a
Ugandan Indian immigrant
family, was a rising star on the
right wing of the Conservative
Party.
www.cabothouse.com Complimentary Design Service Available
Auburn (Rt. 20) 508-832-7678 Burlington 781-273-2600 Burlington (Thomasville) 781-272-9966
Framingham 508-872-5900 Saugus 781-233-0038 Weymouth 781-331-6000
Portsmouth 603-436-9091 Portland 207-761-1999 West Warwick 401-828-6002
*Thomasville only.
A10
The Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Veteran’s Day Sale!
SHOW US YOUR VETERAN ID FOR ADDITIONAL SAVINGS!
Next Generation of Comfort
Relax, Rest and Recline
Introducing one of the most
comfortable reclining chairs which offers
Power recline, Swivel recline, Swivel
glider recline with built in footrest.
Available in many fashion colors.
Also available as a Medical Lift Chair.
Starting at
699
$
in Fabric
SHOWN IN
LEATHER
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Karen Bray drove around to point out maintenance crews she says are in violation.
Leaf blower fight gets noisy
uLEAF BLOWERS
Continued from Page A1
Available at
Hours: Monday - Saturday 10-6 and Sunday 12-4
FURNITURE
781-395-4131 • www.cksfurniture.net
4000 Mystic Valley Parkway (Rte 16), Medford, MA
Newton’s elected representatives struggled to find a compromise amid growing unrest.
“We had to have the police
come to our committee meetings,” said Alison Leary, a city
councilor who has led a push
for leaf blower regulations, “because the landscapers tried to
intimidate our little 5-foot-1
chair.”
Anyone who has had a
peaceful afternoon shattered by
the jet-like roar of super-pow-
We’ve Got Your Gutters
Covered, Year Round!
Never Clean Your Gutters Again™
Helps Prevent Costly Ice Dams!
25 ft of Free
Gutter Helmet
with every 100 feet purchased
Expires 11/30/17
Mention Code 102
Solves 2 problems - Leaves and Ice
• No More Dangerous Ladders • No More Frozen Gutters
• No More Dangerous Icicles • No More Shoveling Roofs
Gutter Helmet is an American-made product that has
been around for more than 30 years and comes with a
manufacturer’s lifetime guarantee.
With Ice Defense, Moonworks has created a system that
helps prevent ice dams. The combination of Gutter Helmet
and Heated Helmet is the ideal ice dam defense that will
provide safety and peace-of-mind.
Valid at first presentation only. Minimum purchases apply. Not valid with any
other offers. Restrictions apply. Ask your Project Specialist about financing
options. Financing provided by 3rd party lender. Red #s: RI 32466, MA 119535.
2 SHOWS
•
Schedule Your Free Estimate today!
617-939-9352
www.moonworkshome.com
200 EXHIBITORS
•
ered leaf blowers — especially
when deployed by bands of
workers alighting on others’
lawns — might relate to the outrage.
And Senator Rand Paul of
Kentucky, who was attacked by
a neighbor last week, apparently in a dispute over his yard, can
certainly attest to how intense
landscaping rage can become.
But why now? For one thing,
hiring out lawn maintenance
has never been more popular.
According to the National Association of Landscape Professionals, landscaping is a roughly $80 billion industry experiencing steady annual growth.
For another, equipment has become ever more powerful —
prompting various towns
around the region, including
Cambridge and Brookline, to
begin looking at ways to minimize the noise.
But in well-to-do Newton,
where as many as 70 percent of
homes employ a landscaping
service, according to one estimate, things have quickly gone
off the rails.
On one side are residents,
even some who hire landscaping companies, who complain
that the heavy-duty, gas-powered blowers favored by lawncare companies kick up dust,
pollute, and make life miserable.
On the other side are the
landscapers, who counter that
they’re simply using the most
effective tool available and that
the less-powerful models
they’re being pushed to use
take significantly longer to
complete a job, resulting in
higher prices.
“It’s like mailing a letter
when you could send an email,” said Jon Sneider, owner
of the local landscaping business Jon Sneider Corp. “We’re
going back in time.”
Blower-related bickering is
nothing new in Newton. It was
nearly a decade ago, after all,
that Hess-Mahan — in an effort
to demonstrate just how unbearable the noise can be — famously carted a blower into the
aldermanic chamber at Newton
City Hall during a meeting and
fired it up.
But the conflict began anew
a couple years ago, when Karen
Bray, a 66-year-old physical
therapist, decided to take a
stand.
4 BLOCKS APART
Top rare book & ephemera
dealers from all over the
world save their
best inventory for
Boston Rare Book Week!
antiquarian & vintage books • ephemera • photographs • autographs • historical documents • maps • prints • manuscripts
In 2015, she and her grassroots group, now known as
Newton C.A.L.M. (Citizens
Against Leaf blower Mania),
pushed the City Council to examine the issue, much to the
chagrin of landscapers, and the
council’s programs and services
committee held a series of
meetings, giving various stakeholders the opportunity to present their perspectives.
Things came to a head in
January, when, during an impassioned City Council meeting
that stretched until well after
midnight and featured a standing-room-only crowd, the council adopted an ordinance aimed
at curbing some of the perceived nuisance.
Under it, leaf blowers would
be required to have a manufacturer’s label proving they don’t
exceed 65 decibels, a step down
from the 77-decibel blowers
used by many landscapers. And
between Memorial Day and Labor Day, only electric leaf blowers would be allowed.
If the goal was to put the issue to bed, however, the effect
has been precisely the opposite.
Since the ordinance went into effect in February, police
have fielded some 350 leafblower-related complaints, and
members of Bray’s group, having successfully lobbied for new
restrictions, have begun confronting landscaping companies they suspect of skirting the
rules.
On a recent afternoon, Bray
steered her bright yellow Volkswagen Beetle through Newton’s residential streets, in
search of the telling rumble of
an illegal blower.
“Excuse me,” she said, stopping at one point to approach a
pair of landscapers working in
a residential yard. “Are you
aware of the leaf blower law in
Newton?”
Admittedly, her approach
has rubbed some the wrong
way. In the past year, Bray said,
she has been bullied, threatened, and dubbed “Wrinklestiltskin.” Not long ago, she received a confusing late-night
call from someone inquiring
about buying a leaf blower.
Turned out, a fake ad had been
posted on Craigslist: Leaf-blowers for sale, contact Karen Bray.
She actually got a kick out of
that.
Landscapers, though, have
been less amused, likening the
group to a band of vigilantes —
a claim bolstered by an incident
in August in which a landscaper reported being assaulted by a
resident who was attempting to
take photographs of the company’s equipment.
The resident denied getting
physical, and no charges were
filed. But the episode has done
little to cool tempers.
The hope on the anti-leafblower side is that — as with
the smoking bans of the 1990s,
which were initially met with
pushback from the restaurant
industry before becoming the
widely accepted norm — the industry will eventually begin to
shift, producing blowers that
are more noise- and environment-friendly.
Until then, however, both
sides appear to be digging in for
a battle that has no signs of
abating.
“The landscapers have [pretty much said], ‘You’re going to
have to take this leaf blower out
of my cold, dead hands,’ ” said
Leary, the councilor. “And that’s
what we’re doing. The blatant
disregard for the law, I’m not
going to put up with.”
Dugan Arnett can be reached at
dugan.arnett@globe.com.
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Region
A11
Across US, women turn 2016 angst into success at polls
uWOMEN
Continued from Page A1
for the first time under a new
form of government, picked a
black woman, Yvonne Spicer,
over a twice-elected white man.
In Newton, voters not only
chose Ruthanne Fuller as their
first female mayor, they also
elected five new female candidates to the City Council, boosting women’s ranks on the council to near parity, 11 out of 25.
The surge of female candidates — often women of color —
can be traced directly back to last
November when the country’s
“very qualified” female candidate for president won the popular vote but lost the election, said
Ann Bookman, a professor at the
University of Massachusetts Boston and director of the Center for
Women in Politics and Public
Policy there.
“I think that it really was kind
of a wakeup call for many women,” she said. “Many women felt
that it would be very exciting to
have the first woman president,
and when it didn’t happen, a lot
of women started saying, ‘If you
look around at government, we
just do not see anything close to
gender parity.’ ”
T he outrage sparked by
Donald Trump’s election as
president — just a month after
he was heard on video bragging
about groping women — has
only intensified since his administration began limiting
birth control access and the
news has been full of powerful
men abusing women.
“Despite all the horrible stories of sexual harassment and
despite all the really ugly evidence of white supremacy, I
think the response of women at
the grass-roots level is, ‘This is
our time. We need to get out
there. We need to put forward a
different view of America,’ ”
said Bookman.
The theme repeated across
the country Tuesday. In Seattle,
two opponents vied to become
the first woman to hold the
mayor’s office since the 1920s;
the victor was the woman who
happens to be a lesbian. Charlotte, N.C., has elected black
mayors and female mayors before but had not elected a black
female mayor until Tuesday.
Barbara Lee, the Democratic
fund-raiser whose family foundation advances women’s representation in politics, said in
an e-mail that the victories
across the country were a
“much-needed jolt of energy.”
“2017 has seen a gigantic
wave of women getting involved in politics: marching, organizing on social media, and
running for office,” Lee said.
“This movement is powered by
women who are newly invigorated and rising up to reject the
politics of hate and claim political power.”
Emerge Massachusetts, a
Lee-affiliated candidate-training program for Democratic
women, had 60 alumni run in
the spring and fall elections.
Forty-two won their races, with
one race still undecided, said
executive director Ryanne Olsen. The 70 percent success rate
is something she can handle.
“Losing in politics is part of
the electoral process,” Olsen
said. “There are so many candidates who run for office, lose,
pick themselves up, run again,
and win.”
Take Lydia Edwards, an East
Boston legal services attorney
who lost her 2016 bid for a special election to the state Senate.
Her sophomore effort for a district City Council seat this week
launched her onto the council,
past a male North End political
native who happens to be an ally of the mayor.
Edwards’s victory — alongside Kim Janey, another black
woman who won a district
council seat based in Roxbury
— will put women nearer to
parity than they’ve ever been on
the Boston City Council, occupying six of 13 seats.
“It’s really a sea change,” said
Bookman, who noted that the
first woman of color on the Boston City Council was elected
just eight years ago. “Ayanna
Pressley was the pioneer.”
“I think it’s really historic,”
Bookman added. “ The City
Council is really beginning to
look like the rest of the city of
Boston. And I think that’s very,
very exciting.”
There were losses, too.
In Everett, newcomer Stephanie Martins lost a spirited bid for
City Council. In Newton, Nicole
Castillo didn’t make it onto the
City Council, and Amy Mah Sangiolo gave up her longtime seat
in a bid for the mayor’s office.
Even the gains are measured
in a field in which women are
outnumbered. Women are still
dramatically underrepresented
in politics, not just in Congress
and state houses, but even in
city and town halls across the
state. Of Massachusetts’ 351 cities and towns, 97 have no elected women serving the commu-
nity, and many have just a smattering of female officeholders.
In Salem, where Mayor
Kimberley Driscoll easily won a
fourth term, nine women ran
for the 11-member City Council
and four won, including firsttime candidates Lisa Peterson
and Christine Madore. But
since some were competing for
the same seat, women will add
just one member, boosting their
ranks to four.
The Cambridge City Council
doubled its female representation — from two to four — including the first Muslim woman elected to the Cambridge
City Council, Sumbul Siddiqui.
Bewtra, a 37-year-old mother just elected to the Melrose
Board of Aldermen, said she
had to decide how much to incorporate her personal story into her political narrative.
“On the one hand, I am Indi-
an-American, a person of color,”
she said. “I didn’t want to make
my messaging all about that.”
But she’s also a city planner
and a member of the city’s Human Rights Commission, and it
all seemed relevant.
In the end, she believes, voters rallied behind her because
they felt included. “What was
really rewarding was being able
to engage so many people along
the way,” she said.
Bewtra and fellow first-time
candidate Kate Lipper-Garabedian will join three other
women on the board. Still, the
five will remain a minority of
the town’s 11-member elected
body, known as the Board of Aldermen. A recent effort to trade
in “aldermen” for a gender-neutral title failed.
Ebbert can be reached at
Stephanie.Ebbert@globe.com.
A12
The Nation
DONATE YOUR CAR
Wheels For
Wishes
x
% Ta
100 tible
uc
Ded
Benefiting
Call: (857) 220-8288
* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.
36th ANNUAL
Your Season
Starts Here!
P R E S E N T E D BY
NOV 9-12 | Seaport World Trade Center
Thur: 3p-10p Fri: Noon-10p Sat: 10a-8p Sun: 10a-6p
• Flippenout Extreme Aerial Show
presented by Killington
• ELITEAM Fitness Challenge presented
by Coca-Cola of Northern New England & Loon
• WZLX 100.7 Classic Ski Lodge
presented by Waterville Valley
• Vertical Runway Fashion Spectacular
presented by Sunday River
• SIA Nordic Village
SAVE $3
Use promo code GLOBE.
Kids under 12 FREE.
SALE
•“What Were They Thinking?” with John Egan
presented by Sugarbush
•“I Knew That” Ski Trivia Game
presented by Mount Snow
• Mountain Activity Center presented by Attitash
• 98.5 The Sports Hub Game Zone
• Long Trail Beer Garden
• Wachusett’s Kids Snow Park Learning Center
• Great Family Fun & Value
One Year Subscription
to
Magazine!
Get Tix Online
+
a $10 Gift Card from
with Paid Admission
Restrictions apply
For more info and tickets go to
Official Snow Report of the Expo
BEWI Productions, Inc. For exhibit info: 781.890.3234 • bewisports.com
BostonGlobe.com
expected.
The majority of Virginia voters, it turned out, had little appetite to be defined by attitudes
that stoked the white supremacist rioting last summer in
Charlottesville. They resoundingly swept Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam, a Democrat, into office, 54 percent to
Gillespie’s 45.
The outcome could be a harbinger of bad news for Republicans defending Senate seats in
the key battleground states of
Arizona and Nevada. Hardright primary candidates
backed by Breitbart News chief
— and former Trump adviser —
Steve Bannon are stoking white
identity and antiestablishment
sentiments in those states in a
struggle for the ideological
heart of the Senate.
Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona, a strong critic of Trump, has
already dropped out of his reelection battle, decrying extremism in the party. The most
well-known Republican in the
primary to replace him is Kelli
Ward, who has a penchant for
divisive rhetoric and has riled
the Arizona GOP. She has received the endorsement of conservative media stars such as
right-wing Fox News hosts
Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham.
In Nevada, establishment
incumbent Senator Dean Heller is facing a Bannon-inspired
challenge in the form of Danny
Tarkanian, another pro-Trump
candidate. Tarkanian has lost
multiple statewide campaigns
in Nevada, but he has energized
the Trump base by demanding
that Heller sign a pledge to replace Senate majority leader
Mi t c h Mc Co n n e l l . He w a s
ahead of Heller in at least one
recent primary poll.
“I am proud to stand with
my friend Steve Bannon,’’ Tarkanian said after McConnell’s
forces attacked Bannon.
There could even be danger
for Republicans in Tennessee,
which is seen as more reliably
Republican. Andy Ogles, the
HURRY!
Limited time
Offer!
Call
Schedule(617)
(000)
000-0000
Call
ToToSchedule
910-3508
FREE Installation
**
ON CUSTOM BLINDS, SHADES,
DRAPES & DECORATIVE HARDWARE
FREE
Drapery / Wood Blinds
Shutters*
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Perils in using Trump’s recipe unveiled
CUSTOM
BLINDS,
SHADES,
SHUTTERS
& DRAPES
CUSTOM
BLINDS,
SHADES,
SHUTTERS
& DRAPES
Soft Roman Shades
G l o b e
Continued from Page A1
*Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE
*We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not
*We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles & RVs
*Fully Tax Deductible
Boston’s Biggest
Ski & Snowboard
B o s t o n
uRACE POLITICS
Make-A-Wish®
Massachusetts
and Rhode Island
WheelsForWishes.org
T h e
In-Home
Design Consultation
NO OBLIGATION
Drapery
Woven Wood Shades
WE DESIGN, WE MEASURE, WE INSTALL, YOU RELAX!
Call
Schedule
Call
ToToSchedule
(617)000-0000
910-3508
(000)
AS SEEN ON TV
WE BRING THE
SHOWROOM TO YOU!
*This
offer
be presented
theoftime
of purchase.
Offer
residential
base installation
3 Day covering
Blinds brand
products
only.one
*This
offer
mustmust
be presented
at theat
time
purchase.
Offer valid
on valid
3 Dayon
Blinds
brand products
only. Buy 1ofwindow
and receive
the 2nd
Offerorexcludes
Special
Orders,
outside
manufacturer
brand
Draperies,
Window
Shutters.
Minimum
purchase
on applicable
of equal
lesser value
at 50%
off! Offer
excludes
Shutters, Special
Orders,
installation,
salesFilm
tax, and
shipping
and handling.
Not
valid on previous
purchases
products of $750 required, excluding sales tax, shipping and handling. Not valid on previous purchase or with any other offer or
or with any other offer or discount. Offer Code BGXB. 3 Day Blinds holds the following licenses: AZ ROC 264398, CA #1005986, CT HIC.0644950, MA
discount. Offer Code CEPC. 3 Day Blinds holds the following licenses: AZ ROC 264398, CA #1005986, CT HIC.0644950, MA #184680,
#184680,
NJ #13VH09390200,
OR #209181,
PA #PA107656,
Rockland
County
#H-12401-34-00-00,
#3DAYBDB842KS.©©2017
20173 3Day
DayBlinds
BlindsLLC.
LLC.
NJ #13VH09390200,
OR #209181,
PA #PA107656,
Rockland
County
#H-12401-34-00-00,
WAWA
#3DAYBDB842KS.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ed Gillespie played the
white identity card hard in
his bid for the governorship
in Virginia.
former head of the ultra-conservative Americans For Prosperity in Tennessee, has announced he would run for the
seat of retiring Senator Bob
Corker and would rely on antiimmigrant pledges such as
“build the wall.’’
Some GOP observers see the
upcoming Senate races as a
possible last stand for the issues-oriented conservatives
who don’t wish to see their party become a silo for white voters — especially when America
is increasingly diverse.
“This is one of those basic
tectonic splits of the party,” said
Charlie Sykes, the former conservative radio host and prominent Trump critic. “It really
does pit people who believe the
United States is a countr y
based on an inclusive idea versus those who really do seem to
lean on the ‘blood and soil’ approach to nationalism.”
Like Trump, the latter group
thrives on a vision of nationalism that stokes cultural divides
such as preserving Confederate
statues and personally insulting football players kneeling to
protest police brutality. They
often use overtly anti-Muslim
rhetoric and denounce economic “globalists,” a term with
anti-Semitic undertones.
Traditional Republicans
warn that a rejection of inclusive politics by the Bannon
wing of the party will spell trouble down the road.
“The first commercial I ever
made for George Bush was
about opening a bridge between Mexico and Texas, and
now all the talk is about a wall,”
said Stuart Stevens, a former
Mitt Romney campaign adviser
and lifelong Republican who
has been vocally opposed to
Trump.
He compared Trump’s and
Bannon’s style of politics to that
of George Wallace, the former
Alabama governor and infamous segregationist.
“This is all part of this tremendous hijacking, in my view,
of what conse r vatis m was
about and what the Republican
Party is about,” Stevens said.
“ This is straight out of the
George Wallace playbook. . . .
There’s a real ugliness to it.”
Ana Navarro, the Republican strategist and frequent
Tr u m p c r i t i c w h o h a s d e nounced her party’s nativist
swing, said, “It is feeling increasingly lonely on Sane Republican Survivor Island.”
“The retirements of traditional Republicans means we’ll
see more nativist Republicans
coming out of primaries,” Navarro said. “The ‘Trumpublicans’ will exert a bigger influence on the image and tone and
claim a bigger piece of the pie
of the party.”
In Washington, the signs of
the growing split between — as
Navarro called them — “Trumpublicans’’ and Republicans are
becoming more evident after a
year in which intraparty differences were often papered over.
The Senate Leadership
Fund, a fund-raising group
closely tied to McConnell, has
started targeting Bannon directly in tweets and press releases, attempting to link him
to white nationalism.
In one tweet, the fund referenced allegations by Bannon’s
ex-wife that he made anti-Semitic statements about “whiny
brat” Jews — an assertion that
Bannon has previously denied.
Another tweet highlighted Breitbart News’ declining Internet
traffic.
“Failing @BreitbartNews:
traffic plummets 20% this year,
desperate for attention! SAD!”
the group tweeted in late October.
There are even open whispers among lawmakers. Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse recently told a conservative radio
host that “a new kind of identity politics” was overtaking conservatives, which Sasse described as a “white grievance
backlash.”
Flake highlighted the shifts
when he announced he would
not seek reelection.
“It is clear at this moment
that a traditional conservative
who believes in limited government and free markets, who is
devoted to free trade, and who
is pro-immigration, has a narrower and narrower path to
nomination in the Republican
Party,” Flake said on the Senate
floor last month.
But Flake made these pronouncements while announcing his retirement from the
Senate, nudged out by the recognition that he “couldn’t run
the kind of race that I would be
proud of and win in a Republican primary at this time,” he
said.
What this means, according
to political experts, is that there
is some understanding within
the “old guard” of the party that
Bannon’s and Trump’s brand of
white identity politics is currently on the ascendancy.
“In any parliamentary system across Europe, these two
sides wouldn’t even be in the
same party, and in many cases,
they wouldn’t even be a part of
the same coalition of governance,” said Justin Gest, a
George Mason University professor and author of “The New
Minority: White Working Class
Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality.”
“ B e c a u s e o f t h e Un i t e d
States electoral system,” Gest
said, “these two have to be bedfellows or they yield a Democratic majority for the next generation.’’
Herndon can be reached at
astead.herndon@globe.com.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A13
Some lessons, signposts in Democratic election wins
By Michael Tackett
and Jonathan Martin
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — By any measure, Tuesday was a big night
for Democrats, especially in
Virginia, where they swept the
top offices, including governor,
and made strong gains in the
General Assembly. Here are
some takeaways from the biggest election night since Donald
Trump’s victory a year ago.
Suburbs propel Democrats
It was largely a suburban rebellion, where more moderate
voters rejected Trump and embraced Democrats.
Be it New Jersey, Virginia, or
Charlotte, N.C., Democrats rode
a miniwave of victories that will
give them energy for candidate
recruitment and fund-raising
heading into the midterm elections next year.
In addition to winning the
top races, for governor of New
Jersey and Virginia, Democrats
also captured the mayoral post
in Manchester, N.H., and the
state Senate in Washington,
along with other important victories in state house elections.
said Gillespie’s problem may
well have been not embracing
him enough. The president’s
approval rating in Virginia was
38 percent in one recent poll,
and he lost the state to Hillary
Clinton.
Trump posted a message on
Twitter endorsing Gillespie several weeks ago, then added a
few more on Election Day. But
with the stain of losing, Trump
quickly cut ties.
“Ed Gillespie worked hard
but did not embrace me or
what I stand for,” Trump wrote
on Twitter. “Don’t forget, Republicans won 4 out of 4 House
seats, and with the economy
doing record numbers, we will
continue to win, even bigger
than before!”
Pragmatism over purity
Liberals who did not enthusiastically back Lieutenant Governor Ralph S. Northam, the
Democratic candidate for Virginia governor, will be rethink-
ing their theory of the race.
Northam had a résumé that fit
the profile of his state. He is an
Army veteran, a physician and
a moderate politically. He was,
in a word, electable.
That does not mean the friction between the institutional
party Democrats and those in
the Bernie Sanders wing will
fade. But the lesson from Virginia is that those fights in the
primary are fine as long as each
side coalesces behind the nominee. Northam defeated former
representative Tom Perriello,
who worked energetically for
Northam’s election.
those efforts may be futile.
But there was a notable exception. Northam won in Virginia Beach, a traditionally Republican area, showing perhaps
that the backlash against
Trumpism could extend to
parts of the military population
$
omeV2017-BG
t
s
u
C DE: NO 17
30/
O CO
PROM Expires 11/
r
e
f
f
O
Trump eschews blame
Trump, traveling in Asia,
With a convincing, if expected, victory for governor of New
Jersey, Philip D. Murphy, a form e r Wa l l S t r e e t b a n k e r,
brought an emphatic end to the
You Fly, WE Drive!
Operating since 1992 • Fully Licensed & Bonded
Operating 30 Trucks • 8 Convenient Florida Locations
617.487.4364 • Visit us at eastcoastautotransport.com
A GreAT rATe
Trumpism without Trump
Ed Gillespie, the Republican
candidate for governor in Virginia, tried his best to sound the
call of Trump’s followers in
stoking the nation’s culture
wars. He was harsh on immigration, supportive of Confederate monuments, and opposed
to those NFL players who have
taken a knee.
But his public record before,
as a national party chairman,
White House counselor, and
Washington lobbyist, had few
of those harsh edges. And like a
lot of Republicans, he only
grudgingly supported Trump’s
c a n d i d a c y. Mo s t n o t a b l y,
Gillespie did not seek to campaign with the president in Virginia, settling for support via
Twitter. That left him with almost all of Trump’s baggage
and few potential benefits.
Jersey barrier
Chris Christie era. The Garden
State now joins six other states
that have Democrats in control
of the legislative and executive
branches.
Murphy has vowed to make
his state a firewall against the
policies of Trump.
FF
O
0
51st Timers
Red counties stay red
Northam’s voice may have
gone down easy in the vast
southwestern part of Virginia,
but there was no political affinity. While many Democrats have
argued that their party needs to
work to regain the support of
rural white voters, the results in
Virginia, at least, show that
that dominates that region.
from a Local Bank
18-Month CD
1.65
Live local. Work local.
Bank local,
◆
APY*
Visit us in Davis, Teele, or Medford Square
by bike, bus, T, car; online or on the phone.
even when you’re not.
Davis Square
%
MiddlesexFederal.com
Teele Square
◆
Medford Square
◆
617-666-4700
*18-Month Certificate of Deposit (CD) will earn a fixed rate of 1.64% with an Annual Percentage Yield (APY) of 1.65% as of October 26, 2017. $500 minimum to open. To earn published APY, all interest earned must remain in the CD for the entire term; withdrawal of interest during
term will result in earnings below the published APY. Early withdrawal penalties may apply. Offer subject to change without notice. CD will renew for the same term at the rate in effect at maturity unless changes are made during the ten calendar day grace period.
Member FDIC
A14
The Nation
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Woman who was angered by pol’s put-down defeats him
MAYS LANDING, N.J. — A
politician who shared a meme
on Facebook during January’s
Women’s
POLITICAL March in
NOTEBOOK Washington
asking whether the protest would be ‘‘over in
time for them to cook dinner’’
is eating his words.
A woman who was angered
by Republican John Carman’s
remarks on Tuesday defeated
him in his bid for a second
term as an Atlantic County
freeholder. Democrat Ashley
Bennett, 32, is a first-time candidate. The Egg Harbor Township resident works as a psychiatric emergency screener at
Cape Regional Hospital.
Carman called the meme ‘‘a
bad choice’’ but said the women in his life were ‘‘strong and
confident’’ enough to not be offended by his joke. He apolo-
gized a few days later. He later
drew more criticism for wearing a confederate flag patch.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three candidates targeted
by racist ads win seats
HOBOKEN, N.J. — Three
Asian-American candidates targeted in racist campaign attacks have won elections in
New Jersey. Ravi Bhalla was
elected mayor of Hoboken
Tuesday, and Jerry Shi and Falguni Patel won seats on the
school board in Edison.
Bhalla had been the subject
of anonymously distributed flyers that labeled him a terrorist.
They pictured Bhalla with the
message ‘‘Don’t let TERRORISM take over our Town!’’ The
Indian-American politician
called the flyers troubling but
said ‘‘we won’t let hate win.’’
Shi and Patel were targeted
by mailers that read ‘‘Make Edison Great Again’’ and said ‘‘the
Chinese and Indians are taking
over our town.’’ It called for the
candidates to be deported.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Va. elects the first openly
transgender legislator in US
RICHMOND — A woman
who is set to become the first
openly transgender person to
serve in a US legislature
FREE TRIAL
AVAILABLE
*,"!
$&..&#( "+,
"# ,')
%0+(',)/You’re Not Alone with Hearing Loss
2 for $895*
Receive 2 AudioToneTM Pro Hearing Aids
at $895 for a limited time only.
* Limit one coupon per patient at the promotional price during event dates only.
Not valid with any other discount or offer. Does not apply to prior purchases.
Fits up to a 35 db loss. Offer expires 11/30/2017.
brushed off her historic win
over one of Virginia’s most conservative lawmakers, saying
that she’ll focus on fixing congested roads and making the
General Assembly more transparent.
‘‘When we’re talking about it
being historic, yeah, it will be
historic when a transgender
woman finally helps fix Route
28, because that’s what I’m
here to do. This is why I ran. I
was very, very specific about
the issues I was running on,’’
Democrat Danica Roem told
FOX 5 in Washington.
Roem, a former reporter
who sings in a metal band in
her spare time, defeated longtime Republican Bob Marshall,
winning 54 percent of the votes
in the northern Virginia House
of Delegates district.
She will be the only out
trans state legislator in the
United States, according to the
Victory Fund, a political action
committee that works to help
get LGBTQ people elected.
Working as a reporter
taught her how to listen and
understand people, Roem said
on her campaign website.
Her opponent was a lightning rod for controversy, sponsoring a bill that would have restricted which bathrooms
transgender people could use.
Marshall also authored a
now-void constitutional
amendment that defined marriage as between one man and
one woman and sponsored a
bill banning gay people from
serving openly in the Virginia
National Guard.
Minneapolis elected Andrea
Jenkins, a black transgender
woman, to its City Council. Victory Fund said she was the first
openly transgender woman
elected to a city council of a
major US city. Tyler Titus, who
is also transgender, won a seat
on a western Pennsylvania
school board.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NRA­backed candidate loses
to boyfriend of gun victim
NEW YORK — Two years after his 24-year-old girlfriend
was killed on live TV, a Virginia
Democrat on Tuesday defeated
an rival who was endorsed by
the National Rifle Association
for a seat in the Legislature.
Chris Hurst, a former news
anchor whose girlfriend and
colleague, Alison Parker, was
killed on air, overtook Joseph
Yost to win the seat. He will be
one of two Democrats to represent the state’s conservative
southwest region in the House.
On Wednesday, Hurst, 30,
described himself as humbled
and awe-struck by his victory.
He said that before Parker’s
death, he had not had political
aspirations.
Parker and a cameraman,
Adam Ward, were doing a live
news segment when they were
shot by Vester Lee Flanagan II,
who had been a reporter at the
station, WDBJ in Roanoke.
Flanagan later killed himself.
Hurst was the only House
candidate in Virginia who was
endorsed by the advocacy
group known as Everytown for
Gun Safety.
But he chose not to make
gun control a key campaign issue even as he ran against Yost,
a three-term incumbent with
an A rating from the National
Rifle Association.
Hurst focused instead on
mental health, as well as issues
like health care and education
funding.
NEW YORK TIMES
Call Today For your FREE Trial 1-888-387-3068
AUBURN
BRAINTREE
BROCKTON
BURLINGTON
CHESTNUT HILL
CONCORD
DANVERS
DENNIS
DUXBURY
FALMOUTH
GARDNER
GLOUCESTER
HOLDEN
HYANNIS
LAWRENCE
LEOMINSTER
MARLBOROUGH
MEDFORD
MILFORD
N ATTLEBORO
N DARTMOUTH
NATICK
NORWOOD
HERITAGE MALL
485 GRANITE ST
776 BELMONT ST
54 MIDDLESEX TRNPKE
822 BOYLSTON ST
86 BAKER AVE
156 ANDOVER ST/RTE 114
6 ENTERPRISE RD
20 TREMONT ST
72 DAVIS STRAITS
354 MAIN ST, STE 4
BROWN’S MALL
800 MAIN ST
973 IYANNOUGH RD/RTE 132
STADIUM PLAZA
TWIN CITY PLAZA
286 WEST MAIN ST
127 MAIN ST
196 EAST MAIN St
429 S WASHINGTON ST
323 STATE RD
117 W CENTRAL ST
500 WASHINGTON ST
ORLEANS
SAUGUS
SWANSEA
TAUNTON
TEWKSBURY
WAREHAM
WATERTOWN
MIDDLETOWN, RI
S KINGSTON, RI
WARWICK, RI
N PROVIDENCE, RI
WESTERLY, RI
195 RTE 6A
WALNUT PLACE / 200 BROADWAY
207 SWANSEA MALL DR
152 DEAN ST
345 MAIN ST, SUITE 2
184 MAIN ST
31 SPRING ST
881 W MAIN RD
36 S COUNTY WAY
300 QUAKER LANE
DOUGLAS CROSSING
93 GRANITE ST
MIRACLE-EAR CENTERS/NH
CLAREMONT
CONCORD
KEENE
W. LEBANON
MANCHESTER
PLYMOUTH
PORTSMOUTH
SALEM
SOMERSWORTH
NASHUA
Hearing test always free. Not a medical exam. Audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only.
CLAREMONT SENIOR CENTER
133 LOUDON RD
640 MARLBORO ST
267 PLAINFIELD RD
2626 BROWN AVE
TENNEY MOUNTAIN PLAZA
HERITAGE COMMONS
489 SOUTH BROADWAY
SOMERSWORTH RAIL STATION
TARA COMMONS
BOSTON GLOBE MEDIA
1 Exchange Place, Suite 201
Boston, MA 02109-2132
The Boston Globe (USPS 061-420)
is published Monday-Saturday.
Periodicals postage-paid at Boston, MA.
Postmaster, send address changes to:
Mail Subscription Department
1 Exchange Place, Suite 201
Boston, MA 02109-2132
YEARLY MAIL SUBSCRIPTION
RATES FOR NEW ENGLAND
Seven days $886.08
Daily (6 Days) $599.04
Sunday only $390.00
For all other mail subscription rates and
information, call 1-888-MYGLOBE or
visit www.bostonglobe.com/subscribe
code DB11G1TA
Free newspaper reading service for
the visually impaired: Contact Perkins
Braille & Talking Book Library at
800-852-3133 or
www.perkinslibrary.org
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A15
THE
COUNTDOWN
TO
Black Friday
WINDOW
SALE
Our biggest discount of the
year ends ON Black Friday.
To help protect your home against leaking
and cold drafts, strong windows and patio
doors will be one of the most important home
improvements you can make BEFORE the winter.
November 1 st to November 24th only!
PLUS
SAVE 20% $100 OFF
on windows and patio doors1
every window and patio door1
Interest accrues from the purchase date but is waived if
paid in full for 12 months. Minimum purchase required.
No minimum purchase required.
Plus, don’t pay a thing for a year
NO NO NO
Money Down
Payments
Interest
for one
full year1
We won’t let new windows impact your holiday spending.
Why? Because you won’t pay anything until next November. Breathe easier this
holiday season with no money down, no payments and no interest for a whole year.1
Don’t take a chance on a vinyl window.
Vinyl windows can warp, leak and cause drafts, so trusting a poor-quality vinyl window
is a poor choice. Our window’s Fibrex® composite material is twice as strong as vinyl.
You’ve got enough on your plate this time of year; we’ve got this.
We build, sell, install and warrant all of our windows; that means there’s no middleman
to deal with, and as the full-service replacement window division of Andersen, we’re
about as trustworthy as you can get.
The Be!er Way to a Be!er Window™
There are limited appointments available
Call for your FREE Window and Patio Door Diagnosis
1-800-657-8799
renewalbyandersen.com
DETAILS OF OFFER – Offer expires 12/9/2017. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. You must set your appointment by 11/24/2017 and purchase by 12/9/2017. 20% off your project and 12 months no payments, no interest when you purchase four or more windows or patio doors between 11/5/2017 & 12/9/2017. Subject
to credit approval. Interest is billed during the promotional period but all interest is waived if the purchase amount is paid before the expiration of the promotional period. Financing for GreenSky®consumer loan programs is provided by federally insured, federal and state chartered financial institutions without regard to age,
race, color, religion, national origin, gender or familial status. $100 off each window or patio door, no minimum purchase required, when you purchase by 12/9/2017. Savings comparison is based on the purchase of a single unit at regular list price. License number available upon request. Available only at participating locations.
See your local Renewal by Andersen location for details. Some Renewal by Andersen locations are independently owned and operated. “Renewal by Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are trademarks of Andersen Corporation. ©2017 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved. ©2017 Lead Surge LLC. All rights reserved.
1
A16
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
For Alex Cora, a hearty welcome back to Boston
When José Massó arrived to Boston in 1973,
one of the first places he visited was Fenway Park.
He wasn’t a diehard Red Sox fan, but he wanted to
see the team’s impressive roster of Latino players,
some of whom would eventually be inducted into
the Baseball Hall of Fame: Orlando Cepeda, Luis
Aparicio, Luis Tiant, Mario Guerrero.
“Later it was Juan Marichal, and then Tony Peña and Luis Rivera in the ’80s and ’90s,” said
Massó, a prominent civic leader and activist in the
Boston Latino community who’s originally from
Puerto Rico. “They were reasons for me, and for a
growing number of Hispanic fans, to go to Fenway
Park.”
This group of iconic Latino Red Sox players —
mostly from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, and later including the mighty Pedro Martinez and David Ortiz — solidified a growing presence of Hispanics at Fenway.
And now, the appointment of Alex Cora, the 42year-old former Red Sox player from Puerto Rico,
caps the team’s embrace of Latino talent on and off
the field. Considering the team’s tarnished racial
past — the Sox were the last major league baseball
team to hire a black player — naming the first
manager of color is historic.
Roughly 32 percent of players in the Major
League of Baseball are of Hispanic descent. A quarter of the Red Sox 40-man roster is Latino, including Rafael Devers, Sandy Leon, and Hanley Ramirez. Cora now joins Rick Renteria of the White Sox
and Dave Martinez of the Washington Nationals as
the only Latino managers in the league.
“It’s beyond memorable. It says so much about
where we are today in this city,” said Massó. For
Puerto Ricans in the diaspora and on the island,
it’s also a much-needed ray of light amid weeks of
tragic news in the wake of Hurricane Maria’s devastation. “Any satisfaction that we can bring to our
homeland, it’s an amazing feeling,” said Cora. In
Monday’s press conference where he was presented as the new manager, Cora gave Dave Dom-
browski, president of baseball operations, a Puerto
Rican flag. As part of his contract, Cora also asked
that the Red Sox provide a private plane to bring
supplies and medicines to the island.
Beyond Latino pride, Cora’s appointment brings
real promise for a team that exited the playoffs early this year. He’s been called “one of the brightest
baseball intellects” around. He’s bilingual and very
much a believer in a data-driven approach to the
game. “Being bilingual helps me connect to some
of the players, but at the end of the day I’ll be evaluated by wins and losses,” said Cora. He has managerial experience, coming from winning the World
Series championship with the Houston Astros as
bench coach, and as a manager in the baseball
winter league in Puerto Rico.
His experience, baseball smarts, and bicultural
background make him a strong addition for the
team — and provide a shot of optimism to tide fans
through Hot Stove season until pitchers and catchers report for spring training.
WARD SUTTON
abcde
Fou nd ed 1 8 72
JOHN W. HENRY
Publisher
BRIAN McGRORY
Editor
VINAY MEHRA
President
ELLEN CLEGG
Editor, Editorial Page
LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
CHRISTINE S. CHINLUND
Managing Editor
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Mark S. Morrow
Jennifer Peter
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Janice Page Arts and Newsroom Innovation
Marjorie Pritchard Editorial Page
David Dahl Print and Operations
Jason M. Tuohey Digital Platforms and
Audience Engagement
Dante Ramos Ideas
Larry Edelman News and Features
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Peter M. Doucette Chief Consumer Revenue
Officer
Wade Sendall Vice President, Information
Technology
Jane Bowman Vice President, Marketing &
Strategic Partnerships
Doug Most Director, Strategic Growth
Initiatives
Maura Davis McAuliffe General Counsel
Charles H. Taylor Founder &
Publisher 1873-1921
William O. Taylor Publisher
1921-1955
Wm. Davis Taylor Publisher
1955-1977
William O. Taylor Publisher
1978-1997
Benjamin B. Taylor Publisher
1997-1999
Richard H. Gilman Publisher
1999-2006
P. Steven Ainsley Publisher
2006-2009
Christopher M. Mayer
Publisher 2009-2014
Laurence L. Winship Editor
1955-1965
Thomas Winship Editor 19651984
Ward Sutton is a cartoonist and illustrator. Follow him on Twitter @WardSutton and suttonimpactstudio.com.
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A17
Inbox
‘Trumpism’ hits
a roadblock
JOAN VENNOCHI
Resistance is just getting warmed up
The new face of Boston City Council
W
hat happened?
Six women
won election to
the Boston City
Council — making
history and stirring optimism that
a legislative body not known for its
relevance or diversity can finally
propel women to real power in this
city.
“A game changer,” said Maura
Hennigan, who served on the
council from 1982 until she ran
for mayor in 2005 — and was
crushed by Mayor Thomas Menino, who snared 68 percent of the
vote.
“They must be doing a happy
dance,” said Peggy Davis-Mullen,
who served on the council from
1991 to 2001 — when she ran for
mayor and was crushed even
harder by Menino, who walked
away with 76 percent of the vote.
“It gives you hope,” she added.
For Boston, just having a critical mass of six female councilors
represents a dramatic sea change.
“When I was on the city council, diversity was having John Sears, a
Republican. Everyone else was
Irish and Italian,” said Larry DiCara, a lawyer and veteran Boston
political observer, who was first
elected to the council in 1972 and
served until 1981.
While that might seem like ancient history — up until November
2013, only 10 women had ever
served on a council created by city
charter back in 1909, according to
the Center for Women in Politics
and Public Policy at UMass Boston. And until Tuesday’s election
results, the highest number of
women serving on it at one time
was four.
But those statistics changed on
Tuesday, when East Boston attorney Lydia Edwards beat Stephen
Passacantilli for a district council
seat that includes the North End
and Charlestown, and Kim Janey
won election to the district council
seat held by Tito Jackson, the district city councilor from Roxbury
who waged a losing campaign
Finally, the city’s
political leaders are
starting to look like
the people they
represent. Finally,
Boston voters are
starting to rock the
status quo.
against Mayor Martin J. Walsh.
Incumbency has its limits. The
mayor put his clout behind Passacantilli, but couldn’t stop Edwards,
who, with Janey, now joins four female incumbent councilors: council president Michelle Wu, Ayanna
Pressley, Annissa Essaibi-George,
and Andrea Campbell.
If the number of women to be
sworn in is a big deal, so is their
ethnic background. “Boston made
history electing six women of color
to the Boston City Council,” exulted
Colette Phillips, a politically active
woman of color, who runs a Boston
public relations and communica-
tions firm.
This new council represents a
big step forward for Boston. But
it’s way too soon to tell if any one
of the women elected to it can
truly write a new chapter in Boston politics. Wu, who topped the
ticket, has been talked about as a
possible mayoral candidate since
she became the first Asian-American woman on the council in
2013. So has Pressley, who in
2009 won a council seat as the
first woman of color.
Hennigan and Davis-Mullen believe that a mayoral run shouldn’t
be an immediate focus. But it’s definitely something for these and
other Boston female politicians to
think about. “People are open to
challenging the establishment,”
said Hennigan. “When you have
new, young leaders coming in like
these are, of course there will be
opportunities to step to the plate,
and run for mayor, governor, Congress, and the Senate.”
“Could there be a woman mayor in the future? I hope so,” said
Davis-Mullen.
So, what happened? Finally,
the city’s political leaders are starting to look like the people they
represent. Finally, Boston voters
are starting to rock the status quo.
Donald Trump’s election changed
the equation for who can run for
office, and his presidency is pushing voters to think out of the box.
What happens next? The face
of power in this city has been
slow to change. Maybe this will
be a tipping point. Of course,
some men hope it’s not.
Joan Vennochi can be reached at
vennochi@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter @Joan_Vennochi.
Are we great again yet?
Can you believe it has been a year? What a difference a
year makes.
We’ve all had a civics lesson. We’ve learned about the
Electoral College, the 25th Amendment, checks and balances, and the rule of law.
We’ve learned that Russia attacked us, Trump’s team
helped, and Republicans don’t care. We’ve learned that
Americans like having access to affordable health care that
can’t be taken away from them, and Republicans don’t care.
We’ve learned that Americans overwhelmingly want sensible gun control regulations, and Republicans don’t care.
We’ve learned the importance of our vote, and that Republicans, through voter suppression and gerrymandering, are
determined to prevent our votes from mattering.
We’ve joined the resistance. We’ve marched on Washington and demonstrated at home. We’ve attended town hall
meetings and called our state and federal elected officials.
Some of us have even run for office for the first time. We’ve
tried (belatedly, some of us) to understand and empathize
with the pain of our neighbors suffering from the dislocations of automation, globalization, and social change, even
as we have sheltered and comforted those marginalized
and terrorized by a new viciousness in our public discourse
and our national policy.
Meanwhile, our current tenant at
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue has attacked the freedom of the press, the
independent judiciary, the military,
and his own party leadership. He
has urged the Justice Department to
prosecute his political enemies. He
has hollowed out the State Department and set foxes to guard the
chicken coops at Energy, Education,
Commerce, the Treasury, and the
Environmental Protection Agency,
banishing science from government policy.
When we experienced what looked for all the world like
a military coup, with Generals Kelly, Mattis, and McMaster
grabbing the wheel at an out-of-control White House, the
ruling elite welcomed it, breathing a sigh of relief.
This is how totalitarianism progresses, we are told.
What once seemed intolerable gradually becomes normal.
Protests eventually subside.
But we’re just getting started. We’re not going to be the
generation that witnesses the end of America’s two-centuries-old experiment with democracy. In the immortal words
of Winston Churchill, who saw even darker days than
these, we will “never give in, never give in, never, never,
never, never — in nothing, great or small, large or petty —
never give in except to convictions of honor and good
sense.”
Happy anniversary. Here’s to 2018. Forward, together.
What a
difference a
year makes.
We’ve all
had a civics
lesson.
GEORGE HIBBARD
Cambridge
Don’t let Brookline seize land
from Pine Manor College
By Thomas M. O’Reilly
T
he shocking proposal by
the town of Brookline to
seize 7 acres of the Pine
Manor College campus for
use as a K-8 school is deeply unfair to our students and faculty,
and a poor way to treat a nonprofit resident that has been a good neighbor
for more than a half-century.
This proposal pits two important
educational missions against each other. At the same time, it destroys seven
acres of open space while putting at
risk an educational institution that
uniquely serves the traditionally underserved.
My biggest concern — more than
the harm to our idyllic landscape, the
threat to our important educational
mission, or the damage it does to attracting prospective students — is this:
The taking sends a terrible message to
our students — predominantly black,
brown, and low-income — about who
is valued in our society, and how they
are treated.
There is something fundamentally
disrespectful about the proposed landtaking. Where once Pine Manor Col-
The proposal pits two
important educational
missions against each other.
lege was all women, mainly middle
and upper income, and largely white,
now 85 percent of the student body
identify as students of color, 80 percent
of our students are low income, and 50
percent are multilingual. Eight out of
every 10 of our students are the first in
their families to go to college. These
students and their families chose Pine
Manor College because they know that
their chances of success are greater
(graduation rate three times the national average for their demographic)
and their outcomes upon graduation
are better: By the most recent accounting, 100 percent of our students were
admitted to graduate school or employed within six months of graduation. In essence, Pine Manor College
Tuesday’s tally is a ‘nay’ vote
for Trump. Will he pivot?
In Tuesday’s election, the voters have spoken with a loud,
clear, and resolute voice to say, “We reject the politics of
President Trump.”
Of course, Trump, in his customary style, will reject and
distort the true meaning of the election results. Trump will
say that those Republicans who lost did so not because they
aligned with him, but because they did not align with him
closely enough (“Democrats win races for governor in Virginia, New Jersey,” Page A11, Nov. 8). The American people
know better. The president’s constant campaign of misinformation and, to use his own words, “fake news,” has
turned off many citizens. He cannot simply say that black is
white and night is day and expect that we will believe it.
Mr. President, your term is careering toward a failure
largely of your own making. It’s not too late for you to remake your image. The American people are forgiving and
have a very short attention span. Do you accept the challenge? Do you accept the need to change? More important,
do you have the will and the capability to change? We, and
indeed the world, are watching to see how you respond.
KEN DEROW
Swarthmore, Pa.
GLOBE FILE PHOTO
ensures they have a better pathway forward in life.
The college has helped bring this
about by reshaping itself. The changing demographics of students, and the
need for all-women colleges to adapt to
new realities or die, have dramatically
changed Pine Manor College. We have
not been alone in needing to craft a
new identity — Vassar, Wheaton, and
Colby-Sawyer have all had to look beyond their origins as all-women colleges in order to remain viable. It is no secret that there have been major bumps
along the way, and our college has
faced some lean years. However, we
have now achieved a level of financial
stability that eluded us only a few years
ago. Our students are succeeding. We
are a college on the rebound.
On Nov. 14, voters at Brookline
Town Meeting will decide whether to
advance the effort to take our front
yard. If they vote to include Pine Manor College in Article 1, current and prospective students will be poised to lose
50 percent of the open space on campus, their traditional graduation venue, important athletic fields that serve
the 40 percent of our students who are
student athletes, and their pond that
serves as a natural lab for their biology
courses, our largest major.
Town officials have pointed out
that years ago the college re-zoned
the 7-acre open space into housing
lots — without also noting that the
change was undertaken only to enable refinancing, not development.
It is not for sale.
Pine Manor College has been a good
neighbor to Brookline. Our library is
open to anyone with a Brookline library card, and town departments
have used our facilities and meeting
spaces free of charge. The college also
makes voluntary payments in lieu of
taxes to the town.
I am encouraged by the people I
talk to in Brookline who have stepped
forward to say this is a bad decision for
both the college and Brookline.
A hostile taking of Pine Manor College’s land is against ever ything
Brookline says it believes in — an embracing, welcoming community, openspace preservation, education for all,
walkable-neighborhood schools, reducing the carbon footprint, and open
and transparent government.
Our students — in all they have
overcome to get here, in all they represent for our future — deserve this special place to go to school to learn, to
thrive, and to call home. That is the
message we hope that Brookline sends
them on Nov. 14.
Thomas M. O’Reilly is president of
Pine Manor College.
Two key ways for companies to show
they take harassment seriously
Scot Lehigh (“How companies can stop sexual harassment,”
Opinion, Nov. 3) posits two ways in which organizations
can address sexual harassment. However, he fails to mention the two most effective: external investigation and independent internal officers.
In 2006, when Cardinal Sean O’Malley balked at the recommendation of Helen Drinan, as senior vice president of
human resources, to fire Dr. Robert Haddad at Caritas
Christi, the former chief counsel of the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination was assigned to investigate, along with four others. The investigators agreed with
Drinan, and the cardinal acquiesced.
Changes to the organizational structure can also help
stop sexual harassment. Most financial institutions have a
chief ethics and compliance officer who reports violations
directly to the board of directors. In the public sector, federal agencies appoint an inspector general to ensure congressional compliance.
Widespread adoption of either approach, or both, in the
corporate world would send a clear signal that senior management is included in the process of an independent investigation and disposition of all allegations of substance.
JOHN POIRIER
Medfield
The writer is a specialist in human resources development and management, and is senior lecturer in human resources at Bryant University in Smithfield, R.I.
Letters should be written exclusively to the Globe and
include name, address, and daytime telephone number.
They should be 200 words or fewer. All are subject to
editing. Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, 1 Exchange
Pl, Ste 201, Boston, MA 02109-2132; letter@globe.com
T h e
A18
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
THE EXPOS LARGEST INVENTORY EVER
Burton
K2
Ride
and more
Mens
Womens
& Kids
Volkl
K2
Blizzard
Elan
Atomic & more
Dalbello
Technica
Lange
Atomic
Nordica & more
Giro
Smith
Bern
and more
Boards
Skis
Boots
and more
Scott
Smith
Oakley
and more
Scott
Swix
Volkl
and more
DOOR BUSTERS
DO
NOT
MISS
OUT!
DO NOT WAIT Inventory is available while supplies last
HUGE CLOTHING SELECTION - BLOWOUT PRICES
Visit one of our 3 Stores: Hanson, Quincy, & Westwood MA
Shop us online at Shop.CountrySki.com
Business
Why can’t Snap
and Twitter make
money like Facebook?
PAGES B10­15
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Panera Bread to acquire Boston­based Au Bon Pain
AT&T ­ Time Warner merger may require sale of CNN
LEUNG: A checklist for Marty Walsh’s second term
Metro
B
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, N O V E M B ER 9 , 2 017 | BO ST ONG L OB E .C O M / M E TR O
You may want to save this.
Yvonne Abraham
How not to
be That Guy
May I have a word with the
men?
Come closer, please . . .
OK, that’s too close.
Super. It has come to my
attention that some of you
are troubled by recent stories
in the Globe and elsewhere
about sexual harassment. You
feel as if men are under siege. And that it has
become impossible to navigate the treacherous terrain of cross-gender professional relationships. You’re afraid to make a move, much
less a joke, lest you fall victim to charges of
misconduct.
“As a follow up to Yvonne’s screed I advise
all males never to meet a female colleague or
vendor without another person present,” one
of you wrote.
“Things keep going the way you want, a
male would be crazy to even say ‘Good Morning’ to a female,” wrote another.
I know it can be confusing. But I’m here to
help. With a little forethought, it’s possible to
both work with women and avoid sexually harassing them.
Clip and save this handy guide on how not
to be That Guy. It’s based on actual events described by women the Globe has been talking
to lately.
‘This was a criminal act’
Unruh accuses Spacey of sexually assaulting son
By Laura Crimaldi
and Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
Former Channel 5 anchor Heather Unruh
accused actor Kevin Spacey of sexually assaulting her teenage son last year on Nantucket, recounting the alleged attack during
an emotional news conference Wednesday
that included a vivid description of the encounter.
In July 2016, Unruh said her then 18-yearold son was at The Club Car, where the
“House of Cards” actor was among the latenight crowd in the dimly lit restaurant.
Her son was mesmerized by Spacey, 58,
Unruh said, and told him he was old enough
to drink.
What happened next, Unruh alleged, was
criminal. She said Spacey purchased alcohol
for her son until he was drunk and then stuck
his hand inside the man’s pants and grabbed
his genitals.
“The victim, my son, was a star-struck,
straight, 18-year-old young man who had no
idea that the famous actor was an alleged sexual predator or that he was about to become
his next victim,” said Unruh, who was accompanied by attorney Mitchell Garabedian and
her daughter Kyla. “This was a criminal act.”
SPACEY, Page B5
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Former news anchor Heather Unruh
spoke of the allegations Wednesday.
Our body parts
I’m starting basic here, to build your confidence. Women’s breasts — even large ones —
do not exist for your entertainment in the
workplace. Do not talk to a woman’s breasts.
Make eye contact during conversations, even
with women you find attractive. Do not talk
about breasts, or use the necklaces that hang
near them as Trojan horses for breast-talk.
And definitely do not touch breasts. Very bad.
MATTHEW HEALEY FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Your body parts
This may be hard to hear, but not everyone
loves the little guy like you do. Do not speak of
it to women at work or at work-related events.
Do not send pictures of it to them, either. Definitely do not insist that they have any contact
with it whatsoever. Do not, under any circumstances, whip it out in the workplace. For example, agreeing as a group to display your
wares, and inviting a new employee to judge
whose manhood is most impressive, is extremely unprofessional (Yes, this really happened).
On the grounds of Mass MoCA in North Adams, Cecilia Hirsch of the IS183 art school did some work in one of the studios from
the Mastheads project, this one named after the legendary New England writer Henry David Thoreau.
THE WRITE PLACES
Tiny studios help authors find
solitude, connection to Berkshires
Your pornography
Have at it at home, if that’s your thing. But
the workplace is no place in which to consume
pornography. Ever. Definitely don’t watch it
on your office computer, where the IT guys
will eventually find it. Not on your phone. Not
even when you’re hanging with your boys on
the House floor. Even women who themselves
enjoy pornography will not take to the idea of
you watching it as they toil beside you. And
while we’re at it, do not try your hand at making porn in the workplace. Do not use your
cellphone to take shots up your colleagues’
skirts or attempt to photograph their cleavage
in meetings. Do not capture Snapchat images
of your co-worker in a bathing suit (She
knows it was you).
Your texts
It is such a marvelous invention, but please
use your phone wisely. Do not use it to text
women (Other than those with whom you are
in a fully consenting relationship) with proposals that they engage in sexual activity of
any kind. Do not text compliments on her behind or her breasts (see above). She may reply
“ha ha,’’ or not reply at all, but she almost certainly does not think it’s funny. More likely,
she is appalled, but she knows you have more
power than she does, and she has no idea how
else to respond. Also, if you are making propositions via text messages, which can be saved
on a screenshot and possibly shared with a reporter who has to take a shower every time
she sees them, you are also as dumb as bricks.
Resign immediately.
Your power
Ask yourself: Does this young intern or
aide or server, just starting out in a career
where you hold the cards, truly find your usually much older, probably married self attractive? When you massage her shoulders at a
bar near the office, or gyrate near her face in
ABRAHAM, Page B5
By Brian MacQuarrie
N
GLOBE STAFF
ORTH ADAMS — Theater professor Peter Campbell was drawn
here from the Upper West Side of
Manhattan, more than content to
sit in an unheated box of 8 square
feet, bundled in a jacket on a cold
and rainy day, and write of an
imagined life of Aristotle.
“I knew the weather would be bad,” said Campbell,
hunched over as he used pen and paper to write on a
spare, wooden shelf. “But it's been great — the solitude, the quiet.”
Campbell bent to his work one recent afternoon inside the Herman Melville studio at the Massachusetts
Museum of Contemporary Art, using one of five barebones writing spaces inspired by 19th-century American authors who found inspiration in the Berkshires.
The studios are part of the Mastheads project, a
first-year experiment conceived by a pair of Pittsfield
architects as a way to connect a new generation of
WRITERS, Page B5
In double­booked
surgeries, study
finds no extra risk
Defying voters, LePage
rejects Medicaid growth
Maine governor says he’ll
block unfunded expansion
By Jonathan Saltzman
GLOBE STAFF
Neurosurgeons can safely run two operations at once
without endangering patients, a study from Emory University in Atlanta concluded, part of a growing body of research in response to a Globe Spotlight Team report that
found surgeons sometimes do simultaneous surgeries
without telling patients.
The Emory researchers found no difference in complication rates between 1,303 cases that overlapped and 972
cases that didn’t at Emory University Hospital. However,
the overlapping surgeries take longer, and patients may
spend more time under anesthesia.
The researchers did not determine whether the patients had given consent to share their surgeon with another patient. During overlapping procedures, a junior
surgeon fills in when the attending surgeon is operating
on a second patient.
SURGERY, Page B4
By Michael Levenson
GLOBE STAFF
Advocates of expanding health coverage
for low-income
Mainers say they will
fight Governor Paul
LePage if he ignores
the will of the voters.
Governor Paul R. LePage of Maine, stung by
the overwhelming passage of a ballot measure
to expand insurance coverage for low-income
residents, made clear Wednesday that he will
continue to fight against expanding Medicaid
coverage under the Affordable Care Act.
In a defiant statement issued a day after
nearly 60 percent of Mainers voted for broader
health insurance coverage, LePage said he will
not implement the law until it is fully funded by
the Legislature.
Expanding Medicaid, he said, “will cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars to give
‘free’ health care to working-age, able-bodied
MAINE, Page B9
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Framingham’s
new life as city
By Jennifer Fenn Lefferts
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Framingham’s long-standing claim as the
Commonwealth’s largest town is now a footnote in its history.
Incorporated as a town in 1700, the community of 70,000 will officially become a city
Jan. 1. After voting in April to change to a city
form of government, residents elected
Framingham’s first mayor Tuesday.
But what does the transformation actually
mean, in practice?
Beyond losing bragging rights as the largest town (that will now go to Brookline, with
nearly 59,000 people), the biggest change will
come in how government functions and decisions are made.
Gone will be the representative Town
Meeting form of government. Framingham is
currently led by a town manager, who handles
the day-to-day-functions; a five-member
Board of Selectmen, the executive branch;
and a 216-person
Town Meeting,
which some say can
be unwieldy and ineffective. Town
Meeting, considered the legislative
branch of the government, could
drag on during
parts of several
weeks in April and
May.
Starting in 2018,
Framingham,
which will be the
state’s 14th largest
community by population, will be run by Mayor Yvonne Spicer
(photo above), an 11-member City Council,
and a nine-person School Committee.
As mayor, Spicer will not only be the city’s
chief executive, but head cheerleader and visionary, who must be able to sit down with
the governor, rally the business community,
chair the School Committee, set goals and priorities. And, also be accountable to residents.
City advocates hope the new form of government will stream-line decision making.
Marlborough Mayor Arthur Vigeant says a
community of Framingham’s size will benefit
from the faster pace of a city government.
(Marlborough was incorporated as a city in
1890.) Time and efficiency are crucial when
working with businesses looking to move or
expand, for example.
A decision that could take weeks or even
years for Town Meeting, can be made by a
City Council within weeks, said Vigeant, who
was re-elected Tuesday.
“That’s really important if you’re a community that size,’’ he said. “It’s probably one of
the advantages Marlborough has over some of
the surrounding communities – the fact that
we can expedite the decision making.’’
Mayors also represent a smaller, more
prominent group than town leaders, allowing
for more face time with state and federal officials, whether it’s the governor, Senate president, or speaker of the House.
With its shift, Framingham becomes the
57th community in the Commonwealth to
have a city form of government.
Starting in
2018,
Framingham,
which will be
the state’s
14th largest
community
by
population.
Jennifer Fenn Lefferts can be reached at
jflefferts@yahoo.com
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
A BIT NOIR — Sunlight filtered through a high-rise’s balconies to flood Chapman Place in downtown Boston on Wednesday.
Indian promotion rattles Maine town
A
By Steve Annear
GLOBE STAFF
business group in Maine has apologized and scrapped
plans for a promotional holiday shopping event called
“Hunt for the Indian” following backlash from the community.
The Skowhegan Area Chamber of Commerce, in
Skowhegan, a town about two hours north of Portland, was set to launch
the scavenger hunt-like game, which would have encouraged participants to track down a Native American figurine hidden inside local
shops to earn holiday discounts, starting after Thanksgiving.
In a post on Facebook Sunday, members of the chamber said the aim
was to support business owners while engaging residents in the area and
said it was not their “intention to offend anyone.”
“Never were we so wrong in thinking that this latest promotion involving the Chamber’s Skowhegan Indian statue would be a good idea,”
the group said in a statement. “No apology can take away our lack of empathy and foresight in this decision. And, for that we are truly sorry.”
According to event details forwarded by the chamber to the Globe,
the group was looking for at least 31 businesses to participate in the illconceived game. Verbal clues about the figure’s whereabouts were to be
BILL SIMPSON, weather service
meteorologist, who says local temperatures
probably will dip below freezing Friday or
Saturday and the wind chill Saturday
morning could fall into the teens
Steve Annear can be reached at steve.annear@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @steveannear.
AROUND THE REGION
WAT E RTOW N
Headstones vandalized
at Catholic cemetery
Watertown police are investigating after several
headstones and a religious statue were vandalized at St. Patrick’s Cemetery Tuesday, Lieutenant James O’Connor said. “We had seven headstones that were intentionally, maliciously
knocked over,” he said. A statue dedicated to the
Marist Missionary Sisters was knocked off its
pedestal and found shattered on the ground.
Several of the sisters are buried around the statue, O’Connor said. The Archdiocese of Boston,
which owns the cemetery, will notify the families
with connections to the damaged headstones
and see that they are repaired, O’Connor said.
BOSTO N
City ties 40­degree
temperature streak
Boston fell just two hours short of beating a 49year-old record for consecutive days with temperatures above 40 degrees, the National Weather Service said. The streak, which lasted for the
201 days since April 20, ended when thermome-
QUOTE OF THE DAY
‘People have been lulled
into a false sense of security
with the recent warm
weather. This is certainly
going to be a wake­up call,
especially with the wind
chill.’
posted to Facebook daily through Dec. 30. If a customer visited the business hiding the figurine, and found it, that person would receive a small
discount — between 5 percent and 20 percent — on items purchased.
The figurine would then be moved to a new store the next day.
When news about the holiday promotion made its way around social
media, the reaction was swift.
“The use of the ‘Indian’ and the horrific game of ‘Hunt the Indian’
goes beyond cultural appropriation and is just violently racist, plain and
simple,” one person wrote on the chamber’s Facebook page.
Jason Gayne, the chamber’s executive director, said in a telephone interview that the group wanted to celebrate the town’s heritage and that
the nine-member board that came up with the event “didn’t mean any
harm by it, by any means.”
“We canceled it completely,” he said.
Gayne said as a result of the public outcry, the chamber will host one
or more community discussions addressing the town’s history, Native
American history, and “the culture of our area.”
ter readings dipped to 37 degrees around 10 p.m.
Tuesday. It is tied for the longest such stretch in
the city since 1968. That streak took place during
a similar time of year, lasting from April 13 to
Oct. 30. The most recent was recorded in 2007,
lasting 191 days from April 21 to Oct. 28. Weather service meteorologist Bill Simpson said there’s
no definite reason for the streak and said it
comes after several years of above-normal temperatures.
BOSTO N
Arraignment in case of
$14,000 stolen flute
A man accused of stealing a $14,000 silver flute
from a Boston student months ago is expected in
court this week. The Suffolk district attorney’s office says the Milton man faces arraignment
Thursday morning on larceny charges. He has
not been identified. The instrument and an iPad
were stolen when the Boston University music
major stepped away from an empty classroom at
the end of August. BU police say they checked security footage from the area and searched pawn
shop databases to try to find the instrument.
University officers were eventually able to identify a suspect who agreed to return the stolen
items last month. (AP)
E A ST P R OV I D EN C E
Voters approve measure
to switch to mayors
Voters overwhelmingly approved changes Tuesday to transfer power from a City Council-appointed city manager to a full-time elected mayor. The current position of mayor is largely ceremonial. The mayor will take office after an
election in 2018. Two candidates have already
announced: Nicholas Oliver, executive director of
the Rhode Island Partnership for Home Care,
and Pawtucket Police Capt. Robert DaSilva. The
winner will take office in January 2019. (AP)
B U R L IN GTO N , V T.
Temporary youth
shelter opens for winter
Teenagers will have a new place to stay during
the winter with the opening of a temporary
youth shelter for ages 18 through 24. The shelter
is inside the parish hall of Saint Joseph’s CoCathedral. WCAX-TV reports the 10-bed shelter
will run on donations and will stay open until
March. People can stay as long as they want at
the shelter. It’s open from 6 p.m. to 7 a.m. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
R MAN KILLED A man, 62, was struck and killed
by an Amtrak train in Ashland on Wednesday,
the MBTA Transit Police said. It occurred while
the man was trespassing on the Framingham/
Worcester line tracks near Front Street in Ashland and was reported around 1:50 p.m. The unidentified man was hit by an outbound Amtrak
train on Track 1, Transit Police said. Transit Police and Ashland fire and EMS responded. The
man was pronounced dead due to injuries sustained in the incident. Transit Police and the
Middlesex district attorney are investigating. No
foul play is suspected, Transit Police said.
R HIGHWAY ARREST A Hyde Park man was
charged with allegedly running large amounts of
heroin and cocaine from Massachusetts to
Maine, officials said. Police arrested Don Twiggs,
38, on Monday night after pulling his vehicle
over on Interstate 95 near the Newport exit in
Maine, authorities said. They seized approximately 200 grams of suspected heroin and 50
grams of cocaine, and the drugs had a street value of roughly $55,000, the Maine Department of
Public Safety said in a statement.
R DRUG BUST More than 30 individuals have
been arrested on drug charges after a large, undercover investigation exposed a heroin and fentanyl distribution ring operating in parts of Middlesex County, according to Attorney General
Maura Healey’s office. The investigation, which
involved Healey’s office, the State Police Gang
Unit, and the Marlborough Police Department,
launched in response to an increase of opioid
overdoses in the area, prosecutors said in a state-
ment. The drug ring operated in Marlborough
and surrounding communities, prosecutors said.
R CAPTURED Several pieces of stolen jewelry
were recovered from a Dorchester man suspected in an attempted burglary at a Mattapan home
Tuesday after a Boston police officer chased and
arrested him, officials said. Officers were first
called to the scene of a breaking and entering in
progress at a residence at 15 Harwood St.,
around 4:38 p.m. Tuesday. Upon arrival, an officer approached and saw a person, later identified
as Leon Williams, 32, of Dorchester, matching
the given description of the suspect running
from the rear of the home. Officers recovered
“numerous” pieces of jewelry from Williams during booking, which he then admitted did not belong to him.
TOP STORIES Women swept to power in Tuesday’s elections, winning mayor’s offices in Framingham, Newton, and
Manchester, N.H. A1 A former Boston TV anchor has accused actor Kevin Spacey of sexually assaulting her son B1
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
Mass. House OK’s bill ensuring free birth control
By Danny McDonald
GLOBE STAFF
House lawmakers Wednesday overwhelmingly approved
a bill that would ensure access
to free birth control in the
state and shield state residents
from changes to federal law regarding contraceptive coverage requirements.
The bill is headed to the
Senate after the 138-16 vote.
T he measure includes a
provision requiring health insurers to continue offering
coverage — without co-payments — for prescription contraceptives regardless of
changes in federal policy or
any future repeal of the federal
Affordable Care Act.
The legislation brings Massachusetts a step closer to becoming the first state in the
nation to pass a law that “protects and expands access to
contraception after the Trump
administration’s interference
with contraceptive coverage
mandate in the Affordable
Care Act,” said Rebecca Hart
Holder, executive director of
NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts, in a statement.
“We applaud the House’s
leadership on this critical issue,” she said. “We urge the
Senate to take up legislation as
soon as possible.”
Supporters of the bill anticipate the state Senate swiftly
passing the proposal. Johanna
Kaiser, a Planned Parenthood
spokeswoman, said the bill
has 29 state Senate co-sponsors.
In a statement, Lizzy Guyton, a spokeswoman for Governor Charlie Baker, said the
administration “fully supports
access to women’s health and
family planning services, is
prepared to protect access to
those services, and will carefully review any final legislation that reaches the governor’s desk.”
The decision comes about a
month after the Trump administration issued a rule that undermines a federal contraception coverage mandate. That
new regulation could mean
many women would no longer
have access to free birth con-
‘Today, the Massachusetts House of
Representatives made clear that birth
control access is not up for debate in
Massachusetts.’
DR. JENNIFER CHILDS-ROSHAK
President of Planned Parenthood Advocacy Fund of Massachusetts
trol.
State law has long required
insurers to provide birth control coverage, but not without
copayments. The Affordable
Care Act, also known as
News
CONTACTS, TIPS, COMMENTS
Switchboard: (617) 929-2000
(617) 929-7400
newstip@globe.com
comments@globe.com
SPOTLIGHT TEAM TIP LINE
(617) 929-7483
Customer service
Obamacare, five years ago required private insurers to provide free contraception.
The bill passed by state legislators would build on the
federal protections and also
Payoffs (based on a $1 bet)
DISPLAY
(617) 929-2200
bostonglobemedia.com
CLASSIFIED
(617) 929-1500
boston.com/classifieds
$5,512
$772
$66
$7
$20.00 20.00 20.00
Sunday-only
home delivery
$8.00 8.00
8.00
Daily single copy
$2.00 2.00
2.50
Sunday single copy
$4.50 4.50
5.00
ANY ORDER
All 4 digits
First 3
Last 3
$230
$129
$129
3-7-1-5
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Payoffs (based on a $1 bet)
EXACT ORDER
All 4 digits
First or last 3
Any 2 digits
Any 1 digit
$4,440
$622
$53
$5
ANY ORDER
All 4 digits
First 3
Last 3
Nov. 08
$185
$104
$104
MASS CASH
06-17-20-22-24
Jackpot: $100,000;
;
5/5
/5 ARM
5
20-YEAR TERM*
winners
MEGA MILLIONS
November 7
01-54-60-68-69
Megaball 11, Megaplier 4
1
10/5
0/5 ARM
20-YEAR TERM*
%
.25
No Points!
%
.50
No Points!
For more information about these and other
commercial real estate loan products, terms
and rates, call us at: 978-358-8845.
PREVIOUS DRAWINGS
Tuesday
Monday
Sunday
Saturday
Friday
7
7/5
/5 ARM
20-YEAR TERM*
25-YEAR TERMS ARE AVAILABLE
Jackpot: $59 Million; No winners
Midday
2-2-3-2
6-8-0-3
0-0-8-1
8-7-9-0
6-1-8-8
CONTACT US AT 617-638-5261
OR BRAINEX@BU.EDU
3 4 4
%
.99
No Points!
MEGABUCKS
Jackpot: $
Our lab is recruiting healthy older
adults ages 55-85 for a 12-week
exercise training program.
Earn up to $335 for completed
study visits & receive free trainersupervised exercise training.
Retail Other
7-day home delivery
EXACT ORDER
All 4 digits
First or last 3
Any 2 digits
Any 1 digit
Material from the Associated
Press, the Washington Post,
and Globe staff reporter
Stephanie Ebbert was used in
this article. Danny McDonald
can be reached at
daniel.mcdonald@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@Danny__McDonald.
EXERCISE & BRAIN
FUNCTION STUDY
Time to Buy
or Refinance?
Lottery
WEDNESDAY MIDDAY 7-0-9-5
of the Planned Parenthood Advocacy Fund of Massachusetts.
CURRENTLY LIVING AN
INACTIVE LIFESTYLE? WANT
TO GET BACK IN SHAPE?
Commercial Real Estate Loans
Advertising
City
PRINT AND DIGITAL
(888) 694-5623
customerservice@globe.com
remove existing barriers to
care and improve access to
contraception for women in
the state, according to a statement from Planned Parenthood.
“Today, the Massachusetts
Ho u s e o f R e p r e s en t at i v e s
made clear that birth control
access is not up for debate in
Massachusetts,” said Dr. Jennifer Childs-Roshak, president
B3
Night
2-9-4-0
7-8-0-7
2-2-5-6
0-7-6-5
3-9-7-9
WEDNESDAY NUMBERS
AROUND NEW ENGLAND
Maine, N.H., Vermont
Day: 3-digit 652
4-digit 1099
Eve: 3-digit 878
4-digit 8916
Wed. Tri-State Megabucks
12-19-21-26-39(6)
Rhode Island
5757
Powerball
12-14-26-48-51
Powerball 13
winners
institutionforsavings.com
*Rate adjusts at 2.50% above FHLBB 5 year rate. Minimum loan amount is $500,000. Minimum debt service coverage 1.20:1. Maximum LTV 70% on
refinances. 80% maximum LTV on purchases and owner-occupied refinances. Other terms and conditions may apply. Rates are subject to change without
notice. Loans under $500,000 and 25-year terms are available, rates may vary. Member FDIC • Member DIF
Are Stairs a Problem?
“I love the peace of mind I get from knowing that
my wife and I can safely get up and downstairs.”
R 7-Day Money Back Guarantee
R Professional Installation
R Short Term Rentals
R Also for Stairs that Turn
R Tax Free!
Glide Upstairs on a Stannah Stairlift!
A Stannah stairlift is a great alternative to
remodeling, moving to a new house or relocating
to the first floor. If stairs are the problem, why
make a dramatic change? We can help you
carry on enjoying life in the home you love!
Want to learn more?
( Call toll-free: 11 (617)
307-4373
617-855-1803
8
Visit us online at www.Stannah-Stairlifts.co
om
Or visit our showroom:
20 Liberty Way, Suite A, Franklin MA 02038
MA HIC #160211, CT Elevator Ltd Contractor License #ELV.0475333-R5
Special O
Offer
Mention “Boston Globe” and save
$200 off
ff your Stannah Stairlift!*
*Excludes rentals & previous purchases. May not be combined
with any other offer. Only one discount per purchase.
B4
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Phone
records
lawsuit
tossed
MESSAGE FOR
WASHINGTON — More
than a hundred supporters
joined a large group of
speakers at a rally on the
steps of the State House in
Boston Wednesday to call
for the preservation of the
“temporary protect status
(TPS)” for immigrants from
designated countries who
have fled armed conflicts
or natural disasters.
Hernandez estate
loses legal battle
By John R. Ellement
GLOBE STAFF
A Suffolk Superior Court
judge has thrown out a lawsuit filed by the estate of Aaron Hernandez against the
company that records telephone calls made by detainees
at the Suffolk County Jail in
Boston.
Hernandez’s lawyers had
argued in court papers that
Securus Technologies was financially liable because someone used a company password
to access phone conversations
the former New England Patriot had with his girlfriend
while jailed in Boston.
The company responded in
court filings that its contract
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
Study: no extra risk in double­booked surgeries
uSURGERY
Continued from Page B1
“These data suggest that
overlapping neurosurgery is
safe and has the potential to
benefit patients by maximizing
efficiency and making highly
sought-after specialists available to a greater number of patients,’’ said the article, whose
lead author is Dr. Brian M.
Howard, a neurosurgical fellow
at Emory.
The study, scheduled to be
published Wednesday in JAMA
Surgery, is at least the seventh
peer-reviewed paper published
by a medical journal about the
safety of overlapping surgeries
since October 2015, when a
Spotlight Team story about a
controversy over simultaneous
operations at Massachusetts
General Hospital drew national
attention to the issue. None of
the studies have found a significant difference in complication
rates.
But an eighth study, as yet
unpublished, found an increased risk for postoperative
complications in concurrent
surgery for hip fractures, and
that the longer the surgeries
overlap, the greater the rate of
complications. An assistant
professor of surgery at the University of Toronto used data
from about 100 hospitals to
compare about 1,000 concurrent hip surgeries with 1,000
that were not performed simultaneously from 2009 to 2014.
At MGH, a handful of top orthopedic surgeons sometimes
scheduled two operations that
overlapped for hours, prompting several colleagues to allege
that patients were endangered
and had not consented to share
their surgeon. MGH leaders
said they took the allegations
seriously and imposed new limits on double-booking, but insisted that no patients were imperiled.
Concurrent surgery is now
the focus of lawsuits against
MGH by two doctors who left
the hospital after complaining
about it. In one, Dr. Dennis
Burke, a prominent orthopedic
surgeon, charged that he was illegally fired for opposing concurrent surgery, while an anesthesiologist filed a separate
whistle-blower lawsuit alleging
that double-booked surgeries at
MGH put patients at risk. The
hospital has denied doing anything improper.
Double-booking also figured
in a series of stories in the Seattle Times about high-volume
neurosurgeons at Seattle’s
Swedish Neuroscience Institute. And it’s the backdrop for
investigations by federal and
New York state authorities into
how a urologist at Lenox Hill
Hospital in Manhattan handled
his enormous surgical volume
and billed for procedures.
The JAMA Surgery study
compared how Emory neurosurgery patients in 2014 and
2015 fared in overlapping and
non-overlapping operations up
to 90 days after their procedures.
Researchers found no significant difference in the outcomes and rate of complications, including surgical site infections and unexpected
readmissions. Overlapping surgery “can be safely performed if
appropriate precautions and
patient selection are followed,”
the study said.
The study did not knowingly
include overlapping surgeries
in which “critical parts” of the
two surgeries happened at the
same time. The federal Medicare program requires surgeons to be in the operating
room for the most important
parts of the operation and not
delegate the work to a junior
surgeon.
The one significant difference between cases that overlapped and those that didn’t is
that patients who shared their
surgeon were in the operating
room about 30 minutes longer
and had open incisions nearly
30 minutes longer. Two of the
other recent studies also found
that overlapping cases took longer.
Dr. Daniel L. Barrow, chairman of the neurosurgery department at the Emory School
of Medicine, said researchers
did not know whether overlapping surgery prolonged cases or
whether surgeons picked two
Bigger Bang
for Your Bucks.
Platinum Money Market/CD Combo
Requires a Platinum Money Market of $250,000
and a Platinum 36-Month CD of $250,000 to open.
1 2
.00%
APY*
Platinum Money Market
Balances $250,000 and above
.50%
APY*
Platinum 36-Month
Certificate of Deposit
Balances $250,000 and above
To open, stop by any of our offices in Newburyport, Beverly, Boxford,
Gloucester, Hamilton, Ipswich, Middleton, Rockport, Rowley,
Salisbury or Topsfield or call us at 978-462-3106 for more information.
cases to overlap because they
were more complex and would
take more time.
Michelle M. Mello, a health
l a w s c h o l a r a t S t a n f o r d ’s
schools of law and medicine
who is working on a study of
concurrent surgeries at multiple hospitals, generally praised
the JAMA Surgery study. But
she said it has shortcomings,
including the fact that it dealt
with only one hospital. And it
doesn’t distinguish between
cases that overlap for only a few
minutes and those that overlap
for far longer.
“Do patients who have more
overlap do worse than patients
who have only a bit of overlap?”
she said. “We just don’t know.”
O n e t h i n g t h a t i s c l e a r,
though, is that patients want to
know if their surgeon will be
tending to a second patient
during their surgery.
Roughly 95 percent of the
people surveyed for a recent
study in the Journal of the
American College of Surgeons
said a surgeon should inform
them beforehand that the doctor will be operating on two patients. And over 91 percent
wanted the surgeon to document when he or she was present. Overall, fewer than 4 percent of those surveyed knew
anything about overlapping
surgery.
Defenders of doctors running two operating rooms have
argued that it increases effi-
ciency, gives patients greater
access to coveted surgeons, and
instills independence in surgical residents who help attending surgeons.
That is the position voiced
in an opinion piece accompanying the study in JAMA Surgery
by Dr. David B. Hoyt, executive
director of the American College of Surgeons. Hoyt applauded the new study as “very important.”
But Dr. Michael Mulholland,
chairman of surgery at the University of Michigan, has said
double-booking benefits only
the surgeons, who can increase
their surgical volumes. It is inefficient for all other medical
staff, he said, including other
surgeons who lose operating
room time.
He also doubted that patients want it.
“How would a reasonable
patient react to a surgeon saying, ‘I plan to be in an adjacent
operating room operating on a
different patient during your
proposed procedure — is that
acceptable to you?’ ” said Mulholland, speaking at a panel
discussion at MGH last year.
“There are no data to answer
that question, but I think that
common sense says that virtually no patient would find this
acceptable.’’
The suit was centered on
phone calls Hernandez
made while jailed.
was with the Suffolk County
sheriff’s department, not Hernandez personally, and therefore the lawsuit should be dismissed. Superior Court Judge
Helene Kazanjian agreed with
the company and this week
ordered the case dismissed.
Hernandez was held at the
Boston jail while awaiting trial for a 2012 double murder.
Five days after his acquittal in
that case, he commited suicide in a state prison where he
was serving a life sentence for
murdering Odin L. Lloyd in
North Attleborough in 2013.
John R. Ellement can be
reached at
ellement@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter
@JREbosglobe.
Jonathan Saltzman
can be reached at
jonathan.saltzman@globe.com
Fall Into
our 15 .
15-Year
5 ea Fixed
ed Rate
ate
Residential Mortgage
2 3
.990%
Interest
Rate
.056%
APR*
Loans up to $2 Million, No Points!**
APPLY ONLINE 24/7
institutionforsavingsloans.com
or call us at 978-358-8904 for information
on these and other rates and terms.
978-462-3106 • institutionforsavings.com
*APY denotes Annual Percentage Yield as of 11/8/17. Rates are variable and subject to change at any time without notice. A Platinum Money Market
Account with a minimum balance of $250,000 and a Platinum 36-Month CD with a minimum balance of $250,000, with a combined statement, are
required to open, maintain and earn the advertised APY. If Platinum Money Market Account balances drop below $250,000, a $10.00 monthly service
charge will be assessed and APY will be reduced. If the CD portion of the combined account is closed or falls below $250,000, the Platinum Money
Market Account will revert back to the Bank’s Traditional Money Market Account APYs. In addition, if minimum balances are not maintained in both
accounts at all times, the APY on the Certificate of Deposit will change for the remainder of the term to a predetermined rate disclosed at account
opening. Maximum CD balance is $1.5 million; maximum Money Market balance is $10 million for a combined maximum balance of $11.5 million.
Transaction limits apply. Must be present to open. Account title must be the same on all accounts. Fees may reduce earnings. Penalty
Member FDIC
Member DIF
will be imposed for early withdrawal on the Certificate of Deposit.
institutionforsavings.com
*APR denotes Annual Percentage Rate as of 11/8/17 and is based on a $165,000, no cash out refinance with minimum credit score of 720 and
maximum LTV of 80%. Rate is subject to change without notice. Unit cost per $1,000 borrowed is $6.90. Minimum loan amount is $100,000, maximum
loan amount is $2 million. Single-family, owner-occupied residences only. Offer subject to credit approval. Property insurance required. Flood insurance
required if the property is located in a FEMA Special Hazard Flood Zone. Monthly payment examples do not include escrow amounts for real estate taxes
and/or insurance, if applicable. This may increase payment amount. Other terms and conditions may apply.
**Points and/or additional fees may be assessed for borrowers with credit scores lower than 720 and/or cash out refinance loans. Member FDIC • Member DIF
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Two towns
mourn teens
killed in crash
By Jake Johnson
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
WEST BROOKFIELD — Tearful friends, family,
and community members gathered at a candlelight
vigil Wednesday night to mourn three teenagers killed
in a one-car rollover crash after school on Tuesday.
Lena Noonan, 16, Christian Congelos, 15, and Jaclyn Desrosiers, 14, students at Quaboag Regional
Middle High School, were remembered as loyal teammates and treasured friends whose promising lives
were tragically cut short.
“Lena loved the game,” basketball coach Charlene
Valle told the gathering of about 500 people on the
town common.
“She worked so hard. . . . This was her year to
shine. She was poised to do great things.”
The teens were traveling south on Douglas Road at
3:30 p.m. when their car, a 2009 Mazda, left the road,
struck a tree, and rolled over, authorities said.
The three were pronounced dead at the scene.
Local police and State Police assigned to the
Worcester district attorney’s office are investigating
the crash.
Grief counselors were at the school on Wednesday
to help students deal with what Quaboag superintendent Brett Kustigian, called a horrible tragedy.
The teens’ deaths have had a powerful impact on
residents in the two towns — Warren and West Brookfield — that make up the regional school system in
Central Massachusetts.
A collage showed the late teens’ smiling faces. Mementoes, including a basketball and Congelos’s soccer
jersey, were displayed along with candles and flowers.
“I, like you, have a child in the system who is broken hearted tonight,” Jim Fontaine, pastor of Friendship Baptist Church in Brimfield, said at the vigil.
“We are grieving together, as friends, as a community.”
Standing in the cold night air, students wept. Fontaine offered some comfort through scripture.
“The Lord is close to the brokenhearted and saves
those who are crushed in spirit,” he said, quoting a
psalm.
Members of the school’s cross country team lined
the white gazebo to light candles for Desrosiers.
“She was always the first person I could go to when
I had a bad day,” one teammate said through tears.
“She brought life to the team.”
The boys soccer team approached the gazebo. A
candle was lit for Congelos, who wore the number
three on his team jersey.
A few players spoke, with one noting, “Knowing
Christian has been a blessing.”
“I never saw him sad,” a teammate said. “It seemed
like he never had a bad day in his life.”
“He was the heart and emotion of this team, “ another said. “[He] will be missed, and his [loss] felt for
years to come.”
John R. Ellement of the Globe Staff contributed to this
report. Jake Johnson can be found
atjake.johnson@globe.com.
You may want to save this.
Tips on how not
to be That Guy
uABRAHAM
Continued from Page B1
the manner of a pasty Chippendale, are you sure
she likes it? If she didn’t, would she really feel she
could tell you, given that doing so could imperil her
career prospects, or her pay? In other words, does
she have full agency in this situation? If the answer
to any of these questions is no, you’re done.
Your jokes
We all like a good laugh, but how about not suggesting that a woman in your employ is a prostitute? Or that she would achieve her life’s ambitions
if she chose to pursue them in a bikini? Or that she
got to where she is because she did with her boss
the things you secretly hope she will do with you?
Also, do not shout, “Hey, Frank is that your niece” to
the Globe State House bureau chief across a crowded Beacon Hill street as he and a younger, female reporter are walking to lunch. Do not do this, not only
because it demeans the very hard work the woman
did to get to where she is, or because it makes her
feel like crap, which it does, but also because, years
later, she could call you out publicly.
Your heart
So, sometimes romance blooms in the workplace. Attraction happens. This is mostly fine, as
long as you don’t profess your longing for a different woman every day, and both parties are fully
consenting, and there is no professional fallout involved. But sometimes, you can misread the signals.
So, if you put your heart out there — not your little
friend, please — and you get the hand, that’s it.
Withdraw, apologize, move on.
The new Golden Rule
Still confused? If all else fails, try this: Imagine
how you would feel if the whole world, including
the hypothetical women you respect, could see how
you’re behaving with this co-worker right now. Not
good? Then step off. Immediately.
Easy, right? You’re welcome!
Globe columnist Yvonne Abraham can be reached
at yvonne.abraham@globe.com and on Twitter
@GlobeAbraham
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
Tiny studios offer writers solitude
uWRITERS
Continued from Page B1
writers to the heritage and creative potential of the region.
Clustered outside the old brick
mills that house the sprawling
museum, the studios offer established and aspiring writers a quiet, unplugged place to work for
three hours at a time. In an age of
digital distraction, the minimalist quarters provide an increasingly scarce commodity: simple
peace and quiet.
Feel free to leave the cellphone
behind.
“If I could have a place like
this, I think I’d be so much more
productive,” said Campbell, a
professor at Ramapo College in
New Jersey. His wife, Luissa
Chekowsky, searched for inspiration only yards away in a studio
named for Nathaniel Hawthorne.
What binds the 19th-century
authors — other studios are
named for Henry Wadsworth
Longfellow, Henry David Thoreau, and Oliver Wendell Holmes
Sr. — is a link to nearby Pittsfield,
where all of them spent time
writing.
Before the studios moved to
the museum, also known as
MASS MoCA, they stood in outdoor locations in Pittsfield, where
they were used this summer for
one-month residencies for writers chosen from a nationwide
pool of applicants.
Two of the studios were on the
grounds of Arrowhead, the Pittsfield farmhouse where Melville
wrote “Moby-Dick.” The others
were placed in Canoe Meadows
Wildlife Sanctuary and Springside Park.
T h e s t u d i o s h av e b e e n at
MASS MoCA since September,
both as workspace and installation piece. They are available until Nov. 26, and will then be
stored in Pittsfield until the summer.
“We’ve been figuring this out
as we go along,” said Tessa Kelly,
who cofounded the project with
Chris Parkinson, her husband
and architectural partner.
That figuring might apply to
logistics and other nuts and bolts,
but the pair’s vision for the project is deeply rooted. It takes inspiration from Pittsfield’s rich literary past and seeks to build on
that legacy by breaking new literary ground.
Funded by a diverse array of
donors topped by the National
MATTHEW HEALEY FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Tessa Kelly and Chris Parkinson are the cofounders of The Mastheads, a Pittsfield organization
that aims to connect a new generation of writers with Western Massachusetts’ literary history.
Endowment for the Arts, Mastheads also strives to reconnect
Pittsfield to a cultural heritage
that is often overlooked by locals
and outsiders alike.
“There’s very little in Pittsfield
that tells you these authors were
there,” Kelly said of the small city
(population about 44,737), better
known in recent decades for
hemorrhaging jobs at General
Electric and pollution in the
Housatonic River.
Kelly, a Pittsfield native, is determined to change that. In addition to providing space for promising writers, the project offers
educational programming designed to illuminate the past and
build excitement for the future.
Sarah Trudgeon, the project’s director of education, has worked
to bring poetry to Pittsfield’s elementary students.
“Our goal is to get them to
think of writing as something fun
to do,” Trudgeon said.
It’s also hard, as John Babbott
can attest.
The 33-year-old from Portland, Ore., set to work on his second novel as one of the five writers in residence for the month of
July. Perched atop a knoll at the
Canoe Meadows sanctuary, Babbott was able to write three-quarters of the novel as he faced the
Berkshires from a small door he
propped open at the Holmes studio.
“It was a pretty incredible experience,” Babbott said. “I had
nothing to focus on but the world
inside my head.”
The studio is a spartan container of exposed cross-laminated
pine, rising 13 feet high and set
on wheels 30 inches above the
ground. There is a chair, a wooden shelf, and a bench. There is no
plumbing or electric outlets, although the summer writers received battery packs to recharge
their laptops.
Skylights and small, adjustable openings in the walls allow
sun and air into the studios, each
designed with a nod to its 19thcentury namesake. Writers seeking 21st-century comforts need
not apply. This is a pre-industrial
environment.
“There were no distractions,”
Babbott said. “I would just write
and write and write, pretty much
until I got too hungry to write.”
The five writers received bicycles, food, $900 stipends, and living quarters in a communal
home in Pittsfield. Babbott said
that tossing around ideas with
the others — three novelists and
two poets, in all — was invaluable.
“What blew me away is the
space actually worked for the
writers,” said Kelly, who is looking ahead to next year’s residencies. While Pittsfield’s legacy will
remain the cultural link, the 2018
program will focus on 19th-century social activism.
The five studios will retain the
names that inspired their design,
and Melville will again be represented. New figures for study will
include historical novelist Catharine Maria Sedgwick, British actress Fanny Kemble, poet John
Greenleaf Whittier, and W.E.B.
Du Bois, the African-American
scholar and civil rights leader
w h o was born i n G re at B a rrington.
The Mastheads project, an allusion to “Moby-Dick,” borrows
its name from the perch high
above the whaling ship Pequod,
from which Melville’s character
Ishmael searched in solitude for
whales. From there, Ishmael saw
more than just the vast sea. He also looked inward to his deepest
thoughts.
The project’s founders hope
this holds true for the studios. “In
a way, they are little viewing platforms,” Parkinson said.
For the Berkshires and beyond.
Brian MacQuarrie can be
reached at
brian.macquarrie@globe.com.
Unruh accuses Spacey of assaulting son
uSPACEY
Continued from Page B1
Unruh’s allegations are the latest to be lodged against Spacey
since last month, when actor Anthony Rapp said the movie and
television star had made an unwanted sexual advance toward
him in the 1980s. Spacey was 26
at the time and Rapp was 14.
Unruh said her son, now a 19year-old college sophomore, reported the incident to Nantucket
police last week and provided evidence to investigators. A police
spokesman declined to comment,
saying reports of sexual assault
are confidential under state law.
Cape and Islands District Attorney Michael O’Keefe said prosecutors have contacted the lawyer for Unruh’s son but haven’t
heard back.
“We don’t do things by press
conference,” O’Keefe said.
Spacey’s attorney didn’t respond to requests for comment.
In the wake of Rapp’s accusation,
Spacey said through a publicist
that he was seeking unspecified
treatment. He also revealed he
was gay, a disclosure that was irrelevant to Rapp’s allegation and
drew widespread criticism.
Netflix has shut down production of “House of Cards,” which
had been filming its sixth and final season. On Wednesday, it was
revealed by the Associated Press
that Spacey would be cut from
Ridley Scott’s finished film ‘‘All
the Money in the World’’ and replaced by Christopher Plummer
just over one month before it’s
supposed to hit theaters. All of
Spacey scenes will be reshot.
During the news conference at
a Boston hotel, Unruh occassionally fought back tears as she described the alleged attack and
lauded women who have publicly
accused movie mogul Harvey
Weinstein of sexual assault for
giving her son the courage to tell
his story.
During the encounter, Unruh
said, her son tried to shift his
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Heather Unruh at times fought back tears when talking about her son’s encounter with actor
Kevin Spacey. She appeared with her daughter Kyla and lawyer Mitchell Garabedian in Boston.
body away from Spacey but was
“only momentarily successful.”
The actor urged her son to accompany him to an after-hours
party to drink more, she said.
Unruh said her son fled the
restaurant when Spacey excused
himself to use the bathroom and
a woman urged the youth to run.
He sprinted to his grandmother’s
house and told his sister what
happened, Unruh said. The siblings then called Unruh, who
traveled to Nantucket in the
morning, she said.
“To Kevin Spacey I want to say
this: Shame on you for what you
did to my son,” she said. “Nothing
could have prepared my son for
how that sexual assault would
make him feel as a man. It
harmed him and it cannot be undone.”
She said Spacey should go to
prison and asked the woman who
went to her son’s aid to come forward. “I know that she had the
presence of mind and was disturbed enough by what she had
seen to approach a young man
who’s almost 6 feet tall and ask
him if he’s OK,” Unruh said.
Her son asked Unruh to speak
publicly about the encounter, she
said. He didn’t go to authorities
sooner, she said, because of embarrassment and fear. Soon after
the alleged attack, however, Unruh said she discussed it with
Nantucket’s sheriff, who urged
him to file a complaint.
She initially accused Spacey of
wrongdoing on Oct. 13, writing in
a tweet that she was a fan of the
actor “until he assaulted a loved
one.” She did not identify the relative in the tweet. During her news
conference, Unruh also alleged
Spacey had targeted another man
during a visit to the island.
Garabedian, who rose to
prominence representing victims
of clergy sex abuse, is representing Unruh’s son.
In a statement, Club Car’s director of operations Ty Costa said
the staff was saddened to read
Unruh’s account. The current
ownership purchased the business after the alleged assault occurred, Costa said.
The restaurant’s former own-
er, Joseph Pantorno, didn’t respond to requests for comment. A
police official said records going
back to 2011 show the restaurant
hasn’t been cited for serving alcohol to minors.
Legal specialists said Unruh’s
son could face scrutiny if Spacey
is prosecuted. “I think he can definitely expect to have to explain
the fact that he was drinking and
underage,” said Colby Bruno, senior legal counsel for the Bostonbased Victim Rights Law Center,
an advocacy group for sexual assault victims.
A defense lawyer would likely
press Unruh’s son on questions of
consent, she said.
“He wasn’t [a minor] at the
time, so they’re going to try to
place as much blame on him as
they possibly can for the encounter. And of course he isn’ t to
blame, but that’s what a defense
attorney does,” Bruno said.
Mark Shanahan of the Globe staff
contributed to this report.
Crimaldi can be reached at
laura.crimaldi@globe.com.
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
FULLER, Margaret M. (Jackson)
BY CITY AND TOWN
AMESBURY
RICCI, Mary R. (Iodice)
BARNSTABLE
BIRKMAIER, Catherine V. (Witham)
PEABODY
DeROCCO, Madeline A. (Flanagan)
PEPPERELL
BELMONT
SARRIS, Fotoula (Boustris)
CARROLL, Ruth Elizabeth (Cooper)
BILLERICA
CHRISTENAKIS, John M.
CURRAN, Valentina H. (Maganzini)
McKEE, Milton J.
BOSTON
BENJAMIN, Nancy
BENNETT, Dr. Avis Kimball
CAPOSSELA, Toni-Lee
DAVIS, Talvin
EKNOIAN, Emily A. (Hallow)
McGRATH, Arlene (Nord)
MULRY, Elizabeth A. (Tosti)
QUINCY
READING
BIRKMAIER, Catherine V. (Witham)
FULLER, Margaret M. (Jackson)
REVERE
CARTWRIGHT, Mary D. (Corbett)
SHERBORN
FANDEL, Thomas R.
BRIGHTON
SARRIS, Fotoula (Boustris)
SOMERVILLE
BROOKLINE
DONOVAN, Jean M. (Connelly)
LaCOUNT, Brian F.
BURLINGTON
CURRAN, Valentina H. (Maganzini)
CAMBRIDGE
MELANSON, Margaret R.
CANTON
HAMMOND-HOMANS, Yvonne
Schraepen
ZEIDEL, Sonia Muriel Tratten
CLINTON
ZEIDEL, Sonia Muriel Tratten
FULLER, Margaret M. (Jackson)
MELANSON, Margaret R.
SOUTH BOSTON
MELANSON, Margaret R.
SOUTH DARTMOUTH
EKNOIAN, Emily A. (Hallow)
SOUTHBOROUGH
EVERETT
CARTWRIGHT, Mary D. (Corbett)
FULCHINO, Salvatore A.
CARROLL, Ruth Elizabeth (Cooper)
GLOUCESTER
MULRY, Elizabeth A. (Tosti)
RICCI, Mary R. (Iodice)
LaCOUNT, Brian F.
HINGHAM
McKEE, Milton J.
DeROCCO, Madeline A. (Flanagan)
CARROLL, Ruth Elizabeth (Cooper)
FABIANO, Lorraine E. (Roche)
WALPOLE
BENJAMIN, Nancy
WALTHAM
RICCI, Mary R. (Iodice)
WAYLAND
LEXINGTON
McGRATH, Arlene (Nord)
PEARSON, Agnes
RICCI, Mary R. (Iodice)
FANDEL, Thomas R.
LOWELL
LaCOUNT, Brian F.
WEST ROXBURY
LYNN
BENNETT, Dr. Avis Kimball
EKNOIAN, Emily A. (Hallow)
MELROSE
DeROCCO, Madeline A. (Flanagan)
MILLIS
BENJAMIN, Nancy
MILTON
CONNAUGHTON, Richard Patrick
DiTULLIO, Louise M. (Varnerin)
McKEE, Milton J.
NAHANT
HAGGERTY, Frederick L.
NATICK
FANDEL, Thomas R.
ZEIDEL, Sonia Muriel Tratten
NEEDHAM
DONOVAN, Jean M. (Connelly)
NEWTON
COHEN, Howard I.
WELLESLEY
FANDEL, Thomas R.
BENJAMIN, Nancy
MULRY, Elizabeth A. (Tosti)
WILMINGTON
CARROLL, Ruth Elizabeth (Cooper)
WINCHESTER
CURRAN, Valentina H. (Maganzini)
WINTHROP
FENNELL, Patricia J. (Dawson)
OUT OF STATE
FLORIDA
BENNETT, Dr. Avis Kimball
DiTULLIO, Louise M. (Varnerin)
MAINE
McGRATH, Arlene (Nord)
NEW HAMPSHIRE
BIRKMAIER, Catherine V. (Witham)
CARTWRIGHT, Mary D. (Corbett)
CURRAN, Valentina H. (Maganzini)
NEW YORK
NORTH ANDOVER
BIRKMAIER, Catherine V. (Witham)
McKEE, Milton J.
NORTH READING
BIRKMAIER, Catherine V. (Witham)
CARTWRIGHT, Mary D. (Corbett)
RHODE ISLAND
BENJAMIN, Nancy
Of Millis, formerly of West Roxbury,
November 7, 2017. Loving mother
of Matthew Burke. Dear sister of
John Benjamin of Tewksbury, Robert
Benjamin and his wife Marie of West
Roxbury and Patricia Quinlan and
her husband Charles of Walpole. Also
survived by several loving nieces and
nephews. Memorial Service Monday
at 2 p.m. at the Kfoury Keefe Funeral
Home, 8 Spring St. (at the corner of
Centre St.), WEST ROXBURY. Relatives
and friends respectfully invited to attend. In lieu of flowers, contributions
in Nancy’s memory may be made to
the MSPCA, 350 S. Huntington Ave.
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130. Guestbook
and directions available at
www.KfouryFuneral.com.
Kfoury Keefe Funeral Home
West Roxbury 617-325-3600
Announcements
PIPEFITTERS LOCAL 537
We regret to announce the death
of Brother Domenic L. Carnevale,
age 95, from Beverly, MA who
passed away on 11/4/17. Domenic was retired and a Life
Member serving 66 years. Services will be held on Sunday, Nov.
12, from 1-4 pm at Campbell Funeral Home, 525 Cabot St., Beverly, MA. Funeral service to be held
Monday, Nov. 13 at 10 a.m. at the
funeral home.
Revere Native
Ret. Asst. VP at
Fidelity
Investments
SMITH, Bernice
WAKEFIELD
MEDFORD
CURRAN, Valentina H. (Maganzini)
Of Reading, formerly of North Andover
and North Reading November 4, 2017,
age 95. Beloved wife of the late William
B. Birkmaier. Loving mother of sons,
William Bradford Birkmaier, Jr., USN
Retired and his wife Laura, the late
Karl Joseph Birkmaier and his late wife
Ursula Jezierski, the late Mark Hunter
Birkmaier and his wife Kristin Davis;
daughters, Lynne Heywood and her
husband Ed, and Lori O’Rourke and
her husband Jim; sister, Pat Patterson
Crosby, late brothers, Fred, Eddie and
Charlie Witham; late sisters, Rose
Chaput, Polly Baron, Alice Boudreau,
Margaret Crosby and Louise Fortunato;
grandchildren, William Bradford,
Birkmaier, III, Sherry Eva Calderon,
Cristina Maria Birkmaier, Kristen
Sponring, Dr. Richard Heywood, Jonathan Heywood, Sacha Cote, Matthew
Birkmaier, Pamela Boesch, Stephanie
O’Rourke, Shannon O’Rourke; great
grandchildren, Skyler and Liam
Birkmaier, Oliver Butrymowicz, Nicolas
and Luca Calderon, Zachary, Joshua
and Payton Sponring, Ella, Ned and
Madison Heywood, Hunter Heywood,
Dylan and Emma Cote, James and Ellinor Boesch.
Funeral Mass will be on Monday,
November 13 at 10 AM at St. Michael
Church, 196 Main St. in North Andover. There will be no calling hours. In
lieu of flowers memorial donations may
be made in her memory to: St. Michael
Parish, 196 Main St., North Andover,
MA 01845, North Reading Citizen’s
Scholarship Foundation or Care Dimensions Hospice, 75 Sylvan St., Suite
B-102, Danvers, MA 01923. She was a
retired Substitute Teacher for the North
Reading School System.
BENJAMIN, Nancy
HARWICHPORT
CONNAUGHTON, Richard Patrick
MEDFIELD
FANDEL, Thomas R.
CARTWRIGHT, Mary D.
(Corbett)
FABIANO, Lorraine E. (Roche)
TEWKSBURY
MALDEN
FULCHINO, Salvatore A.
BIRKMAIER, Catherine V.
(Witham)
STONEHAM
FRAMINGHAM
BENNETT, Dr. Avis Kimball
LAWRENCE
COHEN, Howard I.
SMITH, Bernice
CARTWRIGHT, Mary D. (Corbett)
BENNETT, Dr. Avis Kimball
Croswell Funeral Home
North Reading
(978) 664-3031
www.croswellfuneralhome.com
CAPOSSELA, Toni-Lee
See Enhanced Listing
CARROLL, Ruth Elizabeth
(Cooper)
Of Naples, FL (formerly of Lynn,
Framingham, Southborough, Wayland,
and Boston MA; Manhattan and Dobbs
Ferry NY; and Tampa FL.)
Avis passed to our Lord on Friday
November 3, 2017 at seventy-eight
years of age. Beloved mother of Kim
Bennett, Kathy Ann Bennett, and Mark
Gordon Bennett. Cherished grandmother of Dean Bennett Simpson,
Gordon Burton Bennett, Carson Burton
Bennett, and Raven Burton Bennett.
Former wife of Dr. Gordon George Bennett, DMD (deceased.) A Funeral Mass
will be held at Sacred Heart Church
in Lynn, MA on Saturday November
11, 2017 at Noon. Interment will be
in Pine Grove Cemetery, Lynn MA.
Relatives and friends are invited to call
at the church prior to the Funeral Mass
from 11:00 am – 11:45 am. Flowers
may be sent care of Solimine Funeral Home, 426 Broadway, LYNN, MA
01904 Tel. (781-595-1492). Donations
may be made in honor of Avis to Avow
Hospice, in Naples FL. Directions and
guestbook at www.solimine.com
Of Wakefield resident, November 7.
Beloved wife of the late Elmer Raymond Carroll & the late Vincent Roscio.
Loving mother of Paul Carroll & wife
Nancilee of The Villages, FL; David
Carroll & late wife Ruth of Wilmington,
MA; Kathleen Baxter & husband Robert
of Pepperell, MA; Sheila Parr & husband David of Wakefield, MA; Susan
LeDuc & husband William of Rochester,
NH; and the late Joan, Thomas, and
Christopher Carroll. Mother-in-law of
Cheryl Carroll of Wakefield, MA. Also
survived by 18 grandchildren and 21
great grandchildren. Funeral from the
McDonald-Finnegan Funeral Home,
322 Main St., STONEHAM, on Monday
at 9am followed by a Funeral Mass in
Most Blessed Sacrament Church, 1155
Main St., Wakefield, at 10am. Interment, Forest Glade Cemetery, Wakefield. Visitation for relatives and friends
will be held at the Funeral Home on
Sunday from 1-4pm. In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be made to the charity of one’s choice. For guestbook, www.
mcdonaldfs.com
McDonald-Finnegan Funeral Home
322 Main Street
Stoneham, MA
At 73 years, formerly of Revere in
Derry, NH, Nov. 6 after a brief illness.
Beloved wife of the late Edward F.
Cartwright, Jr. Cherished mother of
Michael E. Cartwright & wife Mary of
No. Kingstown, RI, David F. Cartwright
& wife Lisa of Plaistow, NH & Ronald
P. Cartwright & wife Alicia of Derry,
NH. Dear sister of Ellen Medeiros &
husband Robert, & Anne M. Slaney &
husband Ret. Revere Fire Cpt. George
Slaney all of Londonderry, NH, Kathleen Corbett & her partner Pasquale
DeFeo of Revere, Francis G. Corbett
& wife Kathleen of Revere & the late
Phillip Corbett. Adored grandmother to
Alyssa Clark-Cartwright of Hampton,
NH, Mary Casey Cartwright & Andrew
Cartwright both of No. Kingstown, RI,
Ronald Cartwright of Acton, ME., Alex
Cartwright of Derry, NH, Robbie & Matthew Cartwright both of Plaistow, NH,
Jaysun Blasko & wife Katie & Lillian
Blasko all of Chicopee, Ma. Also lovingly survived by her uncle Atty. Ronald
P. Corbett, Esq. of Revere & many
proud nieces & nephews. Family &
friends are invited to attend the Funeral
from the Vertuccio & Smith Home for
Funerals, 773 Broadway (Rte. 107)
REVERE on Saturday, Nov. 11 at 10:30
a.m., followed by a Funeral Mass in
The Immaculate Conception Church,
(corner of Beach St. & Winthrop Ave.)
Revere at 11:30 a.m., immediately
followed by interment at Puritan Lawn
Memorial Cemetery, Peabody. Visiting
hours are Friday only 3-7pm. Parking
available left of the Funeral Home. Ret.
Asst. V.P. at Fidelity Investments. In
lieu of flowers, remembrances may be
made to New England Center & Home
for Veterans, PO Box 845257, Boston,
MA. 02284-5257 or to Community
Caregivers, 1B Commons Drive, #10,
Londonderry, NH 03053. Please visit
www.vertuccioandsmith.com
CHRISTENAKIS, John M.
Of Billerica, November 5, 2017, age
19. Beloved son of George and Rita
(Amara) Christenakis. Loving brother
of Adriana (Christenakis) Kenyon and
her husband, Christopher, of Billerica
and Daniela Christenakis of Billerica.
Loving uncle of Seamus and Luisa. Also
survived by many aunts, uncles, cousins
and friends. Funeral from the Burns Funeral Home, 354 Boston Rd., (Rt. 3A),
BILLERICA, Saturday, November 11, at
9:00 AM, followed by a Funeral Mass in
St. Theresa’s Church, Billerica, at 10:00
AM. Relatives and friends invited.
Visiting hours Friday, 4-8 PM. In lieu of
flowers memorial contributions may be
made in John’s name to NAMI National
Alliance on Mental illness, ifundraise.
nami.org. John was an avid sports fan
throughout his life and especially loved
baseball. He volunteered at Winchester
Hospital for several years and aspired
to a career helping others in either the
field of medicine or law. Interment, Fox
Hill Cemetery, Billerica.
www.burnsfuneralhomes.com
Brian P. Kelly, Bus. Mgr./FST
John F. McMasters Jr. President
In Memoriam
Funeral Services
Funeral Services
CANNIFF MONUMENT
323-3690
MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR
LESLEY E. COWAN
Saturday, November 11, 2017 at
11 a.m. at The Union Church, 14
Collins Rd., Waban, MA.
Fulgoni and wife Maureen Sateriale,
Lynne Taibbi and husband Frank
Taibbi, Elizabeth Fulgoni and husband
William Battye, 7 grandchildren and 6
great-grandchildren. She also leaves
her loving sister, Theresa Scozzaro.
Services will be private.
SOUTH END
BENNETT, Dr. Avis Kimball
JAMAICA PLAIN
KALAYJIAN, Robert G.
MULRY, Elizabeth A. (Tosti)
Fuller Real Estate in Reading. She
loved helping people find homes, was
honest, knowledgable and a tough negotiator. Her reputation grew and she
became very successful which allowed
her to retire to Florida at the age of 55.
She especially loved playing the
stock market which kept her busy up
until her last days. She was an avid
day-trader sitting at her desk with 3
computer screens playing the market
from Opening Bell until Market close.
Even while in hospice, she had to have
CNBC on to watch how the market was
doing.
She met a wonderful man, Robert
Simon, whom she married 3 years
ago. They enjoyed going out to dinner,
playing cards and spending time with
one another until his death on October
20, 2017.
She leaves her children, Kevin
HINDLE, Peter Gage
DANVERS
DeROCCO, Madeline A. (Flanagan)
HOLYOKE
MELANSON, Margaret R.
M
argaret Fuller “Peggy”
passed away on
November 7, 2017
peacefully surrounded
by her family. Born
on March 6, 1932 as Margaret Jackson
to Mary (Splain) and William Jackson,
and raised in Somerville with her 3
brothers, John, William and Walter
and 2 sisters, Marion and Theresa.
She married Edward Fulgoni on
June 20, 1954 and moved to North
Reading to raise their family. Edward
was killed in a car accident on May
14,1962. It was then that she moved
with her 3 young children to Reading.
Her children always came first and she
made sure they never went without
and gave them so many wonderful
experiences and loving memories.
As her children grew, she began her
Real Estate career and went on to open
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
(617)
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
Funeral Services
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
COHEN, Howard I.
Age 90, in Newton, born in Lawrence,
son of Benjamin and Mildred Cohen,
brother of the late Richard and Herbert
Cohen. Navy veteran and dedicated
computer engineer. Mourned by his
children Betsy Kallus, Deborah Cohen
and Andrew Cohen, their spouses
Menachem Kallus, Edgar Masters and
Cynthia Cohen, and grandchildren,
Sarah, Meirit, Racheli Cohen, and
Yochanan Kallus. Also mourned by
his loving nieces and nephew. With
gratitude for the extraordinary care of
Todd Raymond and his staff at Evans
Park at Newton Corner. Funeral Service
today, Thursday, Nov. 9, at 11:00AM
at Levine Chapels, 470 Harvard St.,
BROOKLINE, MA. Interment at Temple
Emanuel Cemetery, Lawrence. Shiva
at the home of Andrew and Cynthia
Cohen, Newton, MA.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
CONNAUGHTON, Richard
Patrick
Resident of Harwichport,
MA, formerly of Milton,
MA, passed away peacefully
at home surrounded by family on Nov.
4, 2017. Beloved husband of Ruth
(Kamp) Connaughton for 63 years. Best
Dad of his 4 children and their
spouses- Margaret and Bob Klehm,
Patricia Connaughton-Burns, Joanne
and Tom Storey, Richard and Mary
Connaughton. Loving grandfather of 11
incredible grandchildren. Wonderful
brother to his Sister Rose Plant, as well
as Sister Mary Margaret Mattioli,
brother John J. Connaughton (both
predeceased). Loving uncle, cousin, and
friend….
Born in Boston to Patrick Joseph
Connaughton and Rose Anne (Fallon)
Connaughton. He worked as an accountant for the Commonwealth of
Massachusetts for his entire career.
After retirement he returned to his
special place- Cape Cod- the place of his
courtship and honeymoon with Ruth,
the place where he marked the highlights of his life with family and friends,
and the place where he will rest his soul
from now to eternity….
Visiting Hours will be 2-5 on
Sunday, November 12, 2017 at Morris,
O’Connor & Blute Funeral Home, 678
Main Street, HARWICH, MA. Public
Burial will be held at the Massachusetts National Cemetery in Bourne MA
on Monday, November 13, 2017, at
12:30PM.
In lieu of flowers, donations in his
memory can be made to Harwich
Conservation Trust, P.O. Box 101, S.
Harwich, MA 02661; or Broad Reach
Hospice and Palliative Care, 390 Orleans Road, No. Chatham, Ma. 02650.
Words of comfort may be made to his
family at www.morrisoconnorblute.com
CURRAN, Valentina H.
(Maganzini)
Of Burlington, formerly of Medford,
Nov. 8. Beloved wife of George E. Loving mother of George & his wife Donna
of Manchester, NH, Thomas & his wife
Kari of Seattle, WA, Joseph & his wife
Tracy of Billerica, Connie Sorenson
of Burlington, and Diane Curran of
Burlington & her companion Scott Frye.
Sister of Julia Durso of Billerica, Alice
MacNeil of Burlington, Walter Maganzini of Kingston, Benjamin Maganzini of Winchester, and the late Gino
Maganzini. Also survived by 19 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren. A
Vigil and Rosary Service will be held at
St. Margaret’s Church, 111 Winn St.,
Burlington on Friday, November 10 at 7
p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated
at St. Malachy’s Church, 99 Bedford
St., Burlington on Saturday, November
11 at Noon. Relatives and friends are
respectfully invited. The burial will be
private. In lieu of flowers, memorials
in Valentina’s name may be made to
the Shriners Hospitals for Children
www.shrinershospitalsforchildren.org/
donate. Arrangements under the Assistance of the Edward V. Sullivan Funeral
Home, BURLINGTON. For directions
obituary & on line guestbook see
www.stmargaretburlington.org
www.saint-malachy.org
www.sullivanfuneralhome.net
DAVIS, Talvin
86, of Boston, died on November
4, 2017. Beloved husband of Susie
Ann Davis. Loving father of Staci
Davis-Spencer of Boston, and Talvin
“Michael” Davis of Maryland. Devoted
grandfather of 4 grandchildren. Dear
brother of Julia Butler and Eloise Soucer both of Chicago. He is also survived
by a loving host of extended family and
friends. Funeral service Saturday at 11
AM at Union United Methodist Church,
485 Columbus Ave., Boston, MA. Visiting with the family begins at 9 AM with
a Masonic service at 10 AM. Interment
Mount Hope Cemetery, Boston, MA. To
post a sympathy message visit
www.DavisofBoston.com.
DeROCCO, Madeline A.
(Flanagan)
Of Peabody, formerly of Melrose,
11/6/17. Mother of Karen, Cheryl,
Nancy, Patrick & Michael. 10AM Mass
@ Incarnation Church, Melrose, on Saturday 11/11/17. Info @ 781-665-1949
or www.gatelyfh.com.
Every life is a story
worth sharing
Share theirs in The Boston Globe
The Boston Globe’s new Featured Life offering
lets you honor your loved one with a professionally
written narrative about their life and achievements.
$
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
For more details, contact Boston
Globe Classifieds at 617-929-1500
or deathnotices@globe.com.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B7
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
CAPOSSELA, Toni-Lee
DiTULLIO, Louise M.
(Varnerin)
FENNELL, Patricia J.
(Dawson)
Of Boca Raton, Florida and Milton,
passed away unexpectedly on Monday,
November 6, 2017.
Born in Boston and raised in Wellesley, Louise is a graduate of Girls Latin
School, Class of 1948 and Simmons
College, Class of 1952. She was active in
both alumni associations.
Louise supported her husband
Clifton with the establishment of
DiTullio Insurance Agency Inc. and was
a Girl Scout Leader for decades. She
enjoyed sewing, needlepoint and later
in life became a proficient golfer, with
memberships at Via Mizner Golf and
Country Club, Boca Del Mar, FL and
Wollaston Golf Club.
Beloved wife of the late Clifton R.
DiTullio. Mother of Diane DiTullio Agostino and her husband Frank of Milton,
Richard P. DiTullio and his wife Carol
of Milton, Roy M. DiTullio and his wife
Kathleen of Canton, Peter C. DiTullio
and his wife Stephanie of Fallbrook,
CA and Paul A. DiTullio and his wife
Mary of Northboro. Grandmother of
Christopher, John and his wife Cate and
Emily Agostino, Hana and Evan DiTullio, Corinne and Lauren DiTullio, Paige
DiTullio and Tim and Kate DiTullio.
A Mass of the Resurrection will be
celebrated in Saint Agatha Church,
432 Adams Street, Milton, on Saturday
November 11th at 10:00 AM. Relatives
and friends invited. Visiting hours at
Dolan Funeral Home, 460 Granite Avenue, EAST MILTON SQUARE, Friday
4-7 PM. Interment Milton Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations in Louise’s memory may be made to St. Jude
Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St.
Jude Place, Memphis TN 38105.
For information and directions,
www.dolanfuneral.com
Of Winthrop, Oct. 31, loving wife of
William F. Fennell. Adored mother
of Kathleen Fennell of Winthrop,
Patrick Fennell of Winthrop, Kerry
Simoneau and her husband Matthew
of Marlborough and William L. Fennell
of Winthrop. Beloved Nanna of Jessica,
Rachel, John, Jr.., Katlyn, Mark, Sean
and Jack. Dear sister of the late Leo
Dawson, Eugene Dawson and Margaret
Vermiglio. Also survived by many
adored nieces and nephews.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the
visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano
and Son Funeral Home 147 Winthrop
St., Winthrop on Saturday, November
11, 2017 from 8:30 to 9:30 AM followed by a funeral mass in St. John
the Evangelist Church, Winthrop at
10:00 AM. Committal will be private.
For directions, memorial donations
or to sign the online guestbook go to
www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
DONOVAN, Jean M.
(Connelly)
In Needham, formerly of Brookline
died peacefully on November 5, 2017.
Beloved wife of the late Edward V.
Donovan for over 66 years. Dear sister
of Joan A. DiPesa and her late husband
Roger of Brookline. Devoted aunt of
Susan DiPesa and Janice Sennott and
husband Mark all of Brookline and the
late Roger DiPesa, Jr. and former wife
Sherry DiPesa-Joyce of Norwood. Also
a devoted great aunt to Leanne, Karen
and Neil DiPesa. Visitation will be held
on Friday morning from 9:00 – 9:30
in the Bell-O’Dea Funeral Home, 376
Washington St., BROOKLINE, followed
by a Funeral Mass in St. Mary of the Assumption Church, Brookline, at 10:00.
Relatives and friends are kindly invited.
Interment Holyhood Cemetery. Jean
worked for over 30 years for the U.S.
Navy. She was devoted to her family
and to St Joseph Parish in Needham.
She loved to travel all over the world
and do crossword puzzles. In lieu of
flowers, donations in her name made
to St. Mary’s Building Fund, 5 Linden
Pl., Brookline, MA 02445 or St. Joseph
Parish, 1360 Highland Ave., Needham,
MA 02492 would be appreciated.
www.bellodeafh.com
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
FULCHINO, Salvatore “Sal”
A.
Of Malden, formerly of
Everett, entered into eternal
rest on Tuesday, November
7, 2017 in the West Revere Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center after a period of
failing health. He was 92 years old. Sal
was born in Revere and lived in Everett
for most of his life before settling in
Malden these last few years. A proud
U.S. Army veteran, Sal participated in
the Pacific Campaign during World War
II. He was the former Chief Engineer
at WHIL-AM and the former owner of
the Tremont Villa Function Facility, The
Marquise Rouge, and the Rust Corporation. Sal was also a former executive
official with the Middlesex County
Government. He was the son of the late
Andrew and Fannie Fulchino. Sal is
survived by his wife of 70 years, Wilma
E. (Palmore); two sons, Stephen and
Gregory; two daughters-in-law, Barbara
and Darlene; two grandchildren, Kelly
and Cynthia; and three great-grandsons, Peter, Malcolm and Sebastian.
There will be no wake or funeral services. In lieu of flowers, contributions
in Sal’s memory to The Elliott Fund, c/o
Saugus Animal Hospital, 300 Broadway,
Saugus, MA 01906 or to the Shriners
Hospitals for Children, 51 Blossom St.,
Boston, Massachusetts, 02114, would
be sincerely appreciated. Arrangements by the:
Cafasso & Sons Funeral Home
Everett 617-387-3120
FULLER, Margaret M.
(Jackson)
See Enhanced Listing
HAGGERTY, Frederick L.
EKNOIAN, Emily A. (Hallow)
Of West Roxbury, formerly of Boston’s
South End, November 8, 2017. All
services will be held Monday morning at Our Lady of the Annunciation
Cathedral. Complete notice Sunday and
at www.Kfouryfuneral.com.
Kfoury Keefe Funeral Home
West Roxbury
617-325-3600
FABIANO, Lorraine E.
(Roche)
Of Stoneham, Nov 2. Wife of the
late Donald A. Fabiano. Mother of
Kathleen Fabiano, Donald A. Fabiano,
Jr., Karen J. Braden, Nancy Pitcher,
Phyllis D’Apice, Jeannie Wise, Matthew
Fabiano, Florie Zenga, Luke Fabiano,
Peter Fabiano, Rachel Reis, Barbara
Hardy, Cynthia Martin, Michael Fabiano
and the late Paul M. Fabiano. Also survived by 39 grandchildren and 23 great
grandchildren. Visitation for relatives
and friends at the McDonald Funeral
Home, 19 Yale Ave., Wakefield on Sunday from 1-5pm. Funeral Mass in St.
Patrick Church, 71 Central St., Stoneham on Monday at 9am. Interment,
Lindenwood Cemetery, Stoneham. In
lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 309 Waverley Oaks Rd, Waltham,
MA 02452or to St. Patrick Church, 71
Central St., Stoneham, MA 02180.
FANDEL, Thomas R.
“Herman”
94 of Natick Wednesday November 8,
2017. Beloved husband of Rosemary
(Boland) Fandel sharing 72 years of
marriage. Funeral service on Saturday
November 11 at 12:00 Noon in the
Chapel of the John Everett and Sons
Funeral Home 4 Park Street, at NATICK
COMMON. Visiting hours are Friday
from 4:00 to 7:00 P.M. Complete notice
to follow.
Died Tuesday, Oct 31, 2017. Please
come and celebrate his life at the
Christian Calvary Church, 47 Grove
St., Lynnfield, MA 01940 on Saturday,
November 11th at 11:00 am
Talk
Have the
of a
Lifetime
SM
You talk about many
things with your loved ones:
from day-to-day details to
big events. Sharing stories
with those who matter most
isn’t just important today;
it will be especially significant
when it’s time to honor and
commemorate your lives.
Meaningful memorialization
starts when loved ones talk
about what matters most:
memories made, lessons
learned and how they hope
to be remembered.
Download a free brochure
and Have the Talk of a
Lifetime today. It can make
the difference of a lifetime.
talkofali fetime.org
Professor, Biographer, and Chef
T
oni-Lee Capossela, 74,
passed away on November
5 surrounded by her loving
family. She was a professor, author, and chef, and
lived in the South End, Boston. She
was the eldest daughter of N. Francis
Cerulli and Mary G. (Buck) Cerulli, and
was born in Pittsburgh, PA on Sept.
19, 1943. She graduated from Mt. St.
Dominic Academy in Caldwell, N.J.
and earned a B.A. degree in English
Literature from Boston University
summa cum laude and M.A. and Ph.
D. degrees in English Literature from
Brandeis University. She taught rhetoric, writing, and composition at Boston
University’s College of Basic Studies,
UMass-Boston, Cape Cod Community
College, Southeastern Massachusetts
University (now UMass-Dartmouth),
and Northeastern University before
joining the faculty at Stonehill College
in 1991. At Stonehill she served as
director of the Writing Program, coordinator of the Writing Center, and was
promoted to full professor in 2001.
She retired in 2004 in order to
write the biography of John U. Monro,
inspired by reading his obituary in The
Boston Globe. Monro had resigned as
dean of the college at Harvard in order
to direct programs for underprivileged
students at Miles College in Alabama,
reflecting the idealism of the civil
rights movement of the 1960s. During
World War II Monro directed damage
control on the USS Enterprise. Later,
HAMMOND-HOMANS,
Yvonne Schraepen
Age 80, died at home in Canton, MA
on Sunday, November 5, 2017. Born
in Embourg, Belgium, on January 25,
1937, Yvonne came from a big, loving
Belgian family, headed by her parents,
Alphonse and Josee Schraepen. That
spirit traveled with her across the
Atlantic in 1961, when she came
to the U.S. with her first husband,
Henry Hammond. Together, they raised
daughter Genevieve and son Henry,
who survive her, as do their spouses
Dan Matthews and Mimi Neuman, as
well as her grandchildren Eli, Bex, and
Jesse. Yvonne loved above all being a
mother and a grandmother, and that
feeling extended to her second family,
which she acquired in 1988, when
she married James A.P. Homans, who
predeceased her in 2016. She embraced
his sons James, John, and Samuel, their
wives Laura, Angela, and Mittie, and
their children as well: Michael, Cathy,
Caroline, Camilla, Charles, Daniel,
and Stewart. The same held true when
Genevieve married Dan; his children
John, Joe, and Mary joined the circle
- family was family to Yvonne, and her
heart kept making room for more. It
had a special corner for her dogs, Lili,
Lucy, and Ozzie.
Having completed some college
studies at the Universite de Liege in
Belgium, her career path in the U.S.
started with administrative positions
at the Harvard Medical School and
then the Cardiovascular Division of
the Brigham and Women’s Hospital.
After an early retirement from this
field, Yvonne pursued a new path in
retail. Always beautifully turned out
herself, she found positions in a variety
of elegant outlets, winding up at Eileen
Fisher stores, where she took great
pleasure and was always a perfect
model for the clothing.
A voracious reader, generous and
skilled cook, student of Iyengar yoga for
more than 40 years, ardent feminist,
and discerning watcher of British and
Australian TV dramas, Yvonne shone
a warm light on the world for all the
years she walked its paths. She will be
missed by more people than she might
have imagined, and all of her big, loving family will treasure her memory
forever.
A private burial is planned for Saturday, November 11. That afternoon,
from 1:00-5:00, an open house will be
held at Yvonne’s home. Informal remarks will be made at about 3:00, but
well-wishers are welcome at any time.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be
made in her name to Planned Parenthood, or Medecins Sans Frontieres/
Doctors without Borders. See www.
Keohane.com or call 1-800-Keohane for
directions and online condolences.
he developed the system of need-based
financial aid and created training
programs for Peace Corps volunteers.
John U. Monro: Uncommon Educator was published by Louisiana State
University Press in 2012.
Her other publications include The
Critical Writing Workshop: Designing
Writing Assignments to Foster Critical
Thinking (1993), Language Matters:
Readings for College Writers (1996),
The Harcourt Brace Guide to Peer
Tutoring (1998), and many articles in
academic journals.
Her first marriage, to Domenic A.
Capossela of Boston in 1963, ended in
divorce. For 10 years, she was companion to Robert F. Hutton of Cambridge,
who died in 2003. She is survived by
her husband, Ronald A. Sudol, formerly of West Bloomfield, MI, her three
sons, Domenic Capossela of Sharon,
Mino Capossela of Brooklyn, and
Christopher Capossela of Seattle; her
brothers, Mark Cerulli of Mashpee, and
Kurt A. Cerulli of Boston; her sisters,
Francette Cerulli of Worcester, VT,
and Lynn Phillips of New Orleans; five
grandchildren; and her mother, Mary
Hagedorn, of Lake Hiawatha, NJ.
In addition to her academic career,
Professor Capossela joined her first
husband in creating Dom’s Restaurant,
which operated from the North End
waterfront before re-locating to Bartlett Place in the North End of Boston
and expanding to a second location
in Hyannis. She also opened her own
restaurant, Toni-Lee’s, in Hyannis.
She gave cooking lessons and enjoyed
circulating recipes from her private
cookbook.
She was a member of Phi Beta
Kappa and a long-time lector at St.
Paul’s Church in Harvard Square.
Her enthusiasms included cooking,
travel, classical music, theater, movies, museums, and grandchildren. As
a breast cancer patient she promoted
the knitting and donation of prayer
shawls and hats. In her article “Hats,
Shawls, and the Kindness of Strangers”
in Spirituality & Health she wrote: “My
own participation in the ministry—first
as a grateful recipient and then as a
donor—has sharpened my awareness
that the spiritual dimension of cancer
treatment is at least as important as
the medical dimension.”
In lieu of flowers, please make donations to research on metastatic breast
cancer through METAvivor (1783
Forest Dr. #184, Annapolis, MD 21401,
metavivor.org) or Boston Conservatory.
Visiting Hours: Private
HINDLE, Peter Gage
LaCOUNT, Brian F.
McKEE, Milton J.
Dedicated
Educator
58, of Lowell, formerly of Somerville,
November 7, 2017. Devoted son of the
late Eugene F. and Helen E. (Pierce)
LaCount. Dear brother of Elizabeth
McCormack and her husband Michael,
Jacqueline Campbell and her husband
Kevin, all of Tewksbury and the late
Eugene LaCount. Cherished uncle of
William, Brendan and Ashley Tighe
and Alicia Campbell. Calling Hours
will be held in the George L. Doherty
Funeral Home, 855 Broadway (Powder
House Sq.), SOMERVILLE, on Friday,
Nov. 10th, from 5:00pm to 8:00PM.
Relatives and friends invited to attend.
Interment will be private. In lieu of
flowers, donations in Brian’s name
can be made to the American Diabetes
Association at www.diabetes.org. For
more information please visit
www.dohertyfuneralservice.com
Of Hingham, formerly of
Quincy, died at Pat Roche
Hospice House, Hingham,
Monday November 6, 2017.
Born in Newark, New Jersey, Milton
served in the United States Air Force as
a motor vehicle mechanic. He retired
as a Special Services Technician with
Verizon in 1998, after 31 years of
employment.
Beloved husband of the late Kathryn
(Krutenat) McKee. Loving son of Stella
(Walkiewicz) McKee of Kearney, NJ
and the late John T. McKee. Father of
Michael J. McKee, Mark J. McKee and
Matthew J. McKee. Brother of the late
John T. McKee III.
Visiting hours at Dolan Funeral
Home, 460 Granite Avenue, EAST MILTON SQUARE, Thursday November 9
from 4-8 PM. Interment in Lakeview
Cemetery, Brockport, New York, Monday November 13.
For information and directions,
www.dolanfuneral.com
Age 83 of South Dartmouth passed
away peacefully Sunday, November 5,
2017.
Born in New Bedford, a son of the
late Winston R. and Eleanor (Potter)
Hindle, he was a lifelong area resident.
He was the brother of the late Winston
R. Hindle Jr. and W. Thomas Hindle.
He was a graduate of Deerfield Academy and Amherst College. Peter was
an educator at the Deerfield Academy
for forty-four years retiring in 2000. He
was a great teacher and coach of golf
and soccer while at Deerfield. He sang
in an acapella group while at Amherst
College, was an avid collector of matchbox covers and loved puzzles and games
of all types. He was a member of Anthony’s Beach, a music lover, especially
works of Gilbert and Sullivan. Peter was
a great golfer and enjoyed many rounds
at the New Bedford Country Club with
family and friends over the decades of
membership.
His three nieces, Karen Donoghue,
Gail Hindle and Susan Wilson of MA
and two nephews, Russell Hindle of
NC and Gage Hindle of CA; and sister
in-law, Sarah Hindle of MA will miss
Uncle Peter’s wonderful sense of humor
and entertaining jokes.
A memorial service will be held
on Saturday, November 11, 2017 at
2:00PM in the Congregational Church
of South Dartmouth, 17 Middle St,
South Dartmouth, MA 02748. The
Burial is private.
Contributions in Peters name may
be made to: Congregational Church of
South Dartmouth, 17 Middle St, South
Dartmouth, MA 02748.
Arrangements are in the care of
Waring-Sullivan Home at Dartmouth,
230 Russells Mills Road, Dartmouth.
Relatives and friends invited. For tributes and online registration:
www.waring-sullivan.com
KALAYJIAN, Robert G.
Nov 7th of Jamaica Plain.
Son of the late Robert &
Alice (Najarian) Kalayjian.
Husband of Nancy (Davis) Kalayjian.
Loving father of Craig of Jamaica Plain,
Matthew & his wife Kim of Beverly, Ara
& his wife Tricia of Hyde Park, David &
his wife Melinda of Weymouth, Robin
& her husband George Hazerjian of
Norwood and the late Michael &
Steven, both of Jamaica Plain. Brother
of Rose Boyajian of Norwood, Alyce
Poskel of So. Boston and the late Nectar
Ajamian and Charles, both of
Needham. Brother-in-law of Ann
Kalayjian of Ohio & Wanetta Wingard
of Pennsylvania. Grandfather of
Anthony, Daniel, Sandra, Ryan,
Christopher, Celia, Gregory, Bethany
and Samantha. Also survived by many
nieces & nephews. Visiting Hours are
Friday 4-8pm. Relatives & friends
invited. A Prayer Service will take place
at the Mann & Rodgers Funeral Home,
44 Perkins St. (corner of So. Huntington Ave) JAMAICA PLAIN on Saturday
morning at 10am. Interment
Gethsemane Cemetery.
Share a
special memory
Add a cherished memory or condolence to the
online guestbook at boston.com/obituaries.
George L. Doherty Funeral Service
Somerville, MA
www.dohertyfuneralservice.com
McGRATH, Arlene (Nord)
MELANSON, Margaret R.
“Peggy”
Of Lexington, MA, and Ogonquit, ME,
after a long and courageous battle with
cancer, surrounded by her family, died
peacefully November 6, 2017. Beloved
wife of Gerald E. McGrath. Sister of
Alan Nord and his wife Diane of Acton.
Arlene is also survived by her stepsons,
Gerald E. McGrath Jr. of NC, Michael
F. McGrath of NM, Kevin J. McGrath of
Quincy, Paul J. McGrath of Braintree,
and the late Timothy J. McGrath,
formerly of New York, by 6 grandchildren, Jacqueline, Gerald III, Michael,
Marianne, Matthew, and Bridgett, by
many nieces and nephews, and by her
cat Patches.
Retired Teacher and Administrator
for the Boston Public School System,
where she taught in the early childhood
special needs program. Member of
the Lexington Arts & Crafts Society
Metal Workers Guild; Member of the
Lexington Community Center Quilters
Group. The McGrath family wishes to
extend its deepest gratitude to her lifelong friends Maureen and Virginia Tisei
of West Roxbury, to the Robert E. Dunn
and Robert McBride families of Quincy,
to the entire staff of the Mass. General
Hospital Cancer Center - Sarcoma Unit,
to the wonderful neighbors and friends
at the Lexington Place Condominiums,
to the entire staff and volunteers at the
Lexington Community Center and the
Quilters Unit, and to the Lexington Fire
Department, 911 Unit.
Visiting hours will be held Sunday,
November 12 at the Douglass Funeral
Home, 51 Worthen Rd., LEXINGTON
from 2pm to 6pm, and a Memorial
Luncheon will be held on Saturday
November 25 from 1:00 – 4:00 pm at
the Inn at Hastings Park, 2027 Mass.
Ave., Lexington, MA 02421. Relatives
and friends are kindly invited. In lieu of
flowers, donations in her memory may
be made to the Mass. General Hospital
Cancer Center, Sarcoma Unit, 55 Fruit
St. Boston, MA 02114. Interment
private.
Lexington 781-862-1800
www.douglassfh.com
Writer, Artist,
Storyteller for
“Grownups.”
Margaret (Peggy) Rose Melanson (80)
died at her home October 17, 2017 at
11:11PM surrounded by her daughters,
Linda Dell Thompson and Lisa Dawn
Thompson and daughter-in-law Ellen
Miller Landis. Peggy is also survived
by her brother Gerald (Jerry) William
Melanson, sister-in-law Loretta, their
son Corey, daughter Pamela, son-in-law
David Basile and their son Julian. An
Ice-cream Social Memorial will be held
in her honor on November 11, 2017 at
the Delaney House, Holyoke MA 1-3
PM. In lieu of flowers, please donate to
DakinHumane.org
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
To submit an obituary for
editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail to
obits@globe.com, or
information by fax to
617.929.3186. If you need
further assistance about
a news obituary, please
call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices and
obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
B8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
MULRY, Elizabeth A. (Tosti)
Of West Roxbury and Gloucester,
formerly of Jamaica Plain, November
5, 2017. Beloved wife of the late James
J. Mulry. Loving mother of Karen M.
Hickman and her husband Barry of
West Roxbury, Donna M. Martel and
her husband Douglas and their children
Clement, Elizabeth, and Jason of San
Diego, CA, Sheila M. Delamere and her
husband Mark and their son Mark, Jr.
of West Roxbury, Jim J. Mulry and his
wife Laura and their children James III,
Paige, John and Natalie of West Roxbury, and Joseph J. Mulry and his wife
Mary and their children Riley, JJ, and
Maggie of West Roxbury. Also survived
by several nieces and nephews. Loving
sister of Olga Dunn of Walpole and the
late Joseph and John Tosti. Funeral
from the Robert J. Lawler & Crosby
Funeral Home, 1803 Centre St. WEST
ROXBURY on Saturday November 11,
at 9:00 AM. A Mass of Christian burial
will be celebrated in The Holy Name
Church at 10:00 AM. Relatives and
friends are invited to attend. Visiting
hours in the Funeral Home on Friday
November 10, from 3:00 to 8:00 PM.
Interment St. Mary Cemetery
Needham. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Elizabeth
Mulry’s memory on behalf of Mark
Delamere, Jr. to Journey Forward,
5 Shawmut Rd. Canton, MA 02021.
www.lawlerfuneralhome.com
Lawler & Crosby Funeral Home
617-323-5600
PEARSON, Agnes
Surrounded by her loving family, Agnes
Pearson of Lexington died on October
28 at the age of 95. Agnes’ mother,
Olga Anderson, was born in Sweden.
Her father, Theodore Peabody, had
deep roots in Kennebunk, Maine. One
of six children, Agnes grew up in Kennebunk on the family homestead in a
house built by her grandfather. She was
especially close to her sister, Rachel.
Surrounded by woods and close to the
sea, they enjoyed a childhood immersed
in the richness of nature. A sense of
wonder and kinship with the natural
world began and would last a lifetime.
An athletic child, Agnes would snowshoe to school on heavy snow days, eat
apples right off the tree in the autumn,
and sled down Harry Hall’s hill in the
winter.
A keen sense of humor, kind spirit,
and gentle disposition were the fabric
of Agnes’ being. She was queen of
baking vegan calzones and orange cupcakes, lover of anything pickled, friend
to all animals (and many people), and
an avid walker who journeyed many
miles over the course of her life.
As young adults, Agnes and her
sister moved to Boston where they met
their husbands to be. Agnes married
Arnold Pearson, and they had two
daughters, Deborah and Holly. Sadly,
Arnold passed when their second child
was only eight months old.
Although living in Boston for most
of their adult lives, the sisters remained
country girls at heart. They would
walk for miles as they did in childhood,
now accompanied by their beloved
dogs. Often they would start out in the
predawn darkness, watching the sun
rise on these magical mornings.
Deborah had two daughters, Allison
and Rebecca. Agnes adored them and
they loved their grandmother “Gree”
whose qualities of generosity, empathy,
and the ability to produce joy out of
thin air are alive in them.
A celebration of Agnes’ life is
planned for a future date. Agnes was
an advocate for animals, as such, donations in her honor may be sent to The
Humane Society of the United States,
1255 23rd Street, NW, Suite 450, Washington, DC 20037.
SARRIS, Fotoula (Boustris)
101, of Belmont, MA, formerly of
Brighton, passed away surrounded
by her loving family on November 7,
2017. Beloved wife of the late Peter
(Panagiotis) Sarris. Loving mother of
George Sarris and his wife Nancy of
Belmont. Cherished Yiayia of Fotoula
Kopellas and John of Needham, Sofia
Sarafoglou and Tony of Easton, the late
Antonia Pappas and her husband Kary
of Wellington, FL, Christina Zagami
and Tony of Reading, Peter Sarris and
Meropi of Watertown, George Sarris
and Julie of Needham and late Bobby
Sarris. Great Yiayia of 17, Afroditi,
Lucianna, Bobby, Billy, Sofia, George,
Isabella, Anastasia, Christopher,
Athena, Courtney, Gianna, Haralambos,
Antonia, Christos, Katherine and Grace.
Former mother-in-law of Lucy (Cugini)
Sarris. Also survived by many nieces,
nephews, relatives and friends. Born in
Brooklyn, Connecticut to Haralambos
and Christoula Boustris, second of five
children, Penelope, Andonis, Nikos and
Vasilios. They returned back to Greece
when she was 4 years old and she grew
up in Vresthena, Greece. She met the
love of her life on her 21st birthday in
Vrina, Greece November of 1937 and
they were married 2 days later. The
marriage lasted 50 years until Peter’s
death in 1987. They came to the United
States in 1958 in search of a better life
and found it in Brighton, MA, where
she lived for 54 years. Fotoula was dedicated to her Orthodox faith, enjoyed
cooking, gardening and loved spending
time with her family. Funeral Services
will be held on Saturday, November 11,
2017 at 10AM at the Taxiarchae Greek
Orthodox Church, 25 Bigelow Avenue,
Watertown, MA. Visiting hours will
be held on Friday, November 10, 2017
at the funeral home from 4 to 8 pm.
Relatives and friends are kindly invited
to attend. At the request of the family,
please omit flowers. Donations in her
memory may be made to the above
named church. Burial in Mt. Auburn
Cemetery. For online guestbook, please
visit.www.Faggas.com
Faggas Funeral Home
800-222-2586
SMITH, Bernice
92, of Yonkers, NY, passed away peacefully on 11/7/17. Bernice was the loving
wife of the late George Smith. Bernice
is survived by her children Pamela (David) Brownstein of Yorktown Heights,
NY and Richard (Lori) Smith of Tewksbury, MA, grandchildren Ian, Scott,
Jared and Allison and great-grandchild
Raelyn. Calling hours: Saturday 5-8
and Sunday 2-7 at the home of Pamela
& David Brownstein, Tuesday 2-4 &
7-9 at the home of Richard & Lori
Smith. Services handled by King David
Memorial Chapel, Mount Kisco, NY,
914-241-7100
ZEIDEL, Sonia Muriel
Tratten
Of Canton, formerly of Clinton and
Natick, on Monday, November 6, 2017.
Beloved wife of the late Paul Zeidel.
Loving mother of Hannah Lillian
Rizzo & her husband Eugene Rizzo of
Lexington, Leslie Zeidel of Auburndale,
and Dr. Mark L. Zeidel & his wife Dr.
Susan Freedman of Cambridge. Dear
grandmother of David, Benjamin,
Rachael, Emily, Samuel, Rebecca, Sarah
and Joshua and great-grandmother of
Penina, Meira, Ariella, Shira, Emet and
Mendel. Services at Levine Chapels,
470 Harvard St., BROOKLINE, on Friday, November 10 at 10:00am. Burial
at 1:00pm in the B’Nai Brith Cemetery,
55 St. John Rd., Worcester. Memorial observance will be on Sunday,
November 12 from 11:00am-2:00pm at
Orchard Cove, 1 Del Pond Drive, Canton. Donations in Sonia’s memory may
be made to Hebrew SeniorLife.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
Lexington 781-862-1800
www.douglassfh.com
B o s t o n
View The Boston Globe’s
complete list of death
notices and sign
the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries.
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Mario Orangio, at 51; was Watertown’s youngest fire chief
By Emily Sweeney
GLOBE STAFF
When Mario Orangio was
appointed Watertown’s fire
chief in 2004, he was 37 years
old and the youngest fire chief
in the town’s history.
Soon after he took the post,
the Globe ran a feature story
about Mr. Orangio and reported how the newly appointed
chief sported several tattoos,
played the electric guitar, and
was the youngest chief in the 34
Greater Boston communities
that made up the Mass. MetroFire consortium.
“There’s always that perception of a fire chief; you think of
an older guy with a handlebar
mustache,” a clean-shaven Mr.
Orangio said in the Globe interview. “But I think I’ve gotten
the respect by the way I’ve conducted myself, how I’ve prepared myself for the job.”
His effect soon reached well
beyond the borders of his
hometown, as Mr. Orangio
went on to serve as a mentor to
many fire chiefs, including the
state fire marshal.
Mr. Orangio, the former
president of the Fire Chiefs Association of Massachusetts,
died from cancer Nov. 7. He
was 51. Fire and public safety
officials around the state were
in mourning.
His death is the second loss
suffered by the Watertown Fire
D e p a r t m e n t t h i s y e a r. I n
March, Watertown firefighter
Joseph Toscano died after he
collapsed while battling a twoalarm fire inside a home on
Merrifield Avenue.
Provisional Fire Chief Bob
Quinn said Mr. Orangio had developed pancreatic cancer,
which he believes was job-related. “He was diagnosed just
about a year ago,” Quinn said.
“He clearly got it from his years
here as a firefighter.”
Mr. Orangio grew up in Watertown and joined the Watertown Fire Department in 1989.
He lived in Maynard with his
wife, Sandra (whom he met in
junior high), and had three
daughters.
“Mario was a good guy and
extremely compassionate leader,” Quinn said. “He loved his
family more than anything.”
Mr. Orangio retired as fire
chief on Oct. 14, Quinn said.
“He was battling cancer, undergoing chemo, and working
when he could,” Quinn said.
State Fire Marshal Peter J.
BILL POLO/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2004
Whether working the scene
of a fire (right, with fire
helmet) or serving with a
number of professional
firefighting organizations,
Watertown Fire Chief Mario
Orangio had the respect of
both his peers and his staff,
as well as the Watertown
community.
Ostroskey praised Mr. Orangio
for his leadership and for being
a great mentor.
“Mario Orangio was a great
fire service leader tested by
fires, the aftermath of the Marathon bombing which exploded
into his town, and the loss of a
firefighter,” Ostroskey said in a
statement. “His leadership
helped to guide the Department of Fire Services as chair of
the Fire Training Council, and
as mentor to many fire chiefs,
including myself. He will be
missed, and our deepest sympathies go to the broken hearts of
his family, friends, and the
members of the Watertown Fire
Department.”
Boston Fire Commissioner
Joe Finn was among the many
DAVID L RYAN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2005
public safety officials who expressed condolences to Mr.
Orangio’s family on social media. “On behalf of Boston Fire,
our condolences to the family,
f r i e n d s a n d t h e @ Wa t e r townFD on the passing of Chief
Mario Orangio,” Finn wrote.
“Chief Orangio was a true leader for the fire service. He always
cared for his firefighters and
the public. A fighter to the end.”
Watertown Town Manager
Michael J. Driscoll watched Mr.
Orangio rise through the ranks,
and said he had the privilege of
appointing him to lieutenant in
1997, to captain in 2000, and to
fire chief in February 2004.
“For 13 years in his position
of fire chief, Mario provided
leadership and served with dedication and professionalism for
the Watertown Fire Department, town administration,
elected officials, businesses,
and our community,” Driscoll
said in a statement. “Chief
Orangio contributed substantially to the department’s mission and improved the quality
of life for all of us who work and
live in Watertown.”
Emily Sweeney can be reached
at esweeney@globe.com.
NASA VIA AP
Mr. Gordon attempted one of NASA’s
first spacewalks, outside the Gemini
11 in 1966 (right). He later piloted a
space module around the moon.
Richard Gordon;
piloted mission
to moon; at 88
NEW YORK TIMES
Express your
sympathy
G l o b e
Obituaries
By Richard Goldstein
RICCI, Mary R. (Iodice)
Of Lexington, November 6, 2017, age
103. Beloved wife of the late Louis
Ricci. Loving mother of Barbara R.
Anastasy and her husband Ronald of
Naples, FL, Lois L. Ricci of Gloucester,
and Louis J. Ricci and his wife Liz of
Amesbury. Sister-in-law of Anna Errico
of Winchester. Mary is also survived by
6 grandchildren, 8 great grandchildren,
by many nieces and nephews, and by a
dear friend, Doris Nigro of Waltham. A
private Graveside Service will be held at
Westview Cemetery in Lexington.
T h e
NEW YORK — Richard Gordon, who
undertook what became a harrowing and
abortive spacewalk in a 1966 NASA mission, then orbited the moon three years later, but never achieved his dream of walking
on the lunar surface, died Monday at his
home in San Marcos, Calif. He was 88.
His death was confirmed by NASA.
Mr. Gordon and Charles Conrad flew in
the September 1966 Gemini 11 mission to
advance the technique for the rendezvous
and docking of two spacecraft, a procedure
required for moon landings. They soared to
850 miles above the Earth, setting a record
for manned spaceflight.
Mr. Gordon piloted the command module Yankee Clipper during its orbit of the
moon in November 1969 while Conrad and
his fellow Apollo 12 astronaut Alan Bean
carried out the first extensive moon walks,
four months after the pioneering Apollo 11
mission that sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz
Aldrin to the moon.
After taking photos of the moon’s topography to scout tentative landing sites for future missions, Mr. Gordon performed docking maneuvers, allowing his fellow astro-
NASA VIA AP
nauts to return to the capsule in the lunar
lander that had descended from it.
“The name of the game as far as I was
concerned was to walk on the moon, and at
that time I was relegated not to do that,”
Mr. Gordon told a NASA interviewer in
1999 when asked if he was disappointed
that he had to remain 60 miles above the
lunar surface after having come so far.
“I had a job and a function to perform,”
he continued. “And I was happy for them.”
Bean, in an interview on Tuesday, said,
“Dick Gordon was the perfect crew member in that he was easy to get along with all
the time, and no matter what happened he
never got upset, through the ups and
downs of training.”
Mr. Gordon’s missions also included two
troublesome episodes.
He emerged from the Gemini 11 cabin
for a spacewalk that was to last an hour and
47 minutes after a separately launched unmanned space vehicle, the Agena, had
docked with it. He was tethered to his Gemini capsule. But he quickly experienced difficulty stabilizing himself while trying to
carry out various tasks.
He accomplished some of his scheduled
assignments in his first 10 minutes, but the
work was so arduous that he was perspiring into his helmet, temporarily losing vision in one eye, and his heart rate soared.
He rested outside the Gemini for another
half-hour, but had to reenter it because he
was too drained to continue.
“Our understanding of spacewalking
was still not good,” Chris Kraft, the director
of flight operations for the mission, recalled
in his 2001 memoir, “Flight.” “His strength
was fading rapidly and his frustrations
were growing apace.’’
Mr. Gordon, a Seattle native, later spent
more than two hours standing in an open
hatch of the Gemini 11 spacecraft taking
photographs for analysis by astronomers.
There was trouble anew for Mr. Gordon,
and a worrisome moment as well for his
two fellow astronauts, in the first minute of
their blastoff during a thunderstorm from
Cape Kennedy, Fla., in Apollo 12.
Lightning twice struck the craft, and
warning lights flashed on the astronauts’
console, signaling that the electrical and
primar y guidance systems had been
knocked out. Batteries took over, but the
systems were restored quickly and the
flight continued without further electrical
problems.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
Obituaries
Tsarnaev friend seeks
Roy Halladay, 40, fiercely competitive pitcher Supreme Court case
GLOBE NEWS SERVICES
PHILADELPHIA — A fierce
competitor on the mound, Roy
Halladay was generous and
gentle away from the field.
The eight-time All-Star loved
his family, baseball, and flying.
His passion for piloting cost
him his life Tuesday when his
private plane crashed into the
Gulf of Mexico. He was 40.
The crash was reported to
the Pasco County Sheriff ’s Office by a resident at 12:06 p.m.,
and when law enforcement arrived on the scene, the plane,
an ICON A5 registered to Mr.
Halladay, was upside down in
shallow water.
Sheriff Chris Nocco reported that Mr. Halladay had been
the only person on the plane,
adding that the specifics of the
crash were under investigation.
A w i n n e r o f a C y Yo u n g
Award in each league, Mr. Halladay was a 6-foot-6 right-hander known for his durability and
command. He led the league in
innings four times; over his career, he completed 67 games.
After 12 major league seasons with the Blue Jays, who
drafted him in 1995, Mr. Halladay sought to pitch in the postseason for the first time. He
helped clear the way for a trade
that sent him to the Phillies for
catcher Travis d’Arnaud, righthander Kyle Drabek, and outfielder Michael Taylor. He
played four more seasons before a bad back forced him into
retirement.
Former teammates, opponents, and coaches on Wednesday mourned the sudden loss of
the beloved former player,.
Nearly every memory began
with a story about Mr. Halladay’s legendary workout program and his early morning
routine.
Second-baseman Chase Utley recalled his introduction to
Mr. Halladay at the Phillies’
practice complex in Clearwater,
Fla., in 2010.
‘‘My heart hurts writing
this,’’ Utley wrote on Instagram.
‘‘I can still remember the first
day we met. It was 5:45 a.m. on
the first day of spring training
when I arrived. He was finishing his breakfast but his clothes
were soaking wet. I asked if it
was raining when he got in. He
laughed and said ‘No I just finished my workout.’ I knew right
then — he was the real deal.’’
Fo r m e r t e a m m a t e C o l e
Hamels, now a Texas Rangers
ace, joined Phillies chairman
David Montgomery at Philadelphia’s ballpark to remember
Mr. Halladay. Fans left pictures,
candles, and notes at the stadium to honor Mr. Halladay.
‘‘Behind everything he did,
he had a purpose,’’ Hamels said.
‘‘I think you come to realize that
you have very small, short moments in life to do something
great so you have to maximize it.
You have to make the best of it.
And he did. He made us push to
a level that sometimes you
didn’t think you could actually
reach. He made everybody better.’’
Mr. Halladay would make
his first year with the Phillies
his career year, going 21-10
with a 2.44 ERA. He threw the
20 th perfect game in Major
League history during the regular season, and in a division
playoff series against Cincinnati, he threw the second no-hitter in postseason history.
After the postseason no-hitter, Dusty Baker, then the Reds’
manager and a fixture in baseball dating to the late 1960s,
said, “That is the best-pitched
By John R. Ellement
GLOBE STAFF
CAMDEN COURIER-POST VIA AP/FILE
Sport plane has limited track record
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mr. Halladay celebrated
with catcher Carlos Ruiz
(top) after throwing a nohitter to defeat the
Cincinnati Reds in a playoff
game in 2010. He played for
the Philadelphia Phillies for
four seasons after a long
tenure with the Toronto
Blue Jays.
LOS ANGELES — The tiny
sport plane Roy Halladay was
flying when he fatally crashed
into the Gulf of Mexico was
made for entry-level pilots like
him, though the plane’s chief
designer and test pilot died
while flying one earlier this
year, officials and experts said.
Mr. Halladay had been the
proud owner for less than a
month of his ICON A5, and
was among the first to fly it,
with only about 20 in existence, according the website
for ICON Aviation. In one of
many enthusiastic tweets
game I’ve seen since I’ve been
going to the playoffs and the
World Series.”
One of the strongest messages of condolence came from Pedro Martinez, the three-time Cy
Young Award winner whose
prime coincided with Mr. Halladay’s. “I can’t believe it,” the former Red Sox ace wrote on Twitter. “So many times we competed against each other and even
while competing, I wanted to
see you!”
Fellow pitcher Brandon McC a r t hy o f t h e L o s A n ge l e s
Dodgers said, simply: “Roy Halladay was your favorite player’s
favorite player.’’
Based on his retirement
date, Mr. Halladay will not be
eligible for election to baseball’s
Hall of Fame until 2019, but he
will have a strong case because
of his dominance in his strongest seasons. His career record
of 203-105 and his 2,117 career
strikeouts are not eye-popping
numbers, but using the JAWS
system — an evaluation tool
that accounts for a player’s peak
seasons as well as his overall career — Mr. Halladay is ranked
as baseball’s 42nd-best starting
pitcher. Only nine players
ahead of him are not yet in the
Hall of Fame, while more than
30 players below him on the list
are enshrined in Cooperstown.
His postseason success and his
popularity with the media also
bolster his case.
Shortly after he retired, Mr.
Halladay discussed how odd it
felt not to play baseball.
“I find myself kind of sitting
around the house thinking,
‘There’s something missing
here — I should be working out,
I should be running, I should be
doing something,’” he said. “For
a second, it’s kind of a little bit
of panic, and then it kind of sets
in: ‘OK, that’s right. I’m retiring
now.’ It’s actually a very peaceful feeling.”
He eventually turned to flying as an outlet.
Mr. Halladay, whose father
was a pilot, knew the risks that
flying presented. He joked
about his wife’s opposition to
his purchasing a plane in a video that had been posted to YouTube by ICON in October but
that was removed shortly after
the crash.
“She’s fought me the whole
way,” Mr. Halladay said of his
wife, Brandy, in the video.
Piloting small planes has
long been popular among athletes, and Major League Baseball has lost other athletes to
similar crashes. Thurman Munson, an All-Star catcher and the
10th captain of the New York
Yankees, died after crashing a
Cessna Citation in 1979. And
Cory Lidle, a former teammate
of Mr. Halladay’s on the 2003
Blue Jays, died in 2006 when a
Cirrus SR20 he was flying with
a co-pilot crashed into an apartment building on Manhattan’s
Upper East Side.
T h e f a c t t h a t t h e Pa s c o
County Sheriff’s Office led Tuesday’s recovery effort carried extra emotion because of Mr. Halladay’s personal relationship
with the department, which included the donation of a police
dog that the department
named Doc, in reference to Mr.
Halladay’s nickname.
“You wouldn’t know what
Roy did because Roy wouldn’t
tell you what he did,” Nocco
said. “And that’s the legacy of a
great man.”
In addition to his wife, Mr.
GETTY IMAGES FILE/2013
about the plane, he said it felt
‘‘like flying a fighter jet.’’
The A5 is an amphibious
aircraft meant to be treated
like an ATV, a piece of weekend recreational gear with
folding wings that can easily
be towed on a trailer to a lake
where it can take off from the
water. ‘‘The way that a lot of
people described it is a Jet Ski
with wings,’’ Stephen Pope of
Flying magazine.
The man who led the
plane’s design, John Murray
Karkow, died while flying an
A5 in California on May 8, a
crash blamed on pilot error.
Halladay leaves two sons, Ryan
and Braden.
‘‘All-Star pitcher. All-Star
person. All-Star father and family man,’’ Montgomery said.
Mr. Halladay served as a
guest instructor with the Phillies in spring training and had
his own office at the complex.
He enjoyed working with the
organization’s young players on
the mental aspects of baseball.
‘‘He certainly would have
given more to baseball in the future because of his love for the
game,’’ Montgomery said. ‘‘But
his commitment to his family
kept him where he was the last
few years. We’d had a number
of conversations about his potential future in the game. But
he just would say, ‘I want it, but
it’s on hold. It’s on hold right
now because of my family.'’’
Mr. Halladay was the pitching coach at Calvary Christian
High School.
For all of his personal accomplishments, Mr. Halladay
always put the team first and
shared the credit. He gave all of
his teammates and members of
the organization a luxury watch
to commemorate his perfect
game and had a special bond
with former Phillies catcher
Carlos Ruiz.
‘‘Roy was one of the greatest
pitchers I ever caught, and an
even better person and friend,’’
Ruiz said. ‘‘I wanted to win
more for him than myself. I will
miss him ver y much. My
thoughts and prayers are with
his family and loved ones and
all those, like me, who truly admired him.’’
Material from the Associated
Press and The New York Times.
was used in this obituary.
Linda Nochlin, 86, feminist art historian, writer
By Roberta Smith
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Linda Nochlin, a celebrated art historian
whose feminist approach permanently altered her field, died
of cancer Oct. 29 at her home in
New York City. She was 86.
Dr. Nochlin, who taught at
the New York University Institute of Fine Arts, earned a place
of honor in both art-historical
and art-world circles in 1971
with a groundbreaking essay
whose very title — “Why Are
There So Few Great Women
A r t i s t s ? ” — th r e w d o w n a
gauntlet.
Her answer was complex, as
it examined assumptions behind the question, enumerated
the centuries of institutional
and social conventions that had
militated against women succeeding in the arts, and it discredited what she called the
myth of innate genius.
Her inquiry provided several
generations of historians, critics, and artists with new tools
to address issues of gender and
identity in art. It also helped
initiate a collective, and continuing, rewriting of art history.
In the process, not a few female artists have been recognized as great, as the very idea
of greatness has been redefined
and as the conception of art has
expanded to include crafts.
As comfortable with 19thas with 20th-century art, Dr.
Nochlin was always alert to the
overlooked and underrecog-
nized. Her first important
books were “Realism” (1971)
and “Gustave Courbet: A Study
of Style and Society” (1976),
which grew out of her doctoral
dissertation. They appeared at
a time when 19 th-centur y
French painting usually meant
impressionism and post-impressionism (although she
wrote on those subjects, too).
Dr. Nochlin’s ability to toggle
between the past and the present was aided by her clear, accessible writing, which was
built on theory but never deadened by it. Her tone was brisk
and irreverent, her ideas coming out in pithy, manageable
chunks, making her work a perennial favorite with students.
Beyond her interest in art’s
social and political contexts and
meanings, Dr. Nochlin was
keenly attentive to art objects,
especially the surfaces of paintings. She once described herself
as “an aesthetic creature to my
fingertips.” In this vein, her
Charles Eliot Norton Lectures
at Harvard in 2004 were titled
“Bathers, Bodies, Beauty: The
Visceral Eye.”
A graduate of Vassar College,
Dr. Nochlin earned a graduate
degree in English literature at
Columbia University and her
doctorate at the Institute of
Fine Arts. She taught at Vassar,
Stanford University, Williams
College, and Yale University before joining the faculty of the
Institute of Fine Arts in 1980.
She retired in 2013.
A friend of Boston Marathon
bomber Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev
is turning to the US Supreme
Court in hopes of overturning
his conviction for lying to the
FBI following the April 2013
bombing that killed three and
wounded more than 260.
Robel Phillipos, 24, met
Tsarnaev when both were students at UMass Dartmouth and
was questioned by the FBI after
Tsarnaev, and his brother, Tamerlan, were identified as the
persons responsible for the terrorist bombing near the finish
line on April 15, 2013.
Phillipos had initially denied
to the FBI that he went to Tsarnaev’s dorm room at the school
three days after the bombing after he recognized Tsarnaev in a
photo of the bombing suspects
released by the FBI.
He denied going there with
two other friends, and said he
did not see them enter the
room and remove a backpack.
But he later confessed that
he had lied and was convicted
by a jury in US District Court in
Boston. Phillipos, who had no
prior criminal history, was sentenced to three years in prison.
According to the US Bureau
of Prisons, he is scheduled to be
released next February from a
minimum security prison in
Pennsylvania.
The legal arguments Phillipos’ attorney, Derege B. Demissie, will raise before the nation’s
highest court have not been revealed. Demissie filed what is
called a petition for certiorari
with the court on Friday, and
federal prosecutors have until
Dec. 4 to file their answer.
But when the Cambridge’s
man’s conviction was challenged before the First Circuit
Court of Appeals, his lawyers
argued the trial was unfair because the trial judge refused to
review if his statements to the
FBI were voluntary.
The trial judge ruled Phillipos would have to testify in order for the issue to be explored,
a decision the appellate court
concluded was legally justified
as they upheld his conviction.
Tsarnaev, 24, the only person to be charged with carrying
out the Marathon bombing,
was sentenced to death in 2015.
He is appealing his sentence.
His brother, Tamerlan, was
killed during a confrontation
with police in Watertown.
T he Supreme Cour t can
choose not to review the case.
John R. Ellement can be
reached at
ellement@globe.com.
LePage raps vote on
expanding Medicaid
uMAINE
Continued from Page B1
adults, most of whom do not
have dependents.”
The Maine People’s Alliance,
which was part of the coalition
of advocacy groups that supported the referendum, said
LePage — who vetoed five previous Medicaid expansion proposals approved by state lawmakers — cannot thwart the
will of the voters, who backed
the referendum 59 percent to
41 percent on Tuesday.
“The most important point
here is that he can’t veto a vote
of the people,” said Mike Tipping, an alliance spokesman.
“So his comments are unprecedented, and his threats are likely illegal, and it’s another unfortunate degradation of our political norms.
“But we shouldn’t let his tantrum distract from this landslide victory and the final decision of the people of Maine.”
The passage of the ballot
measure, known as Question 2,
will make Maine the 32nd state
to expand Medicaid coverage
under the federal health law,
but the first to do so by a popular vote, rather than by a decision of the Legislature and the
governor.
It will extend coverage to
about 80,000 Mainers who earn
up to 138 percent of the federal
poverty level, or $33,948 for a
household of four.
The Office of Fiscal and Program Review, a nonpartisan
state budget office, estimates
the law will cost Maine $54.5
million annually and bring in
an additional $525 million in
annual federal aid. LePage’s Department of Health and Human
Services estimates the costs to
the state will be much higher —
$63 million in the first year and
$100 million in future years.
The governor argues that
the last time Maine expanded
Medicaid, under then-governor
Angus King in 2002, it created a
$750 million debt to hospitals,
resulted in budget shortfalls,
and did not reduce the number
of uninsured residents.
“Therefore, my administration will not implement Medicaid expansion until it has been
fully funded by the Legislature
at the levels DHHS has calculated,” LePage said Wednesday, referring to the Department of
Health and Human Services,
“and I will not support increasing taxes on Maine families,
raiding the rainy-day fund or
reducing services to our elderly
or disabled.”
John McDonough, a Harvard School of Public Health
professor, said that any attempt
by LePage — a famously pugnacious Republican who has
called himself “Donald Trump
before Donald Trump” — to
block the law will trigger lawsuits from Mainers who are being denied coverage to which
they are legally qualified.
“Can a governor do things to
impede, and slow down, and
thwart?” said McDonough, who
worked on development and
passage of the federal health
law. “I think the answer is yes.
And I don’t think that authority
or power is limitless in the face
of a law passed by the voters.”
He said he hopes the referendum’s passage encourages
activists in other states like
Utah and Idaho that have not
expanded Medicaid coverage to
take the issue to the ballot.
“I hope it creates a kind of a
wave and really exemplifies and
makes concrete the gap in opinion between voters and the people who are trying to repeal, replace, and dismantle the ACA,”
McDonough said.
But funding for the insurance coverage could face roadblocks in the Maine Legislature,
where Democrats control the
House and Republicans the
Senate.
Representative Kenneth W.
Fredette, the House GOP leader, acknowledged Wednesday
that Medicaid expansion is now
“the law of the land” but expressed doubts about funding
it.
“It’s the question of: Do you
want a new car?” Fredette said
on WVOM, a Maine radio station. “Well, yes, of course you’d
like to have a new car. But how
do you pay for it? Well, I think
that’s the fundamental question.”
Echoing LePage, he said
House Republicans will not
support raising taxes or dipping
into the rainy-day fund to expand Medicaid coverage for the
poor. “House Republicans are
going to be very stingy — much
like we were in this past budget
conversation — about how we
are going to continue to pay for
an ever-expanding government,” he said.
House Speaker Sara Gideon,
a Democrat, blasted LePage
and Fredette for what she described as their attempts to obstruct the results of the election. She said the Legislature
will move swiftly to fund Medicaid expansion, as required by
law.
“Mainers want more access
to health care, not less, and are
no longer willing to wait,” Gideon said in a statement. “Any attempts to illegally delay or subvert this law will not be tolerated and will be fought with every
recourse at our disposal.”
Michael Levenson
can be reached at
mlevenson@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@mlevenson.
T h e
B10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Business
Why can’t
Snap and
Twitter make
money like
Facebook?
Panera,
Au Bon
Pain to
join forces
Bakeries with a shared
history plan to reunite
By Janelle Nanos
GLOBE STAFF
GLOBE STAFF PHOTO ILLUSSTRATION; STOCK.ADOBE.COM PHOTOS
Hiawatha Bray
TECH LAB
The numbers
are in and
they’re more
lopsided than
the Boston mayoral race. In the
social media
sweepstakes, it’s
Facebook by a
mile.
Last week,
the massive social network reported third-quarter revenue of
$10.3 billion and net income of $4.7 billion,
both well above Wall Street’s expectations. However, the social messaging service Twitter and
Snap, creator of the Snapchat photo-sharing
app, were both in the red, with Snap posting a
$443 million loss.
Snap’s been around for six years and Twitter
for 11. So will they ever turn a profit? I’m probably not the best person to ask, since I use them
only once in a while. Then again, that might
make me exactly the right person to ask.
I’m one of about two billion humans who
find Facebook irresistible. That’s far more than
the users of Snap and Twitter combined. But if
these two companies could manage to attract
more people like me, they should be able to survive, maybe even thrive.
I hope they do. Facebook is already too powerful. Some viable competition is needed.
Twitter and Snap are attempting to tweak
their offerings just enough to attract a wave of
new users, without alienating their loyalists.
Snap has announced a major overhaul of the
Snapchat app. It’s famous for introducing the
concept of messages that delete themselves, but
notorious for a messy and confusing design
that’s surely alienated lots of would-be users.
Meanwhile, Twitter, which made its name by
limiting user messages to just 140 characters, is
now letting us write messages twice as long.
Presumably, the company is reaching out to the
millions who can’t express their ferocious hatred for Trump or Hillary or the Yankees in fewer than 280 keystrokes.
Each idea takes aim at a core challenge for
both companies. Not only must they recruit
more users, but they’ve also got to persuade
more of them to stick around longer.
After a long period of stagnation, Twitter’s finally seeing sustained user growth — up to 330
million users compared to 317 million at the
same time last year. But that’s still pretty anemic
growth. And the engagement time for Twitter
users looks even worse. The company doesn’t
release official data on this, but one marketing
company, Mediakix, estimates that the average
user logs on for just one minute per day. Even if
that’s off by a factor of 10, Twitter isn’t very
“sticky.”
Advertisers won’t pay premium prices to
reach an audience with short attention spans.
Longer tweets, capable of sustaining deeper,
more serious conversations, could be a cheap
and simple way to keep visitors engaged. But
the promise of 140 more characters won’t be
enough to make me spend more time on Twitter
than my usual 5 or 10 minutes a week. On Facebook, I already get as many characters as I
want.
Snapchat, by contrast, keeps its users quite
TECH LAB, Page B15
Pa n e r a B r e a d a n n o u n c e d o n
Wednesday that it would acquire Boston-based Au Bon Pain, a move that
will reunite two bakery-cafes that
share the same starter yeast.
Ron Shaich, who built Au Bon Pain
into a national brand and used it to
launch Panera, will step down as chief
executive of Panera and serve as chairman of the combined company. He
will be succeeded by Blaine Hurst, currently Panera’s president. Both executives work out of Needham.
Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Au Bon Pain currently operates
more than 300 stores.
“A lot of people have talked about
this in the context of closing the circle,
but that isn’t what it’s about,” Shaich
said. The company has been underinvested in, he said, and there are several
avenues for growth, as Panera’s healthconscious menu resonates with many
venues seeking to serve better fare.
“This is a great strategic acquisition
that offers the opportunity for us to
grow in several new real estate channels, including hospitals, universities,
transportation centers, and urban locations,” he said.
Whether that might mean the
merger of the two companies under
the Panera name, he said, was still too
soon to know.
The ingredients of both companies
can be traced to a cafe called the Cookie Jar that Shaich opened on Winter
Street in downtown Boston in 1980,
shortly after finishing his MBA at Harvard Business School. A year later, he
merged the concept with a small threebakery chain called Au Bon Pain and
began selling healthy, low-cost meals
marketed as a quality alternative to
fast food.
PANERA, Page B15
MORE
MEDIA
Bill O’Reilly’s
contract said
he couldn’t be
fired over an
unproven
harrassment
claim, Fox told a
UK regulator B12
Shirley Leung
Well done, Mr. Mayor.
Now get to work.
CHRISTIAN HANSEN/THE NEW YORK TIMES
The US Justice Department has asked AT&T and Time Warner to sell
Turner Broadcasting in order to go through with a $85.4 billion merger.
Justice Department asks AT&T, Time
Warner to sell CNN; executive says no
By Michael J. de la Merced,
Emily Steel,
and Andrew Ross Sorkin
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — The Justice Department has called on AT&T and Time
Warner Inc. to sell Turner Broadcasting, the group of cable channels that
includes CNN, as a potential requirement for approving the companies’
pending $85.4 billion deal, people
briefed on the matter said on Wednesday.
The other possible way for the
merger to win approval would be for
AT&T to sell its DirecTV division, two
of these people added.
AT&T’s chief executive said CNN
would not be sold, according to
Bloomberg News. “Throughout this
process, I have never offered to sell
CNN and have no intention of doing
so,” Randall Stephenson said.
The demands set up a potential
battle over the fate of the long-in-theAT&T, Page B15
C
ongratulations, Marty Walsh, on
cruising to a second term. You
earned it. Now get back to work, because there’s serious unfinished
business to tackle.
Your landslide victory over City Councilor
Tito Jackson should embolden you. This is not
the time to sit back and hoard all your political
capital. Use it, and do the hard work that firstterm mayors can never get to. We all know
where to start:
R Transportation. You’ve got to stop saying
it’s Charlie Baker’s problem. You have no control over ordering new Green Line cars, but you
do control city streets. Traffic threatens to
choke the city’s economic engine, particularly
in the Seaport District. Create more dedicated
or pop-up bus lanes so MBTA buses on key
commuting corridors can be fast-tracked.
At the same time, push developers to help
pay for transportation fixes, whether it’s helping to upgrade the T or to explore creative solutions such as an aerial tram ferrying commuters from South Station to the other end of the
Seaport District. Better yet, take your Go Boston 2030 transportation plan and see how the
private sector can help fund it.
Now here’s the hard ask. Team up with City
Use your
capital to
attack the
problems
limiting
Boston’s
promise
Council president Michelle Wu to explore playing with toll prices to manage congestion,
something that is already done in London and
Seattle. Wu is looking into it, but she could use
an ally. Electronic tolling makes this possible
now, and while there is a bill coursing through
the Legislature on adding tolls beyond the
Mass. Pike, I wouldn’t hold my breath. If you
want to fix Boston traffic, city leaders have to
take charge. Consider this: Offer discounted
tolls during off-peak times and charge more
during rush hour.
R Housing. You’ve drilled it into us: The city,
under your stewardship, is on track to meet its
ambitious goal of creating 53,000 housing units
by 2030.
So why not up your goal to 60,000 or higher? Like traffic, the high cost of housing threatens to hamper the city’s economy. If it’s too expensive to live here, companies will have a hard
time recruiting and retaining young talent. Already, our reputation precedes us. If Amazon is
hesitant to build a second headquarters in Boston, the lack of middle-class housing almost
certainly will be one of the top reasons why.
The only way to bring down housing cost is
to increase the supply. Even if the city hits its
LEUNG, Page B14
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
TALKING POINTS
ELECTRIC VEHICLES
FORD AND CHINESE
PARTNER TEAM UP
TO DEVELOP
ELECTRIC VEHICLES
TOURISM
CRUISE SHIPS TO BE
BLOCKED FROM
VENICE LAGOON
Ford Motor Co. announced Wednesday that it is launching a venture with a Chinese partner
to develop electric vehicles for sale in China, the biggest market for the technology. The announcement of the $750 million venture with Anhui Zotye Automobile Co. adds to rising
investment by global automakers in China’s growing electric vehicle industry. Zotye already
has its own electric vehicle business and said sales in the first 10 months of this year were
up 14 percent over a year earlier, at 22,500. Sales of pure-electric and gasoline-electric hybrids in China rose 50 percent last year over 2015 to 336,000 vehicles, or 40 percent of global demand. US sales totaled 159,620. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Italian government and Venice officials have agreed on a plan
to block giant cruise ships from
steaming past the lagoon city’s
iconic St. Mark’s Square and instead re-route them to a nearby
industrial port. The agreement
reached Tuesday, the latest in a
years-long debate and still subject to final details, seeks to balance the environmental concerns
of Venice’s delicate ecosystem
with tourism and maritime jobs.
Transport Minister Graziano
Delrio said the plan, to be phased
in over three-five years, calls for cruise ships over 55,000 tons to dock at the mainland’s
Marghera port and avoid transiting through the Giudecca canal, one of the main waterways
through Venice that empties into the St. Mark’s basin. Environmental groups rejected it
since it still allows polluting cruise ships to enter Venice’s lagoon. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Agenda
➔ REAL ESTATE
US mortgage rates
New numbers for the average 30-year,
fixed-rate mortgage will be released
Thursday. Last week, Freddie Mac
reported the average 30-year, fixed-rate
mortgage stayed the same from the week
before, at 3.94 percent.
STREAMING
BROADWAYHD TO
STREAM SHOWS FROM
LONDON’S WEST END
RIDE HAILING
UBER
UNVEILS
PLAN FOR
FLYING TAXIS
GOVERNMENT
FEDERAL
PROSECUTORS
LOOKING INTO
ICAHN’S ROLE
IN TRUMP
ADMINISTRATION
FAST FOOD
WENDY’S STRUGGLES
AS MCDONALD’S AND
BURGER KING GROW
VIDEO GAMES
LATEST CALL OF DUTY
GAME SURPASSES
$500M IN SALES
TECHNOLOGY
SPACEX
INVESTIGATING
ROCKET ENGINE
EXPLOSION
The digital theater streaming network BroadwayHD is growing bigger than its name. It will
soon be the first to stream hits from London’s West End. BroadwayHD will start offering
current and recent offerings with ‘‘Wind in the Willows’’ from the London Palladium on
Nov. 23, an adaptation starring Rufus Hound as Mr. Toad and a story by ‘‘Downton Abbey’’
creator Julian Fellowes and Olivier Award-winning composer and lyricist George Stiles and
Anthony Drewe. After that will be a 2014 stage adaptation of ‘‘From Here to Eternity’’ with
songs by Stuart Brayson and Tim Rice, the first time that show will be streamed. Set just
before the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941, the dark story follows two US soldiers in Hawaii
who fall in love with the wrong women. It begins airing Dec. 7. That’s followed on Dec. 14
by ‘‘The Railway Children,’’ a family friendly show set in Edwardian England and centered
on three children’s love for their imprisoned father who are fascinated by the nearby
railway. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
➔ MEETUP FOR ENTREPRENEURS
Innovation night
Support student entrepreneurship in
Boston during a night of panels,
networking, and discussions. 6 to 9 p.m.,
WeWork, 625 Massachusetts Ave.,
Cambridge. Free.
Commuters of the future could get some relief from congested
roads if Uber’s plans for flying taxis work out. The ride-hailing
service has unveiled an artist’s impression of the sleek, futuristic machine it hopes to start using for demonstration flights
in 2020 and deploy for ride-sharing by 2028. The batterypowered aircraft looks like a cross between a small plane and
a helicopter, with fixed wings and rotors. It was presented at a
technology conference Wednesday in Lisbon. The vehicle is
intended to soar over traffic congestion, sharply reducing city
travel times. Uber hopes it will eventually cost commuters less
than using their own car. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Federal prosecutors are looking into the role played by Carl
C. Icahn (right), the billionaire investor, in advising the
Trump administration on regulatory issues that had the
potential to affect the finances of a company he owns.
Icahn stepped down as an unpaid adviser to President
Trump in August, after scrutiny from members of Congress
about whether he was influencing regulations on ethanol
to benefit his financial investments. One of Icahn’s main
investment companies, Icahn Enterprises, disclosed in a
regulatory filing on Friday that federal prosecutors in
Manhattan had served a subpoena seeking information
about “Mr. Icahn’s activities relating to the renewable fuels
standard and Mr. Icahn’s role as an adviser to the
president.” The filing said Icahn Enterprises was
cooperating with the prosecutors’ demand for information.
When Icahn took on the advisory position this year, critics
complained that it was a conflict of interest because he owns a big stake in an oil-refinery
business called CVR Energy. Indeed, The New York Times reported in March that Icahn was
pressing for a change in a requirement that refiners be held responsible for ensuring that
corn-based ethanol is mixed into gasoline. — NEW YORK TIMES
In an increasingly intense fight for fast-food diners, Wendy’s Co. isn’t keeping pace with its
biggest rivals. The restaurant chain posted same-store sales growth of 2 percent last
quarter, short of the growth reported by McDonald’s Corp. and Burger King. The company’s
results also missed Wall Street’s estimates, sending the shares down the most in more than
a year. Wendy’s finds itself competing with two reinvigorated chains in the burger wars —
especially McDonald’s, which has seen both traffic and same-store sales surge this year.
— BLOOMBERG NEWS
The latest Call of Duty shooting game is a hit,
surpassing more than $500 million in sales in its
first three days on the market. Activision Blizzard
Inc.’s “Call of Duty: WWII” sold twice as many
units in its debut weekend as last year’s “Call of
Duty: Infinite Warfare,” a sign the company’s key
franchise is back on track. The WWII sales
amount to about 20 percent of the $2.5 billion in
total revenue that analysts expected from Activision for this quarter. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
SpaceX is investigating why one of its rocket engines exploded during a test fire earlier this
week at the company’s facility in Texas, the company confirmed Wednesday. The explosion
of the Merlin engine occurred Sunday during what the company called a ‘‘qualification test.’’
No one was injured, but now the company founded by tech entrepreneur Elon Musk once
again has to figure out what went wrong with its hardware, as it suspends engine testing
during the investigation. In 2015, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket exploded a couple of minutes
after lifting off from Cape Canaveral en route to deliver cargo to the International Space
Station. No one was on board and no was injured. Then, in September 2016, another
Falcon 9 blew up, this time while on the launchpad as it was being fueled ahead of an
engine test fire. Again, no one was hurt. — WASHINGTON POST
➔ NETWORKING
Career fair
Attend a day of networking and recruiting
aimed toward diverse, motivated Boston
professionals. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Revere
Hotel, 200 Stuart St., Boston. Free.
➔ INFO SESSION
The most important
season
Small business owners are invited to
attend a session on how to use the
holidays to boost profits and revamp
marketing techniques. 4 to 7:30 p.m.,
East Boston Public Library, 365 Bremen
St., Boston. Free.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
B12
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Deal shielded O’Reilly from firing over allegations
By Joe Mayes
BLOOMBERG NEWS
LONDON — Former Fox News
star Bill O’Reilly had a deal with
the 21st Century Fox Inc. network
that he couldn’t be fired over unproven harassment allegations, a
fresh revelation that casts doubt
over corporate-governance standards at Rupert Murdoch’s media
empire.
O’Reilly ’s contract said he
couldn’t be dismissed based on an
allegation unless it was proven in
court, Jacques Nasser, an independent Fox director, told the UK
Competition & Markets Authority,
according to a summary published
Wednesday. O’Reilly, the former
host of “The O’Reilly Factor,” has
denied all wrongdoing.
Fox has been dogged by criticisms over its handling of sexualharassment claims made against
O’Reilly and Roger Ailes, the nowdece ase d for mer CEO of Fox
News. While Fox made changes to
governance and policies, the controversy has weighed on its $15.3
billion bid for Sky Plc. Competition regulators are reviewing the
RICHARD DREW/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bill O’Reilly’s
contract said
he couldn’t be
dismissed
based on an
allegation
unless it was
proven in
court, a Fox
official told a
British
regulator.
deal for factors including its impact on media plurality and the
Mu r d o c h s ’ a d h e r e n c e t o U K
broadcast standards.
“It’s another nail in the standards coffin as far as Fox is concerned,” said Steven Barnett, a
professor of communications at
the University of Westminster. “It
speaks volumes about the nature
of a company if you can pile up
multiple accusations and be protected by such a clause.”
Contractual clauses such as the
one described by Nasser are coming under scrutiny as sexual-harassment claims sweep through
Hollywood and beyond, following
the downfall of Harvey Weinstein,
the movie mogul accused of rape
and other wrongdoing at the studio he ran.
Weinstein’s contract at The
Weinstein Co. said that as long as
Weinstein covered the costs of settlements and judgments for misconduct including sexual harassment, he could keep his job, according to a report by TMZ, which
cited the 2015 contract. Weinstein
has denied any non-consensual
sexual activity.
Nasser, at a hearing with regulators on Oct. 25, said that when
the board was informed of sexual
harassment allegations against
Ailes, it reacted quickly and he left
the company within days. But
with O’Reilly, it was advised that
the situation was different due to
the terms of the employment
agreement and because the evidence was uncertain.
Board members debated the
timing of O’Reilly’s dismissal,
Nasser said. Some wanted to dismiss him immediately, while others wanted to wait for his contract
renewal, he said. The board didn’t
know the value of settlements
O’Reilly had made with various accusers, Nasser said, in line with
public comments from Fox chief
executive James Murdoch.
When Fox renewed the contract, it included protections for
the company aimed at harassment,
including that O’Reilly could be
dismissed if the company was
made aware of other allegations or
if additional relevant information
was uncovered in a company investigation, Fox has said.
Fresh allegations of misconduct against O’Reilly surfaced in
April, following a New York Times
report that five women had received payments from Fox or
O’Reilly for agreeing not to sue or
talk about their allegations that
O’Reilly verbally abused them,
subjected them to unwanted advances, or made lewd comments.
Fox News announced his departure on April 19, referencing a
“thorough and careful review of
the allegations.”
In hindsight, there could have
been better governance structures
in place at Fox News to ensure the
board knew of the allegations at
an earlier stage, Nasser, a former
Ford Motor Co. CEO, told the UK
competition regulator.
Oversight of Fox News was also
addressed by Nasser at the hearing
with the CMA. Critics of the Sky
takeover have warned of the risk
of a “Foxification” of Sky News, alluding to Fox News’s reputation as
a network more sympathetic to
right-leaning viewpoints, though
others have pointed to regulatory
commitments that would prevent
that. Fox News, which stopped airing in the United Kingdom in August, was faulted by the UK communications regulator this week
for prior biased reporting.
In the United States, the public
has already made up its mind
which political party it will support
and therefore news media is unlikely to influence voting decisions
in that country, Nasser told the
CMA, according to the summary.
No one is
immune
from hacks,
says Mayer
By Kevin Freking
ASSOCIATED PRESS
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TripAdvisor to add health, safety warning badge
By Karen Schwartz
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Responding to
what one travel expert categorized as “a wakeup call,” TripAdvisor has begun placing symbols
next to hotels and resorts that
have been identified as locations
of sexual assault and other major
concerns.
Based on news reports as well
as comments from the TripAdvisor community, the warnings are
designed to identify health, safety, and discrimination issues in
all of the website’s travel categories, said a company spokesman,
Kevin Carter.
“These badges will remain on
Tr i p A dvi s o r f o r u p t o t h r e e
months. However, if the issues
persist we may extend the duration of the badge,” he said. “These
badges are intended to be informative, not punitive.”
Decisions to add or remove a
badge will be made by an employee committee, he said. Listings will not be removed from the
TripAdvisor website regardless of
the number of complaints. “We
want consumers to see good and
bad reviews of businesses,” Carter said. Comments from users
will continue to be posted on the
site.
Three resorts in the Playa del
Carmen region of Mexico were
those flagged by TripAdvisor, including the hotel ranked at No. 2
by users, the Grand Velas Riviera
Maya; the hotel ranked at No. 4,
the Iberostar Paraiso Maya; and
the fifth-ranked hotel, the Iberostar Paraiso Lindo. Each had received thousands of reviews.
TripAdvisor issued a public
apology a week ago to Kristie
Love, 35, of Dallas, after The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported that TripAdvisor had repeatedly deleted her 2010 forum post
about the Paraiso Maya resort,
where she said she had been
raped by a security guard. TripAdvisor said it had run afoul of a
former policy that allowed only
“family-friendly” language. A
subsequent guest at the same resort told The Journal Sentinel
that she tried to write about a
sexual assault that occurred there
in 2015, but eventually gave up
because TripAdvisor said parts of
her review relied on information
that wasn’t firsthand.
“In that review there’s a line
about a doctor making a medical
diagnosis. Because it was a thirdparty medical diagnosis, it constituted hearsay,” a TripAdvisor
spokesman, Brian Hoyt, told The
New York Times last week.
As part of its new policy, TripAdvisor will try to be more clear
about why reviews are rejected.
“Our new e-mail communications will clearly articulate the
phrase or sentences that are in violation of our policy, inviting the
reviewer to make edits and resubmit their review,” Carter said.
Complaints of sexual assault
on travelers are not new, and
there are many posts on TripAdvisor written by travelers who say
they were raped in various countries. The government also identifies locations where sexual assaults occur. For instance, under
“Country Information” for Mexico, the State Department cautions that, “Rape and sexual assault are serious problems in resort and other areas. Many of
these incidents occur at night or
during the early morning hours,
in hotel rooms, or on deserted
beaches, or through drugging of
drinks.”
The Journal Sentinel reporting about TripAdvisor came at a
time of a national conversation
around sexual assault that was
brought about by the Harvey
Weinstein scandal and the #MeToo social media campaign.
The confluence of those
events “served as a wakeup call to
TripAdvisor,” said travel analyst
Henry H. Harteveldt, the president of San-Francisco-based Atmosphere Research Group.
“It’s 100 percent true that in
2017, and certainly going forward, no travel website can arbitrarily censor or remove posts
just because they may address an
uncomfortable topic or be awkward,” he said, noting that the
travel sites have a responsibility
to businesses to ensure that the
allegations are accurate and verifiable.
The health, safety, and discrimination badge is the third
that TripAdvisor is using to mark
businesses with potential concerns. A badge is used to identify
a listing that may be violating
posting guidelines; for instance,
by putting up fake reviews. Another badge is used to note when
TripAdvisor freezes reviews during major news events where
posts may not reflect the opinions of actual guests. That was
used next to the Mandalay Bay
listing in Las Vegas last month after a gunman killed 59 people
and injured more than 500.
Harteveldt said he believes
that TripAdvisor should link to
government warnings as well.
TripAdvisor
said decisions
to add or
remove a badge
indicating
concerns about
health or safety
will be made by
an employee
committee.
WASHINGTON — Former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer told lawmakers Wednesday that the threat
from state-sponsored hackers has
changed the playing field so dramatically that even the best-defended companies can fall victim.
Mayer joined former and current CEOs of Equifax in testifying
before a Senate committee examining recent data breaches that affected millions of Americans. Lawmakers said they hoped to use the information learned to shape future
legislation.
In Yahoo’s case, stolen information for billions of users included
names, e-mail addresses, phone
numbers, birthdates, and security
questions and answers. Mayer said
the thefts occurred during her nearly five-year tenure and she wants to
‘‘sincerely apologize to each and every one of our users.’’
‘‘As we all have witnessed: no
company, individual, or even government agency is immune from
these threats,’’ Mayer said.
Mayer said Yahoo successfully
defended itself against a barrage of
state-sponsored and private hacks
over the years and even employed
hackers to test the company’s defenses. In the end, she said ‘‘Russian agents intruded on our systems and stole our users’ data.’’
Mayer is part of a long line of
company executives and former executives who have made their way
to Capitol Hill in recent years to explain how their company fell victim
to a cyberattack. She was joined by
the interim CEO of Equifax, Paulino
Barros Jr., who took over after hackers exposed the personal information of 145 million Americans.
Barros told the committee he
has focused on improving customer
service and revising the company’s
structure so that the company’s
chief security officer reports directly to him. He also said the company
is on schedule to release a computer app in January that will allow
consumers to lock and unlock their
credit data.
Senator John Thune, a South
Dakota Republican, the committee
chairman, said 48 states have separate laws governing how and when
companies must notify consumers
of a breach. He said a federal law
should replace those state laws.
Spare your staff a long,
frustrating commute by
renting an executive
office suite in Woburn
or Beverly for the
winter months.
Rates start at just
$349 per month!
Don’t let mother nature
interrupt your business.
Call Patricia 781-569-5999
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
SM
Can we be your banker?
100 things more important than a bank.
Family (immediate, extended.)
Friends and their families.
Your home and all the comforts attached to it
(neighborhood, community…)
Pets. Dogs, cats, large animals such as horses.
Also reptiles and fish. And friendly rodents
such as guinea pigs, hamsters etc.
Co-workers.
People you see everyday, but whose names
you don’t know. (The mail man, grocery store
clerk, waiters and waitresses, police officers,
fire fighters.)
Things with sentimental value: memories,
pictures.
Civility: integrity, honesty,
the truth, rules and laws, respect (self, mutual)
kindness, politeness, listening.
Not talking “at” people. Not talking “over”
people.
Friendship.
Generosity.
Empathy: feeling for others.
The planet: air, water, trees, plants, rivers,
the ocean, birds, insects, wild animals, natural
resources, the environment in general.
Forms of artistic expression: music, dance,
poetry, books, plays.
Technology: specifically computers, smart
phones, self-driving cars, things connected
to artificial intelligence...
Science: cures for various illnesses, living
longer, space travel.
Education. Nutrition. Safety.
Veterans and those in active service.
Health—good health.
Places to worship.
Good quality schools.
The future.
Conversation.
Modesty.
Sports (participatory, spectator.) Playing catch.
Watching a game on TV.
Comfortable shoes.
Weddings. Christenings. Birthdays.
Anniversaries. Holidays.
Old movies, some new movies.
Pot-luck suppers.
Volunteer activities (church, social,
community, etc.)
Parks (local and national.)
A sense of humor.
Fairness.
Weekends (especially long weekends.)
Chocolate.
Flowers.
Having someone who loves you.
We asked our customers to answer a
question: “What are the things that
matter to you?” Sadly, none of those things
had to do with banks or banking. We appreciate
that even as a small bank—working day-to-day
with customers—we probably aren’t one of the
big things that truly matter to you. But maybe
we can help support the things that do.
Can we be your banker?
© Copyright 2017 Needham Bank. All rights reserved.
B13
Business
B14
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
SPONSORED BY
WEDNESDAY
DEC 6, 2017
5–8PM $25
FOOD AND BEVERAGES AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE
REGISTER NOW – SPACE IS LIMITED!
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Mayor Martin J. Walsh celebrated his strong reelection victory Tuesday over Tito Jackson.
BETHENNY
FRANKEL
creator, Skinnygirl,
self-made
businesswoman,
bestselling author
and branding guru
BARBARA
LYNCH
James Beard
Foundation awardwinning chef and
restaurateur and
author, Out of Line
GLORIA
STEINEM
Women’s Rights
Pioneer and
Advocate
SARAH
KAY
award-winning poet,
founder & co-director,
Project V.O.I.C.E and
author, B
SHAYNA
SEYMOUR
Walsh faces host of key issues
Emmy winning
journalist, co-anchor
of WCVB’s awardwinning nightly
newsmagazine,
Chronicle
OPENING NIGHT DEDICATED POWER HOUR
TO FEATURE AUTHORS:
•
Adam Grant, top-rated professor, Wharton and best-selling author, Option B
•
Gretchen Stewart, creator and author, Joy Manifesto
•
Grace Killelea, author, The Confidence Effect: Every Woman’s Guide to the
Attitude That Attracts Success
•
Christine Porath, associate professor, McDonough School of Business at
Georgetown University and author, Mastering Civility
•
Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche, award-winning personal finance educator
•
Courtney R. Rhodes, award-winning brand strategist, entrepreneur and
and author, The One Week Budget and Live Richer Challenge
author, Make Your Mark
•
Jen Sincero, #1 New York Times best-selling author and success coach
•
J. Kelly Hoey, author, Build Your Dream Network and named one of the 100
•
Ann Shoket, author, The Big Life, former editor-in-chief, Seventeen, team
member launching CosmoGIRL and millennial enthusiast
•
Dr. Jen Welter, first female NFL coach and author, Play Big
•
Dr. Amy Cooper Hakim, author, Working with Difficult People, Second Revised
Edition: Handling the Ten Types of Problem People Without Losing Your Mind
•
Jess Lahey, teacher, columnist, New York Times and best-selling author, The Gift
•
Celeste Headlee, award-winning journalist and author, We Need to Talk
most influential women on Twitter
of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed
MACONFERENCEFORWOMEN.ORG
uLEUNG
Continued from Page B10
goal, Boston will still be an expensive place to rent or own. In
your second term, be even
more aggressive in getting
workforce housing built, not
just subsidizing units in expensive projects. This means reining in the cost of development,
and you have three powerful
tools in your toolbox: tax
breaks, city-owned land, and
continued easing of labor
union rules on housing projects. Yes, these items will likely
eat up much of your political
capital, but it will be worth it in
the long term.
R Schools. You’ve laid the
groundwork for fixing the city’s
uneven school system, but now
it’s time to execute. Education
is the key to closing the opportunity gap in this city, and we
have a long way to go. With another four years, turn your attention to delivering on a campaign promise to improve the
quality of pre-K. Finish your
work on reinventing high
schools because the city’s employers are clamoring for a
workforce with the right skills.
Finally, fix Madison Technical Vocational High School.
Technology is creating a class of
so-called new-collar jobs —
good-paying jobs that don’t require a four-year degree. The
city’s only vo-tech school
should be magnet for students,
the same way Boston Latin has
a gravitational pull for others.
This is the time, with so much
corporate money pouring into
the city, to bolster education.
General Electric is pledging
$25 million and Vertex $50 million. For once, we see a flow of
money, but is there is a big idea
to fund?
R An Olympic dream with­
out the Olympics. So Boston
didn’t get to host the 2024
Summer Games. That honor
will go to Paris. Bidding for the
Olympics was never about
throwing a party for athletes
but the legacy projects the
event would leave behind. Over
the next four years, get Widett
Circle redeveloped into the next
great Boston neighborhood.
Restore Franklin Park — which
would have hosted dressage
and equestrian events — into
the jewel it should be. Money
from the Winthrop Square garage development can make
that happen.
R Tito Jackson. You’ve won,
now don’t banish Jackson. I
can hardly remember City
Councilor John Connolly from
his unsuccessful 2013 mayoral
run, and he didn’t even skip
town like Sam Yoon. Jackson
has said he doesn’t want to be
part of your administration,
but from one son of Dorchester
to another, you should help the
councilor land on his feet.
Our city desperately needs
more black leaders, and if you’re
serious about making Boston a
more inclusive place, start with
making sure Jackson remains a
visible part of our town.
There are a lot of things you
disagree on, from wooing General Electric and Amazon with
tax breaks to hosting the Summer Olympics. But you have
much in common and stand together on perhaps the biggest
problem facing the city: our inequality of opportunity.
Even amid our economic
boom, too many people in this
city have been left behind. It’s a
problem too big for one son of
Dorchester to solve.
Shirley Leung is a Globe
columnist. She can be reached
at shirley.leung@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter @leung.
The New England Employee Benefits
Council extends a warm thank you to our
generous 2017 Annual Corporate Partners.
Platinum
Gold
Silver
www.BenefitResource.com
Covering the hottest industry topics, the most recent legislation
and the latest trends, the New England Employee Benefits Council
helps benefits professionals stay current, manage change,
exchange insights and ideas, and cultivate new relationships.
neebc.org
781.684.8700
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B15
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Panera to acquire Au Bon Pain
uPANERA
Continued from Page B10
Markets
Small gains let stocks set records
US stock indexes finished with small gains Wednesday as
video game makers gave tech companies a boost and household goods companies rose. But a recent decline in interest
rates continued to pressure banks. Bank of America fell 1.4
percent, and Comerica shed 1.3 percent. Interest rates have
weakened since October, which makes mortgages and other loans less profitable. Still, banks are trading around their
highest levels in a decade. ‘‘Grand Theft Auto’’ maker TakeTwo Interactive Software soared 10.6 percent on betterthan-expected sales, while Activision Blizzard jumped 5.9
percent after the newest ‘‘Call of Duty’’ game had a strong
debut. Tech companies rose a tenth day in a row. They have
climbed almost 40 percent in the past 12 months. Time
Warner Cable slumped after AT&T said it doesn’t know
when its purchase of the media company will close. News
reports said the Justice Department wants to require the
companies to sell Turner Broadcasting or DirecTV, which
AT&T bought in 2015. Time Warner Cable has fallen as investors wonder if the $85 billion deal will happen. Wednesday, its stock lost 6.5 percent; AT&T’s rose 1.1 percent.
DOW JONES industrial average
NASDAQ Composite index
Over the next decade, Shaich and
his late partner, Louis Kane, built
Au Bon Pain by focusing on urban
hubs, taking the company public in
1991. In 1993, it paid $23 million to
acquire St. Louis Bread Company,
an upstart suburban bakery, with 20
locations in the Midwest.
Shaich eventually took the St.
Louis Bread company concept national under the name Panera and
built it and Au Bon Pain in tandem.
By 1999, the company owned or
franchised 265 Au Bon Pain shops
and 125 Panera locations. But Shaich saw more growth opportunities
in Panera and sold off the Au Bon
Pain portion of the business to a private equity firm. It was a tough decision — he compared it to “selling his
first son” — but a lucrative move.
The independent Panera Bread
Co. eventually grew into the biggest
fast-casual food chain in the country
— more than 2,050 locations and $5
billion in annual sales — and in the
process created a training ground
for a league of local restaurant executives that are somewhat jokingly
referred to as the “Bread Mafia.” The
company’s team members have
gone on to leadership roles at
Dunkin’ Donuts, Friendly ’s Ice
Cream, Wahlburgers, Cosi, and Pizzeria Uno. It currently employs
about 800 people in St. Louis, while
150 are based in Needham.
Hurst joined the company in
2010 and was tasked with overseeing Panera 2.0, a $42 million investment by the company to overhaul
digital strategy, supply chain, and
customer service.
With his oversight, the company
introduced digital kiosks and mobile
ordering, and rid its menu of artificial ingredients as part of its “100%
clean” initiative. In an interview, he
said to expect Au Bon Pain to begin
introducing more digital offerings to
better serve customers in the coming months.
In July, Panera was acquired for
$7.8 billion by JAB Holdings, the
European company that owns Peet's
Coffee & Tea, Keurig Green Mountain, and Krispy Kreme Doughnuts.
JAB also owns a majority stake in
retail and roasting companies Intelligentsia Coffee & Tea and Stumptown Coffee Roasters. Industry analysts have also speculated that JAB
might buy Canton-based Dunkin’
Donuts in a move to further consoli-
date its coffee empire.
Bonnie Riggs, a food service analyst with NPD Group, said the wave
of acquisitions comes at a time when
the growth of the fast-casual industry in the United States has stalled
for the first time in five years. She
said that restaurant chains have
been looking to locations like hospitals and universities as opportunities for growth — spaces in which Au
Bon Pain has long operated successfully. Choosing to acquire successful
companies provides economies of
scale as rents and operating costs
are on the rise. The decision among
brand executives, she said, is simple:
“If we’re not acquiring, we’re closing
a lot of stores.”
Shaich said the acquisition of his
former business and the shift in his
role stirred up many emotions.
“The greatest joy over these 36
years has been the opportunity to
learn alongside people like Blaine,”
he said. “There’s a personal gratification in it, but I want to be clear, we
did it because it’s a great opportunity. We’re winning.”
Ron Shaich
launched Au
Bon Pain not
long after
graduating
from Harvard
Business
School in 1980.
He started
Panera in the
1990s and ran
both businesses
in tandem until
selling the Au
Bon Pain
portion. Now
the two bakerycafes will be
reunited.
Janelle Nanos can be reached
at janelle.nanos@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @janellenanos.
AT&T chief says he has
‘no intention’ to sell CNN
uAT&T
Continued from Page B10
works deal that would create a colossus straddling the worlds of media and telecommunications at a
time when upstarts like Netflix are
disrupting traditional players in
both industries.
As originally envisioned, combining AT&T and Time Warner
would yield a giant company offering wireless and broadband internet
service, DirecTV, the Warner Bros.
movie studio, and cable channels
like HBO and CNN.
If the Justice Department formally makes either demand a requisite for approval, AT&T and Time
Warner would almost certainly take
the matter to court to challenge the
government’s legal basis for blocking the transaction.
President Trump has long accused CNN of harboring a bias
against him.
Trump has criticized the proposed merger from a populist perspective. In the final weeks of the
presidential campaign, he argued
“deals like this destroy democracy”
and cited it as “an example of the
power structure” he was fighting.
While critics of the merger have
described it as a sign that there is
too much consolidation in the media and telecommunications industries, analysts have said that there
were few legal grounds on which to
block the transaction.
At an investor conference on
Wednesday, John Stephens, AT&T’s
chief financial officer, said that the
timing of the deal’s closing, which
had been scheduled by year’s end,
was now uncertain. The only remaining issue, he added, was Justice Department approval.
“We are in active discussions
with the DOJ,” Stephens said. “I cannot comment on those discussions.
But with those discussions, I can
now say that the timing of the closing of the deal is now uncertain.”
Executives at both AT&T and
Time Warner have privately expressed bewilderment about the request from the Justice Department.
Because the proposed deal is a “vertical” merger — meaning that neither company competes directly
against the other — they believe
there is little legal basis to block it.
ALAN DIAZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
To win approval of the deal,
AT&T hired lobbyists close to Vice
President Mike Pence and others in
the Trump administration. AT&T
was among the top donors to
Trump’s inauguration.
Stephenson attended at least two
meetings with Trump this year.
Shortly after the first one, Trump
lashed out at CNN on Twitter, saying
of the news network that “their
credibility will soon be gone!” After
the second meeting, which was focused on emerging technologies, the
president said that Stephenson was
doing “really a top job.”
Fighting the deal could prove
challenging for regulators, antitrust
experts said. The Justice Department would have to argue that
AT&T would have an incentive to
withhold Turner channels like CNN
or TNT from rival broadband distributors like Verizon or Comcast.
The Justice
Department
said selling
Turner
Broadcasting
may be a
requirement of
an enormous
merger
between AT&T
and Time
Warner.
Facebook makes money better than Twitter, Snap
uTECH LAB
Continued from Page B10
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
awhile — about 25 to 30 minutes
per day, according to the company.
For much of that time, users are firing off messages and photos at one
another. But Snapchat’s also has
Stories, a feature that serves up
high-quality ad-supported content
from major media companies like
CNN and the Washington Post. Stories could someday generate plenty
of cash, as long as the ads draw
plenty of viewers.
But for all the hype generated by
Snapchat, its user base is remarkably sparse — just 178 million a
month, and barely growing. It
claims to reach 70 percent of 18-to34-year-olds in the United States,
France, Australia, and the United
Kingdom. But many millions of others just don’t get it. And Snapchat’s
bewildering app doesn’t help. Just
figuring out how to launch Stories
or add those cute “lenses” and “geofilters” has scared off many a middle-aged newbie. Making it simpler
is bound to help.
But no amount of software
tweaks can fend off Snapchat’s biggest problem, Facebook, which has
copied its innovations like Stories,
lenses, and geofilters, and added
them to its own messaging programs, Instagram and WhatsApp.
Instagram claims 800 million users
per month and WhatsApp, 1.2 billion users. Instagram is already a
kinder, gentler Snapchat; I don’t
need another.
Both Snap and Twitter have built
products that are designed to do a
few things well. But Facebook has
built a platform. It’s a social environment where users can do a great
many things — read the news, post
vacation photos, play games, go
shopping, or broadcast live video.
Neither Snapchat nor Twitter will ever approach Facebook’s comprehensive appeal, or its immense success.
But an unimpeded Facebook is
not healthy for our society. Let’s
hope Snapchat and Twitter can find
a way to hang in there.
Hiawatha Bray can be reached at
hiawatha.bray@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @GlobeTechLab.
Twitter
and Snap
do a few
things
well. But
Facebook
has built a
platform.
B16
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“Yes, she’s very friendly. Name’s Millie. She’s 7, I think
— a rescue. We done here?”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
5
2
8
3
6
9
4
1
7
6
9
3
7
4
1
8
5
2
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
1
4
7
5
2
8
6
3
9
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
2
1
5
4
9
7
3
6
8
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
3
8
6
2
1
5
7
9
4
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
4
7
9
6
8
3
5
2
1
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
7
3
4
1
5
2
9
8
6
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
8
6
1
9
3
4
2
7
5
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
9
5
2
8
7
6
1
4
3
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B17
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
ZIPPY “Feeling Sluggish” by Bill Griffith
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Plugger moms lead well-balanced lives.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
HONORING HENRY BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Mexican
munchies
6 Sticking point
10 Jungle primates
14 Scuttle a takeoff
15 Perform again
16 A poker strategy
17 Three Henrys:
music man,
factory
innovator,
orator
20 Bus charges
21 Lower the
grade of
22 St. crosser
24 Ship’s post
27 Fence openings
28 Beamed from
ear-to-ear
31 Fleece
33 Cold finish?
34 Bright aquarium
fishes
36 Dazzling success
38 Two Henrys:
actor, explorer
42 Prolonged attack
43 Bully, to a child
45 Spoil
48 Faint
50 Attire
51 Choose
53 Snooty one
55 Test the water?
56 Lands of Latins
58 Dolphins’ home
61 Two Henrys:
slugger, historian
66 Old Monopoly
token
67 Strong smell
68 Grim
69 Harp ancestor
70 Wax’s opposite
71 Befuddle
DOWN
1 Hebrides hat
2 Legal org.
3 Downpour for
champions
4 Shamu, e.g.
5 Recipe
direction
6 Emergency
7 KO verifier
8 Fuss
9 Something
to the wise
10 Ghana capital
11 Roof of the
mouth
12 Makes excited
13 Most crafty
18 Bird beak
19 Cheapened
22 PC key
23 Hotel room perk
25 At that point
26 Type of support
29 Large
containers
30 India neighbor
32 Grad
35 Horseracing
legend Seattle
37 Bygone autocrat
39 Psyche
components
40 Biased
41 Not yet final,
law-wise
44 Paranormal
ability
45 Like some prices
46 Chicago fire
name
47 Overwhelming
fear
49 “I’ve had
enough”
52 Witchy old
woman
54 Drill insert
57 Flat-bottomed
boat
59 Actress
Jessica
60 Gelatin
dish, e.g.
62 Toothpasteapproving org.
63 Voyage
beginning?
64 Who may
come before
Friday?
65 Barely achieve
(with “out”)
8
7
6
1
3
4
2
4
6 5 7
6 2
1
5 7
9 5 7
6
3
8
1
3
7
4
1
T h e
B18
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Radio’s Michael
Felger criticized
for rant on Halladay
Michael Felger, the cohost of the popular midday 98.5 The Sports Hub talk
show “Felger and Mazz,” is facing a
wave of criticism because of his 12minute rant about retired pitcher Roy
Halladay’s death during Wednesday’s
show.
Halladay, a two-time Cy Young Award
winner, died Tuesday when the tiny
sport plane he was flying crashed into
the Gulf of Mexico. The plane, an
ICON A5, was made for entry-level pilots like him.
Felger showed no sympathy for Halladay a day after his death, calling him a
“moron” and “idiot” for flying the
plane.
“He got what he deserved,” Felger declared. “That’s how you’re wired? And
that’s how you die? Bon voyage.”
“It just sort of angers me,” Felger said.
“You care that little about your life? Or
about the life of your family? Your little joyride is that important to you? . . .
With your hand out the window:
‘Weeee! Weeee! Yeah, man, look at the
G-force on this! I’m Maverick, pyew
pyew! Yeah, man, look at this, this is
so cool!’ And you die. Splat. And it’s
over. So you’re that guy? You have to
do that?
“I just can’t relate to him,” Felger continued. “I don’t respect him. To the
point now where that guy is like the
bad guy to me. You got this family, and
you’re going to screw around in this
little toy plane?”
“I find that offensive, that you are that
cavalier about life,” Felger said shortly
after. “I’m sorry, dude, you’re on your
own. I got no sympathy for you. I feel
horribly for your family. I find it offensive.”
During the segment, Felger also
mocked racecar driver Dale Earnhardt
Sr., who died in a crash in 2001.
“Dale Earnhardt? The racecar driver
who died? I root for the wall. I really
do. That ain’t no tragedy,” Felger said,
before mimicking Earnhardt driving.
“And then you crash into the wall?
And I’m supposed to feel bad for you?
Give me a break.”
Felger made the remarks after TMZ
published a video that appears to
show Halladay’s plane making “extreme and unusual changes in altitude” before the crash. Witnesses told
federal investigators that Halladay
was flying his plane low over the gulf
shortly before it slammed into the water, according to the Associated Press.
A National Transportation Safety
Board investigator said on Wednesday
that Halladay had been a licensed pilot since 2013 and logged about 700
hours of flight time before Tuesday’s
crash. She said it was too early to say
whether Halladay’s crash was related
to two earlier crashes this year of A5s,
one of which killed both the plane’s
chief designer and test pilot.
Felger’s comments led to immediate
criticism from many listeners, with
some calling for his removal from the
show.
Asked about the issue, 98.5 program
director Mike Thomas declined to
comment.
Felger is known for his brash style and
has gotten into hot water before. He
made headlines in April after criticizing a colleague on-air for taking two
weeks’ paternity leave.
JACQUELINE REISS
AND ASSOCIATED PRESS
Globe correspondent Maddie
Kilgannon conributed. Read local
celebrity news at www.bostonglobe.
com/names. Names can be reached at
names@globe.com or 617-929-8253.
So you want Cher to play at your party?
That will be $2 million please.
It’s one thing to get a Rod Stewart impersonator, or a Bon Jovi cover band,
to play at your daughter’s sweet 16 party, but what’s the real thing cost?
We ask because Patriots owner Robert Kraft is throwing an invite-only
bash at Gillette Stadium Wednesday, and he’s booked Sir Elton John to entertain his guests. Kraft and the Rocket Man are longtime friends, so it’s
unlikely the Pats poobah is paying John’s usual performance fee, which is
believed to be north of $3 million. But you don’t have to be a billionaire to
get a big-name act to play at your kid’s bar mitzvah. We spoke to a national
music broker, who gave us a breakdown of the tiers of talent and what they
charge for a hits-heavy set lasting between 30 and 90 minutes. The numbers below are performance fees only and do not include additional expenses such as airfare, hotels, ground transportation, and security, which
can add significantly to the bottom line.
There were plenty of familiar faces at the annual Joey Fund Film Premiere, the
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation fund-raiser hosted by Joe and Kathy O’Donnell. Over
1,200 people attended the event, including Greater Catalyst Partners cofounder
David Fialkow, Patrick Lyons, investment adviser John Spooner, developer Steve
Karp, Bank of America’s Anne Finucane and husband Mike Barnicle, chef Jody
Adams (above with Joe O’Donnell), “Dining Playbook” host Jenny Johnson, the
Globe’s Dan Shaughnessy, the Boston Foundation’s Paul Grogan, Highland Capital’s Bob Davis, congressional candidate Dan Koh, WCVB-TV’s Mike Lynch, Berkshire Bank’s Mike Daly, and attorney Harry Manion, among others.
FOR LESS THAN $100,000
The Mighty Mighty
Bosstones
$75,000
Shawn Colvin
$30,000
Mavis Staples
$75,000
Liz Phair
$50,000
FOR LESS THAN $500,000
Nick Jonas
$250,000
LL Cool J
$225,000
Kelly Clarkson
$350,000
Iggy Azalea
$250,000
FOR LESS THAN $1 MILLION
John
Mellencamp
$600,000
Ariana Grande
$750,000$850,000
Nelly Furtado
$600,000
Harry Connick Jr.
$500,000$600,000
THE SKY IS THE LIMIT
Paul McCartney
$4 million$5 million
Cher
$2 million
Bruno Mars
$2.5 million
Billy Joel
Over $1 million
SOURCES: Associated Press; Boston Globe file photos; New York Times file photos
GLOBE STAFF
Fake news
Author O’Donnell: ’68 election was nuttier
MSNBC host Lawrence O’Donnell
would like to remind you that however
chaotic you think the last presidential
election was, the 1968 election was
even nuttier. That may not be comforting, but it is illuminating.
“[The 2016 presidential election]
really was a completely normal campaign year with one extremely eccentric character,” says the Dorchester native. “In 1968, virtually the whole system was out of control.”
That’s the subject of O’Donnell’s
new book, “Playing With Fire: The
1968 Election and the Transformation
of American Politics,” which went on
sale this week. O’Donnell says the election that put Richard Nixon in the
White House was full of “the kind of
characters that Shakespeare would
put on a page.”
That the book is coming out now —
after perhaps the second-most chaotic
presidential election — is kind of perfect timing.
“The worst thing for me would
have been if it had come out right before the Trump campaign,” says
O’Donnell. “It would have been nothing but a story of a time long ago. I
would not have seen its connective tissue to the present.”
He says there are parallels between
Donald Trump’s presidential campaign
and the raucous crusade of former Alabama Governor George Wallace,
who was the candidate of the American Independent Party in 1968.
“Wallace was the first presidential
candidate to welcome the protestors
in his audience as a way
of showing
how tough he
was, and he
confronted
them and
yelled back at
them and
called them
names,”
AP/FILE
O’Donnell
said. “Trump
took exactly that method into his rallies.”
O’Donnell says hosting “The Last
Word” — it airs at 10 p.m. on MSNBC
— helped him finish the book.
“I discovered, to my surprise, that
writing for live television made me a
faster writer. The thing about live TV
is that it simply has to be done, there’s
no space for procrastination,” he said.
O’Donnell’s other writing credits
include several episodes of the Emmy
Award-winning series “The West
Wing.” He rarely re-watches the show,
but proudly says, “They are among the
most durable episodes of television ever produced.
“I don’t think you lose anything by
watching one now. You don’t have a
lesser experience than we had when
we were watching them in their first
broadcast on Wednesday nights at 9
o’clock.”
O’Donnell will talk about his new
book Thursday at a Harvard Bookstore event at First Parish Church in
Cambridge.
Gronk gets down to business
Patriots QB Tom Brady spent a portion of the team’s bye week
planking in the Bahamas, but party boy Rob Gronkowski was all
business — literally.
Gronk spent the down time doing interviews with Yahoo Finance, Fox Business, and CNBC, among other business media outlets, promoting Mojiit, a new app he endorses that allows users to
send 3-D holograms of customizable digital avatars. But questions
are being raised about a claim by the app’s creator Jeremy Greene
that Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak is an adviser to Mojiit.
In a Mojiit press release, Wozniak himself is quoted as saying
he’s involved with the product.
“I’m thrilled to join Mojiit as an advisor,” Woz says in the release. “Jeremy is a natural leader, the company is groundbreaking,
it’s going to change the ecommerce space, and it’s a lot of fun.”
But it’s not true, according to Wozniak’s business partner Ken
Hardesty, who told Yahoo Finance that Wozniak “has not been involved in any discussions or capacity with Mojiit.”
Uh oh.
Here’s a clip of Gronk and Greene hyping Mojiit — and touting
Wozniak’s involvement. (Gronk, who mostly just nods during the
interview, was apparently introduced to Greene by his hip-hop pal
Waka Flocka Flame.)
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rob Gronkowski spoke to the media during the Patriots bye week.
Vieira does her part
for her alma mater
Maybe you read about the folks at
Tufts who want to remove President
Trump’s foul-mouthed former communications director Anthony Scaramuc­
ci from the advisory board for the institution’s Fletcher School of Law and
Diplomacy. Well, one alum who’s still
in good standing at the school is longtime TV journalist/talk-show host
Meredith Vieira. The 1975 graduate
joined Tufts President Anthony Mona­
co at the Museum of Fine Arts for an
entertaining Q&A session kicking off
the school’s “Brighter World” fundraising campaign. . . . A day or so later,
Vieira was also at a fund-raiser, held at
the Calderwood Pavilion, for Hebrew
SeniorLife, which serves seniors
throughout Greater Boston. She was
joined by celebrated octogenarian Rita
Moreno — yes, she’s 85 — as well as
WBZ-TV’s Dr. Mallika Marshall.
More than 1,200 turn out for Joey Fund event
Cars sought for pilot from Affleck, Damon
PAUL RUTHERFORD FOR TUFTS UNIVERSITY
Meredith Vieira talks with guests at the Museum of Fine Arts during the
official launch of Tufts University’s “Brighter World” campaign.
Production must be imminent for “City on a Hill,”
the Ben Affleck- and Matt
Damon-produced Showtime
pilot inspired by the “Boston Miracle” — when civil
leaders helped law enforcement officers reduce street
crime in the 1990s. Boston
Casting sent out a call this
week for cars from 1970 to
1990 for the shoot. If you
AP/FILE
have a vehicle that fits the
bill, you can e-mail cars@bostoncasting.com.
Showtime said in its announcement that the pilot, written by Chuck Mac­
Lean, will focus on an “African-American District Attorney who comes in from
Brooklyn advocating change and the unlikely alliance he forms with a corrupt
yet venerated FBI veteran who is invested in maintaining the status quo. Together they take on a family of armored car robbers from Charlestown in a case that
grows to encompass and eventually upend Boston’s city-wide criminal justice
system.”
No word yet on stars. Damon and Affleck also produced the Syfy show “Incorporated,” but it was not picked up for a second season.
‘That was the craziest rumor of all time . . . I hadn’t actually seen him in, like,
four years.’ KATE HUDSON, on “Watch What Happens Live,” addressing a rumor that she was dating Brad Pitt
Sports
TV HIGHLIGHTS
PGA: OHL Classic, 1 p.m., Golf
NBA: Cavaliers-Rockets, 8 p.m., TNT
NFL: Seahawks-Cardinals, 8:25 p.m., NBC, NFL
NBA: Thunder-Nuggets, 10:30 p.m., TNT
Listings, C6
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 017 | BO ST ONG L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Red Sox prospect dies of cancer
Flores, a highly regarded catcher, was 17 years old
By Alex Speier
GLOBE STAFF
Red Sox catching prospect Daniel Flores
died Wednesday due to complications from
treatment for cancer at the age of 17, the
Red Sox announced. He had been hospitalized in Boston receiving treatment.
“Everyone at the Red Sox was shocked to
hear of Daniel’s tragic passing,” Red Sox
president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said in a statement. “To see the life
of a young man with so much promise cut
Summer League in 2018.
Evaluators raved about Flores’s remarkable defensive abilities, with several industry sources describing him as one of the
most – if not the most – advanced defensive
catchers they’d ever seen at his age.
That ability, coupled with what was seen
as solid to above-average offensive ability,
suggested a player with elite potential. On
top of that, team officials raved about his
leadership, makeup, and commitment to
excel, commending his unusual maturity.
Just last week, several evaluators who’d
seen him play in Fort Myers pegged him as
short is extremely saddening for all of us.
“On behalf of the Red Sox organization, I
would like to extend our deepest sympathies and condolences to Daniel’s family.”
The Red Sox signed the highly regarded,
switch-hitting catcher out of Venezuela this
summer to a signing bonus of $3.1 million.
He spent the summer at the team’s academy
in the Dominican Republic and spent time
this fall in Fort Myers, Fla., working with
Red Sox instructors in advance of his anticipated professional debut in the Dominican
one of the top three to five prospects in the
Red Sox system.
“To me, he’s a future superstar,” said one
scout. “He has a chance to be a perennial
All-Star.”
Days later, members of the Red Sox organization who’d grown close to Flores
through the scouting process and his first
days as a professional ballplayer were reeling while trying to process their grief. According to a major league source, he’d been
receiving treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital after his recent diagnosis with
FLORES, Page C2
Imperfect 10
Celtics roll on
despite loss of
Horford, Tatum
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
Celtics 107 On Wednesday morning Celtics center Al
Lakers 96 Horford reported to
the team’s medical staff that he was experiencing headaches, the result of being struck in the head in Boston’s win
over the Hawks on Monday.
Horford entered the league-mandated concussion protocol and figures
to be sidelined for at least several
games. Just like that, the Celtics’ attempt to stretch their winning streak
to 10 games became more difficult.
They started brilliantly against the
Lakers anyway, bursting to a 21-point
second-quarter lead. Then, rookie forward Jayson Tatum injured his ankle
midway through the second quarter
CELTICS, Page C3
CELTICS’ 10-GAME WIN STREAK
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Center Aron Baynes picked up the slack for the shorthanded Celtics, getting some hang time after a fourth-quarter dunk for 2 of his 21 points.
Andrews sizes up
his assignments
10/20
76ERS
102-92
10/24
KNICKS
110-89
10/26
BUCKS
96-89
10/28
HEAT
96-90
10/30
SPURS
108-94
11/1
KINGS
113-86
11/3
THUNDER
101-94
11/5
MAGIC
104-88
11/6
HAWKS
110-107
11/8
LAKERS
107-96
Bruins dig hole,
lose to Rangers
By Nora Princiotti
INSIDE
LeVangie
promoted
Red Sox make
a good move,
name him
pitching coach.
By Fluto Shinzawa
GLOBE STAFF
GLOBE STAFF
FOXBOROUGH — Patriot David Andrews has never
known anything else as an offensive lineman.
Pass rushers and run stuffers swap in and out of defensive fronts while the five men trying to block them hope to
stay on the field for each and every snap. At center, Andrews
might have to handle a team’s beefiest nose tackle and its
most explosive linebacker on an inside twist one play later.
That’s been going on so long that he barely even notices.
“Little league football the defense would always sub and
O-line would stay the same, so it’s nothing different,” Andrews said.
It’s a simple but critical distinction. Modern NFL defenses are amoebas. Players sub in and out and line up in various spots and stances. But aside from a few jumbo packag-
Rangers 4 NEW YORK — Under normal circumstances, the margin for error in the NHL is
Bruins 2 not very large.
Under extraordinary circumstances — missing half of
the top six, rolling six regulars from last year’s Providence roster, playing a team riding a four-game winning
streak — that margin becomes narrower than a Manhattan alley.
It’s why, after Wednesday’s 4-2 loss to the Rangers at
Madison Square Garden, Bruce Cassidy was not satisfied
with a 10-minute stretch in the first period. His players,
most of them greener than the Incredible Hulk, could
not stop the bleeding once the Rangers started delivering
cuts.
PATRIOTS, Page C5
ç
i
David Andrews is not undersized at 295 pounds,
but he is smaller than most of the players he blocks.
Danger
in the sky
Halladay was
flying low before his plane
hit water. C2
Patriots
target?
Packers release
tight end Bennett for failing
to disclose an
injury. C5
BRUINS, Page C4
X
P
www.imperialcars.com
★
Search
CHRYSLER
Imperial
ç
Imperial Cars
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
On baseball, C2
Email
* ☺ 2
Images
%
I
ImperialCars.com
Over 2,200 Cars, 6 Brands, One 52 Acre Lot in “the little town of Mendon”
Start Search
I’m Feeling Lucky
Happy Customers Shop Here! Find Your Dream Car or Truck.
Advertising
Business
About
Privacy
Terms
Settings
C2
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
LeVangie a good bullpen call
Nick Cafardo
ON BASEBALL
Yes, Dana LeVangie is a
great coach, for one. The Red
Sox’ new pitching coach also
has survived many coaching
and general manager regimes
for the organization
LeVangie was not only a
player in the club’s minor
league system for six years, he
also started his major league
career as the bullpen catcher
for Jimy Williams’s staff and
has been a bullpen coach and
an advance scout for many Sox
regimes.
What does LeVangie, named
to the position on Wednesday
by new manager Alex Cora,
know about pitching? A lot. Pedro Martinez, Derek Lowe, and
Josh Beckett among others
sought his advice over the past
20 years. LeVangie played a vital role in the success of the
Red Sox’ bullpen. He’s the guy
who prepped relievers as they
warmed up in the bullpen before entering the game. As a
catching instructor, consider
that Sandy Leon and Christian
Vazquez was the best defensive
tandem in baseball under the
tutelage of LeVangie.
The Brockton native also
has received praise for his baseball acumen. Former Red Sox
catcher David Ross has said if
he ever became a manager, the
first guy he would hire as his
bench coach would be LeVang-
ie. And when current Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo took over as interim manager of the Red Sox in 2015
when John Farrell was undergoing cancer treatments, he
tabbed LeVangie as his bench
coach.
“He’s an excellent coach,”
said former Red Sox general
manager Dan Duquette, who
first hired LeVangie to the major league staff after his playing
career ended in 1996.
To think that the 48-year-old
LeVangie, who has 28 years of
service in the Red Sox organization, won’t be a major league
manager someday would be
shortsighted.
LeVangie never wanted to
leave Boston. He probably
could have followed Lovullo to
Arizona or former GM Theo
Epstein to the Chicago Cubs,
but he’s a local guy. He went to
Whitman-Hanson High and
American International College. His kids are student-athletes at East Bridgewater High,
and more than anything he
wanted to see them through
their high school careers. Now,
he’ll get that wish.
Cora, who played for the
Red Sox from 2005-08, knew
LeVangie and the respect that
everyone had for him. He interviewed other pitching coach
candidates, looked at guys in
the Sox system, but when all
was said and done, the answer
was staring him in the face.
“Dana was someone I knew
from when I played here and
he’s so knowledgeable and so
well-prepared,” Cora said. ‘I feel
very comfortable and very good
about this decision.”
And nobody knows the
pitchers better than LeVangie.
During the season LeVangie
often could be seen with his
clipboard, heading out to the
bullpen with the starting pitcher to get him ready for his outing. Chris Sale thinks the world
of him. And really, every starter
and reliever has felt comfortable working with LeVangie.
Catchers know pitching.
LeVangie likely will be cautious with his talent. He understands the need for rest, and
when starters need to have
their innings reduced. Cora ultimately will make those decisions, but LeVangie will play a
crucial role in making recommendations.
The Red Sox will keep analytics guru Brian Bannister in
uniform to add input, as he did
with former Sox pitching coach
Carl Willis, but as Cora pointed
out, “Dana will be in charge.”
LeVangie inherits a very
good starting rotation. He’ll also incorporate David Price back
into the mix.
“David Price, down the
stretch, more importantly
proved to himself that he can
come back and be the pitcher
that he wants to be for our
team,” LeVangie said.
He’ll have to find a method
to keep Sale healthy and fa-
tigue-free after the All-Star
break.
Other post-injury challenges
await in lefthander Eduardo
Rodriguez (knee surgery) and
righthander Steven Wright
(cartilage restoration surgery).
They will be important depth
pieces as a starter or reliever.
LeVangie did a nice job in
helping to develop young reliever Austin Maddox. He
helped get the most out of veteran Blaine Boyer.
He loved what he saw from
free agent Addison Reed and
how flawlessly he fit into the
bullpen rotation as the setup
man.
Cora and the Red Sox will
now try to find a new bullpen
coach that was every bit as effective as LeVangie was. And as
Cora pointed out, he wants
someone who can work closely
with LeVangie and be on the
same page.
The Red Sox also named Ramon Vazquez, who played for
the team briefly in 2005, the
quality control coach and Steve
Langone the manager of advance scouting, a role previously held by LeVangie.
When Ross, now an ESPN
analyst and special assistant to
the Cubs, learned of LeVangie’s
promotion he texted, “Love it!”
The pitchers likely will feel
the same way.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
Halladay was flying low before fatal crash
By Andrew Dalton
and Terry Spencer
Red Sox prospect
dies from cancer
uFLORES
Continued from Page C1
the disease.
“Every member of our organization who got to know
Daniel absolutely loved him,”
assistant GM Eddie Romero
said in a statement. “He was
energetic, hard-working, and
genuinely selfless, always with
a smile on his face. He cared
for his teammates and was a
natural leader.
“I’m at a loss for words today. Daniel was an impressive
young man with limitless potential, and his life was cut far
too short. My condolences go
out to Daniel’s mother and sis-
ter. Though with us for a short
time, Daniel will always be a
part of the Red Sox family.”
Flores’s agent, Cesar Suarez, said, “Our thoughts and
prayers are with the Flores
and Salas families as we
mourn the loss of this young
man. There are no words to
express how deeply saddened
I am that his life was cut so
short.”
Peter Abraham of the Globe
staff contributed. Alex Speier
can be reached at
alex.speier@globe.com.
Follow him on twitter at
@alexspeier.
SportsLog
Jones threatens to
sue NFL over Goodell
ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.
— Roy Halladay was flying his
tiny sport plane low over the
Gulf of Mexico shortly before it
slammed into the water and
killed the retired star pitcher,
witnesses told federal investigators (Obituary, B9).
National Transportation
Safety Board Investigator Noreen Price said Wednesday that
Halladay’s ICON A5 experienced a ‘‘high-energy impact’’
with the water. She said both
flight data recorders were recovered and the plane did not
have a voice recorder.
She said Halladay had been
a licensed pilot since 2013 and
log ged about 700 hours of
flight time before Tuesday’s
crash near Tampa. She said a
preliminary report on the cause
likely will be issued in seven to
10 days, but the full investigation could take up to two years.
Price said it was too early to
say whether Halladay’s crash
was related to two earlier crashes this year of A5s, one of them
that killed both the plane’s chief
designer and test pilot.
‘‘Every accident is different.
They are very complex. So as we
move forward in the factual
finding phase, if we see anything that we believe might connect it to previous accidents, we
will certainly look at that. And if
we see anything that we think is
unsafe, we will make recommendation immediately,’’ Price
said during a news conference
in New Port Richey.
The 40-year-old former Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies pitcher had been
the proud owner for less than a
month of his ICON A5, and was
among the first to fly the model. In one of many enthusiastic
tweets about the plane, Halladay said it felt ‘‘ like flying a
fighter jet.’’
Rolled out in 2014, the A5 is
an amphibious aircraft meant
to be treated like an ATV, a
piece of weekend recreational
BILL MITCHELL PHOTO
Daniel Flores, who played in the International Showcase
in the Dominican Republic, was a switch-hitting catcher.
Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones has threatened to sue the
NFL over a proposed contract extension for commissioner Rog­
er Goodell, a dispute sparked by star running back Ezekiel El­
liott’s six-game suspension over alleged domestic violence, two
people with knowledge of the situation told the Associated
Press. Jones told the six owners on the compensation committee he was prepared to sue if the group voted to extend Goodell’s deal. Jones has expressed disapproval with the structure
and compensation in the contract extension . . . The Minnesota
Vikings took quarterback Teddy Bridgewater off the physically
unable to perform list, adding him to the active roster for the
first time in more than 14 months since his left knee was dislocated during practice. The team placed quarterback Sam Brad­
ford on the injured reserve amid continued trouble with his left
knee . . . Quarterback Jameis Winston said consulting renowned orthopedic surgeon Dr. James Andrews about his sore
throwing shoulder was "standard protocol." It's not an indication the injury is worse than he and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
initially believed . . . The NFL players union unanimously
passed a resolution calling on everyone in the league to honor a
two-minute Veterans Day moment of silence this weekend.
With Veterans Day falling on Saturday this year, the players
union voted to ask everyone in the NFL community to observe
this moment of silence Sunday prior to kickoffs.
DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD/TAMPA BAY TIMES VIA AP
Roy Halladay’s mangled plane was removed from the water a day after he died in a crash.
gear with folding wings that
can easily be towed on a trailer
to a lake where it can take off
from the water.
‘‘The way that a lot of people
described it is a Jet Ski with
wings,’’ Stephen Pope, editorin-chief of Flying magazine,
told The Associated Press. ‘‘It’s
really a play thing.’’
The man who led the plane’s
design, 55-year-old John Murray Karkow, died while flying
an A5 over California’s Lake
Berryessa on May 8, a crash the
NTSB attributed to pilot error.
In other tweets, Halladay
said he had dreamed about
owning one of the planes. He
said in video on the company’s
website that he had to talk his
wife into letting him get one.
The son of a corporate pilot,
Halladay had been forbidden to
take up aviation until the twotime Cy Young Award winner
retired from baseball after the
2013 season.
Pope said ‘‘the plane itself is
great.’’ But he had concerns
about Halladay, a relatively inexperienced pilot, taking the
craft out over water at low altitude. The plane, however, was
marketed as a craft that could
do that.
‘‘They still think that that’s
the way the airplane should be
flown, and there are people in
aviation who completely disagree with that,’’ Pope said.
‘‘They think you should not
have a low-time pilot flying low
over water. That’s a recipe for
disaster.’’
Low flying was part of the
problem when Karkow, the designer, crashed, according to
federal investigators. Karkow
was killed along with passenger
Cagri Sever, the company ’s
newly hired director of engineering.
The NTSB blamed pilot error for the crash, saying
Karkow mistakenly entered the
wrong canyon while flying over
a California lake and was unable to correct in time, striking
the canyon wall.
Another A5 crashed in April,
making a hard landing in the
water off Key Largo, Florida, injuring the pilot and his passenger. The pilot told investigators
the plane descended faster
than he expected.
Halladay’s ICON A5 went
down around noon Tuesday off
the coast of Florida, Pasco
County Sheriff Chris Nocco
said.
COLLEGES
UCLA players released on bail in China
Three UCLA men’s basketball players — including LiAngelo
Ball, the younger brother of Los Angeles Lakers rookie Lonzo
Ball — were released on bail early Wednesday morning in Hangzhou, China, after being arrested for allegedly shoplifting Tuesday afternoon, ESPN.com reported. Police told Ball, Cody Riley
and Jalen Hill to stay at their hotel until the legal process is finished. The three will not play when the Bruins open the season
against Georgia Tech in Shanghai, said coach Steve Alford . . .
Auburn men’s basketball coach Bruce Pearl said he couldn’t
comment on a report that states he hasn’t been cooperating
with the school’s internal investigation into the program. ESPN
reported Wednesday that university officials have told Pearl he
could lose his job if he doesn’t cooperate. Auburn fired associate
basketball coach Chuck Person, who was indicted on federal
bribery, conspiracy and fraud charges. The school said Person
was fired on Oct. 18, but Auburn just announced the move . . .
Boston College ranked sixth in the nation in overall Graduation
Success Rate (GSR) in all sports among FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) schools, according to the NCAA’s most recent GSR report.
MISCELLANY
US women top Canada in hockey
Kendall Coyne and Megan Bozek each had a goal and an
assist and the United States women’s hockey team beat Canada,
4-2, in a physical game at the Four Nations Cup in Wesley Chapel, Fla. Cayla Barnes and former Boston College star Alex Car­
penter scored to help the Americans win their second game as
they try to win this event for a third straight time and eighth
overall . . . Carmelo Anthony’s flagrant 2 foul will stand, but the
NBA rescinded the flagrant issued to Russell Westbrook in
Oklahoma City’s loss to Portland last Sunday. The league also
fined Westbrook, Paul George and Thunder coach Billy Dono­
van $15,000 apiece for their criticisms of the officials after the
call against teammate Anthony . . . Aric Almirola was officially
named Danica Patrick's replacement at Stewart-Haas Racing.
The move was expected after Smithfield Foods moved its sponsorship from Richard Petty Motorsports to SHR for 2018. Patrick said after Smithfield announced it was moving that she
would not be back with the team next year . . . Sun Young Yoo
carded a seven-under-par 65 to take a one-stroke lead after the
first round of the Blue Bay LPGA golf tournament in Hainan,
China . . . Atlanta midfielder Julian Gressel was voted Major
League Soccer’s Rookie of the Year . . . Russian boxer Alexander
Povetkin had his indefinite doping suspension from the WBC
cut to one year, but he still must pay a $250,000 fine.
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C3
Rivalry is in rebuilding process
Gary Washburn
ON BASKETBALL
Firstly, the Celtics-Lakers rivalry didn’t resemble yesteryear with the Celtics wearing
their road greens and the Lakers wearing their Forum gold
uniforms at TD Garden
Wednesday night, a 107-96 win
for Boston. That sight should
have nauseated longtime fans
of both teams.
Secondly, this rivalry is a
ways from being restored, with
the Lakers, who had won a
combined 91 games over the
past four seasons, experiencing
roster shakeups, coaching
changes, and ownership infighting.
Finally, after leaving the organization because of owner
Jim Buss, Magic Johnson returned as president when Buss
was fired by his sister, and he
hired former super agent Rob
Pelinka as the new GM.
The Lakers then had UCLA
star and Southern California
native Lonzo Ball fall into their
hands with the No. 2 overall
pick in the NBA Draft in June.
But the deal that may help cement a resurgence is the trade
that sent disgruntled D’Angelo
Russell and the bloated contract of Timofey Mozgov to the
Brooklyn Nets for Brook Lopez
and the rights to swingman
Kyle Kuzma.
Kuzma, the 27th selection
out of Utah who has turned into the steal of the draft, had 10
points Wednesday night and is
averaging 14.9. And Lopez, in
the final year of his contract,
has turned into the stabilizing
veteran center the team desperately needed.
The Lakers also brought
back Brandon Ingram, Larry
Nance Jr., Julius Randle, and
Jordan Clarkson and the team
is off to a solid start in the
treacherous Western Conference. Johnson and Pelinka
didn’t inherited coach Luke
Walton, but they’ve been pa-
tient with the team’s growth
and the philosophy for this
once-proud organization is development first.
“To me that’s what I have
been saying all year, winning
games isn’t the most important
thing for us right now,” Walton
said. “Building habits, building
an identity, which our guys are
doing a great job of. They’re
way further along in this early
season than I thought we
would be at this point. They
have been giving a consistent
effort on the defensive end,
which is our No. 1 priority. Our
guys have been great at that.”
It’s rather difficult to hear
the coach of the Los Angeles
Lakers saying winning is not
the No. 1 priority. But the franchise is building for long-term
success in a conference filled
with All-Stars and juggernauts.
So this season may serve as
more of a learning experience
than an actual positive step
forward measured in wins and
losses.
“It’s nice, we want to win
every game we play in, but
that’s not the most important
thing,” Walton said. “So we’ll
make mistakes. We’ll learn
from them on and off the
court. This is our first road trip
as a group. We’ve had nothing
but one-day road trips so far.
So by the end of this week I’d
expect they’d learn more about
the NBA and that process that
we’re in right now.”
Process is a popular word
among rebuilding teams — especially since the Philadelphia
76ers are beginning to reap the
benefits of their five-year program of patience. The Lakers
are an improved team but they
won’t just wait until these
youngsters develop into cornerstones, they are planning to
make a big free agent splash
next summer.
The Lakers have $53 million
coming off their books in 2018
with a free-agent class that includes LeBron James, DeMarcus Cousins, and Paul George.
The Lakers expect to get better
quickly.
The NBA is unquestionably
better when the Celtics, Lakers,
and Knicks are in the title mix,
and that trio hasn’t been significant at the same time in quite
some time. What the Lakers
are doing is quite similar to the
Celtics’ plan of a few years ago:
load lottery picks, sign selective free agents who can still
play and understand their responsibility is to lead as well as
win. and then wait for free
agency.
Over the past three years,
the Celtics were able to acquire
Al Horford, Gordon Hayward,
and Kyrie Irving to join a
young, talented core. Los Angeles has always felt it was a
premium free-agent destination but the Lakers have been
spurned by top players over the
past few years because of a lack
of leadership and poor play.
Johnson brings instant
credibility, much the way Larry
Bird did in Indiana. Johnson
understands that tossing dollars at free agents — such as
predecessor Mitch Kupchak
did in signing Mozgov and Luol Deng — was useless if there
is no core build around them.
Magic is building that core
and has made some astute decisions over the past few
months to bring the Lakers
back to respectability.
“It’s really fun for the simple
fact that it’s a new era,” Kuzma
said. “It’s been a couple of
rough years in LA but Magic
and Rob Pelinka came in and
turned a lot of things around,
it’s more vibrant around here
from what I can tell. [It was
tough] just from the outside
looking in last year, a lot of
young guys and it’s really optimistic. It’s always fun to be in
that type of workplace.”
The rivalry isn’t restored
yet, but it’s definitely on its way
to being Magic again.
Gary Washburn can be reached
at gwashburn@globe.com.
Streaking Celtics
win 10th in a row
uCELTICS
Continued from Page C1
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Celtics forward Daniel Theis was up to the challenge of blocking a reverse layup attempt by Lakers rookie Kyle Kuzma.
Horford out; Tatum turns ankle
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
Celtics center Al Horford
missed Wednesday night’s
107-96 win over the Lakers
because he has
CELTICS
entered the
NOTEBOOK league’s concussion protocol. Horford was hit in the
head in the second quarter of
Boston’s win over the Hawks
in Atlanta on Monday.
Then rookie forward Jay­
son Tatum injured his ankle in
the second quarter and did
not return to the game.
According to the Celtics,
Horford began to experience
concussion-like symptoms on
Wednesday morning. Coach
Brad Stevens said that he was
told Horford was mostly having headaches.
“That was something that
our medical staff was making
sure they were on,” Stevens
said. “[They said] ‘Let us
know how you feel ASAP. And
if any of these things occur,
please let us know.’
Because we didn’t have
anything this morning. So he
talked to them this morning
and it was described as a
headache to me. But I don’t
know if there were additional
symptoms.”
Last season Horford suffered a concussion when he
was inadvertently struck in
the head during an Oct. 31
practice, and he missed the
next nine games. In that instance, Horford began to experience symptoms one day after
being hit in the head. For
three weeks he had headaches
and felt nauseous and was
bothered by light, noise, and
motion.
“As the days kept going by,
I started to feel worse,” Horford said last December. “Just
a lot of things that wouldn’t go
away. It was a lot of stuff I
didn’t really understand, because it’s never happened to
me before.”
Horford tried resuming
workouts multiple times, but
the symptoms kept returning.
He was finally cleared to play
last Nov. 19, and completed
the rest of the season without
issues.
Stevens said that in addition to the league-mandated
protocol, the Celtics will be
quite cautious with Horford as
he works his way back, particularly given last season’s
struggles.
“I know that if you have
one and then you have another one before it’s fully healed,
that’s obviously a real issue,”
Stevens said. “So we will obviously do whatever is in the
best interest of Al. That’s the
most important thing.”
Last year Horford said
there were times when he
wanted to return to play before he was completely ready,
but he was glad that he did
not.
“Concussions, you have to
be really honest with yourself,
and sometimes that’s hard to
do,” he said in December. “As
athletes, we’re always trained
to play through stuff. And I’ve
played through all types of injuries — ankle sprains, shoulder, whatever — and with the
brain it’s just different. That
was the hard part for me to
understand.”
This season Horford is averaging 14.6 points, 9.2 rebounds, and 4.7 assists per
game for the Celtics, who extended their winning streak to
10 games with Wednesday
night’s 107-96 win over the
Lakers.
With Horford out, Aron
Baynes started at center and
had a team-high 21 points and
eight rebounds. Marcus Mor­
ris, who missed Monday’s
game to rest, played power
forward and chipped in 18
points.
“I don’t expect anybody to
be Al,” Stevens said. “I think
we have to replace what he
does by committee. We can’t
expect anybody to play like
him or be like him on both
ends of the floor.
On the mark
Tatum entered Wednesday
having made 52.9 percent of
his 3-pointers this season, including an otherworldly 81.8
percent from the corners. His
marksmanship has caught the
eye of Lakers coach Luke Wal­
ton, for one.
“I remember what it was
like coming in and it seemed
really far when you come from
college to the NBA and try to
shoot those 3s,” Walton said,
“so the fact he’s shooting it so
well already is impressive, and
he just seems to really have a
great way about him.
“A lot of young players
come in and they try to rush
and force things and they get
sped up. He seems to just be
playing at a nice, comfortable
pace when he’s out there.”
and was lost for the game. And
suddenly the Celtics had to find
a way without two more starters.
The Lakers made a push,
getting as close as 2 points, but
they could never take the lead
and never find a way as the
Celtics grabbed a 107-96 win,
perhaps the most improbable
of this 10-game streak given the
circumstances.
Center Aron Baynes tied his
career high with 21 points and
added eight rebounds, and
Marcus Morris added 18 points
in his TD Garden debut. The
Celtics won despite shooting
just 38.8 percent from the floor
and 24.1 percent from beyond
the 3-point line.
They were gritty and determined, though, forcing 21 turnovers, grabbing 16 offensive rebounds, and asking role players
to become more than that for a
night.
The Lakers were unsettled
for much of the opening quarter when they missed all five of
their 3-pointers, committed
nine turnovers, and botched
several layups. The Celtics
could seemingly do no wrong,
even in times of distress.
At one point Kyrie Irving
nearly coughed up the ball
twice as he dribbled and
danced through defenders. But
he gathered possession and
then sliced through four Lakers
on his way to a layup, bringing
the Garden crowd to its feet. At
the buzzer, Terry Rozier banked
in a 3o-foot 3-pointer, giving
Boston a 33-16 lead.
The Celtics extended their
advantage to 21 points early in
the second quarter, and they
were playing with supreme confidence. On one play, Marcus
Smart whipped a backward
pass over his head to Semi Ojeleye, who converted a reverse
layup as he was fouled.
But the Lakers gradually
clawed back, as coach Luke
Walton went to a smaller lineup
and tried to expose Boston in
transition. With 42.7 seconds
left, a Kyle Kuzma layup pulled
Los Angeles to 52-46, and it
trailed by 9 at the break despite
committing 12 first-half turnovers.
The Celtics led, 74-63, with
Celtics 107, Lakers 96
Min
Kuzma......34
Ingram .....37
Lopez .......18
Ball ...........39
Cld­Pope..36
Bogut ......... 6
Brewer.....11
Clarkson ..27
Hart ..........12
Randle......21
Totals .......
At TD Garden
LA LAKERS
FG
FT Reb
M­A M­A O­T A F
4­10
2­2
2­6 1 5
7­11
4­7
1­7 1 3
5­11
0­0
1­4 1 4
4­15
0­0
1­5 6 1
4­10
2­3
0­3 3 4
0­0
0­0
0­3 0 2
1­5
1­1
1­3 0 3
7­13
2­4
3­5 2 3
0­1
0­0
0­0 0 1
5­9
6­6 3­12 2 4
37­85 17­23 12­48 16 30
Pt
10
18
10
9
12
0
3
18
0
16
96
PPG
14.9
15.5
15.8
8.8
11.4
0.9
1.9
15.4
2.7
11.5
FG%: .435, FT%: .739. 3­pt. goals: 5­24, .208
(Kuzma 0­2, Ingram 0­1, Lopez 0­4, Ball 1­5,
Caldwell­Pope 2­6, Brewer 0­1, Clarkson 2­4, Hart
0­1). Team rebounds: 8. Team turnovers: 21 (24
pts.). Blocks: 8 (Lopez 2, Ball 4, Caldwell­Pope,
Bogut). Turnovers: 21 (Kuzma 3, Ingram 2, Lopez
3, Ball 2, Caldwell­Pope 2, Bogut 2, Brewer, Clark­
son 3, Hart 2, Randle). Steals: 8 (Ingram 2, Ball,
Caldwell­Pope, Brewer, Clarkson 2, Randle).
Technicals: Coach Walton, 8:03/3rd.
BOSTON
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt PPG
Tatum ........ 9
1­2
3­3
0­1 1 1 5 13.5
Morris ......25 7­15
1­2
0­1 2 2 18 13.0
Baynes.....23 8­12
5­8
5­8 3 4 21 7.1
Brown ......33 3­11
3­4 2­11 2 1 9 14.8
Irving........33 7­21
5­5
0­6 5 3 19 22.0
Larkin......... 6
0­2
0­0
0­0 0 0 0 2.2
Smart .......35 3­11
1­2
2­4 6 2 9 9.7
Ojeleye.....26
1­6
2­3
1­4 1 0 4 3.5
Theis ........22
3­6
2­2
3­5 0 5 8 4.9
Rozier.......28 5­12
2­2
3­8 0 2 14 9.4
Totals ....... 38­98 24­31 16­48 20 20 107
FG%: .388, FT%: .774. 3­pt. goals: 7­29, .241
(Morris 3­6, Brown 0­3, Irving 0­7, Larkin 0­1,
Smart 2­4, Ojeleye 0­2, Theis 0­1, Rozier 2­5).
Team rebounds: 17. Team turnovers: 14 (9 pts.).
Blocks: 6 (Tatum, Smart, Theis 3, Rozier). Turn­
overs: 13 (Tatum, Baynes 2, Brown 2, Irving 2,
Smart, Ojeleye 3, Theis 2). Steals: 8 (Tatum, Mor­
ris, Brown, Irving, Smart, Ojeleye, Theis 2). Tech­
nicals: team, 3:19/1st.
LA Lakers....................... 16 36 29 15 —
96
Boston ............................ 33 28 26 20 — 107
A — 18,624 (18,624). T — 2:14. Officials — Eric
Lewis, Kevin Scott, Zach Zarba.
eight minutes left in the third
quarter when the Lakers uncorked an 11-2 run that was
capped by a Jordan Clarkson
layup. Missing so much offensive firepower, Boston turned to
an unlikely source: Baynes.
Over a two-minute stretch, the
burly center threw down a
lefthanded follow slam, converted a jump hook, and took
two foul shots.
The Lakers continued to linger for much of the fourth,
though, twice cutting the deficit
to 3 points. But they also continued to miss layups and opportunities. With six minutes
left, Ir ving made a driving
layup and a tough, dancing
fadeaway, putting the Celtics
ahead, 100-90. The Lakers were
not close again.
In the final moments, chants
o f “ B e at L A” r e v e r b e rat e d
through TD Garden. It had not
been vintage Celtics/Lakers,
but it had been a tough, shorthanded win.
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at
adam.himmelsbach@globe.co
m. Follow him on Twitter
@adamhimmelsbach.
On the clock
Morris had been on a minutes restriction since making
his debut after missing eight
games because of a sore knee,
but Stevens said that moving
forward he would mostly just
monitor the forward’s conditioning to decide how long he
would play him . . . New Red
Sox manager Alex Cora was a
face in the crowd.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Celtics guard Kyrie Irving leaves Lakers center Brook
Lopez in his wake on a first-quarter drive to the basket.
Sports
C4
T h e
NHL
MAPLE LEAFS 4, WILD 2
Minnesota....................1
Toronto ........................1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
*Tampa Bay
Toronto
Ottawa
Detroit
BOSTON
Montreal
Buffalo
Florida
GP W
15 11
17 10
14 6
16 8
14 6
16 7
15 5
14 4
L OL
2 2
7 0
3 5
7 1
5 3
8 1
8 2
8 2
Pts. ROW
24
10
20
9
17
5
17
6
15
6
15
6
12
5
10
4
GF
59
65
51
45
41
44
38
48
GA
42
60
47
43
44
57
54
59
METROPOLITAN
Pittsburgh
New Jersey
Columbus
NY Islanders
NY Rangers
Washington
Philadelphia
Carolina
GP W
17 9
14 9
16 9
15 8
17 8
16 8
15 7
13 5
L OL
6 2
4 1
6 1
5 2
7 2
7 1
6 2
5 3
Pts. ROW
20
9
19
7
19
8
18
7
18
8
17
7
16
7
13
4
GF
45
50
52
55
56
47
47
35
GA
59
45
46
48
57
51
43
38
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
St. Louis
Winnipeg
Nashville
Colorado
Dallas
Chicago
Minnesota
GP W
16 12
14 8
15 8
14 8
15 8
15 7
14 5
L OL
3 1
3 3
5 2
6 0
7 0
6 2
7 2
Pts. ROW
25
11
19
8
18
8
16
7
16
8
16
7
12
5
GF
53
46
40
48
42
43
42
GA
37
40
42
47
43
36
44
PACIFIC
Los Angeles
Vegas
Vancouver
*San Jose
Calgary
Anaheim
Edmonton
Arizona
GP W L OL
15 11 2 2
15 9 5 1
15 8 5 2
13 8 5 0
15 8 7 0
15 6 6 3
14 5 8 1
17 2 13 2
Pts. ROW
24
10
19
9
18
8
16
7
16
6
15
5
11
5
6
1
GF
52
52
42
36
38
43
32
42
GA
34
44
37
30
43
47
44
68
* — Not including late game; ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
At NY Rangers 4
Boston 2
At Toronto 4
at San Jose
Tampa Bay
Minnesota 2
7
Edmonton at New Jersey
7
Minnesota at Montreal
7:30
Arizona at St. Louis
Detroit at Calgary
9
Vancouver at Anaheim
10
Tampa Bay at Los Angeles 10:30
8
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Nashville 3
at Columbus 1
At Carolina 3
At Pittsburgh 3
At Montreal 3
Arizona 1
Vancouver 5
Edmonton 2at NY Islanders 1
(OT)
St. Louis 3
At Buffalo 3
Florida 1
1 —
2 —
2
4
First Period — 1, Toronto, Kadri 9
(Nylander, Rielly), 12:56. 2, Minnesota,
Zucker 4 (Staal), 18:15. Penalties —
Niederreiter, MIN, (boarding), 1:26.
Second Period — 3, Toronto, Mar­
leau 6 (Hyman, Brown), 3:47. Penalties
— Borgman, TOR, (tripping), 5:55; Bo­
zak, TOR, (slashing), 9:24; Borgman,
TOR, (tripping), 15:35; Niederreiter,
MIN, (slashing), 16:48.
Third Period — 4, Toronto, Carrick 1,
3:40. 5, Minnesota, Zucker 5 (Staal,
Suter), 15:01 (pp). 6, Toronto, Brown 7,
19:29. Penalties — Carrick, TOR,
(roughing), 13:36.
Shots on goal — Minnesota 9­14­14
— 37. Toronto 6­6­7 — 19.
Power plays — Minnesota 1 of 4; To­
ronto 0 of 2.
Goalies — Minnesota, Dubnyk 4­6­1
(18 shots­15 saves). Toronto, Andersen
9­6­0 (37­35).
A — 19,049 (18,819). T — 2:30.
Referees — Tom Kowal, Pierre Lam­
bert. Linesmen — Derek Amell, Steve
Miller.
KINGS 4, DUCKS 3
Tuesday night game
Los Angeles.............1
Anaheim...................2
1
1
1
0
1 —
0 —
4
3
First Period — 1, Anaheim, Boll 1
(Montour, Shaw), 6:01. 2, Anaheim, Va­
tanen 1 (Rakell), 12:26. 3, Los Angeles,
Kopitar 8 (Muzzin, Iafallo), 16:58. Pen­
alties — MacDermid, LA, served by
Amadio, Major (interference), 7:25;
MacDermid, LA, Misconduct (miscon­
duct), 7:25; Bieksa, ANA, (slashing),
14:08; Rakell, ANA, (high sticking),
18:13.
Second Period — 4, Anaheim, Rakell
6 (Manson, Grant), 14:52. 5, Los Ange­
les, Kempe 7 (Toffoli, Pearson), 19:01.
Penalties — Perry, ANA, (roughing),
5:33; Quick, LA, served by Andreoff,
(roughing), 5:33; Forbort, LA, (rough­
ing), 5:33; Perry, ANA, (delay of game),
9:50; Andreoff, LA, (roughing), 12:03;
Boll, ANA, Major (fighting), 17:08; An­
dreoff, LA, Major (fighting), 17:08.
Third Period — 6, Los Angeles,
Brown 7 (Iafallo, Kopitar), 5:49 (pp).
Penalties — Anaheim bench, served by
Ritchie (too many men on the ice),
5:39; Kempe, LA, major (high sticking),
5:54; Silfverberg, ANA, (interference),
8:45; Bieksa, ANA, (tripping), 15:29;
Manson, ANA, (cross checking), 17:43.
Overtime — 7, Los Angeles, Shore 2
(Brown), 3:51. Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — Los Angeles 10­11­
17­5 — 43. Anaheim 17­12­6­1 — 36.
Goalies — Los Angeles, Quick 8­2­1
(36 shots­33 saves). Anaheim, Gibson
5­5­1 (33­30), Miller 1­0­1 (10­9).
CANADIENS 3, VEGAS 2
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Chicago at Philadelphia
0
1
Washington 1
Vegas 2
at Calgary 3
Los Angeles 4 at Anaheim 3 (OT)
at New Jersey 1
Tuesday night game
Vegas............................1
Montreal ......................2
0
1
1 —
0 —
2
3
First Period — 1, Montreal, Gallagher
7 (Benn, Plekanec), 8:24. 2, Montreal,
Benn 1 (Hudon, Mete), 10:55. 3, Vegas,
Bellemare 2 (Engelland), 17:41. Penal­
ties — Haula, VGK, (holding), 1:47; We­
ber, MTL, (cross checking), 15:22;
Nosek, VGK, (tripping), 18:17.
Second Period — 4, Montreal, Pacio­
retty 6 (Petry, Shaw), 3:31. Penalties —
Weber, MTL, (holding), 15:52.
Third Period — 5, Vegas, Haula 5
(Marchessault, Perron), 18:23. Penal­
ties — None.
Shots on goal — Vegas 2­12­17 — 31.
Montreal 14­5­9 — 28.
Goalies — Vegas, Lagace 1­4­1 (28
shots­25 saves). Montreal, Lindgren 2­
0­0 (31­29).
FRANK GUNN/THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP
Leafs forward Leo Komarov knocks down Minnesota defenseman
Jonas Brodin in front of Wild goalie Devan Dubnyk on Wednesday.
NBA
MAGIC 112, KNICKS 99
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
BOSTON
Toronto
Philadelphia
New York
Brooklyn
W
9
6
6
6
4
L
2
4
4
5
7
Pct. GB Streak Home
.818 —
W9
3­1
.600
2½
W1
3­1
.600
2½
W5
2­2
.545
3
L1
5­2
.364
5
L1
3­2
Conf.
6­2
3­1
3­3
4­3
3­3
CENTRAL
Detroit
Cleveland
Indiana
Milwaukee
Chicago
W
8
5
5
4
2
L
3
6
7
6
7
Pct. GB Streak Home
.727 —
W3
5­1
.455
3
W1
3­4
.417
3½
L4
3­2
.400
3½
L4
2­3
.222
5
L2
1­3
Conf.
4­2
5­5
2­4
3­5
2­4
SOUTHEAST
Orlando
Washington
Charlotte
*Miami
Atlanta
W
7
5
5
4
2
L
4
5
6
6
9
Pct. GB Streak Home
.636 —
W1
4­2
.500
1½
L1
2­3
.455
2
L3
4­1
.400
2½
L1
3­3
.182
5
L1
0­4
Conf.
4­4
3­1
3­3
3­2
1­7
WESTERN CONFERENCE
PACIFIC
*Golden State
LA Clippers
LA Lakers
*Phoenix
Sacramento
W
8
5
5
4
2
L
3
5
5
7
8
Pct. GB Streak Home
.727 —
W4
3­2
.500
2½
L3
3­4
.500
2½
W2
4­3
.364
4
L3
2­3
.200
5½
W1
1­3
Conf.
5­2
5­3
2­4
2­5
2­4
SOUTHWEST
Houston
Memphis
San Antonio
New Orleans
Dallas
W L
8 3
7 4
7 4
6 5
2 10
Pct. GB Streak Home
.727 —
W3
2­2
.636
1
W1
4­2
.636
1
W3
5­1
.545
2
W3
1­3
.167
6½
W1
1­5
Conf.
4­2
7­2
3­1
3­4
1­8
NORTHWEST
*Minnesota
Portland
Denver
Utah
Oklahoma City
W
7
6
6
5
4
Pct. GB Streak Home
.700 —
W5
4­1
.545
1½
L1
4­3
.545
1½
W1
4­2
.455
2½
L3
5­2
.400
3
L3
2­2
Conf.
5­1
5­3
1­2
5­4
0­5
L
3
5
5
6
6
* — Not including late game
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
At BOSTON 107
LA Lakers 96
At Detroit 114
Indiana 97
At Orlando 112
Miami
at Phoenix
Minnesota
at Golden St.
New York 99
THURSDAY’S GAMES
LA Lakers at Washington
New Orleans at Toronto
Cleveland at Houston
7
7:30
Philadelphia at Sacramento
Okla. City at Denver
10
10:30
8
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
At Cleveland 124 Milwaukee 119
At San Antonio 120LA Clippers
107
New Orleans 117
At Denver 112
Dallas 113
At New York 118
At Toronto 119
at Indiana 112
at Washington 99
Charlotte 113
Chicago 114
Philadelphia 104
Memphis 98
At Sacramento 94
Brooklyn 104
at Utah 97
at Portland 97
Okla. City 86
NEW YORK
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Beasley. 20 2­5 0­0 2­4
Hard­
38 11­21 3­3 1­11
away Jr.
Kanter... 20 5­6 0­0 2­6
Jack ....... 25 3­4 0­0 1­3
Lee......... 30 3­7 5­5 0­2
McDer­
30 5­9 0­0 0­2
mott ......
Ntilikina 23 3­7 0­0 1­4
Thms..... 22 2­6 2­3 1­2
O’Quinn 20 4­7 0­0 1­4
Hernan­
.. 8 4­6 0­2 3­3
gomez...
A F Pt.
3 2 4
1 3 26
0 2 10
5 3 6
1 0 12
1 3 13
9 2
2 2
4 2
6
6
8
0 2
8
Dotson .... 2 0­0 0­0 0­1 0 0 0
Kuzmin­
.. 2 0­2 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
skas.......
Totals .... 42­80 10­13 12­42 26 21 99
FG%: .525, FT%: .769. 3­pt. goals: 5­
12, .417 (McDermott 3­4, Lee 1­2, Hard­
away Jr. 1­5, O’Quinn 0­1). Team re­
bounds: 7. Team turnovers: 23 (29
pts.).
ORLANDO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt.
Fournier 34 9­16 2­4 0­2 5 3 23
Gordon.. 37 8­11 1­2 1­4 1 1 21
Vucevic. 33 9­16 3­3 1­5 1 2 24
Payton .. 29 5­9 1­1 2­6 11 1 11
Ross ...... 24 2­5 0­0 0­2 3 3 6
Smmns . 24 6­10 3­6 1­2 2 1 16
Isaac ..... 23 2­6 0­0 1­2 2 0 4
Mack ..... 20 0­4 0­0 0­4 6 2 0
Biyom­
15 2­2 3­6 0­2 0 2 7
bo ..........
Iwundu ... 2 0­1 0­0 0­0 0 0 0
Totals .... 43­80 13­22 6­29 31 15 112
FG%: .538, FT%: .591. 3­pt. goals: 13­
28, .464 (Gordon 4­6, Fournier 3­6,
Vucevic 3­6, Ross 2­3, Simmons 1­1,
Mack 0­1, Payton 0­2, Isaac 0­3). Team
rebounds: 9. Team turnovers: 12 (21
pts.).
PISTONS 114, PACERS 97
INDIANA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt.
Bog­
31 4­10 3­4 0­7
danovic.
T.Young 35 7­16 0­0 3­6
Turner... 26 4­8 0­0 1­6
Cllsn ...... 29 3­10 1­1 0­2
Oladipo. 38 8­21 2­4 1­3
Joseph... 29 4­8 2­2 0­3
Ste­
phen­ 23 1­4 1­2 1­4
son ........
Jffrsn..... 22 7­10 5­5 1­6
Leaf ......... 7 0­1 0­0 0­1
Totals .... 38­88 14­18 7­38
0 2 12
4
1
3
2
6
4 16
4 8
2 7
5 21
3 11
4 0
3
2 4 19
0 0 0
22 24 97
FG%: .432, FT%: .778. 3­pt. goals: 7­
24, .292 (Oladipo 3­5, T.Young 2­5, Jo­
seph 1­3, Bogdanovic 1­5, Leaf 0­1, Ste­
phenson 0­1, Turner 0­1, Collison 0­3).
Team rebounds: 6. Team turnovers: 15
(11 pts.).
DETROIT
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt.
Bullock.. 33 3­7 0­0 0­1 3 0 7
Harris.... 34 8­19 2­2 0­8 1 4 23
Drum­
34 7­9 0­7 4­21 4 4 14
mond.....
Bradley . 29 4­11 4­4 0­3 0 4 14
Jackson. 27 6­10 4­5 0­3 6 1 18
Gallo­
22 4­5 3­4 0­3 0 2 12
way .......
Smith .... 21 5­10 0­0 1­3 5 0 10
Tolliver . 14 1­3 0­0 0­2 4 2 3
Kennard 12 1­3 0­0 0­0 0 1 2
Mar­
.. 9 3­4 3­3 2­4 1 3 9
janovic ..
More­
.. 6 1­2 0­0 1­2 1 1 2
land .......
Totals .... 43­83 16­25 8­50 25 22 114
FG%: .518, FT%: .640. 3­pt. goals: 12­
27, .444 (Harris 5­9, Jackson 2­3, Brad­
ley 2­5, Galloway 1­1, Tolliver 1­3, Bull­
ock 1­4, Smith 0­2). Team rebounds: 9.
Team turnovers: 15 (24 pts.).
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
MSG special place to McAvoy
By Fluto Shinzawa
GLOBE STAFF
NEW YORK — As a Boston University freshman, Charlie McAvoy played
at Madison Square Garden against Cornell. The native of
BRUINS
Long Beach, N.Y., howNOTEBOOK ever, had yet to experience his hometown
arena as a professional until Wednesday night, with the Bruins in town to
face the Rangers.
“It’s going to be really special,” the
19-year-old said after the morning
skate. “It’s a game I’ve been looking
forward to.
“My freshman year at BU, I had a
chance to play here at Red Hot Hockey.
That was a very good memory for me.
Any time you get to come home and
play at a building like this, where you
grew up going to games, it means a lot.
It’s special.”
MSG is one of the NHL’s crown jewels. Wednesday’s game was on the national schedule of NBC Sports. Such
circumstances could make it overwhelming for a normal teenager.
The Bruins, however, know that
McAvoy is a prodigy.
“He’s from the area,” said coach
Bruce Cassidy. “It’s a rivalry game,
Madison Square Garden. So I imagine
he’s going to be jacked to play and get
out there, as long as it doesn’t get too
much ahead of him in that regard.
“But I don’t think anything really
does with Charlie. If it does, he’s able to
reel it in quickly. I’m looking forward
to seeing what he’s got tonight.”
McAvoy, who finished minus-2 in
23:43 of ice time in the 4-2 loss to the
Rangers, has settled into his role as
Zdeno Chara’s right-hand man. The
rookie spent most of his time matched
against Mika Zibanejad and Kevin
Hayes, the Rangers’ top two centers.
Part of McAvoy’s duties is to play
physically against his opponents. He
has been quick to do so.
While Chara fends off attackers with
his stick and reach, McAvoy has been
eager to separate forwards from the
puck. McAvoy blew up Minnesota’s Ty­
ler Ennis Monday. Ennis came back at
McAvoy later in the game and belted
the defenseman. Earlier in the game,
McAvoy absorbed a wallop from Mar­
cus Foligno.
He has no concerns about the rough
stuff.
“He doesn’t like to get drilled,”
Cassidy said of Ennis. “No matter how
big or small you are, you’ve got pride.
So that part of it, there’ll be payback
along the way. He’ll just have to accept
that and know that people are coming
for him. I think he’s fine with it.
“He plays a lot of minutes, so he’s
going to get hit. And he has the puck a
lot, so he’s going to get hit. All those situations are going to put him in those
spots. He’s just going to have to play
with his head up and understand
they’re coming for him. He’ll learn.
He’s a quick learner.”
BRUCE BENNETT/GETTY IMAGES
Charlie McAvoy was minus-2 in 23:43 of ice time against the Rangers.
To the letter
In 2006, the Bruins and 29 other
teams declined to spend draft capital
on Kevan Miller.
Eleven years later, the self-made
Miller shares the same classification as
Patrice Bergeron: alternate captain of
the Bruins. He wore the “A” for the first
time Monday.
“That’s a tremendous honor,” said
Miller, who was an undrafted free
agent. “It’s something I don’t take very
lightly. It’s a huge honor for me. But I
think there’s a lot of guys in here without a letter that are just as big as leaders.
“We pride ourselves on that as a
team that, whether you wear a letter or
not, you have a responsibility to be a
leader on the team.”
Miller is wearing the newly tailored
uniform because of injuries to David
Krejci (back), David Backes (colon),
and Brad Marchand (upper body). But
the 29-year-old also has qualities that
every coach embraces: hard work,
competitiveness, and a team-first approach, the latter of which Miller most
recently proved on Oct. 30 by jumping
Oliver Bjorkstrand after the Columbus
forward dropped Torey Krug.
“Kevan’s always been that guy,” said
Cassidy. “Sticking up for his teammates. Practices hard every day. Fitness
is through the roof. All the things you
want young kids coming in to notice
how to be a player.
“He’s not flashy in terms of leading
with numbers. He’s a good soldier is
what he is for us every night.”
At even strength, Miller had been
bouncing between both sides while
playing with fellow right-shot defender
Paul Postma. But against Minnesota,
with lefty Rob O’Gara replacing Postma, Miller returned to his strong side
exclusively.
It is where the Bruins feel the
strongman plays his best: manhandling puck carriers, making outlet
passes on his forehand, and being positioned in the offensive zone to ride
down the wall.
“I would hope so,” Miller said when
asked if he was more effective on the
right side. “There’s certain circumstances where it’s easier on the left.
Sometimes it’s easier on the right. I
think it’s just a general consensus that
guys are better on the strong side.”
Watchful eyes
O’Gara, a native of Massapequa,
N.Y., planned to have family and
friends in attendance. Unlike McAvoy,
O’Gara grew up an Islanders fan,
counting Kenny Jonsson and Brad Is­
bister among his favorites . . . Wednesday marked only the second time Cassidy was able to roll the same lines and
pairings for a second straight game. Injuries and underperformance have
forced the coach to juggle more than a
circus performer . . . Former Bruin
Steve Kampfer has dressed for the
Rangers for the last five games. “He
knows his limitations,” coach Alain Vi­
gneault said. “He’s not a big player, but
skates well and he’s good on puck battles. Keeps it simple and doesn’t put
himself in a lot of trouble.” . . . Anton
Khudobin was the backup for Tuukka
Rask. Khudobin had been out of uniform since Oct. 28 because of a lowerbody injury . . . Noel Acciari (finger)
could return Friday against Toronto.
P.K. Subban cracked the fourth-liner’s
finger with a slapper in the season
opener.
Fluto Shinzawa can be reached at
fshinzawa@globe.com.
Bruins dig hole, lose to Rangers
uBRUINS
Continued from Page C1
“The first part of the game we had
some passengers,” the Bruins coach
said. “We’re not in a position in our
hockey club to have a lot of success —
maybe from the odd night — but we’re
not going to win on a regular basis if we
have passengers. We don’t need young
guys to come in here and lead this club.
We just need them to do their job. I
thought early on there were some guys
that weren’t where they needed to be.”
What particularly bothered Cassidy
was how his players cracked in their
own end under the Rangers’ heavy
heat. The barrage started when Tim
Schaller, as the low forward, couldn’t
get a good stick on an outlet pass. Had
Schaller been able to clear the puck, the
danger would have been lower. Instead,
the Rangers kept the cycle going, allowing Pavel Buchenvich to roll over the
boards and attack the puck with speed.
Once Buchnevich got a step on Zdeno
Chara, he cut inside and slipped a riser
over Tuukka Rask on the short side at
9:53 of the first to open the scoring.
“The start wasn’t bad,” said Rask (29
saves). “But that first goal, that was
kind of my bad. I lost my post there.
And then it’s 1-0, so you know the other
team’s going to get some momentum
off that. They made a push. We didn’t
respond right away. It kind of got away
for a little bit. Then we regrouped
again. The good thing is we were in the
game the whole rest of the way. Just got
to weather the storm a little bit when
you go down by one. You don’t want to
make it too tough on yourself.”
The Bruins punched back 21 seconds after Buchnevich’s goal. David
Pastrnak pulled the rebound of Patrice
Bergeron’s shot off the end boards and
slipped the puck through Henrik Lundqvist’s pads, tying the score at 1-1.
But the Bruins lost the game over a
29-second segment. North Reading’s
Jimmy Vesey did the damage.
On the first goal, Vesey drove to the
‘The first part of the
game we had some
passengers.’
BRUCE CASSIDY, Bruins coach
net, collected the rebound of a shortrange Buchnevich shot, and banged the
puck past Rask at 14:41. After the next
faceoff, Vesey went to work again down
low, this time on Rob O’Gara. When
Kevin Shattenkirk snapped off a shot
from the right point, Vesey gained position on the defenseman to find the
puck. Before O’Gara could recover,
Vesey beat Rask at 15:10 to give the
Rangers a 3-1 lead.
“What bothered me was they were
more competitive in front of the net
than we were for the first half of the
game,” Cassidy said. “Then we decided
to get competitive and you see what
happens. We get our goals and keep
them out in front of our net. Tuukka
sees pucks. Everything’s under control.
That’s what bothered me. They were
much more competitive in that area
than we were. We got ours at the end.
That’s generally hockey at times. You
win the slot battle, the net-front battle,
you’re going to do pretty well for yourself a lot of nights. They were a little bit
better than us at that.”
The Rangers excelled at their game
plan of crashing the net, funneling
pucks out to the points, and sending
them back into the fray again. Had the
Bruins been better at boxing out, clearing bodies, and positioning themselves
to win battles, Rask might have had
sharper looks at pucks. But on Vesey’s
goals, Rask did not have much luck
peeking through the bodies the Rangers sent his way.
“They created some havoc out there
and got rewarded with a couple goals,”
Rask said. “That’s the NHL. People
crash the net. You’ve just got to battle
Rangers 4, Bruins 2
At Madison Square Garden
FIRST PERIOD
NY Rangers 1, Boston 0 — Buchnevich 7 (McDonagh, Grab­
ner) 9:53
NY Rangers 1, Boston 1 — Pastrnak 9 (Bergeron, Bjork) 10:14
NY Rangers 2, Boston 1 — Vesey 3 (Buchnevich, Zibanejad)
14:41
NY Rangers 3, Boston 1 — Vesey 4 (Shattenkirk, Desharnais)
15:10
Penalty — NY Rangers, Buchnevich (tripping) 19:20
SECOND PERIOD
No scoring
Penalty — NY Rangers, served by Kreider (too many men on
ice) 13:46
THIRD PERIOD
Penalty — NY Rangers, Holden (slashing) 2:37
NY Rangers 3, Boston 2 — Bergeron 3 (Pastrnak, Krug) 6:44
Penalty — NY Rangers, Desharnais (tripping) 12:24
Penalty — Boston, Pastrnak (hooking) 13:02
NY Rangers 4, Boston 2 — Nash 4 (McDonagh) 19:52 (en)
SCORE BY PERIOD
Boston...................................................1
0
1
—
2
NY Rangers ..........................................3
0
1
—
4
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Boston...................................................7
13
NY Rangers ........................................16
8
13
9
—
—
33
33
Power plays — Boston 0 of 4; NY Rangers 0 of 1.
Goalies — Boston, Rask 3­5­2 (32 shots­29 saves). NY Rang­
ers, Lundqvist 7­4­2 (33 shots­31 saves).
Referees — Dean Morton, Gord Dwyer. Linesmen — Andrew
Smith, Jonny Murray.
Attendance — 18,006 (18,006). Time — 2:25.
and try and make those saves.”
The Bruins didn’t tuck their tails.
Lundqvist turned back all 13 secondperiod shots, including a Grade-A
chance by Jordan Szwarz. Lundqvist
kept stoning the Bruins in the third until Bergeron fired the puck past the ace
at 6:44. The Bruins had their chances
on the power play, including two in the
third. But none of their six man-up
shots went in.
“You want to get results on that.
Right now, we’re not getting them,”
Cassidy said. “It’s a good opportunity.
We did a good job drawing penalties to
get out there. But the most frustrating
thing is the start again. We put ourselves in a bad spot. In this league, it’s
tough to come back. We’ve had a couple
moral victories or whatever you want to
call them to show that we do have character and we’re wiling to fight to the last
whistle. We’ve just got to learn quickly
here not to keep putting ourselves behind the eight-ball. Teams are too good.”
Fluto Shinzawa can be reached at
fshinzawa@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeFluto.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Practice plans are looking up
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
FOXBOROUGH — The Patriots are taking their training
to new heights — literally.
Bill
PATRIOTS
Belichick, who
NOTEBOOK has long and
storied familial
ties to the Naval Academy, will
take his troops to the Air Force
Academy for their practices
and preparations for the game
against the Raiders in Mexico
City on Nov. 19.
The news was confirmed by
Troy Garnhart, the Air Force
Academy’s associate athletic director for communications.
After facing the Broncos in
Denver on Sunday, the team
will travel an hour south to Colorado Springs, where it will
conduct practices at an altitude
of 7,258 feet above sea level.
The game against the Raiders
will be played at Estadio Azteca, which is 7,382 feet above
sea level.
The facilities at the academy
include three fields (two natural grass and one synthetic), an
indoor practice facility, a pair
10,000-square-foot weight
rooms, and two training rooms.
Backup quarterback Brian
Hoyer is looking forward to the
trip as he continues to get reacquainted with former team-
mates and bond with new ones.
“To be able to go a day early
out to Denver, play a game, and
then spend a week out there
where you’re kind of forced to
hang out with each other — not
everybody gets to go home and
see their family and things like
that, so it is kind of good timing
for me to come and get to know
the guys a little better and to
catch up and learn everybody’s
name and who they are and everything,’’ Hoyer said Wednesday.
The nine-year veteran acknowledged that he’s never really been bothered by the challenges playing in altitude presents, but he did smile when he
said, “But maybe that’s because
I play quarterback and I don’t
run around too much.’’
Sitting it out
The Patriots were without
key players Marcus Cannon,
Chris Hogan, and Malcom
Brown at Wednesday afternoon’s full-pads practice.
Cannon, the starting right
tackle, has been nursing an ankle injury and his absence
means it’s likely LaAdrian Wad­
dle will face the unenviable
task of battling Broncos pass
rusher Von Miller on Sunday
night.
Cannon, who performed
well against Miller last December, holding him without a
sack, aggravated the ankle early
Oct. 29 against the Chargers
and gave way to Waddle, who
was solid in keeping Los Angeles’s vaunted pass rush out of
Tom Brady’s face.
Waddle said he’s looking forward to the challenge of squaring off against Miller and the
rest of the Broncos.
“[Miller is] arguably the best
pass rusher in the league,’’
Waddle said after practice. “So
going up against a guy of that
caliber is a hell of a challenge.
The guys up front are excited to
go against [Miller] — and not
just him. It’s the entire front.
Those guys are good.’’
Starting left tackle Nate Sol­
der, who missed Tuesday’s
shorts-and-shells workout, returned to the practice field.
Hogan suffered a shoulder
injury, also against the Chargers, and though he’s expected
to make a full recovery soon, it
likely won’t be in time to play
against the Broncos.
Hogan walked through the
locker room, right arm still in a
sling, after practice.
His absence puts more on
the shoulders of Phillip
Dorsett, who has four catches
for 85 yards.
Brown, a starting defensive
Globe staff’s pro picks WEEK 10
Las Vegas
line
Christopher L. Jim
Gasper
McBride
Nora
Princiotti
Scott
Thurston
Ben
Volin
4­7­2
Last week
3­8­2
2­9­2
6­5­2
5­6­2
Season
65­62­5
56­71­5
68­59­5
62­65­5
71­56­5
Best bets
5­4
3­5­1
6­3
7­2
3­5­1
Seattle
Seattle
Seattle
Seattle
Arizona
Seattle
Seattle
at Arizona
by 6
Selections are against the pointspread. Staff records are calculated using the final spread for each game, which may dif­
fer from the lines above.
tackle, injured his ankle against
the Falcons Oct. 22 and hasn’t
practiced since. He was spotted
in the locker room Wednesday
and was walking without a noticeable limp. The team signed
veteran Ricky Jean Francois on
Tuesday as some insurance in
case Brown’s injury lingers.
“We just tried to add a little
depth to the defensive line. He’s
played this year [and] has some
experience,’’ Belichick said
Wednesday morning of Francois, who played six games with
the Packers this year, the latest
stop in his career, which also
included San Francisco, Indianapolis, and Washington.
“We’ll see. He’s been on several
different teams, played in several different systems, played
3-4 end, played inside on the
guard. We’ll see how it goes.’’
Know your limits
Receiver Danny Amendola
(knee), cornerbacks Stephon
Gilmore (concussion/ankle)
and Eric Rowe (groin), and defensive end Cassius Marsh
(shoulder) were limited at practice . . . Belichick kept the focus
on this week when asked, in
light of the Jimmy Garoppolo
trade, if his goal was to retire
with Brady as his starting QB.
“The goal right now is to beat
Denver,’’ said the coach. He had
a similar response when asked
who he felt was better at putting the media in their place,
himself or Bill Parcells. “Denver. Denver’s the target this
week,’’ Belichick said . . . The
Broncos put starting right tackle Menelik Watson on injured
reserve with a foot ailment.
Jim McBride can be reached at
james.mcbride@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globejimmcbride.
Packers cut Bennett over injury protocol
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
FOXBOROUGH — The
Green Bay Packers cut tight
e n d Ma r t e l l u s B e n n e tt o n
Wednesday because of a “failure to disclose physical condition” designation, the team cited.
Bennett had been ruled out
of this week’s game with a
shoulder problem and he did
not play in Monday night’s 3017 loss to the Detroit Lions.
Teams have until 4 p.m.
Thursday to claim Bennett,
who played all 19 games with
the Patriots last season despite
dealing with several nagging
injuries.
After starter Rob
Gronkowski, the Patriots’
backup tight ends are Dwayne
Allen, who has yet to record a
catch this season, and rookie
Jacob Hollister, who has three
catches for 37 yards.
Since the NFL trade deadline has passed, Bennett is
subject to the waiver process
even as a vested veteran.
In seven games with the
Packers, Bennett caught 24
passes on 38 targets for 233
yards and no touchdowns.
Benne tt signed a threeyear, $21 million contract that
included a $6.3 million signing bonus.
He h a d b a s e s a l a r i e s o f
$900,000 this season, $3.6
million (plus a $2 million roster bonus) in 2018, and $5.65
million in 2019.
The Packers could go after
the prorated amount of that
signing bonus, $4.2 million,
the Associated Press reported.
Nora Princiotti of the Globe
staff contributed to this report.
C5
Andrews sizes up his
assignments on line
uPATRIOTS
Continued from Page C1
es, the offensive line stays the
same unless there’s an injury.
There’s no such thing as a situational center.
That’s one reason the position is more cerebral than
meets the eye, and one reason
the 6-foot-3-inch, 295-pound
Andrews can be asked to stop
346-pound Falcons tackle Dontari Poe or 254-pound Texans
linebacker Whitney Mercilus,
to use Andrews’s examples.
“That position is kind of a
unique position on the offensive line,” coach Bill Belichick
said. “It’s a little bit different
than the other four because of
the snapping and the communication, identification of the
fronts and adjustments. When
you play center you’re right in
the middle of every play.”
Andrews isn’t small enough
to call undersized, but he is
lighter than most upper-tier
NFL centers. Atlanta’s Alex
Mack is 6-4, 312, as is Dallas’s
Travis Frederick. Ravens center
Ryan Jensen is 6-4, 320, and
Rams center John Sullivan is
6-4, 310. Washington’s Spencer
Long is 6-5, 320.
Belichick noted that there
are several centers Andrews’s
size in the league, and he’s
right. Eagles center Jason Kelce
is one of the NFL’s best pivots at
6-2, 295, just about the same
measurements as Andrews.
Oakland’s Rodney Hudson is
6-2, 300. Pure size, though, isn’t
as important as it seems.
Succeeding as an offensive
lineman isn’ t always about
beating your man. Often, it’s
more about not losing too
quickly. Athletically, the Poes
and the Merciluses of the world
have the edge on Andrews in
some way, shape or form, and
Andrews counteracts them in
basically the same way. He sets
his feet, gets a good angle, and
blocks for as long as he can.
“It all starts with good fundamentals, and those fundamentals are pretty basic. They
don’t really alter that much,”
Andrews said. “Having your
weight a certain way or your
hands inside, things like that,
they can’t really change that so
that’s kind of the difference
there. Now, what to expect,
what they might do is a lot different.”
Knowing what to expect is
where Andrews gets his advantage. As the center, he coordinates the offensive line and
calls out the blocks, so both his
Thursday night’s
NFL game
Seattle at Arizona
Time: Thursday, 8:25 p.m., NBC,
NFL Network. Line: Seattle by 6.
Records: Seahawks 5­3 (3­5 vs.
spread), Cardinals 4­4 (2­6 vs.
spread).
Key injuries: SEATTLE: OUT: G Luke
Joeckel (knee), RB Eddie Lacy
(groin), DE Marcus Smith (concus­
sion), DOUBTFUL: S Earl Thomas
(hamstring), QUESTIONABLE: LB
D.J. Alexander (ankle), WR Paul
Richardson (groin), DT Sheldon
Richardson (oblique), CB Richard
Sherman (Achilles). ARIZONA:
QUESTIONABLE: WR Brittan Gold­
en (groin), WR Chad Williams
(back).
individual success and his ability to communicate depend on
how well he knows opponent
tendencies and how to figure
out where pressure might be
coming from, or how to set up
protection for a specific play.
“David’s good at all of those
things,” Belichick said. “He has
a lot of experience in his life
playing center. I think a lot of
those things come pretty naturally to him, the understanding
of how far you have to go, how
quickly you have to get there,
how close in proximity is your
teammate, where is the play designed to run, and so forth. He’s
p r e tty go o d at a l l o f t h o s e
things. He has a good instinct
for the position.”
Andrews is having a strong
season. He’s the No. 3 graded
center in the NFL, according to
Pro Football Focus, and the Patriots’ offensive line problems
earlier in the season stemmed
more from poor play at tackle
than from Andrews. Communication, which Andrews leads,
wasn’t the issue so much as
players simply getting beaten.
He and the rest of the line
will be tested again Sunday
night in Denver against a defense that can stop the run and
get after the quarterback.
And, as he always does, Andrews expects all shapes and
sizes to be coming his way.
“They’re going to be different, so [Domata] Peko is different from [Derek] Wolfe, Wolfe
is different from Von Miller,”
Andrews said.
Peko is 6-3, 325. Wolfe is
6-5, 284. Miller is 6-3, 249.
Over the course of the game,
o n e o f t h e m i s go i n g t o d o
something to Andrews that will
surprise him. What then?
“Then it comes down to a little willpower,” Andrews said.
MIAA to discuss golf format
Boys cause
stir for SB
field hockey
By Craig Larson
GLOBE STAFF
By Ryan Hathaway
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Fourteen athletes took the
field for the overtime period on
Wednesday night, but all eyes
at the Division
SCHOOL
1 South field
ROUNDUP
hockey semifinal were on
Somerset Berkley’s Lucas Crook
and Alex Millar, the only two
boys in uniform.
It was Crook, a high-scoring
junior forward, who tipped in
an errant rebound four minutes
into the 7-on-7 extra session
that lifted the host Raiders to
an emotional, and fiery, 3-2 victory over Canton.
His reaction on seeing the
ball roll into the net was one of
relief.
Crook relaxed his posture,
reassured to have finally
slipped a shot past Canton goalie Riley Brown, who stood up to
top-seeded Somerset-Berkley
(21-0) for most of the night on
the frigid turf.
There was no relief, however, on the Canton side.
“They shouldn’t have boys
on their team, it’s ridiculous,”
said Canton coach Christine
O’Connor after her team’s season ended at 16-4-1.
From start to finish, the Canton sideline had problems with
the physicality of the game,
with one assistant coach being
assessed a green card.
“The officials didn’t keep
control of it, I think if they had,
the result would’ve been different in regulation,” O’Connor
said. “I think the boys were too
Bennett posted on Instagram during the bye week a
message that indicated he was
thinking about retirement.
‘‘After conversations with
my family I’m pretty sure these
next eight games will be the
conclusion of my NFL career,’’
he wrote. ‘‘To everyone who
has poured themselves and
time into my life and career.
These next games are for you.
Thank you.’’
Sports
DEBEE TLUMACKI FOR THE GLOBE
Somerset-Berkley’s Lucas Crook (left), who had the winning
OT goal vs. Canton, was criticized for playing against girls.
physical, I think they were all
together too physical.”
At game’s end, the sides refused to shake hands — an outcome that dismayed SomersetBerkley’s 22-year coach Jen
Crook, Lucas’s mother, who
complained of poor sportsmanship from Canton.
“I’m starting to get really annoyed with this,” she said, adding that her two male athletes
have been playing since seventh
grade and want to continue.
Her daughter, Cameron, a
freshman, is also one of Raiders’ top scorers.
“They could easily go play
soccer, or football, they enjoy the
sport of field hockey,” she said.
Ever y Somerset Berkley
player wore shorts on Wednesday night, a departure from the
traditional uniform featuring a
skirt. The Raiders were told by
the MIAA that there had to be
uniform consistency.
“I don’t know what else to
do,” Crook said. “It’s the adults
that are ruining this.”
A frustrated O’Connor argued that her team was more
skilled, and was hurt by the
presence of the two boys.
“We were the better team,
how do you play against that?”
she said.
Division 1 North
Andover 3, Central Catholic 2
— Trailing at half, 2-1, the topseeded Golden Warriors (190-1) received second-half goals
from freshman Hanna Medwar
to beat their Merrimack Conference rival in a semifinal at
Reading High.
Division 1 South
King Philip 2, Duxbury 1 — Senior Abby Campbell made four
crucial saves and Claire Lawler
converted King Philip’s only
corner as the second-seeded
Warriors (17-2-1) staved off a
relentless Duxbury attack.
Boys’ soccer
Division 3 North
Watertown 1, Wayland 0 —
Sergio Salas denied Wayland’s
final PK bid by Marco Melero
and Jose Luiz Mendoza delivered the decisive shootout goal
for the fifth-seeded Raiders (146-1).
FRANKLIN — Did the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association “err” or “did
we follow [the rule],” in the
words of its executive director
Bill Gaine in not awarding Emily Nash the medalist trophy after the Lunenburg High junior
registered the lowest score at
the recent Division 3 Central
boys’ sectional tournament?
Gaine believes the association did not err in following to
the letter the specific language
of the MIAA’s Golf Tournament
Format for entrants in the individual tournament, which
states (in all caps): “Girls playing on a fall boys’ team CANNOT BE ENTERED IN THE
B O Y S ’ FA L L I N D I V I D UA L
TOURNAMENT. THEY CAN
ONLY PLAY IN THE B OYS’
TEAM TOURNAMENT.”
Facing a severe backlash
that ranged from LPGA legend
Annika Sorenstam to Billie
Jean King, the MIAA acknowledged the controversial fallout
and alleged gender insensitivity
from its strict adherence to its
golf tournament format by convening a meeting of its 23member Golf Committee Dec.
7.
“All golf administrators followed the voted standard in the
format,” emphasized Gaine
Tuesday morning, addressing
the MIAA Board of Directors at
their monthly meeting.
“Now it is our responsibility,
to look at, if in fact, the instructions, the format, was relevant,
was up to date, was consistent
with all standards that we expect of the rule, as well as any
Title IX considerations.”
The committee, according to
Gaine, will also have the benefit
of outside consultants with expertise in dealing with insensitivity with a girl on a boys’ team
or a boy on a girls’ team.
Gaine said the discussion
was ongoing in what he termed
was “an unprecedented situation.”
Playing from the boys’ tees
at Blissful Meadows Golf Club
in Uxbridge Oct. 24, the 16year-old Nash shot a 3-over par
75, four strokes lower than Nico Ciolino from the Advanced
Math & Science Academy (AMSA) in Marlborough.
Because she was a girl playing in the boys’ indivdual tournament, Nash’s winning individual score only counted toward Lunenberg’s team score.
Ciolino, upon receiving the
first-place trophy, offered the
hardware to Nash, but she declined.
The Lunenburg boys’ team,
however, failed to qualify for
the Div. 3 state final held Oct.
31 in Great Barrington. Under
the current format, Nash will
advance to the girls’ individual
state tournament in the spring.
S h e d i d n o t r e c e i v e a ny
hardware from the MIAA, but
was presented a trophy by her
high school and accepted an invite from Sorenstam to compete in the golfing legend’s Annika Invitational at the World
Golf Village in St. Augustine,
Fla. from Jan. 12-15.
“At the end of the day, we followed [the format], there was a
lot of clarity . . . we need to have
consistency, but that doesn’t say
that the golf committee doesn’t
change their mind,” said Richard Pearson, the MIAA’s associ-
ate director. “But how we administered this, we did what we
had to do, we articulated, we informed the member schools.”
A few other noteworthy
items from Wednesday’s twohour meeting:
R Addressing the looming
departures of schools from
their respective conferences in
the Atlantic Coast, Bay State
and the Old Colony — and the
potential negative impact —
Pearson reiterated the MIAA’s
position (Rule 42.1) that a
school cannot depart until two
years after the District Athletic
Committee has been notified,
unless permission has been
granted. Dennis-Yarmouth, Falmouth, Nauset and Sandwich
are slated to leave the Atlantic
Coast League for the Cape & Island, leaving Marshfield on its
own.
Barnstable is also headed to
the Cape & Islands, leaving
Bridgewater-Raynham and
Dartmouth as a twosome in the
Old Colony. Norwood has been
approved to join the Tri-Valley
League from the BSC, joining
2017 entrant Dedham.
R Plymouth North principal
K at h l e e n Mc S w e e n e y w a s
unanimously voted onto the
board, via an at-large appointment, to fill the spot created by
the departure of Notre Dame
Academy AD Donna Brickely.
R The MIAA’s net assets for
2016-17 were down $370,000
from the previous year, according to Marshfield superintendent Jeff Granatino, vice president of the finance/personnel
committee.
Craig Larson can be reached at
craig.larson@globe.com.
C6
Sports
LEGAL NOTICES
T h e
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICE
MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
By virtue of and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Herbert F. Woods and
Gloria J. Woods to Members Mortgage Company, Inc., dated
February 7, 2003 and registered at Suffolk County Registry
District of the Land Court as Document No. 650029 and
noted on Certificate of Title No. 92988 (the “Mortgage”) of
which mortgage Federal National Mortgage Association is
the present holder by assignment from Members Mortgage
Company, Inc. to Plymouth Savings Bank dated February 7,
2003 registered at Suffolk County Registry District of the
Land Court as Document No. 650030 and noted on Certificate of Title No. 92988; assignment from Eastern Bank
successor by merger to Plymouth Savings Bank to ABN
AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc. dated June 1, 2006 registered
at Suffolk County Registry District of the Land Court as
Document No. 721474 and noted on Certificate of Title No.
92988 and assignment from CitiMortgage, Inc. successor
by merger to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc. to Federal
National Mortgage Association dated June 9, 2014 registered at Suffolk County Registry District of the Land Court
as Document No. 832441 and noted on Certificate of Title
No. 92988, for breach of conditions of said mortgage and
for the purpose of foreclosing the same, the mortgaged
premises located at 52 Ayles Road, Hyde Park (Boston),
MA 02136 will be sold at a Public Auction at 12:00 PM
on December 8, 2017, at the mortgaged premises, more
particularly described below, all and singular the premises
described in said mortgage, to wit:
By virtue of and in execution of the Power of Sale
contained in a certain mortgage given by Alex Price, Mark
Belenkii and Svetlana Brodskaya to Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc. acting solely as a nominee for
Countrywide Bank, FSB, dated September 22, 2007 and recorded in Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 42601,
Page 188 (the “Mortgage”) of which mortgage Wilmington
Savings Fund Society, FSB, doing business as Christiana
Trust, not in its individual capacity, but solely as trustee for
BCAT 2015-14BTT is the present holder by assignment from
Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Bank of
America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans
Servicing, LP dated August 4, 2011 recorded at Suffolk
County Registry of Deeds in Book 48287, Page 83 and assignment from Bank of America, N.A. to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, doing business as Christiana Trust,
not in its individual capacity, but solely as trustee for BCAT
2015-14BTT dated October 22, 2015 recorded at Suffolk
County Registry of Deeds in Book 55527, Page 329, for
breach of conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose
of foreclosing the same, the mortgaged premises located
at 32 Blaine Street, Allston (Boston), MA 02134 will be sold
at a Public Auction at 2:00 PM on December 11, 2017, at
the mortgaged premises, more particularly described below, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, to wit:
Southwesterly: by Ayles Road, fifty (50) feet;
Northwesterly: by Lots 40 and 39 as shown on plan hereinafter mentioned, one hundred (100) feet;
Northeasterly: by lands of sundry adjoining owners, fifty
(50) feet; and
Southeasterly: by Lot 42 as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) feet.
Said Land is shown as Lot 41 on a plan drawn by H. M.
Fletcher, Surveyor, dated September 30, 1950, as modified
and approved by the Court, filed in the Land Registration
Office as Plan No. 22733-A, a copy of a portion of which
filed with Certificate of Title No. 54601.
So much of the above described land as is included within
the limits of said Ayles Road, is subject to the rights of all
persons lawfully entitled thereto in and over the same.
The above described land is subject to water pipe easements as set forth in four grants made to the City of Boston, one by Westminster Park Realty Co., Inc., dated October 17, 1928, duly recorded in Book 5083, Page 113, one by
Philip Bazer et al dated October 11, 1928, duly recorded in
Book 5083 Page 135, one by Westminster Park Realty Co.
Inc., dated October 11, 1928, duly recorded in Book 5083,
Page 136, and one by Massachusetts Bond and Mortgage
Co. dated November 4, 1938 duly recorded in Book 5831,
Page 546.
The above described land is also subject to a sewer easement as set forth in a taking by the City of Boston, dated
March 19, 1941, duly recorded in Book 5908, Page 511, as
affected by a revocation of said taking, dated January 13,
1950 duly recorded in Book 6577, Page 13 and an instrument abandoning a portion of said easement, dated November 14, 1951, duly recorded in Book 6740, Page 319.
The above described land is also subject to a taking by the
City of Boston for highway purposes in Ayles Road under
order dated July 21, 1955 filed and registered as Document
#218862.
For mortgagor’s title see deed registered at Suffolk
County Registry District of the Land Court as Document
Number 351477 and Noted on Certificate of Title Number
92988.
The premises will be sold subject to any and all unpaid taxes and other municipal assessments and liens, and
subject to prior liens or other enforceable encumbrances
of record entitled to precedence over this mortgage, and
subject to and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, reservations and conditions of record and subject to
all tenancies and/or rights of parties in possession.
Terms of the Sale: Cash, cashier’s or certified check
in the sum of $5,000.00 as a deposit must be shown at the
time and place of the sale in order to qualify as a bidder
(the mortgage holder and its designee(s) are exempt from
this requirement); high bidder to sign written Memorandum of Sale upon acceptance of bid; balance of purchase
price payable in cash or by certified check in thirty (30)
days from the date of the sale at the offices of mortgagee’s
attorney, Korde & Associates, P.C., 900 Chelmsford Street,
Suite 3102, Lowell, MA 01851 or such other time as may be
designated by mortgagee. The description for the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event
of a typographical error in this publication.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Federal National Mortgage Association
Korde & Associates, P.C.
900 Chelmsford Street
Suite 3102
Lowell, MA 01851
(978) 256-1500
Woods, Herbert F. and Gloria J., 13-011954
A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon, situated in that part of said Boston called Allston, comprising
all of lot 33 as shown on “Plan of Land in Allston, November
1889, E.S. Smilie, Surveyor” recorded with Suffolk Deeds,
Book 1915, Page 481. Said land being bounded and described as follows:
NORTHWESTERLY by Blain Street, sometimes called Blaine
Avenue, 75.56 feet;
NORTHEASTERLY by Lot 31 shown on said plan, 35.78 feet
more or less;
SOUTHEASTERLY by land of owners unknown 76.36 feet;
and
SOUTHWESTERLY by land now or formerly of Mary Whipple,
25.32 feet.
Containing according to said plan 2309 square feet.
For mortgagor’s title see deed recorded with the
Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 42056, Page 12.
See also deed recorded in said Registry of Deeds in Book
55546, Page 150.
The premises will be sold subject to any and all unpaid taxes and other municipal assessments and liens, and
subject to prior liens or other enforceable encumbrances
of record entitled to precedence over this mortgage, and
subject to and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, reservations and conditions of record and subject to
all tenancies and/or rights of parties in possession.
Terms of the Sale: Cash, cashier’s or certified check
in the sum of $5,000.00 as a deposit must be shown at the
time and place of the sale in order to qualify as a bidder
(the mortgage holder and its designee(s) are exempt from
this requirement); high bidder to sign written Memorandum of Sale upon acceptance of bid; balance of purchase
price payable in cash or by certified check in thirty (30)
days from the date of the sale at the offices of mortgagee’s
attorney, Korde & Associates, P.C., 900 Chelmsford Street,
Suite 3102, Lowell, MA 01851 or such other time as may be
designated by mortgagee. The description for the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event
of a typographical error in this publication.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, doing business as
Christiana Trust, not in its individual capacity, but solely as
trustee for BCAT 2015-14BTT
Korde & Associates, P.C.
900 Chelmsford Street
Suite 3102
Lowell, MA 01851
(978) 256-1500
Price, Alex, 16-026460
MASSACHUSETTS BAY
TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY
100 SUMMER ST., SUITE 1200
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02110
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Electronic proposals for the following project will be received
through the internet using Bid Express until the date and
time stated below, and will be posted on www.bidx.com
forthwith after the bid submission deadline. No paper copies
of bids will be accepted. Bidders must have a valid digital ID
issued by the Authority in order to bid on projects. Bidders
need to apply for a digital ID with Bid Express at least 14
days prior to a scheduled bid opening date.
Electronic bids for MBTA Contract No. R32CN04,
WELLINGTON YARD REBUILD – EARLY MATERIAL
PROCUREMENT – MEDFORD, MA, PROJECT VALUE $5,506,258.00, can be submitted at www.bidx.com until
two o’clock (2:00 p.m.) on November 30, 2017. Immediately
thereafter, in a designated room, the Bids will be opened and
read publicly.
MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE
By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained
in a certain Mortgage given by Miguel E. Montesino and
Michelle Montesino to Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans,
Inc., its successors and assigns, dated July 16, 2004 and
recorded with the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds at Book
35064, Page 48 subsequently assigned to Bank of America,
N.A. by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., acting solely as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc.
by assignment recorded in said Suffolk County Registry of
Deeds at Book 48996, Page 203, subsequently assigned to
Federal National Mortgage Association by Bank of America,
N.A. by assignment recorded in said Suffolk County Registry of Deeds at Book 50362, Page 249 and subsequently
assigned to Federal National Mortgage Association by
Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee
for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. by assignment recorded
in said Suffolk County Registry of Deeds at Book 52238,
Page 74; of which Mortgage the undersigned is the present
holder for breach of the conditions of said Mortgage and
for the purpose of foreclosing same will be sold at Public
Auction at 1:00 PM on November 16, 2017 at 8 Shetland
Street, Boston (Roxbury), MA, all and singular the premises
described in said Mortgage, to wit:
The land in that part of Boston formerly Roxbury, with
buildings thereon, bounded ad described as follows: Southeasterly by Shetland Street,. formerly Sherwood Street,
thirty (30) feet; Southwesterly by land now or late of J.P.
Fenno, sixty (60) feet; Northwesterly by land now or late of
Brennan, thirty (30) feet; and Northeasterly by a passageway fifteen feet wide now or formerly known as Sherwood
Court, shown on a plan by C.H.W. Wood, Surveyor, dated
Boston, April 13, 1896, recorded with Suffolk Deeds, Book
2352, page 554. Together with the right to use sad Shetland
Street, and said passageway fifteen feet wide, in common
with other leaning rights therein for all the purposes for
which streets or ways are now or may hereafter be commonly used in the City of Boston. For title see deed at book
22974, page 087.
The premises are to be sold subject to and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, building and zoning laws,
liens, attorney’s fees and costs pursuant to M.G.L.Ch.183A,
unpaid taxes, tax titles, water bills, municipal liens and assessments, rights of tenants and parties in possession.
TERMS OF SALE:
A deposit of FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS AND 00 CENTS
($5,000.00) in the form of a certified check, bank treasurer’s check or money order will be required to be delivered
at or before the time the bid is offered. The successful bidder will be required to execute a Foreclosure Sale Agreement immediately after the close of the bidding. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid within thirty (30)
days from the sale date in the form of a certified check,
bank treasurer’s check or other check satisfactory to Mortgagee’s attorney. The Mortgagee reserves the right to bid
at the sale, to reject any and all bids, to continue the sale
and to amend the terms of the sale by written or oral announcement made before or during the foreclosure sale. If
the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the
sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid.
The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the
Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
The description of the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of an error in this publication. TIME WILL BE OF THE ESSENCE.
Other terms if any, to be announced at the sale.
Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae)
Present Holder of said Mortgage,
By Its Attorneys,
ORLANS PC
PO Box 540540
Waltham, MA 02454
Phone: (781) 790-7800
16-014170
(Pub dates: 10/26, 11/2, 11/9/17)
Notification of
Trade Certification
The U.S. Department of Labor has determined that Thomson
Reuters, Technology Development and Quality Assurance
Groups including on site leased workers from Pontoon, in
Boston, MA has been adversely impacted by increased imports. The subject firm has been certified for (TAA) Trade
Adjustment Assistance benefits as of 10/17/2017.
As a result, affected workers totally or partially separated from employment on or after 09/18/2016 and before
10/17/2019 may be eligible to receive weekly cash benefits; financial assistance for remedial or vocational training programs; travel allowances to and from training; job
search expenses; relocation allowances; Reemployment
Trade Adjustment Assistance (RTAA), Health Coverage Tax
Credit (HCTC) and other reemployment services such as
resume preparation, employment counseling and job referrals.
The scope is material procurement for the Wellington Yard
Rebuild project. This includes furnishing, fabricating, and
delivering running rail, restraining rail, third rail, timber cross
ties, turnouts and other special trackwork as specified in the
contract specifications, complete with curved and straight
closure rails, frogs, plates, fasteners, switch components,
ties, cast chairs, cover guard, pre-curved running rail, precurved restraining rail, and all other material necessary for
installation of the special trackwork.
Bidders attention is directed to Appendix 1, Notice
of Requirement for Affirmative Action to Insure Equal
Employment Opportunity; and to Appendix 2, Supplemental
Equal Employment Opportunity, AntiDiscrimination, and
Affirmative Action Program in the specifications. While there
is no DBE goal associated with this contract, the Authority
strongly encourages the use of Minority, Women and
Disadvantaged Business Enterprises as prime contractors,
subcontractors and suppliers in all of its contracting
opportunities.
Bidders will affirmatively ensure that in regard to any
contract entered into pursuant to this solicitation, minority
and female construction contractors will be afforded full
opportunity to submit Bids and will not be discriminated
against on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, age, or
national origin in consideration for an award.
Additional information and instructions on how to submit
a bid are available at http://www.mbta.com/business_
center/bidding_solicitations/current_solicitations/
On behalf of the MBTA, thank you for your time and
interest in responding to this Notice to Bidders.
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
Luis Manuel Ramirez
General Manager of the MBTA
November 9, 2017
Buying
a car this
week?
Check out
new and used car
specials from over 100
local dealers.
Visit Boston.com/cars
powered by Cargurus.com
For information about these benefits, all workers should
inquire and apply at CareerSolution, 75 Federal Street,
Boston, MA 02114 or Boston Career Link, or their nearest One-Stop Career Center. Information about Career
Center services is available at http://www.mass.gov/lwd/
employment-services or by calling (617) 626-6007.
This notice is also available
http://masspublicnotices.org
(SEAL)
for
viewing
at
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
LAND COURT
DEPARTMENT OF THE TRIAL COURT
17 SM 006465
ORDER OF NOTICE
TO:
Judith James,
and to all persons entitled to the benefit of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, 50 U.S.C. App. § 3901 et seq.:
U.S. Bank Trust, N.A., as Trustee for LSF’9 Master Participation Trust claiming to have an interest in a mortgage covering real property in Boston, numbered 3 Morton Place,
given by: Judith James to Bank of America, N.A., dated May
16, 2012, and registered at Suffolk County Registry District
of the .Land Court as Document No. 803935, and noted on
Certificate of Title No. 119119, and now held by Plaintiff by
assignment, has/have filed with this court a complaint for
determination of Defendant’s/Defendants’ Servicemembers status. If you now are, or recently have been, in the
active military service of the United States of America, then
you may be entitled to the benefits of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. If you object to a foreclosure of the
above mentioned property on that basis, then you or your
attorney must file a written appearance and answer in this
court at Three Pemberton Square, Boston, MA 02108 on
or before DEC 04 2017 or you will be forever barred from
claiming that you are entitled to the benefits of said Act.
Witness, Judith C. Cutler, Chief Justice of said Court on
OCT 19 2017
Attest:
Deborah J. Patterson
Recorder
54107 (James) FEI # 1078.02476 11/09/2017,
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICE
MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
That certain parcel of land situated in that part of Boston
formerly Hyde Park in the County of Suffolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, bounded and described as follows:
B o s t o n
powered by
Visit
boston.com/
monster
today and
get help
from the
experts.
Advance your
Career.
Chat live with
career experts,
get advice on
your next career
move or learn
more about
continuing your
education.
•
Broadcast your
Resume.
Make your
resume available
to hundreds of
recruiters at once.
•
Check your
Salary.
Find out how
much you’re
worth—and how
to ask for more
•
Ace your
Interview.
Learn to master
the interview
process with
tips and advice
from specialists
and experts.
•
Recharge your
Resume.
Land your dream
job with advice
and practical tips
from industry
experts on how
to perfect your
resume and
cover letter.
Scoreboard
NFL
THU
11/9
AFC
East
W L
NEW ENGLAND ... 6 2
Buffalo.................. 5 3
Miami.................... 4 4
NY Jets ................. 4 5
North
Pittsburgh............ 6 2
Baltimore ............. 4 5
Cincinnati............. 3 5
Cleveland ............. 0 8
South
Tennessee............ 5 3
Jacksonville ......... 5 3
Houston................ 3 5
Indianapolis......... 3 6
West
Kansas City.......... 6 3
Oakland................ 4 5
LA Chargers......... 3 5
Denver .................. 3 5
NFC
East
Pct.
.750
.625
.500
.444
PF
PG
27.0
21.8
14.5
21.2
PA
PG
22.4
18.6
22.4
23.0
.750
.444
.375
.000
20.9
21.1
16.1
14.9
16.4
19.0
19.8
25.3
.625
.625
.375
.333
22.6
25.8
28.6
18.0
24.1
14.6
26.0
28.9
.667
.444
.375
.375
28.1
21.8
18.8
18.8
23.1
23.8
19.0
24.8
PF PA
W L Pct. PG PG
Philadelphia......... 8 1 .889 31.4 19.9
Dallas.................... 5 3 .625 28.3 22.3
Washington ......... 4 4 .500 22.1 24.3
NY Giants............. 1 7 .125 16.1 25.9
North
Minnesota............ 6 2 .750 22.4 16.9
Detroit .................. 4 4 .500 25.8 23.3
Green Bay ............ 4 4 .500 22.6 23.9
Chicago ................ 3 5 .375 16.8 21.4
South
New Orleans........ 6 2 .750 27.6 19.4
Carolina................ 6 3 .667 18.7 17.7
Atlanta.................. 4 4 .500 21.3 21.5
Tampa Bay .......... 2 6 .250 19.8 24.8
West
LA Rams............... 6 2 .750 32.9 19.4
Seattle .................. 5 3 .625 23.6 18.6
Arizona ................. 4 4 .500 17.4 25.1
San Francisco...... 0 9 .000 15.9 26.6
THURSDAY’S GAME
Seattle at Arizona..............................8:25
SUNDAY’S GAMES
NEW ENGLAND at Denver................8:30
Minnesota at Washington.....................1
Cincinnati at Tennessee........................1
NY Jets at Tampa Bay........................... 1
LA Chargers at Jacksonville.................1
Pittsburgh at Indianapolis.................... 1
Cleveland at Detroit...............................1
Green Bay at Chicago............................1
New Orleans at Buffalo.........................1
Houston at LA Rams.........................4:05
Dallas at Atlanta................................4:25
NY Giants at San Francisco.............4:25
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Miami at Carolina..............................8:30
MONDAY’S RESULT
Detroit 30.......................at Green Bay 17
11/10
SAT
11/11
SUN
MON
11/12
11/13
NBA
Thursday
Favorite...............Line ............Underdog
At Washington...10½ ............LA Lakers
At Toronto.............5 ......New Orleans
At Houston........... 5½ ............Cleveland
Phila.......................6½ .. At Sacramento
Oklahoma City..... 1 ........... At Denver
National Hockey League
Thursday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At Phila...........­115 Chicago..........+105
At New Jersey
Edmonton.......­125
+115
At Montreal.... OFF Minnesota.......OFF
At St. Louis.....­235 Arizona...........+215
At Calgary......­165 Detroit............+155
At Anaheim....­144 Vancouver.....+134
At Los Angeles
Tampa Bay......OFF
OFF
College Football
Thursday
Favorite................Pts. ............Underdog
At N Illinois.........32 .................Ball St.
At Applchn. St....17½ .........Georgia So.
At Pittsburgh........9 ......... N. Carolina
Friday
Temple.................. 2½ ......At Cincinnati
Washington..........5½ .........At Stanford
At UNLV.................4 ......................BYU
Saturday
Michigan..............17 .......At Maryland
At S. Carolina.......7 .................Florida
Va. Tech................ 3 ........ At Ga. Tech
Tulane....................5½ .....At E. Carolina
N.C. State..............3 ...................At BC
At UCF..................38 ..................UConn
At Syracuse.......... 1 .......Wake Forest
At Penn St...........31 ................Rutgers
Duke.......................3 .............. At Army
At Ohio St...........15½ .......Michigan St.
Indiana...................9 .............At Illinois
Troy......................17 .... At Coast. Car.
Middle Tenn.......12½ ....... At Charlotte
At Air Force...........3 ............Wyoming
At Nevada...........19 ........San Jose St.
Texas Tech...........7½ ..................Baylor
At Kansas St.........2½ ......... W. Virginia
At Oklahoma........6½ ......................TCU
Okla. St..................6½ ..........At Iowa St.
At Louisville........11½ ................Virginia
Notre Dame.......... 3 .............At Miami
At Navy..................4½ .....................SMU
Wash. St................1 ................At Utah
At N’western.........4 .................Purdue
At Mississippi.....20½ .............La.­Lafyt.
At Minnesota........2½ ............ Nebraska
Alabama..............13½ .........At Miss. St.
FAU.........................5½ .........At La. Tech
So. Miss...............10 .................At Rice
USC...................... 13½ ........At Colorado
At Wisconsin......11½ .....................Iowa
Georgia..................2½ ...........At Auburn
At Missouri......... 11 ..........Tennessee
At Texas A&M....19 ........... New Mex.
At UCLA.................2½ ..........Arizona St.
At Vanderbilt........2½ .............Kentucky
Arkansas St........11½ ....At S. Alabama
Georgia St.............6 ........At Texas St.
At N. Texas.........22½ ....................UTEP
At Texas..............34 .................Kansas
At Marshall.........13 .......W. Kentucky
At FIU.....................9½ .....Old Dominion
At UTSA.................7½ ......................UAB
At Clemson.........16 ............Florida St
At LSU..................16½ .............Arkansas
At Arizona...........22 ..........Oregon St.
Boise St.................5½ .........At Colo. St.
Fresno St.............10 ............At Hawaii
NFL
Thursday
Favorite................Pts. ............Underdog
Seattle....................6 .......... At Arizona
Sunday
Minnesota.............1 ...At Washington
At Chicago............6 ...........Green Bay
Pittsburgh...........10 ..At Indianapolis
At Jacksonville.....3½ ........La Chargers
NY Jets.................. 2½ ....At Tampa Bay
At Tennessee........4 ........... Cincinnati
New Orleans.........3 ...........At Buffalo
At Detroit............ 12 ............Cleveland
At LA Rams.........11 .............. Houston
At Atlanta..............3 ...................Dallas
At San Francis­
NY Giants..............2½
co
NEW ENGLAND.... 7½ ........... At Denver
Monday
At Carolina............9 ..................Miami
AHL
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L OL SL Pts.
WB/Scran­
... 8 2 0 1 17
ton.................
Charlotte......... 9 3 0 0 18
Lehigh Val. ..... 9 3 0 2 20
Providence ..... 7 4 0 0 14
Bridgeport ...... 6 6 0 0 12
Hershey........... 5 6 0 2 12
Hartford .......... 5 7 0 1 11
Springfield...... 2 11 1 0 5
GF GA
44 30
48
52
33
38
34
37
33
34
46
23
34
49
50
50
18
16
13
11
13
11
9
42
49
33
33
37
30
31
29
48
35
32
45
31
42
Western Conference
Central Division
Milwaukee...... 7 4 0 0 14
Rockford ......... 7 4 0 0 14
Cleveland........ 5 3 2 0 12
Manitoba ........ 6 4 1 1 14
Gr. Rapids....... 6 6 0 1 13
Chicago........... 4 5 1 0 9
Iowa................. 3 6 2 0 8
37
39
24
38
42
28
29
29
28
25
32
43
31
40
Pacific Division
Tucson............. 6 1 2 0
Stockton.......... 7 3 0 1
San Antonio.... 7 3 1 0
Bakersfield ..... 5 4 1 0
San Diego ....... 5 4 1 0
Texas............... 5 6 0 1
San Jose.......... 4 5 0 1
Ontario ............ 3 6 0 1
31
37
37
25
35
32
29
18
22
28
31
27
35
46
31
29
14
15
15
11
11
11
9
7
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a
win, one point for an overtime or shoo­
tout loss.
TUESDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Lehigh Valley 4...................Bridgeport 2
Grand Rapids 7................San Antonio 4
Milwaukee 3.............................Chicago 0
Charlotte 5.....................................Utica 2
Belleville 4.........................Binghamton 3
Hershey 3............................Springfield 1
WB/Scranton 4........................Toronto 2
Manitoba at Stockton..........................10
Texas at San Diego..............................10
TUE
11/14
Y
Y
WED
11/15
DEN
8:30
NBC
TOR
7:00
NESN
TOR
7:00
NESN
CHA
7:30
NBCSB*
ANA
10:00
NESN
TOR
3:30
NBCSB
Home games shaded
BRO
7:30
NBCSB
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Patriots, Bruins, and Celtics, WBZ­FM 98.5
*WZLX­FM radio 100.7
ON THE AIR
PRO BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
Cleveland at Houston
10:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Denver
TNT
TNT
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
Ball State at Northern Illinois
7:30 p.m. Ga. Southern at Appalachian State
7:30 p.m. North Carolina at Pittsburgh
CBSSN
ESPNU
ESPN
PRO FOOTBALL
NBC,
NFL
8:25 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona
GOLF
1 p.m.
11 p.m.
PGA: OHL Classic
LPGA: Blue Bay LPGA
Golf
Golf
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
10 p.m.
N. Ireland vs. Switzerland
Women’s friendly: Canada vs. US
ESPN2
ESPN2
WINTER SPORTS
4 p.m.
World Cup women’s bobsled
NBCSN
Schools
Latest line
North Division
Toronto ........... 9 4 0 0
Laval ................ 7 4 2 0
Rochester ....... 6 4 0 1
Binghamton.... 5 4 1 0
Belleville ......... 6 6 0 1
Utica ................ 5 5 0 1
Syracuse ......... 3 6 1 2
FRI
Y
FIELD HOCKEY
EIL
Dana Hall 1..............................Bancroft 0
PREP­PRIVATE
Dexter Southfield 6............Beaver CD 0
Wrcstr Acad. 3.....Portsmouth Abbey 0
MIAA tourney
DIVISION 1 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Andover 3........................Central Cath. 2
Winchester 3...............Acton­Boxboro 0
DIVISION 1 SOUTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
King Philip 2............................Duxbury 1
Somerset Berkley 3........ Canton 2 (OT)
DIVISION 1 CENTRAL
Thu., Nov. 9 — Final
Algonquin vs. Nashoba at Grafton
High, 5:15.
DIVISION 2 CENTRAL
Thu., Nov. 9 — Final
Quaboag vs. Oakmont at Lunenburg
High, 5:15.
FOOTBALL
MIAA tourney
DIVISION 1 NORTH
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Everett vs. Central Catholic at Law­
rence High School, Lawrence, 5.
DIVISION 2 NORTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
North Andover at Lincoln­Sudbury, 7.
DIVISION 3 NORTH
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Tewksbury vs. Lynn English at Man­
ning Field, Lynn, 2.
DIVISION 4 NORTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Marblehead at Melrose, 7.
DIVISION 5 NORTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Watertown at Lynnfield, 7.
DIVISION 6 NORTH
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Stoneham at Hamilton­Wenham, 1.
MIAA NORTH DIVISION 7
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Brighton vs. St. Mary’s at Manning
Field, Lynn, 7.
MIAA NORTH DIVISION 8
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Cathedral vs. Lynn Tech at Manning
Field, Lynn, 7.
DIVISION 1 SOUTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Catholic Memorial at Xaverian, 6.
DIVISION 2 SOUTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Bridgewater­Raynham at King Philip,
7.
DIVISION 3 SOUTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Duxbury at North Attleborough, 7.
DIVISION 4 SOUTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Milton at Hopkinton, 7.
DIVISION 5 SOUTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Scituate at Dennis­Yarmouth, 6.
DIVISION 6 SOUTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Middleborough at Old Rochester, 7.
MIAA SOUTH DIVISION 7
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Abington at Mashpee, 7.
MIAA SOUTH DIVISION 8
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
Millis at Wareham, 7.
DIVISION 3 CENTRAL
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Shrewsbury vs. St. John’s (Shrews­
bury) at Doyle Field, Leominster, 5.
DIVISION 4 CENTRAL
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Marlborough vs. Nashoba at Doyle
Field, Leominster, 11a.
DIVISION 5 CENTRAL
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Auburn vs. Nipmuc at Commerce Bank
Field, Worcester, 5.
DIVISION 6 CENTRAL
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
St. Peter­Marian vs. Littleton at Doyle
Field, Leominster, 2.
MIAA CENTRAL DIVISION 7
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Leicester vs. Blackstone Valley at
Commerce Bank Field, Worcester, 2.
MIAA CENTRAL DIVISION 8
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Bartlett vs. Nashoba Valley Tech at
Commerce Bank Field at Foley Stadi­
um, Worcester, 11a.
DIVISION 3 WEST
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Central (R.I.) at Minnechaug, 10a.
DIVISION 5 WEST
Fri., Nov. 10 — Final
West Springfield at Longmeadow, 7.
MIAA WEST DIVISION 7
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Wahconah at Frontier, 3.
MIAA WEST DIVISION 8
Sat., Nov. 11 — Final
Hoosac Valley at Ware, 12:30.
SOCCER
BOYS
EIL
Bancroft 2.............................Landmark 1
ISL
Belmont Hill 1.......................St. Mark’s 1
BB&N 2..................................Middlesex 2
St. Sebastian’s 1...........Roxbury Latin 0
PREP­PRIVATE
Pingree 4................. Dexter Southfield 1
Pomfret 2..................................Cushing 1
Worcester Acad. 4.Salisbury (Conn.) 0
NONLEAGUE
Beaver CD 1...............................Conard 1
GIRLS
EIL
Dana Hall 7..............................Bancroft 2
Newton CD 2..............................Winsor 1
PREP­PRIVATE
Brewster 2................................Berwick 1
Worcester Acad. 2...Phillips Andover 0
MIAA tourney
BOYS
DIVISION 1 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Brookline 3...........................Somerville 0
DIVISION 2 NORTH
Fri., Nov. 10 — Semifinals
Masconomet vs. Arlington at Manning
Field, Lynn, 12:30; Concord­Carlisle vs.
Belmont at Woburn High, 4.
DIVISION 3 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Melrose 3....................................Dracut 0
Watertown 1.................Wayland 0 (SO)
DIVISION 4 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Boston Int’l. 1....................Austin Prep 0
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Burke vs. Manchester Essex at St.
John’s Prep, Danvers, 7.
DIVISION 1 SOUTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Brockton 4...........................Silver Lake 1
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Weymouth vs. Needham at Braintree
High, Braintree, 6.
DIVISION 2 SOUTH
Thu., Nov. 9 — Quarterfinals
Medfield at Pembroke, 4; Walpole at
Oliver Ames, 5:30; Foxborough at Nau­
set, 6; Dartmouth at Duxbury, 6:30.
DIVISION 3 SOUTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Dover­Sherborn 1...................Seekonk 0
Norwell 3.......................Old Rochester 1
DIVISION 4 SOUTH
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Nantucket vs. Cohasset at Scituate
High, 3:15; West Bridgewater vs. Bish­
op Connolly at Milford High, 5:15.
DIVISION 1 CENTRAL
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Algonquin 1.....................St. John’s (S) 0
Marlborough 1.......... Westboro 0 (2OT)
DIVISION 3 CENTRAL
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Holy Name 3.............................Bartlett 1
Nipmuc 5...................Adv. Math & Sci. 1
DIVISION 4 CENTRAL
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Bromfield 9................................ Clinton 0
Hopedale 3..........................Lunenburg 0
GIRLS
DIVISION 1 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Central Cath. 5............Acton­Boxboro 1
DIVISION 2 NORTH
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Woburn vs. Winchester at Manning
Field, Lynn, 5:15; Arlington vs. Danvers
at Manning Field, Lynn, 7.
DIVISION 3 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Swampscott 3...................Austin Prep 0
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Wayland vs. Newburyport at Manning
Field, Lynn, 3:30.
DIVISION 4 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Amesbury 3........................Essex Tech 0
Saint Joseph Prep 1............. Winthrop 0
DIVISION 1 SOUTH
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
King Philip vs. Natick at Natick, Natick,
5:15; Newton South vs. Whitman­Han­
son at Natick, Natick, 7:15.
DIVISION 2 SOUTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Quarterfinals
Medway 2............................... Holliston 1
Thu., Nov. 9 — Quarterfinals
Notre Dame (Hingham) at Silver Lake,
5; Apponequet at Somerset Berkley, 6;
Scituate at Medfield, 6.
DIVISION 3 SOUTH
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Rockland vs. Dover­Sherborn at Scitu­
ate High, 6; East Bridgewater vs. Arch­
bishop Williams at Milford High, 7:15.
DIVISION 4 SOUTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Coyle & Cassidy 2.................Hull 1 (OT)
Millis 3.....................................Cohasset 1
DIVISION 1 CENTRAL
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Nashoba vs. Algonquin at Grafton
High, Grafton, 7; Marlborough vs. Wa­
chusett at Doyle Field, Leominster, 7.
DIVISION 3 CENTRAL
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Bromfield vs. Sutton at Commerce
Bank Field, Worcester, 5; Nipmuc vs.
Oakmont at Commerce Bank Field, 7.
DIVISION 4 CENTRAL
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Tahanto vs. Millbury at Doyle Field,
Leominster, 5; Quaboag vs. Parker
Charter at Lunenburg High, 7.
Transactions
BASEBALL
Boston (AL): Named Dana LeVangie
pitching coach, Ramon Vazquez major
league coach and Steve Langone man­
ager, advance scouting.
Cleveland (AL): Named Victor Rodri­
guez assistant hitting coach.
BASKETBALL
NBA : Fined Oklahoma City Thunder
F Paul George, G Russell Westbrook
and coach Billy Donovan $15,000 for
public criticism of the officiating.
FOOTBALL
Cincinnati (AFC): Placed OT Jake
Fisher on the Reserve­NFI list. Signed
OT Eric Winston.
Cleveland (AFC): Signed DB Darrius
Hillary from practice squad. Placed DB
Reggie Porter on injured reserve.
Signed OL Korren Kirven to practice
squad. Claimed LB Josh Keyes. Waived
LB Deon King.
Denver (AFC): Placed OT Menelik
Watson on injured reserve. Signed OT
Cyrus Kouandjio.
Green Bay (NFC): Waived TE Martel­
lus Bennett.
Minnesota (NFC): Activated QB Ted­
dy Bridgewater from the PUP list.
Placed QB Sam Bradford on injured re­
serve.
Washington (NFC): Signed DL Tava­
ris Barnes and WR Keenan Reynolds to
practice squad. Released OL Givens
Price and WR Shakeir Ryan from prac­
tice squad.
HOCKEY
NY Islanders (NHL): Recalled F Alan
Quine from Bridgeport (AHL).
SOCCER
LA Galaxy : Named Oka Nikolov
goalkeeper coach and Junior Gonzalez
assistant coach on the club’s technical
staff.
Montreal Impact : Named Remi
Garde coach and director of player
personnel.
COLLEGE
Auburn : Fired men’s associate head
basketball coach Chuck Person.
Golf
BLUE BAY LPGA
At Hainan Island, China
Purse: $2.1 million
First Round
Sun Young Yoo...........32­33—65
Xiang Sui.....................32­34—66
Lizette Salas...............32­35—67
Lee­Anne Pace...........34­33—67
Na Yeon Choi..............32­35—67
Pernilla Lindberg....... 35­32—67
Jeong Eun Lee............34­33—67
Ashleigh Buhai...........32­35—67
Sung Hyun Park.........34­34—68
Austin Ernst................34­34—68
Azahara Munoz..........34­34—68
Peiyun Chien...............34­34—68
Shanshan Feng...........34­35—69
Ariya Jutanugarn.......32­37—69
Moriya Jutanugarn....34­35—69
Alison Lee....................33­36—69
Mi Jung Hur................ 35­34—69
Alena Sharp................34­35—69
Caroline Masson........37­33—70
a­Lei Ye........................34­36—70
Yanhong Pan..............37­33—70
Yunjie Zhang...............33­37—70
Minjee Lee...................36­35—71
Sandra Gal.................. 35­36—71
Jessica Korda..............37­34—71
Nelly Korda.................36­35—71
Haru Nomura..............35­36—71
Emily K. Pedersen......36­35—71
Candie Kung...............37­34—71
Hyo Joo Kim................35­36—71
Karine Icher................35­36—71
Lindy Duncan..............36­35—71
Jenny Shin...................37­34—71
Pornanong Phatlum..36­35—71
Ayako Uehara.............34­37—71
Nicole Broch Larsen..38­33—71
Megan Khang.............35­36—71
­7
­6
­5
­5
­5
­5
­5
­5
­4
­4
­4
­4
­3
­3
­3
­3
­3
­3
­2
­2
­2
­2
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
­1
New England player
71 (­1) — Megan Khang, Rockland,
35­36
Tennis
NEXTGEN ATP RESULTS
Round Robin
Chung Hyeon (6) def. Andrey Rublev
(1), 4­0, 4­1, 4­3 (1).; Denis Shapovalov
(2) def. Gianluigi Quinzi (8), 4­1, 4­1, 3­4
(5), 4­3 (5).; Standings: Chung 2­0 (sets
6­1, games 25­15), Shapovalov 1­1 (4­4,
26­22), Rublev 1­1 (3­5, 17­26), Quinzi
0­2 (3­6, 23­28).
Karen Khachanov (3) def. Jared Don­
aldson (5), 4­1, 4­3 (3), 4­2.; Borna Coric
(4) def. Daniil Medvedev (7), 4­3 (5),
2­4, 4­1, 4­2.; Standings: Coric 2­0 (6­1,
26­17), Khachanov 1­1 (4­3, 24­20),
Medvedev 1­1 (4­4, 24­26), Donaldson
0­2 (0­6, 13­24).
VOLLEYBALL
MIAA tourney
GIRLS
DIVISION 1 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Methuen 3.......................Central Cath. 1
DIVISION 2 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Melrose 3.....................Arlington Cath. 1
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Burlington at Danvers, 4.
DIVISION 3 NORTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Notre Dame (T) 3............Lowell Cath. 0
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Austin Prep at Ipswich, 5:30.
DIVISION 1 SOUTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Barnstable 3...............North Attleboro 0
New Bedford 3....................Dartmouth 1
DIVISION 2 SOUTH
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Duxbury 3...................Notre Dame (H) 0
Milton 3...................................Norwood 0
DIVISION 3 SOUTH
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Sacred Heart at Bourne, 7; Case at Ur­
suline, 7.
DIVISION 1 CENTRAL/EAST
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
King Philip at North Quincy, 6; Cam­
bridge at Newton North, 6:30.
DIVISION 1 CENTRAL/WEST
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Westford at Groton­Dunstable, 6; Hop­
kinton at Concord­Carlisle, 7.
DIVISION 2 CENTRAL
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Medfield 3............................Westwood 0
Westboro 3..............................Medway 1
DIVISION 3 CENTRAL
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Hopedale 3............... Adv. Math & Sci. 0
Whit. Christian 3......................Nipmuc 1
DIVISION 2 WEST
Thu., Nov. 9 — Semifinals
Agawam at Longmeadow, 6; Min­
nechaug at Amherst­Pelham, 6:30.
DIVISION 3 WEST
Wed., Nov. 8 — Semifinals
Frontier 3.........................Turners Falls 0
Lee 3..............................................Lenox 1
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
Colleges
HOCKEY
Hockey East standings
.....Conf. .....
Pts. W­L­T
Boston College ....... 8
4­1­0
New Hampshire...... 7
3­0­1
Northeastern........... 6
3­0­0
Boston Universi­
..... 5
2­2­1
ty ..........................
Connecticut............. 5
2­4­1
Maine ....................... 4
2­2­0
Providence .............. 4
2­2­0
Vermont................... 3
1­1­1
Massachusetts ....... 2
1­2­0
Merrimack............... 2
1­3­0
UMass­Lowell ......... 2
1­5­0
All
W­L­T
4­5­1
6­1­1
5­2­1
4­5­1
3­7­1
3­5­0
5­3­0
3­5­1
4­5­0
1­6­2
4­6­0
FOOTBALL
AP TOP 25 SCHEDULE
No. 9 Washington at Stanford, 10:30
p.m.
No. 1 Alabama at No. 18 Mississippi
State, 7 p.m.
No. 2 Georgia at No. 10 Auburn, 3:30
p.m.
No. 3 Notre Dame at No. 7 Miami, 8
p.m.
No. 4 Clemson vs. Florida State, 3:30
p.m.
No. 5 Oklahoma vs. No. 8 TCU, 8 p.m.
No. 6 Wisconsin vs. No. 25 Iowa, 3:30
p.m.
No. 11 Ohio State vs. No. 13 Michigan
State, Noon
No. 12 Oklahoma State at No. 24 Iowa
State, Noon
No. 14 UCF vs. UConn, Noon
No. 15 Southern Cal at Colorado, 4
p.m.
No. 16 Penn State vs. Rutgers, Noon
No. 17 Virginia Tech at Georgia Tech,
12:20 p.m.
No. 19 Washington State at Utah, 5:30
p.m.
No. 21 Michigan at Maryland, 3:30
p.m.
No. 23 West Virginia at Kansas State,
3:30 p.m.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C7
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Chrysler*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Honda Westboro*
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Honda Village*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Audi Cape Cod – A Premier Company
25 Falmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5600
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
Audi Shrewsbury
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016 herbchamberslincoln.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Mirak Hyundai*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
BMW Cape Cod – A Premier Company
500 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5500
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Kelly Infiniti*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Kelly Ford*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, R I
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Best Chevrolet
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
978-263-7300
actonchrysler.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Kelly Jeep*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
Mirak Chevrolet*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Route 110, Westford
978-589-4200
BochHondaWest.com
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-364-2550
BochHonda.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
Acton Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram*
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
196 Great Rd, Rte 2A, Acton
888-871-3051
actonchrysler.com
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
smart center Lynnfield*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Boch Toyota*
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-321-6631 BochToyota.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota/Scion of Watertown*
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
Herb Chambers Nissan of Westboro*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
340 Mystic Ave, Medford, MA
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd,
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
VillageSubaru.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington *
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
Land Rover Sudbury*
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
420 Cabot St, Route 1A, Beverly
978-922-1405
nissanofbeverly.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Kelly Nissan of Beverly*
Boch Honda*
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-996-7751
BochNissan.com
Boch Honda West*
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
Cityside*
Boch Nissan
Boch Chevrolet
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
844-464-3560
BochChevrolet.com
141 Stevens St, Hyannis
508-815-5900
drivepremier.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
Herb Chambers Genesis*
Premier Mazda Cape Cod
Herb Chambers Infiniti Westboro*
Framingham Ford*
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Premier Cape Cod
Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram
smart center Boston*
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Kelly Maserati*
Ferrari Of New England*
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
Boch Maserati*
Boch Hyundai
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-975-6891
BochHyundai.com
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000 drivepremier.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
460 Yarmouth Rd, Hyannis
508-815-5000
drivepremier.com
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
107 Andover St., Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
Kelly Honda*
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902 volvoofnorwood.com
Volvo Cars Cape Cod – A Premier
Company
270 North St, Hyannis
508-815-5400 drivepremier.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
2017 Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz of Boston
C 300
259 McGrath Highway, Somerville, MA 02143
(877) 205-7770
Mercedes-Benz of Natick
4MATIC
®
(855) 879-1262
339
$
Lease
For
253 North Main Street, Route 27, Natick, MA 01760
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield
385 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield, MA 01940
*Per
Mo.
36
Mos.
• Stock #17309232
• MSRP: $43,725
• $3,149 Cap Cost Reduction
• 30,000 Allowed Miles
2017 C 300 4MATIC available only to qualified customers at participating authorized Mercedes-Benz dealers through Mercedes- Benz Financial Services (where
applicable to advertised lease). Advertised lease rate based on a gross capitalized cost of $43,725. Excludes title, taxes, registration, license fees, insurance, and additional options. 30,000 allowed miles. Total monthly payments equal $12,204. Cash due at signing includes $3,149 capitalized cost reduction, $795 acquisition fee,
and first month’s lease payment of $339. Total payments equal $16,148. Subject to credit approval. No security deposit required. Offer valid through 11/30/2017.
(866) 614-4201
The Herb Chambers Companies
Open 24/7 @ HerbChambersMercedesBenz.com
SALES:
Monday-Thursday 8:30am-9:00pm, Friday 8:30am-6:00pm
Saturday 8:30am-5:00pm, Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
SERVICE: Monday-Friday 7:00am-7:00pm, Saturday 8:00am-5:00pm
T h e
C8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
SATURDAY
6 A.M.
Sunshine mixing with
some clouds. The
afternoon will be milder.
Mostly cloudy at night as
a strong cold front approaches.
A shower late.
HIGH
49-54
LOW
37-42
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Quickly turning sunny,
but quite windy and
cold. Temperatures will
be highest in the morning, then falling during the afternoon. Very cold at night.
NOON
6 P.M.
Cold with plenty of
sunshine. Winds will be
gusty, but not nearly as
strong as Friday. The air
will not be as cold.
HIGH
37-42
LOW
20-25
HIGH
36-41
LOW
27-32
1
MONDAY
SUNDAY
6 A.M.
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
6
2
9
6 P.M.
Cloudy with rain possible. It may be just cold
enough across locations
well inland for some
snow to mix in, but accumulation not likely.
Warmer with times of
clouds and sunshine.
Turning cloudy at night.
There can be some
rain. Some wet snow is possible
across the interior.
HIGH
48-53
LOW
40-45
HIGH
43-48
LOW
37-42
10
3
2017 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
FRIDAY
TODAY
9
4
13
11
2
4
1
20
18
8
Difficulty Level
11/09
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Tides
TODAY: Increasingly cloudy and breezy across the area as
a cold front nears from the west. There will be a couple of
showers around at night.
TOMORROW: An arctic chill will grip the region.
It will be the coldest air mass of the season by far.
PRESQUE ISLE
There will be snow showers in the north.
43/29
EXTENDED: Saturday will start with
record-low temperatures in some cases. The
MILLINOCKET
afternoon will not be as brutally cold. It
44/28
will be milder on Sunday.
NEWPORT
46/18
BURLINGTON
49/24
BERLIN
45/26
MONTPELIER
44/22
RUTLAND
49/23
New England marine forecast
Wind
Seas
Temp
1 ft.
51/39
 East Cape
A.M. P.M.
2:47
10.2
8:48
0.1
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
3:02
11.1
9:28
-0.8
2:36 2:50
2:50 3:04
2:59 3:18
2:35 2:49
Yesterday
High/low
45/37
Mean
41
Departure from normal -6
Departure for month +29
Departure for year +523
5 p.m. rel. humidity 57%
BAR HARBOR
47/36
PORTLAND 47/34
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
Seas
Temp
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Vineyard
SE 6-12 kts.
1-2 ft.
53/39
2-4 ft.
53/38
Nantucket
E 7-14 kts.
1-2 ft.
53/43
Buzzards Bay
SE 6-12 kts.
1-2 ft.
53/38
Provincetown
SE 6-12 kts.
2-4 ft.
53/35
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Clear
Visibility
100 miles
Wind
west-northwest at 16 m.p.h.
High/low temperature
23/15
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
0.0”
Normal Temperatures
Nov. readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
58.8
45.1
55.6
Record Temperatures
Record
high
60
Normal
high
40
Normal
low
74
54
40
Record
low
20
25
1921
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
October
November
1.5"
1.29
1.2"
1 0.94
0.9"
FIRST
Nov. 26
FULL
Dec. 3
Spot the Andromeda Galaxy – A. MacRobert
The Andromeda Galaxy is visible in binoculars.
At 9:10 p.m., lie on the ground and look exactly
straight up for a small, dim glow, like a bit of gray
cotton among the stars.
0.07
0.01
someone else. As a result, you
seem more energized. A power
play at work or with an associate
could be difficult to manage. Try
not to become involved. Tonight:
Paint the town red.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Your efforts count, though you
might not appreciate how critical
a family member seems to be.
You would be well-advised to
gain a broader perspective. You
will want to listen carefully during a discussion, as you don't
want to miss what is shared. Tonight: Head home early.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Make calls and return emails,
and you will be able to tightly organize your plans. You will want
to make the most of every moment today. Goodwill surrounds
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
58. Rapper Pepa is 48. Blues
singer Susan Tedeschi is 47.
Singer Nick Lachey of 98 Degrees is 44.
ºIn 1620, the passengers and
crew of the Mayflower sighted
Cape Cod.
ºIn 1872, fire destroyed nearly
800 buildings in Boston.
ºIn 1938, Nazis looted and
burned synagogues as well as
October
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
0.16”
Precip days in November 5
0.13
T 0.08
0.16 0.3"
0.0"
November
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
0.25”
Norm. month to date 1.02”
Year to date
39.41”
Norm. year to date 37.02”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2017
you wherever you go. Extremes
seem to be the natural outcome
of what goes on. Tonight: At a favorite spot.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Your moods might go up and
down until you get into the swing
of the day. You likely will have to
deal with a tantrum or two from
a difficult associate. You'll enjoy
shopping for a special item you
have been craving. Spoil yourself
every once in a while. Tonight:
Your treat.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You seem more energized than
you have been in a while. You
have some ideas that you might
want to execute at this time. You
seem more in touch with your
feelings right now. Others respond with ease to your charm
and wit. Tonight: It seems as
though you can do no wrong!
Jewish-owned stores and houses in Germany and Austria in a
pogrom known as ‘‘Kristallnacht.’’
ºIn 1965, the great Northeast
blackout began as a series of
power failures lasting up to 13
1/2 hours left 30 million people in seven states and part of
Canada without electricity.
ºIn 1976, the UN General Assembly approved resolutions
condemning apartheid in
South Africa, including one
East
♠ J85
♥76543
♦ 63
♣QJ7
South
♠ 7
♥KQJ82
♦ J92
♣AK96
East
Pass
Pass
Pass
All Pass
South
1♥
4♥
5♥
West
1♠
Pass
Pass
North
2♠
4♠
6♥
Opening lead — ♦ K
Today’s deal wins the prize for the costliest error at the
Summer NABC.
Both North-Souths reached six hearts. In the auction,
North’s four spades was a conventional ace-ask, not a cue
bid. West led the king of diamonds; dummy’s ace won.
South, a top professional, took the ace of clubs, ruffed a
club and led dummy’s 10 of trumps to his king. He must
have been stunned when West discarded — so much that
he led a diamond next. West won and gave East a diamond
ruff.
South had a blackout. After he took the king of trumps,
he could cash the king of clubs, finesse with the queen of
spades, pitch a diamond on the ace, ruff a spade, ruff his
last club and score three more high trumps. In the replay,
South made the slam to gain 17 IMPs, and his team won
the match — by two.
Clients who pay pros hefty annual retainers to play aren’t
accustomed to seeing them boot cold slams. North’s reaction, if any, is unknown.
0.6"
0.35
0.1
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
NEW
Nov. 18
Norm.
55.0
41.0
53.7
1938
0
West
♠ K 10 6 4 2
♥ None
♦KQ8
♣ 10 8 5 3 2
4:03 4:12
3:18 3:44
11:52 --11:45 ---
80
0.01 T
LAST
Nov. 10
4:04
3:52
3:16
3:11
Yesterday’s high 45°
100
0.27
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
Today is Thursday, Nov. 9, the
313th day of 2017. There are
52 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Baseball Hall of
Famer Whitey Herzog is 86.
Baseball Hall of Famer Bob
Gibson is 82. Director Bille August is 69. Actor Lou Ferrigno
is 66. Senator Sherrod Brown,
Democrat of Ohio, is 65. Gospel singer Donnie McClurkin is
3:56
3:42
3:01
2:54
Moon phases
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017:
This year you open up to many
new possibilities surrounding
your work and community involvements. You make a stunning
impression on others, and they
remember you. If you are single,
you attract many admirers. You
could enjoy the process of picking
from your selection of potential
sweeties. If you are attached, you
will feel as if your significant other really understands and cares
about you. As a couple, you
evolve to a much deeper level.
LEO often disagrees with you,
but only because he or she can!
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You feel energized and nearly unstoppable. Caring and understanding grow between you and
A.M. P.M.
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Heat Cool
24
0
103
0
136
0
297 881
573 741
486 1035
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
6:27 a.m.
4:28 p.m.
10:00
10:04 p.m.
1:36 1:56
2:31 2:46
High tides
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
Yesterday’s low 37°
SE 6-12 kts.
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
3:02
3:02
2:59
3:03
3:11
2:36 2:54
Martha’s
Cod Canal
Almanac
2:47
2:47
2:45
2:45
2:52
Boston’s recent climate
AUGUSTA
46/31
MT. WASHINGTON
24/1
LEBANON
48/27
SE 3-6 kts.
High tides
Old Orchard ME
Hampton
Beach NH
Plum Island
Ipswich
BANGOR
47/32
LACONIA
47/29
MANCHESTER
PORTSMOUTH 48/35
BRATTLEBORO
49/34
49/26
NASHUA 49/32
PITTSFIELD
47/25
BOSTON 50/38
WORCESTER
PROVINCETOWN
SPRINGFIELD
NEW
47/29
50/32 PROVIDENCE
52/36
BEDFORD
53/37
53/38
HYANNIS 52/39
HARTFORD
51/32
NEWPORT
53/38
BRIDGEPORT
OAK BLUFFS NANTUCKET 52/43
54/40
52/36
Boston Harbor
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
East dealer — N-S vulnerable
North
♠ AQ93
♥ A 10 9
♦ A 10 7 5 4
♣4
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ A Q 9 3 ♥ A 10 9 ♦ A 10 7 5 4
♣ 4. Your partner opens one heart, you bid two diamonds
and he rebids two hearts. What do you say?
ANSWER: Partner’s two hearts shows minimum values, but
you may have a slam if he has the right minimum — with
honors such as the ace of clubs (not the K-Q) and king of
diamonds. Bid two spades. If he next bids 2NT, jump to
four hearts to show slam interest with club shortness.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Keep reaching out to a friend you
have not heard from. You will
find that your intuition soars as
you pick up various messages
from different people. You might
not want to follow through on everything that you feel. Use your
power of observation. Tonight:
Get some sleep.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Surround yourself with friends
and associates. You tend to create
a convivial atmosphere where
others can open up. Maintain
your sense of humor and you will
enjoy yourself, even if you're in a
meeting. Your perspective enlightens others. Tonight: Where
your friends are.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Your sensuality translates to a
highly tuned-in sensitivity. You
pick up on a lot, and you seem to
be able to home in on a problematic situation. You have the ability
to clear up a problem with a parent, supervisor or older person
with ease. Tonight: Out till the
wee hours.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
You seem ready to grasp the details of a convoluted plan or a difficult issue. You are ready to handle a personal matter in a positive
way. You have the capacity to see
the big picture and act on it. Use
this gift to facilitate what is happening. Tonight: Read between
the lines, if you can.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Relate to a close friend or loved
one directly. With this person,
you find that you can discuss situations that you often hide or refuse to air out. Understand what
is happening between you and
this person, and then you can go
about resolving the issue. Tonight: Be a duo.
characterizing the white-ruled
government as ‘‘illegitimate.’’
ºIn 1989, communist East
Germany threw open its borders, allowing citizens to travel
freely to the West; joyous Germans danced atop the Berlin
Wall.
ºIn 2007, six US troops died in
an insurgent ambush in the
high mountains of eastern Afghanistan, making 2007 the
deadliest year for American
forces in Afghanistan since
2001.
ºIn 2012, retired four-star Army General David Petraeus
abruptly resigned as CIA director after an affair with his biographer, Paula Broadwell, was
revealed by an FBI investigation. Thousands of union bakers went on strike against
Hostess Brands Inc., to protest
cuts to wages and benefits under a new contract offer. (Hostess responded by shutting
down its operations and selling
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Defer to others and listen to what
they think. You are more in touch
with your feelings; realize that
you might want to act on them.
Make sure the negatives don't
outweigh the positives. Work toward greater understanding with
a key person. Tonight: Say "yes"
to an offer.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
You see a personal matter as your
problem. A friend senses that
something is off, and he or she
tries to push you to talk and
share. Know that you have no obligation to follow through with
this person's request. Be grateful
for a close friend's time and sensitivity. Tonight: Stop by the gym.
Jacqueline Bigar is on the internet at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2017 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
its assets to new owners who
revived the Hostess brand.)
ºLast year, Democrat Hillary
Clinton conceded the presidential election to Republican
Donald Trump, telling supporters in New York that her
defeat was ‘‘painful, and it will
be for a long time.’’ But Clinton
told her faithful to accept
Trump and the election results,
urging them to give him ‘‘an
open mind and a chance to
lead.’’
G
ThursdayScene
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, N O V E MB E R 9 , 2 017 | BOS T ON GL OB E .C O M / L I F E S TY L E
Resisting
‘small men
doing big and
stupid things’
In his first novel, environmentalist Bill McKibben
takes an offbeat look at patriotism
COREY HENDRICKSON FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
B Y JA M E S S U L L I VA N | G L O B E C O R RE S P O N D E NT
The message may be dire, but he finds the act of protest to
be exhilarating. That’s why he wrote “Radio Free Vermont,”
his first novel after more than a dozen nonfiction books about
global warming, the loss of community, and how to live
“lightly” on the land we’ve inhabited.
The book, just out and subtitled “A Fable of Resistance,”
follows a ragtag band of pranksters who urge their fellow Vermonters to secede from a union that has lost its way. The story, as he writes in an author’s note, is one response to “small
MIDDLEBURY, Vt. — Growing up in the historic town of
Lexington, Bill McKibben loved stories of the American Revolution. As a teenager, he spent his summers leading tours of
the battle green. On the job, he proudly wore a tri-corner hat.
Four decades later, McKibben is still talking about fighting
the good fight. His first book, “The End of Nature,” published
in 1989, helped introduce Americans to the concept of climate change, and most of his work since has amounted to
one big, distressing warning about the environmental consequences of imperialism and exploitation.
THEATER
For his wife, and Brecht,
Shalhoub will make time
By Terry Byrne
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
EVAN AGOSTINI/INVISION/AP/FILE
‘Brooke [Adams]
and I are happy
to have the
chance to work
together.’
TONY SHALHOUB, on
coming to Wellesley on his day
off from Broadway to work
with his wife on a staged
reading of “Fear and Misery
in the Third Reich”
Tony Shalhoub is a little surprised he’s
been in such demand.
The Emmy Award-winning actor, best
known for TV’s “Monk,” and “Wings,” as well
as his many movie appearances, from “Spy
Kids” and “Big Night” to “Men in Black” and
voice roles in “Cars” and “Teenage Mutant
Ninja Turtles,” is currently starring on Broadway in the musical “The Band’s Visit.” He’s also appearing in a new TV series, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” due for release on Amazon
Nov. 29.
“I thought I’d be less busy at this age,” says
Shalhoub, who just turned 64. “But this feels
like the right time to be busy, to keep ourselves sane.”
In addition to performing eight shows a
week in “The Band’s Visit,” Shalhoub is
spending his day off Monday to join his wife,
Brooke Adams, and a cast of 11 other actors
in a staged, script-in-hand reading of “Fear
and Misery in the Third Reich,” the opener for
Commonwealth Shakespeare Company’s
2017-18 season.
“Brooke and I are happy to have the
chance to work together,” says Shalhoub, “and
we’ve known Steve [Maler, Commonwealth
Shakespeare’s founding artistic director] for a
SHALHOUB, Page G7
MCKIBBEN, Page G7
Inside
Music that
won’t be
typecast
THING TANK
FLIPPING OUT,
FLIPPING OFF
From an iPhone glitch to a
fireable offense, a review
of the week online
G2
MUSIC
DEEP
APPRECIATION
Rising R&B star Kelela forges
mutual admiration dynamic
with her fans
G5
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Composer Mehmet Ali Sanlıkol’s new choral piece is titled “DEVRAN.”
I
By Zoë Madonna
GLOBE STAFF
stanbul-born, Boston-based
composer Mehmet Ali
Sanlıkol has resided in the
United States for decades, performing and teaching all over
Boston. However, he has never been
made to feel like an outsider to the extent that he has recently.
“I remember being in a cafe in Belmont with my wife and my daughter,”
he said, recalling then-candidate Donald Trump’s December 2015 call for a
“total and complete shutdown” of
Muslims entering the country. “Can
you imagine, there were 10 screens in
there, and nine of them it was Trump,
saying what he’s saying. . . . It’s bizarre
because I was here during 9/11, and
even then I didn’t have that kind of
feeling.”
Spurred on by his frustration with
growing hostility toward Muslims in
the country and stereotyping of Muslims in the public consciousness,
Sanlıkol set to work on “DEVRAN,” a
choral piece that intertwines Renaissance polyphony and Islamic mysticism. The new work is the centerpiece
of two free concerts made possible by a
grant from the New England Foundation for the Arts’s Creative City program, with the first on Nov. 9 at New
England Conservatory’s Jordan Hall.
In his native Turkey, Sanlıkol was
surrounded by diverse Islamic religious traditions and practices. In contrast, he said, the most visible images
COMPOSER, Page G5
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
Insider
FROM THE BAR
THING TANK
A REVIEW OF THE WEEK IN THINGS
A?
This Spanish
red is the life
of the party
A?DENTITY CRISIS
A?phone users had a minor
freakout the other day when a
major glitch was discovered in
Apple’s new iOS 11 that quite
unhelpfully rendered every in­
stance of “i” as an “A” with a
question mark in a box, which,
let’s be honest, looks pretty
A?ncredible, but which, let’s
once again be honest, isn’t the
best look for a vowel, even the
fourth most popular one. As Apple rushes to remedy the error,
users lacking a necessary personal pronoun are already experiencing feelings of disorientation and nausea as they grapple
for a new sense of purpose, with
many reporting that conversations have been forced to focus
on you.
Deborah Hansen, the chef­owner­som­
melier of Taberna de Haro in
Brookline, has seen her share of wine
trends in the last 20 years. Some Span­
ish wine regions, for example, promote
“big, oaky, too­ripe” reds that aim to
please the masses. “I’m always search­
ing for wines that think outside that
sad box,” she shares. So imagine her
delight when she discovered the pours
of Alfredo Maestro, a next­generation
winemaker, based in Ribera del Duero,
who crafts organic wines from forgot­
ten plots of old vines. “It’s so young
and alive,” says Hansen, referring to a
2015 “El Rey del Glam” ($43 a bottle).
“It’s broad on the palate, not mellowed
by oak, and not marred by oxidation.”
She pairs the garnacha with cordero en
chilindrón, chunks of lamb stewed in a
smoky slurry of dried choricero and
ancho peppers, simmered with toma­
toes and a kiss of cinnamon. The tra­
ditional dish — featured on the new
fall menu — plays well with the wine’s
tannins, which make the red brim with
even more character. “It’s lusty, purple,
and luminous,” she enthuses.
FACIAL TENSION
Speaking of self-consciousness
and the iPhone, it appears the
camera on the latest iteration of
the iPhone’s camera is so good
that it’s causing users to see
what they actually look like,
which is a problem. “I’m going
to need all my friends to switch
to Android,” tweeted one user,
“I am way too ugly for this new
iPhone X camera.” “I’m gonna
try to open the iPhone X front
facing camera and it’s gonna be
like girl are you sure,” said another. “He had pizza for four
meals this week, sleeps about
three hours a night, and apparently has some sort of nongrooming agreement with his
eyebrows,” said my most recent
selfie in not so many words.
Wow, they weren’t kidding
about this thing. [smears pizza grease on lens]
Taberna de Haro, 999 Beacon St.,
Brookline, 617­277­8272,
www.tabernaboston.com
DEBORAH HANSEN
ELLEN BHANG
LAUGH LINES
KELLY MACFARLAND
SUGAR CRASH
If you thought this past Halloween was scary, just wait until
Halloween of the future. A demonstration of an ostensibly can­
dy-dropping drone over a crowd
earlier this week at the Ogaki Robot Festival in Japan turned into
the impromptu debut of a candyfilled-drone-dropping drone. Six
people were injured in the accident, with damages estimated at
100 Grand. ALTERNATE JOKE:
Six people were injured, but officials reported zero cavities. ONE
MORE TIME: Six people were injured, and while nobody finds
that funny, multiple eyewitnesses on the scene confirm seeing
Snickers. OK, I’m done. Sorry.
Thoughts, prayers.
BOTTLES
Not all ciders
are created equal
A
DIGITAL REVOLUTION
And finally this week, Juli Brisk­
man, the cyclist and marketing
executive turned American hero
last week when a White House
photographer captured her flipping off the passing presidential
motorcade, has been fired from
her job. I’m guessing she microwaved fish in the break room or
something. In any case, Juli, I’m
not hiring at the moment, mainly
because I don’t run a thing that
has any jobs, and that’s hard to
market. But if you’re reading this,
I just want you to know that I, for
one, salute your passion for free
expression, as well as your
unique saluting technique. Back
in a sec, that’s my boss calling.
MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
By Gary Dzen
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
s founder of Sherborn’s Stormalong cider company, Shannon Edgar has (at least) two jobs: make
cider, then persuade people why
they should buy Stormalong stuff
over a competitor’s.
“The word artisinal is kind of meaningless
these days,” says Edgar, describing a branding
conundrum he and other small-batch cider
makers face.
Edgar wants you to know his cider is different because the fruit it’s made from is different.
There are four types of cider apples: “bittersweets,” high in tannins and sugar; “bittersharps,” high in tannin and acid; “sharps,” high
in acid; and “sweets,” high in sugar. Many
mass-marketed ciders are made only with the
latter, which is why commercial cider has a reputation for being sugary. Stormalong uses old
varieties of bittersweets and bittersharps,
knobby, sometimes ugly things with names like
Dabinett, Chisel Jersey, and Kingston Black.
“The concord grape analogy kind of turns
the light bulb on for a lot of people,” says Edgar.
“If you’re making wine with Concord grapes it’s
not gonna be the same thing. And most ciders
right now are made with the equivalent of Concord grapes.”
When Edgar brings Stormalong to farmer’s
markets or festivals, he’s often met with the
same reaction from the 1,000 or so customers
he says taste his product every weekend.
“Probably 95 percent of the people that put
the stuff to their lips say, ‘Wow, I’ve never had
anything like this,’ says Edgar. “Their impression of cider is somewhat negative.”
In an effort to both educate and quench,
Stormalong recently teamed up on a four-pack
with West Lebanon, N.H.’s Farnum Hill Ciders
and Eden Specialty Ciders in Newport, Vt.
The pack includes a cider from each as well
as a can that’s a blend of all three. Farnum
Hill’s offering is 6.8 percent ABV with notes of
peach, pear, and pineapple, and a noticeable
funk. Sweetest in the pack, though far from
sweet, is the Eden Specialty cider (6.8 percent
ABV), which prickles with stone fruits before a
rush of umami. The Stormalong offering (6.7
percent ABV) is tannic, with notes of rhubarb
and chocolate, while the blend has elements of
all three. Each of the ciders is dry and champagne-like, meant to give drinkers a taste of the
terroir from which the apples were picked.
Stormalong has set up a website, cidergrown.com, for consumers interested in learning more about what’s in the pack, and about
cider apples in general.
Gary Dzen can be reached at
gary.dzen@globe.com.
‘I got married eight or
nine months ago, I don’t
remember, I was very
drunk. To a man. Spoiler
alert. And he’s lovely and
kind and sweet and his
English is getting so much
better. I’m so proud of him.
“You’re da perfect size!”
Yes I am, that’s correct.
Good job, baby.’
— MacFarland performs at Boston Comedy
Blowout II Saturday at the Shubert Theatre
NICK A. ZAINO III
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
B o s t o n
Pere Ubu is among 34 acts in the eclectic lineup for Hassle Fest 9.
Hassle Fest is keeping
the DIY dream alive
In its ninth year, the all­ages, all­volunteer festival
showcases artists out of the mainstream
By Terence Cawley
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
As the number of music festivals vying for attention grows
ever higher, Hassle Fest, whose
ninth iteration will be held at
Somerville’s ONCE Ballroom
Friday and Saturday, stands out
for several reasons.
Chief among them is the allages festival’s eclectic lineup.
Even the biggest names on the
34-act bill (Dan Deacon, Pere
Ubu, Xiu Xiu) have essentially
no foothold in the mainstream
despite their status as underground icons. From its inception in 2009, back when it was
called Homegrown Fest and
booking future indie stars like
Kurt Vile and Ty Segall, Hassle
Fest has showcased the experimental, boundary-pushing artists that most festivals ignore.
HASSLE FEST 9
Nov. 10 at 6 p.m. (sold out)
and Nov. 11 at 3 p.m. At
ONCE Ballroom, Somerville.
Tickets $25, 617­285­0167,
www.oncesomerville.com
“The important thing is just
that there’s no formula,” says
Sam Potrykus, who as co-director of the local arts nonprofit
Boston Hassle is one of the festival’s chief architects. “We
want to make it exciting and interesting for people.”
T hat’s the other special
thing about Hassle Fest; in true
punk-rock fashion, the festival
is run entirely by Boston Hassle
volunteers, with all proceeds
going directly to the nonprofit.
“I think it’s cool that there’s
this DIY festival that’s been going on for so long,” says Deacon,
an electronic musician who as
Friday’s headliner plans to treat
audiences to his notoriously frenetic, participatory live show.
“It’s not an easy thing to maintain, and I’m just really happy
to finally be a part of it.”
The main project Potrykus
and fellow Hassle co-director
Dan Shea currently hope to get
off the ground is an all-ages music venue, which would provide
a much-needed alternative to
the bars and clubs that currently dominate the Boston music
scene. It’s a cause that both are
passionate about.
“I think it’s fundamentally
wrong to have age restrictions
o n c u l t u r a l e v e n t s ,” s a y s
Potrykus. “There’s no official,
sanctioned, safe all-ages space
NOV 9–12
SEAPORT WORLD TRADE CENTER
Thur: 3pm–10pm • Fri: Noon–10pm
Sat: 10am–8pm • Sun: 10am–6pm
www.SkiSnowExpo.com
Country Ski & Sports, Boston’s Biggest Ski & Snowboard Sale!
Flippenout Extreme Aerial Show
ELITEAM Fitness Challenge presented by Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of Northern N.E.
Wachusett Mountain Kids Snow Park Learning Center
WZLX 100.7 Classic Ski Lodge
Vertical Runway Fashion Spectacular
Long Trail Beer Garden
All Season Mountain Activity Center
Great Family Fun and Value
G l o b e
that’s dedicated to the arts or
music the way the clubs are,
and even the clubs don’t really
respect the artists. It’s just their
cash cow for selling alcohol.”
“Especially in a city like Boston that’s so full of college-age
students, the idea of there not
being anywhere to go if you’re
16 to 20 is crazy,” says Deacon.
“Art spaces and music spaces
are vital community centers for
people in that age group.”
Shea, who’s been booking
shows in the Boston area since
2001, first met Potrykus when
he was underage; it’s all-ages
shows that made their partnership possible.
“It’s coming out of a DIY perspective,” says Shea. “We think
those values are important, and
I believe that they’re becoming
ever more important if the arts
are going to survive.”
For younger bands like Lady
Pills, a group of Berklee students who are playing Saturday,
having to play venues that are
18- or 21-plus makes building
an audience difficult.
“It’s always really frustrating,” says singer-guitarist Ella
Boissonnault. “ The double
standard of, ‘You can play the
show if you’re underage, but
you can’t attend,’ that’s just
alienating to so many people.”
“ That’s a whole group of
people that could be supporting
your music, enjoying music,
and being able to support the
scene,” adds bassist Alison
Dooley.
So far, Boston Hassle has
raised about $25,000 toward its
goal. Most of that comes from
the Black Market flea markets
the Hassle hosts ever y two
months, but an annual 24-hour
telethon featuring local artists
has also helped. In addition to
the new venue fund, these
events pay for the Hassle’s free
monthly newspaper, Boston
Compass, and the roughly 150
shows they put on every year.
“The Black Market has single-handedly made the organization a lot more sustainable,”
says Shea. “It will hopefully
continue to give artisans, makers, and [others] who might be
creative in that tangible way a
place to sell their stuff.”
G3
‘It’s cool that
there’s this
DIY festival
that’s been
going on for so
long. . . . I’m
just really
happy to
finally be a
part of it.’
THEO ANTHONY
DAN DEACON on
performing in Hassle Fest
NOV 28 - DEC 10 WANG THEATRE
Christmas Cards Made Easy!
Santa Photo Packages On Sale Now!
$10 from every Santa Photo ticket purchased
will be donated to Globe Santa.
Buy tickets at Bochcenter.org/GlobeSanta
BUY TICKETS AT BOCHCENTER.ORG
Continued on next page
BOCH CENTER BOX OFFICE
800.982.2787
GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 617.532.1116
Boch Center is a trademark of
The Wang Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.
Discover why we’ve earned the distinction by SKI magazine of
#1 & #2 in the East for Snow & Grooming the last five years!
800-258-0330 • brettonwoods.com
VISIT US AT THE
BOSTON.COM SKI & SNOWBOARD EXPO
FOR EXCLUSIVE DEALS NOV. 9-12*
EARLY SEASON TICKETS
MIDWEEK GOLDEN TICKET
ANYTIME TICKETS
DETACHABLE QUAD PACK
NEW! BRET-TEN PACK
$25 good any day until Dec. 15.
SAVE UP TO $68!
$45 good Mon.-Fri. during non-holiday
periods. SAVE UP TO $36!
$65 good any day all season long.
SAVE UP TO $28!
4 unrestricted tickets good all season
long for $215. SAVE UP TO $157!
10 unrestricted tickets good all season
long for $495. SAVE UP TO $435!
Join RadioBDC at Booth #12 & #13
and enter to win a pair of skis
or a snowboard from Rossignol.
$3 OFF ADMISSION
when you purchase tickets online at SkiSnowExpo.com
and use promo code BDCCON.
*Exclusive Ski Show Specials must be purchased
at the Boston.com Ski & Snowboard Expo,
Nov. 9-12, 2017. Tickets are non-refundable, will
not be replaced if lost or stolen, and must be used
during the 2017-18 season. All sales final. May
not be combined with other offers or discounts.
Subject to change without notice.
T h e
G4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
One event that hasn’t been a
money-maker in recent years is
Ha s s l e Fe s t . To c u t c o s t s ,
the festival has scaled back in
both length (from three days to
two) and venue size (from
Brighton Music Hall to ONCE
Ballroom).
“[Brighton Music Hall] were
great to work with and every-
thing, it’s just not within our
budget,” says Potrykus. “We’re
all volunteers, and the Fest is a
$20,000 operation, you know?
When we lose money on that, it
comes out of the nonprofit
money.”
As Boston-area rents continue their upward climb, finding
an affordable home for the allages venue has proven to be a
near-impossible task. Potrykus
and Shea have already had potential locations in Jamaica
Plain, Somerville, Allston, and
Cambridge fall through for financial reasons.
“This is an incredibly difficult city, between the liquor
laws and the disgusting real estate boom that basically permeates every corner of the city,”
says Shea. “Any place that isn’t
going to be a boon for investors,
and which doesn’t have a pile of
private money behind it, is going to have a massive struggle
opening up in this area.”
In addition to their day jobs
(and in Shea’s case, a wife and
two children), Potrykus and
Shea commit 20-40 hours a
week to running Boston Hassle.
So what keeps them going
when the odds seem stacked
against them?
“We’ve had a lot of conversations over the years like, ‘Maybe
we should quit doing this.’ Then
another volunteer comes along
and excites us again,” says
Potrykus. “But ultimately, we’re
just lifers. Getting our own
space is obviously the goal, but
THEATER
THEATER
THEATER
MUSIC
MUSIC
MUSIC
grand mass in e-Flat maJor
by amy beach
Friday nov. 10 ~ 7:30pm
somerville theatre
schumann, brahms
schoenberg
Continued from preceding page
NIGHT FEVER
whether that goal comes in two
years or 10 years or 15 years, we
are steadfast in our commitment to the cause.”
“If I was able to quit, I would
have already quit,” says Shea.
Terence Cawley can be reached
at terence.cawley@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@terence_cawley
AN EVENING
V N NG OF
O THE
a tradition since 1989
december 8 - 23
New England’s brightest holiday tradition!
Based on the Charles Dickens classic, with
dazzling special effects, traditional and original
songs, and colorful costumes, this one-of-a-kind,
award-winning production has been seen by
more than one million people since 1989.
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $77 | $67 | $62
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
moonbox presents
the 39 steps
Mix a Hitchcock masterpiece with a juicy spy
novel, add a dash of Monty Python and you have
The 39 Steps, a fast-paced whodunit for anyone
who loves the magic of theatre! This two-time
Tony® and Drama Desk Award-winning treat is
packed with nonstop laughs, over 150 zany characters (played by a ridiculously talented cast of
four), an onstage plane crash, train rides, missing
fingers, and some good old-fashioned romance!
by Peter Barlow. Runs Thur-Sun, Nov 17-Dec 9.
Tickets at www.bostontheatrescene.com
617-933-8600
the Freshman-silent Film
nov 18, 2pm
meet those dancing Feet!
noW thru november 12
Stakes are high in this glamorous 1930’s
musical spectacular, when a chorus girl is
given the chance to become a star. With
sensational tap numbers, lavish costumes,
and one show-stopping tune after another,
you will be thoroughly entertained from
the first note to the final tap.
Harold Lloyd’s biggest hit was this silent comedy
gem, featuring his slapstick brilliance and charm.
Enjoy this unique experience, the film is
accompanied by Clark Wilson on the Mighty
Wurlitzer Theatre Organ.
Tix available at TheHanoverTheatre.org
or call 877.571.7469. Use promo code BOGO to
get one free ticket per purchase.
The Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts
2 Southbridge St., Worcester, MA.
One of Pollstar’s top theatres in the world!
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham Road | Beverly | MA
TICKETS: $57 - $82 • KIDS SAVE 50%
BOOK SEATS: NSMT.ORG or 978.232.7200
Call Now! Many Thanksgiving Shows SOLD OUT!
Don’t miss the show that has captivated
35 million people worldwide.
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton St.
Groups of 8+ Call 617.542.6700
1.800.BLUEMAN
BLUEMAN.COM
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 5 & 8, Sun at 3 & 7
Added Shows: Wed 11/22 at 2, Fri 11/24 at 5
Holiday Party Group Rates Call 617-451-0195
Drink & Dining Options Available
Tickets/Gift Certificates Call 617-426-5225
www.shearmadness.com
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
The Ultimate Bee Gees Tribute
Spanning the 60’s to Saturday Night Fever
ReagleMusicTheatre.com
617 Lexington St., Waltham, MA
FREE PARKING
“barrett delivers a
sublime perFormance!”
Leigh Barrett & Will McGarrahan star in a sweet
& hilarious play about the ultimate music lover.
Mrs. Jenkins was called “majestically awful” yet
her Carnegie Hall debut was an instant sellout!
Now through Nov 19 Lyric Stage Copley Sq
617.585.5678 lyricstage.com
one love
Reggae Concert with the Duppy Conquerors
BBQ. Cash Bar (21+). Silent Auction.
Friday, November 10 from 8pm - 11pm
Tickets on sale now!
Celebrated author Nick Payne of the Broadway
sensation CONSTELLATIONS explores how
imagination and memory shape our identities.
“Astonishing and original” (The Telegraph)
NOV 9-DEC 10 at The Gamm, Pawtucket, RI
GAMMTHEATRE.ORG
the blue hour
With luciana souza, voice
Tartuffe charms his way into Orgon’s
household in Molière’s hilarious and biting satire
“A CLASSIC GEM!” - THE NEW YORK TIMES
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
Winner oF 5 tony aWards
including best play!
Based on the best-selling novel by Mark Haddon,
this captivating drama tells the story of an extraordinary teen whose efforts to solve the murder
of a neighbor’s dog leads him on an unexpected
journey. Tix from $25. Through Nov. 25 only!
www.SpeakEasyStage.com / 617-933-8600
nov. 2-19
berlioz & sibelius
Feat. kim kashkashian
Nov. 9 at 7:30 PM, Nov. 11 at 8 PM,
Nov. 12 at 3 PM
Renowned violist KIM KASHKASHIAN brings extraordinary virtuosity to the Berlioz in an unusual
pairing with Sibelius at Sanders Theatre & NEC’s
Jordan Hall.
Benjamin Zander, conductor.
BERLIOZ: Harold in Italy | SIBELIUS: Sym. No. 2
TICKETS: Thursdays $15-$74,
Sat. & Sun. $25-$105
617.236.0999 | bostonphil.org
Boston Playwrights’ Theatre
949 Commonwealth Avenue
Thurs. 7:30 p.m., Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m.
Tickets: 866-411-8111 or BostonPlaywrights.org
december 8-27
tickets on sale noW!
A Holiday Tradition Returns!
Celebrate the season with family and
friends at the 47th annual Christmas Revels!
Enjoy music, dance, comedy and carols
as we explore Renaissance Venice, the cultural
crossroads of the world!
18 Performances - Matinees and Evenings
Harvard University’s Sanders Theatre, Cambridge
Buon Natale!
Tickets at 617-496-2222 or www.revels.org
don’t take it personally
A brilliant play-within-a-play that shows us
how misunderstanding cultural cues can reveal
blind spots you never knew you had. Guillermo
Calderon’s production demonstrates the idea that
naivete can turn out to be the kiss of death.
OCT 26-NOV19. artsemerson.org
Christmas
Time
december 2 - 10
781-891-5600
40 Victorian Carolers, Stunning Dancers
75 Elves and a Full Professional Orchestra
See the Parade of the Wooden Soldiers
Dancing Teddy Bears Nutcracker
ReagleMusicTheatre.com
617 Lexington St., Waltham - FREE PARKING
November 19th, 3 pm at Faneuil Hall
Saxophone virtuoso plays world premiere piece
by Harvard composer Osnat Netzer
Afternoon also includes Beethoven’s 2nd and
Bernstein’s Candide Overture
bbbsociety.org - 617.991.8761
Chamber orchestra A Far Cry presents
The Blue Hour, the highly anticipated
concert-length song cycle composed by
five luminary women composers:
Rachel Grimes, Sarah Kirkland Snider,
Angélica Negrón, Shara Nova,
and Caroline Shaw. Inspired by the
poem “On Earth” by Carolyn Forché.
coro allegro presents
mozart great mass
Boston’s LGBTQ+ & allied classical chorus
HAYDN: Te Deum, MCFERRIN, BLOCH
MOZART: Great Mass in C Minor
SUN, November 19 at 3pm, Sanders Theatre
TIX $65/45/25, Seniors/Students 20% off
Info: coroallegro.org or call (617) 236-4011
Info and tickets: afarcry.org
lavazza chamber ensemble
november 12 at 7:30pm
Chamber Music by Amy Beach & Maurice Ravel
Beach Piano Quintet in f# minor, op. 67
Ravel String Quartet in F Major
Kristina Nilsson & Paula Oakes, violinists
Emily Rome, violist, Jan Pfeiffer-Rios, cellist
James Chubet, pianist
St. Paul’s Church, 15 St. Paul St., Brookline, MA
FREE concert and reception
www.LavazzaChamberEnsemble.org
Season dates: 2/4, 3/18, 5/13 & 6/10
For info: 617-327-3787
THE 8-TIME OSCAR WINNING FILM
WITH SOUNDTRACK PERFORMED LIVE
boston lyric opera’s
World premiere nov 8-12
BY THE HANDEL AND HAYDN SOCIETY
ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS.
A darkly comedic take on the true story of two
19th century serial killers at The Cyclorama at
the Boston Center for the Arts.
boston.com/tickettothearts
dramatic, violent and vulnerable, this new ballet
highlights the artistry of nine male dancers.
Be the first to see this work that opened to rave
reviews in London
and now takes Boston by storm.
Runs Nov 3-12. Call 617-695-6955 or
machaut: the First mass
van ness: neW psalms
16 exquisite voices soar in
eight centuries of sacred song!
Sat, 11/18, 8pm/Boston
Sun, 11/19, 4pm/Newton
Reg. price: $20-$24 * Clausura.org
20% discount w/code: GLOBE
SATURDAY, NOV 11 at 7:30PM
SUNDAY, NOV 12 at 3:00PM
SYMPHONY HALL
TICKETS ARE LIMITED. SECURE YOURS NOW.
Single Tickets from $25
617.542.6772 | BLO.ORG
Order Online through our Self
Serve Order Entry System.
24/7 from anywhere.
By turns powerful and sexy, athletic and
ACTIVITIES
FRIDAY, NOV 10 at 7:30PM
Music by Julian Grant
Libretto by Mark Campbell
A World Premiere commissioned by MusicTheatre Group with the support of BLO.
Boston Globe
Ticket to the Arts
embrace poWer and grace
visit bostonballet.org for tickets.
handel and haydn society
nov 10 + 11 + 12
merrimack repertory
theatre
The incredible true story of
Harvard’s women astronomers who
blew our view of the universe wide open
By Lauren Gunderson • Directed by Sean Daniels
Oct. 18 - Nov. 12 • Lowell, MA
mrt.org/sky
kenneth radnoFsky in
World premiere
NEC’s Jordan Hall, November 10 at 8PM
OPERA
When Devon visits Simone for an end-of-summer
sibs fest on Martha’s Vineyard, she finds her
little sister changed beyond recognition.
Worlds collide and sisters square off in this
keenly-observed comedy about ambition, regret,
and the choices that shape who we become.
Sun. 11/12, 7:30 PM, Sanders Theatre
Schumann Piano Trio in F major, Brahms Piano
Quartet in G minor, Schoenberg Ode to Napoleon,
w/ David Kravitz reciting Lord Byron’s poem
$25, $38, $50, $62/Students: $8/Sr.: $4 off
617.349.0086/www.bostonchambermusic.org
DANCE
nick payn e
neW england premiere oF a
deep and dazzling drama!
Sunday, November 26, at 3 PM
Pianist GEORGE LI, the 2nd place winner at the
2015 International Tchaikovsky Competition,
brings his phenomenal skill to
the composer’s Piano Concerto No. 1
Benjamin Zander, Conductor
WAGNER: Tannhäuser Overture
TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. 1
PROKOFIEV: Romeo and Juliet
TICKETS: $15-$50
617.236.0999 | bostonphil.org
Dan Gabel leads the Vaughn Monroe Orchestra
in an evening of entertaining time-travel!
A complete 1940s experience with:
-Big Band swing
-Moon Maids vocal group
-Comedy sketches and vintage ads
-Dancers
-Vintage market and photo booth
TICKETS: $25 / $18 veterans and students w/ID
www.VaughnMonroeShow.com
www.SomervilleTheatre.com
brilliant classic comedy starts Friday!
i n co g n ito
by
Music Director David Carrier conducts the
New England Philharmonic and the Chorale
in a major work of America’s
first woman composer. Soloists:
Dana Lynne Varga, Vera Savage,
Matthew Anderson, Sean Galligan
Concert talk by Dr. Matthew Phelps
Saturday, November 11, 2017 at 8:00 p.m.
Church of the Holy Name
1689 Centre Street, West Roxbury, MA
Tickets: $35, $30, and $25
www.commonwealthchorale.com
Wagner, tchaikovsky, &
prokoFiev
www.multiculturalartscenter.org
dare to live in Full color.
boston’s hilarious
Whodunit!
January 14 at 2pm
781-891-5600
bu orchestras & bramWell
tovey at symphony hall
On Monday, November 13
Renowned maestro Bramwell Tovey,
Director of Orchestral Activities at
Boston University School of Music,
conducts BU Orchestras performing
Lili Boulanger’s D’un matin de
printemps and Igor Stravinsky’s
Pulcinella Suite, Le Sacre du printemps.
8:00pm – SYMPHONY HALL
301 Massachusetts Ave, Boston
Tickets: $25, $10 student, free with BU ID
bso.org – 617-266-1200
alasdair Fraser (Fiddle) &
natalie haas (cello)
Declares The Boston Globe
Jewelry, fashion, home furnishings, painting
and sculpture that transcend expectations
by 175 outstanding artists from across America.
Live music in the Sculpture Cafe!
Premier Scottish fiddle-cello duo with Campbell
Webster (pipes), Highland Dance Boston, & the
Boston Scottish Country Dancers. Nov. 11, 2017,
3:00 and 7:30. Scottish Rite Masonic Museum in
Lexington, MA.
Tix: www.mktix.com/rscd. At the door if available.
Royal Plaza Trade Center, Marlboro, MA
Minutes from everywhere with FREE PARKING!
Bring friends and make a day of it!
Advance tickets, discount coupons and info:
PARADISECITYARTS.COM
brahms
morning light @ asc
120 exhibitors, speakers &
Free admission
Sat. 11/11, 11:30 AM at the Arlington St Church
Enjoy Brahms’s Scherzo from the F.A.E. Sonata
& Piano Quartet in G minor, and see the church’s
gorgeous collection of Tiffany windows.
$35; Sr: $32; Students: $5
617.349.0086/bostonchambermusic.org
ONLY RAMPART AGAINST DICTATORSHIP IS COURAGE”
“THE ON
- LA VIE
november 17, 18 & 19
“JeWel oF craFt shoWs!”
ABAA/ILAB dealers from the U.S. & 10 other
countries exhibit & sell rare books, maps, prints,
ephemera. Free expert appraisals Sun 1-3pm.
Speakers all weekend. Fri (5-9pm) $20;
Sat (12-7pm) & Sun (12-5pm): FREE!
Hynes Conv Center www.bostonbookfair.com
NOV 9 - 11
EMERSON CUTLER MAJESTIC THEATRE
MUST
CLOSE
SATURDA
Y!
TICKETS S
T
AT $20!
ART
ARTSEMERSON.ORG / 617.824.8400
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
‘It’s an intimate experience with
yourself. I’ve got messages from friends
and fans, and one thing I’ve noticed is
that my fans are really smart, really
complex in terms of their thinking.’
Rising R&B star Kelela
grateful her fans
are willing
to dig deep
KELELA, on responses to her debut studio album, “Take Me Apart”
There’s so much context that
matters. I feel very happy about
putting my feelings out there in
all the ways that I can.
MICHAEL ZORN/INVISION/AP/FILE
K
By Isaac Feldberg
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
elela makes futuristic R&B both intimate and epic,
fluid explorations of love and loss that thread her
sinuous vocals throughout a cavernous soundscape of pulsating beats and shimmering synths.
The effect, overall, is nothing short of hypnotic.
On “Take Me Apart,” the debut studio album she released to
widespread acclaim last month, the singer, 34, deepened and
evolved her unique sound, doubling down on intricate sonic textures and more complex vocal arrangements to create a record
that would cement her dual reputations as one of R&B’s fastestrising stars and its most daring experimentalist.
Now, Kelela’s taking the album on the road, touring North
America and Europe. Ahead of her sold-out stop at the Middle
East Downstairs in Cambridge Saturday, the singer spoke to the
Globe by phone about the tour and her thoughts on the role of the
artist as social advocate.
Q.What does it feel like to have
“ Take Me Apart” out in the
world?
A. I feel really blessed, because
everyone seems to be taking it
really personal, which for me is
really cool. Everyone seems to
be in their feelings about it, and
having a moment with themselves with it. It’s not the thing
that everyone’s listening to together; it’s an intimate experience with yourself. I’ve got messages from friends and fans,
and one thing I’ve noticed is
that my fans are really smart,
really complex in terms of their
thinking. They think in layered
terms, in really complex terms.
So the way they’re giving me reinforcement is so specific;
they’re describing details, and
that’s really cool.
Q. How do you feel about taking
the album on tour?
A. There is a little nervousness.
[Laughs] You want to be on
point, and I’m very critical of
myself when it comes to that,
though I’m also really excited
because it’s the first time I’ve
worked with background vocalists, and the first time I’ve inc o r po rat e d t h at w i t h ke y boards, and leaned into the fulltime permutations of what I’m
trying to say. There’s a whole
other way I’m able to communicate the songs live.
Q. Are you particularly excited
to play any of the songs live?
A. I’m excited to do “Better.” I’m
really looking forward to really
all of them, but especially that
one. There’s a different way
these songs are translating live,
and that makes me feel happy
and fulfilled in a different way.
It’s through the new things that
are being added, the keyboards
and backing vocals. “Take Me
Apart” is really cool, “Enough”
is really cool. They’re all songs
that feel quite epic, and I’ve always just wanted to be really
grandiose, and I think that is
going to happen, which I’m
pretty excited about, even in
pretty small venues. [On the album] I just wanted to share
what was really going on with
me and trying to be honest
G5
about what that is, and then
there’s the other side of hoping
it gets received in the way you
intended. What I’m experiencing now are all these affirmations and confirmation that the
music is very relatable, and that
people get me. I feel understood, at the end of the day. I
can’t wait to see and feel that
live.
Q. You’re politically vocal in
many interviews. Do you feel
like prominent artists have a responsibility to address social issues through their platforms?
A. I don’t think anybody has to
do that — especially black people. Black women are dealing
with a lot already, and explaining it to the world or being
some beacon of social justice
and fairness, being the Statue of
Liberty or whatever, like I’m
good. Having to deal with the
world from that place is already
enough, and there are ways in
which we contribute that don’t
manifest themselves in that
particular way. It’s something I
actually have been discussing a
lot with my black women peers,
where it’s like I want to participate in the way that I want to
participate, and I want to contribute to things getting better
Q. You recently wrote a piece for
Resident Advisor about the specific challenges of being a black
woman in the music industry.
What was that experience like
for you?
A. After it was complete, it was
really nice to feel that I had expressed myself. Black people
can find a lot of solace in reading the experience of a peer, but
I basically wrote that piece so
all the white boys who read
Resident Advisor can be processing their positionality in the
world, and thinking about the
way they understand things to
be differently. I’m excited to
continue to do stuff like that,
because I feel like what I’d write
for my black peers is different
than what I’d otherwise write.
Q. To the tune of what you’re
saying, it’s infuriating how often people of color are still being asked to perform the emotional labor of educating white
people about social injustice,
particularly those issues that
most affect people of color.
A. It feels redundant, also. I do
this every day. Not only do you
have to deal with the thing, but
also you have to be the bulwark
of it, and that is asking Angela
Davis to volunteer. [Laughs]
None of us are Angela Davis,
but it’s like asking someone
who’s constantly on their grind
to grind harder for you, so you
can improve. That’s a thing.
And [expletive] that.
Interview was edited
and condensed. Isaac
Feldberg can be reached at
isaac.feldberg@globe.com, or
on Twitter at @isaacfeldberg.
THE
$10 off
EVERY TICKET
BENEFITS
in the way that I want to do
that, and I don’t want people
policing me on how to do that.
with code
10STEPS
Y2YHARVARDSQUARE.ORG
MOONBOX PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS
17 NOV - 9 DEC
THE BCA PLAZA THEATER
STE
PS
Adapted by
Patrick Barlow
www.bostontheatrescene.com
617-933-8600
✂
For more information visit www.moonbox.org
New England Craft & Specialty Foods
Craft
.+- Festival
✂
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
/4#-& * $ ,4!%+'&231 )"
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Choral work born of frustration
uCOMPOSER
Continued from Page G1
of Islam in the age of social media are drastically skewed toward the conservative. “It’s either ladies that are covered or
men on prayer rugs,” he said.
“Even if the content of the article is talking about something
else, those are the images you
keep getting.”
Raised as a secular Muslim,
he now identifies as someone
who “tries to follow a certain
kind of Sufi brotherhood,”
though he has not been formally initiated. “I do follow more
and less a secular life, but I have
this crazy craving towards these
different types of sacred music.
Not just the kind that I’m creating, but these other ones that I
perform.” he said.
In his music and his life,
Sanlıkol strives against being
forced into boxes or being typecast. “The Renaissance meantone temperament and classical
Turkish music are almost identical. Lots of people think because Middle Eastern music
DEVRAN: MUSIC OF ISLAM,
TURKEY, AND RENAISSANCE
EUROPE
Featuring DÜNYA and the
New England Conservatory
Chamber Singers. At Jordan
Hall, Nov. 9. Free. Repeats
Nov. 12 at First Church of
Roxbury.
has these quarter-tone qualities, they think ‘that’s Oriental
music,’ ” he said emphatically,
gesturing as he spoke. “But actually, quarter tones are blue
notes in Turkish music.”
The two texts in “DEVRAN”
are drawn from Sufi devotional
songs transcribed in a 17 thcentury collection. “O soul, why
do you care for this world?/
Don’t think that this mortal
wealth will remain with you,” it
begins. “In the Turkish language, [“DEVRAN”] can refer
to the cycle of life, life itself, and
basically it has this immediate
connection to Sufism, Islamic
mysticism and the dervishes,”
Sanlıkol said. “It really refers to
that cyclical nature of coming
and going.” He explained that
the piece’s repeated patterns
are similar to those that dervishes would use in their ritual
whirling meditations.
“My first impression was
[that it] sounds like Mehmet,”
New England Conservatory faculty member Robert Labaree
said via telephone. “My second
impression was that it sounds
like pretty much what DÜNYA
would do.” The musician’s collective DÜNYA, which Sanlıkol
and Labaree cofounded, performs music from across the
former Ottoman Empire, from
Austria to Morocco. The two also co-direct the NEC Intercultural Institute, a presenter of
the Music and Monotheism
symposium that Thursday’s
concert concludes.
“He wanted to create
‘DEVRAN’ as a kind of polemic,
to show another kind of Islam,
one that is interested and outgoing and is utterly compatible
with Renaissance harmony,”
Labaree said.
This sort of musical and cultural syncretism is typical of
Sanlıkol’s oeuvre. The composer’s musical background is tripartite, including Western art
music, traditional Middle Eastern music, and jazz. His other
recent projects include albums
with jazz orchestra Whatsnext?
and a coffeehouse opera,
“Othello in the Seraglio: The
Tragedy of Sümbül the Black
Eunuch,” which weaves original
music with period material to
transplant the story of Othello
to 17th-century Constantinople.
During a talk before a recent
per formance of “Othello,”
Sanlıkol had what he described
as his worst experience related
to being a Muslim musician.
One person “started roasting
me with questions that were
just so harsh, really attacking,”
he said. He had described a recent radio program where the
host asked a Muslim if sharia
law was compatible with the
United States Constitution. “Do
we ask if Jewish law or Christian law is compatible — the
whole point is the separation of
church and state. Why do we
need to bring it up with Islam?
This is what I said. And in response this person was up in . . .
arms. She attacked me, ‘You
said that you’re a secular person
but you also said that you pray’
— I wasn’t. I was talking about
Sufi things. But they had no
idea. It went on for, like 15 minutes.”
Zoë Madonna can be reached at
zoe.madonna@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@knitandlisten. Madonna’s
work is supported by the Rubin
Institute for Music Criticism,
San Francisco Conservatory of
Music, and Ann and Gordon
Getty Foundation.
10am-5pm
Saturday
November 11
10am-5pm
Sunday
November 12
10am-5pm
Country Woodcrafts, Holiday Floral, Scarves, Fragrance, Tapestry,
HeatPacks, Lamps, Soft Sculpture, Pet Gifts, Leather, Photography,
Clay, Bottle Chimes, Doll Clothes, Pottery, Jewelry, Holiday Decor, Signs,
Ornaments, Pillow Quilts, Teddy Bears, Primitive and Folk Art, Vintage
Chic, Cutting Boards, Original Watercolors, Candles, Ceramics, Stained
Glass, Toys, Fleece, Soap, Herbal Dips, Salsa, Oils, Vinegars, Maple,
Fudge, Dips, Sauces, Jams, Baked Goods and Much More!
Admission $8.00 - Under 14 FREE
FREE PARKING
Save $2.00 with this coupon. Limit 6 people per coupon
One Admission Good for ALL 3 Days!
From 95 take Exit 50 onto Route 1
GPS Location: 207 Boston Street, Topsfield MA
castleberryfairs.com
NW-CN13625764
Istanbul-born,
Boston-based
composer Mehmet
Ali Sanlıkol.
Friday
November 10
BG
create priceless memories
$37
$26
$50
$13
and up
and up
and up
and up
TICKETS UP
TO 60% OFF
MAYORSHOLIDAY.COM
CITY OF BOSTON
Martin J. Walsh, Mayor
T h e
G6
MOVIE STARS
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
training or an academic background,
Jane Goodall started what would be a
decades-long, groundbreaking study
of a chimpanzee community. Brett
Morgen’s documentary uses striking,
previously unreleased footage to tell
her story, which teaches as much
about human nature as it does about
the primates who were her subject.
(90 min., PG) (Peter Keough)
YY LBJ Woody Harrelson plays Lyndon Baines Johnson in the years before and after the JFK assassination.
It’s entertaining but unexceptional
potted history, with a juicy lead performance under all the makeup and an
emphasis on the political struggles between the realist LBJ, the idealistic
Kennedy circle, and the racist Southern caucus. Directed by Rob Reiner.
(98 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY The Square From Sweden’s Ruben Östlund, a darkly comic and glibly directed satire on the discreet cluelessness of the art-world bourgeoisie,
starring Claes Bang as a hipster museum curator whose life comes apart.
The movie may resemble what it parodies, but it has a stunning scene of
dinner-party misbehavior and Elizabeth Moss as a crazy-eyed American.
(142 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YY½ Thor: Ragnarok In his latest
solo outing, Chris Hemsworth’s hunky thunder god does battle with his
villainous big sis, death goddess Hela
(Cate Blanchett), as well as the Hulk
(Mark Ruffalo). While occasional comedic flashes had been a welcome
surprise in the first two installments,
this one trends toward “Guardians
of the Galaxy” wackiness. It’s a good
time, but also a scattered trifle passed
off as epic. (130 min., PG-13)
(Tom Russo)
For movies coverage, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/movies.
Elisabeth Moss costars in Ruben
Östlund’s “The Square.”
INFO VALID 11/09/17 ONLY
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
JANE (PG) 5 (1:30, 4:05) 7:00, 9:45
()
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
BLADE OF THE IMMORTAL (R) 5 (2:00, 5:00) 8:10
MILLBURY
REVERE
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS
5 6 8 I K DIG
New releases
YYYY Faces Places The 89-year-old
director Agnès Varda and the young
street-artist/photographer JR wander
around rural France, taking pictures
of the vanishing locals and pasting
outsize portraits on water towers and
walls. The documentary is an absolute
delight, but it has a faith in everyday
people that feels both stalwart and
melancholy. In French with subtitles.
(89 min., PG) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ Jane In 1960, at 26, without
MAGNOLIA PICTURES
()
G
5
Bargain show thimes are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
CHESTNUT HILL
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) Advance Tickets Available
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
5:00, 7:45, 10:30
55 Boylston St.
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) Advance
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
Tickets Available 7:30, 10:15
ONLY THE BRAVE (PG-13) 11:40
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) RPX G (12:40) 4:00
ONLY THE BRAVE (PG-13) 11:40
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) RPX G 7:15, 10:30
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) 11:00, 12:00, 2:30, 3:30,
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) G (12:00) 6:30, 9:45
6:00, 7:00, 10:20
GEOSTORM (PG-13) 12:40, 3:20, 6:20
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) G (11:30, 2:50, 3:15)
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) 11:00, 12:00, 2:30, 3:30,
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:30, 12:00,
9:40
6:00, 7:00, 10:20
12:30, 1:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 6:10, 6:40, 7:10,
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) (1:00, 1:30, 3:50)
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 9:20
7:40, 9:15, 9:45, 10:15, 10:35
4:20, 6:50, 7:20, 10:00, 10:40
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 9:20
ONLY THE BRAVE (PG-13) 3:35
JIGSAW (R) (12:00, 2:30, 3:05) 7:45, 10:20
JIGSAW (R) 1:00, 10:40
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:00,
SUBURBICON (R) (11:50)
JIGSAW (R) 1:00, 10:40
10:00
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (R) (3:35)
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 11:20, 1:30, 2:00,
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (R) 1:15, 4:10
6 I DIG
GEOSTORM (PG-13) (11:35, 2:15)
4:30, 5:30, 7:30, 8:30, 10:00
SUBURBICON (R) 12:50
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
LE RIDE (NR) G 6:30
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 11:20, 1:30, 2:00,
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) RealD 3D 5:00, 7:15, 7:45,
http://somervilletheatre.com/
TRAGEDY GIRLS (R) (1:10) 4:10, 7:30, 10:35
4:30, 5:30, 7:30, 8:30, 10:00
10:00, 10:30
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:40
BLADE RUNNER 2049 (R) 5:00, 8:20
HAPPY DEATH DAY (PG-13) (1:20) 4:30
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) RealD 3D 12:00,
BLADE RUNNER 2049 (R) (12:10)
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:40
IT (R) 9:00
12:30, 2:30, 3:00, 5:00, 5:30, 7:30, 8:00, 10:00,
MULLY (NR) 7:00
SUBURBICON (R) 3:00
10:30
BLADE RUNNER 2049 3D (R) G (3:55)
SUBURBICON (R) 3:00
THE FOREIGNER (R) 7:05, 9:50
8
6
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
K
Stadium Seating
Hearing Impaired
Rear Window Captioning
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listing appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 4:15, 7:15
LOVING VINCENT (PG-13) 5:15, 7:40
SUBURBICON (R) 4:30, 7:45
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) 5:15, 8:00
VICTORIA & ABDUL (PG-13) 5:00, 7:30
BELLINGHAM
KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE (R) (12:15)
IT (R) (11:45, 3:30)
DANVERS
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
BRAINTREE
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
AMC BRAINTREE 10
5 6 8 DIG
121 Grandview Rd.
www.REGmovies.com
5 6 DIG
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) Advance Tickets Available
www.amctheatres.com
(5:00) 7:30, 10:00
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) G 7:00,
DEDHAM
LBJ (R) (1:35, 4:50) 7:35, 10:00
9:50
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) G (1:00, 2:00, 5:15)
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) G 11:40, 2:45, 5:30,
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
7:30, 8:30
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) G (12:30, 3:45, 4:15)
7:00, 10:00
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) Advance
8:00, 10:30
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) G 7:00, 9:30
MULLY (NR) G 7:00
Tickets Available 7:10, 9:55
BROOKLINE
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) (1:15, 4:30) 7:45
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
JIGSAW (R) (1:45, 5:00) 8:15
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (R) (1:05, 4:00)
5 6
7:15, 9:55
www.coolidge.org
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER (R) 4:20, 7:00,
9:30
LBJ (R) 5:10, 7:30, 9:40
LUCKY (NR) 4:45
MANSFIELD 66/67 (NR) 7:00
NATICK
TAUNTON
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
5:00, 7:30, 10:00
(PG-13) 1:00, 7:00
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) Advance
www.nationalamusements.com
THOR: RAGNAROK -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) 1:00, 4:15, 7:40
(PG-13) 4:00, 10:00
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 12:00, 3:15, 6:30, 9:40
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:00,
10:00
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 7:15, 7:45, 10:00,
10:30
FOXBORO
9:45
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) 12:00, 3:15, 6:30, 9:40
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 11:30, 2:45, 6:00, 9:05
THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE (PG) (12:40, 3:20) 9:30
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
VICTORIA & ABDUL (PG-13) (12:45, 3:30)
20 South Ave.
10:00
KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE (R) 9:50
5 6 DIG
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 12:45, 3:35, 7:30,
IT (R) (1:30)
www.amctheatres.com
10:30
LE RIDE (NR) G 6:30
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) G 11:00, 1:55, 4:50,
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 I DIG
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
HAPPY DEATH DAY (PG-13) (1:50, 4:45) 8:00
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) Advance Tickets Available
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
BERLIN
SOMERVILLE
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
THOR: RAGNAROK -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
THE FLORIDA PROJECT (R) 11:15, 1:45, 4:15, 7:00,
VICTORIA & ABDUL (PG-13) 6:00
10:30
www.REGmovies.com
SECRET SUPERSTAR (NR) (12:50) 7:20
BATTLE OF THE SEXES (PG-13) 8:00
JIGSAW (R) 11:35, 12:05, 1:55, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 5:30, 7:45, 8:15,
www.jordansimax.com
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
www.studiocinema.com
13) 1:10, 4:20, 7:00, 9:35
7:40, 10:20
5 8
FACES PLACES (PG) 11:45, 2:00, 6:45
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
TYLER PERRY'S BOO 2! A MADEA HALLOWEEN (PG-
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 11:35, 2:05, 4:40,
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
GOLMAAL AGAIN (NR) (4:05)
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
10:05
10:00
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
WONDERSTRUCK (PG) 11:00, 1:30, 4:15, 9:55
BELMONT
HAPPY DEATH DAY (PG-13) 12:20, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45,
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:00,
FURNITURE - NATICK
THE SQUARE (R) 12:00, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30
BURLINGTON
THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE (PG) 12:55, 4:15
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
GEOSTORM (PG-13) (1:20, 4:20) 7:05
BLADE RUNNER 2049 (R) 9:45
IT (R) 9:00
100 Independence Way
SUBURBICON (R) (12:35, 3:15)
MULLY (NR) 7:00
www.showcasecinemas.com
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:00,
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 7:45, 10:30
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
Tickets Available 7:00, 9:45
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) G (12:20, 12:50, 3:00)
6:00, 9:00
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) G (3:40) 6:40, 9:40
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) (12:15, 2:45) 5:15,
7:45, 10:20
JIGSAW (R) (12:15, 2:40) 5:05, 7:30, 10:00
HAPPY DEATH DAY (PG-13) (12:30)
IT (R) 4:15, 9:40
THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE (PG) 12:50, 3:20
GEOSTORM (PG-13) 6:35, 9:35
HAPPY DEATH DAY (PG-13) 12:20, 2:55
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) 12:00, 12:30, 1:00, 3:30,
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
4:00, 4:30, 6:40, 7:10, 7:40, 9:45, 10:45
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 11:30, 3:00, 6:10,
www.landmarktheatres.com
9:15, 10:15
JIGSAW (R) 12:05, 2:40, 5:10, 7:35, 10:05
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:00,
10:00
SUBURBICON (R) 5 (1:25, 4:20) 7:20
THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER (R) 5 (1:10, 4:05)
7:05
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 11:30, 12:00, 2:00,
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (R) 5 (1:20, 4:15)
FRAMINGHAM
2:30, 4:30, 5:00, 7:00, 7:30, 9:30, 10:00
7:15
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 11:30,
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (R) 1:30, 4:20,
BLADE RUNNER 2049 (R) 5 (1:00) 7:00
1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:55
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
7:05, 9:50
THE FLORIDA PROJECT (R) 5 (1:15, 4:10) 7:10
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 7:30, 10:15
THEATRES
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 7:45, 10:30
MULLY (NR) 7:00
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) 5 G (1:05) 7:00
22 Flutie Pass
SUBURBICON (R) 12:40, 7:15
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 5 G (4:00)
5 6 8 I K DIG
TYLER PERRY'S BOO 2! A MADEA HALLOWEEN
7:55, 10:30
CAMBRIDGE
(PG-13) 11:45, 2:25
WESTBOROUGH
10:00
RANDOLPH
REGAL WESTBOROUGH STADIUM 12
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) G 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
www.applecinemas.com
MULLY (NR) G 7:00
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) G 1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30,
www.amctheatres.com
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) G 7:00,
231 Turnpike Road 844-462-7342-453
5 6 8 DIG
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
www.nationalamusements.com
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
5:30, 6:30, 7:20, 8:30, 9:30, 10:05
LEXINGTON
www.REGmovies.com
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:10,
LEXINGTON VENUE
9:45
HAPPY DEATH DAY (PG-13) 11:50, 2:10, 4:30, 7:05,
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) Advance Tickets Available
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
9:25
WOBURN
5 DOL DSS
GEOSTORM (PG-13) 1:20, 4:05, 6:55, 9:45
LOVING VINCENT (PG-13) 4:30, 7:00
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:30, 12:00,
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
GOODBYE CHRISTOPHER ROBIN (PG) 4:00
12:15, 12:30, 1:00, 2:45, 3:15, 3:30, 3:45, 4:15,
VICTORIA & ABDUL (PG-13) 6:45
6:05, 6:30, 6:45, 7:00, 7:30, 9:10, 9:40, 9:55, 10:10,
5 6 8 DIG
5:00, 7:40, 10:20
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) Advance
Tickets Available 7:10, 10:05
MULLY (NR) 7:00
LE RIDE (NR) G 6:30
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 7:00, 9:20
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 1:30, 2:20, 4:00,
7:30, 10:10
PSV GARUDA VEGA (NR) 8:40
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 1:50, 4:40
ARAMM (NR) 9:45
GOLMAAL AGAIN (NR) 9:20
LOWELL
MOST BEAUTIFUL ISLAND (NR) 1:30, 7:20
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
TYLER PERRY'S BOO 2! A MADEA HALLOWEEN (PG-
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
13) 1:30, 3:40, 6:05, 10:00
5 6 8 DIG
BOSTON
5 8 DOL
SUBURBICON (R) 3:45
RIBBON (NR) 4:35
www.artsemerson.org
THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE (PG) 6:00
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
BLADE RUNNER 2049 (R) 1:30, 4:00
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) G 7:00,
9:45
SECRET SUPERSTAR (NR) 6:50
JIGSAW (R) 1:30, 5:00, 8:10
www.nationalamusements.com
7:35, 10:05, 10:35
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (R) 1:15, 3:50,
10:00
SUBURBICON (R) 11:55, 2:25, 5:00
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 1:05, 1:35, 4:10,
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) 10:35, 12:00, 12:30, 1:30,
3:15, 3:45, 4:45, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 10:10
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 9:40
www.landmarktheatres.com
VICTORIA & ABDUL (PG-13) 1:15, 3:50
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:05,
GEOSTORM (PG-13) 11:40, 2:10, 4:50, 7:45, 10:20
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
ONLY THE BRAVE (PG-13) 12:25, 3:25
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 7:20, 7:50, 10:30
9:50
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 1:00, 4:15, 7:30, 10:40
BLADE RUNNER 2049 (R) 11:00, 2:35, 6:05
JIGSAW (R) 11:50, 12:20, 2:15, 2:45
5 6 DOL DIG
10:40
ONLY THE BRAVE (PG-13) 9:35
HAPPY DEATH DAY (PG-13) 12:10, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20,
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
GEOSTORM (PG-13) 1:05, 3:40, 6:20
HAPPY DEATH DAY (PG-13) 12:05, 2:25
THOR: RAGNAROK (PG-13) 12:00, 1:00, 1:45, 3:15,
4:15, 5:00, 6:30, 7:30, 8:00, 10:40
THOR: RAGNAROK 3D (PG-13) 12:30, 3:45, 7:00,
9:30, 10:10
4:45, 7:15, 7:45, 10:05, 10:35
BLADE RUNNER 2049 (R) 8:55
THE FOREIGNER (R) 12:45, 3:35
JIGSAW (R) 12:25, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:05
TYLER PERRY'S BOO 2! A MADEA HALLOWEEN (PG-
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:05,
13) 11:45, 2:15, 6:50, 9:20
10:05
JIGSAW (R) 11:40, 12:10, 2:00, 2:30, 4:20, 4:50,
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:35,
6:40, 7:10, 9:00, 9:30
10:35
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 11:35, 1:35, 2:05,
VICTORIA & ABDUL (PG-13) 5 (1:50, 4:25) 9:30
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (PG-13) 7:05,
READING
THE SQUARE (R) 5 (2:10, 5:15) 8:15
7:35, 10:05, 10:35
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (R) 1:20, 3:55,
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
LOVING VINCENT (PG-13) 5 (1:45, 4:15) 6:55, 9:45
A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS (R) 11:05, 11:35, 1:35,
THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER (R) 5 (1:45, 4:30)
FURNITURE - READING
6:40, 9:15
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
2:05, 4:10, 4:40, 7:05, 7:35, 9:55, 10:15
7:10, 9:15
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 7:15, 7:45, 10:00,
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE (R) 10:40, 1:25,
BATTLE OF THE SEXES (PG-13) 5 (1:15, 4:00)
4:05, 6:50, 9:30
5 8
10:30
HUMAN FLOW (PG-13) 5 8:00
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 7:45, 8:00, 10:20,
www.jordansimax.com
SUBURBICON (R) 2:00, 4:35
AMAZON ADVENTURE 3D (NR) 12:00, 4:00
LADY BIRD (R) 5 7:00, 9:25
10:40
THOR: RAGNAROK -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE
GREAT WHITE SHARK (NR) 1:00, 3:00, 5:00
WONDERSTRUCK (PG) 5 (2:15, 5:10)
SUBURBICON (R) 11:30, 2:00, 4:30
(PG-13) 1:00, 7:00
(PG-13) 1:55, 4:30
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
THE FLORIDA PROJECT (R) 5 (1:40, 4:25) 7:05,
TYLER PERRY'S BOO 2! A MADEA HALLOWEEN (PG-
THOR: RAGNAROK -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
LBJ (R) 1:50, 4:20
11:00, 2:00
9:20
13) 12:25, 2:50, 5:15
(PG-13) 4:00, 10:00
LBJ (R) 6:45, 9:10
DADDY'S HOME 2 (PG-13) 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
4:10, 4:40, 6:50, 7:35, 9:25, 10:15
TYLER PERRY'S BOO 2! A MADEA HALLOWEEN
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G7
‘The absolute duty of patriots is to be dissenting,
to stand up for something.’
BILL MCKIBBEN
COREY HENDRICKSON FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Vermont the perfect setting for author’s take on patriotism
uMCKIBBEN
Continued from Page G1
men doing big and stupid things.’’
Though McKibben conceived it almost a decade ago, the timing seems
right for it now, he says.
“The absolute duty of patriots is to
be dissenting, to stand up for something,” says McKibben, sitting in his
spartan, book-filled office on the campus of Middlebury College, where he
teaches. Otherwise, he says with a
grin, “you’re what they would’ve
called a Loyalist.”
McKibben is a fan of craft beer and
classic soul, and “Radio Free Vermont” is peppered with his favorite
things, including the joys of local
brewing and the quirks of independent, small-town radio. The book also
features “the first cross-country skiing
chase in the history of world literature,” the author jokes, “and probably
the only one ever needed.” (McKibben
is the author of “Long Distance: Testing the Limits of Body and Spirit in a
Year of Living Strenuously’’ about
competitive cross-country skiing and
has served as faculty liaison for Middlebury’s Division 1 Nordic ski team.)
In fact, the book feels like a relic of
the 1970s, when farcical post-hippie
novels by Kurt Vonnegut and Tom
Robbins jammed the drugstore book
racks. McKibben’s three heroes of
classic environmental writing are Edward Abbey, Wendell Berry, and the
poet Gary Snyder, and he says he envisioned “Radio Free Vermont” in the
s p i r i t o f A b b e y ’s “ T h e M o n k e y
Wrench Gang.”
Simply put, writing it was a fun
thing to do, he says, and he’s pleased
that the early reviews have been generous.
“It’s not ‘Anna Karenina,’ I’m well
aware,” he says, relishing the chance
to think lightly for a change.
McKibben’s late father, Gordon,
was a business journalist who served
as a longtime Globe editor. After graduating from Harvard, the younger
McKibben worked for five years for
The New Yorker, writing (then-anonymous) items for the magazine’s Talk of
the Town section. He began to develop some of his ideas about the importance of community-supported business after working on a Village Voice
cover story about the fledgling world
of microbrewing with his roommate,
the future film critic David Edelstein.
“We liked the taste of the beer a
lot,” he recalls, “but it was also the
first flowering of this idea that local
was better.” He notes with pride that
his adopted state of Vermont has the
most breweries per capita in the
world.
The guerrilla broadcaster of his
new book, an aging radical named
Vern Barclay, is based in part on Ken
Squier of Vermont’s WDEV, McKibben
says. The station, in operation since
the 1930s, mixes Red Sox and stockcar racing broadcasts with local news
and specialty music programming.
“Radio has always been a big interest,” says McKibben, who once wrote a
long profile of Squier and his station
for Harper’s. For his second book,
“The Age of Missing Information,” he
studied the effects of cable TV on an
increasingly fractured (and misinformed) society.
“One of the best things about it was
that it allowed me to get rid of the TV,”
he says. “I’d done it its intellectual
due.” When his daughter was five,
McKibben and his wife were out at a
restaurant in the Adirondacks. The
place had a TV on above the register,
and their daughter was mesmerized.
“I’m watching that radio,” she said.
Today, Sophie McKibben is working at
WGBH, producing the station’s new
podcast, “The Frontline Dispatch.’’
There’s a small scene in the book in
which Vern, walking in the woods,
comes across another of McKibben’s
favorite things: a healthy pile of
moose droppings.
“[K]nowing that moose had returned to Vermont in his lifetime
pleased him enormously,” McKibben
writes. “It was the idea that things repaired themselves, that if you backed
off a little and didn’t ask too much of
the world then it would meet you halfway.”
Last weekend McKibben’s 350.org
grass-roots climate movement took
part in Pathway to Paris, a concert
event at Carnegie Hall to launch an
initiative called 1000 Cities, calling
for the world’s cities to transition to
renewable energy by 2040. Before he
spoke ( joking that he would provide
“the boring part of the evening”), the
singer Michael Stipe introduced
McKibben as “an environmental hero
of mine.”
For years now, McKibben has insisted that his advocacy for clean energy is better seen as a conservative
stance, not progressive or “liberal.”
“I want a planet that bears some
passing resemblance to the one that
all human history was enacted on,” he
says. “A planet with some ice on either
end and the odd coral reef in between.
That’s a very conservative set of demands.
“To my mind, the radicals are the
people who work for the oil companies, who get up in the morning maintaining a large fortune by altering the
chemical composition of the atmosphere. That strikes me as radical and
insane.”
If that’s crazy, then maybe it will
take a little crazy in response. Maybe
Vermont, with its eccentric radio and
ubiquitous brewpubs and its piles of
moose droppings, is just the place to
start.
E-mail James Sullivan at
jamesgsullivan@gmail.com. Follow
him on Twitter @sullivanjames.
Shalhoub
to spend
his day off
on stage
uSHALHOUB
Continued from Page G1
long time and like to support his
work.”
Bertolt Brecht’s first openly antiNazi work consists of nearly two dozen
short scenes that capture ordinary
people dealing with extraordinary circumstances: a Jewish wife who prepares to leave her husband to save his
job; a mother who purchases shoes for
her daughter but then doesn’t have
enough money to send her to the Hitler youth; parents who fear their son
has turned them in. The scenes are
harrowing in their simplicity, with
more than a few resonating with contemporary parallels.
“These scenes are part of theater
history,” says Shalhoub. “Our job as actors is to put a fresh patina on them so
that audiences can appreciate them today, but we have to approach the text
at face value. Viewers need to determine the meaning on their own.”
Commonwealth Shakespeare’s entire season is dedicated to moments
when history was in flux, and Maler’s
choices, including Ariel Dorfman’s
“Death and the Maiden” (Jan. 30-Feb.
11), “Old Money” (March 6-18), “Macbeth” (June 1), and “Richard III” (JulyAugust on Boston Common), all reflect
writers’ responses to decisions individuals made at times of uncertainty.
“I suppose it’s hard to do anything
right now that doesn’t feel political,”
Shalhoub says. But great theater is defined by “plays that are compelling
whenever they are produced.”
The musical “The Band’s Visit,”
which opened on Broadway last
SARA KRULWICH/THE NEW YORK TIMES
FEAR AND MISERY IN
THE THIRD REICH
A staged reading, presented by
Commonwealth Shakespeare
Company. At Carling­Sorenson
Theater, Babson College, Wellesley,
Nov. 13. Tickets: 866­811­4111,
commshakes.org
month after a successful run at the Atlantic Theater Company, tells the story
of an Egyptian orchestra made up of
policemen that arrives in Israel to perform at an Arabic cultural center but
winds up in an isolated village instead.
“When we started rehearsing offBroadway, we thought this was simply
a fish-out-of-water story about human
connection,” says Shalhoub. “We were
in technical rehearsals when the [presidential] election happened and suddenly the play had a different kind of
weight and significance because the
landscape had shifted.”
Now, one year into the show and
playing in a larger, Broadway house,
Shalhoub says the audiences continue
to respond with comments about how
important the play is right now.
“We don’t do it for that reason,” he
says. “We try to tell the stories of these
ordinary people and the ways in which
they respond to each other.”
Although he will have limited rehearsal time for the reading of “Fear
and Misery in the Third Reich,” Shalhoub says he has lots of experience
playing opposite his wife, and the combination of familiarity and the material can add to the dramatic tension.
“We will be flying a little by the seat
of our pants,” he says with a laugh,
“but it’s good to have that challenge.”
Terry Byrne can be reached at
trbyrne@aol.com.
On his day off from
“The Band’s Visit,”
Tony Shalhoub (pictured with Katrina
Lenk in the Broadway show) will join
his wife, Brooke
Adams, and other
actors in a script-inhand reading of
“Fear and Misery in
the Third Reich” at
Babson College.
T h e
G8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, N O V E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
ASK AMY
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
Recommendations to heal
a daughter’s wounded soul
Q. I had a bad childhood, where I was physically and emotionally abused by my mother. She
was a single mother of four, and I am the oldest.
I am now responsible for my aged mother’s
care and finances.
I find myself very resentful and holding
grudges from more than 40 years ago that interfere with my ability to be a loving daughter,
rather than merely a responsible daughter.
Can you recommend a book for me to read
that would help put things in perspective? I
feel like I need to see that my adult life really
isn’t dependent on my childhood.
TIRED IN NEBRASKA
A. My first recommendation will help you see
that you are not alone. You are part of a sisterhood, but you might not realize it. Read Susan
Forward’s “Mothers Who Can’t Love: A Healing Guide for Daughters,” written with coauthor Donna Frazier Glynn (2013, Harper Collins).
My next recommendation is intended to inspire you to feel your authentic feelings, love
yourself, and perhaps find your way to understanding and acceptance, if not outright forgiveness.
You could start with any of Pema Chodron’s
meditations, lectures, lessons, or books, but
this one might be best for you now: “The Places
That Scare You: A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times” (2001, Shambhala).
And this final message is from me: Take
heart. You are doing the heavy lifting of life,
and your frequent exposure to your mother at
this stage will understandably plunge you back
into that tender state when you were a vulnerable child to an abusive mother.
You might not be able to move beyond being a “responsible” daughter to being a loving
one, but you might find a measure of peace in
merely abiding and understanding that you
are doing the best you can.
I think it really helps to talk about it, write
about it, sing about it, and shout about it. Get
exercise, be creative, spend time in nature,
nurture your friendships if you can, and find
ways to allow the world to take care of you.
JEFF NEUMANN/CBS
Julianna Margulies (above in “The Good Wife”) will play a magazine editor in “Dietland.”
Margulies returning to TV in AMC’s ‘Dietland’
If you miss “The Good Wife,” you have “The
Good Fight” on CBS All Access, the network’s pay
streaming platform. Diane Lockhart and her hair
helmet are still doing their thing in the Chicago
legal community.
And soon you’ll be able to watch Julianna
Margulies every week. She has just signed on for
the leading role in a new AMC series called “Dietland,” based on Sarai Walker’s darkly comic 2015
bestseller about the beauty industry. Margulies
will play Kitty, a magazine editor targeted by a
feminist organization. Joy Nash, who was in “The
Mindy Project” and “Twin Peaks,” will costar as
an obese woman whose decision to have lap band
surgery places her in the middle of a conflict between rival feminist factions.
The show is from Marti Noxon, a producerwriter whose work includes “UnREAL,” “Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce,” and “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” “Juliana is diabolically talented and
beautiful, which makes her perfect to play our
Kitty,” Noxon said in a statement. “I am genuinely
honored to have the opportunity to work with
her. She’s a special human and a rare actor. I can’t
wait to start and for the world to get a load of this
show.”
Thursday November 9, 2017
7:00pm
BASIC CABLE
First 48 (CC): A man F. 48 (CC): A former First 48: An update
is gunned down.
Marine is shot.
on a case. NEW
Chronicle Grey's Anatomy HD Scandal (CC) HD
TV-14-S NEW
TV-14 NEW
HD
How to Get Away
TV-14-DLSV NEW
News
(CC) HD
J Kimmel
NEW
6 WLNE ABC Daily
7
WHDH News
(CC) HD
Inside E Grey's NEW
Extra HD Family F Family F
TV-PG
NEW
NEW
Murder NEW
News HD
News
News
(CC) HD
J Kimmel
(11:35)
Extra
NBC Boston
Football Night in
Arizona (CC) Live.
WBZ Wheel
CBS NEW
5
WCVB News
ABC (CC)
News
(CC)
Old House Hour HD
TV-G NEW
Jeopardy Big Bang Sheldon
NEW
NEW
NEW
9:30pm
This Is The House
That Jack Built (CC)
Mom
Life in
NEW
NEW
Scandal NEW
News HD
(8:20) Thursday Night Football (CC): Seattle Seahawks at
Arizona Cardinals. Live.
9 WMUR ABC N.H. Ch.
10
WBTS News
NBC (CC)
Inside E Grey's NEW
Scandal NEW
Murder NEW
News
Football Night (CC) (8:20) Thursday Night Football (CC): Seattle Seahawks at
Live. HD
Arizona Cardinals. Live. HD
11
WENH Greater
PBS Boston
Steves
12
WPRI Wheel
CBS NEW
Jeopardy Big Bang Sheldon
NEW
NEW
NEW
25
WFXT ET Enter
FOX
TMZ HD
TV-PG
27
WUNI Enamorándome de
Ramón (CC) HD
36
WSBE Cook's
PBS Country
38
WSBK Big Bang Big Bang News HD
Theory
Theory
44
WGBX British Baking (CC)
PBS HD TV-PG
50
56
WBIN Happen. 227 (CC) 'Harry' NEW
WLVI Goldberg Goldberg Supernatural (CC):
CW
Billie returns. NEW
Vietnam/Telling
(2017) HD TV-PG
Gotham (CC) HD
TV-14-LV NEW
Charlie Rose (CC)
HD TV-G NEW
Mom
NEW
S.W.A.T. (CC) HD
TV-14-L NEW
News
News (CC)
News
(CC)
Late Sh.
NEW
(11:35)
TMZ
Caer En Tentación
(CC) HD
News
(CC) HD
Noticiero
Uni
Double Feature
(CC) HD
BBC
News
As Time
Goes By
Law & Order: CI
(CC) HD TV-14-V
Law & Order: CI
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
Seinfeld
TV-PG
Seinfeld
TV-PG
Dickensian (CC)
The Queen's
PBS NewsHour
Palaces (CC) TV-PG (CC) HD
Jeffers.
All/Fam.
Arrow: Joe is taken
hostage. NEW
Johnny Carson
News (CC)
Life in
NEW
(9:01) Orville HD
TV-14-DLSV NEW
Story HD Woven in Time: The Nazi M/Weapons
Narraganse. HD
(CC) HD TV-PG
64
WNAC ET Enter
FOX
Gotham (CC) HD
TV-14-LV NEW
(9:01) Orville HD
TV-14-DLSV NEW
News
68
WBPX Blue Bloods: Danny Blue Bloods (CC)
ION is taken off a case. HD TV-14
Blue Bloods (CC)
HD TV-14-LV
Blue Bloods (CC)
HD TV-14-DL
TMZ HD
TV-PG
PREMIUM CABLE
A Cure for Wellness (2017) (CC): Man travels to a
strange spa to rescue his company's CEO. HD R
Cinemax
(6:00) Box (2009)
(CC) HD PG-13
Encore
(7:07) The Game Plan (2007) (CC): A QB
learns he has a daughter. HD PG
Flix
(6:10) ★★ Thing
(1982) (CC) HD R
Assassin Vice
News
HBO
★ Doom (2005) (CC): Adaptation of the
video game. HD TV-MA-LV
Get Out (2017): Black man uncovers
conspiracy. HD R
Showtime
Black
Sabbath
Showtime 2
(6:00) Bleed for This 11:55 (2016): Man must avoid
(2016) HD R
confrontation. HD NR NEW
Starz!
Resident (7:15) ★★ Snatch (2000):
Girlfriend Girlfriend
Evil
Exp.
Thieves pursue a diamond. R Exp.
(6:00) Stander: Cop ★★★ The Score (2001) (CC): A thief
turns bank robber. ponders a last heist. HD R
Conan
SPORTS
Patriots Boston Sports Tonight (CC) Live. HD
Football
Count.
ESPN Classic
(6:00) Classic Fball
(CC)
ESPN 2
Fantasy SC
Veterans 30 for 30 (CC): A look at
Show HD Featured Day Live. wrestler Ric Flair. HD
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
PGA Golf PGA Tour Golf (CC): OHL Classic at Mayakoba. Taped. HD
Powernation NEW
Caffeine Caffeine /Drive HD NEW
Motor.
Bruins
Behind/B Behind/B C. Moore Behind/B C. Moore Sports
FAMILY
Gumball Gumball King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad Burgers
Raven's Andi
K.C. Un. Bizaard. Raven's Stuck/
Bunk'd
HD TV-G Home
Mack
Home
Middle
Nickelodeon
Noggin
(11:05) ★ Jackass:
Movie TV-MA-LSV
Gigolos
SMILF
(CC) HD
(9:56) ★★★ Dr. T and the Women (2000)
(CC): A doctor's life is followed. HD R
(10:05) Revolver (2005) (CC): An ex-con
seeks revenge. HD TV-14
ESPN
Freeform
Blue Bloods (CC)
HD TV-14-LV
Arsenal (2017) (CC): A man must rescue
his brother. HD R
(6:30) Early Edition
(CC) Live. HD
Cartoon
Disney
Goldberg
Hunting
(9:45) ★★ Primeval: A killer
crocodile is tracked. TV-14-LV Party
Vice P.
The Fight (10:50) Day the
Game
Earth (2008) TV-PG
Comcast
SportsNet
College Football (CC): UNC (1-8) at Pittsburgh (4-5) in ACC
play. From Heinz Field. Live. HD
Classic
Boxing
Fam Ties
Modern
Family
Last House on the Left (2009):
Remake of the 1972 chiller. R
★★ Constantine (2005) (CC): L.A. cop
Tracey
(8:14) Tracey
Ullman's Ullman's HD TV-MA probes twin's murder. HD TV-14-LV
(7:15) Hell/High Water (2016): SMILF
White
(10:05) Shameless
Two brothers rob banks. R
(CC) HD Famous (CC) HD TV-MA
Curb
Celtics
Post Up
Newhart
Modern
Family
(11:05)
Seinfeld
The Dancer (1999) (CC): A dancer dreams (10:54) Never Back
of Broadway. HD PG-13 NEW
Down (2008) PG-13
HBO 2
TMC
J Kimmel
News
(CC)
This Is The House
Ireland's Lost
That Jack Built (CC) Babies
Rosa de Guadalupe Mi marido tiene
HD TV-14-D
familia (CC) HD
Father Brown (CC)
TV-PG
News
(CC)
Classic
Boxing
Classic
Boxing
SportsCenter (CC) Live. HD
Classic Boxing (CC) Classic
Boxing
Classic Boxing: Top
Mike Tyson bouts.
Women's International Friendly Soccer
(CC): Canada vs. U.S. Live. HD
Golf Cen LPGA Tour Golf
Motor.
Hammers NEW
Behind/B Sports
Dining
Burgers
Liv and
Maddie
★★★ Grease (1978) (CC): Teens fall in love in the
(6:00) ★★ Coming/Amer.: A
prince seeks a princess. TV-PG 1950s. HD TV-PG-DL
SpongBob SpongBob ★★★ SpongeBob Movie (2004) HD TV-G Fresh P. Fresh P.
Blaze
Top Wing Peppa
Peppa
Peppa
Paw P.
Paw P.
Paw P.
Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
Bizaard. Raven's
Home
The 700 Club (CC)
TV-G
HD
Friends
Blaze
Friends
Blaze
A&E
7:30pm
Powered by
7:00pm
Steves
9:00pm
Specials
Charlie Rose (CC)
HD TV-G
News
Late Sh.
NEW
4
8:30pm
News
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
WGBH Greater
PBS Boston
8:00pm
Sports
Q. Your beautiful response to the question from
“Awkward” brought a tear to my eye. Awkward
had a negative reaction to her in-laws’ habit of
saying “love you” to her, even though she didn’t
know them well.
I hope she follows your advice to open herself up to this expression.
She’ll be happier if she does.
GRATEFUL
A. I agree, and thank you.
Ireland's Lost
Babies (CC) TV-PG
S.W.A.T. (CC) HD
TV-14-L NEW
2
7:30pm
Movies
Q. My husband and I rent out our second bedroom to my husband’s younger, 30-year-old
cousin, “Bradley.” He is a generally nice guy,
but he is seriously immature and financially irresponsible.
He started off with a well-paying job where
he could easily pay his expenses, but he did not
like the job, so he quit.
He has a new job now, but it is at much lower pay and he cannot afford anything. We’ve allowed him to delay paying rent for a few
months until his finances are back on track, so
he lives for free. He bums food off of anyone he
can. If not us, then he goes and asks his friends
or neighbors to buy him dinner.
He seems fine with this and has no interest
in looking for better work or a new job.
He was a moocher before, but now it is out
of control. We cannot afford to financially support him the way we do.
My husband has agreed to kick him out in a
few months, if he can’t get it together. As much
as “Bradley” annoys me, I would feel guilty
kicking him out because he has nowhere else
to go. He has been jumping from house to
house for years, asking people if he can live
with them. No one wants him to move in with
them now because they know how he is. What
should we do?
WORRIED
A. At this point, you really can’t blame “Bradley” for his behavior, because . . . it works!
Look, he started out paying his way, and now
he has you supporting him. He might be a
sharper tool than any of you realize.
You and your husband need to develop a
backbone, and realize that your enabling is not
helping. In fact, Bradley has taken a serious
backslide since coming to live with you, and is
now less functional than before.
Firm boundaries, realistic and real-world
consequences (i.e. “You can’t afford to live
here, and so you’ll have to move”), and loving
detachment are called for.
8:00pm
8:30pm
9:00pm
9:30pm
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
Eleven: A stop in
Panama City. NEW
(11:03) The First 48
(CC) HD TV-14
(4:00) Lord/Rings
(2001) HD TV-14-V
★★★ The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) (CC): Frodo continues on his
quest to destroy the evil ring in the second chapter of this epic trilogy. HD TV-PG-V
Animal Planet Yukon Men (CC): A
fire. HD TV-14-L
Yukon Men: Dealing Yukon Men (CC) HD Yukon Men (CC) HD Y. Men (CC): A man
TV-14-L
TV-14-LV
hunts for caribou.
with the fallout.
AMC
BBC America
BET
Star Trek: Voyager Quantum of Solace: James Bond action adventure.
★★★ Hustle & Flow (2005) (CC): A pimp seeks redemption by (9:59)
Martin
becoming a rapper. HD TV-14-DL
Bravo
Top Chef Jr. (CC)
CMT
CNN
Comedy
Central
★★ Pirates/Chest TV-PG-V
Last Man Pirates/Tides (2011): Jack enters Blackbeard's ship. TV-PG-V
OutFront HD NEW
Anderson Cooper
Anderson Cooper
CNN Tonight Live.
CNN Tonight Live.
South
South
South
South
Nathan for You (CC): A Bill Gates
Daily
Klepper
Park
Park
Park
Park
impersonator. HD TV-14-L NEW
NEW
NEW
CSPAN
CSPAN 2
Dest. America
Discovery
DIY
E!
Fit & Health
Food
(4:00) Public Affairs Events
Politics and Public Policy Today
U.S.
Public Affairs Events: Public affairs events, congressional hearings, speeches, and interviews.
Paranormal Wit.
Paranormal Wit.
Paranormal Wit.
Paranormal Wit.
Paranormal Wit.
Fast N' Loud NEW
MythBusters: Jamie tests a motorcycle myth. HD TV-PG NEW Finding HD TV-14-L
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Paradise Paradise Love
Love
Love
Love
E! News NEW
Xscape Still NEW
Housewives/Atl.
Platinum Life NEW E! News NEW
Body Bizarre TV-14 Mystery (CC) TV-PG Mystery Diagnosis Mystery Diagnosis Mystery (CC) TV-PG
Chopped: A giant
Chopped (CC) HD
Beat Bob Beat Bob Beat Bob Beat Bob
Chopped (CC) HD
TV-G
circle of dough.
TV-G NEW
NEW
Fox Movies
Fox News
FUSE
FX
Hallmark
Home &
Garden
Savages FXM
(7:45) X-Men: First Class (2011) (CC) TV-14
X-Men 1st Class (2011) TV-14
MacCallum NEW
Carlson NEW
Hannity HD NEW
Ingraham Angle HD Fox News @ Night
Trivial
Trivial
Scrubs
Scrubs
Scrubs
Scrubs
Scrubs
Scrubs
Death Race 2
Ride
Ted 2 (2015): A teddy bear wants a child. TV-MA-LS Better Things NEW Better
Ted 2
(6:00) Sleigh Bells
Festival of Ice: An ice-sculpture contest. My Christmas Love (2016) (CC) HD TV-G
Ft. Worth Flip or
Flip or
Flip or
Ft. Worth Flip/Flop House H. House
Vintage Vintage
HD TV-G Flop
Flop
Flop
NEW
Atl. TV-G NEW
NEW
Flip TV-G Flip TV-G
History
Curse of Oak Island: Curse of Oak (CC): Trouble unfolds
Matty Blake. TV-PG during a dive. HD TV-PG NEW
(10:01) Ice Road
Truckers NEW
(11:04) Curse of Oak
Island: Matty Blake.
HLN
HSN
ID
S.E. Cupp Live. HD Primetime Justice
Beauty Report TV-G Beauty Report TV-G
Grave Secrets: The Grave Secrets (CC)
death of a woman. HD TV-14-LV
Forensic Forensic
The List TV-G
Home Alone (CC)
HD TV-14-V NEW
Forensic Forensic
Fragranc Beauty
Grave Secrets (CC)
HD TV-14-LV
IFC
★★★ Mission: Impossible III (2006) (CC): A spy battles an
(6:15) Jonah Hex
(2010) HD TV-14-LV arms dealer in this action sequel. HD TV-14-LV
Lifetime
LMN
MSNBC
MTV
National
Geographic
Grey's Anatomy
Adopting Terror
Hardball HD NEW
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Running Wild (CC)
HD TV-PG
NatGeoWild
NECN
Ovation
OWN
Bandit Patrol TV-PG Incredible Dr. Pol
Incredible Dr. Pol
Incredible Dr. Pol
Incredible Dr. Pol
The Take Business The Take Business necn News 9PM
necn News 10Pm
necn News 11PM
★★★ Field of Dreams: A farmer builds a ballpark.
Count of Monte: Framed prisoner plots escape.
20/20 on OWN: Four 20/20 on OWN (CC) 20/20 on OWN (CC) 20/20 on ID (CC) HD 20/20 on OWN (CC)
TV-14
murders. TV-14-V
HD TV-14-V
HD TV-14-DL
HD TV-14-V
Oxygen
QVC
Science
Spike
Sundance
NCIS (CC) TV-14
NCIS (CC) TV-14
Dan & Rick's Gift Guide (CC) HD NEW
What on Earth?
Strange Evidence
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Law & Order (CC)
Law & Order (CC)
TV-14-L
TV-14-DLV
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
★★ Shooter TV-14
(5:30) Pirates/World's (2007) HD TV-PG
Van Helsing NEW
Ghost Wars NEW
Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan NEW
★★★ Anna/Siam (CC): An Anglo gal acts as teacher. ★★★ Kismet (1944) (CC) TV-G
They Were Exp/
My 600-lb Life: A 660-lb. man. HD TV-14
My 600-lb Life TV-14 My 600-lb Life TV-14 My 600-lb Life
Bones TV-14-DLV
NBA Basketball (CC): Cleveland at Houston. Live. HD NBA Basketball (CC) Live. HD
Myster. Museum
Museum NEW
Museum NEW
Myster. Museum
Myster. Museum
Carbon. Carbon. Carbon. Carbon. Carbon. Carbon. Carbon. Carbon. Gethard NEW
M*A*S*H M*A*S*H (8:12) Raymond
Raymond Raymond Mom
Mom
King/Qu. King/Qu.
Cosby
Cosby
Cosby
D. World Cosby
D. World D. World D. World Single
Single
Chrisley Chrisley Chrisley Chrisley Chrisley Chrisley Chrisley Cromart. Modern Modern
Knows
Knows
Knows
Knows
Knows
Knows
NEW
NEW
Family
Family
VH-1
WAM
WE
(6:00) Space Jam
(6:12) Sleepless
Braxton Family
HD
Quantum/Solace (2008) TV-14
Martin
Rundown Get Down
NEW
TV-PG
NEW
Listing L.A. (CC) HD Listing L.A. (CC) HD Real Estate (CC) HD Watch
TV-14
TV-14 NEW
TV-14 NEW
NEW
Inside/Cuomo HD
The List TV-G
Blood Relatives HD
TV-14 NEW
Listing
L.A.
Jonah Hex (2010)
(CC) HD TV-14-LV
P/Runway NEW
Project Runway TV-PG-L NEW Star
Beauty Star NEW
My Baby Is Gone! (2017) (CC) HD TV-14-D Surrogate: A crazed surrogate is hired.
All In/Hayes Live.
Maddow NEW
Last Word Live. HD The 11th Hour Live.
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Running Wild: Ben Running Wild (CC) Running Wild: Ed
Running Wild (CC)
Stiller joins Bear.
HD TV-PG
Helms joins Bear.
HD TV-PG
NCIS (CC) TV-PG
NCIS: Part 1 of 2.
NCIS (CC) TV-14-LV
Shoe Shopping Live. Jane's Gift Favorites (CC) Live. HD TV-G
Strange Evidence
Strange Evidence
Strange Evidence
★★★ I, Robot: Robots are killing humans. TV-14-LV Bad Boys
Law & Order (CC)
Law & Order (CC)
Law & Order (CC)
TV-14-DLS
TV-14-DLV
TV-14-DLV
★★★ Indepndnc. Day (1996): Aliens attack Earth. HD TV-PG-LV ★★ Evan Almighty
★★ Big Fat Liar (2002) HD
Beethoven's 5th
(9:29) ★★ Adventures/B.B.
Braxton Family
Tamar NEW
Growing NEW
Tamar & Vince
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
130
Размер файла
21 967 Кб
Теги
The Boston Globe, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа