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The Boston Globe – March 22, 2018

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Th u r s d a y, M a r c h 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
City Hall
The RMV got faster, but a roadblock looms officials’
trial is
canceled
‘The inconvenience of doing it, is it really going to make me any safer?’
TOM MCMANUS, on paying for the documents required for a Real ID
Integration of Real ID could erase progress the state has made on shortening its wait times
By Adam Vaccaro
GLOBE STAFF
The lines moved quickly at the
downtown Boston Registry of Motor
Vehicles on Wednesday afternoon,
proof of a recent turnaround that
has surprised many who remember
the days of endless waits and surly
customer service agents.
In the news
Drivers were renewing their licenses or obtaining new titles in as
little as 15 minutes. On average, 92
percent of customers waited less
than 30 minutes in February, according to state data, the third
straight month over 85 percent.
That compares to 66 percent as recently as last September.
15%
Thursday: Blustery, cloudy.
High: 39-44. Low: 29-34
RMV, Page A8
GLOBE STAFF
full-time jobs exist
in the Mass.
cranberry industry;
an additional
4,800 jobs rely
on cranberry
production
$1.4b
25%
CHINATOPIX VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2016
tariff on steel in addition to
a 10% tariff on aluminum
The tariff that will add to the price of steel from China
could lead to retaliatory tariffs on cranberries from the US.
Women training to become
surgeons face daunting
challenges juggling their
Specialists
say to fix
State Police,
fix culture
The head of the Vatican’s
communications department resigned after he mischaracterized a private letter from retired Pope Benedict XVI, then had a photo of
it digitally manipulated and
sent out to the media. A4.
The Federal Reserve voted
to raise interest rates, a
move that means quicker
growth of savings accounts
but also means it will cost
more to borrow money for
homes, cars, education, and
more. B10.
Accountability called
root of problems
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2017
in Massachusetts.
The Bay State’s top agricultural food crop — valued at close to $70 million in 2016, according to the
most recent government data — could now face a 25
percent tariff on exports to Europe. Exacerbating the
challenge is the booming cranberry industry in Quebec, which outproduced Massachusetts for the first
time in 2014 and could see further growth if US cranberries are suddenly more expensive for European
consumers.
The series of scandals that has tarnished the Massachusetts State Police
since last fall — most recently the alleged theft of overtime pay — speaks to
an organization suffering from a breakdown of professional culture and accountability, police and legal specialists
say.
“You couldn’t have an overtime fraud
scheme if accountability was in place,”
said Ronal W. Serpas, who served 34
years in law enforcement and was formerly police superintendent in New Orleans, police chief in Nashville, and
chief of the Washington State Patrol.
The next step for a law enforcement
CRANBERRIES, Page A12
STATE POLICE, Page A8
The humble cranberry may be one casualty in a trade war
By Matt Viser
GLOBE STAFF
WASHINGTON — When President Trump imposed stiff tariffs on steel and aluminum imports earlier this month, he invited metal workers in hard hats
to the White House signing ceremony, saying the
move would protect their jobs.
But a few weeks later, the ripple effects of that decision are being felt in other industries across the
country as the European Union prepares to retaliate.
One potential victim: the humble cranberry industry
For breaking news, updated
stories, and more, visit our website:
Zuckerberg admits mistakes
Lists Facebook
privacy changes
BostonGlobe.com
By Hiawatha Bray
VOL . 293, NO. 81
After days of silence, Facebook chief executive Mark
Zuckerberg apologized
Wednesday for lax privacy policies that permitted a political
research firm unauthorized access to information on millions
of Facebook users that it used
to assist Republican Donald
*
Suggested retail price
$2.50
By Mark Arsenault
GLOBE STAFF
RETALIATION IN RED
next president of the Massachusetts Senate — a
move her colleagues hope
will settle a chamber in upheaval. B1.
The upcoming trial of two City Hall
officials accused of illegally pressuring
organizers of the Boston Calling music
festival into hiring union members was
canceled Wednesday after federal prosecutors conceded their evidence was unlikely to meet the judge’s standard for
conviction.
US District Judge Leo T. Sorokin did
not outright dismiss extortion charges
against Kenneth Brissette and Timothy
Sullivan, who allegedly threatened to
withhold permits for the festival in September 2014 if organizers did not hire
union members.
But he told prosecutors and defense
attorneys he was canceling the public
corruption trial, which had been scheduled to begin next week, amid a flurry of
motions indicating that neither side
wanted the high-profile case to move
forward.
Prosecutors had acknowledged that
TRIAL, Page A7
residencies with the demands of pregnancy and
motherhood, according to a
new survey. B10.
Senator Karen E. Spilka said
she has the votes to be the
Prosecutors’ evidence
won’t meet judge’s test
By Maria Cramer
state estimate of the industry’s impact
Friday: Brisk, chilly.
High: 40-45. Low: 29-34.
High tide: 3:14 a.m. 3:46 p.m.
Sunrise: 6:44 Sunset: 6:58
Complete report, C8
zenship or lawful presence in the
country, as well as Massachusetts
residency.
The ID rules come from a 2005
US law as an added security measure
following the 9/11 attacks, and
states have slowly rolled them out
since. Come October 2020, non-Real
2,100
of the world’s
cranberries
come from
Massachusetts and
its 13,500 acres
of commercial
cranberry bogs
Spring broke
But business may not run as
smoothly starting next week, as the
availability of a new kind of license
has state officials bracing for an increase in branch traffic that could
test the agency’s ability to keep pace.
The new driver’s licenses, known
as Real ID, require drivers to show
more documents to prove US citi-
GLOBE STAFF
Trump during the 2016 presidential election.
“This was a major breach of
trust, and I’m really sorry that
this happened. You know, we
have a basic responsibility to
protect people’s data and if we
can’t do that then we don’t deserve to have the opportunity
to serve people,” he said in a
rare live interview on CNN
Wednesday night.
In the interview, and in an
earlier message on his own Facebook page, Zuckerberg
vowed that the company would
improve privacy protections.
Zuckerberg told CNN that
he is willing to testify before
Congress about his company.
He also said he is open to certain government regulations,
such as one that would require
the disclosure of the identities
of Facebook advertisers and
their sources of funding.
The remarks were Zuckerberg’s first public responses to
perhaps the worst crisis the giZUCKERBERG, Page A9
JAY JANNER/AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN VIA AP
MANHUNT ENDS — Three weeks of terror in Austin,
Texas, came to a close early Wednesday, when the
suspect in a series of bombings blew himself up in a
car following a police chase. A2.
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T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Texas bombings tested police for weeks
Cellphone, video
data gave breaks
Fleeing, suspect
died in final blast
By Eva Ruth Moravec
and Devlin Barrett
WASHINGTON POST
AUSTIN, Texas — Before the
intense, three-week manhunt
in a series of bombings came to
a sudden, explosive end in a
roadside ditch in the early
hours of Wednesday, the FBI
agents and police investigators
tasked with identifying the
bomber seemed at times to be
chasing ghosts.
They ran down theories of
drug dealer retaliation gone
awry and struggled to understand the significance of family
connections between the victims. All the while, the bomber
escalated his attacks — first using a trip wire, then by sending
explosives through FedEx.
But behind the scenes, investigators had used cell tower
data to tie Mark Anthony Conditt, a 23-year-old from the Austin suburbs, to the bombing
sites and other important locations, Texas’s governor said
Wednesday. And when the suspected bomber used FedEx, law
enforcement caught an even
bigger break: He had been captured on a store’s video surveillance system.
The furious manhunt for
Conditt culminated after one of
the surveillance teams scouring
the area spotted his red SUV in
a hotel parking lot in Round
Rock, about 18 miles north of
Austin, the Texas capital.
Officers closed in, and Conditt ultimately detonated a
bomb and was killed. The
bloody confrontation brought
an end to three weeks of terror
in which investigators believe
Conditt planted at least six
bombs, either at homes or in
the FedEx delivery system. The
devices killed two people and
injured several others, and officials warned he could have left
more bombs elsewhere that
have yet to be found.
‘‘This is the culmination of
three very long weeks for our
community,’’ said Austin Police
Chief Brian Manley, adding,
‘‘We don’t know where this suspect has spent his last 24 hours,
and therefore, we still need to
remain vigilant to ensure that
no other packages or devices
DREW ANTHONY SMITH/GETTY IMAGES
Law enforcement officials searched the home of suspected bomber Mark Anthony Conditt on Wednesday in Pflugerville, Texas.
have been left through the community.’’
On Wednesday, FBI officials
searched Conditt’s home for
clues about what might have
motivated the attacks as they
advised Austin residents to remain wary. They took two of his
roommates into custody for
questioning — though they released one and said neither was
under arrest.
Conditt attended Austin
Community College from 2010
to 2012 but did not graduate,
according to the school. He was
a home-schooled student who
described himself on a blog as
“not that politically inclined”
but expressed conservative
views on issues like same-sex
marriage and the death penalty.
Friends and neighbors described him as a loner.
“Sometimes he was a very
intense person,” said Jeremiah
Jensen, a friend from the homeschooling community in
Pflugerville. “He could sometimes get frustrated. There
FACEBOOK VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
The motive for Conditt’s
attacks was unclear.
were times he could get angry
over a misunderstanding.”
Mark Roessler, 57, a neighbor, described Conditt as ‘‘quiet,
introverted, polite and cleancut.’’ He said he last saw Conditt
about a week ago, when they
both arrived home at the same
time. ‘‘We didn’t make eye contact,’’ Roessler said. ‘‘In retro-
spect, he was certainly in the
midst of all of this.’’
Eddie Harp, who has been
friends with the Conditt family
for 15 years, read a short statement to the media outside the
Conditts’ home, saying:
‘‘I have a simple and heartfelt statement from the family.
This will be their only statement. The family is grieved not
only for their loss but also for
the loss of those affected by
these heinous actions. The family’s present focus is on dealing
with their shock and loss and
cooperating with the police investigation. If you are a praying
person, please join us in praying for the families of all who
have lost loved ones.’’
Law enforcement officials
said they had no idea what
might have triggered Conditt to
carry out the bombings, but
Governor Greg Abbott, a Republican, said he expected they
would find a ‘‘treasure trove of
information’’ inside Conditt’s
home. Agents have found com-
ponents that match materials
used in the bombs in the suspect’s house, but not completed
bombs, officials said. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has been
able to reconstruc t all the
bombs. ‘‘We know it’s the same
person who manufactured all of
these,’’ said Deputy Assistant
Director Fred Milanowski.
Conditt had been an enigma.
After the first explosion killed
Anthony House, 39, March 2,
police were reluctant to call it a
homicide. They at first explored
a theory in which House might
have been the unintended recipient of a bomb meant for a
drug-dealing neighbor. When
two more bombs went off 10
days later, they shifted gears.
Over 350 law enforcement personnel descended on Austin.
They explored family ties between House and the second
victim, Draylen Mason, 17, and
whether the episodes might
have been racially motivated.
House’s stepfather and Mason’s
grandfather were friends and
prominent members of Austin’s
African-American community.
They wondered whether that
made them targets.
The bombs continued.
A device activated with a
trip wire injured two people,
and investigators then discovered two packages that had
been sent through FedEx. One
exploded at a FedEx facility in
Schertz, while the other was recovered from a facility in Austin.
The governor said officials
first tied Conditt to the explosions by his cellphone, which
they were able to detect was at
the bombing sites.
FedEx surveillance footage
would prove critical. It showed
Conditt in a wig and gloves, and
officers soon obtained a receipt
for the disguise, Abbott said.
‘‘That proved to be the case,’’
Austin Mayor Steve Adler said.
Material from The New York
Times was used in this report.
Daily Briefing
Answers sought on why Sacramento police shot unarmed black man 20 times
Judge takes hard line after school shooting
SACRAMENTO — Relatives,
activists, and Sacramento officials are questioning why police shot at an unarmed black
man 20 times, killing him,
when he turned out to be holding only a cellphone in his
grandparents’ backyard.
Relatives have identified the
man as Stephan Alonzo Clark,
22, according to The Sacramento Bee. His fiancee, Salena
Manni, the mother of his sons,
ages 1 and 3, said his first
name was Stephon.
‘‘We’re mourning right now
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.
— A relatively high bond was
imposed Wednesday in a case
involving a student who
brought a knife to Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High
School, one day after the
same judge set a $500,000
bond for the brother of the
shooting suspect for trespassing at the school.
Broward County Judge
Kim Theresa Mollica ordered
18-year-old Jordan Salter held
on $12,500 bond after she
brought a knife with a 2-inch
blade to the school.
Authorities arrested her after a confrontation with another student Tuesday in the
cafeteria.
The SunSentinel reported
that Salter attorney Brian
Reidy called the high bond
‘‘out of control’’ and ‘‘ridicu-
and so we need our time to
mourn,’’ she said Wednesday.
Police said the man was
spotted breaking at least three
vehicle windows Sunday night.
Sheriff’s deputies in a helicopter said they saw him break a
neighbor’s sliding glass door.
Two arriving officers chased
him into the backyard of his
grandparents’ home, where he
was staying.
The department said he refused orders to stop and show
his hands. He advanced toward
the officers holding an object
extended in front of him, the
department said. The officers
thought he was pointing a
handgun and opened fire, fearing for their safety, the department said.
No gun was found and only
the cellphone was near his
body when more officers arrived and approached him
about five minutes after the
shooting, the department said.
‘‘He was at the wrong place
at the wrong time in his own
backyard?’’ Clark’s grandmother, Sequita Thompson, told The
Bee. ‘‘C’mon now, they didn’t
have to do that.’’
The department could not
say how many times Clark was
hit. The department said the
two officers have been with
Sacramento police for two and
four years.
Black Lives Matter Sacramento called it a police murder
and wants quick answers.
The department is required
to release video from the helicopter and the officers’ body
cameras within 30 days.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Utah eases access to birth control
Parents accused of racial taunts at game
SALT LAKE CITY — Women in conservative Utah will
soon be able to get birth control directly from a pharmacist
rather than visiting a doctor
each time they want to obtain
or renew a prescription, a
move taken by only a few other states, many of them liberal.
Republican Governor Gary
Herbert signed a measure into
law Tuesday allowing those 18
and older to get pills, the
patch, and some other contraceptive devices, putting Utah
in line with a handful of other
states that have passed similar
laws, including California, Colorado, and Oregon.
‘‘I think five years ago, it
wouldn’t have passed, but I
think the world and Utah is
ALBUQUERQUE — A New
Mexico youth soccer league is
investigating allegations that
parents yelled racial slurs at
Hispanic players and that a
parent physically assaulted
one of the girls during a game.
The Duke City Soccer
League said it is looking into
reports that a white man
choked and groped a 14-yearold player during a match Saturday in Bernalillo, N.M.,
which spectators say was filled
with racial tensions.
Ana Garcia, coach of
Alameda 99, a largely Latina
team of players 19 and younger, said the melee began after
her players experienced racial
taunting during an intense 3-3
game with Rio Galaxy — one of
changing,’’ Republican state
Senator Todd Weiler, who
sponsored the measure, said
Wednesday. ‘‘People are more
accepting of the fact that these
things make sense and they actually save the state money.’’
Public health officials say
studies have shown that unplanned births can lead to
more money being spent on
social programs such as Medicaid.
Utah is a Republican-dominated state where most lawmakers and an estimated 60
percent of residents are members of the Mormon church.
While the church generally opposes abortion, birth control is
treated differently.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
the Albuquerque area’s elite
soccer clubs.
‘‘All throughout the game,
the parents were calling the
players things like ‘dirty Mexicans’ and other stuff I can’t
even repeat,’’ Garcia said.
Rio Galaxy coach Steve
Kokulis, said that he didn’t
hear any racial slurs directed
at the Alameda team from parents but that his players reported to him that their opponents used anti-white epithets
— a charge Alameda parents
strongly deny.
After an Alameda player
pushed a Rio Galaxy player
and two Rio Galaxy players
jumped the Alameda girl, a
melee broke out, Garcia said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
lous’’ at a hearing and blamed
it on fear from last month’s
school shooting.
‘‘I don’t know when we all
hit the fear button when everything is such an absolute
emergency,’’ Reidy told the
judge.
Broward sheriff’s office
deputies arrested Zachary
Cruz on Monday afternoon,
saying he rode his skateboard
onto the campus where his
19-year-old brother, Nikolas,
is accused of carrying out the
shooting Feb. 14.
Also Wednesday, Florida
Governor Rick Scott ordered
the state’s highway patrol to
station eight troopers at the
high school to bolster security
there. Scott’s office said the
troopers will arrive Thursday
morning.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
YouTube further restricts gun videos
NEW YORK — YouTube, a
popular media site for firearms enthusiasts, quietly introduced tighter restrictions
this week on videos involving
weapons.
YouTube will ban videos
that promote or link to websites selling firearms and accessories, including bump
stocks, which allow a semiautomatic rifle to fire faster. Additionally, YouTube said it will
prohibit videos with instructions on how to assemble firearms. The video site, owned by
Alphabet’s Google, has faced
intense criticism for hosting
videos about guns, bombs, and
other deadly weapons.
For many gun-rights supporters, YouTube has been a
haven. A current search on the
site for ‘‘how to build a gun’’
yields 25 million results.
BLOOMBERG NEWS
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A3
Lawmakers near agreement
that boosts federal spending MATTRESS MADNESS
Efforts on DACA,
health markets
unlikely to pass
By Thomas Kaplan
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — With government funding set to run out
this weekend, congressional
leaders neared agreement
Wednesday on a voluminous
spending bill that would top $1
trillion, beef up domestic and
military programs, and fund
the government through September.
“ We’re feeling very good
about this,” Senator Chuck
Schumer of Ne w York, the
Democratic leader, said after a
meeting of top congressional
leaders at the Capitol, which
buzzed with activity even as the
falling snow shuttered much of
Washington.
The House and Senate have
until midnight Friday to pass
the spending bill to avoid what
would be the third government
shutdown of the year. As part of
the spending talks, congressional leaders have been trying to
resolve disputes over such issues as immigration, a southern border wall, health care,
and a planned rail tunnel between New York and New Jersey that has drawn the ire of
President Trump.
Some details emerged
Wednesday as negotiators tried
to resolve the last issues standing in their way. To improve
border security, the coming
deal will include more than $1
billion for physical barriers
along the border with Mexico
as well as related technology,
congressional aides said.
But there will be strings attached to what can be built, and
the funding is far short of the
total Trump would ultimately
need to build his promised “big,
beautiful wall.”
The coming agreement is not
expected to resolve the uncertain fate of hundreds of thousands of young unauthorized
immigrants who have been protected under an Obama-era program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which
Trump has moved to end.
An effort by some lawmakers to attach to the spending bill
a proposal to shore up insurance markets under the Affordable Care Act also appears very
likely to fail, at least in part because of a dispute over abortion.
Another sticking point in recent days was funding for a series of infrastructure projects in
the New York City area known
as the Gateway program, including a new rail tunnel under
the Hudson River. Despite his
New York roots, Trump zeroed
in on the Gateway program and
urged Republican leaders not to
provide federal funds for it —
an apparent rebuke to Schumer, whose caucus the president
has repeatedly accused of obstructionism.
The spending bill will not include $900 million in funding
for Gateway that had been included in House legislation last
year. But according to a senior
congressional aide, it will include hundreds of millions of
dollars that could go toward the
Gateway program, including
funds that do not require the
approval of Trump’s Department of Transportation.
The legislation is also expected to include hundreds of
millions of dollars in grants to
states for election technology
and in extra funds for the FBI to
combat Russian cyberattacks.
And although Congress has
shown little appetite for passing significant gun control legislation in response to the mass
shooting last month in Parkland, Florida, the spending bill
will include a modest measure
to improve reporting to the national background check system for gun purchases, according to a senior Republican aide.
Congress approved a broad
tw o - y e a r b u d g e t d e a l l a s t
month that paved the way for
this week’s legislation. That
deal set overall spending levels,
raising strict limits on military
and domestic spending by a total of about $140 billion this
year. This week’s spending bill
allocates the allowed spending
among a vast array of federal
programs.
The mammoth bill is long
overdue, coming more than five
months after the 2018 fiscal
year began on Oct. 1. Since
then, Congress has needed five
stopgap spending measures to
keep the government open. By
snapping that streak of shortterm patches, lawmakers would
provide a dose of stability to
federal agencies that have been
left in limbo as Congress
lurched from one stopgap measure to the next.
Even if a final deal is
reached, there would still be
some risk of a brief shutdown
this weekend, as any one senator could stop the Senate from
speeding up consideration of
the spending bill to meet Friday’s deadline. Last month,
Senator Rand Paul, Republican
of Kentucky, did just that, causing an hourslong shutdown as
he bemoaned the government’s
mounting debt.
This time around, with lawmakers expected to vote on a gigantic spending bill with little
time to digest its contents, Paul
is unhappy yet again.
“It’s a rotten, terrible, nogood way to run your government,” he said on Tuesday, adding, “Really, should we be looking in thousand-page bills with
24 hours to decide what’s in
them?”
The approval of the spending bill would be another blow
to those worried about the government’s ballooning debt.
The spending spree follows
Republicans’ sweeping tax
overhaul late last year, which
was projected to add $1.5 trillion to federal budget deficits
over a decade. The deficit is
now expected to exceed $1 trillion in the 2019 fiscal year, according to the Committee for a
Responsible Federal Budget.
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Trump continues his
attacks on Mueller
WASHINGTON — President
Trump indirectly criticized
Robert Mueller, the special
counsel, on Wednesday for the
ongoing investigation into Russia’s 2016 campaign meddling,
even as a former CIA director
said during a morning news
show that President Vladimir
Putin of Russia may have compromising information on
Trump.
After a weekend of attacking
Mueller — against the advice of
h i s o w n l aw y e r s — Tr u m p
picked up again in early morning tweets when he said he was
quoting a former Harvard professor stating that Mueller
should never have been appointed to be the special counsel to investigate Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election. That
investigation has expanded into
inquiries into Trump’s aides
and his own business dealings.
“I was opposed to the selection of Mueller to be Special
Council,” Trump attributed in a
Twitter post to a professor
e m e r i t u s a t Ha r v a r d L a w
School, Alan Dershowitz.
It was not immediately clear
Wednesday which remarks of
Dershowitz’s the president was
quoting. An interview with Dershowitz on Fox News on Tuesday and an opinion piece by
Dershowitz published Wednesday did not include the exact
phrasing that Trump used in
his tweets. And the language
was not found in a search of
Dershowitz’s cable news appearances over the past week.
Separately, on MSNBC’s
“Morning Joe,” John Brennan, a
former CIA director, speculated
that the Russians “may have
something on him personally,”
referring to Trump.
Brennan was the CIA director when a salacious dossier
Material from the Associated
Press was used in this report.
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YEARS 3 & 4
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surfaced in 2016 that claimed
the Russians had compromising information on Trump.
There has been no proof that
such material exists, but
Trump’s affection for the Russian leader has raised questions
about the nature of their relationship.
On Tuesday, Trump congratulated Putin on his reelection
and made no mention of the
election meddling. Trump has
routinely issued statements
about Russia and Putin that
sound at odds with his own advisers and administration actions.
“I think he’s afraid of the
president of Russia,” said Brennan, now retired from government service and a critic of
Trump.
On Saturday, Brennan attacked Trump on Twitter after
the president tweeted about his
excitement over the firing of the
deputy director of the FBI, Andrew McCabe.
“ When the full extent of
your venality, moral turpitude,
and political corruption becomes known, you will take
your rightful place as a disgraced demagogue in the dustbin of history,” Brennan wrote.
Mueller has accused 13 Russians and three companies of
election meddling. Three of
Trump’s former associates have
pleaded guilty as part of the ongoing inquiry. Last week, the
special counsel issued subpoenas for the Trump organization,
seeking documents including
some related to Russia.
Trump has consistently
called the investigation into
Russia’s meddling a “hoax.”
The tempest over Trump’s
congratulatory call to Putin
quickly intensified Wednesday
into an uproar over White
House leaks, sparking an internal investigation and speculation over who might be the next
person Trump forces out of the
West Wing.
YEARS 1& 2
Cites Dershowitz
as against hiring
the special counsel
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T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
The World
Daily Briefing
Vatican media
chief quits over
doctored note
Photo on letter
from Benedict
had been altered
By Nicole Winfield
ASSOCIATED PRESS
VA T I C A N C I T Y — T h e
head of the Vatican’s communications depar tment resigned Wednesday after he
mischaracterized a private
letter from retired Pope Benedict XVI, then had a photo of
it digitally manipulated and
sent out to the media.
A week after the Associated Press exposed the doctored
photo, Pope Francis accepted
the resignation of Monsignor
Dario Vigano and named his
deputy to run the Secretariat
for Communications for now.
But Francis kept Vigano on in
the department in a lesser capacity, indicating that he
doesn’t believe the problem
was all that grave.
The scandal erupted last
week when Vigano read aloud
part of a private letter from
Benedict at a book launch for
a Vatican-published, 11-volume set of books about Francis’ theology.
Marking Francis’ fifth anniversary as pope, Vigano had
held up Benedict’s letter as a
sign of the continuity be tween the two popes, to blunt
critics who complain that
Francis’ mercy-over-morals
papacy represents a theological break from Benedict’s doctrine-minded, theology-heavy
papacy.
Vigano didn’ t read the
whole letter and omitted the
part where Benedict objected
to one of the authors in the
volume because he had been
a longtime critic of Benedict
and St. John Paul II. A press
release sent out by Vigano’s
office only contained Bened i c t ’s w o r d s o f p ra i s e f o r
Francis and the book initiative, without mentioning that
he hadn’t even read the books
and had no plans to.
The AP reported that the
photograph of the letter that
accompanied the press release had digitally blurred out
the lines where Benedict began to explain that he didn’t
have time to read the books
and wouldn’t comment on
them, as requested by Vigano.
The photo manipulation violated basic photojournalism
ethical standards that forbid
such distortion, especially
when it misrepresents the
content of the image.
The scandal embarrassed
the Vatican and led to accusations that the pope’s own
communications office was
spreading ‘‘fake news,’’ just
weeks after Francis dedicated
his annual media message to
denouncing ‘‘fake news’’ and
the intentional distortion of
information. Francis has frequently chided journalists for
only giving half of the story.
In his resignation letter
dated March 19, Vigano said
he wanted to step aside so
that his presence ‘‘wouldn’t
delay, damage or block’’ Francis’ reform of the Vatican’s
communications operations.
He didn’ t acknowledge
that he had misrepresented
Benedict’s letter or doctored
the photo, saying only that he
realized that his actions — despite his intentions — had
created controversy and destabilized the communications reform.
In his own letter accepting
the resignation, Francis said
he was removing Vigano reluctantly and praised him for
his humility and willingness
to work for the good of the
church. He asked Vigano to
stay on in the communications secretariat in the new
position of assessor, which in
Va t i c a n o f f i c e s u s u a l l y
amounts to the No. 3 spot.
The current No. 2, Monsignor Lucio Adrian Ruiz, will
run the office until a new prefect is named.
It is rare for the Vatican
press office to release such an
exchange of letters, suggesting that the pope wanted to
make clear that he still has
faith in Vigano to help oversee the consolidation of the
Vatican’s vast media operations.
Francis named Vigano, an
expert in film, to head the
new Secretariat for Communications in 2015. The department was created to
bring under one umbrella the
Vatican’s various media operations, to cut costs and improve efficiency. But Vigano’s
reforms and management
style soured relations with
many longtime employees.
After the doctored photo
was revealed and another Vatican commentator, Sandro
Magister, hinted that there
was even more in the letter
that Vigano had concealed,
the communications office released the full text of Benedict’s letter, which had been
sent to Vigano by the retired
pope as ‘‘personal’’ and ‘‘reserved,’’ suggesting that it was
never meant to be made public.
A news release
from Edward
Vigano (above)
failed to mention
that Benedict had
no plans to read
the new books on
Pope Francis’s
theology.
The previously concealed
part of the letter provided the
full explanation why Benedict
had declined Vigano’s request
that he write a commentary
on the books: In addition to
saying he didn’t have time,
Benedict noted that one of
the authors involved in the
project, German theologian
Pe t e r H u e n e r m a n n , h a d
launched ‘‘ virulent ’’ and
‘‘anti-papist’’ attacks against
papal teaching during Benedict’s papacy. He wrote that
he was surprised the Vatican
had chosen the theologian to
be included in the 11-volume
‘‘The Theology of Pope Francis.’’
In the parts of Benedict’s
letter that Vigano read during
the book launch and included
in the press release, Benedict
confirmed that Francis has a
solid theological and philosophical training and he
praised the book initiative for
showing the ‘‘interior continuity’’ between the two papacies. He wrote it was ‘‘foolish
prejudice’’ to paint Francis as
only a practical man devoid of
theology and Benedict as a
mere academic who knew
nothing of the lives of ordinary faithful.
But Benedict’s full caveat
about his refusal to comment
on the volume was never
made public in Vigano’s presentation, press release or accompanying photo. That
omission left the impression
that the 91-year-old retired
pope had read the volume
and fully endorsed it, when in
fact he hadn’t.
HAMZA SULEIMAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAFE AND SOUND — Major General Rogers Nicholas on Wednesday carried one of the freed Nigerian girls
who had been captured by Boko Haram a month ago. Witnesses said the militants returned nearly all of
the 110 girls, dropping them off in the middle of the night with a warning that they stay out of school. A7
Sarkozy faces charges on campaign
Zimbabwe frees thousands from prison
PARIS — Former French
president Nicolas Sarkozy was
handed preliminary charges
Wednesday over allegations he
accepted millions of euros in
illegal campaign funding from
the late Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.
A judicial official said that
investigative judges overseeing
the probe gave the ex-president charges of illegally funding his 2007 winning campaign, passive corruption, and
receiving money from Libyan
embezzlement.
The charges came after
Sarkozy was questioned for
two days by anticorruption police at a station in Nanterre,
northwest of the French capital. The investigation involves
funding for his 2007 president
campaign.
Investigators are examining allegations that Gadhafi’s
regime secretly gave the politician 50 million euros overall
for his campaign.
The sum would be more
HARARE, Zimbabwe —
Zimbabwe’s new president is
commuting death sentences
for some prisoners and releasing thousands of people from
prison, including most women
and everyone under age 18.
President Emmerson
Mnangagwa’s announcement
Wednesday is an effort to ease
overcrowded prisons. He has
said he is against the death
penalty because he once survived hanging when the southern African nation was still colonial Rhodesia.
Nearly 100 people are on
death row in the country of 13
million. Those on it for at least
a decade are having their sen-
than double the legal campaign funding limit at the time
— 21 million euros. In addition, the alleged payments
would violate French rules
against foreign financing and
requiring that the source of
campaign funds be declared.
Sarkozy, 63, who was
France’s president from 200712, has repeatedly and vehemently denied any wrongdoing. According to the same
source, he again proclaimed
his innocence during his questioning.
In the French judicial system, preliminary charges
mean Sarkozy is personally
under formal investigation in
a criminal case. The judges
will keep investigating the
case in the next weeks and
months. At the end of the
whole investigation, they can
decide either to drop the preliminary charges or to send
Sarkozy to trial on formal
charges.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Peru’s president offers to resign
LIMA — Embattled President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski
offered his resignation
Wednesday ahead of an impeachment vote, seeking to
end a debilitating political
drama playing out three
weeks before the Andean nation is set to host President
Trump for a regional summit.
In a nationwide televised
address, Kuczynski, with his
Cabinet standing behind him,
said he didn’t want to become
an obstacle to Peru’s development. But the former Wall
Street investor lashed out at
opponents, led by the daughter of former strongman Alberto Fujimori, for plotting
his overthrow with damaging
leaks of confidential documents that raised doubts
about his integrity during his
six-decade career in private
business.
‘‘I don’t want my country,
nor my family, to continue suffering through the uncertainty
of recent times,’’ he said, adding that the campaign in favor
of his removal had caused
‘‘enormous damage’’ to Peru’s
democracy.
Congress must still accept
his resignation before power
can transfer to Vice President
Martin Vizcarra, who is currently serving as Peru’s ambassador to Canada and
wasn’t present for Kuczynski’s
announcement. Some lawmakers were seeking to deny
Kuczynski his one last act of
government and demanded
that he be prohibited from
leaving the country.
Pressure has been building
on Kuczynski to resign after
the shock revelation Tuesday
of secretly shot videos in
which several of the president’s allies were caught allegedly trying to buy the support
of an opposition lawmaker to
block the conservative leader’s
impeachment.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
tences commuted to life in
prison.
Zimbabwe’s last execution
was in 2005, partly because no
one was willing to be the hangman.
All women except those
serving life sentences are being freed. Also freed are prisoners who are disabled or terminally ill and those sentenced
to life before Feb. 28, 1998.
About 3,000 prisoners are
expected to benefit, said prison deputy commissioner-general Alford Mashango Dube.
He said the current prison
population is about 20,000
and capacity is 17,000.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
S. Sudan optimistic on Guinea worm
ATLANTA — South Sudan
has gone 15 months without a
single reported case of Guinea
worm disease, the nation’s
health minister said Wednesday, suggesting a major victory
for global health officials trying to eliminate the painful affliction.
The Carter Center, a leader
in global eradication efforts,
said only one case of Guinea
worm has been reported so far
in 2018 in Chad, but cautioned
that those numbers were preliminary and would likely rise.
The center said 30 cases were
reported last year in isolated
areas of Ethiopia and Chad, a
real achievement for efforts to
eradicate a disease that only
30 years ago affected 3.5 million people a year in 21 countries across Africa and Asia.
Contracted by drinking infected water, Guinea worm
disease affects some of the
world’s most vulnerable people.
The 3-foot-long worm is
asymptomatic and incubates
in people for up to a year before painfully emerging.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Burgers making inroads in France
PARIS — Forget the baguette. The French are going
crazy for burgers.
Figures released this week
revealed that sales of the jambon-beurre — the ham and
butter baguette sandwich, a
classic of French snacking —
have been surpassed by
sales of American-style burgers.
The study by restaurant
consultants Gira Conseil
showed that about 1.2 billion
ham and butter sandwiches
were sold in 2017, while 1.4
billion burgers were eaten
over the same period.
‘‘Even the Americans are
looking at us with wide-eyed
amazement,’’ Bernard Boutboul, general director of Gira
Conseil, said.
‘‘Obviously the rise in popularity is not linked to sales at
McDonald’s or other fast-food
restaurants,’’ Boutboul said in
a phone interview. ‘‘It’s due to
the growing number of restaurants putting burgers on their
menu.’’
‘‘The French’s favorite
sandwich is losing ground,
slowly but steadily,’’ the study
said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Border deal passed despite tear gas
PRISTINA, Kosovo — Lawmakers in Kosovo approved a
contentious and long-pending
border demarcation deal with
Montenegro Wednesday despite the opposition’s use of
tear gas to prevent a vote.
The 120-seat Parliament
voted 80-11 to endorse the
deal, ensuring its passage with
the minimum two-thirds support required.
The European Union has set
the border agreement as a precondition for Kosovo’s citizens
to travel without visas in Europe’s Schengen travel zone
Kosovo Assembly Speaker
Kadri Veseli said he was hopeful the European Union would
follow through and let Kosovars go visa-free, as citizens of
other Balkan region countries
already do.
The opposition Self-Determination party says Kosovo
loses 20,000 acres of its territory under the agreement.
Opposition leader Albin
Kurti complained that most of
the party’s lawmakers were
barred from the vote or taken
away by police for questioning
after the tear gas was set off in
the Kosovo Assembly.
At least two lawmakers
were injured. Amid the chaos,
the session failed four consecutive times to call the vote.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARMEND NIMANI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Kosovo police removed a tear gas canister thrown by
opposition lawmakers to try to prevent a vote Wednesday.
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
astronaut
Richard Arnold
waved to his
family
Wednesday
before leaving
for a successful
launch on the
Soyuz
spacecraft from
Kazakhstan en
route to the
International
Space Station.
A second US
astronaut,
Drew Feustel,
and Russian
cosmonaut Oleg
Artemyev also
were on board
the Soyuz.
By Choe Sang-Hun
NEW YORK TIMES
SHAMIL ZHUMATOV/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Suicide bomber kills 31 celebrating in Kabul
By Fatima Faizi
and Rod Nordland
NEW YORK TIMES
KABUL — A suicide bomber
detonated explosives in a crowd
celebrating the Persian New
Year in Kabul, on Wednesday,
killing 31 and leaving desperate
family members searching
among bodies and body parts
for their loved ones’ remains.
The victims were strewn
around the courtyard in front of
the Ali Abad Hospital in Kabul,
where relatives preparing for
burials tried grimly to match
trunks with limbs or heads with
trunks, and doctors searched
for anyone with a pulse.
In one corner, lying face
down on a staircase, was a boy
of about 12 named Mustafa,
who at first glance looked alive.
Then it was obvious that one of
his legs was blown nearly off; a
new black-and-white sneaker
A5
S. Korea suggests
three-way summit
with Trump, Kim
HITCHING A
RIDE — NASA
Family members
search among
bodies of victims
The World
remained on the foot. His other
leg was nowhere to be seen. For
more than an hour no relatives
appeared, until finally his
mother and father arrived.
The father restrained his
wife, trying to prevent her from
seeing their son’s gruesome remains; she lashed out in anger.
“Why are you alive?” she shouted at him. “Mustafa is dead,
why are you alive?”
The bomber struck about
noon Wednesday. The explosion happened right outside the
hospital: The bomber was apparently stopped before reaching a Shi’ite shrine in the Kart-e
Sakhi area of western Kabul,
where much larger crowds had
gathered.
It was the latest in a fastgrowing list of insurgent attacks that have targeted the
capital’s Shi’ite, largely ethnic
Hazara community, in the past
two years.
Both Islamic State and Taliban extremists have claimed
more than a dozen attacks on
mosques, shrines, schools and
rallies in the capital since 2016
— often during religious holidays — in an apparent attempt
to sow divisions between Afghan’s majority Sunni Muslims
and minority Shi’ite Hazaras.
Nationwide, insurgent attacks on Shi’ite and Hazara targets have claimed at least 275
lives and left more than 700
people wounded in the past two
years.
Wednesday’s attack, which
wounded more than 60 people,
was the second assault on the
Sakhi shrine claimed by the Islamic State. In October 2016,
gunmen wearing Afghan security uniforms stormed the site,
which was filled with worshippers for the Shi’ ite day of
mourning known as Ashura.
They killed 17 people and battled police for several hours.
Wahid Majrooh, spokesman
f o r t h e Mi n i s t r y o f Pu b l i c
Health, put Wednesday’s death
toll at 31.
T h e m o t h e r o f Mu s t a f a
ripped off her headscarf in her
grief, and rebuffed attempts by
her husband and friends to put
it back on. Beside herself, she
engaged her dead son in desperate conversation. “Mustafa,
why have you left me alone?
You were so happy to celebrate
Nowruz, you so wanted to go.
You said to me, ‘Look Mother,
you don’t know about style. I
have dressed up, and my shirt
matches my shoes.’” The shirt
was also black and white.
In her soliloquy to her dead
son, Mustafa’s mother reminded him of his sister, killed in the
attack on the Sakhi shrine last
year. “When we lost Musqa, you
came to me and you said, ‘Look
Mother, I am here, don’t worry,
I am with you.’ But now, you are
not, and what should I do without you?”
Many of those in the courtyard were furious, yelling at
journalists to leave.
Mustafa’s mother spent her
ire on President Ashraf Ghani,
with a maternal curse: “May
God kill your own son so you
will understand what it means
to lose one.”
Material from the Washington
Post was used in this report.
SEOUL — President Moon
Jae-in of South Korea said
Wednesday that he and President Trump could sit down for
a three-way summit meeting
with Kim Jong Un if their individual meetings with the North
Korean leader on denuclearizing his country proceed well in
the coming weeks.
Moon and Kim are planning an inter-Korean summit
in late April at Peace House, a
South Korean conference hall
inside Panmunjom, the socalled truce village that straddles the Demilitarized Zone, or
DMZ, separating the two Koreas.
That meeting is expected to
be followed by a planned
Trump-Kim summit meeting
by May.
If that meeting takes place,
Trump will be the first-ever sitting U.S. president to meet a
North Korean leader; Washington and Pyongyang are still
technically at war because the
1950-53 Korean War was halted with a truce rather than a
peace treaty.
In o t h e r d e v e l o p m e n t s
Wednesday on the Korean nuclear issue:
R Finnish officials said delegates from North Korea, South
Korea, and the United States
concluded ‘‘constructive’’ unofficial diplomatic talks in the
Nordic country that were widely believed to be laying the
groundwork for the upcoming
meeting between the Koreas
and the proposed US-North
Korea summit.
The foreign ministry said in
a brief statement said that the
tripartite talks were held in a
positive atmosphere and were
aimed at ‘‘building confidence
and reducing tensions on the
Korean Peninsula.’’
Eighteen delegates, six from
each country, plus observers
from the United Nations and
Europe attended the secretive
two-day talks at a 19th-century
manor house just outside Helsinki.
Media were largely kept in
the dark about the identities of
the delegates and issues on the
table, apart from Finnish Foreign Minister Timo Soini saying Tuesday that denuclearization wasn’t on the agenda.
What is known, however,
is that senior North Korean
diplomat Choe Kang Il, who
handles North American affairs for his government, was
among delegates from
Pyongyang, while the US delegation is believed to have included Kathleen Stephens, the
former ambassador to South
Korea.
R The UN Security Council
voted unanimously to extend
the mandate for UN experts
monitoring sanctions against
North Korea.
The resolution adopted emphasizes ‘‘the importance of
credible, fact-based, independent assessments, analysis,
and recommendations’’ by the
experts, who recently reported
that Pyongyang is flouting embargoes by sending Syria
banned items for ballistic missiles and chemical weapons.
Their work was extended until
April 24, 2019.
In Seoul, Moon attached
great significance to the venue
for his coming meeting with
Kim.
“The North Korea-United
States summit, which will follow the inter-Korean summit,
will itself be a momentous
event in world history,” Moon
said.
Material from the Associated
Press was used in this report.
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T h e
The World
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
Britain, Russia trade insults
Diplomats get
undiplomatic
in poisoning case
By Vladimir Isachenkov
and Jill Lawless
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW — The war of
words between Russia and Britain over a former spy’s poisoning got uglier Wednesday when
UK foreign secretary Boris
Johnson called it vomit-inducing that Russian President
Vladimir Putin is rejoicing over
hosting the World Cup. Russia
shot back that Johnson is ‘‘poisoned with venom of malice
and hate.’’
The heated exchange came
in the deepening diplomatic
crisis over the March 4 poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his
daughter in the English city of
Salisbury. Britain asserts that
Russia used a military-grade
nerve agent known as Novichok in the attack, which left
Skripal and his daughter in critical condition. Moscow has denied any involvement in the
poisoning.
Johnson on Wednesday repeated Britain’s position that
responsibility for the poisoning
leads ‘‘back to the Russian state
and those at the top.’’
Jo h n s o n a g r e e d w i t h a
Labour lawmaker who likened
the World Cup hosted by Russia
this summer to Adolf Hitler’s
use of the 1936 Olympics for
political purposes.
‘‘I think the comparison
with 1936 is certainly right,’’ he
said. ‘‘I think it’s an emetic
prospect, frankly, to think of
Putin glorying in this sporting
event.’’
The Russian Foreign Ministr y ’s spokeswoman, Maria
Zakharova, said Johnson is
‘‘poisoned with venom of malice and hate, unprofessionalism, and boorishness.’’
‘‘It’s scary to remember that
this person represents the political leadership of a nuclear
power,’’ she said.
Jo h n s o n’s c o m m e n t s ,
Zakharova, added, reflected
London’s efforts to cast Russia
as an enemy using the most absurd reasons in order to boycott
the World Cup.
‘‘But at what price?’’ she
said. ‘‘At the price of provocations, setting nations and people against one another, and
undermining international
peace and stability. Isn’t the
price too high?’’
Zakharova noted that Johnson’s comments about the 1936
Olympics and the World Cup
were an ‘‘unacceptable and unworthy’’ parallel toward Russia,
a ‘‘nation that lost millions of
lives in fighting Nazism.’’
ANDY RAIN/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
A notice outside the pub where former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter were poisoned.
Poisoning of former spy puts Russia
back in crosshairs of global watchdog
By Ellen Barry
NEW YORK TIMES
LONDON — Last fall, President Vladimir Putin summoned
a Kremlin television crew to his
residence for a ceremony marking the destruction of Russia’s
last declared stocks of chemical
weapons.
The occasion called for a
touch of theater: Shells were
dismantled on camera, decorated with flowery Cyrillic script
reading, “Farewell, chemical
weapons!” Putin spoke proudly
of Russia’s status as a peacemaker and derided the United
States for lagging behind. An
official from the Organization
for the Prohibition of Chemical
Weapons, the global body that
monitors agreements to whittle
down stockpiles, stood by,
beaming.
Six months later, Russia has
been accused of secretly producing a strain of lethal nerve
agents for years, in what would
be a grave violation of its international commitments.
A team of inspectors from
the global watchdog organization his week joined the investigation into the poisoning of
Sergei Skripal, a former Russian spy, and his daughter
Yulia, who were found unre-
sponsive in the English city of
Salisbury on March 4.
Britain has accused Russia
of exposing Skripal to Novichok, a military-grade nerve
agent developed in the last
years of the Soviet Union. Russia has denied the charge.
If proven true, it will cast
doubt on the work of the monitoring body, which was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in
2013 for making chemical
weapons “taboo under international law.”
“This is a real shock to the
system,” as members question
Russia’s reporting of its own
stocks, said Paul F. Walker, director of environmental sustainability at Green Cross International, a disarmament advocacy group. He said that he was
surprised by Britain’s claim that
it had proof Russia had been
producing the nerve agent, and
that he had not yet seen evidence to back it up.
“They must have something
we haven’t seen,” he said.
Russia has pushed back
hard against the accusation,
that saying the nerve agent
used on the Skripals could have
been produced in Britain, Sweden, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, or the United States.
Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova and
Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei
Ryabkov have each said that no
Novichok program existed in either Russia or the Soviet Union.
But scientists have come forward to describe it. Leonid
Rink, who worked at a Soviet
chemical weapons laboratory,
told the Ria Novosti news service that “a big group of specialists” had worked on the strains,
and that it would be no problem for labs outside Russia to
produce the nerve agent.
Vladimir Uglev, who worked
with Rink, told The Bell news
website that he helped produce
four agents under the code
name Foliant from 1972 until
1988. He said he believed that,
by analyzing the remains of
chemical agents in the blood, it
would be possible to determine
“where the specific dose was
produced and by whom.”
He added that, based on
what he witnessed at that time,
the victims were not likely to
survive.
“I can say with nearly 100
percent certainty that if Skripal
and his daughter are taken off
life support, they will die,” Uglev said. “They are now only
technically alive.”
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T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
Militants return kidnapped girls
One captive says
handful died in
Nigerian hideout
By Haruna Umar
and Krista Larson
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAPCHI, Nigeria — Boko
Haram Islamic extremists
brought back nearly all of the
110 girls they had kidnapped
from a boarding school last
month, dropping them off in
the middle of the night
Wednesday with a warning:
‘‘Don’t ever put your daughters
in school again.’’
Several of the girls interviewed said they had been traveling for days before the convoy of vehicles arrived in the
center of the town of Dapchi
around 2 a.m. Residents who
had fled upon hearing that
Boko Haram was headed their
way watched from hiding as
dozens of girls descended from
the vehicles apparently unharmed.
‘‘We were freed because we
a r e Mu s l i m g i r l s a n d t h e y
didn’t want us to suffer,’’ said
Khadija Grema, one of the
freed girls who said a Christian
classmate remained captive.
The extraordinary development brought elation to most
of the families but more heartache for the relatives of the six
girls still unaccounted for. The
sister of one girl fainted
Wednesday upon hearing that
she was not among those freed.
One 14-year-old released by
the fighters told reporters that
five girls had died. She did not
provide other details and it was
not immediately possible to independently verify her claim.
The abductions in Dapchi
have evoked painful memories
of the tragedy in Chibok, where
276 girls were kidnapped from
their boarding school. Nearly
‘We did it out of
pity. And don’t
ever put your
daughters in
school again.’
WARNING FROM BOKO
HARAM MILITANTS
four years later, about 100 of
them have ne ver re turned
home. Many had been forced
to marry their captors and had
children fathered by them.
The Nigerian government
denied that it had paid a ransom or made a prisoner swap
in exchange for the girls’ freedom. The girls were released
‘‘through back-channel efforts
a n d w i t h t h e h e l p of s o m e
friends of the country, and it
was unconditional,’’ Informa-
tion Minister Lai Mohammed
said in the capital, Abuja.
‘‘No money changed hands.
They only had one condition —
that they will return them to
where they took them,’’ he said.
The girls were meeting with
counselors at a nearby hospital
and ‘‘will be quarantined and
be counseled before they go
back to their schools,’’ he added. Nigeria’s government later
said they were being taken to
the capital on a military plane.
The fighters had rolled into
Dapchi in nine vehicles and the
girls were left in the center of
town. As terrified residents
emerged from their homes, the
extremists issued an ominous
warning, resident Ba’ana Musa
said.
‘‘We did it out of pity. And
don’t ever put your daughters
in school again,’’ the residents
said the extremists told them.
Boko Haram means ‘‘Western
education is forbidden’’ in the
Hausa language.
Nigeria’s government said
104 of the 110 schoolgirls had
been confirmed freed.
The latest mass abduction is
thought to have been carried
out by a Boko Haram splinter
group aligned with the Islamic
State group that has criticized
the leader of the main Boko
Haram organization for targeting civilians and has focused
instead on military and Western targets.
Syrian rebel group to withdraw from town
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Hundreds of
armed rebels and civilians will
begin evacuating a besieged
town in eastern Ghouta, a rebel spokesman and Syrian government media reported
Wednesday, in the first instance of fighters leaving the
opposition stronghold east of
the capital following a deal
with the government.
Monther Fares, a spokesman for the powerful Ahrar alSham group, said the deal involves the departure starting
Thursday morning of opposition fighters from his group to
northern Syria. He said the
deal gives security guarantees
for those who decide to stay in
the town after the government
takes over.
The Syria-controlled Military Media Center said 1,500
armed rebels and 6,000 civilians will evacuate Harasta on
Thursday to the northern province of Idlib as part of the negotiated deal. The Ahrar alSham group, based in Harasta,
is the smallest of the rebel
groups that control eastern Ghouta.
It is the first such deal involving the evacuation of opposition fighters from eastern
Ghouta, which has been under
a ferocious government air and
ground assault for a month.
Fa r e s s a i d r e b e l s h a v e
agreed to leave because of ‘‘civilian pressure’’ resulting from
intensive airstrikes and ‘‘warplanes that do not leave the
sky,’’ adding that residents of
Harasta have spent the last
three months inside shelters.
G l o b e
World/Region
A7
Corruption trial canceled;
evidence won’t meet the test
uTRIAL
Continued from Page A1
Sorokin’s threshold for a guilty
finding, based on an interpretation of federal extortion law,
was devastating to their case,
and urged him to reconsider.
On Wednesday, they filed a motion that laid out the evidence
they would present to a jury,
putting the onus on Sorokin to
dismiss the charges.
If he does, as is expected,
prosecutors have already signaled their intention to seek
permission from the US solicitor general to appeal.
“This was the wise election
among many bad options that
[gives] prosecutors the option
to ask the solicitor general to
approve an appeal,” said Martin
G. Weinberg, a veteran criminal
defense attorney who has been
following the case. “The government’s case is nearing its
end in the district court.”
The last-minute legal maneuvering marked the latest
twist in a case that has
stretched over nearly two years
and dogged the administration
of Boston Mayor Mar tin J.
Walsh. After the charges were
filed, a series of legal rulings by
higher courts weakened the
government’s case and forced
prosecutors to revise their strategy.
A spokeswoman for Walsh
declined to comment Wednesday.
The latest blow in the prosec ution case came Monday,
when Sorokin held firm to his
planned jury instructions about
the legal de finition of the
Hobbs Act, the federal law that
forbids extortion. Prosecutors
had criticized his interpretation
as too narrow.
Sorokin had said that the
government needed to prove
the defendants benefited personally when they obtained the
jobs for the union, a standard
that prosecutors said would undercut the Hobbs Act and set a
dangerous precedent for future
PHOTSO BY PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Timothy Sullivan (left) and Kenneth Brissette were being
tried by prosecutors who mistook the purpose of the
federal Hobbs Act, the judge in the case said.
extortion cases.
In a strongly worded response, Sorokin said it was
prosecutors who were misunderstanding the law and noted
that the Supreme Court had repeatedly warned against taking
too broad a view of the Hobbs
Act.
“The government’s position
converts many actual or potential violations of civil law by
government officials into federal felonies punishable by up to
20 years in prison,” Sorokin
wrote.
In their motion Wednesday,
prosecutors disclosed evidence
in the case, including an e-mail
sent by Colleen Glynn, the business agent for Local 11, to
union members. The message
praised Sullivan — and Walsh
— for helping to secure jobs for
nine members at the festival.
“I want you all to know we
got a ton of help from City Hall.
Starting with the top, Mayor
Walsh and his staff members
. . . these folks fought hard for
us because Local #11 fought
hard for them . . . and we MUST
keep supporting them & the political candidates who will keep
fighting on the side of labor,”
Glynn wrote, according to the
e-mail. “When there is a call to
action event Local #11 must
send help.”
It was the clearest evidence
prosecutors had presented that
union leaders were grateful after Brissette, the city’s chief of
tourism, and Sullivan, head of
intergovernmental affairs, allegedly threatened to withhold
city permits unless the organizers hired union workers.
Prosecutors also said Walsh
was elected in 2013 with considerable help from unions and
said Brissette and Sullivan were
seeking to avoid the embarrassment of a union picket outside
City Hall if Boston Calling
didn’t hire members of organized labor.
“Walsh enjoyed the support
of multiple unions during his
campaign for mayor, and some
members of his administration
assumed that unions would be
among his preferred constituents,” they wrote.
Still, prosecutors acknowledged the evidence would fall
short under Sorokin’s guidelines.
“As the government previously stated, it concedes that,
under the Court’s view of the
relevant law, this evidence will
be insufficient to meet the government’s burden of proof at
trial,” prosecutors wrote.
Maria Cramer can be reached
at mcramer@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter
@globemcramer.
Our rebate programs
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A8
Nation/Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
RMV wait time
could slide up
again next week
uRMV
Continued from Page A1
ID licenses will not be an acceptable form of identification
for boarding a domestic flight
or entering a federal building.
That’s a pretty big incentive
to get one. But there’s a catch:
The new ID can only be obtained in person, not online.
Residents who don’t want a
Real ID — maybe because they
don’t fly or are willing to use a
passport when they do — don’t
have to upgrade. A non-Real
ID license can be obtained online unless it’s been 14 years or
more since the last in-person
renewal.
But officials expect many of
the 5.3 million ID holders in
Massachusetts to opt for the
Real ID. And that could send
legions of applicants who
would usually renew online to
RMV branches or AAA offices,
which can handle some RMV
business for its members.
“Any of those 5.3 million
folks who want a federal Real
ID are going to have to come
physically in to either a registry office or a AAA. That’s going to be a big change,” Transportation Secretary Stephanie
Pollack said this week. “We’ve
been preparing for that
change.”
According to state officials,
70 percent of people eligible to
renew their licenses online
choose to do so. But that won’t
be an option when first obtaining a Real ID, though subsequent renewals can be made
online.
Meanwhile, demand for the
Real IDs could be high. In
some of the more than two
dozen states that have already
implemented Real ID, 90 percent of license holders opted
for it, Pollack said.
State officials said the RMV
is taking steps to minimize a
backslide in wait times.
E r i n D e v e n e y, t h e R M V
leader, said the agency has
hired 50 new temporary employees. The RMV hopes 25 of
those workers will keep their
positions permanently, joining
a current staff of about 750.
Online tools could also
moderate wait times, Deveney
said, by letting customers store
some personal information in
state systems ahead of time,
and alerting them to which
doc uments they ’ ll need to
bring to the branch.
Plus, there’s no rush for
many drivers to ge t to the
RMV; the federal requirements don’t take effect until
October 2020. Instead, officials believe many will likely
come in only as their licenses
expire.
California began issuing
Real IDs in January and anticipated service centers would
get busier. But so far officials
there have “not seen a noticeable increase in foot traffic,”
said Artemio Armenta, a
spokesman for the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles.
That could change, he suggested, as October 2020 draws
closer.
In Massachusetts, Deveney
said the agency’s goal is for 80
percent of customers to wait
30 minutes or less, and it will
try to keep this target even af-
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
The Registry of Motor Vehicles office at Haymarket in Boston, with two lines for customers.
ter the introduction of Real ID.
But that would mark some
slippage from the RMV’s performance the last three
months.
And a wait of even 30 minutes would stand in contrast to
the quick processing at the
Boston branch Wednesday.
Elizabeth Porter, who was
back for her second bid to get a
learner’s permit, said she’s
never faced a long RMV wait.
“I literally sat down and
t h e y r i g h t aw ay c a l l e d my
number,” she said.
Aside from crowding concerns, some drivers are also
worried about the simple logistics of obtaining the new ID.
To get one, US citizens must
present a Social Security card
or a document displaying the
Social Sec urity number ; a
passport, birth certificate, or
immigration papers proving
citizenship; and two documents proving Massachusetts
residence, such as a bank
statement or utility bill from
within the last 60 days. Noncitizens must present other
documents to prove lawful
presence in the United States.
And even for drivers skipping Real ID and renewing
their Massachusetts license
online, the state is now requiring more proof of identity upon renewal, including proof of
citizenship or lawful presence,
and another proving Massachusetts residency.
Tom McManus said he does
not have a passport and has no
copy of his birth certificate.
Now a resident of Wareham,
McManus will have to go to
Boston City Hall and pay $12
to get a birth certificate when
the time comes to renew his license.
“ T here’s some inconvenience to this and some extra
c o s t a s w e l l ,” h e s a i d i n a
phone interview. “The inconvenience of doing it, is it really
going to make me any safer?”
A full list of documents required for either form of ID is
available at mass.gov/id.
Some drivers will need still
more information.
To obtain a Real ID in her
state, New Hampshire resident
Nelle Douville had to present
documents showing she had
changed her name when going
through gender transition.
Accountability called root of State Police woes
uSTATE POLICE
Continued from Page A1
organization in turmoil is recovery — and that sort of
change of c ulture is ne ver
something that happens by itself, said William Bratton, who
has served as the head of the
Boston, New York City, and Los
Angeles police departments.
“It always has to be led,” he
said.
“Peer influence works in
some organizations and doesn’t
work in others,” Bratton continued, in a Globe interview
Wednesday. “By that, I mean
peer influence, where the good
guys make it clear to the bad
guys or the people who are
straying that it is not going to
be tolerated. I’ve never been in
an organization where that
happens internally. It has to be
that leadership makes it clear
that there’s the line. You don’t
cross this line.”
The responsibility to lead
the department out of its morass has fallen to State Police
Colonel Kerry A. Gilpin, who
became its superintendent in
November.
Gilpin faced the statewide
media Tuesday to announce
that 20 active troopers and one
retiree face sanctions in an
overtime abuse scandal, in
which troopers are alleged to
have logged hours they did not
work. The most egregious alleged violators put in for as
many as 100 no-show shifts.
Gilpin referred the matter to
Attorney General Maura Healey’s office for investigation and
possible prosecution.
“For us to fulfill our mission
as a police agency, we must
have the public’s trust,” Gilpin
said Tuesday.
The overtime imbroglio was
the latest in a litany of embarrassments for the agency. The
department’s last superintendent, Richard McKeon, and his
deputy, Francis Hughes, retired
in November after revelations
that McKeon ordered an arrest
report altered to remove embarrassing information about
the daughter of a judge. Governor Charlie Baker and Healey
have each announced investigations into that matter.
Reports in February said
that Trooper Leigha Genduso
was a coconspirator in a 2007
drug case who avoided charges
by testifying, yet was subse-
quently hired by the State Police. A day later, two more highranking State Police officials
linked to the report redactions
– Lieutenant Colonel Daniel
Risteen and Major Susan Anderson — retired suddenly.
Genduso, who multiple sources
said was Risteen’s former girlfriend, was then suspended.
Another trooper was suspended this month for allegedly
posting racist rants, while yet
another was relieved of duty for
allegedly coming to work
drunk.
The Legislature’s top leaders
are raising the specter of hauling officials into oversight hearings to address the scandals.
House Speaker Robert A.
DeLeo’s office said the Winthrop Democrat is meeting
with Gilpin on Thursday to discuss the “serious concerns”
about the force. The meeting
had been scheduled in recent
weeks.
“[DeLeo] believes that legislative oversight is not only appropriate, it is constitutionally
required as part of the House’s
responsibility for appropriating
taxpayer funds,” his office said
‘You’re a police
officer; your word
puts people in jail.
You can’t lie.’
RONAL W. SERPAS
Professor and former police
officer on rules for the police
in a statement to the Globe.
“Speaker DeLeo will await the
conclusion of the newly announced audit and other ongoing reviews before making a determination on how to proceed.”
Senate President Harriette
L. Chandler, too, said the Legislature could ultimately bring
extra scrutiny on the department. The Worcester Democrat
said the State Police is filled
with “good people who do incredible work,” and she lauded
Governor Charlie Baker for taking a “strong look” at the recent
problems.
Serpas, now a professor at
Loyola University New Orleans,
said top leaders in a struggling
department need to set and en-
These same rules apply to
any name change, including
from marriages or divorces.
Douville said obtaining documents proving a name change
could be especially burdensome for women.
New Hampshire and other
states with Real ID say on their
websites that drivers must
present documents related to a
name change. Massachusetts
does not, but a spokeswoman
confirmed that drivers here
will also need to prove their
name has changed if it differs
from other documents such as
a birth certificate.
Adam Vaccaro can be reached
at adam.vaccaro@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter at
@adamtvaccaro.
Supreme
Court limits
the reach of
tax crime law
By Jessica Gresko
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHNTLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Nearly 250 Massachusetts troopers made more than $200,000 last year, often by working
long overtime shifts or taking on multiple details, the Globe has reported.
force ironclad rules to ensure
accountability. He suggested a
“one and done” rule for officers
who lie: A lie about anything related to your job or on any written document is a firing offense
in the very first instance. “You’re
a police officer; your word puts
people in jail,” he said. “You
can’t lie. The courts have backed
up termination as a first-time
punishment for lying.”
A second ironclad rule
should be a no-tolerance policy
for officers who witness police
misconduct by others and fail
to report it, he said, speaking
generally and not specifically
about the Massachusetts State
Police.
Serpas said state police forces generally promote top leaders from within, which can
make enforcing accountability
more difficult. “An outside leader brought in without the long
friendships that can erode accountability can often more
easily confront things that need
to be changed,” he said.
Under Massachusetts law,
however, the superintendent of
the State Police must come
from within the department.
Gilpin “walked into a hornets’ nest” when she got the job
last November, but the fact that
she came from inside the agency should not inhibit her ability
to make changes, said former
Boston police officer Tom Nolan. She has been with the State
Police for about 23 years.
“The people inside who are
capable of affecting change are
known to the people in the organization” said Nolan, a professor of criminology and director of graduate programs in
criminology at Merrimack College. “You have to identify the
people who are able to affect
major cultural change” and put
them in positions to do so. “The
vast majority of officers in the
Mass. State Police take their responsibilities seriously. I have
to think they are more upset
than the general public” about
the scandals.
Nolan said the Massachusetts State Police has “long been
a closed shop” with its internal
workings “out of the glare of the
public eye for years.” A “culture
of secrecy” is the kind of atmosphere that can permit a scandal to take root. “There’s a tacit
code of silence that what goes
on in the organization is not to
be talked about with anyone
outside the agency.”
Eugene O’Donnell, a professor at the John Jay College of
Criminal Justice in Manhattan
and a former New York police
officer, sees a larger problem
nationwide in the devaluing of
policing as a “calling, a mission,
a special job.” He says he sees
evidence of this in modern police recruitment materials,
which often stress the competitive pay and benefits, rather
than the nature of the public
service police officers are hired
perform.
“When policing is just a job,
it has profound implications,”
he said. “It’s a major problem,
not limited to police, that agencies over time tend to operate to
the benefit of the employees.
What becomes valued are perks
and benefits, and there can be a
race among employees to see
who can get to the top and accumulate as much as possible.”
Nearly 250 Massachusetts
troopers — or about 12 percent
of the force — made more than
$200,000 last year, often by
working long overtime shifts or
taking on multiple details, the
Globe has reported.
O’Donnell said police should
be “well compensated, comfortably compensated” for their
work, but should not be permitted to enhance their incomes by
performing private details.
While on a detail, he said, an officer who has sworn to serve the
general public is instead serving the interest of some individual, or some company.
“How many officers are
more energetic and focused on
their off-duty work than their
core work?” he said. “What is
policing if it is not about police
work? These are existential
questions for police departments.”
Globe correspondent Matt Stout
contributed to this report. Mark
Arsenault can be reached at
mark.arsenault@globe.com.
WA S H I N G T O N — A S u preme Court ruling Wednesday
will make it harder for the federal government to use a section of tax law to convict someone of obstruction.
The government had interpreted a section of the tax code
to give it a broad ability to
charge someone with obstructing or impeding the work of the
Internal Revenue Service. It argued that someone could violate the statute by doing something intended to obstruct the
IRS’ work, like shredding records, even if the person wasn’t
under investigation at the time
or was under investigation but
didn’t know it.
B u t t h e S u p r e m e Co u r t
ruled 7 to 2 to limit the application of the statue. The justices
said that to convict someone,
the government must show a
connection between the obstructive action the person
takes and a particular investigation or audit that was pending,
or at least reasonably foreseeable.
The court’s majority opinion
pointed out problems with
reading the law broadly.
‘‘Interpreted broadly, the
provision could apply to a person who pays a babysitter $41
per week in cash without withholding taxes, leaves a large
cash tip in a restaurant, fails to
keep donation receipts from every charity to which he or she
contributes, or fails to provide
every record to an accountant.
Such an individual may
sometimes believe that, in doing so, he is running the risk of
having violated an IRS rule, but
we sincerely doubt he would believe he is facing a potential felony prosecution for tax obstruction,’’ Justice Stephen Breyer
wrote for the court.
The case the justices ruled in
involves New York resident Carlo J. Marinello II, who owned
and managed a freight service
that took items between the
United States and Canada.
Material from the Washington
Post was used in this report.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A9
Zuckerberg apologizes to users
uZUCKERBERG
collects information and uses
it,” Brookman said.
Zuckerberg said Facebook is
conducting a “forensic audit” of
Cambridge Analytica to determine what happened to the data it claimed in 2015 to have
destroyed, and added the company is also “working with regulators as they investigate what
happened.”
A former Cambridge Analytica employee, Christopher
Wylie, told the Times and Observer newspapers that, far
from being destroyed, the information was used by the
company to develop advertising strategies for the political
campaigns of unsuccessful Republican presidential contende r Te d C r u z , a n d l a t e r f o r
Trump.
Cambridge Analytica was
created by SCL Group, a British
research firm, funded in part
by Robert Mercer, a wealthy US
investment executive and contributor to conservative causes,
and former Trump strategist
Steve Bannon was involved in
its early operations. Staffed by
researchers from Cambridge
University in the United Kingdom, the company uses “psychometric” systems to predict
human behavior based on their
Internet activities.
Kogan, meanwhile, was
himself a researcher at the British college and created a personality-profiling app that was
based on work at the school’s
Psychometrics Centre. It was
that app that provided the millions of Facebook records to
Cambridge Analytica.
On Wednesday, Kogan told
the BBC in an interview that he
Continued from Page A1
ant social network has faced in
the 14 years since it was founded in a Harvard University
dorm. The firestorm was triggered by reports last weekend
in The New York Times and
British newspaper The Observer that the British firm Cambridge Analytica exploited data
from an academic who had received permission from Facebook to conduct a research
project with its users.
The newspapers reported
that the academic, Aleksandr
Kogan, provided the data he
collected to Cambridge Analytica, without permission from
Facebook.
In h i s p o s t We d n e s d ay,
Zuckerberg said Facebook
learned of the breach in 2015
and then banned Kogan’s app
from its platform. Zuckerberg
said it had received assurances
Cambridge Analytica destroyed
the data.
Zuckerberg said Facebook
only learned from the newspaper accounts that its users’ data
may not have been destroyed
after all.
“This was a breach of trust
between Kogan, Cambridge
Analytica, and Facebook,” he
wrote. “But it was also a breach
of trust between Facebook and
the people who share their data
with us and expect us to protect
it. We need to fix that.”
The disclosures have
spawned furious denunciations
of Facebook’s privacy policies,
triggered investigations by government agencies in the United
States and United Kingdom,
and spurred calls from politicians of both countries for
Zuckerberg to testify before
Congress and Parliament.
On Wednesday, Zuckerberg
described a series of new policies designed to clean up the
fallout from the company’s past
business practices and to prevent future abuses. Facebook
will begin to restrict access by
outside apps to a user’s data if
the app hasn’t been activated in
the previous three months.
App developers will have to
sign a contract with Facebook
to offer apps that seek more
sensitive information, like access to the messages a user
posts.
Facebook will audit all apps
that had access to user data prior to a Facebook change in
2015 that limited their reach.
“And if we find developers that
misused personally identifiable
information, we will ban them
and tell everyone affected by
those apps,” Zuckerberg wrote.
In the CNN interview, Zuckerberg said that review would
be extensive.
“It’s hard to know what we’ll
find, but we’re going to review
thousands of apps. This is going to be an intensive process,
but this is important,” he said.
From shopping sites, entertainment providers, and game
makers, many companies want
customers to allow their apps
to access Facebook accounts —
so they can personalize their
features to customers’ interests, for example, or to identify
friends and acquaintances who
share the same interests.
Finally, Zuckerberg said
that, in the future, Facebook
will feature an easy way for users to see which apps they have
allowed to access their accounts and make it simpler to
turn off their data collection
features.
Justin Brookman, director
of privacy and technology policy at Consumers Union, which
‘We’re going to
review thousands
of apps. This is
going to be an
intensive process,
but this is
important.’
MARK ZUCKERBERG,
Facebook chief executive
publishes Consumer Reports
magazine, said Zuckerberg’s
proposed solutions were too
narrowly restricted to issues involving outside apps.
The social media company
collects sensitive information
about its users through many
other channels, Brookman
said, such as tracking cookies
that trace Facebook users’ activity on thousands of other Internet sites.
The company’s smartphone
app constantly monitors a user’s movements, even detecting
the places where people shop
and comparing that information with the ads the user has
seen on Facebook.
“I think we need to have a
broader conversation about a
lot of the ways that Facebook
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had no idea his work would be
used for the Trump campaign.
‘‘My view is that I’m being
basically used as a scapegoat by
both Facebook and Cambridge
Analytica,’’ he said. ‘‘Honestly,
we thought we were acting perf e c t l y a p p r o p r i a t e l y, w e
thought we were doing something that was really normal.’’
Also Wednesday, a former
Facebook employee told a British parliamentary committee
that the company was lax about
protecting users’ data.
‘‘The real challenge here is
that Facebook was allowing developers to access the data of
people who hadn’t explicitly
authorized that,’’ said Sandy
Parakilas, who worked in data
protection for Facebook in
2011 and 2012.
Meanwhile, the head of
Cambridge Analytica, Alexander Nix, was suspended by the
company’s board after being secre tly recorded by British
television bragging that the
company uses bribery and entrapment against political targets.
Zuckerberg’s lengthy statement Wednesday was the latest
in a string of apologies for various privacy lapses at Facebook.
Ben Edelman, an associate professor at the Harvard Business
School, said Zuckerberg
seemed especially contrite this
time out, noting, “He’s in a lot
of trouble on this one.”
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Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
G l o b e
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
Trump’s dumb new idea
P
resident Trump made big news in New
Hampshire this week with his call for applying the death penalty to big drug dealers — and that only goes to show that bad policy
makes for easy headlines.
The best explanation of why that’s a thoroughly
wrong-headed approach is also the simplest: Western
societies don’t execute people for those kinds of
crimes. Nor should we start.
Without using names, Trump cited conversations
with international leaders who supposedly told him
their countries have no drug problems because they
have the death penalty for drug traffickers. Only a
handful of nations routinely execute drug smugglers
or traffickers. Among them: China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Malaysia. That’s hardly an honor roll of nations that respect
human rights and liberties or the process of law;
their leaders are not the people Trump should be consulting on criminal justice policy.
And notwithstanding Trump’s assertion that the
death penalty works as a deterrent, there’s little real
evidence that his claim is actually true. Iran has been
executing drug offenders for years without ending its
drug problem.
Since 1994, federal law has contained a provision
allowing for the death penalty for drug kingpins,
though no one has been so sentenced. Trump says the
Department of Justice will now start seeking capital
punishment for “big pushers.”
If the DOJ does take that path, it seems likely the
US Supreme Court would block such an execution.
Putting someone to death for a crime other than firstdegree murder has become increasingly anathema to
American jurisprudence. As the high court said in
2008, in Kennedy v. Louisiana, in which it overturned
the death penalty for a man convicted of the brutal
rape of a minor: “As it relates to crimes against individuals . . . the death penalty should not be expanded
to instances where the victim’s life was not taken.”
The court noted that its decision there did not specifically address what it called “offenses against the
State” such as “treason, espionage, terrorism, and
drug kingpin activity.”
Still, the court has also said that the death penalty
should be confined “to a narrow category of the most
serious crimes” and applied only to those “the most
deserving of execution.”
Such a prosecution would likely run up against the
matter of intent, which is central to Western jurisprudence. The intent to kill, for example, is necessary for
a first-degree murder conviction. The intent of drug
trafficking, however, is not to kill the drug user, but
rather to make money by supplying his or her habit.
Further, the act of ingesting or injecting the drug is
not forced upon the user, but instead something that
person undertakes himself. Thus, as serious as the
opioid overdose epidemic has been, it’s hard to see
the resulting deaths as tantamount to the deliberate
and premeditated taking of lives.
The president made his call in the offhand way he
does with so many of his half-baked ideas. It deserves
to be treated no more seriously than that.
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY LESLEY BECKER/GLOBE STAFF:AP
Firing Mueller wouldn’t be easy
T
here are three big reasons why
any rational president in Donald
Trump’s position would not even
think of firing special counsel
Robert Mueller in the middle of
the Russia investigation.
First: It would technically be
hard to do. Trump cannot
directly fire Mueller, because he
is not an appointee of the
president. Trump could try to
persuade Attorney General Jeff Sessions to fire Mueller, but
this is not happening, because Sessions recused himself
from the Russia investigation after being caught in
untruthful testimony about Russia by former senator Al
Franken. Trump could try to persuade Deputy Attorney
General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller, to fire
him, but
Rosenstein will
refuse. This leaves
only one option — to fire Sessions and/or Rosenstein, and
replace them with someone who will fire Mueller.
Apart from the difficulties of finding anyone willing to
fire Mueller, Trump runs into serious difficulties if he goes
outside the Justice Department: for example, tapping EPA
administrator Scott Pruitt as acting attorney general. The
Vacancies Act most likely allows the president to fill a
vacancy inside an agency with only another person already
inside the agency, not from another department. Appointing
Pruitt as acting attorney general might not be valid, and if
so, a court would strike down any official acts he takes in
that office, including firing Mueller. Such an appointment
B y R i c h a r d W. Pa i n t e r
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from outside the Justice Department is an invitation to
litigation over this issue, on top of all of the other
controversy that would ensue.
Trump could avoid this problem by finding someone
inside the department to take Sessions’ or Rosenstein’s job
and then fire Mueller. But because firing Mueller would likely
be an obstruction of justice, it could be difficult to find a
Justice Department lawyer willing to do that. Robert Bork did
it for Richard Nixon in 1973 (Nixon had to fire two attorneys
general on the same Saturday night before he got to Bork),
and that did not go over so well for Bork (the issue was raised
at his unsuccessful 1988 confirmation hearings for the
Supreme Court). Given the fact that the present investigation,
unlike Watergate, involves Russian espionage, and Trump has
already fired FBI Director James Comey in an effort to stop
the probe, the blowback for any DOJ lawyer who fires
Mueller could be much worse than what Bork experienced. It
is not at all certain there is someone at the Department of
Justice reckless enough to put at risk their career and their
bar license, and perhaps their liberty, to do it.
Second: A Mueller firing probably would be obstruction
of justice. Because of the Comey firing, this would be a
second strike against Trump, compounded by his Twitter
feed and public statements, as well as television interviews
with the Russian ambassador that make the president’s
motives crystal clear. As several Republican senators have
warned, a Mueller firing could mean the end of his
presidency. Given the mounting evidence of obstruction of
justice by the president, it could be just what prosecutors
need to try and convict him. He cannot pardon himself
under the Constitution, and Vice President Pence need only
observe how well Gerald Ford did in the 1976 election after
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he pardoned Richard Nixon to realize that a pardon of a
predecessor is not a good idea. Trump is already at risk of
prosecution for obstruction of justice, and a Mueller firing
might land him in prison.
Third: Firing Mueller won’t make the investigation go
away. Congress will insist on a successor independent
prosecutor, just as Congress did in 1973 when Archibald
Cox was quickly succeeded by Leon Jaworski, who was at
least as vigorous in going after Nixon and his aides. Mueller
is a great prosecutor, but he is not the only game in town.
Furthermore, a Mueller firing would likely accelerate
investigations in both houses of Congress, which would
demand access to all of Mueller’s records. Not to mention
the New York attorney general, who likely already has a lot
of those records and the power to prosecute some of the
crimes being investigated, such as money laundering. And,
unlike federal crimes, crimes prosecuted by the State of New
York cannot be pardoned by the president. Shifting the
center of gravity of this investigation to New York is a good
way to land a lot of people on Riker’s Island.
But all of this does not necessarily mean that Trump
won’t try to fire Mueller. He is a reckless president. He is
emotional and unpredictable. He obsesses about this
investigation. He detests Mueller, a symbol of what used to
be right with the Republican Party before Trump destroyed
it. He may fire Mueller or try to fire him. And if Trump does,
we must all be ready to do our part to defend our
Constitution and the Republic.
Richard W. Painter is a professor of law at the University of
Minnesota. He was chief White House ethics lawyer for
President George W. Bush.
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T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A11
Inbox
The Boston Renaissance was
hard won — let’s not kill it
By Paul S. Grogan
F
orty years ago, if you
were to describe the
reality of Boston in 2018
to those following the
cityscape of 1978, you’d
have been called a delusional
optimist — or worse.
Today, while not perfect, Boston is
the envy of the nation for our business
growth, our regional economy, our
clean harbor, and our unmatched
combination of education, health, and
high-tech institutions that have driven
year after year of growth and
prosperity.
Unless we let it slip away.
The Boston Renaissance of the past
40 years has been hard earned, but our
past performance is no guarantee of
our future prosperity — and our
Achilles heels are no secret. We and
other cities face many challenges, but I
see three that pose the most significant
immediate threat.
The first? Our vexing inequality. It’s
no secret that Boston’s growth has not
been shared equally by all residents.
We have built a knowledge economy
that rewards those with the right skills
and access to jobs, but harshly
punishes those without. The latest
data suggest Massachusetts has the
worst inequity between whites and
Latinos in the nation. It is the newest
addition to a library of reports that
find Boston tops the list of unequal
cities, a place where the median net
worth of white families is nearly
$250,000 – versus $8 for AfricanAmerican families.
The second? Housing. The lack of
affordable housing in the region has
the potential to drive out young talent
and make it impossible to fill lowerlevel but critical jobs that underpin the
regional economy.
Third? Transportation. Our
economic growth has increased
congestion, but it has been coupled
with a failure to invest in a transit
infrastructure that should serve as the
vital link connecting our business,
educational, and institutional assets.
The problems seem huge. But if we
look closely, we see the seeds of
solutions to these challenges taking
root across the city.
Take Success Boston. This coaching
program has been the linchpin of a
strategy to increase the percentage of
Boston Public Schools graduates
getting ready for, into, and through
college — and it has nearly doubled the
number of BPS grads earning degrees.
Our community colleges are playing a
larger role than ever in that success —
connecting with businesses and
becoming major players in developing
the next generation of workers.
We’ve also broadened and
deepened investments in our current
workforce, with adult ESL
investments in programs like English
for New Bostonians, job training
partnerships like Skillworks, new
partnerships with tech employers like
Tech Boston, Hack.Diversity and
Resilient Coders, and investments in a
new generation of women and
minority entrepreneurs in Roxbury,
Dorchester, and Mattapan.
In housing, Boston has committed
to add 53,000 housing units by 2030 –
accelerating permitting, encouraging
affordable housing investments, and
freeing up city-owned vacant land for
development. Mayors across Greater
Boston are collaborating on affordable
housing, and Gov. Baker’s housing bill
goes a long way in facing the housing
challenge by using incentives and
regulation changes to expand needed
construction outside the city.
Even in transportation, there is
hope. The MBTA’s new fiscal control
board is creating a more accountable
organization that can wisely use
much-needed investments to create
the better-functioning, climateresilient system we need. Businesses
are stepping up, showing a
willingness to co-invest in new
stations and infrastructure, because
they see the value a working system
brings.
Now wait a minute, you say. Those
aren’t enough jobs. That’s not enough
housing. The T still doesn’t work.
We’re not moving fast enough.
You’re right.
We must face the
challenges of inequality,
affordable housing, and
public transportation.
What we lack isn’t vision. It’s
resolve. The solutions above are
demonstrating success but need
commitment, time, and long-term
investment to expand, take root, or
take hold. Turning ideas into largescale reality is neither easy nor cheap.
But the alternative is more costly: the
exodus of the families, workers, and
businesses that we need to keep
Boston thriving.
It’s a lot easier to build upon
strength than recreate it.
We proudly call Boston a city of
innovation. But the innovations that
will sustain our prosperity are not
those created in a lab or coded into an
app. They are cocreated by business,
civic, and community groups that
expand the opportunity to thrive
across races and classes. We’re
fortunate to be innovators there, too.
We just need to be smart enough to
seize the Boston moment.
Paul S. Grogan has been the president
and CEO of the Boston Foundation
since 2001.
Nashville Mayor
Megan Barry
closes her
speech after
announcing her
resignation.
Missouri Gov.
Eric Greitens
discussed having
an extramarital
affair in 2015,
before taking
office.
In troubled times, SOS is
sent to corporate world
Moral business leaders welcome, but
no substitute for good government
While “moral business leaders” certainly have a role to play
in the community, we must never allow them to replace the
role of government in advancing the public interest (“How
business leaders can be moral leaders,” Opinion, March 15).
Business can certainly “move quickly” to do good, but it can
move just as swiftly to do evil, as the history of labor and
environmental struggles shows.
Furthermore, the op-ed by Dana H. Born and Josh A.
Goldstein is based on assumptions about Donald Trump
and government that beg for scrutiny. Does Trump really
serve as an example of “government”? His proposals, policies, and Cabinet selections suggest that he is a puppet of
big business who does not understand or care about the
purpose of representative government. Therefore, the authors are prescribing the wrong medicine for an ailing society. By all means, encourage the moral business leaders
within their own domain, but in no way can they, nor
should they, replace a government accountable to the citizens it represents.
DANA FRANCHITTO
South Wellfleet
Is this what we’ve come to —
begging big business to save us?
The op-ed “How business leaders can be moral leaders”
shows just how desperate our situation has become. When
we need to call upon the very people most responsible for
our most dire existential problems (gun proliferation, both
local and global; climate change; money-driven politics) to
act against their own best interests (maximizing profits and
minimizing externalities — that is, health or climate costs
of doing business) because our current government has either eviscerated the publicly funded agencies charged with
addressing these problems (Health and Human Services,
Environmental Protection Agency) or used those funds to
exacerbate them (by funneling billions to companies
through the Defense Department), we know our backs are
against the wall and there’s nowhere else to turn.
It’s tantamount to the powerless farmer begging the wily
fox to take mercy on his luckless chickens.
Sad.
GEORGE CHIGAS
Acton
A child’s ZIP code should not decide
their chances of success
Re “School aid lags, and poor pay the price” (Page A1,
March 18): As we see so often, the poor are the ones who
suffer when we disinvest in our children. Rather than having a school funding formula that overwhelmingly benefits
wealthy communities, we need to properly fund all school
systems so that a child’s chances of success are not diminished by where they happen to live. If we won’t spend
enough on our children to help them reach their greatest
potential, who will?
EDWIN ANDREWS
Malden
The demise of Toys ‘R’ Us: That’s the
way the tower of blocks crumbles
AP PHOTOS
JOAN VENNOCHI
Sex, money, and the Nashville
blues
I
n these Stormy Daniels times,
it’s worth noting that a sex
scandal has already ended the
career of one American politician: a woman and a Democrat, who was technically brought
down not by adultery, but by money.
In February, Mayor Megan Barry of
Nashville admitted to an affair with
the head of her security department,
and begged her city for forgiveness.
Five weeks later, she exited the office
she held for two and half years by
pleading guilty to a felony charge of
theft of property. As part of her plea,
she agreed to reimburse the city
$11,000 in unlawful expenses connected to the tryst.
What happened in Nashville shows
the consequences — at least for a female — when sex and politics collide in
office and misuse of public money is
part of the story. Barry acknowledged
the truth, accepted responsibility, and
departed a job she loved.
That certainly sets her apart from
Republican Governor Eric Greitens of
Missouri, who is resisting calls to resign after being charged with felony invasion of privacy in connection with an
affair that occurred before he won election. Greitens admitted to the relationship. But he’s also charged with taking
a compromising photo of the woman
with whom he was involved, without
her permission, and threatening to use
it to blackmail her. He denies that and
awaits trial, still in office.
Then there’s President Trump. His
past is flush with women who claim to
have had sex with him while he was
married. He denies all. If it happened
before Inauguration Day, the extramarital sex, “generic” or otherwise, is
probably between him and Melania.
But the money is another matter.
Daniels, an adult film star whose
real name is Stephanie Clifford, said
she had an affair with Trump that began in 2006, when he was a reality TV
star. Trump said it didn’t happen. But
earlier this year, The Wall Street Journal reported that Trump’s lawyer, Michael Cohen, made a $130,000 payment to Daniels in October 2016, a
month before the presidential election.
Cohen ultimately acknowledged he
had paid Daniels, but insisted neither
the Trump campaign nor the Trump
organization knew anything about it.
Meanwhile, two Democrats in Congress are asking the FBI to investigate
the payments, arguing that any coordination with Trump or his campaign
would violate federal election law.
The New York Times also reports
that Karen McDougal, a former Playboy model who also said she had an affair with Trump, is seeking to be released from a 2016 legal agreement
binding her to silence about the relationship. McDougal is suing the company that owns the National Enquirer,
arguing that a $150,000 payment she
received was arranged with assistance
from Cohen as a way to squelch the
story and her.
In other Trump-related sex news, a
judge ruled on Tuesday that Summer
Zervos, a former “Apprentice” contestant, can proceed with a defamation
suit she filed against Trump after he
said she and others were making up
stories about unwanted sexual encounters with him. Of course, it’s impossible to write about sex and politics
without mentioning Bill Clinton. In
this instance, the connection links
back neatly to efforts by Clinton’s lawyers to have a sexual harassment lawsuit filed by Paula Jones dismissed
while he was in office. With Clinton,
the Supreme Court ruled that no one is
above the law, and New York Supreme
Court Judge Jennifer Schecter reached
the same conclusion about Trump. Her
ruling potentially paves the way for
public disclosure of any other women
involved with Trump and any other
money paid to buy their silence.
What brought down Clinton was
having sex while in office with White
House intern Monica Lewinsky —
something he denied under oath in a
deposition given in the Jones lawsuit.
But the truth did not come out until
1998, after his reelection to a second
term.
In these stormy Trump times, the
lesson from Clinton is deny, delay, and
resist temptation in the White House.
From Nashville, it’s more of the blues.
The truth can set you free — from office.
Joan Vennochi can be reached at
vennochi@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @Joan_Vennochi.
Re “When the toy aisles disappear, it’s the kids who miss
out” (Letters, March 20): I find it baffling that a reader can
lament the loss of “warm memories” of shopping at Toys ‘R’
Us as well as the need to revisit “the few wonderful independent toy stores that still exist” in order to find the fun
atmosphere she now misses.
Before Toys ‘R’ Us was done in by online sales, independent toy stores were done in by Toys ‘R’ Us. Maybe the real
lesson for her grandchildren is that what goes around
comes around.
GEORGE METZGER
Cambridge
Would death penalty for drug dealers
extend to Big Pharma?
President Trump’s strategy to curtail the opiod crisis trumpets getting tough on drug dealers and even considers administering the death penalty (“Trump hits Boston in detailing opioid fight,” Page A1, March 20). Will this new effort include holding to account executives at Purdue
Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, as well as at Insys Therapeutics, Endo Pharmaceuticals, Janssen, Teva, and others?
Or are we going to just round up the usual suspects? Follow
the trail of opiod devastation and it leads to the boardroom,
not the back room.
TODD GOLDSTEIN
Attleboro
Hopeful signs for a better Boston
Thank you for Janet Langhart Cohen’s March 19 op-ed
“The worst and best of Boston.” I have lived here since 1977
and also have felt that the Boston of today is quite different
from the Boston of the 1970s. I feel that the younger generation is more open, more kind, and less bigoted than their
parents and grandparents.
When I hear about Boston’s being a racist city, I cringe
and wonder if it’s just my imagination that things are better. I know things are not perfect, but Cohen’s observations
make me hopeful that indeed we are in a better place than
we were.
SUZANNE SALAMON
Brookline
Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, 1 Exchange Pl, Ste
201, Boston, MA 02109-2132; letter@globe.com
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G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
Senators say vote-security improvements must go faster
WASHINGTON — Senate
Intelligence Committee members pressured Kirstjen Nielsen, secretary
POLITICAL of Homeland
NOTEBOOK Security, to
accelerate key
election security measures,
even as she trumpeted improvements ahead of November’s midterm elections.
Nielsen told the senators,
who are investigating Russia’s
interference in the 2016 election, that the department had
made significant strides in recent months, working with
state and local election officials to improve communication about threats and share
cybersecurity resources. Those
efforts include comprehensive
risk assessments and cyberscans meant to identify vulnerabilities in election systems.
But under questioning,
Nielsen signaled that one of
those undertakings, to grant
full security clearance to state
election officials so they could
receive classified information
on cybersecurity threats, had
been slow going. Of the up to
150 state officials designated
to receive clearances, only
about 20 have them, she said.
In the meantime, Nielsen
said, the department will
share threat information with
relevant state officials.
Republicans and Democrats on the committee made
clear they expect more.
“I hear no sense of urgency
to really get on top of this issue,” said Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine.
Wednesday’s session was
the secretive committee’s first
public hearing to scrutinize
findings from its year-old Russia investigation. It followed
the committee’s release Tuesday of recommendations for
shoring up ballot boxes.
NEW YORK TIMES
Special counsel probed
Sessions’ 2017 testimony
WASHINGTON — Special
Counsel Robert Mueller and
the FBI investigated Attorney
General Jeff Sessions last year
for misleading lawmakers
about his contacts with Russians before eventually closing
that part of the case, said three
people with knowledge of the
matter.
The probe, of statements
Sessions made during his confirmation as attorney general,
was authorized by then-FBI
Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, said the people, who
asked not to be identified. Sessions fired McCabe March 16
for misleading Justice Department officials in a separate
matter.
The Sessions probe shows
the breadth of Mueller’s investigation. It was first reported
by ABC News.
“The Special Counsel‘s Office has informed me that after
interviewing the Attorney
General and conducting additional investigation, the Attorney General is not under investigation for false statements or
perjury in his confirmation
hearing testimony and related
written submissions to Congress,” said Charles Cooper,
Sessions’ lawyer.
Sessions wasn’t aware of
the investigation when he fired
McCabe, a person close to the
attorney general said.
BLOOMBERG NEWS
Republican concedes defeat
in Pa. special election
HARRISBURG, Pa. — Republican Rick Saccone conceded to Democrat Conor Lamb
Wednesday night in a closely
watched special election, more
than a week after the end of a
race that has shaken the GOP’s
confidence ahead of November
midterm elections.
Lamb claimed the seat by
about 750 votes in a district
Donald Trump won by almost
20 percentage points just 16
months ago. Lamb, who struck
a moderate tone during the
race and was backed by influential labor unions, beat Saccone, a state lawmaker with
one of the most conservative
records in the Legislature.
Lamb also benefited from
what Pittsburgh-area Democrats called the party’s most
energized electorate they had
ever seen, driven by an antiTrump fervor.
On Twitter, Lamb said he
congratulated Saccone ‘‘for a
close, hard-fought race.’’
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In Illinois, centrists survive
primary challenges
WASHINGTON — Centrist
incumbents in both parties
survived high-profile primaries in Illinois on Tuesday, edging out restive liberal and conservative challengers in contests that served as tests of the
establishment’s strength
against insurgents.
Democratic Representative
Daniel Lipinski, a seven-term
congressman often at odds
with his party on social issues,
narrowly defeated liberal activist Marie Newman, a firsttime candidate who described
him as a Trump Democrat.
Republican Governor Bruce
Rauner also faced a tough
challenge but ultimately beat
Jeanne Ives, a conservative
state lawmaker who accused
him of betraying his political
base on abortion, gay rights,
and spending.
WASHINGTON POST
Noted AIDS researcher is
tapped to lead the CDC
NEW YORK — A leading
AIDS researcher was picked
Wednesday to run the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention, the government’s top
public health agency.
Dr. Robert Ray Redfield Jr.,
66, who rose to prominence in
the 1980s as a top AIDS researcher, was named to the
post by Secretary of Health
and Human Services Alex
Azar. He is a medical school
professor at the University of
Maryland, where he cofounded the Institute of Human
Virology. He has also been
praised for his work in Maryland on the opioid crisis.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A pearl necklace so elegant
in its simplicity
Discover the beauty of simplicity with
our minimalist design. Suspended from
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2017
a chic sterling chain, the richly luminous
Cranberries fell from a conveyor belt into a waiting truck during harvesting in Carver.
16mm shell pearl has the look of a prized
EU says it will respond to steel
tariff with one on cranberries
South Sea pearl for far less. A piece and
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uCRANBERRIES
Continued from Page A1
“The effects of this could be
decades long,” said US Representative Bill Keating, the
Bourne Democrat who several
years ago helped start the Congressional Cranberry Caucus.
“There’s a way to deal with
trade inequities. But anyone
with even a casual knowledge
of the field knows it should be
done strategically and surgically,” he added. “We’re seeing
the opposite. This is an ax taken to this with collateral damage all around the place.”
Keating spoke Tuesday with
David O’Sullivan, the EU ambassador to the United States,
urging free trade policies and
making the case that US cranberries be left out of a looming
trade war.
The EU is the top destination for cranberr y exports
from Massachusetts, which
produces an estimated 15 percent of the world’s cranberries
on its 13,500 acres of farms.
Many of those are operated by
small farmers in Southeastern
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operative and one of the industry’s most dominant players, is
based in L ake ville. Ocean
Spray declined to comment.
Trump’s latest trade moves
c o u l d c a u s e u p h e av a l i n a
range of US-based products.
Soy bean farmers and airline
manufacturers are worried
that China could re taliate
against new tariffs. Car companies are concerned about
what would happen if NAFTA
negotiations collapse. And the
E u r o p e a n Un i o n h a s p u b lished a lengthy list of targets
that includes everything from
Kentucky bourbon to Florida
orange juice.
Cranberries are a tiny overall slice of the global trade
markets. But a fruit native to
North America — and most
identified with Thanksgiving
— has seen a boom in recent
years, partly because of increased demand in China.
The aim of the proposed
European tariff likely is to put
pressure on House Speaker
Pa u l R y a n , a R e p u b l i c a n ,
whose home state of Wisconsin is the top cranberry producer in the country. Massachusetts is the second-largest
cranberry state, producing
nearly one-fourth of the nation’s crop in recent years.
There are more than 2,100
full-time cranberry industry
jobs in Massachusetts, and an
additional 4,800 that rely on
cranberry production, according to a state report in 2016.
The state estimates the industry’s economic impact at $1.4
billion.
Cranberry is the official
s tate berr y and color. T he
state’s official drink? Cranberry juice.
Wild native cranberries
were cultivated in the early
1800s in the state, with British
ships making return voyages
w i t h c ra n b e r r i e s t o b r i n g
home and use as a source of vitamin C to prevent scurvy during the journey, according to
“America’s Founding Fruit:
The Cranberry in a New Environment” by Susan Playfair.
The potential EU backlash
is concerning, said Brian
Wick, executive director of the
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers’
Association, which was established in 1888. “The European
market is our strongest and
oldest export market for cranberries.”
Massachuse tts growers
have struggled in recent years
with a saturated domestic
market, prompting them to increase marketing overseas.
Their Canadian competition
could grab more market share
without the burden of the EU’s
tariff.
“Canada will just move in,”
Keating said. “The market is
there. . . .
“In Europe there was no
word for cranberr y. We’ ve
gone from them not knowing
what to even call the product
to marketing it, finding a market for it. They now have ‘craisins’ in their salads.”
Trump’s 25 percent tariff on
steel and 10 percent tariff on
aluminum are scheduled to go
into effect on Friday.
“We will not sit idly while
our industry is hit with unfair
measures that put thousands
of European jobs at risk,” European Commission President
Jean-Claude Juncker said.
“The EU will react firmly and
commensurately to defend our
interests.”
If the Trump administration goes through with imposing the steel and aluminium
tariffs on the European Union,
it would set off a 90-day review
period where the EU would begin laying the groundwork for
tariffs on the US-based goods.
“I’m not aware of cranberries ever being put on a list like
this in the past,” said Terry
Humfeld, the executive director of the Cranberry Institute,
a Carver-based nonprofit that
represents members in national and international regulatory
matters. “We need to see the
results of their internal consultations at the EU. Once we see
a final result, and where they
end up on this process, we’ll
react accordingly. Right now
we don’t know what we’re up
against.”
Matt Viser can be reached at
matt.viser@globe.com.
Business
Study details challenges
faced by women training
to become surgeons
PAGES B10-13
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Excel nursing facility in Lexington to close
Interest rates on rise, and consumers will feel it
Decision on short-term rentals on hold in Boston
Metro
B
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E T R O
Yvonne Abraham
A Trump-ish
opioid plan
If all you have is a hammer,
everything looks like a nail.
And if bigotry is your favorite tool, every problem looks
like the fault of immigrants.
And so there President
Donald Trump was, in Manchester, N.H., on Monday afternoon, laying the blame
for the opioid crisis gripping this country on
the evil hordes streaming across the Mexican
border — and our state line.
Tough-guy Trump called for drug dealers
to be executed, which isn’t likely to fly. He
spoke longingly of countries where those
who supply drugs are put to death: “Take a
look at some of these countries where they
don’t play games: They don’t have a drug
problem,” claimed the president, who has expressed admiration for Rodrigo Duterte, the
Philippines strongman whose own war on
drugs features extrajudicial killings. For the
umpteenth time, he called for a wall on the
Mexican border, and decried sanctuary cities, singling out Boston and Lawrence, both
of them — no coincidence — majority minority cities.
There was as much red meat here as at
any Trump campaign rally, and many in that
room ate it up. Never mind that the line between dealer and user is often blurry; or that
we already tried cracking down on drug
dealers with the failed War on Drugs, which
packed our prisons — with mostly black and
brown men — and did nothing to stop users
multiplying; or that most drugs come in
through legal border crossings.
Just like that, the president took a rolling
tragedy in this country, one that killed
64,000 people last year, and bent it to his
hateful world view. In so doing — and not for
the first time — he shot his own administration in the foot.
Because a bunch of the people who are
trying to help his administration tackle this
crisis have done some excellent work finding
real solutions. Among them are Governor
Charlie Baker and former Rhode Island congressman Patrick Kennedy, both of whom sat
on a bipartisan commission to recommend
ways to stanch the overdose epidemic. The
commission’s recommendations could make
a real difference, including providing better
access to medication-assisted treatment,
making sure health insurance covers that
treatment, expanding drug courts, and setting better controls on opioid prescriptions.
Some of their recommendations made it
into the final plan the president introduced
on Monday, though you’d hardly know that
from Trump’s performance. Baker and Kennedy are both frustrated at that.
“Look, we put a lot of time and work into
that report,” Baker said Wednesday. “So, yes,
I’m frustrated about the fact that that gets
lost in a conversation about a variety of issues that are not anywhere near as meaningful solutions as prevention, education, treatment, and recovery.”
Kennedy called Trump’s comments “an
enormous missed opportunity.”
“This is a medical challenge, not a moral
challenge,” he said. “People have a chemistry
issue, not a character issue, and our health
care system needs to reflect that. But the
death penalty became the headline.”
If Trump wants to get tough, Kennedy
said, let him get tough on health insurers,
who still don’t cover addiction treatment as
well as they cover treatment for other illnesses, despite a federal law compelling them to
do so. Or perhaps he could lean on China
and Mexico to shut down labs in their countries producing lethal fentanyl, he said.
“You’re not going to solve an epidemic by
executing a few drug dealers,” Kennedy said.
“That is patently absurd. That isn’t going to
bring anyone back.”
This should have been a win for Trump,
touting the smart work of a bipartisan group
of people, and recommendations both parties can get behind in Congress. Instead, he
chose to deepen divisions by resorting to his
worn old bag of tricks.
Democrats and Republicans must work
together if we’re to make any headway. Big
money — $100 billion, Kennedy reckons —
will be required to make a dent in the crisis,
much more than either the president or Congress are talking about now.
But as the president well knows, tough
talk is cheaper than actual solutions. And
Trump talk is cheapest of all.
Globe columnist Yvonne Abraham can be
reached at yvonne.abraham@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter @GlobeAbraham.
Spilka claims votes to lead Senate
By Joshua Miller
GLOBE STAFF
and Matt Stout
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Senator Karen E. Spilka said
Wednesday she has the votes to be
the next president of the Massachusetts state Senate — a move her colleagues hope will settle a chamber
in upheaval since its former leader,
Stanley C. Rosenberg, stepped aside
following accusations that his husband sexually assaulted or harassed
four men.
T
Says she has support to be its president
The powerful chair of the Senate
budget-writing committee, Spilka
locked up the necessary votes with a
flurry of phone calls over the weekend, according to her colleagues,
tipping a race that had dragged on
for months and absorbed the attention of the 40-seat body.
In a statement, the Ashland
Democrat said she is “deeply honored” by the support she has received and intends to work with the
current Senate president, Harriette
L. Chandler, and her colleagues to
ensure a smooth transition.
“Senators have made clear that
they want certainty in leadership to
allow us to focus solely on the vitally
important work to be done on behalf of the people at this time,” she
said. “It’s time to turn the page and
usher in a new era of collaborative
leadership in the Senate.”
The jockeying for the Senate
presidency began as Rosenberg
stepped aside from the leadership
post in December. His move came
after the Globe detailed accusations
from four men who alleged that
Rosenberg’s husband, Bryon Hefner, had sexually assaulted or harassed them and who said Hefner
bragged that he could influence
Senate business.
The Senate launched an investigation into its former leader, but the
results of that inquiry have not yet
SPILKA, Page B4
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
ow truck drivers from around New England gathered in North Andover on Wednesday in a farewell to Daniel Coady Jr.,
41, a tow truck driver who was fatally struck while working on Interstate 495 last week. He was a lifelong employee of
Coady’s Towing in Lawrence. Coady’s casket was draped in a “thin yellow line” flag, a symbol of the towing industry. B3
After chiding House speaker,
DiZoglio eyes state Senate run
By Matt Stout
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
State Representative Diana DiZoglio, a
Methuen Democrat who just days ago issued a rare public rebuke of House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo, said she is launching a
bid for the state Senate.
DiZoglio confirmed Wednesday that
she will seek the seat held by Kathleen
O’Connor Ives, a Newburyport Democrat
who said this week she is not running
again.
“I have proven I will stand up for my
district and for doing what’s right in my
current role the last six years,” DiZoglio
Diana DiZoglio
has clashed with
House Speaker
Robert A. DeLeo.
said. “As a state senator, I would automatically be a chairperson of a committee, and
my vote would carry much more weight
being one out of 40 elected officials, as opposed to being one out of 160.”
Last week DiZoglio challenged DeLeo
on the House’s use of nondisclosure agreements, calling them “silencing tactics” to
“cover up misdeeds by politicians and others.” DiZoglio unsuccessfully pushed lawmakers to adopt stronger language to ban
the use of the agreements, even describing
her own experience of signing one as an
outgoing House aide in 2011.
DIZOGLIO, Page B4
Fourth March nor’easter slacks off
Slow-to-develop storm may still affect Thursday a.m. commute
By Danny McDonald
GLOBE STAFF
and Alana Levene
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Forecasters sharply reduced the
anticipated snowfall for Eastern
Massachusetts Wednesday night into Thursday, after the region had
braced for the fourth storm this
month marked by high winds and
snow.
But late Wednesday night, the
National Weather Service canceled
a winter storm warning, which is issued when 7 inches or more of
snow is expected in a 24-hour period, to a winter storm advisory,
which is called when just 2 to 4
inches of snow is expected.
The change was issued for Eastern and Central Massachusetts,
parts of Connecticut and Rhode IsSTORM, Page B3
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
A light snow began to fall along Route 3 in Plymouth Wednesday
night as forecasters predicted the fourth storm this month.
Man
robbed,
left to die
in subway
By Jeremy C. Fox
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
A man with a long record of
drug crimes and violent offenses
allegedly spent a half-hour rummaging through an unconscious
man’s belongings, stole a prescription drug and “multiple”
other items, and left the man to
die alone on a subway platform
in Boston early Wednesday, according to the Suffolk district attorney’s office.
Anthony Stimson, 30, of Boston faces charges of larceny and
possession of a Class E drug after
he allegedly took the nerve pain
drug gabapentin and other possessions from 52-year-old Willie
Williams as Williams lay on the
southbound Red Line platform
at Downtown Crossing, according to court filings.
Superintendent Richard Sullivan, a spokesman for the MBTA
Transit Police, expressed revulsion at the callous nature of the
crime.
“In my 20-plus years, I can
only recall this happening one
other time,” he said, going on to
cite the 2014 case when Josue
Gonzalez of Brockton allegedly
stole the cellphone of a woman
struck and killed by a Red Line
train at the same MBTA station.
“I view this as along the same
line of depravity,” Sullivan said,
adding that Stimson is “known
to the T police. We’ve had dealings and encounters with him in
MBTA, Page B5
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
MIT
The behavior
of black holes
By Laney Ruckstuhl
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Scientists believe they have found evidence
that black holes feed on passing stars then
eject energetic jet streams, according to a
study led by a researcher at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
Dheeraj Pasham, NASA Einstein fellow at
MIT, said researchers were able to observe radiation from a supermassive black hole consuming a star, a rare event that was captured
by a global network of telescopes in 2014
from 300 million light years away. It was previously known that when a black hole devours
a star, it emits X-ray waves , which are produced from hot material from the star as it
falls into the black hole.
But the researchers picked up on something that scientists hadn’t noticed before —
13 days later, high-energy jet streams that entered the galaxy echoed the X-rays, leading
Pasham to believe these jet streams might be
an output of the black hole’s star consumption.
“The energy that’s coming out of a black
hole is proportional to the energy that is going
into the black hole,” Pasham said.
In more crude terms, Pasham said, the
black hole is essentially digesting the star.
Such black hole jet streams can have large
implications for the galaxies they enter. Pasham said they can regulate the growth of a
galaxy because of their energy levels.
“Jets can halt star formation in galaxies if
they’re strong enough,” he said. “But not all
black holes produce strong enough jets. That’s
something we don’t understand.”
Black holes are regions of space where
gravity pulls so much that even light cannot
get out.
Pasham led the study alongside researchers at Johns Hopkins University. It was published Monday in Astrophysical Journal.
Pasham said in the future, he hopes scientists can understand why some black holes
seem to emit larger jet streams than others.
“These events are interesting because we
can try to train our telescopes to be ready,” Pasham said. “We don’t know where or when
the next event will happen but if we can try to
understand that we can train our telescopes
in the right direction.”
Laney Ruckstuhl can be reached at
laney.ruckstuhl@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @laneyruckstuhl.
BY THE NUMBERS
$70m
The value of the Massachusetts cranberry crop in
2016. There are rising concerns the state’s top
food crop could be dealt a blow if the European
Union retaliates against President Trump’s threat to
imposed stiff tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. Story, Page A1
QUOTE OF THE DAY
CUSEUM
Via augmented reality, an app installed on a tablet allowed a museum visitor to see an image of the stolen art work as if it were there.
App lets visitors see stolen art
By Steve Annear
D
GLOBE STAFF
espite persistent efforts — and the prospect of a hefty reward
— the whereabouts of the artwork stolen from Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum nearly three decades ago remain
a mystery. But that doesn’t mean people should be forever
barred from seeing those famous paintings hanging on the
museum’s walls as they once did.
Cuseum, a company based in the Seaport District that uses technology
to enhance visitor engagement at museums, launched an independent
project last week called “Hacking the Heist,” which relies on “the magic of
augmented reality” to “return” the pilfered masterpieces to their empty
frames.
Here’s how it works: When a camera on a smartphone or tablet that’s
loaded with the company’s app is aimed at the spaces where the paintings
were, the images appear on the screen, as if they were actually on the wall.
“It’s very seamless in that there’s no buttons or complicated interface,”
said Brendan Ciecko, chief executive and founder of Cuseum. “You’re literally holding up your device and overlaying the paintings that would have
previously hung in the frames.” Apple’s ARKit was used to create the app.
On March 18, 1990, two thieves dressed as police officers gained entry
to the museum and made off with 13 paintings valued at $500 million.
Sunday marked 28 years since the theft. The museum is offering a $10 million reward for information leading to the return of the art.
Ciecko said as “art lovers, and technologists, and Bostonians,” the company thought the project would be a captivating opportunity to experiment
with augmented reality. “We want to inspire people to think about how art
and technology intersect and plays a role, and we have seen a lot of uses
around augmented reality,” he said.
For now, the app only displays Rembrandt’s “A Lady and Gentleman in
Black” and “Christ in the Storm on the Sea of Galilee,” but Cuseum plans to
add more. Along with the app, Cuseum also created a website with information about the heist. A Gardner Museum spokeswoman said the museum was not involved with Cuseum’s experimental app, which currently is
not available to the public. When asked if the museum plans to offer it to
visitors, she added, “Not at this time.”
But Ciecko sees the project one day expanding and getting in the hands
of patrons. “When we get excited about something,” he said, “we throw a
lot of energy into it.”
Steve Annear can be reached at steve.annear@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @steveannear.
AROUND THE REGION
BOSTON
Firefighters rescue
construction workers
Two construction workers were rescued by Boston firefighters after they fell nearly two stories
while working on a Harvard University building
Wednesday afternoon, officials said. The workers were injured and taken to a hospital but are
expected to survive, said Marc Sanders, a spokesman for the Boston Fire Department. Firefighters responded to 140 Western Ave. at 2:17 p.m.,
Sanders said. The building is the future site of
Harvard University’s Science and Engineering
Complex, according to Harvard’s website. Crew
members told firefighters that the men fell about
18 feet onto a landing of the fifth floor of the
building, Sanders said. Firefighters used a ladder truck with a bucket to rescue the men and
bring them back to ground-level, he said.
A M H E R ST
UMass student injured
vacationing in Cancun
A UMass senior from Revere was seriously injured while vacationing in Cancun, Mexico, during spring break, the university said. Lauren
Hayes suffered a skull fracture during a boating
mishap last week in Cancun. On Monday, she
was flown from Mexico to Boston, where she will
receive further medical treatment, UMass said in
a statement. The Dean of Students Office is
working with faculty in the Isenberg School of
Management to keep Hayes on track to graduate
in May, the statement said. A Go Fund Me page
set up to help the Hayes family with medical expenses said Lauren was “showing signs of improvement since arriving in Boston.”
shows such as “Sunday Open House,” “The Good
Day Show,” and “Sunday Live!” Avruch toured
the world performing as “Bozo” for UNICEF and
was given a United Nations Award for his work
with children. He also earned two Emmy Awards
and a “Man of the Year” award for his “tireless
work for charities of all kinds,” according to the
Massachusetts Broadcasters Hall of Fame, which
inducted him into its inaugural class in 2007.
Avruch leaves “his wife, Betty, two sons, grandchildren, relatives and friends,” the station said.
BOSTON
BOSTON
Frank Avruch, aka
‘Bozo the Clown,’ dies
Criminal Justice reform
bill due out this week
Frank Avruch, a longtime WCVB-TV personality
and entertainer known for playing “Bozo the
Clown,” died at his Boston home Tuesday, the
station said. Avruch died at 89 “after a long battle with heart disease,” WCVB said in an article
on its website, citing his family. “Our dad loved
the children of all ages who remembered being
on his show and was always grateful for their
kind words,” his family told the station. “We will
miss him greatly.” A Winthrop native, Avruch
graduated from Boston University in 1949 and
began a career in radio before stepping into television. He played “Bozo” from the late 1950s until 1970, and also hosted other locally produced
A long-awaited bill, aimed at paring the number
of people ensnared in the criminal justice system
and modernizing how Massachusetts punishes
lawbreakers, is poised to emerge from a closeddoor legislative committee this week. It would
come after months of Beacon Hill wrangling between the House of Representatives and more
liberal Senate, which have each passed a different version of the legislation. “We’re in very good
shape and I expect it to be finalized by the end of
the week,” said state Senator William N. Brownsberger, a Belmont Democrat who was one of the
top negotiators on the bill.
POLICE BLOTTER
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
‘I have a great desire to
continue the Liam’s legacy
of onion rings and fresh
seafood at Nauset Beach or
nearby.’
JOHN OHMAN, owner of the iconic Liam’s
snack bar in Orleans, which was demolished
Tuesday after a succession of storms left it
dangling precariously close to the edge of a
cliff. (Source: Cape Cod Times). He is shown
above removing equipemtn from the
restaurant.
R GUN BUST A 70-year-old man was arrested for
possession of an assault rifle and high-capacity
magazines containing more than 350 rounds of
ammunition, and a 29-year-old woman was apprehended for heroin possession in Dorchester
on Tuesday, according to Boston police. Police
Commissioner William B. Evans said in a statement that such military-style weapons make the
city’s streets more dangerous. “There is no need
for any citizen in the city of Boston to be carrying
high powered weapons of this kind, and there
are just too many of these guns out there,” he
said. Officers from the department’s Neighborhood Drug Control Units were conducting an investigation near the intersection of Columbia
Road and Massachusetts Avenue around 1:15
p.m. Tuesday when they saw the woman, Krista
McCaffrey of Winthrop, get out of a Ford Explorer, walk into the nearby KFC, and conduct what
appeared to be a drug deal, according to the
statement. Officers followed McCaffrey back to
the Explorer, where she climbed into the front
passenger’s seat and 70-year-old Stephen White,
also of Winthrop, waited in the driver’s seat, police said. When the officers approached the SUV
and spoke to McCaffrey, she produced a plastic
bag containing a brown powder that appeared to
be heroin, police said. White told officers that he
was armed, and they found that he had a loaded
.45-caliber handgun on his belt, police said. Elsewhere in the SUV, he also had an AR-15-style assault rifle, 10 loaded high-capacity magazines,
and a tactical ballistic body armor vest. Police arrested White and charged him with knowingly
being present where heroin is kept, unlawful
possession of a large-capacity firearm, and 10
counts of unlawful possession of a large-capacity
feeding device, police said. Officers arrested McCaffrey and charged with possession of class B
drugs. White and McCaffrey were arraigned
Wednesday in Dorchester Municipal Court. Bail
was set at $7,500 for White, who was also ordered to surrender all firearms. No bail was imposed on McCaffrey, according to the Suffolk district attorney’s office.
R BANDIT ON RUN Authorities are searching for a
woman who robbed a South Boston bank Monday afternoon, claiming she needed the money to
pay for cancer treatment for herself and her son.
Police responded to a panic alarm at 12:53 p.m.
at East Boston Savings Bank at 430 West Broad-
way after the suspect fled with an undetermined
amount of money, Boston police spokeswoman
Maisha Miraj said. In a statement posted to the
Mass. Most Wanted website, the FBI said the
woman entered the bank, stated she and her son
had cancer, and demanded $5,300. She said
she had a bomb and showed the teller an
unknown device before fleeing on West
Broadway.
R MAN ATTACKED A man was stabbed in the
hand in a bathroom at Bunker Hill Community
College Wednesday afternoon, and the suspect is
still at large, a college spokeswoman said. The incident occurred shortly before 3 p.m. in a firstfloor men’s bathroom of the college’s B Building,
college spokeswoman Karen Norton said. The
victim was treated for his wound and released
Wednesday afternoon, she said. As of 4 p.m., the
man who stabbed him was still at large, Norton
said. The suspect was seen on video surveillance
fleeing the campus, she said. It was not immediately clear what preceded the stabbing, and
Norton said she did not know whether
the victim or suspect were students at the school.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
Hundreds pay tribute to tow truck driver killed on I-495
By Emily Sweeney
GLOBE STAFF
To w t r u c k d r i v e r s f r o m
around New England gathered
in North Andover on Wednesday to bid farewell to one of
their own, Daniel Coady Jr.,
who was struck and killed
while doing his job on Interstate 495 last week.
Coady, 41, graduated from
North Andover High School
and was a lifelong employee of
Coady’s Towing in Lawrence.
“The Coady family is wellrespected and Danny was very
well-liked,” said North Andover
police Detective Lieutenant Eric J. Foulds, who estimated that
more than 500 people — including tow truck drivers, police, and fire personnel — were
there to pay their respects to
Coady, whose funeral was held
at St. Michael Church.
“It was absolutely amazing,”
Foulds said. “I’ve never seen
anything that comes close to
this in my 30-plus-year law enforcement career.”
Coady was fatally struck on
the night of March 14. State Police said he was going to haul
away a car that had been involved in a crash on Interstate
495, and while he was standing
on the left side of his truck, a
Lawrence woman driving a
2007 Pontiac G6 crashed into
an unoccupied BMW in the
breakdown lane and then
veered into the tow truck and
hit Coady.
Tow trucks assembled in the
parking lot of the North Andover Mall Wednesday morning and formed a static procession with flashing lights.
Coady’s casket was draped with
a “thin yellow line” flag, a symbol representing the towing industry, and was carried on the
back of a flatbed truck.
T h e f u n e ra l p r o c e s s i o n
started at St. Michael Church
in North Andover and went to
the North Andover Mall park-
ing lot and then to Ridgewood
Cemetery.
Marc Sheehy, the general
manager of Newburyport Towing Service, was one of many
who attended the moving tribute.
“Words can’t describe . . .
the outpouring of support,” he
said. “He really was a great
guy.”
Todd Chase of the Statewide
Towing Association said approximately 380 trucks were
there for the event.
“It was overwhelming,” he
said. “It was a really, really
large turnout. It was a great
tribute to a very good man.”
Chase added: “The news of
the accident was devastating to
so many of us.”
Shiina Dionne, 28, of Lawrence, was charged with vehicular homicide, drunken driving, speeding, and other offenses in connection with the crash.
She was arraigned Friday at
Tufts Medical Center, where a
not-guilty plea was entered on
her behalf, according to the Essex district attorney’s office.
She is scheduled to appear
in Lawrence District Court on
April 4 for a pretrial hearing.
Sheehy said that if any good
can come out of this, he hopes
it will raise awareness about
the dangers that tow truck drivers must face on the job every
day, and the issue of distracted
driving.
“This is a tragedy that did
not need to happen,” Sheehy
said. “People doing their jobs
are getting killed on the side of
the road. Something needs to
change.”
“Slow down, move over, and
pay attention,” he said. “People
just want to go home to their
families.”
Emily Sweeney can be reached
at esweeney@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@emilysweeney.
Fourth nor’easter brings stiff wind, less snow
uSTORM
Continued from Page B1
land, according to the weather
service.
“There’s a lot of dry air in
place that’s really eating away
at the snow,,” said Stephanie
Dunten, a meteorologist with
the service, explaining the
change just after 10 p.m.
Wednesday.
Between 3 and 4 inches was
expected to fall in Boston, parts
of the North Shore, and the
Merrimack Valley, according to
the service.
Forecasts of a significant
storm prompted some local
school districts to cancel school
on Thursday, including Boston,
Chelsea, Lynn, Malden, and Revere.
The weather could still complicate Thursday morning’s
commute, particularly for
those coming into Boston from
the southeastern part of the
state, according to a forecaster
at the National Weather Service.
“It’s probably going to be
slow,” said Eleanor Vallier-Talbot, a meteorologist with the
service, of Thursday morning’s
commute for South Shore residents.
From Wednesday afternoon
into Thursday morning, the
storm was expected to hit Eastern Massachusetts from the
southwest to the northeast,
said Vallier-Talbot. The southeastern part of the state is expected to get hit the hardest,
with Foxborough seeing between 4 and 6 inches of heavy,
wet snow, according to the service.
The storm warnings
prompted widespread cancellation of Wednesday evening ac-
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
A pedestrian walked down Charles Street against a stormy sky as the fourth nor’easter this month approached Boston.
Storm warnings were reduced Wednesday night as dry air from the north kept most of the storm to the south.
tivities.
Before any snow fell on Boston Common, the impending
spring storm was met with
nonchalance Wednesday evening.
Christa Sabatini of Boston
said she used the storm forecast as a teaching moment on
New England weather for her
4-year-old daughter, Vivian.
“She learned that it was the
first day of spring yesterday in
school, so she said, ‘Then how
c o m e t h e r e ’s g o i n g t o b e
snow?’ ” Sabatini said of her
daughter, who was bundled up
in a puffy jacket and a hooded
scarf with bear ears.
“I explained that we live in
New England,” Sabatini said.
“Sometimes there’s flowers, but
sometimes there’s snow on the
first day of spring. You just never know.”
Bill Anderson of Brookline
described the beginning of
spring as “not very vernal,” but
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thing you get used to growing
up here.”
Fitchburg, located in northern Worcester County, may only see 3 to 4 inches, while Amherst, nestled in the Pioneer
Valley in Western Massachusetts, could see only 1 to 2 inches of snow, according to the service.
Snow had started to fall in
Taunton and New Bedford
around 3 p.m. Wednesday, she
said. On Cape Cod, snow was
Danny McDonald can be
reached at
daniel.mcdonald@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@Danny__McDonald. Alana
Levene can be reached at
alana.levene@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@alanalevene.
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having lived here for more than
30 years, he said he’s not surprised.
“I have had my heart broken
before,” Anderson said.
He added with a shrug, “You
just have to have a hard heart.”
Bill Jena of Pepperell said,
as a lifelong New Englander,
he’s seen worse.
“I’ve seen this type of cold in
April, even the beginning of
May,” said Jena. “It can be depressing at times, but it’s some-
mixing with rain Wednesday
afternoon. Provincetown and
Chatham are expected to see
less than an inch of snow from
the storm, according to the service.
The snow was expected to
start to fall in Boston some
time after midnight, with the
heaviest of the precipitation
starting to taper off between 9
and 11 a.m. Thursday, Dunten
said late Wednesday night.
Previous forecasts had the
snow falling in Boston earlier,
but snow bands from the storm
were struggling to overcome
d r y a i r i n t h e at m o s p h e r e
Wednesday evening, said Dunten.
Roads in the region could be
slushy in the early morning
Thursday but temperatures are
expected to rise above freezing
during the mid-morning hours,
which will diminish accumulation, said Dunten.
Still, travelers should be prepared to add a little extra time
to their commute on Thursday
morning, she said.
“ R o a d s c o u l d b e a l i tt l e
slick,” she said.
The storm, according to National Weather Service forecasters, is expected to bring
high wind gusts along the Massachusetts coast, reaching between 45 miles per hour and 55
miles per hour in Plymouth
and on the Cape and Islands.
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T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
DiZoglio says she’s launching a bid for state Senate
uDIZOGLIO
Continued from Page B1
I n a p h o n e i n t e r v i e w,
DiZoglio acknowledged that
any upward rise in the House
would be limited under DeLeo,
especially after publicly bucking leadership on the House
floor last week.
She had also voted against
lifting term limits on the speakership in 2015, a vote the
House made at DeLeo’s behest,
and she was one of a handful of
Democrats to vote against the
controversial pay raise package
the Legislature passed in early
2017.
DiZoglio said that she had
been weighing a run for
months, but that she hadn’t
talked directly to O’Connor Ives
before announcing her decision. She said she has $70,000
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in her campaign account to
start the race and has already
scheduled a fund-raiser and
campaign kickoff for April 5.
The Senate district includes
Amesbury, Merrimac, Methuen, Haverhill, Newburyport,
Salisbury, and parts of North
Andover. O’Connor Ives, who
first won election in 2012, said
it was time for a “new chapter”
in deciding not to seek reelection and pointed to devoting
more attention to her family.
“The way I’ve set out to do
this is to be as accessible and responsive as possible, participating in meetings, events, and
other activities outside of business hours and on weekends in
all seven communities I represent,” she said in a statement released before dawn. “And now,
at the conclusion of this term,
that time will be spoken for by a
lovely and demanding toddler.
“So, in many ways, I’m disappointed to leave the Senate,”
she added, “but in my heart I
know it’s the right thing to do.”
O’Connor Ives is the sixth
Senator in less than a year to either leave or opt not to seek reelection to the 40-member
b o d y. S h e f o l l o w s L i n d a
Dorcena Forry, the Senate’s only black member, who left for
DiZoglio said she
has $70,000 in
her campaign
account to start
the race and has
already scheduled
a fund-raiser.
newly formed Cannabis Control
Co m m i s s i o n , a n d Jam e s
Timilty left last spring to take a
job as the Norfolk County treasurer. Senator Barbara L’Italien
is running for Congress, effectively giving up her chance to
seek reelection to her Senate
seat.
They may have more compan y. S e n a t o r E i l e e n M .
Donoghue is a finalist for the
Lowell city manager’s job and is
a favorite to replace the outgo-
ing Kevin Murphy, who is retiring April 1. The Lowell City
Council is expected to name its
selection before the end of the
month.
The changes promise to
bring a slew of new faces to the
Senate, where, on Wednesday,
Senator Karen E. Spilka, an
Ashland Democrat, confirmed
she had secured support to be
its leader next year.
Former Senate president
Stanley C. Rosenberg stepped
down from the post late last
year after the Globe reported
that four men accused his husband, Bryon Hefner, of sexually
assaulting or harassing them
while boasting of his influence
over Senate business.
The Senate has since
launched an Ethics Committee
investigation into their former
leader. Rosenberg remains in
the Senate and has maintained
that Hefner had no influence
over the chamber’s business.
Current Senate President
Harriette L. Chandler has said
she does not intend to run for
reelection to the position this
January.
Reach Matt Stout at
matt.stout@globe.com. Follow
him on twitter @mattpstout.
Spilka says she has the votes
uSPILKA
Continued from Page B1
been released.
Chandler succeeded Rosenberg, with her colleagues elevating her to acting president in
December.
Two months later, the Globe
reported that Hefner had access
to Rosenberg’s e-mails, tried to
affect the state budget, and involved himself in the workings
of Rosenberg’s office. That’s all
despite Rosenberg promising
years earlier to put a “firewall”
between his personal life and
Senate business.
In an attempt to end weeks
of intense jockeying, senators
elevated Chandler to the presidency, removing “acting” from
her title. But the politicking
continued — and culminated
Wednesday afternoon, when
Chandler told the Globe that
Spilka had just relayed the
news to her.
“I congratulate her,” the
Worcester Democrat said.
Chandler had previously
pledged to step down from the
leadership post at the end of
this legislative session in early
Januar y 2019. She said
Wednesday that she still expects “to serve out the term.”
But a Spilka political aide,
David Guarino, said Spilka “has
been and will continue to” discuss the timing of the handoff,
raising the prospect that Spilka
might take the gavel sooner.
“The exact timing has yet to be
determined,” he said.
Senate Democrats are scheduled to huddle in a closed-door
caucus Thursday, though a
Chandler aide said any vote
concerning Spilka was not expected.
For months, Spilka, who
chairs the chamber’s Ways and
Means Committee, had been
battling with several other senators to gather support.
Senator Sal N. DiDomenico
of Everett was seen as her top
rival for the post and on
Wednesday said he backed
Spilka.
“I would like to congratulate
chairwoman Karen Spilka, and
I have pledged my support to
her as our next Senate president,” he said.
Senator Eric P. Lesser of
Longmeadow, who had also
been mulling a run for the presidency, met with Spilka at the
Omni Parker House over breakfast this month. A group of senators, including Lesser, pledged
their support to her over the
weekend.
“I feel very confident that
Karen understands where the
younger members are coming
from, appreciates the need for
some changes, and is committed to both a progressive and
reform-oriented agenda,” said
Lesser, a 33-year-old Democrat.
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Senator Anne M. Gobi, who
had backed Lesser, said they
had been gauging support for
him and Spilka before relinquishing the contest.
A Spencer Democrat, Gobi
said she had wanted a new
president who could deliver “regional equity” — both Rosenberg and Lesser hail from western Massachusetts — but the
desire to put the president’s
race to bed was an overriding
factor in shifting her support.
“It’s been a distraction since
December, and it hasn’t abated
at all,” Gobi said. “To see something like this continue through
the budget cycle . . . would have
been detrimental to the Senate.”
Senator Cindy F. Friedman,
an Arlington Democrat and
Spilka supporter, said she’s
heartened Spilka will continue
the Rosenberg policy of empowering senators, instead of
running the chamber from the
top down.
“My sense is that everybody
has really appreciated the work
Stan had done to open up the
Senate and make it more of a
body where there are lots of
voices, people had input, senators were empowered to do the
work they were sent to do,”
Friedman said. “I felt and feel
that Karen is somebody who
believes in it and will continue
that” type of leadership.
Senator Julian Cyr, a progressive Democrat who represents the Cape and Islands,
cheered the negotiating skills of
Spilka, a former arbitrator and
mediator. She is poised to go
toe-to-toe with Democratic
House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo and Republican Governor
Charlie Baker, both of whom
are seen as more conservative
than Spilka.
“Karen is a negotiator,” Cyr
said. “She’s someone who, prior
to running for public office, was
a labor attorney. She’s someone
who can collaborate, but also,
when needed, she can hold the
line.”
Spilka was first elected to
the Senate in 2004, ran unsuccessfully for Congress in 2013,
and was appointed to her powerful budget-writing post by
Rosenberg in 2015.
Asked whether Spilka would
consider giving Rosenberg a
leadership post when she takes
the reins of power, her aide,
Guarino, did not directly answer.
“Senator Spilka will be discussing with her colleagues
their roles in her leadership
team and legislative committees at the appropriate time,” he
said.
Rosenberg, for his part, issued a glowing statement about
Spilka, calling her a “skilled and
committed collaborator.”
“I am glad to know the Senate will be led by such capable
hands,” he said.
2783
E-mail Miller at
joshua.miller@globe.com. Email Stout at
matt.stout@globe.com.
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Details scant in student’s death
Amherst senior
was in Mexico
By Travis Andersen
and Steve Annear
B5
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BY CITY AND TOWN
GLOBE STAFF
The Amherst College football player who died last week
in Mexico City “enriched our
lives and fortified our spirits,”
his family said Wednesday in
an obituary for the 21-year-old
student.
The obituary for Andrew Michael Dorogi,
an Ohio native, appeared on
the website
Andrew
of Dostal BoDorogi died
kas Funeral
at age 21.
Services in
North Olmsted, Ohio.
“Andrew’s smile radiated
the joy and faith with which
he lived his life,” his family
wrote. “We will always remember his wit, intelligence, athleticism and kind heart. We
will forever treasure the blessing of our time with Andrew,
and the precious memories of
how he enriched our lives and
fortified our spirits.”
The authorities have released few details about Dorogi’s death. He died just days
before his 22nd birthday. Dorogi was expected to graduate
in May.
The State Department on
Tuesday confirmed that he
died Friday in Mexico City but
released no details.
A spokeswoman said
Wednesday that the State Department stands “ready to provide appropriate consular services. Out of respect for the
family during this difficult
time, we have no further comment.”
Attempts to reach Dorogi’s
family weren’t successful.
The US Consulate in Mexico City could not be reached
for comment.
Local law enforcement officials had no immediate comment, except to say an investi-
ABINGTON
ARMSTRONG, Robert James
ARLINGTON
LIEBERSON, Stanley
LOMBARDO, Pauline M.
PORRETTA, Stephen A.
BELMONT
CICERO, Scott D.
MULCAHY, William H.
BILLERICA
GIANNINO, Peter F.
BOSTON
ARMSTRONG, Robert James
CICERONE, Lilia (Terragnoli)
DEMONE, Donald F.
JOHNSON, Thomas Edgar
McLEOD-O’MALLEY, Dr. Sara
NABAUNS, Dolores
BRADFORD
CONNELLY, John R. Sr.
BRIDGEWATER
D’AGOSTINO, Joseph R.
JOHNSON, Thomas Edgar
BROCKTON
JOHNSON, Thomas Edgar
BROOKLINE
BROWN, Marjorie L.
EGAN, John Kelly
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Flowers were set out at the Keefe Campus Center at Amherst College to honor the memory
of student Andrew Dorogi, who died in Mexico City last week.
gation remains open.
Amherst junior Mantero
Moreno-Cheek, who played
with Dorogi on the football
team, described him Wednesday as a “great friend.”
“Originally meeting him on
my recruiting visit, we instantly bonded over the fact that we
were both Ohio boys with
nothing but our Ohio pride,”
Moreno-Cheek wrote in a message to the Globe. “He made
the transition to Amherst College easy, as we were able to
talk about mutual friends
[and] common high school
football opponents.”
Moreno-Cheek said he
could yell out “O-H,” and Dorogi would quickly respond,
“I-O,” spelling out Ohio.
“He was a great friend,”
Moreno-Cheek said, “but an
even better person.”
Marquise Watson, a former
running backs coach at Amherst who now coaches at Rutgers, echoed those comments
on Twitter.
“This kid was an amazing
person, going to miss you like
hell,” Watson tweeted Wednesday. “Sad to see someone go so
early. It was my honor to coach
you and build a bond with you.
I love you so much. RIP ANDREW! My prayers go out to
the entire DOROGI FAMILY.
#22forever”
Amherst College, where
Dorogi studied economics, on
Tuesday extended “sympathies
on behalf of the entire Amherst community to his family,
friends, teammates, coaches,
and teachers.”
A college spokeswoman declined to comment further on
Wednesday.
Aides to Senators Elizabeth
Warren and Ed Markey said
their offices are monitoring
the case and have contacted
Amherst officials to offer support and condolences to Dorogi’s family.
According to Dorogi’s obituary, he had a job lined up after graduation as an invest-
ment banking analyst at Wells
Fargo and studied during his
junior year in Rome, “traveling
extensively through Europe
with his best friends.”
In addition to football, Dorogi excelled at hockey in high
school and made the All Ohio
squad, and his interests extended beyond athletics, the
obituary said.
While growing up, he was
an “acapella and glee club
member, and a baritone in the
Cleveland Orchestra Youth
Chorus,” the notice said. “Andre w also volunteered for
Hope for Honduran Children
Foundation.”
His funeral is scheduled for
Saturday.
Cristela Guerra and Danny
McDonald of the Globe staff
contributed to this report.
Travis Andersen can be
reached at
tandersen@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@TAGlobe.
BURLINGTON
LOMBARDO, Pauline M.
RICCI, John F.
VALENTE, Louis P. (Dan)
CAMBRIDGE
CICERO, Scott D.
GIANNINO, Peter F.
LOMBARDO, Pauline M.
MULCAHY, William H.
VALENTE, Louis P. (Dan)
CANTON
RENNIE, John
CHELMSFORD
CONLON, Noreen J. (Finn)
RICCI, John F.
CHELSEA
SMITH, Josephine (Maziarski)
WELSH, Edward J.
DEDHAM
CICERONE, Lilia (Terragnoli)
EGAN, John Kelly
GOLDWAIT, George O.
LEVINE, Sylvia I. (Sandler)
O’LEARY, John F.
DORCHESTER
CONLON, Noreen J. (Finn)
DOVER
O’LEARY, John F.
EAST FALMOUTH
BROWN, Marjorie L.
EASTON
SPILIAKOS, Constantino
EDGARTOWN
RENNIE, John
EVERETT
D’AGOSTINO, Joseph R.
LOZZI, Bertha M. (Hendsbee)
RICCI, John F.
WELSH, Edward J.
FALMOUTH
McLEOD-O’MALLEY, Dr. Sara
RENNIE, John
FOXBOROUGH
GOLDWAIT, George O.
Martha’s Vineyard ferry out of service
Vessel plagued
twice in 1 week
By Laney Ruckstuhl
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
A Martha’s Vineyard ferry
was taken out of service on
Wednesday for up to a week
because of a generator issue,
just days after a power failure
that stranded the vessel for
five hours, the Steamship Authority said.
No passengers were on
board the M/V Martha’s Vineyard when the generator issue
o c c u r r e d Tu e s d a y n i g h t ,
spokesman Sean Gonsalves
said. The power failure on Saturday night stranded 72 pas-
sengers, the authority said.
The authority said Saturday’s problem was caused by
the main fuel oil transfer
pump, which did not generate
enough pressure to transfer
fuel to the vessel. In addition
to the passengers, 11 crew
members and three food concession employees were on
board.
On Monday, the authority
said that the ship had undergone tests, passed Coast Guard
inspection, and been cleared
to resume service.
The ferry will undergo additional testing and repairs in
Fairhaven with the help of the
contractor who helped refurbish the boat before it re-
turned to service on May 7 after an $18 million, five-month
process, the authority said. It
was already scheduled to return to the Fairhaven site in
May for maintenance.
In the meantime, the authority said it would replace
the Martha’s Vineyard with
the Sankaty, a smaller vessel it
typically uses to transport
freight.
Delays in passenger traffic
are not expected, but there
may be delays in transporting
vehicles because of the vessel’s
smaller size.
“We apologize in advance
for any inconvenience this
may cause,” the authority said
in a statement. “The safe and
reliable operation of all Steamship Authority vessels is our
highest priority.”
Conrad Roy, owner of Tucker Roy Marine Towing & Salvage, said his company was escorting the ferry from Martha’s Vineyard to the
Steamship Authority in
Fairhaven because of “machiner y problems” Wednesday
morning.
“If they break down, we’re
close by so we can help them
out,” Roy said.
Laney Ruckstuhl can be
reached at
laney.ruckstuhl@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@laneyruckstuhl.
FRAMINGHAM
GERRY, Thomas J.
GOLDBERG, Herbert J.
HAVERHILL
CONNELLY, John R. Sr.
WELSH, Edward J.
HINGHAM
MORRIS, Julia T.
HYANNISPORT
GRASSINI, Roseanna McCourt
HYDE PARK
CARLEVALE, Herman R.
GOLDWAIT, George O.
JAMAICA PLAIN
GRASSINI, Roseanna McCourt
KINGSTON
FINNERAN, Thomas B.
LEXINGTON
CARLEVALE, Herman R.
LYNN
BECKWITH, Nancy J.
MALDEN
CHANDLER, Tasha Patrice
SMITH, Josephine (Maziarski)
MANOMET
LYONS, Agnes A. (Lerhinan)
MANSFIELD
KOSTARAS, Arthur J.
MARSHFIELD
NOYES, Raymond A.
MASHPEE
McLEOD-O’MALLEY, Dr. Sara
MEDFIELD
FITZPATRICK, Patricia
Man robbed, left to die in T station
uMBTA
Continued from Page B1
the past, including this year.”
For both Williams and Stimson, the address listed in court
filings is the Pine Street Inn, a
South End homeless shelter.
Barbara Trevisan, a shelter
spokeswoman, said privacy
laws prevented her from confirming whether the men had
lived there. She added that
homeless people in Boston often will give the shelter’s address as their own, whether
they currently reside there or
not.
Speaking at Stimson’s arraignment in Boston Municipal
Court on Wednesday, his attorney, Patrick J. Colvario, said his
client has a “substance abuse
problem” and that Williams’s
death “is a sad circumstance;
it’s a sad fact of this case.”
Colvario did not deny that
pills prescribed to Williams
were found in Stimson’s possession but suggested that someone else could have taken the
pills from Williams and passed
them to Stimson.
Stimson has a nine-page record of criminal charges and
convictions in Massachusetts
and Texas that stretches back to
at least 2005 and includes a restraining order, several stints of
incarceration, and probation violations, Alyssa Tochka, a Suffolk assistant district attorney,
said at the arraignment.
He faces current charges for
other crimes that include larceny, drug possession, and drug
possession with the intent to
distribute, Tochka said.
Justice Richard J. Sinnott revoked Stimson’s bail in those
cases. Stimson pleaded not
guilty and was held on $10,000
cash bail. He is scheduled to return to court April 19 for a pretrial hearing.
Surveillance video of the T
station shows that Williams entered the station shortly before
3:30 a.m. Wednesday and that
within a few minutes appeared
“to be having difficulty breathing and to be in medical distress,” Tochka said in court.
Stimson arrived on the platform nine minutes later, took a
bag that was near where Williams lay on a bench, walked
away to sort through its contents, then returned and
searched through Williams’s
pockets and suitcases as he lay
An MBTA Transit Police
photo of Anthony Stimson,
who faces larceny charges.
dying, Tochka said.
Stimson “made no effort to
render aid or reach out for help
for Williams,” Transit Police
said in the arrest report. After
Stimson allegedly completed
his search, taking the prescription drug, two bottles of Suave
shampoo, and other items, he
left the station, according to the
report.
Transit Police officers were
summoned to the platform just
after 5 a.m. to find Williams un-
conscious there, the report
says.
Officers attempted to revive
Williams and summoned Boston Emergency Medical Services, but their combined efforts
were unsuccessful, Transit Police said. EMS pronounced Williams dead at the scene at 5:13
a.m.
Officers soon found Stimson
outside the 7-Eleven on Summer Street downtown, detained
him, and searched him, finding
a metal hammer in the back
right pocket of his jeans and the
pills in a orange bottle with Williams’s name on the prescription label, according to the report.
Stimson waived his Miranda
rights and told officers he and
Williams were acquainted,
Transit Police said.
“Yeah, I know that guy. He
dated my mother. It’s not a big
deal,” Stimson allegedly told the
officers. He also allegedly admitted stealing from Williams.
“Yeah, I took his shampoo. It’s
worth like $2.”
Jeremy C. Fox can be reached at
jeremy.fox@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @jeremycfox.
MEDFORD
CAMELIO, Elisabetta (Lorello)
D’ERRICO, George
LOMBARDO, Pauline M.
ZARELLA, Deletta T.
MELROSE
LOZZI, Bertha M. (Hendsbee)
MILLIS
FITZPATRICK, Patricia
LYONS, Agnes A. (Lerhinan)
MILTON
O’BRIEN, Melba Murillo Montoya
NANTUCKET
SHRIBERG, Glenn Morris
NATICK
COSTELLO, Nancy Jean (Danforth)
GERRY, Thomas J.
SHRIBERG, Glenn Morris
NEEDHAM
CICERONE, Lilia (Terragnoli)
MORRIS, Julia T.
O’LEARY, John F.
NEW BEDFORD
BROWN, Marjorie L.
NEWTON
GOLDBERG, Herbert J.
LEVINE, Sylvia I. (Sandler)
SHRIBERG, Glenn Morris
NORFOLK
RENNIE, John
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
KOSTARAS, Arthur J.
NORWOOD
CICERONE, Lilia (Terragnoli)
COVELLI, John G.
LYONS, Agnes A. (Lerhinan)
RENNIE, John
OXFORD
BECKWITH, Nancy J.
PAXTON
MacLEAN, H. Richard
PLYMOUTH
ARMSTRONG, Robert James
QUINCY
THORPE, Robert L.
RANDOLPH
GOLDWAIT, George O.
MORRIS, Julia T.
READING
GRASSINI, Roseanna McCourt
LOZZI, Bertha M. (Hendsbee)
READVILLE
GOLDWAIT, George O.
REVERE
McNEFF, Peter Joseph
SMITH, Josephine (Maziarski)
ROCKLAND
ARMSTRONG, Robert James
ROSLINDALE
KOSTARAS, Arthur J.
LYONS, Agnes A. (Lerhinan)
ROXBURY
THORPE, Robert L.
SAUGUS
PARKER, Robert D.
SMITH, Josephine (Maziarski)
SCITUATE
SULLIVAN, Patricia Anne (MacDermott)
SHARON
LEZBERG, Milton
SHREWSBURY
FITZPATRICK, Patricia
O’LEARY, John F.
SOMERVILLE
CAMELIO, Elisabetta (Lorello)
DEMONE, Donald F.
LOMBARDO, Pauline M.
SOUTH BOSTON
CONLON, Noreen J. (Finn)
SOUTH END
KOSTARAS, Arthur J.
SPRINGFIELD
SPILIAKOS, Constantino
STOUGHTON
RICCI, John F.
SPILIAKOS, Constantino
WALPOLE
GRASSINI, Roseanna McCourt
WALTHAM
CARLEVALE, Herman R.
MULCAHY, William H.
WAREHAM
CHANDLER, Tasha Patrice
WATERTOWN
CICERO, Scott D.
McNEFF, Peter Joseph
WAYLAND
COSTELLO, Nancy Jean (Danforth)
VALENTE, Louis P. (Dan)
WELLESLEY
FITZPATRICK, Patricia
GERRY, Thomas J.
McLEOD-O’MALLEY, Dr. Sara
MORRIS, Julia T.
O’LEARY, John F.
VALENTE, Louis P. (Dan)
WEST ROXBURY
CICERONE, Lilia (Terragnoli)
KOSTARAS, Arthur J.
WEST YARMOUTH
EGAN, John Kelly
FINNERAN, Thomas B.
WESTON
MORRIS, Julia T.
VALENTE, Louis P. (Dan)
WESTWOOD
LYONS, Agnes A. (Lerhinan)
WEYMOUTH
NOYES, Raymond A.
WINTHROP
McNEFF, Peter Joseph
WOBURN
AMIDON, William G.
BYRON, Lawrence R., III
CAMELIO, Elisabetta (Lorello)
MacLEAN, H. Richard
WOODS HOLE
BROWN, Marjorie L.
WORCESTER
BECKWITH, Nancy J.
OUT OF STATE
CALIFORNIA
LEVINE, Sylvia I. (Sandler)
NOYES, Raymond A.
FLORIDA
COVELLI, John G.
D’ERRICO, George
GERRY, Thomas J.
SAMSON, Charles F.
SHRIBERG, Glenn Morris
INDIANA
McNEFF, Peter Joseph
KENTUCKY
PARKER, Robert D.
MINNESOTA
NOYES, Raymond A.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
D’ERRICO, George
DEMONE, Donald F.
LOZZI, Bertha M. (Hendsbee)
PARKER, Robert D.
WELSH, Edward J.
NORTHBOROUGH
GERRY, Thomas J.
NEW JERSEY
D’ERRICO, George
NORTON
SPILIAKOS, Constantino
OREGON
McNEFF, Peter Joseph
Honor your loved ones
Honor your loved ones with a photo in The Boston
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B6
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T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
VALENTE, Louis P. (Dan)
CHANDLER, Tasha Patrice
Respected Businessman, Trusted
Advisor, Beloved Husband and
Father
L
ouis P. (Dan) Valente of
Weston died on March 18,
2018. Dan was the beloved
husband of Jeanne Peters
Valente for twenty-five years.
He was the devoted father of Louis
Valente, Marianne Valente, Steven
Valente, Diane Valente, Carol O’Hearn,
Susan Stanton and the late Richard Valente. Caring “Grandpa” of ten grandchildren and nine great grandchildren.
Son of the late Luigi and Mary Constance (Fedele) Valente. Brother of
Joseph Valente, Robert Valente and the
late Anne Giglio. Former husband of
the late Marion (Lavoie) Valente, the
mother of his children. Also survived
by four nieces and nephews and two
grandnieces.
Dan was past President, CEO and
Chairman of Palomar Medical Technologies, Inc. and retired Senior Vice
President of EG&G, Inc. (now Perkin
Elmer). Prior to that he held various
financial planning, analysis, taxation,
management, and negotiation positions with Cambridge Corp., Flaherty,
Bliss and Co., Sanders Associates, the
U. S. Department of Defense Contract
Agency and the Department of Energy.
He served on the Board of Directors
of Medical Information Technologies,
Inc. (MEDITECH) for over forty years,
and was a former Director of Palomar
Medical Technologies, Inc., MKS Instruments, Inc., Micrion Corporation,
Patient Care Technologies, Inc., Tytronics, Inc. and SurgiLight, Inc
Dan grew up in North Cambridge
and graduated from St. John’s School
and Cambridge Ringe and Latin
School. He was an alumnus of Bentley
AMIDON, William G.
In Woburn, March 17, 2018.
Beloved husband of Pamela
H. (Havens) Amidon. Loving father of Carrie McSheffrey, her
husband Shawn and Brad Amidon, his
wife Colleen, all of Woburn. Cherished
grandfather of Zoe, Hannah, Austin,
Maggie and Willa. Dear brother of
the late Patricia Meaden. A memorial
service will be held at a later date at the
Old South Church in Boston. Relatives
and friends are respectfully invited to
calling hours Thursday, March 22nd
from 4-7 p.m. At the family’s request,
remembrances may be made in Bill’s
name to Feed the Hungry San Miguel
or Los Ricos - Box 636, 220 N. Zapata
Hwy, Suite 11, Laredo, Texas 780434464. For directions or to leave an
online condolence, please visit www.
lynch-cantillon.com or Facebook under
Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home.
Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home
www.lynch-cantillon.com
781-933-0400
ARMSTRONG, Robert James
“Bob”
See Enhanced Listing
College (now University) and a Certified Public Accountant. He served for a
time on the President’s Advisory Committee at Bentley and was a member
of the AICPA, Mass. Society of CPA’s,
and the Financial Executives Institute.
For a number of years, he lived in
Burlington, MA, where he was a Selectman and member of the Ways and
Means Committee for the Town. He
also served as Trustee and Treasurer at
Choate-Symmes Hospital and belonged
to the Knights of Columbus. He was a
veteran of the U. S. Air Force.
Dan was passionate about all sports,
especially baseball, for which he played
semi-pro for a time in his youth, and
football. He enjoyed his attempts at
golf and, more importantly, his treasured friendships at The Weston Golf
Club.
Throughout their long relationship and marriage, Dan and Jeanne
travelled extensively. They particularly
delighted in their winter sojourns at
The Breakers in Palm Beach where
they were treated like royalty by the
team at The Flagler Club.
One of their proudest accomplishments was the establishment of the
Jeanne and Dan Valente Center for
Arts and Sciences at Bentley University.
An innovation in academia, the Center
has promoted individual scholarship,
teaching and research in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences in collaboration with the traditional
business disciplines of the school. It
was Dan’s sincere hope that this legacy
will continue for many years to come.
The family requests that, if desired,
memorial donations may be directed
BROWN, Marjorie L.
“Marge”
88, of East Falmouth, died March 19,
2018. She was the wife of the late Francis J. Brown. Survived by her nieces
Nancy Roche, Saundra Biggs and Susan
Mullins as well as her nephews Peter
Denny, James Fearon, James Ferrera,
his wife Susan, Thomas Brown Jr. and
his wife Pat. Sister of the late Mary
Callahan, her husband Francis, Dorothy
Denny, her husband Edmund, James
Fearon, his wife Barbara, Barbara Ferrera, her husband Alfred and Joseph
Fearon. Sister in law to the late Father
J. William Brown, Thomas M. and his
wife Marjorie M. Brown. Nephew Robert Denny and niece Mary Ellen Brown
also predeceased her.
Visiting hours will be from 9:30am
to 10:30am on March 24, 2018 at
Chapman, Cole & Gleason Funeral
Home, MASHPEE, followed by an 11
o’clock Funeral Mass at Christ the King
Church, 3 Job’s Fishing Rd, Mashpee.
Burial will be at Mosswood Cemetery
in Cotuit.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to: Alzheimer’s Association, 473 South Street West, Suite
3, Raynham MA 02767 or at www.alz.
org. For on-line guest book and directions, please visit
www.ccgfuneralhome.com.
to Bentley University - Valente Center,
and sent to the attention of Liz Siladi,
University Advancement Office, Bentley University, 175 Forest St., Waltham,
MA 02452.
The family would also like to extend
their thanks and appreciation for the
care provided by Parmenter VNA &
Hospice, 10 Green Way, Wayland, MA
01778.
During his extensive career, Dan
unselfishly counseled many younger
colleagues, giving them help and sound
business advice. According to one
award bestowed on him, he was “A successful executive, a trusted advisor, a
loyal confidant, a willing mentor and a
true friend.” He will be deeply missed.
Visiting hours will be held at the
George F. Doherty & Sons Funeral
Home, 477 Washington St. (Rt. 16)
Wellesley, on Sunday, March 25, from
3-7pm. A Funeral Mass will be held
for Dan in St. Julia Church, Weston on
Monday, March 26, at 11am. Relatives
and friends kindly invited. Interment
in Linwood Cemetery, Weston. For directions and guestbook, gfdoherty.com.
Change of Day
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781 235 4100
BYRON, Lawrence R., III
Of Woburn, suddenly,
March 19, 2018. Beloved
son of Mary (McGowan)
and the late Lawrence R. Byron Jr. of
Woburn. Loving father of Hannah Byron of Andover, and her mother Linda
L. Byron. Dear brother of Maureen
Fregeolle, her husband Gerard of ME,
Ann Killilea, her late husband George,
and Jane Lowell, her husband Peter,
all of Woburn. Very proud uncle of
Amy Patrissi, Maura Agnelli, Robert
Fregeolle, Kathleen Killilea M.D.,
Megan Richmond, Shalen and Rowan
Lowell, along with 9 great nieces and
nephews. Larry is also survived by
his dear long time friend Tom Martin
of Gloucester. A Funeral Mass will be
celebrated, Saturday, March 24th in
St. Barbara’s Church, 138 Cambridge
Road, Woburn, at noon. Relatives and
friends are respectfully invited to call
at the Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home,
263 Main Street, WOBURN, Saturday,
9-11:30 a.m. prior to the Mass. To leave
an online condolence, story or message,
please visit www.lynch-cantillon.com
or Facebook under Lynch-Cantillon
Funeral Home.
Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home
www.lynch-cantillon.com
781-933-0400
Announcements
Funeral Services
BECKWITH, Nancy J.
LOCAL UNION 103,
I.B.E.W.
Rev. Nancy J. Beckwith, of Lynn, age
58 years, daughter of June E.(Larson)
Beckwith of Lynn and the late John E.
Beckwith, sister of Diane J. Beckwith
of Lynn. Funeral services will be held
at the First Lutheran Church, 280
Broadway, Lynn, on Saturday at 10:30
AM to which relatives and friends are
invited to attend. Visiting hours are at
the Parker Funeral Home, 35 Franklin
St., LYNN, Friday, from 4:00 - 8:00 PM.
Please make donations in Nancy’s name
to the First Lutheran Church, Camp
Calumet, PO Box 238 West Ossipee, NH
03890 or Doctors without Borders, PO
Box 5030, Hagerstown, MD 217415030. Guest book at
parkermemorialfuneral.com
Chuck Monahan
Financial Secretary
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
In Memoriam
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
ANN MARIE DOWD
10/30/30- 3/22/14
Still...
CAMELIO, Elisabetta
(Lorello)
Of Somerville, formerly of Cambridge
and Itri, Italy, March 21. Cherished
daughter of the late Raffaele and
Olimpia (Del Bove) Lorello. Beloved
wife of the late Giuseppe Camelio.
Devoted mother of Maria Camelio of
Italy and her late husband Pietro, and
Virginia Sorabella and her husband
Bruno of Somerville. Loving grandmother of Erminia Mitrano of Italy,
Rita DiTucci and her husband Ray of
Medford, Sonia Swift and her husband
Michael of Woburn, and Lino Sorabella
and his wife Crystal of Woburn. Loving
great-grandmother of Rebecca, Alison
and Roberto DiTucci, Pierluigi Volpi,
and Matthew and Katie Swift. Sister of
Felice, Valerio and Maria of Italy. Also
survived by many loving nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. A
Funeral Mass will be celebrated in St.
Ann Church, 399 Medford St., Somerville, Saturday, March 24 at 11 AM.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend and may visit with
the family in the Dello Russo Funeral
Home, 306 Main St., MEDFORD, 8:3010:30 AM. Services will conclude with
entombment at Holy Cross Mausoleum,
Malden. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent in Elisabetta’s name
to S.S. Cosmas and Damian Society,
Inc., 17 Porter St., Cambridge, MA,
02141, or the American Lung Assoc., 1661 Worcester Rd., Suite 301,
Framingham, MA 01701. To leave a
message of condolence please visit
www.dellorusso.net.
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Medford-Woburn-Wilmington
CARLEVALE, Herman R.
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
Spadafora Funeral Home
781-324-8680
CICERO, Scott D.
Chapman, Cole & Gleason
Falmouth, MA - 508.540.4172
We regret to announce the death
of Brother John F. Ricci (Ret).
Visiting Hours will be held on Friday, 4-8pm at Cafasso and Sons
F.H., Everett. A Funeral Mass
will be celebrated on Saturday,
11am at Immaculate Conception
Church, Everett. Brother Ricci
was a member of IBEW for 64
years.
Age 32, gently passed away on March
18, 2018 after a courageous battle with
small cell ovarian cancer. An only child,
Tasha was born on October 14, 1985 in
Wareham, MA. She was the epitome
of love, grace, strength & dedication to
her family and friends. She lived life to
the fullest & had an amazing ability to
reach people in a deep & meaningful
way. Tasha is survived by her mother,
Janis Chandler, & is predeceased by her
father, Derek Evora & her grandfather
Manuel Evora, grandparents Angelina
& David Talavera, Dana Chandler, Sandra & Harry Young, Barbara Baptiste &
her godfather Robert Shepard. She will
be lovingly remembered by her Aunt
Margaret Tabois, her dear friend John
Joseph, college friends Jes Stroh & Liz
Eacmen & childhood friend Mary-Lou
Boucher along with a host of beloved
aunts, uncles, cousins, friends & her
much-loved extended work family
at the Division on Addiction. Special
thanks to the doctors, nurses, and
PCTs at Beth Israel Hospital for their
care. Visitation will be held from the
A.J.Spadafora Funeral Home, 865 Main
St., MALDEN, on Saturday, March
24th from 10am – 12 noon. Relatives
& friends are respectfully invited to
attend. Interment will be private. In
lieu of flowers, please consider making
a donation to the Small Cell Ovarian
Cancer Foundation (smallcellovarian.
org). For directions & guestbook visit
www.spadaforafuneral.com
Ask your funeral
director for details.
Of Lexington. March 19th.
Beloved husband of Anna E.
(Lepore). Stepfather of Gary
Horgan. Brother of S. John Carlevale of
Dedham and the late Gilda A. Carlevale. Brother in law of James DiVito and
his wife Marion of Waltham and the
late Joseph and his late wife Barbara
Lepore. Uncle of Gregory C. Carlevale,
John V. Carlevale, Dominic DiVito and
his wife Mary, James DiVito and his
wife Karen, Ann DiVito, Maria Williams
, Candida DiVito, Karen Lepore and
her partner Jack Lakeman, Kathleen
Boulter and her husband Robert and
Kevin Lepore and his wife Jill. Also
survived by many loving grand and
great nieces and nephews. Son of the
late Victor and Angelina Carlevale.
Herman served in the US Army in WW
II and was the recipient of two purple
hearts and a bronze star. Funeral from
the DeVito Funeral Home, 761 Mt. Auburn St., WATERTOWN, on Saturday at
10 am with a funeral mass at 11 am in
Sacred Heart Church. Burial to follow
in Mount Auburn Cemetery. Relatives
and friends are invited to visit in the
funeral home on Friday from 5 – 8 pm.
In lieu of flowers remembrances may
be made to the Alzheimer’s Association
of MA/NH, 309 Waverley Oaks Rd.,
Waltham, MA 02452. For directions or
to view an online guestbook please visit
devitofuneralhome.com.
Of Belmont, formerly of Watertown and
Cambridge, March 16, 2018. Father of
Sydney I. Cicero and Nathen D. Cicero
of Cambridge. Former husband of
Kama Cicero. Son of Marcelle Faria &
the late Donald Cicero & his surviving
wife Maureen. Brother of Robin Cicero,
Doreen Fraser, Michael Cicero and the
late Donald Cicero. Visiting hours in
the Stanton Funeral Home, 786 Mt.
Auburn St. (Rt16), WATERTOWN on
Friday 5-8 P.M. Relatives and friends
respectfully invited to attend. In lieu of
flowers contributions in his memory to
the Herren Project, P.O. Box 131, Portsmouth RI 02871 would be appreciated.
CICERONE, Lilia
(Terragnoli)
Of Dedham, March 19. Beloved wife of
the late Albert Cicerone. Loving mother
of Robert D. Cicerone and his wife
Deborah, Gina Cicerone all of Dedham.
Grandmother of Teresa Cicerone of Fairfax, VA. Sister of the late Teresa Terragnoli and the late Luigina Pasquale. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Funeral from the George F. Doherty &
Sons, Wilson-Cannon Funeral Home,
456 High St., DEDHAM, Saturday at 8
a.m., followed by a Funeral Mass in St.
Mary’s Church, Dedham, at 9. Relatives
and friends kindly invited. Visiting
hours Friday, 4-8. Interment St. Michael’s Cemetery, Boston. Expressions
of sympathy may be made in Lilia’s
memory to the Alzheimer’s Assoc.,
309 Waverley Oaks Rd., Waltham, MA
02452. For directions and guestbook,
www.gfdoherty.com
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham
781-326-0500
CONNELLY, John R. “Jack”
Sr.
90, of Bradford, passed
away Monday, March 19,
2018 at Holy Family Hospital at Merrimack Valley, Haverhill.
Mr. Connelly was born in Quincy,
MA on July 13, 1927. He was the son
of the late James H. and Mary “Molly”
(Geary) Connelly.
He attended St. Mary’s School in
West Quincy, MA, Sacred Heart School,
Weymouth, MA, and Newman Prep,
Boston, MA before graduating from
Milton (MA) High School. After high
school, Jack enlisted in the Navy during
WWII and served in the South Pacific
and was a member of the occupation
troops in China after the war. After his
honorable discharge from the Navy, he
then attended Boston University. Jack
was a lifelong salesman, avid story-teller, often ahead of this time. His greatest
accomplishment was his family. Also,
he was particularly pleased of his accomplishment in raising money for the
Jimmy Fund by selling commemorative
pieces of Fenway Park’s old left wall.
Mr. Connelly was predeceased by his
loving wife, M. Teresa (Taffe) Connelly
who passed away in 2005 and his six
siblings, Paul Heffernan, Virginia,
James, Kevin and Joseph Connelly and
Florence Healy.
He is survived by his children, Mary
Frances of Charlestown, MA, Patricia
and her husband Warren Bamford of
Hampton, NH, John R. “Jack” Jr. and
his wife Patricia Connelly of Avon, CT,
Jean and her husband Andrew Coady
of Bradford, and Teresa Connelly and
Adam Idris of Manhattan, NY, his
nine grandchildren, John and his wife
Melissa, Daniel and Tim Bamford, John
R. Connelly III, Brendan and Harrison
Connelly, Madeline, Callie and Andrew
Coady and three great grandchildren,
Lucas, Simon and Gloria Bamford, as
well as several nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend his calling hours on
Friday, March 23rd from 4-7 p.m. at
the H.L. Farmer and Sons Bradford Funeral Home, 210 South Main St., (Rte.
125) Bradford. His funeral will be on
Saturday morning, March 24th beginning at 9:00 a.m. at the funeral home
followed by a Funeral Mass of Christian
Burial at 10:00 a.m. at Sacred Hearts
Church, 165 South Main St., Bradford.
Interment with naval honors will follow in Elmwood Cemetery, Bradford.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may
be made to the Jimmy Fund, P.O. Box
849168 Boston, MA 02284-9168 (www.
jimmyfund.org/ways-to-give/giving)
To share a memory or for more
information please visit
www.farmerfuneralhomes.com
H. L. Farmer & Sons Funeral Homes
Bradford - Haverhill
COSTELLO, Nancy Jean
(Danforth)
89, Of Natick, formerly of Sudbury and
Wayland died peacefully, surrounded
by her loving family on Monday, March
19, 2018. Survived by her husband,
William F. Costello and their children
Robert M. Costello, Kathleen Merrill
and Thomas M. Costello. Complete
notice on Sunday, March 25, 2018.
Arrangements entrusted to the care of
the John C. Bryant Funeral Home of
WAYLAND.
CONLON, Noreen J. (Finn)
Age 77, of Lowell, MA died March 20.
Wife of the late John F. Conlon. Daughter of the late James and Christina
(Downey) Finn. She is survived by a
son, James Conlon; a daughter-in-law,
Lori Conlon; a sister, Mary Finn; five
brothers, Fr. Dan Finn, Eugene and
his wife, Denise Finn, Fr. Seamus Finn
O.M.I, Denis Finn, and Gerry and his
wife, Ann Marie Finn; grandchildren,
John Conlon, Aidan Conlon, Cole Conlon and Kiley Conlon, and many nieces,
nephews, and cousins from Ireland and
in the USA. The Tighe Family whom
she considered family. Mother of the
late John Conlon. The family gives their
sincere thanks to the staff of D’Youville
and all of Noreen’s caregivers. Visiting
hours Fri. 4 to 8 P.M. at the Dolan
Funeral Home, 106 Middlesex St.,
CHELMSFORD, MA. A Funeral Mass
of Christian Burial will be Sat. at 10:00
AM at St. Patrick Church, 282 Suffolk
St, Lowell, MA 01854. Burial in St.
Mary Cemetery, Tewksbury. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be made in her
name to the Jack and Noreen Conlon
Scholarship c/o Washington Savings
Bank, 30 Middlesex St, Lowell, MA
01852. Dolan Funeral Home, 978-2514041. dolanfuneralhome.com
Funeral Services
Affordable Cremation
$
1310 complete
617 782 1000
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
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COVELLI, John G.
91, of Norwood, and Naples, FL,
passed away surrounded by his family
on March 15, 2018 in Naples, FL. He
was born in Boston, MA in 1926, the
son of Ida and Dominic Covelli. John
was the owner of John’s Tavern on
Milk Street in Boston, MA. John was
a proud loving husband, father, and
grandfather. John is survived by his
wife of 60 years, Mildred; two children,
Janice Covelli-Rogers (Gary) and John
J. Covelli (Paula); four grandchildren,
Colin, Bradford, Julia, and Amanda;
and his sister, Dolly Hummel. Funeral
Saturday, March 24 from the Gillooly
Funeral Home, 126 Walpole St. (Rt.
1A), NORWOOD, at 10 AM followed by
a Mass of Christian Burial in St. Catherine of Siena Church, Norwood at 11.
Visiting hours Friday 4 – 6. Interment
Highland Cemetery, Norwood.
DEMONE, Donald F.
ARMSTRONG, Robert James “Bob”
Donald F. Demone, 81, of Londonderry,
NH, passed away Tuesday, March
20, 2018 in Windham, NH. Born in
Somerville, MA on January 4, 1937, a
son of the late Simeon and Stella (Cameron) Demone. Don loved his work as
a carpenter where he worked as part of
the Boston Carpenters Union.
Survived by four children, Doreen
Demone and significant other Jim,
Gary Demone and wife Johnnah, Dawn
Rouse and husband Jay, and Nicole
Cheney, seven grandchildren, seven
great grandchildren, as well as many
nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife Judith A. (Phelan)
Demone in 2011.
Following cremation, Memorial
services are Saturday, March 24, 2018
at 12:00pm at Peabody Funeral Homes
and Crematorium, 290 Mammoth
Road, Londonderry with an hour of
visitation from 11am until the service
time, Memorial contributions may be
made to the MSCPA, 400 Broadway,
Methuen, MA 01844. For more information visit
www.peabodyfuneralhome.com
Retired Businessman,
Homebuilder and
Aeronautical Engineer
EGAN, John Kelly
Gillooly Funeral Home
Norwood
(781)-762-0174
www.gilloolyfuneralhome.com
D’AGOSTINO, Joseph R.
Of Bridgewater and Everett, passed
away at Mass General Hospital on
March 20th, 2018, at 59 years. Beloved
son of Joseph A. D’Agostino and the
late Barbara (Crafts) D’Agostino. Loving
father of Oliver, Elyssa, and Abby Jo
D’Agostino. Loving brother of Anne
DeSantis and Johnny D’Agostino. Cherished grandfather of Adrianna. He is
also survived by dear nieces and cousins. Relatives and friends are kindly invited to attend a visitation at Immaculate Conception Church, 487 Broadway,
Everett on Friday, March 23rd, at 9 am,
followed by a Funeral Mass in Immaculate Conception Church at 10 am. In
Joseph’s name, donations may be made
to St. Jude Children’s Hospital, PO Box
1000, Dept 142, Memphis, TN 38101 or
to st.jude.org.
JF Ward Funeral Home
Everett, MA
(617) 387-3367
D’ERRICO, George
George D’Errico, 94 years old of
Jacksonville, FL formerly of Medford,
MA and Montvale, NJ, passed away
Saturday, March 17, 2018 at his home
in the company of his loving family.
George was raised in Medford, MA; son
of the late Rocco and Rose (DiLorenzo)
D’Errico. He met his future wife Sally
Greene of Galway, Ireland at Keystone
Camera Plant in Dorchester, MA. The
couple married at St. Peters Church in
Dorchester and together they shared
59 years of marriage. They began
their married life in Dorchester where
they started their family, later moved
to Bergen County New Jersey and
raised five sons. George proudly spent
countless hours on ball fields quietly
watching his sons participate in various
sports. He loyally followed his favorite
Boston teams, especially the Red Sox
and Bruins. His greatest joy came from
being with his family.
George is lovingly remembered by
his wife Sally; son George (Sharon)
D’Errico of Nashua, NH; son Michael
(Mary) D’Errico of Ponte Vedra Beach,
FL; son Paul D’Errico of Montvale, NJ;
son Brian (Diane) D’Errico of St. Augustine, FL; son Patrick (Darcy) D’Errico
of St. Augustine, FL. He will be greatly
missed by his grandchildren Michael
(Leanne), Shane, Katlyn Rose (Owen),
Gabrielle, Nicole, Devyn, Cade, Olivia,
Brendan, Keira, Brian and great grandchild Christian who were fortunate to
spend so much time with their Poppy.
There are many nieces, nephews,
brothers and sisters-in-law that have
wonderful memories of George.
Beloved brother of Eleanor Martin,
Anna Cordeau, Claire Lamb and the
late Peter, Frank, Arthur and Isabelle
D’Errico. A Funeral Mass will be held
at 10am Monday April 9th at San Juan
Del Rio Catholic Church, located at
1718 State Road 13 North in St Johns,
FL. In lieu of flowers, Memorial Donations in George’s name may be made to
Northeast Florida Community Hospice.
Of Dedham and West Yarmouth on
March 17, 2018. Beloved son of the late
Francis J. and Margaret (Kelly) Egan.
Loving brother of Francis J. Jr. and wife
Carol of Brockton, Carol C. Vandenburgh of Dedham and her late husband
John, Kevin A. of West Yarmouth and
the late Kathleen M. “Kathy” Egan. Also
survived by his goddaughter and niece,
Kelly Kozik and husband Kevin, nephew James Egan and wife Jean, great
niece and nephew Hannah and Cullen,
and his “special nieces” Cassie, Lauren,
Jen, Lisa and Megan and “special nephew” Steve as well as his loving aunts,
uncles and cousins. Visitation will be
held on Saturday morning March 24th
from 9:00 – 10:30 in the Bell-O’Dea
Funeral Home, 376 Washington St.,
BROOKLINE, followed a Funeral Mass
in St. Mary of the Assumption Church
at 11:00. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited. Interment Walnut Hills
Cemetery. Late employee of Cesari and
McKenna Law Office.
FINNERAN, Thomas B.
Age 74, of West Yarmouth,
formerly of Kingston,
passed away peacefully
March 16th in San Antonio, TX,
following a brief illness. He was born in
Boston, and was the son of the late
Thomas B. Finneran and Virginia C.
Mercurio. Tom was the beloved
husband of the late Cleta (LaRocque)
Finneran of Kingston. He leaves behind
his cousin Kevin L. Finneran and his
wife Rita, Cousin Kevin W. Finneran,
his wife Kelly, daughter Hannah, cousin
Lawrence W. Finneran, his wife Linda,
and his close Friend Ann Latham of
San Antonio, TX.
Tom was raised and educated in San
Antonio, TX and graduated from North
American School of Conservation in
CO. He was a veteran of the US Navy.
His “great story” was while stationed
in Puerto Rico he escorted across the
island actress Charmian Carr, from
the Sound of Music, while she was
promoting the movie. Tom represented
R.J. Reynolds Foods, Borden Foods,
and managed Massachusetts Retail
Food Wholesalers for 35 years, and had
a great reputation in the retail food
industry. He retired 14 years ago.
Tom enjoyed cooking, gardening,
and landscaping his home in Kingston
for over 25 years with his wife Cleta. He
traveled to Texas, and Florida during
the winter months. He also enjoyed
traveling to ‘downeast” Maine, and
took many cruises while enjoying his
retirement.
A visitation will be held at the
Cartmell Funeral Home, 150 Court St.
(Downtown) PLYMOUTH, on Saturday,
March 24th, from 9:00 am till 11:00
am. Followed by a service in the funeral
home at 11:00 am. Burial will take
place in Oakland Grove Cemetery in
Bourne. In lieu of flowers, donations
in Tom’s memory may be made to
Mass Audubon, 208 South Great Rd.,
Lincoln, MA 01773. For more info and
online guestbook please visit
www.cartmelldavis.com.
FITZPATRICK, Patricia
Patricia Fitzpatrick (Melville), a lifelong
resident of Wellesley died Wednesday,
March 21, 2018.
Beloved wife of 67 years of the late
Edward B. Fitzpatrick. Loving mother
of Donald and wife Susan of Medfield,
Dianne and her husband Raymond
Normandin of Millis, Bruce of Phoenix,
AZ, Mark and his wife Deirdre of San
Antonio, TX, and Paula Philbrook of
Shrewsbury. She is also survived by 18
grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren,
and 2 great-great grandchildren.
A funeral service will be held Friday,
March 23, 2018 at 12PM in the Henry
J. Burke & Sons Funeral Home, 56
Washington St., WELLESLEY HILLS,
followed by interment at St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Needham. Visiting hours will
be held immediately prior to the service
from 10AM-12PM. In lieu of flowers,
donations in Patricia’s memory may be
made to the National Kidney Foundation at Kidney.org.
Henry J. Burke & Sons
BurkeFamilyFuneralHomes.com
R
obert James (Bob) Armstrong, a retired businessman and homebuilder and
former aeronautical engineer, died at his home in
Plymouth, Massachusetts on March 14.
He was 95. He is survived by Henriette
(Messier), his loving wife of more than
73 years, and by eight children, Susan
(Cooke), James, Paul, Alice, Ellen,
Donna, Charles and Thomas, 13 grandchildren, and 12 great grandchildren.
Mr. Armstrong was born in Boston
in 1923, the only child of Mary (Burke)
Armstrong of Boston and William J.
Armstrong, of Williamstown, Missouri.
A graduate of English High School
in Boston and Aero Technical Institute
in Glendale, CA, he also completed
courses at the University of Bridgeport,
the University of Maryland, and Bentley College.
While humor editor of his high
school yearbook, Mr. Armstrong put
down aeronautical engineering as his
career goal, and Pearl Harbor found
him designing flying boats for Sikorsky Aircraft in Stratford, CT. Soon he
crossed the street to sister company
Chance Vought and engine-modification work on the Corsair fighter plane,
but not before witnessing Igor Sikorsky perfect and fly the first modern
helicopter. Still in fixed-wing aircraftdesign at Baltimore’s Glenn L Martin
Company, Mr. Armstrong shifted to
work on helicopters at Bell Aircraft
in Buffalo, NY where he supervised
the interior design of the prototype of
the first anti-submarine helicopter, a
project that involved close cooperation
with the Navy Department offices in
Washington DC, and then at Kaman
Aircraft in Bloomfield, CT.
In 1952 he left the aircraft industry
to join his father in home construction
and land development on the South
Shore of Massachusetts, turning his
engineering skills to home design. He
settled with his family in Abington
and then Rockland, before moving to
Plymouth in 1980.
Mr. Armstrong served as a director
of the Home Owners Warranty Council
of Eastern Massachusetts, the Builders
Association of Greater Massachusetts,
and was a longstanding member of the
National Association of Home Builders. He was an active member of the
Rotary Club and Knights of Columbus,
was elected to the Rockland Planning Board and Finance Committees,
and was a corporator and director of
Abington Savings Bank before it was
acquired by Santander Bank.
In 1985 Mr. Armstrong and his
wife built a home in Port Charlotte,
FL where several of their “snowbird”
friends had set down roots. Mr. and
Mrs. Armstrong were active members
of each parish in which they worshipped, and were founding members
of Port Charlotte’s San Antonio Roman
Catholic Church.
Mr. Armstrong was known for his
generosity, humor and sense of curiosity, and for the elaborate bedtime tales
woven from his fertile imagination. He
was a mentor to many, from his little
leaguers to bank presidents. He was
also a careful scribe of daily events,
and leaves behind a diary faithfully
kept since the age of 16.
A funeral mass will be held at 10 AM
on Saturday, March 24, at St. Bonaventure Catholic Church, 803 State
Road, in Plymouth, MA. A celebration
of his life is planned for this summer
in Plymouth. Condolences @
www.bartlett1620.com.
GERRY, Thomas J.
GOLDBERG, Herbert J.
GOLDWAIT, George O.
Age 55, of Green Acres, Florida formerly of Natick, MA died unexpectedly
at home on March 15, 2018.
A resident of Green Acres for the past
18 years previously of Orlando and St
Petersburg, he was born and raised
in Natick, MA. Son of the late Paul J.
Gerry and Patricia (Brunnick) Gerry.
Mr. Gerry was a 1981 graduate of
Natick High School. He also attended
St. Petersburg Community College.
Mr. Gerry was employed in the restaurant management in Florida for over
thirty years; Dave’s Last Resort in Lake
Worth, Trade Winds Island Resort in St.
Pete Beach and Just Deserts.
He was an avid sports fisherman and
was a longtime fan of the Boston Red
Sox, Celtics, Bruins, and New England
Patriots.
He was the devoted brother of Patrice
A. Roberts and her husband Francis
of Natick, MA, Michelle Gillespie and
her husband David of Northborough,
MA, Paul J. Gerry, Jr., and his wife Kitty
of Natick, MA, Jacqueline Gerry of
Miami, FL, and Charlene Koagel and
her husband Tom of St. Petersburg,
FL; uncle of Benjamin, Justin, Jimy,
Frankie, Kendra, Ryan, Kate, Alex, Paul,
Kimberly, Jack, John, and Kathryn; and
great-uncle of Danny, Henry, Theodore,
and James.
Relatives and friends are invited
to attend a Memorial Mass at Sacred
Heart Church, 425 North M Street,
Lake Worth, FL on Friday, March 23 at
12:00 Noon.
Private burial will take place at a later
date.
Expressions of sympathy may be
made in his memory to Bring Change
to MInd. https://bringchange2mind.
org
Arrangements by John Everett and
Sons Natick
To sign the online Family Guest Book
please visit www.everettfuneral.com
Of Framingham, MA passed gently
in his sleep on Tuesday, March 20,
2018. He was preceded in death by his
beloved wife of over 50 years, Linda
(Bram) Goldberg. He is survived by his
two children and their families including four grandchildren: Daughter Jill,
son-in-law, Evan; and their children,
Ben and Leah; and son Eric, his wife
Staci, grandchildren Abby and Lila, and
their mother and Eric’s ex-wife, Sharon.
He is also survived by his older sister,
Diane, and her children, Jeffrey, Julie
and Sarah, and their families; and his
younger sister, Elaine, her husband
Bob, and their daughters, Faith and
Jennifer, and their families. He is
further survived by an extended family
of cousins and friends. He will be remembered for his love of sports, games,
and words, in any combination. The
sounds of be-bop or the Beatles could
often be heard while he cruised quickly
down the streets in any of the series
of German sports cars that he enjoyed
driving when not watching or listening
to local sports teams. Funeral services
will be at Stanetsky Memorial Chapel,
475 Washington Street, CANTON, MA
on Friday, March 23rd at 12 Noon,
followed by burial at Sharon Memorial
Park, Sharon. Memorial observance will
be at the home of Jill and Evan Saks
on Friday from 5-7pm and continuing
Saturday from 7-9pm. Expressions
of sympathy in his memory may be
donated to The Jimmy Fund, PO Box
849168, Boston, MA 02284-9168 or
online at www.jimmyfund.org.
Of Hyde Park, March 18,
2018. Beloved husband of
the late Ruth A. (Shaw)
Goldwait. Devoted father Donna M.
Goldwait of Randolph, Patty Shamblin
and her fiancé Mike Tan of San Diego,
CA, and Ann Marie Johnnene of Foxboro. Loving grampy of Tara Shamblin,
and Matthew and Olivia Johnnene. Caring uncle of many nieces and nephews.
Brother of the late Helen Goldwait,
Charles “Pat” Goldwait, Mildred
McCarthy, and Edna “Sue” Goldwait.
George was a member and Past Commander of the Dedham VFW U.S.S.
Jacob Jones Post 2017 and a retired
store manger for A&P Supermarkets.
Visiting hours at the George F. Doherty
& Sons Wilson-Cannon Funeral Home,
456 High St., DEDHAM, Friday, Mar.
23 from 4-8pm. Funeral from the
funeral home Saturday, Mar. 24 at 9am
followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Anne
Church, Readville at 10am. Relatives
and friends kindly invited. Interment in
Knollwood Memorial Park, Canton. In
lieu of flowers donations may be made
in George’s memory to the Alzheimer’s
Association, 309 Waverley Oaks Rd.,
Waltham, MA 02452. Online guestbook
and directions at gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
..
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Stanetsky Memorial Chapel
(781) 821-4600
www.stanetskycanton.com
GIANNINO, Peter F.
Of Billerica, formerly of
Cambridge, March 20. He
is survived by many nieces,
nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews, was the dear partner of the late
Sylvia Cabral and brother of the late
Samuel, Joseph, Frank, John Giannino,
Josie Trischitta, Veronica Spera and
Mary Bruce. Funeral Saturday from
the Sweeney Memorial Funeral Home,
66 Concord Rd., BILLERICA, at 10:30
a.m. A Funeral Mass will be held in
St. Theresa Church, Billerica, at 11:30
a.m. Relatives and friends respectfully
invited. Visiting hours will be held Friday from 4 – 7 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made
to the Wounded Warrior Project, 150
Cambridge Park Drive, Cambridge, MA
02140. Late WW II Army Veteran and
former Cambridge City Hospital employee. www.sweeneymemorialfh.com
Share a memory
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worth sharing
GRASSINI, Roseanna
McCourt
Greatly Loved
92, of Hyannisport, Mass., passed
away on March 18, 2018 at Mayflower
Nursing Center in Yarmouth, MA after
a long illness.
Born in Boston 1925 and one of four
children of Mary O’Connell. Roseanna
married Allyn H. McCourt in 1949 and
had four children. Her husband Allyn
McCourt passed away in 1955 leaving
her with her four young boys. Roseanna
lost her youngest son Kenneth in 1976
in an auto accident and lost her oldest
son Allyn to cancer in 2005. Roseanna
spent over 30 years living in Jamaica
Plain and worked for the Boston School
Department. She moved to Cape Cod in
the late 1980’s. Roseanna met Carmine
Grassini in the year that followed her
late husband’s death in 1955. After
more than 35 years of Carmine’s patient
persistence Roseanna and Carmine
fell in love and married in 1992. The
two of them spent their time travelling the world multiple times. When
they were not travelling Roseanna and
Carmine dedicated and contributed
much of their time and finances to a
wide variety of Catholic Charities. Both
of them were involved in the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of
Jerusalem. Carmine is also a member
of the Knights of Columbus. Both of
them were deeply involved in their local
parish, Our Lady of Victory Church in
Centerville MA. Roseanna was a loyal
and loving friend to the many people
who had the pleasure of entering her
life. She leaves behind her loving and
dedicated husband Carmine Grassini
and two sons Michael McCourt of Reading, MA and Stephen McCourt of Walpole, MA. Roseanna is also survived by
two daughters-in-law, Michele McCourt
of Jamaica Plain and Janice McCourt
of Walpole. She also leaves behind
many nieces and nephews as well as
six grandchildren. Visitation will be
from 2 to 5 pm on Sunday, March 25th
in the John-Lawrence Funeral Home,
3778 Falmouth Rd., Marstons Mills,
MA. A Mass of Christian Burial will be
at 11:30 am on Monday at Our Lady of
Victory Church, 230 So. Main Street,
Centerville, MA. Burial will follow in
the Massachusetts National Cemetery,
Connery Ave. in Bourne at 1:15 pm. For
online guestbook and directions, visit
www.johnlawrencefuneralhome.com
John-Lawrence Funeral Home
508-428-5704 Marstons Mills
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JOHNSON, Thomas Edgar
Of Bridgewater, March 14,
2018. Dedicated Teacher,
serving over 46 years at
Boston Public Schools and Brockton
High School. Beloved husband of
Virginia Johnson of Bridgewater. Dear
father of Lisa Johnson of Quincy and
Jomo Johnson of Brockton. He is
survived by extended family and dear
friends. Funeral Mass Saturday at 10
AM at the Church of the Holy Spirit,
525 River St., Mattapan. Burial Forest
Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain.
Arrangements Davis Funeral Home of
Boston. To post a sympathy message
visit www. DavisofBoston.com.
LEZBERG, Milton “Sonny”
Of Sharon, MA. Entered into rest
on March 16, 2018 at the age of 89.
Beloved husband and best friend for
57 years to Shirley (Kagan) Lezberg.
Devoted father to Ilene Lezberg, and
Deborah and Stephen Megna. Loving
brother to his five sisters: Bea Birnbach,
Elaine Misilo, Joy Zidle and the late
Lois Lesser and Gladys Freedman.
Cherished uncle to many, many nieces
and nephews, and cherished friend to
all who knew him. Funeral services will
be held at Stanetsky Memorial Chapel,
475 Washington Street, CANTON, MA
on Friday, March 23rd at 2pm. Burial
to follow at Sharon Memorial Park,
Sharon, MA. Memorial observance will
be held at Whitney Place of Sharon,
675 South Main Street, 3rd Floor,
Sharon, MA on Friday from 4-7pm, and
continuing Saturday from 4-7pm. In
lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy
in his memory may be donated to Team
Impact, 500 Victory Road, 4th Floor,
Quincy, MA 02171.
Stanetsky Memorial Chapel
(781) 821-4600
www.stanetskycanton.com
LIEBERSON, Stanley
KOSTARAS, Arthur J.
Formerly of Boston’s South
End, passed away on
March 20, 2018. Beloved
husband of the late Romalea “Rose”
(Karageorge) Kostaras. Devoted father
of Charles Kostaras and his wife Zoe of
Mansfield, Mary Kostaras of Mansfield, and Christopher Kostaras and
his wife Pamela of North Attleboro.
Loving grandfather of Valerie Astle,
Melanie Silva, Nicholas Kostaras and
Alexandra Kostaras. Great-grandfather
of Matthew and Meghan Silva and
Henry Astle. Brother of Katherine
Pantages of Quincy and the late George
Kostaras. World War II Army Veteran.
Arthur served as a medic in Europe on
the Battlefield and in a U.S. Hospital
in Paris, France. Late member of the
American Legion, Boston. Former Vice
President of St. John The Baptist Greek
Orthodox Church. Visiting hours in
the P.E. Murray- F.J. Higgins, George
F. Doherty & Sons Funeral Home 2000
Centre St. West Roxbury on Friday,
March 23rd from 4-8pm. Funeral
Service in St. John the Baptist Greek
Orthodox Church, 15 Union Park St.
South End on Saturday, March 24th
at 11:30am (Please go directly to the
church). Relatives & friends kindly
invited. Interment Gardens Cemetery,
West Roxbury. Expressions of sympathy
may be made in Arthur’s memory to St.
John the Baptist Church. For directions
and guestbook pemurrayfuneral.com.
P.E. Murray - F.J. Higgins
George F. Doherty & Sons
West Roxbury 617 325 2000
LEVINE, Sylvia I. (Sandler)
Abbott Lawrence Lowell Professor
of Sociology, Emeritus, at Harvard
University, 84, of Arlington on Monday,
March 19, 2018. For 57 years, the beloved husband of Pat (Beard). Devoted
father of Rebecca Lieberson and her
husband James Babb, David Lieberson, Miriam Pollack and her husband
Stuart, and the late Rachel Lieberson.
Adored grandfather of Simon, Emelia,
Sarah, and Hannah. Dear brother of
Melvin Lieberson. Loving uncle of Lisa
Lieberson. He enjoyed his walks and canoeing at the Mystic River. His greatest
joy was playing with his grandchildren.
Services will be private. Remembrances
in his memory may be made to Greater
Boston Legal Services www.gbls.org,
Amnesty International www.amnesty.
org, or to Doctors Without Borders
www.doctorswithoutborders.org
Levine Chapels, Brookline
617-277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
LOMBARDO, Pauline M.
(Formerly Pauline M. Carrara) -- of
Arlington, formerly of Medford, March
20th. Beloved mother of Alex Carrara of
Arlington. Loving daughter of the late
Paul and Jenny (Reale) Lombardo. Dear
sister of the late Dr. Salvatore Lombardo and dear sister-in-law of Lola
Lombardo of Burlington. Devoted aunt
of Lola Marie Lombardo Mastracci, Dr.
Paul, John and Dean Lombardo. Special
friend of Elaine Foisy. Also survived by
many cousins. A funeral service will
be conducted in St. John Episcopal
Church, 74 Pleasant Street, Arlington,
Saturday, March 24th at 1:30 PM.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend. Interment will be
private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent in Pauline’s name to
St. Jude Children’s Hospital, 501 St.
Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105-1942.
To leave a message of condolence visit
www.dellorusso.net
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Medford-Woburn-Wilmington
LOZZI, Bertha M. “Beth”
(Hendsbee)
Of Dedham, formerly of Newton and
Laguna Woods, CA on Tuesday, March
20, 2018. For 55 years, she was the
beloved wife of the late Paul R. Levine.
Devoted mother of Jerry Levine &
his partner Susan Farber of Newton,
Richard Levine & Debbie Jay of Valley
Village, CA, Peter Levine & Eric Mathre
of Bel Air, CA and the late Barbara A.
Levine and her surviving wife Lori
Griffiths and her family. Cherished
grandmother of Jacob, Harry, Jennie
Rosa, Lily and Reed. Dear sister of
the late Elinor J. Finn and Gwendolyn
Eckman. Devoted aunt to her many
caring nieces and nephews and special
friend to so many. Also survived by her
beloved partner Charles Weinstein and
his family. Services at the Levine Chapels, 470 Harvard St., BROOKLINE, on
Friday, March 23 at 10:00am. Burial in
the Temple Israel Cemetery, 500 North
St., Wakefield. Memorial observance
on Sunday, March 25 from 3-5pm at
NewBridge on the Charles, 5000 Great
Meadow Rd., Dedham. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to a
charity of your choice.
Levine Chapels, Brookline
(617) 277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
Every life is a story
A Featured Life offering lets you honor your
loved one with a professionally written narrative.
Call 617-929-1500 or email
deathnotices@globe.com
Of Everett, March 9, 2018, at age 81.
Beloved wife of the late Raymond A.
Lozzi with whom she shared nearly
45 years of marriage. Loving mother
of James R. Lozzi & his wife Judy
of Sandown, NH, and John R. Lozzi
& his wife Patrice of Reading. Dear
sister of the late Alice Scott & her late
husband William. Loving grandmother of Samantha, Kristen, Michael,
Dominique, and great-grandmother of
Jayme. Relatives & friends are invited
to gather in honor of Beth at the Immaculate Conception Church, 487
Broadway, Everett for her Funeral Mass
celebrated on Saturday, March 24 at
10am. For directions or online tribute:
RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose
(781) 665-1900
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LYONS, Agnes A. (Lerhinan)
Of Westwood, formerly of
Roslindale and Manomet,
died March 19th, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late Joseph F.
Lyons, Esq. Loving mother of Mary
Beth Bell and her husband Raymond of
Millis, Susan Smith, wife of the late
Edward Smith of Norwood, and Joseph
F. Lyons, Jr. and his wife Connie of
Dallas, TX. Devoted grandmother of
Kathryn Hannan and her husband Matt
of Maynard, Gregory Bell of Millis, and
Alexandra, Edward and Jacquelyn
Smith of Norwood. Proud great-grandmother of Terence and William Hannan
of Maynard. Beloved sister of Sr. M.
Chrysta Lerhinan, IHM of Scranton, PA
and dear sister-in-law of Eleanor
(Lyons) McCabe of West Roxbury. Also
survived by many loving nieces and
nephews.
Agnes was born on July 1, 1921 to
the late John and Delia Lerhinan of
Port Washington, NY. The 5th of 7
children, Agnes was a Registered Nurse
and proudly served her country as a U.
S. Navy Lieutenant during WWII. She
met her late husband Joe, also a Navy
Lieutenant, at a stateside Navy dance
and they were married in 1948.
Agnes volunteered at Meals on
Wheels in Westwood for several years.
She was also an avid golfer and member of the Woodland Country Club.
She was fondly known as “Auntie Ag”
to many families during summers in
Manomet. She was a resident of Fox
Hill Village from 2005 until her death.
In addition to her parents, Agnes was
predeceased by her siblings Rev. John
Lerhinan, C.Ss.R., Joseph and Gerard
Lerhinan, Mary Connaughton, and
Margaret Scott.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend visiting hours in the Holden,
Dunn and Lawler Funeral Home, 55
High Rock St., WESTWOOD on Sunday,
March 25th from 3-6 pm. Funeral procession from the funeral home on Monday morning, March 26th at 9:30am
followed by a Mass of Christian Burial
in St. Margaret Mary Church, 845 High
St., Westwood at 10:30am. Interment at
St. Joseph Cemetery, West Roxbury. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made
in Agnes’ memory to Poor Clare Monastery, 920 Centre St, Jamaica Plain, MA
02130 or St. Benedict Abbey, PO Box
67, Still River, MA 01467.
Holden-Dunn-Lawler
www.hdlfuneralhome.net
MacLEAN, H. Richard “Dick”
Of Woburn, March 15. Age
91. Husband of the late
Mary (Bridge) MacLean.
Father of Donald G. MacLean and his
wife Donna of Paxton, and Carol A.
Welch and her husband Michael of
Woburn. Grandfather of Richard and
Lindsey MacLean, and Justin, Daniel,
and Matthew Welch. Great-grandfather
of Shea and Cassidy MacLean. Brother
of John MacLean of Cranston, RI, the
late Lloyd MacLean, and the late Helen
Jenkins. Also survived by several nieces
and nephews. A memorial service will
be held at the North Congregational
Church, 896 Main St., Woburn on
Monday, March 26 at 11:00 am. Burial
will be private. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations may be made to
the North Congregational Church, 896
Main St., Woburn, MA 01801. Late U.S.
Marine Corps Veteran, WWII. Arrangements by the Graham Funeral Home,
WOBURN. www.grahamfuneral.com
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and
on Boston.com,
contact your funeral director,
visit boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500.
To submit an obituary for
editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail to
obits@globe.com, or
information by fax to
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further assistance about
a news obituary, please
call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices and
obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
McLEOD-O’MALLEY, Dr.
Sara
63, of Seconsett Island, Mashpee,
passed away on Sunday, March 18,
2018 after a long illness. Born in
Boston to the late Guy and Alice Emilie
(Warren) McLeod, she leaves behind
her husband, Thomas O’Malley, and her
daughters, Emilie O’Malley of Jamaica
Plain and Claire O’Malley of Somerville.
She is also survived by her sister, Suni
McLeod of Little Rock, AR; her brother,
Stuart McLeod, and his wife, Karen,
of Needham; and several nieces and
nephews.
Services will be privately held.
Memorial donations in Sara’s memory
may be sent to the Alzheimer’s Association’s Longest Day, Attn: C. Bemis, 309
Waverley Oaks Road, Waltham MA
02452 or Friends of Falmouth Dogs, PO
Box 438, Falmouth MA 02541.
For online guestbook and obituary,
visit www.ccgfuneralhome.com.
Chapman, Cole & Gleason
Falmouth, MA - 508.540.4172
McNEFF, Peter Joseph
33 year Employee
at So. Postal
Annex
At 55 years, unexpectedly in Seabrook,
NH, formerly of Winthrop & Everett.
Cherished son of Anne M. (Todino)
McNeff of Winthrop & James V. McNeff
of Somerville. Beloved brother of Matthew J. McNeff & husband David J.
Russo of Watertown, Maria A. Hawkins
& husband Russell of Burlington, IN &
Christina M. McNeff & husband David
Bowles of Portland, OR. Dear uncle
to Sarah E. McNeff & Keith R. McNeff
both of Winthrop. Family & friends are
invited to attend a Visitation on Friday,
March 23 from 5-7 PM in the Vertuccio
& Smith Home for Funerals, 773 Broadway (Route 107) REVERE followed by
a Funeral Service in the funeral home
at 7:15 PM. Parking available left of
the funeral home. Entombment will be
held privately at a later time at Woodlawn Chapel Columbarium, Everett. 33
year employee with US Postal Service
at So. Postal Annex. Avid Sportsman
& Traveler. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to your favorite
charity. Please visit
www.vertuccioandsmith.com
MULCAHY, William H.
Of Waltham, and previously from Cambridge and
Belmont, on March 17th,
age 86, after a brief illness. Bill was
born to Richard J. and Ezella C. on
July 1, 1931 in Somerville. Beloved
husband of the late Ruth A. (Doty) for
37 years. Loving brother of Margaret
Sawtelle and her late husband, Frank,
of Needham and Naples, FL; Paul
Mulcahy of Susquehanna, PA; James
A. Mulcahy of Arlington; and the late
Richard J., Jr. and his wife, Esther, of
St. Paul, MN. Loving uncle to Ann Cray
and her husband, Ken, of Needham;
Peggy McHugh and her husband, Ed, of
Dennis; Bill Boyle and his wife, Janice,
of Redlands, CA; Rick Boyle and his
wife, Pennie, of Intervale, NH, and
Christine Matistic and her husband,
Ed, of Alexandria, VA. Adored by his
grandnephews and grandnieces: James
Cray; Tom Cray and his wife, Carol;
Carrie Willis and her husband, Jason;
Andy Cray and his wife, Annie; Steve
McHugh; Kaitlyn Boyle; Matt Boyle
and his wife, Anneliese; Brian Boyle
and his wife, Brittany; Keith McHugh
and his partner, Amanda Wilmsen;
and Jack Matistic. Great-granduncle
to Owen Cray, Branden Cray, Carsen
Cray, Lily Cray, Damen Cray, Brynn
Willis, Tyson Boyle and Bradyn Boyle.
Proud veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps
(1948-1951), served during the Korean
Conflict as a Staff Sergeant, and was
a member of Marine Corps League.
Active lifetime member, and past commander, of American Legion Post 156
of Waltham, Past commander of VFW
North Cambridge Post. Life Member of
Waltham-Watertown Elks, No. 953. Life
Member of VFW Post 2152, Waltham.
Retiree of the U.S. Postal Service where
he was a letter carrier in Belmont. During his free time, Bill enjoyed spending
time at his family cottage in Magnolia,
and getting together with his countless
friends at the American Legion Post
156. He also volunteered as a driver for
Meals on Wheels for several years, was
an avid reader, and was a dedicated
sports fan. Bill will be greatly missed by
his wonderful neighbors, friends and
family. Friends are invited to a celebration of Bill’s life to be held at American
Legion Post 156, 215 Waverly Oaks Rd.,
Waltham, at a later date, following a
graveside service at Belmont Cemetery,
121 Grove St., Belmont. For more
information, please contact Bill’s niece,
Peggy at 781-856-3352. Memorial donations may be made to American Legion
Post 156, 215 Waverley Oaks Rd.,
Waltham, MA 02453 or to Friends of
Waltham Public Library, 735 Main St.,
Waltham, MA 02451. For guest book
please visit www.lehmanreen.com.
Lehman Reen McNamara
617 782 1000 Brighton
NABAUNS, Dolores
NOYES, Raymond A.
Of Marshfield, March 19, 2018 at
the age of 79. Husband of Marcia
(Gingrow) Noyes; father of Ann
McGuire (John) of MN, Cheryl Noyes
of Weymouth, Steven Noyes (Ying) of
CA, and R. Andrew Noyes (Jaimie) of
Marshfield; grandfather of Brandon,
Sarah, Jack, Michael, William, and
Lauren. Raymond is predeceased by
a sister, Beatrice A. Noyes, and leaves
many nieces, nephews, and in-laws.
Raymond found his life meaning in
his family, his lobstering, and his faith.
Visiting hours will be held on Friday,
March 23, 2018 from 4:00 to 8:00 p.m.
at the MacDonald Funeral Home, 1755
Ocean Street (Rte. 139) Marshfield.
Funeral procession from the funeral
home on Saturday, March 24, 2018 at
10:00 a.m. for a Funeral Mass to be celebrated at 11:00 a.m. in St. Christine’s
Church, 1295 Main Street (Rte. 3A)
in Marshfield. Burial will be at a later
date. For full obituary, online guestbook
and driving directions, please visit our
website macdonaldfuneralhome.com
MacDonald Funeral Home
Marshfield
macdonaldfuneralhome.com
O’BRIEN, Melba Murillo
Montoya
86, of Milton passed away peacefully on
March 18, 2018 at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center surrounded by her
family. She was the loving wife of the
late Laurie “Mike” O’Brien. Melba was
born in Tegucigalpa, Honduras to the
late Juan Bautista Murillo and Susana
Montoya Fonseca Murillo. She leaves
behind many family members, friends,
and loved ones in Honduras.
She worked for the Unemployment
Office for the State of Massachusetts for
15 years before her retirement. Melba
loved gardening, knitting, cooking, but
most of all spending time with her family and family vacations.
Melba is survived by her children,
Gogi Hardiman and her husband Brian
(B.F.D.) of East Bridgewater, Joseph Raicsics, Jr. and his wife Amy of Haverhill,
and Ronel Raicsics and his wife Carly
of Milton; grandmother of Tara, Brian,
Jr. (B.F.D.), Shawn (B.F.D.), Christopher,
Ava, and Isabella; great grandmother of
David, Shawn, Jr., Cheyenne, DeAnna,
Jared, Nicholas, Avery, Matthew, and
Mason. Melba is also survived by her
brothers, Jairo Murrillo and Juan B.
Murrillo. She was predeceased by her
sister, Thelma Murrillo and her brother,
Ivan Murrillo.
Visiting hours will be held on
Sat., March 24, 2018 from 1-4 PM at
Prophett-Chapman, Cole & Gleason, 98
Bedford St., BRIDGEWATER. A short
prayer service will be held at 2 PM. In
lieu of flowers donations may be made
in her memory to the Alzheimer’s Association, P.O. Box 96011, Washington,
D.C. 20090-6011. For online guestbook
and directions visit
www.ccgfuneralhome.com
Prophett-Chapman
Cole & Gleason
508-697-4332
MORRIS, Julia T.
O’LEARY, John F.
Retired Brookline
Firefighter
Of Linden Ponds Hingham, formerly of
Weston, March 18. Beloved daughter
of the late Nicholas and Mary (Barrett)
Morris. Sister of the late Rita Morris,
Mary Doherty, Joan Morris. Aunt of
Mary Ortwein and her husband Tommy
of Rome, GA; Ann Doherty and her
husband Michael Ward of Ventura,
CA; John Doherty and his wife Mary of
Randolph; and the late George Doherty
and his surviving wife Karen of Duxbury. Also survived by eight great nieces
and nephews and two great-great niece
and nephew. Julia was a graduate of
Mission High School, St. Joseph’s College of Emmitsburg, MD, Class of 1947.
Former Teacher of Weymouth High
School and Boston Girls’ Latin. She
taught at The Thompson Elementary
School in Dorchester. Former CCD
Teacher at St. Julia’s Church, Weston.
Funeral from The George F. Doherty &
Sons Funeral Home, 477 Washington
St., (Rte.16) WELLESLEY, Saturday
at 9 AM. Funeral Mass in St. Julia
Church, 374 Boston Post Rd., Weston
at 10 a.m. Relatives and friends kindly
invited. Visiting Hours Friday, 5-8 PM.
Interment St. Joseph Cemetery, West
Roxbury. Expressions of sympathy may
be made in Julia’s memory to St. Julias
Church. For directions and guestbook
www.gfdoherty.com
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley (781) 235-4100
Dolores (Alexander) Nabauns, of New
Orleans, Louisiana, born on October
20, 1946 in New Orleans, Louisiana,
to Zelma Randle and Joseph Alexander passed away at age 71 on March
6, 2018, in Boston, Massachusetts.
Dolores graduated from McDonald
35 High School in New Orleans, LA
in 1964. She was in the Health Care
industry at Charity Hospital as a Payroll
Administrator until retiring in 2000
and in the Government industry at US
Customs Passport Agency as a Passport
Processor in Boston until retiring in
2010. Dolores was preceded in death by
her sister, Alma Carter. She is survived
by her daughter, Kimberly Cox; brother,
Joseph Alexander; sister, Barbara
Carter; and grandchildren, Michael
Cox Jr, Nicholas Cox, and Mikaela Cox.
Dolores had a passion for making photo
albums. She was an active member at
Twelfth Baptist Church, and she was
a volunteer at the Elder Community
Program. The family will like to express
sincere gratitude and appreciation to
friends, neighbors, members of her care
team at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and members of Twelfth Baptist
Church. Thank you for the love, cards,
calls, prayers and support you provided
our family through a very difficult
time in our lives. We are eternally
grateful. Friends and family can pay
their respects at the Memorial Service,
officiated by Rev. Arthur T. Gerald, Jr.,
on Thursday, March 22 from 11:00 a.m.
to 1:00 p.m. at Twelfth Baptist Church,
160 Warren Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts, 02119. J.B.Johnson Funeral
Home is handling arrangements, 196
Warren Street, Roxbury, (617) 4458150.
Of Needham, March 20th.
Beloved husband of the late
Eleanor J. (Connolly)
O’Leary. Devoted father of Kathleen M.
Grover and her husband Geoffrey of
Needham, Jane R. O’Laughlin and her
husband Kevin of Needham, Susan M.
Panzarino and her husband Nicholas of
Shrewsbury, John P. O’Leary and his
wife Nancy of Needham. Grandfather of
Michael, Laura, Amanda, Christopher,
Nicholas, Michael, Emily, Lisa and
Austin. Great grandfather of Ciara.
Brother of Paul O’Leary of Chappaquiddick, George O’Leary of Brookline and
the late Marie Riordan and Robert
O’Leary. Also survived by many nieces
and nephews. Funeral from the George
F. Doherty and Sons Funeral Home,
1305 Highland Ave., NEEDHAM, Saturday at 9 a.m. Funeral Mass in St.
Bartholomew Church, Needham at 10.
Relatives and friends kindly invited.
Visiting hours Friday 4-7. Interment St.
Mary’s Cemetery, Needham. World War
II Navy Veteran. Expressions of
sympathy may be made in John’s
memory to a charity of your choice. For
directions and guestbook
www.gfdoherty.com
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham
781-444-0687
Honor your loved one with a
photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director
for details.
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PARKER, Robert D.
Of Saugus, formerly of KY,
age 85, March 21st. Loving
husband of 63 years of Rose
Marie (Gerokoulis) Parker. Beloved father of Donna LeMoine & her husband
Robert of Saugus, Robert Parker, Jr. &
his wife Carol of Hampton Falls, NH,
George Parker & his wife Katherine
of Beverly. Cherished grandfather of
8 grandchildren, Jennifer, Robert,
Hannah, Kyle, Lydia, William, Owen,
Blake & 1 great grandson, Benjamin.
Dear brother of Janice Collier & Sandra
Abraham both of MI, the late Kenneth Parker, Doris Lavender & Danna
Taylor. US Navy veteran of the Korean
War. In lieu of flowers, donations in
Robert’s name may be made to St.
Jude Children’s Research Hospital at
www.stjude.org. Relatives & friends
are invited to attend visiting hours in
the Bisbee-Porcella Funeral Home, 549
Lincoln Ave., SAUGUS on Friday 4-8
p.m. Funeral from the funeral home on
Saturday at 9 a.m. followed by a funeral
mass in Blessed Sacrament Church, 14
Summer St., Saugus at 10 a.m. Interment Puritan Lawn Memorial Park,
Peabody. For directions & condolences
www.BisbeePorcella.com.
PORRETTA, Stephen A.
Of Arlington after a long and courageous battle with cancer, March 20. Beloved husband of Ellen M., (McDonnell)
Porretta. Step Father of Lori Mahoney
and her husband Jason of Medford,
JoAnna Murray and her husband
Rian of Belmont and Cory Leonard of
Boston. Grandfather of Maeve Murray
of Belmont and Carter Evan Mahoney
of Medford. Son of Theresa M. Mello of
Saugus and the late Silvio A. Porretta.
Brother of Patricia Terranova, David,
Charles and Francis Porretta all of Florida. Relatives and friends are invited
to visit in The DeVito Funeral Home,
1145 Mass Avenue, ARLINGTON,
Saturday morning 9:00 to 11:00 with a
funeral mass to commence at 11:30 in
St. Camillus Church. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in Stephen’s
name to: Beth Israel Hospital, Office of
Development, 330 Brookline Avenue,
Boston, MA 02215.
RENNIE, John
US Marine Corps
Of Norwood and Falmouth
passed away on March 20,
2018 at the age of 82.
Beloved husband of the late Deborah S.
(Martin) Rennie. Devoted father of
Deborah J. Jernegan and her husband
Clifford of Edgartown, Nancy E.
Webster and her husband Kenneth of
Norfolk and Julie S. Gelerman and her
husband Edward of Canton. Loving
brother of Alex B. Rennie and his wife
Virginia O’Toole of Falmouth.
Cherished grandfather of Laura, Alex,
Eva, Katie, K.C., Ella, Andrew, Jack and
Meghan. John was a graduate of
Northeastern University and received a
Bachelor’s degree in Electrical
Engineering. He was a retired Engineer
for Factory Mutual working there for
many years. A funeral home service will
be held on Saturday 1pm at the
Kraw-Kornack Funeral Home 1248
Washington St., Norwood, MA. Visiting
hours will be held on Saturday, March
24, 2018 from 10am-1pm. At the
request of the family burial will be held
at a later date. In lieu of flowers
donations may be made in his name to
the Massachusetts General Hospital,
Cardiology Dept., 55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114. US Marine Corps,
Korean War Veteran.
RICCI, John F.
Lifelong Everett
Resident and
Member of IBEW,
Local 103 for 67
Years.
Of Everett, March 19.
Beloved husband of the
late Mary F. (McSweeney).
Son of the late Pasquale and Genoveffa
(Falco) Ricci. Dear and devoted father
of Denise Vitale and her husband,
Ralph of N. Chelmsford, Cheryl
Morecroft and her husband, Stephen
of Burlington, Maureen Morelli and
her husband, Louis of Everett, John F.
Ricci, Jr. and his wife, Mary of Stoughton and Kevin Ricci of Everett. Brother
of Madelaine Doctors of CA and the late
Philip, Adam, Thomas, Edward and
Beatrice Ricci. John is also survived
by 11 loving grandchildren, 3 greatgrandchildren and former daughter-inlaw, Aniela Ricci. Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited to attend John’s
visiting hours in the Cafasso & Sons
Funeral Home, 65 Clark St. (Corner of
Main St.) EVERETT, Friday, March 23
from 4-8 p.m. His funeral will be from
the funeral home on Saturday at 10
a.m. followed by a funeral Mass in the
Immaculate Conception Church, 487
Broadway, Everett at 11 a.m. Interment,
with military honors, in the Holy Cross
Chapel Mausoleum, Malden. Late U.S.
Army Veteran of the Korean Conflict.
Contributions in John’s memory to the
Alzheimer’s Association, 309 Waverley
Oaks Rd., Waltham, MA 02452 or to
the Wounded Warrior Project, 150
Cambridge Park Dr., Ste 202, Cambridge, MA 02140 would be sincerely
appreciated. Late 67 year member of
the IBEW Local 103. Parking with attendants on duty.
Cafasso & Sons Funeral Home
Everett 617.387.3120
SAMSON, Charles F.
Charles “Charlie” Samson, born
8/18/29, passed away on March 18 in
Spring Hill, FL, after a lengthy illness.
A longtime resident of Massachusetts,
Wisconsin and Florida, he is survived
by his beloved wife Agnes “Midge”
Samson (nee MacDonald), daughter
Catherine, siblings Joseph and Eleanor,
2 granddaughters, 1 great-grandson,
many nieces, nephews, cousins and
other loving relatives. Predeceased by
son Daniel.
Mr. Samson worked for Riverside
Press and the Polaroid Corporation in
the Boston area, as well as the Rayovac
Company in Madison, WI. He was an
avid reader, traveler, and gourmet cook,
and loved telling funny stories and
jokes.
A funeral and memorial will be
held April 5 in Spring Hill, FL. Please
contact Downing Funeral Home for
details, at www.downingfuneralhomeandcremation.com, or at 352-684-5334.
You may also sign the guestbook on
their website.
SHRIBERG, Glenn Morris
Kraw-KornackFuneralHome.com
Family Owned and Operated
781-762-0482
Paying
tribute to
your loved
ones is
important
To submit a paid death
notice for publication in
The Boston Globe and on
Boston.com, contact
your funeral director, visit
boston.com/deathnotices
or call 617.929.1500. Now
offering custom headings
and enhanced listings.
To submit an obituary
for editorial consideration,
please send the information and a photo by e-mail
to obits@globe.com, or
send information by fax
to 617.929.3186. If you
need further assistance
about a news obituary,
please call 617.929.3400.
To access death notices
and obituaries online, visit
boston.com/obituaries.
Age 78, of Nantucket, MA and Sarasota, FL, formerly of Newton, MA and
Natick, MA, died on March 20, 2018.
Beloved husband of Leslie (Arnold)
Shriberg. Dear son of the late William
and Jane Shriberg. Loving brother of
Ann Chavenson. Proud Father of Alison
Freedman and husband Ezra and Dana
Shriberg and husband Randy Austgen.
Lovable “Grumpy” to Talia, Simon, and
Zev. Glenn will be remembered for his
sense of humor, quick wit, corny puns,
love of tennis and golf, and sitting on
his deck on Nantucket reading a library
book. He was an avid Red Sox fan, had
an encyclopedic knowledge of trivia
and song lyrics, and was a generous
and loving man. A graduate of Boston
University Law School, Glenn was a
skilled litigator both in and out of the
courtroom. Services will be held at
the Sharon Memorial Park Chapel, 40
Dedham St., Sharon, MA, on Sunday,
March 25 at 2 p.m. Following services,
memorial observance will be held at
the home of Alison and Ezra Freedman
in Roslindale until 8 p.m., continuing
Monday, March 26 from 2-4 p.m. and
7-9 p.m. with Minyan services at 7:30
p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to The Jill Effect Fund at Dana
Farber, c/o Elizabeth Patterson, 10
Brookline Place, Brookline, MA 02445.
SMITH, Josephine
(Maziarski)
Of Chelsea, peacefully after more then
a Century of independent living, on
March 19th in her 105th year. Beloved
mother of the late Michael J. Smith, Sr.
and his late wife Catherine T. (Ryan).
Devoted daughter of the late Joseph
and Sophie (Podlipski) Maziarski.
Sister of the late Walter and Raymond
Marziarski.Grandmother “Babci” of
Michael J. Smith, Jr. and his wife Susan
and her great grandsons, Ryan and
Matthew Smith, all of Saugus and Kim
Clifford and her husband James of
Melrose. Family and friends are kindly
invited to attend a Funeral Service in
the Smith Funeral Home, 125 Washington Avenue, CHELSEA on Saturday,
March 24th at 11 AM. Visitation prior
to the service beginning at 10 AM.
Interment Services will be private. Late
Jordan Marsh employee of 35 years and
member of the Quarter Century Club of
Jordan Marsh Company.
Smith Funeral Home
617-889-1177
www.smithfuneralhomes.com
SPILIAKOS, Constantino
THORPE, Robert L.
Of Quincy, formerly Roxbury, died
March 19, 2018.
Robert loved his family, New England
and Boston sports, and listening to
old records. He enjoyed traveling with
his wife in their younger years and
worked for Jordan Marsh warehouse
and Milton Marketplace before retiring
after over 20 years of service. He was
a genuine and friendly man who could
stop and strike up a conversation with
anyone. Robert will be greatly missed
by all who knew him.
Son of the late Edward and Pasqualina Thorpe. Beloved husband of Nancy
Thorpe of Quincy. Loving father of
Barbara Stano and her husband Nick
of Weymouth and Sandra Curry of
Quincy. Cherished brother of Loretta
Riccardi and her husband Nick of
Arizona and the late Edward Thorpe.
Devoted grandfather of Robert, Jake,
and Caitlin.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend the visiting hours on
Friday 4-8 PM in the Keohane Funeral
Home, 785 Hancock St., QUINCY.
Cremation will follow. In lieu of flowers, donations in memory of Robert
may be made to The Jimmy Fund c/o
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, PO Box
849168, Boston, MA 02284-9168. See
www.Keohane.com or call 1-800-Keohane for directions and online condolences.
VALENTE, Louis P. (Dan)
See Enhanced Listing
WELSH, Edward J. “Gramp”
Of Norton, age 94, March 19. Husband
of Helen (Minakakis) Spiliakos. Father
of Maria Orfanos of Norton and the late
Pandelis “Peter” Spiliakos. Father-inlaw of Stacia Spiliakos of Easton and
the late Nicholas Orfanos. Also survived
by 3 grandchildren. Predeceased by
several brothers and sisters.
Funeral Services will be held in the
Saint Gregory the Theologian Greek
Orthodox Church, 1007 West Street,
Mansfield, 02048 on Saturday at 10:30
AM. Visiting hours will be held in
the church prior to the services from
9:30AM-10:30AM. Interment will take
place at Canton Corner Cemetery. Arrangements by Farley Funeral Home,
Stoughton. Obit at www.farleyfh.com.
SULLIVAN, Patricia
“Patty” Anne (MacDermott)
Of Scituate, MA passed away peacefully
on March 20, 2018. Daughter of the
late Walter and Elizabeth MacDermott.
Wife to her beloved husband, friend
and love of her life Kenneth L. Sullivan.
Loving mother to her daughters Jennifer Cardoso, her fiance Kenneth Skehill
of Bolton, MA, Allison Richman, her
husband Erik of Scituate MA and Sarah
Servetnick of New York; stepchildren
Karen Baker, her husband Robert of
Wayland, MA, Kenneth E. Sullivan,
his wife Michelle Palomero Sullivan of
Scituate, MA, Gary Sullivan of Wayland,
MA and the late Kathleen Lavezzo and
her late husband William Lavezzo.
Visitation will be held on Friday, March
23, 2018 from 4-7pm at RichardsonGaffey Funeral Home, 382 First Parish
Road, SCITUATE. A Funeral Mass will
be held on Saturday, March 24, 2018
at 10am from St. Mary of the Nativity
Church, 1 Kent Street, Scituate. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be made to
Dana Farber at www.danafarbergiving.
org or a charity of one’s choice. Words
of comfort can be left at richardsongaffeyfuneralhome.com.
Richardson-Gaffey
781-545-0196
B9
Of Everett, formerly of Chelsea,
unexpectedly, March 19, 2018 at age
74. Husband of the late Julia (Gordon)
Welsh. Devoted father of Coleen
Kingsley and her husband Doug of NH
and the late Brien Welsh. Father-in-law
of Kelley Baldasaro of Everett. Loving
son of the late Joseph R. and Agnes
(Cronin) Welsh. Brother of the late
Joseph Welsh, Elaine Maillet, Nancy
Lehmann, John Welsh, Barry Welsh,
Gail Winam. Son-in-law of the late
Mary Orluck. Also lovingly survived
by 5 grandchildren, David Welsh and
his wife Ashlee of Haverhill, Dustin
Kingsley, Shea Kingsley, both of NH,
Caitlin Welsh, Briana Williams, both of
Everett and 2 great grandchildren, Vincent Hernandez, Adriana Hernandez,
both of Everett. Edward was also the
proud owner of his late Basset Hound,
Fred. Funeral from the Frank A. Welsh
& Sons Funeral Home 718 Broadway
CHELSEA on Saturday, March 24th at
8:00 A.M. Followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at St. Stanislaus Church 163
Chestnut St. Chelsea at 9:00 A.M. Services will conclude with Interment at
Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. Relatives
and friends are most kindly invited
to attend. Visiting hours will be held
at the Welsh Funeral Home on Friday
from 4 - 8 P.M. Funeral Home fully
handicap accessible, ample parking
opposite Funeral Home. Should friends
desire, in lieu of flowers, contributions
in Edward’s memory may be made
to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute
and the Jimmy Fund P.O. Box 849168
Boston, MA 02284 or on-line at www.
jimmyfund.org.
For directions or to send expressions of sympathy, please visit
www.WelshFuneralHome.com
ZARELLA, Deletta T.
Of Medford, March 17, age 91. She was
born in E. Boston on March 17, 1927,
the only child of Joseph and Diletta
Zarella. She graduated from Medford
High School and then attended Fisher
School where she completed the Finishing Secretarial Program in 1945. She
worked at HP Hood in Sullivan Square
for many years. Deletta was an avid
Red Sox fan. Her family appreciates the
efforts of the many kind individuals
that enabled her to remain in her family home. Her Funeral Mass will be celebrated in St. Francis of Assisi Church,
Fellsway West, Medford, Saturday at
10AM. Relatives and friends invited.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made to Mystic Valley Elder Services,
300 Commercial St., #19, Malden, MA
02148. For additional information,
please visit,
www.magliozzifuneralhome.com.
Robert Grossman; designed
famed ‘Airplane!’ poster
By Harrison Smith
\WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON —Robert
Grossman, a prodigious illustrator and caricaturist who created a surreal movie poster for
‘‘Airplane!’’ and used the airbrush as an artistic lance, lampooning presidents from Richard M. Nixon to Donald Trump
in gorgeous magazine covers
and acerbic comic strips, died
March 15 at his home in Manhattan. He was 78.
Mr. Grossman was found
dead on Friday morning and
was believed to have died of
congestive heart failure the previous night, said his son, Alex
Emanuel Grossman.
A painter, cartoonist, sculptor and artist of the airbrush,
Mr. Grossman designed book
and record covers and contributed illustrations to a ream of
publications, including Rolling
Stone, Time, Mother Jones, the
Nation, the New York Observer,
The Boston Globe, and New
York magazine.
He created a comic about a
black superhero (Captain Melanin) in the 1960s; received an
Academy Award nomination in
1978 for ‘‘Jimmy the C,’’ a claymation short in which President Jimmy Carter sang Ray
Charles’ version of ‘‘Georgia on
My Mind”; and devised the promotional poster for the 1980
satirical disaster film ‘‘Airplane!,’’ painting a jetliner
whose fuselage had somehow
twisted itself into a knot.
Yet, he was best known as
an equal-opportunity caricaturist, targeting cultural figures
from Playboy founder Hugh
Hefner (partially obscured by a
comically large pair of breasts)
to tennis player Jimmy Connors (drawn as an infant sticking his tongue out on the
court), and tweaking presidents regardless of their political party.
Mr. Grossman transmogrified Ronald Reagan into a
Mickey Mouse-like ‘‘Ronald Rodent,’’ painted Jimmy Carter as
an overall-wearing hayseed,
and in 2005 drew a controversial cartoon of ‘‘Babe Lincoln’’
for the Nation, inspired by a biography that argued Abraham
Lincoln was gay.
He seemed to have a particular fondness for Nixon, who
swept into office just as Mr.
Grossman’s career was taking
off in the late 1960s. For one
Watergate-era cover of Britain’s
Sunday Times Magazine, Mr.
Grossman depicted the president as an overflowing faucet,
water plunging out of his steely
nostrils. For National Lampoon, he imagined Nixon as an
eggplant-nosed Pinocchio, with
a Jiminy Cricket-like Henry
Kissinger perched atop his proboscis.
While Mr. Grossman’s work
was frequently incisive, cartoonist Drew Friedman wrote
by email, it also had a whimsical quality that ‘‘set him apart
from most of his best contemporaries, among them David
Levine and Edward Sorel, who
were masters at playing up the
grotesque.’’
In part, the whimsy was a
result of Mr. Grossman’s favored tool, the airbrush, which
allowed him to effec tively
sculpt three-dimensional figures out of paint or ink. The
technique was later adopted by
humorists such as Terry Gil-
Zakim pledges to up
voter turnout if chosen
By Katie Lannan
Add a memory
or condolence to the guest book at
Boston.com/obituaries
l i a m o f Mo n ty P y t h o n , a l though at the time Mr. Grossman first picked up an airbrush
-- as a child at his father’s silkscreen printing shop in Brooklyn -- the device was not widely
used in the art world.
‘‘He made the airbrush an
expressive medium, where before it was just an objective tool
that commercial artists used to
add dimension or take things
out of an illustration,’’ said Steven Heller, a former New York
Times art director who cochairs the MFA design department at the School of Visual
Arts in New York. ‘‘What Bob
did was create a style that just
jumped off the page.’’
Robert Samuel Grossman
was born in Brooklyn on March
1, 1940. His mother worked as
a bookkeeper for his father,
who painted in his spare time
and instilled an appreciation of
fine art in Bob and his siblings.
M r. G r o s s m a n s a i d h e
turned toward humor in the
1950s reading Mad magazine,
which ‘‘appeared like a nearly
divine revelation,’’ he told the
Tennessean newspaper. He befriended the magazine’s founding editor, cartoonist Harvey
Kurtzman, while studying at
Yale University, where he edited the Yale Record humor magazine and graduated in 1961.
One of his designs for the
Record, a parody cover of the
‘‘ Yew Norker,’’ apparently
helped him get a job at the New
Yorker magazine, where he said
he worked ‘‘as a sub-assistant
cartoon editor’’ before becoming a freelance illustrator.
His marriages to Donna
Lundvall and Vicki Morgan
ended in divorce.
Survivors include his partner of 24 years, Elaine Louie;
three children from his first
marriage, Michael Grossman
Rimbaud and Alex Emanuel
Grossman, both of Manhattan,
and Leila Grossman of Nashville, Tenn.; a daughter from
his second marriage, Anna
Grossman Pedicone of Manhattan; two brothers; and five
grandchildren.
At the time of his death, Mr.
Grossman had just completed
an illustrated novel about the
‘‘Great Moon Hoax’’ of 1835, in
which the New York Sun reported that winged beings lived
on the surface of the moon. Titled ‘‘Life on the Moon,’’ the
book is scheduled to be published in 2019.
Mr. Grossman had also written a comic strip, ‘‘Twump and
Pooty,’’ lampooning Trump and
Russian President Vladimir Putin. The serial followed in the
tradition of his series about Oman (a heroic President Barack
Obama) and Cap’n Bushy (a flying squirrel modeled after President George H.W. Bush).
He said he just couldn’t resist using fake names for his
strips’ famous protagonists.
‘‘The cowardly strategy of
not calling people by their right
names has been employed
since the first fool told a funny
story about a bear named
Hairy, to avoid getting his head
cut off by King Harry,’’ he told
the Atlantic in 2012.
‘‘And it might possibly be
funnier than drearily calling a
spade a spade. The art of caricature enchants me for its similar ability to combine truth and
falsehood in a strangely appealing way.’’
STATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE
Secretary of State candidate
Josh Zakim pledged this week
to increase voter turnout if
elected, offering up a package
of reforms he said would make
it easier for people to vote.
Meanwhile, the current officeholder, William Galvin, has
been pursuing his own election
reform initiatives aimed at expanding access to the polls, and
plans on Thursday to join the
Massachusetts Election Modernization Coalition “to announce a joint effort on Automatic Voter Registration.”
A Boston city councilor challenging Galvin in September’s
Democratic primary, Zakim
proposed scheduling elections
on weekends, letting voters register on Election Day, expanding early voting, and allowing
voters to cast absentee ballots
without a providing a reason
why they can’t go to the polls.
“In the last nearly quarter
century since secretary Galvin’s
been in office, a lot has changed
in our lives,” Zakim said in a
press conference outside the
State House. “People are busier,
they lead busier lives, they’re
working longer hours, commuting further, and it’s not always
easy for people to get to the
polls on Tuesday, and there’s no
reason to have this arbitrary
day be the only time you can
vote.”
T h e
B10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
Business
Excel
nursing
facility
to close
Lexington site plans
to lay off 110 workers
By Katheleen Conti
GLOBE STAFF
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Women in
surgery
juggle it all
Survey shows balance of
residency, pregnancy tough
under training constraints
39%
Survey respondents who said their
experience of pregnancy during
residency made them strongly
reconsider whether they wanted
to continue surgical training.
60%
Respondents who reported there
was a negative stigma associated
with being pregnant as a surgical
resident.
By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
W
GLOBE STAFF
omen training to become surgeons face
daunting challenges
juggling their work
with the demands of
pregnancy and motherhood, according to a
new survey published Wednesday by
researchers at Brigham and Women’s
Hospital.
Among women who had children
during their surgical residency, 39
percent strongly considered leaving
their training, according to the survey, which was published in the medical journal JAMA Surgery. And 29.5
percent of women surveyed would
discourage female medical students
from pursuing careers as surgeons
because balancing pregnancy and
motherhood with training is so difficult.
The study sheds new light on a
critical issue as employers in medicine and other fields consider how to
attract top talent and diversify their
workforces with more women.
Surgery is a male-dominated medical specialty, though the gender gap
has been narrowing. Nationwide,
36.5 percent of surgeons-in-training
are women, according to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical
Education — a smaller share than
among residents of all medical specialties combined.
Dr. Erika Rangel, the lead author
of the study and a surgeon at
Brigham and Women’s Hospital in
Boston, said she was struck that so
many women considered leaving surgery when they began having children.
“This is a workforce issue,” Rangel
said. “If we want to recruit the best
candidates, we have to recruit those
women.”
Training to become a surgeon is
particularly grueling work. It takes
five to nine years, with trainees working 80-hour weeks and spending
many hours on end in the operating
room without breaks. They work
days and nights. The rigorous schedule can be especially difficult for
women who are pregnant and have
young families.
Among women surgeons who responded to the survey, 95.6 percent
said breast-feeding was important to
them, and 58.1 percent stopped
breast-feeding earlier than they
wished because it was too challenging to keep up when they returned to
work in the operating room.
“There were definitely times when
I questioned my career choice and
Dr. Cornelia
Griggs, a chief
resident in
general surgery
at Mass.
General
Hospital, has a
2-year-old
daughter and is
pregnant with
her second
child.
WOMEN SURGEONS, Page B12
The Fed’s moves are good news for retirees, but what’s good
for savers like them may be rough on debtors.
Interest rates on rise, and consumers will feel it
By Evan Horowitz
GLOBE STAFF
As part of its ongoing effort to moderate
economic growth and keep inflation at bay,
the Federal Reserve voted Wednesday to
raise interest rates another quarQUICK ter-percent. It’s the first move in
STUDY what’s expected to be a busy year,
with Fed members indicating
they expect to pass two or three additional
hikes before next January.
By historical standards, interest rates remain quite low. The rate the Fed controls —
called the federal funds rate — will now hover between 1.5 and 1.75 percent, far below
the 5.25 percent it reached before the financial crisis.
But as the increases pile up in the
months ahead, so, too, will the effects on
consumers.
That’s good news for retirees, who can
look forward to higher returns on their savings — something that’s been unattainable
in recent years, with most banks paying interest of well below 2 percent.
Bond investors might also be pleased
with the rate-hiking news, as it will probably
boost the returns on US treasuries and other
MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
bond offerings, allowing for better payoffs at
relatively low risk.
But what’s good for savers may be rough
on debtors. In a widening ripple, the Fed’s
moves will push up the cost of mortgages,
car payments, government debt, student
loans, and even credit card borrowing. And
it’s not just new borrowers who will face
Jerome Powell
is the new
chairman of
the Federal
Reserve.
higher rates: Anyone carrying an adjustable
loan will probably see the monthly payment
increase, in step with the Fed’s hikes.
Believe it or not, this is part of the point.
Rate hikes are explicitly designed to slow the
economy by raising the cost of debt — thereby leaving people with less money to spend.
When mortgage payments go up and
credit card interest rates spike, something
else in the family budget has to give. And the
higher rates go, the more people will have to
cut back, which translates into slower economic growth.
And while it may sound like a misbegotten goal, there’s a good reason the Fed sometimes aims to curb spending and slow the
economy; otherwise, an overheating economy can trigger rising — even spiraling — inflation.
A simplified example: If all your neighbors decide to take out home equity loans to
renovate their kitchens, that might spark a
bidding war for contractors’ time, driving
up the cost of everybody’s project. Something similar can happen on an economywide scale. When borrowing is cheap, and
spending on the rise, people can end up in
QUICK STUDY, Page B13
State officials have approved plans
by a Lexington nursing home to shut
down in May, the latest in a string of
nursing home closures across the region in recent months.
Excel Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation will lay off 110 employees.
The 152-bed facility had about 65
residents last fall, and has already relocated many of them, according to
1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers
East, a union representing nursing
home workers. As of Wednesday, 22
residents remained, according to state
health officials. Nursing homes are responsible under state law for finding a
new placement for their residents.
Excel Center is the latest among
several nursing homes and assisted
living facilities in Massachusetts that
have recently closed or plan to close
over the next few months, resulting in
hundreds of layoffs and relocations of
residents.
Since 2000, more than 200 nursing
homes, or more than a third of the
state’s facilities, have closed, according to the union. State health officials
reported that nine skilled nursing facilities have voluntarily closed or are
pending voluntary closure this year.
The state has more than 45,000 nursing home beds available, but annual
vacancy rates continue to increase,
health officials said.
Layoffs at Excel are slated to begin
in April. A number of certified nursing assistants have been working at
the nursing home for more than 20
years.
Ne w Yo r k - b a s e d Z e n i t h C a r e
Health Group took over the Lexington
facility in May 2014 and quickly announced plans to cut the pay and benefits of workers; after union protests,
the cuts did not materialize. Excel
NURSING HOMES, Page B13
Decision on
short-term
rentals on hold
By Tim Logan
GLOBE STAFF
New rules governing short-term
rentals in Boston are on hold for at
least a few weeks, after the Walsh administration Wednesday withdrew its
proposal before the Boston City Council to rein in the booming industry.
In a letter to the council, Mayor
Martin J. Walsh said he aims to refile
legislation “in the coming weeks” that
would set new rules capping investorowned short-term rentals — which
housing advocates say are pricing too
many long-term renters out of the
market — while still allowing homeowners to rent spare rooms and extra
apartments through online platforms
such as Airbnb.
The delay comes just ahead of a
deadline to vote on Walsh’s initial proposal, which was filed in January. At a
City Council workshop on the bill
Monday, city officials said they need
more time to develop technology to enforce the new rules, while City Council
members remained split on what they
want regulations to accomplish.
“Members of the City Council and I
agree that more time is necessary to
ensure that we enact the best and most
effective policy regarding short-term
rentals in Boston,” Walsh wrote.
Councilor Michelle Wu, who has
pushed for more-stringent regulations
and on Monday urged quick passage of
regulations, said many of the people
involved in the talks “share the same
goal” of closing “loopholes for de facto
hotels.”
“As we hone in on finalizing the details, I’m looking forward to making a
collaborative, quick push to get this
done,” Wu said.
Tim Logan can be reached at
tim.logan@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter at @bytimlogan.
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
TALKING POINTS
DEVELOPMENT
20-STORY HOTEL
PLANNED NEAR
SOUTH STATION
WALTHAM
WAY CLEARED
FOR BREWERY
Agenda
A tiny lot near South Station could soon be home to a 20-story hotel. Developers the Hudson Group filed initial plans Wednesday with the Boston Planning & Development Agency
to put a “striking, slender mid-rise tower” at 150 Kneeland St., in the Leather District, for a
“top-quality hospitality facility.” The 215-foot building would sit on the site of the old Splash
Ultra Lounge, with about 250 rooms and a ground floor restaurant, but no parking. More
details are expected in the coming months. — TIM LOGAN
The Waltham Zoning Board of Appeals has cleared the way for a 23,000-square-foot brewery operated by Mighty Squirrel Brewing Co. to open in Waltham’s Waverley Oaks office
park near Route 128. Mighty Squirrel will contract its brewing through Ipswich Ale Brewery until its brewery space is ready. NAI Hunneman represented both Mighty Squirrel and
property owner Duffy Properties in the lease negotiations. Also this week, Naukabout Brewery & Taproom announced that it has opened its doors in Mashpee. More than 150 craft
brewers do business in Massachusetts today, about five times the number that existed a decade ago. — JON CHESTO
REAL ESTATE
GAMING
WYNN MAY SELL SOME
OR ALL OF HIS STAKE
IN CASINO COMPANY
LABOR
ACTRESSES WANT
HIGHER WAGES FOR
TIPPED WORKERS
FOREIGN
AFRICAN LEADERS
SIGN OFF ON FREE
TRADE AGREEMENT
OIL
LESS OPEC THAN EVER
COMING INTO THE US
Steve Wynn plans to sell some or all of his entire $2.2 billion stake in the casino company he
founded, a week after settling an acrimonious court fight with his ex-wife that freed each to
do as they wish with their share of the family fortune. His plans for the 12 percent holding
in Wynn Resorts Ltd. were outlined in a regulatory filing Wednesday. The 76-year-old
mogul “will seek to conduct such sales in an orderly fashion and in cooperation with the
company,” it said. “No assurance can be provided that Mr. Wynn will elect to sell common
stock.” The potential sale and the unwinding of the shareholder agreement that prevented
Elaine Wynn from lowering her 9.3 percent stake potentially make Las Vegas-based Wynn
Resorts vulnerable to a takeover. Casino regulators in Nevada, Macau, and Massachusetts
are still investigating the company’s handling of harassment claims against Steve Wynn
that were first raised in the couple’s bitter six-year court battle — probes that could result in
him being found unfit to be the largest shareholder in a casino company.
— BLOOMBERG NEWS
Sixteen actresses including Jane Fonda, Sarah Jessica Parker, Reese Witherspoon, and Natalie Portman are urging New York Governor Andrew Cuomo to raise the wage made by
tipped workers. The women signed onto a letter to the Democratic governor as his administration examines whether to eliminate the subminimum wage paid to restaurant servers
and other workers who make tips. The actresses invoked the #TimesUp hashtag and wrote
that relying on tips forces many workers to endure widespread sexual harassment. Others
signing on to the letter include Lily Tomlin, Rashida Jones, Amy Poehler, America Ferrera,
Jessica Chastain, Amber Tamblyn, Brie Larson, Debra Messing, Michelle Williams, Erika
Alexander, Ashley Judd, and Sarah Silverman. Cuomo has called for hearings on the tipped
wage to be held around the state. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
African leaders on Wednesday signed what is being called the largest free trade agreement
since the creation of the World Trade Organization. The deal creates a continental market
of 1.2 billion people, with a combined gross domestic product of more than $3.4 trillion. A
major goal is to boost intra-African trade and rely less on the volatility of commodity prices
that affect many exports. The aim is to have agreement, signed by 44 of the African Union’s
55 member states, enter into force by the end of this year, said the chair of the AU Commission, Moussa Faki Mahamat. States now must ratify the deal, but the number of countries
needed to put the agreement into force has not yet been agreed upon. ‘‘Our peoples, our
business community and our youth in particular cannot wait any longer to see the lifting of
the barriers that divide our continent, hinder its economic takeoff and perpetuate misery,
even though Africa is abundantly endowed with wealth,’’ Mahamat said. He urged strong
follow-up to ‘‘confound those who, outside Africa, continue to think, with barely concealed
condescension, that our decisions will never materialize.’’ — ASSOCIATED PRESS
US refiners are taking less OPEC-produced oil than ever as the group’s members continue
trimming output. Crude imports from seven OPEC members fell to an unprecedented low
of 1.86 million barrels a day last week, a 14 percent drop, according to preliminary government data. The decline comes as the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its
allies make significant strides in trimming a global supply glut. The group saw record compliance with production-cut targets in February. Overall, US crude imports fell to the lowest
level in a month in the week ended March 16, according to the US Energy Information Administration. The biggest drops came from Ecuador, which saw shipments to the United
States fall 86 percent, and Kuwait, which shipped 58 percent less crude than it did the prior
week. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mortgage rates
The latest mortgage numbers will be
released Thursday. Last week, Freddie
Mac reported the average 30-year, fixedrate mortgage fell to 4.44 percent from
4.46 percent the week before.
TALK
Navigating
Silicon Valley
Sit by the fire with Blavity chief executive
and founder Morgan DeBaun, who will
share her insights on navigating Silicon
Valley and launching the largest media
startup for black millennials. Friday, 3:30
to 4:30 p.m., Boston University, 100 Bay
State Road, Room 613A, Boston. Free.
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
BOOT CAMP
Business
fundamentals
CEOs, founders, and management team
members of startups are invited to attend
the Business Fundamentals Bootcamp,
presented by bookkeeping service
Supporting Strategies, at Bentley
University. Presentations by local
business owners will focus on marketing,
finance, law, and human resources.
Participants will be able to ask questions
and learn about managing a growing
MARKETING
N.H. LOTTERY DROPS
‘LUCK YEAH!’ AD
CAMPAIGN OVER
PROFANITY
CONCERNS
FINANCE
UBS AG TO PAY $230M
TO SETTLE MORTGAGEMARKETING
INVESTIGATION
LEGAL
JUDGE PUTS A HALT
TO ARKANSAS
MEDICAL MARIJUANA
LICENSES
business. Lunch will be provided. $50. 9
The New Hampshire Lottery Commission has replaced its ‘‘Luck Yeah!’’ ad campaign with
‘‘Win Time’’ over concerns that the original phrase sounded like a profanity. WMUR-TV reported that at least one state official, Republican Executive Councilor Russell Prescott, criticized the phrase last month after it started showing up online and in television commercials. But Lottery Executive Director Charlie McIntyre defended the ads. He had said that
the word ‘‘luck’’ is an inherent part of the business. He apologized if it was insensitive. But
he added, ‘‘certainly it is effective.’’ McIntyre had said Prescott’s complaint was the first he
had heard, but noted that the ad was designed to make viewers pay attention. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
UBS AG agreed to pay $230 million to resolve a New York state probe into its marketing of
residential mortgage-backed securities before the financial crisis, boosting the state’s recoveries in the investigation to almost $4 billion. The settlement includes $189 million in consumer relief and $41 million in cash for the state, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said
Wednesday in a statement. He said the bank ignored the advice of its own diligence vendors
in packaging and selling loans that didn’t conform to its underwriting guidelines. Royal
Bank of Scotland Group Plc agreed earlier this month to pay $500 million to settle a parallel
investigation by Schneiderman, moving the government-owned lender a step closer to resolving a series of costly US investigations. JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Bank of America
Corp. previously paid $1 billion and $800 million, respectively, to settle New York’s probes
into sales of residential mortgage-backed securities. Citigroup Inc., Morgan Stanley and
Goldman Sachs Group Inc. have also settled. "New Yorkers are still recovering from the
housing crash, as communities grapple with the effects of plummeting home values, vacant
properties and an affordable housing crisis,” Schneiderman said. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
An Arkansas judge on Wednesday struck down the state’s decision to issue its first licenses
to grow medical marijuana, ruling that the process for awarding the permits and the rankings of applicants were unconstitutional. Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen
granted a preliminary injunction preventing the state Medical Marijuana Commission from
awarding cultivation licenses. Griffen last week issued a restraining order preventing the
state from awarding licenses to five companies. Griffen ruled that the process for awarding
the licenses violated a state constitutional amendment voters approved in 2016 legalizing
marijuana for patients with certain conditions. He ruled the commission’s rankings of the
95 applicants for the cultivation licenses were null and void. Griffen sided with an unsuccessful applicant that had sued the state over claims the process for awarding the licenses
was flawed. In his ruling, Griffen said he ‘‘takes no joy’’ in blocking the state from issuing
the licenses. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Conference Center at
Bentley University, LaCava 300, 175
Forest St., Waltham. Register online or go
to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
WEBINAR
Beginners’ guide
to real estate
Anyone considering getting started in the
real estate business are invited to log in
to a webinar on how to make money by
investin in real estate. Participants will
learn about leasing, flipping, short sales,
commercial real estate and tax strategies.
Saturday, 7 to 8 p.m., online. Free.
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
NETWORKING
Weekly business
meetup
Small business owners interested in
growing their business through referrals
are encouraged to attend a morning
meet-up to network with other local
professionals. Friday, 7 to 8:30 a.m., Paris
Street Community Center, 112 Paris St.,
East Boston. Free. Register online or go to
the business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E-mail us at
agenda@globe.com
B12
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
Comeback plotted for KB Toys chain
By Jon Chesto
GLOBE STAFF
Ellia Kassoff wants to be the
person who saves the toy industry — by bringing KB Toys back
from the dead.
The Newport Beach, Calif.-based entrepreneur last year
acquired the KB brand, working
t h r o u g h t h e U S Pa t e n t a n d
Trademark Office, in part for an
online “virtual mall” that he’s assembling out of bygone retail
brands.
With the news last week that
Toys R Us would close or sell all
its US stores, Kassoff has put his
plans into overdrive, aiming to
open hundreds of temporary KB
stores for the fall holiday shopping season. He hopes the popups will help determine where to
put permanent stores, possibly as
early as 2019.
“I think we could build the
concept out pretty quick, with
help from the toy industry and
manufacturers,” Kassoff said.
“We don’t have that much time.”
Kassoff is looking for operating partners, and is already talking to Spencer Gifts, Go! Retail,
and Party City.
After announcing KB’s return
last weekend, he has been constantly hearing from toy makers,
large and small, offering help.
Kassoff said: “I have some of the
biggest executives in the toy industry, saying, ‘We hope you can
save the toy industry.’”
After enduring two bankruptcies, KB was liquidated in early
2009 — Kassoff blames the formerly Pittsfield-based chain’s demise on a debt burden left from
private equity investors. The
brand was acquired by Toys R Us
By Andrew Mayeda
BLOOMBERG NEWS
TIM BOYLE/GETTY IMAGES/FILE 2004
but went unused in recent years,
and Kassoff became the rights
owner after applying for the
trademark.
A Boston University graduate,
Kassoff worked in high-tech in
the Boston area before launching
a recruiting business. His career
change came after he bought the
rights to the then-defunct Astro
Pops candies about eight years
ago.
Tasting success, he decided to
pursue the resurrection business,
full time. His company’s focus
has been on sweets so far, though
his Strategic Marks LLC tangled
with Macy’s over the rights to
some deceased department store
brands. A 2016 settlement with
Macy’s left him with a number of
retail names, including Jordan
Marsh.
“I look for brands that I enjoyed when I was younger,” Kassoff says. “KB happened to be one
of them.”
He says he’s not interested in
the Toys R Us locations, which
are much larger than the roughly
2,000-square-foot mall shops he
thinks would be ideal for KB.
That said, he would like to eventually open a few larger showcase
stores, one per region, that could
feature a bigger lineup of toys
and host demonstrations, presentations, and other events.
Jon Chesto can be reached at
jon.chesto@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @jonchesto.
A shopper
entered one of
the old mall KB
Toys stores, in
Norridge, Ill.,
to take
advantage of a
store-closing
sale. The
dormant brand
may be
relaunched.
Women in surgery
juggle training, family
uWOMEN SURGEONS
Continued from Page B10
whether it was even compatible
with having an infant,” said Dr.
Cornelia Griggs, a chief surgical
resident at Massachusetts General Hospital.
Griggs has a 2 1/2-year-old
daughter and is expecting her
second child in May. Before her
daughter, Eloise, was born,
Griggs worked until the day she
went into labor, she said.
When she came back to work,
she struggled to find time for
breast-feeding her baby while
spending so many hours in the
operating room. “I would forego
any semblance of having a break
in between cases and dash to the
lactation room,” Griggs said.
Most of the 347 women surgeons across the country who responded to the survey — 78.4
percent — said they took maternity leave of six weeks or less during their training. Seventy-two
percent said they felt the leave
was too short.
Maternity leave for surgical
residents is complicated by the
fact that they must complete 48
weeks of clinical activity each
year to finish training on time.
But there are options to tweak
that schedule.
“ We always are looking at
how can we make this work for
residents and programs,” said
Christine Shiffer, a spokeswoman for the American Board of
Trump
readying
tariffs
on China
Surgery. “We’ll keep reviewing
the policy.”
While surgery is a physically
demanding profession, for many
women the emotional challenges
of balancing motherhood and career are even tougher. For example: when a mother has to leave
her sick child with a spouse or
another caretaker because she’s
needed in the operating room.
“One night my baby almost
stopped breathing and was having an asthma attack,” recalled
Dr. Sareh Parangi, an endocrine
surgeon at Mass. General who
did her training in the 1990s.
“We had to rush him to the
hospital at 2 a.m., and I still had
to leave him and go round at 5
a.m.,” she said by e-mail. “I felt
that I was abandoning him.
Luckily my husband and nanny
were there to fill in … but you do
feel guilty.”
Dr. Gerard Doherty, surgeonin-chief at the Brigham, said the
survey results show that hospitals need to do more to accommodate trainees who are pregnant or have young children,
such as by scheduling enough
people to cover for a resident
who goes on leave.
“We can’t leave it up to the
residents,” Doherty said. “We
have to have clear and more progressive policies.”
Surgeons said there are many
ways hospitals can help residents
as they start their families, in-
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
cluding by offering more flexible
maternity leave and work schedules, allowing breaks for surgeons who are breast-feeding,
and setting up lactation facilities.
Despite the challenges, surgeons said, it’s possible — and
fulfilling — to juggle children
and a career in surgery.
“In any high-powered field,
you’re going to question yourself
all the way. You’re making these
sacrifices,” said Dr. Jennifer
Tseng, the chief of surgery at Boston Medical Center, who started
her first job as a surgeon when
she was five months pregnant.
“It absolutely can be done,
maybe not in the way you pictured it or the way your mother
did. It does work. People need to
have more child care and more
support than they might think.”
Several surgeons also said
they see changing attitudes as
more women pursue careers in
the operating room. More female
residents are having babies during training, instead of delaying
until the end of residency.
“For the generation of people
who trained right before me,
there was a lot of stigma. People
felt the pressure to wait,” said Dr.
Rebecca Scully, a third-year surgical resident at the Brigham,
who has a seven-month-old baby.
“As more people have kids in residency, it’s become a much more
viable option.”
Female
surgeons like
Dr. Cornelia
Griggs say they
struggle to find
time for breastfeeding while
in training,
because they’re
forced to spend
so many hours
in the
operating
room.
Priyanka Dayal McCluskey can
be reached at
priyanka.mccluskey@globe.com
Follow her on Twitter
@priyanka_dayal.
WASHINGTON — President
Trump is set to announce about $50
billion of tariffs against China over
intellectual-property violations on
Thursday, according a person familiar with the matter.
The president is considering targeting more than 100 different
types of Chinese goods, according
to the person, who spoke on the
condition of anonymity. The value
of the tariffs was based on US estimates of economic damage caused
by intellectual-property theft by
China, the person said.
“Tomorrow the president will
announce the actions he has decided to take based on USTR’s 301 investigation into China’s state-led,
market-distorting efforts to force,
pressure, and steal US technologies
and intellectual property,” White
House spokesman Raj Shah said in
an e-mailed statement on Wednesday.
Trump instructed US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer last
year to investigate allegations that
China steals US intellectual property and forces American companies
to transfer their technological
know-how to Chinese firms as a
condition of doing business in the
Asian country.
Lighthizer confirmed Wednesday that the administration is considering both tariffs and curbs on
Chinese investment, among other
options. US companies from Walmart Inc. to Amazon.com Inc. have
warned that sweeping sanctions
against China could raise consumer
prices and hit the stock market.
China is preparing to hit back at
Trump’s planned sweeping tariffs
with levies aimed at industries and
states which tend to employ his
supporters, the Wall Street Journal
reported on Wednesday, citing unidentified people familiar with the
matter.
The Trump administration indicated it could delay imposing steel
and aluminum tariffs on some nations while negotiations are taking
place for a more permanent exemption, Lighthizer said.
His office is discussing exemptions at the request of the European
Union, Australia, and Argentina,
and similar talks are expected with
a “great number” of other nations
including Brazil, Lighthizer said
during a briefing to the House Ways
and Means Committee on Wednesday. The goal is to wrap up the talks
over exemptions by the end of
April, Lighthizer said.
“I believe that countries will get
out as we come to agreement, that
some countries will be in a position
where the duties will not apply to
them in the course of the negotiation,” he said. “For example Canada
and Mexico, but others.”
However, Lighthizer later added
that this is the approach to country
exclusions he’s considering, and
that tariffs may start as scheduled
for some countries seeking relief.
Trump announced the tariffs
March 8, and they’re expected to
take effect on Friday.
The EU is “immediately”
launching discussions with Trump
and his administration over trade
issues, including steel and aluminum, the countries said in a joint
statement on Wednesday.
Google is said to work on blockchain-related technology
By Olga Kharif
and Mark Bergen
BLOOMBERG NEWS
Google is working on blockchain-related technology to support its cloud business and head
off competition from emerging
startups that use the heavilyhyped technology to operate online in new ways, according to
people familiar with the situation.
Companies use blockchain and
other so-called digital ledgers to
securely record transactions and
process other data over the Internet — a service Google could use,
for example, to reassure customers that their information is protected when stored on the giant
network of computer servers that
power its cloud services.
The Alphabet Inc. unit is developing its own distributed digital
ledger that third parties can use to
post and verify transactions, one
of the people said. Although the
timing of any product release is
unclear, the company plans to offer this to differentiate its cloud
service from rivals. It will also provide a white-label version that other companies can run on their
own servers, the person added.
The Internet giant has also
been acquiring and investing in
startups with digital ledger expertise. Still, Alphabet was a leading
corporate investor in the field last
year, ahead of Citigroup Inc. and
Goldman Sachs Group Inc., according to research firm CB Insights.
Several people in Google’s infrastructure group, which reports
to cloud chief Diane Greene, have
been tinkering with blockchain
protocols in recent months, according to another person familiar
with the company. Other Google
insiders said recently that the
cloud business is a natural place
for blockchain-related services.
The people asked not to be identified talking about the subject be-
Alphabet
was a
leading
corporate
investor in
the field
last year.
cause the company isn’t ready to
make an announcement yet.
“Like many new technologies,
we have individuals in various
teams exploring potential uses of
blockchain but it’s way too early
for us to speculate about any possible uses or plans,” a Google
spokesman said.
In 2016, Google started a trial
for developers testing blockchain
services on its cloud. The company
is now exploring much more expansive ways to deploy the technology, the people said.
Digital ledgers like blockchain
power Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. They are databases
that are updated regularly across
thousands of computers over the
Internet. Each entry is confirmed
by these machines, which can be
part of public networks or run privately by companies. There are different kinds of digital ledgers —
blockchain is only one. Data
crunched by this technology range
from transactions to supply-chain
updates to digital cats.
When Alphabet wants to keep
up with emerging technology, it
often backs startups in the field
and makes small acquisitions to
recruit talent. GV, Alphabet’s venture capital arm, has invested in
wallet service Blockchain Luxembourg, financial transactions network Ripple, cryptocurrency asset
management platform LedgerX,
international payments provider
Veem and the now-defunct Buttercoin, according to CB Insights.
Among tech giants, IBM and
Microsoft Corp. have so far led the
charge in offering blockchain-related tools and letting companies
tinker with digital ledgers using
their cloud services. The market
for blockchain products and services may grow from $706 million
last year to more than $60 billion
in 2024, according to WinterGreen Research. Cloud’s 800pound gorilla, Amazon.com Inc.,
helps companies build blockchain
applications, and Facebook chief
Mark Zuckerberg is looking at
cryptocurrencies, encryption, and
other decentralized computing approaches.
A slew of startups are trying to
challenge Google’s online dominance by using digital ledgers.
Brave is a Web browser that competes with Google’s Chrome. Instead of running targeted ads,
Brave uses blockchain technology
to pay websites when people
spend time there. BitClave lets
people perform searches online,
and get rewarded for seeing ads.
Another project, Presearch, is also
using blockchain to try to compete
with Google’s search engine, according to a white paper by the
startup.
“You’re going to see an unbelievable amount of R&D expenditures go into this,” said Jeff Richards, a managing partner at venture firm GGV Capital.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
Markets
Stocks wobble, end the day lower
After a jittery afternoon, major stock indexes fell Wednesday, while smaller companies fared better. The Fed raised
interest rates, as expected, but said it could raise rates at a
quicker pace next year. Stocks traded higher early on and
jumped after the Fed’s announcement. The Dow climbed
250 but gave it all up as new Fed chairman Jerome Powell
addressed reporters. The dollar weakened, and bond yields
turned lower. Brent Schutte, at Northwestern Mutual
Wealth Management, said Powell is trying to tell Wall
Street the Fed’s plans without worrying investors too much.
He said stocks fell after Powell said rates might rise higher
than the Fed expects. Home builders advanced following a
report that sales of previously occupied homes increased in
February. Cereal and packaged foods companies slumped
after General Mills reported rising expenses and cut its annual profit forecast, and airlines skidded after Southwest
said its revenue is suffering as it cuts fares to compete with
other companies. Nine of the 10 biggest gainers on the S&P
500 were energy companies. Benchmark US crude rose 2.6
percent.
DOW JONES industrial average
NASDAQ Composite index
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B13
Steady Fed issues modest rate hike
By Martin Crutsinger
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Federal
Reserve is raising its key interest
rate and signaling confidence in the
US economy’s durability but plans to
continue a gradual approach to rate
hikes for 2018 under its new chairman, Jerome Powell.
The Fed said it expects to increase rates twice more this year. At
the same time, it increased its estimate for rate hikes in 2019 from two
to three, reflecting more optimistic
expectations for solid growth and
low unemployment.
In a statement ending its latest
policy meeting, the Fed boosted its
key short-term rate Wednesday by a
modest quarter-point to a still-low
range of 1.5 percent to 1.75 percent.
It also said it will keep shrinking its
bond portfolio. The actions mean
consumers and businesses will face
higher loan rates over time.
Taken together, the Fed’s actions
and forecasts Wednesday suggest a
belief that the economy remains
sturdy even nearly nine years after
the Great Recession ended.
The Fed’s rate hike marks its
sixth since it began tightening credit
in December 2015. The action was
approved 8-0, with the Fed avoiding
any dissents at the first meeting that
Powell has presided over as chairman since succeeding Janet Yellen
last month.
Bond yields rose and stocks held
on to much of their gains after the
Fed’s announcement, which was
widely expected. The yield on the
10-year Treasury note, a benchmark
for mortgages and other loans, rose
from 2.87 percent to 2.93 percent.
The Dow Jones industrial average
was up 140 points, or 0.6 percent; it
had been up 210 just before the announcement.
Some investors had speculated
that Powell might move to impose
his mark on the central bank by indicating a faster pace of rate hikes
for 2018. But the new economic
forecast, which includes a median
projection for the path of future rate
hikes, made no change to the December projection for three hikes
this year.
If the Fed does stick with its new
forecast for three rate increases this
year and three in 2019, its key policy
rate would stand at 3.4 percent after
five years of credit tightening.
Wednesday’s forecast put the Fed
long-term rate — the point at which
its policies are neither boosting the
economy nor holding it back — at
2.9 percent.
The new statement showed only
minor changes from the text the Fed
had issued in January after Yellen’s
CAROLYN KASTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
final meeting. The statement described economic activity as rising at
a ‘‘moderate rate,’’ a slight downgrade from January, when the Fed
described the economy as rising at a
‘‘solid rate.’’
Since the start of the year, economists have been downgrading their
estimates for growth in the JanuaryMarch quarter growth to reflect a
slowdown in consumer spending,
which most analysts think will prove
temporary.
The Fed’s statement did not mention the extra government stimulus
that has been added since its most
recent economic forecast in the form
of a $1.5 trillion tax cut and a budget
agreement that will add $300 billion
in government spending over two
years.
But the Fed’s new forecast does
envision marked increases in economic growth compared with its
previous estimate: It raises the estimate to 2.7 percent growth this year,
up from 2.5 percent in the December projection, and 2.4 percent in
2019, up from 2.1 percent. Those
higher estimates may reflect the expected impact of the additional government spending.
The US unemployment rate, now
at a 17-year low of 4.1 percent, is expected to keep falling to 3.8 percent
at the end of this year and 3.6 percent at the end of 2019, which
would be the lowest rate in a halfcentury. The Fed expects inflation,
which has run below its 2 percent
target for six years, to stay at 1.9 percent this year and then rise to 2 percent in 2019.
A h e a l t hy j o b m a r ke t a n d a
steady if unspectacular economy
have given the Fed the confidence to
think the economy can withstand
further increases within a still historically low range of borrowing
rates.
The financial markets have been
edgy for weeks, and Powell’s backand-forth comments have been only
one factor. A sharp rise in wage
growth reported in the government’s January jobs report triggered
fears that higher labor costs would
lead to higher inflation and, ultimately, to higher interest rates.
Stocks sank on the news. But subsequent reports on wages and inflation have been milder, and the markets appear to have stabilized.
The February jobs report pointed
to an unusually robust labor market: Employers added 313,000 jobs,
the largest monthly gain in 1½
years. The unemployment rate remained at a 17-year low of 4.1 percent.
Other measures of the economy,
though, have been more sluggish.
Consumer spending, for example,
the economy’s primary fuel, has
slowed this year. Some analysts also
worry about the economic consequences of President Trump’s proposed tariffs on imports, which risk
triggering a trade war with other nations.
Under its new
chairman,
Jerome Powell,
the Federal
Reserve said it
expects to
increase rates
twice more this
year.
Interest rates are rising,
and consumers will feel it
uQUICK STUDY
Continued from Page B10
competition for scarce resources —
which pushes up prices.
By raising interest rates in a timely fashion, the Fed can ensure that
we don’t end up in that situation.
And Fed members have at least one
good reason to believe now is the
right time: Unemployment is approaching a 50-year low, suggesting
that one of our most precious resources might be getting dangerously scarce — namely, spare workers.
But there is an uncomfortable
burr in this theory. Right now, inflation is low, not high, and it shows little sign of climbing.
As of January, the Fed’s preferred
inflation measure — core PCE —
stood at 1.5 percent, far below the
official 2 percent target. Not to mention that 2 percent is supposed to be
an average, not a ceiling — meaning
that actual inflation should be above
that level half the time, something
that hasn’t happened in six years.
Herein lies the biggest risk in the
Fed’s effort to slow economic growth
by raising rates repeatedly this year
and another three times in 2019. By
definition, slower growth will mean
fewer new jobs and diminished
wage growth.
Nothing is written in stone,
though. Depending on what Fed
members see in the months ahead,
they could still adjust their plans.
They made this point explicit in a
statement released Wednesday, saying, “In determining the timing and
size of future adjustments to the target range for the federal funds rate,
the Committee will assess realized
and expected economic conditions
relative to its objectives of maximum employment and 2 percent inflation.”
But for the moment, their plan is
to push harder on the economic
IVAN KMIT/STOCK.ADOBE.COM
brakes — even at the cost of jobs and
overall growth.
Evan Horowitz digs through data
to find information that illuminates
the policy issues facing
Massachusetts and the nation.
He can be reached at
evan.horowitz@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @GlobeHorowitz.
Borrowing
money for
things like
home
improvements
may be about to
get more costly.
Excel’s Lexington nursing home to close
uNURSING HOMES
Continued from Page B10
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
Center owners announced in January that it would close “due to market conditions.”
In a 2016 financial statement,
the latest available, the facility reported an operating loss of $4.3
million to state officials. At the
same time it reported it paid about
$2.3 million in rental and management fees to co-owner Jeffrey Vegh.
An attorney representing the
company with labor negotiations
and a manager at Excel did not return calls for comment Wednesday.
Company officials could not be
reached for comment.
Zenith tried to sell the Lexington
facility last May, but the state Department of Public Health would
not approve a deal until the compa-
ny paid about $750,000 in nursing
home user fees it owned the state.
Unable to do so, the company announced in January it would close
the nursing home “with regret and
after much deliberation.”
State health officials said they
have begun withholding
MassHealth (the state’s Medicaid
program) payments from Excel,
and will continue to do so until the
debt is paid.
Tim Foley, acting executive vice
president at 1199SEIU United
Healthcare Workers East, said in a
statement Wednesday that Excel’s
closing is “deeply disappointing”
and accused Zenith of mismanagement.
“Now, because of that mismanagement, more than 100 hardworking caregivers and staff will lose
their jobs – likely with no severance
– and local families must find new
care options for their loved ones,”
Foley said. “This latest closing dramatically highlights once again why
we must demand greater oversight
of the nursing home industry.”
Most recently, Kindred Healthcare, a Louisville, Ky.-based company focused on patients recovering
from illness or injury, announced in
late 2017 it would shut down five
facilities in Massachusetts this year.
Other recent announced closures
include Heritage Nursing Care Center in Lowell and Vibra Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center of Western
Massachusetts in Springfield.
Katheleen Conti can be reached at
kconti@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @GlobeKConti.
State
health
officials
said they
have
begun
withholding MassHealth
payments
from
Excel.
B14
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“Go tell that girl in the yellow dress that her mom
doesn’t deserve Rick.”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
6
9
1
5
2
7
8
4
3
2
4
8
3
1
6
5
7
9
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
5
3
7
9
4
8
6
2
1
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
9
8
4
6
3
5
2
1
7
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
7
1
2
4
8
9
3
5
6
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
3
5
6
1
7
2
4
9
8
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
1
2
9
8
6
4
7
3
5
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
8
7
5
2
9
3
1
6
4
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
4
6
3
7
5
1
9
8
2
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
ZIPPY “Slices of Life” by Bill Griffith
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
A plugger never put a T-shirt on backward, until they
stopped sewing tags into the shirts.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
1 3
2 5
3 5 9
2
4 2
1
6
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
STICK THE LAND IN BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 League of nations
5 Gets jazzy vocally
10 PC maker
14 Stretched ride,
briefly
15 Word with
“firma”
16 Make the
wedding
17 Word from
T.D. Jakes
18 Nickel finish?
19 ___ through
(succeeded)
20 Oven-using duo
23 Like noble gases
24 Fixes typos
25 ___ by (complies
with)
28 “Who ___ has
this info?”
30 Like a prairie of
song
31 “Duck, duck”
follower
33 “Ah, I see!”
36 How some get
things done
40 Buzzing
commotion
41 “Austin Powers”
star
42 User-friendly
43 Be the first band
44 Involuntary
response
46 Soothing stuff
49 Kitchen lure
51 Like horrid
punishment
57 Man of Hannover
58 Lethal black snake
59 Like a fact
60 Female domestic
61 Even a tiny bit
62 Animated Ms.
Krabappel
63 Faux dairy
purchase
64 All muscled up
65 Trail mix
component
1
2
3
4
5
DOWN
Far from thrilling
Bean variety
Bad sign
Think over
Shoulder
warmers
6 Chest or closet
wood
7 “___ we all!”
8 Walked like a giant
9 Was a rat fink
10 Acquiesce
11 Cousin of a raccoon
12 Pismire relative
13 Movie holders
21 About 2 o’clock,
directionwise
22 Bring in for another
checkup
25 Actress Jessica
26 Harrelson on
“Cheers”
27 Bump ___ (meet)
28 Forever,
figuratively
29 Lucy in the sky with
diamonds
31 Late crooner
Campbell
32 Viking ship mover
33 Hygiene variety
34 Water sprinkler?
35 Endangered
antelope
37 Urge on
38 Yachter’s “yes”
39 Attach anew
43 Exceed the limits
44 ’80s White House
name
45 Bird Down Under
46 Joe ___ (average guy)
47 “It’s been ___
pleasure!”
48 Eagles owner Jeffrey
49 Don Draper,
for one
50 Russian mint
product
52 Latin love word
53 ’49 peacekeeping
alliance
54 Language in
Pakistan
55 Polly or Selma, e.g.
56 Edible meadows
9
8
8
6 9
9
3
7
6 8 5
1 2
7 1
B16
T h e
B o s t o n
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
G l o b e
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Gisele to share her
‘Lessons’ in book
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
Shandling memorialized in
documentary by Apatow
After Garry Shandling died two
years ago, his longtime friend Judd
Apatow went through e-mails he and
the comedian had recently shared.
Then he started bawling.
‘‘I realized that every single time I
asked him for anything or wanted him
to come to some event or to read
something for me, he said yes,’’ said
Apatow. ‘‘It really made me cry.’’
Shandling, a groundbreaking comedian not far from the neurotic characters he played, had dedicated his
last years to consciously encourage
and mentor his friends and fellow comedians but Apatow hadn’t realized
the extent of his generosity. ‘‘He had a
lot of conflicts with people but he was
also trying very hard to figure it all out
so he could do better,’’ he said. ‘‘He was
a complete, complex human being
with all the flaws and all the greatness
as anybody else in the world.’’
Apatow decided to memorialize his
friend in an appropriate way. Shandling, who masterminded a brand of
phony docudrama with ‘‘The Larry
Sanders Show,’’ is the subject of Apatow’s four-hour HBO documentary
‘‘The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling.’’
The film includes interviews with
James L. Brooks, Linda Doucett, David
Duchovny, Sacha Baron Cohen, Jay
Leno, Kevin Nealon, Conan O’Brien,
Bob Saget, Sarah Silverman, and Jeffrey Tambor. The documentary airs in
two parts on March 26 and 27.
While four hours sounds like a lot,
Apatow goes deep, drawing on 30
years of Shandling’s intimate diaries
and notes, childhood movies, stand-up
performances, and raw footage. Michael Cera reads the diary entries,
which show a man trying to quiet his
demons. ‘‘You are scared of awakening. Let go of that,’’ one entry reads.
‘‘It was very difficult to sit down
and read his diaries,’’ said Apatow. ‘‘It
was like living in Garry’s head for a
while. It was very emotional. I felt all
his pain and his joy.’’
‘‘The Larry Sanders Show’’ was the
forerunner to a new kind of painfully
awkward, authentic comedy that
would inspire “The Office,’’ “Curb Your
Enthusiasm,’’ “Arrested Development,’’
and a generation of comics.
Shandling had already made a
name for himself with the series “It’s
Garry Shandling’s Show,’’ in which the
actors routinely broke the fourth wall
to comment on what they were up to.
Apatow had a long history with
Shandling, interviewing the comic
when he was a high-school student doing a radio show on Long Island. He
went on to write for Shandling, direct
episodes of “The Larry Sanders Show’’
and considered his “Freaks and Geeks’’
a version of “The Larry Sanders Show,’’
only set in high school.
‘‘The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling’’ explores the development of his
hit shows and delves his childhood,
his tortured romance with Doucett,
his break with former manager Brad
Grey, and the time he became a target
of private eye Anthony Pellicano.
The film reveals that the death of
Shandling’s older brother from cystic
fibrosis when Shandling was 10 became a pivotal event, reverberating in
his relationship with his suddenly
clingy mother, his future love affairs,
and his quest for honesty.
‘‘When his brother died, his family
didn’t talk about it ever. That’s how
they dealt with it — by not talking
about it. And I think Garry became obsessed with presence and truth because he didn’t get that as this important moment,’’ said Apatow.
Shandling died of a heart attack at
age 66 in 2016. Apatow channeled
much of his grief into the documentary, which grew out of short films he
made for the memorial service.
‘‘Now that’s over I’m very sad because it’s like letting go of my relationship with Garry,’’ he said. (AP)
Spears models for Kenzo
Britney Spears has landed her first
high fashion modeling campaign as
the face of Paris-based Kenzo. The
singer, 36, said she had been waiting
for the ‘‘right fit and the right opportunity’’ to represent a luxury brand.
The campaign is for the denim-focused ‘‘Collection Memento No. 2’’
that Kenzo previewed last September.
The brand said celebrity photographer Peter Lindbergh ‘‘captured Britney in all her American dream glory
and beauty.’’ (AP)
Review
ROSALIE O’CONNOR/BOSTON BALLET
Boston Ballet sets Paris tour for April 2019
Ah, springtime in Paris: Boston Ballet has announced its
first tour to the City of Light. And when it performs April 911, 2019, at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées, the company
won’t be making just any debut, as it will perform the European premiere of a new work by the acclaimed choreographer William Forsythe. (Boston dance lovers get to see it
first, with the world premiere in the “Full on Forsythe” program in March 2019.)
Presented by Productions Internationales Albert Sarfati,
the Paris program will also include Forsythe’s rapid-fire
“Pas/Parts 2018,” now on view at the Boston Opera House,
and Jirí Kylián’s “Wings of Wax,” whose “languid, liquid dia-
logues” of dance were praised in the Globe last year.
The company, which will also branch out this summer in
performances with the New York Philharmonic at Lincoln
Center and the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Tanglewood,
has in the last dozen years toured abroad to England, Spain,
South Korea, and Finland.
Boston Ballet artistic director Mikko Nissinen is looking
forward to next year’s trans-Atlantic leap. “I’m thrilled to
present Boston Ballet to new audiences,” Nissinen said in a
statement. “Showcasing our Company’s artistry for the first
time in Paris is also a huge milestone for the Company, and
a dream come true for me.”
Tom Brady soon won’t be the only
published author in his family.
The Patriots QB’s supermodel
spouse, Gisele Bundchen, announced on Instagram Wednesday
that she’s got a
book of her
own on the
way.
Called “Lessons: My Path
to a Meaningful
Life,” it appears to be
a memoir of sorts that’ll include
“some of the experiences I have lived
through these past 37 years, what
I’ve learned, the values that guided
me and the tools that have helped
me become who I am.”
According to the publisher, Penguin Random House, the book will
trace Bundchen’s journey from a
modest home in southern Brazil,
where she shared a bedroom with
her five sisters and was bullied by
classmates, to her appearance at
18 in designer Alexander McQueen’s
runway show in London, an event
that launched her singularly successful career as a model.
“Lessons: My Path to a Meaningful Life” is due out Oct. 2. Brady,
meanwhile, has been making the
media rounds lately promoting his
book, “The TB12 Method: How to
Achieve a Lifetime of Sustained Peak
Performance,” appearing on “The
Late Show With Stephen Colbert”
and NPR’s “Wait Wait . . . Don’t Tell
Me!”
Marcus Smart hopes
for a fast comeback
Shrage tapped
for Brandeis post
Marcus Smart claims he’s the best
bowler on the Celtics, but the injured
guard couldn’t show off his skills at
Kings Dining & Entertainment the
other night.
Smart — who recently had surgery
for a torn ulnar collateral ligament in
his right thumb — arrived at the new
Seaport establishment cradling a
heavily wrapped hand and wrist. Although the 24-year-old said he was
disappointed he couldn’t participate
in the second annual Bowling Bash
for his YounGameChanger Foundation, he also seemed encouraged.
“Hand is doing well,” he said. “The
doctor said the surgery was a success.”
“I’m taking it day by day,” he continued. “There’s really no timetable.
I’m not trying to rush anything. As
bad as I want to be out there, I know
my teammates are going to play as
hard as they can. I know they’re
awaiting my return — whenever that
Barry Shrage, who led Combined
Jewish Philanthropies, the umbrella
group for Jewish institutions in
Greater Boston, is heading to Brandeis to become Professor of the Practice in the Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program.
Hailed by the university as “a powerful voice on the American Jewish
communal scene,” Shrage (inset) will
train and mentor students and help
further the Hornstein
program’s mission
to train future
Jewish professional leaders.
“Brandeis
was founded
70 years ago,
in 1948, by the
American Jewish community, the same year as the State of
Israel,” Brandeis president Ron Liebowitz said in a statement. “Barry is
a transformational leader. What he
achieved at CJP over 30 years is stunning. Not only did he raise $1 billion,
he also championed the next generation of Jewish leaders; promoted innovation and exchanges; and helped
to reinvigorate and lead one of the
most important Jewish communities
in America.”
Shrage announced his intention
to leave Combined Jewish Philanthropies last year. He’s credited with
more than doubling the annual budget of Jewish Boston’s philanthropic
arm from $24 million to $57 million.
The CJP board said his departure
was unrelated to criticism of a
$1.34 million onetime payment
made to Shrage in 2014 after the
board determined, on the advice of
an outside firm, that he’d been undercompensated for years.
The payout, first reported by The
Forward, was in addition to Shrage’s
$343,000 in base salary and
$220,000 in other compensation and
benefits in 2014.
In a statement Wednesday,
Shrage said he’s looking forward to
his new job at the university, which
is based in Waltham.
“Brandeis is a unique and very
special institution,” he said. “As President Liebowitz reasserts Brandeis’
role as a global center of scholarship
on Judaism, it is an honor to accept
this faculty appointment and to join
with others in advancing Brandeis as
a pre-eminent intellectual center for
the Jewish people and the world.”
CHRISTINE HURLEY
Marcus Smart (right) with Kings owner Patrick Lyons.
is. I’m just going to attack this rehab
process and try to come back as fast
as possible.”
The bowling bash drew a few boldfacers, including Walter McCarty, Da-
na Barros, Graeme Townshend, EMoney, DJ Pup Dog, former Miss
Massachusetts Julia Scaparotti, and
Kings owner Patrick Lyons.
(Nicole Yang, Boston.com)
Poehler hits his
stride as an actor
On “You Me Her,” actor Greg Poehler — yes, he’s the brother of Amy
Poehler — plays Jack, a suburban husband who cheats on his wife and then
embarks on a three-way romantic relationship with both women. The
third season of the romcom series on
AT&T Audience Network debuted
Tuesday, so we got Poehler — a Burlington native and BC grad who began
his professional career as a lawyer —
on the horn for a quick chat.
Q.Where does season 3 start?
A. It’s really about whether polyamorous relationships put a strain on a
marriage. I think any time there’s a
three-person relationship, perhaps
there’s someone feeling left out. I
think on our show that kind of switches from season to season.
Q. What did you learn about polyamory?
A. I didn’t know how common it was.
To me, that was the biggest surprise.
And since the show has started, we’ve
been approached by people who are in
these types of relationships, and especially among the younger generation I
think it’s something that’s really no
big deal. So that’s been an eye-opener
for me personally, and it’s been kind of
fun to, at least on television, be a flagbearer in that regard.
Q. What has been the reaction from
polyamorous viewers?
A. Most of them are just extremely
happy to be represented in some
mainstream form. I think on the
AT&T AUDIENCE NETWORK
Burlington native Greg Poehler plays a man who embarks on a threeway romantic relationship with his wife and mistress in “You Me Her.”
whole they have been pleased with
how we portray the characters on the
show. And really the characters and
those involved in polyamorous relationships are in many ways just like
any other relationship, where you
have love and jealousy and heartbreak. We’re just trying to portray it as
honestly as we can using characters
who never thought they’d be in this
situation.
Q. What has been difficult about portraying the character of Jack?
A. It was challenging for me to try to
play a character who cheats on his
wife in the first episode and still try to
make him likable. In season 2, Jack
becomes extremely jealous of the two
women’s relationship, and that also is
a somewhat unlikable trait. For me,
it’s been hard to find the right balance
between his flaws and yet portraying
him as a character that people root
for.
Q. What was the change like from lawyer to actor?
A. I started late in life — I was a lawyer
for 12 years before I started acting.
Both involve tons of acting [laughs].
It’s been an interesting transition, certainly. But now I have 50 episodes between this show and (the TV4 series)
“Welcome to Sweden” under my belt
as a lead actor, so I feel like I’m finally
an actor. I can start writing that on my
airport forms as “occupation” and not
feel guilty about it because I really feel
like I’m hitting my stride.
Globe correspondent Kaitlyn Locke
contributed. Read local celebrity
news at www.bostonglobe.com
/names. Names can be reached at
names@globe.com or at 617-9298253.
‘We conducted a thorough investigation into these allegations and found no evidence
of any wrongdoing.’ 20TH CENTURY FOX, on allegations that Fred Savage verbally harassed female crew members on the set of “The Grinder”
C2
T h e
Sports
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
How friendly will Fenway be to Martinez?
By Nick Cafardo
Red Sox 8, Rays 3
GLOBE STAFF
PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. —
Will Fenway Park be a help or
hindrance to J.D. Martinez?
Martinez,
RED SOX
who went 2 for
NOTEBOOK 4 with three
RBIs and
played right field in the Red
Sox’ 8-3 win over the Rays
Wednesday, has played a few
games at Fenway South, but
he’s not quite sure how it will
all play out at Fenway Park
during the season.
“On the fence with it,” Martinez said. “Most of my power
and strength is to the opposite
way, but I do hit balls to left
field. I’m going to see how it’s
going to be.
“Those fly balls to left may
go out, but the balls I hit to
right might be outs. I’m sure
there’s a tradeoff there. I’m not
going to change my approach
at all. I’m going to stick to what
got me here.”
Martinez, who is hitting
.276 this spring, liked coming
up with runners on base.
“It was good practice focusing on getting the guys in,” he
said.
He feels he has shrugged off
the late start after his delayed
signing, but he doesn’t feel he’s
quite where he wants to be.
“Now my body is starting to
feel better and getting used to
the grind thing,” he said. “Some
of those early at-bats kind of
beat me up. It’s getting there.
“The results were there [today] but I’m getting hits to the
left side and topspin liners. I
At Charlotte Sports Park, Port Charlotte, Fla.
BOSTON
ab r h bi TAMPA BAY ab r h bi
Holt 3b
3 2 2 1 Span lf
3 0 0 0
Rivera 3b
1 0 0 0 Snyder lf
1 1 1 2
Bradley Jr. cf 2 2 1 1 Kiermaier cf 2 0 0 0
Sturgeon cf 1 0 0 0 Field cf
2 0 0 0
Martinez rf
4 0 2 3 Gómez rf
2 0 1 0
Wshington rf 1 0 0 0 Coats rf
2 0 0 0
Moreland dh 4 0 0 0 Miller 1b
3 0 0 0
Ockmy ph-dh 1 0 0 0 Maris 1b
1 0 1 0
3 1 1 1
Bogaerts ss 3 0 0 0 Cron dh
De Jesús ss
1 0 0 0 Seibrt ph-dh 1 0 0 0
Swihart lf-1b 5 1 1 1 Wendle 2b
2 0 0 0
Travis 1b-lf
4 0 1 0 MJohnson 2b 2 0 0 0
3 0 1 0
Leon c
4 1 1 0 Ramos c
Marrero 2b
4 2 2 1 Duffy 3b
1 0 1 0
Robertson 3b 2 0 0 0
Hchvarria ss 2 1 0 0
Totals
38 8 10 7 Totals
32 3 6 3
Boston............................... 100 502 000 — 8 10 0
Tampa Bay....................... 000 100 020 — 3 6 3
E—Maris (1), Hechavarria (2), Ramos (1). 2B—
Holt (3), Bradley Jr. (4), Martinez (4), Leon (1),
Marrero (5). HR—Swihart (3), Snyder (1), Cron
(2). CS—Bradley Jr. (1).
Boston
IP H
R ER BB SO
Walden W 1-0
3
2
0
0
0
4
Elías
2
2
1
1
1
2
Poyner
2
0
0
0
0
3
Shawaryn
1
1
2
2
1
3
Jimenez
1
1
0
0
0
1
Tampa Bay
Yarbrough L 1-1
Hudson
Wright
Chirinos
Romo
Venters
Alvarado
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICE
MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
By virtue of and in execution of the Power of Sale
contained in a certain mortgage given by Veronica B. Bullock to Eastern Bank, dated May 17, 2004 and recorded
in Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 34546, Page
328 (the “Mortgage”) of which mortgage Ditech Financial
LLC f/k/a Green Tree Servicing LLC is the present holder
by assignment from Eastern Bank to ABN AMRO Mortgage
Group, Inc. dated June 1, 2006 recorded in Suffolk County
Registry of Deeds in Book 39769, Page 101 and assignment
from CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to ABN AMRO
Mortgage Group, Inc. to Green Tree Servicing LLC dated
September 16, 2014 recorded in Suffolk County Registry
of Deeds in Book 53521, Page 148, for breach of conditions
of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the
same, the mortgaged premises located at Unit No. 106, of
the St. James Estates Condominium, 66 Saint James Street,
Roxbury (Boston), MA 02119 will be sold at a Public Auction
at 11:00 AM on April 30, 2018, at the mortgaged premises,
more particularly described below, all and singular the
premises described in said mortgage, to wit:
Unit 106 in the St. James Estates Condominium created
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 183A,
by Master Deed dated December 6, 1989 and recorded
with the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds on December 20,
1989 as Instrument No. 339 in Book 16014, Page 185 (the
“Master Deed”) and managed and regulated by the Trustees of the St. lames Estates Condominium Trust under a
Declaration of Trust dated December 6, 1989 and recorded
in Book 16014, Page 144 (hereinafter sometimes referred
to as either the “Condominium Trust” or the “Declaration
of Trust”).
The Unit is shown on floor plans recorded simultaneously
with the Master Deed and also on a copy of the portion
of said plans attached to the Unit Deed first Conveyed by
the Declarant, St. James Estates Development Corporation
to which is affixed the verified statement of a registered
architect in the form required by Section 9 of said Chapter
183A.
The Unit is conveyed together with an undivided 0.35 percentage interest in the common areas in facilities of the
condominium as well as with the exclusive right to use the
garage space designated as Garage No. 202.
The Unit is further conveyed with the benefit of and subject
to all rights, easements, restrictions and other provisions
contained in the Master Deed and Declaration of Trust (as
both may be amended from time to time) as well as the
Rules and Regulations promulgated thereunder, the Unit
Deed and Chapter 1 83A of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
The Unit is further conveyed subject to the Declaration of
Affordable Housing Covenants recorded with said Suffolk
County Registry of Deeds at Book 16030 and Page 120 and
Amended and Restated Covenant for Affordable Housing
Deed Rider recorded herewith.
For title reference, see Deed of Boston Redevelopment Authority to Veronica B. Bullock recorded herewith.
For mortgagor’s title see deed recorded with the
Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 34546, Page 316.
The premises will be sold subject to the terms and
provisions of the covenant for Affordable Housing contained in the DEED Rider recorded as part of the Unit Deed
in Book 34546, Page 318.
The premises will be sold subject to any and all unpaid taxes and other municipal assessments and liens, and subject
to prior liens or other enforceable encumbrances of record
entitled to precedence over this mortgage, and subject to
and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, reservations and conditions of record and subject to all tenancies
and/or rights of parties in possession.
Terms of the Sale: Cash, cashier’s or certified check
in the sum of $5,000.00 as a deposit must be shown at the
time and place of the sale in order to qualify as a bidder
(the mortgage holder and its designee(s) are exempt from
this requirement); high bidder to sign written Memorandum of Sale upon acceptance of bid; balance of purchase
price payable in cash or by certified check in thirty (30)
days from the date of the sale at the offices of mortgagee’s
attorney, Korde & Associates, P.C., 900 Chelmsford Street,
Suite 3102, Lowell, MA 01851 or such other time as may be
designated by mortgagee. The description for the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event
of a typographical error in this publication.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Ditech Financial LLC f/k/a Green Tree Servicing LLC
Korde & Associates, P.C.
900 Chelmsford Street
Suite 3102
Lowell, MA 01851
(978) 256-1500
Bullock, Veronica B., 17-028588
AT&T Mobility, LLC is proposing to modify an existing
wireless
telecommunications facility on a building
located at 19 Myrtle Street,
Boston, Suffolk County, MA.
One antenna will be installed at a center height of
101 feet above ground level
on the 108-foot-tall building.
Any interested party wishing to submit comments
regarding the potential
effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by
sending such comments to:
Project 6118001387-KR c/o
EBI Consulting, 21 B Street,
Burlington, MA 01803 or via
telephone at (413) 281-4650
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know I’m not there when that
happens. When I’m hitting
balls up the middle and opposite way, I’m there.”
Playing defense is important to Martinez too. Manager
Alex Cora said he knows how
he’ll use Martinez defensively,
but he wouldn’t share his plan.
“We talked,” said Martinez.
“He told me I’m going to play
the outfield and he loves the
fact I can play outfield. I can
give those guys [Mookie Betts,
Jackie Bradley Jr., and Andrew
Benintendi] blows. One hundred and sixty-two games is almost a crime. To get them off
their legs is big.”
boston.com/classifieds
AT&T Mobility, LLC is proposing to modify an existing
wireless
telecommunications facility on the building
located at 200 High Street,
Boston, Suffolk County,
MA. Antennas will be installed at a center height of
93’ above ground level on
the rooftop of the 86’-10”
building. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed
facility may have on any historic property may do so by
sending such comments to:
Project 6118001390-KR c/o
EBI Consulting, 21 B Street,
Burlington, MA 01803 or
via telephone at (413) 2814650.
H
2
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PB—Ramos. Umpires—Home, Will Little; First,
Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Tim
Timmons. T—2:58. A—6,134.
notices
& more
LEGAL NOTICES
IP
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Boston’s
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The
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of
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Boston
Sunday
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LEGAL NOTICES
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
With his 100-m.p.h. stuff,
Joe Kelly could be used to
close a game in a pinch.
Mixing it up
Joe Kelly can really throw
the speed ball, but does he
throw it too much?
Kelly routinely gets up to
100 miles per hour, which is
impressive to watch. He’s expected to be a late-inning reliever, likely to close at times
when Craig Kimbrel has an off
day. Kelly is a free agent after
this season, and given the contracts late-inning relievers got
this offseason, it behooves him
to have a strong season.
Last year, Kelly battled a
hamstring strain, which caused
manager John Farrell to monitor his appearances and backto-back outings (he had only
10), and while Kelly thought
the workload was sufficient in
keeping him healthy and productive, he can expect an uptick from the 54 appearances
he made.
LEGAL NOTICES
MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE
By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained
in a certain Mortgage given by Miguel E. Montesino and
Michelle Montesino to Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans,
Inc., its successors and assigns, dated July 16, 2004 and
recorded with the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds at Book
35064, Page 48 subsequently assigned to Bank of America,
N.A. by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., acting solely as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc.
by assignment recorded in said Suffolk County Registry of
Deeds at Book 48996, Page 203, subsequently assigned to
Federal National Mortgage Association by Bank of America,
N.A. by assignment recorded in said Suffolk County Registry of Deeds at Book 50362, Page 249 and subsequently assigned to Federal National Mortgage Association by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for
Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. by assignment recorded in
said Suffolk County Registry of Deeds at Book 52238, Page
74; of which Mortgage the undersigned is the present holder for breach of the conditions of said Mortgage and for the
purpose of foreclosing same will be sold at Public Auction
at 3:00 PM on March 29, 2018 at 8 Shetland Street, Boston
(Roxbury), MA, all and singular the premises described in
said Mortgage, to wit:
The land in that part of Boston formerly Roxbury, with
buildings thereon, bounded ad described as follows: Southeasterly by Shetland Street,. formerly Sherwood Street,
thirty (30) feet; Southwesterly by land now or late of J.P.
Fenno, sixty (60) feet; Northwesterly by land now or late of
Brennan, thirty (30) feet; and Northeasterly by a passageway fifteen feet wide now or formerly known as Sherwood
Court, shown on a plan by C.H.W. Wood, Surveyor, dated
Boston, April 13, 1896, recorded with Suffolk Deeds, Book
2352, page 554. Together with the right to use sad Shetland
Street, and said passageway fifteen feet wide, in common
with other leaning rights therein for all the purposes for
which streets or ways are now or may hereafter be commonly used in the City of Boston. For title see deed at book
22974, page 087.
The premises are to be sold subject to and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, building and zoning laws,
liens, attorney’s fees and costs pursuant to M.G.L.Ch.183A,
unpaid taxes, tax titles, water bills, municipal liens and assessments, rights of tenants and parties in possession.
TERMS OF SALE:
A deposit of FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS AND 00 CENTS
($5,000.00) in the form of a certified check, bank treasurer’s check or money order will be required to be delivered
at or before the time the bid is offered. The successful bidder will be required to execute a Foreclosure Sale Agreement immediately after the close of the bidding. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid within thirty (30)
days from the sale date in the form of a certified check,
bank treasurer’s check or other check satisfactory to Mortgagee’s attorney. The Mortgagee reserves the right to bid
at the sale, to reject any and all bids, to continue the sale
and to amend the terms of the sale by written or oral announcement made before or during the foreclosure sale. If
the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the
sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid.
The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the
Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
The description of the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of an error in this publication. TIME WILL BE OF THE ESSENCE.
Other terms if any, to be announced at the sale.
Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae)
Present Holder of said Mortgage,
By Its Attorneys,
ORLANS PC
PO Box 540540
Waltham, MA 02454
Phone: (781) 790-7800
3/8, 3/15, 3/22/18
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
The Trial Court
Probate and Family Court
Department
SUFFOLK Division
Docket No. SU18P0440EA
Citation on Petition for
Formal Adjudication
Estate of Donald E. Sneed,
Jr.
Date of Death: 12/15/2017
To all interested persons:
A Petition for Formal Probate
of Will with Appointment of
Personal Representative has
been filed by Marlene Pryor
of Boston MA requesting that
the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such
other relief as requested in
the Petition. The Petitioner
requests that: Marlene Pryor
of Boston MA be appointed
as Personal Representative(s)
of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond in an
unsupervised administration.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
You have the right to obtain
a copy of the Petition from
the Petitioner or at the Court.
You have a right to object to
this proceeding. To do so, you
or your attorney must file a
written appearance and objection at this Court before
10:00 a.m. on the return day
of 04/24/2018. This is NOT a
hearing date, but a deadline
by which you must file a written appearance and objection
if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely
written appearance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty
(30) days of the return day,
action may be taken without
further notice to you.
UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE
MASSACHUSETTS UNIFORM
PROBATE CODE (MUPC)
A Personal Representative
appointed under the MUPC in
an unsupervised administration is not required to file an
inventory or annual accounts
with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the
administration directly from
the Personal Representative
and may petition the Court
in any matter relating to the
estate, including the distribution of assets and expenses
of administration.
WITNESS, Hon. Brian J. Dunn,
First Justice of this Court.
Date: March 12, 2018
Felix D. Arroyo
Register of Probate
ORDER OF NOTICE
Trial Court
of Massachusetts
The Superior Court
Worcester Country
Superior Court
225 Main Street
Worcester, MA 01608
Dennis P. McManus, Clerk
of Courts,
DOCKET NUMBER
1885CV0163-C
James Peltekis
Plaintiff
vs.
Chester M. Howe, Harris
A. Reynolds and Robert C.
Moore as Trustees of the
Moore Real Estate Trust
and/or The Beneficiaries of
the Moore Real Estate Trust
Defendants
RE: Chester M. Howe, Harris
A. Reynolds and Robert C.
Moore as Trustees of the
Moore Real Estate Trust
and/or The Beneficiaries of
the Moore Real Estate Trust
WHEREAS a civil action has
been begun against you
in our Superior Court by
James Peltekis, wherein
it is seeking TO: Quiet title
and to establish title to
certain Real Estate located at 97 Main Street,
Southborough, Worcester
County, Massachusetts.
We COMMAND YOU if you
intend to make any defense, that on 05/02/2018
or within such further time
as the law allows you do
cause your written pleading to be filed in the office
of the Clerk of Court named
above, in said Commonwealth, and further that you
defend against said suit according to law if you intend
any defense, and that you
do and receive what the
Court shall order and adjudge therein.
Hereof fail not, at your
peril, or as otherwise said
suit may be adjudged and
orders entered in your absence.
It appearing to this Court
that no personal service
of the Complaint has been
made on the defendant a
deputy sheriff having made
a return on the summons
that after diligent search
he can find no one upon
whom he can lawfully make
service, a copy of which is
hereto attached and made
part of this notice, it is ORDERED that notice of this
suit be given to them by
publishing, once a week for
three consecutive weeks,
the last publication to be
at least 20-days before said
return day in the:
Newspaper:
The Boston Globe
City/Town: Boston,
Massachusetts
CLERK OF COURTS/ASST.
CLERK Anne O’Connor
DATE ISSUED 03/14/2018
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF COMMUNITY
OUTREACH MEETING
REGARDING ADULT-USE
MARIJUANA
ESTABLISHMENT
MASS WELLSPRING
18 POWDERMILL RD,
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS
Notice is hereby given that
Mass Wellspring, Inc. (or its
successor Mass Wellspring
LLC) (the “Applicant”) of 18
Powdermill
Road, Acton,
Massachusetts, will conduct
a Community Outreach Meeting on the following matter at
10:00 A.M. on March 29th,
2018 in the Mass Wellspring
Lobby at
18 Powdermill
Road, Acton, Massachusetts
. The Applicant intends to
apply for one or more of
the following Medical and
Adult-use Marijuana Establishment licenses: Marijuana
Cultivator; Marijuana Product
Manufacturer; Marijuana Research Facility, and Marijuana
Retailer at 18 Powdermill
Rd. in Acton, Massachusetts
pursuant to M.G.L. Ch. 94G
and Chapter 55 of the Acts of
2017, other applicable laws
and regulations promulgated
thereunder, including those
promulgated thereunder by
the Massachusetts Cannabis
Control Commission.
Information presented at the
community outreach hearing will include, but not be
limited to:
1. The type(s) of Adult-use
Marijuana Establishment to
be located at the proposed
address;
2. Information adequate to
demonstrate that the Adultuse Marijuana Establishment
location will be maintained
securely;
3. Steps to be taken by the
Adult-use Marijuana Establishment to prevent diversion
to minors;
4. A plan by the Marijuana
Establishment to positively
impact the community;
5. Information adequate to
demonstrate that the location will not constitute a
nuisance to the community
by noise, odor, dust, glare,
fumes, vibration, heat, glare,
or other conditions likely to
cause nuisance.
Community members will be
permitted and are encouraged to ask questions and
receive answers from representatives of the Applicant.
A copy of this notice is on file
with the Town Clerk, at the
Board of Selectmen’s office,
and the Planning Board office, all located at the Acton
Town Hall, 472 Main Street,
Acton, MA, and a copy of
this Notice was mailed at
least seven calendar days
prior to the community outreach meeting to abutters
of the proposed address of
the Marijuana Establishment,
owners of land directly opposite on any public or private
street or way, and abutters
to the abutters within three
hundred feet of the property
line of the petitioner as they
appear on the most recent
applicable tax list, notwithstanding that the land of any
such owner is located in another city or town.
Mass Wellspring, Inc.
Dr. Stefanie Lipton
President & CEO
Legal NoticePublic Auction
By the virtue of the right
granted by statute 210, section 7 of the Massachusetts
Uniform Commercial Code
(Warehouseman’s Lien), and
all other rights, for the purpose of satisfying the lien of
Gentle Giant Moving Co. Inc.
for storage and other expenses, will be sold at public auction at 1 Burlington
Avenue, Wilmington, MA on
Saturday March 24th, 2018
at 10:00 A.M, all and singular the household furniture
and furnishings and office
furniture of:
John Alibrandi
Gloria Brown
Michael Butts
Carlton Cabot
Elizabeth Corcoran
Victor Costa
Julia Davis
Bob Delpauzo
Carol Dillon
Andrea Dow
Haj Enjoji
Jane Jamet
Homer Lewis
Brinck Lowery
Carol Mc Carthy
Anita McClellan
Patricia Mucci
George Norsig
Gearald Seaward
Christine Semeneko
Dan Silver
Deborah Smith
Jane Stedman
Jeffrey Thomas
Marcia Vincent
Karen Walkey
Included are beds, bureaus,
chests, chairs, tables, tv’s sofas, rugs, appliances, etc.
Gentle Giant Moving Co. Inc.
29 Harding Street
Somerville, MA 02143
Experience Globe.com
Cora believes that changes
Kelly made late last season
should work entering this season.
“There wasn’t a mix in the
first half of the season,” said
Cora, basing his opinion on
feedback he received. “It was a
lot of fastballs. The second half
he started to mix it up and the
strikeout rate went up. That’s
why he was working more on
breaking balls and changeups.
“The hundred is going to be
there. It just matters where he
uses it. I think he’ll be fine.
He’ll get more swings and
misses this year.”
Kelly said he’s not concerned that his high velocity
will bring on arm problems.
“You’re not doing it for 100
pitches,” he said. “If you take
care of your body, you should
be fine.”
As for impending free agency, Kelly said, “I hope I can be
here. I hope Craig can be here.
We have a nasty bullpen and it
would be great to bring it all
back.”
Kelly does have aspirations
of being a closer, but “not as
long as Craig is here.”
And he does look forward to
free agency because “every
player loves to get to that
point.”
Ready or not
Cora tried handicapping the
possibilities of his pitchers who
are coming off injuries being
available for the first week of
the season.
He had Eduardo Rodriguez
at the top of the list, with the
possibility that he could start
the fourth game of the season
at Tampa Bay.
“The plan is for Eduardo to
get on the mound for three innings in three days and go from
there; so far, so good,” said Cora. “He’s putting himself in a
position we may use him sooner rather than later.
“Calendar-wise it works for
us. I’m not saying he’ll be available that first week or the second one, but the way it’s
mapped out, there’s a chance.
If it happens, it would be in
Tampa, but it’s less than 50
percent. Schedule-wise we set
it up, and if he pushes himself,
Spring training report
SCORE: Red Sox 8, Rays 3
RECORD: 17-8-1
BREAKDOWN: Alex Cora described it as a fun day as the Red Sox had
10 hits, six for extra bases. They broke it open with five runs in the
fourth inning, which featured a lefthanded home run by Blake Swihart, a
two-run double by J.D. Martinez, and RBI singles by Deven Marrero and
Brock Holt.
THUMBS UP: Martinez had two hits and three RBIs. Holt also had two
hits as the leadoff man/third baseman. Marrero, competing for the final
utility spot, had a pair of hits. Starter Marcus Walden pitched three
scoreless innings, allowing just two hits with four strikeouts. Lefty Bobby Poyner went two scoreless innings with three strikeouts.
THUMBS DOWN: Roenis Elias allowed a long home run to C.J. Cron, but
the Red Sox didn’t do a whole lot wrong. Mitch Moreland went 0 for 4
and Xander Bogaerts went 0 for 3.
MEDICAL REPORT: All’s well.
AROUND THE BASES: NESN analyst Jerry Remy, who has been around
the team since the beginning of March, will make his return to the
broadcast booth Thursday. Remy has been building up his strength and
is excited about the restart. “It’s something I’ve been looking forward to
for some time,” he said . . . The Red Sox were 5 for 9 with runners in
scoring position . . . The game was played in 2:58 before 6,134 at
Charlotte Sports Park.
NEXT GAME: Thursday vs. Baltimore at Sarasota. Hector Velazquez opposes Mike Wright at 1:05 p.m. The game will be on Channel 25 and
WEEI-AM 850.
NICK CAFARDO
we may be in the position to
use him.”
Cora said Steven Wright’s
chances of being ready are 5050. Wright will pitch four innings Thursday. For Cora, the
biggest test is not the pitching
day, but the day after, to see
how Wright’s repaired left knee
is reacting.
The long shot is Drew Pomeranz, who will pitch two innings Friday in a minor league
game. He’s further away from
being ready, in Cora’s estimation.
Person of interest
Cora was amused by the interest his staff had in Larry Bird
visiting JetBlue Park this week.
Cora didn’t get to meet Bird.
“No, but I saw a lot of people
up there [in the suite],” the
manager said. “We’ll talk about
it in a few days. Trainers were
up there, clubbies, must be
nice. That’s cool. We have kangaroo court. We’ll take care of
that one. And actually, I wasn’t
the one that noticed it. The
people above me noticed. I was
meeting with the president of
baseball operations after the
game. He pointed it out afterward.” . . . Tyler Thornburg’s
methodical comeback from
thoracic outlet syndrome sur-
gery keeps taking positive
turns. He had a good bullpen
session Wednesday, and will
have another Saturday. Thornburg will remain here when the
team starts the regular season.
No hurrying
Cora said he wasn’t sure
whether Dustin Pedroia would
be with the team for the opening series in Tampa, but “the
closer he is to me, the better.”
What Cora meant was that he
could keep his eye on Pedroia’s
rehab so the veteran second
baseman doesn’t try to rush
back and risk a setback after
knee surgery . . . Kimbrel is expected to see game action early
next week against the Cubs . . .
Cora said Bobby Poyner is still
in the mix for a bullpen
lefthander spot despite pitching only as high as Single A last
season. Cora’s prerequisite is
for a lefty to be able to pitch to
righthanded batters, and he
thinks Poyner can do that. Robby Scott also remains in the
picture, and Tommy Layne was
signed to a minor league deal a
couple of weeks ago and
pitched in Wednesday’s game.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
Holt looks to hold position
uON BASEBALL
Continued from Page C1
bench pieces. One will be Sandy
Leon, the backup catcher. Another will be Blake Swihart, a
switch-hitting multi-positional
player who can catch. And another will be Mitch Moreland,
the backup first baseman.
With Eduardo Nunez likely
to be a starter at second base
until Dustin Pedroia comes off
the disabled list, that leaves Deven Marrero, Tzu-Wei Lin, and
Holt likely up for that last spot.
Holt, who does have minor
league options remaining,
should make it, given his past
role. But Marrero is out of options and offers solid defense at
shortstop and third base. Lin
also has options.
“I don’ t feel like I’m in a
competition,” Holt said. “I
know that there are some guys
without options. I feel I’ve
come into camp healthy and
strong and I’ve proved myself.
“I know a lot of people questioned the last couple of years
about what I did as a player, but
I was jacked up. I think a lot of
people forget that.
“The two years prior, when I
was healthy, I proved that I
could help us win and be a productive player and I feel I am
that player. I feel as good as I’ve
felt in a long time, and that’s
encouraging to come into camp
and feel that way.
“I feel I’ve had a good
spring. I’ ve proved myself
again. That’s something I’ve
had to do my entire career.
Prove, prove, prove. I feel like
I’m always doubted a little bit,
but that’s the way it’s been my
whole life, so nothing has
changed.”
We’ve seen enough concussions to know what they can do
to an athlete. Holt suffered
from the effects all last year.
“Last year, once I came back,
I still didn’t feel normal,” he
said. “I didn’t start feeling like
myself probably until the end of
the season. By that time, your
numbers are what they are, and
I wasn’t getting a whole lot of
opportunities to play.
“You miss as much time as I
did and then you come back,
you’re basically in spring training again. And you’re not getting at-bats and it’s hard to get
going.”
Holt, 29, hit a career-low
.200 in 140 at-bats. He could
never get untracked. He felt
completely out of synch. The
explosiveness was gone from
his game.
But now, some extra weight
he put on has made him feel
stronger, and it also helped that
he found the right post-concussion medication.
“I started feeling good mentally and physically at the end
of last year,” he said. “I carried
that over into this spring. That’s
a big thing for me is to stay positive through it all and feeling
good. If I do those two things, I
know I can be the player I’m
used to being.
“I know I wasn’t that player
last year, but I know what I’m
capable of doing.”
Ben Zobrist was once the
utility player teams were trying
to replicate. But as Holt received more notice and made
the All-Star team, it became the
Holt model that teams wanted.
“I wouldn’t say I started it,”
said Holt. “Zobrist was doing it.
Josh Harrison was doing it. For
me, it was what I had to do to
stay on the roster. I came up in
’14 and I was kind of an infielder and playing well. They asked
me to try out different positions. Mine was kind of on the
fly.
“I played first base for the
first time in the big leagues and
outfield first time. I enjoyed doing it. I was getting a chance to
play. It’s easier to be successful
in that role when you’re getting
those consistent at-bats and
reps in the field.
“When you’re not playing as
much, it’s more difficult not only offensively but defensively. It
makes it a little tougher. You aren’t in the rhythm of the game,
not seeing balls off the bat as
much.
“Now you see teams trying
to turn guys into players like
me. It helps the roster out, the
manager out.”
Holt listed his positions of
comfort, in order.
“Second base is my most
comfortable position because
I’ve played there my whole life,”
he said. “That’s the one position
where if I don’t play there for a
while and I show up, I’m not,
like, out of place. I feel good at
shortstop, and that’s up there
because I’ve played there most
of my life.
“I’ve gotten more comfortable in the outfield. Not to take
anything away from outfielders, but it’s a little bit easier
than the infield.”
First base is also a position
he can adapt to. But the least
comfor table is third base,
where he started Wednesday
against the Rays.
“The more chances I get to
play there, the better I do,” Holt
said. “I don’t get over there as
much. Third base is a reactiontype position. Middle infield is
more of a comfort level for me.”
Red Sox manager Alex Cora
was in Holt’s position many
times as a utility player. Some
years he was safe, other years
he wasn’t. He knows what utility players go through.
“ You just play, you don’ t
think about it,” Cora said. “You
can’t let that control who you
are as a player.
“He’s been great. He played
very well at shortstop [Tuesday]. He’s put together good atbats. He’s a good baserunner. In
this situation, you just have to
play and control what you can
control.”
Often easier said than done.
On a deep team, maybe the
final roster spots aren’t a big
deal. But they can be.
When Holt was on his game,
he was the Brock Star.
And he wants, more than
anything, to be that again.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
C3
Sports
Porcello’s passions:
pitching and catching
uPORCELLO
Continued from Page C1
pen season with Derek Lowe,
who won every clinching game
of the curse-breaking 2004 Red
Sox postseason. Porcello invited
him to camp as a sinkerball tutor.
Lowe is impressed with him.
“He just loves to learn, and
everyone tells me he’s just a
Grade A perfect teammate,”
says Lowe.
With new manager Alex Cora’s philosophy of do-yourwork-and-don’t-burn-out, Porcello goes fishing to relax in the
afternoon.
There are some ponds behind the practice field at JetBlue Park, but Porcello ignores
them.
“I fished them for a little bit,
and then a giant snake came
out and that was it for me,” he
says.
So he jumps in his pickup,
and 35 minutes later he’s in
paradise off Sanibel Island.
This is one of his three favorite spots on earth to fish.
The others are the Green
Mountains of Vermont and the
rainforest streams of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington
state.
For more than two glorious
hours, he patrols the waters
among three piers, sporting a
full beard, salt-stained cap, flyfishing T-shirt, shorts, and
comfy sandals that he wears in
the water.
He’s not alone. There are
thousands of baitfish very close
to shore. They dance out of Porcello’s way like tiny synchronized swimmers. There’s also a
dolphin gorging himself at the
end of one pier and a divebombing pelican. Porcello ignores them, but unfortunately
the snook also ignore him.
“They are running circles
around me,” says Porcello, who
has a little Mark Fidrych in
him. The Bird was famous for
talking to the ball on the
mound; Porcello talks to the
fish in the water.
“When I’m not catching
them I do,” he says.
STAN GROSSFELD /GLOBE STAFF
The snook that Rick Porcello went casting for like to hide out near the piers around Sanibel Island and attack baitfish, so he hunts for them there.
No excuses
Porcello, 29, has baseball in
his blood. His maternal grandfather, Sam Dente, started with
the Red Sox in 1947 and played
shortstop for the Indians in the
1954 World Series game, where
Willie Mays made “The Catch.”
Porcello has been catching
trout with his father and two
brothers since he fished the
streams near Morristown, N.J.,
when he was just 7. But after
seeing Robert Redford’s “A River Runs Through It,” he got a
fly rod for Christmas and was
hooked.
“Yeah, it’s bad,” he says. “It’s
a problem. It’s all that I think
about besides baseball. It just
fascinates me. The different approaches to present the fly. I’m
very passionate about it.”
He offers zero excuses for
last season’s 17 losses (against
11 wins) and 38 home runs allowed, which led the league. He
pitched over 200 innings, and
in 10 of his losses the Red Sox
COURTESY RICK PORCELLO
Porcello and his brother caught an elusive brown spotted
trout near the family home in Vermont a while ago.
didn’t score a run when he
pitched.
“I never gave up,” says the
nine-year veteran.
He never gives up in the water either. After hundreds of
casts, Porcello gets a hit. His
pole bends almost to the water,
but the fish shakes loose.
Don’t compare him to Ted
Williams, who is in the baseball
Hall of Fame and two fishing
halls of fame.
“I have so much respect for
him,” says Porcello. “It’s like I
can’t even fathom putting my
name in the same sentence as
Ted Williams.”
Porcello has made pilgrimages to both Cooperstown, N.Y.,
and the American Museum of
Fly Fishing in Manchester, Vt.,
which has Williams’s fishing
memorabilia on display.
“Releasing a great fish,” the
Splendid Splinter once said, “is
about the greatest thrill I get
from fishing.”
Porcello says he never keeps
any of the fish he catches, even
the big ones.
“Why would I kill something that brings me so much
enjoyment and pleasure?” he
says.
Today, the big ones got away.
“They got us,” says Porcello,
who caught only three fish, including a feisty skipjack, which
has razor-sharp spikes on its
dorsal fin.
These ones didn’t get away
During the annual All-Star
break, Porcello can sometimes
be found floating down a river
near the family home in southern Vermont, fly-fishing for
Porcello on
fly fishing:
trout with his brother and
friends.
They always catch a lot of
rainbow trout but not the big
spotted brown trout that are
20-plus inches long.
“They’re smart,” says Porcello. “There’s a reason why
they’re big. It’s because they
don’t fall for the old tricks.”
But one year Porcello was
rowing when his brother tossed
his wooly bugger fly near a pool
that was sheltered by a log.
“I see his rod just go boom,
boom,” says Porcello. “He goes,
‘Rick, it’s one of those huge [expletive] browns.’ So I start frantically rowing because we are
about to go down the chute and
get washed away.”
Porcello, who was barefoot,
and his brother jumped out of
the raft, dodged boulders, and
captured the fish.
“I dip the net in, and it was
the fish of a lifetime,” says Porcello. “A fish that we’ve been
going after for 10 years. It was
just incredible.”
Then there was the time
Porcello was lost in the Olympic Peninsula in Washington
state for 3½ hours after alleg-
edly getting bad directions
from a fisherman wearing a
Seattle Mariners cap. He and
his buddies had no cellphone
service. They came to a fork in
the woods and literally flipped
a coin to decide which way to
go.
The going was tough. Once
Porcello slipped on a wet log
and landed like a cowboy on a
saddle, nearly tumbling into a
12-foot ditch.
Finally they found a beautiful stream in the forest, and
with daylight waning, Porcello’s last cast was a beauty.
“I just get this rip, and the
rod almost gets ripped out of
my hands,” he says. “I set the
hook. It’s this beautiful steelhead. To this day, it’s probably
my favorite fish I’ve ever
caught and probably one of my
favorite places I’ve ever fished.”
Once when Porcello was
with the Tigers, he sneaked out
through the underground
parking garage of a Boston hotel at 5 a.m. to go fly-fishing for
stripers on the waters of the
North Shore — not far from
the secret fishing location of
the great Carl Yastrzemski.
“I had already pitched [in
the series], so I wasn’t concerned, but I just didn’t want
my teammates or my manager
thinking I’m not focused,” he
says.
“But this was one of those
things where I’d never caught
a striper on the fly. They were
in and I had to go. We caught
some really big ones. I was
back at the ballpark before
anybody even got there and so
nobody knew.’’
He says last season was like
today’s fishing: disappointing.
“I was completely healthy,”
he says.
So was it psychological?
“It’s never just one major
thing,” he says. “It was a combination of maybe being a little off and leaving a couple of
pitches up. You get whacked
around and then all of a sudden you’re thinking about it
because you just got whacked
around.
“The human mind, I mean,
it’s going to have an effect on
you.”
Stan Grossfeld can be reached
at grossfeld@globe.com.
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“It’s all that I
think about
besides
baseball. It just
fascinates me.
The different
approaches to
present the fly.
I’m very
passionate
about it.”
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C4
T h e
Sports
Sound advice
from George
He knows what
Hayward is feeling
By Gary Washburn
GLOBE STAFF
Paul George acknowledges the
bond he has with Gordon Hayward. Both sustained serious leg
injuries during
CELTICS
games, and
NOTEBOOK George endured
and completed
the comeback road Hayward is
currently traveling.
Hayward fractured his left tibia and dislocated his left ankle after landing awkwardly in the first
quarter of the Oct. 17 season
opener. In August 2014 while
playing an exhibition game for
Team USA in Las Vegas, George
broke his right tibia and fibula
when he hit the basket stanchion, and missed nearly a full
season. George reached out to
Hayward soon after the Celtic’s
injury and they have maintained
a friendship, with George offering advice about rehabilitation.
“I’ve been in touch with him
through text and kind of been
watching him from afar,” said
George, who was in town Tuesday night with the Thunder.
“Early on I was around him more
so, sending him messages and
talking to him. At this point, it
looks like he’s doing really well,
just watching him and now he’s
shooting and doing on-court
stuff.
“I mean, the biggest thing was
to let him know what obstacles
he was going to face. I think it
helped a bit, just giving him a
heads-up of what to expect. But
yeah, he’s doing a lot better. Even
at this point, he doesn’t need me
to give him encouraging words.
He knows I’ve got his back.”
Hayward is nearly completed
with rehabilitation through the
Alter-G treadmill, but he has not
begun basketball activities besides just taking jumpers. The
Celtics maintain he won’t return
this season.
“That’s one of the biggest
things I told him, is I know it’s
going to be frustrating, like you
feel like you’re about to turn that
corner and then you’re going to
have some setbacks,” George
said. “That’s part of it. Sometimes it’s going to be sore, sometimes it’s going to feel like you
should have done [this exercise].
It’s part of the process. You’ve got
to build confidence, you’ve got to
trust that leg all over again.
“But I told him there was going to be some good days and
some bad days.”
George played six games in
April 2015, nearly nine months
after the injury, and then played
81 games the next season.
way contract who is back after
missing nearly two months with
back spasms.
Bird, the 56th overall pick last
June, was a pleasant surprise in
training camp, so much so that
he played 14 minutes in the Celtics’ 102-92 win over the 76ers on
Oct. 20, their first victory of the
season. Bird played three minutes in the Celtics’ next game and
then headed to the G-League.
Bird would have been up earlier with the Celtics but he was injured during the G-League showcase, aggravating a back injury
that plagued him during his college career at Cal. Bird has taken
the past several weeks to
strengthen the back, and he is
now healthy.
The good news for the Celtics
is that since he missed so much
time, he isn’t close to exhausting
the 45-day limit with Boston
that’s a condition of his two-way
contract.
Bird returned to action with
three minutes in the waning moments of Sunday’s loss to the Pelicans, and he gives the Celtics another body to use while players
such as Kyrie Irving, Jaylen
Brown, and Marcus Smart recover from injuries.
“I’ve just got to stay ready,” he
said. “At this part of the year
there’s a lot of injuries. Being a
rookie, you just never know
when you’re going to get your
number called, so my main thing
is staying locked in at every given
moment and if Brad [Stevens]
calls my name, I’ll be ready to
go.”
Missed calls
Bird watch
According to the last-two-minute report released by the NBA,
which details the officiating in
the final two minutes of close
games, the Celtics benefited from
three non-calls in Tuesday’s 10099 comeback win. Two of the
three offenses were committed by
Marcus Morris before his hit the
winning 3-pointer with 1.2 seconds left.
The league ruled Morris
should have been called for a
five-second call inbounding the
ball with 7.7 seconds left before
he found Al Horford with a
bounce pass.
Horford then passed to Jayson
Tatum, who found Morris for the
3-pointer. The league also ruled
that Morris moved his pivot foot
before dribbling and should have
been called for traveling on the
winning shot.
And with 1:47 remaining, the
NBA ruled that Celtics guard Terry Rozier should have been called
for traveling as he moved his pivot foot before making driving to
the basket. Rozier eventually
dribbled and then found Greg
Monroe for a jumper to slice
Oklahoma City’s lead to 93-89.
With the Celtics decimated by
injuries, they need all the healthy
bodies they can use. And one of
those healthy players — finally —
is Jabari Bird, a rookie on a two-
Gary Washburn can be reached
at gwashburn@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter
@GwashburnGlobe.
FILE/SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thunder star Paul George suffered a serious leg injury in 2014.
B o s t o n
G l o b e
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
p-Toronto
p-BOSTON
Cleveland
Indiana
*Washington
Philadelphia
Miami
Milwaukee
W
53
48
42
41
40
40
39
37
L
19
23
29
30
30
30
33
33
Pct. GB Streak Home
.736 —
L1
29-6
.676
4½
W 1 24-13
.592 10½
W 3 24-11
.577 11½
W 1 24-13
.571 12
W 2 20-15
.571 12
W 4 23-11
.542 14
W 3 22-13
.529 15
L 1 22-14
Conf.
35-9
30-15
30-14
30-18
26-18
25-18
26-18
23-23
Detroit
Charlotte
New York
Chicago
Brooklyn
Orlando
Atlanta
32
30
26
24
23
21
21
39
41
46
46
48
50
50
.451
.423
.361
.343
.324
.296
.296
21-14
19-17
18-17
15-20
14-23
14-20
15-22
19-26
18-25
14-29
18-24
14-27
13-30
9-36
20½
22½
27
28
29½
31½
31½
W2
L2
L1
L2
W2
L2
W1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
d-Houston
d-Golden State
Portland
Oklahoma City
New Orleans
*San Antonio
Minnesota
Utah
W
57
53
44
43
41
41
41
40
L
14
18
27
30
30
30
31
31
Pct. GB Streak Home
.803 —
W6
27-6
.746
4
L1
27-8
.620 13
L 1 25-12
.589 15
L 1 25-11
.577 16
W 2 20-15
.577 16
W4
27-8
.569 16½
W1
27-9
.563 17
L 1 24-12
Conf.
37-8
30-15
26-16
25-20
21-22
24-20
30-15
26-16
Denver
LA Clippers
LA Lakers
Sacramento
Dallas
Memphis
Phoenix
38
37
31
23
22
19
19
33
33
39
49
49
52
53
.535
.529
.443
.319
.310
.268
.264
24-23
22-23
15-27
11-34
12-34
16-27
13-32
19
19½
25½
34½
35
38
38½
L2
L4
L3
L2
L3
L2
L9
27-10
20-15
18-16
12-23
14-22
14-23
9-27
* — Not including late game
d — Clinched division
p — Clinched playoff berth
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
The three division champions in each conference, plus the next five
teams with the best records, qualify. Seeding is based solely on record.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
At Cleveland 132
Toronto 129
Denver 135
at Chicago 102
At Philadelphia 119 Memphis 105
LA Clippers 127 at Milwaukee 120
At Miami 119
New York 98
At New Orleans 96
Charlotte 111
at Brooklyn 105
Washington
Indiana 92
at San Antonio
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Philadelphia at Orlando
7
Detroit at Houston
Memphis at Charlotte
7
Utah at Dallas
8
Atlanta at Sacramento
LA Lakers at New Orleans
8
8:30
10
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
At BOSTON 100
Toronto 93
At New Orleans 115
Okla. City 99
Atlanta 99
at Orlando 86
Detroit 115
Dallas 105
Houston 115
at Utah 94
at Phoenix 88
at Portland 111
At Minnesota 123 LA Clippers 109
CAVS 132, RAPTORS 129
TORONTO
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T
Annoby . 15 2-4 0-0 0-0
Ibaka..... 23 2-8 2-2 0-4
Vlncnas. 20 6-6 2-3 2-8
DeRzan . 35 6-15 9-10 1-3
Lowry.... 33 7-10 4-4 0-4
Powell... 10 2-3 0-0 0-1
Siakam.. 26 4-9 0-0 0-2
Poeltl..... 27 8-13 1-2 7-8
VnVleet. 29 6-13 0-0 0-1
Wright... 21 4-6 2-2 0-2
Totals .... 47-87 20-23 10-33
A
1
2
2
5
7
0
4
1
5
5
32
F Pt
3 5
4 6
1 15
3 21
4 24
1 4
3 9
2 17
2 16
0 12
23 129
FG%: .540, FT%: .870. 3-pt. goals: 1534, .441 (Anunoby 1-1, Ibaka 0-4, Valanciunas 1-1, DeRozan 0-3, Lowry 6-9,
Powell 0-1, Siakam 1-3, VanVleet 4-9,
Wright 2-3). Blocks: 5 (Valanciunas,
Siakam, Poeltl, Wright 2). Turnovers: 7
(Anunoby, Ibaka, Valanciunas, DeRozan, Powell, Poeltl 2). Steals: 4 (Poeltl,
VanVleet 3).
CLEVELAND
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T A F Pt
Green .... 38 4-9 5-6 0-2 1 5 15
James.... 39 11-19 12-14 1-7 17 2 35
Love ...... 30 8-15 3-4 1-12 4 1 23
Caldrón. 27 5-7 0-0 0-1 4 2 14
Hill ......... 36 10-11 0-0 0-3 0 4 22
Zizic....... 16 2-3 2-2 0-1 0 0 6
Smith .... 27 4-6 0-0 1-5 1 2 10
Clrkson . 21 2-7 0-0 0-0 1 2 4
Holland ... 6 1-1 1-2 1-1 0 0 3
Totals .... 47-78 23-28 4-32 28 18 132
FG%: .603, FT%: .821. 3-pt. goals: 1524, .625 (Green 2-4, James 1-3, Love 4-6,
Calderón 4-4, Hill 2-2, Smith 2-3, Clarkson 0-2). Blocks: 3 (Green, Hill, Smith).
Turnovers: 9 (Green, Love, Calderón 2,
Hill 2, Zizic, Smith, Clarkson). Steals: 4
(James, Love, Hill 2).
Toronto .................38 41 20 30 — 129
Cleveland..............42 22 34 34 — 132
A — 20,562 (20,562). T — 2:23.
76ERS 119, GRIZZLIES 105
MEMPHIS
FT Reb
FG
Min M-A M-A O-T
Martin... 25 1-7 6-8 1-5
Green .... 27 5-10 3-4 1-7
Gasol..... 25 2-8 0-0 0-6
Hrrison.. 16 1-4 0-0 1-1
Brooks .. 22 6-9 1-2 0-0
Weber... 23 1-5 0-0 1-1
Selden... 22 5-12 5-5 1-2
Parsons 17 1-6 0-0 0-2
Davis ..... 21 8-14 0-0 5-11
McLmre 13 2-10 0-0 3-4
Chlmers 20 4-8 0-0 0-4
Johnson 11 4-6 1-1 2-4
Totals .... 40-99 16-20 15-47
HEAT 119, KNICKS 98
NEW YORK
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T
Hrdawy 32 5-15 1-1 3-3
Beasley. 34 10-15 0-0 1-7
Kanter... 31 8-13 7-9 7-13
Lee......... 20 2-7 0-0 0-1
Mudiay . 28 3-10 2-2 0-4
Dotson .. 12 1-5 0-0 0-1
Ntilikina 20 1-5 0-0 0-0
Wllims... 10 0-1 0-0 1-3
Hicks ..... 14 0-3 0-0 0-0
OQuinn . 14 3-4 0-0 0-1
Burke .... 26 6-11 0-0 1-7
Totals .... 39-89 10-12 13-40
A
1
3
3
3
4
1
2
0
0
2
2
21
F
2
1
2
2
1
0
2
1
3
1
1
16
Pt
12
22
23
5
8
3
3
0
0
6
16
98
FG%: .438, FT%: .833. 3-pt. goals: 1031, .323 (Hardaway 1-8, Beasley 2-3,
Lee 1-3, Mudiay 0-2, Dotson 1-4, Ntilikina 1-3, Hicks 0-1, Burke 4-7). Blocks: 1
(Hicks). Turnovers: 14 (Hardaway 2,
Beasley 3, Lee, Dotson, Ntilikina, Williams, Hicks, O'Quinn, Burke 3). Steals:
6 (Hardaway, Beasley, Kanter 2, Mudiay 2).
MIAMI
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T A F Pt
JJhnsn ... 22 1-2 1-2 0-5 6 2 3
Rchrdsn 28 5-6 0-0 0-3 5 2 12
Adbayo . 13 3-4 0-0 1-2 0 2 6
Dragic ... 25 5-11 4-4 1-2 5 1 14
TJhnsn .. 27 9-13 0-1 0-2 2 3 22
Ellngtn .. 26 6-12 0-0 2-4 1 0 16
Winslw.. 26 6-14 2-3 0-1 2 2 15
Olynyk .. 30 8-11 4-5 0-5 10 3 22
McGrdr . 24 2-4 1-2 0-3 0 2 7
Babbitt.... 5 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Haslem ... 5 0-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Mickey.... 5 0-1 0-0 0-1 0 0 0
Walton.... 5 0-0 2-2 1-4 0 0 2
Totals .... 45-81 14-19 5-32 31 17 119
FG%: .556, FT%: .737. 3-pt. goals: 1534, .441 (Richardson 2-3, Dragic 0-3,
T.Johnson 4-6, Ellington 4-7, Winslow
1-6, Olynyk 2-4, McGruder 2-3, Babbitt
0-1, Haslem 0-1). Blocks: 2 (J.Johnson,
Richardson). Turnovers: 7 (Adebayo,
Dragic 2, T.Johnson 3, Ellington).
Steals: 9 (J.Johnson, Richardson 3, Ellington, Olynyk, McGruder 2, Walton).
New York..............26 21 30 21 — 98
Miami ....................27 37 35 20 — 119
A — 19,600 (19,600). T — 1:58.
A
1
2
4
1
1
4
4
0
2
0
5
1
25
F Pt
1 8
2 14
3 5
2 2
1 14
2 2
1 18
0 2
4 16
2 5
2 10
0 9
20 105
FG%: .404, FT%: .800. 3-pt. goals: 927, .333 (Martin 0-2, Green 1-3, Gasol
1-3, Harrison 0-1, Brooks 1-3, Selden
3-6, Parsons 0-1, McLemore 1-4, Chalmers 2-4). Blocks: 2 (Gasol, Johnson).
Turnovers: 13 (Green, Brooks 4, Weber
4, McLemore, Chalmers 3). Steals: 6
(Brooks, Weber 3, McLemore, Chalmers).
PHILADELPHIA
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T A F Pt
Cvingtn. 23 6-9 0-0 0-2 1 3 15
Saric...... 23 5-9 2-3 0-3 2 3 15
Embiid... 20 4-10 6-6 1-7 4 2 14
Simmns 25 6-9 1-1 1-7 9 1 13
Redick... 18 5-9 2-2 0-3 1 1 15
Belinelli. 32 6-10 1-1 0-0 2 3 15
Johnson .. 9 1-2 0-0 0-1 2 0 2
Andrsn.. 23 2-8 2-2 0-2 1 5 6
Ilyasova 20 3-7 0-0 1-5 0 1 6
McCnll .. 16 2-2 0-0 0-3 7 1 4
Holmes . 15 3-4 2-5 1-5 2 0 8
Young ..... 9 1-2 0-0 0-0 0 1 2
Jackson... 8 2-3 0-0 0-0 1 0 4
Totals .... 46-84 16-20 4-38 32 21 119
FG%: .548, FT%: .800. 3-pt. goals: 1131, .355 (Covington 3-4, Saric 3-6, Embiid 0-2, Redick 3-6, Belinelli 2-6, Anderson 0-5, Ilyasova 0-1, Holmes 0-1).
Blocks: 4 (Saric, Embiid, Belinelli, Johnson). Turnovers: 14 (Saric, Embiid,
Simmons 3, Redick 2, Belinelli, Anderson, McConnell, Holmes 2, Young,
Jackson). Steals: 8 (Covington, Saric,
Embiid, Simmons 2, Johnson, Ilyasova,
Jackson).
Memphis...............19 25 25 36 — 105
Philadelphia .........26 32 41 20 — 119
A — 10,411 (20,318). T — 2:07.
NUGGETS 135, BULLS 102
DENVER
FG
FT
Min M-A M-A
Chndler. 29 6-9 2-2
Millsap.. 27 8-9 5-6
Jokic...... 24 9-11 1-1
Barton... 26 7-9 0-0
Murray.. 29 5-14 3-3
Beasley. 12 1-3 0-0
Plumlee 19 2-2 0-1
DHarris . 25 5-8 1-1
Craig ..... 19 3-6 1-2
Lyles...... 19 4-10 0-0
Arthur ..... 7 1-2 0-0
Jeffrson... 4 0-0 0-0
Totals .... 51-83 13-16
Reb
O-T
1-5
1-8
2-7
0-3
1-5
0-0
0-3
1-3
1-4
1-6
0-0
0-1
8-45
A
3
3
5
5
7
1
1
5
1
1
0
2
34
F Pt
1 19
2 22
1 21
1 16
1 16
0 3
1 4
1 14
1 7
2 10
2 3
0 0
13 135
FG%: .614, FT%: .813. 3-pt. goals: 2035, .571 (Chandler 5-7, Millsap 1-1, Jokic 2-2, Barton 2-3, Murray 3-6, Beasley
1-2, D.Harris 3-6, Craig 0-1, Lyles 2-5,
Arthur 1-2). Blocks: 6 (Chandler, Millsap, Barton, Murray, D.Harris, Arthur).
Turnovers: 17 (Chandler 3, Millsap 3,
Jokic, Barton, Murray 3, Beasley, Plumlee, D.Harris 3, Craig). Steals: 9 (Millsap 5, Murray 2, Plumlee, D.Harris).
CHICAGO
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T A F Pt
Zipser.... 18 2-9 0-0 0-1 2 3 6
Valntne. 24 4-13 0-2 1-2 3 1 10
Felicio ... 28 7-9 2-2 2-5 1 1 16
Holiday . 23 1-5 0-0 0-2 1 1 3
Payne.... 23 4-7 0-0 0-1 6 3 11
Nwaba .. 26 5-10 1-2 2-4 3 5 11
Portis .... 26 5-11 4-4 2-8 2 3 15
Blkeny... 23 3-10 0-0 1-3 3 2 6
Grant..... 25 3-7 4-4 0-0 7 2 10
Vonleh .. 24 5-8 0-0 1-8 1 1 14
Totals .... 39-89 11-14 9-34 29 22 102
FG%: .438, FT%: .786. 3-pt. goals: 1338, .342 (Zipser 2-7, Valentine 2-8, Holiday 1-4, Payne 3-4, Nwaba 0-2, Portis
1-4, Blakeney 0-1, Grant 0-2, Vonleh
4-6). Blocks: 4 (Payne, Nwaba, Vonleh
2). Turnovers: 15 (Zipser, Valentine 2,
Felicio 2, Holiday 2, Payne 2, Portis 2,
Blakeney, Grant 2, Vonleh). Steals: 12
(Valentine 5, Felicio, Payne 2, Nwaba 2,
Grant, Vonleh).
Denver...................39 38 36 22 — 135
Chicago.................25 21 24 32 — 102
A — 20,671 (20,917). T — 1:57.
McIlroy falls to Uihlein in match play
ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUSTIN, Texas — Rory McIlroy put
together another flawless back nine,
running off five straight birdies. This
time, it wasn’t enough.
Former US Amateur champion Peter
Uihlein built a 5-up lead against McIlroy
and held off his late charge with enough
key shots of his own in a 2-and-1 victory,
one of several surprises Wednesday in
the opening session of the Dell Technologies Match Play.
Defending champion Dustin Johnson hit two shots out of bounds on the
same hole, another tee shot in the hazard, and couldn’t make the putts that he
couldn’t afford to miss on the back nine.
He wound up losing on the 17th hole to
Bernd Wiesberger.
Justin Thomas also got a scare, mainly because his opponent, Luke List, had
to putt with a sand wedge over the last
12 holes. List putted with the leading
edge of his sand wedge, and he fought
back to take Thomas to the 18th hole.
McIlroy was coming off a victory in
the Arnold Palmer Invitational just
three days ago, when he birdied five of
his last six holes to win by three shots.
McIlroy, along with Johnson, Phil
Mickelson, and Tommy Fleetwood, now
have to do some serious clawing to win
their groups. All of them lost the opening match in their four-man groups and
will need some help to advance to the
weekend.
In the two years this round-robin format has been used, only four players
have lost on Wednesday and won their
group.
Jordan Spieth won his opening
match over Charl Schwartzel by winning three straight holes to build a 3-up
lead through 14 and holding on for a 2and-1 victory.
Charles Howell III birdied the 12th
and 13th holes to go 3 up on Mickelson,
who made only one birdie in 16 holes.
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
NFL discusses
the catch rule
Changes proposed
to simplify process
By Ben Volin
GLOBE STAFF
The NFL’s Competition Committee has struggled for years to
come up with clear, concise language for its catch rule. Next week
in Orlando, NFL owners will vote
on yet another version of the rule,
which they hope will finally clear
up any confusion about what is
and isn’t a catch.
Al Riveron, the league’s director
of officiating, revealed Wednesday
on Twitter the new three-step process for determining a catch that
the committee will recommend to
the owners:
1. Control.
2. Two feet down or another
body part.
3. A football move such as:
R a third step
R reaching/extending for the
line-to-gain
R or the ability to perform such
an act
The proposed language does
not include the phrase “survive the
ground,” which was at the heart of
some confusion last season.
Riveron and the committee
spent several days this week reviewing plays from the 2017 season, including Jesse James’s controversial non-catch against the
Patriots, and Corey Clement’s
touchdown catch against the Patriots in the Super Bowl.
The committee also will recommend to owners that the standard
for overturning plays via instant
replay will remain indisputable evidence. Riveron, who makes all replay calls from the league headquarters in New York, was criticized for overturning several calls
with less-than-clear evidence in
2017.
The catch rule is just one of several proposals being put up to vote
at the owners meetings in Orlando, to be held Sunday through
Wednesday. A vote of 24 out of 32
owners is required for a rule to
pass.
For the third straight year, the
Patriots are not proposing any rule
FILE/DON WRIGHT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
This play by Steeler Jesse
James vs. the Patriots was one
reviewed for the rule change.
changes.
Among the proposals:
R The 49ers, Cardinals, and
Chargers want a limit of three
games per year that have “a scheduled kickoff time prior to 1 p.m. in
the time zone of their home stadium.” In layman’s terms, they want
a cap on East Coast 1 p.m. road
games for West Coast teams. The
London games also factor into
this.
R The Jets will recommend capping defensive pass interference
penalties at 15 yards, except for
egregious infractions, which
would still be spot fouls.
R The Chargers and Redskins
want to make personal fouls reviewable plays in the instant replay system.
R The Broncos want to be able
to trade players who are on injured
reserve.
The Competition Committee also will recommend making permanent the rule that places touchbacks on kickoffs at the 25-yard
line. The league adopted this rule
on a temporary basis the last two
years.
The NFL said there will be discussion on the social justice platform, but no vote is anticipated on
the national anthem game-day policy. The league’s current policy
states that players “should” stand
respectfully for the anthem and
that it “may” punish players or
teams, but it is not a requirement.
Ben Volin can be reached at
ben.volin@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @BenVolin
Clayborn aiming to
show off versatility
uPATRIOTS
Continued from Page C1
said Clayborn, who usually lines
up on the right edge. “I know I can
rush the passer and I know I can
set the edge in the run, so I mean,
there’s a couple of different positions that they believe I can play.
So, it’s up to me to prove I can play
them.’’
Proving himself is nothing new
to Clayborn, who was born with
Erb’s palsy, a condition that left
him with nerve damage on his
right side.
“Basically in my neck, trap, and
biceps,’’ he explained in a piece on
“The Players Tribune” in January.
“So I’ve always had limitations in
my right arm as far as strength
and mobility.’’
On Wednesday, he said those
limitations aren’t an issue when
he’s playing.
“It doesn’t really affect me besides in the weight room with doing some stuff, but on the field, I
mean, it doesn’t really affect me,’’
he said. “I’ve learned to compensate when I have to and I do what
I’ve got to do to make plays.’’
Despite being plagued by some
serious injuries — including a torn
biceps that forced him to watch
Super Bowl LI from the sideline —
Clayborn has consistently made
plays in his career. He has 167
tackles and 30 sacks since the Buccaneers made him the 20th overall
pick in 2011.
Clayborn suffered a torn ACL
and MCL that sidelined him in
2012 and also tore a biceps in
2014. Before his second torn biceps in 2016, he had torn his MCL
and meniscus earlier in the season. He acknowledged he thought
about hanging it up after 2016,
but the fighter in him wouldn’t allow it. The result was a career year
and a two-year, $10 million contract from the Patriots.
He acknowledges watching the
Super Bowl loss was difficult and
he likes to think he “would have
made an impact in that game and
possibly a different outcome’’ had
he been healthy.
“I’m glad I made that decision
to come back,’’ said Clayborn.
“Getting over that hump was a big
one, dealing with my fourth injury,
but I’m trying to play as long as I
can — as long as this body lets me.’’
If he can stay healthy this season, Patriots fans can look forward
to a potentially terrifying 1-2 passrushing punch off the edge with
Clayborn on the right and Trey
Flowers off the left.
Clayborn’s self scouting report
should please the Foxborough
faithful.
“Aggressive, hard-nosed — I
like to play every play like it’s my
last,’’ he said.
. . .
Bill Belichick put the Georgia
linebacking quartet of Roquan
Smith, Lorenzo Carter, Davin Bellamy, and Reggie Carter through
the paces at the Bulldogs’ Pro Day
in Athens, Ga. Smith is considered
one of the top backers in the draft
and likely won’t be around when
the Patriots pick at No. 31. Georgia, which fell in the national
championship game to Alabama,
has a boatload of other talented
players, including the running
back tandem of Sony Michel and
Nick Chubb, and defensive tackle
John Atkins. Chubb was one of the
stars of the Combine, finishing as
one of the top performers in the
bench press, vertical jump, and
broad jump . . . Former Arkansas
coach Bret Bielema was spotted at
Southern Cal’s Pro Day wearing
Patriots paraphernalia, just as he
did at the Combine. Bielema, who
has bunch of ex-players on the Patriots (James White, Flowers, Deatrich Wise Jr., and Cody Hollister), watched the main attraction,
quarterback Sam Darnold, as well
as other Trojan standouts, including edge rushers Uchenna Nwosu
and Rasheem Green, running
back Ronald Jones, and receivers
Deontay Burne tt and Ste ven
Mitchell . . . The Patriots officially
re-signed longtime special teams
ace Matthew Slater. Slater, 32, has
played 10 seasons with New England.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
Donato’s got books in his bag
Rookie intends to
keep up with school
By Fluto Shinzawa
GLOBE STAFF
ST. LOUIS — On Tuesday
morning, the Bruins flew to St.
Louis aboard their private charter.
Later that night,
BRUINS
Ryan Donato travNOTEBOOK eled with the
commercial commoners.
It was the consequence of
spending the day at Harvard attending several classes instead of
practicing at Scottrade Center. As
if a commercial flight were not
punishment enough, Donato arrived to the expected chirps of his
teammates, who reminded him
that hockey players usually skip
school to be on the ice, not the
other way around.
Donato is taking an exceptional route, and not just because the
same adjective could be applied to
his NHL debut. A Harvard degree
is a singular prize. The sociology
major intends to stay on track
with his classmates, even if he’s
completing his homework in
plush hotels instead of a Cambridge dorm.
“I’m lucky to have great teachers at school,” said Donato, who
took his course work to South Korea when he played in the Olympics in February. “I’m going to do
all the schoolwork I need, turn in
every paper on time. I’m going to
do all the work I can on the road
and get it handed in at the same
time as every other student, and
not really make any exceptions for
me.
“I don’t want them to be flexible for my circumstance. I’m going to do everything I can to make
it as easy as possible.”
Donato arrived in St. Louis
Tuesday night. The next day, he
hit the ice for the morning skate
to prepare for his second NHL
game. He would have a hard time
matching the performance from
his first.
The 21-year-old had a goal and
two assists in Monday’s 5-4 overtime loss to Columbus. He believed he would start as the No. 3
left wing next to Noel Acciari and
Brian Gionta. But when Rick Nash
was scratched late because of an
upper-body injury, Donato was
promoted to the second line
alongside David Krejci and Danton Heinen.
Donato did not look out of
place as a top-six NHL forward,
even with the situation — a Scituate native playing for the same
team that employed his father Ted
— threatening to weigh down his
skates.
“I think the first shift, my heart
almost popped out of my chest,”
Donato said. “So excited and nervous. But other than that, I just
kind of came ready to focus and
go. Just coming with that mental
mind-set of being ready and remembering it’s just a hockey
game is going to help me play
safe.”
Donato played with pace, skill,
and smarts. People around the
league were watching.
“Confident kid,” said St. Louis
coach Mike Yeo. “I watched him a
lot in the Olympics too. I don’t
think there was any question from
us. We got the news he was going
to be coming into the lineup. I
don’t think there was any surprise
on our part that he was going to
make an immediate impact.”
Donato scored the Bruins’ lone
goal in Wednesday night’s 2-1
overtime loss to the Blues.
they’ve got speed, but they also
may appear even faster than what
they are.
“I know they’ve got guys out of
the lineup, but you look at who
they still do have in the lineup.
You look at Krejci, you look at
Marchand, you look at the play
their veterans are giving them.
[David] Pastrnak is an emerging
star. But their young players have
been really, really impressive this
year.”
Vladimir Tarasenko, St. Louis’s
leading goal scorer (27), was not
available because of an upperbody injury.
OT disappointment
The Bruins might have earned
the overtime win against the Blue
Jackets had Brad Marchand gotten a call. During OT, Pierre-Luc
Dubois practically yanked Marchand’s gear off as the left wing approached the net. No call was
made, to say nothing of a penalty
shot.
Marchand’s reputation may be
a reason he doesn’t get some
whistles.
“He has the puck most of the
night,” said coach Bruce Cassidy.
“And he hangs on to it. He wants
to attack. He wants to be a puckpossession guy. So he takes a lot of
hits, slashes, trips. So you can’t
call them all. That’s just hockey.
But there sure seem to be a lot
that get let go against him.”
Playoff tickets on sale
The Bruins announced after
Wednesday night’s game that individual tickets for all rounds of
the playoffs will go on sale Friday
at 11 a.m. Tickets will be available
at the TD Garden box office, at
BostonBruins.com, on the Bruins’
mobile app, and by calling Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000 . . . The
Bruins signed Wiley Sherman,
Donato’s Harvard teammate, to a
two-year, entry-level contract.
Sherman will report to Providence
on an amateur tryout contract.
The Bruins selected the right-shot
defenseman in the fifth round of
the 2013 draft. The 6-foot-7-inch,
220-pound defenseman had three
goals and four assists in 33 games
as a Harvard senior . . . Backes
visited with former teammate Alex Pietrangelo Tuesday night. “Always good catching up,” said Pietrangelo. “We keep in touch.
We’re pretty close friends. It’ll be
nice not having him chase me
around tonight, I’ll tell you that.”
Lineup losses
The Bruins were without Patrice Bergeron, Jake DeBrusk,
Nash, David Backes, Zdeno
Chara, and Charlie McAvoy
against St. Louis. But the Blues
were not expecting a night off.
“They’re really good. They’re
really fast,” Yeo said before the
game. “They’re dangerous on the
attack. They put you on your
heels. They’ve got a really good
north mentality. Because of that,
NHL
Div.
A
A
A
GP
73
72
73
Pts. ROW
104
44
100
42
93
36
GF
264
240
246
GA
205
186
208
METROPOLITAN Div. GP W L OL
Washington
M 73 42 24 7
Pittsburgh
M 74 42 27 5
Columbus
M 74 41 28 5
Pts. ROW
91
39
89
40
87
35
GF
229
243
210
GA
217
225
206
WILD CARD
Philadelphia
New Jersey
Pts. ROW
86
35
82
32
GF
222
219
GA
220
221
34
28
29
28
22
24
24
22
219
197
211
235
189
185
199
173
218
232
236
263
228
237
251
240
Florida
Carolina
NY Rangers
NY Islanders
Detroit
Montreal
Ottawa
Buffalo
A
M
M
M
A
A
A
A
71
73
73
73
73
74
72
73
37
31
32
31
27
26
26
23
27
31
33
32
35
36
35
38
7
11
8
10
11
12
11
12
81
73
72
72
65
64
63
58
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
p-Nashville
Winnipeg
Minnesota
Div.
C
C
C
GP
72
73
73
W L OL
48 14 10
44 19 10
41 24 8
Pts. ROW
106
43
98
42
90
38
GF
236
242
227
GA
178
190
210
Bruins get playoff spot
PACIFIC
Vegas
San Jose
Los Angeles
Div.
P
P
P
GP
73
73
74
W L OL
47 21 5
41 23 9
40 27 7
Pts. ROW
99
44
91
37
87
38
GF
248
225
212
GA
200
201
186
WILD CARD
Colorado
*Anaheim
Div. GP W L OL
C 73 40 25 8
P 73 37 24 12
Pts. ROW
88
39
86
33
GF
236
206
GA
210
197
uBRUINS
St. Louis
Dallas
*Calgary
Edmonton
Chicago
Arizona
Vancouver
203
212
204
208
209
179
187
194
201
222
234
228
231
240
BILL BOYCE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Brad Marchand of the Bruins is harassed by Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo.
Continued from Page C1
good, hard-fought game, but I think we deserved better.”
The Bruins held tight to a 1-0 lead until
9:36 of the third period. Brayden Schenn
started the game-tying rush by hitting Alex
Steen up the ice. As soon as Steen reeled in
the pass, he dropped the puck off for a trailing Schwartz. The left wing faked an initial
shot, then rifled one for real past Khudobin’s
blocker to tie the game at 1-1.
Khudobin turned in his best work during
the second period, when the Blues ramped
up their presence. The backup’s sharpest
save was on Vince Dunn late in the second.
Riley Nash blocked part of Dunn’s point
shot, but the puck still advanced toward the
net.
Khudobin adjusted to the block and
flashed his right pad to keep the shot from
crossing the line.
The Bruins were without Torey Krug,
who was scratched because of an upper-body
injury and is classified as day-to-day. Krug
participated in Wednesday’s morning skate.
The defenseman left practice early on Tuesday. Paul Postma took Krug’s spot, dressing
for the first time since Dec. 13.
Kr u g j o i n e d D av i d B a c k e s , Pa t r i c e
Bergeron, Zdeno Chara, Jake DeBrusk, Charlie McAvoy, and Rick Nash on the sidelines.
The six players have scored 94 goals and 161
assists.
Ryan Donato scored his second NHL goal
in as many games. Donato had some help
from referee Brad Watson, whose positioning in the offensive zone put him in line for
an assist.
During a cross-checking penalty on Robert Bortuzzo, Alex Pietrangelo tried to clear
the puck from behind his goal line. Pietrangelo’s attempt bounced off David Pastrnak, then glanced off Watson, and dribbled
onto Donato’s stick.
The left wing snapped the puck past Jake
Allen at 10:12 of the first period to give the
Bruins a 1-0 lead.
Fluto Shinzawa can be reached at
fshinzawa@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeFluto.
Blues 2, Bruins 1
73
74
74
73
74
73
73
40
38
35
32
30
25
25
0
1
—
—
Power plays — Boston 1 of 2; St. Louis 0 of 2.
Goalies — Boston, Khudobin 15-6-5 (20 shots18 saves). St. Louis, Allen 24-21-2 (22 shots-21
saves).
Referees — Brad Watson, Dean Morton. Linesmen — Scott Cherrey, Brandon Gawryletz.
Attendance — 18,423 (19,150). Time — 2:26.
BILL BOYCE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Brayden Schenn is the first to congratulate Jaden
Schwartz, who scored in overtime to beat the Bruins.
85
84
80
69
69
61
59
37
34
33
28
29
23
25
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
Eight teams in each conference qualify. The top three teams from
each division comprise the first six spots; the two remaining teams
with the most points, regardless of division, earn the wild card spots.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
At St. Louis 2
Boston 1 (OT)
Arizona 4
at Buffalo 1
Montreal 3
Anaheim
at Calgary
At Pittsburgh 5
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Tampa Bay at NY Islanders
7
Washington at Detroit
NY Rangers at Philadelphia
7
Toronto at Nashville
Arizona at Carolina
7
Vancouver at Chicago
7
Los Angeles at Colorado
Florida at Columbus
Edmonton at Ottawa
7:30
7:30
8
8:30
9
Vegas at San Jose
10
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
At NY Islanders 4
Columbus 5
Pittsburgh 1
at NY Rangers 3
At Washington 4
Edmonton 7
Florida 7
At Detroit 5
At Tampa Bay 4
Toronto 3
At Winnipeg 2 Los Angeles 1 (OT)
Dallas 3
Colorado 5
at Chicago 1
at Carolina 3
At Vegas 4
Vancouver 1
at Ottawa 2
At San Jose 6
New Jersey 2
Philadelphia 4 (SO)
Arizona.........................2
Buffalo..........................1
22
20
28 5
28 8
29 10
36 5
35 9
37 11
39 9
* — Not including late game; ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
p — Clinched playoff berth
COYOTES 4, SABRES 1
At Scottrade Center, St. Louis
FIRST PERIOD
Penalty — St. Louis, Bortuzzo (cross check)
9:40
Boston 1, St. Louis 0 — Donato 2 10:12 (pp)
Penalty — Boston, Riley Nash (roughing) 19:59
Penalty — St. Louis, Soshnikov (roughing) 19:59
SECOND PERIOD
No scoring
Penalty — Boston, Szwarz (slashing) 3:49
Penalty — St. Louis, Schenn (charging) 14:03
Penalty — Boston, Heinen (slashing) 15:14
THIRD PERIOD
St. Louis 1, Boston 1 — Schwartz 21 (Steen,
Schenn) 9:36
No penalties
OVERTIME
St. Louis 2, Boston 1 — Schwartz 22 (Parayko)
0:30
No penalties
SCORE BY PERIOD
Boston ................................1
0
0
0 —
1
St. Louis .............................0
0
1
1 —
2
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Boston ................................9
8
5
St. Louis .............................5
9
5
C
C
P
P
C
P
P
0
0
2 —
0 —
PENGUINS 5, CANADIENS 3
4
1
First period — 1. Arizona, Strome 2
(Goligoski, Perlini), 3:38 (pp). 2. Buffalo, Nolan 3 (Rodrigues, Beaulieu),
11:42. 3. Arizona, Stepan 13 (OEkmanLarsson, Keller), 17:44 (pp). Penalties
— Eichel, Buf (holding), 1:46. Beaulieu,
Buf (hi stick), 15:54.
Second period — None. Penalties —
Martinook, Ari (slashing), 2:50. Strome,
Ari (slashing), 6:24. Perlini, Ari (hooking), 13:34.
Third period — 4. Arizona, Panik 10
(Keller, Stepan), 6:32. 5. Arizona, Domi
8 (Chychrun), 19:50 (en). Penalties —
Domi, Ari (roughing), 8:17. Domi, Ari,
served by Strome (cross check), 8:17.
Nolan, Buf (roughing), 8:17. Okposo,
Buf (hooking), 11:10.
Shots on goal — Arizona 15-5-9 — 29.
Buffalo 13-11-6 — 30.
Power plays — Arizona 2-3; Buffalo
0-4.
Goalies — Arizona, Raanta 17-16-6
(30 shots-29 saves). Buffalo, Johnson
8-12-3 (15 shots-13 saves). Buffalo, Ullmark 1-1-0 (13 shots-12 saves).
Referees — Reid Anderson, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen — Tony Sericolo, Ryan
Daisy.
A — 17,029 (19,070). T — 2:32.
ERIK S. LESSER/EPA
Serena Williams continues to struggle in
her comeback from maternity leave, losing
in the first round of the Miami Open.
Cobb, Orioles agree
to $57 million deal
Alex Cobb, the last big-name starting pitcher
available in a slow-moving free agent market, finalized a $57 million, four-year contract with the
Baltimore Orioles on Wednesday. The righthander had spent his entire six-season big league career with the Tampa Bay Rays. Cobb was 12-10
with a 3.66 ERA in 29 starts last season. He
pitched 179‚ innings in his first full year back
after missing nearly two seasons because of Tommy John surgery. He had turned down the Rays’
$17.4 million qualifying offer in November, and
Baltimore pursued him from the start of free
agency . . . Miami pitcher Dan Straily is taking
some time to rest his pitching arm now in hopes
of avoiding extended time off during the season.
No longer scheduled to start the Marlins’ second
game of the season, an MRI showed some inflammation in his right forearm but no structural issues. Straily started 33 games for Miami last season, going 10-9 with a 4.26 ERA . . . The Detroit
Tigers announced that righthander Matt Manning, a top pitching prospect drafted in the first
round in 2016, has an oblique strain. The Tigers
say Manning will rest until he is pain free and
then resume his throwing program. He is expected to be in extended spring training for a couple
weeks before joining Single A West Michigan.
$2.5 billion price for Panthers
W L OL
50 19 4
45 17 10
43 23 7
Div. GP W L OL
M 74 37 25 12
M 73 37 28 8
SportsLog
NFL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
p-Tampa Bay
BOSTON
Toronto
C5
Montreal ......................1
Pittsburgh....................2
2
1
0 —
2 —
3
5
First period — 1. Pittsburgh, Malkin
41 (Hagelin), 9:53. 2. Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 23 (Malkin, Kessel), 17:31 (pp). 3.
Montreal, Drouin 12 (Byron, Benn),
19:30. Penalties — Alzner, Mon (holding), 16:58.
Second period — 4. Montreal,
Scherbak 4 (Hudon, Lernout), 8:19. 5.
Montreal, De La Rose 4 (Gallagher),
14:24. 6. Pittsburgh, Crosby 24 (Guentzel, Rust), 15:02. Penalties — McCarron, Mon, major (fighting), 5:37. Oleksiak, Pit, major (fighting), 5:37. Guentzel, Pit (holding), 6:09. Gallagher, Mon
(hi stick), 7:10. Maatta, Pit (hooking),
10:39.
Third period — 7. Pittsburgh, Brassard 20 (Guentzel, Maatta), 2:38 (pp).
8. Pittsburgh, Guentzel 21 (Kessel,
Crosby), 18:27. Penalties — Lehkonen,
Mon (hooking), 1:05. Crosby, Pit (tripping), 8:42.
Shots on goal — Montreal 9-12-9 —
30. Pittsburgh 16-12-11 — 39.
Power plays — Montreal 0-3; Pittsburgh 2-3.
Goalies — Montreal, Price 15-23-6
(39 shots-34 saves). Pittsburgh, DeSmith 5-4-1 (30 shots-27 saves).
Referees — Graham Skilliter, Ian
Walsh. Linesmen — Matt MacPherson,
Steve Miller.
A — 18,574 (18,387). T — 2:37.
The price of the Carolina Panthers reached
$2.5 billion, according to people familiar with
bids for the NFL team, which would set a record
for a US professional sports franchise, according
to a Bloomberg report picked up by several media
outlets. That price forced sports-apparel company owner and billionaire Michael Rubin to drop
out. At least three other bidders remain. Panthers
owner Jerry Richardson put the team up for sale
in December after the NFL took over an investigation into workplace harassment allegations
against him . . . Free agent defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh canceled his scheduled visit with
the Oakland Raiders and returned home to mull
his options, reported NFL.com . . . The Detroit Lions signed tight end Luke Willson, adding a potential starter in place of Eric Ebron. The Lions
cut ties with Ebron last week instead of paying
him $8.25 million this season . . . The Denver
Broncos announced an agreement to buy back a
portion of John Bowlen’s minority stake in the
franchise.The brother of majority owner Pat
Bowlen, John Bowlen’s share of the team is believed to be about 33 percent. The Broncos didn’t
say how much of John Bowlen’s share was bought
back, nor did they reveal the purchase price . . .
Every round of the NFL Draft will air on network
television next month for the first time as Fox will
simulcast the NFL Network’s coverage of Days 1
and 2, and ESPN’s coverage of Day 3 will be
shown on ABC.
NHL
Blackhawks to miss playoffs
The NHL playoffs will go on without Chicago
for the first time in a decade after the Blackhawks
were eliminated from contention with a 5-1 loss
to the Colorado Avalanche Tuesday night . . .
Olympic gold medalist Monique Lamoureux-Morando will make her debut as an NHL Network
studio analyst on Friday. The network announced
she will join Kevin Weekes and Tony Luftman on
“NHL Tonight” . . . University of North Dakota junior defenseman Christian Wolanin signed a twoyear, entry-level contract with the Ottawa Senators. A fourth-round pick in the 2015 draft, Wolanin is expected to join the team this week.
FIGURE SKATING
Kostner leads at worlds
Home country favorite Carolina Kostner skated to a surprise lead over Olympic gold medalist
Alina Zagitova of Russia after the women’s short
program at the world championships in Assago,
Italy. US champion Bradie Tennell skated a personal and season-best 68.76 at her first worlds,
finishing seventh. American Mirai Nagasu was
ninth with 65.21 points. The third US skater, Mariah Bell, was 12th with 59.15.
MISCELLANY
Williams loses at Miami Open
Serena Williams lost in the first round of the
Miami Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne,
Fla., still rusty in her comeback from pregnancy
and unable to overcome Naomi Osaka, who won,
6-3, 6-2 . . . The Indianapolis 500 will move to a
new network for the first time since 1965 under a
deal IndyCar signed with NBC Sports. The threeyear deal begins next season and gives NBC all of
IndyCar’s media rights. It includes the crown
jewel Indy 500, which had been a mainstay on
ABC . . . AJ Hurt, 17, captured the women's Alpine combined race at the US championships in
Sun Valley, Idaho, while Olympian Ryan Cochran-Siegle earned the men's title.
C6
T h e
Sports
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
Scoreboard
BC’s Landry draws crowd
THU
Patriots among teams
at Pro Day at Heights
3/22
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Ch. 25
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE STAFF
It may have been a little chillier outside than it was in Georgia, where Bill
Belichick spent his day scouting draft
prospects, but an enormous inflatable
dome protected the field at Alumni
Stadium from the elements Wednesday.
That meant those gathered for Boston College’s Pro Day were plenty
warm despite the imminent snow.
The main draw was edge rusher
Harold Landry, almost certain to go in
the first round of the draft in April.
Landry skipped the timed drills — his
6.88 second three-cone drill, 4.64 40yard dash, 36-inch vertical, and other
measurables from the combine were
more than satisfactory — but went
through position drills guided by Patriots defensive line coach Brendan Daly.
During one drill, Daly positioned
two tackling dummies as a tight end
and a tackle and asked prospects to
align as a 6-technique over the tight
end. Daly moved the dummies left,
right, backward, and forward, and
asked players to attack the right blocker, testing reaction time and power.
Smooth and explosive, Landry said
he took well to Daly’s intense coaching.
During a pass-rush drill, Daly reminded the 21-year-old to stay low and away
from the hypothetical quarterback’s
head or, “that’s going to be another
$25,000,” referring to a fine he could
get from the NFL.
“Oh man,” Landry said. “I actually
met with him this morning to watch
over film for like two hours. Very intense guy. Definitely could see the culture of the New England Patriots within him. And honestly, it would be an
awesome pleasure to go play for that
guy and play in New England. But
yeah, you could definitely see how intense he is and how hard he coaches.”
Landry is almost certain to be off
the board by the time the Patriots
make their first-round selection at No.
31, but his affection for Daly was reciprocated. Along with running the defensive line drills for Landry and teammate Noa Merritt, Daly spent quite
awhile at the beginning of the session
talking to Landry even after the two
3/24
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NBCSB
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6:00†
NBCSB
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TUE
CHC
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CHC
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3/26
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Home games shaded
3/27
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For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI-FM 93.7; Bruins, Celtics, and Revolution, WBZ-FM 98.5; WEEI-AM 850;
†WZLX-FM 100.7
ON THE AIR
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
BC defensive end Harold Landry showed why he is a potential first-round
draft pick at his Pro Day workout Wednesday at Alumni Stadium.
had spent the morning together.
“He did a really nice job in the workout,” Daly said. “Kid is a very good athlete. Honestly, I was actually more impressed in the time that I got to spend
with him this morning watching his
tape and getting to know him as a person. I really enjoyed the exchange. He’s
been well-coached, he knows football
well.”
Landry wasn’t the only player who
worked out. Versatile defensive back
Kamrin Moore, likely to go in the third
or fourth round, looked fast and fluid.
Patrick Towles, the former BC quarterback, worked out as a tight end and
showed good mobility for his 6-foot-5inch, 253-pound frame.
Wide receivers Charlie Callinan and
Thadd Smith, defensive backs Gabe
McClary and Isaac Yiadom, and linebacker Ty Schwab were listed as the
other players present for evaluations.
The weather may have kept a few
teams away, but the Raiders, 49ers,
Jets, Giants, Browns, Redskins, Bears,
Chiefs, Broncos, Texans, Falcons, Steelers, Jaguars, Panthers, and Cardinals
all had representatives on hand.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NCAA AT TD GARDEN
FRIDAY’S EAST REGIONAL SEMIFINALS
Villanova vs. West Virginia, 7:27 p.m.
Purdue vs. Texas Tech, 9:57 p.m.
SUNDAY’S EAST REGIONAL FINAL
Semifinal winners, TBA
level,’’ Evans said. ‘‘He believed in me,
so I believed in him, and he gave me an
opportunity. And he’s still doing that.’’
A big reason the Red Raiders are
still playing this season is because of
their playmaking 6-foot-3-inch guard.
In their NCAA opener, Evans scored
19 of his 23 points after halftime when
they overcame an 8-point deficit to
beat Stephen F. Austin by 10.
Evans then scored 22 points in a 6966 win over Florida, making the goahead 3-pointer with 2½ minutes left.
His only assist came on another alleyoop dunk to Zhaire Smith with 29 seconds left.
‘‘He has courage to make those
plays in those moments. He wants the
ball late,’’ Beard said of Evans. ‘‘He’s
earned the right to be in those moments throughout his career, the ups
and downs.’’
Evans is the Big 12’s second-leading
scorer at 17.8 points per game. He
trails only national scoring leader Trae
Young (27.4 ), the freshman standout
who is leaving Oklahoma after only
one season for the NBA.
Thursday’s NCAA Tournament capsules
SOUTH REGION
at Atlanta
7. Nevada (29-7) vs. 11. Loyola Chicago
(30-5), 7:07 p.m., CBS: The biggest question
is whether Nevada coach Eric Musselman
will take off his shirt while coaching. Hopefully not, but he’s been taking it off a lot
postgame. Despite a spate of injuries, the
Wolfpack are the more talented team, but
they can’t afford to play from behind as
they have in their first two games. Loyola’s
season has been magical, punctuated by
two heart-stopping NCAA victories. Unselfish play and good team defense carry the
Ramblers. I’m predicting another close
game.
5. Kentucky (26-10) vs. 9. Kansas State (2411), 9:37 p.m., CBS: Wait, is it true John Calipari complained about the hotel he was assigned in Atlanta? Only kidding. He can’t
complain about his team, which is playing
its best right now led by ultra-quick freshman point guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander
and prolific shooter Kevin Knox. The Wildcats’ defense has improved tremendously
too. K-State has won two NCAA games
without leading scorer Dean Wade. If he can
play, this might be close; if not, guard Barry
Brown will have to carry his team.
SAT
3/23
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Lake Dawson, assistant director of
college scouting for the Bills, was also
there, as was Kyle O’Brien, vice president of player personnel for the Lions,
who could be in the mix for Landry at
No. 20. Along with Daly, the Patriots
sent college scouting coordinator Brian
Smith.
They were there to see Landry,
mainly. Even teams unlikely to wind up
with him want to get a jump-start on
their opposing player files. Daly said
that, in addition to figuring out who to
covet in the draft, the Pro Day circuit is
where he sees old friends and learns
more about what’s going on in the college game.
“You can learn something from anybody,” Daly said. “You learn, you listen
to these guys talk about their scheme
and what they did and obviously you
pick up things. ‘That’s an interesting
adjustment,’ or ‘That’s a good way to
play something,’ or whatever the case
may be.”
Nora Princiotti can be reached at
nora.princiotti@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter at @NoraPrinciotti.
Evans steers Texas Tech to Boston
Keenan Evans was already Texas
Tech’s starting point guard and had
been to an NCAA Tournament when
Chris Beard became
NCAA
his coach two years
NOTEBOOK ago.
With each win now
extending his college career, Evans is
an All-Big 12 senior guard going to the
Sweet 16.
The third-seeded Red Raiders
(26-9) will face second-seeded Purdue
(30-6) in an East Region semifinal
game Friday night at TD Garden. The
winner will face top-seeded Villanova
(31-4) or No. 5 seed West Virginia (2510) in Sunday’s regional final.
‘‘What I’m most appreciative of
Keenan is he basically trusted me before he had to. He basically took me at
my word,’’ Beard said. ‘‘He trusted me
from Day One, and I asked him to do a
lot of things that he had never done before in his career . . . He’s just continued to be a guy that works at his craft.’’
Evans remembers the first time he
sat down in Beard’s office to talk after
Tubby Smith left for Memphis. It was
only a few weeks after the Red Raiders’
10-point loss to Butler in their first
NCAA game in nine seasons.
Beard told Evans that he wanted to
keep the core group together and bring
in some help.
‘‘I just believed in his process, believed that he wanted to win at this
FRI
Y
WEST REGION
at Los Angeles
3. Michigan (30-7) vs. 7. Texas A&M (22-12),
7:37 p.m., TBS: A&M is finally playing like
the projected top-10 team it was. The Aggies have a first-round NBA draft choice in
Robert Williams and a talented, back-tothe-basket, 6-foot-10-inch 266-pound junior
center in Tyler Davis. Michigan doesn’t have
the big guys to contend with those two and
will have to rely on its outside game and the
tricky defenses of coach John Beilein to prevail.
4. Gonzaga (32-4) vs. 9. Florida State (22-11),
10:07 p.m., TBS: Florida State has its flaws.
The Seminoles are not overly talented and
they don’t take care of the ball well, but
they’re deep and they play tough defense.
Gonzaga needs to counter that by playing
at a fast pace. The Zags are the more talented group. A game in the 80s means Gonzaga
wins. A game in the 60s and Florida State
wins.
JOE SULLIVAN
Evans has been dealing with a bothersome toe for more than a month,
missing the second half of a 59-57 loss
at Baylor on Feb. 17.
He has averaged 21.2 points in his
five games since sitting out at West
Virginia, even while spending much of
his time getting treatment.
‘‘He’s everything good about college
basketball when you think about fouryear players staying and grinding,’’
Beard said. ‘‘The courage he’s shown
here in the last month with his toe issue to still play at this level in the kind
of pain he’s in . . . I know [NBA] guys
look for the intangibles, and that guy’s
middle name is intangible. I’ve never
coached a tougher guy than Keenan
Evans.’’
Padgett out at Louisville
David Padgett, 33, the former Louisville player brought in to bring calm
amid turmoil and upheaval after the
school placed coach Rick Pitino on unpaid administrative leave, parted ways
with his alma mater after serving as its
interim coach.
The move came less than 24 hours
after the Cardinals (22-14) were eliminated from the NIT quarterfinals.
Miller not a Pitt candidate
Arizona coach Sean Miller said in a
statement Wednesday he isn’t a candidate for the coaching vacancy created
when Pittsburgh fired Kevin Stallings
after two seasons earlier this month.
Miller, who grew up in western Pennsylvania and played point guard for the
Panthers from 1987-92, wished his alma mater luck in its search. It was the
second time Miller has come forward
to remove himself from consideration
after making a similar move in 2016
following reports Pitt had approached
him about the job. Pitt interviewed former Indiana coach Tom Crean and former Ohio State coach Thad Matta last
week. Crean ended up taking the job at
Georgia. Rhode Island coach Dan Hurley is also being considered as a possible target for Pitt athletic director
Heather Lyke . . . Arizona freshman big
man Deandre Ayton announced on his
Twitter feed Wednesday he is leaving
early for the NBA. The 7-1, 260-pound
Ayton was named the Pac-12 player of
the year after averaging 20.1 points on
61 percent shooting and 11.6 rebounds per game . . . Northeastern’s
Bill Coen, the 2018 CAA Coach of the
Year, was named by the National Association of Basketball Coaches as the
District 10 Coach of the Year.
Latest line
BASEBALL
1 p.m.
Exhibition: Boston at Baltimore
1 p.m.
Exhibition: NY Yankees vs. Minnesota
4 p.m.
Exhibition: Kansas City vs. Milwaukee
Ch. 25
ESPN2
MLB
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
Div. 2 semis: W. Texas St. vs. Ferris St.
7 p.m.
NCAA third round: Loyola-Chi. vs. Nevada
7:37 p.m. NCAA third round: Texas A&M vs. Michigan
9:30 p.m. Div. 2 semis: Northern St. vs. Sioux Falls
9:37 p.m. NCAA third round: Kansas St. vs. Kentucky
10 p.m. NCAA third round: Florida St. vs. Gonzaga
CBSSN
CBS
TBS
CBSSN
CBS
TBS
PRO BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Orlando
NBA
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2
Junior lightweights: Garcia vs. Vargas
FIGURE SKATING
noon
World Championships (men)
3 p.m.
World Championships (pairs)
NBCSN
NBCSN
GOLF
2 p.m.
PGA: WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play
8:30 p.m. LPGA: Kia Classic
Golf
Golf
PRO HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. Washington at Detroit
10 p.m. Vegas at San Jose
NBCSN
NBCSN
NBA
Thursday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
Phila.......................7 ...........At Orlando
At Charlotte.....OFF ..............Memphis
At New Orleans
.............LA Lakers
OFF
At Houston.......OFF ..................Detroit
Utah........................8 .............. At Dallas
At Sacramento.....2½ ..................Atlanta
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Thursday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
Kentucky...............5½ ............Kansas St.
Nevada......................1 ...........Loyola-Chi.
Michigan...............2½ ..........Texas A&M
Gonzaga................5½ ..................Florida
At UTSA....................4 .......................Sam
At San Francisco.....9 ..............Campbell
Friday
Villanova...................5 ...........W. Virginia
Purdue......................2 ..........Texas Tech
Duke.....................11½ ..............Syracuse
Kansas...................4½ ...............Clemson
National Hockey League
Thursday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At Carolina.....-170 Arizona.......... +158
At Phila...........-208 NY Rangers...+188
At Columbus..-135 Florida............+125
Tampa Bay.....-180 At NY Islndrs +165
Washington....-163 At Detroit...... +153
Edmonton.......-113 At Ottawa......+103
At Nashville.... OFF Toronto............OFF
At Chicago......-181 Vancouver.....+166
At Colorado....-117 Los Angeles.. +107
At San Jose.....OFF Las Vegas...............
Transactions
Colleges
BASKETBALL
MEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT
EAST REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
Villanova (32-4) vs. West Virginia (2610), 7:27 p.m.; Purdue (30-6) vs. Texas
Tech (26-9), 9:57 p.m.
Sunday, March 25 — Final
SOUTH REGIONAL
Thursday, March 22 — Semifinals
Nevada (29-7) vs. Loyola (Chi.) (30-5),
7:07 p.m.; Kansas St. (24-11) vs. Kentucky (26-10), 9:37 p.m.
Saturday, March 24 — Final
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
Kansas (29-7) vs. Clemson (25-9), 7:07
p.m.; Duke (28-7) vs. Syracuse (23-13),
9:37 p.m.
Sunday, March 25 — Final
WEST REGIONAL
Thursday, March 22 — Semifinals
Texas A&M (22-12) vs. Michigan (30-7),
7:37 p.m.; Florida St. (22-11) vs. Gonzaga (32-4), 10:07 p.m.
Saturday, March 24 — Final
WOMEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT
ALBANY REGIONAL
Saturday, March 24 — Semifinals
South Carolina (28-6) vs. Buffalo, 11:30
a.m. or 2 p.m.; UConn vs. Duke, 11:30
a.m. or 2 p.m.; Championship Monday,
March 26, semifinal winners, 7 p.m.
Monday, March 26 — Final
Semifinal winners, 7 p.m.
SPOKANE REGIONAL
Saturday, March 24 — Semifinals
Notre Dame (31-3) vs. Texas A&M
(26-9), 4 or 6:30 p.m.; Oregon (32-4) vs.
Central Michigan, 4 or 6:30 p.m.;
Championship Monday, March 26,
semifinal winners, 9 p.m.
Monday, March 26 — Final
Semifinal winners, 9 p.m.
KANSAS CITY REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
N.C. State (26-8) vs. Mississippi State,
7 or 9:30 p.m.; UCLA winner vs. Texas, 7
or 9:30 p.m.; Championship Sunday,
March 25, semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.
LEXINGTON REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
Oregon State (25-7) vs. Baylor (33-1), 7
or 9:30 p.m.; Louisville (34-2) vs. Stanford, 7 or 9:30 p.m.; Championship Sunday, March 25, semifinal winners,
noon.
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Semifinal winners, noon
FINAL FOUR
Friday, March 30
Albany champion vs. Spokane chamion, 7 or 9:30 p.m.; Kansas City champion vs. Lexington champion, 7 or 9:30
p.m.
Sunday, April 1
National championship, 6 p.m.
NIT
MEN
Tuesday, March 20 — Quarterfinals
Penn State 85....................Marquette 80
Mississippi State 79......at Louisville 56
Wednesday, March 21 — Quarterfinals
Western Kentucky 92..Oklahoma St 84
Utah......................................Saint Mary’s
Tuesday, March 27 — Semifinals
at Madison Square Garden
Game 1, 7 p.m.; Game 2, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 29 — Final
Semifinal winners, 8 p.m.
WOMEN
Tuesday, March 20
Rice 73........................at New Mexico 93
Thursday, March 22 — Third round
Purdue (20-13) at Indiana (19-14), 7
p.m.; James Madison (23-10) at West
Virginia (23-11), 7 p.m.; Fordham (24-9)
at Virginia Tech (20-13), 7 p.m.;
Duquesne (25-7) at St. John’s (18-14), 7
p.m.; Georgia Tech (20-13) at Alabama
(19-13), 8 p.m.; Michigan State (19-13)
at South Dakota (28-6), 8 p.m..
Friday, March 23
UC Davis (27-6) at Kansas State (1815), 8 p.m.
HOCKEY
MEN’S NCAA DIV. 1 TOURNEY
NORTHEAST REGIONAL
At DCU Center, Worcester
Saturday, March 24
Cornell (25-5-2) vs. Boston University
(21-13-4), 1 p.m.; Michigan (20-14-3) vs.
Northeastern (23-9-5), 4:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Cornell-BU winner vs. Michigan-Northeastern winner, 4 p.m.
EAST REGIONAL
At Webster Bank Arena, Bridgeport,
Conn.
Friday, March 23
Notre Dame (25-9-2) vs. Michigan Tech
(22-16-5), 3 p.m.; Providence (23-11-4)
vs. Clarkson (23-10-6), 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Notre Dame-Michigan Tech winner vs.
Providence-Clarkson winner, 6 p.m.
MIDWEST REGIONAL
At PPL Center, Allentown, Pa.
Saturday, March 24
Ohio State (24-9-5) vs. Princeton (1912-4), 3:30 p.m.; Denver (22-9-8) vs.
Penn State (18-14-5), 7 p.m.
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Ohio State-Princeton winner vs. Denver-Penn State winner, 6:30 p.m.
WEST REGIONAL
At Sioux Falls, S.D.
Friday, March 23
St. Cloud State (25-8-6) vs. Air Force
(22-14-5), 4 p.m.; Minnesota State
Mankato (29-9-1) vs. Minnesota Duluth
(21-16-3), 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 24 — Final
St. Cloud State-Air Force winner vs.
Minnesota State Mankato-Minnesota
Duluth winner, 9 p.m.
FROZEN FOUR
at Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul
Thursday, April 5 — Semifinals
Saturday, April 7 — Final
Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.
AHL
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L OL SL Pts.
Lehigh Val. ... 42 16 3 5 92
Scranton ....... 37 19 5 2 81
Providence ... 38 21 3 2 81
Charlotte....... 37 26 0 3 77
Bridgeport .... 31 25 5 3 70
Hartford ........ 29 29 5 3 66
Springfield.... 28 31 5 1 62
Hershey......... 27 30 4 5 63
GF
232
203
188
219
173
183
182
175
GA
187
181
153
192
172
223
203
213
North Division
x-Toronto...... 45 17 1 1
x-Syracuse.... 39 19 3 4
Rochester ..... 30 19 10 6
Utica .............. 31 23 6 4
Laval .............. 24 33 6 2
Belleville ....... 24 36 2 3
Binghamton.. 21 33 7 3
92
85
76
72
56
53
52
209
207
197
179
183
158
157
138
169
187
185
230
234
202
Western Conference
Central Division
Manitoba ...... 38 19 4 4 84
Chicago......... 35 20 7 2 79
Iowa............... 30 20 9 5 74
Gr. Rapids..... 34 24 1 6 75
Rockford ....... 33 24 4 4 74
Milwaukee.... 32 28 4 1 69
Cleveland...... 21 33 6 3 51
222
202
198
197
196
178
152
169
171
201
183
196
198
215
Pacific Division
Tucson........... 35 18 4 1
Ontario.......... 32 20 4 2
San Diego ..... 32 21 3 1
Texas............. 33 22 7 3
Stockton........ 29 22 2 4
San Antonio.. 31 25 10 0
Bakersfield ... 25 22 9 1
San Jose........ 26 24 4 3
180
168
180
194
179
172
161
146
149
160
165
201
164
183
178
168
75
70
68
76
64
72
60
59
x-Clinched Playoff Berth
y-Clinched Divisional Title
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a
win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss.
TUESDAY'S GAMES
Toronto 4...............WB/Scranton 3 (OT)
Chicago 3.....................Cleveland 2 (OT)
Grand Rapids 2...................Milwaukee 1
San Antonio 4........................Manitoba 2
Tucson 4..................................San Jose 0
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
San Jose at Tucson.........................10:05
THURSDAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Cleveland.............................7
Stockton at Manitoba............................8
MLS
SATURDAY, MARCH 24
NYC FC at NEW ENGLAND...............1:30
Portland at FC Dallas........................3:30
D.C. United at Columbus.......................6
Minnesota United at New York............7
Sporting Kansas City at Colorado.......9
LA Galaxy at Vancouver......................10
Baseball
SPRING TRAINING
Wednesday's Games
BOSTON 8, Tampa Bay 3
Houston 8, Washington 3
St. Louis 13, Miami 6
Philadelphia 7, Toronto 7
Chicago Cubs 5, Texas 1
Oakland 2, Brewers (ss) 0
San Diego 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Atlanta 3, Detroit 2
Minnesota 3, Pittsburgh 1
New York Yankees 9, Baltimore 4
Kansas City vs. Cleveland, 9:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Milwaukee (ss) vs. Seattle, 9:40 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Atlanta vs. St. Louis, 1:05 p.m.
BOSTON vs. Baltimore, 1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. Houston, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Minnesota, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Toronto (ss), 1:07 p.m.
Colorado vs. Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Milwaukee, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Toronto (ss) vs. Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m.
Washington vs. N.Y. Mets, 6:10 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Texas (ss), 9:05 p.m.
Chicago WS vs. Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Texas (ss) vs. Seattle, 9:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. San Fran, 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. L.A. Dodgers, 10:05 p.m.
Tennis
MIAMI OPEN RESULTS
Men’s Singles First Round
Joao Sousa def. Ryan Harrison, 7-6
(4), 7-6 (4).; Robin Haase def. Yuichi
Sugita, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1.; Jiri Vesely def. Lukas Lacko, 7-6 (2), 6-3.; Mikael Ymer
def. Jan-Lennard Struff, 3-6, 7-5, 6-1.;
Maximilian Marterer def. Marton Fucsovics, 6-4, 6-4.; Pierre-Hugues Herbert
def. Taylor Fritz, 7-6 (4), 6-4.; Matthew
Ebden def. Gilles Simon, 6-3, 6-7 (2),
7-5.; John Millman def. Peter Gojowczyk, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4.; Michael Mmoh def.
Christopher Eubanks, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4.; Jeremy Chardy def. Rogerio Dutra Silva,
6-3, 7-6 (2).; Nicolas Jarry def. Cameron
Norrie, 7-6 (3), 6-2.; Benoit Paire def.
Mischa Zverev, 1-6, 6-1, 6-2.
Women’s Singles First Round
Carina Witthoeft def. Tatjana Maria,
6-3, 6-4.; Zarina Diyas def. Jennifer Brady, 7-5, 7-6 (8).; Ekaterina Makarova
def. Timea Bacsinszky, 6-2, 2-6, 6-4.;
Monica Niculescu def. Yulia Putintseva, 6-2, 6-4.; Alize Cornet def. Bethanie
Mattek-Sands, 6-2, 7-5.; Alison Riske
def. Magda Linette, 1-6, 6-0, 6-2.; Wang
Yafan def. Marketa Vondrousova, 6-2,
4-6, 7-6 (0).; Hsieh Su-wei def. Katie
Boulter, 6-4, 7-5.; Victoria Azarenka
def. CiCi Bellis, 6-3, 6-0.; Oceane Dodin
def. Veronica Cepeda Royg, vs. Oceane
Dodin, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-3.; Danielle Collins
def. Irina-Camelia Begu, 6-1, 6-1.; Naomi Osaka def. Serena Williams, 6-3, 6-2.
BASEBALL
Baltimore (AL): Signed P Alex Cobb to
a four-year contract. Designated P Jose Mesa Jr. for assignment. Optioned P
Hunter Harvey to Bowie (EL).
Kansas City Rioyals (AL): Assigned P
Richard Lovelady; RHPs Kevin Lenik,
Glenn Sparkman and Josh Staumont;
Cs Nick Dini and Parker Morin and INFs
Cody Asche, Erick Mejia and Ryan
O'Hearn to minor league camp.
New York (AL): Optioned INF-OF Tyler
Austin; OF Billy McKinney; and RHPs
Ben Heller and Giovanny Gallegos to
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
Seattle (AL): Claimed P Dario Alvarez
off waivers from the Chicago Cubs and
optioned him to Tacoma (PCL).
Texas (AL): Placed P Ronald Herrera
on 60-day DL.
Philadelphia (NL): Traded 2B Eliezer Alvarez to Texas for cash.
BASKETBALL
Atlanta (NBA): Signed G Jaylen Morris
to a multiyear contract.
Milwaukee (NBA): Signed G Brandon
Jennings to a second 10-day contract.
FOOTBALL
Atlanta (NFC): Signed TE Logan Paulsen on a one-year contract.
Detroit (NFC): Signed TE Luke Willson
and DT Sylvester Williams.
Indianapolis (AFC): Re-signed CB
Pierre Desir and OT-G Jack Mewhort.
Kansas City (AFC): Signed DT Xavier
Williams.
Minnesota (NFC): Signed LS Nick Dooley, K Kai Forbath and TE Josiah Price.
Waived LB Shaan Washington.
New England (AFC): Re-signed WR
Matthew Slater.
HOCKEY
NHL: Fined Tampa Bay F Steven Stamkos $5,000 for a dangerous trip against
Toronto D Morgan Rielly during a
March 20 game.
Arizona Coyotes (NHL): Named Mike
Berry vice president, corporate partnerships.
SOCCER
Dallas (MLS): Traded F-M Shaft Brewer
to Los Angeles FC for a 2019 fourthround draft pick and general allocation
money.
New York City FC (MLS): Signed D Joe
Scally.
Toronto (MLS): Re-signed M Victor
Vazquez to a multiyear contract extension.
COLLEGE
American Athletic Conference: Promoted chief financial officer Eric Ziady
to senior associate commissioner/
CFO.
Arizona: Announced freshman C Deandre Ayton will enter the NBA draft.
Buffalo: Named Mark Alnutt athletic
director.
Detroit: Announced junior F Kameron
Chatman declared for the NBA draft.
Cincinnati: Fired women’s basketball
coach Jamelle Elliott.
Louisville: Fired men’s basketball
coach David Padgett.
North Carolina: Named Robert
Gillespie assistant football coach.
N.C. State: Announced it will grant a
release to men’s basketball C Omer
Yurtseven so he can pursue a professional career or transfer.
Wake Forest: Announced junior men’s
basketball G Keyshawn Woods is leaving the program.
Ski conditions
MASSACHUSETTS
Berkshire East — mg, 20-42 base, 42-45
trails, 3-5 lifts
Blue Hills Boston — mg, 12-36 base, 215 trails, 2-4 lifts
Bousquet — pp, 10-30 base, 22-23
trails, 4-5 lifts
Catamount — mg, 20-40 base, 32-36
trails, 4-7 lifts
Jiminy Peak — mg, 25-50 base, 45-45
trails, 5-9 lifts
Nashoba Valley — mg, 12-24 base, 1717 trails, 10-11 lifts
Otis Ridge — pp, 25-40 base, 11-11
trails, 2-4 lifts
Ski Butternut — pp, 34-40 base, 22-22
trails, 6-11 lifts
Wachusett — mg, 16-52 base, 25-26
trails, 5-8 lifts
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Attitash — pp, 18-24 base, 67-68 trails,
6-11 lifts
Black — mg, 12-36 base, 42-45 trails,
3-5 lifts
Bretton Woods — pp, 30-40 base, 97-97
trails, 7-10 lifts
Cannon — pp, 24-36 base, 96-97 trails,
6-11 lifts
Cranmore — mg, 24-32 base, 52-57
trails, 3-7 lifts
Crotched — mg, 26-35 base, 25-25
trails, 3-5 lifts
Dartmouth Skiway — mg, 2-24 base,
20-22 trails, 4-4 lifts
Granite Gorge — pp, 14-32 base, 20-20
trails, 4-4 lifts
Gunstock — mg, 45-45 base, 54-55
trails, 6-6 lifts
King Pine — mg, 18-30 base, 17-17
trails, 4-5 lifts
Loon — pp, 35-46 base, 60-61 trails, 710 lifts
Mount Sunapee — pp, 24-32 base, 6166 trails, 6-10 lifts
Pats Peak — pp, 18-30 base, 28-28
trails, 6-11 lifts
Ragged — mg, 36-42 base, 52-57 trails,
5-6 lifts
Waterville Valley — pp, 50-57 base, 5360 trails, 6-11 lifts
Whaleback — mg, 2-24 base, 30-30
trails, 4-4 lifts
Wildcat — pp, 20-40 base, 48-48 trails,
3-5 lifts
VERMONT
Burke — pp, 16-40 base, 50-50 trails,
4-4 lifts
Jay Peak — pp, 20-46 base, 79-79 trails,
9-9 lifts
Killington — pp, 18-28 base, 152-155
trails, 14-22 lifts
Smugglers Notch — pp, 12-50 base, 7878 trails, 6-8 lifts
Stowe — pp, 36-72 base, 111-116 trails,
11-13 lifts
Sugarbush — pp, 20-52 base, 111-111
trails, 13-16 lifts
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C7
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Kelly Chrysler*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Honda Cars of Boston*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Honda Village*
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
Kelly Honda*
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
Boch Maserati*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Audi Shrewsbury
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
Ferrari Of New England*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Mirak Hyundai
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
Framingham Ford*
Kelly Infiniti*
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
Quirk Ford*
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
540 Southern Artery, Quincy
617-770-0070
quirkford.com
smart center Lynnfield
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Kelly Maserati*
smart center Boston
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Cityside*
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
VillageSubaru.com
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.*
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
Kelly Ford*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
Toyota of Watertown*
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Best Chevrolet*
Kelly Jeep*
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
Mirak Genesis
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
Mirak Chevrolet*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Lev Kia of Framingham*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Kelly Nissan of Danvers*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyauto.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
340 Mystic Ave, Medford
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
2018 BMW 320i xDRIVE 2018 BMW X1 xDRIVE28i
HEATED SEATS, NAVIGATION, MOONROOF, REARVIEW CAMERA
STOCK# L21197 • MSRP: $43,345
Lease For
$
299
*
per mo. 24 mos.
with $999 cash
or trade due at
signing
REARVIEW CAMERA, HEATED SEATS, PANORAMIC MOONROOF, NAVIGATION
STOCK# L21227 • MSRP: $41,345
Purchase For
Lease For
$
$
35,498
299
Purchase For
*
per mo. 24 mos.
with $999 cash
or trade due at
signing
$
34,998
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury
128 Boston Post Road, Route 20, Sudbury, MA 01776
855-733-8748 • BMWof Sudbury.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02134
877-727-1794 • HerbChambersBMW.com
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$
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T h e
C8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
SATURDAY
6 A.M.
Mostly cloudy and blustery with a few lingering
snow showers that can
be mixed with rain as the
nor’easter pulls away. Clearing
at night.
HIGH
39-44
LOW
29-34
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Brisk and still rather
chilly with intervals of
clouds and sunshine; a
stray snow shower or
flurry cannot be ruled out. Partly
cloudy at night.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
A reinforcing shot of
some chilly air comes in
from the north and we
remain below average
despite some sunshine. Mostly
clear and cold at night.
HIGH
40-45
LOW
29-34
HIGH
39-44
LOW
29-34
15
MONDAY
SUNDAY
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
3
3
11
1
3
6 P.M.
An area of high pressure
takes more of a firm
grasp on the weather
regime leading to a good
deal of sunshine. Clear to partly
cloudy at night.
A weak upper-air disturbance sliding across the
region can trigger a few
flurries and snow showers; otherwise, brisk and cold.
Cold at night.
HIGH
35-40
LOW
26-31
HIGH
34-39
LOW
26-31
2
2
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
FRIDAY
TODAY
11
30
3
2
10
15
9
14
Difficulty Level
3/22
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.
Fill in the single-box cages with the number in the top-left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
South dealer — Both sides vulnerable
North
♠ 832
♥ AQ7532
♦ AQ5
♣9
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Tides
TODAY: The fourth nor’easter of the month will depart to
the east, though snow showers will linger along the coast,
especially in eastern Maine.
TOMORROW: Cold air will remain locked in place
as high pressure builds in from the west. A few
snow showers can occur in the mountains.
EXTENDED: Still quite cold Saturday with
clouds and sun; snow showers will occur
in the mountains across the north. Chilly
again on Sunday.
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
High tides
3:14 3:46
10.6 9.8
9:36 9:54
-0.5 0.2
High tides
Old Orchard ME 2:55 3:28
Hampton
Beach NH
3:09 3:42
Plum Island
3:33 4:05
Ipswich
2:54 3:27
A.M. P.M.
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
3:14
3:14
3:06
3:16
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
3:29 3:59
3:05 3:38
2:01 2:35
2:58 3:30
Boston’s recent climate
Yesterday
High/low
36/32
Mean
34
Departure from normal -6
Departure for month -34
Departure for year +113
5 p.m. rel. humidity 64%
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
High tides
3:46
3:46
3:41
3:48
A.M. P.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
4:17
3:58
3:28
3:21
4:58
4:35
4:00
3:54
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
4:21 5:01
3:44 4:17
---12:25
---12:18
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
31
618
591
4370
4618
4211
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
Normal Temperatures
March
readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual Norm.
40.8 44.0
29.9 29.7
33.7 32.0
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 36°
100
1921
Record
high
83
80
60
Normal
high
47
40
New England marine forecast
Wind
Seas
Temp
 Boston Harbor NW 12-22 kts. 2-4 ft.
42/30
 East Cape
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
32
20
Record
low
Seas
Temp
0
Yesterday’s low 32°
 Martha’s
Vineyard
N 15-25 kts.
4-7 ft.
40/30
Cod Canal
N 25-35 kts.
10-14 ft. 39/29
 Nantucket
N 25-35 kts.
6-10 ft. 41/32
 Buzzards Bay
N 15-25 kts.
2-4 ft.
 Provincetown
N 25-35 kts.
10-14 ft. 39/34
39/29
Normal
low
-20
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
February
March
2.5"
2.3
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Almanac
6:44 a.m.
6:58 p.m.
12:15
9:59 a.m.
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Visibility
Wind
High/low temperature
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
2.0"
1.5"
Moon phases
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
1.15
0.06 0.01
FULL
Mar. 31
LAST
Apr. 8
NEW
Apr. 15
The moon at dusk is passing close by our line of
80 miles
sight to orange Aldebaran. Watch them separate
east at 39 m.p.h. through the evening. The moon is 1.3 light-seconds
19/14 away; Aldebaran is 65 light-years.
17.0”
HOROSCOPE
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
day, March 22, 2018:
This year you are full of energy,
and experience your life in a new
light. You will focus on your communication with friends and
loved ones. You even might sign
up for a workshop on how to
communicate effectively. If you
are single, the person you choose
to relate to now might not be so
appealing in a year. Stay open to
others, and try not to commit for
a while. If you are attached, the
two of you seem to enjoy each
other even more. You will see a
change in how the two of you relate. GEMINI often pops in and
out of your life.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You could be more in tune with
what is going on than you realize.
Return calls, schedule meetings
and push forward any matters involving communication. Later in
the day, misunderstandings
might dominate. Take a step back
from the chaos. Tonight: Lie low.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You can be possessive. If you find
this tendency emerging, try to
figure out what triggers it. Going
within yourself usually works, as
you can root out the cause. In the
next few weeks, be careful, as
misunderstandings run rampant.
Tonight: Do something that
makes you smile.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Speak your mind. Your words will
help clear up a problem. Your ruling planet, Mercury, goes retro-
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, March 22,
the 81st day of 2018. There are
284 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Composer-lyricist
Stephen Sondheim is 88. Evangelist broadcaster Pat Robertson is 88. Actor William Shatner is 87. Senator Orrin Hatch,
Republican of Utah, is 84. Actor M. Emmet Walsh is 83.
Singer-guitarist George Benson
is 75. Writer James Patterson is
0.08 0.12
0.01
T
T 0.05 T
1.0"
0.71
0.5"
T
T
T
0.03 0.01
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
Overcast Moon and Aldebaran – A. MacRobert
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thurs-
0.55
0.51
FIRST
Mar. 24
7
1885
71. CNN newscaster Wolf
Blitzer is 70. Composer Andrew
Lloyd Webber is 70. Sportscaster Bob Costas is 66. Actress Lena Olin is 63. Singer-actress
Stephanie Mills is 61. Actor
Matthew Modine is 59. Actress
Reese Witherspoon is 42.
ºIn 1312, Pope Clement V issued a papal bull ordering dissolution of the Order of the
Knights Templar.
February
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
0.00”
Precip days in March
13
0.0"
West
East
♠4
♥ K J 10 8
♦ 10 8 6 3
♣ A Q 10 5
♠765
♥9 4
♦J972
♣K J 6 4
South
♠ A K Q J 10 9
♥6
♦ K4
♣8732
South
1♠
2♠
4♠
West
Pass
Pass
Pass
Opening
North
2♥
3♦
6♠
lead — ♠
East
Pass
Pass
All Pass
7
“I have no doubt,” Unlucky Louie told me, “that they’ll
strike oil when they’re digging my grave.”
Louie attributes his bad results to bad luck, despite all
the evidence to the contrary. When he was declarer at
today’s six spades, West led a trump. Louie won and led a
club at the second trick. When West won and led another
trump, Louie had only 11 tricks. He tried a heart finesse
with dummy’s queen, but when East produced the king, the
result was down one.
“Without that trump lead,” Louie grumbled, “I could have
ruffed two clubs in dummy.”
Louie could make the slam by setting up a long suit.
After he wins the second trump, he leads a heart to dummy’s ace, ruffs a heart, ruffs a club and ruffs a heart.
When West discards, Louie draws the missing trump,
overtakes his king of diamonds with the ace and ruffs a
heart. He gets back to dummy with the queen of diamonds
to discard his last two clubs on the good hearts at Tricks 12
and 13.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ 4 ♥ K J 10 8 ♦ 10 8 6 3 ♣ A
Q 10 5. The dealer, at your left, opens one spade, and two
passes follow. What do you say?
March
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
4.80”
Norm. month to date 2.85”
Year to date
13.49”
Norm. year to date 9.46”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
ANSWER: If right-hand opponent had opened one spade,
some players would double. Others would want more in
high cards. In the “balancing” position, though, to double is
clear. You may have a game, and you mustn’t let the opponents buy the deal cheaply when your partner surely has
some points. “Balancing” actions may be shaded.
grade today. Expect some misunderstandings. A blast from the
past easily could appear. You
might meet someone with whom
you have a karmic tie. Tonight:
All smiles.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
You might feel tense with all the
activity around you. Be more direct in how you discuss a problem, but don't hit anyone below
the belt. A change within your
community or at work could
cause some stress. Try not to internalize any tension. Tonight:
Make sure you go to the gym.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You are flying high. Matters involving long-term goals will be
tossed into the limelight. You
might want to reflect on what
you have taken for granted. You
have changed, so your desires
could have changed as well. Make
an adjustment, if need be. To-
night: Out with friends.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You are in the limelight, and others appreciate your efforts. However, finding a point of agreement
could be challenging. You might
find the process long and tedious.
Push this matter aside for a
while, as your ruling planet, Mercury, goes backward. Tonight: Let
go of problems.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
The more reflective you are, the
more likely you will be to find out
why others are being secretive.
Say little, and listen a lot. Check
out all the information that is being shared before taking action;
otherwise, a problem could occur. Tonight: A change of plans is
a good thing.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Keep your day and plans intact.
Don't be surprised if you need to
make a last-minute adjustment.
Be as clear with a loved one as
possible, especially when discussing your relationship. Avoid a
misunderstanding. Tonight: Respond with sensitivity to a request.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
You are full of energy, but try not
to direct it toward a grumpy associate or roommate. You inadvertently might set off a quarrel,
which won't be easy to resolve.
Be smart and distance yourself.
You'll discover how creative you
can be around a loved one. Tonight: Do your thing, but be sensitive to a partner.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
You might not have the answers
you seek, but you do have information. Take time to make some
calls for yourself, even if just to
schedule a routine checkup. You
might be concerned about a
health-related issue; know that
you will handle it. Tonight: Happiest at home.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
You hear good news that you
might want to share. Know that
you are heading in the right direction. Both attached and single
Aquarians could find relating to
loved ones stressful in the next
few weeks. Don't worry, this is
just a phase. Tonight: Allow your
inner child to emerge.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Your sense of direction will help
push a project forward. Listen
carefully to what those you are
working with have to say. Remain
open to the possibility of change.
Refuse to stand on ceremony if
you experience a misunderstanding. Tonight: Cozy up at home
with a good book.
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com. (c) 2018 by
King Features Syndicate Inc.
ºIn 1638, religious dissident
Anne Hutchinson was expelled
from the Massachusetts Bay
Colony for defying Puritan orthodoxy. She settled in presentday Rhode Island.
ºIn 1765, the British Parliament passed the Stamp Act to
raise money from the American
colonies, which fiercely resisted
the tax. (The Stamp Act was repealed a year later.)
ºIn 1894, hockey’s first Stanley
Cup championship game was
played; home team Montreal
defeated Ottawa, 3-1.
ºIn 1933, during Prohibition,
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
signed a measure to make wine
and beer containing up to 3.2
percent alcohol legal.
ºIn 1958, movie producer
Mike Todd, the husband of actress Elizabeth Taylor, and
three other people were killed
in the crash of Todd’s private
plane in New Mexico.
ºIn 1978, Karl Wallenda, the
73-year-old patriarch of ‘‘The
Flying Wallendas’’ high-wire
act, fell to his death while attempting to walk a cable strung
between two hotel towers in
San Juan, Puerto Rico.
ºIn 1991, high school instructor Pamela Smart, accused of
recruiting her teenage lover
and his friends to kill her husband, Gregory, was convicted
in Exeter, N.H., of murder-conspiracy and being an accomplice to murder and was sentenced to life in prison without
parole.
ºIn 2013, anxious to keep Syr-
ia’s civil war from spiraling,
President Obama said during a
visit to Jordan that he worried
about the country becoming a
haven for extremists when
President Bashar Assad was
ousted from power.
ºLast year, a knife-wielding
man plowed a car into pedestrians on London’s Westminster
Bridge, killing four people,
then stabbed an armed police
officer to death inside the gates
of Parliament before being shot
dead by authorities.
ThursdayScene
G
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L OB E .C O M / L I F E S T Y L E
Can’t shake winter blahs?
POONEH GHANA
Try goofing off.
Dan Auerbach on stage with the Easy Eye Sound Revue.
MUSIC
B y D i a n e B a i r a n d Pa m e l a Wr i g h t
Globe Correspondents
When you’re
Dan Auerbach,
there are no days off
By Robert Steiner
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
There’s no disputing that Dan
Auerbach, the powerhouse guitarist and one half of the Black
Keys, is a very busy man. Since
taking a well-deserved break
from the band in 2015, he’s collaborated with artists from the
Pretenders to A$AP Rocky, recorded and toured with psychedelic side project the Arcs, and
last summer released “Waiting
on a Song,” a solo album featuring contributions by John Prine,
Mark Knopfler, and many other
music legends. All of this, and he
also found the time to launch his
o w n r e c o r d l a b e l , E a s y Ey e
Sound — a productive time for
someone technically on vacation.
Auerbach is currently on tour
with the Easy Eye Sound Revue,
AUERBACH, Page G4
TELEVISION
By Matthew Gilbert
GLOBE STAFF
MICHELE K. SHORT/HBO
Bill Hader plays a hit man who turns
to acting in “Barry.”
Hader’s ‘Barry’
a killer comedy
“Barry,” Bill Hader’s
excellent new HBO series, is a comedy, make
no mistake. It’s wry,
mostly, but it can also
be kooky and flip, as it
chronicles a man’s efforts to transition from
violent hit man to LA
actor. I laughed out
loud a number of times
w h i l e w at c h i n g t h e
eight episodes of the
first season, usually
thanks to Henry Winkler as failed-actor acting coach Gene Cousineau. Sitcom vet Winkler, like Ted Danson in
“Bored to Death,” is the
show’s seasoned pro;
he definitely has not
jumped the shark.
But there’s a dramatic undercurrent to
“ B a r r y,” w h i c h p r e mieres Sunday at 10:30
p.m. after the return of
“Silicon Valley.” And
F
GO BOWLING
Lace up those cool, retro shoes,
and hit the lanes. It’s fun; it’s affordable; and anyone can do it (thank
you bumpers!). We love the vintage
feel of family-owned South Boston
Candlepin (617-464-4858,
www.southiebowl.com, $25 per
hour, $2.50 shoes), with woodcarved ball returns, paper and pencil scoring, and manual lane resets.
They have 20 lanes that you can reserve online. You could also spend
lots of time goofing off at King’s
Dining & Entertainment in the Seaport District (617-401-0025,
www.kings-de.com, bowling $7-$10
per person per game or $15-$20 per
hour, $5 shoes), with 16 ten-pin
lanes, arcade games, shuffleboard,
foosball, air hockey, and billiards.
‘‘BARRY,’’ Page G7
Inside
BOTTLES
DANCE
TAKING ON
HEAVY HITTERS
WITH LIGHT BEER
REFLECTING
ON GOLDEN
MOMENTS
Night Shift hopes to
steal shelf space from
Bud and Miller with
low-alcohol Nite Lite
Local dance luminaries
talk about Alvin Ailey and
company on the occasion
of a 50th-anniversary visit
G2
G4
eel like you’ve got spring in your step yet? We may have just passed the equinox
Tuesday, but things still seem pretty wintry. If you’re starting to show symptoms
of too much dark and cold, consider taking some mental-health time. It just so
happens that March 22 is the unofficial National Goof-Off Day and even if you
can’t mark this “national holiday’’ on the day itself let us suggest some activities
to give you a goofy little break.
KAYANA SZYMCZAK FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
TAKE A SUNDAY DRIVE
ON THURSDAY
DIANE BAIR FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
When’s the last time you hopped in the car with no particular place to go? A ride with no rush, a drive taken for
sheer pleasure. Our suggestion: Head north for a slow, scenic cruise on Cape Ann (the other Cape). Follow Route 1 to
Route 128 east, passing the strip malls and office buildings, until you reach the bridge over Annisquam River, a
narrow estuary that divides Rockport and much of Gloucester from the mainland. Follow Route 127, with pretty
water views, and consider a stop at Halibut Point State
Park for a walk around the quarry and along tidal pools.
Back in the car, head into Rockport, and take a selfie next
to the famous Motif No. 1 fishing shack, considered the
most painted building in the world.
PLAY GAMES
You’re locked in a room; the
clock is ticking; you have 60 minutes to escape. You and your teammates need to solve the puzzles,
find the clues to complete the mission, and unlock the door. You
have become an action hero.
Sound like fun? For an hour, you’ll
think of nothing except the game
at hand. No wonder escape rooms
are all the rage. Check out Trapology, ranked as one of the country’s
top escape rooms (857-285-2085,
www.trapologyboston.com, $30).
The current themes are the Drunk
Tank, the Hustler, and the Retreat.
None is easy; all offer immersive,
pressure-packed fun.
GOOF OFF, Page G5
Paradise City
FINE CRAFT, ART
AND SCULPTURE THAT
EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS
JEWELRY FURNITURE SCULPTURE GLASS CERAMICS WEARABLE
W
LE ART PAINTING WOOD LIGHTING GIFTS
EYE-POPPING VISUAL SPLENDOR!
– Boston Globe
MARCH 23, 24 & 25
ROYAL PLAZA TRADE CENTER | MARLBOROUGH, MA
GET YOUR KEY TO THE CITY!
paradisecityarts.com
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
Insider
THING TANK
FROM THE BAR
A REVIEW OF THE WEEK IN THINGS
Spring calls
for the Bamboo
Three things in life are certain: death, taxes,
and March coming in like a lion and, well,
you know the rest. You likely spent the first
week of the month hunkered down with a
muscular bourbon cocktail — or, better yet,
just straight bourbon. And you should have.
It takes that kind of brawn to power you
through New England’s signature frosty
evenings. But when daylight savings kicks
in, a reminder that more daytime is again
the more civilized reality, a lighter drink is
in order — a drink like the Bamboo, a fino
sherry-based drink that’s floral and dry
with just a hint of nuttiness. It is to a martini what Hayden’s sonatas are to his symphonies: less intense but no less complex.
The story is it was created in the 1890s by
Louis Eppinger, a German bartender working at the American-owned Grand Hotel in
Yokohama, Japan. He had worked in San
Francisco prior, so the troops tasked him
with delivering them a taste of American
cocktails, a new phenomenon at that moment. They liked it so much, they brought it
home to the United States. History took a
shine to it and kept it here.
faceplant
A recent series of bombshell reports
contained revelations from Christopher
Wylie, former mastermind behind the
data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica,
now a whistle-blower on the firm’s
shady tactics, including the hijacking of
millions of Facebook profiles toward an
elaborate “information operations”
scheme undertaken to influence voters
in the 2016 presidential election. Wylie
is now blocked from Facebook (because
reasons) but it might not matter much;
#deleteFacebook is trending pretty hard
right now. Is Facebook about to get MySpaced? Does my Ello account still exist?
Is LinkedIn right now slapping itself in
the face and shouting into the bathroom
mirror to psych itself up for this huge
opportunity? (Probably not.) Most importantly, does Cambridge Analytica
have the fan fiction I wrote about Bob
Hoskins and me opening a bed and
breakfast in Wales and peacefully living
out our golden years together? Because
that was intended for Bobtopia members only.
LIZA WEISSTUCH
THE BAMBOO
Makes 1 drink
FAMILY BUSINESS
Speaking of disturbing revelations, some
equally enterprising data scientists on
Tumblr have used new promotional images from Nintendo’s forthcoming Mario
Tennis Aces game to determine with remarkably unsettling precision . . . the
whole situation regarding Luigi’s heretofore unimagined endowment. I really, really don’t want to get into this, but I will
say that the new Nintendo system does
a remarkable job at rendering what appears to be a lycra-cotton micromesh.
Why Luigi would select white shorts in
that style for broad virtual daylight use
is anyone’s guess. It may or may not
have something to do with Mario typically getting most of the attention, but
who knows? I’m just trying to keep
things clean here. These aren’t even real
people.
1½ ounces fino Sherry
¾ ounce dry vermouth
1 dash orange bitters
1 orange twist (for garnish)
LIZA WEISSTUCH FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
1. Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass. Add
ice. Stir for 15 seconds.
2. Strain into a coupe. Garnish with orange twist.
Adapted from Mr. Boston Bartender’s Guide
BOTTLES
Night Shift releasing Nite Lite,
taking on Bud and Miller
SWEET NOTHINGS
Dogs. They sure seem to like you, but do
they like-you like-you? And how can you
be sure? The thing is, you can’t. Which is
why dog owners on Twitter are no longer
taking their pups’ perked ears, sloppy
kisses, and wagging tail at their nonverbal word, opting instead for a classic
fourth-date move: The forced “I love
you.” (Like, in human English, which is
not commonly spoken by non-cartoon
dogs.) The results, as one might expect
with signs of affection achieved through
strict regimens of discipline and reward,
are mixed. Now we just need to get
them to admit what they did to the sofa.
THE SIGH IN SCIENCE
March is acting like December, gorillas
are acting like people, and much to the
delight of the Internet, Ivanka Trump
dressed up in a lab coat and pretended
to do science stuff for a photo op — and
it’s nothing short of a breakthrough in
meme engineering. The most popular
shot from the day captured a gloved and
goggled Ivanka testing the nicotine levels of a sample of vape juice and serving
some fierce Debbie Gibson from “Mega
Shark vs. Giant Octopus” lab-scene realness; but it set Twitter’s imagination
running wild, imagining recipes that call
for the “tears of exactly four poor children” or that the young Trump is “training for the Space Force.”
MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
T
By Gary Dzen
GLOBE STAFF
he six-year-old brewery known for
dank IPAs and bracing sours is releasing 12-packs of Nite Lite, a
low-alcohol brew the company is
hoping steals shelf space from the
Budweisers and Millers of the world.
“Our team just wanted something nice and
simple and easy-drinking,” says Night Shift
cofounder Rob Burns. “We thought it could be
kind of fun to see if we could brew a better
version of Bud
Light.”
After debuting
small batches of Nite Lite each of the
last two years, the
company is betting
more consumers
will want crushable craft and is
hoping to sell 4,000
barrels of the lager
i n 2 0 1 8 . I t ’s t h e
largest debut run
for a single beer in
Night Shift’s history.
There are several qualities drinkers
consistently look
for in their light lagers: crisp, clean
taste, mild sweetness, and a lack of
overt bitterness. To
achieve that end the big brewers use relatively
few hops (as compared to say a standard pale
ale), and they lighten things up with corn, an
ingredient craft brewers have long used as a
punch line.
Night Shift built Nite Lite similarly, adding
real corn (as opposed to corn syrup or rice syrup) and brewing with a touch of Saaz hops,
the classic bittering agent in a Czech pilsner.
As opposed to the macros, the malt-to-corn ratio is higher in Night Shift’s beer, which is un-
pasteurized and checks in at 4.3 percent ABV
and 120 calories.
“It certainly tastes better than a Bud
Light,” says Burns.
A big draw with light lagers is price: you
can buy a 30-pack of cans of many of the big
brands for a little more than $20. Night Shift
can’t offer that, but it’s pricing its 12-packs of
Nite Lite around $15, close to what you might
pay for something like Michelob Ultra. A 4pack of Nite Lite will sell for 6 or 7 bucks,
compared to the brewery’s standard price of
$14 for 4-packs of
IPAs or stouts.
Night Shift isn’t
the first craft brewery to make a produ c t a i m e d at t h e
m a c r o d r i n k e r.
Michigan’s Short’s
Brewing makes Local’s Light. Salem’s
Notch Brewing
brews The Mule, a
4.2 percent ABV
corn lager. But it’s
notable Night Shift
is targeting the big
guys — and the
shelf space and tap
handles that go
along with them —
specifically. Current sales data in
Massachusetts lists
NIGHT SHIFT
100 percent of the
light lager market
as belonging to macrobreweries.
“We’re gonna have fun gunning for their
tap handles instead of our craft beer brethren,” says Burns. “ If we can get even one percent of the Mass. lite beer segment, that
would be a win for us.”
Expect to see Nite Lite in Massachusetts,
New York, and Maine starting in April.
Gary Dzen can be reached at
gary.dzen@globe.com.
LAUGH LINES
MYQ KAPLAN
‘I really don’t know why
more than one person has
Netflix. Like, I got my
password from my old
roommate, he got his from
his parents, they got theirs
from Kevin Bacon.’
— Kaplan performs at Cityside Restaurant and
Bar in Brighton on Monday
NICK A. ZAINO III
VIRGINIA SHERWOOD/NBC/FILE
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G3
VOTE
FOR YOUR FAVORITE
RESTAURANTS
If you love dining out, weigh in. Your vote will
help us crown Boston’s best restaurant.
Globe.com/MunchMadness
#munchmadness
2018
Presented by
GAELLE BERI
F
By Lauren Daley
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
or Darlingside, the magic happened when they
took three microphones away.
It was a deceptively simple move that took the
Boston-based string quartet years to figure out.
But when they did — on their 2015 sophomore album, “Birds Say” — a new sound emerged, a new niche and
new fanbase, said bassist Dave Senft, 32, of Waltham.
Because any way you slice it, when four upper-register male
voices sing in harmony around one microphone — if they do it
well — they inevitably will be compared to Simon & Garfunkel,
Crosby Stills Nash & Young, and/or the Beach Boys.
“We didn’t strive to sound
like the Beach Boys, but we’ll
take it,” said guitarist-banjoist
Don Mitchell, 34, of Waltham.
“One of most common [comparisons] we get is Crosby Stills
Nash & Young, because we’re
four men in harmony, but none
of us would [cite] them as a major influence. I mean, I grew up
with the Beach Boys in the car,
for sure, but I never thought
they were cool — my mom listened to them.”
This last line makes Senft
laugh.“We don’t try to sound
like any band,” he agrees.
Rounded out by fiddlermandolinist Auyon Mukharji of
Cambridge and cellist-guitarist
Harris Paseltiner of Waltham,
Darlingside is a bold-roast
blend of coffeehouse folk,
sparse lyrical poetry, ’70s-era
male harmonies, bluegrass
strings, and dreamy ambience.
Lyrically, they’re apt to allude to
David Foster Wallace and Super
Mario Brothers. Sonically, their
sensibilities lie somewhere between Brian Wilson and Brian
Eno.
The Williams College alumni met in the mid-aughts as
members of the college’s allmale a cappella group.
“I was a total a cappella geek
as a kid. I was definitely looking
forward to singing in college,”
says Senft.
“I sang anywhere and everywhere from age 8 onwards,”
says Mitchell. “I did musical
theater and choir in high school
at Deerfield Academy.” He pauses before admitting: “I was
briefly in a rock band that exclusively covered Dave Matthews and Rage Against the
Machine.”
While a cappella brought
them together, it was a songwriting course that “made us
realize songwriting was part of
our lives,” says Senft, who was a
math major. “I never considered being a professional musician, but then you start writing
songs and get addicted. When
DARLINGSIDE
At the Sinclair, Cambridge,
March 22 (sold out). At the
Academy of Music Theatre,
Northampton, March 24 at
7:30 p.m. Tickets $20-$25,
www.darlingside.com/shows
you find friends who are also
addicted to songwriting, it
turns into a bigger thing.”
The course also gave them
their name: Their instructor
would cite Arthur QuillerCouch’s advice to young writers
‘We didn’t strive
to sound like the
Beach Boys, but
we’ll take it.’
DON MITCHELL
guitarist-banjoist of
Darlingside, which also draws
comparisons to Crosby Stills
Nash & Young
to “murder your darlings.”
“So Darlingside was a
cheeky play on that — like pesticide, or fratricide,” Mitchell
says. “But we changed the C to
S, so it isn’t super morbid.”
They eventually moved into
a house together in Hadley,
near Northampton, around
2009.
Lauren Daley can be reached at
ldaley33@gmail.com.
When is the last time you went to a great antiques show?
Don’t Miss This South Shore Tradition – The 31st Annual
HINGHAM ANTIQUES
SHOW & SALE
Hingham Middle School, 1103 Main St – Rt 228
Take Exit 14 off Rte 3 to Rte 228. In about 1/2 mile, you hit lights at Rte 53. Go straight across.
The Middle School is set back off Rt 228 on the left about 1 mile from the lights.
47 EXHIBITORS SHOWING QUALITY ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES FOR YOUR HOME - RAIN OR SHINE
This Sat, Mar 24, 11 to 5 & Sun, Mar 25, 11 to 4
Admission $7.00. With this BG Ad $6.00
To Benefit Hingham HS Green Team • Managed by Goosefare Promotions
For a list of exhibitors and hwat they are bringing, see www.goosefareantiques.com
TH 3/22
* Fine Jewelry * Ornaments * Leather * Stained Glass * Vintage Chic * Folk Art * Doll Clothes *
The Crafters are Back at the SPRING Castleberry Faire!
Craft Festival
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Despite comparisons to big names,
Mass. quartet forges its own sound
“All our friends were going
to grad school or getting wellpaying jobs, and we were moving into a house together and
playing music without a clear
idea of where to go next,” says
Senft.
“In 2010, we were playing
any gigs offered,” Mitchell adds.
“ We played a gig in a candy
store. We busked at farmers’
markets for rutabaga or cabbage.”
Eventually, the four moved
to Boston and worked with producer Dan Cardinal for their
second and third albums. It was
their second album that thrust
the quartet into the national
spotlight. They found themselves in Rolling Stone and
praised on NPR. They opened
for Patty Griffin, and saw mainstage time at the UK’s Cambridge Folk Fest.
Their third album, “Extralife,” now takes them on tour
from Seattle to Glasgow, with
two hometown shows: a soldout date Thursday at the Sinclair in Cambridge, and Saturday at the Academy of Music
Theatre in their former stamping grounds of Northampton.
The term “extralife” will remind any old-school Nintendo
fan of getting that one-up in Super Mario Brothers.
“ ‘Extralife’ has a literal
meaning from the video game,
but also a second meaning, as
in a starting over, or rebirth,”
says Senft. “My own deeper
meaning is that it focuses on
the extra in life — when you
make it big, and you’re looking
for the next thing. And also, I
just had a son, so there’s one extra life in my house.”
Mitchell says the album also
describes various dystopian visions. “When we got down to
writing, it was around the 2016
election, and we were anxiously
looking toward the future.”
The band just announced
that they’ll play Newport Folk
Fest this summer, which also
has them a bit on edge, Mitchell
says.
“We’re very excited, but a little nervous because of its history with Bob Dylan going electric. We’ll be bringing our synt h e s i z e r, s o i f p e o p l e a r e
expecting us to play traditional
bluegrass . . .” Mitchell lets the
sentence hang and laughs.
“Some people call us bluegrass,
but we’re just the trappings of
bluegrass — mandolin, fiddle,
acoustic guitar, one microphone.”
Shriner’s Auditorium * Wilmington, MA
Saturday March 24 | 10am-5pm • Sunday March 25 | 10am-4pm
American Made Arts, Crafts, Food & Music!
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Admission $7.00 Adult * Under 14 FREE
SAVE $2.00 WITH THIS COUPON * Limit 6 people per coupon
One Admission Good for BOTH Days! castleberryfairs.com
GPS Location: 99 Fordham Rd., Wilmington, MA • From 93 Take Exit 39
Herbal Dips * Quilts * Fragrance * Wearable Art * Metal * Paper * Clay * Personal Care * Pewter BG
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To be included in Boston’s
best seasonal entertainment
coverage year round, reserve by:
Summer Movie Preview April 24
Summer Arts Preview May 15
Fall Arts Preview September 4
Museums October 9
Holiday Arts Preview November 13
The Year in Arts December 11
To advertise, contact
Carolyn Sullivan
617-929-2525
carolyn.sullivan@globe.com
* Country Woodcrafts * Scarves * Photography *
For neo-folkies
Darlingside,
one mic is plenty
* Ceramic * Fleece * Candles * Fiber Arts * Watercolors *
From left: Dave Senft, Auyon Mukharji, Don Mitchell, and Harris Paseltiner of Darlingside.
T h e
G4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
50 years of inspiration
from Alvin Ailey in Boston
BY JEFFREY GANTZ | GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
B
KEYSTONE/GETTY IMAGES
ack on Jan. 27, 1968, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater made its Celebrity Series debut with a pair of performances on the same day at John Hancock Hall. Since then, the company has become an almost annual Celebrity
Series visitor to Boston. Fifty years later, this weekend’s appearance will be
its 48th.
The repertoire will include three Boston premieres: Jamar Roberts’s “Members Don’t
Get Weary,” Gustavo Ramírez Sansano’s “Victoria,” and current Ailey artistic director Robert Battle’s “Mass.” All five programs will end with Ailey’s signature 1960 piece, “Revelations.”
Here is what Battle and some local dance luminaries had to say about Ailey and his
company on the occasion of this 50th-anniversary visit.
JEAN APPOLON
Director of Jean Appolon Expressions
Alvin Ailey’s choreography and his
dance company mean everything to
me, because growing up in Haiti, when
I first saw them
perform on TV, it
left this mark in my
heart. Today I feel
g r a t e f u l t o h av e
them as my inspiration and model to
continue dancing
and doing my work
around the world.
I characterize Mr. Ailey’s works as
very revitalizing and powerful — they
talk about everyday life and real issues.
As a Haitian-American, I can say that
his works will continue to move every
race of people, because they and his
company are organic. And today
they’re even more relevant, because
the issues that Mr. Ailey spoke about
and choreographed decades ago are
still coming through in our lives today.
was a football player. I was like, “That
big dude can dance!” It wasn’t until
later that I realized that it was Mr. Ailey. Changed my whole outlook on that
style of dance.
To see men and
women of color on
stage in such a
beautiful light of
spirit, hope, and
dignity is lifechanging. There’s
nothing better than
that moment. Given what the African-American continues to deal with,
to know that, even with all the trials
and tribulations, Alvin Ailey American
Dance Theater can still show how
dance can bring understanding and
courage is remarkable, to say the least.
ALVIN AILEY
AMERICAN DANCE
THEATER
Presented by
Celebrity Series of
Boston. At Boch
Center Wang
Theatre,
March 22-25.
Tickets $35-$85.
800-982-2787,
www.celebrity
series.org
ADRIENNE HAWKINS
Director of Impulse Dance Company
I first saw the Ailey company in
Tempe, Ariz., around 1969 or ’70. I
went to ASU, and I was the only black
person in the dance
department. Seeing
work with music I
was familiar with,
identified with, and
wanted to move to
with dancers that
looked like me valid at e d t h e m o v e ment vocabulary
that spoke to me, and that was pivotal
for me. The familiar feelings of family,
friends, and experiences that I had as a
black person were put to music and
dance.
I think the voice that was brought
into the dance world by the Ailey company speaks to people of different
backgrounds, cultures, and races. The
company has toured the world, and
the one thing that always speaks to
people is the feeling behind the movement, the person inherent in conveying the message in the movement, the
place in the heart that it takes lives. It
is not isolated, it is not conceptual, it is
not hidden. It is thought out and communicated to the audience.
ROBERT BATTLE
Director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
I first encountered Ailey’s
work when I started dancing and we
were shown videotapes. I think what
struck me was the
humanity. Seeing
modern dance for
the first time, it can
sometimes be a little bit difficult to
understand if
you’re not versed in
it. But this was immediate for me,
and I think it was partly because people looked like me and told stories I
could relate to.
The way he was able to make dance
accessible, and certainly modern
dance accessible, that is how I would
characterize his work. It is so personal
yet universal. He’s telling these stories
about his upbringing, his mother, his
experiences in the church, whatever,
and though he’s choreographing for a
huge audience, it seems like he’s talking directly to you. I believe that he in
his work and his example allows a lot
of people who make dances to dare to
tell a message from the heart, and that
it’s OK to be acceptable, because sometimes that can perceived to be a dirty
word in dance. He made it all right.
Dancers performing
Alvin Ailey’s
“Revelations.”
BILLY MCCLAIN
Half of the Wondertwins (with his
brother Bobby)
Our first true encounter with Alvin
Ailey American Dance Theater came in
our late 20s. The company’s work for
us is a historical map of African-American history being told through movement, so looking at it through an entertainment lens doesn’t do it justice.
The honesty and integrity of the work
has allowed us to take a deeper look at
our own work.
When I first saw Ailey on video, I
didn’t know it was him. I thought it
Jeffrey Gantz can be
reached at
jeffreymgantz@
gmail.com.
GERT KRAUTBAUER
The music
stays at
the core for
Auerbach
A. It was amazing. I feel like I’ve
learned so much in the last year, about
recording, about music-making, about
life in general. It’s been an amazing experience being around these people
who, for some of them, [music] is the
only thing they’ve done since the ’50s.
They were never even touring musicians; they were creating music [in the
studio] every day. So just being around
those people was so inspiring.
uAUERBACH
Q. As someone who has collaborated
with artists across genres, does your
creative process change depending on
the music you’re working on?
A. It’s all just music, I think. No matter
what I’m working on, it’s going to be
my aesthetic that I lend to it. I don’t
like to go into a session having a preconceived idea of what it’s going to be
or what I need to do. I just like to really
let it unfold when I get there. I think
the thing that really translates in music, it’s not the thing you practice a million times, but the thing you just stumble on — it just reeks of humanity. It
has none of the perfection of something that has been labored over; I
want to make music that has that. It almost is subconscious, and when you
listen to it you might not even notice it,
but that’s a magical quality I really
look for in what I work on, that spontaneity.
Continued from Page G1
featuring fellow labelmates Robert
Finley, Shannon Shaw, and Shannon
and the Clams. We spoke with Auerbach by phone ahead of the Revue’s
House of Blues gig Sunday to talk
about the new record, the new label,
and playing a whole lot of music.
Q. How’s the tour been going so far?
A. It’s been really fun. Everybody
seems to be really happy and full of joy,
the crowds have been amazing, and
the shows feel like they’ve been getting
better and better. Every act in the show
has an album that we worked on in the
past six months and that we have available through the label, so it’s a good
showcase for the label.
Q. With “Waiting on a Song,” how did
you land on a more laid-back and vintage pop sound versus the heavier,
bluesy songs you’ve done with other
bands?
A. It all started with these writing sessions last summer, meeting people like
Pat McLaughlin, John Prine, Roger
Cook, all these interesting folks to be
writing with. Those writing sessions
eventually turned into recording sessions, and those recording sessions
turned into this record, and I really
didn’t plan any of it. I sort of let it all
unfold.
ALYSSE GAFKJEN
‘I feel like I’ve learned so much in the last
year, about recording, about music-making,
about life in general.’
DAN AUERBACH
Q. What was it like to work with so
many legendary songwriters on one album?
Q. What made you want to start Easy
Eye Sound at this point in time?
A. Honestly, I feel like I’ve been doing
this all along. I would find an artist
that I really liked or respected, I would
invite them to Nashville, we’d make a
record, but then I’d help them find a
label. So for years, I was basically running a record label, but then giving the
records away [laughs]. I had this
unique opportunity to work out a deal
with Warner, and it’s just really great.
It allows me to give artists really amazing record deals, and it’s been awesome so far.
DAN AUERBACH AND THE EASY EYE
SOUND REVUE
At House of Blues, Boston, March 25
at 7 p.m. Tickets $35,
www.livenation.com
Q. Are there artists you haven’t yet
worked with that you hope to cross off
the bucket list?
A. No, I don’t have anybody in particular. I just like following my gut and see
what presents itself. Because if it’s
meant to be, it’ ll be meant to be; I
don’t go chasing anybody. Like Shannon and the Clams, who we just put
out their record, I heard them for the
first time at a record shop in Memphis.
So it’s sort of by chance, and I think
that’s sometimes the best way.
Q. Nearly 20 years into your career,
how has your perspective on life as a
musician — from songwriting to recording to touring — changed since
you first started?
A. It’s really weird, but my life in the
last year resembles more of what I remember when I was first playing music with my family, listening to records.
I don’t feel like it’s changed, I feel like
I’ve been doing the same thing since I
realized I loved music. Projects will
come and go, but the music, and my
life playing music has always been really constant. I still get excited to play
guitar, or I’m still looking for that one
guitar amp that’s going to blow my
mind. Nothing gets me off more than
writing a great song, and that moment
when you hear it for the first time coming out of your mouth. Since I was 14,
that’s what it’s been all about. Every
day is a new surprise, and it’s always
challenging, but musical. It feels like a
dream, honestly.
Interview was edited and condensed.
Robert Steiner can be reached at
robert.steiner@globe.com
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G5
Goof off the fun
way on National
Goof-Off Day
of Thrones cape you bought for Halloween, a dashing
pirate chapeau, or that just-this-side-of-scandalous
leather bustier (atop sensible clothing please; it’s still
March.) Donated all your wild duds to your niece’s
dress-up box? Consider this a good time to replenish.
Nothing beats the nostalgia-inducing shopping experience and ultra-affordable prices at The Garment District (617-876-5230, www.garmentdistrict.com).
Willing to part with some serious cash in the name of
adding a touch of glorious goofiness to your everyday
look? The glass-beaded Hostess Cup Cakes clutch
($495) at the Alice and Olivia boutique (617-2979059, www.aliceandolivia.com) is an instant attention-getter.
uGOOF OFF
Continued from Page G1
FLIP OUT
Forget that bouncing on a trampoline is good for
you — getting your blood pumping and muscles working. Do it for the sheer, nostalgic, letting-go fun of it.
At Skyzone (857-345-9693, www.skyzone.com/boston, $16 for 60 minutes, $20 for 90 minutes, and $24
for 120 minutes), you can bounce, fly, and flip into a
pit filled with 10,000 foam cubes, play aerial basketball, and test your skills on the Warrior Course, with a
zipline, aerial silks, slide, and warped wall. Skyzone
also offers dodgeball games for kids of all ages.
GET OUT
(WITHOUT GETTING CAUGHT)
Spending National Goof-Off Day playing Monster
Hunter World on your computer? Rookie mistake! If
you’re dedicated to goofing off today, make it count.
Sneak away for an extra-long lunch hour at an unlikely hideaway — perhaps the Butterfly Place in Westford (978-392-0955, www.butterflyplace-ma.com,
$13). Hanging around in the company of a bazillion
brilliantly hued free-flying butterflies feels positively
giddy.
GET GOOFY ON STAGE
In one of the most memorable scenes of the goofoff classic “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,’’ the film’s namesake hero lip-synchs “Danke Schoen” on a float in Chicago’s German-American parade. We can’t promise
you swaying crowds and an oompah band, but if
you’re looking to vocally crush it in front of adoring
fans, there’s always karaoke. Why not bring your inner Lorde or Sam Smith out to play today, when anything goes? Bonus points if you select “Danke Schoen”
or the movie’s other memorable tune, “Twist and
Shout.” Both songs, and 11,000 more, are part of the
catalog at Limelight Stage + Studios (617-423-0785,
www.limelightboston.com). Featuring Asian-style karaoke boxes (six private rooms and a main stage), and
a full menu, this sleek, club-like space offers a nightly
DJ-hosted show. Rather laugh your guts out than sing
your heart out? Try catching the (PG-13-rated) main
stage show at Improv Boston (617-263-6887,
www.improvboston.com, $18). Using (voluntary) suggestions from the audience, these improvisational artistes-slash-professional-goofballs are masters at
transforming the mundane into the hilarious, in a mix
of improv and topical sketches. Feeling like: I’d love to
get up there and do that? Improv Boston offers courses that’ll teach you how to improvise, onstage and off.
GOT KIDS?
KEVIN WINZELER
Skyzone offers dodgeball games for kids of all ages. Below: Kids at play at the
expanded and renovated Discovery Museum.
Skip the laundry and errands and make Goof-Off
Day a holiday devoted to fun. Head over to Acton and
check out the newly reopened Discovery Museum
(978-264-4200, www.discoveryacton.org, $14.50 per
person). Expanded and renovated, this museum has
twice the exhibit space of its old incarnation, with an
emphasis on STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math.) Everything is hands-on, playful,
and designed for tinkering and exploration.
HOW TO BE GOOFY, FOR REAL
Ready for a big life change? Sure, it’s fun to be
goofy for a day, but maybe you’re thinking: I’d like to
actually be Goofy for a living! If you can handle wearing a giant furry costume and being hugged 10,000
times a day, perhaps you’ve got what it takes to be a
Disney character performer. Disney hires folks to portray “face characters” (like the Disney princesses) and
“fur characters,” like Goofy, for Walt Disney World,
Disneyland, Disney Cruise Line, and their theme
parks in Hong Kong, Paris, and Shanghai. The audition process is rigorous, and the costumes can weigh
as much as 47 pounds. For information, go to
www.disneyauditions.com.
DON SOME CRAZY-COOL DUDS
If your daily activities demand a corporate look,
add some elan to your outfit with one fabulously goofy
accessory item. Now’s the time to pull out that Game
JON CHASE FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Diane Bair and Pamela Wright can be reached at
bairwright@gmail.com.
TONY AWARDS
®
INCLUDING
4 WINNER BEST PLAY
THE BEST PLAY OF THE YEAR
“
NOW PLAYING - MUST CLOSE SUNDAY! | SHUBERT THEATRE
.
‘THE HUMANS’, ‘THE HUMANS’, ‘THE HUMANS’.”
Charles ISHERWOOD
BUY TICKETS AT
BOCHCENTER.ORG
BOCH CENTER BOX OFFICE
866.348.9738
GROUPS OF 10+ CALL
617.532.1116
Boch Center is a trademark of The Wang Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.
THEATER
THEATER
THEATER
MUSIC
MUSIC
DANCE
LA CAGE AUX FOLLES
THE INTERACTIVE
SOLVE-THE-CRIME COMEDY!
MERRIMACK REPERTORY
THEATRE
A NIGHT AT
BACH’S COFFEEHOUSE
50TH ANNIV. CONCERT WHEN
JAMES BROWN SAVED BOSTON
WHAT WOULD YOU DO FOR
LOVE?
“Downright Hilarious!” - Huffington Post
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 5 & 8, Sun at 3 & 7
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
Book, Music, and Lyrics by Dan Finnerty
Created by Dan Finnerty and Sean Daniels
Additional Music by Dan Lipton
Directed by Sean Daniels
Mar 21 - Apr 15 • Lowell, MA • mrt.org/danny
celebrated baroque orchestra to perform
Regent Theatre Arlington * Mar 24th, 8pm
Feat. James Brown Band Frontman Tony Wilson
(aka “Young James Brown”)
Tix /Info: 781-646-4849 * RegentTheatre.com
A Harvey Robbins / Tony Wilson Production
Honoring Martin Luther King, Jr.
Youthful passion and fierce family rivalry make
The award-winning Company Theatre presents
the beloved musical “La Cage aux Folles” from
Friday, March 16 through Sunday, April 8, at The
Company Theatre Center for Performing Arts, 30
Accord Park Drive, Norwell.
Tickets: $41, $43
A SERIOUS COMEDY ABOUT
MIDLIFE ENNUI
CONTEMPORARY CLASSIC —
STARTS APR. 20!
The off-Broadway comedy about Being Alive,
What I Did For Love and All That Jazz! “Charming, heartfelt, and insightful.” - TheaterMania.
Zeitgeist Stage at the BCA, March 2-24. Performances: Wed thru Sunday. TIX: 617.933.8600,
www.BostonTheatreScene.com
Caryl Churchill’s masterpiece about the sacrifices
required to be a “top girl” in a man’s world.
“A mind-lifting experience.” — NY POST
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
MUSIC
COOKING WITH
THE CALAMARI SISTERS
RIVETING NEW PLAY —
THRU MARCH 31 ONLY!
Dominique Morisseau’s acclaimed Off
Broadway hit about an auto plant in Detroit.
“Taut, keenly observed, and THOROUGHLY
ABSORBING!” — THE BOSTON GLOBE
“Storytelling at its finest! EXCEPTIONAL!”
— JARED BOWEN, WGBH
“POWER & GRACE! The cast is the heart & soul
of this production.”— WBUR’S THE ARTERY
“ POWERFUL & TIMELY!” — BROADWAY WORLD
A Huntington Theatre Company production
South End / Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
this tragic romance one for the ages. Cranko’s
well-paced storytelling and Prokofiev’s evocative
score expertly capture the beauty and humanity
of Shakespeare’s masterpiece. Runs Mar 15
Tickets: 508-754-3231 or
www.companytheatre.com
Two over-the-top plus-size Italian Sisters from
Brooklyn, Cook, Sing & Dance outrageous musical numbers that get a bit naughty as they share
their saucy secrets that will leave you rolling in
the aisles
April 12- May 20th
Thurs 2 & 7, Fri 8, Sat 2 & 8, Sun 2
REGENT THEATRE
7 Medford Street, Arlington, MA 02474
Box off 855-448-7469 Groups 888-264-1788
PlayhouseInfo.com
Vivaldi - Sonata for Violins “Follia”
Tuckerman Hall, Worcester
call the box office at (781) 871-2787 or visit
There was “La Cage aux Folles”!
Telemann - Burlesque de Quixote
Sunday, March 25, 4pm
For more information and to order tickets,
Before “The Birdcage”...
Bach - Brandenburg Concerti No.’s 4 & 5
WWW.MUSICWORCESTER.ORG
Adults $49-$55; Students $17.50; Youth $7.50
to Apr 8. Tickets at bostonballet.org or call
CLASSICAL WOMEN
JANICE WEBER: GUEST PIANIST
Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto in A Minor
Peggy Stuart Coolidge: Spirituals; plus Beach,
Maconchy, Boulanger, Mendelssohn-Hensel
Orchestra of Indian Hill, Littleton, MA
Saturday, March 24, 7:30 pm. Tix $20-50
978-486-9524 www.indianhillmusic.org
SAT., JUNE 2 @ 7:30
REGENT THEATRE, ARLINGTON
617.695.6955.
MOSCOW FESTIVAL BALLET
SLEEPING BEAUTY
presented by Music Worcester
Friday, March 30, 2018 at 8pm
11th annual tribute to the late MAI CRAMER
HE’S THE PRINCE. SHE’S THE
REBEL.
2 Plays, 4 Actors, 49 Characters: Behold William
Shakespeare and George Bernard Shaw’s most
famous creations side by side, in repertory, from
Bedlam the high-wire, NYC theater company.
MAR 7-25. artsemerson.org
Featuring
HANDEL AND HAYDN SOCIETY
MARCH 23 + 25, 2018
Luther Guitar Jr. Johnson, Michelle Willson,
SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 7PM
STRAND THEATRE
Anthony Geraci’s HipNotics w/ Dennis Brennan
Grammy award-winning a cappella group TAKE6
Harry Christophers, conductor
H+H Orchestra and Chorus
Moscow Festival Ballet returns in a
and Willie J. Laws, Racky Thomas, Peter Hi-Fi, a
Blues Harmonica Battle and more! Proceeds after
aspect of this ultimate religious statement moved
A BOSTON AREA PREMIERE
BY KATE CAYLEY
the spirit. Bach saves the deepest until last…
A dynamic & compelling new play about a master
forger put on trial for selling a long-lost Vermeer
to the Nazis. Featuring Benjamin Evett, Laura Latreille, and directed by Jim Petosa. Mar 17-Apr 8.
New Repertory Theatre | Watertown
617-923-8487 | newrep.org
peace ringing in the mind.”
EPIC ADVENTURE SPANNING
TIME, PLACE, AND GENDER
“DELIGHTFUL, FUN, & ARRESTING! -- WGBH
“DELIGHTFULLY PROPULSIVE!” -- Boston Globe
Orlando the man one day becomes a woman
In a joyful romance spanning 5 centuries!
Now thru March 25 Lyric Stage Copley Sq
617.585.5678 lyricstage.com
2 Southbridge St, Worcester, MA
with Kotoko Brass at The Strand in Dorchester.
Tickets at www.take6.com
VIP package w/ meet & greet available!
“With Christophers in exuberant control, every
fully staged production at The Hanover Theatre
expenses benefit the St. Francis House shelter.
Tickets: Adults $41-$55; Students & Youth, $25
WWW.THEHANOVERTHEATRE.ORG
877.571.SHOW (7469)
(781) 646-4849 • www.regenttheatre.com
ACTIVITIES
with the ineffable chorus’s sublime plea for
WORLD MUSIC CONCERT
AT BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
– The Arts Desk, London
Boston Globe
Ticket to the Arts
Order Online through our Self
Serve Order Entry System.
24/7 from anywhere.
boston.com/tickettothearts
RESCHEDULED !
THE ENDURING MUSE
We canclled on March 2 due to the storm,
but we are RESCHEDULED for March 23 !
Choral music of the Renaissance by Byrd,
Palestrina, Morley, Wilbye, Vautor, de Sermisy
Choral music of the 21st century by Wachner,
Whitacre, Betinis, Bray, Gjeilo, Ešenvalds
Directed by Walter Chapin
FRI MAR 23, 8pm, Brighton-Allston Cong Church
Admission $20; Seniors/Students $15
Info and advance tickets: www.orianaconsort.org
SATURDAY, MARCH 24 | 8 PM (TALK @ 7 PM)
Immerse yourself in the sights, sounds and tastes
of Indonesia with masters of Java’s ancient gong
orchestras and traditional food from Kaki Lima.
Slosberg Music Center, 415 South St, Waltham
TIX: 781-736-3400 | www.brandeis.edu/tickets
Boston Globe
Ticket to the Arts
Order Online through our Self Serve
Order Entry System. 24/7 from anywhere.
boston.com/tickettothearts
MARCH 23, 24 & 25
“JEWEL OF CRAFT SHOWS!’
Declares The Boston Globe
Jewelry, fashion, home furnishings, painting
and sculpture in every price range by
175 outstanding artists from across America.
Live music in the Sculpture Cafe!
Royal Plaza Trade Center, Marlboro, MA
Minutes from everywhere. FREE PARKING
Bring friends and make a day of it!
Advance tickets, discount coupons, info:
WWW.PARADISECITYARTS.COM
T h e
G6
MOVIE STARS
New releases
YY 7 Days in Entebbe The notorious 1976 hijacking of an Air
France jet en route from Tel
Aviv fuels a serviceable thriller
that might have been something more. While the movie
gives Rosamund Pike, Daniel
Brühl, and Eddie Marsan plenty to dig into, it comes at the expense of some key perspectives,
and hinders the tension. (104
min., PG-13) (Tom Russo)
YYYY The Death of Stalin
From Armando Iannucci
(“Veep,” “In the Loop”), a brilliantly caustic satire in which
the jostlings for power in 1953
Moscow are played as Monty
Python-esque farce. A work of
brutal screwball comedy, it features fine performances by
Steve Buscemi (as Nikita
Krushchev), Jeffrey Tambor
(Malenkov), Michael Palin (Molotov), and more. (106 min., R)
(Ty Burr)
YY½ Happy End The title of
Michael Haneke’s melodrama
B o s t o n
is an indicator of the film’s
glum irony. A wealthy Calais
family suffers the fate of all
bourgeois — boredom, guilt,
joylessness, despair, and indifference to the suffering of others. The brilliant Isabelle Huppert and Jean-Louis Trintignant save this from mere
humdrum melancholia. In English and French, with subtitles.
(107 min., R) (Peter Keough)
YYY½ Leaning Into the Wind
— Andy Goldsworthy Sixteen
years after “Rivers and Tides,”
German documentarian Thom-
G l o b e
as Riedelsheimer revisits the
protean British nature sculptor
Andy Goldsworthy, who of late
seems to want to physically
merge with his work. As before,
Goldsworthy’s re-ordering of
nature is so disordering to our
senses as to prompt disbelief,
and then grateful awe. (93
min., PG) (Ty Burr)
Y½ The Leisure Seeker Helen
Mirren (with a Southern accent!) and Donald Sutherland
star as a couple from Wellesley
who head off in their Winnebago for one last road trip. Key
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
West here they come. Understandably, their two grown children freak out. Sounds pretty
bad, doesn’t it? There is pleasure to be had from the very
visible pleasure the two leads
rightly take in each other’s
company. That’s about it. (112
min., R) (Mark Feeney)
YYY½ Love, Simon Fans of
“Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens
Agenda” — the beloved 2015
young adult novel by Becky Albertalli — can relax and celebrate. “Love, Simon,” the film
adaptation of the book, is great.
It’s not exactly like the novel,
but it captures the best parts of
it. Part of the success of the film
can be credited to Nick Robinson, who is perfect as Simon, a
well-liked high school senior
who’s gay and doesn’t know
how — or when — to share. (96
min., PG-13) (Meredith Goldstein)
Y½ Tomb Raider Here’s what’s
good about this big-screen version of the popular video game
(filmed once before with Angelina Jolie): Alicia Vikander, who
MOVIE STARS, Page G7
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INFO VALID 3/22/18 ONLY
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Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERI-
TOMB RAIDER 3D (PG-13) 5 10:15
ENCE (PG-13) G 9:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 5 10:30, 1:15, 4:15
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 7:30,
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 5 10:50, 1:50, 4:35, 7:30
9:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) 5 9:30
Stadium Seating
5 6
Hearing Impaired
www.coolidge.org
Rear Window Captioning
DEDHAM
NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR)
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 4:15, 7:15
LADY BIRD (R) 7:30
G 7:00
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 5:15,
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
8:00, 9:55
THOROUGHBREDS (R) 11:15, 1:30, 3:00, 6:30, 10:15
A FANTASTIC WOMAN (R) 11:00, 4:15
HAPPY END (R) 4:00, 9:45
LOVELESS (R) 1:15, 9:15
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 12:00
CORPORATE (NR) G 7:00
www.nationalamusements.com
6:15, 9:15
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 6:45, 9:50
BLACK PANTHER 3D (PG-13) 8:30
THE POST (PG-13) 12:55, 3:40
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - READING
GRINGO (R) 5 10:45
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 5 7:00, 9:55
5 8
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 5 7:45
www.jordansimax.com
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 5 11:10, 2:10, 5:00, 7:55,
TOMB RAIDER: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
10:25
1:40, 4:20
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) 5 7:00
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERI-
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING 3D (PG-13) 5 9:45
ENCE (PG-13) 7:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:20, 4:15, 7:10, 10:15
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 12:30, 3:00, 3:30,
READING
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERI-
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
ENCE (PG-13) 9:30
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
REVERE
5 6 8 DIG
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
BURLINGTON
RED SPARROW (R) 12:20, 3:35, 6:45, 9:50
www.nationalamusements.com
NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR)
NT LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR) 7:30
5 6 8 I K DIG
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
7:30
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) 7:00, 9:55
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
20 South Ave.
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:40, 3:55, 6:15
5 6 DIG
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:25, 2:05, 5:05, 10:10
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:45, 1:15, 3:30, 4:00,
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) 7:00, 9:55
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:25, 4:15, 7:05, 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 7:00
www.amctheatres.com
THOROUGHBREDS (R) 4:40
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) G 9:40
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 7:00
(R) 4:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:00, 1:05, 2:05, 4:10,
www.showcasecinemas.com
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 4:00, 7:00
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) 7:00, 9:55
5:10, 7:30, 8:30, 10:30
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:15, 1:30, 2:00, 4:20, 4:50,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:45, 4:15, 4:45,
5 6 I DIG
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 5:00, 7:40
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:25, 7:10
7:35, 10:30
6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 9:50, 10:20
http://somervilletheatre.com/
BELLINGHAM
TOMB RAIDER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:20, 4:15, 10:05
THOROUGHBREDS (R) 1:35
RED SPARROW (R) 12:10, 3:10
ANNIHILATION (R) 4:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:15, 1:40, 4:00
DEATH WISH (R) 4:15
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:40, 2:10, 4:35
ANNIHILATION (R) 7:20
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:45, 7:05
THE HURRICANE HEIST (PG-13) 4:25
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:50, 2:20, 4:55, 7:25, 10:05
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 4:15
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) RealD 3D 11:00, 4:25,
THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (R) 11:55, 2:20,
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) RealD 3D 11:35, 12:35,
I, TONYA (R) 7:15
5 6 8 DIG
9:50
4:30
1:05, 2:15, 3:20, 3:50, 4:50, 6:35, 7:35, 9:25, 10:25
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30
GRINGO (R) 1:10
RED SPARROW (R) 5:00, 8:00
www.REGmovies.com
NT LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR) Advance Tickets
Available 7:30
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 7:00, 9:20
www.REGmovies.com
NT LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR) Advance Tickets
Available 7:30
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) Advance Tickets
Available 7:30, 10:20
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING 3D (PG-13) Advance Tickets
Available G 7:00, 9:45
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
DEATH WISH (R) 9:55
ANNIHILATION (R) 12:20, 3:35
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent 12:50,
3:30, 6:10, 9:05
CAMBRIDGE
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.applecinemas.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:15,
6:45, 8:10, 9:35
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 6:45
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:20
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:40, 4:20
ANNIHILATION (R) 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:15, 3:40, 6:05, 8:30, 9:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:00, 4:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:45, 3:30, 4:20, 7:00, 9:35
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:45, 4:10, 6:20, 6:35, 9:00
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
RED SPARROW (R) 1:00, 4:05, 6:30, 9:30
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
THE FORGIVEN (R) 1:30, 7:00
www.artsemerson.org
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
FOXBORO
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:40, 2:20, 5:00, 7:45, 10:25
BOSTON
5 8 DOL
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 4:10, 7:00, 9:40
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:00, 2:15, 4:50, 7:25
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) 9:35
RED SPARROW (R) 12:30, 3:50, 7:00, 10:15
www.studiocinema.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5:30
6:25, 6:55, 9:05
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 5 (1:25, 4:05) 6:50, 9:30
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
SOMERVILLE
5 6 8 DSS
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
NT LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR) 7:30
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:40, 4:20, 7:40, 10:30
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 7:15, 10:00
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) 7:00, 9:55
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:30, 1:00, 1:00,
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
1:30, 3:30, 4:00, 4:00, 4:30, 6:30, 7:00, 7:00, 7:30,
NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR)
9:15, 9:45, 9:50, 10:15
www.REGmovies.com
7:30
DEATH WISH (R) 1:20, 4:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:05) 4:15, 7:00, 9:45
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) 7:00, 9:55
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) G (1:00, 3:55) 7:05
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
5 8
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) Advance Tickets
Available 7:15
GRINGO (R) 4:20, 9:50
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING 3D (PG-13) Advance Tickets
Available G 9:55
THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (R) (1:30, 3:50)
www.jordansimax.com
6:45, 9:00
www.amctheatres.com
TOMB RAIDER: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) G (12:45) 6:30, 10:00
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) G 7:00, 9:40
1:40, 4:20
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) G (3:25)
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 7:30,
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERI-
TOMB RAIDER 3D (PG-13) G 9:25
10:10
ENCE (PG-13) 7:00
DEATH WISH (R) (1:20) 4:05
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 8:30
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERI-
RED SPARROW (R) (12:50, 3:45) 6:15, 9:05
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:05
ENCE (PG-13) 9:30
GAME NIGHT (R) (1:25) 4:00, 7:10, 10:00
BLACK PANTHER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:00, 4:00,
7:00, 10:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) G 12:45, 3:30, 6:45, 9:30
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) G 10:00
TOMB RAIDER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 2:30, 5:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:20, 4:00, 7:30
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:55, 1:15) 4:10, 6:00,
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) G 1:00, 4:15, 7:00
www.nationalamusements.com
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) RealD 3D G 12:15, 3:00,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:05, 1:05, 3:10, 4:10,
6:00, 9:00
6:10, 7:10, 9:20, 10:20
6:55, 9:10
PETER RABBIT (PG) (1:10, 3:35) 7:20
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 9:40
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
RED SPARROW (R) 12:40, 4:20
RED SPARROW (R) 12:30, 3:40
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
RED SPARROW (R) 6:30
GAME NIGHT (R) 12:20, 2:45, 5:10, 7:35, 10:05
www.landmarktheatres.com
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 5 (1:30, 2:00, 4:00,
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 7:00, 9:20
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) RealD 3D 12:55, 1:25, 4:05,
www.amctheatres.com
4:30) 6:30, 7:05, 9:00, 9:40
GAME NIGHT (R) 1:50, 4:10
4:35, 6:45, 7:15, 9:25, 9:55
(R) 5 (1:15) 7:15
GRINGO (R) 4:15, 9:30
THOROUGHBREDS (R) 5 (4:25)
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) G 7:00
THE LEISURE SEEKER (R) 5 (1:40, 4:25) 7:00, 9:40
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:50
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING -- AN IMAX 3D EXPERI-
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) G 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:45
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:25
RED SPARROW (R) 5 (1:00, 4:05) 7:05
ENCE (PG-13) G 7:00, 9:45
(R) 5 (1:35, 4:15) 6:55, 9:35
7 DAYS IN ENTEBBE (PG-13) AMC Independent G
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) 7:00, 9:55
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) 5 7:00
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 7:00
LEANING INTO THE WIND: ANDY GOLDSWORTHY
12:30, 3:15, 6:15, 9:10
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:00, 1:30, 4:00,
GAME NIGHT (R) 5 (4:15)
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) G 5:00, 9:00
(PG) 5 (2:10, 4:40) 7:20, 9:45
GRINGO (R) G 1:40
4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:50, 10:30
GRINGO (R) 5 (1:25)
TOMB RAIDER: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 5 (1:05, 3:55) 6:45,
DEATH WISH (R) 1:30, 4:15
DEATH WISH (R) 1:15, 3:55, 6:40, 9:40
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 5 (1:20, 4:20) 7:20
G 1:00, 4:00
9:15
ANNIHILATION (R) 1:45, 4:30, 10:05
THE HURRICANE HEIST (PG-13) 1:35, 6:55
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 5 (1:10, 4:10) 7:10
TOMB RAIDER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 2:00, 8:00
OH LUCY! (NR) 5 (1:50, 4:20) 7:15, 9:35
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent 1:30,
THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (R) 12:00, 2:25,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 (1:05, 4:00) 7:00
BOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORY (NR) 5
4:20, 7:15
4:45, 7:05, 9:45
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) G 1:45, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
GALAPAGOS: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR) 11:00,
2:00
AMAZON ADVENTURE (NR) 12:00, 4:00
GREAT WHITE SHARK (NR) 1:00, 3:00, 5:00
(1:45) 7:00
THOROUGHBREDS (R) 5 (4:10) 9:45
WESTBOROUGH
RANDOLPH
THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (R) G 12:10,
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
CHESTNUT HILL
2:25, 4:40
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent G 7:00, 9:45
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
5 6 8 DIG
NT LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR) G 7:30
55 Boylston St.
www.nationalamusements.com
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
LEXINGTON
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:00, 12:05, 12:30, 1:05,
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:00, 12:00, 2:30, 3:30,
2:05, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 5:35, 6:20, 7:20, 9:20, 10:20
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:30, 1:00, 3:00, 3:30,
LEXINGTON VENUE
RED SPARROW (R) 12:55, 4:00
4:00, 6:40, 7:10, 9:10, 9:40, 10:10
6:30, 8:30, 9:30
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
PETER RABBIT (PG) 10:50, 1:05, 3:20
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 12:00, 6:10
GAME NIGHT (R) 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:15
RED SPARROW (R) 12:40, 3:55
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:00, 12:00, 2:30, 3:30,
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
6:30, 8:30, 9:30
5 6 8 I K DIG
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:20, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 10:40
www.REGmovies.com
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:20, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 10:40
NT LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR) Advance Tickets
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent G 9:40
THOROUGHBREDS (R) AMC Independent G 4:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:40, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00
Available 7:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:40, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) G (12:30, 3:45) 7:05
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 12:30, 4:00, 7:30, 10:20
TOMB RAIDER 3D (PG-13) G 10:30
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 12:30, 4:00, 7:30, 10:20
5 DOL DSS
A FANTASTIC WOMAN (R) 7:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) RealD 3D 11:35, 1:20, 2:10,
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:25, 3:45
THE POST (PG-13) 6:45
4:05, 4:40, 6:45, 7:15, 9:25, 9:55
GAME NIGHT (R) 1:50, 4:15, 6:45, 9:20
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 3:45
GRINGO (R) 11:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) RealD 3D 1:15, 1:45, 3:50,
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 4:00
NT LIVE: JULIUS CAESAR (NR) 7:30
4:20, 6:30, 7:00, 9:15, 9:50
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:40, 4:25, 7:00, 9:40
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:35, 4:05, 6:50, 9:30
LITTLETON
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 7:05, 9:40
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 7:05, 9:40
O'NEIL CINEMAS AT THE POINT
BRAINTREE
DANVERS
AMC BRAINTREE 10
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
121 Grandview Rd.
100 Independence Way
5 6 DIG
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
1208 Constitution Ave 978-506-5089
www.oneilcinemas.com
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) 7:00, 7:30, 9:55,
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) RealD 3D 7:00, 7:30,
10:25
9:55, 10:25
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:15, 12:35, 1:00, 2:00, 3:35,
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:20, 2:00, 4:10,
3:50, 4:50, 6:35, 7:35, 9:35, 10:25
4:50, 6:55, 7:35, 9:45, 10:20
DEATH WISH (R) 2:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 5 1:25, 4:10
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 11:20, 1:55, 4:30, 7:10,
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 10:40, 1:40, 4:30, 7:10,
9:50
THE HURRICANE HEIST (PG-13) 11:50
10:15
DEATH WISH (R) 2:20, 4:55
THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (R) 12:35, 2:50,
www.amctheatres.com
PETER RABBIT (PG) 5 11:45, 2:20, 4:55
THE HURRICANE HEIST (PG-13) 9:30
5:05
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) G 7:00
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING (PG-13) G 7:00, 10:00
GAME NIGHT (R) 5 11:55, 2:30, 5:15, 10:25
THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (R) 1:00, 3:15,
7 DAYS IN ENTEBBE (PG-13) 2:05, 4:45
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 10:30
PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING -- THE IMAX 2D EXPERI-
RED SPARROW (R) 5 10:30, 1:30, 4:40, 7:35, 10:30
5:30, 7:45, 10:10
UNSANE (R) 7:10, 10:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 7:15, 10:00
ENCE (PG-13) G 7:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 5 7:15
UNSANE (R) 7:10, 10:00
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 7:15, 10:05
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G7
ASK AMY
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
Women MBA candidates
are subjects of offensive list
ROBERT VOETS/NETFLIX
Kathy Bates in Netflix’s “Disjointed.” She has signed on for another season of FX’s
“American Horror Story.”
She’s too good for ‘American Horror Story’
Free Kathy!
I am a huge Kathy Bates fan. Usually, when
she shows up on TV or in a movie, I am instantly
in a better place. I even kind of sort of maybe
liked Netflix’s “Disjointed,” a mediocre pot-dispensary comedy that lasted one season, because
I liked watching her sling weed jokes. She was a
spot of sunshine on “Six Feet Under,” a few episodes of which she directed, and she was a kick
on “The Office.” Plus, of course: “Misery.” Oh,
and “About Schmidt.” And so many more.
But I do wish she weren’t going to spend
more time trying to be stylishly creepy on
“American Horror Story.” But now that “Disjointed” is gone, she has signed on for yet another season — her fifth — of the Ryan Murphy anthology series on FX. She will join two other
“American Horror Story” regulars, Sarah Paulson and Evan Peters, for the show’s eighth season. The subtitle for the season has not been
confirmed, but there are rumors it will be “Radioactive.” In January, Murphy told the press the
action would take place in the future.
Alas, even Bates can’t pull me through
“American Horror Story.” That’s how much I dislike the show.
Q. I am part of an international MBA program at
a well-known European university.
I just found out that the men in the program
have put together a list, ranking all the women
in the program by their looks. I’m furious and
disappointed that the men who are supposed to
be my peers, business partners, co-workers, and
friends have subjected the women in the program to this.
I have been told who started the list, and it
has been talked about by a few people, but I
have not personally seen this list (I’m working
on it).
I’m not really sure what to do. I’m thinking
about writing a letter to the faculty. Others have
suggested asking for the expulsion of the men
who have contributed to the list, and to suggest
that perhaps if they have time to come up with
these rankings, maybe they are not taking this
MBA program seriously.
I feel as though this list is a slap in the face after everything that women have been going
through, and I really don’t want this sort of
treatment or behavior to be normalized ever
again.
But I don’t really know what to do or how to
go about it.
DISGUSTED
A. You have every right to be angry. (And . . . isn’t
this how Facebook got started — as a juvenile
“hot or not” ranking of on-campus women at a
prestigious university?)
The #MeToo movement is demonstrating
that normalizing harassment creates toxic environments and havens for predatory behavior
(which this list absolutely is).
This needs to stop.
Do not count on the university faculty or administration to handle it to your satisfaction.
Think of this challenge a bit like going into
battle: You need to arm yourself with knowledge, and begin building an army. Connect with
your fellow female candidates. Deploy some
MBA-level networking to quickly form a coalition.
If you can obtain hard evidence that this list
exists, you should publicize it, share it widely,
and use the list itself to expose the people behind it. When you do so, mask the identity of the
women named, but display the identities of
those who created and shared it.
If you aren’t able to receive hard proof of the
list, make an appointment with a faculty member and the dean. Insist that they investigate
uMOVIE STARS
Continued from Page G6
brings humor and humanity to
the role of explorer Lara Croft.
Here’s what not so good: virtually everything else. After a
brisk start, it becomes a generic
“Raiders of the Lost Ark” rip-off
with a fine cast wasted. (109
min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
Previously released
JOHN P. JOHNSON/HBO
Henry Winkler (left) and Bill Hader in “Barry.”
Hader plays it right in ‘Barry’
u‘‘BARRY’’
TELEVISION REVIEW
that undercurrent, which I
didn’t think about much until
I’d finished the season, augments my admiration for the
show. Hader’s Barry is a former
Marine who, lost after Afghanistan, decides to kill for a living.
Hader’s handler, Fuches (Stephen Root), sets up the jobs; he
carries them out expertly and
effortlessly. He has been welltrained to kill, and it’s also
something he’s emotionally
equipped to do. He has tamped
down his feelings and gone
numb to survive life after war, a
quality that Hader evokes with
his slack face and lifeless eyes.
The questions of recovery
from service and PTSD, which
gain momentum as Barry reconnects with a few fellow veterans for a job midway through
the season, brings poignancy.
He’s a bad guy, and Hader and
co-creator Alec Berg make sure
we see him kill a few people in
case we have doubts; and yet he
is sympathetic given his loneliness and rudderlessness (and
given the likable Hader, who
plays it just right). When Barry
stumbles into an acting class
while doing recon for a hit, he
sees in the craft of acting anoth-
BARRY
Starring: Bill Hader, Henry
Winkler, Stephen Root,
Sarah Goldberg, Glenn
Fleshler, Paula Newsome,
Anthony Carrigan
On: HBO, premieres Sunday
at 10:30 p.m.
Continued from Page G1
er, better way to channel the
anxiety and rage inside him.
He’s quietly dazzled, watching
lousy actors do scene study, as
he realizes there may be another, better outlet for his pain.
The made-up “improv monologue” he does for Cousineau to
get into the class is really his
own story, and it’s heartbreaking.
But yeah, it’s a comedy, really, and it balances all the Hollywood satire, character comedy,
and noir tendencies beautifully.
It’s filled with smart choices.
Each perfectly cast character
has a twist that places him or
her outside of conventionality.
Barry and Fuches are dealing
with a twisted gang of Chechan
mobsters, and each one is funny, most of all Anthony Carrigan’s NoHo Hank, who prides
himself on his pop knowledge.
Once a guy from the acting
class is killed, the cops show up,
and they are memorable, too,
particularly Paula Newsome as
a detective who steals Cousineau’s heart. They reminded
me at moments of the “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” crew.
The actors playing the acting students are also terrific,
not least of all D’Arcy Carden,
who is best known as personal
assistant Janet (and Bad Janet)
on “The Good Place.” Her character here is a soulless but
friendly wannabe who, in a
manner that made me think of
Kristin Wiig’s bragging Penelope from “Saturday Night Live,”
nods along with anything her
friend Sally says, at times even
mouthing Sally’s words. Sally,
played with winning gusto by
Sarah Goldberg, is the object of
Barry’s desire. She’s the drama
queen in the drama class, and
she is as expressive as Barry is
not. Like Barry, so grim and
lifeless, she still has a way to go
before she becomes fully human.
Matthew Gilbert can be
reached at gilbert@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@MatthewGilbert.
YYY½ Black Panther A smart,
supple action fantasy starring a
superhero of color leading a
strong, unbowed nation of color. Chadwick Boseman (finally)
comes into stardom as King
T’Challa/Black Panther, and
Michael B. Jordan almost steals
the film as a villain driven by
real-world agonies, but the triumph belongs to director-cowriter Ryan Coogler (“Creed,”
“Fruitvale Station”). With Lupita Nyong’o and the ferocious
Danai Gurira. (140 min., PG13) (Ty Burr)
Y Y ½ Gringo A twisty dark
comedy in the action-suspense
vein, with talented actors playing cretinous fools and enough
betrayals, mistaken identities,
and narrative switchbacks to
keep you pleasurably befuddled. All that’s missing is the
pacing of great farce and a
smidgen more depth. Starring
David Oyelowo, Joel Edgerton,
and Charlize Theron; directed
by Nash Edgerton. (110 min.,
R) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ Loveless The young
son of a couple in the midst of a
bitter divorce disappears; they
search, first grudgingly and
then with a gradually awakening panic over what they have
become. It’s the latest bleakly
majestic essay on the death of
Russia’s soul from the great Andrey Zvyagintsev (“Leviathan”).
In Russian, with subtitles. (127
min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY Oh Lucy! This quirky,
sometimes dark Japanese romantic comedy starts with
someone committing suicide
and never strays far from that
edginess. A middle-aged Tokyo
office worker is inspired by
English lessons (and the handsome instructor, played by Josh
Hartnett), to break out of her
routine job and messy apartment and find her inner American. In English and Japanese,
with subtitles. (96 min., unrated) (Peter Keough)
your allegation. Also consider sending an “open
letter” to the university community.
Most importantly, save (and screenshot) everything; the list itself, any communication regarding the list, or any references to it on social
media.
Don’t get discouraged: Speak up, be fearless,
and don’t let anyone convince you that this isn’t
a big deal. This is a very big deal, and it should
be taken seriously.
Q. I’m very indecisive about everything — especially relationships. I tend to run away when issues arise. I’m having doubts about my partner.
For over two years he has had problems keeping
a job, and this causes me a lot of stress about
money. We can’t plan for our future.
We also rarely have sex, mainly because I just
don’t feel like it. I find him attractive, but I’m
not sexually attracted to him. This might be because of the job issue. He doesn’t seem motivated. I don’t know what to do.
UNSURE
A. If running from relationships is your problem, then take a stab at repairing this before you
flee. Your partner sounds depressed. Your own
aversions could be contributing to your problems as a couple — in fact, it sounds as if you
have already actually left the relationship, even
if you’re physically present.
If he communicates well with you about his
challenges, this might unite you as a couple. If
not, you’ll have to do the personal algebra to decide if you should (or want to) invest part of
your own future in trying to shore up this relationship. Running isn’t called for, but you might
need to walk away.
Counseling would definitely help.
Q. I’d like to add my own voice in complaining
about “vocal fry.” But don’t look to England for
answers. So many actors there are retaining
their regional accents and not even bothering to
speak properly. It is an assault on the ears.
DISTRESSED
A. Vocal fry is not an accent, per se, but a style of
speaking.
But I’d like to put a good word in for regional
accents — in every country. I think they’re fascinating and important markers of culture and
identity, and I would hate to see them disappear.
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
YYY Red Sparrow It seems
Jennifer Lawrence and director
Francis Lawrence were just getting warmed up with the
boundaries they tested in the
“Hunger Games” franchise. The
pair reunite for a story about a
Russian spy that’s heavy on
themes of sexual degradation
and sadistic violence. This is arrestingly dark fare that takes
risks across the board. (139
min., R) (Tom Russo)
YYY Thoroughbreds A story
steeped in emotional remoteness manages to command our
attention in first-time filmmaker Cory Finley’s darkly satirical
portrait of the young and disconnected in old-money Connecticut. With riveting perfor-
mances from Olivia Cooke and
Anya Taylor-Joy, this feels like
millennials’ answer to “The Ice
Storm,” only with pervasive suspense, plus some blood. (92
min., R) (Tom Russo)
YY½ A Wrinkle in Time Ava
DuVernay’s adaptation of the
Madeleine L’Engle fantasy classic disappoints with its overdone production design and
uneven script but scores with
the rich emotionalism of the
characters’ family bonds. Storm
Reid is just right as hesitant
teen heroine Meg Murr y;
Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, and Mindy Kaling are
the weakest part of the movie as
a trio of otherworldly spirits.
(109 min., PG) (Ty Burr)
INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO A
COMPLIMENTARY ADVANCE SCREENING
MONDAY, MARCH 26TH AT 7:00PM
AT A BOSTON-AREA THEATER
For your chance to win a pass for two log on to
FOXSEARCHLIGHTSCREENINGS.COM
and enter code: IODGLOBE
This film is rated PG 13. No purchase necessary. One (Admit Two) pass per person. Quantity is limited
and will be available on a first come, first served basis. Seating at the screening is not guaranteed.
IN THEATERS MARCH 28TH
T h e
G8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 2 , 2 0 1 8
“… a broad, remarkable examination
of the magnetic effect of
O’Keeffe’s taste and persona.”
— The Boston Globe
NOW EXTENDED THROUGH APRIL 8!
For the first time, paintings by
Georgia O’Keeffe are shown with
photographs and selections from her
carefully curated wardrobe, revealing
her entire life as a work of art.
Just five stops from Boston’s North Station!
#PEMOKeeffe
Georgia O’Keeffe: Art, Image, Style is organized by the Brooklyn Museum with guest curator Wanda M. Corn, Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor Emerita in Art History, Stanford University. The exhibition
was made possible by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Carolyn and Peter S. Lynch and The Lynch Foundation; Leslie and Angus Littlejohn; Fay, Susan, and Appy Chandler; and Mr. and
Mrs. J. Taylor Crandall provided generous support. We also recognize the generosity of the East India Marine Associates of the Peabody Essex Museum.
TonyVaccaro, Georgia O’Keeffe with “Pelvis Series, Red withYellow”and the desert (detail), 1960. Chromogenic print. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Courtesy ofTonyVaccaro studio.
161 Essex St. | Salem, MA | pem.org
Thursday March 22, 2018
7:00pm
2
WGBH Greater
PBS Boston
4
7:30pm
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Movies
9:00pm
WCVB News
ABC (CC)
6 WLNE ABC Daily
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WHDH News
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NBC Boston
Amanpour Beyond
100 Days
NCAA Basketball Tournament (CC): Kentucky vs.
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Chronicle Grey's Anatomy HD Station 19 (CC): The premiere. HD TV-14- News
TV-14-DLS NEW
DLSV NEW
(CC) HD
HD
J Kimmel
NEW
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Grey's NEW
Family
Extra HD Family
TV-PG
Feud
Feud
J Kimmel
(11:35)
Extra
NBC10 at Access
7:00pm
TV-G
Superst.
NEW
A.P. Bio
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Station 19 (CC): The premiere. NEW
News HD
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NBC10 at J Fallon
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10
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In. Ed.
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WENH Greater
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Station 19 (CC): The premiere. NEW
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Chicago Fire (CC)
HD TV-14-LV NEW
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WPRI NCAA Basketball Tournament (CC): Nevada vs.
CBS Loyola (Chicago). Live. HD
25
WFXT ET Enter
FOX
27
WUNI Rosa de Guadalupe El rico y Lazaro
HD TV-14-D
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36
WSBE Milk
PBS Street
38
WSBK Big Bang Big Bang News HD
Theory
Theory
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(CC) HD TV-14
Law & Order: CI
Seinfeld
(CC) HD TV-14-DSV TV-PG
44
WGBX British Baking (CC)
PBS HD TV-PG
Tutankhamun
Tutankhamun
50
56
WBIN I Survived... TV-14
I Killed My BFF
Deadly Motives HD Dr. G: Med/Exam
WLVI Goldberg Goldberg Supernatural (CC): Arrow (CC): Cayden News (CC)
CW
A search for Lucifer. discovers a secret.
WNAC ET Enter
FOX
68
TMZ HD
TV-PG
Gotham (CC) HD
TV-14-LV NEW
TMZ HD
TV-PG
Gotham (CC) HD
TV-14-LV NEW
WBPX Blue Bloods: A mob Blue Bloods (CC)
ION boss faces charges. HD TV-14-LV
Cinemax
Encore
Flix
HBO
NCAA Basketball Tournament (CC): Kentucky vs.
Kansas State. Live. HD
(11:35)
Showtime Apollo
News (CC)
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TMZ
(CC)
HD TV-14-DL NEW
Papá a toda madre
(CC) HD
Retire Safe & Secure With Ed Slott (CC):
Financial advice.
Lark Rise: Susan's
husband hits her.
Por amar sin ley
(CC) HD
Cat's Attic (CC): The music of
Cat Stevens.
Showtime Apollo
TV-14-DL NEW
News
Blue Bloods: Jamie
is investigated.
Blue Bloods (CC)
HD TV-14-L
HD
News
(CC) HD
Noticiero
Uni
BBC
News
Currier &
Ives
Seinfeld
TV-PG
PBS NewsHour
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Drugs Inc. TV-14-D
Modern Modern
Family
Family
(11:05)
Goldberg
Seinfeld
Blue Bloods (CC)
HD TV-14-LV
PREMIUM CABLE
★★ Murder by Numbers (2002) (CC): A
(5:50) Accountant
★★★ Hard Candy (2005) (CC): A teen
(2016) (CC) HD R
cop hunts for a killer. HD TV-PG
meets a chat-room pal. HD TV-14
★ Tommy Boy (1995) (CC):
Star Trek (7:31) ★ Black Sheep: A man
(10:40) ★★ Escape from L.A.
VI
watches an imbecile. PG-13
Opposites team up. HD TV-14 (1996) HD TV-MA
(5:35)
★★ Operation Condor: Jackie ★★★ The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1989) Another
Focus
Day
Chan in the Sahara. PG-13
(CC): A 1700s fibber battles the Turks. HD TV-14
(5:55)
Vice
Hidden Figures (2016) (CC): Black women (10:10) Here and
High M. Pacific
Snatched News
work for NASA. HD PG
Now HD TV-MA
Rim
The Beguiled (2017) (CC): Man (9:35) Mechanic: Resurrection (2016)
Zookeep.
hides at all-girls school. HD R (CC) A hit man must save his lover. HD R
HBO 2
(6:15) Beguiled
(2017) (CC) HD R
Showtime
Shepherd (7:15) Homeland
(CC) HD TV-MA
Showtime 2
(5:50) Peacemaker: Bad Grandmas (2017): Old
A search for nukes. ladies kill a con man. HD NR
Starz!
(5:59) ★★ Double
Jeopardy TV-14
Rolling Stones
(2013) (CC) HD NR
TMC
J Kimmel
J Fallon
NEW
Amanpour Beyond
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12
64
Sports
(8:15) Hell/High Water (2016): Chi: Ronnie faces
Cartoon Homeland
Two brothers rob banks. R
his past. HD TV-MA Pres. HD
(9:35) Zack and Miri (2008) (CC): Platonic Girl on
pals make adult film. HD R
the Train
Ash vs.
(8:17) Rough Night (2017)
Evil Dead HD R
Ash vs.
The Underworld Blood Wars
Evil Dead HD
★★★ Starman (1984) (CC): Alien crashes ★★ Dune (1984) (CC): A magic spice
on Earth. HD PG
gives power in the year 10,191. HD PG-13
SPORTS
Felger & Boston Sports Tonight (CC) Live. HD
Mazz HD
Planet Earth TV-PG Planet Earth TV-PG Planet Earth TV-PG
(6:55) ★★★ Set It Off (1996): Four embittered women become
bank robbers. Jada Pinkett, Queen Latifah. TV-14-DLSV
Bravo
Housewives/Atl.
(CC) HD TV-14
CMT
CNN
Comedy
Central
Last Man Last Man Last Man Last Man
OutFront HD NEW
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(6:50)
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Office
Office
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Politics and Public Policy Today
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Public Affairs Events: Public affairs events, congressional hearings, speeches, and interviews.
Paranormal Wit.
Paranormal Wit.
Paranormal Wit.
Paranormal Wit.
Paranormal Wit.
Naked and Afraid
Naked & Afraid
Naked & Afraid
Naked NEW
Naked and Afraid
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
Tiny H.
E! News NEW
What Happens (2008) (CC) HD TV-PG-LS Royals HD TV-14
E! News NEW
Detroit ER TV-PG
Detroit ER TV-PG
Detroit ER TV-PG
Detroit ER TV-PG
Detroit ER TV-PG
Chopped: Black
Chopped (CC) HD
Beat Bob Beat Bob Beat Bob Beat Bob
Chopped (CC) HD
TV-G
Forest bacon. TV-G TV-G
NEW
Fox Movies
Fox News
FUSE
FX
Hallmark
Home &
Garden
We Bought a Zoo
Other Woman: Three women seek revenge. TV-14
(10:15) Other Woman TV-14
MacCallum (CC) HD Tucker Carlson HD Hannity HD NEW
Ingraham Angle HD Fox News@Night
Scrubs
Scrubs
Scrubs
Scrubs
Malcolm Malcolm Malcolm Malcolm Malcolm Chris
(6:30) Pacific Rim: Giant robots battle monsters. TV-14-DLV
Atlanta
(10:38) Atlanta
Atlanta
F. House F. House F. House F. House F. House F. House Middle
Middle
G. Girls
G. Girls
Flip Flop Flip or
Flip or
Flip or
FF Vegas Flip Flop House H. House
House
House
NEW
NEW
NEW
Vegas
Flop
Flop
Flop
Vegas
Hunters Hunters
History
Swamp People (CC) Swamp/Blood (CC) Swamp People (CC) (10:03) Truck Night
Jay Paul's reunion. HD TV-PG-LV NEW HD TV-PG-LV NEW HD TV-PG-L NEW
(11:04) Swamp
People TV-PG-LV
HLN
HSN
ID
Crime & Justice
Forensic Forensic Forensic Forensic
Beauty Report TV-G Beauty Report TV-G LouLou/Fashion
Web of Lies (CC)
Pandora's Box (CC)
Web of Lies (CC)
HD TV-14-D
HD TV-14-DLSV
HD TV-14 NEW
Forensic Forensic
Tantowel Beauty
Web of Lies (CC)
HD TV-14-DLSV
IFC
Portland Portland Portland Portland Portland Portland Portland Brock.
NEW
Lifetime
Lifetime Mov.
MSNBC
MTV
National
Geographic
Project Runway
(6:00) A Daughter's
Hardball Live. HD
Jersey Shore
Life Below Zero
(CC) HD TV-14-L
NatGeoWild
NECN
Ovation
OWN
Incredible Dr. Pol
When Sharks TV-14 When Sharks Attack When Sharks TV-PG When Sharks TV-14
The Take Business The Take Business necn News 9PM
necn News 10Pm
necn News 11PM
★★ Fools Rush In: Expectant parents wed. TV-14
★★★ Big (CC): A 13-year-old boy turns "big." TV-PG
20/20 on OWN (CC) 20/20 on OWN (CC)
20/20 on ID: A hit20/20 on OWN (CC) 20/20 on OWN: A
missing family man. HD TV-14-V
HD TV-14-DV
and-run. TV-14-LSV HD TV-14-DV
Oxygen
Paramount
QVC
Science
Sundance
NCIS (CC) TV-PG
NCIS (CC) TV-PG
NCIS (CC) TV-PG
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Lip Sync
Judith Ripka Jewelry (CC) Live. HD
Shoe Shopping Live.
Alaska Mega
Engineering (CC) HD TV-PG NEW
Law & Order (CC)
Law & Order (CC)
Law & Order (CC)
TV-14-DLV
TV-14-DL
TV-14-LV
(6:00) Happening
Pirates/Tides (2011): Jack enters Blackbeard's ship. TV-PG
Magicians TV-MA
Tip-Off
(7:15) NCAA Basketball Tournament (CC) Live. HD
(9:45) NCAA Tournament (CC) Live. HD
(6:00) Ziegfeld Folli. ★★★★ Sunset Blvd.: A silent-screen star. ★★★★ Gone/the Wind (1939) (CC) TV-PG
My 600-lb Life TV-14 My 600-lb Life: Enhanced episode. NEW
600-lb NEW
My 600-lb Life
NCIS: New Orleans London Fallen: Agent foils a terrorist plot. Tron: Legacy: Sam enters a virtual world.
Myster. Museum
Myster. Museum
Museum NEW
Museum NEW
Myster. Museum
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Impracti Impracti Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
TalkShow Jokers
M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Mom
Mom
King/Qu. King/Qu.
Cosby
Cosby
Cosby
Cosby
Single
Single
Single
Single
Uncensored HD
Law & Order SVU:
Law & Order SVU:
Ninja vs. Ninja: Four (10:01) Law & Order (11:01) Unsolved:
Part 1 of 2. TV-14
Conclusion. TV-14
teams. TV-PG NEW SVU (CC) HD TV-14 Tupac HD TV-MA
Love & Hip Hop
(6:33) Surf's Up
Tamar & Vince
Golf
NBCSN
NESN
PGA Tour Golf Live. Golf Cen LPGA Tour Golf: Kia Classic. Taped. HD
PGA Tour Golf (CC) Taped. HD
NHL Live NHL Hockey: Washington†at†Detroit. Live. HD
NHL Hockey: Vegas at†San Jose. Live.
Focused Spot.
MLB Baseball (CC) Taped. HD
Sports
Behind/B Sports
Dining
FAMILY
Gumball Gumball King/Hill Am. Dad Cl/Show Am. Dad Burgers Burgers Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
Bunk'd
Bunk'd
Bunk'd
Bizaard. Bizaard. Gravity
Gravity
Stuck/
Bizaard.
Bunk'd
HD TV-G HD TV-G HD TV-G HD TV-G
Falls
Falls
Middle
(6:00) Mr. Popper's Beyond (CC): Diego (9:01) ★★★ National Lamp. (1983) (CC):
Penguins (CC) TV-G attacks. NEW
A family drive cross-country. HD TV-14
Henry Danger TV-G Spy Kids/Time (2011) HD TV-PG
F. House Friends
Wallykaz Bubble
Bubble
Peppa
Peppa
Peppa
Go Diego Blaze
VH-1
WAM
WE
Nickelodeon
Noggin
(11:14) Friends
Umizoomi Dino
Bronx Tale: A boy's
loyalties are split.
BBC America
BET
Cornhole Championships/Mania (CC):
American Cornhole League. Taped. HD
The 700 Club (CC)
HD TV-G
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
Animal Planet Lone Star Law (CC) Lone Star Law (CC) Lone Star Law (CC) Lone Star Law (CC): Lone Star Law (CC)
Pronghorn season. HD TV-14
HD TV-14
HD TV-14
HD TV-14 NEW
ESPN 2
Freeform
9:30pm
★★★ Open Range (2003) (CC): Cowboys take on a land baron
in the 1880s. HD TV-14-DLV
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Travel
TruTV
TV Land
TV One
USA
The Draft The Draft NFL Live (CC) HD
NEW
NEW
9:00pm
(5:30) ★★ Mr. &
Mrs. Sm. TV-14-LV
Classic MLB Baseball (CC): From 1985: St. Classic MLB Baseball (CC): From 1985:
Louis at Kansas City.
Kansas City at St. Louis.
ESPN/Magazine
(CC) HD
8:30pm
AMC
ESPN Classic
Classic MLB: 1985:
Cardinals at Royals.
8:00pm
F. 48 (CC): A young
woman is killed.
SCenter
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
7:30pm
Powered by
A&E
ESPN
Golden Boy Boxing On ESPN (CC):
Fernando Vargas-Ryan Garcia. Live. HD
Specials
BASIC CABLE
F. 48 (CC): A father Fir. 48: A Tulsa man 60 Days In (CC): Discussing
(11:33) F.
is gunned down.
is gunned down.
the experience. HD TV-14-DLV 48 NEW
(6:00) Early Edition
(CC) Live. HD
M. Smith ESPN/Magazine
(CC) HD NEW
NEW
Boston Fashion Week/School of Fashion Design, Boston
7:00pm
Comcast
SportsNet
Cartoon
Disney
Celtics
Post Up
News
10:00pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 11:30pm
Member Favorites: Programming chosen through viewers' response.
WBZ NCAA Basketball Tournament (CC): Nevada vs.
CBS Loyola (Chicago). Live. HD
5
9:30pm
Promotional partner
Media partners
Thursday Darts TV-PG NEW
Life
Bl. Card Mancave Rundown Black
Card
NEW
NEW
NEW
Sex and the City 2 (2010) (CC): Gal pals take on Abu Dhabi,
love and sex in this sequel to the movie adaptation. HD TV-14
Last Man Last Man
Anderson Cooper
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
TV-14-DL TV-14-DL
Runway NEW
Runway NEW
Love to Kill (2008): Gold-digging killer.
All In/Hayes Live.
Maddow NEW
Jersey Family NEW (9:01) Wild 'N Out
Life Below Zero HD Tuna Hooked Up
(CC) HD NEW
TV-14-L NEW
Watch
NEW
Sex/City
2 TV-14
Music
(10:31) Crazy, Stupid, Love.
CNN Tonight Live.
CNN Tonight Live.
Klepper
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Daily
TV-14-DL TV-14-DL NEW
NEW
Forensic Forensic
Eva Longoria TV-G
Diabolical (CC) HD
TV-14-V NEW
Brock.
Brock.
Love at First Flight Project Runway
Last Will (2010) (CC) HD TV-14
Last Word Live. HD The 11th Hour Live.
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Wild 'N
Life Below Zero
Wicked Tuna (CC)
HD TV-14
(CC) HD TV-14-L
Snapped: The Menendez brothers case.
Lip Sync (10:32) ★★ Rush Hour 3 TV-14
Pikolinos Live. HD
Vince Camuto Live.
Panama NEW
(11:06) Engineering
Law & Order (CC)
Law & Order (CC)
TV-14-DLV
TV-14-L
RuPaul's Drag Race HD TV-14 NEW
RuPaul's Drag Race HD TV-14 Love/Hip
Beverly Hills (2008) HD TV-PG (9:33) ★★ First Wives (1996) HD TV-14
The Babe
Tamar & NEW
Braxton Family (CC) HD TV-14 NEW
Braxton Family
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
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