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The Boston Globe – March 29, 2018

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Th u r s d a y, M a r c h 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Hip hotel trend takes uptown turn
Developers seek to transform tired sites
into stylish outposts in underserved areas
By Tim Logan
GLOBE STAFF
Robin Brown spent 14 years
managing the Four Seasons. Then
he developed the Mandarin Oriental. The man knows fine lodging.
Now he’s overseeing the transformation of the old Days Hotel, a
dumpy motor inn on Soldiers Field
Road, into a bright , bold, ar ts-
themed boutique named Studio Allston.
“It’s like you’re going through an
art gallery,” an excited Brown said as
he showed a guest room bedecked
with huge red owls on the wall
above the bed. “We’ve got 28 distinct
rooms. We’ll try to get everyone to
stay 28 times.”
The 117-room hotel, which will
have a black frame wrapping the
front door and will showcase custom art all the way down to the key
cards, is one of a wave of new hotels
in long-overlooked corners of Boston, from the South End and Roxbury to Allston and Brighton.
Some are creative boutiques.
Some are stylish outposts of national chains. They’re all looking for a
foothold in neighborhoods that are
starting to get noticed, and to provide an alternative to the traditional
HOTELS, Page A8
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Codevelopers Robin Brown (left)
and Stephen Davis.
FINDING
HOME
GLOBE STAFF
bostonglobe.com/
missingdog
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Red Sox outfielders (from left) Jackie Bradley Jr., J.D. Martinez, Andrew Benintendi, and Mookie Betts had
some fun Wednesday in St. Petersburg, Fla. Their season begins at Tropicana Field Thursday. C1.
Thursday: Rain late.
High 53-58. Low 45-50.
Friday: Rain early.
High 58-63. Low 35-40.
High tide: 10:15, 10:48.
AN OFFSEASON? NOT
FOR THE NEWS.
Since the Sox last played, the world’s been stuck in foul territory
Sunrise: 6:32. Sunset: 7:06.
Complete report, B15.
Massachusetts regulators
delivered a potentially fatal
blow to Northern Pass, a
proposed line to bring hydroelectric power from Quebec through New Hampshire. B10.
GLOBE STAFF
Harvey Weinstein
among its teachers, a report
said. B1.
A homeowner’s lawsuit
against former tenants contends they used her Martha’s Vineyard home and
her artwork as backdrops
for shooting pornographic
movies. B1.
VOL . 293, NO. 88
*
Suggested retail price
$2.50
BostonGlobe.com
Data
privacy
scandal
The Red Sox return to the field for Major
League Baseball’s Opening Day on Thursday, after a relatively quiet six months for the team.
The Sox made just one major lineup move —
signing slugger J.D. Martinez — since last season ended with an Oct. 9 playoff loss to the
Houston Astros.
For the rest of the world, however,
it was a dizzying stretch, with jawdropping news rocketing past so
quickly that it was hard to process
it all. With the start of the season
upon us, we’ve compiled a lineup of
nine of the biggest developments since
Dustin Pedroia grounded out to end
last season, a snapshot of how quickly,
and decisively, the world can change.
Leading off: Stormy Daniels. We’re
tempted to put her in the bullpen, since she
starred in “The Closer” (2005), which sounds
like a baseball movie. There’s no detailed plot
synopsis for the film at IMDB.com, but it
couldn’t be any crazier than a future president’s
lawyer arranging hush money for a porn star to
silence a story of spanking, sex, and sharks.
The first news reports on the accusations of
sexual misconduct against filmmaker Harvey
Weinstein were just days old when the Red Sox
left us. The #MeToo reckoning that followed
toppled powerful men in business, politics, and
media, including casino mogul Steve Wynn. Now
the company that’s building Greater Boston’s
first casino is facing more scrutiny than a Red
OPENING DAY, Page A8
Our Nurse Navigator
is your guide through
every step of
joint replacement.
tuftsmedicalcenter.org/thinking
The US Department of Justice is investigating whether Massachusetts
prison officials are violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by forcing incoming inmates who had been taking
medications for addiction to stop the
drugs once behind bars.
US Attorney Andrew E. Lelling revealed the investigation in a letter that
was received by state health and public
safety officials late Tuesday.
The letter, obtained by the Globe,
states that individuals receiving medication-assisted treatment for opioid-use
disorder are protected by the ADA and
that the state’s Department of Correction “has existing obligations to accommodate this disability.”
It is not clear how many prisoners
would be affected by a change in this
policy. But as many as two-thirds of
prisoners have a substance-use disorder.
Advocates welcomed the inquiry
and said Wednesday that Lelling’s letter
is the beginning of a Justice Department effort to eliminate barriers to addiction treatment nationwide — despite
criticisms that the Trump administration has not done enough to address the
PRISONERS, Page A9
Trump fires
Veterans
Affairs chief
White House doctor
picked as new secretary
By Mark Arsenault
The Boston school system
has failed to boost diversity
For breaking news, updated
stories, and more, visit our website:
Mass. ban on drugs
to treat addicts may
be illegal, US says
By Felice J. Freyer
When a mysterious
little dog showed
up recently in the
town of Milton, its
adventures — and
ability to elude
capture — seemed
like something out
of a children’s book.
For the complete
story, go to:
The wetter report
Prison
opioid
rules get
scrutiny
By Lisa Rein and Philip Rucker
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — President Trump
fired his embattled Veterans Affairs secretary Wednesday and tapped as his replacement atop the chronically mismanaged agency the president’s personal physician, who gained prominence
with his effusive praise of the 71-yearº Idea of pardoning former top advisers broached by Trump lawyer. A2.
Stormy Daniels
Robert S. Mueller III
old’s physical and mental health.
The ouster of Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, who has been mired
in scandal over his charging taxpayers
for luxury travel expenses and the infighting among his senior aides, had
been widely expected and was made official at 5:31 p.m. by presidential tweet.
Trump said he would nominate Ronny Jackson, 50, an active-duty rear admiral in the Navy who has served for the
past three administrations as a White
House physician.
A biography released by the White
House shows Jackson is credentialed
and experienced in medicine but has no
background in management. He nonetheless will be charged with delivering
VETERANS, Page A7
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Daily Briefing
Oklahoma gives
teachers a boost
MARTA LAVANDIER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
KEEPING TRACK OF
REMEMBRANCES
Patricia Padauy (right) passed a note on Wednesday to her friend Sharamy Angarita, as they sorted out items
left at the memorial site of Padauy’s son Joaquin Oliver, one of the victims of the mass shooting in Parkland,
Fla.. Volunteers, students, and parents catalogued items and composted flowers as they cleaned up the site.
Trump’s lawyer floated idea of pardons
Suggested notion
to legal teams for
Flynn, Manafort
By Michael S. Schmidt
and Jo Becker
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — A lawyer
for President Trump broached
the idea of Trump pardoning
two of his former top advisers,
Michael T. Flynn and Paul
Manafort, with their lawyers
last year, according to three
people with knowledge of the
discussions.
The discussions came as the
special counsel was building
cases against both men, and
they raise questions about
whe ther the lawyer, John
Dowd, was offering pardons to
influence their decisions about
whether to plead guilty and cooperate in the investigation.
The talks suggest that
Trump’s lawyers were concerned about what Flynn and
Manafort might reveal were
they to cut a deal with the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller
III, in exchange for leniency.
Mueller’s team could investigate the prospect that Dowd
made pardon offers to thwart
the inquiry, although legal experts are divided about whether such offers might constitute
obstruction of justice.
Dowd’s conversation with
Flynn’s lawyer, Robert K. Kelner, occurred sometime after
Dowd took over last summer
as the president’s personal lawyer, at a time when a grand
jury was hearing evidence
against Flynn on a range of potential crimes. Flynn, who
served as Trump’s first national
security adviser, agreed in late
November to cooperate with
the special counsel’s investigation. He pleaded guilty in December to lying to the FBI
about his conversations with
the Russian ambassador and
received favorable sentencing
terms.
Dowd has said privately
that he did not know why Flynn had accepted a plea, according to one of the people. He
said he had told Kelner that the
president had long believed
that the case against Flynn was
flimsy and was prepared to
pardon him, the person said.
The pardon discussion with
Manafort’s attorney, Reginald
J. Brown, came before his client was indicted in October on
charges of money laundering
and other financial crimes.
Manafort, the former chairman of Trump’s presidential
campaign, has pleaded not
guilty and has told others he is
not interested in a pardon because he believes he has done
nothing wrong and the govern-
Michael Flynn (left) has pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI,
while Paul Manafort has pleaded not guilty to money
laundering and other financial crimes.
ment overstepped its authority.
Brown is no longer his lawyer.
It is unclear whether Dowd,
who resigned last week as the
head of the president’s legal
team, discussed the pardons
with Trump before bringing
them up with the other lawyers.
Dowd, who was hired last
year to defend the president
during the Mueller inquiry,
took the lead in dealing directly with Flynn’s and Manafort’s
lawyers, according to two people familiar with how the legal
team operated.
He denied on Wednesday
that he discussed pardons with
lawyers for the president’s former advisers.
Contacted repeatedly over
several weeks, the president’s
lawyers representing him in
the special counsel’s investigation maintained that they
knew of no discussions of possible pardons.
“Never during the course of
my representation of the president have I had any discussions of pardons of any individual involved in this inquiry,”
Jay S e k u lo w, a l aw y e r f o r
Trump, said Wednesday.
Ty Cobb, the White House
lawyer dealing with the investigation, added, “I have only
been asked about pardons by
the press and have routinely
responded on the record that
no pardons are under discussion or under consideration at
the White House.”
Kelner and Brown declined
to comment.
During interviews with Mueller’s investigators in recent
months, current and former
administration officials have
recounted conversations they
had with the president about
potential pardons for former
aides under investigation by
the special counsel, according
to two people briefed on the interviews.
In one meeting with lawyers from the White House
Counsel’s Office last year,
Trump asked about the extent
of his pardon power, according
to a person briefed on the conversation. The lawyers explained that the president’s
powers were broad, the person
said.
Legal experts are divided
about whether a pardon offer,
even if given in exchange for
continued loyalty, can be considered obstruction of justice.
Presidents have constitutional
authority to pardon people
who face or were convicted of
federal charges.
But pardon power is not
unlimited, said Samuel W.
Buell, a professor of law at
Duke University.
“The framers did not create
the power to pardon as a way
for the president to protect
himself and his associates”
from being prosecuted for
their own criminal behavior,
he said.
In 2016, Trump aide spoke to associate tied to Russian spying
By Mark Mazzetti
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — A top
Trump campaign official had
repeated communications during the final weeks of the 2016
presidential race with a business associate tied to Russian
intelligence, according to a
document released Tuesday by
the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the
election.
The campaign official, Rick
Gates, had frequent phone
calls in September and October
2016 with a person the FBI believes had active links to Russian spy services at the time,
the document said. Gates also
told an associate the person
“was a former Russian Intelligence Officer with the GRU,”
the Russian military intelligence agency.
Special Counsel Robert Mueller is investigating numerous
contacts between President
Trump’s advisers and Russialinked individuals and entities
leading up to and after the November 2016 election. The document, filed in Mueller’s name,
stated that the communications between Gates and the
individual were “pertinent to
the investigation.”
The individual is identified
only as “Person A,” and the document describes him as someone who worked for Gates and
Paul Manafort, Trump’s campaign chairman, as part of
their earlier representation of
Russia-aligned parties and politicians in Ukraine, including
the former president of
Ukraine. A person with knowledge of the matter identified
Person A as Konstantin V. Kilimnik, who for years was
Manafort’s right-hand man in
Ukraine.
Manafort has told associates that he does not believe
that Kilimnik has ties to Russian intelligence, but the document released Tuesday shows
that Gates told others of his
history in the intelligence services. That history was widely
discussed for years among people who worked with Manafort
and Gates in Ukraine.
At the time of the calls,
Gates was the Trump cam-
paign’s liaison to the Republican National Committee and,
before that, he was the campaign’s deputy chairman.
Manafort served as the campaign chairman until August
2016, when he resigned amid
the growing controversy about
his work in Ukraine.
Both Manafort and Gates
At the time of the
calls, Rick Gates
was the Trump
campaign’s liaison
to the Republican
National
Committee.
were indicted last year for
money laundering and other financial crimes committed
while, the charges said, they
tried to hide the money they received for their Ukraine work.
Last month, Gates pleaded
guilty to financial fraud and ly-
ing to investigators and has
agreed to cooperate with Mueller’s investigation.
Manafort has vowed to fight
the charges. In February 2017,
he told The New York Times he
had “never knowingly spoken
to Russian intelligence officers,
and I have never been involved
with anything to do with the
Russian government of the Putin administration or any other
issues under investigation today.
“It’s not like these people
wear badges that say, ‘I’m a
Russian intelligence officer,’”
he added.
Kilimnik was born in
Ukraine when it was still part
of the Soviet Union, and he
served in the Russian army as a
linguist. Last year, as scrutiny
mounted of his work with
Manafort and Gates in
Ukraine, he steadfastly denied
any association with Russian
intelligence. An investigation
by Ukrainian prosecutors into
Kilimnik’s possible links to
Russian spy agencies was
closed late last year without
charges.
Kilimnik has maintained
residences in Moscow and Kiev, the capital of Ukraine, and
has traveled regularly between
them during years of working
for Manafort and Gates on behalf of various Russia-aligned
oligarchs and political parties.
The new document is a sentencing memorandum for Alex
van der Zwaan, a lawyer who
pleaded guilty in February to
lying to federal investigators
about his conversations with
Gates in 2016 about work the
two men did in Ukraine.
Van der Zwaan was an attorney at a firm that worked
with Manafort and Gates to
prepare a report used to defend Viktor F. Yanukovych, the
former Ukrainian president,
from international criticism
over the prosecution and incarceration of one of his political
rivals.
Van der Zwaan “worked
closely” on the report with
Gates and Person A, according
to a court filing submitted
Tuesday by van der Zwaan’s
lawyers asking the judge for leniency in sentencing.
OKLAHOMA CITY — A
package of Oklahoma tax hikes
aimed at generating hundreds
of millions of additional dollars
for teacher pay and averting
statewide school closures received final legislative approval
Wednesday night.
The Senate voted 36-10 to
increase taxes on oil and gas
production, cigarettes, fuel,
and lodging — narrowly receiving the three-fourths majority
needed to pass. The House
passed the plan Monday. It is
designed to generate about
$450 million for lawmakers to
spend, and Governor Mary Fallin said she ‘‘absolutely’’ plans
to sign the package.
Amid a furious, last-minute
lobbying effort by the hospitality industry, House and Senate
leaders agreed to pass a separate measure to repeal the $5per-night hotel and motel tax
that was projected to raise
about $45 million.
A separate bill to increase
teacher pay by an average of
about $6,100 also cleared the
Senate on Wednesday.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Charges dismissed
in hazing death
A judge threw out involuntary manslaughter and many of
the other most serious remaining charges Wednesday against
11 of the former Penn State fraternity members arrested in a
pledge’s hazing-related death
last year, the second major
blow to the prosecution’s case.
District Judge Allen Sinclair
dismissed all five involuntary
manslaughter charges, along
with all reckless endangerment
and hazing counts before him,
during the three-day hearing
that wrapped up late Tuesday,
sending to county court for trial
only alcohol violations and single counts of conspiracy to
commit hazing.
The case involves the February 2017 death of 19-year-old
student Tim Piazza of Lebanon,
N.J., who died after falling several times at the house the
night of a bid acceptance ceremony and party.
Security video showed him
and other pledges being plied
with alcohol.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Labrador retrievers
most popular again
NEW YORK — Americans
still love Labrador retrievers,
but the nation’s flirtation with
French bulldogs has reached
new heights.
Labs remain the country’s
most popular purebred dog for
a 27th year, while German
shepherds and golden retrievers have hung on to the second
and third spots in new American Kennel Club rankings released Wednesday.
But French bulldogs hit a
highest-ever No. 4, and German shorthaired pointers
cracked the top 10 for the first
time. The bulldog is fifth, after
notching a record No. 4 ranking last year. Sixth through
10th are the beagle, the poodle,
the Rottweiler, the Yorkshire
terrier, and the German shorthaired pointer.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
For the record
R Correction: Because of a reporting error, a profile of young
adult novelist Mackenzi Lee in
the Thursday Living Arts section, which is printed in advance, misstated the name and
breed of Lee’s roommate’s dog.
The dog’s name is Mila, and she
is a white golden retriever.
R Correction: Because of an editing error, a photo caption for a
Metro story Wednesday on a
maple syrup farm in Vermont
misidentified the owners of
draft horses at the farm. The
horses are owned by Sophia Roleau’s grandparents. The Globe
regrets the errors.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A3
Daniels’s lawyer asks for permission to depose Trump
By Derek Hawkins
WASHINGTON POST
Stormy Daniels’s attorney is
asking a federal judge in California for permission to depose President Trump and his
longtime lawyer Michael Cohen about the nondisclosure
agreement the porn actress
says she signed to keep quiet
about her alleged affair with
the president.
In documents filed
Wednesday morning, Michael
Avenatti said he was seeking
to depose Trump and Cohen
for no more than two hours
each to find out whether
Trump was aware of the agreement and whether he consented to it.
Daniels alleges she had sex
w i t h Tr u m p i n 2 0 0 6 a f t e r
meeting him at a celebrity golf
tournament, then signed the
‘‘hush agreement’’ in October
2016, less than two weeks before the presidential election,
in exchange for a $130,000
payment. Cohen says he made
the payment from his personal
funds without Trump’s knowledge and without being reimbursed.
The porn actress’s lawsuit
claims the agreement was invalid because Trump never
signed it.
In requesting depositions,
Avenatti said he ‘‘intends to
prove that the Hush Agreement did not have a lawful object or purpose.’’
‘‘Rather, the Agreement
and the $130,000 payment
made pursuant to the Agreement, was for the ‘purpose of
influencing’ the 2016 presidential election by silencing
Plaintiff from speaking openly
and publicly about Mr. Trump
just weeks before the 2016
election,’’ he wrote in a 31page motion.
Avenatti is also seeking to
issue no more than 10 document requests to Trump and
Cohen ‘‘on various topics relating to the Hush Agreement.’’
A hearing on the matter is
scheduled for April 30 before
US District Judge S. James Otero in the Central District of
California, based in Los Angeles.
Attorneys for Trump and
Cohen did not immediately respond to messages seeking
comment Wednesday. The
White House has denied that
there was ever an affair between Trump and Daniels,
whose real name is Stephanie
Clifford.
Before the motion was
filed, David Schwartz, an attorney and spokesman for Cohen, told ‘‘60 Minutes’’ that he
was ‘‘sure’’ Avenatti didn’ t
Trump and
Cohen’s legal
teams are seeking
to force Daniels to
settle the case in
arbitration.
want to depose Trump.
‘‘This case is so illogical, it’s
not going to happen,’’ he said.
‘‘You can’t make that happen
by bringing a frivolous action.’’
In a contentious CNN debate with Avenatti last week,
Schwartz said Trump wasn’t
obligated to sign the agreement, which contained a line
for his signature, because he
was a third-party beneficiary.
Trump and Cohen’s legal
teams are seeking to force
Daniels to settle the case in arbitration, which is required
under the terms of the agreement. But Avenatti argues the
matter can’t be resolved ‘‘without facts and evidence, and
thus discovery.’’ He is seeking
expedited depositions and
document production, and a
trial within 90 days of a judicial ruling on the motion.
The $130,000 payment,
Avenatti alleges, amounted to
an in-kind contribution to the
Trump campaign that further
showed the agreement was unlawful.
The arbitration clause, he
wrote, ‘‘plainly is designed to
prevent public disclosure of an
illegal campaign contribution
by mandating that disputes
be tween Plai ntiff and Mr.
Trump be resolved in a confidential arbitration proceeding
shielded from public scrutiny.’’
The motion references the
US Supreme Court case Clinton v. Jones, which stemmed
from Arkansas state employee
Paula Jones’s sexual harassment lawsuit against President Bill Clinton in the mid1990s. In that case, the high
court ruled that the Constitution ‘‘does not offer a sitting
President significant protections from potentially distracting civil litigation.’’ The landmark decision also noted previous cases in which ‘‘sitting
Presidents have given depositions or testified at criminal
trials.’’
Case questioning Trump’s business
ties clears a hurdle in federal court
WASHINGTON — A lawsuit
accusing President Trump of
violating the Constitution by
refusing to diPOLITICAL vorce himself
NOTEBOOK from his businesses cleared
a critical hurdle Wednesday
when a federal judge in Maryland refused the Justice Department’s plea to dismiss it.
The decision could allow the
plaintiffs to scrutinize the
Trump Organization’s financial
records for payments from foreign entities and others possibly seeking to influence the
White House.
In a 47-page order, Judge
Peter J. Messitte said he refused to bar the lawsuit filed
last year by Washington, D.C.,
and the state of Maryland, rejecting claims that the two jurisdictions had not sufficiently
alleged injuries. The suit alleges that Trump has violated
constitutional anticorruption
clauses intended to limit government-bestowed benefits to
the president, or emoluments,
other than salary.
The emoluments case raises
basic questions that have never
been litigated. It is neither
clear what constitutes an illegal
benefit to the president or
whether any legal remedy exists if the president accepts
one.
Although the suit could still
be thrown out on other
grounds, the judge’s ruling
adds to the president’s growing
legal troubles.
For the plaintiffs, his ruling
is an important first step in
their quest to show that Trump
crossed a constitutional line. In
his opinion, the judge said they
had legal standing “to challenge the actions of the president with respect to the Trump
International Hotel and its appurtenances in Washington,
D.C., as well as the Trump Organization with respect to
them.”
The plaintiffs contend that
in hopes of currying presidential favor, government officials
are patronizing Trump-owned
properties instead of hotels or
convention centers in which
Washington or Maryland has a
financial interest. Those payments, they contend, constitute illegal benefits that violate
both the foreign and domestic
emoluments clauses of the
Constitution.
Lawyers for the Justice Department argued that there
was no proof that Washington
or Maryland facilities are losing customers to Trump’s properties.
Even if they are, they contend, that does not amount to a
constitutional violation by the
president.
NEW YORK TIMES
Trump says 2nd Amendment
‘will never be repealed’
WASHINGTON — President
Trump said Wednesday that
the Second Amendment — the
right to keep and bear arms —
“will never be repealed,” responding to an opinion piece
written by a retired Supreme
Court justice who called for
just that.
Trump’s declaration in an
early-morning tweet came after
days of silence on the subject,
despite student-organized
marches around the country
over the weekend calling for
more gun control.
GETTY IMAGES
George Conway, a lawyer
and husband of White
House counselor Kellyanne
Conway, has raised some
eyebrows with his tweets.
On Tuesday, retired Justice
John Paul Stevens wrote an oped in The New York Times calling for the repeal of the Second
Amendment.
“Rarely in my lifetime have I
seen the type of civic engagement schoolchildren and their
supporters demonstrated in
Washington and other major
cities throughout the country
this past Saturday,” Stevens
wrote.
“These demonstrations demand our respect. They reveal
the broad public support for
legislation to minimize the risk
of mass killings of schoolchildren and others in our society.”
Repealing the Second
Amendment would have to be
approved by Congress, and
there have been no formal proposals for such a move.
Stevens retired from the Supreme Court in 2010. He wrote
a major dissent about the Second Amendment in one of the
court’s hardest-fought decisions. Stevens argued that the
amendment does not protect
an individual’s right to own
firearms.
In his tweet, Trump also
said that Democrats support
repealing the Second Amendment, but that has not been the
case in Congress, which is only
considering modest policy
changes on guns. In the 1990s,
a Democratic congressman
from New York introduced legislation for a repeal, but it did
not get any traction. Trump’s
opponent in the 2016 election,
Hillary Clinton, did not campaign to repeal the Second
Amendment.
NEW YORK TIMES
Conway’s husband using
Twitter to tweak Trump
WASHINGTON — As a top
adviser to President Trump,
Kellyanne Conway spends her
days defending her boss from
his legions of critics, making
her fiery case on frequent cable
TV hits.
But now — as they say in
horror stories — ‘‘the call is
coming from inside the house’’:
It seems that her own husband,
lawyer George Conway, has
joined the very anti-Trump
forces she’s fighting against.
George Conway’s Twitter
feed has lately become a font of
Trump critiques. Here’s the one
that really got Beltway types
talking: Last week, he retweeted a CNN reporter (a purveyor
of what his wife and her boss
deride as ‘‘fake news”) who had
posted about how Trump says
one thing and then does another, making it hard for White
House officials to speak for the
president. ‘‘So true,’’ he wrote.
‘‘It’s absurd. Which is why people are banging down the
doors to be his comms director.’’
Which was ... interesting,
since his wife is among those
names often being mentioned
to fill the role of communications director, a job left open
when Hope Hicks last month
announced she was leaving the
job.
There have been plenty of
other tweets poking the president, and since George Conway
is a lawyer, his focus has often
been Trump’s legal woes.
On Wednesday, he retweeted former federal prosecutor
Renato Mariotti’s analysis of
how the lawsuit brought by
adult-film star Stormy Daniels
could prove treacherous for the
president.
‘‘This is why the suit by
Stormy Daniels matters,’’ Mariotti wrote. ‘‘It will be very hard
for Trump and Cohen to avoid
discovery, including depositions under oath.’’
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1.65%. To earn the APY on your account, you must have an active Impact Checking account with a $10,000 average daily balance or $500 minimum direct deposit(s) within each statement cycle or five debit
card POS (pinned or signature) transactions that post and settle in each statement cycle. Each statement cycle the Impact Checking account does not meet these activity requirements, the APY for both the
Impact Savings and Impact Checking defaults to 0.10% for the next statement cycle. New money only. No internal transfers from other accounts permitted. Only one Impact Savings account per taxpayer
identification number. Offer cannot be combined with any other offers.
Member FDIC. Member DIF. Equal Housing Lender.
REV. 03/2018
T h e
A4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
The World
Kim’s diplomatic flair on display in China trip
Signals a fixed
relationship
with Xi Jinping
New activity
at N. Korea
nuclear site
By Jane Perlez
NEW YORK TIMES
BEIJING — With a dose of
mystery and the flair of a
s h o w m a n , N o r t h K o r e a ’s
young leader, Kim Jong Un,
used his debut as an international statesman on Wednesday to present himself as confident, reasonable — and willing to bargain.
Kim’s surprise two-day visit
to Beijing , his first known
overseas trip since taking power, was effectively a reminder
of how much he has set the
agenda in the crisis over his
nation’s nuclear arsenal — and
of what a strong hand he has
going into talks, first with
Pr e s i d e n t Mo o n Ja e - i n o f
South Korea next month and
later with President Trump.
Kim has ye t to say what
concessions he is willing to
make, or what he may demand
from the United States in return. But he continued to
dominate the diplomatic process, reaffirming his willingness to meet with Trump and
repeating his vague commitment to the denuclearization
of the Korean Peninsula in
talks with President Xi Jinping
of China, according to Xinhua,
the Chinese state news agency.
During Trump’s first year in
office, Kim raced ahead with
breakthrough tests of a hydrogen bomb and missiles capable of hitting the US mainland.
Then he abruptly changed
course and used the Winter
Olympics to seize the initiative, surprising the world with
a rapprochement with the
South and then an offer to
meet with Trump.
Through it all, the Trump
administration has been largely relegated to catching up to
Kim. And so it was again this
week, when Kim suddenly
showed up in China on an armored train and was shown
beaming next to Xi, whose cooperation has been critical to
Trump’s strategy of “maximum
pressure” on the North. The
state media in China and
North Korea announced the
meeting on Wednesday, after
two days of secrecy.
In images and in words,
Kim and Xi signaled that they
had repaired the relationship
between their countries,
which had soured as Kim had
accelerated his nuclear program and Xi had responded by
endorsing — and enforcing —
more punishing sanctions proposed by the United States.
“The friendship between
North Korea and China that
was personally created and
nurtured together by former
generations of leaders from
both our sides is unshakable,”
Kim told Xi, according to Xin-
By Eric Talmadge
ASSOCIATED PRESS
AFP/KCNA VIA KNS/GETTY IMAGES
Kim Jong Un visited China this week, meeting the president, Xi Jinping (below), and waving as his train left Beijing.
AFP/KCNA VIA KNS/GETTY IMAGES
hua. Xi went out of his way to
recall the warm friendship between his father, a high-ranking Communist Party official
from the Mao era, and Kim’s
father, Kim Jong Il, the North’s
previous leader.
It is too soon to say whether
the meeting marks a softening
of China’s posture toward Kim
or of its commitment to global
sanctions against North Korea. But the visit ser ved to
highlight Beijing’s unique leverage over North Korea, even
as Trump is threatening China
with a trade war.
Tr u m p c a n t a l k a b o u t
maintaining “maximum pressure” on the North, but ultimately China — the North’s
main trade partner — still decides what that means, be-
cause it can choose how strictly to enforce sanctions.
“China is saying to the
United States and the rest of
the world: Anyone who wants
a deal on anything on the future of the Korean Peninsula,
and certainly something
which deals with nukes, don’t
think you can walk around us,
guys,” Kevin Rudd, a former
Australian prime minister
who is on good terms with the
Chinese leadership, said in
Hong Kong on Wednesday.
The Chinese government
said it had briefed the White
House on Kim’s visit, adding
that Xi had sent a personal
m e s s a g e t o Tr u m p . O n
Wednesday morning, Trump
expressed optimism on Twitter
about the potential for diplo-
matic success, saying there
was “a good chance” that Kim
would “do what is right for his
people and for humanity.”
But there was little in the
public accounts of Xi’s discussions with Kim to suppor t
such a positive assessment.
Though Xinhua quoted Kim as
saying he was open to talks
with Trump and committed to
denuclearization, North Korea’s own state media made no
mention of either.
Xinhua also quoted Kim as
proposing “phased, synchronized measures” by South Korea and the United States — a
phrase that suggests a desire
to negotiate a gradual drawdown of his arsenal, but which
also echoes the North’s position in past talks that dragged
on and ultimately failed. One
major difference between then
and now is that North Korea
has a far more advanced nuclear arsenal.
High-level officials from
North and South Korea began
talks at a border village Thursday to prepare for the summit
between their leaders, the Associated Press reported. Officials plan to use the talks to
determine the date and agenda of the meeting between
Kim and Moon. The results of
the closed-door talks weren’t
immediately clear.
Trump’s incoming national
security adviser, John R. Bolton, meanwhile, has expressed
little patience for extended negotiations. He has said that
North Korea should be asked
to park its nuclear arsenal at
the Oak Ridge nuclear facility
in Tennessee.
If China decides to soften
its stance on sanctions and act
as North Korea’s protector,
Kim will enter the talks with
Trump in a considerably stronger position than he otherwise
would have.
“It is very unlikely that Kim
Jong Un consulted with the
Chinese before offering to
meet Trump,” said Sergey Radchenko, a professor of international relations at Cardiff University in Wales. “This in itself
was a rebellious affront to the
Chinese leadership. But by doing this, Kim immeasurably
strengthened his negotiating
position vis-à-vis the Chinese.
He came to Beijing not as a
supplicant but as an equal.”
TOKYO — Increased activity at a North Korean nuclear site has once again
caught the attention of analysts and renewed concerns
about the complexities of
denuclearization talks as
President Trump prepares
for a summit with Kim
Jo n g Un i n t h e c o m i n g
weeks.
Satellite imagery taken
last month suggests the
North has begun preliminary testing of an experimental light water reactor
and possibly brought another reactor online at its
Yo n g b y o n N u c l e a r R e search Center.
Both could be used to
produce the fissile materials needed for nuclear
bombs.
The findings come at a
particularly sensitive time.
Trump and Kim are planning to meet by May, according to officials, and denuclearization will likely be
the biggest topic on their
agenda if they do meet.
North Korea tested its biggest nuclear device to date
last September. Pyongyang
claims it was an H-bomb.
While the North hasn’t
conducted any tests since,
or test-launched any longrange missiles since Nov.
28, the heightened activity
at the Yongbyon complex
could be ominous.
According to an analysis
in Jane’s Intelligence Review published earlier this
month, a testing program
is now underway at the experimental reactor, which
means it could become operational with ‘‘little warning later in 2018 or in
2019.’’ It said the preliminar y testing follows increased activity throughout
2017.
The reactor was completed five years ago and is
primarily designed to generate electricity for civilian
use. But it could also be
used to produce plutonium
or tritium.
The Jane’s report cautioned that without international inspections it’s impossible to tell for sure if
it’s being used to produce
civilian electricity or weapons-grade material for
bombs. The reactor has
been linked to the local
electricity grid and is believed to be potentially able
to power a city of about
50,000 if operated at full
capacity.
Daily Briefing
Suu Kyi ally is named president
Officer killed by terrorist after saving hostage honored
MANDALAY, Myanmar —
A longtime loyalist to Myanmar’s civilian leader, Aung
San Suu Kyi, was chosen
Wednesday to be the country’s new president, a largely
ceremonial role in which he
is expected to be the official
conduit for her authority.
The new president, U Win
Myint, will succeed U Htin
Kyaw, 71, who resigned last
week after two years on the
job.
Htin Kyaw was widely regarded as an honest but powerless functionary who did
the bidding of Suu Kyi, a
Nobel Peace laureate who has
been condemned globally for
her acquiescence to the military’s violence against Rohingya Muslims.
Win Myint, a 66-year-old
lawyer, is expected to perform
in a similar fashion.
As president, he will be
constrained by both the
military-drafted constitution
and the strong hand of Suu
Kyi.
PARIS — Officers of the
French Republican Guard, riding motorcycles and wearing
blue uniforms and white helmets, formed the honor guard
escorting the simple dark car
carrying the body of Colonel
Arnaud Beltrame to the Invalides in Paris for a hero’s memorial on Wednesday.
President Emmanuel Macron gave a eulogy for Beltrame, and the gendarme was
honored with a full military
ceremony for his act of courage
in voluntarily exchanging himself for a hostage during a terrorist attack last week in the
town of Trèbes, in southwest
France, an act that saved the
woman and possibly others,
but that cost the gendarme his
life.
“To accept to die so the innocent can live, that is the essence of what it means to be a
soldier,” Macron said. “Others,
even many who are brave,
would have hesitated.”
Macron awarded Beltrame
the title of Commander of the
Parliament chose him
from a field of three candidates during a two-hour session in which his character
and qualifications for the job
were not mentioned.
Also not discussed were
his stands on such pressing
issues as the violence against
the Rohingya in Rakhine
state, a growing crackdown
on freedom of speech, a
struggling economy, and continued fighting between the
military and several ethnic
groups.
Suu Kyi, 72, made a rare
appearance in Parliament to
observe the vote, joined by
Win Myint.
The former president,
Htin Kyaw, who has been in
poor health, did not explain
his reason for resigning. But
his wife, Su Su Lwin, who is
also a member of Parliament,
told reporters last week that
it was not for health reasons
and suggested he was not
happy in his role.
NEW YORK TIMES
LUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Colonel Arnaud Beltrame was given the title of Commander
of the Legion of Honor, one of France’s highest accolades.
Legion of Honor, one of the
highest accolades that France
bestows.
Laying aside his weapon on
Friday, Beltrame, 44, entered a
Super U market in Trèbes not
long after Radouane Lakdim,
25, had entered, wielding a
handgun and a knife.
Lakdim shot a customer
and the supermarket’s butcher,
and then took a cashier as a
hostage. Beltrame told him to
let the woman go and to take
him instead.
French news reports suggested on Wednesday that Beltrame had at some point tried
to disarm Lakdim, precipitating the shooting and lethal
knifing of the gendarme.
The Islamic State claimed
responsibility for the attack.
NEW YORK TIMES
Serial rapist will
stay in prison
LONDON — Britain’s High
Court has ordered that a serial rapist believed to have attacked more than 100 women
must stay in prison, overturning a parole board decision
that had cleared the way for
his release.
The decision follows a
challenge by victims of John
Worboys, 60, a former London taxi driver who was
convicted in 2009 of raping
or sexually assaulting 12
women he picked up as passengers.
The victims argued that a
release was ‘‘irrational’’ because Worboys was tried on
only a handful of cases and
the board should have considered that 102 women
made allegations against him.
The High Court said
Wednesday that the board
should have ‘‘undertaken further inquiry into the circumstances of his offending.’’
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A5
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A6
The World
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Egypt votes on final day,
with all eyes on the turnout
El­Sissi expected
to win easily with
token opponent
By Maggie Michael
and Samy Magdy
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Egyptian election
authorities have warned people
to vote or risk paying a fine, as
they look to boost turnout in a
lackluster election that is virtually guaranteed to hand President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi a second four-year term.
El-Sissi faces only a token
opponent in the vote, which resembles the referendums held
by autocrats for decades before
the Arab Spring uprisings of
2011 briefly raised hopes of
democratic change.
Serious challengers were
forced out or arrested, including former Prime Minister
Ahmed Shafiq, who showed up
late Tuesday at a polling center
to cast his ballot. It was his first
public appearance since he announced his intention to run in
December from the United Arab Emirates, where he had
gone after narrowly losing the
2012 election to the Islamist
Mohammed Morsi.
The UAE deported Shafiq after the announcement, and he
was met at the Cairo airport by
unidentified security men who
escorted him to a hotel on the
city’s outskirts. He decided
against running soon thereafter. On Tuesday, he told reporters that voting was a ‘‘national
duty,’’ without elaborating.
The government is hoping
for high turnout to lend the
election legitimacy, and has
staggered the voting over three
days, with polls closing
Wednesday at 9 p.m.
Official results are expected
on April 2.
The National Election Au-
thority said in a statement
Wednesday it will enforce a law
penalizing boycotters with a
fine of around $30. Similar
warnings have been issued in
previous elections, with no real
enforcement.
Nearly 60 million Egyptians
are eligible to vote at some
13,700 polling centers. El-Sissi
won 96.9 percent of the vote in
2014, with an official turnout
of more than 47 percent. In the
2012 election, which witnessed
heightened competition between Islamists and opponents,
turnout reached 52 percent.
In the polling centers this
year, turnout appeared low
over the first two days of voting
then started to gain momentum by midday Wednesday,
with short lines in front of
some polling stations. El-Sissi’s
only opponent is Moussa Mustafa Moussa, a little-known politician who supports the president and made no effort to
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MOHAMED HOSSAM/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
A man in Cairo, wearing a shirt with a photo of President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, showed his
fingers stained with voting ink Wednesday.
campaign against him.
Mahmoud el-Sherif, the
spokesman of the election commission, said Wednesday at a
press conference that the highest turnout was in Cairo, the
Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, and in northern Sinai, the epicenter of an insurgency by Islamic militants.
In Cairo’s heavily populated,
middle-class district of Shubra,
a trickle of voters, mainly older
women, could be seen outside
two polling stations. Judges supervising the polling centers
said that of 7,800 registered
voters, some 3,000 cast ballots,
or around 38 percent. In a
nearby polling center the turnout reached 34 percent, according to figures provided by the
judges.
Saadia Ali, a housewife and
mother of five, said she came
because she hopes things get
better. ‘‘Just tell them that our
houses are collapsing and on
my street they are not doing
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2017 Rosés Have Arrived!
Chateau d’Esclans Whispering Angel Rosé 2017 750 ML....................................... $
Fleur De Mer Côtes de Provence Rosé 2017 750 ML ............................................. $
Gerard Bertrand Côte de Roses Rosé 2017 750 ML ............................................... $
Mimi en Provence Rosé 2017 750 ML.................................................................... $
Villa Wolf Pinot Noir Rosé 2017 750 ML ................................................................. $
Perrier-Jouet Brut 750 ML...................................................................................... $
Laurent Perrier Brut 750 ML .................................................................................. $
Roederer Estate Brut 750 ML ................................................................................. $
Westport Rivers Brut Cuvee RJR 2007 750 ML ...................................................... $
Carpene Malvolti Prosecco Extra Dry 1868 750 ML................................................ $
Ca’ Furlan Prosecco Cuvee Beatrice 750 ML.......................................................... $
Ruffino Prosecco 750 ML ........................................................................................$
Lan Edicion Limitada Rioja 2011 750 ML ............................................................... $
Ruffino Chianti Classico Riserva Ducale Oro 2012 750 ML..................................... $
Steltzner Napa Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 750 ML................................................. $
Palacio de Fefinanes Albarino 2016 750 ML........................................................... $
Umberto Cesari Sangiovese Reserva 2014 750 ML................................................ $
Meerlust Merlot 2009 750 ML................................................................................ $
Trimbach Gewurztraminer 2014 750 ML................................................................ $
Domaine Laroche Chablis 2015 750 ML ................................................................ $
Clos Pegase Napa Chardonnay 2015 750 ML ........................................................ $
Meiomi Chardonnay 2016 750 ML ......................................................................... $
J Lohr Chardonnay Riverstone 2016 750 ML ..........................................................$
Cousino-Macul Cabernet Sauvignon Reserva 2013 750 ML................................... $
Criss Cross Cabernet Sauvignon 2013 750 ML .......................................................$
Lagar de Bezana Amalgama Red 2013 750 ML ......................................................$
Summerland Theresa-Noelle Pinot Noir 2012 750 ML ........................................... $
Firesteed Pinot Noir 2014 750 ML.......................................................................... $
Ca’Montini Pinot Grigio, Trentino 2016 750 ML....................................................... $
Kris Pinot Grigio 2016 750 ML ................................................................................$
St. Supery Sauvignon Blanc 2016 750 ML ............................................................. $
Kim Crawford Sauvignon Blanc 2016 750 ML........................................................ $
Heritance Sauvignon Blanc Napa 2015 750 ML ......................................................$
Louis Jadot Beaujolais Villages 2016 750 ML..........................................................$
Dr. Loosen Riesling 2016 750 ML............................................................................$
Mark West Pinot Noir 2016 750 ML.........................................................................$
Clos Du Bois Chardonnay 1.5 LTR .......................................................................... $
C K Mondavi Cab/Chard/Merlot 1.5 LTR ..................................................................$
Beringer White Zinfandel 1.5 LTR ............................................................................$
Cavit Pinot Grigio 1.5 LTR ........................................................................................$
Sutter Home Cabernet/Chardonnay/Merlot 1.5 LTR .................................................$
Bota Box (All Types) 3 LTR ...................................................................................... $
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LIQUOR SPECIALS
Eagle Rare 10 Year Single Barrel Select 90 Proof 750 ML ...................................... $
Russell’s Reserve Bourbon Single Barrel 110 Proof 750 ML................................... $
Jim Beam Bourbon Single Barrel 95 Proof 750 ML ................................................ $
Knob Creek Bourbon 1.75 LTR................................................................................ $
Woodford Reserve Bourbon 750 ML....................................................................... $
Jim Beam Bourbon 1.75 LTR.................................................................................. $
Jack Daniels Whiskey 1.75 LTR.............................................................................. $
Chopin Vodka 1.75 LTR........................................................................................... $
Ketel One Vodka 1.75 LTR ...................................................................................... $
Tito’s Vodka 1.75 LTR ............................................................................................. $
Absolut Vodka 1.75 LTR.......................................................................................... $
Stolichnaya Vodka 1.75 LTR ................................................................................... $
Smirnoff Vodka 1.75 LTR ........................................................................................ $
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Tanqueray Gin 1.75 LTR ......................................................................................... $
Bombay Sapphire Gin 1.75 LTR.............................................................................. $
Captain Morgan Rum 1.75 LTR............................................................................... $
Bacardi Silver & Gold Rum 1.75 LTR....................................................................... $
Privateer Silver Rum 750 ML.................................................................................. $
Don Q Rum Cristal & Gold 1.75 LTR........................................................................ $
Cruzan Light Rum 1.75 LTR.................................................................................... $
Milagro Silver Tequila 750 ML ................................................................................ $
Sauza Hornitos Plata & Reposado Tequila 1.75 LTR................................................ $
Canadian Club Whisky 1.75 LTR ............................................................................. $
Jameson Irish Whiskey 1.75 LTR............................................................................ $
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Ardmore Scotch Single Malt Traditional Cask 750 ML ............................................ $
Auchentoshan Scotch Single Malt 12 Year 750 ML................................................. $
Highland Park Magnus 750 ML .............................................................................. $
Glenfiddich 12 Year Old 750 ML ............................................................................. $
Glenmorangie 10 Year Old 750 ML......................................................................... $
Oban Scotch Single Malt Small Cask Little Bay 750 ML ......................................... $
Bowmore Scotch Single Malt 12 Year 750 ML........................................................ $
Johnnie Walker Black 750 ML................................................................................ $
Johnnie Walker Red 1.75 LTR................................................................................. $
Dewars White Label 1.75 LTR................................................................................. $
Southern Comfort 1.75 LTR .................................................................................... $
Kahlua 750 ML....................................................................................................... $
Bailey’s Irish Cream 1.75 LTR................................................................................. $
Grand Marnier 750 ML ........................................................................................... $
B & B Liqueur 750 ML............................................................................................ $
Hennessy VS 1.75 LTR............................................................................................ $
Remy Martin VSOP 750 ML .................................................................................... $
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Coors Light/Miller Lite 12 oz. 30 Pack Cans ............................................................ $ 22.99
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Yuengling 12 oz. 24 Pack Cans................................................................................ $ 18.99
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Lagunitas IPA 12 oz. 12 Pack Bottles....................................................................... $ 13.99
Stone IPA 12 oz. 12 Pack Cans................................................................................ $ 13.99
Brooklyn Brewery Mixed 12 oz. 12 Pack Bottles...................................................... $ 13.99
Ballast Point Fathom IPA 12 oz. 12 Pack Cans......................................................... $ 13.99
Ballast Point Bonita Blonde Ale 12 oz. 12 Pack Cans ............................................... $ 13.99
Sierra Nevada ALL TYPES 12 oz. 12 Pack Bottles .................................................... $ 13.99
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anything to fix it,’’ she said.
Some el-Sissi supporters are
suggesting that he should consider amending the constitution to remain president for
life.
Ashraf Ahmed, a 50-yearold ceramic sculptor, said while
smoking shisha in a cafe: ‘‘I
have only one wish and if accomplished, I will be very happy. I wish that the next step is
to change the constitution so he
can run for a third, fourth, fifth,
and forever.’’
El-Sissi has said that he is
not in favor of amending constitutional provisions barring
the president from staying in
office beyond two, four-yearterms.
Several pro-government
lawmakers and media figures
promoted the proposed amendments to allow el-Sissi to stay in
office beyond eight years.
At Saleh Hamad school in
Shubra, at least 3,500 of 12,000
eligible voters cast their votes
by midday, or about 29 percent,
polling judges there said. Christians, strong supporters of elSissi for challenging Islamists,
make up a large portion of voters in the district. They constitute around 10 percent of
Egypt’s predominantly Muslim
population.
Father Marcus Ibrahim, a
Coptic Christian priest who
brought his son with him, said
the church told worshippers to
go and vote without supporting
a certain candidate.
‘‘This is the only way for
change. It’s slow but it will happen as long as we keep participating. I brought my son and
told him to sign the ballot and
drop it in the box so he gets
used to it.
L o ca l med ia, wh ich ar e
dominated by pro-government
commentators, have urged people to come out and vote, saying they have a national obligation to resist foreign plots
aimed at sowing discord.
Ethiopia chooses new
leader, in move that
could ease protests
By Paul Schemm
WASHINGTON POST
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia —
Ethiopia’s ruling coalition has
elected a new chairman and
eventual prime minister from a
region racked by protests, in a
major shift in leadership that
could also ease persistent unrest in one of Africa’s fastestgrowing economies.
Ethiopia has experienced violence for the last three years
amid protests by members of
an ethnic minority known as
the Oromo, who say they have
been systematically excluded
from power.
A decision late Tuesday to
pick an Oromo lawmaker to
lead Ethiopia’s governing coalition marked a potentially important step to ease political
upheavals that have twice
forced authorities to declare a
state of emergency.
The tensions also reverberated well beyond Ethiopia’s borders, threatening its status as
an anchor of stability and foreign investment in East Africa
and its role as a key US ally in
the region.
The council of the Ethiopian
People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front, a coalition of four
ethnically based parties, voted
for Abiy Ahmed, 41, an outspoken Oromo member of parliament, to be its new chairman.
That sets the stage for Abiy to
be named prime minister.
The move comes after days
of closed-door meetings and six
weeks after the previous prime
minister, Hailmariam Desalegn, abruptly announced his
resignation, saying it was to further democracy in the country.
His resignation prompted
the declaration of a new state of
emergency around the country
— and especially in the Oromo
region that surrounds the capital. Oromos make up a third of
the population of 100 million
but maintain they have been
consistently excluded from having a voice in shaping the country.
Abiy would be the country’s
first Oromo head of state in
modern times, and his accession to the premiership is expected to calm the persistent
protests and violence in the
countryside.
‘‘ There was dancing last
night in the town; people were
dancing in the streets and con-
gratulating each other,’’ said
Andu Selam, an engineering
student in the town of Mettu in
the Oromia region in southwestern Ethiopia. ‘‘People have
hope now that things will be
different — if someone else had
been selected, [the demonstrations] would not have stopped.’’
Abiy would only be the third
prime minister since the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary
Democratic Front, or EPRDF,
overthrew the communist regime in 1991. His predecessor
was seen largely as a placeholder dedicated to maintaining the
policies of Meles Zenawi, Ethiopia’s leader until his death in
2012.
Abiy, however, is expected to
bring something very different.
‘‘He was the candidate with
the most radical reform agenda
compared to the other three
candidates,’’ said Hallelujah Lu-
‘People
were
dancing in
the
streets.’
ANDU SELAM, a student,
upon the news that a political
coalition had voted for Abiy
Ahmed (above) as its new
chairman
lie, a political analyst. ‘‘His biggest challenge will be the state
of emergency, not from the perspective of the people, but he
won’ t be a fully mandated
prime minister while the military and intelligence handle the
major political and security situation.’’
Abiy’s victory was clinched
when his chief rival, Demeke
Mekonnen of the Amhara party,
withdrew his candidacy to become the deputy chairman. The
move suggested the Oromos
and the Amharas, the country’s
two largest ethnic groups, have
formed an alliance.
Abiy’s reform agenda, however, will likely face opposition
from the establishment. Among
the biggest challenges will be
attempts to address complaints
against security services, which
are widely reviled by the Oromos for their role in suppressing dissent.
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Trump ousts Veterans Affairs secretary in latest shake­up
uVETERANS
Continued from Page A1
on one of Trump’s signature
campaign promises: to fix the
federal government’s secondlargest bureaucracy.
T h e VA , w h i c h e m p l o y s
360,000 people and has a $186
billion annual budget, serves a
growing population of veterans
in need and is suffering from a
shortage of doctors, nurses, and
mental-health experts.
As a career military officer,
Jackson has been apolitical,
and his views on a range of hotbutton issues affecting the VA
— including proposals to privatize care — are not known.
Trump prizes relationships
and loyalty over traditional
qualifications, and he quickly
developed personal chemistry
with Jackson. The boss admires
the man he calls ‘‘The Doc,’’ according to aides, and cheered
Jackson’s on-camera performance in the press briefing
room in January, where he delivered the results of Trump’s
annual physical as ‘‘very, very
good’’ and ‘‘excellent.’’
At a time when Trump’s critics questioned his mental fitness, based in part on accounts
in the book ‘‘Fire and Fury,’’
Jackson effectively backed up
Trump’s claims of being a ‘‘very
stable genius,’’ telling reporters
that he received a perfect score
on a cognitive exam.
Trump praised Jackson in a
statement Wednesday: ‘‘Admiral Jackson is highly trained
and qualified and as a service
member himself, he has seen
firsthand the tremendous sacrifice our veterans make and has
a deep appreciation for the debt
our great country owes them.’’
On Capitol Hill, however,
there were immediate concerns
about Jackson’s qualifications.
As Chris Lu, who oversaw Cabinet affairs for the Obama White
House, tweeted, ‘‘This is a very
challenging job for even experienced managers.’’
Some Republican senators
issued muted statements saying
they looked forward to learning
more about Jackson. Privately,
there was speculation that he
lacks the management chops to
oversee the VA, according to a
Senate Republican aide who
spoke on the condition of anonymity to talk candidly.
‘‘It could be a disaster for
vets,’’ the aide said of Jackson.
‘‘What has this guy ever managed? Can he really take on one
of the toughest jobs in government?’’
Carl Blake, executive director of Paralyzed Veterans of
America, said, ‘‘We are all headed into the deep unknown
now.’’
The firing of Shulkin, who
was the sole Obama-era holdover in Trump’s Cabinet, is the
latest tremor in a broad shakeup of Trump’s administration.
In March alone, the president
has replaced his secretary of
state, national security adviser,
and top economic adviser and
is planning to soon name a new
White House communications
director.
As Jackson awaits Senate
confirmation, the acting VA
secretary will be Robert Wilkie,
undersecretary of defense for
personnel and readiness, who is
focused on such areas as health,
welfare, and quality of life.
Jackson does not have a political background or experience working with Trump before the president took office.
Born in Texas, Jackson studied
marine biology, graduated from
medical school, and joined the
Navy in 1995. He spent time
leading an emergency medical
unit in Iraq.
David J. Shulkin (left) has been dismissed as secretary of
Veterans Affairs. Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson, the White
House physician, is the president’s choice to replace him.
Jackson began work as a
White House physician in the
mid-2000s and was named the
top presidential physician in
2013, ser ving as President
O b a m a ’s d o c t o r a n d t h e n
Trump’s, but remained an active-duty Navy officer.
Jackson intends to remain
in the Navy until he is confirmed as VA secretary and then
plans to resign before taking
the oath of office, a White
House official said.
Last weekend at Mar-a-Lago, the president’s private estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Trump
asked friends whether Jackson
would be a good choice to run
the VA and then on Monday
asked some of his White House
aides, senior officials said.
One person who heard
Trump mention Jackson’s name
for the post was not sure
whether the president was serious.
Jackson, who is referred to
inside the West Wing as ‘‘Dr.
Ronny,’’ travels regularly with
Trump, and the men have developed a bond.
Jackson checks in on the
president at least once a day,
and the doctor is usually in the
White House residence with
him.
Jackson jokes around with
Trump, which the president
likes, and Trump often tells
friends how smart Jackson is,
officials said.
Among Shulkin’s failures, in
the White House’s estimation,
was his moderate position on
allowing veterans more access
to private doctors outside the
VA system. About 30 percent of
veterans see private doctors
outside the VA, but the president and his supporters, particularly an increasingly influential veterans group backed by
the billionaire industrialists
Charles and David Koch, are
pushing for more private care.
The issue is controversial,
pitting the White House against
traditional veterans groups
who fear a privatized system
that would drain resources
from the government.
Senator Bernie Sanders, an
independent from Vermont,
who serves on the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee, cautioned that any nominee who is
in favor of too much private
care would not be cleared by
the committee.
No consensus for Supreme Court — again — on gerrymandering cases
By Adam Liptak
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — For the
second time this term, the Supreme Court heard arguments
Wednesday about whether voting maps can be so distorted
by politics that they violate the
Constitution.
As they had when an earlier
case was argued in October,
many of the justices agreed
that partisan gerrymandering
is a serious problem that disfigures democracy. But there
was no indication Wednesday
that they had come to an
agreement about whether the
courts can address the problem.
“It seems like a pretty clear
violation of the Constitution in
some form to have deliberate,
extreme gerrymandering,” Justice Stephen Breyer said. “But
is there a practical remedy that
won’t get judges involved in
dozens and dozens and dozens
of very important political decisions?”
Justice Samuel Alito said
that redistricting conducted by
politicians was necessarily political. “Hasn’t this court said
time and again you can’t take
all consideration of partisan
advantage out of districting?”
he asked.
Were the Supreme Court to
forbid taking account of politics in drawing voting maps,
he said, “I really don’t see how
any legislature will ever be able
to redistrict.”
The justices largely agreed
that the oddly shaped Maryland congressional district at
issue, drawn by Democrats in
the Legislature, was an extreme example of distasteful
political gamesmanship.
“It doesn’t seem to have any
internal logic,” Chief Justice
John Roberts said of the district, which stretches from
northwestern Maryland to the
Washington suburbs. He added that the district had been
redrawn in a way “that prefers
one party over another.”
Justice Elena Kagan said it
sometimes might be hard to
tell when politics played too
large a role, but she said that
was not a problem here. “However much you think is too
much,” she said, “this case is
too much.”
But it was not at all clear
that the court was prepared to
say the Constitution may place
limits on extreme partisan gerrymandering, where the party
in power draws voting districts
to give itself an outsize advantage in future elections.
T he Supreme Cour t has
never struck down a voting
district as an unconstitutional
partisan gerrymander. A ruling allowing such challenges
could revolutionize US politics.
Wednesday ’s arguments
provided little information
about whether the justices are
prepared to take that step. Indeed, if arguments in October
in the earlier case, a Democratic challenge of a Republican
m a p f r o m W i s c o n s i n, h a d
heartened opponents of extreme partisan gerrymandering, Wednesday’s arguments in
the Maryland case only served
to confuse them.
Justice Anthony Kennedy,
who probably holds the crucial
vote in both cases, returned to
a theme he had pursued in the
arguments in the Wisconsin
case, asking whether a law that
required partisan gerrymandering in so many words
would violate the Constitution.
The court’s surprise announcement in December that
it would hear the second partisan gerrymandering case, Benisek v. Lamone, No. 17-333,
led to much speculation about
what the move meant for the
challengers in the Wisconsin
case, Gill v. Whitford, No. 161161. But Wednesday’s argument did almost nothing to
clear up the mystery of why the
justices decided to hear a second case.
If there was a hint about
where the court was headed in
the Wisconsin case, it came
from Breyer, who suggested
that the court schedule a new
round of arguments in both
cases, along with one from
North Carolina, in the term
that will start in October.
B r e y e r ’s r e a l a u d i e n c e
seemed to be his colleagues,
none of whom spoke up in support of the proposal.
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A8
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T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Old Days Hotel is Mandarin builder’s new project
uHOTELS
Continued from Page A1
hotel hot spots downtown.
“This will be a value proposition, and a unique experience,” said Brown, who draws
parallels to the Verb, a rockthemed hotel he helped open
in the Fenway in 2014. “And
it’s part of an evolution of the
entire city.”
Brown and the Davis Cos.
are betting $21 million on that
evolution, hoping the right
vibe and a rising tide of development can turn an out-ofthe-way patch of Allston into a
tourist destination.
With a night in a downtown hotel topping $300 during busy months, there’s demand for less-expensive options in neighborhoods where
real estate and operating costs
might be cheaper, said Sebastian Colella, vice president at
the hotel consulting firm Pinnacle Advisory Group.
Meanwhile, as companies
move to big mixed-use projects
such as Boston Landing and
Somerville’s Assembly Row,
there’s a need for nearby accommodations.
“Location still plays a primary role in hotel development,” Colella said. “And while
these may be considered outer
neighborhoods, they are
quickly becoming their own
submarkets.”
That’s where Colwen Hotels
likes to operate. The Portsmouth, N.H., company operates 12 hotels in Massachusetts and is on an expansion
tear. It’s opening three Marriott-branded hotels in Boston
this year — at Ink Block in the
South End and in Cleveland
Circle and Roxbury — plus one
at Assembly Row and its
fourth property in Chelsea.
Colwen tries to get into an
underserved neighborhood
early and establish a market,
said president Julie Scott.
It also aims to hire locally
and connect guests to neighborhood restaurants and
events — like the South End’s
SOWA Market — they might
miss if staying downtown.
“We’re in communities that
are changing and growing.
The hotel is a part of that,”
Scott said. “I come to these
places and I want to live here.”
To help draw guests a bit off
the beaten path, some of these
hotels have a distinctive look.
Colwen’s just-opened AC Hotel
at Ink Block is full of sleek, elegant furniture and a lobby that
displays museum-quality art.
Studio Allston, along with its
art, will have a hip brick-andbeam restaurant with a
swanky outdoor courtyard. Being “Instagrammable” is a stated goal for both.
And more like them are on
the way.
Mount Vernon Co., which
owns apartment buildings in
Boston and two inns on Nantucket, is turning a shuttered
hostel on Berkeley Street in
the South End into a boutique
hotel aimed at twenty- and
thirtysomething travelers. It
will feature a large outdoor
seating area, an ice-cream window on the street, and a
“unique twist on the Boston
experience” in its decor and
theme, said Mount Vernon’s
chairman, Bruce Percelay. He’s
keeping the details secret until
the place opens in September.
“There aren’t a lot of offerings like this,” Percelay said.
“Then you walk around the
block and you have some of
the best restaurants in the
city.”
Developers earlier this
month filed plans for two large
hotels in Kenmore Square: a
295-room expansion of the
Hotel Buckminster and a 382room, 24-stor y hotel to be
built across Beacon Street. Yet
another hotel is planned nearby on Boylston Street near
Fe nw ay Pa r k , a n d s e v e r a l
more are in the works in
Brookline and along Dorchester Avenue in South Boston.
Last week, the development
company Hudson Group said
it wants to build a 20-story
boutique hotel on a tiny lot on
Kneeland Street. It would be
the closest hotel to South Stat i o n , Hu d s o n’s No a m R o n
pointed out, and set amidst
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Developers aim to transform the former Days Hotel at 1234 Soldiers Field Rd. from has-been to happening.
the color and bustle of Chinatown and the Leather District,
unusual corners of the city
with nowhere to stay.
Along with a few big hotels
in the works in the more tradi-
tional places downtown and in
the Seaport, the new projects
will add hotel rooms to the
stock of 22,000 in the region’s
core. That could rein in average rates, which have climbed
43 percent since 2009, according to Pinnacle Advisory
Group. But, developers say,
there’s still upside, especially
in new markets.
“A lot of these neighbor-
hoods have their own character, their own drivers of demand,” Ron said. “It feels like
there’s still a lot of room for
growth.”
That’s what Brown and Stephen Davis, vice president for
development at Davis Cos., see
on Soldiers Field Road. They
note that their hotel would be
a stone’s throw from Harvard
University’s burgeoning Allston campus and is close to
emerging job centers in Watertown and Brighton. It’s wellsituated for visitors to the
Head of the Charles regatta
and the Boston Calling music
festival. It’s also an easy ride to
downtown or Logan International Airport.
So while it might feel a bit
off the beaten path t od ay,
that’s not likely to last.
“We’re helping to build a
neighborhood here,” Brown
said.
Tim Logan can be reached at
tim.logan@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter at
@bytimlogan.
Since the Sox last played, we’ve seen a lot All 22 female senators
seek harassment debate
uOPENING DAY
Continued from Page A1
Sox manager on a losing streak,
with thousands of jobs in the
balance.
Special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III filed his first indictments a few weeks after Sox
players cleaned out their lockers, and few people had a busier offseason. Manafort, Gates,
Flynn, Papadopoulos, Pinedo,
van der Zwaan, a bunch of Russians – you need a scorecard to
trac k who is charged with
what, who pled out, and who
flipped.
It was a rough offseason for
“shithole countries,” as President Trump referred to them in
a January meeting with lawmakers. The remark broke
long-standing profanity norms
for TV news chyrons. (This is
not a good thing : DO NOT
CONGRATULATE)
Reeling from a data misuse
scandal, Facebook is facing
congressional hearings and
possible regulation, while the
company lost $100 billion in
market capitalization in weeks.
That sum would be enough to
fund the state budget for more
than two years, even accounting for State Police overtime.
Early in October, Las Vegas
was burying the victims of the
deadliest shooting in modern
US history. Since then, the
country endured two more
mass shootings that ranked
among the 10 deadliest:
Sutherland Springs, Texas, and
Parkland, Fla. After Parkland,
teenaged survivors have
emerged as the leaders of an
unprecedented nationwide
movement for new gun laws,
which last weekend inspired
demonstrations across the
country.
The White House exodus
since last season has included
enough high-level staffers to
field a starting nine, with lateinnings subs: national security
adviser, FBI deputy director,
secretary of state, president’s
personal assistant, head of the
National Economic Council,
White House communications
Bill would help
people who work
on Capitol Hill
By Alan Fram
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
During the baseball offseason, downtown Boston was slammed by a series of storms . . .
JAE C. HONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
. . . and the Korean nations marched together at the Pyeongchang Winter Games.
director, deputy communications director, White House
staff secretary, deputy national
security adviser, reality star
Omarosa Manigault, and, on
Wednesday, Veterans Affairs
secretary. Does anyone even remember the federal government shut down briefly in January?
The two Koreas marched
together at the Pyeongchang
Winter Olympics, lowering geopolitical tensions, on the biggest stage in sports. It was a
good February for North Korea’s Kim dynasty. Closer to
home, it was a bad February for
the Belichick-Brady dynasty,
which lost the Super Bowl to
the Philadelphia Eagles amid
reports of locker-room tension.
Last fall faded into a winter
that included historic cold and
a string of nor ’easters that
brought widespread flooding
to the Boston area. The flooding put renewed focus on climate change and the need to
combat it, beyond changing the
city’s name to Atlantis.
Mark Arsenault can be reached
at mark.arsenault@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@bostonglobemark
WASHINGTON —The Senate must begin debating legislation helping people who work
in Congress pursue claims of
sexual harassment or discrimination, all 22 female senators
said Wednesday in a letter to
the chamber’s leaders.
‘‘Inaction is unacceptable,’’
the group wrote to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell,
Republican of Kentucky, and
Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat. The
letter, signed by 18 Democratic
and four Republican women,
was an unusual bipartisan display of public pressure on party
leaders.
The House approved legislation in February requiring lawmakers found culpable of violations to reimburse the Treasury
within 90 days if they’ve used
federal money to pay claims
against them. Lists of offices
reaching sexual harassment settlements would be published
twice annually.
The legislation would also
speed processes enacted in
1995 for harassment complaints, eliminating required
counseling and mediation before people can file cases. Employees could work out-of-office
while their complaints are investigated.
David Popp, a spokesman
for McConnell, said he didn’t
know when a bipartisan group
would finish crafting a Senate
bill. He added that McConnell
‘‘supports members being personally, financially liable for
sexual misconduct in which
they have engaged.’’
In a writte n s tateme nt ,
Schumer said, ‘‘We strongly
agree that the Senate should
quickly take up legislation to
combat sexual harassment on
Capitol Hill.’’
The letter comes as lawmakers continue reacting to allegations of sexual harassment that
have swept Congress and the
entertainment, media, and other industries. In recent months,
at least seven members of Congress have resigned or decided
against seeking reelection following allegations of sexual
misconduct.
One of the women signing
Wednesday’s letter, Senator Tina Smith, a Minnesota Democrat, replaced one of those men
in January: Al Franken, who
stepped down after being accused of improper conduct by
several women.
‘‘Survivors who have bravely
come forward to share their
The senators said
they felt ‘deep
disappointment
that the Senate has
failed to enact
meaningful
reforms.’
stories have brought to light
just how widespread harassment and discrimination continue to be throughout Capitol
Hill. No longer can we allow the
perpetrators of these crimes to
hide behind’’ slow-moving processes enacted in 1995, the 22
senators wrote.
Both chambers of Congress
now required lawmakers and
staff to take anti-harassment
training. But in Wednesday’s
letter, the senators said they felt
‘‘deep disappointment that the
S e n at e h a s f a i le d t o e n a c t
meaningful reforms to how
complaints are handled.
The effort was led by Democratic Senators Amy Klobuchar
of Minnesota, Patty Murray of
Washington, and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York.
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
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Plan would penalize immigrants who use tax credits
Part of wider bid
to curb number of
foreign residents
By Nick Miroff
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — Immigrants who accept almost any
form of welfare or public benefit, even popular tax deductions, could be denied legal US
residency under a proposal
awaiting approval by the
Trump administration, which
is seeking to reduce the number of foreigners living in the
United States.
According to a draft of the
proposal, immigration caseworkers would be required to
consider a much broader range
of factors when determining
whether immigrants or their
US-citizen children are using
public benefits or may be likely
to do so.
Current rules penalize immigrants who receive cash welfare payments, considering
them a ‘‘public charge.’’ But the
proposed changes from the Department of Homeland Security would widen the government’s definition of benefits to
include the widely used
Earned Income Tax Credit as
well as health insurance subsidies and other ‘‘non-cash public benefits.’’
The changes would apply to
those seeking immigration visas, or legal permanent residency, such as a foreigner with
an expiring work visa. While it
would make little difference to
those living illegally in the
shadows, it could affect immigrants protected by the Deferred Action on Childhood Arr i v a l s ( DA C A ) p r o g r a m —
whose termination has been
blocked by federal courts — if
they attempt to file for full legal residency.
Immigrants and their families facing a short-term crisis
could potentially have to forgo
help to avoid jeopardizing
their US residency status. The
proposal would also require
more immigrants to post cash
mitted to enforcing existing
immigration law, which is
clearly intended to protect the
American taxpayer by ensuring
that foreign nationals seeking
to enter or remain in the US
a r e s e l f - s u f f i c i e n t ,’ ’ D H S
spokeswoman Katie Waldman
said in a statement.
‘‘Any proposed changes
would ensure that the government takes the responsibility
of being good stewards of taxpayer funds seriously and adjudicates immigration benefit re-
‘Any proposed changes would ensure
that the government takes the
responsibility of being good stewards
of taxpayer funds seriously. ’
DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
bonds if they have a higher
probability of needing or accepting public benefits. The
minimum bond amount would
be $10,000, according to the
DHS proposal, but the amount
could be set higher if an applicant is deemed at greater risk
of neediness.
DHS officials say the proposal is not finalized. But the
overhaul is part of the Trump
administration’s broader effort
to curb legal immigration to
the United States, and groups
favoring a more restrictive approach have long insisted that
immigrants are a drag on federal budgets and a siphon on
American prosperity.
‘‘The administration is com-
quests in accordance with the
law,’’ she added.
DHS officials say the agency
is preparing to publish the proposed changes in the Federal
Register and invite public comment, but they have not set a
date.
Reuters reported on the
proposed changes in early February, and Vox has published
excerpts of a draft. But a more
recent, 223-page version obtained by the Post shows the
proposal is more extensive.
‘‘It ’s s triking that af te r
strong public criticism of a
leaked draft rule, the administration seems to be considering
a version that goes even further, and they’re actively con-
sidering whether to use this
rule to create new grounds for
deporting legal immigrants,’’
said Mark Greenberg, a senior
fellow at the Migration Policy
Institute, which has been critical of Trump’s policies.
One notable aspect of the
proposal indicates native-born
Americans use public benefits
at roughly the same rate the
documented foreign-born population does.
US authorities have long
had the ability to deny residency and other benefits to noncitizens who are dependent on
public assistance. Concerns
about such dependency were
partly the basis for the familybased immigration model in
place for the past half-century,
requiring sponsors to assume
financial responsibility for relatives they wish to bring into
the country. Trump blames
that model for facilitating what
he calls ‘‘horrible chain migration.’’
One of the mos t radical
changes outlined in the proposal would consider refundable tax income credits, including the Earned Income Tax
Credit created to help working
families with low and moderate incomes. According to recent estimates, it is used by
nearly one-fifth of American
taxpayers, particularly those
who work in relatively lowpaid services industries.
Under the proposed changes, immigration caseworkers
would not consider benefits
derived from service in the
armed forces or some other
government job, as well as dis-
US probing Mass. prison rules on addiction
uPRISONERS
Continued from Page A1
opioid crisis.
“I never thought something
like this would come out of the
Trump administration,” said
Dr. Warren J. Ferguson, a University of Massachusetts Medical School professor who added
that Department of Justice officials had consulted him on addiction treatment in prison. “I
was like ‘Wow, this is the best
thing I’ve heard in a long
time.’”
The letter notes that “we
have not reached any conclusions about whether the ADA
has been violated.”
Lelling’s letter focuses on arriving inmates already under
treatment for addiction and
does not address whether medications should be introduced
to opioid-addicted prisoners
during incarceration. But it
again spotlights a prison policy
that has become increasingly
controversial.
Prisons in Massachusetts, as
in most states, do not offer
methadone or buprenorphine
(known by the brand name Suboxone) to opioid-addicted inmates, even though they are
standard treatments outside of
prison. The drugs stop the craving for opioids and prevent
overdoses, and they have been
shown to help people stay in
treatment. Prisoners who do
not receive them are at extremely high risk of overdose
after release.
The state Legislature recently removed a proposal to require medication-assisted
treatments in all prisons, jails,
and houses of correction from a
major criminal justice bill that
is nearing approval by the
House and Senate. But supporters of the proposal are
seeking to attach it to other opioid-related legislation under
consideration.
Correction officials have
said they oppose using buprenorphine and methadone in
prison because the medications
are opioids that can be used illicitly, and buprenorphine is
frequently smuggled into cells.
Felix Browne, a spokesman
for the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, acknowledged receiving Lelling’s
letter and said the department
will cooperate. He also said in a
statement that the Department
of Correction identifies opioidaddicted inmates, offers treatment, and provides a system to
guide their reentry into society.
A spokeswoman for Lelling
and a spokesman for the Department of Justice’s Civil
Rights Division declined to
comment Wednesday.
Sally Friedman, legal director of the New York-based Legal Action Center, a nonprofit
that fights discrimination
against people with addiction,
said a Department of Justice official announced at a meeting
she attended in December that
the Civil Rights Division intended to pursue ADA violations in prisons as they relate to
addicted people.
Friedman said she was not
aware of prison officials in any
other state receiving a letter
from the Department of Justice. But, she said, “from my
perspective, it’s a great new development.”
Leo Beletsky, a Northeastern University professor of law
and health sciences, said he
had spoken with assistant US
attorneys in Boston and Department of Justice officials in
Washington, D.C.
“There is going to be a national move on the part of the
US Department of Justice to
start addressing these blatant
violations of the Americans
with Disabilities Act,” Beletsky
said. Policies opposing medication-assisted treatment “are
baked in stigma,” Beletsky said.
“They’re not based on any scientific rationale.”
An October letter from the
acting US attorney in Manhattan to the New York State attorney general addressed similar
issues as they relate to parental
visitation rules in family court.
It asserts that people who take
prescribed medications for ad-
diction often qualify for protection under the ADA because
their addiction is a disability.
Thus, the New York letter
states, the court cannot deny a
parent visitation with a child or
refuse to facilitate a parent’s reunification with a child because of a past history of opioid
use disorder or current use of
medication-assisted treatment.
Unlike the Massachusetts
letter, the New York letter does
not mention an investigation
and does not focus on prisons,
instead offering guidance to
family and probate courts.
Massachusetts prisoners
nearing discharge are offered a
shot of Vivitrol, a drug that
blocks the high from opioids
for up to a month, and are connected with “navigators” who
help link them to services in
the community. Since the program started in 2014, more
than 400 inmates have received
a pre-release injection of Vivitrol.
But me thadone and buprenorphine are not provided,
not even to ease the pains of
withdrawal.
Inmates in Rhode Island
and in some Connecticut prisons are offered all three addiction medications, but most US
prisons and jails do not provide
them, except for giving methadone to pregnant women, because withdrawal can endanger the pregnancy.
Even federal prisons do not
offer medication for addiction,
except for pregnant women
and a small pilot program offering Vivitrol shortly before
release.
The Trump administration’s
national opioid strategy emphasizes the importance of evidence-based treatment. But in
BOSTON GLOBE MEDIA
1 Exchange Place, Suite 201
Boston, MA 02109-2132
Felice J. Freyer can be reached
at felice.freyer@globe.com.
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‘‘An applicant’s family status is a factor that must be considered when an immigration
o ff i c e r i s m a k i n g a p u b l i c
charge determination,’’ the
proposal states. ‘‘DHS will consider whether the alien being a
dependent or having dependents . . . makes it more or less
likely that the alien will become a public charge.’’
The proposal notes that
‘‘the receipt of noncash benefits tended to increase as family size increased in 2013.’’
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an apparent contradiction to
the Justice Department letters,
it favors one drug, not all three,
in criminal justice settings.
ability, workers’ compensation
and Medicare, unless the premiums are fully paid by the
public. It would also exclude
elementary and secondar y
public education and early
childhood development programs offered under the Head
Start Act.
But children would be considered a negative factor for
caseworkers evaluating whether an immigrant is likely to use
some form of public assistance
or benefit.
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A10
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
The best chance for offshore wind in Mass.
A
fter years of frustrating false starts with Cape Wind,
Massachusetts and the state’s electric utilities are on
the verge of picking the winner, or winners, in the
state’s latest stab at realizing its offshore wind potential. Three bidders have proposed new wind
farms off Southeastern Massachusetts, offering up to 800 mW
in capacity — more power, on a windy day, than the Pilgrim
nuclear power plant. If successful, any of the projects should
provide a big boost to the state’s clean energy goals and help
nurture a local industry.
Still, the collapse of the Cape Wind project, despite years
of hand-holding by the state, was a warning of how even wellintended and lavishly supported projects can crumble in the
Commonwealth’s litigious culture. And while the three applicants all stress how much better their plans are than Cape
Wind, and how much more inclusive the planning process
has been, a bet-hedging approach that takes into account the
many potential pitfalls ahead would be warranted.
To the greatest extent practical, the committee making the
selection should divide the procurement among multiple bidders. That strategy has its drawbacks, but spreading the contract around should reduce the chances that a single lawsuit
or corporate setback endangers the whole endeavor. Splitting
up the procurement would also help create the conditions for
offshore wind in Massachusetts to develop as a competitive
industry that’s not dominated by a single behemoth
The three applicants — Bay State Wind, Deepwater Wind,
and Vineyard Wind — have proposed wind farms that occupy
parcels of ocean that are physically close to one another. Bay
State Wind is a joint effort by the utility company Eversource
and the Danish firm Orsted. Vineyard Wind is a project of
Avangrid, a large utility company, and another group of
Danes, Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners. Deepwater,
which operates the existing pilot wind farm off Block Island,
has partnered with National Grid.
Despite the similarities, though, there are also potentially
important differences between the bidders, including projected construction timetables and the routes for the undersea
cables they would use to connect to land. Each has submitted
multiple proposals of different sizes, giving the selection committee a menu of options to choose from. The state says it will
pick no less than 400 mW, and no more than 800 mW, of
wind generation in this procurement round.
One approach, urged by Bay State Wind in particular,
would be for the state to give the full 800 mW award to one
company. That outcome might maximize economies of scale,
and show the worldwide offshore wind industry that Massachusetts means business.
But an 800 mW procurement split up between multiple
bidders would also send a strong message. And it would
hedge the state’s bets in case developers have unexpected
trouble with financing or permits, or litigation slows the
projects.
Hopefully, the winner or winners in this round of bidding
won’t encounter the death-by-thousand-cuts opposition that
killed Cape Wind. But banking on smooth sailing and accepting the developers’ sunny timetables as gospel would be letting hope triumph over experience. Already, the lawyers are
stirring. In New York, fishermen sued in an effort to prevent a
wind farm off Long Island. And competing electric generators
in New England have shown they aren’t above ginning up opposition to commercial rivals. The Massachusetts selection
committee has to pay attention to price, job creation, and other factors, but it also needs to make sure that it’s giving the
state the best chance to overcome the kinds of obstacles that
have thwarted it before.
JOAN VENNOCHI
DANTE RAMOS
When does journalism
become trespass?
Why your commute
stinks
G
Y
CREDIT: PHOTO ILLUSTRATION LESLEY BECKER/GLOBE STAFF; ADOBE STOCK
ood reporting or inexcusable trespass?
While tracking
down a story about
former White
House communications director Hope
Hicks, New York magazine writer Olivia Nuzzi ended up, without invitation,
in the home office of Corey Lewandowski, President Trump’s former
campaign manager. Now Lewandowski is threatening legal action.
Nuzzi’s long and detailed profile of
Hicks generated so much buzz that the
Columbia Journalism Review interviewed her about it. In it, she disclosed
she had been trying to get Lewandowski to talk to her, but “he fell off
the face of the earth.” Meanwhile, she
was also trying to talk to another
source, who lives in the basement of
the townhouse that also serves as
headquarters for Turnberry Solutions,
a Washington, D.C., lobbying firm. Lewandowski lives upstairs.
When she couldn’t get past a gate to
the basement door, she told CJR, “I
walked up the steps to the main door
and knocked, for like, 10 minutes. And
I’m knocking, knocking, nobody’s answering. But after a while, I just
touched the door knob and the door
was open. I walked in and I’m in the
house, by myself. So I took this photo
of the quote on the wall.
“I peered around but I didn’t walk
fully into the house. I texted my boyfriend, ‘You know, I just walked into
the house, because nobody was answering the door.’ And he said it proba-
bly wasn’t legal and that I should
leave. . . . I went outside and continued
to knock on the door for awhile longer,
and then Jason Osborne, who works at
Turnberry Solutions and worked for
Trump in the final stretch, answered
the door.”
She isn’t the first reporter to end
up in an office she wasn’t invited to
enter. I still recall, with chilling clarity, such an incident from several decades ago. I was a State House reporter. Michael Dukakis was governor. And Edward J. King, who had
shocked Dukakis by beating him in a
1978 primary, and then losing to him
in 1982, was said to be thinking
about running again, this time as a
Republican. An editor told me to get
the story. King didn’t return a phone
call, so I went to his downtown Boston office. It was a cold winter night.
Lights were on, but no one was
around. His office door was open and
the walls were covered with grip-andgrin photos of him with other pols. I
stepped over the threshold, thinking
maybe there was something on his
desk that would indicate his plans.
Then, fear and common sense clicked
in. I ran from the office, to the street,
where I realized I lost a glove somewhere along the way. Discovery
would have been a problem, given
the libel suit King had previously
filed against the Globe.
In my case, there was no closed
door, and I was walking around an official office. Or so a lawyer for the
Globe would have argued. Nuzzi
opened an unlocked door, in a dwell-
abcde
Fo u nd ed 1 87 2
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Managing Editor
ing where Lewandowski apparently
has a designated office. As Andrew Napolitano, a former New Jersey Superior Court judge and a Fox News legal
analyst, told the network, “She broke,
entered, trespassed.”
But Harvey Silverglate, a criminal
defense and civil liberties lawyer,
notes, “The law is actually more rigorous and unforgiving in theory than in
practice.” There’s wiggle room, especially for certain professions, he said,
like journalists, private investigators,
and documentary filmmakers.
“We live in a world where we are
constantly seeking to balance risk versus reward,” said Silverglate. “But every so often we either go too far or we
come upon a person who is hypersensitive to offense or intrusion or perhaps particularly vulnerable.”
To write the Hicks profile, Nuzzi
knocked on many doors and interviewed many people. In a journalism
world taken over by e-mail, texting,
and Twitter, her dedication to old-fashioned reporting is admirable. From her
account to CJR, her entry into Lewandowski’s office was not planned. It just
happened.
The thrill of the hunt pushes journalists into places where they
shouldn’t be. It can be rationalized as a
quest for truth and answers — or defined strictly as law-breaking.
What would I think if I caught Ed
King’s ghost edging closer to my desk?
Joan Vennochi can be reached at
vennochi@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @Joan_Vennochi.
SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Mark S. Morrow
Jason M. Tuohey Digital Platforms and Audience Engagement
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
Janice Page Arts and Newsroom Innovation
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Dante Ramos Ideas
Larry Edelman News and Features
es, your car commute probably stinks.
Here’s why: In January
2010, the jobless rate in
the Boston region stood
at 8.6 percent; in January 2018, it
was 3.5 percent. Nearly 300,000
more people are working. This, by
the way, is cause for celebration.
Growth is fundamentally good for
Massachusetts. The more of it, the
better.
The problem is that we didn’t
upgrade our transportation network for all those people, because
being a hotbed of growth is just
not a part of Boston’s self-image.
Because we treat growth as something that happens only in Arizona or Florida, people suffer the
lengthening commutes, delayed
buses, and late day-care pickups
that the Globe’s Beth Teitell documented in a hugely popular article
earlier this week.
Unless you walk or bike to
work, your commute will keep
getting worse — until Greater Boston, as a region, starts viewing itself as a place that people move to,
not as somewhere that people inevitably leave.
Most of today’s political and
business leaders in Massachusetts
came of age when Boston proper
was hemorrhaging residents, or
barely holding onto them. Yet
growth has picked up since 2000.
According to new estimates released last week by the US Census
Bureau, the four Massachusetts
counties that contain most of the
metro area — Suffolk, Middlesex,
Norfolk, and Essex — have added
nearly 250,000 residents. It’s as if
another Cambridge, another
Somerville, and another Brookline
had just sprouted in our midst.
The basic challenge facing this
urban region — and Governor
Charlie Baker and Boston Mayor
Marty Walsh in particular — is
how to move more people faster
through the same jam-packed corridors.
Fortunately, there’s a lot of
brainpower working on this very
problem. The LivableStreets Alliance recently chronicled how ridership on some of the MBTA’s
highest-volume bus lines has declined, as worsening traffic has
slowed them to a crawl. Thousands more people could travel
the same roads if the city created
more bus-only routes, but Walsh
has been shy about taking away
parking spaces and vehicular
lanes.
Meanwhile, Transportation for
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Peter M. Doucette Chief Consumer Revenue Officer
Jane Bowman Vice President, Marketing & Strategic
Partnerships
Doug Most Director, Strategic Growth Initiatives
Dan Krockmalnic General Counsel
Dale Carpenter Senior Vice President, Print Operations
Massachusetts has proposed
smart tolling that would steer
more highway traffic to off hours.
TransitMatters is pushing an ambitious (and wicked expensive)
transformation of the commuter
rail system into an electrified regional rail system with faster,
more frequent service.
So far, Baker has taken a Mr.
Fix-It approach, which works up
to a point. The MBTA really did
need more transparent management; it needed to get its cost
structure under control; it needed
to shrink the price tag of the
Green Line extension and buy a
slew of new Red Line cars. This
approach is a perfectly rational
answer to the “reform before revenue” transportation debate that
preoccupied the Legislature in
2009. But for the 250,000 new residents who’ve come to the Boston
area since then, or the 300,000
more people who’ve found work,
it’s not enough.
Communities behave differently when they take growth as a given. In places like Seattle and Los
Angeles, local officials have gotten
together with business leaders
and civic groups, drawn up plans
for transit improvements, and appealed directly to voters — who
then expect timely results.
To our jaded eyes, these efforts
might look like hokey West Coast
civic boosterism, not to be repeated here. Because the state gave up
on county government long ago,
we don’t have regional taxing districts big enough to take on major
improvements; either an individual city or town pays for investments, or the state does. Or nobody does, and nothing gets
better.
In Massachusetts, lawmakers
are still nursing a hangover from
the Big Dig, which persuaded too
many voters that public investment is inherently wasteful. It’s
tempting to hold out for hail-Mary
solutions, like a Seaport gondola
whose (initial) costs would (maybe) be covered by a private developer. Yet as a swelling workforce
waits in grinding traffic or on
overcrowded Red Line platforms,
Greater Boston has to stop treating stately decline as its inevitable
fate. Better to embrace our own
growth — and plan accordingly.
Dante Ramos can be reached at
dante.ramos@globe.com. Follow
him on Facebook:
facebook.com/danteramos or on
Twitter: @danteramos.
Charles H. Taylor Founder & Publisher 1873-1921
William O. Taylor Publisher 1921-1955
Wm. Davis Taylor Publisher 1955-1977
William O. Taylor Publisher 1978-1997
Benjamin B. Taylor Publisher 1997-1999
Richard H. Gilman Publisher 1999-2006
P. Steven Ainsley Publisher 2006-2009
Christopher M. Mayer Publisher 2009-2014
Laurence L. Winship Editor 1955-1965
Thomas Winship Editor 1965-1984
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A11
Inbox
At stake in Daniels saga:
It’s not the sex, stupid
WARD SUTTON
Trump is exposed as a walking
national security risk
The Stormy Daniels affair is a scandal not merely because it
is a sex scandal. It is a blackmail, national security, campaign finance, and ethics scandal. The appearance of using
the Trump Organization to pay Daniels for her silence is a
scandal. The possibility of using campaign funds to pay her
is a scandal. Mostly, it’s a national security risk that is the
biggest scandal of all. Does China know about other sexual
partners that Trump has paid for their silences? Does Russia? Do the United Arab Emirates or Saudi Crown Prince
Mohammed bin Salman? If so, how are they using that leverage?
The cluster of scandals around Daniels is pretty much
indefensible, and if it does not remove Donald Trump from
the presidency, it is because his defenders have sacrificed
their souls on the altar of winning.
People are painting this as no worse than President
Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky. But Clinton was impeached for his affair, and he did not try to pay Lewinsky
for her silence. He certainly did not use campaign funds or
a family business of his that he promised to divest from and
relinquish control over while running for president and
while in the Oval Office.
JEREMY GROSS
Wenham
The thing that we should be most concerned about in the
Stormy Daniels story is not the scandal of an extramarital
affair or even a violation of campaign finance laws. Regardless of who is telling the so-called truth about what happened between Donald Trump and Daniels, the payoff to
secure her silence shows that Trump is susceptible to blackmail.
You have to wonder whether Trump would be able to get
top security clearance given this behavior, combined with
his financial dealings, if it were a requirement for assuming
office. Jared Kushner’s inability to get top secret clearance
might be an indication.
JILL TSAKIRIS
Acton
When Mayor Walsh pushes for union
labor, he raises standards for all
Kudos to Scot Lehigh for pointing out the big failure in the
case against two City Hall employees who allegedly pressured Boston Calling into using union labor (“Huge prosecutorial overreach in Boston Calling case brings a big failure,” Opinion, March 23). But I disagree with Lehigh’s notion that City Hall should never “apply pressure of any sort
in that regard.”
If Lehigh were to speak with families of fallen workers
on Workers Memorial Day, he might reconsider. Nonunion
workers are at far greater risk of injury and death. Without
a contract and grievance procedure, nonunion workers frequently experience retaliation for reporting hazards and injuries. Without an apprenticeship training program, nonunion workers are often in the dark about critical safety
measures.
When Mayor Walsh advocates for union labor, he isn’t
just being “pro-union”; he’s raising standards for all workers. Walsh should use all the tools at his disposal to keep
Boston workers safe. He did so when he established a safety
disclosure requirement for contractors seeking permits. He
can do so by prioritizing vendors that are unionized and,
yes, companies that use union labor for events on city property.
What would truly be a failure is if Walsh follows Lehigh’s
advice and fails to enact pro-union, pro-worker safety policies.
MARCY GOLDSTEIN-GELB
Somerville
The writer is executive director of the National Council
for Occupational Safety and Health.
Ward Sutton is a cartoonist and illustrator. Follow him on Twitter @WardSutton and suttonimpactstudio.com.
In fatal police shooting, victim’s
criminal history is beside the point
ALEX BEAM
I
Could hip surgery have saved
Tom Petty and Prince?
t’s possible that Bill Harris could
have saved Tom Petty’s life, and
Prince’s too. But they didn’t ask him.
Wait a minute. . . . What does a
retired Harvard Medical School professor have to do with the titans of rock and
roll? Let me explain.
Tom Petty died of an accidental drug
overdose last year. An autopsy found three
kinds of fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, all of them powerful and addictive
painkillers. His wife and daughter revealed
that Petty had been performing tour dates —
53 of them — with a fractured hip.
“Despite this painful injury he insisted
on keeping his commitment to his fans and,
as he did, it worsened to a more serious injury,” Dana Petty and Adria Petty said in a
statement. “On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full-on
break, and it is our feeling that the pain was
simply unbearable and was the cause for his
over use of medication.”
In an article for STAT, Dr. Lipi Roy, an
addiction specialist in Brooklyn, N.Y., wrote,
“Although surgical repair or replacement
may have provided relief, a major operation
would have put him out of commission for a
minimum of four to eight weeks — not the
ideal option for Petty.” Roy added that Petty
had a history of depression and substance
abuse, so it might be too speculative to as-
cribe his death to his agonizing hip pain.
But let’s speculate. This is a ghoulish subject that I’ve been monitoring for some
time. Prince, who likewise died of a drug
overdose in 2016, was a short (5 feet 3 inches) man who performed his energetic stage
routine in tall platform shoes. As early as
2001, he began to complain of “shooting
pains in his left hip, compounded by soreness in his ankles.”
Corrective hip surgery might have erased
the terrible pain, but Prince had become a
Jehovah’s Witness, a religion that abjures
surgical interventions.
Which brings us to Dr. William Harris,
professor emeritus at the Harvard Medical
School, the Bill Harris of “Nan and Bill Harris Studios,” from which you might occasionally hear WGBH radio broadcasts. Harris has spent the better part of his 91-year
lifetime practicing hip surgery, and has seen
it evolve from a risky procedure to a relatively routine operation.
“In the early days, it was a very dangerous operation,” recalled Harris, who is promoting his new book, “Vanishing Bone:
Conquering a Stealth Disease Caused by Total Hip Replacements.” “One out of every 50
elderly patients died of a pulmonary embolism, and there was a terrible problem with
bone wear that revealed itself after a few
years. Dreaded infections, which require
that the surgery be repeated, occurred in 10
percent of all cases.
In his 50 years of practice, much has
changed. Infection rates are down to 0.5 percent, even lower at elite hospitals such as the
New England Baptist. Two-to-three-week
long hospitalizations have been cut to two to
three days, and many patients are walking
unaided just a few weeks after surgery.
I ran my Tom-Petty-and-Prince-mighthave-lived scenario past Harris, who
deemed it plausible. “There are people who
are inappropriately fearful of surgery,” he
said, “and the best surgeons carry those
people through.” Furthermore, “There is the
suggestion that the replacement will last only 10 years, and we need to reeducate the
patient base.”
Harris thinks hip replacements last longer than people realize — “Most people
should never have to have more than one
operation” — but acknowledges that the
flesh-and-bone hip is still sturdier than the
titanium-and-polyethylene replacement
that he helped invent.
“What does God know that you don’t
know?” I asked.
Harris, chuckling: “A lot.”
Alex Beam’s column appears regularly in
the Globe. Follow him on Twitter
@Imalexbeamyrnot.
In Wednesday’s print edition of the Globe, the caption accompanying the picture of Alton Sterling, the black man fatally shot in July 2016 in an encounter with two white police officers in Baton Rouge, La., contributes to media failure to focus on systemic racism (“Louisiana police won’t be
charged in black man’s killing: AG calls white officers use of
force ‘justified,’ ” Page A7). The caption reads, “Alton Sterling had a long criminal history.” What if the caption simply
had noted that Alton Sterling was 37 years old?
The article lacked systemic analysis of white police officers killing black people at an alarming rate and of the high
number of such cases in which charges were dropped or
dismissed. As a faithful Globe reader, I expect the paper to
be more systemically aware of the impact racism has in
these cases of police violence. The Alton Sterlings of the
world deserve our deeper awareness of racial disparities in
our criminal justice system.
THE REV. WENDY VANDER HART
Arlington
Special treatment for the connected
Re “Senator apologizes amid drunken driving charges”
(Metro, March 28): Politicians and their families should receive special treatment when touting their connections as
they are arrested for drunken driving and other offenses.
How about a button on the officer’s body camera that
streams the encounter through Facebook Live?
ELAINE VESCIO
Grafton
Letters should be written exclusively to the Globe and
include name, address, and daytime telephone number.
They should be 200 words or fewer. All are subject to
editing. Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, 1 Exchange
Pl, Ste 201, Boston, MA 02109-2132; letter@globe.com
T h e
A12
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1
Business
Whispers of Takeda
takeover of Shire growing
considerably louder
PAGES B10­14
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Northern Pass project is dealt a huge setback
Driverless cars return to Boston streets
Quick Study: The rise of ‘businesses in name only’
Metro
B
T H E B O S T O N GL OB E T H U R S DAY, M A R CH 2 9 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E T R O
Yvonne Abraham
Predators and
protectors
I’d like to believe there’s no
need for the legislation Representatives Marjorie Decker and Kay Khan filed this
week.
Why on earth would we
require a statute to expressly
prohibit on-duty police officers from having sexual relations with people in their custody? On what
planet would anybody think it was OK for a
person who has the power that comes with a
badge and gun to engage in sex with people
under their control — as if that person could
truly consent, anyway?
Ours, I’m afraid.
Decker, of Cambridge, and Khan, of Newton, introduced the bill in response to a horrific
case out of Brooklyn, N.Y. There, two plainclothes detectives were charged last fall with
an attack on an 18-year-old. They allegedly ordered her out of a car, drove her away in an unmarked police van, and took turns raping her
as she cried and begged them to stop.
The officers claim the teenager consented
to sex — a claim that might lead to their exoneration. That’s because, even though state
and federal laws ban correctional officers
from sexual contact with an inmate, deeming
a person in custody incapable of consent, laws
in many states are written vaguely enough to
allow an on-duty police officer to evade sexual
assault charges in certain situations by claiming an alleged victim had consented.
That is the case in New York, and in Massachusetts. According to a BuzzFeed report,
35 states have laws that do not expressly prohibit consensual sex between a police officer
and someone in his custody.
In a review of a national database created
by The Buffalo News, BuzzFeed found that “of
at least 158 law enforcement officers charged
since 2006 with sexual assault, sexual battery,
or unlawful sexual contact with somebody under their control, at least 26 have been acquitted or had charges dropped based on the consent defense.”
None of them was in Massachusetts, according to the database. But that doesn’t
mean we shouldn’t tighten the law here.
“For people who think there is a gray area,
there is none,” Decker said. “If they’re working
in any official police capacity, there can be no
such thing as consent.”
The legislation makes clear something that
should be blindingly obvious to anybody who
wears a badge. It certainly should have been
abundantly clear to former Salem police officer Brian Butler, who was charged with rape
and indecent assault and battery in 2016. The
alleged victim had spent Halloween night in a
lock-up at the police station for his own protection, because he was intoxicated and had
flooded his hotel room. The next morning, as
he was wrapped in a blanket because his
clothes were soaked, Butler — the husband of
the city’s police chief — molested him, he said.
“He asked if it was, ‘OK’ and I said, ‘Yes’
out of fear,” the man later told police. Butler
then allegedly took the man to a broom closet
and performed a sex act on him. In court,
prosecutors said video from the station corroborated much of the man’s story.
Butler’s attorney has said the case will
hinge on — you guessed it — whether the alleged victim consented to the sexual contact.
His trial is set for June. A spokesman said the
Salem Police Department has no policy prohibiting sexual relations between officers and
those in their custody. In a sane world, it
wouldn’t need one. Nor would we need the
legislation state lawmakers have proposed.
We don’t live in a sane world. We live in
one where a police officer would use the immense power of his position to exploit someone he is sworn to protect. Or, worse, in one
where he doesn’t understand his power at all.
Globe columnist Yvonne Abraham can be
reached at yvonne.abraham@globe.com
Lack of
teacher
diversity
faulted
SPRING FLING
City is not doing
enough, report says
By James Vaznis
GLOBE STAFF
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
A lone surfer took to choppy waters off Winthrop on Wednesday as the sun came out and the air
temperature finally felt more seasonal. Temperatures are expected to edge even higher as the week
goes on, possibly reaching into the 60s on Friday. Full report, B15.
‘She has found it difficult to reside comfortably in her own home,
leaving it vacant for much of the ensuing 2+ years.’
LEAH BASSETT’S LAWSUIT
Suit: Home was made a porn set
By Steve Annear
GLOBE STAFF
A Martha’s Vineyard woman is suing a
man to whom she rented her seasonal
home, alleging that he allowed the residence to be used as a set for a “multitude”
of scenes for pornographic movies that
prominently featured her artwork as
background props.
Leah Bassett, a longtime resident of
the town of Aquinnah on the island, has
sued Joshua Spafford, the man she says
leased her home under false pretenses,
and production company Mile High Distribution Inc. and its associates. Two entertainment companies that distribute
pornography are also named.
In lawsuit,
Vineyard
woman says
renter hid his
real purpose,
used her art
as props
According to documents filed in US
District Court this week, in September
2014 Bassett was contacted by Spafford
about an “extended ‘winter’ rental” of her
Martha’s Vineyard home, which she built
and designed with her father.
The two met and spoke by phone several times before Spafford agreed to rent
the fully furnished home from October
2014 to May 2015, according to the lawsuit.
Bassett alleges Spafford never mentioned the residence would be used to
shoot “commercial porn” with his employer, Monica Jensen, one of the other
defendants — conduct that Bassett says
The Boston public school system has failed to take sufficient
steps to increase teacher diversity, and consequently its teaching
force is no more diverse today
than it was a decade ago, according to a report issued Wednesday
by the Boston Teachers Union
and several organizations representing people of color.
In a district where the overwhelming majority of students
are black, Latino, or Asian, Boston’s teaching force is predominantly white. During the last
school year, just 20 percent of
teachers were black, 10 percent
were Latino, and 6 percent were
Asian, according to the report,
“Broken Promises: Teacher Diversity in Boston Public Schools.”
“There is nothing magical behind the positive impact that
teachers of color have on students of color,” the groups wrote
in the paper. “All students benefit
from exposure to teachers of all
races. And all teachers need support and professional development, particularly in developing
culturally responsive practices
for the multiracial classrooms
they teach. It is time that Boston
make its policies a reality, for the
betterment of all of our youth.”
Matthew Cregor, education
project director at the Lawyers’
Committee for Civil Rights and
Economic Justice, said the hiring
BPS, Page B5
Alcohol
treatment
for state
senator
RENTAL, Page B9
LONG NIGHTS.
BRUTAL CONDITIONS.
LITTLE PAY. Apply here.
I
By John R. Ellement
and Joshua Miller
By David Abel
GLOBE STAFF
State Senator Michael D. Brady, who pleaded not guilty to a
drunken driving charge this
week, entered a treatment program for alcohol abuse Wednesday as new details emerged of a
1998 crash in Weymouth where
police cited him for drunken
driving — but for which he was
never prosecuted.
In a statement issued on
Wednesday, the Brockton Democrat said he was seeking treatment and counseling for alcohol
use.
“I will be admitting myself for
professional treatment and
counseling for alcohol use. The
course of treatment requires my
GLOBE STAFF
t could be the loneliest job
in New England, a position
that requires long nights
recording brutally frigid
gusts atop the region’s
highest mountain, shoveling
through endless snowdrifts, and
typing up weather bulletins for a
publication called Windswept.
It may also rank among the
most dangerous, given the frequent lightning strikes, intense
winds, and the need to venture
outside as much as a dozen times
a night to tend to often ice-encrusted meteorological instruments.
Brush up your resume. The
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Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
TheMetroMinute
GETTING
READY FOR A
FAMOUS
BATTLE —
GET SMART
James E.
Finigan Jr.,
president of the
Concord
Independent
Battery, cleaned
up the cannon
house on
Lexington Road
before a recent
meeting. The
cannons stored
in the small
building, which
Finigan’s father
helped build,
will be used for
the town’s
annual Patriots
Day celebration.
SWAMPSCOTT HISTORICAL COMMISSION
Again: History
vs. new condos
By Laney Ruckstuhl
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
What would “Silent Cal’’ Coolidge have to
say?
Developers want to convert the seafront
Swampscott mansion that served as
Coolidge’s 1925 summer White House into $2
million condos. But the town’s Historical
Commission and a foundation that promotes
the legacy of the 30th president believe the
manor, known as White Court, should be protected because of its historical significance.
Coolidge and his wife stayed at the 28room home from June to early September in
1925.
It was the summer after their youngest
son, Calvin Coolidge Jr., died at age 16, making the time away even more valuable to the
family, Coolidge Foundation chairman Amity
Shlaes wrote.
“White Court plays a significant role in
American presidential history and is a valuable part of our American heritage,” Shlaes
said in a letter touting the manor’s importance.
In a Globe article from June 1925, headlined “Swampscott wants the president [to]
make himself right at home,” the Coolidges’
arrival in town was joyfully anticipated. Local
police and government officials readied to assist Coolidge upon his arrival.
“In response, the Selectmen were thanked
for their kind offer and assured that above all
else, the president desired a chance to rest,”
the article continued.
The classical revival-style mansion, built in
1895 on six acres of oceanfront property, was
later the home of Marian Court College, which
closed in 2015.
The property, valued at $5.9 million, was
purchased by three local developers for $2.75
million last December. They plan to convert
the space into 18 condos, while preserving the
landscape.
The developers plan to build a replica of
the house and preserve such original elements
as windows, doors, and light fixtures.
One of the developers, Nick Meninno, said
the building needs to be torn down due to
“poor condition,” citing the wood stucco and
vinyl siding that were added during renovations in the 1920s and ’80s.
A town bylaw requires that the Historical
Commission be notified when a developer applies to demolish a building that’s at least 75
years old. The commission can vote to delay
the demolition for up to nine months while it
negotiates with the developer.
Mennino said he feels the proposal is a
compromise between developing the entire
property to the shoreline and leaving the
building intact.
“There’s definitely a middle ground, and
we’ve made some good headway,” he said.
The commission’s chairwoman, Justina Oliver, said this type of redevelopment isn’t unprecedented in the town. A few years ago, a
historic Mediterranean-style home on Puritan
Road was redeveloped into condos.
“We look at ways that we can take something from one form or one use and transformed into another use while still maintaining the overall structure and the intention of
that building,” Oliver said.
The Historical Commission is scheduled to
vote next Tuesday whether to delay the demolition.
Although he was born in Vermont,
Coolidge climbed the political ladder in Massachusetts, where he served as mayor of
Northampton, a state legislator, and governor.
The setting for his Swampscott summer
was decidedly grander than the one at his previous summer White House: a dance hall
above the general store his father managed in
Plymouth Notch, Vt.
Laney Ruckstuhl can be reached at
laney.ruckstuhl@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @laneyruckstuhl.
BY THE NUMBERS
3,476
The number of Amherst voters who supported
changing the town’s charter on Tuesday to replace
a representative Town Meeting, which was adopted
in 1938, with a 13-member town council. The position of town manager will remain. The change
passed with 58 percent support, according to the
Daily Hampshire Gazette.
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Harvard updates hymn
A
By Steve Annear
GLOBE STAFF
t Harvard University, changes have been made to the nearly
two-century-old hymn sung by students and graduates during
celebratory moments at the school.
The university announced this week that a portion of the
lyrics to its alma mater, “Fair Harvard,” have been tweaked so
that the words are more inclusive to the school’s diverse community.
The lyrics “Till the stock of the Puritans die,” the last verse in the 181year-old song, will be replaced with the line “till the stars in the firmament
die,” according to the Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging, a
university group that launched a competition last year and solicited suggestions for revisions from faculty, staff, and current and former students.
The goal of the competition, according to the task force website, was to
“produce a final line that connects the University’s valuable heritage . . . to
a future in which that inheritance is passed on to all.” Three finalists, including the winner, were announced in December.
“Fair Harvard” was first written in 1836 by alumnus Samuel Gilman for
the school’s bicentennial celebration. The stand-out sentence to replace
Gilman’s lyric was submitted by Janet Pascal, a graduate of the class of
1984. The updated version of the alma mater already appears on the
school’s website, along with a notation about the revision.
Pascal’s suggestion was selected by a panel of judges that included Marcyliena Morgan, professor of African and African American Studies; Steph
Burt, professor of English; and Kurt Crowley, the associate conductor of the
popular Broadway play, “Hamilton.” Danielle S. Allen, a professor and cochairwoman of the task force, said in a statement that the revised alma
mater “beautifully connects respect for our ancestors in the first stanza to
an affirmation that any and all can embrace Harvard’s enduring commitment to light and love, to truth and the good of humankind.”
The swap was announced this week as part of the 53-person task force’s
report on ways the school can improve its culture. The group, convened by
outgoing President Drew Faust, came up with eight key points to enact
change on campus.In a statement to the school community this week,
Faust said she was grateful for the group’s work. And, when the occasion
arises to sing the anthem, she won’t hold back.
“When it comes time to sing our alma mater, updated at the suggestion
of the task force, I will proudly give voice to the song’s new final line — and
its recognition that the pursuit of truth and knowledge belongs to everyone
at Harvard, from all backgrounds and beliefs,” Faust said.
Steve Annear can be reached at steve.annear@globe.com.
AROUND THE REGION
BOSTO N
Student loan agency
leaves national group
The Massachusetts Educational Financing Authority, a student loan agency, said Wednesday
that it is ending its membership in a national
group that has been lobbying the US Department
of Education to ease regulations on loan servicers. MEFA’s decision comes a day after nearly
50 state legislators sent a letter to the National
Council of Higher Education Resources demanding to know why it was part of a lobbying group
that was, “working to undermine consumer protections for student loan borrowers.” It has lobbied on behalf of servicers on such issues as limiting the ability of states to regulate student loan
servicers, some of whom have been accused by
state attorney generals, of violating consumer
protections.
B RA I N T R EE
Mega Millions jackpot
4th richest in history
This Friday’s Mega Millions jackpot is an estimated $502 million, which, if hit, would be the
fourth-largest prize in the game’s history, accord-
ing to a statement from the Massachusetts State
Lottery. The cash option totals about $301.5 million, the statement said. The jackpot was last hit
on Jan. 5, when a ticketholder in Florida took
home $451 million, and the last highest prize
was cashed in at $536 million on July 8, 2016,
the statement said. The largest Mega Millions
jackpot was $656 million, hit on March 30, 2012.
B A RN STA B L E
Shriver home drug case
sends two to prison
Two men were sentenced to state prison this
week for their roles in running a large-scale fentanyl distribution ring out of a Shriver family
home in Hyannisport, authorities said. Judge
Gary Nickerson on Tuesday sentenced Troy Monteiro to 4.5 years to 5 years in state prison, and
Trevor Gonsalves-Rose, to 3.5 years to 4 years in
prison, said Cameron Scott a case specialist at
the Barnstable Superior Court’s clerk’s office. The
men, who are both 30 and live in Falmouth, will
be on probation for three years while they serve
their terms, said Scott. The pair were arrested in
January 2017, after police watched the home on
Atlantic avenue for two months. Police said the
Shrivers did not know drugs were being sold
from the property and “were not present at any
time during the investigation.” The home, once
owned by the late Eunice K. Shriver, the founder
of the Special Olympics and the sister of President John F. Kennedy, is now owned by a trust
that is managed by Shriver’s son, Robert Sargent
Shriver III, according to town property records.
WOO DS H O LE
Martha’s Vineyard ferry
out of service again
The Steamship Authority said Wednesday that it
would only accept walk-on passengers on a replacement boat between Woods Hole and Vineyard Haven after both ferries that run the route
were taken out of service. Passenger and vehicle
ferry service between the mainland and Martha’s
Vineyard has been disrupted recently because of
a rash of mechanical and electrical problems
with the two ferries. The M/V Martha’s Vineyard
was taken out of service Wednesday morning;
the M/V Woods Hole was already out of service.
The authority said that a breaker on the M/V
Martha’s Vineyard’s electrical panel needed to be
replaced. The M/V Martha’s Vineyard underwent
a five-month, $18 million renovation last year
before returning to service in May. The authority
said in a statement posted to its website that it
had chartered SeaStreak’s Whaling City Express
for walk-on passengers through Monday to provide service every hour.
POLICE BLOTTER
R BODY FOUND Authorities are investigating after
a body was found off Interstate 95 south in Canton Wednesday afternoon, the Norfolk district
attorney’s office said in a statement. A motorist
who had pulled over to help a driver in distress
spotted human remains “a modest distance” off
the roadway, just south of the interchange with I93, the statement said. The body will be taken to
the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Boston for an autopsy that will likely be conducted
Thursday, said David Traub, a spokesman for the
district attorney’s office.
R TRAIN FATALITY Authorities are investigating
after a commuter rail train in Winchester fatally
struck a man on Wednesday. Officers responded
to a report of a man struck on the tracks near
Swanton Street around 8:30 p.m., according to a
statement from MBTA Transit police. The man,
thought to be in his 20s, was struck by a train
bound for North Station. He was pronounced
dead as a “result of injuries sustained,” police
said. The man’s identity was not released. Foul
play is not suspected, according to MBTA police.
Transit police detectives, along with the Middlesex district attorney’s office, are investigating.
R MOSQUE THREAT SENTENCE Patrick Keogan of
Wilmington was sentenced Wednesday to five
years in federal prison for threatening to burn a
local mosque and for illegally possessing dozens
of guns and ammunition as well as child pornography, the US Attorney’s office said. Keogan, 46,
was also sentenced to five years of supervised release, and will have to register as a sex offender.
He has been in custody since his arrest in July
2016. He pleaded guilty last year to two counts of
making a threat over Facebook, one count of being a convicted felon in possession of firearms
and ammunition, and one count of possessing
child pornography,prosecutors said.
R SCAM SUSPECT A Fall River woman hired to
care for an elderly Mattapoisett couple violated
their trust when she stole $27,100 from them
over an extended period of time, prosecutors alleged Wednesday. Vanessa L. Finglas, 40, pleaded not guilty Wednesday during her arraignment
in Brockton Superior Court on two counts each
of larceny over $250 from a person over 60, forgery of a check, and uttering a false check, the
Plymouth district attorney’s office said in a statement. Finglas’s alleged scheme came to light in
February 2017, when a relative of the victim’s
discovered checks belonging to his family member that “appeared to have been fraudulently
written,” the statement said. “The suspect checks
had been signed by the elderly client who, due to
a medical condition, was no longer able to write
their signature. The reporting relative noted
that the signature did not match his family
member’s.” Investigators accused Finglas, a
home health care aide, of bilking the vulnerable
couple.
R ARMED ROBBERY Police are searching for a suspect accused of robbing a man at gunpoint in
South Boston Tuesday night, officials said.
The victim said he was near Logan Way around
9:45 p.m. when he was approached by the suspect, who was about 6 feet tall and wearing gray
pants and gray jacket, said Boston police spokeswoman Rachel McGuire. No further information
about the victim was immediately available.
The suspect, whose face was covered, stole an
undisclosed amount of money, then fled on foot
into a courtyard by O’Callaghan Way, McGuire
said. No injuries were reported.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
Winthrop female police officer wins over $2m in lawsuit
By Danny McDonald
GLOBE STAFF
A Suffolk County jury has
awarded more than $2 million
to a veteran female police officer in Winthrop, finding that
the town sexually discriminated and retaliated against her,
according to court records.
Judy A. Racow, a police officer for more than 20 years,
claimed she was wrongly removed from the detective unit,
passed over for other jobs, excluded from training sessions
and falsely investigated, according to the complaint.
Last week, a Superior Court
jury agreed, awarding Racow
$676,000 for emotional damages, plus $1,352,000 in punitive
damages, according to court records.
In a statement on its website, Powers, Jodoin, Margolis &
Mantell, the law firm that represented Racow, said the punitive damages were made “to
condemn and deter future conduct of the same nature.”
Police Chief Terence M.
Delehanty, who is also serving
as the interim town manager,
said that an appeal is likely.
“We’re reviewing the verdict
and planning an appeal,” he
said in a brief interview. He declined further comment.
Racow also alleged an
abuse of power by town officials
who waged an “unwarranted
and unlawful campaign of harassment and retaliation
against her.”
The officials’ actions caused
Racow to suffer severe emotional distress, prevented her from
doing her job safely and effectively, and cost her the opportunity to earn substantial overtime, according to the complaint.
The filing outlines various
allegations of discrimination
and retaliation against Racow,
the first female appointed to
the detective unit.
In May 2006, about 11 years
after Racow was made a detective, she was reassigned as a patrol officer, even though she
had more “training, experience,
and seniority in the position
than two of the four male detectives, all of whom remained in
the unit,” according to the complaint.
Although the town claimed
the reassignment was aimed at
reducing overtime and addressing staffing issues, it actually
created additional overtime
costs, according to Racow’s
suit.
When she complained and
filed a grievance over the reassignment, which was supposed
to be temporary, the town retaliated and made it permanent,
Racow alleged.
After filing a charge with the
Massachusetts Commission
Against Discrimination in
2006, Racow resolved the matter with the town in early 2007,
and she was returned to the detective unit, according to the
complaint.
Once back on the unit, however, Racow said she was not allowed to participate “in investigations which traditionally and
directly fell within the job duties of the detectives,” the complaint stated.
In 2012, she was made to
cover “almost all” of another officer’s patrol shifts once he was
assigned to work in the detective unit, according to the complaint.
“After working plainclothes
assignments as a detective
since 1995, (apart from 20062008), it was humiliating for
Officer Racow, one of the most
senior officers in the Department, to be forced to work in
uniform to cover the shifts of a
junior male patrol officer,” read
the complaint.
Additionally, Delehanty, the
chief, had assigned police to investigate Racow in the summer
of 2013 to determine whether
Racow had “improperly disseminated police information,”
according to Racow ’s complaint.
Racow said in her suit that
the chief wanted to demonstrate that Racow had told a
Winthrop resident who was being investigated for “possible
drug activity” about “the presence of a surveillance camera
near his home.”
Racow denied the allegation, and claimed that the investigation was intended to
manufacture a reason to remove her from the detective
Mafia trial may hear victim’s statements
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
If prosecutors have their
way, the South Boston nightclub manager who former New
England Mafia boss Francis
“Cadillac Frank” Salemme is accused of killing in 1993 will
speak from beyond the grave
when the aging gangster stands
trial for the slaying next month.
In court papers filed Tuesday, prosecutors in US Attorney
Andrew E. Lelling’s office said
they want jurors to hear a number of statements the victim,
Steven DiSarro, made to witnesses before his disappearance. Salemme and a codefend a n t , P a u l We a d i c k , a r e
charged with murdering DiSarro to keep him from cooperating with US authorities in an investigation that was targeting
Salemme and his son, Frank.
The indictment alleges that
Salemme and his son, who died
in 1995, had a hidden interest
in The Channel, a now-defunct
Southie club that DiSarro managed in the early 1990s.
Both defendants have pleaded not guilty, and a lawyer for
Salemme recently told the
Globe that the 84-year-old
gangster “100 percent” denies
any involvement in DiSarro’s
slaying and is “chomping at the
bit” for the highly anticipated
trial to start.
In Tuesday’s motion, the
prosecutors asked Judge Allison D. Burroughs to admit a
number of statements at trial
that DiSarro made before his
death. They include a note DiSarro left for his son on the day
that he disappeared, as well as
conversations DiSarro had with
his half-brother, Channel owner Roland Wheeler.
“Wheeler had a conversation with DiSarro days before
DiSarro’s disappearance where
DiSarro was distraught that he
had been summoned to meet
with Salemme,” the motion
said.
During another talk, the filing said, “DiSarro told Wheeler
ab out c ri m in a l ac t i vi ty of
[Frank] Salemme, Jr. that he
had witnessed. In particular,
DiSarro related to Wheeler that
DiSarro was in a vehicle with
Salemme, Jr. and Weadick
when they ripped off a drug
dealer and Salemme, Jr. pushed
the drug dealer out of the moving vehicle.”
Another gangster, Stephen
“The Rifleman” Flemmi, told
investigators in 2003 that Salemme Jr. strangled DiSarro as
Weadick held his legs off the
ground. DiSarro’s remains were
found in Providence in 2016.
Shelley Murphy of the Globe
Staff contributed to this report.
Travis Andersen can be reached
at travis.andersen@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@TAGlobe.
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cording to the complaint.
In September 2013, Delehanty told her that she was being removed from the detective
unit, returning to a uniformed
patrol position, according to
the suit.
Delehanty, the complaint
stated, did not provide a reason
for her removal and placed the
report of Pomeroy Resources,
Inc., into her personnel record.
Danny McDonald can be
reached at
daniel.mcdonald@globe.com.
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unit.
Delehanty retained an outside consultant, Pomeroy Resources, Inc., to assist in that investigation. He offered to not
release the consultant’s report if
she resigned from the detective
unit, but Racow refused, ac-
B4
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Jackie Robinson Foundation weighs in on eve of Yawkey vote
By Milton J. Valencia
Jean, and which have donated
hundreds of millions of dollars
to area programs.
“It is associated with good
will, generosity and a desire to
proactively confront the institutionalized discrimination
that continues to cripple our society,” Baeza said in the letter,
pointing out that Jean Yawkey
sponsored the Boston tour of a
traveling exhibit of Jackie Robinson and the Jackie Robinson
Foundation three decades ago.
The letter stops short of calling on the Public Improvement
Commission to reject the request to change the name of
Yawkey Way, a request that was
based on allegations that
GLOBE STAFF
On the eve of a decisive vote
set for Thursday, a new voice
has weighed in on the yearslong, controversial question of
whether to rename historic
Yawkey Way — that of the Jackie Robinson Foundation, set up
in honor of the man whose legacy is very much at the center
of the debate.
The foundation’s president
and CEO, Della Britton Baeza,
sent a letter to the Boston Public Improvement Commission
highlighting the work of the
Yawkey Foundations, the charitable foundations that were set
up by Tom Yawkey and his wife,
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Yawkey and the Red Sox have a
history of discrimination
against blacks.
But the letter suggests what
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others who have opposed the
name change have argued: that
the name Yawkey Way is inseparable from the work of the
Yawkey Foundations, and so
changing the name of the street
by Fenway Park would taint the
legacy of the foundations and
their charitable work.
“ The Yawkey name resonates loudly at [the Jackie Robinson Foundation],” the letter
states, pointing to the charitable contributions, “and it has
profoundly helped pave the
way for the completion of the
Jackie Robinson Museum,
which will tackle the same complex racial dynamics that are
swirling around the Yawkey
Way naming controversy.”
The letter adds that, “We remain hopeful that our efforts
will continue to contribute to
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LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICE
MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
By virtue of and in execution of the Power of Sale
contained in a certain mortgage given by Veronica B. Bullock to Eastern Bank, dated May 17, 2004 and recorded
in Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 34546, Page
328 (the “Mortgage”) of which mortgage Ditech Financial
LLC f/k/a Green Tree Servicing LLC is the present holder
by assignment from Eastern Bank to ABN AMRO Mortgage
Group, Inc. dated June 1, 2006 recorded in Suffolk County
Registry of Deeds in Book 39769, Page 101 and assignment
from CitiMortgage, Inc. successor by merger to ABN AMRO
Mortgage Group, Inc. to Green Tree Servicing LLC dated
September 16, 2014 recorded in Suffolk County Registry
of Deeds in Book 53521, Page 148, for breach of conditions
of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the
same, the mortgaged premises located at Unit No. 106, of
the St. James Estates Condominium, 66 Saint James Street,
Roxbury (Boston), MA 02119 will be sold at a Public Auction
at 11:00 AM on April 30, 2018, at the mortgaged premises,
more particularly described below, all and singular the
premises described in said mortgage, to wit:
Unit 106 in the St. James Estates Condominium created
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 183A,
by Master Deed dated December 6, 1989 and recorded
with the Suffolk County Registry of Deeds on December 20,
1989 as Instrument No. 339 in Book 16014, Page 185 (the
“Master Deed”) and managed and regulated by the Trustees of the St. lames Estates Condominium Trust under a
Declaration of Trust dated December 6, 1989 and recorded
in Book 16014, Page 144 (hereinafter sometimes referred
to as either the “Condominium Trust” or the “Declaration
of Trust”).
The Unit is shown on floor plans recorded simultaneously
with the Master Deed and also on a copy of the portion
of said plans attached to the Unit Deed first Conveyed by
the Declarant, St. James Estates Development Corporation
to which is affixed the verified statement of a registered
architect in the form required by Section 9 of said Chapter
183A.
The Unit is conveyed together with an undivided 0.35 percentage interest in the common areas in facilities of the
condominium as well as with the exclusive right to use the
garage space designated as Garage No. 202.
The Unit is further conveyed with the benefit of and subject
to all rights, easements, restrictions and other provisions
contained in the Master Deed and Declaration of Trust (as
both may be amended from time to time) as well as the
Rules and Regulations promulgated thereunder, the Unit
Deed and Chapter 1 83A of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
The Unit is further conveyed subject to the Declaration of
Affordable Housing Covenants recorded with said Suffolk
County Registry of Deeds at Book 16030 and Page 120 and
Amended and Restated Covenant for Affordable Housing
Deed Rider recorded herewith.
For title reference, see Deed of Boston Redevelopment Authority to Veronica B. Bullock recorded herewith.
For mortgagor’s title see deed recorded with the
Suffolk County Registry of Deeds in Book 34546, Page 316.
The premises will be sold subject to the terms and
provisions of the covenant for Affordable Housing contained in the DEED Rider recorded as part of the Unit Deed
in Book 34546, Page 318.
The premises will be sold subject to any and all unpaid taxes and other municipal assessments and liens, and subject
to prior liens or other enforceable encumbrances of record
entitled to precedence over this mortgage, and subject to
and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, reservations and conditions of record and subject to all tenancies
and/or rights of parties in possession.
Terms of the Sale: Cash, cashier’s or certified check
in the sum of $5,000.00 as a deposit must be shown at the
time and place of the sale in order to qualify as a bidder
(the mortgage holder and its designee(s) are exempt from
this requirement); high bidder to sign written Memorandum of Sale upon acceptance of bid; balance of purchase
price payable in cash or by certified check in thirty (30)
days from the date of the sale at the offices of mortgagee’s
attorney, Korde & Associates, P.C., 900 Chelmsford Street,
Suite 3102, Lowell, MA 01851 or such other time as may be
designated by mortgagee. The description for the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event
of a typographical error in this publication.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Ditech Financial LLC f/k/a Green Tree Servicing LLC
Korde & Associates, P.C.
900 Chelmsford Street
Suite 3102
Lowell, MA 01851
(978) 256-1500
Bullock, Veronica B., 17-028588
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LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
The Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Invites you to a
Public Information Meeting
for the
North Washington Street Bridge Replacement Project
on
Thursday, April 12, 2018
6:30 – 8:30 PM
Bunker Hill Knights of Columbus #62
545 Medford Street, Charlestown, MA
The purpose of this meeting is to provide the Charlestown
community with an update on the plans to replace the
North Washington Street Bridge, in anticipation of the beginning of construction this spring, and to introduce the
General Contractor, J.F. White Contracting. At the meeting,
an overview of construction staging for the project will
be presented, along with anticipated traffic management
plans. Following the presentation, project staff will lead a
discussion to answer questions.
For those who cannot attend this meeting, the same presentation will be given the following week for residents
of Boston’s North End, at the Nazzaro Community Center
(30 N. Bennet St). That meeting, separately noticed in local
papers, will be Thursday, April 19, 2018, from 6:30pm to
8:30pm. Please note that while each is fully open to the
public, these meetings are intended to focus on issues
specific to each neighborhood, and space is limited at the
Nazzaro Community Center. If you are able to attend the
meeting in Charlestown, please do so.
To be added to the project email list to receive future meeting and construction notifications, contact Jim Kersten,
Public Outreach and Legislative Affairs, at 857-368-9041 or
james.a.kersten@state.ma.us.
The Bunker Hill Knights of Columbus is fully accessible. To
request language or access accommodations, please contact MassDOT’s director of Civil Rights at 857-368-8580,
TTD/TTY 857-368-0603, Fax 857-368-0602 or by email at
MassDOT.CivilRights@dot.state.ma.us.
Please share this notice with others who may be interested
in the project.
The Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Invites you to a
Public Information Meeting
for the
North Washington Street Bridge Replacement Project
on
Thursday, April 19, 2018
6:30 – 8:30 PM
Nazzaro Community Center
30 N Bennet St, North End, Boston, MA
The purpose of this meeting is to provide the North End
community with an update on the plans to replace the
North Washington Street Bridge, in anticipation of the beginning of construction this spring, and to introduce the
General Contractor, J.F. White Contracting. At the meeting,
construction staging and traffic management plans will be
presented. Following the presentation, project staff will
lead a discussion to answer questions.
For those who cannot attend this meeting, the same presentation will be given the previous week for residents of
Charlestown, at the Bunker Hill Knights of Columbus (545
Medford Street). That meeting, separately noticed in local
papers, will be Thursday, April 12, 2018, from 6:30pm to
8:30pm. Please note that while each is fully open to the
public, these meetings are intended to focus on issues specific to each neighborhood.
To be added to the project email list to receive future meeting and construction notifications, contact Jim Kersten,
Public Outreach and Legislative Affairs, at 857-368-9041 or
james.a.kersten@state.ma.us.
The Nazzaro Community Center is fully accessible. To request language or access accommodations, please contact
MassDOT’s director of Civil Rights at 857-368-8580, TTD/
TTY 857-368-0603, Fax 857-368-0602 or by email at
MassDOT.CivilRights@dot.ma.us.
Please share this notice with others who may be interested
in the project.
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Mystic Valley Elder Services
(MVES), an Aging Services
Access Point (ASAP) located
in Malden, MA, is soliciting
proposals from multiple
contractors for the provision of community based
services. Services are provided to consumers in the
Commonwealth’s
Home
Care Program, funded by
the Executive Office of Elder Affairs. Sealed bids will
be accepted until 5:00 pm
on Monday, April 30, 2018.
MVES reserves the right to
amend or withdraw all or
any part of this Request for
Responses. This RFR does
not commit MVES to award
a contract, to pay any costs
incurred in the preparation
of the application, or to
purchase any services. For
bid specifications, including application forms, visit
mves.org. MVES is an AA/
EEO agency.
The Boston City Council’s
Committee on Planning,
Development and Transportation will hold a public
hearing on Thursday, April
12, 2018 at 10:00AM in
the Iannella Chamber, 5th
floor, Boston City Hall, on
the subject of A Petition to
Establish the Greenway
Business
Improvement
District (BID). The petition
seeks to establish a business improvement district
(BID) around the Rose
Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway for the purpose of
contributing to the maintenance and operation of that
park. The proposed BID will
be comprised of properties
abutting the Greenway as
shown on the map below. If
passed, there will be a BID
assessment on all taxable
properties in the BID valued
at $10 Million or greater;
except one-to-four family residential properties,
residential
condominium
units, and tax-exempt entities will be exempt from
BID assessments. In order
to contribute $1,500,000
per year to the Greenway,
the proposed BID assessment is 37 cents per $1,000
of assessed valuation up to
$200 million, plus 11 cents
per $1,000 of assessed
valuation over $200 million.
Residential rental properties will be assessed at half
this amount. The proposed
benefits of the BID are the
capacity it creates to facilitate the maintenance and
operations of the Greenway,
and enhance and improve
the overall experience for
everyone who works, lives,
or visits the defined BID
District, which includes the
Greenway. The complete
hearing notice and BID petition can be viewed at: www.
boston.gov/public-notices/
39906.
LEGAL NOTICES
ORDER OF NOTICE
Trial Court
of Massachusetts
The Superior Court
Worcester Country
Superior Court
225 Main Street
Worcester, MA 01608
Dennis P. McManus, Clerk
of Courts,
DOCKET NUMBER
1885CV0163-C
James Peltekis
Plaintiff
vs.
Chester M. Howe, Harris
A. Reynolds and Robert C.
Moore as Trustees of the
Moore Real Estate Trust
and/or The Beneficiaries of
the Moore Real Estate Trust
Defendants
RE: Chester M. Howe, Harris
A. Reynolds and Robert C.
Moore as Trustees of the
Moore Real Estate Trust
and/or The Beneficiaries of
the Moore Real Estate Trust
WHEREAS a civil action has
been begun against you
in our Superior Court by
James Peltekis, wherein
it is seeking TO: Quiet title
and to establish title to
certain Real Estate located at 97 Main Street,
Southborough, Worcester
County, Massachusetts.
We COMMAND YOU if you
intend to make any defense, that on 05/02/2018
or within such further time
as the law allows you do
cause your written pleading to be filed in the office
of the Clerk of Court named
above, in said Commonwealth, and further that you
defend against said suit according to law if you intend
any defense, and that you
do and receive what the
Court shall order and adjudge therein.
Hereof fail not, at your
peril, or as otherwise said
suit may be adjudged and
orders entered in your absence.
It appearing to this Court
that no personal service
of the Complaint has been
made on the defendant a
deputy sheriff having made
a return on the summons
that after diligent search
he can find no one upon
whom he can lawfully make
service, a copy of which is
hereto attached and made
part of this notice, it is ORDERED that notice of this
suit be given to them by
publishing, once a week for
three consecutive weeks,
the last publication to be
at least 20-days before said
return day in the:
Newspaper:
The Boston Globe
City/Town: Boston,
Massachusetts
CLERK OF COURTS/ASST.
CLERK Anne O’Connor
DATE ISSUED 03/14/2018
Gentle Giant Moving Co. Inc.
29 Harding Street
Somerville, MA 02143
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COMMERCIAL REAL EstAtE LOAns
It Takes a Team.
Legal Notice Public Auction
By the virtue of the right
granted by statute 210, section 7 of the Massachusetts
Uniform Commercial Code
(Warehouseman’s
Lien),
and all other rights, for the
purpose of satisfying the
lien of Gentle Giant Moving Co. Inc. for storage and
other expenses, will be sold
at public auction at 1 Burlington Avenue, Wilmington,
MA on Saturday April 14th,
2018 at 10:00 A.M, all and
singular the household furniture and furnishings and
office furniture of:
Phillip Allen
Robert Brokaw
Kristen Campbell
Martha Cassin
Robert Dekle
Patrizia Depasquale
Paula Fenton
Waller Finnegan
Maura Flaherty
Michael Flannery
Michael Giambro
Steven Gravar
Rob Hallenbake
Susan Hanna
Clifton Helman
Jobs for Bay State Grads
Rob and Amy Job
Dov Kolker
Regina Kyle
Mary Lannon
Kevin Laughlin
Monica Laurans
John Murray
New England Rehab
Katherine O’Donnell
Matthew Reed
Stephen Riel
Pamela Ryan
Stoddard’s Inc.
Hope Saunders
Senior Tours Players
Timothy Steiner
William Tidwell
Barbara Varzakis
Included are beds, bureas,
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leveling the playing field for all
to pursue the promise our
country offers, in keeping with
the aspirations of our beloved
namesake . . . We give credit to
the Yawkey name for making
that possible.”
The letter comes as the Public Improvement Commission
is expected to vote on the request to return the two-block
strip to its original name, Jersey Street, a request that has divided Boston’s business and civic leaders. Boston community
l e a d e r s s u c h a s Pa r t n e r s
HealthCare chairman Jack
Connors and Cardinal Sean
O’Malley, of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, opposed the name change, saying
it would taint the work of the
charitable foundations.
The Red Sox, led by principal owner John Henry, requested the name change in February, citing Yawkey’s reputation
as a racist and a willingness to
distance Fenway Park from that
history. Henry also owns The
Globe.
The letter does not specifically state whether the foundation supports or opposes the
name change, and calls to the
foundation were not immediately returned.
Yawkey, for whom the street
was named in 1977, owned the
team from 1933 until his death
in 1976. During his tenure, the
Red Sox were the last Major
League Baseball club to integrate, finally calling up their
first black player, infielder
Pumpsie Green, in 1959. That
was 12 years after Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color
barrier with the Broo klyn
Dodgers.
Yawkey is also believed to
have screamed a racial slur
from the grandstand at Robinson and two other black players
during a team tryout in 1945,
though the person who yelled
the slur has never been confirmed.
The Public Improvement
Commission, an independent
body that controls and permits
the use of public space, has the
final say of whether to rename
the street. The members represent departments within the
administration of Mayor Martin J. Walsh, who has not publicly taken a position on the
proposal. His office said he
would defer to the commission’s process, “which is still ongoing.”
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T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
4 arrested driving through Dorchester with loaded guns
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
Boston police Tuesday arrested two juveniles and two
adults for allegedly cruising
through Dorchester with loaded semiautomatic handguns in
a bust that stopped the violent
foursome “before they hurt
anyone,” officials said.
One of the suspects, Ian
Percival, 26, of Quincy, has
three prior convictions for unlawful possession of a firearm
with sentences ranging from
18 months in jail to four to five
years in state prison, according
to prosecutors.
“I want to commend our officers, since we most likely prevented another tragedy, by intercepting this vehicle before
they hurt anyone,” Boston Police Commissioner William B.
Evans said in statement.
His words were echoed by
Suffolk District Attorney Daniel F. Conley.
“The cycle of violence and
retaliation has claimed too
many lives, and interrupting it
has to be a priority for us in
law enforcement,” Conley said
in a statement. “Fast-breaking
investigations like this one
don’ t just take guns off the
street — they save lives.”
The men caught the attention of gang unit officers
around 5:10 p.m. Tuesday
when their vehicle sped
through stop signs in the area
of Pleasant Street and Savin
Hill Avenue, Boston police said
in a statement.
A police report filed in the
case said the unit officers were
monitoring suspected gang affiliates involved in an ongoing
feud linked to “numerous”
shooting deaths.
Officers stopped the vehicle
and recognized the four young
men inside, the statement
said. The report said the vehicle was carrying gang associates traveling through rival territory.
“The officers also noticed
that the previously open window was now closed and the
doors locked,” the release said.
“Believing items may have
been discarded from the vehicle, the officers retraced their
path of travel.”
Police ultimately recovered
two loaded black semiautomatic firearms, identified as a
Smith & Wesson Bodyguard
.380 and a Smith & Wesson
M&P .40, near 28 High St., the
spot where the sharp-eyed
cops first noticed the vehicle
with its window open, authorities said.
“Both firearms had scratches consistent with being
BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT
Semiautomatic handguns were recovered by police who
stopped a vehicle that was speeding through Dorchester.
‘Time and time again, we are seeing
young people with high­powered
weapons, some who have already been
charged and convicted of these crimes
several times before; and it’s troubling,
to say the least.’
WILLIAM B. EVANS, police commissioner
thrown from a moving vehicle,
and thermal imaging showed
that the firearms were warmer
than their surrounding area,
which indicates they had likely
just been in a person’s possession,” the statement said.
Prior to the stop, the report
said, the suspects’ vehicle was
traveling so erratically that
“[n]umerous other vehicles
had to drastically alter their
path of travel in order to avoid
[getting hit].” The suspects’ ve-
hicle had also taken a number
of “unnecessary turns” in an
effort to avoid surveillance, the
report alleged.
Evans implored judges to
keep repeat gun offenders
locked up for lengthy stretches
to protect public safety.
“Time and time again, we
are seeing young people with
high-powered weapons, some
who have already been
charged and convicted of these
crimes several times before;
and it’s troubling, to say the
least,” Evans said in the statement. “My officers have already taken almost 150 guns
off the streets so far this year,
many of them from kids who
are only sixteen and seventeen
years old. My officers are doing
their part, and we are making
a plea to the judges and courts
to work in partnership with us
to help keep these repeat violent offenders with multiple
firearms convictions out of our
neighborhoods.”
In addition to Percival, police also arrested Jonathan A.
Dasilva, 26, of Dorchester, a
16-year-old juvenile from the
neighborhood, and a 17-yearold juvenile from Quincy, according to the release. The juveniles weren’t named because
of their ages.
All four suspects are
charged with unlawful possession of a firearm, unlawful possession of ammunition, possession of a firearm with an obliterated serial number, and
unlawful possession of a large
capacity feeding device, police
said.
Percival was also charged
with unlawful possession of a
firearm (second and subsequent offense), failure to stop,
and negligent operation of a
motor vehicle, the statement
said. Plus he was hit with civil
citations for various auto law
infractions.
At his arraignment Wednesday in Dorchester Municipal
Court, Percival was ordered
held on $100,000 cash bail and
additionally held on a probation matter, while Dasilva was
held on $50,000 bail and had
his open bail revoked in a separate case, Conley’s office said.
The juveniles appeared in
the Juvenile Division of Dorc h e s t e r Mu n i c i p a l Co u r t ,
where bail for each was set at
$10,000, prosecutors said.
Jeremiah Manion of the Globe
Staff contributed to this report.
Travis Andersen can be
reached at
travis.andersen@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@TAGlobe.
Eric J. Tyrrell, 28,
is accused of
selling two 19th­
century coins that
were stolen from
Gronkowski’s
home last month
when he and his
housemates were
at the Super Bowl.
2nd man arraigned
after burglary at
Gronkowski home
Pleads not guilty;
3rd man at large
By Emily Sweeney
GLOBE STAFF
WRENTHAM — The second
of three men wanted for burg l a r i z i n g t h e Fo x b o r o u g h
home of New England Patriot
Rob Gronkowski while he was
at the Super Bowl appeared in
court Wednesday and was ordered held on $1,000 cash bail.
Eric J. Tyrrell, 28, appeared
in Wrentham District Court to
face two counts of receiving
stolen property worth more
than $250.
Tyrrell is accused of selling
two 19 th-century coins that
were stolen from Gronkowski’s
home last month when he and
his housemates were away at
the Super Bowl.
Tyrrell, Anthony V. Almeida, 31, of Randolph, and Shane
J. Denn are facing charges for
their alleged roles in the burglary of Gronkowski’s home.
I t ’s u n c l e a r w h e t h e r
Gronkowski’s home was specifically targeted because the suspects knew he was out of town,
or whether his property was
chosen at random. According
to documents filed in court,
the items that were stolen in
the break-in belonged to
Gronkowski’s housemates.
Last week, Almeida pleaded
not guilty to charges of breaking and entering in the nighttime, two counts of receiving
stolen property, and malicious
destruction of property in connection with the burglary, police said.
Denn, 26, of Tewksbury,
who has also been linked to recent crimes in Wilmington,
Tewksbury, and Andover, remains at large.
According to documents
filed in court, Gronkowski and
his housemates came home
Feb. 5 and found that their
house had been broken into.
The basement door and an
upstairs bedroom door had
been forced open, and a basement window had been
smashed. One housemate discovered that a watch and
bracelet were missing from his
room, and another housemate
told police that three handguns were taken from his
room, along with jewelry, rare
coins, and his Social Security
card and birth certificate.
Gronkowski’s bedroom was
locked and secured.
The police report states that
Gronkowski had left for Minneapolis on Jan. 29. His housemates said the doors and windows were secure when they
left on Feb. 1, but they later realized the house alarm was not
on, according to the police report.
Also according to the report, Gronkowski’s property in
Foxborough has 16 cameras.
Video from the night of Feb. 4
— Super Bowl Sunday —
showed an individual walking
over to the basement windows
and then leaving. Police believe
the suspect broke one of the
windows to test to see whether
a security system was active.
On March 12, police received a call from Doug Davis,
the founder and president of
the Numismatic Crime Information Center, a nonprofit that
tracks stolen coins and currency. Davis told police that he
was aware that coins were reported stolen from Gronkowski’s home and he’d posted an
alert and received a response
— and as it turned out, a coin
dealer in Weymouth had them.
T he coin dealer in Weymouth confirmed with police
that he had purchased two
19th-century coins from Tyrrell on Feb. 23 and 27. (The
dealer paid $1,750 for an 1896
coin and $1,800 for an 1879
coin.)
The coin dealer said Tyrrell
told him the coins belonged to
his father and that he had previously tried to sell them at a
pawn shop.
Tyrrell turned himself in to
police earlier this week. He is
due back in court for a pretrial
hearing on April 26.
Emily Sweeney can be reached
at esweeney@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@emilysweeney.
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
A WATERY WORKOUT — Teams of rowers and their barking coxswains are beginning to fill up the Charles River
in the early mornings, a definite sign of spring.
Report faults lack of teacher diversity
uBPS
Continued from Page B1
issues are “going to take some
significant attention to resolve.”
The Boston school system
has been struggling for decades
to fully comply with a 1970s
federal court order that set
minimum quotas for the racial
and ethnic makeup of its teaching force. Under the order, at
least 25 percent of the system’s
4,500 teachers are supposed to
be black. But the school system
only briefly met or exceeded
that threshold in the late 1990s
and early 2000s.
The order also requires another 10 percent of the teaching force to comprise other ethnic and racial minorities, and
the school system has met and
exceeded that requirement for
many years. Some advocates,
however, argue that the school
system should strive to greatly
exceed those thresholds, noting
that 42 percent of the system’s
students are Latino, compared
with 10 percent of its teachers.
B o s t o n s c h o o l o ff i c i a l s
Wednesday agreed the teaching
force needs to better reflect the
demographics of its students,
and stressed they have been
placing greater emphasis on
that goal in recent years. They
said they have about a dozen
programs that aim to recruit
and retain teachers of color.
“We are going to do everything we can to make sure we
have a team of adults that reflects the cultural, racial, ethnic, and linguistic backgrounds
of our students,” Superintendent Tommy Chang said in an
interview. “We’ve been working
on a number of programs that I
believe are helping to turn the
corner on this.”
Diversity among teachers
at Boston Public Schools
100%
Other 0.3%
Asian 6.2%
Latino 10.1%
80%
Black 20%
60%
White 61.8%
40%
20%
0
’11-’12 ’12-’13 ’13-’14 ’14-’15 ’15-’16 ’16-’17
SOURCE: “Broken Promises: Teacher Diversity
in Boston Public Schools”
Last year, the school system
wrapped up one of its best hiring seasons, with 43 percent of
new teachers positions going to
candidates of color. Yet the recruitment efforts increased the
representation of black and Latino teachers by less than 1 percent, according to data the
school system provided to the
Globe.
One of the biggest challenges the school system has faced
in diversifying its teaching
force has been keeping teachers
in the system, school officials
and the advocacy organizations
said.
For instance, many of the
teachers hired in the early
years of the federal court order
have been retiring, while other
teachers have been leaving the
system for a variety of reasons,
including being lured away by
other systems trying to diversify their teaching ranks.
Tanisha Sullivan, president
of the Boston chapter of the
GLOBE STAFF
NAACP, said the school system
needs to be more innovative in
coming up with new ways to recruit teachers of color to the
system.
“I think part of the challenge for BPS has been a lack of
intentionality in developing
and implementing initiatives
that can help to move the needle on teacher diversity,” she
said.
She also said it is difficult for
the school system to hold any
one person accountable for diversity hiring, because the init i a t i v e s h av e b e e n s p r e a d
across so many different departments within the central
offices, as well as among the
system’s 125 school principals
and headmasters who have
gained hiring autonomy in recent years.
The organizations behind
the report include the NAACP’s
Boston chapter, the Massachusetts Asian American Educators Association, the Lawyers’
Committee for Civil Rights and
Economic Justice, the Greater
Boston Latino Network, the
Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, the Collaborative
Parent Leadership Action Network, the Black Educators Alliance of Massachusetts, the Boston Teachers Union, and the
Boston Network for Black Student Achievement.
The report recommends
that the school system expand
some of its existing programs,
particularly those that target
local candidates who are more
apt to stay in the system. Those
programs include one that
mentors high school students
to become teachers and another that trains classroom aides
to be teachers.
Other recommendations include giving hiring priorities to
teachers of color whose positions have been eliminated due
to budget cuts at individual
schools in the system, and offering other teachers early in
their careers “letters of reasonable assurance” that they will
have a position for the next
school year.
“Together with our allies
who organized this report, we
share the goal of improving
teacher diversity within BPS, as
well as the very important reasons why that improvement
must be prioritized,” Jessica
Tang, president of the Boston
Teachers Union, said in a prepared statement. “We look forward to collaborating with BPS
leadership and other stakeholders to advance these recommendations.”
James Vaznis can be reached at
james.vaznis@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@globevaznis.
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BY CITY AND TOWN
AMESBURY
DUMAIS, Frank
ATTLEBORO
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie
(McNulty)
WAYLAND, Lisa Ann (Coates)
BEVERLY
MORRISSEY, Barbara A. (Glynn)
BILLERICA
MICHALSKI, Therea A. (Deprey)
PUSTIZZI, Carmelo
BOSTON
O’CONNELL, Margaret M. (Delaney)
WANNINGER, Ryan Paul
BOXFORD
KASTRINELIS, Peter L.
BROOKLINE
COX, Constance (Buffum)
GARSTON, Barbara
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie
(McNulty)
BURLINGTON
MICHALSKI, Therea A. (Deprey)
CHARLESTOWN
SIEGFRIEDT, Barbara A. (nee Lewis)
ROSLINDALE
DiIORIO, Paolo S.
SAUGUS
FULCHINI, Pasquale
O’BRIEN, Joann T. (Taracevicz)
WELLS, John J., Jr.
SOMERVILLE
DiIORIO, Paolo S.
SOUTH HADLEY
WAYLAND, Lisa Ann (Coates)
SUDBURY
JENNEY, Paul J.
SWAMPSCOTT
COX, Constance (Buffum)
GRILLO, Pamela M. (Decuyke)
TEWKSBURY
DiIORIO, Paolo S.
CHESTNUT HILL
GARSTON, Barbara
UPTON
CONCORD
GREGORY, Ann (Krull)
ROBINSON, LeRoy M., Jr. ‘Lee’
WAKEFIELD
DANVERS
VECCHIONE, Elizabeth (Mastrocola)
DOVER
MORRISSEY, Barbara A. (Glynn)
O’CONNELL, Margaret M. (Delaney)
EAST BOSTON
PUSTIZZI, Carmelo
EVERETT
GRILLO, Pamela M. (Decuyke)
O’BRIEN, Joann T. (Taracevicz)
VECCHIONE, Elizabeth (Mastrocola)
FRAMINGHAM
O’CONNELL, Margaret M. (Delaney)
HAVERHILL
KASTRINELIS, Peter L.
HINGHAM
LEARY, Sybil L.
HOPKINTON
COOK, Douglas B.
LEXINGTON
MICHALSKI, Therea A. (Deprey)
LYNN
FULCHINI, Pasquale
KASTRINELIS, Peter L.
LYNNFIELD
O’BRIEN, Joann T. (Taracevicz)
MALDEN
MICHALSKI, Therea A. (Deprey)
MEDFIELD
O’CONNELL, Margaret M. (Delaney)
MEDFORD
DiIORIO, Paolo S.
JENNEY, Paul J.
MICHALSKI, Therea A. (Deprey)
MELROSE
O’BRIEN, Joann T. (Taracevicz)
WELLS, John J., Jr.
MIDDLETON
VECCHIONE, Elizabeth (Mastrocola)
MORRISSEY, Barbara A. (Glynn)
WALPOLE
DUMAIS, Frank
WEST FALMOUTH
JENNEY, Paul J.
WEST ROXBURY
O’NEIL, Olga P. (Porrata-Doria)
WESTON
SENNOTT, Edward J., Jr.
WESTWOOD
SENNOTT, Edward J., Jr.
WEYMOUTH
GUEST, Irene W. (Nowlin)
WINCHESTER
SIEGFRIEDT, Barbara A. (nee Lewis)
WINTHROP
GRILLO, Pamela M. (Decuyke)
WRENTHAM
EMSWILER, William Anderson, III
OUT OF STATE
CONNECTICUT
GARSTON, Barbara
FLORIDA
GREGORY, Ann (Krull)
NEEDHAM
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie
(McNulty)
(McNulty)
LOUISIANA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie
WAYLAND, Lisa Ann (Coates)
NEW YORK
NEWTON
O’NEIL, Olga P. (Porrata-Doria)
WELLS, John J., Jr.
GARSTON, Barbara
NORTH READING
O’CONNELL, Margaret M. (Delaney)
RHODE ISLAND
PEABODY
FULCHINI, Pasquale
MINSON, George
VECCHIONE, Elizabeth (Mastrocola)
TEXAS
Or add a condolensece
to the guestbook at
boston.com/obituaries
GARSTON, Barbara
WAYLAND, Lisa Ann (Coates)
MISSION HILL
O’NEIL, Olga P. (Porrata-Doria)
Share a memory
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Medford-Woburn-Wilmington
ROBINSON, LeRoy M., Jr. ‘Lee’
WANNINGER, Ryan Paul
54, of Hopkinton, MA passed away
suddenly on March 25, 2018. He leaves
behind his beloved family, wife Diane
Stelfox Cook of Hopkinton, children,
Noelle Cook, Peter Cook, and Katherine
Cook of Mendon, Matthew Doyle of
New York City and Brian Doyle of
Hopkinton, his mother Sally Cook
and brother Duncan Cook of West
Falmouth. Doug was a proud graduate
of the University of Maine, Orono. He
earned two degrees: Forest Engineering
and Civil Engineering. His love for the
outdoors began in childhood, and continued during his time in Maine, where
as a student, he started the business
that would grow to be one of the largest
forestry companies in New England,
Cook Forest Products of Upton. Although Doug is remembered for being a
hard worker, it is his love for family and
friends, and his drive to do anything for
them, that will be so greatly missed. He
was a warm and strong presence everywhere. Doug was a passionate skier and
especially loved the woods of Jay Peak
and introducing others to the thrill of
being outdoors. He loved fishing from
his Shamrock which he salvaged and
rebuilt. He looked forward to OBH
hockey. All are welcome to the wake at
Chesmore Funeral Home, 57 Hayden
Rowe St in HOPKINTON on Thursday,
April 5 from 4 to 8 pm and to the memorial service on Friday, April 6 at 11
am at St. John’s Church, 9 Glen Road
in Wellesley. In lieu of flowers, gifts in
celebration of Doug may be made to a
forestry scholarship in his name. Donations may be made in his name to the
University of Maine Foundation, Two
Alumni Place, Orono, ME 04469-5792
or online at our.umaine.edu/cook.
Of Saugus, 94, on March 24, Former
Proprietor of Fulchini’s Bakery in Lynn.
He was the loving husband of the late
Maria (Savignano) Fulchini. Son of the
late Michele & Annunziata Fulchini.
Beloved father of Nancy Gauthier of
Peabody, Louise Duda & her husband
Richard of Newburyport. Cherished
grandfather of Debbie Grigas & her
husband Bobby of Pembroke, Mark
Gauthier & his wife Stephanie of Wilmington, Janet Mahoney of Seabrook,
NH, Joseph Mahoney of Kingston, NH.
Also predeceased by several brothers
and sisters. Relatives & friends are
invited to attend visiting hours in the
Bisbee-Porcella Funeral Home, 549
Lincoln Ave., SAUGUS on Monday
11- Noon. Followed by a funeral
service in the Funeral Home at Noon.
Entombment Holy Cross Mausoleum,
Malden. For directions & condolences
www.BisbeePorcella.com.
WALTHAM
MILTON
COX, Constance (Buffum)
O’BRIEN, Joann T. (Taracevicz)
COOK, Douglas B.
Of Somerville, March 28th. Beloved
husband of Luisa (Capone) DiIorio.
Devoted father of Anthony DiIorio of
FL, Franco DiIorio and his partner Toni
Bardzillowski of Roslindale, Bruno
DiIorio and his wife Norma of Medford,
Adele Harris and her husband Chris of
Tewksbury, and the late Robert DiIorio.
Loving grandfather of Robyn, Christine,
Robert, Paul, Carmen, Sophia, Olivia
DiIorio, and Isabella Harris. Also survived by many loving sisters-brothersin-law, nieces and nephews. A funeral
service will be celebrated in St. Ann
Church, 399 Medford St., Somerville,
Saturday, March 31st at 12:30 PM.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend and may visit with
the family at the Dello Russo Funeral
Home, 306 Main St., MEDFORD Saturday from 10 AM to noon. Services will
conclude with interment at Oak Grove
Cemetery, Medford. To leave a message
of condolence, visit: dellorusso.net.
EMSWILER, William Anderson, III
DiIORIO, Paolo S.
REVERE
PUSTIZZI, Carmelo
VECCHIONE, Elizabeth (Mastrocola)
FULCHINI, Pasquale
COOK, Douglas B.
MILLIS
ROBINSON, LeRoy M., Jr. ‘Lee’
SENNOTT, Edward J., Jr.
NEWBURYPORT
FULCHINI, Pasquale
DiIORIO, Paolo S.
MINSON, George
COX, Constance (Buffum)
WANNINGER, Ryan Paul
WISCONSIN
MINSON, George
COX, Constance (Buffum)
96, of Providence, RI, formerly of
Milton, MA & Little Compton, RI, died
peacefully at home with family on
March 20, 2018. Loving wife of the late
Andrew H. Cox from Bangor, ME.
Born in Providence, daughter of
the late Dr. William P. and Constance
(Arnold) Buffum.
Mother of Emily Sinagra, Deborah
Marion, grandmother of Dominique,
Elena and Tristan Sinagra, Anna
Marion Kidd and her husband Benjamin Kidd and Andrew Marion, greatgrandmother to Logan and Charlotte
Kidd and William Marion, as well as,
a devoted aunt to many nieces and
nephews and their families. In addition
to her husband and parents, she is predeceased by her brothers Thomas A. &
William P. Buffum, Jr., their wives Jane
(Churchill) and Jean (Fitz) Buffum and
a niece, Joanna “Jenny” Chamberlin.
Memorial Service will be held Saturday, April 7th at 11am in the Redwood
Chapel at Swan Point Cemetery, 585
Blackstone Boulevard, Providence.
In lieu of flowers, please make a
donation in her name, to the Sakonnet Preservation Association. www.
sakonnetpreservation.org. For full
obituary & condolences go to
monahandrabblesherman.com
..
..
..
.. Experience Globe.com
..
.
Of Amesbury, Mass., age 51, passed
away at his home on March 16th after
a long illness. He was born July 2,
1966 in Brunswick, Maine where he
graduated with honors from Brunswick
High School in 1984. He earned his
Bachelor’s degree with honors at Boston University in 1988. He had been
employed for 24 years as a quality assurance engineer at American Student
Assistance.
Frank was predeceased by his
father, Robert Leon Dumais, and by his
mother, Louise Boucher Dumais. Frank
is survived by and will be sadly missed
by his seven older siblings. These
include two brothers, Robert L. Dumais
Jr. and his partner Frank Amagliani of
Memphis, Tenn.; Michael E. Dumais
and wife Maggie Franco Dumais of
Topsham; and five sisters, Dorothy
Stackpole and husband Keith of No.
Yarmouth; Susan Jones and husband
Tom of Lusby, MD.; Margaret [Peggy]
Rice and husband David of Gray; Denise DeGruchy and husband David of
Gray; and Mary Dumais of Lisbon Falls.
Frank leaves behind several nephews and nieces including Leanne Hansen and husband Craig of Pepperell,
Mass.; Erin Duford and husband James
of No. Yarmouth; Nathan Jones and
wife Jamie of Atlanta, Georgia; Amanda
Zimmermann and husband Chris of
Lusby, MD; Bronwen Rice and partner
Alias Tagami of Washington D.C.; Emily
DeGruchy and husband Pete D’Angelo
of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Matthew DeGruchy
and partner Karen Kao of Brooklyn,
N.Y.; and Jacob Minardi and partner
Amanda Reed of Lisbon Falls. Frank
also leaves several grandnieces, grandnephews, and cousins.
Frank was an avid reader who
owned an impressive book collection.
He was also incredibly knowledgeable
about music, enjoyed going to concerts,
and had an extensive and unusual collection of vinyl, other music mediums,
and movies. He had friends all over
who described him as a “really considerate, good, and decent guy”. Frank
loved the Brunswick area, especially
Mere Point and Popham Beach. Frank’s
family and friends enjoyed his wonderful sense of humor and his good nature.
Frank will be interred with
his parents at St. John’s cemetery in
Brunswick on July 27th at 11 AM and a
celebration of his life will be held at his
family’s annual gathering on July 28th
in North Yarmouth.
Frank loved to read, therefore in
lieu of flowers please consider a memorial gift to the Curtis Memorial Library,
23 Pleasant St., Brunswick, ME 04011.
Arrangements are by Stetson’s Funeral Home, 12 Federal St., Brunswick,
where condolences may be expressed at
stetsonsfuneralhome.com
EMSWILER, William
Anderson, III
Of Walpole, March 26,
2018, age 80. Beloved
husband of Janes E. (Brill)
Emswiler. Loving father David Emswiler and his wife Cindy of Wrentham,
the late William A. Emswiler, IV, and
the late Timothy J. Emswiler. Cherished
grandfather of Christopher Emswiler
of Middleboro and Courtney Emswiler
of Wrentham and great grandfather
of Hannah Carey. Brother of the late
Sandra Emswiler. Nephew of Mahlon
Johnstone and his wife Ann of Walpole.
Relatives and friends are kindly invited
to attend Bill’s Memorial Service that
will be held in the Epiphany Episcopal
Church, 62 Front Street, Walpole on
Monday, April 2, 2018 at 11:00 AM.
Visiting hours are respectfully omitted
and interment will be private. In lieu
of flowers, memorial donations may be
made to: Hope Hospice, 765 Attucks
Lane, Hyannis, MA 02601.
Delaney Funeral Home
www.delaneyfuneral.com
Of Chestnut Hill was entered into
rest on Wednesday, March 28, 2018.
Beloved wife of 42 years to Matthew
Garston. Dear daughter of Molly Gordon and the late Jordan Kauffman, and
step-daughter of the late Milton Gordon. Devoted mother of Stacy Garston
and son-in-law to be Dustin Tupper.
Loving sister of Michael Kauffman
(Robin), Phyllis Kauffman, and Richard
Gordon (June Swanson). Services will
be held at the Sharon Memorial Park
Chapel, 40 Dedham Street, Sharon, MA
02067 on Friday, March 30, 2018 at 10
A.M. with interment to follow. Family
will be receiving guests at Barbara’s late
residence immediately following services on Friday, as well as Saturday and
Sunday. In lieu of flowers, donations in
Barbara’s memory may be made to the
American Liver Foundation.
www.liverfoundation.org
Stanetsky Memorial Chapel
www.stanetskybrookline.com
GREGORY, Ann (Krull)
GRILLO, Pamela M.
(Decuyke)
Of Swampscott, formerly of Winthrop,
March 22. Devoted wife of the late
Thomas Grillo. Loving mother of Gary
Grillo and his wife Dayna of Winthrop,
Kim Brennan and her husband Pat of
Everett, Tia Brennan and her husband
John of Everett, Frank Grillo and
his wife Rebecca of Swampscott and
Thomas Grillo and his wife Shirley of
Everett. Dear sister of William Staff
of Lowell. Cherished grandmother of
Robert, Amanda, Olivia, Alana, Connor,
Michael, Riley, Sawyer, Patrick and
Casey. Great grandmother of Finn.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the
visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano
and Son Funeral Home 147 Winthrop
St., Winthrop on Friday, March 30,
2018 from 4:00 to 7:00 PM. A funeral
service will be held in the funeral home
at 6:00 PM that evening. Memorial donations may be made to www.
caringforacure.org. For directions or
to sign the online guestbook go to
www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
GUEST, Irene W. (Nowlin)
Of Weymouth, passed away peacefully,
March 28, 2018 at the age of 93. Irene
was born in Somerville where she grew
up and was educated. She has lived
in Weymouth for over 60 years. She
worked in the administrative office of
Electro Switch of Weymouth for many
years. She is the wife of the late Harry
J. Guest. Loving mother of Robert G.
Guest and his wife Denise of Weymouth
and Paul F. Guest of Weymouth. Predeceased by her sisters Eleanor Peterson,
Louise Myers, Phyllis MacDonald and
Evelyn Corbett. Dear grandmother
of Adam Guest, Jacqueline Guest
and Robyn Guest Movsessian, all of
Weymouth and her great-grandson
Dillon Movsessian of Weymouth. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend visiting hours
Saturday in the McDonald Keohane
Funeral Home SOUTH WEYMOUTH at
809 Main Street (Rte. 18 opp. So. Shore
Hospital) from 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM,
immediately followed by a service at
1:30 PM in the Funeral Home. Burial
will take place in Blue Hill Cemetery,
Braintree MA. See www.keohane.com
for directions and online condolences
or call 781-335-0045
JENNEY, Paul J.
94, of Wilder Lane, died on Tuesday,
March 27, 2018, at the New London Hospital. She was born in
Greenwich, CT on January 21, 1924,
the daughter of Anthony and Mary
(Rembicz) Krull. She graduated from
Greenwich High School and then from
St. Vincent’s Hospital School of Nursing
in New York City.
From 1951-1958 Ann had been a registered nurse at New York Life in New
York City. From 1972-1989 she was a
nurse at Rivercrest Deaconness Nursing
Home in Concord, MA. From 19681995 she lived in Concord, MA and
then for four years had lived in Lexington, VA before moving to New London,
NH in 1999. She was a communicant
at Our Lady of Fatima Parish in New
London and a member of the Women’s
Society. Ann was active with the Parish
activities and volunteered at Council
on Aging, was a member of The Red
Hat Society, and enjoyed gardening and
doing crossword puzzles. Ann loved
spending time her three daughters and
granddaughter and her many friends.
Her husband of 49 years, Walter
G. Gregory, died in 2007. She is also
predeceased by four sisters and one
brother. She is survived by her three
daughters, Stephanie M. Gregory and
companion, Cam Cote, of Lewiston,
ME, Lisa G. Gallagher and husband,
Steve, of Marblehead, MA and Justine
E. Stamp and husband, James, of Mont
Vernon, NH; and a granddaughter,
Clara Gregory Gallagher and aunt to
many nieces and nephews. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be celebrated on
Tuesday, April 3, 2018, 10:30 at Our
Lady of Fatima Church, 724 Main
Street, New London, NH. Burial will be
at 3:00 p.m. in St. Bernard’s Cemetery,
Concord, MA.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Council on
Aging, 37 Pleasant Street, New London,
NH 03257.
To sign an online guestbook please
visit www.chadwickfuneralservice.com.
Announcements
LOCAL UNION 103,
I.B.E.W.
We regret to announce the death
of Brother Henry J. Comperchio
(Ret). Brother Comperchio was a
member of IBEW for 54 years.
Chuck Monahan
Financial Secretary
Every life is a story
A Featured Life offering lets you honor your
loved one with a professionally written narrative.
Call 617-929-1500 or email
deathnotices@globe.com
78, of West Falmouth and
formerly of Sudbury and
Medford, passed away on
Tuesday, March 27, 2018. He was the
beloved husband of Sonja (Kuharchek)
Jenney for 46 years and the son of the
late Joseph and Eleanor (Carey) Jenney.
In addition to his wife, Paul is survived by his children: Sean P. Jenney
of Hamilton MA, and Paul J. Jenney Jr.
and his wife Abigail S. of Concord MA;
and his grandchildren: James P. Jenney
and Sophia R. Jenney, of Concord MA.
He also leaves his sister Paula Keating
and her husband James Keating, as
well as extended family.
Visiting hours will be held from
4:00-7:00 p.m. on Monday, April 2, at
the Chapman, Cole & Gleason Funeral
Home, 584 West Falmouth Highway
(Route 28A), WEST FALMOUTH. A
Funeral Mass will be celebrated at
10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, April 3, at St.
Elizabeth Seton Church, 481 Quaker
Road, North Falmouth. Burial will
follow in the Massachusetts National
Cemetery in Bourne.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to the West
Falmouth Public Library, PO Box 1209,
West Falmouth, MA 02574.
For online guestbook, obituary and
directions, visit ccgfuneralhome.com.
LEARY, Sybil L.
90, of Hingham and West Hyannisport,
passed away on Sunday, March 25th,
2018.
Born on January 10, 1928 in
Quincy, MA, she was the daughter
of the late Herbert N. and Dorothy
(Walden) Burns. Sybil was a graduate
of North Quincy High School. She was
a cheerleader and Co Captain for five
years. After completing high school, she
attended the Katharine Gibbs School
of Boston. Sybil had a wonderful and
rewarding career in investment securities at A.L. Albee and Co. In 1949, she
married the love of her life, Ronald
F. Leary and they shared 68 happy
years together. They had five children,
fourteen grandchildren and twenty
great-grandchildren. Sybil enjoyed
skiing, playing golf, gardening, painting, playing bridge, doing needlework,
knitting and crocheting. She enjoyed
all sports and cheered loyally for her
Boston teams. Sybil was a member of
the Garden Club of Hanover. She was
a member of the Order of Rainbow
for Girls and a Girl Scout. Sybil was
a member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal
Church of Hanover where she taught
Sunday school along with her husband
Ronald. Sybil was blessed with a kind
and loving heart. She new the value of
a smile and was gifted at passing them
on. She could get just about anyone to
smile. Sybil was truly beautiful inside
and out.
In addition to her parents and twin
sisters, Dorothy (Burns) Anderson and
Phyllis Burns, she was predeceased by
her son, Richard M. Leary and loving
husband, Ronald F. Leary. She also
leaves behind four daughters, Kathleen
Olsson and her husband David of
Hingham, Susan Wachob and her husband George of Bedford, VA, Deborah
Eckhart and her husband Michael of
Lancaster, PA, Nancy McKown and
her husband Louis of Downingtown,
PA; Six grandsons, Erik Olsson, Tim
Wachob, Louis, Matthew, William, and
Joseph McKown; Eight granddaughters, Lyndsie Olsson, Jody (Wachob)
Carson, Erin (Wachob) Wood, Robyn
(Wachob) Welker, Stephanie (Eckhart)
Cahoon, Suzanne and Jennifer Eckhart,
and Laura McKown; and twenty-three
great grandchildren.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend the visiting
hours on Saturday, March 31, 2018
from 9:30-11 AM at the Pyne Keohane
Funeral Home, 21 Emerald St. (Off
Central St.), HINGHAM. The funeral
service will be celebrated on Saturday
at 11:00 a.m. at Pyne Keohane Funeral
Home, Hingham. A private burial for
immediate and extended family will
follow at the Hanover Center Cemetery,
47 Main St., Hanover, MA, 02339.
A memorial contribution in Sybil’s
memory may be made to the charity of
your choice. See www.Keohane.com or
call 1-800-Keohane for directions and
online condolences.
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie
(McNulty)
Chapman, Cole & Gleason
W. Falmouth, MA - 508.540.4172
KASTRINELIS, Peter L.
Devoted
Husband, Father
and Grandfather
88, of No. Andover and longtime
Boxford resident passed away on March
27. Devoted husband, father and grandfather. Worked for many years in the
jet engine / aerospace division of GE
in Lynn. Husband of the late Barbara
(Adams). Survived by sons Peter and
wife Sheila of Centerville, Michael and
wife Kathy of Groveland, and Timothy
and wife Kelly of Ipswich; grandchildren Eric and wife Sarah, Laura, Alex,
Michael, Andrew, Tim, and Kristina
Kastrinelis. Calling hours will be Friday
in the Driscoll Funeral Home, 309 So.
Main St., Haverhill from 4:00 to 7:00
PM. Funeral Liturgy will be celebrated
Saturday in Sacred Hearts Church, 165
So. Main Street, Haverhill at 10:00 AM.
Burial in Mount Vernon Cemetery, West
Boxford. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Merrimack Valley Hospice,
360 Merrimack Street, Lawrence, MA
01843. For guestbook, please visit
www.driscollcares.com
Driscoll Funeral Home
Haverhill
Of Brookline on March 27, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late Warren J.
MacGillivray. Loving mother of Bonnie
MacGillivray and husband Michael
Blout of Bristol, NH., Susan Molloy
and husband Bob of Pelham, NH., Lisa
MacGillivray Coughlin of Attleboro and
Warren J. MacGillivray Jr. and wife Alecia Domer of Needham. Adored grandmother of Fawne Hill and husband
Jeffrey, Bobby Molloy, Michael Molloy,
Ryan and Brendan Coughlin, Julia
Molloy and Kenzie and Rylee MacGillivray. Dear sister of Doris Blanchette
of Brookline, Lawrence McNulty of
Concord and the late John McNulty
and Marilyn Whalen. Also survived
by many nieces and nephews. Funeral
from the Bell-O’Dea Funeral Home, 376
Washington St., BROOKLINE, Saturday
morning at 9:10 followed by a Funeral
Blessing in St. Mary of the Assumption
Church at 10:00. Relatives and friends
are kindly invited. Visiting hours in the
funeral home on Friday from 3:00 –
7:00. Interment Walnut Hills Cemetery.
Ret. Administrative Assistant Brookline
Public School Dept. In lieu of flowers
donations in memory of Alice made
to the Fisher House, ATTN Jennifer
DeLuca, PO Box 230, South Walpole,
MA. 02071 or www.fisherhouseboston.
org would be appreciated.
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
B o s t o n
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
MICHALSKI, Therea A.
“Terri” (Deprey)
Of Billerica, formerly of Malden and
Medford, March 28. Beloved wife of
the late Leonard W. Loving mother of
son Mark & his wife Lynn of Lexington
and daughter Lori of Billerica. Proud
grandmother of Jamie. Predeceased by
9 brothers and sisters. Funeral from
the Edward V. Sullivan Funeral Home,
43 Winn St., Burlington (exit 34 off
Rt. 128/95, Woburn side) on Saturday
March 31 at 9 a.m. Followed by a funeral service and blessing at St. Barbara
Church, 138 Cambridge Rd,, Woburn
at 10 a.m. Visiting hours at the funeral
home on Friday from 4-8 p.m. Interment in Oak Grove Cemetery, Medford.
Memorials in Theresa’s name may
be made to the American Society for
the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals,
“ASPCA”, www.aspca.org or 1-800-6280028. For directions, obituary & online
guestbook see www.saintbarbaraparish.
com or www.sullivanfuneralhome.net
MINSON, George
George Minson of Peabody, passed
away in his Brooksby Village home on
Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at the age of
88. Born on March 31, 1929, he was
the son of the late Nathan and Jennie
Minson. Beloved father of Edward
Minson and his wife, Mary of Whitefish
Bay, WI, and Stephen Minson of Watertown. George also leaves his granddaughter, Jeanette Minson of New
York City as well as his niece, Wendy
Provoda and her husband, Michael of
West Hartford, CT and his nephew,
Harold Miller and his wife, Ellen of St.
Augustine, FL. A Funeral Service will be
held in Stanetsky-Hymanson Memorial
Chapel, 10 Vinnin St., SALEM, MA, on
Friday, March 30, 2018 at 9am. Burial
will follow in Sharon memorial Park,
Canton. George’s family will sit Shiva at
the Minson Peabody residence from 2
to 6pm on March 30th.
Stanetsky-Hymanson Chapel,
10 Vinnin St., Salem 781-581-2300
www.stanetskyhymansonsalem.com
MORRISSEY, Barbara A.
(Glynn)
92, died Sunday March 25, 2018 at
home. Daughter of the late Charles and
Edna (Meuse) Glynn. She was born in
Wakefield, MA.
Barbara Morrissey is a former
national sales trainer and account manager for Nynex. She also ran her own
business “Advertising Unlimited”. After
her retirement she volunteered with
the Doric Dames, serving as recording
secretary and giving tours of the State
House. In addition to her work at the
State House, Barbara was also involved
with Carlisle House and the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.
Barbara is survived by her son,
Francis I. Morrissey Jr., and his wife
Maureen of Eliot, ME, her daughter,
Barbara Ann Morrissey of Beverly;
her sister Eleanor Glynn of Halifax,
Canada; five grandchildren, Theresa,
Melissa, Sarah, Heather and Amanda;
five great grandchildren Danielle,
Valerie, Ryan, Owen, and Hannah.
She was predeceased by her daughter
Virginia Morrissey.
Visiting Hours: A Funeral service
will be held in The Campbell Funeral
Home, 525 Cabot St., BEVERLY, on
Tuesday, April 3rd at 1 P.M. Relatives
and friends are invited to attend. Visiting hours will be held prior from 12 to
1 P.M. Contributions may be made in
her name in lieu of flowers to charity of
one’s choice. Information, directions,
condolences at
www.campbellfuneral.com
O’BRIEN, Joann T.
(Taracevicz)
Of Melrose, 3/26/18. Wife of the late
Walter J. O’Brien. Mother of Maureen
Picciotto & Susan Aristizabal. Visitation
@ Gately Funeral Home, MELROSE,
Friday 3/30/18 from 8:30-9:30AM.
Followed by a Blessing @ Incarnation
Church in Melrose @ 10:00AM. Info @
781-665-1949 or www.gatelyfh.com
Funeral Services
Affordable Cremation
1310 complete
617 782 1000
$
O’CONNELL, Margaret M.
(Delaney)
Of Framingham, formerly of Dover,
died March 25th, 2018. Beloved wife of
the late Thomas F. O’Connell. Loving
mother of Thomas F. of Philadelphia,
PA, Margaret Mary of Boston, John
Marion of Medfield and Most Reverend
Mark O’Connell of North Reading. Devoted grandmother to 4 loving grandchildren. Sister of Sr. Jean Delaney O.P.
of Saugus and the late John Delaney,
Ann Dinneen, Rev. David Delaney and
Paul Delaney. Also survived by many
loving nieces and nephews.
Margaret graduated from Emmanuel
College in 1947 with a degree in Mathematics and went to work in the Lyman
Laboratory of Physics at Harvard
University. While at Harvard, she met
her future husband who was a librarian
at Widener. Once they were married,
she devoted herself to her family and
volunteering for the Church.
Relatives and friends are invited to
attend visiting hours in the Holden,
Dunn and Lawler Funeral Home, 55
High Rock St., WESTWOOD, on Monday, April 2nd from 4-8pm. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be celebrated on
Tuesday morning, April 3rd at 11am in
Most Precious Blood Church, 30 Centre
St., Dover. Interment at Highland
Cemetery, Dover. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in Margaret’s
memory to the Dominican Sisters of
Peace, 2645 Bardstown Road, St. Catharine, KY 40061.
Holden-Dunn-Lawler
www.hdlfuneralhome.net
O’NEIL, Olga P.
(Porrata-Doria)
Of Mission Hill March 27, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late Charles F.
O’Neil. Loving mother of Charles J. and
his wife Jane of West Roxbury, Robert
F. and his wife Christine, Steven E.
and his wife Deborah of Newton and
the late Kenneth D. O’Neil. Devoted
grandmother of Robin, Jodie, Briane
and her husband John, Michael, Lacey
and Krista. Great-grandmother of
Christopher, Sadie, Brooke and Liam.
Sister of Americo Porrata-Doria of
Puerto Rico, Paquita Delgado of Carver
and the late Aida Valles. Also survived
by several nieces and nephews and a
loving extended family. A Funeral Service will be held on Saturday morning
March 31st at 9 o’clock in the William
J. Gormley Funeral Home, 2055 Centre
St. WEST ROXBURY, followed by a
burial at St. Joseph Cemetery. Visiting
hours Friday, 4pm – 8pm. Relatives and
friends are respectfully invited. The
O’Neil family would like to thank the
doctors, nurses and care providers at
the Newton Wellesley Hospital for the
exceptional care they provided to Olga
during her illness. For guestbook please
visit gormleyfuneral.com.
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
617-323-8600
PUSTIZZI, Carmelo
Of Waltham. March 27, 2018. Husband
of Marilyn J. (Gahan) Robinson. Father
of LeRoy M. ‘Lee’ Robinson, III and his
wife, Jennifer of Waltham and Nancy E.
Rodick and her husband, Martin of Millis; grandfather of Rachel and Victoria
Robinson and James and Drew Rodick;
brother of the late Patricia L. Millen.
Family and friends will honor and remember Lee’s life by gathering for calling hours in The Joyce Funeral Home,
245 Main Street (Rte. 20), WALTHAM
on Friday, March 30th from 4 to 8 p.m.
and again on Saturday morning when
his funeral service will be held at 10
a.m. Burial will be in Mount Feake
Cemetery. For complete obituary, guest
register and directions please visit
www.joycefuneralhome.com
SENNOTT, Edward J., Jr.
“Ned”
Of Weston, March 25, 2018.
Father of Patrick J. and Jillian A. Sennott. Son of Patricia (Walsh) and the late Edward J. Sennott. Brother of Peter J. Sennott (Mary)
of Westwood. Ned also leaves his nephews, Kevin and Michael Sennott, aunts,
uncles and cousins. Family and friends
will honor and remember Ned’s life by
gathering to visit from 9:30 to 10:30
a.m. on Monday, April 2nd in The
Joyce Funeral Home, 245 Main Street
(Rte. 20), WALTHAM before leaving in
procession to Saint Julia Church, 374
Boston Post Road, Weston where his
Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11
a.m. Burial will be private. Memorial
donations may be made to ‘my529 Plan
fbo Jillian Ann Sennott’ and/or ‘my529
Plan fbo Patrick Joseph Sennott’
c/o Heritage Financial, 100 Lowder
Brook Drive, Suite 1000, Westwood,
MA 02090. For complete obituary,
guest book and directions please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
SIEGFRIEDT, Barbara A.
(nee Lewis)
Passed away peacefully in Winchester,
MA, surrounded by her family on
March 27, 2018. Beloved wife of 52
years of the late Ernest E. Siegfriedt, Jr.
Loving mother of Michael Siegfriedt,
Mark Siegfriedt (Maria), Sharon Siegfriedt and Barbara Siegfriedt. Adoring
grandmother of Emily and Brenna
Siegfriedt, Sydney, Madison and Bailey
Holman. She was preceded in death
by her sister, Eileen Long (Lewis). Barbara was born in Charlestown, MA on
March 3, 1932 to Manuel and Kathleen
Lewis (Donahue). A sympathetic and
loving caregiver, she earned a nursing
degree at Lawrence Memorial Hospital
and worked as a nurse at Mt. Auburn
Hospital prior to raising her family of
four in Winchester, MA. Always quick
with a smile, a laugh, a kind word and
a listening ear, she was known for her
generous and empathetic spirit as well
as for her healthy strong will. Services
and interment will be private. A Celebration of Life will be held at Cafe Escadrille on Friday, March 30th from 12:00
– 3:00 pm. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to the Wounded Warrior
Project. For online condolences please
visit www.lanefuneral.com
Lane Funeral Home
Winchester
781.729.2580
VECCHIONE, Elizabeth
“Betty” (Mastrocola)
Of Billerica, unexpectedly, March 27,
beloved husband of Kathleen H. (McKenzie) Pustizzi. Loving father of Matthew Pustizzi and his wife Meaghan of
Dracut, Danny Pustizzi of Chicago, IL
and Kristen Pustizzi of Billerica. Brother of Robert Pustizzi of Wilmington.
Visiting hours will be held Friday at
the Sweeney Memorial Funeral Home,
66 Concord Rd., BILLERICA, from 4-7
p.m. Relatives and friends respectfully
invited. Funeral arrangements will be
private. Memorial contributions may be
made to the MSPCA, 350 South Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02130.
www.sweeneymemorialfh.com
Funeral Services
SWEENEY BROTHERS
HOME FOR
FUNERALS, INC.
Serving Greater Boston
Serving Quincy & The South Shore
617-472-6344
CANNIFF MONUMENT
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
Obituaries
Lawrence Grossman, at 86,
longtime television executive
WASHINGTON POST
One Independence Ave., Quincy
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
B7
By Matt Schudel
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
ROBINSON, LeRoy M., Jr.
‘Lee’
G l o b e
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
85, of Peabody, wife of the late Everett
Firefighter Peter Vecchione (Ret),
passed away at the Brudnick Center for
Living on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 with
her family at her side.
Surviving are her 2 sons and their
spouses, Robert and Linda Vecchione
of Peabody, and Richard and Karen
Vecchione of Danvers, 2 grandchildren,
Stacy Vecchione and Richard Vecchione; 2 brothers and their spouses, Donald and Norma Mastrocola of Naples
FL, and Al and Victoria Mastrocola of
Everett, a sister, Jeannette Mastrocola
of Middleton, and several nieces and
nephews. She was also predeceased by
her parents Daniel and Mary (Camarario) Mastrocola, a grandson Matthew
Vecchione and her siblings Richard
Mastrocola and Linda Mastrocola.
Betty’s working career extended for
40 years as an Avon representative and
retired as a district manager a position
which she held for several years.
Visiting Hours: Her family will
receive relatives and friends on Saturday, March 31st from 3 to 6 p.m. at the
Conway, Cahill-Brodeur Funeral Home
at 82 Lynn St., PEABODY. Her Funeral
will be held from the Funeral Home at
9 a.m. on Monday, April 2nd followed
by a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
at St. Ann Church, 140 Lynn St., Peabody. Her burial will be held at Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. The family
requested that memorial contributions
be made to the Alzheimer’s Association
MA/NH Chapter, www.alz.org/MANH.
Please visit www.ccbfuneral.com for
directions, online obituary and memorial guest book.
WASHINGTON — Lawrence
Grossman, who expanded public television programming as
the top executive at PBS in the
1970s and 1980s, and who later led a resurgence of NBC’s
news division before budget
battles with the network’s corporate bosses forced his departure, died March 23 at his
home in Westport, Conn. He
was 86.
He had Parkinson’s disease
and oral cancer, a granddaughter, Rebecca Grossman-Cohen,
said.
As a longtime advertising
executive, Mr. Grossman was
an unlikely choice to lead the
ad-free Public Broadcasting
Service. But one of his advertising agency’s clients in 1970s
had been PBS — his company
designed the network’s now-familiar logo featuring the letter
P combined with the stylized
profile of a head — and he had
previously worked at CBS and
NBC.
Mr. Grossman moved to
Washington in 1976 to take
charge of PBS, at the time little
more than a loosely aligned
group of hundreds of locally
controlled educational TV stations around the country. During his eight-year tenure, he
maintained financial stability
while giving PBS more of a national presence, largely
through cultural programming
and news.
‘‘Public television is, and
will continue to be, indispens-
CHRISTOPHER BIERLEIN/GLOBE PHOTO/FILE 1997
Mr. Grossman was the top executive at PBS in the 1970s
and 1980s.
able in America,’’ he said in
1982. ‘‘We must continue to be
the bulwark of quality that
stands firm against the tide of
mediocrity and worse which
now engulfs so much of television.’’
He introduced such programs as ‘‘Live From Lincoln
Center’’ and concerts from the
White House and the Kennedy
Center and approved production of a 13-part series on the
history of the Vietnam War. He
led efforts that expanded ‘‘The
MacNeil/Lehrer Report’’ to a
full hour in 1983, making it the
first hour-long nightly newscast on any network. (It is now
called ‘‘PBS NewsHour.”)
Mr. Grossman also received
credit within PBS for standing
up to federal and corporate opposition to a 1980 docudrama,
‘‘Death of a Princess,’’ about a
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
WANNINGER, Ryan Paul
Beloved Music
Teacher and
Friend Departed
Ryan Paul Wanninger (age 41) passed
away on March 9, 2018 after a four
year battle with cancer. He was born on
January 3, 1977 in Texas and grew up
in Baton Rouge, but said he found his
true home in Boston. In the year 2000
he graduated from Berklee College of
Music with a BA in Music. Ryan was
an accomplished musician who shared
his passion generously as a private
music teacher, and occasionally played
his guitar with bands in the Boston
area. He also became a skilled IT
consultant and web designer. In recent
years, as a patient with a story to tell,
and a clear ability to tell it, Ryan was
sometimes asked to speak to student
groups and professionals in the medical
field. He was always glad to share his
journey, as a way to give back. Ryan
was preceded in death by his father
Stephen Wanninger, and grandfathers
Leo Wanninger and Ralph Ongley. He is
survived by his mother Kathleen Wanninger Bourgeois, stepfather Donald
Bourgeois, and his beloved grandmothers Dorothy Wanninger and Elizabeth
Ongley Jennings. He will also be missed
by a loving and supportive extended
family and cherished friends.
With the love and support of wonderful friends, Ryan was able to thrive
during tough medical struggles. Thank
you to those most special friends!
He was very grateful to his medical
teams at Dana-Farber and Brigham &
Women’s Hospital, and Good Shepherd
hospice. Ryan was always thinking of
others, and desperately urged all to
have a colonoscopy done without delay,
and go on to live a long and happy life!
He would say, “Happiness is a choice”.
Visiting Hours: A Celebration of
Ryan’s Life will be held on Monday,
April 2, 2018. Family and friends will
be meeting from 6-8 pm at Union
Street Restaurant, 101 Rear Union
Street, Newton Center.
Anyone who has been touched by
Ryan’s life is welcome to attend.
Honor your loved one
with a photo in
The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director for details.
WAYLAND, Lisa Ann
(Coates)
Of Waltham, passed away unexpectedly
March 27th, 2018. Beloved wife of 33
years to Scott T. Wayland. Devoted &
loving mother of Andrew Wayland and
his wife Lucy of Attleboro and Alicia
Maloney and her husband Jeff of South
Hadley. Dear sister of Robert J. Coates
Jr. of Nashua, NH, Linda J. Goguen and
her husband Gerard of Pembroke, NH
and Brian D. Coates and his wife Alison
of Waltham, the late Paul E. Coates
and his wife Anush Coates of Chelmsford, and the late Patrick J. Coates
and his wife Eva Coates of Gardner.
Daughter-in-law of Helen M. Wayland
of Waltham. Godmother to Michael
Rheaume, Jennifer Coates and Ryan
Coates. In addition she is survived by
many nieces, nephews and numerous
cherished friends. Relatives and Friends
are respectfully invited to attend a
Funeral Service in celebration of Lisa’s
Life in the Mary Catherine Chapel
of Brasco & Sons, 773 Moody St.,
WALTHAM, on Saturday morning at
11:00 a.m. Visiting Hours will be held
in the Brasco & Sons Memorial Funeral
Home on Friday from 4 – 8 p.m. Parking attendants will be on duty. In lieu
of flowers expressions of sympathy may
be made in Lisa’s memory to the Buddy
Dog Humane Society, 151 Boston Post
Rd., Sudbury, MA 01776. For complete
obituary, guest book & additional information please refer to;
www.BrascoFuneralHome.com
Waltham (781) 893-6260
“Creating Meaningful Memories”
WELLS, John J., Jr.
Of Saugus, formerly longtime of
Melrose, March 24, 2018, at age 77.
John is survived by his beloved wife of
almost 52 years, Janice (Ralston) Wells;
his daughter, Monica Sullivan and her
husband Paul of Newton; his son, John
“Jake” Wells of Saugus; his grandsons,
Jack and Patrick Sullivan; his siblings,
Jane Jack and her husband Doug of
Windham, NH, Greg Wells and his wife
Dawn of Brockton, Sara Beauchamp
and her husband Phil of Woburn, and
Lisa Masters of Jamestown, NY. Also
survived by 19 nieces and nephews.
John was predeceased by his mother
and father, Eulalia C. (Johnson) “Nana”
Wells and John J. “Jack” Wells; and his
sister, Deborah Wells. Services are private. Gifts in memory of John may be
made to the American Heart Association, 300 5th Ave., Ste 6, Waltham, MA
02451. For online tribute, please visit
RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose
(781) 665-1900
Saudi princess who was beheaded after being accused of
adultery. He resisted efforts by
members of Congress, the State
Department, the military, and
Mobil Oil — one of PBS’s largest
underwriters — to block the
broadcast.
In 1984, despite having no
experience in daily journalism,
Mr. Grossman became the head
of NBC News, personally chosen by network chief Grant Tinker. At the time, the network’s
news division was slipping in
ratings and respect, with its
‘‘NBC Nightly News’’ broadcast
in third place behind CBS and
ABC, and the onetime morning-show juggernaut, ‘‘Today,’’
trailing ABC’s ‘‘Good Morning
America.’’
Mr. Grossman helped engineer a turnaround at NBC
within two years, as the ‘‘Nightly News’’ occasionally outranked its competitors, and
‘‘ Today ’’ became the No. 1
morning show.
He hoped to build on those
gains and restore NBC’s news
division to its former glory, but
in 1986 the network was
bought by General Electric. The
new corporate leaders instituted across-the-board budget
cuts, which Mr. Grossman ignored as long as he could. With
his onetime patron, Tinker, out
of the picture, Mr. Grossman
often clashed with NBC’s new
president, Robert Wright.
He came under growing internal attack by ‘‘Nightly News’’
anchor Tom Brokaw, who questioned Mr. Grossman’s journalistic ability. Others pointed out
that NBC had failed in several
attempts to create a successful
TV news magazine.
Mr. G r o s s m a n w a s d i s missed in 1988 and replaced by
Michael Gartner.
‘‘I count Tom Brokaw as one
of my friends,’’ Tinker told the
Washington Post. ‘‘But I read
somewhere that he was among
the detractors, and that his reason was that Larry was not
born in a newsroom. I say bull
to that. Larry brought all the
skills, talents, abilities, and instincts to that job that are necessary.’’
Lawrence Kugelmass was
born June 21, 1931, in Brooklyn. After his father died, he
was adopted by his mother’s
second husband, Nathan
Grossman.
He graduated from Columbia University in 1952 and
spent one year at Harvard Law
School before going to work in
the promotions department of
Look magazine. He joined the
advertising department at CBS
in 1956, then moved to NBC in
1962, becoming the network’s
vice president of advertising.
He ran his own advertising
agency from 1966 to 1976.
A f t e r l e av i n g N B C , Mr.
Grossman taught at Harvard’s
John F. Kennedy School of Government and, in 1993, became
president of Horizons TV, a
onetime challenger to PBS and
C-SPAN.
In the late 1990 s, he and
former PBS chairman Newton
Minow launched Digital Promise, a nonprofit organization
that receives federal and private funding to use digital technologies to improve education.
He leaves his wife of 64
years, the former Alberta Nevler of Westport; three daughters, Susan Grossman of Brooklyn, Caroline Grossman of
Waltham, Mass., and Jennifer
Grossman Peltz of Manhattan;
a brother; six grandchildren;
and two great-granddaughters.
T h e
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B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Obituaries
Joan Braverman Pinck, college leader, equal rights advocate
By Bryan Marquard
been told I am overqualified so
often I can barely use the term
Speaking in 1976 at a semi- without shuddering.”
She said she decided to benar for women in banking,
Joan Braverman Pinck cau- gin her speech with these extioned that changes wrought by amples because they said “a lot
affirmative action would not be a b o u t t h e w a y w o m e n a r e
welcomed by men who were hired, or, more to the point, the
suddenly competing with wom- way they are not hired, and not
promoted.”
en for supervisory roles.
Mrs. Pinck, who also had
“Resistance to this prospect
is strong,” she said. “It comes served as assistant secretary for
from c ultural tradition; it higher education in Massachucomes from prejudice; it comes setts, noted drily that “things
from ignorance; it comes from worked fine before women and
minorities started asking for
fear.”
She then focused on an in- their share of the pie, and
herent contradiction of that re- things would have gone on
sistance.
working fine if this disagree“If, as our cultural tradition able business of equal opportutells us, women are really infe- nity had never happened.”
And though the workplace
rior to men and quite unable to
do men’s work, why, on the oth- changes were necessary and
er hand, are we told that wom- overdue, “no one is asking the
en are threatening to men? banks, or any other institution,
Men are not threatened by oth- to plead guilty for what was; at
least, I am not,”
er men — the ones
she said. “ What
with whom, for
women are asking
the most part,
is that banks and
they are competbusinesses and ining,” she said, adding that “power,
dustries and, yes,
even universities,
and the exercise
thereof, is regardwhich are possibly
guiltier than anyed as off-limits to
women. Women
one else, recognize social evoluwho exercise power are perceived as
tion when it appears in front of
a threat, and they
their collec tive
are also perceived JOAN BRAVERMAN
noses. And reas ‘less feminine.’ ” PINCK, speaking
A former dean ironically about the pace spond with something more than a
a t P i n e M a n o r of societal change
dysfunctional reCollege, and a foraction.”
mer assistant
In another speech, delivered
dean and lecturer at Harvard
Business School, Mrs. Pinck a year earlier to the National
died March 10. She was 89, had Association of Bank Women,
lived in Cambridge, and had she said that because of their
life experiences, women are
been ill for several years.
During a career that ranged “more adaptable than their
from teaching English at Bel- male counterparts.”
mont High School to serving as
“Most women who work,
a leader of the Planned Parent- married or not, live two lives,
hood League of Massachusetts one professional and one doand the Women’s Equality Ac- mestic,” she said in 1975. “They
tion League, Mrs. Pinck got to learn to switch back and forth,
see firsthand that without gov- to shift gears with great defternment regulations ensuring ness, to turn off one side of
equal opportunity protections themselves and to turn on anin the workplace, “little prog- other almost effortlessly and
ress would have been made,” nearly always imperceptibly, as
the occasion requires.”
she said in 1976.
Ma n y w o m e n w h o s e e k
Detailing just a few instances of the sexism she had faced, management roles, “having
Mrs. Pinck said that one time “I been denied access by the front
was told that since I had al- door, have learned how to shinready two children and would ny up the tree, climb on the
not promise my prospective roof, find their way through the
employer that I would sin no attic to the back rooms in order
to end up in the front office,”
more, there was no job.”
Other rejections were equal- she said. “And all the while
ly memorable. “A woman’s col- keeping their hair combed,
lege turned me down because their clothes neat and approprithey were looking for a man,” ate, and bearing in mind that at
she recalled, adding that “I’ve the end of the day they were
GLOBE STAFF
‘Things
worked fine
before women
and minorities
started asking
for their share
of the pie.’
THE PINCK FAMILY
Joan Braverman Pinck visited with former first lady Lady Bird Johnson. Mrs. Pinck rose
above sexism in the workplace to become a leader in higher education.
obliged to stop by the market to
pick up the components of a
meal which they themselves
would prepare and serve; and
that before starting out on their
day’s work they had to be sure
the cat was out, the dog in, the
check left for the milkman, the
laundry arranged for, and the
car inspected.”
Joan Braverman grew up in
Lowell, the older of two sisters
born to Edwin Braverman and
the former Esther Goodman.
Her father ran Towers Motor
Parts, a wholesale distributor.
Mrs. Pinck attended the
Cambridge School of Weston,
and was 17 when she was badly
burned in a dormitory fire.
“My mother was indomitable. Nothing stopped her,” said
her son Charles of Washington,
D.C. “Not the fire that nearly
took her life as a teenager that
required six months of hospitalization and the most gruesome and painful skin grafts
imaginable. She survived
through sheer grit and determination. These qualities enabled
her to achieve so much in her
life.”
Afterward, she applied to
only one school, Radcliffe College, from which she graduated
in 1950 with a bachelor’s degree in English literature. She
was elected president of student government as a junior,
and was president of her senior
class.
Moving to Washington, she
was teaching English at the Madeira School in Greenway, Va.,
when she met Dan C. Pinck,
who had served in the Office of
Strategic Services, a predecessor of the CIA, and went on to
work in administrative positions at Harvard University and
the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology. They married in
1951.
During her 25th Radcliffe
reunion, in 1975, Mrs. Pinck estimated that about 90 percent
of her classmates had married
within a year of graduating. “It
was kind of in the water supply,” she told the Crimson, Harvard’s student newspaper. “It
wasn’t a conscious choice between marriage and career. It
was being propelled in one direction without being aware of
it.”
In 1967, Mrs. Pinck became
a fellow of the Bunting Institute
at Radcliffe. She became a dean
at Pine Manor two years later,
then an assistant dean at Harvard Business School, and then
assistant secretary of higher education. Mrs. Pinck’s other jobs
included serving as director of
research administration and
policy at Beth Israel Hospital,
and as a principal for The Chilmark Group.
“She wasn’t just smart in
terms of being an academic.
She was practical, too, and
combined those two qualities,”
her son said. “That’s why she
was so successful. She forged
ahead and opened doors for
lots of women today. She really
did.”
Drew Gilpin Faust, Harvard’s president, sent a letter of
condolence to Mrs. Pinck’s husband. “Joan was an extraordinary person and a much admired member of the Harvard
community,” Faust wrote. “She
did so much to inspire her colleagues — and me.”
In 1972, Lawrence E.
Fouraker, dean of Harvard
Business School, sent a letter to
Harvard’s then-president Derek
C. Bok recommending that
Mrs. Pinck be hired. Her “administrative and teaching experience gives her excellent qualifications to undertake this
work,” Fouraker wrote. “We
know of no man as well-qualified for the job.”
Services will be private for
Mrs. Pinck, who in addition to
her husband and son leaves a
son and two daughters, Anthony of Delray Beach, Fla., Jennifer of Boston, and Alexandra of
Cambridge.
Mrs. Pinck will be buried in
Chilmark on Martha’s Vineyard, where she and her husband had spent time for decades.
“She and my father traveled
all over the world,” Charles
said, “but they always said that
when they came back to the
Vineyard it was more beautiful
than any other place they’d
been.”
Bryan Marquard can be
reached at
bryan.marquard@globe.com.
Stéphane Audran; starred in Oscar­winning ‘Babette’s Feast’
By Neil Genzlinger
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Stéphane
Audran, the French actress
who served up one of cinema’s
most sumptuous meals as the
title character in the 1987 film
“Babette’s Feast,” died Tuesday. She was 85.
Françoise Nyssen, France’s
culture minister, announcing
her death on Twitter, said that
“her presence, her elegance
and her inimitable voice remain and resonate.”
Ms. Audran’s son, actor
Thomas Chabrol, told Agence
France-Presse that his mother
had been ill for some time and
had died at home, but he did
not give a location.
Although “Babette’s Feast”
was her best-known movie internationally — it won the Oscar for best foreign language
film in 1988 — Ms. Audran by
then had been famous for decades in France, most notably
for her work in the films of the
director Claude Chabrol, to
whom she was married from
1964 to 1980.
Her first film with him, and
her fourth overall, was “Les
Cousins” in 1959, and many
others followed, including
“Les Biches” in 1968, “Just Before Nightfall” in 1971 and
“Violette Nozière” in 1978.
Another career high point
was Luis Buñuel’s comedy
“The Discreet Charm of the
Bourgeoisie” (1972), another
winner of the best foreign language film Oscar, in which she
played one of a group of cultured guests at a dinner party
that turns increasingly surreal.
Ms. Audran was born Co-
JOHN SPRINGER COLLECTION
Ms. Audran was famous for decades in France before she appeared in the 1987 Danish movie “Babette’s Feast,” which
became the first Danish film to garner an Oscar win for best foreign language film.
lette Suzanne Dacheville in
Versailles, France, on Nov. 8,
1932. Her father, a doctor,
died when she was young, and
she was raised by her mother.
In the early 1950s she took
acting classes and was cast in
several plays but did not have
much success onstage. Her
first film role was in 1957 in
“ L e Je u d e l a N u i t ” ( “ T h e
Game of the Night”), but her
career accelerated when Chabrol began casting her. In their
almost two-dozen films, she
often played a bourgeois woman.
Before her marriage to Chabrol, who died in 2010, Ms.
Audran was married to JeanLouis Trintignant; after their
divorce she acted with him in
several films, including “Les
Biches” (“The Does”), with her
new husband, Chabrol, directing. It was one of Ms. Audran’s
most challenging roles. She
played a bisexual woman
named Frédérique.
“I like challenges,” she told
The Los Angeles Times in
1988, “and I like jumping into
the unknown.”
She demonstrated that to a
greater extent with the work
she did with other directors.
She played the mistress of
Laurence Olivier’s character in
the TV miniseries “Brideshead
Re visited ” in 1981. In the
1996 action film “Maximum
Risk,” she played the mother of
Jean-Claude Van Damme’s
character, who investigates his
twin brother’s death.
In a career in which she
covered the whole range of
roles — drama, comedy, ro-
mance — she was best known
f o r h e r t u r n i n “ B a b e tt e’s
Feast,” based on a story by Isak
Dinesen.
Ms . A u d r a n p l a y e d t h e
enigmatic title character, a sophisticated Frenchwoman
who arrives unexpectedly in a
remote Danish fishing village
in the 1800s and shakes things
up when she prepares a sumptuous, cosmopolitan meal for a
group of its dour, upright inhabitants.
The movie was by the Danish director Gabriel Axel, who
said casting the quintessentially French Ms. Audran, rather than a Danish star, was crucial.
“She opens a door differently from a Danish woman,” he
said in a 1988 interview. “She
even moves differently. Now
this is very important. It
wouldn’t have been the same
with a Danish actress.”
Vincent Canby, reviewing
the movie in The New York
Times, wrote: “Miss Audran
dominates the movie in the
same way that Babette takes
charge of the sisters’ household and the village. The actress is still one of the great
natural resources of European
films.”
Ms. Audran leaves her son.
In a 1994 interview with
T he C hica go Tribun e, Ms .
Audran had an unusual description of how she begins to
find a character.
“It starts with the clothes,”
she said. “It is the first thing
you have to think of. It’s helpful because, if you notice, the
way you wear your clothes is
the way you are.”
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
A job at
the top of
a brutally
cold world
uMT. WASHINGTON
Continued from Page B1
Mount Washington Observatory, home to some of the fiercest
weather on the planet, has an
opening on the night shift.
“It’s not for everyone,” acknowledged Adam Gill, one of
six observers at the summit
weather station, which is
staffed continuously.
Night observers work 6 p.m.
to 6 a.m., eight days in a row.
Candidates must be tough
enough, a detailed job listing
notes, to “self-evacuate” from
the summit, if need be, and
“handle frequent exposure to a
combination of high winds and
low temperatures, specifically
at night.”
All for a salary of $28,000 a
year.
The job has its perks, insisted Gill, 25, who has studied atmospheric science and is in his
third year working at the compound, 6,288 feet above sea level. “ There’s lots of extreme
weather,” he said. “It’s fun to be
able to collect that data.”
Also wor th noting — no
weather observer has died on
the job, although Gill did have a
close call.
In his first winter there, he
returned from his duties collecting precipitation samples
and checking instruments just
as a massive lighting bolt hit
the mountaintop. It caused the
observatory lights to flicker.
“It was super loud,” he said.
“If I was outside, it could have
been bad.”
Then there’s the wind chill,
which often drops to 50 below
zero or lower. “Frostbite can set
in quickly, in as little as 30 seconds,” he said, noting that he
often wears as many as five layers and goggles when he goes
outside, making sure not a
patch of skin is exposed.
When the weather lifts, the
job does have some unique benefits. They include stunning
views, especially at night, when
clear skies unveil a vast panorama of stars and the hazy bands
of the Milky Way. Summer
months allow for beautiful
hikes through the White Mountains. Plus, weather observers
get six days off between shifts at
the summit.
Still, the job can take a toll
and few observers last longer
than four years, Gill said.
Desp ite the danger and
d r u d g e r y, w h i c h t h e y g e t
through with everything from
board games to Netflix, the observatory has no problem finding candidates for the job.
Less than 24 hours after the
job was posted on Tuesday, the
observatory had already received several applications.
They typically receive between
200 and 300 resumes when a
job opens, Gill said. “It’s a good
entry-level job,” he said.
Aside from living like a hermit in a remote outpost with
notoriously extreme weather —
in 1934, Mount Washington
measured a wind speed of 231
miles per hour, which remains
the world’s most powerful recorded gust not involving a cyclone — the job comes with other demands.
Weather observers ride a
tank-like, tracked vehicle to
work, sleep in rooms with other
weather observers, and perform building maintenance.
They also have to be certified in
a special language for reporting
the weather and have office
skills including PowerPoint,
which can come in handy when
giving tours to visitors in the
warmer months.
That sounds pleasant
enough. But much of the dayto-day work can be grueling.
When it’s below freezing at
night, which is much of the
year, observers have to don
their layers of cold-weather
gear and use a crow bar to keep
the observatory’s instruments
from freezing. When the gusts
surge, they have to drop to the
ground and crawl back inside.
“It can be really exhausting,”
Gill said. But all the work has
an upside, Gill said. “You don’t
notice the loneliness as much as
you think you would,” he said.
David Abel can be reached at
dabel@globe.com.
T h e
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G l o b e
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Arrested state senator enters alcohol program
uBRADY
Continued from Page B1
full attention over the next few
days,” he said. “I look forward
to returning to work next
week.”
Brady also apologized
Wednesday to his constituents
and colleagues “for the embarrassment that this incident has
caused.”
Brady was arrested by Weymouth police on Saturday, the
second time officers in the
South Shore community have
cited him for drunken driving,
according to Weymouth police
records obtained Wednesday by
the Globe.
On Dec. 4, 1998, shortly before midnight, Weymouth police arrived at 652 Pleasant St.,
where they found a white Pontiac Fiero had been driven into a
telephone pole “at a high rate of
speed,” according to a Weymouth police report written at
the time.
“The telephone pole had
penetrated all the way through
the front end to the fire wall,
and there were no skid marks,’’
according to the report.
Brady was injured but conscious and identified himself to
police, according to the records.
Paramedics were also at the
scene of the crash, and while
Brady was in an ambulance,
then-Weymouth police Officer
Richard M. Fuller Jr. stepped
inside and spoke with him.
“As paramedics stabilized
Brady I was able to talk to him
in the confines of their ambulance,” wrote Fuller, who is now
a captain. “I immediately noticed a strong odor of alcohol
coming from Brady’s person.”
Fuller asked Brady to explain why his car slammed into
a telephone pole. “He stated
that he had missed the turn,’’
wrote Fuller, who added, “the
accident did not occur on a
turn.”
Brady told Fuller he had
been drinking at a bar called
the Yard Rock in Quincy since 1
or 2 p.m. that day. The crash
took place around 11:35 p.m. “I
then questioned him as to how
much he had to drink and he
stated that he had ‘a lot of
beers.’ ”
Fuller concluded that Brady
was “extremely intoxicated,’’ a
view Fuller said was shared by
the paramedics.
Brady was not placed under
arrest, however, because of his
injuries, the report said. Instead, Fuller sent him a citation
in the mail charging him with
operating under the influence
and operating to endanger, according to Weymouth police records.
The case against Brady then
shifted to Quincy District Court
for a clerk’s hearing, which is
historically a closed-door process where information about
the evidence presented is not
made public unless a criminal
case moves forward.
The hearing appears to have
been in early 1999, and the outcome seems to have been overwhelmingly in favor of Brady.
Based on court and Registry
of Motor Vehicles documents,
the operating under the influence of liquor charge appears to
have been dismissed outright;
the driving to endanger criminal charge reduced to a marked
lanes violation, a civil infraction
that cost him $100. And Brady
was found responsible for not
wearing a seat belt, and was
fined $35.
The court records list Brad y ’s a tt o r n e y a s R o b e r t
Creedon. But it was not immediately clear if that was a reference to Robert S. Creedon Jr., a
member of a politically connected Brockton family and former state senator who is currently the clerk magistrate for
Plymouth County Superior
Court.
In 1 9 9 9 , C r e e d o n w a s a
Democratic state senator from
Brockton and Brady was a
member of Brockton’s City
Council.
Calls to the Brockton courthouse where Creedon works
NEW CHARGES
Michael
Brady was
arrested
again by
Weymouth police
on drunken
driving charges.
and to his home in Brockton
were not returned Wednesday.
Brady’s more recent encounter with Weymouth police took
place March 24, when an officer
pulled over the 55-year-old and
told the senator he would be
testing his ability to drive a car.
Instead of providing a driver’s license, Brady handed the
officer a Massachusetts identification card “and stated he was
a state senator,” according to a
written description of the arrest
by police.
Unsteady on his feet, Brady
had bloodshot and glassy eyes,
slurred his words, and his
breath reeked of alcohol, police
said. He declined to take a
chemical breath test after failing several sobriety tests in a
parking lot, according to police.
The first required him to recite the alphabet from A to Z.
The senator “slurred the letters
together to get to H, I, J; he
then repeated H, I, J.” Brady
subsequently gave two officers
a look of confusion, and then
stated “Z,” according to the police narrative.
The second required Brady
to count aloud backward from
60 to 40.
Brady, slurring his words,
correctly counted from 60 to 50
but then “kept repeating numbers in the 40’s,” the police narrative said.
Brady then continued counting into the 30s, before he was
stopped. Police say Brady went
on to fail three other tests, including one where he struggled
to balance on one foot and
count — swaying left to right,
putting his foot down numerous times, switching feet, and
slurring numbers together.
Brady served on the Brockton City Council from 1997 to
2009, according to his official
biography.
He was elected a state representative in 2008.
As a senator, he has voted in
favor of toughening operating
under the influence laws.
John R. Ellement
can be reached at
ellement@globe.com. Joshua
Miller can be reached at
joshua.miller@globe.com.
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
AND THEN . . . One can just imagine an exchange between these two waterfowl captured sitting on a dock along the Charles River in Cambridge.
Suit alleges renter turned home into a set for porn
uRENTAL
Continued from Page B1
violated the lease.
Stephen A. Roach, an attorney who represents three of the
defendants — Jensen, Mile
High, and another individual
he declined to name — said the
suit “arose out of a basic landlord-tenant dispute.”
He said Bassett became upset because someone he does
not represent failed to pay rent.
“ The allegations are unfounded,” he said during a brief
phone interview Wednesday
evening.
Attempts to reach the defendants themselves were unsuccessful.
In March 2015, before Bassett knew about the porn
shoots, Spafford e-mailed Bassett to tell her he had vacated
the house because he had been
fired by Jensen — who goes by
the pseudonym Nica Noelle —
and could no longer pay rent,
the suit claims.
Bassett asked her parents,
who live on Martha’s Vineyard,
to inspect the property after she
received Spafford’s e-mail. Bassett’s parents were “shocked by
the deplorable state of condition in which they found their
daughter’s personal residence.”
In the following days, Bassett’s mother returned to the
house to find “two strangers”
unpacking suitcases and groceries, court documents say.
The two people told Bassett’s
mother they were guests of
Jensen. After Spafford “unexpectedly ended his employ-
GABRIELLE MANNINO/MARTHA’S VINEYARD TIMES
This house on Skye Lane in Aquinnah was allegedly used in the filming of porn movies.
ment,” she took over his lease
for the remaining months.
Bassett’s mother took the
key to the home from Jensen
and informed her daughter
about what had taken place.
Bassett later refused to advise
her mother to return the house
key to Jensen, the court filing
says.
When Bassett returned to
the property in May 2015, the
damage was worse than first realized, according to court documents. A s “circ umstances
evolved,” Bassett independently
discovered that her home had
been used for “the production
of graphic pornography” credited to Mile High Distribution,
Jensen, and those listed in the
lawsuit.
“Arising from her profound
anger, embarrassment, and
general sense of personal violation in response to the discovery of her home’s use for commercial porn production, Ms.
Bassett proceeded over the ensuing weeks/months to engage
in periodic — and admittedly
somewhat obsessive — review
of Internet sites” maintained by
Jensen, Mile High, and adultfilm actors who starred in the
films and “publicly boasted
about their porn shoots on chic
and tony Martha’s Vineyard.”
The suit alleges photographs
and videos posted online included nude and graphic scenes
showing Bassett’s home, furnishings, and artwork.
During her own investigation, it became clear to Bassett
that the defendants had allegedly “utilized nearly every room
of her home for their porn production,” including shooting
scenes on top of her dining
room table, and in her bathrooms, basement, and on her
sofas,” according to court filings. “It also became clear that
they deliberately moved some
of her more distinctive pieces of
art from room to room in order
to ‘aesthetically enhance’ their
porn scenes.”
Bassett alleges that at least
24 films or videos were shot
“wholly or in part” on her property and that the use of her art
in the productions violated
copyright law, since the defendants profited by depicting her
works without permission.
The suit says Bassett sought
mental health services in 2015
to help her cope with the “emotionally and psychologically
traumatizing” experience.
“She has found it difficult to
reside comfortably in her own
home, leaving it vacant for
much of the ensuing 2+ years,”
court documents say. “And
while she has had financial
need for the rental income that
she could have been earning
during her periodic absences,
she has been emotionally unable to rent out her personal
residence long-term to strangers again.”
Bassett is seeking monetary
compensation, alleging breach
of contract, copyright infringement, civil fraud, trespassing,
and a host of other charges. The
complaint was filed in federal
court because some of the defendants are in other countries,
and copyright infringement is a
federal offense, the suit says.
Danny McDonald of the Globe
staff contributed. Steve Annear
can be reached at
steve.annear@globe.com.
T h e
B10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Business
Takeover whispers about
Shire growing much louder
A worker
packed drugs at
a Takeda plant
in Germany.
Takeda, Japan’s
largest drug
company, is
eyeing Shire,
which has
major
operations in
Massachusetts.
Takeda ponders bid;
may be worth $50b
By Jonathan Saltzman
Shire stock price
250
200
GLOBE STAFF
EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/FILE 2014
Northern
Pass dealt
big setback
Mass. pulls out of
deal, looks to Maine
Shire PLC, the Irish drug maker
that has most of its operations in Massachusetts, has for months been the
subject of takeover rumors.
On Wednesday, the whispers grew
considerably louder. Japan’s largest
drug company, Takeda Pharmaceutical Co., said it is considering making a
bid for the company — one that analysts predicted could approach $50 billion.
Takeda apparently is enticed by
Shire’s stock price, which has fallen 45
144.53
150
100
2016
2017
2018
SOURCE: Yahoo! Finance
percent in the past 15 months. It said
in a statement that the potential offer
“is at a preliminary and exploratory
stage and no approach has been
made” to Shire’s board.
“There can be no certainty that an
approach, if made, will lead to any
transaction,’’ Takeda said. Its cancer
research unit, Takeda Oncology, is
based in Cambridge.
The announcement lifted Shire’s
shares more than 12 percent to close
at $144.53 on the Nasdaq exchange
Wednesday, signalling that the secondbiggest biopharma employer in Massachusetts could be in play.
Takeda said that buying Shire,
which specializes in rare-disease treatments as well as the ADHD drug Adderall, would bolster its portfolio of
oncology, neuroscience, and gastroenterology drugs. It would also extend
Takeda’s reach in the United States
and vault the Japanese company into
SHIRE, Page B14
WHERE’D EVERYBODY GO?
By Jon Chesto
GLOBE STAFF
Eversource Energy’s Northern Pass
project suffered a significant and potentially fatal blow Wednesday when
Massachusetts pulled the plug on a
contract to use the proposed $1.6 billion transmission line to import Canadian hydropower through New Hampshire.
Governor Charlie Baker’s administration, working with a selection committee representing three big electric
utilities, will instead try to seal a deal
with a competing transmission project
that would bring the hydropower
through western Maine. Eversource
said it is not giving up on Northern
Pass after spending more than a quarter of a billion dollars developing it.
The announcement follows unsuccessful attempts by Eversource to persuade officials in New Hampshire to
drop their opposition to the 192-mile
PHOTOGRAPHEE.EU/STOCK.ADOBE.COM
As entrepreneurship wanes, Mass. produces more BINOs — businesses
in name only — that are unlikely to ever hire, pay wages, or generate the
kind of economic dynamism usually associated with new firms
GLOBE STAFF FILE/2012
Opposition to Northern Pass has
been intense for years in some
parts of New Hampshire.
Northern Pass. In February, the New
Hampshire Site Evaluation Committee
denied a crucial permit for the project,
ruling that the huge towers required
for portions of the line could despoil
the state’s scenic rural countryside and
affect the important tourism industry
there.
Like Northern Pass, the Maine
transmission project, from energy
company Avangrid, would import
more than 1,000 megawatts of electricity from Hydro-Quebec. An Avangrid
spokesman said its project would bolster the regional power grid and help
curb greenhouse gas emissions by substituting hydropower for electricity
from fossil fuel plants.
“This was an opportunity to make a
really major regional contribution,”
Avangrid spokesman John Carroll
said. “It really leverages the limited resources that Maine has to contribute to
the regional solution to New England’s
energy challenges.”
E
By Evan Horowitz
Mass. business creation
GLOBE STAFF
ntrepreneurship is waning, in Massachusetts and around the country. Despite widespread talk of disruptive
young companies and startup incubators, the US economy is becoming
dominated by old firms, while startup rates have yet to recover from the
Great Recession.
Instead of hungry new businesses, Massachusetts is instead seeing an uptick in pseudobusinesses like independent contractors, Uber
drivers, and freelance consultants.
QUICK Think of them as BINOs — businessSTUDY es in name only — not because they
are necessarily bad, but because they
are unlikely to ever hire, pay wages, or generate
the kind of economic dynamism usually associated with new firms.
Exclude these BINOs and what you see is a
long-term shortfall in the creation of what we
might call employer-businesses — the growthseeking type that is more likely to hire employees and expand over time.
In recent years, Massachusetts has been generating just under 6,000 employer-businesses
per quarter, compared with 6,700 during the
peak years before the recession, according to a
novel dataset recently released by the Census
Bureau. That adds up to a roughly 12 percent
dip, which is actually not bad, compared with
16,000
All businesses
12,000
9,000
Businesses likely
to hire employees
6,000
3,000
’05
’07
’09
’11
SOURCE: Census Bureau
’13
’15
’17
GLOBE STAFF
the 20 percent drop for the country as a whole.
While there was a time when this falloff in
startups could be attributed to struggling regions or sluggish sectors, that’s no longer the
case. Nationwide, 48 of the 50 states are spawning fewer employer-businesses today than they
were before the recession. It isn’t just the loss of
mom-and-pop retail shops in a Walmart-ized
world; you find the same pattern in manufacturing, construction, and the entire services sector.
As harbingers of the future go, this isn’t particularly cheering. Young firms have historically
been engines of job creation and productivity. In
fact, the widespread notion that small businessHOROWITZ, Page B14
NORTHERN PASS, Page B14
Driverless cars return to Boston streets to continue tests
By Adam Vaccaro
GLOBE STAFF
Self-driving cars have returned to
the roads of Boston this week after a
brief shutdown to review safety standards following the death of a pedestrian in Tempe, Ariz., where a woman
was struck by an autonomous Uber
car.
But Massachusetts officials have de-
layed a plan to expand testing in the
region.
NuTonomy Inc. and Optimus Ride,
two Boston-based companies testing
the technology in the Seaport District,
took a break last week at the request of
city officials, who sought to better understand the companies’ safety procedures after the Uber crash.
Since the accident, Uber has kept
its self-driving cars off the road in Arizona, Toronto, Pittsburgh, and California. This week, Arizona, which has
loudly championed a low-regulation
environment for driverless companies,
ordered Uber to keep its program halted in the wake of the death. Uber has
also said it will not seek to extend its
permit to test in California after it expires later this week.
But in Boston, NuTonomy and Optimus Ride got the green light to resume operations from city officials
Tuesday. The companies began testing
the technology here last year, and nuTonomy offers rides to some members
of the public through a partnership
with the ride-hailing firm Lyft. Neither
company has reported any incidents
DRIVERLESS CARS, Page B13
MORE
HOME SALES
Prices are up, and single­
family sales are down. B12
ECONOMY
Growth revised up to 2.9
percent in 4th quarter B13
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
TALKING POINTS
CASINOS
STEVE WYNN’S EX­
WIFE SAID SHE TOLD
COMPANY LAWYER
ABOUT ALLEGED RAPE
OF EMPLOYEE IN 2009
ASSOCIATED PRESS
INTERNATIONAL
TRUMP BUSINESS
LOSES BID TO REGAIN
CONTROL OF PANAMA
HOTEL
Elaine Wynn said a Wynn Resorts Ltd. in-house lawyer who was told in 2009 about an “alleged rape” of an employee by her former husband, Steve Wynn, called it a “personal” matter. The former wife of the company’s founder testified Wednesday for the first time in open
court about the allegations of sexual misconduct that led Steve Wynn to step down as chairman and chief executive of his casino empire last month. She said at a hearing in Las Vegas
that she told Wynn’s general counsel, Kim Sinatra, nine years ago about the alleged rape
from four years earlier. Sinatra responded that “it was not a company matter but a personal
matter, and as far as she was concerned, it was handled,” according to Elaine Wynn’s testimony. A Nevada state judge is deciding what evidence of Steve Wynn’s alleged misconduct
can be brought at a jury trial scheduled for next month. Elaine Wynn says she lost her seat
on the Wynn Resorts board of directors in 2015 because she had raised questions about her
former husband’s “reckless behavior.” Todd Bice, a lawyer for Wynn Resorts, said the company fundamentally disputed that Elaine Wynn reported the 2005 incident as a corporate
governance issue. “She was seeking and sharing information from Mrs. Sinatra to use in her
divorce,” Bice said at the hearing. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
President Trump’s family hotel business has lost a bid to regain control of the luxury hotel
in Panama that ousted his brand, according to a new emergency arbitration ruling. The arbitrator ruled Tuesday that Trump’s company should not have been evicted while a broader
arbitration dispute was ongoing between the hotel owners and Trump. But with Trump outmaneuvered in Panama and the hotel in the owners’ hands, the arbitrator declined to reinstate the Trump team. He also barred all parties from starting new legal fights over the matter. ‘‘The facts on the ground now militate against forcibly undoing the steps that have been
taken,’’ arbitrator Joel Richler wrote. He said his decision might be different if Trump had
sought an emergency arbitration decision before the hotel owners successfully petitioned
the Panamanian courts for help. Alan Garten, the Trump Organization’s general counsel,
declined to comment on the ruling. But in past statements to the Associated Press, he has
said that the Trump Organization expects the arbitration process will ultimately find that
Trump Hotels’ firing and subsequent removal from the property without an arbitrator’s approval violated Trump’s contract. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Agenda
Want to stay up to date with the Bay
State’s business world? Follow the
Globe’s LinkedIn page for constant alerts.
Friday, March 30
➔ DISCUSSION
Coffee talk
Join Cambridge Innovation Center Boston
for a monthly discussion on various
cultural topics. This month’s discussion,
in partnership with the Swedish American
RETAIL
PARENT
COMPANY
OF SAKS,
LORD &
TAYLOR HAD
AN
UNHAPPY
HOLIDAY
SEASON
GLOBE FILE PHOTO
The rebound taking shape in parts of the retail industry
eluded the owner of the Saks Fifth Avenue and Lord &
Taylor department stores, which failed over the holiday
season to reverse a decline in same-store sales. Hudson’s
Bay Co. reported fourth-quarter earnings on Wednesday
that missed analysts’ estimates. Hudson’s Bay has axed
2,000 jobs, reorganized management, and centralized ecommerce operations under a plan to win back customers, who are increasingly turning away from department
stores in favor of online retailers like Amazon.com Inc.
The Toronto-based company, which is also facing a restless activist investor, agreed last year to sell its iconic
Lord & Taylor building in Manhattan and unload a minority share to a private equity firm to reduce debt.
— BLOOMBERG NEWS
Chamber of Commerce, is centered
around the Swedish practice of “fika” and
open borders. There will be coffee and
Swedish pastries. Friday, 8:30 to 9:30
a.m., CIC Boston, 18th-floor kitchen, 50
Milk St., Boston. Free. Register online or
go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
➔ WEBINAR
Branding and
marketing
Understand the difference between
marketing and branding through an online
RETAIL
WALMART PULLS
COSMOPOLITAN
MAGAZINE FROM
CHECKOUT AISLES
PHARMACIES
WALGREENS TAKES
OVER RITE­AID
STORES
TECHNOLOGY
BLACKBERRY
REVENUE GROWS ON
SOFTWARE SALES
Walmart is pulling Cosmopolitan magazine from its checkout counters, bowing to pressure
from an activist group that sees the publication’s racy covers as “sexploitation.” The world’s
largest retailer will now sell the Hearst Corp. publication just in its magazine aisle, spokesman Randy Hargrove said. The National Center on Sexual Exploitation — a group with
roots in fighting pornography — said it had been working behind the scenes with the retailer for months on the decision, which makes Walmart’s checkout aisles “family friendly.”
When asked about Walmart’s move, the media company said that Cosmopolitan is focused
on empowerment. “Cosmopolitan is the most successful global media brand for young
women, with award-winning content produced by leading female journalists,” Hearst said.
“We are proud of all that the brand has achieved for women around the world in the areas
of equality, health, relationships, career, politics, and social issues.” — BLOOMBERG NEWS
course. Participants will learn the
essentials of branding, how to determine
their target market, and how to manage
their company’s online reputation. Friday,
10 a.m. to noon, online. Tickets range
from $46 to $70. Register online or go to
the business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
The retail industry may be ailing, but for Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc. the cure is more
pharmacies. The drugstore has completed its takeover of 1,932 new stores from a deal last
year with Rite Aid Corp. While same-store sales in the front of Walgreens’ US drugstores,
where customers buy items like toilet paper and toothpaste, fell 2.7 percent in the fiscal second quarter, sales at the pharmacy counter in the back of the store grew 5.1 percent. —
BLOOMBERG NEWS
BlackBerry Ltd. set a record quarter for software revenue, further cementing recent success
the company has had in winning corporations over to its new nonphone offerings. Revenue
was $239 million, beating the average estimate of $215.5 million and overshooting even the
most optimistic analyst prediction. Software revenue was $218 million, and 70 percent of
that was recurring, as opposed to one-time licensing payments. Chief executive officer John
Chen has worked to establish the company as a serious security software provider in a
range of different product lines, such as systems to manage an entire company’s stable of
mobile phones, or to let cars securely update their entertainment systems.
—BLOOMBERG NEWS
➔ WORKSHOP
Investing for
retirement
Attend a workshop held by JVS
CareerSolution on how to save for
retirement. Learn about investment
options, retirement accounts, and how to
ATHLETIC GEAR
LULULEMON SALES
RISE ON ONLINE
ORDERS
Lululemon Athletica Inc.’s sales accelerated
faster than expected last quarter, helped by
booming e-commerce orders, sending the
company’s shares on their biggest rally in almost 10 months. The yoga-wear maker posted comparable-sales growth of 11 percent,
accounting for currency effects and direct-toconsumer channels. Quarterly revenue and
profit beat estimates, easing concerns that a
CEO shuffle would disrupt its performance.
Lululemon is pushing to create more innovative products, attract more male customers,
and expand internationally. But the February
resignation of Laurent Potdevin, who the
company said had behaved unprofessionally,
has threatened to distract from these efforts.
— BLOOMBERG NEWS
maximize matching contributions from
your employer. Friday, 1 to 2:30 p.m., JVS
CareerSolution, 75 Federal St., 3rd floor,
Boston. Free. Register online or go to the
business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
➔ FIELD DAY
Join a collaborative
workspace
Those who work from home or are the
only content person on their team are
invited to sit it on a “field day” for content
BLOOMBERG NEWS VIA GETTY IMAGES
professionals to work alongside one
another. Find out what other people are
working on, get and share advice, and get
work done in a communal space. Friday,
AUTOMOBILES
NEW CARS IN EU WILL
HAVE SYSTEM TO CALL
EMERGENCY SERVICES
AFTER AN ACCIDENT
All new cars in the European Union will need to have a special system that automatically
calls the emergency services in case of an accident. Erik Jonnaert, the secretary general of
the ACEA car manufacturers’ association, said Wednesday that the eCall system ‘‘has the
potential to save many lives by shortening the reaction time of emergency services.’’ Sensors
in the car automatically transmit its location, the exact time, and direction it was headed in
when the accident happens. The eCall system was approved by the 28-nation EU in 2015,
and the three-year transition period ends this weekend. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., WeWork South Station,
745 Atlantic Ave., 8th floor, Boston. Free.
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
B12
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Prices rise as number of homes for sale falls
Mass. single­family
home sales were
down 6.1% in Feb.
By Katheleen Conti
GLOBE STAFF
The state’s housing market offered no surprises in February:
The number of homes for sale remained at record lows, while
prices crept ever higher.
It marked the third month in a
row that the number of singlefamily homes for sale in Massachusetts fell below 10,000 — a record low for the month.
Sales of single-family homes
for the month were down 6.1 percent, compared with February of
last year, while condominium
sales remained flat, compared
with the same time last year, according to the Massachusetts Association of Realtors.
Meanwhile, the median price
for both single-family homes and
condominiums hit the same figure — $350,000, an increase of 7
percent for homes and 11.1 percent for condos. It marked the
third time that the median price
for single-family and condos were
the same since MAR began recording the data in 2004.
“At one time, condominiums
were often a more affordable option for buyers who wanted to get
onto the first rung of the homeownership ladder,” said Rita Coffey, president of the association
and general manager of Century
2 1 Tu l l i s h & C l a n c y i n We y mouth. “Today, that’s not necessarily the case, as inventory is so
low and demand so high that
many low- and moderate-income
home buyers are being left on the
outside looking in.”
The Warren Group, which
tracks a larger number of real estate transactions in Massachu-
Justice Dept. says
they’d be used as
weapons in market
By Cecilia Kang
NEW YORK TIMES
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
setts, recorded a 6.4 percent yearover-year increase in the median
single-family home price — which
reached $340,000 in February.
Warren also pegged the median
price of condos at $350,000, but
at a higher year-over-year increase of about 18 percent. Based
on Warren’s data, both median
prices are records for the month.
“This most recent gain marks
23 consecutive months of yearover-year median home price
gains, and there’s no sign that
they’re slowing down,” said Warren Group chief executive Tim
Warren.
While Warren recorded a dip
of 2.5 percent in single-family
home sales last month compared
with February 2017, it said condo
sales were up 3.1 percent.
In the red hot Greater Boston
market, sales were slightly down,
but median prices broke February
records: $549,000 for single-family homes and $546,000 for condos, according to the Greater Boston Association of Realtors,
which covers 64 cities and towns.
Even for February, typically a
slow month for sales, MAR said,
the number of single-family
homes on the market fell to a re-
cord low of 9,494 — a 28 percent
drop from the same time last
year. The number of condos for
sale also dropped 28 percent, to
2,791.
Still, the few properties that
hit the market were scooped up
quickly. On average, single-family
homes spent 11 fewer days on the
market in February 2018 than
they did in the same month last
year, while condos sold in four
fewer days.
The median
price for both
single-family
homes and
condominiums
hit the same
figure in
Massachusetts:
$350,000.
Katheleen Conti can be reached at
kconti@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @GlobeKConti.
Facebook to make
its privacy controls
simpler amid scandal
Features will go to
single page, explain
how data is used
By Elizabeth Dwoskin
WASHINGTON POST
Facebook is making it simpler
for people to control how their
data is used after a massive privacy scandal has shaken the
company and caused its stock
price to drop 15 percent.
In the coming months, privacy controls that are now in 20
different places on Facebook’s
app will be merged into a single
page, and will include what the
company says will be easier-tocomprehend features that explain how the company is using a
person’s data, the company announced Wednesday. Facebook
will also create a page that makes
it easier for people to download
their data so that they can more
clearly view what information
t h e c o m p a ny c o l l e c t s a b o u t
them.
The changes come during a
crisis moment after revelations
that the data consultancy Cambridge Analytica had wrongfully
obtained the Facebook profiles
on at least 30 million US Facebook users.
They also coincide with
sweeping ne w privac y laws,
which require more specific and
simplified disclosures to consumers, that are about to go into
effect in Europe. Facebook chief
executive Mark Zuckerberg is expected to testify in Congress next
month.
‘‘The last week showed how
much more work we need to do
to enforce our policies, and to
help people understand how
Facebook works and the choices
they have over their data,’’ Erin
Egan, Facebook’s chief privacy
officer, wrote in the blog post.
‘‘We’ve heard loud and clear that
privacy settings and other important tools are too hard to find,
and that we must do more to
keep people informed.’’
The changes Facebook announced Wednesday, which the
company says have been in the
works for several months, are
primarily redesigns that streamline already-existing features.
The social network already gives
consumers the ability to download their data and control many
privacy settings, albeit in a confusing way.
But research has shown that
changes in design, sometimes
called privacy nudges, can impact people’s behavior, said Lorrie Cranor, director of the CyLab
Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University and the US Federal Trade
Commission’s former chief technologist.
A 2010 study by Cranor and
other Carnegie Mellon researchers found that people tend to
comprehend simpler privacy policies better than long, complicated ones.
JOSH EDELSON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Facebook’s stock has dropped 15 percent amid a massive privacy scandal.
Electricity supplier to pay $5 million to settle claims
By Katheleen Conti
GLOBE STAFF
An electricity supplier will pay
$5 million to settle claims of deceptive marketing and sales tactics that resulted in consumers
being overcharged, according to
state Attorney General Maura
Healey’s office.
In addition to the settlement
payout announced Wednesday,
Viridian Energy LLC of Norwalk,
Conn., agreed it would not market its electricity supply door-todoor in Massachusetts for the
next two years and that it would
change some of its marketing
methods.
Merger
trial shifts
to Turner
channels
Consumers in Massachusetts
have the choice of getting their
electricity through licensed suppliers instead of directly from
state-regulated utilities such as
Eversource and National Grid.
Viridian “engaged in various
deceptive and unfair sales tactics,” through its door-to-door
sales, direct mail, and family-andfriend-based marketing push, according to the attorney general’s
office, which said it has received
complaints from consumers
about the company since 2008.
People who switched to Viridian
ultimately paid more for electricity than they would have had they
stayed with their original utility,
Healey’s office said.
“ O u r s e ttleme nt req uir es
Viridian to pay back millions of
dollars they owe customers for
their deceptive tactics and false
promises,” Healey said in a statement.
Viridian is alleged to have contracted independent sales agents
and instructed them to sign up
customers, including friends and
family members. A third-party
door-to-door marketer hired by
Viridian is also alleged to have
“engaged in widespread misconduct,” including falsely promising
savings, falsely claiming to be af-
filiated with residents’ utility
companies, switching customers
to Viridian without authorization, and “other aggressive marketing tactics,” Healey’s office
said.
The bulk of the settlement,
$4.6 million, will provide restitution to customers, while the rest
will cover costs of the investigation and be used to set up a fund
for future enforcement cases
against competitive electric suppliers.
Katheleen Conti can be reached at
kconti@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @GlobeKConti.
Viridian
‘engaged
in various
deceptive
and unfair
sales
tactics.’
ATTORNEY
GENERAL’S
OFFICE
WASHINGTON — The head of
Turner Broadcasting on Wednesday pushed back against one of the
central arguments of the government’s case to block the AT&T and
Time Warner merger, saying his
company’s channels would not be
used as a weapon against rivals if
the deal goes through.
The Justice Department has argued that Turner, which is owned
by Time Warner, owns “musthave” channels like CNN and TNT
that the merged company would
use as leverage in negotiations
with other cable and satellite TV
operators. But John Martin, chief
executive of Turner, said his channels were not absolutely vital for a
cable or satellite business.
“I believe we have must-have,
as do other programmers,” Martin
said. “Must-have is another way of
saying we have popular programming.”
Many of the Justice Department’s arguments in the trial have
centered on the importance of
Turner’s exclusive sports rights,
which include professional and
college basketball games. Martin’s
testimony has been one of the
most anticipated parts of the trial.
The Justice Department called
Martin as an adversarial witness,
in large part to present e-mails
and memos he wrote that revealed
how important Turner content is
to Time Warner’s business, and
how critical Turner is for cable and
satellite operators.
In a memo presented Wednesday, from 2016, Martin emphasized the importance of renewing
rights to the NCAA college basketball championships, known as
March Madness. “March Madness
plays a critical role” for Turner, Eric Welsh, a lawyer for the Justice
Department, read from the e-mail.
It’s “not just important but has
a critical role,” he said to Martin.
Martin, who joined Time Warner in 1993, was one of the first
witnesses called by the Justice Department. He has been a vocal critic of the government’s lawsuit to
block the merger, calling the department “clueless” last month.
During cross-examination by
AT&T, Martin refuted the government’s idea that the merger would
give AT&T the incentive to use
Turner Broadcasting as a negotiating weapon to extract higher fees
from cable, satellite, and online
streaming providers.
Cable channels, he said, need
to be distributed to make money
— and can’t do that if rival cable
operators decide the price is too
high to carry a channel.
“Distribution is the most important variable for success for
any programmer,” Martin said. He
said revenue for cable television
networks comes from two sources:
subscription revenue and advertising. “Distribution affects both of
those. It’s simple math.”
The trial has attracted huge
public interest, with the courtroom packed with company and
government officials, investors, reporters, and industry analysts. On
Tuesday, executives from AT&T
and Time Warner were in attendance. John Stankey, an AT&T executive poised to lead Time Warner if the merger is approved, has
attended daily.
Judge Richard Leon of US District Court of the District of Col u m bi a w i l l d e c ide t h e c a s e .
Wednesday, in one of his few comments so far, he expressed astonishment at the $1 billion Turner
pays each year for rights to broadcast NBA games.
“You said billion?” he said, eyebrows raised.
Early testimony by AT&T’s rivals has supported the Justice Department claim that the merger
would unfairly harm their businesses that depend on offering
Turner’s channels.
Warren Schlichting, the president of SlingTV, owned by Dish
Network, a satellite TV company,
took the stand Monday and Tuesday. He said Turner’s “hard-core”
negotiating tactics in the past had
led to blackouts of their channels
and a loss of subscribers. Schlichting warned that things would get
worse with a merger.
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B13
Rate of economic growth in last quarter was 2.9 percent
Expansion is third
longest on record
By Martin Crutsinger
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WA S H I N G T O N — T h e U S
economy grew at a solid 2.9 percent annual rate in the final three
months of last year, a sharp upward revision that caps three
quarters of the fastest growth in
more than a decade. The Trump
administration is hoping the
economy will accelerate further
this year, aided by sizable tax cuts
and increased government spending.
The gross domestic product,
the country’s total output of goods
and services, grew at a faster clip
than its previous estimate of 2.5
percent, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.
That 2.9 percent fourth quar-
ter advance followed gains of 3.1
percent in the second quarter and
3.2 percent in the third quarter.
It’s the strongest nine-month
stretch of growth in a dozen years,
since the economy expanded at
rates of 3.7 percent, 3.5 percent
and 4.3 percent from the third
quarter of 2004 through the first
quarter of 2005
Wednesday’s revision, the government’s third and final look at
GDP in the quarter, was better
than analysts had been expecting.
‘‘The economy’s wheels were
spinning faster than we thought
in the fourth quarter,’’ said Chris
Rupkey, chief financial economist
at MUFG Union Bank in New
York. ‘‘There is nothing in today’s
report that holds the economy
back from its historical run to beat
the 10-year expansion of the Clinton years in the 1990s.’’
The current expansion is al-
ready the third longest on record
and will become the second longest, surpassing the expansion of
the 1960s next month. If it lasts
through June 2019, it will become
the new record-holder, surpassing
the 10-year expansion from
March 1991 to March 2001.
The updated growth figure reflected in part more spending by
consumers in services including
auto repairs. Overall consumer
spending grew at the fastest pace
in three years. The revision also
reflected less of a slowdown in inventory rebuilding than previously thought, stronger business
spending on new structures and
more spending by state and local
governments.
For the year, the GDP expanded 2.3 percent, a solid rebound
from a 1.5 percent GDP increase
in 2016, which had been the
weakest showing since the last re-
cession ended in 2009.
President Trump often points
to the pickup in growth last year
as evidence that his economic program of tax cuts, deregulation,
and stronger enforcement of trade
deals is already having a positive
impact.
During the 2016 campaign,
Tr u m p p r o m i s e d t o d o u b l e
growth, which has averaged a
lackluster 2.2 percent annually
since the recession ended.
While Trump has talked about
hitting GDP growth of 4 percent
or better, his budget is based on
an expectation that the economy
will expand at average annual
rates of 3 percent over the next decade. That forecast has been challenged as overly optimistic by private forecasters, who point to the
retirements of the baby boom generation and lagging productivity
as factors likely to constrain
‘The
economy’s
wheels
were
spinning
faster
than we
thought in
the fourth
quarter.’
CHRIS RUPKEY
Chief financial
economist,
MUFG Union
Bank
Uber
had big
ally in
Arizona
Equifax
hires
a new
CEO
Begor headed GE’s
credit card arm
E­mails reveal tight
relationship with
governor’s office
By Ken Sweet
ASSOCIATED PRESS
By Bob Christie
and Melissa Daniels
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — E-mails released
Wednesday between Arizona
Governor Doug Ducey’s staff and
Uber executives shed new light
on a cozy relationship between
the first-term Republican and the
company whose autonomous vehicle recently was involved in a
fatal crash.
The previously unseen e-mails
released by the governor’s office
were first reported by The Guardian newspaper. They show that
Ducey’s staff worked closely with
the company as it began experimenting with autonomous vehicles that the company began testing on public roads in August
2016 without informing the public.
The governor’s staff pushed
back, saying Ducey’s embrace of
Uber and autonomous vehicles
was one of his administration’s
most visible and public initiatives
and that there was no secret testing.
‘‘Allegations that any company
has secretly tested self-driving
cars in Arizona is 100 percent
false,’’ Ducey spokesman Patrick
Ptak said. ‘‘From the beginning
we’ve been very public about the
testing and operation of self-driving vehicles, and it has been anything but secret.’’
The e-mail exchanges fill in
the gaps between what Ducey
was saying publicly since taking
office in early 2015 and what was
happening behind the scenes as
his administration helped Uber
set up shop in the state and then
launch its driverless car testing
program.
In the earliest days of his administration, Ducey ordered a
ANGELO MERENDINO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
state agency to stop citing Uber
drivers for violating the state’s
taxicab laws. He then pushed
through a law legalizing ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft, a
move his Republican predecessor
vetoed the year before. He then
issued an executive order in August 2015 encouraging and allowing self-driving vehicle testing
with no reporting requirements.
Over the years since taking office, Ducey took frequent opportunities to boost Uber’s operations, tweeting about the company’s services and welcoming them
after they pulled their self-driving
cars from California in a dispute
with that state’s regulators in December 2016 and shipped them
to Arizona.
‘‘California may not want you,
but Arizona does,’’ Ducey said
when he took the first ride as a
passenger in Uber’s self-driving
cars in April 2017.
Behind the scenes, Ducey’s
staff worked closely with Uber as
he championed its regular service
and its self-driving vehicles, allowing them to operate without
permits and encouraging their
testing and operation on public
roads.
His staff se t up mee tings,
helped steer Uber executives to
Phoenix city officials as they tried
to lift an airport ban, and got the
governor’s office to tweet its suggested message about a new service called ‘‘Uber eats’’ when it
rolled out.
The emails show a top Ducey
staffer was invited to use Uber offices for work while in San Francisco. The governor’s office said it
provided the emails to the newspaper in September.
Ptak, Ducey’s spokesman, defended the tweet and other efforts
to promote the company.
‘‘We are proud to welcome innovation to Arizona,’’ he said.
‘‘We often promote news of the
thousands of jobs and opportunities coming to Arizona. That’s
nothing new.’’
The Arizona Democratic Party
blasted Ducey after the email revelations.
‘‘Governor Doug Ducey violated the trust of hardworking Arizonans across the state,’’ the party’s executive director, Herschel
Fink, said in a statement. ‘‘This
bombshell report further exposes
the mismanagement by Governor
Ducey and his sheer priority to
put business relationships ahead
of Arizona.’’
The governor suspended the
company ’s testing privileges
Monday, citing safety concerns
and ‘‘disturbing’’ dashcam footage of the March 18 crash in Tempe crash that killed a pedestrian
as she walked her bike across a
darkened road. Experts told The
Associated Press that the technology on Uber’s car should have
spotted (name her) the pedestrian and the failure revealed a serious flaw.
Immediately after the crash,
Uber voluntarily suspended its
autonomous vehicle testing in Arizona, as well as California, Pittsburgh and Toronto. The company
on Tuesday decided not to reapply for the California permit
‘‘with the understanding that our
self-driving vehicles would not
operate in the state in the immediate future.’’
Uber has about 200 vehicles at
all four testing locations.
Uber said it is
cooperating
with police
following a
deadly accident
involving one
of the rideshare
company’s selfdriving cars in
Arizona.
Self­driving cars resume
tests on Boston streets
uDRIVERLESS CARS
Continued from Page B10
from their Boston tests.
“We have met with our partners, nuTonomy and Optimus
Ride, to review the testing policies
and procedures that are mandatory components of the City of Boston’s program. With this safety review complete, Boston will allow
autonomous-vehicle testing to resume,” said Boston Transportation Commissioner Gina Fiandaca.
NuTonomy declined to comment beyond confirming resumption of its testing. Optimus Ride
did not return requests for comment.
Meanwhile, state officials were
originally scheduled this week to
sign a new agreement with a coalition of several Boston suburbs
that would allow companies to apply to test self-driving vehicles on
growth.
But economists have been revising up their GDP forecasts for
this year and 2019 based on
Trump’s success in winning approval in December of $1.5 trillion
in tax cuts over the next decade
and a February budget deal that
will boost government spending
on the military and domestic programs by $300 billion over the
next two years.
Private economists do not expect the burst in government
stimulus to last, forecasting that
expected growth around 2.9 percent this year and 2.7 percent in
2019 will be followed by a return
to slower rates closer to 2 percent.
Interest rate increases from the
Federal Reserve to guard against
inflation and rising rates triggered
by increasing government deficits
are expected to slow growth in
coming years.
Among other
standards, Boston
tests require a driver
seated in the front
seat at all times.
their streets. Now that deal won’t
be sealed until at least late April.
Amanda Linehan, a spokeswoman for the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, a regional agency
involved with the agreement, said
the delay is attributed to the Uber
accident in Arizona.
Among other standards, the
Boston tests require a driver to be
seated in the front seat at all times
to take control of the car as needed.
Arizona allowed companies to
conduct tests without a so-called
safety driver. But in the Tempe in-
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
cident, a driver was in the front
seat when the car hit the pedestrian. Video from the Arizona death
showed that the vehicle did not
slow down as it approached the
woman, apparently failing to detect her in the late evening as she
crossed a dark street with a bicycle.
Adam Vaccaro can be reached at
adam.vaccaro@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter at
@adamtvaccaro.
A nuTonomy
self-driving car
took a spin
around
Drydock
Avenue in the
Seaport.
NEW YORK — Equifax tapped
longtime financial industry executive Mark Begor as its new permanent CEO, the company said
Wednesday, as Equifax continues
to try to recover from fallout surrounding the company’s massive
data breach.
The 59-year-old Begor will take
over from Paulino do Rego Barros
Jr., who became interim CEO in
September when Richard Smith
stepped down from the post.
Smith’s departure followed those
of two other high-ranking executives who left in the wake of the
hack, which exploited a software
flaw that Equifax didn’t fix to expose Social Security numbers,
birthdates and other personal data
that provide the keys to identify
theft.
Begor comes to Atlanta-based
Equifax from the private equity
firm Warburg Pincus, but he spent
35 years at General Electric before
joining that firm. Begor ran GE’s
retail credit card business from
2002 to 2011, which was eventually spun off into a separate company now known as Synchrony Financial. The company is one of the
largest co-brand credit card issuers in the country, which is when a
company pairs up with a bank to
issue a credit card under its brand.
He also is on the board of directors
for FICO, the company behind the
namesake credit score.
In an interview with The Associated Press, Begor said he believed his previous experience
working at GE — which deals with
both businesses and consumers —
would help him in the role. Equifax is still dealing with the aftereffects of the breach. A total of about
147.9 million Americans have
been affected by Equifax’s data
breach, which remains the largest
exposure of personal information
in history, and the company is under numerous state and federal investigations as well as dozens of
class-action lawsuits.
‘‘We didn’t have the right defenses in place, but we are investing in the business to protect this
from ever happening again,’’ Begor
said. ‘‘We are a public trust in
many regards and we need to
work to earn that trust back.’’
Begor said his was initially approached about interviewing for
the job back in October and it took
until March for the board to finalize its decision. His appointment
at Equifax is effective on April 16,
and he will also become a board
member. He will be stepping down
from his position at Warburg Pincus and FICO.
Begor will have an initial pay
package of around $20 million, according to his employment with
the company, which will consist of
a base salary of $1.5 million, an
annual bonus of at least $1.5 million, and a starting package of $17
million stock grants.
Equifax also announced
Wednesday that do Rego Barros Jr.
will retire from the company early
next year. He will assist Begor during the transition process.
Equifax shares rose $2.62, or
2.25 percent, to $119.04.
B14
Business
T h e
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Takeda pondering a bid for Shire
uSHIRE
Continued from Page B10
the ranks of the world’s top drug
makers.
Shire said no offer has yet been
received. Nonetheless, the announcement sent ripples through
the world of biopharma in Massachusetts, where Shire has more than
3,000 employees, most of them in
Lexington.
Only Sanofi Genzyme, the raredisease unit of the French drug giant Sanofi SA, is bigger, with 5,000
employees, according to the Massachusetts Biotechnology Council.
Leora Schiff, principal at Altius
Strategy Consulting, a biopharma
consulting firm in Somerville, said
that if Takeda buys Shire, it would
probably mean consolidation of employees in the Massachusetts biotech hub. That could mean layoffs.
Shire bought Cambridge-based
Baxalta International Inc., with a
pipeline of cancer drugs, in 2016,
for $32 billion. Given Takeda Oncol-
ogy ’s similar focus, she said, it
would make no sense to retain all of
Shire’s jobs in cancer research.
“Companies that acquire are always looking for savings of some
sort,’’ she said.
She also said Takeda’s announcement will almost certainly prompt
other pharmaceutical companies
with operations in Massachusetts to
take a look at Shire.
Ken Cacciatore, a Shire analyst
for Cowen and Co. in New York,
agreed.
But he said he believed Shire’s
stock is vastly undervalued and
should fetch at least $180 a share.
Investors, he said, appear to be
more worried than necessary about
the competition Shire’s hemophilia
therapies face from new products
such as Hemlibra, made by Roche.
“We think investors are taking
the most negative view on those
risks,” he said. The share price has
“become incredibly cheap.”
If Takeda actually makes a bid for
Shire, it would continue a trend in
which major foreign biopharmaceutical companies have sought to expand their presence in the Boston
area, the nation’s leading biotechnology hub.
In 2008, Takeda bought Cambridge-based Millennium Pharmaceuticals, one of the state’s bestknown biotechnology companies,
for $8.8 billion. Millennium became
the cancer-fighting division Takeda
Oncology.
Early last year, Takeda paid $5.2
billion for Ariad Pharmaceuticals
Inc. of Cambridge, which has a
blood cancer drug on the market.
“We’re seeing more foreign companies cement their commitment to
Massachusetts and the incredible
pipeline of breakthrough therapies
being developed here,” said Robert
Coughlin, chief executive of the
MassBio trade group.
‘Compa­
nies that
acquire
are always
looking
for savings
of some
sort.’
LEORA SCHIFF
Altius Strategy
Consulting
Jonathan Saltzman can be reached
at jsaltzman@globe.com.
Northern
Pass dealt
major
setback
uNORTHERN PASS
Continued from Page B10
Markets
Stocks lose for a 2nd straight day
Stock indexes struggled to find direction Wednesday, ending a day of choppy trading with a loss for the second
straight day. The decline was modest, compared with the
previous day’s steep drop, but both were largely driven by a
sell-off of technology stocks. Losses at Amazon, Netflix, and
other consumer-focused companies also weighed on the
market. Energy stocks fell with crude oil prices. Those losses outweighed gains by drugstore chains, health care companies, and others. Despite strong company earnings and
market-boosting corporate deal news, traders wrestled with
the implications of headlines about the problems of Amazon, Facebook, and Tesla. Facebook, which has taken a
beating over privacy issues, reflected the broader market,
dipping into the red at times before eking out a small gain
of 0.5 percent. Red Hat had the tech sector’s largest decline,
5.3 percent. Investors also fretted about Amazon as Axios
reported President Trump has wondered if there’s a way to
‘‘go after’’ Amazon over taxes. Amazon’s CEO also owns The
Washington Post, which Trump calls a fake news outfit. Tesla fell 7.7 percent; Moody’s downgraded its credit rating.
DOW JONES industrial average
The state’s three big electric utilities — Eversource, National Grid,
and Unitil — are required under a
2016 state law to purchase additional sources of cleaner energy. For that
reason, Eversource was on both
sides of the bargaining table: It’s
part of a team of utility executives
and state officials that will negotiate
the renewable power contracts
while being a backer of one of the
projects to deliver that power to
Massachusetts.
But after the initial rejection by
New Hampshire, the selection team
tapped the Avangrid project as a
backup, while giving Eversource a
March 27 deadline to reverse its fortunes in the Granite State. With
Eversource unable to do so by Tuesday, the selection committee officially moved on to the Maine project.
State officials said the selection
committee will try to negotiate a
contract with Avangrid by the end of
April and submit it to the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities
for approval.
Meanwhile, Eversource said it
will continue to fight its case in New
Hampshire, taking its appeal to the
state’s Supreme Court if necessary.
“Northern Pass isn’t going away,”
said spokesman Martin Murray. “We
have opportunities to earn the permit that is required here in New
Hampshire. We have virtually every
other permit that is necessary.”
Eversource has spent $277 million as of the end of 2017 planning
and promoting Northern Pass, costs
that will be borne by shareholders,
Murray said, not its ratepayers.
Going with Avangrid also skirts
possible potential conflict-of-interest issues, with Eversource in a position to help pick its own transmission project.
“You have got one company signing a contract with another company that’s affiliated with them. There
ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2015
is always a risk of the possibility of
self-dealing,” said Cynthia Arcate,
chief executive of PowerOptions, a
Boston-based group that negotiates
power contracts for nonprofit organizations.
The Avangrid project is estimated to cost less than Northern Pass —
$950 million — and could be finished in 2022. Most of it would run
through existing utility rights of
way, and would tie into an electrical
station in Lewiston, Maine, where
the hydropower would then flow
over the existing transmission system to Massachusetts.
Maine Governor Paul LePage has
welcomed the Avangrid project and
vowed an expeditious permitting review. LePage is in his last year in office, but Carroll said Avangrid and
its Central Maine Power subsidiary
expect to have all their state permits
in hand by the end of this year. He
said construction could start in the
second half of 2019.
But the nearly 150-mile Avangrid
project, known as New England
Clean Energy Connect, faces its own
opposition. Critics are particularly
concerned about the effects the power line would have on Kennebec River
Gorge and the Appalachian Trail.
“As more people in Maine know
about the project, there’s going to be
more opposition that arises over the
impacts,” said Dylan Voorhees, clean
energy project director with the Natural Resources Council of Maine.
Avangrid said it has offered millions of dollars to offset the impacts
of the power line crossing over the
gorge. But it’s also possible the state
of Maine may require the company
to bury the line underground, which
would drive up the costs.
Emily Norton, Massachusetts director for the Sierra Club, said her
group has many of the same concerns with the Avangrid line as it
does with Northern Pass, such as
displacing other forms of clean energy, particularly at projects that could
be built within New England.
“You have money going to the Canadian government, rather than
staying in our own region,” Norton
said.
However, the Conservation Law
Foundation, a powerful environmental group based in Boston that
fiercely opposed Northern Pass, is so
far undecided on the Avangrid plan.
Massachusetts electricity customers will end up paying for the
new power line. But Avangrid maintains that its project would result in
lower electric bills over time because
it would displace more expensive
electricity from fossil fuel sources.
But Dan Dolan, president of the
New England Power Generators Association, whose members include
natural gas-fired electricity plants,
predicted the Maine project would
drive up costs for ratepayers.
“This is a project that doesn’t
have a single one of its permits and
it’s going to face significant opposition,” Dolan said. “There’s a long
way to go here.”
The Northern
Pass project
was slated to
run the length
of the Granite
State, including
through parts
of the White
Mountains.
Jon Chesto can be reached at
jon.chesto@globe.com.
‘Businesses in name only’ on the rise in Mass.
NASDAQ Composite index
uHOROWITZ
Continued from Page B10
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
es create the majority of new jobs
masks the truth that this work is
done by young small business — and
that the young part is more important than the small.
Indeed, the fact that young firms
are popping up less frequently could
help explain why our recovery has
been so slow, requiring eight years
to dig out of its recessionary hole
without yet reaching the 4 to 5 percent growth rates achieved after prior recessions.
And if you’re hoping for a quick
fix, unfortunately, no one even
knows why this is happening.
Demographics are one possibility. Middle age seems to be the most
likely time in life for people to start
businesses, with the average age of
founders hovering around 40. So it’s
possible that the decline in business
formation merely reflects the fact
that baby boomers have been steadily passing out of middle age and into
their golden years.
But it ’s not clear how much
weight this theory can bear — researchers at the Brookings Institution tried to pin down this demo-
graphic link and found only weak
evidence to support it.
A more likely culprit is market
consolidation, which is leaving more
US industries dominated by a handful of powerful players. It’s not just
CVS and Walgreens, or Comcast and
Time Warner, either — the top four
manufacturing companies control
43 percent of US sales; the top four
finance firms nearly 35 percent; and
the top four retail trade firms account for 30 percent.
With so many big, entrenched
businesses around, new entrants
may find it harder to get a foothold.
Especially when those firms manage
to lock in their market advantage
through patents, lobbying power,
and other anti-competitive barriers.
Facing such daunting adversaries,
some would-be entrepreneurs may
decide not to try — even when they
have genuinely innovative ideas.
If you’re looking for a less alarming explanation, it’s possible the data we have are actually exaggerating
the issue. Most of the information
about the long-term trend comes
from a Census Bureau survey that
dates to the late 1970s, and there’s
at least some reason to think those
years were a blip with an unusually
high number of new businesses being formed. Judged against that exceptional beginning, the trend was
bound to trip downward. Though
now that we have a corroborating
set of data for more recent years —
based on applications for employer
identification numbers — this “maybe it’s a statistical artifact” explanation has lost some of its power.
Most likely, Americans really are
starting fewer businesses than they
used to — and opting for more
BINOs. Which projects a dark shadow onto our otherwise bright economic landscape. Unemployment
may be low, and overall GDP growth
improving, but the real key to future
prosperity is innovation, which has
traditionally come from hungry new
businesses.
Where will it come from now?
Evan Horowitz digs through data
to find information that illuminates
the policy issues facing
Massachusetts and the nation.
He can be reached at
evan.horowitz@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeHorowitz.
Entrench­
ed big
businesses
may be
making it
harder for
new
entrants
to get a
foothold.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
Boston’s forecast
NOON
6 P.M.
SATURDAY
6 A.M.
Clouds will limit the
sunshine, but it will
remain dry. An easterly
flow off the ocean will
keep temperatures low. Some
rain at night.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
A cold front moving
through the area will
produce rain in the
morning. Clouds will
break for some sunshine in the
afternoon, turning milder.
HIGH
53-58
LOW
45-50
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
High pressure will promote a nice and sunny
start to the weekend
with seasonably mild
temperatures. Increasingly
cloudy at night, maybe a shower
late.
HIGH
58-63
LOW
35-40
MONDAY
SUNDAY
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
6 P.M.
Sunshine will mix with
a few clouds as it
becomes chillier. High
pressure will promote
dry weather through the night
with partly cloudy skies.
A morning shower possible; otherwise, breezy
with times of clouds and
sunshine. Any clouds
will give way to clearing skies
at night.
HIGH
53-58
LOW
38-43
NOON
HIGH
43-48
LOW
33-38
HIGH
51-56
LOW
29-34
1
30
5
9
3
36
2
60
1
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
6 A.M.
By Dave Green
FRIDAY
TODAY
5
1
3
11
12
12
Difficulty Level
3/29
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
TODAY: Clouds will be on the increase across much of the
area as a storm nears from the southwest. Rain will move
into southern areas late.
TOMORROW: A cold front will bring morning rain
to eastern areas, then clouds will break for some
sun in the afternoon. Flurries in the mountains.
EXTENDED: High pressure will promote
sunny weather across much of the area
Saturday. A cold front will bring snow
showers to the north at night.
Tides
A.M. P.M.
High tides
A.M. P.M.
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
10:1510:48
10.9 10.5
3:58 4:31
-0.2 -0.7
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
10:1510:48
10:1510:48
10:2410:55
10:2210:54
10:2610:58
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
11:0711:42
11:1411:49
10:2911:02
10:1610:49
High tides
Old Orchard ME 10:1010:43
Hampton
Beach NH
10:2410:57
Plum Island
10:3011:01
Ipswich
10:0910:42
10:1010:42
9:07 9:34
9:5910:32
Boston’s recent climate
Yesterday
High/low
54/36
Mean
45
Departure from normal +3
Departure for month -50
Departure for year +97
5 p.m. rel. humidity 52%
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
Normal Temperatures
March
readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual Norm.
41.6 45.0
30.5 30.7
34.0 32.7
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 54°
100
1998
Record
high
85
80
Normal
high
60
49
40
Normal
low
35
New England marine forecast
Wind
Boston Harbor
E 6-12 kts.
Seas
Temp
1 ft.
54/47
East Cape
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
20
Seas
Temp
Record
low
11
1923
0
Yesterday’s low 36°
Martha’s
Vineyard
S 3-6 kts.
2-4 ft.
52/44
Cod Canal
S 4-8 kts.
3-5 ft.
54/45
Nantucket
S 4-8 kts.
3-5 ft.
50/42
Buzzards Bay
S 4-8 kts.
1 ft.
53/45
Provincetown
S 4-8 kts.
3-5 ft.
49/42
-20
26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
February
March
2.5"
2.3
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Almanac
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
6:32 a.m.
7:06 p.m.
12:34
5:10 p.m.
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Visibility
Wind
High/low temperature
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
0.55
0.01
T
1.0"
0.71
T 0.05 T
T
T
T
0.03 0.01
T 0.09
0.5"
0.01 0.07
0.01
26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
FULL
Mar. 31
LAST
Apr. 8
NEW
Apr. 15
FIRST
Apr. 22
Gradually, Venus has been emerging into twilight
120 miles
view low in the west. It will creep higher week by
west at 17 m.p.h. week to have a long showing as the “Evening Star”
33/19 through spring and summer.
16.0”
HOROSCOPE
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
You focus intensely on getting the
job done. Your dedication and serious attitude make you a star in
the work arena. You could be
confused about a situation that
surrounds a co-worker or your
role in that matter. Tonight: Do
not fight an adjustment that
could affect your plans.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You hear news that could have
you taking another look at a situation happening around you.
Someone from a distance could
be involved. Why you think you
are upset might have nothing to
do with why you actually are upset. Tonight: Change gears, and
let the fun begin.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
If you can, stay close to home.
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, March 29,
the 88th day of 2018. There are
277 days left in the year.
Birthdays: Author Judith Guest
is 82. Former British prime
minister John Major is 75. Comedian Eric Idle is 75. Composer Vangelis is 75. Basketball
Hall of Famer Walt Frazier is
73. Actor Bud Cort is 70. Actor
Brendan Gleeson is 63. Football Hall of Famer Earl Camp-
1.5"
1.15
Fog Venus in twilight – A. MacRobert
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, March 29, 2018:
This year you greet change positively and with determination to
make the most of a sudden opportunity. Much goes on behind
the scenes. Your instincts take
you down an interesting path.
You will differentiate your feelings from your fears. If you are
single, you could meet someone
who makes you smile from ear to
ear. This person could mosey into
your life after the summer. If you
are attached, you enter a rather
intense period this fall, where
you love being together. A natural
warmth draws you and your
sweetie closer together. VIRGO
understands you well.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
2.0"
Moon phases
bell is 63. Gymnast Kurt Thomas is 62. Rock singer Perry Farrell is 59. Comedian-actress
Amy Sedaris is 57. Model Elle
Macpherson is 55. Senator
Catherine Cortez Masto, Democrat of Nevada, is 54. Movie
director Michel Hazanavicius
is 51. Actress Lucy Lawless is
50. CBS News correspondent
Lara Logan is 47. Tennis Hall
of Famer Jennifer Capriati is
February
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
0.01”
Precip days in March
18
0.0"
March
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
4.98”
Norm. month to date 3.91”
West
Year to date
13.67”
Norm. year to date 10.52”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
East
♠ J985
♥ 10 3
♦ 87
♣ J 10 8 7 2
♠ 10 7
♥A Q 9 4 2
♦K63
♣K 9 3
South
11:1911:52
10:5611:19
7:04 7:27
6:57 7:20
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
20
804
761
4556
4788
4415
South dealer — Both sides vulnerable
North
♠ AQ64
♥ J65
♦ 10 9 5 4
♣AQ
♠ K32
♥K87
♦ AQJ2
♣654
South
1♦
1 NT
West
1♥
Pass
Opening
North
1♠
3 NT
lead — ♥
East
Pass
All Pass
4
“What chance have I got?” Unlucky Louie grumbled. “The
man’s luck is as good as mine is terrible.”
Louie meant the player we call Harlow the Halo. While
Louie labors under a cloud of misfortune, Harlow’s finesses
always work and his errors — and they are frequent —
never cost.
In a team match, both Louie and Harlow played at 3NT.
West led a heart, and dummy’s jack won.
Louie carefully took his three spade tricks next and saw
West discard a diamond. Louie next tried the diamond
finesse. When West took the king and led the nine of clubs,
Louie knew he needed the club finesse for nine tricks. He
played dummy’s queen and made his contract.
“What happened in the replay?” I asked.
“The Halo finessed in diamonds at Trick Two,” Louie
said bitterly. “When West won and led a club, Harlow had
to guess: He couldn’t both finesse in clubs and try for four
spade tricks. He took the club finesse — and made game.”
Poor Louie. He played correctly and gained nothing.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ 10 7 ♥ A Q 9 4 2 ♦ K 6 3 ♣ K
9 3. Your partner opens one spade, you bid two hearts and
he rebids two spades. What do you say?
ANSWER: This is a borderline decision, and much depends
on your partner’s style. If his opening bids tend to be rocksolid, you can jump to 3NT. If, like many players these
days, he tends to open distributional hands that are light
in high cards, you probably should settle for an invitational
bid of 2NT.
There might be an issue that
rears its ugly head and demands
your attention. A partner seems
to be unwilling to deal with the
matter at hand. You might have
to handle the situation by yourself. Tonight: Listen to an older
person who gives you advice.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
You will want to step back before
making any calls. Follow your
sixth sense when it comes to the
timing of discussions. You could
find that you are not speaking the
same language as a partner or
loved one. Revise your thinking
about this person. Tonight: In the
limelight.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You could be busy handling a financial matter. You keep hitting
an obstacle as you try to move on
an issue that affects your daily
life. Your frustration could build
and build. Imagine what it would
take to get your points across.
Give that idea a shot. Tonight:
Balance your checkbook.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You are on top of your game, but
a loved one could be hindering
your progress. Any attempt to
move this person will need to be
done with hard, concrete facts. A
loved one whom you have put on
a pedestal appears once more.
Tonight: Whatever knocks your
socks off.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Your playful mood delights many
people, except for a key individual in your personal life. This person has been cold, withdrawn
and overly serious as of late. You
might not be able to get the approval you want from him or her.
Avoid a power play at all costs!
Tonight: Stay mum.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You feel more upbeat than you
have in many years. However,
trying to communicate those feelings might be difficult. Be more
aware of what others want, and
try to address their needs more
completely. Do that, and you'll
sail to success. Tonight: Have
some fun with your friends.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Your finances could play a significant role in your decision-making
process. You might be eyeing a
purchase for your home. Be as direct as possible when getting
quotes and estimates. This expenditure could considerably increase your investment. Tonight:
Out on the town.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
If you pull back and see the big
picture, you might make a decision. Sometimes you are too focused on goals and not as grounded in reality as you should be.
Don't let yourself obsess over a de-
sire that might never materialize.
Tonight: In the swing of things.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
A low-level depression might be
stopping you from putting your
best foot forward. If you never
make the effort, you won't know
what could have been possible.
One-on-one relating is highlighted. Coming to an understanding
about money will be critical. Tonight: Out late.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
You feel drawn to a situation that
you would like to know more
about. You might want to back
out of plans, especially if they revolve around a very controlling
individual. You could be sorry
that you have ignored a key person in your life. Tonight: Do not
have any regrets.
Jacqueline Bigar is at www.jacquelinebigar.com. (c) 2018 by
King Features Syndicate Inc.
42.
ºIn 1638, Swedish colonists
settled in present-day Delaware.
ºIn 1792, Sweden’s King
Gustav III died, nearly two
weeks after he had been shot
by an assassin during a masquerade party.
ºIn 1867, Britain’s Parliament
passed, and Queen Victoria
signed, an act creating the Dominion of Canada.
ºIn 1912, British explorer
Robert Falcon Scott, his
doomed expedition stranded in
an Antarctic blizzard after failing to be the first to reach the
South Pole, wrote the last
words of his journal: ‘‘For Gods
sake look after our people.’’
ºIn 1951, Julius and Ethel
Rosenberg were convicted in
New York of conspiracy to
commit espionage for the Soviet Union. (They were executed
in June 1953.)
ºIn 1971, Army Lieutenant
William L. Calley Jr. was convicted of murdering 22 Viet-
namese civilians in the 1968
My Lai massacre. (Calley ended up serving three years under house arrest.) A jury in Los
Angeles recommended the
death penalty for Charles Manson and three female followers
for the 1969 Tate-La Bianca
murders. (The sentences were
later commuted.)
ºIn 1973, the last United
States combat troops left South
Vietnam, ending America’s direct military involvement in
the Vietnam War.
ºIn 1984, under cover of early
morning darkness, the Baltimore Colts football team left its
home city of three decades and
moved to Indianapolis.
ºLast year, Britain filed for divorce from the European
Union as Prime Minister Theresa May sent a six-page letter
to EU Council President Donald Tusk. Thirteen people were
killed when a small church bus
collided with a pickup truck on
a two-lane road about 75 miles
west of San Antonio.
T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
En route to the Wilbur, Chrissy Metz talks
‘This Is Us,’ her new memoir, and more
It’s been two weeks since the season 2 finale of “This Is Us,” everyone’s
favorite sob-inducing family drama,
and our hearts won’t mend until the
show returns. Meanwhile, Chrissy
Metz, who plays Kate Pearson on the
NBC series, is busy promoting her
new book, the aptly-titled “This Is Me:
Loving the Person You Are Today,” a
memoir studded with advice and personal life lessons from Metz. We talked with the actress before she stopped
at the Wilbur on Thursday.
Q. What was it like to film Kate and
Toby’s wedding scene in the finale?
A. It was emotional for several reasons. It was the first time I had
worked with Milo [Ventimiglia], his
character [having died when my character was young]. I thought it was so
creative and brilliant that Kate’s going
through her own cold feet and uncertainty and feeling so many emotions
because her father isn’t there, and in
her dream, we see this beautiful vow
renewal between Jack and Rebecca
[Mandy Moore]. It was a moment
that was really special to be a part of
and know that it was really going to
affect people as the show has.
Q. How has your character changed
over the past two seasons?
A. I think that she’s come to face a lot
of her guilt and her shame surrounding the death of her father — through
therapy, through her connections with
her brothers Kevin [Justin Hartley]
and Randall [Sterling K. Brown], and
I think for so long she never talked
about her feelings. When she started
to open up, that was really important
for her growth. . . . She definitely is
changing because she’s being kinder
to herself, and that in turn will promote and foster a much healthier relationship between herself and Kate
and Toby’s relationship.
Q. In the finale, we see that a year in
the future, Toby [Chris Sullivan] is
suffering from depression. What’s in
store for his and Kate’s relationship?
A. I know there will be some changes,
and a lot of conversations about starting a family again. What’s really
amazing in the foreshadowing of Toby’s depression is that he was there
for Kate for so long, and he was the
strong one, and now when he needs
her, she’s going to be there for him. I
think that we’re going to discover
where Toby’s depression comes from,
or stemmed from, or why he’s feeling
so down and helpless. I think we’re
just going to get that much deeper into their lives and really what’s going
WIRE IMAGE (LEFT)
“This Is Us” star Chrissy Metz, who titled her new memoir “This Is Me,” will appear at the Wilbur Thursday.
on with Toby.
Q. Your book details several encounters you’ve had with celebrities as
you’ve risen to fame in Hollywood —
who have you met recently who made
you feel starstruck?
A. You know, I love Dwayne Johnson. I
love him. And not just because he’s a
handsome wall of a human. But because he came from nothing and really turned his life around. I don’t know
if he has more hours in his day, but
I’m liked: How does he do what he
does? With such a positive outlook
and smile. It’s so inspiring. I met him
on “[The Late Show With Jimmy]
Fallon” when we did the Super Bowl
show, so that was really fun.
Q. Self-confidence is a theme in your
book. What is confidence to you?
A. I think confidence is trust in yourself. . . . It’s this whole shift in the way
we think about ourselves, that we’re
always comparing our lives and our
Gronk to appear in
film with Mel Gibson
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
Actor Corey Feldman
says he was attacked
Los Angeles police on Wednesday
were investigating an alleged attack
on actor Corey Feldman, who tweeted
that he was hospitalized after being
stabbed.
A passenger in Feldman’s vehicle
shined a flashlight at another vehicle
they thought was following them at an
intersection on Tuesday night, police
said.
An unknown male made a stabbing
motion at Feldman’s stomach and
fled, Officer Drake Madison said.
Feldman drove himself to a hospital, and has since been released. He
didn’t appear to have any stab
wounds, Madison said.
Police are investigating whether
road rage was behind the confrontation, Officer Lizeth Lomeli said.
Feldman tweeted that he’s had
threats and is being harassed, and
shared photos of himself in a hospital
bed and gown being examined by a
police officer.
Feldman, 46, appeared in ‘‘Stand
by Me’’ and ‘‘Gremlins’’ as a child in
the 1980s, and went on to appear in
several movies with his namesake and
good friend Corey Haim, who died in
2010.
He has said that he was sexually assaulted as a child in Hollywood, allegations he made in 2013 and again recently amid the industry-wide examination of sexual misconduct.
Feldman filed a new police report
about one childhood assault, but the
Los Angeles Police Department said
the statute of limitations for the alleged crime had expired.
He said in October that he was determined to expose pedophiles in Hollywood who had victimized him and
Haim, and was seeking to raise money
to hire attorneys and security. (AP)
Files to be shared with
late singer Prince’s family
Prosecutors in the Minnesota county where Prince died have agreed to
share investigative files with attorneys
for the musician’s family under strict
guidelines.
Carver County Attorney Mark Metz
says Prince’s death investigation re-
bank accounts to everyone else’s, but
we need to realize that we’re so much
more than the way we look or the
number on the scale or the bank account. Then we can be more loving
and kind toward ourselves and toward others. And that, I feel, is true
beauty, true confidence. . . . On paper
it doesn’t seem like I would be here
and have this life, but I have to share
my story and I have to be transparent
in that, because it helps me and, I
hope, in turn helps other people.
mains active, so the data is confidential. But family attorneys may view it
to determine whether to file a lawsuit
in Illinois before a two-year statute of
limitations expires.
Prince’s plane stopped in Moline,
Ill., when he became ill from a suspected drug overdose days before his
death. He died April 21, 2016.
A judge’s order says attorneys must
view the data at the sheriff’s office only. It must not be copied, shared, or
openly discussed.
Investigative data becomes public
in Minnesota after a case is resolved,
or if no charges are filed. Metz said he
plans to make a charging decision in
the near future. (AP)
Former ‘Voice’ contestant
criticizes Clarkson
Kelly Clarkson is responding to a
former contestant on “The Voice” who
called the singer “small minded.” After
being booted from the show, Molly
Stevens, who’s gay, posted a comment
on Instagram critical of a comparison
Clarkson made on the show. Clarkson,
the original “American Idol” winner
who’s a judge on “The Voice,” had said
Stevens reminded her of the Indigo
Girls and Melissa Etheridge, which
Stevens said was a “labeling trap” and
“small minded.”
“While I’m extremely honored to
be in that category of talent I do believe that comment did us all a disservice and only threw us into a labeling
trap,” Stevens wrote. “It felt small
minded to me and exactly what I feel
we need to bring attention to the
world. . . I am a singer songwriter who
happens to be gay. And so is @melissa_etheridge and @indigogirlsmusic. . . It’s a common stereotype that
happens too often. People put us in
boxes.”
Clarkson said she meant no disrespect.
“Wow. This really bums me out,”
she tweeted. “I need everyone 2 hear
me & hear ALL OF THE WORDS I
SAY. I compared Molly to Melissa
Etheridge, Patty Griffin (a name that
was left out conveniently), & the Indigo Girls purely because of the rasp in
her voice & that she’s an amazing storyteller.” (People)
CHARLES SYKES/INVISION/AP
Chris Evans acknowledged the audience after a performance of “Lobby
Hero” at the Hayes Theater in New York.
Evans makes his Broadway debut
It’s nice — and perhaps not surprising — to see Sudbury’s own Chris Evans
winning raves in his Broadway debut.
With no CGI to save him, the “Captain America” star’s performance in Ken­
neth Lonergan’s “Lobby Hero” is “a marvel of smooth calculation and bluster,”
says finicky New York Times critic Ben Brantley.
In the show, about four ordinary New Yorkers involved in a murder investigation in the lobby of a Manhattan apartment building, Evans plays a macho cop
— a “handsome sleaze,” says Brantley — with a very impressive mustache. He costars with Brian Tyree Henry, Michael Cera, and Bel Powley.
If Lonergan’s name seems familiar, that’s because the Harvard grad won an
Academy Award for his screenplay for “Manchester by the Sea,” which he also directed.
Evans, meanwhile, has revealed he may be done playing Captain America.
The actor, who’s played the red-white-and-blue superhero since 2011, told the
Times: “You want to get off the train before they push you off.” That said, he’s already shot “Avengers: Infinity War,” which comes out next month, and its sequel.
There’s been talk that Patriots
tight end Rob Gronkowski might
hang up his cleats and head to Hollywood.
Maybe it’s true.
According to The Tracking Board,
Gronk has signed
on to costar,
with Mel
Gibson and
Frank Grillo,
in an action
flick called
“Boss Level.”
The film, to
be directed by
Joe Carnahan, also
stars Naomi
Watts,
Annabelle
Wallis, and
Will Sasso.
We don’t
know much
about Gronk’s
role yet, but
Grillo plays a retired special forces veteran who gets
trapped in a loop that results in his
death every day. Sounds kind of like
Bill Murray in “Groundhog Day,” but
without the laughs.
Tom Brady’s favorite target has a
few previous film credits, including
an appearance in the movie “Entourage,” and playing a cop in “You Can’t
Have It,” which didn’t go direct to video but should have. It could be that
Gronk would give up football because
he’s suffered a lot of injuries over the
past few seasons, including a concussion in last season’s AFC Championship Game.
Obviously, there’s a precedent for
beefcakes becoming bankable movie
stars, with Dwayne “The Rock” John­
son being Exhibit A. According to
Forbes.com, the former professional
wrestler made $65 million in 2017,
commanding eight-figure fees for
such films as “Baywatch” and “Jumanji.”
Globe correspondent Kaitlyn Locke
contributed. Read local celebrity news
at www.bostonglobe.com/names.
Names can be reached at names@
globe.com or at 617-929-8253.
Who walked up to Beyoncé and bit her? We think the mystery may finally be solved.
AP
Face facts
It’s not exactly “Spotlight,” but a
shout-out to Hunter Harris for helping
to solve — we think — the #WhoBitBe­
yoncé mystery.
In case you missed it, in a new interview with GQ, “Girls Trip” star Tiffany
Haddish says she attended a party after
Jay­Z’s concert in LA last December,
and she witnessed Beyoncé grab Jay-Z
and storm off. When Haddish asked
what was wrong, a friend of Beyoncé’s
told her: “Can you believe this [expletive] just bit Beyoncé?”
Haddish didn’t name the responsible
party in the GQ piece, but the story gave
rise to all sorts of social media speculation and reporting. First, New York
Magazine’s The Cut assembled a list of
the celebrities who were at the afterparty: Rihanna, James Franco, French
Montana, Queen Latifah, G­Eazy, Did­
dy, Sara Foster, Jen Meyer, and Sanaa
Lathan.
Then Harris did a little digging. The
23-year-old Emerson grad, who cut her
journalistic teeth writing about cops
and crime for Boston.com, works as a
news and pop culture blogger for New
York Magazine’s Vulture section. She’s
also a big fan of Beyoncé, and she
wasn’t going to rest until she found out
who bit Bey.
“It’s Beyoncé. Someone bit Beyoncé,”
Harris told us this week. “How is that
not the most important story? The audacity — walking up to Beyoncé and biting her! I had to find out who it was.”
Harris began by tweeting obsessively
(and humorously.)
“im gonna ask this nicely: WHO!
BIT! BEYONCÉ!” she tweeted.
That was followed by this: “in the
criminal justice system, Beyoncé is represented by two separate yet equally important groups: me, hunter harris, who
investigates crimes, and tiffany haddish, who snitches on the offenders.”
Eventually, a tipster checked in to
say that Haddish told the Beyoncé biting story at a stand-up show in Jacksonville in January, but she’d added an im-
portant detail: Haddish said the biter
dated French Montana. That directed
everyone’s attention to “Love & Basketball” star Lathan, who’s been romantically linked to Montana.
Lathan then responded with a tweet
of her own: “Y’all are funny. Under no
circumstances did I bite Beyonce and if
I did it would’ve been a love bite.”
That was enough for Harris — and
many others — to conclude that Lathan
is the culprit.
“[Lathan] waited too long to deny it,
and her ‘if I did it,’ and that cute emoji.
. . . It’s too much,” Harris said. “I’m sure
it was a playful bite, but you can’t bite
Beyoncé. What is wrong with you?”
‘I admit it! Fake hair, and I did my nose. I feel I have a responsibility to tell the
truth.’ TYRA BANKS, supermodel, talking about the cosmetic surgery she’s had
Sports
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Baseball: Cubs-Marlins, 12:40 p.m., ESPN
Baseball: Red Sox-Rays, 4:10 p.m., NESN
NHL: Lightning-Bruins, 7 p.m., NESN
NBA: Bucks-Warriors, 10:30 p.m., TNT
Listings, C7
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T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N GL OB E .C O M /S P O RT S
OPENING DAY 2018
Pirates
at Red
Sox,4:10
2:05p.m.,
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Red Sox
at Rays,
Spring cleaning
Sale, Sox
ready to
start anew
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Tropicana Field’s dome can’t contain the high expectations for Sox starter Chris Sale (left) and manager Alex Cora going into Thursday’s opener.
Dan Shaughnessy
ON BASEBALL
Are fans ready to
embrace them?
SHAUGHNESSY, Page C4
Go for Beckham
Patriots should try to land star receiver from Giants. Sullivan, C2
RHP Chris Archer (10-12, 4.07 in 2017)
GLOBE STAFF
Celtics 97 SALT LAKE CITY — The Celtics
knew they would be underJazz
94 manned on this four-game road
Super Bowl may have been played
under new catch rule. On football, C2
trip, with Kyrie Irving, Marcus Smart and Daniel
Theis all recovering from surgeries. Yet they had
found a way to scrape together three consecutive
wins anyway. This game against the Jazz,
though, figured to offer the greatest challenge of
all, as forwards Al Horford and Marcus Morris
also missed the game because of sore ankles.
There were times when it looked as if Boston’s absences would finally be too much to overcome, and there were others when it looked as if
this surging team would once again flick away
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Chara gets extension
Bruins sign 41-year-old captain
(above) to one-year, $5m deal. C3
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — J.D. Martinez was launching
the ball over the right-center-field fence at Tropicana Field
during batting practice Wednesday. Red Sox president of
baseball operations Dave Dombrowski commented, “Looks
like you’ve arrived.”
Martinez is an integral part of what I call the team’s Fab
Five: Martinez, Chris Sale, David Price, Mookie Betts, and
Craig Kimbrel, the five most important players on the team.
Oh, Rafael Devers, Andrew Benintendi, Xander Bogaerts,
ON BASEBALL, Page C5
its circumstances and find a way to grab an unlikely win.
Once again, Boston proved that no roster is
too shorthanded and no deficit is too great. In
this case, the Celtics trailed by 4 points with less
than two minutes remaining before they closed
the game with a 7-0 run, the final 3 the most improbable of all, as Jaylen Brown drilled a 3pointer from the top of the key with 0.3 seconds
left, sending Boston to a 97-94 win Wednesday
night.
It was Boston’s fifth victory in a row and it
concluded a perfect four-game road trip that
may have made Brad Stevens the favorite to win
NBA coach of the year.
CELTICS, Page C6
RICK BOWMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Celtics’ Jaylen Brown (7), muscling his way in for
a layup, hit the big 3-pointer with 0:03 seconds left.
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Mookie Betts RF
Andrew Benintendi LF
Hanley Ramirez 1B
J.D. Martinez DH
Xander Bogaerts SS
Rafael Devers 3B
Eduardo Nunez 2B
Christian Vazquez C
Jackie Bradley Jr. CF
LHP Chris Sale (17-8, 2.90 in 2017)
RF Carlos Gomez
CF Kevin Kiermaier
3B Matt Duffy
C Wilson Ramos
1B C.J. Cron
LF Denard Span
SS Adeiny Hechavarria
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Nick Cafardo
OPENING DAY PROJECTED LINEUPS
TAMPA — It would be impossible to
script a more bland Opening Day. It is as
if the Baseball Gods conspired to give the
Red Sox an opportunity to fly under the
radar for a while.
Boston’s 2018 Olde Towne Team — almost the exact same cast of characters
that inspired apathy and some legitimate
disdain while winning a second straight
division title last year — will open its season Thursday af-
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Chris
Sale threw 3,327 pitches to Sandy Leon over the course of 31 games last
season. Not once did he shake his head
when Leon called a pitch to ask for
something else.
It sounds impossible. Surely there
had to be a time or two when Sale disagreed with the choice his catcher
made. The lefthander is one of the best
pitchers of his generation and knows
his own abilities better than anyone.
Most starters consider signals from
the catcher to be suggestions, not orders. Some even call their own games.
But Sale just nods and gets into his delivery.
“He threw every pitch I called,” Leon said. “He never shook me off.”
Sale happily confirmed it.
“I know, I was there,” he said.
Sale has made not thinking an act
of brilliance. The 28-year-old is set to
make his fourth career Opening Day
start on Thursday when the Red Sox
face the Tampa Bay Rays.
If the coming season is like the others, Sale will make the All-Star team,
win 17 games, and strike out roughly a
third of the batters he faces. His statistics compare favorably to those of
Madison Bumgarner, Corey Kluber,
and Stephen Strasburg.
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T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Was Super Bowl officiated under new rule?
Ben Volin
ON FOOTBALL
ORLANDO — The NFL isn’t
going to replay Super Bowl LII.
And Lord knows, no one feels
any sympathy for the Patriots.
But the team that supposedly gets all of the calls had two
big ones go against it in that
41-33 Eagles victory. And the
Patriots may have a case that
the NFL changed its rules on
the fly, without telling anyone.
We’re talking, of course,
about two big Eagles touchdowns in the second half of the
game: Corey Clement’s 22-yard
catch in the third quarter that
put the Eagles ahead, 29-19,
and Zach Ertz’s 11-yard touchdown catch to put the Eagles
ahead for good with 2:21 left in
the game.
Both were reviewed carefully by director of officiating Al
Riveron in the instant replay
booth, and both touchdowns
were upheld. But these weren’t
easy decisions.
Clement’s touchdown wasn’t
cut-and-dried. The ball shifted
around in his arms as he was
going to the ground — “slight
movement,” in NFL parlance. It
looked like a catch and smelled
like a catch, but New Englanders had seen that play overturned before — just six weeks
earlier, in fact.
Buffalo’s Kelvin Benjamin
sure seemed to make an incredible touchdown catch at the
end of the first half of a Dec. 24
game against the Patriots, but
Riveron and referee Craig
Wrolstad determined that Benjamin didn’t have full control
until the ball stopped moving
around his arms. And at that
point, Benjamin didn’t get both
feet inbounds. So, touchdown
overturned.
“It was clear and obvious
that he did not have control of
the ball until he brought it all
the way down into his chest,”
Wrolstad said after that game.
But Clement didn’t need to
bring the ball all the way down
into his chest, for some reason.
This time, “slight movement” of
the ball was OK.
“There was some slight
movement, but we didn’t see
loss of control,” Riveron said
Wednesday as the NFL
wrapped up its annual owners
meetings. “We didn’t see indisputable evidence that he did
not have possession of the football.”
The NFL changed its catch
rule this week, emphasizing
that “movement of the ball
does not automatically result in
loss of control.”
And Riveron noted Wednesday that “the [old] rule did say
slight movement is allowed.”
He’s right. Here is the previous language:
“If a player has control of
the ball, a slight movement of
the ball will not be considered a
loss of possession. He must lose
control of the ball in order to
rule that there has been a loss
of possession.”
A source on the NFL’s Competition Committee said the
MATT SLOCUM/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The ball shifted in Corey Clement’s arms in the Super Bowl,
but the NFL maintains he didn’t lose control of it.
standard, even under the old
rule, has always been: “Did you
move the ball, or did the ball
move you? There’s a big difference.”
Referee Gene Steratore was
mic’d up during the Super
Bowl, and NFL Films released
the audio of Steratore’s explanation of the call.
“Is there a little ball movement? Yes,” Steratore said to
umpire Roy Ellison. “But that
does not mean loss of control,
you know? It goes from here,
sticks on the forearm, right
back to the hand — touchdown.”
But that’s not how the NFL
officiated it during the 2017
season. The precedent was set
with the Benjamin non-catch.
And the precedent may have
been ignored on the game’s biggest stage, without anyone
Make a
play for
Beckham
Again, it may have been the
“right” call, but it ignored the
precedent of the James play.
It sure looked like the NFL
applied the new catch rule in
the Super Bowl, instead of applying the precedent set under
the old rule.
“I can’t really tell you whether there was any change to the
rule as it was called in the Super Bowl,” Steelers owner Art
Rooney told me Wednesday. “I
just think that it needed to be
addressed, and oddly enough,
it was really without controversy — unanimous approval, and
really very little dissent about
how it should be done.”
The entire league may be on
board with the new standard
now, but the Patriots can’t be
thrilled with the NFL potentially changing its rules on the fly.
“That changes the biggest
and most important game of
the season,” former quarterback Tim Hasselbeck said on
ESPN this week. “That’s a massive thing. That’s a big deal.”
The James and Benjamin
non-touchdowns were wildly
unpopular with NFL fans not
in New England. The NFL felt
the heat of calling its catch rule
too closely.
No one is feeling any sympathy for the Patriots. But the
team that supposedly gets all
the calls was on the wrong end
of two big ones, on the game’s
biggest stage.
Ben Volin can be reached at
ben.volin@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @BenVolin
Goodell: Targeting rule big step
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
Tara Sullivan
Odell
Beckham
Jr. might
or might
not be on
the trading block,
and if
sources
inside the Giants building are
reading the mood correctly,
“might not” is the likelier conclusion to the conversation that
dominated this week’s NFL
owners meetings.
But if there is a sliver of daylight in this doorway, here’s a
thought for the Patriots and Bill
Belichick: Go ahead and push it
open. Find out what it would
take to land Beckham, and if
the price is right, make an offer.
Then line up the 25-year-old
wide receiver alongside Tom
Brady and wait for the magic to
happen.
Because make no mistake:
Beckham is magic. On the field,
he is a rare talent, a generational player who causes more than
his share of off-field headaches
but whose transcendent ability
is undeniable.
This is why he isn’t likely to
go anywhere, at least not for
less than a first-round draft
pick (or two) or at least a similar talent in return.
But even if the Giants are
not out soliciting trade proposals, they aren’t going to ignore
their phones either. That was
the ultimate message from coowner John Mara, who managed to ignite the firestorm at
the start of the meetings when
he declined to describe Beckham as “untouchable,” and
then attempted to douse things
a few days later when he insisted, “He’s not on the block.”
But Mara also conceded
this: “Is that going to stop clubs
from possibly calling us? No.”
Pick up the phone, Patriots.
Mara may or may not have
done this all intentionally, driving home the franchise’s growing frustration with Beckham
just as the receiver is entering
his fifth year in the league and
eager for a lucrative contract
extension.
The Giants are caught in a
strange rebuild-but-win-now
conundrum, overhauling their
roster by shedding the likes of
Jason Pierre-Paul and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, while
adding former Patriot Nate Solder as the highest-paid left
knowing about it.
The NFL’s power brokers
were asked Wednesday if they
used the new standard in the
Super Bowl instead of the old
one.
“I’ll probably let Al do that,
since he’s the one who made
the decision,” commissioner
Roger Goodell said, smartly.
“No we did not,” Riveron
said. “There was no conversation of, ‘We have to pull back,’
or, ‘We have to rule differently.’
“But remember, the rule did
say slight movement is allowed,
and that’s exactly what we
heard. So there was slight
movement, and we had numerous occasions during the year
where we had slight movement
but we did not overturn it.”
Not with the Benjamin
catch on Christmas Eve. And
not according to Troy Vincent,
the NFL’s vice president of football operations.
“That slight movement of
the ball — the old language
read ‘slight movement,’ then
that means you’ve got to overturn it,” Vincent said last week
on “The Dan Patrick Show.”
“We removed and got out of the
business of slight movement.
Because you can have movement but still be in control.
“The Clement play in the Super Bowl was the best example.
The ball moved but he had
complete control over the ball
through the process of the
catch.”
So the Clement play felt like
a catch, and will be a catch under the new rules, but maybe
would’ve been overturned under the old rules. Got it.
I’m sure Robert Kraft and
Bill Belichick would have appreciated knowing this before
the game. Neither was available
for comment on the matter
Wednesday.
As for the Ertz catch, it sure
looked similar to the Jesse
James play against the Patriots
on Dec. 17. Ertz took a couple
of steps, lunged toward the end
zone, and the ball popped out
when he landed on the ground.
James’s catch was overturned. Ertz’s was upheld.
“All right, look, you have
him going to the ground, or is
he a runner there?” Steratore
said to Riveron while reviewing
the play, per NFL Films.
“Deeming this a lunge forward
after he is a runner, with the
second foot down.”
2015 FILE/WILFREDO LEE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
In his first three (full) seasons, Odell Beckham Jr. of the
Giants had at least 90 catches and 1,300 receiving yards.
tackle in football and hanging
with 37-year-old Eli Manning
for at least another season.
That they would be willing
to make Beckham and his negotiating team a little uncomfortable could be nothing more
than another sign by new general manager Dave Gettleman
that times are changing in East
Rutherford.
But again, if there’s a chance
that Beckham is there for the
taking, the Patriots should find
a seat at the table. Yes, other
teams make more sense — ones
that have more cap room
(49ers, Jets, Rams) or more/
higher draft picks (Browns,
Bills, Colts). But the Patriots do
have a first-rounder to deal
(31st overall) and a top-flight
receiver they could offer (Brandin Cooks) to help the Giants
maintain their current strategy.
And the Patriots, still a winnow team, make sense because
of a 40-year-old quarterback
who’d love nothing more than a
shot at avenging this year’s loss
in the Super Bowl. Why not
give him one more toy to play
with? Beckham is as good a
downfield threat as there is in
the NFL (right up there with
Julio Jones and Antonio
Brown), but is just as good in
traffic, able to slip past tacklers
with strength and speed.
Imagining it might be possible, let’s take a look at the biggest concerns.
R Beckham can’t stay
healthy.
Last season ended early because of an ankle injury, and
Beckham has had issues with
his hamstrings in the past. But
even missing a few games does
not offset his productivity when
on the field.
In 47 career games, Beckham has 313 catches for 4,424
yards and 38 touchdowns, averaging 14.1 yards per catch. In
his first three (full) seasons, he
had at least 90 catches and
1,300 yards, and too many
memorable moments to count,
from one-hand acrobatics to after-the-catch highlights.
R He has off-the-field issues.
This is true. From the ill-advised (a pre-playoff boat trip to
Miami), to the ridiculous (a
post-touchdown dog-peeing
pose), from the weird (a kick-
ing-net wedding proposal drama), to the serious (a recent
Paris hotel video showing Beckham in the company of a woman and some white powder),
Beckham, in the words of a
longtime Giants employee, “can
give aspirin a headache.”
But Belichick could be the
perfect antidote, a my-way-orno-way boss unafraid of dealing
with difficult players. And at
25, Beckham can still mature.
R He doesn’t respect his
bosses.
This one is tough to read, as
it was clear that the leadership
of former Giants coach Ben
McAdoo was disastrous across
the board. But Beckham is
working on his third coach in
five years, and his immaturity
no doubt played a role in the
demise of both Tom Coughlin
and McAdoo.
But this much is certain:
Beckham has the respect of his
teammates.
He is beloved in the Giants
locker room, and Beckham’s
fellow players never doubted
his competitiveness, his desire
to win, or his work ethic.
And he seems to share that
respect with Brady, as the two
shared Instagram messages
this offseason, wherein Beckham revealed the custom Brady
jersey in his collection and Brady quoted rap lyrics to finish off
a Beckham caption.
The two actually exchanged
jerseys after a 2016 preseason
game, and Beckham once described the Patriots as his leastfavorite favorite team, admiring and hating their success all
at once.
Again, all of this is highly
unlikely. But any chance to
unite one of the game’s best
wide receivers with the game’s
best-ever quarterback is worth
investigating, no matter how
slim the odds.
You thought Brady and Randy Moss made for a good combination? Imagine Brady and
Beckham.
Of course it would be difficult, given an undoubtedly
high price tag versus an undeniably low draft position, but in
a fast-moving, trade-driven offseason, why not go for it?
Make the call, Patriots. Give
it a shot.
ORLANDO — Commissioner Roger Goodell reiterated
Wednesday that the top priorities of the NFL are protection
and safety as he explained and
defended the new “lowering
your head” rule at the wrapup
of the league’s annual meetings.
Reaction has been swift and
strong to the new rule that bans
players from lowering their helmet to initiate contact with another player.
The penalty is 15 yards with
the possibility of ejection.
“Our focus is on how to take
the head out of the game and
make sure we’re using the helmet as protection, and it’s not
being used as a weapon,” Goodell said, “and that’s the core of
what we’re focused on, and I
think we made a tremendous
amount of progress this week.”
Although Goodell said there
was near-unanimous support
among coaches for the rule,
many players and ex-players
have reacted negatively and
predicted chaotic results. The
commissioner said education is
the key to getting everyone on
the same page.
“There’s still a great deal of
communication and education
that has to take place,” he said.
“We’ll be doing that over the
next 90 days, including going to
each club and having players,
coaches, medical staffs — all
hands on deck at each club — to
go through the changes.’’
The rule applies to all players, regardless of position, and
the way it reads – “lowering the
head to initiate contact with the
helmet is a foul’’ — has led to
concern that it could result in
an excessive amount of penalties that would hurt the flow
and extend the length of games.
For example, a running back
plowing into a defense or a
quarterback crouching down
and accelerating into the defense on a sneak play could be
subject to a 15-yard flag.
“I don’t know how you’re going to play the game,’’ Redskins
cornerback Josh Norman told
USA Today. “If your helmet
comes in contact? How are you
going to avoid that if you’re in
the trenches and hit a running
back, facemask to facemask,
and accidentally graze the helmet? It’s obviously going to
happen.’’
49ers cornerback Richard
Sherman predicted that the
new rule could have the opposite effect of its intention.
“It’s ridiculous,’’ Sherman
told USA Today. “Like telling a
driver if you touch the lane
lines, you’re getting a ticket.
[It’s] going to lead to more lower-extremity injuries.’’
Hall of Famer Tim Brown
said strict enforcement could
result in multiple ejections.
“ The new targeting rule
looks like a disaster waiting to
happen!” Brown tweeted. “Un-
less, the goal is to activate more
players on game day, hope so,
teams will need them.”
Goodell said he was aware of
the concern from players over
an increase in penalties, ejections, and fines, and further
concerns that they’ll have to relearn how to play.
“You’re jumping ahead to
the players who haven’t had the
chance to hear the discussion
we’ve had,’’ he said.
“I’d give them an opportunity first to understand what the
play is before we make a lot of
judgments about the ramifications.’’
Part of the impetus for the
rule is the NFL’s desire to eliminate the kind of catastrophic hit
absorbed last season by Steelers
linebacker Ryan Shazier, who
suffered a serious neck injury
that left his career in doubt.
“The head, and the lowering
of the head, has become too
commonplace and it needs to
get out of the game,’’ said Falcons president Rich McKay,
chairman of the Competition
Committee. “I think the coaches unanimously stood up and
said, ‘We’re with it, we understand it’s a major change and
we take responsibility.’ ’’
. . .
The league also ruled
Wednesday that teams no longer will be required to kick
meaningless extra points after a
touchdown on the final play of
regulation.
Points to consider with Manziel
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE STAFF
If you live somewhere with
Internet access, you may know
by now that the Patriots were
one of several teams who spoke
to former NFL quarterback
Johnny Manziel at Texas A&M’s
Pro Day on Tuesday, where
Manziel threw passes.
This has led to questions
about whether the Patriots
might sign Manziel, who’s been
out of the league since 2015.
There was a lot of buzz that
the Patriots liked Manziel
ahead of the draft in 2014, but
their conversations now do not
mean Johnny Football is destined for Foxborough. As many
things with Manziel are, any
team’s reported interest gets
blown out of proportion because of his former draft status
and name recognition.
On that note, let’s get to
some wild and largely unhelpful speculation over why the Patriots might, or might not, be
interested in his services.
We’ll start with the cons:
1. His NFL tape is bad.
The Heisman Trophy winner
never replicated his college success in professional football.
Manziel threw for 1,675 yards,
7 touchdowns, and 7 interceptions in 15 games (eight starts,
2-6) over two years with the
Browns. He reportedly had issues focusing and picking up
the playbook, and New England’s offense is complicated.
2. He could get suspended
for domestic violence.
Legally, the charge brought
in April 2016 by Manziel’s former girlfriend, who swore under oath that he attacked her,
was dismissed last November
after Manziel completed an anger management course. The
league, however, isn’t required
to come to the same conclusions as law enforcement.
3. It would be a circus.
That’s quite the understatement. If this is the level of attention we’re giving a couple of
conversations during a time
when teams are talking to everyone, what would it be like
during OTAs or training camp?
Here are the pros:
1. He’s a good athlete.
Manziel has a smaller-than-
average frame for an NFL quarterback, but he can move that
body around, though. Manziel’s
6.75 three-cone and 4.03 shuttle times were both excellent
and show similar agility and
quickness to Julian Edelman.
2. He’d be cheap.
Manziel said he’s willing to
play for free. The Patriots would
have to pay him, but it could be
a minimum deal if he managed
to make the roster.
3. His could end up being a
powerful story about mental
health.
Manziel has said all the right
things before and wasn’t able to
follow through with them. He’s
saying all the right things again,
as are those around him. Wide
receiver Mike Evans said at the
A&M Pro Day that Manziel is
“getting his life back on track.”
Manziel said earlier this year
that he’s been diagnosed with
bipolar disorder and now takes
medication and gets treatment.
He’s also completed programs
that stopped his drug and alcohol abuse, Manziel has said,
which he described as a form of
self-medication.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Chara signs one­year extension
By Barbara Matson
Chara said. “Obviously we all know you
can’t play — lacing up skates — forever.
I just feel at this time there’s plenty left,
so I want to enjoy it.’’
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Zdeno Chara wanted nothing more
than to stay in Boston.
The 41-year-old captain and 12-year
Bruin got his wish
BRUINS
Wednesday, signing a
NOTEBOOK one-year, $5 million
extension for the 201819 season, a deal that includes another
$1.75 million in performance-based
bonuses.
“I’m happy, we are happy, I think it
works for both sides,’’ Chara said while
sitting alongside general manager Don
Sweeney at TD Garden. “I’m very
pleased. For me, it was very important
that I continue to play and I stay in
Boston.
“I believe in this team, it’s very exciting to be part of this team. I think this
team has a chance and that’s all you
can ask for. Rest of it is up to us to do
on the ice.’’
Chara’s salary is $4 million this season. But after producing a line of 716—23 and a plus-26 in 68 games,
Sweeney was left with no doubt about
the big defenseman’s ability to perform. In 888 games with Boston (seventh in team history), he has averaged
25:04 of ice time. Despite losing his
spot on the power play, this year he has
averaged a team-high 23:00 minutes
per game.
“He’s been a dominant player this
year,’’ Sweeney said. “He takes all the
hard matchups, he doesn’t shy away
from any situations, and he’s embraced
the role he’s emerged into, peeling back
a little bit of situational things and being very open-minded to that.’’
Chara told Sweeney when negotiations began that more than just staying
with the team, he wanted to keep performing at a high level, and Sweeney
agreed Chara had backed that up. That
made the resolution easier.
“I would not be surprised if we’re
sitting here [again] because he’s indicated that he wants to continue to play,
and this is based on performance, obviously his longevity with our hockey
club, his importance to our hockey club
in a leadership role, and I think you’re
seeing that with his tutelage of some of
our younger players both on and off the
ice,’’ Sweeney said.
Chara believes there will be another
contract in his future, but he added the
incentives in this deal were not the key
factor.
Big absence
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Zdeno Chara, at age 41, still leads
the Bruins in average playing time.
Lightning thumbnails
R When, where: Thursday, 7 p.m., at TD Gar­
den.
R TV, radio: NESN, WBZ­FM (98.5).
R Goals: Nikita Kucherov 38, Brayden Point
28, Steven Stamkos 27.
R Assists: Stamkos 59, Kucherov 58, Victor
Hedman 42.
R Goaltending: Andrei Vasilevskiy (42­15­3,
2.59 GAA), Louis Domingue (6­3­0, 2.87), Pe­
ter Budaj (3­3­1, 3.77).
R Head to head: This is the third of four
meetings this season. The Bruins have won
the previous two, including 3­0 on March 17
at Tampa.
R Miscellany: Tampa Bay averages a league­
leading 3.5 goals per game and has the sec­
ond­best power play in the league, clicking
at 24.7 percent . . . The Lightning sit just one
point ahead of the Bruins in the Atlantic Di­
vision after dropping two in a row and four
of their last seven games . . . Kucherov’s 96
points rank second in the NHL, while Vasi­
levskiy leads the league with 42 wins.
“For me, motivation comes with being on the ice and competing,’’ he said.
“And for that you need to be under the
contract. At the same time I’m highly
motivated just to be playing and competing, coming to the rink every day
and being surrounded by such youth
and talented players, the right mix of
players — it just can’t get any better.’’
Chara doesn’t know how many seasons he has left, but he has no intention of slowing down now.
“It’s hard to put a number on it,’’
Without Chara in the lineup Tuesday night in Winnipeg, the Jets were
overly rambunctious when lining up
Black-and-Gold sweaters along the wall
during their 5-4 shootout win.
Case in point: Jets defenseman Josh
Morrissey leveled rookie blue liner
Matt Grzelcyk with a heavy hit at the
end of the second period, earning a
five-minute boarding major and rendering Grzelcyk hors de combat for the
remainder of the night.
Had the 6-foot-9-inch Chara been
on the beat, maintaining order as he
has since arriving in Boston as a free
agent in July 2006, the Jets would not
have been as free to take liberties. The
Jets also crushed top right winger Da­
vid Pastrnak with a couple of big hits
along the boards, each of them going
unpenalized by a four-man officiating
crew that at times was overwhelmed by
the action.
Coach Bruce Cassidy acknowledged
after the game that Chara’s presence
would have mitigated some of the Jets’
chippiness and overall aggressiveness.
“Yeah, and [David] Backes probably, and Charlie is a big man who can
handle himself there, too,” said the
coach. “And Rick Nash is a big man, so,
yeah, we missed some guys that could
handle that.
“But I thought we had plenty of grit
in the lineup tonight, showed plenty of
compete. But, yeah, that might balance
it a bit.”
Injury updates
Sweeney updated the status of the
injured Bruins, saying that Backes (leg
laceration), Jake DeBrusk (upper
body), Chara (upper body), and McAvoy (knee) all skated Wednesday morning, but Sweeney also said there is no
definitive timetable for their returns.
Nash (upper body) did not skate, and
there was no word on the extent of Grzelcyk’s injury.
For his part, Chara said, “I’m feeling
better, I’m making progress, and when
it’s time to be in the game, I’ll be ready
to play.”
Kevin Paul Dupont of the Globe staff
contributed to this report.
Sports
NHL
LEAFS 4, PANTHERS 3
Florida ..........................1
Toronto ........................3
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Div. GP W
ATLANTIC
p­Tampa Bay
p­BOSTON
Toronto
L OL
A 76 51 21 4
A 75 47 17 11
A 77 46 24 7
METROPOLITAN Div. GP W
Washington
Pittsburgh
Columbus
L OL
M 77 46 24
M 77 43 28
M 77 43 29
WILD CARD
Div. GP W
7
6
5
GF
GA
273
249
261
217
194
219
Pts. ROW
106
105
99
45
44
39
Pts. ROW
99
92
91
43
41
37
GF
GA
243
253
222
225
238
211
GF
GA
*Philadelphia
New Jersey
M 77 38 25 14
M 76 40 28 8
90
88
36
35
232
229
231
228
Florida
Carolina
NY Rangers
NY Islanders
Montreal
Detroit
Ottawa
Buffalo
A
M
M
M
A
A
A
A
85
79
75
74
68
67
63
60
36
31
30
29
26
23
24
23
229
215
223
246
196
199
207
177
228
244
248
279
245
239
270
250
75
77
77
77
77
77
76
76
39
34
33
32
28
28
26
24
L OL
29
32
35
35
37
38
39
40
7
11
9
10
12
11
11
12
Pts. ROW
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
Div. GP W
p­Nashville
p­Winnipeg
Minnesota
L OL
C 76 49 16 11
C 76 47 19 10
C 76 42 24 10
PACIFIC
Div. GP W
*p­Vegas
San Jose
Los Angeles
L OL
P 76 48 21 7
P 77 44 23 10
P 77 42 28 7
WILD CARD
Div. GP W
Pts. ROW
109
104
94
43
43
39
GF
GA
245
255
233
193
200
215
Pts. ROW
103
98
91
45
39
40
GF
GA
254
238
224
205
209
190
GF
GA
St. Louis
Anaheim
C 76 43 28 5
P 77 39 25 13
91
91
40
35
212
218
198
208
*Colorado
Dallas
Calgary
Edmonton
Chicago
Vancouver
*Arizona
C
C
P
P
C
P
P
90
86
80
74
72
65
63
39
35
33
30
30
28
24
240
218
205
224
217
201
190
222
210
234
250
238
248
242
76
77
77
77
77
77
76
41
39
35
34
31
28
26
L OL
27 8
30 8
32 10
37 6
36 10
40 9
39 11
Pts. ROW
* — Not including late game; ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
p — Clinched playoff berth
Eight teams in each conference qualify. The top three teams from
each division comprise the first six spots; the two remaining teams
with the most points, regardless of division, earn the wild card spots.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
At Wash 3
Florida 3
NY Rangers 2 (OT)
at Vegas
Arizona
at Colorado
Philadelphia
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Tampa Bay at Boston
7
Dallas at Minnesota
Pittsburgh at New Jersey
7
Winnipeg at Chicago
Detroit at Buffalo
7
Columbus at Calgary
Florida at Ottawa
7:30
San Jose at Nashville
8
8
8:30
9
Edmonton at Vancouver
Arizona at Los Angeles
10
10:30
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
At Winnipeg 5
Boston 4 (SO)
At New Jersey 4
Carolina 3
At St. Louis 3
At Dallas 3
San Jose 2 (OT)
Philadelphia 2 (OT)
At Detroit 5
Pittsburgh 2
Columbus 7
NY Islanders 4
at Ottawa 3
At Vancouver 4
At Nashville 2
Minnesota 1 (SO)
1
0
1 —
1 —
3
4
First period — 1. Toronto, Marner 21
(Rielly, Plekanec), 3:05. 2. Toronto,
Matthews 30 (Nylander, Gardiner),
9:24. 3. Toronto, Marleau 25 (Marner),
13:55. 4. Florida, Huberdeau 24 (Mal­
gin), 17:49. Penalties — Bjugstad, Fla
(tripping), 4:26.
Second period — 5. Florida, Hu­
berdeau 25 (Trocheck, Pysyk), 15:08.
Penalties — van Riemsdyk, Tor (hook­
ing), 2:41. Polak, Tor (slashing), 4:04.
Third period — 6. Toronto, van Ri­
emsdyk 35 (Bozak, Brown), 11:48. 7.
Florida, Dadonov 25 (Yandle, Ekblad),
18:34. Penalties — Marner, Tor (hold­
ing stick), 13:32.
Shots on goal — Florida 9­10­14 — 33.
Toronto 16­11­8 — 35.
Power plays — Florida 0­3; Toronto
0­1.
Goalies — Florida, Luongo 15­11­2
(35 shots­31 saves). Toronto, Andersen
36­20­5 (33 shots­30 saves).
Referees — Justin StPierre, Chris
Rooney. Linesmen — Scott Cherrey,
Kory Nagy.
A — 18,893 (18,819). T — 2:34.
CAPITALS 3, RANGERS 2
NY Rangers ............1
Washington ............1
0
0
1
1
0 —
1 —
2
3
First period — 1. NY Rangers, Hayes
22 (Vesey, Skjei), 12:42 (pp). 2. Wash­
ington, Burakovsky 10 (Backstrom, Os­
hie), 19:27. Penalties — Backstrom,
Was (roughing), 10:59. Wilson, Was
(tripping), 13:44. Skjei, NYR (slashing),
15:57.
Second period — None. Penalties —
Chytil, NYR (hooking), 6:50. Pionk, NYR
(tripping), 9:50. Kempny, Was, double
minor (hi stick), 14:50.
Third period — 3. NY Rangers,
Spooner 12 (Andersson, Skjei), 10:35. 4.
Washington, Eller 18 (Backstrom, Kuz­
netsov), 18:55. Penalties — Beagle,
Was (holding), 2:37. JCarlson, Was
(roughing), 4:21. Vesey, NYR (rough­
ing), 4:21.
Overtime — 5. Washington, Kuznets­
ov 25, 0:38. Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — NY Rangers 18­9­
10­0 — 37. Washington 8­13­11­1 — 33.
Power plays — NY Rangers 1­5;
Washington 0­3.
Goalies — NY Rangers, Lundqvist 25­
24­7 (33 shots­30 saves). Washington,
Holtby 32­15­4 (37 shots­35 saves).
Referees — Ghislain Hebert, Steve
Kozari. Linesmen — Michel Cormier,
Derek Amell.
A — 0 (18,506). T — 2:37.
PREDATORS 2, WILD 1
Tuesday night game
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
At Toronto 4
C3
at Edmonton 3
Anaheim 1
Minnesota................0
Nashville ..................1
0
0
1
0
0 —
0 —
1
2
Predators win shootout, 1­0
First period — 1. Nashville, Josi 12
(Turris), 2:51. Penalties — Sissons, Nsh
(interference), 13:15.
Second period — None. Penalties —
Murphy, Min (hooking), 2:18. Hartman,
Nsh (tripping), 5:07. Coyle, Min (rough­
ing), 8:07. Winnik, Min (elbowing),
15:31. Dubnyk, Min, served by Eriksson
Ek (embellishment), 16:45. Arvidsson,
Nsh (interference on the goaltender),
16:45. Koivu, Min (hooking), 17:22.
Third period — 2. Minnesota, Staal
40 (Granlund, Parise), 16:45. Penalties
— None.
Overtime — None. Penalties — None.
Shootout — Minnesota 0 (Niederreit­
er NG, Parise NG, Koivu NG). Nashville
1 (Turris G, Ellis NG)
Shots on goal — Minnesota 4­7­9­3 —
23. Nashville 11­10­7­1 — 29.
Power plays — Minnesota 0­2; Nash­
ville 0­4.
Goalies — Minnesota, Dubnyk 32­
14­7 (29 shots­28 saves). Nashville,
Rinne 41­11­4 (23 shots­22 saves).
Referees — Francis Charron, TJ Lux­
more. Linesmen — Matt MacPherson,
Pierre Racicot.
A — 17,424 (17,113). T — 2:47.
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Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Without a doubt,
Sale, Sox start anew
uRED SOX
Continued from Page C1
“If he’s not the best, he’s
close,” said new teammate J.D.
Martinez, who has faced Sale
more than any other pitcher in
his career.
“He has this weird, lanky
body and a weird, lanky delivery that makes it hard to find
the ball,” Martinez said. “When
you do find it, it’s coming in hot
and you have to be ready to go.
It’s not easy; it’s not fun.”
Martinez spends countless
hours studying pitchers to
glean bits of information that
can give him an edge when he
comes to the plate. He watches
video and breaks down scouting reports, sopping up as
much information as he can to
find exploitable tendencies.
“I go to sleep thinking about
it,” Martinez said. “I’m a little
crazy about preparation.”
But Sale was a safe he never
cracked.
“Completely unpredictable.
He does things for no reason,”
Martinez said. “That’s what
makes him so good.”
Martinez has 42 career plate
appearances against Sale. He
has more home runs (3) against
him than any other pitcher but
also more strikeouts (16).
“I’ ve hit him pretty well
when I’ve made contact,” Martinez said. “But that doesn’t
happen much.”
Leon knows the feeling. He
faced Sale in one game, on June
21, 2016, at Fenway Park. Leon
struck out twice, but he did
have a single.
“A broken-bat looper,” Leon
said. “I was lucky. He was so
nasty. It wasn’t fun. I’m glad
he’s on my team.”
Sale approaches every batter
with a clean slate. He lets the
catcher, pitching coach, and advance scouts decide what’s best.
Sale’s four-seam fastball,
slider, and changeup are all
above-average pitches, so any
combination is effective. In a
big situation, almost every
starter has a pitch he doesn’t
quite trust. Not Sale; they’re all
good.
“You have to be careful what
pitch you want to call, some hitters hit certain pitches better
than others,” Leon said. “But
every pitch I call for Chris I like.
“His slider is nasty. But I like
his fastball more than his slider. He can locate it to both sides
of the plate or slow it down. He
can throw his change at any
time. He can locate any pitch at
any time. That’s why he’s Chris
Sale.”
There’s freedom in leaving
the decisions to others. Sale
considers it his job to pitch, not
ponder. His role is unfolding
that “weird, lanky” 6-foot-6inch, 185-pound body and
throwing the ball.
“If I was smart, I’d be a scientist,” he said. “It takes the
thinking aspec t out of the
game. For me, if I’m thinking in
my mind, ‘I want to throw a
fastball right here,’ and [the
catcher] throws down a slider
or changeup, I now have doubt
in my mind.
“You never want to go out
on th at f i eld wit h a sin gle
doubt, it’ ll eat you alive. I
throw every pitch with a purpose and whichever one it is,
that’s what I go with it.”
Developing that level of
trust in the catcher is a product
of knowing there is no wrong
choice.
“That would be a pretty arrogant thing to say. But I have
confidence in myself, I do,” Sale
said. “I don’t want to come off
as arrogant or cocky, but you
have to. If you’re not confident
in what you’re putting out
you’re kind of wasting your
time.”
When Sale started to compare his process to a writer fini s h i n g a s t o r y, a r e p o r t e r
laughed. Bad idea.
“Seriously, I’m not joking.
This is real,” Sale said. “If you’re
not confident in what you’re
putting out, don’t do it. For me,
that’s where I’m at.”
Red Sox manager Alex Cora
hopes to see that competitiveness rub off on his younger
pitchers. As bench coach of the
Astros last season, he marveled
at Sale’s determination.
“ The way he pitches, it
seems like e ver y pitch is a
championship pitch with him,”
Cora said. “You’re like, ‘Wow.’
Which is great. There are a few
guys who can learn that and
compete the way he does.
“I’m not saying they don’t
compete. I’m saying it would be
great if everybody gets to that
level. Is it hard to do? Of course,
yes. That’s why he’s one of the
best in the big leagues.”
Chris Archer, who is starting
for the Rays, said every pitcher
has the goal of “mindful intent”
on every pitch.
But it’s easy to get caught up
thinking ahead or get annoyed
by an umpire’s call. Distractions abound in a major league
ballpark.
“To maximize your potential
as a starting pitcher, you have
to be mindful of every pitch,”
Archer said. “The way [Sale]
mixes pitches is what impresses
me. Not only does he have highend stuff, it’s such a mix that
the hitter can’t wait for one particular one.”
Sale finished second in the
Cy Young Award voting last
season and the Red Sox made a
quick exit from the playoffs.
There is still much he can accomplish and it starts Thursday.
It also will start with a new
catcher. Leon caught all but
one of Sale’s starts last season
but Christian Vazquez has him
for the opener. Their history together is only 5‚ innings.
Cora sees Vazquez as his primary catcher and wants him to
get comfortable with Sale. He
also trusts the scouting report
Vazquez will refer to.
“I know we’re going to get
Chris’s best,” Cora said. “We always do.”
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
The wait is almost over for Mookie Betts (center) and his Red Sox teammates, who open the season Thursday at 4:10 p.m.
For starters, not much fanfare
uSHAUGHNESSY
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Continued from Page C1
ternoon at 4 p.m., 1,400 miles
from home in the worst ballpark in the majors against perhaps the worst team in the majors while folks back in Boston
are looking at snowbanks,
gearing up for Celtics and Bruins playoffs, and still asking
why Malcolm Butler did not
play in the Super Bowl.
“We’re a pretty good team,’’
senior statesman Dustin Pedroia (recovering from knee
surgery) said before the Sox
shuttered their spring clubhouse in Fort Myers earlier this
week.
This is true. Though it’s
been a while since the Sox
owned the hearts of Hub sports
fans, they should be a strong
entry in the top-heavy American League this year. They’ve
added a 45-home-run bat (J.D.
Martinez) to a team that won
back-to-back division titles
with bookend 93-win seasons.
It’s not a stretch to expect better seasons from Hanley
Ramirez (trimmer, healthier),
Xander Bogaerts (10 homers
last year), and David Price (six
wins in 2017).
Meanwhile, Andrew Benintendi looked like a Yaz/Fred
Lynn hybrid in spring training,
ace closer Craig Kimbrel is in
his walk year, and a full season
of baby bull slugger Rafael Devers bodes well for 2018.
Mookie Betts is a pocket Willie
Mays, an MVP waiting to happen.
When new manager Alex
Cora was asked what he liked
about spring training , the
rookie skipper smiled and said,
“Besides the freaking best record in baseball?’’
Haha. Good one. Cora
knows that Boston’s 22-9-1
Grapefruit record means nothing once the season star ts
Thursday against Chris Archer,
the much-buffeted ace (2-12,
5.45 ERA lifetime against the
Red Sox) of the Rays. What Cora may not yet know is that a
93-win, first-place season also
holds little currency in Boston
Odds
......2017 vs. opp......
IP ERA
W­L
BOSTON AT TAMPA BAY, 4:10 p.m.
Sale (L)
Archer (R)
­180
+150
4­1
1­1
40.2
15.1
2.66
5.87
7.0
11.0
3.86
2.45
Rays-Red Sox
series thumbnails
At Tropicana Field,
St. Petersburg, Fla.
Thursday, 4:10 p.m.
(Statistics from 2017)
NESN, WEEI­FM (93.7)
W­L ERA
CHI. CUBS AT MIAMI, 12:40 p.m.
Lester (L)
Ureña (R)
­195
+165
1­0
2­0
PITTSBURGH AT DETROIT, 1:10 p.m.
Nova (R)
Zimmermann (R)
­125
+105
0­1
0­1
6.1
7.0
8.53
3.86
5.0
0.0
9.00
0.00
ST. LOUIS AT NY METS, 1:10 p.m.
Martínez (R)
Syndergaard (R)
+125
­145
0­1
0­0
MINNESOTA AT BALTIMORE, 3:05 p.m.
Odorizzi (R)
Bundy (R)
+105
­125
2­0
0­2
20.1
12.0
3.10
6.00
19.0
10.0
4.74
5.40
LHP Chris Sale
RHP Chris Archer
Friday, 7:10 p.m.
NESN, WEEI­FM (93.7)
W­L ERA
LHP David Price
6­3 3.38
LHP Blake Snell
5­7 4.04
Saturday, 6:10 p.m.
NESN, WEEI­FM (93.7)
W­L ERA
HOUSTON AT TEXAS, 3:35 p.m.
Verlander (R)
Hamels (L)
­170
+145
2­1
1­1
NY YANKEES AT TORONTO, 3:37 p.m.
Severino (R)
Happ (L)
­160
+135
0­1
2­0
12.2
11.2
4.97
1.54
LA ANGELS AT OAKLAND, 4:05 p.m.
Richards (R)
Graveman (R)
­135
+115
0­0
1­1
8.0
29.0
1.13
4.66
MILWAUKEE AT SAN DIEGO, 4:10 p.m.
Anderson (R)
Richard (L)
­115
­105
0­0
0­1
12.1
6.0
5.11
9.00
PHILADELPHIA AT ATLANTA, 4:10 p.m.
Nola (R)
Teheran (R)
­130
+110
2­0
1­2
15.0
23.1
1.20
5.79
CHI. WHITE SOX AT KANSAS CITY, 4:15 p.m.
Shields (R)
Duffy (L)
+145
­170
0­0
1­3
10.1
22.0
7.84
7.77
SAN FRANCISCO AT LA DODGERS, 7:10 p.m.
Blach (L)
Kershaw (L)
+250
­310
1­2
4­1
25.1
34.0
3.20
1.59
CLEVELAND AT SEATTLE, 10:10 p.m.
Kluber (R)
Hernández (R)
­170
+145
1­0
0­0
7.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
COLORADO AT ARIZONA, 10:10 p.m.
Gray (R)
Corbin (L)
­110
­110
2­1
2­1
18.0
22.1
3.50
4.03
these days.
It’s totally unfair, but absolutely true: We are insanely
spoiled in this High Renaissance of Boston sports. The Patriots have finished first a million straight years (OK, only 14
of the last 15) in their pathetic
Warhol Division. The upstart
Celtics had the best record in
the entire Eastern Conference
last year. And the Bruins (remember those meaningless Adams Division banners?) can tell
you the plug-nickel value of the
Presidents’ Trophy.
Baseball used to be the exc e p t i o n . In t h e A m e r i c a n
League from 1961-68, you had
17­8 2.90
10­12 4.07
RHP Rick Porcello
11­17 4.65
TBA
—
—
Sunday, 1:10 p.m.
NESN, WEEI­FM (93.7)
W­L ERA
RHP Hector Velazquez
3­1 2.92
RHP Jake Faria
5­4 3.43
Head to head: This is the first of 19
games; the Sox went 11­8 vs. the
Rays last season.
Miscellany: Face of the franchise
Evan Longoria was shipped to the
Giants in the offseason as the Rays
undergo a rebuild, again . . . Ar­
cher is making his fourth straight
Opening Day start for the Rays . . .
Faria, 24, no­hit the Tigers in six in­
nings in his final spring training
start.
to beat nine other teams over
162 games to finish first, and it
meant you went directly to the
World Series. That’s part of the
reason that the 1967 Red Sox
are so beloved in this region.
They won the greatest pennant
race of all time, finished first in
a 10-team league, and went to
the seventh game of the World
Series.
The 2017 Red Sox liked to
brag that they were the first
Sox team to finish first in backto-back season in more than
100 years, and that is true but
nonetheless meaningless, because they were choking dogs
in October, just as they were in
2016. The locals were one-anddone both seasons. They
amassed a single victory in seven playoff games. None of the
young core guys hit, and not a
single pitcher on the current
Sox roster has ever won a postseason game as a starter.
Mr. October? Today’s Red
Sox have a lot of Mr. Junes.
But Opening Day is about
starting over, so let’s get into
the spirit. This is 2018. Your
Sox are tanned and relaxed,
and they really like their 42year-old manager. The clubhouse culture is great. PingPong for everyone. There will
be no more “It’s-not-me-it’sthem,’’ David Price/Dennis
E c k e r s l e y, A p p l e Wa t c h
Cheatin’ tomfoolery.
The Sox have rid themselves
of clueless manager John Farrell and a cast of coaches who,
according to ownership, ruined
the 2017 season with a poor
“approach.’’ The ’18 CoraMen
are ready to ride Launch Angle
and First-Pitch Swinging all
the way to the Fall Classic.
It’s not going to be easy. The
American League is stacked at
the top. The Houston Astros
and Cleveland Indians — the
franchises that dismissed the
Sox the past two Octobers —
are still loaded, and the Yankees are once again baseball’s
centerfold team with a Murderers Row of sluggers reminiscent of the Ruth-Gehrig days.
But the Red Sox are also really good. They have baseball’s
highest payroll ($223 million).
They have the exact same team
that just won 93 games, plus a
guy who hit 45 homers last
year. They have a new manager
who is loved by all, and a
friendly early schedule that
gives them nine games out of
the gate against teams that are
trying to lose (Rays and Marlins).
It’s like a steady diet of Bills,
Jets, and Dolphins. The Sox
could be 9-0 when they play the
Yankees at Fenway April 10.
But will you embrace them?
Will you love them again? Or
will you watch the Celtics and
Bruins and speculate on the
NFL Draft and wonder about
Malcolm Butler?
Let’s see. It all starts Thursday in the dumb, dank Trop
Dome.
Nerves not getting in Cora’s way as dream day approaches
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —
Alex Cora managed two seasons of winter ball in Puerto
Rico. There
RED SOX
was spring
NOTEBOOK training, too.
He knows the
job.
But Thursday will be the
first time he manages a team —
his team — in a major league
game that counts. This isn’t filling in when the manager gets
ejected, as happened last season in Houston. This is the fulfillment of a dream Cora has
had for years.
“For this day to arrive and
being able to do it is awesome,”
he said. “But honestly, there’s
no difference. I’ve been in a
great place as a person for
quite a while. This past year, I
learned a lot throughout the
year. It was a great year personally. I’m surrounded by a lot of
people who made that year
special.
“Am I excited about it? Yeah.
Am I nervous about it? Not really.”
Cora said he felt more pres-
sure as general manger of the
team Puerto Rico sent to the
World Baseball Classic last season. They advanced to the
championship game before losing to the United States.
“The expectations on that
team were unreal,” he said. “It
was either make it to the final
or win it. When you’re the GM
of your national team, everyone was looking at us.
“So this is awesome, I’m the
manager of the Boston Red
Sox. But at the same time, all
those experiences helped me to
be calm and ready for this challenge.”
Cora joked that if he didn’t
get enough sleep on Wednesday, it would only be because
his 8-month-old twins kept
him awake.
Rays manager Kevin Cash,
who played with Cora on the
2007-08 Red Sox, is happy to
be part of his big day.
“We talked a bunch when he
got the job,” Cash said. “He had
probably as exciting an offseason as anybody in baseball,
winning the World Series and
getting the Red Sox job.
“Alex is a great baseball
mind and has the personality
to connect with players. I’m
looking forward to shaking his
hand on Opening Day.”
Back home again
For Chris Sale, pitching
Opening Day at Tropicana
Field will bring back warm
memories. The first major
league game he ever attended
was the first game in Rays’ history, March 31, 1998, against
Detroit.
A day after he turned 9, Sale
went to the game with his uncle.
“I sat just to the left of [section] 144,” Sale said, pointing
to the bleachers in right field.
“I had a Rays jersey on. My uncle bought me a polo with Rays
colors, the blue and the green
and the white and I got mustard on it. That’s where the jersey came from.
“I actually have a panoramic
picture at my house of the first
pitch being thrown here.”
Sale, who grew up in Lakeland, Fla., will have a large
group of family and friends at
the game.
The Rays are celebrating
their 20th anniversary
throughout the season. The
1998 team will be honored on
Saturday, with Hall of Famer
Wade Boggs expected to be
part of the group.
Kickoff party
Eduardo Rodriguez decided
before spring training that he
wanted to wear No. 57 to pay
tribute to one of his heroes, the
great Venezuelan pitcher Johan
Santana. Third base coach Car­
los Febles had 57 and he gave
it up to Rodriguez.
Normally that would be it,
coaches give up their numbers
to players all the time.
But Cora playfully nudged
Rodriguez, saying he had to do
something to compensate Febles. After a while, it built up to
Rodriguez buying dinner for
the entire team.
That was Tuesday night at
the 400 Beach Seafood and Tap
House in St. Petersburg. According to Cora, 56 people
showed up. Every player and
coach in the travel party was
on hand along with assorted
staff members. It wasn’t mandatory, either.
Rodriguez was not stuck
with the bill, by the way. Several well-compensated teammates kicked in.
“I’ve never been on a team
that the whole travel group was
in one same room,” Cora said.
“It was awesome. It was something that we will always remember. Whatever happens
throughout the season, we can
go back to that day.
“We’ve been talking about
connecting and all that and
having fun. You know what? At
the end of the day, it’s what
they do. This is a good group.
They care about each other. It
was eye-opening and it was
pretty cool to be with them.”
Pitching switch
The Rays were planning to
start Nathan Eovaldi on Sunday. But the righthander has
“loose bodies” in his elbow and
will have arthroscopic surgery.
He was placed on the disabled
list. Righthander Jake Faria
will start in his place . . . Not
much can help the atmosphere
at dingy Tropicana Field, but
the Rays installed new turf for
aesthetic purposes. It’s the
same model of Shaw Sports
turf used before, just a different shade of green.
Streak ends
With Dustin Pedroia officially going on the disabled list
on Thursday, his streak of 11
consecutive Opening Day starts
will end. Mark Loretta started
in 2006 and Eduardo Nunez is
set to start Thursday . . . The
Red Sox will have five different
Opening Day starters in the
last five years. Sale follows Rick
Porcello, David Price, Clay Bu­
chholz, and Jon Lester. They
also will have six different
catchers in six years with
Christian Vazquez coming after Sandy Leon, Blake Swihart,
Ryan Hanigan, A.J. Pierzynski,
and Jarrod Saltalamacchia . . .
At 21 years and 156 days, Rafa­
el Devers would become the
second youngest Opening Day
starter at third base for the Sox.
Luis Alvarado was 21 years and
82 days old when the Sox
opened the 1970 season at New
York against the Yankees.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C5
Foul ball: Exhibition cut short
ASSOCIATED PRESS
FILE/JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Mookie Betts needs to return to his 2016 form, when he was runner-up for MVP in the AL.
Sox will need five-star effort
uON BASEBALL
Continued from Page C1
and Hanley Ramirez will look
to thrust themselves in there
during the course of the season,
but starting Thursday, Martinez
will begin his tenure as the elite
hitter the Red Sox didn’t have
for a year after David Ortiz retired.
You can argue that Martinez
is the most important hitter to
join the Red Sox since Manny
Ramirez; they needed power after finishing last in the American League in home runs in
2017. It took a while to consummate the deal because a
Lisfranc foot injury that forced
him to miss almost two months
of last season was still showing
up on the MRI.
So Martinez was signed late.
He did not hit one home run in
camp, but nobody was fretting
because he was hitting line
drives all over the field.
What he has also done is bestow his knowledge of hitting
and preparation on teammates,
particularly Betts, the superstar
of the team who had an off season after finishing MVP runner-up in 2016. Martinez, who
hit 45 homers in only 119
games last season, would love
to see Betts return to the form
that took the American League
by storm.
“We talk hitting all the time,”
Martinez said. “Mookie is always asking a lot of questions.
We have good dialogue about
hitting.
“Looking forward to hitting
in this lineup. One through
nine, we’re pretty solid. It’s a
tough lineup to pitch to. If we
all do our par t , it could be
something special.”
So Martinez has to do his
job. Betts has to do his job as a
power-hitting leadoff man who
can also get on base and steal
bases. Sale, the Opening Day
starter, has to be the dominant
Sale of last season but needs to
stay strong from starts 1
through 33. He gave everyone a
scare when he was struck by a
line drive off the left hip in his
final spring training tuneup.
Price is eager to put an injury- and controversy-filled season behind him. He and Sale
have been eased into the season.
Dombrowski built this team
with the idea that he would
have an unbeatable 1-2
lefthanded duo at the top of the
rotation. It didn’t go as planned
last season, when Price was limited to 11 starts and did a bullpen stint once he came back.
“I think we’re all looking forward to the start of the season
and what this rotation is capable of doin g if e ver yon e is
healthy,” said Price, who will
start the second game Friday.
“I’ve never felt better coming out of spring training. It
went very well, I thought. I feel
strong. I was able to throw all
four of my pitches earlier than
I’ve ever thrown them. It’s all
good.”
Kimbrel is likely the pitcher
who is behind as he had to leave
Florida for about three weeks to
be with his ailing daughter in
Boston. But judging from his
dominating performance
against the Cubs Tuesday in the
final exhibition game, you
wouldn’t know that it was only
his second appearance in a
game this spring.
Ma n a g e r A l e x Co r a h a s
deemed Kimbrel ready to go.
The Red Sox would like to avoid
using him early in this series,
but they’ll use him if they have
to. The last thing they would
want is for Kimbrel to break
down because he did too much
too soon.
While he was away from the
team, he did throw bullpen sessions in Boston. He also was
able to throw to hitters, so
while he didn’t get the usual 5-7
appearances a closer would get,
he came close with other work.
Obviously, a closer who
struck out nearly 50 percent of
the batters he faced in 2017 is
hugely important. Kimbrel will
have the added pressure of
heading into his free agent season. Every closer wants to have
that great season to launch him
into big dollars (though Greg
Holland didn’t get it, and still
sits on the market). Kimbrel
seems to compare best to Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman,
who averages $20 million per
year.
“ We have one goal,” said
Sale. “That’s to win a World Series. That’s all that matters. No
individual numbers even enter
my mind.”
Martinez shrugs off the notion that he will be under a microscope. He’ll earn $110 million over a five-year deal to be
Boston’s cleanup hitter. Eyes
will be upon him to see whether
he can fill Ortiz’s very large
shoes and be the clutch bat Ortiz was for so many years.
Martinez has a chance to be
all that. As he took batting practice, there was admiration apparent among the players and
Sox executives for the way the
ball was rocketing off his bat.
Asked whether he could
have used a few more days to
get his stroke down, he said, “I
don’t think you ever get it completely the way you want it. I
think if you ever say you do, this
game has a way of biting you.
You’re always striving to get
better.”
Martinez gets it that he was
brought here to add power. Will
he hit 45 homers? Will he come
close? That’s a question he
doesn’t know the answer to.
But it all begins Thursday afternoon at The Trop, when four
of the Fab Five will begin their
respective quests to dominate
the game of baseball for the Red
Sox.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
SportsLog
76ers’ Embiid injured in collision
Philadelphia center Joel Embiid was taken to
a hospital for precautionary testing after a collision with teammate Markelle Fultz Wednesday
night. The team said the 7-footer had a facial
contusion, but did not have a concussion. Embiid left the game in the second quarter and did
not return but the 76ers still beat the visiting
New York Knicks, 118-101. Fultz was driving
toward the basket 20 seconds into the period
when he appeared to accidentally head-butt
Embiid. Fultz was not injured on the play.
Love in concussion protocol
Cleveland Cavaliers forward Kevin Love entered the NBA’s concussion protocol after being
elbowed in the face. Love was struck by Miami’s
Jordan Mickey during Tuesday night’s 98-79
loss to the Heat. He briefly returned to the floor,
but experienced concussion-like symptoms at
halftime. The Cavaliers said Love will miss their
game at Charlotte and his status will be updated when appropriate . . . LeBron James tied one
of Michael Jordan’s most impressive records
with his 866th consecutive game with at least
10 points. James matched Jordan’s 17-year-old
mark against the Jordan-owned Hornets in
Charlotte, N.C., when he scored on a powerful
alley-oop dunk on a pass from J.R. Smith in the
second quarter . . . Nassir Little scored 28
points, 3 shy of the McDonald’s All-American
Game record, and the West rallied to beat the
East, 131-128, in Atlanta. In the girls’ game,
UConn-bound Christyn Williams was named
the MVP after leading the West to an 82-79 win
over the East with 22 points and 12 rebounds.
FOOTBALL
Giants set price for Beckham
The New York Giants have asked for at least
two first-round picks in return for Odell Beck­
ham Jr., a league source told ESPN, even though
the team insists it is not shopping the threetime Pro Bowl wide receiver . . . Former TCU
quarterback Trevone Boykin was arrested on an
aggravated assault charge after his girlfriend
accused him of beating her severely at his
Mansfield, Texas, home. A police statement said
Boykin was arrested after police reviewed footage of a March 21 incident captured by Boykin’s
security video system. He was booked into the
city jail and remained without bond, pending
arraignment Boykin denies the allegations . . .
Cornerback Justin Coleman signed his restricted free agent tender with the Seattle Seahawks
that is expected to pay him $2.9 million for the
2018 season . . . Cleveland traded Cody Kessler,
its former starting quarterback, to the Jacksonville Jaguars for a conditional 2019 seventhround draft pick. The Jaguars were in the market to find a backup for starter Blake Bortles . . .
Former Patriots tight end Benjamin Watson
agreed to return to the New Orleans Saints.
Watson played for the Patriots from 2004-09.
MISCELLANY
BC’s Watts rookie of year
Boston College freshman forward Daryl
Watts was named the collegiate National Rookie of the Year by the Women’s Hockey Commissioners Association. Watts already had won the
2018 Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award as the
national women’s hockey player of the year . . .
Qualifier Danielle Collins shocked eighth-seeded Venus Williams, 6-2, 6-3, to advance to the
semifinals of the Miami Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla. She will play Jelena
Ostapenko, who beat Elina Svitolina, 7-6 (7-3),
7-6 (7-5), in the quarterfinals. On the men’s
side, John Isner overpowered South Korea’s
Hyeon Chung, 6-1, 6-4, to reach the semifinals.
Spring training came to a repulsive end Tuesday night at
Dodger Stadium.
The exhibiBASEBALL tion finale beNOTEBOOK tween the Angels and Dodgers was cut short because of a
foul-smelling leak that spilled
sewage onto the field in the
fifth inning.
The game was called after a
32-minute delay with two outs
in the bottom of the fifth, giving the Dodgers a 4-3 victory
over their Los Angeles rivals.
The water main leak left a
brown mess pooling near the
Dodgers’ dugout in foul territory as the grounds crew spread a
drying agent and worked to
clean it up.
‘‘I'm not going to tell you
what it really was,’’ Dodgers
outfielder Andrew Toles said.
‘‘That’s messed up. It’s nasty.’’
There was definitely an undeniable stench, according to
players.
After about 10 minutes of
waiting on the field, both teams
returned to their respective
dugouts. Umpire crew chief
Gerry Davis announced the delay as officials tried to deter-
mine if it was a stadium or city
issue.
The Dodgers said Wednesday that repairs were made and
the entire system was thoroughly examined. The Dodgers
will host the Giants in Thursday’s opener.
Yankees set to slug
After a winter of waiting,
the Yankees are ready to roll
with two of baseball’s best sluggers.
Aaron Judge and newcomer
Giancarlo Stanton will bat second and third when the Yankees open against the Toronto
Blue Jays on Thursday.
‘‘We can’t wait,’’ said Judge,
the 2017 AL Rookie of the Year.
‘‘We've been excited for this
since the beginning of spring
training.’’
Stanton won the 2017 NL
MVP award with Miami, then
was acquired by the Yankees in
a December trade.
‘‘I’m focused, excited, just
ready to get some games that
mean something,’’ he said.
Judge hit a rookie-record 52
homers and led the American
League. Stanton topped the National League with a careerhigh 59.
Ohtani debut Sunday
Two-way sensation Shohei
Ohtani is scheduled to make his
major league pitching debut
Sunday when he starts for the
Angels in their fourth game of
the season, at Oakland. The
much-hyped Japanese star is
expected to be the team’s designated hitter in at least one of
the first three games, but it’s
unclear if that will happen in
the opener on Thursday . . .
Kansas City will be without Sal­
vador Perez for up to six weeks
after the star catcher sprained
the medial collateral in his left
knee while carrying a suitcase
up some stairs in his home. The
injury occurred Tuesday night,
when the Royals returned to
Kansas City from spring training . . . Ichiro Suzuki, 44, will
start in left field for the Mariners in Thursday’s opener
against the Indians . . . Athletics pitching prospect A.J. Puk,
22, injured his pitching elbow,
and Dr. James Andrews is recommending he have Tommy
John surgery . . . Outfielder Tim
Tebow, 30, was promoted to
Double A after going 1 for 18
with 11 strikeouts in big league
spring training games for the
Mets.
Gloomy forecast puts Reds on hold
By Joe Kay
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CINCINNATI — The 2018
baseball season already has its
first rain delay.
The Cincinnati Reds pushed
back their opener against the
Washington Nationals by a day
because unrelenting rain is
forecast for Thursday. The
teams will open on Friday afternoon instead, taking advantage
of what was a scheduled day off.
It is the first time since 1966
that Cincinnati called off its
opener because of the weather.
The pitching matchups remain the same: NL Cy Young
Award winner Max Scherzer
(16-6) faces Homer Bailey (6-9),
who is making his first Opening
Day start for the Reds.
The forecast calls for steady
and some times heavy rain
Thursday, meaning the game
likely would have faced long delays if it could be played at all,
Reds president Phil Castellini
said.
‘‘Trust me, we do not cancel
games here lightly,’’ Castellini
said.
Before the game was rescheduled, it already had become a different sort of opener
in Cincinnati, which by tradition begins the season at home.
The city throws a big party
complete with a downtown parade on Opening Day, but that
wasn’t possible this year with
Major League Baseball’s open-
ing date. The market association that organizes the festivities is busy with the upcoming
Easter weekend and decided to
wait until Monday, when the
Reds host the Cubs, to hold the
parade.
Now, there won’t even be a
game in Cincinnati as the rest
of the teams get underway.
Dave Martinez will have to
wait a day before his first game
as Nationals manager. He takes
over for Dusty Baker, who was
fired after Washington failed to
make it past the first round of
the playoffs again last season.
‘ ‘ I ’m j u s t e xc i t e d a b o u t
standing out for the anthem
and getting it started,’’ Martinez
said.
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A NEW PODCAST FROM
Sports
C6
T h e
NBA
By Adam Himmelsbach
p­Toronto
*p­BOSTON
p­Cleveland
p­Philadelphia
p­Indiana
Washington
Miami
Milwaukee
W
55
51
45
44
44
41
40
39
L
20
23
30
30
31
33
35
35
Pct. GB Streak Home
.733 —
W1
31­7
.689
3½
W 4 24­13
.600 10
W 1 25­11
.595 10½
W 8 26­11
.587 11
W 3 26­13
.554 13½
W 1 21­17
.533 15
W 1 23­13
.527 15½
L 1 23­15
Conf.
36­9
30­15
32­15
27­18
31­18
26­19
27­19
24­23
Detroit
Charlotte
New York
Chicago
Brooklyn
Orlando
Atlanta
34
34
27
24
24
22
21
40
42
49
50
51
52
54
.459
.447
.355
.324
.320
.297
.280
23­14
21­18
18­18
15­22
14­25
15­22
15­22
20­26
20­26
15­31
18­26
15­30
13­32
9­36
W2
L1
L2
L6
W1
L1
L4
WESTERN CONFERENCE
d­Houston
d­Golden State
Portland
Oklahoma City
New Orleans
San Antonio
*Utah
Minnesota
W
61
54
46
44
43
43
42
43
L
14
20
29
31
32
32
32
33
Pct. GB Streak Home
.813 —
W 10
31­6
.730
6½
L 2 28­10
.613 15
L 1 25­13
.587 17
L 1 26­12
.573 18
L 2 22­16
.573 18
L2
29­8
.568 18½
W 1 24­12
.566 18½
W 1 28­10
Conf.
38­8
30­16
28­17
25­21
22­24
25­20
28­17
30­16
*LA Clippers
Denver
*LA Lakers
Sacramento
*Dallas
Memphis
*Phoenix
40
40
32
24
23
21
19
34
35
41
51
51
54
56
.541
.533
.438
.320
.311
.280
.253
22­23
24­23
16­28
11­35
13­35
18­28
13­32
20½
21
28
37
37½
40
42
W2
L2
L1
L2
W1
W2
L 12
21­15
27­10
18­16
13­25
14­24
15­24
9­28
* — Not including late game
d — Clinched division
p — Clinched playoff berth
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
The three division champions in each conference, plus the next five
teams with the best records, qualify. Seeding is based solely on record.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
BOSTON
at Utah
Brooklyn 111
at Orlando 104
At Minnesota 126
Atlanta 114
At Memphis 108
Portland 103
At Philadelphia 118 New York 101
LA Clippers
Cleveland 118
Dallas
at Charlotte 105
at Phoenix
at LA Lakers
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Detroit
7
Chicago at Miami
7:30
Okla. City at San Antonio
Indiana at Sacramento
10
Milwaukee at Golden St.
10:30
8
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
At Wash 116
San Antonio 106
At Toronto 114
At Miami 98
Cleveland 79
Denver 110
Dallas 103
at Sacramento 97
Portland 107 at New Orleans 103
Indiana 92
at Golden St. 81
At Houston 118
At LA Clippers 105 Milwaukee 98
Chicago 86
CAVS 118, HORNETS 105
CLEVELAND
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Green .... 32 6­15 5­5 1­1
James.... 37 14­26 9­11 2­10
Thmpsn 16 1­2 0­0 1­3
Hill ......... 35 4­13 0­0 1­2
Hood ..... 27 5­12 1­2 1­5
Nance J. 20 2­5 0­0 3­9
Clarksn . 19 2­6 0­0 1­2
Caldrón. 14 2­2 0­0 0­0
Smith .... 31 8­9 2­2 1­5
Osman .... 6 1­2 0­0 0­1
Holland ... 2 0­0 0­0 0­0
Perrnts.... 2 0­1 0­0 0­0
Zizic......... 2 0­0 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 45­93 17­20 11­38
A
1
8
1
4
1
0
1
2
3
0
0
0
1
22
NETS 111, MAGIC 104
F Pt
1 18
1 41
4 2
3 9
1 13
3 4
4 5
0 4
1 19
0 3
0 0
0 0
1 0
19 118
FG%: .484, FT%: .850. 3­pt. goals: 11­
28, .393 (Green 1­4, James 4­8, Hill 1­5,
Hood 2­4, Clarkson 1­3, Smith 1­2, Os­
man 1­2). Team rebounds: 7. Team
turnovers: 6 (6 pts.). Blocks: 1 (Nance
Jr.). Turnovers: 6 (James 4, Clarkson,
Smith). Steals: 9 (Green, James, Nance
Jr. 4, Smith 3).
CHARLOTTE
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
M.Wlms 38 0­4 6­6 0­5 3 1 6
Kd­Glcst 21 5­7 1­2 0­2 1 4 11
Howard. 29 7­12 5­5 3­10 1 3 19
Batum ... 26 2­5 2­2 0­2 5 0 6
Walker .. 33 7­18 5­5 0­2 4 0 21
Graham. 10 1­2 0­0 2­2 2 2 2
Bacon.... 24 3­7 0­0 0­7 2 2 6
Lamb..... 25 4­6 2­2 0­3 2 0 11
Hrnngm .. 1 0­0 0­0 0­0 0 1 0
Kmnsky 18 7­9 1­2 1­5 0 1 16
Monk..... 15 3­6 0­0 0­2 0 2 7
Totals .... 39­76 22­24 6­40 20 16 105
FG%: .513, FT%: .917. 3­pt. goals: 5­
21, .238 (M.Williams 0­2, Batum 0­2,
Walker 2­8, Bacon 0­2, Lamb 1­3,
Kaminsky 1­1, Monk 1­3). Team re­
bounds: 5. Team turnovers: 13 (12
pts.). Blocks: 2 (M.Williams, Howard).
Turnovers: 13 (M.Williams 2, Kidd­Gil­
christ, Batum, Walker 2, Bacon 2,
Lamb, Hernangómez, Kaminsky, Monk
2). Steals: 2 (M.Williams, Lamb). Tech­
nicals: .
Cleveland..............22 42 31 23 — 118
Charlotte...............26 28 24 27 — 105
76ERS 118, KNICKS 101
NEW YORK
FG
FT Reb
M­A M­A O­T
1­3 0­0 0­1
9­20 3­5 0­8
5­11 7­9 3­14
Min
Thomas. 19
Beasley. 35
Kanter... 31
Hard­
33 3­13
away Jr.
Burke .... 28 7­15
Kornet... 18 1­7
Ntilikina 24 1­6
Hicks ....... 5 0­0
Wil­
22 1­4
liams .....
A
1
3
1
1­2
2­3 2 3
1­2
0­3
0­6
1­1
2­2
2­4 2 4
6
1
1
1
9
0 18
1 2
3 3
0 0
5
Mudiay . 25 8­15 5­6 1­4 2 3 22
Totals .... 36­94 20­26 10­46 20 22 101
FG%: .383, FT%: .769. 3­pt. goals: 9­
31, .290 (Thomas 1­2, Beasley 1­3,
Hardaway Jr. 2­8, Burke 2­5, Kornet 0­6,
Ntilikina 1­3, Williams 1­2, Mudiay 1­2).
Team rebounds: 12. Team turnovers:
17 (25 pts.). Blocks: 5 (Beasley 2,
Kanter, Mudiay 2). Turnovers: 16
(Thomas, Beasley, Kanter 3, Hardaway
Jr., Burke 3, Ntilikina 3, Williams, Mudi­
ay 3). Steals: 4 (Burke, Williams 2, Mu­
diay).
PHILADELPHIA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Cvingtn. 33 7­16 1­1 1­4 1 4 17
Saric...... 36 9­19 6­6 4­14 5 1 26
Embiid..... 9 2­6 1­2 2­3 0 1 5
Simmns 34 6­7 1­4 2­8 10 1 13
Redick... 31 8­17 2­2 0­6 5 1 21
McCnnll 10 0­0 0­0 0­1 1 0 0
Belinelli. 25 4­7 4­4 0­2 2 4 14
Fultz ...... 14 1­5 1­2 0­5 7 2 3
Ilyasova 26 2­10 0­0 2­8 2 2 4
Holmes . 22 6­11 3­6 3­7 1 3 15
Totals .... 45­98 19­27 14­58 34 19 118
FG%: .459, FT%: .704. 3­pt. goals: 9­
31, .290 (Covington 2­8, Saric 2­5, Embi­
id 0­1, Redick 3­10, Belinelli 2­3, Ilyaso­
va 0­4). Team rebounds: 9. Team turn­
overs: 12 (13 pts.). Blocks: 3
(Covington, Simmons, Fultz). Turn­
overs: 12 (Covington, Saric 2, Embiid,
Simmons 4, Redick, Belinelli, Ilyasova
2). Steals: 9 (Covington 3, Saric 2,
Redick, Belinelli, Fultz, Ilyasova). Tech­
nicals: Redick, 1:49/2nd.
New York..............28 35 17 21 — 101
Philadelphia .........37 30 26 25 — 118
BROOKLYN
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Carroll... 30 6­10 0­0 0­12
Hlls­Jffr. 33 4­15 6­7 4­9
Allen...... 28 6­9 3­5 4­8
Crabbe.. 30 5­14 0­0 0­2
Russell .. 30 5­9 4­4 1­5
Dnwdde 19 1­4 0­0 0­1
Cnnngh. 19 3­8 0­0 1­5
Harris.... 27 4­4 4­4 0­3
LeVert... 25 6­14 2­2 1­3
Totals .... 40­87 19­22 11­48
A
2
4
1
0
12
0
0
3
6
28
F Pt
5 14
2 14
1 15
1 13
0 16
1 3
2 6
2 14
3 16
17 111
FG%: .460, FT%: .864. 3­pt. goals: 12­
34, .353 (Carroll 2­5, Allen 0­1, Crabbe
3­8, Russell 2­5, Dinwiddie 1­4, Cun­
ningham 0­3, Harris 2­2, LeVert 2­6).
Team rebounds: 5. Team turnovers: 9
(7 pts.). Blocks: 5 (Carroll, Allen, Rus­
sell, Cunningham, Harris). Turnovers: 8
(Carroll, Hollis­Jefferson 2, Allen, Rus­
sell 2, Cunningham, LeVert). Steals: 6
(Carroll, Hollis­Jefferson 2, Allen, Rus­
sell, LeVert).
ORLANDO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Gordon.. 32 6­13 0­0 1­3
Hezonja 36 8­17 5­5 0­7
Vucevic. 31 11­21 1­1 4­15
Purvis.... 24 0­6 2­2 0­3
Augustn 32 4­10 3­4 1­1
Artis ...... 25 1­3 0­0 0­0
Mack ..... 29 5­12 1­2 0­4
Biymbo . 12 2­3 1­2 0­4
Afflalo ... 10 0­1 0­0 0­0
Birch........ 9 3­6 0­0 5­7
Totals .... 40­92 13­16 11­44
A
3
3
5
1
3
3
6
0
0
1
25
F Pt
3 15
2 23
2 24
3 2
3 14
3 2
1 13
0 5
0 0
1 6
18 104
FG%: .435, FT%: .813. 3­pt. goals: 11­
31, .355 (Gordon 3­6, Hezonja 2­6,
Vucevic 1­3, Purvis 0­4, Augustin 3­5,
Artis 0­1, Mack 2­5, Afflalo 0­1). Team
rebounds: 8. Team turnovers: 10 (15
pts.). Blocks: 4 (Artis, Biyombo 2, Affla­
lo). Turnovers: 9 (Gordon, Hezonja,
Vucevic 3, Augustin, Mack, Biyombo,
Birch). Steals: 4 (Hezonja, Purvis, Au­
gustin, Mack).
Brooklyn................36 22 27 26 — 111
Orlando .................33 18 30 23 — 104
ATLANTA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Collins... 24 4­6 1­2 0­5
Prince ... 34 7­14 3­4 0­4
Dedmon 30 6­11 0­0 0­12
Lee......... 30 3­6 2­2 0­4
Taylor ... 29 6­11 8­9 2­2
Muscala 25 8­10 4­4 1­2
Dorsey .. 18 2­5 1­2 0­1
Cavngh . 17 4­7 0­0 1­6
Magette 26 1­4 0­0 0­1
Whte III... 6 0­3 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 41­77 19­23 4­37
A
0
0
2
2
5
1
1
2
2
15
GLOBE STAFF
SALT LAKE CITY — The Lakers on Wednesday announced that
point guard Isaiah Thomas will
undergo arCELTICS
throscopic surNOTEBOOK gery on his troublesome right hip
on Thursday, ending his season.
According to ESPN, Thomas is
having the procedure to clean up
inflammatory debris related to
the labral tear he suffered last
March while playing for the Celtics. Thomas continued on despite
the injury until aggravating it during last season’s Eastern Conference finals.
“Obviously the most important
thing to me right now is that he
gets back healthy and fully
healthy as quickly as possible,”
Celtics coach Brad Stevens said
Wednesday. “This sounds like the
right next step and if that’s the decision he made, then hopefully
that happens, to get back as soon
as possible.”
The two-time All-Star elected
not to have surgery last summer,
choosing rest and rehabilitation
as a path back to the court for his
final season before free agency. In
August, Thomas was traded to the
Cavaliers in the deal that brought
Kyrie Irving to Boston. But his injured hip kept him from making
his debut until Jan. 2, and he
struggled noticeably after his return.
On Feb. 8 Thomas was traded
to the Lakers. He had played better in Los Angeles, averaging 15.6
points and 5 assists over 17
games, but his hip pain had gradually worsened recently.
Silas on 10­day deal
Veteran guard Xavier Silas officially signed his 10-day contract
with the Celtics and was active
when the team faced the Jazz. Silas, 30, most recently played for
the G-League’s Northern Arizona
Suns. Last summer he played in
the BIG3, the three-on-three basketball league that mostly featured retired NBA players.
Silas was teammates with former Celtic and current team television commentator Brian Sca­
labrine. Silas said that Scalabrine
told him last summer that he was
good enough to play in the NBA.
“Me being older, I think I understand that it’s not about trying
to do too much or make a name or
a big splash,” Silas said. “It’s just
doing what I’m supposed to do
and helping out the team, even if
it’s little things here and there.”
Silas averaged 18.4 points and
4.1 rebounds over 30 games with
Northern Arizona this season. Stevens said the Celtics added him to
provide some wing depth on their
injury-depleted roster.
“What we told him this morning was, ‘You’re going to replace
Kyrie Irving. So we expect 25
points a game on 50/40/90 shooting.’ ” Stevens quipped. “No, I
mean, just do what you do best
and come in and be you and we’ll
adjust to you. Like, when you get
in the game, try to impact it by
playing hard defensively and being ready to run a basic menu of
offensive options based on what
we go through today.”
Morris, Horford sit
Celtics forwards Marcus Mor­
ris and Al Horford both missed
Wednesday’s game because of
sore ankles. Neither player is expected to be sidelined for long.
Morris’s sore ankle caused him
to miss Sunday’s game against the
Kings, and then in the third quarter of Monday’s game he landed
on Suns guard Troy Daniels’s foot.
X-rays were negative, and Morris
said he hopes to play against the
Raptors on Saturday.
“It’s just bruised,” he said. “It’s
not too bad. The swelling went
down.”
Horford tweaked his ankle
Monday, too, but stayed in the
game. He took part in the team’s
shootaround Wednesday but the
team is being cautious.
Jazz players
Stevens said he has been
pleased to see the success of former Celtics Jae Crowder and Jo­
nas Jerebko in Utah. Jerebko
signed with the Jazz last summer
and Crowder was acquired from
the Cavaliers in a February trade.
“When Jae got traded here I
thought this was going to be perfect, and it has been,” Stevens
said. “It’s been fun to watch from
afar. Jonas has had a great year.
“But they won a lot of games
for us and they care about winning and put the team first, so I’m
sure they appreciate the positions
they’re being put in.”
Crowder is averaging 12.4
points and 4.1 rebounds over 19
games with the Jazz, and Jerebko
is averaging 5.6 points and 3.4 rebounds per contest.
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at
adam.himmelsbach@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@adamhimmelsbach.
Brown’s 3­pointer helps Celtics zing Jazz
uCELTICS
Celtics 97, Jazz 94
Continued from Page C1
The Jazz were clinging to slight
leads in the final minutes, and appeared focused on trying to let the
clock run out. But that generally
does not work in the NBA, especially against a Celtics team like this
one.
After Greg Monroe grabbed an
offensive rebound and hit a pair of
free throws, Jayson Tatum soared
in for a one-handed slam off a steal
to tie the score at 94 with 1:09 left.
Jae Crowder and Joe Ingles both
missed chances to give Utah the
lead, and the Celtics had a final
chance with 14.7 seconds left.
The possession developed slowly, as Shane Larkin drove through
the lane. Rookie Semi Ojeleye had a
good look at a 3, but passed it up
for a better one, Brown’s dagger
from the top of the key.
Brown had 21 points to lead the
Celtics, who made 12 of 21 3-pointers. Shane Larkin added 10 points,
9 rebounds and 4 assists.
The Celtics had several strong
bursts in the opening half, and
each time it looked as if reality
would hit and their lack of manpower would finally reveal itself.
But it didn’t.
Boston started the game by
making 4 of 5 shots and took a 12-5
lead, and the Jazz called timeout.
Utah then rolled off a powerful
13-0 run in which it seemed to establish its dominance at the rim
Min
Tatum............ 32
Yabusele....... 15
Baynes .......... 28
Brown............ 30
Rozier ............ 30
Larkin ............ 34
Ojeleye.......... 32
Monroe ......... 23
Nader ............ 16
Totals ...... ......
At Salt Lake City
BOSTON
FG
FT
Reb
M­A
M­A
O­T A F
6­15
2­2
0­2 3 1
1­2
0­0
0­1 1 2
6­8
1­1
2­6 1 4
6­10
6­8
3­5 3 3
4­15
2­2
1­7 3 2
4­11
0­0
2­9 4 2
3­3
0­1
0­4 1 1
2­10
4­6
3­8 4 2
3­5
0­0
0­0 0 1
35­79 15­20 11­42 20 18
Pt.
16
3
13
21
13
10
7
8
6
97
FG%: .443, FT%: .750. 3­pt. goals: 12­21, .571 (Brown
3­3, Rozier 3­8, Tatum 2­3, Larkin 2­4, Ojeleye 1­1, Ya­
busele 1­2). Team rebounds: 6. Team turnovers: 16 (24
pts.). Blocked shots: 2 (Tatum 2). Turnovers: 16 (Brown
4, Tatum 3, Baynes 2, Nader 2, Yabusele 2, Larkin, Mon­
roe, Ojeleye). Steals: 11 (Monroe 4, Brown 2, Ojeleye 2,
Tatum 2, Nader). Technical fouls: None.
UTAH
FG
FT
Reb
Min
M­A
M­A
O­T A F Pt.
Favors ........... 24
4­6
0­0
2­5 0 1
8
Ingles............. 33
4­12
1­1
1­6 5 3 11
Gobert........... 40
3­5
4­6
3­11 2 1 10
Mitchell......... 40
7­20
5­6
0­0 6 3 22
Rubio ............. 36
4­14
5­6
2­8 10 2 14
Crowder........ 30
7­14
0­0
1­4 0 4 16
O’Neale ......... 18
1­2
0­0
0­3 1 2
2
Jerebko ......... 11
1­5
0­0
2­7 0 1
3
Exum ............... 9
3­4
2­2
1­1 1 1
8
Totals ...... ...... 34­82 17­21 12­45 25 18 94
RICK BOWMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Celtics’ Jayson Tatum,
shooting over Utah’s Joe Ingles,
went 6 for 15 for 16 points.
with dunks and layups.
But the Jazz later retreated from
that strategy, mostly relying on average 3-point shooters to fire away
from beyond the arc. And then
there were plenty of times when
Utah could not even get off a shot
at all, as it committed eight turnovers during the game’s first 14
minutes.
All of that allowed the Celtics to
linger despite closing the first quarter by making just 3 of 17 shots.
FG%: .415, FT%: .810. 3­pt. goals: 9­33, .273 (Mitchell
3­8, Ingles 2­7, Crowder 2­8, Jerebko 1­2, Rubio 1­6, Fa­
vors 0­1, O’Neale 0­1). Team rebounds: 8. Team turn­
overs: 16 (19 pts.). Blocked shots: 6 (Gobert 2, O’Neale
2, Crowder, Exum). Turnovers: 16 (Gobert 4, Mitchell 4,
Crowder 3, Rubio 2, Exum, Favors, Ingles). Steals: 7 (Ru­
bio 3, Crowder 2, Gobert, Mitchell). Technical fouls:
None.
Boston.................................. 18 30 19 30 —
97
Utah...................................... 24 15 32 23 —
94
A—18,306 (19,911). Officials—Leroy Richardson,
Courtney Kirkland, Zach Zarba.
Boston used an 8-0 run to tie the
score at 28, and then with Utah
leading by 2 points, the Celtics hit it
with an 18-4 burst that was keyed
by Brown. The second-year wing
hit a pair of 3-pointers and a tough,
driving layup during a two-minute
stretch, giving the Celtics their largest lead of the half, 46-34.
Boston led by 10 points early in
the third quarter when the Jazz finally put together a sustained run.
Utah attempted just one free throw
in the opening half, but it took 10
foul shots during just the first six
minutes of the third quarter.
Crowder also drilled a pair of 3pointers during Utah’s seemingly
crushing 30-9 run that gave it a 6958 lead. Once again, though, the
Celtics were resilient, as they held
the Jazz to just 2 points over the final 4:08, as Boston mixed in a twothree zone defense.
Ojeleye had a strong sequence
for Boston, converting a 3-point
play over defensive player of the
year candidate Rudy Gobert, drilling a corner 3-pointer, and then
draining a pull-up jumper, helping
Boston pull within 71-67 at the
start of the fourth.
The Jazz stretched their lead to
8 points early in the fourth, but the
Celtics continued to linger thanks
to their stunningly accurate 3-point
shooting.
Terry Rozier, who had been 0 for
8, hit three 3-pointers over a
stretch of less than two minutes,
and then Larkin added one from
the top of the key that somewhat
improbably pulled Boston within
85-84 with 5:45 left.
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at
adam.himmelsbach@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@adamhimmelsbach.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK
A
0
7
0
5
8
0
1
0
5
0
26
F Pt
1 10
1 21
5 13
2 8
3 20
4 24
2 5
1 10
3 3
0 0
22 114
FG%: .532, FT%: .826. 3­pt. goals: 13­
27, .481 (Collins 1­2, Prince 4­5, Ded­
mon 1­2, Lee 0­2, Taylor 0­1, Muscala
4­6, Dorsey 0­2, Cavanaugh 2­4, Mag­
ette 1­2, White III 0­1). Team rebounds:
6. Team turnovers: 20 (20 pts.). Blocks:
2 (Collins, Lee). Turnovers: 20 (Prince
7, Dedmon, Taylor 5, Muscala 2, Dorsey
2, Cavanaugh 2, Magette). Steals: 10
(Collins, Prince, Lee 3, Taylor 2, Musca­
la, Magette 2). Technicals: team,
10:29/4th.
MINNESOTA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Gibson .. 30 3­4 1­1 0­7
Bjelica... 37 6­8 0­0 0­6
Towns... 41 19­32 12­15 4­15
Teague.. 30 4­12 1­1 0­0
Wiggins 37 7­13 1­2 0­2
Crawfrd 26 4­9 1­1 1­1
Dieng..... 18 4­6 1­1 2­6
Jones..... 21 1­6 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 48­90 17­21 7­37
A
2
3
4
8
3
4
0
9
33
F Pt
2 7
2 14
4 56
5 11
3 17
0 10
2 9
2 2
20 126
FG%: .533, FT%: .810. 3­pt. goals: 13­
30, .433 (Bjelica 2­4, Towns 6­8, Teague
2­6, Wiggins 2­5, Crawford 1­4, Dieng
0­1, Jones 0­2). Team rebounds: 6.
Team turnovers: 13 (17 pts.). Blocks: 1
(Towns). Turnovers: 13 (Bjelica, Towns
2, Teague 2, Wiggins 2, Crawford 2, Di­
eng, Jones 3). Steals: 9 (Bjelica, Teague
2, Wiggins 2, Dieng 2, Jones 2).
Atlanta ..................32 25 31 26 — 114
Minnesota.............34 31 33 28 — 126
GRIZZLIES 108, TRAIL BLAZERS 103
PORTLAND
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Aminu ... 28 2­9 1­2 0­6
Turner... 30 2­9 1­2 1­4
Nurkic ... 28 5­6 2­4 4­8
Napier... 27 2­11 3­4 0­1
McCllm . 37 16­25 7­9 0­3
Davis ..... 19 1­2 1­2 1­6
Collins... 22 4­6 0­0 1­2
Cnnghtn 28 1­5 0­0 1­4
Bldwn.... 21 5­6 4­7 0­4
Totals .... 38­79 19­30 8­38
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
T-WOLVES 126, HAWKS 114
F Pt
3 3
0 22
5 17
2­2
0­0
0­0
0­0
G l o b e
LA’s Thomas will have hip surgery
EASTERN CONFERENCE
20½
21½
28½
30½
31
32½
34
B o s t o n
F Pt
2 5
4 5
2 12
2 8
2 42
1 3
1 10
4 3
2 15
20 103
FG%: .481, FT%: .633. 3­pt. goals: 8­
30, .267 (Aminu 0­6, Turner 0­3, Napier
1­6, McCollum 3­7, Collins 2­3, Con­
naughton 1­4, Baldwin IV 1­1). Team
rebounds: 10. Team turnovers: 12 (12
pts.). Blocks: 8 (Turner, Nurkic 3, Davis,
Collins, Connaughton 2). Turnovers: 12
(Aminu 3, Turner, Nurkic, Napier, Mc­
Collum 2, Davis, Collins 2, Connaugh­
ton). Steals: 7 (Aminu, Nurkic 3, Napier,
McCollum, Connaughton).
A — 16,050 (18,119). T — 2:12. Offi­
cials — James Capers, Mark Ayotte,
Brett Nansel.
MEMPHIS
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Green .... 29 2­8 2­4 2­8
Martin... 30 3­6 1­2 3­14
Gasol..... 21 3­8 1­2 0­3
Chalm­
20 3­5 0­0 1­4
ers .........
D.Broks . 30 6­12 5­8 2­6
Simmns 28 4­7 0­0 0­0
Seldn Jr. 23 4­8 1­3 1­1
Davis ..... 19 3­6 1­2 0­6
Parsons 19 6­12 0­0 1­3
M.Broks 21 7­12 2­2 1­1
Totals .... 41­84 13­23 11­46
A
2
2
6
F Pt
4 6
2 7
2 8
2 3
2
3
2
0
2
2
23
8
3 18
1 8
1 10
5 7
2 15
1 21
24 108
FG%: .488, FT%: .565. 3­pt. goals: 13­
25, .520 (Green 0­3, Gasol 1­3, Chalmers
2­2, D.Brooks 1­3, Simmons 0­1, Selden
Jr. 1­1, Parsons 3­7, M.Brooks 5­5).
Team rebounds: 11. Team turnovers:
15 (13 pts.). Blocks: 2 (Green,
M.Brooks). Turnovers: 15 (Green, Gasol
2, Chalmers 3, D.Brooks 2, Simmons 4,
Selden Jr. 2, M.Brooks). Steals: 7 (Gasol
2, D.Brooks 2, Selden Jr., Parsons,
M.Brooks).
Portland ................28 30 23 22 — 103
Memphis...............20 33 23 32 — 108
Duke freshman Bagley to leave early for NBA
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Duke freshman Marvin Bagley
III is entering the NBA Draft.
Bagley announced his decision
Wednesday on his verified Instagram account, saying he ‘‘learned
a lot this year on and off of the
court.’’
The announcement came three
days after Duke’s season ended
with an overtime loss to Kansas in
the Midwest Regional final.
Duke spokesman Mike De­
George said Bagley would ‘‘eventually’’ hire an agent. Bagley is expected to be a high lottery pick.
The AP All-American and Atlantic Coast Conference player and
rookie of the year led the conference in scoring and rebounding,
averaging 21.0 points and 11.1 rebounds.
Bagley broke nine program records for freshmen, including
points (694), scoring average, rebounds (366), rebounding average, and double-doubles (22).
Only three other players in Division 1 also averaged at least 20
points and 10 rebounds.
‘‘No freshman has done more in
his freshman year than Marvin,’’
coach Mike Krzyzewski said after
Bagley’s post. ‘‘He’s broken every
record and he’s really represented
us at the highest level. I’m proud
of him because he came in late and
he adapted at the highest level. We
wish him well. He and his family
have prepared him well for this
move. He’s ready. I can only see
great things happening for him.’’
MSU’s Bridges opts out
Michigan State star Miles
Bridges is skipping his final two
seasons of eligibility and entering
the NBA Draft.
The school announced Bridges’s departure, and it came as no
surprise after a fine season in
which he was named a secondteam All-American by the AP.
‘‘God couldn’t have placed me
in a better place for these last two
years,’’ Bridges said in a statement.
He also thanked coach Tom Izzo
and his staff ‘‘for giving a skinny
kid from Flint a chance to play at
such a legendary program.’’
Bridges said he would sign with
agent Rich Paul and Klutch Sports.
Texas losing G Davis
Texas junior guard Eric Davis Jr.
announced he’s turning pro after
being held out several games late
in the season after reports raised
allegations he had taken money
from an agent representative.
Texas held Davis out of the
Longhorns’ final six games after
the payment allegations were
raised in a Yahoo Sports report in
late February.
In a statement released by Texas, Davis said he wanted to put the
‘‘unfortunate events’’ of the end of
the season behind him.
He didn’t elaborate or address
the payment allegations directly.
Davis averaged 8.8 points in 26
games this past season.
Texas freshman forward Mo
Bamba has declared for the NBA
Draft and said he won’t return to
school.
Junior guard Kerwin Roach II
has also said he’ll enter the draft,
but has no plans to hire an agent,
which would allow him to return
for his senior season.
Pair leave S. Carolina
Seven-foot sophomore Khadim
Gueye and 6-6 freshman Ibrahim
Famouke Doumbia, a pair of reserve forwards, are leaving South
Carolina’s program, according to
coach Frank Martin.
Gueye, from Senegal, saw his
playing time decrease from seven
minutes per game in 28 games as a
freshman to five minutes per game
in 17 contests this season.
Famouke Doumbia, who is
from Mali, played in 12 games this
season and averaged fewer than
four minutes a contest.
Martin thanked both players
for their contributions and wished
them well in the future.
Auburn’s Pearl keeps job
Auburn coach Bruce Pearl received a vote of confidence from
the Tigers’ new athletic director,
Allen Greene, who told a Birmingham radio station it’s “absolutely” his intention to stand by
Pearl, barring further developments from the FBI or NCAA after last September’s arrest of
then-associate head coach Chuck
Person, who allegedly accepted
money in exchange for promising
to steer Auburn players to a finan-
cial adviser when they turn pro.
Greene, who was hired in January, said Pearl, who guided Auburn to a share of its first Southeastern Conference regular season title since 1999, ‘‘feels like
he’s done nothing wrong.’’. . .
UNC Greensboro extended the
contract of coach Wes Miller
through the 2028-29 season after
the 35-year-old led the Spartans
to their first NCAA Tournament
since 2001. Athletic director Kim
Record announced the seven-year
extension that increased Miller’s
base salary to more than
$300,000 and increased his retention bonus and other performance-based incentives . . . Villanova guard Jalen Brunson and
Kansas guard Devonte Graham,
whose teams will square off in the
national semifinals Saturday at
the Final Four, were among five
players invited to Los Angeles for
the 42d annual presentation of
the John R. Wooden Award, given
to the nation’s best player. They
will be joined by Arizona’s Dean­
dre Ayton, Oklahoma’s Trae
Young, and Duke’s Bagley . . . Tennessee and Memphis have agreed
to renew their rivalry starting
next season when the Tigers host
the Volunteers Dec. 15 at Memphis’s FedEx Forum in the first
meeting between the programs
since the 2012-13 season. The
schools meet at Knoxville’s
Thompson-Boling Arena in the
2019-20 season and Nashville’s
Bridgestone Arena in 2020-21.
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
Scoreboard
Y
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
TUE
TB
4:10
NESN
TB
7:10
NESN
TB
6:10
NESN
TB
1:10
NESN
MIA
7:10
NESN
MIA
6:10
NESN
FLA
1:00
NESN
PHI
12:30
NBC
3/29
3/30
3/31
TB
7:00
NESN
4/1
4/2
C7
4/3
Y
Y
WED
4/4
TB
7:30
NESN+
TOR
7:30
NBA,
NBCSB
MIL
8:00
NBCSB
TOR
8:00
ESPN,
NBCSB
HOU
8:30
NBCSB
Home games shaded
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI­FM 93.7; Bruins, Celtics, and Revolution, WBZ­FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
BASEBALL
12:40 p.m.
3:35 p.m.
4:10 p.m.
7:10 p.m.
10:10 p.m.
FILE/BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Deontae Hawkins (with BC coach Jim Christian) faced Loyola Chicago when he was playing for Illinois State.
Loyola impresses BC’s Hawkins
By Julian Benbow
GLOBE STAFF
It’s funny the difference a year can
make.
Just a year ago, Loyola Chicago was
a middle-of-the-pack Missouri Valley
Conference team scrapping to survive
in one of the country’s tougher mid-majors.
Now, the Ramblers are the darlings
of the NCAA Tournament, turning
March Madness upside-down with
their run to the Final Four as a No. 11
seed, and their chaplain, Sister Jean,
has become an unofficial mascot.
Before Deontae Hawkins landed at
Boston College last summer, he was in
the MVC at Illinois State, where his
teams routinely pushed over the very
same team that now has an opportunity to win a national championship.
“Oh, we beat up on them every time
I played them at Illinois State,” Hawkins said. “I never lost to Loyola.”
Hawkins faced the Ramblers six
times in his three years at Illinois State.
He walked off the floor with wins six
times. Seeing double- or triple-teams
was the norm against the Ramblers,
but he still averaged 12.7 points and
5.7 rebounds against them.
Watching the turnaround of a former rival from a team that went 8-10 in
the MVC a year ago to a team that won
the regular-season and tournament titles to earn the 11th seed in the South
Region, then busted brackets by beating Miami, Tennessee, Nevada, and
Kansas State, is part of what makes
March Madness what it is, Hawkins
said.
“It’s amazing to see the way the
coach turned the program around,”
Hawkins said. “Sister Jean. It’s crazy.
Those guys, they work hard, and every
time we did play them, they gave us
their best shot.”
Through battles on the court with
Loyola, Hawkins actually made some
friends. He is close with current Ramblers Ben Richardson and Donte Ingram, and a former one, Milton Doyle,
who is now with the Brooklyn Nets.
Luke Yaklich, an assistant at Illinois
State while Hawkins was there, is now
an assistant for Loyola’s Final Four opponent, Michigan.
“He’s going to know the ins and
outs,” Hawkins said. “So it’s going to be
a good game, man.”
If the Ramblers sneaked up on anyone this season, they shouldn’t have.
They led the MVC in scoring margin,
and finished second in 3-point shooting percentage and scoring defense,
winning games by not beating themselves.
“If I had to do a scouting report on
them, I’d say don’t lose the shooter,”
Hawkins said. “Don’t help too much.
Throw some 2-3 at them with some
length and box them guys out, if you’re
a bigger team.
“And like I said, don’t lose them
shooters. And communicate. Communication just makes the defense and the
game so much easier.
“But I take my hat off to them and
their program. They’re doing what
they’re supposed to be doing. It’s amazing just to watch.”
If there’s a common bond among
MVC teams, said Hawkins, it’s the chip
on their shoulder from being overlooked for tournament bids.
“People underestimate the Missouri
Valley Conference, but it’s some tough
kids in that conference and some teams
that feel like they could get a chance to
go to the dance without winning the
conference,” Hawkins said.
“Wichita State was one of those
teams. Creighton was one of those
teams that didn’t have to win the conference to get a bid. They feel like they
deserve to be where they’re at and
they’re proving it. So I take my hat off
to Loyola.”
Hawkins transferred to Boston College last summer, but a torn right ACL
and a partially torn meniscus ended his
season after just eight games.
He had surgery in December and remained a constant presence in the locker room and on the bench — typically
dressed to the nines — as the Eagles put
together their best season in seven
years, going 19-16 and earning an NIT
bid.
“It was very important just to cheer
these guys on and know that I’m still
here supporting them and the coaching
staff,” Hawkins said. “Letting them
know what I see on the bench and what
they don’t see on the court. Just to try
to be a coach of the game and just supporting them guys. Did pretty good this
season, just was missing that one
piece.”
He’s in the process of applying for a
waiver for a sixth year of eligibility with
the hopes of regaining the season stolen by injury. In the meantime, he’s going through rehab and continuing to
work toward a master ’s degree in
sports administration.
“It was tough, but like my mom always told me, everything happens for a
reason,” Hawkins said. “And I feel like
this is a reason. To get my master’s,
work on getting my master’s, and handle that.”
Julian Benbow can be reached at
jbenbow@globe.com.
‘We feel like we don’t have a voice, and we demand that you [headmaster
Dr. Oscar Santos] give our teachers, students, and parents a voice.’
KAIYA DUVERNA, among more than 50 Cathedral students who staged a walkout at school on Wednesday.
Cathedral students protest AD firing
By Nate Weitzer
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
More than 50 Cathedral High students and community members stood
outside the school Wednesday morning, seeking answers for the termination of former athletic director and
boys’ basketball coach Larry Merritt.
Merritt was terminated last Friday
for an unspecified violation of school
policy.
The walkout, organized by girls’ basketball players Amani Boston and Kaiya Duverna, had students calling for
the reinstatement of Merritt as well as
educational reforms.
When Cathedral headmaster Dr. Oscar Santos opened the school’s front
doors, asking students to return to
class, Boston delivered an impassioned
plea to him, saying, “We believe that
Larry Merritt was terminated unfairly
and without due process. When you
terminated Mr. Merritt, you didn’t just
terminate our AD, you terminated our
coach for life.
“For many of us, sports is an escape.
That gym is like our therapy, and that
man who sat in that office — always
watching and working with us — that
was like our therapist.”
Santos declined to answer questions
at the school but later released a statement, saying, “The Cathedral High
School Athletic Director was terminated on March 23 after a thorough investigation into multiple incidents violating the school’s code of conduct.
“The behavior involved is unaccept-
able at Cathedral High School by any
member of our community. A monthlong investigation was conducted involving various students, faculty and
parents; this is not the result of one
complaint or any factors outside these
code of conduct violations.
“As this is a personnel issue, additional details of the incidents cannot be
released.
“Some students raised concerns
about this matter; we are proud of
them for doing so, as it is important for
them to voice those concerns, but based
on the findings of this inquiry, we are
confident in our decision.”
In addition to the reinstatement of
Merritt, the students called for more
advanced placement classes. They cited
overworked teachers, the poor quality
of lunch, and the cancellation of SAT
testing March 22 because of poor
weather, forcing students to schedule
and pay for testing on their own time.
“We feel like we don’t have a voice,
and we demand that you [Santos] give
our teachers, students, and parents a
voice,” said Duverna.
“We demand transparency with finances and how our tuition is being allocated to create a stronger academic
environment and school culture.”
Merritt, a 1991 Cathedral graduate,
was a three-sport standout and was
honored for his community service as a
student. He was hired as athletic director in 2015 and boys’ basketball coach
for the 2016-17 season. He had served
two previous stints as AD on an interim
basis.
In Merritt’s three-plus years overseeing the athletic department, Cathedral
won back-to-back Division 4 state titles
in girls’ basketball and consecutive Division 4 South sectional titles in boys’
basketball. The football team advanced
to the Division 8 state semifinals last
fall for the first time in program history.
Two days after Cathedral was eliminated from the Division 4 South boys’
basketball tourney with a 91-87 doubleovertime loss at Cohasset March 5,
Merritt was placed on administrative
leave pending an investigation of a
complaint.
According to Boston and other
members of the student body, the complaint came from the mother of a senior
on the team who had fouled out late in
the loss to Cohasset.
“Any coach is going to be strict on
their kids,” said Boston. “But that’s because they care about you. Whatever
the situation, [Merritt] was trying to
help him become a better person.
“He has meant so much to the community. His wife works here, his daughter graduated, and he has two other
daughters that go here.”
She said students decided to make a
statement with their action.
“We did all this on our own,” said
Boston. “But it was also based on the
guidance he gave us throughout our
years here.”
Nate Weitzer can be reached at
nweitzer7@gmail.com.
Chicago Cubs at Miami
Houston at Texas
Boston at Tampa Bay
San Francisco at LA Dodgers
Cleveland at Seattle
PRO BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at San Antonio
10:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Golden State
TNT
TNT
GOLF
12 p.m.
4 p.m.
Golf
Golf
LPGA: ANA Inspiration
PGA: Houston Open
Latest line
ESPN
ESPN
NESN
ESPN
ESPN
NBA
Thursday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At Detroit..........OFF .........Washington
At Miami..............13 ................Chicago
At San Antonio OFF ....Oklahoma City
Indiana.................. 7½ ....At Sacramento
At Golden St.... OFF ...........Milwaukee
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Thursday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
Penn St.....................4 ......................Utah
Saturday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
Michigan...................5 ...........Loyola­Chi.
Villanova...................5 ..................Kansas
PRO HOCKEY
7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston
8 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota
NESN
NBCSN
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
NIT final: Penn State vs. Utah
ESPN2
TENNIS
1 p.m.
7 p.m.
ESPN2
ESPNews
Miami Open
Miami Open
Colleges
BASKETBALL
MEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT
EAST REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
Villanova 90..................West Virginia 78
Purdue 65.........................Texas Tech 78
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Villanova 71......................Texas Tech 59
SOUTH REGIONAL
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Loyola­Chicago 78.......Kansas State 62
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
Kansas 80..............................Clemson 76
Duke 69.................................Syracuse 65
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Kansas 85...........................Duke 81 (OT)
WEST REGIONAL
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Michigan 58...................Florida State 54
FINAL FOUR
Saturday, March 31
Loyola­Chicago vs. Michigan..........6:05
Kansas vs. Villanova.........................8:49
WOMEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT
ALBANY REGIONAL
Monday, March 26 — Final
UConn 94....................South Carolina 65
SPOKANE REGIONAL
Monday, March 26 — Final
Notre Dame 84........................Oregon 74
KANSAS CITY REGIONAL
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Mississippi St. 89.......................UCLA 73
LEXINGTON REGIONAL
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Louisville 76..................Oregon State 43
FINAL FOUR
Friday, March 30
UConn vs. Notre Dame, 9 p.m.
Louisville vs. Mississippi State, 7 p.m.
Sunday, April 1
National championship, 6 p.m.
NIT
Men
Tuesday, March 27 — Semifinals
at Madison Square Garden
Western Kentucky 64.................Utah 69
Penn State 75........Mississippi State 60
Thursday, March 29 — Final
Penn State vs. Utah, 8 p.m.
WOMEN
Wed., March 28 — Semifinals
Virginia Tech 64..........West Virginia 61
Indiana 71......................................TCU 58
HOCKEY
MEN’S NCAA DIV. 1 TOURNEY
NORTHEAST REGIONAL
At DCU Center, Worcester
Saturday, March 24
Boston University 3..................Cornell 1
Michigan 3......................Northeastern 2
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Michigan 6..............Boston University 3
EAST REGIONAL
At Webster Bank Arena, Bridgeport,
Conn.
Friday, March 23
Notre Dame 4.............. Michigan Tech 3
Providence 1...........................Clarkson 0
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Notre Dame 2.....................Providence 1
MIDWEST REGIONAL
At PPL Center, Allentown, Pa.
Saturday, March 24
Ohio State 4.......................... Princeton 2
Denver 5..............................Penn State 1
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Ohio State 5...............................Denver 1
WEST REGIONAL
At Sioux Falls, S.D.
Friday, March 23
Air Force 4........................St. Cloud St. 1
Minn. Deluth 3.....MSU­Mankato 2 (OT)
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Minn. Duluth 2.......................Air Force 1
FROZEN FOUR
at Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul
Thursday, April 5 — Semifinals
Ohio State vs. Minnesota­Duluth, 6
p.m.; Notre Dame vs. Michigan, 9:30
p.m.
Saturday, April 7 — Final
Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.
Schools
BASEBALL
PREP­PRIVATE
Beaver CD 9...................................Gann 3
LACROSSE
BOYS
PREP­PRIVATE
Dexter Southfield 6 St. George’s 5 (OT)
Rivers 18....................................Proctor 7
SOFTBALL
PREP­PRIVATE
Worcester Acad. 6Portsmouth Abbey 5
(8 inn.)
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
MLS
SATURDAY, MARCH 24
New York City FC 2....NEW ENGLAND 2
Portland 1...............................FC Dallas 1
Columbus 3.........................D.C. United 1
New York 3.............Minnesota United 0
Sporting Kansas City 2........ Colorado 2
LA Galaxy 0.........................Vancouver 0
FRIDAY, MARCH 30
Real Salt Lake at Toronto FC............... 8
SATURDAY, MARCH 31
New York at Orlando City.....................1
Los Angeles FC at LA Galaxy............... 3
Vancouver at Columbus........................3
Portland at Chicago...............................6
Atlanta United FC at Minnesota United
New York City FC at San Jose..............8
D.C. United at Sporting Kansas City8:30
NEW ENGLAND at Houston..............8:30
Philadelphia at Colorado.......................9
Montreal at Seattle..............................10
National Hockey League
Thursday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At BOSTON......OFF Tampa Bay......OFF
Pittsburgh.......­123 At N. Jersey...+113
At Buffalo....... ­118 Detroit............+108
Florida.............­160 At Ottawa......+150
At Nashville....­155 San Jose........ +145
At Minnesota.­150 Dallas.............+140
Winnipeg........ ­170 At Chicago....+158
At Calgary.......OFF Columbus........OFF
Edmonton.......­128 At Vancouver+118
At LA................­240 Arizona.......... +220
TRANSACTIONS
MLB
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday’s Games
Pittsburgh at Detroit, 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Baltimore, 3:05 p.m.
Houston at Texas, 3:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 3:37 p.m.
BOSTON at Tampa Bay, 4:00 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago WS at Kansas City, 4:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Friday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
BOSTON at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday’s Games
Washington at Cincinnati, ppd.
Chicago Cubs at Miami, 12:40 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Detroit, 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Diego, 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m.
San Fran at L.A. Dodgers, 7:08 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 10:10 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Washington at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Milwaukee at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
San Fran at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
AHL
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L OL SL Pts.
x­Lehigh Vl. .. 42 17 4 5 93
Scranton ....... 39 20 6 2 86
Providence ... 40 22 3 2 85
Charlotte....... 39 26 0 3 81
Bridgeport .... 33 26 5 3 74
Hartford ........ 31 30 5 3 70
Hershey......... 28 32 4 5 65
Springfield.... 28 33 5 2 63
GF
237
220
201
227
186
192
183
187
GA
198
198
163
197
183
230
224
213
North Division
x­Toronto...... 48 18 1 1
x­Syracuse.... 42 19 3 4
x­Rochester.. 31 20 11 6
x­Utica........... 34 24 6 4
Belleville ....... 26 37 2 3
Laval .............. 24 36 7 2
Binghamton.. 22 35 7 4
98
91
79
78
57
57
55
222
218
205
191
172
191
169
145
171
196
196
242
251
218
Western Conference
Central Division
Chicago......... 38 21 7 2 85
Manitoba ...... 39 22 4 4 86
Gr. Rapids..... 37 24 1 7 82
Rockford ....... 36 25 4 4 80
Iowa............... 30 23 9 6 75
Milwaukee.... 34 28 4 1 73
Cleveland...... 21 35 7 3 52
216
232
210
211
206
190
157
180
181
193
209
219
202
226
Pacific Division
Tucson........... 36 19 5 1
San Diego ..... 34 21 3 1
Ontario.......... 33 21 4 2
Texas............. 34 23 7 4
Stockton........ 30 23 2 4
San Antonio.. 32 26 10 0
San Jose........ 28 25 4 3
Bakersfield ... 26 23 9 1
187
186
176
199
183
175
156
166
157
169
167
207
169
186
180
181
78
72
72
79
66
74
63
62
x­Clinched Playoff Spot
y­Clinched Division
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a
win, one point for an overtime or shoo­
tout loss.
TUESDAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Bridgeport 6.............................Hershey 4
Hartford 4.................. Springfield 3 (SO)
Syracuse 5........................ Binghamton 1
Toronto 5.......................................Laval 1
Grand Rapids 3.................. Texas 2 (SO)
WB/Scranton 5..................Providence 2
Utica 3..........................Rochester 2 (OT)
Rockford 4............................. Manitoba 3
Chicago 3........................................Iowa 1
Cleveland at Stockton......................... 10
Bakersfield at San Diego.....................10
THURSDAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Hershey at Utica.....................................7
Belleville at Syracuse.............................7
San Jose at Grand Rapids.....................7
Providence at Lehigh Valley........... 7:05
Bridgeport at Springfield.................7:05
Charlotte at Rochester.....................7:05
Laval at Binghamton.........................7:05
WB/Scranton at Hartford................7:15
Toronto at Manitoba..............................8
Texas at Milwaukee...............................8
Tucson at Iowa........................................8
Stockton at San Antonio..................8:30
Cleveland at San Diego.......................10
Bakersfield at Ontario......................... 10
Tennis
MIAMI OPEN RESULTS
Singles
Men
John Isner (14) def. Chung Hyeon
(19), 6­1, 6­4.
Women
Jelena Ostapenko (6) def. Elina Svi­
tolina (4), 7­6 (3), 7­6 (5).; Danielle Col­
lins def. Venus Williams (8), 6­2, 6­3
NBA G League
Single Elimination
CONFERENCE QUARTERFINALS
Eastern Conference
Friday, March 30: Grand Rapids at Rap­
tors 905, 7 p.m.
Saturday, March 31: Lakeland at Erie, 3
p.m.
Western Conference
Friday, March 30: Texas at Rio Grande
Valley, 8 p.m.
Saturday, March 31: South Bay at Okla­
homa City , 5:15 p.m.
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Eastern Conference
Monday, April 2: Grand Rapids­Raptors
905 winner at Westchester, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, April 3: Lakeland­Erie winner
at Fort Wayne, 7 p.m.
Western Conference
Monday, April 2: Texas­Rio Grande Val­
ley winner at Austin, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, April 3: South Bay­Oklahoma
City winner at Reno, 9 p.m.
BASEBALL
Chicago (AL): Acquired P Ricardo Pinto
from Philadelphia for international
signing bonus pool money. Placed P
Carlos Rodon and C Kevan Smith on
10­day DL, retroactive to March 26. Se­
lected the contract of P Hector Santia­
go.
Detroit (AL): Signed P Jairo Labourt on
a minor league contract. Placed P
Johnny Barbato and P Mike Fiers on 10­
day DL, retroactive to March 26. Se­
lected the contract of INF Niko Good­
rum.
Los Angeles (AL): Optioned P Felix Pe­
na to Salt Lake (PCL). Designated C
Carlos Perez for assignment. Selected
the contract of RHP­OF Shohei Ohtani
from AZL Angels.
New York (AL): Announced P Jose Me­
sa Jr., a Rule 5 Draft pick, was returned
by Baltimore and assigned him to
Scranton/Wilkes­Barre (IL).
Oakland (AL): Optioned RHPs Trevor
Cahill and Frankie Montas, INF Franklin
Barreto and OFs Mark Canha and
Dustin Fowler to Nashville (PCL). An­
nounced P Raul Alcantara cleared
waivers and was sent outright to Nash­
ville. Placed RHPs Paul Blackburn and
Ryan Dull, C Josh Phegley and INF Re­
nato Nunez on 10­day DL, retroactive
to March 26. Reassigned P Simon Cas­
tro, C Beau Taylor and INF Sheldon
Neuse to minor league camp.
Seattle (AL): Selected the contract
of P Casey Lawrence. Optioned INF/OF
Taylor Motter to Tacoma (PCL). Placed
RHPs David Phelps, Erasmo Ramirez
and OF Ben Gamel on 10­day DL, retro­
active to March 26. Re­assigned P
Hisashi Iwakuma to minor league
camp.
Tampa Bay (AL): Placed RHPs Nathan
Eovaldi and Jose DeLeon on the 10­day
disabled list. Recalled P Austin Pruitt
from Durham (IL). Released P Daniel
Hudson.
Cincinnati (NL): Selected the contracts
of INF­OF Phil Gosselin and P Kevin
Quackenbush. Reassigned P Vance
Worley to minor league camp.
Los Angeles (NL): Optioned OF Andrew
Toles to Oklahoma City (PCL).
Milwaukee (NL): Selected the contract
of 1B/OF Ji­Man Choi. Optioned P Tay­
lor Williams to minor­league camp. Re­
assigned C Christian Bethancourt, INF/
OF Nick Franklin, INF Nate Orf, OF Kyle
Wren, P J.J. Hoover, P Radhames Liz
and P Wade Miley to minor league
camp.
New York (NL): Assigned OF Tim
Tebow to Binghamton (EL). An­
nounced OF Bryce Brentz cleared
waivers and was sent outright to Las
Vegas (PCL).
St. Louis (NL): Selected the contracts
of P Jordan Hicks and C Francisco Pe­
na. Recalled P Jack Flaherty from
Memphis (PCL). Optioned P John Breb­
bia to Memphis. Designated INF
Breyvic Valera and P Josh Lucas for as­
signment. Placed RHPs Luke Greger­
son, Alex Reyes and Adam Wainwright
on 10­day DL, retroactive to March 26.
San Diego (NL): Sent P Rowan Wick
outright to El Paso (TL). Selected the
contracts of P Adam Cimber and Cs
A.J. Ellis and Raffy Lopez. Optioned P
Buddy Baumann, RHPs Colten Brewer
and Phil Maton, and OF Travis
Jankowski to El Paso. Placed OF
Franchy Cordero, INF Allen Cordoba,
RHPs Dinelson Lamet and Colin Rea
and P Matt Strahm on 10­day DL, retro­
active to March 26. Placed OF Alex
Dickerson on 60­day DL.
BASKETBALL
Philadelphia (NBA): Announced the G
League franchise will move from New­
ark, Delaware, to Wilmington and will
change its name to the Delaware Blue
Coats.
FOOTBALL
Arizona (NFC): Signed DL Moubarak
Djeri.
Cleveland (AFC): Traded QB Cody Kes­
sler to Jacksonville for a conditional
2019 seventh­round draft pick.
New Orleans (NFC): Signed TE Benja­
min Watson on a one­year contract.
HOCKEY
Boston (NHL): Signed D Zdeno Chara
on a one­year contract extension.
Chicago (NHL): Recalled G Collin Delia
from Rockford (AHL). Assigned G J­F
Berube to Rockford.
Colorado (NHL): Recalled G Andrew
Hammond from San Antonio (AHL).
SOCCER
Dallas (MLS): Signed F Maxi Urruti on a
three­year contract.
ULTIMATE FIGHTING CHAMPIONSHIP
USADA: Announced Amanda Lemos
tested positive for a prohibited sub­
stance and accepted a two­year sanc­
tion for her anti­doping policy viola­
tion.
COLLEGE
Brown: Named Katie Reifert and Au­
brey Marsellis assistant volleyball
coaches.
Depaul: Announced junior G Max Strus
will declare for the NBA draft.
Duke: Announced freshman C Marvin
Bagley III has declared for the NBA
draft.
Georgia Southern: Announced junior G
Tookie Brown has declared for the NBA
draft.
LOYOLA (MD.): Named Tavaras Hardy
men’s basketball coach.
Michigan State: Announced sopho­
more F Miles Bridges will enter the
NBA draft.
South Carolina State : Announced it
will not renew contract of women’s
basketball coach Doug Robertson Jr.
Named Roderick Woods women’s in­
terim basketball coach.
Texas: Junior guard Eric Davis Jr. will
enter the NBA draft.
Toledo: Signed men’s basketball coach
Tod Kowalczyk to a two­year contract
extension through 2022­23.
Ski conditions
MASSACHUSETTS
Berkshire East — mg, 20­42 base, 40­45
trails, 3­5 lifts
Bousquet — pp, 10­30 base, 22­23
trails, 4­5 lifts
Catamount — mg, 20­40 base, 34­36
trails, 5­7 lifts
Jiminy Peak — mg, 20­45 base, 43­45
trails, 5­9 lifts
Ski Butternut — mg, 26­36 base, 22­22
trails, 6­11 lifts
Wachusett — mg, 14­50 base, 25­26
trails, 5­8 lifts
C8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
5
4
7
9
6
1
2
3
8
9
3
1
4
2
8
7
5
6
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
6
8
2
5
7
3
9
4
1
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
4
9
6
2
1
5
3
8
7
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
3
2
8
6
9
7
5
1
4
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
1
7
5
3
8
4
6
2
9
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
8
1
9
7
3
2
4
6
5
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
7
5
3
1
4
6
8
9
2
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
2
6
4
8
5
9
1
7
3
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
C9
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
ZIPPY “N.Z.O.T.K.D.” by Bill Griffith
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
You’re a plugger if your teenage cruising buddy now
accompanies you to doctors’ appointments.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
6
4 3
1
4
7
3 2
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
SO SAYS CAPT. OBVIOUS BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 It may be charted
5 “Boo” kin
9 Delayed from
acting
14 Foiled
16 Writer Jules
17 Hollywood
joe jape?
(beginning)
19 Saloon
necessity
20 Cockney roll call
answer
21 Dr. with seven
faces
22 High-altitude
weather probe
24 Self-centered
excursions
29 Corn unit
30 Prepare for
a selfie
31 Rural field
32 Summer
ermine
35 Egyptian river
36 Isn’t badly?
37 Hollywood
joe jape?
(middle)
40 Sounds of
astonishment
41 Invisible energy
source
42 App maker
43 Versatile truck,
briefly
44 It has a mark
45 Crayola option
46 Motorcycle part
48 Dueling weapons
51 Hawaiian
serving
52 Fancy eggs
53 Nut going
around and
around
55 Hollywood
joe jape?
(ending)
61 Projecting
window
62 Facial feature
63 Proceeds along
64 Cans in
Britain
65 Blend in bowls
1
2
3
4
5
DOWN
Out-there guess
Some whales
TNT part
Fed. publisher
Any judge,
at times
6 Not moving
7 Dine
8 Beverly Wilshire
feature
9 Pilot verbally?
10 Operatic voice
11 Dude relative
12 Cranium
center?
13 Affirmative
15 Antecede
18 Shuttered
23 Bellies up to
24 Embodiment
25 Legendary
automaton
26 Troy’s war story
27 Pasta variety
28 Faun relative
32 Porky proboscis
33 Brushed thing
34 Neither this
nor that
35 Birth-related
36 U-turn from
cathode
38 Milk-related
39 Swelling reducer
44 Seats at
19-Across
45 Some
Broadway
offerings
47 Was picky
49 Poetic T.S.
50 Muslim sect
52 Free-thinking
54 Departer
55 Gobsmack
56 “How ___ you?”
57 Yang go-with
58 Do film work
59 Greek letter
60 It has an
eye on TV
5 9
3
8 1
3
8
8
5
1
5
7 1
6
1
2 7
5
C10
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
Kelly Chrysler*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
Honda Cars of Boston*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
371 Washington Street, Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
Kelly Honda*
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
Ferrari Of New England*
Mirak Hyundai
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Cityside*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
Infiniti of Hanover
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
Framingham Ford*
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
2060 Washington St, Hanover
781-570-5200
infinitiofhanover.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Kelly Infiniti*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
Kelly Ford*
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Quirk Ford*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
540 Southern Artery, Quincy
617-770-0070
quirkford.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Herb Chambers Genesis*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Mirak Genesis
Kelly Jeep*
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St, Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.*
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Lev Kia of Framingham*
Kelly Nissan of Danvers*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyauto.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
Best Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram*
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota of Watertown*
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
VillageSubaru.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
Mirak Chevrolet*
smart center Boston
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
smart center Lynnfield
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
Best Chevrolet*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
Boch Maserati*
Kelly Maserati*
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
Honda Village*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Audi Shrewsbury
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
520 Colony Place, Plymouth
508-747-1550
thebestchrysler.com
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
340 Mystic Ave, Medford
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo of Boston
525 Boston Post Rd. • Route 20 • Wayland, MA 01778
New 2018 Alfa Romeo
194
Q4 STELVIO $
AWD
INCOMING UNIT• MSRP: $44,790
LEASE FOR
*
/ MO. 24 MOS.
$3,999 due at signing
New 2017 Alfa Romeo
GIULIA
Q4 AWD
STK# A140 • MSRP: $47,590
LEASE FOR
199
$
**
/ MO. 24 MOS.
$3,999 due at signing
Available at Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo through 3/31/2018 to qualified lessees with Tier 1 approved credit through Chrysler Capital . Delivery by 3/31/2018 required. Subject to availability – quantities are limited. **24-month closed-end lease for a new
2017 model year Alfa Romeo Giulia Q4 AWD (in-stock only) with an MSRP of $47,590 (stock # A140).*24-month closed-end lease for a new 2018 model year Alfa Romeo Stelvio AWD (in-stock only)with an MSRP of $44,790 (stock # incoming unit).
Lessee is responsible for insurance, maintenance, repairs, $0.50 per mile over 10,000 miles per tear, and excess wear and tear. MA sales tax, doc, reg, acq, security deposit, and first months payment are separate. Lease payment reflects conquest cash
for customers currently leasing a competitive brand vehicle (non Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, FIAT or Alfa Romeo product) and enter into a new purchase or lease of an eligible model. Extra charges may apply at lease end. Requires Tier 1 Credit approval with Chrysler Capital. In stock models only. ^Includes all incentives, and excludes taxes and all dealer fees. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Prior sales excluded from all offers.
855-806-3336
herbchambersalfaromeoofboston.com
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo of Millbury
2 Latti Farm Rd. • Route 20 • Millbury, MA 01527
855-866-0411
herbchambersalfaromeo.com
Sales: Monday-Thursday 8:30am - 8:00pm
Friday-Saturday 8:30am - 6:00pm, Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
Service: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 6:00pm
ThursdayScene
G
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / L I F E S T Y L E
From
fanfic
to
her fic
DAVID BEAN
Chris Carrabba brings Dashboard
Confessional to the House of Blues.
Mackenzie Van Engelenhoven
started by writing loving homages.
Now as Mackenzi Lee she’s a rising
star in YA historical fantasy.
BY S . I . ROS E N BAU M | G LO B E COR R E S P O N D E N T
MUSIC
It’s more than
a feeling for
Dashboard
Confessional
By Ryan Burleson
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Chris Carrabba is down to earth, but he’s
not exactly ordinary.
Taylor Swift counts him as an influence.
Jimmy Iovine, the record business giant,
once implied that his impact could rival
Eminem’s. He’s toured with U2.
Between 2001 and 2006, as lead singersongwriter for Dashboard Confessional,
Carrabba made three gold records, writing
songs like “Hands Down” and “Screaming
Infidelities” that became millennial equivalents of “American Pie” or “Go Your Own
Way.” He made a classic MTV “Unplugged”
when doing so held cultural cachet. He was
the face of emo at its cultural peak. He is, if
such a thing still exists, a rock star.
When reached for a chat with the Globe,
however, in advance of a show Friday at the
House of Blues, the 42-year-old wasn’t jetsetting with Bono. He was riding to his next
show in a van full of strangers. Happily.
“We’re driving through Manitoba, admiring the prairies,” he says. “It looks like
A
bout 800 years ago in Iceland, a
poet named Snorri Sturluson
put pen to parchment to record the already-millenniaold stories of a trickster deity
from Norse mythology
known as Loki.
Now it’s novelist Mackenzie Van Engelenhoven’s turn.
Van Engelenhoven — known to the fans
of her popular young-adult novels as Mackenzi Lee — was thrilled when she was
tapped recently by Marvel Comics to write
a series of YA sagas about the franchise’s
most sympathetic villains. The first will focus on Loki, who was borrowed from the
Norse pantheon to become a staple of Marvel’s fictional universe in the 1960s. “It’s incredibly cool to be part of that legacy,” Van
Engelenhoven said, “a work that has had so
many creators in so many ways over time.”
In a way, she added, working with a legacy character takes her back to her roots.
As a kid, she would write fanfiction, scrawling stories about characters from fantasy
novels and sci-fi movies in a notebook.
DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL, Page G4
Inside
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
LEE, Page G7
THEATER
A forger who paints as if his life depends on it
MUSIC
ALL GROWN­UP
Sylvan Esso’s rapid ascent
toward mainstream success
includes a Grammy nod and
headlining gigs at big venues
G5
THING TANK
THEORIES ABOUND
From Stormy Daniels’s
dilated pupils to an unnamed
Beyoncé biter, a review of
the week online
G2
By Don Aucoin
GLOBE STAFF
WATERTOWN — “Why struggle in vain to realize your own genius when you can have someone
else’s?’’
That glib credo — a blend of
opportunism, cynicism, and
m ay b e a r u e f u l r e a l i s m — i s
enunciated in “The Bakelite Masterpiece’’ by an art forger named
Han van Meegeren, explaining
how he discovered he “could be,
in my lack of authenticity, a great
artist.’’
Han’s musings are far from
idle. His life hangs in the balance
as he is interrogated in a prison
cell by a woman wearing a military uniform and an implacable
expression.
Kate Cayley’s smart and twisty
two-hander, inspired by a true
story and directed by Jim Petosa
at New Repertory Theatre, stars
two skilled actors known for
bringing different kinds of intensity to their performances: Benjamin Evett and Laura Latreille.
Evett — a frequent presence
on New Rep’s stage in productions like “Amadeus,’’ “Good,’’ Arthur Miller’s “Broken Glass,’’
“Cherry Docs,’’ Sondheim’s “Assassins,’’ and numerous others —
excels at playing men on the edge
and is at his most compelling
when he opens it up to full throttle. Latreille, who was part of the
splendid New Rep ensemble two
years ago in Richard Nelson’s
“Regular Singing,’’ tends toward
an inward style that often suggests her characters know, or suspect, more than they’re saying.
‘‘BAKELITE MASTERPIECE,’’ Page G4
ANDREW BRILLIANT/BRILLIANT PICTURES
Benjamin Evett in “The Bakelite Masterpiece.”
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
Insider
THING TANK
At Brassica Kitchen + Cafe
in Jamaica Plain, Noah
Todoroff is pouring a 2016
Walnut City Wineworks
Pinot Gris, hailing from
Oregon’s Willamette Valley.
“The thing I love is that
when you begin sipping,
you get pear and apple,
then a creamy mouthfeel,”
says the general manager
and beverage director. And,
because it’s nicely priced at
$12 a glass and $48 a bot­
tle, you need not hesitate
treating yourself. The lively
white complements a
steaming bowl of Chatham
mussels, prepared by chef­
owners Philip Kruta and
Jeremy Kean. The bivalves
are simmered in a miso­in­
fused red Thai curry and
served with toasted sour­
dough, slathered with nas­
turtium compound butter.
After the spicy salinity of
the dish, the wine pro says
the nutty, almond­like fin­
ish of the wine refreshes. It’s
clear what motivates this
team: “We love to share the
things we love with the peo­
ple we love,” Todoroff en­
thuses.
A REVIEW OF THE WEEK IN THINGS
FROM THE BAR
Mussels and wine
a love letter to
the neighborhood
JAWS DROPPING
Anderson Cooper’s hotly anticipated “60 Minutes” interview with porn
auteur (because, honestly, her vision
permeates her oeuvre) Stormy Dan­
iels raised some serious questions:
Who threatened her to keep silent
about her alleged affair with pre-POTUS billionaire megastud DJ Trump?
(Theories abound.) What was going
on with her pupils? (Theories abound;
let’s stay on track, guys.) And most
pressing: Seriously, what kind of person uses Shark Week for foreplay?
Will I ever be able to enjoy it (i.e.
Shark Week) again? How did Shark
Week just get more unsettling than it
already was? How do sharks feel
about this? Can we maybe hold off on
telling the sharks, since they already
seem pretty unpleased with us?
SHAME DIFFERENCE
Elsewhere in highly clickable public
humiliation, Twitter user @tpain_yo
submitted a tragic throwback photo
essay of sorts, documenting an episode that found her ensnared (on a
dare) in a playground toddler swing,
requiring eventual rescue from a
team of first responders and some
teeny-tiny jaws of life (a.k.a. scissors). Viral redemption achieved! And
user @BubbaAtkinson held a public
hearing on Twitter for his dog Charlie,
who may or may not have gotten into
the trash, and obviously got into the
trash. After zero deliberation the jury
returned a verdict that she was a
good girl and should go swimming
yes she should.
Brassica Kitchen + Cafe,
3710 Washington St., Ja­
maica Plain, 617­477­4519,
www.brassicakitchen.com
CHRISTOPHER HAYNES
ELLEN BHANG
LAUGH LINES
DREW MICHAEL
NO EXIT
And elsewhere in getting stuck, an
Uber driver in San Francisco was berated online for choosing the healthy
option and trying to take the stairs
out of a Safeway (*snicker*) parking
lot. (It didn’t work.) The driver
blamed Uber’s navigation system —
more commonly referred to as “the
driver.” Meanwhile in Phoenix, a cat
named Gypsy got stuck atop a utility
pole over the weekend, much to the
Internet’s fascination. Witnesses to
the rescue report having the same
Stevie Nicks song stuck in their heads
the whole time. And finally, a college
professor in Hialeah, Fla., got stuck
obeying his own rule of forcing tardy
students to dance for the class after
showing up late himself; or maybe it
was his students that got stuck
watching their professor attempt human dancing. Either way, thoughts
and prayers.
‘I get depressed, I feel
disconnected from other
people. You know what I
mean? If you don’t know
what I mean, that is what I
mean.’
— Michael plays CitySide Comedy at CitySide
Bar in Brighton Monday
NICK A. ZAINO III
BOTTLES
Shakesbeer takes the stage
By Gary Dzen
W
NIBBLE­GATE?
Back to some actual news. According
to an interview with Tiffany Haddish
in GQ, an unnamed actress bit Be­
yoncé in the face. I know, right?! Haddish declined to say who, and Bey’s
lips are sealed, so journalists and inquiring minds who want to know are
setting upon their own investigation,
starting with the obvious question:
Who didn’t bite Beyoncé in the face?
A HuffPost list of confirmed denials
includes Jennifer Aniston ( “ ‘What? I
have no idea what this means,’ said a
spokesperson.”), Kathy Bates
(“bates” is, after all, the past tense of
“bites”), and Julie Andrews (I’d press
harder on that one). You could also
check to see which actresses are
suddenly hosting ads for SuperBeets.
MICHAEL ANDOR BRODEUR
GLOBE STAFF
hen you name your company Shakesbeer, you’re
bound to be approached by
theater-loving aesthetes
dropping their favorite
lines.
“It’s almost constant,” says Mike Sartor,
who along with his wife, Jessie, founded the
Hingham-based Shakesbeer Beverages company last year. “It keeps me on my toes to make
sure I’ve got the right street cred.”
The couple met at Colgate, where Jessie
was an English major and Mike was “a guy
who liked beer a lot.” She wrote an honors thesis on the women in William Shakespeare’s
plays. Like many other folks who start their
own breweries, he’s an avid homebrewer who
has decided to strike out on his own.
Shakesbeer currently makes two beers.
The company introduces Act 1, a hazy,
5.5 percent ABV New England-style IPA, on its
website with a verse:
“From grains of olde and hops of new; Our
maiden Taming of the Brew; With golden hue
and citrus air; An ale refined with modern
flair.”
A stronger IPA, The Tempest, is named after one of the British playwright’s well-known
works.
“Maybe I’m a nerdy pun guy, but I really
liked Shakesbeer as a brand for a long time,”
says Sartor, who points to the accessibility of
Shakespeare’s plays as a link with beer’s reputation as a drink for the common man or woman. “Maybe it was low-hanging fruit.”
All of this might not work if the beer wasn’t
any good. At 7.7 percent ABV, The Tempest
features 6 hop varieties but drinks like a much
lighter brew, with pops of grapefruit and orange peel and a subtle bitterness representative of the style. (The Brewers Association, a
trade organization representing small and independent brewers, just officially recognized
“Juicy or Hazy Pale Ale,” “Juicy or Hazy IPA”
and “Juicy or Hazy Double IPA” as official
styles to be judged in competitions, so expect
to see even more of these beers in the coming
year). Strip out the literary references and The
Tempest is an above-average IPA, worth seeking out regardless of whether you’ve seen a
Shakespeare-in-the-park production of “Othello.”
Shakesbeer doesn’t have a physical brewery.
Sartor currently brews at Shebeen Brewing Co.
in Wolcott, Conn. He’s moving a portion of
that production to Ipswich in the coming
months, and someday the couple would like to
open up their own shop in Hingham. The company’s third beer, a hoppy pale ale brewed
with lemon zest and aptly named A Midsummer Night’s Dream, will be released May 1.
Gary Dzen can be reached at
gary.dzen@globe.com.
GIJS VAN DER MOST
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
most of our songs to piano and
guitar, to make sure the song is
a song first, and then go back
and worry about vocal production and track production. A
good song should be able to be
played on just the guitar and
still be gut-wrenching.
Cal Shapiro
(left) and Rob
Resnick met
while they were
at Tufts.
Q. And when you tour, how do
you get all your beats and instrumental sound with only
two people?
RR: You know that guy that
walks around New York with
that big drum and 10 cymbals
and is bike pedaling and plays
guitar? That’s what we look
like on stage.
For
Timeflies,
warm
memories
of tacos
and Tufts
PIPER FERGUSON
T
G l o b e
By Sophie Cannon
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
ime flies when you’re having fun — and touring
the nation with your college buddies for a living.
Cal Shapiro and Rob Resnick met at Tufts
University and after starting a band there, they
eventually made the call to break away and start
producing tracks on their own. In 2010 Timeflies was born,
with Shapiro on vocals and Resnick producing their tracks.
Some 200 million video views and 500 million Spotify streams
later, the duo has been featured on Jimmy Fallon and Jimmy
Kimmel’s late-night shows and “Good Morning America”;
their “Be Easy” is currently ESPN’s song of the month, the
track featured during many of the network’s programs.
Before they return to Boston Saturday for a show at House
of Blues, the pair spoke with the Globe by phone to chat about
their music and the thrill of being back where it all began.
Q. When you come back to play
here, does it bring back any
feelings from your start at
Tufts?
Cal Shapiro: I think our first
show was at the Middle East,
in the basement, so we knew
the venues around us because
we went to shows at school,
and we knew what the House
of Blues was, and now coming
back there, you get a little bit of
the feels. We are going to have
some Tufts family and friends
coming out, and I have a lot of
family coming to the show, so
NEWSEUM
Comedy Central’s
Klepper talks
late­night satire
in the age of Trump
By Megan McDonough
THE WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — Jordan
Klepper, host of ‘‘The Opposition with Jordan Klepper’’ on
Comedy Central, remembers
simpler times when news cycles weren’t plagued by nearconstant scandals and latenight presidential tweets.
‘‘In the ‘Daily Show’ days,
with Jon [Ste war t], you
weren’t always chasing the
story of the day. You were maybe prepping stories a couple
days ahead of time,’’ Klepper
said. ‘‘It doesn’t work like that
anymore. . . . Like, Donald
Trump is picking a fight with
Joe Biden. Usually, you could
live off that deer for like a
month and a half — make a
leather coat, feed a family —
but right now, no. What’s happening? There’s a porn star doing an interview on Sunday
‘There are always
times when
[Trump] beats us
to the joke and
that’s frustrating,
but I think we
view it as more of
a challenge.’
JORDAN KLEPPER
[Stormy Daniels sat with ‘‘60
Minutes’’ this past weekend]
. . . the budget, and, oh, also,
there’s a giant march happening in front of his house.’’
The ‘‘Daily Show’’ alum was
in Washington over the weekend to cover Saturday’s March
for Our Lives, the student-led
rally to urge Congress to adopt
it feels like a homecoming. I
have family in Watertown.
Rob Resnick: I’m very close
with all the people at Anna’s
Taqueria, so I am very excited
to go see them.
Q. Tufts not only got you two
together but gave you a manager, Jared Glick, and tour manager, Luke Heffernan. How is it
to work with college buddies
every day?
CS: It’s the best-case scenario.
Not only is it great that you
work with people that you respect, but you also know 100
percent of the time that they
got your back and you have
theirs because there is that
family-friendship kind of relationship.
Q. Being a duo, does your process in making a new song
start with Rob’s beats or with
Cal’s lyrics?
RR: Typically we tend to write
stricter gun laws and end mass
shootings. But before Klepper
took to the streets, he swung
by the Newseum on Friday for
an hourlong conversation
about late-night satire in the
age of Trump, comedians as
thought leaders, and commonsense gun laws. Oh, and that
baffling time former Trump
adviser Carter Page praised
Klepper’s show and asked to
be on it, despite the program’s
progressive bent.
For fans in the audience, it
was a chance to see Klepper
break from his fatuous onscreen persona and discuss
politics from his real-life point
of view. (Klepper’s conspiratorial conservative character is
based off incendiary voices
like Ale x Jones and Glenn
Beck and alternative-media
sources like Infowars and Breitbart — much as Stephen Colbert channeled Bill O’Reilly in
his long-running program,
‘‘The Colbert Report.”)
‘‘We see it as an ability — a
freedom — to take crazy and
try to find logic behind it when
sometimes there doesn’t seem
to be logic in the Oval Office,’’
Klepper said. ‘‘There are always times when [ Trump]
beats us to the joke and that’s
frustrating, but I think we
view it as more of a challenge.’’
His larger-than-life character has even attracted some attention in Trump’s sphere.
‘‘People often ask us if there
are ever people that don’t get
what you are doing . . . and
don’t understand the comedy
[of the show]. I would often
say no, until literally three
weeks ago Carter Page walked
into our office and said, ‘I love
your guys’ show.’ ”
‘‘We were very confused.
We’re like, ‘Have you seen our
show?’ ” Klepper said with a
laugh. ‘‘It was a little hard to
wrap my head around it, but
then you start to see we all are
living within our own little
self-constructed bubbles [and]
project our point of view on
the person in front of us.’’
Klepper is used to conducting interviews with some of
the administration’s most ardent supporters. ‘‘People say
yes [to being on camera] beKLEPPER, Page G6
Q. Your original Too Much To
Dream tour started last year in
September. Why extend the
tour through 2018?
CS: [The set] just didn’t feel
complete yet, and that’s what
we were touring off of, so we
knew we wanted to buckle
down and get everything perfect. That’s how we feel we
have it now.
RR: You can’t force the creative
side of it. Saying we had to go
on the road and we didn’t feel
100 percent about, was something we just couldn’t get behind. So we got back in and
made one of our favorite songs
we’ve ever created, “Be Easy.”
We were able to focus so much
attention on that, and make
that sound exactly how we
wanted it to, so no regrets.
With our band name being
Timeflies, we aren’t very good
with deadlines. But we’re here.
G3
‘I think our first show was at the
Middle East, in the basement, so we
knew the venues around us . . . and we
knew what the House of Blues was, and
now coming back there, you get a little
bit of the feels.’
CAL SHAPIRO
TIMEFLIES
At House of Blues, March 31
at 7 p.m. Tickets $30­$50,
www.ticketmaster.com
epic place to play.
Q. Anything to add before we
see you in Boston?
RR: If Anna’s Taqueria wants to
sponsor the tour, we are in.
Q. And you are playing the
House of Blues for the second
time on this tour as well. Is
that still an exciting venue for
you two?
CS: House of Blues is one of our
favorite venues of all time.
From backstage, to everyone
there, there is such a vibe in
there. I still get the same feeling and same chills. Actually, I
think one of my favorite shows
of our entire career happened
there. It was right after the
Boston Marathon bombing.
We did a freestyle and brought
out first responders onstage.
So going back in that room, I
go back to that moment. It’s an
un
f
y
l
i
Fam
th
i
w
s
t
star
ise in
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inm
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To be included in Boston’s
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CS: We miss being in Boston.
It’s a great city to go to and to
develop our sound in. And we
are coming home.
RR: And Hong Kong in Camb r i d ge h as g r e at s c o r p i on
bowls, very drinkable.
Interview was edited and
condensed. Sophie Cannon can
be reached at sophie.cannon
@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @the_grandCannon.
T h e
G4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
From far left: Chris Carrabba,
Chris Kamrada, and Scott
Schoenbeck of Dashboard
Confessional in January.
KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES/FILE
Carrabba turns his inward gaze outward
uDASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL
Continued from Page G1
Texas, but everybody’s in galoshes instead of cowboy boots.”
Carrabba needed a lift after both
axles blew off Dashboard Confessional’s trailer amid the Canadian swing of
the tour behind “Crooked Shadows,”
the band’s first album in nine years.
He’s toured in the interim, with Dashboard and the Americana band Twin
Forks, but “Crooked Shadows” marks
the return of Carrabba as a subject of
cultural intrigue. GQ, The New Yorker,
The Atlantic, The New York Times:
These and more marquee media have
recently waxed nostalgic for the ways
in which he conveyed a new kind of interior angst at Dashboard’s pinnacle.
Still, Carrabba just isn’t the kind of
celebrity who elevates himself above
strangers, and he’s not about to let broken trailer axles cancel a show.
“The most important thing is playing tonight,” Carrabba says. “I’m going
to make it because these people helped
out.”
DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL
At House of Blues, Boston, March 30
at 5:30 p.m. Tickets $33­$53,
www.ticketmaster.com
Carrabba’s comfort with strangers
isn’t feigned. It was cultivated as a teen
in south Florida’s punk and hardcore
scene, where newcomers were treated
like family and inclusion was sacrosanct.
“Our scene was racially diverse and
pretty evenly split down the gender
line,” he remembers. “Every faith
seemed to be represented there, or
people without faith. It was OK to be a
bisexual or gay or lesbian or transgender teen there when it wasn’t elsewhere. Everybody was encouraged to
be who they were.”
This cross-pollination meant that
musical expression took myriad forms.
Before Carrabba broke through with
Dashboard’s acoustic torch songs, he
fronted the punk band Vacant Andys
and the intricate rock troupe Further
Seems Forever, forged from the ashes
of the Christian hardcore band Strongarm. An early Dashboard tour saw
Carrabba open for Snapcase, which is
more or less the equivalent of James
Taylor splitting the bill with Pantera.
Unironically.
“I still haven’t played a coffee shop,”
Carrabba says, laughing. “Hardcore
was the circuit for my friendships and
booking shows. I was doing something
different, but I knew I was doing it in a
safe place. Hardcore kids never get
credit for their breadth of musical
taste.”
Carrabba’s concerts at the time
were a wonder to behold: Young people with sleeves of tattoos, prolific
piercings, dyed hair, and mosh pit
bruises gathered around the dashing
punk rocker and his Gibson to sing
loudly about summer kisses and broken hearts, “breathing deeply from envelopes” and what it feels like to be a
“trophy display of bruises.” These early
shows had the gravitas of gospel per-
formance: Kids left with raspy voices,
smiling and less afraid to outwardly
purge internal tumult.
The moment was right. At the turn
of this century, rock music was being
sucked dry by “post-grunge” bands like
‘I still haven’t played a
coffee shop. Hardcore
was the circuit for my
friendships and
booking shows.’
CHRIS CARRABBA,
Dashboard Confessional frontman
Creed, giving mainstream listeners the
option of Britney Spears and little else.
Into the void stepped Dashboard, My
Chemical Romance, the Used, Taking
Back Sunday, Jimmy Eat World, and
more: bands rife with sensitive, edgy-
Artful
acting in
a twisty
two­hander
Ryan Burleson can be reached at
ryanscottburleson@gmail.com. Follow
him on Twitter @ryanburleson.
S TA G E R E V I E W
THE BAKELITE MASTERPIECE
Play by Kate Cayley. Directed by
Jim Petosa. Presented by New
Repertory Theatre. At MainStage
Theater, Mosesian Center for the
Arts, Watertown, through April 8.
Tickets $37­$67, 617­923­8487,
www.newrep.org
u‘‘BAKELITE MASTERPIECE’’
Continued from Page G1
ing — and, to Geert, implausible —
defense: That what he sold to Goering
was not a Vermeer but a forgery, brilliantly executed by Han himself. He is
a “perfect fraud,’’ not a traitor. At a
time when the nation is at risk of tearing itself to pieces over who did what
during the German occupation, Han
spells it out to Geert: “You shot some
Nazis but I made them into fools. And
they can be public fools. For the
crowd to laugh at. I am the hero who
pulled the chair out from under Hermann Goering. Think about those
people, laughing. Their laughter is serious, it’s desperate, they laugh to
ward off despair. You’ll need that.’’
Geert isn’t buying. “You couldn’t
paint a Vermeer to save your life,’’ she
tells Han. So he challenges her to let
him do just that. Allow him, he says,
to prove his case by painting a subject
of her choice in the style of Vermeer.
She grudgingly consents. T hree
guesses which subject she chooses?
Director Petosa deftly builds an
aura of suspense while not losing
sight of the ideas woven through “The
Bakelite Masterpiece.’’ Those ideas
touch on matters of fame, obscurity,
immortality, and honor; on the question of art as an emblem of nationhood and a means of individual survival; and about what is authentic
and what is counterfeit, not just as regards painting but also the stories we
tell ourselves.
Their pairing ensures that currents of tension flow throughout the
cerebral game of feint-and-parry that
is “Bakelite Masterpiece,’’ which unfolds on a set — designed by the inexhaustible Cristina Todesco, who
seems to create the scenery for half
the shows in town — that consists of
several towering grids bedecked with
empty painting frames.
It is Amsterdam in 1946, after the
end of World War II, a time of reckoning for Dutch citizens who collaborated with the Germans during the occupation — and a time to take stock of
the Nazi appropriation of art.
Geert Piller (Latreille), an art historian who was a member of the resistance and now heads a commission to
investigate appropriated art, is accusing the disheveled-looking Han of being one of those collaborators; specifically, of selling a rediscovered Vermeer masterpiece to none other than
Hermann Goering, whom Han hosted
at a dinner party. (Geert was present
when Han unveiled the supposed
painting by Vermeer, and he will return more than once to the question
of why she wept at that moment).
Facing the prospect of being either
shot or hanged, Han offers an intrigu-
Benjamin Evett and
Laura Latreille in New
Repertory Theatre’s
production of “The
Bakelite Masterpiece.”
seeming white males, primarily, who
could conjure pop’s theatricality while
retaining a sheen of underground purity. “Emo,” an umbrella term for these
acts and prior waves of sensitive punk
dating back to the ’80s, in Washington,
D.C., could now pack arenas.
Carrabba rode this wave for nearly
a decade, becoming a permanent fixture in the cultural firmament. Then
he stepped back, moved to Nashville,
wrote for other pop stars, and waited
until he had something meaningful to
say as Dashboard.
He found it, nine years later, in the
form of anthemic songs like “ We
Fight,” “Belong,” and “Be Alright,”
work from “Crooked Shadows” that’s
the most hi-fi pop that Carrabba’s produced. He turned his inward gaze outward, mining the ways in which
strangers, friends, and lovers lean on
one another instead of returning to the
baying sigh of a single broken heart.
“We earned what we could from the
ground up, and we tried to lift the
whole damn crowd up,” Carrabba
sings on “We Fight.”
“Crooked Shadows” was released
on Feb. 9, and less than a week later 17
students and teachers were gunned
down at Stoneman Douglas High
School in Parkland, Fla., not far from
where Carrabba lived in his teens. In
the ’90s, a former girlfriend was a student there, as were Carrabba’s longtime friends Jordan Pundik and Ian
Grushka of pop punk titans New
Found Glory. Another friend lost a
daughter in the massacre.
Without meaning to, Carrabba had
written songs — especially “We Fight,”
imploring the “bleeding and battered”
to never go quietly — that dovetail
with the real-time empowerment and
protest exhibited by the student survivors and supporters who participated
in March for Our Lives demonstrations last weekend.
“These kids are as savvy as any generation has ever been,” Carrabba says.
On May 16, the songwriter will perform in Pompano Beach alongside
New Found Glory and Yellowcard’s
William Ryan Key to benefit the families of those injured or killed in the
shooting. “These kids are saying, ‘We
need your help. You need to save us.’
That’s powerful.”
Carrabba seemed to be communing
with a younger version of himself: the
populist forged in punk rock idealism
not far from Parkland.
“The next wave of leaders need to
be honing their chops now,” he says.
“These songs are a reminder that there
are things worth standing up for.”
ANDREW BRILLIANT/BRILLIANT PICTURES
Don Aucoin can be reached at
aucoin@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter@GlobeAucoin
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G5
By Jeremy D. Goodwin
A
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
s pop duo Sylvan Esso
keeps getting bigger, vocalist-songwriter Amelia
Meath has found room
for some personal indulgences. When she takes the call for a
phone interview one recent afternoon,
she’s in the green room at a Dallas venue, scrolling through a selection of
lawn ornaments online.
“I started to do this thing now
where I realize I’m an adult and I can
do things — like buy pink lawn flamingos if I want them. And in this case I
decided that I do,” Meath says, with
the good humor and down-to-earth
earnestness that mark her affect.
If Meath’s lawn in Durham, N.C. —
where the Cambridge native has relocated along with her musical partner
in Sylvan Esso, Nick Sanborn — starts
filling up with plastic flamingos, she
will have earned it.
Sylvan Esso got its start a few years
ago when Meath asked Sanborn —
who at the time was playing in the
Americana-flavored band Megafaun,
alongside some former Bon Iver collaborators — to remix a track by Mountain Man, the vocals-forward folk trio
she’d cofounded as an undergrad with
fellow Bennington College students
Molly Erin Sarlé and Alexandra Sauser-Monnig. The result came a few
months too late for Mountain Man’s
purposes, but it became the closing
track on Sylvan Esso’s self-titled debut
album, released in 2014.
The earthy sounds of Mountain
Man evoke traditional images of the
Green Mountain State and Meath’s upbringing in what she calls a “singing
family,” whose members were annual
participants in the solstice-themed
Christmas Revels concerts in Cambridge. But Meath’s melodies are given
context in Sylvan Esso with the electronic beats crafted by Sanborn.
If the duo’s debut was a bit more introspective, its 2017 follow-up, aptly titled “ What Now,” is more densely
packed with hooks and beats that pretty much insist you get out of your seat.
It fueled a rapid ascent for the group.
The record netted Sylvan Esso its first
Grammy Award nomination (for best
dance/electronica album) and other
signifiers of mainstream success.
The duo’s triumphant performance
on the first day of the Boston Calling
festival last year felt like a big homecoming moment for Meath, but one
senses there are greater milestones
still in store. On its current tour, which
brings the duo to Mass MoCA for a
sold-out show Saturday, Sylvan Esso
will headline shows at big-deal venues
like the Greek Theatre in Berkeley, Calif., and Red Rocks Amphitheatre outside Denver. (Tickets remain for their
April 4 date at the Strand in Providence.)
“Every time we’ve played a show
somewhere it’s been twice as big as the
last show we played there. It’s just
been this constant linear progression,”
THEATER
Sylvan Esso is all
grown­up now
The duo’s rapid ascent toward
mainstream success includes
a Grammy nomination
and headlining gigs
at major venues
SHERVIN LAINEZ
‘You have to remember
that the only reason
you are where you are
is because of the
decisions you and your
original team made.’
AMELIA MEATH (above, with her
musical partner in Sylvan Esso,
Nick Sanborn)
Sanborn says, on a different phone
call. “One of the cool things about this
phase of our career is we’re getting to
this point where all the opportunities
we’re getting are big enough that our
families really understand how big
they are.”
Sylvan Esso is less than a year removed from the release of “ What
Now,” but its spring and summer touring is getting a boost from the release
THEATER
of a stand-alone single, “PARAD(w/
m)E,” accompanied by an elaborate
video for which Meath served as creative director and lead dancer.
Though packed with sticky melodies and propellant rhythms, the
group’s aesthetic encompasses a sort of
bespoke EDM in which the beats and
sonic veneer are deliberately imperfect.
“When I hear an off-kilter drumbeat or something that sounds like it’s
been mis-sliced,” Sanborn says, “those
speak about intention to me, they
speak about choices. I like being reminded that a human being was interacting with a machine to accomplish a
goal.”
The “idea behind Sylvan Esso,”
Meath says, is about “working with
machinery to talk about the greater
humanity of things.”
The defining example of this approach in the group’s catalog is “Radio,” a 3½-minute slice of perfect radio
pop whose lyrics slash at the very idea
THEATER
of a hit single and whose sound reflects the physical imprint of the artists’ hands.
The song opens with two electronic
patterns originally sculpted by Sanborn. To get the final version, Sanborn
recorded these parts to a vintage Otari
reel-to-reel tape recorder that had
been used for years by Meath’s mom, a
public radio reporter. They then recorded the results as Meath pressed on
the reels with her hands during playback, altering the pitch and creating a
watery, distorted effect.
The result lives between words —
both digital and analog, exact and imprecise. The song’s lyrics reflect a similar state of ambivalence. Meath sings:
“I’ve got the moves of a TV queen/ Folk
girl hero in a magazine/ Faking the
truth in a new pop song/ Don’t you
wanna sing along?”
The listener can contemplate the
tensions woven into the song’s lyrical
and sonic fabric — or just dance.
“It’s mostly eviscerating me,” Meath
THEATER
says, “about my wish to be able to
write a perfect pop song and to be on
the radio.”
As the stakes continue to rise,
Meath and Sanborn are conscious of
their desire not to “ruin it,” she says, as
new pressures come into play.
“The bigger things get, you have a
lot more opinions being thrown at you
all the time and you have to remember
that the only reason you are where you
are is because of the decisions you and
your original team made,” she says.
“But there’s no one around telling us to
change who we are. And the only reason we got here is by being ourselves.”
That’s already proven enough to
supply the plastic, pink flamingos of
Meath’s choosing. And as Sylvan Esso
makes itself even more comfortable in
the pop-music firmament, there could
be greater trophies still to come.
Jeremy D. Goodwin can be reached at
jeremy@jeremydgoodwin.com. Follow
him on Twitter @jeremydgoodwin.
MUSIC
DANCE
handel and haydn society
april 6 + 8, 2018
Moscow festival Ballet
sleeping Beauty
one state, two state
red state, blue state
la cage aux Folles
The award-winning Company Theatre presents
the beloved musical “La Cage aux Folles” from
Friday, March 16 through Sunday, April 8, at The
Company Theatre Center for Performing Arts, 30
Accord Park Drive, Norwell.
Tickets: $41, $43
For more information and to order tickets,
call the box office at (781) 871-2787 or visit
www.companytheatre.com
Before “The Birdcage”...
There was “La Cage aux Folles”!
cooking with
the calaMari sisters
MoonBox presents
caBaret
Kander and Ebb’s Tony Award winning musical
comes to the Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston
Center for the Arts, APRIL 14 - 29. Directed/
Choreographed by Rachel Bertone, Music
Directed by Dan Rodriguez and featuring Aimee
Doherty* as Sally Bowles. Musical number
include well-known classics of the musical
stage like “Money,” “Tomorrow Belongs To
Me,” “Willkommen,” “Maybe This Time,” and of
course “Cabaret.” Tickets at bostontheatrescene.
com/617-933-8600. More at moonbox.org.
Final weeKend —
Must Close saturdaY!
Two over-the-top plus-size Italian Sisters from
Brooklyn, Cook, Sing & Dance outrageous musical numbers that get a bit naughty as they share
their saucy secrets that will leave you rolling in
the aisles
April 12- May 20th
Thurs 2 & 7, Fri 8, Sat 2 & 8, Sun 2
REGENT THEATRE
7 Medford Street, Arlington, MA 02474
Box off 855-448-7469 Groups 888-264-1788
PlayhouseInfo.com
Don’t miss Dominique Morisseau’s acclaimed Off
Broadway hit about an auto plant in Detroit.
“Taut, keenly observed, and THOROUGHLY
ABSORBING!” — THE BOSTON GLOBE
“Storytelling at its finest! EXCEPTIONAL!”
— JARED BOWEN, WGBH
“POWER & GRACE! The cast is the heart & soul
of this production.” — WBUR’S THE ARTERY
“ POWERFUL & TIMELY!” — BROADWAY WORLD
A Huntington Theatre Company production
South End / Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
THE
CORVETTES
DOO WOP REVUE
An�a Chri�tie
april 29 at 2pM
781-891-5600
euGene o’neill’s powerFul
pulitZer priZe winner
The Premier National Touring Doo Wop Revue
A Rollicking Ride Through The Good Old Days
of Rock & Roll.
Robinson Theatre ~ 617 Lexington St., Waltham
ReagleMusicTheatre.com ~ FREE PARKING
the iNteractiVe
SoLVe-the-criMe coMeDy!
“Downright Hilarious!” - Huffington Post
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 5 & 8, Sun at 3 & 7
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
OPERA
a BoStoN area preMiere
By kate cayLey
A dynamic & compelling new play about a master
forger put on trial for selling a long-lost Vermeer
to the Nazis. Featuring Benjamin Evett, Laura Latreille, and directed by Jim Petosa. Mar 17-Apr 8.
New Repertory Theatre | Watertown
617-923-8487 | newrep.org
MerriMack repertory
theatre
Book, Music, and Lyrics by Dan Finnerty
Created by Dan Finnerty and Sean Daniels
Additional Music by Dan Lipton
Directed by Sean Daniels
Mar 21 - Apr 15 • Lowell, MA • mrt.org/danny
by Eugene O'Nei
“A WORK ABOUT THE OVERPOWERING
FORCE OF NATURE!” — The Guardian
A surprisingly contemporary play that crackles
with fierce physicality, humor, and drama.
Starts April 6 Lyric Stage Copley Sq
617.585.5678 lyricstage.com
APRIL 5-8
An uplifting, heartbreaking musical comedy about
America’s volatile mix of drama and democracy
SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY’S MODERN THEATRE
$15 | $10 students/seniors
ModernTheatre.com | 866.811.4111
*** DISCOUNT OFFER: 1 SEAT for $2 ***
Choose “interactive seating” at checkout
ADDITIONAL PROGRAMMING WITH GUEST
ARLIE HOCHSCHILD
4/6: Ford Hall Forum | http://tiny.cc/Hochschild
4/7: Post-matinee talkback
coNteMporary cLaSSic —
StartS apr. 20!
Caryl Churchill’s masterpiece about the sacrifices
required to be a “top girl” in a man’s world.
“A mind-lifting experience.” — NY POST
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
Boston university opera
institute presents
Pelléas et Mélisande, an evocative impressionist
opera in 5 acts, a story of passion & mystery.
Music by Claude Debussy | Arr. Stephen McNeff
MARCH 31 & APRIL 1, 2018
Performed at Emerson Cutler Majestic Theatre
Conductor- William Lumpkin
Stage Direction- E. Loren Meeker
TICKETS - CUTLERMAJESTIC.ORG
$20 general; $15 BU alumni, WGBH
& WBUR members, senior citizens;
$5 Students; Free with BU ID
BU.EDU/CFA/OPERA
“A delightful operatic confection, led by
presented by Music Worcester
Artistic Director Harry Christophers...was stylishly
Friday, March 30, 2018 at 8pm
up to date…actress Antonia Christophers
Moscow Festival Ballet returns in a
made a fine, sassy job of narration.”
fully staged production at The Hanover Theatre
– The New York Times
2 Southbridge St, Worcester, MA
FRIDAY, APR 6, 7:30PM
Tickets: Adults $41-$55; Students & Youth, $25
SUNDAY, APR 8, 3:00PM
WWW.THEHANOVERTHEATRE.ORG
NEC’S JORDAN HALL
877.571.SHOW (7469)
elgar
the dreaM of gerontius
what would you do for
love?
Hear the greatest oratorio ever written by
an Englishman! Elgar’s masterpiece is an overpoweringly eloquent and dramatic portrayal of the
moments preceding death & what lies beyond.
MADELEINE SHAW, mezzo-soprano,
ROBERT MURRAY, tenor, DEREK WELTON, bass
and CHORUS PRO MUSICA.
FRIDAY APRIL 20 at 8:00 PM
Conductor’s Talk at 6:45pm
617.236.0999 | bostonphil.org
Boston Globe
Ticket to the Arts
Youthful passion and fierce family rivalry make
this tragic romance one for the ages. Cranko’s
well-paced storytelling and Prokofiev’s evocative
score expertly capture the beauty and humanity
of Shakespeare’s masterpiece. Runs Mar 15
to Apr 8. Tickets at bostonballet.org or call
617.695.6955.
Order Online through our Self Serve Order Entry
System. 24/7 from anywhere.
boston.com/tickettothearts
T h e
G6
Klepper finds hope
in students’ activism
uKLEPPER
Continued from Page G3
cause, I think, two things: They want
attention and they think they can
win. Even if they are like, ‘I know
you, I’ve seen you,’ they are like, ‘I
want my point of view up against
yours,’” he said. ‘‘You think, ‘Oh, my
God, I can’t believe they said that,’
[but] they can, and oftentimes don’t
see the shame in [saying] that.’’
Klepper, who grew up in Kalamazoo, Mich., and honed his craft at
Second City and Upright Citizens Brigade, has been involved in covering
the gun-control debate since his early
days at Comedy Central (he joined in
2014) and hosted a one-hour ‘‘investi-
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
gative comedy’’ special called ‘‘Jordan
Klepper Solves Guns’’ last June.
‘‘Since Parkland, there has been a
change in the conversation. There are
new voices and new people pushing
this with passion and with a moral
authority,’’ Klepper said. He later
added in an interview, ‘‘I’m really
hoping this is a watershed moment
[and] it continues to grow and encompasses all of the people affected
by gun violence. . . . I think you’re going to see something that is going to
be hard to shake, and I think these
kids are going to focus on this all the
way through the midterms.’’
‘‘What I get so frustrated about . . .
is the people that say, ‘ You know,
you’re never going to fix it all!’ It’s
like, ‘I know. We know,’” Klepper emphasized to the Newseum audience.
‘‘People were dying in car accidents,
too, and there’s no way to fix that either — you can’t get rid of cars — but
you can help. Put in seat belts. . . .
Let’s show that we are willing to do
something without sitting back on
our heels thinking, ‘If you can’t fix it
all, it’s not worth doing.’ We don’t
have time for that.’’
He’s also in awe of students getting involved with the political pro-
cess at such an early age. ‘‘As a high
schooler, I don’t think I saw the path
to be politically active, or a role for
that, which is why I think it’s so eyeopening to watch these students find
that,’’ Klepper said. ‘‘I missed an opportunity to be a part of democracy
that early on, and it’s something that
didn’t hit me until much later.’’
He also praised the Parkland students’ resilience to vicious comments
and social media attacks from online
detractors. ‘‘This is the era of the
troll,’’ he told the crowd. ‘‘It’s easier to
be against something than it is to be
passionate for something.’’
DANVERS
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 7:30
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PACIFIC RIM UPRISING: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
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PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) G (12:15) 6:45
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SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (12:30, 3:45) 6:30, 9:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 11:45,
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 12:45, 5:15, 6:15,
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (12:35, 3:50) 7:10, 10:10
2:45, 5:30, 8:15
10:10
www.nationalamusements.com
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THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) (12:45) 4:20, 7:40, 10:40
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A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:55) 4:10, 7:15, 10:20
CAPITOL THEATRE
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:30,
PETER RABBIT (PG) 12:00, 2:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:15, 1:55, 4:35
GAME NIGHT (R) (11:45) 6:15
1:30, 4:20
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) AMC
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GAME NIGHT (R) 12:15
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5 8
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BRAINTREE
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 5:00, 7:30
AMC BRAINTREE 10
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 4:20, 6:30
121 Grandview Rd.
THE GODFATHER (R) 7:00
5 6 DIG
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 4:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 5:00, 7:40
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
ACRIMONY (R) G 7:00, 9:50
PETER RABBIT (PG) 10:15, 1:00, 3:30
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent G
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PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) G 12:00
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GAME NIGHT (R) 12:45, 5:45, 7:30, 10:00
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BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
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THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
10:15
9:45
7 DAYS IN ENTEBBE (PG-13) AMC Independent G
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
LEANING INTO THE WIND (PG) 11:15, 4:00, 6:30
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376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
THOROUGHBREDS (R) 11:00, 1:45, 4:45, 10:00
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MLA (NR) (12:25)
NEEDI NAADI OKE KATHA (NR) (3:55)
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (1:20) 4:30, 7:35
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RAJARATHA (NR) 12:00
RAJARATHA (NR) 3:20
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10:05
UNSANE (R) (12:05, 2:40) 5:15, 8:00, 10:30
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) (12:50) 4:00, 7:00, 9:50
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:10) 4:20, 7:20, 10:10
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) G (1:00) 4:00, 7:15, 10:15
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T h e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G7
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Author Mackenzi Lee (right) with guests at last month’s book launch party for “Bygone Badass Broads” at Trident Books in Boston.
She’s a rising star in young adult historical fantasy
uLEE
Continued from Page G1
“Fanfiction is so fundamentally a
part of who I am as a writer,” she said.
She was curled in a chair in her living room in Jamaica Plain on a sunny
weekday; as we talked, she kept getting upstaged by Lila, a glamorous
white lab who belongs to her roommate, Laura Koenig, who oversees
children’s services at the Boston Public
Library’s main branch. Ordinarily, at
this hour Van Engelenhoven would be
at her day job as events planner for
Trident Booksellers and Cafe, but a fire
had temporarily closed it down a few
days before.
Van Engelenhoven has plenty to
keep her busy: Along with the Loki
book, she’s working on a sequel to her
2017 breakout, “The Gentleman’s
Guide to Vice and Virtue’’; researching
her next novel, which will be set during the tulip speculation frenzy of the
17 th century; and preparing for a
book tour to promote “Bygone Badass
Broads,’’ a nonfiction book of short
historical profiles released last month.
It’s a lot to handle, but she’s excited
— especially about getting to meet her
readers on the tour. “Teenagers come
to you ready to love your books,” she
said. “No one loves things the way
teenagers love things.’’
As a kid growing up in Utah, Van
Engelenhoven loved stories. Not necessarily books. Instead of reading, she
and her sister preferred audiobooks.
Her parents bought them each a
boombox, and they would carry them
around the house, listening to books
on tape. (They didn’t use headphones,
so they had to keep a little distance
from each other while listening.)
Meanwhile, adults who thought of
Van Engelenhoven as bookish would
give her well-meaning classics —
“Anne of Green Gables,’’ “A Little Princess,’’ “Little Women’’ — but she found
them less than compelling.
“I don’t think I was a very good
reader,” she says. “I would get handed
these books and not be able to read
them, and I would feel really dumb.”
When she did find a tale she loved,
however, she loved it with her whole
being.
For example: Shannon Hale’s fantasy novel “The Goose Girl,’’ based on
the Grimm’s fairy tale. Hale was a
Utah author, and Van Engelenhoven
went to all of her book events wearing
a blue cloak she’d made in a sewing
class, so she could look like the main
character.
“That book was so important to
me,” she said. “That’s the book I would
write fanfiction of, before I knew what
fanfiction was.”
Later, when she found online fanfiction communities where writers
traded stories back and forth, they
nurtured her confidence as a writer:
“You get feedback immediately,” she
said. “You have people who are cheering you on.”
In a way, fanfiction is nothing new:
When Sturluson wrote down the
Norse tales, he was writing characters
that were well known to his readers.
Today, fanfiction also allows practitioners to make tales more inclusive.
For example, on “Star Trek’’ Uhura
typically had only a few lines per epi-
sode, but in the hands of various writers, she has become the main protagonist of several works. And while BBC’s
“Sherlock’’ has only flirted with homoeroticism, many in fanfiction have already explored the complex relationship between its two leading men.
‘In the way of fanfic,
I decided I was going
to do my part to give
these historical
narratives back to
people who’ve been
excluded from them.’
MACKENZIE VAN
ENGELENHOVEN, known to fans of
her YA novels as Mackenzi Lee
“So many women and queer people
and minorities turn to fanfiction,” Van
Engelenhoven said, “because you’re
not seeing yourself in these [traditional] narratives, in these worlds you really love.”
As she got older, Van Engelenhoven’s affection for stories hit an obstacle. She felt as if she was too old for
YA novels but didn’t find literary fiction as satisfying.
Instead, she stopped reading fiction and became a history major in
college. By chance, around that time,
she found a copy of “The Goose Girl’’
in a bookshop and reread it, remem-
bering all over again why she loved it.
So after graduation, Van Engelenhoven went to Simmons to get an
MFA in young-adult fiction. She began
writing the story that would become
her first novel: “ This Monstrous
Thing,’’ a “Frankenstein rehash” that
was published in 2015.
Van Engelenhoven had gotten a
two-book deal. Like many authors, she
found the second book grueling. A
first novel isn’t written under pressure, while a second one has already
been paid for with an advance. “I just
couldn’t make it work,” she recalled. “I
was like, ‘Can I just give them the
money back?’ ”
To blow off steam, she started writing another historical novel just for
fun. This one would focus on a young
British lord in the 18th century and
embrace every hoary trope and plot
device she loved. But “in the way of
fanfic,” she said, “I decided I was going
to do my part to give these historical
narratives back to people who’ve been
excluded from them.” The self-described ardent feminist made her protagonist a bisexual rogue and gave him
a black love interest.
At first, she used the second, secret
novel as a reward for working on her
more artistically serious “official’’
book. But finally, she sent a draft to
her agent, Rebecca Podes of the Rees
Literary Agency, who wrote back:
“This is what you need to be working
on.”
That draft became “The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue,’’ a
New York Times bestseller, Kirkus
Prize nominee, and Stonewall Honor
MOVIE STARS
New releases
YY Flower “Lolita” gets a skate-punk
makeover in a seriocomic portrait of a
girl with some very casual views on
sexuality, and some very particular
ones about how to use it as a weapon.
The film is quite the showcase for Zoey Deutch, who plays brazen, breezy,
even soulfully vulnerable. Still, she’s so
off-putting it’s hard to see the point of
it all. (93 min., R) (Tom Russo)
YYY Isle of Dogs A hand-crafted
stop-motion fable about exiled dogs on
a Japanese island. So it’s a Wes Anderson movie. His most political too, and
a film visually (and superficially) in
love with Japanese culture. A qualified
delight, with voicework by Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Jeff Goldblum, Scarlett Johansson, Greta Gerwig, Bill Murray, and many others. (98
min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YYY Itzhak Alison Chernick can
barely keep up with her subject, the
renowned violinist Itzhak Perlman, as
the septuagenarian hops from recording Bach to accompanying Billy Joel or
making soup for Alan Alda. Her documentary captures the musician’s joie
de vivre while touching on the darker
aspects of his life, such as his struggle
with polio. In English and Hebrew,
with subtitles. (83 min., unrated)
(Peter Keough)
YY Pacific Rim Uprising You wouldn’t
have thought a sequel to Guillermo del
Toro’s underperforming robots-versusmonsters spectacle was likely, especially with someone else directing. Yet
here’s the follow-up from genre TV vet
Steven S. DeKnight (“Spartacus”),
starring John Boyega. It plays like a
lost “Transformers” entry until the fi-
NICOLA DOVE/IFC FILMS
From left: Dermot Crowley,
Paul Whitehouse, Steve Buscemi,
Jeffrey Tambor, and Paul Chahidi
in “The Death of Stalin.”
nale. (111 min., PG-13) (Tom Russo)
YYY Unsane A beguilingly nasty exercise in paranoia, shot on an iPhone
by director Steven Soderbergh just to
prove he can. Claire Foy (TV’s “The
Crown”) plays a damaged young woman held at a mental institution against
her will. The movie gets in, messes
with your head, and vanishes, leaving
only a lingering aftertaste of unreliable narrative. (98 min., R) (Ty Burr)
Previously released
YYY½ Black Panther A smart, supple action fantasy starring a superhero
of color leading a strong, unbowed nation of color. Chadwick Boseman (finally) comes into stardom as King
T’Challa/Black Panther, and Michael
B. Jordan almost steals the film as a
villain driven by real-world agonies,
but the triumph belongs to directorco-writer Ryan Coogler (“Creed,”
“Fruitvale Station”). With Lupita
Nyong’o and the ferocious Danai Gurira. (140 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YYY Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr
Story A fascinating documentary
about the Vienna-born star of classic
Hollywood films who was celebrated
for her beauty and ignored for her
brains; Lamarr’s 1942 invention of
“frequency hopping” now powers your
cellphone, GPS, WiFi, and Bluetooth
technology, and she never made a
dime off it. Directed by Alexandra
Dean. (90 min., unrated) (Ty Burr)
YYYY The Death of Stalin From Armando Iannucci (“Veep,” “In the
Loop”), a brilliantly caustic satire in
which the jostlings for power in 1953
Moscow are played as Monty Pythonesque farce. A work of brutal screwball
comedy, it features fine performances
by Steve Buscemi (as Nikita Krushchev), Jeffrey Tambor (Malenkov), Michael Palin (Molotov), and more. (106
min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ Leaning Into the Wind — An­
dy Goldsworthy Sixteen years after
“Rivers and Tides,” documentarian
Thomas Riedelsheimer revisits the
protean British nature sculptor Andy
Goldsworthy, who of late seems to
want to physically merge with his
work. Goldsworthy’s reordering of nature is so disordering to our senses as
to prompt disbelief, and then grateful
awe. (93 min., PG) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ Loveless The young son of a
couple in the midst of a bitter divorce
disappears; they search, first grudgingly and then with a gradually awakening panic over what they have become. It’s the latest bleakly majestic
essay on the death of Russia’s soul
from the great Andrey Zvyagintsev
(“Leviathan”). In Russian, with subtitles. (127 min., R) (Ty Burr)
award winner.
When her fans found out she was
writing a book about Marvel’s Loki,
they wanted to know whether, like her
p r o ta go n is t f ro m “ G e n tlema n’s
Guide,’’ she would write Loki as queer.
Yes, she tweeted. “Loki is a canonically pansexual and gender fluid character.”
The announcement sparked a
fierce online backlash from some who
felt that Van Engelenhoven was forcing an interpretation on the character
in a misguided nod to diversity.
She defended her position, noting
that the character switched genders a
few times in the pages of Marvel comics and that the Nordic myths refer to
the character’s gender fluidity — including an episode wherein the god
gives birth to a horse.
Getting the Marvel gig brought her
back into the orbit of a personal hero:
“Goose Girl’’ author Hale.
It turned out Hale had also written
a YA book for Marvel, dealing with one
of the most powerful of Marvel’s superheroes, “Squirrel Girl.’’ So Van Engelenhoven contacted her to get a
sense for what working with Marvel
was like.
Toward the end of the conversation, she mentioned, that she’d always
been a big fan.
A few days later she got a message
from Hale. “I have to ask you a weird
question,” she said. “Did you used to
wear a cape to my events?”
S.I. Rosenbaum, a freelance writer
based in Boston and New York, can be
reached at si@arrr.net
YYY½ Love, Simon Fans of “Simon
vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda” — the
beloved 2015 young adult novel by
Becky Albertalli — can relax and celebrate. “Love, Simon,” the film adaptation of the book, is great. It’s not exactly like the novel, but it captures the
best parts of it. Part of the success can
be credited to Nick Robinson, who is
perfect as Simon, a well-liked high
school senior who’s gay and doesn’t
know how — or when — to share. (96
min., PG-13) (Meredith Goldstein)
YYY Peter Rabbit Even though this
thoroughly contemporary adaptation
frequently tramples Beatrix Potter’s
gentle whimsy, it’s also irresistibly entertaining. James Corden’s voice work
as Peter is brightly of-the-moment,
while live-action costar Domhnall
Gleeson’s update of nemesis Mr.
McGregor is prickly fun. (93 min., PG)
(Tom Russo)
YYY Red Sparrow It seems that Jennifer Lawrence and director Francis
Lawrence were just getting warmed
up with the boundaries they tested in
the “Hunger Games” franchise. The
pair reunite for a story about a Russian spy that’s heavy on themes of sexual degradation and sadistic violence.
This is arrestingly dark fare that takes
risks across the board. Joel Edgerton
costars. (139 min., R) (Tom Russo)
YYY Thoroughbreds A story steeped
in emotional remoteness manages to
command our attention in first-time
filmmaker Cory Finley’s darkly satirical portrait of the young and disconnected in old-money Connecticut.
With riveting performances from Olivia Cooke and Anya Taylor-Joy, this
feels like millennials’ answer to “The
Ice Storm,” only with pervasive suspense, plus some blood. (92 min., R)
(Tom Russo)
T h e
G8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
ASK AMY
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
Friendship is tested
by sexual come­on
Dear Readers: This week I am running
topical “best of ” columns while I’m on book
tour, meeting readers of my memoir, “Strangers Tend to Tell Me Things,” which is now out
in paperback. I’ll be back next week with
more answers and advice directed toward a
fresh batch of dilemmas. Today’s topic is relationships.
Q. I’m a 28-year-old straight male. My best
friend from childhood and I rent an apartment together. He came out to me when he
was 18. I care about him as a brother (I’m an
only child). We respect each other’s boundaries and I support and accept him.
A couple of months ago my girlfriend of
four years ended our relationship. I was
crushed. During that time, my best friend
told me he needed to tell me a secret — that
he had sexual feelings toward me. He wanted
to know if I felt the same way. I told him I
loved him as a brother only and did not share
any sexual feeling toward him.
After that night, I thought everything was
OK between us. Things went back to normal,
but a couple of weeks ago he came home
drunk. He crawled into bed with me and tried
to be sexual with me.
I have been avoiding him. I don’t want to
be in the same room alone with him right
now. I’m not sure what to do. I really do care
for him. I don’t want to lose our friendship,
but how do I get the point across that I’m not
interested in him sexually? What can I do
about this problem?
SAD DUDE
A. Crawling into bed and coming on sexually
to a sleeping person is assault. Unfortunately,
like many victims of unwanted sexual contact, you seem to be blaming yourself and
wondering what you can do to repair the relationship with the aggressor.
But he is the one who has disrespected and
violated you. An ongoing friendship between
the two of you might be impossible. This represents a huge loss for you, which is why you
would like to try to repair what he broke.
What happened is not your fault! It is his.
You should think very seriously about whether you want to continue to cohabit with him.
If you want to try to have a friendship, you
two will have to talk about it. He should apologize and assure you this will never happen
again. If it does, the friendship is over, and
OLIVER UPTON/FX
Donald Sutherand plays billionaire J. Paul Getty in the FX series “Trust.”
As J. Paul Getty, Donald Sutherland is a gas
I’m having a great time watching Donald
Sutherland flirt shamelessly with going over the
top on the FX series “Trust,” which premiered on
Sunday. He plays billionaire J. Paul Getty in the
1970s, at the time his 16-year-old grandson, J.
Paul Getty III (Harris Dickinson), is kidnapped.
Sutherland’s Getty is an odd, fascinating figure. Despite his enormous wealth, he’s stingy
enough to install a pay phone in his British estate, Sutton Place, lest the servants get free service. He buys a pet lion. He is pampered like an
infant by his servants, one of whom dresses Getty
and brushes his teeth. And he keeps a small harem of lovers in his home; they hang around together, wondering which one will end up in Getty’s bed for the night.
Sutherland exudes contempt and indifference,
as he lurks about the gothic mansion. He bullies
everyone and plays cruel games with the women;
grandson J. Paul III is the only person we see him
show affection toward — at least for a while. Getty is strictly moral — but solely when it comes to
the family’s reputation and its impact on the
business. Otherwise, he’s a hollow creature who
voices disatisfaction with his sons constantly and
enjoys setting them against one another.
By the way, “Trust,” from Danny Boyle and Simon Beaufoy, is meant to be a three-season show,
with each season focusing on a different time period in the life of the Getty family. If it is renewed,
and I hope it is, season 2 will go back to the 1920s
to show how Getty built his empire.
Thursday March 29, 2018
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Scout TV-14-DLSV
Homeland: Carrie
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Barry HD Silicon
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★★ John Q (2002) (CC): An ER is taken
Naked
Zombieland (2009): Coward
(10:58) ★★★ Stand
Gun 2 1/2 and rebel slay zombies. TV-14 hostage by a desperate dad. HD TV-PG
by Me (1986) TV-14
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Vampire Disaster Movie (2008): Spoof
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vs. Satan. HD R
(10:25) Here and
Now HD TV-MA
High M.
★ National Secur.
(2003) HD TV-14
Wakefield (2016) (CC): A man lives in his Billions (CC): Chuck Cartoon Homeland
attic, where he spies on his family. HD R gets a mandate.
Pres. HD
High M.
Observe/Report: A mall cop
chases a flasher. TV-MA-LSV
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25th
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Starz!
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Evil
Evil Dead agent tracks a killer. HD TV-14
Personal Shopper (2016) (CC): Gal works
(6:05) ★★★ The
as personal shopper. HD R
Straight Story G
★★
Hostel
TMC
Ash vs.
Trumbo (2015): Biopic of
Evil Dead Dalton Trumbo. HD R
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couple is stranded at sea. R
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Bunk'd
Hop (2011): Slacker adopts
Raven's Gravity
Gravity
Stuck/
Bizaard.
Bunk'd
HD TV-G HD TV-G talking rabbit. HD TV-PG
Home
Falls
Falls
Middle
(10:02)
Siren (CC) HD NEW (9:01) Siren (CC)
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(6:00) ★★★★ Lion
Shadowhunters HD HD TV-G
HD NEW
King (1994) (CC) HD
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Bubble
News
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Classic College Football (CC): From 1995: Classic College Football (CC): Alabama
Alabama at Auburn.
vs. Auburn in the 1982 Iron Bowl.
College Slam Dunk/3-Point (CC): The
30th annual event. Live. HD
SportsCenter (CC)
Live. HD
Spotless The LEGO Movie: A Lego figure fights evil. F. House Friends
(11:10) Friends
Shimmer Nella
Sunny
Peppa
Peppa
Peppa
Umizoomi Rusty R. Blaze
you should consider calling the police. (September 2015)
Q. I am an 18-year-old girl. I have been dating
my boyfriend for nearly two years. My boyfriend means everything to me. Although I
have made mistakes, we’ve always talked
things out.
Last year we both went to university in different parts of the country, so it was like we
were having a long-distance relationship. I
was OK with it until I met another guy who
gave me everything I have been missing. We
were not really dating but I had sex with him
many times.
Earlier this week my boyfriend found out
and broke up with me. It was only after he
was gone that I realized he has always been
and always will be my everything. I still love
him.
I want him back, but he doesn’t want to
hear from me. Please help me, Amy.
M
A. Perhaps you’ve studied the famous “marshmallow test” in college. In this study, preschoolers were presented with a choice —
they could eat one marshmallow now or eat
two marshmallows if they waited 20 minutes.
(If you aren’t aware of this study, there is
some wonderful video on YouTube of children
suffering through it.)
This fascinating study demonstrates the
relative ability of people to delay gratification
in order to receive a larger reward later.
You have flunked the “marshmallow test”
— big time. You were not willing to hold out
long enough to receive a larger reward (staying in a loving, long-term relationship) later.
You sound as if you are a little surprised
that your infidelity has had such an extreme
consequence. Why is that? Breaking up is the
foreseeable and natural consequence of
cheating.
My take is that you are probably still too
immature to bank your two marshmallows
for later. You are 18; you don’t have the fortitude to be in a long-distance relationship. Let
this be your wake-up call in terms of personal
ethics. When you make an ethical lapse that
hurts someone else, apologize and ask for forgiveness. (February 2015)
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
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