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The Boston Globe – March 30, 2018

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abcde
Friday, March 30, 2018
NRA is
using race
as tool in
latest fight
Confronted by youth
movement, group
reaches beyond base
Rosenberg’s husband is indicted
Hefner charged with sexual assault,
lewdness; not-guilty plea planned
By Yvonne Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
A grand jury Thursday indicted
Bryon Hefner, the husband of Senator Stanley C. Rosenberg, on multiple charges of sexual assault,
criminal lewdness, and distributing nude photographs without consent.
The indictments, issued by a
statewide grand jury, follow a joint
investigation by the attorney general and the Suffolk district attorney into allegations by several
men, first reported by the Globe,
that Hefner assaulted and harassed
them during the past few years,
when Rosenberg was Senate president.
The alleged victims told the
Globe that Hefner boasted of his
influence on Beacon Hill and that
they were reluctant to report his
assaults for fear of alienating his
powerful husband and harming
their careers. Two of those men say
they are among the four victims cited in Thursday’s indictment.
The indictments are a dramatic
turn in a months-long controversy
that led Rosenberg to step aside
from the presidency late last year.
Hefner, 30, was indicted on five
counts of indecent assault and battery. The indictments allege one
victim was assaulted on three occaHEFNER, Page A6
The charges
Bryon Hefner is
to appear in court
on April 24.
R One victim was assaulted on three occasions in 2015 and
2016.
R Another victim was
assaulted in 2014.
R A third victim was assaulted in 2016.
R Hefner allegedly obtained nude photographs of another victim and sent or showed
the pictures to four
other people.
By Astead W. Herndon
GLOBE STAFF
WASHINGTON — The National Rifle
Association billed the video as “The Gun
Conversation You Need To See,” a lowkey intro that belied the inflammatory,
racially laden messages the lobbying
powerhouse is deploying in the wake of
the latest school shooting spree.
The NRA’s video featured Killer
Mike, an outspoken African-American
activist and rapper who gained fame as
a political surrogate for Bernie Sanders
on the 2016 presidential circuit, speaking with Colion Noir, the NRA’s most
prominent black spokesman.
They agreed on one thing: Gun-control activists — embodied most recently
by students marching on Washington —
are ignoring black Americans.
Other content on the NRA’s video
website accuses one outspoken Parkland, Fla., student of displaying his
“white privilege.’’
Black people “can’t continue to be a
lackey,” Killer Mike said in the video, using words he later said he regretted.
Antigun activists, the rapper said,
are “going to progress us into slavery.”
NRA, Page A8
Ty Burr
COMMENTARY
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Oyster farmers parked on the Crowes Pasture flats, believed to be one of the last exposed tidal flats open to off-road traffic in the state.
Can the kids
give us a
Hollywood
ending?
BEACH ACCESS STIRS SANDSTORM
State plan to ban vehicles on popular flats catches Dennis by surprise
By Brian MacQuarrie
GLOBE STAFF
W
here is Frank Capra
now that we really
need him?
If the director of
“Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,”
“It’s a Wonderful Life,” “Meet
John Doe,” and other high-water
marks of that hopeful Hollywood sub-genre called Capracorn were around today, you
know he’d already be working
on a script set in and around the
aftermath of the shootings in
Parkland, Fla. And we’d all be
waiting to see how it ended.
Last year around this time, I
wrote a column pining for a new
Mr. Smith to go to Washington
and remind us what simple,
honest decency looks like. I never expected Mr. Smith to be Ms.
Gonzalez.
Emma Gonzalez, 18, is the
most prominent of the survivors
of the Feb. 14 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School. Like her schoolmate-surBURR, Page A8
In the news
A city commission postponed
a vote on the controversial
question of whether to rename
Yawkey Way after a spirited,
two-hour hearing. B1.
North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong
Un, and President Moon Jae-in
of South Korea will meet for
the first time on April 27, offiFor breaking news, updated
stories, and more, visit our website:
BostonGlobe.com
VOL . 293, NO. 89
*
Suggested retail price
$2.50
DENNIS — Families and friends have lolled
away long summer days on a secluded off-road
beach in East Dennis for generations, driving
across the broad tidal flats to bask at the water’s edge.
“It’s the highlight of everybody’s summer,”
said Justin Labdon, a resident of neighboring
Brewster who cherishes motoring across the
flats with his children and paddleboards. “My
kids call it Adventure Beach.”
That adventure, which a member of the
town’s Conservation Commission called the
“pursuit of happiness,” might be coming to an
end.
Citing concerns over erosion and pollution,
state regulators want to ban recreational vehi-
cles from the firm, smooth sand that stretches
for more than a quarter-mile into Cape Cod
Bay, believed to be one of the last exposed tidal
flats open to off-road traffic in Massachusetts.
Beach access is near and dear to Cape residents, and the surprising announcement that
driving on the Crowes Pasture flats might be
banned has drawn an outcry.
FLATS, Page A9
State Police won’t just move us along
Nestor Ramos
COMMENTARY
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
A State Police officer monitored the crowd at
Logan Airport’s Terminal A.
Attorney General Maura Healey
called on Governor Charlie
Baker to take more leadership
Gloria Larson
is stepping
down as
president of
Bentley University in
June, and the
college will
rename a signature program in
her honor: the Gloria Cordes
Larson Center for Women and
Business. B9.
A standing-room-only crowd
packed into a church to cele-
RAMOS, Page A6
SOX CAN’T CLOSE OUT OPENER
cials said. A3.
in addressing transparency
concerns raised after revelations that payroll records for a
State Police division were not
disclosed for years. B1.
Maybe the most recent State Police scandal is
so galling because we all feel like witnesses.
The latest indignity involves large, unreported paychecks for troopers from Troop F — those
responsible for policing, among other sites, Logan International Airport. Which, unless you’re
a serial speeder or a murder suspect, is probably
the only place you regularly interact with the
Staties.
If you love anyone enough to go get them
from the airport — congrats on finding true love,
by the way — then you know how it works: You
roll into the Terminal C pickup area and find
two rows of cars idling directly in front of the
“No Standing” signs.
And there’s a state trooper, hands on his
hips, looking like a man in a grass seed commercial gazing upon his reinvigorated lawn. Sometimes the troopers appear to be sitting in their
cars. Only when you dare to linger a little does
the trooper leap into action, demonstratively
waving you along, telling you to keep it moving.
Obviously, Troop F’s duties extend far beyond
Break and the clouds
Friday: Cloudy, rainy.
High: 58-63. Low: 36-41.
Saturday: Warm, sunny.
High: 53-58. Low: 41-46.
High tide: 11:10 a.m. 11:37 p.m.
Sunrise: 6:30 Sunset: 7:07
Complete report, C9
brate the life of a 22-year-old
black man who was shot to
death by Sacramento police,
prompting angry protests and a
resolve to force changes in police departments around the
country. A2.
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Red Sox
reliever
Carson
Smith
walked
back to the
mound
after giving
up a basesloaded
triple to
the Rays’
Denard
Span. The
Sox lost
6-4 after
taking a
4-0 lead
into the
8th inning.
C1, C4-C6.
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
Emotions raw at funeral for man shot by police
Death spurs calls
for police reform
By Don Thompson
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A
standing-room-only crowd
packed into a church Thursday to celebrate the life of a
22-year-old black man who
was shot to death by Sacramento police, prompting angry protests in California’s
capital city and a resolve to
force changes in police departments around the country.
The musical and scriptural
celebration of Stephon Clark’s
life was interrupted by his
emotional brother Stevante,
who hugged and kissed the
casket, led the crowd in chanting his brother’s name, pounded his chest, and shouted. Others on the stage attempted to
calm him, with limited success.
T h e R e v. A l S h a r p t o n
hugged and consoled him and
told the crowd not to judge
how families grieve.
‘‘This brother could be any
one of us, so let them express
and grieve,’’ Sharpton said as
he delivered the eulogy with
Stevante Clark clutching him
a r o u n d t h e n e c k . ‘ ‘ We a r e
proud of them for standing up
for justice.’’
Later Thursday, about 100
protesters blocked downtown
streets for the third day in a
row during rush hour but did
not prevent fans from entering
a Sacramento Kings NBA
game at a downtown arena as
they had during two previous
games. Stevante Clark had
asked protesters not to block
the game.
Security was heavy outside,
with police standing in riot
gear and fans entering
through heavy fencing and
metal detectors.
Clark was killed March 18
by two Sacramento police officers responding to a report of
someone breaking car windows. Video of the nighttime
JEFF CHIU/POOL PHOTO/GETTY IMAGES
The Rev. Al Sharpton was joined by Stevante Clark, Stephon Clark’s brother, at the funeral in Sacramento Thursday.
incident released by police
shows a man later identified
as Clark running into the
backyard of his grandparents’
home where police fired 20
rounds at him after screaming
‘‘gun, gun, gun.’’
It turned out C lark was
holding a cellphone.
About 500 people attended
the funeral, where friends and
family shared memories of
Stephon Clark’s ‘‘keen dancing
ability,’’ sense of humor and
smarts, and his desire to be a
good father to his two young
sons. Speakers frequently
star ted call-and-response
chants of ‘‘I am . . . Stephon
Clark.’’
Clark’s name has been a rallying cry at protests and calls
for police reform in California
and beyond. Families of people killed by police marched
Thursday in Compton, calling
for more transparency in useof-force investigations, and
the night before a small group
of protesters gathered in New
York City.
In Sacramento, Sharpton
and others chastised President
Trump for failing to comment
on police shootings of young
black men. On Wednesday,
White House Press Secretary
Sarah Sanders was asked
about the Clark shooting and
demurred, referring to it as a
local issue.
‘‘That is a systemic prob-
lem, not a local problem,’’ said
Zaid Shakir, a prominent California imam and former spiritual adviser to Muhammad
Ali. ‘‘That’s an American problem, a uniquely American
problem.’’
Omar Suleiman, another
imam who spoke, warned of
attempts by the press to attack
Clark’s character as a way to
suggest he’s not ‘‘worth fighting for.’’
‘‘The same media that hu-
manizes white terrorists vilifies black victims,’’ he said.
The near daily protests in
downtown Sacramento have
remained largely peaceful,
with only a few instances of
physical confrontations between protesters and police or
other civilians. Several protesters Thursday approached a
line of police on bicycles, with
one holding up a cellphone
and asking ‘‘is this a gun?’’
At the funeral, Sharpton
and others praised demonstrators for their restraint and
urged them to follow the lead
of the Rev Martin Luther King
Jr. and his advocacy of nonviolent protest.
The Sacramento Kings and
their owner have been supportive of the Clark family.
The team announced plans
to set up an education fund for
Stephon Clark’s children and a
partnership with Black Lives
Matter Sacramento to bring
‘‘transformational change’’ to
the city’s black communities.
The arena is the focal point
of a downtown revitalization
effort. The area has struggled
economically and has a large
homeless population.
Sacramento Mayor Darrell
Steinberg said he’s committed
to working with Stevante
Clark to bring more resources
to his South Sacramento community.
The two spoke at the funeral, where Stevante Clark apologized for previously disrupting a City Council meeting by
jumping on a desk, dancing,
and shouting his brother ’s
name at Steinberg.
‘‘We’re going to forgive the
mayor, amen,’’ Clark said at
the funeral. ‘‘Everybody say
they love the mayor.’’
Shernita Crosby, Stephon
Clark’s aunt, has said the family isn’t ‘‘mad at all the law enforcement.’’
‘‘We’re not trying to start a
riot,’’ she said. ‘‘What we want
the world to know is that we
got to stop this because black
lives matter.’’
Daily Briefing
Teachers in Arizona threaten strike
More data sought from visa applicants
Sessions says no to 2nd special counsel
Arizona teachers, among
the lowest paid in the country,
are threatening to strike if
state lawmakers do not raise
their salaries and restore dramatic funding cuts that
schools have endured.
Teachers, who organized a
grass-roots campaign on social
media, are demanding a 20
percent raise and restoration
of school funding to 2008 levels, before the recession
struck, according to the Arizona Republic. They are also asking state lawmakers to stop
cutting taxes until Arizona’s
per-student spending reaches
the national average.
‘‘The last thing that any of
us want to do is go on strike,
but if we have to, we will,’’
teacher Dylan Wegela, an organizer of the movement, told
protesters Wednesday at a ral-
WASHINGTON — The
State Department wants to require all US visa applicants to
submit their social media usernames, previous e-mail addresses, and phone numbers,
vastly expanding the Trump
administration’s enhanced vetting of potential immigrants
and visitors.
In documents to be published in Friday’s Federal Register, the department said it
wants the public to comment
on the proposed new requirements, which would affect
nearly 15 million foreigners
who apply for visas to enter
the US each year. Previously,
social media, e-mail, and
phone number histories were
only sought from applicants
identified for extra scrutiny,
such as those who have traveled to areas controlled by terrorist organizations. An estimated 65,000 people per year
are in that category.
The new rules would apply
to virtually all applicants for
immigrant and nonimmigrant
visas. The department estimates it would affect 710,000
immigrant visa applicants and
14 million nonimmigrant visa
applicants, including those
who want to come to the United States for business or edu-
WASHINGTON — Attorney General Jeff Sessions on
Thursday rebuffed — at least
for now — a call from GOP
leaders to appoint a second
special counsel to look into
the FBI’s handling of its most
high-profile probes, and announced that he has asked
the US attorney in Utah to
spearhead a broad review.
Sessions made the revelation in a letter to three key
Republican leaders in the
House and Senate who have
called on him to appoint a
second special counsel, noting that Justice Department
regulations call for such appointments only in ‘‘extraordinary circumstances,’’ and
that he would need to conclude ‘‘the public interest
would be served by removing
a large degree of responsibility for the matter from the Department of Justice.’’
He asserted that the department has previously tack-
ly outside the State House.
Arizona is the latest state
where educators have risen up
to demand higher wages and
more investment in schools,
emboldened by a successful
statewide teacher walkout in
West Virginia. Teachers there
shut down schools for nine
days until state lawmakers and
the governor agreed to give
them a 5 percent raise.
Teachers in several Oklahoma districts plan to walk out
Monday, demanding a $10,000
raise for themselves, a raise for
support staff, and additional
money for schools. State lawmakers recently passed a bill
that would give teachers a
$6,000 raise, but many educators plan to stay out of the
classroom until the state accedes to their demands.
WASHINGTON POST
‘Serial stowaway’ unfit for trial
CHICAGO — A woman
ony criminal trespass and felodubbed a ‘‘serial stowaway’’ for ny burglary.
repeatedly trying to sneak onPortions of Hartman’s mento commercial jets without a
tal evaluations read aloud in
ticket has been ruled unfit for
court Thursday included a
trial, a judge ruled
long list of her
Thursday.
mental health
Cook County
problems. PsycholJudge Maura Slatogist Christopher
tery Boyle ordered
Cooper described
Marilyn Hartman,
Hartman as an ‘‘in66, to be sent to a
telligent woman’’
secured mental
and said she unhealth facility in Elderstands the
gin, near Chicago.
Marilyn Hartman
charges against
has been arrested
The ruling comes
her. But, he said,
in or near airports Hartman suffers
after psychologists
many times.
for the defense and
from major depresprosecution recomsion, delusions she
mended Hartman undergo
is being persecuted, and a
mental health treatment.
‘‘preoccupation with media atHartman has been nabbed
tention.’’
in and near airports dozens of
Prosecutors said Hartman
times and made it onto planes
tried to walk out of an intersix times. She recently made it
view room when she was left
into the air on a flight from
unattended during an evaluaChicago to London and was
tion.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
subsequently charged with fel-
cation, according to the documents.
The documents were posted on the Federal Register’s
website on Thursday but the
60-day public comment period
won’t begin until Friday’s edition is published.
If the requirements are approved by the Office of Management and Budget, applications for all visa types would
list a number of social media
platforms and require applicants to provide any account
names they may have had on
them over the previous five
years. It would also give applicants the option to volunteer
information about social media accounts on platforms not
listed in the application.
In addition to their social
media histories, visa applicants would be asked for five
years of previously used telephone numbers, e-mail addresses, international travel,
and deportation status, as well
as whether any family members have been involved in terrorist activities.
Only applicants for certain
diplomatic and official visa
types may be exempted from
the requirements, the documents said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Iowa man cleared to insult hometown
DES MOINES — An Iowa
man threatened by city officials with legal action for saying on a website that his
hometown smelled like ‘‘rancid dog food’’ won a freespeech lawsuit Thursday when
a federal judge prohibited the
city from further threats and
awarded him damages.
Josh Harms, represented by
the American Civil Liberties
Union of Iowa, filed suit in US
District Court asking a judge
to block Sibley officials from
suing him.
City officials said they’d sue
if he didn’t stop criticizing the
town’s odor problem from
Iowa Drying and Processing,
which makes an animal food
supplement from pig blood.
The company moved to a
vacant building in Sibley in
2013 and Harms began publishing his protest website in
2015. The city said Harms was
hurting the community and
threatened a lawsuit.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
led high-profile and resourceintensive probes, and revealed he had named US
attorney John Huber to lead a
review of the topics that the
legislators had requested he
explore.
Those topics include aspects of the Russia investigation and several matters related to Hillary Clinton and
her family’s foundation.
Sessions in November had
revealed to GOP legislators
that he had directed senior
federal prosecutors to look
into matters they wanted
probed, and he said in an interview with Fox News earlier
this month that that review
was being led by a person
outside of Washington.
Sessions, though, had not
revealed the name of that
person, and his public comments have done little to quiet the cries for a second special counsel.
WASHINGTON POST
Calif. judge rules coffee needs warning
LOS ANGELES — A Los
Angeles judge has ruled that
California law requires coffee
companies to carry an ominous cancer warning label because of a chemical produced
in the roasting process.
Superior Court Judge Elihu
Berle wrote in a proposed ruling Wednesday that Starbucks
and other coffee companies
failed to show that the threat
from a chemical compound
produced in the roasting process was insignificant.
A nonprofit group had sued
coffee roasters, distributors,
and retailers under a state law
that requires warnings on a
wide range of chemicals that
can cause cancer. One of those
chemicals is acrylamide, a carcinogen present in coffee.
The coffee industry had
claimed the chemical was
present at harmless levels and
should be exempt from the law
because it results naturally
from the cooking process necessary to make beans flavorful.
The case has been developing for eight years and is still
not over. A third phase of trial
will later determine any civil
penalties that coffee companies must pay.
In the first phase, Berle said
the defense failed to present
enough evidence to show there
was no significant risk posed
by acrylamide in coffee.
The law put the burden on
the defense to show that the
level of the chemical won’t result in one excess case of cancer for every 100,000 people
exposed.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A3
The World
North, South
Korean leaders
set April 27 as
meeting date
Discussions may
pave way for Kim,
Trump talks
By Choe Sang-Hun
NEW YORK TIMES
ARIANA CUBILLOS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maria Martinez (left), the mother of Jose Rafman, and his wife, Juanita Bracho, reacted to news of his death in the fire.
Venezuela jail fire highlights troubles
Critics say penal
system fraught
with bribery
By Ana Vanessa Herrero
NEW YORK TIMES
VALENCIA, Venezuela —
Like most jails in Venezuela,
the one attached to the police
station in the northern city of
Valencia was packed beyond capacity. Built to house roughly
60 inmates, it contained about
200.
Simmering anger fueled a riot there Wednesday morning: A
prison guard, wounded by a
knife, was taken hostage. Inmates threatened to kill him
with a grenade unless their demands were met. Others set
mattresses alight.
The fire turned the jail into
an inferno. Emergency workers
punched holes in the walls to
let the smoke disperse and the
inmates escape.
But by nightfall, 66 men
and two women — who were
evidently at the jail to visit
loved ones — were dead and
scores were injured. Police fired
tear gas and rubber bullets at
grieving relatives and rights advocates who gathered outside
the jail overnight demanding
information.
Late Thursday morning, a
policewoman came outside and
spoke to relatives demanding
answers. She had a small sheet
of paper in her hands.
JUAN BARRETO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Police agents gave information to the relatives of some of
the 68 people who died in the jail fire.
“Carlos Sánchez?” she shouted.
A woman immediately
raised her hand and yelled, “I’m
his mother, yes.”
“He died,” the policewoman
said.
The mother started crying.
She said her son had less than a
year on his sentence.
The policewoman recited
some names of inmates who
had survived the fire and then
shouted: “Look, I haven’t had
any breakfast, so let’s calm
down. These are the names I
have, that’s it.”
With Venezuela in an economic collapse even worse than
the Great Depression and its
public health system in free fall,
inmates throughout the country are going hungry. Protests
are on the rise. Weapons and
drug smuggling are prevalent,
as is bribery of guards and of
the heavily armed groups who
hold sway over cellblocks.
Other marks of the unprecedented crisis include hyperinflation, extreme shortages of
food and medicine, constant
electrical blackouts, thousands
of children dying of malnutrition, rampant crime in every
province and looting and rioting in the streets.
The fire was one of the worst
disasters in the history of Venezuela’s prisons and its toll surpassed the 61 who died in
clashes at a prison in Barquisimeto in 2013.
In m a t e s ’ r e l a t i v e s s a i d
Thursday that they had been
told the fire started after authorities tried to break up a party overseen by gangs — known
as pranatos — that have paid off
or intimidated the prison staff
to permit drugs, alcohol, and
sex. On Wednesday, they said,
wives and girlfriends were permitted to visit their loved ones
at the prison.
María, 56, who lives around
the block from the jail and who
insisted that her surname not
be used because she fears reprisal, described the jail as a chaotic mess.
On weekends, she said, a
truck delivers ice and food for
the parties overseen by the
gangs, and prostitutes regularly
enter and leave the police station attached to the jail.
The Venezuelan Prisons Observatory said it had warned for
a long time about the untenable
situation at police station jails,
where detainees are often kept
far longer than the 48-hour
holding period mandated by
law after an initial arrest.
Being part of a police station, the jail was a place meant
to hold inmates for short periods of time after arrest, said
Jeremy McDermott, cofounder
of Insight Crime, a research
group which has studied Venezuela’s prison system.
The Venezuelan Program of
Education-Action in Human
Rights, known by its acronym
PROVEA, is one of the main humanitarian organizations in the
country. It said on its Twitter
account that the “indolence” of
the government had contributed to the death toll.
SEOUL — North Korea’s
leader, Kim Jong Un, and President Moon Jae-in of South Korea will meet for the first time
on April 27, officials said Thursday, setting a date for talks
meant to extend the recent détente on the Korean Peninsula
and pave the way for discussions between Kim and President Trump.
Early this month Kim
agreed to a meeting with Moon,
part of a flurry of diplomacy
around North Korea’s nuclear
program that began with the
Nor th’s par ticipation las t
month in the Winter Olympics
in Pyeongchang, South Korea.
Senior negotiators from both
Koreas met Thursday at Panmunjom, the so-called truce village on the countries’ border, to
agree on a date and discuss other aspects of the summit meeting.
The two Korean leaders will
meet at Peace House, a South
Korean building inside Panmunjom, according to a joint statement the negotiators issued at
the end of their talks Thursday.
Peace House lies south of the
demarcation line that bisects
Panmunjom, which means that
Kim would become the first
North Korean leader to set foot
in the South since the Korean
War.
Unification Minister Cho
Myoung-gyon, the South’s chief
delegate to the Panmunjom
talks, hinted at progress toward
including denuclearization in
the agenda for the Kim-Moon
meeting. But he said the two
Koreas might need another
round of talks in coming weeks
to settle the matter.
“ The South and North
agreed on efforts to make the
summit successful, sharing its
historic significance in denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula,
settling peace there and improving inter-Korean relations,”
Cho told reporters.
T he mee ting will be the
third ever held between leaders
of the two Koreas. Kim’s father
and predecessor, Kim Jong Il,
met with two South Korean
presidents — Kim Dae-jung in
2000 and Roh Moo-hyun in
2007 — in Pyong yang , the
North Korean capital.
The diplomacy was welcomed by UN Secretary-General António Guterres, who has
repeatedly expressed angst
about the threat of war on the
Korean Peninsula. “I think
there is here an opportunity for
a peaceful solution to something that, a few months ago,
was haunting us as the biggest
danger we were facing,” Guterres told reporters at the UN
headquarters in New York.
South Korean envoys who
m e t w i t h K i m Jo n g U n i n
Pyongyang early this month
said he had expressed willingness to negotiate with the United States about normalizing
ties and giving up his country’s
nuclear weapons in return for
security guarantees. Kim also
vowed to suspend all nuclear
and missile tests during the
talks, the envoys said.
Kim offered then to meet directly with Trump, who quickly
accepted. No date has been set,
but Trump said he was willing
t o m e e t K i m b y May, a f t e r
Moon’s discussions with him.
This week, Kim surprised
both South Korea and the United States by secretly visiting
Beijing, in his first trip outside
North Korea since taking power. He met with President Xi
Jinping of China, the North’s
traditional communist ally, in a
bid to mend frayed ties before
meeting Moon and Trump.
In his discussions with Xi,
Kim reaffirmed his intention to
meet with the two leaders, according to Xinhua, the Chinese
state news agency. Later Thursday, the North’s official Korean
Central News Agency for the
first time confirmed Kim’s plan
to meet with Moon, without
disclosing the time and venue
of their meeting.
Moon’s office said Thursday
that it was a welcome development, calling it “highly significant” that Kim had reportedly
confirmed his willingness to
discuss denuclearization and
meet with the US and South
Korean presidents.
Daily Briefing
Prison term sought for politician
Kenyan politician says he was drugged
JAKARTA, Indonesia —
Prosecutors demanded 16
years in prison for a senior Indonesian politician accused of
playing a key role in the theft
by officials of $170 million of
public money.
At a sentencing demand
hearing on Thursday, prosecutors also called for fines and
the seizure of Setya Novanto’s
assets if he fails to return $7.4
million.
Included was a $135,000
luxury ‘‘Richard Mille’’ watch
that he allegedly received as
NAIROBI — A Kenyan opposition politician alleged he
was drugged and deported to
Dubai early Thursday after
his attempt to enter Kenya
led to him being detained in
an airport bathroom for more
than a day.
Miguna Miguna, targeted
in a Kenyan government
crackdown amid lingering
election tensions, was deported even after a court ordered
authorities to release him,
lawyer Cliff Ombeta said.
Police at the airport
roughed up lawyers and
part of the conspiracy.
Anticorruption police allege Novanto was among
about 80 people, mostly officials and legislators, who used
the introduction of a $440
million electronic identity
card system in 2011 and 2012
to steal more than a third of
the funds.
Novanto, the former
speaker of Indonesia’s Parliament and senior member of
the Golkar party, denies any
wrongdoing.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOHAMED HOSSAM/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
French soldiers weren’t targeted
PARIS — A man drove his
car toward a group of French
soldiers out on a Thursday
morning jog, but suddenly
swerved to avoid hitting them,
a prosecutor said, dismissing
any link with terrorism.
After a brief police manhunt, a man and a woman
were arrested in the Isere region, a police official said.
The official said the woman, arrested in Echirolles, a
suburb of Grenoble, in southeast France, was the owner of
the car. The man was apprehended in Grenoble.
No injuries were reported.
‘‘We are very clearly not
dealing with a case of terrorism,’’ Grenoble prosecutor
Jean-Yves Coquillat said.
The man has a long record
of petty crime with 25 convictions and was twice imprisoned for a total of four years.
But he shows no sign of Islamic radicalization, Coquillat
said.
At least four soldiers from
the 27th Mountain Infantry
Brigade had appeared to be
targeted by the car, according
to the brigade’s chief Colonel
Alain Didier.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Egyptian authorities went to great lengths to get people
to vote, in an attempt to legitimize the election.
Landslide likely for president in Egypt
CAIRO — The initial results
of Egypt’s presidential election
show a landslide win for President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, who
faced no serious challenge,
and a turnout hovering
around 40 percent, pro-government media reported
Thursday
Counting began after polls
closed late Wednesday, wrapping up three days of voting.
Egyptian authorities went to
great lengths to bolster turnout in a bid to give the election
legitimacy. Official results are
expected Monday.
Provincial governors and
other officials promised incentives and rewards, and in some
cases resorted to threats to get
people to the polls. The National Elections Authority
threatened fines of around $30
for anyone boycotting the election, but similar warnings
have been made in the past
without being widely enforced.
Local media also urged
people to vote, portraying it as
a national obligation.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
forced them to leave when
they tried to serve the court
order, said another lawyer,
James Orengo.
Miguna said in a Facebook
post that authorities broke into the bathroom where he
had been held and forcibly injected him with a substance
and he passed out. He said he
regained consciousness when
the Emirates flight arrived in
Dubai.
There was no immediate
response from Kenyan authorities.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Resistant gonorrhea reported in UK
A super-resistant strain of
gonorrhea has been reported
in the United Kingdom following warnings from global public health officials that the
common sexually transmitted
disease is becoming more difficult to treat.
Health officials in England
said it is the first time a case of
gonorrhea could not be treated
successfully with antibiotics
commonly used to cure it.
Earlier this year, a man,
who was not named, sought
treatment there for symptoms
he developed about a month
after he had sexual contact
with a woman in Southeast
Asia, according to a case report from Public Health England. The bacterial infection
was treated with two antibiotics, azithromycin and ceftriaxone, but subsequent tests still
came back positive for the disease, the officials said.
Gonorrhea, which is caused
by the bacterium, Neisseria
gonorrhoeae, is one of the
most common sexually transmitted diseases around the
world.
WASHINGTON POST
A4
T h e
The World
Russia to expel
150 diplomats in
retaliation move
Tensions with
West continue
after UK attack
By Richard Pérez-Peña
NEW YORK TIMES
LONDON — Intensifying
Russia’s clash with Europe and
the United States, the Kremlin
on Thursday announced that it
would expel 150 Western diplomats and close the US Consulate in St. Petersburg.
The action was in retaliation
for the expulsion of more than
150 Russian officials from other
countries — which was a reaction to a nerve-agent attack on
British soil that Britain and its
allies have blamed on Moscow.
The US ambassador to Russia, Jon M. Huntsman Jr., was
summoned to the Foreign Ministry, Foreign Minister Sergey
Lavrov announced. Sixty US
diplomats will be expelled from
Russia — the same as the number of Russian diplomats whom
Washington is expelling. The
Americans were given until
April 5 to leave the country.
The crisis over the poisoning
of a former Russian double
agent and his daughter has
driven tensions between the
Kremlin and the West to their
highest pitch in decades. The
tit-for-tat responses raise the
prospect of further, more serious escalations, either public or
clandestine.
Relations were already rocky
over Moscow’s roles in the wars
in Syria and Ukraine, its annexation of Crimea, its meddling in
elections in the United States
and elsewhere, the assassination of Kremlin foes in Russia
and abroad, cyberattacks and
disinformation campaigns
against other countries, and
what Western officials have described as a broad, largely covert effort to destabilize and
discredit liberal democracies.
Russia as a whole and many
powerful Russians individually
are already under economic
sanctions by the West, and London has vowed to tighten its
scrutiny and control of the vast
Russian wealth — much of it
held by allies of President Vladimir Putin — that has flowed into Britain in recent years. Britain has also said it will re-examine several suspicious deaths of
Kremlin opponents.
Putin and his government
have denied any involvement in
the March 4 attack on Sergei V.
Skripal and his daughter, Yulia,
and have tried to cast blame on
Britain, the United States,
Ukraine, the Czech Republic,
and others.
The Skripals were found unconscious in a busy shopping
area in the small English city of
Salisbury, where Sergei Skripal
lives. He remains hospitalized
in critical condition, but his
daughter is showing improvement , British officials announced Thursday. British officials say that hundreds of people could have been exposed to
Novichok, the toxin used
against the Skripals.
Lavrov said that Russia had
called for a meeting next Tuesday of the Organization for the
Prohibition of Chemical Weapons to discuss the Skripal case.
Prime Minister Theresa May
of Britain and her government
contend that the pair were poisoned with one of an extremely
powerful class of nerve agents
known as Novichok, developed
by Soviet scientists in the 1970s
and ‘80s. They claim to have
solid evidence that Russia was
probably behind the attack, and
that Putin himself probably approved it.
The British government has
not made its evidence public,
but has shared it with major allies, who have said that they
agree with London’s conclusions. The Organization for the
Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the international body that
polices a chemical weapons ban
treaty, is investigating.
President Trump, who has
long been loath to criticize Putin or his government, has
made no public statement on
the attack or who was to blame.
But officials in his administration have publicly backed May’s
statements, and Monday the
president ordered the expulsion
of 60 Russian officials who
work in the United States, and
the closing of the Russian consulate in Seattle.
More than 20 other countries, primarily European, also
announced expulsions Monday,
and a few more joined in on
Tuesday, as did NATO headquarters in Brussels. The expulsions were a remarkable show
of international unity and coordination, in solidarity with Britain, which had already forced
23 Russian officials to leave the
country; Moscow responded by
expelling 23 Britons.
B o s t o n
G l o b e
‘It’s the most happiest day of my life that I am back to my country.’
MALALA YOUSAFZAI
NIGHAT DAD/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Malala Yousafzai (center) attended a meeting with Pakistani women’s rights activists in Islamabad on Thursday.
Youngest Nobel laureate returns home
20-year-old back
in Pakistan 5 years
after being shot
By Shaiq Hussain
THE WASHINGTON POST
ISLAMABAD — Malala
Yousafzai, the world’s youngest
Nobel laureate, made her first
trip back to Pakistan on Thursday, more than five years after
Taliban militants shot her in
the head for fighting for the
right for girls to go to school.
Yousafzai was flown to Britain in 2012 for medical care
and then impressed the world
with her eloquent defense for
the rights of girls and women.
She went on to receive the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, together with Indian child rights activist Kailash Satyarthi, before
being accepted to Oxford University.
While she has been hailed
by supporters as a champion
against extremism, some Islamist hard-liners in Pakistan
and elsewhere have criticized
Yousafzai as a mouthpiece for
Western cultural views.
In a sign of the attention she
still draws in Pakistan, security
for Yousafzai’s visit was extremely tight.
‘‘I have been dreaming of returning to Pakistan for the last
five years and today I am very
happy, but I can still not believe
that this is actually happening,’’
she said tearfully at a reception
hosted by Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi.
‘‘Today after five and half
years I have set foot on my soil.
Whenever I would travel, in
plane or in car, I would imagine
that it’s Pakistan and I am drivi n g i n Is l a m a b a d . I w o u l d
imagine this is Karachi, and it
was never true, but now that I
see it, I am very happy,’’ she
added.
The reception included senior government functionaries,
leading social activists, parliamentarians and guests from
her home region of Swat who
came to welcome what they
dubbed ‘‘daughter of Pakistan.’’
‘‘The entire world gave you
China’s defunct space lab hurtles toward Earth
By Christopher Bodeen
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING — China’s defunct
and reportedly out-of-control
Tiangong 1 space station is expected to reenter Earth’s atmosphere sometime this weekend. It poses only a slight risk
to people and property on the
ground, since most of the bussize, 8.5-ton vehicle is expected to burn up on reentry, although space agencies don’t
know exactly when or where
that will happen.
Below are some questions
and answers about the station,
its reentry and the past and fut u r e o f C h i n a’s a m b i t i o u s
space program.
Q. What will happen and
how great is the danger?
The European Space Agency predicts the station will reenter the atmosphere between
Saturday morning and Sunday
afternoon — an estimate it
calls ‘‘highly variable,’’ likely
because the ever-changing
shape of the upper atmosphere affects the speed of objects falling into it.
The Chinese space agency’s
latest estimate puts reentry
between Saturday and
Wednesday.
Western space experts say
they believe China has lost
control of the station. China’s
chief space laboratory designer Zhu Zongpeng has denied
Tiangong was out of control,
but hasn’t provided specifics
on what, if anything, China is
doing to guide the craft’s reentry.
Based on Tiangong 1’s orbit, it will come to earth some-
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
honor and respect and Pakistan will also give you honor. It
is your home . . . you are not an
ordinary citizen, your security
is our responsibility,’’ the prime
minister said at the meeting.
He also referred to the militants that wounded Yousafzai
and the battle Pakistan is still
fighting.
‘ ‘ We a r e f i g h t i n g a w a r
against terror. No matter what
the world says about us, Pakistan is fighting the largest war
against terror and our more
than 200,000 soldiers are fighting this war,’’ he said.
Video showed the Nobel laureate clad in traditional Pakistani shalwar kameez and her
head covered in a red and blue
scarf sitting next to the premier
along with her parents. She also met with female ministers.
The 20-year-old Yousafzai
arrived in the early hours of the
morning amid tight security at
Islamabad’s Benazir Bhutto International Airport.
Pakistani news channels
aired footage of her leaving the
airport along with her parents
Court rules Sarkozy
must stand trial
Allegedly sought
to sway judge in
campaign probe
By James McAuley
WASHINGTON POST
ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE
Researchers tested China’s now-defunct Tiangong 1 prior to its September 2011 launch.
where between 42.7 degrees of
latitude north and 42.7 degrees south, or roughly somewhere over most of the United
States, China, Africa, Southern
Europe, Australia, and South
America. Out of range are Russia, Canada, and northern Europe.
Based on its size, only
about 10 percent of the spacecraft will likely survive being
burned up on reentry, mainly
its heavier components such
as its engines. The chances of
anyone on earth being hit by
debris is considered less than
one in a trillion.
Q. How common is humanmade space debris?
Debris from satellites,
space launches and the International Space Station enters
the atmosphere e ver y fe w
months, but only one person is
known to have been hit by any
of it: American woman Lottie
Williams, who was struck but
not injured by a falling piece of
a US Delta II rocket while exercising in an Oklahoma park
in 1997.
Most famously, America’s
77-ton Skylab crashed through
the atmosphere in 1979,
spreading wreckage near the
southwestern Australia city of
Perth, which fined the United
States $400 for littering.
The breakup on reentry of
the Columbia space shuttle in
2003 killed all seven astronauts and sent more than
80,000 pieces of debris raining
down on a large swath of the
southern United States. No
one on the ground was injured.
In 2011, NASA’s Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite
was considered to pose a slight
risk to the public when it came
down to earth 20 years after
its launching.
Debris from the 6-ton satellite ended up falling into the
Pac i f i c O c e a n , c a u s i n g n o
damage.
China’s own space program
raised major concerns after it
used a missile to destroy an
out-of-service Chinese satellite
in 2007, creating a large and
potentially dangerous cloud of
debris.
in a convoy of over a dozen vehicles, many carrying police
and security personnel.
It is not yet clear whether
she will visit her home village
in the Swat Valley.
Her four-day itinerary has
her staying mostly in Islamabad and meeting Pakistani officials, media representatives,
and social activists as well as
relatives.
‘‘It’s the most happiest day
of my life that I am back to my
country and meeting my people. All my countrymen sitting
here I want to welcome you,’’
she said in Pashto, the native
language of her region.
‘‘I continued my education
in the U.K. but I always wanted
to move freely in Pakistan. I
want to invest in the education
of children. Pakistani women
should be empowered.’’
Even in her early teens,
Yo u s a f z a i w a s k n o w n a s a
champion of girls’ education,
something that cannot be taken for granted in parts of Pakistan and elsewhere in the region.
PARIS — France’s highest
court on Thursday ordered former president Nicolas Sarkozy
to stand trial for allegedly attempting to intervene in an investigation into his 2007 campaign finances.
The charges — for corruption and the abuse of influence
— emerged as the latest twist
in a tangled web of suspected
wrongdoing that Sarkozy,
France’s conservative president between 2007 and 2012,
has doggedly denied. Specifically, they concern allegations
that he attempted to sway
judges investigating him for
campaign finance abuses.
A French media outlet, citing documents from Libyan archives, reported shortly after
Sarkozy left office that he may
have accepted cash transfers of
50 million euros from the regime of the now-deceased dictator Moammar Gadhafi in order to finance his 2007 run. A
government probe was opened
that year.
As part of that inquiry, investigators monitored a number of different cellphones
Sarkozy used to communicate
with his lawyer, Thierry Herzog. According to French media, those monitored phones
revealed, in 2014, communications with a judge, Gilbert Azibert, to whom Sarkozy — planning a 2016 presidential run at
the time — allegedly promised
a plum position in Monaco in
e xc h a n ge f o r i n f o r m at i o n
about other pending legal proceedings against him.
Sarkozy and his lawyers argued that the wiretapping violated attorney-client privilege
and that the secretly monitored communications should
be deemed inadmissible in
court. But in 2016 the Cour de
Cassation, the nation’s highest
judicial body, rejected their appeal, clearing the way for him
to stand trial.
Sarkozy, 63, will now attempt to appeal the trial summons, his lawyers said Thursday in a statement. ‘‘He does
not doubt that once again the
truth will triumph,’’ the statement read.
But even a successful appeal in this case would be unlikely to end Sarkozy’s extensive legal woes. Thursday’s order, first reported by France’s
Le Monde newspaper, is only
the latest in a growing list of
charges.
The Libya probe is still ongoing, and Sarkozy was placed
under formal investigation last
week for allegedly accepting
bribes and illegal campaign
funds from Gadhafi’s regime.
Sarkozy also is slated to
stand trial for alleged campaign finance abuses in his
2012 reelection campaign.
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A5
Eight are feared dead after family’s SUV plunges off cliff
Three children
still missing but
presumed killed
By Matt Stevens
and Louis Lucero II
NEW YORK TIMES
They were the portrait of a
modern family: a married female couple and their six adopted children. And in 2014,
they were thrust in front of the
world for all to see.
One of those children — Devonte Hart, who is black — was
photographed hugging a white
police sergeant in Portland,
Ore., during a 2014 demonstration to protest police violence.
In the photograph, Devonte
clung to the officer, a mix of fear
and anguish in his tearful eyes.
But the intense news media
coverage that followed may
have been the reason the Hart
family decided to flee to Washington state, authorities said on
Wednesday.
Then, the unthinkable: The
family’s sport utility vehicle
plunged off a 100-foot cliff in
Northern California and was
discovered on Monday — upside down, engulfed by the
waves of the Pacific Ocean.
Both parents, Jennifer and
TRISTAN FORTSCH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Hart family photo taken at a Bernie Sanders rally in Vancouver. At right, Portland Police
Sergeant Bret Barnum hugged Devonte Hart, 12, at a 2014 protest rally.
Sarah Hart, were found dead
inside the SUV; three of their
children were discovered dead
outside it; and the three other
children, including Devonte,
were still missing on Wednesday evening and feared dead,
law enforcement officials said.
“We have every indication to
believe that all six children
were in there; however, only
three bodies have been recovered,” said Sheriff Tom Allman
of Mendocino County. “We have
no evidence and no reason to
believe this was an intentional
act. Certainly people are wondering what caused this.”
Still, authorities did not dis-
Flagship universities
growing out-of-state
student enrollment
By Nick Anderson
WASHINGTON POST
Founded by and for their
states, public flagship universities are increasingly becoming national institutions with
students from across the country. The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor shows the
trend: Barely more than half of
its incoming freshmen, 51 percent, were from within the
state in fall 2016.
That was down 13 percentage points from a decade earlier.
The question of student’s
home states is a huge issue for
universities. For hundreds of
thousands of college-bound
students nationwide, their
home-state flagship is either
their top choice or one of
them.
A Washington Post analysis
of the latest available federal
data found that at 11 flagships
in 2016, more than half of the
incoming freshman classes
were from out of state. For several small states, that was no
surprise. Those low-population states must recruit from
throughout their regions to fill
classes. The lowest in-state
share, 21 percent, was at the
University of Vermont.
Of the New England states,
the University of Massachusetts Amherst had the highest
percentage of in-state students, at 73 percent.
Some state schools have
made a conscious decision to
go national. A prime example
is the University of Alabama,
where 32 percent of freshmen
in 2016 were from the state.
That was down 34 points in a
decade. Alabama, with its national powerhouse football
team as a marketing draw, has
exemplified the move toward
out-of-state students.
At West Virginia University,
the in-state share was 45 percent, down a few points over
10 years. But university President E. Gordon Gee said he
wants to draw as many state
residents as possible to the
flagship campus in Morgantown. ‘‘Our future in West Virginia is to keep our talent in
state,’’ he said.
Out-of-state students help
universities in significant
ways. They diversify campuses, bringing fresh perspectives
and life experiences. They fill
seats in states with stagnant or
declining population. And of
course, they pay more. In-state
students at public universities
get a huge discount on tuition.
Those from elsewhere bring
revenue that helps support
that discount and offset the
long decline in state funding
for higher education. College
Board data show that tuition
and fees for in-state students
at public universities this year
average $9,970. For out-of-
JOHNNY HUU NGUYEN/AP
state students, the average is
$25,620.
That’s a difference of nearly
$16,000.
But there are drawbacks.
Politically, it can be risky for
prestigious schools to be perc e i v e d a s g i v i n g t o o m a ny
seats to outsiders. And out-ofstate students are often
wealthier than those from in
state, which can hinder efforts
to foster socioeconomic diversity on campuses.
Consider the University of
Michigan. It is one of the most
prestigious universities in the
country, public or private. It
produces vast amounts of research and serves about
44,700 students. Nearly
29,000 are undergraduates. Of
those undergrads, 15 percent
come from families with
enough financial need to qualify for Pell Grants. At many
other public universities, the
Pell share is twice or three
‘As a public
university, we
should be much
more
representative of
all kinds of
diversity.’
MARK SCHLISSEL,
president of the University
of Michigan
times that. At the same time,
Michigan’s in-state share of
freshmen slid. It was 64 percent in 2006 and as high as 67
percent in 2008.
Mark Schlissel, president of
the University of Michigan
since July 2014, said in a recent visit to The Post that he
wants to raise the Pell share
and preserve the in-state majority on campus.
‘‘As a public university, we
should be much more representative of all kinds of diversity,’’ he said.
Of Pell-eligible students,
Schlissel said, he wants the
percentage to be ‘‘over 20 at
least before I’m done.’’
Of in-state students, he
said: ‘‘I would like to keep the
majority of undergrads from
Michigan.’’
He said Michigan offers significant aid programs that ensure students from within the
state can attend regardless of
financial need.
The Post’s analysis found
that the in-state share of freshmen rose at just 6 of the 50
flagships from 2006 to 2016.
Those were the universities of
Alaska, Delaware, Georgia,
Idaho, Maryland, and Virginia.
count the possibility that some
of the children may have been
staying with friends.
At a news conference on
Wednesday, Allman conceded
that many questions remain:
When did the accident, as he
called it, occur? Why did the
SUV drive across at least 75 feet
of dirt before plummeting into
the ocean? Why weren’t there
skid marks?
Allman said his office knew
of no witnesses.
In the meantime, troubling
reports about the family have
emerged.
Washington state Child Protective Services learned on Fri-
day of allegations of abuse
against the Harts and tried to
make contact with them that
day, but no one answered when
its employees visited their
home, Norah West, a spokeswoman for the state’s Department of Social and Health Services, said on Wednesday.
West said that Child Protective Services had opened the inquiry because of “allegations of
abuse or neglect in the home.”
She said the children’s agency made two subsequent attempts to establish contact with
the family, visiting the home
again on Monday and Tuesday,
but was unsuccessful. A spokes-
man for the Clark County Sheriff’s Department in Washington
state said he was not aware of
any previous interactions with
the family.
A neighbor of the Harts in
Wo o d l a n d , Wa s h ., D a n a
DeKalb, told NBC affiliate KGW
that Devonte, the child from
the 2014 photograph, had recently begun venturing over to
her home to ask for food, sometimes several times a day.
According to DeKalb, Devonte said his mothers sometimes withheld food from the
children as punishment and
didn’t allow them outside.
DeKalb said she was the one
who brought the family to the
attention of Child Protective
Services. She told KGW that
when an employee from the
children’s agency visited on Friday, the Harts refused to answer the door, and that the family left only hours later. DeKalb
did not immediately respond to
a telephone message on
Wednesday night.
Publicly available records
show that Sarah Hart had lived
in Minnesota for years before
eventually moving to West
Linn, Ore., and then Woodland,
Wash. Court records show that
a woman with her name and
age was convicted of misde-
meanor domestic assault in
Minnesota in 2011.
Investigators identified the
bodies of Jennifer and Sarah
Hart, both 38, of Woodland. By
Wednesday, coroner’s officials
had also identified the bodies of
the three children: Markis, 19;
Jeremiah , 14; and Abigail, 14.
Authorities say the three missing children are Devonte, 15;
Hannah, 16; and Sierra, 12.
In 2014, Devonte was photographed at a demonstration in
Portland, one of many protests
across the country of a grand
jury’s decision not to bring
criminal charges against Darren Wilson, the police officer
who fatally shot Michael Brown
in Ferguson, Mo. Devonte, who
was then 12, had been holding
a “Free Hugs” sign, and Sergeant Bret Barnum approached
him to ask why he was crying.
The photograph of the two
embracing, which was first
published by The Oregonian
newspaper, ricocheted around
social media and was featured
by major news media outlets.
In an interview at the time
with The Oregonian, Barnum
said the boy told him that he
was sad “about the protests,
kind of about national events.”
“I just kind of sighed,” he recalled, “and said, ‘I’m sorry.’”
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A6
The Region
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
Rosenberg’s spouse indicted on assault charges
uHEFNER
Continued from Page A1
sions in Boston in 2015 and
2016 — once in an apartment,
once in a restaurant, and once
in a car. That alleged victim told
the Globe last year that Rosenberg was present in the car but
that he did not know whether
the then-Senate president was
aware of the assault. The Globe
found no evidence that Rosenberg, 68, knew of any of Hefner’s alleged assaults. According to the indictment, Hefner
sexually assaulted another victim in 2014 and exposed his
genitals to that same victim in
2016, and assaulted a third victim in the summer of 2016.
Prosecutors also say Hefner
obtained nude and partially
nude photographs of another
victim without his knowledge,
and sent or showed the pictures
to four other people without the
victim’s consent.
“Today’s indictments send a
clear message that we will not
tolerate behavior of this kind,”
Attorney General Maura Healey
said in a statement, thanking
the victims for coming forward.
District Attorney Daniel F.
Conley said the joint investigation had revealed “a disturbing
pattern of conduct that was not
only inappropriate, but criminal. . . . We know the facts specific to this case, with many of
the parties working in politics
and government, made it especially daunting to come forward.”
Hefner will receive a summons to appear in Suffolk Superior Court on April 24 to be arraigned on the charges. Most of
the counts carry a maximum
sentence of five years in state
prison.
“It’s surreal,” one of Hefner’s
alleged victims said. “I know
most survivors of sexual assault
never get their day in court. I’m
still afraid of what happens
next, but I’m also confident that
all of the survivors are going to
be able to get through it.”
He also said he hopes Hefner “is somewhere praying.”
Hefner ’s attorney, Tracy
Miner, said he would plead not
Key moments in the scandal
Bryon
Hefner was
in the Senate
Gallery for
former
governor
Deval
Patrick’s
ceremonial
departure
from the
State House.
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2015
guilty to the charges.
“Mr. Hefner . . . looks forward to contesting the allegations in a court of law, where
evidence must be produced and
witnesses can be confronted,”
she said in an e-mail.
In a statement to the Globe
in November, Hefner said he
was shocked by the men’s allegations and could not respond
to anonymous accusers. If the
case proceeds to trial, those
who accuse him of assaulting or
exploiting them will probably
face him in a courtroom.
Rosenberg, in a statement,
said: “These are serious charges. They are now being handled
by the judicial system. I have
faith in that system and trust
that it will adjudicate this case
fairly.”
The indictment will likely
intensify the turmoil that began
in the Senate after the allegations first surfaced, costing
Rosenberg his Senate presidency and leaving the chamber in
disarray as others jockeyed to
replace him. It comes just as a
senator has claimed the votes to
be the next president and legislators are attempting to move
forward with the business of
lawmaking.
In an emotional statement
the day after the allegations
against his husband first
emerged, Rosenberg said he
was heartbroken and expressed
sympathy for those who said
Hefner had assaulted them.
Rosenberg, who had vowed
that there would be a firewall
between his personal life and
State House business after an
earlier controversy over Hefner’s meddling in Senate business, insisted again that Hefner
had no influence over the business of the Senate.
He said Hefner had entered
an inpatient treatment center
for alcohol dependence. The
couple has since separated.
Acting on claims that Hefner
had boasted of his influence on
Beacon Hill, Rosenberg’s Senate colleagues launched an independent investigation to determine whether the then-Senate president had violated
chamber rules. That investigation is pending. Rosenberg
stepped aside as president, initially for the duration of the
Senate investigation, and Senator Harriette Chandler temporarily assumed the presidency.
Her tenure was extended after the Globe revealed in February that Hefner appears to have
been more involved in Senate
business than Rosenberg had
claimed, with documents and
some who dealt with Hefner revealing that he had access to
the Senate president’s official email, calendar, and contacts;
had lobbied on a budget
amendment; and showed a
deep knowledge of Senate matters. Rather than waiting for
the investigation to conclude,
senators have decided to move
on: Last week, Ways and Means
Chairwoman Karen Spilka announced she had rounded up
enough votes to be their next
president.
Current Senate President
Chandler called the charges
against Hefner “deeply disturbing” and applauded the victims
for coming forward to authorities.
“Clearly, the actions described will not be tolerated,
and the Senate will cooperate
fully with the district attorney
and attorney general’s office,”
she said. “These charges illustrate why it is critical that the
[Senate] investigation be completed in as thorough a manner
as possible.”
In a statement Thursday,
Spilka called the Hefner indictments “the latest turn in one of
the toughest periods in the history of the state Senate.”
“My colleagues and I are
heartsick for the victims of
these alleged crimes,” Spilka
said. “There is simply no place
for assault and harassment of
any kind. While this and other
investigations continue, it is
important for all potential victims to feel safe to come forward to investigators so that
the full truth can be known and
addressed.”
Senator Barbara A. L’Italien,
an Andover Democrat who is
º Dec. 3, 2014 The Globe reports that then-incoming Senate
President Stanley C. Rosenberg had admonished his husband, Bryon Hefner, to stop talking with other senators about Senate business, after accusations that Hefner boasted about his influence on
key decisions.
º Jan. 7, 2015 Rosenberg is elected Senate president.
º Nov. 30, 2017 The Globe reports that four men had come forward to say Hefner had sexually assaulted and harassed them
over the past few years. Hefner says in a statement, “I was
shocked to learn of these anonymous and hurtful allegations.”
º Dec. 1, 2017 Rosenberg says he is heartbroken by the report.
He promises full cooperation with a Senate investigation, insisting
Hefner had no influence over Senate business.
º Dec. 4, 2017 The Senate temporarily replaces Rosenberg as
president. Attorney General Maura Healey and Suffolk District Attorney Daniel F. Conley urge alleged victims of Hefner to come forward so they can launch an investigation.
º Dec. 18, 2017 A Senate committee investigating Rosenberg’s
conduct agrees to hire an outside law firm to spearhead the inquiry.
º Feb. 4 The Globe reports that Hefner had full access to Rosenberg’s e-mails, attempted to affect the state budget, and involved
himself in the workings of his husband’s office, as well as in Senate affairs.
º Feb. 8 The Senate votes unanimously to keep Senator Harriette
L. Chandler as its president for the rest of the year. (Senator Karen
Spilka has now claimed enough votes to take over.)
º March 29 Hefner is indicted on multiple charges of sexual assault, criminal lewdness, and distributing nude photographs without consent. Two of the four victims cited in the indictment spoke
to the Globe for the Nov. 30 story.
MARTIN FINUCANE/GLOBE STAFF
running for Congress, said
Thursday was “a very sad day
for the Senate.”
But, she added, “I do believe
that the victims now feel that
their stories have been heard,
have been taken seriously,
which I was advocating for all
along. I’m sure they now feel
they’re on the path toward justice being served.”
Senator Bruce E. Tarr, the
Senate minority leader, said he
hopes the criminal justice system works “swiftly and effectively to address what’s been alleged.”
“The behavior alleged in
these indictments is shocking,
it’s despicable, and it’s completely unacceptable,” Tarr said.
A spokeswoman for Governor Charlie Baker said he and
Lieutenant Governor Karyn
Polito “commend those who
came forward to report these
despicable actions and believe
those who engage in crimes and
sexual harassment of any kind
must be held accountable.”
One of the men who told his
story to the Globe, but who is
not among the victims included
in the indictment, was distressed to learn yet more men
allege Hefner assaulted them.
“There are so many victims,”
he said. Coming forward last
year “was the right thing to do,”
he added. “I feel some validation in that.”
The investigation into Hefner will continue, Healey and
Conley said, and they appealed
to others with information or
allegations related to the case to
contact them.
Globe columnist Yvonne
Abraham can be reached at
yvonne.abraham@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@GlobeAbraham. Joshua
Miller of the Globe staff and
Globe correspondent Matt Stout
contributed to this report.
State Police can’t just move us along this time
uRAMOS
Continued from Page A1
HOW TO
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Spotlight’s Sacha Pfeiffer leads a conversation with Chessy
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Globe.com/Consent
moving traffic along. And
maintaining some semblance
of order in the scrum of airport
traffic, all while scanning the
crowds for suspicious activity,
is surely harder than it looks.
Some amount of policing, particularly at a place like Logan,
is about being visible — which
can look an awful lot like
standing around.
But if you haven’t had the
first 10 minutes of an emotional family reunion ruined by
your husband’s bitter complaining about this, then congratulations again, because you
are not my wife.
For this, a trooper can make
about as much money annually
as three Boston Public School
teachers combined. Two dozen
troopers each racked up more
than $100,000 in overtime last
year, records show. Twenty
troopers from Troop F made
over $250,000. And until this
week, that data hadn’t been reported to the state comptroller
since 2010.
Other State Police scandals
in recent months appear to involve more flagrant breaches of
trust. One, involving allega-
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A State Police officer was stationed at Logan Airport in
Boston near a construction site by Terminal C.
tions that command staff ordered troopers to redact an incident report that would have
embarrassed a judge’s daughter, appears to have cost the
colonel running the agency his
job; another, involving noshow overtime shifts, may have
involved actual theft.
Confronted with just one of
these messes, the State Police
might have been able to get
away with the same strategy
the famously secretive department has used for previous unwanted scrutiny, waving us all
along, like idling cars shooed
out of the pickup lane.
But that won’t work this
time.
Public trust in the State Police is being sorely tested. So
when Massport, the entity that
runs the airport and pays
Troop F, essentially describes
this as an honest mistake, well,
the State Police is fresh out of
benefits-of-the-doubt.
“Troop F is responsible for
safety and security at transpor-
tation hubs that, obviously, are
high priority targets for foreign
terrorist organizations and domestic lone wolf actors,” said
State Police spokesman David
Procopio in an e-mail. There’s a
Some amount of
policing,
particularly at a
place like Logan, is
about being visible
— which can look
an awful lot like
standing around.
9/11 memorial at Logan for a
reason.
At Logan, Procopio said,
state troopers are responsible
for all law enforcement services, including “curb security, patrols inside the terminals,
criminal investigations, traffic
enforcement, and all other law
enforcement functions.”
That means troopers in tactical gear patrol the airport’s
terminals, and State Police respond when TSA searches uncover something illegal or suspicious. State Police K-9 units
hunt for explosives, and State
Police detectives investigate
deaths, larcenies, drug trafficking, money laundering, assaults, sexual assaults, and violations of Massport regulations. Another section of Troop
F focuses on training and
emergency planning.
Some of that is standard
State Police stuff and some of it
isn’t. The State Police have not
released data on which of those
details required the most overtime hours last year, and why.
Nobody is arguing that
troopers should not be compensated fairly for their time,
training, and risk — only that
their pay should be appropriate and open to the same scrutiny as every other state employee.
To that end, the State Police
announced this week that it
will take over from Massport
the responsibility for paying
Troop F and report that pay
along with that of other troopers. And the new commander
of the State Police, Colonel Kerry Gilpin, is reviewing overtime policies and practices “to
determine opportunities to improve the department’s performance and adhere to the mission of the State Police,” Procopio said.
“She understands the need
to strengthen the public’s trust
in the agency and is wholeheartedly committed to a thorough review.”
Understanding how and
why the public’s trust is eroding is valuable and even refreshing from an agency that
has long been pretty secretive.
But fixing it is going to require
getting out of the cruiser and
telling us just why, exactly, we
should move along.
Nestor Ramos can be reached
at nestor.ramos@globe.com
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A7
The Nation
Trump talks infrastructure,
midterms, N. Korea in Ohio
DAVID RICHARD/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump promised union engineers and
maintenance workers to fix the nation’s infrastructure.
Rules change for
pregnant immigrants
Release from
custody won’t
be automatic
By Maria Sacchetti
WASHINGTON POST
WA S H I N G T O N — T h e
Trump administration has rescinded an Obama-era policy
that ordered immigration officials generally to release pregnant women from federal custody, US officials said Thursday.
Immigrant organizations
immediately blasted the policy
change as an example of human rights abuses under President Trump, but it remained
unclear how many more pregnant women might be jailed for
deportation as a result.
Under the Obama administration, some pregnant women
also were subject to mandatory
detention if they had committed certain crimes or had arrived illegally and were subject
to a fast-paced expulsion process called expedited removal.
US Immigration and Customs Enforcement said the new
policy follows Trump’s executive order last year directing the
agencies to target anyone in the
United States illegally. His order reversed former president
Barack Obama’s instructions to
mainly detain and deport criminals and those who had recently crossed the border.
However officials cautioned
that the new directive does not
mean that all pregnant women
will be detained. Cases will be
handled on an individual basis,
depending on the women’s
flight risk, medical condition,
and whether they pose a danger
to the public. Immigration officials also generally do not detain women in their third trimester.
‘‘We’re ending the presump-
tion of release for all pregnant
detainees,’’ said Philip Miller,
deputy executive associate director at ICE. ‘‘We’re no longer
exempting any individual from
being subject to the law.’’
The policy quietly took effect
in December, and Miller said he
did not know if it has led to an
increase in pregnant detainees.
Since then, ICE has held 506
pregnant women in custody,
but most are no longer detained. Miller said he did not
know if they had been released
or deported. As of March 20,
about 35 pregnant women were
in custody.
Advocates for immigrants
swiftly rebuked the new policy,
which comes months after the
American Civil Liberties Union,
the Women’s Refugee Commission, and others filed a complaint with the Department of
Homeland Security about the
treatment of pregnant detainees. They said that ICE offered
inadequate care and that detention harmed women who had
been raped or had high-risk
pregnancies. Some miscarried.
The National Immigrant
Justice Center, a nonprofit that
advocates for immigrants’
rights, called the new policy
‘‘little more than blanket prolonged detention for all immigrants.’’
‘‘Again, ICE’s policymaking
tells us all we need to know
about the administration’s immigration-related goals — inflicting the maximum possible
harm on already vulnerable individuals and communities, all
in service of an explicitly antiimmigrant agenda,’’ Mary Meg
McCarthy, the center’s executive
director, said in a statement.
ICE officials said the agency
provides prenatal care and education to pregnant detainees, as
well as ‘‘remote access’’ to specialists.
tions made by Daniels, whose
real name is Stephanie Clifford.
As is typical for Trump, the
president appeared at several
times to veer off his prepared
remarks on infrastructure policy to interject with comments
perhaps designed to appeal to
his audience.
As he left the Oval Office on
Thursday morning to begin his
trip to Ohio, Trump bade farewell to Hope Hicks, one of his
longest-serving and closest
aides. Hicks is leaving her post
as White House communications director.
WASHINGTON POST
Judge denies porn actress’s
bid for expedited jury trial
A federal judge Thursday
denied a request from Stormy
Daniels, who says she was paid
to remain silent about an affair
with President Trump, to expedite a jury trial in her lawsuit
against the president.
The request for an expedited
jury trial and limited discovery
— including a deposition of
Trump and his personal attorney, Michael Cohen — was
deemed ‘‘premature and must
be denied’’ because some questions may wind up being answered by a future petition
from Trump and Cohen, wrote
Judge S. James Otero of the US
District Court for the Central
District of California. The ruling is a setback for Daniels’s
case and it remains unclear
how the high-profile lawsuit
will proceed.
WASHINGTON POST
McCabe
launches
GoFundMe
site for costs
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HARVARD BOOK STORE PRESENTS THE BOSTON GLOBE’S
MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN
in conversation with Spotlight’s Sacha Pfeiffer
TUESDAY, APRIL 3RD AT 6:00 PM
BRATTLE THEATRE • 40 BRATTLE ST.
Tickets on sale now at HARVARD.COM
By Matt Zapotosky
WASHINGTON POST
Former FBI deputy director
Andrew McCabe on Thursday
launched an online fund-raiser
to help cover the legal costs
that might come as he navigates investigations and congressional inquiries and explores whether he will sue over
his abrupt ouster from the bureau.
McCabe’s team unveiled the
legal defense fund, hosted on
the GoFundMe website, about
2 p.m. By 3:30 p.m., it had
raised more than $18,700 toward a $150,000 goal.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions fired McCabe from the
bureau about two weeks ago,
ending his more than 20-year
career just 26 hours before McCabe could retire and begin collecting his full retirement benefits. The move is likely to cut into his pension, though
McCabe’s team said money
raised for the legal defense
fund will not be used ‘‘for anything beyond his defense of the
allegations against him.’’
‘‘He will continue to fight for
the pension and benefits he deserves, rather than accept any
crowdfunding for that purpose,’’ his team wrote on his
GoFundMe page.
Sessions said he fired McCabe over findings from the Justice Department inspector general that McCabe had authorized an inappropriate
disclosure to the media, then
allegedly misled investigators
about it. .
But McCabe, who disputes
the inspector general’s conclusions, shot back that his firing
was politically motivated,
meant to undermine the FBI.
Photo credit: Alex Teng
the midterms, so we can’t be
complacent.’’
Trump promised to repair
the nation’s ailing roads, bridges, and other infrastructure
‘‘from a source of endless frustration into a source of absolutely incredible pride.’’
‘‘And we’re going to do it all
under budget and ahead of
schedule,’’ the president promised, seeming to look past the
reality that his $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan has little apparent momentum on Capitol
Hill. The plan has received only
tepid support from Congress
since the administration unveiled it earlier this year.
Chief among the infrastructure projects Trump promoted
here was his long-promised
wall at the US-Mexico border.
‘‘We’re getting that sucker
built!’’ Trump said. ‘‘That’s
what I do. I build. I was always
very good at building. It was
my best thing. I think better
than being president, I was always very good at building.’’
Trump has not been seen in
public since porn actress
Stormy Daniels appeared last
Sunday night on ‘‘60 Minutes,’’
detailing her allegations of a
sexual encounter with Trump
in 2006.
An estimated 22 million
Americans watched the CBS
broadcast — including the president, aides said, who fumed
about it privately but withheld
any public comments or counterattacks. White House
spokesmen said Trump categorically denied all the allega-
Our CD rates
are a thing of beauty.
Photo credit: Globe Staff
RICHFIELD, Ohio — President Trump flew here Thursday
to promote his infrastructure
plan, but after
POLITICAL a week of seNOTEBOOK clusion as he
has been besieged by an adult-film star’s allegations of an affair and by
news on the Russia probe, he
delivered his thoughts on a variety of topics, from the midterm elections to his North Korea talks.
Trump threatened to delay
finalizing his renegotiated
trade deal with South Korea
until after he meets with North
Korean leader Kim Jong Un
and resolves the nuclear confrontation with Kim’s rogue nation.
‘‘I may hold it up until after
a deal is made with North Korea,’’ Trump said. ‘‘You know
why? Because it’s a very strong
card and I want to make sure
everyone is treated fairly and
we’re moving along very nicely
with North Korea.’’
Regarding his still-unscheduled upcoming meeting with
Kim, Trump said, ‘‘If it’s no
good, we’re walking, and if it’s
good, we will embrace it.’’
Trump’s speech felt at times
like a stream of consciousness
commentary reminiscent of his
signature campaign rallies
from 2016, as he zigzagged
from his prepared text on infrastructure policy to his thoughts
on issues of the day, like this
week’s debut of the remake of
‘‘Roseanne.’’
‘‘Look at her ratings!’’ the
president said of Roseanne
Barr, the Trump supporter who
is the show’s star. Its two-episode premiere drew 18.2 million viewers.
Rallying union engineers
and maintenance workers inside a chilly and dirt-floored industrial barn here in Richfield,
on the outskirts of Cleveland,
Trump used his official, taxpayer-funded visit to warn his political supporters against complacency in the fall midterm
elections.
As Trump told it, the country was headed in the wrong direction — until he took office.
‘‘There’s never been an economy like this,’’ he boasted. ‘‘We
can’t lose that by getting hurt in
A disarmingly honest memoir about giving advice when
you’re not sure what you’re doing yourself.
“RELATABLE, FUNNY,
CRINGEWORTHY, AND HELPFUL.”
—ALYSSA MASTROMONACO,
New York Times bestselling author of Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?
A8
The Nation
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
Can Emma Gonzalez offer Hollywood ending?
uBURR
Continued from Page A1
vivors David Hogg, Cameron
Kasky, Alex Wind, Jaclyn
Corin, and Sarah Chadwick,
she has become a vocal activist
for common-sense gun-control
legislation and a figurehead
for a newly galvanized political youth movement.
But Gonzalez has something extra: the charisma of a
natural star. That she doesn’t
seem to care about such things
only makes her seem more appealing. With her closecropped hair, steely gaze, air
of sorrowful fury, and knack
for the theatrical gesture, Gonzalez has captured the national imagination in a way few
people her age have ever done.
In the immediate aftermath
of the shooting, Gonzalez became a social media lightning
rod with her cry of “We call
BS” against the National Rifle
Association and recalcitrant
D.C. lawmakers. At the March
for Our Lives this past weekend, she again commandeered
the stage and held about half a
million people mostly silent to
represent how long it took
Nikolas Cruz to kill 17 of her
classmates and instructors. All
these students are leaders to
humble their elders, but Gonzalez is their face, even if she’d
throw it all away to have her
friends back.
The media loves Emma
Gonzalez, as witness a burbling New Yorker piece that
likened her in sartorial style
and rebellious substance to
Joan of Arc — as witness this
article itself — but for now,
she and her friends are using
it and us to further their own
ends. Which is as it should be.
When you have something important to say and someone
hands you a megaphone, you’d
be a fool to pass it up.
The struggle right now is
over the larger narrative of
what Emma Gonzalez and the
Parkland kids mean.
To those for whom the Second Amendment is gospel,
they’re seen as a threat and so
must be revealed as fakes,
frauds, paid actors rather than
New transgender
briefings sought
By Spencer S. Hsu
WASHINGTON POST
CLIFF OWEN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Part of Emma Gonzalez’s presentation Saturday at the Washington March for Our Lives was an extended period of silence.
grieving kids.
Teen Vogue staged and circulated a video of the Parkland activists tearing up a paper shooting-range target; an
online troll altered it to look
like they were shredding a
copy of the Constitution. Gonzalez has been called a “skinhead lesbian” by a legislative
candidate in Maine; all of the
students are regular recipients
of death threats and cookedup Internet conspiracy theories. Whatever they’re doing,
it’s making some people nervous.
To a majority of Americans,
though, they’re young adults
who’ve survived (and are still
surviving) trauma and are
speaking out in an effort to
keep that trauma from being
visited upon others. They have
the passion and conviction of
their age, and an anger and
articulation beyond their
years.
And they keep me thinking
about Jimmy Stewart.
Imagine “Mr. Smith Goes to
Washington” retooled for the
Age of Trump, with the gangly
hero replaced by a stalwart
Cuban-American girl who
won’t take no for an answer
from the mealy-mouthed career politicians in the Capitol.
Cast Paul Ryan, Mitch McConnell, and Devin Nunes as the
fat-cat incumbents who think
they’ve got Ms. Gonzalez’s
number; cast John McCain in
the old Claude Rains role of
the silver-fox centrist who befriends the new kid but is secretly beholden to the NRA.
(In the part of Gonzalez? Maybe an intense performer like
Ellen Page, who at 31 is probably too old. Maybe an up-andcoming actor like Bella
Thorne, whose father was Cuban. But, honestly, the real
Gonzalez is playing the role
just fine on her own.)
And when all looks lost —
when the digitally altered video of Gonzalez taking an AR15 to a kitten is all over Fox
News and even her Parkland
friends have deserted her —
give Emma the big filibuster
scene, the one where she talks
through the day and the night
until her voice becomes hoarse
but she never flags, she keeps
calling BS, until the silver fox
has a change of heart and confesses all before the collected
viral eyes of America.
That’s how it goes in the
movies, right? And that’s how
we like to think things should
go in life because we’ve been
so well trained by a century of
two-hour narratives with a
moral and a happy ending
frosted on top. Well. They
called it Capra-corn for a reason, which is that you’d have
to be naive to believe it
worked that way.
Every now and then it does,
though, and every now and
then our children believe the
stories we’ve told them so well
that they shame us into making them true. That could still
happen.
It could also happen that
Gonzalez and her peers will
make some mistakes, will say
things in their zeal that they
shouldn’t, will give their enemies ammunition while alienating the fair-weather followers. Will screw up a little or a
lot, as humans do, or simply
fall victim to the attention and
adulation they’re getting. Although I imagine having seen
17 of your friends murdered
would tend to keep a person
on track.
For now, the Parkland kids
look like this country’s best
hope for itself — a stiff shot of
can-do idealism in a beatendown age — and the most astonishing part is that they’re
writing their own script as
they go along. They know how
they want this movie to end.
Now all they have to do is get
us there.
Ty Burr can be reached at
ty.burr@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @tyburr.
Facing a youth movement, NRA uses race as a tool
uNRA
Continued from Page A1
The video was the most
striking example of a concerted
effort by the NRA during the
last week to use race as a dividing line in the debate over gun
control.
By casting the students from
Parkland, whose classmates
were recently gunned down by
a mass shooter, as just more
out-of-touch white liberal lobbyists, the NRA is making an
overt racial appeal to nonwhites to reject the wave of antigun protests sweeping the
country. The NRA itself is an
overwhelmingly white organization with a fraught racial history, but the organization is
now attempting to capitalize on
existing fears among blacks and
Hispanics that gun-control advocates do not sufficiently emphasize shootings in cities that
overwhelmingly affect minority
neighborhoods.
It is both a blunt racial appeal and a sophisticated strategy rife with coded language.
“ They only want to hear
from black people who agree
with gun control,” Noir said in a
video released Saturday, the day
of March for Our Lives rallies in
Wa s h i n g t o n , B o s t o n , a n d
around the country. In other
videos, the NRA seemed to
push the idea that people who
live in inner cities should arm
themselves against gangs, not
succumb to gun restrictions.
NRA experts said the new
strategy could be a sign of an increasingly fearful organization.
After the mid-February shooting that killed 17 people in
Parkland, student activists have
presented the American gun
lobby with its most formidable
opponent in years.
“There’s a recognition from
the NRA that this is a more real
threat than other gun-control
movements,” said Scott Melzer,
author of a 2009 book called
“Gun Crusaders: The NRA’s
Culture War.”
He cited a recent NBC News/
Wall Street Journal poll that
showed a plurality of Americans had a negative opinion of
the NRA for the first time in
Judges
keep troop
ban orders
in place
nearly two decades.
“They’ve mostly only had to
message to their base because
that’s all they need to do,” Melzer said. “But now there’s something else going on here and
they recognize this as more potentially ominous.”
“The NRA is on the run,”
said Alan Jenkins, a former civil
rights lawyer with the Department of Justice.
Noir and the NRA did not respond to a request for comment.
The interview with Killer
Mike, whose real name is Michael Render and who represents one half of the rap group
“Run The Jewels,” appeared on
NRA TV, the organization’s
main media arm. The channel
is loaded with video clips from
conservatives pundits of all
stripes, with some messages
that border on apocalyptic to
more sunny episodes about
shopping for outfits that work
with a firearm.
Trending videos over the
past week include a segment
called “Do Black Lives Matter to
Anti-Gun Activists?,” “Colion
Noir responds to David Hogg’s
White Privilege,” and another
that details the gun-toting history of a civil rights activist. Dana Loesch, the NRA’s main
spokeswoman, told a conservative audience recently that
“there are thousands of grieving black mothers in Chicago
every weekend, and you don’t
see town halls for them.” The
video with Noir and Killer Mike
has also been viewed more than
120,000 times on YouTube.
“NRA, please please please
double down on content like
this. This is the stuff that changes minds,” one commenter said.
The strategy of race-based
attacks has left liberal organizations and gun-control advocates fuming, especially because Saturday’s march went to
great lengths to include prominent minority voices from different racial backgrounds.
The opposition has been so
fierce that Killer Mike has already apologized for his appearance on NRA TV. In a twopart video posted the same day
NRA TV VIA YOUTUBE
The NRA video with Killer Mike (left) and Colion Noir has
been viewed more than 120,000 times on YouTube.
the NRA video was released,
the rapper said he now realizes
the NRA used his words as a
“weapon” against the March
For Our Lives.
“I’m sorry that an interview
I did about a minority, black
people in this country, and gun
rights was used as a weapon
against you guys,” he said.
“That was unfair to you and it
was wrong, and it disparaged
some very noble work you’re
doing.”
Critics were unsympathetic,
and said the rapper should have
known the organization would
seek to use his words for its
own purposes.
A primary strategy of the
NRA, they said, is to deflect attention from the proliferation
of guns in America and the epidemic of mass shootings. Generating racial resentment and
fear of criminals fits that playbook, they said.
“ T h e N RA h a s l o n g e m ployed old and familiar blameshifting tactics that are highly
racialized in order to turn attention away from the gun-cont r o l d e b a t e ,” s a i d Kr i s t e n
Clarke, director of the Lawyers’
Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “Whether stigmatizing
black single mothers, or pandering to communities of color
through figures such as Killer
Mike, or promoting more cops
inside schools as the solution to
school shootings, the NRA has
long used dog whistles to drive
its agenda.”
Black supporters of President Trump disagreed. They
said the liberal anger was another sign of the supposed po-
litical correctness problem
among liberals, who they view
as being intolerant of differing
views.
“It’s so sad that Rapper Killer Mike can’t have an opinion,”
tweeted Diamond and Silk,
who were paid supporters of
the Trump campaign. Their real
names are Lynnette Hardaway
and Rochelle Richardson.
The new strategy represents
another twist in the NRA’s complicated history on race and political activism, according to
Melzer and others who have
studied the NRA for years.
Founded in 1871, its political
activism and close alignment
with conser vative politics
emerged strongly in the 1990s,
when current president Wayne
LaPierre ascended to power and
experts said the organization
sought to remake itself from a
single-issue Second Amendment group to something greater: a one-stop shop of conservative cultural zealotry. LaPierre’s
NRA now stands against more
than gun-control rights, calling
itself “liberty’s safest place”
against “thugs” and “liberals.”
J u s t l a s t y e a r, a n N R A
spokesperson on NRA TV said
that there was no “genuine
black oppression as there was
in the past” and that President
Obama “set race relations back
100 years in this country.”
NRA TV today features programming for nearly every demographic, including Noir’s
show, videos from more traditional conservative firebrands,
and a Real Housewives-style
program called “Love at First
Shot.” Noir, who was hired after
years of running a successful
YouTube series about gun enthusiasts, regularly attracts
more than 100,000 viewers per
episode.
His programs often accuse
others — not the NRA — of being the true arbiters of racial bias in America.
“If our politicians are truly
using the carnage that they refuse to stop to attack the rights
of honest, hard-working Americans caught in living hell, then
they are guilty of the most despicable form of racism imaginable,” Noir said in another video
posted Monday.
Whether or not this message
resonates with black communities is hard to ascertain. Recent
polling released by Quinnipiac
University said black Americans are more likely than their
white or Hispanic counterparts
to support gun control, and
polls show that whites make up
the majority of those opposed
to stricter gun regulations.
Multiple black gun ownership groups did not return repeated requests for comment,
and survey data show the NRA’s
membership remains overwhelmingly white — though specific numbers are unavailable.
Black gun ownership has risen
in the Trump era, but the NRA
still received widespread condemnation for remaining silent
after the death of Philando Castile, a licensed black gun owner
who died in a police shooting in
Minnesota during 2016.
Because of this, some question whether the NRA’s recent
overtures to black communities
are even targeted at black people. Jenkins, the former DOJ
lawyer and the current president of a social justice organization called The Opportunity
Agenda, said the NRA is merely
using black people as a prop to
speak to their white base.
“Attempting to divide black
people is not the same as an
overture to black people,” Jenkins said. “It’s just corrosive
and cynical.”
Astead W. Herndon can be
reached at
astead.herndon@globe.com.
WASHINGTON — A federal
judge on Wednesday left in
place her nationwide order
blocking last year’s Trump administration’s ban on transgender troops while she awaits
fresh legal briefings on the impact of a policy shift announced Friday.
On Friday, the president revoked the full ban he initially
backed last summer for a new
policy that would still disqualify many transgender troops
who have had gender reassignment surgery.
A s the White House unveiled its new order Friday
night, Justice Department lawyers filed papers asking four
federal courts to lift preliminary injunctions those courts
issued late last year over the
previous iteration of the ban.
The legal maneuvers are
similar to the flurry of federal
court activity as the White
House imposed and then altered entry ban orders as it
navigated court decisions.
The injunctions that froze
the Trump administration’s
initial ban on transgender
troops came in lawsuits
brought by some troops,
would-be recruits, human
rights groups, and several
states against a change that
would undo an Obama-era policy from 2016 allowing transgender individuals to enlist
and serve openly.
In those lawsuits, judges in
Washington, Baltimore, Seattle, and Riverside, Calif., had
said the Trump ban of last year
probably was discriminatory
and required the military to allow transgender recruits to enlist and continue to serve openly effective Jan. 1.
The four courts had said the
parties bringing the lawsuits
were likely to win their arguments that the initial ban was
unlawful.
In Washington on Wednesday, US District Court Judge
Colleen Kollar-Kotelly declined
to lift two orders she issued
late last year temporarily halting the ban. Instead, she gave
GLBTQ Legal Advocates and
Defenders and the National
Center for Lesbian Rights —
who have sued on behalf of six
active-duty transgender service
members — until April 6 to
amend their lawsuit in light of
the new executive order.
The judge then gave the Justice Department until April 20
to say how it intends to proceed.
Justice Department senior
trial counsel Ryan Parker and
trial attorney Andrew Carmichael had told the court the
block to the ban in essence was
moot in light of the changes
Friday. They asked Kollar-Kotelly to dissolve her injunction,
saying the basis for it ‘‘no longer exist’’ and that a streamlined ban, like that issued Friday, was necessary to counter
the risk to ‘‘military readiness.’’
Kollar-Kotelly’s move to
maintain the injunction, for
now, tracked with action Monday by US District Judge Marsha Pechman of Washington
state. Pechman gave all sides
one week to update their filings in a similar case.
‘‘President Trump’s lastminute maneuvering does
nothing to save his unlawful
and discriminatory policy,’’
Washington Democratic state
Attorney General Bob Ferguson said in a statement.
‘‘Nothing the federal government has said or done up to
this point, including Friday’s
developments, changes anything about the unlawful and
discriminatory nature of President Trump’s ban,’’ Ferguson
said.
Injunctions on the initial
ban issued by federal judges
Marvin Garbis of Baltimore
and Jesus Bernal of Riverside
also remain in place.
In a 44-page memo to the
president made public Friday,
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis
recommended disqualifying
US troops who have had gender reassignment surgery.
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Region
A9
State plan to end public access to flats stirs a sandstorm
uFLATS
above the high-water mark.
That means fewer vehicles, on
far less space.
But for Fitzgerald, who has
multiple sclerosis, the ability to
drive on the flats has helped
him reach an area that might
otherwise be inaccessible.
“My disease has made it
harder for me to walk any distances, especially on the beaches. Crowes Pasture has allowed
me to continue going to the
beach in an enjoyable way and
share that experience with my
6- and 9-year-old children,”
Fitzgerald wrote to the commission.
Labdon said he understands
that the Cape’s beaches need to
be protected, but he is convinced the cars pose no danger
Continued from Page A1
“They will not be happy until every human is kept within
their designated ‘appropriate’
areas,” groused summer resident John Fitzgerald, a 43-yearold father of two children.
The town’s Conservation
Commission, more accustomed
to sleepy talk of easements and
egress, drew a feisty, standingroom-only crowd to a recent
meeting where the chairman
seemed as irate as the residents.
“Will you please explain to
me what the hell is going on?”
chairman George Macdonald,
who opposes the ban, asked in
exasperation to loud applause.
For years, driving on the
flats raised no concerns. The
state does not have a blanket
prohibition on the practice,
and in 2004 the state Department of Conservation and Recreation wrote that it recognized
the use of recreational off-road
vehicles at Crowes Pasture,
Macdonald said.
But when the mid-Cape
town recently proposed an update to its 1999 beach manage-
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Dennis Conservation Commission chairman George Macdonald, on the access road to
Crowes Pasture flats, said he was blindsided by the state’s plan.
off-road vehicle access to the
tidal flats does not further the
purposes of the conservation
restrictions and should not be
‘Crowes Pasture has allowed me to
continue going to the beach in an
enjoyable way.’
JOHN FITZGERALD, 43, summer resident
ment plan, state agencies took
notice and specifically objected
to this traffic on the flats.
In December, the state Department of Environmental
Protection notified town officials that the flats should not be
used for off-road vehicles because they “may cause compaction of the resources there, and
the area may also be impacted
by fluids and other contaminants leaking or falling off,”
said Ed Coletta, a department
spokesman.
In early March, state conservation officials weighed in by
saying that the “proposal to
continue allowing recreational
allowed.”
Ma c d o n a l d s a i d h e w a s
blindsided.
No sea life is endangered,
because the flats are barren, he
said, and other off-road vehicles are allowed to drive to
small aquaculture plots on the
flats.
“There had been a clear understanding that all of the activities that are currently allowed will be ongoing,” said
Macdonald, who served as the
town’s natural resources director for 33 years. “I’ve told the
p u b l i c m a ny, m a ny t i m e s ,
‘Don’t worry.’ ”
At the recent meeting,
which the Globe watched later
on video, most commissioners
q u e s t i o n e d w hy c h a n ge i s
needed at the Crowes Pasture
Conservation Area.
But even if the panel pushes
back, the state can ban vehicles
from the flats because of its authority over wetlands protection, according to Karen Johnson, the town’s natural resources director.
The dispute has prompted
Dennis to seek legal advice on
how to proceed.
All of that is so much bureaucratic mumbo-jumbo for
the many families who clamber
into Jeeps, four-wheel drive
SUVs, and other off-road vehicles to meander along a narrow
dirt track and then drive onto
the beach near the mouth of
Quivett Creek.
A maximum of 125 vehicles
have been allowed on the beach
and the flats in years past — a
limit often reached by 10 a.m.
on weekends — and the four
hours spanning low tide have
become something of a paradise for beachgoers seeking a
different experience at water’s
edge.
Coolers are hauled far out
on the flats, umbrellas raised,
kayaks unloaded, grills put to
use, and fishing poles stuck in
the sand — far from the crowds
and bustle often associated
with Cape Cod beaches.
Under the new plan, 85 recreational vehicles would be allowed on the sandy beach
Experience Globe.com
to the flats.
“I know there are a lot of environmental folks with their
heart in the right places who
think this is damaging, but it’s
not,” Labdon said. “There’s no
sea life that you’re driving
across, you’re not damaging the
dunes, and to get there you’re
driving 10 miles per hour
through an established trail.”
The board will take up the
issue again on April 5, with a
summer tradition hanging in
the balance.
“Don’t ask me how this will
end up,” Macdonald said, “because I don’t know.”
Brian MacQuarrie can be
reached at
brian.macquarrie@globe.com.
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A10
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
G l o b e
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
Mayor Walsh must clear the air on City Hall Plaza
N
ow that the US attorney’s case against
City Hall aides Tim Sullivan and Ken
Brissette has been broomed from federal
court, Mayor Marty Walsh needs to make
one thing crystal clear: Requests to hold
events on City Hall Plaza or other city properties will
not depend in any way on whether the event organizer
employs union labor.
The charge in the recently dismissed case was that
Sullivan and Brissette had committed extortion by
pushing the Boston Calling music festival to hire union
workers for its September 2014 event on City Hall Plaza. US District Court Judge Leo T. Sorokin said that to
prove extortion, the prosecution would have to show
that the two had somehow benefited personally from
having those union members hired. When prosecutors
acknowledged they couldn’t meet that standard, Sorokin tossed the case. The US attorney’s office is considering an appeal.
Whatever happens next, the dismissal of the case
shouldn’t open the door for City Hall to try to pressure
event organizers to hire union workers for events on
city property. As long as a crew has the necessary skills
to perform the task at hand in setting up, running, and
breaking down an event, City Hall should be neutral
about whether or not they use union labor.
Queried on the matter, Laura Oggeri, spokeswoman
for Mayor Walsh, noted that the arrangement the city
has with Delaware North for managing and running
the holiday market and skating rink on the plaza from
December through February, as well as some summer
programming, doesn’t have any requirement for union
labor. Neither does the application for use of the various plaza spots through the city’s Property Management Department.
In a statement, she added that the “city process neither requires nor encourages the use of unions.” But
Oggeri said Walsh himself wouldn’t have any comment
on the matter until the case against Sullivan and Brissette, which may be appealed, is concluded.
Click by click, we Internet
‘users’ are being used
Will high court
kill gerrymander?
By Richard North Patterson
O
By Woodrow Hartzog
T
he revelation that Cambridge Analytica was involved in the extraction of
data involving over 50 million Facebook users has
raised more than a few questions about
just what went wrong and who is to
blame. Facebook originally deflected the
blame, saying, “People knowingly provided their information, no systems
were infiltrated, and no passwords or
sensitive pieces of information were stolen or hacked.” But this statement reveals precisely what has gone wrong
with the entire digital ecosystem. The
Cambridge Analytica debacle reveals
that the system worked exactly as intended. We never stood a chance.
Sometime in the early 2000s, tech
companies and lawmakers converged on
a path that turned the Internet against
you. The apps you downloaded, the
screens you interacted with, and the devices you used were slowly but surely designed to ensure that you never stopped
sharing and exposing yourself.
The root of the problem is counterintuitive. It’s all about the control. Specifically, our desire to have control over our
data has been turned against us. In theory, it’s good to be able to control how our
data are collected, used, and shared. It
lets us optimize the risks and rewards of
sharing and determine our own fate.
Unfortunately, the control we’ve been
given is a mirage. Companies are manipulating our perception of control, which
causes us to share more and feel good
about it in the process. Companies engineer our consent for even the riskiest of
disclosures.
Of course, that’s not how it’s usually
presented to us. Tech companies treat
their requests for our permission to collect and use our personal information as
though it were a gift. Mark Zuckerberg
and other tech leaders embrace this narrative with statements like “What people
want isn’t complete privacy. It isn’t that
they want secrecy. It’s that they want
control over what they share and what
they don’t.”
Lawmakers are also feeding this
beast. They have created rules for privacy protections that revolve around the
idea that companies respect our privacy
so long as they get our consent and keep
us informed. Tech companies get to say
that they are simply complying with the
rules set by lawmakers to give the people
what they want: control. Despite all of
this, we are not yet the masters of our
That’s overly cautious. The dismissal of this case
could leave the impression that it’s now fine for the city
to press event organizers to use union labor. And that
the skids will be greased if they do. A forceful statement by the mayor would do a lot to clear up any uncertainty.
And that’s important. The administration has, at
least episodically, brought City Hall Plaza to life in
imaginative ways, helping transform it from a barren
windswept brickscape to a venue that regularly attracts
passersby.
The city should build on that success. If City Hall
Plaza can be successfully programmed in the cold winter months, there’s no reason there can’t be a continuous offering of year-round attractions there. But that
will require a sense that City Hall really is open to a
wide range of proposals. Walsh should underscore that
by stressing that anyone who makes a serious application will receive fair consideration — and that using
union labor isn’t an unstated requirement.
ADOBE STOCK
own destinies. What’s missing are some
basic rules about how digital technologies are designed.
Design is a lever of power. Industry
will always use it. Even though we are
called “users,” we are really just responding to our environment. We cannot click
buttons and menu options that don’t exist. We cannot fully process all the warnings and pop-up notices we are confronted with, let alone the fine print. And we
don’t always recognize attempts at persuasion and manipulation. Even when
we do, sometimes they are hard to resist.
Just ask anyone who made an impulse
purchase on Candy Crush.
With everyone focusing so much on
giving people control, policy makers
have failed to create rules that keep technologies from collectively overloading
our brains with requests for data and
unfairly manipulating us. Even if every
tech company perfected its privacy settings, people would still have hundreds,
if not thousands, of other apps to deal
with. Focusing too much on control
leaves unanswered the difficult questions about the collective toll of manipulation, surveillance, and automated decision-making.
abcde
Fou n d e d 1 8 7 2
JOHN W. HENRY
Publisher
BRIAN McGRORY
Editor
VINAY MEHRA
President
ELLEN CLEGG
Editor, Editorial Page
LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
JENNIFER PETER
Managing Editor
Tech companies are never going to
stop asking for your data. Much like children who will ask for sweets until their
parents relent from exhaustion, these
companies are draining our finite ability
to resist, and our choices are being
shaped so as to make our exposure inevitable. The system allows companies to
launder their risk onto users.
Until lawmakers fill the design gap
and we all demand trustworthy technologies, industry’s unquenchable thirst for
data will dictate how these companies
build their technologies. Lawmakers and
industry should seek design that does
not manipulate us or dangerously expose us regardless of what we consent
to. Where choice is appropriate, we
should demand better choices, not more
options. With a clearer vision for the design of safe and sustainable technologies, we can work together for a more
common good.
Woodrow Hartzog, professor of law and
computer science at Northeastern
University, is the author of the
forthcoming “Privacy’s Blueprint: The
Battle to Control the Design of New
Technologies.”
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& Publisher 1873-1921
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Publisher 1921-1955
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1965-1984
n Wednesday, the
Supreme Court considered killing off
the gerrymander —
and temporized.
It shouldn’t. In most congressional races, democracy has
gone missing. Roughly 40 of
435 seats are deemed competitive. In 2016, only eight incumbents lost. The average margin
of victory was 37 percent.
A key factor is gerrymandering, practiced by partisan specialists armed with granular demographic data.
Every decade following the
census, these vote-counting specialists rig congressional districts to minimize the parlous
effects of democracy. After the
Republican sweep of 2010,
GOP-controlled legislatures redrew the maps of congressional
districts, using technology and
software with insidious artistry
to cement Republican control.
It worked. In 2012 House
races, Republicans won 1.5 million fewer votes than Democrats
— and 33 more seats. In 2016,
fewer than half the votes yielded Republicans another 14
seats.
According to the Brennan
Center for Justice, GOP gerrymandering created a “durable
majority” of 16 to 17 seats. In
the swing states of North Carolina, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, Democrats
have gained no seats since
2010. In the 17 states where Republicans drew the maps, their
candidates won 53 percent of
the vote — and 72 percent of the
seats.
In North Carolina, 53 percent of the vote got the GOP 10
of 13 seats — ruefully, Republican state Rep. David Lewis said,
“I do not believe it’s possible to
draw a map with 11 Republicans and two Democrats.” In
2012, 47 percent of the vote
gained the GOP 60 of 99 seats in
the Wisconsin state assembly.
Envious, Maryland Democrats
stacked a Republican district
against a 10-term GOP incumbent – who then failed to reach
38 percent of the vote.
This tampering empowers
extreme candidates, perpetuates incumbents, and strips the
vote of meaning. The inevitable
result — low turnout — further
sickens democracy. But, traditionally, courts have worried
about how to determine when
redistricting became excessively
partisan.
Now, more sophisticated
mathematical analyses focus on
“the efficiency gap”: districts
drawn to produce “wasted
votes” — artificially wide margins when compared with the
voting populace. Thus armed, a
federal court in North Carolina
struck down the GOP’s blatant
gerrymander. Its test was
straightforward: Whether a
map was intentionally drawn to
benefit one party and handicap
another; whether it achieved
that purpose; and whether it
had no legitimate justification.
The GOP met that description
with room to spare.
Similarly, a federal court determined that Wisconsin’s legislative map “was designed to
make it more difficult for Democrats . . . to translate their
votes into seats.” These cases
made Republicans fearful about
2018. Steve Stivers, the head of
the National Republican Congressional Committee, says
bluntly: “After the redistricting
in 2011, a lot of districts were
shored up substantially. And it
makes a difference.” Thus the
GOP cynically argues that
courts should await the 2020
Census.
Last fall, a reckoning loomed
— if not for 2018, then beyond.
The Supreme Court heard a Republican challenge to the ruling
in Wisconsin — placing the
North Carolina ruling on hold
until it renders a decision. It
then decided to hear another
Republican challenge to the
Democrats’ rotten borough in
Maryland. At issue in both cases
is whether partisan gerrymandering abridges the constitutional right to vote.
At the hearing in the Wisconsin case, Chief Justice John
Roberts dismissed mathematical analyses as “gobbledygook.”
His fellow conservatives — Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, and
Neil Gorsuch — seemingly concur with Roberts that the court,
which rendered Citizens United, should not address the “political question” of gerrymandering — ironically, for the good
of its reputation. But Justices
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen
Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and
Elena Kagan plainly disagree.
The apparent swing vote was
Justice Anthony Kennedy. In
2004, he voted against a challenge to gerrymandering for
fear there was no “workable
standard.” But he is clearly concerned that gerrymandering
burdens voters’ rights to be fairly represented — a point he
raised in oral argument.
Then came Wednesday’s
hearing regarding Maryland.
Ginsburg and Sotomayor suggested that because a ruling
would not affect 2018, a decision was pointless; Breyer suggested that the court reschedule
both cases, plus the North Carolina decision, for this fall. One
implication is that the preliminary vote on the Wisconsin case
preserved the Republican gerrymander — potentially accelerating our devolution into a plutocracy sustained by sham elections.
Be very afraid. Citizens United took us far enough.
Richard North Patterson’s
column appears regularly in the
Globe. Follow him on Twitter
@RicPatterson.
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Opinion
A11
Inbox
Boston’s frustratingly,
maddeningly, wearyingly
long commutes
AP/WIDE WORLD
Immigrants having lunch at Ellis Island just before the First World War. Ellis Island received as many
as 790,000 immigrants at this time.
Befriending
the stranger
A
By Rachelle G. Cohen
s the snow melts and the days grow longer,
this is — or should be — the season of welcoming the stranger.
For millennia, Jews around the world
have marked the exodus from Egypt at Passover Seders
— a celebration of that long journey from slavery to
freedom. But even more so, a time to recall that equally
ancient admonition: “You too must befriend the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.”
It’s not as easy these days to “befriend the stranger”
— not when executive orders are being thrashed out in
federal courts, not when immigrants are afraid to show
up for routine status hearings lest they be summarily
detained, and not when the promise of freedom from
oppression is ever more elusive.
There was a time, not so long ago, when this nation
was a more welcoming place.
It was January 2001 when our country opened its
doors to some 3,800 of the so-called Lost Boys of South
Sudan. Children when they left their war-torn villages,
they trekked for hundreds of miles, they fought for
their lives, and many were forced into being child soldiers. Thousands died along the way.
The lucky ones made it to a refugee camp in Kenya.
It was there that then-Globe reporter Ellen Barry
picked up their story and chronicled the journey of a
dozen of these now not-so-lost boys to their new home
in New England.
One of them, now appropriately called Moses, told
the story of his journey at this year’s AJC Diplomats
Seder, and hundreds rose to applaud his courage and to
welcome this former stranger.
But today there are too few happy endings, too few
welcomes.
And so, around my Seder table this year, we will remember absent friends, friends whose journeys are not
yet complete, those I hold in my heart but whose lives
remain in limbo and often in turmoil — victims not just
of violence and injustice in their home countries, but also of indifference here.
There is and will always be a place for Sukru, once a
high-ranking judge in Turkey, now studying here for his
PhD under a work permit and presumably on the road
to asylum. But the pain of uncertainty is constant. Even
the possibility that this kind and gentle man who risked
everything to escape ahead of a Turkish arrest warrant
would not in the end be welcomed here is abhorrent.
His wife and children — whereabouts unknown —
are perhaps, with some luck, strangers in some other
strange land enduring the hardship of separation.
And there is Mev, another Turkish judge who became a friend when he came to Boston with his family
to study English — before he was ordered home and his
world was turned upside down by an increasingly autocratic Turkish president.
After months in a refugee camp in Germany, Mev
and his family have a real home — or at least a real address — and Mev has at last the promise of a job in a
country that has “befriended the stranger” more generously than our own.
No, we cannot welcome them all. That debate is not
new. My own father was fortunate enough to flee the
pogroms of Eastern Europe just as America was experiencing an earlier wave of anti-immigrant legislation in
the early part of the 1900s. He was among the lucky
ones.
But we can honor that heritage and that tradition by
doing what we can.
The Passover Seder traditionally ends with the
phrase “Next Year in Jerusalem” — an expression not of
a literal reunion but of hope for a better life and for
freedom. This year, many families will end the Seder
with a prayer for “an end to exile” for so many of those
who remain strangers in strange lands and “for ultimate redemption, for peace and perfection for the entire world.”
A tall order indeed — but one which can begin in a
single heart.
Commuter
was driven
to a fit of rage
wrong, it can take even
longer than sitting in traffic. (Dm1120) . . .
Re “Boston’s clogged arteries” (Page A1, March 26):
I’ve been commuting from
the North Shore to Boston
since 1990. For the first 12
years, I drove. Psychologists
speak of “suicidal ideation”
as a bad sign. By 2002, I
was feeling something more
like “homicidal ideation.”
This reached its peak
with a game of chicken one
winter day, when I drove
from the Interstate 93 offramp into the Storrow
Drive tunnel. We had to
merge three lanes into two,
alternating cars as in a zipper.
One driver refused to let
me in. In a fit of madness, I
pressed my car’s hood
against his, heedless of a
collision. He shot ahead,
jumped out of his seat, and
gestured for me to come
fight him. I ignored him till
the chorus of honks from
other crazed drivers forced
him back into his vehicle.
Since that day, I’ve taken
the train. It’s not easy — 30
minutes from Beverly to
North Station, 30 minutes
on the Orange Line to Forest Hills, then 30 minutes’
walk to the school where I
teach English as a Second
Language. But I am infinitely happier and less stressed.
If the MBTA vanished and I
had to drive, I would quit
my job.
Americans fail to invest
in public transportation,
and cling to a suburban,
car-dependent lifestyle that
is fundamentally stupid.
“And when something goes
wrong” is a phrase you can
apply often to Keolis as well
as the MBTA. (bceagle91)
...
TOM GRIFFITH
Beverly
Want to vent about
slow commutes?
Get in line
Beth Teitell’s article Monday
about the Boston area’s excruciatingly congested commutes generated more than
300 comments on BostonGlobe.com. Here is an edited
sample:
Investment in ferries, commuter rail, and rapid transit
would benefit the commuters (Pedrojoyce) . . .
And when something goes
But it’s still a great place to
live and work. Please, sir,
may I have some more of
the Kool Aid? (Gilly560) . . .
So who is stopping you
from moving? (bljo) . . .
Did that 20 years ago. Can
travel 25 miles to work in
35 minutes. Enjoy your
commute this morning.
(Gilly560) . . .
Yes, the city and Commonwealth need to put far more
resources into alternatives
like mass transit and bicycles, higher peak-hour tolls,
and fewer parking spaces in
the city. Clearly, 10 years after the
comple- THE SCROLL
tion of
the Big Dig (which improved traffic flow in the
short term), things are
worse than before. As other
cities have learned, as long
as we put more and more
resources into accommodating cars, their numbers
will just keep increasing.
That’s a losing game. Many
people realize the problem
(gridlock), but not the
change in thinking needed
to address it. (FlyingDutchman) . . .
I want to bike to work. I
just need some physically
protected lanes or off-street
paths in a few locations and
then I’ll stop driving to
work (and thus take up less
space with my car). I’m sure
there are a lot of people like
me — interested, but concerned. (toaster123) . . .
As I have said for years,
when you are stuck in slowmoving traffic, look around
you: 90 percent of the cars
just have a driver. If we
could only get people to
carpool, the problem would
go away. (mrbill) . . .
Car pools: a marriage of the
burdens of car ownership,
with the drawbacks of taking the bus. (11speedbike)
Rachelle G. Cohen, former editorial page editor of the
Boston Herald, is a consultant to government agencies
and NGOs on international judicial-press relations.
Budget cuts, inflation have chipped
away at Mass. gains in adult education
SCOT LEHIGH
Taking guns from troubled owners
M
assachusetts has some of
the strongest gun laws in
the nation, but there’s always room for improvement.
That’s why members of Moms Demand
Action for Gun Sense in America are prowling the State House halls, building support
for legislation to temporarily take firearms
away from those whose mental or emotional
condition renders them a risk to themselves
or others.
Under state Representative Marjorie
Decker’s bill, local law enforcement or a
family member could petition a court to order the confiscation of someone’s guns. If a
judge decides there’s a real risk that the gun
owner might use them to hurt himself or
others, the judge could issue a temporary
extreme-risk protection order under which
firearms could be taken. A formal legal
hearing that included the gun owner would
have to follow within 14 days. If the judge
then decreed that the gun owner posed “a
significant danger” of hurting self or others
with the firearms, the order would be extended for a year.
That’s a remedy other states have adopted after mass shootings by angry, alienated
men whose previous behavior had raised
red flags, but whose weapons couldn’t be
taken because of a lack of legal authority.
In determining whether a gun owner
poses a safety risk, the judge could consider
things such as recent acts of violence by the
person against self or others; use or threats
of physical force; violation of abuse- or harassment-prevention orders; convictions for
domestic violence; reckless brandishing of a
firearm; corroborated evidence of drug or
alcohol abuse; and any “dangerous” mental
health issues.
Skeptics note that local police chiefs already have considerable leeway in revoking
gun permits. That’s true — yet the Major
City Police Chiefs Association, which represents three dozen chiefs around the state,
has weighed in with a letter to House Speaker Robert DeLeo in support of the bill.
“[S]ome chiefs . . . would feel more comfort-
The bill addresses the
dangers posed by those
who risk hurting
themselves or others.
able if they had prior legal authority before
removing firearms,” wrote association president Brian Kyes.
Angela Christiana, of Moms Demand Action, Boston, says the law would help prevent suicides, which accounted for 58 percent of Massachusetts gun deaths in 2016.
“Often when someone is considering
suicide, it is a temporary state,” she says. “If
they have access to guns, their ability to be
successful at committing suicide is about 90
percent.” Connecticut has had such a law
since 1999; one study credits the statute
with preventing dozens of suicides.
The bill addresses mental illness, an issue gun-rights advocates often focus on, and
with due process protections. So the gun
groups of course support it, right? Wrong.
The Gun Owners’ Action League, the Massachusetts NRA affiliate, says it is “extraordinarily cruel for the law to treat a person who
is suicidal or depressed in the same manner
as a potential mass murderer.” Fear not, gun
guys; in cases where the worry was selfharm, the judge’s order would make that
clear, says Representative Decker.
“If we really want to do something about
mental health and gun safety, we’ve gotta
walk the talk,” says Molly Lanzarotta, a volunteer with Moms Demand Action.
So what are the prospects for passage?
The Senate is expected to be supportive — if
the bill clears the House. Decker says she
has had good talks with Speaker DeLeo,
who led the push for the 2014 gun-laws rewrite but hasn’t been able to secure a sitdown with Governor Baker.
When I inquired, both offices offered up
bowls of lukewarm mush. Ah, excuse me,
careful statements. DeLeo’s spokeswoman
said he’s having conversations on the issue;
Baker’s spokeswoman said he’s open to
working with the legislature on the matter.
Here’s what seems to be happening: Baker is waiting to see what DeLeo will do, because Mr. Manners worries that if he pushes
publicly for this, DeLeo might interpret that
as a declaration that his own 2014 gun-law
effort didn’t go far enough — and get his
nose out of joint.
Um, guys, you’re supposed to be the dynamic duo of smart gun laws. Couldn’t you
just sit down and work this out?
Scot Lehigh can be reached at
lehigh@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter@GlobeScotLehigh.
Your editorial “Harsh realities for Latinos, but little action”
(March 13) makes an important and long-overdue point: In
2018, too many of our state’s undereducated and limitedEnglish-proficient adults are languishing on waiting lists
rather than contributing their full potential for their families and their communities. This hasn’t always been the
case. Massachusetts was a national leader in welcoming
and educating new arrivals — in the decades surrounding
1900. We were on the path to restoring this tradition in the
late 1990s, and by 2001 we had established the nation’s
most effective system of public adult basic education services, including adult literacy, high school equivalency, and
English for speakers of other languages.
Since 2001, a combination of budget cuts and inflation
has reduced the quantity and impact of these classes by
more than 30 percent. This not only hurts native-born and
immigrant families who are already struggling to get by in
the new economy; it is also shortsighted social and economic policy. Reputable return-on-investment studies in
other states show that for each dollar invested in adult basic education, communities see an average return of $3.
Fully funding adult basic education is not only the right
thing to do; it is an investment that benefits us all.
BOB BICKERTON
Boston
The writer is a retired senior associate commissioner of
elementary and secondary education and the former director of the state office of adult education.
His answer to clutter concerns
Re “Junk science can’t reverse a clutter disaster” (March
28): That’s a great front-page story. I’m clipping it for my
huge “clutter folder,” and I will file it — whenever I can find
the folder in this big pile of papers.
DON RICKTER
Arlington
Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, 1 Exchange Pl, Ste
201, Boston, MA 02109-2132; letter@globe.com
T h e
A12
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
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275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
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39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
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231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
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Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
Land Rover Sudbury*
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Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
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1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
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Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
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Business
As Gloria Larson departs
Bentley, she is optimistic
about women in society
PAGES B9-13
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Mass. companies drop Ingraham show advertising
Healey wants consumer electricity market shut down
Magnolia Bakery opening draws Quincy Market crowd
Metro
B
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E F R I DAY, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E T R O
Yawkey Way name change decision postponed
AGAINST
By Milton J. Valencia
GLOBE STAFF
A city commission postponed a vote Thursday
on the controversial question of whether to rename Yawkey Way after a spirited, two-hour
hearing that grappled with the city’s complicated
racial past and present.
Long-time powerbrokers such as philanthropist Jack Connors and former Red Sox CEO John
Harrington turned emotional as they highlighted
the work of the late Tom Yawkey, the former Red
Sox owner who left hundreds of millions to charity. Leaders of the city’s black community, such as
state Representative Byron Rushing and Tanisha
Sullivan, president of the city’s NAACP, pointed
out Yawkey’s reputed bigotry.
And still others who weighed in on the controversial petition to rename the two-block strip by
Fenway Park called for a more cordial resolution
— a way to celebrate Yawkey’s charities while rec-
‘If you were to change the
name of a street based on
what happened 50 years ago,
you’d have to change the
name of virtually every street
in the city of Boston.’
KEITH MCDERMOTT, former longtime head of
the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center
ognizing the Red Sox’ history of discrimination.
Perhaps donating his foundation’s money to urban baseball programs? Or erecting the team’s
first statue of a black player?
FOR
‘We see it as a way to clarify
our vision for the future.’
DAVID S. FRIEDMAN, lawyer for Red Sox
“If you were to change the name of a street
based on what happened 50 years ago, you’d have
to change the name of virtually every street in the
city of Boston,” said Keith McDermott, the former
longtime head of the Reggie Lewis Track and
Athletic Center, who said Boston’s leaders should
focus more on closing the economic gap between
Boston’s white and black communities.
“Is the name change of a street going to
change a wealth gap?” McDermott asked.
So goes the challenges before the Boston Pub-
lic Improvement Commission, a city board that
monitors the use of public ways and is charged
with deciding on the petition to change a street
name. The street’s abutters support the renaming
of Yawkey Way, and yet commissioners acknowledge they are deciding something far more significant.
The commission agreed Thursday to delay a
vote until April 12, giving members and the public another two weeks to digest a question that,
all agreed, involves more than a street name
change.
“This quite clearly is a different petition, and a
different conversation,” said Chris Osgood, Boston’s chief of streets, transportation, and sewer,
and the chair of the commission, who pointed
out street name petitions are typically unanimously supported, and attract little public interest.
YAWKEY, Page B5
Some jails
aiding the
addicted
Healey
weighs in
on police
records
US attorney’s inquiry
misses sheriffs’ efforts
to comply with ADA
Calls on Baker for
transparency fix
By Matt Rocheleau
By Felice J. Freyer
GLOBE STAFF
GLOBE STAFF
Attorney General Maura
Healey is calling on Governor
Charlie Baker to take more
leadership in addressing transparency concerns raised in the
wake of revelations that payroll
records for an entire State Police division were not disclosed
for years.
“It’s time that the Baker administration take a leadership
role on this issue,” Healey told
reporters Thursday. “I hope
they take these concerns — that
are rightly raised — seriously,
and move quickly to address
these issues. Again, this is
about a culture. This is about
accountability. This is about
transparency. It needs to be
fixed, and it needs to be addressed now.”
Her comments come after a
Globe report Monday detailed
how neither the State Police
nor the Massachusetts Port Authority had publicly filed information on payouts for Troop F,
which patrols Logan International Airport and some other
areas, with the state comptroller since 2010.
The 140-person Troop F division — which accounted for
more than $32.5 million in
spending last year alone — has
been on the payroll of Massport, an independent public
agency that owns and operates
Logan, some of the Seaport,
and two other airports outside
Boston. But the troopers are
State Police employees, and the
troop’s operations are overseen
by State Police commanders.
Baker on Monday said he
was shocked to learn the records hadn’t been disclosed, an
act he called “clearly deliberate.”
“It’s clear that the State Police is going to have to work
back some of that public credibility that’s been sacrificed by
some of these really bad actors,” Baker said, adding that
his new head of the State Police, Colonel Kerry A. Gilpin,
has taken steps that “are directly designed to address some of
those issues.”
Officials from the State Police and Massport announced
Tuesday that in the future,
Troop F will be paid directly by
State Police, and Massport will
reimburse the law enforcement
agency in an effort to ensure records are properly disclosed.
On Thursday, Baker spokesman Brendan Moss said in response to Healey’s comments
that “Baker agrees more work
remains to strengthen the pub-
US Attorney Andrew E. Lelling’s investigation into the treatment of addicted prisoners focuses on the Department of Correction, which runs the
state prisons where people stay for long
sentences.
But the investigation apparently
does not extend to facilities, run by
county sheriffs, where people are incarcerated for shorter periods of time —
jails where inmates await trial or houses of correction where they stay for sentences of less than 2½ years.
Kevin Maccioli, spokesman for Middlesex County Sheriff Peter J. Koutoujian, who is president of the Massachusetts Sheriffs Association, said he was
unaware of any sheriff receiving a letter
from Lelling like the one he sent to
state officials this week questioning the
treatment of addicted prisoners.
But the 13 county jails are where inmates typically go immediately after arrest, and where they will go into withdrawal from drugs if they are addicted.
And notably, a couple of the county facilities are working to address the issue
raised in Lelling’s letter.
Lelling wrote to state officials that
he was investigating whether the state
was violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by requiring inmates who
have been taking medications for addiction to stop once incarcerated. Prisons in Massachusetts, and in most other states, do not provide the two main
medications to treat addiction — buprenorphine and methadone — because those same drugs can also be
smuggled in for illicit use.
But an inmate who arrives at the
Franklin County House of Correction in
Greenfield will be treated differently.
Since 2016, Franklin County inmates who have been taking prescribed
buprenorphine have been able to keep
taking the medication while incarcerated there. A total of 157 inmates have received the drug since the program
started.
HEALEY, Page B4
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Herbie Ziskund’s (right) lefthanded glove now sits in a display case at Newton North High School. The
Newton native offered the glove for then-President Obama to use on Opening Day in 2010 (below).
Taken out to the ballgame
A mitt in the White House? Ex-Newton player can explain.
Capital source, B5.
By Joshua Miller
M
R Barbara Bush drops in with her
any are the iconic
old class at Smith College.
items that may
make their way into
R House won’t release nondisclosure
Barack Obama’s
agreements.
presidential library
in Chicago: a pen used to sign the
cial assistant and body man, Reggie
Affordable Care Act; his inaugural
Love, who knew Ziskend’s love of
speech as the country’s first black
the game. The president, Love said,
president; the photograph of a stoneeded a lefthanded glove — and
ic Obama in the Situation Room as
quickly.
Navy SEALs hunted Osama bin
Obama was soon going to throw
Laden.
out the ceremonial first pitch at NaBut one item that will not be
tionals Park in Washington, D.C. —
there is Herbie Ziskend’s baseball
100 years after President William
glove.
Howard Taft threw out the first
It sits in a less august place of
pitch on Opening Day of the WashPABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/AP/FILE 2010
honor: a glass case at Newton
ington Senators’ 1910 season, beNorth High School.
ginning a storied tradition.
Ziskend, a left-handed Newton native, got the
On the pitcher’s mound, Obama put on a Chicago
glove from his father when he started to play ball at
White Sox cap (eliciting boos), slipped on Ziskend’s
Bigelow Middle School. He oiled it regularly, slept
well-worn Rawlings glove, and wound up.
with it under his mattress occasionally, and used it for
The president threw the ball the distance, even
games throughout his high school baseball days.
though the trajectory veered well high and to the
Years later, when he was a young aide in the White
left.
GLOVE, Page B5
House in 2010, Ziskend got a call from Obama’s speGLOBE STAFF
JAILS, Page B4
Gaming chief says Wynn builds casino on ‘at-risk basis’
By Mark Arsenault
GLOBE STAFF
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Stephen Crosby, head of the Gaming Commission, urged it
to proceed with Wynn Resorts’ Everett casino as planned.
The Massachusetts Gaming
Co m m i s s i o n’s a ge n d a f o r
Thursday’s meeting at first
looked pretty typical: a construction update by one of the
state’s casino licensees, a review of some flow charts, and a
PowerPoint-style presentation
on hiring plans for a gambling
resort — all important topics, if
a little dry.
But there was an elephant
in the room: the commission’s
ongoing investigation into sexual misconduct allegations
against former Wynn Resorts
chief executive Steve Wynn,
and whether the company
building a $2.4 billion gambling palace in Everett is suitable to run a casino in Massachusetts.
The commission’s chairman, Stephen Crosby, addressed the tension in conducting ordinary business while
such a high-stakes investigation hangs in the balance.
“I have said repeatedly that
for now we must proceed with
the Everett project as planned
and be thoughtfully mindful of
the thousands of people whose
jobs may be affected by this is-
sue and of the long-term economic benefits envisioned by
this project,” Crosby said at the
start of the meeting. “But as a
practical matter . . . Wynn Resorts proceeds with this project
on an at-risk basis.”
In other words, don’t assume how the investigation
may turn out by how the commission handles its regular
business. The commission’s
staff hopes to complete the investigation into the company’s
handling of the accusations
against Steve Wynn by summer.
WYNN, Page B4
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
TheMetroMinute
GET SMART
GLOBE STAFF FILE/2017
At the end of a
cleaner river run
By Margeaux Sippell
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Renata von Tscharner is retiring after 18
years as president of the Charles River Conservancy, which she founded in 2000 with the
goal of cleaning up the river and its banks to
make the Charles swimmable. The Globe recently spoke with von Tscharner, who was
trained as an architect and urban designer in
Switzerland, about her tenure and the challenges the conservancy faces moving forward.
This interview has been edited and condensed.
Q: What were some of your proudest moments leading the
Charles River Conservancy?
A: The opening of
the skate park [in
East Cambridge] in
fall 2016 was extraordinary because land
that was contaminated, that was not used
RENATA VON
by anybody, suddenly
TSCHARNER:
was a place where
“The Charles already athletes could gather
and practice their
is an enormous
asset, but it could be sport. It created a
so much more.’’
space that helped
people do something
healthy and active in the city.
Another thing I’m very proud of — 14 years
ago, together with [the performance group]
Revels, we started something called RiverSing. It’s a celebration of the autumnal equinox, where thousands of people gather in late
September at the Weeks Bridge to sing songs,
and then a boat comes down the river . . . it’s
an absolutely magical celebration [that]
brings out the beauty of the river.
Q: What were the most challenging parts
of your job?
A: There are always a lot of challenges
when you work with different agencies. We
work both with the Department of Conservation and Recreation and also with the Mass
DOT on bridges. Whenever you work with different agencies to coordinate all those efforts,
it’s a challenge.
Q: Do you swim in the Charles yourself?
A: I certainly do — on those official “City
Splash” days. I’m also a windsurfer, so sometimes I fall in. It’s a wonderful experience to
swim in the Charles and look up at the greenery and up at the State House. We’ve picked a
location for a swim park [downriver from the
Museum of Science] where there’s no conflict
with boats and there’s parkland next to it. It’s
a wonderful place to swim.
Q: What kind of challenges does the new
executive director, Laura Jasinski, face?
A: We have a new capital project that we’re
working on, and that is to create a swim park
— we will raise the money to build it, just as
we did with the skatepark. The water is swimmable most of the time, but there is no approved location for swimming, so the conservancy has been offering what we call “City
Splashes” one day a year. So far 1,200 people
have participated and many are on the waitlist. So that will be a major effort, where people can swim not just one day a year, but for
the [whole] season.
Q: Do you have any plans for retirement?
A: I have a granddaughter in Paris, so I
guess I will see her a bit more often! I deeply
care about [Boston], about the river, so my
main goal is to make sure that the organization is ready for the new leader. I will remain
on the advisory board — I will not be in the office after my retirement gala on June 2, but I
will definitely be available if Laura can use my
help.
Q: What do you see as the future of the
Charles?
A: I think that the Charles already is an
enormous asset, but it could be so much more
than it is today. This is a very densely settled
city, so to have this publicly owned land in the
middle is an extraordinary chance. The potential of the river is not fully used yet, so that’s
what the conservancy will be working on — to
make the river and parkland on both sides
more accessible and attractive, to have places
where people can sit in restaurants along the
river. There are many improvements, and
we’ve only just started.
Margeaux Sippell can be reached at
margeaux.sippell@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @MargeauxSippell.
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
A DOGGY DO-SI-DO — A pair of pups played at Boston’s North End Dog Park at DeFilippo Playground Wednesday.
A furry farewell
By Laney Ruckstuhl
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
During his 23 years of life, Paul, the oldest living tree kangaroo in the
United States, was a favorite of visitors to Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence.
The Matschie’s tree kangaroo was euthanized Tuesday
after having complications from heart issues that reduced
his quality of life, the zoo said on Facebook. He was 23
years, 5 months, and 5 days old. The median life expectancy for a tree kangaroo in a zoo is about 13 to 14 years.
“It is a great testament to the love and care Paul received from his keepers and veterinary staff that he lived
such a long life,” said Jeremy Goodman, the zoo’s executive director, in the statement.
Paul was born at the Miami Metro Zoo in October 1994
and moved to the Providence zoo in 1997.
Matschie’s tree kangaroos are endangered due to habi-
tat loss from logging, oil drilling, and mineral mining, Goodman said in the
statement. The species is native to Papua New Guinea and the nearby island of Umboi.
Roger Williams spokeswoman Diane Nahabedian said Paul was “really
charismatic” and loved meeting guests who visited the zoo.
“He would climb on the structures and do what tree
kangaroos do,” Nahabedian said. “We do keeper talks every day, and Paul was a really good ambassador for the
Matschie’s tree kangaroo species. They’re a cute species
when you see them close.”
Guests hoping to see a tree kangaroo aren’t out of luck
— there are two others living at the zoo that are under age
10, Nahabedian said. “Most of us aren’t going to get to see
a tree kangaroo up close in the wild,” she said.
Laney Ruckstuhl can be reached at laney.ruckstuhl
@globe.com.
AROUND THE REGION
B O STO N
School committee OK’s
largest budget in history
The Boston School Committee Wednesday night
unanimously approved a $1.1 billion budget
proposal for the next school year, representing
an approximately $16.5 million increase over
this year’s spending level. School officials touted
the budget as the largest in city history, but it
does not come with any high-profile initiatives.
Instead, it sustains funding for existing programs, such as extended school days and more
rigorous courses at 16 lower-grade schools.
Mayor Martin J. Walsh is expected to include the
spending plan in his overall city budget proposal
that he will present to the City Council next
month.
WO O DS H O L E
Troubled ferry cleared
for return to service
The Steamship Authority said Thursday morning that a ferry boat taken out of service the day
before — the Martha’s Vineyard — had been
cleared to resume carrying passengers. And an
authority spokesman said a status update on the
ferry Woods Hole, a second vessel that remains
out of service, will be available soon. The Martha’s Vineyard was taken out of service Wednes-
day morning; the Woods Hole was already out of
service. The authority said Wednesday afternoon
that a breaker on the Martha’s Vineyard’s electrical panel needed to be replaced. The vessel has
encountered several problems since returning
this month from a five-month, $18 million overhaul. The authority also said it had chartered a
SeaStreak vessel for walk-on passengers through
Monday to be able to provide service every hour.
C O L RA I N
Man says he will invest
prize in retirement
A Colrain man this week became the second $15
million grand-prize winner in the Massachusetts
State Lottery’s “200X” instant game, the lottery
office said Thursday. Gary Herzig chose the cash
option of $9.75 million. He said he plans on using his winnings to invest in his retirement, the
lottery office said in a statement. F.L. Roberts, a
gas station in Greenfield, sold Herzig the $30
ticket and will receive a $50,000 bonus for its
sale.
W E ST E R LY, R. I .
Firefighters rescue boy
from burning home
Firefighters have helped save a 15-month-old
from a home fully engulfed in flames. Authori-
ties said the fire broke out at a Westerly residence around 7 p.m. Tuesday. Police said a man
and two boys, ages 6 and 7, escaped through a
window, but the boys’ younger brother was still
inside when firefighters arrived. Firefighters rescued the boy from a playpen near where the
flames broke out. Police Captain Shawn Lacey
said the boy with hospitalized with first and second-degree burns, but he is expected to survive.
Investigators believe the fire started from a pan
with cooking oil that was left on the stove. (AP)
GORHAM, N.H.
Teacher gave teen knife
for civics skit, police said
A New Hampshire teacher who gave a high
school student a knife for a civics lesson skit to
discuss searches and seizures and the Fourth
Amendment was put on paid administrative
leave and has since resigned, according to authorities. The student’s father reported the incident at Gorham Middle and High School, according to WMUR-TV. Gorham Police Chief Pi
Cyr said Wednesday the teacher approached the
17-year-old student for the skit and gave him the
bi-fold knife. The student put it in a lunchbox.
Other students weren’t aware of that when the
two went through the skit. Knives are banned at
the school. Police said the teacher made a poor
decision, but no criminal charges will be filed.
Several petitions are being circulated to bring
the teacher back to work. (AP)
POLICE BLOTTER
R VICTIM IDENTIFIED A man who was stabbed
to death in Dorchester on Sunday has been identified as 33-year-old Anthony Young, police said.
Young, of Boston, was “suffering from apparent
stab wounds” when police found him early in the
morning, Boston police said in a statement on
Thursday. He died at a hospital. Boston police
are investigating the incident. Anyone with information is asked to call (617) 343-4470.
R DIRT BIKE ARRESTS Three men from Roxbury accused of recklessly riding dirt bikes were
arrested Thursday night inside a UHaul storage
facility where officers had followed them, Boston
police said in a statement. Giovanny Martinez,
23, Jason Martinez and Najja Joseph, both age
24, were charged with disorderly conduct, negligent operation of a motor vehicle, and operating
after a license was suspended/revoked, the statement said. They will also be issued citations for
“committing an array of auto law violations” in
the area of Rusfield Street and Massachusetts Avenue, police said. Officers were conducting an
ongoing investigation when they spotted the trio
riding the bikes. They followed them to the storage facility, where the riders tried to flee on foot.
R CAR CRASH A Waltham man was arrested
for drunken driving after he rammed into a utility pole and a home in Newton Thursday morning, injuring himself and his passenger, State Police said. Julio Savedra Alonzo, 23, was driving in
a 2004 Toyota Matrix around 1:40 a.m. when he
lost control of the car on Boylston Street and
crashed into the pole and the home’s porch steps,
police said in a statement. Aside from the brick
staircase, the building did not suffer extensive
damage, said Newton Fire Lieutenant Eric
Fricke. “The utility pole was completely snapped
in half and Eversource needed to install a new
one,” Fricke said. The passenger had to be extricated by Newton firefighters. Alonzo, who suffered minor injuries, and his passenger, who sustained more serious injuries, were taken to Beth
Israel Deaconess Medical Center, State Police
said. No further information about the passenger
was immediately available. Minutes before barreling into the Newton house, Alonzo allegedly
sped through a construction site on Boylston
Street in Brookline and did not stop for police
when signaled to do so, said Brookline Police
Deputy Superintendent Michael Gropman.
R GUN BUST Police arrested a Camden, N.J.,
man on Wednesday after finding him in a Dorchester apartment with a loaded pistol and several bags of marijuana, officials said. Officers arrested Freddie Evans, 30, at 385 Blue Hill Ave. at
5:55 p.m. during an investigation, Boston police
said in a statement. While executing a search
warrant of the area, officers seized a loaded .40caliber Hi-Point Smith and Wesson pistol with
seven live rounds of ammunition, three live .40caliber rounds, one .40-caliber spent cartridge,
several plastic bags of marijuana, and various
drug paraphernalia consistent with the illegal
sale of drugs, police said. Evans was charged
with unlawful possession of a firearm, unlawful
possession of ammunition, unlawful possession
of a firearm with an obliterated serial number,
and possession with intent to distribute Class D
drugs.
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B3
OVER AND OVER AGAIN
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Different days, different bridges, different gaits but the effects were remarkably similar. On the left, joggers cross a bridge on the Charles River Esplanade; pedestrians
walked into a setting sun on the foot bridge under the Zakim-Bunker Hill Bridge.
Case of mystery judge is solved
Boston grand jury indicts
Ga. man in lottery scam
Portrait found to be Lemuel Shaw, 1800s chief justice
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
The verdict is in.
Court officials have determined that a portrait of a previously unnamed judge hanging outside the chambers of
Chief Justice Ralph D. Gants of
the state Supreme Judicial
Court depicts the Honorable
Lemuel Shaw, who held Gant’s
position from 1830 to 1860.
The break in the case, which
befuddled and fascinated local
historians, was announced in a
statement Thursday from the
SJC, which had issued a rare
public appeal in February for
information leading to the
judge’s identity.
“ T hanks to the forensic
work of Trial Court Assistant
C h i e f Co u r t O ff i c e r Ke i t h
Downer and our Director of
Education and Public Programs Cliff Allen, we have been
able to identify the subject of
the portrait as the Honorable
Lemuel Shaw in his younger
years,” Gants said in the release. “The remarkable level of
interest among members of the
public and over 40 submissions
received is an example of civic
engagement at its best.”
Shaw, the father-in-law of
Herman Melville, ruled on a
range of issues during his tenure, including slavery, school
segregation, business law, and
labor relations. He ruled in an
1836 case that a slave brought
voluntarily into Massachusetts,
then a free state, was effectively free from bondage, an opinion cheered by abolitionists.
“It is upon these grounds we
are of opinion, that an owner
of a slave in another State
where slavery is warranted by
law, voluntarily bringing such
slave into this State, has no authority to detain him against
his will, or to carry him out of
the State against his consent,
for the purpose of being held in
slavery,” Shaw wrote at the
time, according to a transcript
of the ruling posted on the University of Florida website.
But his ruling in another
case in 1851 upheld the Fugitive Slave Law.
“Although personally opposed to slavery, Shaw believed
that it was ‘too deeply interwoven in the texture of society to
be wholly or speedily eradicated,’ ” said an entry on the website of the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery. “In
1851 he issued an opinion supporting the constitutionality of
t h e Fu g i t i v e S l a v e L a w o f
1850.”
In seeking the identity of
the mystery judge, court officials received a total of 42 informed guesses, the SJC said.
The tipsters named 24 people,
but not all of them had served
on the SJC, according to the
statement.
Ten guesses came in for
Shaw; four for Thomas Dawes;
three for Samuel Sumner Wilde; two for Ethan Allen Greenwood; two for Simeon Strong;
two for Levi Lincoln; and two
for Marcus Morton Sr. to round
out the top tier, the SJC said.
Officials credited Downer
with cracking the case by employing his expertise in forensic science and deep knowledge of antiques and fine art.
Downer made a visual inspection of the painting and
did limited research without
seeing any of the informed
guesses, the SJC said. Then he
really drilled down.
“He found that the very basic and obvious features narrowed the painting to a small
field of study,” the statement
said. “Following the visual examination, he conducted a UV
light absorption or reflection
test using a UV-A (blue or black
light), which allowed him to
see things the naked eye cannot. Next, bright yellow and
bright white light tests allowed
those present to see the loop
script initials ‘L S’ become visible on the top rail of the
stretcher.”
Call it the smoking gun.
T he equipment Downer
used will be shown at an event
April 10 at the John Adams
Courthouse, where Gants will
attach Shaw’s nameplate to the
portrait. The 10 people who
guessed Shaw are also invited
to attend, the statement said.
They’ll be treated to a tour
of the historic courthouse, led
by Allen.
“While it may be impossible
to conclude with 100% certainty the true identity of the justice, the court believes that the
most persuasive arguments,
confirmed by the forensic repor t that the cour t has received, point to a younger Lemuel Shaw whose portrait was
painted before or around the
time he was appointed to the
Supreme Judicial Court in
1830,” the release said.
Legal luminaries praised
Shaw during a 1930 ceremony
in Massachusetts marking the
100th anniversary of his appointment to the SJC.
Frederick H. Chase, speaking on behalf of the Boston Bar
Association, was particularly
effusive, according to a transcript of his remarks posted to
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The agonizing search by relatives of Joseph Brancato, the
Marine recruit who disappeared in November, is now
over, as authorities said Thursday that his body was discovered in the brush alongside Interstate 95 in Canton on
Wednesday.
Brancato, 21, was reported
missing Nov. 18 in Roslindale’s
Me n d e l s s o h n S t r e e t a r e a ,
where he was living and training with ex-Marine Gunnery
Sergeant Frank Lipka, a Marine
recruiter who has since been
named as a person of interest in
what was once a missing-person case.
Norfolk District Attorney
Michael Morrissey’s office confirmed in a statement that
Brancato’s remains had been
recovered and that an autopsy
was performed Thursday.
“Cause and manner of death
remain undetermined and under investigation pending further testing,” the statement
said. “The matter remains under active investigation by Massachusetts State Police detectives attached to the Norfolk
District Attorney’s Office working with Boston Police detectives.”
Lipka was the sole recruiter
at the Roslindale office where
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(888) 694-5623
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Lemuel Shaw headed the
state Supreme Judicial
Court from 1830 to 1860.
the state website.
“The master of his century
was Lemuel Shaw,” Chase said.
“ . . . No one has done more to
help us to keep our faith in the
living force and beauty of the
common law. He gave enduring assurance to society that judicial pronouncements come
as the result of profound
knowledge, earnest human
consideration, and deliberate
conviction.”
I r o n i c a l l y, C h a s e a l s o
gushed over portraits of the
celebrated judge.
“His portraits even, so familiar to us all, carry conviction of his power,” Chase said.
“As we look at his likeness we
are reminded of the legendary
Greek who, when asked how
she knew that Hercules was a
god, replied, ‘ because I was
content the moment my eyes
fell upon him.’ ”
Travis Andersen can be
reached at
travis.andersen@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@TAGlobe.
A federal grand jury in Boston on Wednesday indicted a
Georgia man for his alleged role
in a multimillion-dollar lottery
scam that targeted elderly people in Massachusetts and elsewhere, according to US Attorney Andrew E. Lelling’s office
and court records.
Peter Anthony Chin Jr., 34,
was indicted on one count of
conspiracy to commit mail and
wire fraud, Lelling’s office said
in a statement. An arraignment
date hasn’t been set. His public
defender declined to comment.
Prosecutors allege Chin was
part of a scheme that targeted
people who ranged in age from
approximately 69 to 90 between 2012 and 2017, including a 72-year-old Taunton man
who got fleeced to the tune of
$93,633.33 in 2013, according
to filings and Lelling’s office.
“The victims were informed
via phone, email and mail that
they had won millions of dollars in a lottery, but that they
had to pay the taxes on their
purported winnings before the
funds could be released,” the
statement said. “Chin’s co-conspirators directed the victims to
mail or wire funds to Chin or to
his associates. Chin kept a portion of the funds for himself
and then distributed the rest as
directed by his co-conspirators,
including sending significant
amounts to Jamaica.”
Multiple victims across the
United States have lost at least
$2 million, according to an affidavit filed in the case in February.
A co-conspirator, Wilder
Vladimir Merelan, was convicted in US District Court in Bos-
ton in 2016 of wire and mail
fraud conspiracy for serving as
the “U.S. conduit of more than
$800,000 in fraudulent lottery
proceeds from victims in the
U.S. to co-conspirators in the
United States and in Jamaica,”
the affidavit said.
Merelan, 31, was sentenced
to 51 months in prison and ordered to pay $733,998.99 in
restitution, court records show.
He’s serving his time in New
Jersey and slated for release in
June of 2020, according to the
Federal Bureau of Prisons.
Prosecutors said in a court
filing in Merelan’s case that the
consequences for the victims
were severe.
“One victim’s son reported
that because of this scheme,
which ensnared his 90+ year
old father and his handicapped
mother, the family had to take
various protective steps in response, resulting in diminished
responsibility and control for
his father over his own life,” the
filing said. “His father had to be
moved into an assisted living
facility because the family was
concerned that someone might
go to the father’s home and
hurt him, the family took over
his finances, and the father lost
a measure of his ‘freedom.’ ”
Merelan’s lawyer, Brian J.
Griffin, had requested a 30month sentence for his client.
“From the outset of this case
Vladimir has expressed to his
loved ones . . . how truly sorry
he is and how he hopes to one
day truly make up for the pain
he has caused people so undeserving of it,” Griffin wrote in
his sentencing memorandum.
Travis Andersen can be reached
at travis.andersen@globe.com.
Body found in Canton identified as missing recruit
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Wednesday's Powerball
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Powerball 21
Jo s e p h B ra n c at o w a s p r o cessed, Ed Buice, a spokesman
for the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, has said in an email. Brancato was living with
Lipka in the hopes of passing
the physical tests necessary to
become a Marine, his family
has said.
In Winthrop, an emotional
scene played out outside the
two-story home on Otis Street
where Brancato had lived with
his mother and grandmother
before moving in with Lipka.
“I’m never going to be the
same; I lost my son,” his mother, Kim Brancato, said, before
becoming overcome with emotion.
Her son, she said, “was like
the mayor of the city.”
“He knew everybody,” she
said.
Brancato attended a vocational high school, was a fisherman, and badly wanted to be a
Marine, she said.
“He was Joey,” she said.
“There was no one like Joey.”
When she learned that a
body had been found off a highway in Canton on Wednesday,
Brancato said she went into
shock.
“I still had a little bit of hope
that Joey would walk through
the door and this would all be
just a big nightmare,” she said.
His grandmother, Midge
LeBaron, said the family is
BPDNEWS.COM
Joseph Brancato was first
reported missing Nov. 18 in
Roslindale.
looking for answers. she said
she prayed every night for her
grandson while he was missing.
“It’s hard right now . . . because I don’ t know how he
died,” she said. “You know, I
don’t want him to have suffered.”
Kim Brancato said her son
wanted to “fight for this country and he hooked up with the
wrong person,” meaning Lipka.
Lipka was arraigned on
Monday in West Roxbury Municipal Court on charges unrelated to Brancato’s disappearance, and bail was set at
$10,000 cash.
He was charged with assaulting a pizza delivery driver
during an incident last September.
A police report filed in the
case said homicide detectives
learned of the alleged assault of
the driver as part of an “ongoing investigation . . . in relation
to the disappearance of Joseph
Brancato.”
In the weeks since Brancato
disappeared, Boston police and
the Naval Criminal Investigative Ser vice have searched
wooded areas along Turtle
Pond Parkway in the Stony
Brook Reservation in Hyde
Park on multiple occasions.
Brancato’s body apparently
was discovered by happenstance. According to Morrissey’s office, a motorist pulled
over in the breakdown lane and
saw the remains Wednesday afternoon on a curving part of I95 where the highway branches
off from I-93.
While on the side of the
road, the person saw “human
remains a modest distance off
the roadway.” Responding State
Police troopers confirmed the
sighting and oversaw the recovery of Brancato’s remains.
Travis Andersen of the Globe
Staff contributed to this report.
John R. Ellement can be
reached at
ellement@globe.com.
Metro
B4
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
Healey calls on Baker for police payroll transparency
uHEALEY
Continued from Page B1
lic’s trust in the department
and is working with Colonel
Gilpin as she undertakes a
thorough review of the State
Police.”
Moss added that Gilpin
“continues to review accountability and supervisory policies
to determine opportunities to
improve the department’s performance.”
On Thursday, Healey’s office
said it has been following the
Troop F issue. But the attorney
general’s comments earlier in
the day put the onus on Baker.
“I put this up to the Baker
administration to lead on this,”
she said. “Ultimately, it’s going
to be up to the Baker administration to make sure that issues
are addressed and problems
are fixed.”
Healey’s office is, however,
investigating another State Police matter: alleged overtime
abuses in Troop E, a division
that covers the Massachusetts
Turnpike.
“That is a criminal investigation that is ongoing and we’ll
continue to be available to take
any referrals,” Healey said
Thursday.
Earlier this month, State Police announced that, following
an internal audit, 20 active
troopers and one retiree face
sanctions in an overtime abuse
scandal in Troop E. The troopers allegedly logged hours they
did not work, with some alleged violators putting in for as
many as 100 no-show shifts.
Nine of those troopers were
suspended without pay, nine
more retired, and one was kept
on active duty, officials have
said. Another trooper had been
suspended without pay and
was under investigation in another matter prior to the announcement of the internal audit’s results.
State Police have faced a series of controversies in recent
months, including the department’s handling of the arrest of
a judge’s daughter — and revelations that the former colonel
ordered the scrubbing of the report — which has sparked at
least three separate probes.
Even as Healey pressed Baker to address transparency issues, her office is fighting to
keep some State Police records
hidden from public view.
Healey’s office is working
with the State Police to fend off
‘I put this up to the
Baker administration to
lead on this. Ultimately,
it’s going to be up to the
Baker administration to
make sure that issues
are addressed and
problems are fixed.’
MAURA HEALEY, State attorney general
two public records suits
brought by the Globe.
In the first case, the State
Police denied a request for reports of police caught driving
drunk and a judge accused of
stealing a $4,000 watch. A su-
perior court judge ruled that
the records are public, but Healey’s office has appealed.
In the second case, State Police denied a request for state
troopers’ dates of birth. The
Globe requested the informa-
tion in order to look up the
driving records of officers who
had been involved in crashes.
The Registry of Motor Vehicles
generally requires both a name
and date of birth to look up an
individual’s driving record because so many drivers share the
same name.
State Auditor Suzanne
Bump has also launched an audit into the State Police’s Commonwealth Fusion Center, the
department’s antiterrorism data clearinghouse.
Globe correspondent Matt Stout
and Todd Wallack of the Globe
staff contributed to this report.
Matt Rocheleau can be reached
at
matthew.rocheleau@globe.com
. Follow him on Twitter
@mrochele.
Jails aim to comply with ADA
uJAILS
Continued from Page B1
Starting this year, Franklin
County has expanded its program, also initiating buprenorphine treatment for opioid-addicted inmates. Today 27 of the
facility’s 225 inmates are receiving buprenorphine, according to Assistant Superintendent Ed Hayes.
B u t i t ’s n o t c h e a p . T h e
county spends about $350,000
a year to provide buprenorphine to about 30 people each
day, Hayes said. A $100,000
state grant awarded last year
helps but doesn’t pay all the
bills, he said.
The Hampden County
House of Correction was also a
recipient of a $100,000 state
grant to improve the treatment
of addicted prisoners. There,
LEGAL NOTICES
opioid-addicted inmates receive tapered doses of buprenorphine to treat withdrawal symptoms. They also
can start on buprenorphine
shortly before release.
Other county facilities — including the biggest, Middlesex
County — have expressed interest in a long-acting, injected
form of buprenorphine. As a
once-a-month shot, this new
formulation would not be susceptible to illicit use and would
be easier to administer. But although the Food and Drug Administration approved it late
last year, the drug is not yet
widely available.
L elling ’s le tter also addressed another group of people affected by prison policy:
those who are detained, not
because they’ve committed a
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
crime, but because a judge has
civilly committed them for addiction treatment, under Section 35 of state law.
More than half the men civilly committed for addiction
treatment in Massaschusetts
are sent to a facility run by the
Department of Correction,
where they do not receive buprenorphine or methadone.
Lelling’s letter emphasized
that these men, like the inmates, are also protected by
the ADA.
Women and some men who
are civilly committed go to facilities that offer all addictiontreatment medications.
Felice J. Freyer can be reached
at felice.freyer@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@felicejfreyer
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
SUPERIOR COURT
DEPARTMENT OF THE TRIAL COURT
BUSINESS LITIGATION SESSION
C.A. No. 17-0925
NOTICE OF PENDENCY AND PROPOSED SETTLEMENT
OF CLASS ACTION AND HEARING ON PROPOSED SETTLEMENT
TO: ALL PERSONS WHO ORDERED MEDICAL RECORDS FROM A HOSPITAL LOCATED IN MASSACHUSETTS
AND WHO HAD THEIR MEDICAL RECORDS REQUEST(S) PROCESSED BY SERVICE PROVIDER CIOX HEALTH,
LLC OR HEALTHPORT TECHNOLOGIES, LLC (collectively, “CIOX”) AT ANY TIME FROM MARCH 27, 2013 TO
MARCH 5, 2018 (THE “CLASS” AND EACH MEMBER THEREOF A “CLASS MEMBER”).
On March 27, 2017, Plaintiff, Danielle Baldassari, filed the above-captioned class action litigation against CIOX on behalf of all Persons whose medical records requests to Massachusetts Medical Providers
were processed by CIOX from March 27, 2013 to March 5, 2018. The lawsuit alleged violations of Massachusetts statute G.L. chapter 111, section 70, including that CIOX overcharged for postage when
responding to certain medical records requests made by Class Members to the Massachusetts Medical Providers for which CIOX provided release of information request processing services. The parties
have agreed to settle the litigation on the following terms. Given the impracticality of sending checks for, on average, $0.33, to thousands of medical records requestors, the parties agreed that CIOX will
make a payment to the class settlement fund in the amount of $72,370.95, the calculated overcharge between March 27, 2013 and February 1, 2018, to Health Law Advocates, a Massachusetts-based non-profit
that provides assistance to low income residents for health care access. Additionally, CIOX has affirmed that it does not and will not charge amounts for postage in excess of that allowed by Massachusetts
statute G.L. chapter 111, section 70, when processing and responding to medical records requests. Lastly, CIOX has agreed to pay plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees and expenses not to exceed $33,500. All such
amounts will be paid by CIOX and not out of the class settlement fund.
The Massachusetts Superior Court preliminarily approved this settlement on March 22, 2018. A final hearing will be held on May 31, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. (the “Settlement Hearing”), before the Court in Courtroom
1017, Suffolk County Superior Court, Three Pemberton Square, Boston, MA 02108, at which the parties will ask the Court to: (i) determine whether, for settlement purposes only, the Court’s preliminary certification
of the non-opt-out Class, pursuant to Massachusetts Rule of Civil Procedure 23, should be made final; (ii) determine whether the Court should grant final approval of the proposed Settlement on the terms
and conditions provided for in the Parties’ settlement agreement as fair, reasonable, and adequate, and in the best interest of the Class; (iii) determine whether judgment should be entered dismissing the
litigation with prejudice; (iv) consider the application of Plaintiffs’ Counsel for attorneys’ fees and reimbursement of expenses; and (v) hear and determine other matters relating to the proposed Settlement.
Any claims you might have against CIOX for non-compliance with Massachusetts statute G.L. chapter 111, section 70 in connection with CIOX’s processing of medical records requests at any
time from March 27, 2013 to March 5, 2018, will be forever released and dismissed as a result of this Settlement and the Court’s approval of it.
If you have any objection to this Settlement, you must deliver it in writing to the lawyers involved and the Court by no later than April 23, 2018, to the following three addresses: (1) Civil Clerk’s Office,
Massachusetts Superior Court, Three Pemberton Square, Boston, MA 02108; (2) John R. Yasi, Forrest, Lamothe, Mazow, McCullough, Yasi & Yasi, P.C., Two Salem Green, Suite 2, Salem, MA 01970 (counsel for
plaintiff); and (3) Javier F. Flores, Manion Gaynor & Manning, LLP, 125 High St., Boston, MA 02110 (counsel for CIOX), Your written objection must include the following case name and civil action number:
Baldassari v. CIOX Health, LLC., 17-0925-BLS2, and must state the details, including: (1) the date of your medical records request that was processed by CIOX; (2) the basis of your objection; (3) whether
you intend to appear at the hearing; (4) the identity of your counsel, if any; and (5) a list of any witnesses or exhibits you intend to present. You are invited to appear at the final settlement hearing on
May 31, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. before the Court in Courtroom 1017, Suffolk County, Superior Court, Three Pemberton Square, Boston, MA 02108; please note, however, that in order to be heard, you must timely
submit the written objection referenced immediately above.
For the full details of the lawsuit, the claims that have been asserted by Plaintiff, and the terms and conditions of the Settlement, you may refer to the papers on file with the Court. You or your attorney may
examine the Court’s files during regular business hours of each business day at the office of the Clerk of Court, Civil Clerk’s Office, 12111 Floor, Suffolk County Superior Court, Three Pemberton Square, Boston, MA 02108.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
501 Boylston St., Suite 5100
Boston, MA 02116
10:00 a.m.
The Oversight Council is proposing a FY2019 direct appropriation budget of $27,431,406. Up to $1,563,617 of
the proposed amount has been designated for the operations of the Betsy Lehman Center for Patient Safety and
Medical Error Reduction which was reestablished within
CHIA in 2012. Further, the Oversight Council is proposing
a $750,000 retained revenue account to help fund the
development, operation and maintenance of the All Payer
Claims Database (APCD).
Individuals who notify the Oversight Council of their intention to provide oral comment at the hearing will be afforded an earlier opportunity to speak. Interested parties may
register to speak by emailing CHIA-Legal@state.ma.us. All
others will be allowed to sign up to provide comments on
a first-come basis the day of the hearing.
Written comments will also be accepted at the same email
address through Monday, April 30, 2018.
Individuals who are unable to submit written comments
by email should mail the Center for Health Information
and Analysis, 501 Boylston Street, Suite 5100, Boston, MA
02116, Attention: Oversight Council. Written comments
must be postmarked by Monday, April 30, 2018.
This hearing is being held pursuant to the provisions of
M.G.L. c. 12C, §2A.
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Commonwealth of
Massachusetts
Fall River District Court
Bristol, ss CIVIL DOCKET
# 1732CV000890
RE: Webster Bank, N.A.
v. Leslie Belovitch and
George J. Belovitch
ORDER OF NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
TO: George J. Belovitch,
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN,
GREETING:
WHEREAS a civil action
has been begun against
you in our District Court
by Webster Bank, N.A.
wherein it is seeking to disperse Surplus funds from
the foreclosure of the property located at 703 Meridian
Street, Fall River, MA 02720.
We COMMAND YOU if
you intend to make any defense, that on May 25, 2018
or within such further time
as the law allows you do
cause your written pleading
to be filed in the office of
the Clerk of Court at the Fall
River District Court at 186 S.
Main Street, Fall River, MA
02720 in the County of Bristol, in said Commonwealth,
and further that you defend
against said suit according
to law if you intend any defense, and that you do and
receive what the Court shall
order and adjudge therein.
Hereof fail not, at your
peril, or as otherwise said
suit must be adjudge and
orders entered in your absence.
It appearing to this Court
that no personal service
of the Compaint has been
made on the defendant,
the attorneys for the Plaintiff having sworn that after
diligent search they can find
no one upon whom they
can lawfully arrange for
service and whose present
whereabouts is unknown, it
is ORDERED that notice of
this suit be given to them
by pubishing in the Boston Globe, a newspaper of
general circulation in Massachusetts once a week for
3 successive weeks, the last
publication to be at least 20
days before said return day.
Dated at Fall River this 22nd
day of March, 2018.
Hon. Gilbert J. Nadeau, Jr.
Justice
John C. O’Neil
Clerk of the Court
NOTICE OF WAITING LIST
OPENING AND LOTTERY
MAPLE COMMONS APARTMENTS located at 60 School
Street, Springfield, MA 01105
is re-opening its Waiting List
and will be taking applications
for HUD Section 8 Very Low
Income Waiting List for One,
Two & Three Bedroom apartments. Applications will be
available from April 09, 2018
to May 18, 2018. You may
obtain applications in several
ways during the application
period:• In person at the
Management Office located
at 60 School Street, Springfield, MA 01105 • Print the
Application from our website
at
www.firstresourcecompanies.com• At the Springfield Central Library, 220
State Street, Springfield, MA
01105• Outing Park Apartments, 37 Saratoga Street,
Springfield, MA 01105If you
or anyone assisting you
cannot use these methods,
please call 413-734-7771/
MA Relay 711 and ask that
an application be mailed to
you. Maple Commons Apartments has existing waitlists.
Completed original applications received/post marked
by the lottery deadline will
be entered into a lottery to
determine placement order
of lottery applicants to be
added to these existing lists.
The lottery location and date
and time is: JUNE 6, 2018 AT
11:00AM AT OUTING PARK
APARTMENTS, 37 Saratoga
Street Springfield, MA 01105
Applicants are not required
to attend the lottery; however applicant presence is
most welcome. AFTER THE
LOTTERY, THE WAITING LIST
WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL
FURTHER NOTICE.
Capucine
Montessori
School (Arlington, MA) admits students of any race,
color, national and ethnic
origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or
made available to students
at the school. It does not
discriminate on the basis
of race, color, national and
ethnic origin in administration of its educational
policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan
programs, and athletic and
other school-administered
programs. For more information visit www.
capucinemontessori.org
Scandal still dogs Wynn’s Everett project
uWYNN
DANIELLE BALDASSARI,
on behalf of herself and all other similarly situated, Plaintiff,
v.
CIOX HEALTH, LLC, Defendant.
The Health Information and Analysis Oversight Council
(Oversight Council) of the Center for Health Information
and Analysis (CHIA) will hold a public hearing on CHIA’s
upcoming fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget. The purpose of this
hearing is to afford all interested members of the public the
opportunity to provide oral and/or written comment on the
Oversight Council’s proposed budget for CHIA.
Robert DeSalvio, president of the Wynn Boston Harbor casino, says a rebranding is likely.
Continued from Page B1
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
SUFFOLK, SS.
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Notice of Hearing
The MA Department of Labor
Standards will conduct a license hearing on Friday, April
13, 2018 at the Charles F.
Hurley Building, 19 Staniford
Street, Second Floor, Boston,
Massachusetts, pursuant to
M.G.L. Ch. 140, Sec 46D and
454 CMR 24.00 concerning
the following application at
the designated time:
10:00 a.m.
Sweet Dreams
LLC, Kathleen Hall, Owner, of
45 Spruce St., Suite B, West
Barnstable, MA to conduct
an employment agency in the
name of Sweet Dreams LLC,
at the same address.
The owner or owners of
the employment agency, or
if the employment agency
is owned by a corporation,
the president and treasurer
thereof, shall attend the hearing. M.G.L. Ch. 140, Sec 46C
and 46D; 454 CMR 24.05.
Interested parties or duly
authorized agents thereof,
may submit signed written
protests specifying why the
license should not be issued, to Laura Hoitt, Licensing Manager, Department of
Labor Standards, 19 Staniford
Street, Second Floor, Boston,
MA 02114
Date of Notice: March 27,
2018
Notice is hereby given by
Auto Service and Tire, Inc.
1590 Blue Hill Avenue,
Mattapan, MA 02126
Pursuant to the Provisions
of GL C255, Section 39 that
on April 25 ,2018, there will
be a private sale of the following motor vehicles to
satisfy our garage keepers
lien thereon for Storage,
Towing Charges, Care and
Expense of Notices and Sale
of the following
1) KM8SC73DX2U152401
Hyundai Sante Fe
Randy Rosario 28 Oliver
Street #3 Milford, MA
01757
2) 1N4AL21E48C271645
Nissan Altima
Luis Angel Ruiz-Padilla
185 Washington Avenue
Chelsea MA 02150
3) 5J6RW2H84HL020686
Honda Crv
David S. Dodge 100 Calumet Street Boston, MA
02120
This Notice Is Given Under the Provisions of
GLC.255 Section 39a
The commission’s enforcement arm launched its investigation after The Wall Street
Journal in January reported
that dozens of people who have
worked for Wynn Resorts “told
of behavior that cumulatively
would amount to a decadeslong pattern of sexual misconduct by Mr. Wynn,” including
acts of exposing himself and
pressuring employees for sex.
T he stor y stated that in
2005, Wynn forced a manicurist at his Las Vegas casino into
sex and later paid her a $7.5
million settlement. Steve Wynn
has denied wrongdoing, saying,
“The idea that I ever assaulted
any woman is preposterous.”
The Journal this week reported allegations that company managers “enabled” Steve
Wynn’s conduct.
Wynn resigned from the
company in February and re-
cently sold his stock in Wynn
Resorts.
The Everett casino has been
named Wynn Boston Harbor.
Robert DeSalvio, president of
the Everett resort, told reporters the company is “absolutely
considering a rebranding of the
project” with a new name.
Mark Arsenault can be reached
at mark.arsenault@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@bostonglobemark.
Judge dismisses Exxon lawsuit
Oil and gas giant wanted to stop states’ investigation
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — A federal
judge on Thursday dismissed a
lawsuit by Exxon Mobil Corp.
aimed at stopping an investigation by New York and Massachusetts officials into whether the oil giant misled investors and the public about its
knowledge of climate change
and how the issue could affect
its business.
‘‘Exxon’s allegations that
the AGs are pursuing bad faith
investigations in order to violate Exxon’s constitutional
rights are implausible and
therefore must be dismissed
for failure to state a claim,’’
Manhattan US District Judge
Valerie Caproni said.
In her ruling, Caproni described Exxon’s lawsuit as
‘‘running roughshod over the
adage that the best defense is a
good offense.’’
Exxon sued Massachusetts
Attorney General Maura Healey and her New York counterpart, Eric Schneiderman, in
2016 after they subpoenaed
documents about Exxon research into the role of fossil fuels in climate change.
The global oil and gas company called their investigation
politically motivated and accused the Democrats of trying
to take away the company’s
free-speech rights on an important issue.
Healey late Thursday said
called it a ‘‘turning point’’ in
their investigation and a ‘‘victory for the people.’’
“Exxon has run a scorched
earth campaign to avoid answering our basic questions
about the company’s awareness of climate change. Today,
a federal judge has thoroughly
rejected the company ’s ob-
‘Exxon has run a
scorched earth
campaign to avoid
answering our
basic questions.’
MAURA HEALEY,
Massachusetts attorney general
structionist and meritless arguments to block our investigation,’’ Healey said.
Schneiderman said he was
pleased with the court’s decision.
The Texas-based Exxon said
it was reviewing the judge’s
decision and evaluating its
next steps.
‘‘We believe the risk of climate change is real and we
want to be part of the solution,’’ Exxon said in a statement. ‘‘We’ve invested about
$8 billion on energy efficiency
and low-emission technologies
such as carbon capture and
next generation biofuels.’’
The states have been investigating since 2015 whether
Exxon misled the public and
investors about the reality of
climate change, including the
ways it could impact the company’s finances. They’re also
examining whether Exxon
properly valued its reserves
based on what its scientists
projected.
Exxon claimed the evidence
of political motivation includes meetings the attorneys
general had with environmental groups and Schneiderman’s
claim at the press conference
that Barack Obama’s environmental agenda was being opposed by “morally vacant”
forces.
The judge said the company offered “extremely thin allegations and speculative inferences.”
“ The factual allegations
against the AGs boil down to
statements made at a single
press conference and a collection of meetings with climatechange activists,” she wrote.
“Some statements made at
the press conference were perhaps hyperbolic, but nothing
that was said can fairly be read
to constitute declaration of a
political vendetta against Exxon.”
Material from Bloomberg
News was used in this report.
Boston’s best jobs
The Careers Section of The Boston Sunday Globe
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
B5
CAPITAL SOURCE
Barbara Bush updates
her Smith classmates
Even former first ladies like
to keep up with their college
girlfriends.
“I am still old and still in
love with the man I married 72
years ago,” Barbara Bush wrote
in the March edition of the
alumnae magazine for Smith
College, a women’s school in
Northampton.
Her dispatch leads the
“Alumnae Lives Update” section for the class of 1947, and
she is among
10 class members who provided updates
for the Smith
Alumnae
Quarterly’s
latest edition.
She
dropped out
Barbara Bush of the college
in 1944 and
married George H.W. Bush two
weeks later, according to a
White House biography. Smith
claims her as a member of the
class of 1947, a school spokeswoman said.
A full-page photograph of
Bush sitting in a garden in
Kennebunkport, Maine, also
appears in the publication,
with a quote from the matriarch of the American political
dynasty.
“I have had great medical
care and more operations than
you would believe. I’m not sure
God will recognize me; I have so
many new body parts! Also,
George Bush has given me the
world. He is the best — thoughtful and loving,” she says.
Her note says she is “very
active” in the Barbara Bush
Foundation for Family Literacy.
Her husband, the former president, keeps busy with his foundation, Points of Light, she
writes.
“All of our children are
working and serving others in
their own way, along with my
17 grandchildren. I am very
proud of them,” she writes.
Bush didn’t name any of her
famous children or grandchildren or mention that her husband and son George W. Bush
once occupied the White
House.
Bush is among two first ladies to attend Smith. The other,
Nancy Reagan, graduated in
1943.
LAURA CRIMALDI
Fire victim known for
huge campaign fraud
A rascal ghost of politics
past has passed — nearly unnoticed.
He was only identified as an
85-year-old man who burned
himself up in his Andover
apartment when he tried to
smoke while using his oxygen
machine. But he was much
more than that in the rogues
gallery of the Massachusetts
political world.
In fact, he went to jail in the
1990s for what federal prosecutors said at the time was the
“largest case of campaign fraud
in the history of this country”
— one that some have speculated may have dashed any hopes
for then-Senator Paul Tsongas
to keep his presidential campaign alive.
Nick Rizzo, whose fund-raising skills took him into the inner political circles around
President Jimmy Carter, Vice
President Walter Mondale, and
top Democratic state and national leaders of the late 1970s
and 1980s, died March 8.
His gruesome death caught
the attention of the major media outlets, from the Globe to
Boston’s leading television stations and even his hometown
newspaper, the Lawrence Eagle-Tribune.
But none of the brief stories
mentioned his notorious career, his rise from a middleclass Lawrence neighborhood
to the political backrooms of
the State House and hallways
of Capitol Hill, where he demonstrated an extraordinary
skill as a campaign fund-raiser.
There are no references to
his equally extraordinary crash
in 1992, when federal authorities found out he had embezzled $1 million in campaign
funds. He had faded from public view, nearly a quarter century since his release from prison
and his return to his adopted
town of Andover, where he
could be seen bagging groceries at the local supermarket.
Hardest hit in the scam was
Tsongas, whose political career
— two-term congressman, US
senator, and major presidential
contender — was built in good
part around his relationship
with Rizzo.
It was seen as the most oddball alliance in Massachusetts
politics — a strait-laced, serious-minded, and reserved
Tsongas, whose reputation was
built on his honesty and demands for clean government,
tying himself closely to a fasttalking, slick money man who
vacationed in Las Vegas casino
hotels and loved to flash his
money.
“It was oddball, but it
worked,’’ said one leading Merrimack Valley Democrat, who
marveled at the relationship’s
years of success.
The scandal broke out just
months after Tsongas, who
died in 1997 after a long battle
with cancer, had dropped out
of the 1992 Democratic presi-
MATT MCCLAIN/WASHINGTON POST
MUTUAL SUPPORT — Leah Lipke, 16, (left) and Ashley Keene, 16, from Cypress Bay High School in Weston, Fla.,
embraced as they gathered with other Florida students outside the Capitol during last Saturday’s March for Our Lives.
dential campaign, a crowded
race in which he emerged as
Bill Clinton’s most serious obstacle to the party’s nomination.
A major drag on Tsongas’s
campaign was his lack of
funds. What he didn’t know:
Rizzo was hitting up donors —
nearly $1 million, according to
prosecutors — to pay off gambling debts. He was also
charged with obtaining,
through his Tsongas connections, $2.8 million in fraudulent bank loans.
The scheme blocked Tsongas from not only using the
money but also qualifying for
matching federal funds for his
campaign.
Rizzo was left with few if
any political friends, and he
alienated Tsongas when he
feigned having liver cancer after he was confronted with the
charges. He pleaded guilty in
federal court and was sentenced in October 1993 to 52
months in federal jail.
FRANK PHILLIPS
House won’t release
nondisclosure deals
Amid the fractious floor debate this month over its sexual
harassment policies, the House
of Representatives passed a
measure waiving any previous
nondisclosure agreements —
effectively releasing former employees from their pacts with
the chamber to keep silent.
That doesn’t mean the
House itself is prepared to divulge details.
The top attorney for the
chamber — which enjoys an exemption from public records
law — is refusing a Globe request for copies of any of the 33
written agreements that House
Speaker Robert A. DeLeo said
have been signed since 2010.
DeLeo has repeatedly said
the House has not executed any
agreement to settle an allegation of sexual harassment in
that time. And his office has
said that the total number he’s
disclosed includes 15 agreements the House signed with
employees who were laid off
more than eight years ago.
Details beyond that have
been hazy. State Representative
Diana DiZoglio has said, and
DeLeo confirmed, that she
signed one in 2011 when she
was a departing aide. But the
Methuen Democrat has
charged that House attorneys
have been “very careful in
choosing not to document
within the language of these
agreements why certain employees have had to sign them.”
She also described them “silencing tactics” used to “cover
up misdeeds.”
DeLeo has denied that. The
Winthrop Democrat pointed
specifically to language that he
wrote, and that the House
passed March 15, waiving all
past nondisclosure agreements
as evidence that the charge was
“irresponsible speculation.”
That brings us to the agree-
ments themselves. DeLeo has
called their use “part of doing
business,” and he’s defended
the House’s decision to not ban
them outright, saying it gives
victims an avenue of confidentiality.
In denying copies of the severance agreements and any accompanying nondisclosure
clauses, House counsel James
C. Kennedy pointed to the Legislature’s blanket records law
exemption in a succinct e-mail
to the Globe.
“Therefore,” he wrote in the
two-sentence response, “your
request is denied.”
MATT STOUT
Sean Spicer to raise
funds for Diehl
State Representative Geoff
Diehl cochaired President
Trump’s campaign in Massachusetts and has been one of
the White House’s most vocal
supporters in the state.
Now, it’s Diehl’s turn to get
help from Trump — or at least
his former mouthpiece.
Sean Spicer, the short-lived
and often-parodied former
White House press secretary,
will headline a $250-per-head
fund-raiser downtown next
month for Diehl’s US Senate
campaign.
Holly Robichaud, a Diehl
spokeswoman, said the campaign is hoping to draw 50 to
60 people to the April 12 event
at the Union Oyster House,
where Spicer is billed as a “spe-
cial guest” speaker.
Spicer endured a tumultuous six-month stint as Trump’s
first press secretary before
leaving last year amid an internal dispute with newly named
communications director Anthony Scaramucci, whose own
10-day tenure was famously
shorter.
A Rhode Island native,
Spicer resurfaced in New England last fall, serving as a visiting fellow at Harvard University’s Institute of Politics.
But even that stint wasn’t
without controversy: Spicer reportedly kept his events off the
record, prompting student criticism that they were secretive
— if not ironic, given his former gig. Harvard officials said
Spicer wasn’t the only visiting
fellow to have off-the-record
talks.
That Diehl, a Whitman Republican, is enlisting Spicer’s
help isn’t surprising. Diehl was
cochairman of Trump’s 2016
campaign locally and attended
Trump’s inauguration the following January.
Diehl is now a strong favorite to win next month’s Republican convention endorsement.
He’s running in the GOP primary against Beth Lindstrom,
a longtime activist in state Republican Party politics, and
wealthy businessman John
Kingston.
The winner will challenge
incumbent Democrat Elizabeth
Warren this fall.
MATT STOUT
Obama aide
from Newton
passed mitt
to president
uGLOVE
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Continued from Page B1
Yawkey Way name
decision postponed
uYAWKEY
Continued from Page B1
The commission, made up
of city department heads appointed by Mayor Martin J.
Walsh, has handled only six
such petitions since 2011.
Walsh has not publicly taken a
position on the issue.
Red Sox principal owner
John Henry, who also owns The
Boston Globe, sought the name
change in Februar y, citing
Yawkey’s and the Red Sox’ reputation for discrimination.
The team’s legal counsel, David S. Friedman, told commissioners Thursday that the organization sees the street name as
a sign of “an era marked by racial discrimination,” posted “on
the front door of our baseball
stadium.”
“We see it as a way to clarify
our vision for the future,” he
said.
Yawkey, for whom the street
was named in 1977, owned the
team from 1933 until his death
in 1976. During his tenure, the
Red Sox were the last Major
League Baseball club to integrate, finally calling up their
first black player, infielder
Pumpsie Green, in 1959. That
was 12 years after Jackie Robinson broke baseball’s color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers.
Walter C. Carrington, a former ambassador to Nigeria and
Senegal, who investigated the
Red Sox as a member of the
Massachusetts Commission
Against Discrimination in
1959, said he found a pattern of
bigotry under Yawkey’s leadership. He said Robinson once
told him directly that “Tom
Yawkey was the biggest bigot in
professional baseball.”
Sullivan, of the NAACP, said
Boston’s race relations have im-
“We have some very serious
work to do in race relations,”
said Connors, the well-known
philanthropist, though he added, “The way to solve or address
the problem is not to change
the name of this street and another street and another street,
it is to bring these great resources together. The Boston
Red Sox, and the Yawkey Foundation . . . let’s bring these parties together.”
Ziskend got his glove back
and used it to play a softball
game a few days after the historic throw.
But later that month, Ziskend and housemates Eric Lesser and Jake Levine — two other young White House officials
(and now a Massachusetts
state senator and a California
lawyer, respectively) — were
sitting talking about the pitch.
“Herbie was like, ‘the president used my glove and we
should treat it accordingly,’ ”
recalled Levine.
“And it started to take on a
life of its own.”
Ziskend said he considered
donating it to the Obama library, or perhaps even the National Baseball Hall of Fame in
Cooperstown, N.Y. But after
speaking with his one-time
Newton North High School
baseball coach, he decided his
alma mater is where it belonged.
“I’m glad,” Ziskend, 32,
said, “that glove is resting at
Newton North.”
Valencia can be reached at
milton.valencia@globe.com.
Joshua Miller can be reached
at joshua.miller@globe.com.
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
Public Improvement Commission chair Chris Osgood listened during Thursday’s hearing.
proved in the years since
Yawkey, and she called on the
commission to seize on that
progress and erase his name
from a public street.
“We are not the same Boston,” she said. “Today our government, through you . . . has
the chance to demonstrate
that.”
But supporters of Yawkey,
and specifically the family’s
foundations, argued that the
change will forever tarnish the
Yawkey name and be inseparable from his charity work. They
say Tom Yawkey changed his
ways, moved past a time that
bigotry was pervasive across
baseball and the country, and
that he should be remembered
for the totality of his work.
The list of speakers included
the board members of several
organizations who received
funding from the Yawkey Foundations; the nonprofit director
who worked with his wife, Jean,
who said her name will also be
unfairly tarnished; and a college junior who benefited from
the Yawkey Scholars Program.
T h e
B6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
BY CITY AND TOWN
ACTON
CUMMING, Donald L.
TRUDEAU, Paul J.
ARLINGTON
SOUL, Harwood E.
ASHLAND
TREDDIN, Mary L. (Palkey)
ATTLEBORO
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie (McNulty)
BELLINGHAM
CONROY, Thomas J.
BELMONT
SOUL, Harwood E.
VAILLIANT, Lucille Ann (Rizzo)
BOSTON
CAROTA, John A.
GOLDMAN, Robert
BOXBOROUGH
CUMMING, Donald L.
BOXFORD
NALLY, James P.
BROOKLINE
CONROY, Thomas J.
GARSTON, Barbara
GOLDMAN, Robert
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie (McNulty)
MARTIN, James R.
BURLINGTON
McSWEENEY, Joan (Clifford)
CANTON
ADAMS, John P.
FEENEY, Thomas R.
CHESTNUT HILL
GARSTON, Barbara
CONCORD
TRUDEAU, Paul J.
DEDHAM
CONROY, Thomas J.
D’SOUZA, Hector
DORCHESTER
MACDONALD, Therese M. (Donovan)
McSWEENEY, Joan (Clifford)
EAST BOSTON
VIGNOLI, Paul Joseph, Sr.
EVERETT
CHAMBERS, Charlie
GRILLO, Pamela M. (Decuyke)
O’BRIEN, James J.
HYDE PARK
FEENEY, Thomas R.
IPSWICH
MOSES, Gerald B.
LUNENBURG
CLAPP, Catherine H.
LYNN
FULCHINI, Pasquale
LYNNFIELD
FESTA, Joseph Sr.
MALDEN
CHAMBERS, Charlie
MARBLEHEAD
LAPPIN, Marion
MATTAPAN
PANTOJA, Felicia Maria
ROWLEY
MOSES, Gerald B.
SALEM
NALLY, James P.
SAUGUS
FULCHINI, Pasquale
VAILLIANT, Lucille Ann (Rizzo)
SOUTH DENNIS
PANTOJA, Felicia Maria
STONEHAM
McMANUS, Geraldine M. (Moynihan)
SUDBURY
TRUDEAU, Paul J.
SWAMPSCOTT
GRILLO, Pamela M. (Decuyke)
TEWKSBURY
HOURIHAN, Sally Jane (Anderson)
WAKEFIELD
CHAMBERS, Charlie
FONDINI, Carmella A. (D’Alessandro)
LeSAFFRE, Donald W.
Of Weymouth, passed away
March 28, 2018. David was
born and raised in
Fitchburg by the late Ernest and Jennie
Chambers with his sister and brother.
He earned his Bachelors Degree in
English from UMass Amherst and went
on to study Philosophy at Harvard
University. David served in the United
States Air Force and Reserves during
the Vietnam era, then later worked at
The U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research,
Development & Engineering Center
where he retired from in 2012. He was
an avid reader, loved salt water fishing,
playing guitar, enjoyed watching old
movies, writing screenplays, and
spending time with his family. He
adored his two grandchildren and loved
being their proud Papa.
Loving and proud father of Jessica
M. Finn and her husband James M. of
Norwell. Cherished Papa of Ava M. and
James M. Finn.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend the visiting hours on
Saturday 2-4 PM in the Pyne Keohane
Funeral Home, 21 Emerald St. (off Central St.), HINGHAM, followed by his
funeral service at 4 PM in the funeral
home. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made in memory of Ernest David
Chambers to The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (www.
michaeljfox.org). See www.Keohane.
com or call 1-800-Keohane for directions and online condolences.
Of Needham, March 26, 2018. Beloved
husband of Veronica (Cornell) Conroy.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held
in St. Bartholomew Church on Monday,
April 2nd at 10 am. Complete notice to
follow on Sunday. For more information, please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Of Saugus, 94, on March 24, former
Proprietor of Fulchini’s Bakery in Lynn.
He was the loving husband of the late
Maria (Savignano) Fulchini. Son of the
late Michele & Annunziata Fulchini.
Beloved father of Nancy Gauthier of
Peabody, Louise Duda & her husband
Richard of Newburyport. Cherished
grandfather of Debbie Grigas & her
husband Bobby of Pembroke, Mark
Gauthier & his wife Stephanie of Wilmington, Janet Mahoney of Seabrook,
NH, Joseph Mahoney of Kingston, NH.
Also predeceased by several brothers
and sisters. Relatives & friends are
invited to attend visiting hours in the
Bisbee-Porcella Funeral Home, 549
Lincoln Ave., SAUGUS on Monday
11- Noon. Followed by a Funeral
Service in the Funeral Home at Noon.
Entombment Holy Cross Mausoleum,
Malden. For directions & condolences
www.BisbeePorcella.com.
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home
(781) 828-0811
WALTHAM
TRUDEAU, Paul J.
WELLESLEY
ZAKHER, Fouad M.D.
CAROTA, John A. “Jack”
WEST ROXBURY
D’SOUZA, Hector
WESTON
TRUDEAU, Paul J.
WESTWOOD
MARTIN, James R.
WEYMOUTH
CHAMBERS, Ernest David
CLAPP, Catherine H.
“Helen”
WILMINGTON
CAROTA, John A.
HOURIHAN, Sally Jane (Anderson)
WINCHESTER
GOLDMAN, Robert
WINTHROP
CHAMBERS, Charlie
GRILLO, Pamela M. (Decuyke)
NATICK
ZAKHER, Fouad M.D.
MAINE
CAROTA, John A.
NORTH ANDOVER
McSWEENEY, Joan (Clifford)
Of Canton, passed away
March 27th. Beloved
husband of the late Janet
(Dwyer). Brother of Carol Bosader of
Easton, Betty Callahan of Norwood,
Dottie Austin of S. Attleboro, Vincent
Adams of Easton, and Timothy Adams
of RI. Also survived by 10 nieces and
nephews. Visiting hours at the Dockray
& Thomas Funeral Home, 455
Washington St., CANTON, Tuesday 6-8
pm. Funeral Mass at St. John the
Evangelist Church, Canton, Wednesday
morning at 10:30. Burial Knollwood
Memorial Park, Canton. John was an
Army Veteran of the Vietnam Era.
Donations may be made in his memory
to the Canton Veteran’s Service
Department, 801 Washington St.,
Canton, MA 02021. For complete
obituary and guestbook see www.
dockrayandthomasfuneralhome.com
REVERE
FESTA, Joseph Sr.
CONNECTICUT
GARSTON, Barbara
McMANUS, Geraldine M. (Moynihan)
NALLY, James P.
NONANTUM
TREDDIN, Mary L. (Palkey)
FULCHINI, Pasquale
READING
MACDONALD, Therese M. (Donovan)
McMANUS, Geraldine M. (Moynihan)
MELROSE
FONDINI, Carmella A. (D’Alessandro)
LeSAFFRE, Donald W.
McMANUS, Geraldine M. (Moynihan)
VIGNOLI, Paul Joseph, Sr.
NEWTON
CONROY, Thomas J.
TREDDIN, Mary L. (Palkey)
ZAKHER, Fouad M.D.
CONROY, Thomas J.
PEABODY
CHAMBERS, Charlie
FULCHINI, Pasquale
NALLY, James P.
OUT OF STATE
NEWBURYPORT
FULCHINI, Pasquale
CHAMBERS, Ernest David
NORTH READING
McSWEENEY, Joan (Clifford)
VAILLIANT, Lucille Ann (Rizzo)
MEDFORD
VAILLIANT, Lucille Ann (Rizzo)
NEEDHAM
CONROY, Thomas J.
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie (McNulty)
ZAKHER, Fouad M.D.
ADAMS, John P.
MISSISSIPPI
MOSES, Gerald B.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie (McNulty)
NALLY, James P.
VAILLIANT, Lucille Ann (Rizzo)
NEW YORK
GARSTON, Barbara
GOLDMAN, Robert
TENNESSEE
MOSES, Gerald B.
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72 years, a resident of Wells, ME formerly of Wilmington, MA, died Sunday,
March 25, 2018 following a courageous
battle with pancreatic cancer. He was a
well-known civil engineer in the Boston
area for many years. Beloved husband
of Linda A. (Colson) Carota of Wells;
beloved father of Jacqueline Carota of
Plymouth, MA and Elizabeth Carota of
New Bedford, MA; beloved stepfather
of Sharon Hansen and her fiance
Nick Martone of North Andover, MA;
beloved brother of Catherine Capuano
and her husband Nicholas of Stoneham, MA; beloved grandfather of Justin, Sarah, Jeremy, Alyssa and Macayla.
Services will be private. Should friends
desire, donations in John’s memory can
be made to the JT Fortin Foundation
for Autism, www.jtfortinfoundation.
org. Arrangements are in care of Bibber
Memorial Chapel, 67 Summer St., KENNEBUNK, ME 04043.
www.bibberfuneral.com
CHAMBERS, Charlie
“Buddy”
66, of Peabody and formerly of Everett,
died Wednesday, March 28 while surrounded by his family. Visiting hours
on Monday from 5:00 until 8:00 PM
at the Conway, Cahill-Brodeur Funeral
Home, 82 Lynn St, PEABODY. His Funeral Mass will be on Tuesday at 10:30
AM at St. Adelaide’s Church, Lowell St.,
Peabody, to which relatives and friends
are kindly invited to attend. Burial will
be in Puritan Lawn Memorial Park,
Lake St, Peabody. For directions and
on-line obituary, visit
www.ccbfuneral.com
Funeral Services
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
D’SOUZA, Hector
FEENEY, Thomas R.
GARSTON, Barbara
Of Chestnut Hill, was entered into
rest on Wednesday, March 28, 2018.
Beloved wife of 42 years to Matthew
Garston. Dear daughter of Molly
Gordon and the late Jordan Kauffman,
and step-daughter of the late Milton
Gordon. Devoted mother of Stacy
Garston and son-in-law to be Dustin
Tupper. Loving sister of Michael
Kauffman (Robin), Phyllis Kauffman,
and Richard Gordon (June Swanson).
Barbara taught in the Waltham school
system in grades K through 3 for 40
years and her recent hobbies included
several artistic endeavors. Services will
be held at the Sharon Memorial Park
Chapel, 40 Dedham Street, Sharon, MA
02067 on Friday, March 30, 2018 at 10
A.M. with interment to follow. Family
will be receiving guests at Barbara’s late
residence immediately following services on Friday, as well as Saturday and
Sunday. In lieu of flowers, donations
in Barbara’s memory may be made to
the American Liver Foundation. www.
liverfoundation.org
Stanetsky Memorial Chapel
www.stanetskybrookline.com
Loving Mother,
Grandmother,
and Great
Grandmother
94 of Lunenburg, died peacefully
Wednesday afternoon March 28, 2018
in Leominster Crossing surrounded
by her loving family. Helen was born
August 9, 1923 in Somerville, MA, a
daughter of the late Joseph and Margaret (Hession) Hession and has lived
in Lunenburg since 1965. Her beloved
husband William I. Clapp died in 1985.
Helen will be remembered by three
sons, William F. Clapp and his wife
Nancy L. Hansen of Stratham, NH, Paul
D. Clapp and his wife Mary Nardone of
Southboro, MA and Edward S. Clapp
and his wife Maureen of Leominster,
MA; two granddaughters, Lindsay
Walker of New Mexico and Jill Gnip of
Littleton, CO; two great-grandchildren,
Corrine Walker and Andrew Gnip;
one son-in-law, Norman Winchester
of Leominster and several nieces and
nephews. Helen was predeceased by
her daughter Margaret T. Winchester
and two brothers, Martin J. and William C. Hession. Helen was a long-time
member of St. Boniface Church of
Lunenburg, the Lunenburg Women’s
Club and the Lunenburg Senior Center.
She was an avid golfer, bowler and a
talented bridge player. Helen also was a
great sports fan. Helen loved to spend
time with her family. We remember her
fondly and with respect. She taught us
how to “live on the bright side of life”.
She won hearts with her gentle being,
her apple pie and her witty Irish quips.
She made the world around her a better
place. Funeral services will be held on
Saturday, March 31, 2018 at 11 a.m.
in the Lunenburg Chapel of SawyerMiller-Masciarelli Funeral Homes, 763
Massachusetts Ave. A visiting hour will
be held in the funeral home prior to the
service from 10-11AM. Private Burial
will be held in South Cemetery in the
Spring. In lieu of flowers memorial
contributions may be made in Helen’s
memory to the Lunenburg Senior Center, The Eagle House Supporter’s Inc.,
25 Memorial Drive, Lunenburg, MA
01462. For more information please
visit www.masciarellifamilyfuneralhomes.net. John F. Masciarelli, Walter
C. Taylor and James M. Hebert, funeral
directors.
Funeral Services
1310 complete
617 782 1000
617-524-1036
87, of Boxborough, March 28, 2018.
Beloved husband of 59 years to Jacqueline A. “Jackie” (Barry) Cumming.
Father of Steven & wife Lynn, Alan &
late wife Kate and Scott & wife Connie
Strittmatter. Brother of Ruth Gibbs,
Kenneth & wife Nancy and the late
John Cumming. Also survived by 5
grandchildren, Megan, Bryan, Justin,
Benjamin and Brett. Visiting hours
Monday, April 2nd 5-8 p.m. at Acton
Funeral Home, 470 Massachusetts
Ave (Rt. 111) ACTON. Funeral Service
Tuesday, April 3rd 10 a.m. at United
Church of Christ Congregational, 723
Massachusetts Ave., Boxborough, MA
01719, followed by burial in South
Cemetery, Burroughs Rd., Boxborough.
Donations in Memory of Donald may
be made to United Church of Christ
Congregational. For obituary, directions
or to leave an online condolence visit
www.actonfuneralhome.com
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
617-323-8600
$
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
CUMMING, Donald L.
Of Dedham, March 26, 2018. Visiting
hours Monday 4-8 pm. Complete notice
to appear on Sunday, April 1, 2018.
Affordable Cremation
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
Eaton Funeral Home
781-444-1631
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
GOLDMAN, Robert
Of Canton passed away
March 26th. Father of
Douglas Feeney and his
wife Petya of Chatham. Grandfather of
Noah Feeney. Brother of James Feeney
of Abington, Joseph Feeney of Marlboro
and the late David Feeney. Also
survived by many nieces and nephews.
Tom was a longtime friend of Bill W.
Visiting hours at the Dockray &
Thomas Funeral Home, 455 Washington St., CANTON, Monday morning
from 8:30 to 10:15 am, followed by
Funeral Mass at St. Anne’s Church, 90
W. Milton St., Hyde Park, Monday
morning at 11 am. Burial VA National
Cemetery, Bourne, Monday afternoon
at 2 pm. Army Veteran of the Vietnam
Era. Donations may be made in his
memory to the Canton Veteran’s Service
Department, 801 Washington St.,
Canton, MA 02021. For complete
obituary and guestbook see www.
dockrayandthomasfuneralhome.com
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home
(781) 828-0811
FESTA, Joseph Sr.
On March 26, 2018. Visitation will be
held Monday, April 2, 2018 from 4:00
pm to 8:00 pm. Complete notice to follow. For guest book please visit
www.Buonfiglio.com
Paul Buonfiglio & Sons-Bruno
Funeral Home
FONDINI, Carmella A.
(D’Alessandro)
Of Wakefield, March 27. Wife of the
late Giordano E. Fondini. Mother of
Susan A. Hodgkins and husband Frank
of Melrose and Maria A. Fondini of
Wakefield and her late infant daughter
Patricia A. Fondini. Grandmother of
Matthew Antetomaso and wife Mary
of Methuen and Jordan Antetomaso of
Georgetown. Great Grandmother of
Gianna Claire Antetomaso. Also survived by several nieces and nephews.
Funeral from the McDonald Funeral
Home, 19 Yale Ave., WAKEFIELD, on
Tuesday at 9am followed by a Funeral
Mass in St. Florence Church, 47 Butler
Ave., Wakefield, at 10am. Interment,
Forest Glade Cemetery, Wakefield.
Visitation for relatives and friends at
the Funeral Home on Monday from
4-8pm. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to the St.
Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501
St. Jude Pl., Memphis, TN 38105. For
obit, guestbook & directions,
www.mcdonaldfs.com.
79, of Winchester, MA, passed away
March 29, 2018. Beloved husband of
Brenda (Chasen), Dear brother-in-law
of Edith Chasen-Cerreta and Brendan
Cerreta of Woodhaven, NY, loving
cousin of Rachel and Jesse Halpern
of Jacksonville, FL, Alice Rabin of
Silver Spring, MD, Elizabeth Socolow
of Lawrenceville, NJ, Chet and Betty
Sussman of Delray Beach, FL, Glady
and Joe Trommer of Kew Gardens, NY
and their wonderful children. Retired
insurance administrator, man of many
talents and interests. Was involved in
music all his life and played the bassoon most recently with the Metrowest
Symphony Orchestra. Captain in the
US Air Force and served in Vietnam.
Navigator on B52 and FB111s. As an
active Toastmaster, achieved the level
of District Governor, led his district
to Distinguished District. Loved
photography and loved dogs and joined
them together as a dog show photographer. Was President of the Middlesex
County Kennel Club and member of
Eastern Dog Club. He and his wife
joined together in breeding and showing their loving maltese dogs. In lieu of
flowers, remembrances may be made
to PPA research, FTD Unit, Mass General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, Boston MA
02144. Services to be held at Schwartz
Brothers-Jeffer Memorial Chapel of Forest Hills, NY 718-263-7600. Interment
to follow at New Monteflore Cemetery,
West Babylon, NY.
GRILLO, Pamela M.
(Decuyke)
Of Swampscott, formerly of Winthrop,
March 22. Devoted wife of the late
Thomas Grillo. Loving mother of Gary
Grillo and his wife Dayna of Winthrop,
Kim Brennan and her husband Pat of
Everett, Tia Brennan and her husband
John of Everett, Frank Grillo and
his wife Rebecca of Swampscott and
Thomas Grillo and his wife Shirley of
Everett. Dear sister of William Staff
of Lowell. Cherished grandmother of
Robert, Amanda, Olivia, Alana, Connor,
Michael, Riley, Sawyer, Patrick and
Casey. Great grandmother of Finn.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the
visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano
and Son Funeral Home 147 Winthrop
St., Winthrop on Friday, March 30,
2018 from 4:00 to 7:00 PM. A funeral
service will be held in the funeral home
at 6:00 PM that evening. Memorial donations may be made to www.
caringforacure.org. For directions or
to sign the online guestbook go to
www.caggianofuneralhome.com.
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B7
Remembered
Obituaries
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HOURIHAN, Sally Jane
(Anderson)
Korean War Air
Force Veteran
Age 84, of Tewksbury,
passed away March 26,
2018. Beloved wife of John
L. Hourihan. Daughter of the late
Russell J. and Marie Irene (Schaaf)
Anderson. Mother of Paulette Brennan,
and her late husband John, of Beverly,
Bonnie Simmons and her husband
Mark of Naples, FL, Mary (Hourihan)
Donnell, of Wilmington, Fay Hourihan,
of Tewksbury, and Sally Gillis and her
husband Joseph, of Tewksbury.
Grandmother of Kylie and Lindsey
Simmons, Michael and Matthew
Donnell, and Hannah and Jared Gillis.
Sister of the late Leroy Anderson and
his late wife Margaret, the late Eloise
Sevener, and the late Betty Kauer.
Sister-in-law of Walter Sevener of Wilmington, Dar Kauer, of Kinross, MI, John
Gorman, Bette Mangano and her
husband Bob, all of Tewksbury, and the
late Margaret Gorman. She also leaves
many nieces, nephews and extended
family members.
Calling hours are Monday, April 2nd,
from 4-8 p.m. at the Farmer & Dee
Funeral Home, 16 Lee St., TEWKSBURY. Funeral services will be held
Tuesday, April 3rd, at 10:30 a.m. at the
Funeral Home. Interment to follow at
Tewksbury Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
donations in her memory may be made
to Tewksbury American Legion Post
# 259, 180 Pond St., Tewksbury, MA
01876. www.farmeranddee.com
LAPPIN, Marion “Mimi”
Marion “Mimi” (Zaiger) Lappin, 92,
of Swampscott, entered into rest
surrounded by her loving family, on
Wednesday, March 28, 2018. Mrs. Lappin was born in Chelsea, MA, daughter
of the late Louis and Beatrice (Bennett)
Zaiger. She is survived by her beloved
husband, Robert I. Lappin, with whom
she shared 71 years of marriage.
Marion was a lady of impeccable style
and grace, known for her excellent
taste. She was a charitable woman,
sharing her time and talent with the
Jewish Federation of the North Shore,
for whom she served as chairwoman of
the woman’s division. Left to cherish
her memory, in addition to her adored
husband, Robert, are her devoted son
Andy D. Lappin and his wife Diane of
Glencoe, IL, her son Peter J. Lappin
of Beverly, her daughter Nancy J. Lappin of Marblehead and her cherished
grandchildren: Lauren Sarah Lappin,
Danielle Faith Lappin, Alexander Brett
Lappin, Jacklyn Sarah Lappin, Matthew Alexander Lappin and Benjamin
Poser. A funeral service will be held
on Friday, March 30 at 11:00am in
Stanetsky-Hymanson Memorial Chapel,
10 Vinnin Street, Salem, MA. Burial
will be in Congregation Shirat Hayam
of the North Shore Cemetery, Beth El
Section, 506 Lowell Street, Peabody,
MA. In lieu of flowers, donations in her
memory may be made to The Lappin
Foundation, PO Box 986, Salem, MA
01970, or the charitable organization of
your choice.
Stanetsky-Hymanson Chapel
10 Vinnin St., Salem, 781-581-2300
www.stanetskyhymansonsalem.com
LeSAFFRE, Donald W.
Of Wakefield, March 28, 2018, at age
82. Beloved husband of the late Marilyn
R. (Mokler) LeSaffre. Devoted father
of Karen C. LeSaffre and her husband
Andy Kilgore of Somerville, and John P.
LeSaffre of Wakefield. Loving brother
of Anne Bruhmuller and her husband
Jim of Center Barnstead, NH, Daniels
G. LeSaffre and his wife Ruth of Stoneham, John D. LeSaffre and his wife
Nancy of Melrose, the late Robert D.
LeSaffre and his surviving wife Patricia
of Wakefield, and the late Dolores
Driscoll and her surviving husband
John S. “Jack” of Rye, NH. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Relatives & friends will gather
in honor of Don’s life during visiting
hours at the Robinson Funeral Home,
809 Main St., MELROSE on Monday,
April 2 from 4-8 p.m., and again on
Tuesday at 9 a.m. before leaving in
procession to Most Blessed Sacrament
Church, 1155 Main St., Wakefield for
his Funeral Mass celebrated at 10 a.m.
Interment at Lakeside Cemetery, Wakefield. For directions or online tribute:
RobinsonFuneralHome.com
Robinson Funeral Home
Melrose
(781) 665-1900
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral director for details.
MACDONALD, Therese M.
(Donovan)
Of Reading, March 29, 2018 at age
88. Beloved wife of the late Philip A.
Macdonald. Devoted mother of Peter E.
Macdonald and his wife Pam, Christine
A. McEleney and her husband John,
Maria M. Arthur and her husband
Charlie and Ted Macdonald. Cherished
grandmother of CJ, Alex and Vicki Arthur, Cameron, Olivia, Sophia and Amelia Macdonald and Patrick McEleney.
Sister of the late Bernard Donovan,
Marie Flynn, John Donovan, Dorothy
Hannon, her twin sister Trudy Colbert
and Helen McDonald. Daughter of the
late John and Mary (Harris) Donovan.
Aunt to many loving nieces and nephews. She was the cherished lifelong
friend to many. Funeral from the
Doherty-Barile Family Funeral Home,
11 Linden St., READING, Tuesday,
April 3rd at 9 a.m., followed by a Funeral Mass Celebrating Therese’s Eternal
Life in St. Patrick Church, 71 Central
St., Stoneham at 10 a.m. Family and
friends are cordially invited to gather
and share memories with her family
on Monday, April 2nd from 4-8 p.m. in
the funeral home. Parking attendants
and ramped entrance available. Interment will be held at the Massachusetts
National Cemetery in Bourne at a later
date. Please consider making donations
in memory of Therese to Lahey Health
at Home, Middlesex East Visiting Nurse
Association, 800 Cummings Park, Suite
500, Woburn, MA 01801. For directions
or to send a memorial condolence
www.barilefuneral.com. or www.facebook.com/BarileFamilyFuneralHome.
Doherty-Barile Funeral Home
Celebrating Life-Sharing Memories
781-944-1589
MacGILLIVRAY, Alice Marie
(McNulty)
Of Brookline on March 27, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late Warren J.
MacGillivray. Loving mother of Bonnie
MacGillivray and husband Michael
Blout of Bristol, NH., Susan Molloy
and husband Bob of Pelham, NH., Lisa
MacGillivray Coughlin of Attleboro and
Warren J. MacGillivray Jr. and wife Alecia Domer of Needham. Adored grandmother of Fawne Hill and husband
Jeffrey, Bobby Molloy, Michael Molloy,
Ryan and Brendan Coughlin, Julia
Molloy and Kenzie and Rylee MacGillivray. Dear sister of Doris Blanchette
of Brookline, Lawrence McNulty of
Concord and the late John McNulty
and Marilyn Whalen. Also survived
by many nieces and nephews. Funeral
from the Bell-O’Dea Funeral Home, 376
Washington St., BROOKLINE, Saturday
morning at 9:10 followed by a Funeral
Blessing in St. Mary of the Assumption
Church at 10:00. Relatives and friends
are kindly invited. Visiting hours in the
funeral home on Friday from 3:00 –
7:00. Interment Walnut Hills Cemetery.
Ret. Administrative Assistant Brookline
Public School Dept. In lieu of flowers
donations in memory of Alice made
to the Fisher House, ATTN Jennifer
DeLuca, PO Box 230, South Walpole,
MA. 02071 or www.fisherhouseboston.
org would be appreciated.
MARTIN, James R.
Of Westwood, formerly of
Brookline on March 27,
2018. Devoted husband of
65 years to Joan (Kenneally) Martin.
Visiting hours Mon. 4 - 7. Funeral Mass
Tues. 10. Further information www.bellodeafh.com Complete notice to appear
on Sunday, April 1, 2018.
McMANUS, Geraldine M.
“Gerry” (Moynihan)
Of Reading, formerly of Melrose, March
26, 2018, in her 97th year. Beloved
wife of George L. McManus “Mac” with
whom she shared 65 years of marriage.
Devoted mother of Deborah A. McManus of Reading and Brian G. McManus
and his wife Venere of W. Suffield, CT.
Cherished grandmother ”Nanni” to
Brittany M. Fife of Reading. Dear twin
sister of the late Gerald F. Moynihan. A
private celebration of life will be held at
a later date. In remembrance of Gerry
McManus, those who wish may make a
contribution to Alzheimer’s Association,
309 Waverley Oaks Road, Waltham,
MA 02452.
Anderson-Bryant Funeral Home
781-438-0135
McSWEENEY, Joan
(Clifford)
Of Burlington, formerly of Dorchester,
March 27. Beloved wife of the late Brian J. McSweeney, Jr. Loving mother of
Brian J. McSweeney, III & his wife Jennifer of Andover, Kevin M. McSweeney
of Burlington, and Nancy A. Pastore &
her husband Robert of North Reading.
Proud grandmother of Catherine and
Brian J. McSweeney IV and John and
Sarah Pastore. Sister of Eleanor Mangerian of Stoneham and Marilyn Walsh of
Canton and the late John “Jack” Walsh.
Sister-in-law of Richard Mangerian,
Eugene “Terry” McSweeney and the late
Barbara McSweeney, Kathleen Stanton,
and the late Earl Stanton, Margaret &
Edward Connolly, Mary & John Ricci.
Funeral from the Edward V. Sullivan
funeral home, 43 Winn Street, Burlington (exit 34 off Rt. 128/95, Woburn
side) on Monday, April 2 at 9 a.m.
Followed by a Mass of Christian Burial
in St. Margaret’s Church, 111 Winn St.,
Burlington at 10 a.m. Visiting hours
Saturday, March 31 from 3-6 p.m.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited. In lieu of flowers, memorials
in Joan’s name may be made to the
Alzheimer’s Association, 309 Waverley
Oaks Road, Waltham MA 02452. For
directions, obituary & online guestbook
see www.stmargaretburlington.org or
www.sullivanfuneralhome.net
MOSES, Gerald B. “Moe”
O’BRIEN, James J.
Of Everett, March 25. Beloved son
of the late James R. and Gertrude L.
(Grassa) O’Brien. Dear and devoted
brother of Richard “Dick” Francis
O’Brien of Washington, DC. Jim is also
the loving uncle of Catherine Lynch
O’Brien and Miles Edward O’Brien and
his wife, Sara Fitzgerald O’Brien and
great-uncle of Everett Y. O’Brien, Oliver
G. O’Brien and Cassidy L. O’Brien.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend Jim’s visiting hours in
the Cafasso & Sons Funeral Home, 65
Clark St. (Corner of Main St.) EVERETT, Monday, April 2 from 4-7 p.m. His
funeral will be from the funeral home
on Tuesday at 9 a.m. followed by a funeral Mass in the Immaculate Conception Church, 487 Broadway, Everett at
10 a.m. Interment Glenwood Cemetery,
Everett. In lieu of flowers, contributions
in Jim’s memory to the Immaculate
Conception Church “Restoration Fund”
489 Broadway, Everett, MA 02149,
would be sincerely appreciated. Parking
with attendants on duty.
Cafasso & Sons Funeral Home
Everett 617.387.3120
PANTOJA, Felicia Maria
Philip Kerr, writer who
created ‘Gunther’ detective
By Richard Sandomir
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Philip Kerr, a
Scottish-born writer whose
popular novels feature a Naziera detective named Bernie
Gunther, whose hard-boiled
style made him literary kin to
Philip Marlowe, Raymond
Chandler’s classic private eye,
died Friday in London. He was
62.
The cause was bladder cancer, according to his publisher,
G.P. Putnam’s Sons.
Through 13 novels, including “Greeks Bearing Gifts,”
which will be published next
week, Mr. Kerr drew Gunther
as a savvy and cynical Berlin
criminal police investigator
who hates Hitler and quits his
job when the Nazis take over.
He becomes a private detective,
but is then pressed into gumshoe jobs for the propaganda
minister Joseph Goebbels and
Reinhard Heydrich, a principal
architect of the Final Solution.
Gunther is “one of crime fiction’s most satisfying and unlikely survivors: the good cop in
the belly of the beast,” Jane
Kramer, The New Yorker’s longtime European correspondent,
wrote last year.
Some of the novels bring
Gunther into postwar intrigues
in Argentina, Cuba, France,
Greece, and other countries.
Mr. Kerr wrote fantasy novels for children (the “Children
of the Lamp” series, under the
name P.B. Kerr), a mystery novel involving Sir Isaac Newton,
and thrillers set in the world of
soccer. But he was most successful at the Gunther series,
which began with “March Violets” in 1989.
After two follow-ups, Mr.
Kerr set Gunther aside for 15
years, taking an approach to his
creation far different from that
of Sue Grafton, who cast her
private detective, Kinsey Millhone, in 25 alphabet-spanning
novels that began in 1982 and
ended with her finale, “Y Is for
Yesterday” (2017), which was
published four months before
her death.
Mr. Kerr recalled that he had
other interests and did not
want to be typecast as a
Gunther-only writer.
“I sort of packed it in after
three because I thought three’s
a nice number,” he told the radio host Leonard Lopate of
WNYC in 2015. “I hadn’t signed
up to do the same thing for the
rest of my life.”
Mr. Kerr leaves his wife,
Jane Thynne, who is also a novelist; a daughter, Naomi Kerr;
two sons, William and Charlie;
and a sister, Caroline Kerr.
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
Of Rowley, 71, on March 26, 2018 in
Haverhill. He joined the Boston Red
Sox in 1964 with his Major League
career spanning nine seasons. In 1970
he was voted an MLB All-Star for the
Boston Red Sox.
Of all of Jerry’s accomplishments,
the most important was his family. He
is survived by his wife of fifty years,
Carolyn (Altieri) Moses, whom he married in 1968 at Most Blessed Sacrament
Church in Wakefield; his children, Kristin Reynolds of Ipswich and Stephen
Moses and wife Meghan of Ipswich;
seven grandchildren, Amy, Luke, Jack,
Ben, Quinn, Tynan and McKenna; a
brother, Samuel “Rollo” Moses and wife
Beth of TN, and sisters Tiffie Moses and
Pam Harris and husband Kenneth, all
of MS.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated on Tuesday, April 3, 2018
at 10 am at Our Lady of Hope Church,
1 Pineswamp Road, Ipswich. Family
and friends are respectfully welcomed.
Interment will be private. Visiting
Hours are Monday, April 2 from 4-8 pm
at the Whittier-Porter Funeral Home,
6 High Street, Ipswich. In lieu of flowers the family requests all memorial
contributions be sent to The Stern Lab
for Clinical Research in Neurodegenerative Disease at Boston University, www.
sternneurolab.org/donate/ For directions or to leave a condolence please
visit www.whittier-porter.com.
Whittier-Porter Funeral Home
Ipswich Massachusetts
NALLY, James P.
86, of Salem and formerly of Peabody,
devoted husband of Elaine J. (Cormier)
Nally with whom he shared over 61
years of marriage. Born in Peabody, he
was the son of the late Richard J. and
Anna F. (McGivern) Nally and step-son
of the late Margaret (Roach) Nally. He
was the loving father of, Thomas J. and
his wife Tara Nally of Salem, James M.
Nally of Danvers, Janet Nally Barnes
and her husband Brian Barnes of Boxford and Christine E. and her husband
Raymond C. Tilden, Jr, of Greenland,
NH, grandfather of Raymond C. Tilden,
III, Jennifer Tilden and Shaela and Tess
Nally, brother of Ann Marie Johnson of
Norwalk, CT and step-brother of Sister
Ann Dominic Roach and Richard and
James Roach and is also survived by
many cousins, nieces, nephews, family
and friends, including his dear friend
Frederick Murtagh of Peabody. He was
predeceased by his brother Richard J.
Nally, Jr. Visiting hours will be held on
Monday from 4:00 until 8:00 PM at the
Conway, Cahill-Brodeur Funeral Home,
82 Lynn St., PEABODY. His Funeral
Mass will be celebrated on Tuesday
at 10:30 AM at St. John’s Church,
Peabody. Burial will be in Cedar Grove
Cemetery, Peabody. In lieu of flowers,
donations can be made in his name to
either Care Dimensions, 75 Sylvan St,
Suite B-102, Danvers, MA 01923 or
Alzheimer’s Association MA/NH Chapter, 309 Waverly Oaks Road, Waltham,
MA 02452. For directions and on-line
obituary, visit www.ccbfuneral.com
TREDDIN, Mary L. (Palkey)
Felicia Maria (Ash) Pantoja, 51, or S. Dennis, MA,
formerly of Mattapan, MA,
died Friday, March 23, 2018 surrounded by her loving family. She was born
and raised in Boston, MA and was a
graduate of Holy Cross Cathedral High
School.
Felicia is the loving daughter of Paul
and her late mother Victoria (Gatewood) Ash (2012) whom she deeply
missed and spoke of everyday. She is
survived by her husband Daniel; her
beloved son Armando and adored
daughter Jessica Pantoja both of S.
Dennis, MA; her brothers Paul Ash, Jr.
of S. Dennis, MA; Anthony Ash of Chicopee, MA; Philip Ash of W.Yarmouth,
MA and sister Patricia Taylor of Hyde
Park, MA. She also leaves behind her
cherished grandson Carter along with
her loved nieces and nephews who she
loved as if they were her own.
Felicia loved to work with children
and was a proud and dedicated special
education aide with Ezra H. Baker
Elementary School in W. Dennis, MA
for 21 years. She enjoyed walks on the
beach with her family, music, singing
and always looked forward to Saturday
nights where her brother Phil would
bring over new movies for them to
watch and order take out. Felicia was
devoted to her family and loved to
prepare and cook large meals for the
family every Sunday. Above all else,
Felicia looked forward to her daily visits
from her grandson Carter.
Family and Friends will gather Monday, April 2nd from 9:30 am to 10:30
am at Doane, Beal & Ames Funeral
Home, 729 Route 134, S. Dennis, MA
02660 followed by an 11 am Mass at
St. Pius X Church, 5 Barbara St., S.
Yarmouth, MA 02664. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Lupus
Foundation of America. For online
condolences, please visit
www.doanebealames.com.
SOUL, Harwood E.
(Ret. Capt. Belmont F.D.) Of Belmont
March 26, 2018. Beloved husband of
Beverly J. (Dattoli) Soul. Devoted father
of Harwood E. “Howie” Soul of Belmont
& Valerie J. Roy & her husband Larry of
Arlington. Loving grandfather of Courtney & Nicholas Roy. Brother of the
late Leona Mantineo & Norman Soul.
Funeral Mass in St. Joseph Church,
Common St. Belmont on Monday at 9
A.M. Relatives and friends respectfully
invited to attend. Visiting hour in the
Stanton Funeral Home 786 Mt. Auburn
St. (Rt16) Watertown on Monday 7:45
am – 8:30 am. Interment Private. In
lieu of flowers contributions to the
Belmont Firemen’s Relief Fund, P.O.
Box 79222, Belmont, MA 02479 or to
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital,
262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis,
TN 38105 would be appreciated.
Age 58, of Ashland, formerly of
Newton, on Tuesday, March 27th
after a brief sickness, surrounded by
family. Beloved wife of John Treddin.
Loving mother to Danielle Woolfrey
and her wife, Jen; Ron Treddin and
his wife, Christina; Jack Treddin and
his wife, Vikki; Nicole Andrews and
her husband, Jon; and Joe Treddin.
Devoted Nana to five grandsons:
Anthony, Sinatra, Jackson, Eric, and
Tyler. Daughter of the late Ronald and
Marie Palkey. Also survived by her
sisters, Jeanne Christle and Michelle
Palkey, as well as many nieces and
nephews. Mary was a graduate of
Newton Catholic High School and Regis
College. A lifelong resident of Newton
until 2014, she dedicated her life to
raising her five children and teaching
English and Drama for many years
at Trinity Catholic High School. Mary
loved teaching and directing, and she
will be fondly remembered by the many
students who sat in her classroom and
stood on her stage. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in Mary’s name
to St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, 262
Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN
38105. Visiting hours in the Magni FH,
365 Watertown St., Rt. 16, NEWTON,
Monday, April 2, from 4-8PM and again
Tuesday at 9:30AM before proceeding
to Our Lady Help of Christians Church,
573 Washington St., Newton, for a
10:30AM Funeral Mass. Burial Calvary
Cemetery, Waltham.
Andrew J. Magni & Son FH, Newton
www.magnifuneralhome.com
TRUDEAU, Paul J.
VAILLIANT, Lucille Ann
(Rizzo)
Of Saugus, formerly of Somerville and
Stoneham, March 27. Beloved wife of
Alexander Vailliant. Devoted mother
of Deborah Whittaker and husband
William of Medford, Teresa Vicente
and husband Aderito of Saugus, Nancy
Ludwig and husband Michael of N.
Reading, Lucille White of Belmont,
and the late Donna Marie. Stepmother of Sharon Hagen and husband
Peter of NH. Loving grandmother of
Suzanne and Richard Cyr, Charles and
Elizabeth Ludwig, Nina White, Patricia
Wilson, and Marc Hagen. Loving great
grandmother of Gavin, Victoria, and
Abigail. Dear sister of Jennie Rizzo and
the late Giovanni, Frank, Joseph, Mary
and Rose. A graveside service will be
conducted in Holy Cross Cemetery, 175
Broadway, Malden, Saturday, March
31 at 12 noon. Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited to attend and
may visit with the family from 10 AM
to 11:30 AM at the Dello Russo Funeral
Home, 306 Main St., MEDFORD. To
leave a message of condolence visit
www.dellorusso.net.
Dello Russo Funeral Home
Medford-Woburn-Wilmington
VIGNOLI, Paul Joseph, Sr.
Life-long resident of East
Boston, passed away
peacefully surrounded by
his loving family after a brief illness on
March 27th at the age of 92. Visiting
Hours Monday. Funeral on Tuesday.
Complete notice to follow in Sunday’s
edition. For more info visit ruggieromh.
com
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston 617-569-0990
ZAKHER, Fouad M.D.
Of Waltham, March 27,
2018. Beloved husband
of Elizabeth “Bette”
(Crowe) Trudeau. Loving father of
Mark Trudeau of Naples, FL, Christopher Trudeau of Waltham, David
Trudeau and his wife, Susan, of Acton
and Matthew Trudeau and his wife,
Clair, of Concord. He was the proud
Pops of Allie, Jonathan, Arden and
Sean Trudeau-all of whom he loved
dearly. Brother of Theresa Longland of
Sudbury and the late, Louise Bergen,
Lionel Trudeau, Alice Burdette, Ernest
Trudeau, Roland Trudeau, Lorraine
Demers, Claire LeBlanc, Jeanne Hoener
and Joseph Trudeau. Also survived by
many nieces and nephews. Family and
friends will gather to celebrate Paul’s
life during visitation hours at The Joyce
Funeral Home, 245 Main Street (Rte.
20), WALTHAM on Monday, April 2nd
from 4 to 8 p.m. and again at 10 a.m.
on Tuesday morning before leaving
in procession to Saint Jude Church,
147 Main Street, Waltham where his
Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11
a.m. Burial will be in Massachusetts
National Cemetery, Bourne on Wednesday morning at 11 a.m. Memorial
donations may be made to St. Jude
Children’s Research Hospital, 262
Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN
38105. For complete obituary, guest
book and directions please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
Age 86, of Wellesley, passed away
suddenly on March 28, 2018. Beloved
husband of 60 years of the late Denise
(Arian) Zakher. Loving father of
Cherine Nestor and her husband Coleman of Wellesley, and Jehane Johnston
and her husband Paul of Wellesley.
Also survived by 4 grandchildren,
Elise, Alexandra, Kyle, and Andrew,
two great-grandchildren, Harper and
Jack. Brother of Marie-Therese Zakher
of Montreal, Canada. Also survived by
many nieces and nephews. Fouad was
a practicing Physician for over 60 years
in Natick, Massachusetts and was affiliated with MetroWest Medical Center.
He continued to practice until his
death. A Funeral Mass will be held on
Thursday, April 5 at St. Paul’s Church,
502 Washington St., WELLESLEY, at
10:00 am. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited. Interment Woodlawn
Cemetery, Wellesley. In lieu of flowers,
expression of sympathy may be made
in Fouad’s memory to the American
Diabetes Association, PO Box 15829,
Arlington, VA 22215. Online guestbook
at gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781-235-4100
T h e
B8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
Obituaries
Rusty Staub, slugger known for his commitment to craft, fans, charity
By Richard Goldstein
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Rusty Staub,
baseball’s lumbering Le Grand
Orange and one of the finest
and most durable hitters of his
time died Thursday in West
Palm Beach, Fla. He was 73.
His death, in a hospital,
was caused by a heart attack,
his brother, Chuck, said.
Mr. Staub’s career spanned
parts of three decades, from
the 1960s to the ‘80s, playing
mostly for Houston, Montreal,
Detroit, and the New York
Mets. He died early on Major
League Baseball’s opening day,
and hours later, during the
ceremonies at Citi Field for the
Mets’ opener, with the St. Louis Cardinals, the team asked
for a moment of silence, describing him as “an iconic New
Yorker in his adopted hometown,” and for Ed Charles, the
popular third baseman for
their 1969 World Series-winning team, who died March
15.
‘‘He could be as tough as
hell and as soft as a mushroom,’’ said Mets teammate
and close friend Keith Hernandez, who choked back tears as
he spoke about Mr. Staub at
Citi Field.
A 6-foot-2 left-handed batter who weighed 240 pounds
late in his career — by then he
was a gourmet cook and a restaurant owner — Mr. Staub cut
an unmistakable figure at the
plate.
“ He h a d c u r l y r e d h a i r,
choked up three inches on his
bat, wore his uniform pants
high and ran like molasses in
winter,” the Canadian newspaper The National Post once
said of him.
But he could hit — and play
ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE/1984
A six-time All-Star, Mr. Staub amassed 2,716 hits and 292 home runs over his career with
the Houston Astros, Montreal Expos, New York Mets, Detroit Tigers, and Texas Rangers.
outfield and first base as well.
In his 23 seasons, he amassed
2,716 hits and 292 home runs
while being named to six AllStar teams.
He flowered as a hitter with
the Astros of the mid-1960s;
became the Expos’ first star
player; and played nine seas o n s w i t h t h e Me t s i n tw o
stints: in the 1970s, when they
won their second National
League pennant, and then in
the ‘80s, when he became one
o f b a s e b a l l ’s m o s t a c c o m plished pinch-hitters.
He was later a Mets broadcaster, from 1986-1995, working mostly with Ralph Kiner
a n d T i m M c C a r v e r. A n d
though a native of New Orleans, he was much the New
Yorker. At one time he owned
two restaurants in Manhattan,
Rusty’s and Rusty Staub’s on
Fifth.
Mr. Staub was especially respected, during his baseball
career and afterward, for his
community involvement and
his charitable work.
He particularly endeared
himself in Canada, where he
played for the expansion Expos; he was an All-Star in all
three of his full seasons in
Montreal, from 1969-1971. He
learned French and became a
traveling ambassador for the
team, hailing the advent of
Major League Baseball in Canada.
He did so out of respect for
the fans, he said.
“I was in Quebec — I
couldn’t talk to a child,” he
told The Montreal Gazette in
2012. “I couldn’t say something encouraging. I felt like I
was not doing my job — not
being able to respond to the
media at least in some basic
form.
“I took about 25 French
classes after the first season,
and the next year I took longer
c l a s s e s ,” h e c o n t i n u e d .
“There’s not a question that
my making that effort is part
of the reason that whatever Le
Grand Orange represented to
Montreal and all those fans,
they knew I cared and I tried.”
As for the sobriquet that
stayed with him, he wrote in
The New York Times, teammates had been calling him
the Big Orange even before he
arrived in Montreal in a trade
with Houston.
“The name wasn’t formalized for the public until one
day when we were playing in
Los Angeles,” he recalled. “I hit
a home run and made a pretty
good catch when Willie Crawford hit a pea against the
fence. T he ne xt day in the
newspapers, I was ‘Le Grand
Orange.’ And in both English
and French papers, it stayed
that way.”
The Expos traded him to
the Mets in April 1972. A year
later, he helped propel them to
a National League pennant,
hitting three home runs — accounting for all his hits — in
their five-game victory over
the Cincinnati Reds in the National League Championship
Series.
He also injured his shoulder in that series while making
an outstanding catch. But he
w e n t o n t o b at . 4 2 3 i n t h e
World Series, with two doubles and a homer, though the
Mets were defeated by the
Oakland A’s in seven games.
Mr. Staub drove in 105 runs
in 1975, setting a Mets record
that stood for 15 years. But he
was traded that December to
the Detroit Tigers, with the
Mets receiving pitcher Mickey
Lolich, and served mostly as a
designated hitter.
Mr. Staub returned to the
Expos in a trade in July 1979.
In h i s f i r s t a t - b a t b a c k a t
Olympic Stadium, Expos fans
gave him a standing ovation.
It was a short second stint
in Montreal. He spent the
1980 season with the Texas
Rangers and then signed with
the Mets as a free agent, playing his final five seasons with
the team. As a pinch-hitter in
1983, he had eight consecutive
hits in June and drove in 25
runs that season.
Mr. Staub was also seen displaying his cooking techniques
on television, but his love of
food made it challenging to
keep his weight down.
“ I t ’s h a r d ,” h e t o l d T h e
Times in 1985. “I’ll go into my
favorite Italian restaurant,
and there’s this risotto dish
that I just love. It’s got gravy
and porcini mushrooms, and I
say, ‘Not this time.’ But every
time I go there I have to get it.”
Mr. Staub became president of the Rusty Staub Foundation, which has supported
emergency food pantries
throughout New York in collaboration with Catholic Charities. He also created the New
York Police and Fire Widows’
and Children’s Benefit Fund,
which has raised millions of
dollars for the families of uniformed personnel killed in the
line of duty. (An uncle of Mr.
Staub’s died while working as
a New Orleans police officer.)
When Major League Baseball returned to New York for
the first time after the terrorist
attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, with
the Mets playing the Atlanta
Braves, the Mets donated proceeds from the game, about
$450,000, to the fund for widows and children.
That night, Mr. Staub said,
the organization had distributed $8.3 million in the 15 years
before the attacks.
“Since then, we’ve already
raised $8 million,” he told The
Times. “You want to get money to the widows and children,
we’re the ones.”
Material from the Associated
Press was used in this
obituary.
Jerry Moses; was All-Star
as catcher for Red Sox
By Marvin Pave
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
On May 25, 1965, 18-yearold rookie catcher Jerry Moses
became the youngest Red Sox
player to hit a home run — a
record that still stands —
when he connected off Minnesota Twins pitcher Mudcat
Grant at Fenway Park.
A star quarterback and
catcher from Yazoo City High
School in Mississippi, Mr. Moses had turned down a football
scholarship offer from Paul
“Bear” Bryant of the University of Alabama, choosing instead to sign with the Red Sox
for a $50,000 bonus.
He played for seven Major
League teams between 1965
and 1975, including his first
four with the Red Sox, and
while with Boston he was an
American League All-Star in
1970.
“There are no better fans
than the Boston fans: loyal,
they know the game, if you
hustle they will stand by you,”
Mr. Moses told the Society for
American Baseball Research.
“They know each player and
have their favorites. I have
been out of baseball 36 years
and still get two to three letters a week for autographs on
baseball cards.”
Mr. Moses, who previously
had lived in Ipswich for many
years and was passionately involved with charities including
the Jimmy Fund and Genesis
Fund, died Monday in High
Pointe House in Haverhill
from complications of aphasia
and dementia.
He was 71 and resided in
Rowley.
Honored in 1970 as the BoSox Club’s Man of the Year, he
played in 386 Major League
games, hitting .251 with 48
doubles, eight triples, 25 homers, and 109 runs batted in.
Mr. Moses hit .304 in 53
games in 1969 and was having
another promising season in
1970, when he had a careerbest six homers and 35 RBIs in
92 games.
But he injured his hand and
was out of the Red Sox lineup
the final six weeks of the season.
In early October 1970, he
told the Globe that “around
the clubhouse, one of the big
games was making trades.
We’d sit around trying to figure out who was going for
who.”
Speculation soon became
reality as the Red Sox traded
Mr. Moses, Tony Conigliaro,
and Ray Jarvis to the California Angels in a six-player deal.
In 1987, Mr. Moses told the
Globe that “you can tell I was a
catcher from looking at my
hands. I’ve got calcium buildup in a few fingers and I broke
one of my middle fingers four
times. You know, it’s a catcher’s hand.”
Mr. Moses was a popular
instructor at the summer
camp he ran with Red Sox
teammate and second baseman Mike Andrews, a former
Jimmy Fund chairman.
“Jerry was my best friend
and our families were very
close,” Andrews said. “He was
always there for the Jimmy
Fund, especially through his
golf tournaments. He also
chaired a huge event to honor
Ted Williams that took up
many hours of his time and we
honored him for his efforts.”
Mr. Moses, the late Red Sox
relief ace Dick Radatz, and
starting pitcher Gary Bell were
pranksters in the clubhouse
and at Red Sox fantasy camps,
where they were known as
“the three amigos.”
For Radatz’s 50th birthday,
Mr. Moses hosted a gala party
at the Bayside Expo.
“I only caught Dick in the
bullpen,” Mr. Moses recalled
years later, in 2005. “I spent
most of my life in the bullpen
— I have a PhD in bullpen.”
His roommates in Wellsville, N.Y., during his first minor league season included future Red Sox pitcher Billy
Rohr.
Rohr recalled that his best
friend in Wellsville was anothe r c a t c h e r, “ a n d w h e n w e
heard that this hotshot catcher
from Mississippi was coming I
made up my mind I wasn’t goi n g t o l i k e h i m . We l l , h e
wound up being best man at
my wedding and I was in his
wedding party. There was no
pretense with Jerry. He was
genuine and he didn’t have to
be anyone other than himself.”
As a Red Sox rookie, Mr.
Moses, who was 6-foot-3 and
weighed 205 pounds during
his playing days, shared an
apartment in Brookline with
another rookie, pitcher Jim
Lonborg.
Lonborg said Mr. Moses
GLOBE FILES
Mr. Moses, shown tagging out Thurman Munson, debuted with the Red Sox in 1965 and was traded to California in 1970.
FRANK O’BRIEN/GLOBE FILE 1970
DAN GOSHTIGIAN/FILE 1970
Mr. Moses played for six other teams after leaving the Red Sox but made his home in
Massachusetts. He was passionately involved with charities, particularly the Jimmy Fund.
“was kind-hearted and a joy to
be around, and had a legendary sense of humor. I still remember the $1.75 breakfasts
we had at this little drugstore
near our apartment. He was
athletic, sound defensively —
especially on balls in the dirt
— and had some pop in his
bat.”
Gerald Braheen Moses was
a son of Samuel Moses and the
former Mary Frances Greer.
In the Society for American
Baseball Research interview,
Mr. Moses recalled that when
he was a boy, his father was his
coach and he “inspired me and
my brother with great talks before our games, and about life
and how to do the right
things.”
In 1968, Mr. Moses marred
Carolyn Altieri of Wakefield.
Throughout his career, Mr.
Moses was identified by reporters and headline writers
alternately as Jerry or Gerry.
His wife recalled that he often
signed autographs Jerry Moses.
After hitting a home run as
an 18-year-old, Mr. Moses
went to the minors for season-
ing and proceeded to record
homers for his first hits at the
Single A, Double A, and Triple
A levels.
Mr. Moses held numerous
charity golf tournaments at Ipswich Country Club and entered the business world after
retiring as a player.
He worked for Ogden Foods
and then started his own concessions company, FanFare,
whose clients included the former Great Woods Center for
the Performing Arts in Mansfield, the World Trade Center
in Boston, and Pro Player Sta-
dium in Miami.
He stayed on as a consult a n t at Fa n Fa r e a n d w a s a
mentor to his daughter, Kristin Reynolds, and son, Stephen, both of Ipswich, while in
semiretirement.
Mr. Moses helped Stephen,
a former New York Mets minor league player, found Ann’s
Boston Brownie in Topsfield.
With Kristen, he opened Off
the Vine in Rowley.
In addition to his wife, son,
a n d d a u g h t e r, M r. M o s e s
l e av e s a b r o t h e r, R o l l o o f
Memphis; two sisters, Tiffie of
Brandon, Miss., and Pam Harris of Madison, Miss.; and seven grandchildren.
A funeral Mass will be said
at 10 a.m. Tuesday in Our Lady of Hope Church in Ipswich.
Mr. Moses, who saved his
bat from his Major League AllStar Game, was “close with
God,” his son said. “Faith was
ver y important to him. He
taught us to be humble and
caring.”
Stephen called his father
“the best mentor I could have.
He was a self-made man who
loved the competition and the
camaraderie of baseball, and
who most of all loved his family.”
Marvin Pave can be reached at
marvin.pave@rcn.com.
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B9
Business
Report:
Walmart
to acquire
Humana
Firms pull
ads in Fox
News show
protest
By Andy Rosen and Jaclyn Reiss
GLOBE STAFF
Move into insurance
would echo CVS plan
A Twitter dispute between Fox
News host Laura Ingraham and a survivor of the Parkland, Fla., shooting
spiraled into a public relations crisis
for large Massachusetts companies
Thursday, as teen activist David Hogg
led a torrent of online protests against
advertisers on the Fox host’s show.
TripAdvisor and Wayfair both said
they would no longer advertise during
the “Ingraham Angle,” after she teased
Hogg, a high school senior, about being rejected by several colleges to
which he had applied.
“The decision of an adult to personally criticize a high school student who
has lost his classmates in an unspeakable tragedy is not consistent with our
values,” Wayfair said in a statement after being called out on social media for
advertising on Ingraham’s show. “We
do not plan to continue advertising on
this particular program.”
Needham-based TripAdvisor said
in a statement that the company does
not “condone the inappropriate comments made by this broadcaster.”
“In our view, these statements, focused on a high school student, cross
By Zachary Tracer
BLOOMBERG NEWS
NEW YORK — Walmart Inc. is in
early talks to acquire health insurer
Humana Inc., The Wall Street Journal
reported, a transaction that would
pitch the retailer headlong into a rapidly changing industry whose surging
costs and regulatory pressures have
led to a series of megadeals.
The details of the discussions are n ’ t c l e a r, a n d a d e a l m a y f a l l
through, the Journal said, citing unidentified people familiar with the
matter. Humana, valued at about $37
billion, would be Walmart’s largest
deal on record.
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
ALAN DIAZ/ASSOICATED PRESS/FILE 2017
Shirley Leung
MARVIN JOSEPH
Laura Ingraham later apologized
for comments about David Hogg.
the line of decency. As such, we have
made a decision to stop advertising on
that program,” the company said.
TripAdvisor and Wayfair both declined to comment further. Liberty
Mutual, a third local company that
Hogg and others said is a major Ingraham advertiser, did not respond to
multiple requests for comment.
Hogg is a survivor of the shooting
at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School in which 17 people were killed
on Valentine’s Day, and he has since
emerged as one of the most forceful
voices among young activists calling
for new gun restrictions.
Ingraham later backtracked, apologizing “for any upset or hurt my tweet
caused him or any of the brave victims
of Parkland.”
But the firestorm by then had become the latest example of the persuasive power that social media activists
have brought to bear against conservative causes, particularly since the
election of Donald Trump. In February, for example, a boycott movement
prompted several companies — including Boston home security firm
SimpliSafe — to end promotional partnerships with the National Rifle Association.
“Advertisers, who are ultrasensitive
to risk and controversy in a situation
that’s as sensitive as this one, are go-
A trailblazer
at a tipping point
The students call her
GLars, and the rest of us
know her as Gloria Larson.
When Larson (above)
steps down as president
of Bentley University in
June, she will be gone but not forgotten. Next
week, the Waltham school will rename a signature program in her honor: the Gloria Cordes Larson Center for Women and Business.
It is a fitting tribute to the first woman
to head Bentley, but
also to someone who
has spent a lifetime as
a trailblazer, from her
stints as a two-time
cabinet secretary in
the Weld administration to the first woman to chair the Greater
Boston Chamber of Commerce and the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority.
The 67-year-old lawyer has worn so many
hats and seamlessly navigated public and private sectors — prior to Bentley she was a partner at the law firm Foley Hoag — that it can be
Gloria Larson, Bentley’s first
female president, is finishing
up her term optimistic about
the place of women in society
ADVERTISING, Page B11
INSIDE
ENERGY
AG Maura Healey wants to
shut electricity market. B11.
AUTOMOTIVE
EPA looking to roll back US
emissions targets. B12.
hard to sum up the entirety of her career.
So I punted to Deval Patrick, whom Larson
endorsed for governor in 2006, giving up her
Republican stripes to do so.
“What’s amazing and beautiful and inspiring about Gloria is this notion of the public
citizen,” said Patrick, who will be Bentley’s
graduation speaker this year.
After winning the governorship, Patrick
tapped Larson to co-lead his transition team.
He praised her ability to build connections
among so many communities and serve as
a bridge.
“That’s a very special thing in any place,
particularly here,” said
Patrick. “We get a little
silo-ed, a little inward
looking here.”
Larson arrived at Bentley in 2007, drawn
by the chance to shape a generation of millennials whose own triple bottom line — people,
planet, and profits — resonated with her. She
figured there was no better place to do this
than at a school known for its business focus.
LEUNG, Page B11
ED REINKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2017
A published report says retailer
Walmart and health insurer
Humana may join forces.
Health care spending accounted
for about 18 percent of the US economy last year, and continues to surge
with an aging population, pricey
medications, and a complex regime of
reimbursements and middlemen.
Companies have been trying to address some of the market’s inefficiencies by getting bigger: Cigna Corp. is
acquiring Express Scripts Holding
Co. for $54 billion, and CVS Health
Corp. is buying Aetna Inc. for $68 billion.
For Walmar t , which operates
thousands of pharmacies in its stores,
the logic of buying an insurer could
be similar to drugstore chain CVS’s
plan — gaining more leverage in negotiations with drug companies by
taking up a bigger share of purchasing power for pharmaceuticals.
Walmart and Humana already
partner on prescription drug plans
for individuals in the US Medicare
program. The plans offer some prescriptions for as little as $1, as long as
customers pick up their drugs at a
Walmart or Sam’s Club. Walmart
could use the takeover to steer more
of Humana’s customers to its stores
through its drug coverage arrangements.
Stores can also be a convenient
place for individuals to get care, and
both CVS and Walmart have clinics in
some stores.
A cupcake-craze fixture lands in Boston
By Steve Annear
GLOBE STAFF
For Bobbie Lloyd, the grand opening of Magnolia Bakery in Faneuil Hall
Marketplace Thursday marked something of a return to her Boston roots.
Long before she was a celebrity
judge on TLC’s “Next Great Baker,” and
before she lived in New York City, overseeing cupcake duties as Magnolia’s
chief baking officer, she attended Boston’s Modern Gourmet Cooking School
and later co-owned a restaurant in
Brookline that featured classic American desserts.
Being back in Boston for the opening this week was nostalgic, to say the
least.
“This is where my culinary life
started,” Lloyd said. “My love of food
started somewhere else as a child, but
BAKERY, Page B13
ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Magnolia Bakery (think “Sex and the City”) has cheesecake and more at Quincy Market.
Business
B10
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
TALKING POINTS
ENERGY
LAWMAKERS ASK
EVERSOURCE
TO RETHINK SOLAR
CHARGE
AGRICULTURE
OCEAN SPRAY
HAS NEW CEO
LODGING
MASS. SENATE
UNVEILS BILL TO TAX
SHORT-TERM RENTALS
FAST FOOD
MCDONALD’S TO ADD
$150 MILLION TO
TUITION PROGRAM
Eversource Energy’s
controversial solar demand charge is now
getting scrutiny from
the state’s congressional delegation. US Senators Ed Markey and
Elizabeth Warren and
US Representative Joe
Kennedy signed a letter to Eversource on
Thursday asking the
company to rethink
the new charge before
it takes effect for new solar customers on Dec. 31. They cite the extra cost for homeowners
who adopt solar — in the neighborhood of $100 a year. The new charge, the federal lawmakers say, could undermine the state’s clean-energy goals and hurt blue-collar solar workers. State lawmakers are also looking at Eversource’s charge and have indicated they may
soon revisit the law that initially allowed the charge to be put in place. Meanwhile, Eversource says it simply wants to ensure that solar users pay their fair share of the costs for the
poles and wires that carry electricity on their streets. — JON CHESTO
Agenda
Saturday, March 31
SERIES
Get financially literate
Join the Boston Financial Learning Center
for a lesson in financial literacy. Speaker
and financial educator Kimmy Le will
share advice on how to get control of
personal finances and build a lasting
career. Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon, Boston
Financial Learning Center, 1200 Hancock
St., Suite 304, Quincy. Free. Register
online or go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
Ocean Spray Cranberries has a new boss. Bobby Chacko will be the
new CEO of the cranberry-farming cooperative in Lakeville, taking
over for longtime CEO Randy Papadellis. Chacko was promoted to
president and chief operating officer in February, making him the obvious heir apparent. Before joining Ocean Spray last year, Chacko was
a regional president in Pennsylvania with Mars Inc. Chacko will oversee about 2,000 employees. — JON CHESTO
The Massachusetts Senate has released a bill aimed at taxing short-term rentals, including
those made through online platforms like Airbnb. The bill unveiled Thursday would impose
existing state hotel taxes on the rooms and allow communities to impose local excise taxes.
The bill differs from legislation approved by the House last week. That bill included a tiered
system that would impose a 4 percent state tax on rentals by individuals who offer no more
than two rooms for rent. Short-term rentals made through a professional property manager
or investor host would be taxed at 5.7 percent and 8 percent, respectively. Airbnb said the
House bill goes too far. Backers of the Senate bill say it would generate $34.5 million in state
taxes and $25.5 million in local taxes annually. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
McDonald’s Corp. plans to pump $150 million
into tuition assistance for its US employees, becoming the latest corporate giant to use the federal tax overhaul to boost benefits. An estimated
400,000 restaurant workers will be eligible for
the program, the fast-food chain said on Thursday. To qualify, workers will only need to be with
the company for 90 days, down from nine
months, and work 15 hours a week, down from
20. The infusion, paid over five years, triples the
current spending level. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
CONFERENCE
Entrepreneurship
conference
Students and professionals are invited to
attend the annual Harvard
Entrepreneurship Conference to meet and
mingle with startups, venture capitalists,
and experienced entrepreneurs. There will
be keynote speakers, panels, and
networking. Breakfast, lunch, and happyhour cocktail included. Saturday, 8:30
a.m. to 7 p.m., Harvard Business School,
Cambridge. Tickets range from $35 to
$150. Register online or go to the
business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
DRIVERLESS CARS
FAMILY SETTLES
OVER AUTONOMOUS
VEHICLE DEATH
AUTOMOBILES
VOLKSWAGEN
VOWS TO
ACCEPT TRADES
OF DIESEL CARS
BANNED IN
GERMANY
The family of an Arizona woman killed when struck by an autonomous Uber vehicle apparently has reached a settlement with the company. Cristina Perez Hesano, an attorney for the
daughter and husband of 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg, said Thursday that the matter ‘‘has
been resolved,’’ but would not go into detail. Herzberg was killed March 18 as she walked
her bike across a dark street in Tempe, Ariz., a Phoenix suburb. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sunday, April 1
Volkswagen is trying to reassure German customers worried
about the future of their diesel cars by telling them they can
trade in their new diesel if it is banned from the road by cities trying to meet air pollution limits. The company said
Thursday that the guarantee applies to new cars bought from
a Volkswagen dealer from April 1 through the end of the
year, and would be good for three years. If the car owner is
hit with a ban on driving at work or at home, the car could
go back to the dealer for a non-banned model. The German
courts have ruled that cities with high pollution levels can
ban diesel cars from their streets. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
WORKSHOP
MORTGAGES
RATES LARGELY
UNCHANGED
Long-term mortgage rates moved little this week after a monthslong stretch of increases.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said the average rate on 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages ticked
down to 4.44 percent from 4.45 percent last week. The benchmark rate averaged 4.14 percent a year ago. Rates are relatively low by historical standards, but they have risen from an
average that remained below 4 percent last year. Mortgage rates rose steadily in January,
February, and early March, as interest rates generally increased in response to higher levels
of government debt and expectations of rising inflation. The previous week’s slight gain was
the 10th increase in 11 weeks. The average rate on 15-year, fixed-rate loans slipped to 3.90
percent this week from 3.91 percent last week. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
User experience
design
Attend a workshop on User Experience
Design (UXD), the process of improving
product usability to enhance user
satisfaction. Students will learn to
understand how humans interact with
digital products and services, how to
complete a white-board challenge at an
interview, and more. Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4
APPS
SNAP TO CUT
ANOTHER 100 JOBS
Snap Inc. is cutting another set of employees, focusing this time on the advertising side of the
business after earlier trimming staff in engineering and content. The cuts total around 100 workers, according to people familiar with the matter,
and represent the final step in a restructuring process set in motion in the fourth quarter. The people didn’t want to be identified discussing internal
details. Snap, which operates the Snapchat app,
cut around 120 engineers earlier this month, saying it wanted to maintain a high technical bar, according to an internal memo distributed
at the time. In January, the company let about two dozen employees go on the content side
of its business. Those moves fueled further uncertainty for staff at a company that’s lost key
executives and released a widely criticized product redesign. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
p.m., General Assembly, 125 Summer St.,
13th floor, Boston. $250. Register online
or go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
BOOT CAMP
Learn to use SQL
Attend a workshop on Structured Query
Language (SQL), a domain-specific
language used in design and
programming. Participants will gain a
working knowledge of SQL through
lectures and exercises. Must have
PRIVATE CLUBS
IS CLUB OFFERING
FEMALE WORK SPACE,
NETWORKING
DISCRIMINATORY?
New York City is investigating whether a private club founded as a work space and networking hub exclusively for women violates the city’s antidiscrimination law by barring
men. The city’s Commission on Human Rights started its probe into The Wing after receiving a tip from the public. The inquiry focuses on whether the club violates the city’s public
accommodations law, which bans discrimination on the basis of gender. A lawyer representing The Wing said it does not violate any city or state laws. The club’s cofounder Audrey
Gelman said the club’s success shows women have ‘‘a deep yearning’’ for all-female spaces.
— ASSOCIATED PRESS
PostgreSQL and PGadmin installed ahead
of time. Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
General Assembly, 125 Summer St., 13th
floor, Boston. Register online or go to the
business agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E-mail us at
agenda@globe.com
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
25
THE BOSTON GLOBE
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
Markets
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B11
Bentley to honor first woman leader
uLEUNG
Continued from Page B9
“I have not been disappointed,”
Larson told me in an interview in
her campus corner office recently.
Millennials “really do want to be
the agents of change in the business world.”
Larson was brought in to raise
the profile of Bentley, an institution that can get easily overshadowed when your backyard is filled
with the likes of Harvard, MIT,
Wellesley, Boston University, Tufts,
and Northeastern.
She’s tried to set Bentley apart
by focusing on how the school prepares its undergraduates for work,
even partnering with companies to
fine-tune the curriculum so students are taught skills employers
are looking for.
Larson has been touting socalled hybrid education — or what
Bentley likes to call “PreparedU,”
which is the title of her recent
book. It combines academics with
internships and other experiential
learning to better prepare students
for the world of work. It’s a similar
formula proselytized by her counterpart Joseph Aoun at Northeastern, with its co-op tradition.
“It’s not so much where you go
to college, but how do you go to
college,” Larson said.
Bentley enjoys a high rate of job
placement for graduates — over 97
percent — at a time when families
are focused on making sure they
get a return on investment from
their college educations. Bentley’s
annual cost, including room and
board, is more than $68,000.
While Larson has spent a lifetime preoccupied with how women
can break the glass ceiling, the notion of launching a center to advance women didn’t gel until about
halfway into her presidency.
It was PricewaterhouseCoopers
— the accounting firm that employs more Bentley graduates than
any other company — that sparked
the idea when on a campus visit executives asked Larson if she had a
personal priority as president.
Larson said she wanted to help
women break through in the busi-
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
Bentley’s outgoing president (above) will lend her name to the Gloria Cordes Larson
Center for Women and Business.
ness world. To which an executive
from PwC responded: “You have
just named one of the corporate
world’s single biggest problems:
the retention of high-potential
women.”
That discussion, in the living
room of the Bentley’s president’s
house, led to the creation of the
Center for Women and Business in
2011. PwC gave $1 million, while
four alumni kicked in $3 million to
get the initiative off the ground.
Liberty Mutual provided an additional $1 million last year.
Among those alumni were Steve
and Christine Manfredi, who gave
$2 million. They were the ones who
wanted to rename the center in
Larson’s honor, to keep her connected to Bentley.
“It’s something I have thought
about for a long time,” said Steve
Manfredi, who is also chair of the
Bentley board. “She’s always going
to be out in the public arena. She is
always going to be an advocate. It’s
just a natural fit.”
After decades of fighting the
good fight, Larson feels that women are finally on the verge of being
treated equally.
“This is the first time I have felt
overwhelmingly positive about the
pace of change,” she said. “I think
the tipping point is upon us.”
So what’s next for Larson?
Not politics, though she said she
has twice been asked by prior governors to run as their lieutenant
governor. “I said no. My focus has
been policy, not politics,” said Larson, who is an unenrolled voter.
Instead, she’s staying in academia, but this time at Harvard.
Starting in the fall, she will be a
“president-in-residence,” in a yearlong program at the Graduate
School of Education and serving as
an adviser and mentor to aspiring
college presidents.
It’s not a seven-day-a-week gig,
which is exactly what she was looking for.
“I see this as a personal decomp r e s s i o n c h a m b e r,” L a r s o n
quipped.
‘This is the
first time I
have felt
overwhelmingly
positive
about the
pace of
change. I
think the
tipping
point is
upon us.’
GLORIA
LARSON.
referring to
women’s fight for
equality
Shirley Leung is a Globe columnist.
She can be reached at
shirley.leung@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @leung.
Stocks’ 2-day losing streak ends
Technology companies powered US stocks to solid gains
Thursday, snapping the market’s two-day losing streak.
Banks, consumer-focused companies, and industrial stocks
also helped lift the market. Even so, the broad gains weren’t
enough to make up for the market’s first quarterly loss
since 2015. After years of slow-and-steady growth and a
roaring start to 2018, the market plunged in early February,
its first 10 percent drop in two years. In the weeks since,
the market has been volatile. The Dow is down 2.5 percent
for the year, while the S&P 500 is off 1.2 percent. The Nasdaq is holding to a 2.3 percent gain. Major indexes were
headed higher from the start of trading Thursday as investors sized up several earnings reports and data showing
spending by US consumers rose 0.2 percent in February,
while incomes increased 4.4 percent. Tech stocks powered
much of the market’s climb Thursday. Facebook added 4.4
percent after taking a beating for days over privacy concerns. Even with the roller-coaster ride that technology
stocks have been on lately, the sector is up 3.2 percent this
year, while most other sectors are in the red.
DOW JONES industrial average
Mass. firms pull ads from Ingraham show
uADVERTISING
Continued from Page B9
ing to be extra skittish in terms of
trying to avoid any kind of blowback from what’s essentially a political and public relations battle,” said
John Carroll, a professor at Boston
University who focuses on journalism and advertising.
He said companies under normal circumstances will try to reach
consumers across ideological lines,
using TripAdvisor as an example.
“Conservatives travel, too. TripAdvisor is perfectly happy to appeal
to as wide an audience as they possibly can,” Carroll said. “But there’s
a certain level of heat and pushback
from the public that they are not
willing to undergo.”
The backlash came after Ingraham tweeted a link Wednesday to a
story about Hogg being rejected at
four colleges. Ingraham also said it
was ‘‘totally predictable, given acceptance rates’’ that Hogg was
‘‘dinged by UCLA with a 4.1 GPA.’’
Hogg, in turn, called for a boycott of major companies that advertise on her show, tweeting out a list
of 12, including TripAdvisor, Wayfair, and Liberty Mutual.
Outside of Massachusetts, other
companies on Hogg’s list, including
Expedia, Nestle, and the pet food
brand Nutrish, said they would remove their ads from Ingraham’s
show, according to news accounts.
Hogg tweeted a “thank you” to
TripAdvisor on Thursday afternoon
JIM LO SCALZO/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
Marjory
Stoneman
Douglas High
School student
David Hogg
spoke at the
March For Our
Lives demonstration last
week in Washington, D.C.
— a tweet that earned more than
14,000 likes in about an hour.
Christina Prignano of the Globe
staff contributed to this report.
AG seeks closure of consumer electricity market
By Jon Chesto
GLOBE STAFF
NASDAQ Composite index
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
Attorney General Maura Healey
on Thursday called for the Legislature to shut down the market that
allows consumers to buy electricity
from independent suppliers instead
of their local utility, saying they are
being hit with millions in extra
costs.
Healey released a report that
showed electric customers who
switched to a competitive supplier
collectively paid nearly $180 million
more than if they had remained
with their utility, during a two-year
period between July 2015 and July
2017.
The report focused on the nearly
500,000 residents who buy directly
from a competitive supplier, not residents participating in a group contract organized by their community.
Healey said she found patterns that
indicate low-income and minority
neighborhoods are being targeted
with aggressive sales tactics: Thirtysix percent of low-income households received their electricity supplies from a competitive supplier,
double the rate among nonlow-income customers.
Edgar Dworsky, founder of the
ConsumerWorld.org website in
Somerville, said he was surprised to
learn that low-income residents are
particularly being targeted, and are
paying more than other people as a
result.
“There may have been a bona
fide deal for some short period of
time,” Dworsky said. “But like the
$99 triple play from the cable company, you better be careful when the
year is up because that bill is going
up. Rich or poor, everyone needs to
scrutinize their bills monthly.”
Shutting down the competitive
market for individuals, Healey said,
is the most effective way to protect
them from scams. She is not targeting municipal group-purchasing cooperatives, or the commercial and
industrial market.
Earlier this week, Healey announced that one supplier, Viridian
Energy LLC of Connecticut, had
agreed to pay $5 million to settle
charges that its marketing and sales
practices were deceptive. The company also agreed to not market its
electricity supply door-to-door in
Massachusetts for the next two
years.
A spokesman for the state energy
and environmental affairs office said
the Baker administration would review Healey’s report.
Customers have been able to buy
electricity from a company other
than their utilities since a 1997 state
deregulation law took effect. While
many large commercial and industrial users, such as factories or university campuses, were quick to take
advantage of the opportunity, savings have been harder to find on the
residential side. One reason is the
existing utilities — namely Eversource and National Grid — can be
tough to beat. They buy power at
wholesale rates and pass on the
costs directly to consumers without
a markup.
In 2014, state regulators adopted
rules that allow suppliers to pass
along unpaid bills to the utilities,
making it less risky for new firms to
enter the market.
The Retail Energy Supply Association, a national trade group that
represents 20-plus companies,
called Healey’s analysis “solitary and
flawed.”
“It’s not like everyone in this
market is a bad actor,” added James
Bride, president of Energy Tariff Experts LLC in Cambridge. “There are
reputable companies that do deliver
value to customers.”
Bride suggested the state could
subject suppliers to new regulations,
such as clarifying their marketing
claims. He also said officials should
encourage “smart meter” practices
that allow consumers to pay less for
power during off peak times. Those
types of plans could give suppliers a
competitive edge.
“Just shutting the entire thing
down strikes me as a little Draconian compared to doing a thorough
analysis of best practices all around
the country,” added Ian Bowles, who
works at a Boston firm that finances
energy startups and is a former state
energy and environmental affairs
secretary. “We need more, not less,
innovation in this area.”
Jon Chesto can be reached at
jon.chesto@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @jonchesto.
‘There are
reputable
companies
that do
deliver
value to
customers.’
JAMES BRIDE,
president, Energy
Tariff Experts
LLC
B12
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
Trump again launches attack against Amazon Google,
Facebook
reveal UK
pay gap
Says retailer should
pay more in taxes
By Eileen Sullivan
and Nick Wingfield
NEW YORK TIMES
WASHINGTON — President
Trump escalated his attack on Amazon on Thursday, saying that the
online behemoth does not pay
enough taxes — and strongly suggesting that he may try to rein in
the e-commerce business.
The president’s commentary
was made in a Twitter post in
which he accused Amazon of putting thousands of local retailers
out of business and of using the
US Postal Service as “their Delivery Boy.”
“I have stated my concerns
with Amazon long before the Election,” Trump wrote. “Unlike others, they pay little or no taxes to
state & local governments, use our
Postal System as their Delivery
Boy (causing tremendous loss to
the US), and are putting many
thousands of retailers out of business!”
Amazon and the company’s
founder, Jeff Bezos, are among
Trump’s regular Twitter targets. In
December, Trump questioned
whether the US Post Office charges Amazon enough for package deliveries. And in August, Trump
said Amazon hurts taxpaying businesses.
Amazon, however, does pay
taxes — $412 million in 2016, for
example, according to the company’s report to the Securities and
Exchange Commission.
Trump has attacked Amazon on
Twitter more than a dozen times
since late 2015, months after he
had launched his presidential
campaign. Many of those tweets
seem to have been prompted by
critical coverage in The Washington Post, the news organization
that Bezos acquired personally in
2013 for $250 million.
Women are paid
less than men
By Giles Turner
and Nate Lanxon
BLOOMBERG NEWS
TAMIR KALIFA/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Trump has repeatedly accused
Bezos of using the Post as a tool to
intimidate opponents in Washington into treating Amazon more favorably, although editors at the
newspaper say Bezos plays no role
in directing its news coverage.
The president’s latest broadside
did not mention the Post, instead
focusing on a handful of issues he
has previously cited to criticize
Amazon. While Amazon once
widely avoided collecting sales tax
in states, it now collects it in every
state that has one for goods that it
sells from its own inventory.
Some municipalities, however,
have complained that Amazon
does not collect local taxes under
its agreements with states. And in
most states Amazon does not col-
lect sales taxes on sales of goods
sold by third parties on its platform.
Drew Herdener, an Amazon
spokesman, declined to comment.
The media company Axios reported Wednesday that Trump has
wondered aloud whether Amazon
could be vulnerable to antitrust or
competition laws. Amazon shares
fell almost 5 percent after the Axios article was published. In afternoon trading Thursday, they were
down more than 1 percent.
Raj Shah, a deputy White
House press secretary, said that
Trump “has talked about the need
to have tax parity between online
retailers and brick-and-mortar retailers.”
Shah, speaking Thursday
morning on the program, “Fox &
Friends,” said this was something
Congress could help facilitate and
that the president would support.
In 2015, shortly after Trump
started his attacks against the
company, Bezos joked on Twitter
about sending the candidate into
space on a rocket made by Blue
Origin, a space exploration startup
Bezos owns.
But since Trump became president, Bezos and Amazon have become much quieter about his attacks. The company has refused to
comment publicly about them.
People who work there say privately that, while they do not enjoy
Trump’s tweets, they are more
likely to prompt eye rolling rather
than some form of crisis control.
An Amazon
Flex driver
delivered a
package to a
home in Austin,
Texas, earlier
this month.
Administration set
to ease fuel-efficiency
targets for carmakers
By Juliet Eilperin
and Brady Dennis
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — Top Trump
administration officials are engaged in a heated debate over how
to undo federal fuel-efficiency targets for cars and light trucks, as
manufacturers voice concern that a
major rollback of an Obama-era
rule could go too far and fracture
the nation’s auto market.
The internal negotiations over
relaxing carbon-emission limits for
cars and SUVs slated to be sold in
model years 2022-2025 underscore
the challenge officials face in trying
to fulfill President Trump’s 2017
promise to ease the regulatory burden on Detroit.
Some of the same companies
that had pressed for action now
worry that they will be forced to
comply with two standards: the
stricter specifications that California imposes on its massive auto
market and a separate requirement
for the rest of the country.
Within the next few days, several administration officials say, the
Environmental Protection Agency
will announce that it has concluded automakers cannot meet fuel-efficiency guidelines set by the previous administration. Under those
guidelines, cars and light trucks
would have to average more than
50 miles per gallon overall by 2025.
But the more difficult issue is
what the replacement will be — a
point of intense wrangling among
the EPA, the National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration, and
the White House. The talks have
been complicated by the fact that
California sets the pace for nearly
35 percent of the nation’s auto market, with tailpipe requirements followed by a dozen states and the
District of Columbia.
California has threatened to
press ahead on its own if the administration weakens the federal
targets significantly, prompting
some automakers to lobby for the
current standards to mainly be
kept. The current federal requirement for the 2018 model year is
38.3 miles per gallon. By 2025, it
would rise to roughly 51 miles per
gallon.
On Tuesday, Ford executive
chairman Bill Ford and chief executive Jim Hackett wrote a post on
Medium calling for ‘‘one set of standards nationally, along with addi-
tional flexibility’’ that would allow
Ford to sell lower-emissions vehicles that US consumers could afford.
‘‘We support increasing cleancar standards through 2025 and
are not asking for a rollback,’’ they
wrote.
Company officials plan to meet
with EPA administrator Scott
Pruitt by early next week to discuss
the potential new standards. General Motors chief executive Mary
Barra met with Pruitt and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao
earlier this month.
Margo Oge, a former senior EPA
official who helped to negotiate the
Obama administration’s guidelines
with California and the auto industry, said that multiple companies
have privately shared the concerns
that Ford just raised publicly. Rather than change the 2025 thresholds, the automakers want more
options for meeting them given the
significant sums manufacturers
have already invested.
‘‘I don’t think they were expecting that the Trump administration
would roll back the standards’’ to
the degree that now seems likely,
Oge said. ‘‘Sometimes you dance
with the devil, then you don’t really
like the dance.’’
Officials at the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, whose
members produce 70 percent of
the cars and light trucks sold in the
United States, say low gasoline
prices in recent years have created
a disconnect between what sort of
vehicles federal policy makers expect to be sold and what Americans
are ac tually buying. Alliance
spokeswoman Gloria Berquist noted that the government had previously predicted future sales would
be two-thirds cars and one-third
light trucks, while the current ratio
is the reverse.
‘‘We’re caught between these
standards and the marketplace,
and they’re not aligning,’’ Berquist
said.
Within the administration,
NHTSA Deputy Director Heidi
King has pressed for a significant
reduction in future mileage levels.
The agency has offered a range of
numbers in negotiations, according to individuals who spoke on the
condition of anonymity because no
final decision has been reached,
with the lowest proposal being
34.5 miles per gallon by 2025.
Facebook Inc. pays female
staff in Britain just 0.8 percent
less on average than male employees, but women’s bonuses
are almost 40 percent lower.
The mean average disparity
in pay at Facebook is an improvement compared to
Google’s UK arm, where women are paid on average 17 percent less than men. Google’s average bonus for female staff is
43 percent lower than for male
staff.
Amazon.com Inc. also released gender pay gap figures
Thursday for its various UK
subsidiaries. It pays women an
average of six percent less than
men across its local workforce
The company also broke out
its UK subsidiaries, such as Amazon Video Ltd., which pays
women on average 40 percent
less than men, but its Amazon
UK Services Ltd. business pays
women just 2 percent less, better than that of the parent company’s combined workforce average.
A m o n g Fa c e b o o k ’s t o p
quartile — or highest paid staff
— about 30 percent are women.
This decreases to just 19 percent in the second quartile, according to data published by
the company. For Amazon Video, the figures are about 39 percent and 50 percent respectively, while Amazon UK Services
hovers about the 30 percent
Among Facebook’s
highest paid staff
about 30 percent
are women.
BRIAN BLANCO/GETTY IMAGES
Gunmaker struggled to find
lender for bankruptcy financing
By Eliza Ronalds-Hannon
and Tiffany Kary
BLOOMBERG NEWS
For Remington Outdoor Co.,
one of the oldest firearms makers
in the United States, not even going
bankrupt is easy these days.
At a time when gun-control
demonstrations have unfolded
across the nation and the world, 30
lenders declined to provide bankruptcy financing for the company,
according to court filings. In the
end, two prominent financial companies— Franklin Resources and a
unit of JPMorgan Chase — ended
up giving Remington the bulk of a
$100 million loan. The names of
other lenders that agreed to provide financing were blacked out
from court documents.
Gunmakers have fallen on hard
times. A projected jump in sales
stemming from the expected election of Hillary Clinton never materialized due to her defeat, and retailers such as Dick’s Sporting
Goods Inc. have restricted sales.
Remington, burdened by debt from
its 2007 acquisition by Cerberus
Capital Management, filed for
Chapter 11 on March 25, a day after throngs energized by student
survivors of a February mass shooting in Florida rallied for the passage of tighter gun laws. The skittishness of Remington’s potential
lenders could be the first sign that
Wall Street is listening to the protesters.
Remington, to speed through
Chapter 11, needed three new
forms of financing to help it stay
afloat through the bankruptcy process.
The company was able to secure
a $45 million bridge loan from its
parent, which is owned by Cerberus, to give it enough cash to
make it to the bankruptcy in the
first place.
The company also had to negotiate debtor-in-possession loans to
finance operations through the
Chapter 11. Remington sought a
$100 million term loan from outside investors to provide a large
chunk of the cash. It had no takers.
‘‘The vast majority of lenders
contacted, however, indicated that
they were reluctant to provide financing to firearms manufacturers,’’ according to a court filing. The
company’s adviser, Lazard Freres &
Co., said it approached 30 potential
lenders — not just banks but hedge
funds specializing in distressed
debt who are usually hungry for
such opportunities — and found no
appetite among them.
Finally, existing term-loan lenders agreed to extend the $100 million loan — but their identities remained anonymous. Their names
are redacted from court documents.
Spokesmen for Franklin, JPMorgan, and Cerberus declined to
comment. A Remington representative didn’t respond to requests
for comment.
Remington appears to have had
an easier time negotiating with
parties to an asset-backed loan.
Eventually, the lenders provided
$193 million. Among them are
Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Regions Financial, Synovus Financial
Corp., Fifth Third Bank Bancorp,
and Deutsche Bank.
Bret Reid
displayed a
Remington 700
hunting rifle
and a
Remington R1
Enhanced
model 1911
pistol at
Atlantic
Outdoors gun
shop in
Stokesdale,
N.C., this week.
mark for both of the top two
quartiles.
The largest difference for the
top percentile in Amazon’s report was within its London Development Center unit, where
just 8.2 percent of the highest
earners are women. Within this
division, more women receive
bonuses compared to men — 98
percent versus 95 percent— but
female employees received a
mean bonus pay 12 percent
lower than male colleagues.
In a statement Thursday, the
e-commerce giant said that using the median average rather
than the mean, its own gender
pay gap analysis for the collective Amazon UK workforce
showed it paid women 0.7 percent more than men, however.
“ We have programs that
we’re continually working to
further improve, to actively recruit and help advance more
women into senior and technology-focused roles as we grow
our business here in the UK,” an
Amazon spokesman said in the
statement.
Staff at the US tech giants
are among some of the best
paid in the UK. Around 1,000
people work for Facebook UK
Ltd., sharing pay of $290 million over 2016, according to the
latest available accounts.
Fiona Mullan, head of European human resources at Facebook, said the pay gap was due
to the company’s engineering
workforce, which represents
over half of Facebook’s employees in the UK, and that more
men are in senior leadership
positions.
“Technical roles also tend to
drive higher market rates of
pay, both in terms of salary and
total compensation, due to the
demand for specialized skills,”
Mullan said.
All companies with more
than 250 UK employees have to
disclose their gender pay gaps
by April 4. As of Friday, 6,356 of
an expected 9,000 companies
had submitted data to the government website. Among other
companies known for out-sized
paychecks, Goldman Sachs
Group Inc. reported a UK pay
gap of 56 percent, while Citigroup Inc. pays UK females 44
percent less than male employees on average.
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B13
PHOTOS BY ARAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Justin Shaka marveled at Magnolia’s cupcake selection; chief baking officer Bobbie Lloyd and cashier Meme Dunham served the bakery’s first customer, Heidi Baldacci, on opening day.
Magnolia Bakery (think ‘Sex and the City’) lands in Boston
uBAKERY
Continued from Page B9
my culinary life started here.”
And with that, Lloyd disappeared into the bustling crowds of
people who packed together in a
long line that stretched half the
length of Quincy Market’s west
end, orchestrating the store’s debut as samples of Boston Cream
Pie Banana Pudding, a local twist
on a company staple, were handed
out.
Magnolia Bakery first opened
in 1996 in New York City’s West
Village. Four years later, it was
prominently featured in Season 3
of the hit show “Sex and the City,”
sending fans scrambling to the
store’s front doors to get their
hands on some homemade sweets.
Since then, it has remained a
fixture of the cupcake craze, even
Barclays
to pay $2b
mortgage
settlement
By Renae Merle
WASHINGTON POST
After a three-year investigation, the Justice Department
said Thursday that it had
reached a $2 billion settlement
with Barclays, a giant British
bank that federal prosecutors
say sold toxic mortgages that
contributed to the global financial crisis.
Prosecutors say that between 2005 and 2007 Barclays
sold investors packages of
mortgages that were worth
less than the bank claimed,
costing the investors billions
of dollars. More than half of
the $31 billion in mortgage
packages eventually defaulted,
prosecutors said. The settlement ‘‘is an important step in
recognizing the harm that was
caused to the national economy,’’ Richard Donoghue, US attorney for the Eastern District
of New York, said in statement.
But, for Barclays, the settlement may also be a triumph.
The penalty could have been
much bigger, industry analysts
say. The bank also didn’t have
to admit wrongdoing.
‘‘The settlement came at
the bottom end of expectations
and much sooner than expected,’’ Ian Gordon, an analyst at
Investec, said in a research
note, according to Bloomberg.
Barclays is paying much
less than some other big banks
who have faced similar allegat i o n s . In 2 0 1 3 , J P Mo r g a n
Chase paid $13 billion. In
2014, Bank of America agreed
to a record-setting $16 billion
settlement. Deutsche Bank
paid $7 billion earlier this
year.
In a statement Thursday,
Barclays chief executive Jes
Staley said he was pleased to
reach a ‘‘fair and proportionate settlement,’’ adding, ‘‘It has
been a priority for this management team from the start
to resolve these historic issues
in a timely and appropriate
manner wherever possible.’’
The Justice Department also extracted $2 million from
two former Barclays executives, Paul Menefee and John
Carroll. But neither admitted
w r o n gd o i n g , a n d b o t h r e mained defiant despite the settlement.
during a time that feels like fancy
doughnuts have taken center stage
and cupcake shops locally have
closed their doors.
If Thursday’s turnout was any
indication, the company continues
to attract a wide range of people —
both first-timers and fervent fans
— with a hankering for frosted
goodies.
Many who came to sample and
spend money at the Quincy Market bakery had snuck out of work
for a few brief moments.
Justin Shaka, chief executive of
a startup called Rebion, and coworker Rachael Aldrich showed
up 15 minutes before the shop
opened its counter to raucous applause. They said they had never
tried Magnolia Bakery before, so
they didn’t mind the half-hour
wait before stocking up on delec-
tables.
“I see a carrot cake, I see a lemon,” said Aldrich, eyeing the array
of cupcakes behind the glass case.
“I’m getting them all.”
James Driscoll, 24, was there
for the banana pudding. He had
sampled it before, when a State
Street colleague brought it up
from New York City, so he knew
what he wanted before staking his
claim in the ever-growing queue.
“I never was a fan of pudding
like that, but when I tried this, I
was like, ‘It’s very good,’ ” he said.
“It’s definitely worth it, in my
mind.”
Food blogger Olivia Yang knew
what the bakery had to offer as if
she were reading from its menu.
“They have more than just cupcakes,” she said. “Their red velvet
slices are really good, they have ti-
ramisu, they have tarts — it’s just a
really good, well-rounded bakery.”
She said that as a native of New
Jersey who didn’t live far from
Magnolia’s New York locations,
having a shop in Boston was like
having a little piece of home nearby. “It’s kind of like a classic,” said
Yang, 26. “When you think New
York City, you think Magnolia Bakery.”
Magnolia
Bakery, which
started in the
West Village in
New York City,
is most well
known for its
cupcakes.
While some people stepped
away from their day jobs to visit
the bakery, others arrived with
wide-eyed and eager children, as
the smell of frosting wafted
through the air.
Patty Kendall, a Beacon Hill
resident, waited near the back of
the line with her daughter Abigail,
3, and 8-month-old-son. When she
told her daughter they were heading to Faneuil Hall to get cupcakes, Abigail sprinted to get her
clothes on, she said.
“It was the fastest we have ever
gotten out of the house,” Kendall
said.
Steve Annear can be reached at
steve.annear@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @steveannear.
Aimee Ortiz of the Globe staff
contributed to this report.
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F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
G l o b e
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Red Sox chairman Werner reacts to success of ‘Roseanne’ reboot
ADAM ROSE/ABC VIA AP
Roseanne Barr and John Goodman in “Roseanne.”
Some people are surprised that, all these years later,
“Roseanne” is a hit again. Not Tom Werner.
Before he was Red Sox chairman, Werner was a TV executive with a host of hit sitcoms to his credit, including
“Roseanne,” and he had a pretty good idea that reviving the
show about a fictional blue-collar family — whose matriarch now is a Trump supporter — would resonate with
viewers.
Boy was he right. The “Roseanne” reboot, executive produced by Werner, drew more than
18 million viewers Tuesday, prompting President Trump himself to call star Roseanne
Barr to congratulate her on the show’s success (and, we’re just guessing, take credit for
the excellent ratings).
“I’m happy the president called Roseanne,”
Werner told us Thursday. “Part of what we’re trying
to do with this show is generate a conversation about the
economic struggles of the Conner family. There’s no doubt
one reason Trump was successful in places like Pennsylvania and Michigan and Wisconsin is because there were
working-class voters who wanted to see change.”
Werner, whose resume also includes “The Cosby Show,”
“3rd Rock From the Sun,” “Cybill,” and “That ’70s Show,”
said the characters on “Roseanne,” and the issues they deal
with, are relatable in a way that a lot of TV shows aren’t.
“So much of television is escapist, and ‘Roseanne’ is the
opposite of that,” he says.
But Werner says the reboot isn’t written to appeal specifically to Trump supporters. He wonders how folks in red
states reacted to the show’s second episode, in which Roseanne’s grandson expressed a desire to wear girls’ clothing. A
future episode will deal with a character who develops an
opioid addiction, and another is about John Goodman’s
character feeling frustrated about immigration.
“These are stories you won’t see on many other
comedies,” Werner says. “They’re incredibly relevant.”
Asked if Barr’s own political views — she’s
voiced support for Trump — helps or hinders
the show, Werner drew a comparison to the
’70s sitcom “All in the Family.”
“Archie was an extremely conservative character but the show worked because it was social
commentary,” he says. “I think people are aware of
Roseanne Barr’s political inclinations, but they’re more
interested in her character’s relationships with (Goodman’s
character) Dan and her daughters and grandchildren.”
Notwithstanding the success of the new “Roseanne,”
don’t expect Werner to resuscitate all of his past shows.
“I’m not necessarily a fan of reboots myself,” he says.
“What was exciting to me about this was introducing very
relevant themes and the opportunity to see these relatable
character wrestling with economic issues.
“I really don’t want to see Ashton Kutcher playing a 45year-old on ‘That ’70s Show.’ ”
P-town fest to honor
director Sean Baker
Affleck tweets back
at The New Yorker
Indie film fans may want to check
out the Provincetown International
Film Festival, which is planning something special this summer for its 20th
anniversary.
Sean Baker, the writer-director of
“The Florida Project” (and of 2015’s
“Tangerine”) will receive the Filmmaker on the Edge Award, an honor bestowed on creators who bend cinematic boundaries. Baker will attend the
festival and sit down June 16 with director/provocateur John Waters, a
previous Filmmaker on the Edge honoree.
Also, actress Chloë Grace Moretz
will be on hand to receive the festival’s
second annual Next Wave Award,
which spotlights unique voices in the
indie film world. Moretz, who stars in
the PIFF Spotlight selection “The
Miseducation of Cameron Post,” is
barely 21 but has already appeared in
dozens of films. (It helps when you
start at the age of 5.) She’ll accept the
award in conversation with Sundance
Film Festival director John Cooper
June 15.
The festival, which runs June 1317, kicks off with “Wild Nights With
Emily,” a dramedy starring former
“SNL” cast member Molly Shannon as
poet Emily Dickinson.
Ben Affleck responded Thursday to
The New Yorker’s gentle takedown titled “The Great Sadness of Ben Affleck,” and the Internet loves him for
it.
The actor tweeted: “@NewYorker
I’m doing just fine. Thick skin bolstered by garish
tattoos.”
Affleck,
who’s an
infrequent
tweeter,
had been
mute since
photos surfaced of him
standing shirtless on a beach in
Hawaii. The paparazzi pics confirmed
that the much-discussed tattoo of a
massive phoenix on Affleck’s back is,
in fact, real, and not, as he’d claimed
in an earlier interview, faked for a
movie.
The New Yorker piece, an assessment of Affleck since his split with
wife Jennifer Garner, called the Cambridge-bred Oscar winner “suddenly
flailing” and referenced “his enormous, garish tattoo.”
Whatever. Affleck’s response suggests he’s entirely unbothered by people’s impressions of him or his tattoo,
and Twitter approved. People posted
GIFs and memes of Affleck as Batman,
proclaiming the actor victorious over
The New Yorker.
Baker
Moretz
KELLY DAVIDSON
From left: Public Enemy songwriter and producer Hank Shocklee, Kurtis Blow, and Prince Charles Alexander.
Kurtis Blow drops wisdom on Berklee students
The legendary Kurtis Blow, considered one of the founders
of hip-hop, paid a visit to Berklee College of Music this week,
sitting down with Prince Charles Alexander, a Grammy-winning engineer who’s also a professor of music production and
engineering at Berklee. Blow also chatted with students in
music production, songwriting, and ensemble classes.
Blow’s career includes many firsts — first rapper to sign
with a major label, first to use a sample loop, first to earn a
gold record (for “The Breaks”), and first in rap to make a
music video (for “Basketball.”)
Blow, 58, encouraged students to network while in
school.
“Once you leave here, you have a calling card,” he said.
“People usually support you when you have goals and
dreams and aspirations. All doors will open.”
There’s no question Blow’s self-titled debut LP, released
in 1980, kickstarted hip-hop. In addition to his own music,
Blow produced or mixed several other artists, including
Run-D.M.C., The Fat Boys, as well as the “Krush Groove”
soundtrack.
Globe correspondent Robert Steiner
contributed. Read local celebrity news
at www.bostonglobe.com/names.
Names can be reached at names
@globe.com or at 617-929-8253.
Parker endorses Nixon
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
Cosby judge to stay on
The judge in Bill Cosby’s sexual assault trial rejected demands Thursday
from the comic’s lawyers that he step
aside because his wife is a social worker and advocate for assault victims.
Judge Steven O’Neill said at a pretrial hearing that he’s ‘‘not biased or
prejudiced’’ by his wife’s work and that
the assertion that he shares the same
views as his wife or has let his rulings
be influenced by her profession ‘‘is
faulty, plain and simple.’’
Cosby’s lawyers were in court
Thursday in suburban Philadelphia
making a last-ditch effort to postpone
the comedian’s sexual assault retrial
after losing their bid to overturn
O’Neill’s ruling allowing up to five additional accusers to testify. Jury selection is scheduled to begin Monday, but
Cosby’s lawyers could appeal that decision to the state Supreme Court.
The 80-year-old Cosby faces charges that he drugged and molested former Temple University athletics administrator Andrea Constand at his
home in 2004.
As Cosby’s lawyers were battling
with O’Neill, who also oversaw his first
trial, they were counting on him to
make critical rulings to bolster their
defense that Constand is a moneygrubbing liar.
The judge’s wife, Deborah O’Neill,
is a psychotherapist at the University
of Pennsylvania and coordinates a
team that cares and advocates for student sexual assault victims. Cosby’s
lawyers emphasized their concern
over a $100 donation made in Deborah O’Neill’s name to an organization
that gave money to a group planning
protests outside Cosby’s retrial.
O’Neill said the donation was made
13 months ago by the university department where his wife works and
that it wasn’t a personal donation using her own money or their joint assets.
O’Neill said Thursday that Cosby’s
old lawyers raised the prospect of having him step aside in December 2016,
but never followed through. He added
that he could’ve rejected the recusal
request simply because Cosby’s lawyers waited too long to ask.
He said they were aware of Deborah O’Neill’s work as far back as December 2016, but that they waited until getting several adverse rulings just
before retrial to raise it as an issue.
O’Neill spoke glowingly about his
wife and said it was difficult to have
her accomplishments ‘‘trivialized’’ in a
legal motion. He said Cosby’s lawyers
had presented an antiquated view of
marriage where spouses must agree
on everything. ‘‘What we do not share
are unified views,’’ O’Neill said, adding
that his wife’s views, ‘‘do not influence
me one iota.’’
The sweetest thing
Sarah Jessica Parker has endorsed
‘‘Sex and the City’’ castmate Cynthia
Nixon’s run for governor of New York.
Parker endorsed Nixon on Instagram Thursday, calling her ‘‘my sister
on and off screen.’’
Nixon is challenging incumbent
Governor Andrew Cuomo for the
Democratic nomination.
‘‘Sex and the City’’ star Kristin Davis also has endorsed Nixon.
The three women plus Kim Cattrall
starred in the HBO show from 1998 to
2004 and in two subsequent ‘‘Sex and
the City’’ films. (AP)
CRAIG BLANKENHORN
Sarah Jessica Parker (right) is the second “Sex and the City” cast member to endorse Cynthia Nixon (left) in her run for governor of New York.
The defense request for the judge
to step down was just one of the issues
being argued during the pretrial hearing Thursday. Cosby’s lawyers also
wanted the judge to allow jurors to
hear how much Cosby paid Constand
in a 2006 civil settlement and to hear
from a woman who says Constand
talked about making up allegations so
she could sue and get money.
Lawyer Becky James argued that
Marguerite Jackson’s testimony that
Constand talked about wanting to set
up a ‘‘high-profile person’’ after seeing
a television news report about a celebrity accused of violating women
speaks to her state of mind before she
went to police with allegations Cosby
drugged and molested her in 2004.
Assistant District Attorney Kristen
Fedden said that they doubt the discussion happened and Constand’s lawyer, Dolores Troiani, has said that
Jackson is ‘‘not telling the truth.’’
Prosecutors say the theory that
Constand wanted to set up Cosby is
undermined by the comedian’s testimony in a 2005 deposition that she
only visited his home when invited
and that he gave her pills without her
asking for them.
O’Neill blocked Jackson from testifying at the first trial because he said
her testimony would be hearsay and
prosecutors want him to do the same
for the retrial.
The AP does not typically identify
people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done. (AP)
A win for ‘Serial’ subject
A Maryland appeals court has upheld a ruling granting a new trial to a
man whose conviction in the murder
of his high school sweetheart became
the subject of the podcast ‘‘Serial.’’
Adnan Syed was convicted in 2000
of killing Hae Min Lee and burying her
body in a shallow grave in a Baltimore
park. A three-judge panel on Thursday
upheld a lower court ruling granting
him new trial.
Syed’s story was widely publicized
in the 2014 ‘‘Serial’’ podcast, which
cast doubt on his guilt. The show attracted millions of listeners and shattered podcast records.
A lower court judge vacated Syed’s
conviction in 2016, citing his attorney’s failure to cross-examine a key
witness. Prosecutors appealed to the
Maryland Court of Special Appeals,
the state’s intermediate appeals court.
(AP)
‘I am actually retired, so I would love to see you ladies.’
CAMERON DIAZ, actress, confirming her retirement while talking to Selma Blair and Christina Applegate
Sports
TV HIGHLIGHTS
PGA: Houston Open, 4 p.m., Golf Channel
Baseball: Red Sox-Rays, 7:10 p.m., NESN
NBA: Pelicans-Cavaliers, 8 p.m., ESPN
Women’s Final Four: Notre Dame-UConn, 9 p.m., ESPN2
Listings, C8
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E F R I DAY, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
OPENING DAY 2018
Pirates at Red Sox, 2:05 p.m., NESN
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8
4
0
0
Letting it slip
Bullpen’s
meltdown
does in Sox
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Alex
Cora slept peacefully through the night
before his first game as a major league
manager on Thursday. Instead of rushing off to the ballpark in the morning,
he ran a quick errand to pick up diapers and baby food for his 8-month-old
twin boys.
“It’s just a regular game, man. For
me, this is something I always wanted
to do, but it’s not going to change who
I am,” Cora said.
That could depend on his bullpen.
A near-perfect day turned into a disaster for Cora and the Red Sox when the
Tampa Bay Rays scored six runs in the
eighth inning to claim a 6-4 victory.
RED SOX, Page C5
Dan Shaughnessy
It can’t get
much worse
than this
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Nothing went right for the Red Sox in the eighth inning, including this infield grounder that eluded shortstop Xander Bogaerts for a run.
INSIDE
Power
trip
Celtics capped
4-0 swing in
style Wednesday night in
Utah. C2
Building
a lineup
The Athletic is
filling out roster for Bostonbased website.
Sports media, C2
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Wow.
What is there to say other than . . .
R Bring back John Farrell.
R Wait till next year.
R Bring back Grady Little.
R The Red Sox have already played
their worst game of the season.
R How do you blow a 4-0 lead to a
team that looks like it is designed to
lose?
R Bring back Bobby Valentine.
OK, let’s all calm down. I am overreacting here. The season is not over.
Alex Cora is going to be just fine (we
think). This is not going to be one of
those Raging Bullpen teams that
gives fans heart attacks in the seventh
and eighth innings.
SHAUGHNESSY, Page C6
Bruins take over first place in East
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
Bruins
4 There’s still enough of
the Big Bad Bruin
Lightning 2 m e m o r y r a t t l i n g
around the old West End for generations Baby Boomer and older to hold
out hope that one night benches will
clear on Causeway Street again, the
ice will turn into a junkyard of scattered sticks and gloves and tattered
shirts, and Garden rent-a-cops will
ring the lower bowl to hold back the
frothing, rabid masses.
Oh, how delightfully barbaric, and
wonderfully entertaining, we once
had it here in the Hub of Hockey.
It didn’t quite reach that level
Thursday night, amid the Bruins slipping oh-so-impressively into first
place in the Eastern Conference with
their 4-2 win over Tampa Bay. It was,
though, by current NHL standards, a
bonafide doozy, including a rare flareup by Tuukka Rask (now 33-11-5) in
which the Bruins goalie smacked
Cory Conacher upside the head midBRUINS, Page C3
CONFERENCE RACE
Bruins
Lightning
POINTS
107
POINTS
106
RECORD
48-17-11
RECORD
51-22-4
GAMES LEFT
6 (3 home, 3 away)
GAMES LEFT
5 (3 home, 2 away)
Final meeting: Bruins at Tampa Bay, Tuesday
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Bruins winger David Pastrnak (88) is at the center of
a celebration after scoring in the first period.
C2
T h e
Sports
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
p-Toronto
p-BOSTON
p-Cleveland
p-Philadelphia
*p-Indiana
Washington
Miami
*Milwaukee
W
55
52
45
44
44
41
41
39
L
20
23
30
30
31
34
35
35
Pct. GB Streak Home
.733 —
W1
31-7
.693
3
W 5 24-13
.600 10
W 1 25-11
.595 10½
W 8 26-11
.587 11
W 3 26-13
.547 14
L 1 21-17
.539 14½
W 2 24-13
.527 15½
L 1 23-15
Conf.
36-9
30-15
32-15
27-18
31-18
26-20
28-19
24-23
Detroit
Charlotte
New York
Brooklyn
Chicago
Orlando
Atlanta
35
34
27
24
24
22
21
40
42
49
51
51
52
54
.467
.447
.355
.320
.320
.297
.280
24-14
21-18
18-18
14-25
15-22
15-22
15-22
21-26
20-26
15-31
15-30
18-27
13-32
9-36
W L
d-Houston
61 14
*d-Golden State 54 20
Portland
46 29
Oklahoma City
44 31
New Orleans
43 32
San Antonio
43 32
Minnesota
43 33
Utah
42 33
Pct. GB Streak Home
.813 —
W 10
31-6
.730
6½
L 2 28-10
.613 15
L 1 25-13
.587 17
L 1 26-12
.573 18
L 2 22-16
.573 18
L2
29-8
.566 18½
W 1 28-10
.560 19
L 1 24-13
Conf.
38-8
30-16
28-17
25-21
22-24
25-20
30-16
28-17
LA Clippers
Denver
LA Lakers
*Sacramento
Dallas
Memphis
Phoenix
.547
.533
.446
.320
.307
.280
.250
23-23
24-23
17-28
11-35
13-36
18-28
13-33
20
21½
28½
31
31
32½
34
W3
L1
L2
W1
L7
L1
L4
WESTERN CONFERENCE
41
40
33
24
23
21
19
34
35
41
51
52
54
57
20
21
27½
37
38
40
42½
W3
L2
W1
L2
L1
W2
L 13
21-15
27-10
19-16
13-25
14-24
15-24
9-29
* — Not including late game
d — Clinched division
p — Clinched playoff berth
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
The three division champions in each conference, plus the next five
teams with the best records, qualify. Seeding is based solely on record.
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
At Detroit 103
Washington 92
At Miami 103
Chicago 92
at Sacramento
Indiana
at Golden St.
Milwaukee
At San Antonio 103 Okla. City 99
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Chicago at Orlando
7
Philadelphia at Atlanta
7:30
Minnesota at Dallas
8:30
Memphis at Utah
9
New Orleans at Cleveland
8
Milwaukee at LA Lakers
10:30
Phoenix at Houston
8
LA Clippers at Portland
10:30
Denver at Okla. City
8
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
BOSTON 97
Brooklyn 111
at Utah 94
at Orlando 104
At Philadelphia 118 New York 101
Cleveland 118
at Charlotte 105
CELTICS 97, JAZZ 94
A
1
3
1
3
3
1
4
0
4
20
F
2
1
4
2
3
1
2
1
2
18
Atlanta 114
At Memphis 108
Portland 103
LA Clippers 111
at Phoenix 99
At LA Lakers 103
Dallas 93
PISTONS 103, WIZARDS 92
Wednesday night game
BOSTON
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T
Yabsele. 15 1-2 0-0 0-1
Tatum ... 32 6-15 2-2 0-2
Baynes.. 28 6-8 1-1 2-6
Rozier.... 30 4-15 2-2 1-7
Brown ... 30 6-10 6-8 3-5
Ojeleye . 32 3-3 0-1 0-4
Larkin.... 34 4-11 0-0 2-9
Nader.... 16 3-5 0-0 0-0
Monroe. 23 2-10 4-6 3-8
Totals .... 35-79 15-20 11-42
At Minnesota 126
Pt
3
16
13
13
21
7
10
6
8
97
FG%: .443, FT%: .750. 3-pt. goals: 1221, .571 (Yabusele 1-2, Tatum 2-3, Rozier 3-8, Brown 3-3, Ojeleye 1-1, Larkin
2-4). Team rebounds: 6. Team turnovers: 18 (24 pts.). Blocks: 2 (Tatum 2).
Turnovers: 16 (Yabusele 2, Tatum 3,
Baynes 2, Brown 4, Ojeleye, Larkin, Nader 2, Monroe). Steals: 11 (Tatum 2,
Brown 2, Ojeleye 2, Nader, Monroe 4).
UTAH
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T A F Pt
Favors... 24 4-6 0-0 2-5 0 1 8
Ingles .... 33 4-12 1-1 1-6 5 3 11
Gobert... 40 3-5 4-6 3-11 2 1 10
Rubio..... 36 4-14 5-6 2-8 10 2 14
Mitchell 40 7-20 5-6 0-0 6 3 22
O'Neale. 18 1-2 0-0 0-3 1 2 2
Jerebko. 11 1-5 0-0 2-7 0 1 3
Crwder.. 29 7-14 0-0 1-4 0 4 16
Exum....... 9 3-4 2-2 1-1 1 1 8
Totals .... 34-82 17-21 12-45 25 18 94
FG%: .415, FT%: .810. 3-pt. goals: 933, .273 (Favors 0-1, Ingles 2-7, Rubio
1-6, Mitchell 3-8, O'Neale 0-1, Jerebko
1-2, Crowder 2-8). Team rebounds: 8.
Team turnovers: 16 (19 pts.). Blocks: 6
(Gobert 2, O'Neale 2, Crowder, Exum).
Turnovers: 16 (Favors, Ingles, Gobert 4,
Rubio 2, Mitchell 4, Crowder 3, Exum).
Steals: 7 (Gobert, Rubio 3, Mitchell,
Crowder 2).
Boston ...................18 30 19 30 — 97
Utah .......................24 15 32 23 — 94
A — 18,306 (19,911). T — 2:15. Officials — Zach Zarba, Courtney Kirkland,
Leroy Richardson.
WASHINGTON
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T
Porter.... 16 2-7 2-2 1-2
Morris ... 36 5-15 0-0 2-6
Gortat ... 28 5-7 0-0 2-12
Strnsky . 35 4-8 2-2 3-5
Beal ....... 36 6-17 2-3 1-5
Oubre.... 32 5-12 4-5 0-4
Mhinmi ... 9 2-4 0-0 1-2
Sssions . 15 2-4 2-3 1-2
Scott ..... 19 4-10 0-0 1-4
Meeks ... 14 2-5 0-0 0-1
Totals .... 37-89 12-15 12-43
A
2
5
3
6
1
3
0
6
1
1
28
F
0
3
3
3
1
2
2
0
4
1
19
Pt
7
11
10
11
15
14
4
6
8
6
92
FG%: .416, FT%: .800. 3-pt. goals: 632, .188 (Porter Jr. 1-3, Morris 1-6, Satoransky 1-3, Beal 1-8, Oubre Jr. 0-4,
Sessions 0-1, Scott 0-2, Meeks 2-5).
Blocks: 6 (Porter Jr., Morris 4, Oubre
Jr.). Turnovers: 15 (Porter Jr. 2, Morris,
Gortat 2, Satoransky, Beal 6, Mahinmi,
Scott, Meeks). Steals: 9 (Morris, Gortat, Satoransky, Beal 2, Oubre Jr., Sessions 2, Meeks).
DETROIT
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T A F Pt
Johnson 37 4-11 0-0 2-5 2 2 9
Tolliver . 32 4-6 5-5 1-2 2 2 14
Drmnd... 38 10-16 4-7 5-23 4 2 24
Jackson. 28 6-16 1-2 0-2 8 2 13
Bullock.. 29 6-9 0-0 0-1 3 0 14
Smith .... 20 3-9 0-0 0-3 2 2 6
Ellenson 16 3-7 2-2 1-5 1 0 9
Kennard 19 2-5 3-4 0-1 2 1 8
Ennis ..... 11 2-4 0-0 0-0 0 0 4
Mrelnd .. 10 1-1 0-0 1-2 2 3 2
Totals .... 41-84 15-20 10-44 26 14 103
FG%: .488, FT%: .750. 3-pt. goals: 621, .286 (Johnson 1-3, Tolliver 1-3, Jackson 0-4, Bullock 2-4, Smith 0-3, Ellenson
1-1, Kennard 1-2, Ennis 0-1). Blocks: 3
(Tolliver, Drummond, Moreland). Turnovers: 16 (Johnson 2, Tolliver, Drummond, Jackson 4, Bullock, Smith, Ellenson, Kennard, Ennis 2, Moreland 2).
Steals: 9 (Johnson 4, Tolliver, Bullock,
Kennard 2, Moreland).
Washington..........24 25 17 26 — 92
Detroit ...................23 26 32 22 — 103
A — 18,268 (21,000). Officials — Scott
Foster, Kevin Cutler, Karl Lane.
HEAT 103, BULLS 92
CHICAGO
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T
Holiday . 22 3-10 4-4 0-1
Vonleh .. 33 5-12 3-4 3-13
Lopez .... 31 6-12 1-2 2-6
Payne.... 30 4-10 2-2 0-0
Nwaba .. 35 4-11 6-8 1-7
Valntine 24 2-10 0-0 0-4
Portis .... 32 6-16 1-2 7-16
Grant..... 12 1-1 0-1 1-1
Kilptrick 15 1-7 3-3 0-1
Arcdcno.. 7 1-1 0-0 0-1
Totals .... 33-90 20-26 14-50
A
1
1
1
5
4
4
0
1
0
2
19
F
2
1
4
2
2
3
1
3
1
0
19
Pt
13
14
13
11
15
4
13
2
5
2
92
FG%: .367, FT%: .769. 3-pt. goals: 626, .231 (Holiday 3-7, Vonleh 1-4, Lopez
0-1, Payne 1-4, Nwaba 1-1, Valentine
0-3, Portis 0-3, Kilpatrick 0-3). Team rebounds: 13. Team turnovers: 18 (14
pts.). Blocks: 5 (Lopez 3, Nwaba, Portis). Turnovers: 18 (Holiday, Vonleh,
Lopez 3, Payne 3, Nwaba 2, Valentine,
Portis 6, Grant). Steals: 10 (Holiday,
Vonleh 2, Payne, Valentine 2, Portis 2,
Kilpatrick 2).
A — 19,746 (19,600). T — 2:13. Officials — Rodney Mott, Ray Acosta, Josh
Tiven.
MIAMI
FG
FT Reb
Min M-A M-A O-T A F Pt
JJhnsn ... 30 1-5 0-0 1-8 2 3 2
Richdsn. 33 8-16 5-5 1-5 3 3 22
Whtside 19 3-8 2-2 3-7 4 2 8
TJohnsn 12 3-6 0-0 0-0 0 1 6
Dragic ... 33 6-11 4-4 1-5 5 3 17
Ellngtn .. 27 2-8 3-3 0-1 0 1 8
Wade .... 18 2-7 4-4 0-3 4 1 8
Olynyk .. 17 4-7 1-1 1-3 0 5 11
Winslw.. 26 5-8 2-3 0-9 2 2 13
Adbyo ... 12 1-2 1-2 0-0 0 1 3
McGrdr . 12 2-4 0-0 0-3 0 1 5
Totals .... 37-82 22-24 7-44 20 23 103
FG%: .451, FT%: .917. 3-pt. goals: 727, .259 (J.Johnson 0-1, Richardson 1-4,
T.Johnson 0-3, Dragic 1-3, Ellington 1-7,
Olynyk 2-4, Winslow 1-3, McGruder
1-2). Team rebounds: 3. Team turnovers: 17 (13 pts.). Blocks: 7 (J.Johnson
2, Richardson 2, Whiteside 2, Winslow).
Turnovers: 17 (J.Johnson 2, Richardson, Whiteside 2, T.Johnson, Dragic 2,
Ellington 2, Wade 2, Olynyk 3, Winslow
2). Steals: 7 (Whiteside, Dragic, Wade
3, Olynyk, Winslow).
Chicago.................21 25 22 24 — 92
Miami ....................29 22 27 25 — 103
This weekend on TV, radio
SATURDAY
BASEBALL
1 p.m. — St. Louis at NY Mets, MLB
4:05 p.m. — Houston at Texas, FS1
6:10 p.m. — Boston at Tampa Bay,
NESN, WEEI-FM 93.7
8:40 p.m. — Milwaukee at San Diego,
FS1
MEN’S NCAA BASKETBALL
6:09 p.m. — Final Four: Loyola Chicago
vs. Michigan, TBS
8:49 p.m. — Final Four: Kansas vs. Villanova, TBS
PRO BASKETBALL
3 p.m. — Charlotte at Washington,
NBA
7:30 p.m. — Toronto at Boston, NBA,
NBCSB, WBZ-FM 98.5
BOXING
10 p.m. — Mark DeLuca vs. Michael
Moore, ESPN2
CURLING
9:30 p.m. — Men’s world championships (US vs. Japan), NBCSN
GOLF
2 p.m. — PGA: Houston Open, Golf
3 p.m. — PGA: Houston Open, NBC
5 p.m. — LPGA: ANA Inspiration, Golf
PRO HOCKEY
1 p.m. — Florida at Boston, NESN,
WBZ-FM 98.5
7 p.m. — Montreal at Pittsburgh, NHL
HORSE RACING
12:30 p.m. — Dubai World Cup, NBCSN
6 p.m. — Florida Derby, NBCSN
COLLEGE LACROSSE
1 p.m. — Women: Dartmouth at Harvard, NESN Plus
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. — Premier: Liverpool at
Crystal Palace, NBCSN
9:30 a.m. — Bundesliga: Augsburg at
Bayer Leverkusen, FS2; Bundesliga:
Freiburg at Schalke 04, FS1
10 a.m. — Premier: Southampton at
West Ham United, CNBC; Premier:
Swansea City at Manchester United,
NBCSN
12:30 p.m. — Bundesliga: Borussia
Dortmund at Bayern Munich, Fox; Pre-
mier: Manchester City at Everton,
NBC
2:30 p.m. — Bundesliga: Volfsburg at
Hertha Berlin, FS2
3 p.m. — MLS: Los Angeles FC at Los
Angeles Galaxy, Fox
3:30 p.m. — NWSL: Orlando at Washington, Lifetime
8 p.m. — MLS: New York City at San
Jose, ESPN2
8:30 p.m. — MLS: New England at
Houston, NBCSB
TENNIS
1 p.m. — Miami Open, ESPN2
SUNDAY
BASEBALL
1:10 p.m. — Boston at Tampa Bay,
NESN; St. Louis at NY Mets, ESPN
4 p.m. — Cleveland at Seattle, MLB
8:38 p.m. — San Francisco at LA Dodgers, ESPN
PRO BASKETBALL
1 p.m. — Philadelphia at Charlotte,
NBA
3:30 p.m. — Houston at San Antonio,
ABC
6 p.m. — Oklahoma City at New Orleans, NBA
9:30 p.m. — Sacramento at LA Lakers,
NBA
GOLF
2 p.m. — PGA: Houston Open, Golf
3 p.m. — PGA: Houston Open, NBC
5 p.m. — LPGA: ANA Inspiration, Golf
PRO HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. — Boston at Philadelphia,
NBC, WBZ-FM 98.5
7:30 p.m. — Washington at Pittsburgh,
NBCSN
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. — Premier: Stoke City at Arsenal, NBCSN
9:30 a.m. — Bundesliga: Eintracht
Frankfurt at Werder Bremen, FS1
11 a.m. — Premier: Tottenham
Hotspur at Chelsea, NBCSN
TENNIS
1 p.m. — Miami Open, ESPN2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Celtics’ performance
on trip pleased Ainge
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
SALT LAKE CITY — Celtics president of
basketball operations Danny Ainge was beaming after the team’s 97-94 win over the Jazz
Wednesday that was capped by Jaylen Brown’s
last-second 3-pointer.
Ainge, a former BYU star, remains quite
the celebrity here, despite the fact that he
swooped in and plucked away Gordon Hayward last summer. And Ainge’s family tree has
sprouted quite a few branches in Utah, so he
was surrounded by happy loved ones in the
bowels of the arena after the win.
Ainge was pleased by his undermanned
team’s 4-0 trip that also included an impressive win over the Portland Trail Blazers, and
he thinks the stretch could have future benefits for players who are suddenly receiving
more chances.
“It’s good to have this next-man-up mentality,” he said. “Brad [Stevens] has them prepared, and the guys just play hard.
“They haven’t executed well on either end
of the court at times. But at big times against
good teams on the road, those are tough
games to win even with a full squad.
“The leaders set the tone, and the other
guys know they have to play hard. It’s a league
of opportunity, and we have guys that are really getting their first shots right now.”
Stevens remains almost stunningly focused
and balanced even amid impressive winning
streaks, but from his perch, Ainge does have
more of an opportunity to enjoy stretches like
this one, even if only briefly.
“Obviously winning games in Utah and
Portland are challenging even when you’re
100 percent, so give the guys credit,” he said.
“We haven’t played great basketball. We’ve
had some bad stretches. But our guys have
been resilient and they just keep fighting. It’s
been fun to watch.”
Here are some thoughts and observations
about the state of the Celtics as they march toward the postseason.
R The Celtics outscored the Jazz by 25
points during Shane Larkin’s 33 minutes, 34
seconds on the court Wednesday. That also
means Boston was outscored by 22 points during Larkin’s 14:26 on the bench. The pesky
point guard has been invaluable recently, including his team-high nine rebounds in this
game.
R When Hayward spurned the Jazz to sign
with the Celtics last July, Wednesday’s game
figured to be one of the most highly anticipated of this NBA season. But Hayward’s opening-night ankle injury changed that, and it
seems some of the vitriol toward him in Salt
Lake City has subsided.
There were a handful of fans at the game
wearing Hayward Celtics jerseys, and I was
curious whether they were Boston fans or just
Hayward fans whose allegiance to him had
not wavered.
As for Hayward’s health, Stevens said the
forward is still using an anti-gravity treadmill
and has yet to progress to unaided running.
He just spent a few days in Miami to get a
break from the monotony of rehab. Stevens
said he thinks that when the postseason arrives, it will sting Hayward.
“He’s in a really good place; it’s just that it’s
hard,” Stevens said. “He hasn’t played the
whole season, and now as you’re entering
playoff time, that’s a whole other level of interest you have in trying to be there to help your
team. So I know it’s hard for him.”
But Stevens added that this absence from
basketball will likely only make Hayward’s
heart grow fonder.
“When he gets back on the court, if he
loved it before, he’ll really love it now,” Stevens
said.
R The Celtics went on an absolute tear
shooting 3-pointers during this trip. According to basketball-reference.com, Boston is just
the second team in NBA history to make at
least 48 percent of its tries in four consecutive
games while connecting on a minimum of 10
3-pointers in each game.
Coincidentally, the Jazz earlier this season
became the first team to do it.
But no team has ever hit those marks in
five straight games, and the Celtics will have a
chance to do that against the Raptors Saturday.
Boston’s four-game surge is even more impressive when one considers that three of the
team’s top four 3-point shooters missed games
during the stretch, as Kyrie Irving (four), Marcus Morris (two), and Al Horford (one) were
all sidelined at various times.
R If you don’t think former Celtic Jae
Crowder was seeking some revenge after the
team traded him to the Cavaliers last summer,
consider this exchange he had with Jaylen
Brown when the two embraced after the
game.
“He said it hurt him,” Brown said. “He said
it hurt him real bad. I said I wanted it to. I
wanted it to sting a little bit.”
Brown was looking for a different kind of
revenge. He had not forgotten about how
thoroughly the Jazz stomped the Celtics in
Boston in December. Regardless of this game,
Crowder seems to feel much better about his
role in Utah than he did in Cleveland. He’s a
good fit with the Jazz.
R To recap: The Celtics just won a road
game against a powerful team with Irving,
Horford, Morris, Marcus Smart, and Daniel
Theis all sidelined. They won despite committing 10 third-quarter turnovers and trailing by
6 points with 2:15 left in the fourth quarter.
R I got a bit wistful during this stop in Salt
Lake City, because for the first time since
2013-14, there will be no return trip in July.
The Celtics took part in the four-team Utah
Jazz summer league each of the last three
years. It was a nice, low-key event that was the
perfect lead-in to the considerably more chaotic Las Vegas summer league. And it was the
first chance to get a look at recent Boston
rookies such as Terry Rozier, Brown, and Jayson Tatum.
Stevens said the team had several discussions earlier in the year about whether to return to Salt Lake City, and it was ultimately
decided that it was just a bit too much of a
grind when combined with Las Vegas.
“It didn’t feel like it was as important to
play this many games,” Stevens said. “This was
an incredible place to play summer league,
and one of the main reasons to me was how it
was like a road game.
“When you played Utah, this place was
rocking, and that kind of jolts you in the middle of July. I think that was good for our young
guys.”
I guess I’ll just have to go find some cool,
mountainous hikes outside Boston somewhere.
Adam Himmelsbach can be reached at
adam.himmelsbach@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @adamhimmelsbach.
The Athletic filling roster
By Chad Finn
GLOBE STAFF
The Athletic, a subscription-based, venture-capital-backed sports website that
launched in January 2016 with its inaugural
city-specific branch in Chicago,
SPORTS managed to keep any plans for
MEDIA
Boston quiet even as it quickly
expanded to 18 cities over the
past two years.
The Wall Street Journal was the first to
confirm last month that The Athletic did indeed have plans to enter the already-saturated
Boston sports market. And the process is well
underway. The specific launch date isn’t certain, according to a couple of writers who are
joining the site. But its lineup of writers is taking shape.
Among those who will be writing for The
Athletic Boston are Fluto Shinzawa, who is
leaving the Globe to become the site’s Bruins
writer; Jen McCaffrey (currently MassLive)
and Chad Jennings (Boston Herald), who will
cover the Red Sox; and Jay King (MassLive),
who will be the Celtics reporter.
The site’s Patriots hire will be evident in
the coming days.
It’s uncertain who will be the local editor
of the site.
The writers who have been hired have
dealt with Paul Fichtenbaum, The Athletic’s
national chief content officer and a former
Sports Illustrated editor.
Audition time
NBC Sports Boston is ramping up the
search for a replacement for Kayce Smith on
“Boston Sports Tonight.” Smith left the network for Barstool Sports in late February.
Among those who will audition to join
holdovers Tom Curran, Michael Holley, and
Tom Giles on the program is Emily Austen.
Austen is familiar locally as the former in-are-
na reporter for the Celtics. She gained notice
for all the wrong reasons in June 2016 when
she made racially disparaging comments during a Facebook live chat on Barstool Sports.
Austen lost her job at the time as a Rays and
Magic reporter for Fox Sports regional networks in Florida.
Austen has spoken frequently to college
athletic programs in recent years about the
perils of social media and how quickly one
moment can ruin a career.
Others who are expected to audition include Elika Sadeghi, MJ Acosta, Chantel McCabe, and Danielle Trotta.
Patrick had enough
Dan Patrick explained on his radio show
Thursday morning why he has decided to
leave as host of the “Football Night in America” studio program on NBC’s “Sunday Night
Football” broadcasts. Patrick, who has been
host of the program since its launch in 2008,
said NBC offered him a five-year contract extension but he decided not to accept. “I didn’t
know if I wanted to do five more years of it,’’
he said. “I decided that I was not going to be
spending Sundays doing football on TV anymore.” Patrick said he did not know who
would succeed him but speculated that Mike
Tirico would make the most sense . . . Joseph
Maar, NESN’s vice president of programming
and production and executive producer since
July 2012, is leaving the network at the end of
April. Maar, who had a significant say in the
network’s programming and personnel decisions over the past six years, is departing to
pursue “interests in sports technology and
content production,” per a NESN spokesman.
The network has already begun its search to
find his replacement.
Chad Finn can be reached at finn@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter @GlobeChadFinn.
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
p-BOSTON
p-Tampa Bay
p-Toronto
Div.
A
A
A
GP
76
77
77
W L OL
48 17 11
51 22 4
46 24 7
Pts. ROW
107
45
106
45
99
39
GF
253
275
261
GA
196
221
219
METROPOLITAN Div. GP W L OL
p-Washington
M 77 46 24 7
Pittsburgh
M 78 44 28 6
Philadelphia
M 78 39 25 14
Pts. ROW
99
43
94
42
92
37
GF
243
257
234
GA
225
241
232
WILD CARD
*Columbus
New Jersey
Pts. ROW
91
37
89
35
GF
222
232
GA
211
232
36
31
30
29
24
26
25
23
231
215
223
246
205
196
210
180
231
244
248
279
242
245
272
256
Div. GP W L OL
M 77 43 29 5
M 77 40 28 9
Florida
Carolina
NY Rangers
NY Islanders
Detroit
Montreal
Ottawa
Buffalo
A
M
M
M
A
A
A
A
76
77
77
77
78
77
77
77
39
34
33
32
29
28
27
24
29
32
35
35
38
37
39
41
8
11
9
10
11
12
11
12
86
79
75
74
69
68
65
60
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
p-Nashville
p-Winnipeg
Minnesota
Div.
C
C
C
GP
77
77
77
W L OL
50 16 11
47 20 10
43 24 10
Pts. ROW
111
44
104
43
96
40
GF
250
257
238
GA
196
206
217
PACIFIC
p-Vegas
San Jose
*Los Angeles
Div.
P
P
P
GP
77
78
77
W L OL
48 22 7
44 24 10
42 28 7
Pts. ROW
103
45
98
39
91
40
GF
256
241
224
GA
208
214
190
WILD CARD
St. Louis
Anaheim
Div. GP W L OL
C 76 43 28 5
P 77 39 25 13
Pts. ROW
91
40
91
35
GF
212
218
GA
198
208
241
220
205
224
223
201
193
224
215
234
250
240
248
244
Colorado
Dallas
*Calgary
*Edmonton
Chicago
*Vancouver
*Arizona
C
C
P
P
C
P
P
77
78
77
77
78
77
77
41
39
35
34
32
28
27
28 8
31 8
32 10
37 6
36 10
40 9
39 11
90
86
80
74
74
65
65
39
35
33
30
31
28
25
* — Not including late game; ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
p — Clinched playoff berth
THE PLAYOFF FORMAT
Eight teams in each conference qualify. The top three teams from
each division comprise the first six spots; the two remaining teams
with the most points, regardless of division, earn the wild card spots.
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
At Boston 4
Tampa Bay 2
At Minnesota 5
Dallas 2
Pittsburgh 4at New Jersey 3 (OT)
At Chicago 6
Detroit 6
at Buffalo 3
Columbus
at Calgary
Florida 2 (OT)
Edmonton
at Vancouver
At Ottawa 3
At Nashville 5
San Jose 3
Arizona
Winnipeg 2
at Los Angeles
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Carolina at Washington
7
Chicago at Colorado
Toronto at NY Islanders
7
Los Angeles at Anaheim
9
Tampa Bay at NY Rangers
7
St. Louis at Vegas
10
10:30
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
At Toronto 4
At Wash. 3
Florida 3
NY Rangers 2 (OT)
RED WINGS 6, SABRES 3
Detroit ..........................1
Buffalo..........................2
2
0
3 —
1 —
PENGUINS 4, DEVILS 3
1
1
1
1
1 —
0 —
SENATORS 3, PANTHERS 2
2
1
0
1
0 —
1 —
2
3
First period — None. Penalties —
None.
Second period — 1. Ottawa, Pageau
13 (Hoffman, Pyatt), 1:24. 2. Florida,
Ekblad 16 (McGinn, Yandle), 5:19 (pp).
3. Florida, Dadonov 26 (Weegar,
Petrovic), 6:50. Penalties — McCormick, Ott (hi stick), 3:35.
Third period — 4. Ottawa, Paajarvi 8
(Smith, Karlsson), 0:16. Penalties —
Burrows, Ott (slashing), 9:35. Yandle,
Fla (slashing), 12:16.
Overtime — 5. Ottawa, Pageau 14,
4:44 (penalty shot). Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — Florida 8-6-10-2 —
26. Ottawa 10-12-5-3 — 30.
Power plays — Florida 1-2; Ottawa
0-1.
Goalies — Florida, Reimer 20-13-6 (30
shots-27 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 2223-6 (26 shots-24 saves).
Referees — Brian Pochmara, Garrett
Rank. Linesmen — David Brisebois,
Tony Sericolo.
A — 15,095 (17,000). T — 16:21.
WILD 5, STARS 2
Dallas............................1
Minnesota....................1
1
3
0 —
1 —
at Vegas 2
at Colorado 1
San Jose.......................2
Nashville ......................2
2
5
First period — 1. Dallas, Benn 29
(Seguin), 2:51. 2. Minnesota, Granlund
20 (Suter), 16:02. Penalties — Coyle,
Min (holding), 13:03. Murphy, Min,
double minor (hi stick), 15:49.
Second period — 3. Minnesota, Dumba 12 (Suter, Zucker), 7:19 (pp). 4. Minnesota, Parise 11 (Granlund, Dumba),
8:18. 5. Dallas, Shore 10 (Hamhuis,
Methot), 9:42. 6. Minnesota, Zucker 31
(Staal, Dumba), 19:49 (pp). Penalties —
Benn, Dal (hi stick), 6:48. Klingberg, Dal
(hooking), 18:47.
Third period — 7. Minnesota, Parise
12 (Granlund, Dumba), 19:43 (en). Penalties — Radulov, Dal (hooking), 13:41.
Parise, Min (slashing), 15:33. Roussel,
Dal (charging), 20:00. Winnik, Min
(roughing), 20:00.
Shots on goal — Dallas 7-11-13 — 31.
Minnesota 7-11-4 — 22.
Power plays — Dallas 0-4; Minnesota
2-3.
Goalies — Dallas, Lehtonen 13-14-3
(21 shots-17 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 33-14-7 (31 shots-29 saves).
Referees — Chris Lee, Dean Morton.
Linesmen — Brian Mach, Kiel Murchison.
A — 19,350 (17,954). T — 2:33.
0
1
1 —
2 —
3
5
First period — 1. Nashville, Turris 15
(Subban, CSmith), 5:26. 2. San Jose,
Couture 32 (Burns, Boedker), 6:55. 3.
Nashville, Arvidsson 29 (Forsberg, Johansen), 10:14. 4. San Jose, Dillon 5
(Hansen), 12:05. Penalties — Fiala, Nsh
(interference), 12:46. Kane, SJ (interference), 13:26.
Second period — 5. Nashville,
CSmith 22 (Fiala, Ellis), 10:38. Penalties
— Pavelski, SJ (holding stick), 4:52.
Couture, SJ (tripping), 6:11. Johansen,
Nsh (hi stick), 7:23. Burns, SJ (holding),
11:51. Hartman, Nsh (slashing), 15:04.
Karlsson, SJ (tripping), 18:51.
Third period — 6. San Jose, Boedker
15 (Tierney, Meier), 5:54. 7. Nashville,
Ellis 9 (Forsberg, Arvidsson), 10:06. 8.
Nashville, Bonino 11 (Forsberg), 19:43
(en). Penalties — , Nsh, served by Hartnell (too many men on ice), 1:48. Ekholm, Nsh (cross check), 3:52. Subban,
Nsh (delay of game), 16:50.
Shots on goal — San Jose 9-9-24 —
42. Nashville 14-11-7 — 32.
Power plays — San Jose 0-6; Nashville 0-5.
Goalies — San Jose, Jones 29-19-6
(31 shots-27 saves). Nashville, Saros 95-7 (42 shots-39 saves).
Referees — Jean Hebert, Jon
McIsaac. Linesmen — Jonny Murray,
Derek Nansen.
A — 17,543 (17,113). T — 2:41.
BLACKHAWKS 6, JETS 2
Winnipeg......................0
Chicago ........................2
4
3
First period — 1. New Jersey, Palmieri 24 (Hischier), 12:19. 2. Pittsburgh,
Sheary 16 (Hornqvist, Oleksiak), 12:44.
Penalties — Zacha, NJ (tripping), 14:27.
Dumoulin, Pit (interference), 17:57.
Second period — 3. Pittsburgh, Letang 8 (Hagelin, Dumoulin), 6:59. 4.
New Jersey, Hall 34 (Butcher), 14:41
(pp). Penalties — Letang, Pit (tripping),
1:12. Oleksiak, Pit (interference), 13:40.
Hunwick, Pit, major (fighting), 17:49.
Wood, NJ, major (fighting), 17:49.
Third period — 5. New Jersey, Coleman 12 (Zajac), 5:11. 6. Pittsburgh,
Hornqvist 25 (Dumoulin, Sheahan),
11:26. Penalties — Zajac, NJ (slashing),
7:37. Moore, NJ (roughing), 20:00.
Hornqvist, Pit (roughing), 20:00.
Overtime — 7. Pittsburgh, Crosby 28
(Letang), 0:19. Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — Pittsburgh 12-8-14-1
— 35. New Jersey 12-9-10-0 — 31.
Power plays — Pittsburgh 0-2; New
Jersey 1-3.
Goalies — Pittsburgh, Murray 2515-3 (31 shots-28 saves). New Jersey,
Kinkaid 22-10-3 (35 shots-31 saves).
Referees — Francis Charron, Steve
Kozari. Linesmen — Libor Suchanek,
Darren Gibbs.
A — 16,514 (17,625). T — 2:34.
Florida ......................0
Ottawa .....................0
Philadelphia 2
PREDATORS 5, SHARKS 3
6
3
First period — 1. Buffalo, Eichel 25
(Pominville, Guhle), 3:16. 2. Buffalo,
O'Reilly 21 (Reinhart, Ristolainen), 7:11
(pp). 3. Detroit, Larkin 13 (Svechnikov),
7:41. Penalties — Frk, Det (hooking),
5:54. Nolan, Buf (hi stick), 17:15. Ristolainen, Buf (interference), 19:23.
Second period — 4. Detroit, Helm 11
(Nielsen), 5:21. 5. Detroit, Mantha 24
(Hicketts, Nielsen), 16:26. Penalties —
Abdelkader, Det (slashing), 4:45. Ericsson, Det (interference), 12:49. , Buf,
served by Nolan (face-off violation),
14:26.
Third period — 6. Detroit, Athanasiou
15 (Abdelkader, Kronwall), 1:50. 7. Buffalo, Rodrigues 7 (Mittelstadt), 4:51. 8.
Detroit, DeKeyser 6 (Nyquist, Zetterberg), 10:10. 9. Detroit, Svechnikov 2
(Mantha, Larkin), 16:59. Penalties —
Daley, Det (holding), 6:06. Okposo, Buf
(hi stick), 11:53. Falk, Buf (interference), 14:00.
Shots on goal — Detroit 12-8-12 — 32.
Buffalo 11-13-8 — 32.
Power plays — Detroit 0-5; Buffalo
1-4.
Goalies — Detroit, Howard 21-27-8
(32 shots-29 saves). Buffalo, Johnson
9-13-3 (12 shots-9 saves). Buffalo, Lehner 14-26-9 (20 shots-17 saves).
Referees — TJ Luxmore, Justin StPierre. Linesmen — James Tobias, Kory
Nagy.
A — 18,493 (19,070). T — 2:33.
Pittsburgh................1
New Jersey..............1
Arizona 3
2
3
0 —
1 —
2
6
First period — 1. Chicago, Kane 27,
3:44. 2. Chicago, Saad 18 (Kane,
Schmaltz), 17:17. Penalties — Perreault, Wpg (tripping), 19:38.
Second period — 3. Chicago, Jurco 5
(Anisimov), 4:26. 4. Chicago, Jurco 6
(Gustafsson, Murphy), 11:13. 5. Winnipeg, Little 16 (Byfuglien, Morrow),
14:24. 6. Chicago, Gustafsson 4 (DeBrincat, DSikura), 17:27. 7. Winnipeg,
Scheifele 23 (Connor), 18:51. Penalties
— None.
Third period — 8. Chicago, DeBrincat
27 (DSikura, Ejdsell), 2:11. Penalties —
Wheeler, Wpg (slashing), 12:24. Anisimov, Chi (interference), 13:25.
Shots on goal — Winnipeg 14-9-11 —
34. Chicago 14-15-13 — 42.
Power plays — Winnipeg 0-1; Chicago 0-2.
Goalies — Winnipeg, Comrie 1-2-0
(42 shots-36 saves). Chicago, Delia 10-0 (27 shots-25 saves). Chicago, Foster 0-0-0 (7 shots-7 saves).
Referees — Dan O'Rourke, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen — Bevan Mills, Andrew
Smith.
A — 21,839 (19,717). T — 2:24.
NHL LEADERS
Not including last night’s games
GOAL SCORING
GP
Alex Ovechkin, Wash..............77
Patrik Laine, Win. ....................76
Evgeni Malkin, Pitt. .................73
William Karlsson, Vegas ........77
Connor McDavid, Edm............77
Eric Staal, Minn........................76
G
45
43
42
40
40
40
ASSISTS
GP
Claude Giroux, Phi...................78
Blake Wheeler, Win.................76
Connor McDavid, Edm............77
Jakub Voracek, Phi..................78
Johnny Gaudreau, Calg. .........76
Steven Stamkos, TB ................75
Mathew Barzal, NYI ................77
Nikita Kucherov, TB ................74
A
66
66
62
61
59
59
58
58
POWER-PLAY GOALS
GP
Patrik Laine, Win. ....................76
Alex Ovechkin, Wash..............77
Steven Stamkos, TB ................75
Patric Hornqvist, Pitt. .............65
Anders Lee, NYI .......................77
Evgeni Malkin, Pitt. .................73
Tyler Seguin, Dal......................77
Mika Zibanejad, NYR...............67
Vincent Trocheck, Fla. ............75
Matthew Tkachuk, Calg. ........68
PP
19
15
15
14
14
14
14
14
13
10
POWER-PLAY ASSISTS
GP
Blake Wheeler, Win.................76
Jakub Voracek, Phi..................78
Phil Kessel, Pitt. .......................77
John Carlson, Wash.................77
Sidney Crosby, Pitt..................77
Nikita Kucherov, TB ................74
PPA
32
29
28
27
27
27
POWER-PLAY POINTS
GP
Phil Kessel, Pitt. .......................77
Blake Wheeler, Win.................76
Sidney Crosby, Pitt..................77
Nikita Kucherov, TB ................74
Evgeni Malkin, Pitt. .................73
Claude Giroux, Phi...................78
Jakub Voracek, Phi..................78
Steven Stamkos, TB ................75
Taylor Hall, NJ ..........................71
John Carlson, Wash.................77
Mikko Rantanen, Colo.............76
PPP
38
38
35
35
35
34
34
33
32
31
31
SHOOTING PERCENTAGE
GP G
S
McDavid, Edm..........77 40 260
MacKinnon, Colo. ....69 38 264
Kucherov, TB............74 38 267
Tavares, NYI.............77 33 240
Ovechkin, Wash. .....77 45 332
Hall, NJ ......................71 33 254
Seguin, Dal. ..............77 39 316
Tarasenko, StL.........74 31 286
Pct.
15.38
14.39
14.23
13.75
13.55
12.99
12.34
10.83
PLUS/MINUS
GP
William Karlsson, Vegas ........77
J. Marchessaul, Vegas ............74
Reilly Smith Vegas ..................66
Brad Marchand, Bos. ..............61
+/+42
+35
+32
+31
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
C3
Sports
Tempers flared, and it worked wonders
Fluto Shinzawa
ON HOCKEY
For the most part, the NHL
is enjoying an extended period
of peace, one that is likely to
continue until fighting is eliminated.
Cedric Paquette, last seen
clobbering Rick Nash out of
uniform, can enjoy a free skate
without the invitation that
would have been sure to come
in previous seasons. Nikita
Kucherov can slash and crosscheck and carve up opponents
without fear of picking his
teeth out of an opponent’s
glove.
But there are occasional
games in which tempers flare,
punches fly, and temperatures
rise.
They are glorious.
In the second period of the
Bruins’ 4-2 win over Tampa
Bay on Thursday, Cory Conacher swallowed chunks of Tuukka
Rask’s blocker and glove. In the
third, after Dan Girardi
dumped Patrice Bergeron with
a heavy but whistle-clean hit in
the neutral zone, David Pastrnak decided it was a good opportunity to chuck knuckles for
the first time in 248 career
NHL games.
Both actions did not go unnoticed on the Bruins’ bench.
“Probably a clean hit. But
you can’t have your better players being taken advantage of
like that,” said David Backes,
more accustomed to tuning up
opponents than Pastrnak. “Kudos to Pasta for stepping up
and fighting a bigger guy who’s
probably more used to having
his gloves off. That’s one heck
of a job by a 21-year-old kid
that’s really starting to grow
and really starting to have an
all-around game. Can’t say
enough about those actions.
The rest of the game too, there
were plenty of willing combatants stepping up for each other
and sticking together. When
the team sticks together like
that, it feels like there’s eight
guys on the ice instead of just
five. That’s a good feeling to
have in this room.”
Everybody understands the
league’s wariness and weari-
ness of fighting. It is not safe.
Fists to the face do not lead to
good health.
The fearsomeness of fighting, however, is enmeshed with
the brutality of the sport. Nothing about hockey is safe, from
the velocity at which large men
travel to the force with which
they drive shoulders into flesh.
The last time the Bruins played
the Lightning, Backes ended
up on the wrong end of a Yanni
Gourde skate slash that opened
up a crevasse in his right leg
that required 17 stitches to
close.
This is a dangerous sport
played by large, athletic, and
competitive men.
But it is one in which the
act of fighting brings its combatants together like few actions do. For most of the first
period and half of the second,
Rask believed the Lightning
were crashing the net and taking his defensemen along for
the ride. Finally, when Conacher barreled into the crease with
Brandon Carlo as his sidecar,
Rask blew his top.
“The first period, somebody
fell on my knee there,” Rask
said. “There was actually a
penalty called. Then that one,
it felt to me that our own D’s
weren’t jumping on me. It felt
like a push or something. So I
just had to let them know I’m
there. It happened twice.”
With a flash of Tim Thomas’s rage, Rask closed on Conacher and introduced him to
his equipment. Carlo completed the scuffle by taking Conacher down to the ice.
By the time Andrei Vasilevskiy crossed the red line and approached the melee, Rask had
calmed down. The officials,
anyway, intervened to deny observers the pleasure of a puckstopper punch-up.
“It gets guys going,” said Torey Krug. “Especially some
guys that sometimes don’t have
a pulse on the bench, it gets
them engaged in the game. All
of a sudden, you’re standing on
the bench wondering what’s
going on. You see one of your
superstar players getting going
on the ice, someone you think
you never see. But that’s fun.
He stood up for himself. Obvi-
ously guys will jump in if they
have to. It was fun.”
Rask kept his stuff on. Pastrnak did not.
Pastrnak does his best work
with his gloves firmly glued to
his hands. He hammered home
a power-play goal in the first
off Ryan McDonagh’s stick. In
the third, Pastrnak capped his
Gordie Howe hat trick by getting the secondary helper on
Brad Marchand’s empty-net
goal.
The kid who used to hear
footsteps and tumble after the
slightest of checks has matured
into a puck-pursuit maniac, the
perfect complement to Marchand and Bergeron.
In that way, Pastrnak was
the unlikeliest of Bruins to
whack Girardi from behind,
whirl to confront the Tampa
defenseman, and issue the
challenge. He has never fought.
Girardi is a big man that Pastrnak dropped two years ago
with an illegal hit to the head
that cost him two games.
But Bergeron is the Bruins’
golden child. They do not like
seeing their best player absorb
any wallops. So Pastrnak engaged.
“It was perfect timing,” Pastrnak said of the fight. “Tight
game. Playing for first place in
the division. I think it was perfect timing.”
The fight did not last long.
Its brevity did not dampen his
teammates’ admiration.
They clapped their sticks as
Pastrnak retreated to the penalty box. The taps resumed
when Pastrnak was released
following his five-minute banishment. Bergeron grabbed
Pastrnak’s head and gave him a
hug.
“That’s our team right there
in a nutshell. That’s our team,”
coach Bruce Cassidy said. “We
stick together. We’ve done that
all year no matter who’s in the
lineup.
“We trust our players to go
out there, do the job, and have
each other’s backs. That’s what
makes it a special group.”
Fluto Shinzawa can be reached
at fshinzawa@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeFluto.
Bruins move atop
Eastern Conference
uBRUINS
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
A referee gets between Tuukka Rask and Cory Conacher after the Lightning forward invaded the Bruins’ crease.
Backes returns after missing 5 games
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
David Backes, challenged to
make it through one full period
of late, was back in the Bruins
lineup ThursBRUINS
day with TamNOTEBOOK pa Bay in town
and a chance
for the Bruins to shimmy their
way into first place in the Eastern Conference standings.
Backes, 33, had been absent
since March 17, the night he
suffered a deep gash to his
right thigh in a goal-mouth
scrum during the first period
in Tampa. He played 15:18 in
the Bruins’ 4-2 victory over the
Lightning Thursday night,
with three shots on goal.
“Got a new set of pants, so
the usual bacteria won’t be filtering into that thing,” said a
smiling Backes, his leg sliced
by Yanni Gourde’s skate that
night at Amalie Arena. “Green
light. Let’s play. It’s one of
those games, if you’re medically cleared, you get in [the lineup] any way you can.”
Backes dashed frantically to
the bench to seek medical help
that night in Tampa, and was
all done after only 5:42 in ice
time, doctors needing some 18
stitches to close the wound
above his right knee.
Two nights earlier in Sunrise, Backes was all done after
only 5:10, tossed out in the
first period for his high hit on
Panthers forward Vincent Trocheck. The referee called a
match penalty on Backes, a call
that later was not reaffirmed
when the league’s Department
of Player safety rendered no
opinion on the matter.
“I feel like we’ve done a
good job of giving it time to
close up and mitigate against
all the risk we can,” Backes said
in regard to the injury.
Chara getting close
Despite what looked like an
encouraging morning practice
in Brighton, the Bruins remained without a number of
key performers with only two
weeks remaining before the
start of the playoffs.
Team captain Zdeno Chara,
out since suffering an injury
(undisclosed) March 13 at Carolina, appeared strong and fluid on his skates during the
workout but remained on the
sideline for an eighth straight
game.
“He’s back skating,” said
coach Bruce Cassidy, whose
team captain signed a one-year
contract extension on Wednesday. “Getting close.”
Rookie blue liner Charlie
McAvoy, who also joined the
morning practice, though
decked out in a red (non-contact) sweater, also remained
hors de combat due to a
wrenched knee suffered March
3 vs. Montreal. He missed his
13th straight game.
Cassidy said earlier in the
week that Chara and McAvoy,
once cleared to play, will team
up again as his No. 1 pairing.
In turn, that will leave Brandon
Carlo and Torey Krug paired
on the next unit. The third
pairing will have Matt Grzelcyk on the left, with either
Kevin Millar or Adam McQuaid
on the right.
Grzelcyk, felled at the end
of the second period on Tuesday when hammered into the
boards by Winnipeg’s Josh
Morrissey, skated in the morning and said he felt well
enough to return to action vs
Tampa. Cassidy wanted to wait
until after the pregame warmups before he declared the exBU star fit for action.
Following the morning
skate, Grzelcyk said he did not
suffer a head injury (i.e. concussion) on the Morrissey hit,
but definitely was rocked by
the hit, which sent Morrissey
to the penalty box for a five-
minute fighting major.
“I feel better than I thought
I would be feeling,” said Grzelcyk, who has become an increasingly important part of
the Boston attack, including
his relief work at the point on
the power play. “I was a little
shaken up . . . nothing to do
with my head . . . but I was
pretty sore and my muscles
were all tense and stuff. It’s all
calmed down a little bit.”
Meanwhile, the Bruins added valued fourth-line center
Sean Kuraly (upper body) to
the injured corps, where he
joined Jake DeBrusk and Rick
Nash, the latter two believed to
have sustained concussions.
Food for thought
Backes, though he didn’t
play on the club’s recent fourgame road trip, went along for
the ride, which allowed him to
continue his treatments on his
nasty wound and to visit
friends and family back home
in suburban Minneapolis.
After arriving in St. Paul,
the veteran forward invited all
his Black-and-Gold teammates
to his parents’ place in North
Oaks, Minn., for a homecooked meal. The majority of
teammates made the trek out
to the burbs for the free eats
and camaraderie.
“Mom made dinner and 14
guys took Ubers to come to the
house,” said Backes, sincerely
impressed by the turnout. “I
made them pay for their own
Ubers, too . . . at least they haven’t submitted receipts to
me.”
Backes said he suspected on
some teams only one or two
players would have taken him
up on the dinner offer, which
included his mom’s lasagna
and kale salad whipped up by
his wife, along with roasted
brussel sprouts.
“We had 14 guys there, and
that was a real special moment
in my career — to have that
many guys care about each
other that much,” he added.
Rask is on a roll
Tuukka Rask made 26 saves
Thursday night and also is expected back in net Saturday
when the Panthers visit the
Garden for a 1 p.m. matinee.
Rask has a 10-game streak (90-1) without a regulation loss,
allowing 27 goals in that
stretch . . . Anton Khudobin,
likely to start Sunday in Philadelphia, will be looking to snap
a season-worst four-game losing streak (0-2-2). His longest
previous dip this season was
an 0-2-0 stretch at the start of
December. He then went 8-2-2
prior to the recent four-game
slump . . . Brad Marchand has
an impressive 13-21—34 line
in his 24 games since serving
out his five-game suspension
for his hit on New Jersey’s
Marcus Johansson on Jan. 23.
Stamkos silenced
A quiet night for Tampa star
Steven Stamkos, who was held
off the scoreboard and landed
only one of the six shots he
fired Rask’s way. Keep in mind,
the Bruins were without their
top shutdown pair, Chara and
McAvoy, which meant most of
the heavy work fell to Carlo
and Krug. Carlo finished plus-1
and Krug was a game-high
plus-3 . . . Patrice Bergeron
factored in three goals (1-2—3)
and also won 12 of his 21 faceoffs. He is now 1-4—5 in his
three games back after suffering a fracture in his right foot
. . . David Pastrnak had his first
career fight, trading shots with
Dan Girardi after the Bolts defenseman smacked Bergeron
with an aggressive open-ice hit
7:16 into the third period. Pastrnak wrapped a goal and assist around the bout, awarding
the Czech winger with his first
Gordie Howe hat trick.
Continued from Page C1
Bruins 4, Lightning 2
way through the second period.
Conacher, after barreling into Rask in a pileup with Boston
defenseman Brandon Carlo,
straightened up, only to be
greeted by a swift glovehand
punch to the back of the head
by the franchise Boston tender.
The sellout crowd of 17,565
was woke, as was the rest of a
Boston lineup well aware the
Lightning had held ownership
of first place in the East since
Oct. 19 (back when the Bruins
were a meager 3-3-0).
By Rask’s own telling, it was
a playoff game, despite the fact
the chase for the Stanley Cup
won’t start for another two
weeks.
“I just had to let them know
I’m there,” said Rask, objecting
to a few physical shots the Bolts
doled his way. “I threw a couple
of punches and that’s it.”
Rask’s bold action, which
bought Bolts goalie Andre Vasilevskiy the length of the ice for
firsthand inspection, came
with some risk. The Boston
lead at the time stood at 2-1, on
goals by Tim Schaller and David Pastrnak. If the penalties
fell the wrong way, Tampa
would have rolled out its No. 2ranked power play and perhaps
turned the score upside down.
“I wasn’t thinking of that,
obviously,” said Rask, drawing
a chuckle from the media surrounding his locker. “I don’t do
it too often, I guess.”
A good thing he was “emotionally engaged,” added Rask.
“Whatever I feel out there,
you try to protect yourself,” he
later said, as if then summoning his inner Gerry Cheevers.
“Stuff happens in the heat of
the moment. Hopefully I don’t
start doing that every game. I
doubt it. I have to go have a
couple of beers now just to cool
off.”
When the smoke cleared,
the Bruins actually had the better of the referee’s whistle,
staked to a two-minute power
play. And the Lightning never
were able to pull even. In the
third period, Patrice Bergeron
bumped the lead to 3-1 at
11:59, followed less than two
minutes later by a Victor Hedman strike that cut to it 3-2.
The jawkbreaker then came on
Brad Marchand’s empty-netter
at 1 9 : 0 4 , w i t h t h e G a r d e n
crowd then chanting , “ We
want the Cup!”
“We’re in the entertainment
business, first of all, so we want
to win,” said coach Bruce Cassidy, his club at the top of the
heap now with a 48-17-11 record and 107 points, a single
point ahead of Tampa (5122-4). “And we would like to
win with, you know, what Boston fans appreciate — hard
work, blue collar, a certain level
of pace and skill. They’ve become accustomed to that here
. . . Listen, they pay a lot of
money to see us play and I
think our guys have performed
well in this building. Hopefully
they are happy with the product.”
At TD Garden
FIRST PERIOD
Penalty — Tampa Bay, Point (holding) 8:12
Penalty — Boston, Miller (high-sticking) 14:26
Boston 1, Tampa Bay 0 — Schaller 12 (Wingels)
19:02
Penalty — Tampa Bay, Killorn (interference)
19:29
Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0 — Pastrnak 32 (Krug,
Bergeron) 19:34 (pp)
SECOND PERIOD
Penalty — Boston, Gionta (boarding) 1:18
Boston 2, Tampa Bay 1 — Miller 21 (Kucherov,
Hedman) 1:44 (pp)
Penalty — Boston, Donato (high-sticking) 8:41
Penalty — Boston, Rask, served by Wingels
(roughing) 11:16
Penalty — Boston, Rask, served by Wingels
(roughing) 11:16
Penalty — Tampa Bay, CConacher (goaltender
interference) 11:16
Penalty — Tampa Bay, CConacher (roughing)
11:16
Penalty — Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy, served by
CePaquette (unsportsmanlike conduct) 11:16
Penalty — Boston, McQuaid (hooking) 16:10
THIRD PERIOD
Penalty — Tampa Bay, Girardi, major (fighting)
7:16
Penalty — Boston, Pastrnak, major (fighting)
7:16
Penalty — Boston, Backes (roughing) 10:13
Penalty — Tampa Bay, CePaquette (roughing)
10:13
Boston 3, Tampa Bay 1 — Bergeron 28 (Krug,
Marchand) 11:59
Boston 3, Tampa Bay 2 — Hedman 15 (Gourde,
Girardi) 13:54
Boston 4, Tampa Bay 2 — Marchand 34
(Bergeron, Pastrnak) 19:04 (en)
SCORE BY PERIOD
Tampa Bay ............................ 0
1
Boston .................................... 2
0
1
2
—
—
2
4
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Tampa Bay ............................ 6 11
Boston .................................. 16
3
11
10
—
—
28
29
Power plays — Tampa Bay 1 of 4; Boston 1 of 2.
Goalies — Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 42-16-3 (29
shots-26 saves). Boston, Rask 33-11-5 (28 shots26 saves).
Referees — Trevor Hanson, Francois St.Laurent. Linesmen — Matt MacPherson, Michel
Cormier.
Attendance — 17,565 (17,565). Time — 2:50.
If the Bruins can hold serve
over their final five games — to
Tampa’s four — they will open
the postseason on home ice
against the weakest of the two
wild cards in the East (the Devils as of Thursday morning). If
the Bolts can slip back into
first, then the Bruins would
face the Maple Leafs in Round
1, the series likely to begin on
Causeway Street. The club that
finishes first is also assured
home ice through the first
three playoff rounds.
“ T he big thing for us is,
we’re in the playoffs,” said
Lightning coach Jon Cooper,
whose club will face the Bruins
again Tuesday night in Tampa.
“But one of our goals was to try
to get the division and we’ve
got these guys one more time.”
The Bruins now have won
all three meetings with Tampa
this season, providing a mental
edge into that last matchup at
Amalie Arena.
For whatever it’s worth, the
momentum is with the Bruins,
who have played at an amazing
.771 clip (42-10-7) since their
meager 6-7-4 start across the
first six weeks.
“It gets guys going,” said defensmeman Torey Krug (two
assists, 43 for the season), reflecting on the sight of Rask going off. “All of a sudden, you’re
standing on the bench wondering what’s going on, and you
see one of your superstar players getting going on the ice . . .
someone you never see [fighting] . . . and it’s fun.”
Ol’ timey hockey. The ghosts
of Pie McKenzie and Wayne
Cashman circled back around
the old West End on a night
first place was up for grabs. A
sign, perhaps, that a delightful
spring awaits.
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at
kevin.dupont@globe.com.
C4
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
OPENING DAY 2018
RaysSox,
6, Red
Sox 4p.m., NESN
Pirates at Red
P
2:05
N
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
The Red Sox and Rays, led by managers Alex Cora and Kevin Cash, are lined up for the singing of the national anthem prior to Thursday afternoon’s season opener at Tropicana Field.
It was going great . . .
. . . until suddenly it wasn’t
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Rays center fielder Kevin Kiermaier (top) and left fielder Denard Span avoid each other as a
ball hit by Eduardo Nunez sails past them in the second inning . . .
The biggest blow in the Rays’ six-run eighth came off the bat of Denard Span, who sent a
two-out triple into the right-field corner off Sox reliever Carson Smith . . .
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
CHRIS O’MEARA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
. . . and Nunez took advantage of the misplay
by tearing around the bases and steaming toward the plate as the Rays retrieve the ball . . .
. . . with Nunez making the call himself as he
slides into home headfirst to complete his
two-run, inside-the-park homer.
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Chris Sale did everything he could to make the Sox’ opener a success. The lefty shut out
the Rays over six innings, allowing just one hit while walking three and whiffing nine.
MIKE EHRMANN/GETTY IMAGES
. . . the rocket shot scoring Kevin
Kiermaier (right), Carlos Gomez, and
Brad Miller (not pictured) . . .
MIKE EHRMANN/GETTY IMAGES
. . . and earning Span some high praise in
the dugout for giving Tampa Bay a 5-4 lead
after it opened the inning trailing, 4-0.
CHRIS O’MEARA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carson Smith trudges off the mound after finally putting an end to a nightmare eighth
for the Sox. Smith and Joe Kelly combined to walk four and allow six runs in the frame.
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C5
OPENING DAY 2018
RaysSox,
6, Red
Sox 4p.m., NESN
Pirates at Red
P
2:05
N
Price ready to get his season started
Lefthander feels
better than ever
Rays 6, Red Sox 4
At Tropicana Field, St. Petersburg
BOSTON
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Betts rf
4 0 1 0 0 1 .250
Benintendi lf
4 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Ramirez 1b
3 0 0 0 1 2 .000
Moreland 1b
0 0 0 0 0 0
—
Martinez dh
3 1 0 0 1 2 .000
Bogaerts ss
4 2 3 0 0 0 .750
Devers 3b
4 0 1 2 0 0 .250
Núñez 2b
4 1 2 2 0 1 .500
Bradley Jr. cf
4 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Vázquez c
3 0 1 0 0 0 .333
Totals
33 4 8 4 2 6
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —
David Price was on the disabled
list at this time a year ago, limited to throwRED SOX
ing only short
NOTEBOOK distances because of a
small ligament tear in his elbow.
Two doctors told the
lefthander he didn’t need surgery, but it wasn’t until May 29
that he rejoined the rotation.
Price lasted 11 starts before a
triceps strain put him back on
the DL for eight weeks.
Now Price is the No. 2 starter behind Chris Sale and starts
Friday night against the Rays
with no limitations other than
what would be normal for the
first start of the season.
With an eye on the entire
season, the Sox restricted the
workload on Sale, Price, and
No. 3 starter Rick Porcello in
spring training. Price started
only three games against major
league teams, throwing 12 innings. The rest of his work
came in minor league intrasquad games with a predetermined number of pitches
per inning.
Price feels better physically
entering the season than he can
ever remember.
“I feel like every year in
spring training I have a twoweek period where I just kind
of take it easy,” Price said. “To
not have that concern, to be
able to work on stuff in bullpens and go out there and
throw as hard as want in bullpens and in games, to be able
to throw everything, that was
perfect for me.”
After last year, Price is grateful to be in the rotation to start
the season.
“This is what I’ve done my
entire life,” he said. “This is the
one thing that I know. To be
able to do that for us in the beginning of the year and expect
to do it for the entire year, it’s a
good feeling.”
A healthy Price and the addition of J.D. Martinez stand as
the two biggest improvements
to a team that won 93 games
last season.
“I don’t know what we’re
not going to do well, and that’s
good,” Price said. “I think we’re
TAMPA BAY
Duffy 3b
Kiermaier cf
Gómez rf
Cron 1b
a-Miller ph-1b
Ramos c
Span lf
MaSmith lf
Hechavarria ss
Robertson 2b
b-Wendle ph-2b
Refsnyder dh
Totals
AB
4
3
3
3
0
4
3
0
4
2
1
1
28
R
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
6
H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 1 .250
0 0 1 2 .000
0 0 1 1 .000
0 0 0 3 .000
0 1 1 0
—
0 0 0 1 .000
1 3 1 0 .333
0 0 0 0
—
2 1 0 0 .500
0 0 1 2 .000
0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 2 1 .000
4 6 7 11
Boston............................... 030 000 100 — 4 8 0
Tampa Bay....................... 000 000 06x — 6 4 0
a-walked for Cron in 8th, b-grounded out for
Robertson in 8th. LOB—Boston 4, Tampa Bay 5.
2B—Bogaerts 2 (2), Devers (1), Núñez (1), Duffy
(1). 3B—Span (1). HR—Núñez (1), off Archer. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 2 (Bradley
Jr., Vázquez), Tampa Bay 2 (Robertson 2). RISP—
Boston 2 for 7, Tampa Bay 2 for 4. Runners moved
up—Devers. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Gómez, Cron).
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
6 1 0 0 3 9 92 0.00
Sale
Barnes
1 0 0 0 0 0 13 0.00
Kelly
‚ 1 4 4 3 1 29 108.0
CSmth BS1; L 0-1 „ 2 2 2 1 1 20 27.00
Tampa Bay
Archer
Pruitt W 1-0
Colomé S 1
IP
6
2
1
H
6
1
1
R ER BB SO NP ERA
4 4 1 6 81 6.00
0 0 1 0 26 0.00
0 0 0 0 16 0.00
Archer pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited
runners-scored—CaSmith 3-3, Pruitt 1-0. PB—
Vázquez. Umpires—Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Laz
Diaz; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Manny Gonzalez. T—3:00. A—31,042 (31,042).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Joe Kelly got the hook from manager Alex Cora after walking three and getting just one out in the eighth inning.
going to do everything extremely well. It might not be
great, but I don’t think we’re
going to be average or below
average at anything.”
Price also has moved past
the controversies of 2017. His
interactions with the media —
often tense for much of last season — are back to normal. Price
has tuned out trolls on social
media, too.
It’s a clean slate, as much as
there can be one in Boston.
“Yeah, I view that as the
same thing for every beginning
of the season,” he said. “Everybody has a 0.00 ERA right now.
This is an exciting time of the
year . . . Ready to go.”
Making progress
Eduardo Rodriguez, who is
on the DL recovering from
knee surgery, threw 67 pitches
over five innings in a minor
league game against Twins
prospects in Fort Myers, then
15 more in the bullpen.
Rodriguez said his command was sharp and he could
be ready with one more start.
Drew Pomeranz threw 60
pitches in a minor league game
in Fort Myers on Wednesday.
He said he is over the forearm
strain that put him on the DL
and is building arm strength.
The tentative schedule is for
Pomeranz to pitch in a minor
league intrasquad game in Fort
Myers on Monday. From there,
he could join one of the affiliates for a rehabilitation assignment.
“I feel like I’m getting close,”
Pomeranz said.
Many moves made
Along with putting Pomeranz and Rodriguez on the DL,
the Sox made a series of other
moves to set their 25-man roster.
Lefthander Bobby Poyner
and righty Marcus Walden
were added to the major league
roster. Poyner was given No. 66
and Walden No. 64.
Infielder Marco Hernandez,
who is recovering from left
shoulder surgery, was placed
on the 60-day DL.
Righthanded pitcher Austin
Maddox (right shoulder strain),
second baseman Dustin Pedroia (recovering from left knee
surgery), and righthander Tyler
Thornburg (recovering from
right shoulder surgery) were
placed on the 10-day DL.
Fired up
A small grease fire filled
Tropicana Field with a smoky
haze 4½ hours before first
pitch.
The fire was in a concession
stand near section 308. Smoke
was pouring from a vent in the
stands behind first base.
Rays president Brian Auld
said sprinklers extinguished
the blaze and the game was not
affected beyond that concession stand being closed.
The St. Petersburg Fire De-
partment responded to the
scene.
Stadium workers, media
members, and others with reason to arrive early for the game
were kept outside until the situation was resolved.
No one already inside the
building was evacuated.
Cora was in the visitors’
clubhouse when he heard the
fire alarm. His reaction was
what you would expect.
“I have to leave? Not now!”
he said.
Streak ends
Thursday’s 6-4 loss against
Tampa Bay snapped a threegame winning streak on Opening Day. The Sox are 58-59-1 in
openers . . . Sale, who worked
six scoreless innings, dropped
his ERA to 1.93 in five Opening
Day starts . . . Chris Archer,
who allowed four runs over six
innings, has a 5.49 ERA in 20
career starts against the Sox.
His ERA against other teams is
SECOND INNING
RED SOX — Martinez walked on a full count.
Bogaerts doubled to left, Martinez to third. Devers grounded out, shortstop Hechavarria to first
baseman Cron, Martinez scored, Bogaerts to
third. Núñez hit an inside-the-park home run to
center on the first pitch, Bogaerts scored. Bradley Jr. popped out to shortstop Hechavarria.
Vázquez singled to center. Betts fouled out to
first baseman Cron.
SEVENTH INNING
RED SOX — Bogaerts doubled to center. Devers
doubled to right, Bogaerts scored. Pruitt pitching.
Núñez grounded out, shortstop Hechavarria to
first baseman Cron. Bradley Jr. popped out to
third baseman Duffy. Vázquez grounded out,
shortstop Hechavarria to first baseman Cron.
EIGHTH INNING
RAYS — Moreland in as first baseman. Kelly
pitching. Robertson walked on a full count. Refsnyder struck out. Duffy doubled to right, Robertson scored. Kiermaier walked on a full count.
Gómez walked on a full count, Duffy to third, Kiermaier to second. Miller pinch-hitting for Cron.
Smith pitching. Miller walked, Duffy scored, Kiermaier to third, Gómez to second. Ramos struck
out. Span tripled to right, Kiermaier scored,
Gómez scored, Miller scored. Hechavarria hit an
infield single to second, Span scored. Wendle
pinch-hitting for Robertson. Wendle grounded out,
shortstop Bogaerts to first baseman Moreland.
3.63 . . . The Sox, who led the
majors by having 81 runners
thrown out on the bases last
season, are at it again. Xander
Bogaerts was doubled off first
base in the fourth inning and
Mookie Betts was picked off
first when he strayed too far in
the eighth . . . Principal owner
John Henry and chairman Tom
Werner did not attend the
game. Team president Sam
Kennedy was on hand and took
the coaching staff out for dinner on Wednesday.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
Bullpen melts down in eighth, Sox fall to Rays
uRED SOX
Continued from Page C1
Joe Kelly and Carson Smith
could have used diapers. They
combined to give up four walks
and three hits to a lineup that
had been shut down the previous seven innings.
“It’s pretty pathetic what I
did,” Kelly said. “You can’t do
that.”
It took one game for Cora’s
strategy to come under scrutiny. His honeymoon ended on
the church steps.
The Sox had a 4-0 lead after
seven innings. Chris Sale allowed one hit over the first six
a n d s t r u c k o u t n i n e . Ma tt
Barnes then worked a perfect
seventh. Sox pitching had retired 15 of the last 16 batters to
that point.
Cora had several options
open at that point and went to
Kelly because the matchups favored his fastball. The righthander walked leadoff hitter
Daniel Robertson but came
back to strike out Rob Refsnyder.
Ke l l y go t a h e a d o f Matt
Duffy, 0 and 2, and missed
twice. His next pitch was a slider right over the plate that
Duffy lined to right field for an
RBI double.
Kelly walked Kevin Kiermaier and Carlos Gomez to load the
bases. It was only the second
time in 99 career relief appearances Kelly had three walks.
When Smith came in, he
walked Brad Miller on five
pitches to force in a run.
“Walking the first guy, can’t
do that,” Smith said. “Put my
back up against the wall.”
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Alex Cora (left) was headed for a win in his first game as Sox manager, until the eighth.
Smith struck out Wilson Ramos and got ahead of Denard
Span, 1 and 2. One pitch away
from ending the inning and
holding the lead, Smith
couldn’t put Span away.
Span fouled off a full-count
pitch then lined a triple to right
field.
Adeiny Hechavarria followed with an RBI infield single.
The Sox did not blow a lead
of more than three runs all last
season. That left Cora having to
explain what he did and didn’t
do.
He did not use Craig Kimbrel in the eighth inning, a decision made before the game.
Kimbrel pitched only twice in
spring training after spending
three weeks in Boston when his
infant daughter had heart sur-
gery.
“We’re not going to put him
in that spot right now,” Cora
said. “We feel he’s ready but I
don’t think it’s fair for him to
come into that situation, it’s not
a clean inning.”
Cora said it would take a few
weeks to build Kimbrel up to
handle four or five outs given
his abbreviated spring training.
Had Smith held the lead, Kim-
brel was coming in for the
ninth.
“ We have to take care of
players and that’s the way we’re
going to take care of him,” Cora
said. “He’s ready to pitch. But
we’re not going to jeopardize
his health just because there’s
traffic in the eighth inning.”
Cora had a lefthander in the
bullpen, but he didn’t want
Bobby Poyner making his major league debut against Span
with the bases loaded.
“Nah. We’re not going to put
him in a spot like that,” the
manager said.
A bigger issue is that the Sox
traded for Addison Reed last
July to improve the bullpen but
let him walk as a free agent after the season and never replaced him.
President of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said
throughout spring training that
the team had ample depth. Not
Thursday.
It left Sale with no decision
on a day he pitched with his
usual ferocity.
“We show up to win,” Sale
said. “Things like that happen.”
Pitching for the first time
since he was struck on the left
hip by a line drive in his final
start of spring training, Sale
struck out nine and walked
three over six innings. The Rays
advanced only two runners beyond first base against him.
The Sox took a 3-0 lead on
Rays starter Chris Archer in the
second inning thanks to an unconventional home run.
J.D. Martinez drew a walk in
his first plate appearance as a
member of the team. Xander
Bogaerts’s double to the gap in
left sent Martinez to third. He
scored when Rafael Devers
grounded to shortstop.
Nunez then sent a shallow
fly ball to the gap in left that
Span and Kiermaier converged
on. But Span hesitated then
ducked away as Kiermaier approached and the ball fell between them.
Nunez rounded the bases as
Kiermaier chased the ball
down. New third base coach
Carlos Febles, in his first big decision of the season, sent Nunez
to the plate.
Robertson collected the relay throw just behind shortstop
and had a play on Nunez. But
his throw to the plate was
straight into the back of the
mound and bounced away.
Nunez slid across the plate
on his stomach and signaled he
was safe.
It was the first inside-thepark home run for a Sox player
on Opening Day since Carl Yastrzemski in 1968 at Detroit.
The Sox added to their lead
in the seventh inning when Bogaerts and Devers led off with
doubles. But it didn’t last.
Cora watched plenty of meltdowns during his playing career. Were the emotions different as a manager?
“As a player I was upset and
you turn the page and show up
tomorrow,” he said. “As a manager, I’m upset. Turn the page
and show up tomorrow.”
Peter Abraham can be reached
at peter.abraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@peteabe.
C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
OPENING DAY 2018
RaysSox,
6, Red
Sox 4p.m., NESN
Pirates at Red
P
2:05
N
Kelly, Smith were in giving mood
Both took walk
on the wild side
Nick Cafardo
ON BASEBALL
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —
We thought from the beginning that the bullpen was
clearly an area where the Yankees were better. That couldn’t
have been borne out more
than on Opening Day at Tropicana Field when the Red Sox
bullpen imploded.
Six innings of one-hit ball
by Chris Sale led to abysmal
performances by Joe Kelly and
Carson Smith. These are Boston’s setup men, and on Thursday afternoon they set up a disaster. A 4-0 lead soon dissolved into a 6-4 loss. Kelly
was charged with four runs.
Smith couldn’t find the plate,
walked a batter with the bases
loaded, and then allowed a
three-run triple to right by
Denard Span.
If Dennis Eckersley had
been in the NESN booth, he
would have referred to the
bullpen’s performance as
“yuck.” Let’s face it, it was even
worse than that.
And what a time to be yuck.
First game of the season. Outcome seemingly in hand. Sale
pitches great and is out after
92 pitches. Matt Barnes comes
on to pitch a clean seventh,
and Kelly is summoned for the
eighth and the game changes
on a dime. This was not what
new Red Sox manager Alex
Cora was looking for. All camp
long, everyone seemed to have
smooth relief outings, including Smith, who had missed
most of the last two seasons after Tommy John surgery.
Was Smith the guy to go to
after Kelly was yanked with
the lefthanded-hitting Brad
Miller due up? Bobby Poyner
was warming up. If you are not
going to use him then, when
will he be used?
Cora said afterward he was
not going to bring in someone
who has never pitched above
Double A into his first major
league game with the bases
loaded. Understandable? OK.
Should Cora have turned to
Craig Kimbrel in one of those
high-leverage situations the
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Carson Smith eyes the flight of a ball hit by Denard Span, a two-out triple to deep right field that plated three runs and gave Tampa Bay a 5-4 lead.
manager spoke about in camp?
Kimbrel had thrown against
the Cubs on Tuesday. Was it
too soon to go back to him after he made only two appearances in major league games
all spring?
Cora said his staff decided
before the game that Kimbrel
was not going to be used in the
eighth inning. The feeling was
it was too early for that, after
he missed most of camp to be
with his daughter after her
heart procedure.
New pitching coach Dana
LeVangie said, “Not now. We’ll
ease him into that. It wouldn’t
be fair to do that to him.”
Cora agreed. It would mean
Kimbrel would have had to get
ready in the middle of an inning. Cora said he’d also have
to get Kimbrel out there for the
ninth, but would he? Couldn’t
he have used Kimbrel in the
eighth in the high-leverage situation, and then use someone
else for the ninth, perhaps
Smith?
You can also question
whether Kimbrel should be on
the roster if he’s not ready for
anything and everything this
early in the season.
You can question the decision of who was used when,
but the bottom line is that if
Kelly and Smith are late-inning
relievers, they have to be able
to protect a four-run lead.
What an awful way for a team
to lose. What an awful taste in
the mouths of Red Sox players
to see the bullpen squander
their good work in the first
game of the season against a
lousy team.
“They’re our guys and
they’ll continue to be our
guys,” LeVangie said. “Given
the matchups, they were the
guys to use in those situations.”
The Sox were looking for a
double play out of Smith, with
his funky delivery. What
should have been Cora’s first
win, a new beginning for the
Red Sox, turned into a fiasco of
the highest order.
You don’t hear Rays fans go
crazy very often, but they did
when the final out of the
game was recorded. The Red
Sox didn’t play all of this
three-hour game. They played
about 2:30 of it. The last halfhour was pure hell. When a
team’s bullpen loses a game,
it’s demoralizing. You have to
know that the bullpen can
keep the status quo. You have
to know it can protect a fourrun lead.
Kelly called his perfor-
mance “pathetic.” He entered
the game at the start of the
eighth and immediately
walked Daniel Robertson. After Kelly struck out the next
batter, Matt Duffy doubled,
driving in the Rays’ first run.
Kelly then walked Kevin Kiermaier and Carlos Gomez.
“You can live with getting
hit around a little bit,” Kelly
said, “but when you put runners on with a free pass, first of
all it’s going to bite you in the
butt, and second of all, the
most frustrating part, the guys
in front of you threw the ball
so well, we hit well, fielded
well. Let’s just say it’s probably
as worse as it can get.”
Smith walked in the second
run. After Wilson Ramos
struck out, Span cleared the
bases.
“It’s tough, but I’ve been
there before,” said Smith. “I
shouldn’t have problems getting out of that. I can’t walk
the first guy. My command was
a little off. My fastball was all
right and I had trouble with
Span. I had him 1-2 and
couldn’t put him away.”
Smith added, “I’ve always
lived and died for those pressure moments, and it just
didn’t work in our favor today.”
Things had better improve
in the bullpen because nothing
can bring a team down quicker
and ruin a manager’s tenure
faster than a shoddy bullpen.
And nothing can reinforce that
the Yankees have a better pen
than when something like this
happens.
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
Sox have to hope it can’t get much worse than this
uSHAUGHNESSY
Continued from Page C1
But what in the name of
“Launch Angle” went on at the
Trop Thursday? In a scene that
was wildly reminiscent of the
Red Sox’ season-opening disaster here 15 years ago, the Sox
wasted a Chris Sale gem, blew
a 4-0 lead in the eighth, and
dropped a 6-4 decision to a
team that looks worthy of a
commissioner’s investigation
for consumer fraud. The Rays
look like they are trying to lose
this year, but that didn’t stop
them from overwhelming the
Sox’ setup-by-committee in the
sixth-run eighth.
Oh, and in case you haven’t
heard, all this damage was inflicted while Craig Kimbrel sat
in the bullpen and never
warmed up. This after we were
told all winter that he would be
used in high-leverage situations before the ninth inning.
Not Thursday. Even though
Cora told us Kimbrel was
“available,’’ the rookie skipper
said that “we decided before
the game” that Kimbrel would
not be inserted into the middle
of an inning.
Did I mention that the Sox
ran into a pair of outs? Didn’t
think so. And it would have
been three blunders if a Tampa
relay throw hadn’t bounced off
the mound on Eduardo
Nunez’s second-inning insidethe-park homer.
This was, in short, the Full
Monty of Sox Suck on Opening
Day.
Poor Cora. What a way to
start your Red Sox managerial
career. Fergie had a better day
singing the anthem at the NBA
All-Star Game.
The polite manager was
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
J.D. Martinez had a quiet game in his Red Sox debut, going 0 for 3 with two strikeouts.
ready for the firing squad
when the Sox clubhouse doors
swung open in the early minutes after the shocker.
First question: Why no
Kimbrel?
“We talked about it before
the game and I don’t want to
put him in that spot right
now,’’ said the manager. “We
feel he’s ready, but I don’t think
it’s fair for him to come into
that situation. It’s not a clean
inning. We talked about it and
we’ ll stick to it . . . He was
available, but for where we are
at right now . . . for what we
are trying to accomplish this
year, we need him for the long
run and not for just Opening
Day. If that siutation presents
later, probably 15 days, he’ll be
in in that situation . . . I’m not
going to change my mind be-
cause of all the stuff going on
out there. We’ve got to plan
and we’ve got to take care of
players and that ’s the way
we’ve got to take care of him,
especially now.’’
Sorry, but this won’t fly with
folks back home. Kimbrel’s
spring was limited because he
was in Boston for three weeks
caring for his infant daughter,
but Cora does himself no favors by telling us that Kimbrel
is ready, but the Sox don’t want
to put him into an inning that
is not clean. Kimbrel shouldn’t
be here if he’s not available to
rescue Joe Kelly once Kelly gets
into trouble in the eighth.
Same with kid lefty Bobby
Poyner, who warmed up but
did not get in the game. There
were a couple of spots for a
lefty specialist in the eighth,
but Poyner has never pitched
in the big leagues and Cora
again said, “We’re not gonna
put him in a spot like that.’’
Excuse me? Then why is
Poyner here? Why is Cora saddled with a couple of relievers
— one a rookie and one an All
Star — who could not be put in
“a spot like that”? This makes
it sound like the Sox started
the season with a dysfunctional roster. Maybe this loss is on
Dave Dombrowski.
Kelly and Carson Smith did
all the damage after Sale’s six
innings of one-hit pitching.
Kelly: one out recorded,
three walks, one hit, four
earned runs. ERA: 108.00.
Cora on Kelly: “He had good
stuff. You have to keep it in the
zone.’’
Ouch. Farrell-esque.
Smith: two outs recorded,
one walk, two hits, two earned
runs. ERA: 27.00.
“It’s baseball,’’ said the manager. “We know it’s gonna happen. I guess just get it out of
the way right away. But it was
actually a good game for us offensively. We could have scored
more. Defensively we were solid.
“You always want to get the
W out of the way right away.
Any loss is disappointing, but
to lose it that way, yeah, of
course you think about it. But
one thing, we have to come
back tomorrow and be ready
for tomorrow.’’
The ghosts of 2003 were all
over this game. In 2003, Pedro
Martinez gave his bullpen-bycommittee a 4-0 lead and the
pen could not hold it. Carl
Crawford, of all people, hit a
walkoff three-run homer to
complete the comeback in
Tampa’s 6-4 vic tor y. Same
score as Thursday.
Sox pitching coach Dana
LeVangie, the only person still
here who was in a Boston uniform that day, told the Globe’s
Alex Speier, “I didn’t want to
go back that far. I was living in
the moment at the time. Tough
one, but that’s why we play the
game tomorrow.’’
David Price gets the ball Friday night . Against his old
team. In his old office.
With the Red Sox’ season on
the line.
Not true, of course. There’s
160 more after Friday. But Alex
Cora will certainly feel better if
Price rides to the rescue in
Game 2.
Dan Shaughnessy is a Globe
columnist. He can be reached
at dshaughnessy@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@Dan_Shaughnessy
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C7
Baseball
Davidson hits
3 HRs in rout
By Dave Skretta
ASSOCIATED PRESS
White Sox 14 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Matt Davidson became the fourth player in
Royals
7 major league history to homer
three times on Opening Day, the White Sox went deep
six times total, and Chicago routed the Kansas City
Royals, 14-7, Thursday to spoil their 50th anniversary
celebration.
Tim Anderson also
homered twice and Jose
Abreu went deep for the
White Sox, who picked
up James Shields in a
big way after the former
Royals ace surrendered
four runs in the first inning.
Shields wound up
lasting six innings,
holding Kansas City
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
without a hit after that
DH Matt Davidson had
shaky first.
three of the White Sox’
Of the four players
six HRs on Thursday.
with three-homer opening days, three have
done it against the Royals, while the six homers by
Chicago on Opening Day matched the big league record set by the Mets in 1988.
Yolmer Sanchez added a three-run single and Yoan
Moncada drove in a pair of runs for the White Sox,
who forced Royals manager Ned Yost to burn through
nine pitchers.
Danny Duffy breezed through three innings for
Kansas City, but a trio of homers in a five-run fourth
turned his day around.
Davidson becane the first White Sox player with a
three-homer game since Dan Johnson in October
2012.
AL
EAST
Baltimore
New York
Tampa Bay
Boston
Toronto
W
1
1
1
0
0
L Pct.
0 1.000
0 1.000
0 1.000
1 .000
1 .000
GB
—
—
—
1
1
Div. Last 10 Streak
0-0
1-0
W1
1-0
1-0
W1
1-0
1-0
W1
0-1
0-1
L1
0-1
0-1
L1
CENTRAL
Chicago
*Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
W
1
0
0
0
0
L Pct.
0 1.000
0
—
0
—
1 .000
1 .000
GB
—
½
½
1
1
Div. Last 10 Streak
1-0
1-0
W1
0-0
0-0
—
0-0
0-0
—
0-1
0-1
L1
0-0
0-1
L1
WEST
Houston
Oakland
*Seattle
Los Angeles
Texas
W
1
1
0
0
0
L Pct.
0 1.000
0 1.000
0
—
1 .000
1 .000
GB
—
—
½
1
1
Div. Last 10 Streak
1-0
1-0
W1
1-0
1-0
W1
0-0
0-0
—
0-1
0-1
L1
0-1
0-1
L1
NL
EAST
Atlanta
New York
Washington
Miami
Philadelphia
W
1
1
0
0
0
L Pct.
0 1.000
0 1.000
0
—
1 .000
1 .000
GB
—
—
½
1
1
Div. Last 10 Streak
1-0
1-0
W1
0-0
1-0
W1
0-0
0-0
—
0-0
0-1
L1
0-1
0-1
L1
CENTRAL
Chicago
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
W
1
1
0
0
0
L Pct.
0 1.000
0 1.000
0
—
0
—
1 .000
GB
—
—
½
½
1
Div. Last 10 Streak
0-0
1-0
W1
0-0
1-0
W1
0-0
0-0
—
0-0
0-0
—
0-0
0-1
L1
WEST
San Francisco
*Arizona
*Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego
W
1
0
0
0
0
L Pct.
0 1.000
0
—
0
—
1 .000
1 .000
GB
—
½
½
1
1
Div. Last 10 Streak
1-0
1-0
W1
0-0
0-0
—
0-0
0-0
—
0-1
0-1
L1
0-0
0-1
L1
* — Not including late game
RESULTS
THURSDAY
At Tampa Bay 6
Chi. Cubs 8
Boston 4
at Miami 4
Pittsburgh (ppd.)
At NY Mets 9
Milwaukee 2 (12 inn.) at San Diego 1
At Atlanta 8
Philadelphia 5
at Detroit
Washington (ppd.)
St. Louis 4
at Cincinnati
Chi. White Sox 14
at Kansas City 7
At Baltimore 3 (11 inn.) Minnesota 2
San Francisco 1
at LA Dodgers 0
Houston 4
Cleveland
at Seattle
Colorado
at Arizona
at Texas 1
NY Yankees 6
at Toronto 1
At Oakland 6 (11 inn.)
LA Angels 5
...........2018...........
W-L
ERA
Team ............2017 vs. opp ............
rec.
W-L
IP
ERA
BOSTON AT TAMPA BAY, 7:10 p.m.
Price (L)
Snell (L)
Off
Off
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-2
8.0
10.2
2.25
5.91
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
0-1
0-1
6.1
7.0
8.53
3.86
PITTSBURGH AT DETROIT, 1:10 p.m.
Nova (R)
Zimmermann (R)
Off
Off
WASHINGTON AT CINCINNATI, 4:10 p.m.
Scherzer (R)
Bailey (R)
Off
Off
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
1-0
0-2
6.0
5.2
0.00
25.41
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
3-1
0-0
30.0
0.0
4.20
0.00
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
3-0
1-1
17.0
18.0
2.12
3.00
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
3-1
0-1
24.2
5.1
2.92
5.06
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
2-0
0-2
16.0
12.2
3.94
4.97
NY YANKEES AT TORONTO, 7:07 p.m.
Tanaka (R)
Sanchez (R)
Off
Off
CHICAGO CUBS AT MIAMI, 7:10 p.m.
Hendricks (R)
Smith (L)
Off
Off
PHILADELPHIA AT ATLANTA, 7:35 p.m.
Pivetta (R)
Foltynewicz (R)
Off
Off
HOUSTON AT TEXAS, 8:05 p.m.
Keuchel (L)
Fister (R)
Off
Off
COLORADO AT ARIZONA, 9:40 p.m.
Anderson (L)
Ray (L)
Off
Off
LA ANGELS AT OAKLAND, 10:05 p.m.
Skaggs (L)
Manaea (L)
Off
Off
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
0-3
1-1
15.1
17.1
6.46
6.23
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
MILWAUKEE AT SAN DIEGO, 10:10 p.m.
Chacín (R)
TBA
Off
Off
SAN FRANCISCO AT LA DODGERS, 10:10 p.m.
Cueto (R)
Off
—
—
0-0
Wood (L)
Off
—
—
0-0
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher this season.
TOM SZCZERBOWSKI/GETTY IMAGES
Stanton leaves big imprint
Slugger homers
twice in NY debut
1-2
2-0
22.2
18.0
5.96
4.00
get the first one out of the way
and then you can relax.’’
Stanton was given the silent
treatment by the Yankees, except
for head athletic trainer Steven
Donohue, when he returned to
the dugout after the second home
run. So Stanton high-fived imaginary hands.
‘‘I had to get it late,’’ he said.
‘‘But I got some air high-fives.’’
Stanton became the seventh
Yankee to hit multiple home runs
on Opening Day, the first since
Joe Pepitone in 1963.
‘‘Every pitch, it just seemed
like he was in a really good place,’’
Boone said.
Stanton took a strike from J.A.
Happ (0-1) in the first inning,
then hit a 426-foot, two-run drive
to right measured at 117.3 miles
per hour.
‘‘It’s an interesting feeling,
man,’’ Stanton said. ‘‘It was similar to my first one ever.’’
By Ian Harrison
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Yankees 6 T O R O N T O —
Giancarlo Stanton
Blue Jays 1 felt like a rookie
again.
Stanton began his Yankees career in style, hitting the hardesthit opposite-field home run since
Major League Baseball began
tracking exit velocity in 2015,
adding an RBI double and a second homer into the center-field
party deck in the ninth. Stanton’s
four RBIs led the Yankees over
the Toronto Blue Jays, 6-1, on
Thursday and gave Aaron Boone
a win in his first game as a professional manager.
‘‘My biggest challenge, I told
myself, was going to be to be
calm,’’ Stanton said. ‘‘You want to
CUBS 8, MARLINS 4
ORIOLES 3, TWINS 2
CHICAGO
Happ cf
Bryant 3b
Rizzo 1b
Contreras c
Schwarber lf
Almora Jr. lf
Russell ss
Heyward rf
Báez 2b
Lester p
Cishek p
La Stella ph
Totals
AB
5
4
4
5
3
1
3
3
3
2
1
1
35
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 1 0 3 .200
2 1 0 1 1 .250
2 1 1 0 2 .250
0 1 1 0 3 .200
1 1 1 1 0 .333
0 0 0 0 0 .000
1 2 0 1 0 .667
1 1 1 1 0 .333
0 0 1 1 1 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 1 2 0 0 1.000
8 9 8 5 10
MIAMI
Brinson cf
Dietrich lf
Castro 2b
Bour 1b
Anderson 3b
Cooper rf
Rojas ss
Wallach c
Ureña p
Maybin ph
Telis ph
Rivera ss
Totals
AB
5
4
3
4
3
3
4
3
1
1
1
1
33
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 0 0 .000
1 2 0 0 1 .500
2 1 0 2 1 .333
0 0 1 1 0 .000
1 2 2 1 0 .667
0 1 1 1 1 .333
0 1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 1 3 .000
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 1 0 0 0 1.000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
4 8 4 6 7
Chicago....................310 100 300 — 8 9 2
Miami....................... 103 000 000 — 4 8 2
E—Russell (1), Schwarber (1), Tazawa (1),
Wallach (1). LOB—Chicago 9, Miami 9. 2B—
Bryant (1), Contreras (1), Heyward (1), La
Stella (1), Rojas (1), Maybin (1). 3B—Dietrich
(1). HR—Happ (1), off Ureña, Rizzo (1), off
Ureña, Schwarber (1), off Guerrero. SB—
Russell (1). DP—Chicago 2; Miami 1.
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Lester
3‚ 7 4 3 3 2 8.10
Cishek W 1-0 1„ 1 0 0 1 2 0.00
Duensing
1 0 0 0 1 1 0.00
Strop
1 0 0 0 1 1 0.00
Wilson
1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Montgomery
1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
Miami
Ureña L 0-1
O'Grady
Guerrero
Steckenrider
Tazawa
IP H
4 6
1 0
1‚ 2
„ 1
2 0
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 4 2 11.25
0 0 0 0 0.00
3 2 0 4 13.50
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 1 2 0.00
Inherited runners-scored—Cishek 2-0,
Steckenrider 2-2. IBB—off Ureña (Báez,
Schwarber). HBP—by Montgomery
(Dietrich), by Ureña (Báez, Rizzo, Russell).
Catchers interference—Wallach. NP—Lester
71, Cishek 28, Duensing 17, Strop 13, Wilson
19, Montgomery 9, Ureña 74, O'Grady 12,
Guerrero 37, Steckenrider 20, Tazawa 20.
Umpires—Home, Larry Vanover; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Chris Guccione;
Third, Carlos Torres. T—3:18. A—32,151
(37,442).
METS 9, CARDINALS 4
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Odds
Giancarlo Stanton
had plenty to
celebrate in his
Yankees debut: two
home runs, four
RBIs, and three
runs scored.
ST. LOUIS
Fowler rf
Pham cf
Carpenter 3b
Ozuna lf
JoMartínez 1b
YadMolina c
DeJong ss
Wong 2b
CaMartínez p
Muñoz ph
Totals
AB
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
3
2
1
33
NY METS
AB
Nimmo cf
3
Céspedes lf
5
Bruce rf
3
Cabrera 2b
4
Frazier 3b
4
González 1b
3
Plawecki c
3
Syndergaard p
2
Flores ph
1
Lagares ph
1
Rosario ss
4
Totals
33
R H BI BB SO
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 3
1 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 3
2 3 2 0 0
1 1 2 1 0
0 1 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 1
4 6 4 1 15
R H BI BB SO Avg.
2 2 0 1 0 .667
0 2 3 0 2 .400
0 1 1 2 1 .333
1 0 0 1 1 .000
1 1 0 1 1 .250
1 2 1 2 0 .667
2 2 1 2 0 .667
0 0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
2 2 2 0 1 .500
9 12 8 9 8
St. Louis...................020 101 000 — 4 6 1
NY Mets...................120 050 01x — 9 12 0
E—JoMartínez (1). LOB—St. Louis 3, NY
Mets 11. 2B—Carpenter (1), González (1),
Plawecki (1). HR—JoMartínez (1), off Syndergaard, YadMolina (1), off Syndergaard.
SB—Bruce (1). S—Syndergaard. DP—St. Louis 3.
St. Louis
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
CaMrtínez L 0-1 4‚ 4 5 4 6 5 8.31
Bowman
‚ 3 3 3 1 0 81.00
Cecil
‚ 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Mayers
1 2 0 0 0 1 0.00
Hicks
1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
Tuivailala
1 1 1 1 2 1 9.00
NY Mets
IP H
Syndrgrd W 1-0 6 6
Gsellman
1 0
Swarzak
1 0
Familia
1 0
YANKEES 6, BLUE JAYS 1
MINNESOTA
AB
Dozier 2b
5
Mauer 1b
5
Sanó 3b
5
Rosario lf-cf
4
Morrison dh
3
LaMarre pr-dh
1
Escobar ss
5
Kepler rf
4
Buxton cf
3
Grossman ph-lf 1
JCastro c
4
Totals
40
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 1 0 0 1 .200
0 1 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 3 .000
1 1 0 1 0 .250
0 0 0 1 1 .000
1 1 0 0 0 1.000
0 1 0 0 2 .200
0 1 0 1 0 .250
0 1 0 0 2 .333
0 1 2 0 0 1.000
0 0 0 0 2 .000
2 8 2 3 11
BALTIMORE
AB
Davis 1b
4
Machado ss
4
Schoop 2b
5
Jones cf
5
Mancini lf
4
Beckham 3b
4
Álvarez dh
1
Valencia ph-dh 1
Gentry rf
3
Rasmus ph-rf
0
Joseph c
3
Totals
34
R H BI BB SO
0 0 0 1 1
0 2 0 1 1
0 0 0 0 2
1 1 1 0 2
1 1 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1 0
1 0 0 1 1
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1 0
0 1 2 0 1
3 5 3 5 13
Avg.
.000
.500
.000
.200
.250
.000
.000
.000
.000
—
.333
Minnesota..........000 000 002 00 — 2 8 0
Baltimore...........000 000 200 01 — 3 5 0
LOB—Minnesota 8, Baltimore 7. 2B—
Machado (1). 3B—Joseph (1). HR—Jones (1),
off Rodney. SB—Rosario (1), Buxton (1),
Machado (1). S—Joseph. DP—Minnesota 1;
Baltimore 1.
Minnesota
Odorizzi
Duke
Reed
Hildenberger
Rodney L 0-1
IP H
6 2
1 1
2 0
‚ 0
„ 2
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 2 7 0.00
2 2 1 4 18.00
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 2 0 0.00
1 1 0 0 13.50
Baltimore
Bundy
O'Day
Brach BS 1
Givens
Bleier W 1-0
IP H
7 5
1 0
„ 2
1‚ 0
1 1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 7 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
2 2 2 2 27.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
Rodney pitched to 1 batter in the 11th. Inherited runners-scored—Rodney 2-0, Givens
2-0. IBB—off Duke (Valencia), off Hildenberger (Davis). WP—Duke 2, Bleier. PB—Joseph. NP—Odorizzi 93, Duke 24, Reed 23,
Hildenberger 9, Rodney 7, Bundy 88, O'Day
12, Brach 34, Givens 14, Bleier 14. Umpires—
Home, Joe West; First, Doug Eddings; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Mark Ripperger.
T—3:31. A—45,469 (45,971).
ASTROS 4, RANGERS 1
Avg.
.000
.000
.250
.000
.750
.333
.250
.000
.000
.000
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 0 10 6.00
0 0 0 3 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 1 1 0.00
Inherited runners-scored—Bowman 1-1,
Cecil 2-1. HBP—by CaMartínez (Nimmo).
WP—Tuivailala 2. NP—CaMartínez 90, Bowman 16, Cecil 10, Mayers 20, Hicks 8, Tuivailala 20, Syndergaard 85, Gsellman 14,
Swarzak 13, Familia 17. Umpires—Home,
Fieldin Culbreth; First, Brian O'Nora; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Chris Conroy.
T—3:01. A—44,189 (41,922).
HOUSTON
Springer rf
Bregman 3b
Altuve 2b
Correa ss
MGonzález 1b
Reddick lf
Gattis dh
Marisnick cf
McCann c
Totals
AB
4
3
2
3
3
4
3
4
4
30
R H BI BB SO
1 1 1 1 1
0 1 0 1 1
1 0 1 1 1
0 1 1 1 2
0 1 0 1 1
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1 2
1 1 1 0 2
1 1 0 0 1
4 6 4 6 13
TEXAS
DeShields cf
Gallo 1b
Andrus ss
Béltre 3b
Mazara rf
Choo dh
Chirinos c
Odor 2b
Rua lf
Totals
AB
4
4
3
4
3
4
4
2
3
31
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 1 .000
1 2 0 1 0 .667
0 2 0 0 0 .500
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 0 4 .000
0 1 0 1 1 .500
0 0 0 0 1 .000
1 6 0 2 9
Avg.
.250
.333
.000
.333
.333
.000
.000
.250
.250
Houston....................101 100 010 — 4 6 0
Texas........................000 000 001 — 1 6 0
LOB—Houston 6, Texas 6. 2B—Bregman
(1), Correa (1), Andrus (1). HR—Springer (1),
off Hamels, Marisnick (1), off Hamels. SF—
Altuve. DP—Houston 1; Texas 2.
Houston
Verlnder W 1-0
Devenski
Peacock
Giles
Texas
Hamels L 0-1
Leclerc
ChMartin
Bush
Jepsen
Stanton led the major leagues
with 59 home runs last year and
won the NL MVP, then was acquired from Derek Jeter’s payrollparing Miami Marlins to join AL
Rookie of the Year Aaron Judge
on the resurgent Bronx Bombers,
who fell one win shy of reaching
the World Series last year. Stanton became the first player to
homer in his first Yankees plate
appearance since Judge two years
ago.
‘‘We’ve got it in us,’’ Stanton
said. ‘‘Top to bottom, we’re going
to be tough.’’
Stanton doubled off John Axford in the fifth and hit a 434-foot
home run off Tyler Clippard in
the ninth.
‘‘All day long, I thought he was
winning pitches,’’ Boone said.
Luis Severino (1-0) pitched
5„ scoreless innings for the Yankees, who won their opener for
the first time since 2011.
IP H
6 4
1 0
1 0
1 2
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 2 5 0.00
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
1 1 0 1 9.00
IP H
5„ 5
‚ 0
1 0
1 1
1 0
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 4 7 4.76
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 2 0.00
1 1 2 2 9.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
Inherited runners-scored—Leclerc 1-0.
HBP—by Verlander (Mazara). WP—Giles.
NP—Verlander 90, Devenski 12, Peacock 14,
Giles 17, Hamels 94, Leclerc 3, ChMartin 12,
Bush 22, Jepsen 14. Umpires—Home, Jerry
Meals; First, Ron Kulpa; Second, Ed Hickox;
Third, Gabe Morales. T—2:59. A—47,253
(48,114).
NY YANKEES
Gardner lf
Judge rf
Stanton dh
Sánchez c
Hicks cf
Gregorius ss
Drury 3b
Walker 2b-1b
Austin 1b
Wade 2b
Totals
AB
5
4
5
5
4
3
4
4
3
1
38
R H BI BB SO Avg.
2 1 1 0 0 .200
1 2 0 1 2 .500
3 3 4 0 1 .600
0 1 1 0 1 .200
0 2 0 0 2 .500
0 0 0 1 0 .000
0 1 0 0 2 .250
0 1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
6 11 6 2 9
TORONTO
Travis 2b
Donaldson 3b
Smoak 1b
Granderson lf
Pearce ph
Morales dh
Grichuk rf
Martin c
Pillar cf
Díaz ss
Totals
AB
4
3
3
2
1
4
3
3
3
3
29
R H BI BB SO
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1 0
0 0 0 1 2
0 1 0 1 1
0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 1
1 1 1 0 2
0 0 0 0 0
1 2 1 3 12
Avg.
.000
.000
.000
.500
.000
.000
.000
.000
.333
.000
NY Yankees.............200 020 101 — 6 11 1
Toronto.................... 000 000 010 — 1 2 2
E—Severino (1), Granderson (1), Oh (1).
LOB—NY Yankees 7, Toronto 4. 2B—Judge
(1), Stanton (1), Sánchez (1), Walker (1).
HR—Gardner (1), off Barnes, Stanton 2 (2),
off Happ, off Clippard, Pillar (1), off Betances. SB—Donaldson (1). DP—Toronto 2.
NY Yankees
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Severino W 1-0 5„ 1 0 0 3 7 0.00
Green
1‚ 0 0 0 0 3 0.00
Betances
1 1 1 1 0 0 9.00
Chapman
1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Toronto
Happ L 0-1
Axford
Loup
Barnes
Oh
Clippard
IP H
4„ 4
‚ 2
1 1
1 2
1 1
1 1
R ER BB SO ERA
3 2 1 5 3.86
1 1 0 1 27.00
0 0 1 0 0.00
1 1 0 1 9.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
1 1 0 1 9.00
Inherited runners-scored—Green 1-0, Axford 1-1. NP—Severino 91, Green 22, Betances 13, Chapman 10, Happ 96, Axford 14, Loup
11, Barnes 18, Oh 12, Clippard 21. Umpires—
Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Paul Nauert;
Second, Scott Barry; Third, David Rackley.
T—2:51. A—48,115 (49,286).
BRAVES 8, PHILLIES 5
PHILADELPHIA AB
Hernández 2b
5
CarSantana 1b
5
Williams rf-lf
4
Hoskins lf
3
Altherr cf-rf
3
Crawford ss
3
Franco 3b
2
Knapp c
3
Nola p
2
Florimón ph
1
Totals
31
R H BI BB SO
1 2 1 0 2
1 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 2
1 2 1 0 0
1 1 0 1 1
1 0 0 1 1
0 0 1 2 0
0 1 2 1 2
0 0 0 1 1
0 0 0 0 1
5 6 5 6 11
ATLANTA
Inciarte cf
Albies 2b
FFreeman 1b
Markakis rf
Flowers c
Suzuki ph-c
Bourjos pr-lf
Tucker lf
Stewart c
Swanson ss
Flaherty 3b
Teheran p
Adams ph
Culberson 3b
Totals
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 0 1 .250
1 1 1 0 1 .200
3 1 2 3 0 .500
1 1 3 0 1 .200
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 1 0 1 0 .500
1 0 0 0 0
—
0 1 1 0 1 .250
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 1 0 0 0 1.000
1 1 0 0 0 1.000
8 9 7 4 6
AB
4
5
2
5
0
2
0
4
0
4
4
2
1
1
34
Avg.
.400
.000
.000
.667
.333
.000
.000
.333
.000
.000
Philadelphia............ 100 004 000 — 5 6 1
Atlanta......................000 002 033 — 8 9 0
E—Knapp (1). LOB—Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 6. 2B—Hoskins 2 (2), Inciarte (1). HR—
Hernández (1), off Teheran, Albies (1), off
Morgan, FFreeman (1), off Milner, Markakis
(1), off Neris. SB—Hoskins (1). S—Inciarte.
DP—Atlanta 2.
Philadelphia
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Nola
5‚ 3 1 1 1 3 1.69
Milner
‚ 1 1 1 0 0 27.00
García
1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
Morgan
„ 1 2 2 1 1 27.00
Ramos BS 1
„ 1 1 0 1 1 0.00
Neris L 0-1
„ 2 3 3 1 0 40.50
Atlanta
IP H
Teheran
5„ 4
Brothers
0 0
Winkler
1‚ 1
Moylan
„ 1
SFreeman
‚ 0
Vizcaíno W 1-0
1 0
R ER BB SO ERA
4 4 3 3 6.35
1 1 2 0
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 1 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 3 0.00
Brothers pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored—Milner 1-1, Morgan 1-0, Ramos 1-1, Brothers 2-1, Winkler
3-2, SFreeman 2-0. IBB—off Neris (FFreeman). HBP—by García (Suzuki), by Teheran
(Hoskins). WP—Teheran. PB—Knapp. NP—
Nola 68, Milner 8, García 12, Morgan 20, Ramos 20, Neris 9, Teheran 90, Brothers 12,
Winkler 23, Moylan 25, SFreeman 5, Vizcaíno
16. Umpires—Home, Jerry Layne; First, Greg
Gibson; Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Jordan Baker. T—3:28. A—40,208 (41,149).
‘‘The key to the game was Severino,’’ Blue Jays manager John
Gibbons said. ‘‘He shut us down
pretty good.’’
Brett Gardner hit a leadoff
home run off Danny Barnes in
the seventh. Judge singled, doubled, and walked for New York,
which opened the season with a
road win for the first time since
2006 at Oakland.
‘‘It’s definitely fun to do it for
real and get off on a good note,’’
Boone said.
Boone had been a television
analyst since retiring as a player
after the 2009 season. New York
fired Joe Girardi after the Game 7
loss to Houston in the AL Championship Series, deciding it needed a new approach.
Happ allowed three runs —
two earned — and four hits in 4„
innings. Kevin Pillar homered on
Dellin Betances’s first pitch in the
eighth.
WHITE SOX 14, ROYALS 7
CHICAGO
Moncada 2b
AGarcía rf
Abreu 1b
Davidson dh
Delmonico lf
LGarcía ph-lf
Castillo c
Anderson ss
Sánchez 3b
Engel cf
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
6 0 1 1 0 2 .167
6 2 2 0 0 0 .333
5 2 2 2 0 0 .400
4 4 3 5 1 0 .750
1 1 0 0 2 0 .000
1 1 1 0 0 0 1.000
5 0 0 0 0 1 .000
4 3 2 3 1 1 .500
4 1 1 3 1 2 .250
3 0 2 0 2 1 .667
39 14 14 14 7 7
KANSAS CITY
Jay lf
Merrifield 2b
Moustakas 3b
Duda 1b
Cuthbert dh
Soler rf
Gordon cf
Orlando cf
Escobar ss
Butera c
Totals
AB
5
5
5
4
3
3
4
0
3
4
36
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 1 0 0 1 .200
1 1 1 0 0 .200
2 2 1 0 0 .400
1 1 3 0 0 .250
0 1 1 0 0 .333
0 0 0 1 1 .000
0 1 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 0 0
—
1 0 0 1 0 .000
1 2 0 0 0 .500
7 9 6 2 2
Chicago....................000 530 330 — 14 14 1
Kansas City.............400 000 012 — 7 9 0
E—Moncada (1). LOB—Chicago 6, Kansas
City 5. 2B—Moncada (1), AGarcía (1), Engel
(1), Moustakas (1), Gordon (1), Butera (1).
HR—Abreu (1), off Duffy, Davidson 3 (3), off
Duffy, off Boyer, off Flynn, Anderson 2 (2),
off Duffy, off Boyer, Duda (1), off Shields.
DP—Kansas City 1.
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Shields W 1-0
6 5 4 4 1 0 6.00
Infante
1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Avilán
1 2 1 0 0 1 0.00
Minaya
„ 1 2 2 1 1 27.00
Bummer
‚ 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
Kansas City
Duffy L 0-1
Boyer
Keller
Grimm
Hill
BurSmith
Flynn
Maurer
Herrera
IP H
4 7
1 2
1 0
‚ 0
‚ 0
0 1
1‚ 4
„ 0
‚ 0
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 2 5 11.25
3 3 1 0 27.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
1 1 1 0 27.00
1 1 0 0 27.00
1 1 2 0
3 3 0 0 20.25
0 0 1 1 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
HBP—by Shields (Cuthbert), by Hill (LGarcía). WP—Minaya 2. PB—Butera. NP—
Shields 97, Infante 18, Avilán 27, Minaya 24,
Bummer 2, Duffy 78, Boyer 30, Keller 13,
Grimm 11, Hill 4, BurSmith 15, Flynn 17, Maurer 13, Herrera 2. Umpires—Home, Brian
Gorman; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Tripp Gibson. T—3:26.
A—36,517 (37,903).
BREWERS 2, PADRES 1
MILWAUKEE
Cain cf
Yelich lf
Braun 1b
Shaw 3b
Santana rf
Piña c
Villar 2b
Thames ph
Choi ph
Arcia ss
Anderson p
Sogard 2b
Aguilar ph
Pérez pr-2b
Totals
AB
5
4
4
5
5
5
3
1
1
5
2
1
0
1
42
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 3 0 0 0 .600
0 1 1 1 1 .250
0 0 0 1 1 .000
0 1 0 0 2 .200
0 2 0 0 0 .400
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
1 1 0 0 0 1.000
0 1 1 0 0 .200
1 1 0 0 1 .500
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 1 .000
2 10 2 2 9
SAN DIEGO
Margot cf
Myers rf
Hosmer 1b
Pirela lf
Asuaje 2b
Szczur pr
Lopez ph
Headley 3b
Galvis ss
Hedges c
Richard p
Renfroe ph
Spngnberg 2b
Totals
AB
4
5
4
5
3
0
0
4
4
5
2
1
2
39
R H BI BB SO
0 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1 2
0 2 0 0 1
0 1 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 0
0 0 0 1 1
0 2 1 1 1
0 0 0 0 4
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 1
1 6 1 6 15
Avg.
.250
.000
.000
.400
.333
—
—
.000
.500
.000
.000
.000
.000
Milwaukee.......001 000 000 001 — 2 10 1
San Diego........ 000 000 001 000 — 1 6 0
E—Santana (1). LOB—Milwaukee 7, San
Diego 8. 2B—Shaw (1), Choi (1). HR—. SB—
Cain (1), Szczur (1). CS—Pérez (1), Galvis
(1). DP—Milwaukee 2; San Diego 3.
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Anderson
6 1 0 0 3 6 0.00
Hader
1 1 0 0 1 3 0.00
Albers
1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Knebel BS 1
1 2 1 1 0 1 9.00
Jeffress W 1-0
2 1 0 0 2 2 0.00
Barnes S 1
1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00
San Diego
Richard
Yates
McGrath
Stammen
Hand
Cimber L 0-1
IP H
7 6
„ 1
‚ 0
1 0
2 0
1 3
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 1 4 1.29
0 0 1 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 0 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
1 1 0 1 9.00
IBB—off Jeffress (Lopez). HBP—by Hand
(Aguilar). NP—Anderson 97, Hader 21, Albers 14, Knebel 14, Jeffress 35, Barnes 17,
Richard 83, Yates 18, McGrath 5, Stammen
12, Hand 19, Cimber 16. Umpires—Home,
Gerry Davis; First, Mark Carlson; Second,
Brian Knight; Third, Pat Hoberg. T—3:36.
A—44,649 (40,209).
ATHLETICS 6, ANGELS 5
LA ANGELS
Cozart 2b
Trout cf
Upton lf
Pujols 1b
Young pr
Marte 1b
Calhoun rf
Simmons ss
Valbuena 3b
Ohtani dh
Maldonado c
Totals
AB
6
6
5
5
0
0
5
4
5
5
5
46
R H BI BB SO Avg.
1 3 1 0 2 .500
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
1 2 1 0 1 .400
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 0 0 0 0
—
2 3 1 0 1 .600
1 1 1 1 0 .250
0 0 0 0 1 .000
0 1 0 0 1 .200
0 3 1 0 0 .600
5 13 5 1 7
OAKLAND
Joyce lf
Semien ss
Lowrie 2b
Davis dh
Olson 1b
Piscotty rf
Chapman 3b
Lucroy c
Powell cf
Totals
AB
4
5
5
5
5
4
4
5
5
42
R H BI BB SO
1 1 0 2 1
2 3 1 1 1
0 2 0 0 1
1 2 4 0 1
1 1 1 0 3
0 0 0 1 1
0 0 0 1 1
0 1 0 0 0
1 2 0 0 2
6 12 6 5 11
Avg.
.250
.600
.400
.400
.200
.000
.000
.200
.400
LA Angels...........020 111 000 00 — 5 13 0
Oakland..............000 040 100 01 — 6 12 0
LOB—LA Angels 9, Oakland 10. 2B—Cozart (1), Maldonado (1), Powell (1). 3B—Calhoun (1), Powell (1). HR—Cozart (1), off
Graveman, Pujols (1), off Graveman, Calhoun (1), off Graveman, Davis (1), off Richards, Olson (1), off Richards. DP—Angels 1.
LA Angels
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Richards
5 7 4 4 3 4 7.20
Wood
1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Bedrosian BS 1 ‚ 3 1 1 0 0 27.00
Álvarez
‚ 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Middleton
1‚ 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Johnson
1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
NRamírez L 0-1 1‚ 2 1 1 2 3 6.75
Oakland
Graveman
Buchter
Petit
Treinen
Hatcher W 1-0
IP H
5 7
1 0
2 1
2 3
1 2
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 0 1 9.00
0 0 1 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 2 0.00
Graveman pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored—Álvarez 2-0, Middleton 2-0. IBB—off NRamírez (Joyce). NP—
Richards 89, Wood 17, Bedrosian 16, Álvarez
4, Middleton 27, Johnson 11, NRamírez 34,
Graveman 78, Buchter 19, Petit 25, Treinen
25, Hatcher 17. Umpires—Home, Ted Barrett; First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Chad
Fairchild; Third, Will Little. T—4:02.
A—27,764 (48,592).
GIANTS 1, DODGERS 0
SAN FRAN.
AB
Jackson cf
4
Panik 2b
4
McCutchen rf
4
Posey c
2
Longoria 3b
4
Pence lf
4
Belt 1b
4
Crawford ss
4
Blach p
2
GkHernndez ph 1
Osich p
0
Gearrin p
0
Watson p
0
Sandoval ph
1
Strickland p
0
Totals
34
R H BI BB SO
0 1 0 0 1
1 2 1 0 0
0 1 0 0 1
0 0 0 2 1
0 0 0 0 3
0 2 0 0 1
0 1 0 0 2
0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
1 8 1 2 11
Avg.
.250
.500
.250
.000
.000
.500
.250
.250
.000
.000
—
—
—
.000
—
LA DODGERS
AB
Taylor cf
4
Seager ss
4
Puig rf
3
KiHernndez 2b
2
Bellinger 1b
4
Kemp lf
3
Barnes pr
0
Grandal c
3
Forsythe 3b
4
Kershaw p
2
Utley ph
1
Pederson ph
1
Totals
31
R H BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 1 2 .000
0 0 0 2 0 .000
0 0 0 0 2 .000
0 1 0 1 1 .333
0 0 0 0 0
—
0 2 0 1 1 .667
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 2 0 0 0 1.000
0 1 0 0 0 1.000
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 6 0 5 10
San Francisco......... 000 010 000 — 1 8 0
LA Dodgers..............000 000 000 — 0 6 0
LOB—San Francisco 8, LA Dodgers 9. 2B—
McCutchen (1), Pence (1). HR—Panik (1), off
Kershaw. SB—Puig (1), Utley (1). DP—San
Francisco 2; LA Dodgers 1.
San Francisco
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Blach W 1-0
5 3 0 0 3 3 0.00
Osich
1 0 0 0 1 2 0.00
Gearrin
1 2 0 0 0 1 0.00
Watson
1 0 0 0 1 3 0.00
Strickland S 1
1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
LA Dodgers
Kershaw L 0-1
Chargois
Fields
Cingrani
IP H
6 8
1 0
1 0
1 0
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 7 1.50
0 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 0 1 0.00
WP—Osich. NP—Blach 81, Osich 19, Gearrin 18, Watson 17, Strickland 19, Kershaw 91,
Chargois 12, Fields 13, Cingrani 15. Umpires—Home, Mark Wegner; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, John
Tumpane. T—2:55. A—53,595 (56,000).
C8
T h e
Sports
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
Scoreboard
Ryder on a roll in Houston
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Schools
P G A To u r r o o k i e S a m
Ryder played just enough golf
Thursday to get his name atop
the leaderGOLF
board in the
ROUNDUP
Ho u s t o n
Open.
Ryder holed an 8-foot birdie putt on the 15 th hole to
reach 8 under par before it was
too dark to continue. The
opening round was delayed
two hours because of overnight rain that dumped more
than 2 inches on the Golf Club
of Houston.
But it was partly cloudy,
warm, and breezy for most of
the day, with a forecast for
more of the same through the
weekend.
Former US Open champion
Lucas Glover and Kevin Tway
each shot 7-under 65 in the
morning. They had a one-shot
lead over Rickie Fowler, Rod
Pampling, Ryan Armour, and
Julian Suri among those who
completed their rounds.
Beau Hossler, another PGA
Tour rookie, was at 7 under
through 16 holes.
Phil Mickelson looked as if
he would be among the leaders when he shot 30 on the
front nine and was one shot
behind. Mickelson, who won
the Mexico Championship
three weeks ago for his first
victor y in more than four
years, stalled on the back nine,
and then wound up in the
wrong spot on the par-3 14th.
Facing a bunker shot with
the green running away from
him, Mickelson left it in the
sand and the ball rolled back
into his footprint. He did well
SAT
SUN
MON
TUE
NONLEAGUE
Abby Kelley Foster 8.....N. Brookfield 6
TB
7:10
NESN
TB
6:10
NESN
TB
1:10
NESN
MIA
7:10
NESN
MIA
6:10
NESN
TB
2:05
NESN
FLA
1:00
NESN
PHI
12:30
NBC
TB
7:30
NESN+
FLA
7:30
NESN
3/31
4/1
4/2
4/3
WED
Y
FRI
3/30
BASEBALL
Y
Y
THU
4/4
4/5
LACROSSE
BOYS
MID-WACH
Littleton 8..........................Shrewsbury 7
NONLEAGUE
Ashland 20............................Stoughton 4
Lowell 8....................Gloucester 7 (2OT)
GIRLS
MID-WACH
Shrewsbury 7..........................Littleton 5
NONLEAGUE
Marshfield 14.........................Hingham 9
Norwood 16........................Bellingham 4
Shepherd Hill 19......................Assabet 4
TOR
7:30
NBA,
NBCSB
TENNIS
JOSH HEDGES/GETTY IMAGES
to get that one on the fringe,
and got up-and-down to make
double bogey.
Mickelson wound up with a
68, along with Jordan Spieth,
who made three late birdies
playing in the morning.
Bubba Watson had to make
two straight birdies to avoid a
playoff against Suri in group
play last week at the Dell Technologies Match Play. Suri left
that World Golf Championship and had to qualify Monday to get into the Houston
Open.
He still has hopes of going
to Augusta National ne xt
week. Winning the Houston
Open is the only way to get into the Masters.
Glover isn’t in the Masters,
either. He ran off five consecutive birdies through the middle of his round and added two
more late in his round for his
lowest score of the year.
LPGA — Lexi Thompson is
smiling and having fun again
at the ANA Inspiration.
A year after a rules violation cost her four strokes in
regulation in an eventual playoff loss, Thompson shot a 4under 68 to finish the opening
round in Rancho Mirage, Calif., three strokes behind leader
Pernilla Lindberg.
Thompson also again overpowered Michelle Wie, four
years after routing her in a final-round showdown on another hot afternoon at Mission
Hills for her first major title.
Fighting dizzy spells on the
front nine, Wie had a 75 that
left her in danger of missing
the cut.
Lindberg birdied her final
two holes for a bogey-free 65,
playing in the last group to finish the round.
Beatriz Recari and Ayako
Uehara were a stroke back.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
UConn, ND renew old rivalry
said McGraw, who on Thursday was named the Associated
Press coach of the year. ‘‘I
think that it always, of course,
will be a rivalry just because
they’re the best team in the
country right now. But I think
it’s not that intensity that we
had when we were in the Big
East because you’re constantly
watching in your conference.
‘‘Now we’re in the ACC, and
we’re focused on that, and
that’s the best conference in
women’s basketball. We really
focused on that. So I think it
definitely has lessened the intensity of the rivalry, but that
could change tomorrow.’’
. . .
ing on the grand stage of the
Final Four.
‘‘The neat thing about it is
after every game in December
now I will say to her all the
time, ‘I’ll see you in March.’ If I
see you in March it will be in
the Final Four, so that’s cool,’’
Auriemma said.
The unbeaten Huskies and
Irish play Friday night in the
national semifinals in which
all four top seeds advanced.
The winner will face Louisville
or Mississippi State for the title Sunday night.
There was a stretch between 2010 and 2013 when
the two squads played 15
times. The Irish won seven
times, twice knocking UConn
out of the Final Four.
‘‘I think now we only play
them once a year, there is
some distance to the rivalry,’’
By Doug Feinberg
ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio — It
wasn’t long ago Geno Auriemma and Muffet McGraw were
constantly on each other’s
minds.
That’s what happens when
you coach two of the nation’s
best teams and play in the
same conference. UConn and
Notre Dame would play four
times a season, heightening
the intensity of one of the best
rivalries in women’s college
basketball.
Now with the two powerhouse programs in different
conferences — UConn in the
American Athletic Conference
and Notre Dame in the Atlantic Coast Conference — the intensity has diminished. They
play only once a season, with a
second meeting usually com-
South Carolina’s A’ja Wilson was named the AP women’s player of the year. She averaged 22.6 points and 11.8
rebounds this season.
SportsLog
76ers star Embiid needs surgery
Philadelphia 76ers All-Star center Joel Embiid will need surgery on an orbital fracture of his
left eye and he has a concussion from an injury
suffered Wednesday when he was accidentally
head-butted by teammate Markelle Fultz. There
was no timetable Thursday on how long Embiid
would be out . . . Los Angeles Lakers guard Isaiah Thomas will need four months to recover
from arthroscopic surgery on his right hip, according to the team . . . Pistons forward Blake
Griffin missed Thursday’s game against the
Washington Wizards in Detroit because of an
ankle injury . . . Jason Kidd, Steve Nash, and
Grant Hill were notified of their election into the
Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in
Springfield as part of the Class of 2018, ESPN
reported. The full class will be revealed Saturday at the Final Four in San Antonio.
COLLEGES
Locals among Baker finalists
Harvard’s Ryan Donato and Northeastern’s
Adam Gaudette joined Denver’s Henrik Borgstrom as finalists for the Hobey Baker Award,
given to college hockey’s best player. All three
have already signed NHL contracts. Donato
plays for the Bruins . . . Providence College junior forward Erik Foley of Mansfield agreed to
terms on a three-year entry level contract with
the St. Louis Blues, forgoing his senior season.
AP honors Brunson, Bennett
Villanova junior point guard Jalen Brunson
was named the Associated Press men’s college
basketball player of the year . . . The AP picked
Virginia's Tony Bennett as men's college basketball coach of the year after a season that ended
with the Cavaliers losing to UMBC to become
the first No. 1 seed to lose to a 16-seed in NCAA
Tournament history . . . Penn State won its first
NIT championship since 2009 with an 82-66
victory over Utah at Madison Square Garden . . .
NCAA leaders expect to receive recommendations for reforming college basketball by April
25 and have pledged to quickly implement
changes while preserving the status quo when it
comes to amateurism, NCAA president Mark
Emmert said during his annual state of the association news conference at the Final Four.
BASEBALL
Holland, Cardinals reach deal
A person familiar with the deal told the AP
that All-Star closer Greg Holland and the St.
Louis Cardinals agreed to a $14 million, oneyear contract . . . Toronto Blue Jays shortstop
Troy Tulowitzki was put on the 60-day disabled
list because of bone spurs in his right heel, retroactive to March 28. Tulowitzki suffered a season-ending ankle injury last July 28 and has not
played since . . . Former All-Star Rusty Staub
died at 73 after an illness in West Beach, Fla. He
played 23 seasons in the majors. Obituary, Page
B8 . . . The average major league salary on
Opening Day fell 0.9 percent to $4.41 million
from last year’s $4.45 million, according to a
study by the AP.
MISCELLANY
Stephens makes Miami final
US Open champion Sloane Stephens beat
Victoria Azarenka, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1, to reach the
women’s final of the Miami Open tennis tournament on Saturday in Key Biscayne, Fla. . . .
Nevada boxing regulators filed a formal complaint against Canelo Alvarez for doping violations, putting his May 5 middleweight title rematch with Gennady Golovkin in jeopardy. Alvarez could be suspended for a year for testing
positive twice for the performance-enhancing
drug Clenbuterol.
VOLLEYBALL
Home games shaded
BOYS
INTER-HIGH
Burncoat 3................Worcester South 0
WESTERN ALLIANCE
BC High 3...................................Milford 0
NONLEAGUE
Braintree 3..................................Norton 0
Gr. New Bedford 3..........Framingham 0
Lexington 3............................ Arlington 0
Lincoln-Sudbury 3..............Wachusett 0
N. Quincy 3.........................Latin Acad. 2
O'Bryant 3..............................Randolph 0
Quincy 3...............................Weymouth 0
Main South 3............Worcester North 2
Worcester Tech 3....................Doherty 0
Colleges
BASKETBALL
MEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT
EAST REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
Villanova 90..................West Virginia 78
Purdue 65.........................Texas Tech 78
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Villanova 71......................Texas Tech 59
SOUTH REGIONAL
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Loyola-Chicago 78.......Kansas State 62
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Friday, March 23 — Semifinals
Kansas 80..............................Clemson 76
Duke 69.................................Syracuse 65
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Kansas 85...........................Duke 81 (OT)
WEST REGIONAL
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Michigan 58...................Florida State 54
FINAL FOUR
Saturday, March 31
Loyola-Chicago vs. Michigan..........6:05
Kansas vs. Villanova.........................8:49
WOMEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT
ALBANY REGIONAL
Monday, March 26 — Final
UConn 94....................South Carolina 65
SPOKANE REGIONAL
Monday, March 26 — Final
Notre Dame 84........................Oregon 74
KANSAS CITY REGIONAL
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Mississippi St. 89.......................UCLA 73
LEXINGTON REGIONAL
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Louisville 76..................Oregon State 43
FINAL FOUR
Friday, March 30
UConn vs. Notre Dame, 9 p.m.
Louisville vs. Mississippi State, 7 p.m.
Sunday, April 1
National championship, 6 p.m.
NIT
Men
Tuesday, March 27 — Semifinals
at Madison Square Garden
Western Kentucky 64.................Utah 69
Penn State 75........Mississippi State 60
Thursday, March 29 — Final
Penn State 82.............................. Utah 66
WOMEN
Wed., March 28 — Semifinals
Virginia Tech 64..........West Virginia 61
Indiana 71......................................TCU 58
HOCKEY
MEN’S NCAA DIV. 1 TOURNEY
NORTHEAST REGIONAL
At DCU Center, Worcester
Saturday, March 24
Boston University 3..................Cornell 1
Michigan 3...................... Northeastern 2
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Michigan 6..............Boston University 3
EAST REGIONAL
At Webster Bank Arena, Bridgeport,
Conn.
Friday, March 23
Notre Dame 4.............. Michigan Tech 3
Providence 1...........................Clarkson 0
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Notre Dame 2.....................Providence 1
MIDWEST REGIONAL
At PPL Center, Allentown, Pa.
Saturday, March 24
Ohio State 4..........................Princeton 2
Denver 5..............................Penn State 1
Sunday, March 25 — Final
Ohio State 5...............................Denver 1
WEST REGIONAL
At Sioux Falls, S.D.
Friday, March 23
Air Force 4........................St. Cloud St. 1
Minn. Deluth 3.....MSU-Mankato 2 (OT)
Saturday, March 24 — Final
Minn. Duluth 2.......................Air Force 1
FROZEN FOUR
at Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul
Thursday, April 5 — Semifinals
Ohio State vs. Minnesota-Duluth, 6
p.m.; Notre Dame vs. Michigan, 9:30
p.m.
Saturday, April 7 — Final
Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.
BASEBALL
Babson 17...............................Curry 1 (8)
Boston College 10..................Clemson 2
Clark 4........................................Nichols 0
Eastern Conn. 7.......Albertus Magnus 1
LIU Post 3.............................Bridgeport 2
Rhode Island College 6....Anna Maria 1
Rivier 5..............Pine Manor 0 (Game 1)
Rivier 13............Pine Manor 0 (Game 2)
Roger Williams 7............. Keene State 5
UMass Dartmouth 5..Bridgewater St. 4
WPI 6...................Fitchburg State 4 (11)
LACROSSE
MENS
Mount Ida 16..............................Becker 5
New England College 11...............UNE 5
WOMENS
Bates 17...................St. Joseph’s (Me.) 3
Bridgewater St. 18. W. New England 8
NE College 18.................Gordon 17 (OT)
Elms 6................Rhode Island College 5
Trinity 9....................................Cortland 8
UMass Dartmouth 19......Salem State 9
Worcester State 9.......................Curry 7
TENNIS
Bentley 8..................................Stonehill 1
Biola 8..................................Merrimack 1
Brandeis 7..................................Babson 2
Connecticut College 5....Coast Guard 4
Rhode Island College 7.Salve Regina 2
UMass Boston 6........................Suffolk 3
Soccer
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts. GF GA
Columbus............... 3 0 1 10 8 3
NYC FC ................... 3 0 1 10 8 3
New York............... 2 1 0 6 7 1
ATL United FC....... 2 1 0 6 7 6
Philadelphia .......... 1 0 1 4 2 0
NEW ENGLAND ..... 1 1 1 4 4 5
Montreal ................ 1 2 0 3 4 5
D.C. United ............ 0 2 2 2 5 9
Orlando City.......... 0 2 1 1 2 5
Chicago.................. 0 2 0 0 4 6
Toronto FC............. 0 2 0 0 0 3
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Kansas City ........... 2 1 1 7
Vancouver ............. 2 1 1 7
Los Angeles FC..... 2 0 0 6
MIN United ............ 2 2 0 6
FC Dallas................ 1 0 2 5
Houston.................. 1 1 1 4
LA Galaxy .............. 1 1 1 4
Real Salt Lake....... 1 1 1 4
San Jose................. 1 1 0 3
Colorado ................ 0 1 1 1
Portland ................. 0 2 1 1
Seattle.................... 0 2 0 0
9
5
6
6
5
7
3
3
5
3
2
0
9
6
1
8
2
4
3
6
5
4
7
4
FRIDAY, MARCH 30
Real Salt Lake at Toronto FC............... 8
SATURDAY, MARCH 31
New York at Orlando City.....................1
Los Angeles FC at LA Galaxy............... 3
Vancouver at Columbus........................3
Portland at Chicago...............................6
ATL United FC at Minnesota United...8
New York City FC at San Jose..............8
D.C. United at Sporting KC..............8:30
NEW ENGLAND at Houston..............8:30
Philadelphia at Colorado.......................9
Montreal at Seattle..............................10
FRIDAY, APRIL 6
Montreal at NEW ENGLAND............7:30
TOR
8:00
ESPN,
NBCSB
HOU
8:30
Ch. 38
BOYS
NONLEAGUE
Hopedale 4.........................Chelmsford 1
Lucas Glover fired a 7-under 65 Thursday to grab a share
of the first-round clubhouse lead in the Houston Open.
MIL
8:00
NBCSB
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI-FM 93.7; Bruins, Celtics, and Revolution, WBZ-FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
Latest line
BASEBALL
1 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Detroit
7 p.m.
NY Yankees at Toronto
7:10 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay
MLB
MLB
NESN
NBA
Friday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At Orlando............6½ ................Chicago
At Atlanta.........OFF .....................Phila.
At Cleveland....OFF ....... New Orleans
At Oklahoma City3½ ..................Denver
At Houston.......OFF ................Phoenix
Minnesota.............5½ .............. At Dallas
At Utah..............OFF ..............Memphis
At LA Lakers....OFF ...........Milwaukee
At Portland............6 ..........LA Clippers
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
CBI final: San Francisco at North Texas ESPNU
7 p.m.
CIT: Illinois-Chicago at N. Colorado
CBSSN
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
Geico Nationals (boys’ semifinal)
5 p.m.
Geico Nationals (boys’ semifinal)
ESPN2
ESPN2
PRO BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
New Orleans at Cleveland
10:30 p.m. LA Clippers at Portland
ESPN
ESPN
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Friday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
At N. Texas...........4½ ..... San Francisco
At N. Colorado.........9 ...........Ill.-Chicago
WOMEN’S NCAA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
Final Four: Louisville vs. Mississippi St. ESPN2
9 p.m.
Final Four: Notre Dame vs. UConn
ESPN2
GOLF
12 p.m.
4 p.m.
LPGA: ANA Inspiration
PGA: Houston Open
Saturday
Favorite...............Line .............Underdog
Michigan...................5 ...........Loyola-Chi.
Villanova...................5 ..................Kansas
NHL
Friday
Golf
Golf
PRO HOCKEY
7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at NY Rangers
NHL
TENNIS
1 p.m.
7 p.m.
ESPN2
ESPNews
Miami Open (men’s semifinals)
Miami Open (men’s semifinals)
Favorite...........Line
At NY RangersOFF
At WASH.........-203
Toronto...........-164
At Colorado.... OFF
At Anaheim.....OFF
At Las Vegas..-150
Underdog........Line
Tampa Bay......OFF
Carolina.........+183
At NYi.............+154
Chicago............OFF
Los Angeles....OFF
St. Louis.........+140
Transactions
Golf
Hockey
PGA TOUR HOUSTON OPEN
AHL
Thursday
At Golf Club of Houston
Humble, Texas
Partial First Round
Lucas Glover.............................33-32—65
Kevin Tway...............................32-33—65
Rickie Fowler............................33-33—66
Rod Pampling...........................32-34—66
Julian Suri..................................33-33—66
Ryan Armour............................ 34-32—66
Bud Cauley................................33-34—67
Keith Mitchell...........................33-34—67
Matt Every................................ 34-33—67
Greg Chalmers.........................34-33—67
Padraig Harrington..................34-33—67
Michael Thompson..................33-34—67
Brett Stegmaier........................34-33—67
Seamus Power.........................31-36—67
Jason Kokrak............................33-34—67
Shawn Stefani..........................35-32—67
Steve Stricker...........................35-32—67
Grayson Murray.......................33-34—67
Brandt Snedeker......................33-34—67
Harold Varner III......................34-34—68
Scott Piercy.............................. 33-35—68
Tom Hoge..................................34-34—68
Martin Piller..............................34-34—68
Jordan Spieth............................34-34—68
Henrik Stenson.........................33-35—68
Bill Haas.....................................34-34—68
Keegan Bradley........................35-33—68
Joel Dahmen.............................36-32—68
Abraham Ancer........................33-35—68
Denny McCarthy......................34-34—68
Nicholas Lindheim...................35-33—68
Danny Lee.................................32-36—68
J.J. Henry...................................34-34—68
Kevin Streelman...................... 33-35—68
Matt Kuchar..............................36-32—68
Fabian Gomez...........................34-34—68
Phil Mickelson..........................30-38—68
Justin Rose................................34-34—68
Shane Lowry.............................33-35—68
Luke List....................................36-32—68
Chad Campbell.........................35-34—69
Robert Garrigus........................38-31—69
Thomas Pieters........................35-34—69
D.A. Points.................................35-34—69
Mackenzie Hughes..................35-34—69
James Hahn.............................. 35-34—69
Emiliano Grillo..........................35-34—69
Jonathan Byrd..........................34-35—69
C.T. Pan..................................... 35-34—69
Jamie Lovemark.......................34-35—69
Aaron Wise............................... 33-36—69
Rob Oppenheim.......................35-34—69
Byeong Hun An........................33-36—69
Jon Curran.................................33-36—69
Daniel Berger............................34-35—69
Russell Henley..........................33-36—69
Kelly Kraft.................................36-34—70
Sam Saunders..........................34-36—70
Tony Finau................................ 36-34—70
Chris Kirk...................................35-35—70
Martin Kaymer.........................34-36—70
Jonas Blixt.................................35-35—70
Brandon Harkins......................36-34—70
Alex Cejka.................................36-34—70
Adam Schenk........................... 36-34—70
Bobby Gates............................. 36-34—70
Ethan Tracy...............................34-36—70
Ryan Baca.................................34-36—70
Dawie van der Walt................ 37-33—70
Ryan Blaum...............................36-34—70
Retief Goosen...........................35-35—70
Ernie Els.....................................34-36—70
Matt Jones................................ 36-34—70
Chez Reavie..............................35-35—70
Hunter Mahan..........................35-36—71
Scott Brown..............................36-35—71
Russell Knox.............................37-34—71
Brice Garnett............................34-37—71
Cody Gribble.............................35-36—71
New England players
68 () — Keegan Bradley, Hopkinton,
35-33
68 () — J.J. Henry, Fairfield, Conn.,
34-34
69 () — Rob Oppenheim, Andover,
35-34
69 () — Jon Curran, Hopkinton, 33-36
72 () — Peter Uihlein, Mattapoisett,
33-39
73 () — Scott Stallings, Worcester,
38-35
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L OL SL Pts.
x-Lehigh Vl. .. 42 17 4 5 93
Scranton ....... 39 20 6 2 86
Providence ... 40 22 3 2 85
Charlotte....... 39 26 0 3 81
Bridgeport .... 33 26 5 3 74
Hartford ........ 31 30 5 3 70
Hershey......... 28 32 4 5 65
Springfield.... 28 33 5 2 63
GF
237
220
201
227
186
192
183
187
GA
198
198
163
197
183
230
224
213
North Division
x-Toronto...... 48 18 1 1
x-Syracuse.... 42 19 3 4
x-Rochester.. 31 20 11 6
x-Utica........... 34 24 6 4
Belleville ....... 26 37 2 3
Laval .............. 24 36 7 2
Binghamton.. 22 35 7 4
98
91
79
78
57
57
55
222
218
205
191
172
191
169
145
171
196
196
242
251
218
Western Conference
Central Division
Chicago......... 38 21 7 2 85
Manitoba ...... 39 22 4 4 86
Gr. Rapids..... 37 24 1 7 82
Rockford ....... 36 25 4 4 80
Iowa............... 30 23 9 6 75
Milwaukee.... 34 28 4 1 73
Cleveland...... 21 35 7 3 52
216
232
210
211
206
190
157
180
181
193
209
219
202
226
Pacific Division
Tucson........... 36 19 5 1
San Diego ..... 34 21 3 1
Ontario .......... 33 21 4 2
Texas............. 34 23 7 4
Stockton........ 30 23 2 4
San Antonio.. 32 26 10 0
San Jose........ 28 25 4 3
Bakersfield ... 26 23 9 1
187
186
176
199
183
175
156
166
157
169
167
207
169
186
180
181
LPGA TOUR ANA INSPIRATION
Tennis
Thursday
At Mission Hills CC (Dinah Shore
Tournament Course)
Rancho Mirage, Calif.
First Round
Pernilla Lindberg..................... 32-33—65
Beatriz Recari...........................33-33—66
Ayako Uehara...........................31-35—66
a-Albane Valenzuela...............34-33—67
Jessica Korda............................31-36—67
Ha Na Jang................................35-32—67
Lexi Thompson.........................35-33—68
In Gee Chun..............................35-33—68
Chella Choi................................33-35—68
Sung Hyun Park.......................34-34—68
Cristie Kerr................................33-35—68
Brittany Altomare....................32-36—68
Charley Hull..............................32-37—69
Emma Talley.............................34-35—69
Amy Olson.................................35-34—69
Hee Young Park.......................34-35—69
Kris Tamulis..............................34-35—69
Sun Young Yoo.........................35-34—69
Jennifer Song............................35-34—69
Paula Creamer......................... 35-35—70
Inbee Park.................................35-35—70
Jodi Ewart Shadoff..................35-35—70
Moriya Jutanugarn..................35-35—70
Kim Kaufman............................36-34—70
Hannah Green.......................... 37-33—70
Nasa Hataoka...........................34-36—70
Angel Yin...................................37-33—70
Lindy Duncan............................36-34—70
Bronte Law................................35-35—70
a-Lucy Li....................................36-34—70
Lydia Ko.....................................33-37—70
Brooke M. Henderson.............33-37—70
Sei Young Kim..........................35-35—70
Pornanong Phatlum................36-34—70
Madelene Sagstrom................35-35—70
Jeongeun Lee6..........................34-37—71
Azahara Munoz........................34-37—71
a-Atthaya Thitikul....................35-36—71
Nelly Korda...............................34-37—71
Caroline Inglis.......................... 36-35—71
Mel Reid.....................................36-35—71
Alena Sharp..............................36-35—71
Nicole Broch Larsen................37-34—71
Aditi Ashok................................35-36—71
Shanshan Feng.........................35-36—71
Eun-Hee Ji................................. 35-36—71
New England players
68 () — Brittany Altomare, Shrewsbury, 32-36
78
72
72
79
66
74
63
62
x-Clinched Playoff Spot
y-Clinched Division
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a
win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss.
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Bridgeport 6.............................Hershey 4
Hartford 4.................. Springfield 3 (SO)
Syracuse 5........................ Binghamton 1
Toronto 5.......................................Laval 1
Grand Rapids 3.................. Texas 2 (SO)
WB/Scranton 5..................Providence 2
Utica 3..........................Rochester 2 (OT)
Rockford 4............................. Manitoba 3
Chicago 3........................................Iowa 1
Cleveland 6.............................Stockton 0
Bakersfield 3........................San Diego 2
THURSDAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Hershey at Utica.....................................7
Belleville at Syracuse.............................7
San Jose at Grand Rapids.....................7
Providence at Lehigh Valley........... 7:05
Bridgeport at Springfield.................7:05
Charlotte at Rochester.....................7:05
Laval at Binghamton.........................7:05
WB/Scranton at Hartford................ 7:15
Toronto at Manitoba..............................8
Texas at Milwaukee...............................8
Tucson at Iowa........................................8
Stockton at San Antonio..................8:30
Cleveland at San Diego.......................10
Bakersfield at Ontario......................... 10
Basketball
NBA G LEAGUE
Single Elimination
CONFERENCE QUARTERFINALS
FRIDAY
Eastern Conference
Grand Rapids vs. Raptors..................... 7
Texas vs. Rio Grade Valley...................8
SATURDAY
Western Conference
Lakeland vs. Erie.....................................3
South Bay vs. Oklahoma City......... 5:15
MIAMI OPEN
Purse: Men, $7.97 million (Masters
1000)
Women, $7.97 million (Premier)
Singles
Men
Pablo Carreno Busta (16) def. Kevin
Anderson (6), 6-4, 5-7, 7-6 (6).
Women
Sloane Stephens (13) def. Victoria
Azarenka, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1.
Doubles
Men
Karen Khachanov and Andrey Rublev def. Steve Johnson and Sam Querrey, 6-3, 6-1.
Ski conditions
MASSACHUSETTS
Berkshire East — mg, 20-42 base, 32-45
trails, 3-5 lifts
Bousquet — sc, 10-30 base, 22-23 trails,
4-5 lifts
Catamount — mg, 20-40 base, 34-36
trails, 5-7 lifts
Jiminy Peak — mg, 20-45 base, 38-45
trails, 6-9 lifts
Ski Butternut — mg, 26-36 base, 22-22
trails, 6-11 lifts
Wachusett — mg, 14-50 base, 23-26
trails, 5-8 lifts
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Attitash — mg, 18-24 base, 63-68 trails,
6-11 lifts
Black — mg, 12-36 base, 21-45 trails,
2-5 lifts
Bretton Woods — mg, 30-40 base, 7797 trails, 4-10 lifts
Cannon — wetsn, 24-36 base, 96-97
trails, 7-11 lifts
Cranmore — mg, 12-16 base, 39-57
trails, 2-7 lifts
Crotched — mg, 26-35 base, 24-25
trails, 2-5 lifts
Dartmouth Skiway — sc, 2-24 base, 1622 trails, 4-4 lifts
BASEBALL
Baltimore (AL): Placed OF Mark Trumbo and P Gabriel Ynoa on 10-day DL,
retroactive to March 26. Selected the
contracts of INF Pedro Alvarez, OFs
Craig Gentry and Colby Rasmus, and
INF Danny Valencia from Norfolk (IL).
Optioned P Alex Cobb to Bowie (EL).
Designated RHPs Alec Asher, Stefan
Crichton, Michael Kelly and Jesus
Liranzo for assignment.
BOSTON (AL): Selected the contracts
of P Bobby Poyner and P Marcus
Walden. Placed INF Marco Hernandez
on 60-day DL and RHPs Austin Maddox
and Tyler Thornburg and 2B Dustin Pedroia on 10-day DL.
Cleveland (AL): Placed OF Michael
Brantley, P Ryan Merritt, P Danny Salazar and INF Gio Urshela on 10-day DL,
retroactive to March 26. Selected the
contracts of P Matt Belisle and OF Rajai Davis from Columbus (IL). Designated OF Abraham Almonte and P Ben
Taylor for assignment. Reassigned P
Jeff Beliveau, INF Drew Maggi, P Evan
Marshall, C Jack Murphy and 1B Mike
Napoli to minor league camp.
Houston (AL): Placed RHPs Jandel
Gustave, James Hoyt and Brady Rodgers on 10-day DL, retroactive to
March 26.
Kansas City (AL): Placed C Salvador
Perez, P Nate Karns, INF Adalberto
Mondesi and OF Bubba Starling on 10day DL. Designated RHPs Wily Peralta
and Ryan Zimmer for assignment. Selected the contracts of P Blaine Boyer
and INF Ryan Goins. Recalled C Cam
Gallagher from Omaha (PCL).
Los Angeles (AL): Placed P Andrew
Heaney on 10-day DL, retroactive to
March 26.
Minnesota (AL): Selected the contract
of OF Ryan LaMarre. Placed RHPs Ervin
Santana and Phil Hughes on 10-day DL.
New York (AL): Placed 1B Greg Bird
and OF Jacoby Ellsbury on 10-day DL
and OF Clint Frazier on the seven-day
concussion DL, retroactive to March
26. Recalled INF/OF Tyler Austin from
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
Texas (AL): Selected the contract of P
Kevin Jepsen from Round Rock (PCL).
Designated 1B Tommy Joseph for assignment. Placed RHPs Tony Barnette,
Tim Lincecum and Ricardo Rodriguez,
and P Martin Perez on 10-day DL, retroactive to March 26.
Toronto (AL): Selected the contracts of
RHPs John Axford and Tyler Clippard.
Placed SS Troy Tulowitzki on 60-day
DL. Placed OFs Dalton Pompey and Anthony Alford on 10-day DL. Designated
P Sam Moll for assignment. Optioned P
Tim Mayza, RF Teoscar Hernandez and
P Joe Biagini to Buffalo (IL).
Atlanta (NL): Placed INF Johan Camargo, P Chase Whitley and LHPs Luiz Gohara and Jacob Lindgren on 10-day DL,
retroactive to March 26. Optioned 3B
Rio Ruiz to Gwinnett (IL). Reassigned
SS Sean Kazmar, OFs Ezequiel Carrera
and Danny Santana and P Anibal Sanchez to minor league camp.
Chicago (NL): Optioned P Shae Simmons to Iowa (PCL).
Cincinnati (NL): Placed P Anthony DeSclafani on 60-day DL and P Brandon
Finnegan and RHPs David Hernandez,
Michael Lorenzen and Kevin Shackelford on 10-day DL. Placed P Raisel Iglesias on the three-day paternity list. Recalled P Cody Reed and P Jackson Stephens from Louisville (IL). Selected the
contract of INF/OF Cliff Pennington.
Colorado (NL): Placed RHPs Carlos Estevez and Jeff Hoffman and P Zac
Rosscup on 10-day DL, retroactive to
March 26.
Los Angeles (NL): Placed RHPs Tom
Koehler and Yimi Garcia and 3B Justin
Turner on 10-day DL, retroactive to
March 26.
Miami Marlins : Placed P Brett Graves
to 60-day DL. Designated C Austin Nola
for assignment. Select contracts of P
Jacob Turner, INF Yadiel Rivera and C
Bryan Holaday New Orleans (PCL). Recalled P Jarlin Garcia from Jacksonville
(SL) and P Dillon Peters and OF Braxton Lee from New Orleans.
Philadelphia (NL): Placed RHPs Jerad
Eickhoff, Tommy Hunter and Mark
Leiter Jr. on 10-day DL, retroactive to
March 26. Optioned P Jake Arrieta to
Clearwater (FSL).
Pittsburgh (NL): Placed P A.J. Schugel
on 10-day DL, retroactive to March 26.
San Francisco (NL): Placed P Madison
Bumgarner and P Mark Melancon on
10-day DL, retroactive to March 26.
Placed P Julian Fernandez on 60-day
DL and P Will Smith and P Jeff Samardzija on 10-day DL. Selected the
contract of LF Gregor Blanco from
Richmond (SL). Recalled RHPs Pierce
Johnson and Roberto Gomez from
Richmond. Recalled P Reyes Moronta
from Sacramento (Cal).
BASKETBALL
Atlanta (NBA): Assigned F Tyler Cavanaugh and transferred G Josh Magette to Erie (NBAGL).
FOOTBALL
Detroit (NFC): Signed C Wesley Johnson.
Minnesota (NFC): Signed LB Reshard
Cliett and CB Marcus Sherels.
Oakland (AFC): Signed CB Leon Hall.
Washington (NFC): Acquired 2018
fourth- (No. 109), fifth- (No. 142 and
163), and conditional 2020 draft picks
from Denver for S Su'a Cravens and
2018 fourth- (No. 113) and fifth-round
(No. 149) draft picks. Waived RB LeShun Daniels.
HOCKEY
Calgary (NHL): Recalled F Spencer Foo
from Stockton (AHL).
Colorado (NHL): Reassigned G Spencer
Martin to San Antonio (AHL).
Los Angeles (NHL): Signed D Daniel
Brickley. Signed F Mikey Eyssimont to
a two-year entry-level contract,
Nashville (NHL): Signed F Eeli Tolvanen
to an entry-level contract.
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
C9
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
The sky will remain
rather cloudy through
the day with rain and
drizzle at times, which
will taper off in the afternoon.
Clearing tonight.
SUNDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
The mild air will stick
around with a good deal
of sunshine. A gusty
breeze will develop in
the afternoon. Partly cloudy and
brisk at night.
HIGH
58-63
LOW
36-41
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
A shower cannot be
ruled out early in the
day, but much of the
time will be dry with
some sunshine. A mainly clear
sky at night and turning chillier.
HIGH
53-58
LOW
41-46
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
90
HIGH
45-50
LOW
38-43
HIGH
45-50
LOW
33-38
9
60
6 P.M.
Remaining chilly as
clouds thicken up with a
storm approaching from
the west. Rain is likely,
especially during the afternoon
and at night.
A colder air mass moving in will lead to a chillier day despite plenty
of sunshine throughout
the day. Remaining mostly clear
at night.
HIGH
51-56
LOW
29-34
32
TUESDAY
MONDAY
3
120
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
SATURDAY
TODAY
6
300
1
2
432
2
Difficulty Level
3/30
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.
Fill in the single-box cages with the number in the top-left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
South dealer — Both sides vulnerable
North
♠ 75
♥ 653
♦ AK52
♣KQ64
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
TODAY: A cold front will bring clouds and periods of rain.
The steadiest rain will fall early in the day.
TOMORROW: Dry and chilly air will accompany an
area of high pressure across the region. There will be
plenty of sunshine around.
EXTENDED: Another cold front will pass
through Sunday and will lead to an increase
in clouds and stray showers. Chilly with
sunshine on Monday.
Tides
A.M. P.M.
High tides
A.M. P.M.
High tides
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
11:1011:37
11.0 10.8
4:52 5:21
-0.6 -0.9
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
11:1011:37
11:1011:37
11:1711:42
11:1611:43
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
---12:04
---12:11
11:2411:51
11:1111:39
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
11:2111:48
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
---12:15
11:45 --7:53 8:15
7:46 8:08
High tides
Old Orchard ME 11:0411:31
Hampton
Beach NH
11:1811:45
Plum Island
11:2311:50
Ipswich
11:0311:30
11:0411:31
9:5810:22
10:5411:21
Boston’s recent climate
Yesterday
High/low
50/37
Mean
44
Departure from normal +2
Departure for month -49
Departure for year +98
5 p.m. rel. humidity 89%
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
21
825
784
4577
4811
4438
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
Normal Temperatures
March
readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual Norm.
41.9 45.1
30.7 30.8
34.1 32.8
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 50°
100
1945
Record
high
86
80
Normal
high
60
49
40
Normal
low
35
New England marine forecast
Boston Harbor
Wind
Seas
Temp
W 10-20 kts.
1-2 ft.
60/38
East Cape
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
20
Seas
Temp
Record
low
0
Yesterday’s low 37°
Martha’s
Vineyard
SW 10-20 kts.
4-7 ft.
55/35
Cod Canal
SW 10-20 kts.
1-3 ft.
54/38
Nantucket
SW 12-25 kts.
4-7 ft.
52/38
Buzzards Bay
SW 8-16 kts.
1-3 ft.
53/37
Provincetown
SW 10-20 kts.
3-5 ft.
52/37
-20
27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
February
March
2.5"
2.3
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Almanac
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
2.0"
1.5"
Moon phases
6:30 a.m.
7:07 p.m.
12:37
6:19 p.m.
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
1.15
0.55
0.01
LAST
Apr. 8
NEW
Apr. 15
FIRST
Apr. 22
Dense fog Full moon and stars – A. MacRobert
Weather
Visibility
1/16 of a mile
Wind
west-southwest at 30 m.p.h.
High/low temperature
35/27
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
16.0”
After dark, look above the moon by about a fist
and a half at arm’s length for Denebola. The name
means “tail of the Lion.” Twice as far to the moon’s
left is Arcturus, the “Bear Driver.”
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
March 30, 2018:
This year you break out of your
mold to create new patterns and/
or try out new interests. Your life
takes on a more exciting tone
than in the recent past. You open
doors and approach life in a novel way. If you are single, a powerful attraction could build sometime after the summer. Go with
the flow, and you'll be glad you
did. If you are attached, you and
your sweetie add a new quality to
your life together. The two of you
might decide to expand your family or take up a new passion. LIBRA is loving and sensitive toward you.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Your energy and sense of well-being are fueled by a close friend or
associate. You have reason to celebrate. Handle detailed work in
the morning, when you can focus
on key matters with precision. By
the afternoon, you gladly will network. Tonight: Sort through the
possibilities.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Your ingenuity emerges when
eyeing a potential problem. Make
it OK to remain focused on one
project in the afternoon, but expect some calls or a knock on the
door. Decide what feels right
when working with an associate.
Tonight: Opt to go out to dinner
with a loved one.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Indulge your need for precision
in the morning, when you can focus. By the afternoon, even if you
are busy with a project, your
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Good Friday, March
30, the 89th day of 2018. There
are 276 days left in the year.
The Jewish holiday Passover
begins at sunset.
Birthdays: Game show host Peter Marshall is 92. Actor John
Astin is 88. Actor-director Warren Beatty is 81. The Moody/
Blues drummer/songwriter
Graeme Edge is 77. Rock musi-
T 0.05 T
0.5"
T
T
0.03 0.01
T
T 0.09
0.01 0.07
0.01
February
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
0.00”
Precip days in March
18
0.0"
cian Eric Clapton is 73. Actor
Paul Reiser is 62. Rap artist MC
Hammer is 55. Singer/songwriter Tracy Chapman is 54. TV
personality Piers Morgan is 53.
Singer Celine Dion is 50. Singer
Norah Jones is 39.
ºIn 1822, Florida became a
United States territory.
ºIn 1867, Secretary of State
William H. Seward reached
East
♠ J9632
♥9874
♦ 97
♣53
South
♠ A K Q 10
♥ A J 10
♦ Q43
♣AJ2
South
2 NT
West
North
East
Pass
6 NT
All Pass
Opening lead — ♣ 10
Monks at a monastery spent their time transcribing
ancient texts by hand. When they got computers to facilitate the process, it elicited a comment from the abbot:
“Now we can have archaic and eat it too!”
At 6NT, South needs more than one slice of cake. He has
11 top tricks with many chances for one more. South starts
by taking four clubs, pitching a diamond. East lets go a
spade and a heart. South next leads a heart to his jack.
West wins with the queen and leads the jack of diamonds, and declarer takes the queen and continues with
the top spades.
When West discards a heart, South cashes the A-K of diamonds next. East must save his jack of spades; he discards
a heart. South discards his last spade.
At Trick 12, dummy leads a heart. When East follows
low, his last card is the jack of spades. South also knows
that West still has a high diamond, so South puts up the
ace of hearts to make the slam. He has given himself every
chance, ending with a squeeze.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ 7 5 ♥ 6 5 3 ♦ A K 5 2 ♣ K Q 6
4. Neither side vulnerable. The dealer, at your right, opens
one spade. What do you say?
March
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
4.98”
Norm. month to date 4.04”
Year to date
13.67”
Norm. year to date 10.65”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday,
T
1.0"
0.71
27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
FULL
Mar. 31
4
1923
West
♠84
♥K Q 2
♦ J 10 8 6
♣ 10 9 8 7
mind is likely to wander. A case
of spring fever might have you
feeling distracted. Make plans for
the weekend. Tonight: With loved
ones at a favorite place.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Make calls in the morning, when
you have a lot on your mind and
need to contact several people.
You might feel as if you can discuss nearly topic with those
around you. In a sense, you have
set up a safe space with people
you can trust. Tonight: Honor
your comfort level.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Observe a tendency to loosen up
as the day goes on. In the morning, deal with practicalities. By
the afternoon, you'll adopt a
much more carefree attitude. Listen to what is being shared by a
roommate or family member. Tonight: Use your charm and humor.
agreement with Russia to purchase the territory of Alaska for
$7.2 million, a deal ridiculed by
critics as ‘‘Seward’s Folly.’’
ºIn 1870, the 15th Amendment to the US Constitution,
which prohibited denying citizens the right to vote and hold
office on the basis of race, was
declared in effect. Texas was readmitted to the Union.
ºIn 1964, the original version
of the TV game show ‘‘Jeopardy!,’’ hosted by Art Fleming,
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Handle important matters in the
morning, when you are likely to
get your way. Expect unusual creativity to come forward. Confirm
plans with a key person in the
evening. You might want to indulge this person, but you do
have a budget. Tonight: Christen
the weekend.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
You could feel sluggish in the
morning. By the afternoon, you
will be at your best. Others note
your high charisma and energy.
Before you know it, if you don't
already have plans, you will. You
might be overwhelmed by all the
possibilities. Tonight: Whatever
suits your fancy.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
If you have an important call to
make, by all means do it before
lunch. Afterward, you might feel
the weight of the past few days
and will need some downtime.
premiered on NBC.
ºIn 1981, President Reagan
was shot and seriously injured
outside a Washington, D.C., hotel by John W. Hinckley, Jr.; also wounded were White House
press secretary James Brady,
Secret Service agent Timothy
McCarthy and a District of Columbia police officer, Thomas
Delahanty.
ºIn 1991, Patricia Bowman of
Jupiter, Fla., told authorities
she’d been raped hours earlier
ANSWER: Some players would climb in boldly with a
double, especially since the vulnerability offers some protection. But the hand is more oriented to defending, and
if your partner responded to a double by bidding two (or
more) hearts, your support for the other major would be a
major disappointment. Pass.
Some of you will choose to reflect
on certain powerful feelings. Use
this time well. Tonight: Make it
OK to fly solo.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
The impression you give this
morning impresses the right person. By the afternoon, a successful meeting occurs that gets you
the desired results. If you can
start your weekend early, do. A
loved one does everything he or
she can to pull you out the door.
Tonight: Where the action is.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
You could be in for a surprise.
You approach a personal matter
differently from your usual style.
Suddenly, you understand where
a key person is coming from.
Take on a strong role in the afternoon, wherever you are. Know
that others want to join. Tonight:
Make strong choices.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
One-on-one relating puts a smile
on your face. How you deal with
someone and the choices you
make could be quite different
from what you had anticipated.
Know that you are breaking a
pattern as you head in a new direction. Tonight: Try something
new and exotic.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Your ability to move forward
could startle others. You'll go
along with someone else's ideas,
yet somehow encourage changes
that you would like, too. You
don't see yourself as manipulative, nor does this person; you
simply use logic. Tonight: Make it
a special night.
Jacqueline Bigar is on the internet at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2018 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
by William Kennedy Smith, the
nephew of Senator Edward
Kennedy, at the family’s Palm
Beach estate. (Smith was acquitted at trial.)
ºIn 2003, the northbound
lanes of the Leonard Zakim
Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge in
Boston opened after five years
of construction; the southbound would open nine
months later.
ºLast year, a massive fire
caused an interstate bridge to
collapse during rush hour in
Atlanta; no one was hurt. (A
homeless man has been
charged with arson.) North
Carolina rolled back its ‘‘bathroom bill’’ in a bid to end a
yearlong backlash over transgender rights that had cost the
state in business projects, conventions, and basketball tournaments. At Cape Canaveral,
SpaceX successfully launched
and then retrieved its first recycled rocket.
C10
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
1
3
4
5
8
9
7
6
2
5
8
7
3
2
6
9
4
1
Today’s Calcudoku Solution
9
6
2
4
1
7
5
8
3
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
8
9
6
1
3
5
4
2
7
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
2
7
1
9
4
8
3
5
6
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
4
5
3
6
7
2
1
9
8
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
7
1
5
8
6
4
2
3
9
ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
3
4
8
2
9
1
6
7
5
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
6
2
9
7
5
3
8
1
4
ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
C11
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
ZIPPY “Click Me Quick!” by Bill Griffith
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Some pluggers have to give themselves a wedgie
every couple of minutes just to keep their pants up.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
3
4 1
5
7 2
3
1
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
ON THE HARD STUFF BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 A “Three B” of
music
5 Upholstered wall
decoration
10 ___ spumante
14 One partner
15 Jaded and tired
16 Word that stops
the pouring
17 60th anniversary
celebrations
20 Vase type
21 Woody dwelling
22 Jungle creature
23 Drum starter?
24 ___-di-dah
26 Editor or tailor
28 Olympics
competitor
29 Lake Huron’s
neighbor
31 Start or
beginning
32 Out of shape?
34 Forensics strands
35 “___ make a
difference”
36 Hand axes, e.g.
41 Sword beater,
it’s said
42 Actress Mendes
43 More than
teared up
45 Company currency
48 Small brook
50 Wax maker
51 Work boot
features
54 Potassium
hydroxide
cleaner
55 Excellent serve
56 Lodging place
57 Spiked, as punch
59 “Hit ’em where
they ___”
61 High-end kitchen
features
65 Bit of baby talk
66 Board a vehicle
67 Rush job
notation
68 Mideast’s
Gulf of ___
69 Put away
70 Attachment to
“your”
DOWN
1 Thing built in the
gym
2 Hostilities
3 Benefits
petitioner
4 “O Come, All Ye
Faithful,” e.g.
5 Grass beard
6 Mao’s realm
7 Prince of India
8 Netherlands
Antilles resort
9 Sally Field role
10 Leather-piercing
tool
11 Big clippers
12 Old plains
dwelling (var.)
13 Advertising
circular
18 Eye
inappropriately
19 Entirely
23 Major airport
25 Elizabeth of
cosmetics
27 Provide funding
30 Very ready to go
33 It’s up for debate
35 Boot-shaped country
37 Certain Himalayan
38 Any movie villain
39 Hailing from Beirut
40 Phantomlike
44 Type of shirt or
square
45 Mark of infamy
46 “Lord Jim” novelist
47 Christen anew
49 Not corpulent
52 Cocktail party
spreads
53 Something a dog
follows
58 “Plasm” prefix
60 “Take ___ a
blessing”
62 Palindromic
Bobbsey
63 Press finisher?
64 Sun-blocking letters
2
1
4
9
8
3
8
9
8
2
3
9 6
5
8 6
2
C12
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G
Weekend
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E F R I DAY, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M /A RT S
Tye Sheridan (left
and below) stars in
Steven Spielberg’s
“Ready Player One.”
JAAP BUITENDIJK/WARNER BROS. PICTURES
MOVIES
’80s
TELEVISION
MORGAN AS AN EX-CON: FREE TO GO DEEPER
enough
Steven Spielberg ramps up the
nostalgia in a film adaptation of
Ernest Cline’s ‘Ready Player One’
FRANCISCO ROMAN
I
By Matthew Gilbert
GLOBE STAFF
’m one of those people who, since “30 Rock,” thinks Tracy Morgan could read
a phone book out loud and make it funny. With his hangdog face and his
boyish pronunciations, he is a complete natural. He doesn’t need to set up
big punch lines; he just speaks, over-pronouncing words, altering their emphasis, stumbling into malapropisms, and it’s hilarious. Yes, I shamelessly
enjoyed hearing Morgan, in his new TBS series, “The Last O.G.,” say to a white woman, “Do you just want to see another black man in the penile system?”
I expected “The Last O.G.,” which premieres Tuesday at 10:30 p.m., to depend on
Morgan’s singular delivery for laughs. And it does, plenty, including his cheering,
W
“Go Justin, go Justin,” in a
flashback to the night of the
first “American Idol” finale.
But the single-camera show,
co-created by Jordan Peele and
John Carcieri, is much more
than an excuse for Morgan’s
comic stylings.
It’s also a someTiffany
times-moving
Haddish
story that has a
and Tracy
streak of sadness
Morgan in
and regret as
“The Last
well as a message
O.G.”
of healing. Each
of the six episodes available for review was
balanced effectively between
humor and honest emotion,
with Morgan a more mature
presence than you might expect.
The story is about second
chances, which, now that Morgan is back working after the
2014 traffic accident that left
him in bad physical shape, has
extra resonance. Morgan’s Tray
has just gotten out of prison after serving 15 years on a drug
‘‘THE LAST O.G.,’’ Page G4
By Ty Burr
GLOBE STAFF
atching “Ready Player One,” I
thought more than once of a muchcirculated Internet meme: that
photo of Steve Buscemi from “30
Rock” where the 50-something actor wears a backward baseball cap,
totes a skateboard, and exclaims to
some off-camera teenagers, “How do you do, fellow kids?”
Based on a hugely popular book by Ernest Cline (who cowrote the screenplay with Zak Penn), the movie is Steven Spielberg’s attempt to plug himself back into the zeitgeist with a riproaring, cutting-edge, virtual-reality action fantasia. Also, to remind us that he helped invent the modern blockbuster genre 40
years ago. How do you do, fellow kids?
Because Spielberg remains one of our best, most natural filmmakers, “Ready Player One” works more frequently than you
might expect. Certainly it’s a smarter experience than the shallow theme park ride suggested by the trailers. But it’s also a
movie whose tired hero-boy clichés aren’t enlivened by a drab
leading actor. It overuses ’80s nostalgia as shorthand for genuine
emotional involvement, and it presents us with a rapturous digital wonderworld only to sternly lecture us that reality is the better value.
Well, it is, but after an overlong 138 minutes of the most eyebugging pixels studio money can render, that moral seems a little hypocritical. “Ready Player One” stars Tye Sheridan (“Mud,”
“X-Men: Apocalypse”) as Wade Watts, an orphaned teenager in
2045 Columbus, Ohio. In this future America wobbling on the
precipice of dystopia, citizens live in “The Stacks” — vertical
‘‘READY PLAYER ONE,’’ Page G7
MUSIC
MUSGRAVES IS IN FULL SWOON
ON ‘GOLDEN HOUR,’ AND IT SUITS HER
I
By Terence Cawley
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
f Kacey Musgraves did not
exist, someone would have
to invent her. On her first
two major-label albums,
the Texas singer/songwriter checked all the right boxes —
musically traditional enough
for old-school country fans, lyrically progressive enough for
bro-country haters, versatile
enough to open for Willie Nelson one minute and Katy Perry
the next — without ever coming
across as anything but her own
genuine, charming self. Not
since Taylor Swift has a country
star seemed so primed for pop
stardom. But rather than reach
for that brass ring with “Golden
Hour,” Musgraves takes a step
sideways with a dreamy, blissful
album of love songs unlike anything she’s ever recorded.
Save for the occasional banjo
and the mild twang in Musgraves’s voice, “Golden Hour”
largely forgoes the classic country signifiers of her past work.
In their place are mellow acoustic guitars and airy synthesizers
that give the record a serene, almost adult-contemporary lightness. Even the more adventurous production choices, like the
vocoder refrain on “Oh, What a
‘‘GOLDEN HOUR,’’ Page G2
G2
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
Insider
O
n paper, the duo program that tenor Lawrence Brownlee and
bass Eric Owens bring
to Jordan Hall on April
7 is a fairly typical affair: some operatic
highlights from each man’s repertoire
in the first half, and a selection of traditional spirituals, popular songs, and
gospel numbers in the second.
A curious thing about the program,
though, is that, read the right way, it
neatly outlines the improbable journey
by which Brownlee, an African-American who grew up in a blue-collar family in Youngstown, Ohio, has become
one of the most admired bel canto
singers of his day.
That journey begins in church, with
the gospel songs that close out the concert. It was in the church choir that
Brownlee’s father directed, and where
his mother was a soloist, that he got
his start singing. His talent was apparent early on, and he would later credit
the astonishing flexibility of his voice,
so crucial in bel canto, to the gospel
“riffs or runs” he heard and practiced
from an early age.
The popular American songs that
precede them — he will sing “Lulu’s
Back in Town,” made famous by Fats
Waller, as well as duets with Owens —
are a reminder of the show chorus that
he joined in high school, an experience
that allowed him the opportunity to
visit and perform in Berlin at 15. “This
was an explosion in my mind,” he said
in a recent phone interview before a
concert in Chapel Hill, N.C. “I thought,
this was what music can do.”
Still, a career as any kind of musician — let alone an opera singer — did
not occur to Brownlee until he was in
college, when he won a National Association of Teachers of Singing competition with his rendition of Puccini’s
“Che gelida manina.” After the performance, a woman mysteriously approached him and told him that, while
he had tremendous natural talent,
Puccini was all wrong for his voice. He
needed something lighter.
So his teacher assigned him “Ecco,
ridente in cielo,” a bel canto mainstay
from Rossini’s “The Barber of Seville.”
At his next lesson, “I began to sing it,”
Brownlee recalled during the interview, “and I remember singing the first
couple of phrases, and [my teacher]
CAMBRIDGE — If the past is still
alive — in us, in its relics — what can
we ask of it? What can it teach us?
Renée Green poses those questions in
“Within Living Memory,” which caps
her two years as artist in residence at
Harvard’s Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts.
Green’s river of history is deep and
shot through with light. She uses the
Carpenter Center’s Le Corbusierdesigned modernist structure as a
springboard into considerations of
space, movement, and modernism.
Many of her videos, texts, and installations rely on artfully arranged accumulations of words, images, and ideas,
rushing with odd and lovely associations.
In the breathtaking video “Americas: Veritas” she matches wheeling,
curvaceous drone shots of the Carpenter Center with those of Le Corbusier’s
Casa Curutchet, in Argentina. It’s a
lush and lonely duet. These are the on-
RENÉE GREEN: WITHIN LIVING MEMORY
At Carpenter Center for the Visual
Arts, Harvard University, 24 Quincy
St., Cambridge, through April 15.
617­496­5387, carpenter.center/
program/renee­green­within­living­
memory
CLASSICAL NOTES | DAVID WEININGER
A journey from church
to bel canto acclaim
Opera, spirituals, popular songs, and gospel numbers
are all part of the repertoire for tenor Lawrence Brownlee
SHERVIN LAINEZ
noticed I had a certain ease and ability
with the coloratura. He told me to do it
again. So I did it again. And he said,
‘This is your voice. This is what you
were born to sing.’ ”
Since winning the Metropolitan
Opera’s National Council Grand Finals
in 2001, singing Rossini and Donizetti,
Brownlee has become one of the most
sought-after tenors in this repertoire.
Which brings us to the first half of the
Celebrity Series of Boston program,
where he will sing “Ah! mes amis,”
from Donizetti’s “La Fille du Régi-
ment,” whose famous nine high C’s he
sings not only with accuracy and power but with remarkable sweetness as
well.
As for the concert’s African-American spirituals, they are a reminder of
his 2013 album, “Spiritual Sketches.”
They also offer a fuller glimpse of him
as a person. At an NPR Tiny Desk concert that year, Brownlee said that he
associated the song “All Night, All
Day,” with its image of an angel watching over humanity, with his son Caleb,
who had recently been diagnosed as
GALLERIES | CATE MCQUAID
A RIVER RUNS
THROUGH IT
RENÉE GREEN/FREE AGENT MEDIA
“Spacing” (above) and “Space Poems #3 (Media Bichos)” (below)
by Renée Green.
being on the autism spectrum.
While a good deal of this outstanding singer’s career is present here, a
more recent aspect of it compels mention: The song cycle “Cycles of My Being,” a joint project by composer Tyshawn Sorey, poet Terrance Hayes, and
Brownlee that premiered last month.
It arose from a commission for a Carnegie Hall concert, which Brownlee decided to use to create a piece that
would give voice to what he called “the
experience of being a black man” in today’s America.
ly Corbu buildings in the Americas; the
architect hoped for many more.
Each text in “Selected Life Indexes”
highlights the life of a figure of the
modern age: Albert Einstein, W.E.B.
Du Bois, Muriel Rukeyser. Green lists
the cast, but doesn’t label her prosepoem indices, so we have to read deep
into them to discover which subject
they address. That sets up an unlikely
kinship among the subjects; not knowing, we are back at the beginning with
them, unsure what will unfold.
In 2015, Green spent time at the
home of another great modern architect, the Rudolph Schindler House in
Los Angeles. Her hypnotic video “Begin Again, Begin Again” layers archival
footage with her luminous imagery,
much of it underwater. A voice-over
weaves Schindler’s modernist manifesto with jewel-like pieces by writers
Paul Bowles and Thomas Mann, and
ties Schindler’s lifeline — 1887-1953 —
to Green’s, which started in 1959.
Removing history’s organizational
guideposts opens up new channels in
history’s river. Connections, metaphors, and bruises we never saw before are revealed, and the past appears
afresh, its heart beating.
Cate McQuaid can be reached at
catemcquaid@gmail.com. Follow
her on Twitter @cmcq.
RENÉE GREEN/CARPENTER CENTER FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, HARVARD UNIVERSITY
ERIC OWENS AND
LAWRENCE BROWNLEE
Presented by Celebrity
Series of Boston
At Jordan Hall, April 7, 8 p.m.
Tickets $35­$75. 617­482­6661,
www.celebrityseries.org
Part of the inspiration came from
seeing the deaths of black men that
have roiled the country and given birth
to Black Lives Matter — Philando Castile, Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin.
But it also came from Brownlee’s own
experience. The time he sang at a gala
concert for high-priced donors in St.
Louis and, 10 minutes later, was mistaken for the valet. The time at a Seattle opera house where an usher demanded to know why he was in the
building before a concert, and relented
only when Brownlee showed her a
poster in the lobby with his picture on
it.
“I tell people all the time, I think
I’m incredibly fortunate,” he said. “I’ve
seen 46 countries. I’ve met presidents.
I’ve performed on the great stages of
the world. But the fact [is] that if I’m
walking out of a department store and
the beeper goes off that someone has
stolen something, and someone with
blond hair and blue eyes is walking out
of there at the same time, 99.9 percent
of the people are going to assume that
it’s me. Just based on the skin that I
have. That’s just a very real thing.”
So he joined forces with Sorey,
whom he sought out for his music’s
“complex rhythmic ideas,” and Hayes,
of whom he remarked, “his wordplay
is such that sometimes you’ve been hit
and you don’t even know what you’ve
been hit by. We could all bring our collective experiences together.
“ Why not be in a position of
strength?” he added “By that I mean,
to take hold of the conversation and
say: I want to talk about something
that is very bothersome to me. And to
be able to do something to give voice to
something that should be talked
about.”
David Weininger can be reached at
globeclassicalnotes@gmail.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@davidgweininger.
CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/GETTY IMAGES
Her hour
has come
u‘‘GOLDEN HOUR’’
Continued from Page G1
World” and the disco-lite pulse of
“High Horse,” blend naturally into
Musgraves’s tranquil headspace. An album this endlessly chill might get boring in a less talented songwriter’s
hands, but Musgraves never fails to
draw listeners into her reverie.
If “Golden Hour” sounds like the
work of someone who recently fell in
love and got married, that’s because it
is and she has. Every gorgeous melody
feels infused with Musgraves’s affection for her partner, and though she
occasionally lapses into doe-eyed cliché, for the most part romance hasn’t
dulled her lyrical edge. If anything, it’s
helped her relax a bit; while the old
Musgraves would have smothered
“Velvet Elvis” in wink-nudge puniness, now she’s comfortable letting
the endearingly goofy conceit of the
song sell itself. Elsewhere, “Happy &
Sad” articulates Musgraves’s fear that
nothing this good can last with the
same acuity with which she once
chronicled life as a small-town nonconformist.
Musgraves wrote “Butterflies,” the
most heart-meltingly beautiful love
song on an album full of them, a mere
week after meeting her future husband. That kind of inspiration can’t be
faked, and “Golden Hour” has so many
similarly enchanting moments it practically glows. It takes courage for
someone in Musgraves’s position to
make an album this intimately personal, but it’s hard to imagine an artist as
headstrong as her wanting it any other
way. As she puts it in the album’s first
song and mission statement, “I’m alright with a slow burn.”
Terence Cawley can be reached at
terence.cawley@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @terence_cawley.
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G3
Lines get crossed in Flat Earth’s muddled ‘Antigone’
By Don Aucoin
GLOBE STAFF
WATERTOWN — With one sharply
executed production after another in
the past year — Lauren Gunderson’s
“Silent Sky,’’ Neil LaBute’s “Fat Pig,’’
Tony Kushner’s “A Bright Room Called
Day’’ — Flat Earth Theatre has been on
an impressive roll, demonstrating the
passion and craft that fringe theater
companies can bring to a range of important work.
Alas, that roll comes to a screeching
halt with Flat Earth’s muddled “Antigone.’’ Circumstances beyond the company’s control are a major factor, but
that doesn’t make the experience of
this production any less frustrating for
the audience or, I suspect, for the cast,
who deliver uneven performances.
Directed by Lindsay Eagle, this
staging employs Lewis Galantiere’s adaptation of Jean Anouilh’s “Antigone,’’
which was itself a retelling of the tragedy by Sophocles. Written during the
German occupation of France in World
War II, the adaptation was fashioned
by Anouilh as a rallying cry of resistance against both the Nazis and the
collaborationists of the Vichy regime.
Flat Earth’s “Antigone’’ aims for a
“Nevertheless, she persisted’’ topicality
in telling the tale of the title figure
(Regine Vital), a young woman who
defies an unjust ruler, Creon, the king
of Thebes, played by George Page.
(More later on Page, his struggles, and
the damaging impact on the production.)
In case your grasp of classical studies has grown shaky with the years,
here’s a quick recap: Antigone’s father
was King Oedipus — yes, that Oedipus,
the fate-pummeled wretch who killed
his father, married his mother, and
gave Freud such an abundance of material to work with. Antigone is one of
four children from the marriage of Oedipus and Jocasta, including a sister,
Ismene (Rachel Belleman), and two
brothers, Eteocles and Plynices, who
initially share the throne. Oh, and Antigone is engaged to Haemon, the son
of her uncle, Creon. Haemon is played
at Flat Earth by Cody Sloan, puzzlingly
attired in a sweater and khakis that
seem more suited to “High School Musical’’ than Greek tragedy.
Still, the Flat Earth production gets
off to a promising start, with a sinuously entrancing chorus (Elbert Joseph, Michael John Ciszewski, and
Regine Vital as
Antigone in Flat
Earth Theatre’s
production.
JAKE SCALTRETO
S TA G E R E V I E W
ANTIGONE
Adapted by Lewis Galantiere.
From the play by Jean Anouilh.
Directed by Lindsay Eagle.
Presented by Flat Earth Theatre. At
Black Box, Mosesian Center for the
Arts, Watertown. Through March 31.
Tickets $25, 617­923­8487,
www.flatearththeatre.com
Emily Elmore) helpfully sketching
what has transpired: A civil war erupted after Plynices led a rebellion against
Eteocles; the brothers killed each other
outside the gates of the city; Antigone’s
uncle Creon was then made king; Creon promptly decreed that the body of
Plynices was to be left to the dogs and
vultures while Eteocles was to be buried with honors; and Antigone is now
determined that Plynices shall receive
a proper burial, even if she has to do it
herself. As the chorus explains: “What
is for Creon merely the climax of a political purge, is for her a hideous offense against God and Man.’’ That triggers an epic battle of wills between Antigone and Creon.
Or at least it should be epic. But
Page had not mastered his lines by
Monday night’s performance, more
than a week into the run. He carried a
digital tablet throughout the performance, consulting it for lines, and was
never really able to develop his character, breaking the production’s rhythm.
It’s important to note that Page
stepped into the role shortly before the
show opened after illness forced the
performer cast as Creon to leave. Page
deserves credit for tackling such a
challenge. He soldiered gamely on
Monday, though it must have been agonizing for him. And I suppose Flat
Earth is following in that venerable
the-show-must-go-on tradition. (The
production appeared to have been
snakebit from the start. According to
director Eagle, Page was the third actor in the role of Creon, the first having
left because of personal issues.)
But it added up to a distraction for
the audience. In those squirm-inducing moments, you can’t help but feel
for an actor, making it almost impossible to lose yourself in the story. I haven’t felt so bad for a performer since
the actor Bruce Myers, suffering from
a severe case of jet lag, forgot his lines
two dozen times during a 2011 performance at Boston’s Paramount Center
of “The Grand Inquisitor,’’ a Peter
un
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Fam
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star
TONY RIVETTI/ABC
Zach Braff stars in the ABC series “Alex, Inc.”
Creating ‘Alex, Inc.’ — a sitcom about
a podcast about a podcast company
By Sonia Rao
THE WASHINGTON POST
‘‘Alex, Inc.’’ is a TV series about a podcast
about the company producing that very podcast.
The podcast is ‘‘StartUp,’’ which in its first
season follows the 2014 creation of Gimlet Media. As Gimlet CEO and cofounder Alex Blumberg would say at the beginning of each episode,
the concept is quite meta — and an unlikely subject for a TV show, given that it deals with the
intricacies of venture capital and audio storytelling. How does a story this niche end up on a
network like ABC?
‘‘That’s a really good question,’’ Blumberg
said in a recent interview. ‘‘I’m still not entirely
sure. I’m piecing together how it happened.’’
Zach Braff plays a fictionalized version of
Blumberg in the new series, which airs Wednesday nights. Just as Blumberg left his gigs as a
‘‘This American Life’’ producer and ‘‘Planet
Money’’ cofounder behind, Alex Schuman quits
his unspecified radio job to found his own company.
Creator Matt Tarses took some liberties in
adapting the podcast — swapping out ‘‘Blumberg’’ for ‘‘Schuman’’ and tossing in a few supporting characters, for example — but the core
elements of ‘‘Alex, Inc.’’ mirror those of ‘‘StartUp.’’ Braff exudes the same earnest quality
heard in Blumberg’s voice. His public-defender
wife, Rooni (Tiya Sircar), appears about as often
as Blumberg’s wife and Gimlet’s creative director, Nazanin Rafsanjani, did. Even billionaire
Chris Sacca, an early investor in Twitter and
Uber to whom Blumberg pitches his company
in the first episode of ‘‘StartUp,’’ plays himself
on the ABC series.
So, back to the question. Tarses and his team
did worry about the esoteric nature of podcasts
in writing the broadcast series. Watching a guy
run around with a microphone is fun but arguably less engaging than, say, watching him save
lives in a hospital — the subject of Braff and Tarses’s previous collaboration, ‘‘Scrubs.’’
‘‘There were moments where we were much
more in the weeds of it, and we had to pull
back,’’ Tarses said. ‘‘We wanted to tell a story
about someone trying to pursue his version of
the American Dream, someone doing something he felt he would be good at and that he
could change the world a little bit by doing. I
think that’s universal.’’
To further this goal of fitting ‘‘the ABC
brand,’’ as Tarses called it, the series depicts
much of Alex’s personal life. Blumberg’s two
children didn’t have much to do in ‘‘StartUp,’’
seeing as they were toddlers at the time, but older versions of them appear on-screen as the
magic-obsessed Ben (Elisha Henig) and precocious Soraya (Audyssie James). ‘‘Alex, Inc.’’
paints its protagonist to be quite the family
man, something Blumberg seems to be off-microphone. He began this interview by saying
that his daughter had pinkeye, adding, ‘‘I think
we both have pinkeye, frankly.’’
Despite creating ‘‘Planet Money’’ and ‘‘StartUp,’’ Blumberg does not consider himself to be a
‘‘serial entrepreneur.’’ Running a company is
stressful, he said, and ‘‘looking out at the world
in general and being, like, ‘Ah, this is the thing
‘‘ALEX, INC.,’’ Page G6
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Brook-directed adaptation of a section
of Dostoyevsky’s “The Brothers Karamazov.’’
While “The Grand Inquisitor’’ was a
solo piece, “Antigone’’ is not, and
Page’s effortful struggles appeared to
throw Vital off her game. It was especially noticeable during the extended
showdown between Antigone and Creon that is the dramatic crux of the play.
The scene virtually unraveled, though
Vital’s performance was lacking in
tragic grandeur in other scenes as well.
I fully expect Flat Earth to rebound
with its next production, but explaining
the mitigating circumstances beforehand might have helped the audience
understand why “Antigone’’ falls so
short of the company’s usual standard.
Don Aucoin can be reached at
aucoin@globe.com.
T h e
G4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
With György Kepes,
photographs
as experiments
His images exist in a kind of alternate
reality, part sci­fi spookiness,
part optical Fortress of Solitude
By Mark Feeney
PHOTOGRAPHY REVIEW
GLOBE STAFF
CAMBRIDGE — From the start,
photography has been binary. First, it
was a matter of metal (the daguerreotype) and paper (the calotype). Later
there would be black-and-white and
color. Now it’s analog and digital. In
each case, one side decisively won out
— a reminder that the medium was,
and is, as much technology as art.
Winning out has been true, too, only more so, with the most important
photographic binary of all. It’s so basic
we hardly even think of it: representational and non-representational. Representation has preponderated in the
medium to such an extent that its
hold has seemed complete. One of the
virtues of “Györg y Kepes Photographs: The MIT Years, 1946-1985” is
to remind us that this isn’t so.
The show, which runs through July
15 at the MIT Museum, is the second
of two. “György Kepes Photographs:
From Berlin to Chicago, 1930-1946”
opened there last fall and closed earlier this month. The museum’s Gary
Van Zante curated both shows. Many
of the images were more traditional.
The show included actual cityscapes.
But already very much apparent was
Kepes’s focus on the experimental, the
nature of seeing, and the place of abstraction in the medium.
Kepes (1906-2001) led one of those
extraordinary 20th-century lives that
began in Mitteleuropa; hopscotched
Western Europe, fleeing totalitarianism; and fetched up in the New World,
there helping to forge modern culture.
A Hungarian native, Kepes moved to
Berlin (where he was László MoholyNagy’s assistant), London, Chicago
(where he taught at the New Bauhaus), then Cambridge. He was a fixture at MIT for decades, eventually becoming an Institute professor, the university’s highest honor.
In 1967, Kepes founded MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies. The
two shows are a tribute to the center’s
50th anniversary. Measured and comprehensive, they are impressive acts of
institutional devotion. Along with 66
GYÖRGY KEPES PHOTOGRAPHS:
The MIT Years, 1946­1985
At MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts
Ave., Cambridge, through July 15.
617­253­5927, mitmuseum.mit.edu
Kepes photographs and photograms
(a kind of camera-less image, using
light and sensitized paper), the current show includes three dozen related items: books, documentary photographs, pamphlets, and audio and
video of a wide-ranging interview.
Kepes himself was a one-man center for advanced visual studies. As
well as a photographer, he was teacher, visual theorist, graphic designer,
author, academic administrator, and
painter. If anything, photography was
more means than end. The great English landscapist John Constable once
said that “Paintings are a science of
which pictures are the experiments.”
Kepes could have substituted “photographs” for “paintings” — and he’d
have meant “science” and “experiments” literally, not as metaphor.
What attracted Kepes was contrast,
the play between light and dark, and
the effects that light can produce in a
photograph. A photographic image, as
most everyone thinks of it, takes the
external world and reduces its three
dimensions to two. Kepes’s photographs and photograms take a selfcontained world — not quite external,
but not quite internal either — that is
intrinsically two-dimensional and
documents it. These images exist in a
kind of alternate reality, part sci-fi
spookiness, part optical Fortress of
Solitude. It’s an antiseptic, speculative
realm of squiggles, blobs, filaments,
webs, whorls, and shapes of varying of
indeterminacy. As such imprecise
words suggest, description is not
Kepes’s friend. In fairness, that did
not concern him.
Inevitably, this self-contained
world reflects the one beyond the
darkroom. Kepes can control space,
COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF GYÖRGY KEPES
Clockwise (from top
left): “Gate” (1948),
“Untitled” (1968), “High
Speed Photograph”
(1948), and
“Waterforms” (1950) on
display at the MIT
Museum in the exhibit
“György Kepes
Photographs: The MIT
Years, 1946-1985.”
but not time — or, rather, time expressed culturally. “High Speed Photograph” looks like, yes, one of the highspeed photographs that made his MIT
colleague Harold Edgerton famous.
“Gate,” from 1948, recalls Isamu Noguchi’s sculpture. “Untitled” from
1950 has something of Max Ernst and
Surrealism to it. At times, one might
think of Abstract Expressionism — the
lower the light, the more all abstraction looks alike? — or even undernourished Rorschach blots. Presumably, none of these resemblances were
intended (other than maybe the Edgerton). But that’s the point: a reminder of the limits of imaginative control.
The occasional recognizable subject comes as a relief. A pair of 1949
photographs called “Tree Shadows”
does double duty: honoring both the
external world and the visual grammar of Kepes’s alternate one. The title
of “Light Bloom,” from 1950, describes the condition Kepes’s images
aspire to, and some of them can be
striking.
It comes as no surprise that “Untitled” is the most frequent title. When
there is a fuller title, it tends to be
more interesting than the image that
bears it: “Texture Fields,” “Cracked
Lines,” “ Wheel Spokes and Flame
Form.” “Form” and “forms” are impor-
Mature
Morgan on
display in
‘Last O.G.’
Mark Feeney can be reached at
mfeeney@globe.com.
TELEVISION REVIEW
THE LAST O.G.
Starring: Tracy Morgan, Tiffany
Haddish, Cedric the Entertainer,
Ryan Gaul, Allen Maldonado,
Malik Yoba, Taylor Mosby, Dante
Hoagland, Edi Patterson
On: TBS, Tuesday at 10:30 p.m.
u‘‘THE LAST O.G.’’
Continued from Page G1
charge. During his incarceration, he
grew up some, read the dictionary,
and fantasized about reuniting with
his one great love, Shay (Tiffany Haddish), even though she refused to visit
him and has moved on with her life.
He returns to his Brooklyn neighborhood, and he lives in a halfway house
headed up by Miniard Mullins (Cedric
the Entertainer), a guy whose aspirations to be a stand-up comic are clearly deluded. While Tray was in prison,
Brooklyn became a hipster haven, but
“The Last O.G.” wisely keeps the predictable gentrification jokes to a minimum — at least after the uneven premiere.
And yes, I did say Tiffany Haddish.
The actress, who broke through last
year in the movie “Girls Trip,” is a
bright, energetic presence on the
show, as she was on “The Carmichael
Show.” Like Morgan, she’s a natural,
but unlike Morgan’s character, she
does not suffer fools. We quickly learn
that Shay has teen twins who look sus-
tant words for Kepes. As for “Moving
Carlight Photographed Walking with
Camera,” it’s more explanation than
title.
The show concludes with three
large-format Polaroids. Not only are
they in color — granted, a rather subdued color — but they’re still lifes. Or
still lifes, of a sort. One includes a ruler, a prism, and a diagram of a frog.
It’s telling that’s it’s a diagram rather
than a real frog or model of a frog or
anything attempting verisimilitude.
Does Kepes’s work represent a
higher, even ultimate, visual purity —
or a squandering of artistic opportunity, a visual austerity that flirts with impoverishment? One can make a strong
theoretical argument that Kepes’s images capture a visual reality that traditional photography cannot. That the
latter is a visual cheat that deceives.
But within that deception abide a
richness, an emotional power, and a
capacity to surprise altogether alien to
Kepes’s pursuits. There’s a Milan Kundera novel with the poignant — and
very Mitteleuropean — title “Life Is
Elsewhere.” It could suffice for Kepes’s
photography, too, only without the
poignancy.
FRANCISCO ROMAN
Tracy Morgan (right) stars as an ex-con who returns to his Brooklyn neighborhood to rebuild his life .
piciously like Tray, and that she has
married a white guy, Josh (“She’s my
queen,” Tray says, “she just got lost”).
When Tray comes sniffing around,
hoping to get back in her life and
spend time with the kids, she’ll have
none of it. Her rage toward him is profound, and Haddish is as powerful in
those moments as she is in the more
comic situations. Her every word
lands.
I admire the way “The Last O.G.”
doesn’t bother toying with us about
the real paternity of Shay’s kids. The
show avoids a few common pitfalls, as
it keeps its focus on Tray’s sincere efforts to rebuild his life and become a
chef — he learned how to mix candy
bars into a “dessert loaf” when he was
behind bars. Ultimately, he’s a pretty
good guy. We see him on an affectionate Tinder date, and we see him ably
come to terms with a woman —
played by Chrissy Metz from “This Is
Us” — he romanced from prison.
While Morgan stays somewhat lowkey, many of the characters around
him are broad, including the men in
his halfway house and his boss at the
coffee shop where he works, an amusingly officious chain-restaurant manager played by Edi Patterson.
I can’t say “The Last O.G.” is a triumph; the writing would need to cut
even deeper for that, and every single
jail-shower joke would need to miraculously disappear. But it’s nonetheless
a promising vehicle for Morgan, and
I’m eager to see where it goes.
Matthew Gilbert can be reached at
gilbert@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @MatthewGilbert.
T h e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
T
By Ty Burr
GLOBE STAFF
he foxtrot is a dance
where, no matter how
many steps you take, you
end up back in the place
you started. At least, that’s
the definition according to Michael
Feldmann (Lior Ashkenazi), a prosperous Israeli businessman who in Samuel Maoz’s stark, dreamlike drama “Foxtrot” receives a number of psychological body blows that threaten to knock
him off his feet.
The first, coming just as the film begins, is the news that Michael’s son, a
soldier named Jonathan, is dead. The
uniformed grief counselors from the
Israeli Army are at the door, and everything must go according to procedure,
including an injection to calm Michael’s hysterical wife, Daphna (Sarah
Adler), and an attention to Michael’s
hydration needs that approaches the
comically Kafkaesque.
How did Jonathan die? Is there
even a body? That’s on a need-to-know
basis. And so “Foxtrot” proceeds in a
key of scrupulously observed absurdity
that masks a simmering rage toward
Michael and the blindness of the country he comes to symbolize.
Writer-director Maoz is best known
for his 2009 film “Lebanon,” based
partly on his own experiences as a tank
gunner during the 1982 Lebanon War.
Like that film, “Foxtrot” brings a coolly
critical, occasionally surrealist eye on
the assumption that Israel’s military
efforts have made for a better, wiser
people.
THEATER
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G5
MOVIE REVIEW
THE
DANCE
OF LIFE
YYY½
FOXTROT
Written and directed by Samuel
Maoz. Starring Lior Ashkenazi,
Sarah Adler, Yonathan Shiray.
At Coolidge Corner, Kendall Square.
108 min. R (some sexual content
including graphic images, brief
drug use). In Hebrew, with subtitles.
‘Foxtrot’ a startling,
quietly sardonic
drama from Israel
PHOTOS BY GIORA BEJACH/SONY PICTURES CLASSICS
Lior Ashkenazi plays a grieving father in “Foxtrot.” Yonatan Shiray (top right, with Gefen Barkai, Shaul Amir,
and Dekel Adin) plays his son, an Israeli soldier whose death raises questions.
The central portion of the film
loops around to spend time with the
son, Jonathan (Yonathan Shiray), one
of four disaffected, disillusioned Israeli
army grunts stationed at a roadside
checkpoint in the middle of nowhere.
They live in a cargo container that’s
slowly sinking into the sand and most
of the passersby are camels. Every so
often an Arab or two drive through,
whom the soldiers treat with by-the-
THEATER
book procedural humiliation. Then it’s
back to boredom.
“Foxtrot” has a third chapter, too,
but I won’t spoil it other than to say
that it concerns a reckoning for Michael — and by extension his entire
generation of countrymen — that may
or may not stick. Maoz is a director of
gallows humor and creamy visual control, and the movie at times dances
along the edge of magical realism only
THEATER
to pull the characters and the audience
back with a jolt. The entirely preventable tragedy around which “Foxtrot”
ultimately hinges has its victims, but
the perpetrator comes to seem more
and more blurry the longer we look.
There are hints of a coming apocalypse — birds swarming, a dog leaping
behind a door of frosted glass — and
the less obvious collapse of a man’s
marriage and his self-respect. Certain
THEATER
things are buried, literally and figuratively, while refusing to entirely go
away. God may not be listening, or He
may have decided it’s time to get even.
A story is told in one scene about a
family Bible, treasured for generations
and surviving the Holocaust, that gets
traded for a girlie magazine.
That’s about as concrete as Maoz
gets in suggesting a culture that has
lost its right to tradition. The more unyielding power of “Foxtrot” — which
has won major festival prizes and just
missed getting a foreign language Oscar nomination — lies in its poetic conviction that there’s no greater weakness than an insistence on strength
and that those who don’t remember
their own history are condemned to
repeat it, one way or another. “Foxtrot”
is a dance where, no matter how many
steps its characters take, they end up
back in the place they started.
Ty Burr can be reached at
ty.burr@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @tyburr.
MUSIC
DANCE
one state, two state
red state, blue state
La Cage aux FoLLes
The award-winning Company Theatre presents
the beloved musical “La Cage aux Folles” from
Friday, March 16 through Sunday, April 8, at The
Company Theatre Center for Performing Arts, 30
Accord Park Drive, Norwell.
Tickets: $41, $43
For more information and to order tickets,
call the box office at (781) 871-2787 or visit
www.companytheatre.com
Before “The Birdcage”...
There was “La Cage aux Folles”!
Cooking with
the CaLaMaRi sisteRs
Two over-the-top plus-size Italian Sisters from
Brooklyn, Cook, Sing & Dance outrageous musical numbers that get a bit naughty as they share
their saucy secrets that will leave you rolling in
the aisles
April 12- May 20th
Thurs 2 & 7, Fri 8, Sat 2 & 8, Sun 2
REGENT THEATRE
7 Medford Street, Arlington, MA 02474
Box off 855-448-7469 Groups 888-264-1788
PlayhouseInfo.com
MoonBox PResents
CaBaRet
Kander and Ebb’s Tony Award winning musical
comes to the Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston
Center for the Arts, APRIL 14 - 29. Directed/
Choreographed by Rachel Bertone, Music
Directed by Dan Rodriguez and featuring Aimee
Doherty* as Sally Bowles. Musical number
include well-known classics of the musical
stage like “Money,” “Tomorrow Belongs To
Me,” “Willkommen,” “Maybe This Time,” and of
course “Cabaret.” Tickets at bostontheatrescene.
com/617-933-8600. More at moonbox.org.
FinaL weekenD —
Must CLose satuRDaY!
Don’t miss Dominique Morisseau’s acclaimed Off
Broadway hit about an auto plant in Detroit.
“Taut, keenly observed, and THOROUGHLY
ABSORBING!” — THE BOSTON GLOBE
“Storytelling at its finest! EXCEPTIONAL!”
— JARED BOWEN, WGBH
“POWER & GRACE! The cast is the heart & soul
of this production.” — WBUR’S THE ARTERY
“ POWERFUL & TIMELY!” — BROADWAY WORLD
A Huntington Theatre Company production
South End / Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
a BoStoN area preMiere
By kate cayley
A dynamic & compelling new play about a master
forger put on trial for selling a long-lost Vermeer
to the Nazis. Featuring Benjamin Evett, Laura Latreille, and directed by Jim Petosa. Mar 17-Apr 8.
New Repertory Theatre | Watertown
617-923-8487 | newrep.org
MerriMack repertory
theatre
Book, Music, and Lyrics by Dan Finnerty
Created by Dan Finnerty and Sean Daniels
Additional Music by Dan Lipton
Directed by Sean Daniels
Mar 21 - Apr 15 • Lowell, MA • mrt.org/danny
THE
CORVETTES
DOO WOP REVUE
april 29 at 2pM
781-891-5600
The Premier National Touring Doo Wop Revue
A Rollicking Ride Through The Good Old Days
of Rock & Roll.
Robinson Theatre ~ 617 Lexington St., Waltham
ReagleMusicTheatre.com ~ FREE PARKING
by Eugene O'Nei
Caryl Churchill’s masterpiece about the sacrifices
required to be a “top girl” in a man’s world.
“A mind-lifting experience.” — NY POST
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
euGene o’neill’s powerFul
pulitZer priZe winner
“A WORK ABOUT THE OVERPOWERING
FORCE OF NATURE!” — The Guardian
A surprisingly contemporary play that crackles
with fierce physicality, humor, and drama.
Starts April 6 Lyric Stage Copley Sq
617.585.5678 lyricstage.com
Handel and Haydn society
april 6 + 8, 2018
Moscow festival Ballet
sleeping Beauty
Artistic Director Harry Christophers...was stylishly
Friday, March 30, 2018 at 8pm
OPERA
NEC’S JORDAN HALL
877.571.SHOW (7469)
elgar
the dreaM of gerontius
what would you do for
love?
Boston university opera
institute presents
Pelléas et Mélisande, an evocative impressionist
opera in 5 acts, a story of passion & mystery.
Music by Claude Debussy | Arr. Stephen McNeff
MARCH 31 & APRIL 1, 2018
Performed at Emerson Cutler Majestic Theatre
Conductor- William Lumpkin
Stage Direction- E. Loren Meeker
TICKETS - CUTLERMAJESTIC.ORG
$20 general; $15 BU alumni, WGBH
& WBUR members, senior citizens;
$5 Students; Free with BU ID
BU.EDU/CFA/OPERA
“A delightful operatic confection, led by
presented by Music Worcester
up to date…actress Antonia Christophers
Moscow Festival Ballet returns in a
made a fine, sassy job of narration.”
fully staged production at The Hanover Theatre
– The New York Times
2 Southbridge St, Worcester, MA
FRIDAY, APR 6, 7:30PM
Tickets: Adults $41-$55; Students & Youth, $25
SUNDAY, APR 8, 3:00PM
WWW.THEHANOVERTHEATRE.ORG
Hear the greatest oratorio ever written by
an Englishman! Elgar’s masterpiece is an overpoweringly eloquent and dramatic portrayal of the
moments preceding death & what lies beyond.
MADELEINE SHAW, mezzo-soprano,
ROBERT MURRAY, tenor, DEREK WELTON, bass
and CHORUS PRO MUSICA.
FRIDAY APRIL 20 at 8:00 PM
Conductor’s Talk at 6:45pm
617.236.0999 | bostonphil.org
Youthful passion and fierce family rivalry make
this tragic romance one for the ages. Cranko’s
well-paced storytelling and Prokofiev’s evocative
score expertly capture the beauty and humanity
of Shakespeare’s masterpiece. Runs Mar 15
to Apr 8. Tickets at bostonballet.org or call
617.695.6955.
Boston Globe Ticket to the Arts
An�a Chri�tie
coNteMporary claSSic —
StartS apr. 20!
APRIL 5-8
An uplifting, heartbreaking musical comedy about
America’s volatile mix of drama and democracy
SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY’S MODERN THEATRE
$15 | $10 students/seniors
ModernTheatre.com | 866.811.4111
*** DISCOUNT OFFER: 1 SEAT for $2 ***
Choose “interactive seating” at checkout
ADDITIONAL PROGRAMMING WITH GUEST
ARLIE HOCHSCHILD
4/6: Ford Hall Forum | http://tiny.cc/Hochschild
4/7: Post-matinee talkback
tHe interactiVe
solVe-tHe-criMe coMedy!
“Downright Hilarious!” - Huffington Post
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 5 & 8, Sun at 3 & 7
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
Order Online through our Self Serve Order Entry System.
24/7 from anywhere.
boston.com/tickettothearts
T h e
G6
Braff ’s back
in ‘Alex, Inc.’
u‘‘ALEX, INC.’’
Continued from Page G3
that is coming’ ’’ is not his strong suit.
Blumberg did have the foresight to
think up Gimlet, which has helped
usher podcasts into the mainstream.
The network, known for producing
shows like ‘‘Reply All’’ and ‘‘Crimetown,’’ reports that its podcasts are
downloaded more than 12 million
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
times per month, and ‘‘StartUp’’ has
‘‘tens of millions’’ of downloads on its
own. Still, Hollywood’s interest surprised him — ‘‘The subject of a network family comedy within three years
of starting a company? No way’’ — and
he was flattered when producer John
Davis, a force behind films like ‘‘Joy’’
and ‘‘Game Night,’’ reached out.
At this point, Gimlet’s mantra was
to ‘‘focus, focus, focus’’ on its fledgling
company. Blumberg and Gimlet cofounder Matt Lieber remained relatively hands-off throughout development, while Davis went ahead and got
the ‘‘Scrubs’’ duo involved. The show
got a series order from ABC last spring.
‘‘I related to the idea of a guy who is
trained to do this one thing his whole
life — be a radio journalist and tell
these documentary-style audio stories
— who suddenly decides that he can
run a company and deal with managing people and budgets and coming up
with cash,’’ Tarses said, adding that he
made a similar jump from being a TV
writer to running a show.
‘‘Alex, Inc.’’ is Tarses’s fourth outing
as a series creator, following a string of
one-season sitcoms. It also marks
Braff’s first TV project since ‘‘Scrubs,’’
which ended in 2010. The actor ap-
peared in a few films afterward and, in
2013, decided to write and direct another one of his own called ‘‘Wish I
Was Here.’’Like Blumberg, he looked
to investors to fund the passion project. But Kickstarter proved a controversial choice for a man who, at
$350,000 per ‘‘Scrubs’’ episode, had
once been among the highest-paid TV
actors.
‘‘Alex, Inc.’’ is a safe return to network television for Braff, whose humorous narrator’s voice lends itself
well to a show about podcasting. Tarses does not shy away from using voiceover narration to bookend episodes.
Blumberg, who watched ‘‘Scrubs’’
with his wife ‘‘back . . . before we had
kids,’’ recognizes some of the more
subtle parallels between himself and
Braff’s character in ‘‘Alex, Inc.’’ When
Soraya tells her father in the pilot that
‘‘TV is better’’ than radio because she
needs pictures, he launches into a
goofy reenactment of a true-crime story to convince her otherwise. It is familiar territory for Blumberg.
‘‘As somebody who has to explain
what I do to people who don’t understand what I do, including my own
kids, it’s the kind of thing that you
have to give into,’’ he said, laughing.
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:00, 5:00, 11:00
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:00, 5:00, 11:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:40, 2:30, 6:00, 9:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:40, 2:30, 6:00, 9:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:20, 3:00, 6:30, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:20, 3:00, 6:30, 10:00
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30,
10:40
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30,
10:40
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 2:00, 8:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 2:00, 8:00
ACRIMONY (R) G 2:00, 4:50, 7:45, 10:45
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent 1:25,
4:10, 6:50, 9:45
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) G 1:15, 7:00,
9:45
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) AMC Independent G 2:30,
5:30, 8:15, 10:50
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent G 8:00
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent G 10:40
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:05, 1:30, 3:55, 6:25,
8:50, 11:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 12:50, 3:45, 6:35, 9:20,
11:55
UNSANE (R) 2:25, 5:00, 7:35, 10:00
ACRIMONY (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 9:40, 10:30
()
INFO VALID 3/30/18 ONLY
()
G
5
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
8
Stadium Seating
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
Rear Window Captioning
6
K
Hearing Impaired
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:00
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:50
PETER RABBIT (PG) 4:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 2:10, 4:20, 6:30, 8:30
THE LEISURE SEEKER (R) 2:00, 7:30, 9:55
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 2:20, 5:00, 7:40, 10:00
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) Advance Tickets Available 8:00
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
www.studiocinema.com
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 4:30, 7:30
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) Advance Tickets Available 8:00
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) Advance Tickets Available (1:25) 4:25, 7:35, 10:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) Advance Tickets Available G (12:00, 12:30, 2:40, 3:40) 6:00, 7:00, 9:20,
10:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) Advance Tickets
Available G (1:00) 4:30, 8:00
HICHKI (NR) (12:25, 3:25) 6:15, 9:05
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) (12:15) 6:30
NEEDI NAADI OKE KATHA (NR) (12:15)
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (12:55) 4:00, 7:05,
9:55
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) (12:45, 3:50)
6:45, 9:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (12:05, 2:30) 4:55, 7:30,
9:50
UNSANE (R) (3:30) 9:10
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) (12:40) 4:05, 7:10, 10:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:15) 4:20, 7:20, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (1:10) 4:15, 7:15, 10:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:35, 3:45) 6:35, 9:25
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:10, 3:35) 6:55, 10:05
RED SPARROW (R) (3:20)
BOSTON
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
5 8 DOL
www.artsemerson.org
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 2:30, 8:00, 10:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 11:45,
5:15
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 10:00, 1:15, 4:30, 7:45,
10:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 9:35, 6:30
TOMB RAIDER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:25, 9:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:40
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 11:30, 2:45, 6:00,
9:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 3:15, 9:45
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) G 9:30, 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 10:30,
1:45, 5:00, 8:15
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 9:50, 12:10, 2:35, 4:50,
7:10, 9:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:00, 1:50, 4:35, 7:20,
10:05
RED SPARROW (R) 11:35, 2:55, 6:15
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 9:35, 9:35
GAME NIGHT (R) 10:25, 12:50, 3:20, 5:45, 8:20,
11:00
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 10:15, 1:00, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent 10:40,
4:25, 10:50
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) AMC Independent G 9:45,
10:45, 12:30, 1:30, 3:15, 4:15, 6:00, 7:00, 8:45, 9:45
ACRIMONY (R) G 10:20, 1:20, 4:20, 7:25, 10:25
ANNIHILATION (R) 10:05, 12:55, 3:45, 6:50, 10:55
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) AMC Independent 10:35,
1:25, 4:10, 6:55, 9:40
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent G 9:40, 12:20, 3:00,
5:30, 8:10, 10:45
DOUBLE FEATURE: PETER RABBIT / JUMANJI (NR)
12:15, 4:55
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
11:00, 2:00
AMAZON ADVENTURE 3D (NR) 12:00, 4:00
GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D (NR) 1:00, 3:00, 5:00
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
ACRIMONY (R) Advance Tickets Available (12:10,
3:15) 7:05, 10:35
BEST F(R)IENDS MOVIE (NR) Advance Tickets Available 8:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) Advance Tickets Available G (3:05) 10:05
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) Advance Tickets
Available G (11:30) 6:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RPX Advance Tickets
Available G (12:00) 7:10
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RPX Advance Tickets
Available G (3:35) 10:30
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) (12:50, 1:20, 3:50) 4:20, 6:50,
7:20, 9:50, 10:20
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (12:25, 12:55) 4:00,
6:30, 7:00, 10:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) G (3:30) 9:45
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:00, 3:45) 6:35, 10:45
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (12:05) 4:05, 7:15, 10:25
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (12:15) 6:45
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) (12:30, 3:40) 10:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:40) 4:10, 7:40, 10:45
GAME NIGHT (R) (3:55) 10:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (11:35, 2:50) 6:20, 10:10
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
121 Grandview Rd.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 11:15, 4:30, 10:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:50,
7:15
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:30, 7:30, 10:45
BLACK PANTHER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:30, 5:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:15, 2:20, 8:10, 11:00
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 10:00,
11:00, 1:15, 4:30, 7:45, 11:00
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:30, 3:45,
7:00, 10:15
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 10:10, 2:00, 4:20, 7:40,
10:10
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 10:20, 1:00, 3:40, 6:50,
9:30
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 5:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 10:45, 2:10, 4:50, 8:10, 10:50
ACRIMONY (R) G 11:10, 2:00, 4:40, 6:40, 10:00
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) 10:00, 12:35,
3:10, 5:45, 8:20, 10:55
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
www.coolidge.org
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
ITZHAK (NR) 11:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:00
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
9:55
THE LEISURE SEEKER (R) 1:45
FOXTROT (R) 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45
RE-ANIMATOR (NR) G 11:59
BURLINGTON
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 10:30, 4:05, 9:40
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 1:15,
7:00
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 10:10, 12:30, 3:30, 6:30,
9:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:00, 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 3:00, 6:15, 9:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:45,
12:45, 1:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 10:15, 1:55, 4:15, 6:45,
9:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:15, 4:40, 9:55
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) RealD 3D 2:00, 7:20
RED SPARROW (R) 1:30
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 10:00, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25
GAME NIGHT (R) 5:00, 10:15
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:40, 2:25, 5:10, 7:45, 10:30
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent 11:30,
2:10, 4:50, 7:35, 10:20
CAMBRIDGE
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.applecinemas.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 10:45, 1:30, 4:15, 7:00,
9:45
HICHKI (NR) G 9:55
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 10:00, 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20,
9:40
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 10:10, 3:00, 7:40
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 10:15, 12:35,
3:00, 5:15, 7:35, 10:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) G 10:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) 5:15
RANGASTHALAM (NR) G 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:10
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 10:20, 11:50, 1:10,
2:40, 4:00, 5:30, 6:50, 8:30, 9:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 10:00, 12:00, 2:00,
4:00, 6:00, 8:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 12:30, 10:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 10:15, 12:30, 2:45, 5:00,
7:15, 9:30
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 5 (11:00) 1:30, 4:00,
6:30, 9:00
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 5 (1:25) 4:05, 6:50, 9:30
ITZHAK (NR) 5 (11:15) 1:15, 3:45
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 5 11:30, 2:05, 4:35,
7:05, 9:40
ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) 5 (11:05) 11:35, 1:00, 1:35,
2:00, 3:30, 4:10, 4:40, 6:00, 6:45, 7:20, 8:30, 9:10,
9:45
UNSANE (R) 5 6:40, 9:25
FOXTROT (R) 5 (11:10) 1:20, 4:15, 7:10, 9:20
THE CHINA HUSTLE (R) 5 (11:20) 1:50, 4:20, 7:15,
9:45
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
55 Boylston St.
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:20
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 3:30, 7:00, 10:20
DANVERS
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
100 Independence Way
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 10:40, 4:20, 10:00
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:40,
7:10
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 10:00, 1:00, 4:20, 7:45,
11:00
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 10:40, 1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 10:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 10:30, 3:50, 9:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 1:10, 6:40
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 10:30, 4:30, 9:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:30, 3:00, 6:30, 9:45
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) G 12:15, 3:45, 7:15, 10:45
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:15,
8:00
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 11:00, 1:30, 4:00, 6:30,
11:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) 10:00, 1:00, 3:40
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) AMC
Independent G 11:15, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:20, 4:50, 10:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) RealD 3D 2:10, 7:50
RED SPARROW (R) 10:20, 10:10
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 11:50, 2:30, 5:40, 8:20,
11:00
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:50, 2:30, 5:20, 10:45
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 10:10, 12:50, 3:30, 6:40, 9:20
ACRIMONY (R) G 11:00, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:50
ANNIHILATION (R) 8:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) AMC Independent G
10:10, 1:40, 5:00, 7:50, 10:40
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) G 10:15, 1:20,
4:10, 6:50, 9:40
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) AMC Independent G
11:50, 2:30, 5:10, 8:00, 10:50
UNSANE (R) AMC Independent G 6:30, 9:20
FLOWER (R) AMC Independent G 10:00, 1:30, 4:00,
6:30, 10:15
DOUBLE FEATURE: PETER RABBIT / JUMANJI (NR)
G 12:30, 5:15
DEDHAM
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:55, 7:10, 10:05
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:50, 5:05, 8:15
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:05
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:40, 3:25, 6:25, 9:05
UNSANE (R) 11:35, 10:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 6:50, 9:20
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 5:15, 7:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 12:20, 3:35, 6:45, 9:55
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 3:00, 6:15, 9:25
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 12:45, 4:00, 7:15,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:30, 1:00, 2:10,
4:10, 4:55, 7:05, 7:35, 10:20
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:25, 2:15, 5:00, 7:40, 10:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:40, 1:55, 4:20, 6:35,
9:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 11:15, 2:05, 4:45, 7:25
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 1:45, 4:15, 6:55, 9:30
ACRIMONY (R) 9:50
ACRIMONY (R) 12:15, 3:30, 6:40, 10:00
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 1:35, 4:30, 7:40, 10:35
PETER RABBIT (PG) 12:05, 2:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 4:40, 7:20, 9:50
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:40, 3:35, 6:25, 9:15
UNSANE (R) 3:55, 9:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 1:25, 6:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:45, 12:15, 3:00,
3:30, 6:15, 6:45, 9:25, 9:55
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 12:45, 4:00, 7:15,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:15, 1:10, 1:55,
3:50, 4:35, 6:40, 7:25, 9:20, 10:05
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 12:50, 3:40, 7:00, 9:45
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:40, 1:50, 4:05, 6:35,
9:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:05, 3:45, 6:30, 9:05
ACRIMONY (R) 1:20, 4:10, 7:05, 10:00
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 11:35
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) G 12:30, 3:30, 6:30,
9:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 1:40,
4:30, 7:30, 10:20
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:30, 9:50
BLACK PANTHER 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:00, 6:45
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 3:15, 9:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) G 12:15, 6:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) G 11:45, 3:00, 6:15,
9:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D G 12:45,
4:00, 7:15, 10:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) G 11:00, 12:15, 1:15,
2:30, 4:45, 5:45, 7:20
SHERLOCK GNOMES 3D (PG) RealD 3D G 11:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES 3D (PG) RealD 3D G 3:30, 10:40
PETER RABBIT (PG) 10:50
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:30
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) AMC
Independent G 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 11:45, 4:30, 10:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (PG) RealD 3D 1:45, 7:15
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) G 2:15, 7:30, 10:10
GAME NIGHT (R) 4:40
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:00, 9:40
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 12:00, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
5 DOL DSS
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 4:00, 7:00, 9:15
THE POST (PG-13) 6:45, 9:00
BOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORY (NR) 4:15
LITTLETON
READING
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - READING
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
READY PLAYER ONE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(PG-13) 1:00
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
REVERE
O'NEIL CINEMAS AT THE POINT
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
www.oneilcinemas.com
5 6 8 I K DIG
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 11:45, 3:00, 6:50, 10:10
GAME NIGHT (R) 5 1:15, 10:20
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 5 10:30, 4:00, 7:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 5 11:15, 1:50, 4:35, 7:15,
9:55
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 5 10:45, 1:25, 4:15, 6:40,
9:30
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 5 10:55, 1:30, 4:05,
6:40, 9:40
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 5 11:05, 2:05, 4:50, 7:35,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 5 11:30, 2:15, 5:00,
7:45
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING 3D (PG-13) 5 10:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 5 10:15
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 12:00, 3:30, 7:00
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
1208 Constitution Ave 978-506-5089
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:00, 1:30, 3:15, 4:30,
6:20, 7:30, 9:35, 10:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:00
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:30, 4:05, 6:40, 9:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:25, 4:10, 7:00, 9:40
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 2:00, 9:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15, 9:25, 9:55,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:05, 11:40, 1:45,
2:15, 4:25, 4:55, 7:05, 7:35, 9:45, 10:10
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:35, 9:30
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:10, 2:20, 4:40, 6:50,
9:00
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:10, 3:50, 6:25, 9:10
UNSANE (R) 11:10, 4:50, 7:20
ACRIMONY (R) 1:35, 4:20, 7:10, 10:00
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 11:00, 2:20, 2:50, 6:05,
6:35, 9:15
RED SPARROW (R) 11:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) 10:00, 12:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 12:00, 2:55, 6:10, 9:00,
11:40
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:40, 4:30, 7:35, 10:15
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 12:30, 6:20
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) 1:35, 4:15, 6:55,
9:35
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 10:15, 11:45,
12:15, 12:45, 1:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:45, 6:15,
6:45, 7:15, 8:00, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25, 11:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:05,
11:35, 1:45, 2:15, 2:45, 4:25, 4:55, 7:10, 7:40, 9:30,
10:00, 10:30
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:20, 4:20, 7:05, 9:50
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 10:05, 10:35, 12:25,
12:55, 2:35, 3:05, 4:50, 5:20, 7:00, 9:20
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:10, 3:55, 6:30, 9:10,
11:45
GOD'S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN DARKNESS (PG) 1:25,
4:10, 7:25, 10:10
THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (R) 7:30, 9:40,
11:50
UNSANE (R) 1:15, 3:40, 6:40, 9:05, 11:25
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 11:15, 2:30, 5:45, 8:55
ACRIMONY (R) 1:00, 3:50, 7:20, 10:05
SALEM
CINEMASALEM
1 E. India Square 978-744-1400
5 DOL DSS
www.cinemasalem.com
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 7:00
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 4:00, 10:00
JOSIE (NR) 4:40, 7:20, 9:15
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 4:45, 7:15, 9:40
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 3:45, 6:45, 9:50
THE TRUE 1692 IN 3D (NR) 6:30
SOMERVILLE
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
www.showcasecinemas.com
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:25, 3:25, 4:05, 6:30,
7:10, 9:50, 10:20
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:30, 1:50
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:45
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 10:40, 2:00, 4:35, 7:15,
9:55
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:35, 2:20, 5:05, 7:45, 10:25
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 9:40, 11:55, 2:25, 5:00, 7:25
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 9:30, 10:00,
12:00, 12:30, 1:00, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:20, 6:50,
7:20, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:45
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 10:20, 11:40, 1:45,
2:15, 4:20, 4:50, 7:00, 7:30, 9:35, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 10:15, 1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:40
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 9:35, 11:45, 2:05, 4:30,
6:55, 9:10
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 10:30, 1:15, 3:55, 6:40,
9:20
ACRIMONY (R) 9:50, 12:50, 3:50, 7:05, 10:05
5 6 I DIG
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
READY PLAYER ONE: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(PG-13) 1:00
READY PLAYER ONE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG13) 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:10, 12:55, 3:05, 6:10,
7:00, 9:20
GAME NIGHT (R) 9:30
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:25, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 1:35, 4:50, 7:45, 10:25
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 12:00, 12:30,
1:00, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 10:00, 10:30
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 4:30,
7:05, 9:45, 10:10
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:30, 4:20, 7:30, 10:15
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 12:05, 2:30, 5:00, 7:10,
9:25
I CAN ONLY IMAGINE (PG) 1:45, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05
ACRIMONY (R) 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:20
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:55, 3:40, 4:10, 6:40,
7:10, 10:10
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:00, 1:20
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:35, 4:20, 6:50, 9:35
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:10, 1:55, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 12:05
PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST (PG-13) 11:20, 2:00,
4:40, 7:20, 10:05
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 1:10, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:25, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15,
7:45, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25, 11:05
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 1:15, 1:45, 4:05,
4:35, 6:55, 7:25, 9:45, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 11:15, 2:05, 4:45, 7:40, 10:20
http://somervilletheatre.com/
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30, 9:50
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 6:30, 9:30
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5:00, 8:00
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 4:10, 5:20, 6:45, 7:45,
9:40
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
ACRIMONY (R) Advance Tickets Available (1:00)
4:20, 7:25, 10:20
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) Advance Tickets Available G (12:40, 3:00) 6:00, 7:00, 9:00, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) Advance Tickets
Available G (12:00, 3:30) 6:30, 9:30
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) (12:35, 3:10)
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) (12:20, 3:20) 6:45,
10:20
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) (1:15, 3:50) 6:35, 9:20
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) (1:10) 4:30, 7:20, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) (12:50) 7:10
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) (12:10) 4:10, 7:05, 9:50
GAME NIGHT (R) (3:40) 10:10
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) (12:30) 4:00, 6:15, 9:40
WALTHAM
EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 5 (1:00) 4:05, 7:00, 9:50
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 5 (1:05) 4:10, 7:20, 9:55
UNSANE (R) 5 (12:50) 4:20, 7:40, 10:00
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 G 1:10, 4:15, 7:15
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 5 (1:15) 4:00, 7:10,
10:05
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) 5 (12:40) 6:45, 9:30
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 5 G 9:45
READY PLAYER ONE 3D (PG-13) 5 (3:45)
WESTBOROUGH
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) 12:20, 3:20, 3:50, 6:30,
7:00, 9:30, 10:00
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:15
GAME NIGHT (R) 11:55, 2:25, 7:25
A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) 1:00, 3:45, 6:25, 9:10
LOVE, SIMON (PG-13) 11:10, 1:45, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45
MIDNIGHT SUN (PG-13) 1:35
READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:45, 12:15,
12:45, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 6:15, 6:45, 7:15, 9:25, 9:55,
10:25
PACIFIC RIM UPRISING (PG-13) 11:05, 11:35, 1:40,
2:10, 4:15, 4:45, 6:50, 7:20, 9:40, 10:15
TOMB RAIDER (PG-13) 1:20, 4:05, 6:55, 9:35
SHERLOCK GNOMES (PG) 11:50, 2:00, 4:20, 6:35,
9:00
UNSANE (R) 4:50, 10:05
THE DEATH OF STALIN (R) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
10:10
ACRIMONY (R) 1:15, 4:10, 7:05, 9:50
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G7
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
Mark Rylance and
Tye Sheridan in
“Ready Player One.”
WARNER BROS. PICTURES
Back to the future, via the ’80s
u‘‘READY PLAYER ONE’’
MOVIE REVIEW
trailer parks made of girders
and RVs — and pour their money and time into the OASIS (Ontologically Anthropocentric
Sensory Immersive Simulation), a virtual-reality landscape
where anything is possible and
they can be any avatar-selves
they choose.
In other words, the America
of tomorrow has given up on reality, which isn’t as far from today as one might think — a provocative notion that “Ready
Player One” puts on the table
and mostly leaves there. Instead, we dive into the dazzling
OASIS, where Wade becomes
the elfin teen adventurer Parzival, hanging with his hulking
best buddy Aech (pronounced
“H” and voiced by an excellent
Lena Waithe) and running
physically impossible road races across a VR New York City
where the challenges include a
T. Rex and King Kong.
That opening action scene is
a reminder that A) Spielberg
can choreograph action with a
skill to leave an audience gasping for breath and B) modern
digital effects can do just about
anything (in this case turn the
lanes of the Manhattan Bridge
into loop-de-loop Hot Wheels
tracks). The race is for a hidden
key, one of three “Easter eggs”
YY½
READY PLAYER ONE
Directed by Steven Spielberg.
Written by Zak Penn and
Ernest Cline, based on the
novel by Cline. Starring Tye
Sheridan, Olivia Cooke, Mark
Rylance, Lena Waithe, Ben
Mendelsohn. At multiplexes
in Boston and suburbs;
Jordan’s Furniture IMAX
in Natick and Reading.
138 minutes. PG­13
(sequences of sci­fi action
violence, bloody images,
some suggestive material,
partial nudity, and language).
Continued from Page G1
squirreled away in the OASIS
by its late creator, James Halliday, the film’s Willy Wonka figure and its most touching lost
boy. As embodied by that great
changeling Mark Rylance — he
won a 2015 supporting actor
Oscar for Spielberg’s “Bridge of
Spies” — Halliday is a gentle genius somewhere out on the
spectrum; he’s the real-est thing
in all of “Ready Player One,”
and you wish the movie were
about him.
Instead, it’s about Wade/Parzival’s dash to get the keys and
the clues ahead of the film’s villain, Nolan Sorrento (Ben Men-
delsohn), a creepy corporate
smoothie who wants to monetize the OASIS with ads. What’s
at stake? Uh . . . the ownership
of the OASIS, which seems a little paltry given that Sorrento
has half the population in hock
to his VR enhancements, desperate to “make coin,” and
threatened with detention in
his debt-collecting “loyalty centers.”
Some juicy real-world political parallels flicker at the edges
of “Ready Player One,” but the
movie would rather tend to the
vroom-vroom, the gee-look,
and the remember-when.
There’s a tough-talking lady adventurer named Art3mis (Olivia Cooke of “Thoroughbreds”)
who has five times the nerve
and 10 times the personality of
our hero, but even she’s required to melt into his arms
sooner or later.
The oddest aspect of “Ready
Player One” is its reliance on
shout-outs to the 1980s in a
movie set six decades later. Because Halliday filled his digital
universe with the pop junk of
his own childhood, the citizens
of the OASIS are schooled in the
catechism of “Back to the Future” and Van Halen, “The Iron
Giant” and Duke Nukem, Stephen King’s “Christine” and
James Cameron’s “Terminator
2.” Toward the end, when we’re
MOVIE STARS
Previously released
YY½ Annihilation In Alex Garland’s adaptation of Jeff VanderMeer’s cryptic sci-fi novel, a
team of five women is sent to
explore a mysterious “Area X”
bordered by an iridescent wall
called “The Shimmer.” The bizarre landscapes and deadly,
mutant denizens are let down
by the film’s incoherence and
potted philosophy. (115 min.,
R) (Peter Keough)
YYY½ Black Panther A
smart, supple action fantasy
starring a superhero of color
leading a strong, unbowed nation of color. Chadwick Boseman (finally) comes into stardom as King T’Challa/Black
Panther, and Michael B. Jordan
almost steals the film as a villain driven by real-world agonies, but the triumph belongs
to director-co-writer Ryan
Coogler (“Creed,” “Fruitvale
Station”). With Lupita Nyong’o
and the ferocious Danai Gurira.
(140 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ Call Me by Your Name
A rich, novelistic coming-of-age
story, set in an overripe Italy in
the 1980s. Timothée Chalamet
plays an academic’s son and
Armie Ham-mer a young research assistant with whom he
embarks on an affair; no one
films light and landscape with
more sensuality than director
Luca Guadagnino. In English
and Italian, with subtitles.
(132 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYYY The Death of Stalin
From Armando Iannucci
(“Veep,” “In the Loop”), a brilliantly caustic satire in which
the jostlings for power in 1953
Moscow are played as Monty
Python-esque farce. A work of
brutal screwball comedy, it features fine performances by
Steve Buscemi (as Nikita
Khrushchev), Jeffrey Tambor
(Malenkov), Michael Palin
(Molotov), and more.
(106 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY½ A Fantastic Woman
From Chile, a gently furious
THE ORCHARD
Zoey Deutch in “Flower.”
drama about a trans woman
(Daniela Vega, fantastic) finding bureaucratic humiliation
and inner strength after her
lover dies. Director Sebastián
Lelio (“Gloria”) has the knack
of illuminating the lives of everyday saints with empathy
and warmth. A foreign-language Oscar nominee. In Spanish, with subtitles. (104 min.,
R) (Ty Burr)
YY Flower “Lolita” gets a
skate-punk makeover in a seriocomic portrait of a girl with
some very casual views on sexuality, and some very particular
ones about how to use it as a
weapon. The film is quite the
showcase for Zoey Deutch, who
plays brazen, breezy, even soulfully vulnerable. Still, she’s so
off-putting so much of the time,
it’s hard to see the point of it
all. (93 min., R) (Tom Russo)
YY Game Night Shouldn’t a
movie with this title be entertaining? For all the energy that
Rachel McAdams, Jason Bateman, and their castmates pour
into their gimmicky comedy,
there’s too often a feeling that
they’re straining to pump up
flat material. A hotshot financier (Kyle Chandler) encourages a role-play mystery in which
everyone competes to solve his
staged abduction. But when actual kidnappers crash the party, the game gets real. (100
min., R) (Tom Russo)
YYY Isle of Dogs A handcrafted stop-motion fable about
exiled dogs on a Japanese island. So it’s a Wes Anderson
movie. His most political too,
and a film visually (and superficially) in love with Japanese
culture. A qualified delight,
with voice work by Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Jeff
Goldblum, Scarlett Johansson,
Greta Gerwig, Bill Murray, and
many others. (98 min., PG-13)
(Ty Burr)
YYY½ Love, Simon Fans of
“Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens
Agenda” — the beloved 2015
young adult novel by Becky Albertalli — can relax and celebrate. “Love, Simon,” the film
adaptation of the book, is great.
It’s not exactly like the novel,
but it captures the best parts of
it. Part of the success of the
film can be credited to Nick
Robinson, who is perfect as Si-
given a vision of Halliday as a
boy sitting slack-jawed before
an early video game, the movie
raises and quickly discards a
disturbing notion: that an asocial savant grew up to seduce
the entire population of Earth
into his hermetically sealed obsessions.
The ’80s stuff is there because it makes audiences in
2018 feel good, of course, although you may wonder if today’s younger audiences really
recognize or care about “Beetlejuice” or “Monty Python and
the Holy Grail.” (How do you
do, fellow kids.) I imagine this
worked more organically in the
novel, where readers could digest and parse the umpteen references at their own pace, rather than ducking them like incoming dodgeballs. You feel like
you’re ticking items off a Trivia
Night list, and the only time the
gambit really works is a headspinning visit to the world of
Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining,” Parzival and Art3mis and
Aech placed with liberating wit
into the actual lobby footage of
the 1980 film.
It all builds to a battle betw e e n t h e d e n i z e n s o f t h e
OASIS and Sorrento’s minions
that feels like every digitized
End Times donnybrook the
movies have sold us for the past
10 years. By then, the cohesive
and enjoyable early scenes have
turned rushed as the film
sprints to keep up with developments in the book; after a latefilm power-up in which the
characters dash between their
vir tual and ac tual worlds,
“Ready Player One” limps to a
tidy, over-explained conclusion.
There’s a weirder, better story in here, one that would probably give us less Parzival and
more Mark Rylance, but it also
wouldn’t make nearly as much
money or stroke an audience’s
ego. Spielberg’s on board because he’s our generation’s master movie fantasist, not because
he wants to peer too much under the film’s thematic hood. If
“Ready Player One” wants to insist that reality’s all that matters, why is it so much better at
keeping us in the dark?
Ty Burr can be reached at
ty.burr@globe.com.
mon, a well-liked high school
senior who’s gay and doesn’t
know how — or when — to
share. (96 min., PG-13)
(Meredith Goldstein)
YY Pacific Rim Uprising You
wouldn’t have thought a sequel
to Guillermo del Toro’s underperforming robots-versus-monsters spectacle was likely, especially with someone else directing. Yet here’s the follow-up
from genre TV vet Steven S.
DeKnight (“Spartacus”), starring the charismatic John
Boyega. It plays like a lost
“Transformers” entry until the
finale. (111 min., PG-13)
(Tom Russo)
YYYY The Shape of Water
A fantastic romantic masterpiece, made at the intersection
between art film and pop romance, from Guillermo del
Toro (“Pan’s Labyrinth”). Sally
Hawkins (astonishing) plays a
mute cleaning lady who falls
for an imprisoned creature
from the deep (Doug Jones);
what sounds ridiculous is a
rapture of filmmaking. With
Michael Shannon, Octavia
Spencer, and Richard Jenkins.
(123 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YYY Unsane A beguilingly
nasty exercise in paranoia, shot
on an iPhone by director Steven Soderbergh just to prove he
can. Claire Foy plays a damaged young woman held at a
mental institution against her
will. The movie gets in, messes
with your head, and vanishes,
leaving only a lingering aftertaste of unreliable narrative.
(98 min., R) (Ty Burr)
YY½ A Wrinkle in Time Ava
DuVernay’s adaptation of the
Madeleine L’Engle fantasy classic disappoints with its overdone production design and
uneven script but scores with
the rich emotionalism of the
characters’ family bonds.
Storm Reid is just right as hesitant teen heroine Meg Murry;
Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, and Mindy Kaling are
the weakest part of the movie
as a trio of otherworldly spirits.
(109 min., PG) (Ty Burr)
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
JAMES DIMMOCK/NBC
Sara Bareilles plays Mary Magdalene, John Legend
(center) is Jesus, and Alice Cooper portrays King Herod.
A live and buzz­worthy
‘Jesus Christ Superstar’
I’m way too excited about “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in
Concert,” which airs Sunday at 8 p.m. on NBC. I know every single word of that musical by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, and have since I was a kid, and even if the production is awful, I know I will nonetheless love listening to it all over again.
The cast is well-chosen, and it pushes at least one cultural
button. John Legend stars as Jesus, despite the dominance of
white Jesuses in the arts and hippie Jesuses in productions of
the show. Rock god Alice Cooper — who also appeared on a
1996 recording of the rock opera — is King Herod. Sara Bareilles is Mary Magdalene, and “Hamilton” alum Brandon Victor Dixon is Judas.
The event will be filmed in front of a live audience in Brooklyn, and some of that audience will participate in the show, as a
crowd of Jesus’ followers.
IT’S TIME TO LOOK AT YOUR INVESTMENTS.
A ONCE IN A LIFETIME
ROAD TRIP THEY WILL
NEVER FORGET
“WONDERFUL.
DONALD SUTHERLAND
IS SO GOOD.
HELEN MIRREN,
AS USUAL, IS
SIMPLY SUPERB.”
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
HELEN
MIRREN
DONALD
SUTHERLAND
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E
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© CH FILMS LLC, 2017
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T h e
G8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
F R I D A Y, M A R C H 3 0 , 2 0 1 8
LOVE LETTERS
BY MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN
We feel so guilty
Q. One of my friend’s boyfriends was interested in
me. I knew my friend loved him very much but
that it wasn’t reciprocated.
Idiot me . . . I thought if I kept talking to him
and socializing, their relationship would survive.
I didn’t want to be the cause of her misery. But as
time went by, I saw that her boyfriend really
loved me. I also started becoming attracted to
him. But I had promised myself that I would never tell this to anyone, not even him, because that
would ruin everything. But he could tell.
For some time, there was bad tension among
the three of us. His feelings for me started getting
pretty obvious. I would tell everyone, including
my friend, that there was nothing going on. This
went on for a while.
One day, he broke up with her. I didn’t want
him to. But then he and I started our relationship. It’s been two years now and we can’t move
past the guilt. . . . We talk about it every day. We
love each other, but we feel like we are very bad
people for having done this to a friend. We have
lost most of our friends because they don’t approve of our relationship. Sometimes I feel like
walking away from everything — him and all of
the people who haven’t supported us. Will this relationship ever feel OK? Please help.
SORRY
s
’
t
r
eh a
t
n
e
t
con
o
t
n
e
t
Lis
your
w
ll, the ne
u
f
r
o
d
e
d by
f r a c t ur
. Inspire
hear t is
it
r
o
u
t
o
k
y
a
r
redith
ill spe
W he t he
lobe, Me
o dc as t w
G
p
n
s
r
o
t
e
s
t
t
d
The Bo
L ove L e
ships, an
lumn in
n
o
c
io
t
r
la
la
e
u
nce, r
her pop
les roma
k
time.
c
a
t
in
ion at a
t
s
e
u
Golds te
q
e big
eak— on
h ear t br
A. It’s true — you did a bad thing to a friend. The
entire love triangle was mishandled, and your denial of your feelings only made things worse.
But . . . you learned some lessons, right? And
now it’s two years later. People have moved on (I
hope) and have started making choices that have
nothing to do with you.
It’s important to know that circles of friends
change over time, even without conflict. Do not
assume that your entire community was altered
?
breakup
a
r
e
v
o
et
w do I g
o
H
:
1
n
Seaso
forever because of these specific relationship mistakes. Your group was going to evolve no matter
what.
It does sound like it’s time for you and your
boyfriend to find some new social situations so
that you can be a regular couple making friends
— as opposed to “that couple who betrayed your
close friend two years ago.” Make some new
memories with people who aren’t as focused on
your origin story. Let it become less important
over time.
For the record, you don’t need your former
friend’s forgiveness to move on. You just have to
promise yourself that you’ll do better — and follow through.
MEREDITH
READERS RESPOND:
If you love him, make new friends. Not giving
you a pass though. You deserved to lose the
friends who thought you did a bad thing. Because
you did.
WENDYWelp, you did all the things I would have advised you not to do at the time, but there it is.
Make some new friends whom you haven’t hurt,
and don’t hurt them.
DIAMONDGIRL
I just hope it was worth it . . . sneaking around
behind a friend’s back, serving as a confidant to
her boyfriend as he told you he didn’t love her
anymore, spending enough time with him to develop feelings, lying to everyone about your feelings. You got the guy — congrats! But there’s a
reason you feel guilty two years later.
BOSTONSWEETS21
Column and comments are edited and reprinted
from boston.com/loveletters. Send letters to
meredith.goldstein@globe.com.
Stitcher
etters.s
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e
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o
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Sherlock Holmes (2011): Sherlock battles Moriarty. TV-14-LV
(4:30)
This Christmas (2007) (CC): An estranged family
Sparkle gathers for a yuletide reunion. HD TV-14
WNAC ET Enter
FOX
Encore
Specials
BBC America
BET
64
Cinemax
News
NBA Basketball (CC): L.A.
Clippers at Portland. Live. HD
NCAA
NCAA Women's Bask. Tournament (CC):
Women's Connecticut vs. Notre Dame. Live. HD
SCenter
Graham N NEW
Quad: A building
faces demolition.
(7:43) Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection (2012) (CC):
Madea gets a new houseguest. HD TV-PG
Live/BBC NEW
Black
BET's
Card
Mancave
(10:19) Madea's Witness (CC):
Madea gets a new houseguest.
Death Row HD
Forensic Forensic
M. Asam Beauty
M. Asam Beauty
Truth and Lies: Waco (2018) (CC): The
1993 Waco, Texas, raid. HD
Pawn
Stars
Mystery NEW
Snapped TV-PG
Snapped TV-PG
Bourne Supremacy: On-the-lam CIA op is framed.
Bourne
Laurie Felt LA Live. Shawn Killinger (CC) Live. HD
Outrageous Acts
Outrageous Acts
Outrageous Acts
Law & Order (CC)
Law & Order (CC)
Law & Order (CC)
TV-14-LV
TV-14-LV
TV-14-DLV
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
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