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The Daily Telegraph Travel - March 31, 2018

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***
Saturday 31 March 2018 . telegraph.co.uk
SPA STRUCK ?Gardens deliver as much joy as a good cocktail? page 3 | BEACH BUZZ St Ives ticks all the family holiday boxes page 22
CHOCOLATE CHECKLIST On the trail of the cocoa bean in Mexico page 28 | KEVIN BACON ?I once found a baboon in my room? page 31
Make the world your own
Next stop,
Amsterdam
As the new Eurostar service launches, we reveal
what to do, where to stay ? and how to go Dutch
2
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
***
AND WE?RE OFF
Sit back and enjoy our expert tour through this week?s most exhilarating travel experiences
CITY CENTRAL MONTPELLIER
MEET THE
EXPERTS
France?s most seductive spot is stirring in the Mediterranean spring
GO NOW
25
CLAIRE IRVIN
Claire is Head of
Travel Editorial at
The Telegraph.
Reluctantly she
has had to
acknowledge her
nine year-old is a
better surfer. In
Cornwall she has
been known to
breakfast on
cream teas.
RODNEY BOLT
COVER IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES; THIS PAGE: BBC; GETTY IMAGES; ALAMY
Rodney is
Telegraph
Travel?s
Amsterdam
expert. He fell
in爈ove with the
city from the
back of a bicycle
in the Eighties,
and has been
writing about it
ever since.
FIONA DUNCAN
Fiona has
reviewed hotels
for The Telegraph
since 2000.
Before that she
wrote the
Charming Small
Hotel guides,
published by her
husband. She still
loves hotels ? in
interesting places.
19
SHE?S
BAC K!
The original celebrity chef
Fanny Cradock was once a
travel writer for this paper.
Fiona Duncan takes
a爁ascinating journey
through the archives
PLUS
5 Hot spots: where in the
world is everyone?
6 Amsterdam special: the
complete city guide
11 First Person: divorce to
helicopter heroics
15 Travel tales: the
kindness of strangers
21 Just back: a flight of
fancy in Sierra Leone
22 Family breaks: Cornwall
28 Culinary holidays: the
chocolate trail in Mexico
31 My life in travel:
Kevin Bacon
32 It?s a deal: this week?s
best hotel offers
5
E XC LU S I V E T O U R S
COOL
POOLS
The extraordinary
white terraces and
warm waters of
Pamukkale are well
worth a visit. But
in爓hich country
will爕ou find them?
PART Y
TIME
The days are getting
longer and festival
season is about to
begin. From Colorado
to La Coru馻, we
preview some of
the爐reats ahead
Experience the thrill of the Spa Six Hours in Belgium accompanied by racing legend Derek Bell
and燩aul Hudson, The Telegraph?s Motoring Editor. For more details, see page 9.
For the warmth of the early
Mediterranean spring and
the light which sharpens the
focus of France?s most
seductive city. Elegant,
sensual and insurgent,
Montpellier has been
cultured for 1,000 years,
with undertows of irony
leavening the whole. And if
you fancy some excitement,
take in the International
Festival of Extreme Sports
? skateboarding,
rollerblading, BMX,
wakeboarding and much
else ? from May 8-13 (fise.fr).
Fly there with easyJet
(easyjet.com) from Gatwick.
STAY HERE
Palatial maison d?h魌e
Baudon de Mauny (1),
hidden behind an
inconspicuous door in the
old town, has vast rooms
and excellent breakfasts
(telegraph.co.uk/tt-baudonde-mauny; doubles from
�8). Bang central, the
three-star Hotel d?Aragon (2)
comes on like a modestly
noble town-house. It?s
suitable for the civilised
(hotel-aragon.fr; doubles
from �).
WALK HERE
Start at the Com閐ie (3). The
vast, car-free square is
ON THE
RADAR
Our pick of the
week?s travel stories
WORLD?S LARGEST
CRUISE SHIP SETS SAIL
The world?s largest cruise
ship sets out on its maiden
voyage today, bound
for燼爏ummer in the
Mediterranean before
heading to the Caribbean
later in the year.
The Symphony of the
Seas has been three years
? and �9?million ? in the
making, but will finally
welcome passengers for
the爁irst time for a one-off,
theatre to the sunlit surge of
southern life, overseen by
18th and 19th century
grandeur. Then plunge into
the medieval centre.
Bourgeois mansions give
way to techno-bars, ethnic
jewellers and conspiratorial
streets where students ?
Rabelais and Auguste Comte
among them ? have scurried
since the 13th-century.
through to the Eighties
weeping with nostalgia for
temps perdu.
SEE THIS
EAT HERE
The Fabre museum (4) is
one of France?s finest. Until
June 3, the Muses et Grisettes
exhibition focuses on
Montpellier women through
the ages�(museefabre.
montpellier3m.fr).
TRY THIS
Unlock a bike from a
V閘omagg cycle station ? it?s
simple; look on tamvoyages.com ? and pedal
the six-mile cycleway past
lagoons and flamingoes, to
seaside Palavas. This is your
time for sun and sand.
SHOP HERE
The Rue de l?Ancien
Courrier (5) offers affordable
fashion, while towards the
Rue de l?Aiguillerie (6),
retail gets markedly more
funky. Pomme Reinette, the
old-time toy shop, will have
children of the Forties
five-night cruise to and
from Barcelona via Naples
and Rome. The Royal
Caribbean ship?s official
programme launches on
April 7, when it leaves
its燘arcelona base for
voyages to Palma de
Mallorca, Provence and
Florence, Pisa, Rome and
Naples. It will be manned
by a 2,200-strong
crew爎epresenting
77爊ationalities.
Symphony is usurping
Harmony of the Seas as the
largest cruise liner ever
built, with room for 5,518
passengers (versus
Harmony?s 5,479), in 2,759
stateroom cabins, 12 more
than its predecessor. The
vessel has 18 decks, 24
guest lifts, is 1,188ft long
DRINK HERE
Best wine bars are Glouglou
(7) at 27 Rue Pila St G閘y, the
loungier Verre � Soi (8) at
17 Rue St Guilhem (both
have good by-the-glass
ranges) and Enfants Rouges
(9) at 3 Plan Duch�.
Presently top of my
Montpellier list is Les
T?ocqu閟 (10), a husband
and wife outfit of charm,
invention and low prices.
Tucked into a small old
town street, it?s hard,
but rewarding, to find. Do
book (0033 467 634286);
two courses ?24/�;
three ?29.
OFF THE MAP
Montpellier has the oldest
continuously operating
medical school in the world,
and its anatomy museum is
conceivably the most
gruesomely illuminating.
Cling to the notion that this
is educational, but it?s still
tough for the faint-hearted.
Available only on a guided
tour (?14, montpellierfrance.com).
Anthony Peregrine
and 238ft high and has a
cruising speed of 22 knots.
From November 10,
Symphony will be based in
a new cruise terminal in
Florida, nicknamed the
Crown of Miami for its
striking design when
viewed from the water.
Royal Caribbean says the
ship?s 2019 and 2020
Caribbean itineraries are
now on sale.
WORLD?S FASTEST ZIP
WIRE GETS FASTER
Zip World in Penrhyn
Quarry, Bethesda, Wales,
has upgraded its zip wire
ride, making the fastest in
the world ? and longest in
Europe ? even faster.
Velocity 2, which opens
this week, will reach a top
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
DID YOU KNOW?
Montpellier, long reckoned
to be France?s most tolerant
city, hosted the country?s
first gay marriage, 11 days
after it became legally
possible in 2013.
7
1
Sherlock Holmes turned up
in Montpellier with
surprising regularity ? first
at the end of his postReichenbach, ?post-mortem?
exile (?Adventures Of The
Empty House?), then to save
Watson from a beating
(?Disappearance Of Lady
Frances Carfax?).
4
6
PARK
ESPLANADE
CHARLES-DE-GAULLE
9
MONTPELLIER
8
5
3
10
2
100m
speed of 125mph, up from
119mph, after the attraction
raised the line?s starting
point and moved and
redesigned the landing
area. There are now four
lines instead of two
allowing a family to
ride爐ogether.
Velocity 2 races across
Penrhyn Quarry for a mile,
500ft above the ground.
Telegraph Travel?s
Rachel Cranshaw, who
rode the original Velocity,
described the experience as
?exhilarating, more like
flying than anything else?.
COST OF RENEWING
PASSPORT SOARS
The cost of obtaining a
British passport rose this
week, with the fee for
adults increasing to as
much as � ? or �7 for
those who need a travel
document urgently.
The charge for an online
passport application has
risen from �.50 to
�.50, while postal
applications have increased
from �.50 to �. The
cost of a child?s travel
document has risen from
� to � and from �
to �.50 by post. A
premium fast-track
renewal for an adult now
costs �7, up from �8.
NEW DREAMLINER FOR
SINGAPORE AIRLINES
The first ever Dreamliner
787-10 aircraft, said to be
the most technologically
advanced plane built, has
MORE
ONLINE
Has Norway
just opened
the world?s
most scenic
toilet? Read
all about it at
telegraph.co.uk/
tt-norway
entered service with
Singapore Airlines.
The airline, voted best in
the world in the Telegraph
Travel awards in
December, welcomed the
first of 49 orders of the
latest model of the Boeing
plane, describing it as
?magnificent piece
of爀ngineering?.
The Dreamliner 787-10 is
longer than its siblings,
carrying 40 more
passengers (330) than
the�7-9.
Boeing says it has the
lowest operating cost per
seat of any wide-body
plane in service today,
raising the prospect of
cheaper long-haul flights.
Edited by Hugh Morris
ROSIE GREEN
SPA STRUCK
Want a well-being boost? The glorious gardens and nature-inspired
spa at Barnsley House will put a spring in your step
H
ow would
you like to
supercharge
your spa
treatment?
How about
layering on
an agereversing plant extract that?s
been picked under a full
moon by virgins in the
Himalayas? Or perhaps try
a bit of Nasa level machinery
that guarantees to lift your
jowls right up to your
cheekbones?
Too much? Thought so. Then
what about just choosing to
have your treatment in serene,
natural surroundings?
Spas everywhere are flagging
up the well-being boost that
being immersed in/close to
greenery brings.
Hippy dippy? Well, no.
Scientific research shows
access to it is linked to reduced
levels of depression, anxiety
and stress. So now every yoga
retreat worth its cymbals offers
up the opportunity to namaste
outdoors and forest bathing is
officially a thing (with spas as
mainstream as Center Parcs
buying into the idea). Oh, and
woodland gymnasiums are
springing up everywhere
(Calcot Manor opens theirs
this year).
I?m all for it. Like olives
and爒iews, I?ve only started
appreciating gardens later
in爈ife. But now they deliver
as much joy as a good
cocktail, crisp linen sheets
or a new pair of shoes. And
if you want to combine
gorgeous gardens with a
great spa, then Barnsley
House is hard to beat.
This year it celebrates
the centenary of the
legendary Rosemary Verey,
who created its magical
gardens. And spring is a
glorious time to visit it,
with magnolia and wisteria
bursting into flower.
The spa makes good use
of the garden?s offerings (as
does the excellent Potager
restaurant). Dried lavender
bunches await you on
the treatment beds, the
?herbarium? (steam and
sauna) uses home-grown
hanging herbs, while freshly
picked mint flavours the
drinking water.
The spa design is all
about connecting you to
the gardens, too. You walk
down to it from the main
house, along an enchanting
meandering path, shedding
stress with each step. The
building materials used also
encourage that connection ?
think lots of stone and
Shed, which is a cosy garden
hideaway in the grounds.
If you need reviving after a
long beastly winter (and who
doesn?t), then Barnsley House is
your place.
Rates at Barnsley House start
from �1 per night on a bed
and breakfast basis, based
on two sharing:
telegraph.co.uk/
tt-barnsleyhouse
WAKE UP CALL?
Transform tired trans-seasonal
skin with Decl閛r?s new Facial
Yoga Lift, from � for 30
minutes. The radianceboosting, cheekbone-sculpting
Spring is a glorious
time to visit it,
with magnolia
bursting into flower
wood, and floor-to-ceiling
windows. The spa is smallish,
but well thought out. It?s
luxe and friendly. If you
were being uber critical
you might say it is starting,
just starting, to look a little
bit tired.
I had an Elemis Garden of
England Rose Restore massage,
� for 50 minutes. It uses
salon-only products, layering
on oils that truly smell like fresh
picked blooms.
The therapist Gemma (do ask
for her) was excellent. A skilled
masseur who tackled knots and
tension with confidence and
care, she also did a manicure,
which has lasted weeks (tip: go
nude, go one coat).
The rooms are country
chic, very quirky and cool.
There are luxe sheets and they
are big on super-size showers
and baths.
To really immerse yourself in
nature, book the Rosemary
Verey Suite, which has its own
conservatory, or the Potting
Barnsley House offers a natural spa
treatment is big on massage,
with stimulating ?stretches?
and energetic Kobido
movements. For stressed
out skin, Darphin has launched
the soothing, plumping,
nourishing (and divine
smelling) Vetiver Stress Relief
Detox Oil Mask, �, and
Vetiver Essential Oil Elixir, �.
decleor.co.uk; darphin.co.uk
PARIS IN SPRING
If you can?t get there,
Atelier Cologne?s super
chic Bois Montmartre
candle is an olfactory ode
to the city. Think effervescent
petitgrain and pink pepper
on a sultry cedar wood base;
available for � each from
ateliercologne.com
3
4
***
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
THE HOT LIST
E A R LY S U M M E R
C E L E B R AT I O N S
FIVE
STAR
What better way to salute the season than with a cultural festival that
makes the most of the great outdoors? Chris Leadbeater takes his pick
Could there be anything more
gloriously incongruous than a festival
pinned firmly to Mexican folklore
being held in the American Rockies?
That the Colorado capital Denver has
a Cinco de Mayo bonanza
(cincodemayodenver.com; May 5-6) is
remarkable. That this year?s is the
32nd edition is a reason to be cheerful.
Who doesn?t love a mariachi band?
ALL
ABOUT
ANTHONY
Why spend one weekend at a summery cultural festival when you can
make a whole month of it? That?s the judicious opinion of the Portuguese
capital Lisbon, which devotes the entirety of June to its patron holy
fellow St Anthony. How? Via an extravaganza of parades and theatre
events, the sound of jazz and fado in the streets, and the devouring of
roasted sardines with basil (lisboanarua.com/festasdelisboa).
BERLIN
IN MAY
Never look for anything less than pragmatism from
our good friends in Germany. They could hold the big
Karneval der Kulturen (karneval-berlin.de) ? with its
noisy street parties and around one million visitors ? in the
traditional carnival month, February. But Berlin is as
cold as a polar bear?s toothbrush in February, so that
would be a miserable idea. Better to host a four-day
blow-out on May 18-21 instead. Clever thinking.
SHERRY
MERRY
I?M
SPARTACUS
What makes a cultural festival g
go with
a swing? Flamboyant costumes? All
dan
right, go on then. Flamenco dancing?
That would be nice. Sherry? Oh yyes, now
we?re talking. So it?s buenos dias Spain,
and hola to the annual Seville F
Fair
(April 15-21; visitasevilla.es/en/h
visitasevilla.es/en/history/
a these
feria-de-abril), which revels in all
latt
things ? but particularly the latter.
TAKE
THE
TOURS
CALIFORNIA
GLEAMING
FIRED UP
France is such an expert at
sipping wine that it can do
it爓ith its eyes shut while
riding a unicycle backwards
up Mont Blanc. Still, that
won?t be necessary at the Viti
Loire festival (vitiloire.tours.
fr), which, held in Tours, will
honour the best plonk and
produce of the Loire
Valley via cycle rides
and food stalls,
on爐he weekend
of燤ay 27-28.
id-point, too, not least
Spain serenades summer?s mid-point,
a, which marks the
in the Galician city La Coru馻,
arrival of John the Baptist?s feast day in just the
uld want ? by piling
way any biblical prophet would
ts beaches, and
hills of discarded wood onto its
a frenzy (nights of
torching them in a pyromania
n.com). Health and
June 23-24; hoguerassanjuan.com).
ivolity? In spades.
safety? Not much. Fun and frivolity?
San Francisco cannot compete with New Orleans for
pre-Easter weather, so doesn?t try, instead staging its
main Mardi Gras-esque moment once the Bay Area has
heated up. This year?s Carnaval San Francisco (May
26-27) will be the event?s 40th edition. Expect sequins,
street food, and sunshine (carnavalsanfrancisco.org).
FLAME
GAMES
The summer solstice is also a flammable affair in the Austrian Tyrol,
where the ski zone Tiroler Zugspitz Arena gets as far as it can from its
winter image every June 23 by building some 8,000 bonfires on the
hillsides ? many of them crafted as elaborate mythological symbols
? and setting the night ablaze (zugspitzarena.com/en/news-events).
FLOUR
POWER
EVA LONGORIA; ELLEN DEGENERES; JEREMY CLARKSON; ANTHONY BOURDAIN; MARIAH CAREY/INSTAGRAM; GETTY IMAGES; ALAMY
France will also cast off its (chic and quite expensive, actually) winter coat
in the next few weeks. And what will it replace it with? Yes, leather tunics,
chainmail and some sort of warpaint. Obviously. The Great Roman Games
(arenes-nimes.com) will take over the ancient amphitheatre in N頼es from
April 28 for three days of chariot racing, gladiator battles and swarthy
men acting out their Russell Crowe fantasies.
HOT SPOTS
Where in the world is everyone this week? Compiled by Soo Kim
ELLEN
DEGENERES
ON THE BEACH
EVA LONGORIA
MIAMI
The American actress of
Desperate Housewives fame
put her feet up. For our
expert guide to Miami,
see爐elegraph.co.uk/
miami-travel-guide
The comedian
and television
host, who
recently
celebrated her
60th birthday,
enjoyed a break
by the sea with
her wife, Portia
de Rossi. For our
experts? pick
of爐he world?s
most fabulous
beaches, see
telegraph.co.uk/
worlds-bestbeaches
JEREMY CLARKSON
SWEDEN
The presenter of The Grand
Tour tackled a snowy road
in a Lamborghini. For more
great European road trips,
see telegraph.co.uk/
best-european-road-trips
ANTHONY
BOURDAIN
TEXAS
The chef and
television host
appreciated the
installation work
of minimalist
artist Donald
Judd in Marfa.
Discover more
about the Texan
town at
telegraph.co.uk/
marfa-texasdonald-judd
MARIAH CAREY
CALIFORNIA
The American singer was
in celebratory mood at
Disneyland. For some great
family holidays to take this
year, see telegraph.co.uk/
family-holidays-for-2018
5
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
***
COVER STORY
CREATIVE
AND COOL
Bikes and bridges
in Jordaan, right;
the Rijksmuseum,
left; Semyon
Bychkov, inset,
conducts
the燫oyal
Concertgebouw
Orchestra
The dawn of a new
Golden Age in
the city of canals
The new train link to
Amsterdam brings this
hub of artistic creativity
within easier reach. Go
soon, says Rodney Bolt
C
anals lined with
decorative gabled
houses; cosy woodpanelled caf閟, flowers
bursting from buckets
on street corners,
boats gently gliding on
the waterways, flocks
of cyclists and a famously easy-going
populace all help create Amsterdam?s
allure. But while it may be one of
Europe?s most visually and
temperamentally charming cities, it is
also one of the most culturally rich. Its
artistic abundance ? painting,
architecture and photography; opera,
music, dance and a thriving
contemporary arts scene ? make an
alchemical mix that only deepens the
appeal. With a direct rail connection at
last in place, now is the time to explore
Amsterdam in depth ? you may find it
even rivals Paris.
The Old Masters from Holland?s
17th-century Golden Age are the
mainstay of its artistic heritage, of
course. You will find dozens of these
paintings with their extraordinarily
beautiful and poignant insights into
the everyday life of the time, not
only爄n the Rijksmuseum
(rijksmuseum.nl) but in the
richly stocked Amsterdam
Museum (Amsterdam
museum.nl), and several
historic canalside mansions.
Many of these, such as the
splendid yet still somehow
domestic Museum Van Loon
(museumvanloon.nl), are open
to the public. And it?s not just art
that dazzles in the Rijksmuseum.
The collection takes you on a
journey far beyond grand old
paintings, via exquisite artefacts in
its Asian Pavilion to ornate 17thcentury dolls? houses.
Across the way, the Van Gogh
Museum (vangoghmuseum.nl)
shows more of the tortured artist?s
brilliant and most memorable
paintings than anywhere else in the
world, and next door to that, the
Stedelijk (stedelijk.nl) not only has a
strong and varied collection of
modern art (especially Malevich,
Mondrian and De Stijl) but also
houses some prime 20th and 21stcentury design.
The Stedelijk?s changing exhibitions
inspire, challenge and sometimes
bewilder with work from the very
forefront of contemporary art� as do a
host of smaller galleries, many in the
Jordaan quarter of town.
In these days of rising rents, many
a
artists
have decamped to
B
Berlin,
and more
r
recently
Lisbon, but
A
Amsterdam
still has
a vigorous art scene.
R
Regular
?Open
Atelier? weekends
in different
n
neighbourh
hoods
open
s
studio
doors to
y
you,
for
o
one-to-one
c
chats
with
a
artists
a
about
their
GETTY IMAGES; REUTERS; BLOOMBERG
6
work. Photography is hottest of all in
Amsterdam at the moment. For many
visitors to town, the FOAM Museum of
Photography (foam.org) tops the list of
must-sees, for its shows uncovering
lesser-known historical corners of the
art, for blockbuster exhibitions of
famous photographers and intriguing
new work. Huis Marseille
(huismarseille.nl) not only comes up
with exhibitions of engaging and
challenging contemporary work, but
is housed in two monumental canal
houses, one with a fine 18th-century
ceiling painting.
The Amsterdam City Archive
(amsterdam.nl/stadsarchief) adds a
warming dash of nostalgia with
frequent shows of old photos from its
The Stedelijk?s
changing
exhibitions
inspire, challenge
and bewilder
huge collection, and the Unseen
Amsterdam festival (unseen
amsterdam.com) brings the very
latest爌hotography from all over the
world to town each September.
Unseen marks the tail end of a busy
summer festival programme, with
such offerings as the annual Holland
Festival (hollandfestival.nl; the
Netherlands? answer to Edinburgh),
followed by Julidans ( julidans.nl;
international contemporary dance)
and De Parade (deparade.nl; zanier,
more circus-like fare), along with
many more.
The new kid on the block is rapidly
becoming the most popular: each
October, Amsterdam Dance Event
(amsterdam-dance-event.nl), billed as
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
IN THE BAG
MEN?S
TRAVEL燬ET
SWEATER
Make sure you?re
canal cruise-ready
by slipping into one
of WYSE London?s
star-spangled
cashmere knits.
�0; wyse
london.co.uk
Cannabis is the
buzzword on every
dermatologist?s lips.
We suggest slathering
the stuff on rather
than smoking it. Try
Perricone MD?s CBx
for Men travel set.
�; perriconemd.
co.uk
HELMET
VAN GOGH BOOK
Crushability isn?t
what most look for in
protective wear, but
Closca?s packable
helmet will keep you
safe while pootling
about the city?s
narrow streets.
�0; opumo.com
IF YOU ONLY HAVE A DAY, DO THIS?
Cram in the cultural must-sees and end with dinner (going Dutch optional)
�Book an as-the-doorsopen ticket for the Van
Gogh Museum online
(no point wasting time
in queues). Ration
yourself to an hour
with爕our favourite
paintings, then walk
to爐he Rijksmuseum,
where you can see the
cr鑝e de la cr鑝e of the
Old Masters in the
Gallery of Honour. Grab
a quick coffee in the
caf� beneath the giant,
bathtub-like extension
of the Stedelijk across
the square, before
dropping inside to
explore contemporary
art. Try to squeeze in a
little time in the design
galleries, then hop on a
tram direct to Centraal
Station, and a (free)
ferry across the IJ
behind it, to the EYE
Film Institute. The
museum?s hip waterside
caf� is the place for
lunch, before visiting
whatever exhibition is
on and the Panorama
downstairs, where
you燾an view snippets
of爁ilms from
the燾ollection.
�After lunch comes
what is perhaps
Amsterdam?s greatest
delight, a stroll along
the historic canals,
taking in a little Golden
Age architectural
grandeur. Herengracht,
Keizersgracht and
Prinsengracht are
the爇ey canals, and
Reguliersgracht, which
cuts across them,
provides alluring views.
On Keizersgracht, you
might like to stop off at
Museum Van Loon to
view its period interiors
and garden, or for a fine
show at FOAM Museum
of Photography. Or
perhaps head west
to爐he Jordaan
quarter, to爀xplore
private galleries of
contemporary art.
�Dinner is in The
Duchess (the-duchess.
com), the former
counting house of a
bank. The restaurant is
in the centre of town,
which means it isn?t far
to travel to a concert at
the Concertgebouw, or
a performance at De
Nationale Opera and
Ballet. Round off the
day with a nightcap at
Caf� Welling (cafe
welling.nl), a musician?s
favourite behind the
Concertgebouw.
the world?s biggest club festival for
electronic music, brings more than
2,000 artists, DJs and other musicians
from around the globe, along with
thousands more clubbers, for day and
night events all over town. Somewhat
more sedate, but with just as much
cultural clout, is the International
Documentary Film Festival
Amsterdam (idfa.nl) in November, one
of the leading events of its kind.
Of course, fine music and groundbreaking performance are not
confined to the festival months.
Amsterdam has impressive cultural
fixtures. The Royal Concertgebouw
Orchestra (concertgebouworkest.nl)
justifiably has a reputation for being
one of the best there is, and is
particularly renowned for
interpretations of Mahler.
The superb acoustics of the historic
Concertgebouw (concertgebouw.nl)
makes it a favourite among visiting
musicians, bringing the cream to
Amsterdam. The Dutch National Opera
(operaballet.nl) is known for topquality adventurous productions,
where budgets are fruitfully spread,
rather than being channelled towards
one or two soloists.
And though it has
shed its cosy,
scuffed venue for a
new home with
perhaps less
atmosphere, the
BIMhuis (bimhuis.
nl) continues to
draw jazz and
improvised music
aficionados, as it has
Brush up on your Dutch art
history before visiting
Vincent Van Gogh?s
eponymous museum.
Loving燰incent is an
animated燽iopic featuring
65,000 hand-painted frames.
�99; download on iTunes
ESSENTIALS
EUROSTAR?S
NEW SERVICE
Eurostar?s
non-stop services
from London to
Rotterdam (3爃r
1爉in) and
Amsterdam (3爃r
41爉in) begin on
Wednesday with
two trains a day
departing at 08.31
and 17.31. Fares
start at �
return. Until
passport
protocols are
agreed, returning
passengers will
have to change in
Brussels for
immigration and
security
screening. There
are also dozens of
air services to the
city from London
and regional
airports. Search
for fares and
routes via
skyscanner.net.
MORE
INFORMATION
Rodney Bolt?s
guide to the city?s
sights, hotels and
restaurants is at
telegraph.co.uk/
tt-amsterdam
guide. The tourist
information site
is iamsterdam.
com.
THE GOLDEN
AGE ON SHOW
IN BRITAIN
Many wealthy
collectors bought
paintings from
the Dutch
Golden燗ge for
stately homes in
Britain. A new
exhibition of
such爉ajor
works, now
owned by the
National Trust,
will run at Bath?s
Holburne
Museum from
May 25 to Sept 16
(holburne.org).
done for decades. From time to time,
Amsterdam has also experienced rich
periods of intense architectural
creativity. Another is happening now:
witness the exhilarating aerodynamic
zigzag of the EYE film museum
(eyefilm.nl), across the water behind
Centraal Station. The museum houses
a wide-ranging collection of
sometimes extremely rare films,
dating back to the 19th century.
Other outbreaks of bravura modern
architecture can be found in the
former Eastern Docklands nearby, and
among the bigger-than-you company
headquarters buildings in the Zuidas
district, south of the city centre. Of
course, the Golden Age boom, which
gave Amsterdam its main canals,
provides the city with its most august
architectural heritage, but quirkier
moments from the past ? such as the
undulating, almost Gaud�-esque
buildings of the architects of the early
20th-century Amsterdam School ? can
be even more rewarding. You?ll find
prime examples in the Rivierenbuurt,
south of the centre, and
Scheepvaartbuurt to the west.
Dancing until dawn, puzzling over a
curious installation, listening to a top
string quartet, or standing quietly
before a Vermeer: hopefully your
appetite for Amsterdam has been
whetted. In which case, before you go,
you may like to peruse our selection of
the city?s best caf閟 and restaurants ?
see panel on page 9 ? the foodie vibe is
as resurgent and as culturally rich as
the arts scene.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 8 J
7
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
***
COVER STORY
GREAT DAY TRIPS
LEIDEN
Four hundred years
ago, the moated city of
Leiden was wealthier
and more powerful
than Amsterdam, and
the legacy of its
thriving cloth trade is
a succession of
picturesque canal-side
streets lined with
17th-century
mansions, gothic
churches, excellent
museums and the
historic botanical
gardens ? the Hortus
Botanicus. Leiden is
also a university town
full of students on
bicycles.
NEW
MASTERS
Modern works
and art books
line the walls at
Hotel Pulitzer
THE HAGUE
Home to the
government and the
Mauritshuis museum,
one of the most
perfect small-scale
museums in the world
containing artistic
jewels from
Rembrandt, Vermeer
(Girl with a Pearl
Earring) and
Fabritius.
HAARLEM
Just 15 minutes by
train from Centraal
Station, Haarlem has a
cosy, almost provincial
air, yet爌acks engaging
museums, friendly
caf閟 and a muchpainted church within
its comfortably
walkable extent. Don?t
miss the Grote Markt
(Market Square), Grote
Kerk church and the
hofjes ? secluded
almshouse courtyards
dating from爐he 15th
century爋nwards.
GETTY IMAGES
8
J CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7
Downstairs there?s a Guerlain spa, and
a pool. To top it off, the Librije?s Zusje
restaurant boasts two Michelin stars.
WHERE TO STAY
7
Contemporary class
with a nod to the past
1
HOTEL
TWENTYSEVEN
Rooms from �3
telegraph.co.uk/
tt-hoteltwentyseven
There are just 16 super-exclusive suites
on the floors above Amsterdam?s most
august private club, in a building that
dates back to 1916. From the backlit,
onyx reception area to the satin scatter
cushions on the beds, everywhere is
sumptuously decorated. If there is an
opposite to Dutch Minimalism, this is
it. Each suite is assigned a butler, and
the quietly polite, effortlessly helpful
staff really do give you the feeling that
for once the claim that ?everything is
possible? is not a false one. There?s also
a top-notch bar and restaurant.
2
THE DYLAN
Rooms from �5
telegraph.co.uk/tt-thedylan
Intimate and detached from city
bustle, the Dylan comprises 40 rooms,
spread through two historic canalside
buildings. Guests enter via a 17thcentury arch and across a courtyard,
which help create the exclusive
atmosphere. Inside, old-world
elegance sets the base note with
exuberant contemporary flourishes.
All rooms are individually styled and
some have canal views. There?s also an
excellent choice of restaurants,
including Michelin-starred Vinkeles.
The hotel attracts honeymooners and
the occasional film star.
3
HOTEL ESTHEREA
Rooms from �2
telegraph.co.uk/tt-estherea
Old Amsterdam meets opera-set
bordello. Fake cherry blossom, real
orchids, patterns on every fabric and
crystal chandeliers with frilly shades,
fill three adjoining canal houses.
Rooms vary in size and d閏or but most
feature bold wallpaper, comfy sofas or
armchairs and quirky references.
There?s no restaurant but breakfast is
lavish, with smoothies, cakes, and
salads alongside the usual fare. The
hotel is in the heart of the Negen
Straatjes: the Nine Little Streets, a hip
shopping, caf� and restaurant quarter.
4
KAMER 01
Rooms from �2
telegraph.co.uk/tt-kamer01
This canal house dating from 1585 has
been renovated with flair; the owner
was an interior designer for 25 years.
Original features are enlivened by bold
colours and inviting fabrics. Designer
classics (Le Corbusier sofas in the
bedrooms) rub cheeks with antiques.
But there is a sense of home; a place
where you can feel like a personal
guest. The champagne breakfast uses
mostly organic, local ingredients. Even
the sparkling wine is Dutch ? and good.
5
BIRD
(Zeedijk 77; thaibird.nl) Crush up at
the window counter or grab one of the
handful of small tables for tangy Thai
food, cooked while you wait. �
BOUGAINVILLE
(Dam 27; restaurant
bougainville.com)
At燾onvivial
round爐ables, you
will爏uccumb to a
succession爋f delicate,
finely tuned dishes.
Local products and
WALDORF
ASTORIA
AMSTERDAM
Rooms from �3
telegraph.co.uk/
tt-waldorfastoriaamsterdam
Period pieces remain including
Rococo licks and curls and 17thcentury ceiling paintings. Parts reach
museum perfection, such as the
Maurer Room, a dining suite with
18th-century wall-paintings and its
interior entirely intact. Then comes an
elegant newer layer, where the style is
contemporary, but the tone
maintained: modern Murano glass
lamps and chandeliers; blues and
cream colours that give a calm, muted
touch; stylish staff uniforms by one of
Holland?s hottest designers.
Rooms from �3
telegraph.co.uk/tt-hotelpulitzer
Running through 25 buildings,
between two major canals, this is a
delightful warren of passages,
stairways, sudden open spaces, with
many an original feature intact, but
with a fresh, contemporary feel. Prints
and paintings from the hotel?s
extensive modern art collection
decorate the walls. Many
rooms have fine canal views,
AUGUST
and all come with a potted
INTERIOR
history of whichever canal
Hotel
house you find yourself in.
Twentyseven
Pulitzer?s Bar is a city
features a
institution and serves good
top-notch bar
wines and classic cocktails.
Plating up the best
of Amsterdam
CITY CENTRE
Rooms from �4
telegraph.co.uk/tt-thetoren
HOTEL PULITZER
WHERE TO EAT
Rodney Bolt picks 15 of his favourite
Amsterdam restaurants and caf閟. Price
guide, per person for a three-course
evening meal without wine: � ? below
�; # ? � to �; #� ? over �.
6
unalloyed natural flavours
predominate. #�
THE DUCHESS
(Spuistraat 172; the-duchess.com) The
talk-of-the-town since it opened in
2015, as much for the space and
sumptuous d閏or as for the cuisine
(everything from foie gras-filled
doughnuts to beef Wellington,
pictured right). #�
GREETJE
(Peperstraat 23; restaurant
greetje.nl) The best of
Dutch cooking ? pure
ingredients and
forgotten flavours,
with a twist. #
DE LAATSTE
KRUIMEL
(Langebrugsteeg 4;
THE TOREN
de is
delaatstekruimel.nl) Homemade
trending in Amsterdam right
now,燼nd燚e Laatste Kruimel?ss
forest-fruit bread puddings,
d
dangerous chocolate cake and
scones (with homemade jam,
m)
of course, and lashes of cream)
top the lot. �
THE LOBBY
(Nes 49; thelobbynesplein.
nl) At once hip and cosy.
Dishes are hearty, healthy
and superbly done. �-#
MUSEUM AND DE
PIJP DISTRICTS
ARC
(Amsteldijk 67; arc.amsterdam)
Named燼fter the former city archive
in which it is housed, ARC is sleek
and quietly contemporary and the
cuisine is ? literally and
metaphorically ? spectacular. #�
AUBERGE JEAN & MARIE
(Albert Cuypstraat 58-60;
aubergeamsterdam.nl) Offers
traditional French cuisine,
superb爓ines, a relaxing atmosphere
and pleasant service, and at
a爎easonable price. #
A key motif
refers to
the patron
who hired
out his sofa
and gave
guests the
key to his
front door
Luscious fabrics, rich colours, soft
chairs, dark carved wood, subtle
lighting and chandeliers. Mysterious
and womblike, The Toren is set in a
couple of grand canal houses, and
seems to suck you back into another
world the moment you arrive. Here
and there original features remain: a
painted ceiling, carved wainscoting,
stucco moulding. There are zany
touches, too: crocodile-skin and faux
corrugated-zinc wallpaper alongside
the flock and damask. The lush d閏or
infiltrates the rooms, as do the period
touches: a four-poster bed, perhaps,
gilded ceilings, or an Empire-style
writing desk.
8
UTRECHT
Locals have it that
?Amsterdam was built
by man, Utrecht by
God himself ?. The old
centre seems to bear
that out: spruce and
stately, low-key and
romantic, with two
long canals, a network
of side streets, and the
gothic tower of the
Dom (cathedral) to
navigate by. Museum
Catharijneconvent
(catharijneconvent.nl)
has beautiful medieval
manuscripts and
religious art as well as
paintings by the likes
of燫embrandt
and燬aenredam.
DE HOGE VELUWE/
KR諰LER-M躄LER
MUSEUM
Helene M黮ler loved
art. Her husband,
Anton Kr鰈ler loved
nature. De Hoge
Veluwe National Park
(hogeveluwe.nl)
sprawls through acres
of dunes and forest.
The Kr鰈ler-M黮ler
Museum
(krollermuller.nl) has
a sculpture garden
that is a hit with
children.
Nick Trend and
Rodney燘olt
atmosphere. A running key motif
references the original Mr Jordaan, the
hotel?s founder who, five decades ago
? in a move prescient of Airbnb ?
began to hire out his sofa to guests,
giving them the key to his front door.
The venture evolved and expanded,
but there?s still a very individual mood,
an air of someplace different.
10
MISC
EATDRINKSLEEP
Rooms from �6
telegraph.co.uk/
tt-misceatdrinksleep
A touch of the quirkier side of
Amsterdam. Misc is in a small 17thcentury canal house, has pleasingly
KIMPTON
DE WITT
Rooms from �7
telegraph.co.uk/tt-kimptondewitt
An Eighties building envelopes two
17th-century houses like a giant snail
shell. Inside, Ave Bradley?s soothing
design ? soft blues and greys,
minimalist clarity offset by eyecatching contemporary artworks and
intriguing furniture ? creates a pool of
calm. Here and there a period touch
(old beams, a flash of stained glass)
from one of the older buildings
remains, and local references (Delft
colouring, work by Dutch artists)
abound. The 5pm Wine Hour (offering
free wine and snacks) becomes
genuinely relaxed and chatty, and
there are some fine teas at the all-day,
free, tea bar. Classy VanMoof bicycles
are also complimentary.
9
MR JORDAAN
Rooms from �
telegraph.co.uk/tt-mrjordaan
Hip yet homely. Two canal houses are
given a touch of boutique-hotel style
(bare brick walls, Sixties/Seventies
retro designer chairs, contemporary
lamps) while retaining a welcoming
warm
warmth, created by soft hues of olive,
grey aand brown, and a relaxed, cheery
CIEL BLEU
(Hote Okura, Ferdinand Bolstraat
(Hotel
333; okura.nl). Wunderkind Onno
K
Ko
Kokmeijer, who picked up two
M
Michelin
stars in quick succession
in his early 30s, comes up with
delightfully
wayward creations
d
on
o the 23rd floor of one of the
tallest buildings in town. #�
COUSCOUS CLUB
(Ceintuurbaan 346;
couscousclub.nl) Just couscous,
and only three types to choose
from, but made with fine
ingredients, in the traditional
m
manner (with the couscous being
steamed over the bubbling vegetable
steam
stock), and served in convivial
surrounds. �
LA FALOTE
(Roelof Hartstraat 26; lafalote.nl)
Traditional Dutch ambience and
food� the cooking comes from an
earlier generation: pots of mussels,
cooked ham and mustard, steak with
tomato and melted cheese, North Sea
prawn cocktail. �
MAMOUCHE
(Quellijnstraat 104; mamouche.
restaurant) One of the first restaurants
EXCLUSIVE
SPACE
The historic
Dylan features
an intimate
courtyard
dotty individually decorated
rooms, and friendly owners
who can give great advice about what?s
on around town. Six rooms range from
cool contemporary d閏or by Dutch
designer Thijs Bakker, through to
gloriously campy neo-Baroque,
complete with chandelier and
canopied bed ? with a touch of Africa
and Asian temple-kitsch along the
way. The rooms are equipped to a
degree not usually found in this price
range, with a Nespresso machine,
complimentary non-alcoholic drinks
and fresh flower arrangements.
For more of the best hotels in
Amsterdam, see: telegraph.co.uk/
tt-amsterdamhotels
to begin propelling De Pijp
neighbourhood towards foodie
heaven, Mamouche produces refined
Moroccan cuisine. #
RIJKS
(Rijksmuseum ? separate entrance,
behind the museum, Museumstraat 2;
rijksrestaurant.nl). Star chef Joris
Bijdendijk, still in his 20s, has shot
across town from Bridges restaurant to
glitter in a new setting ? beneath the
Netherlands? national museum,
Rijksmuseum. Food pictured bottom
left. #-#�
SINNE
(Ceintuurbaan 342; restaurantsinne.nl)
Unpretentious, unfussy atmosphere.
All energies hone in on the food:
dishes are exquisitely presented, and
the price tag is nowhere near as big as
you might expect. �
WINK
(Govert Flinckstraat 326HS, 1073 CJ;
bijwink.nl) A tiny kitchen with a
serving hatch, but the food propels
things to a different level altogether.
Menus change whenever chef
Natasja stops enjoying cooking
a燿ish� a perfect recommendation
for a restaurant. Prices: #
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
9
10
***
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
FIRST PERSON
NEED TO KNOW
GETTING
AIRBORNE
only a flat space
about the size of
a tennis court.
The Helipaddy
app lists more
than 10,000
places to land,
from a boutique
hotel in Scotland
to ch鈚eaux in
France and an
iconic hotel in
Norway (see
panel, left).
Helisafari
organises
multi-day
helicopter tours
of large
geographical
areas. So far
we?ve travelled
on group trips the length and breadth of
Scotland, Scandinavia and Africa, to places you
could never hope to reach by car, train or foot.
Of course, travelling by helicopter is far from
cheap but in some instances it can cost less than
a first-class flight. Fuel costs about �0 per hour
in an R44 four-seater, which can be split four
ways. Both businesses have carried myself and
Paddy on the most incredible adventures. The
greatest was on our honeymoon, during a flight
from Crete to Cape Town. We were dual-piloting
a helicopter alongside a convoy of pre-Second
World War biplanes recreating an Imperial
Airways route. It was certainly not everyone?s
idea of a romantic getaway, but the private tour
group needed a helicopter escort and we thought
it a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I had to pinch
myself gliding over Egypt and down through
Sudan in 104F (40C) heat with a flock of ancient
aircraft humming alongside us like a flock of
ducks. But it all went wrong at Ethiopia?s
Gambela Airport when we stopped to refuel.
Armed police became aggressive, shouting and
locking all 50 of us in a small room following a
dispute over landing permissions. They couldn?t
believe the entourage that had landed and
thought we were spies, troublemakers or insane.
We stayed there for three days, sleeping on the
floor with nothing to eat but eggs bartered for
with our guards. Eventually someone found a
loose door and snuck out to grab a mobile phone
from one of the aircraft. Someone in the group
was best friends with the wife of former US
secretary of state John Kerry. A call was swiftly
put through and we were soon sent on our way.
Our touring helicopter safaris are far less
dramatic, although weather always plays a part.
On a recent four-helicopter tour to the ski resort
of Meg鑦e in France, it was apparent from
forecasts that the weather ahead was becoming
unfavourable. We had to plot a 1,000-mile detour
to Scandinavia instead, ending up in a restaurant
called Smakbyn on a group of islands between
Finland and Sweden. There we feasted on Nordic
crayfish, goats cheese and heritage tomatoes.
From there, we flew to the Dutch island of
ILLUSTRATION: TOM MCGUINNESS FOR THE TELEGRAPH
Full access to the
Helipaddy app
(helipaddy.com)
costs �.99
per爕ear.
�
Destinations
with Helisafari
(helisafari.com)
include Scotland,
Croatia,
Morocco and
Scandinavia.
Booking: �0.
�
HQ Aviation
(hqaviation.com)
at Denham
Aerodrome has
information on
lessons. A private
pilot?s licence
costs from
�,000 and the
Civil Aviation
Authority
requires a
minimum flight
time of 45 hours.
�
Once qualified,
you could fly to:
Knockinaam
Lodge, southwest Scotland
(3爃r 45 min from
London); Ch鈚eau
La Cheneviere,
Normandy (1 hr
20 min); Juvet
Landscape Hotel,
west Norway
(9爃r); St Mark?s
Square, Venice
(5爃r); or Ch鈚eau
de Chailly, France
(2 hr 45 min).
I FOUND PEACE IN THE SKIES
The day my new life truly
took off? in a helicopter
Reeling from a divorce, Sarah Chenevix-Trench
decided to conquer her fear of flying in the most
radical way possible. She has never looked back
M
y hatred of flying was
well爇nown for years. The
thought of getting into
an燼luminium tube,
sidestepping into Row 28
and hurtling through the air
at the mercy of an unknown
pilot is one I?ve long found
deeply unnerving. I?d grin and bear it for the
sake of family holidays, but I?d never dreamed of
setting foot in a helicopter or light aircraft.
So it was, to put it mildly, a moment of extreme
inner turmoil and desperation that drove me to
Denham Aerodrome in Buckinghamshire one
bright spring morning six years ago, aged 50.
My husband of 26 years and the father of our
three children had separated from me and our
marriage had fallen apart. After finalising the
divorce, and with our children grown up and
installed at boarding school or university, I found
myself alone with only the dog for company.
There were two options: spend a fortune on a
psychotherapist (I tried it but it wasn?t for me) or
do something so out of my comfort zone that I?d
be forced from the dark recesses of self-analysis
and distracted from my impending personal
crisis. Learning to fly appeared to be the solution,
unorthodox though it sounds.
My father piloted Spitfires during the Second
World War and I had fond early memories of
aerodromes, men in uniform and oily rags. So
though terrifying, bizarre and ? to friends and
family ? wholly bonkers, my decision to get a
helicopter pilot?s licence felt exhilarating,
liberating and strangely grounding. Proving I?d
so dramatically moved on was an added bonus.
What I could never have realised when I
climbed into that Robinson R44 ? a light
four-seater helicopter ? for the first time was
how drastically it would change my life. I can still
recall the extraordinary sense of weightlessness
on taking off and freedom as we breezed over
fields, hedgerows and houses. Seeing everything
from above was empowering. I was hooked.
Learning to hover a helicopter, one of the first
things you?re taught at flying school, is a
mindfulness exercise more powerful than all the
books and meditation clips you could ever read
or watch ? like trying to balance on a ball without
slipping off. All thoughts disappeared as I
focused on the job in hand. It was the best sort of
release as I realised how much more there was to
life. I also had to spend hours learning the
principles of flight for theory exams on aviation
law, navigation and the weather.
The airfield can be a place for unexpected
meetings. I?ve had an earnest discussion with the
actor Tom Cruise on the subject of turbine lag
while he was practising flight scenes for one of
the Mission Impossible films, which was surreal.
Just being in the hangar can mean you get asked
to give people lifts. Paddy (my new husband,
whom I married after bonding over heated
debates about aviation risk management!) has
flown Made In Chelsea?s Georgia ?Toff ? Toffolo
as a favour when they were stuck in traffic, and
I?ve flown to the home of Jay Kay of Jamiroquai.
A year after first stepping into a helicopter and
with 70 hours of flying time, I was awarded a
licence. Five years on, my life is unrecognisable.
I split my time between Holland Park in London
and Suffolk, where I live with Paddy. We own a
Robinson R44, bought second-hand for
�0,000 (although a smaller two-seater
Robinson R22 can cost as little as �,000, the
price of a Land Rover Discovery) and commute
back and forth. It?s opened up the world. I?ve
flown low over the Alps, above whales in the
Mediterranean and sharks in the Bahamas. If we
want to have lunch in Bruges, we do. At
weekends, we?ve had lunch in Suffolk, dinner in
Oxford then flown to Scotland for the day.
Together we?ve launched two companies�
Helipaddy and Helisafari ? with more in the
pipeline including a potential commuter shuttle
service from Dorset to London for those who
don?t want to drive on a Friday night.
Helipaddy was born around the kitchen table
in 2013 out of our frustration with outdated
information about heli-friendly destinations,
particularly hotels and restaurants. Having got
our licences, we wanted to know where we could
land. You don?t need an official helicopter pad,
I?ve had a discussion with
Tom Cruise about turbine
lag while he was practising
for Mission Impossible
Texel ? the location of the last European battle of
the Second World War ? and stayed at Hotel
Texel near the Slufter nature reserve. Each
morning we unfurled maps across the breakfast
table to debate where the wind might blow us
next. Part of the fun is the sense of camaraderie
and mission that develops. You have to be
flexible, unflappable and with a keen desire to
expand your horizons.
Of my three sons ? Harry, now 29, James, 26,
and Marcus, 24 ? the youngest two have got their
helicopter pilot licences, taking their lessons in
our helicopter which we lend for training to
Denham Aerodrome to help with costs. For us, it
has been the best money we?ve spent. A couple
of weekends ago, the boys woke up to blue skies
so flew from our home in Suffolk to the northwest Norfolk coastline with our terrier, Hovis,
and labradoodle, Tate, for a long walk on the
beach and lunch; we were back in time for tea.
The only downside, with so many pilots in the
family, is the back-seat flying, which can be
horrendous. Thankfully, there?s an isolator
switch that I can use to tune them out when it
becomes too much ? because, as I?ve learned,
there is nothing more peaceful than soaring
above the countryside.
As told to India Sturgis
ADVICE AND
INSPIRATION
FROM OUR EXPERTS
telegraph.co.uk/travel
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facebook.com/telegraphtravel
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The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
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Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
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KINDNESS OF STRANGERS
DINNER IS
ON ME
GETTY IMAGES
Trying out the
cuisine was on
the menu in the
Faroe Islands
Friendship without frontiers
You?re miles from home, you don?t speak the language and you?re lost. At precisely that point help arrives
in the most unexpected form. In the spirit of the season, our writers salute Good Samaritans worldwide
?The response to
vulnerability is
not to prey on it,
but to help?
Marcel Theroux
T
he remarkable thing
about random acts of
kindness is not how
rare they are, but how
frequent. The
well-advertised
possibilities of human
cruelty would make
you think that homo homini lupus is
the size of it: man is a wolf to man.
But wander the world and what do
you find? Strangers going out of their
way to give each other painstaking
directions. People lending each other
umbrellas, drivers thanking each other
by flashing their hazard lights.
If humans were the rational
maximisers of advantage that some
economists would have us believe,
rich people would never return from
poor countries alive. But, in general,
the human response to vulnerability is
not to prey on it, but to help. And very
often, it seems to me, generosity varies
inversely with the wealth of the giver.
My highlight reel of unexpected
kindnesses could quickly become the
length of the main feature: a Fijian
medical student who let me share half
his berth on a train from Darjeeling to
New Jalpaiguri that was so crowded I
would never have been able to board it
without his help. A Siberian trucker
who changed a flat tyre on my car in
Chukotka and waved off my offer of
assistance. ?It?s like drinking a cup of
It was as
though
Helen
Mirren had
invited a
stranger
around for
pie and
mash
tea for me,? he said. A Mongolian
noodle-seller who, in Ulaanbaatar,
gave me a bottle of home-made yak
vodka as a leaving爌resent.
But the current prize for going
beyond the call of duty I?m awarding
to a Faroese lady called Laura Joensen,
who invited me to lunch in her cosy,
turf-roofed house in Tjornuvik. She
didn?t know me from Adam, but I?d
bumped into her niece during a walk
on the blustery Faroese coast and
expressed an interest in traditional
Faroese food. I received a lunch
invitation for the following day.
Over lunch, I realised that Laura is
an actress and quite celebrated in her
homeland. It was rather as though
Helen Mirren had invited a total
stranger around for pie and mash. It
was an unforgettable meal ? and not
just because of Laura?s generosity. She
served fermented lamb that smelled
like blue cheese, whale meat, and a
sauce of sheep guts called garnatalg
that is served on wind-dried fish. She
was aware that some palates might
find the dishes a challenge. ?It?s
enough to say ?like? or ?not like?
without saying ?ugh?,? she said, with a
slight steeliness. The food was an
acquired taste, but the sense of
conviviality was universal.
Thank you, Laura.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 16 J
15
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
***
KINDNESS OF STRANGERS
A PROBLEM
SHARED
Help was found
on Isla del Sol
on Lake
Titicaca, Bolivia
J CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16
?It?s important to
pass on the
favour in your
own country?
Sophie Campbell
T
o the two Dutch women who
lent me money and let me ?
and a flea-bitten dog I?d
temporarily adopted ? share
their rented bed on a bitter night on
Isla del Sol, Lake Titicaca, Bolivia,
when I truly thought my travelling
companion was dead, thank you. (I did
pay them back and buy them dinner.)
To the Anglo-Russian couple I met
at Chekhov?s house near Moscow, who
insisted on inviting me to their dacha
where a relative took me swimming in
the green forest backwaters, thank
you. To the women on the same trip
who stopped me striding starkers into
a banya during the men?s? session,
thank you. And likewise, to the
Japanese guy who explained that the
tall chimney I had mistaken for a sento
(public bathhouse) in Kyushu was
actually a crematorium, thank you.
In travel, as in life, 85 per cent of
people you meet are very decent, 10
per cent go above and beyond, and
you just hope you don?t meet the other
five per cent. I?ve lost count of the
times that people have gone out of
their way to help: right now, for
instance, I?m in New York City and last
night got on a bus without validating
my MetroCard first. A woman not only
explained but got off the bus to help
me, risking missing her ride home.
Meanwhile, the driver waited for us.
That spontaneous generosity is
incredibly moving and often
impossible to pay back, except for a
heartfelt thank you at the time. It?s
frequently proffered by people who
have little to give, or who are busy, or
?You?re a travel
journalist?
Dearie爉e, aren?t
you having a bad
day?? she said
Chris Leadbeater
T
here are several things you
always need to hand as a travel
writer. A passport, a phone
and a credit card are essentials.
So is a sense of direction, and an
awareness of where you are on the
map. As is a grasp of how much petrol
you require to reach your next
YOUR STORIES
tired, and could pretend not to notice.
Such acts change how you feel about
a爌lace. It happens in this country, too.
On at least three occasions I?ve been
moved by women coming over to
commiserate and ask if they can help
while I?ve been blubbing on public
transport (usually about men).
Nevertheless, I?m haunted by a
bloke in San Pedro de Atacama, Chile,
who offered us a bed for the night and
then added: ?So, my son can stay with
you when he comes to Britain?? We
didn?t stay. Thinking back, I don?t
think it was fair: we didn?t know him,
hadn?t asked to stay, and these things
are spontaneous gestures, not deals.
Still, it made me realise how
important it is to pass on the favour in
your own country. Which I do. My
most recent success being a man from
the G?K Chesterton Society of
Barcelona (honestly) who was trying
unsuccessfully to find the author?s flat
on my road. I stopped to help. We
ended up not only finding it but being
shown around by its owners. He was
thrilled. I was thrilled. I think we?ll
both remember that, although we?ll
PICTURE THIS
destination ? and whether you already
have this in your tank. You tend to be
careful with these matters if you are
on, say, the back-roads of Uruguay.
But you might be more complacent
if you are exploring South Island of
New Zealand. Complacency was one of
my excuses at the February end of a
Kiwi summer. That, and a wanderlust
that meant that, after a mazy meander
down from Aoraki/Mount Cook
National Park to Queenstown, I was
seized by an impulse to carry on ? to
glimpse the sunset on the shore of
Lake Te Anau, 110 miles south-west.
Did I pause to think that this was a
round-trip of a fair length? Longer
than I had fuel for? Not really. The
sunset was superb, the lake serene,
and the only petrol station, shut. By
now, I was driving on fumes. This
presented two possibilities. A
continuation that would undoubtedly
see me rammed by a lorry in the
darkness, after conking out on the
road. Or a cold night in the seat of my
car waiting outside the petrol station.
Or maybe there was a third option.
Margaret. A grandmotherly figure,
wrapped in a thick coat, though the
evening was warm, she pulled up as I
was considering my fate. Did she know
when the station would reopen?
Tomorrow. Did she know where the
nearest alternative was. Yes, Limehills,
30 miles away. My face must have
Driving through
New Hampshire,
I stopped to take
photographs.
Continuing on, I
passed a fire
station. Then, I
heard a siren and
soon, a fire truck
filled the mirror.
I pulled over. So
did the
firefighters. One
of them handed
me the camera
that I?d left on the
car roof.
Martin Castellan
SEAT SWITCH
We were
grounded in New
York City, flew to
Atlanta the next
day and were put
on standby. We
were already a
day behind and
my friend was
going to miss an
exam if we didn?t
get the next
flight. Some
strangers gave up
their seats so we
could make it.
Victoria Borisch
SAFE SHELTER
While rowing
across the
Atlantic, we had
to stop in at
Lanzarote. A
woman following
us online
happened to be
visiting her
parents, came to
the marina and
lent us her
holiday home
annexe until we
could get our
rowing boat
working again.
Chris Shirley
SUNSET
SPECTACLE
A trip to see Lake
Te Anau in New
Zealand, right, led
to fuel problems
and a fortuitous
meeting
fallen here, as she mentioned the
canister of fuel for her lawnmower ?
mine, if I would pay her for it. I
opened my wallet to find nothing but
euros. No New Zealand dollars.
Margaret laughed; asked what I did
for a living. ?Travel journalist.? She
laughed again. ?Dearie me,? she added,
?Aren?t you having a bad day??
She would later explain that she had
a grandson travelling abroad; that she
hoped someone would extend the
same help if he was similarly stuck.
For, when she returned after five
minutes, she said I could have the
petrol. For free. She wouldn?t take the
euros. All she wanted was a copy of the
feature I was writing. And so we stood
in her garage ? me a man she had just
met, half her age and twice her height
? pouring her petrol into my hire car.
She even made me a cup of tea.
Of course, I ignored her wishes. The
next morning, I posted 40 dollars (�)
to her address, with a thank you card.
The following day?s email had a mildly
cross tone. A deal was a deal, she said.
The petrol was a gift; she had given the
cash to charity. I did at least keep to
the rest of the bargain. Six months
later, I posted a copy of my article.
Again, word came back. ?Nice piece,?
it said, ?but you seem to have omitted
some of your difficulties on the road.
Perhaps a list of gas stations would be
of use to your readers??
GETTY IMAGES
16
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
YOUR
STORIES
Have you ever been
touched by the kindness of
strangers on your travels?
Please write to
travelviews@
telegraph.co.uk
?The welcome,
the shared meal,
the reaching out
of two cultures?
Michelle Jana Chan
S
FORBIDDING
LANDSCAPE
A Tuareg tribesman
proved a lucky
charm for one
traveller stuck in
the desert, left
?He nodded
and爈eft us as
mysteriously as
he had appeared?
Peter Hughes
I
was on my way to Timbuktu
when I was the beneficiary of an
act of empathy almost mystical
in its surprise. The stranger
could hardly have been more strange,
nor, it turned out, could he have
been爇inder.
It was January 1971 and two of us
were attempting to drive across the
ome say Sana?a is the oldest
continuously inhabited city in
the world, founded by Shem,
son of Noah, and the origin of
all truly Arabic people. I entered the
Old Town by the throat-like archway
of Bab Al-Yaman, to wander between
the towering six or seven-storey
homes built a millennium ago in mud
with alabaster friezes in gypsum and
Koranic calligraphy embossed above
arched windows.
Along the narrow alleys there were
men manoeuvring wheelbarrows
laden with bales of wire and bolts of
cloth, children playing with spinning
tops and a woman carrying a Singer
sewing machine on her head. Fruit-
Sahara to the ancient desert city in
Mali. Fabled for 700 years, Timbuktu,
at the time of our journey, was known
chiefly for being among the remotest
places on Earth.
For four days we had driven south
through Algeria across a flat gravel
plain, following a track waymarked by
carcasses of dead sheep tossed from
trucks, battered fragments of
abandoned vehicles, rock cairns and
the occasional oil drum left by
the燜rench.
In Mali the road deteriorated. Broad
pools of sand as fine as cement powder
flooded across the track. Wheel marks
swooped to either side to skirt the
foot-deep ruts in the middle. We
SANA?A TO
SAVOUR
A chance meeting
led to an
enchanting
encounter in
Yemen, above
sellers were touting pomegranates,
pink mangoes and persimmons,
besides traders offering up
frankincense and myrrh.
Then a woman and I caught each
other?s eye, down from the mosque in
Harat Mansur. She spontaneously
asked me to lunch and I accepted, of
course. It is encounters such as these
that can become the most enchanting
of a trip; for me they are the greatest
reason to travel. It continues to
astonish me how often strangers reach
out this way.
Behind the closed doors of a home,
this was my first chance to see the
faces of the veiled women I had heard
were the most beautiful in the world.
Sa?ada, my impulsive host, was lovely:
a mother of four with olive eyes and a
flawless complexion. Her daughters
were pretty, too. But it was her servant
who was the kind of woman that men
go to war over: dark, polished skin, full
lips, a swaying walk. She could have
been a child of the Queen of Sheba,
said to have ruled Yemen a thousand
years ago.
A meal almost miraculously
appeared on the table. We tore apart
unleavened flat bread, dipping it into
saltah stew with fenugreek froth, pots
of soft, broad beans and a vegetable
ratatouille with peppers and tomatoes.
I remember the taste of aniseed,
fennel and cumin ? as Sa?ada urged me
to eat more, while showing me
pictures of her family, touching my
hair, holding my face in between her
hands like a prayer, even pinching me
in the ribs to say I hadn?t eaten
enough. Before I left, she gave me
grapes and sweet honey-cake and
Yemeni coffee made from qusr, the
husk, which is boiled with cinnamon
and cardamom.
The kindness of Sa?ada. Above all, it
was her welcome into her home; the
shared meal; the snatched
conversation; the reaching out of two
women across cultures ? that I will
always remember most about Yemen.
ploughed into one of these sand lakes,
hoping to power our way through.
Within 50 yards we were stuck.
Working in temperatures of more
than 86F (30C), we set about the
laborious routine to free ourselves.
First one side of the car was jacked up,
then the other, so sand could be dug
out from under it. We had strips of
chain link fencing to lay under the
wheels for grip. After two hours we
had moved the car six feet.
A Tuareg in blue robe and white
turban appeared from the desert.
He gestured that the easiest thing
would be to pick the car up and place
it on firm ground. We agreed and
suggested he helped. For a while he
WE SHOULD BE KIND
ON HOLIDAY, TOO
SHOW A
BIT OF
SENSITIVITY
婤e on sunburn
patrol. If you see
a fellow Briton
with爌inking
shoulders, let
them know and
offer them a
splodge of the
white stuff.
婭f you see a
group photo
being taken, offer
to take it so the
photographer
can be in it, too.
婭f you spot a
family on a plane
split up by the
randomness of
the seating
allocation, offer
to give up
your爏eat.
THINK OF
FRIENDS
BACK HOME
婼end that
postcard (below).
You can?t pin
a燱hatsapp
message to
a爁ridge. Keep
notes on special
places you?ve
visited so you can
advise friends
who might go
there later.
婤e sparing
with your social
media bragging.
BE KIND TO
LOCALS
婻emember that
many tourist
industries are
built on a tipping
culture. Chances
are your �is
worth a lot more
to your waiter
than it is to you,
just read up
on爓hat?s
appropriate
before you go.
婫ive locals the
benefit of the
doubt. Yes, they
might be trying
to sell you
something, but
they might just
want to chat or
practise English.
Greg Dickinson
did, but we only gained another nine
inches before the car sank to its
axles again.
Without a word, the Tuareg stepped
aside, knelt and abased his head in
prayer. When he returned, again
without speaking, he took a lanyard
from around his neck and presented it
to me. It had a small noose at one end
and a tassel at the other, and seemed to
have been spun from fine strands of
black goat leather. I touched my right
hand to my heart in thanks and placed
the lanyard over my head. The Tuareg
nodded and left us as mysteriously as
he had appeared. Minutes later a truck
arrived, the first we had seen, and its
crew pushed us free.
17
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Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
19
***
HOTELS
CRITICS?
CHOICE
Reid?s Palace Hotel,
Madeira, left; Fanny
Cradock with her
husband, Johnnie.
right; tea time at
the Berkeley,
below; Fiona
Duncan, bottom
In the footsteps
of Fanny, the
Bon Viveur
T
hough they are a little
hazy, some of my
earliest television
memories are of
Fanny Cradock. Now,
42 years after her
increasingly
eccentric 20-year
long television career came to an
abrupt end (when she was incredibly
rude to a cookery competition
winner), and 23 years after her death,
she?s popping up again for Easter.
Fanny Cradock Invites you to? A
Cheese and Wine Party (1970) is one of
50 classic cookery shows being served
up on BBC iPlayer this weekend.
Frankly, with the possible exception of
Keith Floyd, she makes her fellow
celebrity chefs (of which she was
surely the first) look positively mousy.
I will have to steel myself to watch
the old bird. To be honest, as a child I
was rather frightened of Fanny
Cradock. With her imperious manner,
heavily painted face, supercilious
pencilled eyebrows and coiffed hair,
she looked like a cross between Danny
La Rue and Edna Everage. I was
always faintly alarmed that she might
turn on her henpecked co-star,
husband Johnnie complete with
monocle and much-needed glass of
wine, and do his head in with a rolling
pin or a meat cleaver.
Of course, it was my mother, not
me, who cooked Fanny?s recipes in
those days. Like Fanny, she was a
product of the post-war era, a
housewife who loved entertaining,
though she had none off Fanny
Fanny?ss cruel
streak (abandoning her sons and
wice
marrying four times, twice
bigamously). I can see my
anny on
mother now, just like Fanny
d rustling
television, all pearls and
silk with her apron on, getting
ready for a buffet supperr or a
wine and cheese party for her
ry
neighbours. She was very
proud, in later life, that I
nd
became a travel writer and
hotel critic for The
Telegraph. It was her
ad
newspaper of choice, read
every day at breakfast.
What my mother didn?t
know ? and nor did I till
recently ? was that my
h
predecessor as Telegraph
hotel reviewer in those
decades was none
other than Fanny
Cradock, writing
as Bon Viveur.
Mum must have
read Fanny?s
columns and, I do
believe, taken
note of her
recommendations
when we went to
country hotels and on holidays abroad.
Fanny described how her Bon
Viveur columns, which carried
housewives from the dregs of
rationing to the brashness of
Thatcher?s Britain, came about. Evelyn
Garrett, then woman?s editor, asked if
she and Johnnie would like a few
weekend breaks in the country.
Fanny: (disbelievingly):
?Doing爓hat??
Evelyn: ?Now, don?t run away with
the idea this is something big. It?s
simply a series I think might hold up
for six weeks. We?d pay expenses, of
course. I want you to find out if there
is anything left that is worthwhile in
the inns of England.?
Fanny: ?What sort of anything??
Evelyn: ?A warm welcome,
honest爁are, integrity, Fanny, if it
still爏urvives.?
Almost 70 years on, that?s exactly
what I have been trying to find, too.
Trawling The Telegraph?s archives,
I燾an?t get enough of her forthright
columns. Like me, she loved hotels
and inns, including a number of the
same ones, and she loved travelling.
But she also cut to the chase and had
a way with word
words and a bruising
wit to which I can only aspire.
She pulled no punches on a
trip to Winch
Winchester in 1950: ?We
mau
slept in a mausoleum-like
bedroom plun
plunged in 25-watt
gloo The bed
Stygian gloom.
tapestry p
peeled, as did the
ceiling. T
The straw bulged
from the palliasse under
lim feather overlay.
our limp
d
The dust
was as thick
t breakfast tea,
as the
the chamber as
ch
chilly
as our toast?.
She was no less
k
kindly
to the town
it
itself:
?England
shou pay more
should
attentio to this historic
attention
BBC
Our hotel reviewer Fiona Duncan
finds she shares much in common
with her predecessor, Fanny Cradock
town which draws so
many tourists. Its
restaurants and hotels
should, in their turn,
pay more attention
to燛nglishmen
and爐ourists?.
On the English
Riviera, she resorted
to capitals to vent her
spleen: ?I?VE FOUND
SOME SCANDALOUS PLACES with
lukewarm bathwater, insufficient
toilet arrangements, annexe rooms
devoid of bedside lighting?? The list
of complaints goes on.
The directness of her descriptive
writing means that it is admirably
unpretentious. How can I not love her,
long to have met her, when she wrote,
in 1951, about my own beloved village,
Beaulieu, in Hampshire: ?The first
crisp tang of spring has made last
weekend notable. I have seen sunlight
glinting on the Solent, stippling the
tree-trunks in the New Forest and
silvering Beaulieu river.?
And when she was satisfied with a
hotel, she made her readers long to go,
as every good critic should. Arriving
late and unexpected at the Master
Builder?s, close to my house, she wrote:
??We can?t do much I?m afraid?, said Mr
Fry, who runs the hotel with his sister,
?but you?re welcome to what there is.?
At 8.45, I sat down to hot gravy soup,
beef steak and kidney pie, stewed fruit,
custard, two vast slabs of燾heese, all
followed by good coffee, for 6s.?
Reading that, and all Bon Viveur?s
reviews, subtitled ?In Quest of
Pleasure? complete with photographs
and useful maps, it?s hard not to feel
deep nostalgia and regret for
the crazy pace of life today.
There?s irony though. The
evident enjoyment of plain
English fare came from the
television chef that espoused
food colourings,
piping bags and
HARD TO
recipes like Jelly �
BELIEVE
la Zizi (layers of
Fanny said The
different coloured
Dorchester had
jelly) and Green
?elegant dining
Cheese Ice
at low cost?
Cream. My
mother only went
so far with Fanny Cradock
? she preferred Constance
Spry and Elizabeth David.
IN QUEST OF
PLEASURE
Fanny Cradock
reviewed hotels
for The Daily
Telegraph, above
The list of hotels that
Fanny and I have both
enjoyed is by no means
short. Most, of course,
have changed
enormously since her
day, though one, Knoll
House in Studland Bay,
was, when I visited it a
few years ago, exactly
as she found it, down to
the bars of carbolic soap
and uniformed nannies
on hand to remove
guests? children. (It has
since been refurbished.)
Other mutual favourites
include The George at
Yarmouth (?as
shipshape as a
battleship, as trim and
taught as a yacht?) and the Isle of Eriska
near Oban (?you may well mistake the
hotel for a country mansion?). In
London, the Connaught, Goring and
Stafford all won her approval at various
times, as they do mine. However, we
must politely agree to disagree about
The Dorchester. Her observation (in
1982), that the Berkeley, Athenaeum,
Savoy and Dorchester offer ?elegant
dining at low cost? brings tears of
disbelief to my eyes today.
As it has done for me, The Telegraph
gave Fanny and Johnnie the
?The dust was as
thick as爐he breakfast
tea, the燾hamber as
chilly as爋ur toast?
opportunity to travel offshore, and her
articles are credited with inspiring
many readers to take their first
tentative steps abroad. They went to
Goa, Barbados, Corfu (?in the Durrell
Country?), Ibiza (?of all the
Mediterranean coast this rates the
highest with us for an unsophisticated
holiday?), Spain, France, Italy,
Scandinavia and many other places.
Wherever she reported from, she
had a knack of conjuring up the
destination in a few well-chosen
words, at the same time as giving
straightforward practical advice. In
1952 she wrote ?Two Weeks in
Denmark on �? (�2.50 in today?s
money) and 15 years later ?Getting a
Fortnight on the French Riviera out of
�? (�0). At Reid?s Palace in
Madeira, a hotel I loved when I
reviewed it for its 125th anniversary
in�16, she usefully informed her
readers in 1953: ?Anyone able to spend
more than � on a holiday can do so
legally at Reid?s. As it is British owned,
a Bank of England concession permits
payment from foreign currency
allowance for only part of your hotel
bill. The balance is paid in sterling in
England before departure.?
People may scoff, but all the
travelling and hotel reviewing is
actually hard work. ?Bon Viveur?,
reads a footnote in 1951, ?is taking a
well-earned holiday after a strenuous
but enjoyable year in the quest of
pleasure on readers? behalf.? She was
soon back in the fray, travelling to
Mallorca (?the nightlife, which I
dutifully probed on your behalf, is in
the open air? I danced to a good band
for about an hour?), Denmark, Holland,
Jersey, Portugal and the Tyrol.
Forty years ago, for our wedding
night, my parents gave my husband
and I a stay in a fancy hotel called
Monkey Island, on the Thames at Bray.
Bon Viveur had endorsed it, and
maybe, just maybe, that?s why my
mother chose it as a special treat for
us. This August, we are going back for
the first time since then. Closed for
several years, the hotel is to be
relaunched, and when I review it, I
will be thinking of the newfound
connection between Fanny and Fiona.
?Fanny Cradock Invites You to . . . A
Cheese and Wine Party? is available
on bbc.co.uk/iplayer.
20
***
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
M A K E T H E WO R L D YO U R OW N
Share stories, tips and photographs from your travels
JUST BACK
The birds and
the bees and
the picathartes
This week?s winner: Katie Parry goes on
a romantic flight of fancy in Sierra Leone
L
ove can take you in
many directions.
Including, it seems,
to a parched corner
of Sierra Leone?s only golf
course at 6am on a Sunday.
I爃ave just started dating
a燽lue-eyed South African.
Since I am also 22, I have yet
to learn that you can love
someone without loving
their hobbies.
Which means I am now a
devoted birdwatcher. I am
learning that not all birds
that soar and wheedle over
the dugout canoes that
speckle the ocean are
seagulls, that sunbirds sing
most beautifully in the first
silent minutes after a June
rainstorm, and that the
ducking and diving of the
stiff-winged swift provokes
an answering swoop in my
own stomach.
The avian holy grail,
however, is the picathartes.
This incredibly rare bird
looks like a rather startled
anorexic pheasant made of
black Plasticine, but
fortunately love is blind.
We search for it whenever
we can, slotting our limbs
like pieces of a jigsaw into
the overcrowded minibuses
that wend their way
outwards from the
laughing, colourful
streets爋f Freetown.
One journey brings us to
the Liberian border, just as
the sun is rising. Even at this
hour the thick, dark forest
HOW TO ENTER
Email your entry,
in 500 words
(with爐he text in the
body of the email), to
justback@telegraph.
co.uk by爉idnight on
Tuesday April 3.
For爐erms and
conditions, see
telegraph.co.uk/
tt-justback.
The winner will
receive �0 in
the currency of
their choice from
the Post燨ffice.
The Post Office
is the UK?s largest
travel money
provider, offering
up to 80
currencies in more
than 11,500
branches with
0爌er cent
commission.
All currencies can
also be ordered
online for next day
branch or home
delivery. Check
exchange rates at
postoffice.co.uk/
travel-money/
currency-converter
pulses with heat, and
a爉iasma of leaf mould
permeates every thought.
Each branch hides vicious
thorns, and as we stoop to
wait under a boulder the
cool moss soothes the
ragged skin of my fingers.
The hours inch past. We
see nothing. This may be
due to our guide, Kenneth,
who periodically brings
his flip-flop down with a
resounding THWACK on
some tree trunk or body
part, before pausing to
admire whatever vaguely
insect-shaped smudge he
has created. My boyfriend
The bird looks
like a startled
anorexic pheasant
made of black
Plasticine
bristles, and gives Kenneth
a small leafy branch
instead of the flip-flop.
Kenneth is delighted. He
ties it so that, when he
launches his next燼ttack, it
makes an enormously
loud, whipping WHOMP.
This, it seems, is the
entrance music our quarry
has been waiting for. She
is爑nmistakable, even at
50ft. Her yellow head bobs
in what is left of the
evening light, and she hops
from rock to rock cocking
her neck thoughtfully,
before disappearing off into
the gloaming.
We stay seated, frozen in
reverent silence. I am struck
by the idea that to this bird
I燼m just another animal�
another crooked stitch in
the enormous rambling
tapestry of the natural
world. It is, surprisingly,
a爂ood feeling.
This is followed swiftly by
another, smugger thought:
I燼m clearly a better
birdwatcher than David
Attenborough, who had
to爓ait until he was
28爐o爀ncounter the
picathartes.營?m expecting
a燾all from the BBC any
minute now?
THE BIG PICTURE
Claudia Harrington
from London is
this week?s winner
with her moody
shot爋f Venice in
the morning sun
PEOPLE
LIKE YOU
WE WILL MISS
MAREMMA
Further to Tim Jepson?s
Tuscan recommendations
(?Think you know Tuscany?,
March 24), my wife Penny
and I are about to say
farewell to our Maremma
home after 44 years. We
know every road in the area
and most of the tracks; we
have visited dozens of
Etruscan sites and medieval
hill towns, beaches, lakes,
churches, wineries, hot
springs and cold caves. Here
are a few things we can
recommend:
Alberese?s Parco Naturale
della Maremma. A long wild
beach and woodland, with
possibilities for canoeing,
cycling, horse riding and
walking.
Enjoy local food and wine
anywhere. Morrelino red is
very good, but then there is
If you have taken a photograph
that captures the weird and
wonderful in the world of
travel, email it to thebig
picture@telegraph.co.uk.
You爉ust include a brief
description of the photograph
and your name, address and
telephone number.
The closing date for
this week?s competition
Brunello at Montalcino.
I爎ecommend Villa Patrizia
winery near Cana.
Santa Fiora boasts a lovely
ice cream in the piazza,
a爉ining museum, a church
full of majolica and
a爉edieval trout farm.
On Monte Amiata, you
can ski in the winter, but on
the road to Roccalbegna is
Monte Labbro, with a nature
park and wonderful views.
Roccalbegna is a lovely
little town with a Lorenzetti
triptych in the church and
two great restaurants.
Finally, Il Rintocco in
Cinigiano. Sit in the intimate
space of the small piazza.
Fabio and Monica have
boundless energy and
enthusiasm, and will bring
out the fresh fish of the day
for you to choose.
We will really miss
these爐hings.
ALLAN SWANNELL WINS
A牐250 RAILBOOKERS
VOUCHER
is midnight on Tuesday
April 3. We regret that
we are unable to accept
postal entries.
Each week the sender of the
winning entry will receive a
Nikon D3300, a lightweight
digital SLR camera, worth
�9.99. It has many features,
including a 24.2-megapixel
DX-format CMOS sensor,
allowing you to capture
high-definition images in low
light settings, and a built-in
?guide mode?.
The prize is provided by
Nikon (nikon.co.uk) and
Imagine Cruising
(imaginecruising.co.uk).
See telegraph.co.uk/
tt-thebigpicture for the terms
and conditions of the
competition and a gallery of
the runners-up.
TUSCANY BY THE SEA
restaurant not far from the
beef with the weight and
We visit Tuscany every
main square.
price scrawled on a piece of
other year, and as was
The restaurant is easily
brown paper. Your bistecca
pointed out in your
recognised by the queue of
alla fiorentina will be
coverage last Saturday, the
hungry diners waiting to be thrown on the BBQ blazing
beaches are overlooked.
seated for the two sittings at in the kitchen. Booking by
I can recommend Tirrenia 7pm and 9pm. Giulio, the
telephone is essential. You
as a family-friendly
head chef, will take your
won?t regret it.
environment: gorgeous
order by presenting a slab of ANNIE BOON
beaches, plenty of sun
shades, beds for all, indoor
experienced acts of
COMPETITION
HOW TO ENTER
shelter, food outlets
kindness shown by
Please email
WIN A �0
everywhere and plenty of
feedback on the
RAIL VOUCHER strangers in distant
play areas for children.
parts and we?d like to theme of kindness
Above all, it is clean.
EDWARD LOCK
As some of our most
seasoned writers
point out so vividly
this week, the act
The best way to see the Val
of travel, of being in
d?Orcia in Tuscany is on
foot. Last summer we spent unfamiliar places
a week walking from Sienna facing unfamiliar
to Montepulciano, indulging situations, often
brings out the best in
in a feast of beautiful
the people we meet.
landscapes and delicious
They want to help,
food. The winner of our
personal ?best restaurant of they want to engage,
they want to give.
the week? award went to
You too will have
Osteria Acquacheta in
WHERE?S THE BEEF?
Montepulciano ? a small
hear about
them� wherever
they happened;
whatever they were.
Please send your
stories for possible
publication next
week and a chance
to win a �0 gift
voucher, courtesy of
rail specialists
Railbookers (020
3780 2110;
railbookers.co.uk).
abroad, or any of the
articles in today?s
section (no more
than 175 words), by
midnight on April 3
to travelviews@
telegraph.co.uk.
Please make sure
you include your
contact details.
See telegraph.co.uk/
tt-travelviews
for full terms and
conditions.
21
22
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
***
FAMILY HOLIDAYS
Is this the coolest
cottage in Cornwall?
A stay in St Ives gave
Claire Irvin and family
buzzy beach action,
rooms with great views
and rainy-day getaways
G
etting away from it all
is what unites most of
us when we?re
planning a holiday.
The idea of exiting
normal life and
leaving behind
hustle, bustle and,
let?s be honest, other people, can be as
alluring as a lie-in. But what if you
already live away from it all ? if
your爄dea of the perfect holiday is
getting into it all?
As commuters, my husband and I
are not unfamiliar with hustle and
bustle. But our family weekends in our
countryside home are about as far
from the madding crowd as one could
want to be. So for our summer holiday
we decided it would be fun to take the
children (aged eight and five)
somewhere that offered a classic
seaside holiday, but with a bit of a buzz
too. Buckets and spades, of course.
A爌ool if poss ? Charley loves to swim
but hasn?t earned his ocean stripes yet.
Surfing too and maybe even riding for
horse-mad Amelie and me, scene-y
restaurants and bars (from which we
can, quel treat, walk home please!) for
fun nights out. Some artsy browsing
opportunities for my culture-buff
husband. Oh, and we would also
require some luxury r&r too, please.
An impossible brief? Not for luxury
cottage company Cornish Gems, who
proposed Compass House, nestled into
the cliff face overlooking Porthminster
Beach. Its ludicrously advantageous
location initially brought out the
cynical side of us (Was it too central?
Would its picture windows give
passing tourists a bird?s-eye view in
Waking up to a stormy
sea, it turns out, can be
just as intoxicating as
a爏un-baked beach
rather than affording us uninterrupted
views out?).
In real life, to quote Charley, it was
hard to find much wrong with it. Its
beautifully appointed rooms feature
contemporarily nautical interiors and
modern art works. An attic ?tower??
room gives up panoramic coastal
views, a majestic overview of St Ives
harbour and is the bedroom of dreams
for a romantically dreamy eight-yearold with a vivid imagination. A newly
renovated veranda gives extra living
space complete with perfect moving
?postcard? views of Porthminster
Beach, meaning that come shine or
rain (this is Cornwall, after all) you are
always part of the stunning scenery
beyond ? we did, however, employ
discretion at all times to avoid any
inadvertent Life of Brian moments.
Waking up to a stormy sea, it turns
out, can be just as intoxicating as a
sun-baked beach ? as long as you?ve
got enough Uno stamina and local
fudge to sit out the rain. (This view
also turned out to be my holiday
reading downfall ? whenever I had a
chance to sit and read I?d find myself
distracted into idly soaking up
whatever action was going on below).
And Porthminster Beach Caf� just a
few steps away provided the most
upscale of locals ? for breakfast, lunch,
dinner, afternoon ice cream, extra
clotted cream for a scone, cheeky
sundowners on the beach as the
children chased seagulls? The list, it
seemed, was endless.
So far, so good. Now for St Ives
to燿eliver.
First up: the sea. The first day
dawned sunny and cloudless and
wetsuits on, body boards in tow, we
set out into the waves. Porthminster is
the calmest of St Ives?s beaches, with
currents better suited to paddle
boarding than riding a double
overhead, but it proved just enough
for Charley?s first forays into the
ESSENTIALS
STAYING THERE
Compass House can
be let through
Cornish Gems
(cornishgems.com/
holiday-cottages/
Compass_House.
html); weekly stays
cost from �665,
rising to around
�000 in peak
summer.
co.uk); breakfast,
lunch and dinner
(mains from �).
The Sail Loft (01736
710748; St Michael?s
Mount, Marazion);
good selection of fish
dishes, scones too.
The Hub (01736
799099; hub-stives.
co.uk); hot dogs/
burgers from �.
EATING THERE
ACTIVITIES
Porthmeor Beach
Caf� (01736 793366;
porthmeor-beach.
St Ives Boat (07824
633447; stivesboatrides.co.uk) offers
self-drive boats,
kayak hire, fishing.
Swimming with
Horses (07720
617661; cornwall
swimming horses.
co.uk): �pp.
St Michael?s Mount
(01736 710265;
stmichaelsmount.
co.uk): castle and
garden, �
adult/�50 child.
Leach Pottery (01736
799703; leach
pottery.com):
� under-18s free.
waves. Demands for ?an actual swim?
gave us all the inclination we needed
to hop aboard the charming coastal
branch line train for Carbis Bay, and
lunch overlooking the water
complete with a dip in the very chichi
surrounds of the Carbis Bay Hotel
pool and spa. The jacuzzi provided
the perfect spot to overlook the
children swimming and indulge in
yet more people-watching.
And Carbis Bay Beach started off
the activity which defined the
holiday? DOG COUNTING. I will
leave you to imagine the joy of trying
to remember if the last sighting was
labrador number 23 or 24?*
Previous experience of St Ives
meant the day of our trip to
St燤ichael?s Mount dawned with the
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
HOLIDAY
HOTLIST
TRUNKS
Stripy trunks with a
nod to the Seventies
from the new
loungewear brand.
�; lesgirls
lesboys.com
MULES
Twist on a classic,
cotton heritage
mules燽y Alexa
Chung for Superga.
�; superga.co.uk
GAME ON
Battle it out on the
beach with this
wooden family
game set from
Overmont games.
�.99, amazon.co.uk
BEACH
BLISS
space we have
experienced at peak
season in the past, we
trundled straight into one
when we got back.
(Each燙ompass House let
comes with a parking ticket for the
station car park five minutes? walk
along the beach. But be warned ? just
because you have a parking ticket
does爊ot guarantee you a space ? St
Ives is notorious for lack of adequate
parking and a long wait in each car
park is not uncommon).
Skippy with the prospect of in and
out parking, we left St Ives for the
second day on the trot to explore
Zennor, D?H Lawrence?s favourite
village, a stunning drive along the
coast from St Ives, and to marvel at the
old mermaid?s chair and enjoy a pub
lunch at The Tinner?s Arms.
Ambling back along the coastal
roads, we stopped off in a seemingly
random field to feast our taste buds on
a local Moomaid ice cream from a cool
retro caravan, and our eyes on yet
another spectacular view. Back in St
Ives, the parking gods were not so
kind? We resolved to stay put for the
rest of the week.
It wasn?t the only piece of luck that
couldn?t last ? the weather had to
break at some point but with a jaunty
skip in our step we defied the odd spot
of rain to spoil our holiday. It certainly
couldn?t put a dampener on the daily
rounds of mini golf next to Compass
Charley and
Amelie Irvin, far
left, loved
Compass House
most mundane of practicalities
occupying us ? would we or wouldn?t
we manage to find a parking space
close to home again? But the lure of
exploring one of Cornwall?s most
spectacular landmarks, and, for me,
captivating my children with the same
Cornish folklore and legends that
brought history alive for me as a child,
proved too great and we ventured out.
The informal ?ferry? ride across at
high tide, the views and the search for
the giant?s heart didn?t disappoint ?
and neither did the unexpectedly
delicious organic, home-grown lunch
and Cornish wine at the Sail Loft and
the thrill of walking back across the
causeway that low tide had uncovered.
And, what luck! Instead of the
three-hour wait for said car parking
SWEAT SHIRT
Spell it out with
celebrity favourite
brand Off Duty?s
slogan sweatshirt.
�; offdutyuk.com
House, the magical afternoon
Amelie and I spent at Peep
Out Training Yard and Long
Rock beach swimming with
horses, nor our sea safari to
Seal Island ? or, for that
matter, our morning?s surf lesson
with燼n expert and impassioned
instructor on Porthmeor Beach.
(Though Amelie outclassing me
during her inaugural hour in the
surf爒ery nearly threatened to, as
I燾ame up from a spectacular wipeout
to see her speeding past like a pro).
What?s more, a spot of rain
apparently ??gave my husband the
We were so hard pushed
to find time for a cream
tea that we had to fit
one爄n for breakfast
impetus? to explore the art galleries
hidden around the windy streets
above the harbour, for the first time
with an intrigued Charley in tow, and
a visit that seemed to inspire him
ahead of our own pottery workshop at
Leach?s Pottery, which is considered
by many to be the birthplace of
British爏tudio pottery.
Who knew we were a family of
budding potters? Not I ? but during
the afternoon we spent learning about
the history of the pottery and trying
our hand at our own, it
turns out we all have
a爌assion that we?ve
continued since
returning home.
And爐he carefully
packaged hand-fired creations that
arrived in the post a few weeks
later爌rovided not only爐he excitement
of A燩ARCEL but a salutary reminder
of our wonderful time.
And what of the evenings, complete
with the novelty of walking home?
From the world-famous beachside
fare, watching the (real) surfers at
Porthmeor Caf�, eagle-eyed dolphin
spotting at Porthgwidden Caf�, to the
harbourside burgers and milkshakes
at Hub St Ives and fish and chips on
the harbour, there?s a reason foodies
flock to the region. We were so hard
pushed to find time for a cream tea we
had to fit one in for breakfast.
But confession time. Our two
favourite meals were (wait for it)
AT燞OME (our Compass House home).
Even the best eateries, it seems, can?t
compensate for home-cooked pizza
eaten with THAT VIEW and washed
down with some local red. And when
you?ve only got to walk 20 yards to
bed, there?s definitely no need for a
taxi home.
* For any interested parties, the dog
count reached 216. If you want a
breed breakdown, I can put you
directly in touch with my children.
23
24
***
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
25
T RU S T E D A DV I C E
TELEGRAPH
T R AV E L
COLLECTIVE
Our experts make your travel their business
CHRIS
LEADBEATER
TRAVEL
EXPERT
WHAT WOULD YOU DO?
A new wave of long-haul flights
is making international travel
easier than it has ever been
TERRY
RICHARDSON
Dear Helen
GETTY IMAGES
Some 20 years ago, when the low-cost
airline revolution took off, much was
written about the world becoming a
smaller place ? at least in terms of
accessibility and travel times.
And it was ? with easyJet, Ryanair
and (briefly) Go dashing to parts of the
planet that had been left largely
untouched by planes departing from
UK airports. Suddenly, if you fancied a
long weekend in Krakow or Budapest,
you could indulge your desires ? and
do so at a price which made the idea
practical and affordable.
Two decades on, we are witnessing a
similar casting out of the low-cost
aviation net ? but this time dropping to
land in countries far further afield than
Hungary and Poland.
Despite their successes (and
occasional controversies) since the
turn of the millennium, neither
Ryanair nor easyJet has ventured too
far beyond Europe. In March 2015,
Ryanair responded to reports that it
might be launching flights to the US
with a short statement that it had ?not
considered or approved any
transatlantic project, and [did] not
intend to do so? ? while, for all that it
serves some 135 airports, you can
currently journey no further from
Britain with easyJet than Tel Aviv in
Israel or Hurghada in Egypt.
Instead, these stalwarts have
seen their thunder stolen by the
enormously ambitious Scandinavian
low-cost carrier Norwegian ? and,
to a lesser degree, by its Icelandic
rival Wow Air. Last Sunday saw
Norwegian launch a four-timesweekly direct service between
Gatwick and Chicago, while Tuesday
brought a non-stop connection
between Gatwick and the Texas
capital Austin, which will depart
three times every week.
Both introductions tread on the toes
of national airlines and big-brand
heavyweights like British Airways and
United. This is the
intention.
Norwegian now
offers direct
flights from its
London hub to 10
US cities,
including ?less
uncrowded visit is to spend the
obvious? options
night in Pamukkale village,
such as the
which has plenty of
Colorado state
accommodation ? try Melrose
capital Denver,
TURKEY
Hotel (melrosehousehotel.com)
Oakland in
EXPERT
and the dearer Hotel Hal-Tur
California, and Seattle ? and
(haltur.net). Then explore the
demonstrated its sky-wide
I am interested in visiting
formations and ancient site the
vision last month with the
Pamukkale in Turkey. I will be
following morning. The vast
beginning of a non-stop
travelling alone and I want to be majority of day trippers don?t
Gatwick-Buenos Aires link.
able to dip into the waters while
arrive until the afternoon after
Wow Air has been
I?m there. However, I can?t swim
the long drive from the coast.
similarly expansive, and
and am worried that the pools
Hierapolis-Pamukkale is
now touches down at 10
might be slippery.
situated on the western rim of
American airports, while
HELEN SHANMUGAM the vast Anatolian plateau,
its closest domestic
around 120 miles east of the
competitor, the national
popular Aegean resort cum
carrier Icelandair, drops
cruise ship port of Kusadasi,
landing gear in four. The
The surreal, brilliant white
near Ephesus. Comfortable
downside with both these
travertine terraces and warm,
inter-city coaches run from here
operators ? that you have
limpid pools of Pamukkale hang to Denizli, the nearest city to
to travel via Reykjavik ? is
from the rim of a steep valley
Pamukkale and frequent buses
offset by their range of
side in Turkey?s picturesque
and minibuses make the
regional departures. Wow
south-west. It?s an amazing
40-minute run between
Air flies from Edinburgh as
natural formation, and
Denizli?s bus station and
well as Gatwick and
combined with the wellPamukkale.
Stansted; Icelandair from
preserved ruins of the GreekTurkish Airlines (turkish
Glasgow and Manchester
airlines.com) and Pegasus
Roman city of Hierapolis
(and Gatwick and
(flypgs.com) both fly to Denizli?s
nearby, it?s a very popular
Heathrow). Norwegian is
Cardak airport from Istanbul,
tourist attraction. The
yet to embrace the rest of
pools can be a little slippery,
and both also offer flights from
the UK to such an extent in
but they aren?t deep, so you
the UK to Istanbul. As to when
terms of transatlantic trips
don?t need to worry about not
to travel ? May, June and
? but does serve Stewart
being able to swim.
September are good; warm and
International (for New
The best way to enjoy an
sunny but not too hot.
York) and Providence (as an
alternative to Boston) from
Belfast and Edinburgh.
This is, indeed, a second
what I can say ? having flown with all
low-cost revolution, where the big
three airlines in the last two years ? is
winner is the consumer.
that they offer a similar level of
Let?s take as an example that topical
service, reliability and comfort.
London-Chicago route, and departure
But the revolution is about more
dates of Wednesday, May 16 and
than mere price. As airlines try to find
Sunday, May 20. At the time of writing,
an edge in a busy marketplace, they
a search for return economy fares
launch fresh connections which open
unearths the exact same fare, of �2,
up the globe ? and the broadening of
with BA and United (both to
horizons is not limited to the US.
Heathrow) ? whereas Norwegian (to
Norwegian brought in a non-stop hop
Gatwick) produces a figure of �0 for
from Gatwick to Singapore last
its equivalent ?LowFare+? price
September, before China Airlines
bracket (I?m ignoring the ?LowFare?
re-introduced its direct connection
category, which comes to �0, but
between the UK (also Gatwick) and
includes nothing more than 10kg of
Taiwan in December. Small world? Yes.
hand luggage). That?s a fair saving, for
And getting smaller by the minute.
This is,
indeed,
a爏econd
low-cost
airline
revolution,
where the
big winner
is the
consumer
NATURAL
BEAUTY
GILL
CHARLTON
CONSUMER
CHAMPION
We?ve received a fine for speeding
in Milan, but the offence took
place almost two years ago
Q
I have received a ?Notice of
Payment? in the post saying
that a fine of ?54.70 (�.92)
has been imposed for a
violation of the Italian Highway Code
on Aug 26 2016. My husband and
I爓ere in Milan at that time and had
hired a rental car from Hertz.
In October 2016 we were charged a
fee by Hertz for providing our details
to the Italian authorities so the letter
has come as no surprise.
However, I read somewhere that
there is a time limit for the notification
of such fines. We have 60 days to pay
though there?s a reduction if we pay in
full within five days. Can you advise?
ANN BAKER
A
It always astonishes me how
long it takes the Italian
authorities to issue traffic
fines. In your case, it was
16爉onths after the offence. According
to the Italian Traffic Code, the police
have only 360 days after receiving
identification of the driver of the
vehicle (that is, the date that Hertz
handed over your UK address) within
which to notify foreign drivers of the
fine. This information is provided on
the website of European Municipality
Outsourcing (EMO), an independent
agency linked to Florence-based debt
collection agency Nivi Credit, which
many Italian police forces have tasked
with collecting the fines.
The blue waters
of Pamukkale
Do you have to pay the
bring in plenty
fine? In my view you don?t of visitors
because the Milan police
failed to send you the
paperwork in time. I
wonder why they bothered as they are
very well aware of the law on this.
Perhaps a batch got ?lost? and they are
taking a punt that people will panic and
pay, worried about the debt being
pursued or the risk of a black mark on
their credit rating. I tried to contact
both EMO and Nivi Credit by telephone
and email to confirm the 360-day
cut-off but neither agency responded.
Mrs Baker?s fine was for driving
8kph over the speed limit on the
ring-road around Milan. A small
infringement,
you might think,
SEND YOUR QUESTIONS
but enough to
TO GILL CHARLTON,
trigger one of
NICK TREND AND OUR
the city?s many
DESTINATION EXPERTS
roadside speed
cameras. The
If you have had a problem with
only upside is
your holiday or travel
that, unlike the
arrangements, contact our
UK, speeding
troubleshooter Gill Charlton, or
fines are not
our consumer expert Nick
accompanied by
Trend at the email address
penalty points
below.
on your licence.
We also have more than 150
But the
destination experts all over the
biggest source of
world who can help with
revenue from
suggestions for great places to
motorists are
stay, to eat and to visit.
fines of up to
Please email all questions to
?100 a time for
asktheexperts@telegraph.
driving into
co.uk, giving your full name
Limited Traffic
and, if your query is about a
Zones (ZTLs). In
dispute with a travel company,
Florence it?s
your address, telephone
estimated that
number and any booking
more than 1,000
reference. We regret that we
fines a day are
cannot personally answer all
issued for this
the queries we receive, but
violation ? a nice
your email will be
little earner for
acknowledged.
the city coffers.
26
***
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
27
28
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
***
MEXICO
FROM BEAN
TO BAR
A farm worker
in Comalcalco,
right; a shop in
Oaxaca, left
Heaven scent in
Aztec country
From Mexico City to
Oaxaca, Sue Quinn
indulges in the flavours
and aromas of chocolate
I
f a nation?s cuisine is the
key to its heart, then
chocolate is the portal
to Mexico?s soul. Almost
4,000 years ago its
indigenous tribes were
among the first in the
world to cultivate cacao
and turn the bitter beans into
delicious things to eat and drink.
There?s good reason why a chocolate
bar in the 1970s was named Aztec.
Others of course followed suit, and
rival cacao-producing countries in
Central and South America have taken
the limelight over the past 20 years,
supplying quality beans for the world?s
booming artisan chocolate market.
Now, Mexico is seeking to reclaim
its gastronomical gift to the world,
with its cacao producers striving to
prove their beans are up there with
the best, and a new generation of
chocolatiers joining the craft/gourmet
chocolate revolution (a bar of
Montezuma?s Sea Dog with dark
chocolate sea salt and lime anyone?)
Today, there?s no better way to
explore the country than to follow the
scent
of chocolate. My own
sweet voyage of
discovery leads
me to
Hacienda
Cacaotera
Jes鷖
Mar韆,
a爈ush
cacao
plantation
and chocolate
factory in
Tabasco, in
Mexico?s south-east.
mostly processing it to make drinks.
But there are signs of a chocolate
renaissance in Mexico. Jes鷖 Mar韆 is
working hard to preserve and rescue
ancient strains of the prized criollo
variety of bean, and turning them into
bars of eating chocolate. And nearby
Hacienda La Luz, an exquisite
plantation with fragrant gardens and
a燽eautifully tiled燾ourtyard in the
main building, is爓inning
international awards for爄ts爃ighquality chocolate bars and燽omb髇s.
Tour operators and hotels in
Villahermosa organise
visits to the plantations,
but roads are now
signposted to make
MUCHO MUNDO
Tabasco?s ?cacao trail? easy
CHOCOLATE
to explore independently
SHOP AND
by car. It?s a lovely option.
MUSEUM
The journey might be a
In this beautiful
little bumpy but the
old building in
landscape is a picture; the
the Roma
roads are flanked by trees
district, you can
flowering scarlet, pink and
learn about the
yellow, and dotted with
history of
stalls selling tropical fruit
chocolate at the
and pozol, the state?s
remarkable little
ubiquitous cacao drink.
museum
Tabasco is heaven for
upstairs, then
food lovers. Cocina Chontal
refuel at the caf�
is a delightful wooden
and chocolate
cabin in the jungle serving
shop. Try the
authentic dishes cooked
chocolate
over fire in an open
The charming ?cacao ambassador?,
Florencio S醤chez Rodriguez, who
guides visitors around the plantation,
explains the process of making
chocolate from ?tree to bar?. He urges
me to taste the tangy white pulp that
envelops the beans nestling inside the
pods, then escorts me deep into the
jungle where shade-loving cacao
flourishes under a canopy of banana,
mango and rubber trees. Like most
chocoholics, I?ve never seen the raw
ingredients before, and the alien-like
pods that grow directly out of the tree
trunks are a revelation. ?The trees are
like humans, they need love,?
Florencio says, cradling a burnished
cacao pod in his爃ands.
Jes鷖 Mar韆 is one of a cluster of
beautiful, colonial-style cacao
plantations, or haciendas, near
Comalcalco (a town about 35 miles
from Tabasco?s capital Villahermosa)
that are proudly opening their doors to
the public to boost domestic and
international interest in Mexican
chocolate. Over the past decade,
Mexican cacao production has fallen
by 50 per cent, in part due to old and
diseased cacao trees and
farmers clearing their
GOURMET
plantations to make way for
DELIGHTS
palm oil, maize and
Green and
livestock. As a result, the
yellow cocoa
cradle of chocolate has
pods, left; Tout
been爄mporting much of
Chocolat, right
its燾acao from Africa and
MEXICO CITY?S BEST CHOCOLATE SHOPS
Hip骴romo,
06100 Ciudad de
M閤ico City
QUE BO
tamales with
a爉ug of chillispiked hot
chocolate, and
artisan bomb髇s
and bars in
gorgeous
flavours, all
made爁rom
Mexican cacao.
Calle Mil醤 45,
Ju醨ez, 06600
Ciudad de
M閤ico,
Mexico City
TOUT
CHOCOLAT
Drool over the
artisan bars and
bomb髇s in a
range of
wonderful
flavours at this
gem of a
chocolate shop.
Amsterdam 154,
Chef Jos� Ram髇
Castillo is leading
the Mexican
chocolate
revolution with
his exquisite
flavours and
vibrant colours.
Try the bright
orange bomb髇s
filled with
mango, chilli,
and salt, or vivid
pink ones filled
with guava. Five
locations in
Mexico City.
SUCR?ELLE
Glorious
chocolates made
with natural
ingredients in a
riot of shiny
colours and
flavours. Try the
passion fruitfilled bomb髇s
accompanied by
one of their
Mexican
blend coffees.
Calle Hegel 342,
Polanco, Polanco
V Secc, 11560
Ciudad de
M閤ico, CDMX,
Mexico
EL MORO
CHURRERIA
A Mexico City
institution since
1935, this small
churros and hot
chocolate caf� is
a chocoholic?s
nirvana. Also try
the heavenly
churros ice
cream
sandwiches.
Eje Central
L醶aro C醨denas
42, Centro,
06000
Cuauhtemoc,
Mexico City
kitchen. Founder Nelly Cordova
Morillo is determined to preserve
authentic Tabasco cuisine, and makes
chocolate from scratch ? grinding the
beans herself ? to enrich her excellent
mole sauces. In Comalcalco, a town
untroubled by tourism, Restaurant de
Yuli also serves tasty local specialities,
including chocolate-spiked mole
sauces and desserts. And with a car
you can include the ancient Mayan
archaeological site, located a mile or so
from Comalcalco, in your itinerary.
Next stop on my chocolate mission
is the city of Oaxaca, capital of the state
of the same name. Cacao isn?t grown
here, but its location on an ancient
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
ESSENTIALS
Aeromexico
(aeromexico.com)
flies directly from
London
Heathrow to
Mexico City from
about �0
return, and from
Mexico City to
Villahermosa
(Tabasco) and
Oaxaca from
about �0
and牐180
respectively.
TABASCO
from �), or
Quinta Real
(quintareal.com;
double rooms
from �).
Dining there:
El Eden in
Villahermosa for
authentic
Tabasco cuisine
(gruporodizio.
com.mx).
OAXACA
A two-day
chocolate tour
with Chimalli
in燨axaca costs
around �0
per person,
including
airport transfers
GETTY IMAGES; ALAMY; SUE QUINN
Contact the
Tabasco Tourist
Authority (Sergio
L髉ez Garcia,
sergiologa78@
hotmail.com) or
Operadores
Tur韘ticos de
Tabasco
(c.h.zapata.
medina@gmail.
com) or Viajes
Camgo (ventas2@
viajescamgo.
com). The cost of
touring with a
guide is around
� per day; also
bookable
through
visitmexico.com,
which has an
English language
option.
Staying there:
In Villahermosa
try the Crowne
Plaza (ihg.com;
double rooms
trading route means chocolate is a
fundamental part of daily life, and
ancient techniques are still used to
make drinks consumed thousands of
years ago. At Tierra Antigua restaurant
and gallery in Teotitl醤 del Valle, a
peaceful village 45 minutes? drive
from the city, Carina Santiago Bautista
cooks sublime Oaxacan food and
teaches visitors how to make
chocolate atole, a creamy festive drink
featuring fermented white cacao
beans. ?It?s such a special drink
from爋ur ancestors,? Carina explains
as爏he grinds the ingredients on a
metate, a hot flat stone, before mixing
the paste with water and whisking it
with a molinillo to produce a highly
prized froth.
At Chocolate de la Villa Real in
Zaachila, a quiet village 20 minutes
from Oaxaca, Genoveva Yolanda
Martinez Peralta is also working to
preserve traditional ways. The factory
makes chocolate with machinery but
she demonstrates ancient techniques
for visitors ? on her hands
and knees, grinding cacao
MUST-SEES
beans, cinnamon, almonds
Hostal de la Noria,
and sugar on a metate ? the
left, in Oaxaca; the
same way she has done it for
city?s Cathedral of
almost
50 years. She learned
Our Lady of the
the technique from her
Assumption, above
mother, who would let her
T R AV E L
TRIBES
and chocolate
demonstrations
(chimalli.travel).
Staying there:
Hostal de La
Noria, close to
Oaxaca?s vibrant
Z骳alo Square
(hostaldelanoria.
com; doubles
from �).
Dining there:
Restaurante
Catedral for
excellent
authentic dishes
(restaurante
catedral.com.
mx); Pal?Dolor
Cocina de Autor
for modern
dishes and
cocktails
(paldolorcoc
inadeautor.coci);
La Mezcalerita
for mescal
ales and
gorgeous snacks
(facebook.com/
lamezcalerita).
ride on the back of her legs when she
was a baby, as she went about her
arduous business of making chocolate.
?At all the important life events you
drink chocolate,? Genoveva says,
adding that she knows the paste is
ready when it ?shines like a mirror?.
Nowhere else in Mexico are there
more opportunities to sample
chocolate than in Oaxaca ? although
not necessarily in the form we
recognise in the UK. Chocolate bars
for eating tend to be grainier, as they
are filled with cinnamon and
ingredients such as almonds, but
delicious all the same. Street stalls and
market stands offer a profusion of hot
and cold cacao beverages, including
tejate, an ancient drink made from
toasted maize and fermented cacao,
topped with a creamy foam. Benito
Ju醨ez Market is an excellent place to
buy cacao-rich mole paste that adds a
smoky kick to stews and soups.
I find myself drawn along Mina
Street, a buzzing thoroughfare in the
centre of architecturally stunning
central Oaxaca, by the smell of cacao
issuing from chocolate shops such as
Mayordomo. Here, Oaxacans buy their
favourite chocolate blends in bulk and
I watch transfixed as they are made to
order. Cacao beans, almonds,
cinnamon and piloncillo (unrefined
sugar) are fed into grinding machines
and emerge as a rich aromatic paste,
destined for chocolate drinks. I buy a
bag of this luscious stuff to take home,
so I can enjoy the taste of Mexico, new
and ancient, long after my trip is over.
The Territorialist
Jason surveys his E-seat grimly, assessing
the patterned polyester terrain before
sinking heavily into it. He has a love/hate
relationship with the middle seats on
planes. On the one hand, he hates having
two borders to defend from two hateful
opponents on this flight to New York. On
the other, he loves having something to
hate. For a military enthusiast like Jason,
BA 115 from LHR to JFK is a war game,
a燽attle of wills, an adroit display of
strategy, perseverance and machismo.
Jason erects his camp by planting his
elbows firmly into the crook of both arm
rests, gripping the ends tightly. He favours
defensive tactics in the north ? above his
waist ? but his legs are very much on the
offensive. It?s vital to let the women
flanking him ? a besuited academic in 24D
and an exchange student in 24F ? know
who is the boss of row 24, he thinks,
clenching his jaw with determination.
Jason recalls The Art of War by Sun Tzu:
?The supreme art of war is to subdue the
enemy without fighting.? Jason spreads his
knees as far apart as his grey tracksuit
bottoms will stretch, forcing his opponents
to adjust their neatly crossed legs
outwards, to a deferential 75-degree angle
to the aisle and window. Jason immediately
deploys his elbows, encroaching further
over the armrests, to luxuriate in newly
claimed territory. His splayed knees signal
V for victory, and Jason nods with
satisfaction when the student has her knee
clipped by a trolley. Now all he has to do is
plug his headphones into the armrest
without moving his arms. He pokes at the
pocket in the seat in front of him with his
toes, clad in a grubby white sports sock.
This manoeuvre will take time, Jason
knows. But Rome was not built in a day.
Anna Hart
ILLUSTRATION BY TOM MCGUINNESS FOR THE TELEGRAPH
GETTING
THERE
29
30
***
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
31
***
SUNLIT
SHORE
Tunnels Beach
in Kauai, left;
Bangkok, right;
the Adirondacks
KEVIN BACON
MY LIFE
IN TRAVEL
The Hollywood actor travels so light, he
doesn?t mind washing his clothes in a hotel
sink in Thailand, Hawaii or Scotland
THIRTY YEARS IS A LONG TIME to
be married in Hollywood and we both
travel for work constantly, so we?re
adamant about not going too long
without seeing each other. When
we?re not working, Kyra and I love
?staycations? at our homes in New
York and Los Angeles.
A HURRICANE WAS BREWING as
we flew to Cabo, Mexico to celebrate
our 10th anniversary. The airport was
flooded, with water coming through
the ceiling. When we got to our hotel
room, I remembered thinking: ?At
least we have tequila.?
WE WERE STRANDED ON A BED
when we woke that night to three
inches of water on the floor. It wasn?t
romantic. I wrote a song about it
called 10 Years爄n Mexico with my
band [The Bacon Brothers].
MY IDEA OF HOLIDAY HELL is an
all-inclusive resort where you just
stay in your enclosure, lying on the
beach with a pi馻 colada. I prefer lots
of activities, like hiking and getting
out on the water in a boat and
exploring the local area.
I ADORE SCOTTISH PEOPLE and
got to know them when Kyra was
filming in Glasgow and I flew in for a
few days. I really love Glasgow and
Kyra couldn?t
stop telling me
about how
friendly and
welcoming the
locals were.
I QUIT
CIVILISATION
while growing up
in Philadelphia in
the Sixties, when
our family decamped every summer
to our cabin on Lake Honnedaga in
the Adirondack Mountains. I was one
of six kids and we?d all pile into the
station wagon at the crack of dawn
for the 320-mile journey. It was
10爉iles up a dirt track, with no
electricity, no phone and no hot
water. It was fantastic.
I?VE GOT A LONG WAY TO GO as I?ve
only climbed two mountains in the
Adirondacks so far. While you have
Munro-bagging in Scotland, we have
?London is a lot like New
York, with its melting
pot of cultures. I could
walk there for hours?
the Adirondack 46ers in the US, who
are hikers devoted to summiting all
46 peaks of the range over 4,000ft.
KAUAI IN HAWAII IS PERFECT for
Kyra and me. Towards the end of the
year, our work takes us to California,
so it?s an easy flight. The north of the
island is breathtakingly beautiful.
I?VE GIVEN UP SUNBATHING so it
doesn?t bother me that the island gets
GETTY IMAGES; WIREIMAGE
I ONLY TAKE ONE FAMILY
HOLIDAY A YEAR at Christmas with
my wife Kyra [Sedgwick, the
American actress] and our children
Travis [the actor and musician], 28,
and Sosie [the actress], 26. But when
they were younger, it was important
for us to have regular family holidays,
so we did many trips throughout the
year, in spring, summer and winter.
so much rain, which makes the
vegetation very lush. Kauai also has
some of the most amazing hiking
trails along the Na Pali coast.
ALL THE GEAR
I LIKE REMOTE PLACES that are
difficult to reach. It helps us avoid the
crowds. It?s why I love Anguilla,
which has been a favourite
destination of ours since the early
Nineties. It has a such a fascinating
history, but sadly got pretty badly hit
by Hurricane Irma last year.
I use one from EltaMD,
which was recommended
by my dermatologist. I
wear it every day
wherever營 am.
�.40; amazon.co.uk
SUNSCREEN
LONDON FEELS LIKE HOME TO ME
as I?ve spent a lot of time there over
the past seven years. It?s a lot like
New York City with its melting pot of
cultures. I could walk for hours
around different neighbourhoods
with their unique vibes.
BANGKOK IS LIKE NEW YORK but
30 times over for its energy and
intense atmosphere. I was there for a
month filming Elephant White and I
loved the city. It?s noisy and full of
crowds, traffic and food smells. I even
remember wandering one night and
stumbling into the middle of a
protest, but I never felt unsafe.
I FOUND A BABOON IN MY ROOM
while shooting The Air Up There in
the area formerly known as the
Eastern Transvaal [now Mpumalanga
province] of South Africa. We used to
see hippos, boars and warthogs
wandering by.
IT WAS SO PEACEFULLY QUIET and
exotic and remote that it felt like this
was where civilisation began. While
places like Paris and Rome are also
steeped in history, it really felt like
this was where it all started.
I PACK AS LITTLE AS POSSIBLE
into the smallest carry-on bag, so I
haven?t checked a bag in 20 years. I?m
happy to wash my clothes in my hotel
sink and wear quick-dry underwear,
which is convenient for travelling.
RUCKSACK
I started using a Patagonia
backpack about three years
ago and it?s the best one
I?ve ever owned. It?s very
robust, lightweight and has
a great capacity for packing
a lot of things.
�; eu.patagonia.com
IT?S OK TO GET LOST when
travelling. Ditch the car, get a bike or
walk and you?ll find the unexpected.
GREECE AND BUDAPEST are
next爋n my bucket list.
Interview by Sarah Ewing
SUNGLASSES
My pair from ic!
berlin are another
essential for me.
They?re comfortable
without being flashy.
From �5; pretavoir.co.uk
Kevin Bacon is ambassador for EE?s
Max plan, which includes access to
the BT Sport app, for the new
Samsung Galaxy S9 phone. For more
information, see a video of the latest
advert featuring Kevin and Rio
Ferdinand at youtube.com
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32
Saturday 31 March 2018 The Daily Telegraph
***
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tapestries, antiques and
wingback chairs.?
Book by April 30 for stays
until March 29 2019. Quote:
?TELP?; 0333 222 1794; see
terms: telegraph.co.uk/
tt-highbullen
CHECK IN
DEAL OF THE WEEK, 30% OFF
GRANGE HOTEL
golf course with
breathtaking views of
Dartmoor and Exmoor. The
Estate Standard Rooms can
be found in The Courtyard
and Gardner?s Row, located
in different buildings
around the Highbullen
Estate.
Telegraph Travel?s Devon
expert, Suzy Bennett says:
??a Victorian Arts and
Crafts-style manor house
with vaulted brick ceilings,
E XC LU S I V E
OFFERS
Telegraph Travel writer,
says: ?The Grange was
purpose-built as a hotel in
the 1860s, in an Italianate
style that gives it a feel of
Umbria-in-Cumbria.?
20% OFF
Book by April 15 for stays
until May 31 2018
(midweek stays). Quote:
?TELP?; 0333�1�39;
see terms: telegraph.co.
uk/tt-grange-cumbria
seafood-inspired restaurant
combining a sophisticated
menu with fresh ingredients
in a laid-back setting.
Stephen McClarence,
Telegraph Travel writer,
says: ?Affordable, cosy-chic
and with a host of activities
on its doorstep, this ticks
lots of boxes for families and
those wanting a relaxing yet
energetic break.?
Book by April 30 for stays
until May 31 2018. Quote:
?TELEGRAPH?; 0333 414
2219; see terms: telegraph.
co.uk/tt-the-fish
Our pick of the week?s hotel deals, tailored for Telegraph readers
THE LUGGER
HOTEL
CORNWALL
From �2 per person
�
Two-night stay
�
Breakfast
�
Three-course dinner on
each evening
�
Hot chocolate with
clotted cream cookies
�
Late check out
�
Access to wellies, macs
and brollies
�
Slippers and robes
25% OFF
Relax and unwind with a
waterfront stay on Portloe
Harbour in Cornwall. The
hotel?s restaurant has now
been awarded two AA
Rosettes for its local cuisine.
Fiona Duncan, Telegraph
Travel?s hotels expert, says:
?The Lugger is a quirky,
small-scale, 17th-century
smugglers? inn with 23
rooms. With the South West
Coastal Path close by, it?s an
excellent choice for walkers
looking to explore the
rugged Cornish coastline.?
Book by April 30 for stays
until April 30 2018. Quote:
?TELP?; 0333 222 1794; see
terms: telegraph.co.uk/
tt-the-lugger
y article.
Again, word came back. ?Nice piece,?
it said, ?but you seem to have omitted
some of your difficulties on the road.
Perhaps a list of gas stations would be
of use to your readers??
GETTY IMAGES
16
The Daily Telegraph Saturday 31 March 2018
***
YOUR
STORIES
Have you ever been
touched by the kindness of
strangers on your travels?
Please write to
travelviews@
telegraph.co.uk
?The welcome,
the shared meal,
the reaching out
of two cultures?
Michelle Jana Chan
S
FORBIDDING
LANDSCAPE
A Tuareg tribesman
proved a lucky
charm for one
traveller stuck in
the desert, left
?He nodded
and爈eft us as
mysteriously as
he had appeared?
Peter Hughes
I
was on my way to Timbuktu
when I was the beneficiary of an
act of empathy almost mystical
in its surprise. The stranger
could hardly have been more strange,
nor, it turned out, could he have
been爇inder.
It was January 1971 and two of us
were attempting to drive across the
ome say Sana?a is the oldest
continuously inhabited city in
the world, founded by Shem,
son of Noah, and the origin of
all truly Arabic people. I entered the
Old Town by the throat-like archway
of Bab Al-Yaman, to wander between
the towering six or seven-storey
homes built a millennium ago in mud
with alabaster friezes in gypsum and
Koranic calligraphy embossed above
arched windows.
Along the narrow alleys there were
men manoeuvring wheelbarrows
laden with bales of wire and bolts of
cloth, children playing with spinning
tops and a woman carrying a Singer
sewing machine on her head. Fruit-
Sahara to the ancient desert city in
Mali. Fabled for 700 years, Timbuktu,
at the time of our journey, was known
chiefly for being among the remotest
places on Earth.
For four days we had driven south
through Algeria across a flat gravel
plain, following a track waymarked by
carcasses of dead sheep tossed from
trucks, battered fragments of
abandoned vehicles, rock cairns and
the occasional oil drum left by
the燜rench.
In Mali the road deteriorated. Broad
pools of sand as fine as cement powder
flooded across the track. Wheel marks
swooped to either side to skirt the
foot-deep ruts in the middle. We
SANA?A TO
SAVOUR
A chance meeting
led to an
enchanting
encounter in
Yemen, above
sellers were touting pomegranates,
pink mangoes and persimmons,
besides traders offering up
frankincense and myrrh.
Then a woman and I caught each
other?s eye, down from the mosque in
Harat Mansur. She spontaneously
asked me to lunch and I accepted, of
course. It is encounters such as these
that can become the most enchanting
of a trip; for me they are the greatest
reason to travel. It continues to
astonish me how often strangers reach
out this way.
Behind the closed doors of a home,
this was my first chance to see the
faces of the veiled women I had heard
were the most beautiful in the world.
Sa?ada, my impulsive host, was lovely:
a mother of four with olive eyes and a
flawless complexion. Her daughters
were pretty, too. But it was her servant
who was the kind of woman that men
go to war over: dark, polished skin, full
lips, a swaying walk. She could have
been a child of the Queen of Sheba,
said to have ruled Yemen a thousand
years ago.
A meal almost miraculously
appeared on the table. We tore apart
unleavened flat bread, dipping it into
saltah stew with fenugreek froth, pots
of soft, broad beans and a vegetable
ratatouille with peppers and tomatoes.
I remember the taste of aniseed,
fennel and cumin ? as Sa?ada urged me
to eat more, while showing me
pictures of her family, touching my
hair, holding my face in between her
hands like a prayer, even pinching me
in the ribs to say I hadn?t eaten
enough. Before I left, she gave me
grapes and sweet honey-cake and
Yemeni coffee made from qusr, the
husk, which is boiled with cinnamon
and cardamom.
The kindness of Sa?ada. Above all, it
was her welcome into her home; the
shared meal; the snatched
conversation; the reaching out of two
women across cultures ? that I will
always remember most about Yemen.
ploughed into one of these sand lakes,
hoping to power our way through.
Within 50 yards we were stuck.
Working in temperatures of more
than 86F (30C), we set about the
laborious routine to free ourselves.
First one side of the car was jacked up,
then the other, so sand could be dug
out from under it. We had strips of
chain link fencing to lay under the
wheels for grip. After two hours we
had moved the car six feet.
A Tuareg in blue robe and white
turban appeared from the desert.
He gestured that the easiest thing
would be to pick the car up and place
it on firm ground. We agreed and
suggested he helped. For a while he
WE SHOULD BE KIND
ON HOLIDAY, TOO
SHOW A
BIT OF
SENSITIVITY
婤e on sunburn
patrol. If you see
a fellow Briton
with爌inking
shoulders, let
them know and
offer them a
splodge of the
white stuff.
婭f you see a
group photo
being taken, offer
to take it so the
photographer
can be in it, too.
婭f you spot a
family on a plane
split up by the
randomness of
the seating
allocation, offer
to give up
your爏eat.
THINK OF
FRIENDS
BACK HOME
婼end that
postcard (below).
You can?t pin
a燱hatsapp
message to
a爁ridge. Keep
notes on special
places you?ve
visited so you can
advise friends
who might go
there later.
婤e sparing
with your social
media bragging.
BE KIND TO
LOCALS
婻emember that
many tourist
industries are
built on a tipping
culture. Chances
are your �is
worth a lot more
to your waiter
than it is to you,
just read up
on爓hat?s
appropriate
before you go.
婫ive locals 
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