close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Guardian Weekend — January 20, 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
Elena Ferrante: my new column, my ?rst love
Clive James on The Crown
Can our marriage survive polyamory?
20.01.18
Kate Moss talks wild times, heroes and her charity shop habit*
*Outfit by Oxfam
Starters
5 Hadley Freeman
6 Tim Dowling Plus Bim Adewunmi
8 Your view Plus Stephen Collins
10 Q&A Sarah Millican, comedian
13 Experience I?m a
record-breaking wing-walker
Features
14 ?Oh, I love a charity
shop? From good causes
to bad boys: Kate Moss
talks to David Bailey
22 Hit the gas Can an exracing driver convince the world
hydrogen cars are the future?
32 ?You blame yourself?
James Bulger?s mother
Behind the scenes of
today?s cover story, p14:
looks燽ack, 25 years on
David Bailey with Kate
42 Pillow talk Getting
Moss, dancing to Harry
enough sleep ? or too much?
Nilsson. ?Every shoot we
50 Take a bow Clive James
do is wild,? says Moss
wallows in The Crown
Fashion
53 Blind date Thom meets Grace
54 Cag-cool Anoraks updated
58 All ages Go green
60 The edit Top 10 sporty buys
61 Jess Cartner-Morley Chunky sweater, ?oaty skirt
63 Beauty Sali Hughes picks the best winter nail treats
Space
66 Le chic Brilliant colours light up a Paris ?at
70 The edit Ten of the best table lamps
71 Alys Fowler Why you should sow chillies now
73 Let?s move to Finnieston, Glasgow
Family
74 Anita, Marc and Andrea An experiment in polyamory
77 Is my boyfriend bisexual? Ask Annalisa Barbieri
79 The secret to Getting on with your child?s partner.
Plus,燗 letter to? you and me, ?ve years ago
Body & mind
80 Oliver Burkeman Meditate on this. Plus My life in sex
82 Zoe Williams Fortysomething ? and on the run
83 The balance Plus Sharmadean Reid
Back
85 Coco Khan Plus Crossword and Quiz
86 Elena Ferrante My ?rst love
83
54
50
70
Berger & Wise
BERGERANDWYSE.COM. COVER: DAVID BAILEY. KATE MOSS WEARS LAIRD & CO
FEDORA, �.99, AND JAEGER JACKET, �,燨XFAM.ORG.UK/SHOP. THIS PAGE: JON
GORRIGAN; BEN LAMB; PAL HANSEN, ALL FOR THE GUARDIAN
This product is made from sustainably managed forest and controlled
sources. Printed by Roto Smeets Group BV, Deventer, Netherlands
FENTON BAILEY
Front Contents
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 3
USA
San Francisco
Salinas
2
Yosemite
1
Merced
Las Vegas
3
Monterey
3
Bakers?eld
1
Los Angeles
By Rail
By Coach
1
Nights in hotel
1
Grand Canyon
1
Williams
Front
Hadley Freeman
From Monica Lewinsky to Tonya Harding, 90s outcasts are finally getting their due
ILLUSTRATION: THE PROJECT TWINS/SYNERGY
L
Last
week marked the 20th anniversary
of what was once known as the Monica
o
Lewinsky scandal but is now, rightly,
L
rreferred to as the Bill Clinton scandal
? and my goodness, in today?s new postWeinstein light, Lewinsky?s story looks
W
almost unrecognisable. There was a time
a
when it seemed she would for ever be
w
known for a blowjob she gave her boss
k
when she was 22. Trapped on her knees
w
iin history?s amber, Lewinsky?s legacy was
decided not by the politicians and so-called friends who so eagerly
betrayed her, but the media, and especially, it pains me to say, by
female writers. Novelist Erica Jong expressed concern about all the
?attacks? the president suffered from ?the young women in the
office. And particularly the ones who are a bit father-obsessed... and
feel neglected.? New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd, who won
a燩ulitzer for her coverage, described Lewinsky as ?a ditzy, predatory
White House intern who might have lied under oath for a job at Revlon?.
Twenty years seems to be the amount of time it takes for the world to
take a breath and re-evaluate a demonised woman. Now 44, Lewinsky
has built a reputation for herself as an anti-bullying advocate, and many
of her earlier critics have apologised. The 90s was dominated by women
who became tabloid punchlines, and many are now benefiting from
long overdue reassessments. Marcia Clark, the lead prosecutor in the
1995 OJ Simpson trial, and for so long a byword for bad hair, was finally
refashioned as the moral centre of Ryan Murphy?s 2016 miniseries The
People Vs OJ Simpson. Murphy showed us a Clark who was the victim
of a misogynistic public mood, which mocked her divorce and her
perm, instead of listening to her righteous arguments ? just as it allowed
Simpson?s celebrity to obscure his long history of domestic abuse.
(Murphy is now planning a miniseries about Lewinsky and Clinton.)
Famously, Anita Hill?s 1991 televised testimonies that Clarence
Thomas had sexually harassed her, in the face of his denials, led to
her being described by one journalist as ?nutty and a bit slutty?. Hill?s
testimony did not stop Thomas from becoming a supreme court judge
but ? proving that history has a sense of humour, only with a very long
lead time ? Hill was recently announced as the head of a commission on
sexual harassment in the workplace, organised by women in film.
Finally, I, Tonya, the forthcoming and excellent film about the
disgraced ice skater Tonya Harding, emphasises that, although Harding
d
will for ever be remembered as the woman who kneecapped her rival,
w
Nancy Kerrigan (even though she didn?t), she was very much a victim
N
in the whole story. After a viciously abusive childhood, followed by an
even more abusive relationship, she entered a world that refused to
e
ssee her as anything more than white trash. Harding has always insisted
sshe never knew about her ex?s plan to arrange the assault on Kerrigan,
tthough she did cover up for him afterwards; given his history of beating
tthe absolute crap out of her, this is not exactly surprising.
So times change, but they also don?t. The Clinton anniversary
ccoincided with the publication in Le Monde of a letter, signed by 100
women, including Catherine Deneuve, about the increased awareness
w
of sexual harassment by powerful men. The signatories fretted about
o
tthe real ?victims?: ?men who?ve been disciplined in the workplace
when their only crime was to touch a woman?s knee, try to steal a爇iss,
w
ttalk about intimate things during a work meal, or send sexuallyccharged messages to women who did not return their interest?.
No matter how many lessons we learn from the past, there will always
be people willing to go to the mat to defend the rights of powerful men
b
tto exploit female subordinates. They claim that a hand brushing a爇nee
iis now ?under the same umbrella? as rape, wilfully ignoring the fact
tthat the umbrella here isn?t sex but power and the imbalances thereof.
This is what was consistently overlooked every time Lewinsky was
T
described as ?predatory?; this is what still gets overlooked, every time
d
ssomeone writes that modern feminism is ?returning to a victimology
paradigm?, as American literary critic Daphne Merkin claimed recently.
p
Lewinsky, Hill and Harding in particular are stories of punching
down: women who were exploited ? first by men, then by the global
d
media ? and who had no recourse to reply. This is not ?victimology?,
m
but an acknowledgment that the power dynamics are not always
b
equal. It?s great that this is at last being recognised; but it is telling that
e
we had to wait until they were no longer part of public life.
w
After all, there was one woman who was demonised in the 90s and
sstill is, because she has yet to retreat into the shadows. But don?t worry,
Hillary Clinton: when you?re 90, the world might finally forgive you, too H
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 5
Front Tim & Bim
A French TV crew arrives ? to ask me about bananas
Some years ago, a television crew came to my house to interview
me about men and crying. They seemed determined to portray me
as someone who thought men shouldn?t cry. I maintained that I?d
wept only the night before, while watching a programme about
children being sent to boarding school. ?Which is weird,? I said,
?because I probably wouldn?t cry about sending my own kids to
boarding school.? This statement was greeted by a stony silence.
?Well, not in front of them,? I added. ?I mean, I would probably
cry later, about the money.?
After that, I resolved to refuse all future invitations to appear on
TV, but none came. When a French TV journalist contacted me recently about doing an
interview, I?d long since forgotten about this resolution. I said I was available, at that point
fairly certain it would never happen.
?By the way,? I say to my wife on Friday,
?a French journalist is coming to interview
me this afternoon.?
?What for?? she asks.
?It?s to do with an article I wrote two
months ago,? I say. ?Which I ought
to爎eread.?
At 3pm, I am pacing the ground floor,
looking alternately at my phone and
out 爐he window.
?What are you doing?? the youngest one,
who is busy playing Fifa 17, asks.
?French television is coming to interview
me,? I say. ?But they?re late.?
?Why you?? he says.
?I?m huge in France,? I say.
A taxi pulls up outside.
?Oh, bollocks,? he says, letting in a goal.
The doorbell rings. At the door, I find the
journalist and, behind him, a woman laden
with equipment.
?Nice to see you,? he says, shaking my
hand. ?Sorry we are late.?
?That?s OK,? I say.
?Can we do this again?? he asks.
?Do what again?? I say.
He means the handshake: they wish to
film me answering the door, before it gets
too dark. The camera operator sets up her
tripod on the pavement, but decides it
would be better for the reconstruction if
we爏hake hands halfway along the garden
path. I don?t like how eager this makes me
seem, but I agree. We do two takes.
Afterwards, the camera operator sets up
some lights at one end of the sitting room
and moves an armchair forward.
?I show you my questions,? the journalist
says. ?So you know what to expect.?
He produces a notebook with three
numbered questions neatly written in
English. The first restates the premise of
6 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
the article I wrote, and doesn?t require me
to say much beyond ?Yes?. The second asks
me to sum up my findings. The third
contains the phrase ?editorial position?.
?This is correct, in English?? he asks.
?Yes,? I say. ?Editorial position is fine.?
He turns the page. ?Ah, OK,? he says. He
reads question 5 aloud. I try to listen, but
my eye is snagged on question 4, which
he?s skipped. It?s right at the top of the page
and it appears to say: ?Would you like to
touch my banana??
He moves on to question 6. I blink hard
and adjust my glasses. Question 4 still
clearly says, ?Would you like to touch my
banana?? My mind begins to race.
?This is OK?? the journalist says, after
reading the last question.
?Yes, although??
?We?re ready,? the camera operator says.
At her bidding, I sit in the armchair. The
journalist sits down behind the camera and
reads question 1.
?Yes, exactly,? I say. Normally at this
stage, I would be worried about my posture
or the titles on the bookshelf directly
behind my head, but now I can think only
of question 4.
At one point, my wife pauses halfway
down the stairs and peers in. I raise my
eyebrows as if to say ?Help!?, but as far as
she is concerned, I?m a deer caught in some
headlights and she?s just a car passing in
the other direction.
?So he didn?t ask if you wanted to touch
his banana?? she says after they?ve gone.
?No,? I say. ?But I spent the whole
interview thinking about my answer.?
?Is it some kind of psychological
technique, do you think??
?The worst thing is,? I say, ?I never even
brought it up.?
Briefly noted
Adewunmi
Bim Ad
I began the year
in duty free, glum
at the prospect of
leaving family and
friends once again
just because I have
a great job that
I love in a city thousands of miles
away (that I am slowly claiming as
mine with every passing day).
What the brain knows is not
necessarily what the body feels. And
so, feeling very sorry for myself,
I爏ought to plug the hollow feeling ?
one I爃aven?t felt with such intensity
in 25 years, since Dad loaded my
boarding school suitcase into the car
? with ?bougie parfum閑?. Thank
you, Jo Malone.
Seeking pleasure in carefully
concocted scent was ingrained in
me燽y my mother. For her, scent is
glamour, and the heavier the scent,
the more substantial she feels.
My爁irst perfume memory of my
mother is Chlo� she has always
believed in the classics. Catching
a爓hiff of it ? a much rarer occurrence
as I get older ? sends me back to being
five or six, and rubbing my wrist on
hers to transfer the scent before she
walked out of the door. Sometimes,
Mum would spray a little in the air
and tell me to walk swiftly into the
misty cloud. As it settled, every little
droplet felt like a爐iny anointing.
The thing about perfume, even
the mass-produced stuff, is that it?s
always perfectly unique; your own
body chemistry reacts to and alters
the scent as it chooses. If you can?t
afford haute couture (and with its
prohibitive price tags, who can?),
perfume is the next best thing when
it comes to exclusivity: the most
customisable luxury.
This shopping trip I went fruity:
something to fool my body into
feeling summery for the dark few
months ahead. And爓ow, I smell
like燼 new peach.
ALAMY
Tim Dowling
AC A DE M Y
JUDI
A W A R D�
W I N N E R?
DE NCH
ALI
FA Z A L
Kevin Maher, The Times
THE TIMES
Empire
Radio Times
Woman & Home
Empire
Good Housekeeping
Baz Bamigboye, Daily Mail
Total Film
ON BLU -R AY
& DV D MONDAY
?
�!
Front Your view
PETE SOUZA/NEWSCOM/ALAMY; ALAMY
As an experiment, I am sure many of us can do without our smartphones
for a short period (Off The Leash, 13 January). But how about discussing
whether we should be aiming to live without them permanently? That
would have been interesting. I?d miss maps most ? I get lost easily.
Theo Morgan London W9
Welcome to your new-look
Weekend. We?ve given the
magazine a makeover, starting
with our new Family section:
here you?ll find Annalisa
Barbieri?s indispensable advice
column and A letter to?, as
well as expert tips and a weekly
feature. We?ve added a燾olumn
on how busy people get stuff
done, and work/life advice
from entrepreneur Sharmadean
Reid. Coco Khan charts her
attempts to grow up, while
novelist Elena Ferrante writes
her first weekly column.
Meanwhile, our brilliant food
writers move to Feast magazine,
joining an unbeatable lineup:
don?t miss Grace Dent?s first
restaurant review. Enjoy!
Melissa Denes Editor
Stephen Collins
8 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
Small data
Hadley Freeman?s
column (13 January)
struck a chord with
me, and probably
with a lot of people,
particularly women.
Self-doubt can be
paralysing, yet those
who feel it the most
are often the most
capable. I nearly
didn?t send this in;
then I thought again.
As a young black woman, much
of Afua Hirsch?s article (Under
My Skin, 13 January) resonated
deeply. The racial stereotypes
society clings to (many rooted in
18th-century pseudo-science)
have a palpable effect on interpersonal relationships, and it is
frustrating to see any attempt at
discourse met with resentment,
hostility and bigotry.
Jessica Duncan
Witham, Essex
Jacqui Betts
Nunney, Frome
While it is disappointing to see the Obama legacy attacked
(Me And Mr President, 13 January), I suspect his successes
(open relations with Cuba, universal healthcare) will be the
final resting places for future diplomacy and national policy.
We?ll see him as the president who played the long game.
Steven Woodruff Pasadena, California
Last week, six busy
people attempted
a smartphone detox.
You said:
40% Delete all social
media apps
32% My smartphone
has improved my life
28% Revert to an
old-style phone
Email weekend@theguardian.com or comment at theguardian.
com by noon on Monday for inclusion. Letters are subject to our
terms and conditions; see http://gu.com/letters-terms. To
contribute to A letter to or My life in sex, email, respectively,
family@theguardian.com and sex@theguardian.com; include
your address and phone number.
Front Q&A
st
eate ent?
r
g
My ievem
ach rned a art
I tu ken he er
bro a care
into
Sarah Millican, comedian
Born in South Shields, Millican, 42, was 29 and working
in燼爅obcentre when her first marriage ended.
She turned her divorce into standup, won best newcomer
for her燿ebut Edinburgh show in 2008, and had
her own BBC爏eries. Last year, she wrote her first book,
How To Be Champion; she is currently touring
her show Control Enthusiast. She is married
to the comedian Gary Delaney, and爈ives in燙heshire.
What would your superpower be?
To touch-type. My entire book was typed with
three fingers and a very confident space-bar thumb.
When were you happiest?
The day our rescue dog came for a爒isit. I burst into tears.
And my (most recent) wedding, of course.
Is it better to give or receive?
I like giving presents at Christmas.
But if it?s oral sex, definitely receive.
What is your greatest fear?
That when I?m having a cup of (decaf) tea before bed, I?ll
discover the biscuit tin to be empty. Doesn?t happen a lot.
What was the best kiss of your life?
Just after our wedding. Neither of us really drinks,
so we were both sober, and it was our first kiss alone,
where people weren?t throwing rice at us.
I爃adn?t realised how much rice hurts.
Which living person do you most admire, and why?
My mam, dad and sister, who have all been through an
incredible amount. They?ve all had health problems and
have come through with strength, grace and positivity.
What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
I?m always a bit late, but I don?t mind that, because
it means that whoever I?m meeting is already there.
What is the trait you most deplore in others?
I hate it when people are later than me.
What makes you unhappy?
Being away from home. When I get back,
we have Maximum Home Days, where we put the fire on,
watch films we love and nap with animals.
10 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
Who would play you in the film of your life?
When I started doing standup, I爓as likened to Mrs
Doubtfire and Tootsie, so I?d be played by a very hairy man.
Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
?Have you got any sugar?? Because nobody
has sugar in their tea now, and I?m the freak.
What is the closest you?ve come to燿eath?
My sister saved me from drowning. I爏houted at her
because she pulled me out of the pool and hurt my arm.
What do you consider your greatest achievement?
That I turned a broken heart into a燾areer. That I hit rock
bottom and bounced back up a lot higher.
What is the most important lesson life has taught you?
Hard work pays off. And that there?s not only ?the one?:
you燾an have loads of husbands.
Tell us a secret
There are no secrets. Everything gets mined for comedy Rosanna Greenstreet
ANDY HOLLINGWORTH
What is your earliest memory?
I was five and playing Mary in the nativity. The doll playing
Jesus was dirty and covered in pen. I remember the teacher
saying: ?Sarah, cuddle the baby Jesus.? I?ve never really been
maternal. It was terrible casting.
What do you most dislike about your appearance?
Some days, all of it, but not all days.
We believe in a
different perspective.
We don?t in?ate prices just to reduce
them later on. We never have, and we
never will. Instead, we?d love to help
make your dream kitchen a reality, by
giving you an important part for free.
So in January, the sink cabinet is on us.
neptune.com
For full terms, visit neptune.com/kitchenoffer
Offer ends 31st January 2018.
activity and things could go wrong, but I said:
?Well, at 88爓hat does it matter? You?ve got
to爂o sometime; you might as well go in a blaze
of爂lory.?
When we landed the last time, I爏aid: ?Can I go
back up again now?? It felt really good to be up
there with the wind in my face, hitting speeds of
140mph. The wind blows your cheeks in and out.
I 爐hought: ?You know what, it will blow some of
my wrinkles away.? But I came down with a few
more than I went up with.
I had to get a doctor?s certificate to
say I was fit enough to do the stunt.
He asked me: ?What do you call old??
I爏aid: ?Well, I?m old when營燾an?t
It felt really
get out of bed, when I燾an?t get out
good to be up
of a燾hair, when I can?t help anyone
there with the
else, but not till then.? So he signed
wind in my face,
me off. Afterwards, he燼dmitted that
hitting speeds
he wondered whether he had done
of�0mph
the right thing. But he?s got a picture
of me on the wing up in his surgery,
so if anyone starts moaning, he
says: ?Look, that lady is 88 and she?s
not燾omplaining.?
Even at this age, I don?t have any
aches and pains. I do use a walker
to get around and can feel a bit
off燽alance if I don?t. My left leg gives
way from time to time and there?s
some numbness there, but you learn
to live with things.
At my age, a lot of people are stuck
in their ways. I don?t think any of my
friends from my retirement home
want to join me. I imagine most of
them think I?m mad. But I do think
people my age should be doing more
adventurous things. You shouldn?t
sit back and feel sorry for yourself.
I lost my husband 14 years ago and
that was hard, but you?ve got to get on with things.
I?m always amazed by the number of people who say: ?Oh,營燾ouldn?t do that.? But
Lots of people suggest I should be taking it easy,
there?s爊ot much to it, really. I燿on?t know where the desire to stand on the wing
but that?s rubbish. I?ll爃ave fun when I can.
of燼爌lane燾ame from. I?d moved into a residential home three爕ears ago and thought:
I?ve got two young grandsons. When I said I was
?What can I do when I?m 90??
going to do a wing-walk, one of them said: ?Well,
I considered skydiving or abseiling. When I decided on wing-walking, I爁igured there
if that?s what you really want to do.? He didn?t
was no reason not to do it straight away. I did my first wing-walk two years ago, on my 87th
say don?t do it, but... My other grandson said to
birthday. People said I was the oldest woman to do it.燭hen last June, aged 88, I did it again
his mother: ?Don?t encourage her, Mum.? I?ve
and broke my own record as the world?s oldest female爓ing-walker.
obviously got to teach the younger generations
There was something about being strapped to the wing of a bright-yellow 1944 Boeing?
how to live.
Stearman that captured my imagination. It?s very exciting. But the first time I did it, it was
Guinness World Records will verify my
a bit tame. This year, I said to the pilot: ?Can you make it a bit more adventuresome?? And
next爓ing-walk in March ? so then it will be
he said: ?I could do a loop-the-loop if you like??
official. And I?ll keep going: the world?s oldest
This time, he ended up doing half a loop, which was very effective. You go down
man爐o wing-walk is 95, so I?ll have to carry on
a燽it,爐hen straight up. It was windy, so all a bit wobbly. But you?re safely strapped in
till營?m 96. My doctor said: ?You can?t be beaten
with燼爃arness. The pilot makes sure everything is secure. I had thermal gloves on,
by a man, can you, Betty?? and I said: ?I most
earplugs and lots of layers. I燼lso had a neck brace ? you don?t have to, but I?ve got a bit
certainly will not.?
of燼燾ricked neck.
Betty Bromage
Both times, we took off from Gloucestershire airport and were in the air for 15 minutes.
You don?t sit on the wing ? you perch on what looks like a chair. I wasn?t nervous,
Do you have an experience to share?
exactly. But when you look at the propellers, you do feel a爈ittle strange. It also looks a
Email 爀xperience@theguardian.com
very long way down. You?re warned at the beginning that it?s a potentially dangerous
I?m a record-breaking wing-walker
AS TOLD TO SOPHIE HAYDOCK
TOM PILSTON FOR THE GUARDIAN
Front Experience
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 13
?I still turn up for work
wanting to get a picture
that hasn?t been done.
I still get excited,,
and I like being part of the process.
I mean, I?m still shocked
when I get a campaign?
Kate Moss talks to David Bailey
Portraits by David Bailey
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 15
Kate Moss Right. We?ve been given some questions, and I?m going to ask you: ?What is
the爓ildest shoot or trip you?ve been on together?? We haven?t been on any trips together
? but the wildest shoot?
David Bailey Every shoot we ever do.
KM Yeah, exactly. They?re all wild, they are.
Next question: ?What?s the worst thing you?ve ever said to each other in the heat of the
moment, and how did you get away with it?? I know what you said?
DB What did I say? ?You?re Kate Moss?, or something?
KM That was it! When I first met you, you walked into the dressing room and I was so
excited but really, really nervous, obviously, and scared. Terrified because everyone
had爐old me that you made every model cry.
DB I?ve never made models cry.
KM I was sitting having my hair and makeup done and you went, ?So you?re Kate Moss?
What?s all the fuss about?? And walked out!
Some girls would have taken that as an insult
whereas I was like, ?Yes. He is fucking Bailey!?
Not燼燿isappointment in any way, ever.
What are your pet hates? Stylists?
DB I don?t like pets. And yeah, I?m not mad about
stylists, because I can do my own.
KM Question three. ?Why do you think you have
both thrived for so long in your respective fields??
DB Why have you lasted for so long?
KM I think because I still turn up for work wanting
to get a picture that hasn?t been done. I爏till get
excited, and I like being part of the process of
KM: When I ?rst met
you, I爓as so excited
but scared. Terri?ed.
And you said:
?So you?re Kate Moss?
What?s all
the fuss about??
creating an image. I mean, I?m still shocked when
I get a campaign! What do you think? How many
years have you been doing this?
DB Sixty years.
KM Sixty years! And you?re still excited by it?
DB I haven?t got it right yet, that?s why.
KM You must have had a day of work where you
thought, I killed it?
DB No.
KM You never think that you smashed it?
DB No. I always think it could be better. When I爏ee
the contact sheets I?m so depressed.
KM Nothing?s good enough, is it? Perfectionist.
DB I always tell my assistants: most people have
a燡iminy Cricket on their shoulder ? I?ve got Stanley
Kubrick sitting on mine. And he was persistent.
KM What?s your favourite Stanley Kubrick film?
DB Probably Lolita. Peter Sellers ? it?s his best film.
He?s great in Doctor Strangelove as well.
KM I like him as Chauncey Gardiner.
DB The film Being There. I was going to make that
years ago.
KM Oh, I love that film. And I like Clockwork
Orange. I can watch that over and over again.
DB I was going to do that as well, with the Rolling
Stones ? with Andy Warhol and Mick Jagger. Mick
was going to be in the main gang and the other
gang was going to be [led by] Baby Jane Holzer.
Andy was going to make silk screens for the
backgrounds. Andrew Oldham, who was Mick?s
manager, wanted more for the Rolling Stones than
we had for the budget of the film ? and nobody
knew who the Rolling Stones were in America at
that time. So it never got made.
KM Kubrick did quite a good job, though.
DB He did a much better job. He saved me again.
What?s the next question?
KM Oh yes, sorry, going off-piste. When it comes to
charity, what are the particular stories and causes
that have stayed with you? I?ve been working with
Comic Relief for 10 years. I wear a爎ed nose.
DB The trouble with charity is that you can?t do it all
of the time and people get upset when you can?t.
Somebody once said, ?Can you do a charity for
tortoises?? I said, ?Well, they?re not very high on
my list, really. I love tortoises but there are more
urgent things with human beings at the moment.?
KM I work for Amfar every year, the Aids
foundation that Elizabeth Taylor started. It?s
amazing what they?ve done. George Michael gave
a lot to charity. I heard all the money he made
from Last Christmas went to Band Aid.
DB The concert was good.
KM Freddie Mercury and David Bowie was one of
the best duets ever.
DB There?s only been three times a man has stuck
his tongue down my throat and one of them was
Freddie Mercury at Band Aid.
KM [Gasps.] Oh, don?t. You couldn?t mind it,
though? It was Freddie! Wouldn?t you have been
a燽it pissed off if he didn?t try? He was the best gay
ever! Was he wearing Spandex? ?
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 17
Kate models clothes from oxfam.
org.uk/shop, including J燙ompton,
Sons & Webb Ltd jacket, �.99, this
page; 60s Saint Laurent coat, �,
opposite; vintage Trikki by Edna
Wallace leopard-print skullcap with
scarf, �.99, and George Simonton
Studio PVC-style coat, �99,
previous page; and vintage Gapelle
faux-fur coat, �, overleaf
KM: Have you donated
to charity shops
anonymously?
Could lots of us be
walking around
in Moss and
Bailey wardrobes?
DB: Could be
THE ORIGINAL
NORWEGIAN
VOYAGE
At 125 years-old,
no one knows these fjords,
mountains, and charming
communities better
than we do
Bergen - Kirkenes - Bergen
Spring & Summer: 1 Apr to 30 Sep 2018
12-DAY CLASSIC ROUND VOYAGE:
1. Bergen, the City of Seven Mountains
2. Stylish Art Nouveau town of 舕esund
3. The medieval royal city Trondheim
4. Bod� and the beautiful Lofoten Islands
5. Troms� is the capital of the Arctic
6. Honningsv錱, portal to the North Cape
FREE EXCURSION to the North Cape at the top of Europe
FREE EXCURSION Midnight Concert in the Arctic Cathedral, Troms�
9. Stunning scenery of Vester錶en and Lofoten
10. Seven Sisters and Torghatten mountains
11. Calling at Kristiansund and Molde
12. Return to Bergen and extend your trip
CALL: 0203 553 1608 | VISIT: www.hurtigruten.co.uk
12 DAYS FULL BOARD
INCLUDING TWO FREE EXCURSIONS
AND ONE � LA CARTE DINNER
Book before 31 Mar 2018
SELECT
FARE
FROM
�429PP
Terms and conditions: Offer of two free excursions and one � la carte dinner applies to new bookings only on Select fare 12-day Classic Round Voyages between 1 April and 30 September 2018.
Offer applies to bookings made between 26 December and 31 March. From price quoted is in GBP and are per person, based on full occupancy of an inside two-berth cabin, on a full-board basis.
Single supplements may apply. Cabins and excursions are subject to availability. Hurtigruten operates a ?exible pricing system and prices are capacity controlled, correct at time of booking.
Not included: travel insurance, luggage handling, international ?ights (unless otherwise stated), optional excursions or gratuities. Flights booked with Hurtigruten are ATOL protected (ATOL 3584).
All itineraries are subject to change due to local conditions. Please enquire for full itineraries and full booking terms and conditions.
� Hennie Blomsma
7. Kirkenes is near the Russian border
8. Hammerfest, the world?s most northern town
STYLING: JAMES BROWN AT AGENCY ARTISTS LDN. MAKEUP: SHARON DOWSETT AT CLM. HAIR: SALLY O?NEILL AT AGENCY ARTISTS LDN. RETOUCHING BY PAPERHATFTP.COM
DB I don?t remember! He came up behind me, twisted me round and stuck it in! [Laughs.]
KM I met Cleo Rocos, who used to hang out with him and Kenny Everett at the time, and
she was like, ?Oh Freddie and Kenny would?ve loved you!? And I was like, ?Don?t say that
? I爉issed out!? Kenny and Freddie. My dream team.
DB I didn?t know which way to go with this photoshoot, really. One side of me said we
should make it more fun, trousers that wouldn?t fit properly, but that would defeat the
purpose. You could have looked like Charlie Chaplin! That wouldn?t have made you like
buying clothes from charity shops.
KM Oh, I love a charity shop. Because you know what, all these vintage shops, they just go
and trawl all the charity shops.
DB They get in there early.
KM Yeah, and then put them in their shops for �0 because they know what a Balmain
shirt looks like. And designers go to vintage shops to copy the designs from yesteryear.
DB So the only way to do the shoot, really, was to
make it look like old-fashioned fashion pictures.
KM I love that picture of us ? me in the purple and
you in the turquoise, dancing to Harry Nilsson
(see contents page). We were listening to him last
night, playing Somewhere Over The Rainbow, in
a爏torm with forks of lightning, watching it from
the bay window seat. Apparently, Ringo was
really good friends with him?
DB John Lennon was. He?s been overlooked
hasn?t he, Harry? Great sense of humour.
KM Definitely, because I?d never heard of him
KM: ?From the age of
14 to 18, I got all my
clothes from Oxfam.
The high street was all
late-80s, but I wanted
to dress like a hippy?
and I like that old kind of music. And that bit in
Over The Rainbow ? there?s that long pause and
you think it?s over, and then: ?Chris, can I have
some scotch, water, matches, and heroin, please??
You wouldn?t get away with that now.
DB Can?t get away with anything now. That?s the
worst thing that?s happened, political correctness.
You never know who?s telling the truth, because
they can?t say what they think. It?s self-censorship.
KM What are the best things you?ve found in
a燾harity shop?
DB I don?t know, I don?t go to them often.
KM You could?ve fooled me! [Laughs.]
DB I know what the best thing is ? an accordion.
A爎eally fancy one. It was �0 and they said, ?Why
are you buying that?? I said, ?It?s a beautiful object.?
KM Oh, with all the mother of pearl and
everything ? lovely. That is a lot of money, though,
for a charity shop. Are you sure it was one?
From the age of 14 to 18 or 19, I got all my clothes
from Oxfam. And then I started making myself go
vintage so I didn?t have to trawl. You couldn?t buy
70s clothes in shops in the early 90s, it was all late80s clothes. I wanted to dress like a hippy ? those
ribbed jumpers, that was the only place to get
them. Bin liners full of clothes for � I remember
seeing Yves Saint Laurent suits from the 70s for
� or something ridiculous. Amazing.
What?s your favourite thing that you?ve donated
to charity?
DB My time.
KM Worth a fortune, dear! And you give a lot of
pictures and prints, away, don?t you?
DB To the right people.
KM Have you donated anonymously? Could
lots爋f爑s be walking around in Moss and
Bailey爓ardrobes?
DB Could be. Catherine [Bailey] takes all my
clothes down to the charity shop without telling
me. ?Where?s those Dickies I like?? ?Oh, they?ve
gone to the charity shop.? ?Where?s that shirt??
KM I do Oxfam and the Sue Ryder in Highgate.
I燿o my clean-outs ? an archive pile, a back-in-thewardrobe pile, and we take a pile to charity.
What are your top tips for charity-shop shopping?
DB Keep looking!
KM I used to walk around a lot when I was
younger, get the tube, and every time I passed
a燾harity shop I?d go in. I can sense if somewhere
has a good one. I bought a dress that belonged to
Errol Flynn?s wife. It was in Key West and the shop
had a picture of her wearing it, tulle with white
pearl and glass beads hanging off it.
DB Are there any more questions?
KM Nope, that?s it. Fabulous.
DB There you go, Joe.
KM That?s a wrap! Kate Moss wears Oxfam to燾elebrate the燾harity?s
75th year. The Oxfam show opens London fashion
week on 15 February, and will be live streamed on
Facebook. Visit facebook.com/oxfamG B
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 21
Baby,
you
can
drive
my
hydrogen
car
Inventor Hugo Spowers has a dream: to replace today?s cars with his own hydrogen
Photographs: Joel Redman
prototype. The Elon Musk of the Valleys takes Oliver Franklin-Wallis for a spin
In the
mid-1990s, Hugo Spowers ran a Formula
Three racing team. At the time, motorsport was in the pocket of big tobacco.
Every weekend, Formula One cars emblazoned with cigarette brands ?
Marlboro, Camel, Silk Cut ? raced on TV in front of millions. ?It was pretty
clear it was killing people,? Spowers says. ?Meanwhile, the industry was
portraying a link between smoking and winners. It was ludicrous. But
nobody was going against it.?
So when, in 1995, Spowers? team introduced a燾ar decorated
with an anti-smoking campaign, it caused a commotion. At
a爌arty the night before the car was set to debut at the British
Grand Prix, the chairman of the British Racing Drivers? Club
summoned Spowers, outraged. ?He bellowed at me for a爁ull
five minutes, about how motorsport needed its sponsors,
and ?not pinkos like you?,? Spowers says now, chuckling. But
Spowers was unmoved: he knew he was right. Furthermore, he
believed it made financial sense: the relationship with tobacco
was tainting the sport for businesses that didn?t want to be
associated with smoking.
But industries are slow to change, and Spowers? scheme
found few backers. Disillusioned and low on funds, he quit
racing soon after. It wasn?t until 2006 that motorsport finally
banned tobacco advertising completely.
So Spowers is used to being doubted, mocked and shouted
down. But he has also learned to be patient. Sometimes,
the only way to tell the difference between a crackpot and
a爒isionary is to wait a while.
Now 57, Spowers has the grey hair of an ageing rock star,
a爎uddy complexion and a dishevelled charm. When we meet,
a燾hecked shirt is poking through large holes in his red cableknit jumper; his trousers are being held up by a belt made from
an upcycled fire hose. For the last 16 years, Spowers has been
founder and chief engineer of Riversimple, a爏mall hydrogenfuelled car company based in Llandrindod Wells, in mid-Wales.
In 2016, it unveiled its first production-ready car: the Rasa,
a爎adical, ultra-light two-seater powered by a hydrogen fuel
cell. This year, the company will roll out a beta test of 20 cars in
Monmouthshire and if all goes well, Spowers hopes to have the
car on the market in 2019. ?As far as we can tell,? he says, ?we
are the only independent hydrogen car startup in the world.?
Riversimple?s headquarters lie on a small industrial park in
otherwise picturesque Welsh countryside: the surrounding
hills are flocked with sheep;爐he main office overlooks a stream.
Inside, engineers work at desks upcycled from pallets. Spowers
Hugo Spowers and his wife Fiona Clancy at their Riversimple HQ
employs 19 people, and today several engineers in the workshop are huddled
around the chassis of the first of Rasa?s beta test cars. This has just arrived
from the supplier in Melton Mowbray (Riverside tries to use UK-based
suppliers where possible) and is undergoing testing before the other 19 are
ordered.
The Rasa (short for tabula rasa, or clean slate) is baby blue and has a sleek,
friendly design. Its unusual, aerodynamic shape was designed by Chris Reitz,
who also designed the modern Fiat 500. ?We want to design something
people want, not just for eco guilt,? Spowers says. The entire car weighs just
580kg, or less than half a Volkswagen Golf and a quarter of a Tesla Model S.
Its chassis is carbon fibre, and it uses low-rolling resistance wheels.
Every part has been painstakingly engineered for lightness; the lower the
weight, the less energy required. The car can do 0-60mph in 10 seconds ? the
equivalent of a Ford Fiesta ? and has a range of around 300 miles. But it does
that on just 1.5kg of hydrogen, using a tiny 8.5kW fuel cell. Toyota?s hydrogen
car, the Mirai, uses 5kg to achieve the same range.
The fuel cell is supplemented by a燽ank of supercapacitors ? extremely
fast-charging batteries ? that supply four wheel-mounted electric motors
with additional power for acceleration. An innovative regenerative braking
system captures most of the energy wasted during braking, putting it
back into the supercapacitors. When combined with the fuel cell, Spowers
says, that lets the Rasa achieve the equivalent of more than 250 miles per
gallon.燫unning on hydrogen from renewable sources, that would make it ?
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 25
a燾ontender for the most sustainable
car in the world.
The engineers roll the Rasa out
into the car park, and Spowers offers
to take me for a drive. Its gull-wing
doors swing open to reveal a sparse
if surprisingly spacious cabin. ?All
strapped in OK?? He flicks a series
of switches; the fuel cell and air
compressor burble into life, creating
a great whooshing noise. It feels like
sitting in a DeLorean.
This car is clearly a prototype
? there?s no heating and the
dashboard?s LCD screen isn?t
working (Spowers says these issues
will be fixed in the beta cars) ? but
it?s surprisingly polished. We whiz
out of Riversimple?s lot. Spowers
is in his element; back when he ran
his Formula Three team, he?d race
a爈ittle, too, and he drives fast, with
the practised economy of a semiprofessional. That?s the other selling
point: ?It?s awfully good fun,? he
says, grinning.
Workers with the Rasa, which is less than half the weight of a VW Golf
For years, Riversimple was just
Spowers and an idea. The family was supported by Hugo?s wife
Fiona, then in a senior role at advertising agency TBWA (they
have a�-year-old son, Stirling, named after Stirling Moss,
and a daughter, Djazia, 15). These days, Fiona is a燿irector at
Riversimple; she has curly blond hair, rectangular glasses and a
calm, concise demeanour, a爊atural counterweight to Spowers?
academic爀nthusiasm.
The first car that Riversimple built was the LIFECar, a
collaboration with the classic carmaker Morgan. When the
LIFECar debuted at the Geneva Motor Show in 2008, it was
heralded as a breakthrough: it could hit 90mph and weighed
just 650g. ?It was to demonstrate, in 2007, that a zeroemissions sports car was possible,? recalls Charles Morgan,
then爉anaging燿irector of the carmaker. But the company
deemed it too expensive to continue. ?Breakthroughs are
never爀asy,? Morgan says.
Riversimple then adapted the LIFECar technology into
a爏mall, low-cost, Smart car-like prototype called the Hyrban.
Plans were floated for a consumer trial in Leicester, but the
project failed to secure funding and political approval. ?At the
same time, the crash happened, and that took an enormous
amount of courage out of all investors,? Fiona tells me over
lunch in Riversimple?s boardroom. ?The appetite for radical
ideas evaporated.?
I ask why they never gave up on the idea. ?From time to time,
we are in the doldrums, but not for long,? Fiona says. ?There is
always momentum and progress.?
?We haven?t actually got to the point of mortgaging the
house,? Hugo says.
?Yes, we have.? Fiona turns her head, exasperated. ?What do
you mean??
?Oh, yes,? Hugo says, sheepishly. ?Yes, yes, yes, we have, yes.?
In 2015, Riversimple reached a breakthrough: the company
was awarded a � grant by the Welsh government to develop
the Rasa. This was followed by a ?2m grant from the EU for the beta test.
Then, in June 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union.
Spowers is nervous about what Brexit means for the company. ?Those
EU grants will disappear, and also the EIB [European Investment Bank].? At
a recent conference, he met an EIB representative who confirmed his fears
about future funding for UK projects. ?He said the sense there is that, if the
telephone rings and it starts with a 44, don?t bother picking up.?
The car industry has been slow to kick its fossil-fuel habit: electric vehicles
(EVs) still make up less than 2% of all new cars sold. But that is expected
to change rapidly: in 2017, the UK and France announced their intention
to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2040. Germany and China
are expected to follow suit. All Volvos will be electric or hybrid from 2019.
Every爉ajor manufacturer is investing heavily in the development of
electric燾ars such as the Tesla Model 3 and Nissan Leaf, which run on lithiumion batteries.
For a long time, the industry has explored another alternative to the
combustion engine: hydrogen fuel
cells. To put it simply, fuel cells work
by electrochemically combining
hydrogen, stored in a pressurised
tank, with air to generate an electric
current; the only emission is water
vapour. However, development of
fuel cell technology has been slow.
They are expensive to produce
(platinum is a key component), as
is hydrogen. The gas is flammable
and difficult to store. And while
hydrogen can be produced using
renewable energy via electrolysis
(using a current to separate water
into hydrogen and oxygen) it?s more
commonly produced from natural ?
?Now, if the
telephone rings
and it starts
with a 44, the
EU won?t bother
picking up?
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 27
gas, releasing carbon dioxide in the
process. For that reason, Tesla?s
Elon Musk has called the technology
?fool cells?. There?s an industry joke:
hydrogen is the fuel of the future ?
and it always will be.
A longstanding defence made
by爃ydrogen advocates is that it is
more practical. Hydrogen cars can
travel more than 300 miles on a
single tank and爎efuel in minutes,
similar to refuelling a petrol car,
whereas today?s EVs take several
hours to charge.
?It takes five minutes to fill a car
with petrol. A燭esla is 30 minutes
with a supercharger, and that?s to
80% [charged],? Spowers says. ?So
for a motorway services with 20
petrol pumps, you?d need to replace
them with 120 chargers to get the
same throughput of cars. Each Tesla
charger is 120kW, so that means
you?d need a 14.4mW substation ?
the equivalent of powering 32,000
Work in progress: ?We want to design something people want, not just for eco guilt?
homes in the UK. Charging one
battery car is very easy; filling one
hydrogen car is impossible. But
as爕ou scale, that situation completely reverses.?
in processes like fuel cells.? Toyota expects 30% of vehicles to be hydrogen
As batteries and hydrogen gas simply store energy, they don?t
powered by 2050.
in themselves reduce carbon emissions ? rather, they move the
But Spowers? real criticism of battery-electric cars is much simpler: it?s
emissions problem on to the electricity grid: the energy still
that they are too heavy. ?The top of the range燭esla爃as a battery heavier
has to be produced somewhere. Which is fine in places such as
than our car,? he says. He?s not against batteries; he?s just as critical of
California, where home solar panels are practical year round,
manufacturers trying to put hydrogen into existing cars. ?That?s why it?s so
but less so in countries where the grid runs on dirty coal and
expensive, because you?re trying to put it into conventional cars. Whereas if
natural gas. Add in the emissions of making the battery and,
you design燼燾ar around the characteristics爋f hydrogen, you can essentially
according to some academic studies, an electric car actually
work燼round those barriers and they all disappear.?
emits more CO2 over its lifespan than an efficient petrol vehicle.
Hugo Spowers had a privileged upbringing. His father, William, an
Solar and wind power are intermittent, which is why
Australian, established the books department at Christie?s auction house
governments are piling money into grid storage technologies.
and was an avid horticulturalist, establishing one of the country?s largest
Therein may lie hydrogen?s advantage: it can be produced
private arboretums. Spowers credits his environmentalism to weekends
using excess renewables energy at peak time, then stored in
working in the gardens. ?I grew up wanting to make wildlife documentaries,?
tanks or underground caverns. Moreover, because hydrogen
he says. ?Then, at 15, I caught the motor racing bug.? After Eton, he studied
emits no carbon when burned, it can be used to supplement or
engineering science at Oxford, and fell in with the Dangerous Sports Club,
replace natural gas (methane) in heating homes and businesses
a爏ociety that became notorious for
? responsible for nearly a third of the UK?s carbon emissions.
staging extreme and surreal stunts.
To date, that has been considered too expensive. But so, too,
The group is credited with inventing
will be the process of upgrading the electricity grid to deal with
zorbing and bungee jumping;
electric cars.
Spowers claims to be the first ever to
At the 2017 World Economic Forum in Davos, a consortium
jump head first.
of companies including Toyota, Honda, Daimler, Shell and
After university, he got a job as a
BMW announced the formation of the Hydrogen Council,
mechanic working on racing cars.
which will invest in hydrogen research and lobbying. Japan has
He became intimately familiar with
announced its intention to become the world?s first ?hydrogen
car design: the difference between
society?, aiming to have 35 hydrogen fuel stations in operation
brackets made in Britain and Italy;
by 2020.
the benefits of lightness. His first
Toyota, whose Prius popularised the hybrid car, is betting
car was a Pelland, a rare kit car with
heavily on hydrogen, with a �,000 consumer sedan called the
a fibreglass body. ?It was incredibly
Mirai, fuel-cell buses and trucks in development. ?As a爏torage
lightweight. I could pick the front
medium, it?s really quite interesting,? says Jon Hunt, who works
end up in a tight parking space and
for Toyota?s hydrogen business. ?You can ship it in the gas grid
move it,? he says. In 1982, he and ?
network, you can burn it in a燿omestic boiler, you can use it
?When you have
a bright new
idea, all the talk
goes straight
to the reason
it can?t be done?
28 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
some colleagues built a car ?on three
and sixpence? and entered it into
the Le Mans 24 Hours. Soon after, he
founded Prowess Racing and entered
Formula Three.
When Spowers quit motorsport, he
considered leaving the car industry
altogether. He immersed himself in
the writings of leading ecologists
(Amory Lovins, Paul Hawken) and
became interested in the study of
complex systems. In 1996, he
enrolled in a residential course
Hawken was teaching at Schumacher
College in Totnes, Devon. During an
extracurricular weekend rockclimbing trip, Hawken ? whose book
The Ecology Of Commerce Spowers
credits as a爉ajor influence ?
convinced him of the potential of
fuel cells.
Spowers studied for an MBA (his
thesis was on the feasibility of fuel
cell cars) and came to a dramatic
conclusion: that in order for the
Hugo Spowers test-drives the Rasa in the Elan Valley in Wales
car industry to be sustainable, it?s
not just a爍uestion of hydrogen
or batteries ? it needs an entirely
different business model.
it?s going to happen,? Spowers says. Recently, the company has started to
Traditional car companies ? in fact, traditional corporations,
attract international interest, particularly from China, but those offers would
period ? Spowers says, will never solve our environmental
require outsourcing manufacturing and selling the Rasa outright ? which
problems. Publicly listed companies are driven by shareholder
goes against everything Spowers believes in.
returns, shareholder returns by profits, and profits by selling
Ultimately, Riversimple?s success may depend on factors outside his
as many goods as possible ? and, therefore, using up as many
control. Widespread infrastructure for hydrogen refuelling is at least
natural resources as possible. ?Your interest is maximising
a燿ecade away. Meanwhile, battery technology continues to fall in cost, and
resource consumption. That?s what maximises your profit.?
energy-dense, solid-state versions, which are expected to charge faster and
So rather than sell Rasas, Riversimple plans to lease them
offer a longer range, are in development.
to drivers, charging a fixed tariff and mileage fee. They don?t
?I?m not anti-battery,? Spowers insists. ?If the technology comes along,
have an exact price for the consumer version ? it will depend
we?re not going to defend hydrogen for the sake of it. We could easily swap
on hydrogen prices at the time, but will definitely be less than
out the power train for something else.? He amends his earlier claim: ?We are
�0 a month all-inclusive (including fuel and insurance). Their
not a hydrogen car company, we?re a sustainable car company.?
target is the same monthly running cost as a VW Golf. ?We?re
But for now, Spowers is optimistic. After nearly two decades, he?s being
the only car company in the world that never wants to sell
taken seriously. More than 800 people have applied for a place on the beta
a燾ar,? Spowers says.
test. Riversimple is already working on designs for a four-seater model and
The leasing model makes the Rasa?s expensive carbon-fibre
also a爈ight van. ?Last-mile delivery?
chassis cost-effective, because it increases the car?s lifespan;
? the last part of a delivery service
and a爈onger lifespan means more profit for the company, as
from transportation hub to the
well as using fewer natural resources. ?At an environmental
final destination ? ?is growing very
level, we are rewarded for resource conservation, rather than
quickly,? he爏ays.
resource consumption,? Spowers explains.
One day, he believes,
For years, that business model ? the result of nearly 20 years?
the world爓ill see that he?s
thinking and tinkering ? was seen as outlandish; but in the last
right. ?Whenever you have
decade, the circular economy movement, which advocates
a bright new爄dea, all the
similar principles, has emerged and grown in popularity.
conversation goes爏traight to
?No爋ne was taking him seriously,? recalls Richard Sutton,
the reason it can?t燽e燿one.
a friend of Spowers? and former director of the Goodwood
This is so much燽etter, not only
Festival of Speed. ?The world has caught up with him now.?
environmentally but financially
Hugo Spowers hopes eventually to build 5,000 cars a year
? the business model we?ve got ?
here in Wales, employing up to 220 people ? exactly the kind
that爄t?s a no-brainer.
of sustainable innovation the government so often talks
?People are eventually going
about. But so far financial support has been limited. ?It would
to爑nderstand.? be fantastic for the UK to step in, but that doesn?t look like
?All strapped
in?? Spowers
asks as we whiz
out of the lot.
?It?s awfully
good fun?
30 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
Furniture for Dining, Living, Bedroom & Home Of?ce
Large Cosenza sofa shown in T3 fabric �249
*Small Cosenza sofa in T2 fabric
At participating ercol stockists
Terms and Conditions apply ask in store for details.
For a 2018 catalogue and stockist details visit ercol.com or call 01844 271821
CO SENZA
sofa from �9 *
Offer ends 27th February 2018
ercol.com
Mother
love
She was only 2 6 when her son
James Bulger was murdered
by two 10-year-old boys.
Denise Fergus tells
Simon Hattenstone
why she still blames herself
Portraits: Antonio Olmos
D
enise Fergus says her son James is
still very much part of the family. A large portrait of him hangs on the living
room wall, and her three younger boys regard him as their elder brother; they
often talk about him. ?James is never far from our minds. I brought the lads
up knowing him, even though they never met him.?
It is 25 years since James Bulger was murdered, and it has taken Fergus this
long to write about it. It?s not that she didn?t want to: it was just too painful.
We meet at her publisher?s office, where she admits she has not been looking
forward to this interview. Her second husband, Stuart, the father of her two
youngest children, is here to support her.
James Bulger was killed one month short of his third birthday in 1993. It
was a murder that shocked, and which continues to shock, Britain. James was
tortured to death by two 10-year-olds, Robert Thompson and Jon Venables,
who left him on a railway track to be hit by a train.
The CCTV footage of the blond toddler walking away from Liverpool?s
Strand shopping centre, hand in hand with one of his killers, remains one
of the most chilling images of the 20th century, not least because it looks
so innocent. The murder and trial consumed the country. How could two
young boys commit such a crime? Three days after James?s body was found,
the then prime minister John Major talked about the Tories? tough stance
on crime, saying: ?Society needs to condemn a little more and understand
a little less.? And sure enough, society did condemn. When Thompson and
Venables arrived at Preston crown court for their trial nine months later, in
November 1993, it looked as if the baying mob would tear them to pieces.
The two boys were found guilty
and sentenced to a minimum of
eight years, making them Britain?s
youngest murderers. In the wake
of their trial, Fergus ? who left
school with no formal qualifications
? took on the legal profession
and the government, believing
their sentence too lenient. It was
increased to 15 years by the then
home secretary, Michael Howard,
but he was later overruled.
Thompson and Venables were
released from secure children?s
homes in 2001, after eight years.
Since their release, Fergus has
?He loved
making people
laugh. He?d run
into your arms
with a big smile
on his face?
campaigned against their right to anonymity, and the money
spent on those new identities.
Her new book, I Let Him Go, is part memoir and part
excoriation of the legal system she says has let her down. But
there is another reason she has written it ? to bring her son
back to life. She is tired of James being remembered simply as
the little boy who was murdered. She wants us to know him as
the livewire he was: ?He was very bubbly. He loved dancing to
Michael Jackson videos and making people laugh. My happiest
memory of him is him running towards me with his hair
bouncing everywhere. He didn?t walk anywhere. He?d run into
your arms with a big smile on his face.? The memory of his smile
makes her smile, transforming her: over the years, Fergus?s
anger and grief have etched themselves into her face.
On both hands she wears multiple rings ? three on each ring
finger. Most striking is a gold signet ring that says MUM. On her
coat is a heart-shaped For James pin badge, illustrated with the
image of a little boy holding hands with a slightly older girl.
Her book is a painful, sometimes traumatic read. Fergus reveals
she is haunted by the idea that, at the end, James was calling for
her and she didn?t come. For many years, when she thought of his
last few minutes, she had panic attacks and was unable to breathe.
But the most heartbreaking aspect of I Let Him Go is its title.
Fergus was a cautious young mother, who nearly always took
James out shopping in a buggy. But not that day: she let go of his
hand in the butcher?s shop for a second to take out her purse,
long enough for Thompson and Venables to snatch James. For
so many years, she says, she would obsessively ask herself why
she hadn?t taken the buggy, why she let go of his hand, why
she turned left rather than right when she came out to look for
him. In the book she writes: ?When you?ve lost a child, you go
through stages. You blame yourself. You blame others. But at the
end of it there are only two people to blame in this, and that?s
the two who took him. But it did take me a long time to realise
that and get my head around it. It wasn?t me that killed James.?
The book?s title suggests you still blame yourself, I say. ?Well,
I do, because I was the last to see James alive.? She pauses, and
quietly corrects herself. ?One of the last.?
Fergus, now 50, still doesn?t know much about what happened
that day. She did not attend the three-week trial (she was heavily
pregnant with her second son, Michael, and was told the stress
might make her miscarry). If there is news in the papers, Stuart
goes through it with a thick black marker to blank out any details
she would not want to know. Astonishingly, many of us know
more about the murder of James Bulger than his mother does.
Denise Fergus grew up in a happy, working-class family in
Kirkby, Liverpool. She was the second youngest of 13 children,
seven boys and six girls. ?We didn?t have much, but what we
did have we appreciated,? she says. ?There was never a dull
moment because there was that many of us, either fighting or
getting on. More fighting than getting on, probably. But we?ve
always been there for each other and always will be.?
She left school at 16 and worked in an ice-cream factory. She
was never career-minded, she says, believing motherhood
would be her biggest role. At 18, she met Ralph Bulger, who
worked in security, and they moved into a bedsit close to their
family homes. They had been together two years when she
became pregnant. But at full-term, Fergus was told the baby she
was carrying had no heartbeat. She gave birth to a stillborn
daughter, Kirsty ? a loss that devastated her. She remembers
saying to herself, ?Today is the worst day of your life. It will never ?
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 35
REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
get worse than this.? Two years later, she gave birth to James.
There were times, she says, when she wanted to die after James
was murdered. Initially, she returned to the family flat with Ralph.
?But all I could see was James?s toys, his clothes, his bed. I couldn?t
cope, so I ended up moving in with my mum for a while.?
In their grief, she and Ralph grew distant. He retreated into
a爓orld of alcohol, drinking two bottles of whisky a day, while
she retreated into herself. The birth of Michael, just after the
trial, failed to heal the rift. One day Ralph said he was going
out, and never returned; the couple divorced in 1995. In a book
published in 2013, My James, Ralph said that he had blamed
Fergus for letting James go, and now felt ashamed.
For a time, Fergus refused to accept that James was dead. ?I
thought: after the trial, I?ll get James back,? she says. ?Once it was
done and dusted, he was going to come walking through the door
? they?d made a massive mistake. But once the trial had ended
and James didn?t come through that door, I knew it was all over.?
She stopped eating. Her family told her she was killing herself.
She didn?t care: she wanted to be with James. At his funeral, all
she could think about was curling up in that tiny casket with him.
Throughout their trial, reporting restrictions meant that
Thompson and Venables were referred to in the press as Child A
and Child B. But at the close of the trial, the judge allowed their
names to be released, ?because the public interest overrode the
interest of the defendants... There was a need for an informed
public debate on crimes committed by young children.? It was
a燾ontroversial decision that was to have huge repercussions.
Fergus might seem like a tough cookie ? indeed, a couple of her
friends tell me she is one ? but she still finds it hard to talk about
James publicly. Today it?s the presence of Stuart who makes
it possible. When they met, he was an electrician and just 20
? seven years younger than her. He is a big, warm man with an
unwavering devotion to his wife; the more he talks, the more
she relaxes.
?I met you in 96,? he says. ?In my young, slim, hairy days.?
?He was my toyboy!? she laughs. It?s a nice surprise; I ask if
she can remember the first time she laughed after the trial.
?When I had Michael. For the first time I爎ealised I needed to
feed him, change him ? that this little person was in my arms
again and he was mine. There were mixed emotions. I爓as so
pleased to have Michael, but still grieving for James. I thought,
I?ve got to stop thinking about what?s happened and start
thinking about what?s happening. I had to become a mum again.?
She was determined her anger would not poison her children.
Does she find it easy to laugh these days? She looks at Stuart,
and grins. ?Oh God, you wanna hear me half of the time.?
?She?s one of the funniest people you?ll ever meet,? he says
adoringly. ?She?s got a wicked sense of humour. When she?s
relaxed and in a nice place, she can have everyone rolling
around laughing.?
?We all do that, though, don?t
we?? Fergus says.
?Yes,? Stuart says, ?but it?s nice to
?They wanted to
see that side of you ? people just see
do something. It
Denise, the mother of James Bulger,
wasn?t accidental?
fighting another campaign or telling
The燙CTV footage
people what she?s been through.?
from燣iverpool?s
How does she think the public
Strand shopping
sees her? ?I think people see me as
centre showing
a爉iserable cow who?s constantly
James燘ulger being led
fighting and never smiles.?
away by his爇illers
Does that bother her? ?No,燽ecause the fight for James is爓hat they see.
They don?t see the other side where I let my hair down. I燼m爃uman.?
When she?s not fighting for James, what does she do? ?Moan!? she laughs
?Cleaning. Tidying up.?
?Most people?s houses have bottles of wine,? Stuart says. ?Denise has
bottles of bleach and Dettol.?
Fergus gives him a look you wouldn?t argue with. ?No, we have both.?
?True,? he says. ?I polish off the bottles of wine, she just polishes.?
?Well, you can take out your anger on the toilet seat, can?t you?? she says.
At times like this, they sound like a double act. But make no mistake: Fergus
is still ferocious in defence of her eldest son. She has little time for people who
suggest we should try to understand rather than simply condemn Thompson
and Venables, because they were a product of troubled families. Plenty of
children have difficult backgrounds, she says: it doesn?t turn them into killers.
Two weeks after their trial, Lord Taylor of Gosforth, the lord chief justice,
increased the boys? tariff by two years, recommending that Thompson and
Venables serve a minimum of 10 years. Fergus was relentless in her campaign
to have their sentence further
increased, while their lawyers
fought to have it reduced. With the
vociferous support of the Sun, close
to 280,000 people signed a petition
supporting her bid, including 4,400
letters of support agreeing that
Venables and Thompson should
remain in detention for life and
nearly 6,000 asking for a minimum
period of detention of 25 years.
After the Sun handed in its
petition to increase the sentence
further in 1994, home secretary ?
?I thought, after
the trial, James
was going to
walk through
the door ? they?d
made a mistake?
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 37
COURTESY OF DENISE FERGUS
Michael Howard announced that they would be kept in custody
for a minimum of 15 years ? meaning they would be at least 25
when they were released and would have served seven years in
an adult prison. But the House of Lords overturned this
decision in 1997, ruling that it was unlawful for the home
secretary to decide on minimum sentences for young offenders.
Lord Donaldson described Howard?s intervention as
?institutionalised vengeance? by ?a politician playing to the
gallery?.
Two years later, in 1999, the European court of human rights
ruled that the boys did not receive a fair trial, because the adult
court was ?severely intimidating?. Denise and Ralph Bulger
applied to the European court, arguing that victims of crime
should be involved in the sentencing of the perpetrators. They
lost, and in October 2000 the new chief justice Lord Woolf
recommended that the tariff be reduced, back to eight years.
In 2001, Thompson and Venables were released on lifelong
licence, with new identities.
Stuart says this was the lowest and angriest he had seen
Fergus. She locked herself in the bedroom and lashed out. What
did she do? She looks at Ralph. ?I think I just smashed it up,
didn?t I?? They laugh. But they didn?t at the time. She felt she
had failed in her final promise to James: that she would keep
his killers locked up. ?I couldn?t deliver and the guilt swamped
me,? she writes in the book. ?She just needed that time to
thrash it out of her head, her mind, her body,? Stuart says today.
Fergus has always condemned vigilantism, but in 2004 she
told the News of the World she had tracked Robert Thompson
down, with the intention of screaming at him, ?Why did you kill
my child?? But, ?paralysed with hatred?, she could not confront
him. At the time she said, ?I will find the other one next. They
can change their addresses as much as they like ? but they can?t
change their faces.? Today, she has no interest in tracking them
down. I ask how she would cope now if she found herself in the
same room as Thompson or Venables. ?It would never happen,?
she says. ?I would never want them anywhere near me.?
was terrified for her family. ?The first thing I said to Stuart is, he could have
chatted any of my nieces up. He could have spoken to Michael on a night out.?
Her anxiety for her children reached new levels. Five years ago, Michael,
then 19, told the Daily Mail he had never travelled alone on a bus or train. The
family home in Kirkby is protected by CCTV cameras and security lights.
Thompson and Venables were given new identities because there was
a爁ear of reprisals. Would it have bothered Fergus if they had been killed in
a爎evenge attack? ?I can?t answer that because it never happened and I don?t
think along those lines anyway.? She points out that Venables has now been
recalled to prison twice, for possession of indecent images of children, without
being attacked. ?If anything does happen to him, it?s not on my head, because
I have never come out and said I want them dead. I don?t because I?m not an
evil person. I just wanted them to do a proper sentence in an adult prison.?
In 2005, 18-year-old student Anthony Walker was murdered by two young
men in a racist attack in Liverpool. He was found with an ice axe in his head
after being ambushed. Soon after, his mother, Gee Walker, a Christian, said
that she forgave his killers, ?because they don?t know what they were doing?.
I mention the case. Fergus, who is acquainted with it, anticipates the
question: ?She forgave, yes?? Would it have made her life easier if she had
found forgiveness? ?Of course it
would have been easier for me,? she
says brusquely. ?But it wasn?t to be.?
To forgive them would be to betray
James, she says. ?I am a forgiving
person but I?ll never forgive them.
Not even on my deathbed. Ask
me爐hat question when I?m dying
and營?ll still say: I will never
forgive爐hem.? She says it with such
conviction, like a pledge.
Fergus is still fighting on a number ?
?I brought the
lads up knowing
James, even
though they
never met him?
Back then, there was so much Fergus was angry about: the length
of the sentence, the contempt with which she felt she was
treated by the authorities, even the way the newspapers insisted
on referring to her son as Jamie, when he had always been James.
It?s hard to know what would have pacified her. Fergus writes
that ?any decent person who makes a mistake should be given
the chance to make amends?, but does not extend this principle
to Venables and Thompson, because ?they aren?t decent people
who live by the same morals we do?. She believes giving them
new identities means they have never had to own their crime;
their time in custody was not spent taking responsibility, but
obliterating it. ?When they meet
somebody, they?ve got to pretend
?When I had Michael,
they?re somebody they?re not. In
I was still grieving
their minds they were told, ?You
for James. I realised
never killed that child, you did this
I needed to become
instead.? They had to make up a life,
a mum again?
to erase all they did from their minds.? Above: Fergus with
In 2010 it was reported that,
James on his first and
despite being banned from
last holiday, in Wales.
Merseyside, Venables had visited
Right: ?My three
Liverpool several times, where
handsome boys? ? from
he had gone clubbing, snorted
left, Leon, six, Michael,
cocaine and attended Everton
12, and Thomas, seven,
football matches. Fergus says she
in 2006
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 39
ANTONIO OLMOS FOR THE GUARDIAN
of fronts ? for victims? families to be alerted by the probation
service as soon as somebody on licence is recalled to prison,
and for an inquiry into why the experts insisted Venables was
rehabilitated (she is convinced that those who worked with
him when he served his initial sentence knew he had a sexual
interest in children). Fergus writes that her friends worry her
refusal to stop campaigning is damaging her. Does she think
there is any truth in that? ?It?s not damaging me whatsoever,?
she says. ?At the end of the day, I?m the only one to speak out
for James. I am James?s voice. And if there?s anything I can do to
fight for him, I will.?
A year after James was killed, five-year-old Silje Redergard
was beaten to death by two six-year-old boys in Trondheim,
Norway. The crimes were compared, although there were
notable differences (Silje was older than James; the boys were
younger than Thompson and Venables; all three were friends
and had been playing together, so it appeared to be a game that
had gone wrong). The biggest difference was in the way Norway
treated the killers; Trondheim felt a collective responsibility for
the murder, and that it was their job to rehabilitate the boys into
society rather than to demonise them.
I mention this case to Fergus, too. Again she is familiar with
it, and does not find it a feasible alternative. ?I think that would
be a dangerous thing to do. In their best interests, they should
have done prison.?
Stuart points out further differences. ?There was an element
of this case being accidental,? Stuart says. ?With James?s case
they caught animals and killed them. They tried to take a girl
a爁ew weeks before, they tried to take a boy on the morning of
that day. They wanted to do something. It wasn?t accidental.?
After James died, Fergus had nightmares about him. She says
writing the book has been cathartic; increasingly, he appears in
her dreams as the cheeky, happy boy he was. ?It has brought back
a lot of nice memories.? For 10 months she allowed everything to
pour out to her ghostwriter, Carly Cook, and it served as a form of
therapy. ?There were more and more things I was remembering
about him. Things that I?d put to the back of my mind. I was going
home with a smile on my face, and that?s what I needed.?
In 2013, Venables was recalled to prison for possession of
indecent images of children ? and given another identity.
A燾ouple of weeks before we meet, it was reported that he was
back in prison, for the same offence. Although Thompson has
not reoffended since his release on licence 17 years ago, Fergus
maintains that neither was ready for their freedom. ?I said
years ago, because they weren?t properly punished, that they
would go on to reoffend. But I didn?t feel I爓as listened to. The
government thought they knew better.?
Is there a grim satisfaction to be had from the fact that Venables
has reoffended? She shakes her head. ?I just hope and pray he
didn?t hurt anyone else ? but I just knew it was going to happen.?
What would justice look like now, when it comes to Venables?
?He?s not only committed the one crime now, he?s committed
three. So he should be locked up for a long time. I?m not saying
for ever, just a long time.? Even here, I sense a slight softening.
For many years, Fergus called for a full-life sentence for both.
Does she still feel the same intense anger? ?I haven?t got the
energy for it any more.? Maybe, she says, writing the book has
helped get it out of her system. ? I don?t give them the爐ime
of day any more. I don?t think about them, I don?t even like
saying爐heir names.?
Is Stuart glad she?s less angry? ?God, yes,? he says.
Fergus prefers to focus on the positives: her three surviving
40 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
sons, Stuart, her charity work. The boys are young men. Michael, 24, and Tom,
19, are landscape gardeners; Leon, 18, hopes to be a computer game designer.
She says she has finally given them their wings, and has recently noticed a role
reversal. ?When they used to go out, we?d always be texting and calling, saying
where are you, what are you doing, when are you going to be home? Now it?s
them calling us to find out where we are and what time we?ll be home.?
Fergus spends much of her time running the charity For James,
which爏he爏et up in 2008. They offer free holidays and respite care in
their燾aravan near Blackpool, to disadvantaged families, victims of crime燼nd
those who have suffered bereavements. ?We have helped 200 families,?
Stuart says. ?Because it?s a static caravan we can?t have wheelchairs in there,
so we?re now fundraising to buy a lodge where we can have more families.?
I ask Fergus if she takes anything positive from James?s death. ?Yes, this.
We?re helping other kids in his name.?
Stuart looks at Fergus. ?People always remember James as that
murdered爈ittle toddler from Liverpool, but what you?re doing now is
turning燼爊egative into a big positive. James?s legacy is that we?re now
helping other kids. That?s given you,
not closure but a bit of??
Fergus smiles, and finishes his
sentence for him. ?Peace. Yes.? ?I don?t give
them the爐ime
of day. I don?t
think about
them. I don?t
say their names?
I Let Him Go is published
by Blink爋n 25 January.
To爋rder燼燾opy爁or �.44, go
to燽ookshop.theguardian.com
or call 0330 333 6846. A portion
of the proceeds爓ill be donated
to the James Bulger Memorial
Trust, supporting families of
victims爋f燾rime.
Vispring has never wavered from its original philosophy of using the very best craftsmanship and exclusive natural materials
- such as British wool, cotton, cashmere, silk, bamboo, mohair and horsehair - to produce the ?nest beds in the world.
New for 2018 - selected mattresses are now available with M-Pure - the natural, sustainable ?ame retardant treatment
solution exclusively brought to you by Vispring. This revolutionary chemical-free ?ame retardant is 100% environmentally
friendly, using only natural bio-based raw materials.
Visit your local Vispring Specialist and discover our handmade bed collection this winter.
VISPRING. SLEEP WELL, SLEEP NATURAL.
Pssst...
you awake?
Rest is good for you ? but is a growing obsession
with hours, quality and sleep data
keeping us up all night? Nicole Mowbray meets
the ?clean sleepers? hitting the hay by 8.30pm
Photographs: Lol Keegan
CHRISTIAN HARDER
Above: Inscape
meditation centre in
New York, where the
worried weary pay $45
for Deep Rest sessions.
Participants are woken
up if they start snoring
Evenings are something of a rush for Megan Hobbs.
The 29-year-old solicitor doesn?t finish work until
6.30pm and it takes her 45 minutes to travel home
from central London to the flat she shares with her
boyfriend. ?I go to Pret a Manger or somewhere
about 5pm and grab a soup and a sandwich to eat
at my desk,? she says. ?Otherwise there?s no way
I can get to bed by 8.30pm. I?d rather eat at home,
but I燾an?t sleep on a full stomach.?
It takes a lot of work and organisation for
Hobbs爐o get what she describes as ?the right
amount? of sleep. For her, a late night is getting
into bed at 9.30pm; by that time, she admits to
feeling ?stressed?. On a good night, she keeps her
room cool, quiet and dark and usually switches
off her phone by 8pm. There?s a pricey milkshake
containing hops to be consumed before
bed, and a爉agnesium-infused sleepaid spray she uses on her wrists and
neck. For the past year, Hobbs has also
worn a fitness tracker in bed to analyse
the amount and quality of her sleep.
?Before I got this device, I was
only爂etting about seven hours of
rest per night. It?s shown me I need
to be in bed for 10 hours to achieve
enough restorative deep sleep ? any
less and I feel grumpy.? She admits
her爎elationship with her partner and
her friendships have suffered, but
Hobbs doesn?t think she?s fetishising
sleep. ?I燾hoose to prioritise my
health,?爏he says.
Writer Lucy Dunne, 31, tells a similar
story. She says her husband thinks she?s
?crazy? for going to bed at nine every
night instead of sitting up with him and
watching television together. Another
34-year-old woman tells me she is
concerned about ever having a baby,
because of the lack of爏leep. ?I?m used
to爂etting nine to 10 hours a night now,?
she explains. ?I know I?d feel rubbish
getting much less.?
The quantity ? and quality ? of sleep
we get has been eroded over the past
few decades, due almost exclusively to
the increasingly frantic pace at which
we live our lives. The internet, social
media and technology that enables us to
be available 24/7 means most of us are
desperate for more hours in the day; and
for many, it?s sleep that gets sacrificed.
The research into the consequences
of long-term sleep deprivation makes
alarming reading. While sleeping
between seven and nine hours a
night爃as been recommended by the
World Health Organisation and ratified
by the US?s燙enters for Disease Control
(CDC), a 2013 study by the National
Sleep Foundation (an American
education and advocacy group) showed that the average adult in the UK
is getting by on 6hr 49min of sleep per night in the week. People in Japan
and the US fared even worse, on 6hr 22 min and 6hr 31 min respectively.
Meanwhile, the Chinese are the world?s best sleepers, achieving a little more
than nine hours on average.
Many people are consistently underslept. Research from non-profit
scientific organisation RAND [Research and Development] in 2016 found
that爏leep deprivation costs the UK economy up to �bn a year, or 1.86%
of GDP, a figure calculated with data from employers, employees and
information about sleep duration. They found that increasing nightly
sleep爁rom under six hours to燽etween six and seven hours could add �bn
to the UK economy.
Meanwhile, it?s about more than productivity or GDP. Many researchers
believe that enough sleep is quite simply the difference between life or early
death. More than 20 large-scale epidemiological studies reported the same
clear relationship: the shorter your sleep, the shorter your life. ?
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 45
STYLIST: KIRSTY MCKENZIE
In reaction to this, Hobbs, Dunne et al are part of a growing band of young people
? mostly millennial and, anecdotally, women ? who observe a night-time regime of
going to bed extremely early. Aided by data mostly gleaned from fitness trackers, these
people focus on achieving ?clean sleep? ? often to the detriment of their social lives and
relationships ? because they believe it will make them look and feel more healthy, and be
more productive at work.
The term clean sleeping was coined by Gwyneth Paltrow (who else?), who in 2016
announced that she gets between seven and eight hours of ?good-quality sleep?
each爊ight, ?ideally 10?. ?The lifestyle I lead is based not just on clean eating, but also
on燾lean sleeping,? she said. ?It goes without saying that poor sleep is terrible from
a燽eauty perspective.?
More recently, the hit 2017 book Why We Sleep propelled its author, the sleep scientist
Matthew Walker, into the (terrifying) headlines. Walker argues that ?a chronic lack of sleep
is one of the biggest public health challenges we face in the 21st century?. There is almost
no health condition that couldn?t be improved
by more shuteye, he writes: it will boost your
career, intelligence and your looks, improve your
immune system, aid weight management and
improve your cardiovascular health.
It?s no wonder a good night?s sleep has evolved
into the new status symbol. While燽ragging
rights used to be attached to being a member
of the macho ?sleepless elite? ? think
Margaret燭hatcher?s four hours a night and
fashion designer Tom Ford?s purported three ?
today the wealthy and privileged boast about
being well-slept. It?s a lifestyle encouraged燽y
the Silicon Valley set, many of whom are
spending millions of dollars ? and hours ?
designing data-capturing devices to help爌eople
quantify how much rest they are getting (and,
Bragging rights
used to be
attached to
being a member
of the macho
sleepless elite
46 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
ironically,爉issing out on rest themselves to do it).
Being able to prioritise sleep over a爊everending
night-time to-do list, anxieties about finances or
workaday stresses is a luxury it seems money can
buy. Almost overnight, the most basic of human
functions has become aspirational. Researchers
have even come up with a term to describe this
obsession with sleep: ?orthosomnia?. Aided by
technology and encouraged by big business, sleep
is becoming something we feel we can control.
Luke Sherwin is chief creative officer at hip
American bed company Casper. He says the
company has seen a growing awareness of the
importance of sleep among their consumers.
?In爐he past two years, fitness trackers and
quantitative self programmes have really increased
awareness,? he says. ?That?s both a爂ood thing and
a bad thing. We did a bunch of behavioural research
a year ago and one of the main things that came
up was a big anxiety around sleep. That was a key
problem for people.?
But isn?t the notion of ?good? sleep subjective?
Restorative levels are almost impossible to
quantify outside a laboratory with the capability
to analyse brain waves.
Nevertheless, helping people to sleep better
has become a multibillion-pound industry.
Forecasters predict the global market for at-home
tech products (body-responsive mattresses,
temperature-regulating bedding and pyjamas,
smart lighting) will be worth more than �bn by
next year. Practically every wellness brand has a
sleep-aid product, from diets to lavender pillow
sprays and melatonin-infused waters, bedtime
teas to soporific milkshakes, scented candles to
magnesium bath soaks. Then there?s the cost of
sleep aids to the NHS and private sleep clinics, as
well as prescription medications.
On the telephone from his sleep clinic in Berkeley,
California, Walker sounds as if he is carrying
the weight of the world on his shoulders. The
sleep scientist has called for a public awareness
campaign to encourage people to sleep more, and
even for sleep to be ?prescribed? and treated like a
preventative medicine. Just one week of reduced
sleep, he writes, alters your DNA.
?The genes that are changed are the ones
associated with cardiovascular disease, stress,
chronic inflammation and cancer tumours,?
he tells me. ?Just one week of short sleep ? five
or six hours every night ? would tip someone?s
previously normal blood sugar levels into the
pre-diabetic zone. Mother nature took about 3.6m
years to put this thing called eight hours of sleep
in place and within the space of 70 or 80 years,
through modernity and the industrial revolution,
we have lopped off almost 20%. How could we
not imagine that there would be catastrophic
health, disease and neural consequences to that??
he燼sks, sounding slightly panicked himself.
He describes a University of Colorado study
in which cardiologists found a 25% increase in
the number of heart attacks in spring, when
we lose an hour?s sleep, but a 21% decrease in
autumn, when we gain an hour. ?There is a
global experiment that is performed on 1.6bn
people across 70 countries twice a year and it?s
called daylight saving time,? he says. ?I think
that emphasises how fragile and vulnerable and
dependent on sleep our bodies are.?
Does he worry that the attention given to how
much or little we sleep causes anxiety? ?I give
talks, I do radio and television, and when I get
emails from people saying: ?I heard you on the
radio and I struggle with sleep and now I am more
concerned than ever,? I realise that perhaps what
I?ve done is in part escalate the problem. I do
write back to them and give them the resources
to hopefully help their problem. But I struggle
with that. I think I am still errorful in how I surf
that line, between giving the hard science and
ensuring I don?t upset people too much.?
At the London Sleep Centre on Harley Street,
Petra Hawker?s client list is growing. Over the
past five years, the sleep psychotherapist has
seen a爃uge rise in young people suffering anxiety
issues around getting enough sleep. She says a
large part of the problem is the ? not unfounded ?
notion that sleep is a preventative medicine and
a爁undamental part of a healthy lifestyle.
?People should make positive steps towards a
healthy amount of sleep each night,? she says, ?but
sleep is not something you can completely control.
Once the mind gets involved, it affects the燼ctual
process.? Too much sleep data, she argues, is
putting people into a state of high anxiety. The best
thing to do is relax and let it happen. ?Ultimately,
it comes down to commercialism ? companies
are monitoring sleep as a business proposition. It
means they can sell you things.?
Take the Sleep Council in the UK, a body that
calls itself ?an impartial, advisory organisation
that raises the awareness [sic] of the importance
of a good night?s sleep to health and wellbeing?.
The organisation commissions surveys and
issues information on how well ? or poorly ? we
sleep. It recommends a爏ensible bedtime and a
comfortable bed as ?key to sleeping well?. Sound
advice, but bear in mind that the Sleep Council
is the consumer education arm of the National
Bed Federation, the trade association for British
bed manufacturers. Unsurprisingly, it also
recommends that we change our mattress every
seven years to help us sleep better ? and to help
it爏ell more mattresses.
In New York, at fashionable meditation centre
Inscape in the shadow of the Flatiron building,
the worried and weary pay for Deep Rest sessions
($25 for 45 minutes). At one of their in-demand
events on a Sunday night, I lie in a purple-hued
room called the Alcove with 10 or so other people,
after being anointed with fragrant calming oil.
I爈isten to the melodic, rhythmic tones of an
Australian woman over the speakers, telling me to
relax and how to breathe. While the class doesn?t
teach sleep, it aims to help the body unwind and
?It?s a fairytale
that we can
control our
sleep. But no
one makes
money telling
you to listen
to your body?
become less aware (in this way it differs from
meditation, where one is meant to maintain
awareness). An Inscape facilitator is present to
wake people if they start snoring and disturb
others. The session is enjoyable and relaxing, but
there is something strange about lying in a room
of strangers, trying to rest. Many燼re regulars; one
attends whenever she can. ?I travel a lot for work
and I?m concerned that disrupting my sleep will
have negative consequences on my health,? she
explains. ?I?m desperate to爎edress the balance.?
Dr Neil Stanley is a British independent
sleep expert who has been researching the
field for more than 35爕ears. He also believes
orthosomnia is a money-making proposition for
big businesses. ?Essentially, people want to make
you anxious to sell products, devices, books,?
he says. ?Saying,�A lack of sleep is going to kill
you? is a爂ood headline, but there?s not a whole lot of evidence for that. We are being sold
a dream that we can be in control of our sleep. It?s a爁airytale. But no one?s going to make
money out爋f telling you to listen to your body.?
London-based acupuncturist Mia Kawada agrees. She says she is seeing increasing
numbers of women using sleep trackers and then reporting problems with their sleep.
?It?s爂ood that people are taking responsibility,? she爏ays. ?But with every machine or
gadget comes a tendency to rely on what the data says, instead of what your body is telling
you. You start to care more about what the app says than how you feel.? Kawada says one
of her patients was anxious because her tracker had been telling her she wasn?t getting
enough deep sleep, even though she had gone to bed at 10.30pm. ?When I燼sked her how
she was feeling during the day, she admitted that she didn?t feel tired,? Kawada says, ?but
the statistics were clearly stressing her out. It?s a little counterproductive.
?We live in an age where we think having more information is empowering. But the ?
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 47
SAROYAN HUMPHREY FOR THE GUARDIAN
Sleep scientist
Matthew Walker,
who爏ays that just one
week of reduced sleep
alters your DNA
more爄nformation we have, the more we feel
the need to control things we have been doing
automatically for millennia. By trying to exert
this control, we lose the connection with our
own燽odies.?
?I?m in bed by nine every night, even at
weekends,? says 27-year-old Jane Clarke, an
executive assistant from York who has become
attached to the Apple Watch she received for
Christmas in 2016. ?I get up at 6.30am. It?s
stressful to find time to get enough sleep. I rarely
go out in the week and爋nly see my boyfriend at
the weekend. But I believe it?s good for my health
to keep this routine. I never get colds.?
Petra Hawker believes that seeing friends and
connecting with others is just as important to your
health as sleep. ?People shouldn?t be coming home
from work and going to bed at 8.30pm
unless they have to get up extraordinarily
early. These routines mean people
struggle to fit the things they need to do
into their day, leading to more stress.?
Neil Stanley adds that the science
around sleep trackers is not great.
?They can?t measure deep sleep or
dreaming sleep. They only measure
movement, which gives no information
about what?s happening in the brain ?
and that?s the important place. People
are using this information to diagnose
themselves with a sleep problem or
determine that they need more sleep.
It?s concerning. This whole ?observed
self? lifestyle is pretty pointless. If爕ou
wake up and you are too sleepy to drive
to Edinburgh, don?t drive to Edinburgh.
It doesn?t really matter what a watch
says. If爕ou are awake, alert and focused
during the day you have had enough
sleep. It?s as simple as that. Go to bed
when you are爏leepy.?
Walker believes that in the next two to
four years, the technology around apps
and trackers will become more accurate.
?What I would say is, ignorance is
not bliss in this case,? he says. ?The
approach can?t be to say: ?Don?t tell
all those people about the problems
that come from not getting enough
sleep,? because that does those people
a disservice. We need to tell them
the hard facts, but figure out a way of
dissipating the anxiety.?
That may be easier said than done,
however. Graphic designer Mari Wright
from London says she has consigned
her fitness tracker to the drawer after
becoming ?obsessed? with monitoring
her health on it. ?I was a signed-up
clean sleeper,? she says, ?but to get to
bed early I ate ready meals, which was
probably counterproductive. No matter
what I did, I was regularly measuring six hours or so of sleep on the device
and I talked about it every day. Eventually, my sister told me to stop it. I do
miss it, but I can?t say I feel much different. If anything, I sleep more.? Some names have been changed
Petra Hawker?s tips for a good night?s sleep
1 Wind down for an hour before bed. Go into a room that is comfortable,
write down any problems you have or things you need to do. Don?t go on
your phone or a screen ? blue light from these devices affects the production
of melatonin, the hormone that regulates sleep. Deep breathing and yogic
exercises will reduce adrenaline levels.
2 Keep the bedroom cool, dark and quiet; these are biological indicators to
the body that it?s time to sleep.
3 Don?t use the bed as a workspace or somewhere to watch TV. The brain
needs to learn that the bed is for sleeping in, not for lying in without sleep.
4 The brain likes routine. If you do the same thing every night, it will fall
into燼 pattern.
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 49
Illustration by Ben Lamb
How to recover from a hospital stay? Watch The Crown, then watch it all over again.
Clive James pays homage to Her Majesty ? and remembers a frosty royal meeting
The Queen and I
As my latest stay in hospital came to an end,
the爏econd series of The Crown was just starting
on Netflix. Since my prescribed formula for
rehabilitation consisted mainly of the instruction
just to lie there and shut up, I had nothing to do
except maintain the horizontal position and watch
the delightful Claire Foy plough onward in her role
of Queen. I thought she coped nobly.
So nobly, in fact, that when the second series was
all used up, I reverted to the first episode of the first
series and watched the whole thing again. It would
be worth it just for the cars. As piloted by the suave
Matt Smith, the Duke of Edinburgh?s Lagonda is an
impeccable example of one of the most beautiful
objects ever manufactured in Britain. You could
say爐he same of the Queen herself, still looking
imperturbably shiny even as the duke drives off to
yet another raucous lunch with his ghastly pals.
The great triumph of the first series is that the
duke is shown to be more noble than his instincts:
more likeable, indeed, than his sense of humour,
which seems to have been then pretty well what it
is now, a combination of rudeness and random
abuse. But just when you?re thinking that he?s
a爏tandard Euro-thug on the make, he undercuts
his爎outine racist snottery with a kind offer to
teach a black boy to drive.
The duke and the future Queen are in Kenya
while the King, at home, lies dying. The
newlyweds think they have some time together,
but in cold fact it?s running out. Some of the action
is made up ? if the duke, in reality, ever scared off
a燾razy elephant, he did it by swearing at it ? but it?s
all in character, especially the bits about the D of E
being an able chap, really, who stood to lose a lot
by getting himself tied to the throne. Farther away
among the far-flung remains of empire, there were
whole populations of us who accurately guessed
that he would prove to be the goods, if only in the
long term. Besides, he had no choice.
We understood that, too; and we approved. It?s
the premise, just as often explicit as hidden, that
powers the narrative as it keeps running. These
people might have chosen their destiny, but only on
the understanding that they must now, and from
now until the end, play the part laid down for them.
The Duke of Windsor keeps popping up to show
the result of trying to duck out. As爌ortrayed by
Alex Jennings, the D of W is made as repellent as
possible ? perhaps with a judicious downplaying
of his hankerings to be a catspaw of the Nazis ? but
he is also given a tragic sense of the magnitude of
what he has renounced: life itself. You might say it
was a high price to pay for winning爑ntrammelled
access to the embrace of the deadly Mrs Simpson,
but don?t forget people all over the trembling
empire were saying the same thing at the time.
By and large, the pageant is true to the complexity
of historic memory. You can?t get that effect just
by making Princess Margaret (Vanessa Kirby)
a爏cold, although that was undoubtedly what she
was. Even Margaret, however, is given a full ration
of complex motives. And the truth is that the
Queen being polite was always at least as scary as
her sister being catty.
Having been instructed, just before I met the
Queen, to start walking backwards the moment she
changed the subject, I found the instruction awfully
easy to carry out. The sovereign has a full range of
facial effects available, and one of them is an icy
blast comparable to the average winter temperature
in McMurdo Sound. Also, she is the Queen, whereas
you, never forget it, are Joe Shmuck.
In effect, of course, nobody forgets. The whole
royal system is essentially devoted to maintaining
the monarch?s prestige. One of the quiet triumphs
of the story is the way that private secretary
?Tommy? Lascelles doesn?t just stay silent for
a爈ong time before he speaks, he stays silent for
a爈ong time before the Queen speaks. On the part
of the actor, Pip Torrens, this is a performance that
might theoretically have been equalled by a block
of wood, but it would have to have been a pretty
classy block of wood.
One of the triumphs of the show?s sub-language
of tight-lipped protocol is that everyone bows at
the right angle. The trick, evidently, is not to incline
the head, but to signal the readiness to incline
one?s head if the right circumstances arise ? eg,
a爎ebellion of the entire nobility or a space invasion
from Atrophon. Otherwise, the bow should be
a爏ubtle modification of absolute stillness.
Pondering what I have now learned, I can see why
I was hauled backwards out of the Queen?s presence
at such a rate. My eyebrows were too animated. She
gave me a medal, though: perhaps for my speed
over 100 metres in reverse, with triple stumble.
At least I never incurred the royal wrath. In The
Crown, everybody does, including Churchill. She
catches him lying to her, and she gives him
a爓igging. John Lithgow reacts as if the palace is
caving in around his ears, which is surely an
accurate registration of how the grand old man
must have felt. Lesser prime ministers also get it
in the neck. Macmillan, when she reminds him
that he was not only first on the bandwagon in the
Suez crisis, but also first off, looks as if he has
swallowed a pond full of toads. He conveys this by
barely flexing his nostrils, as if having reluctantly
detected a bad odour emanating from himself.
The historical facts tell us that the Queen and
Macmillan were pals at the level of mutual
chortling, and that she wouldn?t have chewed
him爋ut if he had burned down the palace; but
for燿ramatic purposes it suits the story to make
her look strict.
As for Anthony Eden, he is made out to be
a爉oustache-chewing patsy. One is almost sorry
for him, until one reminds oneself that one is
feeling sorry for an actor: an actor who was
probably ecstatic to get the part. But while the
monarch is strangling her heads of government
with a noose of silk, the script obliges us to
remember that she has such authority only at the
price of rarely exercising it. She hasn?t even got
the power to save Charles from Gordonstoun.
The facts about Gordonstoun are scrambled,
just as, in the course of this enormous show, the
facts often are; and no doubt, further on, they will
be again. The spoken vocabulary too often wanders
into the blatantly recent, and occasionally the
pictures are wrong: British four-engined bombers
never paraded above the Mall so early in the war,
because so early in the war there were no British
four-engine bombers.
But even while it was still straining to rearm,
Britain was never without power. It was never less
strong than its constitution. Whether that
constitution will remain a valuable asset is yet to
be seen. During my youth, there was still no doubt
about it, even in Australia.
Some Australian critics have said that the Duke
of Edinburgh?s equerry, Mike Parker, doesn?t
sound Australian enough, but I remember a time
when Aussies at the level of those who hobnobbed
with royalty all spoke the way Geoffrey Robertson
was speaking the last time I saw him, on John
Howard?s lawn in Sydney. Oh yairs. Ebsolutely.
Soon, there will be new actors to play the Queen
and her consort: and soon, in real life, the cast must
also change. Some of you will be lucky enough to
see it all happen. Meanwhile the rest of us can go
on being reminded about what life was once like.
It would take an incurably radical spirit to contend
that the Queen, if only by handing out a few
hundred thousand tinsel gongs to people whose
loyal devotion might have been a bit more
expensive to purchase on the open market, had
not played a great part in holding things together.
Some might say holding things back, but even
a爁ew of those will be glued to the screen. I wonder
how it all turns out The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 51
Weekending Fashion Beauty Space Gardens Family Mind & body Puzzles
Blind date
Thom, 25,
auditor
What were you hoping for?
Interesting conversation.
First impressions?
She had lovely eyes, was
well dressed and had been
thoughtful enough to wear
a爊ecklace with her name
was no chance
on, so there
th
of forgetting it.
did you talk about?
What d
Stranger Things,
Str
Jamaican family,
her Ja
India, the guilt that
India
comes with working for
a爈arge燾orporation.
a爈arg
moments?
Any awkward
aw
None that stood out.
aybe that we both
Mayb
struggled with the wine list.
Good table manners?
Faultless.
She wore
re
a necklace with
her name on:
no chance
ce
of forgetting
ing
thing about Grace?
Best th
She spoke
passionately
sp
about
abou her interests,
most o
of爓hich seemed
to al
align with mine.
Would y
you introduce her
to爕our
friends?
to
They?d
They? get along well.
Describe
Grace
De
in three爓ords
Adventurous,
A
warm,
stylish.
w
What do you think
Wha
she made of you?
Seemingly
an interesting
Seemin
enough
enou individual to
share燼燾ouple
of Aperol
share燼
spritzes
with.
sp
Did you go on somewhere?
We did.
di I knew a nice
rooftop
roofto bar next door.
GRAEME ROBERTSON; ALICIA CANTER, BOTH FOR THE GUARDIAN
And... did you kiss?
And.
A little?
change one
If you could
c
the evening,
thing about
a
what would it be?
wha
While the
t company was
spot on,
o the restaurant
was slightly lacking
(it was
in atmosphere
atm
a燭uesday night).
a燭u
Marks out of 10?
Ma
9.
Would you meet again?
hope so; numbers
I hop
were爀xchanged.
we
What were you hoping for?
A fun evening. And if not,
at爈east a funny story.
First impressions?
Phew! Tall,
handsome and爌olite.
Grace, 25,
learning
coordinator
What did you talk about?
Thom had some good
stories about travelling
around America, including
attending a Trump rally
(not as a supporter, luckily)
and spending a week with
a Mormon family. I tried to
impress with my ?breaking
into Glastonbury? story.
Any awkward moments?
Maybe an awkward silence
or two at the beginning.
But爋therwise, none.
Good table manners?
I didn?t even notice ? must
have been good!
Best thing about Thom?
Totally down to爀arth.
Would you introduce him
to爕our friends?
Yes.
Describe Thom in
three爓ords
Unassuming,
adventurous,燾ool.
What do you think he
made爋f you?
I was a bit nervous,
so I?m爃oping I didn?t
dominate爐he conversation.
Did you go on somewhere?
For a couple of drinks at a
rooftop bar with a燾ool view.
And... did you kiss?
Maybe...
If you could change one
thing about the evening,
what would it be?
Nothing, it was fab.
Maybe爋ne less Aperol spritz
on my part.
Marks out of 10?
9.5.
Would you meet again?
We爀xchanged numbers,
so營?d like to think so.
Thom and Grace ate at the
Lampery, London EC3.
Fancy a blind date? Email
blind.date@theguardian.com.
If you?re looking to meet
someone like-minded, visit
soulmates.theguardian.com
He
attended
a Trump
rally
Fashion Story
Destination unknown
Jacket (above), from
a爏election, bally.co.uk.
54 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
Journey?s end
Jacket (right), stripe
hood shirt, trousers,
and trainers, all
from燼爏election,
balenciaga.com. ?
Storm warning
Hit the road in style as the
cagoule and ?eece go haute.
Photographs by Jon Gorrigan.
Styling by Helen Seamons
High wires
Vintage jacket (far left),
�, by The North Face,
from rokit.co.uk. Neck
warmer, �, by
Columbia, from
urbanoutfitters.eu. Levi?s,
�, mrporter.com.
Trainers, from �5,
prada.com.
Go the distance
Jacket (above), �5,
T-shirt, �, and shorts,
�0, all by Martine Rose,
from matchesfashion.
com. Trainers, �.95,
adidas.co.uk. Socks, �
topman.com.
Take a break
Fleece (left), �,
by燙olumbia, from
urbanoutfitters.eu.
Photographer?s
assistant: Joe Murphy.
Fashion assistant:
Bemi Shaw. Grooming:
Stephanie G-M at
State management
LA using Alima Pure.
Model: Malcolm Evans
at New York Models.
Shot on location in
Los燗ngeles
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 57
Fashion All ages
Get your winter greens
1
Style tip
Green can be worn
with any other colour ? just
like the stem of a flower ? so it?s
the perfect supporting tone for
separates. Wearing an acid green
dress with classic navy neutrals
will make it fit for the office
? or opt for a fun floral
pop-print
2
3
1 Pam wears floral
dress, �.99, hm.com.
Coat,牐89.99, zara.com.
Boots, �.99, hm.com.
Earrings, �0, by Oscar
de la Renta, from net-aporter.com.
2 Chizoba wears dress, �,
monki.com. Blazer, �5,
marksandspencer.com.
Boots, �5, dunelondon.
com. Cap, � topshop.com.
3 Kelly wears top, �.99,
zara.com. White shirt,
�.99, hm.com. Skirt,
�5, intropia.com.
Leather jacket, �9,
marksandspencer.com.
Shoes, �8, senso.com.
4
5
4 Agustina wears dress,
�, asos.com. Boots,
�0, urbanoutfitters.com.
Earrings, �
accessorize.com.
5 Tawan wears denim
jacket, �5, etrececile.
com. Trousers, �5,
joseph.com. Bum bag, �,
asos.com. Sunglasses,
�5, prismlondon.com.
Lounger, �0,
johnlewis.com.
Photographer: David
Newby. Stylist: Melanie
Wilkinson. Hair: Shukeel
at Frank Agency using
Bumble and bumble.
Makeup: Lisa Stokes
using L?Occitane. Fashion
assistant: Melina Frangos.
Models: Pam at Ugly, Kelly
at Mrs Robinson, Tawan at
Storm, Agustina at Premier
and Chizoba at Milk
Fashion Wishlist
1
2
3
4
5
On your marks
Borrow a trick from the
track, and add a
sporty detail to your look
STYLING: MELANIE WILKINSON
6
Buy
this
9
7
8
1 A tucked-in white shirt and heels will instantly elevate
a pair of casual爐rousers燬ide stripe trousers,
�.99, zara.com. 2 Drawstring trousers, �.99, hm.com.
3 Padded jacket, �0, ganni.com. 4 Socks, �, by
Vetements x Reebok, from matchesfashion.com.
60 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
10
5 Striped jumper, �, urbanoutfitters.com.
6 Wear sporty stripes with a midi爏kirt and trainers Jumper, �0,
by JW Anderson, from燽rownsfashion.com. 7 Tote bag,
�, arket.com. 8 Dress, �, asos.com. 9 Zip skirt, �, topshop.com.
10 Sock boots, �5, stories.com.
PHOTOGRAPH: DAVID NEWBY. STYLING: MELANIE WILKINSON. HAIR AND MAKEUP: SAM COOPER AT CAROL HAYES MANAGEMENT
Fashion Jess Cartner-Morley
What
I wore
this
week
Chunky
sweaters and
?oaty skirts
99
9
9
1
2
1 Pleated, �, stories.com
2 Blue, �, arket.com
3 Red printed, �0, by Rixo, from net-a-porter.com
4 Black and white pleated, �.99, hm.com
5 Face print, �, monki.com
4
3
With the honourable exception of those poor
souls who have to step right out of their Twixmas
cosies and into corsets and sequins on the
Hollywood red-carpet circuit, in pursuit of
award-season glory, no one in their right mind has
any interest in dressing up in January. The best that
can be said about this month is that it too shall pass.
Soon it will be February, which is爏till cold and
dark, but at least has the grace to燽e short, and
comes with pancakes and heart-shaped chocolates.
However, it seems to me important not to
give爑p completely in January. By which I mean
I爐ake a燿im view of a look overreliant on comfy
old trousers, Uggs and cardigan-coats. These are
not clothes so much燼s nightwear
modified for the爌urpose of ?
reluctantly ? leaving爐he house. It is
more obvious爐han you realise, as
you shamble into the office clutching
a takeout coffee the size of燼 hotwater bottle, that your spirit remains
on the sofa.
With this in mind, I have hit
upon燼爁ormula for January
dressing爐hat is爀very bit as
comfortable and cosy,燽ut looks
sharper. More interesting to
25
wear爓ithout being more
challenging to wear, if you see爓hat
I爉ean. What you need is a爁loaty,
loose skirt, ideally old-ladynightgown length ? this is a爒ery
fashionable hemline, actually ? and
then a燾hunky爏weater.
There is nothing in the world as comforting to
wear at this time of year than a fluffy, snuggly,
hibernation-sized sweater. The trick here is to
wear爄t with something surprising and slightly
fashiony, so that it looks like a statement knit
rather爐han a jumper of the jeans-and-jumper
variety. So switch up the bottom half and find
some爇ind of floaty skirt: pleated, or just long
and爈oose; bright or sparkly is good if you are
so爄nclined.
There is no need to do anything ambitious;
like爐uck your top half in, or add fussy layers.
Just爌ut a爊ice skirt on, and then a big jumper
over爐he top. Boots are good here, if for no
other爎eason than they save a fight with a tangled
tights drawer. If爕ou still have a pair of mid-heeled
knee-high boots knocking about from the days
when we used to wear them over jeans, perfect.
Instantly, you have an outfit that acknowledges
the realities of January, without being defeated
by爐hem. This is a mission statement, as much
as燼爁ashion one Jess wears jumper, �0, by Ganni,
from net-a-porter.com. Skirt, �0, jigsaw.com.
Boots, �, office.co.uk. Watch, Jess?s own
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 61
Beauty Sali Hughes
Nail it
The best rehab for
dry winter nails
1
C
Ke reat
ra
i
tin ve N
Tr ail
ea
tm Des
en ign
?
t,
�s Re
4.
99 scue
,a
m RXx
az
on Dai
.co ly
.u
k
Sal
ly H
a
�nsen
.95
, su Moist
u
per
dru re Re
h
g.c
om ab,
2
3
Shea
Nail
& Cu
ticle
Nou
locc
rish
itan
e.co ing Oil,
m
�,
Do some of your nails get to a certain length, then
peel or split? I had three that, however carefully
pee
manicured, split at the exact same point in the
ma
growth cycle, forcing me to cut them, and爐heir
gro
neighbours, right down (always with Muji?s nail
nei
cclipper: way better than any I?ve found in
a燾hemist) and start all over again.
It?s predictably common at this time of year, when nails are
drier from harsh weather and the hokey cokey in and out of
central heating. This year, however, my own problem has been
all but eradicated. Back in December, a New York manicurist
looked at my pathetic, battle-torn thumbnail stump and told
lo
me, in hushed but firm tones (she represented a rival brand),
that I爊eeded Creative Nail Design?s Rescue RXx Daily Keratin
Treatment (�.99, 15ml).
Did I ever. This brush-on oil, containing cruelty-free keratin,
has been only fractionally short of miraculous on my dry,
brittle nails. Within only a爁ew days (genuinely), all my nails
were looking and feeling healthier, and over the following
weeks, the regular splits failed to materialise. I?m left with only
one persistent peeler, but even that?s much improved. The
o
downside is one must be diligent ? applying twice
daily
(over polish is fine) without exception, then
d
massaging
in. I keep the bottle on top of my phone
m
next to the bed, so I don?t forget first and last thing
(button up your pyjamas beforehand, if you don?t
want oily spots on the fabric).
If your nails are a little dry and dehydrated,
I爒ery much like Sally Hansen Moisture Rehab
(�95, 10ml), an ungreasy treatment containing
the hyaluronic acid used in most modern face
serums (conscientious types can even pop it
under their CND RXx oil, just as you?d layer your
skincare products). This sinks in fast, hydrating
dried-out nails with neither mess nor staining.
If your nails are a constant maintenance job and carrying a
glass polish bottle around in your handbag makes you nervous,
I爎ecommend L?Occitane Shea Nail & Cuticle Nourishing Oil
((�, 7.5ml). Packed in a plastic tube with brush nib, it squeezes
directly on to the nail with no risk of spilling. The oil is luxurious
and effective, conditioning rough cuticles and drastically
improving flaky and splitting nails. It?s also decent on lips The Measure
Meas
Going up
Hair cla
clamps Now
fashionable, according
fashio
to Man Repeller.
Matisse His shade of
blue is a nice flip to lilac
(spring?s tricky colour).
See Annie Costelloe
Brown?s earrings.
Roberto Cavalli
menswear Really quite
lovely in the hands of
new creative director
Paul
Surridge. Think
P
Thin
White Duke by
T
way
w of rockabilly.
Waterfall cardigans
dig
gans
and blow-driess Best
B
way to celebrate
eG
Grace
And燜rankie?s return.
etur
urn.
Edeka The German
man
supermarket is
enjoying an unlikely
likely
fashion moment
nt:
its yellow and blue
logo爃as been爐weaked
weaked
and turned into
o
a燘alenciaga design
sign.
H閏tor Beller韓
n
In燨ff-White, the
he
Arsenal
senal player is
is our
spring
ring style hero.
hero.
Going down
TePe anxiety The only
interdental brushes we
use but, goddamn it, we
are still on red (0.5mm)
and had hoped to be on
purple (1.1mm) by 2018.
Poppers All over Puma
and Adidas?s spring
collections. Fun but
unpop ever so easily.
Far from ideal in the
polar vortex.
Repurposing Glossier
bubblewrap bags
for the gym Sporting
them in the changing
room is爐he ultimate in
hipster humblebrag.
Sheet masks Once
you?ve tried a rubber
mask ? see Dr Jart ? you
can?t go back. Thicker,
moister and pleasingly
Instagram-friendly.
Pink and red Seismic
news in colour blocking:
we?re all about pink
and green. Very Gucci.
Me-ganism Gone vegan
and feel great? Well
done. Now shut up.
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 1818 63
Space Homes
Bright sparks
A colourful Paris apartment
is home to a燾reative couple
who never stay in one place for
long. Hannah Booth drops by
Photographs by Vincent Leroux
68 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
P
aris?s centuries-old apartment buildings, before
Haussmann took over the city?s planning, are demure
places, hidden behind huge, street-facing doors.
Usually, a small door is embedded within. Step through
and, in Victoire de Taillac?s case, you enter a courtyard with
a爂rand staircase sweeping off to the right and the apartments
themselves. But De Taillac?s family home is to the left. A modest
two-floor 1930s flat (?like two shoeboxes stacked on top of each
other?) it is perched on top of this 18th-century former h魌el
particulier, and accessed via the servants? entrance.
A narrow spiral staircase leaves you dizzy by the second
floor; the apartment is on the seventh. How you manage the
tiny, worn steps in heels, or lugging a suitcase, is anyone?s
guess. There is a lift, says De Taillac, but it?s been broken for
months. So she has been buying food a day at a time. Her wine
is delivered: ?They send the young guy,? she laughs.
But the climb is worth it. The view from the top-floor living
room, and the main bedroom below, is breathtaking: all sky and
rooftops, with the Eiffel Tower bang in the middle.
She lives here with her husband, Ramdane Touhami, and
their three children. De Taillac ?
founder with Touhami of luxury
beauty brand Buly 1803 ? is from
an aristocratic French family,
descended from a royal guardsman
said to be one of the inspirations
for the Three Musketeers. Touhami
is a former skate kid, the son of
a燜rench-Moroccan apple picker
from south-west France.
You enter the apartment directly
into a tiny garret kitchen, lined with
turquoise Cole & Son wallpaper, with
sloping beams painted the same
shade; a narrow hallway leads off
it, snaking round to the bedrooms.
Upstairs, the living room leads to
a爅ewel-box dining room, papered
in gold-tile wallpaper, shelves lined
with curiosities.
For a pair inhabiting the world of
luxury brands, the apartment is
a爎efreshingly messy jumble, with all
the trappings of ordinary family life.
Tester paint streaks the hallway;
growth charts are scrawled up the
wall. The two youngest children ?
Adam, 12, and Noor, 10 ? share a爎oom;
the eldest, Scherazade, 14, has been
given free rein to decorate hers. The
living space feels like a爒intage
emporium: Touhami is fond of
chairs, and no two are the same. An
expensive-looking baby-pink leather
Barcelona chair and ottoman by Mies
van der Rohe is, on closer inspection,
yellowing and tatty. ?It?s 15 years old
now, and was vintage when we
bought it,? says De Taillac.
The family hasn?t lived here long.
They never do: they lived in Japan
for a year in 2016, and before that
Previous pages, left:
a燽espoke sofa; owner
Ramdane Touhami
designed the coloured
wall. Right: the garret
kitchen. Opposite: Cole
& Son?s Geometric II
Prism and Antique Mirror
wallpapers in the dining
room. Below, clockwise
from top: the view
from the living room;
Victoire de Taillac and
her husband, Ramdane
Touhami; classic Uten
Silo organiser by
Vitra (connox.co.uk).
Inset:燙ire Trudon
Napoleon bust candle
(johnlewis.com)
spent two years in a brownstone
in Brooklyn, New York. The main
reason for their peripatetic lives is
Buly, the historical beauty brand
they ?revived? in 2014; they
currently have four stores in Asia.
But they are also nomadic by nature.
Before having children, they lived in
Tangier and India. ?Paris is home,?
says De Taillac, ?but we enjoy
discovering new places. Ramdane is
restless ? he likes movement.?
The pair first breathed new life
into an ancient company with
Cire Trudon, a 16th-century wax
maker, which they turned into
an international candle brand.
Looking to ?create? a brand of his
own, Touhami scoured historical
archives. He chanced upon JeanVincent Bully, a 19th-century master
perfumer from Paris. Three years
later, dropping an ?l? from the name,
Buly 1803 was born.
Where will the family head next?
?It?s getting harder to move,? says
De Taillac. ?The children won?t want
to leave their friends and schools.?
So for now, they are staying put
? painting the hallway blue and
getting the lift fixed. ?Home,? she
says, ?is where my family is.? House rules
Pet interiors hate De Taillac: the
invasion of technical kitchen gadgets.
Worst decorating mistake De燭aillac:
when a temporary solution
becomes爌ermanent.
Bedside reading De Taillac: a tower
of Pisa ? magazines, newspapers,
novels, gardening and cooking books.
Last thing you bought for your
home? Touhami: An art deco tea
set爄n silver.
Your worst home habit De Taillac:
buying new things ? it?s full!
Guiltiest pleasure Touhami:
a燾hocolate pastry and mint tea in
front of the football.
What would we find in your fridge?
Touhami: Greek white beans, Greek
lentils, Greek hummus.
Last house guest? Our
children?s爁riends.
ch
Space Wishlist
2
4
1
3
Switched on
Shed some light with
a爐able lamp ? the more
futuristic, the better
6
5
9
8
7
Buy
this
1 Serena lamp, �5.10, by Flos, from ariashop
ariashop.co.uk.
lamp in brushed
2 The power of three: chic, geometric, metallic Tripod la
table lamp, �,
gold, �5, by Bloomingville, from amara.com. 3 Ewer ta
made.com. 4 Bon Jour T base lamp in yellow, �1, heals.com.
5 Blooper lamp in cedar green, �0, conranshop.co.uk.
conranshop.co.u 6 Harmony
70 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
10
ribbon lamp, �, johnlewis.com. 7 Astrid white metal and glass lamp,
�, habitat.co.uk. 8 A penholder and a light: just what every desk needs
Buddy lamp, �5.76, by Northern Lighting, from nest.co.uk.
9 TorchT1 lamp, �5, by Sylvain Willenz, from twentytwentyone.com.
10 Control lamp, �9, by Muuto, from padlifestyle.com.
Gardens Alys Fowler
Let?s face it, January is a dark and dastardly
month: sowing most things is pointless. But the
exception is chillies. Sure, the seed packages say
sow in March, but you want to be potting them
on by then. The longer you give chillies to grow,
the more fruit they?ll reward you with.
Chillies originate from central and south
America, with the Andes the principal area. From this we
can爑nderstand a few of chillies? true loves: warm sunny
days�(no higher than 29C), cooler nights (no lower than 10C),
and dry conditions.
The ideal temperature for germination is 28C, and thus
requires a heated propagator with a snug lid. Chillies don?t
like to dry out at the early stages of germination, but don?t like
to sit in damp conditions, either. Chilli seed is often slow to
germinate, and fungus has plenty of time to attack and kill the
seeds. I find a thin layer of vermiculite over the seed is often
the solution: it remains moist, but has good air porosity, which
should keep moulds at bay. If you don?t have a propagator, you
can get away with a radiator shelf or warm cupboard as long as
you move the seeds to a sunny windowsill the
minute they germinate. Using warm water on
young seedlings when watering makes a huge
difference to the speed of growth.
Chillies are hungry and will need repotting
regularly in spring until they find their final
growing spot. They have an expansive fibrous
root system that loves to roam. Repot every
time white roots appear in the drainage holes.
If you want lots of fruit, grow undercover or in
the most sheltered and sunny outdoor space,
such as against a south-facing wall.
Chillies are broken down into five groups: Capsicum annuum,
which includes bell peppers (pictured top), wax, cayenne,
jalapenos and chiltepin; C. frutescens, which includes tabasco
(above, inset) and Thai peppers; C. chinense (hailing from
east of the Andes) which includes naga, habanero and scotch
bonnets; C. pubescens, which includes the perennials rocoto
peppers; and C. baccatum (left), which includes aji peppers.
I爃ave met many peppers that make me weep, but never one
that I have disliked. Behind the instant kick are fruity, earthy,
smoky, bitter and sweet notes.
Chilli lists are rather addictive, so here are a few of the best:
Sea Spring Seeds in Devon, which includes their own Britishbred chillies; Simpson Seeds has impeccable taste, as does
South Devon Chilli Farm. All three offer excellent plug plants.
Finally, The Real Seed Company has interesting rocotos and
even an outdoor ripening chilli, tried and tested in Wales The big chilli
ALAMY (3); GAP
Masses of fruit will
reward early sowers
What to do this week
Plant this Find the bright yellow of
forsythia flowers a bit too gaudy?
Grow white forsythia, Abeliophyllum
distichum (pictured), instead. This
Korean native has scented, starlike
flowers that appear in February
and March on bare branches; it?s
compact, reaching 1.5m x 1.5m. It
needs a sheltered, sunny spot, close
to the house so you can enjoy the
he
perfume.
Visit this If you have a hankering
g
for hellebores, award-winning
hellebore breeders Ashwood
Nurseries in the West Midlands is
your best bet. Head there on
27 January or 17 February for one
e
of their behind-the-scenes tourss
and a chance to buy hellebores you
won?t see anywhere else. Go to
ashwoodnurseries.com for details.
Make this Have a seed packet sortout. Repurpose an old photo album
by placing one packet into each clear
plastic photo pocket: alphabetised if
you?re feeling particularly efficient.
Jane Perrone
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 71
MURDO MACLEOD FOR THE GUARDIAN; GETTY IMAGES
Space Let?s move to
Well connected? Very well placed, with
Kelvingrove Park right there, the Clyde with the
BBC, STV, Hydro and SEC, and a half-hour walk
to Glasgow Central. Trains: the local station,
Exhibition Centre, makes Glasgow Central in four
mins (every 10 mins or so) en route for Motherwell
(45 mins) and Cumbernauld (1 hr) one way,
Milngavie (20 mins) or Dalmuir (20 mins) the other.
Schools Primaries: Sgoil Gh鄆dhlig Ghlaschu
(Glasgow Gaelic school) and St
Patrick?s are ?good? or ?very
good?, and Anderston ?good?, says
Education Scotland. Secondaries:
From the streets
Sgoil Gh鄆dhlig Ghlaschu again, or
Calum Fraser ?A fantastic food
a walk to Hillhead High and Notre
and drink scene. Nice independent
Dame High (girls), both of which
shops in the Hidden Lane.?
lack current inspection reports.
Michaela Ball ?Jumping house
Hang out at? Quite the culinary
prices and smart new pavements.?
hub: Porter & Rye, the Finnieston,
the Gannet, Ox and Finch,
Alchemilla and Crabshakk are all
in爐he Good Food Guide, and within
a few hundred yards of each other.
I燾ould go on.
Where to buy A tale of three
cities. To the north towards
Woodside Place and Sauchiehall
Street it?s燼ll爌osh, leafy, Victorian
tenements. To the south, around
Argyle Street, the same only denser,
less leafy and shabbier. Then it?s the Clydeside
What?s going for it? Bare lightbulbs. Yes, yes, I know they?re very fashionable right
slabs of contemporary apartments. Flats: three
now, thank you very much. I have read Living Etc. But, at the risk of sounding like my
bedrooms, �0,000-�0,000; two bedrooms,
late granny, what?s wrong with a lampshade? Once upon a time, bare lightbulbs in a
�0,000-�0,000; one bedroom, �0,000window might have indicated poverty or dereliction. Now they mean quite the opposite.
�0,000. Rentals:
You?ll struggle to find a lampshade in the windows of the modish new nitespots on
a one-bedroom flat, �0-�0pcm; a threeArgyle Street, aka the Strip. Finnieston is yet another tale of gentrification. Where once
bedroom flat, �0-�200pcm.
dockworkers had their fish supper, yuppies/dinkys/hipsters/whatevs now eat octopus
Bargain of the week A cool-looking onewith blood orange and drink in gin bars; where there were once actual docks, there
bedroom爁lat in a lovely Victorian listed former
are now ?luxury? (you might want to speed-dial trading standards with that word)
barracks; �6,000, with doorsteps.co.uk
apartments. With wearying inevitability, last year saw Finnieston third in the UK for
Tom Dyckhoff
property price rises, at 14%. So perhaps it?s a case of let?s not move to. Or, if you do, maybe
open something useful. With lampshades. And no cocktails in jam jars.
Do you live in Hebden Bridge? Do you have
The case against The much-documented problems of gentrification. The Clydeside
a爁avourite haunt or a pet hate? If so, email
half燽y the Expressway can feel bleak, unpopulated and Anywheresville. Few affordable
lets.move@theguardian.com by next Tuesday.
options if you have a family.
Finnieston, Glasgow: gentri?ed,
trendy, not a lampshade in sight
The best place to move for... wellbeing
I?d like to be well, wouldn?t you? Well,
well-er. I?m OK. Midlife dampens
expectations, and I?m easy to please.
But where could I be well-er?
Quality of life indices boomed
in late-70s America, as a way of
charting ? and promoting ? places
after the urban crisis when New
York nearly went bust. They arrived
here during David Cameron?s drive
for More National Happiness, when
everyone became briefly obsessed
with Scandi noir and why the Danes
are so bloody cheery when it never
stops raining. Each year the Office
for National Statistics asks questions
such as, ?Overall, how satisfied
are you with your life?? Now every
district?s mood is mapped, we know
precisely where to move to feel
more Danish (or Norwegian, as last
year Norway snatched Denmark?s
happiest nation crown).
And it?s not where I live. Most
cities tend towards the un-well.
Recent research found Northern
Ireland the well-est region of the UK,
Craven in Yorkshire (left) the well-est
district, and North Warwickshire and
Orkney in third place, confirming
the suspicion that all the UK needs
for cheer is green hills, decent house
prices, few people and lots of sheep.
Me? I?m generally well-est where
I燾an smell ozone and freshly fried
doughnuts: the seaside. Throw
in a爏mart telly and a爉asochistic
north-easterly and I?m in heaven.
Whitby, you?re mine. Tom Dyckhoff
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 73
Family
I came to realise that
my life was built
around something
I didn?t believe in
...monogamy
Words by Anita Cassidy. Photograph by Laura Pannack
I
t was the hardest thing I?d ever had to
say to my husband, Marc. Three years
ago, I sat down and told him: ?The idea
of having sex just with you for the next 40 years ? I
can?t do it any more.? But I had come to爎ealise
that my life was built around something I didn?t
believe in: monogamy.
We had been together for 12 years and had two
children, now nine and seven. I love being a爉other
and I set the bar high from the start ? cloth nappies
and cooking from scratch. But I爊eeded something
more in my emotional and sexual life.
Marc?s reaction was remarkable; he agreed
to support me and open our marriage to other
partners, although it wasn?t really what he
wanted. We started counselling to try to identify
the best of what we had, to save it and protect
it. Sex is a big part of a relationship, but it is only
a爌art. We didn?t want it to scupper us.
If that sounds difficult, it was. I don?t think we
could have done it if we hadn?t spent most of our
marriage reading, talking and exploring together.
I quickly embraced the dating scene and
discovered another side of my sexual self.
74 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
I爀nrolled on lots of sites, where you are asked
specific questions about yourself and your
preferences. It was illuminating: do I like this? Yes.
Do I like that? Well, let?s see. They were the kind of
questions I?d never been asked before ? and had
never asked myself.
I became convinced that traditional relationships
are like an air lock. You meet someone. It?s amazing
and it?s rare, and then you lock it; you shut the
windows and doors, and you try desperately to
keep it all to yourselves. Then the air turns sour
because there?s no oxygen. You might make a
sexual mistake on the spur of the moment
because you are craving some ? any ? contact.
Why not live in a world where you can have room
for that connection, that spark?
I think most people?s reaction was that Marc
should have kicked me out. My immediate family
have been supportive, although my mother is
still ambivalent. We discuss everything openly,
and she understands where I?m coming from, but
worries that I?m going to end up on my own. If
I燿o, though, it will be because I have chosen that.
People who choose to be polyamorous often do
so after delving deep into themselves and their
desires, so it runs close to the kink scene, which
was also something I wanted to explore. There?s
a爐emptation to think that, had Marc and I explored
these things together, our marriage might have
worked without opening it up. I?m not sure that
it爓ould have, though, given that he wasn?t into it.
It can seem quite intimidating, but I was so ready
for it. The first time I went to a fetish club, I felt
like營爓as at home ? that I?d found my people.
I now have a partner of two years, Andrea.
We work as a couple, but we also have sex with
friends. He?s the only partner I have introduced
to my children. I love Andrea and I?m very lucky
to have him, but I don?t want to live with him ?
we燽oth value our solitude too much. He and I can
flirt with other people and ask for their number,
but I still feel jealous sometimes. He went away
with another woman and, yes,爄t was difficult.
Meanwhile, Marc and I realised we were no
longer compatible. I had changed too much. We
still share the family home and parent our children
together. We still get on. We have counselling
together, we spend Christmas together ? we
Anita Cassidy with her husband, Marc (right), and her partner, Andrea
are still reading and learning as we used to.
We爓anted to keep all the bits that worked.
We have had to learn so much about
communicating better, and I think the children
have benefited from that. We have explained
that Dad needs one person to be with and Mum
needs more爌eople to make her happy. The talk
is ongoing; we won?t wait to sit them down when
they are teenagers, expecting them suddenly to
get it. Understanding polyamory is complicated,
but monogamy is fraught with ambiguity, too.
You can craft your own polyamory, but I?m not
sure I would want more than two or three other
partners. I?m hoping two people I met recently
will become lovers, but there?s no rush. People
assume that I?m constantly having sex, but it?s
not燼s simple as that. I want an emotional and
mental connection with someone, so it takes
time爐o build up to that.
Monogamy, meanwhile, feels more like a
competition where you need to bag someone
before anyone else does. None of that applies
in a poly setup, which is incredibly liberating.
Think how strange it would be to have only one
friend. You can?t get everything from one platonic
relationship. Why would you try with one lover?
But it?s a challenge: you?re swimming against the
cultural norm and it?s difficult emotionally, with or
without the support of an existing partner. On top
of that, the amount of work involved in maintaining
multiple relationships, sexual and platonic, is huge.
Andrea and I look to the future, but there are no
expectations. We are part of a broader community
and we think developing that is more important.
Put it this way: I don?t see myself sitting on a park
bench at 80 with one other person. I?d like to be
part of a group of people, a community. We seem
to want a silver bullet for everything. One God.
One partner. But life is plural.
M
arc:營?d realised for a few years that
Anita wasn?t completely happy,
so it爓asn?t a total shock when
she told me爏he wanted to explore nonmonogamy. It爓as爑psetting to hear that what
we had wasn?t爉eeting her needs, but it was
very爄mportant to me that she was happy. If
that爉eant her exploring a different relationship
style, then I would be there to support her.
I did a lot of reading around the subject of
ethical non-monogamy. It makes a lot of sense
intellectually, but it doesn?t resonate with me
emotionally. It didn?t feel right. I was prepared
for our marriage to continue, with me being
monogamous and Anita having other partners,
but that proved more difficult than we envisaged.
I completely support Anita. I?m glad she has
been able to share with me what she?s discovering
about the honesty and communication needed
to make polyamory work. It?s also true of
monogamous relationships, and I hope to take
what I have learned from this experience into
my爁uture relationships.
What I have always wanted ? and still do ? is to
be with one partner, long-term, with whom I can
share all of life?s rich experiences, to enjoy the
journey and the inevitable changes together As told to Camilla Palmer. Appetite, a novel
by Anita Cassidy, is published by RedDoor at
�99. To order a copy for �64, go to bookshop.
theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846.
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 75
Classified Space
LO COLE FOR THE GUARDIAN
Family Ask Annalisa Barbieri
What you?re trying to do is ignore very clear
evidence, to ?make it OK?, thinking that if you
can爅ust get over this patch, everything will be
fine. And that?s unlikely to happen.
While many people have fantasies that don?t
mirror their real-life choices, these don?t make
them act differently. I like the way he says he
doesn?t want to realise this 20 years down the
line, with little爐hought of what impact that would
actually have on a family situation.
I consulted Kirstie McEwan, who is燼 sexual and
relationship counsellor (cosrt.org.uk). ?You?re
obviously heartbroken,? she said, ?but you?ve
always known he was curious, haven?t you??
She wondered what?s keeping
you together. ?Is it more than just
a爎elationship? Is there further
entanglement, shared finances?
He can
Do爕ou still want a relationship with
explore his
this man and, if so, what sort?? She
sexuality ? but
sexualit
also pointed out that the ball is not in
he needs to do
his court but in yours.
it on his own
You ask how trust can be rebuilt
but, given that he?s very probably
lying to himself, I think this is going
to be a long, hard journey for you. It
does seem you have had suspicions
for a爓hile (you don?t mention your
ages, nor how long you?ve been
together). ?Some people,? McEwan
says, ?may suspect something but
don?t want to see the truth. Now it?s
squarely in front of you and you have
to deal with it.?
You may have been avoiding your
suspicions because of insecurity:
maybe you feel he is better than
nothing, or better than other men
out there. But what you?re doing is cheating
I found out two weeks ago that my boyfriend had kissed another man.
on爕ourself if you put up with this. You?ll be
The爊ext day, he texted the same man inappropriate messages, asking
forever wondering and suspicious, until you end
to meet again and proceed further than kissing (the messages were
up a shadow of yourself.
apparently sent while my boyfriend was very drunk). When we spoke about
There is nothing wrong with someone being
this, he said he did not enjoy the kiss, but wanted to see if he enjoyed other
bisexual, or exploring their sexuality ? but not
activities with men.
on爕our time, and not if it hasn?t been agreed.
I have always known he has been curious in this way and I?ve voiced my
I think his claim that he?s going to ask you to
concerns about him wanting a man instead of me (a woman). He?s always responded that
marry him within the year is his way of trying
I am what he wants, insisting he loves me. But this encounter demonstrates that he is still
to燾onvince himself.
not sure. He believes his bisexuality is a sign that he is undecided, so he wants to explore
Relationships, and marriages, are hard work.
or rule out men ? but continue in a relationship with me. I燿on?t think that?s fair, but
What you absolutely cannot do is enter into them
I爓ant to help him.
with suspicions, or in a situation in which you are
When we discussed his cheating, he said he was planning on proposing within the
not someone?s number one.
next year, but was worried about committing to me when it may turn out that he would
Yes, your boyfriend needs to work out his
eventually prefer men. He doesn?t want to realise this 20 years down the line, when we
sexuality, but he needs to do it on his own. If you
are married with kids.
stick around to ?help him? through this, you will
His excuses for the kiss were weak at best: he was under incredible pressure and stress
at work, and going through a family upheaval, all of which produced a cocktail of emotions see his actions as a reflection of you and define
yourself by them. And really, this has nothing to
that, when this man instigated a kiss, led to him kissing back. What do I do?
do with you, and everything to do with him If your boyfriend didn?t enjoy his kiss with this man, why would he want to do more?
Send your problem to annalisa.barbieri@mac.com.
And,爕ou know, lots of people cope with stress, and manage to get very, very drunk,
Annalisa regrets she cannot enter into
without changing their sexuality. What would happen if you had a baby together, or
personal correspondence
had爉oney problems? Would爃e go out and kiss an entire boyband?
My boyfriend kissed another man
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 77
Classified Space
The ultimate luxury for your home
Homelifts by Stannah
Whether enhancing the value of your property
or looking to move effortlessly between ?oors
at home ? the possibilities for transforming your
lifestyle with Stannah are endless.
Take the Salise, our stylish two person, discreetly
indispensable compact lift, that can be ?tted
stress-free almost anywhere in your home, with
minimum disruption.
Or our executive lifts, which offer spacious travel for
up to four or ?ve people over several ?oors and will not
only bene?t your lifestyle now, but will bring value and
convenience to your home for years to come.
Then there?s the indispensable Butler service lift. A
must-have luxury for moving food and drink, groceries
and shopping to all ?oors in the ?nest homes.
We all love a little luxury and the latest technology to
help make our busy lives easier. Discover the bene?ts
our range of homelifts can bring to you today.
The Midilift
Spacious travel
The Butler lift
Welcome helping hand
Call us to ?nd out more FREEPHONE 0800 414 8767
www.stannahhomelifts.co.uk
The Salise
Discreetly indispensable
Family
The secret
et to... getting on with your child?s partn
partner
We don?t have to love
ove
ild?s partner
everyone. Your child?s
Don?t create problems
if爐here aren?t any. Ten years
down the line,
line your child might
be parenting your grandchild
with this pers
person. Do you want
your judgme
ment from now
clouding that future? Also:
beware overs
oversharing social
media. You ccan?t take back
what?s out爐here.
out爐h
might not be your cup
up of tea.
How good does the
relationship have to
o be?
It爊eeds to be functioning,
oning,
safe燼nd mutually benefi
eneficial;
but it?s not you living
ng with,
loving or having sex
x with
this person. Accept爐hat
that
your child has made
e a燾hoice.
Remember, if they?re happy,
Keep the channels of
communication open, warm and
that should be good enough for
you. Sometimes rejecting them
says more about your own
shortfalls than your child?s.
friendly. Don?t lob opinions in. If they?re
sought, offer them in a measured way.
Don?t get personal. Rushing in with
judgments is usually a mistake, and can
lead to alienation.
INTERVIEW BY CAMILLA PARKER
Be welcoming. They
hey might be anxious
or nervous. Be gently curious and get to
know them. Don?t go on first impressions.
Let the dust settle. You might see
that they can support, help and love
your child in a happy
ppy relationship.
Give them the benefi
nefit of the doubt.
Families are living, complex
entities. Celebrate that. Don?t
undermine it. Let things take
their燾ourse.
Major, Relate
Advice by Ammanda M
PHOTOGRAPH BY KELLIE FRENCH; ILLUSTRATION BY LO COLE, BOTH FOR THE GUARDIAN
A letter to... you and me, ?ve years ago
It?s New Year?s Eve, and you?re
getting ready to pop out and
celebrate with friends. You?re not
ready for what?s about to happen.
Shortly before midnight, you?ll
open the door to an emergency
doctor clutching your elder son?s
blood test results. She?ll tell you to
get him to hospital immediately.
In a few days you?ll get the cancer
diagnosis ? and it?ll dawn on you how
lucky you are that this determined
and kindly doctor pursued you so
late on New Year?s Eve. Your lovely
six-year-old?s life was on the line.
The next few weeks will bring the
horrors of force-feeding medication
to a boy in hospital, who is maddened
with steroids and has lost his hair,
his home life and his school life. Yet,
unbelievably, you will all survive.
All the people who showed up for
you during your last crisis, when your
younger son was catastrophically
unwell, will show up again. Granny,
aunties, uncles, friends, creating
huge waves of kindness and care. It
matters hugely to your two little
boys: they will be made emotionally
much safer by all this. And you will
stay intact as a family, living
between other people?s homes,
hospital and nursery.
Later, as you emerge from the
most gruelling bit, more friends will
show up ? neighbours, colleagues,
strangers and nurses. They?ll all
have their own ingenious ways to
help a boy stuck at home, and his
anxious parents. There?ll be the
neighbour you?ve never met, who
rings the doorbell to give you icecream and says she and her Buddhist
friends will be chanting for you. The
employer who sets up a car service
so you can get around without
disease exposure. The friend who
leaves a home-cooked meal behind
your big plant pot every Wednesday
for when you return after the anxious
days in surgery ? and there are an
unfathomable number of those.
Now, five years later, much of the
edge has come off. Elder son is OK.
All is so much better than you could
have hoped. His return to school
did not go so well. You weren?t on
your guard ? you?d learned to have
remarkable faith in institutions
and it was misplaced at this point;
he?s lost some of his tenacity, and
sometimes seems at sea. But at
every parents? evening they?ll tell
you he?s kind and fair. He?s never
accused of mean or cruel behaviour.
He seems emotionally intact. And
each time you hear it, you will know
where this comes from. And you will
silently thank them all The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 79
Body & mind Oliver Burkeman
But this isn?t just them being nice about your
ineptitude. Getting distracted genuinely isn?t
a爌roblem; indeed, noticing when you?re
distracted is arguably the whole point ? the very
moment in which the skill of meditation is
developed, equivalent to the moment that you
pick up a dumbbell at the gym.
?Every time you catch yourself
wandering and escort your attention
back to the breath, it is like a biceps
curl for the brain,? Harris writes.
Listen to this
?It爄s also a radical act: you?re
Dan Harris?s 10% Happier
breaking a lifetime?s habit of walking
podcast is a non-cheesy
around in a fog of rumination and
resource for novice
projection, and you are actually
meditators. Or to explore the
focusing on what?s happening right
wilder shores of meditation,
now.? Getting back on the wagon,
try Deconstructing Yourself
over and over, is the practice. And
good luck doing that if you haven?t
fallen off first.
A similar logic applies to
establishing a daily meditation
habit, or many other habits, such
as爌hysical exercise. If you stop
doing it爁or a while, and then notice that you?re
Another new book on how to meditate is published roughly every 17 seconds, but since
feeling more crotchety, tired or downcast, you?ll
the baby arrived, I haven?t had much patience with them. In the opening pages, they
have a爏trong motivation to return to it ? far
tend to include some phrase like, ?First, pick a time when you know you?ll be
stronger than trying to force things using
undisturbed?, and I never find out what comes next because I?ve flung the book across
willpower. Or maybe you?d like to get better at
the room in disgust ? although not, to be clear, at the baby.
listening to your partner, or not checking your
So it?s a relief to discover Meditation For Fidgety Skeptics by Dan Harris, the US
phone during meals,爋r whatever; again, the more
newscaster whose earlier book, 10% Happier, chronicled his adventures in meditation
times you notice you?ve failed, the爉ore you?re
following an on-air panic attack. This new book isn?t mainly about how to meditate,
entraining exactly the presence of mind the new
but爃ow to actually meditate ? how to make yourself sit down and do the damn thing; in
habit requires.
that sense, it?s really a manual for cultivating any good habit. Specifically, the book
You might think of this as a kind of superhabit,
makes the case for transforming how we think about ?falling off the wagon?. In most
which makes acquiring any new habit easier.
approaches to habit change, unsurprisingly, falling off the wagon is seen as a bad thing.
If爕ou can turn falling off the wagon into an
(In Alcoholics Anonymous, which has much to answer for here, it?s exceedingly bad.)
integral part of the process ? even to learn to relish
But Harris argues that sometimes it?s not just excusable, it?s essential.
the experience of climbing back aboard ? you?ll be
Meditation teachers are generally warm and smiley people, and they explain basic
using your failure as fuel for success.
meditation in a warm and smiley way: sit comfortably, close your eyes, pay attention to
You?re not doing it wrong. Or, to be precise:
the sensations of your breath, and if you get distracted, don?t beat yourself up; just
doing it wrong is right gently return your attention to the breath.
Can?t keep your mind on
your meditation? Relax
I?ve always known that being
Muslim would mean waiting until
marriage for sex. It?s not that
we?re prudish or lacking desire:
Islam teaches us that wholesome
sex nourishes the bond between
a husband and wife. Rather it?s
because sex is so precious that we
preserve it for the one we want to
spend our lives with. I wouldn?t
want it any other way.
But sexuality doesn?t start with
marriage. It starts in adolescence,
like everybody else?s. I?m blessed
with a great career, supportive
family and friends, and an active
80 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
social life, but it doesn?t take away
the longing to come home to a kiss
on the neck and more.
The problem is that, for a whole
generation of British Muslims,
meeting the one is getting harder.
For a community that values
marriage so highly, we set ourselvess
many barriers. Men in their 40s
who won?t look at women past
their reproductive prime. Women
who still live at home, but won?t
consider men who don?t own their
own home. Thinly veiled racism
and sectarian prejudices, blamed
on爌arental preferences.
In the meantime, I?ve learned selfpleasuring. Religious scholars have
differing views on this, but it?s my
way of keeping my libido in check
while discovering how my body
responds to different sensations and
what I enjoy. There?s no porn ? just
my imagination. And when I do
meet my future wife, I hope that
she?s done so, too. That way we can
discover intimacy together, knowing
our needs and supporting each other
sexually as well as spiritually.
Each week, a reader tells us about
their sex life. Want to share yours?
Email sex@theguardian.com
ILLUSTRATIONS: MICHELE MARCONI; LO COLE, BOTH FOR THE GUARDIAN
My life in sex The single Muslim
PHOTOGRAPHER: KELLIE FRENCH. HAIR AND MAKEUP: SARAH CHERRY. TOP, FROM MY GYM WARDROBE
Body & mind Zoe Williams
and ? wham! ? he looks exactly the same and I look
like his portrait in the attic, the spirit animal who?s
done his ageing for him.
Roberts immediately dispells this shadow of
inauthenticity: he insists on everyone calling
themselves a runner, because everyone was born
to run. He can assess a huge amount just from
running alongside me for a minute or two: how
long my stride is, how harshly my heels hit the
ground, what my posture?s like, how much I?m
struggling at what kind of tempo.
But before that, we do five minutes
that is more like therapy.
What I learned
ed
?When you feel you can?t go on,
is it your legs that are killing you,
To improve your speed,
or your lungs?? he asks. Lungs,
you爏hould run at
hands down. Plainly, if I had
a爌ace爐hat is more
ore
stronger glutes, then my technique
than爕ou can
would be better and that would
reasonably爏tand,
d, for five
help. ?OK,爉ake each in breath
minutes every two
wo days.
four爏trides and each out breath the
It?s called overloading
oading and
same.? The difference is immediate
it?s almost unbearable
bl
and striking: I could now run for
two whole minutes at a time. Next
he advises me to make my stride
shorter. ?You?re only accelerating if
you have contact with the ground.?
I was halfway round the park before
I爁igured out what he meant; the
shorter your stride, the more often
your foot hits the ground, the faster
you go. Within reason, obviously.
Roberts is full of useful advice:
almost everyone is a heel-striker,
but if you aim to hit the ground
with the middle of your foot, you?ll
put less pressure on your patellar
tendon in the long term. Keep
your head up and your chest open; hunching
I feel about the word ?runner? the way I felt about ?mother? when I?d just had
forward is爄nefficient. Stamina work is all intervals
a燽aby�爐hat爄t was completely fraudulent. You can?t call yourself a runner until you
(a爉inute fast, a minute slow); endurance work
can爎un for longer than 90 seconds at a time. But you can?t force yourself out running
is all about just trying to run for longer without
when爕ou?re not a runner. It?s a puzzler, right?
stopping. You have to do both, Roberts says,
That?s why I went to see Matt Roberts, a personal trainer so high-end that David
before commencing a story about Paula Radcliffe?s
Cameron was a client; that?s him you could see in the background of paparazzi shots,
training regime. Unfortunately, being asked to use
looking like a security detail, but actually monitoring the PM?s glute engagement.
Paula Radcliffe as a role model of any sort exceeds
Roberts爄s my age and I remember him starting out, when I was at the London Evening
every last ounce of my stamina Standard燼nd all we talked was his abs, the Atkins diet and Zo� Ball. Anyway, 21 years pass
Can Cameron?s personal
trainer help me run?
Solutions
Quiz 1 Beowulf.
2 Newborns.
3 RSPB.
4 Snowdon.
5 Heidelberg.
6 Helots.
7 British Empire.
8 Alfred Adler.
9 Pasta name origins:
orecchiette; farfalle;
82 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
fusilli;爈inguine; orzo;
spaghetti;爌enne.
10 Regular season games for
teams in major US leagues.
11 Fictional Emmas: Jane
Austen; Flaubert; Marvel
comics; The Avengers.
12 Shrinking bodies of
water:燗frica; Central Asia;
Bolivia; Iran.
13 Codenames for second
world爓ar operations: Dunkirk;
North Africa invasion;
Dieppe raid; Sicily invasion;
Netherlands/Germany.
14 Churches founded in
their爃onour.
15 Types of porpoise.
Crossword See right.
T
A
O R A N
U
D
K E N T
H
M C V E
A
F R U I
N
M
P E C O
G
G
L I V E
E
N
V
G E
R
T
I
I G
O
T
G
R I
A
A N
T
J
S A
M
H E
S
H
T
C H
E
N O
N
D L
Y
V
C
R E N O T
N
R
P I A N O
C
I
P E A C H
H
E L S E A
O
L I E S
I
M
E T D I E
A
R
Body & mind The balance
Bossing it
Sharmadean Reid
P臠 HANSEN FOR THE GUARDIAN
Dina Asher-Smith
?Food is fuel, but I will eat
Tangfastics before a race?
Sprinter Dina Asher-Smith, 22, is the British record holder at both 100m and 200m
Sleep I?m always in bed by 10.30pm, and my phone is off by 11pm. Sleep and training are my
highest priorities and I need a minimum of eight hours? sleep. You can train yourself to be
better at it; I won?t lie on my bed unless I?m going to sleep. If I?m travelling to a different
time zone, I?ll start adjusting before I leave. I?ll get up at 4am, even if I?m a zombie.
Eat Food is functional for me, rather than a pleasure. When I?m training, for this April?s
Commonwealth Games, say, food is fuel: high protein, low carbs. Breakfast is three
scrambled eggs, spinach, a yoghurt and black coffee. Lunch is protein ? fish or chicken.
Dinner is what my mum cooks. I don?t do cheat days and I don?t drink. But I like a nice meal
out. I?ve cut out all unnecessary sugar, but sometimes eat Haribo Tangfastics before a race.
Work I have a Google calendar with every single thing I do on it. My coach and my mum are
hooked up to it, too. I race between February and August, so I try to get all other obligations,
like visiting schools, done outside that. I train six days a week, usually gym in the
mornings and track from 6.30-8.30pm. Last February, I broke my foot when I was also
studying for my history finals at King?s College London. I didn?t see my friends or do
anything fun. But studying history, with its wars and coups, makes me feel fortunate that
the most stressful thing in my life is how fast I can run in a straight line.
Family I?m currently moving out of my family home to live by myself. My friends moved
out of home for uni, so they understand bills. I don?t, so I need to grow up. It?s a New Year
resolution to make more time for family and friends. I can be out of the country for two
months at a time, so I have to work at relationships.
Fun My dad calls me ?roomie? because when I?ve had a full day, I need to recharge in my
bedroom. I?m an introvert; I can happily be alone for days. Relaxing is reading, sleeping,
swimming. I get a month off every year: last year I travelled all over, which my physio wasn?t
too happy about. I do no exercise in that month. I won?t even run for a bus Interview by Colin Crummy
Q: How do I
change career?
A: Sometimes
the hardest
part is getting
everyone else on
board with the
idea. It?s not an intrinsically British
thing爐o encourage people who
want to do something different;
there?s a爎eason爓e have the phrase
?above爕our station?.
First, you need to develop an
unwavering self-belief. You?re
going to smash it ? and you should
say that to yourself every day. But
don?t imagine that you can just
stroll into your new life. Give the
transition a爕ear. That?s what it takes
to swot up in your chosen field, feel
confident in your skills and start to
change people?s perceptions.
I started out in fashion. I?d read
the style magazines since I was 12;
I could name every collection and
designer. Then I燿ecided to open a
nail salon. Few people believed in
me; I was a爐otal industry outsider.
I燿id a nail course, made friends
with beauty journalists and went to
trade shows.燱AH kickstarted the
new wave of nail art, and now we
have a salon in the heart of London.
In short: know your stuff. Find a
night course. Get a mentor. Talk to
people about your passion.
My biggest career change has
come fairly recently. I?ve always
been into tech and was always
the first person at school with the
latest gadgets (yes, I had a pager).
As爐he start-up culture blossomed,
I thought, why not? For a while I?ve
wanted to build software for salons.
So two years ago, I made a爌lan.
I爓ent to every public talk on AI,
data, software development, VR,
bots: anything that might be useful.
Eventually people just accepted that
technology is what I do now.
There?s no such thing as an
overnight success. People will see
you in your new career and think
?wow?, but no one will ever know
how hard you?ve worked to get
there. Go for it.
Sharmadean Reid is the founder of
WAH Nails and beautystack.co
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 83
Classified Space
Adult learner
Coco Khan
It?s time I figured
g
out how to be a grownup. But ?rst I will need to master a few things...
La year, my cousin in Sydney had a baby,
Last
an爄rresistible little boy with sparkling hazel
an
eyes and chubby wrists. His arrival was
ey
excitedly anticipated in all corners of my family.
ex
Dormant燱hatsApp groups were reanimated,
D
a爎olling feed of scaremongering parenting articles
a�
(?Thumb sucking: how addictive is it really??); baby bodily fluid
updates (?Today we learned about puking through the nose?); and
a photo challenge in which relatives outdid each other in finding
kid versions of boring adult things (?Look, a tax return game,
for爐oddlers!?).
?You know what he really needs,? I ventured in the group chat,
?a Fisher-Price Build-Your-Own-Pension *insert crying face emoji*!
OMG, am I right, guys?
They were not amused.
You see, I have a confession. I?m a millennial. I like avocados,
working freelance and posting the occasional selfie because, hey,
have you ever seen someone in this much debt look this good?
Like others of my generation, the regular trappings of adulthood ?
marriage, home ownership, children, a pension ? seem increasingly
out of reach. But if that version of adulthood is impossible, then
it?s time to invent a new one ? a task that falls to me. I am, after all,
the only millennial in my family: my mum, the youngest of her lot,
had me later in life, and until the arrival of this new bundle of joy,
I爎emained the youngest.
I am determined to set an example for my new nephew, and
demonstrate that this version of adulthood is both acceptable and
achievable. It is time for me to shed my generation?s reputation as
eternal adolescents and rise to the challenge.
But first, I will need to master a few things. I will need to learn to
drive. I will need to be able to explain to my mum what I actually do
for a living. It is time I embraced the great outdoors (my partner is
very, very English and wants us to do more rural activities). I want to
become punctual, and I would like to be able to swim (another thing
my very, very English boyfriend likes is water, being near it and in it).
And then there?s the other stuff ? the grownup stuff I don?t yet
know I need to do ? but which will undoubtedly involve a lot of
queueing and being on hold.
Adulthood is a mysterious beast. Just when you think you?ve
cracked it, it has some other little joker up its sleeve ? a big soulsearching conundrum that can?t be fixed with a Topshop gift card.
It?ll燽e a challenge and an adventure, and whether I?m up to it will
depend on who you ask. (Friends: ?Yes!? Mum: ?Oh dear.?) But I?m
ready to give it a go GETTY IMAGES (2)
Crossword by Sy
Across
7/13/14 1985
novel by
Jeanette
Winterson
(7,3,3,3,4,5)
8 Bruce ....,
anti-nuclear
campaigner
and爁ormer
priest (4)
9 Jane Campion
movie starring
Holly燞unter
and Harvey
Keitel (1993)
(3,5)
10 Timothy .......,
convicted of,
and爀xecuted
for, the�95
bombing of
Oklahoma燙ity
(7)
12 See 4
14 See 7
16 Popular area
of New York and
1
Quiz by Thomas Eaton
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
9
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
London? (7)
19 Hard cheese
made爁rom ewe?s
milk (8)
20 See 1
22 The first
James燘ond
movie爐o
star燫oger燤oore
(4,3,3,3)
Down
1/20 1994 spy
caper starring
Jamie Lee Curtis
and Arnold
Schwarzenegger
(4,4)
2 See 4
3 Alfred Hitchcock
thriller from
1958 (7)
4/2/18/12 Novel
for燾hildren by
Roald燚ahl�(1961)
(5,3,3,5,5)
5 A city in Italy ?
or a beach in Los
Angeles? (6)
6 The name given
to waterfront
promenades in
Doha,燚ubai and
Muscat (8)
11 Andrew ........,
Scottish/American
steel magnate
and benefactor,
especially of
libraries�(1835-1919)
(8)
13 See 7
15 The princess
in Shakespeare?s
Cymbeline (6)
17 1955 novel
by燰ladimir
Nabokov�(6)
18 See 4
21 Title of the
heads爋f state
of燢uwait and
Qatar�(4)
1 Which epic poem
is about a hero of
the燝eats?
2 Who would exhibit
the Moro reflex?
3 Which charity
was爁ounded by
Emily Williamson
as爐he Plumage
League?
4 Which mountain
is爇nown locally as
Yr燱yddfa?
5 Where is the
Ruperto Carola
University?
6 Who were the
state-owned serfs of
ancient Sparta?
7 What, according
to JR Seeley,
was燼cquired
?in燼爁it爋f absence
of爉ind??
8 Which pioneering
Austrian psychiatrist
died in Aberdeen
deen
in�37?
Answers on page 82
What links:
9 Ears; butterfly;
spindle; tongue;
barley; twine;
quill?
10 American
football�(16);
basketball (82);
ice hockey (82);
baseball (162)?
11 Woodhouse;
Bovary; Frost;
Peel?
12 Lake Chad;
Aral Sea;
Lake Poop�
Lake Urmia?
13 Dynamo; Torch;
Jubilee; Husky;
Market Garden?
14 Diego Maradona
in Rosario and
John燙oltrane in
San燜rancisco?
15 Dall?s;
Harbour; Vaquita;
Burmeister?s;
Bu
Spectacled; Finless?
Spe
Back
Elena Ferrante
ILLUSTRATION: ANDREA UCINI FOR THE GUARDIAN
I loved that boy爐o爐he point where, seeing him, I felt close to fainting
Some time ago, I planned to describe my first times. I listed a certain
number of them: the first time I saw the sea, the first time I flew in
an燼eroplane, the first time I got drunk, the first time I fell in love, the
first time I made love. It爓as an exercise both arduous and pointless.
For that matter, how could it be otherwise? We always look at first
times with excessive indulgence. Even if by their nature they?re
founded on inexperience, and so as a rule are not very successful,
we爎ecall them with sympathy, with regret. They?re swallowed up
by燼ll the times that have followed, by their transformation into habit,
and yet we attribute to them the power of the unrepeatable.
Precisely because of this innate contradiction, my project began
to爏ink right away and shipwrecked conclusively when I tried to
describe my first love truthfully. I made an effort to search my
memory爁or details and I found few. He was very tall, very thin, and
seemed handsome to me. He was 17, I 15. We saw each other every
day燼t six in爐he afternoon. We went to a deserted alley behind the
bus爏tation. He spoke to me, but not much; kissed me, but not
much;燾aressed me, but not much. What primarily interested him
was爐hat營爏hould caress him. One evening ? was it evening? ? I kissed
him as I爓ould have liked him to kiss me. I did it with such an eager,
86 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
shameless intensity that afterwards I decided not to see him again.
But燼lready I don?t know if that really happened then, or in the
course爋f other brief loves that followed. Certainly I loved that
boy爐o爐he point where, seeing him, I爈ost every perception of
the爓orld,燼nd felt close to fainting, not out of weakness but out
of燼n爀xcess of爀nergy.
Consequently, I discovered, what I distinctly remember of my first
love is my state of confusion. Or rather, the more I worked on it, the
more I focused on deficiencies: vague memory, sentimental
uncertainties, anxieties, dissatisfaction. Nothing, in fact, was
sufficient; I expected and wanted more, and was surprised that he,
on爐he other hand, after wanting me so much, found me superfluous
and ran away because he had other things to do.
All right, I said to myself, you will write about how altogether
wanting first love is. But, as soon as I tried, the writing rebelled,
it爐ended to fill gaps, to give the experience the stereotypical
melancholy爋f adolescence. It?s why I said, that?s enough of first
times.燱hat we were at the beginning is only a vague patch of colour
contemplated from the edge of what we have become Elena Ferrante?s column will appear in Weekend every Saturday
ve to purchase on the open market, had
not played a great part in holding things together.
Some might say holding things back, but even
a爁ew of those will be glued to the screen. I wonder
how it all turns out The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 51
Weekending Fashion Beauty Space Gardens Family Mind & body Puzzles
Blind date
Thom, 25,
auditor
What were you hoping for?
Interesting conversation.
First impressions?
She had lovely eyes, was
well dressed and had been
thoughtful enough to wear
a爊ecklace with her name
was no chance
on, so there
th
of forgetting it.
did you talk about?
What d
Stranger Things,
Str
Jamaican family,
her Ja
India, the guilt that
India
comes with working for
a爈arge燾orporation.
a爈arg
moments?
Any awkward
aw
None that stood out.
aybe that we both
Mayb
struggled with the wine list.
Good table manners?
Faultless.
She wore
re
a necklace with
her name on:
no chance
ce
of forgetting
ing
thing about Grace?
Best th
She spoke
passionately
sp
about
abou her interests,
most o
of爓hich seemed
to al
align with mine.
Would y
you introduce her
to爕our
friends?
to
They?d
They? get along well.
Describe
Grace
De
in three爓ords
Adventurous,
A
warm,
stylish.
w
What do you think
Wha
she made of you?
Seemingly
an interesting
Seemin
enough
enou individual to
share燼燾ouple
of Aperol
share燼
spritzes
with.
sp
Did you go on somewhere?
We did.
di I knew a nice
rooftop
roofto bar next door.
GRAEME ROBERTSON; ALICIA CANTER, BOTH FOR THE GUARDIAN
And... did you kiss?
And.
A little?
change one
If you could
c
the evening,
thing about
a
what would it be?
wha
While the
t company was
spot on,
o the restaurant
was slightly lacking
(it was
in atmosphere
atm
a燭uesday night).
a燭u
Marks out of 10?
Ma
9.
Would you meet again?
hope so; numbers
I hop
were爀xchanged.
we
What were you hoping for?
A fun evening. And if not,
at爈east a funny story.
First impressions?
Phew! Tall,
handsome and爌olite.
Grace, 25,
learning
coordinator
What did you talk about?
Thom had some good
stories about travelling
around America, including
attending a Trump rally
(not as a supporter, luckily)
and spending a week with
a Mormon family. I tried to
impress with my ?breaking
into Glastonbury? story.
Any awkward moments?
Maybe an awkward silence
or two at the beginning.
But爋therwise, none.
Good table manners?
I didn?t even notice ? must
have been good!
Best thing about Thom?
Totally down to爀arth.
Would you introduce him
to爕our friends?
Yes.
Describe Thom in
three爓ords
Unassuming,
adventurous,燾ool.
What do you think he
made爋f you?
I was a bit nervous,
so I?m爃oping I didn?t
dominate爐he conversation.
Did you go on somewhere?
For a couple of drinks at a
rooftop bar with a燾ool view.
And... did you kiss?
Maybe...
If you could change one
thing about the evening,
what would it be?
Nothing, it was fab.
Maybe爋ne less Aperol spritz
on my part.
Marks out of 10?
9.5.
Would you meet again?
We爀xchanged numbers,
so營?d like to think so.
Thom and Grace ate at the
Lampery, London EC3.
Fancy a blind date? Email
blind.date@theguardian.com.
If you?re looking to meet
someone like-minded, visit
soulmates.theguardian.com
He
attended
a Trump
rally
Fashion Story
Destination unknown
Jacket (above), from
a爏election, bally.co.uk.
54 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
Journey?s end
Jacket (right), stripe
hood shirt, trousers,
and trainers, all
from燼爏election,
balenciaga.com. ?
Storm warning
Hit the road in style as the
cagoule and ?eece go haute.
Photographs by Jon Gorrigan.
Styling by Helen Seamons
High wires
Vintage jacket (far left),
�, by The North Face,
from rokit.co.uk. Neck
warmer, �, by
Columbia, from
urbanoutfitters.eu. Levi?s,
�, mrporter.com.
Trainers, from �5,
prada.com.
Go the distance
Jacket (above), �5,
T-shirt, �, and shorts,
�0, all by Martine Rose,
from matchesfashion.
com. Trainers, �.95,
adidas.co.uk. Socks, �
topman.com.
Take a break
Fleece (left), �,
by燙olumbia, from
urbanoutfitters.eu.
Photographer?s
assistant: Joe Murphy.
Fashion assistant:
Bemi Shaw. Grooming:
Stephanie G-M at
State management
LA using Alima Pure.
Model: Malcolm Evans
at New York Models.
Shot on location in
Los燗ngeles
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 57
Fashion All ages
Get your winter greens
1
Style tip
Green can be worn
with any other colour ? just
like the stem of a flower ? so it?s
the perfect supporting tone for
separates. Wearing an acid green
dress with classic navy neutrals
will make it fit for the office
? or opt for a fun floral
pop-print
2
3
1 Pam wears floral
dress, �.99, hm.com.
Coat,牐89.99, zara.com.
Boots, �.99, hm.com.
Earrings, �0, by Oscar
de la Renta, from net-aporter.com.
2 Chizoba wears dress, �,
monki.com. Blazer, �5,
marksandspencer.com.
Boots, �5, dunelondon.
com. Cap, � topshop.com.
3 Kelly wears top, �.99,
zara.com. White shirt,
�.99, hm.com. Skirt,
�5, intropia.com.
Leather jacket, �9,
marksandspencer.com.
Shoes, �8, senso.com.
4
5
4 Agustina wears dress,
�, asos.com. Boots,
�0, urbanoutfitters.com.
Earrings, �
accessorize.com.
5 Tawan wears denim
jacket, �5, etrececile.
com. Trousers, �5,
joseph.com. Bum bag, �,
asos.com. Sunglasses,
�5, prismlondon.com.
Lounger, �0,
johnlewis.com.
Photographer: David
Newby. Stylist: Melanie
Wilkinson. Hair: Shukeel
at Frank Agency using
Bumble and bumble.
Makeup: Lisa Stokes
using L?Occitane. Fashion
assistant: Melina Frangos.
Models: Pam at Ugly, Kelly
at Mrs Robinson, Tawan at
Storm, Agustina at Premier
and Chizoba at Milk
Fashion Wishlist
1
2
3
4
5
On your marks
Borrow a trick from the
track, and add a
sporty detail to your look
STYLING: MELANIE WILKINSON
6
Buy
this
9
7
8
1 A tucked-in white shirt and heels will instantly elevate
a pair of casual爐rousers燬ide stripe trousers,
�.99, zara.com. 2 Drawstring trousers, �.99, hm.com.
3 Padded jacket, �0, ganni.com. 4 Socks, �, by
Vetements x Reebok, from matchesfashion.com.
60 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
10
5 Striped jumper, �, urbanoutfitters.com.
6 Wear sporty stripes with a midi爏kirt and trainers Jumper, �0,
by JW Anderson, from燽rownsfashion.com. 7 Tote bag,
�, arket.com. 8 Dress, �, asos.com. 9 Zip skirt, �, topshop.com.
10 Sock boots, �5, stories.com.
PHOTOGRAPH: DAVID NEWBY. STYLING: MELANIE WILKINSON. HAIR AND MAKEUP: SAM COOPER AT CAROL HAYES MANAGEMENT
Fashion Jess Cartner-Morley
What
I wore
this
week
Chunky
sweaters and
?oaty skirts
99
9
9
1
2
1 Pleated, �, stories.com
2 Blue, �, arket.com
3 Red printed, �0, by Rixo, from net-a-porter.com
4 Black and white pleated, �.99, hm.com
5 Face print, �, monki.com
4
3
With the honourable exception of those poor
souls who have to step right out of their Twixmas
cosies and into corsets and sequins on the
Hollywood red-carpet circuit, in pursuit of
award-season glory, no one in their right mind has
any interest in dressing up in January. The best that
can be said about this month is that it too shall pass.
Soon it will be February, which is爏till cold and
dark, but at least has the grace to燽e short, and
comes with pancakes and heart-shaped chocolates.
However, it seems to me important not to
give爑p completely in January. By which I mean
I爐ake a燿im view of a look overreliant on comfy
old trousers, Uggs and cardigan-coats. These are
not clothes so much燼s nightwear
modified for the爌urpose of ?
reluctantly ? leaving爐he house. It is
more obvious爐han you realise, as
you shamble into the office clutching
a takeout coffee the size of燼 hotwater bottle, that your spirit remains
on the sofa.
With this in mind, I have hit
upon燼爁ormula for January
dressing爐hat is爀very bit as
comfortable and cosy,燽ut looks
sharper. More interesting to
25
wear爓ithout being more
challenging to wear, if you see爓hat
I爉ean. What you need is a爁loaty,
loose skirt, ideally old-ladynightgown length ? this is a爒ery
fashionable hemline, actually ? and
then a燾hunky爏weater.
There is nothing in the world as comforting to
wear at this time of year than a fluffy, snuggly,
hibernation-sized sweater. The trick here is to
wear爄t with something surprising and slightly
fashiony, so that it looks like a statement knit
rather爐han a jumper of the jeans-and-jumper
variety. So switch up the bottom half and find
some爇ind of floaty skirt: pleated, or just long
and爈oose; bright or sparkly is good if you are
so爄nclined.
There is no need to do anything ambitious;
like爐uck your top half in, or add fussy layers.
Just爌ut a爊ice skirt on, and then a big jumper
over爐he top. Boots are good here, if for no
other爎eason than they save a fight with a tangled
tights drawer. If爕ou still have a pair of mid-heeled
knee-high boots knocking about from the days
when we used to wear them over jeans, perfect.
Instantly, you have an outfit that acknowledges
the realities of January, without being defeated
by爐hem. This is a mission statement, as much
as燼爁ashion one Jess wears jumper, �0, by Ganni,
from net-a-porter.com. Skirt, �0, jigsaw.com.
Boots, �, office.co.uk. Watch, Jess?s own
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 61
Beauty Sali Hughes
Nail it
The best rehab for
dry winter nails
1
C
Ke reat
ra
i
tin ve N
Tr ail
ea
tm Des
en ign
?
t,
�s Re
4.
99 scue
,a
m RXx
az
on Dai
.co ly
.u
k
Sal
ly H
a
�nsen
.95
, su Moist
u
per
dru re Re
h
g.c
om ab,
2
3
Shea
Nail
& Cu
ticle
Nou
locc
rish
itan
e.co ing Oil,
m
�,
Do some of your nails get to a certain length, then
peel or split? I had three that, however carefully
pee
manicured, split at the exact same point in the
ma
growth cycle, forcing me to cut them, and爐heir
gro
neighbours, right down (always with Muji?s nail
nei
cclipper: way better than any I?ve found in
a燾hemist) and start all over again.
It?s predictably common at this time of year, when nails are
drier from harsh weather and the hokey cokey in and out of
central heating. This year, however, my own problem has been
all but eradicated. Back in December, a New York manicurist
looked at my pathetic, battle-torn thumbnail stump and told
lo
me, in hushed but firm tones (she represented a rival brand),
that I爊eeded Creative Nail Design?s Rescue RXx Daily Keratin
Treatment (�.99, 15ml).
Did I ever. This brush-on oil, containing cruelty-free keratin,
has been only fractionally short of miraculous on my dry,
brittle nails. Within only a爁ew days (genuinely), all my nails
were looking and feeling healthier, and over the following
weeks, the regular splits failed to materialise. I?m left with only
one persistent peeler, but even that?s much improved. The
o
downside is one must be diligent ? applying twice
daily
(over polish is fine) without exception, then
d
massaging
in. I keep the bottle on top of my phone
m
next to the bed, so I don?t forget first and last thing
(button up your pyjamas beforehand, if you don?t
want oily spots on the fabric).
If your nails are a little dry and dehydrated,
I爒ery much like Sally Hansen Moisture Rehab
(�95, 10ml), an ungreasy treatment containing
the hyaluronic acid used in most modern face
serums (conscientious types can even pop it
under their CND RXx oil, just as you?d layer your
skincare products). This sinks in fast, hydrating
dried-out nails with neither mess nor staining.
If your nails are a constant maintenance job and carrying a
glass polish bottle around in your handbag makes you nervous,
I爎ecommend L?Occitane Shea Nail & Cuticle Nourishing Oil
((�, 7.5ml). Packed in a plastic tube with brush nib, it squeezes
directly on to the nail with no risk of spilling. The oil is luxurious
and effective, conditioning rough cuticles and drastically
improving flaky and splitting nails. It?s also decent on lips The Measure
Meas
Going up
Hair cla
clamps Now
fashionable, according
fashio
to Man Repeller.
Matisse His shade of
blue is a nice flip to lilac
(spring?s tricky colour).
See Annie Costelloe
Brown?s earrings.
Roberto Cavalli
menswear Really quite
lovely in the hands of
new creative director
Paul
Surridge. Think
P
Thin
White Duke by
T
way
w of rockabilly.
Waterfall cardigans
dig
gans
and blow-driess Best
B
way to celebrate
eG
Grace
And燜rankie?s return.
etur
urn.
Edeka The German
man
supermarket is
enjoying an unlikely
likely
fashion moment
nt:
its yellow and blue
logo爃as been爐weaked
weaked
and turned into
o
a燘alenciaga design
sign.
H閏tor Beller韓
n
In燨ff-White, the
he
Arsenal
senal player is
is our
spring
ring style hero.
hero.
Going down
TePe anxiety The only
interdental brushes we
use but, goddamn it, we
are still on red (0.5mm)
and had hoped to be on
purple (1.1mm) by 2018.
Poppers All over Puma
and Adidas?s spring
collections. Fun but
unpop ever so easily.
Far from ideal in the
polar vortex.
Repurposing Glossier
bubblewrap bags
for the gym Sporting
them in the changing
room is爐he ultimate in
hipster humblebrag.
Sheet masks Once
you?ve tried a rubber
mask ? see Dr Jart ? you
can?t go back. Thicker,
moister and pleasingly
Instagram-friendly.
Pink and red Seismic
news in colour blocking:
we?re all about pink
and green. Very Gucci.
Me-ganism Gone vegan
and feel great? Well
done. Now shut up.
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 1818 63
Space Homes
Bright sparks
A colourful Paris apartment
is home to a燾reative couple
who never stay in one place for
long. Hannah Booth drops by
Photographs by Vincent Leroux
68 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
P
aris?s centuries-old apartment buildings, before
Haussmann took over the city?s planning, are demure
places, hidden behind huge, street-facing doors.
Usually, a small door is embedded within. Step through
and, in Victoire de Taillac?s case, you enter a courtyard with
a爂rand staircase sweeping off to the right and the apartments
themselves. But De Taillac?s family home is to the left. A modest
two-floor 1930s flat (?like two shoeboxes stacked on top of each
other?) it is perched on top of this 18th-century former h魌el
particulier, and accessed via the servants? entrance.
A narrow spiral staircase leaves you dizzy by the second
floor; the apartment is on the seventh. How you manage the
tiny, worn steps in heels, or lugging a suitcase, is anyone?s
guess. There is a lift, says De Taillac, but it?s been broken for
months. So she has been buying food a day at a time. Her wine
is delivered: ?They send the young guy,? she laughs.
But the climb is worth it. The view from the top-floor living
room, and the main bedroom below, is breathtaking: all sky and
rooftops, with the Eiffel Tower bang in the middle.
She lives here with her husband, Ramdane Touhami, and
their three children. De Taillac ?
founder with Touhami of luxury
beauty brand Buly 1803 ? is from
an aristocratic French family,
descended from a royal guardsman
said to be one of the inspirations
for the Three Musketeers. Touhami
is a former skate kid, the son of
a燜rench-Moroccan apple picker
from south-west France.
You enter the apartment directly
into a tiny garret kitchen, lined with
turquoise Cole & Son wallpaper, with
sloping beams painted the same
shade; a narrow hallway leads off
it, snaking round to the bedrooms.
Upstairs, the living room leads to
a爅ewel-box dining room, papered
in gold-tile wallpaper, shelves lined
with curiosities.
For a pair inhabiting the world of
luxury brands, the apartment is
a爎efreshingly messy jumble, with all
the trappings of ordinary family life.
Tester paint streaks the hallway;
growth charts are scrawled up the
wall. The two youngest children ?
Adam, 12, and Noor, 10 ? share a爎oom;
the eldest, Scherazade, 14, has been
given free rein to decorate hers. The
living space feels like a爒intage
emporium: Touhami is fond of
chairs, and no two are the same. An
expensive-looking baby-pink leather
Barcelona chair and ottoman by Mies
van der Rohe is, on closer inspection,
yellowing and tatty. ?It?s 15 years old
now, and was vintage when we
bought it,? says De Taillac.
The family hasn?t lived here long.
They never do: they lived in Japan
for a year in 2016, and before that
Previous pages, left:
a燽espoke sofa; owner
Ramdane Touhami
designed the coloured
wall. Right: the garret
kitchen. Opposite: Cole
& Son?s Geometric II
Prism and Antique Mirror
wallpapers in the dining
room. Below, clockwise
from top: the view
from the living room;
Victoire de Taillac and
her husband, Ramdane
Touhami; classic Uten
Silo organiser by
Vitra (connox.co.uk).
Inset:燙ire Trudon
Napoleon bust candle
(johnlewis.com)
spent two years in a brownstone
in Brooklyn, New York. The main
reason for their peripatetic lives is
Buly, the historical beauty brand
they ?revived? in 2014; they
currently have four stores in Asia.
But they are also nomadic by nature.
Before having children, they lived in
Tangier and India. ?Paris is home,?
says De Taillac, ?but we enjoy
discovering new places. Ramdane is
restless ? he likes movement.?
The pair first breathed new life
into an ancient company with
Cire Trudon, a 16th-century wax
maker, which they turned into
an international candle brand.
Looking to ?create? a brand of his
own, Touhami scoured historical
archives. He chanced upon JeanVincent Bully, a 19th-century master
perfumer from Paris. Three years
later, dropping an ?l? from the name,
Buly 1803 was born.
Where will the family head next?
?It?s getting harder to move,? says
De Taillac. ?The children won?t want
to leave their friends and schools.?
So for now, they are staying put
? painting the hallway blue and
getting the lift fixed. ?Home,? she
says, ?is where my family is.? House rules
Pet interiors hate De Taillac: the
invasion of technical kitchen gadgets.
Worst decorating mistake De燭aillac:
when a temporary solution
becomes爌ermanent.
Bedside reading De Taillac: a tower
of Pisa ? magazines, newspapers,
novels, gardening and cooking books.
Last thing you bought for your
home? Touhami: An art deco tea
set爄n silver.
Your worst home habit De Taillac:
buying new things ? it?s full!
Guiltiest pleasure Touhami:
a燾hocolate pastry and mint tea in
front of the football.
What would we find in your fridge?
Touhami: Greek white beans, Greek
lentils, Greek hummus.
Last house guest? Our
children?s爁riends.
ch
Space Wishlist
2
4
1
3
Switched on
Shed some light with
a爐able lamp ? the more
futuristic, the better
6
5
9
8
7
Buy
this
1 Serena lamp, �5.10, by Flos, from ariashop
ariashop.co.uk.
lamp in brushed
2 The power of three: chic, geometric, metallic Tripod la
table lamp, �,
gold, �5, by Bloomingville, from amara.com. 3 Ewer ta
made.com. 4 Bon Jour T base lamp in yellow, �1, heals.com.
5 Blooper lamp in cedar green, �0, conranshop.co.uk.
conranshop.co.u 6 Harmony
70 20 January 2018 | The Guardian Weekend
10
ribbon lamp, �, johnlewis.com. 7 Astrid white metal and glass lamp,
�, habitat.co.uk. 8 A penholder and a light: just what every desk needs
Buddy lamp, �5.76, by Northern Lighting, from nest.co.uk.
9 TorchT1 lamp, �5, by Sylvain Willenz, from twentytwentyone.com.
10 Control lamp, �9, by Muuto, from padlifestyle.com.
Gardens Alys Fowler
Let?s face it, January is a dark and dastardly
month: sowing most things is pointless. But the
exception is chillies. Sure, the seed packages say
sow in March, but you want to be potting them
on by then. The longer you give chillies to grow,
the more fruit they?ll reward you with.
Chillies originate from central and south
America, with the Andes the principal area. From this we
can爑nderstand a few of chillies? true loves: warm sunny
days�(no higher than 29C), cooler nights (no lower than 10C),
and dry conditions.
The ideal temperature for germination is 28C, and thus
requires a heated propagator with a snug lid. Chillies don?t
like to dry out at the early stages of germination, but don?t like
to sit in damp conditions, either. Chilli seed is often slow to
germinate, and fungus has plenty of time to attack and kill the
seeds. I find a thin layer of vermiculite over the seed is often
the solution: it remains moist, but has good air porosity, which
should keep moulds at bay. If you don?t have a propagator, you
can get away with a radiator shelf or warm cupboard as long as
you move the seeds to a sunny windowsill the
minute they germinate. Using warm water on
young seedlings when watering makes a huge
difference to the speed of growth.
Chillies are hungry and will need repotting
regularly in spring until they find their final
growing spot. They have an expansive fibrous
root system that loves to roam. Repot every
time white roots appear in the drainage holes.
If you want lots of fruit, grow undercover or in
the most sheltered and sunny outdoor space,
such as against a south-facing wall.
Chillies are broken down into five groups: Capsicum annuum,
which includes bell peppers (pictured top), wax, cayenne,
jalapenos and chiltepin; C. frutescens, which includes tabasco
(above, inset) and Thai peppers; C. chinense (hailing from
east of the Andes) which includes naga, habanero and scotch
bonnets; C. pubescens, which includes the perennials rocoto
peppers; and C. baccatum (left), which includes aji peppers.
I爃ave met many peppers that make me weep, but never one
that I have disliked. Behind the instant kick are fruity, earthy,
smoky, bitter and sweet notes.
Chilli lists are rather addictive, so here are a few of the best:
Sea Spring Seeds in Devon, which includes their own Britishbred chillies; Simpson Seeds has impeccable taste, as does
South Devon Chilli Farm. All three offer excellent plug plants.
Finally, The Real Seed Company has interesting rocotos and
even an outdoor ripening chilli, tried and tested in Wales The big chilli
ALAMY (3); GAP
Masses of fruit will
reward early sowers
What to do this week
Plant this Find the bright yellow of
forsythia flowers a bit too gaudy?
Grow white forsythia, Abeliophyllum
distichum (pictured), instead. This
Korean native has scented, starlike
flowers that appear in February
and March on bare branches; it?s
compact, reaching 1.5m x 1.5m. It
needs a sheltered, sunny spot, close
to the house so you can enjoy the
he
perfume.
Visit this If you have a hankering
g
for hellebores, award-winning
hellebore breeders Ashwood
Nurseries in the West Midlands is
your best bet. Head there on
27 January or 17 February for one
e
of their behind-the-scenes tourss
and a chance to buy hellebores you
won?t see anywhere else. Go to
ashwoodnurseries.com for details.
Make this Have a seed packet sortout. Repurpose an old photo album
by placing one packet into each clear
plastic photo pocket: alphabetised if
you?re feeling particularly efficient.
Jane Perrone
The Guardian Weekend | 20 January 2018 71
MURDO MACLEOD FOR THE GUARDIAN; GETTY IMAGES
Space Let?s move to
Well connected? Very well placed, with
Kelvingrove Park right there, the Clyde with the
BBC, STV, Hydro and SEC, and a half-hour walk
to Glasgow Central. Trains: the local station,
Exhibition Centre, makes Glasgow Central in four
mins (every 10 mins or so) en route for Motherwell
(45 mins) and Cumbernauld (1 hr) one way,
Milngavie (20 mins) or Dalmuir (20 mins) the other.
Schools Primaries: Sgoil Gh鄆dhlig Ghlaschu
(Glasgow Gaelic school) and St
Patrick?s are ?good? or ?very
good?, and Anderston ?good?, says
Education Scotland. Secondaries:
From the streets
Sgoil Gh鄆dhlig Ghlaschu again, or
Calum Fraser ?A fantastic food
a walk to Hillhead High and Notre
and drink scene. Nice independent
Dame High (girls), both of which
shops in the Hidden Lane.?
lack current inspection reports.
Michaela Ball ?Jumping house
Hang out at? Quite the culinary
prices and smart new pavements.?
hub: Porter & Rye, the Finnieston,
the Gannet, Ox and Finch,
Alchemilla and Crabshakk are all
in爐he Good Food Guide, and within
a few hundred yards of each other.
I燾ould go on.
Where to buy A tale of three
cities. To the north towards
Woodside Place and Sauchiehall
Street it?s燼ll爌osh, leafy, Victorian
tenements. To the south, around
Argyle Street, the same only denser,
less leafy and shabbier. Then it?s the Clydeside
What?s going for it? Bare lightbulbs. Yes, yes, I know they?re very fashionable right
slabs of contemporary apartments. Flats: three
now, thank you very much. I have read Living Etc. But, at the risk of sounding like my
bedrooms, �0,000-�0,000; two bedrooms,
late granny, what?s wrong with a lampshade? Once upon a time, bare lightbulbs in a
�0,000-�0,000; one bedroom, �0,000window might have indicated poverty or dereliction. Now they mean quite the opposite.
�0,000. Rentals:
You?ll struggle to find a lampshade in the windows of the modish new nitespots on
a one-bedroom flat, �0-�0pcm; a threeArgyle Street, aka the Strip. Finnieston is yet another tale of gentrification. Where once
bedroom flat, �0-�200pcm.
dockworkers had their fish supper, yuppies/dinkys/hipsters/whatevs now eat octopus
Bargain of the week A cool-looking onewith blood orange and drink in gin bars; where there were once actual docks, there
bedroom爁lat in a lovely Victorian listed former
are now ?luxury? (you might want to speed-dial trading standards with that word)
barracks; �6,000, with doorsteps.co.uk
apartments. With wearying inevitability, last year saw Finnieston third in the UK for
Tom Dyckhoff
property price rises, at 14%. So perhaps it?s a case of let?s not move to. Or, if you do, maybe
open something useful. With lampshades. And no cocktails in jam jars.
Do you live in Hebden Bridge? Do you have
The case
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
31 173 Кб
Теги
the guardian, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа