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The Hollywood Reporter — January 17, 2018

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January 17, 2018
Sundance ’18
Buzzy breakouts,
hot docs and a
post-Harvey pall
W H Y ACCU S E RS
S TAY A N O N Y M O U S
BY ANONYMOUS
Oscar’s
Awkward
Season
Next: SAG Awards
take on #MeToo
PAY E Q U A L I T Y
How I Became
TV’s $20M Woman
+ Grey’s Anatomy’s ELLEN POMPEO reveals her fight to earn ‘what I deserve’
+ Mark Wahlberg, Michelle Williams and optics vs. reality in the Time’s Up era
+ Pssst ... A-list actresses are sharing their salary secrets now
Issue No. 3, January 17, 2018
FEATURES
62 How I Fought to Become
TV’s $20 Million Woman
Grey’s Anatomy star
Ellen Pompeo reveals in her
own words the personal
struggles and behind-thescenes negotiations that
led to a well-deserved new
title: highest-paid actress
on a primetime drama.
70 A Chill Over Sundance
2018 — and It’s
Not the Weather
Harvey’s gone and with him
the formerly freewheeling
party scene as insiders hope
a more sober and serious
festival won’t throw cold
water on last year’s hot sales
market: “We really haven’t
lost any buyers.”
76 ‘There Is a Zihuatanejo
for Everyone’
27
John David Washington, a son of Denzel
Washington who is headed to his first
Sundance festival, was photographed
Jan. 8 at Luchini Pizzeria in Hollywood.
Find out the last person Washington
stalked on Instagram at THR.com/video.
Sandro coat (available at Bloomingdale’s, Beverly
Center), Dries Van Noten sweater (Barneys New
York, Beverly Hills), Hudson jeans.
Cover photographed by Mike Rosenthal; Washington photographed by Eric Michael Roy
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
2
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
ELLEN POMPEO WAS PHOTOGRAPHED DEC. 9 AT DOHENY ROOM IN LOS ANGELES.
Tim Robbins, who starred
with Morgan Freeman in
The Shawshank Redemption,
reveals what makes the
legend — the SAG Awards’
Life Achievement honoree
— so extraordinary.
Warner Bros. Pictures
thanks the
Producers Guild of America
and congratulates our friend
CHARLES ROVEN
on being honored with the
David O. Selznick Achievement Award
and proudly congratulates our nominees
Emma Thomas, p.g.a. • Christopher Nolan, p.g.a.
Charles Roven, p.g.a. • Deborah Snyder, p.g.a. • Zack Snyder, p.g.a. • Richard Suckle, p.g.a.
Dan Lin, p.g.a. • Phil Lord, p.g.a. • Christopher Miller, p.g.a. • Roy Lee
Dunkirk and It:
© 2018 WBEI
Wonder Woman:
TM & © DC and WBEI
®
The LEGO Batman Movie:
© 2018 WBEI & DC Comics
© 2018 The LEGO Group
CONGRATULATIONS
TO ALL OUR
2018 AWARDS
NOMINEES
WESTWORLD
CSA ARTIOS AWARDS
TELEVISION SERIES COMEDY JEANNE MCCARTHY,
CSA ARTIOS AWARDS
TELEVISION PILOT AND FIRST SEASON - DRAMA
JOHN PAPSIDERA, DEANNA BRIGIDI-STEWART
CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM
®
SAG AWARDS®
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
LARRY DAVID
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY AN ENSEMBLE IN A COMEDY SERIES
ACE EDDIE AWARDS
BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
“FATWA!” STEVEN RASCH, ACE
“THE SHUCKER” JONATHAN CORN, ACE
NICOLE ABELLERA HALLMAN, LESLIE WOO
THE NIGHT OF
®
CSA ARTIOS AWARDS
LIMITED SERIES AVY KAUFMAN, SABRINA HYMAN, SUSANNE SCHEEL
THE DEUCE
WGA AWARD
SM
®
NEW SERIES - WRITTEN BY MEGAN ABBOTT, MARC HENRY JOHNSON,
LISA LUTZ, GEORGE PELECANOS, RICHARD PRICE,
WILL RALSTON, DAVID SIMON, CHRIS YAKAITIS
ASC AWARDS
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PEPE AVILA DEL PINO “PILOT”
INSECURE
®
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ENTERTAINER OF THE YEAR ISSA RAE
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
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MOVIES FOR TELEVISION AND MINI-SERIES GEORGE C. WOLFE
THE DANNY THOMAS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF EPISODIC
TELEVISION, COMEDY
THE WIZARD OF LIES
NAACP IMAGE AWARDS
SILICON VALLEY
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A TELEVISION MOVIE OR
LIMITED SERIES ROBERT DE NIRO
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COMEDY SERIES - WRITTEN BY LARRY DAVID, JON HAYMAN,
JUSTIN HURWITZ, JEFF SCHAFFER
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®
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®
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JONATHAN DOTAN, MIKE JUDGE, CARRIE KEMPER, ANDREW LAW,
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CLAY TARVER, GRAHAM WAGNER, AARON ZELMAN
ADG AWARDS
DGA AWARDS
HALF-HOUR SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES
“HOOLI-CON,” “SERVER ERROR” RICHARD TOYON
THE DAVID L. WOLPER AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER
OF LONG-FORM TELEVISION
PGA AWARDS
THE DANNY THOMAS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF EPISODIC
TELEVISION, COMEDY
MOVIES FOR TELEVISION AND MINI-SERIES BARRY LEVINSON
ACE EDDIE AWARDS
BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION RON PATANE
WGA AWARDS
LONG FORM ADAPTED - TELEPLAY BY SAM LEVINSON AND
JOHN BURNHAM SCHWARTZ AND SAMUEL BAUM
PGA AWARDS
CSA ARTIOS AWARDS
FEATURE FILM - NON THEATRICAL RELEASE
ELLEN CHENOWETH, SUSANNE SCHEEL (ASSOCIATE)
OUTSTANDING TELEVISION MOVIE, LIMITED SERIES OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL
OUTSTANDING ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION MOVIE, LIMITED SERIES
OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL OPRAH WINFREY
OUTSTANDING WRITING IN A TELEVISION MOVIE OR SPECIAL
SCREENPLAY BY PETER LANDESMAN AND ALEXANDER WOO
AND GEORGE C. WOLFE
WGA AWARDS
LONG-FORM ADAPTED - TELEPLAY BY PETER LANDESMAN AND
ALEXANDER WOO AND GEORGE C. WOLFE
CSA ARTIOS AWARDS
FEATURE FILM - NON THEATRICAL RELEASE
CINDY TOLAN, MEAGAN LEWIS, DANIEL CABEZA (ASSOCIATE)
THE DEFIANT ONES
ACE EDDIE AWARDS
BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (SMALL SCREEN)
“PART 1” LASSE JÄRVI, DOUG PRAY
GAME OF THRONES
SAG AWARDS
BIG LITTLE LIES
®
®
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
PETER DINKLAGE
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY AN ENSEMBLE IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING ACTION PERFORMANCE BY A STUNT ENSEMBLE IN
A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES
DGA AWARDS
DRAMATIC SERIES
JEREMY PODESWA “THE DRAGON AND THE WOLF”
MATT SHAKMAN “THE SPOILS OF WAR”
ALAN TAYLOR “BEYOND THE WALL”
ACE EDDIE AWARDS
BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
“BEYOND THE WALL” TIM PORTER, ACE
WGA AWARDS
DRAMA SERIES - WRITTEN BY DAVID BENIOFF, BRYAN COGMAN,
DAVE HILL, D.B. WEISS
ADG AWARDS
ONE-HOUR PERIOD OR FANTASY SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES
“DRAGONSTONE,” “THE QUEEN’S JUSTICE,” “EASTWATCH” DEBORAH RILEY
PGA AWARDS
THE NORMAN FELTON AWARD FOR
OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF EPISODIC TELEVISION, DRAMA
ASC AWARDS
EPISODE OF A SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
ROBERT MCLACHLAN, ASC, CSC “THE SPOILS OF WAR”
GREGORY MIDDLETON, ASC, CSC “DRAGONSTONE”
NAACP IMAGE AWARDS
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY (TELEVISION)
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING IN A TELEVISION MOVIE OR SPECIAL ALLEN HUGHES
BALLERS
®
®
SAG AWARDS
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A TELEVISION
MOVIE OR LIMITED SERIES NICOLE KIDMAN
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A TELEVISION MOVIE
OR LIMITED SERIES REESE WITHERSPOON
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A TELEVISION MOVIE
OR LIMITED SERIES LAURA DERN
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A TELEVISION MOVIE
˚
OR LIMITED SERIES ALEXANDER SKARSGARD
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES DWAYNE JOHNSON
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
JOHN DAVID WASHINGTON
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
OMAR MILLER
BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
“YOU GET WHAT YOU NEED” VÉRONIQUE BARBE, DAVID BERMAN,
JUSTIN LACHANCE, SYLVAIN LEBEL, MAXIME LAHAIE, JIM VEGA
WGA AWARDS
LONG-FORM ADAPTED - TELEPLAY BY DAVID E. KELLEY
ADG AWARDS
TELEVISION MOVIE OR LIMITED SERIES
“SOMEBODY’S DEAD,” “LIVING THE DREAM,” “YOU GET WHAT YOU NEED” JOHN PAINO
CSA ARTIOS AWARDS
DAVID RUBIN, MELISSA PRYOR (ASSOCIATE)
PGA AWARDS
CSA ARTIOS AWARDS
THE NORMAN FELTON AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF
EPISODIC TELEVISION, DRAMA
TELEVISION SERIES COMEDY DORIAN FRANKEL, SIBBY KIRCHGESSNER,
MARLISE GUNZENHAUSER (ASSOCIATE)
SESAME STREET
VICE NEWS TONIGHT
®
DGA AWARDS
CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS BENJAMIN LEHMANN
“THE MAGICAL WAND CHASE: A SESAME STREET SPECIAL”
CHILDREN’S EPISODIC AND SPECIALS - “MEET JULIA”, WRITTEN BY
CHRISTINE FERRARO
CHILDREN’S EPISODIC AND SPECIALS - “THE MAGICAL WAND CHASE: A SESAME
STREET SPECIAL” WRITTEN BY RAYE LANKFORD, JESSICA CARLETON,
DGA AWARDS
DGA AWARDS
CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS MATTHEW O’NEILL AND THALÍA SODI
PGA AWARDS
THE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING SPORTS PROGRAM
THE NEWSPAPERMAN: THE LIFE AND TIMES
OF BEN BRADLEE
ROLLING STONE: STORIES FROM THE EDGE
THE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF DOCUMENTARY MOTION PICTURES
ACE EDDIE AWARDS
“PART 1” BEN SOZANSKI, ACE GEETA GANDBHIR, ANDY GRIEVE
WGA AWARDS
BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE) AARON I. BUTLER
THE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF LIVE ENTERTAINMENT AND
TALK TELEVISION
REAL SPORTS WITH BRYANT GUMBEL
COMEDY/VARIETY TALK SERIES SCOTT CARTER, ADAM FELBER,
MATT GUNN, BRIAN JACOBSMEYER, JAY JAROCH, CHRIS KELLY,
BILL MAHER, BILLY MARTIN, BOB OSCHACK, DANNY VERMONT
CRIES FROM SYRIA
TIM CARVELL, JOSH GONDELMAN, DAN GUREWITCH,
GEOFF HAGGERTY, JEFF MAURER, JOHN OLIVER,
SCOTT SHERMAN, WILL TRACY, JILL TWISS, JULI WEINER,
BEN SILVA, SEENA VALI
PGA AWARDS
PGA AWARDS
15: A QUINCEAÑERA STORY: ZOEY
VARIETY/TALK/NEWS/SPORTS (REGULARLY SCHEDULED PROGRAMMING)
PAUL PENNOLINO “FRENCH ELECTIONS”
COMEDY/VARIETY TALK SERIES
HARD KNOCKS: TRAINING CAMP WITH
THE TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS
THE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING CHILDREN’S PROGRAM
GIRLS
LAST WEEK TONIGHT WITH JOHN OLIVER
“CHARLOTTESVILLE: RACE AND TERROR” TIM CLANCY, CAMERON DENNIS,
JOHN CHIMPLES AND DENNY THOMAS
THE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING SPORTS PROGRAM
WGA AWARDS
®
ACE EDDIE AWARDS
KEN SCARBOROUGH
PGA AWARDS
VARIETY/TALK/NEWS/SPORTS (REGULARLY SCHEDULED PROGRAMMING)
PAUL G. CASEY “1572”
TELEVISION SERIES COMEDY
COMEDY SERIES - WRITTEN BY GABRIELLE ALLAN, RACHEL AXLER,
TED COHEN, JENNIFER CRITTENDEN, ALEX GREGORY, STEVE HELY,
PETER HUYCK, ERIK KENWARD, BILLY KIMBALL, DAVID MANDEL,
IAN MAXTONE-GRAHAM, DAN MINTZ, LEW MORTON,
GEORGIA PRITCHETT, WILL SMITH
EPISODIC COMEDY - “JUDGE” - WRITTEN BY TED COHEN
ADG AWARDS
HALF-HOUR SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES - “OMAHA” JIM GLOSTER
PGA AWARDS
THE DANNY THOMAS AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF
EPISODIC TELEVISION, COMEDY
LIMITED SERIES
EPISODIC DRAMA - “THE BOOK OF NORA” - TELEPLAY BY TOM PERROTTA
AND DAMON LINDELOF, STORY BY TOM SPEZIALY AND DAMON LINDELOF
JENNIFER EUSTON, EMER O’CALLAGHAN
DGA AWARDS
COMEDY SERIES BETH MCCARTHY-MILLER “CHICKLET”
ACE EDDIE AWARDS
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ACE EDDIE AWARDS
DGA AWARDS
CSA ARTIOS AWARDS
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY AN ENSEMBLE IN A COMEDY SERIES
MOVIES FOR TELEVISION AND MINI-SERIES JEAN-MARC VALLÉE
REAL TIME WITH BILL MAHER
®
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JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS
BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION
“CHICKLET” ROGER NYGARD, ACE AND GENNADY FRIDMAN
THE LEFTOVERS
WGA AWARDS
SAG AWARDS®
DGA AWARDS
WGA AWARDS
NAACP IMAGE AWARDS
VEEP
®
®
PGA AWARDS
TEDDY KUNHARDT, GEORGE KUNHARDT
ACE EDDIE AWARDS
PGA AWARDS
THE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF DOCUMENTARY MOTION PICTURES
PRODUCERS EVGENY AFINEEVSKY, DEN TOLMOR, AARON I. BUTLER
SPIELBERG
PGA AWARDS
THE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF
NON-FICTION TELEVISION
THANKS AND APPRECIATES THE GUILDS, CRITICS,
AND PRESTIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS HONORING
OUR TALENT WITH YOUR RECOGNITION.
©2018 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved. HBO® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc.
Sesame Street® and associated characters, trademarks and design elements are owned and licensed by Sesame Workshop. All rights reserved.
70
Director Reed Morano,
whose drama I Think
We’re Alone Now
premieres at Sundance,
was photographed
Jan. 5 at Company 3
in New York.
Issue No. 3, January 17, 2018
45
Karpen was
photographed
Jan. 5 in
Bleecker
Street’s
Manhattan
office.
THE REPORT
STYLE
13 Why We’re Talking Now
57 Parka City, Utah
Tackle freezing
Sundance temps in style
while shuffling between
premieres and parties.
20 Feinberg Forecast
60 Posh. Private. Prestigious.
Pasadena?
ABOUT TOWN
A-listers are snapping up
historic homes in the grande
dame of L.A. suburbs, where
it “takes an act of God” (or
perhaps Meryl Streep) to get
some residents to sell.
27 This Ballers Dude Just
Wants to Do Shakespeare
John David Washington,
Denzel’s kid, debuts at
Sundance and stars in Spike
Lee’s Black Klansman.
THE BUSINESS
45 Executive Suite:
Andrew Karpen
Bleecker Street’s CEO on the
first post-Harvey Sundance,
indie film’s future and
how to get movie fans to
actually go to theaters.
REVIEWS
79 Mosaic
Starring Sharon Stone and
Garrett Hedlund, the HBO
miniseries version of Steven
Soderbergh’s murdermystery app fails to satisfy.
BACKLOT
82 ‘I’m Not Looking to
Fill a Quota, I’m Looking
for Quality’
60
PGA honoree and Universal
chief Donna Langley on
Get Out and film’s future.
City Hall in Pasadena,
completed in 1927.
Streep, Kristen Wiig
and Mandy Moore have
recently purchased
homes in the area.
84 ‘Let’s Get the World Right’
THIS WEEK ON THR VIDEO
Reed Morano on the advice she received
from cinematographer Conrad Hall.
Casting veteran Victoria
Thomas on building stories,
one face at a time.
Morano photographed by Jai Lennard
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
6
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
KARPEN: MACKENZIE STROH. PASADENA: TREKANDSHOOT/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO.
What motivates women to
say #MeToo after an initial
accusation is made against a
star or an executive?
Matthew Belloni
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ADVERTISING
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John Amato
PRESIDENT
Severin Andrieu-Delille
Gary Bannett
Dana Miller
Michele Singer
CHIEF TECHNOLOGY
OFFICER
CHIEF FINANCIAL
OFFICER
CHIEF MARKETING
OFFICER
GENERAL COUNSEL
Jim Thompson
CHIEF AUDIENCE
OFFICER
Robert Alessi
Barbara Grieninger
Julian Holguin
Angela Vitacco
CONTROLLER
VICE PRESIDENT,
FINANCE
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT,
BRAND PARTNERSHIPS
VICE PRESIDENT,
HUMAN RESOURCES
There simply is nothing that can
compare to experiencing a film in
a darkened cinema, surrounded by
anonymous strangers as you’re seduced
by sound and images … kidnapped
and transported in ways you could
only hope and imagine. To see a film
any other way is not to have truly
seen the film.
Scott Cooper
writer/director
Hostiles
Black Mass
Out of the Furnace
Crazy Heart
Movies and movie theatres. They were made for each other.
National Association
of Theatre Owners
Advancing the Moviegoing Experience
The Re ort
↑ Film
Rock Steady
How Jumanji could save a
flailing movie producer p. 14
Television
Big Little Payday
Behind the Headlines
The Apple effect on HBO
star salaries p. 16
Heat Index
JUMANJI: FRANK MASI/SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT. EMANUEL: ILYA S. SAVENOK/GETTY IMAGES FOR FAST COMPANY. BESSON: KARWAI TANG/WIREIMAGE. HADDISH: GABRIEL OLSEN/FILMMAGIC. KRAMER: BEI/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK.
Ari Emanuel and
Patrick Whitesell
The Endeavor leaders are
in talks for Saudi Arabia’s
sovereign wealth fund
to buy a stake in WME’s
parent company for a
reported $500 million-plus.
Luc Besson
The EuropaCorp founder lays
off 22 staffers in the wake of
the megaflop Valerian as his
TV division is sold to French
conglomerate Mediawan.
Tiffany Haddish
The Girls Trip breakout books
a Super Bowl commercial as
the new face of Groupon, then
her film nabs best picture
at the NAACP Image Awards,
where she snags two wins.
Joel Kramer
The famed stunt coordinator
is accused of molesting a
12-year-old Eliza Dushku on
the set of 1994’s True Lies (he
denies it) as co-stars Arnold
Schwarzenegger and Jamie
Lee Curtis offer support.
Showbiz Stocks
$59.44 (+6%)
CBS CORP. (CBS)
Rosenblatt Securities
reiterates its “buy” guidance
on the TV company on
news it is not negotiating a
Viacom acquisition.
$17.12 (-12%)
GAMESTOP (GME)
Despite robust holiday sales,
the video game seller says
adjusted earnings fell as much
as 18 percent for the year.
I’m a Sex Assault Accuser,
and I’m Anonymous. Here’s Why
I
One of three women detailing sexual misconduct claims against Crash
screenwriter Paul Haggis explains the timing of speaking out, why Leah Remini
is ‘shameful’ and what it means that she isn’t using her name BY ANONYMOUS
n the late 2000s, I was sexually assaulted by Paul Haggis
at work. “I need to be inside
you,” he said as he came at me. I
felt my life could have been over,
as this man who was my father’s
age forcibly grabbed me and
tried to kiss me against my will.
Fortunately, I escaped.
I told friends and family about
the attack. But I never planned
to tell my story publicly. A few
weeks ago, I changed my mind.
I told the Associated Press my
story of workplace assault at
the hands of Haggis — and I did
so anonymously.
Since publication of that Jan. 5
piece, Haggis, an Oscar-winning
screenwriter, has shamelessly used
his powerful voice to attempt to
discredit me and his other accusers, insinuating we are liars and
cowards because we seek anonymity. This is a strategy that predators
use to silence their victims.
I’d like to explain why I decided
to share my story and why I chose
anonymity.
Why I Came Forward
Even after the #MeToo movement
inspired others to speak out, I
chose silence. When Haggis issued
a hypocritical statement condemning Harvey Weinstein, I fumed, but
still I chose silence.
That changed when I read that
another woman had accused him
Illustration by Brian Stauffer
Jan. 9-16
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
13
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
The Report
of rape and that Haggis had filed
a retaliatory lawsuit against her
accusing her of defaming him.
Outraged, I read the horrifying
details of this woman’s story. She
wasn’t as fortunate; she didn’t
get away. I couldn’t let this woman
battle this serial predator and
bully alone. I decided to speak out.
Why I Chose Anonymity
I solicited advice from every
communications expert I know.
Each one urged me to hide my
identity. They said Haggis could
sue me, just like his first rape
accuser. They said my job would
be affected and asked whether I
wanted my name forever linked to
his. They warned me that Haggis
would use his powerful friends to
denounce us, which is precisely
what he has done.
I decided using my name would
be too much. By speaking anonymously, I could help protect other
women and still protect myself.
From my experience, editors
will not print workplace sexual
assault stories without extensive
research and confirmation. I had
to collect documentation and
answer detailed questions reliving every aspect of my story. I am
not anonymous to the reporters
who told my story: They know my
name, have seen contemporaneous evidence corroborating the
circumstances of my experience
and have spoken with
people to whom I confided details shortly
after the assault.
But I also know that
Haggis
others assaulted by
powerful people are unwilling to
go through such a vetting process. Unfortunately, their stories
remain untold.
Once you tell your story, you
wait. The fear of retaliation was
crippling for me. Sharing a dark
secret with strangers left me
feeling vulnerable and uncertain whether they would betray
me when the story went to print.
I worried Haggis would turn
around and expose me or hurt my
family. I had many sleepless
nights, filled with fear and anxiety about how my predator might
attack me again.
After the Story
When the AP article came out
with the stories of several
women, I felt some relief knowing
Jumanji Hit Saves
Broke ‘Billionaire’
Producer Ted Field, once named one of
the world’s richest, was swimming
in debt and living in an Airbnb before
the surprise smash BY ERIQ GARDNER
o one may be smiling more broadly at the
N
smashing commercial success of Jumanji:
Welcome to the Jungle than Frederick “Ted”
Field, whose notable personal financial troubles
might be reversed by a movie that already has
grossed more than $670 million worldwide.
Field became an executive producer on Sony’s
holiday reboot after acquiring film rights to
the 1981 fantasy book by Chris Van Allsburg (he
I had done the right thing.
Reading the familiar and haunting details of the other accounts
made me feel like we were no
longer alone, but the feelings of
vulnerability continued.
Unlike many of the Hollywood
power players accused, Haggis
has not apologized to any of the
women he has hurt. Instead,
he’s responded by citing his very
public charity work as evidence
that he couldn’t be a rapist or
a predator. I find this infuriating. While victims often hide in
silence, sexual predators often
hide behind the “right” social
causes, including women’s rights.
It was Haggis’ philanthropic work
that led me to believe that he was
one of Hollywood’s “good guys.”
He has also attempted to
discredit his accusers, alleging we are working together to
profit from him and are acting on behalf of the Church of
Scientology, of which Haggis is
a prominent defector. This is
offensive and false. I do not know
and have not spoken or met with
any of his other accusers. I do not
stand to make anything. I want
nothing from Haggis other than
that the truth be known.
I have no connection with
Scientology or its practitioners.
also exec produced the 1995 Robin Williams film
version). Field is the great-great-grandson and
heir of Marshall Field, who began a department
store empire that once was one of the biggest in
the country. In 1990, along with Jimmy Iovine,
Ted Field co-founded Interscope Records, whose
artists included Dr. Dre, Nine Inch Nails and U2.
After selling the record company, he went into
film producing as founder and chief executive of
Radar Pictures, which was behind such films as
The Last Samurai and The Chronicles of Riddick
as well as Jumanji.
In 2002, Forbes named Field one of the 400
richest people on the planet with an estimated net
worth of $1.2 billion. But his great fortune was a
myth. “It was never the case that I was a billionaire;
never said I was, never spoke to any one of those
publications,” he testified in November in a deposition obtained by THR. “Completely made up.”
Field, now 64, estimated under oath that
decades ago, at his financial peak, he was
worth about $100 million but added that
he’s been in debt most of his adult life. In
September, he nearly went to trial over
Field
a $500,000 loan he solicited for a
14
For those people — including
actress Leah Remini — who have
stated publicly that all of Haggis’
accusers are part of a Scientology
conspiracy, shame on you. Isn’t
now the time to be listening to
your sisters? Such baseless statements attempt to silence all of us
and the entire #MeToo movement.
Was speaking anonymously the
right decision? Haggis’ response
confirmed that it was. Choosing
anonymity does not make my
story any less true.
Workplace sexual assault is
about the person in the powerful
position taking away the rights of
the victim and invalidating their
experience. Haggis continues to
try to do this every chance he has.
Given the challenges with
coming forward, it is not surprising that so many victims remain
silent. I never wanted to share
my experience, and doing so has
reminded me why: It has left me
feeling exposed, stressed and
anxious — my only upside is that
I hope my story will contribute in
the fight to hold victims up high,
giving them a somewhat better
option to tell their stories when
they’re ready.
Editor’s note: Haggis has denied
the claims against him.
remake of Kickboxer before settling. He’s currently being chased by Johnny Lin and Filmula
Entertainment over $2.2 million owed from an
investment in a new record label. And that’s
peanuts compared with Field’s $100 million in
tax debt, which emanated from a complicated
hostile takeover during the 1990s.
He might still be reputed to be a high-flying
billionaire, but according to Field’s testimony
during a judgment debtor examination, he has
a payment plan with the IRS, lives in an Airbnb
with money from a relative’s credit card and
drives a 2009 Nissan GT-R that’s having transmission trouble, which he can’t get fixed. (He
could not be reached for comment.)
While it’s not clear what his profit participation
will be for the Jumanji reboot, Field certainly can
count on a Hollywood ending. “This has been a
difficult time, kind of a roller-coaster ride in
Hollywood,” Field said at his November deposition, in which he touted Jumanji “prequel
IP” and a “potential spinoff” for television if the film became a hit. “A
one-hit movie can cover a lot of
problems for me.”
HAGGIS: JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE. JUMANJI: FRANK MASI/SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT. LIFESAVER: ISTOCK. FIELD: TODD WILLIAMSON/GETTY IMAGES.
Behind the Headlines
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The Report
How HBO’s Big Little Lies Stars
Leveraged Apple for Big Paydays
Reese and Nicole will get around $1 million an episode for season two as the
tech giant ‘inflates the whole ecosystem of TV actor salaries’ BY LESLEY GOLDBERG
A
pple’s arrival in the scripted originals space already is changing the
price for top talent on the small screen.
The tech giant, estimated to enter the
scripted genre with a budget of $1 billion in
its first year, recently paid what sources say
is upward of $1.25 million per episode to stars
Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon for
its 20-episode untitled morning-show drama.
The eye-popping salaries also include fees for
executive producing and points on the show’s
backend. And that payday directly impacted
the recently announced second season of
HBO’s smash hit Big Little Lies, sources say.
The David E. Kelley drama was originally
eyed as a limited series — with Witherspoon
and Nicole Kidman bringing Liane Moriarty’s
book to HBO (amid multiple offers) after the
↑ From left: Witherspoon, Kidman and Kravitz were among those
getting sizable pay increases for season two of Big Little Lies.
duo optioned it as a feature film. HBO did not
have additional season deals with any of the
Big Little Lies cast since the series was intended
as a one-off, covering all of Moriarty’s book.
Following the show’s breakout success — it
won the Emmy and Golden Globe for limited
series — HBO had to ink entirely
new deals with the cast for a second season. The option to do more
was not in anyone’s contracts
since part of the appeal for top
Bloys
stars to do TV is the limited nature
of a show — like Big Little Lies’ seven episodes.
Witherspoon and Kidman, say sources,
received between $250,000 and $350,000 an
episode for season one, plus exec producer
fees and points off the show’s backend.
Those numbers skyrocketed for season two
not only because of the show’s success, but
also because of the precedent of the massive
payday Witherspoon scored from Apple.
Sources say the duo is getting in the $1 million-an-episode ballpark for season two, as well
as points off the show’s backend and EP fees.
Co-stars like Zoe Kravitz also are said to have
scored significant bumps, with the actress’
total season-one salary of $380,000 jumping
to $3 million for the sophomore run. Shailene
Woodley, who earned $1.7 million for season
one, is also said to be getting a sizable pay raise.
Season two of the show is being planned to
shoot in the spring but won’t air until 2019.
“It’s not a shock to anybody that having a
second season of an ongoing series is easier to
have with those deals in place,” HBO programming president Casey Bloys tells THR. “Every
outlet has to make their own decisions about
economics that make sense for them. I’m not
going to shake my fist and say, ‘Darn it, Apple!’
If that’s what made sense for them for that
show, God bless.”
Sums up one agent of the war for top talent in
a landscape approaching 500 scripted shows:
“If HBO pays Witherspoon her quote that Apple
is paying, it inflates the whole ecosystem of TV
actor salaries.”
As for a potential third season of Big Little
Lies — which now will compete in the drama
series category for awards — sources say none
of the cast has deals in place.
Says Bloys: “Everybody involved is so busy
that it’s hard to imagine aligning everybody’s
schedule again. That we were able to get season two together is a small miracle.”
Digitizing Actors for ‘Insurance’
A machine that looks like an airport security body scanner aims to
bring studios 360-degree performer imaging BY CAROLYN GIARDINA
digital imaging startup is in talks
A
with several Hollywood studios to offer a visual effects solution:
faster 3D facial scans of actors.
The Newport Beach, Californiabased company, Ovio, originally
designed the tech for plastic surgeons and has now partnered
with 20th Century Fox president of
postproduction Ted Gagliano, an
adviser and investor in the company.
“Hollywood has been scanning
actors for a variety of reasons,
primarily in visual effects, where
a digital double or other such use
is needed,” says Gagliano, adding
that he views Ovio
as a more flexible way
to get an “accurate
source file” for uses
such as creating
Gagliano
avatars for costume
designers or virtual and augmented
reality production.
While 3D scanning an actor’s face
is common in Hollywood, systems
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Ovio can create a 360-degree 3D face scan
in 12 seconds. It was built by Glenn Derry,
who contributed to virtual production tech
used on Avatar and The Jungle Book.
16
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
vary in terms of how they work and
are used. For instance, USC Institute
for Creative Technologies’ Light
Stage facial-scanning tech was used
in such films as Avatar and Gravity.
Scans of actors also have been
used in delicate instances, such
as after the death of Paul Walker
in 2013, when scans of his brothers
were used to complete Furious 7,
which was in production at the time.
Weta’s four-time Oscar-winning
VFX pro Joe Letteri, who led
that work on Furious 7, hasn’t seen
the Ovio system but says: “You
never know when that is going to be
useful. In a way, it’s almost like an
insurance policy.”
LIES: HILARY BRONWYN GAYLE/HBO (3). MONEY: ISTOCK. SCAN: COURTESY OF OVIO. BLOYS: TOMMASO BODDI/GETTY IMAGES FOR PLANNED PARENTHOOD. GAGLIANO: MICHAEL BUCKNER/GETTY IMAGES FOR JONSSON CANCER CENTER FOUNDATION.
Behind the Headlines
THE MOST HONORED
ENSEMBLE OF THE YEAR
SCREEN ACTORS GUILD AWARD® NOMINATIONS
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE
BY A CAST
IN A MOTION PICTURE
7
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR
IN A SUPPORTING ROLE - MARY J. BLIGE
WINNER B E S T E N S E M B L E
INCLUDING
GOTHAM AWARDS - INDEPENDENT SPIRIT AWARDS - NEW YORK FILM CRITICS ONLINE - SAN DIEGO FILM CRITICS SOCIETY
“THE KIND OF MOVIE THEY DONT MAKE ANYMORE, UNTIL SHE DOES.
THE BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR.’’
NOMINEE
NOMINEE
BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
BE ST C I NE MATO GRA PHY
WGA AWARDS
ASC AWARDS
VIRGIL WILLIAMS AND DEE REES
RACHEL MORRISON
F O R Y O U R S A G® C O N S I D E R A T I O N
LOV E I S A K I N D O F S U RV I VA L
The Report
Behind the Headlines
92%
Box Office
Broadcast TV
Cable TV
Domestic
International
Gross Cume % Chg Gross Cume
18-49
Live+3
Viewership
Live+3
1.
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle SONY
35.4 291.6(4) -5 81*93 383 674.6
1.
NFC Wild Card FOX
9.2
31.2M
1.
Major Crimes TNT
3.9M
2.
The Post FOX
23.4 27.9(4) +1278 1.7*3
2.
NFL Playoffs NBC
7.0
22.9M
2.
Vikings HISTORY
3.3M
3.
The Golden Globes NBC
5.1
19.7M
3.
Shameless SHOWTIME
2.7M
4.
Knightfall HISTORY
2.14M
5.
The Librarians TNT
2.05M
6.
Nashville CMT
1.6M
7.
Grown-ish FREEFORM
1.6M
8.
Grown-ish FREEFORM
1.4M
1.7
29.6
Expanding nationwide into 2,819 theaters, the
Meryl Streep-Tom Hanks starrer is bringing in
an older crowd — more than 66 percent of its
audience is above age 35.
3.
The Commuter LIONSGATE
16.4 16.4(1) 6.3*13
6.3
Kudos on a delay? Apparently it’s a
thing. While awards shows typically
see no consequential lifts from
DVR, the 2018 Globes added a robust
700,000 viewers over three days.
22.7
Led by Liam Neeson, this action thriller
directed by Jaume Collet-Serra attracted a
mostly a male audience (54 percent) and
a B CinemaScore.
4.
The Big Bang Theory CBS
4.5
19.9M
5.
Young Sheldon CBS
3.4
17.6M
6.
The Simpsons FOX
3.0
7.4M
7.
Ellen’s Game of Games NBC
2.7
9.9M
4.
The Greatest Showman FOX
15.6 98.4(4) +13 15.2*71 100.1 198.5
8.
911 FOX
2.7
5.
Star Wars: The Last Jedi DISNEY
15.3 595.6(5) -36 19*52 673.4 1.27B
9.
Modern Family ABC
2.7
8.5M
6.
Paddington 2 WARNER BROS.
15
15(1)
1.9*16 139.8 154.8
10. Ellen’s
The sequel, picked up from The Weinstein Co.,
is losing the family demo to Jumanji and is
tracking well behind the original’s first-week
total ($26 million).
7.
Insidious: The Last Key UNIVERSAL/SONY
14.6 50.8(2) -51 17.7*40 44.2 95
8.
Proud Mary SONY
12
12(1)
-
N/A
12
9.
Pitch Perfect 3 UNIVERSAL
7.3 96.3(4) -30 8.3*44 67.7
164
N/A
11.
Will & Grace NBC
2.3
7.5M
12.
Chicago Med NBC
2.2
10.3M
13.
Mom CBS
2.1
14.
Chicago PD NBC
2.1
10M
15.
Law & Order: SVU NBC
2.1
8.5M
Closer
Look
11.
Ferdinand FOX
5
77(5) -35
19
55.8
13.3*70 132
209
12.
Molly’s Game STX
4.8 21.6(3) -31 2.8*15
13.
Coco DISNEY
4.7 198.2(8) -13
19*35 425.2 623.4
14.
I, Tonya NEON
4.2 10.9(6) +72
N/A
15.
The Shape of Water FOX SEARCHLIGHT
3.6 27.3(7) +15 3.2*1 3.2 30.5
11.7
N/A
Damnation USA
971,000
10. The
Chi SHOWTIME
714,000
Game of Games NBC
9.8M
One to Watch
11.5M
The X-Files FOX
Star Gillian Anderson says she’s done,
and maybe that’s for the best. The
revived drama’s Jan. 3 premiere ranked
22nd in primetime for the week.
Dwayne Johnson’s Top Films
Jumanji inches its way up the Rock’s hit list
10. Darkest
5.6
Hour FOCUS
36.8(8) -8 10.6*22
2.5
9.
Furious 7 2015
Fate of the Furious 2017
3. Fast & Furious 6 2013
4. Jumanji* 2017
5. Moana 2016
6. Fast Five 2011
7. San Andreas 2015
8. G.I. Joe: Retaliation 2013
9. Journey 2 2012
10. Hercules 2014
1.
2.
33.3
Jumanji is Johnson’s
biggest non-Fast film.
10.9
Star Wars leans heavily on
references to the originals, and
that doesn’t play with young
audiences in the No. 2 market
BY PATRICK BRZESKI
Breakout Yara Shahidi’s spinoff
of Black-ish premiered to a twoyear launch high on ABC’s youngerskewing cable sibling and added
another 2.9 million views with digital.
9.8M
Disney’s Jedi
Mind Trick Fails
to Lure China
$1.516B
$1.236B
$788.7M
$674.6M
$643.3M
$626.1M
$474M
$375.7M
$335.3M
$244.8M
Source: comScore global gross. *Still in theaters
tar Wars: The Last Jedi suffered
S
one of the worst secondweekend declines the Chinese box
office has ever seen. The film’s
debut of $28.7 million already was
viewed as disappointing, but its
92 percent plummet to $2.4 million
in weekend two was alarming. “Last
Jedi has already been pulled from
cinemas here,” says Jimmy Wu,
chairman of Chinese cinema chain
Lumiere Pavilions. “It’s performed
much worse than we … expected.”
Despite a promo push, the Disney/
Lucasfilm tentpole may finish in
China with less than $50 million,
below recent imports like Valerian
($62 million) and Geostorm
($65.6 million). While it was North
America’s top movie of 2017 with
$595 million and counting, its global
total is now $1.27 billion, well below
Force Awakens’ $2.1 billion in 2015.
The situation is arguably worsening for Disney. Force Awakens
totaled $124 million in China in
2016, and franchise spinoff Rogue
One earned $69 million last year.
“We’ve seen the Star Wars franchise downgrading across all key
measures,” says James Li, cofounder of Beijing-based research
firm Fanink, which conducts exit
surveys for top Hollywood releases.
A large part of the Star Wars
struggles in China stem from the
fact that the original three films
never received a wide release in the
country. “Because of the complex
characters and themes, the prequels
and all of the multigenerational layers that are part of the culture, or
cult, of Star Wars,” notes Li, “it’s been
hard for young Chinese filmgoers to
get into the franchise.”
Box-office source: comScore; estimates in $ millions; ( )Weekends in release; *Territories. Broadcast source: Nielsen, live-plus-3, week of Jan. 1. Cable TV source: Nielsen, live-plus-3 scripted series, week of Jan. 1.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
18
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
POST: NIKO TAVERNISE/TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX. PADDINGTON: COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. PICTURES. GLOBES: PAUL DRINKWATER/NBC. GROWN-ISH: ERIC LIEBOWITZ/FREEFORM.
X-FILES: ED ARAQUEL/FOX. STAR: INDUSTRIAL LIGHT & MAGIC/LUCASFILM. JUMANJI: COURTESY OF SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT. COMMUTER: OLLIE UPTON/LIONSGATE.
Total
Audience
Live+3
Jedi ‘s China
decrease
in Week 2
CAMPAIGNS PAUSE TO BREATHE
AS THE OSCAR SUSPENSE BUILDS
Set those alarm clocks for pre-sunrise Jan. 23 as the
Academy Awards noms are revealed and the final push begins. Until
then, it’s nail-biting, finger-crossing time By Scott Feinberg
FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
More stories per square mile.
6ˆÃˆÌw“Ãv°œÀ}œÀV>
415-554-6241 to learn more.
In the Fade, Germany
Felicite, Senegal
As the Academy’s complex process of
winnowing down its shortlist of nine
features to just five nominees was taking
place, Germany’s entry, starring Diane
Kruger and directed by Fatih Akin, finished
strong, winning both the Golden Globe
and Critics’ Choice awards.
This story of a single mom and nightclub
singer, played by Vero Tshanda Beya,
in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic
Republic of Congo, won the top honor, the
FIPRESCI Prize for best foreign-language
film, at the just-concluded 29th Palm Springs
International Film Festival.
DIRECTOR
DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Joe Wright, Darkest Hour
Strong Island
His Churchillian drama was among the
nominees for best film when the BAFTA
Awards noms were announced Jan. 8,
but Wright (right) wasn’t nominated in
the directing category and also failed
to secure a slot when the DGA Awards
noms were revealed.
Yance Ford’s deeply personal directorial
debut about his brother’s murder and
its aftermath, which has been the toast
of the doc community this season, was
awarded best feature, best direction
and best debut at the 11th Cinema Eye
Honors in New York on Jan. 11.
CINEMATOGRAPHY
SOUND MIXING
Rachel Morrison,
Mudbound
Blade Runner 2049
On the heels of its best sound BAFTA
nom, this epic sequel got bounced from
the top category in the Cinema Audio
Society’s 54th nominations by Wonder
Woman. The two groups did agree on
Baby Driver, Dunkirk, The Shape of Water
and Star Wars: The Last Jedi.
On Jan. 9, Morrison (beside camera)
became the first woman nominated for
the top prize of the American Society
of Cinematographers, and if the Academy
follows ASC’s lead, would be the first
woman ever nominated for this Oscar.
20
FADE: COURTESY OF CANNES. FELICITE: FELICITE 2016/©ANDOLFI. DARKEST: JACK ENGLISH/FOCUS FEATURES. STRONG: COURTESY OF NETFLIX. MUDBOUND: STEVE DIETL/NETFLIX. BLADE: COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT.
Film in SF to capture the imagination.
Capture up to $600,000 in rebates.
Motion Picture Artwork © 2017 STX FINANCING, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
The Report
7 Days of DEALS
Who’s inking on the dotted line this week
T V’S HDR FOR M AT WARS IMPACT STU DIOS:
‘W E’R E GOING TO H AV E CONFUSION’
With their deep blacks and rich reds, the latest highdynamic range displays dazzled attendees at the
recent International Consumer Electronics Show, but
the ever-expanding lineup of HDR TVs (which retail
for as much as $6,000) — as well as the new HDR10+
format — also could fan the flames of an early-stage
HDR format war.
Before last year, there were primarily four competing standards: HDR10, an open HDR format that
every Hollywood studio supports; the proprietary
Dolby Vision for home entertainment, supported by
Netflix, Amazon and every major studio except Fox;
and Technicolor’s Advanced HDR and Hybrid Log
Gamma (developed by the BBC and Japan’s NHK),
both of which are focused on live broadcasting.
LG’s Super
UHD TV (left)
and Samsung’s
QLED TV.
vs.
Making its CES debut was Samsung’s HDR10+,
which has support from Fox, Warner Bros., Amazon
and Panasonic and, like Dolby Vision, is aimed at
high-end studio content. “HDR10 brought the ability
to present filmmakers’ creative intent, [but] you
benefit only from the top-end TV models,” says 20th
Century Fox and Fox Innovation Lab exec Danny
Kaye of the rationale for HDR10+, which “expands
the quality experience to TVs not as expensive.”
But the existence of so many options comes with
a pricey trade-off. If multiple HDR formats enter
the consumer market, Hollywood could bear the burden of increased production and delivery costs for its
content. “If you have to make multiple versions, it’s
going to cost money,” warns Howard Lukk, director of
engineering and standards for the Society of Motion
Picture and Television Engineers. “There’s a price to
pay for having multiple standards.”
The other factor is shopper confusion, never
helpful in a tech rollout. The Ultra HD Alliance, a
consortium whose members include the major studios, is “focused on education and information for
consumers,” says UHDA president Mike Fidler, citing a logo to help buyers identify which devices are
certified. Says Lukk, “We’re going to have confusion for a couple years until [HDR] sorts itself out.”
— CAROLYN GIARDINA
New Life for the Showrunner of The Walking Dead
After four years as showrunner, Scott M. Gimple is
Big
rising to a new role in The
Deal
Walking Dead’s universe.
As part of a new overall
deal with AMC, Gimple has
been elevated to chief content officer for the franchise,
and he will oversee all things
Walking Dead, executive
Kang
producing the flagship and
spinoff Fear the Walking Dead as well as
gaming and future brand extensions on a
variety of platforms.
Gimple’s promotion comes after comics creator Robert Kirkman, who retains
control of the comics universe and merchandising on that side, exited his overall
deal with AMC in August and moved to
Amazon Studios, where he will develop
The series under Gimple diverted from the
comics, killing off Chandler Riggs’ Carl (left).
content. Gimple, who has roots in the
comic book industry and has been a longtime Walking Dead reader, has served as
an important brand manager for the series
since he joined during season two.
Angela Kang, who has been with the
show since 2011, was promoted to exec producer and showrunner for the newly
announced season nine. Meanwhile, the drama’s first two showrunners, Frank Darabont
(who developed the series for AMC) and
Glen Mazzara, alongside Kirkman and exec
producers Gale Anne Hurd and David
Alpert, continue to battle the company over
series profits in a potential $1 billion lawsuit.
— LESLEY GOLDBERG
Rights Available! Hot new books with Hollywood appeal
Brownstein
FILM
Leonardo DiCaprio (LBI,
Hansen Jacobson) is in
talks to star in Quentin
Tarantino’s 1969-set Sony
ensemble feature that
involves Charles Manson.
Natalie Portman (CAA,
George Sheanshang)
is in talks to star in Fox
Searchlight’s astronaut drama Pale Blue Dot,
from director Noah
Hawley and producer
Reese Witherspoon.
Luke Wilson (CAA,
Hirsch Wallerstein) will
join Ansel Elgort in Warner
Bros. and Amazon’s
The Goldfinch adaptation.
Taraji P. Henson (UTA,
Vincent Cirrincione, Meyer
& Downs) will star in and
produce a John Singletondirected film about Emmett
Till, the black teen whose
white killers were acquitted
by an all-white jury in 1955.
BY ANDY LEWIS AND TATIANA SIEGEL
Orphan Monster Spy (VIKING FOR YOUNG READERS, MARCH 20)
Most Dangerous Man in America (TWELVE, JAN. 9 )
BY Matt Killeen AGENCY Paradigm
BY Bill Minutaglio/Steven L. Davis AGENCY Anonymous
Think Inglourious Basterds meets Mean Girls: A half-Jewish Aryanlooking orphan infiltrates a school for the children of Nazi elites
to stop the development of the atomic bomb in this YA debut with
strong word-of-mouth buzz.
Oscar bait for an actor: Ex-Harvard professor Timothy Leary,
famous for his LSD experiments, was six months into a 10-year
sentence for having two joints when the Weather Underground
helped him escape and Nixon obsessed over the manhunt.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
22
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
TV: COURTESY OF BRAND (2). DEGENERES: LEE MANNING PHOTOGRAPHY. WALKING: GENE PAGE/AMC. BOOK: COURTESY OF PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE. BROWNSTEIN: JERRITT CLARK/FILMMAGIC. DICAPRIO: VICTOR
BOYKO/GETTY IMAGES FOR LDC FOUNDATION. RODRIGUEZ: JEFFREY MAYER/WIREIMAGE. SCHAEFFER: DAVID LIVINGSTON/WIREIMAGE FOR FILM INDEPENDENT. KANG: ALBERT L. ORTEGA/GETTY IMAGES.
Deal
of the
Week
series. … NBC has renewed
Ellen’s Game of Games for
a second season. … Fox has
ordered three additional
episodes of L.A. to Vegas.
17%
Decrease in Walt Disney chairman
DiCaprio
DeGeneres sold an adjacent unit in May for $6 million.
Chadwick Boseman
(Greene & Associates,
Management 360, Ziffren
Brittenham) will star in
Universal’s international
thriller Expatriate, with
Barry Jenkins set to direct.
Clive Owen (CAA, Hirsch
Wallerstein) is in talks to
join Will Smith in Ang Lee’s
Gemini Man.
John Dickerson (WME)
has replaced the ousted
Charlie Rose as a co-host
of CBS This Morning.
Orion Pictures has picked
up zombie musical Anna
and the Apocalypse for
North and Latin America.
David Oyelowo (CAA, the
U.K.’s Hamilton Hodell,
Inphenate, Schreck Rose),
Dominic West (WME, the
U.K.’s Tavistock Wood)
and Lily Collins (CAA, LBI,
Sloane Offer) will star in
BBC One and Masterpiece’s
Les Miserables miniseries.
Jean-Marc Vallee
and producing partner Nathan Ross have
launched production
company Crazyrose and
partnered with Bloom.
Christian Slater (UTA, the
U.K.’s Markham Froggatt)
will lead the voice cast of
the animated DC feature
Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay.
Elvis Presley: The
Searcher’s Thom Zimny
(WME) will direct a Johnny
Cash doc for Imperative
Entertainment and producer
Frank Marshall.
Former Fox Animation vp
Darlene Caamano Loquet
(Newhouse Porter) will
produce Blue Sky’s Nimona.
TELEVISION
Ronan Farrow (WME) has
finalized a three-year deal
with HBO to develop and
front a series of investigative documentary specials.
Sons of Anarchy’s Chris
Collins (UTA, McKuin
Frankel) will write and
showrun Starz’s John Wick
series The Continental.
A&E has ordered
unscripted series Marcia
Clark Investigates the First
48 and Grace vs. Abrams.
… TBS has renewed Full
Frontal With Samantha Bee
and American Dad for two
more seasons and Drop
the Mic and The Joker’s
Wild for second seasons.
… TNT has picked up
its Snowpiercer reboot to
DIGITAL
Portlandia’s Carrie
Brownstein (UTA,
Brillstein) will adapt her
memoir, Hunger Makes
Me a Modern Girl, as
the Hulu comedy pilot
Search and Destroy.
Hulu has nabbed exclusive streaming rights
to ER as well as George
Clooney’s Catch-22 limited
series adaptation. … Apple
has ordered futuristic
drama See, from Francis
Lawrence and Peaky
Blinders creator Steven
Knight, straight to series. …
Netflix has ordered supernatural drama Chambers.
ENDORSEMENTS
Tiffany Haddish (APA,
Principato Young, Del
Shaw) is Groupon’s new
spokesperson and will
star in its Super Bowl ad.
REAL ESTATE
Ellen DeGeneres
(Westside Estate) has
sold her Westwood high-rise
condo for $5.85 million.
and CEO Bob Iger’s compensation,
Big
Number which was $37.3 million ($2.5 million
base salary) in the past fiscal year.
Rep
Sheet
Gina Rodriguez and
Stranger Things’ Finn
Wolfhard, who both
left APA in the fall, have
signed with CAA .
Nicolas Cage has left
CAA for WME.
Departing Teen
Vogue editor-in-chief
Elaine Welteroth has
signed with CAA .
Scott Speedman has
signed with Anonymous
Content.
When We Rise’s Ivory
Aquino has signed with
Abrams and Industry.
Next
Big
Thing
Jac Schaeffer
REPS Verve, Writ Large
WHY SHE MATTERS
The screenwriter has
been tapped to pen
a Scarlett Johanssonfronted Black Widow
stand-alone movie for
Marvel. Schaeffer, 39,
appeared on the 2015
iteration of the Black List
with her alien-invasion
comedy The Shower,
which got the attention
of Anne Hathaway,
who brought her on to
pen the gender-bent
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels
remake, Nasty Women,
for MGM.
TO OUR
SAG AWARD NOMINEES
®
OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING MALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
© 1995 SAG-AFTRA
OUTSTANDING FEMALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
ROBIN WRIGHT
OUTSTANDING FEMALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
CLAIRE FOY
DAVID HARBOUR
OUTSTANDING FEMALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING MALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
MILLIE BOBBY BROWN
OUTSTANDING ACTION PERFORMANCE BY A
STUNT ENSEMBLE IN A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES
JASON BATEMAN
OUTSTANDING MALE ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
JEFF DANIELS
OUTSTANDING FEMALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
LAURA LINNEY
ON THEIR
AMAZING PERFORMANCES
OUTSTANDING FEMALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
JANE FONDA
OUTSTANDING FEMALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
LILY TOMLIN
OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE IN A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING FEMALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
ALISON BRIE
OUTSTANDING MALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
MARC MARON
OUTSTANDING ENSEMBLE IN A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING FEMALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
UZO ADUBA
OUTSTANDING ACTION PERFORMANCE BY A
STUNT ENSEMBLE IN A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING MALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
AZIZ ANSARI
About Town
People, Places, Preoccupations
PERSON OF INTER EST
This Ballers
Dude Just
Wants to Do
Shakespeare
John David Washington debuts at
Sundance and stars for Spike Lee
By Mia Galuppo • Photographed by Eric Michael Roy
J
ohn David Washington was
5 when he first saw his dad,
Denzel, onstage in Richard III
in New York’s Shakespeare
in the Park. “I was like, ‘I want to do
that,’ ” recalls the Studio City native, 33.
Following that Central Park summer
came Philadelphia, Malcolm X, Training
Day — and a slew of awards speeches,
all of which gave the young Washington
pause “because of that nepotism factor.”
A star running back at North Hollywood’s
Campbell Hall, he instead set his sights
on the NFL, and after graduating from
Morehouse in Atlanta, he made it to the
then-St. Louis Rams as an undrafted free
agent before he was eventually cut. He
bounced around the European and the
now-shuttered United Football leagues
until a torn Achilles tendon sidelined him
for good and Washington, then 28, turned
to plan B (aka his original plan A). After
nine rounds of auditions (“Sheila Jaffe, the
casting director, was the first person I ever
read for and she told me, ‘Don’t ever play
football again’ ”), he scored a tailor-made
role as NFLer Ricky Jerret on HBO’s Ballers.
When he’s not working, Washington studies acting at HB Studios in New York.
Last fall, he landed the lead in Spike Lee’s
Black Klansman. And now, he’ll take a few
days off from Ballers’ season four to travel
to the Sundance Film Festival, where he
appears in two competition films, including Monsters and Men, in which he stars as
a conflicted cop. He spoke to THR ahead of
his Park City fest debut.
GROOMING BY YVETTE SHELTON
What initially turned you off acting?
As [my dad] started to ascend in popularity and prestige, the world around
Hear more from Washington at THR.COM/VIDEO
27
“I was really attracted to that perspective,
being an African-American police officer
thrown into that situation,” says Washington
of his role in Monsters and Men as a
cop whose colleague kills an unarmed black
man. “I had never really heard that side
of the story.” He was photographed Jan. 8
outside Luchini Pizzeria in Hollywood.
Styling by Tiffani Chynel
COS coat, Hugo Boss suit and shirt (available at
Bloomingdale’s Beverly Center), Aquatalia shoes.
About Town
People, Places,
Preoccupations
us changed, the relationships
changed, the way people treated us
changed. I became self-conscious
— I wanted to do stuff on my own.
Football was my art form to say,
“Hey, this is my own thing.” I got
lost in that character, if you will,
because of my relentless pursuit of
independence.
W R IT
HBO’s Mysterious App Move
L
Washington
(right) with
Anthony
Ramos in
Monsters
and Men.
His other
Sundance
film is
Monster.
Do you have a dream role?
Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew.
Petruchio. I would love to play
him in a Spike Lee film. Let’s start
it here.
ate in 2017, Justine Bateman spent an
entire day glued to her phone, desperate to unravel the murder mystery at
the center of Mosaic, the new miniseries from
Steven Soderbergh — which HBO released
in November, months ahead of its Jan. 22
TV premiere, via a free app that lets viewers
dictate how the plot unfolds. “The thing that
drove me was the story,” says Bateman of the
Ed Solomon-penned and Soderbergh-directed
project, which centers on the killing of a children’s book author (Sharon Stone). All viewers
of the “branching narrative” watch the same
first clip, but after that they are asked to choose
which character they want to follow through
the story. By the time they are finished, each
viewer will have seen a customized version.
Bateman says she found herself compulsively
asking “Then what?” at the end of every eightto 38-minute chapter.
She wasn’t the only one. Mosaic became
one of the top 30 entertainment apps for
iPhone on Nov. 9, the day after its launch,
according to App Annie; it garnered 90 million impressions across mobile app stores.
Critical response has been mixed, but fans
include Activision Blizzard Studios’ Stacey
Sher, who says it’s “for anybody who ever
mourned the end of a series and had questions
they felt were unanswered about characters
that weren’t the protagonist — anyone you fall
in love with can become the protagonist for you.”
Soderbergh, Solomon and executive
producer Casey Silver began working on the
project in 2013, developing a 500-page script
and creating more than seven hours of footage. Not all of the material appears in both the
app and the HBO version — six one-hour episodes airing over five consecutive nights (see
THR’s review, page 79). “Steven literally rebuilt
from the ground up,” Solomon says of the TV
version. “We built a new story.”
Mosaic is no longer among
the top 100 entertainment apps
for iPhone, but that could change
when the miniseries airs — and
Amato
its model could soon be applied
to other projects. “It’s something
we think has moved the needle a
bit and whetted the appetite
for more,” says HBO Films presiSoderbergh
dent Len Amato, adding that
there have been discussions about giving other
creators a shot at the platform. “Everyone can
put their own stamp on it.”
Solomon says he, Soderbergh and Silver
are just getting started. “The new [branching
narrative] that we’re working on is by orders
of magnitude more complex and utilizes the
form in a much more confident way,” he says.
“Steven often refers to Mosaic as the first version of this form.”
HOT NEW SUNDANCE DISHES
Festivalgoers have a few fresh eatery options
in Park City: Opened in June by chef-owner
Adam Ross, Twisted Fern (1300 Snow Creek
Drive) has seen rockers from The Killers sample its New
American cuisine (think butternut squash salad, $14, and
blackened octopus, $18). For something meatier, Texasinspired Altitude opened in December at 440 Main St.
(formerly Bandits Grill & Bar, a fave of Hilary Swank, Mariah
Carey and Justin Bieber), with a finger-licking BBQ board.
And Riverhorse Restaurant’s year-old add-on, Riverhorse
Provisions (221 Main St.), is a gourmet eatery/market with
grab-and-go items like quiche. — PETER KIEFER
Fest
Food
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
28
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
Twisted Fern’s Adam Ross previously spent
more than a decade at Main Street’s Bistro 412.
MONSTERS: ALYSTYRE JULIAN/COURTESY OF SUNDANCE. PHONE: ISTOCK. MOSAIC: COURTESY OF HBO. STONE: CLAUDETTE BARIUS/HBO. AMATO: JENNY
ANDERSON/WIREIMAGE. SODERBERGH: CHANCE YEH/GETTY IMAGES. NICKEL: MIKE STONER PHOTOGRAPHY. TWISTED: COURTESY OF SUBJECT.
How a ‘branching narrative’ platform for Steven Soderbergh’s Mosaic
lured mobile fans months before the miniseries’ TV premiere By Natalie Jarvey
It felt so natural. I was having the
awakening that was like, “This is
what I am supposed to be doing.”
I remember my first day on set
on the pilot with Peter Berg, and
there is the Rock and like a couple hundred extras, and I had a
lot of talking to do. I was nervous
as hell, but then we got into it and I
wanted to do take after take.
If the studios will have me!
For me, it’s really about filmmakers. Christopher Nolan is one
of them. Tarantino. Spike Lee I
already got to work with. The
pressure was tremendous, but
that being said, because of my
football background, I almost
became impervious to the pressure. I’m like, “Bring it on.” It was
a 35-day shoot and the way he
shoots, he is like, “Cut. We got it!”
and I am like, “Spike, I can give
you more.” “We got it! Next up.
Let’s go. Slate in.” I was just like,
“Daaamn.” It was like suicides.
In football, you say it’s the twominute offense. You have two
minutes to win and you have to
score a touchdown.
Stone (above) plays murder
victim Olivia Lake, one
of six characters users can
follow with the app.
ROOM
How did it feel when you started
working on Ballers?
After a string of indies, would you
want to do a studio blockbuster?
E RS
NETFLIX
PROUDLY CONGRATULATES
PGA VISIONARY AWARD WINNER
AVA DUVERNAY
PGA SERIES AWARD NOMINEES
THE CROWN
THE NORMAN FELTON AWARD
FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF EPISODIC TELEVISION, DRAMA
STRANGER THINGS
THE NORMAN FELTON AWARD
FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF EPISODIC TELEVISION, DRAMA
MASTER OF NONE
THE DANNY THOMAS AWARD
FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF EPISODIC TELEVISION, COMEDY
BLACK MIRROR
THE DAVID L. WOLPER AWARD
FOR OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF LONG-FORM TELEVISION
PGA DOCUMENTARY AWARD NOMINEES
CHASING CORAL
OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF DOCUMENTARY MOTION PICTURES
JOSHUA: TEENAGER VS. SUPERPOWER
OUTSTANDING PRODUCER OF DOCUMENTARY MOTION PICTURES
About Town
Yes, I Did Say That!
Quotes
A look at who’s saying what in entertainment
Compiled by Seth Abramovitch
AZIZ ANSARI
The Master of None star, responding to claims from
a woman he took on a date in 2017 that he had
“ignored clear non-verbal cues” to stop during a sexual
encounter. “Everything did seem OK to me,”
he added, “so when I heard that it was not the case
for her, I was surprised and concerned.”
“I’m sorry you were
inconvenienced.
We will try to
move out our dead
quicker.”
ROB LOWE
The Montecito-based actor,
slamming actress Bella Thorne on
Instagram for having tweeted,
“Fuck u 101” after the highway’s
closure caused her to miss
boyfriend Mod Sun’s gig
in Santa Barbara. Mudslides in
the area claimed 20 lives.
“Lena was
not present in our
group during
the countless hours
of work for the
last two months.”
CASEY BLOYS
TESSA THOMPSON
The HBO programming president,
in a Wall Street Journal interview,
dinging Netflix as he explained
his network’s strategy of nurturing
talent and promoting projects.
The actress, revealing on Instagram
that despite posing alongside
Time’s Up organizers in a group
photo, Dunham had not been
involved in the initiative’s planning.
“He hated me.
He took one look
at me and wanted
to kill me.”
KEVIN TSUJIHARA
The Warner Bros. CEO,
explaining the studio’s decisionmaking process following a
shake-up that saw Toby Emmerich
promoted to chairman of
Warner Bros. Picture Group.
HUGH GRANT
The Paddington 2 star, telling
People about his relationship
with Robert Downey Jr.
while working on the 1995 film
Restoration.
Trump’s remarks stirred up a shitstorm on Twitter.
“The only ‘shithole’ is you,” Jamie Lee Curtis
posted, while George Takei dubbed him “President
Shithole.” Patton Oswalt took the long view: “In a
week Trump will do/say something that will make
today’s shithole comment seem quaint.”
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
MEGYN KELLY
The NBC host, telling guest Maria
“Fit Mom” Kang that she used
to ask her stepfather to fat-shame
her. Kelly later clarified that
body-shaming others is “something
I absolutely do not support.”
“If you have
50 kids, you’re
not going
to every soccer
game.”
“Toby has
green light, I have
red light.”
STARS
CALL
TRUMP
THE SWORD
“Some of us want
to be shamed!”
30
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
“It is to them,
and them alone,
that I apologize.”
CATHERINE DENEUVE
The French actress,
addressing sexual assault
victims who felt “attacked”
after she co-signed a letter
published in Le Monde that
denounced the #MeToo
movement as “puritanism.”
ANSARI: MATT WINKELMEYER/GETTY IMAGES FOR THE CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS. THOMPSON: JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC. TSUJIHARA: BARRY KING/GETTY IMAGES. DENEUVE: KRISTINA NIKISHINA/EPSILON/GETTY IMAGES. OSWALT: AMANDA EDWARDS/WIREIMAGE.
“By all indications,
[it] was completely
consensual.”
and
W I N N E R
G O L D E N G L O B E AW A R D
®
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS ALLISON JANNEY
W I N N E R
CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS
BEST ACTRESS
(COMEDY)
MARGOT ROBBIE
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
ALLISON JANNEY
BAFTA AWARD NOMINATIONS
BEST LEADING
ACTRESS
MARGOT ROBBIE
BEST SUPPORTING
ACTRESS
ALLISON JANNEY
BEST ORIGINAL
SCREENPLAY
W I N N E R
ALLIANCE OF WOMEN FILM JOURNALISTS
BRAVEST PERFORMANCE
MARGOT ROBBIE
MAKE-UP ARTISTS AND HAIR STYLISTS GUILD AWARDS
NOMINEE
STEVEN ROGERS
FEATURE-LENGTH MOTION PICTURE – BEST PERIOD
AND/OR CHARACTER MAKE-UP
LEE
DEBORAH LA MIA DENAVER • TERESA VEST • BILL MYERY
BEST COSTUME DESIGN - JENNIFER JOHNSON
BEST MAKE UP & HAIR - DEBORAH LA MIA DENAVER, ADRUITHA
PRODUCERS GUILD AWARDS
NOMINEE
COSTUME DESIGNERS GUILD AWARDS
THE DARRYL F. ZANUCK AWARD
EXCELLENCE IN CONTEMPORARY FILM
WRITERS GUILD AWARDS
CASTING SOCIETY OF AMERICA ARTIOS AWARDS
BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
BEST CASTING: STUDIO OR INDEPENDENT (COMEDY)
MARY VERNIEU • LINDSAY GRAHAM
TARA FELDSTEIN BENNETT (LOCATION CASTING) • CHASE PARIS (LOCATION CASTING)
BRYAN UNKELESS • STEVEN ROGERS
MARGOT ROBBIE • TOM ACKERLEY
NOMINEE
STEVEN ROGERS
SCREEN ACTORS GUILD AWARDS
NOMINATIONS
FEMALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE
MARGOT ROBBIE
FEMALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
ALLISON JANNEY
SPIRIT AWARDS
NOMINATIONS
BEST FEMALE
LEAD
MARGOT ROBBIE
BEST SUPPORTING
FEMALE
ALLISON JANNEY
BEST
EDITING
TATIANA S. RIEGEL
ACE EDDIE AWARDS
NOMINEE
BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM
(COMEDY)
TATIANA S. RIEGEL
MARGOT ROBBIE SEBASTIAN STAN
AND ALLISON JANNEY
DIRECTED BY CRAIG GILLESPIE WRITTEN BY STEVEN ROGERS
CLUBHOUSE PICTURES
NEONguilds.com
NOMINEE
JENNIFER JOHNSON
NOMINEE
About Town
Party
Crawler
The Red Carpet
1
2
Jessica
Biel
and Bill
Pullman
Margot Robbie (left)
and Allison Janney
Critics’ Choice Awards
Santa Monica, Jan. 11
5
3
4
Octavia Spencer (left)
and Sally Hawkins
From left: Timothee
Chalamet, Jacob Tremblay
and Armie Hammer
Gal Gadot
9
Adam Sandler (left)
and Ted Sarandos
6
Reese
Witherspoon
8
Brooklynn Prince (left)
and Angelina Jolie
7
Guillermo
del Toro
32
10
From left: Emily V. Gordon,
Zoe Kazan, Judd Apatow
and Kumail Nanjiani
Five days after the Golden
Globes, the 23rd annual
Critics’ Choice Awards,
hosted by Olivia Munn,
honored many of the same
films and stars as the
HFPA event. The preteen
set, including best young
actress winner Brooklynn
Prince (8) as well as
Mckenna Grace and Jacob
Tremblay (5), worked
the star-studded room at
Santa Monica’s Barker
Hangar, snapping selfies
with A-listers Gal Gadot (4),
Angelina Jolie (8), Armie
Hammer (5) and Chris
Hemsworth, among others.
The busiest spot of the
night seemed to be the
Yogurtland corner, where
Hammer, Prince and the
evening’s best actress in a
comedy series winner
Rachel Brosnahan (for The
Marvelous Mrs. Maisel)
were among those loading
up on froyo. While the
Globes’ red carpet blackout
was not repeated, topics
from the HFPA’s night
were still hot, including
the buzz surrounding
Oprah Winfrey’s potential
run for president in 2020.
“She has intelligence,
wisdom, morality and
vision. Not a bad start?
But it’s up to her,” said
The Handmaid’s Tale and
Fargo producer Warren
Littlefield, while Rita
Moreno voiced skepticism:
“She can do much more
as a civilian. I don’t think
she’ll do it — she would
think better of it.” Support
for women in Hollywood
and the Time’s Up movement also remained front
and center — mentioned
by many winners in their
acceptance speeches.
The Big Sick’s Kumail
Nanjiani (10), who took
to the stage alongside
wife Emily V. Gordon (10)
and producer Judd
Apatow (10) to accept the
award for best comedy,
thanked “all the white men
who have allowed us to
stand here today.” And an
impassioned best director
winner Guillermo del
Toro (7) closed the show
with a call for change to
those who have not hired
women, exclaiming, “You
don’t know what you’re
missing!” — RAMONA SAVISS
BIEL, GADOT, WITHERSPOON: JEFF KRAVITZ/FILMMAGIC. ROBBIE, SPENCER, HAMMER, JOLIE, KAZAN: KEVIN MAZUR/WIREIMAGE. DEL TORO: STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. SANDLER: JOE SCARNICI/GETTY IMAGES FOR FIJI WATER.
Critical Moment
He’ll go deeper to try to understand everything he cares about....
“
I wouldn’t call it rule breaking or pushing boundaries;
I would call it raising a magnifying glass
to the foolishness of the human condition.
”
— N O R M A N L E A R O N R YA N M U R P H Y
his shows when I was young
“ I remember watching
and being moved by them.
The way he tackled social issues so directly
and opened a conversation
about things no one wanted to talk about was fascinating to me.
— R YA N M U R P H Y O N N O R M A N L E A R
C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S T O O U R G O O D F R I E N D
R YA N M U R P H Y
on receiving the
N O RMA N LE A R ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IN TELEVI SI ON
We are proud to be your partners
”
About Town
The Red Carpet
3
1
Sterling K. Brown (left)
and Reginald Hudlin
2
Tessa Thompson (left)
and Lena Waithe
Samira Wiley
NAACP
Image
Awards
5
Loni Love
(left) and
Tamera
MowryHousley
Pasadena, Jan. 14-15
4
Ava
DuVernay
6
Niecy Nash
7
Elijah Kelley (left),
Marsai Martin and
Caleb McLaughlin
8
Kerry
Washington
11
Halle
Berry
10
9
Issa Rae (left) and
Yara Shahidi
From left: Anthony Anderson,
Terry Crews and Jay Pharoah
34
The 49th NAACP Image
Awards kicked off
the night before the live
show with a dinner at
the Pasadena Conference
Center, where Morgan
Freeman, Kareem AbdulJabbar and Mary J.
Blige were among the
luminaries on hand for
the presentation of nearly
50 awards, including top
youth performance for
Stranger Things’ Caleb
McLaughlin (7). “It’s something to get accolades
and acknowledgements
in this industry,” supporting actress nominee Samira
Wiley (2) told THR. “But
to be able to receive that
from my own community
is just beyond.” Character
voiceover nominee Yvette
Nicole Brown saw the
evening as an opportunity
to celebrate black creators:
“When Insecure, Atlanta
and Queen Sugar don’t
just have black showrunners [but] also have black
directors, black directors
of photography [and] black
writers ... you get to see
all the different versions
of us.” The annual awards
were held on Martin
Luther King Jr. Day, with
Black-ish star Anthony
Anderson (10) as host
(and winner for actor in
a comedy series). The
Pasadena Civic Auditorium
stage was set ablaze with
messages of empowerment and inclusion as 10
awards were presented,
along with special honors
for Danny Glover and others. Following Anderson’s
opening monologue, Kerry
Washington (8), Tracee
Ellis Ross, Lena Waithe (1),
Jurnee Smollett-Bell,
Angela Robinson and
Laverne Cox urged viewers to vote in the primary
elections and issued a
Time’s Up call to action,
voice by voice: “We have
always been on the front
lines of change. ... But we
can’t do it alone. Stand
by us. Stand for us. Stand
with us.” Entertainer of
the year Ava DuVernay (4)
closed the night with her
impassioned acceptance
speech: “We did what Dr.
King said we’d do — live
the dream, and we are the
dream.” — ASHLEY LEE
WAITHE, WILEY, MCLAUGHLIN, ELLIS, DUVERNAY, WASHINGTON, BERRY: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES FOR NAACP. BROWN, LOVE, DEVINE: EARL GIBSON III/GETTY IMAGES. NASH: PARAS GRIFFIN/ GETTY IMAGES FOR NAACP. RAE, ANDERSON: JESSE GRANT/GETTY IMAGES FOR NAACP.
Sharper Image
NETFLIX
PROUDLY CONGRATULATES
MORGAN FREEMAN
ON RECEIVING THE
SCREEN ACTORS GUILD
LIFE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
About Town
The Red Carpet
“I know it’s the year of the
women and everything,
but oh, my God, the men,”
said Meryl Streep (1)
during her acceptance
speech for The Post, which
scored best film, best
actor — Tom Hanks (3) —
and best actress (Streep)
at the annual NBR awards
gala. “Our film, in this
very fraught moment, is
about the best working situation between a
man and a woman, where
respect and devotion to
the work and to the honor
of the work is paramount,”
said the star. Yet girl
power was still front and
center at NYC’s Cipriani
42nd Street: Gal Gadot
and Patty Jenkins took
home the Spotlight Award
for Wonder Woman, and
Lady Bird took honors for
director Greta Gerwig (4)
and supporting actress
Laurie Metcalf (5). “When I
first started watching movies, I didn’t know that they
were made by people,”
Gerwig said. “I genuinely
thought that they were
handed down from God.”
1
From left: Meryl
Streep, Rita Wilson,
Tina Fey, Allison
Williams and
Julianna Margulies
National Board of Review Awards
New York, Jan. 9
2
From left: Michael H.
Weber, James Franco
and Scott Neustadter
5
Saoirse Ronan (left)
and Laurie Metcalf
— SUZY EVANS
Fashion Showdown
4
Greta
Gerwig
6
3
Tom Hanks (left) and
Steven Spielberg
Jordan Peele (left)
and Lil Rel Howery
The Assassination of Gianni Versace:
American Crime Story
Hollywood, Jan. 8
8
7
From left: Ryan Murphy,
Dana Walden and Darren Criss
Edgar Ramirez (left)
and Ricky Martin
9
Penelope
Cruz
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
36
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
“I think that [Donatella
Versace] really loves
Penelope [Cruz] and knows
that Penelope would
never do anything to represent her in a negative
light,” series creator
Ryan Murphy (8) said at
the ArcLight Hollywood
premiere of his latest
American Crime Story
installment for FX. Murphy
revealed to THR that,
though he understands
the Versaces are wary of
the project (the family
issued a Jan. 8 statement
calling the series “fiction”),
“Donatella Versace sent
Penelope Cruz (9) a
very large arrangement of
flowers.” Following the
packed screening, guests
boarded buses to the
Hollywood Palladium,
which was transformed into
an opulent Miami Beach
party with themed cocktails and dinner, decadent
desserts and a runway with
glitter-covered mermen
and Versace swimsuit-clad
models. — JEAN BENTLEY
STREEP, HANKS: KEVIN MAZUR/GETTY IMAGES. FRANCO, GERWIG, METCALF: JAMIE MCCARTHY/GETTY IMAGES. PEELE: DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES. MARTIN: FRANK MICELOTTA/FX/PICTUREGROUP. MURPHY: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES. CRUZ: SCOTT KIRKLAND/FX/PICTUREGROUP.
The Year of the
Women (and Men)
About Town
Heard Around Hollywood
the stage, were sorted properly.
But what about the handcuff
keys? Says Velghe, “I have his,
and he has mine.”
Ventimiglia
Hawaii Missile Panic:
A Manager’s Story
Who has donated most to Time’s Up GoFundMe campaign, which supports harassment victims?
Rambling Reporter
By Chris Gardner
Time’s Up Power Rankings: Who’s Giving What
Between Dec. 20 and Jan. 7, the Time’s Up anti-harassment GoFundMe
campaign exceeded its $15 million target, and organizers have raised
the goal to $17 million. As dollar figures climb, so does the sense that
ranking on the donors list is a new status symbol. “People are digging through the list to see who gave what,” says an insider. Top donors
include Kate Capshaw and Steven Spielberg’s Wunderkinder Foundation
and CAA ($2 million each); Mark Wahlberg at $1.5 million and WME
adding $500,000 (given in Michelle Williams’ name amid the recent
furor over unequal reshooting fees) to its earlier $1 million; Katie
McGrath and J.J. Abrams, ICM Partners, and UTA at $1 million each;
and Reese Witherspoon and Shonda Rhimes at $500,000 each. And while
Page Six called out men who wore Time’s Up pins to the Golden Globes
but haven’t donated, pins are not tied to contributions.
How the Globes Avoided an
Oscar Envelopegate
All too mindful of rival accountants PricewaterhouseCoopers’
role in the best picture mix-up at
the 2017 Oscars, Ernst & Young
partner Mieke Velghe told THR on
the Globes red carpet that “our
firm put policies and procedures
in place ... to make sure that when
we get to the stage, we have the
right envelopes for the right winners.” Added E&Y’s Andy Sale:
“There was more interest in
making sure procedures were
as tight as they could be.”
Handcuffed to cases containing
winners envelopes until they
got backstage, the pair were
joined by production staff and
NBC standards and practices
execs to ensure that both sets of
envelopes, one for each side of
Johnson
Velghe and Sale, handcuffed to the envelopes.
Thruline Entertainment manager Ron West and his wife, Lila,
were in their Maui hotel room
early Jan. 13 when their phones
lit up with an emergency alert:
“BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT
INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK
IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS
NOT A DRILL.” West, whose
clients include Blair Underwood
and Great News’ Briga Heelan, tells
THR that with local news not yet
reporting on the alert, he called a
nearby Air Force base: “The guy
who picked up told us
to seek shelter.” One
of West’s clients,
writer Doug Stanton
—
who, thanks to
West
his upcoming film,
12 Strong, has ties with government officials — quickly made
some calls, which reassured West,
yet “there was a lot of not knowing” as he and his wife were herded
to the Andaz Maui at Wailea
Resort ballroom before a second
alert revealed the mistake (an
Emergency Management Agency
employee had pressed the wrong
button). West hopes protocol
changes are on the way: “It’s a good
cocktail party story,” he says, “but,
man, it was a surreal experience.”
Dakota Johnson Gets Skunked
With four films in 2018, life
should smell like roses for
Dakota Johnson — but she woke
up Jan. 7 at her home in the
Hollywood Hills to find a “skunk
situation.” It’s become an epidemic. “This was the fourth time
in a year,” she says with a laugh.
“Thank God, it [involved] someone
else’s dog, not mine.” Johnson
adds that as a former Miss Golden
Globe, she sees the HFPA’s changing of the title to Golden Globe
Ambassador as “brilliant. Anyone
who wants to do that should have
the opportunity to do so. Gender
equality is fundamental.”
Got tips? Email rambling@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
38
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
Wagner
HO T
REST
The night before
the Globes, Milo
Ventimiglia had
dinner at Katsuya in
Brentwood. Adam
Sandler also was in.
… Producer Paula
Wagner, Bella Hadid
and Tiffany Trump
shared the room
at The Polo Lounge.
… David Benioff and
D.B. Weiss lunched
at Pizzeria Mozza. …
Nicole Richie checked
out Marvin. … David
Duchovny stopped by
A Votre Sante. … Greer
Grammer and Lyndon
Smith were at Ivory
on Sunset. … Dionne
Warwick was at Mr
Chow. On a different
day, Alan Gasmer
rubbed elbows with
Carolyn Newman.
WME’s Sean Perry
sat nearby.
NEW
AU R A
NT
Tuck
The Quick Pitch
Ebullient Argentinian
chef-impresario Juan
Pablo Torre is quietly
operating this loosely
Spanish, decidedly
modernist downtown
L.A. dining room that
boasts a sharp craft
cocktail list. Jamon
iberico and other
conservas (tuna belly,
sardines) lead to
finessed shared plates:
paella with artichokes
and a flat-iron steak
with potato ratatouille.
The Inside Dish
Torre’s chic 14-unit
Tuck hotel has quickly
become an under-theradar alternative to the
Ace for in-the-know
industry out-of-towners.
820 S. Spring St.
— GARY BAUM
ABRAMS: JEFFREY MAYER/WIREIMAGE. STREEP: SAMIR HUSSEIN/WIREIMAGE. WITHERSPOON: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES. SPIELBERG: KARWAI TANG/WIREIMAGE. RHIMES: JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC. MONEY: ISTOCK (5). ACCOUNTANTS: FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY
IMAGES. JOHNSON: VENTURELLI/GETTY IMAGES FOR GUCCI. VENTIMIGLIA: PAUL ARCHULETA/FILMMAGIC. WAGNER: RANDY SHROPSHIRE/GETTY IMAGES. TUCK: EMI KITAWAKI. TIME: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. WEST: RICK ROWELL/ABC VIA GETTY IMAGES.
Power
Dining
Access to safe water (at schools), as part
of the Swarovski Waterschool program
SWAROVSKI AND UCL A TF T ARE
PROUD TO UNVEIL WATERSCHOOL.
TO FIND OUT MORE, VISIT:
SWAROVSKIWATERSCHOOL.COM
About Town
Mileposts
Richard Venture, a
character actor
who lent gravitas to
the best picture
Oscar nominees All
the President’s Men,
Missing and Scent of a
Woman, died Dec. 19 in
Chester, Connecticut.
He was 94.
1
3
1 McKee and
Branand
2 The Levys
with Max
Emanuel
3 Thompson
Hitched, Hatched, Hired
Inside the industry’s celebrations and news
Weddings
CAA music agent
Kasey McKee married Brian Branand
on Dec. 2 at the
Belmond El Encanto
in Santa Barbara in
front of 85 guests.
The couple will honeymoon in Bali.
Births
Matthew Levy and
wife Mariya Levy,
partners at
Hansen, Jacobson,
Teller, Hoberman,
Newman, Warren,
Richman, Rush,
Kaller & Gellman,
welcomed son Max
Emanuel Levy on
Dec. 27 at CedarsSinai Medical Center
in Los Angeles.
Indigo Films
named Erin Howard
senior vp development Jan. 15.
Dinsmore
FremantleMedia
North America
appointed Jayson
Dinsmore president of alternative
programming
and development
Jan. 10.
UTA named partner
Blair Kohan to its
board of directors
Jan. 10.
Congrats
Paramount named
David Sameth president of worldwide
marketing Jan. 11.
Protagonist Pictures
tapped Isabelle
Stewart as head of
acquisitions Jan. 8.
Jenna Block joined
Rhiannon Harries
Verve as a feature
agent Jan. 8.
was named finance
director at STX
International and
Brandon Fong senior
vp business development at STX Digital,
and Jack Teed, Shari
Hardison and Elizabeth
Stephens earned
senior vp positions at
STX Films on Jan. 12.
Ziffren Brittenham
upped associates
Dean Bahat, Logan
Clare and Benjamin
Rubinfeld to
partner on Jan. 9.
Deaths
Terence Marsh, the
Keith Jackson,
art director and production designer who
received Oscars for
Doctor Zhivago and
Oliver!, died Jan. 9
in Pacific Palisades
after a four-year
battle with cancer.
He was 86.
the folksy voice of
ABC college football
whose rumblin’,
stumblin’ descriptions of the game
made him a favorite of viewers,
died Jan. 12 in Los
Angeles. He was 89.
Doreen Tracey,
John Thompson,
the longtime head
of production at
Millennium Films,
died Jan. 9 in Los
Angeles of leukemia.
He was 71.
1971-2018
Pavlic
Dolores
O’Riordan
Michael Pavlic
joined Annapurna
Pictures as president of creative
advertising Jan. 10.
The Cranberries’ lead
singer and lyricist
died suddenly at 46
olores
O’Riordan of
The Cranberries
had been in London
to work with the L.A.
hard rock band Bad
Wolves. She had heard
D
Zoe Rogovin was
promoted to
vp development at
Bravo on Jan. 10.
To submit, send email to hhh@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
40
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
one of the original
Mouseketeers on
The Mickey Mouse
Club, died Jan. 10
in Thousand Oaks,
California, of
cancer. She was 74.
their rendition of
“Zombie” and was going
to add her vocals to
their track. That never
happened. O’Riordan
died suddenly Jan. 15
(the cause of death was
unknown). “My first
time hearing her voice
was unforgettable,”
Hozier, like O’Riordan
from Ireland, wrote on
Twitter. “I’d never heard
somebody use their
instrument in that way.”
Jean Porter, a
petite supporting
player in such
1940s MGM movies
as Bathing Beauty and
Andy Hardy’s Blonde
Trouble and the widow
of film noir directing legend Edward
Dmytryk, died
Jan. 13 in Canoga Park,
California. She was 95.
Greta Thyssen, a
Danish beauty who
doubled for Marilyn
Monroe, dated Cary
Grant and starred
opposite The Three
Stooges, died Jan. 7
in New York of pneumonia. She was 90.
Donnelly Rhodes,
who played the hapless escaped con
Dutch on Soap and
Doc Cottle on
Battlestar Galactica,
died Jan. 8 of cancer in Maple Ridge,
British Columbia.
He was 80.
O’Riordan melded alternative
rock with Celtic-infused pop.
WEDDING: BRITTANY TAYLOR PHOTO. BABY: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. THOMPSON: COURTESY OF EWPR. DINSMORE: COURTESY OF FREMANTLE. PAVLIC: COURTESY OF ANNAPURNA. O’RIORDAN: XAVI TORRENT/WIREIMAGE.
2
EE BRITISH ACADEMY
FILM AWARDS
SUNDAY 18 FEBRUA RY 2018
www.bafta.org | #EEBAFTAs
BEST FIL M
CALL ME BY YOUR NA ME Emilie Georges, Luca Guadagnino,
Marco Morabito, Peter Spears
DARKEST HOUR Tim Bevan, Lisa Bruce, Eric Fellner, Anthony McCarten,
Douglas Urbanski
DUNKIRK Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas
THE SHAPE OF WATER Guillermo del Toro, J Miles Dale
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Martin McDonagh
OUTSTA NDING BRITISH FIL M
DARKEST HOUR Joe Wright, Tim Bevan, Lisa Bruce, Eric Fellner,
Anthony McCarten, Douglas Urbanski
THE DEATH OF STALIN Armando Iannucci, Kevin Loader, Laurent Zeitoun,
Yann Zenou, Ian Martin, David Schneider
GODÕS OWN COUNTRY Francis Lee, Manon Ardisson, Jack Tarling
LADY MACBETH William Oldroyd, Fodhla Cronin OÕReilly, Alice Birch
PADDINGTON 2 Paul King, David Heyman, Simon Farnaby
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Martin McDonagh,
Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin
OUTSTA NDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER,
DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER
THE GHOUL Gareth Tunley (Writer/Director/Producer),
Jack Healy Guttmann & Tom Meeten (Producers)
I A M NOT A WITCH Rungano Nyoni (Writer/Director),
Emily Morgan (Producer)
JAWBONE Johnny Harris (Writer/Producer), Thomas Napper (Director)
KINGDOM OF US Lucy Cohen (Director)
LADY MACBETH Alice Birch (Writer), William Oldroyd (Director),
Fodhla Cronin OÕReilly (Producer)
FIL M NOT IN THE ENGLISH L A NGUAGE
ELLE Paul Verhoeven, Sa•d Ben Sa•d
FIRST THEY KILLED MY FATHER Angelina Jolie, Rithy Panh
THE HANDMAIDEN Park Chan-wook, Syd Lim
LOVELESS Andrey Zvyagintsev, Alexander Rodnyansky
THE SALESMAN Asghar Farhadi, Alexandre Mallet - Guy
NOMINATIONS ANNOUNCED ON 9 JANUARY 2018
DOCUMENTA RY
SUPPORTING ACTOR
M A KE UP & HA IR
CITY OF GHOSTS Matthew Heineman
I A M NOT YOUR NEGRO Raoul Peck
ICARUS Bryan Fogel, Dan Cogan
AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL Bonni Cohen,
Jon Shenk
JANE Brett Morgen
CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER All the Money
in the World
HUGH GRANT Paddington 2
SA M ROCKWELL Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri
WILLEM DAFOE The Florida Project
WOODY HARRELSON Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Donald Mowat, Kerry Warn
DARKEST HOUR David Malinowski, Ivana Primorac,
Lucy Sibbick, Kazuhiro Tsuji
I, TONYA Deborah La Mia Denaver, Adruitha Lee
VICTORIA & ABDUL Daniel Phillips
WONDER Naomi Bakstad, Robert A Pandini,
Arjen Tuiten
A NIM ATED FIL M
COCO Lee Unkrich, Darla K Anderson
LOVING VINCENT Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman,
Ivan Mactaggart
MY LIFE AS A COURGETTE Claude Barras, Max Karli
DIRECTOR
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Denis Villeneuve
CALL ME BY YOUR NA ME Luca Guadagnino
DUNKIRK Christopher Nolan
THE SHAPE OF WATER Guillermo del Toro
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
Martin McDonagh
ORIGINA L SCREENPL AY
GET OUT Jordan Peele
I, TONYA Steven Rogers
LADY BIRD Greta Gerwig
THE SHAPE OF WATER Guillermo del Toro,
Vanessa Taylor
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
Martin McDonagh
A DA PTED SCREENPL AY
CALL ME BY YOUR NA ME James Ivory
THE DEATH OF STALIN Armando Iannucci,
Ian Martin, David Schneider
FILM STARS DONÕT DIE IN LIVERPOOL
Matt Greenhalgh
MOLLYÕS GA ME Aaron Sorkin
PADDINGTON 2 Simon Farnaby, Paul King
LEA DING ACTRESS
ANNETTE BENING Film Stars DonÕt Die in Liverpool
FRANCES McDORMAND Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri
MARGOT ROBBIE I, Tonya
SALLY HAWKINS The Shape of Water
SAOIRSE RONAN Lady Bird
LEA DING ACTOR
DANIEL DAY-LEWIS Phantom Thread
DANIEL KALUUYA Get Out
GARY OLDMAN Darkest Hour
JA MIE BELL Film Stars DonÕt Die in Liverpool
TIMOTHƒE CHALA MET Call Me by Your Name
SUPPORTING ACTRESS
ALLISON JANNEY I, Tonya
KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS Darkest Hour
LAURIE METCALF Lady Bird
LESLEY MANVILLE Phantom Thread
OCTAVIA SPENCER The Shape of Water
SOUND
ORIGINA L MUSIC
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Benjamin Wallfisch,
Hans Zimmer
DARKEST HOUR Dario Marianelli
DUNKIRK Hans Zimmer
PHANTOM THREAD Jonny Greenwood
THE SHAPE OF WATER Alexandre Desplat
CINEM ATOGR A PHY
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Roger Deakins
DARKEST HOUR Bruno Delbonnel
DUNKIRK Hoyte van Hoytema
THE SHAPE OF WATER Dan Laustsen
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING,
MISSOURI Ben Davis
EDITING
BABY DRIVER Jonathan Amos, Paul Machliss
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Joe Walker
DUNKIRK Lee Smith
THE SHAPE OF WATER Sidney Wolinsky
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING,
MISSOURI Jon Gregory
BABY DRIVER Tim Cavagin, Mary H Ellis, Julian Slater
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Ron Bartlett, Doug Hemphill,
Mark Mangini, Mac Ruth
DUNKIRK Richard King, Gregg Landaker,
Gary A Rizzo, Mark Weingarten
THE SHAPE OF WATER Christian Cooke,
Glen Gauthier, Nathan Robitaille, Brad Zoern
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI Ren Klyce, David Parker,
Michael Semanick, Stuart Wilson, Matthew Wood
SPECIA L VISUA L EFFECTS
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Gerd Nefzer, John Nelson
DUNKIRK Scott Fisher, Andrew Jackson
THE SHAPE OF WATER Dennis Berardi, Trey Harrell,
Kevin Scott
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI Nominees TBC
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES Nominees TBC
BRITISH SHORT ANIM ATION
HAVE HEART Will Anderson
MA MOON Ben Steer
POLES APART Paloma Baeza, Ser En Low
BRITISH SHORT FIL M
PRODUCTION DESIGN
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Sarah Greenwood,
Katie Spencer
BLADE RUNNER 2049 Dennis Gassner,
Alessandra Querzola
DARKEST HOUR Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
DUNKIRK Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis
THE SHAPE OF WATER Paul Austerberry,
Jeff Melvin, Shane Vieau
COSTUME DESIGN
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Jacqueline Durran
DARKEST HOUR Jacqueline Durran
I, TONYA Jennifer Johnson
PHANTOM THREAD Mark Bridges
THE SHAPE OF WATER Luis Sequeira
A A MIR Vika Evdokimenko, Emma Stone, Oliver Shuster
COWBOY DAVE Colin OÕToole, Jonas Mortensen
A DROWNING MAN Mahdi Fleifel,
Signe Byrge S¿rensen, Patrick Campbell
WORK Aneil Karia, Scott OÕDonnell
WREN BOYS Harry Lighton, Sorcha Bacon,
John Fitzpatrick
THE EE RISING STAR AWARD
(VOTED FOR BY THE PUBLIC)
DANIEL KALUUYA
FLORENCE PUGH
JOSH OÕCONNOR
TESSA THOMPSON
TIMOTHƒE CHALA MET
Congratulations
to all nominees
All nominations correct at the time of going to press.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
THE WINNERS OF THE 201718
Alfred P.
SLOAN
Film Awards
Film School Winners 2017
A M E R I CA N F I L M I N ST I T U T E
Tuition Award MARINA HOAG
Production Award FIDO Ruby Mateo, Producer; Anna Golin, Director/Writer; Jake Stock, Writer;
Carlo Mendoza, Cinematographer; Alex Tsagmilis, Editor; and David Lawrence, Production Designer
Screenwriting Award LITTLE LEPER Greg Wayne, Writer
Screenwriting Award SEMYA Niki Sharirli, Writer
CA R N E G I E M E L LO N U N I V E R S I T Y S C H O O L O F D R A M A
Screenwriting Award PERCY SPENCER AND THE RADARANGE Jess Honovich, Writer
Screenwriting Award SHEEPISH Daniel Hirsch, Writer
Screenwriting Award THE BUZZBOTS Whitney Rowland, Writer
Production Award
Production Award
Screenwriting Award
Screenwriting Award
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
NOW OR LATER Nick Singer, Writer/Director
KNIGHTS IN NEWARK Christopher Abeel, Writer/Producer
BLUESHIFT Tim O’Connor, Writer
UNDER GLASS Noelia Rodriguez Deza, Writer
N E W YO R K U N I V E R S I T Y
These awards, in screenwriting, film
development, and film production,
recognize exceptionally talented work
that explores science and technology
themes and characters in an accurate
and dramatically compelling fashion. The
awards provide financial support and are
part of a nationwide program to stimulate
the next generation of filmmakers to tackle
science and technology subjects and to
challenge existing stereotypes of scientists,
engineers and mathematicians. The
program has supported 600 film projects
and developed seventeen feature films for
theatrical release to date.
Screenwriting Award SEVEN ETERNITIES Mirella Christou, Writer
Screenwriting Award IMPRINT Jennifer Sherman, Writer
First Feature Award A NEW PROPHET Rezwan Sumit, Director/Writer
U N I V E R S I T Y O F CA L I FO R N I A , LO S A N G E L E S
Directing Award LAMARA Bo Yoon (Amber) Ha, Director/Writer
Screenwriting Award DESIGNER KIDS Raeann Giles Dunn, Writer
Screenwriting Award IVORY HUNT David Calbert, Writer
Production Award
Production Award
Screenwriting Award
Screenwriting Award
U N I V E R S I T Y O F S O U T H E R N CA L I FO R N I A
VARIABLES Sabina Vajraca, Director/Writer
HANGER’S LIMB Joel Santner, Director/Writer
THE MARS GENERATION Alyson Nicholas, Writer
THE VALLEY OF DRY BONES Jeremy Palmer, Writer
Film Institute Winners 2017
FILM INDEPENDENT
Distribution Grant THE HOUSE OF TOMORROW Peter Livolsi Director/Writer;
Tarik Karam, Producer; Danielle Renfrew Behrens, Producer
Episodic Grant AGE OF REPTILES Michael Kogge, Creator/Writer
Fast Track Grant RADIANT Annika Glac Director/Writer, Robyn Kershaw, Producer
Producing Grant ADVENTURES OF A MATHEMATICIAN Thor Klein, Director/Writer;
Producers Joanna Szymanska, Lena Vurma, and Mary Young Leckie
SAN FRANCISCO FILM SOCIETY
BELL Darcy Brislin and Dyana Winkler, Co-writers
Science in Cinema Filmmaker Fellowship DARK WEB Mark Eaton and Ron Najor, Co-writers
Science in Cinema Prize (2016) HIDDEN FIGURES Ted Melfi, Director
Science in Cinema Filmmaker Fellowship
S U N D A N C E I N ST I T U T E
Commissioning Grant UNTITLED SMALLPOX ERADICATION PROJECT Jamie Dawson, Writer;
Howard Gertler, Producer; Anthony Bregman; Producer; Stefanie Azpiazu, Producer
Episodic Grant LEVITTOWN Adam Benic, Creator/Writer
Feature Film Prize MARJORIE PRIME Michael Almereyda, Director/Writer
Fellowship BELL Darcy Brislin and Dyana Winkler, Co-writers
2018 AWARDS
Commissioning Grant WHAT THE EYES DON’T SEE based on the book by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha;
Cherien Dabis, Director/Writer; Rosalie Swedlin, Producer for Anonymous Content;
Michael Sugar, Executive Producer for Anonymous Content
Episodic Grant UNTITLED JP MORGAN PROJECT John Lopez, Creator/Writer
Feature Film Prize SEARCH Aneesh Chaganty, Director/Co-writer
Fellowship KATIE WRIGHT C. Wrenn Ball, Writer
Filmmaker Fund Award
Filmmaker Fund Award
Filmmaker Fund Award
Student Grand Jury Prize
Student Grand Jury Prize Honorable Mention
T R I B E CA F I L M I N ST I T U T E
ADVENTURES OF A MATHEMATICIAN
INVISIBLE ISLANDS Emily Lobsenz, Director/Writer
ONE MAN DIES A MILLION TIMES Jessica Oreck, Director/Writer
THE GLOWING GENE Annie Pulsipher, Writer
A MOTIVATED MAN Christopher Abeel, Writer
The Business
Executive Suite
Andrew
Karpen
Bleecker Street’s CEO on the
first post-Harvey Sundance,
indie film’s future and how to
get movie fans to actually go
to theaters By Tatiana Siegel
W
hen it comes to gaining insight on what
movies play well
in indie-owned movie theaters,
Bleecker Street CEO Andrew
Karpen need look no further than
his wife of 25 years, Pam Karpen.
“She actually owns a fourscreen movie theater in Bethel,
Connecticut. And yes, she plays
Bleecker Street films,” he says
with a laugh. “And no, I am not
involved in any of the negotiations
on what the terms are.” Still, the
intel on what drives increasingly
distracted audiences out to a
theater comes in handy when the
former Focus Features co-CEO is
looking to buy a film at a market like the upcoming Sundance
Film Festival. This year marks
Bleecker Street’s fourth year in
Park City and the first that all
three of his avid skier children
— two sons, 22 and 20, and a
daughter, 17 — will join him.
Karpen, 51, founded the film
distributor in 2014 with backing from 5-Hour Energy founder
Manoj Bhargava and named it
with a nod to the old Focus headquarters at 65 Bleecker St. Now
1
2
3
RÉSUMÉ
CURRENT TITLE
CEO, Bleecker Street Media
PREVIOUS JOB
Co-CEO of Focus Features
BIG HIT
Oversaw the Focus release
of Wes Anderson’s Moonrise
Kingdom, which grossed
$68.3 million worldwide
1 “Outside of the film business, my biggest passion is the New York Giants,” says Karpen, photographed Jan. 5 in Bleecker Street’s Manhattan office.
2 A football signed by former Giants quarterback Phil Simms. 3 Bleecker released a 2016 adaptation of David Grann’s The Lost City of Z.
Photographed by Mackenzie Stroh
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
45
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
The Business
Executive Suite
1
employing 21 people, the company
has proved savvy with its picks:
The Helen Mirren-starring drone
thriller Eye in the Sky turned out
to be one of the biggest art house
releases of 2016, with $18.7 million
at the U.S. box office. And after
releasing Steven Soderbergh’s
Logan Lucky in 2017 ($27.8 million), Bleecker Street will release
Soderbergh’s thriller Unsane,
starring The Crown’s Claire Foy,
on March 23. That’s one of nine
films it has on deck for 2018 (up
from six last year), including
two that will debut at Sundance,
the Jon Hamm-Rosamund Pike
starrer Beirut and the Hilary
Swank-led Alzheimer’s drama
What They Had.
Karpen, who lives in Weston,
Connecticut, invited THR to his
office in Manhattan’s NoMad
neighborhood to discuss the state
of indie film in the streaming era.
This year marks the first Sundance
without Harvey Weinstein. How
will that change the market’s vibe?
For the past couple of years, I
don’t think The Weinstein Co.
has acquired many titles out
of Sundance, so I don’t think it
really will impact the marketplace. The bigger impact will
continue to be the new buyers that
have come over the past couple
years. Companies like us, Netflix,
Amazon, Annapurna.
Do you think it will be a buyer’s or
seller’s market this year?
It really comes down to a filmto-film situation. It’s the quality
of the films and figuring out
which will be traditionally theatrically released and which might
go on alternative platforms.
Out of last year’s crop, only three
films made more than $4 million
at the box office — The Big Sick,
Beatriz at Dinner and The Hero.
Do you think there will be a market
correction this year?
Buyers have different mandates
and different rationales for what
they buy and spend. There were
a number of films the past couple
years that had large price tags,
go to this week. So having other
distributors out there releasing
similar kinds of films for similar
audiences is actually a good thing.
How would you characterize the
state of independent film now?
The good news is more people are
seeing independent film than ever
before. The opportunity and
the avenues to see indie film are
greater, whether it’s in a theater,
on your computer, on your TV or
on your phone. The difficult part
is there’s so much content out
there that connecting the content
with audiences and having them
see a film, whether it’s in a theater
or streaming, is changing.
2
3
4
You worked with Amazon on The
Lost City of Z, Elvis & Nixon and
Patterson. Will you partner again?
1 “I go to every Giants game,” says Karpen. “Some people
joke I married my wife for her season tickets.” 2 “When a film
allows people to see another person’s point of view, that’s a
win,” says Karpen of Eye in the Sky. 3 Beirut’s world premiere
is slated for Jan. 22 at Sundance. 4 To get through New York’s
winters, he says, “A little whiskey helps keep you warm.”
and there were films that weren’t
as widely reported that had
smaller price tags. We’ll continue
to see both, but slowly we have
seen the number of films with
the big, big price tags come down.
We’ll see that continue this year.
What’s the festival acquisition you
wish you had landed that got away?
The very first year at Sundance for
Bleecker, I loved Brooklyn. And I
worked with many of the people
involved with that film before
at Focus. But it was very clear
that it was going to go to a studio
specialty division.
Explain the Bleecker Street model.
Our goal is to distribute interesting, entertaining films for a
discerning audience and primarily
theatrical first. Most of our films
follow a platform release strategy,
but we have done wide releases. We
did Logan Lucky wide, and we’re
doing another film with Steven in
March, Unsane.
With Logan Lucky, you spent
$20 million to market it and
targeted red-state audiences. But
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
it still wound up performing best in
blue-state, big-city markets.
The big lesson from that film is,
especially now when people have
the opportunity to do so much
more with their time, to first and
foremost target moviegoing
audiences and then break down
the subset to your core audience.
Trying to get people who don’t
go to the movies to change their
habit is a much harder task.
Who do you see as your biggest
competitors?
Look, I think in some ways aren’t
we all competitors?
You’re probably not competing
with, say, Saban Films for any films.
But I would think you would be
with Sony Pictures Classics, Focus,
Roadside Attractions.
True. And we also want them
to succeed because I think the
more people who go to the movies as a habit, the better off we
all are. [Convincing] someone
who hasn’t gone to the movies in
nine months to go to a movie is
twice as hard as convincing someone which movie they’re going to
46
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
My understanding is they’ll now
be doing their own distribution.
They were working with people
like myself and Roadside as they
were ramping themselves up. But
you’d have to ask them.
How would you describe the typical
Bleecker Street film?
I don’t think there is a typical
Bleecker Street film. You go from
Nostalgia, opening in February,
to Unsane in March, to Beirut in
April, to Disobedience, which is
a film we picked up in Toronto, in
April. They’re all very different
films. The one thing I would say is
I think they all have a core audience, and, hopefully, not only can
we reach the core audience, but we
can expand beyond that.
Where do you see Bleecker Street
five years from now?
Technically, the company name
is Bleecker Street Media, and
it wasn’t Bleecker Street Films
because as the marketplace
changes, would we ever get into
TV or digital or short-term content? That’s to be determined. I
think the key for Bleecker is to
find compelling stories, interesting stories that we can bring to
an audience for them to enjoy.
Some people will like some of our
movies. Some people might not.
But I’d like to think when they
see a Bleecker movie, it’s at least
thought-provoking. What form
that takes in the next five years,
we’ll have to wait and see.
SAG-AFTRA CONGRATULATES ALL OF OUR NOMINEES!
INDIVIDUAL NOMINEES:
UZO ADUBA ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK
ANTHONY ANDERSON BLACK-ISH
AZIZ ANSARI MASTER OF NONE
JASON BATEMAN OZARK
MARY J. BLIGE MUDBOUND
ALISON BRIE GLOW
MILLIE BOBBY BROWN STRANGER THINGS
STERLING K. BROWN THIS IS US
TIMOTHÉE CHALAMET CALL ME BY YOUR NAME
STEVE CARELL BATTLE OF THE SEXES
HONG CHAU DOWNSIZING
BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH SHERLOCK: THE
LYING DETECTIVE
WILLEM DAFOE THE FLORIDA PROJECT
JEFF DANIELS GODLESS
LARRY DAVID CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM
JUDI DENCH VICTORIA & ABDUL
ROBERT DE NIRO THE WIZARD OF LIES
LAURA DERN BIG LITTLE LIES
PETER DINKLAGE GAME OF THRONES
JANE FONDA GRACE AND FRANKIE
CLAIRE FOY THE CROWN
JAMES FRANCO THE DISASTER ARTIST
DAVID HARBOUR STRANGER THINGS
WOODY HARRELSON THREE BILLBOARDS
OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
SALLY HAWKINS THE SHAPE OF WATER
SEAN HAYES WILL & GRACE
HOLLY HUNTER THE BIG SICK
ALLISON JANNEY I, TONYA
RICHARD JENKINS THE SHAPE OF WATER
DANIEL KALUUYA GET OUT
NICOLE KIDMAN BIG LITTLE LIES
JESSICA LANGE FEUD: BETTE AND JOAN
LAURA LINNEY OZARK
JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS VEEP
WILLIAM H. MACY SHAMELESS
MARC MARON GLOW
FRANCES McDORMAND THREE BILLBOARDS
OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
LAURIE METCALF LADY BIRD
ELISABETH MOSS THE HANDMAID’S TALE
BOB ODENKIRK BETTER CALL SAUL
GARY OLDMAN DARKEST HOUR
MARGOT ROBBIE I, TONYA
SAM ROCKWELL THREE BILLBOARDS
OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
SAOIRSE RONAN LADY BIRD
GEOFFREY RUSH GENIUS
SUSAN SARANDON FEUD: BETTE AND JOAN
ALEXANDER SKARSGÅRD BIG LITTLE LIES
LILY TOMLIN GRACE AND FRANKIE
DENZEL WASHINGTON ROMAN J. ISRAEL, ESQ.
REESE WITHERSPOON BIG LITTLE LIES
ROBIN WRIGHT HOUSE OF CARDS
CAST/ENSEMBLE NOMINEES:
THE BIG SICK
BLACK-ISH
THE CROWN
CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM
GAME OF THRONES
GET OUT
GLOW
THE HANDMAID’S TALE
LADY BIRD
MUDBOUND
ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK
STRANGER THINGS
THIS IS US
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
VEEP
SUNDAY
8ET 5PT
TM & © 2018 Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved. SAG-AFTRA and Screen Actors Guild Awards are registered trademarks and the Actor statuette and SAG-AFTRA logo are TM and
© SAG-AFTRA. © 2018 Screen Actors Guild Awards, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
STUNT ENSEMBLE NOMINEES:
BABY DRIVER
DUNKIRK
GAME OF THRONES
GLOW
HOMELAND
LOGAN
STRANGER THINGS
THE WALKING DEAD
WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES
WONDER WOMAN
The Business
Media Missteps in the MeToo Age:
Why ‘No Comment’ Isn’t an Option
Flubs over Weinstein and Woody are putting stars like Greta Gerwig and Matt Damon on
the hot seat and creating complex, nuanced new rules for what to say (and not say) on the
red carpet and beyond. Warns one crisis PR guru: ‘You can’t wing it’ By Kim Masters
W
hen Greta Gerwig
made her way into
the press room after
winning a Golden Globe for
Lady Bird on Jan. 7, her victory lap
was interrupted by a difficult
but predictable question: Did she
regret having worked with Woody
Allen, who directed her in the
2012 movie To Rome With Love?
Granted, that kind of sharpedged question might not
have been thrown at a Hollywood
award winner in the past, but
this year it was obvious that the
Time’s Up movement was going
to dominate the Globes ceremony. In December, Dylan Farrow
had written an op-ed in the Los
Angeles Times explicitly calling out
Gerwig, along with Kate Winslet
and Blake Lively, for their praise
of her father, whom Farrow has
long insisted molested her when
she was young. (Allen has denied
the allegations.) Farrow noted
that Gerwig had fumbled a question on the subject in a November
interview on public radio’s Fresh
Air. And just two days before
the Globes, the issue gained fresh
currency when The Washington
Post published a widely circulated
piece in which author
Richard Morgan
said he had analyzed
Allen’s voluminous
archives and found
Krumholtz
them brimming with
evidence of an obsession with
young girls. Weeks earlier, Ellen
Page, Gerwig’s co-star in To Rome
With Love, had posted on Facebook
that working with Allen was
the “biggest regret” of her career.
Yet Gerwig still wasn’t ready
for the question at the Globes. “You
know, it’s something that I’ve
thought deeply about and I care
deeply about, and I haven’t had
an opportunity to have an
in-depth discussion where I come
down on one side or the other,”
she stammered. The dodge did not
go unnoticed in press reports.
Gerwig’s fumble — she felt
compelled to do a follow-up interview with The New York Times the
next day in which she praised
Farrow and said of Allen, “I will
not work for him again” — is
another sign of Hollywood’s
new reality. For those who have
been associated with alleged
perpetrators — and even those
who haven’t — evading questions
about sexual misconduct and
the Time’s Up movement no longer is possible. “Everyone should
presume that every time they
stand in front of a camera, microphone or iPhone, this is going to
Illustration by Nicholas Dehghani
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
48
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
be asked about, and they should
have a concise and thoughtful
response,” says Terry Press, president of CBS Films. Press adds
that any publicist who doesn’t
explain this reality and plan for
possible questions is providing
“very poor client service.”
Kelly Bush Novak, CEO of the
ID public relations firm, agrees.
“A lot of publicists think you can
sidestep it and say, ‘I’m here to
talk about my movie,’ but those
days are over,” says Bush Novak.
She points out that some of the
hard questions are originating
not with reporters but rather with
stars calling people out on social
media. Those challenges not only
beg for a response but make it
much easier for journalists who
might normally avoid a difficult topic to ask about it instead.
Coming up with the right
answer can be daunting. “The
trial in the court of public opinion in the age of social media is
something to behold,” says one
talent rep whose client has drawn
ire for a shaky answer to a Time’s
Up question. A publicist with a
client who had the same experience adds that online critics can
be implacable: “It’s like, you can’t
even be honest.”
Matt Damon is a vivid example
of what can go wrong when
a question isn’t answered well.
Normally at ease when talking with reporters, Damon got
into trouble in October when
he was promoting Suburbicon and
offered a muddled explanation
of what he knew about Harvey
Weinstein and when he knew it.
Things got worse when he told
Rolling Stone in December that
“there’s … a difference between,
you know, patting someone on
the butt and rape or child
molestation.” Though he said all
such behavior had to be “confronted and eradicated without
question,” Damon nonetheless got pulverized. (I would note
that I’ve repeatedly said what
seems obvious — that there is a
continuum of conduct — in
TV and radio interviews without any pushback.)
KRUMHOLTZ: JASON KEMPIN/GETTY IMAGES FOR NETFLIX.
Publicity
BAFTA LOS ANGELES
THANKS OUR MEMBERS,
GUESTS AND PARTNERS
FOR CELEBRATING WITH US AT
THE BAFTA TEA PARTY,
AND WISH YOU ALL THE BEST
FOR THE SEASON AHEAD.
THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:
EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS
SUNDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2018
#EEBAFTAS #BAFTATEA
Publicity
CBS Films’ Press notes that
Damon faced undeserved condemnation because he had not
framed his answers with care.
“Nobody in Hollywood thinks
for one minute that Matt Damon
is abusive or inappropriate,”
she says. “He is a completely
upstanding, honorable person.
He got into a situation where
he answered truthfully but without consideration.” (Damon’s
reps declined comment.)
More recently, actor David
Krumholtz, who appears in Woody
Allen’s new Wonder Wheel, also
faced blowback and seemed
to display a learning curve in real
time. On the day the
Post ran its piece
on Allen’s archives,
Sitrick
Krumholtz tweeted
that working with the director
was “one of my most heartbreaking mistakes.” He was quickly
attacked on Twitter by some who
felt the statement rang hollow
given how recently he had worked
with Allen. And he didn’t handle
the criticism with grace. “Easy to
scrutinize me, eh?” he tweeted
back at one point. “Go fuck yourself. And also, eat shit.”
But the next day, when
Krumholtz appeared on a panel
before the Television Critics
Association to promote his new
CBS show, Living Biblically, he
came prepared with a lengthier
and more nuanced statement
explaining that Allen had been
a childhood idol but that he is
now “ashamed” of the decision to
work with him. After Gerwig
and Krumholtz corrected course,
others who are likely to face
questions about Allen also seem
to have understood that silence
will no longer be an option. On
Jan. 10, Mira Sorvino, who won
an Oscar for Allen’s Mighty
Aphrodite and herself has alleged
abuse by Weinstein, wrote an
emotional open letter of apology to Farrow. Three days later,
Rebecca Hall said she would
never work with him again and
had donated her wages from
Allen’s upcoming film, A Rainy
Day in New York.
Visualization for Film, TV and Immersive Entertainment
LOS ANGELES | LONDON | VANCOUVER | SYDNEY
CONGRATULATES
CHARLES ROVEN
Recipient of the 2018 David O. Selznick Award
“A lot of publicists think
you can sidestep it
and say, ‘I’m here to talk
about my movie,’ but
those days are over.”
Kelly Bush Novak, publicist,
of Gerwig’s Globes fumble
A communications executive
at one studio says the fault for
earlier missteps in some cases
lies with publicists who failed to
anticipate hard questions. “They
come from an arrogant place
where people want access to their
clients,” he says. While they may
be good at picking and choosing
among media requests, “they’re
not prepared to defend a position or head off a problem.” Crisis
PR guru Michael Sitrick insists
that it’s often star clients who fail
to think ahead about how they
should handle the press. “Some
people think it looks easy,” he says.
“They think, ‘I can wing it.’ You
can’t wing it.” He says his
firm prepares clients facing hard
questions “the way a lawyer
would prepare a client to testify.”
As with every issue in
Hollywood right now, gender parity affects this debate as well.
After the Globes, some wondered
why Gerwig was questioned
about Allen but Justin Timberlake
and Ewan McGregor weren’t.
Following the ceremony, Girls
actor and activist Benjamin
O’Keefe tweeted, “Not one dude
Golden Globes Winner talked
about the #MeToo movement in
his speech. Knowing this industry their publicists probably told
them it would be better for them.”
Male or female, Bush Novak
says that some clients fail
to answer questions gracefully
simply because they are nervous or lack confidence. “A lot of
people think they need to be an
expert” to address political issues,
she says. “They say, ‘I’m not going
to talk about that.’ But if we’re
really going to make change, everybody should think about what they
stand for. Get educated and talk
about it and take a position.”
SITRICK: JOE KOHEN/WIREIMAGE. GERWIG: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES.
The Business
If Oscar is walking on eggshells this season, it’s because potential
nominees already are drawing fire for alleged offscreen behavior as the
Academy aims to head off yet another year of controversy By Gregg Kilday
E
ven as James Franco
was accepting his best
comedy actor Golden
Globe on Jan. 7 for his
performance as oddball film
director Tommy Wiseau in The
Disaster Artist, the fallout began.
Several women tweeted, accusing him of sexually exploitative
behavior, which then was detailed
in a Jan. 11 Los Angeles Times story.
While Franco disputed their
claims, he told Stephen Colbert,
“I completely support people coming out and being able to have a
voice,” adding, “If there’s restitution to be made, I will make it.”
While Ashley Judd, in an interview with the BBC, said, “I think
what James said was terrific,” not
everyone agreed. In a Jan. 14 L.A.
Times follow-up about how the
controversy could affect Franco’s
chances of scoring an Oscar nom,
one actress who had voted for
him said: “I wish I could have that
vote back. We had the Casey
Affleck thing last year. It detracts
from what we should be doing —
celebrating the work.”
But wait. So does this mean
that to “celebrate the work” we
must consider the person’s behavior beyond the work?
There’s no way of knowing if
the current uproar surrounding
Franco will cost him an Oscar
slot. The nomination balloting
began Jan. 5 and closed Jan. 12, so
many of the ballots already would
have been cast. But if he is nominated Jan. 23, his nomination will
become problematic.
Last year, Affleck, the eventual
best actor winner for Manchester
by the Sea, survived stories about
two 2010 lawsuits accusing him
of unwanted sexual advances
and harassment that were
settled out of court. But given the
current climate of heightened
awareness about gender inequality and sexual harassment, it’s an
open question whether Affleck
could have prevailed this season
— and if he participates in the
March 4 Oscar ceremony, it’s likely
to trigger another outpouring
of outrage.
All of this leaves the Academy
walking on eggshells. Within the
organization, there already was
a lot of nervousness that the
noms, if lacking in diversity, could
open the Oscars up to renewed
charges of #OscarsSoWhite
and #OscarsSoMale. The recent
Directors Guild nominations,
which included Get Out’s Jordan
Peele and Lady Bird’s Greta
Gerwig — along with The Shape
of Water’s Guillermo del Toro,
Illustration by Riki Blanco
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
52
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
FRANCO: VENTURELLI/WIREIMAGE.
CAUTION, MINEFIELDS
STRAIGHT AHEAD
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri’s Martin McDonagh
and Dunkirk’s Christopher Nolan
— set a bar. If the Oscar noms
fall short in either the directing
or acting categories, the Academy
will feel the heat.
And now it also has to worry
about the alleged behavior of
potential nominees. Franco isn’t
the only one drawing fire.
Darkest Hour’s Gary Oldman had
barely finished his Golden Globe
acceptance speech when fans of
Call Me by Your Name’s Timothee
Chalamet began circulating
a Daily Beast piece that called
Oldman to task for a 2001 incident of alleged spousal abuse,
which he has denied, and a 2014
Playboy interview where he
wondered aloud why he wasn’t
allowed to use the C-word.
Such “opposition research”
used to be the stuff of so-called
whisper campaigns, used by
Oscar strategists to spread the
word within the industry that
a given awards prospect wasn’t
worthy. Sometimes, such talk
surfaced in the sniping of awards
bloggers, but it rarely reached the
ears of the general public. That
has all changed with the explosion
of social media, where anyone
is now free to lob a charge online
and retweets travel faster than
any denials.
That wouldn’t matter if Oscar
voters truly concentrated on
judging the work itself rather
than the personalities involved.
But the Oscars have
always been, in
part, a popularity
contest. Why else
would filmmakFranco
ers spend so much
time chatting at everything
from cocktail parties to postscreening Q&As? It’s not just to
explain the filmmaking challenges they encountered but also
to ingratiate themselves with
the voters as friendly, likable,
deserving candidates.
In an ideal world, they shouldn’t
have to do that. The work should
speak for itself. But then we don’t
live in an ideal world.
Heartiest congratulations Donna
from all of us at Gold Circle !
← Strategic editing made two key characters, played by Rockwell
JUST BY MOVING ONE CRITICAL SCENE,
THREE BILLBOARDS WON OVER AUDIENCES
Director Martin McDonagh and editor John Gregory worried that moviegoers might find
Frances McDormand’s character too extreme. Then they hit on a solution By Carolyn Giardina
F
rances McDormand, Sam Rockwell
and writer-director Martin McDonagh
have all collected Golden Globes for their
work on Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri, but if it were not for film editor
John Gregory, himself recently nominated
for an American Cinema Editors Eddie
award, that might not have been the case.
For as Gregory and McDonagh cut the
film, they realized that McDormand’s Mildred,
who uses billboards to urge police to solve
the case of her daughter’s rape and murder,
could come across as an off-putting, even
alienating character. And so, in a key decision,
they decided to move a flashback of Mildred’s
final conversation with her daughter, which
ends in an ugly argument, to an earlier point
in the story. In so doing, they quickly realized
that their decision changed the character.
Gregory explains that in the original script,
the flashback occurred deeper into the film,
but the filmmakers became concerned that “by
leaving it so late, you’re going to lose sympathy
with this woman.” When her billboards burn
down, Mildred sets fire to the police station,
“which is really very neurotic,” he admits. But
by setting the flashback earlier in the film, “You
know that it’s not really about the burning of
the billboards; it’s about her trying to come
to terms with the last conversation with her
daughter. If you know her story a lot earlier, you
are more sympathetic with Mildred no matter
what she does.”
Similarly, careful editing helped shape
Rockwell’s character of Dixon, a racist police
officer. “On the surface of it, he’s a really
nasty guy,” says Gregory. “His change, to the
point where you do kind of like him in the
end, is a hell of an arc. We had to play that very
carefully.” But by selecting the right takes,
especially Rockwell’s reaction shots, the filmmakers were able to show that Dixon also is
a “vulnerable young boy. It’s just a look in his
face and his eyes.”
congratulates our client
BRUCE
MILLER
on a well-deserved accolade for your amazing talent and faithfulness to your craft.
With special recognition to Tracy for her unwavering support and counsel over the years.
GOLDEN GLOBE® WINNER
Best TV Series – Drama
“The Handmaid’s Tale”
MERRICK MORTON/TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX (3)
and McDormand, each more sympathetic.
On your recoognittion frrom the
Prooduccers Guildd of Amerricca
as recippient of th
he
A well--deeservved hoonor
Froom Henry Win
nterrsterrn
an
nd youur friiends at
Higghland Fillm Group
PRODUCERS
GUI LD AWARDS
NO M I N E E S B R E A K FA S T
PR ESEN T ED BY
JA N UA RY 2 0, 2 0 1 8
at the S A B A N T H E A T R E
MODE R AT ED BY
GARY LUC C H E SI
President, Producers Guild of America
Nominees for the Darr yl F. Zanuck Award for
outstanding producer of theatrical motion pictures:
THE BIG SICK
CA L L M E BY YO U R NA M E
DUNKIRK
GET OUT
I , T ON YA
L A DY B I R D
M O L LY ’ S G A M E
THE POST
T H E S H A P E O F WA T E R
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
WON DER WOM A N
By Invitation Only
Fashion
PRODUCTS: COURTESY OF BRAND (7). HOULT: DAVID BECKER/GC IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES. HAMMER: BRYAN STEFFY/GC IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES. HEDLUND: RANDY SHROPSHIRE/GETTY IMAGES FOR AT&T. MITCHELL: JONATHAN LEIBSON/GETTY IMAGES FOR PEPSICO CREATORS LEAGUE STUDIOS. ICICLES: ISTOCK.
Hedlund
Hammer
Hoult
Helly Hansen
Pointnorth waterproof puffer
coat with ventilation to
prevent overheating; $425,
hellyhansen.com
Parka
City, Utah
Tackle freezing Sundance
temps in style while shuffling
between premieres and parties
Frame
L’homme Slim
straight-leg jeans in
dark gray wash;
$219, frame-store.com
Mitchell
By Carol McColgin
Barneys New York
Leather-accented
cashmere gloves
with touchscreenfriendly thumb and
index-finger slits;
$375, barneys.com
Connolly
Oversize wool knit sweater;
$590, mrporter.com
Ugg
Waterproof leather
and suede Halfdan
boot with wool lining;
$190, ugg.com
Elder
Statesman
Rib-knit
cashmere hat;
$265,
barneys.com
Frame
Suede Western jacket; $949,
frame-store.com
↑ Armie Hammer, Nicholas Hoult, Garrett Hedlund and Jason Mitchell keeping warm at Sundance.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
57
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
Style
2 Boseman’s tribal-meets-tech uniform. 3 From left: Nyong’o, Bassett and
Martin Freeman in Dogon-inspired costumes. 4 African-dress references,
such as Tuareg textiles (pictured) inform many of the looks in the film.
Costumes
3
3
4
1
1 Mandela (inset), in ceremonial dress, was an inspiration;
Bassett’s character, wearing a futuristic interpretation.
2
Black Panther’s Chic African Influences
For Marvel’s new film, ‘an army’ of culturally attuned costume designers leaned on Winnie Mandela’s birthday ensemble,
high-tech touches and tribal artifacts — from Maasai and Tuareg dress — to inform the distinctive garb By Booth Moore
Panther, or T’Challa — created
in 1966. Played by Chadwick
Boseman, he rules over the
fantastical African country of
Wakanda, which is rich with
vibranium — a mythic metal that
comprises Captain America’s
shield, is woven into the Black
Panther’s suit and has positioned
the nation a century ahead of
the rest of the world. The fight for
vibranium has T’Challa facing
off with Michael B. Jordan’s Erik
Killmonger, whose tattoos are
patterned after those of Ethiopia’s
Mursi and Surma tribes.
5
5 A digital rendering of the garb
worn by the Dora Milaje, the
secret service of Black Panther’s
country. 6 An Ndebele woman
sporting neck rings, remade in
rubber for the film.
6
Carter worked with five illustrators, 14 designers, mold
makers, fabric dyers and jewelry
makers and dispatched shoppers
to Ghana and South
Africa to find artifacts, textiles and
Carter
jewelry to use as prototypes. “It was an
army,” she says. On
her mood boards
were images of dress
Coogler
from the Maasai,
Tuareg, Ndebele and Dinka peoples
(including a men’s beaded corset
from the Metropolitan Museum of
Art). She also examined garments
by avant-garde pleating master
Issey Miyake and African-inspired
fashions by Yves Saint Laurent
and Donna Karan.
Lupita Nyong’o plays undercover agent Nakia, who dresses in
a hundred shades of green, each
worn only once. Says Nyong’o, who
dons a body-hugging, chartreuse
neoprene gown for a glamorous
casino scene: “Ruth, Ryan and I
wanted Nakia to look both elevated
and grounded in her work as
a spy, and each costume reflects
those things.”
58
The Walking Dead’s Danai
Gurira is a member of Wakanda’s
secret service, the Dora Milaje,
dressed in colorful armor. “For
the Dora Milaje, I wanted to see
how heavy Ndebele neck rings
were,” Carter says, noting that
the rings were remade in rubber
for filming.
One scene has T’Challa and
his mother, Ramonda (Angela
Bassett), on a mission to a mountain tribe, the Jabari. “I used the
Dogon tribe [a remote civilization in Mali] as inspiration for all
things Jabari,” says Carter. “The
Jabari also wear these phenomenal grass skirts that Ryan Coogler
just fell in love with.” Bassett’s
costumes were inspired by reallife royalty. “I looked at footage
of Winnie Mandela arriving to her
birthday party in South Africa
wearing a traditional Zulu woman’s ceremonial costume that
was just beautiful,” says Carter.
As a futuristic touch, Bassett
wears a shoulder piece patterned
from African lace that was
3D-printed at a studio in Belgium.
Says Carter, “I thought the queen
should represent her technologically advanced nation.”
PANTHER: MATT KENNEDY/MARVEL (3). MANDELA: REUTERS/SIPHIWE SIBEKO/SOUTH AFRICA SOCIETY. TAUREG: MARKA/UIG VIA GETTY IMAGES. SKETCH: ANTHONY
FRANCISCO/MARVEL. NDEBELE: DEAGOSTINI/GETTY IMAGES. COOGLER: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/WIREIMAGE. CARTER: DAVID LIVINGSTON/GETTY IMAGES.
uth Carter has created costumes for Do the Right Thing,
Amistad, Malcolm X, Selma
and many more films, but nothing
prepared her for the scope of Walt
Disney’s Black Panther, directed by
Ryan Coogler. For the super-stylish
superhero film opening Feb. 12,
she imagined a new African diaspora with 700 costumes fusing
futurism, indigenous dress and
high fashion, drawing on sources
from the Rose Bowl Flea Market
to textile dealers in Accra, Ghana.
The film brings to life Marvel’s
first black superhero — Black
R
357 West 17th StreetWest Chelsea,
New York
$29,500,000 BeG)XOO)ORRU0DVWHU | Bath
Tomer Fridman
310.926.3777
tomer.fridman@compass.com
By Appointment Only
CalBRE 01750717. Compass is a licensed real estate broker (01991628) in the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject
WRHUURUVRPLVVLRQVFKDQJHVLQSULFHFRQGLWLRQVDOHRUZLWKGUDZZLWKRXWQRWLFH7RUHDFKWKH&RPSDVVPDLQRƅFHFDOO
Style
Real Estate
Pasadena
Just Sold
$7M
1
1 Albert and Elsa Einstein in front of their home in Pasadena, where they spent three winters during the
1930s when he was a visiting professor at Caltech. 2 This 1959 home, built by architects Whitney Smith
and Wayne Williams, hadn’t changed hands in 50 years before Streep bought it in December.
Posh. Private. Prestigious. Pasadena?
A-listers are suddenly snapping up historic homes in the grande dame of L.A. suburbs,
where it ‘takes an act of God’ (or perhaps Meryl Streep) to get some residents to sell By Peter Kiefer
restrictions on new development, some of
hen Meryl Streep and Kristen Wiig buy similar
homes within blocks of each other in the span of
the strictest in L.A. County, keep some residential developers at bay.
a week, the question inevitably arises: What hot
Streep and Wiig purchased mid-century
new enclave is drawing Hollywood now? Here, the neighMoore
homes — for $3.6 million and $3 million,
borhood in question — Pasadena — may be hot, but it’s
respectively (Wiig’s is one of the original Case
the opposite of new. The grande dame of L.A. suburbs and
Study Houses). They join Mandy Moore, who
the region’s de facto intellectual capital (home to Caltech,
the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a half-dozen major
bought in Pasadena in 2017 ($2.6 million), as
cultural institutions), Pasadena and its storied mid-cendid Rachel Bilson ($3.25 million).
tury and post-and-beam homes have welcomed a steady
“The perception that Pasadena is in the
Streep
stream of stars and execs. “I have certainly seen an uptick
boondocks has kept it lower on Hollywood’s
in entertainment industry people coming here from all
radar,” says Pacific Union International’s Maggie Navarro,
levels — costume designers, actors and producers. There
along with a certain “impenetrability” due to limited housare people that I would never expect to be calling me,” says
ing supply. “There is very little turnover or spontaneous
agent Matthew Berkley of brokerage Deasy/Penner, who
construction,” says Navarro. “Getting some [residents] out
of their houses, some of whom have lived there 40, 50, even
has worked with star clients including the late Paul Walker.
60 years, takes an act of God,” she jokes, adding homes are
In 2017, the median sales price of a home in Pasadena
often passed down for generations.
— about $1.2 million in the fourth quarter — climbed
But the visibility of Pasadena,
6 percent, according to Pacific
convenient to the studios in
Union International. Compared to
Burbank, is growing amid the east17 percent year-over-year growth
ward creep of such production
in Pacific Palisades, Pasadena
companies as Blumhouse (based in
prices — even in the ritzier South
Echo Park) and Justin Lin’s Perfect
Pasadena neighborhood — seem
(almost) modest. Keeping them in
Storm Entertainment (DTLA). Says
check, in part, is the abundance of
producer Barry Mendel, who has
historic districts and landmarked
lived in Pasadena for two decades:
homes: Not every buyer is up for the
“It’s great to see the artistic comhassles that often come with legacy
munity migrate east to where the
Wiig bought Case Study House No. 10, designed in 1947 by
properties. And Pasadena’s zoning
bohemians live.”
father-son team Kemper Nomland and Kemper Nomland Jr.
W
GOOD
IN MY
HOOD
Barry Mendel
Producer, The Big
Sick and Trainwreck
◄
Nicole’s Market & Cafe
“My wife and I eat potato and truffle
egg white omelettes ($12) and read
the paper in mutually adoring silence.”
921 Meridian Ave.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
60
This 20,000-squarefoot mansion where
Mad Men once filmed
— commissioned
by John S. Cravens,
president of the Edison
Electric Co., and completed in 1930 — was
built for $1.25 million,
for several decades the
most expensive home
built in Pasadena.
The home was listed,
originally for $10.5
million, by Josie Tong
and Gretchen Seager
of Sothebys.
On the Market
601 ORANGE GROVE BLVD.
Soon to be listed
for $3 million-plus by
Deasy/Penner’s
Matthew Berkley,
this 6,000-squarefoot English Tudor
was owned by
Morton Pinsky
and actress wife
Helene, parents of star
doctor Drew Pinsky,
who is selling the home
with his sister.
The Central Library
Pie ‘n Burger
“It’s gorgeous, the resources are nonpareil in L.A., and people there really
care about books, can you imagine?”
285 E. Walnut St.
“Millionaires sit next to gardeners next
to cheerleaders and Caltech geniuses.
I get a turkey burger and fries ($11.25).”
913 E. California Blvd.
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
EINSTEIN: ULLSTEIN BILD VIA GETTY IMAGES. SMITH: CAMERON CAROTHERS/COURTESY OF CROSBY DOE ASSOCIATES, INC. MOORE: FREDERICK M. BROWN/GETTY IMAGES. STREEP: MIKE COPPOLA/GETTY IMAGES. WIIG: SHAWN BISHOP/COURTESY OF CYNTHIA
LUCZYSKI AND LAUREN LUCZYSKI. CRAVENS: DOUGLAS HILL/DOUGLAS HILL PHOTOGRAPHY/COURTESY OF AMERICAN RED CROSS LOS ANGELES REGION. ORANGE: CAMERON CAROTHERS. PINSKY: JB LACROIX/WIREIMAGE. MARKET: COURTESY OF SUBJECT.
430 MADELINE DRIVE
2
NYU TISCH AT THE
SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL
For 25 years, NYU Tisch School of the Arts has had a presence at the
Sundance Film Festival.
7KLV\HDURIWKH´OPVDQGSURMHFWVDWWKHIHVWLYDODUHDI´OLDWHGZLWK
7LVFKDOXPQLDQGRIWKHIHDWXUH´OPVLQFRPSHWLWLRQDUH7LVFKGLUHFWHG
ZULWWHQRUSURGXFHG
In celebration of our alumni, and our continued support of independent and
FUHDWLYHVWRU\WHOOLQJZH­UHSURXGWRKRVW
TISCH ON MAIN
TISCH ALUMNI RECEPTION
317 Main Street
1167 Woodside Avenue
Park City
Park City
This space is reserved Jan. 19-21 exclusively
for NYU Tisch Alumni and invited guests.
11 a.m.-1 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 20
7LVFK­VSUHVHQFHDWWKHIHVWLYDOLVPDGHSRVVLEOHE\SKLODQWKURSLFVXSSRUWIURP
Amy P. & Frank M. Garrison, Molly & Sean Durkin, Jon & Jeanette Tullis, Pat & Walter Moore,
Stefania & Mark Magidson, and Carol & Ben Greenspan.
#TischSundance
HOW I FOUGHT
TO BECOME TV’S
$20 MILLION
WOMAN
Grey’s Anatomy star Ellen Pompeo reveals in her own words the
personal struggles and behind-the-scenes negotiations that led to a
well-deserved new title: highest-paid actress on a primetime drama
As told to LACEY ROSE
On March 27, 2005,
ABC debuted a medical drama titled Grey’s
Anatomy from an
unknown creator, Shonda
Rhimes. The show
was an instant smash,
and everybody involved was ecstatic.
Everybody, that is, except for the
series’ star, Ellen Pompeo, the Grey
of Grey’s Anatomy. “I knew I was
fucked,” she recalls thinking at the
time. After all, Pompeo was supposed
to be a movie star.
Following a rocky childhood in
a blue-collar, mob-heavy Boston
suburb, where she and several
siblings were raised by her father and
grandparents (her mother died of
an overdose when Pompeo was just
5), she headed to Hollywood. Before
long, her breakout role as the love
interest in the 2002 film Moonlight
Mile sparked interest from major
filmmakers. “Sam Mendes, Steven
Spielberg, Warren Beatty,” she
rattles off the names. “They were all,
‘We were blown away by this performance’ and ‘You’re a superstar.’ ”
But by 2004, her movie career had
stalled and she was perilously close
to broke. Then her agent, CAA’s Rick
Kurtzman, brought her the script
for Grey’s Anatomy. “I was like, ‘I’m
not going to be stuck on a medical
show for five years,’ ” she remembers
telling him. “ ‘Are you out of your
fuckin’ mind? I’m an actress.’ ” He
convinced her to audition anyway, if
only to pay the rent.
Fourteen years later, Pompeo is
no longer a renter. In late 2017, she
signed a new deal that covers the
current Grey’s season as well as two
more, and will make her dramatic
television’s highest-earning actress.
(Though a 15th and 16th season have
not been formally ordered, Rhimes
says, “The show will go on as long as
Ellen wants to do it.”)
Pompeo credits her boss and
mentor — who recently signed a
nine-figure pact of her own at
Netflix — with empowering her to
demand the best possible deal. “As
a woman, what I know is you can’t
approach anything from a point
of view of ‘I don’t deserve’ or ‘I’m
not going to ask for because I don’t
want other people to get upset,’ ”
Rhimes says now. “And I know for
a fact that when men go into these
negotiations, they go in hard and
ask for the world.”
Pompeo had plenty of leverage.
Grey’s has been drawing nearly
12 million viewers 300-plus episodes
in, making it ABC’s No. 2 drama,
behind only fall 2017 entry The Good
Doctor. And the show, which airs
in some 220 territories around the
world, is a multibillion-dollar franchise for ABC parent Disney.
Rhimes recalls giving her star a
simple piece of advice: “Decide what
you think you’re worth and then ask
for what you think you’re worth.
Nobody’s just going to give it to you.”
The result: Pompeo’s new pact will
have her earning more than $20 million a year — $575,000 per episode,
along with a seven-figure signing
bonus and two full backend equity
points on the series, estimated to
← “Where I grew up, the men around me always
had all of the power and money, which definitely
ties into my whole experience,” says Pompeo,
photographed Dec. 9 at Doheny Room in L.A.
Styling by Petra Flannery. The Row top, Anita Ko earrings.
Photographed by Mike Rosenthal
PART 2 PAY D I S PA R IT Y
bring in another $6 million to $7 million. She also will get a producing
fee plus backend on this spring’s
Grey’s spinoff as well as put pilot
commitments and office space
for her Calamity Jane production
company on Disney’s Burbank lot.
Already, she has a legal drama
in contention at ABC, and she
recently sold an anthology drama to
Amazon, which will focus each season on a different American fashion
designer’s rise to prominence.
Actors typically hate discussing
their paychecks in the press, but
Pompeo, a married mother of three,
has chosen to do so with THR now
in the hope of setting an example
for others as women in Hollywood
seize a new moment of empowerment and opportunity. An edited
version of the conversation follows.
I’m 48 now, so I’ve finally
gotten to the place where
I’m OK asking for what I deserve,
which is something that comes
only with age. Because I’m not the
most “relevant” actress out
there. I know that’s the industry
perception because I’ve been this
character for 14 years. But the
truth is, anybody can be good on a
show season one and two. Can you
be good 14 years later? Now, that’s
a fuckin’ skill.
I’m not necessarily perceived as
successful, either, but a 24-yearold actress with a few big movies
is, even though she’s probably
being paid shit — certainly less
than her male co-star and probably with no backend. And they’re
going to pimp her out until she’s
33 or 34 and then she’s out like
yesterday’s trash, and then what
does she have to take care of herself? These poor girls have no real
money, and the studio is making
a fortune and parading them like
ponies on a red carpet. I mean,
Faye Dunaway is driving a fuckin’
Prius today. Now, there’s nothing
wrong with a Prius, but my point
is, she had no financial power. If
we’re going to invoke change, that
has to be part of it.
For me, Patrick [Dempsey]
leaving the show [in 2015] was
a defining moment, deal-wise.
They could always use him as
leverage against me — “We don’t
need you; we have Patrick” —
which they did for years. I don’t
know if they also did that to him,
because he and I never discussed
our deals. There were many
times where I reached out about
joining together to negotiate, but
he was never interested in that.
At one point, I asked for $5,000
more than him just on principle, because the show is Grey’s
Anatomy and I’m Meredith Grey.
They wouldn’t give it to me. And
I could have walked away, so why
didn’t I? It’s my show; I’m the
number one. I’m sure I felt what
a lot of these other actresses feel:
Why should I walk away from
a great part because of a guy?
You feel conflicted but then you
figure, “I’m not going to let a guy
drive me out of my own house.”
So, what does it look like when
he leaves the show? First, it looks
like a ratings spike, and I had a
4
1 “Shonda had her
evolution and brought us
all along with her,” says
Pompeo (above right
with Rhimes). 2 Pompeo
is one of the few left
from the ABC drama’s
original cast; she calls
co-star Dempsey’s 2015
exit a major turning
point for her. 3 Though
she says she doesn’t
consider it a passion, she
has directed multiple
episodes. 4 Pompeo
with music producer
husband Chris Ivery and
Stella Luna, one of
the couple’s three kids.
nice chuckle about that. But the
truth is, the ink wasn’t even dry on
his exit papers before they rushed
in a new guy. I was on vacation in
Sicily, decompressing — it was
a long working relationship and
it was a tumultuous end and I
needed a moment to just chill with
some rosé — and they’re calling
me, going, “What do you think of
this guy?” “What do you think of
this guy?” And they’re sending pictures. I was like, “Are you people
fucking nuts? Why do you feel that
you have to replace this person?”
I couldn’t believe how fast the
studio and the network felt like
they had to get a penis in there. We
brought in Martin Henderson, but
they didn’t love the storyline, so
that ended.
Things have changed, though.
In Shonda finding her power
and becoming more comfortable
with her power, she has empowered me. And that took her a
while to get to, too. It was part
of her evolution. It’s also why
our relationship is so special. I
was always loyal to her, and she
responds well to loyalty. So, she
got to a place where she was so
empowered that she was generous with her power. Now, what
did that look like? It looked like
her letting me be the highest-paid
woman on television, letting me
be a producer on this show, letting
me be a co-executive producer
on the spinoff and signing off on
the deal that the studio gave me,
which is unprecedented.
Let me back up. What happened is that I went to Shonda
and I said, “If you’re moving on
to Netflix and you want the show
to go down, I’m cool with that.
But if you want it to continue, I
need to be incentivized. I need to
feel empowered and to feel ownership of this show.” And she was
like, “I absolutely want to keep
the show going. It’s the mothership, so let’s find a way to make
you happy. What do you want?”
Now, maybe it’s my Irish
Catholic upbringing, but you
never want to [be perceived as]
too greedy. Or maybe it’s just
that as women, that’s our problem; a guy wouldn’t have any
problem asking for $600,000 an
Hear Pompeo reveal which Meredith Grey character trait she most admires at THR.COM/VIDEO
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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PART 2 PAY D I S PA R IT Y
3
2
episode. And as women, we’re
like, “Oh, can I ask for that? Is
that OK?” I’d call Shonda and
say, “Am I being greedy?” But CAA
compiled a list of stats for me,
and Grey’s has generated nearly
$3 billion for Disney. When your
face and your voice have been part
of something that’s generated
$3 billion for one of the biggest
corporations in the world, you
start to feel like, “OK, maybe I do
deserve a piece of this.”
What I said to Shonda is the
truth: “I don’t get to do anything
else, and that’s frustrating for me
creatively. I make 24 episodes of
TV a year, and as part of this deal, I
cannot appear anywhere else. And
directing is cool but, to be honest, it just takes me away from my
kids.” Then I said, “So, it’s got to be
a ton of money. And it has to help
me with my producing because
producing is something I really
enjoy. That’s my creativity now.”
Acting, to me, is boring. An actor
is the least powerful person on set,
so I don’t care about chasing roles.
Plus, at my age, it’s pretty unrealistic. Not that I can’t do a cool cable
thing, but I’m not going to have
this whole second life as a movie
star. I’m not fuckin’ Julia Roberts.
In the last few weeks, a lot of
us actresses in town have been
having these meetings [as part of
the Time’s Up initiative]. We’ve
been sharing stories and trying
to figure out how we can promote change and use our voices
to help other people. And I’ll
tell you, sitting in rooms full of
Oscar-winning actresses listening to how they’ve been preyed
upon and assaulted is frightening. And it confirmed that my
path really was the right one for
me, because I’ve chosen to financially empower myself so that I
never have to be ducking predators and chasing trophies. It’s
not for everyone. You have to be
more interested in business than
you are in acting.
By the way, I saw the other
path. My agent once sent me to
see Harvey, too. I went right up
to his room at the Peninsula,
which I would never normally do,
but Harvey was a New York guy,
so it made sense. Plus, it was in
the middle of the day, and he had
an assistant there. He didn’t try
anything on me. Had he, I’m a
little rough around the edges and
I grew up around some very tough
people, so I probably would have
picked up a vase and cracked him
over the fucking head. But I also
feel completely comfortable saying
that I walked into that room batting the shit out of my eyelashes.
My goal in that room was to charm
him, as it is in most rooms like
that. You think, “Not only do I have
to show that I’m a good actress,
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
but that director also has to in
some way fall in love with me and
at least become enamored with
me.” That never felt right or good
to me. And I’ve had conversations
with my agent 17 years later where
I said, “You sent me into that
room knowing …” They claim they
didn’t know.
I think we need to get to a place
where actors have more ownership over what they do. That
should be part of this conversation
we’re having now. I don’t know if
you listened to Jay Z’s latest album,
but in one song he talks about how
all the white guys own the record
labels and they say to these artists,
“Oh, here’s a $3 million advance,”
while they’re making billions. The
artists are chasing Grammys and
Lamborghinis, so they think, “Oh
yeah, I’m rich.” Meanwhile, Sony
just made fucking $500 million,
and they gave you $3 million and
65
you think you’re doing amazing.
With Tidal, Jay Z’s empowered
artists by giving them a piece, and
it makes them more invested. I
love it.
When I’m directing an episode,
as soon as I get the script, I give it
to the actors. Then I let them come
to the casting sessions and make
them feel part of the process; I get
so much more out of them that
way. You have a choice. You can
hold actors down and try to control them, but it kills their spirit
and they resent being there.
I should also say this: I don’t
believe the only solution is
more women in power, because
power corrupts. It’s not necessarily a man or a woman thing.
But there should be more of us
women in power, and not just on
Shonda Rhimes’ sets. Look, I
only have a 12th-grade education
and I wasn’t a great student, but
I’ve gotten an education here at
Shondaland. And now my 8-yearold daughter gets to come here
and see fierce females in charge.
She loves to sit in the director’s
chair with the headphones on
yelling “Action” and “Cut.” She’s
growing up in an environment
where she’s completely comfortable with power. I don’t know any
other environment in Hollywood
where I could provide that for
her. Now I hope that changes …
and soon.
P O M P E O ’ S P AY C H E C K S :
A BRIEF BREAKDOWN
STAR SALARY
BACKEND POINTS
PRODUCING DEAL
Fourteen Grey’s seasons in, Pompeo now
earns $575,000 per
episode. The deal will
take her through a notyet-ordered 15th and
16th season.
She also scored a
seven-figure signing
bonus plus two backend
points on the series.
The latter is estimated
to bring in another
$6 million to $7 million.
Pompeo gets a producing fee plus backend on
the Grey’s spinoff, due in
March — an easy decision, suggested Rhimes’
producing partner,
Betsy Beers. “We know
how invested Ellen can
get,” she says, “and we
really wanted her voice.”
Pompeo is guaranteed
put pilot commitments
for other projects and
office space for her company on the Disney lot.
← Jaina Lee Ortiz (left) and
Pompeo on the Grey’s
spinoff, for which Pompeo
gets a producing fee.
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
OPTICS VS. REALITY
THE HARD
TRUTH
ABOUT PAY DISPARITY
Rallying cries aside, it’s not simple misogyny that is responsible for
Hollywood’s gender pay gap — it’s greed. And only greed (and maybe some new data)
will close it: ‘A studio’s job is to make money, not to be social engineers’
By LACEY ROSE
On Jan. 7, Debra Messing stood
before E! cameras and slammed
the network’s executives for,
as she put it, “[not] paying their
female co-hosts the same as
male co-hosts.” The swipe followed Catt Sadler’s December
departure, which, the former host wrote in
a now-viral blog post, came after E! wouldn’t
pay her what Jason Kennedy was making.
“So,” Messing continued, on-message in her
black gown, “we stand with [Catt].”
And just like that, Sadler’s situation got
swept up in the #MeToo movement, with prominent actresses from Eva Longoria to Sarah
Jessica Parker actively piling on. A deluge
of news reports followed, with headlines blasting E! as the latest perpetrator of overt gender
disparity — a position corporate sibling NBC
found itself in days before when stories surfaced that Hoda Kotb would make $7 million
co-anchoring Today, whereas outgoing host
Matt Lauer pulled in $25 million. Days later, a
massive gap between Mark Wahlberg’s and
Michelle Williams’ All the Money in the World
reshoot earnings caused an outcry. Often lost
in such swirls of publicity, however, are the
nuance and complexity of Hollywood dealmaking; and, per a half-dozen dealmakers surveyed
on the subject, the fact that widespread parity
may be harder to achieve than Messing and her
committed cohorts suggest.
“If all things are equal, there
should be parity, but when are
all things ever equal?” says one
prominent attorney, before
Stotsky
echoing several others in arguing that trying to regulate equal
pay in a creative industry where
roles are rarely identical and
talent has an intangible value is,
at best, unrealistic and, at worst,
Berwick
impossible. All say that dealmaking is, at its core, about simple economics,
with greed trumping all. “In the trenches,”
adds another representative, “the buyer is
just trying to pay as little as possible and, as
a representative, I’m trying to get [my client]
paid as much as possible.” Which is not to
suggest that women or people of color are on
equal footing. To the contrary, Hollywood
pacts are determined by a combination of
leverage and precedent in a system where
industrywide assumptions have long benefitted white men. Among those assumptions:
that only male action stars can open a movie
abroad, and that women are willing to see
“male” movies with men but men are less
likely to see “female” movies with women.
Such biases have led to ingrained practices,
including, as Jessica Chastain recently told
THR, the fact that a male star’s film deal
often is negotiated first, leaving the actress
to make due with “what was left over.” That
Illustrations by Jenn Liv
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
66
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
WO M E N O F C O LO R
FAC E A ST E E P E R C L I M B
there also are considerably more quality
opportunities for men, both in front of and
behind the camera, has only contributed to
their ability to take a hard line (and show a
real willingness to walk away) during a tense
negotiation. As America Ferrera told THR in
a 2017 interview, “The entire system is built
to keep [women] from asking for more.” And
she is including actresses’ representation in
that: “I feel like most of the times that I have
had to ask for something, I had to convince my
agents to ask with me, and them saying, ‘We
don’t think you should ask for that.’ ”
At least a few reps say they’re hopeful that
the bounty of data streaming services are gathering — who watches what, and when exactly
viewers tune out — could prove useful in dismantling some of the notions that have led to
such systemic gender bias. “Look, a studio’s job
is to make money, not to be social engineers,”
says attorney Neil Meyer, who has represented
Halle Berry and Taraji P. Henson. “That said,
we’re a community, and to the extent that
any or all of us do something to perpetuate
inequality, we’re all complicit; either you’re trying to be a part of the solution or you’re trying
to be part of the problem.”
STOTSKY: DIA DIPASUPIL/GETTY IMAGES FOR NBCUNIVERSAL. BERWICK, WILLIAMS: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES. SADLER: TAYLOR HILL/FILMMAGIC. KOTB: PETER KRAMER/NBC/NBC NEWSWIRE VIA GETTY IMAGES.
1
1 The drama
over the nearly
$20 million
disparity between
Kotb’s and Lauer’s
Today salaries
died quickly.
2 The gap between
Wahlberg’s and
Williams’ reshoot
pay on All the
Money in the World
sparked more
public outrage.
3 Other actresses
adopted the salary
disparity between
E!’s Sadler and
Kennedy as a red
carpet rallying cry.
Though the brouhaha surrounding Kotb
and Lauer died down quickly — thanks in
part to several next-day press reports that
pointed to Lauer’s two decades in the anchor
chair to justify the wage gap — the Sadler/
Kennedy narrative was slower to lose steam,
which is why E! brass are opting to weigh
in, arguing that the chasm between the optics
and the reality is significant. At issue, they
say, is the personalities’ respective workloads,
with Kennedy a primetime host and Sadler
primarily a daytime one. “These situations are
apples and oranges,” says E! president Adam
Stotsky, who adds that his network has a long
history of fairly compensating women, rattling off highly paid examples from Chelsea
Handler to the Kardashians. Still, per Frances
Berwick, president of NBCUniversal Cable
Entertainment’s lifestyle networks, the
When it comes to pay, race compounds inequity
+
2
3
decision to speak publicly about the disparity
is not without complications. “You don’t want
to stop the flow of this positive mechanism for
change, but we also have to be cautious about
running with a little bit of information that
then explodes into something that’s actually
not true,” she says, adding: “There’s a danger
that a lot of other things get wrapped into it in
service of this movement.”
In the case of Williams vs. Wahlberg, the
optics were that much more abysmal: To
return to the All the Money in the World set to
reshoot scenes that once featured disgraced
star Kevin Spacey, Williams was reportedly
paid $80 per day (for 10 days) while her male
co-star pocketed $1.5 million. Though the
reality — how it happened and what exactly
she and her agent, WME’s Brent Morley,
knew — remains murky, what is clear is that
the WME-repped Wahlberg, who has fronted
major global franchises and whose box office
track record overseas distributors relied on to
sell the film, had considerably more leverage and used it. Of course, those specifics
hardly mattered when it spilled out into public
view (see “#MeToo and the Power of Salary
Transparency,” page 68).
If there is a silver lining for future dealmaking, it is that the current climate can be
(and arguably already is) used as a bargaining chip. Take Wonder Woman director Patty
Jenkins, whose team was able to negotiate a
deal last summer that took her from $1 million on the original — which shattered a
theatrical glass ceiling, reinvigorated the
DC film universe and became a symbol of
strength for women — to somewhere between
$7 million and $9 million plus backend to
write and helm the sequel. The pact not only
sets a new precedent by making her the highest-paid female director in history but also
puts her on par with what any male director
would receive after such a box office triumph.
Sure, Jenkins warranted the massive payday,
having just delivered an $822 million film;
but in this case, with hers a face of a movement, studio Warner Bros. also couldn’t afford
not to pay her. Asked whether he intends
to continue using the increasingly charged
environment to his female clients’ advantage,
one top lawyer jokes: “Abso-fucking-lutely,”
adding: “If you don’t use it, you’re not doing
everything you can for your client.”
To play Brad Pitt’s mother in The Curious Case of
Benjamin Button, Taraji P. Henson was paid in the
low-six figures and had to cover her own lodging. “The
math really is pretty simple: There are way more talented
black actresses than there are intelligent, meaningful
roles for them,” she wrote in her 2016 memoir, Around
the Way Girl. “This is exactly how a studio can get away
with paying [the third lead] less than 2 percent what it’s
paying the person … listed first [on the call sheet].”
The institutional obstacles that contribute to the gender pay gap are compounded for women of color, who
experience even fewer significant opportunities than
white women. Less experience means lower pay, which
means a lower quote — a vicious cycle.
Perceptions that there’s less of an audience for
stories featuring people of color — that “black projects”
don’t play overseas, and
Asian- and other minority-led projects don’t
perform domestically —
contribute to lowballing.
“If your analysis starts
with, ‘We can’t even
fill out the line item for
foreign,’ you are immediately discounted,”
says attorney Darrell
Miller, whose clients
include Angela Bassett,
Courtney B. Vance and
Luke Cage showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker.
“That myth is still a problem with middle-aged buyers.”
As a result, adds Miller, “People of color concede
in negotiations quicker because they get less golden
opportunities. When there’s more diverse content
being made, that shifts the ability to have real leverage
for people who are fortunate enough to be there the
one year they’re making Black Panther.” — REBECCA SUN
W R I T E R P AY D I S P A R I T Y :
G EN D ER VS . R AC E
According to the WGA’s 2016 Hollywood Writers
Report, race is a bigger factor in pay disparity
than gender, putting minority women — even at
the top levels — at the greatest disadvantage.
$700K
$646K
MEDIAN EARNINGS
95TH PERCENTILE
600
500
$447K
$387K
400
300
200
$134K
$118K
$101K
100
WHITE MEN
WOMEN
MINORITIES
Source: 2016 Hollywood Writers Report.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
PART 2 PAY D I S PA R IT Y
#METOO AND THE
POWER
OF SALARY
TRANSPARENCY
Actresses are chipping away at studio leverage by sharing openly about their pay
and bucking a system ‘created to pit them against one another’
B y TAT I A N A S I E G E L
Don’t ask. Don’t tell.
That has been the
Hollywood modus
operandi when
it comes to paydays,
which are guarded
with the secrecy of
CIA black ops missions — until
now. Thanks to the Time’s Up initiative, more actresses are feeling
emboldened to share salary information with one another, both in
person and on social media.
Previous lack of transparency
hurt actresses negotiating film
and TV salaries, and one antidote
to the widespread occurrence of
gender pay disparity appears to
be sunshine. Take the example
of All the Money in the World stars
Mark Wahlberg and Michelle
Williams. THR has confirmed
that Wahlberg was paid nearly
10 times what Williams made
($5 million vs. $625,000) despite
both having roughly the same
amount of screen time — and
Williams is the one being pushed
for an Oscar nomination.
On the day after the Golden
Globes ceremony, where the issue
of gender pay disparity was thrust
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
68
into the spotlight as a red carpet
rallying cry, Melissa Silverstein,
founder of the nonprofit Women
and Hollywood and director of
the Athena Film Festival, tweeted
about that “egregious pay gap”
between Wahlberg
and Williams. That
prompted Jessica
Chastain to retweet,
adding “I heard
Silverstein
for the reshoot she
got $80 a day compared to his
MILLIONS. Would anyone like
to clarify?” By Jan. 9, USA Today
confirmed the reshoot disparity. (Neither star was technically
paid for reshoots. Williams
received a per diem of $80 vs. the
$1.5 million that Wahlberg’s agent
was able to negotiate as a salary
bump because the actor had cast
approval and could potentially
W O M E N : H O W T O N E G O T I AT E F O R
M O R E D O U G H O N YO U R N E X T G I G
+
The gender
pay gap is
expected to close by
2059 (according to the
Institute for Women’s
Policy Research). In
the meantime, here are
three tactics to secure
a better deal for your
next job:
DON’T PLAY CATCH-UP
Your starting salary
can create ripple effects
throughout the rest of
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
your tenure at a company. It may be tempting
to wait for a few years
of experience (and courage) before negotiating
for a raise, but “the difference in starting pay
has an enormous effect
on pay disparity,” says
employment lawyer
Ann Fromholz, because
bonuses or future
increases are typically
calculated as a percentage of current salary.
“The gap becomes wider
and wider as years go by.
It’s important for women
to negotiate what they’re
worth at the outset.”
BE WILLING TO WALK
“The best deals are
gotten when there’s a
willingness to walk away
unless you’ve got a
certain amount,” says
a top talent rep. And
never say, “I really want
to work with you, but
PART 2 PAY D I S PA R IT Y
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1
torpedo the film, already reeling
in the wake of the Kevin Spacey
sex scandal.) The story then went
viral, and four days later, Wahlberg
agreed to give $1.5 million to
the Time’s Up campaign; WME,
which reps both actors, donated
another $500,000.
“For women in Hollywood, the
system was created to isolate
them from each other and to pit
them against one another,” says
Silverstein. “Women are taking back the power by sharing
the information in a way that has
never been done before.”
In the past, it would have been
a major faux pas for Chastain to
publicly comment on another
actress’ salary, especially before
it had been published. But that’s
what happened thanks to a recent
Time’s Up meeting. According
to a source who attended, the
Wahlberg-Williams discrepancy
was discussed at length, as was
Tracee Ellis Ross getting paid significantly less than her Black-ish
co-star Anthony Anderson.
With negotiations for the fifth
season ongoing, sources say Ellis
Ross feels that if she isn’t brought
up to Anderson’s level, she may
opt to appear in fewer episodes to
make up the disparity by guesting on another show. The tactic
has split opinions within Time’s
Up, with some worried that it’s
more a retreat than a forwardlooking solution (fitting in extra
work isn’t always feasible, and
often an actress wouldn’t earn as
much guesting as she would as a
1 Ellis Ross reportedly earns significantly
less than her Black-ish co-star Anderson.
2 Chastain’s tweet about the pay gap
between Williams and Wahlberg would
have been taboo before #MeToo.
network star). A network source
says a new deal will significantly
increase her compensation and
cautioned that Anderson and Ellis
Ross’ roles aren’t equal given that
he has been attached to Black-ish
from the start and is an executive
producer. Still, until a few weeks
ago, this type of candid conversation would never have taken place
outside an actress’ agency.
Open discussion about pay
is not without precedent in other
high-profile industries. In the
sports world, the public knows
what everyone makes, from Tom
Brady to a middle reliever on
the Yankees. Hollywood’s secrecy
is easily explained by those
it empowers — the studios, who
until now have benefited from
holding all the cards and have
discouraged other parties from
disclosing details of deals.
Turns out, that might run afoul
of certain laws. In several states
including California, it’s illegal for
a company to prevent its employees from discussing their pay.
During the Obama administration, the National Labor Relations
Board stepped up enforcement
of these pay secrecy laws, stating
can you give me more
money?” adds executive
coach Katie Donovan of
Equal Pay Negotiations.
“That surrenders all leverage. A better line would
be, ‘I’m having difficulty
saying yes to this offer,
and here’s why.’ ”
EMBRACE SISTERHOOD
Women pay a higher
social cost for negotiating their pay than men,
often branded as being
difficult or aggressive
and alienating the other
party, says Hannah Riley
Bowles, senior lecturer
that anything designed to
discourage employees from exercising the right to discuss their
salaries is unlawful. “The intent
behind all of the statutes is [to
rectify] the fact that traditionally, women and minorities have
made less than Caucasian males
because they didn’t know that
they could ask for more, because it
was a secret,” says Wendy Lane,
head of Greenberg Glusker’s labor
and employment group. The laws
apply to both direct employers
(like studios) and people acting
as an intermediary (like a talent
agency). “Transparency absolutely
benefits women when negotiating,” says ICM Partners film
financing agent Jessica Lacy. “It’s
paramount that we better understand how much disparity there
is. Transparency is vital to ignite
the spark for that conversation.”
Now there’s talk of the Trump
administration rolling back those
actions. “If nobody is allowed to
discuss it, how will we ever know
that there are these disparities?”
Lane asks. “If employees can speak
about it, then that can be the
beginning of the process of having
the discussions for higher pay.”
Silverstein won’t say where
she heard about the WilliamsWahlberg gap but says she would
tweet about a similar case in a
heartbeat. “This statement made
women powerful,” she says. “The
industry reaction and response
are huge indicators that more revelations add to the conversation
that things need to change.”
in public policy at the
Harvard Kennedy School.
However, they experience more success when
advocating on someone
else’s behalf. Bowles
recommends adopting
what she calls the
“I-We” approach, whereby
a woman positions her
refusal to settle for less
not as oppositional but
rather as an asset to
the team. Says Donovan:
“Women actually get
more than men in negotiations when we use the
collaborative approach.”
2
Touted as a boost for gender
parity, the new rule may
empower female execs but
could hamper talent deals
+
Under a Jan. 1 California
law intended as a step
toward closing the gender pay gap,
an employer can no longer ask for
salary history from a potential hire.
Female execs seeking to make a
move seem the most likely to benefit. If a lower starting salary and
fewer raises than male counterparts
have deflated a woman’s earnings,
the law offers a clean slate on which
she can negotiate. “It might mean
that somebody wanting to hire an
executive is going to be willing
to pay what they think she is worth,”
not simply what she’s been paid,
says attorney Linda Lichter, who
reps both talent and execs.
But the effect on female talent
isn’t so easy to predict. “The first
step to cutting a deal was to call a
representative and ask for quotes.”
says attorney Bob Darwell, who
represents companies like Amazon
Studios and calls this “a fundamental change. The new law makes it
more challenging to address disparity in compensation. If the
information isn’t flowing as freely,
there’s less information available
to try to address that gap.”
Reps will now need advance
permission from clients in order to
disclose past pay. “Assuming our
clients agree, we have the choice
of whether to share a quote,” says
lawyer Joel McKuin, whose clients
include Kristen Stewart and Noah
Hawley. “If a quote is going to help
the client, we’re going to use it.”
While some fear the law could
encourage studios to lowball
anyone who doesn’t offer a quote,
McKuin says it could help talent
whose quotes are artificially low
because they had focused on indie
projects or TV. However, “if the
market is unfair because it’s imposing disparity on people’s income
based on gender, it’s up to all of us
to keep fighting, quote or no quote.”
— ASHLEY CULLINS
— REBECCA SUN
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
WI LL TH E SALARY
H I S TO RY L AW
HELP WOMEN?
69
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
t
he specter of Harvey
Weinstein — onetime
Sundance king and now
pariah — looms large
as dealmakers descend
on Park City for this year’s festival
and market.
The indie film world continues to soul search in the wake of
revelations that its most visible
figure allegedly raped and sexually harassed women, including
actresses Rose McGowan and
Louisette Geiss, at the festival
itself. Weinstein’s footballviewing party on the fest’s first
Sunday was always a must for
sellers and talent; he presided
over it like the Mayor of Park
City — which, at least for 10 days
in January, he essentially was
(witness the thinly veiled depiction of him on Entourage’s
Sundance episode).
This year, gone the way of the
disgraced mogul will be the
bacchanalian behavior of fests
as recent as 2014’s, when jury
president Bryan Singer seemed to
spend more time on Grindr than
at screenings, or 2013’s, when
CAA party guests were shocked
to see female burlesque dancers
performing simulated sex acts. “I
don’t think you’ll see those massive parties that we all remember
from 10, 15 years ago,” says
Verve’s Amy Beecroft. “Listen,
it is a really serious time in our
business. We have identified
the problem, and we are taking
meaningful steps to change.
People are much more aware,
which, let’s face it,
obviously needed
to happen.”
Verve won’t be hosting
a party as it has
Allain
done in past years.
Ditto for CAA, which
abandoned its shindig
after THR reported
details of its wild 2013
Bernard
event. UTA again will
hold a daytime brunch instead of a
late-night party. WME is keeping
the doors open on its Main Street
lounge for three nights — but
is winnowing the guest list and
will for the second year host the
Horizon Award (with Cassian
Elwes) for up-and-coming female
filmmakers. ICM will throw its
first Sundance bash in years,
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
also toasting female filmmakers.
The fest itself updated its code
of conduct Jan. 11, stating a commitment to “allowing attendees
to experience [Sundance] free
of harassment, discrimination, sexism and threatening or
disrespectful behavior,” and
local organizers are planning a
Respect Rally on Jan. 20 (see page
75) as a follow-up to last year’s
women-powered March on Main.
While Sundance lore is rife
with tales of all-night hotel
dealmaking and boozy shindigs,
some industryites welcome
the new restraint. “I hate that
[drinking] part of it. I’m too old
for all of that,” says producer
Stephanie Allain, heading to
Park City this year with the TV
series Leimert Park. “Young girls
are aware of what’s happening.
Young guys are aware of what’s
happening. They’re having
conversations about what is
appropriate and what isn’t appropriate. So that’s going to be in
the back of every greeting, every
meeting and every gathering.”
The market itself also may
feel the absence of Weinstein.
70
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
Although The Weinstein Co.
hadn’t made a significant
Sundance acquisition in years, it
nonetheless drove up the prices
for films it pursued (think 2016’s
The Birth of a Nation and 2015’s
Brooklyn, which both sold to Fox
Searchlight — for $17.5 million
and $9 million, respectively).
But Sony Pictures Classics’ Tom
Bernard dismisses the notion of a
significant post-Harvey effect at a
fest where progressive indie values rule. “The dealmaking will be
the same. Harvey Weinstein was
never a factor in Sundance,” he
insists. “And Sundance was bigger
than his behavior. He stood out
like a sore thumb. Sundance does
not accept those kinds of people.”
Whether acquisition price tags
will remain high — as with last
year’s The Big Sick ($12 million,
Amazon), Patti Cake$ ($9.5 million, Searchlight) and Mudbound
($12.5 million, Netflix) — without TWC in the mix remains to
be seen. Only three films from
Festival films with buzz, from left:
Sorry to Bother You, Ophelia, A Kid Like
Jake, The Catcher Was a Spy, White
Fang, Hearts Beat Loud and Wildlife.
JAKE, LOUD: JON PACK/SUNDANCE. OPHELIA: COVERT MEDIA/SUNDANCE. SORRY: DOUG EMMETT/SUNDANCE. SPY: DUSAN MARTINCEK/SUNDANCE. WILDLIFE,
FANG: COURTESY OF SUNDANCE. ALLAIN: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC. BERNARD: JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE. D’SOUZA: MICHAEL KOVAC/WIREIMAGE.
A CHILL OVER
201
— AN D IT’ S N OT TH E WEATH E
8
R
Harvey’s gone and with him the formerly
freewheeling party scene as insiders hope a
more sober and serious festival won’t throw
cold water on last year’s hot sales market:
‘We really haven’t lost any buyers’
BY TAT I A N A S I E G E L
12 FILMS ON THE HOT LIST:
A ‘FUCKED UP’ THRILLER,
SPIES AND SHAKESPEARE
with period pieces (noms
for Pride & Prejudice
and The Imitation Game).
And Westmoreland
directed Julianne Moore
to a best actress trophy
for Still Alice.
Hearts Beat Loud
WME
DIRECTOR Brett Haley
BUZZ The closing-night
film features Nick
Offerman as a Brooklyn
dad who forms an unlikely
songwriting duo with
his college-bound daughter (Kiersey Clemons).
The Parks and Recreation
alum and Clemons both
sing in the film.
A Kid Like Jake
CAA
DIRECTOR Silas Howard
BUZZ The Transparent
last year’s crop earned $4 million or more at the box office:
Big Sick ($43 million), Beatriz at
Dinner ($7 million) and The Hero
($4 million). Another question is
whether Searchlight, typically a
big spender, will tighten its purse
strings in anticipation of the
pending Disney-Fox
megadeal. WME’s
Christine D’Souza
Gelb isn’t expecting
any kind of market
D’Souza
correction. “It will
Gelb
be a seller’s market
because we haven’t really lost
any buyers,” she notes. “It will be
interesting to see how aggressive
streamers will be on the acquisitions front after having made
such a big shift into production
recently.” Sellers are particularly
excited about Neon, the 1-year-old
distributor that picked up Beach
Rats, among other titles, at 2017’s
fest and made good on its Toronto
acquisition I, Tonya (bought with
30West), which landed a Golden
Globe nom for star Margot Robbie
and a win for Allison Janney.
Despite revelations of sexual
misdeeds that have jeopardized
three major acquisitions the
past two years — Nate Parker’s
Birth of a Nation (before #MeToo
and Time’s Up) and Louis C.K.’s
I Love You, Daddy and Morgan
Spurlock’s Super Size Me sequel
(both after) — there’s no talk of
morality clauses being inserted
into contracts. “I don’t think
they’d be enforceable,” says a
top buyer. “It’s just going to be
‘buyer beware.’ ”
Though the market noise
won’t be quite as loud as it was in
2017, there is plenty of buzz surrounding several films making
their Park City debuts, including many with ties to Hulu’s
Emmy-dominating drama The
Handmaid’s Tale: See helmer Reed
Morano’s postapocalyptic love
story, I Think We’re Alone Now, and
five films featuring Ann Dowd
(both on page 72). Festbound
insiders have identified 12 standout titles that should make solid
sales (see sidebar). And if the
post-acquisition toasting takes
place at a demure dinner rather
than a late-night bash, say fest
veterans, it’s all to the good.
— ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY CHRIS GARDNER
Assassination
Nation
WME
DIRECTOR Sam Levinson
BUZZ “Polarizing.” “Fucked
up.” Just a couple of the
phrases buyers are using
to describe Levinson’s
script. The official logline
calls it “a thousand percent true story about how
the quiet, all-American
town of Salem absolutely
lost its mind.” Curiosity
surrounding this film from
the son of Barry Levinson
is off the charts.
The Catcher
Was a Spy
UTA
DIRECTOR Ben Lewin
BUZZ Considered perhaps
the most commercial
film available (it originally
was poised to debut at
Toronto), the Paul Rudd
starrer chronicles the
true story of Moe Berg, a
major leaguer who lived
a double life working for
CIA precursor the OSS
during World War II. Guy
Pearce, Jeff Daniels and
Paul Giamatti also star.
Colette
CAA/WME
DIRECTOR Wash
helmer takes on a family
drama that centers on a
couple (Claire Danes and
Jim Parsons) who struggle to get on the same
page when their 4-yearold, Jake, embraces a
female identity.
Leave No Trace
WME
DIRECTOR Debra Granik
BUZZ Granik, whose
2010 Winter’s Bone
nabbed a best picture
Oscar nom, is back with
a drama starring Ben
Foster as a reclusive
father on the run with his
13-year-old daughter. It
bows in the Premieres
section, where contenders Call Me by Your
Name, The Big Sick and
Mudbound debuted
in 2017.
Sorry to
Bother You
WME
DIRECTOR Boots Riley
BUZZ Riley makes his
feature directing debut in
a film set in an alternate
present-day version of his
native Oakland, California,
where a black telemarketer (Sundance regular
Lakeith Stanfield) discovers a magical key that
gives him kick-ass selling
skills but propels him into
a macabre universe.
The Tale
ICM
DIRECTOR Jennifer Fox
BUZZ With #MeToo now
embedded in the national
psyche, this film might
prove to be the festival’s
most relevant, centering on a woman (Laura
Dern) who is forced
to reexamine her first
sexual relationship and
the stories women tell
themselves in order to
survive. Elizabeth Debicki,
Common and Jason
Ritter also star in the film,
based on writer-director
Fox’s real-life experience.
White Fang
UTA
DIRECTOR Alexandre
Espigares
BUZZ This animated
The Miseducation
of Cameron Post
UTA/WME
DIRECTOR Desiree
Akhavan
BUZZ Sundance alum
Akhavan (Appropriate
Behavior) returns with
a comedy about a teen
girl (Chloe Grace Moretz)
grappling with her sexual identity. Promiscuous
prom queens plus gay
conversion therapy
should add up to laughs.
Sasha Lane, Jennifer
Ehle and John Gallagher
Jr. also star.
Westmoreland
Ophelia
BUZZ This depiction
CAA
DIRECTOR Claire
of the French author
screams “Oscar
bait” given star Keira
Knightley’s track record
of the Star Wars fandom
for this empowered spin
on Shakespeare’s Hamlet,
in which the previously
passive Ophelia takes
a page from Rey’s playbook? Buyers seem to
think so, if the film is well
executed. Naomi Watts
and Clive Owen co-star.
McCarthy
BUZZ Can Daisy Ridley
bring in even a fraction
kids’ pic — based on the
Jack London classic
about a wolf torn between
domestication and life
in the wild — is playing
in the same slot as the
acclaimed Eagle Huntress
did in 2016. Rashida
Jones, Eddie Spears,
Offerman and Giamatti
provide the voices.
Wildlife
WME
DIRECTOR Paul Dano
BUZZ Dano makes his
helming debut with an
adaptation of Richard
Ford’s acclaimed novel
(Dano and partner Zoe
Kazan wrote the screenplay). Jake Gyllenhaal and
Carey Mulligan star as
a couple whose marriage
falls apart amid infidelity.
ANN DOWD
HAS 5 FI LM S AT
THE FEST, BUT
SHE STILL WON’T
NEED A PARKA
“They’re as different as can be,” says Dowd (with Evan
Peters in American Animals) of her five Sundance films.
h
“If they’ve seen
Handmaid’s Tale,
they already know
the weirdest thing
they could get,” says
Morano of making
The Rhythm Section
for Paramount. She
was photographed
Jan. 5 at Company 3
in New York.
‘SOMETHING WEIRD,
, ROMANTIC
WITH VIOLENCE’
i
t’s a postapocalyptic kind of morning in Manhattan. The temperature
outside hovers in the single digits, and the streets are largely empty
amid a so-called “bomb cyclone”
that just dumped more than a foot of snow. The
backdrop fits given that director Reed Morano
is here in a Chelsea editing bay to put the finishing touches on her postapocalyptic drama
I Think We’re Alone Now, making its world
premiere Jan. 21 at Sundance.
“I love magenta,” she says facetiously as she
and colorist Tom Poole tweak hues in the film,
which stars Peter Dinklage and Elle Fanning
as the last two people on Earth. (Or are they?
The title’s IMDb credits are purposefully
misleading.) “The first forms of real, noticeable
color come when Elle’s character shows up,”
says Morano, 40, pointing to a muted image of
Dinklage dragging a dead body to a mass grave.
“She changes his perspective.”
The colors onscreen might appear bleak,
but Morano’s horizon is rosy indeed. With
studios now scrambling to get women behind
the camera, the Emmy-winning Handmaid’s
Tale helmer (who in 2013 became the youngest member of the American Society of
Cinematographers, only its 14th woman at the
time) might be the hottest hand at Sundance.
And if she’s feeling any pressure that Alone isn’t
locked 16 days from its debut, the Brooklynbased mom of two boys (7 and 9) and breast
cancer survivor isn’t showing it.
“Reed is an absolute force,” says her film’s
producer, Fred Berger (La La Land). “She did not
hear the word ‘No.’ And as a producer, I never
like to say that word, but the nature of an independent film has boundaries and constraints,
and she is the best version of a filmmaker who
does not accept those constraints and who is
constantly pushing the capacity of the movie
bigger and better.”
Photographed by Jai Lennard
HAIR AND MAKEUP BY NICOLE BLAIS FOR CHANEL PALETTE ESSENTIELLE AND T3 TOOLS
AT EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS. ALONE: COURTESY OF SUNDANCE. HANDMAID’S: GEORGE
KRAYCHYK/HULU. AMERICAN: COURTESY OF BRIGADE. DOWD: RICH FURY/GETTY IMAGES.
aving five films at Sundance over the
course of a career would be impressive.
Try five in one year. That’s what Ann
Dowd can boast after the 2018 fest wraps, with
the Handmaid’s Tale Emmy winner appearing in a quintet of world premieres, all shot in
the past 11 months — from horror (Ari Aster’s
Hereditary) to crime thriller (Bart Layton’s
American Animals) to drama (Silas Howard’s
A Kid Like Jake, Christina Choe’s Nancy,
Sebastian Silva’s Tyrel).
“I have a wonderful manager and agent,
Marsha McManus and Gary Gersh, who were
so generous in trying to work
the schedules because if that
were up to me, I would just — I
couldn’t. I couldn’t manage it,
shooting in Utah and upstate New
Dowd
York and North Carolina. I don’t
even know where I was,” jokes Dowd. “They
make it possible.”
Tyrel, which centers on a young man
(Mudbound’s Jason Mitchell) who spirals out
of control when he realizes he’s the only black
person attending a weekend birthday party
at a secluded winter cabin, proved particularly
gratifying because it offered an opportunity
for Dowd, 61, to work with her then-12-year-old
son, Trust Arancio, a newcomer to the screen
but one who has spent ample time on sets.
“Sebastian called, and we were having a
conversation about what the film was about
and what are the dynamics, especially
between cultures. Black. White. And I said,
‘You know, I’m very interested because my
son is African-American. I have to know the
subtleties,’ ” recalls Dowd. “He said, ‘Would
he be in the film?’ I almost dropped the phone.
The generosity of that — I don’t want to ever
leave him home, right?”
Dowd won’t be doing a victory lap down
Park City’s Main Street — currently shooting
season two of Handmaid’s in Toronto, she’ll
get only a two-day “break” to travel to L.A. for
the SAG Awards on Jan. 21 (the Hulu drama
scored an outstanding cast nom).
“I would love to be there to support them
because all five of these films are so deserving,” says Dowd. “Then again, one should have
such problems.” — T.S.
,
,
in the lead and Barbara Broccoli producing,
Morano wasn’t able to squeeze directing on
the second season of Handmaid’s Tale into
her schedule, but her acclaimed work on the
Hulu drama led to a meeting with Star Wars
gatekeeper Kathleen Kennedy about, um,
something. “I guess she was watching with
her daughter and then called people and was
like, ‘Who’s this Reed person?’ She thought
I was a guy,” says Morano of her two-anda-half-hour sit-down with the Lucasfilm
president. “She’s amazing. We’re talking about
adventure movies, and I’m not even remembering that she produced Goonies. Any movie
that I put my finger on that I loved when I was
growing up was a movie that she produced.
Anyway, it was a great meeting. Obviously, I
can’t say anything about what else we were
talking about.”
Morano’s nomadic hippie upbringing
fostered an adaptability that served her well
when it came to breaking into showbiz. “We
moved around every winter. I don’t know.
Maybe my dad was, like, on the run from the
law,” she says of her late stepfather, a restaurateur who moved their extended clan from Fire
Island to Wyoming to New Mexico to Vermont
and New Hampshire. After graduating from
NYU, she spent a year in L.A. working at The
Cheesecake Factory in Brentwood (“the least
successful Cheesecake Factory in the United
States because everybody there is not eating,”
she jokes). Nothing much happened, so she
returned to New York and worked her way up
the indie film ladder on
shorts before landing her
breakout gig shooting the
Director Reed Morano has an Emmy
Melissa Leo starrer Frozen
for The Handmaid’s Tale, an envied indie
River. That led to more
film pedigree and, oh yeah, she beat
DP jobs on The Skeleton
cancer. Now she’s at Sundance with an
Twins and Kill Your Darlings
end-of-the-world love story that could
before she was entrusted to
be the talk of the festival (and a
direct Meadowland.
prelude to Star Wars?) BY TAT I A N A S I E G E L
By 2016, Morano was
looking for her follow-up.
A violin player, she sparked
to the Jennifer Yee script First Chair about a
She’s used to pushing her career bigger too:
self-obsessed virtuoso violinist who’s forced to
To helm the Handmaid’s Tale pilot, Hulu and
move back in with his estranged wife, with Jeff
MGM were looking for a Ridley Scott type. But
Bridges and Diane Lane attached. But the script
Morano had a vision for Margaret Atwood’s
was “sort of melodramatic,” says Morano. “I
dystopia and fought hard for the gig. Star
didn’t want to do another really sad movie. I
Elisabeth Moss also campaigned for Morano,
wanted to do a full Page 1 rewrite [with Stuart
who had cast her as the lead in her 2015 feature
Blumberg] because I liked the concept, but I
directing debut, the grief drama Meadowland.
wanted to adapt it.” (She plans to make the film
(The two met through Susan “Goldie”
later this year.)
Goldberg, now an Annapurna executive who
Instead, she told her agents at WME to be
worked at Mad Men home AMC.) Currently
on the lookout for something in the vein of
shooting Paramount’s La Femme NikitaEternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind or Fight
esque The Rhythm Section with Blake Lively
Left: Says Fanning,
with Dinklage in I Think
We’re Alone Now, “I felt
more open to express
myself because Reed’s
behind the camera. I
just felt so safe.” Right:
Morano on the set of
The Handmaid’s Tale
with Moss (left).
Women at the Helm:
Hollywood vs. Sundance
31%
28%
4%
1,100
top-grossing
films
2007-2017
73
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
Sundance
Narrative
Competition
2018
Source: USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative
Club. “Something weird that has maybe a
slight sci-fi element to it, slightly romantic,
some violence,” she says.
That’s when she first read Mike Makowsky’s
Black List script for I Think We’re Alone Now,
which shares a throughline with Fight Club —
the main character “thought he was living one
thing, and then it turns out it’s all a lie.” She
pitched her take to Berger. “I’ve rarely had so
many incoming calls on a script in my life,” he
says. “But Meadowland was a film that struck
me as so stylish and confident that it didn’t
take a lot of convincing to bring Reed on.”
Dinklage, 48, already was attached to star
and produce. The casting of Fanning, 19,
opposite him is sure to raise eyebrows in the
current entertainment climate. Yet somehow
their pairing seems organic. “Reed understands human connection so well. ... You
hear, ‘Oh it’s an apocalyptic film,’ but that’s
not actually what the film is about at all,”
says Fanning. “And she was very clear about,
‘No it’s about this relationship between two
people, and maybe they’re an odd coupling or
the age, but it’s a love story there.’ ”
Fans of Handmaid’s Tale (Morano directed
the show’s first three episodes, creating its
visual palette) will appreciate the similar
feel. “That’s my look,” she says of both. But
her look is changing with Rhythm Section as
Morano enjoys the perks of a nearly $50 million budget. For one thing, she agreed to
hire a director of photography (12 Years a
Slave’s Sean Bobbitt). For another, “We can
shoot a car-chase scene that takes five days,
you know? And make Blake look like nothing anybody’s ever seen before with great
wigs and prosthetics.” What the two films
have in common is that they both represent
genres (postapocalyptic drama and assassin thriller) where female directors aren’t
typically seen. “Whenever a woman wields a
gun in a film, it ends up looking like they’re
trying to be sexy rather than they actually
know what they’re doing,” she says. And, for
the first time during our interview, Morano
(who has at least glimpsed the galaxy’s most
formidable glass ceiling for female directors
— the Star Wars franchise), volunteers a
reference to her gender. “I hate to be a dick,
but I kind of think it’s because men are
directing those films.”
Find out what classic ’80s movie Morano watched over and over as a kid at THR.COM/VIDEO
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Sundance
Narrative
Competition
2007-2017
OYEZ, OYEZ, OYEZ!
FOR THE
NOTORIOUS RBG
Millennials
moniker,
heap scorn —
Ruth Bader
have embraced the Supreme Court justice with the hip-hop
liberals view her as their champion and conservatives
now with RBG, a new documentary about her life and legacy,
Ginsburg is ready to take Sundance by storm BY G R E G G K I LDAY
Ginsburg, pictured
with granddaughter
Clara Spera, “was
the legal architect
of the women’s
rights movement in
the ’70s,” says
filmmaker West.
a
t 84, Supreme Court
Justice Ruth Bader
Ginsburg — who is
expected to attend
the world premiere of
RBG, the documentary about her
life and legacy that first screens at
Sundance on Jan. 21 — could be the
toast of the fest. “Millennials are
big fans of hers,” says Julie Cohen,
who directed the film along with
Betsy West. “What they love about
her is the contrast between her
seriousness of purpose and her
lighter side.”
Having embraced the hip-hop
moniker Notorious RBG (originally bestowed upon her by an
NYU law student), Ginsburg
doesn’t shy away from the notoriety or pop culture currency
her nearly 25 years on the court
have brought (though in October
2016 she said she’d never seen
Kate McKinnon’s portrayal of
her on Saturday Night Live). She
allowed the filmmakers, who
worked on the project for three
years, into her chambers and into
her life outside the court.
They tag along as she mingles
with her fans; visits the Sante Fe
Opera (opera being a passion she
shared with her ideological opposite but still close friend, the late
Antonin Scalia); and even as she
goes through her daily workout
routine. Adds West, “She’s very
proud, as an 84-year-old woman,
that she keeps herself in shape.”
CNN Films signed on as producer in the project’s early
stages. Explains Amy Entelis,
who as CNN Worldwide’s exec vp
FOU R LIVE S THAT HAVE D E FI N E D TH E I R TI M E S
Jane Fonda in Five Acts
Seeing Allred
Won’t You Be My Neighbor?
HBO DOCUMENTARY FILMS
NETFLIX
FOCUS FEATURES
DIRECTOR Susan Lacy
BUZZ At 80, Jane Fonda has become a feminist
DIRECTORS Sophie Sartain, Roberta Grossman
BUZZ High-profile ambulance chaser or idealistic
DIRECTOR Morgan Neville
BUZZ The Oscar-winning director of 2013’s
icon — although earlier in her career she was
often defined by the men in her life, a reality
that Lacy’s film doesn’t gloss over as it traces
the actress, activist and Academy Award winner’s
self-transformation.
women’s rights champion? The filmmakers
retrace Gloria Allred’s 40-year-career as an attorney who often seems to spend as much time
before the cameras as she does in court, taking on
men from Bill Cosby to Donald Trump.
20 Feet From Stardom turns his attention to the
late Fred Rogers, the Presbyterian minister
turned children’s entertainer and longtime PBS
mainstay, in this doc that is already scheduled
for a June 8 theatrical release.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
74
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
RGB: CNN FILMS/SUNDANCE. ENTELIS: ARAYA DIAZ/GETTY IMAGES FOR SUNDANCE. JANE: COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION/
COURTESY OF SUNDANCE. ALLRED: ALEX POLLINI/SUNDANCE. NEIGHBOR: JIM JUDKIS/SUNDANCE. ROBIN: MARK SENNET/
SUNDANCE. WILLIAMS: FRED DUVAL/FILMMAGIC. MARCH: RICH POLK/GETTY IMAGES FOR IMDB. FISHBACK: STEVE ZAK. ASTER,
HARCOURT: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. FRIZZELL: EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES. SKARSGARD: COURTESY OF PARADIGM.
The doc lineup looks at personalities as different as the gentle Fred Rogers and the confrontational Gloria Allred
talent and content development
oversees the cable net’s documentary film unit, “Our audience
is familiar with the court and its
decisions, but putting her entire
life’s work in context — we don’t
get to do that on a daily basis.”
In fact, the film argues,
Ginsburg, who co-founded the
Women’s Rights Project at the
American Civil Liberties Union
in 1973, was instrumental in
educating the court about gender
inequality even before she became
a Supreme. Beginning with 1973’s
Frontiero v. Richardson, the first
case she argued before SCOTUS
— she successfully made the case
that female service members
deserve housing allowances just
like their male counterparts —
she won five of the six cases she
brought to the Supreme Court.
“That’s a theme of the film,”
says West. “When the justice
began her career as a litigator,
From left: CNN Films’ Vinnie
Malhotra, network president Jeff
Zucker, Entelis and CNN Films’
Courtney Sexton at a 2015 Sundance
screening of The Hunting Ground.
there were thousands of laws that
discriminated against women
— they couldn’t get a credit card
without their husband’s permission, husbands in 12 states
couldn’t be prosecuted for raping
their wives, and it went on and on.
She took it on very strategically
and systemically, a step-by-step
strategy to convince justices,
many of them male, that discrimination did exist. She says in the
film, ‘I felt like I was a kindergarten teacher.’ ”
As the doc analyzes it, once
Ginsburg was installed on the
court — she was nominated by
President Clinton and approved
by the Senate on a 96-3 vote —
she initially staked out a relatively
moderate, consensus-building position, but as subsequent
appointments have driven the
court to the right, she has become
the great dissenter, unafraid to
take her fellow justices to task.
Although she appears diminutive, her voice carries great weight
and is heard throughout the film.
While cameras have never been
allowed into the court, there are
audio recordings, which the RBG
filmmakers make use of to capture those arguments. “We made
the decision we were not going
to shy away from those recordings
even though there was no obvious picture to cover them,” says
Cohen. “The force of her voice,
even in her very first Supreme
Court argument, is so impressive.
It’s fun to hear her going from
being a little tentative and nervous to being super-forceful.”
Robin Williams:
Come Inside My Mind
JIGSAW PRODUCTIONS
DIRECTOR Marina Zenovich
BUZZ Working with Alex Gibney’s production
company, the director, whose résumé includes
two Roman Polanski documentaries, this time
re-examines the life of the lightning-quick comedian, drawing on new interviews with those
who knew him and fresh archival material like
outtakes from Mork & Mindy. — G.K.
75
FIVE COULD-BE BREAKOUTS
WITH BIG PRE-FEST BUZZ
Ari Aster
HEREDITARY
WHY HIM The snowbound horror film starring Toni Collette
and Gabriel Byrne could cement the 31-year-old director as the
next genre rising star in the same vein as The Witch’s Robert
Eggers. The AFI grad previously helmed a visceral 30-minute
short, The Strange Thing About the Johnsons, that became
a viral sensation in 2017, five years after its creation.
Dominique Fishback
NIGHT COMES ON
WHY HER Recently seen on HBO’s The Deuce, the Brooklyn
native plays a young woman who gets out of juvenile detention and must face her past. The NEXT section feature is a
leading-role stepping-stone for the 26-year-old actress who
has proven her versatility with parts in FX’s The Americans,
Showtime’s The Affair and upcoming YA film The Hate U Give.
Augustine Frizzell
NEVER GOIN’ BACK
WHY HER The Texas native, a writer-editor-helmer who also
acts, makes her feature directorial debut with a high-energy
drama about two teen BFFs who ditch school to head to the
beach but find themselves broke and in trouble (think Spring
Breakers). The 38-year-old (who is married to director David
Lowery) has seen two of her shorts debut at SXSW.
Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie
LEAVE NO TRACE
WHY HER Director Debra Granik made Jennifer Lawrence into
a sensation with 2010’s Winter’s Bone. Now she’s finally returning to Sundance with Leave No Trace, which stars 17-year-old
McKenzie, who hails from New Zealand, as a young girl secretly
living on a nature reserve near Portland, Oregon, with her
troubled father (Ben Foster).
Valter Skarsgard
LORDS OF CHAOS
WHY HIM His name may be familiar: He’s the younger brother
of actors Alexander (Big Little Lies) and Bill (It) Skarsgard (all
sons of Stellan Skarsgard). While he plays a supporting role
in the Norwegian black metal movie starring Rory Culkin, it’s a
promising American film debut for the 22-year-old, who starred
in the Swedish drama Black Lake. — REBECCA FORD
Park City
Women’s March
to Skip
the Marching
a
fter an estimated
7,000 people swept
down Park City’s
main drag during 2017’s
Women’s March on Main,
this year’s Jan. 20 event —
on the first anniversary of
President Trump’s inauguration — will be a stationary
Respect Rally. “We wanted
to be thoughtful of what was
already happening in such
a small town,”
says organizer
Cynthia Levine.
Williams
“It was an
incredible event last year
that made Park City history,
so we wanted to leave it as
just that and do something
Harvey Weinstein was among those participating in 2017’s snowy march,
which ended in a rally with speakers including Handler and Williams.
different.” The rally will take
place at City Park in North
Park City, with an hourlong program of speakers
including local activists and
entertainment industry
figures (Chelsea Handler
and Jessica Williams issued
memorable calls to action
at the 2017 event). The rally
will address issues from the
environment to the #MeToo
movement. Says Levine, “I
want everyone to lock arms
and recognize the victory of
the past year.” — MIA GALUPPO
2018
SAG AWA R D S
PREVIEW
I
1
I knew of Morgan Freeman before
I met him. I was a big fan of The
Electric Company and I knew him
from Street Smart and a couple
of other movies, so I was a big fan
of his. When we met in person,
I was immediately struck by his
warmth, his serenity, his calm.
I came to really love him not only
as a partner in doing Shawshank
Redemption but also as a friend.
There are different types of
actors. There are actors who
demand attention and focus, who
can be really exhausting to work
with. With Morgan, his generosity
and the giving that he approaches
the work with not only make you
a better actor but also make it so
much easier to be on a set. I think
that has everything to do with
confidence. People who tend to
demand a lot of attention and
drain the energy from others are
doing so out of a lack of confidence
or some insecurity.
I always felt Morgan was quite
secure in his talent. He had a
strong sense of confidence in the
way he approached the character,
and that confidence rubs off on
people who work with him. There
was a great understanding in
him of what should be prioritized
‘ There Is a
Zihuatanejo
for Everyone'
TIM ROBBINS, WHO STARRED WITH MORGAN FREEMAN IN 1994’S
SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION, REVEALS WHAT MAKES THE LEGEND
— THE SAG AWARDS’ LIFE ACHIEVEMENT HONOREE — SO EXTRAORDINARY
on a movie set and how energy
should be spent.
We would hang out on weekends and sometimes have
dinner after shooting. Morgan
has a great sense of humor.
Occasionally, he would say something out of the side of his mouth
that would make me laugh on
the set. I always felt, going into
rehearsal on a new scene, that
we had a bond, a common belief
in what that script was, to find
every piece of the scene — every
detail, every unspoken moment
that wasn’t written.
I think one of the reasons
Shawshank continues to resonate
is that it’s one of the few movies
about a loving relationship —
really a love story about two men
— that doesn’t involve car chases
or is a buddy comedy. It’s about
two people coming to know each
STAR , P RO D U C E R , W YS IW YG
Lori McCreary on her 22-year Revelations producing
partner, ‘a great pointer toward true north’
What might surprise people
about Morgan Freeman?
I come from the tech industry,
so I call him WYSIWG: What you
see is what you get. It’s a computer term, but it’s exactly who
Morgan is. Sometimes, when
you meet an actor, you don’t
know if they’re acting or that’s
them. Morgan is just who he is.
How did you decide on the
mission for your company?
We’re committed to stories
that haven’t been told or haven’t
been told from a particular
point of view. And Morgan is
extremely loyal, not only with
his team but with projects.
We’ve had projects on our slate
for 20 years that we’ve gotten
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
76
other very well under very difficult circumstances. I also think
its staying power has to do with
the overall theme of the movie,
which is that there is redemption
in holding on to your dream and
that regardless of the obstacles in
your path, there is a Zihuatanejo
for everyone somewhere.
I still have dinner with Morgan
every year or two. Over the years,
we’ve been amazed at the people
calls about in the last year, saying, “Do you have this project
about Bass Reeves?” [Reeves
was the first black U.S. marshal
west of the Mississippi.] Some of
these projects are just now coming into their time to be told.
What has he taught you as
your producing partner?
We worked on a project about
Nelson Mandela for years that
ended up going away. I was
quite upset. Morgan said, “Lori,
every project has its time and
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
its team. That door closed, but
there’s going to be windows that
open.” Two weeks later, we got
a treatment for a book that eventually became Invictus. Had I not
listened to him and been open
for something else, I’m not sure
I would have noticed that coming across my desk. He’s a great
pointer toward true north.
Anything else?
He’s an amazing singer. We’re
dying to get him in a musical.
— REBECCA FORD
2
‘ YO U F E E L TH E E N E RGY ’
A female host and an all-women presenter lineup put the focus on ‘this cultural shift
we’re looking for,’ says SAG-AFTRA president Gabrielle Carteris By Ashley Lee
I
3
ROBBINS: FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES FOR AFI. MCCREARY: JB LACROIX/WIREIMAGE. INVICTUS: WARNER BROS./PHOTOFEST. SHAWSHANK: PHOTOFEST. BELL: STEVE
GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. SPENCER: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES. STONE: CHARLEY GALLAY/GETTY IMAGES FOR VANITY FAIR. NYONG'O: AXELLE/BAUER-GRIFFIN/FILMMAGIC.
BERRY: KARWAI TANG/WIREIMAGE. FANNING: VENTURELLI/WIREIMAGE. TRAN: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES FOR DISNEY. STATUE: COURTESY OF TBS.
1 Freeman (left) and Robbins reunited in
2011, when Freeman was honored with AFI’s
Life Achievement Award. 2 As Mandela in
2009’s Invictus. 3 Shawshank Redemption.
who would stop us to say that
Shawshank is their favorite
movie of all time, or that they’ve
seen it 40 times, or that it
changed their life, saved them
in some way. That’s pretty
remarkable and it’s quite a gift,
I must say. I don’t think that anyone knew when we were doing
it that it would resonate as deeply
as it did. We all knew it was an
extraordinary script, one of the
best we’ve ever read, but I don’t
think we had any idea. Our job
was just to stay true to what Frank
[Darabont] had written and the
poetry of that. The three of us had
enough experience and enough
love for that script to, at times, be
stubborn, but we made an extraordinary film together.
What else is there to say about
Morgan? Just that he’s a handsome devil. — AS TOLD TO PATRICK SHANLEY
t wasn't until December that SAG-AFTRA
announced that the 24th annual SAG
Awards, taking place Jan. 21 at the Shrine
Auditorium and airing live on TNT and TBS,
will feature a lineup of all-women presenters
— including Halle Berry, Dakota Fanning, Lupita
Nyong’o, Emma Stone and Star Wars: The Last
Jedi breakout Kelly Marie Tran. On the heels of
weeks of sexual misconduct scandals that have
rocked Hollywood, it seemed a timely choice,
but in fact it’s a plan that had been in the works
for more than a year, says SAG-AFTRA president Gabrielle Carteris. “We work so hard on
creating economic and creative equity,” she
explains. “We’re celebrating all
of our actors but are really looking to highlight and celebrate
the women and the great work
they’re doing.”
Bell
Indeed, the show will also celebrate female talent with another first: a host.
The Good Place star Kristen Bell will emcee the
event, which presents 15 honors that include
the coveted outstanding cast award, which frequently presages Oscar’s best picture (though
it did not in 2017, when Hidden Figures took the
top SAG Award).
And while actresses aren’t expected to be
wearing black as they did at the Golden Globes
in a show of support for the Time’s Up movement — an industry-wide response to concerns
about workplace safety, pay parity and other
issues affecting women’s progress and power
in entertainment, which was announced Jan. 1
— Carteris notes that SAG-AFTRA has been
actively collaborating with various human rights
organizations and initiatives, in addition to
Time’s Up. “These are our members, and they’re
looking to create a meaningful future for all of
us,” she says. “I’m interested in true systemic
change, and if we’re really going to make a shift,
we have to deal with it on not just an industry
level but an international and global level.”
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
77
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
From left: Hidden Figures’ Octavia Spencer,
Janelle Monae and Taraji P. Henson accepted the cast
prize at 2017's awards.
Although solidarity may be the theme,
controversy could be lurking in the awards
envelopes. Golden Globe wins for The
Disaster Artist’s James Franco and Darkest
Hour’s Gary Oldman, both nominated for SAG
Awards, led to heated discussion on social
media about their past conduct. After stories
about Franco’s alleged sexual misconduct
surfaced, he chose not to attend the Jan. 11
Critics’ Choice Awards, where he won best
comedy actor.
Carteris had no comment on these potentially problematic nominees, pushing instead
for a focus on the bigger picture, beyond the
little gold statues: “Let’s talk about the real
thing, because it’s not the awards. We are in a
certain time in our history, and it is clear that
the time is now for all of us to come together
and really move forward and create this cultural shift we’re looking for. That’s the real
truth, and the awards can be a platform [for
that] or not. The time is now — you feel the
energy behind it and people are ready. I would
like to see us create from that energy.”
From left: SAG Awards presenters Stone, Nyong'o,
Berry, Fanning and Tran.
AKICITA: THE BATTLE OF STANDING ROCK: Anka Malatynska, Additional Cinematographer | AWAVENA, Adam Cosco, VR Editor | BELIEVER: Anton Floquet,
Cinematographer, Wes Lofgren, Production Sound Recordist | THE BLAZING WORLD: Ed Wu, Cinematographer, Farhad Ahmed Dehlvi, Gaffer, Stephen St. Peter,
Grip | BLINDSPOTTING: Tom Hammock, Production Designer, Leo Leung Chan, Assistant Editor, Tarek Karkoutly, Assistant Editor, Hunter Venable, Assistant Editor
| CHERRIES: Azazel Jacobs, Producer, Gabriela Gonzalez, Co-Producer, Ava Berkofsky, Cinematographer, Daniella Nowitz, Gaffer, Leslie Bumgarner, Key
Grip | THE CLIMB: Jon Aguirresarobe, Cinematographer | COME SUNDAY: Francesca Galesi, Researcher | DARK MONEY: Rick Rosenthal, Executive Producer |
THE DEVIL WE KNOW: Rick Rosenthal, Executive Producer | DON’T WORRY, HE WON’T GET FAR ON FOOT: Steve Golin, Producer | EIGHTH GRADE: Allison
Jones, Casting, Claire Fowler, Additional Script Supervisor | EMERGENCY: Joenique C. Rose, Producer, Farhad Ahmed Dehlvi, Best Boy | A FUTILE AND STUPID
GESTURE: Allison Jones, Casting Director | GARFIELD: Todd Banhazl, Cinematographer | GENESIS 2.0: Peter Indergand, Cinematographer | HALFWAY THERE:
C O N G R ATU L ATI O N S
Rick Rosenthal, Director, Noah Rosenthal, Cinematographer, Edd Lukas, Additional Cinematographer, Shayar Bhansali, Additional Editor | HEARTS BEAT LOUD: Erin
A F I C O N S E RVAT O RY A L U M N I
Magill, Production Designer | HEREDITARY: Ari Aster, Director/Writer, Pawel Pogorzelski, Cinematographer | HIGH & MIGHTY: Martim Vian, Cinematographer, Chris
A T T H E 2018 S U N D A N C E F I L M F E S T I V A L
Hamilton, Camera Operator, Edd Lukas, Camera Operator, Jeff Powers, Camera Operator, Amanda Treyz, Camera Operator | INVENTING TOMORROW: Diane
Becker, Producer, Berenice Chavez, Assistant Editor, Alison Kelly, Additional Cinematography | LAZERCISM, Patrick Russo, Cinematographer | LEIMERT PARK: Mel
57 ALUMNI
Jones, Executive Producer/Director/Writer (Creator), Gabriela Gonzalez, Line Producer, Cesar Ochoa, Locations, Caleb Tou, Gaffer | THE LONG DUMB ROAD: Edward
39 FIL MS
Salerno Jr., Gaffer | MANDY: Brett W. Bachman, Editor | MATANGI/MAYA/M.I.A.: Catherine Goldschmidt, Cinematographer | THE OSLO DIARIES: Daniella Nowitz,
Camera Operator | PUZZLE: Lynarion Hubbard, Assistant Editor | ROBIN WILLIAMS: COME INSIDE MY MIND: Nick Higgins, Cinematographer, Poppy Das, Editor
| SEEING ALLRED: Roberta Grossman, Director/Producer | THE SHIVERING TRUTH: Tarin Anderson, Visual Consultant | SKATE KITCHEN: Claire Fowler, Additional
Script Supervisor | SPHERES: “SONGS OF SPACETIME”: Darren Aronofsky, Executive Producer/Key Collaborator | THE TALE: Ellen Burstyn, Cast | WAR PAINT:
Katrelle N. Kindred, Director/Writer | WHAT THEY HAD: Holly Dorff, ADR Voice Casting, Brian Wessel, Additional Editor | WHITE RABBIT: Elizabeth Sung, Cast
| WILD WILD WEST: A BEAUTIFUL RANT BY MARK BRADFORD: Dime Davis, Director | WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?: Rick Rosenthal, Executive Producer
SCREENWRITING | DIRECTING | PRODUCING | EDITING | PRODUCTION DESIGN | CINEM ATOGR APHY
Reviews
Television
← Stone, with Paul Reubens, is a writer
ensnared in a love triangle that turns deadly.
Mosaic
CLAUDETTE BARIUS/HBO
Starring Sharon Stone
and Garrett Hedlund, the
HBO miniseries version of
Steven Soderbergh’s
murder-mystery app fails
to satisfy By Tim Goodman
A good rule of thumb is that it’s
always unwise to pass on whatever Steven Soderbergh is up to.
He famously quit making films
to focus entirely on TV, directing every episode of Cinemax’s
The Knick, executive producing a
Starz series based on his film
The Girlfriend Experience and
then pivoting to create an
app-based murder-mystery experience that he agreed to cut into
a limited series for HBO. And
then, of course, he proceeded to
resume making films.
As an app, Mosaic asked users
to follow one narrative path, along
which you could access detours
and alternatives, before arriving
at an “ending” that was essentially the beginning of another
narrative path recounting a different side of the same story (with
the same scenes shot from new
vantage points and characters you
hadn’t really met yet taking center
stage). It was exhausting — seven
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
hours of content overall — especially for viewers easily distracted
or bored, or just hungry for an oldfashioned, linear storyline (though
in that case, why did you download
the app in the first place?).
The HBO version offers up the
story in linear fashion. Successful
but lonely children’s book author
Olivia (Sharon Stone) has a boytoy, Joel (Mudbound’s Garrett
Hedlund), but is then seduced by
con man Eric (Frederick Weller),
who was hired by Olivia’s neighbor
AIRDATE 8 p.m. Monday, Jan. 22 (HBO)
CAST Sharon Stone, Frederick Weller,
Garrett Hedlund, Jennifer Ferrin, Paul
Reubens, Allison Tolman, Beau Bridges
DIRECTOR Steven Soderbergh
79
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
Michael (James Ransone), who
covets her property. Eric ends
up truly falling in love with Olivia
and then backing out of the con,
ill-advisedly coming clean to her.
Olivia flips out, sending remorseful Eric away mere minutes before
she’s murdered.
It’s an attention-grabbing tale.
Unfortunately, the HBO miniseries iteration never quite escapes
the impression that it originated as something else and was
then repurposed. There are some
odd cuts — especially odd given
Soderbergh’s usually precise
storytelling prowess — and
the jumpy, staccato style takes
some getting used to. There
is also an excessive number of
close-ups, probably so that it
would all play better on a phone.
Most problematically, the pace
feels off, though it’s hard to
put your finger on why. Mosaic
intrigues in bits and pieces but
fails to cohere into a unified or
satisfying TV experience.
The writing, from Ed Solomon
(Now You See Me, Charlie’s Angels,
Men in Black), is serviceable if
never subtle, though good mysteries don’t need to be. And
unsurprisingly, Soderbergh gets
excellent performances from
everyone, even if certain
moments register as overwrought
— again, probably because that
worked best for the app.
In the end, that’s the problem
with this post-app version of
Soderbergh’s experiment: Every
instance where something feels
off will make the viewer wonder
if the app may have been better than this more traditional
version, if the removal of the
interactive elements somehow
smudged or skewed the essence
of the endeavor. Perhaps there
are people who used the app and
then will enjoy the HBO episodes,
too, but the likelier scenario is
that neither Mosaic vets nor novices will be fulfilled.
Reviews
Film
12 Strong
THR’S SOCIAL CLIMBERS
A ranking of the week’s top actors, comedians
and personalities based on social media engagement
across Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and more
This
Week
Last
Week
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Last
Week
Comedians
1
←
→ I
1
I
Dwayne Johnson
1
←
→ I
1
I
Kevin Hart
2
←
→ I
2
I
Millie Bobby Brown
2
←
→ I
2
I
Joe Rogan
3
↑ I
-
I
Emma Watson
3
↑ I
5
I
D.L. Hughley
4
↑ I
6
I
Mike Epps
5
↑ I
-
I
Marlon Wayans
The Jerry Bruckheimer-produced, fact-based
actioner starring Chris Hemsworth is simplistic
but rousing and red-state ready By Todd McCarthy
Set in Afghanistan just after 9/11, when a dirty dozen
American Special Forces operatives were dropped in to
take down Taliban and al-Qaida perpetrators, this entertaining, mildly risible real-life-inspired yarn comes
off as much like a Western as a modern war film — right
down to having the Americans ride into battle on horseback. This may be the first big studio release that feels
like it was made by and for Trump’s America, which could
mean muscular business in red states.
Apart from the Pirates of the Caribbean and National
Treasure sequels, this is also the first feature that feels like
a real Jerry Bruckheimer production in at least a decade.
It’s got it all: the military swagger, the high-tech hardware
and the one-dimensional approach to character, geopolitics and military adventurism. Go, USA!
The film is based on an action, fully detailed for the
first time in Doug Stanton’s 2009 book, Horse Soldiers, that
was long classified — a risky incursion of Americans, along
with Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostum’s Northern Alliance of
Afghan fighters, into the Taliban-controlled northern town
of Mazar-i-Sharif. The objective was clear: Take the town,
and you control the North.
With Thor himself, aka Chris Hemsworth, leading the
charge, how can the outcome be in doubt? Still, as
Hemsworth’s Capt. Mitch Nelson puts it, “There is no playbook here. We’re gonna have to write it ourselves.” A few
team members are played by recognizable actors — Michael
Shannon, Michael Pena and Trevante Rhodes — but little
effort is made to differentiate them, so it’s Hemsworth’s
show and he’s up to the task: charismatic, confident, jokey, a
Kentucky boy who just wants to get the job done and return
to his wife and daughter.
The script by Ted Tally (The Silence of the Lambs) and
Peter Craig (two Hunger Games entries) is tight. The biggest
challenge for some of the Americans was the one thing
they weren’t trained for: riding horses, the ordinary means
of transport in this difficult
OPENS Friday, Jan. 19
terrain. All the same, the tone is
(Warner Bros.)
familiar and unvarying — it’s
CAST Chris Hemsworth,
Michael Shannon, Michael
all macho, all the time. Danish
Pena, Navid Negahban,
commercials wiz Nicolai Fuglsig,
Trevante Rhodes, William
directing his first feature, does
Fichtner, Geoff Stults
a capable job getting the action
DIRECTOR Nicolai Fuglsig
convincingly on the screen.
Rated R, 130 minutes
This
Week
Actors
In her first Instagram
posts since June, she
announced her support for
the Time’s Up legal defense
fund battling harassment
and assault, posting multiple
times about the fund and
from the Globes red carpet.
She accrued 18 million Instagram favorites.
“As an alumni of In Living
Color, I must say this was
dooooope as fuck,” wrote
Wayans on Instagram,
posting part of Bruno Mars
and Cardi B’s new “Finesse”
music video that honors the
’90s sketch show. Wayans’
Instagram favorites jumped
153 percent to 389,000.
4
↓ I
3
I
Finn Wolfhard
5
↑ I
9
I
Gal Gadot
6
↑ I
11
I
Dove Cameron
6
↑ I
-
I
Bill Maher
7
←
→ I
7
I
Noah Schnapp
7
↑ I
8
I
Ricky Gervais
8
↑ I
20
I
Gaten Matarazzo
8
↑ I
9
I
Kumail Nanjiani
9
↓ I
6
I
Jennifer Lopez
9
↑ I
10
I
Amy Schumer
10
↓ I
4
I
Kevin Hart
10
↓ I
4
I
Colleen Ballinger
11
↑ I
25
I
Ian Somerhalder
12
↑ I
18
I
Lily Collins
13
↓ I
10
I
Hugh Jackman
14
↓ I
12
I
Nina Dobrev
15
↑ I
-
I
Reese Witherspoon
Witherspoon tweeted that
it was “the deepest honor”
to give Oprah Winfrey the
Cecil B. DeMille Award at
the Globes, sharing a
portion of Winfrey’s viral
speech. With that and other
tweets from the ceremony,
she earned 231,000 likes, a
461 percent boost.
16
↓ I
14
I
Lucy Hale
17
↑ I
23
I
Vanessa Hudgens
18
↑ I
-
I
Caleb McLaughlin
19
↑ I
-
I
Zac Efron
20
↓ I
8
I
Priyanka Chopra
21
↓ I
13
I
Cara Delevingne
22
↑ I
-
I
Bella Thorne
23
↑ I
-
I
Shay Mitchell
24
↑ I
-
I
Deepika Padukone
25
↑ I
-
I
Jason Momoa
80
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
This
Week
Last
Week
TV Personalities
1
↑ I
2
I
Joanna Gaines
2
↑ I
-
I
Chip Gaines
Though his wife usually
steals the spotlight
on the this chart, Gaines
re-enters one spot below
her with 1.7 million
Instagram favorites after
a Jan. 2 post showing off
Joanna’s baby bump and
announcing that their
fifth child is on the way.
3
↑ I
7
I
Jake Tapper
4
↓ I
3
I
Tamera Mowry
5
↑ I
-
I
Jimmy Fallon
6
←
→ I
6
I
Gordon Ramsay
7
↑ I
-
I
Stephen Colbert
8
↑ I
-
I
Tyra Banks
9
↓ I
1
I
Chelsea Handler
10
←
→ I
10
I
Steve Harvey
Data Compiled By
Source: The week’s most active and talked-about entertainers on
leading social networking sites Facebook, Google Plus, Instagram,
Twitter and YouTube for the week ending Jan. 10. Rankings are based
on a formula blending weekly additions of fans as well as cumulative
weekly reactions and conversations, as tracked by MVP Index.
12: DAVID JAMES/WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT. WATSON: JB LACROIX/WIREIMAGE. WAYANS: JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE. WITHERSPOON: STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. GAINES: ROY ROCHLIN/FILMMAGIX.
Hemsworth
plays Capt.
Mitch Nelson,
who led a
U.S. Special
Forces team
into
Afghanistan
on a high-risk
mission.
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Backlot
Innovators, Events, Honors
‘I’m Not Looking to Fill
a Quota, I’m Looking for
Quality’ Universal chief
Donna Langley on Get Out
and film’s future By Pamela McClintock
Awards
Season
U
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
82
↑ Langley, who has been with the studio since
2001, was named chairman in 2013.
What are your goals for 2018?
Oh gosh, nothing that I can tell you
on the record. (Laughs.) But the
landscape is shifting — just look at
Disney’s bid for Fox. As a company,
we are very well positioned with
our owners and with our management team to meet the challenges of
the current climate and figure out
the solution. That’s certainly what
we’re all putting our heads together
about as business leaders, with
[Universal Filmed Entertainment
Group chairman] Jeff Shell leading
the charge.
How do you think the Disney-Fox
union would change the landscape?
I have no idea because it’s unclear
how the [merged] company is going
to run — who is going to be doing
what, and what kinds of movies
they’re going to be making. Buying
the rest of the Marvel universe, that
seems like a good fit. But it’s too
early to tell. Consolidation potentially brings turmoil.
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
FILMS AND
FILMMAKERS
BEING FETED
AVA DUVERNAY
The filmmaker behind Selma
and the upcoming A Wrinkle in
Time will be honored with the
PGA’s Visionary Award.
RYAN MURPHY
The prolific TV force behind
American Crime Story and
Feud will receive the Norman
Lear Achievement Award.
CHARLES ROVEN
The David O. Selznick
Achievement honor will go to
the veteran producer, whose
work includes Wonder Woman.
GET OUT
The Stanley Kramer Award,
focused on a project that
raises social issues, will go to
Jordan Peele’s racial satire.
LANGLEY: MILLER MOBLEY. MURPHY: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES.
niversal Pictures chairI don’t open a script and say, “OK,
man Donna Langley has
this is the one that hits the diversity angle.” Like I always say, I’m
steered the studio ship
not looking to fill a quota, I’m lookduring a tumultuous time for the
ing for quality. It’s about putting
film industry, with hits includfamiliar stories in the hands of origiing Jordan Peele’s Get Out (which
nal voices, and therefore it becomes
grossed $254 million against a
something slightly different.
$4.5 million production budget)
and Girls Trip, which was one of
the few comedies that clicked in
Have movies gotten easier to make,
2017, earning $139 million against
or harder?
a $19 million budget. And The Fate
What is increasingly under siege
of the Furious — the eighth installis how much money you spend
ment in the franchise — was the
to make a movie. The audience is
year’s No. 3 film at the
becoming more discernglobal box office ($1.236 biling because they have
PGA Awards
lion). Langley, 49, who is
other avenues to entertain
Jan. 20
involved in the new Time’s
themselves. The digital
Beverly Hilton
Up initiative, is one of only
platforms are friction-free
two women currently run— you can just sit on the
ning a Hollywood film studio, a gig
couch and watch a movie. We have
she’s held since 2013. Ahead of
to deliver movies that are worthy
being honored with the Producers
of being seen in a theater. We’re
Guild of America’s Milestone Award,
not Disney — we don’t have a long
she spoke about the changes comroster of giant global franchises.
ing in 2018 and the pressing issues
We certainly have some nice ones,
facing the industry.
but in order for us to do what we
do, we have to make other kinds
of movies that are targeting a very
Was Get Out a big risk?
specific audience and that have
It wasn’t a big risk financially
the potential to break out if they’re
because there was no way we could
executed to a high degree. We’ve
lose. It was a year before the election
made a real business out of that
when we greenlighted it, and we
kind of diversity.
had a real conversation about how
it would be received in the marketplace and whether it would be
What does it mean for the film
alienating. Obviously, Jordan knew
industry that Disney is aggressively
in his mind exactly what movie
moving into the streaming space?
he was making. The picture wasn’t
There’s more opportunity. The
completely clear to us, however,
potential of over-the-top platforms
and we didn’t have any idea it would
means movies that aren’t considbecome the phenomenon it was.
ered worthy of a theatrical release
— and all of the risk and financial
outlay — can be made for a streamHow do you go about finding these
ing service. That’s not a bad thing.
diverse stories?
Backlot
Awards
Season
‘Let’s Get the World Right’
Casting vet Victoria Thomas on
building stories, one face at a time
2
3
By Rebecca Ford
to life. The Los Angeles native, who first
found her love of casting while studying
film at UCLA, will be honored with the Hoyt
Bowers Award for outstanding contribution to the casting profession at the Casting
Society of America’s 33rd annual Artios
Awards, held Jan. 18 with simultaneous events
in New York and L.A.
Would you say your job has gotten easier or
harder with the way the business has changed
over the years?
1
1 Thomas was photographed Nov. 17 at The Fig House in L.A.
2 Smith in Detroit. 3 Washington and Viola Davis in Fences.
said that wasn’t a reason to pass. Even after
we got him on tape, we were still considering him and other actors for all the parts. We
took weeks mixing and matching to decide
whom we wanted to play what.
Easier on a process level because of email
— not having to wait for actors to pick up
Diversity has been a big topic of discussion in
sides. I do miss going through headshots,
casting since the #OscarsSoWhite issue. How has
one by one — the physical act of going
that affected your work?
CSA Artios
through them. I like to see what
In the past, you maybe had to try to
Awards
people have done; that is valuable to
pry open some minds about how peoJan. 18
me. It’s also gotten harder just because
ple of color do all sorts of things and
Beverly Hilton
casting is done by committee, espeare all types of people. Today, it’s not
Hotel, L.A.
cially in some television. It sometimes
necessarily casting directors bringStage 48,
NYC
gets a little less personal, and with
ing it up — it’s the studio or network.
some television, to be honest, it just
They’re finding it more important
becomes about the 20 people who have to
than it was five years ago. My feeling is that it’s
make this decision. You have to adjust to that.
about getting the world right, whatever that
world is, and some of those worlds may not be
diverse. If that is the case, then that’s the case.
What’s a role from a film of yours that took you
a long time to cast, and how did you finally do it? It’s not about diversity for diversity’s sake —
let’s get the world right.
It took us about four months to cast Algee
Smith as Larry [in Detroit]. He was doing the
New Edition movie, and his dad thought he was Has the sexual harassment scandal affected
too busy and didn’t have time to audition, so
casting? For example, would an actor reading a
they passed. We read a lot of people — profes- sex scene be met with more concern today?
sional actors, nonprofessional actors, singers,
Most casting directors have always tried to
acting students from performing arts colleges
be sensitive to those types of scenes when
and high schools, so that took time. As we went
you’re reading them — where there is nudity
further into the casting process, we went over
or sexually suggestive scenes. Especially since
actors who passed to see if there was anyone we a lot of casting directors are women, we’ve
could re-approach. When I found out the reaalways been a little protective of actors and
son Algee had passed, I called his manager and
actresses coming in to do those sorts of things.
What do you love most about your work?
THEY’VE ALSO BOOKED ROLES AS HONOREES
LYNN STALMASTER AWARD
Kevin Huvane
Longtime client Nicole Kidman
will present the CAA partner and
managing director with the award
named after the first casting director
to win an honorary Oscar.
MARION DOUGHERTY NEW YORK
APPLE AWARD
Barry Levinson
The honor will be presented in New
York to the Oscar-winning director of Rain Man and prolific producer
(HBO’s The Wizard of Lies).
Photographed by Sami Drasin
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
84
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
I love being in the room with actors and actually doing the thing that is going to potentially
get them the part — going though the scenes
and acting with them. The job can be very
challenging and it’s hard sometimes, and we
all work really hard, but are you kidding me?
I’m lucky to have worked with the directors
that I have worked with and the films I’ve been
a part of.
DETROIT: FRANCOIS DUHAMEL/UNIVERSAL PICTURES. FENCES: DAVID LEE/PARAMOUNT PICTURES. HUVANE: KEVIN MAZUR/GETTY IMAGES. LEVINSON: DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES.
O
ver the years, casting director
Victoria Thomas has helped a slew
of auteur filmmakers, including
Kathryn Bigelow (Detroit), Denzel Washington
(Fences), Tim Burton (Edward Scissorhands)
and Quentin Tarantino (Django Unchained),
find just the right actor to bring their stories
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FOR PROVIDING THE 2017 WOMEN IN ENTERTAINMENT GIFT BAG AND
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C A N D I D R O U N D TA B L E S W I T H T O P F I L M TA L E N T
THE DIRECTORS
From Left: Joe Wright, Guillermo Del Toro, Patty Jenkins, Anjelina Jolie, Denis Villeneuve, Greta Gerwig
with
DIRECTORS JANUARY 21
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89 Years of THR
Memorable moments from a storied history
1 9788
199799
1980
199 8 1
19
9 82
1983
1984
4
1988 5
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
0
1991
199
92
1 999 3
199
94
1 999 5
1999 6
199 977
199 988
In 1988, Oprah and Donald First Crossed Paths
Oprah Winfrey, 63, and Donald
Trump, 71, have a history that
stretches back long before the
recent speculation — ignited by
her fiery Golden Globes speech
— that she could challenge him
in the 2020 election. Just two
years after her talk show went
national, the future media mogul
had the future president of the
United States — whose fame
had risen after the publication
of his 1987 book, The Art of the
Deal — appear as a guest. (When
The Oprah Winfrey Show launched
Sept. 8, 1986, on L.A.’s KABC as
a replacement for Tom Snyder
and a new challenger to Phil
Donahue’s daytime dominance,
THR’s review said it was “heavily slanted towards the realm of
pop psychology” and was “not
exactly the apogee of intellectualism, but it doesn’t bill itself
as such.”) On the April 25, 1988,
show, Winfrey asked Trump
about full-page newspaper ads
he’d taken out attacking U.S. foreign policy. When she said their
content sounded like “political
presidential talk,” Trump replied,
“Probably not, but I do get tired
of seeing the country get ripped
off.” (He stressed topics like allies
taking trade advantage of the U.S.
and not paying their fair share for
defense — the same issues he ran
on in the 2016 election.) When
Winfrey asked if he thought he’d
win a presidential bid, Trump
answered: “Well, I don’t know, I
think I’d win. I’ll tell you what:
I wouldn’t go in to lose. I’ve
never gone in to lose in my life.”
And while his affection might
diminish if Winfrey runs against
him in 2020 (he appeared on her
show nine times), when asked by
Larry King on CNN in 1999 if he
“had a vice presidential candidate
in mind,” Trump replied: “Oprah.
I love Oprah. Oprah would always
be my first choice.” Asked Jan. 9
in the Cabinet Room how he felt
about a Trump-Winfrey matchup,
the president said, “I’d beat Oprah
… [but] I don’t think she’s going
to run.” — BILL HIGGINS
The Hollywood Reporter, Vol. CDXXIV, No. 3 (ISSN 0018-3660; USPS 247-580) is published weekly; 39 issues — two issues in April, July, October and December; three issues in January and June; four issues in February, March, May, August and September; and five issues in November — with 15 special issues:
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T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
88
J A N U A R Y 1 7, 2 01 8
JEFFREY ASHER/GETTY IMAGES
↑ Trump and Winfrey sat next to promoter Don King (far right) at the Mike Tyson-Michael Spinks fight in Atlantic City on June 27, 1988, two months after Trump was a guest on her daytime talk show.
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