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The Hollywood Reporter - March 21, 2018

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March 21, 2018
‘I Was Extorted
Out of My Job’
John Skipper’s ESPN exit
and cocaine mea culpa
Stylist Ashley Weston
and Chadwick Boseman
in New York City.
Stars of St yle
2 0 1 8
25 MOST
POWERFUL
RED CARPET
TASTEMAKERS
Vice’s Adult
in the Room
MGM CEO Sacked
Roseanne
Ret urns?!
by tom arnold
Issue No. 11, March 21, 2018
FEATURES
56 The 25 Most Powerful
Stylists in Hollywood
74 I Was Extorted Out of
‘the Best Job in Sports’
Do fashion and feminism
still match? Hell yes, say the
tastemakers who’ve treaded
carefully through the most
sensitive awards season ever.
After abruptly resigning
as president of ESPN in
December, John Skipper
finally reveals the cocaine
habit, lapsed judgment
and extortion plot that
forced his anguished exit
from Disney after
27 years: “I put Bob Iger in
an untenable position.”
64 ‘You Don’t Get on
the Best Dressed List
Overnight’
56
Ansel Elgort (left) and
stylist John Tan were
photographed March 2
at The 1896 in Brooklyn.
On Elgort: Louis Vuitton
shirt, pants and sneakers.
On Tan: Louis Vuitton shirt,
Haider Ackermann pants,
Paul Andrew shoes.
THR’s first Stylist Roundtable
reveals red carpet challenges,
from the Golden Globes’
“battle of the black dress” to
designers about-facing on
rising stars to losing money
during awards season.
SEE YOU IN 2 WEEKS
The next issue publishes April 4. Keep up
with breaking news, reviews and video
at THR.com and sign up for THR’s Today in
Entertainment newsletter.
Photographed by David Needleman
10
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Issue No. 11, March 21, 2018
52
A rendering of the
new stadium for
the expansion L.A.
Football Club in
Exposition Park.
23 Vice Media’s New Adult
in the Room
Nancy Dubuc takes the reins
from Shane Smith with
an eye toward broadening the
appeal of the company beyond
a young male audience.
ABOUT TOWN
33 Hollywood’s Stealth
Support of the March:
‘It’s Important This
Not Be the Celebrity Show’
A-listers from Oprah to
Spielberg are signing
checks and stepping back
to support the March
for Our Lives on March 24.
THE BUSINESS
44 Creative Space:
Tom Werner
Comedy’s onetime kingmaker (and now the
Red Sox chairman) is back
with a Roseanne revival —
and plenty of great tales.
46 TV Pilot Season
Confidential: Hiring Talent
in the Time’s Up Era
Six casting chiefs dish
on pay parity, the roles they
struggled to cast and the
hires that have them envious.
STYLE
50
50 Givenchy’s ‘Marriage’
to Audrey Hepburn
Today’s red carpet style
owes its start to the late
designer’s relationship
with a star, writes historian Bronwyn Cosgrave.
Hepburn with designer
Hubert de Givenchy
during production of
Funny Face; he
created her wardrobe
for the 1957 film.
52 Beyond the ‘Black
Beverly Hills’ for
South L.A.’s Insecure
Generation
Issa Rae isn’t the only
industry player putting
down roots in neighborhoods where Lenny Kravitz
and Tina Turner have
lived: Prices are soaring
and diverse buyers are
discovering historic homes,
A-list views and “strong
family feel.”
REVIEWS
44
79 Roseanne
THIS WEEK ON THR VIDEO
Watch Hollywood’s fashion masterminds
reveal behind-the-scenes secrets.
ABC’s revival of the sitcom
may not have the original’s edge, but the cast is as
compelling as ever.
Roseanne “was so
special, and the bar
was so high,” says
Werner, photographed
Jan. 30 in his
Santa Monica ofice.
CORRECTION Merv Grifin and Eva Gabor
were never married (THR 3/7).
Photographed by Michele Thomas
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
12
M A RC H 21, 2018
RENDERING: GENSLER. GIVENCHY: DAVID SEYMOUR/MAGNUM PHOTOS.
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of April for the final
judging round of the
Peabody Awards,
which will be presented
May 19 in New York.
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REBECCA SUN
moderated a panel
on Asian-American
representation
in storytelling — with
Agents of SHIELD’s
Chloe Bennet, Crazy
Ex-Girlfriend producer
Sono Patel and
graphic novelist Gene
Luen Yang — on
March 20 at the Netflix
building in Hollywood.
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T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
14
M A RC H 21, 2018
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Chu. Read them at
THR.com/filmart.
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T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
16
M A RC H 21, 2018
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Contributors
TOO MUCH RED CARPET STYLE FOR ONE COVER
1 GAL GADOT (RIGHT)
AND ELIZABETH STEWART
Photographed by Sami
Drasin on March 1 at the
Beverly Hills Women’s Club.
“Fashion comes and goes.
But style is something that’s in
you,” says the Wonder Woman
star. Adds Stewart, her Santa
Monica-based stylist: “Gal is
very confident, so fittings go
quickly. She’ll put something
on, and she knows it looks
good, and we are done.”
On Gadot: Givenchy dress.
On Stewart: Givenchy jacket,
blouse and pants.
2 CHADWICK BOSEMAN AND
ASHLEY WESTON
Photographed by Zenith
Richards on March 1 at 632
on Hudson in New York.
The Black Panther lead tops
best-dressed lists thanks
to the bold hues and graphic
prints chosen for him by his
bicoastal stylist. “With Ashley,
I don’t have to think about it
— and that’s the whole point,”
says Boseman. The pair have
worked together since 2014.
On Weston: DSquared2 dress, IWC
watch and David Yurman jewelry.
On Boseman: DSquared2 jacket, shirt
and pants.
1
2
3 SAOIRSE RONAN (LEFT) AND
ELIZABETH SALTZMAN
Photographed by Brigitte
Sire on March 2 at The
101 Cofee Shop in Hollywood.
“E can always tell when I love
something because I’ll stand in
it in a certain way and I’ll just
naturally know how to move,”
says Ronan, who refers to
her secret style weapon by
her first initial. The Londonbased Saltzman has been
collaborating with the Lady
Bird star since 2016.
On Ronan: Ralph & Russo dress,
Jacquie Aiche earrings, Jimmy Choo
shoes. On Saltzman: Michael Kors
blouse, sweater and pants, Ivy
earrings, Giuseppe Zanotti shoes.
4 ELLE FANNING (RIGHT)
AND SAMANTHA MCMILLEN
3
Photographed by Diego
Uchitel on March 8 at Line
204 Studios in Hollywood.
There was no shortage of
couture gowns, but Fanning
showed up to set in a hot pink
Juicy sweatsuit. “[Elle] is
a unicorn because there’s no
one like her and she doesn’t
want to be like anybody else,”
says McMillen, Fanning’s
stylist for six years. Notes the
Beguiled star: “The red carpet
is my safe zone, where you’re
admired for your uniqueness.”
4
1 Sarah Paulson and
Mahershala Ali toasted
2017’s THR power
stylists at The Ponte.
2 From left: Justin
Timberlake with his
stylist Annie Psaltiras
and Jonah Hill at the
2017 event.
2
1
20
THR’S STARS OF STYLE: THE EVENT
The 25 Most Powerful Stylists in Hollywood were revealed
March 20 at a dinner for honorees and their A-list clients hosted
by THR’s Carol McColgin and Booth Moore in partnership
with Jimmy Choo creative director Sandra Choi at the Lenny
Kravitz-designed Stanley House above the Sunset Strip. Follow
#THRStylists for exclusive coverage online.
ALI, HILL: BILLY FARRELL/BFA.COM.
On Fanning and McMillen:
Rodarte dresses and jewelry.
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The Re ort
Television
‘No Quotes’
How a new law is impacting
talent negotiations p. 24
↑ Moguls
Behind the Headlines
Where’s Rupert?
Injured Murdoch may be
testing retirement p. 28
Heat Index
Kevin Mayer (left) and
Bob Chapek
The Disney executives earn
expanded portfolios in a reorg
that puts them in competition
to replace CEO Bob Iger when
his contract expires in 2021.
MURDOCH: TAYLOR HILL/WIREIMAGE. MAYER: BECK STARR/WIREIMAGE. CHAPEK: RICHARD HARBAUGH/DISNEYLAND RESORT VIA GETTY IMAGES. BAILEY: KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY
IMAGES. OLIVER: JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE. ZUCKERBERG: KIMBERLY WHITE/GETTY IMAGES FOR BREAKTHROUGH PRIZE. SANDBERG: RACHEL MURRAY/GETTY IMAGES FOR MAKERS.
John Bailey
The Academy president
stays mum as the organization
begins an investigation into
claims of harassment leveled
at the cinematographer.
Can a New Leader Take Vice
From ‘Puberty Into Adulthood’?
John Oliver
HBO’s Last Week Tonight host
hits No. 1 on Amazon with his
gay bunny children’s book
taking aim at Vice President
Mike Pence.
As A+E chief Nancy Dubuc steps in to succeed CEO Shane Smith, she will
need to help turn around the Viceland network, decide whether to go public and
improve a corporate culture wracked by #MeToo turmoil BY NATALIE JARVEY
I
Mark Zuckerberg and
Sheryl Sandberg
The Facebook founder and
COO face a harsh spotlight
from Congress after reports
reveal 50 million user profiles
were accessed by a U.K.based analytics firm working
for the Trump 2016 campaign.
Showbiz Stocks
$39 (+2%)
VIACOM (VIAB)
Analyst Laura Martin of
Needham upgrades the stock
to “buy” on the assumption
that a cost-cutting efort will
save $100 million this year.
$4.86 (-6%)
PANDORA MEDIA (P)
Investors are selling shares of
the music service ahead of
April’s IPO for Spotify that will
infuse the rival with capital
and erase its debt.
n May 2015, Shane Smith
made an eyebrow-raising
admission: He told the
Financial Times that he was considering stepping down as CEO
of Vice Media even as the brand
was in the midst of a campaign
to reach near-global ubiquity
through its digital brands, eponymous HBO show and forthcoming
cable network. The following year,
Smith and his family decamped
from New York to a renovated
$23 million home in Santa Monica
as he took a step back from daily
management of Vice.
It would take another two
years, a revenue shortfall brought
about by an industrywide advertising slowdown and a sexual
harassment scandal that vaulted
Vice into the crosshairs of the
#MeToo movement before Smith
finally was ready to let go. In his
March 13 memo revealing that
he would transition to executive
chairman to make way for A+E
Networks chief and Vice board
member Nancy Dubuc to succeed
him as CEO, he praised Dubuc
as an “operator extraordinaire.”
As is often the case at the
beginning of a marriage, Smith,
48, and Dubuc, 49, have been
profuse in their praise for each
other, but what type of working
relationship they will develop
remains to be seen. “They won’t
last 18 months without killing
each other,” snipes one insider.
Both executives are known
to act swiftly, boldly and often
from the hip, which can prove
impactful when managing as
individuals but becomes trickier
when attempting to do so in tandem. Smith, in his memo to staff,
characterized his pairing with
Dubuc as a “modern-day Bonnie
and Clyde,” but, notes the insider,
“everyone knows how Bonnie and
Clyde ended.”
Employees got a glimpse of
their new future March 16, when
Dubuc made the rounds at Vice’s
Brooklyn headquarters for a casual
meet-and-greet that sources say
left her soon-to-be staff, eager
for a hands-on leader following
Smith’s move west, feeling hopeful. Internally, Dubuc is being
positioned as a complement to
Vice’s existing leadership team,
but it’s not yet clear what leverage she will have to reorient the
company for the long term, with
Smith still involved in content
production and dealmaking from
across the country.
Dubuc — with her track record
of picking hits, be it Duck Dynasty
or Pawn Stars — is said to be
Illustration by Matt Collins
March 12-19
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
23
M A RC H 21, 2018
The Report
Behind the Headlines
enthusiastic about the possibilities for content production that
Vice has established in-house,
including twin HBO shows Vice,
re-upped through season seven,
and Vice News Tonight. “She sees
it as a content machine,” says
a Dubuc confidant, who expects
she’ll push more aggressively
on Vice’s output of docs, TV series
and branded content. As for
Smith, Tom Freston, MTV founder
and Vice board member, says that
the executive shuffle will “free up
Shane to focus single-mindedly”
on Vice News “as well as rainmaking the big revenue deals.”
One added complication is
the already frayed relationship
between Dubuc and the A+E board,
which includes Disney and Hearst
executives who maintain a stake in
Vice. The board is said to have been
frustrated by Dubuc’s public flirtation with Amazon. Two sources
suggest Vice had for several weeks
been her plan B. Smith, who was
looking for a lifeline for Vice in the
Left: Smith (left)
with Action
Bronson, host of
Fuck, That’s
Delicious on
Viceland; Vice
News Tonight’s
newsmaking
episode about
Charlottesville.
form of a female leader amid its
#MeToo era turmoil and the resignation of several top executives,
already had begun the outreach.
And now, having “overplayed her
hand at A+E,” as one insider puts
it, Dubuc found that she could use
a new opportunity. Per sources,
tensions between Dubuc and the
A+E board rose still more when
board members found out that she
was exiting for a top job at Vice via
a call from a reporter.
The Vice that Dubuc inherits
has ballooned to 3,000 employees as it has expanded its digital
and linear channels internationally, part of an effort to justify
its ever-multiplying valuation
($5.7 billion after a $450 million infusion from private equity
firm TPG in 2017) to its stable
of media investors, including
Fox, Disney and A+E. Following
a year in which Vice is said to
have missed its revenue projections by more than $100 million,
Dubuc will need to assess whether
Smith’s oft-discussed plan to
take the company public is viable.
Adding to the challenge, Dubuc
will be tasked with evaluating the
effectiveness of early efforts to
improve Vice’s corporate culture, including the creation of a
female-led advisory board and
a commitment to achieving pay
parity, following a string of sexual
harassment allegations.
Turning around the 2-year-old
Viceland cable network that Vice
launched in partnership with A+E
will be a top priority for Dubuc.
The low-rated network, which has
focused on courting an elusive
young-male audience, took a hit in
January when Rogers Media abandoned a $100 million joint venture
with Vice that had brought the
channel to Canada, where the Vice
brand was founded. And though
several of Viceland’s domestic carriage deals are set to run through
2021, insiders seem to think Dubuc
has only another year or so to right
that ship.
Observers seem to agree that
Dubuc, who is no stranger to Vice
after three years on the board, has
the chops to lead the company’s
next chapter. Says MediaLink CEO
Michael Kassan, whose advisory
firm has counted Vice and A+E as
clients, “This is a company that’s
moving out of puberty into adulthood, and Nancy has got the ability
to take that next step while at the
same time capturing the je ne sais
quoi of Shane.”
Lacey Rose contributed to
this report.
How Actors Are Benefiting From a ‘No Quotes’ Law
alifornia’s new law banning employers from
C
asking potential hires about their previous salary is helping to close the gender pay gap among
actors this pilot season. It’s also uncovering a
pervasive inequality in what non-white stars were
earning as well as boosting the paydays for belowthe-line employees.
The legislation, which went into efect Jan. 1,
bans studios from seeking salary history — aka
an actor’s “quote” — in a bid to help narrow the
gender pay gap and achieve parity. That instead
forces the negotiation to focus on an actor’s skill,
stature, social media profile and the demands
of the role, among other factors. This is a fundamental change in how business has been done
during the broadcast networks’ annual pilot season, when more than 70 comedies and dramas
compete for the same pool of talent.
Top stars are not being impacted, say reps.
Instead, some sources say the legislation has
provided salary boosts to women and diverse
actors in midlevel roles in a season in which
broadcasters have put a renewed emphasis on
female-fronted fare and onscreen inclusion.
Those actors traditionally have been bound by
their quotes.
“What I’ve seen in the film side and through this
TV pilot season is that we’ve been unshackled
from being primarily a quote-driven business,” says
talent attorney Rick Genow, who estimates he’s
seen anywhere from a 10 percent to 20 percent pay
increase in the deals women and non-white actors
have secured this pilot season. “I’ve been doing
this for 26 years and had my eyes opened because
it’s uncovered a bit of what was a pervasive
inequality in what women and minority actors were
being paid that was not as obvious before.”
Others on the talent side say the legislation
is a double-edged sword, as the inability to ask
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
24
M A RC H 21, 2018
for quotes has turned the negotiation process
into “Kabuki theater,” where most involved
know what actors were paid previously but can’t
discuss it. “It hurts people with high quotes and
makes it harder for them because [their salaries]
are being looked at again as studios were cutting those quotes anyway,” says one top agent.
Still, casting directors at the major networks
and studios who participated in TV’s annual
pilot season tell THR as part of a pilot season
survey (see page 46) that the change hasn’t
impacted salaries as a whole because their overall
budgets largely remain the same.
Instead, they say the law has led to
an elongated casting process that
stems from extra rounds of salary
negotiations with lawyers, agents
Sanchez
and business afairs execs. (At press
time, a large percentage of pilots had yet to complete casting.)
Adds Fox executive vp casting Tessa
Sanchez, “I like the idea that people that have
done good work are now getting pay equity for
doing the same job.”
BRONSON: KEVIN MAZUR/GETTY IMAGES FOR THE WEBBY AWARDS. SANCHEZ: TASIA WELLS/GETTY IMAGES. VICE: COURTESY OF HBO.
As new California legislation bans employers from seeking salary history, some agents privately worry about
‘Kabuki theater’ in talent negotiations, while others see the gender pay gap narrowing BY LESLEY GOLDBERG
The Report
Behind the Headlines
As mobile viewing grows, Netflix, Hulu and Amazon are experimenting more
with 10- to 15-minute programs amid a depressed digital ad market
BY NATALIE JARVEY
I
n fall 2015, Verizon held a star-studded
party headlined by Kanye West as part of
a no-expenses-spared launch of streaming app go90, a plan that included spending
hundreds of millions of dollars on shortform
programming. Dozens of streaming services
— including now-defunct ones like Comcast’s
Watchable and Fullscreen — joined to produce 10- to 15-minute shows. That market was
short-lived, however, as subscribers failed to
materialize and digital-advertising competition from Google and Facebook made it hard to
recoup budgets.
Now Hollywood’s digital producers are betting big on buyers with even deeper pockets:
Netflix, Amazon and Hulu. In recent months,
the major streamers have experimented with
show formats and lengths, whether through
Amazon’s deal to fund Funny or Die-produced
short films or Netflix’s plan for 15-minute
comedy specials — not to mention its expansive deal with Jerry Seinfeld that includes
24 new episodes of Comedians in Cars Getting
Coffee (which range from nine to 23 minutes
each). Hulu, meanwhile, has begun taking
meetings with digital producers as it explores
what programming chief Joel Stillerman calls
“an emerging content lane.” Shortform shows
“might get people to interface with our platform for reasons other than to watch an entire
episode of television,” Stillerman says.
This investment in so-called “snackable”
What New U.S. Streaming
Subscribers Are Watching First
Adventure
Sci-fi
Thriller
Comedy
6%
19%
9%
9%
HULU
8%
NETFLIX
8%
10%
16%
Animation
Crime
11%
21%
Drama
Mystery
Source: 7Park Data
‘He Is Not Creative’: Why MGM Cut CEO Gary Barber
A rift between board chairman Keith Ulrich and the studio’s top exec grew significantly in recent months BY PAUL BOND
ven by Hollywood standards, MGM’s firing of CEO Gary
E
Barber on March 19 was dramatic, catching Barber himself
of-guard. While the company remains mum, insiders tell THR
that an unbridgeable gap had grown between Barber and board
chairman Kevin Ulrich, whose Anchorage Capital Management
is MGM’s largest investor.
When Barber was hired to run the then-struggling home of
the James Bond franchise in 2010, it was on the assumption
he’d whip the studio into shape, then sell it. But eight years later,
Ulrich has had a change of heart, while Barber still believes a
sale is in the best interest of shareholders, which include himself, Highland Capital Management and Solus Alternative Asset
Management. Ulrich had been sizing up an exec to replace
Barber about a year ago, but unable to find a suitable choice, the
board agreed in October to extend Barber’s contract through
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Barber
26
2022, making the firing all the more bafling. Two sources say
Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co., an MGM banker,
backed Ulrich’s move to oust Barber.
In recent years, Barber hasn’t grown the top or bottom line. In
2016, revenue of $1.2 billion was the lowest in five years, while
profit of $155.2 million was less than the previous year and
only marginally better than in 2014. Barber also put himself
in a bind by championing Ben-Hur (2016), which lost about
$120 million for MGM and partner Paramount Pictures, and he
needed to redeem himself with Tomb Raider. His fate may have
been sealed when the $94 million film opened to $24 million
domestically March 16. According to a source, Ulrich has said
that Barber “has done a good job of stabilizing the situation
financially and getting the place downsized, but he is not creative. He’s not the guy to take the place to the next level.”
M A RC H 21, 2018
NETFLIX, HULU, AMAZON: COURTESY OF NETWORKS. MGM: AP PHOTO/DAMIAN DOVARGANES. MAN: ISTOCK. BARBER: ALLEN BEREZOVSKY/GETTY IMAGES.
Streamers Take a New Bite
Out of ‘Snackable’ Shows
programming comes as mobile video viewing
is expected to grow to nearly a quarter of all
video viewing in 2018, per research firm eMarketer. Digital series, often sold as 10-minute
episodes in blocks of 10, also are a cost-effective way to keep fickle young viewers engaged
between, say, new seasons of Stranger Things.
The average cost of a digital project is typically about $10,000 per minute but can stretch
higher than $20,000 if a project warrants.
Those budgets might have been more than
the digital ad market could support, but they
are a fraction of the billions of dollars that
Netflix content chief Ted Sarandos and rivals
have earmarked for programming annually.
The interest in shortform isn’t expected to
stop with the established streamers, either. In
addition to Jeffrey Katzenberg, who is seeking
to build a business around premium shortform video with his new company, WndrCo,
executives at HBO and Disney’s forthcoming
streaming service also are said to be open to
buying shows of varying lengths. “Thank
God,” sighs one digital executive. “It was starting to feel dismal for not just my business but
for Hollywood.”
TM & © 2018 Turner Festivals, Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.
The Report
Behind the Headlines
Broadcast TV
Cable TV
Domestic
International
Gross Cume % Chg Gross Cume
18-49
Live+3
Viewership
Live+3
1.
Total
Black Panther DISNEY
26.6 605(5) -35 30*57 577.1 1.18B
Ryan Coogler’s movie will soon overtake fellow
Marvel pic The Avengers ($623.4 million) to
rank as the No. 1 superhero pic of all time in
North America, unadjusted for inflation.
2.
Tomb Raider WARNERS
23.6 23.6(1) - 87.2*65 105.2 128.8
I Can Only Imagine ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS
- 195K*3 195K 17.3
17.1 17.1(1)
3.
Audience
Live+3
1.
Big Bang Theory CBS
3.9
17.5M
1.
The Walking Dead AMC
9.4M
2.
This Is Us NBC
13.5M
3.8
2.
The Alienist TNT
2.97M
3.
Young Sheldon CBS
3.1
15.8M
3.
When Calls the Heart HALLMARK
2.8M
4.
The Voice (Mon.) NBC
2.9
13.4M
4.
Haves and Have Nots OWN
2.6M
5.
Grey’s Anatomy ABC
2.9
9.9M
5.
ACS: Versace FX
2.2M
6.
American Idol ABC
2.7
11.8M
6.
Homeland SHOWTIME
2.05M
7.
If Loving You Is Wrong OWN
2.04M
8.
Unsolved USA
1.6M
Though later episodes haven’t fared as
well, Idol enjoyed a solid start on ABC.
It posted 17 percent growth among
younger viewers with live+3, not bad
for a genre plagued by minimal DVR.
The $7 million movie — about the best-selling
Christian single of all time (of the same name)
— scored the fourth-biggest domestic opening
ever for a faith-based film, unadjusted.
4.
A Wrinkle in Time DISNEY
16.3 60.7(2) -51 3.2*11 10.6
5.
Love, Simon FOX
11.8 11.8(1)
-
N/A
N/A
USA’s event drama about the murders
of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls
dipped 25 percent in its second outing,
still respectable considering spring’s
especially competitive cable oferings.
7.
9-1-1 FOX
2.6
71.3
8.
The Bachelor (Mon.) ABC
2.6
9M
9.
11.8
9.
The Bachelor (Tues.) ABC
8.7M
2.6
10. The
Heralded as the first major studio film to
feature a gay teen protagonist, the YA
adaptation disappointed in its U.S. debut
after underperforming in many red states.
Voice (Tues.) NBC
2.5
11.8M
7.
Game Night WARNERS
5.6 54.2(4) -29 3.9*51 30.8
85
Peter Rabbit SONY
5.2 102.4(6) -23 15.5*22 42.7
145.1
8.
Strangers: Prey at Night AVIRON
4.7 18.5(2) -55
0.3
0.7 19.5
9.
Red Sparrow FOX
4.5 39.7(3) -47 9.2*72 66.9 106.6
10. Death
11.
Wish MGM
29.9(3) -49
1.3*20
7.4
37.3
Annihilation PARAMOUNT
1.7 29.6(4) -48 N/A
N/A
29.6
3.4
Survivor CBS
2.3
Modern Family ABC
2.3
7.4M
13.
Chicago P.D. NBC
10.5M
2.1
14.
Chicago Fire NBC
2.1
9.9M
15.
NCIS CBS
2.0
Closer
Look
Tomb Raider’s $23.6M can’t match the original
The Greatest Showman FOX
1.1 169.7(13) -41 3.8*25 229.4 399.1
15.
The Hurricane Heist ENT. STUDIOS
1
5.4(2) -66
2
5.9 10.3
Tomb Raider 2001
Pokemon: First Movie 1999
3. Mortal Kombat 1995
4. The Angry Birds Movie 2016
5. Prince of Persia 2010
6. Resident Evil 2 2004
7. Mortal Kombat 2 1997
8. Pokemon: The Movie 2000
9. Tomb Raider 2 2003
10. Resident Evil 4 2010
1.
2.
13.
14.
The reality-centric network sees small
numbers for scripted, with the
Scientology satire down 32 percent to
886,000 live+3 viewers in season two.
Top Video Game Film Debuts
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle SONY
1.62 400.2(13) -41 N/A 541.3 941.5
1.59
The Arrangement E!
16M
12.
7 Days in Entebbe FOCUS
1.59 1.59(1)
N/A N/A
Detour TBS
One to Watch
10.1M
12.
Atlanta FX
1.5M
1.3M
10. The
11.
6.
9.6M
The first Raider grossed
$274 million globally.
$77.4M
$56.1M
$49.1M
$40.1M
$35.1M
$34.1M
$33.5M
$33.3M
$33.2M
$31.7M
Domestic; adjusted for inflation. Source: BoxOficeMojo
How’s Rupert’s
Health? ‘I’m
Doing Great’
The Fox titan, 87, is recovering
from a back injury and hasn’t
been seen in months, worrying
some insiders BY PAUL BOND
ore than a month after his
M
Feb. 11 no-show at a party to
thank firefighters for saving his L.A.
vineyard during the Skirball blaze,
Rupert Murdoch is largely AWOL
from 21st Century Fox as he recovers from a back injury sufered
in January on son Lachlan’s yacht.
Emails, phone calls and text messages he had been sending while
recuperating from the compression
fracture to his back are fewer and
farther between, say insiders. Some
employees are wondering if the
87-year-old media mogul might be
testing retirement following the
December unveiling of his $52.4 billion deal to sell most of Fox assets
to Disney. (Murdoch also was absent
when Fox reported quarterly earnings Feb. 7, leaving it to his sons and
CFO John Nallen to speak about
the company’s financial results.)
There’s a worry that plans for a
post-Disney “New Fox” — including
Fox News, Fox broadcast network,
Fox Sports, 28 local television
stations and possibly six Sinclair
afiliates — could sufer without
Murdoch’s full attention. Says
Steven Birenberg, of Northlake
Capital Management, “Investors
would prefer Rupert stick around for
at least a year post the deal-close.”
But while he may not be as active
as usual, sources say he has taken
meetings recently and in early March
hosted a cocktail party at his home
for the board members of both Fox
and News Corp. “I’m doing great,”
Murdoch tells THR in an email. “I
appreciate if anyone is worried about
me but they shouldn’t be. I’ve been
busy with meetings at home but I’m
looking forward to being back in
the ofice in a couple weeks.”
Box-ofice source: comScore; estimates in $ millions; ( )Weekends in release; *Territories. Broadcast source: Nielsen, live-plus-3, week of March 5. Cable TV source: Nielsen, live-plus-3 scripted series, week of March 5.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
28
M A RC H 21, 2018
ARRANGEMENT: EIKE SCHROTER/E! ENTERTAINMENT. AMERICAN: ABC/MARK LEVINE. UNSOLVED: ISABELLA VOSMIKOVA/USA NETWORK. TOMB: PARAMOUNT PICTURES/PHOTOFEST. SIGN:
ISTOCK. MURDOCH: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/WIREIMAGE. PANTHER: MARVEL/DISNEY. IMAGINE: ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS. SIMON: BEN ROTHSTEIN/20TH CENTURY FOX.
Box Office
The Report
7 Days of DEALS
Who’s inking on the dotted line this week
STR ANGER THINGS ’ SUCCESS SIGNALS
SEASON THR EE SALARY SPIK ES FOR ALL
The Stranger Things kids have hit a growth spurt —
and so have their paychecks.
The castmembers of the Netflix hit scored major
pay raises following an intense renegotiation ahead
of the sci-fi drama’s eight-episode third season, set
to begin production April 23. Sources say the new
deals for the young actors are worth about 12 times
their previous salaries; Netflix declined comment.
According to sources, the cast is divided into
different pay tiers. In the “A tier” are adults Winona
Ryder and David Harbour, now making $350,000
an episode. The “B tier” consists of the boys — Finn
Wolfhard, Gaten Matarazzo, Caleb McLaughlin
and Noah Schnapp — each collecting $250,000 an
episode, while the actors in the “C tier” — onscreen
teenagers Natalia Dyer, Charlie Heaton and Joe
Keery — are each pocketing $150,000 an episode.
What remains a mystery is where the show’s
14-year-old breakout, Millie Bobby Brown, landed
among those tiers, as her camp has been tightlipped throughout the dealmaking process. What’s
known is that Brown separated herself from the
rest of the cast during the renegotiation and is making at least $250,000. But some sources suggest the
young star — who has parlayed her role on the show
into rich endorsement deals, a massive social media
following (15 million on Instagram) and plum
film roles, including in the next Godzilla — may be
Harbour and
Brown as
Sherif Hopper
and Eleven.
getting even more, possibly $350,000. (Insiders say
that Brown’s team asked for $500,000 an episode.) Others scoff at the idea of Brown earning as
much Ryder, an Oscar-nominated actress who has
been working for three decades, and say the starlet
instead is in her own tier of $300,000.
Regardless of Brown’s exact payday, the hefty
salary bumps represent massive raises for the SAG
Award-winning ensemble. Although the actors
received bonuses of about $60,000 once it became
clear that the show was a phenomenon, a renegotiation was all but a given heading into the drama’s
third season. Sources say the child actors were
making in the low-$20,000 range for the first two
seasons, which means they’ve scored 1,200 percent
raises. “You could argue they were radically underpaid,” says one rep, “so I view it as a make-good from
Netflix.” — BRYN ELISE SANDBERG
Streamers Get Animated With A-List Adult Cartoons
Could animation be the next
genre to benefit from the
Big
explosion of buyers in the
Deal
Peak TV era?
Apple joined the
animated arms race March 12, winning a bidding war for musical comedy Central Park
from Emmy-winning Bob’s Burgers creator
Loren Bouchard, Nora Smith and Josh Gad
with a two-season, 26-episode order for
the series featuring Kristen Bell, Stanley
Tucci and Daveed Diggs.
That came days after Amazon entered
the adult animated comedy space with a
straight-to-series order for Undone,
from BoJack Horseman creator Raphael
Bob-Waksberg and Kate Purdy. Netflix,
meanwhile, has the Tiffany Haddish
starrer Tuca and Bertie, from BoJack duo
Bob-Waksberg and Lisa Hanawalt; Matt
Groening’s Disenchantment, which the
streaming giant ordered for two seasons;
and critical favorite BoJack, among others.
Hulu also entered the space in January
with a two-season order for an Animaniacs
reboot, part of its pact for Warner Bros.
Animation’s massive library.
While animated series can be a challenging nut to crack creatively (see Fox’s
failed eforts, including Allen Gregory,
Axe Cop and Bordertown), outside of The
Simpsons and its expensive voice cast,
they are more financially
attractive than scripted
fare, where salaries for top
stars continue to escalate.
Animation also transcends demographics and
Bouchard
is useful in streamers’ bids
to have something for everyone.
“There’s a plethora of dramas and
comedies but very few animated shows,”
says WME’s Richard Weitz, who repped
Gad in the Central Park deal. “When you
hear one that’s great, you know it’s worth
the premium [money] because there won’t
be another one coming in around the
corner.” — LESLEY GOLDBERG
Rights Available! Hot new books with Hollywood appeal
Moss
FILM
Elisabeth Moss (WME, the
U.K.’s Independent, Ribisi)
will join Melissa McCarthy
and Tifany Haddish
as stars of New Line mob
drama The Kitchen.
Ava DuVernay (CAA, Del
Shaw) will direct Warner
Bros. and DC’s The New
Gods adaptation.
Lucas Hedges
(CAA, Anonymous,
Bloom Hergott, Glick and
Weintraub) will play a
pseudonymous version
of Shia LaBeouf in Honey
Boy, a biopic about, cowritten by and co-starring
the former child star.
Linda Cardellini (ICM,
Mosaic, Jackoway
Tyerman) and Matt Dillon
(UTA, Untitled, Wendy
Heller) have joined Tom
Hardy along with Kyle
MacLachlan in Josh Trank’s
Al Capone biopic Fonzo.
BY ANDY LEWIS AND TATIANA SIEGEL
A Higher Loyalty (FLATIRON, APRIL 17)
A Child Went Forth (HIGH-TOP PUBLISHING, MAY 18)
BY James Comey AGENCY Javelin
BY Boston Teran AGENCY Kern Literary/Donald V. Allen
Donald Trump’s Twitter attacks have propelled the former FBI
director’s book to No. 1 on Amazon. The story of a straightarrow FBI legend tangling with a potentially corrupt president,
with Russian meddling in the background, has an irresistible lure.
Teran’s other books in development include The Creed of Violence
at Universal, with Leonardo DiCaprio to star and Todd Field to
direct, and God Is a Bullet, with D.J. Caruso (Disturbia) attached to
direct. Here, a boy smuggles money to abolitionists in the 1850s.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
30
M A RC H 21, 2018
STRANGER: TINA ROWDEN/NETFLIX. BOUCHARD: GABRIEL OLSEN/FILMMAGIC. HIGHER: COURTESY OF MACMILLAN. MOSS: DAN MACMEDAN/WIREIMAGE. TENNANT, LYNCH: JEFF SPICER/GETTY IMAGES. HURD:
JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC. ISAAC: DAVE J HOGAN/GETTY IMAGES. HART: ROY ROCHLIN/FILMMAGIC. HEDGES: ROB KIM/GETTY IMAGES. WEINSTEIN: SPLASH NEWS. GRAHAM: JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC.
Deal
of the
Week
26M
Amazon’s U.S. video audience as of
early 2017 (second to Netflix’s
Big
Number 48 million), according to documents
reviewed by Reuters on March 14.
Tennant
Hurd
Isaac
Hart
for season six. … MTV is
expanding Total Request
Live to three daily airings.
… ABC has renewed The
Bachelor, Dancing With the
Stars, America’s Funniest
Home Videos and Child
Support for seasons 23, 27,
29 and two, respectively.
Hedges
Weinstein paid a total of $8.24 million for his 5.71-acre spread.
Kristen Stewart (Gersh,
McKuin Frankel) will star
as actress Jean Seberg in
Automatik’s thriller Against
All Enemies.
(Innovative, LINK, Morris
Yorn) and Blindspot’s
Michelle Hurd (APA, TMT)
will star in CBS’ Cagney
& Lacey reboot alongside
Ving Rhames.
Madonna (CAA, Maverick,
Untitled, Greenberg
Glusker, Grubman Shire)
will direct MGM’s Taking
Flight, a biopic about ballerina Michaela DePrince.
Nicolas Cage (WME, Stride,
Bloom Hergott) will star
in the drug thriller Running
With the Devil.
Ian McKellen (CAA, the
U.K.’s Independent) and
Helen Mirren (CAA) will
star in New Line thriller
The Good Liar, directed by
Bill Condon.
TELEVISION
Departing Grey’s Anatomy
star Sarah Drew
Melissa Joan Hart (APA,
Gilbertson) will reprise
her first star-making role
in Nickelodeon’s Clarissa
Explains It All revival.
Shepard Smith (Kramer)
has signed a new multiyear
deal with Fox News.
David Tennant (UTA, the
U.K.’s Independent) will
play Jennifer Garner’s
husband in Lena Dunham’s
HBO comedy Camping.
Annihilation’s Alex Garland
(WME, Bloom Hergott) will
write, direct and executive
produce FX’s Silicon Valley
drama pilot Devs.
Limitless alum Jake
McDorman (UTA, Mosaic,
Hansen Jacobson) will
play Candice Bergen’s son
in CBS’ Murphy Brown.
Nicole Kidman (CAA,
Australia’s Shanahan,
Media Talent, Jackoway
Tyerman) will reteam with
David E. Kelley for HBO’s
limited series The Undoing.
Chris Cuomo (CAA)
will leave his post as
co-anchor of CNN’s New
Day for a primetime slot
on the network.
NBC has renewed Will &
Grace for a third revived
(11th overall) season. …
A&E has renewed Leah
Remini: Scientology and the
Aftermath for a third
season. … USA has renewed
The Sinner for season two. …
Starz has renewed Power
DIGITAL
Ben Affleck (WME, Ziffren
Brittenham) and Oscar
Isaac (UTA, Inspire, Stone
Genow) are in talks for the
long-gestating drug crime
drama once known as Triple
Frontier, now to be directed
by J.C. Chandor for Netflix.
The Lego Ninjago Movie’s
Charlie Bean (Verve,
Hirsch Wallerstein) will
direct a live-action/CG
Lady and the Tramp for
Disney’s upcoming streaming service.
Newcomer Juliet
Lashinsky-Revene
(Paradigm, Pacific View,
Jackoway Tyerman)
will executive produce
her drama Demons,
about the 1980s and ’90s’
“Satanic Panic,” for Hulu.
Business news startup
Cheddar has raised
$22 million in a new round
led by Raine Ventures.
Rep
Sheet
Heather Graham has
signed with APA for
writing, producing and
directing.
Next
Big
Thing
Lashana Lynch
REPS ICM, the U.K.’s
BWH, Alan Siegel
WHY SHE MATTERS
Benjamin Bratt has left
WME for CAA .
Happy Death Day scribe
Scott Lobdell has signed
with Abrams.
The English actress, 30,
is in final talks to join
Brie Larson in Captain
Marvel, replacing
DeWanda Wise, who is
dropping out because
of scheduling conflicts
with Netflix’s She’s
Gotta Have It. Lynch,
who made her Stateside
debut in Shondaland’s
short-lived ABC Romeo
and Juliet spinoff Still
Star-Crossed, is rumored
to be playing superhero
Monica Rambeau.
Hulu has landed Reese
Witherspoon and Kerry
Washington’s limited series
Little Fires Everywhere.
… Apple has acquired
magazine subscription
service Texture.
REAL ESTATE
Harvey Weinstein has
sold his longtime oceanfront estate in Westport,
Connecticut, to neighbor
Andrew Bentley for $16 million in an of-market deal.
MUSIC
Seventeen-year-old rapper Lil Pump (Ziffren
Brittenham) has re-signed
with Warner Bros. Records.
Matthew Perry (Partners
Trust) has sold his
former home in L.A.’s Bird
Streets neighborhood for
$12.5 million.
Gina Torres, who will
star in USA’s untitled
Suits spinoff, has signed
with 42West.
Documentary filmmaker
Stanley Nelson has
signed with WME, as has
Dolly Parton.
C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S TO O U R E XC E P T I O N A L ST Y L I STS
F OR THE I R DISTI NGU ISHE D WO R K
ANNABELLE HARRON
AS H L E Y W ESTO N
CRISTINA EHRLICH
E L I Z A B E T H S A LT Z M A N
E L I Z A B E T H S T E WA R T
E R I N WA L S H
I L A R I A U R B I N AT I
JA M I E M I Z R A H I
JA S O N R E M B E R T
J E A N N E YA N G
J I L L L I N C O L N & J O R DA N J O H N S O N
K ARL A WELCH
K AT E YO U N G
LESLIE FREMAR
MICAEL A ERL ANGER
MICHAEL FISHER
M O L LY D I C KS O N
N I C K Y YAT E S
SAMANTHA MCMILLEN
TA R A S W E N N E N
THOMAS CARTER PHILLIPS
WENDI & NICOLE FERREIRA
A N D C H E E RS TO O U R E NTIR E TE A M O F A RTI STS F OR
A NOTHE R O U TSTA NDI NG Y E A R
AN
C O MPANY
About Town
People, Places, Preoccupations
Hollywood’s Stealth Support of the March:
‘It’s Important This Not Be the Celebrity Show’
PARKLAND: JOHN MCCALL/SUN SENTINEL/TNS/NEWSCOM (2). GUN: BOBAINSWORTH/GETTY IMAGES. TRUMP, LOESCH: JIM
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GETTY IMAGES. WINFREY: MIKE MARSLAND/WIREIMAGE. BRAUN: TIFFANY ROSE/GETTY IMAGES FOR CHEFDANCE.
A-listers from Oprah to Spielberg are signing checks and stepping back as agencies sponsor travel to D.C.
and Parkland natives across the industry rally for the gun-control March for Our Lives on March 24 By Rebecca Sun
ollywood for once is ducking
publicity. While much of the entertainment industry has thrown its
support behind the March 24 March
for Our Lives in Washington — and the larger
gun-safety movement launched in the wake of
the Feb. 14 shooting that killed 17 at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland,
Florida — stars, reps and execs are purposely
downplaying their involvement.
“It’s important that this not be the ‘celebrity,
Hollywood-savior-coming-in show,’ ” says
Tascha Rudder, executive director of Endeavor
Foundation, which advises Everytown for
Gun Safety, one of the nonprofits involved in
the march. (Endeavor began working with
Everytown in October, after the Las Vegas mass
shooting survived by WME employees and
clients including Jason Aldean.)
H
The discretion arises in part from sensitivity to the life-and-death nature of the issue but
also from awareness that gun-control detractors can point to Hollywood involvement
as evidence of a big-money liberal
agenda, thereby discrediting
the work of such students as Emma
Gonzalez and David Hogg, who,
organizers
insist, truly have been
Winfrey
driving the movement.
“Anything that I or my company is doing is insignificant
compared to what these kids are
doing,” says ICM motion picture
Braun
lit co-head Harley Copen, who
graduated from MSD. “The kids have helped
craft this narrative, and the story has been
distinctly rejecting everything having to do
with celebrity and politicians.” This included
Illustrated by Alex Williamson
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
33
M A RC H 21, 2018
a suggestion that they look into attending
the Oscars, which the students declined to
pursue. “The kids don’t want to be famous,”
says the agent. “They want change.”
Though stars like Jimmy Fallon have said
they’ll attend the march, others — including
the Clooneys, the Katzenbergs, the Spielbergs
and Oprah Winfrey, who have each given
$500,000 — feel their most powerful impact
begins and ends with writing a check, says one
donor. Lending logistical aid are such industry
figures as Scooter Braun, cited by organizers
for his fundraising efforts, and Dancing With
the Stars producer Deena Katz, who filed the
permit application for the D.C. march.
CAA, WME, UTA and ICM Partners all
have made financial contributions and are
providing transportation from Florida to
Washington for students and chaperones. “We
About Town
Guest Column
People, Places,
Preoccupations
If I Can Watch
Roseanne,
So Can You
had approximately 700 [MSD] kids
that wanted to go,” says actor Mary
Van Luven, who is coordinating
efforts by L.A. MSD alumni. Gabby
Giffords’ organization, Giffords:
Courage to Fight Gun Violence, is
providing trips for 200. “The
agencies stepped up to cover the
costs and the logistics involved
in getting another 500 teenagers
to the march.”
Van Luven adds that organizers have met their initial $75,000
goal thanks in large part to “a
substantial donation from an
entertainment entity who prefers
to remain anonymous” and have
set a new goal of $150,000 in order
to get more students to D.C.
In addition, WME is helping
put together Stay Amped, a D.C.
benefit concert the night before
the march featuring Fall Out Boy
alongside G-Eazy, Bebe Rexha,
The show’s onetime writer-producer
— and Barr’s ex — admires the reboot
if not its ‘Trump-loving troll’ star
By Tom Arnold
Police and
others
comforted
students
following the
Feb. 14 mass
shooting
at Stoneman
Douglas.
Lizzo and others. Proceeds will
benefit Everytown and Giffords,
and WME is working with individual and corporate patrons to
enable students to attend for
free. Charlie Puth will perform at
March for Our Lives L.A., one
of at least 371 sister marches. And
Lin-Manuel Miranda is dedicating a
portion of proceeds from March’s
Hamildrop (his monthly Hamilton
remix track), a mashup duet with
Dear Evan Hansen’s Ben Platt.
Van Luven notes that ICM’s
Copen, WME’s Todd Jacobs and
UTA’s Jonathan Beckerman, all
MSD alumni, have been particularly active in drumming up
support. “When you move from
a small town 3,000 miles away,”
says Jacobs, “to see the outpouring of support from this creative
community that has become my
other family is really an extraordinary feeling.”
hen THR
asked me to
review the
new Roseanne reboot,
I promised objectivity.
But, of course, I’d been
the audience warm-up
guy for the Roseanne
pilot in 1988 and
worked my way up on
the show from writer to
producer. In fact, by the
time Roseanne fired
me in 1994 — destroying the trophy case in
my ofice, canceling my
credit cards and promising I’d never work
in show business again
— I’d been executive
producing and playing
Arnie for a few years.
So you can see why
these delightful memories would make it hard
W
not to be prejudiced.
When I read on
Twitter that there was
going to be a Roseanne
reboot, I was happy for
Roseanne and the other
actors, but I also knew
the new show’s success
would rest on one thing:
Who will Roseanne
Conner be in 2018?
Because Roseanne Barr
is more polarizing
than ever. No longer a
feminist-pacifist voice
for the working folks,
she’s now a far-right
Trump-loving troll
who’s gone hard against
liberals and Hillary
supporters and even
#MeToo women. That is
not the Roseanne Barr
I knew, but that’s OK
so long as that’s not the
Roseanne Conner she
brings back to TV. Then
I read on the internet
that Roseanne Conner
was going to be a farright Trump lover. But
then I remembered it’s
the internet, and that’s
where you hear all sorts
of crazy stuf, like the
president paying hush
money to porn stars.
So I decided to watch
the first episode,
“Twenty Years to Life,”
and I discovered this:
SAMUEL GOLDWYN’S GRANDSONS
HONOR HIS GIVING LEGACY
John and Tony fete the 75th anniversary of the
Entertainment Industry Foundation By Peter Kiefer
I
t was the early suffering
he endured as a Polish
immigrant that transformed Samuel Goldwyn into
a pioneer of helping others.
“Samuel and Frances were
people who understood hardship, and at various points in
their lives people helped them
without whom they might not
have survived,” says producer
John Goldwyn of his grandparents. “So philanthropy was
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
34
embedded in their worldview.”
And in John’s: He and
brother Tony were presenters
at the March 20 gala celebrating the 75th anniversary
of the Entertainment Industry
Foundation — co-founded
by Samuel Goldwyn with
Humphrey Bogart, James
Cagney, Gene Kelly, Joan
Crawford and Cecil B. DeMille
— and the more than $1 billion
it has raised to support arts,
M A RC H 21, 2018
Dan is alive. Though
John Goodman’s character suffered what
everyone assumed was
a fatal heart attack in
the 1997 series finale,
he and Roseanne
haven’t skipped a beat.
Darlene is grown up,
living at home and
unemployed. The show
always did a great job
of organically dealing
with adolescent issues,
and Darlene’s genderfluid son, Mark, played
AL
SOCI ON
A C TI
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WYLER: COURTESY OF ©A.M.P.A.S. J. GOLDWYN: MICHAEL KOVAC/GETTY IMAGES FOR AFI. T. GOLDWYN: AXELLE/BAUER-GRIFFIN/FILMMAGIC. ROSE:
BRYAN STEFFY/BET/GETTY IMAGES FOR BET. BEADLE: DAVID LIVINGSTON/GETTY IMAGES. GREENBERG: DESIREE NAVARRO/WIREIMAGE.
by Ames McNamara,
will definitely be dealing. (I just flashed back
to a long-ago writers
room with head writer
Danny Jacobson lecturing us about story
points and me staring
enviously across the
table at fellow writer
Joss Whedon’s beautiful flowing red hair.)
Jackie is in the
house! I’ll full-on admit
to Laurie Metcalf
superfandom. She
could carry this show.
She could carry every
show ever. When she
walks into what is set
↑ The new
Roseanne
premieres
March 27.
Read Daniel
Fienberg’s
THR review
on page 79.
← Barr
with Arnold
(as Arnie)
on a 1990
episode.
up to be a knock-down
drag-out confrontation with Roseanne,
Jackie is wearing a
“Nasty Woman” shirt
and has a pussy hat
in hand. “What’s up,
deplorable?” she greets
her sister. Their backand-forth covers
a lot of ground: health
care, snowflakes, flags
and guns. But the
jokes work and trigger
an actual commonsense gun-safety
moment (that’s the
show I loved). It didn’t
feel at all false that
Dan found the family’s
handgun in an ice
cream container in the
garage freezer.
As always, Roseanne
is best when it pulls
into its core: that crazy
family. New viewers
might think Roseanne
and Jackie are arguing about Trump and
Hillary, but look at
the glint in Roseanne
Conner’s eyes. She’s
just busting her sister’s
chops, like we all do.
Bottom line: If you
want to watch a show
because it’s the voice
of your political point of
view, right or left, do not
education and health causes.
“If he were alive, he’d be calling
people around town and hustling them to do more because
that is who he was,” says Tony.
“But he would be thrilled with
the way he still has a central
presence in Hollywood and to
know that things like the EIF
are thriving.”
Asked which of his grandfather’s films exemplifies his
social conscience, John
cites 1946’s The Best Years of
Our Lives, the Oscar-winning
drama about World War II
vets facing difficulties as they
watch the Roseanne
reboot. You’ll be disappointed. But if you’re a
fan of the original
Roseanne, especially
the glory years — you
know, the “Tom Arnold
years” — this is as good
as it’s going to get.
Roseanne has done
everything from pulling my hair transplants
immediately after
surgery to saying I had
a 3-inch penis on SNL,
so I figure if I can give
the show another shot,
maybe other people
could too.
I can forgive
Roseanne Conner voting for Trump in 2016.
I bet if you’re a Midwest
housewife, he might’ve
come across on TV
like he really had your
back. But Roseanne
Barr knew Donald
Trump personally for
30 years and saw how
he treated women. She
even did business with
him. I’m not surprised
by anything Trump
does, but Roseanne
Barr made $200 million
of Roseanne Conner,
so I’m a little disappointed she doesn’t
have her back.
From left:
Rose,
Beadle and
Greenberg.
reenter civilian life. “It was
the first movie ever to examine
PTSD,” says John. “It had an
outsized impact.”
The EIF gala
also honored
J. Goldwyn
Sherry Lansing
and Katie Couric,
among others,
with the Samuel
Goldwyn Legacy
Award for their
work with EIF’s
T. Goldwyn
Stand Up to
Cancer campaign, which has
raised more than $480 million
to fight the disease.
← From left: The Best Years of Our Lives director William Wyler, producer Samuel Goldwyn
and screenwriter Robert E. Sherwood with the film’s Oscar and other awards.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
35
M A RC H 21, 2018
HOW ESPN PLANS TO
WAKE UP WOKE
The net’s new morning show, Get Up!,
will stick to sports — except when
‘something political makes itself
part of our world’ By Marisa Guthrie
ike many legacy media brands, ESPN is in
the throes of a digital reinvention. It has a
new president — Jimmy Pitaro, the former
head of Disney’s interactive media division — and
a soon-to-launch OTT service. But on April 2, it
will unveil a most traditional TV staple: a morning
show. Get Up!, which will air weekdays from 7 to 10
a.m., is hosted by Mike Greenberg (aka Greeny, the
erstwhile partner of Mike Golic on ESPN Radio’s
long-running Mike & Mike), Michelle Beadle (outspoken feminist and sports/culture observer) and
Jalen Rose (NBA journeyman turned sports media
star). Its executive producer, Bill Wolff, returned
to ESPN in 2017 after stints with the likes of Rachel
Maddow and The View.
It’s a big, costly swing for the network, including
the lease of a 19,000-square-foot studio and ofice
complex in Manhattan’s South Street Seaport
and nearly $15 million in talent salaries ($6.5 million
for Greenberg, 50; $5 million for Beadle, 42; and
$3 million for Rose, 45, sources say). Greenberg has
worked with Rose on various ESPN platforms
but never with Beadle, who returned to the network
in 2014 after less than two years at NBC. With
the NYC studio under construction, the team has
been rehearsing at ESPN headquarters in Bristol,
Connecticut. “From the first second she started
talking,” says Greenberg, “the only thought
going through my mind was, I better step up my
game because she is ready.”
Get Up!’s NYC locale should widen its booking
pool, and its six-seat anchor desk will make room
for guests including ESPN NFL analysts Booger
McFarland and Damien Woody. Wolf stresses
that the show’s top mandate is to cover sports as
the network pivots away from a broader cultural focus cultivated by former president John
Skipper (see page 74). Still, “when players take
a knee, then it deserves coverage and conversation,” notes Wolf, referring to NFL players’
national anthem protests. “If something political
makes itself part of our world, we are dishonest and inauthentic if we don’t discuss it.” Rose
has “never been muzzled in any way” during
his decade at ESPN, he says: “I appreciate the fact
that I’m able to talk about more than what happened in last night’s NBA game. And I think fans
appreciate that. When our president tweets about
sports, now he’s fair game.”
L
About Town
Yes, I Did Say That!
Quotes
A look at who’s saying what in entertainment
Compiled by Seth Abramovitch
“I’m Cynthia Nixon. I’m
a New Yorker. And together,
we can win this fight.”
CYNTHIA NIXON
The Sex and the City star, in a video announcing her
intention to challenge Andrew Cuomo for the Democratic
gubernatorial nomination in New York.
HEATHER LOCKLEAR
The Dynasty star, allegedly,
to police oficers who’d
entered her home to respond to
reports of domestic battery.
“My hard won
advice: never get
into an elevator
alone with
terry gilliam”
“I call them
Fakebook.”
ANDREW LACK
The NBC News chief,
on how the social media
giant “doesn’t have value
for publishers” hoping
to monetize their content.
ELLEN BARKIN
The actress, responding
on Twitter to director Gilliam
decrying the “mob rule” of
the “silly” #MeToo movement
in a recent interview.
“Throw the
whole app-oligy
away.”
“I wasn’t like
those pretty girls
with those nice
little noses. Maybe
that’s why.”
RIHANNA
The singer, on Instagram,
rejecting Snapchat’s apology for
a tasteless ad making light
of domestic abuse (asking users if
they would rather “slap Rihanna”
or “punch Chris Brown”).
The statement led to a 4 percent
drop in Snap stock.
DEATH
OF A
STAR
MAN
36
“White privilege
and desperation
and disaster. It
came from a place
of self-centered
delusion.”
BARBRA STREISAND
SHIA LABEOUF
The legend, on why she had no
#MeToo stories to share in a
talk moderated by Ryan Murphy
at the Paley Center for Media.
The actor, addressing in Esquire
his 2017 arrest in Georgia, in which he
belittled a black police oficer for
being “stuck in a police force that
doesn’t give a fuck about you.”
After Stephen Hawking died March 14 at 76, Eddie
Redmayne, who won an Oscar playing the
physicist, called him “the funniest.” Cher tweeted
about their lunch date. Obama urged him to “have
fun out there among the stars.” And Kirstie Alley
tweeted an inscrutable “Thanks for your input.”
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
BENJAMIN GLAZE
The American Idol
contestant, 20, telling The
New York Times about
his disappointment at having
judge Katy Perry ambush
him with a peck on the lips
— his first — on the show.
M A RC H 21, 2018
NIXON, RIHANNA: DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES. LACK: PAUL HAWTHORNE/GETTY IMAGES. HAWKINGS: GARY GERSHOFF/WIREIMAGE. LABEOUF: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC.
“You fucking
deserve your kids
to die! And when
you find yourself
in that position,
think of me!”
“I wanted to
save it for my first
relationship.
I wanted it to be
special.”
LOS ANGELES
From style collections to cocktail selections, a new experience awaits.
New stores. New restaurants. New views.
@beverlycenter
@beverlycenter
@beverlycenter
beverlycenter.com
About Town
The Red Carpet
FX All-Star Talent Party
New York, March 15
3
From left: Donald
Sutherland,
FX CEO John
Landgraf and
Brendan Fraser
2
Paul Simms and
Zazie Beetz
1
From left: Billie
Lourd, Sarah Paulson
and Keri Russell
4
Danny Boyle
Fulfillment Fund
8
Hollywood, March 13
From left:
Anne Sweeney,
Rich Ross and
Fulfillment Fund
CEO Maria
Espinosa Booth
9
Robert De Niro
(left) and
Bradley Cooper
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
38
M A RC H 21, 2018
Party
Crawler
In FX We Trust
The casts of FX’s returning
and upcoming series took
over Lucky Strike Manhattan
for the network’s annual
upfront event. Such stars
as The Americans’ Keri
Russell (1), Better Things’
Pamela Adlon (5) and
American Crime Story’s
Darren Criss took to the bowling lanes and pool tables,
while all eyes were on Trust
leads Donald Sutherland (3)
and Brendan Fraser (3)
as the soiree followed an SVA
Theatre screening of the
upcoming Getty drama, which
depicts the 1973 kidnapping
of John Paul Getty III. If the
show’s exec producers have
their way, it will continue on
for two more seasons. “There’s
so much to say and do about
three generations of Gettys,”
creator Simon Beaufoy
told THR. — JACKIE STRAUSE
6
Marcia Gay Harden and
David Marshall Grant
Impact Awards
Hollywood, March 17
7
From left: Jeremiah
Brent, Armie Hammer
and Nate Berkus
5
Pamela Adlon and
Alysia Reiner
11
Hosts Teri Polo (left)
and Sherri Saum
12
Anika Noni
Rose
10
Rita Wilson
39
LOURD: DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES. SIMMS, BOYLE ADLON: ANTHONY BEHAR/FX/PICTUREGROUP. FRAZER: KENA BETANCUR/FX/PICTUREGROUP. HARDEN: RICH POLK/GETTY
IMAGES. BRENT: VIVIEN KILLILEA/GETTY IMAGES. ROSS: MICHAEL TRAN/FILMMAGIC. COOPER, WILSON: CHRISTOPHER POLK/GETTY IMAGES. SAUM, ROSE: TOMMASO BODDI/WIREIMAGE.
LGBT Visibility on TV
Nate Berkus (7) and Jeremiah
Brent (7), stars of TLC’s Nate
& Jeremiah, were honored at
the Family Equality Council’s
annual gala by their friend
Armie Hammer (7). “What
does it feel like for a young
gay, transgender or bisexual
child to watch a family that
looks like them, living openly
on television?” Brent asked
in an emotional speech. “We
know that we now have a
responsibility to love visibly,”
he added at Universal Studios’
Globe Theatre. The evening
raised funds for the advocacy group for LGBTQ families.
— MARC MALKIN
De Niro Blasts Trump
“What we’re doing tonight
is celebrating 40 years of helping young people in Los
Angeles,” said presenter Anne
Sweeney (8) of the Fulfillment
Fund, which empowers
L.A. youth through education.
Bradley Cooper (9) also took
the Ray Dolby Ballroom stage
to introduce Robert De
Niro (9), who helped honor his
personal doctor Gary Gitnick
and wife Cherna (founders of
the nonprofit), before his fiery
attack on President Trump. “A
college education is important,
but education without humanity is ignorance,” said De Niro.
“Look at our president, he was
exposed to a quality education,
but he’s still an idiot.” The evening raised $1.3 million for the
fund’s work. — BILL HIGGINS
About Town
Heard Around Hollywood
ever tell her, ‘I don’t know’ ”). But
the most poignant moment came
when Kingsley stood up to talk
about Hollywood’s olden days. “We
had more power then,” she said.
“We didn’t have bloggers. If we
didn’t want to give them a client,
they couldn’t have them. They had
to wait their turn.”
By Chris Gardner
Dana Walden’s Dog Found! Rights Available
In a plot twist worthy of one of her hit shows, Dana Walden’s lost dog,
Bailey, has found her way home. The Fox TV Group chairman and CEO
had been searching for her black lab mix for three weeks, since she ran
off on Malibu’s Kanan Dume Road on Feb. 21. Rescue efforts — which
included top studio execs taking time to comb the area — failed to find
the dog, but Bailey’s trainer, Jaime Goodrich, didn’t give up. She had her
van tricked out with motion-detecting remote cameras, baited it with
Bailey’s old blankets and left it parked, with the door open, near where
the dog ran off. Sure enough, March 14, the cameras caught Bailey in the
van. Two deputies from the Malibu sheriff’s station were dispatched, the
dog was captured, and Walden and her beloved were reunited. She’s
already working on a tagline for the movie version: “It’s a reminder,” she
tells THR, “to never give up hope.”
Pat Kingsley Scores
1,800 Square Feet of Publicity
Carri McClure and Tracy Shaffer.
Heidi Schaeffer told a story about
Some historic figures have roads
named after them, others get statues. But Pat Kingsley, who in the
1980s and ’90s built a reputation
as the most powerful publicist
in Hollywood, is getting her own
events space. A new junket and
events suite, off the lobby of PMKBNC’s Century City offices, was
dedicated to Kingsley, 84, with a
ceremony March 14. And pretty
much anybody who ever flacked
for anyone showed up, including
Kingsley protegees Catherine Olim,
Karen Samfilippo, Carol Marshall,
getting arrested with Kingsley
at a 1988 anti-nuke protest
(“I couldn’t have asked for a better mentor”) while Cindi Berger
revealed Kingsley’s tips for representing Barbara Walters (“Don’t
Adam Rippon, the first openly
gay U.S. Olympic figure skater,
is all over Hollywood these days.
Since winning the bronze in
South Korea, the 28-year-old
has been meeting stars and
attending industry events (like
the Oscars). “I’ve been offered
a couple of cameos, but I haven’t
had time,” he told THR at the
Human Rights Campaign gala
in L.A. on March 10, where
he received the organization’s
Visibility Award. “But I would
love to try acting.” He’s already
connecting, becoming friends
with the likes of Faye Dunaway,
whom he met Oscar night at
the Vanity Fair party. “Someone
tapped me on the shoulder and
was like, ‘I loved watching you
skate.’ And I was like, ‘Um, I
loved watching your career over
the past decades.’ ” Rippon’s first
Hollywood role, though, may
be more about hoofing than acting; he says he’s considering an
offer to compete on Dancing With
the Stars. — MARC MALKIN
Frank Oz on Disney’s Muppets:
‘They Don’t Get It’
Puppeteer Frank Oz, who had his
hands inside Muppets from 1963
until Disney purchased the felt
franchise in 2004, isn’t thrilled
with how the Mouse House is
treating Kermit and the gang. “As
much as Disney wants the best for
The Muppets, they don’t get it,”
Oz, 73, told THR’s Kim Masters on
a recent appearance on KCRW’s
The Business. “They don’t get the
true rebellion and true affection
underneath those characters.
They really want to do a good job,
[but] they’ve never asked me [or]
the performers how to do it.”
Got tips? Email rambling@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Katzenberg
40
M A RC H 21, 2018
HO T
R
Oprah Winfrey
checked out Lucques.
… Leonardo DiCaprio
popped by Felix. …
Jeffrey Katzenberg,
Anita Hill and Andy
Cohen shared the room
at The Palm in Beverly
Hills. … Over at TAO,
Timothee Chalamet
held court, while next
door at Beauty & Essex,
Lana Del Rey sat for
dinner with friends. On
a diferent night, Greta
Gerwig stopped by. …
Anthony Scaramucci
greeted Nicolas Cage
at a Polo Lounge booth.
… Sally Hawkins and
director Marc Forster
lunched at Milo & Olive.
… Andy Samberg
was at Musso & Frank
Grill. ... RuPaul had
lunch at WeHo Bistro.
... Larry David was
at Republique.
NEW
URA
E S TA
NT
Native
The Quick Pitch Chef
Nyesha Arrington
reigns at this hyperlocal ode to the nearby
Santa Monica Farmers
Market. The pedigreed vet of Melisse
expresses her light
and airy style with
a crossover method
— utilizing, say, a
Korean mustard for a
Wagyu beef tartare
preparation or ofering a pastrami-style
roast duck breast.
For dessert, try her
toasted vanilla custard with kumquat and
oat crumble.
The Inside Dish On
her way up, Arrington
appeared on Top Chef.
620 Santa Monica
Blvd. — GARY BAUM
WALDEN: FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES FOR THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER. DOG: COURTESY OF DANA WALDEN/FOX. KATZENBERG: STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. HILL: TAYLOR HILL/FILMMAGIC. NATIVE: JAKE AHLES PHOTOGRAPHY. RIPPON: SLAVEN VLASIC/GETTY IMAGES. KINGSLEY: TODD WILLIAMSON.
Rambling Reporter
PMK-BNC’s Berger and Michael
Nyman flanked Kingsley.
Hill
What Adam Rippon Really
Wants to Do Is Act
New leash on life? Fox TV Group chairman/CEO Walden has been reunited with runaway Bailey.
Rippon
Power
Dining
Marni ©2018 South Coast Plaza
Aquazzura · Balenciaga · Bottega Veneta · Brunello Cucinelli · Burberry · Cartier · Céline · Chanel · Chloé
Christian Louboutin · Dior · Dior Homme · Dolce&Gabbana · Escada · Fendi · Gianvito Rossi · Gucci · Hermès
Louis Vuitton · Marni · Max Mara · Miu Miu · Moncler · Oscar de la Renta · Prada · Ralph Lauren · Roger Vivier
Saint Laurent · Salvatore Ferragamo · Stella McCartney · The Webster · Tiffany & Co. · Valentino · Van Cleef & Arpels
partial listing
San Diego FWY (405) at Bristol St., Costa Mesa, CA
SOUTHCOASTPLAZA.COM 800.782.8888
@SouthCoastPlaza #SCPStyle
About Town
Mileposts
Paul Cassidy, a
radio and television executive who
was chairman
of the broadcasting
group Cordillera
Communications,
died March 1 in
Plano, Texas. He
was 83.
1
1 Lerner
and Baron
2 Rex
Ransome
3 Butterworth
3
Hitched, Hatched, Hired
Inside the industry’s celebrations and news
Weddings
Tim Phillips, a TV lit-
Wifreddy Chiang
Bebe Lerner, partner
erary partner at UTA,
and wife Andrea
Phillips welcomed
son Rex Ransome
Phillips on Feb. 23 at
Cedars-Sinai.
senior vp finance
and operations,
Callum Grant senior
vp European acquisitions and sales,
and senior vp talent
brands at ID-PR,
married Mud Baron,
a flower farmer who
runs the Muir Ranch
in Pasadena, on
March 10 at Highland
Springs Ranch &
Inn in Cherry Valley,
California. Bob
(pictured) and two of
Lerner’s other
dogs accompanied
her down the aisle.
Congrats
Victoria Parker was
named executive vp
of MSG Productions
on March 9.
Chara-Lynn Aguiar
was tapped as
vp strategy at ESPN
Media Networks on
March 19.
Ellen Kathleen
Director in Residence
at the School of Media
Studies at The New
School in New York on
March 12.
Shapiro
Stuart Ford’s AGC
Studios named Greg
Shapiro head of
film March 12 and
Michael Rothstein
president of worldwide distribution,
Bill Brady, a longtime director of
CBS News programs
and four-time
chair of the DGA’s
Network Negotiating
Committee, died
March 14 in New York.
He was 65.
Glendon Palmer
senior vp and head
of urban content,
Cristina Garza head
of Latino content,
David Schulhof head
of music and Jed
DeMoss creative
executive March 15.
Comedy Central
promoted Anne
Harris and Christian
McLaughlin to senior
vp talent and development and Tara
Schuster, Ari Pearce
and Jordan Ellner to
vp March 9.
Deaths
Donna Butterworth,
Flynn
Ryan Flynn was
promoted to senior
vp current production at Bravo Media
on March 13.
MARCH 22
Keegan-Michael Key, 47
Reese Witherspoon, 42 →
Cindy Ballard was
named chief HR officer of ICM Partners
on March 8.
MARCH 23
Michael Haneke, 76
Michelle Monaghan, 42
Keri Russell, 42
Sean Baker, writerdirector of The
Florida Project, was
named 2018 Hirshon
MARCH 24
Jessica Chastain, 41
Tig Nitaro, 47
Jim Parsons, 45
To submit, send email to hhh@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
a child actress in the
’60s who co-starred
with Elvis Presley
in Paradise, Hawaiian
Style and with Jerry
Lewis in The Family
Jewels, died March 6
in Hilo, Hawaii,
after a long illness.
She was 62.
Birthdays
Births
Mill House Motion
Pictures partner
Jordan Foley and wife
Katie Foley welcomed daughter Ellen
Kathleen Foley on
March 11 at CedarsSinai Medical Center
in Los Angeles.
Loyola Marymount
University tapped
Peggy Rajski to lead
LMU School of Film
and Television as
dean, effective June 1.
Michael Gershman,
an Emmy-nominated
cinematographer
who shot and
directed episodes of
Buffy the Vampire
Slayer and Crossing
Jordan, was found
dead March 10 in
Malibu. He was 73.
42
M A RC H 21, 2018
MARCH 25
Sarah Jessica Parker, 53
MARCH 26
Alan Arkin, 84
Keira Knightley, 33
Leslie Mann, 46
Martin McDonagh, 48
MARCH 27
Quentin Tarantino, 55
MARCH 28
Vince Vaughn, 48
Mike MacDonald,
a veteran Canadian
stand-up comedian who made more
consecutive appearances at the Just
for Laughs festival
than any other comic,
died March 17 in
Ottawa because of
heart complications.
He was 63.
LERNER: ROCHELLE BRODIN/COURTESY OF SUBJECT. PHILLIPS, FOLEY: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. BUTTERWORTH: PARAMOUNT/GETTY IMAGES. FLYNN:
COURTESY OF BRAVO. SHAPIRO: DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES. WITHERSPOON: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES FOR DISNEY.
2
ADV ERTI S EM ENT
Nearly 50 years ago, the United States banned all tobacco advertising on TV.
Now, surveys find smoking and cigarette brands inside broadcast, cable and streaming
shows watched by millions of American kids. Who thinks that’s a good idea?
H
alf a century ago, tobacco companies spent billions of
dollars on TV advertising. Researchers estimate the
average teen saw 1,350 cigarette commercials each year.
Then, in 1970, Congress passed a landmark law that ended all
tobacco ads on TV and radio. As soon as the tobacco companies
stopped sponsoring TV shows, smoking inside the shows themselves dropped by 70 percent. But look what’s happening now.
Media companies that took Big Tobacco’s ad money before
1970 now feature smoking inside their kid-rated TV shows.
At least fifteen recent scripted TV series rated TV-G, TV-PG or
TV-14 have featured smoking, according to recent surveys.
Fourteen of these shows are produced or broadcast by Comcast,
Disney, Fox, Sony and Time Warner. All five companies have
published policies addressing tobacco in their kid-rated movies.
None has a policy to keep its kid-rated TV shows smokefree.
TV-MA shows attracting many young viewers also include
smoking. Some shows even spotlight actual tobacco brands.
Health authorities have worked for years to get smoking out of the
movies that kids see most. Will America’s biggest media companies
now turn around and embed tobacco in their TV shows instead?
Here’s a better idea. Stop pushing tobacco at kids, period.
Tobacco incidents in TV shows with biggest youth share
Stranger
Things
TV-14
Netflix
The Walking
Dead
TV-MA
AMC
Orange is the
New Black
TV-MA
Netflix
45
House of
Cards
TV-MA
Netflix
41
Fuller
House
TV-G
Netflix
22
Modern
Family
TV-14
ABC
20
American
Horror Story
TV-MA
FX
182
94
15
TV-14
Unbreakable
Kimmy Schmidt Netflix
9
TV-14
Fox
9
Bones
Sample: Scripted live-action series, 2015-16 season. Adapted from Truth Initiative’s report,
While You Were Streaming (2018), available free at truthinitiative.org/smokescreens.
Smoking in movies kills in real life. Smokefree Movie policies—the R-rating, anti-tobacco spots, certification of no payoffs, and an end to brand
display—are endorsed by the World Health Organization, American Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Cancer
Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Americans for Nonsmokers’ Rights, American Public Health Association,
Breathe California, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Los Angeles County Dept. of Public Health, New York State Dept. of Health, New York State
PTA, Truth Initiative and many others. This ad is sponsored by Smokefree Movies, UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94143-1390.
smokefreemovies.ucsf.edu
The Business
Creative Space
Werner owns a
1960s Good Humor
truck, which he and the
grandkids sometimes
drive around the Pacific
Palisades to hand
out ice cream.
Tom
Werner
Comedy’s onetime
kingmaker (and now the
Red Sox chairman) is back
with a Roseanne revival
— and plenty of great tales
He fondly recalls
Jimmy Fallon and Drew
Barrymore shooting
a new ending for
the rom-com when the
Sox won in 2004.
By Lacey Rose
T
he only thing that rivals
the impressiveness of Tom
Werner’s IMDb page is the
impressiveness of Tom Werner’s
business card. On one side, the
card that he slides across the table
in his new Santa Monica offices
reads Thomas C. Werner, chairman, The Boston Red Sox. Turn it
over, and his name sits above
another title: chairman, The
Liverpool Football Club. Such is
the stuff television juggernauts
like The Cosby Show, That ’70s Show
and Roseanne can buy.
In Hollywood circles, however,
Werner, 67, always will be known
as one-half of the sitcom hit factory Carsey-Werner, which he ran
for decades with partner Marcy
Carsey. The pair first worked
together during the late 1970s at
ABC, where Werner and his thenboss championed such comedies
as Soap, Taxi and Mork & Mindy.
Once on their own, the producers
found even more success, first
RÉSUMÉ
CURRENT TITLE
Founder,
Werner Entertainment
PREVIOUS JOB
Co-founder, Carsey-Werner
Entertainment
BIG HITS
The Cosby Show
and Roseanne, both No. 1
series during their runs in
the 1980s and ’90s.
He keeps a
Liverpool Mr. Potato
Head in his ofice
along with a framed
shot of him cameoing
with LeBron James
on Survivor’s
Remorse.
with The Cosby Show (1984-92)
and then with a steady stream of
follow-ups including 3rd Rock From
the Sun, Cybill and Grace Under
Fire. (Though it closed its doors to
new production in the mid-2000s,
Carsey-Werner remains active
as a syndicated distributor of its
hits and will produce the March
27 revival of ABC’s Roseanne.)
It was during that lucrative run
that Werner, a New York-reared
Harvard grad, began dabbling in
sports. In 1990, he and a group
of investors purchased the San
Diego Padres for $75 million,
and by 2001, Werner had scooped
up the Red Sox, with partners,
for a reported $660 million plus
debt; the same group bought
the Premier League team nine
years later.
Though Werner, a father
of three and grandfather of six,
splits his time between Boston
and Los Angeles, he’s still
active in the entertainment
world via his 10-year-old Werner
Entertainment. Among his
recent projects: the off-Broadway
magic show In & Of Itself and
Starz’s now concluded Survivor’s
Remorse. In L.A. for an MLB
owners meeting in late January,
Werner reflected on Roseanne’s
“rocky” years, Robin Williams’
debut and why you shouldn’t hold
out for a That ’70s Show reboot.
heard that iconic music and saw
this relationship between John
and Sara. My emotions, more as a
viewer than as a producer, surprised me. I called her up and she
said, “What do you think about
trying to do a reboot?” Initially, I
was leaning against the idea. The
show was so special, and the bar
was so high. The only way it could
work is if everybody came back —
the idea of doing a reboot without
everybody is just silly.
You’ve been resistant to
remakes. What got you to say yes
to rebooting Roseanne?
You lured back former writers,
many of whom endured rocky
runs on the original. How did you
assuage their concerns?
Sara Gilbert did a segment on
The Talk with John Goodman. She
sent it to me and said, “Watch
this, and let’s chat afterward.” I
Photographed by Michele Thomas
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
44
M A RC H 21, 2018
Even though it was rocky, everyone felt we were making great TV
and that this was an opportunity
Pulled from a
vast collection, his
Emmy for The Cosby
Show and two Golden
Globes for Roseanne
occupy a shelf with
family pictures.
Werner was
photographed
Jan. 30 in his
new Santa
Monica ofices,
where he
shares space
with a full-time
development
executive and
an executive
assistant.
He keeps two
World Series trophies
in L.A. and one in
Boston. Asked about
his early Yankees
fandom, he jokes, “We
all make mistakes.”
After the first episode aired in
1988, Roseanne Barr threatened
to walk, which she’d do again
(and again). How did you handle it?
I just kept believing that the
work was good enough and important enough that we would sort
it out. We could have done a show
about a working-class mom and
cast a more conventional actress,
but Roseanne was the right person. Some children are easier than
others. Moving on … (Laughs.)
air because there was a lot of
consternation about the plot. And
then it was the No. 1 show on TV.
Your résumé is loaded with iconic
sitcoms. Which one was hardest to
get on the air?
You and Marcy have said on
multiple occasions that the rape
allegations against him were
“beyond [your] knowledge or
comprehension” during the series’
run. How would you quantify
their impact on the show’s legacy?
Mork & Mindy. Marcy and I were
desperate because our development slate that year was [dire],
and we’d seen Robin Williams
at The Comedy Store. We talked
to Garry Marshall, concocted
this idea, but we had to put
together a pilot. The reason that
Pam Dawber played Mindy was
because she was in a pilot we had
shot called Sister Terri. We knew
it wasn’t going to get on the air —
but, in it, she was looking stage
left. [We shot something with]
Robin looking stage right and cut
a scene as if they were on the same
soundstage.
So they never actually met?
Not when we did the pilot!
Nobody believed in the show. Fred
Pierce, head of ABC, said, “This is
a one-joke show.” Garry, who
was a good salesman, says, “Fred,
it is a one-joke show, but Three’s
Company is a half a joke.” Fred
laughed. It was a good reminder
that you can get a show on the air
with humor.
DVDs are handy
as he revives
Roseanne. Carsey
opted not to be
involved, but Werner
has sent her rough
cuts of the
rebooted series.
to try it again. We have a chance
to actually talk about stuff like
[opioid addiction] and not end on
a comedic beat.
viewers. When Murphy Brown
was announced, it was all over the
news the next day. But the audience is sophisticated. They may
come the first week, but only if it’s
great will they come back.
The Cosby Show put CarseyWerner on the map, but that was
hardly a slam dunk either.
It was turned down by every
network. And when NBC put it on
the air, stories were very sliceof-life — like, “The grandparents
come over for dinner!” Brandon
Tartikoff said, “So what happens?”
I said, “Well, not a lot. That’s kind
of what we’re doing.”
Every week now we seem to hear
about another reboot. Given your
library, is it safe to assume you’re
approached often?
Yeah, but it’s hard to make a
reboot fresh, and we always had
this sense of we want to be proud
of something that we did — and
we don’t need the income. It has to
be something that’s worth it. I
can’t imagine doing a reboot on
That ’70s Show with Ashton
Kutcher being 35. With Roseanne,
there were new stories to be told
today in Trump America.
What’s driving the reboot craze?
All of these shows have loyal
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
What did the network fight
you on?
They wanted more story. Marcy
and I were in Brooklyn during
the second episode, and we created this scheme where we would
not answer when [the network]
called. Then we’d send them a
cassette, which for some reason
got “lost” between Brooklyn
and L.A. We just wanted to get
through the six or eight episodes
we shot before it went on the
45
M A RC H 21, 2018
Are you in touch with Bill Cosby?
I haven’t spoken to him lately.
It has definitely tarnished
the library, and I don’t want to
say much more about that.
You studied politics at
Harvard. What made you pivot
to entertainment?
I was always interested in
sociology, and the thing I found
extraordinary about TV was
its power. One of my first jobs at
ABC was in the research department. And while my politics are
quite liberal, I was fascinated
about when people were watching
TV and who was watching and
why, and the Nixon White House
was very interested in when the
best time was to give these
speeches. Somehow I became the
point guy for them. They would
call me and say, “The president
wants to give a speech in the next
48 hours. When is the best time
to do it?” I was all of 22.
At 39, you and some partners
bought the Padres, and you
famously invited Roseanne to sing
the national anthem.
It was a bit of a nightmare.
You’ve suggested in the past that
that incident, where she shrieked,
spit and grabbed her crotch,
negatively impacted the show’s
syndication value. Is that true?
It did. There was a lot of anger
toward me [in San Diego], and it
was magnified by the fact that they
thought I was from Hollywood.
There was a guy in front of the stadium with a sign that said, “Honk
if you hate Werner.” I’d put my hat
down and honk as I drove in so he
wouldn’t recognize me. (Laughs.)
Who’s more dificult: athletes
or actors?
It doesn’t matter if they’re
talented.
The Business
How has the push for
pay parity impacted
dealmaking?
Television
GRACE WU If someone is of the
TV Pilot Season
Confidential:
Hiring Talent in
the Time’s Up Era
Six casting chiefs dish on pay parity, the roles
they struggled to cast and the hires that have
them envious By Lesley Goldberg
W
e have even less time this year” has become
a familiar refrain, and this TV pilot season was no exception as casting directors
scrambled to populate 76 pilots in the face of mounting competition from cable and streaming outlets.
Adding to the usual set of challenges were a push for
even greater diversity (calling all Asian males!) and a
new California law that bans potential employers from
asking about an actor’s prior salary or “quote.” With
most key roles now filled, six top casting directors —
ABC/ABC Studios’ Ayo Davis, Universal TV’s Beth Klein,
20th Century Fox TV’s Sharon Klein, Fox’s Tess Sanchez,
Sony Pictures TV’s Dawn Steinberg and NBC’s Grace
Wu — get candid about the stars they wanted and the
leverage they lost as the small screen adapts to the
Time’s Up era.
I wish agents would stop asking …
AYO DAVIS … for offers! I’ll get an email saying someone
is testing on Tuesday, and we have to get an offer out on
Monday to beat it.
BETH KLEIN … what’s in the budget for the role.
DAWN STEINBERG … calling me when they have one offer
to see if I’ll give them another offer to only put up the
price of their first offer.
SHARON KLEIN … what kind of wine I drink.
TESS SANCHEZ … where the series is shooting! It knocks
off half their list if you say someplace other than L.A. or
New York.
same stature and they’re coleads, then that’s something
we would discuss and consider
— we couldn’t overlook it.
S. KLEIN We are being more
cognizant of it. When we put a
two-hander in place, that is the
first conversation. Look at the
cast for Single Parents [Taran
Killam, Leighton Meester and
Brad Garrett] — they’re getting
the same amount.
What has been the
most glaring new
trend in casting this
season?
Who’s the actor
everyone tried to land
this year?
DAVIS Female leads.
B. KLEIN We have even less time
this year than last. Now you’re
lucky if you have time to watch
a self-tape before that actor
has four offers on the table.
And fewer people are auditioning because they have the
leverage to say, “If you want to
be my top priority, don’t make
me audition.”
STEINBERG The networks picked
up scripts later, and while
you should have 10 to 12 weeks
to cast something, now they’re
saying, “We shoot in five or
six weeks.”
WU Having diversity in our
shows in a prominent way,
which now we’re seeing more
than ever across the board
with all the networks.
S. KLEIN There’s a huge
amount of mid- to late-30s,
female-led dramas. And
business-wise, we’re dealing
with making deals without
quotes. Each year, there are
fewer and fewer people available and more and more
people working. And we want
exclusivity [assurance that
an actor won’t work on another
network’s show].
SANCHEZ What’s old is new
with talent from the ’80s and
’90s like Lea Thompson, Don
Johnson and Katie Holmes.
There’s opportunity for people
of all ages.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
46
M A RC H 21, 2018
Davis
B. Klein
S. Klein
DAVIS Jenny Slate, Rosario
Dawson and Leslie Odom Jr.
B. KLEIN We went after Damon
Wayans Jr. and Lauren Cohan
and got neither! A lot of people went after Matthew Goode
and Michael C. Hall.
STEINBERG Mary Elizabeth
Winstead.
WU Alessandro Nivola,
Logan Marshall-Green and
Olivia Munn.
S. KLEIN Jessica Biel, Nick
Offerman, Tatiana Maslany,
Alfre Woodard and Michael
Pena.
SANCHEZ Ramon Rodriguez.
Who’s your most
rewarding discovery?
DAVIS Justin Johnson Cortez,
← From left:
Thompson
(Fox’s
Our People),
Johnson
(Fox’s
untitled Erin
Foster
comedy)
and Holmes
(Fox’s
untitled Ilene
Chaiken
drama).
a Native American actor we
hired on Staties. He won over
our producers in his first take.
STEINBERG The actors in their
70s whom we’ve attached
to NBC’s Norman Lear comedy Guess Who Died: Hector
Elizondo, Christopher Lloyd
and Holland Taylor.
WU Natalie Morales in the Josh
Malmuth and Mike Schur pilot.
S. KLEIN Callie Hernandez
[Mixtape] is a star.
DAVIS: WARREN SKALSKI/ABC. B. KLEIN: COURTESY OF NBC. S. KLEIN, STEINBERG: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES. SANCHEZ: FOX/PICTUREGROUP. WU: CHRIS HASTON/NBC. WINSTEAD: AXELLE/
BAUER-GRIFFIN/FILMMAGIC. PENA, COHAN: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC. WAYANS: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES. SLATE: DAVID LIVINGSTON/GETTY IMAGES. ODOM: ROY ROCHLIN/FILMMAGIC. DAWSON: DONATO
SARDELLA/GETTY IMAGES. HALL: WALTER MCBRIDE/WIREIMAGE. THOMPSON: RICH POLK/GETTY IMAGES. JOHNSON: ERNESTO DI STEFANO PHOTOGRAPHY/WIREIMAGE. HOLMES: BRYAN BEDDER/GETTY IMAGES.
EXECUTIV E SURV EY
How has the new law
about salary histories
impacted your deals?
B. KLEIN Negotiations are defi-
nitely going longer as there’s
a lot more back-and-forth.
WU We’re probably paying
actors more than what their
quotes are. Anyone who had
quotes that were historically
lower has benefited.
S. KLEIN I’ve been doing this
a long time and know what
people’s quotes are and where
they should be. I think we’re
making deals we would have
made last year.
↑ From
left: Pilot
season’s
most
wanted:
Winstead,
Pena,
Wayans,
Slate, Odom,
Cohan,
Dawson
and Hall.
Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Aniston and
George Clooney are each making in the
$1 million range for their TV roles. What’s
the impact on you?
DAVIS The no-quote system [as
part of California’s new law].
We’ve spent a lot of time on the
phone with business affairs,
and it takes more time to get
deals closed.
B. KLEIN Relenting on auditions.
It’s pretty glaring that the process is getting truncated and
what we’re used to — multiple
auditions — seems to be
shrinking because of time and
competition.
STEINBERG The no-quote system has made it really hard
to negotiate deals.
WU There is much more tolerance for being supportive of
people being attached to other
projects. We want to have protections in place so that you’re
not seeing an actor playing a
lead role on another network at
the same time.
S. KLEIN We took much more
care in budgeting these things
with an eye toward equality.
SANCHEZ We’ve had writers
come in with roles that aren’t
seven-year parts but instead
three seasons. That’s exciting
because it gives us the opportunity to get creative in our
dealmaking.
DAVIS Everybody always wants that quote. It makes the
conversations more extensive.
STEINBERG Whenever you’re starting up something, you
probably overpay a tiny bit just to attract those people.
WU It only impacts us if it’s somebody of their stature.
S. KLEIN Those people were never going to go for the traditional model of network television.
SANCHEZ Talent salaries are creeping up in general.
Given the competitive environment right
now, what is the one thing you have had to
relent on?
DAVIS Exclusivity. The industry standard is actors can
only guest in three episodes a season. We’ve been a
lot more flexible this year than any other in order to land
talent. Every actor is working on something else.
B. KLEIN Auditions, which flies in the face of what this is
all supposed to be about. Now it’s all straight offers
because otherwise somebody else will take the talent.
STEINBERG Exclusivity. But sometimes it helps if you have
an actor going out and doing another show that they’re
promoting and also bringing eyeballs to your show — as
long as we’re in first position!
What was the hardest role for you to cast?
DAVIS Asian males, and there are a lot of Asian
male roles.
STEINBERG A funny guy in his 20s, any ethnicity, because
they’re all working.
WU We tried to cast leads with people who didn’t feel
Give us an example
of how #MeToo and
Time’s Up have
impacted pilot season.
What’s the casting that
has you most envious?
STEINBERG [Actress] Genevieve
DAVIS Walton Goggins [in CBS’
L.A. Confidential].
B. KLEIN: Damon Wayans Jr. [in
CBS’ untitled Austen Earl
comedy] and Lauren Cohan [in
ABC’s Whiskey Cavalier].
S. KLEIN I love Damon Wayans
Jr., but we didn’t have anything
for him this year, and Les
Moonves called him personally
to get him.
SANCHEZ Emmy RaverLampman [from the touring
cast of Hamilton] in Netflix’s
Umbrella Academy. I was convinced we were going to put her
on a Fox show.
What’s the biggest
change to the way
you’ve done business
this season?
Sanchez
Steinberg
Wu
Angelson passed on a pilot
because they wouldn’t pay her
parity with her male co-star.
Good for her.
WU In terms of casting and how
we’re talking about characters,
we’re all feeling like marginalizing women or female voices is
just unacceptable.
SANCHEZ We’ve done more
examining of gender in specific
roles. Like, why can’t that be a
female police chief? Why can’t
that governor be a woman?
It was reflected in the pilots we
pick because we had so many
female leads.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
47
overly familiar or conventional. [Lead actress] Sarayu
Blue changed the Aseem Batra comedy, so we’re now
casting actors who are of South Asian descent to play
her parents, and her kids are going to be biracial.
S. KLEIN The 35-year-old female single lead in a drama.
Everybody’s working!
SANCHEZ Single female leads in their 30s. It’s been challenging to convince an actress who has or is starting a
family to move to Vancouver, Chicago or Atlanta to do
22 episodes and potentially uproot a family. We’re going
to have to get creative.
What casting most surprised you?
DAVIS Toby Kebbell in Salvage. I did not think we’d be
able to land him.
WU Jessica Alba in NBC’s Bad Boys spinoff. We thought
we already had our star in Gabrielle Union, but she
was determined to land a big star [opposite her] and was
responsible for delivering Jessica.
S. KLEIN It surprises me that pilot season is still a thing!
SANCHEZ Damon Wayans Jr. on a CBS multicam.
M A RC H 21, 2018
NOWHERE
ELSE
JOIN 12 000+ ATTENDEES
TUESDAY 8 – THURSDAY 17 MAY 2018
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A Power Stylist’s
New Suit Shingle
2
eading men on Hollywood’s red car-
L pets have a new reason to high-five.
4
1
1 On the subway, from left: Bullock, Blanchett, Rihanna, Kaling,
Awkwafina, Carter, Hathaway and Paulson each exude a distinct style.
2 Rihanna’s hacker borrowed fashion inspiration from Bob Marley.
3 Bullock’s ringleader dons a Stella McCartney fur-free white jacket.
4 Blanchett (whose costumes were inspired by Richards, 5) with Bullock.
Ocean’s 8 Style:
How to Transform
Cate Into Keith
MARLEY: CHRIS WALTER/WIREIMAGE. OCEAN’S: BARRY WETCHER/WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. RICHARDS: JON FURNISS/WIREIMAGE. SUIT:
COURTESY OF ILARIA URBINATI. HEDLIND: JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC. URBINATI: DONATO SARDELLA/GETTY IMAGES FOR THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER.
Blanchett’s androgynous look joins Bullock’s ‘sleek
and polished’ outfits and Rihanna’s Bob Marley hats
in summer’s most fashionable movie By Booth Moore
ith Cartier jewels, couture
gowns and eight stylish stars,
Ocean’s 8, out June 8 from
Warner Bros., is shaping up to be the
most fashionable film of the summer.
The new female crew of the Ocean’s
franchise gathers to pull off a heist at the
Met Gala, stealing a diamond necklace
worth more than $150 million. “Going
back to the original in the 1960s, fashion was a character in the movie,” says
costume designer Sarah Edwards.
Edwards crafted distinct looks for each
crewmember, keying into her special
talent. “It’s important that everyone is
instantly recognizable because everything is moving so quickly in a heist,” she
says. The ringleader, art forger Debbie
Ocean (Sandra Bullock), is “calm, sleek
and polished like her brother” Danny
(George Clooney) in minimalist clothes,
while her best friend, nightclub owner
W
5
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
3
Lou (Cate Blanchett), is all rock ’n’ roll.
“We tried to translate Keith Richards
into a female character,” notes Edwards,
who tapped Burberry to design velvet
suits for Blanchett’s androgynous glam
look. Starlet Daphne (Anne Hathaway)
is a “classic actress like Elizabeth Taylor,”
while Rose (Helena Bonham Carter) is a
“fashion designer past her prime” who
is a mix of “Vivienne Westwood, Grace
Coddington, Victorian and Japanese
style.” Playing against diva type, Rihanna
portrays Nine Ball, a Caribbean hacker.
“She has such an incredible sense of
personal style, and here I was putting
her in these huge baggy jeans with boots
and an Army jacket, which she embraced
completely,” says Edwards. Rounding
out the cast is jewelry designer Amita
(Mindy Kaling); criminal turned soccer mom Tammy (Sarah Paulson); and
pickpocket Constance (Awkwafina), a
“skater punk.”
For the Met Ball, Edwards tapped
Vogue for help in asking houses to create custom looks, putting Bullock in
an Alberta Ferretti sea-life-motif gown,
Blanchett in a Givenchy green sequin
jumpsuit, Hathaway in a pink Valentino
cape gown and Rihanna in a red Zac
Posen ball gown. “A lot of the girls didn’t
see the dresses until two days before
[shooting],” says Edwards. “Thank goodness, everyone liked theirs.”
49
M A RC H 21, 2018
Power stylist Ilaria Urbinati — whose
clients include Armie Hammer and
Donald Glover — has designed a suit
collection, debuting in April, in
collaboration with millennialfocused brand Strong Suit.
“Honestly, it was all really selfish,” says Urbinati of the initial
inspiration. “I work with 40
diferent men and I need stuf all
the time, so I was thinking, ‘What do
I need for fittings that I can’t get?’ ”
Such needs included spezatto
suits (in which the trousers and sport
coats are diferent colors); pleated
pants that aren’t too baggy (“We always
have to tailor them,” she says); and a
higher-waist trouser, which prevents an
awkward gap between the pants and
vest of a three-piece suit. True to form,
Urbinati didn’t shy away from patterns
and texture (“They gave me books
upon books of fabrics to choose from,”
she says) or color, selecting a range
of spring-appropriate hues, from hunter
greens to cranberry. Silhouettewise, the collection ofers something
for everyone: snazzy tuxedos; traditional cuts; and more casual, unlined
linen suits. Mudbound actor Garrett
Hedlund debuted a green linen style
at the Spirit Awards, teaming it
with a red paisley shirt for a ’70s vibe.
The Arkansas-based Strong
Suit’s prices (from $500 at strongsuit
clothing.com and Nordstrom) also
were a plus for Urbinati. “When I post
things on Instagram, my friends can
go buy it,” she says. “For the suits
to be at Nordstrom is amazing because
everyone can get their hands on
one.” — SAMANTHA REED
↓ Kilgore blue windowpane suit; $795.
Right: Hedlund in Ignatius sport coat ($695)
and Edmond linen shirt ($125).
Style
Tribute
Givenchy’s
‘Marriage’
to Hepburn
Today’s red-carpet style owes its start
to the late designer’s relationship with a
star, writes a historian By Bronwyn Cosgrave
n March 10, the French master of the
little black dress, Hubert de Givenchy,
died at age 91. His partnership with
Audrey Hepburn in the 1950s and ’60s, which
forged a bond between Hollywood and haute
couture, lives on.
That legacy was front and center this
awards season. Long black dresses — evocative of the dark, languorous Givenchy gown
that Hepburn, as Holly Golightly, wears
in the opening scene of her best-known film,
Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1958) — dominated
the run-up to the Oscars as the formal garb
of Time’s Up. The protest movement’s sartorial ethos also resonates with Hepburn’s
decision to exclusively wear Givenchy
onscreen and at the Oscars through much
of her career. After she visited Givenchy’s
Paris atelier in 1953 — to secure him as her
designer for Sabrina — she considered his
designs to be her uniform. “I felt so good in
his clothes,” she once said.
Before Hepburn and Givenchy, Hollywood’s
relationship with the French fashion industry
had proved fractious. For three of his 1930s
movies, Samuel Goldwyn paid Coco Chanel
$1 million to create costumes. After working with Gloria Swanson on Tonight or Never
(1931), she severed her relationship with the
studio. Swanson had become pregnant, though
she never let on during her fittings. “Lose five
pounds!” Chanel demanded. That never happened. As for the expansive atelier Goldwyn
set up for Chanel on his lot, she visited it once.
Hepburn’s breakthrough in Hollywood was
partly due to her fresh image. Her unusually slight frame was a contrast to the pinups
like Betty Grable and Marilyn Monroe who
dominated the box office at the time. She
humanized couture, which the average
woman had never aspired to wear until she
came along. And as she
↓ Hepburn in Givenchy in
Sabrina, for which Head won proved the ideal muse
a costume Oscar in 1955.
for Givenchy, he shook
up the traditions of his
craft by conceiving a
more youthful mode,
interpreting the freespirited creativity
O
1 Hepburn in a
1958 fitting with designer
Givenchy at his Paris
atelier. 2 The designer and
his muse in 1983.
3 The 1970 facade of the
French fashion house,
founded in 1952.
1
2
enveloping his artsy, Left Bank Paris domain.
Unlike some of his fashion forerunners who had worked on costume pictures,
Givenchy also put up with the
petty frustrations of dealing with
egotistical costume designers.
He never commented publicly on
Edith
Head accepting the best cosHead
tume design Oscar for what was
mostly his work on Sabrina. (Truth be told,
Head was quite capable of making gowns for
Hepburn and dressed her when she won the
best actress Oscar in 1954 for Roman Holiday.)
Above all, a wide range of women looked to
Hepburn’s Givenchy gowns for fashion direction. Growing up in L.A., an adolescent Cher
studied Hepburn and Givenchy’s partnership.
When she hit it big in the late 1960s, she found
her Givenchy in Bob Mackie. Looking back on
winning her Oscar for Moonstruck, Cher said:
“The biggest thing in my life was winning that
award. The second biggest thing was shaking
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
50
M A RC H 21, 2018
hands with Audrey Hepburn and having her
say, ‘I’m so happy you won.’ ”
It was 1988 and by then, Giorgio Armani was
scouting Hollywood for muses, which he first
found in Michelle Pfeiffer. Ultimately, Armani
enlisted a stable of talent (not unlike the
old studio system), rather than just one star,
to represent his work on the carpet. Today,
most luxury brands do the same, contractually
enlisting celebrities to advertise their designs.
There was never a contract between Givenchy
and Hepburn. She paid for Givenchy couture
that she wore offscreen. From 1956, a contract
clause stipulated that Givenchy make costumes
for all her contemporary films. Givenchy
referred to their relationship as a “marriage”
and once said, “She remained absolutely, unbelievably loyal to me.”
Cosgrave is a fashion historian and author
of 2007’s Made for Each Other: Fashion and
the Academy Awards.
HEPBURN: REPORTERS ASSOCIATI & ARCHIVI/MONDADORI PORTFOLIO/EVERETT COLLECTION. SABRINA: GEORGE RINHART/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES. PORTRAIT: PHOTOFEST. BUILDING: AFP/GETTY IMAGES. HEAD: PARAMOUNT/GETTY IMAGES.
3
Style
Real Estate
Beyond the ‘Black Beverly Hills’
for South L.A.’s Insecure Generation
Issa Rae isn’t the only industry player putting down roots in neighborhoods where
Lenny Kravitz and Tina Turner have lived, prices are soaring and diverse buyers are
discovering historic homes, A-list views and ‘strong family feel’ By Peter Kiefer
Illustration by Jason Lee
52
Charles Quarles. For many of
the 300 influencers who attended,
from Jamie Lee Curtis to Ted
Sarandos and Nicole Avant, it was
their first exposure to the area’s
historic architecture and breathtaking views. “I don’t know if
[the fundraiser] had an impact on
home prices,” says Quarles. “But
I do know it was something that
people were proud of, and there
were many guests who had never
visited the area before.”
Yet the region’s Hollywood ties,
primarily to African-American
film and music stars, stretch back
generations. Ray Charles owned
a home in View Park, as did Ike
and Tina Turner. Debbie Allen lives
there and has her dance academy
in Baldwin Hills. Baskets coproducer Sally Sue Beisel-Lander
has a house in Baldwin Hills,
where Lenny Kravitz lived during
high school — he credits the area’s
architecture for inspiring the
launch of his own interior design
firm. Media executive Ramon
Wilson grew up near Principato
Young’s Kevin Parker in View Park,
where TV exec Billy Parks bought
in 2017. Warner Bros. senior vp
production Niija Kuykendall lives
in Leimert Park, where Parker’s
colleague Brian Dobbins (whose
clients include Anthony Anderson,
Kenya Barris and Andre Braugher)
owns an investment property.
Two years ago, Sony senior vp and
chief diversity officer Paul Martin
bought in Ladera Heights. “It’s
in the heart of L.A., but it feels very
much like East Coast suburbia,”
says Martin. “There is a sense of
escape, a strong family feel, yet
it’s only a short drive to some of
the major studios.”
Tour these neighborhoods, and
you’ll glimpse some of the city’s
best hillside living — and views:
north-facing to the Hollywood
sign, east-facing to the downtown
skyline. Some vantage points in
Ladera Heights and View Park
have south- and west-facing views
that peek into the South Bay and
stretch across to Catalina. A smattering of #ResistTrump signs dot
curved, palm-lined streets with
manicured lawns. Spanish, Tudor
↓
5200 SHENANDOAH AVE.
Aflalo’s 5,400-square-foot
four-bedroom with pool was
listed Feb. 5 for $2.3 million
by Marina Steele.
405
LADERA HEIGHTS
Darden
Aflalo
Sony senior vp and chief diversity oficer
Paul Martin makes his home in this threesquare-mile area that’s broken up into
“upper” and “lower” Ladera Heights, with
Slauson Avenue as the dividing line. Cruise
the streets, and you’ll feel as if you’ve
traveled back in time with a wide range of
mid-century, mostly single-story homes.
Many have south-facing views, but a select
group on the upper stretch of Shenandoah
Avenue along the blufs feature stunning
looks at the ocean. Christopher Darden of
O.J. Simpson trial fame lived here, as did
rapper Tyler, the Creator. Orlando Magic
guard Arron Afflalo put his 1961-built
home (pictured above and below), formerly
owned by WNBA legend Lisa Leslie, on the
market in February for $2.3 million.
BALDWIN: GEORGE ROSE/GETTY IMAGES. SHENANDOAH: VISUALOPENHOUSE.COM. AUREOLA: COURTESY OF COLDWELL
BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE. KRAVITZ: JEFFREY MAYER/WIREIMAGE. RENDERING: COURTESY OF DEPARTMENT OF CITY
PLANNING. SIMPLY: 7552532@N07/FLICKR. VIEW: PIERRE GALANT/COURTESY OF BENJAMIN J. KAHLE. DOBBINS: MATT
WINKELMEYER/GETTY IMAGES. DARDEN: NATHAN CONGLETON/NBC/NBCU PHOTO BANK VIA GETTY IMAGES. AFFALO: GARY
BASSING/NBAE VIA GETTY IMAGES. OBAMA: SAMIR HUSSEIN/WIREIMAGE. ALLEN: LEON BENNETT/WIREIMAGE. KUYKENDALL:
FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES. KEELING: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. JOHNSON: DAVID LIVINGSTON/GETTY IMAGES.
hy now? It’s a question that mystifies
longtime residents of
Baldwin Hills (often referred
to as the “Black Beverly Hills”)
and its surrounding South L.A.
neighborhoods — Ladera Heights,
View Park, Windsor Hills
and Leimert Park — that are
now seeing double-digit annual
price jumps in their historic
homes and an influx of diverse
new buyers in ZIP codes that
traditionally have drawn mostly
African-American families.
Some attribute the trend to
positive exposure in a crop of
films and TV series, particularly
HBO’s Insecure. “In other shows,
it was always like, ‘Oh, we’re
going to South L.A., we’re going to
the hood’ — or Law & Order would
do a ‘Somebody got murdered on
that street!’ And it’s like, nobody
got murdered there, what are you
talking about?” says creator and
star Issa Rae of Insecure’s chic, sexy
depiction of the area. “I know the
L.A. that I see, and I was just tired
of seeing it not reflected.”
Other observers point to
development around the RamsChargers NFL stadium in
Inglewood (including 3,000 housing units, 620,000 square feet of
retail and a hotel) that is poised to
transform the area when it opens
in 2020. (There’s been talk about a
new Clippers arena in Inglewood
as well.) Also, the soccer-specific
Banc of California Stadium, home
of the new Los Angeles Football
Club, opens April 29 in nearby
Exposition Park, where the Lucas
Museum of Narrative Art broke
ground March 14.
But the most intriguing theory
of the boom centers on Barack
Obama, who attended a 2012 fundraising breakfast in View Park
hosted by real estate developer
W
BA LDW IN HILLS
The nabe where Lenny Kravitz grew up,
now the setting of Issa Rae’s HBO comedy
Insecure, includes Baldwin Vista — a few
thousand homes tucked up against Kenneth
Hahn state park (pictured) — and an enclave
known as the “Dons,” where all but one
street starts with “Don” (Spanish for “sir”),
a nod by 1950s and ’60s developers to the
area’s Mexican heritage. Until that period,
the area was home to mostly white families;
some left after the U.S. Supreme Court
invalidated white-only real estate covenants
in 1948, and there was a larger exodus after
the Watts riots in 1965.
Rae
L E I M E R T PA R K
Kravitz
Kuykendall
Warner Bros.’ Niija Kuykendall lives in the area named for 1920s developer
Walter H. Leimert, who commissioned the Olmsted Brothers (sons of the
master behind New York’s Central Park) to design its plan. Leimert has its
own walkable village but will contend with a massive plan just blocks away to
10
redevelop the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw
Plaza mall (rendering above) that
would create a 10-story ofice building, 961 apartments and condos, a 400room hotel and more than 300,000 square feet of restaurants and retail.
↓
3026 6TH AVE.
This newly landscaped
three-bedroom was
listed March 7 for
$960,000 by Sotheby’s
Andrea Dunlop.
↑
5634 GLENFORD ST.
This 2,500-square-foot
three-bedroom with city
views, listed by Keller
Williams’ Tammy Faecher,
sold March 1 for $1.5 million.
↑
3660 AUREOLA BLVD.
↑
This 3,700-squarefoot four-bedroom, listed
by Coldwell Banker’s
Janet Singleton, sold in
December for $1.57 million.
V I E W PA R K
5434 MARBURN AVE.
This 1,900-square-foot
three-bedroom was listed
Jan. 4 for $930,000 by
Cardona Realty’s Juan
Carlos Ayala.
Obama
Allen
W INDSOR HILLS
The housing stock here is less impressive
than in neighboring View Park: Homes start
at about $700,000 — many ofering southfacing views. Former NBA great Marques
Johnson, who listed his home on Dawn View
Place last year for $1.5 million, plans to relist
the house this spring. The area has beloved
eateries including the Caribbean restaurant
and health food store Simply Wholesome
(pictured), originally opened by local Percell
Keeling in 1984 and relocated in 1995 to the
site of abandoned 1950s sandwich shop The
Wich Stand (at the corner of West Slauson
Avenue and Overhill Drive).
Keeling
Johnson
The home of Debbie Allen and the
site of a buzzy 2012 Barack Obama
fundraiser was added in 2016 to the
National Register of Historic Places.
The area’s only documented home
(pictured below) built by renowned
architect Paul Williams — a
2,900-square-foot three-bedroom
on a 0.32-acre lot — sold in 2017
for $1.3 million. Monteith Park, a small,
triangular green space at the corner
of Olympiad Drive and South Mullen
Avenue that in 2012 was reinvigorated with improved lighting and new
benches, hosts summer concerts and
community movie nights.
Style
1 Compass’
Kofi Nartey
holds the
$1.8 million
listing on this
three-bedroom
on Baldwin
Hills’ Don
Diablo Drive.
2 A rendering
of the L.A.
Football Club’s
$250 million
stadium.
Real Estate
Rent a Slice of Hollywood History
Villa Carlotta’s $5.5 million reno restores the scandal-tinged
building’s 1920s details as 50 units will hit the market soon
1
2
in January stood at about $1.3 million, a 19 percent increase from
the same month last year.
When listings hit the market,
bidding wars are now commonplace. A three-bedroom on
South Sherbourne Drive in Ladera
Heights, listed in January for
$1.2 million, closed a month later
for $1.32 million. “There is so
much demand and just not enough
inventory,” says Coldwell Banker’s
Molly Lowe, who sees many older
homeowners — predominantly
African-American — selling to a
more diverse pool of young
professionals. “Whites, Asians —
everyone is coming in,” Jackson
confirms. “Some people are complaining that white residents are
starting to take over our neighborhood, but on the flip side, property
values are going up. So it’s complicated.” Lowe adds that she often
sees buyers who are priced out
of the Westside think twice about
purchasing a Playa Vista condo
once they see what they can get for
their dollar in Windsor Hills or
Leimert Park.
“You know what’s brought more
visibility to the area — and I hate
to give props to the technology
— but it’s people driving through
using a [navigation] app,” says
Coldwell Banker’s Janet Singleton.
“They’ll call up and say, ‘I just
saw your sign. What is the name
of this neighborhood? And how
much is it?’ ” The answer creeps
ever higher. Driving through View
Park, Jackson shakes his head as he
points out a string of homes that,
if listed, could fetch more than
$2 million. “Can you believe that?”
he asks. “It’s crazy.”
estoring Villa Carlotta in Franklin Village — a site wrapped in one of
R Hollywood’s most tantalizing scandals — was going to take more than
a coat of paint. So after acquiring the 50-unit building for $12.25 million in
2014, CGI Strategies set out a meticulous $5.5 million plan to breathe new
life into the historic structure considered by many to be L.A.’s version of
New York’s Chelsea Hotel. (CGI’s original plans to convert the landmark into
a boutique hotel were scrapped in 2015 amid fierce local opposition.)
“I think everyone thought it would be torn down and brought up to
modern standards, but nope — they wanted to keep it as real as it was,”
says local muralist Alan Jurgens, who spent a year restoring hundreds
of stenciled beams (hand-mixing more than 100 custom paint colors) on
the building’s cofered ceilings. With renovations now complete, THR got
an early look at L.A.’s newest old building, where CGI will be listing a mix
of studios, one- and two-bedroom apartments and a rooftop penthouse.
Monthly rents haven’t yet been determined (units will come to market in the
coming weeks), but based on comparable apartments in the area, a onebedroom should go for about $2,000.
Built in 1926 at the corner of Franklin and Tamarind avenues near
the base of Beachwood Canyon, the Spanish colonial building originally
belonged to Eleanor Ince, widow of silent-film tycoon Thomas Ince. Its
architect, Arthur E. Harvey, also designed the neighboring Chateau
Elysee — now Scientology’s Celebrity Centre. In 1924, Thomas Ince died
a few days after being carried of William Randolph Hearst’s yacht, and
rumors swirled that Hearst had shot him by accident — a bullet intended
for Charlie Chaplin, whom the mogul suspected of having an afair with
his mistress, Marion Davies. Hearst allegedly financed the building’s
construction as a grief payment to Eleanor.
In later decades, Villa Carlotta became a favorite haunt for rock bohemians like Jim Morrison.
No two units share the same layout, and
almost all original moldings, cabinetry, sinks,
doors and windows were preserved — a painstaking process for CGI’s Mark Ross, who worked
with consultants from the Hollywood Heritage
Museum and L.A.’s Ofice of Historic Resources.
“I was expecting to find a skeleton wearing a
tuxedo in one of the closets,” he jokes. The building has a rooftop deck and a tiled entryway with
a grand piano (but no onsite parking). Arguably
the best unit is the two-story townhouse once
occupied by gossip scribe Louella Parsons,
another passenger on Hearst’s yacht that
fateful night. As a hush payment (again, allegedly), Hearst gave her the apartment, where
she cranked out columns that were fetched by a
courier via her window. — P.K.
→ Top: Even the palm trees in Villa Carlotta’s courtyard are landmarked. Right, top: the building, circa 1920s; bottom: Parsons’ onetime townhouse.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
54
M A RC H 21, 2018
DIABLO: COURTESY OF COMPASS. RENDERING: GENSLER. VILLA: COURTESY OF DB&R MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS, INC. (3).
and mid-century houses from
such renowned architects as Paul
Williams and Raphael Soriano,
many single-story, appear modest
from the street, but lot sizes can
reach 17,000 square feet, and many
homes have pools.
What you won’t see is much
ground-up construction. “Many
new buyers appreciate the
architecture in these areas and
are restoring many of the older
Spanish, mid-century and colonial
homes with period details and
upgrades, as opposed to gutting
and remodeling,” says Deasy/
Penner’s Benjamin Kahle, who lives
in View Park and specializes in
its historic homes. The John Aaroe
Group — which was folded into
Pacific Union in 2017 — opened a
Baldwin Hills office two years ago.
Its team of 15 agents includes Ron
Jackson, who has lived in Baldwin
Vista for decades and has sold
more than 100 homes in the area
— which has long been undervalued, he notes. But that’s changing:
The past two years, the median
home price in Baldwin Hills has
soared from $620,000 to almost
$785,000 — a 27 percent jump
— according to Zillow. In Ladera
Heights, the median home price
MAKING AN IMPACT
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From Sharon Altman, Karen Ivanick,
and your team at CLA
CLAconnect.com
THE 25
MOST
POWERFUL
IN
H O L LY WO O D
Do fashion and feminism still match?
Hell yes, say the tastemakers who’ve
treaded carefully through the most
sensitive awards season ever and are
ranked by THR in the eighth annual
celebration of the glamour gurus
turning red carpet stars into style’s
most potent influencers
PRODUCED A ND EDITED BY CA ROL MCCOLGIN
C LIE N T
E L L E FA N N I NG (L EF T)
A N D SA M A N T H A
M C M I L L E N (NO. 3)
“I do get inspired by the film
I’m in and put a little of that
into my look,” says Fanning. “For
Maleficent, I played Sleeping
Beauty, so why wouldn’t we go
full-out princess?” The actress
also explains how she feels about
designer questions on the red
carpet: “Samantha and I put a lot
of efort into the clothes, so,
yeah, you can ask me who this is.
I’m very proud to tell you because
those fittings last a long time.”
On Fanning Valentino Couture dress,
Tifany & Co. ring. On McMillen Valentino
dress, Neil Lane jewelry.
PHOTOGR A PHED BY
D I E G O U C H I T E L O N M A RC H 8
AT LIN E 204 ST U DIO
IN H OL LY W O OD
Every year, THR assesses the hits and
misses of Hollywood’s most star-studded
red carpets (or black carpets, as they were
at the Golden Globes and BAFTAs). The
culmination of a fashion season that —
for the entertainment industry — begins
with the Cannes Film Festival and wraps
at the Oscars, this eighth annual list
ranks the town’s most influential stylists. Factors considered include taste, star power of a stylist’s client roster,
social media impact, and relevance in the awards-season
conversation and beyond. Even as #AskHerMore morphed
into #WhyWeWearBlack and feminist messaging elevated
red carpet moments, let’s not forget that green is still
part of the mix whenever a stylist works to craft the right
image for the right star and takes him or her to the next
level. Margot Robbie, whose glamour guru Kate Young
ranks No. 1 this year, was named Chanel’s new face on Oscar
Sunday (for an idea of what that could mean: Emma
Stone’s Louis Vuitton deal reportedly scored her up to
$10 million). “Fashion is a big business, especially in this
industry,” says Elizabeth Saltzman (No. 2), who dressed
Oscar nominee Saoirse Ronan. “It gives people escapism
and a little relief — let’s let it be.”
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S The
youngest Fanning sister shut
down Cannes in 21 looks, including a hand-painted Vivienne
Westwood unicorn gown. “We
were like, ‘Yes!’ ” says Elle of
Westwood’s offer to paint the
dress. “It had the unicorn and my
name.” Adds McMillen: “It’s like a
museum piece. Really incredible.”
T OP L O O K S Fanning, 19, channeled Grace Kelly at the Berlin
Film Festival in caped Valentino
Couture. “It was different for
me because it was very closed
up and it wasn’t pastel,” says
Fanning, who has six upcoming
films including Reed Morano’s I
Think We’re Alone Now.
NO. 6
I L A R I A U R B I N AT I
ELIZABETH
ST E WA R T
NO. 2
K AT E YO U NG
ELIZABETH
SA LT Z M A N
C LIE N TS Margot
Robbie, Dakota Johnson,
Selena Gomez, Natalie
Portman, Michelle Williams,
Sienna Miller
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S THR’s
most influential stylist, who
also topped this list in 2012 and
2016, boasted 1.3 billion media
impressions in 2018 for her
styling during Oscar week of
Robbie alone, who was named
the new ambassador for Chanel
the day of the show. Young
dresses a roster that fronts some
of the most coveted luxury labels
— Gucci (Johnson, 28), Louis
Vuitton (Williams, 37) and Dior
(Portman, 36), which are Nos. 1,
2 and 7 of Google’s most searched
brands in 2017.
T OP L O O K S Young outfitted
Robbie, 27, in everything from
Versace butterflies to Miu Miu
feathers and an embroidered white
Chanel Haute Couture gown for
the Oscars that took Karl Lagerfeld
550 hours to create (Robbie topped
Instagram's list of Oscar stars
with the most buzz). Says Young:
“Our ’90s supermodel theme
informed the clothes, hair and
makeup choices [for Margot]. I just
love the bright, minimal feeling
from that era.”
CLIE N TS Saoirse Ronan,
Gwyneth Paltrow
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S Saltzman,
a former Vanity Fair fashion
director, set trends with her more
extreme “editorial” approach for
Lady Bird nominee Ronan’s looks.
“It’s never just about a pretty dress
on a rack,” says the London-based
stylist, who mixed it up with a
’60s-inspired Prada minidress
for the Spirit Awards and pink and
orange Gucci satin in Palm
Springs. Says Saltzman, “I saw it
on the runway and grabbed it.”
T OP L O O K S Ronan, 23, graced
the Oscars in Calvin Klein by
Appointment with a dramatic bow
back (detachable for parties). “Pink
seemed iconic,” says Saltzman,
who also loved Ronan’s “powerful”
sculpted, padded-shoulder Versace
at the Globes. “It was a moment
that wasn’t about fashion — it was
about strength.”
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S Two
words: Wonder Woman. Gadot was
the year’s biggest breakout star,
gaining 13.8 million Instagram
followers as her film pulled
in $821 million worldwide at the
box office. Stewart posted a
Boomerang of the heroine, 32,
flashing flat sandals under her
fiery red Givenchy gown for the
premiere. “I’m not complicated.
I like to look a little bit sophisticated, clean, simple and elegant,
and I really like to be comfortable,” says Gadot, who also was
one of the most tweeted-about
Oscar stars in Givenchy fringe
with a jaw-dropping Tiffany
& Co. aquamarine necklace that
had more than 1,000 diamonds.
Says Stewart, “Gal is very confident, so fittings can go quick.”
T OP L O O K S The actress wowed
in Altuzarra’s gilded warrior dress
at the Justice League premiere.
Says Gadot, “We had a gunmetal
dress, and two days before the
premiere, Elizabeth came with the
golden one — it was perfect.”
NO. 3
SA M A N T H A
MCMILLEN
CLIE N TS Elle Fanning,
Dakota Fanning, Daisy Ridley,
Ashley Judd, Brie Larson
NO. 5
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S
Urbinati is a menswear tastemaker, putting forth such trends
as rich velvet and 1970s looks,
as showcased by Hammer’s retro
gold Dolce & Gabbana tuxedo
in Palm Springs. Says Urbinati,
“I used heavy bow ties, ’70s
colors and cuts, pinky rings and
a lot of unbuttoned shirts with
gold chains.”
T OP L O O K S Urbinati’s favorites
include Hammer, 31, in Armani
red velvet at the Oscars. And,
in lieu of a white rose pinned to
his lapel, she dressed Glover, 34,
in an all-white Zegna tux at the
Grammys, the ultimate nod to
women’s rights. “Initially, no one
was clear on whether the men
were supposed to participate in
Time’s Up,” says Urbinati. “I posted
about it on Instagram, stating
yes, the men would be standing by
the women and wearing black. The
Rock commented, and the whole
thing went viral.”
NO. 7
MICAEL A
E R L A NG E R
C LIE N TS Meryl Streep,
Lupita Nyong’o, Common
Diane Kruger
J U L I A VON B O E H M
CLIE N TS Nicole Kidman
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S Von
Boehm consistently lands the
Hear celebrity stylists dish on their clients’ do’s and don’ts at THR.COM/VIDEO
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
C LIE N TS Armie Hammer,
Dwayne Johnson, Donald
Glover, Shailene Woodley
58
M A RC H 21, 2018
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S “I dressed
seven people for the Oscars,” says
Erlanger, who styled nominee
Streep, 68, in a plunging red Dior
PREVIOUS SPREAD: FANNING HAIR BY JENDA ALCORN, MAKEUP BY KATE SYNNOTT AT THE WALL GROUP. MCMILLEN HAIR BY RICHARD MARIN AT CLOUTIER REMIX, MAKEUP BY KATE SYNNOTT AT THE WALL GROUP. SET DESIGN BY DANIEL HOROWITZ
AT JONES MGMT. THIS SPREAD: WESTON HAIR BY RACHEL BURNEY AT THE WALL GROUP, MAKEUP BY SAISHA BEECHAM AT CLOUTIER REMIX. BOSEMAN GROOMING BY SAISHA BEECHAM FOR KERASTASE L’INCROYABLE BLOWDRY AT CLOUTIER REMIX.
NO. 4
CLIE N TS Gal Gadot,
Viola Davis, Cate Blanchett,
Jessica Chastain
NO. 1
most coveted runway pieces
(Valentino, Rodarte’s silver
sequins in Cannes, Versace from
Donatella’s epic Tribute
Collection) for Kidman, who
delivered high-impact styles for
her Big Little Lies awards sweep.
The New York-based stylist
commissioned a crimson Calvin
Klein by Appointment pleated
silk dress with $2 million worth
of Harry Winston diamonds for
Kidman’s big win at the Emmys.
T OP L O O K S The Australian
actress, 50, was the evening’s best
dressed in cobalt Armani Prive
with a bold bow at the Oscars.
CLIE N T
C H A DW I C K B O S E M A N A N D
ST Y LIST A S H L E Y W E ST ON
Says Boseman about his Black Panther press tour looks: “I was
able to be myself and enjoy wearing the clothes. You have to find
someone who knows what you’re willing to try. Sometimes, I’m
like, ‘Uh …’ but then she understands what I mean.” Adds Weston,
who has worked with the actor since June 2014: “We don’t speak
too many words. We've been around each other long enough.”
On Weston Dsquared2 shirt, bra, skirt; David Yurman jewelry.
On Boseman Dsquared2 jacket, shirt, pants; David Yurman jewelry.
PHOTOGR A PHED BY Z EN I T H R ICH A R DS
ON M A RC H 1 AT 632 ON H U DSON
IN N E W YO R K CIT Y
CLIE N T
A NSEL ELGORT
(RIG H T) A N D ST Y LIST
J O H N TA N
When Elgort first met Tan, he told
the stylist that he’d worn a Zara
suit to the CFDA Awards honoring
his photographer father, Arthur
Elgort. “John looked at me and said,
‘You never have to go buy a suit
again — I’ll dress you in insane
designers.’ It sort of became this
thing,” recalls the actor.
On Tan Palm Angels jacket, Louis Vuitton
shirt, Dries Van Noten pants, Paul Andrews
shoes, Carrera sunglasses. On Elgort Tom
Ford jacket, sweater, jeans, belt, shoes.
PHOTOGR A PHED BY
DAV I D N E E D L E M A N
O N M A RC H 2 AT T H E
1896 IN B RO O K LY N
THE SPECIALISTS:
MEN’S, MUSIC AND
R ISING TASTEM A K ERS
M E N’S
MICH AEL FISHER
The stylist draws inspiration from his clients and the
roles they’re promoting. Three
Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri’s Sam Rockwell, 49,
had an awards season wardrobe built around his “Tony
Manero, Saturday Night
Fever” vibe. “Sam has some
slick moves, and his suiting
reflected that,” says Fisher. For
Stronger’s Jake Gyllenhaal,
37, it was all about “very classic, strong leading-man looks,”
and for Star Wars: The Last
Jedi’s Adam Driver, 34, it was
“all-black everything” as
it only could be for the actor
playing Kylo Ren.
CHRIS HOR AN
Director Jordan Peele, 39,
looked sharp throughout
awards season in a range of
tailored looks by Burberry,
Paul Smith and Zegna
Couture. Most notable was
his classic white Calvin Klein
tuxedo jacket with a Get
Out-themed deer-antler
lapel pin when he took home
the best original screenplay
statuette on Oscar night.
Says Horan, “We used artwork
based of the film to make
gold antlers that were dripping red enamel blood.”
JEFF K IM
When it comes to nailing
men’s style, Michael B.
Jordan’s guru has it down.
Kim dressed the actor, 31,
in a double-breasted Calvin
Klein suit and gold-tipped
shirt for the Black Panther
premiere in L.A. Kim’s
inspiration? “We wanted to
bring in subtle elements
of his character, the golden
jaguar suit.”
“Ashley definitely raised my
fashion game. I’m a tailored
man because of her.”
JOHN TAN
“I saw a blue velvet tuxedo
jacket and loved it,” says Tan,
describing the inspiration
for his longtime client Ansel
Elgort’s Oscars look. “Before
I even said a word, Tom Ford
suggested the same color —
talk about destiny,” adds the
New York stylist, who also
chose a Tom Ford charcoal
turtleneck and pinstripe suit
for the 24-year-old actor’s
Baby Driver premiere. “Keep
in mind it was June, and Los
Angeles weather doesn’t call
for turtlenecks, but I thought
it could be a strong alternative to a classic shirt and tie,”
says Tan. “I’d like to think
Ansel, Tom Ford and I made
that fashionable again.”
ASHLEY W ESTON
The NYC stylist had a
jam-packed schedule with
Chadwick Boseman’s worldwide Black Panther blitz.
Their hero look? The actor,
40, stood out in an embroidered Dzojchen kimono suit
at the film’s South Korea
premiere in Seoul. “It’s like, ‘Go
big or go home.’ Chadwick’s
willing to make a statement,
Hart
ASHLEY NORTH
Jumanji actor Kevin Hart,
38, called on his stylist of
10 years for the $928.9 million film’s press bonanza.
For the Hollywood premiere,
“we paired Kevin’s Neil
Barrett suit with a boot rather
than a dress shoe, and that
was something diferent for
him,” says North. Adds Hart:
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
and I like that,” says Weston.
Boseman tells THR, “Working
with Ashley means I don’t
have to think about it, and
that’s the whole point.”
JEAN N E YANG
“I reference Sean Connery
as James Bond for proper fit
and tailoring,” says Yang, who
keeps Alexander Skarsgard,
41; Jamie Dornan, 35; and
Kumail Nanjiani, 40, dashing.
Adds the veteran stylist, “I
always have handkerchiefs in
my kit — they add the exclamation point to a tuxedo.”
M U SIC
KOLLIN CARTER
“You can have a million fittings
and bring a ton of dresses,
but if you and that client don’t
connect, it always shows,”
says Carter, who clearly clicks
with his muse, Cardi B, 25.
“Our Clive Davis pre-Grammy
look got a huge response.
People have seen Cardi in
tons of colors, hairstyles,
silhouettes, but this was different. We decided to go super
minimal and classic — she
wore an Ashi tuxedo dress
with a built-in corset and exaggerated hips that gave her
the shape of a goddess. It’s an
all-time favorite.”
JA MIE MIZR AHI
The stylist, who keeps
American Idol judge Katy
Perry, 33, looking fierce (her
beaded Rasario slip for the
Oscar party circuit was nextlevel dazzling), also pulls
designer duty. Mizrahi took
over as Juicy Couture’s creative director in 2017, and she’s
aiming to make the iconic L.A.
brand cool again.
MEL OTTEN BERG
Rihanna’s longtime New York
City-based stylist has first dibs
on the dreamiest Giambattista
Valli couture. He dressed the
star, 30, in a frothy cottoncandy pink confection for the
Valerian carpet in Hollywood,
even making a cameo on
Instagram, while flufing
@BadGalRiri’s sweeping train,
much to the liking of 1.9 million
of her Instagram followers.
62
M A RC H 21, 2018
M AR N I SENOFON TE
Senofonte shatters the social
sphere whenever Beyonce,
36, steps out. The singer’s
post of her Grammys velvet
cold-shoulder Nicolas Jebran
dress (inspired by the 1960s
Black Panther movement)
garnered 3.5 million double
taps on Instagram. “From her
custom-made Judith Leiber
panther crystal purse to her
Lorraine Schwartz jewels,
no detail was spared,” says
Senofonte. “And, as large
as Beyonce’s earrings were,
they weighed next to nothing
except for the 80 carats of
flawless diamonds.”
RISIN G
MOLLY DICKSON
The longtime assistant of
Leslie Fremar went out on
her own in 2017, dressing
Stranger Things’ Sadie Sink,
15, in Jackie O-esque Miu
Miu for the Globes (“I was
inspired after binge-watching
The Crown,” Dickson says)
and Scarlett Johansson, 33,
in vintage Yves Saint
Laurent for a New York gala.
Dickson’s styling must-haves?
“Cofee, double-stick tape,
a strong team and Y7 Yoga.”
ERICA CLOU D
Karla Welch’s former assistant
got the biggest response to
This Is Us’ Mandy Moore, 33,
in sweeping Rosie Assoulin
at the Globes. “It was a Time’s
Up statement and also a nod
to a strong, inspiring female
designer,” says Cloud, who
started working with Wonder
Woman director Patty
Jenkins, 46, this year.
A N DREW MU K A M A L
“Spectacular jewelry is key,
especially in the sea of black
at the Globes,” says Mukamal
of Big Little Lies’ Zoe Kravitz,
29, in jaw-dropping Lorraine
Schwartz emerald earrings
(105 carats!) with Yves Saint
Laurent. The pair also topped
best dressed lists with rainbow Dior at the Emmys. Says
the stylist, “It was whimsical
for us, but the fit and plunging
back gave it the sexy-cool factor we favor.” — C.M.
PREVIOUS SPREAD: GROOMING BY FRED VAN DE BUNT AT ART DEPARTMENT. THIS SPREAD: RONAN HAIR BY DRITAN VUSHAJ FOR SACHAJUAN AT FORWARD ARTISTS, MAKEUP BY FIONA STILES AT STARWORKS ARTISTS. SALTZMAN HAIR BY DALLIN JAMES AT THE WALL GROUP, MAKEUP BY HINAKO AT THE WALL GROUP. HART: PHILLIP FARAONE/GETTY IMAGES.
Image gurus behind the recent red carpet moments of Beyonce,
Sam Rockwell, Katy Perry, Chadwick Boseman, Cardi B and Patty Jenkins
discuss the looks that put them on Hollywood’s map
C LIE N T
SAO I R S E RON A N
ELIZABETH
SA LT Z M A N (NO. 2)
(L EF T) A N D
“I don’t think there’s anything
necessarily wrong” with being
asked whom she’s wearing on the
red carpet, says Ronan. “I’ve
never had a problem with it. I want
to talk about the film first and
foremost, but I do think it’s fun to
be creative when it comes to
fashion, and that’s something I’ve
started to appreciate because of
working with Elizabeth.”
On Ronan Giambattista Valli dress, Kate
Spade earrings, Jimmy Choo shoes.
On Saltzman Michael Kors dress, Carlo Zini
earrings, Verdura bracelet, Miu Miu shoes.
PHOTOGR A PHED BY
BR IGI T T E SI R E ON
M A RC H 2 AT MINIB A R
IN H OL LY W O OD
Couture dress. “We loved the bold
color — it was an added bonus
that it was designed by a woman”
(Maria Grazia Chiuri).
T OP L O O K S The New York-based
stylist wanted a “warriorinspired” wardrobe for Nyong’o’s
Black Panther press, including
a violet bejeweled Atelier Versace
for the premiere of the billiondollar box-office behemoth.
Nyong’o, 35, captioned a photo for
her 5.4 million Insta followers:
“Purple Reign.”
NO. 8
K ARLA W ELCH
C LIE N TS Tracee Ellis Ross,
Sarah Paulson, Justin Bieber,
Elisabeth Moss, Demi Moore
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S While
Welch’s Oscar “It” girl Ruth Negga
wasn’t out on carpets this year,
the stylist never played it safe with
her other “strong, vocal, independent” clients. Welch collaborated
with Ross on 2017’s Comme
des Garcons-themed Met Ball,
where the Black-ish actress, 45, in
sculptural blue, was one of a few
attendees who dared to wear a Rei
Kawakubo extreme look.
T OP L O O K S Welch, who topped
THR’s list in 2017, turned out 11
outfits for Ross’ American Music
Awards hosting gig: “It was
an awards season in one night.”
NO. 9
C R I ST I N A
EHR LICH
C LIE N TS Greta Gerwig,
Allison Williams, Laura Dern
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S The
bicoastal stylist pulled off an
awards-season trifecta: quirkychic for Lady Bird director
Gerwig, timeless glamour for Get
Out actress Williams and fearless chameleon looks for Big Little
Lies nominee Dern, 51.
T OP L O O K S Oscar nominee
Gerwig, 34, brought the “wow”
factor in sky blue Rosie Assoulin at
the Spirit Awards. Says Ehrlich of
Dern’s Calvin Klein at the Oscars,
“Laura’s choice of white, the
opposite of black, felt symbolic of
the cultural shift that has already
occurred and will continue
to grow.”
‘YOU DON’T GET ON
THE
BEST
DRESSED
LIST OV ER N IGHT ’
THR’s first Stylist Roundtable
reveals red carpet challenges,
from the Golden Globes’ ‘battle of
the black dress’ to designers
about-facing on rising stars to
losing money during awards
season: ‘We put ourselves in a
hole’ for a shot at fashion glory
BY BOOTH MOOR E
PHOTOGR A PH ED BY RU V EN A FA NA DOR
If ever there was an awards season that tested the mettle of Hollywood stylists, it was this one. When Time’s Up orchestrated a red carpet “blackout”
before the Golden Globes, stylists had just days to find all-black options, as
everyone from show producers to nominated talent struggled with what
was fashion-appropriate for the politicized mood. One of the upsides of
Hollywood’s gender-equality reckoning has been the beginnings of a serious discussion about inclusion. In that spirit, THR hosted its first Stylist
Roundtable to discuss how the red carpet itself is becoming more inclusive,
among other topics. The guests March 6 were Jason Bolden, 35, who helped director Ava
DuVernay become her own style icon; Law Roach, 39, who transformed Mudbound’s Mary
J. Blige from music diva to leading lady; Tara Swennen, 38, who guided I, Tonya best supporting actress Allison Janney to become a style star; and Ilaria Urbinati, 38, and Jeanne
Yang, 50, who pushed the envelope with Armie Hammer (Call Me by Your Name) and
Kumail Nanjiani (The Big Sick). Their conversation touched on everything from how the
carpet became a #MeToo platform to what stylists get paid (it’s not as much as you think).
Let’s talk about Mary J. Blige.
ROACH My mind-set was to introduce the
world to Mary the actress because we’re so
familiar with Mary the singer. But when I
met her, I was schooled. She said, “I like what
I like.” I had to figure out clever ways to
introduce things that were still her — but she
didn’t know were her yet. What people don’t
understand about this job is that it’s not about
the dress. It’s about the psychology of what
leads up to the dress. Every time we’d [try on a
dress] and pull the shoulders down, her posture would change. So I figured out, this is her
comfort zone. After that, everything became
off-the-shoulder.
Did you have to talk her into things?
Who was the first client you got paid to style?
JASON BOLDEN Gabrielle Union.
TA R A SW EN N EN Lindsay Lohan a million years
ago — she had a Proactiv commercial.
IL A RIA U R BINATI Brendan Fraser. It all went
wrong, but I learned a lot.
J EA N N E YA NG Keanu Reeves. I did the entire
cast of The Matrix, actually. It was kind of
the beginning of real celebrity styling, which
didn’t exist. It was a two-month press tour.
L AW ROACH The R&B singer K. Michelle.
What’s the biggest misconception about what
you do?
SW EN N EN [That we] just shop.
U R BINATI Thinking we just show up and put
clothes on people, that we snap our fingers and
there are our favorite looks. They don’t understand the item you see go down the runway is
the only one in the world.
BOLDEN And it’s circulating …
U R BINATI … at trunk shows, to editorial
shoots at Vogue or Elle. It really has almost
nothing to do with what dress you think is best.
The dress has to be available at the time you
need it, the fashion house has to want to lend it
to that particular client, then it has to come, it
has to fit, and they have to like it.
And it’s always a sample size?
BOLDEN You’re lucky if it’s a 2.
U R BINATI Men’s is so much easier. A lot of
the time, I’m pulling from store merchandise,
and they have all the sizes.
Clockwise from top left: Bolden, a contributor to E! Live
From the Red Carpet; Yang, Katie Holmes’ ex-partner of
the now-defunct Holmes & Yang clothing label; Swennen,
who also does costume design; Roach, a judge on America’s
Next Top Model; and Urbinati, whose first designer suit
collaboration debuts in April, were photographed March 6
at Carondelet House in Los Angeles.
On Bolden: Hermes shirt and pants, Balenciaga hat. On Yang: Pallas
coat, Chloe shirt, Saint Laurent pants, Hoorsenbuhs earrings. On
Swennen: Adrianna Papell jumpsuit. On Roach: Saint Laurent jacket,
Dolce & Gabbana shirt and pants, Calvin Klein vest, Gucci glasses, John
Hardy bracelet. On Urbinati: COS sweater, Derek Lam 10 Crosby skirt,
Casadei boots.
Did Time’s Up make this a dificult season, especially the all-black looks on the Golden Globes
red carpet?
U R BINATI It was more pressure, and there
were more things to consider than just what’s
the prettiest dress.
BOLDEN More like: Could you get another
black dress?!
SW EN N EN We were all in panic mode.
YA NG We were all on text chains.
BOLDEN It was the first time everyone
banded together.
U R BINATI I had a custom tux made for one
of my clients for the BAFTA Awards that
we couldn’t end up using because we had to
do black at the last minute. For the BAFTAs,
they made an announcement. But with the
Globes, I had publicists calling me, “Are the
men wearing black? Do you have to wear a
black tux shirt?”
SW EN N EN It was a decision that was made
very late in the game. Allison Janney’s Mario
Dice dress had a little white beading, and
she was very fearful. In the end, I said that I
didn’t want that to impede our creativity.
So we did it, and it was one thing that set her
apart at the Globes.
BOLDEN My client Ava DuVernay said she
heard no makeup, no jewelry. Then I looked
at her and said, “We’re wearing makeup and
jewelry.” It boiled down to the battle of the
best black dress.
ROACH It became fun to see the carpet and
how we all interpreted black.
YA NG If you think about it, though, there’s no
other industry where we can push an agenda
like this. The fact is that artists, whether in
music or film, have always been the progressive
front because we have been the most accepting of being different. It’s wonderful that the
red carpet [is] more important than just what
you’re wearing.
How do you develop an awards-season style
strategy for a client?
ROACH I try to figure out who my client is and
not change them but just elevate if I can, so it’s
a lot of them and a little bit of me.
ROACH I had to talk her into wearing the mint
green Elie Saab for the Palm Springs Film
Festival awards gala because that was a color
and silhouette she had never done. That was
my breakthrough point. I finally just said,
“Trust me.” She did, and the reviews and compliments she got. … She said, “You’re right.
From now on I will listen.”
Tara, how did you work with Allison?
SW EN N EN It was about developing a trusting
relationship and pushing her a little bit at
every single event. For the I, Tonya press run,
we did something like 55 outfits by the end.
We didn’t want to repeat too many colors or
patterns or shapes. She also is over 6 feet tall,
and we could play with her because she is a
fashion stylist’s muse. If you look, she was getting progressively a little bolder.
Do you think a style strategy can make a
diference when it comes to an Oscar campaign?
SW EN N EN I’m sure it affects it. It’s attention. It
was beautiful to watch her bloom.
How do you feel about criticism?
BOLDEN Everyone has their point of view. But
I tell people, “Do you really understand what
just happened?” She could have had the most
amazing dress five seconds ago … then she
was late, she drank last night and can’t fit in it.
People don’t realize all the things that can
go wrong.
BOLDEN Or that you get last-minute phone
calls that a client is just deciding to attend.
You were saying that your client Taraji P. Henson
was a last-minute RSVP to the Oscars!
BOLDEN [I had] two days. She is the nicest
human on the planet. She shows up to fittings,
puts it on, and if she starts talking to herself
in the mirror, it’s done: “Oh, this is a queen
moment, honey! The bitches are going to lay
at my feet, honey!” Then she starts doing
her posing.
YA NG It’s interesting there’s never been a
styling competition reality show because
Watch five celebrity stylists sound off about the industry at THR.COM/VIDEO
By then, she was under contract at Chanel.
BOLDEN If you say no to me at the beginning,
no is forever. I am notorious for using the
exact same email that says, “Unfortunately,
we would like to pass.” So I go back and write,
“Unfortunately, WE’D like to pass!”
ROACH I do the same thing!
BOLDEN I don’t really know if it’s the design
houses more than the PR people. Because you
have these girls and guys who sit there and
just because that is not something they [themselves] watch on television, it’s not important.
U R BINATI It is funny how personal it is. You’ll
“I
B
Z
T
D
L
N
to dress her, I say no. We go to Paris, you see
the designers, they say, “I love her, how come
I’ve never dressed her?”
YA NG You have to build relationships though,
that’s what I tell my clients: Go to the lunch, go
the event. I’m the OG of the group. There are
designers I have worked with for years who
once in a while will say no. It doesn’t matter if
I have the biggest A-list star in the world, it’s
not a match. It’s a testament to you that you’re
able to work around it.
SW EN N EN For devil’s advocate, now people are
doing street style, so those samples could all be
going to the airport on a Jenner and it’s game
over. There are more people in Hollywood and
the music business than ever … everything is
spread super thin.
YA NG Actors don’t have tons of money, at
N T H E B E GIN NING,
R A N D S W OU L DN’T T
ENDAYA. NOW WE GO
O PA RIS, Y O U S E E T H E
E S I G N E R S, T H E Y S A Y, ‘I
O V E H E R, H O W C O M E I’V E
E V E R D R E S S E D H E R ? ’ ” Roach
Do you think there is enough inclusion in terms
of whom fashion brands are willing to loan to?
ROACH I built my career and Zendaya’s career
on not using any big brands at all.
BOLDEN Boom.
ROACH I will tell you why, because in the beginning they wouldn’t touch her.
BOLDEN Pass, pass, pass.
ROACH Zendaya made it to the cover of Vogue,
she has never worn Valentino, Gucci or Chanel.
She only wore Dolce & Gabbana when she got a
Dolce campaign. We built that girl’s career and
my career using smaller brands and emerging
designers to prove a point. Now that they want
3
If it’s so hard to borrow, why not just buy?
least in the beginning, so it’s about buying
some and borrowing some, getting smart
pieces and developing their style. When
I started working with Kumail right before
the Emmys, he was hoping to get his movie
to Sundance. Cut to Oscars. But even still,
you don’t get on the best dressed list overnight. One thing I want to
convey to young actors is
to develop a trust in us, let
BIG
us go in for a long game,
don’t have us just for a few
OUCH
red carpet events.
have someone random on some show, and you
think they’d never loan to you, and the designer
turns out to be a huge fan. I have worked in
every aspect of the business, so I understand
as a brand you have a certain image. If you are
Gucci and you have five runway-worthy dresses
that season, maybe you want to save them for
the big moment.
1
But a great Gucci dress,
why not buy it?
U R BINATI Then anybody
can wear it, and they do
“Who wore it best?”
ROACH In the beginning, I
only put Zendaya in things
other people have worn
because literally she is 6 feet tall. Who is going
to wear it better? She is.
Do you think men get more of a pass on the
red carpet?
U R BINATI Men dressed really boring for
years, then my client Armie [Hammer] wore a
red velvet tux to the Oscars in March. Men are
getting praise because they are finally wearing color, doing something different, whereas
when women take risks, they get eviscerated.
That has to stop. I think it’s crazy we’re doing
this whole Time’s Up thing and talking about
the way we treat women versus men, but
somehow no one is talking about how it’s OK
we tear women to shreds in the media. There
were a couple of people who didn’t wear black
to the Globes, and people were shaming them
on social media. Maybe that person felt like
wearing red made more of a statement, maybe
she didn’t get the memo.
SW EN N EN I always say you haven’t made it
until you’ve made it on the worst dressed list.
2
YA NG People have said stylists have ruined the
red carpet. I feel like for the first time, we see
people of all sizes, colors and shapes, and you
can identify and say, “Oh, that person, I love
her city style or his ability to peacock.” That to
me is what makes it.
Jason, Ava is a director, someone behind the
scenes, who has now become a style icon.
ROACH Can I say, I’m obsessed with what you
do with her. I love when someone creates a
point of view for a client.
BOLDEN Ava is a force, the voice of now. Ava
is not the normal size we are maybe used to
seeing. She wears The Row to Prada, and it’s
all custom. The people who buy The Row do
not look like those girls [designers Mary-Kate
and Ashley Olsen]. That consumer looks like
Ava. When you think about the dollars and
cents, what’s keeping these businesses afloat,
it’s someone who looks the opposite of that
PR person [or designer], and [they] are saying
no to that person. So, it goes deep.
What is it like working with a designer on a
custom piece?
BOLDEN I’m straight up sketching. When I
was working on Yara [Shahidi]’s 2017 Emmys
dress, I was on the phone with [Prada] saying
it had to be her last princess moment.
U R BINATI Even with Armie’s red velvet
Armani tux, down to every button, the lining,
the lapels. When we decided on the red velvet, I
said if we put a black lapel on it, which you normally do on a tux, it will look like Hugh Hefner
or a weird vampire. All those little details are
the difference between what makes it work and
what makes it ridiculous.
PREVIOUS SPREAD: SET DESIGN BY CHARLOTTE MALMLOF. BOLDEN GROOMING BY DYANA RAZINN. ROACH GROOMING BY ORLANDO, MAKEUP BY AMBER AMOS AT THE ONLY AGENCY. HAIR BY RUSLAN NUREEV AT THE WALL GROUP, MAKEUP BY MIA JONES AT THE
WALL GROUP. ON-SET STYLING BY JARDINE HAMMOND. THIS SPREAD: JANNEY: AXELLE/BAUER-GRIFFIN/FILMMAGIC. DUVERNAY, BLIGE: STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. HAMMER: NEILSON BARNARD/GETTY IMAGES. NANJIANI: DAN MACMEDAN/WIREIMAGE.
90 percent of what we deal with are external
factors — the manager, agent, boyfriend or
designer. You are juggling 20 balls, and then
someone will throw in another one.
SW EN N EN People forget a lot of designers don’t
want to dress your clients. I remember with
Kristen Stewart, I called Lanvin for seven
years. They said, “Listen, our demo to sell these
clothes is closer to the 30s, so she’s not what
we want quite yet.” Every two months, I called
and said, “Are we ready yet?” Finally, it was
like the clouds opened up, and we got it, and she
was like, “Nah.”
NO. 10
actress, 29, eschewed a gown for
a pink and red suit by the brand
for the Oscars carpet.
J I L L L I NC O L N &
J O R DA N J O H N S ON
5
4
1 Swennen’s
client Janney
in Mario
Dice at the
Golden
Globes.
2 Styled by
Roach,
Blige wore a
mint green
Elie Saab to
the Palm
Springs Film
Festival
awards gala.
3 Hammer’s
red velvet
Armani
tux for the
Oscars,
courtesy of
Urbinati.
4 Bolden’s
Oscar
gown for
DuVernay
was Armani
Prive.
5 Yang’s
client
Nanjiani
(with wife
Emily V.
Gordon in
J. Mendel)
donned
a Zegna
tux for
the Oscars.
Some people think stylists get paid under the
table by designers to dress their clients.
YA NG When a makeup artist or a hairstylist
comes to a shoot, they are paid their full-day
rate. When we go in for the awards shows, we
typically get paid [by studios] about $1,000 per
look. Then we deduct our expenses: shipping
costs, paying assistants and tailoring, and it
costs up to $1,500 to $2,000 per look.
CLIE N TS Jennifer
Lawrence, Jennifer Garner,
Kiernan Shipka
W H Y T H E Y M AT T E R The
duo dress Dior brand ambassador Lawrence in sexy yet
feminist-minded fashions such
as her metallic, rainbow-pleated
gown at the Red Sparrow opening in London. Lincoln says that
Lawrence’s sheer Atelier Versace
at the mother! London premiere
was gangbusters on social, and
Johnson cites Garner’s arms as
the inspiration for the presenter’s
knockout electric blue at the
Oscars. Says Lincoln, “The dress
had to show off her arms.”
T OP L O O K S Lawrence, 27, made
headlines when she stepped
out in a revealing and plunging
black Versace at a London photocall, while her male co-stars
bundled up in the brisk cold.
She snapped back at critics on
a Facebook post: “This is sexist. … Everything you see me
wear is my choice. And if I want
to be cold THATS MY CHOICE
TOO!” Boom.
So during awards season, you lose money?
BOLDEN Every day.
SW EN N EN We have no union to protect us, and
NO. 11
the studios have banded together for a set rate
that’s not enough. You can get into an uncomfortable position with your client, who will
say, “I’m promoting this movie, why should I
pay for my own alterations?”
U R BINATI If it’s worn on the red carpet,
designers will usually cover tailoring.
SW EN N EN The aesthetic is key, so we’re not
going to compromise your look just to get a
little side cash. That being said, we will openly
welcome it if it’s available.
ROACH It’s not like you’re striking a deal. The
brands will pay your day rate. I went from making $10,000 a day working with girls in music
who didn’t have the right look to making
$750 a day for someone Hollywood thought had
the look. We take these jobs, make less money,
put ourselves in the hole, so we can make it to
that magazine.
U R BINATI It’s a long game, the equivalent of
an actor doing an indie movie.
SW EN N EN But it’s worth the money to ensure
we do our job properly, and the lead actress or
actor is looking …
BOLDEN … like a movie star.
CLIE N TS Reese Witherspoon,
Emma Stone, Amy Adams,
Zoe Saldana, Emilia Clarke
NO. 12
L AW R OAC H
C LIE N TS Mary J. Blige,
Zendaya, Celine Dion,
Tom Holland
W H Y H E M ATTERS Instagram’s
most followed stylist, Roach
started working with Blige, 47,
for her Mudbound press tour.
The singer and Oscar nominee
shifted her style from curvaceous
sparkle to more elegant looks by
Vera Wang and Cushnie et Ochs.
A winged Jean-Louis Sabaji
Couture dress with door-knocker
David Webb earrings at the SAG
Awards kept the drama levels high.
T OP L O O K S Zendaya, 21,
wore a monarch butterfly dress
by Moschino to The Greatest
Showman premiere in Australia.
“I was so inspired by the costumes and also took into account
that the monarch is native to
the country,” says Roach. He also
pulled out the stops for 49-yearold Dion’s white Stephane Rolland
with exaggerated shoulders at
the Billboard Awards. “That one
went viral. I got calls and texts
from people telling me they cried
[when they saw Dion].”
PE T R A F L A N N E RY
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S THR’s
No. 1 stylist in 2015 called on Zac
Posen this year to create something simple for her powerhouse
actress-producer-entrepreneur
client, who helped spearhead the
Time’s Up movement and allblack Globes carpet. “Reese knows
what she wants, and Petra brings
the magic polish,” Posen tells
THR. Witherspoon, 41, captioned a
photo of her gown on Instagram:
“This year’s look means so much
more. Standing in solidarity.
#WhyWeWearBlack.”
T OP L O O K S Flannery’s longtime client Stone landed a
two-year Louis Vuitton deal in
October rumored to be worth
between $6 million and $10 million. The Battle of the Sexes
NO. 13
ROB ZA NGA R DI
& MARIEL HAEN N
C LIE N TS Jennifer Lopez,
Lily Collins, Hailee Steinfeld,
Jessica Biel, Gwen Stefani,
Ciara
W H Y T H E Y M AT T E R The
in-demand duo are known for
megawatt glamour and have a
massive audience thanks to the
126.3 million-plus collective
Instagram following of their
superstar clients.
T OP L O O K S “We like to do
the unexpected,” says Zangardi,
as evidenced by 21-year-old
Steinfeld’s purple metallic kneehigh boots with a classic strapless
white gown at the Grammys.
Says Haenn, “Stylists are making
bolder choices not only for the
talent to make a statement but
also for themselves.”
NO. 14
NO. 16
J A S ON B O L D E N
LESLIE FREM AR
C LIE N TS Yara Shahidi,
Ava DuVernay, Storm Reid,
Taraji P. Henson
CLIE N TS Charlize Theron,
Julianne Moore
NO. 15
W EN DI &
N ICOLE FER R EIR A
C LIE N TS Sally Hawkins,
Octavia Spencer, Elizabeth
Banks, Tom Cruise, Chris Pine
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S The
Ferreira sisters juggled two
Shape of Water nominees —
Hawkins, 41, and Spencer, 45
— and both actresses made
a splash in Armani Prive and
Brandon Maxwell at the Oscars,
respectively. “Sally’s dress was
customized to actually be wearable because the one shown on
the runway was too heavy,” says
Nicole of Hawkins’ long-sleeved
crystals. Adds Wendi of Spencer’s
satin organza: “Octavia wanted
‘Shape of Water blue or green.’ ”
TOP LOOKS Banks, 44, was red
hot in a spangled Jeffrey Dodd
dress at the Pitch Perfect 3 premiere in Hollywood. Says Wendi,
“Our inspiration was a simple
slip, but we still wanted it to have
Elizabeth’s personality — it was
simple, sexy, dynamic.”
NO. 21
JEN R ADE
C LIE N TS Angelina Jolie,
Rumer Willis
NO. 19
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S A
mainstay whose stellar output
is consistent, New York-based
Fremar draws inspiration from
the “incredible women” she works
with: “You need to stay confident
in your vision; people can give you
direct feedback on social media,
and they don’t hold back.”
T OP L O O K S Fremar remains the
film fest queen, whipping up crystal and scarlet tulle Valentino for
Moore, 57, in Venice and a Prada
flapper gown with Chopard gems
for Theron, 42, in Cannes.
NO. 17
TA R A S W E N N E N
CLIE N TS Allison Janney,
Kristen Stewart
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S The L.A.based stylist elevated Janney’s
style over the course of her I, Tonya
Oscar run-up. She outfitted the
star, 58, in a slinky Mario Dice
gown with sequin cutouts (originally white, then reconfigured in
black for the Globes), but Swennen
was most proud of Janney’s Bibhu
Mohapatra gown with elaborate
sleeves at the BAFTA Awards:
“It exuded couture-like elegance
while supporting the Time’s
Up movement.”
T OP L O O K S Swennen dressed
Janney in two winning Oscar
looks — a red Reem Acra gown
with Jimmy Choos and a custom
Brandon Maxwell top and skirt.
NO. 18
E R I N WA L S H
CLIE N TS Thandie Newton,
Sarah Jessica Parker,
Maggie Gyllenhaal
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S “Fashion
is meant to contribute to the
narrative. This awards season
was a good indicator of that,”
says Walsh, who dressed Parker,
52, in Sophia Loren -esque
Dolce & Gabbana with “La Dolce
Vita accents” for the black Globes
dress code. “We used fashion as
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
N I C K Y YAT E S
CLIE N TS Claire Foy,
Vicky Krieps
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S The
London-based stylist keeps the
Crown star looking modern. “I
loved the contrast of an ultrafeminine cape against masculine
trousers,” says Yates, referring
to Foy’s custom Oscar de la Renta
jumpsuit for the Emmys.
T OP L O O K S Foy, 33, dazzled in
embellished Gucci at the Breathe
London premiere. Yates says
fans also reacted to Foy in Stella
McCartney at the Globes: “Claire’s
suit had its own Twitter page at
one point.” Another crowning feat
for Yates was Krieps, 34, in red
Alexander McQueen lace at the
Phantom Thread NYC premiere: “It
was a special moment.”
NO. 20
T H OM A S C A R T E R
PH I L L I P S
CLIE N TS Millie Bobby Brown,
Danai Gurira
W H Y H E M AT T E R S The New
York-based stylist makes his
debut on THR’s list after working
with the Stranger Things fashion
darling, who was named the new
face of Calvin Klein Jeans. Aptly,
Phillips dressed Brown, 14, in
pink Calvin Klein by Appointment
sequins with Converse kicks for
the SAG Awards.
T OP L O O K S The ex-assistant to
Flannery (No. 11), Ehrlich (No. 9)
and E!’s Brad Goreski teamed with
Gurira for her Black Panther tour:
“It was an honor to have a small
part in such a historic moment in
film. We drew inspiration from
Danai’s heritage and worked with
African designers,” including Lisa
Folawiyo from Nigeria, Sindiso
Khumalo from South Africa, and
EDUN, which sources across
Africa. The actress, 40, was gifted
a striking turquoise necklace in
South Africa. Says Phillips, “She
wore it over a The Row dress at the
Johannesburg premiere.”
68
M A RC H 21, 2018
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S The
veteran stylist has worked with
red carpet queen Jolie, 42, for
the past 15 years. Rade’s secret
weapon? “My tailor and couture
designer Laura Basci — she takes
everything and makes it better.”
T OP L O O K S Rade especially
loved Jolie’s fitted Ralph & Russo
with feathers at the Critics’ Choice
Awards (“Classic Hollywood
glamour but also totally fresh and
modern”). Of the several carats
worn by the First They Killed My
Father director at the BAFTAs,
Rade says, “Graff hadn’t loaned to
celebrities in probably 50 years,
so that was a moment.”
NO. 22
J A S ON R E M B E R T
C LIE N TS Issa Rae, Rita Ora,
Zayn Malik
W H Y H E M AT T E R S The stylist
turned Insecure star Rae, 33, into
one of the year’s breakout fashion
“It” girls — she’ll host the CFDA
Awards in June.
T OP L O O K S “Issa in Marc
Jacobs got a big response!” says
Rembert of Rae’s graphic sequin
dress at the NAACP Image Awards.
Other hits included Malik, 25,
in a dusty pink Richard James suit
with a white rose lapel patch at
the Grammys.
NO. 23
A N NABELLE
H A R R ON
C LIE N TS Oprah Winfrey,
Salma Hayek
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S It’s all
about Oprah. “My Golden Globes
look got the biggest response,
and it was more about a moment
than the clothes,” says Harron.
Winfrey’s impassioned Cecil B.
DeMille Award acceptance speech
rallied the audience and 19 million viewers, with #Oprah2020
becoming one of the evening’s top
trending hashtags. The 64-yearold icon’s off-the-shoulder Atelier
GADOT HAIR BY RENATO CAMPORA AT THE WALL GROUP, MAKEUP BY SABRINA BEDRANI AT THE WALL GROUP. STEWART HAIR BY MATTHEW COLLINS FOR L’OREAL AT THE WALL GROUP, MAKEUP BY HINAKO FOR DIOR AT THE WALL GROUP. SET DESIGN BY LIZZIE LANG AT WALTER SCHUPFER MANAGEMENT.
W H Y H E M AT T E R S Bolden
keeps his roster of activist,
accomplished women looking
fashion-fierce while they rewrite
the Hollywood rules. DuVernay’s
midnight Armani Prive on Oscar
night showcased her sophistication, while Shahidi deftly balances
couture with youthful edge.
Says Shahidi, 18, of Bolden’s picks,
“There’s never been a situation
in which I felt like the dress was
wearing me.”
T OP L O O K S The former SoHo
vintage shop owner was inspired
by one of his favorite TV shows
growing up, 227, for Shahidi’s
dramatic Ralph Lauren bow at
the SAG Awards. “Jackee Harry ’s
character wore major bows — I
really wanted a modern moment
of that,” he says. The Grown-ish
actress adds that she also loved her
gold Zimmermann for the VMAs:
“I felt like Athena.”
a tool for the bigger picture.”
T OP L O O K S Newton, 45, stole
the show in a lilac Jason Wu gown
with crystals at the Emmys.
C LIE N T
GAL GADOT
(RIG H T) A N D
ELIZABETH
ST E WA R T (NO.
4)
“You get to play dress-up and
wear these extraordinary,
beautiful gowns,” says Gadot of
the red carpet. “It’s fun. It’s a
celebration of fashion,” adds
the actress, who cites her
stylist “Miss Elizabeth” as her
personal style icon.
CREDITS HERE AND HERE
On Gadot Givenchy dress, Jimmy Choo
shoes. On Stewart Givenchy jacket,
blouse, pants; Jimmy Choo shoes.
PHOTOGR A PHED BY
S A M I D R A S I N O N M A RC H 1
AT T H E B E V E R LY HIL LS
W O M E N’S C LU B
C LIE N T
YA R A S H A H I D I
J A S ON
B O L D E N (NO. 14)
AND
“One of Yara’s character
traits that helps me pick
looks for her is humor,”
says the stylist. “If it
doesn’t make us laugh, it
does not work.” Adds
Shahidi, “It’s really like
nothing too serious.”
Bolden comments that it’s
“her personal quirk.”
On Shahidi Schiaparelli dress,
Dsquared2 shirt, Sara Weinstock
ring. On Bolden Alexander Wang
jacket, Hermes shirt, Acne pants.
PHOTOGR A PHED BY
R YA N P F L U G E R
O N M A RC H 3 IN
L O S A N GE L E S
Versace black velvet gown was
nice, too: “It was custom-made
on a very tight timeline to
stand in solidarity,” says Harron.
T OP L O O K S See above.
NO. 24
PE N N Y L OV E L L
C LIE N TS Chrissy Metz,
Anne Hathaway, Kristen Wiig,
Rose Byrne
W H Y S H E M AT T E R S The
L.A.-based British stylist started
working with the This Is Us star,
37, in September. For their first
red carpet outing, Lovell commissioned a custom Daniela Kurrle
ombre chiffon gown, and from
then on it was rainbow crystals,
swishy fringe and pearl-accented
lace for Metz. “People really
responded to Chrissy enjoying her
red carpet moments,” says Lovell.
T OP L O O K S Byrne, 38, hit the
G’Day USA Los Angeles Black Tie
Gala in an elegant Oscar de la
Renta tulle frock, while Wiig, 44,
donned Galvan’s green hammered
velvet at the Governor Awards.
Up next? Hathaway, 35, will return
to the red carpet for the Ocean’s 8
press tour.
SHAHIDI HAIR BY NAIVASHA JOHNSON FOR ORIBE HAIRCARE AT EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS, MANICURE BY EMI KUDI AT OPUS BEAUTY. BOLDEN GROOMING BY JACKI BROWN. MAKEUP BY EMILY CHENG.
NO. 25
WAY M A N
BA N N ER M A N
& MICAH
M C D ON A L D
C LIE N TS Tessa Thompson
W H Y T H E Y M AT T E R The duo
help define avant garde when
dressing their leading lady. The
Westworld and Thor: Ragnarok
star, 34, twirled her way down
the Emmys carpet in Boomerangfriendly rainbow-lurex Rosie
Assoulin pleats.
T OP L O O K S Thompson’s “elliptical galaxy” gown by Miu Miu
for the Wrinkle in Time premiere
was accented with a crystal
crescent moon Judith Leiber bag.
“Her dress had cascading embellishments,” says McDonald. In
Sundance, “she wore an Altuzarra
skirt with a female directors
sweater that read ‘Ava Greta Patty
& Dee,’ ” says Bannerman. “It
was important to Tessa to honor
these women — we were proud to
be a part of the process.”
71
3
Elle Fanning
in Valentino Couture
4
Gal Gadot
in Altuzarra
5
Nicole Kidman
in Armani Prive
6
Armie Hammer
in Dolce & Gabbana
7
Lupita Nyong’o
in Atelier Versace
8
Tracee Ellis Ross
in Comme des Garcons
9
Greta Gerwig
in Rosie Assoulin
25 TOP
LOOKS
OF THE
YEAR
THR picks this awards
season’s standout
styles, one from
each of Hollywood’s
most influential
tastemakers
10
Jennifer Lawrence
in Atelier Versace
17
Allison Janney
in Brandon Maxwell
18
Thandie Newton
in Jason Wu
19
Claire Foy
in Gucci
11
Emma Stone
in Louis Vuitton
12
Zendaya
in Moschino
20
21
Millie Bobby Brown in
Angelina Jolie in
Calvin Klein by Appointment Ralph & Russo Couture
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
72
13
14
15
Hailee Steinfeld
Yara Shahidi in
Elizabeth Banks
in Alexandre Vauthier Ralph Lauren Collection in Jefrey Dodd
22
Issa Rae
in Marc Jacobs
M A RC H 21, 2018
23
Oprah Winfrey
in Atelier Versace
24
Rose Byrne
in Oscar de la Renta
16
Charlize Theron
in Prada
25
Tessa Thompson
in Rosie Assoulin
ROBBIE: JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE. RONAN: FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES. FANNING, THERON: PASCAL LE SEGRETAIN/GETTY IMAGES. GADOT: JON KOPALOFF/FILMMAGIC. KIDMAN, HAMMER: STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE. NYONG'O: JESSE GRANT/
GETTY IMAGES. GERWIG, STEINFELD, BANKS, NEWTON, JOLIE: AXELLE/BAUER-GRIFFIN/FILMMAGIC. ROSS: GEORGE PIMENTEL/WIREIMAGE. LAWRENCE: JOE MAHER/FILMMAGIC. STONE, SHAHIDI: DAN MACMEDAN/WIREIMAGE. ZENDAYA: DON ARNOLD/
WIREIMAGE. FOY: ANTHONY HARVEY/WIREIMAGE. BROWN, JANNEY: JOHN SHEARER/GETTY IMAGES. RAE: MICHAEL TRAN/FILMMAGIC. WINFREY: VENTURELLI/WIREIMAGE. BYRNE: EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES. THOMPSON: KEVIN MAZUR/WIREIMAGE.
1
2
Margot Robbie
Saoirse Ronan in
in Versace
Calvin Klein by Appointment
easy, particularly for a Southerner
tightly wound with traditional
values. I have not necessarily been
comfortable reflecting and being
self-reflective.
I’ve grown to learn that taking
care of yourself is a continuous,
lifelong process. What I’ve done
is take some time for reflection.
I’ve had an opportunity to not
use for a long period of time, and
I have resources to help me now,
which are ongoing.
ON DEC. 18, JOH N SK IPPER
suddenly resigned as president
of ESPN and co-chairman of
Disney Media Networks, citing his
desire to seek treatment for what
he called a “substance addiction.”
The announcement shocked
employees at ESPN and its parent
company, and was met with
disbelief and confusion throughout the sports and media worlds.
Skipper, 62, the married father
of two sons, was raised in North
Carolina and had worked at Disney
for 27 years, 13 of them under
Bob Iger. He became president of
ESPN in January 2012 and spearheaded the company’s aggressive
campaign to secure long-term
rights deals for live sporting
events from the NBA, college football and many other sports. But
cord cutting, rising programming costs and other challenges
during Skipper’s presidency
resulted in several rounds of
layoffs and skepticism from Wall
Street about the network’s future.
Prior to his departure, Skipper
had been orchestrating a multipronged strategy to combat the
negativity and project an optimistic and ambitious trajectory for
the company in the years ahead.
Over the course of several hours
during the first two weeks of
March, Skipper was interviewed
for the first time since his departure by ESPN historian, journalist
and Hollywood Reporter contributor James Andrew Miller. The
following is excerpted from those
in-person conversations:
Let’s talk about the nature of the
substance abuse, please.
The statement I released was
accurate. I had a substance
abuse problem. I grew up wanting to be countercultural. I
worked at Rolling Stone for the
first 10 years of my professional life. I had a point of view
that recreational drugs were
recreational, that they weren’t
dangerous. That they could be
used without repercussions.
So, we aren’t talking about alcohol?
No, I’ve been a social drinker my
whole life. I enjoy a martini, I
enjoy a bottle of wine with friends
for dinner. I’ve never had an issue
with alcohol. You know, I’m an
old hippie, and then an old New
Yorker from the ’80s.
Am I safe to assume then that your
substance addiction was cocaine?
It’d be safe to assume that.
Any heroin?
Never.
Opioids?
I don’t use opioids. I have never
put a needle in my arm. I’m not
interested in fentanyl.
How are you?
I’m doing well.
In your resignation statement,
you wrote, “I have struggled
for many years with a substance
addiction. I have decided that
the most important thing I can
do right now is to take care
of my problem.” Do you feel like
you’ve done that, or at least
begun the process?
I did get some therapy. I did go
through treatment. I thought the
best thing to do was to take the
time to check myself into a facility, and I was able to understand
a bit more about substance use
and to think about how it intersected with my life. Therapy isn’t
Did your cocaine use ever get in the
way of your work?
After abruptly resigning as president of ESPN
in December, JOHN SKIPPER finally reveals the
cocaine habit, lapsed judgment and extortion plot
that forced his anguished exit from Disney after
27 years: ‘I put Bob Iger in an untenable position’
By JAMES ANDREW MILLER | Illustration by GUY SHIELD
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
75
M A RC H 21, 2018
Never. At ESPN I did not use at
work, nor with anyone at work,
or with anyone I did business
with. I never allowed it to interfere with my work, other than
a missed plane and a few canceled
morning appointments. I’ve
never been a daily user. My use
over the past two decades has, in
fact, been quite infrequent. I
judge that I did a very good job and
that it did not get in the way of
my work. I worked hard, I worked
smart. I worked all the time.
You were, however, dealing with
an illegal substance. Throughout
your years of use, were you
worried about getting caught?
It turns out I was more than
unusually clever in devising ways
to separate my professional life
from my personal life.
Clever as in one wouldn’t have
seen the president of ESPN
walking around Central Park at
night in search of coke?
Not at all. Let’s just say I was
careful.
Did you resign as president of
ESPN?
Yes.
Were you asked to resign by Disney
CEO Bob Iger?
It was clear to me that I put Bob in
an untenable position.
Your resignation statement was
released on a Monday. The previous Wednesday you addressed
a large community of ESPN employees and gave a rather impassioned
speech about the company’s future.
On that day, when you gave that
speech, did you have any thought
about resigning?
No, I did not.
Well, we spoke the next day,
Thursday, and made plans to get
together the following week for
a long-promised interview about
ESPN. When did the conversation
with Bob take place?
That discussion occurred
on Friday afternoon, before I
resigned on Monday.
Then that leaves us with Friday,
Dec. 15, evidently being one of
the most critical days of your
professional life.
Yes, it does, but I want to stress
that until that Friday conversation occurred, I worked with
complete conviction with colleagues I loved and for a company
I loved. But I hurt my family,
particularly my wife, and I forfeited a great job.
Since Friday was so significant,
can you unpack it for us, please?
I understand why you need to
ask that question, but I’m not
sure how much I want to get into
that, Jim.
ESPN and an officer of The Walt
Disney Co. to be associated in
any way with any of this. I do want
to make it clear, however, that
anything I did in this regard, and
anything else resulting from this,
was a personal problem. My drug
use never had any professional
repercussions, but I still have profound regret. I accept that the
consequences of my actions are
my responsibility and have been
appropriate. I also have to accept
that I used very poor judgment.
Well, John, with all due respect,
I’m a bit confused. There seems
to be a big piece missing to this
story. I’m looking at my notes:
First, you’ve shared that you were
an infrequent user of cocaine
— something that could be true of
others in the entertainment and
media business. I’m not an expert
in this area, but I’m not sure some
would even call that an addiction.
Second, you’ve stated categorically
that your use never got in the
way of your work. And third, you’ve
admitted that on the days leading
up to your decision to resign, you
had no thoughts of resigning.
None of that seems to explain why
you reached the decision you had
to resign. I know this is dificult,
John. I hope you understand why
I’m pushing a bit here.
Poor judgment, meaning that it
sounds like on a particular night,
you couldn’t rely on the secret
world you had created and threw
caution out the window by buying
from a strange source?
In December, someone from
whom I bought cocaine attempted
to extort me.
No.
That, and of course the usage
itself.
Not this time. It turned out I
wasn’t careful this time.
Was this the moment that
made you realize you had a substance abuse problem, because
you were willing to act so dangerously in order to obtain some
coke that night?
What did they say?
They threatened me, and I understood immediately that threat
put me and my family at risk, and
this exposure would put my
professional life at risk as well. I
foreclosed that possibility by disclosing the details to my family,
and then when I discussed it with
Bob, he and I agreed that I had
placed the company in an untenable position and as a result, I
should resign.
Yes, I believe that’s true. I knew
then I had a problem I needed
to address.
I guess this also explains why you
had never before thought about
resigning.
I acted very foolishly. It made
me want to seek help and get this
out of my life.
Did you agree to resign because
you understood that Bob couldn’t
allow the company, by extension,
to be threatened by whoever was
extorting you?
I did understand that.
Were you also concerned that
the company might wind up being
in a position of having to defend
your actions, or any behavior that
accompanied or resulted from
your drug use?
That did occur to me. Look, it was
inappropriate for the president of
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
I wish that had been the
outcome. I didn’t ask for that
outcome, though. I was overwhelmed by the circumstance.
I simply just disclosed the
facts, and it became clear in my
conversation with Bob what I
needed to do. Everything happened very quickly.
“I WaS UnUSUaLLY CLEVER In DEVISIng
WaYS TO SEPaRaTE mY PROFESSIOnaL
LIFE FROm mY PERSOnaL LIFE."
Someone you had dealings with in
the past?
Again, respectfully, didn’t you
just say you were careful about
your dealings in this area?
and say, “Look, I’m being threatened concerning a purchase of
cocaine. I’m going to tell you right
now, I did buy cocaine. I do not
use it at work, I’ve never been
afected by it at work, and this has
forced me to admit I have a problem. I love my job, this company,
and its employees, and I respectfully ask for a leave to seek
treatment and I will return as soon
as possible”?
Forgive me, John, but I can’t help
thinking now about when someone was attempting to extort
David Letterman with information that he had an afair with
a staf member. Dave took the
step of going on the air and
disclosing that it was indeed true,
adding that in doing so he was
hoping to protect his job. When
you found out you were being
threatened, was there a part of
you that wanted to go to Bob
76
M A RC H 21, 2018
1
1 Skipper (right) with NFL commissioner
Roger Goodell. 2 With Iger at the 2017 ESPYs.
John, perhaps unavoidably
in a post-Weinstein world,
there has been speculation about
work-related issues involving
female colleagues contributing
to your exit. Is there truth to
any of this?
Those rumors and speculations
are categorically and definitively untrue. There were no such
incidents at work during my
entire tenure, including no allegations. I did not traffic in that
kind of activity. The company is
not engaged in any actions
on my behalf and never has been.
There were no affairs or inappropriate relationships at work
nor indiscretions other than
what I have disclosed. My behavior relative to women at ESPN
was always respectful. I did not
touch anybody inappropriately.
I did not tell off-color jokes. I
treated everybody with respect.
The principle reason I chose to
write the statement I wrote — to
disclose substance abuse — was
to make it clear that this didn’t
have anything to do with harassment, settled lawsuits or any
internal indiscretions. I never
had any relationships, even
con sensual adult relationships,
with anybody at work. And as
far as I know, there was never a
single claim of one.
shove some toothpaste back in the
tube. This is too dificult”?
It was an agonizing weekend. I
don’t think I ate for the 48 hours.
I was filled with great regret and
tension. My stomach was churning. I wasn’t sleeping. I was
despondent. I was panicked. But,
no, I never thought about trying
to reverse course.
And what was it like for you the
day after your resignation was
announced?
That’s the day, of course, that there
is no turning back; it’s done, it’s
gone, it’s public. It was miserable.
I spent it mostly by myself in New
York City. I cry sentimentally at
movies, but I never cry personally.
That’s the only day that I cried.
And I cried because I realized the
profundity of what I’d done to
myself, to my family, and that I’d
given up the best job in sports on
the planet.
And, look, I wrote in the press
release that I said I regretted
letting people down. On Tuesday,
that was the day that was most
crushing. I thought about all
these people I love, that worked
with me, and we’d done great
things with —
Many who came to the company
because of you.
2
GOODELL: ANNA WEBBER/GETTY IMAGES FOR HEARST CORPORATION. IGER: JORDAN MURPH/ESPN IMAGES.
And if someone were to claim that?
It would be categorically mendacious. I had a personal problem
with an illegal substance, and
any issues around it were and are
personal. There is nothing that
will come out that will contradict
what I have said here.
Take us inside the 48 hours from
Friday to Sunday, when you wrote
your resignation statement. Was
there a part of you that all of a
sudden woke up Saturday morning
and said, “Wait a second. I love
this job, I love these people. I gotta
you might have had to adopt a
totally diferent approach to it. Like,
you had somehow been able to
separate and rationalize the usage
because you still felt like you were
doing your job?
Yes, there were people I hired
away from good jobs; who got
promoted, who stayed at
the company, came back to the
company because we wanted
to work together. And I realized
that day that I had severed all
those relationships. And that
most people heard about it
in a press release. But my greatest disappointment was letting
people I care about, my family
and people I work with, down —
all of whom told me I didn’t have
to worry about that, I needed
to take care of myself. And that
makes you feel a little better.
But that doesn’t make it happen
inside your gut.
Let’s deconstruct this a bit more,
please. Because you never used
at work, because people at work
didn’t see any of the vestiges of
this issue, were you able to then
further compartmentalize your
behavior? As opposed to if it had
manifested itself at work, then
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
(Laughs.) That, my friend, is an
astute question, and the answer
is yes. In order to do what I did,
you have to be a master of compartmentalization. Which is why
people are going, “I don’t understand this.” Because they have
the belief that they can recognize
someone who has a problem.
Because it “has to” manifest itself.
And I did a very good job of not
letting it manifest itself, with the
exception — and this part is
another piece of the part that I let
myself down and I did not hold
myself to the standard I should
have, which is, in order to compartmentalize, you have to deceive
yourself and deceive other people.
And that’s not who I want to be,
and I think that has to be part of
my rehabilitation.
Going back to the big meeting
with employees that Wednesday,
how much of your optimism about
the future of ESPN that day was
reality-based versus sheer hope?
I believed very strongly that
a year later, two years later, the
narrative was going to be very
different. It was going to be that
ESPN had maintained its preeminence in sports media and
navigated into having what was
still the strongest portion of a
video bundle, along with having
a strong subscription product
and robust ad sales. And that we
would be in a much better place.
And I wanted to have that be
the cap to my tenure. Not to leave
in what I regarded as the middle
of what was going to be a successful transition.
There is never a good time to go
through such a painful exit, but
believing in such a favorable course
ahead must have made your departure all the more dificult.
It was, though of course at the
time the issue itself was so
overwhelming, I didn’t have time
to navigate the nuance of what
it meant relative to legacy. And,
of course, one of the things I
don’t like about this is that I had
27 really constructive, positive,
77
M A RC H 21, 2018
wonderful years at Walt Disney.
I thought I was going to be able to
put a cap on all of it. But now that
opportunity is gone.
One might guess that you don’t
have to go out and punch a clock
right now. What are you thinking
about in terms of your own future?
Are you in a “fold my tent and
quietly go away” mood? Or are you
in a “I can’t wait to get back in the
arena” state of mind?
The Walt Disney Co. was very good
to me. They changed my life.
Right now, I enjoy the great luxury
of time and being able to only do
things I want to do, with people
I want to do them with. But I find
myself impatient. I’d like to get
back in and do some things that
matter. I’d like to work with some
people who are doing exciting
things. I think, when you step
back, I was in the maelstrom of
a day-to-day job in which I was
concerned about trying to get
things done every minute, and
it was an extraordinarily large
job. Now, as I take time to look at
the world of sports and media
and things I care about — basketball and soccer and culture and
media — there are a lot of really
fun things to do. I’m actually
quite excited. In some ways I have
but to make the best of it. And
I do intend to make the best of it.
I’ve been meeting with people,
and that has gotten me even more
excited. I’m healthy, and I’m ready
to plunge back in. I don’t know
exactly what form that will take.
I don’t think it will take the form
of a large corporate job, managing a lot of people and running a
big company. I think it will take
the form of helping a few smart
people; people I like and respect
and who do things that matter.
Any thoughts you’d like to share
about Jimmy Pitaro being named
to the job you used to have?
Yeah, of course it has a certain
pang to it. Because it has a sort
of definitive finality, that, OK,
somebody new is going to be in
charge. The good news is that
Jimmy Pitaro is a good guy; I like
Jimmy very much. He’s a good,
smart executive. His style will
work at ESPN. I wish him well,
and (laughs) I hope he does better
than the last guy!
In association with
9-12 April 2018
Cannes - France
Cannes International Series Festival
MIPDrama Buyers Summit
Drama Co-Production Summit
International Screenings
The Biggest Week in TV.
4 days / 10,500 participants / 1,632 exhibiting companies / 100 countries /
3,800 acquisition executives including 1,640 drama buyers
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Reviews
Television
Roseanne
ABC’s revival of the sitcom may
not have the original’s edge, but
the cast is as compelling as ever
By Daniel J. Fienberg
election
comes
between
Trumploving
Roseanne
and her
Hillarysupporter
sister
Jackie
(Metcalf,
right).
reasonable that the Conners, who spent
nine seasons from 1988 to 1997 as TV’s
most convincing representatives of bluecollar economic anxiety, might fall into
a Trump-friendly demographic? And isn’t
it a good thing that the revival of Roseanne
isn’t flinching from such unsettling
aspects of contemporary American life?
Through the three episodes sent to critics, the 10th season of Roseanne puts itself
squarely in the camp of revivals that have
no trouble justifying their purpose in 2018.
Barr and showrunners Bruce Helford and
Whitney Cummings have made a show
that tackles the 2016 election head-on, with
storylines and dialogue addressing health
care costs, the opioid epidemic, changing
perspectives on gender and sexuality, and
more. Unfortunately for Roseanne, shows
like Speechless, The Middle and Black-ish are
doing that, too, but with more freshness.
Things are actually going pretty well for
the Conners as the series returns. When
ABC/ADAM ROSE
To address the elephant in the room: Yes,
the premiere of ABC’s Roseanne revival
spends a chunk of time on the title character’s support for Donald Trump. And, yes,
the fights between Roseanne (Roseanne
Barr) and her sister Jackie (Laurie Metcalf)
over that vote are uncomfortably familiar.
Now imagine a world in which social
media hadn’t made it possible to know
Barr’s every hateful thought about Hillary
Clinton or which bizarro conspiracy
theories she was peddling to her hundreds
of thousands of Twitter followers. In
that world, wouldn’t you find it perfectly
↑ The 2016
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
79
M A RC H 21, 2018
we left the show, Dan (John Goodman)
was dead, but the premiere finds him waking up in a sleep apnea mask (turns out
he never died after all). Original Becky
(Lecy Goranson) also is back, while Sarah
Chalke, aka Second Becky, has a guest-starring role that includes the not-so-subtle
acknowledgement, “We could be the same
person!” Such meta moments, thankfully, are mostly limited to the premiere,
which otherwise resists Fuller House-level
nostalgia bloat.
An unemployed Darlene (Sara Gilbert)
is living at home again with her two kids
(Emma Kenney and Ames McNamara).
D.J. (Michael Fishman) and his daughter
(Jayden Rey) are around. Jackie begins the
new season estranged from Roseanne
because of the latter’s support of Trump,
but the explicit political debate lasts only
one episode. That’s good if you don’t want
to hear Roseanne singing Trump’s praises
but also because the show’s approach
to the divide is too broad — Jackie shows
up in a “Nasty Woman” shirt and brings
over a bottle of Russian dressing to taunt
Roseanne — to do real justice to this season’s overriding theme, which is the
breakdown of civil debate within families
and the country at large.
Roseanne soon settles back into
rhythms that felt revolutionary when it
was in its heyday but have become the
norm among better sitcoms. An issue
arises, a conflict ensues, a character takes
an unexpected position, and things are
resolved over a hug or a bit of driveway basketball. Of course, the appeal of Roseanne
is less about surprise and more about
the supreme proficiency of the stars. The
standouts are Goodman, whose work here
is a reminder that his lack of Emmy recognition for this role was a crime, and the
great Gilbert, who hurls every punch line
like a dart.
Enough shows have followed in its convention-rejecting footsteps that Roseanne
now looks like the conventional one. That’s
why “I like Roseanne, but I can’t deal
with the Trump stuff” is a strange worry.
That Roseanne can still make you squirm,
even a little, is proof it’s still Roseanne.
AIRDATE 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 27 (ABC)
CAST Roseanne Barr, John Goodman, Sara Gilbert,
Laurie Metcalf, Michael Fishman, Lecy Goranson
EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS Roseanne Barr, Sara Gilbert,
Tom Werner, Bruce Helford, Whitney Cummings
Reviews
Television
Trust
Danny Boyle’s FX series
about the Gettys
struggles to make you
care about rich people
problems By Tim Goodman
(left) is J. Paul
Getty Sr. and
Amanda Drew
his mistress,
Belinda.
to the vibe and approach of the
pilot, but it has enough random deviations here and there
to make you nervous about
future episodes.
J. Paul Getty Sr. is embodied
here with ruthless joy by Donald
Sutherland, who quite rightly
decides (at least in the early going)
to play the patriarch as someone
who has a relentless disregard
for everyone else’s feelings while
shuttering his own in pursuit
of endless profit. Getty Sr.’s only
pleasure seems to come from
manipulating his harem of girlfriends, each sure that she will
end up with a large slice of his
fortune. (It’s very clear, at least in
this telling of the story, that Getty
Sr. disdained the idea of parting
with even the tiniest fraction of
his money, and anyone with ideas
of getting his or her hands on it
was delusional.)
Wealth and familial rot are
meaty themes for a drama to
mine, and J. Paul Getty, at one
time considered the richest
man in the world, is an intriguing figure. But the trouble series
creator and writer Simon Beaufoy
(whose most recent screenplay
credit is 2017’s Battle of the Sexes)
keeps running into is that tightwad billionaires who care nothing
for other people (even their own
blood) make for deeply unlikable
central characters. Surround
them with a large number of
other characters who fail to ignite
empathy in the viewer, and you’re
going to end up with a tragedy
that lacks the kind of gut punch it
needs to keep you interested.
The narrative of Trust kicks
off when J. Paul Getty III (Harris
Dickinson) gets in debt to the
Mafia while living in Rome and
is kidnapped in 1973. None of the
Getty boys, including the young
man’s father, J. Paul Getty Jr.
(Michael Esper), has the money
AIRDATE 10 p.m. Sunday, March 25 (FX)
CAST Donald Sutherland, Harris Dickinson,
Hilary Swank, Brendan Fraser
CREATOR Simon Beaufoy
DIRECTOR Danny Boyle
or inclination to pay the ransom,
and Getty Sr. refuses to, saying
that would only embolden others
to kidnap the remaining kids and
grandkids. The amount owed?
$6,000. So, yeah, it’s hard to really
feel the love for this lot.
Brendan Fraser shows up in
the second episode as the head of
security for Getty Sr. — complete
with cowboy hat and accent —
while Hilary Swank plays Getty
III’s divorced mother, Gail.
(These are, respectively, the Mark
Wahlberg and Michelle Williams
roles in Scott’s film.)
The challenges for long-term
emotional investment here are
real. That’s not to say Trust won’t
get there — especially considering
FX seems wedded to the idea of
a multiseason story. But the only
hope for improvement in the first
few episodes is Dickinson’s spoton performance as the wayward
16-year-old wild child. It may not
be the showiest role, but it’s the
closest the series comes to getting
us to care.
OLIVER UPTON/FX
FX’s new drama Trust, about the
Getty family, faces a hurdle right
out of gate: No matter the dramatic allure of the tragedy that
beset that clan of oil magnates
and wealth magnets, Americans
don’t have a lot of interest in
one-percenter woes these days —
particularly if the one-percenters
in question aren’t a relatable
bunch to start with. Ridley Scott’s
recent All the Money in the World,
which told pretty much the same
story as Trust, failed to make a
splash at the box office and likely
will be remembered more for its
casting and salary scandals than
anything else.
On top of that, the three episodes
sent to critics by FX, all directed
by Danny Boyle, are uneven. The
first is a compelling-enough start
to the story; the second features
overly splashy stylistic flourishes
— an ill-conceived split-framing
technique, a character speaking
directly to the camera — that
are out of sync with the pilot; the
third finds Boyle largely reverting
← Sutherland
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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Reviews
Film & Television
PROMOTION
featuring
A ranking of the week’s top actors, comedians and
personalities based on social media engagement across
Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and more
This
Week
Last
Week
New York is home to some of the
entertainment industry’s most powerful
players whose inluence matters in Hollywood.
In its 8th Annual New York Issue, The
Hollywood Reporter will deliver a who’s who of
the 35 most inluential individuals in media.
C O N TAC T: N EW YORK | 2 1 2 .434.4324
LOS AN G E L ES | 3 23. 5 25. 2 245
LY NNE .S EGAL L@TH R.CO M
Comedians
←
→ I
1
I
Dwayne Johnson
1
←
→ I
1
I
Kevin Hart
2
←
→ I
2
I
Jennifer Lopez
2
←
→ I
2
I
Tifany Haddish
3
↑ I
9
I
Finn Wolfhard
3
←
→ I
3
I
Joe Rogan
4
↑ I
8
I
Will Smith
4
←
→ I
4
I
Tommy Chong
5
↑ I
-
I
Emma Watson
5
←
→ I
5
I
D.L. Hughley
6
↑ I
-
I
Colleen Ballinger
7
↓ I
6
I
Marlon Wayans
8
↓ I
7
I
Amy Schumer
9
↑ I
-
I
Mike Epps
10
↑ I
-
I
Dennis Miller
Watson marked
International Women’s Day
(March 8) with an Insta
post saying that she’d be
taking over National
Geographic’s feed for the
day to highlight female
photographers. It was the
top post of the week by an
actor (5.3 million likes).
6
↑ I
13
I
Chris Hemsworth
7
↑ I
-
I
Priyanka Chopra
8
↓ I
5
I
Kevin Hart
9
↓ I
7
I
Gal Gadot
10
↑ I
-
I
Michael B. Jordan
11
↓ I
6
I
Dove Cameron
12
↑ I
15
I
Shay Mitchell
13
↑ I
-
I
Vanessa Hudgens
14
↑ I
16
I
Millie Bobby Brown
15
↑ I
-
I
Lily Collins
16
↑ I
22
I
Lucy Hale
17
↑ I
-
I
Monica Bellucci
18
↓ I
12
I
Nina Dobrev
19
↑ I
-
I
Tifany Haddish
20
↓ I
14
I
Robert Downey Jr.
21
↑ I
-
I
Tom Holland
22
↑ I
-
I
Mark Hamill
“Thanks to the Internet,
nothing ever goes away,”
bemoaned Hamill in a
widely shared tweet after
footage surfaced of him
singing in German on TV
in the 1980s. In all, the actor
garnered a 79 percent
boost in retweets for the
week — 133,000 total.
O N SA L E : 4 / 1 1 | C L O S E : 4 /4 | M AT E R I A L S : 4 / 5
BONUS DISTRIBUTION: Tribeca Festival, Key hotels in
NYC, NY Power Event and BB Latin Music Conference.
Last
Week
1
THE 35 MOST POWERFUL
PEOPLE IN MEDIA
ADVERTISING
AVAILABLE
FOR PRINT,
TABLET,
DIGITAL AND
MOBILE
This
Week
Actors
23
↑ I
-
I
Tommy Chong
24
↑ I
-
I
Bella Thorne
25
↑ I
-
I
Jordyn Jones
The pundit and former
SNL star debuts on the
Top Comedians chart with
203,000 Facebook likes.
“Take this any way you want
to, and I’ll take it the way I
want to,” he wrote March 13.
“There has never been
a President like this in the
history of this country.”
This
Week
Last
Week
TV Personalities
1
←
→ I
1
I
Jimmy Kimmel
2
↑ I
8
I
Tamera Mowry
Mowry returns to the top
two for the first time since
January with a 70 percent
jump in Instagram favorites.
She posted a throwback
to her 2012 maternity photo
shoot for her first child,
Aden, and a shoot with her
The Real co-hosts for
International Women’s Day.
3
↑ I
7
I
Jake Tapper
4
↓ I
2
I
Joanna Gaines
5
↑ I
6
I
Mike Huckabee
6
↑ I
-
I
Jimmy Fallon
7
↓ I
3
I
Gordon Ramsay
8
↓ I
4
I
Tyra Banks
9
↑ I
-
I
Stephen Colbert
10
↓ I
5
I
Chelsea Handler
Data Compiled By
Source: The week’s most active and talked-about entertainers on
leading social networking sites Facebook, Google Plus, Instagram,
Twitter and YouTube for the week ending March 13. Rankings are based
on a formula blending weekly additions of fans as well as cumulative
weekly reactions and conversations, as tracked by MVP Index.
82
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In ’92, Hollywood Explored VR With Lawnmower Man
↑ Brosnan (left) and Fahey in Lawnmower Man. New Line and King settled for $3.4 million — but King’s name wound up on video boxes anyway.
The Hollywood Reporter, Vol. CDXXIV, No. 11 (ISSN 0018-3660; USPS 247-580) is published weekly; 39 issues — two issues in April, July, October and December; three issues in January and June; four issues in February, March, May, August and September; and five issues in November — with 15 special issues:
Jan. (1), Feb. (2), June (4), Aug. (4), Nov. (3) and Dec. (3) by Prometheus Global Media LLC, 5700 Wilshire Blvd., 5th floor, Los Angeles CA 90036. Subscription rates: Weekly print only, $199; weekly print and online, including daily edition PDF only, $249; online only, $199; digital replica of weekly print, $199.
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T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
84
M A RC H 21, 2018
DONNA WILLINSKY/NEW LINE CINEMA/PHOTOFEST
With Ready Player One, Steven
Spielberg now has his own VR epic.
He’d probably be happy if his estimated $175 million-budgeted film
made more than five times its cost
the way 1992’s The Lawnmower Man
did ($6 million to $32 million box
office). But he’d probably like to avoid
other aspects of the first VR-themed
movie’s release. Like the THR review:
“Frankenstein meets Virtual Reality in
The Lawnmower Man, an otherwise
unexceptional sci-fi feature,” was the
first sentence. (And he has: Ready
was hailed as a “rollicking adventure
through worlds both bleak and fantastic” in its THR review.) And then
there was the problem of the source
material. Spielberg’s film is based on
a novel by Ernest Cline. Lawnmower
sprung from a short story by Stephen
King, who sued for “misleading and
deceptive use” of his name. King’s
story was about a suburbanite run
over and dismembered by the workman he hires to mow his lawn. The
New Line version is about a dull
gardener whose IQ is raised via VR
experiments. Jeff Fahey played the
gardener, and, two years before
he took on 007, Pierce Brosnan was
the mad scientist. “Stephen liked
the movie,” says director Brett
Leonard. “He called me and told me
that. What he didn’t like was it was
marketed as being ‘from the mind of
Stephen King.’ His story was one
scene in the movie. The virtual reality
part had nothing to do with his
story.” — BILL HIGGINS
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