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The Hollywood Reporter - December 18, 2017 part 2

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An excellent ensemble cast.”
“
4
–
SCREEN® ACTORS GUILD
AWARD NOMINATIONS
I N C LU D I N G
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY AN ENSEMBLE
IN A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY
A MALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
A FEMALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
M A RC M AR O N
A LIS ON BRIE
FO R
YO U R
GOLDEN GLOBE®
NOMINEE
B E STV SERIES
T –A
CTR E S S
MUSICAL OR COMEDY
ALISON BRIE
CO N S I D E R AT I O N
A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES
About Town
3
The Red Carpet
Jefrey Katzenberg (left)
and Justin Timberlake
THR’s Women in
Entertainment Breakfast
Los Angeles, Dec. 6
2
Olivia
Munn
7
Gal
Gadot
1
8
Sherry Lansing (left)
and Jennifer Lawrence
From left: Zoey Deutch,
Kyra Sedgwick
and Anna Paquin
11
Janice Min (left)
and Nancy Dubuc
12
From left:
Lily Collins,
Bryce Dallas Howard
and Isla Fisher
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
58
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
13
Dawn Hudson (left)
and Bonnie Arnold
Party
Crawler
4
Angelina
Jolie
Call to Action at
THR’s Power 100
5
6
Niecy Nash and
Sterling K. Brown
10
From left:
Nina Shaw,
Jennifer Salke
and Robert
Greenblatt
9
Glenn Close (left)
and Sarah Silverman
16
14
From left: Courteney
Monroe, Nancy Lesser
and THR’s Lynne Segall
15
THR’s Matthew Belloni
and Shonda Rhimes
Yara Shahidi
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
59
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
LANSING, TIMBERLAKE, KROLL, MIN, SEGALL, BELLONI: BENJAMIN SHMIKLER/ABIMAGES. MUNN, JOLIE, GADOT: JESSE GRANT/GETTY IMAGES. NASH, DEUTCH, COLLINS: RICH FURY/GETTY IMAGES. CLOSE: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES. SHAHIDI, SHAW, HUDSON: MATT WINKELMEYER/GETTY IMAGES.
Sue Kroll
At the 26th annual
Women in Entertainment
breakfast presented by
Lifetime, Hollywood’s top
female leaders put forth
ideas on how to make the
entertainment industry
a more empowering place
for women. “I just want
the world to know how
powerful and creative and
badass and original you
all are,” said THR’s Women
in Entertainment issue
guest editor Shonda
Rhimes (16), addressing
the crowd at Milk Studios.
Power 100 players including
Hylda Queally, Sue Kroll
(6) and New York Times
Weinstein reporters Jodi
Kantor and Megan Twohey
sipped cofee and green
juice with such guests as
Chrissy Metz, Glenn Close
(9), Isla Fisher (12) and
Sterling K. Brown (5).
Sherry Lansing Leadership
Award honoree Jennifer
Lawrence (1) spoke about
the importance of creating a community “where
outspoken women lead”
in the wake of revelations
about sexual harassment and assault: “Let’s
be resilient, let’s all be
silence breakers.” Justin
Timberlake (3) introduced
the next generation of
empowered women — the
21 students chosen as
the 2018 class of THR and
Big Brother Big Sisters
of Greater Los Angeles’
Mentorship Program (see
page 70) in partnership
with the Entertainment
Industry Foundation —
and Gal Gadot (7) handed
out the first-ever Wonder
Woman Scholarship, a
four-year full ride at Loyola
Marymount University
funded by Warner Bros.
Keynote speaker Angelina
Jolie (4) urged attendees to think beyond
Hollywood to champion
female artists and activists
everywhere: “Together
we stand for more than our
own rights and freedoms,
but the freedom and
rights of all women.” The
event was sponsored by
American Airlines, Fiji
Water, Forevermark, Gersh,
eOne, SAG-AFTRA and
LMU. — MIA GALUPPO
About Town
2
The Red Carpet
Mark Hamill and
Daisy Ridley
1
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
From left: Lupita Nyong’o,
Joonas Suotamo, John Boyega
and Kelly Marie Tran
Los Angeles, Dec. 9; London, Dec. 12
4
Rian
Johnson
5
Benicio Del Toro (left)
and Ram Bergman
3
Bob Iger and
Kathleen Kennedy
7
6
Gwendoline
Christie
From left: Alan Horn,
Ava DuVernay and
Alan Bergman
10
Domhnall Gleeson (left)
and Adam Driver
8
Prince William, Duke
of Cambridge (left),
and Prince Harry
9
Laura Dern
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
60
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
Hollywood returned to a
galaxy far, far away when
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
premiered at the Shrine
Auditorium in Los Angeles
and three days later held
its European premiere in
London. In L.A., first-time
Star Wars director Rian
Johnson (4) told THR on
the Stormtrooper-lined red
carpet that the film is an
emotional roller-coaster: “I
really tried to keep the tone
in that place where it can
go back and forth nimbly
between getting heavy
and being just a blast.” The
screening featured highs
(lots of applause) and
bittersweet moments as
Carrie Fisher’s final performance as Leia debuted.
All eyes were on heroine
Rey played by Daisy
Ridley (2), who credited
her character’s popularity
to the writers and said, “I’m
just very happy to be the
face.” Other stars on hand
included Mark Hamill (2),
John Boyega (1) and newcomer Kelly Marie Tran (1),
who wrapped producer
Ram Bergman (5) in an
emotional hug on the red
carpet, thanking him for
giving her a chance to
join the Star Wars family.
Following the premiere,
which was dedicated to
Fisher, guests celebrated
at the afterparty with
packed casino tables and
photo ops with assorted
characters. Johnson could
not take more than two
steps without someone
rushing to shake his hand,
while Hamill posed for
pictures with numerous
fans. Benicio Del Toro (5),
who plays a new character
in the film, did his best
to greet well-wishers while
his 6-year-old daughter
slept on his shoulder. At the
London premiere, Prince
William (8) and Prince
Harry (8) — who appear
(but are unrecognizable) as
Stormtroopers in the film
— walked the carpet (each
received a Stormtrooper
helmet) at the Royal Albert
Hall alongside BB-8 and
fellow castmates. The U.K.
screening will benefit the
princes’ charity, the Royal
Foundation. — RYAN PARKER
NYONG’O, CHRISTIE, HORN, DRIVER: JESSE GRANT/GETTY IMAGES FOR DISNEY. HAMILL, IGER, BERGMAN: ALEX J. BERLINER/ABIMAGES. JOHNSON: CHARLEY GALLAY/GETTY IMAGES FOR DISNEY. PRINCE: EDDIE MULHOLLAND/WPA POOL/GETTY IMAGES. DERN: DAVE J HOGAN/GETTY IMAGES.
Jedi at Last
“THE
BEST-TOLD STORY
ON
TV
TODAY
...
A STORYTELLING MASTERCLASS
”
– THE DAILY BEAST
GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINATION
®
BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA
3 SAG AWARDS NOMINATIONS
®
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY AN ENSEMBLE IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING ACTION PERFORMANCE BY A STUNT ENSEMBLE IN A COMEDY OR DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
PETER DINKLAGE
3 CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS NOMINATIONS
BEST DRAMA SERIES
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
PETER DINKLAGE
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
EMILIA CLARKE
WGA AWARD NOMINATION
DRAMA SERIES
DAVID BENIOFF, BRYAN COGMAN, DAVE HILL, D.B. WEISS
AFI AWARD WINNER
TOP TEN TELEVISION PROGRAMS OF THE YEAR
About Town
King of the Jungle
Sony went wild re-creating
the tropics at TCL Chinese
Theatre for the Jumanji:
Welcome to the Jungle
premiere. It had its own
king, too. In the film, teenagers are sucked into a
video game and become
characters, and in real life,
the cast had one person
in mind whose body they’d
want to inhabit: The Rock.
“I would just lift shit all
the time,” Nick Jonas (6)
said of wanting to step
into the shoes of co-star
Dwayne Johnson (2).
Kevin Hart (3), on the
other hand, joked that he’d
want to be anyone but
Johnson. “Everyone else in
the cast besides Nick, Karen
and Jack are assholes,”
he quipped. “I don’t know
who’s left over, but you do
the math.” Following the
screening, the cast enjoyed
a themed party with tropical trees, lifelike safari
animals and jungle juice.
The Red Carpet
Jumanji: Welcome
to the Jungle
Hollywood, Dec. 11
2
Dwayne Johnson
and girlfriend
Lauren Hashian
1
— BRIAN PORRECA
5
The cast pulled up to
the premiere at the
TCL Chinese Theatre.
3
Kevin Hart (left)
and Tom Rothman
4
Karen
Gillan
6
Nick Jonas (left)
and Joe Jonas
The Post
Washington, D.C., Dec. 14
8
7
10
Kate Capshaw and
Steven Spielberg
Tom Hanks and
Rita Wilson
Meryl Streep
Hot Of the Press
“There’s a lot of excitement when you talk
about an administration
attacking the press to
stop the truth from being
told,” director Steven
Spielberg (8) told THR at
the Post premiere, aptly
held at D.C.’s Newseum.
“That all happened in 1971,
but it’s kind of evocative
of things that are also part
of the current landscape.”
Tom Hanks (10), who plays
legendary Washington
Post editor Ben Bradlee,
echoed: “I think the current administration and
their like-minded allies
are waging a guerrilla war
on the First Amendment.”
Attendees included Daniel
Ellsberg, who leaked
the Pentagon Papers at
the center of the film to
The New York Times and
then the Post, along with
Amazon CEO and current
Post owner Jef Bezos,
U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy,
CNN’s Wolf Blitzer and
Fox News’ Chris Wallace.
Ellsberg, 86, who remains
a government transparency activist, said he
never imagined in 1971
that exposing the papers
would result in attending
a Hollywood premiere.
“I thought I’d be in prison
for life,” he said. “It’s a
lot better being out here
than being behind bars.”
— DAN FRIEDMAN
9
Alison
Brie
JOHNSON, GILLAN: PHILLIP FARAONE/GETTY IMAGES. HART, JONAS: COURTESY OF SONY. BLACK: JB LACROIX/WIREIMAGE. CAR: ALBERT L. ORTEGA/GETTY IMAGES. BRIE, SPIELBERG, STREEP: MANDEL NGAN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES. HANKS: PAUL MORIGI/WIREIMAGE.
Jack Black
“GRAND
SLAM...TERRIFIC”
– THE BALTIMORE SUN
AN INTIMATE”,
“
UNSETTLING PORTRAIT
– THE ATLANTIC
2 GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINATIONS
®
BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR
MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
ROBERT DE NIRO
BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
IN A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
MICHELLE PFEIFFER
SAG AWARDS NOMINATION
®
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A
MALE ACTOR IN A TELEVISION MOVIE OR MINISERIES
ROBERT DE NIRO
3 CRITICS’ CHOICE
AWARDS NOMINATIONS
BEST MOVIE MADE FOR TV
BEST ACTOR IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TV OR LIMITED SERIES
ROBERT DE NIRO
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A MOVIE MADE FOR TV OR LIMITED SERIES
MICHELLE PFEIFFER
WGA AWARD NOMINATION
LONG FORM ADAPTED – TELEVISION
SAM LEVINSON AND
JOHN BURNHAM SCHWARTZ
AND SAMUEL BAUM
About Town
Heard Around Hollywood
Rambling Reporter
By Chris Gardner
Guillermo to Aliens: Your Spaceship Is ‘Crappy’
While on the awards circuit promoting his new sci-fi film about a
cleaning lady who falls in love with a fish-man, The Shape of Water
director Guillermo del Toro happened to let slip that once, years ago, he
had a close encounter with aliens. “[I] sound like a complete lunatic,
but I saw a UFO,” he told the crowd at The Hollywood Masters series at
Loyola Marymount during a Nov. 15 appearance. “I was with a friend.
We bought a six-pack. We sat down to watch the stars and have the beer.
And we saw a light on the horizon going super-fast. I said, ‘Honk and
flash the lights.’ ” When the UFO veered toward them, del Toro and his
buddy got a close look at the craft. “It was horribly designed,” said del
Toro when describing his disappointment. “It was so crappy. It was a
flying saucer, so cliched, with lights [blinking]. But the fear we felt was
primal. I’ve never been that scared in my life.” — STEPHEN GALLOWAY
Depp Ditches L.A. Digs, but
Leaves a Pirate Chandelier
Cash-strapped Johnny Depp
managed to unload all five of his
apartments in the Eastern
Columbia building in downtown L.A., where he and ex-wife
Amber Heard once nested. But
the Pirates of the Caribbean star
did leave something behind in a
corner penthouse: a pirate shipshaped chandelier hanging over
the entranceway. “It’s a great conversation piece,” says real estate
agent Bill Cooper, who is listing the two-bedroom, three-bath
property as a rental ($7,500 a
month) for its new owners. It is
understood that the fixture was
a wedding present to Depp and
Heard, neither of whom, remarkably, claimed it in the divorce.
Liza Minnelli, Expect a Call
from Renee Zellweger
Renee Zellweger is currently
hip-deep in research for her next
Zellweger
Depp’s deserted pirate ship chandelier.
Gersh
Paltrow
Hollywood’s Holiday Parties:
Who Went Where When
Seth MacFarlane usually dusts
the competition with his epic
holiday party at his sprawling Beverly Hills estate — and
this year was no exception:
Entertainment included Baby
Driver’s Ansel Elgort performing a rendition of “Have Yourself
a Merry Little Christmas” in
front of a 70-piece orchestra.
Guests included Robert Pattinson,
Kate Hudson, Lea Michele and
Bachelor star Nick Viall (“He
must have taken 200 selfies with
guests,” reports one attendee).
Over at the talent agencies, the
holiday festivities were more
low-key. UTA’s annual holiday
party — scheduled for Dec. 6 at
Tao — was canceled because of
fires ripping through the area;
WME celebrated by renting out
Universal Studios on Dec. 14;
CAA thanked its workers with
an assistant appreciation week
— starting Dec. 11 — offering
conference room manicures and
mini-massages. Meanwhile, at
Fox’s corporate event Dec. 12 on
the lot, the mood was bittersweet as employees contemplated
being purchased by Disney (some
guests were spotted in Mickey
Mouse baseball caps).
Got tips? Email rambling@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
Power
Dining
64
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
HO T
REST
Armie Hammer popped
by Stella Barra in
Hollywood. … Gwyneth
Paltrow, Jimmy Fallon
and Jessica Alba joined
the masses at Eataly.
… This Is Us’ Mandy
Moore, Jon Huertas
and Justin Hartley had
dinner at Sushi | Bar
in Encino. … Jef Berg
was at Nerano. On a
diferent night, Bob
Gersh was in. Lawrence
Bender sat nearby. …
Phil Rosenthal and
Jesse Tyler Ferguson
had dinner at 189 by
Dominique Ansel. …
Jefrey Katzenberg,
newlyweds Justin
Verlander and Kate
Upton, lawyer Sean
Marks, Allan Loeb
and Jason Markarian
shared the room
at Craig’s.
NEW
AU R A
NT
Tintorera
The Quick Pitch Chef
Maycoll Calderon
— who has found
international acclaim
with his Mexico
City restaurants —
brings the creativity
he nurtured under
Ferran Adria and
Jean-Georges
Vongerichten to a
hidden-garden lair.
The concept is 1957
Acapulco by way
of 2017 Silver Lake,
expressed through
skilled renditions
of tiraditos, ceviches
and tostadas.
The Inside Dish The
restaurant’s name
references a Mexican
film about a killer
shark released two
years after Jaws.
2815 Sunset Blvd.
— GARY BAUM
TINTORERA: ALEN LIN. DEL TORO: FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES. ZELLWEGER, PALTROW: JB LACROIX/ WIREIMAGE. SHIP, GHOST: ISTOCK. GERSH: TODD WILLIAMSON/GETTY IMAGES. CHANDELIER: COURTESY OF REALTOR.
Del Toro reveals a close encounter of the “cliched” kind.
role, playing Judy Garland in
Judy, an upcoming biopic about
the late singer. “There’s so much
material out there,” Zellweger,
48, tells THR. Her favorite find
so far: a clip of Garland performing with Mickey Rooney on CBS’
The Judy Garland Show, which
ran in 1963 and 1964. “She’s so
comfortable,” Zellweger marvels of Garland, who died of an
accidental barbiturate overdose
in 1969. “You could see she’s
being herself. She was so funny
and cool.” Still, there is one key
resource Zellweger hasn’t yet
tapped for the film (which starts
shooting in February): Garland’s
daughter, Liza Minnelli. “I think
I might have to do that — thanks
for the idea,” she tells THR. “It
sounds like a good excuse to
make a phone call.” — MARC MALKIN
ISSA RAE IS A MARVEL...
“
A RADIANT PERFORMANCE
OF TREMENDOUS CONFIDENCE”
– ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
”
“THE SHARPEST COMEDY OF THE YEAR
– TIME
GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINATION
®
BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
ISSA RAE
7 NAACP IMAGE AWARD NOMINATIONS
®
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
ENTERTAINER OF THE YEAR
ISSA RAE
OUTSTANDING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
ISSA RAE
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING
ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
JAY ELLIS
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING
ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
YVONNE ORJI
OUTSTANDING WRITING IN A COMEDY SERIES
ISSA RAE “HELLA GREAT”
ISSA RAE “HELLA PERSPECTIVE”
AFI AWARD WINNER
TOP TEN TELEVISION
PROGRAMS OF THE YEAR
About Town
Mileposts
Martin Ransohof,
who produced such
acclaimed features
as The Cincinnati
Kid, Save the Tiger
and Jagged Edge,
died Dec. 13 in Los
Angeles. He was 90.
2
Suzanna Leigh, who
co-starred with Elvis
Presley in Paradise,
Hawaiian Style, died
Dec. 11 of liver cancer
in Winter Garden,
Florida. She was 72.
1 Lewis
and Rabkin
2 Ella Mary
3 Gottfried
1
Hitched, Hatched, Hired
Inside the industry’s celebrations and news
Weddings
Jbeau Lewis, a
music agent at UTA,
and Milana Rabkin,
co-founder and CEO
of Stem, a digital
music and video
distributor, were
married Nov. 25 at
Hotel El Ganzo
Beach Club in San
Jose del Cabo, Mexico.
The couple will
honeymoon in Kenya
and Tanzania.
Births
David Stone, WME
partner and television agent, and
wife Natalie Kolawa
Stone welcomed
daughter Ella Mary
Stone on Nov. 18.
Verve agent Chris
Noriega and wife
Lauren Noriega, a
sales executive at
Amazon, welcomed
son Kellan Brian
Noriega on Oct. 20
at Ronald Reagan
UCLA Medical Center
in Los Angeles.
Adam Cooper,
an entertainment attorney at
Jackoway Tyerman,
and wife Sharon
Cooper welcomed
son Miles Brett
Cooper on Nov. 18 at
Cedars-Sinai.
Mike Napodano
Lilah Bernice
Pollak on Oct. 23 at
Cedars-Sinai.
Congrats
Fox Networks Group
upped Brian Sullivan
to president and COO
on Dec. 7.
was named senior
vp and chief technology officer for
Disney|ABC TV
Group on Dec. 11.
Rick Levy, founding
partner and general counsel at ICM
Partners, and wife
Andrea Chapelle welcomed son Sterling
Boxer Levy on Nov. 7
at Cedars-Sinai
Medical Center in
Los Angeles.
John Pollak, president of worldwide
television & international at Electus, and
wife Rachel Israel
welcomed daughter
UTA tapped Joseph
Kessler as global head
of IQ on Dec. 5.
Deaths
Thom Hinkle was
Sterling Boxer
Univision promoted
Liz Sanderson to
senior vp strategy &
insights Dec. 6.
upped to executive vp
of original programming and Jenifer
Kim to senior vp original programming
for TBS on Dec. 5.
Howard Gottfried, the
McMahon
Wendy McMahon was
Erik Carlson was
named president of
ABC’s Stations Group
on Dec. 6.
D.J. Jacobs was
Birthdays
Oscar-nominated
producer who teamed
with screenwriter
Paddy Chayefsky on
Network, The Hospital
and Altered States,
died Dec. 8 in Los
Angeles. He was 94.
promoted to president and CEO of Dish
Network on Dec. 5.
upped to CFO and
head of business
development for
Media Rights Capital
on Dec. 11.
Vibiana Molina was
named head of business and legal affairs
for Fox 21 Television
Studios on Dec. 5.
DEC. 19
Ronan Farrow, 30
Jake Gyllenhaal, 37 →
DEC. 22
Ralph Fiennes, 55
Diane Sawyer, 72
DEC. 20
Jonah Hill, 34
Todd Phillips, 47
Dick Wolf, 71
DEC. 23
Finn Wolfhard, 15
DEC. 21
Barry Gordon, 69
Jefrey Katzenberg, 67
Ray Romano, 60
DEC. 25
Jimmy Bufett, 71
Annie Lennox, 63
Sissy Spacek, 68
To submit, send email to hhh@thr.com
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
66
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
DEC. 24
Lee Daniels, 58
Conrad Brooks, who
appeared in six films
for cult filmmaker
Ed Wood, including
Plan 9 From Outer
Space, died Dec. 6 in
Martinsburg, West
Virginia. He was 86.
Arnold Burk, a former
United Artists and
Paramount executive
and longtime entertainment attorney,
died Dec. 10 in Chapel
Hill, North Carolina.
He was 85.
Pat DiNizio, the
frontman, songwriter and guitarist
of The Smithereens,
died Dec. 12 in
Summit, New Jersey,
after a series of
health problems.
He was 62.
LEWIS: COURTESY OF JOEL BERNSTEIN. STONE, LEVY: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. GOTTFRIED: COURTESY OF NORAH WEINSTEIN. MCMAHON: DISNEY/ABC. GYLLENHAAL: VENTURELLI/WIREIMAGE.
3
“ONE
OF TV’S
GREATEST”
COMEDIES
– THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER
“BACK IN
HILARIOUS FORM...
WICKEDLY FUNNY”
– UPROXX
2 SAG AWARDS NOMINATIONS
®
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY AN ENSEMBLE IN A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
LARRY DAVID
WGA AWARD NOMINATION
COMEDY SERIES
LARRY DAVID, JON HAYMAN
JUSTIN HURWITZ, JEFF SCHAFFER
CONGRATULATES
ROBIN WRIGHT
SCREEN ACTORS GUILD NOMINEE
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE BY A
FEMALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
HOUSE OF CARDS
CONGRATULATES
JASON
BATEMAN
GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINEE
BEST ACTOR, TV DRAMA
OZARK
SCREEN ACTORS GUILD
NOMINEE
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE
BY A MALE ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
OZARK
AND
LAURA
LINNEY
SCREEN ACTORS GUILD
NOMINEE
OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE
BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A
DRAMA SERIES
OZARK
‘I Have Wings to Fly’
The head of the
Chuck Lorre Family
Foundation, which
has funded four
scholarships worth
$1 million.
Warner Bros.
executive Dee Dee
Myers helped
coordinate the firstever Wonder Woman
scholarship.
Only one blot stained
Lorre scholarship
winner Jordyn’s day:
Her mentor, Adriene
Bowles, was in
Paris on business.
Shark Tank’s
Greiner was
so moved, she said
she wants to
help other mentees
through college.
Judith (top) won
the Lori Greiner
scholarship, with
Melany (below)
receiving a Lorre
scholarship.
Twenty-one high school juniors gather with the 2017
graduates of THR’s WIE Mentorship Program as the new
class begins a year of partnership with Hollywood’s
top female leaders By Stephen Galloway • Photographed by Austin Hargrave
Winner Arellano (second from left) and her mentor,
Laurie Zaks (second from right), were embraced by scholarship
presenters Gadot and Justin Timberlake.
J
Steve Ujlaki,
dean of the LMU
film school, helps
oversee the 17 girls
now there on full
WIE scholarships.
ust an hour before THR’s Women in
Entertainment gala got underway
Dec. 6, things were looking awfully
shaky. Word spread that a fierce
brushfire was racing toward Bel Air, endangering many attendees’ homes and keeping
several stellar names (Meryl Streep, Selena
Gomez and Amy Pascal) from attending.
Miraculously, their houses were unscathed —
and so was a highlight of THR’s year: Its annual
presentation of full-ride scholarships to some
of the mentees in the 9-year-old Women in
Entertainment Mentorship Program, a joint
venture between THR and Big Brothers Big
Sisters of Greater L.A. Thanks to the generosity of Shark Tank entrepreneur-inventor Lori
Greiner and producer Chuck Lorre, three girls
from low-income families in South and East
L.A. were awarded scholarships to Loyola
Marymount University worth $250,000 each.
But it was a fourth scholarship recipient
who stole the show: When Gal Gadot made a
surprise appearance to announce the creation of the first Wonder Woman Scholarship
(funded by Warner Bros.), a visibly shocked
Carla Arellano, 19, took the stage and stunned
the audience with her speech. “Feet,” she said,
quoting Frida Kahlo, “what do I need you for
when I have wings to fly?”
The 2017 and
2018 mentees
were
photographed
Dec. 6 at the
Women in
Entertainment
Breakfast at
Milk Studios in
Los Angeles.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Kaiya
Jordyn
Jasmine
Judith
Egypt
Alyssa
Alison
Maritza
Dariana
Jenny
Karen
Shirleya
Alexandria
Melany
Keary
Mey
10
11
19
27
28
37
39
38
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12
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47
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41
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25
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34
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42
48
71
41 THR’s
Galloway
42 Jennifer
43 BBBS
chairman
Laura
Lizer
44 Paula
45 Yvette
46 Yessenia
47 LMU’s
Stacy
Barnes
48 Emily
49 Jazmin
8
7
17 18
23
22
30
30 Arianna
31 Teresa
32 Neida
33 Snyder
34 Zyrah
35 Ujlaki
36 THR’s
Matthew
Belloni
37 Katherine
38 WB’s Myers
39 Mentorship
manager
Jenny
Vasquez
40 Greiner
15 6
14
29
40
46
5
4
2
1
17 Celine
18 LaTierra
19 Jennifer
20 Denise
21 Lauryn
22 Angelica
23 Kalis
24 Joselyn
25 Ana
26 Rashell
27 Veronica
28 The Lorre
Foundation’s
Trisha
Cardoso
29 Mia
9
36
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45
TIMBERLAKE: RICH FURY/GETTY IMAGES.
LMU president
Tim Snyder
has agreed to
match all the
scholarship money
donors raise.
The Business
Executive Suite
1
2
Byron Allen
The comic turned mogul on living on
‘studios’ crumbs,’ Weinstein’s future and
Christian Bale’s new Western Hostiles
By Tatiana Siegel
A
t age 14, Byron Allen was
already doing standup, and one night at the
Comedy Store, Wayne Kline, a
writer on TV’s Good Times, happened to see his act. “He said,
‘Can I get your phone number?
I know somebody that might be
interested in working with you,’ ”
Allen recalls. Two weeks later,
he was sitting in star Jimmie
Walker’s apartment alongside
Jay Leno and David Letterman,
writing material for the show. He
got $25, the first money he made
writing jokes, which paid a lot
better than working as a paper
boy. “I had to throw two papers
to make a penny,” he says. “So,
1 Roy Lichtenstein’s Red Lamps. “I’ve been collecting art for over 20 years. I love this one,”
says Allen, who was photographed Nov. 17 in his Century City ofice. 2 Allen, his wife and
others shared a Daytime Emmy Award for producing Justice for All With Judge Cristina Perez.
“One of [the trophies] belongs to me, and one of them belongs to my wife,” he says.
I had to throw 5,000 papers to
make that.”
Allen, now 56, spent 18 years as
a comedian and host of television
hits such as Real People before
launching Entertainment Studios
in 1993. He owns 100 percent of
the company, which he says has
$1 billion in assets and boasts
41 TV shows and seven 24-hour
HD networks — including
Pets.TV and Comedy.TV — that
reach nearly 80 million subscribers. And Allen grabbed attention
in the film world after his first
RÉSUMÉ
CURRENT TITLE
Chairman and CEO,
Entertainment Studios/
Freestyle Digital Media
PREVIOUS JOB
Co-host of NBC’s
Real People from 1979-84
BIG HIT
47 Meters Down,
with a $5.5 million
budget, has grossed
$44 million
Photographed by Michele Thomas
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
72
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
feature release, the June shark
thriller 47 Meters Down — which
he rescued from a straight-toDVD fate at the Weinsteins’
Dimension Films — became
2017’s most successful indie with
$44 million domestic. He then
acquired three splashy films in
Toronto, including the $50 million awards hopeful Hostiles (in
theaters Dec. 22), a Western starring Christian Bale.
Since 2007, Allen has been
married to Jennifer Lucas, executive producer at Entertainment
Studios, and the couple, who live
in West L.A., have children ages
9, 7 and 5. He invited THR to his
Century City office, from where
The Business
he oversees a staff of 200 and
a 75,000-square-foot studio in
Culver City, to discuss what other
assets he’s eyeing.
We are really focused on movies
that we believe warrant a wide
release of 2,000 to 4,000 [theaters] and can do anywhere from
$40 million to $70 million at the
box office. We’re chasing what the
studios don’t necessarily want.
Their ambitions are much higher.
So, we’re staying in our weight
class. And we’re chasing the
studios’ crumbs. Basically, we’re
chasing box-office failures for a
studio. But their box-office failure
is our success. Their crumbs are
our gourmet meal. When you do
that across 15 to 20 movies a year,
it’s a real business.
You got to know the average
entertainment consumer from
doing Real People for five years.
From your vantage, do Hollywood
decision-makers lack that insight?
I also was on the road as a comedian for more than 22 years. I
made my living and fed myself by
standing onstage in front of an
audience all across this country.
And if I didn’t know how to make
them laugh every six seconds, I
didn’t eat.
A lot of people in Hollywood, in
the studio system, are arrogant.
They fly over America in private
jets, and they pretty much think
they are smarter than the people
between [the coasts]. They try to
get the audience to buy in to their
taste and get the audience to buy
what they like. As a comedian,
you quickly learn you have to give
them what they like.
I opened for Lionel Richie and
Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton.
When you stand in front of their
audience for half an hour, you’re
like, “Yeah, I know what you like.”
You bought 47 Meters Down
from The Weinstein Co. Have you
considered buying the studio?
No. We haven’t really looked at
it. No need. I mean, it’s a great
acquisition for somebody who
wants to get a relationship with
the theaters. We already have that.
We bought Freestyle Releasing in
October 2015. That’s how we got
into the movie business. We have
an output deal with Netflix, and
Alliance handles our home entertainment. Our infrastructure is
built and up and running. So, for
us, it’s not a fit.
I bought 47 Meters Down off
of Bob [Weinstein]. I never dealt
with Harvey on that at all, because
Harvey wasn’t on that side of the
house. This movie was on a truck
and headed to the DVD store. We
were able to stop the trucks from
delivering it to the DVD stores,
and it ended up being the biggest
indie release of the year.
Allen with Barack Obama: “I started
supporting him when he was a senator,”
he says. “Just a genuinely good guy.”
For an indie distributor, you
are spending big on prints and
advertising. It worked on 47
Meters but not on horror entry
Friend Request. Are you rethinking
that strategy?
in buying their finished movies
piecemeal, we look at whoever
brings a movie to the table. But
I’m guessing that they would
want to keep the movies intact
for a sale.
What is the most profitable part of
your business?
Our television business. We think
being in the movie business is
also a wonderful pathway to being
in business with talent that can
grow our TV side, because some
of this talent will lend itself to
television. We just want to be in
business with the best of the best.
And we saw that the top of the
pyramid, that talent pool quite
often sits in the movie sandbox.
What makes a film right for
Entertainment Studios?
You know, Hollywood is a casino.
You have to put your chips on the
table and hope for the best. It’s a
big gamble. But I believe it’s real
simple. Number one, you need
a good movie. Number two, you
need a good release date. And then
number three, you need to spend
enough money to tell everybody
you have a good movie. We know
there’s a built-in audience for horror movies. We just didn’t do well
with our first horror outing.
You’ve pledged to spend $16 million
to market the Ted Kennedy scandal
film Chappaquiddick. Still the case?
Yes.
Executive Suite
How will you make it relevant?
Will you lean in to the current
sex scandal climate with your
marketing?
It’s very timely. What happened
then would be gargantuan news
today. At the end of the day, the
landing on the moon really did an
amazing job of keeping him off
the front page.
You did the courtroom show
We the People With Gloria Allred.
Any plans to reteam amid this
#MeToo moment?
She was great to work with, and I
would love to work with her again.
She was as professional and as
focused as they come.
As a longtime stand-up, is there
too much political correctness in
comedy today?
When you start punishing and
censoring comedians, that’s a
real bad sign of us as Americans
losing our First Amendment
rights. As a comedian, I’m gonna
push the boundaries. Some things
you’re going to love, and some
things you’re going to hate. But
this is America. Great people
died for us to have this right. And
don’t ever let anybody lose one
drop of blood over something
that is rightfully yours. Especially
comedians.
3
4
1
2
1 Allen, age 14, writing for Good Times with Letterman (leaning back) and Walker (in orange).
2 Allen with his mother (right), his wife and their children. 3 The suit jacket his mother
bought for his first appearance, at age 18, on The Tonight Show. 4 During a commercial break,
Allen remembers Johnny Carson telling him, “Don’t worry, son. You’re gonna be great.”
What do you think will happen
to TWC?
I don’t know. As far as any interest
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
74
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
The Business
Year in Review
Why 2017 Was
Like a Trip
to the 1950s
Sexism, racism and attacks on dissent
made an ugly return, but #MeToo could
make 2018 the ‘year of kicking ass rather
than groping it’ By Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
us, the racist, misogynist, homophobic demon
we are desperate to exorcise. They act without
shame, supporting accused child molesters for the Senate, passing tax bills that they
know benefit the rich over the poor or middle
class, aggressively seeking to restrict the
constitutional rights of minorities, women,
immigrants and the LGBTQ community, all
in the smarmy pursuit of personal political
power over conscience or patriotism.
Trump is to American values what Bizzaro
Superman is to reality: a twisted parody of all
that Americans hold dear, a clownish court
jester who lacks the intelligence, integrity and
self-awareness to see, or care about, the damage he’s doing. According to The Washington
Post, in his first 298 days, Trump made 1,628
false or misleading statements. Is the America
of 2017 no longer demanding truth from
elected officials? Is it just too much effort for
us to do as Thomas Jefferson advised? “If ever
you find yourself environed with difficulties
and perplexing circumstances, out of which
you are at a loss how to extricate yourself,
do what is right, and be assured that that will
extricate you the best out of the worst situations.” Well, this is the worst situation. Will
we do what is right in 2018?
One bright ray of hope that we are capable of
doing what is right has been demonstrated by
the #MeToo movement. Pulling sexual predators out of the slimy shadows and thrusting
them into the harsh, unrelenting light of public scrutiny has elevated the power of women
against those who would diminish them. It
has raised awareness among all men, even
staunch supporters of women’s equality, who
can undoubtedly recall a time or two when
they acted or spoke to a woman in a way that
was not appropriate. It has eliminated the typical male excuses
from our social lexicon: “I was
just kidding.” “Can’t you take a
joke?” “You’re not even my type.”
Weinstein
“You were coming on to me.” And
all the other desperate and defensive phrases
that need to be publicized so they will never
be used again.
Another sign of American defiance in the
face of political and social oppression is the
mass protests by athletes, from high school
to the pros. These protests fulfill Americans’
glorious past as a people determined to fight
for what is right. From women’s suffrage to
worker’s unions to civil rights to anti-war,
Americans have used public protest to inform
one another about injustices, at grave personal risk, in order to eliminate those
injustices. Colin Kaepernick may be the face
of such protests because he has been singled
out for punishment by the NFL, but he has
inspired dozens of players, coaches and owners
in the NFL, NBA, WNBA and, to a lesser extent,
the NHL and MLB. It is a joy to see so many
embrace their responsibility as role models to
kids and as members of the community.
The backlash already has begun. Women
speaking out about harassment are called
Illustration by Kyle Hilton
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
76
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
KAEPERNICK: TAYLOR HILL/GETTY IMAGES. WEINSTEIN: JIM SPELLMAN/WIREIMAGE.
M
an, 2017 has been the Tommy Wiseau
of the century. A whole year of our
short stay on Earth has been hijacked
by a cast of clueless characters so tone- and
times-deaf that they’ve made America look like
the national road company version of The Room
(“You’re tearing me apart!”). These disaster
artists are dominating not only politics but,
worse, our pop culture, which acts as the
prophetic entrails of our country’s cultural and
social future. And right now, those are some
pretty grim gizzards.
The end-of-year party theme for 2017 is
the long overdue Abuse of Power for Idiots.
Although producer-in-an-open-robe Harvey
Weinstein and President Trump (“Make
America Grope Again”) have diametrically
opposed political views, they are united in
their belief that power over others is a license,
even a duty, to exploit them. That’s not the
worst part. The worst part is uncovering how
many people have been, and still are, complicit
in enabling the abuse despite their glib denials. If you’re at all wondering if I’m referring
to you, then yes, I am.
The year 2017 was like time-traveling back
to the ’50s, an era when most Americans
had blind faith in government, parents, religion and Big Business. Father
knew best, both figuratively and
literally. Women were fashionable accessories, college students
were pennant-waving boosters of
Kaepernick
status quo, blacks were keeping
their heads down, gays were in denial or hiding. And everyone except Ban the Bomb bums
and civil rights agitators were patriots. Those
White Fathers in power had only our best
interests at heart, and anyone who suggested
otherwise was a communist sympathizer bent
on destroying the American Way of Life.
A simple life for the simple-minded. If you
think that sounded good, then yes, I am referring to you.
That docile, complacent Ghost of America
Past that Trump and his GOP cronies are trying so desperately to conjure is, to the rest of
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The Business
Year in Review
King
L. Murdoch
Moonves
Spiegel
Predictions 2018! Next Year’s Biggest Stories
THR experts look into their crystal balls for the ideas, trends and deals that will shape
the media and entertainment landscape in the new year (and far beyond)
DEALS
The Urge to Merge
After Disney acquires a large
chunk of 21st Century Fox, the
next big merger could be CBS
and Lionsgate. While many on
Wall Street have been pining
for CEO Leslie Moonves to
recombine CBS with Viacom,
this move would be a way to give
CBS the bigger media footprint
it needs. Lionsgate already
distributes movies made by CBS
Films, Lionsgate-owned Starz
would complement CBS-owned
Showtime, and Lionsgate content
would help beef up the CBS
All Access streaming service with
films from the Hunger Games,
Saw and Twilight franchises and
TV shows like Orange Is the New
Black and Nashville. — PAUL BOND
MOGULS
Rupert’s Play for CNN
After selling most of his Fox
empire, Rupert Murdoch may
let his son Lachlan run the parts
that Disney didn’t buy (the Fox
broadcast network, Fox News
and the FS1 and FS2 sports
networks) and return his attention to an old love: the previously
spun-of News Corp. In order
to rebuild the parent of newspapers including The Wall Street
Journal and the New York Post,
the octogenarian mogul could
set his sights on CNN should
AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson
give in to DOJ demands and
divest the cable news outfit in
order to finally win approval
of his $85.4 billion merger with
Time Warner. — PAUL BOND
woman’s contract. (Megyn Kelly
is now reportedly the top-paid
anchor at NBC News.) But just
as the #MeToo moment retooled
morning news, it will also recast
the retrograde gender dynamics
that perpetuated bad behavior by
anchor stars. — MARISA GUTHRIE
TELEVISION
Dawn of the Post-Peak TV Era
Scripted output is still set to
top the 500-some original series
that aired in 2017, but that’s a
content yield too great to sustain.
A plateau at Netflix is as inevitable as its anticipated $8 billion
yearly spend seems outlandish,
even by CEO Reed Hastings’ lofty
standards. And buyers will shrink
in ad-supported cable as some
bail out of scripted (Viacom and
NBCU already are honing their
catalogs) and others fold completely, changing the way series
are financed and distributed.
— MICHAEL O’CONNELL
DIGITAL
Who Wants to Buy Snapchat?
Snapchat’s redesign, announced
in November, is meant to create a
more personalized and easierto-understand experience and
grow its 178 million daily active
user base. The move could very
well have the opposite efect,
since the app’s near-opacity
for people over 30 was part of
what powered its youth ascent.
Without the scale of Facebook
and a stock price stubbornly
beneath its $17 IPO price, the
Evan Spiegel-led Snap Inc. could
very well find itself a takeover
target. — NATALIE JARVEY
FILM
Breaking the VOD Window
Since it has its own nascent
OTT platform to service, Disney
has been the one major studio
with no interest in testing a premium VOD window that would
ofer movie rentals well before
the current three months after
theatrical release. That has made
it tough to assemble the three
or four studios needed to make a
new home entertainment service
viable. But Disney’s acquisition of Fox may be what finally
puts pressure on the other major
studios to get moving to find
a new distribution channel and
overrule the objections of theater owners to breaking the VOD
window. — PAMELA MCCLINTOCK
ASIA
Studios Get More From China
There is a solid chance that
China overtakes North
America in 2018 to become the
biggest theatrical film market
in the world. Will this bring
back Chinese investment into
Hollywood? Maybe. But Beijing
still views entertainment as a
risky and vainglorious investment sector for local tycoons.
Instead, expect attention to shift
in the opposite direction, with
Hollywood again pushing for a
bigger slice of China’s enormous pie. Studios may be able to
nudge their Chinese box-ofice
take upward from 25 percent
of ticket sales, but Beijing won’t
surrender its many levers of
market manipulation, including
blackout periods and control of
distribution. — PATRICK BRZESKI
NEWS
The End of the Star System
Before they were toppled
amid sexual misconduct claims,
Matt Lauer and Charlie Rose
were given top billing over their
female co-anchors — Savannah
Guthrie at NBC’s Today and Gayle
King and Norah O’Donnell at
CBS This Morning. Sources tell
THR that the issue of pay parity
arose in the renegotiation of each
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
78
Hastings
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
Guthrie
Stephenson
MOONVES: AXELLE/BAUER-GRIFFIN/FILMMAGIC. KING: GARY GERSHOFF/GETTY IMAGES. MURDOCH: TODD WILLIAMSON/GETTY IMAGES. SPIEGEL: LARRY BUSACCA/
GETTY IMAGES FOR TIME INC. HASTINGS: DOMINIQUE CHARRIAU/GETTY IMAGES. GUTHRIE: CHARLES SYKES/BRAVO. STEPHENSON: CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES.
liars by celebrities and politicians. Sports organizations are trying to muzzle athletes from
expressing themselves because they say sports
is no place for political commentary. Yet they
play the national anthem and have military
displays that clearly express political opinion.
Only the oppressed, mostly people of color who
actually have reason to speak out, are being
told to hold their tongues.
Silence breeds further oppression, so if we
want 2018 to be the year of kicking ass rather
than groping it, we will have to raise our voices
for every group who faces injustice: people
of color, women, immigrants, Muslims, the
LGBTQ community and anyone else being
marginalized by those in power who look at us
with eyes, as W.B. Yeats wrote, “as blank and
pitiless as the sun.”
I watched the incredibly moving viral video
in which tearful middle schooler Keaton Jones
recounts school bullies physically and emotionally harassing him and wonders why they
do it. With a catch in his voice, he wonders
what can be done about them. “Stay strong, I
guess. It’ll probably get better one day,” he says
unconvincingly, turning away from the camera as he weeps. Immediately, there was an
outpouring of support from celebrities, politicians and athletes. I couldn’t help but think
that’s where America is now, being bullied by
some pretty ruthless villains. We can’t just
hope things will get better one day, we have to
make them better now. Together.
(Since the video was released, questions
about Keaton’s parents’ racial views have been
raised. That doesn’t make him being victimized less wrong or harrowing. Maybe that’s
even more reason for us to rally around him,
to show him the America we can make it.)
On HBO’s The Newsroom, anchor Will McAvoy
(Jeff Daniels) laments the America that has
lost much of its greatness by describing the
people we used to be when we were at our peak:
“We stood up for what was right. We fought
for moral reasons, we passed laws, struck
down laws for moral reasons, we waged wars
on poverty, not poor people. We sacrificed, we
cared about our neighbors. We put our money
where our mouths were, and we never beat our
chest. We built great big things, made ungodly
technological advances, explored the universe,
cured diseases, and we cultivated the world’s
greatest artists and the world’s greatest economy. … We aspired to intelligence, we didn’t
belittle it, it didn’t make us feel inferior. We
didn’t identify ourselves by who we voted for in
our last election, and we didn’t scare so easy.”
Let’s make 2018 the year we don’t scare
so easy and strive to become those people
once again.
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“ NOLAN’S
FILM IS AN EPIC ACHIE VEMENT–
THE VERY DEFINITION OF WHAT CINEMA CAN AND SHOULD BE.
‘DUNKIRK’ IS VISCERAL F ILMMAKING THAT
CAN TRULY BE CALLED ART.”
—CHRIS NASHAWATY
F O R
Y O U R
C O N S I D E R A T I O N
W W W . WA R N E R B R O S 2 0 1 7 . C O M
I N
A L L
C A T E G O R I E S
“THE CAST IS SUPERB. IT’S AS FINE AND UNSELFISH
A DISPLAY OF ENSEMBLE ACTING AS YOU’LL SEE ANYWHERE.”
–PETER TRAVERS
“‘DUNKIRK’ IS A TOUR DE FORCE
OF CI N EMATIC CRAFT AND TECH N IQU E, BUT ON E
THAT IS UNAMBIGUOUSLY IN SERVICE OF A SOBER,
SINCERE, PROFOUNDLY MORAL STORY
THAT CLOSES THE DISTANCE BETWEEN YESTERDAY’S FIGHTS AND TODAY’S.”
–MANOHLA DARGIS
With the SAG Awards’ snub of the old guard honored by the Globes, the us-versus-them of
our Trumpy political system has reached Hollywood. Will it upend the Oscars, too?
By Stephen Galloway
F
or lovers of all things
traditional — those
with a yearning for the
past, a respect for the
tried-and-true, a belief in the
old world order — Dec. 13 was a
bleak day indeed. That’s when
the 2,500 members of the Screen
Actors Guild’s awards committee kicked the establishment in
the balls.
Just 48 hours after the
Hollywood Foreign Press
Association rewarded a slew of
veterans with Golden Globe nominations — among them, such
bauble-bearing artists as Meryl
Streep, Tom Hanks, Helen Mirren,
Daniel Day-Lewis and Octavia
Spencer, all previous Oscar and
Globe winners — SAG went rogue,
sticking it to the Hollywood
nomenklatura when its movie
noms were revealed and shutting
out the blue bloods.
True, some of the same old
names were sprinkled among the
SAG Awards’ movie nominees;
how could it be otherwise, given
that almost any awards-oriented
film needs a goodly dose of star
power just to get off the ground?
But, with few exceptions (Denzel
Washington for Roman J. Israel,
Esq. and arguably Steve Carell for
Battle of the Sexes), there wasn’t an
A-lister to be found.
Instead, SAG favored the film
industry’s blue- and white-collar
workers. It opted for those who toil
close to the industry’s icy Kuiper
Belt, rather than at its molten
core. Make no mistake, this was
a vote for outsiders, a cri de coeur
from the dispossessed warning
those at the nexus of power: Don’t
for a second imagine that Donald
Trump-like disruption is confined
to the political sphere — it’s oozing out of Tinseltown, too.
What a far cry that was from
the Globe film nominations just
two days before, when Steven
Spielberg’s The Post
took six, including
best drama, actor
(Hanks) and actress
(Streep). The direcWashington
tor’s paean to the
First Amendment
was completely
ignored by SAG.
Think that was the
Carell
exception to the rule?
The Globes included Christopher
Nolan’s Dunkirk and Ridley Scott’s
All the Money in the World among
its best picture nominees, but neither made it into the SAG Awards’
Illustration by Matt Collins
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
82
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
WASHINGTON: KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY IMAGES. CARELL: TIBRINA HOBSON/GETTY IMAGES.
AWARDS SEASON MEETS
THE AGE OF DISRUPTION
best ensemble circle. (The omission of Money’s Christopher
Plummer and Michelle Williams,
both of whom were nominated for
Globes, may be explained by the
film’s failure to reach SAG voters
in time.) Among other Hollywood
aristocrats, Day-Lewis (Phantom
Thread) and Mirren (The Leisure
Seekers) found favor with the
Globes, while SAG left them blowing in the wind.
The gap between the two
awards bodies comes into sharp
focus when you look at the
nominees’ previous hauls. The
actors and actresses nominated
for this year’s film Globes boast
24 Oscars among them; the SAG
Award nominees (excluding
those in the ensemble category)
total just 15.
So what does this mean come
the Oscars? For all the hullabaloo over the SAG Award and Globe
nominations, they’ve always
served as an appetizer before
the main meal. Each has gained
significance over the years as a
litmus test for the Oscars, part of
an awards Triple Crown in which
the final race is the only one that
really counts. This year, the SAG/
Globe divergence doesn’t so much
winnow the potential Oscar
nominees as indicate a rift in the
motion picture industry, a divide
between the insiders and outsiders, the haves and have-nots.
If the Academy has traditionally been on the side of the haves,
it’s not evident that’s still the
case. The truth is, the battle playing out with the Globes on one
side and SAG Awards on the other
reflects one taking place within
the Academy itself. Many pundits
wondered if Moonlight’s best picture win in February was an
aberration; rather, it revealed how
powerful the anti-establishment
wing of the Academy has become.
Old school and new school
aren’t wrestling inside SAG and
the HFPA alone; they’re in a tugof-war behind the closed doors of
Hollywood’s most prestigious
institution. Only when the Oscar
noms are revealed in January will
we know which side has won.
CONGRATULATES
2018 GOLDEN GLOBE &
SAG AWARD NOMINEE
BOB ODENKIRK
©2017 AMC Network Entertainment LLC. All Rights Reserved.
OUTSTANDING
PERFORMANCE BY
A MALE ACTOR
IN A DRAMA SERIES
GOLDEN GLOBE AWARD
®
BEST ACTRESS
(COMEDY)
NOMINEE
HELEN MIRREN
© HF PA
“WONDERFUL. DONALD SUTHERLAND IS SO GOOD.
HELEN MIRREN, AS USUAL, IS SIMPLY SUPERB.”
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
“TWO GREAT PERFORMANCES FROM TWO LEGENDARY ACTORS.”
-Paul Heath, THEHOLLYWOODNEWS.COM
HOW TO ERASE KEVIN SPACEY
IN NINE DAYS OF SHOOTING
An unprecedented feat of last-minute show-must-go-on moxie
allowed All the Money in the World director Ridley Scott to film 400 new
shots with Christopher Plummer as J. Paul Getty By Carolyn Giardina
THE
LEISURE
SEEKER
FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION
BEST ACTRESS
HELEN MIRREN
↑ While the makeup team had to age Spacey
n Monday, Nov. 6, cinema(left) to play Getty, they used a wig and other
tographer Dariusz Wolski was
efects to make Plummer look younger.
in a digital color grading suite at
post house Company 3 completing
the performance and the dynamic
All the Money in the World when he
between the actors,” Wolski says.
got a call canceling his scheduled
All the original locations were
Tuesday meeting with direcused, except for a scene
tor Ridley Scott to review the
in Rome when Getty buys
final film. Two days later,
a $2 million painting. Scott
with the clock ticking down
leaned on visual effects only
to the movie’s release, Scott
for a scene that was origiScott
announced in an unprecenally shot in Jordan; since
dented move that he was replacing
it was impractical to return,
Kevin Spacey, who had just been
Plummer was filmed in front of
accused of sexual assault, with
a greenscreen and the original
Christopher Plummer in the role
desert photography was added
of J. Paul Getty.
behind him once Spacey had been
“It would have been a pity if
digitally removed.
the film was completely neglected
For the hair and makeup team,
because of what happened,”
Plummer, 88, posed the opposite
Scott says of his decision, which
challenge of working with the
moved the film’s release back
58-year-old Spacey. Hair designer
only three days (to Dec. 25)
Ferdinando Merolla says that
and added $10 million, paid for
he first used a wig and makeup
by financing partner Imperative
to make Plummer look 10 years
Entertainment, to the drama’s
younger for scenes set in 1962,
$40 million budget as he filmed
then ditched the wig so the actor
nearly 400 new shots over
would appear with his own hair
nine days in the U.K. and Italy.
in scenes set in 1973.
Some scenes were redone,
Tim Fraser, sound mixer on
with Michelle Williams and
the reshoot, used the same mics
Mark Wahlberg returning for the
that Maurizio Argentieri employed
reshoots; others combined new
during the original filming “to
footage with shots from the origimake it easier to swap between
nal that didn’t include Plummer
the material,” says sound edi(like a scene during which Getty
tor Oliver Tarney. And because
speaks to a group of journalists).
Plummer’s tread would sound
“We staged them in a similar way,
different from Spacey’s, new
but we adapted a little based on
sound was added.
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
DONALD SUTHERLAND
84
MONEY: COURTESY OF SONY PICTURES (2). SCOTT: TIM MOSENFELDER/GETTY IMAGES.
O
T H E
A M E R I C A N
A N N O U N C E S
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CELEBR ATING
BEHIND
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T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
89
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
Style
Travel
1
2
3
Holiday Hideouts,
After the Hurricanes
With storms and crime taking out traditional industry
winter haunts St. Barts and Cabo, price hikes and
wait lists plague Miami, Hawaii, Aspen and Asia: ‘Everyone
who has reservations feels very relieved’ By Beth Landman
T
he annual 10-day foray to St. Barts is one of the most Hollywood of holidays, with such
regulars as Leonardo DiCaprio, Naomi Watts, Michael Douglas, Uma Thurman, Ellen
DeGeneres and David Letterman visiting, and moguls including David Gefen and Roman
Abramovich entertaining on their mega-yachts. Rooms typically run above $2,000 per night,
with a 10-night minimum, and often are secured a year in advance. So, when Hurricane Irma
swept through the Caribbean in September, crippling the St. Barts airport and shuttering
top hotels (photos of the Eden Roc showed what seemed to be only a slab of stone remaining),
people were horrified for the locals and quietly panicked about the loss of their retreat. Other
winter destinations also were clobbered by the storm — from St. Maarten (a top haunt for
Mariah Carey) to Anguilla (a favorite of Sandra
Bullock, Denzel Washington, Liam Neeson
and Justin Timberlake) — while the State
Department issued warnings about violence
in Cabo San Lucas, beloved by Jennifer Aniston
and George Clooney, in November. “My family
has been going to Cabo over Christmas forever, but we canceled this year when we heard
heads were rolling up on the beach,” says
Lizzie Grubman, daughter of legendary music
business attorney Allen Grubman. The family
will instead check in to a hotel in South Beach.
As alternative locales such as Miami book
up (Ritz-Carlton, Key Biscayne; the Faena in
South Beach; and Acqualina in Sunny Isles
were all but sold out in October), prices — and
anxieties — are rising. “Usually, people have
their assistants call us, but this year, even
our biggest clients are calling directly,” says
travel industry expert Jaclyn Sienna India, who
adds that $1,500 is now the minimum for a
good hotel in Miami. Blade, the private flight
service started by former Warner Music COO
Rob Wiesenthal and backed by Barry Diller,
among others, has had to “double the amount
of flights to Miami we offered last year” from
New York, says a rep.
Clever voyagers are seeking out high-end
Florida spots that weren’t yet open this time
last year, like Miami’s new Four Seasons,
Surfside (from $1,149), or the Carillon
Wellness retreat, which recently reopened
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
90
(from $975 for New Year’s), or, farther north,
the Hutchinson Shores Retreat in Jensen
Beach, which just opened in October (from
$230). One of the Florida Keys’ top resorts,
Amara Cay in Islamorada, reopens Dec. 15
(from $486). Though sold out, Palm Beach’s
The Breakers never hiked its rates, and famed
hotel The Colony, with a few rooms left at $529,
“has seen a 20 percent increase in occupancy,”
reports a rep. “This year’s hurricane has certainly played a role in the rise of reservations.”
Hawaii, too, has seen an uptick. “My client,
a big finance mogul who has invested in a
few Oscar-winning movies, had to cancel a
six-bedroom villa in St. Barts and relocate
to an oceanfront estate in Hanalei,” says
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
Alfonso Cuaron’s
Mex City, Post-Quake
shooting his latest film Roma in Mexico
W hile
City this past year, director Alfonso Cuaron
4
5
1 “The renovation of the Four Seasons Costa Rica will be completed Dec. 15, and we have been sending a lot of people there,
including an executive from a major network,’’ says Sienna India. 2 Little Nell in Aspen, which saw an uptick in reservations.
3 The Colony in Palm Beach has seen a 20 percent rise in occupancy. 4 The restaurant at 1Oak in the Maldives, where Akiva moved
his New Year’s Eve party from St. Barts. 5 Sashimi at the Four Seasons Hualalai in Hawaii, where overall bookings are up.
FOUR, NELL, 1OAK, SASHIMI: COURTESY OF SUBJECT. COLONY: SARGENT PHOTGRAPHY. FOXX: JB
LACROIX/WIREIMAGE. DOUGLAS: TRIBRINA HOBSON/GETTY IMAGES. CUARON: SHARON SWART.
Gen Hershey, president of the travel agency
Genuine Access. Adds Vikram Seshadri of
Protravel: “If you want to go to the Big Island
now, you have to get on a wait list.” According
to Sienna India, The Four Seasons Lanai also
is completely sold out: “There are $20,000
suites that we booked like crazy.”
Musician and actress Natali Yura, who
recently finished filming Reprisal with Bruce
Willis, is now packing her sweaters instead of
bikinis. “I had really wanted to visit St. Barts
because I’ve never been and my friends are
obsessed with it, so I got my bathing suits and
emotions ready, but we were told there was no
way the house we rented would be in shape,
so I’m going to Aspen,” she explains. Always a
popular retreat for the entertainment industry, the ski destination has become a tougher
ticket than ever. “Prices are at least 25 percent
higher in Aspen this year,” says Sienna India.
Some more adventurous travelers are heading to Asia. Caribbean fan Michael Douglas,
who owns a home in Bermuda and frequents
St. Barts, tells THR: “Our family is going to
spend the holidays exploring and enjoying
the sights of Asia, including India, Thailand
and Cambodia, and we will end up spending New Year’s in Hong Kong.” Hotelier and
restaurateur Richie Akiva, who throws one
of St. Barts’ biggest New Year’s Eve parties,
attended by the likes of Justin Bieber, Naomi
Campbell and Robin Thicke, is relocating to
the Indian Ocean in Maldives, where he now
has a 1Oak resort. “Elizabeth Hurley, who
is a St. Barts regular, will be coming, as will
David Beckham,” says Akiva. (Don’t expect
to see Amal Clooney, who is vocally opposed
to the government in Male, the capital of
Maldives.) The Tao Group, which is opening a
Lavo restaurant outpost at Singapore’s Marina
Bay Sands, will host a New Year’s party there
with St. Barts regular Jamie Foxx. “A lot of our
guests are using this as a launch point and
then going to places like Bali or Thailand,”
says Tao partner Noah Tepperberg.
Andrea Feczko, host of ABC TV’s Vacation
Creation, says that Punta Damita
in Riviera Nayarit, Mexico, also
is a hot destination. “Gwyneth
Paltrow has a beach house, and
Douglas
Jennifer Aniston, Rihanna, Sofia
Vergara, Kirsten Dunst and Ewan
McGregor also go,” she says. “It
has secluded white sand beaches
and turquoise water like the
Caribbean, with only two major
Foxx
properties, a Four Seasons and a
St. Regis. You can go for a day trip to Sayulita,
a wonderful surfing destination.”
St. Barts regular Martha Stewart is sticking
closer to home. “I am going to be at my farm in
Westchester with family, baking, cooking and
hoping we can do some cross-country skiing,”
she tells THR. The Americans producer Joel
Fields is also staying stateside. “We’ll be visiting Boston — unglamorous, but all-American:
family, Freedom Trail, Tea Party Museum and
other patriotic fun,’’ he says.
Those with their hearts set on the
Caribbean are finding other islands to explore.
While the Turks and Caicos Islands were hit
by Irma, and some homes like Jay McInerney’s
withstood too much damage to be habitable
for the holidays, top resorts — the Shore Club
and Amanyara — have reopened, and demand
is off the charts. “People are desperately trying to find places — they keep asking me to try
to get them in to Parrot Cay, but it’s sold out,’’
says Jane Rose, producer and manager of Keith
Richards, who has a house on the little island
off Turks, as does Bruce Willis. “Everyone who
has reservations feels very relieved.” Those
who won’t be deterred from St. Barts — such
as Ron Perelman, who will sail his yacht there
“to help support the island,” says his rep —
should know that while the 14-day minimum
has been relaxed, rates haven’t been reduced.
And, says Tony-winning producer Francine
LeFrak: “My friend who is also a producer was
just in St. Barts and so many of the restaurants are closed. You want to be supportive,
but you still need dinner.”
rediscovered his hometown. “I was constantly confronted with the memory of my past and the Mexico
City of the present, a city that is incredibly sophisticated, informed and cosmopolitan,” says Cuaron,
who adds that the recent earthquake “has left scars
in several areas,” but “very few places have sufered
closures.” December is the best month to visit, with
many Chilangos — natives of Mexico City — out of
town. Between Dec. 12 and Jan. 6, Guadalupe-Reyes,
which started as a religious celebration, “has now
turned mostly into a continuous party known as
‘posadas.’ ” The Oscar-winning director’s selects for
Mexico City:
WALKING AROUND “My favorite neighborhoods are
Coyoacan, colonia Roma and colonia Condesa.
Coyoacan is the most traditional neighborhood and
dates back to Aztec times. It’s where Frida Kahlo lived
and a lot of artists later on. The square gets very lively
on weekends. Roma and Condesa are the hipster-cool
areas with zillions of cafes and new restaurants coming up every single day.”
EATING “I’m a vegetarian, and a lot of places are very
veggie friendly. Rosetta (Calle Colima 166, Delegacion
Cuauhtemoc, Col. Roma Norte, 06700) is Italian
with a twist. Chef Elena Reygadas, sister of director
Carlos Reygadas, is always experimenting, combining
amazing homemade pastas with Italian and Mexican
ingredients. She’ll do ravioli with mamey, a seasonal
fruit like avocado but red. Maximo Bistrot (Tonala 133,
Roma Norte, 06700) is modern European and delicious. Chef Eduardo Garcia is very accommodating
and improvises for me. Pujol (Tennyson 133, Polanco,
Polanco IV Secc, 11570) has inventive, high-end Mexican
cuisine. They serve these little corns in a clay pot —
absolutely amazing.”
DRINKING “Cantinas are old-fashioned drinking
establishments, and you can find many still open all
over the city. My favorite is a hole-in-the-wall mezcal
bar called La Clandestina (Av. Alvaro Obregon 298,
Condesa, 06140), which sells amazing artisanal
mezcals. Comfort Food is a great cofee place in
the Colonia Narvarte (Cumbres de Maltrata 390,
local E, Esquina Mitla, Narvarte Oriente, 03020).”
— AS TOLD TO SHARON SWART
Cuaron kicking back in Mexico City.
Get more of Cuaron’s Mexico City recommendations on vegetarian eating, green spaces, culture, markets and where to work out at THR.COM.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
Style
Rose McGowan’s
#MeToo Beauty
Fashion News and Notes
A anti-harassment cri de coeur, 2018
fter 2017’s collective
might just be the year that women
rewrite the script of the beauty industry,
long a feminist target for promoting
unrealistic standards. In February,
godmother of the #MeToo movement
Rose McGowan launches her decadein-development The Only Skincare line
with just two products, TheOnlyWash
($32) and TheOnlyLotion ($48), for
“a revolutionary approach to healthy
2
1
3
How to Dress a Versace Show
Without Any Help From Versace
To re-create the rococo shirts and PJs of Italian designer Gianni Versace and the Miami
bombshell looks of Donatella, costume designer Lou Eyrich drove up vintage prices with
12-hours-a-day bidding and ordered decorative safety pins ‘plated in gold’ By Booth Moore
1 Ramirez in a pink bathrobe requested by
Murphy. 2, 3 Cruz wears a pink gown and
leather jacket inspired by but not from Versace.
leather jackets, skintight jodhpurs
and gowns for sister Donatella
(Penelope Cruz), who took over the
business after his death. And
Eyrich had to do it without any
help from the actual fashion house
of Versace, which is not involved
in the project.
Instead, Eyrich and her team
bought up hundreds of vintage
Versace pieces from dealers
around the world, including The
Way We Wore and Catwalk in
Los Angeles. “I think we drove
the prices up,” she says. “We were
on the internet 12 hours a day.”
What she couldn’t find or afford
(the original chainmail gowns,
for example, were too expensive),
she re-created. “We were cautious
to honor Versace and Donatella,
so we tried to use the best silk,
and when we used safety pins
as a decorative element, we had
them plated in gold,” says Eyrich,
adding that Cruz is friends
with Donatella, so it was important to her to be respectful. For
an “uber sexy” pink silk evening
dress, for example, “we collaborated with Penelope. We were
inspired by a Versace design from
1996, but we didn’t want to rip it
off. First of all, that’s not legal,
but also, we didn’t want to insult
them.” A scene of the designer’s
final fashion show in Milan in
1997 involved Eyrich painstakingly re-creating 17 catwalk looks:
“How he cut for women was just
exquisite!”
A New Protocol for the Red Carpet?
→ FOLLOWING THE cultural awakening in Hollywood over gender inequality, industry insiders are trying
to figure out how to acknowledge the #MeToo movement, with talk among actresses about wearing all
black to the Golden Globes to protest sexual harassment. A recent meeting at CAA included the possibility of a new protocol for the red carpet. “There was discussion of crafting talking points,” says a source.
Documentarian Jennifer Siebel Newsom, founder of The Representation Project, thinks her 2014
#AskHerMore campaign is more relevant now than ever. “AskHerMore and #MeToo are about treating
women as full human beings rather than objects,” she says. “The Golden Globes nominated five white
men in the director category. White men are not the only people making good films; they are just the
ones being recognized. Let’s talk about that on the red carpet.” But, adds Newsom, not at the expense
of talking about gorgeous gowns: “Fashion does not diminish women. Our culture does.” — B.M.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
92
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
skin that eliminates the need for overpriced, overly complicated beauty
regimens,” the company website says.
McGowan has written she is launching the line because “We became
disenchanted with the beauty industry
and how many products we were
told we needed.” And now that she has
become a leader in the harassment
discussion, a source tells THR she’s
looking for a philanthropic partner for
her business, which was in development
long before #RoseArmy became a rallying call for women in Hollywood and
beyond. (Brave, McGowan’s memoir out
Jan. 30, might also have been a more
apt brand name for these times.)
Celebrity-fronted brands that align
with a star’s values are proving to
be marketable, notes Larissa Jensen,
beauty industry analyst at The NPD
Group, pointing to Rihanna’s Fenty
Beauty and its focus on diversity and
Kat Von D Beauty’s emphasis on being
cruelty-free. But tapping into a social
cause doesn’t guarantee success, says
Jensen. “The key is to do so in a way
that is ingrained in the fabric of the
brand.” Two recent examples? Jecca,
a line makeup artist Jessica Blackler
created for transgender people,
launches Dec. 16 with a correct and
conceal palette designed to address
beard shadow and a portion of sales
going to LGBTQ charities. Lipslut, created this year by three college students
in San Luis Obispo, California, raises
money for women’s charities (including
Planned Parenthood and the National
Organization of Women) with its F*ck
Trump and F*ck Hollywood lipsticks.
That’s not just lip service. — B.M.
VERSACE: JEFF DALY/FX (3). MCGOWAN: JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC. CARPET: ISTOCK.
O
McGowan
ne of the most hotly
anticipated TV projects
of the new year, The
Assassination of Gianni Versace:
American Crime Story, comes to FX
Jan. 17. Ryan Murphy’s series tells
the story of serial killer Andrew
Cunanan’s cross-country killing
rampage that culminated in his
murder of Versace on the steps
of his Miami villa on July 15, 1997,
and offers a window into the
gilded brand the Italian fashion
designer created, which counted
Princess Diana, Elton John and
Elizabeth Hurley as fans.
Costume designer Lou Eyrich
was charged with creating ’90sera Miami “heat and sizzle,” as
she calls it, including rococo print
shirts and loungewear for Versace
(Edgar Ramirez) and studded
elegance. comfort. style & Grace.
F
BR ENTWOOD VILLAGE
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Style
Getaways
2
3
1
Melvyn’s, where Sinatra tipped in Benjamins and Liza did napkin origami for hours,
gets a 21st century redo to keep those ‘newest young hipsters’ coming By Kathryn Romeyn
T
he night we opened,
we turned away Steve
McQueen and Ali MacGraw,”
recalls Melvyn’s Restaurant &
Lounge maitre d’ Brian Ellis, who
was hired by the late Melvyn
Haber in 1975 to help run what
quickly would become one of Old
Hollywood’s most beloved Palm
Springs getaways. “They were on a
motorcycle, they weren’t dressed
right, and Mel said, ‘Can you come
back another night?’ ” And they
did. Because everyone came back.
After purchasing the Ingleside
Inn — a 1925 Spanish-style estate
on Ramon Road — Haber opened
Melvyn’s, which helped transform
the Ingleside into one of Palm
Springs’ first premier resortstyle hotels. It hardly mattered
that neither Haber nor Ellis
even knew how to work a cash
register. “We were successful overnight,” says Ellis, 68.
“Everybody wanted to come, and
they came to be seen.”
Even before Melvyn’s opened,
the inn was a destination for
the likes of industrialist Howard
Hughes, actors Elizabeth Taylor
and Ava Gardner and painter
Salvador Dali. But at Melvyn’s, the
celebrity quotient went through
the roof, according to Mark
Myrick, the head bartender since
the early 1980s. Clive Davis has
been known to fill
half the room with
his entourage, and
seven U.S. presidents
have dined there. Zsa
MacGraw
Zsa Gabor was a regular, as were Cher (“a
little bit of a recluse,”
says Myrick) and, of
course, Frank Sinatra,
Madsen
known to grab the
pianist’s mic when the mood
struck him. Old Blue Eyes held
his lavish pre-wedding dinner
with Barbara at the restaurant in
1976. “Anybody who was anybody
was here for that dinner,” says
The patio
was
repainted
and
revamped
to allow
more light
and make
the space
feel more
like a porch.
Outdoor
furniture was
updated.
B E FO R
Ellis. “Joey Bishop, Sammy Davis
Jr., Wallis Annenberg.”
Now, four decades after it first
opened, Melvyn’s is reintroducing
itself. On Dec. 15, the restaurant,
lounge and adjoining Ingleside
Inn are debuting a new look after a
yearlong renovation. The project’s
lead designer, Dan Worden of Napa,
California-based firm Shopworks,
calls the renovation less of a gut
job and more of a “skillful facelift.” The challenge, he says, was
to add modern touches without
sacrificing the old-school 1920s
splendor. “We needed to not throw
the baby out with the bathwater,”
says Worden, who was hired by the
PlumpJack Group, which purchased Melvyn’s and the Ingleside
Inn in 2016 after Haber died.
(PlumpJack Group was founded
E
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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94
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
in 1992 by Gavin Newsom, now
California’s lieutenant governor
and a frontrunner in the 2018
governor’s race, and composer and
philanthropist Gordon Getty.)
Highlights of the renovation
include a restored bar, dining
room and patio, where for the
first time casual dress is permitted. (Flip-floppers be warned:
Slacks and a collared shirt are
still required in the dining room.)
The inn’s 30 rooms (from $229),
suites and villas — previously
decked out in ’70s kitsch — now
have a mint, brown and white palette, with pops of color via orange
cashmere blankets. Custom-made
headboards of ebony-stained pine
were added along with Spanishstyle rugs, midcentury sofas
and a mobile martini cart with a
butler who makes the rounds
shaking cocktails for guests (not
to mention a throwback lobby
candy bar with Werther’s Original
EXTERIOR: PALM SPRINGS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. LEWIS, POOL, PATIO: COURTESY OF INGLESIDE INN (4).
Palm Springs’ Rat Pack Hangout
Spruces Up But Keeps Its ‘Cool’
1 Melvyn’s canopied entry in the 1980s. 2 Haber
(left) with Jerry Lewis in 1989. 3 The Ingleside
Inn in the 1940s, when it was run as an inn and
private club by Ruth Hardy, who later became
Palm Springs’ first female councilwoman.
Style
Getaways
HOT
LOTS
A F TE R
Haber (left) with John Travolta, who
frequented Melvyn’s in the late 1970s.
Palm Springs
Just Sold
$2 .7M
775 S. LA MIRADA ROAD
Melvyn’s’ bar was stripped and brought back to its
original look, with contemporary ceiling fixtures
added. The interior got a fresh coat of paint and all
the furniture was reupholstered.
Ellis or Myrick has a tale to tell.
Liza Minnelli? She’d spend hours
doing origami with napkins.
Debbie Reynolds? She would trade
gossip with the staff over glasses
of white zinfandel. An associate
of gangster John Gotti? Don’t ask.
But Sinatra was in his own
league. Myrick recalls how the
singer regularly handed out
$100 bills to the waitstaff with
the instructions: “I don’t want
[my friends’] drinks to get half
empty; just give them another.”
Once, while smoking a cigarette
outside, Sinatra asked a valet
about the biggest tip he’d ever
received — $100, he was told, to
which he retorted, “What cheap
bastard only gave you $100?”
The valet responded that said
tipper was in fact Sinatra. “So
he gave [the valet] two $100 bills
when he came out that night,”
recalls Myrick.
Nowadays, says Ellis, he doesn’t
always know whether a face is
B
E FO R E
famous, but some stars occasionally still come. Myrick recalls
noticing a woman seated at the bar
a few years ago who looked familiar. “I’m thinking, I know
her from Home Depot or the cleaners or something,” he says with a
laugh. It was Ellen DeGeneres.
The revamped Melvyn’s
leans into its rich history, which
remains a lure for fresh fans.
What Ellis calls “the newest
young hipsters” have flooded
the place in recent years. “They
like things that are old, so they
love the Hollywood glamour of
this place.” Adds Madsen: “When
my friends and I share stories
[about Melvyn’s], we always have
that feeling of the ‘good old days,’
even if the times we had were
only a few weeks ago.” It’s still
“that place you could let your hair
down and be yourself away from
prying eyes and bask in the sun,”
she says. “From a time when cool
was really cool.”
This 4,300-square-foot
four-bedroom with
pool, listed by Bennion
Deville’s Patrick
Jordan and Stewart
Smith, sits on a halfacre with commanding
views of the valley in
all directions and a
12-panel solar system.
On the Market
1350 LADERA CIRCLE
Marykay Nibley
of Rodeo
Realty has the
$5.9 million
listing on the
home known as the
Elvis Honeymoon
Hideaway (Elvis and
Priscilla Presley leased
it in 1966).
New Hotspots in the Desert
Hollywood insiders share their favorite noshes as
Palm Springs gets its first rooftop restaurant By Peter Kiefer
70300 SAN LORENZO
ROAD, PALM DESERT
→ MOD CAFE “It’s great for brunch,” says UTA’s Keya Khayatian. “For
anyone vegan or just health-conscious, this is the place.” It’s $12 for
the house-made spinach nut burger — or the regular old grass-fed
beef one. 515-551 N. Palm Canyon Drive
→ ACQUA CALIFORNIA BISTRO Opened in July at the River shopping
complex, Acqua is a favorite of execs Bill Damaschke and John
McIlwee. “Amazing outdoor dining and these awesome fountains and
great Italian food,” says McIlwee. The River Mall, Rancho Mirage
→ KIMPTON ROWAN PALM SPRINGS This seven-story, full-scale downtown hotel is the only one in town to ofer a rooftop pool. Come for a
dip (with stunning views) and stay for drinks and eats cooked up by
the 4 Saints restaurant. 100 W. Tahquitz Canyon Way
The Rowan opened Nov. 17 with two restaurants: the rooftop’s
4 Saints and chef Steve Wambach’s Juniper Table.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
96
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
Listed for $3.7 million
by St. James + Canter’s
Markus Canter,
Frank Sinatra’s “Villa
Maggio” has panoramic
mountain and valley
views, three buildings, a
resort-style pool, tennis
court and helipad.
BAR, TRAVOLTA: COURTESY OF INGLESIDE INN (3). LORENZO: COURTESY OF BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY. LADERA: JIM STEINFELDT/MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES. MIRADA: PATRICK KETCHUM. ROWAN: LAURE JOLIET. PRESLEY: DAVE J HOGAN/GETTY IMAGES.
candies). The outdoor pool deck
was expanded, and a fire pit was
added along with a poolside
refreshment bar. Melvyn’s menu
retains traditional fine dining
with tableside cooking (think
trout amandine, $28, and steak
Diane, $31.50).
With the renovation complete, now comes the hard part:
re-creating that golden era
Hollywood magic for the millennial generation. “[The staff]
always made me feel like I
was Gloria Swanson,” says actress
Virginia Madsen, a Melvyn’s regular. “After dinner, you might sit
at the bar and have a drink served
on a coaster with Sinatra’s face
on it while being serenaded by an
impersonator who was the best
of the best. You couldn’t stop
yourself from getting pulled onto
a tiny dance floor, where festivities would explode into a full-on
dance party.”
Name the star, politician or
gangster for that matter, and
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PERFORMANCES BY
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They’re
the dynasties,
the establishment,
the families
with hundreds of
film and television
credits to their
multigenerational
names, and
as the Poitiers,
Hustons, Ladds and
others in THR’s
exclusive portfolio
reveal, they’re just
now getting started
The Hustons
From left Anjelica Huston
(with Oscar), Danny Huston
and Jack Huston
Photographed by Austin Hargrave
on July 20 at Anjelica’s home
in Pacific Palisades
Says Anjelica, “We’re very
united in our dedication to each
other and to our family.”
Styling by Petra Flannery
On Anjelica: Armani dress, Christian Louboutin
shoes, Lisa Eisner bracelet, Tifany & Co. earrings.
On Danny: Tom Ford suit. On Jack: Armani
suit, Hugo Boss shirt (from Saks Fifth Avenue
Beverly Hills), Christian Louboutin shoes.
TURN TO PAGE 102 FOR THEIR STORY →
← Anjelica with her father, John Huston, in a scene from his
How to Endure in Hollywood
for Four Generations
The Huston family attributes its legacy of entertainment icons — from
vaudevillian Walter, father of Oscar-winning director John, to young star
Jack — to work ethic: ‘Pure labor is aristocratic in itself’ By Mark Morrison
L AST Y EA R, W HEN THE $100 MILLION
reboot of Ben-Hur opened to blistering
reviews and crashed at the box office, its
star Jack Huston took the failure in stride.
“I did everything — blood, sweat and tears.
But any movie is out of your hands. You
take a shot, and sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t,” he says philosophically.
Sitting nearby, his aunt Anjelica, however,
pounces to his defense like a mother lion:
“It’s amazing what he did in that movie —
not to mention, sort of endangering his life
in the chariot scene. That wasn’t CGI. Jack
put his ass on the line!” She pauses, simmers
down and adds: “If I see that someone in the
family is being badly criticized in a way that
they don’t deserve, I become infuriated. I
know how hard it is to act in a movie when
maybe the standards aren’t what you would
like. You get blamed for a lot of that. So I
feel more upset if I read a bad review for any
member of my family than I do for myself.”
Family first. That’s the credo of the
Huston clan gathered around the dining
table of Anjelica’s resplendent Pacific
Palisades home. There’s Jack, 35, best known
for Boardwalk Empire (and slated to star with
Isabelle Huppert in Matthew Weiner’s 2018
miniseries The Romanoffs); his uncle Danny,
55, enjoying the glow off of summer blockbuster Wonder Woman, in which he played
villain General Ludendorff; and Anjelica,
66-year-old Oscar winner for 1986’s Prizzi’s
Honor and resident matriarch. Tall, elegant
and fiercely passionate, the formidable
Huston progeny represent third- and fourthgeneration Hollywood.
Their legacy started with Anjelica
and Danny’s grandfather, Walter Huston,
the Canadian-born vaudevillian who
won an Oscar for his supporting role in
1948’s The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. That
landmark was helmed by their father,
Walter’s son and maverick filmmaker John
Huston, who won Oscars for best director and best adapted screenplay. His dozens
of writing and directing credits include an
uncommon number of classics (The Maltese
Falcon, Moby Dick, The Misfits, Key Largo)
and cult films (The Dead, which featured
Anjelica and was written by her brother
Tony; and Mr. North, directed by Danny and
co-starring Anjelica).
Such range and dogged ambition are
defining Huston traits. While Jack claims
to have faint memories of his grandpa John
(who died in 1987 from emphysema), none
of them knew Walter (who died in 1950). But
all are well versed in Huston lore. Says
Jack, “In Walter’s biography, it said that at
16 years old he got on a freight train and
came to New York and worked for nothing
for many, many years. You realize the drive
to [act] that much. I think every single one
of us would do the same thing.“
Anjelica sees the Huston legacy this way:
“It starts with my father’s extremely serious
work policy and his ideas that pure labor is
aristocratic in itself and that to give yourself
over to an artistic pursuit is a thing to be
highly prized. And if you do have an ambition, that you have to really honor it and get
behind it and set a standard to uphold that
ambition. I am competitive and ambitious,
and it stems from that will to excel.” Adds
Danny: “It’s always easier being a Huston
[than not]. You can always get your foot in
the door, but then you have to deliver. At
times, people tend to be a little more critical. And why not? One of the first films I
directed, some lovely reviewer said, ‘John
Huston passed the baton to his son Danny,
only he tripped and dropped it.’ Ouch! But
it’s OK. You take hits. Hustons are gamblers. We’re art seekers.”
Besides, when it comes to reviews, the
opinions they value most are one another’s.
“The greatest review is having Anjelica like
my work,” says Danny. “We’re harsh critics. I
know that Anjelica’s not going to mince her
words.” Jack agrees: “If Danny or Anjelica
come up to me and say, ‘God, that was good,’
it’s the greatest compliment I can ever get.”
When it comes to the director’s romantic
relationships, a scorecard helps. John Huston
was married five times, and only Anjelica
and Tony, now a lawyer, share the same two
parents. They are the children of John’s
second wife, Enrica Soma, a prima ballerina.
Neither sibling knew about Danny — John’s
out-of-wedlock child with actress Zoe Sallis
— until he was 2. Their half sister, writer
Allegra, was born to Soma and another man
when the dancer was estranged from John,
yet the director adopted and raised her after
her mother was killed in a car accident in
1969. But parentage was never a dividing
factor for the Hustons. Says Anjelica, “We’re
very united in our dedication to each other
and to our family.”
From left: Tony Huston, writer-director turned lawyer, with father John and half brother Danny, circa mid-’80s. Right: Walter
Huston (with actress Claire Trevor) won an Oscar in 1949 for The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. His son John won best director.
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HAN AND CHECHEL JOSON AT DEW BEAUTY AGENCY. WALK: STANLEY BIELECKI MOVIE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES. J. HOUSTON: ALBANE NAVIZET/KIPA/SYGMA/GETTY IMAGES. OSCAR: BETTMANN/GETTY IMAGES.
1969 movie A Walk With Love and Death.
The Ladds
From left Alan Ladd Jr., Kelliann Ladd,
Amanda Ladd-Jones, David Ladd and Jordan Ladd
Photographed by Austin Hargrave
on Dec. 12 at Alan’s home in Century City
“W E ALL SPEAK MOV IE,” ACTRESS
Jordan Ladd, 42, says of her family. It started with her grandfather
Alan Ladd, an Arkansas native
who became one of the biggest
stars of the ’40s and early ’50s in
film noirs like 1942’s This Gun for
Hire and the iconic 1953 Western
Shane before his death from an
accidental drug overdose in 1964.
“He was at the top of his game,
but I had no idea what he did until
I was about 6 and first saw him
on film and shouted, ‘That’s my
dad,’ ” says his son and namesake,
Alan Ladd Jr. “Laddie,” as he came
to be known, became an agent at
Creative Management Associates
“because I couldn’t get into any
of the guilds.” After producing in
London, Ladd Jr. returned to
L.A. in 1973 to join 20th Century
Fox, where he was named president three years later. “Initially,
I think he felt overshadowed by
his father’s career,” says Laddie’s
daughter Amanda Ladd-Jones, 45,
who recently completed a documentary, nine years in the making,
about her dad, Alan Ladd Jr.: The
Man Behind the Movies.
As he put his stamp on Fox
— famously greenlighting Star
Wars after United Artists and
Universal turned it down; suggesting to Ridley Scott that the
lead in Alien be played by a woman
— the press stopped referring to
Laddie as “the son of,” recognizing him as a force in his own right.
Kelliann Ladd, 56 — the eldest
of his four daughters who would
become a producer of films like
the Robert Redford starrer An
Unfinished Life — theorizes that
he made female-focused movies
like Jane Fonda’s Julia and Sally
Field’s Norma Rae in part because
he was surrounded by women
at home. “Well, I certainly wasn’t
afraid of women — those films
all had good scripts with great
actresses,” says Ladd, now 80,
who left Fox to create The Ladd
Co. in 1979. “Movies like The Right
Stuff and Chariots of Fire won all
the awards, but it was the Police
Academy movies that made the
money for us,” he says. Ultimately,
he earned an Oscar himself as
a producer of 1995’s Braveheart.
Meanwhile, Laddie’s half brother
David Ladd, 70, co-starred as
a kid with his father in The Proud
Rebel, only to move into producing in his mid-30s with films like
Typography by Simon Walker
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
Wes Craven’s The Serpent and the
Rainbow before serving as an exec
at MGM during most of the ’90s.
“I had a pretty good run when I
was young,” he recalls of his earlier
acting days.
For Jordan — David’s daughter from his marriage to actress
Cheryl Ladd and best known for
her work in Death Proof and Cabin
Fever — joining the family business was inevitable. On Sunday
nights, she says, the entire clan
met at Laddie’s home, where, after
dining on cold cuts from Nate ’n
Al, they’d screen the latest films,
“watching Missing and Dead Men
Don’t Wear Plaid, maybe films
we shouldn’t have been watching
as kids. But we became wellversed in cinema, which always
held a magic for me.” — GREGG KILDAY
The Joneses
From left Rachel Jones, Kidada Jones,
Rashida Jones, Martina Jones, Quincy Jones
and Quincy Jones III
Photographed by Austin Hargrave Aug. 25
at Quincy’s home in Bel Air
Quincy Jones, 84, is best known as the
Grammy-winning icon who produced for
Frank Sinatra and Michael Jackson and composed the soundtracks for In the Heat of the
Night (1969) and The Italian Job (1969). But he
has been nearly as productive on the family
front, fathering seven kids with five women,
three of whom he was married to. After marrying actress Jeri Caldwell and having one
daughter (not pictured), Jones wed Swedish
actress Ulla Andersson in 1967; they had
Martina, 51, a model, and Quincy Jones III,
48, a music producer. Jones’ third marriage,
to model Peggy Lipton, yielded actor-writers
Kidada, 43, and Rashida, 41. Jones also had a
brief affair with dancer Carol Reynolds, with
whom he had daughter Rachel, 54, who calls
herself the “Quincy Jones of veterinarian
medicine.” (Jones’ youngest daughter, with
actress Nastassja Kinski, is model Kenya Julia
Miambi Sarah Jones, 24, not pictured.) “We
laugh a lot,” says Angie Tribeca star Rashida
about growing up Jones. “In an industry that
is sometimes shady, sometimes lame, sometimes frustrating, it’s nice that none of
those are words I would use to describe my
family.” THR asked patriarch Quincy about
raising such a sprawling family.
Did you encourage your kids to go into
entertainment?
I didn’t encourage them or discourage
them. They were always with me as much
as possible, so they were exposed to the
entertainment business and could make
their own decision.
Was there anyone you brought home who your
kids were starstruck by?
Are you kidding me!? There was always
someone coming by, from Steve McQueen
to Brando and Spielberg to Michael.
Were you a strict dad?
When I had to be — I always paid attention.
What parenting advice would you give them?
Know yourself and love who you are. That
way you can transfer that love to your child.
— JANE CARLSON
“They all have a strong music
influence, but they all found
their own path,” says Quincy
Jones of his children. “It doesn’t
surprise me as much as it makes
me proud that each one has
found their own direction in life.”
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
VA L K ILMER, 57, IS SEATED ON A
and Mercedes Kilmer
Photographed by Austin Hargrave
on Nov. 22 at Val’s studio
and art gallery in Los Angeles
“It’s just an example of the power of the
mind,” says Val of his Christian Scientist
faith, along with his family, helping him
during throat cancer treatment, including
traditional modalities like chemotherapy.
— SETH ABRAMOVITCH
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
107
When Legacies Collide
In a dynasty-rich industry that’s all about
relationships, intermarriage is an inevitability.
Call them ‘Hollywood mergers’ By Jane Carlson
Wasserman + Ziffren
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The Kilmers
From left Val Kilmer, Jack Kilmer
couch in his Brentwood home,
which is spilling from every crevice with his personal art projects.
(A spray-painted “GOD” stencil
is a recurring motif.) Next to him
are Mercedes, 26, and Jack, 22, his
two children with ex-wife Joanne
Whalley, the English actress who
was his co-star in the 1988 Ron
Howard fantasy film Willow.
Kilmer is not the screen god
he was in ’80s and ’90s films like
Top Gun, The Doors and Batman
Forever. A two-year battle with
throat cancer has taken its toll,
and a procedure on his trachea
has reduced his voice to a rasp
and rendered him short of breath.
Still, when the topic turns to his
performer kin — Jack is an actor
who has appeared in The Stanford
Prison Experiment and The Nice
Guys; Mercedes travels in New
York avant-garde theater circles
— he has plenty to say. “Fame is
sort of a mess,” says Val. “You get
treated differently, but it doesn’t
have anything to do with who you
actually are.” Jack, who inherited
his dad’s harlequin pout, says acting allows him to try “a little bit of
everything, like an experiential
dilettante.” Mercedes, with a face
worthy of a femme fatale, says she
“can’t remember not being aware”
of her parents’ fame. “It was about
navigating how other people perceived us rather than any kind of
reckoning.”
Shortly after Val’s diagnosis,
Mercedes was hit by a car in a
scary accident that left a scar
down her leg. “We were in the
same hospital at the same time,”
she recalls. Adds Jack, “I was just,
you know, miserable, distraught,
sitting next to these two.” Val, a
Christian Scientist, says his faith
helped him get through those
ordeals, and he has undergone
chemotherapy to combat the disease. These days, he keeps things
light. “I was too serious,” he admits
of his movie-star moment. “I’d get
upset when things like Oscars and
recognition failed to come my
way.” Was an Oscar something he
always wanted? “I would like to
have more Oscars than anybody,”
he says. “Meryl Streep must feel
pretty good, you know? It must
feel nice to know that everyone
loves her. It’s about being loved.”
In 2001, Casey Wasserman, grandson of Lew Wasserman,
who was head of MCA, married Laura Zifren, daughter of
Hollywood super lawyer Ken Zifren and granddaughter of Lew’s
friend, late attorney and California Democratic Party leader
Paul Zifren. A former classmate of Laura’s called their marriage
“a Hollywood merger.” They have two children.
Koch + Meyers-Shyer
Entertainment lawyer Robert Koch, son of former Academy
president Hawk Koch, grandson of producer Howard W. Koch — and
stepson of Ken Zifren — joined forces with Annie Meyers-Shyer
in 2012. Annie is the daughter of iconic rom-com helmers Nancy
Meyers and Charles Shyer and granddaughter of director Melville
Jacob Shyer. The two wed at Meyers’ Pacific Palisades home.
Wilding + Getty
From 1981 to 1989, Elizabeth Taylor’s son Christopher Wilding
(with Michael Wilding) was married to Aileen Getty, oil tycoon
J. Paul Getty’s granddaughter. They have two children together.
Jenner + Felder
Brandon Jenner — son of Caitlyn Jenner with second wife,
songwriter Linda Thompson (and the ex-stepson of Kris Jenner)
— has been married to Leah Felder, daughter of Eagles guitarist
Don Felder, for five years. They have one daughter together.
Kopelman + Barrymore
Will Kopelman, son of Chanel president-COO Arie L. Kopelman,
was married to Drew Barrymore — who hails from five generations
of actors and Hollywood stars including grandfather John — from
2012 until 2016. They have two daughters together. Kopelman’s
sister Jill Kargman is the creator and star of Bravo’s Odd Mom Out.
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
The
Hedren-Griffith-Johnsons
From left Don Johnson, Dakota Johnson,
Tippi Hedren and Melanie Griffith
Photographed by Joe Pugliese on Dec. 11 at Quixote Studios
in West Hollywood
“I’ve never heard that story,” says Dakota Johnson after learning how
her parents Don and Melanie met as actors — when he was 22 and she
was 14 — in a stairwell on the set of her grandmother Tippi’s film.
TURN TO PAGE 110 FOR THEIR STORY →
Dakota Johnson: ‘I Keep My Therapist on Speed Dial’
BACK ON THE 1972 SET OF THE H ARR AD
Experiment, a 22-year-old Don Johnson, in
his highest-profile role yet, acted opposite a legend in the making, Tippi Hedren.
Melanie Griffith, Hedren’s 14-year-old
daughter, who later became one of the most
in-demand actresses of the ’80s and ’90s,
played a student in the film. “We were in
the stairwell of this Anheuser-Busch Estate
waiting for a setup,” says Johnson. “We
started chitchatting.” Recalls Griffith of a
scenario that today might spark accusations and perhaps even the attention of law
enforcement: “I thought he was the most
beautiful person I’d ever seen.”
Dakota Johnson, 28, the Fifty Shades of
Grey star who is the product of Johnson and
Griffith’s second marriage, chimes in: “I’ve
never heard that story.” Says Griffith with a
laugh: “Yeah, we have some that we never
told you.”
Four years after that stairwell meeting, the first of two unions (and divorces)
1
3
2
between Griffith, 60, and Johnson, 68,
Johnson’s Miami Vice, Griffith’s Oscarbegan. Hedren, now 87, recalls her misgivnominated everywoman turn in Working
ings. “They were two beautiful, wonderful
Girl and Dakota Johnson’s Fifty Shades
people, and here, my daughter was showfranchise.
ing signs that I had never seen before in
Matriarch Hedren blazed the trail as
her, with an older man, and there was just
one of Hitchcock’s cool blondes in 1963’s
sheer panic," she says. “How
The Birds and Marnie a year
do you handle that? There
later. But behind the scenes,
“It was
was a very strong attachment
Hitchcock harassed his star
between the two of them.” Adds
mercilessly, threatening to end
a fucking
Don, “Still is.” Griffith puts
her career if she didn’t acquicoffin!”
her head on his shoulder, and
esce to his sexual demands and
Melanie, on the gift
Dakota jokes, “I keep my theraisolating her from cast, crew
that Hitchcock
gave her when she
pist on speed dial.”
and her only child with the late
was 6: a figurine
Despite an unorthodox hisactor Peter Griffith. “I wasn’t
of her mother lying
tory, the family has achieved
allowed to go to the set,” says
down in a box
what few have, working with
Griffith. The director also sent
directing legends, from Alfred
a 6-year-old Griffith a figurine
Hitchcock (Hedren) and Mike Nichols
of her mother lying down in a box. “It was a
(Griffith) to Sidney Lumet (Don) and David
fucking coffin!” exclaims Griffith.
Fincher (Dakota). Each savvily chose sigIn a show of strength decades ahead of
nature roles that captured their particular
her time, Hedren refused to make another
era’s zeitgeist: Hedren’s The Birds, Don
movie with Hitchcock despite being locked
in a seven-year contract with him. “She
became an example of what to never let happen in my life," says Griffith. "Hopefully,
I’ve passed that on to Dakota — to be strong
in your work and in yourself.” Adds Dakota,
who next appears in Luca Guadagnino’s
Suspiria and Fifty Shades Freed: “I was taught
self-respect and grace and strength. Never
before this moment did anyone in my family
[explicitly] say, like, ‘Be careful.’ Sometimes,
powerful men in Hollywood will try
to whatever.”
Of the four, the youngest member of
the clan is the busiest, or, as Griffith
jokes, “Dakota’s the only one who’s getting
scripts.” But Hedren — a big-cat activist who
founded the Shambala Preserve in Acton,
California — still is going strong, appearing in roughly one film a year. For her part,
Griffith is picking quality work, playing
a small role in this year’s awards-season
hopeful The Disaster Artist. In recent years,
Don Johnson has pivoted between TV (Sky
Atlantic’s Sick Note and HBO’s Eastbound
& Down) and film, co-starring in this year’s
Brawl in Cell Block 99 and in the upcoming
adult-skewing Book Club opposite Mary
Steenburgen, Jane Fonda and Diane Keaton
(the film sold to Paramount for $10 million
in the biggest deal out of AFM).
“There are things we have to manage [as
actors],” says Don Johnson. “You have times
when you’re a pretty big deal, and then
1 Grifith and Johnson in 1975.
when you’re not such a big deal. What it all
2 Grifith with Dakota, then 8, at a
1998 premiere in Westwood.
comes back to is the work and how much
3 Hedren won a Golden Globe for
joy that you get out of doing it.”
The Birds in 1964.
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
110
PREVIOUS SPREAD: PROP STYLING BY KINSLEY DANIEL. ON-SET STYLING BY JARDINE HAMMOND. DON JOHNSON GROOMING BY SONIA LEE FOR CHANEL PALETTE ESSENTIELLE AT EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS. HEDREN AND GRIFFITH HAIR BY SEAN METCALFE. HEDREN MAKEUP BY MIRIAM VUKICH AT EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS. GRIFFITH MAKEUP BY GINA RIBISI. DAKOTA HAIR BY
MARK TOWNSEND AT STARWORKS ARTISTS, MAKEUP BY KATE LEE FOR CHANEL PALETTE ESSENTIELLE AT THE WALL GROUP. THIS SPREAD: BUZ AND DAVID GROOMING BY CARISSA FERRERI AT TRACEY MATTINGLY. JENJI MAKEUP BY KRISTINA FRISCH. GRIFFITH: RON GALELLA, LTD./WIREIMAGE (2). HEDREN: EARL LEAF/MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES.
The Fifty Shades star jests, but her parents Melanie Griffith’s and Don Johnson’s two marriages — to
each other — and grandmother Tippi Hedren’s horrific tale of Hitchcock’s harassment ensures endless
fascination with three generations of actors whose performances defined zeitgeists By Tatiana Siegel
The Kohans
From left Buz Kohan, Jenji Kohan and David Kohan
Photographed by Austin Hargrave
on Nov. 17 at David’s home in Beverly Hills
BU Z KOH A N IS R ECOU N TING
another colorful story from
50 years in Hollywood. “I was
doing an Ann-Margret special,
and there was a kid who was
a gofer. Because he came from
New York, I took him under my
wing. Years later …” Here, his
son David picks up the narrative:
“… I was applying for summer
jobs and writing all these producers letters. I got a call from one:
Joel Silver. He said, ‘You know why
I called you? Because one person
was nice to me when I was a PA.
Your father.’ ”
Gathered in David’s sprawling home, the Kohans — Buz,
David and kid sister Jenji — laugh
and note the lesson. “ ‘Be nice
to the people below you,’ ” says
Jenji. “They will rule the industry
and remember how they were
treated.” That wisdom has worn
well for these TV storytellers.
Buz, 84, has won 13 Emmys for
The Carol Burnett Show, specials
and Oscarcasts. David, 53, cocreated Will & Grace, for which he
won an Emmy in 2000. Jenji, 48,
created Weeds for Showtime and
Orange Is the New Black on Netflix
and is an exec producer on the
streamer’s SAG-nominated GLOW.
So what is the Kohan legacy?
“Capturing a voice that existed at
our dinner table” — also fostered by mom and author Rhea
Kohan — “and putting it into television,” says David. Not that they
were encouraged to follow in their
father’s footsteps (David’s twin,
Jono, is a real estate investor). Says
Jenji, “We were supposed to be doctors, lawyers, or I was supposed to
marry well.”
Today, the family includes
David’s wife, Blair Kohan, a
partner at UTA; Jenji’s husband,
author Christopher Noxon; and
his showrunner sister, Marti
Noxon (Bravo’s Girlfriends’ Guide
to Divorce). For Buz’s kids, TV
“didn’t seem like a pipe dream,”
says David. “I remember being on
set, seeing cameras and lights. I
thought, ‘This is where grown-up
things happen.’ ” It’s no wonder,
then, that his daughter, Olivia, 22,
is a PA on Will & Grace. — M.M.
Hear the legacy families open up about their celebrity crushes and who is the most competitive at THR.COM/VIDEO
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
Sutherland
and Sons
From left Donald Sutherland,
Rossif Sutherland, Roeg
Sutherland and Kiefer Sutherland
Photographed by Austin Hargrave
on Sept. 16, 2015, in Toronto
DONA LD SU THER L A N D WAS
preparing for the 1983 film Max
Dugan Returns when he noticed in
the script that his character had
a son — a teenage baseball player
with no lines. He immediately
thought of his eldest son, then 16.
“I said [to director Herbert Ross],
‘What about Kiefer — he’s here
staying with me and he’s a terrific
athlete.’ He said, ‘I have to audition him,’ ” recalls Sutherland, 82.
“He took Kiefer into his trailer
for an hour and a half, and [Ross]
came out and said, ‘He’s not
an actor.’ ”
The elder Sutherland adds:
“I told Kiefer, and it made him so
angry, he was so insulted, that
maybe that catalyzed him. All he
wanted was a job so he could
buy a decent suit.” The Canadian
teen did land the cameo after
an audition — which kick-started
a career that has spanned 35 years
and encompassed such hits as
The Lost Boys and Flatliners on the
big screen and 24 and Designated
Survivor on TV. But from Kiefer’s
perspective, both Dad and Mom,
Canadian stage actress Shirley
Douglas, were ambivalent about
him acting.
“I was always grateful to my
parents for letting me find my
way,” says Kiefer, now 50. “They
were there if I wanted to talk to
them, but they never pushed me.
In fact, both of my parents were
disappointed that this was what
“All he wanted was
I wanted to do. I think I felt the
a job so he could buy
a decent suit,” says
same way for my daughter.”
Donald Sutherland about
the first film role
He’s referring to his only child,
he procured for Kiefer.
Sarah Sutherland, 29, who has
become a breakout hit as the longsuffering first daughter Catherine Meyer on
including CAA agent Roeg, 43 (from his
Veep. “My father tried to lovingly deter me,”
third marriage to Canadian actress Francine
she says, but seeing her dad in a 1997 Toronto
Racette), patriarch Donald inadvertently led
production of The Glass Menagerie when she
by example. His five children gravitated toward
was 7 was “something I’ll never forget. At a
the industry, including Kiefer’s twin sister,
young age, to see someone you know so well
Rachel Sutherland, a Toronto-based postprosuccessfully be someone else is profound.”
duction producer who has worked on such fare
With all of the successes in his family,
as the TV series Dark Matter. His and Racette’s
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
112
other sons, Rossif, 39, and Angus, 35, also
are actors. “In no way did I influence their
career choices,” says Donald. “They’re all independent people. They might have looked
at me and said, ‘Shit, I don’t want to do that.’
But I have certainly not ever said, ‘Oh, you
should be an actor.’ ”
As for any advantage conferred by having
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
S. SUTHERLAND: CHRIS WEEKS/LIAISON/GETTY IMAGES.
a famous father, Kiefer remains skeptical. “I
watch my daughter, who’s an extraordinary
actor, and she’s had to grind it out,” he says. “It
would be interesting to find out behind closed
doors if someone ever said [when] it’s neck and
neck between two people, ‘Oh, let’s give him
a shot because I’m friends with his old man.’ I
have no idea if that ever happens.” — T.S.
“Both of my parents were quite
disappointed that this was what
I wanted to do. I think I felt
the same way for my daughter.”
Kiefer, on his and his daughter’s choice to become an actor
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
113
DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
Kiefer with
daughter
Sarah at a
2001 Josie
and the
Pussycats
premiere.
The Poitiers
4
Photographed by Joe Pugliese on Feb. 20
at Spago in Beverly Hills
SI DN E Y P OI T I E R M A DE O S C A R H I ST ORY
in 1964 as the first African-American to
win best actor, for Lilies of the Field. He was
knighted by Queen Elizabeth a decade later,
and in 2009 was awarded the Presidential
Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.
But the film legend is vehement about how
he discouraged his six daughters from going
into showbiz. (Poitier also has eight grandchildren and three great-grandkids.) “No,
we wanted them to become doctors and lawyers!” he exclaims, referring to first wife
Juanita, now 87, and wife Joanna, 74, both
pictured here.
Yet Hollywood has its seductions. Says his
daughter Anika, 45, an actress-director who
helmed two episodes of BBC’s The Choir in
2013: “Growing up, we put on plays or dance
recitals for our parents and their friends
after dinner parties. Our audience members
were Sean Connery, Roger Moore and Michael
Caine.” Adds Sydney Poitier Heartsong, 43,
who stars in AXN’s upcoming detective procedural Carter, out in 2018: “When Anika and
I were growing up, my father’s Oscar sat on
the desk in his study. We just thought it was
a really heavy, super cool gold doll we could
incorporate into our games. Turns out that’s
not the norm.” Joanna, a former actress, sums
it up, “I guess the apple really doesn’t fall far
from the tree.”
But at least one child agrees with Sidney’s
take: “I was appalled by my father’s job,” says
his eldest daughter, jewelry designer Beverly
Poitier-Henderson, 65. “Everyone else’s dad was
a policeman, doctor, preacher, teacher. But
my father was an actor — it was embarrassing.
What kind of job is that?” — JEANIE PYUN
3
2
1
12
13
10
11
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Guylaine Gouraige, granddaughter, 23
Gabrielle Gouraige, granddaughter, 19
Gina Poitier-Gouraige, daughter, 56; administrative assistant
Sherri Poitier, daughter, 63; chef
Beverly Poitier-Henderson, daughter, 65; jewelry designer
Aisha LaBarrie, granddaughter, 40; children’s clothier
Etienne Gouraige, grandson, 22
Juanita Marie Hardy Poitier, first wife, 87; appeared as herself
in the 2014 documentary Life’s Essentials With Ruby Dee
9 Pamela Poitier, daughter, 63; actress who appeared in 1997’s
The Jackal
10 Anika Poitier, daughter, 45; actress-director who helmed
episodes of BBC’s The Choir in 2013
11 March, grandson, 2
12 Sydney Ayele LaBarrie, great-granddaughter, 12
13 Joanna Poitier, wife, 74; actress whose most recent appearance
is in the 2010 short Yard Sale
14 Paloma, granddaughter, 6
15 Kai LaBarrie, great-granddaughter, 10
16 Sidney Poitier, 90; acting icon who won the best actor Oscar
for 1963’s Lilies of the Field
17 Sydney Poitier Heartsong, daughter, 43; actress who
co-stars with Jerry O’Connell in Sony Pictures TV Networks’
Carter, a detective procedural airing in 2018
18 Sunny Plum, granddaughter, 2
19 Diarra LaBarrie, great-granddaughter, 7
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
7
9
6
5
8
15
17
19
16
18
14
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
‘You Always Fight That
Nepotism Label’
Those who broke into Hollywood from the outside look at the children of legacies as spoiled shoo-ins — and
sometimes they’re right. But as THR learned from actors and execs in industry families, these bloodlines come
with their own expectations and pitfalls: ‘You have a parent who made one or two enemies along the way’
By Tatiana Siegel
W H E N Z OE PE R RY L A N DE D T HE
female lead of the CBS hit Young
Sheldon, she had a bit of an inside
track — her mother, Laurie
Metcalf, originated an older version of the role on The Big Bang
Theory. “[Co-creator] Chuck Lorre
was aware I had become an actor
but not of anything I’d done,” says
Perry, who had to audition for
him. “I went in knowing that I had
this odd connection on my side
— there was a character already
established by my mother, but I
didn’t put much stock in the idea
that this could be a slam dunk.”
Still, try explaining that to
other actresses whose parents
didn’t star in the hit source material, and they no doubt would
roll their eyes. In a business with
a seemingly infinite stream
of hopefuls but only a limited
number of opportunities, the
Illustrations by Zohar Lazar
T H E HOL LY WO OD R EP ORT ER
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DE C E M BE R 18, 2017
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