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2018-02-14 The Boston Globe

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Wednesday, February 14, 2018
‘People are usually not terribly happy when they sign these things.’
MARK WHITNEY, an employment lawyer in Marblehead, talking about love contracts
KEEPING OFFICE ROMANCE ALL BUSINESS
J
By Katie Johnston
GLOBE STAFF
ust in time for Valentine’s Day: the love
contract.
As more women speak out about sexual misconduct in the workplace, employers are getting increasingly nervous
about all the people dating on their watch.
Many companies already forbid supervisors
from asking out subordinates, but some are
cracking down on romance altogether, employment lawyers and human resource consultants
say. Others are looking into love contracts —
known more formally as consensual relationship
agreements — in which co-workers who are romantically involved sign a document stating that
ADOBE STOCK
Couples who work
The real story of those living
their foodie dreams together. G1.
they are together voluntarily and are aware of the
rules surrounding workplace dating.
These contracts generally note that sexual harassment is prohibited and forbid signers from
being involved in each other’s jobs, or retaliating
against each other down the road, in an attempt
to maintain an environment free of favoritism
and avoid later claims that the relationship was
coerced.
“Companies are trying to get creative and proactive and doing lots of different things to protect
themselves and protect the workplace,” said Jason Habinsky, an employment lawyer at Haynes
and Boone in New York. “Something that might
have been considered awkward or unnecessary,
LOVE CONTRACTS, Page A11
Spy chiefs
say Russia
meddling
continues
Midterm election called
a target; Democrats demand
to know what Trump is doing
By Ellen Nakashima and Shane Harris
WASHINGTON POST
1,846
59 percent
The number of potholes reported to the city surged in
January, up from 1,567 during January 2017.
The percentage of holes the city fills within its goal of one day, according to the CityScore
measurement of response to constituent requests. The goal is 80 percent.
WASHINGTON — The nation’s top intelligence chiefs were united Tuesday in declaring
that Russia is continuing efforts to disrupt the US
political system and is targeting the 2018 midterm election, following its successful operation
to sow discord in the most recent presidential
campaign.
Their assessment stands in contrast to President Trump, who has repeatedly voiced skepticism of Russian meddling in the 2016 election.
At a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing
on worldwide threats, Democrats demanded to
know what the intelligence community is doing
to counter Russia’s actions and whether Trump
has given explicit directions to them to do so.
‘‘We cannot confront this threat, which is a serious one, without a whole-of-government response when the leader of the government continues to deny that it exists,’’ said independent
Senator Angus King of Maine.
The disconnect between Trump and his most
senior intelligence advisers has raised concerns
that the US government will not be able to mount
an effective plan to beat back Russian influence
operations in the upcoming midterm election.
RUSSIA, Page A8
Cost-cutting
chain wins
auction of
Boston Herald
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
The weather is a big factor, as the cycle of freezing temperatures followed by thaws is a recipe for potholes.
Still so many
bumps in
the roads
The city aims to get potholes
filled within a day, but it isn’t
always working out that way
fraud, and breach of trust,
raising doubts about him
staying in office. A4.
Warm hearts
The FBI said it gave the
Trump administration information on Rob Porter
multiple times last year,
Wednesday: Much milder.
High 46-51. Low 35-40.
contradicting the White
House’s account. A2.
Thursday: Rain late.
High 51-56. Low 40-45.
ies that deliver in the
state seeing an increase in
customers. B11.
After an injury-filled season
in which he feuded with
the media and alienated
fans, David Price is seeking
a fresh start as pitchers
GLOBE STAFF
By the time John Sheils spotted
the pothole on Summer Street in
South Boston, it was already too late.
“It almost knocked the fillings out
of my teeth, I hit it so hard,” said
Sheils, a Weymouth resident who hit
the pothole in late December and got
a flat tire. “All the lights on my dashboard lit up.”
Later, Sheils said, he logged on to
Boston’s 311 website to report the
road defect and learned another person had flagged it two days earlier.
Boston officials have an ambitious
goal to fill potholes within one working day of identifying the rim-bending, tire-flattening craters. But their
Experts alarmed
that Trump has
no science adviser
The Israeli police recommended that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
be charged with bribery,
The milkman appears to
be making a comeback in
Massachusetts, with dair-
By Laura Crimaldi
Hightide:10:18a.m.,10:50p.m.
Sunrise: 6:42 Sunset: 5:15
Complete report, B15.
and catchers reported to
Red Sox camp. C1.
Jack Hynes died at 88
after five decades on Boston TV as an anchorman
and reporter. B10.
VOL . 293, NO. 45
*
Suggested retail price
$2.00
By Jon Chesto
GLOBE STAFF
record for meeting that benchmark is
mixed, figures show.
The city said it met the one-day
benchmark for 82 percent of the potholes it has identified so far this year
— about 2,800 craters.
But another measurement, CityScore, the system that looks at Boston’s response to individual constituent requests, shows the city has come
up short on potholes. The goal for
that standard is to fill 80 percent
within a day — but on that measurement, the city said it fills 59 percent
of potholes within the one-day goal.
Chris Osgood, chief of streets for
Mayor Martin J. Walsh, said public
works crews are trying to pick up the
Digital First Media, a national newspaper
chain that has earned a reputation for relentless
cost-cutting, emerged as the winning bidder for
the Boston Herald in a bankruptcy auction held
Tuesday.
The Denver-based company, which is also
known as MediaNews Group and is owned by
New York investment firm Alden Global Capital,
beat out two other bidders with a package that totaled nearly $12 million in cash and assumed liabilities, according to Herald publisher Pat Purcell.
The winning bid is significantly higher than
the initial offers by two other bidders, GateHouse
Media and Revolution Capital Group. More details about the offer were not disclosed Tuesday
night.
Guy Gilmore, chief operating officer for the
buyer, said in a statement that his company is
“pleased to have the opportunity to be a part of
POTHOLES, Page B4
HERALD, Page B12
Maine town plots a comeback
Thomas
Farragher
By David Abel
GLOBE STAFF
CAMBRIDGE — When the Ebola virus began sweeping through West Africa four years ago, killing thousands of
people and threatening to spread beyond the continent, President Barack
Obama turned to his science adviser for
options.
Presidents before him have sought
the counsel of White House science advisers to build atomic weapons, seek
cures for cancer, and devise policies to
oversee research into stem cells, cloning, and the human genome.
President Trump, however, appears
in no rush to follow suit. More than a
year after taking office, Trump has yet
to appoint a science adviser — longer
than any other president since World
War II, when Franklin D. Roosevelt created the position to receive technical,
apolitical advice.
His failure to fill the prominent post,
SCIENCE, Page A10
MILLINOCKET, Maine —
The tidy, white bandstand
stands on the edge of a goneto-seed main street pocked by
vacant storefronts where plywood has replaced plate glass,
where hope has nearly been
chased away by a gut-punched
economy on the edge of collapse.
The Great Northern Paper
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Company — the full-employment guarantor for generaDick Angotti, a former employee, visited the closed Great
tions of paper-makers who
Northern Paper Mill. “I can still hear it,” he said.
once made this town hum —
helped pay for the local hospital, the airport,
built that bandstand.
the baseball uniforms that bore its initials, the
In fact, the company, which sprang up like
goal posts at the local high school, and the conBrigadoon at the dawn of the 20th century,
crete foundations for the homes of workers
helped build almost everything here in “Magic
who streamed through its gates and punched
City,’’ a place conjured from the woods in the
its time clock.
shadow of Mount Katahdin and powered by
The paper mill stopped operating in 2008,
the waters of a tributary of the west branch of
and when its smokestacks were demolished a
the Penobscot River.
Great Northern’s endlessly deep pockets
FARRAGHER, Page A11
T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
The Nation
FBI counters White House on probe of ex-aide
Wray says agency reported on Porter multiple times
By Deb Riechmann
and Zeke Miller
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Contradicting the White House, the
FBI said Tuesday it gave the
Trump administration information on multiple occasions last
year about a top aide accused of
domestic abuse by his two former wives, and the investigation wrapped up in January.
That account by FBI Director Christopher Wray challenged the White House assertion that Rob Porter’s background ‘‘investigation was
ongoing’’ and officials first
learned the extent of accusations against him only last
week, just before he abruptly
resigned.
Wray’s testimony marked
the latest development in a
scandal that has called into
question the judgment of senior
members of the White House
staff, put new stress on the administration’s already strained
credibility with the public, and
drawn accusations of tone-deaf
handling of abuse allegations.
The weeklong fallout from
the allegations against Porter,
President Trump’s staff secretary, has thrown the West Wing
into chaos not seen since the
earliest months of the administration and has sparked new
rounds of recriminations inside
the White House.
Privately, officials acknowledge that the public timeline offered last week — that the administration first learned of the
former wives’ charges against
Por ter last Tuesday — was
flawed at best.
Several senior officials, including chief of staff John Kelly
and White House counsel Don
McGahn, were aware of the
broad allegations against Porter
for months, officials said.
Kelly found out after requesting an update on the large
number of senior staffers operating without full security clearances, according to a senior administration official who spoke
on condition of anonymity to
discuss internal discussions.
McGahn told Kelly last fall
there was concern about information in the background investigation involving Porter’s
former wives, the official said,
and Kelly expressed surprise
that Porter had previously been
married.
Despite that, Porter took on
an increasingly central role in
the West Wing and was under
consideration to serve as
Trump’s deputy chief of staff,
two officials said.
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders told
reporters Monday, ‘‘The White
House had not received any
specific papers regarding the
completion of that background
check.’’ Yet Wray testified that
the FBI sent the White House
its preliminary report in March
2017 and its completed investigation in late July. Soon after
that, the agency received a request for a follow-up inquiry,
and it provided that information in November. Porter was
interviewed about the allegations in September, an official
said.
‘‘And then we administratively closed the file in January,
and then earlier this month we
received some additional information and we passed that on
as well,’’ Wray added in his congressional testimony Tuesday,
without elaboration.
The FBI does not make recommendations about whether
to grant or deny a security
clearance, officials said, leaving
the determination up to the
employee’s agency, in Porter’s
case, the White House.
Sanders maintained Tuesday that her statement about an
ongoing investigation was accurate because Porter’s clearance
hadn’t received a final sign-off
from the White House Office of
Personnel Security.
‘‘We find those statements to
be consistent with one another,’’
she said.
The White House has refused to divulge the number of
staff members who still do not
have full clearances, though the
MANUEL BALCE CENETA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Officials have said that White House chief of staff John
Kelly (left) was aware of the broad allegations against Rob
Porter for months.
list includes Jared Kushner, the
president’s senior adviser and
son-in-law. Kushner’s attorney,
Abbe Lowell, said in a statement that ‘‘there are a dozen or
more people at Mr. Kushner’s
level’’ who are working without
full security clearances.
Separately, Trump’s intelligence chief called for top-tobottom reform of the security
clearance process, which allowed Porter to operate in his
job for more than a year with
only an interim clearance.
‘‘We have a broken system
and I think everybody’s come to
agree with that now,’’ Dan
Coats, the director of national
intelligence, told The Associated Press. He called for limits on
the information made accessible to those with temporary
clearances — a practice that is
currently not followed in the
West Wing, an official said.
Meanwhile, Colbie Holderness, Porter’s first wife, pushed
back against comments made
by presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway that seemed to
suggest strong women can’t be
victims of domestic violence.
Conway, in a weekend inter-
view on CNN, said she had no
reason to disbelieve accounts
by Holderness and another form e r w i f e t h a t Po r t e r h a d
abused them. But when asked if
she was concerned for top
White House aide Hope Hicks,
who reportedly was dating Porter, Conway said no because
‘‘I’ve rarely met somebody so
strong with such excellent instincts and loyalty and smarts.’’
Conway went on to say that
‘‘there’s no question’’ that domestic violence ‘‘knows no demographic or geographic
bounds,’’ and she understands
there is a stigma that surrounds
these issues.
In an opinion piece in The
Washington Post, Holderness
wrote that Conway’s first statement ‘‘implies that those who
have been in abusive relationships are not strong. I beg to
differ.’’
Porter resigned after Holderness and his second former
wife, Jennifer Willoughby,
came forward with allegations
of emotional and physical
abuse. Porter has denied harming his former partners.
The White House approach
has drawn criticism even from
Trump’s own party. ‘‘I think you
can’t justify it,’’ Iowa Senator Joni Ernst told CNN about a report that the White House arranged for Porter to defend
himself privately to reporters
after the allegations surfaced.
‘‘You can’t justify that.’’
Daily Briefing
Jail staffers face
felony charges in
dehydration death
Three staffers from the jail
run by conservative firebrand
David Clarke, the former Milwaukee County sheriff, were
charged Monday with felonies
stemming from the dehydration death of a mentally ill inmate who was denied water
for a week as punishment for
bad behavior.
The charges came less than
a year after an inquest jury
heard evidence from prosecutors that it was common for
employees of the Milwaukee
County Jail to cut off water to
unruly prisoners in violation of
the jail’s written regulations,
the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported.
Lieutenant Kashka Meadors and correctional officer
James Ramsey-Guy are each
charged with neglecting an inmate, a felony. Sheriff’s Major
Nancy Evans is charged with
felony misconduct in office
and misdemeanor obstruction.
Clarke, who oversaw the jail
until his retirement last August, was not charged in the
matter because he was not directly involved.
Prosecutors allege Meadors
gave the order to shut off water in 38-year-old Terrill
Thomas’s solitary confinement
cell in April 2016 and that
Ramsey-Guy was the jail staffer who physically closed the
pipes, according to the Journal
Sentinel.
The move was intended to
discipline Thomas, who had
used his bedding to clog a toilet and flood his jail cell in the
special needs unit, where he
was initially kept for his bipolar disorder, according to prosecutors. An investigation later
showed that he went seven
days without any liquid, lost
35 pounds, and called out for
water before staffers found
him dead in his cell. The medical examiner ruled he died
from ‘‘profound dehydration’’
and classified it a homicide.
Evans, the jail’s former
commander, is accused of lying to investigators during an
inquest into Thomas’s death
last year. Prosecutors say she
misled them on questions
about how long Thomas’s water was withheld and failed to
preserve critical surveillance
video that showed the water
being cut off and never restored again, according to the
Associated Press.
WASHINGTON POST
THE RETURN OF LOVE
2 life terms in Manhattan bombing
NEW YORK — Ahmad
Khan Rahimi, an Afghan-born
immigrant who worked quietly behind the counter of his
family’s fast-food restaurant
before building and planting
the bomb that exploded in
Manhattan in 2016, was sentenced on Tuesday to two life
terms in prison.
Judge Richard M. Berman
handed down the sentence in
US District Court in Manhattan, ending the prosecution of
Rahimi, who was convicted of
the act of jihad-inspired terrorism that was widely considered a near miss, injuring dozens without killing anyone.
Rahimi was convicted by a
jury in October of setting off
weapons of mass destruction.
Rahimi, 30, planned an attack that was simple and potentially lethal. On Sept. 17,
2016, Rahimi traveled to Manhattan from his home in Elizabeth, New Jersey, pulling suitcases on rollers with each
hand. He went on to place a
homemade bomb — packed
into a pressure cooker and
wired to a flip-phone detonator — on a stretch of the Chelsea neighborhood’s West 23rd
Street, busy with pedestrians
on a warm Saturday night.
The blast from that device sent
glass and shrapnel flying and
launched a construction waste
container across the street.
More than 30 people were injured, and they testified at Rahimi’s trial.
He placed a second bomb
on West 27th Street, but a
passerby on edge from the
blast four blocks away noticed
it and called police, and the
bomb squad took the device
away without incident. Earlier
that day, he had placed a bomb
in a garbage can at the finish
line of a US Marine Corps
charity race in Seaside Park,
N.J. The race’s start time had
been delayed, however, and no
one was hurt when the bomb
exploded.
He had planned more attacks. The day after the Chelsea explosion, Rahimi returned to New Jersey and left a
backpack containing six pipe
bombs in an Elizabeth, N.J.,
train station. One exploded after it was detonated by a police
robot, but the bombs caused
no injuries.
NEW YORK TIMES
Man shot by police had fought eviction
“LOVE”, the famous 1976 Robert Indiana sculpture, was reinstalled on John F.
Kennedy Plaza on Tuesday in Philadelphia. The sculpture was removed for repairs a
year ago while the park was going through a renovation.
HOMESTEAD, Fla. — An
84-year-old military veteran
who had been fighting eviction
from his apartment near Miami was fatally shot by at least
four police officers.
The Miami Herald reported
that officers were called to the
Hidden Grove apartment complex on Monday when Raymond Bishop threatened to
kill himself. Detective Argemis
Colome told local news outlets
that a confrontation ensued
and police were forced to
shoot.
The newspaper reports
Intelligence agencies warn of climate change dangers
Corker may get back into Senate race
The US intelligence community is at odds with the
White House about threats
America faces from climate
change.
The nation’s intelligence
agencies are warning, in the
annual Worldwide Threat Assessment, of global instability
if climate change continues
unabated, according to a report submitted for a hearing
Tuesday before the US Senate
Select Committee on Intelligence.
“The impacts of the long-
WASHINGTON — Senator
Bob Corker, a Tennessee Republican who has clashed with
President Trump, is rethinking
his political future and considering jumping back into this
year’s Senate race, according
to two Republicans close to
him.
But the Senate campaign of
Representative Marsha
Blackburn, a Tennessee
Republican, now the frontrunner for the GOP nomination, told The Washington Post
on Tuesday that anyone who
JACQUELINE LARMA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
term trends toward a warming
climate, more air pollution,
biodiversity loss, and water
scarcity are likely to fuel economic and social discontent —
and possibly upheaval —
through 2018,” the report
states.
The intelligence report describes how warming temperatures will exacerbate disasters,
war, shortages, economic volatility, and migration. Citing research showing that human
activities have accelerated extinctions worldwide 100 to
1,000 times normal rates, the
analysts write that losses “will
jeopardize vital ecosystems
that support critical human
systems.”
Two recent policy papers
from the Department of Defense carried no such alarms
about the warming
world, placing the military
nominally in line with the
president’s actions and reversing a position adopted by President George W. Bush’s Pentagon in 2008.
BLOOMBERG NEWS
Bishop was being evicted for
‘‘harboring unauthorized’’
dogs named Roxie and Ranger.
A lawsuit said one of the dogs
attacked and injured another
resident.
A Veterans Administration
psychiatrist says in court documents that the pets ‘‘provided
invaluable emotional therapeutic benefit.’’ The case had
been in mediation but talks
between the two sides failed.
The Florida Department of
Law Enforcement is investigating.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
doubts her ability to win a
general election against the
likely Democratic nominee,
former governor Phil
Bredesen, is sexist.
‘‘Anyone who thinks
Marsha Blackburn can’t win a
general election is just a plain
sexist pig,’’ Blackburn campaign spokeswoman Andrea
Bozek said in an interview.
Politico reported Monday
that Corker is ‘‘listening’’ to
those encouraging him to run
again.
WASHINGTON POST
T h e
A4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
The World
Daily Briefing
Police suggest
Netanyahu be
charged with
corruption
Israeli attorney
general to weigh
prosecuting him
By David M. Halbfinger
and Isabel Kershner
NEW YORK TIMES
MAURO PIMENTEL/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
A BRAZILIAN BASH — A reveller of the Beija-Flor samba school performed during the second night of Rio de
Janeiro’s Carnival celebration on Tuesday.
Trial starts for suspect in Sweden attack
Opposition arrests continue in Egypt
STOCKHOLM — An Uzbek
man who carried out a deadly
attack on Stockholm last year
swore allegiance to the Islamic State group in a video and
wrote that he wanted ‘‘to
scare the infidels and leave
my life,’’ prosecutors said
Tuesday as his trial began.
Rakhmat Akilov appeared
before the Stockholm District
Court for ramming a stolen
truck into a crowd in the
Swedish capital, killing five
people and injuring 14 others
because he wanted to punish
Sweden for joining a coalition
against the group that calls itself the Islamic State.
He is charged with terrorrelated murder and attempted murder. The prosecution
has asked that he receive a
life sentence and be extradited from Sweden. Prosecutor
Hans Ihrman said the trial
has implications across Europe for those fighting to halt
extremist attacks.
CAIRO — Egypt’s former
antigraft chief was arrested
on Tuesday, his lawyer said,
the latest development in an
upheaval that has roiled the
country ahead of next month’s
presidential election.
The lawyer, Ali Taha, said
that Hesham Genena was arrested at his home in a Cairo
suburb. The arrest came a day
after the military said it
would take action to safeguard its ‘‘honor and dignity’’
following incendiary comments by Genena in which he
claimed in a television interview that former military
chief of staff Sami Annan was
in possession of documents
incriminating the country’s
leadership.
Annan was among a string
of potentially serious election
challengers to the incumbent,
President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, to be arrested or forced out
of the race.
Genena, who was to be one
of Annan’s two top campaign
aides, led Egypt’s top watch-
Akilov, who has confessed
to the attack, wore handcuffs
as he entered the high-security courtroom. Ihrman described how Akilov drove a
stolen beer truck into a busy
Stockholm shopping street
last April, and how he was arrested hours later. A British
man, a Belgian woman, and
three Swedes were killed.
Akilov was born in Uzbekistan and worked there as a
construction worker. He
came to Sweden in 2014 and
applied for asylum, claiming
he had been persecuted. His
application was rejected, and
he was ordered to leave Sweden in December 2016.
Instead, he went underground, eluding authorities’
attempts to track him down.
Sweden’s domestic intelligence agency has said that
it had nothing indicating
that he was planning an attack.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Friend of Park sentenced to 20 years
TOKYO — A confidante of
former South Korean president Park Geun-hye was sentenced Tuesday to 20 years in
prison and fined almost $17
million for her role in a huge
corruption scandal that led to
Park’s impeachment and continues to roil the country.
The heavy sentence handed
down to Choi Soon-sil bodes ill
for Park, who is still on trial
and is facing almost exactly
the same charges.
Choi took advantage of her
long-running, private ties with
Park, Judge Kim Se-yoon said,
to force big South Korean
companies such as Samsung to
give donations to two foundations, which were meant to be
used to encourage sports but
were instead slush funds for
Park and Choi.
‘‘In light of the size of material gains obtained by the accused, the severe confusion in
state affairs caused by her
crimes, and the people’s sense
of frustration, the guilt of the
accused is very heavy,’’ the
judge said, according to re-
Trial renews France’s age-of-consent debate
YONHAP/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
Choi Soon-sil had been a
friend of former South
Korean president Park
Geun-hye for decades.
ports from inside the packed
courtroom.
Choi, 62, has been friends
with Park for about four decades. Her father, a kind of
shaman-fortune teller, was
close to Park’s father, Park
Chung-hee, who served as
South Korea’s strongman president from 1963 until he was
fatally shot by his own spy
chief in 1979.
WASHINGTON POST
Lassa fever outbreak strikes Nigeria
LAGOS, Nigeria— The
World Health Organization
says as many as 450 people
may have been infected with
Lassa fever in Nigeria in less
than five weeks.
In a statement released on
Tuesday, WHO said that 43
suspected deaths from the viral hemorrhagic fever were
reported between Jan. 1 and
Feb. 4, and that 37 of them
had been confirmed.
Dr. Wondimagegnehu Alemu, the organization’s representative to the West African
dog agency until el-Sissi fired
him in 2016. He is the latest
election-related casualty in
what appears to be an intensifying campaign against dissent ahead of the vote.
On Jan. 27, Genena was
assaulted by three men near
his home, sustaining serious
eye and knee injuries. He said
in an interview last week that
he suspected the attack was
related to an appeal he
planned to file the same day
contesting the removal of Annan’s name from the list of
presidential hopefuls. Authorities said at the time that he
was injured in a brawl following a car accident he was involved in.
Annan himself was arrested by the military last month,
days after he declared his intention to run for president.
The military said he faced
charges of incitement against
the military and forgery.
Genena said he feared for Annan’s life in detention.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
nation, calls it an ‘‘unusually
high number of cases for this
time of year.’’
The disease is spread
through contact with the
bodily fluids of sick people.
Humans often contract the
virus from eating food contaminated by the urine or feces of rodents.
The disease starts as a fever with body aches and can
progress to patients bleeding
from the nose or mouth.
There is no vaccine.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PONTOISE, France — A 29year-old man went on trial
Tuesday in a Paris suburb for
having sex with an 11-year-old
girl, a case that has rekindled
strong debate on the age of
sexual consent in France.
Unlike many countries,
France does not have a legal
age under which a minor cannot agree to a sexual relationship — although the country’s
top court has ruled that children aged 5 and under cannot
consent. Lawyers for the suspect argued that the girl was
consenting and aware of what
she was doing, while lawyers
for the girl have said she was
simply too young and confused to resist.
In a decision that shocked
many, the prosecutor’s office in
the town of Pontoise decided
to put the man on trial not for
rape but for charges of ‘‘sexual
abuse of a minor under 15.’’
Defense lawyers say the
man and the girl met in a park
and the girl voluntarily followed him to an apartment
and consented to have sex.
They’ve also claim their client
thought she was over 15.
The girl’s family filed a
complaint for rape in the town
of Montmagny, but prosecutors apparently felt the suspect
did not use violence or coercion. French law defines rape
as sexual penetration committed ‘‘by violence, coercion,
threat, or surprise.’’
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Saakashvili undeterred by deportation
WARSAW — Ukrainian opof Ukraine,’’ Saakashvili said.
position leader Mikheil
Saakashvili was deported to
Saakashvili said Tuesday that
Poland because he entered
he would continue rallying
Ukraine from there last year.
people against the
Speaking in Ukrainination’s authorities
an and English, he
from abroad, followsaid he would find a
ing his deportation.
way to return to
At a news conferUkraine, insisting it
ence in Warsaw,
is his country.
Saakashvili described
Saakashvili and a
his detention in Kiev
small crowd of supby armed, masked
porters shoved their
Mikheil
men and immediate
way through a line of
Saakashvili
ejection to neighborguards from Poland
ing Poland as a viola- said he would
into Ukraine in Sepreturn to
tion of international
tember.
Ukraine.
laws.
‘‘Warsaw-Kiev, KiHe vowed to conev-Warsaw, I have
tinue encouraging Ukrainians
traveled that route many times
to stand up to authorities he
and will do it again,’’ Saakashconsiders ‘‘corrupt elites.’’
vili said, without offering spe‘‘We will have millions of
cifics.
people protesting in the streets
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — The Israeli
police recommended on Tuesday that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu be charged
w i t h b r i b e r y, f r a u d , a n d
breach of trust, casting a pall
over the future of a tenacious
leader who has become almost synonymous with his
country. The announcement
instantly raised doubts about
his ability to stay in office.
Concluding a yearlong corruption investigation, the police recommended that Netanyahu face prosecution in
two corruption cases: a giftsfor-favors affair known as
Case 1000, and a second scandal, dubbed Case 2000, in
which Netanyahu is suspected of back-room dealings with
Arnon Mozes, publisher of
the popular daily Yediot Ahronoth, to ensure more favorable coverage.
All told, the police accused
Netanyahu of accepting nearly $300,000 in gifts over 10
years.
Netanyahu, addressing the
nation live on television
shortly before the police released their findings just after
9 p.m., made clear that he
would not step down. “I feel a
deep obligation to continue to
lead Israel in a way that will
ensure our future,” he said,
before embarking on a 12minute defense of his conduct.
“You know I do everything
with only one thing in mind
— the good of the country,” he
said. “Not for cigars from a
friend, not for media coverage, not for anything. Only for
the good of the state. Nothing
has made me deviate, or will
make me deviate, from this
sacred mission.”
The police recommendations must now be examined
by state prosecutors and the
attorney general, Avichai
Mandelblit. The final decision
about whether to file formal
charges lies with Mandelblit
and is subject to a hearing beforehand with Netanyahu’s
lawyers. Reaching that
threshold alone could easily
take months.
According to police, expensive cigars, jewelry, and pink
champagne flowed into the
prime minister’s official Jerusalem residence in quantities
sufficient to stock a small
cocktail lounge.
The generous patrons included Arnon Milchan, the Israeli movie producer, and
James Packer, an Australian
billionaire.
But it is the favors Netanyahu may have given his
wealthy friends in return that
could herald his downfall.
A formal bribery charge
would be by far the most serious outcome, and the most
ominous for his political survival.
Netanyahu is serving his
third consecutive term since
his election in 2009, and his
fourth overall since the
1990s. If he remained in the
post through July 2019, he
would set a record for total
time in office, surpassing that
of the state’s founder, David
Ben-Gurion.
Netanyahu has vehemently denied any wrongdoing
and has vowed to fight on,
saying that no police recommendation would prompt his
resignation.
His longevity attests to his
political agility and to his perfection of a campaigning and
governing style in which he
ABIR SULTAN/EPA/SHUTTERSTOCK
Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu has
been the focus of a
yearlong graft probe.
casts his political foes and
critics as enemies of the
broader body politic. Though
he has formed previous ruling
coalitions with those to his
left, his current government
is often described as the most
right-wing and religious in Israel’s history.
And he has presided over
an increasingly bitter relationship with the Palestinians
in the territories Israel has occupied for more than a halfcentury, whose hopes of soon
gaining a state of their own
have dwindled as Israeli settlements expand.
But while Netanyahu has
prepared the public for this
moment for months, and
made strenuous efforts to discredit those investigating
him, he has not prepared Israel or his government for the
possibility that he may be unable to continue to lead. He
has designated no successor,
and no single member of his
own coalition has emerged as
ready to step into his shoes.
Meanwhile, a centrist opposition, led by Yair Lapid of the
Yesh Atid par ty, has been
gaining strength.
In a twist straight out of a
political thriller, a key witness
against Netanyahu, according
to Israeli news reports Tuesday night, turned out to be
Lapid himself, who had been
Netanyahu’s finance minister
in a previous coalition.
According to a police statement about their recommendations, Netanyahu promoted
the extension of a 10-year tax
exemption to expatriate Israelis returning to the country, “a
benefit that has great economic value for Milchan,”
who has long worked in Hollywood. But the Finance Ministry blocked this legislation,
saying it was against the national interest and fiscally unsound.
The Israeli law enforcement authorities have handled the cases with great caution, wary of the possibility of
bringing down a prime minister who might then be proved
not guilty in court, not least
with Israel facing increasing
security threats on its northern and southern frontiers.
But Israel’s constant state
of alert has led some critics to
argue all the more that a
prime minister so focused on
fighting his own legal battles
cannot be entrusted with fateful decisions of peace and
war.
Opposition politicians
pounced Tuesday night, demanding that Netanyahu step
down, be ousted by his coalition, or at least declare himself “incapacitated,” as former
Prime Minister Ehud Barak
urged on Twitter, calling the
police findings “hair-raising.”
“Most of you are honest
people,” Stav Shaffir, of the
left-leaning National Union
party, wrote on Twitter, addressing Netanyahu’s coalition. “If you have a drop of
concern for the future, fulfill
your obligation. Free Israel
from this madness.”
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
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T h e
The World
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
S. Korea says Washington is willing to talk with the North
President Moon
Jae-in indicates
shift in US policy
By Choe Sang-Hun
NEW YORK TIMES
SEOUL — US officials told
South Korea’s president they
were willing to hold direct negotiations with North Korea, a
spokesman for President Moon
Jae-in said Tuesday, indicating
a shift in the Trump administration’s policy.
The statement came just
days after Vice President Mike
Pence visited PyeongChang,
South Korea, which is hosting
the Winter Olympics, and met
with Moon. Since the vice president’s departure Saturday, reports of an understanding between Washington and Seoul
on the possibility of dialogue
have appeared in the news media, but South Korean officials
would not confirm them until
Tuesday.
“The United States too looks
positively at South-North Korean dialogue and has expressed
its willingness to start dialogue
with the North,” Moon’s spokesman, Kim Eui-kyeom said.
Dialogue with the North has
been used by successive US administrations as a carrot —
paired with the stick of sanctions — in the hopes of getting
the isolated nation to end its
nuclear weapons program. Until recently, Trump administration officials insisted no such
meetings would take place until
the North had first taken steps
toward disarmament.
President Trump recently
described Moon’s overtures to
the North Koreans as “appeasement.” And when Secretary of
State Rex Tillerson said in December that the United States
was willing to hold a “meeting
without precondition,” the
White House insisted his comments were premature.
But in an interview with The
Washington Post after he left
South Korea, Pence suggested
that the United States was open
to a meeting, even indicating
that it would enter talks without preconditions.
“So the maximum pressure
campaign is going to continue
and intensify,” Pence said of the
punishing sanctions imposed
on the North by the United Nations. “But if you want to talk,
we’ll talk.”
Agreeing to talks before the
North Koreans have demonstrated a willingness to dismantle their weapons program
would be a subtle but potentially significant shift in Washington’s approach, and a win for
Moon.
When Pence and Moon met
last week, the allies apparently
found common ground: They
would agree to talks without set
rules, but they will continue to
use sanctions as leverage.
“President Moon and I reflected last night on the need to
do something fundamentally
different,” Pence told reporters
S. Africa
president
besieged
Assange
arrest
warrant
upheld
His own party
wants him out
Judge urges him
to leave embassy
By Norimitsu Onishi
NEW YORK TIMES
By Richard Pérez-Peña
and Iliana Magra
NEW YORK TIMES
LONDON — A British judge
upheld an arrest warrant for Julian Assange for the second
time in a week on Tuesday, a
significant setback for him after
5½ years of evading authorities
by living in the Ecuadorean
Embassy in London.
Before a packed London
courtroom, Senior District
Judge Emma Arbuthnot rejected the arguments made by Assange’s lawyer, stating that he
was not a prisoner, that his living conditions were nothing
like those of a prison, and that
he could have as many visitors
as he liked. In fact, she said, he
could — and should — walk free
to meet his legal fate.
“He is a man who wants to
impose his terms on the course
of justice,” Arbuthnot said. “He
wants justice only when it’s in
his favor.”
If the judge had nullified the
warrant, Assange, the founder
of WikiLeaks, might have left
the embassy, but that was far
from certain. The US and British governments have never
ruled out the existence of a secret request to extradite him to
the United States, where he
could face prosecution for publishing classified documents.
“We are surprised,” Assange
NEIL HALL/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/SHUTTERSTOCK
Supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange demonstrated outside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London on Tuesday.
said on Twitter. “Judge went
well outside what the parties
presented in court. This seems
to have led to many factual errors in the judgment.”
On Feb. 6, Arbuthnot rebuffed a claim by Assange’s lawyer, Mark Summers, that the
warrant was void because it
stemmed from a Swedish extradition request that has since
been withdrawn.
On Tuesday, she rejected the
argument that the warrant was
contrary to the public interest,
saying that Assange’s “failure to
surrender has impeded the
court of justice.”
Summers gave no immedi-
ate public response to the
judge’s decision.
In the courtroom’s public
gallery, which held a large contingent of Assange’s supporters,
many of the judge’s comments
met with gasps and murmurs of
disapproval. Afterward, several
of his allies cited a 2016 ruling
by a United Nations human
rights panel, stating that Assange was the victim of arbitrary detention.
Arbuthnot dismissed the
United Nations group’s finding
as ill-informed. The British authorities have said in the past
that Assange is in self-imposed
isolation, not detention.
WikiLeaks released in 2010
a trove of government documents provided by Chelsea
Manning, a US Army analyst,
which US officials said harmed
national security.
In 2016, it published emails, hacked by Russian intelligence, that were damaging to
Hillary Clinton’s presidential
campaign.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions said last year that arresting Assange was a priority for
the Justice Department. But no
charges against him have been
made public, and it is not clear
whether the department has
prepared an indictment but
kept it under seal.
Assange’s legal hurdles began in 2011, when Sweden requested that he be extradited
there to face accusations that
he had sexually assaulted two
women. He said that the charges were politically motivated,
that he would not get a fair trial
there, and that Sweden might
turn him over to the United
States. After the British courts
rejected his bid to quash the extradition request, Ecuador
granted him asylum and he
took refuge in the embassy. In
doing so, he jumped bail, which
resulted in the British arrest
warrant.
Dozens of Russians believed dead in US-led Syria attack
NEW YORK TIMES
MOSCOW — Four Russian
nationals, and perhaps dozens
more, were killed in fighting between pro-government forces
in eastern Syria and members
of the US-led coalition fighting
the Islamic State, according to
Russian and Syrian officials.
A Syrian military officer said
that about 100 Syrian soldiers
had been killed on Feb. 7 and 8,
but news about Russian casualties has dribbled out slowly,
through Russian news organizations and social media.
Much about the attack and
the associated casualties has
been obscured in the fog of war.
For reasons that remain unclear, Syrian government troops
and some Russian nationals appear to have attacked a coalition position, near Al Tabiyeh,
Syria.
The attack occurred in the
vicinity of Deir el-Zour, a strategic, oil-rich territory that is cov-
Friday after meeting with the
South Korean leader.
The allies, he said, would demand “at the outset of any new
dialogue or negotiations” that
North Korea “put denuclearization on the table and take concrete steps with the world community to dismantle, permanently and irreversibly, their
nuclear and ballistic missile
programs.”
“Then, and only then, will
the world community consider
negotiating and making changes in the sanctions regime that’s
placed on them today,” Pence
said.
eted by the Syrians. Most of the
fatalities were attributed to a
US airstrike on enemy columns
that was called in by US-backed
Kurdish soldiers who believed
they were under attack.
At no point, a US military
spokesman said, was there any
chance of direct conflict between US and Russian forces.
“Coalition officials were in
regular communication with
Russian counterparts before,
during and after the thwarted,
unprovoked attack,” according
to Colonel Ryan S. Dillon, a
spokesman for the US military.
“Russian officials assured coalition officials they would not engage coalition forces in the vicinity.”
The Kremlin — seeking to
play down its involvement in
the fighting in Syria and seemingly hoping to avoid escalating
tensions with the United States
— has sidestepped questions
about the episode, even as it
MAURICIO LIMA/NEW YORK TIMES
US Special Forces soldiers were stationed at a front-line
outpost near Manbij, Syria, last week.
faces rare criticism at home
over its failure to acknowledge
the deaths of Russians in Syria.
It has stressed repeatedly
since last Wednesday that no
members of the Russian armed
forces were killed, and that any
Russians fighting alongside the
Syrians were mercenaries.
“We only handle the data
that concerns Russian forces
servicemen,” Dmitry Peskov,
Kremlin spokesman, said at a
news briefing. “We don’t have
data about other Russians who
could be in Syria.”
The Kremlin said much the
same about the nature of the
forces in Crimea and eastern
Ukraine in 2014, however,
claiming they were volunteers
and men on vacation, only to
admit later that they were regular soldiers.
President Vladimir Putin
has said at least three times
since 2016 that combat operations in Syria were winding
down. Yet there are hundreds if
not thousands of contract soldiers in Syria whom the Russian government has never acknowledged.
They were deployed both to
help keep the cost down and to
avoid reports of casualties, especially with a March presidential election approaching.
Though the Kremlin enacted a
law during the Ukraine crisis in
2015 to make battlefield casualties a secret, the funerals for
regular soldiers killed in combat need to be more official
than those for mercenaries, and
are thus difficult to hide.
JOHANNESBURG — Leaders of South Africa’s governing
party ordered President Jacob
Zuma to step down on Tuesday,
saying that his continued presence was eroding the “renewed
hope” felt since the election of
new party leaders in December.
Ace Magashule, secretarygeneral of the African National
Congress, said the party had
not given Zuma a deadline to
respond, but added that he was
certain the president would deliver a reply the next day. “Let’s
leave it to President Jacob Zuma,” Magashule said.
The confrontation heightened a power struggle in the
party that has governed South
Africa since apartheid ended
and has become less known for
its heroic past than for corruption and mismanagement. The
power struggle has paralyzed
South Africa, which has the
continent’s largest economy.
In what appeared to be a
turning point, the ANC for the
first time moved decisively
against the leader it had shielded for nine years against a series of accusations of misconduct. But party leaders said Zuma was being dismissed
because he’s harming the ANC’s
prospects — not because of the
ethical issues surrounding him.
“President Zuma has not
been found guilty by any court
of law,” Magashule said. “And
when we took these decisions,
we did not take these decisions
because Comrade Jacob Zuma
has done anything wrong.”
Negotiations over Zuma’s future have cast a pall over the optimism that followed Cyril Ramaphosa’s election in December to succeed him as leader of
the ANC, and his pledge to steer
South Africa on a new course.
Although Ramaphosa, deputy
president since 2014, has a
mixed record in both politics
and business, he has spoken
forcefully against corruption
and is allied with ANC officials
with reputations as reformers.
Party leaders did not address how they would respond
if Zuma did not step down, but
the ANC would almost certainly
have to remove him through a
vote of no confidence in Parliament.
But a no-confidence vote
would bring fresh attention to
widespread corruption in the
ANC and expose the governing
party to charges of hypocrisy. It
has used its dominance in Parliament to quash eight previous
opposition-led motions of no
confidence.
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A7
Immigration debate begins
with dispute among leaders
GOP move to
target sanctuary
cities draws fire
AUCTION
By Kevin Freking
and Jill Colvin
S P E C I A L I ST S
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A highstakes Senate debate over immigration got off to a halting
start Tuesday, with Republican
and Democratic leaders immediately at loggerheads over how
to move forward and President
Trump warning this was the
‘‘last chance’’ to extend protections to Dreamer immigrants.
Trump issued the warning
in a morning tweet as the Senate opened what was billed as
an unusual and open-ended debate on a host of immigration
issues. Democrats had pushed
for the debate, hopeful they
might be able to craft a piece of
legislation in real time on the
Senate floor — or at least force
Republicans on the record on
some difficult issues.
But the experiment in legislating hasn’t gotten very far yet.
S e n a t e m a j o r i ty l e a d e r
Mitch McConnell, Republican
of Kentucky, began the process
by throwing his weight behind
legislation based on the president’s priorities.
To kick it off, he proposed allowing Republicans to bring up
an amendment targeting cities
that don’t fully cooperate with
federal immigration authorities, so-called sanctuary cities.
Then, Democrats would bring
up legislation of their choosing.
Amendments gaining 60 votes
would become part of the
broader immigration bill.
The Senate’s top Democrat,
Chuck Schumer of New York,
quickly objected.
‘‘To begin the debate as the
Republican leader suggests
would be getting off on the
wrong foot,’’ Schumer said.
‘‘Very partisan.’’
Schumer wants McConnell
to bring up legislation that incorporates President Trump’s
priorities and a second, much
narrower bill from Senators
John McCain, Republican of
Arizona, and Chris Coons,
Democrat of Delaware.
His reasoning: The legislation Schumer wants considered
would address the population
of young immigrants that lawmakers from both parties say
they want to help, rather than
side issues such as how to deal
with sanctuary cities.
McConnell replied: ‘‘I’m not
trying to dictate to them what
they offer. They shouldn’t be
trying to dictate to us what we
offer. We ought to just get started.’’
The disagreement means
there could be several more
hours of speeches before any
votes occur. That gives a group
of moderate lawmakers more
E V E R Y ST E P
O F T H E W AY
SUSAN WALSH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell spoke to reporters
Tuesday. The Senate debate began with a disagreement
between McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer.
time to come up with a package
that could generate 60 votes in
the Senate.
‘ ‘ Un t i l w e r e a c h a n e n d
there, I still hope that’s the vehicle,’’ said Senator Jeff Flake, Republican of Arizona, one of the
group’s key participants.
Trump, in an early-morning
tweet, said Congress must act
now to provide legal protections to young Dreamer immigrants.
‘‘Wouldn’t it be great if we
could finally, after so many
years, solve the DACA puzzle,’’
he wrote, adding: ‘‘This will be
our last chance, there will never
be another opportunity! March
5th.’’
Trump was referring to a
deadline he announced last
year to end a program protecting young immigrants from deportation, formally known as
Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals, or DACA. But a recent
court ruling has rendered that
deadline all but meaningless.
In an exchange later Tuesd ay w i t h S e n at o r S h e r r o d
Brown, Democrat of Ohio,
Trump again tried to accuse
Democrats of not wanting to fix
DACA, but then told the senator he was joking.
‘‘Everybody’s in there working hard on it right now. I think
we have a chance to do DACA
very bipartisan. I think that can
happen,’’ he said during a meeting on trade issues with a bipartisan group of lawmakers at the
White House. ‘‘And I hope we’re
going to be able to do that, senator.’’
One GOP proposal based on
principles dictated by the White
House would pave a path to citizenship for up to 1.8 million
young Dreamer immigrants in
the United States, a lure for
Democrats that many Republicans oppose.
Trump also wants $25 billion for Trump’s border wall
with Mexico and other security
measures, as well as curbs on
legal immigration — a must for
many Republicans.
‘‘This proposal has my support, and during this week of
fair debate, I believe it deserves
the support of every senator
who’s ready to move beyond
making points and actually
making a law,’’ McConnell said
in beginning debate Tuesday.
McConnell and other GOP
supporters describe the measure as the Senate’s best shot of
passing a bill that the president
will sign, but many Democrats
consider some of the proposals,
including limiting the relatives
that legal immigrants can bring
to the United States, to be nonstarters.
Schumer has expressed repeated opposition to Trump’s
sweeping approach, pushing
for a more narrow focus.
‘‘Helping the Dreamers become Americans and protecting our borders. That should be
the focus of all our energies,’’
Schumer said Tuesday.
Trump’s overall immigration
plan, opposed by many Democrats, stands little chance of
prevailing because any measure
will need 60 votes. That means
proposals will need substantial
bipartisan support since the
GOP majority is 51-49, and McCain has been absent in recent
weeks battling cancer.
Still, many Republicans are
insisting that the bill incorporating Trump’s priorities is a
compromise because it gives up
to 1.8 million young immigrants a pathway to citizenship.
‘‘The president’s framework
is not an opening bid in negotiations. It is a best and final offer,’’ said Senator Tom Cotton,
Republican of Arkansas.
In a meeting with sheriffs at
the White House, Trump continued to frame the debate in a
way that depicts many of the illegal immigrants seeking to enter the United States as dangerous criminals.
‘‘We’re asking Congress to
support our immigration policy
that keeps terrorists, drug dealers, criminals and gang members out of our country. We
want them out. We don’t want
them in and right now we’re
working on DACA, we’re working on immigration bills and
we’re making them tough,’’
Trump said.
2nd judge orders DACA kept intact
Justice Dept. says
it will continue
to fight program
By Alan Feuer
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — For the second time in two months, a federal judge has stepped into an
intense political fight over immigration policy, ordering the
Trump administration to keep
in place the embattled program
known as DACA, which protects young unauthorized immigrants from deportation.
The nationwide injunction,
issued Tuesday by Judge Nicholas G. Garaufis of US District
Cour t in Brooklyn, came a
month after a court in California ruled the administration
needed to spare Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.
Garaufis’s ruling in many
ways echoed the one by Judge
William Alsup of US District
Court in San Francisco. But it
offered additional reasons why
DACA should remain in place
as the case continues through
the courts and detailed the
harms its repeal would cause to
young immigrants and others.
On Sept. 5, Attorney General
Jeff Sessions announced the
Trump administration planned
to end DACA gradually, saying
the program had been unconstitutionally established by
President Obama in 2012. The
Department of Homeland Security is still considering pending
DACA applications and renewal
requests from recipients whose
benefits expire by March. But
the department plans to reject
all applications after that.
After Sessions’ announcement, a coalition of immigration lawyers and a group of 16
Democratic state attorneys general, led by Eric Schneiderman
of New York, filed separate but
linked lawsuits in Brooklyn,
claiming the repeal was an “arbitrary and capricious” decision
largely motivated by a “racial
animus” against Latinos.
Garaufis agreed the rollback
was arbitrary and capricious,
but while he has criticized President Trump from the bench for
his anti-immigrant tweets and
public statements, the judge
made no mention of racial animus in his findings.
Under the ruling, the government will have to maintain
DACA as it was before the Sept.
5 announcement. But it does
not have to accept new applications, and it can decide renewal
requests case-by-case. While
Garaufis noted he was sympathetic to those who were unable
to apply for DACA before Sept.
5, he added that the injunction
would not apply to them.
Immigration lawyers who
brought the case nonetheless
hailed his ruling as a victory.
“During a week when the
Senate is having a battle over
immigration, we now have two
judges saying that what happened on Sept. 5 was not justified,” said Marisol Orihuela, a
lawyer from Yale Law School.
“This sends a clear message to
lawmakers to act and pass
something.”
Schneiderman said the
judge had affirmed the states’
position. “Federal courts from
coast to coast have now reviewed the record and reached
the same conclusion,” he said.
“President Trump’s decision to
rescind DACA was illegal.”
Devin O’Malley, a Justice Department spokesman, reiterated arguments the government
made before Garaufis, saying
DACA was “an unlawful circumvention of Congress.”
“Promoting and enforcing
the rule of law is vital to protecting a nation, its borders,
and its citizens,” O’Malley added. “The Justice Department
will continue to vigorously defend this position, and looks
forward to vindicating its position in further litigation.”
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The Nation
A8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Nation’s top intelligence
officials cite Russia threat
uRUSSIA
Continued from Page A1
And Daniel Coats, director of
national intelligence, said there
is ‘‘no single agency in charge’’
of blocking Russian meddling,
an admission that drew the ire
of Democrats.
‘‘The fact that we don’t have
clarity about who’s in charge
means, I believe, we don’t have
a full plan,’’ said Senator Mark
Warner, Democrat of Virginia,
the vice chairman of the committee, which is conducting an
investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.
He also said social media
companies, whose platforms
have been fertile turf for Russian bots seeking to stoke divisions among Americans, have
been ‘‘slow to recognize the
threat’’ and that ‘‘they’ve still
got more work to do.’’
Coats said that Russia will
continue using propaganda,
false personas, and social media to undermine elections.
‘‘There should be no doubt
that Russia perceives its past efforts’’ to disrupt the 2016 presidential campaign ‘‘as successful
and views the 2018 midterm
elections as a potential target
for Russian influence operations,’’ said Coats, the leader of
the US government’s 17 intelligence agencies.
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The nation’s top intelligence officials, led by director of national intelligence Daniel Coats
(center), addressed the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday.
His assessment was echoed
by all five other intelligence
agency heads present at the
hearing, including CIA Director
Mike Pompeo, who two weeks
ago stated publicly that he had
‘‘every expectation’’ that Russia
will try to influence the coming
election.
The intelligence community’s consensus on Russia’s intentions led Senator Jack Reed,
Democrat of Rhode Island, to
press officials on whe ther
Trump has directed them to
take ‘‘specific actions to confront and to blunt’’ Russian interference activities.
FBI Director Christopher
Wray said the bureau is undertaking ‘‘a lot of specific activities’’ to counter Russian meddling but was ‘‘not specifically
directed by the president.’’ And
Pompeo added that Trump ‘‘has
made very clear we have an obligation’’ to make sure policy
makers have a deep understanding of the Russia threat.
Coats also said the intelligence agencies ‘‘pass on to the
policy makers, including the
president,’’ relevant intelligence.
Reed pressed on his question: ‘‘Passing on relevant intelligence is not actively disrupt-
ing the operations of an opponent. Do you agree?’’
Coats said: ‘‘ We take all
kinds of steps to disrupt Russian activities.’’
Pompeo added: ‘‘Senator
Reed, we have a significant effort. I’m happy to talk about it
in closed session.’’
‘There should be
no doubt that
Russia perceives
its past efforts as
successful.’
DANIEL COATS
Director of national intelligence
A visibly frustrated Reed responded: ‘‘The simple question
I’ve posed is, has the president
directed the intelligence community in a coordinated effort,
not merely to report but to actively stop this activity, and the
answer seems to be that . . . the
reporting is going on, as reporting [goes on] about every threat
going into the United States.’’
Earlier in the hearing,
Pompeo said that the intelligence community has offensive
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‘‘capabilities’’ to ‘‘raise the costs
to adversaries’’ seeking to hack
into election systems.
He took issue with King’s
suggestion that the US government has not taken actions to
deter adversaries in cyberspace.
‘‘Your statement that we have
done nothing does not reflect
the responses that, frankly,
some of us at this table have engaged in — that the US government has engaged in — both
during and before this administration,’’ Pompeo said.
King, citing the nuclear
d o o m s d a y m o v i e ‘ ‘ D r.
Strangelove,’’ said, ‘‘deterrence
doesn’t work unless the other
side knows’’ about the weapon.
‘‘It’s true — it’s important
that the adversary knows,’’
Pompeo said. ‘‘It’s not a requirement that the world know it.’’
Asked whether the adversary knows about US actions,
he said, ‘‘I’d prefer to leave that
for another forum.’’
The intelligence chiefs also
said that North Korea’s presence at the Olympics in South
Korea, which saw a historic visit by North Korean leader Kim
Jo n g U n ’s s i s t e r, h a d n o t
changed the intelligence community’s assessment that the
regime is trying to build nuclear weapons to threaten its
n e i gh b o r s a nd t h e Un i t e d
States.
‘‘The decision time is becoming ever closer in terms of how
we respond’’ to North Korea’s
weapons development, Coats
said.
Pompeo said his agency has
completed an analysis of how
North Korea would respond to
a US military strike, as well as
what it would take to bring the
regime to the negotiating table.
He offered to describe that
analysis only in a closed, classified session.
Pompeo also responded to
reporting last week by The New
York Times and the Intercept
about an intelligence operation
to retrieve classified National
Security Agency information
believed to have been stolen by
Russia. The Times reported
that US spies had been bilked
out of $100,000, paid to a shadowy Russian who claimed to be
able to deliver the secrets as
well as compromising information about Trump.
Pompeo categorically denied
that the intelligence agency had
paid any such money, directly
or indirectly. He claimed that
the newspaper had been duped
by the same person trying to
sell the US government bogus
information.
At the end of the hearing,
committee chairman Richard
Burr, Republican of North Carolina, said that the panel hoped
to release publicly the findings
of its Russia investigation ‘‘before the primaries begin’’ in
March. Their probe includes a
review of the intelligence community’s January 2017 assessment on Russian interference,
he said. That assessment concluded that the Russians wanted to help get Trump elected.
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W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
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uSCIENCE
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T h e
which has required Senate conf i rm at i o n s i n ce 1 9 76 , h as
raised concerns among scientists throughout the country,
but perhaps nowhere more
than in Cambridge, where the
most recent White House science adviser is sounding the
alarm.
“It’s mind-boggling,” said
John Holdren, Obama’s science
adviser for eight years who has
since resumed his career as a
professor of environmental poli c y a t Ha r v a r d ’s K e n n e d y
School of Government. “It’s vital for the president to get the
best science advice, and right
now, he isn’t getting that. His
decisions are being made without the benefit of science.”
A physicist, Holdren oversaw the White House Office of
Science and Technology Policy,
which had a staff of 135 people
who advised Obama through
studies and briefings on subjects from climate change to
nuclear weapons policy.
As an assistant to the president, Holdren was one of the
few White House officials with
direct access to Obama. That
proximity allowed his staff to
play key roles in helping the
president navigate through
complex crises, such as the
2010 Deepwater Horizon oil
spill in the Gulf of Mexico and
the 2011 nuclear meltdown at
the Fukushima plant in Japan.
Since returning to Cambridge, Holdren and many of
his colleagues have grown dismayed that Trump not only
hasn’t appointed a science adviser — and may ultimately
choose not to — but that his administration has given short
shrift to science in general.
As evidence, they point to
Trump’s first budget, which
proposed a 20 percent cut to
the Energy Department’s Office
of Science, an agency that oversees a vast amount of basic research at the national laboratories; an 18 percent cut to the
National Institutes of Health;
and a 31 percent cut to the En-
PETE SOUZA/THE WHITE HOUSE/FILE 2010
John Holdren was the White House science adviser for
Barack Obama and aided him in the wake of several crises.
vironmental Protection Agency.
Many of those proposed cuts
are unlikely to make it through
Congress, although lawmakers
have yet to approve a budget
for the current fiscal year.
White House officials
wouldn’t discuss personnel decisions, but they said the Office
of Science and Technology Policy now has a staff of just 50, far
below the level under Obama.
Fewer than half are scientists.
An official in the office, who
spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized
to discuss the matter publicly,
said the staff has spent the year
preparing reports on subjects
including space policy, cyber
security, and nuclear energy.
He also said he expects the
staff will grow in the coming
years.
The official, however, acknowledged that the lack of a
director has posed challenges.
“I’m not particularly concerned that this will result in
Armageddon, as some make it
sound, but I think it’s important for OSTP to get a director
nominated and swiftly confirmed,” the official said. “I do
believe the work that is being
done is important, and I think
the president appreciates that.”
Trump is receiving scientific advice from members of his
Cabinet and other agencies, the
official added.
Asked if Trump intends to
appoint a science adviser, who
oversees the office, he said: “It’s
my understanding that there
will be a director appointed.”
But other top scientists
around the country warned
that briefings on technical matters from Cabinet secretaries
and agencies are insufficient.
“That advice is not always
without bias, given the varied
missions, cultures, and priorities of the different agencies,”
said Neal Lane, a physicist who
served as science adviser to
President Bill Clinton.
Lane, who teaches at Rice
University in Houston, said the
post is vital, especially in times
of crises, because it gives the
president a trusted confidant
who can “quickly pull together
relevant information and give
[him] truly unbiased advice.”
“History tells us that President Trump will face decisions
in future times of crisis and
many of those will require technical advice,” he added. “Who
can he depend on when that
happens?”
Others noted that Trump
has already slashed funding for
clean energy research and announced the United States
would withdraw from the Paris
climate accord.
Ken Kimmell, president of
the Union of Concerned Scientists, a Cambridge advocacy
group that represents thousands of scientists around the
country, noted Trump recently
falsely told a British broadcaster that polar ice caps were not
melting but “setting records.”
“He desperately needs a science adviser in the White
House to set him straight on
basic scientific facts and ensure
that science factors into decision-making,” Kimmell said.
“However, one science adviser
can’t undo all the damage that
is being caused by budget cuts
to scientific research, the dismissal of academic scientists
from government advisory
commissions, the deletion of
scientific information from
agency websites, and the clear
message from above that certain topics, such as climate
change, cannot be freely discussed.”
Some wondered whether
Trump has any interest in science at all.
Rush D. Holt, a physicist
and former congressman who
leads the American Association
for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest scientific society, said every president should have a science adviser.
“The most serious problems
come when there is a president
who willfully ignores and does
not have any apparent interest
in science or in seeking credible
information and advice from
scientists,” Holt said.
For his par t , Holdren is
working with Holt and others
to promote science and push
back against the Trump administration when it takes actions
or makes statements that contradict scientific findings.
Rather than settling quietly
back into his academic career,
Holdren has given speeches,
written essays, and drummed
up opposition to what he describes as the Trump administration’s “assault on science.”
“ We’re tr ying to replace
what Trump is cutting, while
responding to his indignities,”
he said. “The stakes are high.
There’s a danger that the United States could lose its leadership in science and technology.”
David Abel can be reached at
dabel@globe.com. Follow him
on Twitter @davabel.
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W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Region
A11
‘You could tell by the
sound and the feel of it
if something was wrong.’
DICK ANGOTTI
A former longtime mill employee speaking
about the mill’s Number 11 paper
machine — once the world’s largest
A small Maine town plots its comeback
uFARRAGHER
Continued from Page A1
f e w y e a r s l a t e r, r e s i d e n t s
watched with disbelief. It was
the painful end of an era. And
the lights on the little white
bandstand on Penobscot Avenue, brightly lit for Christmas,
went dark. Seemingly for good.
“ When I was a kid, the
downtown’s bandstand was like
the cultural center of our community,’’ said Sean DeWitt,
whose father worked at the paper mill here for 42 years.
While at a conference in Peru a couple of years ago, bored
and with time on his hands, DeWitt built a website in an hour
and asked for donations. The
dark bandstand was a metaphor for his beloved hometown
so he sent this message: Let’s
brighten Millinocket again.
“Twenty hours later, we had
raised $650 to buy the lights,’’
DeWitt, 42, said. “Messages
poured in like, ‘You have no
idea how much this means to
me.’ This was small. It was microscopic. But it was a win.’’
DeWitt is president of Our
Katahdin, a community and
economic redevelopment
group led by the sons and
daughters of paper mill employees who are determined to
save the little town their forebears built.
A year ago, they purchased
the 1,400-acre mill site for $1.
They are negotiating with the
IRS for partial forgiveness of
$1.4 million in back taxes. They
want to take economic baby
steps. The days of the 4,000worker mills are gone. The future? Think seven or eight businesses where 100 or 200 employees fuel a more diverse and
resilient economy.
“If people think we’re going
to bring the kinds of jobs back
that we had in the 1950 s, I
would say the chance of success
is precisely zero,’’ DeWitt told
me. “We have to embrace the
world as it is. We still have the
transmission lines from the
dams. We still have affordable
power. We have a cool climate
for data centers. We have some
things that nobody on the East
Coast has.
“Boy, there’s a different feeling around town now.’’
You can feel that sitting in
the conference room at a handsome refurbished building on
Millinocket’s main street, an
old, red-brick former Odd Fellows hall that now houses
Designlab, a graphic design
and marketing firm run by Jessica Masse and her husband,
John Hafford.
They’ve got two young kids,
sterling resumes, an impressive
PHOTOS BY KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Above, the town of
Millinocket, Maine.
Mike Osborne (left), vice
president of Our Katahdin,
says the paper company
“took care of us for 100
years. We have to take care
of the next 100 years.’’
list of clients, and a strong Internet connection that grants
them access to business far
from the woods of Maine.
As Masse sat at a large
wooden table in that conference room the other morning,
she nodded as members of the
Our Katahdin group talked
about the bracing realities of rebuilding an economy from the
ashes of an old paper mill.
“We are still fragile as a community, but I have no doubt
that we will recover,’’ Masse
said. “Before they lit the lights
on that bandstand in 2015, we
were thinking of leaving. It was
so negative around here. But
that made the difference for us.
We wanted to stay. That tipped
the scales. People just need a little bit of hope.’’
Optimism like that will
come in handy considering the
task at hand. Since 2000, the
town’s population has declined
by about 16 percent to about
4,500 and grown older. Its median age in 2015 was 48. Its
median income is about
$30,000 a year.
“The community has gone
through a whole succession of
letdown after letdown,’’ said
Mike Osborne, Our Katahdin’s
vice president and a fifth-generation Mainer. “Great Northern
took care of us for 100 years.
We have to take care of the next
100 years.’’
The first new building block
toward rebirth slipped into
place on Tuesday when officials
announced a Maine-based
firm, a manufacturer of crosslaminated timber, is moving to
the old mill site, bringing 100
jobs with it.
Great Northern’s skeleton is
all that’s left of the old mill, a
vast industrial site — thick with
ice these days — patrolled by a
single security guard.
This place once accounted
for 72 percent of the town’s tax
revenues. Now, the old administration building sits cold and
empty, the plaster on its walls
crumbling. The old time clock
is long gone. There are rooms
with empty desks and lonesome coat hangers. Speakers
for an old intercom system
hang silently on the peeling
walls.
As we toured the dark, cavernous building that used to
house the Number 11 paper
machine — once the world’s
largest — Dick Angotti lets his
mind drift back to the days
when he was a young man on
the job here, when the sounds
of machines pumping out paper was Millinocket’s moneymaking metronome.
“I can still hear it,’’ said An-
gotti, 67, who now works for a
wood-products engineering
firm. “It had a voice of its own.
You could tell by the sound and
the feel of it if something was
wrong. My goal is to turn the
lights back on. I refuse to retire
until I can see something happening here.’’
Town Manager John Davis
worked in the mill here for 30
years and can remember the
days when human resources
employees would patrol the
town’s bars and restaurants to
recruit workers for the mill’s
’round-the-clock shifts.
He envisions a new
Millinocket economy fueled by
biotech businesses and data
centers and solar plants. “I haven’t been this optimistic about
Millinocket since I got out of
high school,’’ said Davis.
From the sidelines, Our Katahdin has a faithful cheering
section packed by pensioners,
some of whom sit in Dick Manzo’s well-heated garage in the
town’s Little Italy section, within sight of the mill where the
86-year-old spent his working
life.
These days Manzo holds
court, spinning stories about
the old days and twisting the
arm of a visitor to have a little
nip of the anisette that he keeps
handy amid the wrenches and
saws and lathes of his workplace.
He worked with Sean DeWitt’s grandfather at the Great
Northern Paper Company.
“We know these young people who are trying to get this
town back on its feet,’’ Manzo
told me. “And they’re just as
s i nc e r e a s t h e y a re s ma r t .
They ’re going to bring this
place back to life. I just know
they are.’’
In the chair next to him Wally Paul, 62, who used to operate
the paper mill’s power system,
offered his own yardstick by
which success should be measured.
“The thing I want to see?’’
asked Paul. “Baby carriages. I
want to see young parents
pushing baby carriages in
town, because that’s the sign of
prosperity. You have jobs. That
means young people are working again. That means raising
families. That means more kids
are going to our schools. More
businesses are selling things to
more people. Baby carriages.
That’s what we need.’’
Hours later, as the dusk
gathered outside the windows
of the downtown Scootic In
Restaurant, I sat across the table from Deb Rountree. Across
the street, the bandstand stood
snow-covered and, with Christmas now over, unlighted.
Rountree is the associate academic dean at the Katahdin
Region Higher Education Center. She’s a 1980 graduate of
Stearns High School here,
whose father and grandfather
worked for Great Northern. She
knows there were two sides of
the old system’s benevolence.
With an abundance of jobs
came this curse: an atrophied
entrepreneurial spirit.
“We can’t stand to lose a lot
more,’’ she said. “Everything is
kind of hanging in the balance.
It was beautiful here. All the
buildings were well-maintained and well-kept, and people took pride in this place.
That’s the most painful part of
this: people losing that sense of
pride. I’d love to see a lovely,
lively, beautiful main street.
But this could go a couple of
different ways. We need a few
small wins.’’
And as she sipped her coffee,
there was no traffic on the main
street, Penobscot Avenue. No
cars. No people. No baby carriages.
Not yet.
Thomas Farragher is a Globe
columnist. He can be reached at
thomas.farragher@globe.com.
With contracts, employers try to keep office romances all business
uLOVE CONTRACTS
Continued from Page A1
now companies are willing to
look past that.”
Big companies are more
likely than smaller businesses
to have dating policies. At Facebook and Google, employees
are allowed to ask a co-worker
out only once, according to
news reports. If they are turned
down, they can’t ask again, reflecting Equal Opportunity Employment Commission guidance that asking people out repeatedly can constitute
harassment.
A number of companies
around Boston declined to talk
about their policies. At Fidelity
Investments, where two fund
managers were embroiled in
sexual harassment allegations
last fall, prompting chief executive Abigail Johnson to move
her office in order to keep a
closer eye on her workforce, senior employees may not date
anyone they manage or whose
career they could substantially
impact.
And it’s not just private companies getting involved in their
employees’ private lives. Just
last week, the US House of Representatives voted to prohibit
sexual relationships between
lawmakers and staffers under
their supervision.
In a day and age when consent apps can be used to document if a person has agreed to
have sexual relations, and accounts of coerced hookups end
up splashed online, it’s clear
that dating has become more
fraught for everyone.
But the #MeToo movement,
and ensuing rule-tightening,
may be making co-workers especially cautious about dating.
Over the past decade, about 40
percent of people surveyed annually by the employment site
CareerBuilder said they had
dated a co-worker. At the end of
last year, the number dropped
to 36 percent — a 10-year low.
Men have also become more
cautious about office romance,
according to a new annual poll
by the workplace rankings com-
pany Vault, which found that
for the first time in six years,
men were more likely than
women to find any workplace
relationship unacceptable.
Love contracts are still relatively uncommon — one workplace consultancy estimates
that less than 17 percent of
companies require co-workers
to report that they are dating.
But 45 percent of respondents
to the Vault survey said they
were aware that their companies had some kind of office romance policy, up from 24 percent in 2013.
“Companies have to walk a
fine line because they don’t
want to be the love police, but
they do have to be careful,” said
Mark Whitney, an employment
lawyer in Marblehead who specializes in representing executives. “ You don’ t want love
spats spilling over into the
workplace.”
In the past year, Whitney
has had four clients who were
asked to sign love contracts after it was discovered that they
were involved with a co-worker
— while they were married to
other people. In one case, involving two executives at a major corporation in the Boston
area, the company asked the
employees to sign a love contract after the affair came to
light.
A few years ago, the employer probably wouldn’t have reacted so aggressively, Whitney
said. And it can backfire. When
couples are asked to sign love
contracts, one or both of them
often ends up leaving the company, he said.
“People are usually not terribly happy when they sign these
things,” he said. “They don’t
love that their personal lives are
being memorialized in a corporate document.”
Human resources consultant Jay Starkman is not a fan
of love contracts for that very
reason: “It certainly is a morale
killer. ‘I’m having a relationship
and I’ve got to go sign a contract about it.’ ”
A company policy requiring
love contracts could also potentially stifle harassment complaints if a victim is reluctant to
come forward because he or she
didn’t report the relationship.
Forbidding dating all together is even sillier, said Starkman,
who runs Engage PEO in Fort
Lauderdale. “It’s like prohibition. People are just going to
drink behind the scenes.”
Companies that have had to
deal with ugly co-worker breakups or harassment lawsuits
tend to be more proactive about
having employees sign love contracts, employment lawyers say.
These documents can be helpful in resolving allegations
raised against a company by
showing that the employer was
trying to protect and inform
employees about the rules surrounding the relationship.
“I don’t necessarily think it
wins the day [in court], but it’s
a helpful fact,” said Habinsky,
who, like other employment
lawyers interviewed, had never
used one in court.
Beyond protecting the com-
pany, love contracts can protect
workers, too, said Clarence Belnavis, an employment lawyer at
Fisher Phillips in Seattle and
Portland, by letting them know
human resources is open to addressing any potential problems and takes the issue seriously.
“Sitting down and having
these conversations with folks
lets people know that any complaints are going to be welcome,” he said. “I think it’s a
very empowering conversation.”
L ove contrac ts can also
m a ke f o r a n a m u s i n g p l o t
point.
At Dunder Mifflin, the fictional paper company on the
TV show “The Office,” Michael
is so thrilled to sign one with
his boss, Jan, that he does so
with flourish — and dots his “i”
with a heart.
Katie Johnston can be reached
at katie.johnston@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@ktkjohnston.
A12
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
The path of
national fiscal
folly
P
resident Trump’s new budget serves at least
one purpose beyond that of doorstop:
Viewed through a realistic lens, it helps
highlight the worsening fiscal dilemma this nation now faces.
If you assume that those parts of the new tax cut
package that ostensibly expire in December 2025 are
extended, as are other tax cuts, and that the recent
spending agreement establishes a new budgetary baseline, those policies will add $4.5 trillion more to the national debt over a decade, according to the Committee
for a Responsible Federal Budget.
Add that to the debt we were already racking up before those policies, and the total effect would swell the
national debt to $30 trillion, or an estimated 109 percent of Gross Domestic Product by the end of the next
decade. That would surpass the previous highest debtto-GDP ratio, which came in the aftermath of World
War II.
The Trump administration disguises those effects
through a series of gimmicks and legerdemain. For example, they are assuming that the economy will grow
at about 3 percent annually for the next decade, and
that the president will achieve a reduction in domestic
spending of more than 40 percent over the same period.
How realistic is that? Most forecasters, including
the Congressional Budget Office, consider 2 percent a
far more likely average rate of growth. (At that lower
growth rate, the national debt grows an additional
Trump, who once spoke of
balancing the budget over two
terms, has now abandoned that
talk; similarly, this budget discards
his promise not to cut Medicare or
Medicaid.
$3.1 trillion over 10 years.) As for the budget cuts, the
president is assuming that Congress will have the
stomach for those large spending reductions, when in
fact it has just passed — and he has just signed off on —
a significant increase in both domestic and military
spending.
Trump, who once spoke of balancing the budget
over two terms, has now abandoned that talk; similarly, this budget discards his promise not to cut Medicare
or Medicaid.
All this should surprise no one. Despite the usual
supply-side palaver that the $1.5 trillion tax cut would
pay for itself, no credible estimate, whether static or
dynamic, has projected anything close. Almost all put
the 10-year revenue loss at above $1 trillion. Meanwhile, last week’s budget deal, if it becomes the new
baseline, would add $1.7 trillion, over a decade, to expenditures.
The fiscal framework has things for both sides of
the aisle: more military spending favored by conservatives, more domestic spending favored by Democrats,
including longer-term funding for the Children’s
Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.
But it is hugely violative of this basic fiscal axiom:
Unless budget expenditures are for long-term investments that will pay societal dividends over succeeding
generations, in good economic times, those expenditures should be paid for as they are made.
No one knows exactly where the tipping point into
economic and fiscal turbulence is when it comes to a
national debt overload. But there is widespread agreement on several principles. First, over the longer term,
the national debt shouldn’t increase at a faster rate
than the economy. Further, the higher a country’s debtto-GDP ratio, the more limited its range of response
when the next economic downturn comes. The need to
service a large debt also makes the budget shakier
when interest rates increase. And finally, by increasing
the debt load on future generations for today’s spending, we are limiting their lifestyle to expand our own.
The country’s current fiscal policy has become farcical. The tax cut obviously needs to be revisited. And
some sort of spending restrictions need to be reimposed to start to narrow the currently widening gap
between spending and revenue.
Yes, there will be some pain involved, but a nation
neglects its current finances only at its very real future
peril.
abcde
Fo u n d e d 1 8 7 2
JOHN W. HENRY
Publisher
BRIAN McGRORY
Editor
VINAY MEHRA
President
ELLEN CLEGG
Editor, Editorial Page
LINDA PIZZUTI HENRY
Managing Director
JEFF JACOBY
The
Tea
Party,
RIP
I
admired the Tea Party. I regarded it as the most impressive American grass-roots political movement in my adult
life. I cheered its rise to influence in 2009 and 2010, applauded its
focus on curbing government’s exploding budgets and trillion-dollar deficits,
and shared its opposition to the massive overreach of the Affordable Care
Act. I defended it against scurrilous attacks from unhinged liberals, who demonized its members as segregationists, terrorists, and arsonists.
And now I mourn its demise.
To be honest, the Tea Party has
been a dead letter for a while. Its political high-water mark came in the 2010
midterm elections, when Republicans
picked up 63 US House seats in a
sweeping landslide. Its greatest policy
achievement was the “sequestration”
agreement and Budget Control Act of
2011, when President Obama was
compelled to accept across-the-board
reductions in discretionary spending
in exchange for getting Congress to approve an increase in the federal debt
limit.
Alas, party politics proved fatal to
the movement. “Inertia pulled us toward partisanship,” writes Matt Kibbe,
an early Tea Party organizer, “and over
time there was growing pressure to
support the party, not our principles.”
Consequently, not much was left of the
Tea Party afflatus after Mitt Romney’s
GLOBE STAFF/
ADOBE STOCK
presidential campaign of 2012, and
what little vitality it had left was completely drained by Donald Trump’s
hostile takeover of the Republican Party four years later. “Under Trump,”
Kibbe concedes sadly, “the Tea Party
original agenda of freedom and fiscal
responsibility has been replaced with a
populist nationalism that doesn’t particularly prize spending restraint.”
If there were any lingering doubt
on that score, it was wiped out by last
week’s bipartisan budget binge — a
$400 billion debauch of new spending
that makes a mockery of everything
Republicans have ever said about the
need for fiscal discipline and how
they’re the party to impose it. This
wasn’t a budget forced on a GOP bargaining from a position of weakness; it
was a deal embraced by the party that
controls both houses of Congress and
the White House.
What an abomination.
When Obama was president, Republicans — spurred by Tea Party activists demanding more individual
freedom and fiscal integrity — loudly
sang the praises of balanced budgets
and smaller deficits.
“We have a debt crisis staring us in
the face,” Paul Ryan told “Meet the
Press” in 2011, when he was the
House Budget Committee chairman.
“The problem we have is spending,
not taxes. We’ve got to get our spending under control because that’s the
root cause of our problem.” In those
days, Ryan was a Tea Party hero. Back
then, Democrats venomously denounced him for warning that the giant entitlement programs were devouring the federal budget and had to
be reined in.
Now Ryan is just another profligate
GOP spender, one in a long line of Republican deficit hawks whose squawk,
impressively fierce, turned out to be
mostly for show.
It’s an old scam, and many earnest
voters always fall for it. Those Tea Party rallies in 2009 and 2010 were electric with grass-roots enthusiasm;
when voters surged to the polls to elect
Republican candidates, they believed
they were empowering a party that
agreed government was too costly and
overbearing. Fifteen years earlier, voters had believed the same thing. In
1994, Newt Gingrich and his band of
GOP insurgents swept to power behind their “Contract with America,”
vowing an end to “government that is
too big, too intrusive, and too easy
with the public’s money.” Yet then as
now, the spirit of reform didn’t stand a
chance. Government got bigger. Insurgents were co-opted. And Republicans
forfeited their moral authority.
America is drowning in red ink,
and the national debt — $20.5 trillion
and rising by the week — is an onrushing calamity. The Tea Party really
cared about that threat, and for one
brief, shining moment, so did the Republican Party. But the moment
passed, and power corrupted.
Jeff Jacoby can be reached at
jacoby@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @jeff_jacoby.
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Opinion
A13
Inbox
Strong case is made
for challenging our DAs
SCOT LEHIGH
Today’s GOP through two sets
of Republican eyes
T
ime was, when you
thought of the Republican
Party, a clear-cut set of
principles came to mind.
No, the rhetoric wasn’t always in synch with the reality, but you
had some idea where the party’s conceptual compass pointed: toward freer
markets, freer trade, smaller government, lower taxes, fiscal discipline, and
traditional values.
But we have now arrived at this unsettled moment in politics. The GOP
has emerged as America’s governing —
or rather, trying-to-govern — party
with its marquee principles in at least
short-term inversion and quite possibly in longer-term transformation.
The December tax cut and the February spending deal, which have put
the nation on a course to rack up $3
trillion to $4 trillion in new debt over a
decade, render risible any claims of fiscal responsibility, revealing a decade of
rhetoric about spending restraint and
debt dangers as mere camouflage in
the battle against Barack Obama. Tax
cuts still matter, of course, but fiscal
discipline and smaller government?
They’ve flown the coop.
It goes without saying that a party
with a protectionist president can’t
credibly say it favors free trade. And for
all its religiosity, the party’s moral-values wing has barely shrugged at President Trump’s reported affair with, and
payoff to, an adult film actress. Presidential character apparently doesn’t
matter as long as a president gets his
judicial picks (hard) right.
Curious about how all that sits with
longtime GOP stalwarts, I reached out
to two people who are each the “Mr. Republican” of their states, former New
Hampshire attorney general Tom Rath,
a past Republican National Committeeman and a Granite State mainstay of
many a presidential campaign, and
Massachusetts’ longtime Republican
National Committeeman Ron Kaufman, who served as political director
for President George H.W. Bush.
Rath sees his party through a glass
starkly.
“There are people I talk to every day
who are shaking their heads,” Rath
said. “The party has gone in a very different direction from one that is recognized by longtime Republicans.”
Not so Kaufman. “I believe we are
the party of civil rights, the party of
smaller government, with smaller deficits, and the party of a strong defense,”
he said.
Let’s give Kaufman (and Rath, who
also makes it) the strong-on-defense
argument. But no matter its distant
history, it’s hard to see how a party
whose president traffics in racial resentments that are a dog whistle to the
alt-right can be viewed as the champion of civil rights. Does Kaufman think
Trump has done a good job of rejecting
those forces?
“No, of course not,” he said. But
“our party has, yes.” And yet, later in
our conversation, Kaufman himself
conceded that the GOP’s “single biggest problem is that we are perceived
to be the party of intolerance.”
Further, can a party returning us to
trillion-dollar annual deficits credibly
claim to be the party of fiscal responsibility? “How can you, with this budget?” asked Rath, referencing last
week’s congressional spending deal.
“I don’t like the fact that the debt is
growing,” said Kaufman. “That has
been a problem for way too long for
both parties.” Except that Bill Clinton
presided over the last three budget surpluses. And Obama’s big increase in
the national debt came in considerable
part because the Great Recession
sheared away millions of jobs and badly depressed revenues. The GOP debt
acceleration, contrariwise, is taking
place during a strong economy.
Kaufman, who sees it all as degrees
of gray, seems OK with the change.
“All parties evolve and change as
time passes and different issues come
up,” he said.
Rath, by contrast, clearly rues the
GOP’s metamorphosis. Is he discouraged about his party?
“Well, I’ve been happier,” he said.
“But I am enough of a fossil to believe
that there will be another chapter or
two here.”
Scot Lehigh can be reached at
lehigh@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeScotLehigh.
RENÉE GRAHAM
When it comes to race, Boston
keeps punching itself
N
ote to all future mayors:
Leading Boston means
having to say you’re
sorry.
Mayor Martin J.
Walsh apologized again for a racially
insensitive incident in our city, or as
my black out-of-state friends call it,
“Boston being Boston.” In a tone-deaf
tweet to “honor” Black History Month,
the Boston Police Department
celebrated former Celtics coach Red
Auerbach for, among other things,
being the first NBA coach to draft a
black player.
The social media verdict was swift
and correct. Only in Boston would a
police department mark Black History
Month by recognizing a white man.
Black folks can’t even have 28 measly
days to themselves. On Monday, Walsh
tried to wipe clean this latest smudge
on the city’s tarnished reputation.
The mayor called the police
department’s tweet “completely
inappropriate and a gross
misrepresentation” of the city’s
observation of Black History Month. “I
am personally committing to the
people of Boston that we will always
honor our black leaders, activists, and
trailblazers with the respect they
deserve, not just in February, but every
day and every month of the year.”
Even in a month designated to
recognize black excellence, people of
color can’t get the respect they deserve
in Boston.
Savaged on social media, BPD
claimed its “intentions were never to
I want to thank Yvonne Abraham for her column about our
elected district attorneys in this state (“It matters who the
DA is,” Metro, Feb. 8). Many voters don’t even realize that
DAs hold an elected position and are subject to challenge.
With the opioid crisis in full bloom, it has become obvious that we need our police and district attorneys to partner with the communities they serve. While it is integral to
the job of prosecuting criminals for the police and DAs to
be allies, prosecutors must also serve as a guiding hand
where they see economic and racial disparity in law enforcement.
Poverty, more than the nature of the crime committed,
often determines who sits in jail awaiting trial, because
people with money can come up with a few hundred dollars
to get released, while those with no means are held, sometimes for months. Imagine the costs to one’s job security,
the effects on people’s kids, and other impacts that occur
when an unconvicted individual awaiting trial sits in jail.
The DA can decide whether a bail request is necessary.
This should not be a rote decision, because losing one’s
freedom and being locked up is an extreme consequence
for any person.
It is a great idea to get to know your district attorney
and to let those running the show of prosecuting criminals
know that they, like the police, serve the people in their
communities, both to protect us from crime, but also to
prevent unnecessary, costly, and life-altering incarceration.
KATHERINE ROSSMOORE
Marshfield
The writer is an attorney.
What if DAs were appointed
instead of elected?
Yvonne Abraham is exactly right — it matters very much
who the district attorney is. From Cape Cod to Pittsfield,
DAs make huge decisions that affect families and communities, and their ideas on policy make a big difference on
Beacon Hill. It’s quite likely, for example, that Massachusetts might be doing more on criminal justice reform, and
might have decriminalized marijuana sooner, if not for the
political clout of the DAs.
The American Civil Liberties Union and other groups
are working to bring attention to DAs so that community
members can hold them accountable. This effort is noble,
but it’s probably doomed to fail unless we reform the way
Massachusetts chooses DAs.
Busy citizens have too much to do to study, say, Suffolk
District Attorney Dan Conley’s management decisions. On
Election Day, they have other fish to fry, from holding accountable governors and presidents to choosing their state
representatives.
Today’s historic low crime level is causing people to
want wisdom and balance from DAs. However, it might not
take much of an increase in crime rates for voters to lean
heavily to the most punitive prosecutors around, regardless
of whether that is really good policy.
There’s a better way. District attorneys could be civil service appointees, selected by the governor. Governors are accountable to the people, and unlike district attorneys, there
hasn’t been a governor who has run unopposed in the modern history of Massachusetts.
AVI GREEN
Cambridge
The writer is executive director of the Scholars Strategy
Network. His views here are his own.
Trump budget offers an antidote
for failed Democratic policies
Since when has going to work become such anathema? It
seems to me that the subheadline, “Spending plan aims to
put more recipients to work,” should have been the Globe’s
choice as its lead headline on Tuesday’s front page instead
of “President seeks to cut safety net programs.” The Globe’s
rabid anti-Trump views mirror failed Democratic, leftist
policies. Is it any wonder the heartland of America thrust
Donald Trump into the presidency over continuing Barack
Obama’s welfare-state, America-last views — views that
would have continued if Hillary Clinton had assumed the
office?
Health Connector and the
Massachusetts Lottery, still pulled their
ads from WEEI. Perhaps hitting that
station in the wallet might curb its
race-baiting ways, since absolutely
nothing else has prevailed. If sports
radio is generally a cesspool, WEEI is
certainly its deepest end.
And while I’m calling out BPD and
WEEI, let me also jab the Globe.
Inexplicably and against company
Boston spends a lot of time trying — and failing — to
outrun a history of insensitivity toward people of color.
offend,” then honored Celtics legend
Bill Russell. Still, Boston again made
national headlines for all the wrong
reasons, and at a time when
sensibilities were already frayed.
Sports radio station WEEI last week
suspended one of its hosts, Christian
Fauria, for mocking Don Yee, an AsianAmerican and agent for New England
Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.
Fauria imitated his idea of an “Asian”
accent, an ugly stereotype reminiscent
of white actor Mickey Rooney’s
“yellowface” performance in “Breakfast
at Tiffany’s.”
Fauria apologized, but Comcast,
City of Boston Credit Union, and two
state agencies, the Massachusetts
DAs should bring guiding hand to
cases where disparity plays a role
policy last week, a sports section
headline used the term “illegal alien” to
describe the suspect in a drunk driving
crash that killed an Indianapolis Colts
player and his Uber driver. To describe
a human being as “illegal” is an
anachronism expected on right-wing
outlets like Fox News and Breitbart,
not in a mainstream newspaper.
All American cities and towns
harbor racism and cultural callousness.
In 2016, a Philadelphia radio station
fired a sports talk host with a history of
making hateful comments. This week,
a Chicago television station blamed a
graphics “mix-up” for a Winter
Olympics story illustrated with “P.F.
Chang 2018.” The Games are being
hosted by Pyeongchang, South Korea;
P.F. Chang’s is an Asian-themed
restaurant chain.
Yet no city wears its self-inflicted
wounds like Boston. In a city
intoxicated with its illustrious past,
Boston spends a lot of time trying —
and failing — to outrun a history of
insensitivity toward people of color.
Even when Boston gets it right, like the
Red Sox choosing Alex Cora, the team’s
first manager of color, or electing a city
council with six women of color, this
city will never get as much praise as it
gets derision when things go off the
rails.
No, Mayor Walsh can’t control
what happens on a sports radio station
or those who tweet before they think.
But, at some point, Boston has to stop
punching itself in the face. Incidents
are always amplified because here,
racism never murmurs. It’s a piercing
shriek confirming what so many
justifiably believe about our city’s
ongoing struggles.
Especially in this era of outrageprone social media, there are those
always waiting for Boston’s next racial
misstep. Lately, and perhaps too true
to form, Boston isn’t making them wait
too long.
Renée Graham can be reached at
renee.graham@globe.com. Follow her
on Twitter @reneeygraham.
JAMES KEENEY
Boston
Those Republicans — fiscal
conservatives? Don’t think so
When Willie Sutton was asked why he robbed banks, he’s
said to have answered, “That’s where the money is.” “Sutton’s law” can be extended to a discussion of the national
debt. Hypocritical Republicans talk a good game regarding debt, but they keep adding to it — with a tax cut and a
budget proposal amounting to trillions of dollars. This is
not surprising, since for an influential part of their constituency, debt is much better than its alternative.
If the government wants to spend money, it has to get
the money somewhere. Let’s apply Sutton’s law: You get it
from those who have it. There are only two ways: Confiscate it in the form of taxes or borrow it with a promise to
pay it back, with interest.
If you were a fat cat Republican donor, which would
you prefer?
JON PLOTKIN
Hull
Front­page wordplay is a slam­dunk
OK, I certainly appreciate the Globe’s more serious efforts
at news reporting, but sometimes you just have to tip your
hat to the little things done well. Monday’s tiny front-page
weather headline, “Pall pierced,” on the morning after the
former Celtic’s No. 34 was raised in celebration at the Garden, was indeed a good one.
JIM FATHY
Newton
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A decade after major companies
abandoned Boston, big businesses are
flocking back in droves. What changed?
A leading economist, Isenberg’s Robert Nakosteen, explains why the region is
now pulling companies in after years of driving them away.
BY CHUCK LEDDY
T
here was a time not long ago when the
from suburbia into cities,” he says. “Jeff Immelt,
talk in Boston was all about why so many
the former CEO of GE, said he didn’t like looking
big businesses were being swallowed up
out of his Fairfield, Connecticut office window
and moving their headquarters — from
and seeing only wooded area. He wanted to see
FleetBoston Financial to John Hancock
a city instead.”
Insurance to Gillette.
Boston’s walkability and livability attracted GE,
It’s a very different conversation today. Hardly a
just as it attracts other big businesses.
week passes when a tech giant or biopharmaceutical
Nakosteen also cites Boston’s unique business
company or startup announces that it’s relocating to
ecosystem, one that fosters innovation in cutting-
Greater Boston — or considering it as a new home.
edge industries like healthcare and technology.
General Electric is moving its global headquarters
This ecosystem includes dozens of renowned
from Fairfield, Connecticut to Fort Point, Amazon
research universities, clusters of innovative
has put Boston on its shortlist of cities for a sec-
companies, and a highly-educated workforce.
ond global headquarters, and Vertex, part of the
region’s booming biotech sector, opened its $800
the Seaport. “When firms doing specific kinds of
million global headquarters on the South Boston
When high-profile big
waterfront in 2014, just to name a few examples.
businesses make highly-
So what changed in one short decade?
A wide-ranging conversation with one of the leading experts on the Commonwealth’s economy,
Professor Robert Nakosteen of The Isenberg
publicized moves to Boston,
as with GE, it also enhances
business like healthcare and tech are using specific kinds of labor pools,” Nakosteen says, “they
cross-pollinate, coming together for the benefit of
all of those companies.”
That allows for a sharing of ideas, employees,
and suppliers, and helps everyone grow together,
School of Management at UMass Amherst,
the area’s reputation as a
Nakosteen says.
provides insight into where the state has been —
global business center.
The most obvious benefit, says Nakosteen, is hard
and where it’s going. As the executive editor of
MassBenchmarks, Nakosteen produces a quarterly
economic journal that studies data and trends in
the Massachusetts economy — and as a result,
nobody knows it better than he does.
Why They Come
The Benefits
to overstate: Jobs.“GE has promised to bring 800
“GE moved to Boston in part because they wanted
to refashion themselves as a cutting-edge technology company,” Nakosteen says, “so locating to a
world-class tech center like Boston fit perfectly
For starters, Boston has a number of traits that
with that goal.”
distinguish it in ways that are attractive to today’s
Greater Boston has a number of “innovation clus-
corporate culture, Nakosteen says.
ters,” such as biotech in Kendall Square and soft-
“First, there’s been a trend for companies to move
ware/tech startups in the Innovation District by
employees into its new headquarters,” he says.
“Amazon has promised to bring 50,000 jobs to the
READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT
GLOBE.COM/ISENBERG
WHAT DOES BUILDING
THE NBA’S FAN BASE
HAVE IN COMMON WITH
COMBATING FRAUD RISK?
DRIVE.
From connecting world-class partners with the NBA
to tackling the business risks and challenges of a
global client base, there’s no limit to where drive
can take someone. Because at Isenberg, drive is
constantly challenged, and channeled into hugely
successful careers that take our alumni to the
highest levels of the business world and beyond.
LI LI LEUNG ’03
MBA/MS, Business and Sport Management
WE DRIVE
THE DRIVEN.
VP, Global Partnerships, NBA
TONY JORDAN ’95
Bachelor of Business Administration, Accounting
Partner at EY, Fraud Investigator
®
UMASS AMHERST
drivethedriven.com
Business
The milkman is back,
hitching a ride on the
food­delivery bandwagon
PAGES B11­14
For breaking news, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/business
Airbnb rules elude council; measure worries landlords
Charles River Labs buying Mich. firm in $800m deal
LEUNG: Hitting WEEI where it hurts — in the wallet
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T H E B O S T O N GL OB E W EDN E S DAY, F E B RUARY 14 , 2 01 8 | B O S T O NG L O B E .C O M / M E T R O
Adrian Walker
Tweet does
city no favors
“Of course — Boston.”
That was a headline in
The New York Times after
Adam Jones was called
the n-word by a fan at
Fenway Park last May, in
an incident that prompted widespread local soulsearching.
The underlying idea was that if something
so tawdry was going to happen in the arena of
sports, it was entirely predictable it would happen here. You’d like to call that a cynical, outdated sense of what Boston is like. But then you
encounter whoever runs the Boston Police Department’s Twitter feed and you find yourself
forced to reconsider.
As you’re probably heard by now, the department — as part of its Black History Month
observance — tweeted a picture of Boston Celtics patriarch Red Auerbach’s statue, with a
glowing tribute to all Auerbach had done for
African-Americans. As the tweet noted, he
signed the first black player in NBA history
(Chuck Cooper), named the first black head
coach (Bill Russell), and fielded the league’s
first all-black starting lineup.
Reaction was swift when the tweet went up
Sunday night, and it wasn’t positive. Unfortunately, the BPD wasn’t done embarrassing itself. Someone took the down the tweet, but in
doing so posted an apology widely condemned
as inadequate.
Among the publicly aggrieved was Boston
NAACP President Tanisha Sullivan. She pointed to the recent Globe Spotlight Team series on
race (to which I contributed). The series posed
the question of whether Boston continues to
deserve its reputation as unwelcoming to black
people. “That question was posed very intentionally,” Sullivan said. “It is moments like
these that require us to say yes.”
Let’s get this out of the way: This controversy is not about Red Auerbach himself. In the
same era in which the crosstown Boston Red
Sox organization resisted change with all its
might, the Celtics were the polar opposite.
But it’s Black History Month for a reason —
that reason being to honor the contributions of
those leaders, often African-Americans who are
marginalized, who otherwise risk being written
out of history. If you think Auerbach has been
denied his due in this town, we can meet at his
statue near Faneuil Hall and talk it over. Red
was an icon, but he fails every test of a good
Black History Month tweet.
Sullivan said the department should have
focused on the black players who broke the
barriers Auerbach was credited with shattering. “There was a way to celebrate sports history while also educating people about the men
who actually broke those barriers.”
Both Mayor Marty Walsh and Police Commissioner William Evans were slow to react to
the problem. Sullivan and Walsh spoke Monday morning.
Walsh put out a statement just before noon.
“We are celebrating the accomplishments
and limitless contributions of the Black community to our city and the entire country, from
Harriet Tubman to great leaders of today such
as (former) Chief Justice Roderick Ireland, artists like New Edition and Michael Bivins, powerful activists including Mel King and Superintendent Lisa Holmes, the first African-American woman to lead the Boston Police Academy
training program,” the statement said. “I am
personally committing to the people of Boston
that we will always honor our Black leaders, activists and trailblazers with the respect they deserve, not just in February, but every day and
every month of the year.”
Well thanks, mayor. But it shouldn’t be a revelation that a city — especially this city — might
want to honor black people during Black History Month. Once again, the city’s painful image
and tortured reality have managed to coincide.
Adrian Walker is a Globe columnist. He can be
reached at adrian.walker@globe.com.
LONGING FOR PEACE AT HOME
Koreans in Boston area eye Olympics with cautious optimism
By Brian MacQuarrie
GLOBE STAFF
Hee K. Yoon left northern Korea
as a young child in 1947, when his
family fled south from the Communists. Seventy years later, Yoon’s
homeland remains divided, and he
sees reunification as only a distant
hope.
Still, the sight of a joint Korean
team at the Winter Olympics in
PyeongChang has heartened him
with hope that perhaps the peninsula someday will live under one
flag — just as the Korean athletes,
north and south, marched into the
Opening Ceremonies under one
banner.
“Hopefully, this will be the first
step. Confrontation is not a good
thing,” Yoon said after lunch at a
Korean restaurant in Allston.
Although Yoon, who has lived in
the United States since 1973, said
the unified Korean team could be a
harbinger of dialogue between the
bitter neighbors, he acknowledged
that many Koreans are skeptical of
what they see as a propaganda ploy
by Kim Jong-un, the North Korean
dictator.
“He has to find a way to survive
and hang on for a few more years,”
Yoon said.
That wariness, tinged with
KOREA, Page B6
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
‘Hopefully, this
will be the first
step.’
HEE K. YOON, speaking
of a joint Korean team at
the Winter Olympics
BED OF ROSES
DAVID L RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Telly Sanxaridis with Stapleton Floral Design added to 8,000 roses ready for Valentine’s Day delivery in a truck in Boston. B2.
State GOP’s efforts
for Baker defy rules
‘I was on oxygen. He could have
blown us all to kingdom come.’
KATHRYN PERRY-DOUGAN (below), comforted by Robert DiVenuti
Neutrality required,
but petitions in use
By Frank Phillips
GLOBE STAFF
JOHN TLUMACKI/GLOBE STAFF
Man targeted estranged wife
with arson, police allege
By Emily Sweeney
and John R. Ellement
GLOBE STAFF
A man was arrested Tuesday
for allegedly pouring gasoline
around a Brockton home where
his estranged wife was staying
and lighting it on fire while she
was inside with other residents,
authorities said.
Matthew Eldredge, 35, was
charged with domestic assault
Choices. Choices.
Choices.
Find your harbor.
and battery, breaking and entering in the nighttime, arson, and
three counts of attempted murder.
Pleas of not guilty were entered on his behalf at his arraignment Tuesday in Brockton
District Court.
He was ordered held without
bail, and a dangerousness hearing was scheduled for Feb. 20.
FIRE, Page B6
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The Massachusetts Republican
Party is organizing nomination petition drives across the state for
Governor Charlie Baker and his
running mate, Lieutenant Governor
Karyn Polito, in what appears to be
a violation of the party’s rule that
bars it from providing any resources to a candidate in a contested primary.
E-mails obtained by the Globe
show the party’s grass-roots arm,
MassVictory, has been setting up
weekend outings all over the state
for volunteers to gather signatures
for the nomination papers for Baker
and Polito — despite the fact there
is another candidate in the GOP gubernatorial race. Scott Lively, a controversial arch-conservative minister whose anti-gay rhetoric is outside the mainstream state GOP, is
now acc using the governor of
“cheating’’ by using the state party
to support his campaign.
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McNamara, the deputy director of
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signatures as we can with as many
volunteers we can recruit that day!
We will have multiple locations
around the state.”
“ . . . It would help immensely to
get Governor Baker and Lieutenant
Governor Polito on the ballot first,”
McNamara continued, referring to
getting those nomination papers
certified before other candidates.
The state Republican party’s
rules are clear about its involvement in primaries. They state:
“Unless two-thirds of the GOP’s
party executive committee agrees,
neither the State Chair nor any person employed by the State Committee, shall assist, aid, or publicly endorse any candidate in favor another candidate in . . . a contested
Republican primary.”
McNamara is an employee of the
state party, GOP officials confirmed.
The Massachusetts Victory Committee is a federal committee that
serves as a fund-raising vehicle for
the state GOP.
REPUBLICANS, Page B6
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GET SMART
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION/1847
Douglass found
voice, support
in Massachusetts
By Zipporah Osei
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Massachusetts was a hub of activism at
the height of the abolitionist movement in
the mid-1850s.
Frederick Douglass, one of the most famous activists, made many ties in Boston
and across the state. On his adopted birthday of Feb. 14 (most slaves didn’t know their
exact day of birth), here are five places in
Massachusetts with connections to Douglass.
A taste of freedom in New Bedford:
Douglass was born a slave in Maryland in
1818. With the help of his future wife, Anna
Murray, he escaped in 1838. The couple
married and settled in New Bedford shortly
afterward.
New Bedford was a Quaker area and sympathetic to abolitionists. He and his wife
started their family and became involved in
several organizations in the city. Douglass
began to hone his skills as an orator as he
became more involved in local churches and
abolitionist groups.
Turning point in Nantucket: Douglass
quickly made a name for himself among
black abolitionists because of his involvement with the African Methodist Episcopal
Zion Church and his impressive oratory
skills. But it wasn’t until his now-famous
speech on Nantucket, in 1841, that he
spoke in front of a white crowd.
“This is an era when being good at public
speaking is like being a celebrity. People
were so profoundly impressed by him,” said
John Stauffer, professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University.
Stauffer is the author of “Picturing Frederick
Douglass.”
After the speech, Douglass was asked to
become a travelling lecturer for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Nearly a decade in Lynn: Douglass and
his family settled in Lynn while he traveled
as a lecturer for the American Anti-Slavery
Society from 1841 to 1848. Trains ran
through Lynn, making it easy for him to
travel from city to city.
While living in Lynn, Douglass wrote the
first of several autobiographies, “Narrative
of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.”
A friend in Springfield: Douglass was
good friends with John Brown, the abolitionist who believed slavery should be ended
with force. He would often visit Brown in
Springfield, where Brown lived from 1846 to
1849, and the two frequently exchanged letters.
Douglass edited the provisional constitution Brown wrote before his raid on Harper’s Ferry, then in Virginia, Stauffer said.
Brown asked Douglass to join him on the
raid, but he declined.
“Douglass was a prudent revolutionary,”
Stauffer said. “He didn’t go with Brown on
the raid because he suspected he was entering danger. He recognized that his greatest
contribution to the movement was through
the brilliance of his language.”
Connections to abolitionists in Boston:
The prominent Massachusetts abolitionist,
William Lloyd Garrison, became a mentor to
Douglass and, through him, Douglass became intimately involved with the antislavery community.
When Douglass’s former master threatened to find him, Boston residents raised
the money to send him to Europe to avoid
recapture.
“Boston was the cultural center of the
country at the time, so while Douglass is in
Boston he begins to see himself as a true intellectual,” Stauffer said.
“He would go on to do great things, but
his years in Massachusetts were indispensable.”
Zipporah Osei can be reached at
zipporah.osei@globe.com.
PHOTOS BY DAVID L RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Randy Ricker, owner of Brattle Square Florist in Cambridge, checked on completed orders and their delivery destinations.
Bouquets, and the bottom line
By Natasha Mascarenhas
world but became bored, so he decided to take on a
business he knew nothing about.
With the help of a doting staff, Ricker learned the
ins and outs of being a florist, as anxiety inducing as it
was. “It’s never an easy transition into something new,
but if you jump in the water, you never really have an
option to sink — you have to swim,” he said.
On Valentine’s Day, Ricker will be in the shop setting up at 5 a.m. He said that in just the one week leading up to Wednesday, the shop will sell up to a month’s
worth of inventory. That’s over 7,000 roses.
There’s a lot of room to sink. But Catie Zedros, a few
steps away, has faith, and quite a large stake in the rel-
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
CAMBRIDGE — Surrounded by thousands of roses
and dozens of other bouquets, Randy Ricker doesn’t
want to hear your love story.
The owner of Brattle Square Florist spent Tuesday
preparing for Valentine’s Day, a florist’s version of New
Year’s Eve, the Super Bowl, and a royal wedding tied
together with a frilly ribbon. But Ricker declared his
disdain for lengthy love notes and insisted that “flowers should do the heavy lifting” when declaring one’s
devotion.
Step inside the Harvard Square shop, though, and
you’ll find the work of romance in the making.
The sweet aromas of hydrangeas, alstroemerias, lilies, and orchids waft
up from the basement, where the flowers are cut and arranged. Step over
the scrapped leaves and cut stems scattered on the floor and behold tubs of
pink, white, and red roses from Ecuador and Colombia.
Surrounded by such opulent beauty, Ricker prefers the cheaper option:
carnations.
“I don’t really care if people turn their noses up at [carnations], or think
it’s cheap,” said Ricker, taking a cigarette break from the chaotic morning
inventory. “I like what I like.”
Five years since he bought the business, Ricker still stands as the new
kid of a century-old shop known for its arrangements, pen-and-paper bookkeeping, and first-name-basis hospitality. He’s proud that he hasn’t
changed much since it opened. His mantra: Why try to fix something that
isn’t broken?
But these days uncertainty hovers over the enterprise, often regarded as
a trademark of the square: In December, a cluster of Harvard Square properties — Brattle Square Flower Shop included — were sold to a real estate
investment company for $108 million.
Jeff Murphy, who works at the shop on the big holidays, explained his
fears in hushed tones, while loading deliveries in the trunk of his car.
“I don’t know what this community would do if this place closes,” Murphy said.
Ricker said he doesn’t waste time worrying. “I don’t think about the
things that I can’t control,” he said.
Before taking over the shop, Ricker spent 20 years in the corporate
atively new owner.
Zedros, 82, has worked at the shop since she was 12. Her father and his
two brothers started it in 1917 when they emigrated from Greece.
“The store started because one person was thankful that they were in
this country, and could change their lives simply by earning a living doing
what they loved,” she said between scribbling customer orders.
“Randy really kept it the same,” she added. “He understood that when
something is happy and low key, why change the flavor of it?”
Stephen, her son, 55, works right alongside her, taking orders, helping
customers and making arrangements.
Sure, the shop could have stayed in the Zedros family completely, and
Stephen tried to keep it that way: For 10 years, he owned the business.
“I gave it up because I would be up till 11 p.m every night, it was just too
much,” he said.
As if on cue, Randy’s mother, Barbara Ricker, rolled in with homemade
blueberry muffins and pastries. Barbara drives up from her home in South
Carolina every Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day to help out.
Watching the Zedroses, then her own son at his desk, Barbara Ricker
softly smiled.
“There’s a mother and son standing there, and there’s a mother and son
standing here,” she said. “And I just feel, isn’t there something really, really
special about that?”
After all the bouquets are delivered, Randy Ricker will take his mother
home, probably with a bouquet of her favorites — blue hydrangeas.
Natasha Mascarenhas can be reached at natasha.mascarenhas@globe.com.
AROUND THE REGION
CA M B R I DG E
H AV E R H I L L
L E X I N GTO N
Angela Davis donates
papers to Harvard site
Child in Essex County
dies of flu, officials say
Senator Barrett
diagnosed with cancer
Activist and 1960s radical Angela Davis is donating her papers to a library of women’s history at
Harvard University. The school revealed Tuesday
it received 150 cartons of rare material from the
74-year-old Davis, including letters, personal
writings, and unpublished speeches. Jane Kamensky, director of the Schlesinger Library, said
the collection sheds light on topics from black
feminism to the prison abolition movement. Davis is an academic and author known for her
work on racial and gender justice. She was acquitted in 1972 of providing guns for Black Panthers in a California courthouse shooting. She
said her papers reflect 50 years of work “to expand the reach of justice in the world.” (AP)
The state Department of Public Health confirmed Tuesday the first flu-related child death of
the year. A health official said the child was a 6year-old girl from Haverhill. The child’s flu was
confirmed by a clinical test and the symptoms,
according to a statement from the department.
The Essex district attorney’s office, meanwhile,
could not confirm the flu-related death but did
say that investigators believe a 6-year-old Haverhill girl, Delilah Lovelace, died on Monday from
a “medical issue.” The state, citing federal data,
said there have been 63 reported flu-related child
deaths across the country during this flu season.
State health officials are urging those who have
not received a flu shot to get vaccinated.
Senator Michael Barrett, a veteran Beacon Hill
Democrat, revealed Tuesday that he has been diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia and
will undergo treatment at Massachusetts General
Hospital over the next 30 days. He said he will
continue to perform his legislative and constituent service duties during his treatment and recovery period. He also said he plans to seek reelection. “In terms of politics, for me nothing will
change: I’ll be running for reelection in the fall,”
he said. The Lexington Democrat, elected to the
Senate in 2012, said his illness, which he called
highly curable, will force him to remain secluded
for several months. Barrett, 69, missed Thursday’s Senate session because of the illness.
DAVID L RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
TEENS STRUCK — Two teenagers were
injured when a car hit them Tuesday while
they were in a crosswalk on Columbus
Avenue in Roxbury, Boston police
Commissioner William B. Evans said. Four
teenagers were crossing at the intersection
of Columbus Avenue and Malcolm X.
Boulevard around 11:05 a.m. when a
driver lost control of a white sedan, hit the
two pedestrians, and crashed into a utility
pole on the median. The victims were a
15-year-old boy and a 16-year-old girl, and
the driver was taken to the hospital as a
precaution. In an e-mail Tuesday night,
Officer Stephen McNulty, a department
spokesman, described the teens’ injuries as
“non-life threatening.”
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Calls proposal
underfunded
By Adam Vaccaro
Gets 8 months for
fake ID scheme
GLOBE STAFF
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
Travis Andersen can be reached
at tandersen@globe.com.
B3
Markey hits Trump
infrastructure plan
Former
RMV
worker
sentenced
A Boston man who turned
away from gang life and landed
a job as a Registry of Motor Vehicles clerk received an 8month federal prison sentence
Monday for his role in a scheme
to sell fraudulent licenses and
other documents to illegal immigrants, according to prosecutors and court records.
David Brimage, 46, a former
clerk at the RMV Haymarket
branch, was sentenced during a
hearing in US District Court in
Boston. He pleaded guilty in
November to a charge of producing a false identification
document.
An affidavit filed in the case
said Brimage was identified as
an RMV clerk who “knowingly
issued fraudulent MA [driver’s
licenses] and/or ID cards to illegal aliens, believed to be from
the Dominican Republic, who
are using counterfeit identification documents of the stolen
identities of United States Citizens.”
Authorities were alerted to
the scheme in 2015.
Prosecutors said two other
co-defendants, Angel Miguel
Beltre Tejada, 32, and Bivian
Yohanny Brea, 41, obtained
identification documents belonging to US citizens in Puerto
Rico and sold them to clients
seeking legitimate identities in
Massachusetts.
The clients included illegal
immigrants who were previously deported, including one person who had faced drug charges, authorities said.
Tejada received several hundred dollars for his work on
each case, while Brea collected
up to $2,700 per identity, according to prosecutors.
Brea brought clients to the
Haymarket RMV, where Brimage and fellow clerks Evelyn
Medina, 56, Annette Gracia, 37,
a n d K i m b e r l y Jo r d a n , 3 3 ,
would accept “hundreds of dollars in cash to illegally issue authentic RMV documents, including Massachusetts licenses
and ID cards,” said US Attorney
Andrew E. Lelling’s office in a
statement. “The clerks also accepted bribes to use the RMV’s
system to run queries, including Social Security number audits, to confirm that the identities the clients were stealing actually belonged to verifiable
individuals.”
All the defendants have now
been sentenced for their roles
in the brazen scheme.
Brimage’s lawyer, Charles W.
Rankin, described his client in a
recent court filing as a man
who had been “involved with
gangs” in Boston’s Mission Hill
section as a youth but rejected
that lifestyle while serving a
state prison sentence for a drug
conviction.
“This posed serious difficulties for him ... when he was
pressured and threatened by
gang members,” Rankin wrote.
“Notwithstanding that pressure, he was steadfast in his resolve to turn his life around. He
was also pressured after his release, but stayed away from the
gangs and successfully completed his probation.”
Brimage, Rankin said, has
worked steadily since his release from prison in 1997,
working at New England Baptist Hospital, New England
Medical Center, Edible Arrangements, and the RMV for
seven years until his arrest in
the federal case.
He’s currently working as a
delivery driver to “make ends
meet and to pay off the outstanding balance on his auto
loan,” Rankin wrote.
Brimage, a father of two,
will face significant financial
challenges when he completes
his 8-month sentence, according to Rankin.
In a statement Tuesday, Lelling decried the conduct of
Brimage and his co-defendants,
calling the scheme “egregious.”
Metro
CHARLES KRUPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Attorney Steven M. Gordon represents the Powerball winner from New Hampshire.
Winner presses case for secrecy
By Travis Andersen
New Hampshire lottery officials are grandstanding with
their claim that they must
identify the winner of a $560
million Powerball jackpot for
transparency’s sake, the winner’s lawyer asserted Tuesday
during a court hearing.
“It’s a feel-good argument,
‘we want to be transparent,’ ”
said Steven M. Gordon, who
represents the woman, a New
Hampshire resident identified
as Jane Doe in court papers.
“But it really has the substance of cotton candy once
you start looking at it in detail.”
Gordon, of the high-powered Shaheen & Gordon firm
cofounded by William Shah e e n , h u sb a n d o f S e n at o r
Jeanne Shaheen, addressed
Hillsborough County Superior
Court Judge Charles S. Temple
during a 90-minute hearing on
the matter.
Doe won the jackpot last
month and signed the back of
the ticket, before realizing a
trust could have signed the
ticket and accepted the money
on her behalf, keeping her
name private.
Now she wants Temple to
order her name withheld from
public records requests, or let
her replace her name on the
ticket with a trust that she’s
since created.
State officials say altering
the ticket will make it invalid.
Gordon said the notion that
Doe’s name must be revealed
so the lottery can fulfill its mission of transparency is “defeated,” since a trust can accept a
prize on behalf of a winner.
In addition, Gordon said,
the lottery commission publicly discloses its audit reports,
contracts, employee salaries,
and fiscal management struc-
ture — information the public
needs to assess how the agency is functioning.
“ T he disclosure of Ms.
Doe’s identity would reveal
nothing about what the commission is up to,” Gordon said.
Not true, according to state
Assistant Attorney General
John J. Conforti, speaking on
behalf of the commission.
Conforti said a signed, winning lottery ticket is a public
record under state law.
“Transparency ensures that
these games are on the level,”
Conforti said.
“. . . When somebody wins
a lottery [prize] of $560 million, there is a public interest
in knowing who the winner
was, and that it was a fair and
equitable process,” Conforti
said.
R e p l a c i n g t h e w o m a n’s
name on the ticket with her
trust, he said, is strictly prohibited by the Multi-State Lottery Association, or MUSL,
which administers Powerball.
“We cannot guarantee that
MUSL will honor the ticket if
it’s altered or destroyed,” Conforti said.
The commission seeks the
dismissal of Doe’s lawsuit;
Temple took the dismissal motion under advisement.
Gordon said Doe isn’t proposing altering the original
ticket; she wants the state to
make a photocopy of that ticket.
T he a l t er e d p h o t o co p y,
bearing the name of Doe’s
trust instead of her name,
would be provided in response to public records requests.
Gordon reiterated during
the hearing that his office and
the Merrimack market that
sold the ticket have been inundated with calls from strangers seeking information about
News
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‘There is a
responsibility for
our country to
fund the needed
infrastructure
upgrade . . . ’
US SENATOR EDWARD
MARKEY
Beckwith said Massachusetts
would be at a disadvantage
competing for those funds.
Stephanie Pollack, the state’s
transportation secretary, said
Massachusetts officials hope to
work with the Trump administration and the state’s congressional delegation as the proposal moves forward.
Republicans in Congress are
also reportedly wary of the
plan’s cost, since it’s not clear
how it would be funded.
Adam Vaccaro can be reached
at adam.vaccaro@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter at
@adamtvaccaro.
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Doe.
Concerns that she’ll be harassed if her name is publicized, Gordon said, “are real.”
The winning ticket has to
be redeemed within a year of
the drawing.
Doe has also filed a motion
seeking payment of the jackpot to her trust, pending the
resolution of the lawsuit.
“Ms. Doe would like her
money,” Gordon said.
“And I think if she has the
winning ticket, [then the]
commission would like to give
it to her,” Gordon added.
The commission is expected to file a response to the request in court in the coming
days.
Conforti said the commission will likely agree to the
transfer motion, but there
“may be some verbiage” to
iron out.
US Senator Edward Markey
blasted President Trump’s infrastructure plan, saying it was
not adequately funded and unlikely to result in new public
works projects in Massachusetts.
“There is a responsibility for
our country to fund the needed
infrastructure upgrade, and
this battle has just begun,” Markey said at an event in Boston.
The White House said the
plan, released Monday, “will increase investment, streamline
permitting, strengthen rural
America, and modernize our
workforce.” Trump posted on
Twitter that it would be “a big
week for Infrastructure.”
“After so stupidly spending
$7 trillion in the Middle East, it
is now time to start investing in
OUR Country!” he wrote.
Trump has previously said
he would launch a $1 trillion infrastructure plan, and the administration said the proposal
could generate up to $1.5 trillion in spending.
But Markey, echoing some of
his fellow Democrats, dismissed the proposal as a
“fraud” and “meaningless” because the federal government
would only be contributing
$200 billion. Half would support an “incentive program”
that would award grants for a
variety of infrastructure projects, including roads and railways, water supply structures,
and pollution cleanup projects.
The White House said the
grants would encourage additional funding from cities,
states, and the private sector,
and applicants would have to
prove they’d be able to raise the
necessary money. The grants
could cover up to 20 percent of
a project’s cost, which Markey
said was too low to be meaningful. Markey, a member of Senate panels related to the environment and infrastructure,
said he is also concerned that
part of Trump’s plan to streamline permitting processes could
harm the environment.
Geoff Beckwith, executive
director of the Massachusetts
Municipal Association, said the
program would put a burden
on cities and towns already
struggling to cover infrastructure costs. “If we at the local level had . . . the money that would
enable us to pave more roads,
we would be doing that now,”
said Beckwith.
The plan calls for spending
$50 billion on grants for projects in rural communities.
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Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
So many
bumps in
the roads
Keiko Orrall
announces
run for state
treasurer
By Aimee Ortiz
uPOTHOLES
Continued from Page A1
pace when it comes to filling potholes —
including those flagged by constituents.
“It is a target that we are mindful
about and we want to be able to hit it,”
he said. “We’re still closing a large number of cases and a majority of those cases
in that 24-hour period. We look forward
to being able to hit [the target] with
greater regularity.’’
With Walsh’s blessing, the city set the
24-hour goal in the fall of 2015 after
finding it was handily meeting a target
of filling potholes within a 48-hour period.
Last year, the city said it patched 79
percent of its 9,355 potholes on time —
those discovered by the city and reported by constituents. In 2016, 77 percent
of the 4,925 potholes were filled on time.
During the record-breaking winter of
2015, 57 percent of 7,159 potholes were
fixed within 48 hours as the city put
most of its resources into snow removal,
Osgood said.
The one-working-day turnaround
time affords some leeway for weekends.
For example, if a pothole is discovered at
noon on Friday, pavers have until Monday to patch it and have it count toward
the city’s benchmark, the city said.
But during the winter months, when
the weather swings from freezing temperatures to stretches of thawing, the
battle to contain potholes sends public
works crews scrambling to keep pace
with the crumbling asphalt.
“The potholes are all over the place,”
said Sheils, who has been commuting to
Boston for work for 25 years. “You’re
looking more for the potholes than
you’re watching the traffic because there
are so many of them.”
And the number of potholes reported
to the city’s 311 system increased last
month to 1,846, up from 1,567 during
January 2017, city data show. Some of
the reports, however, pertain to potholes
that the city isn’t responsible for fixing
because they’re on a state road or near
manhole covers maintained by private
utilities.
In most cases, the roller-coaster temperatures and wide-ranging weather
conditions are the culprit.
GLOBE STAFF
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Samuel Brack used a roller to finish off repairs on St. James Avenue earlier in the winter.
National Weather Service data show
there were five significant storms last
month, starting with more than 13 inches of snow dumped on the city Jan. 4. A
week later, nearly 2 inches of rain fell
over two days, followed by more snow at
the end of January.
The cycle of freezing conditions followed by a thaw allows water to seep into small cracks in the pavement and expand, causing the asphalt to buckle beneath the weight of passing cars.
The amount of asphalt city pavers
used to repair the roads also increased. As
of last Friday, the city had gone through
254 tons, compared to 187 tons during
the same period last year, Osgood said.
The road hazards cost both the city
and motorists.
Over a five year period, the city paid
more than $163,000 to reimburse drivers for damage their vehicles incurred
after striking potholes, figures show. The
city spends about $6 million annually
and repaves about 30 lane miles each
year, Osgood said.
Marc Angelone said he had just begun his commute home from work on
Jan. 18 when his car struck a pothole in
front of the Boston police district station
on New Sudbury Street.
The impact flattened both passenger
side tires and upset the vehicle’s alignment, requiring a flat bed truck to tow
Angelone’s Audi A6 to a dealership in Peabody, he said.
The following day he reported the
pothole to the city, Angelone said, and
within a few days it was filled.
“It was a relatively quick,” said Angelone, a lawyer who commutes to the
city from Methuen.
Ten public works employees are assigned to combat these road nemeses
throughout the year, but during pothole
season their ranks can swell to 40 workers on a given day, Osgood said.
The city’s strategy for battling is potholes is twofold, Osgood said.
During good weather, paving crews
resurface streets — work that Osgood
said the city coordinates with construction schedules for utility companies and
others that might have to dig up roads.
When pothole season arrives in the
winter and spring, the strategy shifts to
deploying enough staff and the right
equipment to areas where potholes open
up, he said.
Annissa Essaibi-George, an at-large
city councilor, said her office has fielded
complaints about potholes, particularly
on state roads that are maintained by
the Massachusetts Department of Transportation.
“There’s just a lot of frustration that
the city and the state haven’t been able
to keep up with the demand,” she said.
Jeferson Schueng said he was driving
his family to church on Jan. 14 when he
struck a pothole at the intersection of
Saratoga and Bennington streets in East
Boston. He filed a claim with the city,
seeking $115 to cover the cost of replacing the tire he blew on his Chevrolet
Cruze.
The city rejected the claim and referred Schueng to Eversource because
the pothole he said he struck had
opened up next to a manhole cover controlled by the utility.
Schueng, who lives in Winthrop, said
he was so annoyed by the city’s response
that he threw the notification in the
trash.
“I was really frustrated,” he said. “Our
state is very expensive. We should get
better roads.”
Matt Rocheleau of the Globe staff
contributed. Laura Crimaldi can be
reached at laura.crimaldi@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter @lauracrimaldi.
Keiko Orrall wants to make
history — again.
The Republican state representative from Lakeville, who
in 2011 became the first AsianAmerican woman elected to the
Massachusetts House of Representatives, launched her state
treasurer campaign Tuesday
morning as she seeks to unseat
Deb Goldberg, a Democrat.
In a video released by her
campaign, Orrall said she
wants to bring “fiscal responsibility” to the treasurer’s office to
make it “ work better and
smarter for you.”
“I just think we need to have
someone who is holding the 15
agencies under that constitutional office down to accountable standards, to make sure
[the office] is being run efficiently for taxpayers,” she said
in a telephone interview Monday night.
If elected, Orrall said she
will work to ensure that the
agencies under the Treasury
“are working for the taxpayers
and not setting up roadblocks”
and would look to reduce
“onerous regulation.”
“ We need to have people
who are making regulations
that make sense, that are for
the benefit of the taxpayers,”
she said. “Not just bureaucrats,
sitting in cubicles, making rules
for the sake of rules and not understanding the consequences.”
A supporter of President
Trump, Orrall said she knows
she could be facing an uphill
battle explaining her position to
voters. According to a recent
WBUR poll, just 28 percent of
those surveyed viewed Trump
favorably. “I voted for the president, but I don’t agree with him
on everything,” Orrall said.
Aimee Ortiz can be reached at
aimee.ortiz@globe.com.
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
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G l o b e
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T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Koreans
in Boston
hope for
progress
GOP’s
petitions
back
Baker
uKOREA
uREPUBLICANS
hope, was reflected over and
over as Koreans in the Boston
area began watching the
Olympics unfold in a country
that has become a flashpoint
of global tension.
President Trump and Kim
have traded schoolyard insults
for months in an escalating
war of words. Trump’s nickname of “Little Rocket Man”
for Kim and the North Korean’s description of Trump as a
“dotard” might be laughable,
at best, if not for an underlying
fear of miscalculation and nuclear conflict.
Against that backdrop, any
peaceful communication between the Koreas is welcomed.
“We hope that this Olympics provides a momentum for
a more enduring peace on the
Korean peninsula,” said Yonghyon Kim, the South Korean
consul-general in Boston.
However, he added, “it’s up to
North Korea.”
The North Korean presence
at the Games is small: only 22
athletes, many of whom are
part of the combined women’s
ice hockey team. But Kim, the
consul-general, said the initiative is important even if the
motivation is rooted in self-image and propaganda. The dictator’s sister, for example, is attending the Games and is the
first person in three generations of the ruling family to
cross into the South.
“Some people are concerned and worried. I think
that is also legitimate,” Kim
said. “At the same time, whatever the North Koreans’ intentions may be, we need to make
the best use of this window of
opportunity to reduce tensions
on the peninsula.”
New Hampshire prosecutors
confirmed Tuesday that a Derry
man and his 6-year-old son died
the day before in a murder-suicide accomplished with carbon
monoxide poisoning.
The announcement from Attorney General Gordon Gordon
J. MacDonald’s office came after the medical examiner concluded the autopsies of Matthew Edmunds, 39, and his
child, Preston Connor Edmunds, who were found dead
Monday in a trailer they shared.
“The investigation to date
reveals that this was a murder/
s u i c i d e w i t h Matt h e w E d munds, age 39, murdering his
son,” MacDonald’s office said.
Derry police were asked to
perform a well-being check at
the Edmunds residence on Kendall Pond Road around 12:30
p.m. Monday and made a horrific discovery after forcing
their way into the mobile home
and a locked bedroom, according to the news release:
“Police observed that the
room had been sealed from the
inside using duct tape and a
blanket. Also in the room, police located two charcoal grills
each containing burnt charcoal
and ash. Police found a sign
hanging from the living room
ceiling fan. The sign warned police that they ‘will find me and
my son’ in the bedroom and to
be aware of ‘dangerous carbon
monoxide levels.’ ”
Senior Assistant Attorney
General Benjamin J. Agati said
Edmunds’s older son, Connor,
had drowned in 2009, before
Preston was born.
Agati said Matthe w Edmunds left “multiple pages” of
writing that made “his intentions pretty clear.” Investigators
will analyze it to try to determine Edmunds’s motive.
The Baker political team
and the state party did not respond to repeated requests for
comments about whether they
were breaking party rules by
using its resources to help the
governor.
“The Massachusetts Republican Party and MassVictory are
pleased to support Massachusetts Republican candidates up
and down the ballot,” said the
state GOP’s spokesman, Terry
MacCormack.
When McNamara’s e-mail
was read to him, Lively, Baker’s
only declared challenger, was
miffed.
The conservative Springfield
minister, who launched his
campaign last month, is also
trying to gather the required
10,000 certified voter signatures for his nomination papers
to qualify for the state primary
ballot.
Lively said he was surprised
to find the party is working for
the governor, because party officials had assured him they
would be impartial.
He compared the party’s
help for Baker to the rancor
that developed at the GOP convention in 2014, when conservative candidate Mark Fisher
filed suit against the GOP —
charging party leaders had manipulated the ballot so he just
missed the delegate support
threshold to run on the primary ballot against Baker.
In 2016, the party agreed to
put Fisher on the primary ballot, but it also paid him
$240,000 to settle his lawsuit.
It was never determined if
the state party had acted improperly.
“ This is very alarming. I
have been waiting to see how
the Baker team will cheat this
time,’’ said Lively, who ran as an
independent for governor in
2014 and barely got 1 percent
of the vote.
“This is a consistent pattern
with Mr. Baker. I don’t see why
a sitting governor with all that
popularity and money would
revert to cheating. It suggests
an inherent character flaw.”
Baker ’s team did not respond to charges from Lively,
who is not a popular figure in
GOP establishment circles. He
is best known for his highly
controversial anti-gay activities
and statements in this country
and around the world.
Some GOP insiders said they
believe Baker’s campaign is attempting to keep Lively off the
September ballot by denying
him enough delegates at the
April convention.
Party rules require statewide candidates to get 15 percent of the delegates to qualify
for the Sept. 4 ballot.
The party-organized petition drive reflects the strong
grip the governor and his political team have on the state Republican Party and their use of
its financial resources, staff,
and election operations.
That control has aggravated
the conservative wing of the
state GOP, which has been marginalized by Baker during his
time in office.
In a bold and unheard of political move by a governor, Baker, according to a GOP source
involved in the effort, spent
over $900,000 in the 2016 elections to win a bare majority of
the 80-member Republican
State Committee, the party’s
governing body.
Baker has refused to identify
the donors, claiming he is not
legally required to do so.
The Massachusetts Victory
Committee, which is paying the
staff, is a federal committee and
is allowed to raise donations as
much as $44,900 per donor —
far above the state campaign finance laws that cap individual
contributions at $1,000 a year.
In a ruling criticized by campaign finance watchdogs, state
regulators have determined
that the Baker operation does
not violate state law banning
the use of federal funds in state
political campaigns.
Travis Andersen can be reached
at travis.andersen@globe.com.
Frank Phillips can be reached
at frank.phillips@globe.com.
Continued from Page B1
Continued from Page B1
CRAIG F. WALKER/GLOBE STAFF
Toward that end, Korean
cooperation on the playing
field is a positive, said Kay
Dong, president of the KoreanAmerican Citizens League of
New England.
“Is it propaganda? Maybe,
but maybe it’s more. Only he
knows,” Dong said of Kim
Jong-un. “It’s better than war,
isn’t it?”
Dong, who graduated from
Boston College in 1974, said
she cried when she watched
some of the first events of the
Games.
“I became so emotional.
I’ve been in America 47 years,
but the roots in my head, being Korean, are there,” she
said.
Myong Sool Chang, founder
and editor of the Boston Korea
newspaper, echoed that cautious sense of optimism.
“There has been so much
tension about the North and a
nuclear bomb, so I think this is
a good chance to start talks be-
tween South and North,”
Chang said. “We have to start
from there. Eventually, the
goal is non-nuclearization of
the Korean peninsula.”
The possibility of war is ingrained into the consciousness
of South Koreans in a way that
is incomprehensible to most
Americans. Suyoung Kim, a
34-year-old living in Brookline,
knows that mindset firsthand
from his service as a South Korean military police officer in
the demilitarized zone.
“We feel like war is always
close, but at the same time we
don't feel it’s closer,” Kim said.
He sees North Korea’s participation in the Games as window dressing, or perhaps the
result of a secret deal between
the two countries.
“It’s a good step forward.
But for some people in Korea,
it’s just showing off,” Kim said.
“There must have been some
trade: If you send North Korean athletes, we’ll send you
some money or rice. And the
next time you have some kind
of challenge, we’ll just accept
whatever you want.”
Despite all the attention being paid to the unified team,
these Olympics are not the
first time that the countries
have joined hands. They
marched together at the Sydney Olympics in 2000, at Athens in 2004, and Turin in
2006.
Those displays of cooperation were unthinkable during
the 1988 Summer Games in
Seoul. The North Koreans did
not compete at those Games,
which occurred less than a
year after a terrorist attack organized by North Korean
agents killed everyone aboard
a South Korean airliner.
Emily Lee, a Boston University senior from Seoul, was not
alive when the attack happened, but she has lived in the
shadow of the enmity between
the nations. The Koreas still
Man accused of targeting wife with arson
uFIRE
Continued from Page B1
All of the occupants of the
home made it out safely, including Eldredge’s wife. But it
could have been much worse,
said the landlord, Kathryn
Perry-Dougan.
“I was on oxygen,” said Perry-Dougan, who is recovering
f r o m a r e c e n t i l l ne s s . “ He
could have blown us all to
kingdom come.”
According to a police report
filed in court, police responded to the multifamily home at
9 Highland St. at 1:45 a.m. for
a report of breaking and entering.
The owners of the property,
Perry-Dougan and her husband, Warren Dougan, told
police they had rented a room
to Eldredge and his wife, and
the four of them resided together on the first floor of the
home.
Approximately three days
ago, Eldredge’s wife ended her
relationship with him and
asked him to leave, which he
did, the report states.
Early Tuesday morning,
Perry-Dougan and her husband were awoken by Eldredge’s wife screaming for
help, and when they got to up
to see what was wrong, they
saw Eldredge punching her in
the face, according to the police report.
Eldredge left when the couple called 911.
Police searched the area but
were unable to locate Eldredge. After the officers left,
dispatch received a second call
from 9 Highland St., reporting
that Eldredge had returned
and had lit the house on fire,
the report states.
Pe r r y - D o u g a n a n d E l dredge’s wife told police they
were in the kitchen when they
heard a commotion outside;
when they looked outside they
saw Eldredge with a red container, pouring gasoline on the
exterior entrance and other
doors.
“Moments later the front
entrance of the house was engulfed in flames,” the police report states.
‘It will bring them
together — for
now.’
EMILY LEE, senior at Boston
University, on the unity of the
Olympic Games
have far to go, she said.
“Honestly, I don’t think it is
a first step, but I think that
people will talk about it,” Lee
said of the joint team. And dialogue is a good thing.
“It can bring people together and forget about politics,”
Lee said. “It will bring them
together — for now.”
Brian MacQuarrie can be
reached at
brian.macquarrie@globe.com.
Father killed
son, self in
N.H. home,
officials say
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
MARC VASCONCELLOS/THE ENTERPRISE
Matthew Eldredge was ordered held without bail when he appeared Tuesday in Brockton
District Court. He faces charges that include arson and attempted murder.
In a telephone interview,
Perry-Dougan said that when
she first saw flames, she tried
to dial 911 on the house
phone, but the landline wasn’t
working. She used a cellphone
to alert police and the Fire Department.
“He just flipped out,” said
Perry-Dougan, 62. “He didn’t
like the fact that she was staying here and he couldn’t.”
According to the police report, Perry-Dougan and the
other occupants of the house
exited through a back door.
Fire Captain Edward Williams said fire fighters responded at 2:25 a.m. Tuesday,
and all of the residents got out
safely. Two people were treated for minor smoke inhalation, Williams said.
Williams said the damage
to the home is estimated to be
$40,000.
When officers searched the
area again for Eldredge, this
time with the help of a K-9
unit, they located him hiding
on Ellsworth Street.
“As we approached Mr. Eldredge he reeked of gasoline,
and his clothes were soaked
with gasoline,” the police report states.
Police placed Eldredge’s
clothing into evidence, along
with an orange lighter he had
been carrying, the report
states.
The report says that during
the booking, police found that
Eldredge had three outstanding warrants.
Eldredge has been in trouble with the law several times
over the past few months.
Cour t doc uments show he
pleaded guilty to shoplifting
Nov. 20; on Dec. 2, he was accused of attacking his wife in a
parking garage and charged
with strangulation and domestic assault and batter y. He
fac ed anot her shopli f ting
charge on Jan. 3.
On Dec. 4, the cour t released Eldredge on personal
recognizance and ordered him
to have no contact with the alleged victim (his wife).
In court documents, Eldredge is listed as unemployed
and living at a homeless shelter on North Main Street.
Six families were displaced
by the fire and are being pro-
vided temporary housing assistance by the American Red
Cross, said Jeff Hall, Red Cross
spokesman.
Perry-Dougan said she received vouchers for a hotel but
would prefer to be in her own
home.
She said she got out of the
hospital Thursday and was recovering from pneumonia.
She said Eldredge’s wife
was “one of my best tenants”
and she was happy to give her
a place to stay.
Eldredge, however, was another story.
“He was just trouble,” she
said in a telephone interview.
Pe r r y - D o u g a n s a i d s h e
nearly died from her recent illness. Now she has to deal with
this.
“I couldn’ t wait to come
home,” she said, “and now I
don’t have a home.”
Emily Sweeney can be reached
at esweeney@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter
@emilysweeney. John R.
Ellement can be reached at
ellement@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @JREbosglobe.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B7
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
ANDREWS, Karen M.
(Steeves)
BY CITY AND TOWN
ABINGTON
CANALE, J. Andrew PhD
POCASSET
BORGATTI, Bruno J.
ACTON
LOSIER, Philip G. Jr.
QUINCY
DENARO, Joan M. (Murray)
GUIDABONI, Peter A.
PHILLIPS, Athena (Palsson)
SMALL-PRASHER, Stephanie L.
AMESBURY
BAXTER, Joseph F. Jr.
ANDOVER
SHAINKER, Arnold N.
RANDOLPH
BELLISSIMO, Joseph J., Cambridge
P.D. (Ret)
ARLINGTON
BAXTER, Joseph F. Jr.
HARRINGTON, Mary C. (Harte)
SPINALE, Frank J.
BELLINGHAM
BERTOLINO, Peter F.
READING
NICHOLS, Edward M.
BELMONT
CHOULIAN, M. Louise
LOSIER, Philip G. Jr.
REVERE
DENARO, Joan M. (Murray)
BOSTON
CANALE, J. Andrew PhD
RODRIGUEZ, Bernardo
SISTER CHRISTINA M. KILLION, MFIC
SISTER MARY FAUSTINA DUGGAN,
MFIC
SMALL-PRASHER, Stephanie L.
BRADFORD
O’NEIL, Lillian E. (Cote)
BREWSTER
CHOULIAN, M. Louise
BRIDGEWATER
BELLISSIMO, Joseph J., Cambridge
P.D. (Ret)
BRIGHTON
CONSIDINE, Edward M., Sr.
ROSLINDALE
HARRINGTON, Mary C. (Harte)
MURCH, Richard Harley
ROXBURY
RODRIGUEZ, Bernardo
SALISBURY
PERRY, Jean C. (Carangelo)
SAUGUS
BAXTER, Joseph F. Jr.
CHERUBIN, Kristina M. (Izak)
PERRY, Jean C. (Carangelo)
WALLINGFORD, Margaret M.
(Blanchard)
SOMERVILLE
O’NEIL, Lillian E. (Cote)
VITTORIA, Katherine E. (Riley)
BROOKLINE
BERGER, Cynthia
HARRINGTON, Mary C. (Harte)
MEDOFF, Atty. Irving I.
WALLINGFORD, Margaret M.
(Blanchard)
CAMBRIDGE
BELLISSIMO, Joseph J., Cambridge
P.D. (Ret)
MASSIE, Leda (DiFava)
CANTON
CAMOZZI, Ermenegildo
CONSIDINE, Edward M., Sr.
PHILLIPS, Athena (Palsson)
SOUTH BOSTON
FLYNN, Dorothy J. (McKinnon)
HARRINGTON, Mary C. (Harte)
SOUTHBOROUGH
BORGATTI, Bruno J.
SWAMPSCOTT
KLEIN, Herbert D.
TAUNTON
BARDSLEY, Lillian (MacMaster)
OLDRO, Robert E.
CHESTNUT HILL
CANALE, J. Andrew PhD
WAKEFIELD
CHERUBIN, Kristina M. (Izak)
O’NEIL, Lillian E. (Cote)
DEDHAM
SMALL-PRASHER, Stephanie L.
DIGHTON
OLDRO, Robert E.
WALTHAM
LOSIER, Philip G. Jr.
MIZZONI, Phyllis M. (Simmons)
OLDRO, Robert E.
DORCHESTER
DWYER, Mary T. (Galvin Greene)
EVERETT
SIGNORIELLO, Arthur R.
WARREN
SMALL-PRASHER, Stephanie L.
FRAMINGHAM
DEVITT, Carol A.
GLOUCESTER
KNOTT, Betty Davis
HANOVER
HAMMERQUIST, Colleen M. (Taylor)
HOLBROOK
ANDREWS, Karen M. (Steeves)
HOLLISTON
BERGER, Cynthia
WATERTOWN
BONSIGNORE, Salvatore P.
CHOULIAN, M. Louise
WELLESLEY
BORGATTI, Bruno J.
TEDOLDI, Betsy M. (McCurran)
WELLESLEY HILLS
PARKER, Dr. Jack S.
HYDE PARK
CAMOZZI, Ermenegildo
WENHAM
NICHOLS, Edward M.
LOWELL
DONOIAN, Ara George
MALDEN
BARDSLEY, Lillian (MacMaster)
BAXTER, Joseph F. Jr.
RUSSELL, Josephine Carneglia
WEST ROXBURY
BELLISSIMO, Joseph J., Cambridge
P.D. (Ret)
MURCH, Richard Harley
MARLBOROUGH
ANDREWS, Karen M. (Steeves)
WESTFORD
MIZZONI, Phyllis M. (Simmons)
MEDFORD
O’NEIL, Lillian E. (Cote)
SPINALE, Frank J.
WESTWOOD
PARKER, Dr. Jack S.
MELROSE
BARDSLEY, Lillian (MacMaster)
BAXTER, Joseph F. Jr.
WEYMOUTH
DENARO, Joan M. (Murray)
METHUEN
GANIM, Donald G.
WHITINSVILLE
KNOTT, Betty Davis
MIDDLEBOROUGH
BELLISSIMO, Joseph J., Cambridge
P.D. (Ret)
OLDRO, Robert E.
WILMINGTON
NICHOLS, Edward M.
RUSSELL, Josephine Carneglia
MILTON
NASH, Peter J. Jr.
NATICK
BORGATTI, Bruno J.
CONSIDINE, Edward M., Sr.
LOSIER, Philip G. Jr.
NEWTON
CANALE, J. Andrew PhD
JOHNSON, Richard E.
MEDOFF, Atty. Irving I.
SISTER CHRISTINA M. KILLION, MFIC
SISTER MARY FAUSTINA DUGGAN,
MFIC
NORTH READING
DIAZ, Margery E. (Wigton)
LOSIER, Philip G. Jr.
NICHOLS, Edward M.
NORWOOD
CAMOZZI, Ermenegildo
CONSIDINE, Edward M., Sr.
OSTERVILLE
PARKER, Dr. Jack S.
PLYMOUTH
CHERUBIN, Kristina M. (Izak)
MILLER, Thomas Moreland
WINCHESTER
HALL, David W.
VITTORIA, Katherine E. (Riley)
WINTHROP
BURNS, Carol J. (DeNapoli)
GUNN, Frances G. (Farrell)
PERRY, Jean C. (Carangelo)
NEEDHAM
BORGATTI, Bruno J.
CONSIDINE, Edward M., Sr.
KLEIN, Herbert D.
TEDOLDI, Betsy M. (McCurran)
NORTH ANDOVER
DIAZ, Margery E. (Wigton)
SHAINKER, Arnold N.
76, of Bellingham MA, died
peacefully Sunday evening
(February 11, 2018) at his
residence after a lengthy illness, surrounded by his loving family. Beloved
husband of Dorothy A. (Carroll)
Bertolino.
Along with his beloved wife of
fifty years, he is survived by 1 Son:
Michael F. Bertolino ad his wife Susan
of Nashville NC; 2 Daughters: Sherryl
Bastarache and her husband Gary of
Bellingham MA and Lisa Bertolino of
Blackstone MA; 7 Grandchildren; 1
Great Grandchild; 1 Sister: Annette
Presti and her husband Peter of FL; 1
Brother-in-law: Joseph Presti of Burlington MA. He was the brother of the
late Camille Presti of Burlington MA.
His funeral, with Military Honors,
will be held Saturday (February 17th)
at 8am from the Edwards Memorial
Funeral Home, 44 Congress Street, Milford, MA, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 9am in St. Blaise Church,
1158 South Main Street, Bellingham,
MA. Visiting hours will be Friday (February 16th) from 4pm to 7pm. Visit
www.edwardsmemorialfuneralhome.
com for obituary & condolence book.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to The St. Jude
Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St.
Jude Place, Memphis TN 38105-9959.
Edwards Memorial Funeral Home
Milford MA
BONSIGNORE, Salvatore P.
Salvatore P. Bonsignore of
Watertown, passed away
on February 12. Beloved
husband of Georgette Bonsignore
(Boscher). Loving father of Georgette
Coen of Watertown, Robert Bonsignore
and his wife Dorothy Gilbert of New
Hampshire, and Theresa Collins and
her husband Frank of Watertown. Dear
grandfather to Christen, Michael, Daniel, John, Nicole, Lauren, and Mathew.
Also survived by his great grandchildren Nicholas, Thomas, Brooke, Evelyn,
Michael, Shawn, Domenic, Gemma,
Clara, and Benjamin. Brother of the
late Mary Volpe, James Bonsignore,
and Robert Bonsignore. Relatives and
friends are invited to visit at the DeVito
Funeral Home 761 Mt. Auburn St.,
WATERTOWN, on Thursday, February
15 from 4-8pm. A funeral home service
will be held on Friday at 10am. Interment to follow at Ridgelawn Cemetery,
Watertown. In lieu of flowers, donations in Salvatore’s name can be made
to Disabled American Veterans, State
House, Room 546 Boston, MA 02133 or
visit www.davma.org.
WEST END
SPINALE, Frank J.
LYNN
PERRY, Jean C. (Carangelo)
NEWTON HIGHLANDS
JOHNSON, Richard E.
Of Marlborough, formerly of Holbrook,
passed away unexpectedly after a brief
illness, on February 11, 2018 at the
age of 55. Born in Boston, Karen grew
up in Holbrook and graduated from
Holbrook High School. She has lived
in Marlborough for the past 23 years.
Karen enjoyed traveling, especially
cruises, Disney World and was also
a Michael Jackson fanatic. Above all,
Karen was most happy spending time
with her family and grandchildren. A
devoted wife, mother, grandmother and
friend, Karen will be greatly missed by
all who were blessed to have known
her. Karen was the wife of Carlton W.
Andrews, III for the past 36 years. Loving mother of Christine Maloney and
her husband Tim of Shrewsbury, Michelle Brazeau and her husband Rick of
Hudson and Laura Andrews and John
Logan of Marlborough. Dear daughter
of William Steeves of Holbrook and the
late Dorothy Steeves. Devoted sister
of Kathleen Wesselman of Knoxville,
TN, Linda Aronovitz of Nashua, NH
and Theresa Leen of Holbrook. Dear
“Grams” of Kiira, Alexis, Cayden, Noah,
Riley, Autumn, Landon and Nevaeh.
Daughter-in-law of Priscilla Andrews
of Plymouth and the late Carlton
Andrews, Jr. Also survived by many
nieces, nephews, extended family,
friends and her beloved pets. Reposing
at the Cartwright Funeral Home, 69 So.
Franklin St., (RT 37) HOLBROOK, until
9:30 AM on Friday, February 16th, followed by a Funeral Mass at 10:30 AM
in St. Joseph Church, 153 So. Franklin
St., Holbrook. Relatives and friends are
respectfully invited to attend. Visiting
hours Thursday, February 15th, from
4:00 – 8:00 PM. Burial in Blue Hill
Cemetery, Braintree. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made
in Karen’s name to the National Shrine
of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, 339 S.
Seton Ave., Emmetsburg, MD 21727
or to the Epilepsy Foundation, 8301
Professional Place, Suite 200, Landover,
MD 20785. For directions or to leave a
sympathy message for the family, visit
www.cartwrightfuneral.com.
BERTOLINO, Peter F.
WOBURN
RUSSELL, Josephine Carneglia
VITTORIA, Katherine E. (Riley)
BARDSLEY, Lillian
(MacMaster)
Of Malden, February 9th. Devoted wife
of James W. Bardsley, Jr. of Lexington and the late Leo Ronan. Beloved
mother of Leo Ronan of Taunton,
Lillian Ronan and Ralph Ronan both
of Malden, Paul Ronan of Hampstead,
New Hampshire, Shane Ronan of Lancaster, Ohio, Heather MacMaster of Las
Vegas, Nevada and the late Kim Ronan.
Sister of the late Muriel MacMaster,
Barbara Midell and Ralph MacMaster.
Also lovingly survived by 9 grandchildren, 3 great granddaughters as well
as many nieces and nephews. Family
and friends are kindly invited to attend
a Funeral Service in the Good Shepard
United Methodist Church, 577 Salem
Street, Malden on Friday, February
16th at 12 Noon. Committal Services
will be private. In lieu of flowers, the
family suggests that memorial contributions be made to the Good Shepard
Methodist Church.
Carroll Funeral Home
781-322-6322
www.carrollfh.com
OUT OF STATE
FLORIDA
DIAZ, Margery E. (Wigton)
KLEIN, Herbert D.
MAINE
NICHOLS, Edward M.
NEVADA
BERGER, Cynthia
NEW HAMPSHIRE
BARDSLEY, Lillian (MacMaster)
O’NEIL, Lillian E. (Cote)
BAXTER, Joseph F. Jr.
2/8/18, formerly of Melrose. Husband
of Sylvia and father of Deborah &
John. Visitation Thursday 4-8 with a
10:30AM Mass at St. Joseph Church,
Malden on Friday. Info @ 781-6651949 or www.gatelyfh.com
SOUTH CAROLINA
DIAZ, Margery E. (Wigton)
OUT OF COUNTRY
UNITED KINGDOM
CHERUBIN, Kristina M. (Izak)
Honor your loved one
with a photo in
The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
BELLISSIMO, Joseph J.,
Cambridge P.D. (Ret)
Of Randolph, formerly
of Cambridge, February
12, 2018. Visiting hours
Monday 4-8 p.m. at the Kfoury Keefe
Funeral Home. Complete notice Sunday
and at www.KfouryFuneral.com.
Kfoury Keefe Funeral Home
West Roxbury
617-325-3600
BERGER, Cynthia
80, of Las Vegas, formerly of Holliston
MA, passed away February 11, 2018.
She was born December 13, 1937 in
Boston, to the late Louis and the late
Etta (Rosenberg) Snider. She went
through the Brookline MA school system, attending the Devotion School and
Brookline High School. She is survived
by her daughter Wendy (Laura) Kraft
and son Neil Berger, 3 granddaughters;
and brother Stephen (Marlene) Snider.
She is predeceased by husband Irwin
Berger. Services will be held in Las
Vegas, NV.
BORGATTI, Bruno J.
Of Wellesley, February 13.
Beloved husband of Gloria
L. (Arale) Borgatti for 68
years. Devoted father of Randall J.
Borgatti and his wife Joan of Pocasset,
Robert J. Borgatti of Southborough.
Grandfather of Christopher, Elizabeth
and Brian Borgatti. Also survived by 3
great grandchildren and many nieces
and nephews. Brother of the late
Vincent Borgatti, Elsie Tiberi and Rose
Ferrara. Bruno was retired owner of BJ
Borgatti Upholstering of Wellesley. WW
II Army Veteran. Funeral from The
George F. Doherty & Sons Funeral
Home, 477 Washington St. (Rte. 16)
WELLESLEY, Friday at 9 AM, followed
by a Funeral Mass in St. Paul’s Church,
Wellesley at 10 A.M. Relatives and
friends kindly invited. Visiting hours
Thursday, 5-8. Interment, Woodlawn
Cemetery, Wellesley. For directions and
guestbook www.gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley (781) 235-4100
BURNS, Carol J. (DeNapoli)
Of Winthrop, Feb. 10. Devoted wife
of David Burns. Loving mother of
Christopher Burns and his wife Alison
of Bridgewater and Jonathan Burns
and his wife Allison of Winthrop. Dear
sister of the late Kenneth DeNapoli.
Cherished grandmother of Kaileen,
Francis and Caroline.
Visiting Hours: Family and friends
are cordially invited to attend the
visitation from the Ernest P. Caggiano
and Son Funeral Home, 147 Winthrop
St., WINTHROP on Thursday, February
15, 2018 from 8:00 AM to 9:30 AM followed by a Funeral Mass in St. John the
Evangelist Church, Winthrop at 10:00
AM. Interment to follow the mass
in the Belle Isle section of Winthrop
Cemetery. Memorial donations may be
made to the Robert A. DeLeo Senior
Center, 35 Harvard St., Winthrop, MA
02152. For directions or to sign the
online guestbook go to
www.caggianofuneralhome.com
Caggiano-O’Maley-Frazier
Winthrop
CAMOZZI, Ermenegildo
“Gildo”
Of Norwood, passed away February
11th at home, surrounded by his loving family, after a courageous battle
with Metastatic Melanoma. Beloved
husband of Marguerite (Baldini). Father
of Peter Camozzi and his wife Lisa of
Canton, John Camozzi of N. Andover,
Joseph Camozzi and his wife Diane of
Needham, Annmarie Khokha and her
husband Vivek of Foxboro. Grandfather
of Johnny, Julianna, Angelina, Christopher, Annie, Sophia and Francesca
Camozzi. Brother of Ida Noris, Pierina
Noris, both of Italy and the late Martina
Breda. Brother-in-law of Eleanor and
Lewis George of Norton. Visiting hours
at the Dockray & Thomas Funeral
Home, 455 Washington St., CANTON
Friday, 4-8, pm. Funeral Mass at St.
Catherine of Siena Church, Norwood
Saturday at 9 am. Burial Highland
Cemetery, Norwood. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made, in Gildo’s
name, to Boston Catholic TV, P.O. Box
9196, 34 Chestnut St. Watertown, MA
02471 or to the Multiple Myeloma
Research Foundation, 383 Main Ave.,
#5 Norwalk, CT 06851. For complete
obituary and guestbook, see: www.
dockrayandthomasfuneralhome.com.
Dockray & Thomas Funeral Home
781-828-0811
CANALE, J. Andrew PhD
CHOULIAN, M. Louise
83, died Tuesday, February 6, at Mount
Auburn Hospital after a brief illness.
Born on December 24th, 1934, Louise
graduated from Tufts University with
a major in economics in 1956. Upon
graduation, she began her professional
career at the main office of the First
National Bank of Boston. There she
rose from the ranks to become the first
female vice president in that institution
and remained with the bank throughout its ownership changes, finishing her
career as a consultant with the present
owner, Bank of America. Louise greatly
enjoyed her Cape Cod condominium
in her spare time and spent numerous
happy days in Brewster throughout
her adult life. She was a loyal benefactor of Tufts University for many
years, a member of the Class of 1956
Reunion Committee, and a volunteer
on numerous committees of the Tufts
Alumni Council and the Tufts Fund.
Her keen mind, wit, and infectious
laugh will long be remembered by all
those who had the pleasure of knowing
her. She is survived by her cousins
Dr. William H. Zovickian, John A.
Zovickian, Stephen R. Philips, other
loving family members, and her many
friends. Louise was the daughter of
Onnig and Haigouhy Choulian, niece of
Dr. Hovhannes Zovickian, and cousin
of Dr. Anthony Zovickian, all of whom
predeceased her. Services will be held
at the Aram Bedrosian Funeral Home,
558 Mount Auburn Street, WATERTOWN, MA on Friday, February 16,
2018 at 11:30 a.m. Relatives and
friends are kindly invited to attend. In
lieu of flowers, the family requests that
donations be made to the M. Louise
Choulian Endowed Scholarship Fund
at Tufts University. Interment at Ridgelawn Cemetery, Watertown.
CONSIDINE, Edward M., Sr.
Of Newton, died on Feb. 12, 2018.
Andy is survived by his beloved wife
Kay McGowan M.D., his daughter
Sarah Katherine Canale M.D. and her
husband Zachary Bloom and their
daughter Olive Lily Bloom of Winchester, his son John Andrew Thomas
Canale, Esq. of Santa Monica, CA, his
mother Mary (Cahill) Canale and his
sisters Joan Szuberla of Toledo, OH,
Ann Canale of St. Charles, MO, Jane
Canale of Hamilton, Ontario and many
nieces and nephews. He was the son of
the late Joseph A. Canale and brother
of the late James Canale. A wake will be
held on Thursday, Feb. 15th from 5-8
PM at Eaton & Mackay Funeral Home,
465 Centre St., NEWTON CORNER.
His funeral will be from the Eaton &
Mackay Funeral Home on Fri., Feb. 16
at 12:30 PM followed by a service at St.
Ignatius of Loyola Church, Chestnut
Hill at 1:30 PM. Interment at the
Newton Cemetery. Relatives and friends
are kindly invited. In lieu of flowers, we
invite people to make donations to the
the Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology at Brigham and Women’s
Hospital or a charitable organization
of your choosing. For directions, or to
share a memory of Andy, please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton & Mackay Funeral Home
Newton Corner 617-244-2034
CHERUBIN, Kristina M.
(Izak)
Of Saugus, formerly of Wakefield, age
64, February 10. Loving mother of
Mark Cherubin of Saugus & Victoria
Cherubin of Saugus. Beloved fiancee
of Gregory Buccini of Plymouth. Dear
sister of Stefan Izak of England. Aunt
of Nikolai Izak of England. Visiting
hours will be held in the Bisbee-Porcella Funeral Home, 549 Lincoln Ave.,
SAUGUS on Friday, 4-8 p.m. Funeral
services to be held in Bolton, England.
Interment Heaton Cemetery, England.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made to Dana Farber Cancer Institute,
PO Box 849168, Memorial Donations,
Boston, MA 02284 or www.dana-farber.
org/gift. For directions & condolences
www.BisbeePorcella.com.
Of Natick, formerly of Brighton, February 11, 2018. He was a simple man
with a huge heart. Beloved son of Irish
parents, the late Edmund A. & Mary
(Canning) Considine. Devoted husband
of the late Carol (Lombard) Considine.
Loving father of Karen & Anthony Susi
of Canton, Doreen & Bruno Mancini
of Norwood, Edward Considine, Jr. &
Susan Vose of Brighton, Brenda & Mark
Miskin of Needham, Andrea & David
Kelly of Natick, and Dave & Christine of
Natick. Brother of John “Jack” & Maureen Considine of Brighton, and late
Marie Schroeder, and Teresa Murphy.
Grandfather of Tony, Joe, & Jim Susi,
Mike & Shannon, Dan, & Gina Mancini,
Dylan & Eva Considine, Ricky, Jake, &
Brandon Miskin, Katherine & Julianne
Kelly, and Brendan & Caitlyn MacLellan. Also survived by many nieces and
nephews. Edward received a Bachelor’s
Degree from Northeastern University
Class of 1959 and Served in the United
States Navy during the Korean War.
Funeral from the Lehman, Reen, &
McNamara Funeral Home, 63 Chestnut
Hill Ave. (nr. Brighton Courthouse)
BRIGHTON, Friday, February 16th
at 9:30am. Followed by a Funeral
Mass in St. Columbkille Church, 321
Market St., Brighton at 10:30am.
Relatives and friends are kindly invited
to attend. Interment Private. Visiting hours, Thursday, from 4:00 to
8:00pm. In lieu of flowers donations
in memory of Edward may be made to
the American Cancer Society, 30 Speen
St., Framingham, MA 01701. Funeral
Home Handicapped Accessible. For
directions and guest book please visit
www.lehmanreen.com
Lehman Reen McNamara
Brighton 617 782 1000
DENARO, Joan M. (Murray)
Announcements
PIPEFITTERS LOCAL 537
We regret to announce the death
of Brother Earl R. Stacey, Jr. of
South Weymouth, passed away
February 11, 2018. Visitation
hours at the C.C. Shepherd Funeral Home, 134 Pleasant St, South
Weymouth on Thursday February
15, 2018, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Brian P. Kelly, Bus. Mgr./FST
John F. McMasters Jr. President
Of Weymouth, died February 13, 2018
at the age of 89. She was the wife of
Michael Denaro. Loving mother of Joan
Perkins of Revere, Rita Denaro and Michael Denaro, both of Quincy. Sister of
Robert Murray of SC, William Murray
of Woburn, and the late Lawrence
Murray of Belmont. Also survived by
2 grandchildren. Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited to attend the
visiting hours on Friday 10:30-11:30
AM in the McDonald Keohane Funeral
Home NORTH WEYMOUTH at 40 Sea
Street (off Route 3A - Bicknell Square)
prior to the Funeral Mass in St. Jerome
Church, Weymouth at Noon. Burial in
St. Joseph’s Cemetery, West Roxbury.
See www.Keohane.com for directions and online condolences or call
781-335-0045.
T h e
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G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
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DEVITT, Carol A.
DWYER, Mary T.
(Galvin Greene)
GANIM, Donald G.
GUNN, Frances G. (Farrell)
KNOTT, Betty Davis
Of Winthrop, Feb. 7, 2018. Beloved wife
of 50 years to the late James P. Gunn.
For death notice and arrangements,
please visit: www.mauricekirbyfh.com.
Maurice W. Kirby Funeral Home
Winthrop
617-846-0909
HALL, David W.
Age 79, died peacefully, February 12,
2018 at the Bethany Healthcare Center,
Framingham. Born in Boston, she
was the daughter of the late John A.
and Anna (Sullivan) Devitt. Ms. Devitt
attended the Notre Dame Academy
High, Hingham, graduated from Emmanuel College, Boston and received
her Master’s Degree from Fairfield
University, Fairfield, CT and Boston
State College. Carol was a former
Sister of Notre Dame where she taught
English and History at Cardinal Cushing Central High School in S. Boston,
St. Mary School in the North End,
St. Mary School in Lawrence, Bishop
Fenwick High School, Peabody. Later
as a Teacher in the Waltham Public
School System. She enjoyed time with
her family and friends at her home in
Arlington and summer home in Wells,
Maine. Carol is survived by her cousins,
Judith Devitt of West Roxbury and Sr.
Helen Sullivan, CSJ of Brighton. She
also leaves behind her dear friend Dorothy Lynch of Holbrook. Visiting hours
will be at Holy Spirit Chapel, Bethany
Health Care Center, 97 Bethany Road,
Framingham, Friday, February 16,
2018, 9:15-10:15AM, followed by
Funeral Mass at 10:30 a.m. Burial will
follow at Milton Cemetery, Milton. Arrangements are under the direction of
the Norton Funeral Home, 53 Beech St.
(Corner of Union Ave.), Framingham. In
lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy
may be made to Bethany Healthcare
Center, 97 Bethany Road, Framingham,
MA 01702, C/O Sr. Jacquelyn McCarthy, CSJ. For online guestbook log onto
www.nortonfuneralhome.com
Norton Funeral Home, Inc.
Framingham, MA
DIAZ, Margery E. (Wigton)
Of North Andover, formerly of Estero,
FL and North Reading, February 10,
2018, age 98. Beloved wife of the late
Arthur J. Diaz, Sr. Loving mother of
Melissa Standley of North Reading,
Arthur J. Diaz, Jr. and Donald J. Diaz,
sister-in-law of Arnold Diaz and wife
Susan, all of South Carolina. Grandmother of Lori, Matt, Jeni and Sara.
Great grandmother of Blaize, Zoe and
Phineas. Funeral service at the Union
Congregational Church, 148 Haverhill
St., North Reading on Tuesday, February 20 at 10:30 AM. Calling hours will
be held prior to the service at church
from 9:30 to 10:30 AM. Interment in
Riverside Cemetery in North Reading.
Memorial donations may be made in
her memory to: New England Paralyzed
Veterans of America, 1208 VFW
Parkway, Suite 301, West Roxbury, MA
02132 or to the charity of one’s choice.
Former secretary of the Union Congregational Church for 70 years.
Croswell Funeral Home
www.croswellfuneralhome.com
North Reading (978) 664-3031
DONOIAN, Ara George
Ara George Donoian, 92, of Lowell,
passed away February 11, 2018, in
Needham, MA. He is survived by his
wife of 66 years, Eva (Dadian) Donoian,
four children, Dianne Rees and her husband Bill of Millis, MA, Gary Donoian
and his wife Melanie of East Greenwich, RI, Stephen Donoian and his wife
Taleen of Hopkinton, MA, and Kathryn
Eskandarian and her husband Michael
of Bedford, MA; ten grandchildren, one
great-grandchild and one on the way.
Also, many loving sisters and brothersin-law, and nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends will be received
at Saints Vartanantz Armenian Church,
180 Old Westford Road, Chelmsford, on
Thursday from 9:00 AM to 10:45 AM.
Ara’s Funeral Service to follow at 11:00
AM. Interment in Westlawn II Cemetery, Lowell. A remembrance dinner to
follow at Saints Vartanantz Church. In
lieu of flowers, memorial donations in
his name may be made to the Armenia
Tree Project, www.armeniatree.org, or
to The American Macular Degeneration
Foundation, www.macular.org.
Morse-Bayliss Funeral Home
Lowell, MA
www.morsebaylissfuneralhome.com
Greatly Loved
In Dorchester, February 11th. Beloved
wife of the late Richard H. Dwyer and
Patrick J. Greene. Daughter of the late
Patrick J. and Margaret M. (O’Keeffee)
Galvin. Loving mother of Patricia M.
Greene of Dorchester, Sean R. Greene
and his wife Maureen Joyce-Greene
of Quincy, Rita F. and her husband
Gerard Bailey of Quincy, Margaret B.
and her husband Thomas O’Hearn
of South Boston, Teresa M. and her
husband Gregory Clark of Weston, and
Brendan J. and his wife Anne Greene
of Norwell. Sister of Patricia Johnston
of South Boston and the late Margaret
Tarmey. Devoted Nana of Alexandra
Clark, Shayne Bailey, Siobhan Greene,
Patrick Clark, Caitlin Greene, Zachary
Bailey, Nolan Greene, Victoria Clark,
Jacqueline Greene, Jordan Bailey,
Conor Greene, Meghan Greene, Justin
Greene, and Reece Clark. Survived
by many nieces and nephews. Family
and friends will honor and remember
Mary’s life by gathering for visiting
hours in the Murphy Funeral Home,
1020 Dorchester Ave., DORCHESTER,
on Thursday from 3-8 P.M. Her Funeral
Mass will be celebrated in St. Margaret
Church of St. Teresa of Calcutta Parish,
Friday morning, February 16th, at
10:30 A.M. A private interment will be
held at Bourne National Cemetery at a
later date. Mary was a former member
of the Friendly and K Clubs, and attended the Quincy Council on Aging
at the Kennedy Center in Squantum.
In lieu of flowers, donations in Mary’s
memory may be made to Boston Medical Center, Geriatrics Department, c/o
Development Office, 801 Massachusetts
Avenue, 1st floor, Boston, MA 02118.
For directions and guestbook, please
visit www.jmurphyfh.com. Funeral
Home handicapped accessible with
ample parking.
FLYNN, Dorothy J.
(McKinnon)
Of South Boston, passed away February 11, 2018 at the age of 85. Devoted
wife of the late Albert Flynn. Beloved
daughter of the late Francis and Mary
(O’Keefe) McKinnon. Loving sister of
late Francis McKinnon, his wife Rita
the late David McKinnon, his late wife
Sis, the late Robert McKinnon, his late
wife Maria, and the late Jake McKinnon, his late wife Frannie. Also survived
by many loving nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. Visiting hours in the
O’Brien Funeral Home, 146 Dorchester
Street, South Boston, on Thursday
from 4-7PM. Funeral Mass in St. Brigid
Church, 841 East Broadway South
Boston on Friday at 11:00AM. Relatives
and friends are invited to attend both
services. Interment will be private.
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Donald G. Ganim, 83, of
Methuen passed away
Monday morning, February
12, 2018 at High Pointe Hospice House
in Haverhill, after a courageous battle
with prostate cancer. Born in 1934 in
Brooklyn, NY, beloved son of the late
Tofie (Tom) and Nellie (Farrah) Ganim,
Don graduated from Fort Hamilton
High School in Brooklyn in 1952. He
entered New York University on an Air
Force ROTC scholarship and earned
a B.S. degree in 1956 in international
marketing. He was commissioned in
the U.S. Force as a 2nd Lt., where he
served three years of active duty, followed by six years as a contracting officer in the Air Force Reserve in Rome,
NY. He achieved the rank of Captain,
before being Honorably Discharged
from the Air Force Reserve.
Hired by Raytheon Corp. based in
Lexington, MA in 1966, Donald worked
for thirty years as a contract manager
in both the HAWK and PATRIOT air
defense missile system programs. He
retired in 1996, but quickly became
bored with retired life. With a passion
for investment and financial securities,
he passed both the Series 6 and Series 7
broker’s license exams, authorizing him
to sell virtually any type of individual
security. He was employed by Putnam
Investments in Andover, as a certified
financial advisor for seven years.
After retiring from his second
“career,” Don fully embraced retirement
life with his soulmate and devoted wife
of over sixty years, Violet. They enjoyed
traveling together, both domestically
and internationally, spending time
exploring Boston and the North Shore,
and relaxing on the beaches of Salisbury. Don was a regular spectator at
all his grandchildren’s events, whether
on the stage, the athletic field/court or
hockey rink. He regularly attended Red
Sox games with his family at Fenway
Park, where he shared season tickets
for over twenty-five years.
An active member of Latitudes
Sports Club in Methuen, St. Monica’s
Parish, and the Emerald Pine community in Methuen, Don served as the Treasurer and President of their homeowner’s association. He was instrumental
in alerting Toll Brothers Construction
of the unfinished land abutting their
newly built homes and spent countless
hours with both town officials and with
building representatives to ensure a fair
and well-structured merger occurred
between the two neighborhoods. He
was a charter member of the Knights of
Columbus at St. Monica’s Parish, where
he served as an officer and rose to the
level of third degree knight. Committed to their principles of charity, unity
and fraternity, Don fully embraced the
Catholic identity and many charitable
missions of the Knights organization.
Don is survived by his beloved
wife of sixty years, Violet (Manassa);
their three children, Doreen (Ganim)
Archambault and her husband, Robert,
of Atkinson, NH, Donald Ganim II,
M.D. and his wife, Joann (Sulikowski)
Ganim, M.D., of Hamilton, MA, and
Thomas M. Ganim and his wife, Kerry
(Menmuir) of Saugus, CA. He was a
proud grandfather to his five grandchildren, whom he loved dearly and
was so closely involved in their lives,
Gabrielle, Donny, Will, Tyler, and Paige;
and his older brother, Raymond Ganim
of Brooklyn, NY.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend the visitation on
Friday, February 16, 2018 from 4:00
-8:00 PM at Cataudella Funeral Home,
126 Pleasant Valley Street, METHUEN. A Funeral Mass will be held on
Saturday, February 17th at 11:00 AM
at St. Monica Church, 212 Lawrence
St., Methuen. For directions or to send
condolences, please visit
www.cataudellafh.com
Cataudella Funeral Home
978-685-5379
GUIDABONI, Peter A.
75, of Quincy, passed away
on February 12, 2018.
Beloved husband of
Theresa Guidaboni. Loving father to
Peter Guidaboni, Jr., Wayne Guidaboni,
Brian Guidaboni, Chris Guidaboni, and
his stepchildren Kelly Tabbut, Linda
Murphy, and John P. Brennan. Son of
the late Ernest and Mabel Guidaboni
Arruda. Brother to Barbara Arponen
and her husband Richard, Michael
Guidaboni and Mary Sampson, William
Arruda and his wife Susan, Richard
Arruda and his wife Lynn, Stephanie
Arruda Joubert and her husband Jim,
and the late Patricia Chandler. Peter is
also survived by several grandchildren.
Visiting hours will be held on
Thursday, February 15th from 4-8:00
PM at the Shepherd Funeral Home,
216 Main St (Rt. 106) KINGSTON.
A Funeral Mass will be held at St.
Joseph Church in Kingston on Friday,
February 16th at 10:00 AM. Peter will
be laid to rest with Military Honors at a later date. To offer condolences or for directions please visit
www.shepherdfuneralhome.com.
Shepherd Funeral Home, Kingston.
BostonGlobe.com
64, of Winchester, Feb. 12, 2018. Visiting Hours Friday 4-8PM. Funeral Sat.
9:30AM Costello Funeral Home for
procession to Wildwood Cemetery, Winchester at 10AM. Late Lt. Winchester
F.D. www.costellofuneralhome.com
HAMMERQUIST, Colleen M.
(Taylor)
Of Hanover, MA, passed away on
Saturday evening, February 10, 2018,
comfortably surrounded by some family
and friends. She was the loving wife of
her late husband, Harry, survived by
her two sons Erik and Gregg as well as
grandchildren Luke and Tess. Visiting
hours will be on Thursday, February 15th from 4pm-7pm at Sullivan
Funeral Home, 551 Washington Street,
Rte 53, HANOVER. A Funeral Mass
will be celebrated on Friday, February
16th at 11am at St. Thecla Church, 145
Washington Street, Rte 53, Pembroke.
Burial is private. For directions and to
sign Colleen’s online guestbook, visit
SullivanFuneralHomes.com
Hanover Rockland Hanson
781-878-0920 781-293-2020
Family Operated Since 1897
HARRINGTON, Mary C.
(Harte)
Of Arlington February 10, 2018.
Beloved mother of Michael Harrington and his husband David Breen
of Brookline, Mary B. Harrington of
South Boston, Eileen Kirk and her
husband Tony of Roslindale. Loving
grandmother of Declan, Noah and
Caroline. Dear sister of William and
Neal Harte. A Funeral Mass will be
celebrated for Mary, in St. Eulalia
Church, Winchester, Friday morning
at 10:00. Relatives and friends invited.
Calling hours in the George L. Doherty
Funeral Home, 855 Broadway (Powder
House Sq.) Somerville, Thursday February 15, 2018, 4-8. Interment private.
For more information please visit
www.dohertyfuneralservice.com
George L. Doherty Funeral Service
Somerville, MA
JOHNSON, Richard E.
Of Newton Highlands, suddenly Feb
13, 2018. Son of the late Ralph W. and
Mary C. (Walsh) Johnson. Brother of
Jean Johnson of Newton Highlands,
Ralph of Carver, Paul of Eastham,
Natalie Johnson of Newton Highlands,
Ruth Conway of Sharon, Joseph of
Newton Highlands, and Judith Quinn
of Kingston. He is also survived by 10
nieces and nephews and 11 greatnieces and nephews. His funeral will
be from the Eaton Funeral Home, 1351
Highland Ave., NEEDHAM on Fri., Feb
16 at 9:30 AM followed by his Mass of
Christian Burial in Mary Immaculate of
Lourdes Church, Newton Upper Falls
at 10:30 AM. Relatives and friends are
kindly invited. Visiting hours Thurs.
3-6 PM. Interment St. Mary’s Cemetery
Needham. In lieu of flowers, donations
in his name may be made to Mary Immaculate of Lourdes Church, 270 Elliot
St., Newton, MA 02464. For directions
or to share a memory of Richard please
visit www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton Funeral Home
Needham 781-444-0201
KLEIN, Herbert D.
WWII Veteran
Of Lantana, FL & Montreal
Quebec formerly from
Swampscott, MA on
February 9, 2018 at 97 years old
Preceded in death by his wife of 60
years Semah M. and his brothers
Emanuel and Arthur. He is survived by
his children Robert E. (Charlotte) and
Jane Brown (Michael) and longtime
partner Mollie Corber. Grandfather of
Jonathan, Michael (Elizabeth), Abigail
(Alex), Emily (William), Zachary
(Caitlin) and Elizabeth Brown. Great
grandfather of Lucas and Lauren Klein.
He was a veteran of WWII and worked
at Gilchrist and 40 years at Boston
University Medical Center until his
retirement. Herb took up golf at 65 and
played almost daily until he was 96. He
also loved to travel, play bridge and do
daily crosswords. He was a master
craftsman and often built furniture for
friends and family. He did numerous
wood carvings and other creative things
from jewelry to making lamps out of
anything that did not move. Funeral
arrangements are private. Shiva at
Temple Beth Elohim, 10 Bethel Rd.
Wellesley, MA Thursday, February 15,
2018 from 4-7p.m. Donations in his
memory may be made to the American
Cancer Society or the Crohns and
Colitis Foundation of America.
Beloved wife of James M. Knott
Sr., died peacefully at her home on
February 11, 2018 surrounded by her
devoted family and caregivers. She
is survived by her children Janet L.
Knott, Andrew M. Knott and wife Jayne
(Fifield) Knott, James M. Knott Jr. and
wife Gigi (Gao) Knott, Edward Jeffrey
Knott and wife Barbara (Glunn) Knott
and grandchildren Jennie L. Knott and
partner Philipp Bolt, Andrew M. Knott
Jr. and wife Angela (Jenkins) Knott,
Nancy D. Knott and fiance Matthew J.
Crescio and Elissa E. Knott. Betty was
a graduate of Brookline High School
and the Fisher School in Boston. She
met Jim in 1947 at a Rockport Art
Association dance on July 4th. And
the two were soon inseparable. After
they married, the young couple moved
to Wellesley to raise their family. They
later moved to Northbridge to start
Riverdale Mills Corporation and spent
their summers in Gloucester.
An accomplished woman with many
interests, Betty was happiest cooking
dinner for her family, balancing the
books for Riverdale Mills, organizing the Wellesley Republican Town
Committee, planning events with the
Wellesley Garden Club, and contributing to her many interests in the Cape
Ann Community. Her Episcopalian
faith was practiced daily. “Do unto
others as you would have them do unto
you” was one of her many reminders of
how to live gracefully in the world. Her
passion for history, interior and landscape design reflected her artistic flair
grounded in New England tradition.
On Friday afternoons she could often
be seen enjoying the Boston Symphony.
Betty was a loving, strong matriarch
and cherished friend, she will be dearly
missed by many. The Knott family
wishes to acknowledge their gratitude
for the many remarkable caregivers that supported and assisted with
Betty’s care. Services will be held at St.
John’s Episcopal Church, 48 Middle St.,
Gloucester, MA on Saturday, February
17 at 12 o’clock. A celebration of Betty’s
life will follow at the Shalin Liu Performance Center in Rockport, MA. In lieu
of flowers, the family requests that you
send a donation in honor of Betty to the
charity of your choice. Arrangements
are by the Greely Funeral Home, 212
Washington St., GLOUCESTER, MA.
Online condolences may be given at:
www.greelyfuneralhome.com
Greely Funeral Home, Gloucester
978-283-0698
LOSIER, Philip G. “Greg” Jr.
78, passed away peacefully on February 11, 2018 in Natick. He was born
December 19, 1939 in Oak Park, IL
to Philip and Evelyn (Kelly) Losier.
Greg was a basketball and baseball allscholastic at Belmont High School and
graduated in 1957. In recognition of his
athletic achievements he was inducted
into the Belmont High School Athletic
Hall of Fame. He was a member of the
basketball team at Harvard College
and remained an enthusiastic Crimson
supporter through the years. He was
also a graduate of Boston University.
Greg was an avid sports fan to the
end. In addition to his love of the
Boston professional sports teams he
was always up to date on local high
school basketball and hockey scores,
particularly for Belmont and Waltham
and was a volunteer basketball coach
at New Mission High School in Boston.
Prior to his retirement, he was employed at Hills Department Stores for
many years. Greg is survived by his five
children and fourteen grandchildren,
David Losier and his wife Barbara and
their children, Brett, Christopher and
Emily of Acton, Kristen Bilodeau and
her husband Cory and their children Alexandra and Abigale of North Reading,
Michael Losier and his wife Kimberly
and their children Dylan, Brendan and
Taylor of Waltham, Brian Losier and
his wife Kara and their children Jack,
Flynn, Cullen and Brennan of Lexington and Sean Losier and his wife Katlyn
and their children Connor and Molly of
Medford. Greg is also survived by his
brother David Losier of Tewksbury, MA.
Funeral Services were held privately.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may
be sent in Greg’s name to support
the YMCA of Greater Boston Annual
Fund, 316 Huntington Ave., Boston,
MA 02115. Arrangements entrusted to
the care of Blake Chelmsford Funeral
Home, 24 Worthen St., CHELMSFORD.
For condolences visit
chelmsfordfuneralhome.com.
Funeral Services
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
MASSIE, Leda (DiFava)
Of East Cambridge, February 9. Beloved
wife of the late Joseph Dyas Massie.
Devoted mother of Roberta Gurney and
her husband Ralph, Rhonda Massie
and her husband Paul Keplin, Robert
Dyas Massie and the late Richard Dyas
Massie. Loving grandmother of Aaron
Gurney and his wife Adrienne, Seth
Gurney and his wife Melissa, Steven
Keplin and his wife Siobhan, Andrew
Keplin, Adriana, Christina, Elena and
Joseph Massie and great grandmother
of Maximus, Lucius, Calliope and
Penelope Gurney, Madison, MacKenzie and James Gurney, Abigail and
Samantha Keplin. Sister of Cesare and
Marcello DiFava and the late Alfineo,
Osvalda, Nellio and Loreta. Survived by
her sister-in-law Helen DiFava. Funeral
from the Donovan-Aufiero Funeral
Home, 140 Otis St., CAMBRIDGE,
Friday at 9 AM, followed by a Rite of
Christian Burial in the Sacred Heart
Church, 49 Sixth St., Cambridge at
10 AM. Visiting Thursday 4-8 PM.
Interment Cambridge Cemetery. Leda
enjoyed working in food service and
made many friends at Iffens Restaurant
in East Cambridge and at the cafeteria
in the Middlesex Courthouse. For guest
book visit donovanaufierofuneralhome
MEDOFF, Irving I.
Attorney
Age 87, of Newton, on Monday, February 12, 2018. For 64 years, he was
the beloved husband of Phyllis (Sade)
Medoff. Cherished father of Bruce
Medoff & his wife Joanne of Newton,
Laura Medoff of Newton, David Medoff
& his wife Donna of Newton, and
Nancy Medoff & her fiancé Dan Paisner
of Brookline. Adoring zayde of Matthew, Colby, Kara and Jacob and Robin.
Dear brother of Beatrice Fay & her
husband Stuart of Fitchburg and the
late Benjamin Medoff, Louis Medoff,
Herman Medoff and twin sister, Frieda
Cohen. Irving practiced law for 50
years. He was an avid fisherman and
will be remembered for his wry sense
of humor, his kind hearted decency, his
compassion and his integrity.
Services at the Levine Chapels,
470 Harvard Street, BROOKLINE,
on Thursday, February 15 at 9:30am.
Burial in the Beth El Cemetery, 776
Baker Street, West Roxbury.
Shiva will be held at his late residence immediately following the burial
until 7:00pm. Friday from 1pm - 4pm.
Saturday 7:00pm – 9:00pm and continuing Sunday from 2:00pm – 6:00pm
In lieu of flowers, remembrances may
be made to Jewish Big Brothers & Big
Sisters Association, 333 Nahanton St,
Newton, MA 02459 or to the Friends
of the Israel Defense Forces, 60 E 42nd
St., New York, NY 10165
Levine Chapels, Brookline
(617) 277-8300
www.levinechapel.com
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is a story
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For more details and pricing
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Remembered
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
G l o b e
Obituaries
Marty Allen, clownish half
of comedic duo in 1960s
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
MILLER, Thomas Moreland
NASH, Peter J. Jr.
PARKER, Dr. Jack S.
94, of Westwood and
formerly of Wellesley Hills
and Osterville, passed away
peacefully on Friday, February 9, 2018.
Relatives and friends are kindly
invited to a circle of remembrance at
3PM on Saturday, February 17th in the
chapel at the Unitarian Universalist Society of Wellesley Hills, 309 Washington
St, Wellesley Hills 02481.
For additional information
and guestbook, please visit:
Duckett-Waterman.com
Most recently of Plymouth,
age 92, passed away
peacefully surrounded by
his children and grandchildren on
February 4th, 2018. He was greatly
loved and will be sorely missed by
family and friends. Born on December
8th, 1925, in Mount Union, Pennsylvania, Tom graduated from Mount Union
High School in 1943, and during WWII
served in the Army Air Corps, primarily
in Assam, India. Under the GI Bill he
graduated with a degree in Civil
Engineering in 1950 from Pennsylvania
State University. In 1976 he obtained a
Master’s Degree in Engineering from
Northeastern University. He worked as
an engineer for American Bridge,
American Viscose, and Westinghouse in
Western Pennsylvania until 1958 and
then, in the Boston area, as Project
Engineer with NRC, Norton, and Varian
until his retirement in 1992. During
retirement Tom’s adventures included
piloting his boat, the Wake Robin, from
Cape Cod to Key West and back. He
travelled the world, visiting all the
continents except Australia, and
became a voracious reader, reading
widely in history and science.
Throughout his life, he was a strong
believer in the power of education and
a supporter of the environment. In
2005 he completed four years of service
for the Senior AmeriCorps. He is
survived by his sons, George W. Miller
and his wife Cathy of Middle Grove, NY,
Douglas K. Miller and his wife Becky
Day of Estes Park, CO, and his
daughter, Emily Miller Mlcak of Stow,
MA; by his grandchildren: William
Miller of Queensbury, New York, Kelly
Miller of Ballston Spa, NY, and Violet
Miller Mlcak, of Stow, MA; by his four
great-grandchildren; by his siblings,
Dorothy Lamberson and Wendell
Miller; and by Donna Louise Tanis, his
partner of over 20 years, with whom he
lived on the Cape. He is preceded in
death by his wife of 36 years, Mary
Elizabeth Radle Miller, also a MUHS
graduate; by siblings, Kenyon Miller
and John Miller, and by his parents,
William G. Miller, a former Mount
Union school superintendent, and
Violet Mae Miller. In lieu of flowers,
those who wish may contribute in his
name to the Mount Union High School
Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 33, Mount
Union, PA 17066.
MIZZONI, Phyllis M.
(Simmons)
Of Westford, formerly of Waltham,
February 13, 2018. Beloved wife of
the late Robert F. Mizzoni. Mother of
David Mizzoni of Bedford, NH, Glen
Mizzoni of Waltham and the late
Robert P. Mizzoni and Susan Mizzoni.
Grandmother of Jessica, Genevieve,
Gina, Johanna, Michael and Nicholas.
Great-grandmother of George, John,
Gianna, Joseph and Giovanni. Sister of
Michael Simmons of Townsend, Mary
Voss of Halifax and the late William
Simmons. Family and friends will
honor and remember Phyllis’ life by
gathering for calling hours in The Joyce
Funeral Home, 245 Main Street (Rte.
20), Waltham on Friday, February 16th
from 4 to 8 p.m. and again at 9 a.m.
on Saturday morning before leaving in
procession to Sacred Heart Church, 311
River Street, Waltham where her Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m.
Burial will follow in Grove Hill Cemetery, Waltham. For complete obituary,
guestbook and directions please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
MURCH, Richard Harley
Of Roslindale, February 9, 2018.
Beloved husband of Christol (Yobst).
Visiting hours Monday, February 19th
from 4-8 pm. A Funeral Mass will be
celebrated on Tuesday, February 20th
at 11:00 am in St John Chrysostom
Church, 4750 Washington Street, West
Roxbury. Complete notice to appear on
Sunday, February 18, 2018.
William J. Gormley Funeral Service
617-323-8600
Funeral Services
SWEENEY BROTHERS
HOME FOR
FUNERALS, INC.
One Independence Ave., Quincy
617-472-6344
Serving Quincy & The South Shore
Age 42, of Milton, passed away unexpectedly February 12th. Beloved son
of Peter J. Nash, Sr. of Milton and the
late Martha (Miller) Nash. Brother of
Daniel J. Nash and his wife Amy of
Dorchester. Devoted uncle of Ronan
Nash of Dorchester. Nephew of Michael
Nash and his wife Noreen of Randolph,
Jeremiah Nash and his wife Patsy of
Newton, and Mary Jennings of Canada.
Also survived by his father’s partner
Dernella Diver of Dorchester, his close
friend Adrienne Munroe of Dorchester,
and a large extended family. Funeral
Mass at St. Agatha Church, Milton,
Saturday at 12 noon. Visiting hours at
the Alfred D. Thomas Funeral Home,
326 Granite Ave., MILTON, Friday 4-8
pm. Burial Milton Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made in his
memory to the Dana Farber Cancer
Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston,
MA 02215. For complete obituary and
guestbook see www.alfreddthomas.com
Alfred D. Thomas Funeral Home
(617) 696-4200
NICHOLS, Edward M. “Ted”
Of Reading and formerly of
Wilmington, died unexpectedly on February 11, 2018,
at age 90. Beloved husband of 67 years
to Jean L. (Boyd) Nichols; loving father
of Edward of Kennebunk, ME, Karl of
Norfolk, VA, David of Derry, NH, Peter
of Wenham, Guy of Lowell, Andrew
of North Reading and the late Mark
Nichols; grandfather of 22 and great
grandfather of 12.
Funeral service at the Faith Lutheran
Church, 360 So. Main Street (Rt. 28)
in Andover on Friday, February 16 at
11 AM. Calling hours at the Croswell
Funeral Home, 19 Bow St., NORTH
READING, on Thursday, February
15 from 4 to 7 PM. Interment in
Wildwood Cemetery in Wilmington at
a later date. Retired Assistant Probation Officer in Superior Court for the
Commonwealth of MA from 1954 to
1987. U.S. Navy Veteran of WWII, U.S.
Marine Corps Veteran of the Korean
War and U.S. Army Reserves Captain
with the Medical Corps during the
Vietnam Conflict. Memorial donations
may be made in his memory to:www.
foundation4love.org.
Croswell Funeral Home
www.croswellfuneralhome.com
North Reading (978) 664-3031
O’NEIL, Lillian E. (Cote)
Of Medford February 11, 2018. Beloved
wife of the late Eugene F. O’Neil, Sr.
Loving mother of Eugene F. O’Neil,
Jr. of Somerville, Pamela L. Koch and
her husband Robert of VA, Cheryl A.
Peledge and her husband Richard of
Wakefield, Kathryn J. Sadowski of
Wilton, NH, John D. O’Neil and his
wife Barbara of Bradford. Dear grandmother of Kristen, Paul, Jason, Justin,
Jared, Jeffrey, Brenton, Corey, Patrick,
Brian and Conor. Also survived by 11
great grandchildren. Sister of the late
Roger Cote and Susie Sensale. Lillian
loved playing Bingo and vacationing in
Orrs Island, ME during the Summer.
Funeral from the George L. Doherty
Funeral Home, 855 Broadway (Powder
House Sq.) Somerville, Friday morning
8:30am, followed by a Funeral Mass in
St. Raphael Church, Medford at 9:30.
Relatives and friends invited. Calling
hours Thursday 4-8. Interment Oak
Grove Cemetery. In lieu of flowers
donations may be made in Lillian’s
memory to the charity of your choice.
For more information please visit
www.dohertyfuneralservice.com
George L. Doherty Funeral Service
Somerville, MA
OLDRO, Robert E.
Of Waltham, February 11, 2018. Husband of Joan F. (Couture) Shaughnessy.
Father of Mark E. Oldro of Dighton,
Robert E. Oldro, III of Taunton, John
C. Oldro, Debbie A. Sylvia, both of
Middleboro and Michael S. Oldro and
Tammy Oldro, both of Jamestown, NY.
Son of Margaret (Bradley) Clinch of
Waltham and the late Robert E. Oldro.
Brother of the late Patricia Tweedy.
Also survived by several grandchildren
and step-children. Family and friends
will honor and remember Bob’s life
by gathering for calling hours in The
Joyce Funeral Home, 245 Main Street
(Rte. 20), Waltham on Friday, February
16th from 4 to 8 p.m. and again on
Saturday morning when his funeral
service will be held at 11 a.m. Burial
will be private. For complete obituary,
guest book and directions please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
Express
your sympathy
View The Boston Globe’s complete
list of death notices and sign the
guestbook at boston.com/obituaries.
Duckett - J.S. Waterman & Sons
Home of Memorial Tribute
Sudbury, MA
(978) 443-5777
PERRY, Jean C. (Carangelo)
Of Saugus, formerly of East Boston,
February 9th. Wife of the late Donald
M. Perry. Beloved mother of Lisa PerryCalderan & her husband Paul of Lynn,
Laura Falasca & her husband John III
of Salisbury. Loving grandmother of
5 grandchildren. Dear sister of James
Carangelo of Winthrop. An hour of visitation will be held in the Bisbee-Porcella Funeral Home, 549 Lincoln Ave.,
SAUGUS, on Saturday from 11 a.m.
to noon. A funeral service will be held
in the funeral home at noon. In lieu of
flowers, donations in her memory may
be made to the Northeast Animal Shelter at www.NortheastAnimalShelter.
org. For directions & condolences
www.BisbeePorcella.com.
SHAINKER, Arnold N.
Of Andover, on February 12, 2018.
Beloved husband of Susan (Zagoren)
Shainker. Devoted father of Cate,
Lindsay, Howard, and Scott. Cherished
grandfather of Eli, Felix, Levi, Molly,
and Logan. Dear brother of Elaine,
Stuart, Robert, and Donna. Services
at Temple Emanuel, 7 Haggetts Pond
Rd., Andover, MA, Thursday, February
15, 2018 at 11:00 am. Interment at
Sharon Memorial Park. Shiva will be
observed at Arnold and Susan’s home
on Thursday after interment until 8pm.
Friday from 1:00-3:30, and Saturday
6:00-8:00 pm. Shiva will be observed at
the home of Scott and Lindsay Shainker
on Sunday 1-4 pm. In lieu of flowers,
donations in Arnold’s memory may
be made to The New England Center
for Placental Disorders Fund, c/o the
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Foundation, Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center, East Campus, 330
Brookline Avenue - Kirstein Suite 3,
Boston MA, 02215.
SIGNORIELLO, Arthur R.
PHILLIPS, Athena “Tina”
(Palsson)
Of Canton formerly of Quincy, died
February 13, 2018.
Tina graduated from the Woodward
School of Girls in Quincy and later
received her bachelors degree from
Emmanuel College. Tina worked for
Mantech Corporation and Lockheed
Martin both in Needham. She also
worked as a programmer for Honeywell
for many years. Tina was a mentor for
the junior achievement program for the
youth in Newton and Wellesley, MA.
She cherished her dear friends at Beth
Isreal Deaconess Hospital and Canton
Library. Tina will be sadly missed by all
those who had the pleasure of knowing
her.
Beloved wife of 50 years to Laurence
Phillips of Canton. Loving daughter of
the late Gudmundur and Louise Palsson. Caring sister of Jonathon Palsson
and his wife Joan of Duxbury and the
late Eugene Palsson and his wife Kathryn. Cherished aunt of Susan Brennan
and her husband Jack of Abington,
Patti Sprague and her husband Peter of
Kingston, Larry Naclerio and his wife
Rosann of Scituate and many other
nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends are respectfully
invited to attend the visiting hours
on Thursday 9:30-10:30 AM in the
Keohane Funeral Home, 785 Hancock
St., QUINCY. Funeral service will be
celebrated on Thursday at 10:30 AM
in Keohane Funeral Home, Quincy.
Burial in MA National Cemetery,
Bourne at 1:45 PM. In lieu of flowers,
donations in memory of Tina may be
made to the Animal Rescue League of
Boston, 10 Chandler Street, Boston,
MA 02116. See www.Keohane.com or
call 1-800-Keohane for directions and
online condolences.
RODRIGUEZ, Bernardo, Sr.
Of Roxbury, February 12, 2018. Devoted husband of Francisca Rodriguez
of Roxbury. Beloved father of Bernardo
Rodriguez, Jr. and his wife Barbara of
Avon and Marilyn and Milagro Rodriguez both of Roxbury. Dear grandfather
to Keith Collins, Suzanne Schedin and
the late Inti Caban. Loving brother of
Augustina and José Manuel Rodriguez
both of Yabucoa, PR. He is survived by
extended family and a host of friends.
Funeral Mass Friday at 10 AM at St.
Mary of the Angels Church, 377 Walnut
Ave., Roxbury (corner of Columbus and
Walnut Aves.) Visiting with the family
at Church Thursday 6-9 PM. Interment
Forest Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain.
Arrangements Davis Funeral Home of
BOSTON. To Post a sympathy message
visit www.DavisofBoston.com
RUSSELL, Josephine “Jo”
Carneglia
Of Woburn. Feb. 8. Age 89. Wife of the
late Frederick W. Russell, Sr., and the
late Paul Carneglia. Mother of Marie
Brown of Malden and her husband,
the late Ronald Brown, Sr.; Charles
Carneglia and his wife Karen of Woburn; and Frederick W. Russell, Jr. and
his wife Patti of Wilmington. Grandmother of Ronald Brown, Jr., Breeanna
Faust, Vivaldo and Paul Meneses, Erica
Carneglia, Lisa, Joseph, Jacob, Mikaila,
Cole and Jared Russell, Jacob, Kenneth
and Mia Ryan. Services will be private.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s
Foundation, 322 8th Ave., 7th Floor,
New York, NY 10001. Arrangements by
the Graham Funeral Home, WOBURN.
www.grahamfuneral.com.
B9
Retired MBTA
Bus Driver
Of Everett, Feb. 9. Beloved
husband of the late Marylou
(Luciano) for over 60 years.
Loving son of the late Jennie (Sateriale)
and Gaetano Signoriello. Dear and
devoted brother of Mary Blanscet of
Oregon and the late Margaret Moore,
Joseph and Frank Signoriello. Arthur
is also survived by several loving and
caring nieces, nephews, grandnieces
and grandnephews. Relatives and
friends are respectfully invited to attend
Arthur’s visitation in the Cafasso &
Sons Funeral Home, 65 Clark St. (Corner of Main St.) EVERETT, Saturday,
February 17 beginning at 9 a.m. until
10:30 a.m. with his funeral service to
follow in the funeral home at 10:30
a.m. Interment, with U.S. Navy Military
Honors, Glenwood Cemetery, Everett.
Past-Commander of the Navy Seabees.
Parking with attendants on duty.
Cafasso & Sons Funeral Home
Everett 617.387.3120
SISTER CHRISTINA M.
KILLION, MFIC
Of Newton, a beloved member of the
Missionary Franciscan Sisters for 68
years, died on February 12, 2018 at
Bethany Healthcare Center in Framingham.
She was the loving daughter of the
late Patrick and Bridget (Nicholson)
Killion. Sister of the late John Killion,
Patrick Killion, Tom Killion, Fr. William
Killion (Florida), Sr. Ellen Killion MFIC
and Bridie Cunniffe. Sister Christina
is survived by many nieces, nephews,
grandnieces, grandnephews, extended
family and her Missionary Franciscan
Sisters.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated in the Chapel at Mount
Alvernia Convent, 790 Centre Street,
Newton, MA 02458, Thursday February 15 at 10:00 AM. Visitation in the
Chapel from 9:00-10:00 A.M. Relatives
and friends invited. Interment will be
in Holy Cross Cemetery, Malden.
Donations in Sister Christina’s
memory may be sent to Missionary
Franciscan Sisters Retirement Fund at
the address listed above.
For online obituary and guestbook,
www.dolanfuneral.com
SISTER MARY FAUSTINA
DUGGAN, MFIC
Of Newton, a beloved member of the
Missionary Franciscan Sisters for 80
years, died on February 10, 2018 at
Saint Patrick’s Manor in Framingham.
She was the loving daughter of John
Joseph and Nora (McGrath) Duggan.
Sister of the late Hugh Duggan, Jim
Duggan, Jack Duggan, Al Duggan, Angela Duggan and Sheila Duggan. Sister
Faustina is survived by her nephew
Hugo Duggan of London, England
extended family, many friends and her
Missionary Franciscan Sisters.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated in the Chapel at Mount
Alvernia Convent, 790 Centre Street,
Newton, MA 02458, Friday, February 16 at 10:30 AM. Visitation in the
Chapel from 9:00-10:30 A.M. Relatives
and friends invited. Interment will be
in Holy Cross Cemetery, Malden.
Donations in Sister Faustina’s
memory may be sent to the Missionary
Franciscan Sisters Retirement Fund at
the address listed above.
For online obituary and guestbook,
www.dolanfuneral.com
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
By Peter Keepnews
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Marty Allen,
the frizzy-haired, bug-eyed
clown who joined forces with
crooner Steve Rossi to form one
of the most successful comedy
teams of the 1960s, died Monday in Las Vegas. He was 95.
Allen and Rossi’s humor was
not sophisticated — Mr. Allen’s
signature phrase was the succinct exclamation “Hello dere!”
— but it was effective. Most of
their routines took the form of
interviews, with Rossi asking
the questions and Mr. Allen typically playing a befuddled and
incompetent (but strangely lovable) astronaut, football player,
doctor, or other character.
In one of their best-known
routines, Mr. Allen was a punchdrunk boxer. “Would you say
you’re the best fighter in the
country?” Rossi asked him.
“Yeah,” he replied fuzzily,
“but in the city they murder
me.”
If Rossi’s unflappable suavity was standard operating procedure for a comedy team’s
straight man, Mr. Allen’s childlike mix of innocence and insanity was something new. Audiences responded, especially
after the team began doing topical jokes.
During the 1964 presidential campaign, Mr. Allen, a
Pittsburgh native, portrayed
the ultraconservative Republican candidate Barry Goldwater
Mr. Allen (left) joined Steve
Rossi in comedic routines
on stage and television.
— although he made no attempt to sound like him and began the interview with “Hello
dere!” — and said he was confident of winning “all 13 states.”
Within a few years after
teaming up in the late 1950s,
Allen and Rossi had become a
familiar presence in the nation’s top nightclubs and on
television variety shows.
In two of their many appearances on “ T he Ed Sullivan
Show,” Allen and Rossi had the
unenviable task of following the
Beatles. They won over an audience dominated by screaming
teenage girls both times.
On the first occasion, in Februar y 1964, Mr. Allen performed a frenetic dance wearing a Beatle wig; on the second,
in September 1965, he ran up
and down the aisles while Rossi
sang “She Loves You” (its lyrics
amended to “We love you, yeah,
yeah, yeah” and addressed to
the audience).
Rossi died in 2014.
Remembered
SHARE YOUR MEMORIES ON OUR GUEST BOOK AT BOSTON.COM/OBITUARIES
SMALL-PRASHER,
Stephanie L.
VITTORIA, Katherine E.
“Betty” (Riley)
Greatly Loved
Died in Boston, Feb. 6, 2018, Stephanie
L. Small-Prasher,78 of Quincy. Beloved
daughter to the late Murton and
Florence Small, Sr; beloved wife to Dr.
Sanjay Prasher, mother to John Catalan
of Dedham, Martine Storms Ward of
Warren, and the late Stephen Storms;
sister to Murton O. Small, Jr and Louise
Letourneau and husband,Leroy of
Bowdoin, ME. Visitation 10 to11AM,
Saturday, Feb 17, followed by 11AM
Funeral at Brackett Funeral Home,
29 Federal Street, Brunswick, ME.
www.brackettfuneralhome.com
SPINALE, Frank J.
Of Medford, MA, February 11, 2018. Age 95, died
peacefully at home surrounded by his loving family. Resident
of West Medford for over 62 years and
formerly of the West End of Boston. Beloved husband of 68 years of Margaret
R. (DiMare) Spinale. Devoted father of
Rosemary Judge and her husband Jack
of Bonita Springs, FL, Valerie Spinale of
Marshfield, Joseph Spinale of Boston,
Michael Spinale of Medford. Cherished
“Grampi” of Jacquelyn Judge and her
husband Sean Fitzgerald of Marshfield,
Erin Horan and her husband Dustin of
Hyde Park, Tyler Pepin of Marshfield
and Cody Pepin and his girlfriend Holly
of Cheshire, CT. Special great grandfather of Owen Fitzgerald of Marshfield.
Dearest brother of Anna DiFranco of
Stoneham. Pre-deceased by his siblings
Joseph and Dominic Spinale, Josephine
LeMeir, Frances Bellis, Mary Ragusa,
Connie Marchio and Lee Schell. Also
survived by many loving nieces and
nephews. US Army Veteran of WWII Pacific Theatre. Member of Teamsters
Local 25, and longtime member of Boston’s Hay Market pushcart Association.
The family wishes to thank the many
caregivers for their compassion and
loving care in his final days especially
those at Lahey Hospice and his nurses
Kara and Jeff and nurses aid Joesline
and those from Mystic Valley Elder Services. Funeral from the Keefe Funeral
Home, 5 Chestnut Street, ARLINGTON,
MA, on Friday at 10 am. Followed by a
Funeral Mass celebrating Frank’s life in
St. Raphael Church, 512 High Street,
West Medford, MA, at 11 am. Family
and friends are cordially invited to
gather and share remembrances with
the Family on Thursday from 4-8 pm
at the funeral home. Interment Oak
Grove Cemetery, West Medford. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be made payable to Middlesex East Visiting Nurses
Hospice, c/o Lahey Philanthropy, 41
Mall Road, Burlington, MA 01805. To
leave an online condolence visit
www.keefefuneralhome.com.
TEDOLDI, Betsy M.
(McCurran)
Of Needham, February 12, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late William J.A.
Tedoldi. Visiting hours on Monday,
February 19th from 4-7 pm. Complete notice to follow on Sunday.
For more information, please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton Funeral Home
781-444-0201
Of Woburn, formerly of Winchester,
February 12, 2018. Beloved wife for
nearly 55 years of Joseph J. Vittoria.
Devoted mother of Joanne Starr of
North Andover, Susan Stamas and her
husband Jim of Andover, Tricia Palmer
and her husband Danny of Winchester.
Loving grandmother of Matthew
Stamas, Nicholas and Taylor Palmer.
Sister of Claire Delorey of Pembroke,
Paul Riley of Norwood and the late Fred
Riley. Also survived by several loving
nieces and nephews. Funeral from the
McLaughlin - Dello Russo Family Funeral Home, 60 Pleasant St., WOBURN,
Friday, February 16th, at 10:30 a.m.
followed by a funeral Mass celebrated
in St. Eulalia Church, 50 Ridge St.,
Winchester, at 11:30 a.m. Relatives
and friends are respectfully invited to
attend. Visiting hours Thursday 4 to 8
p.m. Services will conclude with burial
at Wildwood Cemetery, Winchester.
It has been requested that in lieu of
flowers contributions may be made in
Betty’s memory to the American Parkinson Disease Assoc., 135 Parkinson Ave.,
Staten Island, NY 10305. For complete
obituary and to leave an online message
of condolence please visit
www.dellorusso.net
Dello Russo Family Funeral Homes
Woburn - Medford - Wilmington
WALLINGFORD, Margaret
M. (Blanchard)
In Brookline on February 12, 2018.
Loving mother of Sheryl Smith of
Saugus. Devoted daughter of the late
Charles and Mary (Curley) Blanchard
and dear sister of the late Charles K.
Blanchard. Visitation will be held on
Friday February 16th in the Bell-O’Dea
Funeral Home, 376 Washington St.,
BROOKLINE from 10:00 AM – 11:00
AM with a funeral service at 11:00.
Relatives and friends are kindly invited.
Interment is private. In lieu of flowers
donations made to the N.E. Shelter for
Homeless Veterans, 17 Court St., Boston, MA 02108 would be appreciated
BostonGlobe.com
T h e
B10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Obituaries
Vic Damone, 89, leading crooner in 1950s, nightclub star for decades
By Adam Bernstein
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — Vic Damone, a pop crooner whose
creamy baritone and heartthrob good looks propelled his
success at the jukebox and onscreen in the post-World War II
era, and for five decades more
in nightclubs and concert halls,
died Sunday at a hospital in Miami Beach. He was 89.
The cause was complications of respiratory failure, said
his son-in-law William Karant.
Mr. Damone lacked the outsized personality of fellow Itali a n A m e r i c a n p o p s i n ge r s
Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin, but he nonetheless flourished on a rung just below
greatness. He made about
2,000 recordings, as well as
dozens of movie and TV appearances, and sold out performances until he retired in the
early 2000s after a stroke.
He made his professional
debut at 17, tying for first place
on the radio contest ‘‘Arthur
Godfrey’s Talent Scouts,’’ and
his 1947 recording debut heralded an enviable new talent.
‘‘If I had one wish,’’ Sinatra was
said to have remarked, ‘‘it
would be for Vic Damone’s tonsils. Vic has the best pipes in the
business.’’
Music critic Will Friedwald,
in his volume ‘‘A Biographical
Guide to the Great Jazz and Pop
Singers,’’ attributed to Mr. Damone all the hallmarks of Sinatra’s early romantic balladeer
phase — ‘‘the beautiful voice,
the light clear sound, the precise articulation, the impeccable phrasing.’’
What Mr. Damone lacked, in
Friedwald’s view, was the livedin vocal shading that Sinatra
cultivated over a turbulent life
of wine, women, and ring-ading mischief.
It was not that Mr. Damone
led a tumult-free life: He had
several rocky marriages, including to actress Pier Angeli and
actress-singer Diahann Carroll;
he was once dangled out of a
AFP/LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Mr. Damone had a velvety voice and teen idol looks.
New York hotel window by a
Mafia kingpin; and he struggled back from bankruptcy after being swindled by business
partners.
Mr. Damone did not push
the boundaries of the pop form
with his sunnily delivered standards, hit-parade titles, show
tunes, and updated love ballads
with syrupy orchestrations.
He never ‘‘stood for something beyond a voice itself,’’
Friedwald wrote. ‘‘He was part
of an era; Sinatra created one.’’
Mr. Damone’s early string of
hits included ‘‘I Have but One
Heart,” “Again,” “You’re Breaking My Heart,’’ and ‘‘Angela
Mia,’’ but he was especially
known for the ballad ‘‘On the
Street Where You Live’’ from
the musical ‘‘My Fair Lady.’’ He
also had top-selling records
with title songs from movies
such as ‘‘An Affair to Remember’’ and ‘‘Gigi.’’
Mr. Damone was signed to
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios
and appeared in lighthearted
early 1950s musicals such as
‘‘Rich, Young and Pretty,” “Deep
in My Heart,” “Hit the Deck,’’
and ‘‘Kismet,’’ in the last as the
caliph who sings ‘‘Stranger in
Paradise.’’ In a rare departure
from form, he took a supporting role as a leatherneck in the
World War II drama ‘‘Hell to
Eternity’’ (1960).
The advent of rock-and-roll
drove Mr. Damone from his
perch atop the pop charts, but
he made two of his finest albums during that phase of his
career — ‘‘Linger Awhile with
Vic Damone’’ and ‘‘The Lively
Ones,’’ both 1962 — featuring
the singer at ease with jazzy uptempo standards such as ‘‘The
Mos t Beautiful Girl in the
World.’’
He hosted two short-lived
TV musical-variety programs
and made a steady run of guest
appearances on ‘‘The Andy Williams Show.’’ A favorite of President Reagan’s, he sang at the
White House at least three
times during the 1980s.
Mr. Damone — he took his
mother’s maiden name — was
born Vito Rocco Farinola in
Brooklyn on June 12, 1928. He
accompanied his music-loving
parents from a young age and
took vocal lessons until his father, an electrician, was disabled in a workplace accident.
At 16, Mr. Damone left high
school to support his family as
an usher and elevator operator
at the Paramount Theatre in
New York, while aspiring to a
career like Sinatra’s.
‘‘I found the timbre of my
ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE/1987
Mr. Damone was married several times, including to actress Diahann Carroll.
voice was similar to his,’’ he told
the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel decades later. ‘‘I was singing
Sinatra songs to girls, and they
loved it. I thought this is what I
want to do.’’
After Mr. Damone’s triumph
on ‘‘Arthur Godfrey’s Talent
Scouts,’’ comedian Milton Berle
helped him get a contract with
Mercury Records. He sold millions of albums while serving a
two-year Army stint in Germany during the Korean War.
With author David Chanoff,
Mr. Damone wrote a memoir,
‘‘Singing Was the Easy Part’’
(2009), a title that alluded to his
dramatic private life.
There was the hotel window
incident, apparently provoked
by Mr. Damone’s decision to
call off an engagement to the
daughter of a Mafioso. A sitdown brokered by Luciano
crime family boss Frank Costello spared his life.
The singer subsequently
squired a series of screen god-
Harvey Guthrie; divinity dean pushed equality
By Bryan Marquard
GLOBE STAFF
Frustrated by the Episcopal
Divinity School’s refusal to hire
its first ordained Anglican
woman to serve on the faculty,
the Rev. Harvey Guthrie Jr.
threatened to step down as
dean in 1974, and he issued his
ultimatum in the most public of
forums: a speech during commencement ceremonies.
He said that if the school’s
board claimed no funds were
available, he would quit so his
salary could be used. “That is
blackmail, but I believe it is
Gospel blackmail,” he told the
Globe. “It is all I can do about it,
but in the name of God, something has to be done.”
Several months later, the
Cambridge school hired two ordained women, the Rev. Carter
Heyward and the Rev. Suzanne
Hiatt. While Dr. Guthrie was
dean, the school also became
the first Episcopal seminary to
let ordained Anglican women
celebrate the Eucharist in its
chapel and the first to admit
openly gay and lesbian students
to degree programs.
The school “had a dean who
was practicing ecclesiastical
disobedience,” said the Rev.
Gar y Hall, who recently
stepped down from chairing
the Episcopal Divinity School
board. “That was a hard moment, but he didn’t back down.”
Dr. Guthrie, who in retirement returned home to California and volunteered as a legal
aid advocate for the poor late
into his 80s, died Dec. 17 in Oxnard, Calif., of complications
from a fractured hip. He was 93
and had lived in Fillmore, Calif.
“The trustees had said, ‘We
don’t have the money to hire
any more people.’ And he said,
‘This is really a matter of justice,’ ” Hall said.
Through Dr. Guthrie’s teaching and leadership, “he had a
gigantic” influence on the Episcopal Divinity School, said Hall,
who added that he also “was
one of the major leaders in ordination for women and really
had an impact in ways that are
hard to measure.”
In 1998, Dr. Guthrie told the
Los Angeles Times that his
push for gender equity in the
Episcopal denomination sent a
message that “this isn’t just a
male establishment here.”
“He was consistently supportive of women’s voices and
women’s leadership in ways
that were genuine from his toes
to his brilliant mind,” said Fredrica Harris Thompsett, an
Episcopal Divinity School professor emerita.
In a statement to the school
community, the Rev. Dr. Kelly
Brown Douglas, the current
dean, wrote that “Dean Guthrie
was admired and respected by
so many in the Episcopal Divinity School family, including myself, and I am indebted to him
for the legacy he has left.”
In 1958, Dr. Guthrie joined
the faculty of what was then the
Episcopal Theological School,
and he was named dean in
1969. He was a leader in the
1974 merger of the institution
with the Philadelphia Divinity
School, and was co-dean with
the Rev. Edward Harris of the
renamed Episcopal Divinity
School until Harris retired a
couple of years later. Dr. Guthrie stayed as dean until 1985.
He taught Old Testament
and “was a riveting lecturer,”
said Hall, who added that he
“took every class I could from
him” while studying at the
school.
“He was a great scholar, but
he was someone who could really teach a subject to people
who were at various levels of
competence: people who knew
nothing about the subject and
people who were experts,” said
Hall, former dean of the Washington National Cathedral. “He
could talk for exactly 50 minutes, which I was always impressed with. He would make
his point, the bell would ring,
and the class would be over.”
Harvey Henry Guthrie Jr.
was born in Santa Paula, Calif.,
which is part of Ventura County, known for its citrus industry.
His father, Harvey Sr., was a laborer and held many jobs. His
mother, the former Emma Aubrey, had been a church custodian and later worked in a lemon packing plant.
Upon graduating from Ventura High School, the future divinity school dean aspired to be
either a lawyer or minister. He
attended Ventura Junior College and graduated from Missouri Valley College with a
bachelor’s degree, but reading
“Leaves from the Notebook of a
Tamed Cynic,” by theologian
Reinhold Niebuhr, provided direction. Dr. Guthrie headed to
Union Theological Seminary in
New York City, where Niebuhr
taught.
“While I was there, I decided
the Episcopal Church was the
one I wanted to be ordained in,”
Dr. Guthrie told the Los Angeles Times. “I was attracted to
the Episcopal tradition of inclusiveness and doctrinal freedom.”
He spent three years as vicar
of St. Margaret’s Church in
White Plains, N.Y., before becoming an instructor at General Theological Seminary in New
York City, where he received a
master’s and a doctorate, both
in theology.
In the 1960s, while at Episcopal Divinity School, he
helped found the Boston Theological Institute consortium,
which allowed students to take
some courses at any of seven area seminaries.
Dr. Guthrie also had been a
president of the Association of
Theology Schools, and after
stepping down as dean of Episcopal Divinity School he served
until 1995 as rector of St. Andrew’s Church, in Ann Arbor,
Mich. The books he wrote include “God and History in the
Old Testament” (1960), “Israel’s
Sacred Songs” (1966), and
“Theology as Thanksgiving:
From Israel’s Psalms to the
Church’s Eucharist” (1981).
In 1945, Dr. Guthrie married Doris Peyton. They had
met while they were college students, and in retirement they
lived in her family’s home in
Fillmore. Mrs. Guthrie, who
had worked in survey departments at universities in Massachusetts and Michigan, was 91
when she died in their home in
2016. Their son Lawrence died
last year.
Upon returning to California
in 1995, Dr. Guthrie became a
legal aid volunteer, and was
honored in 2011 for his work.
“People really loved my dad,”
desses, including the hard-living but exquisitely inviting Ava
Gardner. On one occasion, the
usually teetotaling Mr. Damone
downed at least four double
vodkas to keep her interested.
‘‘Ava Gardner could make you
do terrible things,’’ he quipped
in the memoir.
In 1954, he married the
troubled starlet Angeli, with
whom he had a son, Perry. The
marriage crumbled quickly, and
Perry became the subject of a
custody battle that drew international headlines. Years later,
Angeli died of an overdose.
Mr. Damone’s second marriage, to actress Judy Rawlins,
produced three daughters but
ruptured amid his bankruptcy
in 1971. Two of his business
partners had fled to Beirut with
$250,000 from a bank loan he
had cosigned.
He climbed out of the red
through $25,000-a-week performances in Las Vegas. The
dire need for income led him to
turn down the role of singer
Johnny Fontane in ‘‘The Godfather’’ (1972) — the part went instead to singer Al Martino — because of the comparably paltry
compensation. It was not, in
the movie’s parlance, an offer
he couldn’t refuse.
His later marriages to Becky
Ann Jones and Carroll (“Her
priorities were show business,
pure and simple”) also collapsed. In 1998, he married
fashion designer Rena Rowan,
a cofounder of the apparel company Jones New York; she died
in 2016. Perry Damone died in
2014 from lymphoma.
Sur vivors include three
daughters, Victoria, Andrea Damone-Brown, and Daniella Damone-Woodard; two sisters;
and six grandchildren.
Mr. Damone, long bothered
by his lack of formal education,
completed the coursework required for a diploma from his
old Brooklyn high school in
1997.
Boston news anchor
Jack Hynes dies
By Bryan Marquard
GLOBE STAFF
Dr. Guthrie forged the way
for women to be added to
Episcopal Divinity School’s
faculty in Cambridge.
said his daughter, Lynn of Seattle. “My dad lived a long and
meaningful life, right up to the
end, and lots of people cared
deeply for him.”
He spoke Spanish fluently
and until a few years ago was
h e l pi n g f a m i l i e s , m a ny o f
whom were Latino immigrants,
secure Social Security and disability benefits. “The justice
gene was deeply, deeply planted
i n Ha r v e y ’s D NA ,” Ha r r i s
Thompsett said.
In addition to his daughter,
Dr. Guthrie leaves two sons,
Stephen of Cambridge and Andrew of Hong Kong; a brother,
Jim of Port Angeles, Wash.; and
three granddaughters.
A funeral service will be held
at 10 a.m. Saturday in Trinity
Episcopal Church in Fillmore,
Calif., which he had attended in
retirement, finding equal sustenance in the pews as he had
standing at the pulpit.
“I find myself saying, ‘Hey, I
really do believe all this stuff,
even when I’m not standing up
front getting paid for it,’ ” he
told the Los Angeles Times.
Dr. Guthrie “was just a tremendous person,” his brother
said. “He was very witty, along
with his penchant for helping
people.”
“Harvey was an exemplary
Christian person in so many
ways, but he was also smart and
warm, and you don’t always see
that combination in life,” Hall
said. “He had a brain and heart
in equal measure, and I really
miss him more than I can say.”
Marquard can be reached at
bryan.marquard@globe.com.
Jack Hynes, who was
known as the dean of Boston
TV news during his decadeslong career as an anchorman,
died Tuesday in the Linden
Ponds retirement community
in Hingham. He was 88.
He spent about 50 years as
a TV news reporter and anchorman in Boston without
developing much fondness for
the spotlight and its inevitable
trappings.
“I do run away from the celebrity status,” he told the
Globe in 1984. “It never attracted me at all. I don’t get a
kick out of being recognized
on the street or in restaurants.
I’m an unglamorous guy in a
glamorous business.”
Fr o m 1 9 5 7 u n t i l 2 0 0 6 ,
Hynes was on the air on
WHDH-TV, WCVB-TV, and
C h a n n e l 5 6 . To h i s n e w s
broadcasts he brought a gravitas and dignity that drew comparisons to the best in the
business, and to iconic Boston
figures.
“Jack Hynes to me is Walter
Cronkite, if you will,” Gerald
Walsh, then president and
general manager of Channel
56, said when he hired Hynes
in 1984.
“Jack Hynes to Boston is
Ted Williams. He’s Bobby Orr.
He’s Bill Russell. He’s Red Auerbach. He’s an identity.”
John Bernard Hynes Jr.
grew up in Dorchester, the oldest son of John B. Hynes, who
was mayor of Boston from
1950 to 1960, and the former
Marion Barry.
Hynes graduated from Boston College High School and
the University of Notre Dame,
and also served three years in
the Marine Corps.
His late wife, the former
Ma r i e Ke l l y, h a d b e e n t h e
Breck Girl in Breck hair product advertisements. She died
in 1998 in their Chatham
home.
Hy n e s l e av e s tw o s o n s ,
John III of Boston and Barry
TOM HERDE/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2005
Jack Hynes called himself
“an unglamorous guy in a
glamorous business.”
of Beverly; two daughters, Kelly Hynes McDermott of Medfield and Shauna Hynes-Baler
of Yarmouthport; a sister, Marie Hynes Gallagher of Falmouth; two brothers, Barry of
South Boston and Richard
of Brookline; 10 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.
Services will be announced.
Though known as a gifted
and witty storyteller, Hynes
generally avoided injecting humor into his news broadcasts,
even as on-set banter became
a staple at many stations.
“Most of the stories you do
don’t lend themselves to levity,” he explained in the 1984
interview.
“ When I first star ted in
television, one of the criticisms was that I looked too
young. So I developed this
mien of serious stuff to make
myself look older, more mature. It became a habit. It’s
still there,” he said, before adding with a laugh: “The youth
went but the seriousness
didn’t.”
A full obituary will appear
later.
Bryan Marquard can be
reached at
bryan.marquard@globe.com.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B11
Business
Airbnb
rules so
far elude
council
Mayor seeks to stop
loss of housing units
Landlords worry
incomes will be cut
By Tim Logan
GLOBE STAFF
PHOTOS BY PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
E
By Julia Preszler
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
very Wednesday morning, Brian Fruzzetti of Crescent Ridge
Dairy in Sharon drives up to
Jessica Gilmartin’s home in
Newton. He enters and places
butter, eggs, and a bottle of
milk into her refrigerator.
The delivery also comes with another
personal touch, Gilmartin says: Fruzzetti
carries a dog biscuit in his pocket, which
he gives to the family labradoodle. Fruzzetti and Gilmartin often pause to chat
about their families.
Then, Fruzzetti hits the road to bring
dairy products to many of the approximately 4,000 customers in towns from
Middleborough to Harvard that Crescent
Ridge’s eight home delivery trucks service
each week.
The milkman, that symbol of simpler
times, appears
to be making a
bit of a comeback in Massachusetts. About
10 New England
dairies deliver in
the state, servicing everyone
from families
with children to
single young
professionals.
While there are
no concrete data
on the popularity of home delivery, many
dairies say they have experienced an increase in customers in recent years.
The draw? Many people are seeking
more personal connections with their
food sources, as reflected by the popularity of farm-to-table dining. Others, who are
helping fuel a broader grocery-delivery
craze, simply love the convenience of not
having to lug heavy jugs of milk home
from the store.
Nostalgia seems to be playing a role as
well.
“When we have friends come over and
I take out a bottle of milk, they always re-
The milkman is back,
hitching a ride on the
food­delivery bandwagon
The sound of clanking bottles, a symbol of simpler times,
is becoming more common in Massachusetts homes
Roger
Barsamian
made deliveries
in South
Boston for
Milton-based
Thatcher Farm,
using notepads
on his truck’s
dashboard to
help keep track
of orders.
RENTS, Page B14
MORE
TRANSPONDERS
E­ZPass could soon work at
the gas pumps, too B12
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE
Data breach allowed firms to
see competitors’ data B12
MILK, Page B14
Shirley Leung
Hitting WEEI where it hurts
This week I’ve been listening to
WEEI just so I can track down its advertisers — one by one.
I’m truly curious: Who chooses to
do business these days with a station
that disparages Tom Brady’s 5-year-old
daughter and mocks a well-known
sports agent by speaking in a stereotypical Asian accent? And that’s just in
the past month.
Turns out there are plenty: Geico,
Ikea, Honey Dew Donuts, Brookline
Bank, East Boston Savings Bank,
ZipRecruiter, Prime Motor Group,
Sprint, among many others.
But defections are on the rise, especially after I contacted advertisers to
explain themselves. On Tuesday, three
more organizations — Citizens Bank,
the Massachusetts State Lottery, and
LEUNG, Page B14
Three
more
advertisers
cut ties
with the
radio
station
More than an hour into a hearing
Tuesday on new regulations that Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh wants to
put in place for short-term rentals like
Airbnb’s, City Council President Andrea Campbell asked a version of the
same question five times in five minutes.
“What is the problem here?” she
said. “And what is our goal?”
It’s a question councilors wrestled
with repeatedly over the course of a
five-hour hearing, and it highlights the
complexity of reining in the booming
business of short-term rentals, without
hurting tourism in the process.
Walsh aims to block apartments
from being used full time as shortterm rentals — often by investors who
don’t live there — a move the administration says will boost the city’s housing supply and help ease its rental
crunch.
But some homeowners and landlords who use Airbnb to help pay their
bills said they worry they could be
knocked out of business.
“I can see a future in Boston because I’m able to save money by renting this way,” said Rose Baker, a nursing student whose family owns a
short-term rental unit in Dorchester.
“It’s my way to stay here.”
The use of short-term rentals — for
visitors who rent apartments by the
night — has exploded in Boston,
thanks in part to websites like Airbnb
that make it simple to list a unit, as
easy as booking a hotel room.
City officials estimate 2,000 apartments — out of more than 165,000
rental units citywide — are essentially
full-time short-term rentals, particularly in the tourist-friendly neighborhoods in and around downtown. That
number has roughly doubled in two
years, said Sheila Dillon, Walsh’s housing chief.
Housing advocates, and City Hall,
worry that landlords are skipping the
traditional 12-month lease to rent by
the night to tourists, a practice that’s
often more profitable.
Charles River Labs buying Michigan firm
$800m deal seen
helping meet demand
By Jonathan Saltzman
GLOBE STAFF
Charles River Laboratories International Inc., a Wilmington company
that contracts with drug and medical
device makers to test products in mice
and rats, said Tuesday that it will pay
$800 million to buy a Michigan firm
that does similar work.
Charles River has entered into an
agreement to acquire MPI Research of
Mattawan, Mich. MPI is a “contract research organization” that helps pharmaceutical and medical device companies that outsource some research and
development.
It has become increasingly common for drug makers to outsource
tasks like the testing of experimental
DINA RUDICK/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2016
Charles River Labs counts testing compounds for
toxicity as among its functions.
medicines in clinical trials, in part to
avoid having to lay off workers if those
experiments end in failure, as many do
in the high-risk industry.
Both Charles River and MPI are
“nonclinical CROs” that focus on the
early testing of drugs on laboratory animals, not on humans. Many drug
companies view that work as too costly
to do themselves.
James C. Foster, chairman and
chief executive of Charles River Labs,
said that MPI was “an exceptional strategic fit for Charles River” and the
Michigan company’s 1-million-squarefoot facility “will provide needed capacity to meet current and future demand.”
“We greatly respect MPI’s employees, its scientific capabilities, and the
reputation it has built over the nearly
25 years since its founding, and look
CHARLES RIVER LABS, Page B14
B12
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
E­ZPass could soon work at the gas pumps, too
By Andy Rosen
GLOBE STAFF
Your E-ZPass transponder
might get you through the toll
booth in a hurry, but what if it
could help you breeze through
the line at the gas station or restaurant drive-through in the
same way?
A Massachusetts company is
hoping to harness the more than
32 million transponders on the
roads today to create a new payment system customers could use
to buy goods and services with-
Verdeva is
one of
many
companies
working
on in­
vehicle
payment
options.
out leaving their cars.
Verdeva Inc. on Tuesday announced a deal with the 16-state
group that runs E-ZPass, giving
the relatively unknown startup a
year to develop a pilot program to
use the transponders for purchases beyond the toll booths.
The company is developing a
product called PayByCar, with
which drivers would create separate payment accounts to use at
businesses that accept payments
via transponder, an arrangement
it says would be the first of its
kind.
Chief executive Kevin Condon,
who at 62 is leading his first
startup after a career in transportation technology and publishing, said the idea came to him
while sitting in traffic one day on
the Southeast Expressway.
At first, he thought he could
use the devices to help people access other government services —
perhaps renewing their registration while waiting at a gas pump,
for instance. But he said he
quickly realized that the “bigger,
faster opportunity was in transactions.”
Now, after working for two
years to get the E-ZPass organization onboard, the company expects to launch a pilot at a handful of gas stations soon. Verdeva
is also raising money.
Pa r t i c i p a t i n g b u s i n e s s e s
would recognize transponders on
their premises that are enrolled
in the PayByCar program and
ping drivers via cellphone to see
if they want to pay electronically.
Verdeva, not E-ZPass, would han-
dle the payment.
Ma ny companies, big and
small, are working on in-vehicle
payment options, but Condon
feels the deal accessing so many
E-ZPass transponders gives Verdeva a big head start.
“This is about building a relationship very quickly with as
many drivers and as many vehicles as possible, and this is the
fastest way to get there,” he said.
Andy Rosen can be reached at
andrew.rosen@globe.com.
Herald
auctioned
to chain
DOR mix­up reveals
companies’ tax data
uHERALD
A data mix-up on a state tax
portal inadvertently made private data from about 16,500
business taxpayers viewable to
other companies, potentially
even competitors.
The breach lasted from Aug.
7, 2017, through Jan. 23, 2018,
and allowed some companies to
view other business’s names, federal employer identification
numbers, tax payments, and other data, according to the Massachusetts Department of Revenue.
No individual employee information, such as Social Security
numbers or wage data, was accessible to unauthorized people
as a result, the agency said Tuesday.
In total, there were fewer than
150 instances in which a company could have peeked at another’s data, officials in the administration of Governor Charlie Baker said.
A total of 128 files were
viewed by 145 unique businesses
clients, but it’s possible those
numbers include some companies looking at their own tax data, the officials said.
The saga began when the
agency made a technical change
aimed at allowing tax agents to
better help businesses with questions about withholding. The
shift allowed those agents to
view bulk file data — the information submitted by payroll vendors such as ADP — sent through
the portal, MassTaxConnect.
But the Department of Revenue made a mistake somewhere
along the way. Thirty-eight payroll companies were using the
portal. And any one of their clients could have looked at data
from any other of their clients.
Companies would not have been
able to see the information from
a business that used a different
payroll company.
The agency says it fixed the issue in January within 24 hours of
finding out about it. But it did
not send out a letter notifying the
By Joshua Miller
GLOBE STAFF
Continued from Page A1
the Boston Herald through
the next chapter of its storied
history.”
The sale still needs to be
approved by a bankruptcy
court judge, who is expected
to review the deal Friday. The
proceeds will be divided
among the creditors through
the bankruptcy process.
Digital First owns the
Denver Post , the Orange
County Register, the Mercury
News of San Jose, and numerous other papers in Colorado,
California, and several other
states. The company owns
two dailies in Massachusetts,
the Lowell Sun and Sentinel
& Enterprise of Fitchburg,
and previously owned the
Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield.
Despite Digital First’s reputation, unionized employees
and their representatives expressed relief on Tuesday
night.
“We had some initial conversations with Digital First
last week, and they were cordial and we look forward to
talking to them moving forward,” said Herald reporter
O’Ryan Johnson, chairman of
the editorial unit for the Greater Boston Newspaper Guild.
“It was a long day. We’re happy
that Boston is remaining a
two-newspaper town. We’re
thrilled that our members are
still going to have jobs.”
NewsGuild-Communications Workers of America
president Bernie Lunzer said
the union will work with the
new owner to keep the newspaper vibrant.
“Clearly the Herald mattered to them. They won the
bid,” Lunzer said in an e-mail.
“The journalists and other
workers at the Herald are
what makes it valuable.”
After years of trimming
costs to keep pace with de-
The newspaper has struggled for years, cutting costs as print advertising declined.
clines in print advertising, Purcell put the Herald up for sale
last September and eventually
reached an agreement with
GateHouse, which owns a
number of papers in the region. At the time, the Herald
listed debts and liabilities of
roughly $31 million, with the
Globe, which prints the Herald, among its largest creditors.
GateHouse’s offer of $4.5
million in cash and up to
$500,000 for employees’ paid
time off, however, was contingent on the Herald wiping
out most of its liabilities in
bankruptcy court. Since then,
Revolution Capital Group
submitted an initial bid that
was similar to GateHouse’s,
and Digital First Media entered the bidding last week.
It’s unclear if GateHouse or
Revolution Capital sought to
increase their offers during
the auction Tuesday.
In a statement, Purcell
said he had promised to “do
everything humanly possible
to avoid shuttering the unique
and fearless voice of the Boston Herald,” and emphasized
the auction process resulted
in a final bid that was more
than double the initial offer
that GateHouse made.
“GateHouse did not see
these guys coming,” said Ken
Doctor, a media analyst and
columnist for Harvard’s Nieman Foundation for Journalism. “There aren’t many buy-
ers out there. They thought it
would be theirs.”
Job cuts were expected, regardless of the sale’s outcome. The Herald employed
about 240 people as of December, but both GateHouse
and Revolution Capital said
in their bids they could whittle that down to as few as 175
positions post-bankruptcy.
Digital First told union representatives they expected to
employ at least a similar
number of workers.
“Even a property that’s in
pretty bad shape is attractive
to somebody, and especially
attractive to people who have
a big chain and can do a number of things in a centralized
way and are practiced in reducing expenses,” said Rick
Edmonds, a media business
analyst at the Poynter Institute, a journalism-focused
nonprofit in Florida.
Alden Global exerts tight
control on business decisions
at Digital First, he said, but
largely gives newsrooms autonomy. That said, he expects
Alden Global to continue to position the Herald as a conservative alternative to the Globe,
primarily as a market strategy.
In recent weeks, Digital
First moved to slash jobs at
its California papers. Doctor
noted that the company
hasn’t replaced its chief executive officer who left last year,
and he doesn’t expect Digital
First to hire a new one anytime soon.
“ That shows you how
much this company will cut,
that they’ll even cut a CEO
position to save money,” Doctor said.
Two weeks ago, the Herald
reached an agreement with
unions that collectively represented more than 100 workers to vacate their labor contracts, and the bankruptcy
court judge approved that
agreement on Feb. 1. As part
of the deal, the Herald agreed
to a requirement that bidders
would recognize accrued paid
time off and seniority status,
and promise to make offers to
no fewer than 175 employees.
The Herald had expected
to lose nearly $3 million, prior to the bankruptcy, on nearly $34 million in revenue in
its current fiscal year, according to court filings.
“If the current owners
were unwilling to pump it up,
[bankruptcy] seemed like the
only alternative,” Doctor said.
“ They didn’ t want to put
more money into it and they
couldn’t find a buyer who
would take on that kind of
debt. . . . The fact that GateHouse came forward, you
could use Chapter 11, that
gave them a way forward.”
Jon Chesto can be reached at
jon.chesto@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @jonchesto.
38 payroll companies of the issue
until Friday.
The reason for that delay was
unclear.
The Globe became aware of
the issue after being forwarded
an e-mail sent to a client by Gusto, a payroll, benefits and human
resources company.
The changes the agency made
to the tax portal, the e-mail said,
“erroneously permitted business
taxpayers to view files containing
company names, federal employer identification numbers
(FEINs), and tax payment
amounts for companies like
yours. As a result, people outside
your company could see your
company data.”
A spokeswoman for Gusto
confirmed the authenticity of the
e-mail and underscored that the
trouble originated with the agency, rather than with Gusto or any
other payroll vendor.
Nathalie Dailida, a spokeswoman for the state Department
of Revenue, said the agency “recently identified a technical issue
related to bulk filer information
within the MassTaxConnect system, and quickly determined
that individual employee data
was not made viewable. DOR has
taken steps to correct this technical issue and will continue to
take all precautions necessary to
ensure reporting data is securely
managed throughout this tax
season.”
The agency’s leader is relatively new. Christopher C. Harding
became commissioner of the Department of Revenue in August.
He was previously the agency’s
chief of staff and, before that,
was an entrepreneur in the private sector.
Baker, a Republican, is running for reelection this year. During his tenure, he has trumpeted
efforts to make state government
more effective and efficient.
Massachusetts income taxes
are due for most on April 17.
Joshua Miller can be reached at
joshua.miller@globe.com.
Fed likely to continue rate hikes, Powell suggests
By Rich Miller
and Christopher Condon
WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP
BREAKFAST
ON INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY
Thursday, March 8 | 8—10am
This year, every dollar contributed, including
breakfast attendance, will be matched thanks
to a partnership with the Kraft family.
YOU ARE
INVITED TO
JOIN US
Boston City Council President
KEYNOTES Shaun Robinson and Andrea Campbell
MODERATOR Shirley Leung
MASTER OF CEREMONIES Candy O'Terry
HOSTED BY
Loomis, Sayles & Company
1 Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111
LEARN MORE at boston@swsg.org or
www.swsg.org/breakfast
WITH SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS
STATE STREET CORPORATION’S PROFESSIONAL WOMEN’S NETWORK
BLOOMBERG NEWS
WASHINGTON — Federal
Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell suggested that the US central bank would push ahead
with gradual interest-rate increases even as it remains on
the lookout for threats to the financial system in the wake of
the recent stock market rout.
“ We are in the process of
gradually normalizing both interest rate policy and our balance sheet,” he said Tuesday in
t h e t e x t o f h i s c e r em o n i al
swearing-in speech in Washington, adding, “We will remain
alert to any developing risks to
financial stability.”
They were Powell’s first public comments since financial
markets last week suffered
their most severe bout of vola-
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LEXEY SWALL/NEW YORK TIMES
Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said, “We will
remain alert to any developing risks to financial stability.”
tility in years, partly on concern
that rising wages might spur inflation and prod the Fed into
faster rate hikes.
While the new Fed chairman didn’t specifically mention
the steep fall in share prices,
other central bank officials
have played down its impact on
the economy and the financial
system.
Federal Reserve Bank of
New York President William
Dudley last week called the
share shakeout “small potatoes,” while Cleveland Fed President Loretta Mester said on
Tuesday that the turmoil hadn’t
affected her economic outlook
or her support for further interest-rate hikes.
“If economic conditions
evolve as expected, we’ll need
to make some further increases
in interest rates this year and
next year, at a pace similar to
last year’s” when the Fed raised
rates three times, she said in a
speech in Dayton, Ohio.
In their last quarterly projection in December, Fed officials
penciled in three rate hikes for
this year, according to the median forecast in their so-called dot
plot. They tacitly reiterated that
view at their Jan. 30-31 meeting, when they said they expected “further gradual increases in
the federal funds rate.”
Powell’s comments on Tuesday “were consistent with the
message” in January, said Michael Feroli, chief US economist at JPMorgan Chase & Co.
in New York. They’re “in a process of raising rates and not
close to the finish line.”
Investors see a quarter percentage point hike at the central bank’s next policy-making
meeting on March 20-21 as a
virtual certainty, according to
pricing in federal funds futures.
Powell said the Fed had
made “great progress in moving
much closer” to its goals of full
employment and stable prices
since he joined the central bank
as a governor in 2012.
Unemployment is down to
4.1 percent, from 8.2 percent
back then. Inflation though remains below the Fed’s 2 percent
target, standing at 1.7 percent
in December.
“Today, the global economy
is recovering strongly for the
first time in a decade,” Powell
said.
He said the Fed was moving
to normalize monetary policy
“with a view to extending the
recovery and sustaining the
pursuit of our objectives.”
Once revered for its policymaking prowess, the central
bank has come in for increasing
congressional criticism since
the financial crisis, with some
Republican lawmakers calling
for stepped-up oversight of its
monetary policy actions.
“We listen to feedback and
give serious consideration to
the possibility that we might be
getting something wrong,”
Powell said. “There is great value in having thoughtful, wellinformed critics.”
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Business
B13
TALKING POINTS
MEAL KITS
BLUE APRON LOSES
CUSTOMERS BUT
FINANCIAL LOSS IS
LESS THAN EXPECTED
Despite losing a big chunk of customers last year, shares
in Blue Apron rose after the company reported slimmer
losses than Wall Street had expected. The mail-order meal
kit company, which cut its marketing budget to focus on
current subscribers and operational improvements, reported a loss of $39.1 million in its fourth quarter. While
the company lost about 15 percent of its customer base
over the previous year, Blue Apron said the customers it
retained spent more money. Blue Apron’s average revenue
per customer was $248 in the fourth quarter of 2017 compared to $246 in the fourth quarter of 2016, and $3 better than the third quarter of 2017. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Agenda
➔ WORKSHOP
Explore a career
in health care
Attend a workshop to explore career
options beyond nursing in a hospital
setting. Learn about training, average
salaries, barriers to employment, and skill
LABOR
UNION WITHDRAWS
PETITION TO
REPRESENT SOME
YALE GRAD STUDENTS
REAL ESTATE
HOME PRICES AT
ALL­TIME HIGH
A labor union has withdrawn a petition to represent some Yale University graduate
students after years of organizing efforts. Yale officials say they were notified by Local 33UNITE HERE on Monday that the union was withdrawing its petition to the National
Labor Relations Board to represent student teachers in eight of the 56 departments in the
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Local 33 co-president Robin Dawson told the Yale
Daily News the union ended the effort because it did not believe the conservative Trump
administration and NLRB would be sympathetic to its cause. Yale officials have refused to
bargain with the union after the students voted to join the labor group last year. Yale argued
the students should have voted as a whole, not by individual departments.
— ASSOCIATED PRESS
requirements. Participants will identify
roles in health care that play to their
strengths and interests, get access to
online resources and job postings, and
create an employment plan. Thursday,
10:30 to noon, JVS CareerSolution, 75
Federal St., 3rd Floor, Boston. Free.
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Home prices jumped to all-time highs in almost two-thirds of US cities in the fourth quarter
as buyers battled for a record-low supply of listings. Prices for single-family homes, which
climbed 5.3 percent from a year earlier nationally, reached a peak in 64 percent of metropolitan areas measured, the National Association of Realtors said Tuesday. Of the 177 regions in the group’s survey, 15 percent had double-digit price growth, up from 11 percent in
the third quarter. Home values have grown steadily as the improving job market drives demand for a scarcity of properties on the market. While prices jumped 48 percent since
2011, incomes have climbed only 15 percent, putting purchases out of reach for many
would-be buyers. The most expensive markets were San Jose, Calif., where the median price
was $1.27 million, followed by San Francisco, the Irvine, Calif., area, Honolulu, and San Diego. The San Jose area had a 26 percent increase in prices, the biggest of any region, followed by Reno, Nev., and the Putnam/Dutchess County area, north of New York City. The
biggest decline was in Glens Falls, N.Y., where prices dropped almost 12 percent. Cumberland, Md., and Elmira, N.Y., followed. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
➔ PANEL
BEVERAGES
PEPSICO’S SNACK
BUSINESS MAKES UP
FOR LOWER
DRINK SALES
DRUG STORES
WALGREENS
TO PURSUE TAKEOVER
OF LARGE DRUG
DISTRIBUTOR,
REPORT SAYS
COPY MACHINES
XEROX SHAREHOLDER
SUES OVER FUJIFILM
TAKEOVER
PepsiCo’s snacks are having to pick up more of
the slack for its ailing beverages. The company
posted sales and earnings that topped analysts’
estimates last quarter, helped by an uptick in
volume at its Frito-Lay business in North America. The snack growth helped offset continued
declines at the Purchase, N.Y.-based company’s
drinks business. PepsiCo’s success with snacks
is a sign that Frito Lay is innovating — examples include Organic Doritos and yogurt-based
crackers — while simultaneously strengthening its core brands. But it hasn’t been able to
pull off the same trick on the beverage side. North America Beverage sales volumes were
down 2 percent in the fourth quarter. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
Inside the minds
of designers
Attend a panel discussion featuring
members of the Boston design
community in the fields of branding, user
experience, and city planning. Learn how
to look at projects from a design point of
view. Thursday, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.,
General Assembly Boston, 125 Summer
St., 13th floor, Boston. Free. Register
online or go to the business agenda at
bostonglobe.com.
Shares of AmerisourceBergen soared Tuesday on reports that Walgreens is pursuing a
complete takeover of the huge drug distributor. The Wall Street Journal reported late
Monday that Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc. reached
out to AmerisourceBergen Corp. about a potential
deal several weeks ago. The paper, citing anonymous
sources, said no offer is on the table. Walgreens
already owns about 26 percent of the company,
according to data provider FactSet. Walgreens Boots
Alliance Inc. runs more than 13,200 stores in 11
countries, and is the largest US drugstore chain. Last
September, it said it would spend $4.38 billion to buy
nearly 2,000 Rite Aid stores and some distribution
centers and inventory. Adding the rest of AmerisourceBergen would give the company a
tighter grip on its supply chain. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Xerox Corp.’s third-biggest shareholder sued to block its plan to turn over control to Fujifilm
Holding Corp., calling the deal a one-sided transaction that leaves Xerox investors virtually
powerless. Darwin Deason asked a judge to block the deal and terminate joint venture
agreements between the companies. He claims the agreement is the result of fraud and that
directors breached their fiduciary duties. Fuji, Xerox, current Xerox board members, and
Ursula M. Burns, Xerox’s former chairman and chief executive officer, are named as
defendants in the lawsuit, in which Deason seeks to represent all Xerox shareholders.
Deason and Carl Icahn, Xerox’s second-biggest investor, said in a Feb. 12 letter to
shareholders that they opposed the deal, agreed to last month, because it “dramatically
undervalues” the company. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
➔ INNOVATION
Corporate
collaboration night
Venture Cafe is hosting a corporate
collaboration night with startups so
entrepreneurs can better understand
problems innovators face and how to
work with others on solutions. Thursday,
TOYS
MATTEL TO LAUNCH
NEW CARD GAME
THAT’S DOUBLE UNO
What’s next for Uno? Dos, of course. Mattel is
launching the new card game Dos next month in
hopes of giving its nearly 50-year-old Uno brand a
second life. Dos has similar rules as Uno, except
players make two piles of cards and can throw down
two cards at a time instead of one. It comes as Mattel
tries to turn its business around, mainly by updating
classic brands, such as Barbie dolls and Hot Wheels
cars. The toy maker’s revenue fell 11 percent last
year, hurt by the bankruptcy filing of Toys R Us and
the changing tastes of kids, who are increasingly
reaching for a tablet instead of a toy. Uno, however, was a bright spot: The company says
Uno sales were up 12 percent in 2017 from the year before. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
3 to 8:30 p.m., Venture Cafe Kendall, One
Broadway, 5th floor, Cambridge. Free.
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
➔ DIVERSITY
Inclusion
in the workplace
Executives and those in leadership roles
are invited to attend an educational
diversity and inclusion event hosted by
OutBio, a Boston-based LGBTQ drug
FAST FOOD
MCDONALD’S
WANTS TO
BOOST ITS
CHICKEN
BUSINESS
McDonald’s Corp., aiming to extend a three-year growth run, is betting that
it can attract customers by being more like Chick-fil-A. One of the company’s
top priorities is to become a ‘‘credible chicken player’’ in the United States,
according to internal McDonald’s documents reviewed by Bloomberg News.
The initiative has been dubbed ‘‘Better Chicken,’’ the fast-food giant said in a
letter to franchisees, who operate about 90 percent of its US locations. McDonald’s has already taken steps to elevate its chicken sandwiches and nuggets, which were long seen as a serviceable if uninspiring part of the menu.
The chain has vowed to stop serving poultry with antibiotics, and it removed
artificial preservatives from McNuggets. It also rolled out Southern-style
sandwiches and tenders, which are coated in a crispy buttermilk breading
that’s similar to what Chick-fil-A offers. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
development network. The event will
feature complimentary career and
management coaching sessions.
Refreshments will be offered. Thursday,
5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Canopy City CoWorking, 14 Tyler St., Somerville. Free.
Register online or go to the business
agenda at bostonglobe.com.
Events of note? E­mail us at
agenda@globe.com
B14
Business
T h e
THE BOSTON GLOBE
25
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Council wrestling with Airbnb rules
uRENTS
Continued from Page B11
“We cannot win the war on
our housing shortage in Boston
if housing units are being taken
off the market and used as
short-term rentals,” Dillon said.
“This is what’s happening.”
Last month, Walsh proposed
allowing people who rent a
spare room in their home to
keep doing so, while capping
short-term rentals in investorowned units at 90 nights per
year. It was a policy two years in
the making. But on Tuesday,
the proposal seemed to make
no one happy.
Several councilors asked
why the city should allow investor units at all, given that — by
some calculations — landlords
might still make more renting
for 90 prime nights a year on
Airbnb than they would with a
standard 12-month lease.
Others ques tion ed how
much of a difference the plan
would make in rental prices
and wondered whether red
tape associated with new rules
might discourage residents
from listing spare apartments
for short-term use.
“Some people just use this to
make extra money,” said City
Coun cilo r Frank B aker. “I
would be hesitant to get into
some of these rules.”
Councilors also heard from
people who attended the City
Hall session.
The industry giant Airbnb
packed the chamber with property hosts, some of whom testified that renting out units
through the company’s platform had helped them pay their
mortgages or tuition.
Several people from Chinatown said longtime residents
have been pushed out of some
buildings to make way for
short-term rentals.
Hotel workers filled one side
of the chamber as Brian Lang,
president of Unite Here Local
26, said blocking investorowned short-term rentals is the
“number one policy issue” for
the union.
A few people asked how the
bill would treat visiting doctors,
researchers, and others who
come to town for more than a
few nights but stay far less than
a year.
Those are some of the many
details and questions that are
likely to be hashed out in coming weeks as council members
decide whe ther to vote on
Walsh’s proposal or to hold
more hearings and amend it.
Other cities have had
lengthy debates about such regulations; Los Angeles, for example, has been studying the issue
for three years.
Tim Logan can be reached at
tim.logan@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter at
@bytimlogan.
Milk
deliveries
make a
comeback
uMILK
Continued from Page B11
Markets
Stocks up again in a calmer market
US stocks rose a third straight day Tuesday, led by banks,
retailers, and tech companies — following a harrowing
drop of more than 10 percent over the previous two weeks.
Amazon climbed again, and athletic apparel companies
rose following solid quarterly results from Under Armour.
Apple continued to recoup some of its recent losses. On
Wednesday, the Labor Department will issue its monthly
report on consumer prices. Investors will be watching because the recent bout of market volatility was touched off
by worries inflation might be increasing. Under Armour reported better-than-expected sales. The stock had plunged
50 percent in 2017 and 30 percent in 2016. It rose 17.2 percent Tuesday. Amazon climbed 2 percent, and dollar stores,
department stores, and clothing companies made gains, as
well. AmerisourceBergen, one of the largest prescription
drug and hospital supplies distributors, jumped 9.3 percent
after The Wall Street Journal said Walgreens Boots Alliance
wants to buy the rest of the company. It already owns 26
percent. GNC Holdings rose 18 percent; it has formed a
joint venture with Harbin Pharmaceutical, of China.
DOW JONES industrial average
mark, ‘You have a milkman?
Who still has a milkman?’ ” Gilmartin said. “It feels nice. It
feels more like a neighborhood.
You feel like you’re part of a
community.”
At prices that hover in a
range of $2.80 to $3.40 per half
gallon of milk with varying fat
content, home delivery is not
significantly more expensive
than buying a carton at the grocery store, especially when
compared to organic brands.
Warren Shaw, an owner of
Shaw Farm in Dracut, said his
home-delivery service, which
dates to 1908, hit a lull about
15 years ago when the farm had
about 300 home-delivery customers. Now, he estimates that
the company delivers to between 800 and 1,000 homes
each week.
“I think in general, from
Amazon Prime to the milkman,
home delivery is in vogue and
we’re catching as much of that
curve as we can,” Shaw said.
C r e s c e n t R i d g e D a i r y ’s
home delivery sales have increased 6 percent to 7 percent
each year for at least the past
three years, said Lisa King, the
company’s business development manager.
Tully Farms Dairy in Dunstable recently began offering
home delivery for the first time
in its nearly 150-year history,
serving 14 households on its
first day. Now, the farm will
PAT GREENHOUSE/GLOBE STAFF
A plastic box contained milk and food items gathered by driver Roger Barsamian for an
order delivered to a South Boston address by Thatcher Farm of Milton.
work on increasing its client
base by reaching out to the 250
people who indicated they were
interested when the family
opened a farm store last spring,
said Charlie Tully Jr., president
of Tully Farms Inc.
“It kind of brings it back to
the consumers,” he said.
Convenience is a big selling
point for Liz DiPesa, who runs a
day care out of her Milton
home. Between the products
she receives from Thatcher
Farm, also in Milton, and occasional deliveries from other
sources, she says she rarely
goes to the grocery store anymore.
Many dairies now deliver a
wide range of products other
than milk, including eggs, yogurt, meat, pre-made meals,
vegetables, ice cream, and even
rock salt.
DiPesa has become friendly
with her delivery driver, Joe
Manning, whose family has run
the farm since 1891.
“We talk about life, and we
solve all the world’s problems
in my kitchen. We wish the
world would catch up with us,”
DiPesa said.
It’s that personal relationship that consumers seem to
want, said Kiley Putnam, a
spokeswoman for the New England Dairy & Food Council.
“In general, the population
has become further separated
from the farm, and it’s clear to
see the trend of consumers
wanting to know where their
food is coming from,” Putnam
said.
At Shaw Farm in Dracut,
other than swapping out the
horse-drawn delivery wagon of
yesteryear for a brand-new, fully-refrigerated Mercedes-Benz
truck, not much has changed.
The farm still uses vat pasteurization, an older method that
heats the milk at a lower temperature for a longer period.
(Many large chains use a faster
process at higher temperatures,
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
Julia Preszler can be reached at
julia.preszler@globe.com.
Hitting
WEEI where
it hurts
Charles
River buys
Mich. firm
uLEUNG
uCHARLES RIVER LABS
the Massachusetts Health
Connector — cut ties with
WEEI.
For those keeping score at
home, that means at least five
advertisers — including Comcast Corp. and City of Boston
Credit Union — have either
terminated or suspended commercial buys on the popular
sports talk station.
The reason some advertisers are taking their money
elsewhere is simple. It’s hard
to defend WEEI’s offensive
commentary.
“These kinds of statements
do not reflect Citizens’ culture
of respect and inclusion,” Citizens spokesman Peter Lucht
said in a statement. “We have
communicated that to WEEI
management and have suspended our advertising on the
station.”
Citizens Bank has been advertising on and off on WEEI
for nearly decade.
A Connector ad aired during the “Kirk & Callahan”
morning show Tuesday, but
just before noon the agency
that runs the state’s health insurance exchange confirmed it
had pulled its ads.
“The Health Connector terminated their advertising with
WEEI due to recent behavior,”
Connector spokesman Jason
Lefferts said in an e-mail.
forward to welcoming MPI to
the Charles River family,” he
added.
Founded in 1947, Charles
River is more than twice as old
as the biotech industry it
serves. It focuses not on the eureka moments that define so
many biotechs, but on the behind-the-scenes services they
outsource — from testing compounds for toxicity to supplying
antibodies for drug production
to genetically engineering rats
and mice for animal drug trials.
As the life sciences sector
has boomed in Massachusetts
and beyond, Charles River has
become an integral player in
the industry. It does work for
every one of the 100 largest
global drug developers, and
played a supporting role in
more than half of the 86 new
medicines approved by the
Food and Drug Administration
in 2014 and 2015.
The MPI acquisition is expected to close early in the second quarter of this year.
Shares of Charles River —
which has a market value of
more than $5 billion — closed
Tuesday at $107.66 on the New
York Stock Exchange, an increase of 5.54 percent.
Continued from Page B11
Continued from Page B11
NASDAQ Composite index
giving milk a longer shelf life.)
Still, aspects of the business
have evolved.
Thatcher Farm, in Milton, is
now surrounded by houses, so
there is no longer a dairy farm
on site, said Pam Ames, the office manager there. The business gets its milk, already bottled, from Hatchland Farm in
Haverhill, N.H.
Crescent Ridge has shifted
its focus from dairy farming to
raising beef. For home delivery,
the farm gets raw milk from the
St. Albans Cooperative Creamery in Vermont and pasteurizes
the milk at its Sharon location.
In the end, the old-time feeling may be the biggest draw for
customers.
“They love the nostalgia of
the milk truck rumbling down
the street and the glass bottle
clinking at the front door,”
Ames said.
JOHN WOLFSOHN VIA THE NEW YORK TIMES
A WEEI cohost imitated sports agent Don Yee (above)
using a stereotypical Asian accent.
Last fall state treasurer Deb
Goldberg began pulling ads
from WEEI after insensitive
remarks were made about the
transgender community. But
the lottery — which is also
overseen by Goldberg — continued its relationship until I
called on Tuesday.
I don’t know how much ad
revenue the station has lost,
but management must be feeling some heat. I made numerous requests for comment to
Entercom Communications,
which owns WEEI, but came
up short.
Advertisers like to be on
WEEI because it is one of the
top-rated stations in the Boston market and reaches a coveted demographic of men ages
25 to 54.
Listeners tune in for the
station’s shock-jock style, but
WEEI has gone too far with an
ever-growing list of hosts who
have been suspended for
crossing the line.
Midday cohost Christian
Fauria set off the current wave
of advertiser blowback when
he imitated sports agent Don
Yee using a stereotypical Asian
accent. Yee, who is of Chinese
descent and was born in the
United States, speaks English
without an accent; he represents Brady and San Francisco
49ers quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo.
On Friday, WEEI suspended Fauria for five days, characterizing his behavior as an “insensitive and ill-conceived attempt at humor.”
His reprimand came two
weeks after the suspension of
another WEEI personality, Alex Reimer. The fill-in host was
suspended indefinitely after
using a derogatory phrase to
describe Brady’s daughter.
For too long, WEEI drove
ratings by spewing hate and
vitriol disguised as sports talk.
Finally, some advertisers have
had enough. What about the
others? Let me know if you
still want your name associated with the station.
Globe correspondent
Margeaux Sippell contributed
to this report. Shirley Leung is
a Globe columnist. She can be
reached at
shirley.leung@globe.com.
Jonathan Saltzman can be
reached at
jsaltzman@globe.com
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B15
By Dave Green
Boston’s forecast
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Sunshine mixing with
some clouds and turning much milder with a
southwesterly breeze.
Increasing clouds at night with a
few showers later on.
FRIDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
There can be a shower
early in the morning;
otherwise, clouds and
some sunny breaks with
a mild afternoon. Some rain
moving in at night.
HIGH
46-51
LOW
35-40
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
Mild in the morning with
a few showers; otherwise, clouds breaking for
some sunshine and blustery and chillier in the afternoon.
Colder at night.
HIGH
51-56
LOW
40-45
HIGH
50-55
LOW
20-25
10
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
12
6
5
6 P.M.
A couple of snow showers possible in the morning, then clouds giving
way to some sunshine
in the afternoon. Clear to partly
cloudy at night.
High pressure building
in from the north will
provide a cold start to
the weekend despite a
good deal of sunshine. A snow
shower at night.
HIGH
41-46
LOW
27-32
HIGH
33-38
LOW
26-31
10
1
2018 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
THURSDAY
TODAY
2
2
15
11
2
1
1
3
10
20
Difficulty Level
2/14
Each row and column must contain the numbers 1 through
6 without repeating.
The numbers within the outlined boxes, or cages, must
combine using the given operation (in any order) to pro­
duce the target numbers in the top­left corners.
Fill in the single­box cages with the number in the top­left
corner.
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
BY FRANK STEWART
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
TODAY: Turning much milder across the region with clouds
and sunshine; there can be spotty freezing drizzle early
across Vermont.
TOMORROW: Some showers early along the
coast in southeastern areas; otherwise, breezy and
PRESQUE ISLE
mild with clouds and some sunshine.
34/22
EXTENDED: Again, some rain in the south
Friday morning. Mild to start, then turning
MILLINOCKET
colder Friday afternoon. Much chillier for
34/22
Saturday.
BURLINGTON
41/33
MONTPELIER
39/28
MT. WASHINGTON
25/22
LEBANON
42/30
RUTLAND
41/33
Boston Harbor
Wind
Seas
Temp
SW 8-16 kts.
1-2 ft.
48/37
East Cape
A.M. P.M.
High tides
A.M. P.M.
10:1810:50
10:1810:50
10:3010:59
10:2310:54
10:2510:54
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
11:1011:51
11:1411:53
10:3211:04
10:2310:55
Yesterday
High/low
33/25
Mean
29
Departure from normal -2
Departure for month +21
Departure for year
+2
5 p.m. rel. humidity 58%
BAR HARBOR
39/31
PORTLAND 42/32
LACONIA
42/29
MANCHESTER
PORTSMOUTH 45/34
BRATTLEBORO
47/33
47/31
NASHUA 47/32
PITTSFIELD
44/32
BOSTON 49/37
WORCESTER
PROVINCETOWN
SPRINGFIELD
NEW
45/34
46/33 PROVIDENCE
44/37
BEDFORD
47/35
48/37
HYANNIS 45/37
HARTFORD
47/35
NEWPORT
44/39
BRIDGEPORT
OAK BLUFFS NANTUCKET 43/36
44/38
45/38
New England marine forecast
High tides
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
 Small craft advisory
 Gale warning  Storm warning
Normal Temperatures
Wind
Seas
Temp
Martha’s
SW 7-14 kts.
1-3 ft.
45/39
Nantucket
SW 8-16 kts.
1-3 ft.
44/38
Buzzards Bay
SW 7-14 kts.
1-2 ft.
45/36
Provincetown
S 8-16 kts.
1-2 ft.
44/35
Record
high
66
60
Normal
high
38
Normal
low
24
0
Record
low
-10
-20
-4
Yesterday’s low 25°
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
January
T
1.5"
1.2"
0.06
0.25
0.23
0.04
0.03 T
0.29 0.36
T
0.9"
0.69
0.6"
0.3"
0.16
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
FIRST
Feb. 23
FULL
Mar. 1
LAST
Mar. 9
Orion at its peak – A. MacRobert
February is when the bright constellation Orion
stands highest in the south after dinnertime. In its
middle is a diagonal row of three stars: Orion’s Belt.
2016
February
1.26
0.21
NEW
Feb. 15
Norm.
37.3
23.4
29.4
1951
70
0.65
January
24 Hr. Precipitation
Yesterday
0.00”
Precip days in February 8
0.0"
February
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
2.44”
Norm. month to date 1.43”
Year to date
Norm. year to date
7.44”
4.79”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018
BY JACQUELINE BIGAR
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
If you have ever wanted to head
in a new direction or strive for a
certain result, the time is now.
Take the plunge, and you are likely to witness an immediate success. Revisit a project that has
been on the back burner for a
while. Tonight: Go where the
crowds can be found.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
One-on-one relating could become a problem if you are not
careful. Expect an opening to appear between you and a significant person in your life. Remember that others often look to you
as a role model. Think before you
speak or take action. Tonight:
Burn the candle at both ends.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
You might have the best inten-
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Ash Wednesday, Feb.
14, the 45th day of 2018. There
are 320 days left in the year.
This is Valentine’s Day.
Birthdays: TV personality
Hugh Downs is 97. Former
New York City mayor Michael
Bloomberg is 76. Jazz musician
Maceo Parker is 75. Movie director Alan Parker is 74. Journalist Carl Bernstein is 74. For-
Record Temperatures
Moon phases
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018:
This year you often consider your
options carefully. You have a
sense that a lot could change -and quite suddenly at that. An element of the unexpected keeps
your daily life busy. Communication could be volatile at times, so
be on top of your game. If you are
single, you discover how important it is to stay open to others.
You will take your time getting to
know a potential significant other. If you are attached, the two of
you often take off together for a
spontaneous day off. Try to understand each other more.
AQUARIUS is a great sign for a
friend.
Actual
40.2
24.4
29.7
Yesterday’s high 33°
80
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Mostly cloudy
100 miles
west at 37 m.p.h.
7/-11
10.0”
Feb. readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
10
Vineyard
Mount Washington (5 p.m. yesterday)
Cool
0
0
0
0
0
0
20
46/36
Weather
Visibility
Wind
High/low temperature
Snow depth at 5 p.m.
Heat
36
423
449
3426
3545
3201
30
1-2 ft.
6:42 a.m.
5:15 p.m.
10:33
6:02 a.m.
(valid at 5 p.m. yesterday)
40
SW 8-16 kts.
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
8:58 9:25
10:0210:34
mer Republican senator Judd
Gregg of New Hampshire is 71.
TV personality Pat O’Brien is
70. Magician Teller is 70. Representative Richard Neal of
Massachusetts is 69. Cajun
singer-musician Michael
Doucet is 67. Actor Ken Wahl is
61. Opera singer Renee Fleming is 59. Actress Meg Tilly is
58. Pro Football Hall of Famer
West
East
♠ 43
♥A753
♦ AQ62
♣J76
♠865
♥9 8
♦KJ5
♣ Q 10 5 4 3
South
11:1211:49
10:5111:06
6:59 7:14
6:52 7:07
50
Cod Canal
Almanac
10:0710:38
Boston’s recent climate
AUGUSTA
39/27
BERLIN
39/24
A.M. P.M.
10:1810:50
9.9 9.0
4:01 4:35
1.0 0.1
High tides
Old Orchard ME 10:1210:44
Hampton
Beach NH
10:2610:58
Plum Island
10:2810:57
Ipswich
10:1110:43
BANGOR
38/22
NEWPORT
40/28
Tides
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
North dealer — Neither side vulnerable
North
♠ 10 9 2
♥ Q 10 6 2
♦ 10 8 4
♣AK9
♠ AKQJ7
♥KJ4
♦ 973
♣82
North
Pass
2♠
3♠
East
South
Pass
1♠
Dbl
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — ♥
West
Pass
3♣
9
Today’s deal appeared in the excellent Daily Bulletin at
the ACBL Fall Championships. In a pairs event, NorthSouth bid and raised spades. Then East came in with a
“pre-balancing” double, and West took out to three clubs.
North pushed on to three spades, passed out.
West led the nine of hearts, and East slipped by winning
and returning a heart, hoping his partner would ruff. South
drew trumps and threw a diamond on dummy’s fourth
heart, making four for plus 170 — a top score.
East thought he might have opened one diamond —
much easier in hindsight. He also thought North should
have doubled three clubs to show a good defensive hand,
inviting South to play for a penalty. East observed that
North-South would be plus 300 against three clubs
doubled.
I doubt that. North-South would win six tricks on defense
only if North led a heart — not exactly clear. Even then, if
West took the ace and led a spade, South would have to win
and lead a trump, ducked (!) by North.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ 4 3 ♥ A 7 5 3 ♦ A Q 6 2 ♣ J
7 6. Your partner opens one spade, you respond two diamonds, he rebids two spades and you try 2NT. Partner then
bids three diamonds. What do you say?
ANSWER: Your partner is looking for a place to play. His
bidding suggests six spades, diamond tolerance and no
desire to play at game or at notrump. Bid three spades or
perhaps (if you are vulnerable) four spades. Partner may
hold A K 10 8 5 2, 2, K 10 5, Q 3 2.
tions to keep the peace while having an important talk with a partner; however, the issue has to do
with the other party's intentions,
not yours. Do not make the situation into something it isn't.
Choose to stay mellow. Tonight:
How about a movie?
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
You could be on the verge of a dynamic change. You will want to
step up to the plate and fill in
where there is a sudden upset or
change. Be realistic about your
options at the same time. Weigh
the pros and cons of an important financial decision. Tonight:
Let off some steam.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You could feel as if you have to
come up with a great idea or solution. If you encourage someone
in your inner circle to brainstorm
with you until a solution is found,
the results will be much better.
You also will avoid becoming
stressed. Tonight: Be spontaneous with a loved one.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Your friends are unusually responsive and want to become
more involved in your life. A family member could display some
jealousy over not being the one
who resolves an ongoing issue. Be
aware of this person's desire and
need to help you. Tonight: Make
it an early night.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
You have impact, no matter what
you do or who else is involved.
Others sense your intensity simply by listening to the questions
you ask. You might feel overloaded and need a break. Ask an associate to pitch in; you can trust
him or her. Tonight: Speak your
mind.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You will be able to make a difference by saying the right thing. A
roommate or family member
who feels somewhat boxed in
suddenly might become rebellious, to the extent that you could
be shocked. Consider how easygoing this person has been. Tonight: Make it your treat.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
The Moon is in your sign, and it
can have a profound effect on you
emotionally, intellectually and/or
physically. You might want to
have an open discussion about a
situation that ails you with someone who can help you work
through the matter. Tonight: You
are all smiles.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
You could be in a frustrating situation. Be aware of a tendency to
avoid discussing your feelings.
Express some of your emotions
more often. As a result, you will
find that you also become more
in touch with others' feelings. Tonight: Take a much-needed personal night.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Jim Kelly is 58. Actor Simon
Pegg is 48. Matchbox Twenty
singer Rob Thomas is 46. Former Patriots quarterback Drew
Bledsoe is 46.
ºIn 1663, New France (Canada) became a royal province
under King Louis XIV.
ºIn 1849, James K. Polk became the president to be photographed while in office as he
posed for Matthew Brady in
New York City.
ºIn 1912, Arizona became the
48th state as President Taft
signed a proclamation.
ºIn 1929, the ‘‘St. Valentine’s
Day Massacre’’ took place in a
Chicago garage as seven rivals
of Al Capone’s gang were
gunned down.
ºIn 1962, first lady Jacqueline
Kennedy conducted a televised
tour of the White House in a
videotaped special that was
broadcast on CBS and NBC
(and several nights later on
ABC).
ºIn 1979, Adolph Dubs, the US
ambassador to Afghanistan,
was kidnapped in Kabul by
Muslim extremists and killed in
a shootout between his abductors and police.
ºIn 2008, Republican campaign dropout Mitt Romney
endorsed John McCain for the
party’s presidential nomination.
ºIn 2013, double-amputee and
Olympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius shot and killed his girlfriend,
Reeva Steenkamp, at his home
in Pretoria, South Africa; he
was later convicted of murder
and is serving a 13-year prison
term. American Airlines and
US Airways announced an $11
billion merger that turned
American into the world’s biggest airline.
ºLast year, the Senate confirmed former wrestling entertainment executive Linda McMahon to lead the Small Business Administration.
You can be challenging when you
feel the need to be, but in general
you prefer to be easygoing. Remain sure of yourself as you attempt to resolve a problematic
situation. A friend could be unusually angry and hostile as well.
Tonight: Decide what your priorities are.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Examine the possibilities, and
figure out what seems to be holding you back. It might be quite
clear that you need to get away
from a certain person in order to
make good decisions. In a sense,
this person contaminates your
mind with irrelevant gossip. Tonight: Out and about.
Jacqueline Bigar is on the internet at www.jacquelinebigar.com.
(c) 2018 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
T h e
B16
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
Gearan to lead
Institute of Politics
TAYLOR BALLANTYNE/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED
Raisman photo shoot
sends a message
Aly Raisman posed nude in the
2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue, appearing in photographs and
videos with words and phrases like
“fierce,” “survivor,” “trust yourself,”
“live 4 you,” and “abuse is never OK”
painted on her body.
The shoot was part of a new SI
Swimsuit franchise called “In Her
Own Words.” Shot by an all-female
crew using words chosen by the subject, the franchise was conceived “to
deliver a message of empowerment,
beauty, confidence and self-acceptance,” according to a press release.
The Raisman photos were credited to
Taylor Ballantyne.
“Women do not have to be modest
to be respected,” said Raisman, a
Needham native, in an interview with
SI Swimsuit.
“I believe that women [or anyone]
should be able to wear whatever
makes them feel comfortable and happy. Our society puts too much pressure
on women and young girls to look
‘perfect,’ and we have to stop doing
that. I’m proud that SI Swim is using
women of all shapes and sizes with
various backgrounds.”
Raisman, who appeared in the
2017 swimsuit issue and posed nude
in the 2015 ESPN Body Issue, also
took part in a more standard swimsuit
photoshoot for the 2018 issue, appearing in various swimsuits in Aruba.
Rhode Island native Olivia Culpo
participated in an “In Her Own
Words” shoot, as well, appearing with
words and phrases such as “pain
shapes,” “love transforms,” and “woman” on her body. (Kevin Slane, Boston.com)
DARREN MCCOLLESTER/GETTY IMAGES FOR BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL
Gronk donates to hospitals in Mass., Maine, and R.I.
Rob Gronkowski, his father, Gordon, and two of his four brothers paid a visit Tuesday to Boston Children’s Hospital, where the Pats tight end played beanbag toss and donated $25,000. Also Tuesday, the Gronk group made
similar visits — and presented similar donations — to the Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital at Maine Medical
Center in Portland and Hasbro Children’s Hospital in Providence. Jeffrey Sanders, COO of the Portland hospital,
in conveying the center’s gratitude, said, ‘‘Gronk will always be a champion to us.’’ The money was raised
through two raffles by Gronk Nation. One was for tickets to the AFC Championship Game and the other was for
tickets to the Super Bowl. (AP)
Schumer film trailer
gets tough feedback
Murray to join cellist
at Worcester show
We’re not sure what to expect when
Bill Murray joins cellist Jan Vogler at
Worcester’s Hanover Theatre in April.
The show, which will also include
violinist Mira Wang and pianist Van­
essa Perez, is billed as
an evening of music,
poetry, and prose.
Apparently the evening will showcase
the words of Mark
Twain, Ernest Heming­
way, and Walt Whitman, and the music of Leonard Bernstein, George Ger­
shwin, and Stephen Foster.
Murray (inset) and Vogler, who met
when the former “SNL” cast member
made some wisecracks about Vogler’s
cello as the two were making their way
through airport security, released an
album, “New Worlds,” in 2017.
Tickets for the April 22 show in
Worcester are priced between $45 and
$150.
INSTAGRAM
Buzz starting
for ‘Uncle Drew’
The movie won’t be out until June,
but the hype for “Uncle Drew” has
already begun. Posters have been
released for the feature film based
on the popular Pepsi ads featuring
Celtics guard Kyrie Irving as an
old dude who plays serious hoops.
In addition to Irving, the movie includes Reggie Miller, former Celtics players Nate Robinson and
Shaquille O’Neal, Chris Webber,
“Survivor’s Remorse” actress Erica
Ash, and Lisa Leslie. The movie
about Uncle Drew’s attempt to get
a group of septuagenarians together for one final tournament hits
theaters June 29.
Against the family
Not everyone is psyched about the
conceit in Amy Schumer’s new madein-Massachusetts movie. Called “I Feel
Pretty,” the comedy is about a woman
who believes she’s a raving beauty —
“undeniably pretty” — after falling off
a bike and suffering a concussion.
(The film comes out June 29.)
“My character Renee, she kind of
has low self-esteem and she really
wants to be pretty and just feel all the
parts of life that open up to you when
you’re just gorgeous, and then I fall off
my bike in SoulCycle and I start seeing
myself as a supermodel,” Schumer explained last week on Ellen DeGe­
neres’s show. “I look exactly the same,
but in my mind, I am Gisele [Bund­
chen].
The problem, some say, is that
Schumer is already all of those things.
Comedian Sofie Hagen went on
an epic Twitter rant after watching
the “I Feel Pretty” trailer, and it’s hard
to argue with what she says. Her insights included: “So the new Amy
Schumer movie is about a woman
who is half an inch from being conventionally Hollywood attractive (but
rest-of-the-world attractive) who
thinks she’s rest-of-the-world attractive? I have never been more confused
in my life.”
Schumer hadn’t responded to the
backlash by press time, but she had
made her rumored relationship with
Mark Gearan, who’s spent his career in politics and academia, is the
new director of the Institute of Politics
at the Harvard Kennedy School.
Gearan (inset), who grew up in
Gardner and worked on
former Massachusetts
governor Michael
Dukakis’s 1988 presidential campaign,
will begin at the IOP
in March.
“At Harvard, we believe in the power of public service to transform our
societies for the better,” Harvard’s
president, Drew Faust, said in a statement. “We are excited that Mark, a
distinguished leader who has dedicated most of his impressive career to
public service, will now bring his remarkable skills and passion to the
IOP.”
A onetime journalist — he worked
at the Fitchburg Sentinel — Gearan
was headquarters press secretary for
Dukakis during the governor’s failed
presidential bid and later served as
White House deputy chief of staff and
director of communications in the
Clinton administration. He left the
White House in 1995 to become director of the Peace Corps, and in 1999 became president of Hobart and William
Smith Colleges, a post he held for 18
years.
“The mission to inspire and prepare Harvard students to become
leaders in politics and public service
could not be more important,” Gearan,
a Harvard alum, said in a statement.
“As an undergraduate, I benefited
greatly from the IOP, and I look forward to continuing its rich legacy for
today’s students with vibrant programs, speakers, and ideas from academia and practice.”
MORE CELEBRITY NEWS
Stage role for Hanks
Just in case being a film titan wasn’t
enough, Tom Hanks, fresh off being
cast as Fred Rogers in an upcoming
biopic, will be returning to the stage.
He will play Sir John Falstaff in “Henry IV,” the Shakespeare Center of Los
Angeles announced Tuesday. Rita Wil­
son, his wife, will also be in the show,
which will be directed by Daniel Sulli­
van, a Tony Award winner. The play
will have 24 performances starting
June 5 and ending July 1. Hanks was
last onstage in 2013, when he starred
in Nora Ephron’s “Lucky Guy” on
Broadway. (The New York Times)
ROBYN BECK/AFP/GETTY IMAGES/FILE
Martha’s Vineyard chef Chris Fischer
official. Schumer attended DeGeneres’s 60th birthday bash over the
weekend and posted a pic of herself
smooching Fischer, captioning the
photo: “Happy Birthday @theellenshow thank you for having us!”
Read local celebrity news at
www.bostonglobe.com/names. Names
can be reached at names@globe.com
or at 617-929-8253.
‘13 Reasons’ unchanged
A planned second season of ‘‘13 Reasons Why’’ on Netflix will be unaffected by allegations of sexual misconduct
against author Jay Asher. Netflix said
Tuesday that Asher was uninvolved in
the new season, scheduled to air this
year. Asher’s best-seller from 2007
about a suicidal teenager is the basis
for the show. On Monday, the Society
of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators said Asher was kicked out of
the organization because of complaints about harassment. (AP)
‘We are disappointed that anyone would make such a wrongful comment.’
MIKO BRANDO, Marlon Brando’s son, responding to Quincy Jones’s claim that Marlon Brando slept with Richard Pryor
‘Leipzig Week in Boston’ is brought to a happy conclusion
By Zoë Madonna
MUSIC REVIEW
GLOBE STAFF
Sunday afternoon, a collaborative
program with the Boston Symphony
Chamber Players and the Gewandhaus-Quartett of Leipzig proved (if it
needed proving) that the trans-Atlantic creative alliance between their two
parent orchestras does not start and
end with their soon-to-be-shared musical head honcho, Andris Nelsons.
Whole sections of seats may have
been empty at Symphony Hall, but
the music on stage was full of life.
The program was the final event in
the “Leipzig Week in Boston” festivities, which also included lectures, lieder, and a BSO concert that both celebrated Leipzig’s musical heritage and
gave a young composer a world premiere. The violinists of the regular
Gewandhaus-Quartett were present
for this program, with guests Anton
Jivaev (viola) and Jürnjakob Timm
(cello) completing the foursome. The
Germans opened the program with a
cool rendition of Haydn’s String Quartet in D, Op. 64, No. 5, known as “The
Lark” for the initial movement’s highflying first violin line, which was
BOSTON SYMPHONY
CHAMBER PLAYERS
With the Gewandhaus­Quartett
At Symphony Hall, Sunday
ROBERT TORRES
The Boston Symphony Chamber Players performed Ligeti’s “Six
Bagatelles for Wind Quintet” Sunday.
beautifully expressed by Gewandhaus
Orchestra concertmaster Frank-Michael Erben.
For the first two movements, it
seemed a kind of Platonic ideal of the
classical-period string quartet. Every
gesture was measured and deliberate,
not a single sound out of place, and
there wasn’t much to do but marvel at
its perfection. The players added
some snap and bite in the third movement, breaking the spell, and I was
glad. Platonic ideals are boring. The
breakneck Presto was one to remember, propelled by carefully contained
fire.
The Boston Symphony Chamber
Players then took the stage for Ligeti’s
clever “Six Bagatelles for Wind Quintet,” which was also performed last
month, at Jordan Hall. The players inhabited the complex work’s casual virtuosity; they created sonic scenes of a
mad chase in twittering winds and
thumping bassoon, and a visceral cry
in a rending horn blast.
The Leipzig strings and the Boston
winds came together at last for the final piece before intermission, Lukas
Foss’s “For Aaron.” The titular “Aaron”
was the composer’s longtime friend
Aaron Copland, and the piece did
have the same notes of sweetness and
innocence that characterizes such
works as “Appalachian Spring.” Energe t i c f i d d l e - t u n e - l ike m e l o d i e s
swooned into open-hearted dreamy
interludes under the baton of BSO assistant conductor Moritz Gnann.
Mendelssohn’s Octet in E flat was
center stage in the second half, with
the Gewandhaus-Quartett, Steven Ansell of the Chamber Players, and three
BSO section guests. Erben again led
the first-violin charge through the
wild thickets of buzzing strings. The
piece was full of heady vitality; Mendelssohn wrote it at the age of 16, and
the players telegraphed that youthful
anything-is-possible spirit. BSO cellist
Sato Knudsen took off into the final
movement as if fired from a gun, and
the rest sustained that spirit through
the driving fugue and puissant march
that followed. After being pulled
through that vor tex of energ y, a
spring in the step while walking out
was almost inevitable.
Zoë Madonna can be reached at
zoe.madonna@globe.com. Follow
her on Twitter @knitandlisten.
Madonna’s work is supported by the
Rubin Institute for Music Criticism,
San Francisco Conservatory of Music,
and Ann and Gordon Getty
Foundation.
TV HIGHLIGHTS
College basketball: GWU at UMass, 7 p.m. NESN Plus
Olympics: Figure skating (pairs final), 7 p.m. NBC
NBA: Clippers-Celtics, 8 p.m., NBCSB, ESPN
Olympics: Women’s hockey (US-Canada), 10:10 p.m., NBCSN
Listings, C2, C8
Sports
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E W E D N E S DAY, F E B RUA RY 14, 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
Tara Sullivan
Rippon’s voice
resonates
PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — Adam Rippon is a figure skater, a firsttime Olympian at the unlikely age of
28.
Adam Rippon is a superior athlete,
good enough to help US figure skaters
land bronze in the team event.
Adam Rippon is a gay man, out,
proud, and loud of who he is.
Adam Rippon is a hilarious storyteller, telling tales of
sad In-N-Out Burger binges while watching the Olympics
he failed to make four years ago or remembering how he
would nab the free apples from his gym to augment groceries he could barely afford.
Adam Rippon is outspoken, having publicly taken on
Vice President Mike Pence over gay rights.
Adam Rippon is unafraid to speak his mind, continuing
to do so as Pence has come and gone from these Olympics,
aware of not becoming a distraction to teammates but unSULLIVAN, Page C6
White seizes
golden moment
PyeongChang 2018
By Will Graves
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOIC VENANCE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Trailing entering his final run, Shaun White flew into action and
claimed his third career gold medal in the Olympic men’s halfpipe.
PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — The pressure was
real. So were the tears — of joy, relief, redemption.
This is why Shaun White keeps going. This is why the
snowboarding superstar keeps coming back to the Olympics, a journey that’s seen him evolve from teenage phenom to global brand to living legend. One with a perpetual
target on his back and impossible expectations to meet.
Standing atop the halfpipe on a gray Wednesday morning at slushy Phoenix Snow Park with his hopes for a third
gold down to one final shot, White never wavered.
‘‘I honestly knew I had it,’’ White said. ‘‘I knew I had to
put it down.’’
The stakes left him little choice. Rising star and heir apparent Ayumu Hirano had snatched the lead out of White’s
hand during the men’s halfpipe final, throwing a spectacular epic second run to vault into the lead and put a portion
of White’s Olympic legacy at risk.
Not that it mattered.
One deep breath, a half-dozen near flawless tricks — including back-to-back 1440s, a trick he never landed in
WHITE, Page C7
Quality start
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Zdeno Chara and Charlie McAvoy
celebrate Chara’s empty-netter.
Bruins get
cooking
at home
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
SPRING IN THE AIR — Alex Cora (right) is expected to bring new energy to the Red Sox, who open camp Wednesday. On baseball, C2
After a rough 2017 season, Price is ready ‘mentally and physically’
FORT MYERS, Fla.
— I’ve been in Fort
Myers well over 24
hours, and every conversation with every
Red Sox fan, snowbird, and JetBlue
clubhouse attendant
starts with the same
question:
“How come Malcolm Butler didn’t
play in the Super Bowl?’’
No one knows. We’ll never know.
So let’s talk about something else
for a minute. Let’s turn to the feel-bad
story of the 2017 Red Sox. Let’s get everyone back in the baseball mood
with a cleansing, expansive interview
with David Price.
Price blew up the 2017 Red Sox
season, a division-title campaign that
gave way to another predictable oneand-done skunking in the playoffs. He
hurt his elbow in spring training,
came off the shelf in late May, and was
cruising along pretty well when he
lost his mind and hurt his elbow again
in July.
He lashed out at the media (most
famously with his airplane ambush of
Dennis Eckersley), stopped granting
interviews except on the days he
pitched, made little disguise of his hatred for Boston, and eventually came
back and pitched well out of the bullpen when the Sox were desperate for a
starter.
Price’s 2017 season goes into the
books as a 6-3, injury-riddled cam-
OPEN EXTENDED HOURS
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paign, but it was much more than
that. The $217 million lefty made
himself the poster child of everything
folks disliked about the Red Sox.
Fast-forward to 2018’s “reporting
day” for Sox pitchers and catchers,
and there was Price, affable, thoughtful, answering questions from the picnic table podium where every Red Sox
manager and star player delivers
opening remarks in mid-February.
Think of it as 17 minutes in the denSHAUGHNESSY, Page C2
Bruins 5 The Bruins are now twothirds of the way
Flames 2 through the regular season, eagerly awaiting the start of the
playoffs in April.
In other words, they’ve officially
reached maintenance time, their record now 35-12-8 after Tuesday
night’s methodical 5-2 dismantling of
the Calgary Flames in front of a full
house of 17,565 on Causeway Street.
Patrice Bergeron scored twice
(team-high Nos. 26, 27), Riley Nash
did the same (Nos. 9, 10), and team
captain Zdeno Chara finished it off
with a 180-foot empty-netter, completing a three-goal third period that
delivered their 19th win this season
on home ice.
“We made it a lot more difficult
for them to get to the front of the
net,” said Bruins coach Bruce CassBRUINS, Page C5
INSIDE
Sign of the times
A slow free agent market could benefit the Red Sox. Speier, C3
Players in charge
Stevens said he let Hayward, Horford run a practice recently. C3
BC three­peat
Eagles top BU, 4-3, in OT for third
straight women’s Beanpot title. C4
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Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Cora’s challenge
not unlike one
Francona faced
Nick Cafardo
kidding aside, you’re human
beings. If you concentrate just
ON BASEBALL
on baseball, it becomes a grind.
Learn about them and their
FORT MYERS, Fla. — It
families on and off the field.
feels a little like spring training
“The way [Price] threw the
2004, after Terry Francona took ball in October with conviction,
over for Grady Little.
it was very impressive. ObviFrancona’s job was to get the ously I want to see him make
Red Sox to the World Series,
30-plus starts. That’s the goal,
which he did. He also won it.
and it’s been cool to talk to him.
Alex Cora finds himself in a
He’s been in the World Series
similar situation. Two firstbut he hasn’t been there since
place finishes, followed by two
2008. Not many guys have instraight eliminations in the Dinings in the World Series.
vision Series — despite the fact
[Brandon] Workman, [Joe]
that John Farrell had a World
Kelly, Price. That’s something
Series championship under his
that’s going to push him. Lookbelt — simply wasn’t good
ing forward to seeing him perenough.
form every five days to see what
Cora was hired to bring a
he can do.”
new energy, to crash the Red
Cora was especially interestSox through that playoff roading when speaking about Blake
block.
Swihart and Xander Bogaerts.
So on Tuesday, in his first
He called Swihart an athlete
news conference of the spring,
and felt he was in the mix for
we learned some of what Cora
the 25-man roster. Swihart is
might be looking to do. It’s obout of options, so he has to
vious that his style will differ
make the team or be subjected
from Farrell’s. He’ll be more
to waivers.
hands-on, more communica“Swihart is a guy that obvitive with his players, and likely
ously has gone through ups and
go out on the field with them
downs healthwise,” said Cora.
and instruct.
“He’s going to catch, take
Farrell let his coaches take
ground balls. He’s an athlete
on those tasks. Farrell’s players
and his versatility and athletididn’t kick him in the shins,
cism is a plus for any team.
but they also
When he’s
didn’t show
right, he
him a lot of
swings the bat
love. Farrell
well. You’ll see
didn’t engenhim in differder warmth,
ent positions
while Cora
. . . He’s up for
does.
the challenge.”
Of course,
Cora said
this is called
Swihart would
the honeyeven be conmoon period.
sidered part of
It’s the getthe second
ting-to-knowbase mix, and
you stage of
more.
Cora’s mana“Second,
ALEX CORA
gerial tenure.
third, anyRed Sox manager
There’s so
where,” said
much more to
Cora. “I hacome. Cora
ven’t been
didn’t even quite know how to
with him yet on the field but
handle his first speech in front
[from] everything I hear he’s a
of his team.
guy, especially when he’s
He said he didn’t know if he
healthy, you can move around
should address the pitchers
and someone you can use beand catchers, who officially
hind the plate. You don’t see
start on Wednesday, or wait un- that too often. Like [Austin]
til the full squad arrives next
Barnes in LA. He can catch and
week. He’s already had many
in the World Series he’s playing
conversations with his players
second base. Because he’s that
throughout the offseason and
good of an athlete.”
early in spring training. But he
It’s obvious Cora, a former
acknowledged it’s a process and infielder, really wants to spend
he understands that the jury
time with Bogaerts.
may be out on him until he
“Xander is one of the best
shows his true colors and how
shortstops in the big leagues,”
he responds to players in good
said Cora. “You look at his
times and in bad.
numbers. His on-base percentCora likely will handle his
age last year, it wasn’t that bad.
coaching staff much as Astros
Sometimes we talk about batmanager A.J. Hinch handled
ting average and balls in play
him.
and all that stuff, nagging inju“My experience was a
ries and all that stuff. Someunique one,” Cora said. “A.J.
times you have a bad year. It
was basically, ‘Do whatever you
happens and players bounce
want.’ I was like a second manback. But he’s up there with the
ager with him, and I appreciatbest of them.
ed that because it prepared me
“Mentally he’s in a good
for this.”
place right now. That’s a guy
The feeling from the Red
I’m looking forward to working
Sox front office is that the comwith on a daily basis. Big fan of
munication will be better.
him when he got called up [as a
There will be a new way to skin
rookie], the way he slowed
the cat. Maybe there will be
down the game. At that age, it
more emphasis on analytics.
was very impressive.
Maybe there will be new ways
“There are certain things ofto teach hitting or base runfensively we feel he can do putning. Maybe there will be more
ting himself in a better hitting
shifting and better ways to play
position that will help him out,
defense.
and we’re looking forward to
Maybe it’s what this roster
seeing him perform this year.”
needs. We will see.
Would Cora like to see more
Cora will also have his hand
power from Bogaerts?
in developing players. He needs
“More consistent, at-batto get Rafael Devers to the next
wise,” said Cora. “I still have
level, offensively and defensivethat at-bat against Charlie Morly. He needs to make sure Anton in the playoffs, and at the
drew Benintendi continues to
end everybody knew that Charprogress. While Cora gave
lie Morton had the best stuff of
roundabout answers on whethall of them in October and Noer he wants a primary catcher
vember. For [Bogaerts] to drive
rather than the split between
that ball to right-center, you
Christian Vazquez and Sandy
have to be a good hitter, a good
Leon that existed last season,
athlete, and I still think about
he was diplomatic and said, “I
that at-bat.
anticipate we’ll have a great de“I’m not saying he’s going to
fensive catcher, a general behave that result all the time,
hind the plate and execute the
but he can put himself in posigame plan. Both are capable.”
tion to again be among the elite
It’s obvious Cora hasn’t had
shortstops.”
any heavy talks with David
In his wildest dreams, Cora
Price. He feels it’s important to
would be the new Terry Francohave a relationship with players na. The Red Sox have put him
that goes beyond baseball.
in that position. The rest is up
“You spend time with them,
to Cora.
from 2 till 10:30; there’s more
Nick Cafardo can be reached at
to their life and my life,” Cora
cafardo@globe.com. Follow
said. “David has a baby, 8-9
him on Twitter @nickcafardo.
months old. I’ve got mine. All
‘My experience was
a unique one . . . I
was like a second
manager with
[A.J. Hinch], and
I appreciated that
because it prepared
me for this.’
JKM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
Blake Swihart (right), in the batting cage with Sandy Leon, is in the mix to make the 25-man roster for the Red Sox.
Starters’ spring workload eased
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
FORT MYERS, Fla. — David
Price strained his left elbow on
Feb. 28 last season while
throwing two
RED SOX
innings in a
NOTEBOOK simulated
game against
minor leaguers.
The injury led to two
lengthy stints on the disabled
list and Price was able to make
only 11 starts.
Now the Red Sox are taking
steps to better protect Price
and their other starters by
scheduling them for less competition in spring training.
Price, Drew Pomeranz, Rick
Porcello, and Chris Sale are
unlikely to appear in the first
7-10 days of exhibition games.
For Price and Pomeranz, the
Sox do not want to put too
much strain on their elbows.
For Porcello and Sale, the idea
is to conserve energy for later
in the season.
“We’ve got to take it slow,”
Price said Tuesday. “I feel like
the more time, the more spring
trainings you have, you learn
that.”
Price felt he pushed too
quickly in spring training last
season, trying to atone for a
disappointing 2016 season.
“That’s not the way to do it.
You’ve got to ease yourself into
it,” he said.
New pitching coach Dana
LeVangie laid out the plan in
December and presented it to
the players in early January.
Sale quickly endorsed it, as did
the other starters.
“Everybody is on board for
it. Take your time and we’ll be
ready when Opening Day
comes,” Price said.
That he returned from the
disabled list last September
and pitched effectively out of
the bullpen that month and in
the postseason gave Price
peace of mind coming into this
season.
“To be able to throw the
baseball in October that way,
whether you’re starting or
coming out of the bullpen,
you’ve got to be able to take
something good out of it,” he
said. “Coming off the injury I
dealt with last year, to come
back and be able to throw the
amount of pitches that I did, to
be able to throw in back-toback games, that was good.”
Cagey Cora
It’s no secret that several
Red Sox players will start
spring training recovering
from surgical procedures. Second baseman Dustin Pedroia,
lefthander Eduardo Rodriguez,
and righthander Tyler Thorn­
burg are all expected to open
the season on the disabled list.
But manager Alex Cora was
evasive when asked directly
about those players, speaking
only in generalities about who
would be ready for camp.
Steven Wright, who had
surgery on his left knee last
May, has said he expects to be
ready for Opening Day. But Cora dodged that question, too.
“I can’t give you a timeline,”
he said. “I don’t think that’s
right for the player. I saw him
throwing the ball the other day
and he looked really, really
good.”
Cora acknowledged he was
feeling his way through the
job.
“My style is yet to be determined,” he said. “But one thing
for sure, enjoy the process. Relax through it. That’s very important.”
Still shopping
J.D. Martinez is not the only
free agent the Red Sox are still
involved with. The Sox, San
Francisco Giants, and Philadelphia Phillies are among the
teams considering lefthanded
reliever Tony Watson.
Watson, 32, has averaged 72
appearances over the last five
seasons and has a career 2.56
ERA. He also has 16 games of
playoff experience.
A major league source said
the Giants were pushing hard
for Watson.
Fans get first look
Fans will be allowed into
Fenway South at 9:30 a.m. on
Wednesday for the first workout for pitchers and catchers.
The team is expected to be on
the field around 10 . . . The
MLB Players Association is
conducting a training camp for
free agents starting Wednesday
at the IMG facility in Bradenton, Fla. The Red Sox were trying to find out what players
would be there and whether
scouts would be allowed to
watch. The media already has
been barred . . . The Sox will
have a scout in Seattle on
Thursday to evaluate Tim
Lincecum, who is trying to
make a comeback. The 33year-old righthander was 2-6
with a 9.16 ERA with the Angels in 2016 and sat out last
season . . . Non-roster catcher
Oscar Hernandez was delayed
obtaining a visa from Venezuela and should arrive in a few
days. Beyond that, all the
pitchers and catchers reported
on time . . . Position players
don’t officially report until
Sunday, but most are already
in camp and working out. Pedroia is due in Friday, Cora said
. . . Sox legends Dwight Evans,
Pedro Martinez, and Jason
Varitek were among the instructors working with the
players.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at pabraham@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
Price is ready ‘mentally and physically’
uSHAUGHNESSY
Continued from Page C1
tist chair surrounded by dozens
of folks with drills.
One minute into the session,
the indomitable Jonny Miller
asked, “How do you feel mentally coming in after a tough
season last season?’’
Perfect. This is one of the
dominant pitchers of the last
decade, a guy with a suddenly
fragile $200 million elbow, but
we wonder about him “mentally.’’
“I had a very good offseason
and I feel good both mentally
and physically,’’ said Price.
Did he think a change in
managers was necessary?
“Honestly, I didn’t care. I
didn’t have a problem with
manager John [Farrell].’’
Price has an opt-out clause
at the end of this season. It
probably would cost him a bundle, but he could leave Boston.
This could be a true measurement of how much he hates the
Boston Baseball Experience.
Price cleverly will not show his
hand on this one.
“I want to be great every
year,” he said. “That’s always my
goal. I expect to win here and
that’s what I came here for.’’
Any doubt in your mind
you’ll be in Boston next year?
“No. Not at all. I came here
to win. I knew how tough it was
to play here, to pitch here. I
know all the emotions are going
to be even better in a positive
way.’’
Any regrets about his decision to come to Boston when he
was a free agent after the 2015
season?
“No. Not at all. Everything
I’ve been through in the past
JIM DAVIS/GLOBE STAFF
David Price appears relaxed as he met with the media as
pitchers and catchers reported to spring training Monday.
two years has been a struggle
absolutely. I feel like I’ve gotten
better from it. I’ve learned from
it and look forward to continuing to learn.’’
How would you characterize
what happened last year with
your relationships with the media? It didn’t seem like you
liked to be in Boston at the end.
“If that’s the way it was interpreted,’’ he started. “I could
have handled it better last year,
absolutely. But I didn’t. I’ve
moved on and I look forward to
getting back this year and getting off on the right foot.’’
What’s your policy on talking to the media now?
“We can talk, but if you’re
going to come over and overload me with negativity, that’s
not going to happen. That’s not
going to happen.’’
Any regrets about the way
the Eckersley episode played
out last summer?
“Yes. I could have handled it
better.’’
Are there things that have
surprised him about being an
athlete in Boston?
“No. Honestly I feel like it’s
pretty straightforward. You
know what you’re going to get.
If you go out there and pitch
well and play well, you’re going
to have the support.
“That’s something I took
from James Shields. If you don’t
like it, pitch better. You can always make things better by
pitching better, and that’s what
I’ve got to do. Throw the ball
the way I’ve thrown the ball before getting to Boston and I
look forward to doing that.’’
In O c t o b e r, w h e n Pr i c e
pitched well in the Sox’ only
playoff win, he wouldn’t say
anything positive about the applause he got from Fenway
fans. How does he feel about
the fans now?
“Fine. I’ve never said anything about it. I know what to
expect. I just need to go out and
pitch well.’’
Does he think the atmosphere is overly critical in Boston?
“You guys expect a lot and
have had a lot of championship
teams. I know the Patriots have
won a lot and the Celtics won in
’08. The Bruins. You guys expect a lot, and I think guys coming into Boston know that. Go
out there and win. Winning
cures everything.’’
Does he think of himself as a
leader on this team?
“Absolutely. For sure . . .
Leaders lead. There’s definitely
different ways to lead and different types of leaders.
“I feel like I’ve always been
one to lead with my actions. I
didn’t do that very well last
year. I know that. I understand
that. And I look forward to getting back and being that faucet,
not being a drain.’’
Will he try to make amends
if and when he sees Eckersley?
“If he wants to talk, I’ll talk.’’
Toward the end of the mass
interview, Price was asked
about former teammate J.D.
Martinez, who has been offered
a whopping contract by the Red
Sox but has yet to sign.
“I’ve talked to him a couple
of times, and I’ve told him we’d
love to have him here,’’ said
Price.
Hmmmmm. Maybe this explains some of Martinez’s reluctance to commit to the Sox.
I can hear it now . . .
“You’d love it here. It’s swell.
And they really like free agents
named J.D.!”
The first official workout for
pitchers and catchers is
Wednesday.
Meanwhile . . . what about
Malcolm Butler?
Dan Shaughnessy can be
reached at
dshaughnessy@globe.com
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Slow market could benefit Red Sox
By Alex Speier
GLOBE STAFF
One day before the first workout
of pitchers and catchers in Red Sox
spring training camp, a strange,
unsettled feeling prevails throughout baseball. With nearly 100 free
agents unsigned, there’s a palpable
sense that the offseason isn’t over,
that rosters are still in a formative
state.
The game has never seen a market that was so sluggish, where the
free agencies of so many top players (J.D. Martinez, Eric Hosmer,
Jake Arrieta, etc.) bled into the official start dates of spring training.
In Red Sox camp, the Martinez
question will hover nearly every
day until he chooses his destination. According to major league
sources, the Red Sox’ current fiveyear offer remains in the vicinity of
$100 million — closer to that mark
than the $125 million figure that
has been reported.
The Sox continue to covet Martinez for the middle of their lineup.
He represents the best answer to
the team’s 2017 power deficiency.
“I’ve talked to him a couple
times,” said pitcher David Price,
who played with Martinez in Detroit in 2014 and 2015. “I told him
we’d love to have him here. He
knows that and he’s going through
his process.”
Nonetheless, in the absence of
other obvious suitors willing to
push the auction price higher, the
team has shown little inclination to
bid against itself, even as it has
maintained what agent Scott Boras
described to the Globe last week as
a “good-faith negotiation.”
Martinez isn’t alone. The agreement between the Cubs and Yu
Darvish on a six-year, $126 million
deal last week represented the first
nine-figure contract of an offseason
that was expected to deliver a
handful of them. It’s been a strange
winter, one that in many ways has
befuddled numerous members of
the industry who have struggled to
recall anything like it.
Yet there have been past instances of late-forming markets.
Rewind to the winters of 200203 and 2003-04, the first two offseasons after team owners and the
MLB Players Association managed
to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement without a
strike.
According to an Oct. 30, 2003,
article in the Los Angeles Times,
the MLBPA considered a grievance
charging owners with collusion to
fix salaries by employing an information bank that permitted clubs
to know the offers being made to
players by competitor teams. Entering the 2003 season, free agents
such as Reggie Sanders and Kenny
Lofton were left to twist in the
wind until mid March, when they
took one-year deals in the vicinity
of $1 million.
Current baseball commissioner
Rob Manfred, then MLB’s executive vice president of labor relations, denied that owners were conspiring to depress or fix salaries,
saying, “Did the market look different last year? It looked different for
legitimate reasons. I mean, it
should not have been a shock that
it looked different.”
Formal collusion charges were
never filed. But that time of tension
is an interesting one to ponder
now, given what occurred during it.
The game experienced an unusual market correction that resulted in the availability of free agents
at drastically different salaries from
what had been offered before and
would be offered after. From 200304, salaries around the game declined by 2.5 percent. The winter
spending binge of 2000-01 that saw
the game reward young superstars
such as Alex Rodriguez ($252 million for 10 years) and Manny
Ramirez ($160 million for eight
years) gave way to dramatically
more modest contracts.
Jim Thome reached a six-year,
$85 million deal with the Phillies
after the 2002 season — a 30 percent discount on what Jason Giambi, a similar player, had struck just
one year earlier. Then-29-year-old
superstar V ladimir G uerrero
signed a five-year, $70 million deal
in January 2004 — earning less
than half the guarantee made to
Ramirez.
It is possible that this winter —
one in which the Yankees and
Dodgers are sitting out of the highest end of the free agent market
while trying to get below the luxury-tax threshold of $197 million —
represents a similar time. And if so,
it likewise represents a significant
opportunity for a Red Sox team
that is among the few willing to
spend beyond the luxury tax
threshold.
The Red Sox are in an enviable
position in that they have money to
spend.
They are not in an enviable posi-
tion with the state of their minor
league system. There is a dearth of
high-end prospects to anchor deals
for elite players, suggesting that it
is preferable for them to anticipate
potential needs now rather than
address them on the trade market
in July.
They have the resources to add
Martinez and bolster other areas of
their roster. As much as team officials believe in the potential of Carson Smith, Joe Kelly, Matt Barnes,
and Brandon Workman to assume
primary setup roles, they also recognize that they lost the pitcher —
Addison Reed — they acquired to
cement that spot last year.
Likewise, questions remain
about the middle-infield depth and
whether Marco Hernandez, Brock
Holt, Deven Marrero, or Tzu-Wei
Lin truly represents a quality fallback option for Dustin Pedroia
(and, should they be injured, Xander Bogaerts or Rafael Devers). The
Sox have a choice to invest in an insurance policy now or wait until
the summer to figure out whether
they need to make a move.
At a time when few teams are
spending, the Sox have an unusual
opportunity to make considerable
upgrades in the weeks preceding
the season. As much as the winter
has seemed like an exercise in Martinez-or-bust, they still have a
chance to aim higher, and to find
the sort of late-spring upgrades
that may help them avoid a trip to
the trading block later.
Wi ll that be the te am’s a pproach? Right now, like so much
else about the market, that remains
an unanswered question.
Sports
C3
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
Toronto
BOSTON
Philadelphia
New York
Brooklyn
W
40
40
29
23
19
L
16
18
25
35
39
Pct. GB
.714 —
.690
1
.537 10
.397 18
.328 22
Streak Home
W6
24­4
L 2 21­10
W 4 17­10
L 7 16­11
L 6 11­20
Conf.
24­7
25­13
15­13
11­23
12­21
CENTRAL
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Indiana
Detroit
Chicago
W
34
32
32
27
20
L
22
24
25
29
36
Pct. GB Streak Home
.607 —
W4
20­7
2
W2
.571
19­9
.561
2½
W 2 20­11
.482
7
L 3 18­12
.357 14
W 1 13­15
Conf.
25­12
19­17
22­15
16­19
17­16
SOUTHEAST
Washington
Miami
Charlotte
Orlando
Atlanta
W
32
30
23
18
18
L
24
27
33
38
40
Pct. GB Streak Home
.571 —
W 1 17­10
.526
2½
L 1 14­12
.411
9
L 4 15­15
.321 14
L 2 11­15
.310 15
L 1 13­17
Conf.
19­14
21­16
12­18
11­24
8­29
WESTERN CONFERENCE
PACIFIC
Golden State
LA Clippers
LA Lakers
Sacramento
Phoenix
W
44
29
23
18
18
L
13
26
32
38
40
Pct. GB Streak Home
.772 —
W3
22­7
.527 14
W 1 16­12
.418 20
L 1 14­14
.321 25½
W1
8­17
.310 26½
L6
9­21
Conf.
25­10
20­16
11­22
10­24
12­24
SOUTHWEST
Houston
*San Antonio
New Orleans
Memphis
Dallas
W
43
35
30
18
18
L
13
23
26
37
40
Pct. GB Streak Home
.768 —
W9
22­6
.603
22­6
9
L2
.536 13
W 2 14­12
.327 24½
L 6 13­16
.310 26
L 2 11­19
Conf.
25­8
20­13
14­19
15­21
10­28
NORTHWEST
Minnesota
Oklahoma City
Portland
*Denver
Utah
W
35
32
31
30
29
L
25
26
26
26
28
Pct. GB Streak Home
.583 —
L1
23­7
.552
2
L 1 20­10
.544
2½
L 1 16­11
.536
3
W1
22­7
.509
4½ W 10
17­9
Conf.
26­10
17­17
17­15
19­18
18­14
* — Not including late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
At Toronto 115
Miami 112
Cleveland 120
At Milwaukee 97
Atlanta 92
Sacramento 114
Houston 126
at Minnesota 108
at Okla. City 112
at Dallas 109
San Antonio
at Denver
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
LA Clippers at BOSTON
8
Okla. City at Memphis
8
Atlanta at Detroit
7
Sacramento at Houston
8
Charlotte at Orlando
7
Toronto at Chicago
8
Miami at Philadelphia
7
LA Lakers at New Orleans
8
Indiana at Brooklyn
7:30
Phoenix at Utah
Washington at New York
7:30
Golden St. at Portland
9
10:30
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Hayward, Horford were coaches for a day
By Adam Himmelsbach
GLOBE STAFF
Warriors coach Steve Kerr created a bit of a stir Monday when
he handed the coaching reins to
his players for the day. They were
in charge of running the pregame
shootaround and meetings, and
then took turns drawing up plays
during their win over the Suns.
Kerr said his players had lost focus over the past month, and that
it would be a good way for them to
get reengaged.
Celtics coach Brad Stevens said
Tuesday that he has never done
such a thing during a game, but
he did try something similar at a
recent practice. He said that a few
weeks ago Gordon Hayward and
Al Horford were put in charge of
the session.
“We just do that to look at it
from a different level, a different
perspective,” Stevens said. “I think
it would be harder for the younger
guys to do it, but [Horford and
Hayward] understand what all
five guys are doing in an action,
because they understand why
you’re trying to do it.”
Hayward is sidelined with an
ankle injury, and Horford missed
practice that day, too, so it was a
good way for both to have an impact on the session without actually dribbling or shooting.
“It’s definitely challenging,”
Horford said. “I’m not very good
Clippers thumbnails
R When, where: Wednesday, 8 p.m., at
TD Garden.
R TV, radio: NBCSB, ESPN, WBZ­FM
(98.5).
R Scoring: Lou Williams 23.2, Tobias
Harris 16.4, Danilo Gallinari 15.8.
R Rebounding: DeAndre Jordan 15.1,
Harris 6.6, Gallinari 4.8.
R Assists: Williams 5.3, Milos Teodosic
5.3, Austin Rivers 3.7.
R Head to head: This is the second and
final meeting. The Celtics won the first,
113­102, Jan. 24 at Los Angeles.
R Miscellany: The Clippers shipped star
forward Blake Griffin to Detroit a few
days before the trade deadline . . . For­
mer Celtics guard Avery Bradley,
picked up in that trade, is averaging
14.4 points, 2.6 rebounds, and 2.1 as­
sists overall this season.
at it. I think that maybe if I see
some things in the game, I can call
it and stuff, but it’s pretty impressive.
“I think Gordon probably did a
better job than me drawing up
plays off that. I think it’s fun. It’s
something different. Coach is putting trust on us to have fun with
it.”
Horford said the experience
gave him a greater appreciation
for Stevens and his skills as a tactician.
“He is a genius, man,” Horford
said. “He’s pretty smart.”
New­look Clippers
On Sunday, the Celtics lost to a
Cavaliers team that featured four
new rotation players who had
been acquired just three days earlier. On Wednesday the Celtics will
face the Clippers, whose recent reconstruction was not quite as rapid, but is still notable.
Last month Los Angeles traded
Blake Griffin to the Pistons in exchange for Avery Bradley, Tobias
Harris, Boban Marjanovic, and a
first-round pick. Also, when the
Celtics faced the Clippers on Jan.
24, Austin Rivers and Danilo Galli­
nari were out with injuries. Both
players have returned.
Even though Los Angeles is still
figuring out how to use its new
pieces, Stevens said, the players’
skills are no secret.
“Avery Bradley is playing for
the Clippers for the first time, but
we all know Avery well,” he said.
“We all know the great things that
that he’s done. Tobias Harris is
playing near an All-Star level. We
know him well. At the end of the
day, they’re fitting those guys into
what they do best.”
Sweeter dreams
With unusual travel schedules
and varying tipoff times, sleep is
at a premium in the NBA. The
pregame nap, for example, is a
longstanding tradition. In addition to getting enough sleep, the
Celtics have put an emphasis on
getting quality sleep. The team
has now partnered with the sleep
performance company Bedgear,
which is installing specialized
beds and pillows that fit the players’ individual sizes and sleep
styles.
Smart isn’t ready
Celtics guard Marcus Smart
completed some shooting drills
Tuesday but did not participate in
the team’s full practice. Stevens
said that Smart and guard Shane
Larkin (knee) remain on track to
return for the first practice after
the All-Star break . . . College basketball broadcaster Dick Vitale
will help call the Celtics-Clippers
Wednesday on ESPN. It is part of
the network’s annual “crossover”
night, when NBA and NCAA
broadcasters switch places. Vitale
will be joined by NBA regular
Mark Jackson and play-by-play
man Ryan Ruocco . . . The Celtics’
121-99 loss to the Cavaliers was
the most-watched ABC regularseason Sunday game since 2013.
The game was seen by an average
of 4.635 million viewers, a 62 percent increase from last season’s
comparable game between the
Knicks and Spurs.
Adam Himmelsbach can be
reached at
adam.himmelsbach@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@adamhimmelsbach.
SportsLog
Boston College ends three­year ACC road skid
Jerome Robinson poured in 27 points and
Jordan Chatman added 17 on 5-of-12 shooting
from 3-point range as the Boston College men’s
basketball team won its first road game in Atlantic Coast Conference play in nearly three years
with an 81-58 victory over Pittsburgh on Tuesday night. The Eagles (16-10, 6-7 ACC) hadn’t
won an ACC road game since March 3, 2015 at
Virginia Tech, a string of 23 straight losses. Pitt
(8-19, 0-14) opened up a big lead by the midway
part of the first half, but from the 6:42 mark in
the Eagles went on a 16-4 run to close to within
34-32 at the break. BC started the second half on
a 9-0 run to take a lead they never relinquished.
Parker Stewart had 16 points for the Panthers.
NHL
Seattle files expansion application
The group looking to bring professional
hockey to the city of Seattle formally filed its expansion application with the National Hockey
League. The Oak View Group and its prospective NHL ownership group, led by billionaire
David Bonderman and filmmaker Jerry Bruck­
heimer, also made a $10 million deposit. The expansion application has been expected for
weeks and is the next step in Seattle’s ongoing
hope of bringing an NHL franchise to the largest
market in the country without a professional
winter sports franchise . . . Los Angeles acquired
veteran defenseman Dion Phaneuf and forward
Nate Thompson from the Ottawa Senators in exchange for forwards Marian Gaborik and Nick
Shore. The deal gives the playoff-contending
Kings more depth on the blue line as they assume the final three-plus years of Phaneuf’s contract . . . Flyers goalie Brian Elliott will miss 5-6
weeks after abdominal surgery for an injury sustained Saturday against Arizona.
BASEBALL
franchise’s career tackles leader and four-time
Pro Bowl selection linebacker Derrick Johnson,
who will become a free agent and said he plans
“on playing for several more years.” . . .
NFL.com reported that sources said former Panthers offensive coordinator Mike Shula will take
the same job with the Giants . . . According to reports, Seahawks safety Kam Chancellor plans to
play next season if he is medically cleared from a
neck injury that ended his 2017 season early.
Jeter happy with Marlins’ plan
MISCELLANY
Marlins chief executive officer Derek Jeter
said the franchise is on the path to long-term
success after offseason moves that purged the
batting order of four starters. The team opens
camp Wednesday following trading Giancarlo
Stanton, Dee Gordon, Marcell Ozuna, and
Christian Yelich for mostly prospects. Jeter said
he intended to keep Stanton until the NL MVP
said he didn’t want to be part of a rebuilding
process . . . Yu Darvish and the Cubs finalized
their six-year, $126 million deal . . . The Orioles
and pitcher Kevin Gausman avoided arbitration
with to a one-year, $5.6 million deal. Gausman
had asked for $6,225,000 and the club submitted $5.3 million.
NFL
Chiefs, LB Johnson to part
The Chiefs announced they won’t re-sign the
ATP investigates racist remark
The ATP said it is reviewing accusations by
Donald Young that Ryan Harrison used racially
inappropriate language when the two Americans had a heated exchange during their opening-round match at the New York Open on Monday. Harrison defeated Young, and at one point
during a changeover the two appeared to be arguing, with the chair umpire moving in between
the players to attempt to calm the situation . . .
New York Knicks forward Kristaps Porzingis
had successful surgery at Hospital for Special
Surgery in Manhattan to repair a torn anterior
cruciate ligament in his left knee. Porzingis, who
is expected to miss much of next season, was
hurt Feb. 6 . . . Major League Lacrosse’s 2018
All-Star Game, featuring MLL All-Stars versus
Team USA, will be played June 28 at Harvard
Stadium, home of the Boston Cannons.
New Orleans 118
at Detroit 103
At Chicago 105
At Philadelphia 108 New York 92
At Utah 101
LA Clippers 114
At Golden St. 129
at Brooklyn 101
BUCKS 97, HAWKS 92
ATLANTA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Prince ... 30 4­12 2­4 0­1
Ilyasova 28 5­15 4­6 3­7
Dedmon 28 5­8 1­1 2­10
Bazemr . 29 6­15 1­2 0­5
Schrodr. 31 8­16 0­0 2­3
Taylor ... 14 0­1 0­0 0­3
Dorsey .. 13 0­2 0­0 1­3
Collins... 23 2­5 0­0 4­5
Delaney 15 0­3 4­5 0­7
Bembry. 12 1­2 0­0 1­3
Muscala 17 2­7 2­2 1­3
Totals .... 33­86 14­20 14­50
A
2
2
0
4
4
4
1
1
2
1
0
21
F
1
1
2
4
2
1
0
1
0
0
2
14
Pt
11
15
13
17
18
0
0
4
4
2
8
92
FG%: .432, FT%: .765. 3­pt. goals: 8­
25, .320 (Antetokounmpo 0­4, Middle­
ton 1­3, Maker 1­2, Snell 2­3, Bledsoe
2­6, Brown 1­4, Terry 1­2, Kilpatrick
0­1). Team rebounds: 7. Team turn­
overs: 10 (12 pts.). Blocks: 10 (Antetok­
ounmpo 2, Middleton, Bledsoe 3, Zeller
2, Brown, Terry). Turnovers: 10 (Ante­
tokounmpo, Middleton 2, Bledsoe 6,
Zeller). Steals: 6 (Antetokounmpo,
Middleton, Bledsoe, Brown, Terry 2).
Technicals: Bledsoe, 1:08/3rd.
Atlanta ..................24 19 18 31 — 92
Milwaukee............21 20 33 23 — 97
A — 14,720 (18,717). T — 2:03. Offi­
cials — Jacyn Goble, Gediminas Petrai­
tis, Jason Phillips.
KINGS 114, MAVS 109
A
3
3
1
7
4
7
2
1
2
0
30
Phoenix 83
RAPTORS 115, HEAT 112
FG%: .384, FT%: .700. 3­pt. goals: 12­
35, .343 (Prince 1­5, Ilyasova 1­7, Ded­
mon 2­3, Bazemore 4­7, Schroder 2­4,
Dorsey 0­2, Delaney 0­1, Bembry 0­1,
Muscala 2­5). Team rebounds: 8. Team
turnovers: 14 (19 pts.). Blocks: 6 (Ded­
mon, Bazemore, Collins 4). Turnovers:
12 (Prince 2, Dedmon, Bazemore 2,
Schroder 5, Delaney, Muscala). Steals:
7 (Prince 2, Ilyasova 2, Dedmon, Schro­
der, Collins). Technicals: Bazemore,
4:04/4th.
MILWAUKEE
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Antknp.. 34 7­16 1­2 3­15 3 5 15
Middltn. 35 7­15 6­7 1­7 3 4 21
Maker ... 25 5­7 1­2 1­3 1 1 12
Snell ...... 31 2­7 0­0 1­3 2 1 6
Bledsoe. 35 5­14 2­2 1­3 9 3 14
Parker... 18 2­8 3­4 1­3 0 0 7
Zeller..... 23 7­9 0­0 5­8 0 2 14
Brown ... 17 1­6 0­0 1­4 1 2 3
Terry ..... 13 1­2 0­0 0­1 3 0 3
Kilptrck... 9 1­4 0­0 0­1 1 0 2
Totals .... 38­88 13­17 14­48 23 18 97
SACRAMENTO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Jackson. 31 5­9 1­1 1­6
Randlph 26 10­15 0­0 1­7
Cauley... 28 4­8 2­4 1­4
Fox......... 31 5­12 0­0 0­4
Bgdnvc.. 34 8­17 0­0 0­5
Carter ... 27 3­6 0­0 0­4
Koufos .. 22 5­5 1­2 2­7
Hield...... 17 3­8 1­1 0­1
Temple . 19 4­7 3­4 0­0
Sampsn .. 5 0­0 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 47­87 8­12 5­38
Orlando 101
San Antonio 99
F Pt
1 12
1 22
4 10
0 11
3 19
4 8
2 11
0 8
4 13
0 0
19 114
FG%: .540, FT%: .667. 3­pt. goals: 12­
29, .414 (Jackson 1­4, Randolph 2­3, Fox
1­3, Bogdanovic 3­7, Carter 2­5, Hield
1­4, Temple 2­3). Team rebounds: 9.
Team turnovers: 9 (17 pts.). Blocks: 4
(Cauley­Stein 2, Koufos, Sampson).
Turnovers: 9 (Jackson, Randolph 3, Fox
3, Bogdanovic, Temple). Steals: 6 (Cau­
ley­Stein, Fox, Carter 3, Hield).
DALLAS
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Mtthws . 29 4­12 2­2 1­5 2 0 13
Barnes .. 30 6­14 3­5 0­5 2 0 18
Nowitzk 32 4­10 3­3 0­6 3 3 12
Smith. ... 30 6­15 3­4 0­3 3 3 17
Barea .... 32 7­13 0­0 1­5 13 2 19
Powell... 26 6­9 5­6 2­6 5 0 18
Ferrell ... 15 0­2 0­0 0­1 0 1 0
McDrmt 19 2­3 2­3 0­3 1 0 6
Kleber ..... 2 0­0 0­0 0­1 0 2 0
Mejri........ 6 0­0 0­0 0­1 0 1 0
Clnwrth. 19 3­5 0­0 0­1 0 1 6
Jones....... 0 0­0 0­0 0­0 0 2 0
Totals .... 38­83 18­23 4­37 29 15 109
MIAMI
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Winslw.. 21 2­4 0­0 0­2
Rchrdsn 37 3­9 2­2 0­3
Whitesd 23 5­9 0­0 2­10
T.Jhnsn . 22 3­8 1­2 0­4
Dragic ... 31 10­19 5­6 1­2
Ellingtn . 31 5­11 0­0 2­7
Adebay . 25 3­6 5­5 1­5
J.Johnsn 29 7­11 1­2 1­7
Wade .... 21 4­9 2­2 3­11
Totals .... 42­86 16­19 10­51
A
2
5
1
2
4
1
3
0
6
24
F Pt
4 5
2 10
1 10
2 7
3 28
0 15
3 11
2 16
1 10
18 112
FG%: .488, FT%: .842. 3­pt. goals: 12­
29, .414 (Winslow 1­1, Richardson 2­5,
T.Johnson 0­1, Dragic 3­5, Ellington 5­
11, J.Johnson 1­4, Wade 0­2). Team re­
bounds: 4. Team turnovers: 16 (28
pts.). Blocks: 3 (Richardson, Whiteside,
Adebayo). Turnovers: 16 (Winslow,
Richardson 3, Whiteside, Dragic 3, Ad­
ebayo 2, J.Johnson 2, Wade 4). Steals: 5
(Richardson, Whiteside 2, T.Johnson,
Dragic).
TORONTO
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Anunby . 13 2­3 0­0 0­2 0 1 6
Ibaka..... 26 5­7 4­4 1­10 0 0 14
Valncns. 30 2­4 2­2 1­10 1 2 6
Lowry.... 33 8­17 2­3 2­4 8 3 22
DeRozn . 35 11­25 4­6 1­2 4 2 27
Poeltl..... 18 1­1 2­2 1­1 0 4 4
Miles ..... 15 3­11 3­5 0­0 0 1 11
Siakam.. 19 2­8 1­1 0­4 1 2 5
VanVlet. 23 4­8 0­0 0­5 6 1 10
Powell..... 7 0­0 0­0 0­1 2 1 0
Wright... 21 4­6 0­0 1­1 2 2 10
Totals .... 42­90 18­23 7­40 24 19 115
FG%: .467, FT%: .783. 3­pt. goals: 13­
35, .371 (Anunoby 2­2, Ibaka 0­1, Lowry
4­8, DeRozan 1­7, Miles 2­10, Siakam
0­1, VanVleet 2­3, Wright 2­3). Team
rebounds: 5. Team turnovers: 8 (9
pts.). Blocks: 3 (Valanciunas, Poeltl,
Wright). Turnovers: 8 (Anunoby 2, Va­
lanciunas 2, Lowry, DeRozan 3). Steals:
7 (Valanciunas, Lowry 2, DeRozan,
VanVleet 2, Wright).
Miami ....................24 31 26 31 — 112
Toronto .................28 29 41 17 — 115
A — 19,800 (19,800). T — 2:13. Offi­
cials — Brian Forte, Leroy Richardson,
Scott Wall.
CAVS 120, THUNDER 112
CLEVELAND
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Osman .. 15 2­6 0­0 0­2
James.... 40 14­23 6­10 0­8
Thmpsn 23 1­2 0­0 1­5
Hill ......... 24 3­7 0­0 1­1
Smith .... 31 6­10 0­0 0­6
Hood ..... 24 5­10 0­0 0­2
Green .... 27 3­7 4­4 0­4
Nance.... 25 5­10 3­6 8­9
Clarksn . 24 6­10 1­2 0­3
Korver..... 8 0­3 0­0 0­1
Totals .... 45­88 14­22 10­41
A
1
8
1
4
3
0
1
2
4
0
24
F Pt
3 5
1 37
3 2
3 7
4 18
5 14
4 10
3 13
2 14
0 0
28 120
FG%: .511, FT%: .636. 3­pt. goals: 16­
36, .444 (Osman 1­2, James 3­7, Hill 1­4,
Smith 6­9, Hood 4­8, Green 0­2, Clark­
son 1­3, Korver 0­1). Team rebounds: 9.
Team turnovers: 7 (9 pts.). Blocks: 4
(James, Nance Jr. 3). Turnovers: 7
(James 5, Thompson, Clarkson). Steals:
6 (Hill, Smith, Hood 2, Nance Jr., Korv­
er).
OKLAHOMA CITY
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T A F Pt
Anthony 36 10­22 1­2 2­7 0 3 24
George.. 40 8­19 4­4 0­4 6 3 25
Adams .. 42 8­12 6­10 12­17 1 3 22
Abrines . 23 0­3 0­0 0­3 1 2 0
Westbrk 39 7­19 7­8 2­7 12 2 21
Huestis . 15 0­0 0­0 0­1 0 2 0
Pattersn 10 0­0 0­6 1­3 1 2 0
Felton.... 14 2­6 0­0 1­3 0 2 6
Grant..... 21 5­9 3­6 0­6 2 1 14
Totals .... 40­90 21­36 18­51 23 20 112
FG%: .458, FT%: .783. 3­pt. goals: 15­
40, .375 (Matthews 3­7, Barnes 3­8,
Nowitzki 1­4, Smith Jr. 2­9, Barea 5­9,
Powell 1­1, Ferrell 0­1, Collinsworth
0­1). Team rebounds: 10. Team turn­
overs: 9 (7 pts.). Blocks: 4 (Nowitzki,
Ferrell, Mejri 2). Turnovers: 9 (Mat­
thews, Nowitzki, Smith Jr., Barea 4,
Powell, Collinsworth). Steals: 4
(Barnes, Smith Jr., Barea, McDermott).
Sacramento..........29 36 23 26 — 114
Dallas.....................16 28 27 38 — 109
FG%: .444, FT%: .583. 3­pt. goals: 11­
35, .314 (Anthony 3­9, George 5­13,
Abrines 0­3, Westbrook 0­3, Felton 2­5,
Grant 1­2). Team rebounds: 9. Team
turnovers: 11 (10 pts.). Blocks: 3 (An­
thony, Adams, Grant). Turnovers: 9
(Anthony, George 3, Adams, West­
brook, Patterson, Felton 2). Steals: 6
(Anthony, George, Adams 2, West­
brook 2). Technicals: Westbrook,
3:14/1st.
Cleveland..............29 33 29 29 — 120
Oklahoma City.....28 29 30 25 — 112
A — 19,801 (19,200). T — 2:04. Offi­
cials — Mitchell Ervin, Mark Lindsay,
Kevin Scott.
A — 18,203 (18,203). T — 2:20. Offi­
cials — James Capers, Pat Fraher, Der­
ek Richardson.
ROCKETS 126, T’WOLVES 108
HOUSTON
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
MbhaMt 29 3­6 0­0 0­4
Tucker... 28 3­4 1­2 0­1
Capela... 26 5­7 4­6 3­12
Paul ....... 34 5­11 2­3 2­8
Harden.. 36 10­20 8­9 0­6
Gordon.. 30 3­10 4­4 0­0
Andersn 26 7­12 1­2 2­4
Green .... 18 2­6 0­0 0­0
Nene...... 14 3­7 2­3 2­2
Totals .... 41­83 22­29 9­37
A
2
0
1
7
13
1
1
0
0
25
F Pt
4 7
2 10
3 14
1 13
2 34
3 13
1 21
4 6
3 8
23 126
FG%: .494, FT%: .759. 3­pt. goals: 22­
47, .468 (Mbah a Moute 1­3, Tucker 3­4,
Paul 1­5, Harden 6­10, Gordon 3­9, An­
derson 6­10, Green 2­6). Team re­
bounds: 9. Team turnovers: 6 (3 pts.).
Blocks: 4 (Mbah a Moute, Capela, Paul,
Harden). Turnovers: 6 (Mbah a Moute
2, Paul 2, Harden, Nene). Steals: 1
(Paul). Technicals: Tucker, 9:04/3rd.
A — 18,978 (19,356). T — 2:10. Offi­
cials — Derrick Collins, Aaron Smith,
Sean Wright.
MINNESOTA
FG
FT Reb
Min M­A M­A O­T
Wiggins 41 2­14 3­4 1­3
Gibson... 34 5­8 2­2 1­5
Towns ... 35 12­16 9­9 5­12
Butler .... 36 5­13 5­5 0­7
Teague.. 38 10­15 3­3 0­5
Crawfrd 20 5­13 0­0 0­1
Dieng..... 12 0­1 0­0 2­5
Bjelica ... 12 1­1 0­0 0­0
Jones..... 10 0­3 0­0 0­2
Brooks..... 1 0­0 0­0 0­0
Aldrich .... 1 0­0 0­0 0­0
Totals .... 40­84 22­23 9­40
A
0
0
3
6
8
1
2
0
2
0
0
22
F Pt
3 7
2 12
6 35
1 15
2 25
0 11
4 0
1 3
0 0
0 0
1 0
20 108
FG%: .476, FT%: .957. 3­pt. goals: 6­
23, .261 (Wiggins 0­5, Towns 2­3, Butler
0­3, Teague 2­3, Crawford 1­6, Bjelica
1­1, Jones 0­2). Team rebounds: 8.
Team turnovers: 9 (17 pts.). Blocks: 4
(Wiggins, Towns 3). Turnovers: 8 (Wig­
gins, Towns, Teague, Crawford 2, Dieng
3). Steals: 3 (Wiggins, Towns, Craw­
ford). Technicals: Crawford, 9:23/2nd.
Houston.................23 31 30 42 — 126
Minnesota.............31 19 30 28 — 108
Sports
C4
T h e
NHL
HURRICANES 7, KINGS 3
Los Angeles.................0
Carolina........................3
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay
BOSTON
Toronto
Detroit
Florida
Montreal
Ottawa
Buffalo
GP
57
55
58
55
53
55
55
57
W
38
35
34
23
24
22
19
17
L OL
16 3
12 8
19 5
23 9
23 6
26 7
27 9
30 10
Pts. ROW
79
36
78
32
73
29
55
19
54
22
51
20
47
17
44
17
GF
204
185
192
149
154
144
147
137
GA
154
133
162
166
172
172
194
188
METROPOLITAN
Washington
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
New Jersey
Carolina
Columbus
NY Islanders
NY Rangers
GP
56
58
57
56
57
56
58
57
W
32
32
28
28
27
29
27
27
L OL
17 7
22 4
19 10
20 8
21 9
23 4
25 6
25 5
Pts. ROW
71
29
68
30
66
27
64
24
63
24
62
23
60
24
59
24
GF
176
182
169
168
158
151
194
166
GA
165
174
167
174
169
156
214
175
GP
55
57
59
57
56
55
56
W
34
33
34
33
31
30
24
L OL
12 9
15 9
21 4
20 4
19 6
21 4
24 8
Pts. ROW
77
29
75
31
72
31
70
29
68
28
64
29
56
24
GF
173
183
170
175
168
174
158
GA
143
154
151
151
158
163
161
PACIFIC
*Vegas
*San Jose
Calgary
Los Angeles
Anaheim
Edmonton
Vancouver
*Arizona
GP
55
56
57
56
58
55
56
56
W
36
30
29
30
27
23
22
14
L OL
15 4
18 8
20 8
21 5
20 11
28 4
28 6
32 10
Pts. ROW
76
34
68
26
66
27
65
28
65
24
50
21
50
22
38
13
GF
187
165
161
162
161
157
147
135
GA
152
156
164
140
166
184
180
194
* — Not including late game; ROW — Regulation plus overtime wins
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Calgary 2
At Buffalo 5
Tampa Bay 3
Columbus 4
at NY Islanders 1
At Detroit 2
Anaheim 1
At Nashville 4
St. Louis 3 (OT)
At Minnesota 3
NY Rangers 2
New Jersey 5at Philadelphia 4
(SO)
At Winnipeg 4 Washington 3 (OT)
At Pittsburgh 6
Ottawa 3
Chicago
at Vegas
Los Angeles 3
Arizona
at San Jose
At Carolina 7
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Columbus at Toronto
7
Montreal at Colorado
9:30
Florida at Vancouver
10
MONDAY’S RESULTS
At Toronto 4
Tampa Bay 3
At Arizona 6
Chicago 1
Florida 7
DEVILS 5, FLYERS 4
New Jersey..............0
Philadelphia ............1
3
3
1
0
0 —
0 —
Devils win shootout, 1­0
First period — 1. Philadelphia,
Konecny 14 (Giroux, Gostisbehere),
1:54. Penalties — , NJ, served by Wood
(too many men on ice), 4:34. Sim­
monds, Phi (hi stick), 10:11. Noesen, NJ
(interference on the goaltender),
12:49. Couturier, Phi (tripping), 13:31.
Second period — 2. New Jersey, Hall
22 (Vatanen), 4:06. 3. Philadelphia,
Laughton 9 (Raffl, MacDonald), 4:49. 4.
Philadelphia, Gudas 2 (Filppula,
Weise), 10:36. 5. New Jersey, Moore 7
(Zajac, Bratt), 13:17. 6. Philadelphia, Gi­
roux 19 (Voracek, Gostisbehere), 15:59
(pp). 7. New Jersey, Hischier 10 (Bratt),
16:09. Penalties — Wood, NJ (rough­
ing), 7:40. Gostisbehere, Phi (cross
check), 7:40. Couturier, Phi (tripping),
11:04. Zajac, NJ (cross check), 15:10.
Third period — 8. New Jersey, Hall 23
(Hischier, Zajac), 18:39. Penalties —
Lappin, NJ (hi stick), 3:26. Wood, NJ
(hooking), 16:10.
Overtime — None. Penalties — None.
Shootout — New Jersey 1 (Palmieri
NG, Stafford G). Philadelphia 0 (Weal
NG, Konecny NG, Voracek NG)
Shots on goal — New Jersey 9­12­
12­3 — 36. Philadelphia 13­13­7­2 — 35.
Power plays — New Jersey 0­3; Phil­
adelphia 1­5.
Goalies — New Jersey, Kinkaid 11­7­2
(35 shots­31 saves). Philadelphia, Neu­
virth 7­7­3 (36 shots­32 saves).
Referees — Chris Rooney, Kyle Reh­
man. Linesmen — Pierre Racicot,
James Tobias.
A — 19,312 (19,543). T — 2:50.
WILD 3, RANGERS 2
NY Rangers..................1
Minnesota....................3
1
0
0 —
0 —
at Edmonton 5
SABRES 5, LIGHTNING 3
5
4
2
3
First period — 1. Minnesota, Staal 25,
3:09. 2. Minnesota, Parise 3, 4:34. 3.
Minnesota, Foligno 6 (Winnik, Eriksson
Ek), 6:17. 4. NY Rangers, Gilmour 1
(DeAngelo, Hayes), 8:50 (pp). Penalties
— Niederreiter, Min (delay of game),
7:29. Miller, NYR (interference), 17:37.
Second period — 5. NY Rangers,
Hayes 13 (Grabner, Pionk), 11:46 (pp).
Penalties — Niederreiter, Min (hold­
ing), 1:24. Prosser, Min (slashing), 9:08.
Nash, NYR (cross check), 9:36. Dumba,
Min (slashing), 10:31.
Third period — None. Penalties —
None.
Shots on goal — NY Rangers 11­19­4
— 34. Minnesota 13­8­8 — 29.
Power plays — NY Rangers 2­4; Min­
nesota 0­1.
Goalies — NY Rangers, Lundqvist 23­
18­4 (29 shots­26 saves). Minnesota,
Dubnyk 23­10­4 (34 shots­32 saves).
Referees — Chris Lee, TJ Luxmore.
Linesmen — Libor Suchanek, Shane
Heyer.
A — 18,887 (17,954). T — 2:27.
1 —
2 —
3
7
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
2018 Beanpot FINAL
First period — 1. Carolina, Slavin 5
(Staal, Pesce), 6:40. 2. Carolina, Faulk 5
(Williams, Rask), 8:56. 3. Carolina,
Faulk 6 (Aho, Teravainen), 17:43 (pp).
Penalties — Kempe, LA (delay of
game), 4:42. Hanifin, Car (hooking),
5:25. Mitchell, LA (slashing), 16:39.
Forbort, LA (holding), 19:30.
Second period — 4. Carolina, Faulk 7
(Aho, Teravainen), 1:17 (pp). 5. Caroli­
na, Skinner 17 (Rask, Williams), 7:42
(pp). 6. Los Angeles, Kopitar 23 (Muzz­
in, Toffoli), 11:49 (pp). 7. Los Angeles,
Toffoli 19 (Pearson, Kopitar), 17:05.
Penalties — Iafallo, LA (hooking), 5:59.
Skinner, Car (interference), 10:35.
Forbort, LA (hooking), 12:32.
Third period — 8. Los Angeles,
Mitchell 3 (Clifford, Doughty), 6:43. 9.
Carolina, Skinner 18 (Di Giuseppe),
14:15. 10. Carolina, Aho 21 (Teravain­
en), 16:32. Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — Los Angeles 3­14­13
— 30. Carolina 18­16­7 — 41.
Power plays — Los Angeles 1­2; Car­
olina 3­5.
Goalies — Los Angeles, Kuemper 9­
1­3 (21 shots­18 saves). Los Angeles,
Quick 21­20­2 (20 shots­16 saves). Car­
olina, Ward 17­7­3 (30 shots­27 saves).
Referees — Eric Furlatt, Jon McIsaac.
Linesmen — Scott Cherrey, Mark
Shewchyk.
A — 12,805 (18,680). T — 2:24.
PREDATORS 4, BLUES 3
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
Nashville
Winnipeg
St. Louis
Dallas
Minnesota
Colorado
*Chicago
At Boston 5
2
2
B o s t o n
Tampa Bay ..................1
Buffalo..........................1
1
2
1 —
2 —
3
5
First period — 1. Buffalo, Baptiste 2
(Girgensons), 6:25. 2. Tampa Bay,
Gourde 22 (Kucherov, Hedman), 13:23
(pp). Penalties — Wilson, Buf (closing
hand on puck), 12:10. Girgensons, Buf
(tripping), 16:12. Koekkoek, TB (hi
stick), 20:00.
Second period — 3. Buffalo, Reinhart
12 (O’Reilly, Rodrigues), 1:16 (pp). 4.
Tampa Bay, Namestnikov 19, 13:19. 5.
Buffalo, Wilson 4 (Nelson, Antipin),
15:47. Penalties — , TB, served by Erne
(too many men on ice), 2:07. Larsson,
Buf (slashing), 6:49. Girgensons, Buf
(tripping), 6:56.
Third period — 6. Buffalo, O’Reilly 18
(Okposo, Ristolainen), 3:41 (pp). 7.
Tampa Bay, Callahan 3 (Sergachev,
Point), 11:36. 8. Buffalo, Reinhart 13
(O’Reilly), 19:52 (en). Penalties —
Dotchin, TB (slashing), 2:21. Okposo,
Buf (tripping), 9:32.
Shots on goal — Tampa Bay 14­9­6 —
29. Buffalo 9­12­12 — 33.
Power plays — Tampa Bay 1­5; Buf­
falo 2­3.
Goalies — Tampa Bay, Domingue 2­
8­0 (32 shots­28 saves). Buffalo, John­
son 4­9­3 (29 shots­26 saves).
Referees — Francis Charron, Trevor
Hanson. Linesmen — Brian Mach,
Steve Barton.
A — 16,530 (19,070). T — 2:35.
JETS 4, CAPITALS 3
Washington.............1
Winnipeg .................1
1
0
1
2
0 —
1 —
3
4
First period — 1. Winnipeg, Scheifele
16 (Byfuglien, Perreault), 14:41. 2.
Washington, Backstrom 14 (Ovechkin,
Wilson), 19:37. Penalties — Kulikov,
Wpg (tripping), 10:49. JCarlson, Was
(slashing), 15:38.
Second period — 3. Washington,
Burakovsky 5 (Eller, Chiasson), 11:22.
Penalties — Bowey, Was (interfer­
ence), 7:11.
Third period — 4. Washington, JCarl­
son 10 (Kuznetsov, Connolly), 7:01. 5.
Winnipeg, Little 12 (Roslovic, Byfug­
lien), 11:30. 6. Winnipeg, Scheifele 17
(Wheeler, Perreault), 19:45. Penalties
— JCarlson, Was (slashing), 7:15.
Byfuglien, Wpg (slashing), 18:43.
Overtime — 7. Winnipeg, Myers 6
(Scheifele), 2:35. Penalties — None.
Shots on goal — Washington 13­9­
4­1 — 27. Winnipeg 13­14­15­2 — 44.
Power plays — Washington 0­2; Win­
nipeg 0­3.
Goalies — Washington, Holtby 28­
10­4 (44 shots­40 saves). Winnipeg,
Hellebuyck 29­8­8 (27 shots­24 saves).
Referees — Tom Chmielewski, Dan
O’Halloran. Linesmen — Jonny Murray,
Kory Nagy.
A — 15,321 (15,294). T — 2:35.
St. Louis ...................1
Nashville ..................0
2
0
0
3
0 —
1 —
3
4
First period — 1. St. Louis, Bouw­
meester 2 (Berglund, Schenn), 15:18.
Penalties — Dunn, StL (holding), 8:47.
Gunnarsson, StL (hi stick), 16:52.
Second period — 2. St. Louis, Steen
13 (Stastny, Tarasenko), 3:10. 3. St.
Louis, Schwartz 18 (Steen, Tarasenko),
9:00 (pp). Penalties — Johansen, Nsh
(tripping), 7:47. Pietrangelo, StL (hold­
ing), 13:07. , Nsh, served by Fiala (too
many men on ice), 14:57.
Third period — 4. Nashville, Jarnkrok
14 (Ekholm, Subban), 9:06. 5. Nashville,
Watson 6 (Ellis, Sissons), 14:33. 6.
Nashville, Watson 7 (CSmith, Josi),
15:48. Penalties — CSmith, Nsh (hi
stick), 13:37.
Overtime — 7. Nashville, Forsberg
17, 1:19 (penalty shot). Penalties —
None.
Shots on goal — St. Louis 7­16­7­1 —
31. Nashville 13­3­15­2 — 33.
Power plays — St. Louis 1­3; Nash­
ville 0­3.
Goalies — St. Louis, Hutton 15­5­2
(33 shots­29 saves). Nashville, Rinne
29­8­4 (31 shots­28 saves).
Referees — Brad Watson, Tom Kow­
al. Linesmen — Brad Kovachik, Ryan
Gibbons.
A — 17,221 (17,113). T — 2:40.
BLUE JACKETS 4, ISLANDERS 1
Columbus.....................0
NY Islanders................1
2
0
2 —
0 —
4
1
First period — 1. NY Islanders, Tava­
res 29 (Lee, JBailey), 17:51 (pp). Penal­
ties — Johnston, NYI (hooking), 3:46.
Johnston, NYI (tripping), 15:06. Jokin­
en, Cls (tripping), 16:33.
Second period — 2. Columbus, Bjork­
strand 10 (Werenski, Dubois), 6:02
(pp). 3. Columbus, Dubois 13 (Werens­
ki, Bjorkstrand), 19:03 (pp). Penalties
— Leddy, NYI (delay of game), 4:10.
Johnson, Cls (holding), 15:49. Nelson,
NYI (hooking), 17:39.
Third period — 4. Columbus, Dubin­
sky 5 (Jenner, Anderson), 6:01. 5. Co­
lumbus, Atkinson 9 (Panarin, Werens­
ki), 6:44. Penalties — Jokinen, Cls (em­
bellishment), 7:37. Barzal, NYI (cross
check), 7:37. Savard, Cls (cross check),
11:03.
Shots on goal — Columbus 26­15­10
— 51. NY Islanders 11­7­12 — 30.
Power plays — Columbus 2­4; NY Is­
landers 1­3.
Goalies — Columbus, Bobrovsky 24­
18­4 (30 shots­29 saves). NY Islanders,
Halak 17­18­4 (51 shots­47 saves).
Referees — Brian Pochmara, Dean
Morton. Linesmen — Tony Sericolo, Be­
van Mills.
A — 10,232 (15,795). T — 2:29.
PENGUINS 6, SENATORS 3
Ottawa .........................0
Pittsburgh....................1
2
3
1 —
2 —
3
6
First period — 1. Pittsburgh, Guent­
zel 17 (Schultz, Malkin), 4:07 (pp). Pen­
alties — Hoffman, Ott (hooking), 3:26.
Second period — 2. Ottawa, Bras­
sard 15 (Stone, Borowiecki), 4:18. 3.
Pittsburgh, Guentzel 18 (Kessel, Le­
tang), 5:10. 4. Pittsburgh, Malkin 31
(Hagelin, Schultz), 10:01. 5. Pittsburgh,
Aston­Reese 1 (Crosby, Sheary), 11:22.
6. Ottawa, White 2 (McCormick, Pyatt),
17:19. Penalties — None.
Third period — 7. Pittsburgh, Letang
4 (Dumoulin, Crosby), 10:09. 8. Ottawa,
Duchene 14 (Hoffman, Karlsson), 14:21
(pp). 9. Pittsburgh, Aston­Reese 2 (Du­
moulin, Crosby), 18:55 (en). Penalties
— Rust, Pit (hooking), 14:00. Cole, Pit,
major (fighting), 19:36. Cole, Pit,
served by Reaves (hooking), 19:36. Mc­
Cormick, Ott, major (fighting), 19:36.
Shots on goal — Ottawa 11­14­8 —
33. Pittsburgh 4­7­17 — 28.
Power plays — Ottawa 1­2; Pitts­
burgh 1­1.
Goalies — Ottawa, Anderson 15­17­5
(18 shots­17 saves). Ottawa, Condon 4­
10­4 (9 shots­5 saves). Pittsburgh,
Murray 20­12­2 (33 shots­30 saves).
Referees — Frederick L’Ecuyer, Wes
McCauley. Linesmen — Greg Devorski,
Darren Gibbs.
A — 18,448 (18,387). T — 2:35.
RED WINGS 2, DUCKS 1
Anaheim.......................0
Detroit ..........................1
0
1
1 —
0 —
1
2
First period — 1. Detroit, Larkin 9,
13:32. Penalties — Ritchie, Anh (rough­
ing), 2:17. Green, Det (hooking), 9:32.
DeKeyser, Det (tripping), 16:25.
Second period — 2. Detroit, Nielsen
13 (Mantha, Green), 15:37. Penalties —
None.
Third period — 3. Anaheim, Henrique
17 (Bieksa, Rakell), 16:06. Penalties —
Bertuzzi, Det (tripping), 5:06. Helm, Det
(slashing), 9:21. Bieksa, Anh (tripping),
17:39.
Shots on goal — Anaheim 16­5­12 —
33. Detroit 5­8­3 — 16.
Power plays — Anaheim 0­4; Detroit
0­2.
Goalies — Anaheim, Gibson 19­15­6
(16 shots­14 saves). Detroit, Howard
16­17­6 (33 shots­32 saves).
Referees — Jean Hebert, Kevin Pol­
lock. Linesmen — Ryan Daisy, Vaughan
Rody.
A — 19,515 (20,000). T — 2:25.
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
The Boston College hockey team celebrated its third straight Women’s Beanpot title and eighth overall.
BC women win Beanpot
Miano’s goal in OT settles it for fourth­ranked Eagles
By Barbara Matson
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Boston College
4 In t h e 4 0 t h
annual womBoston University 3 en’s Beanpot
tournament, the teams from Boston
College and Boston University provided
a true Battle for Boston Tuesday night
before a loud home crowd of 888 at
BC’s Conte Forum, and a showcase for
just how much the women’s game has
improved in those 40 years.
With some of the best scorers in the
nation dueling each other and a pair of
prime-time goalies, it took overtime to
crown a Beanpot champion.
The Eagles took an early lead, the
Terriers wrestled it away, only to have
BC tie the game in the final frantic minutes of regulation. The back and forth
continued into overtime, but BC got the
last chance, earning a power play when
Abbey Stanley was called for tripping.
Eagles captain Toni Ann Miano cashed
it in, sending a wrist shot from the center point whistling past BU goalie
Corinne Schroeder at 14:57 to give BC a
4-3 victory. Fourth-ranked Boston College (26-3-3) claimed its third straight
Beanpot and eighth overall. BC has
won all eight in the last 13 years.
“We want the Beanpot, all the other
awards are just add-ons,’’ said BC goalie
Katie Burt, who had 35 saves and
picked up the Bertagna Award as the
tournament’s top goalie. “It’s really nice
to win the championship on home ice.’’
BC freshman Daryl Watts, a Toronto
native, introduced herself to the Beanpot record books with two goals, including the tying goal late in the third
period. Already the nation’s leading
scorer, she connected for BC when it
mattered most.
“It was a great pass from Molly
Slowe and I just took a chance and shot
it and luckily it went in,’’ MVP Watts
said of the shot she roofed into the BU
net at 15:52 of the third. “I think that
just gave our team a boost of energy
and just got us refocused and I think it
kind of swung the momentum to our
side.’’
Said BU coach Brian Durocher, “It
was a real classic with some of the
country’s best playing really well.’’
The Eagles came into the game with
a dominant offense, featuring three of
the nation’s top six scorers: No. 1 Watts
(72 points), No. 2 sophomore Caitrin
Lonergan (66), and No. 6 junior Makenna Newkirk (53) and immediately
knocked down a 2-0 lead in the first period.
BU (11-15-6) looked to be in form to
win its first Beanot as a varsity program
when the Terriers came charging back
with three second-period goals, taking
a 3-2 lead. BU won its only title in 1981
as a club team.
But Watts’s fiery shot in the final
minutes of the third changed the script.
Watts is in her first year at the
Heights, flinging in goals as fast as she
can load them up on her stick. She has
led the nation in goals from her first
week on the ice, collecting three goals
and two assists in her first two games.
Her linemate Lonergan, already has
reached 100 career points in 43 games.
By the end of the first period, both
Watts and Lonergan had picked up a
pair of points, Watts her nation’s best
38th goal and Lonergan her 100th ca-
reer point.
Watts opened the scoring at 2:18,
beating Schroeder with a straightforward shot from the bottom of the right
circle.
At 12:26, Slowe collected her second
goal of the season on passes from Watts
and Lonergan. That one marked Lonergan’s 100th. Lonergan leads the NCAA
in assists with 40.
Burt made three difficult saves in
the first period, including a pair of
flashy glove saves on BU’s top scorers
Victoria Bach and Rebecca Leslie.
But the Terriers came careening
back in the second period, paced by
Bach and Leslie. Not to be outdone by
the BC numbers, Bach finally connected on a willowy rush through the BC
defensive zone, unloading a high shot
to score her 25th goal of the season and
100th of her career, becoming the first
player in program history to reach 100.
Defenseman Reagan Rust tied it up
at 4:00 with a power play goal, putting
a shot through Burt’s pads from the left
circle. Lonergan was in the box for
hooking.
Leslie then gave the energized Terriers the lead at 8:16, taking advantage of
an odd man rush to sent a wrist shot
past Burt.
. . .
Freshman Becca Gilmore scored
goals 2:01 apart in the third period as
Harvard (12-13-2) rallied from a 3-1
deficit to defeat Northeastern (1415-3), 4-3, in the consolation game.
Gilmore, a Wayland native and Nobles
grad, also had an assist in the third
straight victory for the young Crimson
team.
Northeastern was waiting 30 years for this Beanpot party
By Frank Dell’Apa
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Northeastern got the jump
on opponents in ending its 30year Beanpot drought Monday
night. But when it came to celebrating, the Huskies ended
up being late to their own party.
While alumni, fans, and
students gathered at Punter’s
Pub on Huntington Avenue —
the line extended outside the
door to Chicken Lou’s, more
than a block away — the
Northeastern players were
stranded in the O’Neill Tunnel,
engine problems causing the
team bus to stall.
“That was probably the craziest thing that happened,”
said Northeastern senior defenseman Trevor Owens, who
scored his second goal of the
season in a 5-2 win over BU in
the final. “Everyone’s phone
was blowing up — ‘Where are
you guys?’ We’re trying to rush
to get to celebrate with people.
You just want to get home and
start celebrating, that’s it.”
The university sent along
several vans to deliver the
team to campus, where the
celebratory atmosphere
matched that of 1980, when
NU won the Beanpot for the
first time, according to Paul
Filipe.
“I went by [Monday] night,
but I didn’t stay as long as I did
in 1980,” said Filipe, whose
son, Matt, is a Husky sophomore forward. “Everyone was
pulling for Northeastern
[Monday] night and in 1980,
everyone was pulling for
Northeastern — we had never
won it before.
“It got the monkey off
Northeastern’s back, so you
don’t have to answer that any
more. It brought a lot of positive attention to Northeastern.
There were a lot of kids in the
stands that ended up coming
to Northeastern. So, I think
that started the whole turnaround, be tween that and
George Matthews re-doing the
rink. There was a lot of momentum after that.”
The Huskies also won the
1984, ’85, and ’88 championships, but it took three decades
before the Filipes became the
first NU father-son combination to win the Beanpot.
“When you snap a 30-year
drought, people are just re-
Northeastern 5, BU 2
Harvard 5, BC 4
Monday night’s summary
At TD Garden
NU (17­8­5) ......................
BU (15­12­3).....................
MATTHEW J. LEE/GLOBE STAFF
Forward Matt Filipe hoists the Beanpot trophy on Monday
night, celebrating Northeastern’s first title in 30 years.
lieved,” said Owens, among
four NU seniors who reached
the 2015 Beanpot final, a controversial 4-3 overtime loss to
BU. “Because once you go into
a drought like that, you’re kind
of like, they’re obviously not
going to win it this year because they haven’t won it in
previous years.
“I think it just brought a lot
of joy to people that care about
this program and to a lot of the
alumni. There’s guys I played
with that didn’t experience
what it’s like to win a Beanpot.
It’s like you repay those guys.”
The Huskies extended the
party to a half-hour commemoration at Matthews Arena
Tuesday ni gh t , unive rsity
president Joseph E. Aoun,
outgoing athletic director Peter Roby, and coach Jim Madigan speaking to a crowd of
about 200 students and supporters.
Afterward, Madigan posed
with the Beanpot trophy for
photos in the arena lobby, then
2
1
2
0
Monday night’s summary
At TD Garden
1
1
—
—
5
2
BC (14­13­3).................
Harvard (11­10­4).......
0
1
1
0
3
3
0
1
—
—
4
5
Scoring: BU, Logan Cockerill (Hank Crone,
Chad Krys) 12:35; NU, Nolan Stevens (Zach So­
low, Jeremy Davies) 14:38 (pp); NU, Adam Gaud­
ette (Dylan Sikura, Nolan Stevens) 17:32 (pp);
NU, Trevor Owens (Patrick Schule, Austin Gold­
stein) 14:32; NU, Adam Gaudette (Dylan Sikura,
Jeremy Davies) 19:56 (pp); BU, Shane Bowers
(Logan Cockerill, Dante Fabbro) 17:20; NU, Ad­
am Gaudette (Jeremy Davies) 19:29 (en).
Saves: NU, Cayden Primeau 38; BU, Jake Oet­
tinger 22.
Scoring: Harv, Lewis Zerter­Gossage (Ty Pel­
ton­Byce, Adam Fox) 13:38 (pp); BC, Christopher
Brown (unassisted) 17:49; Harv, John Marino
(Henry Bowlby, Nathan Krusko) 4:21; Harv, Henry
Bowlby (Ty Pelton­Byce, Adam Fox) 6:34 (pp); BC,
Logan Hutsko (Kevin Lohan, Michael Kim) 7:01;
Harv, Jack Donato (Mitchell Perrault, Eddie Ellis)
12:02; BC, Logan Hutsko (Jesper Mattila, Julius
Mattila) 17:26 (pp); BC, Logan Hutsko (Casey
Fitzgerald) 18:24; Harv, Seb Lloyd (Adam Fox,
Lewis Zerter­Gossage) 2:43.
Saves: BC, Ryan Edquist 31; Harv, Cameron
Gornet 30.
sent the trophy to his office.
“I’m not sure what we did
with it in 1988,” Madigan said.
“I think we put it in the [trophy case] at Cabot Gym.”
Madigan took another step
toward escaping the shadow of
Fernie Flaman, the Northeastern coach from 1970-89. Madigan became the first Husky to
have played for and coached a
Beanpot titlist (he was also an
assistant for the ’88 champions). He also played in a Frozen Four and guided a team to
the Hockey East crown.
“When you’re around long
enough, you win and then you
lose,” Madigan said. “For me,
this was about our kids, our
players, this was about our
team. Coaching is great, it’s excellent to be around these
young men and they keep you
young. I’ve seen how hard they
work and I know they deserve
this win.
“For me this was about our
young men, our institution, for
finally moving the ball forward. I’m looking at this like
1980, it took us 28 years for
this university to win the first,
and then we had success following it.
“Hey, the curse is broken.
We’ve won now. It took us 30
years to win and, hopefully,
this is momentum and the impetus for us to win future
championships in this tournament.”
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C5
Pastrnak bumped, and the switch worked
Fluto Shinzawa
ON HOCKEY
In Tuesday’s first period,
when the Bruins went on the
power play in search of the tying goal, David Pastrnak tried
to carry the puck into the offensive zone.
Mark Giordano squashed
that entry.
The Calgary captain
thumped Pastrnak so hard that
the right wing lost his stick. On
the following wave, Pastrnak
and Giordano clashed once
more. This time, Pastrnak took
exception to Giordano’s check
by slashing the defenseman
and ending the Bruins’ power
play.
The penalty was one reason
Bruce Cassidy called for a
change.
For the final two periods,
David Backes took Pastrnak’s
spot on the No. 1 line during
even-strength play. The switch
worked. The Bruins scored four
straight goals and claimed a
5-2 come-from-behind win over
the Flames. Backes and Brad
Marchand assisted on Patrice
Bergeron’s second goal.
“Stroke of genius, huh?”
Cassidy cracked.
The Bruins coach uncovered two solutions with one adjustment. The top line improved with Backes’s meaty
presence. But Cassidy also sent
a message to Pastrnak: No jobs
are safe when selfishness, soft
play, and underwhelming per-
formance are submitted.
“You’re going to have tough
matchups come April and
May,” Cassidy noted. “If we’re
fortunate enough to be playing
well and playing at that time of
the year, that’s what he’s going
to see. He’s going to have to
grow from the experience he
got last year. So there was a little bit of [message-sending], for
sure.
“I love David’s passion for
the game, his willingness to
compete. We just have to remind him every once in a while
how to compete, how to manage the puck, and how to best
help the team.”
For most of the season,
Marchand, Bergeron, and Pastrnak have formed the league’s
best three-zone line. Of late,
however, Pastrnak has gone
quiet. The right wing has one
goal in his last 10 games.
On Tuesday, Pastrnak had a
good chance off a Danton Heinen feed that David Rittich
kicked out in the second period. Two nights earlier, Eddie
Lack got in front of Pastrnak’s
short-range backhander.
But hot goalies are not the
only reason Pastrnak’s production has fallen off. He has not
been able to get open to put his
strengths to use. Pastrnak has
landed only seven shots in the
last five games. When he’s on,
like he was in an eight-shot
barrage against Montreal Jan.
20, Pastrnak is a puck-pounding machine.
Pastrnak’s one-timer, usual-
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Hats off to Bruins defenseman Torey Krug (right), who
sends his greetings to Flames forward Garnet Hathaway.
ly his moneymaker, has gone
missing.
On the power play, the Bruins’ best goal-scoring option is
for either Torey Krug or Ryan
Spooner to set up Pastrnak for
a blast from the left circle. Pastrnak owns the team’s best onetimer. He does not require
much time nor space to launch
the puck into orbit behind a
helpless goalie.
In practice, it is much harder to do.
Pastrnak’s last goal, which
he netted against Toronto on
Feb. 3, was a power-play strike.
But it was scored off the rush
past Frederik Andersen, not of
the one-time variety. Opponents are not granting Pastrnak many windows in which
to send such pucks on goal.
Four years into his career, Pastrnak has developed into the
kind of goal scorer that penal-
ty-killing coaches devise game
plans to deny.
It is not just Pastrnak’s 19
career power-play goals that
are causing caution for opponents. Bergeron’s mastery of
the bumper position between
the circles is prompting penalty-killers to lessen two options
for the price of one.
“When they take away the
bumper and take away Bergy,
they’re also taking away Pasta,”
Krug said. “Because the puck
can’t get up to me. They’re trying to keep Spooner down low.
They’re also trying to take away
Bergy and Pasta at the same
time.”
It’s what any clear-thinking
PK coach would instruct. Only
T.J. Oshie can play the bumper
as well as Bergeron. Even while
facing the shorthanded heat,
Bergeron has canned a teamhigh nine power-play goals.
You know how most of those
take place: with Bergeron, toes
pointed at the net, rapidly
snapping pucks from just inside the right dot even when
checkers are trying to close.
Bergeron is just as dangerous when he’s distributing
pucks as the bumper instead of
ripping them on goal. He is the
safety valve for Krug and
Spooner, quick to bump pucks
right back at them or distributing them elsewhere around the
rotation.
So if Spooner, for example,
controls the puck on the right
side of the setup, his options
are limited and not as threatening if the killers swarm
Bergeron. It usually forces
Spooner to carry the puck lower down the right-side wall,
where limited space makes
working conditions more favorable for the penalty kill.
If Spooner runs out of room,
Marchand, usually his closest
available teammate at the
right-side goal line, doesn’t
have much space to play with
the puck either. Krug has to rotate from the top to lower on
the right side as support. So if
Spooner passes to Krug, the defenseman is left with a long
and low-percentage cross-ice
feed to Pastrnak. The killers
have done their job.
“The other teams know
that’s one of the strengths of
our team,” Krug said. “We’re
scoring power-play goals when
the puck is rotated up top, then
it’s going over to Pasta. Then
it’s on net. Then they’re scrambling. So then we hit a seam
and we score a goal.
“Now teams know that to
slow us down, they have to create battles that are more beneficial for them. Four-on-four
below the tops of the circles is
probably something that’s better for them.”
Pastrnak’s absence of power-play production may have
affected the rest of his game. So
Cassidy grabbed Pastrnak by
the figurative collar with a
coach’s go-to move: a demotion.
Pastrnak, while riding with
Heinen and Riley Nash on the
third line, played like a player
annoyed by the move. He skated hard, pushed back physically, and played at a higher tempo.
“He knew he took a bad
penalty,” Cassidy said of the
slash. “He came out of the box
ready to go in the second period. He was physical. He was
winning pucks. Nice play, Heinen found him, got his shot on
net. He wanted to give back.
He knew he messed up. That’s
the growth you like to see him.
“You don’t like to see a guy
go pouting, sit at the end of the
bench, and not respond. That’s
maturity. He responded the
right way, played hard, and
helped us win a hockey game.”
Fluto Shinzawa can be reached
at fshinzawa@globe.com.
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeFluto.
Bruins get cooking
for the home crowd
uBRUINS
Continued from Page C1
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Patrice Bergeron, who scored twice, beats Flames goalie David Rittich to give the Bruins a 3-2 lead in the third period.
Park: 1977­78 team had 20­20 vision
By Kevin Paul Dupont
GLOBE STAFF
Brad Park scored 213 goals
over the course of his career, including 22 in 1977-78 when he
was one of 11
BRUINS
Bruins to score
NOTEBOOK 20 or more —
an NHL record
that stands to this day.
One of the game’s great defensemen, Park scored most of
his goals on shots launched
from 10-15 feet inside the blue
line, the kind of long-range offerings that rarely make it to
the front of the net these days
— never mind the back of the
net.
In Park’s opinion, though, it
shouldn’t be as hard it looks today.
“No. 1, when I shot the puck
from the point, I never looked
at the net,” recalled Park, in
town Tuesday when the Bruins
feted the 11 scorers on the
1977-78 squad. “Because if I
couldn’t miss the first [defender], the net was irrelevant.”
According to Park, he read
opposing teams’ checkers as a
guide for launching his shots.
For instance, he knew that Bob
Gainey, Montreal’s superb defensive forward, had a keen
awareness of placing himself
directly in the shooting lane.
Get the puck by Gainey, and it
was a fair bet it would make it
to the Habs’ net.
“If I just missed his feet, I
was on the corner of the net,”
said Park, 69, whose stickhandling at the point was sublime.
“A good player like Gainey, always on his angle, you know if
you miss then you’ll be on the
corner — so I’d only look 10-12
feet in front of me and just try
to beat that guy. Simple philosophy.”
Park and nine of his Blackand-Gold 20-goal brethren
made it to the reunion, including the likes of Terry O’Reilly,
Peter McNab, Don Marcotte,
Jean Ratelle, Stan Jonathan,
Bobby Schmautz, Gregg Shep­
pard, Bobby Miller, and Rick
Middleton. Wayne Cashman
was the only one of the 11 not
to make it.
Led by McNab’s career-high
41 strikes that season, the
group finished with 283 of the
team’s 333 goals.
Gaudreau a tall order
Johnny Gaudreau, the tiny
dancer who some believed
might not be able to withstand
the rigors of pro hockey, arrived
at TD Garden Tuesday night
with his Calgary Flames tied for
second in NHL scoring with 66
points.
“He just goes out there and
makes plays, regardless of his
size or weight,” said Bruins
rookie defenseman Charlie
McAvoy, a Team USA teammate of Gaudreau’s last spring
in the World Championships.
“You’ve always got to respect
him, but try to minimize his
time with the puck.”
Gaudreau, the former Boston College standout, has 48 assists, second only to the Flyers’
Jakub Voracek (53). He went
into Tuesday’s games tied with
Edmonton’s Connor McDavid
for points (66), the two of them
trailing only Tampa Bay’s Niki­
ta Kucherov (71).
Gaudreau added to it with a
goal, his 19th of the season, in
the first period of the Bruins’
5-2 win.
A skating wizard, and equally deceptive with his stickhandling, the 5-foot-9-inch Gaudreau played three seasons at
The Heights before finally turning pro with the Flames after
finishing his 2013-14 season
with the Eagles. He has since
averaged nearly a point per
game in the NHL (288
games/270 points).
Bruins rookie defenseman
Matt Grzelcyk, a former BU
Terrier, played two seasons
against Gaudreau when they
resided at opposite ends of
Commonwealth Avenue. Both
have had to overcome questions about their size in order
to find their way in the NHL.
“To be honest, I’m not really
surprised at all,” said Grzelcyk.
“Even before college, playing
against him in the USHL, especially with the way the game’s
going, he kind of fits in perfectly. He’s fun to watch, for sure.”
Overlooking overtime
In 54 games prior to Tuesday night, the Bruins had won
only four of their 12 overtime
games, three of those in the
shootout. Like most NHL clubs,
they do very few three-on-three
drills in practice, even though
more than 20 percent of their
games run beyond regulation.
“We don’t do it full-ice,” said
coach Bruce Cassidy, noting
that his workouts include
three-on-three play only in the
offensive zone. “In hindsight,
we probably should, with our
overtime record, looking back.
“It’s an area we talk about
certain strategy, like taking the
puck back out of the zone if you
don’t like what you see. And using the goalie. We’ve asked the
goalies to play all icings — that
way you have puck possession,
and I think puck possession is
the No. 1 key to overtime. And
be smart with your decision
making, when you are going to
shoot.
Miller is closer
Bruins defenseman Kevan
Miller, sidelined the last five
games with an upper-body injury, wore a red (noncontact)
sweater during the morning
workout and is drawing closer
to a return, possibly on the
club’s upcoming five-game trip.
“Could be Saturday [in Vancouver],” said Cassidy, “but again,
that’s a few days away.” . . . ExBruin Doug Hamilton finished
the night a minus-2, but led all
shooters with 10 attempts, six
of which made it to Tuukka
Rask . . . The Flames outhit the
Bruins, 37-29, a rarity for Boston on their home ice. Flames
winger Garnet Hathaway led
the smack pack with a total of
nine hits. Torey Krug and David
Backes each put five on the
Flames . . . McAvoy helped set
up Riley Nash’s second strike
with a nifty pass to Tim
Schaller. The ex-BU standout
finished a game-high plus-3
and landed two shots on net . . .
Boston’s No. 2 line, with David
Krejci centering Jake DeBrusk
and Ryan Spooner, did not factor on the scoresheet. The trio
combined for a half-dozen
shots, the equivalent of what
Patrice Bergeron put on David
Rittich for the night.
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at kevin.dupont
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeKPD.
idy, reviewing a night that had
his charges playing far more
like the club that recently went
18 games without a regulation
loss. “We didn’t give them oddman rushes. Everything they
got, they earned. And I think
we did a little better job being a
little more belligerent in the
scoring area, getting to the
goaltender — getting second
chances.
“So we played more to our
style of play and how we want
to wear teams down.”
For Cassidy, it was his 82nd
game behind the Boston bench,
the equivalent of a full NHL
season, after taking over for
Claude Julien last Feb. 7. Cassidy is now a robust 53-20-9 for
115 points since taking over a
team that was in peril of missing last year ’s playoffs and
seemingly incapable of playing
with the top teams in the
league.
Now about to start a fivegame trip Saturday night in
Vancouver, Cassidy’s club is
bearing down on Tampa for the
top spot in the league’s overall
standings. The Bruins could
play .500 hockey the rest of the
way and still finish with 105
points.
Tuukka Rask finished with
28 saves and improved his record to 23-9-4, his best work
coming in the first period when
the Flames struck twice in the
opening 10 minutes on their
first seven shots. He stoned
them the rest of the way, his
teammates buttoning up the
back end of the ice and allowing
the Flames only 17 shots over
the final 40 minutes.
“It was 2-2 going into the
third,” noted Flames backliner
Travis Hamonic. “It could have
gone either way at that point.
They got that one at the start of
the third and we just couldn’t
get back into it.”
T he tiebreaker, 3-2, belonged to Bergeron, as did the
4-2 strike. Patrice the Thief, the
premier defensive forward in
the game, now has scored 17
goals in 19 games, the hottest
streak of his storied career.
If this were Bergeron’s own
Olympic Games, it’s as if he’s
Team Canada and everyone else
is lowly Switzerland.
“I feel like the looks are
there,” said Bergeron, noting he
has become more conscious of
shooting. “Brad [Marchand] is
finding me and I am trying to
get open, whether it’s my trying
to shoot more, or it’s the situation presenting itself more, I
don’t know. I am just trying to
make the play that’s in front of
me and lately it’s been shots
Bruins 5, Flames 2
At TD Garden, Boston
FIRST PERIOD
Boston 1, Calgary 0 — Nash 9 (Backes, Grzel­
cyk) 0:28
Boston 1, Calgary 1 — Bennett 8 (Hathaway)
2:03
Penalty — Boston, Kuraly (cross check) 5:48
Calgary 2, Boston 1 — Gaudreau 19 (Stajan,
Giordano) 9:12
Penalty — Calgary, Frolik (slashing) 17:13
Penalty — Boston, Pastrnak (slashing) 18:34
SECOND PERIOD
Penalty — Calgary, Stone (hooking) 7:02
Penalty — Calgary, Monahan (holding) 9:38
Penalty — Boston, Chara (tripping) 14:07
Boston 2, Calgary 2 — Nash 10 (Schaller, McA­
voy) 16:20
Penalty — Boston, Schaller (tripping) 18:33
THIRD PERIOD
Penalty — Calgary, Frolik (hooking) 1:03
Boston 3, Calgary 2 — Bergeron 26 (Krug) 1:15
(pp)
Penalty — Boston, Marchand (roughing) 4:53
Boston 4, Calgary 2 — Bergeron 27 (Marchand,
Backes) 9:19
Boston 5, Calgary 2 — Chara 6 16:14 (en)
SCORE BY PERIOD
Calgary................................... 2
0
0 —
2
Boston .................................... 1
1
3 —
5
SHOTS BY PERIOD
Calgary................................. 13
8
Boston .................................. 11 16
9
13
—
—
30
40
Power plays — Calgary 0 of 5; Boston 1 of 4.
Goalies — Calgary, Rittich 5­2­2 (39 shots­35
saves). Boston, Rask 23­9­4 (30 shots­28 saves).
Referees — Kendrick Nicholson, Dan O’Rourke.
Linesmen — Scott Driscoll, Andrew Smith.
Attendance — 17,565 (17,565). Time — 2:33.
more than plays.”
The Bruins needed all of 28
seconds to get on the board,
Nash cashing in for the 1-0 lead
off of David Backes’s feed out
from behind the net. Matt Grzelcyk set up the strike with a
strong pinch along the left wing
board, setting up his pass to
Backes for the front-of-the-net
relay to Nash.
But the Flames, clinging to
one of the final playoff spots in
the west, answered only 1:35
later, off a Grzelcyk miscue
deep in the Boston end. Grzelcyk, in a puck exchange with
Noel Acciari, saw the puck ricochet off Garnet Hathaway and
go right to the stick of Sam Bennett for the easy doorstep pot
against Tuukka Rask.
Struggling to generate shots
on Flames goaltender David
Rittich, the Bruins soon found
themselves in a 2-1 hole when
ex-BC standout Johnny Gaudreau knocked home his 19th of
the season at 9:12.
Rask turned back attempts
by Mark Giordano (top of circle
slapper) and Matt Stajan (top of
crease rebound), but couldn’t
prevent the tricky Gaudreau
picking up the loose change at
the left post and knocking it
home before Adam McQuaid
could close off the play.
Nash scored again in the second period for his 10 th goal
this season, matching his career
high and lifting the Bruins into
the 2-2 tie at 16:20.
Streaking toward the net,
Nash cashed in on a pass from
Tim Schaller out of the left circle after Schaller collected an
alert feed by Charlie McAvoy.
Kevin Paul Dupont can be
reached at kevin.dupont
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @GlobeKPD.
C6
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
PyeongChang 2018
TALES FROM THE GAMES
North leading cheers
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE STAFF
The most interesting representatives of North Korea at the Winter Olympics aren’t competing.
Swaying, chanting, and clapping as one, always in one of several
red uniforms and never breaking character, it’s the cheerleaders
that have captured peoples’ attention.
They are oddly mesmerizing, swaying in perfect synchronicity
but also chanting through pivotal moments in games with seemingly no understanding of what’s going on around them.
Going 230 deep, they vastly outnumber the 22 athletes from
North Korea competing in the Games. All are at least 5 feet 3 inches and have been deemed “pretty” by the government, according to
the New York Times, and the group is often referred to as Kim Jong
Un’s “army of beauties.”
The all-female squad is constantly tended to by older, male handlers. The cheerleaders room in pairs and go to the bathroom in
groups. They are living in a condominium complex more than an
hour away from PyeongChang and travel on buses with police escorts to get to and from events.
They’ve been seen as an olive branch, an extension of the positive step the two Koreas took by competing under the same flag at
PyeongChang, which the cheerleaders all have been waving.
Moreso, they’ve served as a representation of a militaristic and
ruthless regime that has used these Olympics to attempt to make
itself more palatable to an international audience. Synchronized
activities are a routine part of propagandistic displays, like huge
parades, common in North Korea. They attempt to project an image of discipline and strength, rather than isolation and poverty.
ROBERT CIANFLONE/GETTY IMAGES
Reigning Olympic figure skating champ Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan hasn’t competed since October because of an ankle injury.
Repeat the question
It’s a daunting
task for Hanyu
John Powers
ON OLYMPICS
JULIE JACOBSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
No more ‘hanger’ pains
Don’t worry, America. Chloe Kim isn’t “hangry” anymore.
The 17-year-old snowboarding phenom was rewarded on the
NBC morning show Tuesday after winning gold in the halfpipe
Monday. Kim chatted about her win over some of her favorite foods
after she tweeted in between runs during the halfpipe final that her
stomach was growling because she hadn’t finished her breakfast.
“Wish I finished my breakfast sandwich but my stubborn self
decided not to and now I’m getting hangry,” Kim tweeted between
runs during the finals. (Hangry is a combination of hungry and angry.)
The endearing star had also mentioned a hankering for ice
cream and churros, so that’s what she got, along with sandwiches
(though those looked more like ham and cheese than the breakfast
variety) when she sat down with hosts Savannah Guthrie and Hoda
Kotb.
It doesn’t seem as if Kim is hard to please when it comes to food.
In the past, she has tweeted about her love of In-N-Out Burger, pizza and Flamin’ Hot Cheetos, which she once had a friend mail her
in New Zealand because they weren’t available.
It’s been a good few days for Kim, the hero snack lovers didn’t
know they needed until she was flipping, tweeting and munching
her way into their hearts.
PYEONGCHANG, South
Korea — The challenge was
daunting enough even before
Yuzuru Hanyu trashed his right
ankle during a November practice. No man has won consecutive Olympic figure skating
gold medals since Dick Button
in 1952, when athletes went to
the Games by ocean liner and
performed on natural ice outdoors as the sun was setting.
Managing it on one leg would
be a five-ringed circus trick.
“It can be described as pressure but at the same time I am
happy to be able to skate for
the first time in a long time,”
the 23-year-old Japanese levitator said when he arrived here
to prepare for Friday’s short
program. “I want to take this
expectation and I want to accept it and turn it into energy. I
want to show people the performance that makes them feel
it was worth the wait.”
Hanyu may be back but he
hasn’t competed since October.
And he’ll be up against the
most daunting field in Olympic
history with two former world
champions in Canada’s Patrick
Chan and Spain’s Javier Fernandez, who have five crowns
between them, plus a precocious American skywalker in
18-year-old Nathan Chen.
Hanyu made history four
years ago in Sochi when he became the first Asian to win the
men’s gold medal, upsetting
the favored Chan. Since then
Hanyu has won the global title,
lost it to Fernandez, and won it
back. If Hanyu’s on form he’s
still the top guy on the planet.
If his ankle is wobbly then this
becomes anybody’s game.
Chen, who beat Hanyu in
their Moscow showdown last
fall and won the Grand Prix final in December in Hanyu’s absence, has the liftoff to compete with the champs, with two
quadruple jumps in his short
program and as many as five in
the free skate. What he’ll need,
though, is more composure on
the Olympic stage than he
showed last week in the team
event, where he sleepwalked
through his short, doubling a
quad and falling on the triple
axel.
“Definitely not a representation of who I am and what I
can do,” Chen said after he’d
placed fourth. “Definitely need
to work harder for the next
couple of days. I need some
time to go over everything. All
of the mistakes that I did. Figure out exactly what went
wrong so that when the time
comes for the actual [individual] event, that doesn’t happen
again.”
Even for reigning world
champions, delivering the
goods at the Games has been
an overwhelming assignment.
Since 1964 only three —
Czechoslovakia’s Ondrej Nepela (1972), and Scott Hamilton
(1984) and Evan Lysacek from
the US (2009) — have gone on
to win in the Olympic year. All
of them came in fitter than did
Hanyu, who was off the ice for
two months. “[His recovery]
was slow, as expected, because
the injury was quite bad,” said
his coach, Brian Orser. “It was
slower than we were all hoping.”
So the Japanese, who had
no chance at a team medal
with their third-level-quality
pairs and dancers, held Hanyu
out of the men’s competition
and used his understudies.
“[Hanyu] has all the experience
and what he needs is just to be
fully recovered,” said Orser.
“But he is skating pain-free and
I think it was just wiser for him
to have the time at home and
work out.”
The men operate at a decidedly higher elevation than they
did eight years ago in Vancouver, where Lysacek likely was
the final men’s champion to
win without landing a quad.
When Hanyu reclaimed the
global title from Fernandez last
year he did it with two quads
in the short program and four
in the long.
That’s what it takes to be a
contender now, which is why
Chen knew that he had to get
vertical and multiple once he
hit the senior level. “You have
to know what your competitors
are doing,” he said. “I started
doing the quads because I saw
what the other competitors
were doing.”
At last year’s world championships, where he finished
sixth (right behind Chan) in his
debut, Chen tried the nowstandard two in the short and a
record six in the long. Though
he fell on the Lutz and the Salchow, Chen made it clear to his
rivals, whom he knew he’d be
seeing all this season, that he
had the chips to match whatever the table stakes became. His
game plan here is for two and
either four or five. “Depending
on how things go in practices,”
he said. “It just kind of depends on percentages and how
I feel.”
Chen is clearly the kid in
this group alongside the 27year old Chan and the 26-yearold Fernandez, and it showed
in his first Olympic outing. “I
definitely let the rest of the
team down, so I feel bad in that
regard,” Chen said. “But I think
that it was a good opportunity
for me to put myself out there
and make silly mistakes. In the
individual I’ll be more ready.”
For Hanyu, the question is
how much he’ll have to do to
win. Does he try the quad loop
or play it safer? “I need to have
wise strategy,” he said. “I know
I can win if I give a clean performance.
“I really believe in that.
There are many choices. I have
many options and what will be
included in the actual program
has to be decided as I am conditioning myself.”
Three months ago, Hanyu
feared that he’d be watching
these proceedings at home. So
it was delightful for him to
practice in the Olympic rink
and give a news conference
where “I’m giving you good
news and not bad news.” “I
want to show that this is my
dream stage,” Hanyu added,
“and want to give my dream
performance.”
John Powers can be reached at
john.powers@globe.com.
Rippon found his voice, and it resonates
uSULLIVAN
Continued from Page C1
SEAN M. HAFFEY/GETTY IMAGES
Beer necessities for curlers
Curling isn’t the most glamorous sport in the Winter Olympics.
It’s not the most breathtaking or the most high-profile.
But it has this going for it: It’s the only Olympic sport designed
to be played while drinking a beer.
OK, maybe the athletes competing in PyeongChang aren’t sipping a cold one during their competitions. But before and after?
You bet.
On Friday, Canadian mixed doubles curler Johnny Morris posted a photo of himself and American curler Matt Hamilton (the
mustached Wisconsonite) enjoying a couple of brewskis together.
This was before Morris and partner Kaitlyn Lawes beat Switzerland for the gold medal on Tuesday.
No one can justly blame Morris for having a drink with a friend
when he’s still in competition mode, because it’s actually a curling
tradition called “broomstacking.” It basically refers to competitors
gathering for a beer or two after a match. The origin of the term is a
little different, which Hamilton explained to reporters earlier during the Games.
“Broomstacking is something they did back in the day. About
halfway through the game, all the old guys would put there brooms
in the middle of the ice and go inside to go take a shot of Scotch,” he
said.
CNBC, which is where most of the curling has been shown during these Olympics, should try that during its regular programming.
Morris, who was described as a reformed “bad boy of curling”
(seriously) on the broadcast, ultimately made the argument for his
sport most succinctly after winning gold.
“It’s fast-paced, athletic, a lot of fun, and the beer still tastes just
as good after the game,” Morris said.
Nora Princiotti can be reached at nora.princiotti@globe.com.
Follow her on Twitter at @NoraPrinciotti.
daunted in sticking to his beliefs.
Adam Rippon is supremely
comfortable in his own skin, often thanking his single mom,
Kelly, and his open-minded
friends for fostering a world
that welcomed him just the way
he was.
Adam Rippon is alternately
stone-cold serious and delightfully irreverent, speaking directly to gay youth who might
need a role model to look up to
in their own journey of discovery, or lamenting his own single
status as Valentine’s Day approaches and welcoming all potential suitors.
Adam Rippon, a breakout
star of the PyeongChang Olympics, is all this and more, a sum
of inspirational parts that leave
you resting on a time-worn expression that fits him as well as
anything I can think of: It’s Adam Rippon’s world, and we’re
just living in it.
“I want to get people talking,” he said Tuesday, a day after his clean, dynamic skate
helped the US team land a
bronze, a day before training
for the individual competition
begins in earnest. “What I’m
looking forward to Friday is getting the rest of the world crazy
about Adam Rippon.”
There’s so much to be crazy
about. But if we’ve been caught
by surprise by the delightful
Californian by way of Scranton,
Pa., then shame on us for missing out on the fun.
“I’ve always sort of been unabashedly myself, and I’ve always spoken my mind and from
the heart, and you know what, I
think America is just catching
on,” Rippon said. “The other
day I was joking to one of my
friends and he was like, ‘You’re
kind of everywhere right now,’
and I’m like, ‘I know, I’m America’s sweetheart.’
“He just laughed in my face.
But what you think of as sort of
the American people embracing, on paper, I don’t think I really embody much of any of that
perceived persona. I think maybe that’s what people are latching onto.
“My story is different. I’m
different. On some level we all
feel different, and when we are
embraced for who we are, it’s
awesome.
“I know what it’s like to be a
young kid and feel out of place,
and to want to share your ideas
and feel like people might not
like them. I spent a lot of time
worrying what people thought
of me. As soon as I was able to
let go of those doubts, that’s
when I was really able to find
my voice.
“I hope that in the process of
sharing who I am with everyone, they can find their voice,
too. Honestly, it’s really fun to
be yourself. It’s really fun to be
me.”
But he is no joke. With such
outspoken pride in his sexuality, with such a comfortable ability to share that confidence,
Rippon represents the best sort
of progress in our society, the
ability to accept others without
judgment, to celebrate others’
achievement despite our differences, to inspire others who see
themselves in you.
As the first openly gay man
to qualify for an American
Olympic team — now joined by
freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy,
who came out publicly after
competing in the 2014 Sochi
Games and qualified for this
year’s Olympics — Rippon can
speak not only to athletes of the
future who don’t have to hide in
a closet, but to those of the past
whose legitimate fear of backlash forced them to stay in one.
“Me using my voice has given my skating a greater purpose,” he said. “It’s a voice to
reach young kids. I’ve gotten so
many messages, young kids, all
over the country, that my story
has resonated with them and
it’s incredibly powerful, this
platform you can have at the
Olympic Games. That’s why it’s
so important.
“In addition to the support
I’ve gotten, I’ve also heard
things like, ‘Adam Rippon
should tone it down.’ I can’t
tone it down. I’m being myself.”
That self came under fire
since the original interview
with USA Today columnist
Christine Brennan in which
Rippon expressed disappointment over Pence’s appearance
at these Games, citing disagreement with Pence’s record on
LGBQT issues. When Brennan
further reported that Pence’s
people were rebuffed in setting
up a meeting with Rippon, the
ensuing back-and-forth garnered national headlines.
But Rippon has held his own
and held his ground, showing
the necessary mettle for the role
model he knows he is.
“I have no problem talking
about what I’ve said, because I
stand by it,” he said. “But I
think right now the Olympics
are about Olympic competition
and the athletes involved.
“I talked to [Brennan] about
how I felt before the Games and
it’s brought a lot of attention,
questions to my other teammates. I don’t want to distract
from their Olympic experience
and I don’t want my Olympic
experience to be about Mike
Pence.
“I want it to be about my
amazing skating and being
America’s sweetheart.”
It’s his world. It’s fun living
in it.
Tara Sullivan is a Globe
columnist. She can be reached
at tara.sullivan@globe.com.
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C7
PyeongChang 2018
Sweeney unhurt after
crashing in luge run
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MATT PEPIN/GLOBE STAFF
The service was top-notch at the Yongpyong Resort, the site of the technical Olympic races.
Skiing in South Korea a joyride
By Matt Pepin
GLOBE STAFF
PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — At most ski areas in the
United States, there’s a standard set of signs you encounter
as you approach the end of a lift
ride.
“Raise the safety bar.”
“Prepare to unload.”
“Keep your ski tips up.”
In South Korea, they should
add one more: “Don’t forget to
bow.”
At the end of every lift ride,
a liftie waits at the landing platform — not inside the shack —
and greets you as you arrive
with both a deep bow and “annyeong haseyo,” the Korean
phrase for hello.
It’s polite to bow back, and
perhaps say “kamsamnida” —
thank you — as you ski away.
The same thing happens at
the base lift stations, where the
attendants are unbelievably
friendly and will help you in almost any way. That even includes going outside the line
corral to pull a struggling skier
up into the loading zone. They
lower the safety bar for you.
They push you up to the right
spot to load the chairlift. It’s
like the lifties are your personal
valets.
Yongpyong Resort is where
the technical ski races are being
held in the Olympics, and colleague Rachel Bowers and I
had the opportunity to spend a
morning there before the
Games kicked into high gear.
Yongpyong opened in 1975, although the location has been a
ski area since 1953 and is considered South Korea’s first
modern ski area. A section designed to hold major races was
added in 1998, and Yongpyong
has hosted World Cups and
other events.
The level of service was the
big takeaway, but it was also a
really fun place to ski.
Yongpyong is a two-peak
kind of layout on Mount Balwang, with a valley between the
peaks, although part of the area
was closed because of the Olympics. We could not take what appeared to be a beautiful eightpassenger gondola to the Dragon Peak, which is at an elevation
of about 4,700 feet, because that
served the slopes that would be
used for the races.
What was open was enough
to get a good feel for skiing in
Korea, which honestly feels an
awful lot like skiing in New
England. Yongpyong is not
huge by any stretch, and if I
had to compare it with a New
England mountain, I’d say it’s
like Ragged Mountain, or Berkshire East, or Gunstock. Places
such as Killington, Loon, and
Sugarloaf are far larger.
But the snow at Yongpyong
was perfect. It undoubtedly
was mostly manmade, because
there wasn’ t a ton of snow
across the surrounding landscape, but the slopes were
thickly covered with soft
packed powder. When I walked
uphill one morning to watch
some of the training runs, my
boots sank into the groomed
snow an inch or two every step,
which meant that on skis it was
as carve-able as it gets.
There also wasn’t a trace of
ice, and the area was pretty
much deserted on the weekday
we visited. We were the first
and only ones in line for first
chair, but it was difficult to get
an answer as to whether that
was the norm or just because of
the Olympics. On Saturday
morning, there appeared to be
a few more skiers and snowboarders heading out, but not
many more.
A huge difference from New
England skiing was that advertising is everywhere — on billboards, safety netting, and the
backs of chairs. Yongpyong is
also extensively built up, with
hotels and condos throughout
the surrounding region and extending far uphill, like a ski area plopped in the middle of a
small city. It does not have
much in the way of rustic and
rural charm.
Another big difference:
chain-link fencing lines any
slope that has the danger of
drop-offs into the woods. There
were several trails that meandered through the forest and
didn’t have a ton of advertising,
but the chain-link fencing and
signs e ver ywhere that app ea r ed to be like dis tan ce
markers took away that “away
from it all” feeling you get
when a trail is left in a more
naturalized state.
Tree skiing? I didn’t see any
tracks in the woods.
One thing I did see a lot of
was Olympic-level skiers out
getting their ski legs in shape in
the days before things got truly
competitive. After these Olympics, Yongpyong will always
have a special designation as an
Olympics venue, and for me
it’ll be a fond memory of being
able to experience a place chosen to be one of sport’s grandest stages.
Matt Pepin can be reached at
matt.pepin@globe.com. Follow
him on Twitter @mattpep15.
White seizes moment with epic run
uWHITE
Continued from Page C1
competition before these finals
— and one seemingly interminable wait later, White’s return
to the top of his sport was complete.
When his score of 97.75
flashed, more than two points
clear of Hirano and almost six
clear of Australian bronze
medalist Scotty James, it all
seemed worth it. The long road
back from disappointment in
Sochi four years ago. The painful recovery from a crash in
New Zealand last fall that required emergency surgery. The
notion the man who for so long
served as a pioneer had been
surpassed by the next generation.
Not quite yet.
‘‘He wears the weight of the
country and the world on his
shoulders for this,’’ said J.J.
Thomas, White’s longtime
coach. ‘‘This is our Super Bowl.
But bigger because it’s only
once every four years and he
stresses out.’’
Funny, it didn’t show as he
became the first American
male to win gold at three separate Winter Olympics. Speedskater Bonnie Blair won gold
in the 1988, 1992 and 1994
Games. The gold was also the
100th overall gold for the United States in the Winter Games.
‘‘What can I say? I won the
Olympics,’’ White said. ‘‘Three
CAMERON SPENCER/GETTY IMAGES
Snowboard star Shaun White, 31, is the first American
male to win gold at three separate Winter Olympics.
gold medals. I was just hoping
they'd give it to me. I was pretty sure I put it down but it took
a little while. Just trying not to
make eye contac t with the
judges.’’
James, White and Hirano
traded electric runs during
qualifying on Tuesday, ‘‘sending it’’ in snowboarding terms
and sending a bit of a message
in the process. The three have
eyed this showdown on the
world stage for months and Hirano — who edged James in
the X Games last month, an
event White opted to skip after
locking down a spot on the US
Olympic Team — shrugged
when asked if he wa s concerned about the 98.50 White
put up on Tuesday to earn the
right to go last in the finals.
‘‘I know what he does and
he knows what I do,’’ Ayumu
said.
Namely, put on a show.
White put together a dazzling first run, throwing a 1440
early on and building from
there. He tossed his helmet toward the crowd when he finished and celebrated in the
waiting area while the judges
deliberated. His score of 94.25
was tops after the first of the
three finals runs, but Hirano
recovered after sitting down
during his first trip to put
White on notice during the second.
The 19-year-old uncorked
back-to-back 1440s of his own
and when the crowd exploded
as his 95.25 flashed, he simply
shrugged his shoulders, unfazed by the stakes.
Hirano missed an opportunity to go even higher when he
washed out on his final run.
James put together an unspectacular last set, setting the
stage for White. He called the
o p p o r t u n i ty t o go l a s t h i s
‘‘good luck spot.’’ And with
good reason. He went last during his gold medal runs in Turin in 2006 and Vancouver in
2010.
Yet White had the top of the
podium locked up during his
last sprint down the pipe on
both occasions. This moment
required something more. And
he delivered.
While the culture of snowboarding occasionally finds itself at odds with the competitive nature of the sport —
James openly questioned the
judging before the Games and
even said he’s ‘‘not huge on
perfect scores’’ — White embraces it. His gold in Turin as a
mop-topped 19-year-old
helped launch him into a global brand. His repeat performance in Vancouver four years
l a t e r, o n e h e f i n i s h e d b y
stomping a ‘‘Double McTwist
1260’’ with gold already in
hand, cemented his status as
arguably the greatest ever in
his sport.
This time around, it felt different.
American luger Emily
Sweeney avoided serious injury
Tuesday in a frightening crash
that knocked
OLYMPIC
her out of the
ROUNDUP
PyeongChang
Olympics during the final heat of the competition.
The diagnosis was that
Sweeney had only some bumps
and bruises.
‘‘I’m OK,’’ she said.
Sweeney lost control around
C u r v e 9 , t h e t r a c k ’s m o s t
treacherous spot, and then began careening all over the track.
She wound up sliding feetfirst
up one curve toward the track
roof before getting thrown from
her sled and eventually tumbling to a stop.
Many in the crowd looked at
the monitors, horrified. The
stands were filled with fans
cheering raucously, and they
immediately went silent waiting for some sort of sign that
Sweeney would be all right.
It took several minutes for
Sweeney to get to her feet, then
several more before she could
finally start a slow walk to the
finish area — surrounded by
team and on-site medical personnel.
‘‘I’ve never been so relieved
than when I saw her getting up
and walking,’’ said American
teammate Summer Britcher,
choking back tears.
These were the first Olympics for Sweeney.
Natalie Geisenberger of Germany prevailed — her second
consecutive title and one that
added another page to her burgeoning résumé of accomplishments.
Curling — Canada won the first
gold medal in mixed doubles,
beating Switzerland, 10-3, in
front of a roaring crowd of jubilant Canadians.
The win over the defending
world champions marked a historic moment for mixed doubles, which was making its
Olympic debut. Switzerland
conceded the match early after
falling too far behind, reaching
out to shake their opponents’
hands and prompting John
Morris to hoist Canadian teammate Kaitlyn Lawes into the air
with glee.
Russians Anastasia Bryzgalova and Aleksandr Krushelnitckii defeated Norway, 8-4, to
capture the bronze medal.
Speedskating — Kjeld Nuis
made it four gold medals in
four races for the Netherlands,
a run nearly beyond belief.
Moving in a blur of orange
early on with a blistering pace,
Nuis swept past his toughest
opponents to take home gold in
the 1,500. In second was another Dutchman — Patrick Roest.
The Dutch have won eight of
12 speedskating medals, keeping them on the stunning medal pace set at the 2014 Sochi
Games, when they finished
with 23 out of 36.
American skaters disappointed again with Joey Mantia
finishing eighth and Shani Davis crossing in 19th position.
Short­track speedskating —
Choi Min-jeong skated around
waving to the South Korean
fans who chanted her name.
Arianna Fontana grabbed the
Olympic medals
STANDINGS
G
Norway...................... 3
Netherlands ............. 4
Canada...................... 3
Germany ................... 5
United States........... 4
France........................ 2
OA Russia ................. 0
Japan ......................... 0
Sweden ..................... 2
Italy............................ 1
Austria....................... 2
South Korea ............. 1
Czech Republic........ 0
Finland ...................... 0
Australia ................... 0
China ......................... 0
Slovakia .................... 0
Switzerland .............. 0
Kazakhstan............... 0
S
5
4
4
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
B
3
2
3
2
2
2
4
2
0
1
0
1
1
2
0
0
0
0
1
All
11
10
10
9
7
5
5
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
TUESDAY/WEDNESDAY MEDALISTS
ALPINE SKIING
Men’s combined
Gold: Marcel Hirscher, Austria
Silver: Alexis Pinturault, France
Bronze: Victor Muffat Jeandet,
France
CROSS­COUNTRY SKIING
Men’s sprint classic
Gold: Johannes Hoesflot Klaebo,
Norway
Silver: Federico Pellegrino, Italy
Bronze: Alexander Bolshunov, OA
Russia
Women’s sprint classic
Gold: Stina Nilsson, Sweden
Silver: Maiken Caspersen Falla,
Norway
Bronze: Yulia Belorukova, OA Rus­
sia
CURLING
Mixed doubles
Gold: Canada (Kaitlyn Lawes, John
Morris)
Silver: Switzerland (Jenny Perret,
Martin Rios)
Bronze: Russia (Anastasia Bryzga­
lova, Aleksandr Krushelnitckii)
LUGE
Women’s singles
Gold: Natalie Geisenberger, Germa­
ny
Silver: Dajana Eitberger, Germany
Bronze: Alex Gough, Canada
SHORT TRACK SPEEDSKATING
Women’s 500
Gold: Arianna Fontana, Italy
Silver: Yara Van Kerkhof, Nether­
lands
Bronze: Kim Boutin, Canada
SNOWBOARD
Men’s halfpipe
Gold: Shaun White, United States
Silver: Ayumu Hirano, Japan
Bronze: Scott James, Australia
Women’s halfpipe
Gold: Chloe Kim, United States
Silver: Liu Jiayu, China
Bronze: Arielle Gold, United States
SPEEDSKATING
Men’s 1,500
Gold: Kjeld Nuis, Netherlands
Silver: Patrick Roest, Netherlands
Bronze: Kim Min Seok, South Korea
Italian flag in celebration.
This being wild and wooly
short-track speedskating, the
result of the women’s 500 meters waited on the judges’ decision.
The outcome hung in the
balance for several minutes
while the referees sorted out a
photo finish between Choi and
Fontana.
It was Fontana who was celebrating, jumping up and down
in her skates and shaking her
fists in triumph. The Italian
earned her sixth career Olympic
medal, equaling Wang Meng of
China for most by a short-track
skater. The photo showed Fontana’s skate blade crossed barely in front of Choi's.
Nordic skiing — Johannes Hoesflot Klaebo of Norway won
gold in the men’s sprint, with
Frederico Pellegrino of Italy getting the better of a photo finish
to take silver ahead of Russian
Alexander Bolshunov.
Yet again, there was no medal for the United States. Jessica
Diggins placed sixth, failing in
her quest to become the first
American woman to medal in
cross-country skiing.
Olympics on TV Wednesday
TIME
EVENT(S)
CHANNEL
6:30 a.m.
Men’s ice hockey: US vs. Slovenia (live)
NBCSN
7:10 a.m.
Men’s ice hockey: Russia vs. Slovakia (live)
USA
9:30 a.m.
Luge: men’s doubles final; skeleton: women’s
training
NBCSN
11:30 a.m.
Biathlon: women’s 15km final
NBCSN
1:15 p.m.
Women’s curling: Denmark vs. Sweden
NBCSN
3 p.m.
Luge: men’s doubles final; Nordic combined:
men’s individual normal hill/10km final
NBC
5 p.m.
Women’s curling: US vs. Japan
CNBC
7 p.m.
Figure skating: pairs final (live)
NBCSN
8 p.m.
Figure skating: pairs final (live); Alpine skiing:
NBC
men’s super G final (live); men’s skeleton (live);
speedskating: women’s 1,000m final
10 p.m.
Men’s ice hockey: Finland vs. Germany (live)
CNBC
10:10 p.m.
Women’s ice hockey: US vs. Canada (live)
NBCSN
12:05 a.m. (Thu.) Snowboard cross: men’s final (live); men’s skele­ NBC
ton
12:30 a.m. (Thu.) Women’s curling: US vs. Britain
NBCSN
2:30 a.m. (Thu.)
Women’s ice hockey: Russia vs. Finland (live)
USA
2:40 a.m. (Thu.)
Men’s ice hockey: Norway vs. Sweden (live)
NBCSN
5 a.m. (Thu.)
Cross­country: Women’s 10km final
NBCSN
5 a.m. (Thu.)
Men’s curling: Canada vs. Norway
USA
C8
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Scoreboard
PyeongChang 2018
Colleges
WED
2/14
THU
2/15
FRI
2/16
BASKETBALL
GUILLAUME HORCAJUELO/EPA
Jared Goldberg of the US missed a slalom gate but went back and completed the course.
Goldberg eyeing downhill
By Matt Pepin
GLOBE STAFF
JEONGSEON, South Korea — Jared Goldberg’s journey to the top of Mount Gariwang, from which he started
in the Olympic Alpine combined event on Tuesday, began at Killington Resort in
Vermont.
His parents first met there.
It was also the first place he
clicked into skis.
“I’ve got some really funny
pictures of him,” Goldberg’s
father, Don, said, adding that
his son’s interest in the sport
was apparent right away.
“He loved it. He was
hooked, I think, from the very
beginning,” Don said.
The Goldbergs left New
England a long time ago. Jared was born in Boston and
the family lived in Massachusetts during his early years
before moving west. They settled in Utah, where Don owns
a temporary staffing company
for computer consultants and
Jared developed into one of
the top speed racers on the
US Ski Team.
Goldberg finished Tuesday’s combined in 36th place
after missing a gate in the afternoon slalom, but was
ninth after the morning
downhill, less than a second
behind the leader.
“I was risking a lot. Today
was very favorable for the slalom guys. Most of the top 10
are slalom skiers, so I was just
trying to go as hard as I could
and mostly in control, but
then in the middle I couldn’t
see very much because the
wind was swirling there,”
Goldberg said.
But there were some takeaways from the event, which
was won by Austria’s Marcel
Hirscher. Goldberg again was
fast in the downhill portion —
he also posted fast times in
training runs here — and is
eager for Thursday’s Olympic
downhill.
“I had a good downhill run
and I’m really happy with
that. It wasn’t the cleanest
run, but there’s things that I
can clean up for the downhill
race, so I think it was like another good training run down
it, and that was a positive for
sure,” Goldberg said.
Goldberg now represents
one of the best chances to pull
off another American surprise in the Winter Olympics.
He has never hit the podium
in a World Cup, but the 26year-old has been on the rise.
In his early days on the
slopes, he both skied and
snowboarded, and began racing in both.
“He was beating people by
a lot. He just had this aptitude to find the fall line, and
he really liked that ,” Don
Goldberg said.
Ja r e d s t i l l g o e s s n o w boarding occasionally, Don
said, and he also loves to powder ski. Really, anything on
the slopes suits him.
“That’s how his passion is.
He just loves skiing, he loves
doing [ski racing], he loves to
powder ski, he loves to ski any
place he can. The powder skis
are the first thing he actually
packs on a trip like this,” Don
said.
Goldberg’s love of skiing
was apparent Tuesday when,
after missing a gate halfway
through the slalom, he
trudged back uphill to complete the turn and then finish
the course so he would be listed as an official finisher, no
matter how far back, instead
having a DNF designation by
his name.
“I always like to hike, if
things go wrong, and get my
money’s worth for coming out
here,” Goldberg said. “I like to
ski, so I want to ski down it. I
inspected it, so might as well
see what it ran like.”
Don Goldberg met Jared’s
mother, Annette, at Killington and put Jared on skis
there at around the age of 3.
Killington remains a special
place for him.
“Annette was a nurse, she
lived locally, and I would
come up on weekends and I
was a part-time ski instructor
and so was she, and that’s
how we kind of met over the
years. And I have a lot of great
friends from there, it’s a really
close connection,” Don said.
T h i s i s Ja r e d ’s s e c o n d
Olympics — he finished 19th
in the super combined and
11th in the giant slalom in
Sochi in 2014.
“Last time he was 22 years
old, very young, really didn’t
know what was going on. He
was getting his feet wet,” Don
Goldberg said.
This time, Don thinks the
experience could pay off.
“Two days from now could
be really good,” he said.
Matt Pepin can be reached at
matt.pepin@globe.com.
Shiffrin waits; Alpine delayed
By Matt Pepin
GLOBE STAFF
The women’s slalom became the third Alpine ski race
to be postponed at the
PyeongChang
OLYMPIC
Olympics.
NOTEBOOK
After twice
pushing back
the start time for the first run
of the slalom at Yongpyong Alpine Centre, officials decided
to postpone Wednesday’s race
to Friday, meaning American
star Mikaela Shiffrin must
wait another day to begin
competing.
The women’s giant slalom,
originally scheduled for Monday, is scheduled for Thursday,
as is the men’s downhill,
which was originally scheduled for Sunday. Both were
postponed because of wind.
The postponements will
compress the schedule for Alpine skiing, which has 10
events remaining, into 10
days. Only the men’s Alpine
combined, which was held
Tuesday at Jeongseon Alpine
Centre, has been held.
A large crowd had gathered
well ahead of the original start
time for Wednesday’s race,
and American fans were out in
force to see Shiffrin, one of
four US starters in the field of
83.
Second effort
Jocelyne Lamoureux­Da­
vidson can’t remember ever
scoring twice on the same
shift. The three-time Olympian looking for her first gold
medal is just happy to give the
Americans a bit of a boost.
She did it in Olympic record fashion.
Lamoureux-Davidson had
the fastest back-to-back goals
in Olympic history, scoring six
seconds apart in the second
period as the United States
shut out the Russians, 5-0, in
Gangneung, South Korea on
Tuesday night.
‘‘I don’t know if I’ll ever
come close to that again,’’
Lamoureux-Davidson said.
‘‘But we’ll see.’’
Lamoureux-Davidson not
only topped Canada’s Caroline
Oullette, who scored twice in
16 seconds on Feb. 11, 2006,
in a 16-0 rout of Italy at Turin,
but also the men’s mark of
eight seconds apart held by
Carl Goran Oberg of Sweden
in 1960 at Squaw Valley.
Kacey Bellamy, who scored
the first goal of the game off a
pass from Lamoureux-Davidson, called the record incredible.
With the win, the Americans remained undefeated going into their early Olympic
showdown with Canada,
which is also 2-0.
The Americans are at the
PyeongChang Games trying to
end a 20-year gold medal
drought. The last time these
teams met in the Olympics,
Canada rallied from an 0-2
deficit to win its fourth
straight gold in overtime in
2014 in Sochi.
No medal will be on the
line Thursday, just positioning
for the semifinals. That made
tuning up the offense a must
for the Americans with Canada routing its first two oppo-
nents by a combined 9-1 after
a 4-1 win over Finland earlier
Tuesday.
‘‘I have no doubt we’re
ready,’’ goalie Nicole Hensley
said.
A few firsts in pairs
The North Korean pairs
team of Ryom Tae Ok and Kim
Ju Sink scored a season-best
69.40 points to briefly move
into second place during the
short program inside the
Gangneung Ice Arena.
North Korea’s only pair
drew cheers from a large block
of uniformly dressed fans for
even the most simple of elements in practice. Then, they
neatly landed their opening
triple twist lift, hit a triple toe
and throw triple loop, and
were showered afterward with
flowers from their fans.
The couple dressed in silver
and black and performed to a
cover of the Beatles song ‘‘A
Day in the Life’’ by English
rock guitarist Jeff Beck. They
were the 10th among 22
teams to take the ice, although
all of the medal contenders
were still to come.
Still, their score qualified
them for the free skate Thursday.
One of the other competitors, Harley Windsor, became
the first indigenous Australian
to compete at the Winter
Olympics when the pairs skater joined Ekaterina Alexan­
drovskaya for their short program.
Material from the Associated
Press was used in the report.
MEN
HOW AP TOP 25 FARED
1. Virginia beat Miami, 59­50
2. Michigan St. beat Minnesota, 87­57
7. TX Tech beat 23. Oklahoma, 88­78
13. Kansas beat Iowa State, 83­77
16. Rhode Island beat Richmond, 85­67
18. Tennessee played South Carolina
21. Texas A&M lost to Missouri, 62­58
NEW ENGLAND
Albertus Magnus 84... SUNY­Canton 72
Anna Maria 102.................Mount Ida 84
Boston College 81.............Pittsburgh 58
Emmanuel 96.........................Norwich 66
Gordon 87..................Roger Williams 71
Johnson & Wales 86..................Regis 67
New Haven 85.........Bloomfield 80 (OT)
Nichols 93............. Eastern Nazarene 83
Pine Manor 64.................Johnson St. 61
Rhode Island 85.................Richmond 67
Salve Regina 70.................... Endicott 68
St. Joseph’s (Maine) 76............Lasell 56
Suffolk 84....................................Rivier 57
U. of New England 135.............Curry 99
Wentworth 67...............Western N.E. 64
OTHER EAST
Buffalo 84...........................Kent State 72
Monmouth 73................Saint Peter’s 57
St. Bonaventure 79................La Salle 68
SOUTH
Alabama 80....................................LSU 65
Arkansas 75......................Mississippi 64
James Madison 62...................UNCW 61
Virginia 59..................................Miami 50
MIDWEST
Ball State 90...............................Akron 77
Bowling Green 83..........W. Michigan 81
Central Mich. 80................No. Illinois 72
Creighton 94......................Bemidji St. 46
E. Michigan 58..............Miami (Ohio) 57
Georgetown 87..........................Butler 83
Kansas 83..........................Iowa State 77
Michigan St. 87.................Minnesota 57
Missouri 62.......................Texas A&M 58
Nebraska 70........................ Maryland 66
North Dakota St. 87....... Mayville St. 53
Northern Iowa 47...............Evansville 41
Toledo 82......................................Ohio 74
SOUTHWEST
Texas Tech 88....................Oklahoma 78
WOMEN
HOW AP TOP 25 FARED
3. Baylor beat 21. Oklahoma St., 87­45
16. Ohio State beat Illinois, 88­69
NEW ENGLAND
Albertus Magnus 85 J & Wales (R.I.) 68
Dean College 51....................Mitchell 36
Eastern Nazarene 71............. Nichols 46
Elms 74..................................Bay Path 53
Endicott 63.................... Salve Regina 59
Lasell 69.......................Saint Joseph’s 42
Newbury 62...............................Lesley 50
Norwich 70.......................Anna Maria 68
Pine Manor 75.................Johnson St. 69
Roger Williams 70..................Gordon 44
Suffolk 52....................................Rivier 37
University of New England 69.Curry 49
Western New England 69Wentworth 43
Wheelock 53.............................Becker 45
OTHER EAST
Fordham 66.............................La Salle 45
Princeton 60................................Penn 40
Sage 72..................................Hartwick 67
SOUTH
Campbell 53...................Presbyterian 40
Gardner­Webb 52............. Longwood 41
High Point 77.......................Winthrop 40
Radford 52................................Liberty 45
UNC Asheville 71.......Charleston So. 69
MIDWEST
Ohio State 88............................Illinois 69
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 87.......................Oklahoma St. 45
FAR WEST
Emmanuel 72..............................Regis 66
HOCKEY
MEN
OTHER NEW ENGLAND
Sacred Heart 2.......................Air Force 1
Stonehill 5....................Franklin Pierce 2
WOMEN
HOW USCHO TOP 10 FARED
4. BC beat BU, 4­3
OTHER NEW ENGLAND
BC 4.....................................................BU 3
Endicott 4................................Bowdoin 2
Harvard 4........................ Northeastern 3
MIDWEST
Wis.­Stevens Pt. 3...Concordia (Wis.) 1
Boston College, 4­3
Boston Universi­
ty (11­15­6)
....0
Boston College
(26­3­3)
....2
3
0
0 —
3
0
1
1 —
4
Scoring: Boston College, Daryl Watts
(Toni Ann Miano, Caitrin Lonergan)
2:18; Boston College, Molly Slowe
(Daryl Watts, Caitrin Lonergan) 12:26;
Boston University, Victoria Bach (Rea­
gan Rust) 3:15; Boston University, Rea­
gan Rust (Abbey Stanley, Nara Elia)
4:00 (pp); Boston University, Rebecca
Leslie (Victoria Bach, Breanna Scarpa­
ci) 8:16; Boston College, Daryl Watts
(Molly Slowe) 15:52; Boston College,
Toni Ann Miano (Makenna Newkirk,
Kenzie Kent) 14:57 (pp).
Saves: Boston University, Corinne
Schroeder 30; Boston College, Katie
Burt 35.
Tennis
ATP NEW YORK OPEN
Singles First Round results
Adrian Menendez­Maceiras def.
Steve Johnson (7), 1­6, 6­3, 7­6 (7).;
Radu Albot, Moldova def. Bjorn Fratan­
gelo, 6­4, 6­3.; Peter Gojowczyk def.
Blaz Kavcic, 6­4, 6­2.; Jeremy Chardy
def. Stefano Travaglia, 4­6, 7­6 (1), 6­4.;
Evgeny Donskoy def. Victor Estrella
Burgos, 7­5, 6­1.
ATP ARGENTINA OPEN
Singles First Round results
Aljaz Bedene def. Jiri Vesely, 6­0,
6­3.; Leonardo Mayer def. Rogerio
Dutra Silva, 6­7 (4), 6­2, 6­4.; Gael Mon­
fils def. Pablo Cuevas (7), 6­1, 6­4.; Fer­
nando Verdasco (8) def. Thiago Mon­
teiro, 6­2, 7­5.; Horacio Zeballos def.
Marco Cecchinato, 6­1, 6­4.; Gastao
Elias def. Roberto Carballes Baena, 6­2,
6­4.
ATP ABN AMRO WORLD
Singles First Round results
Philipp Kohlschreiber def. Karen
Khachanov, 3­6, 7­6 (1), 7­6 (5).; Daniil
Medvedev def. Gilles Muller (9), 6­4,
7­6 (9).; Viktor Troicki def. Jan­Lennard
Struff, 1­6, 7­6 (5), 6­2.; David Goffin (4)
def. Benoit Paire, 6­1, 6­3.; Tallon Griek­
spoor def. Stan Wawrinka (5), 4­6, 6­3,
6­2.; Filip Krajinovic def. Felix Auger­
Aliassime, 6­2, 3­6, 7­5.
WTA QATAR TOTAL OPEN
Singles First Round results
Madison Keys (12) def. Wang Qiang,
6­1, 6­4.; Kristina Mladenovic (11) def.
Peng Shuai, 6­2, 6­4.; Petra Kvitova (16)
def. Cagla Buyukakcay, 6­0, 6­3.; Jo­
hanna Konta (10) def. Bernarda Pera,
7­6 (5), 6­1.; Alize Cornet def. Anett
Kontaveit, 6­2, 6­1.; Anastasija Sevas­
tova (13) def. Donna Vekic, 6­3, 6­4.;
Marketa Vondrousova def. Yulia
Putintseva, 6­3, 6­1.; Sorana Cirstea
def. Maria Sakkari, 6­2, 6­3.; Magdale­
na Rybarikova (14) def. Fatma Al Nab­
hani, Oman, 6­3, 6­1.; Sam Stosur def.
Irina­Camelia Begu, 6­4, 6­2.; Carina
Witthoeft def. Tatjana Maria, 6­3, 6­0.;
Barbora Strycova def. Aleksandra Kru­
nic, 6­4, 6­4.; Elise Mertens (15) def.
Timea Babos, 2­6, 6­1, 6­1.; Carla Suar­
ez Navarro def. Kateryna Bondarenko,
3­6, 6­3, 6­3.; Julia Goerges (9) def. Luc­
ie Safarova, 6­1, 7­5.
Second Round
Garbine Muguruza (4) def. Duan
Ying­Ying, 6­3, 6­4.; Caroline Garcia (7)
def. Dominika Cibulkova, 6­3, 6­7 (3),
6­0.
Y
SAT
SUN
2/17
2/18
VAN
10:00
NESN
Y
MON
TUE
CAL
4:00
NESN
EDM
9:00
NESN
2/19
Y
2/20
ALL­STAR
GAME
8:20
TNT
LAC
8:00
ESPN,
NBCSB
Home games shaded
For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Bruins and Celtics, WBZ­FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
South Florida at UCF
7 p.m.
Clemson at Florida State
7 p.m.
Davidson at VCU
7 p.m.
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Kansas State at Oklahoma State
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Villanova at Providence
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Virginia Tech at Duke
8 p.m.
East Carolina at Tulane
9 p.m.
Georgia Tech at Wake Forest
9 p.m.
Kentucky at Auburn
9 p.m.
Memphis at SMU
9 p.m.
Seton Hall at Xavier
9 p.m.
St. John’s at DePaul
11 p.m.
Nevada at Boise State
11 p.m.
Wyoming at San Diego State
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10:30 p.m. Golden State at Portland
ESPN,
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8 p.m.
LA Clippers at Boston
LPGA: Australian Open
PRO HOCKEY
7 p.m.
Columbus at Toronto
NHL
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
FS1
Real Madrid vs. Paris Saint­Germain
Schools
BASKETBALL
HOCKEY
BOYS
ATLANTIC COAST
Falmouth 57........................Sandwich 36
BAY STATE
Braintree 65......................Weymouth 50
Brookline 79...................Framingham 60
Natick 59..............................Wellesley 44
Needham 64................Newton North 58
Walpole 65................Norwood 61 (2OT)
BOSTON CITY
Madison Park 71.................S. Boston 62
O’Bryant 68.......................Latin Acad. 37
Tech Boston 76...................E. Boston 39
CAPE ANN
Masconomet 71.................Amesbury 59
N. Reading 66.........................Ipswich 44
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Pope John 62...................Austin Prep 58
DUAL COUNTY
Acton­Boxboro 50...............Westford 44
Wayland 76.............................Weston 46
HOCKOMOCK
Foxboro 39...............................Canton 34
Franklin 59...........................Attleboro 44
Mansfield 79......................King Philip 73
Milford 58.................North Attleboro 36
Sharon 81...........................Stoughton 76
Taunton 71......................Oliver Ames 44
INTER­HIGH
Worcester North 63Worcester South
59
MAYFLOWER
Southeastern 62................Tri­County 35
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Central Cath. 57....................Andover 50
Lawrence 75....................Lowell 72 (OT)
Methuen 59...........................Haverhill 43
N. Andover 77...........................Dracut 47
MIDDLESEX
Belmont 59.............................Reading 56
Lexington 63...........................Woburn 59
Melrose 61..........................Wakefield 48
Watertown 53....................Burlington 49
Wilmington 57....................Stoneham 50
Winchester 57..................... Arlington 55
NORTHEASTERN
Beverly 69.................................Revere 42
Everett 80...........................Somerville 65
Lynn Classical 68..........Lynn English 58
Malden 50........................Marblehead 48
Salem 55.................................. Saugus 35
Winthrop 72.......................... Medford 54
PATRIOT
N. Quincy 53............Plymouth South 48
Quincy 62..................Plymouth North 52
Scituate 66.............................Hanover 36
Whit.­Hanson 69...................Duxbury 48
TRI­VALLEY
Westwood 50...................Bellingham 33
NONLEAGUE
Arlington Cath. 63...........Shawsheen 54
Bridge.­Raynham 76............Xaverian 65
Digh.­Rehoboth 59........Bp. Connolly 53
Durfee 84...............Somerset Berkley 65
Keefe Tech 73..............................Sizer 50
Marshfield 69....................Barnstable 51
Nauset 81.................................Bourne 43
St. John’s (S) 44..............Shrewsbury 40
St. Peter­Marian 74..............Quabbin 53
Sutton 72........................St. Bernard’s 60
GIRLS
BAY STATE
Braintree 62......................Weymouth 42
Brookline 57...................Framingham 29
Walpole 48............................Norwood 40
BOSTON CITY
Fenway 54......................New Mission 46
Fenway 54......................New Mission 45
Latin Acad. 78.......................O’Bryant 39
CAPE ANN
Masconomet 51.................Amesbury 19
N. Reading 50.........................Ipswich 26
CATHOLIC CENTRAL
Arlington Cath. 64.............Pope John 37
COMMONWEALTH
Gr. Lowell 45.................... Essex Tech 38
Mystic Valley 60..........................PMA 29
Northeast 43...........................Chelsea 23
DUAL COUNTY
Concord­Carlisle 54............Waltham 40
Newton South 76....Lincoln­Sudbury 30
HOCKOMOCK
Foxboro 81...............................Canton 32
Franklin 46...........................Attleboro 39
Mansfield 51......................King Philip 32
Oliver Ames 63......................Taunton 34
Stoughton 55...........................Sharon 37
MERRIMACK VALLEY
Billerica 52........................ Tewksbury 35
N. Andover 64...........................Dracut 36
MIDDLESEX
Belmont 68.............................Reading 47
Melrose 65..........................Wakefield 55
Woburn 49...........................Lexington 41
NORTHEASTERN
Danvers 44......................Swampscott 36
Everett 54...........................Somerville 40
Lynn Classical 50..........Lynn English 27
Malden 48........................Marblehead 32
Saugus 60.................................. Salem 44
PATRIOT
Duxbury 40...................Whit.­Hanson 36
Hanover 52.............................Scituate 18
PREP­PRIVATE
Marianapolis 62.......................Nobles 52
TRI­VALLEY
Hopkinton 68.........................Dedham 39
Medfield 59........................... Medway 49
NONLEAGUE
Bridge.­Raynham 47.E. Bridgewater 41
Case 50..............................Old Colony 39
Cohasset 50...............Whit. Christian 38
Durfee 54...............Somerset Berkley 45
Marshfield 57....................Barnstable 25
Natick 53..............................Wellesley 42
Nauset 44.................................Bourne 27
Quabbin 50..............St. Peter­Marian 40
Saint Joseph Prep 41....Maimonides 37
Sutton 59.................................Doherty 25
Tyngsboro 55.................Lowell Cath. 41
Ware 48................Southwick­Tolland 34
BOYS
CAPE ANN
Lynnfield 5...........................N. Reading 5
COMMONWEALTH
Nashoba Tech 7................ Minuteman 5
MERRIMACK VALLEY/DUAL COUNTY
Billerica 2.....................Acton­Boxboro 2
MIDDLESEX
Melrose 3..............................Wakefield 1
NONLEAGUE
Chicopee 8...........................Wahconah 2
John Paul II 10 Mashpee/Upper Cape 1
John Paul II 10 Mashpee/Upper Cape 1
Sandwich 1...........................Nantucket 0
GIRLS
HOCKOMOCK
Canton 10.............................Stoughton 0
MERRIMACK VALLEY/DUAL COUNTY
Haverhill/N. Andover/Pentucket 3Ac­
ton­Boxboro/Bromfield 2
Lincoln­Sudbury 1... Concord­Carlisle 0
NORTHEASTERN
Masconomet/Amesbury/Georgetown/
Newburyport/Triton 5Beverly/Dan­
vers/Ipswich 0
NONLEAGUE
Marshfield 8............N. Quincy/Quincy 3
R For updated scores and highlights,
go to bostonglobe.com/sports/high­
schools.
Baseball
REMAINING FREE AGENTS
96 remaining free agents (q­rejected
qualifying offer)
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Baltimore (8) — Pedro Alvarez; dh­
1b; Craig Gentry, of; J.J. Hardy, ss; Jere­
my Hellickson, rhp; Ubaldo Jimenez,
rhp; Wade Miley, lhp; Seth Smith, of;
Chris Tillman, rhp.
Boston (5) — Fernando Abad, lhp;
Blaine Boyer, rhp; Rajai Davis, of; Edu­
ardo Nunez, inf; Chris Young, of.
Chicago (2) — Mike Pelfrey, rhp; Ge­
ovany Soto c.
Detroit (1) — Anibal Sanchez, rhp.
Houston (4) — Carlos Beltran, dh; Ty­
ler Clippard, rhp; Francisco Liriano,
lhp; Cameron Maybin, of.
Kansas city (6) — Melky Cabrera, of;
Trevor Cahill, rhp; q­Eric Hosmer, 1b;
q­Mike Moustakas, 3b; Peter Moylan,
rhp; Jason Vargas, lhp.
Los Angeles (9) — Andrew Bailey,
rhp; Jesse Chavez, rhp; Yunel Escobar,
3b; Ricky Nolasco, rhp; Bud Norris, rhp;
Cliff Pennington, inf; Brandon Phillips,
2b; Ben Revere, of; Huston Street, rhp.
Minnesota (3) — Matt Belisle, rhp;
Glen Perkins, lhp; Hector Santiago, lhp.
New York (2) — Jaime Garcia, lhp;
Matt Holliday, dh.
Seattle (3) — Jarrod Dyson, of; Car­
los Ruiz, c; Danny Valencia, 1b­3b.
Tampa Bay (4) — q­Alex Cobb, rhp;
Lucas Duda, 1b; Logan Morrison, 1b;
Colby Rasmus, of.
Texas (4) — Andrew Cashner, rhp;
Carlos Gomez, of; Jason Grilli, rhp;
Mike Napoli, 1b.
Toronto (3) — Brett Anderson, lhp;
Jose Bautista, of; Michael Saunders, of.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Arizona (2) — Jorge De La Rosa, lhp;
J.D. Martinez of.
Atlanta (2) — R.A. Dickey, rhp; Jason
Motte, rhp.
Chicago (4) — q­Jake Arrieta, rhp;
Jon Jay, of; John Lackey, rhp; Koji Ue­
hara, rhp.
Cincinnati (3) — Bronson Arroyo,
rhp; Scott Feldman, rhp; Drew Storen,
rhp.
Colorado (5) — Carlos Gonzalez, of;
Ryan Hanigan, c; q­Greg Holland, rhp;
Jonathan Lucroy, c; Mark Reynolds, 1b.
Los Angeles (4) — Andre Ethier, of;
Franklin Gutierrez, of; Chase Utley, 2b;
Tony Watson, lhp.
Miami (4) — Mike Aviles, inf; A.J. El­
lis, c; Dustin McGowan, rhp; Ichiro Su­
zuki, of.
Milwaukee (2) — Matt Garza, rhp;
Neil Walker, 2b.
Philadelphia (1) — Clay Buchholz,
rhp.
Pittsburgh (3) — Joaquin Benoit, rhp;
John Jaso, 1b; Chris Stewart, c.
St. Louis (2) — q­Lance Lynn, rhp;
Seung­Hwan Oh, rhp.
San Diego (1) — Erick Aybar, ss.
San Francisco (3) — Matt Cain, rhp;
Jae­Gynn Hwang, 1b­3b; Michael
Morse, ib­of.
Washington (6) — Joe Blanton, rhp;
Alejandro De Aza, of; Stephen Drew,
2b; Adam Lind, 1b; Oliver Perez, lhp;
Jayson Werth of.
NBA G-League
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W
L Pct.
Westchester ...........25 14 .641
Raptors ....................23 14 .622
Long Island .............20 16 .556
Maine .......................16 21 .432
GB
—
1
3½
8
Central Division
Fort Wayne .............21 15
Grand Rapids..........20 18
Wisconsin................17 20
Windy City ..............15 20
Canton .....................13 23
.583
.526
.459
.429
.361
—
2
4½
5½
8
Southeast Division
Erie ...........................20 17 .541
Lakeland..................18 17 .514
Greensboro .............12 24 .333
Delaware .................11 25 .306
—
1
7½
8½
Western Conference
Midwest Division
Oklahoma City........20 16 .556
Sioux Falls...............19 17 .528
Iowa..........................18 17 .514
Memphis..................15 23 .395
—
1
1½
6
Pacific Division
South Bay................23 14
Reno .........................20 16
Santa Cruz ..............19 17
Northern Arizo­
....17 19
na..........................
Agua Caliente.........18
21
.622
.556
.528
—
2½
3½
.472
5½
.462
6
Southwest Division
Austin.......................24 14 .632 —
Texas........................22 16 .579
2
Rio Grande ..............22 17 .564 2½
Salt Lake City .........11 28 .282 13½
Latest line
NBA
Wednesday
Favorite...............Line ............Underdog
At Detroit..............8½ ................Atlanta
At Phila..................7 ..................Miami
Charlotte............... 5 ..........At Orlando
Indiana.................. 4½ ........At Brooklyn
Washington..........4½ .......At New York
Toronto..................6½ ..........At Chicago
At Houston......... 14½ ........Sacramento
At BOSTON...........4½ .........LA Clippers
At New Orleans....5 ............LA Lakers
At Memphis..... OFF ...Oklahoma City
At Utah..............OFF ...............Phoenix
Golden State........ 6½ .........At Portland
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Wednesday
Favorite...............Line ............Underdog
At UCF................. 13½ .............S. Florida
At Michigan...........11 .....................Iowa
Oakland.................6½ .....At Yngstn. St.
At Cleve. St...........3½ .................Detroit
At Vanderbilt...........2 ..............Miss. St.
Dayton...................... 5 ...At Geo. Mason
St. Joseph’s...........3½ ........At Fordham
At UMass..................5 ..........Geo. Wash
At Florida St.........2½ ..............Clemson
At Okla. St................3 ...........Kansas St.
Villanova.................10 ....At Providence
At Duke...................11 ..............Va. Tech
Davidson...................3 .... At Va. Comm.
At Drake...................2 ..........Indiana St.
At Bradley.............7½ ............Illinois St.
At S. Illinois..........2½ ........Missouri St.
At Loyola­Chi.........11 ...................Valpo
At Tulane............10½ ..........E. Carolina
At Indiana................ 8 ..................Illinois
At New Mex.............4 ...............Utah St.
At SMU......................8 .............Memphis
At Auburn.............8½ .............Kentucky
At Florida............10½ ............... Georgia
At Xavier.................. 5 ...........Seton Hall
St. John’s..................2 ............At Depaul
At Wake Forest.......5 ..............Ga. Tech
At Syracuse..........4½ ............N.C. State
Fresno St.............12½ .. At San Jose St.
At UNLV..................15 .............Air Force
At CS Nthrdg........ PK ...... UC Riverside
At San Diego St...7½ ............Wyoming
At Boise St...............1 ................Nevada
National Hockey League
Wednesday
Favorite...........Line Underdog........Line
At Toronto.......OFF Columbus........OFF
At Colorado....­115 Montreal........+105
At Vancouver.­105 Florida.............­105
Transactions
BASEBALL
MLB Players Association : An­
nounced the resignation of director of
communications Greg Bouris.
Baltimore (AL): Signed P Kevin
Gausman on a one­year contract.
Tampa Bay (AL): Signed P Sergio
Romo on a one­year contract.
Toronto (AL): Signed P Craig
Breslow on a minor league contract.
Chicago (NL): Signed P Yu Darvish
on a six­year contract and OF Peter
Bourjos on a minor league contract.
Milwaukee (NL): Signed OF Quintin
Berry on a minor league contract.
New York (NL): Traded 3B Matt
Reynolds to Washington for cash.
San Diego (NL): Placed P Jose Tor­
res on the restricted list.
Washington (NL): Signed RHPs Bra­
dy Dragmire David Goforth, Edwin
Jackson, Jaron Long, Roman Mendez,
Chris Smith and Cesar Vargas; LHPs
Tim Collins, Ismael Guillon, Bryan
Harper and Tommy Milone; Cs Miguel
Montero and Jhonatan Solano; INFs
Reid Brignac and Chris Dominguez;
and OFs Ryan Raburn and Moises Sier­
ra.
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Tennessee (AFC): Named Matt Ed­
wards assistant special teams coach,
Scott Booker and Ryan Crow defensive
assistants and Matt Pees quality con­
trol coach.
HOCKEY
AHL : Suspended Bridgeport F
Steve Bernier one game and Bakers­
field F Mitch Callahan 20 games.
Anaheim (NHL): Recalled D Marcus
Pettersson from San Diego (AHL).
Columbus (NHL): Loaned D Andre
Benoit to Bridgeport (AHL).
Detroit (NHL): Recalled F Dylan Sad­
owy from Toledo (ECHL) to Grand Rap­
ids (AHL).
Los Angeles (NHL) : Placed F Trevor
Lewis on IR, retroactive to Feb. 9.
San Antonio Rampage (AHL) :Re­
called F J.C. Beaudin from Colorado
(ECHL).
St. Louis (NHL): Recalled F Oskar
Sundqvist from San Antonio (AHL).
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
D.C. United: Traded the rights to M
Yamil Asad to Atlanta for general and
targeted allocation money.
Seattle Sounders : Signed M Alex
Roldan and D Jordan McCrary.
Sporting Kansas City : Traded a 2018
international roster spot to Colorado
for general allocation money.
COLLEGE
Hampton : Named Brian White of­
fensive coordinator and Marcus Dixon
defensive line coach.
Ohio State : Named Taver Johnson
cornerbacks coach.
Suny Old Westbury : Named Mi­
chael Cardino assistant baseball
coach.
AHL
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L OL SL Pts.
Scranton ....... 30 13 3 1 64
Lehigh Val. ... 31 14 3 3 68
Providence ... 28 16 3 2 61
Charlotte....... 28 20 0 3 59
Bridgeport .... 23 20 5 2 53
Hartford ........ 24 21 4 3 55
Springfield.... 22 27 1 1 46
Hershey......... 19 25 3 4 45
GF
158
175
142
180
136
145
145
128
GA
124
155
121
152
138
173
163
172
North Division
Toronto ......... 37 11 0 1
Utica .............. 26 14 6 3
Rochester ..... 25 13 7 5
Syracuse ....... 28 17 2 3
Laval .............. 18 24 6 2
Belleville ....... 20 27 1 3
Binghamton.. 13 26 6 3
75
61
62
61
44
44
35
164
143
145
160
140
127
115
95
133
138
136
172
188
165
Western Conference
Central Division
Manitoba ...... 32 11 4 3 71
Iowa............... 25 15 7 3 60
Chicago......... 24 16 6 2 56
Gr. Rapids..... 26 18 1 6 59
Milwaukee.... 25 20 4 0 54
Rockford ....... 25 21 3 3 56
Cleveland...... 16 25 4 3 39
180
160
148
165
140
160
113
121
152
136
153
156
161
156
Pacific Division
Tucson........... 27 14 2 1
San Diego ..... 26 17 1 0
Texas............. 25 18 5 2
Stockton........ 22 17 2 3
Ontario.......... 23 18 3 1
San Antonio.. 24 20 6 0
San Jose........ 21 19 2 3
Bakersfield ... 19 18 7 1
143
144
148
137
128
136
112
122
121
131
159
125
127
146
129
141
57
53
57
49
50
54
47
46
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a
win, one point for an overtime or shoo­
tout loss.
MONDAY’S GAME
Iowa 3................................San Antonio 2
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Charlotte 6...............................Hartford 0
Lehigh Valley 5...................Bridgeport 0
Cleveland 3.............................Rockford 1
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Hartford at Charlotte.............................7
Syracuse at Utica................................... 7
Belleville at Laval....................................7
San Antonio at Milwaukee....................8
Bakersfield at San Diego.....................10
Tucson at San Jose.............................. 10
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Grand Rapids at Manitoba....................8
Cleveland at Chicago.............................8
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
C9
No. 4 Needham teams up to stop No. 1 Newton North
By Owen Pence
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Sensing fatigue in teammate
Thomas Shaughnessy late in
Tuesday night’s fourth quarter,
Needham seSCHOOL
nior for ward
ROUNDUP
M i c h a e l
Klemm assertively told the Rockets star he
would be taking over the lead
defensive duties for the duration.
Klemm made good on his
word, tracking Newton North
captain Ethan Wright as if
bound by rope to his opponent’s waist. With 45 seconds
remaining and the Rockets
ahead, 60-55, Klemm made the
game’s decisive play, coolly
swiping the ball from Wright
(14 points) at the top of the key
before slamming it home on the
boston.com/
classifieds
LEGAL NOTICES
other end, setting in motion a
jubilant display from the
packed Needham High bleachers.
Aided by a scorching offensive first quarter and 28 points
from Shaughnessy, fourthranked Needham knocked off
No. 1 Newton North, 64-57, in a
definitive Bay State Conference
victory.
T he vic tor y came in the
midst of a tragic and somber
period for the Needham High
community. Two students, 16year old Talia Newfield and 17year old Adrienne Garrido, died
after being struck by a vehicle
on Saturday evening.
“Today was a really tough
day and over the weekend was
just tragic,” said Shaughnessy.
“This is a really good opportunity to come together [and] uni-
notices
& more
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Department of Public Utilities
NOTICE OF FILING AND PUBLIC HEARING AND PROCEDURAL CONFERENCE
D.P.U. 17-162
January 22, 2018
Petition of Western Massachusetts Electric Company d/b/a Eversource Energy for approval of its annual Storm
Recovery Adjustment Factor filed pursuant to its Storm Recovery Reserve Cost Adjustment tariff.
On October 31, 2017, Western Massachusetts Electric Company d/b/a Eversource Energy (“WMECo” or
“Company”) filed a petition with the Department of Public Utilities (“Department”) for approval of its Storm Recovery
Adjustment Factor (“SRAF”). This filing was made pursuant to Western Massachusetts Electric Company, D.P.U. 10-70
(2011), and the Company’s Storm Recovery Reserve Cost Adjustment (“SRRCA”) tariff M.D.P.U. No. 1054B. The
Department has docketed this petition as D.P.U. 17-162.
The Company proposes to recover $6,866,787 through the SRAF, which consists of the unrecovered balance of
deferred storm-related costs approved for recovery by the Department, as well as the unrecovered balance of deferred
storm-related costs approved for recovery by the Department subject to ongoing investigation. See D.P.U. 10-70;
Western Massachusetts Electric Company, D.P.U. 13-135 (2016); Western Massachusetts Electric Company, D.P.U.
15-149. WMECo also proposes to recover $411,377, including carrying charges, for storm costs associated with a
February 25, 2017 tornado.
On December 20, 2017, the Department approved, subject to further review and reconciliation, the following
SRAFs, effective January 1, 2018. Western Massachusetts Electric Company, D.P.U. 17-162 (2017).
Rate Class
R-1/R-2
R-3/R-4
23/24/G-0/T-0
G-2/T-4
T-2
T-5
S-1/S-2
The Company’s proposed rate adjustment for a typical residential (R-1) customer using 600 kilowatt hours per
month on average would result in a monthly bill increase of $0.13 or 0.1 percent, holding all other charges constant.
In this phase of the proceeding, the Department will investigate whether the SRAFs currently in effect include only
those costs that are storm-related, incremental to the Company, exceed the established threshold, and were reasonably
and prudently incurred.
The Attorney General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (“Attorney General”) has filed a notice to intervene
in this matter pursuant to G.L. c. 12, § 11E(a). Further, pursuant to G.L. c. 12, § 11E(b), the Attorney General
has filed a notice of retention of experts and consultants to assist in her investigation of the Company’s filing, and
has requested Department approval to spend up to $150,000 in this regard. Pursuant to G.L. c. 12, § 11E(b), the
costs incurred by the Attorney General relative to her retention of experts and consultants may be recovered in the
Company’s rates. Any person who desires to comment on the Attorney General’s notice of intent to retain experts
and consultants in this matter may submit written comments to the Department not later than the close of business
(5:00 p.m.) on Wednesday, February 21, 2018.
The Department will conduct a public hearing to receive comments on the Company’s petition on Wednesday,
February 28, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Department’s offices, One South Station, 5th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts,
02110. The public hearing will be immediately followed by a procedural conference. Any person interested in
commenting on this matter may appear at the public hearing or submit written comments to the Department no later
than the close of business (5:00 p.m.) on Wednesday, February 28, 2018.
Any person interested in participating in the evidentiary phase of this proceeding must file a written petition for
leave to intervene no later than the close of business (5:00 p.m.) on Wednesday, February 21, 2018. A petition
to intervene must satisfy the timing and substantive requirements of 220 CMR 1.03. Receipt by the Department, not
mailing, constitutes filing and determines whether a petition is timely filed. A late-filed petition may be disallowed as
untimely, unless good cause is shown for a waiver under 220 CMR 1.01(4). Pursuant to 220 CMR 1.03(1), a petition
must satisfy the standing requirements of G.L. c. 30A, § 10 to be allowed.
One original and one (1) copy of all written comments, petitions to intervene, and comments on the Attorney
General’s notice of retention of experts and consultants must be filed with Mark D. Marini, Secretary, Department
of Public Utilities, One South Station, 5th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02110 no later than the close of business
(5:00 p.m.) on the dates noted above. In addition, one copy of all written comments and petitions to intervene should
be sent to the Company’s attorney, Steven Frias, Esq., Keegan Werlin LLP, 265 Franklin Street, Boston, Massachusetts
02110-3113.
All documents should also be submitted to the Department in electronic format using one of the following
methods: (1) by e-mail attachment to dpu.efiling@state.ma.us and sarah.herbert@state.ma.us; or (2) on a CD-ROM.
The text of the e mail or CD-ROM must specify: (1) the docket number of the proceeding (D.P.U. 17-162); (2) the
name of the person or company submitting the filing; and (3) a brief descriptive title of the document. All documents
submitted in electronic format will be posted on the Department’s website: http://web1.env.state.ma.us/DPU/FileRoom/
dockets/bynumber(enter “17-162”).
A copy of the Company’s petition and the Attorney General’s notice of retention of experts and consultants are
available for public viewing during regular business hours at WMECo’s offices at One Federal Street, Springfield,
Massachusetts 01105; and at the Department, One South Station, 5th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02110. Any
person desiring further information regarding the Company’s filing should contact its counsel, Steven Frias, Esq.,
at (617) 951-1400. For further information regarding this notice, please contact Sarah Herbert, Hearing Officer,
Department of Public Utilities, at (617) 305-3500.
To request materials in accessible formats (braille, large print, electronic files, audio format), contact
the Department’s ADA Coordinator at DPUADACoordinator@state.ma.us or (617) 305-3642. Reasonable
accommodations at public or evidentiary hearings for people with disabilities are available upon request. Include
a description of the accommodation you will need, including as much detail as you can. Also include a way the
Department can contact you if we need more information. Please provide as much advance notice as possible.
Last minute requests will be accepted, but may not be able to be accommodated. Contact the Department’s ADA
coordinator at DPUADACoordinator@state.ma.us or (617) 305-3642.
Case Name
Federal National Mortgage Association
vs
Ameripath Mortgage Corporation et al
RE: Ameripath Mortgage Corporation
WHEREAS a civil action has been begun against you in
our Superior Court by Federal National Mortgage Association wherein it is seeking to; obtain judgment against
Ameripath Mortgage Corporation
We COMMAND YOU if you intend to make any defense,
that on 03/12/2018 or within such further time as the law
allows you do cause your written pleading to be filed in
the office of the Clerk of Court named above, in said Commonwealth, and further that you defend against said suit
according to law if you intend any defense, and that you
do and receive what the Court shall order and adjudge
therein.
Hereof fail not, at your peril, or as otherwise said suit may
be adjudged and orders entered in your absense.
It appearing to this Court that no personal service of the
Complaint has been made on the defendant a deputy sheriff having made a return on the summons that after diligent
search he can find no one upon whom he can lawfuly make
service, a copy of which is hereto attached and made part
of this notice, it is ORDERED that notice of this suit be given
to them by publishing, once a week for three successive
weeks, the last publication to be at least 20 days before
said return day in the:
Newspaper: Boston Globe/Herald, Mass Law Wkly or Metro
Boston
City/Town: City of Boston
Date issued
01/29/2018
Clerk of Courts/Asst Clerk
Marc J. Santos
NOTICE OF RATE CHANGE
In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 118E, Section 13D,
which requires EOHHS to establish and biennially update
rates to be paid by governmental units to providers, EOHHS has amended 101 CMR 346.00: Rates for Certain
Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders Programs,
to update the rates to be paid by governmental units for
certain substance-related and addictive disorders services,
effective January 1, 2018.
Rates updated by the amendment to this regulation include an increase by a Cost Adjustment Factor (CAF) of
2.72%. In addition to the CAF, the following service program rates were updated in the following manner: (1) Clinically Managed Detoxification Service rates were updated
to reflect salary increases, recalculate certain program
expenses such as consultant, occupancy, and transportation, and modify the utilization factor to benchmark it to
relevant social service programs; and (2) Acute Treatment
Service rates were updated to reflect salary increases. This
amended regulation went into effect on January 1, 2018.
Based on projected utilization, the estimated fiscal impact
for rate year 1 is $2,694,913. There is no fiscal impact to
cities and towns.
AT&T Mobility, LLC is proposing to construct seven
new
telecommunications
tower facility located near
25 Hammond Street, Boston, MA 02129. Two new
towers will be replacement
light poles with top-mounted antennas and an overall
height of 20’-10” above
grade. These will be located: 25 Hammond St and
on Arthur’s Way. Four new
towers will be replacement
light poles with top-mounted antennas and an overall
height of +/-22’- 11” above
grade. These will be located: 1355 Washington St,
SW Corridor Park, 39 Dalton
St and 55 Yawkey Way Ext.
One of the new towers will
be a replacement light pole
with a top-mounted antenna and an overall height
of 20’-10 1/2” above grade.
This tower will be located at
7 Follen St. Any interested
party wishing to submit
comments regarding the
potential effects the proposed facility may have on
any historic property may
do so by sending comments
to: Project 6118000579TC c/o EBI Consulting, 21
B Street, Burlington, MA
01803, or via telephone at
(339) 234-2597.
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LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS - M.G.L. C. 30, sec. 39M
CONSTRUCTION ADVERTISEMENT OF
INVITATION FOR BIDS
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND RECREATION
251 CAUSEWAY STREET, SUITE 600,
BOSTON, MA 02114-2104
PHONE: 617-626-1250 FAX: 617-626-1449
www.mass.gov/dcr
Contract No.: P18-3203-C05 (4039)
Title: New Bedford State Pier Reconstruction - East Wharf
Location: New Bedford State Pier, New Bedford, MA
Contract No.:P17-3177-M1A
Title: Installation of Reflectorized Pavement Marking on
Parkway and Roadways of DCR - State-Wide
Location: (State Wide) - Barnstable, Berkshire, Bristol,
Dukes, Essex, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex,
Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester
Counties.
Sealed proposals submitted on a form furnished by the Department will be received until 11:00 AM on Wednesday,
March 7th, 2018 at the Boston address above, and will be,
at that time and place, publicly opened and read.
CDs,w/spec’s,avail at DCR HDQRTS free. To have CDs
shipped provide completed address, phone# w/YOUR FedEx # to Carol.A.Bernardi@state.ma.us When possible will
email.
In the event that any addenda are issued throughout the
open period for this project, DCR will distribute these addenda via email to the email identified by the prospective
bidders to DCR at the time the CD of plans and specifications is issued. PLEASE NOTE: All bidders must confirm receipt of any DCR email communication by sending a return
email stating: “(name of bidder) confirms that we have received Addendum #__ for Project No. P18-3203-C05 (4039)
and Title New Bedford State Pier Reconstruction – East
Wharf”. The email must show the name and phone number
of the bidder’s responsible contact person.
A pre-bidding conference for prospective bidders will be
held on Friday, February 23 at 10 AM at New Bedford State
Pier, New Bedford, MA
Sealed proposals submitted on a form furnished by the Department will be received until 11:00 AM on Wednesday,
March 7, 2018 at the Boston address above, and will be, at
that time and place, publicly opened and read.
CDs, w/spec’s,avail at DCR HDQRTS free. To have CDs
shipped provide completed address, phone# w/YOUR FedEx # to Carol.A.Bernardi@state.ma.us When possible will
email.
In the event that any addenda are issued throughout the
open period for this project, DCR will distribute these addenda via email to the email identified by the prospective
bidders to DCR at the time the CD of plans and specifications is issued. PLEASE NOTE: All bidders must confirm
receipt of any DCR email communication by sending a
return email stating: “(name of bidder) confirms that we
have received Addendum # for Project No. P17- 3177-M1A
and Title “Installation of Reflectorized Pavement Marking on Parkways and Roads of DCR - State-Wide”. The
email must show the name and phone number of the bidder’s responsible contact person.
A pre-bidding conference for prospective bidders will be
held on February 21, 2018 at 10:30 AM at DCR Headquarters, 251 Causeway Street, 7th Floor Conference
Room, Boston, MA.
The estimated project cost is $ 5,000,000
The project consists of installation of pavement marking on
Parkways, Roadways and Parking Lots of the Department
of Conservation and Recreation. This operation will call for
two (2) or more truck mounted striping units of painting
a minimum of twelve miles of pavement making (paint of
thermoplastic) a day.
The estimated project cost is $ 800,000.00
The work is to be accomplished within 219 calendar days
of a notice to proceed. Liquidated damages in the amount
of $2,000 per day will be assessed if the work has not
been completed in accordance with the provisions of the
contract within the time specified (as extended by any authorized extension of time granted in accordance with the
contract provisions).
The work is to be accomplished within 730 calendar days
of a notice to proceed. Liquidated damages in the amount
of $500.00 per day will be assessed if the work has not
been completed in accordance with the provisions of the
contract within the time specified (as extended by any authorized extension of time granted in accordance with the
contract provisions).
The General Contractor shall have the following qualification requirements:
Bidders must be pre-qualified by the Massachusetts
Dept. of Transportation (MassDOT) Highway Division in
the Pavement Markings category to bid on the above
project. An award will not be made to a Contractor
who is not pre-qualified by MassDOT Highway Division
prior to the opening of Proposals.
All Bidders must be pre-qualified by the Massachusetts
Dept. of Transportation (MassDOT) Highway Division in the
Marine Construction category to bid on the above project. An award will not be made to a Contractor who is not
pre-qualified by MassDOT Highway Division prior to the
opening of Proposals
The proposed contract includes a combined participation goal of 10.4% of the bid price for minority-owned
business enterprises and women-owned business enterprises. Proposed MBE/WBE participation plans that
include solely MBE or solely WBE participation, or do
not include a reasonable amount of participation by
both MBE and WBE firms to meet the combined goal,
will not be considered responsive.
The applicable local minority workforce utilization percentage is a minimum goal of 15.3%. The applicable
local women workforce utilization percentage is a
minimum goal of 6.9%.
The Commonwealth encourages the participation of
Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprises
(“SDVOBE”) on its construction projects. The ServiceDisabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprise participation benchmark for this contract is 3.0%.
Each bid must be accompanied by a bid deposit, in the
form of a bid bond, cash, certified check, or a treasurer’s
or cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust
company, payable to the Department of Conservation and
Recreation in the amount of 5% of the bid.
Each bid must be enclosed in a sealed envelope on which
the bidder’s return address, including the bidder’s name, is
listed, and be addressed as follows:
John Clarkeson,
Director of Contract Administration and Procurement
Department of Conservation & Recreation
251 Causeway Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02114
SEALED BID/PROPOSAL ENCLOSED
Contract No.: P18-3203-C05 (4039)
Contract Title: New Bedford State Pier Reconstruction –
East Wharf
Bids are subject to the provisions of M.G.L. Ch. 30, Sect.
39F, G, H and M inclusive. Wages are subject to minimum
wage rates as per M.G.L. Ch. 149, sections 26 to 27D inclusive. The Department reserves the right to waive any
informalities in or to reject any and all bids if it be in the
public interest to do so.
The proposed contract includes a combined participation goal of 0.0% of the bid price for minority-owned
business enterprises and women-owned business enterprises. Proposed MBE/WBE participation plans that
include solely MBE or solely WBE participation, or do
not include a reasonable amount of participation by
both MBE and WBE firms to meet the combined goal,
will not be considered responsive.
The applicable local minority workforce utilization percentage is a minimum goal of 15.3%. The applicable
local women workforce utilization percentage is a
minimum goal of 6.9%.
The Commonwealth encourages the participation
of Service-Disabled Veteran- Owned Business Enterprises (“SDVOBE”) on its construction projects. The
Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprise
participation benchmark for this contract is 0.0%.
Each bid must be accompanied by a bid deposit, in the
form of a bid bond, cash, certified check, or a treasurer’s
or cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust
company, payable to the Department of Conservation and
Recreation in the amount of 5% of the bid.
Each bid must be enclosed in a sealed envelope on which
the bidder’s return address, including the bidder’s name, is
listed, and be addressed as follows:
Trial Court of Massachusetts
The Superior Court
ORDER OF NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
DOCKET NUMBER 1873CV00068
Marc J. Santos, Clerk of Court
Bristol County
Bristol County Superior Court-Taunton
9 Court Street, Rm 13
Taunton, MA 02780
Case Name
Federal National Mortgage Association
vs
Ameripath Mortgage Corperation et al
RE: Ameripath Mortgage Corporation
WHEREAS a civil action has been begun against you in our
Superior Court by Federal National Mortgage Association wherein it is seeking to; obtain judgment against New
Century Mortgage Corporation
We COMMAND YOU if you intend to make any defense,
that on 03/12/2018 or within such further time as the law
allows you do cause your written pleading to be filed in
the office of the Clerk of Court named above, in said Commonwealth, and further that you defend against said suit
according to law if you intend any defense, and that you
do and receive what the Court shall order and adjudge
therein.
Hereof fail not, at your peril, or as otherwise said suit may
be adjudged and orders entered in your absense.
It appearing to this Court that no personal service of the
Complaint has been made on the defendant a deputy sheriff having made a return on the summons that after diligent
search he can find no one upon whom he can lawfuly make
service, a copy of which is hereto attached and made part
of this notice, it is ORDERED that notice of this suit be given
to them by publishing, once a week for three successive
weeks, the last publication to be at least 20 days before
said return day in the:
Newspaper: Boston Globe/Herald, Mass Law Wkly or Metro
Boston
City/Town: City of Boston
Date issued
01/29/2018
Clerk of Courts/Asst. Clerk
Marc J. Santos
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
FOR THE DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS
In the Matter of the Complaint of BESTREV LTD., as
Owner and Operator of the S/V BEST REVENGE 5, for
Exoneration from or Limitation of Liability.C.A. No.: 1:18cv-10006
If any claimant desires to contest either the right to exoneration from or the right to limitation of liability, then the
claimant shall file and serve on the attorneys for BestRev
an Answer to the Complaint on or before March 2, 2018
unless the Claim has included an answer, or be defaulted.
LEGAL NOTICES
me take him.’ He came out tonight and did his thing. He was
locked in.”
Cleared in Andover
Andover High principal
Philip Conrad said the district
has cleared varsity boys’ hockey
coach Chris Kuchar and two assistants of allegations that they
denied players food or water,
concluding an internal investigation into their behavior. Conrad said he plans to reinstate
the coaches as soon as he can
confirm that the state’s Department of Children and Families
has reached the same conclusion. Andover (8-4-2) plays at
Acton-Boxborough Wednesday
night.
. For more highlights, go to
bostonglobe.com/schools.
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS M.G.L. C. 149 CONSTRUCTION
ADVERTISEMENT OF INVITATION FOR BIDS
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION and RECREATION
251 Causeway Street, Suite 600,
Boston, MA 02114-2104
PHONE: 617-626-1250 FACSIMILE: 617-626-1351
www.mass.gov/dcr
Contract No.: P18-3236-M1A
Title:
OVERHEAD DOOR, Maintenance, Repair,
Replacement
Location:
Statewide
Sealed GENERAL BID proposals shall be submitted on a
form furnished by the Department and will be received until 11:00 AM on Wednesday, March 7th,2018 and will at
that time and place be publicly opened and read.
CDs, w/spec’s,avail at DCR HDQRTS free. To have CDs
shipped provide completed address, phone# w/YOUR FedEx # to Carol.A.Bernardi@state.ma.us When possible will
email.
In the event that any addenda are issued throughout the
open period for this project, DCR will distribute these addenda via email to the email identified by the prospective
bidders to DCR at the time the CD of plans and specifications is issued. PLEASE NOTE: All bidders must confirm
receipt of any DCR email communication by sending a return email stating: “(name of bidder) confirms that we have
received Addendum #__ for Project No._______ and Title
__________”. The email must show the name and phone
number of the bidder’s responsible contact person.
A pre-bidding conference for prospective bidders will not
be held. Please call Fred Yule at 617- 913-9146 or email
Fred.Yule@MassMail.State.MA.US with any questions
The project consists of: a two year contract for the maintenance, repair, and replacement of existing overhead doors
at various DCR statewide facilities.
The estimated project cost is $ $200,000
The work is to be accomplished within 730 calendar days
of a notice to proceed. Liquidated damages in the amount
of $ 200 per day will be assessed if the work has not been
completed in accordance with the provisions of the contract within the time specified (as extended by any authorized extension of time granted in accordance with the
contract provisions).
The proposed contract includes a combined participation goal of 0.0% of the bid price for minority-owned
business enterprises and women-owned business enterprises. Proposed MBE/WBE participation plans that
include solely MBE or solely WBE participation, or do
not include a reasonable amount of participation by
both MBE and WBE firms to meet the combined goal,
will not be considered responsive.
The applicable local minority workforce utilization percentage is a minimum goal of 15.3%. The applicable
local women workforce utilization percentage is a
minimum goal of 6.9%.
The Commonwealth encourages the participation of
Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprises
(“SDVOBE”) on its construction projects. The ServiceDisabled Veteran-Owned Business Enterprise participation benchmark for this contract is 0.0%.
Each bid must be accompanied by a bid deposit, in the
form of a bid bond, cash, certified check, or a treasurer’s
or cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust
company, payable to the Department of Conservation and
Recreation in the amount of 5% of the bid. Each bid must
be enclosed in a sealed envelope on which the bidder’s
return address, including the bidder’s name, is listed, and
be addressed as follows:
John Clarkeson, Director of Contract Administration
and Procurement
Department of Conservation & Recreation
251 Causeway Street, 6th Floor
Boston, MA 02114
SEALED BID/PROPOSAL ENCLOSED
Contract No.:S18-3236-M1A
Contract Title: Overhead Doors, Maintenance, Repair, and
Replacement
John Clarkeson, Director of Contract Administration and
Procurement Department of Conservation & Recreation
251 Causeway Street, 6th Floor Boston, MA 02114
Bids are subject to the provisions of M.G.L. Ch. 149, sections 44A to H, inclusive. In addition, bids are also subject
to Ch. 30, Sect. 39F, G, H and M inclusive. Wages are subject to minimum wage rates as per Mass. Gen. L. Ch. 149,
sections 26 to 27D inclusive. The Department reserves the
right to waive any informalities in or to reject any and all
bids if it be in the public interest to do so.
SEALED BID/PROPOSAL ENCLOSED
Contract No.: P17-3177-M1A
Contract Title: Installation of Reflectorized Pavement
Marking on Parkways and Roadways
of DCR - State-Wide
All Bidders, both Sub and General, for this project are required to be certified with the Massachusetts Division of
Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (DCAM) for
the work they are bidding on, and must submit with the bid
an update of their respective qualifications.
Bids are subject to the provisions of M.G.L. Ch. 30, Sect.
39F, G, H and M inclusive. Wages are subject to minimum
wage rates as per M.G.L. Ch. 149, sections 26 to 27D inclusive. The Department reserves the right to waive any
informalities in or to reject any and all bids if it be in the
public interest to do so.
Leo Roy, Commissioner
Massachusetts Department of Conservation
and Recreation
Leo Roy, Commissioner
Massachusetts Department of Conservation
and Recreation
Leo P. Roy, Commissioner
Massachusetts Department of Conservation
and Recreation
All persons asserting any claims against BestRev or the
Vessel with respect to which the complaint seeks limitation shall file and serve their respective Claims on or before
March 2, 2018 or be defaulted. Each claim shall specify
the facts upon which the claimant relies in support of the
claim, the items thereof, and the dates on which the same
accrued. All claims shall be filed with the Clerk of this
Court at the United States District Court for the District of
Massachusetts, 1 Courthouse Way, Boston, Massachusetts
02210 or electronically through the Court’s CM/ECF system, and served by U.S. Mail to the BestRev’s attorney, Michael J. Daly, Pierce Atwood LLP, One Financial Plaza, 26th
Floor, Providence, Rhode Island 02903.
powered by
thing. It’s a good feeling to
come out here and give the
community something they deserve.”
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS – M.G.L. C. 30, sec. 39M
CONSTRUCTION
ADVERTISEMENT OF INVITATION FOR BIDS
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION and RECREATION
251 CAUSEWAY STREET, SUITE 600,
BOSTON, MA 02114-2104
PHONE: 617-626-1250 FAX: 617-626-1449
www.mass.gov/dcr
NOTICE is hereby given that BestRev Ltd. (“BestRev”), as
Owner and Operator of S/V BEST REVENGE 5 and its appurtenances (“Vessel”) has filed a Complaint in the United
States District Court for the District of Massachusetts, C.A.
No. 1:18-cv-10006, pursuant to 46 U .S.C. § 30501 et seq.,
claiming the right to exoneration from or limitation of liability for all claims and for any and all losses, damages, and
injuries allegedly sustained as a result of the total loss of
S/V BEST REVENGE 5 by fire on or about July 11, 2017 in or
around Falmouth, Massachusetts, as more fully described
in the Complaint.
All persons desiring to review the amended regulations
may go to
https://www.mass.gov/regulations/101-CMR- 34600-ratesfor-certain-substance-related-and-addictivedisordersprograms or request a copy in writing or in person from
MassHealth Publications, 100 Hancock Street, 6th Floor,
Quincy, MA 02171. To view or download related supporting materials, go to https://www.mass.gov/service- details/
proposed-regulations-supporting-materials.
February 14, 2018
fy as a school. We had something to play for.
“We played inspired and we
played like we wanted some-
NOTICE OF COMPLAINT FOR EXONERATION FROM OR
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
Pursuant to the authority of M.G.L. c. 118E and in accordance with M.G.L. c. 30A, a public hearing was held on
Friday, September 15, 2017, in the First Floor Conference
Room, 100 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA.
Individuals may submit written comments, or request a
copy of any notices or written comments, concerning the
matters herein by e-mailing ehs-regulations@state.ma.us.
Please submit electronic comments as an attached Word
document or as text within the body of the e-mail with the
name of the regulation in the subject line. All submissions
must include the sender’s full name, mailing address, and
organization or affiliation, if any. Individuals who are unable
to submit comments or request a copy of any notices or
written copies by e-mail should mail written comments or
requests to EOHHS, c/o Debby Briggs, 100 Hancock Street,
6th Floor, Quincy, MA 02171.
Lawrence’s Miguel Camacho keeps a close eye on Lowell’s
Nathaniel Siow (4) in first-half action on Tuesday.
The project consists of Reconstruction of the North-East
Corner Relieving Platform and pile supported East Wharf.
Reconstruction consists of:
> Stabilization and partial demolition of the existing
North-East Corner down to the relieving platform
> Construction of a new relieving platform including
steel piles and concrete platform and concrete
perimeter retaining wall
> Partial reconstruction of East Wharf including steel
bearing piles, concrete pile caps and concrete deck
and fender system within reconstruction area.
SPCA Rates ($/kilowatt hour)
($0.00299)
($0.00279)
($0.00226)
($0.00163)
($0.00105)
($0.00065)
($0.00269)
Trial Court of Massachusetts
The Superior Court
ORDER OF NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
DOCKET NUMBER 1873CV00068
Marc J. Santos, Clerk of Court
Bristol County
Bristol County Superior Court-Taunton
9 Court Street, Rm 13
Taunton, MA 02780
MARK LORENZ FOR THE GLOBE
Shaughnessy was his usual
vocal self, scoring or assisting
on 14 of 16 points over a furious 16-3 second-quarter run.
Following a Wright 3-pointer that cut the Needham (14-2)
lead to 4 with under two minutes remaining, Shaughnessy
answered, canning a trey from
the top of the key.
“He’s such a great leader,’’
said Needham coach Paul Liner.
Newton North (15-4) clawed
away in the fourth quarter, and
a putback from sophomore Aaron Cooley (18 points, eight rebounds) trimmed Needham’s
lead to 5 following Shaughnessy ’s three. From there,
Klemm took over.
“The last few [possessions],
I was on Ethan and I’m getting
tired and Michael was like, ‘Let
NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
Premises: 478 Shawmut Avenue, Unit 4, Zebra Condominium, Boston, MA
By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained
in a certain mortgage given by Marie-Claude Mendy to
Bank of America, N.A. and now held by Wilmington Savings
Fund Society, FSB, doing business as Christiana Trust, not in
its individual capacity, but solely as trustee for BCAT 201514BTT, said mortgage dated October 5, 2006, and recorded
with the Suffolk County Registry District of the Land Court
as Document No. 727193 and noted on Certificate No.
C211-29, said mortgage was assigned from Bank of America, N.A. to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, doing
business as Christiana Trust, not in its individual capacity,
but solely as trustee for BCAT 2015-14BTT by assignment
dated October 2, 2015 and recorded with said Registry District of the Land Court as Document No. 855722 and noted
on Certificate No. C211-29; for breach of the conditions in
said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same
will be sold at Public Auction on March 14, 2018 at 12:00
PM Local Time upon the premises, directly in front of the
building in which the unit is located, all and singular the
premises described in said mortgage, to wit:
Unit #4 in The Zebra Condominium (the “Condominium”),
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, created pursuant
to M.G.L. Chapter 183A, by a Master Deed, dated September 16, 1987 and filed with the Suffolk County Registry
District of the Land Court as Document Number 429322.
The Post Office address of the Unit is: 478 Shawmut Avenue, Unit #4, Boston, MA 02118
The Unit is more particularly described in the Master Deed
and on the floor plans filed therewith and on the first Unit
Deed filed as Document No. 429897, to which is affixed
the verified statement of a registered architect in the form
required by M.G.L. Chapter 183A, Section 9.
Said Unit contains an undivided 7.02 percent interest in the
common areas and facilities of the Condominium.
The Unit is subject to, and has the benefit of, the provisions
of M.G.L. Chapter 183A, the Master Deed, the Declaration
of Trust, the By-Laws, and such Rules and Regulations as
may be promulgated pursuant thereto, and to a certain
Land Disposition Agreement filed with said Registry as
Document No. 418629.
For my Title, please see Deed of Mui and Lo filed herewith.
The description of the property contained in the mortgage shall control in the event of a typographical error in
this publication.
For Mortgagor’s Title see deed dated October 5, 2006,
and registered with the Suffolk County Registry District of
the Land Court as Document No. 727192 and noted on Certificate of Title No. C211-29.
Said Unit will be conveyed together with an undivided percentage interest in the Common Elements of said
Condominium appurtenant to said Unit and together with
all rights, easements, covenants and agreements as contained and referred to in the Declaration of Condominium,
as amended.
TERMS OF SALE: Said premises will be sold and conveyed
subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles,
municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.
FIVE THOUSAND ($5,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price
must be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or
cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the
purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid
in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check
within thirty (30) days after the date of sale.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Shechtman Halperin Savage, LLP
1080 Main Street
Pawtucket, RI 02860
Attorney for Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, doing
business as Christiana Trust, not in its individual capacity,
but solely as trustee for BCAT 2015-14BTT
Present Holder of the Mortgage
(401) 272-1400
NOTICE OF AGENCY ACTION
SUBJECT:
Payment Rates for Periodic Orthodontic
Treatment Visits
AGENCY:
Massachusetts Executive Office of Health
and Human Services
Pursuant to the provisions of M.G.L. c.118E, the Executive
Office of Health and Human Services (EOHHS) will accept
public comments relative to the adoption of emergency
amendments to:
101 CMR 314.00: Dental Services
These amendments will codify, effective February 15, 2018,
updates to the payment rates for periodic orthodontic
treatment visits (code D8670) from $67 (monthly rate) to
$200 (quarterly rate) for the standard rate, and from $90
(monthly rate) to $268 (quarterly rate) for the EPSDT-eligible member rate. MassHealth will be concurrently adopting corresponding emergency amendments to 130 CMR
420.000: Dental Services to codify updates to the billing
rule for periodic orthodontic treatment visits from monthly
to quarterly (90-day) billing periods. EOHHS is making these
changes to ensure that payments are consistent with efficiency, economy, and quality of care and reasonable and
adequate to meet the costs that must be incurred by efficiently and economically operated providers, and to ensure
continued access to care for these services. The amendments are projected to have no impact to annual aggregate
MassHealth expenditures.
Individuals may submit written comments by e-mailing
ehs-regulations@state.ma.us. Please submit electronic
comments as an attached Word document or as text within
the body of the e-mail with the name of the regulation in
the subject line. All submissions must include the sender’s
full name and address. Individuals who are unable to submit comments by e-mail should mail written comments
to EOHHS, c/o D. Briggs, 100 Hancock Street, 6th Floor,
Quincy, MA 02171. Copies of the proposed regulation are
available at EOHHS or may be viewed at EOHHS’s website
at https://www.mass.gov/service-details/executive-officeof-health-and-human-services-public-notices. EOHHS will
also schedule a public hearing on these amendments.
AT&T Mobility, LLC is
proposing
to
construct
twenty-one new telecommunications tower facilities located in Boston, MA.
One new tower, located at
126 Dorchester St, will be
a 35’-8” replacement light
pole with a top-mounted
antenna. Twenty new towers will be a 29’8” replacement light pole with a topmounted antenna. These
sites will be located at: 325
E 8 th Street, 130 G St, 377
Athens St, Bullock Street,
309 Old Colony Ave, 400 E 6
th St, 75 W Broadway, 104 B
St, 47 B St, 300 E St, 412 W
Broadway, 345 Dorchester
St, 222 E St, 193 D St, 300
Summer St, 177 W 8 th St,
87 Seaport Blvd, 10 Melcher
St, 243 C St, and 175 A St.
Any interested party wishing to submit comments
regarding the potential
effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so
by sending comments to:
Project 6118000107-SF c/o
EBI Consulting, 21 B Street,
Burlington, MA 01803, or
via telephone at (781) 2732500.
AT&T Mobility, LLC is proposing to construct seven
new
telecommunications
tower facilities located near
200 W 2 nd Street in Boston,
MA. Four of the new towers
will be 22’- 2” replacement
light pole with a top-mounted antenna. These will be
located at: 601 Congress St,
321 Congress St, 3 Richards
St, and 505 Congress S. One
new tower, located at 200
W 2 nd St, will be a 26’-1”
replacement light pole with
a top-mounted antenna.
One new tower, located at
288 Dorchester St, will be
a 30’-1” replacement light
pole with a top-mounted
antenna One new tower,
located at 394 Dorchester
St, will be a 30-foot replacement light pole with a topmounted antenna Any interested party wishing
to submit comments regarding
the
potential
effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so
by sending comments to:
Project 6118000584-TC c/o
EBI Consulting, 21 B Street,
Burlington, MA 17403, or
via telephone at (339) 2342597.
LEGAL NOTICES
MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE
By virtue and in execution of
the Power of Sale contained
in a certain mortgage given
by Cheryl Fiorenza to Mustang Capital Partners, LLC
dated September 7, 2017 and
recorded with the Middlesex
County Registry of Deeds
in Book 69898, Page 445 as
affected by an assignment
from Mustang Capital Partners, LLC to Urban Vision
Ltd. as Trustee of the 7476 Berkshire Street Realty
Trust, u/d/t dated February
5, 2018 a certificate of said
Trust being recorded with
the Middlesex County Registry of Deeds in Book 70601,
Page 122 of which mortgage
the undersigned is the present holder, by said assignment from Mustang Capital
Partners, LLC to Urban Vision
Ltd. as Trustee of the 74-76
Berkshire Street Realty Trust
dated February 5, 2018 and
recorded with the Middlesex
County Registry of Deeds in
Book 70601, Page 518. The
mortgage is affected by a
Subordination and Standstill
dated September 7, 2017 by
Mustang Capital Partners,
LLC for the benefit of Raymond C. Green Funding, LLC
& Realty Capital, LLC and recorded with the Middlesex
Southern District Registry of
Deeds in Book 69898, Page
451. For breach of the conditions of said mortgage and
for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at
Public Auction at 11 o’clock
am on the 15th day of March,
2018 at 76 Berkshire Street,
Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts all and singular the premises described
in said mortgage,
To wit;
Beginning at a point on the
Southeasterly side of Berkshire Street, 43.89 feet Northeasterly from the corner of
Lincoln Street, as shown on
a plan by W.H. Whitney, dated
February 13, 1895, recorded
with Middlesex South District
Deeds, Plan Book 89, Plan 10,
and bounded:
NORTHWESTERLY
by
Berkshire Street, 37 feet;
NORTHEASTERLY
by a
portion of Lot 14 on said plan,
now or formerly of M. Mitchell et al. 80.39 feet;
SOUTHEASTERLY
by
Lot 12 on said plan, 37 feet;
SOUTHWESTERLY
by
Lot 13 on said plan, 80.39
feet.
Containing 2,974.5 square
feet, and being the greater
portion of Lot 14 on said
plan.
Premises to be sold and conveyed subject to and with the
benefit of all rights, rights of
way, restrictions, easements,
covenants, liens or claims in
the nature of liens, improvements, public assessments,
any and all unpaid taxes, tax
titles, tax liens, water and
sewer liens and any other
municipal assessments or
liens or existing encumbrances of record which are
in force and are applicable,
having priority over said
mortgage, whether or not reference to such restrictions,
easements, improvements,
liens or encumbrances is
made in the deed including a certain mortgage deed
given by Cheryl Fiorenza to
Raymond C. Green Funding
LLC and Realty Capital, LLC
dated September 7, 2017 and
recorded with the Middlesex
County Registry of Deeds in
Book 69898, Page 433 in the
original, principal sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Thousand
Dollars ($750,000.00).
Terms of sale: A deposit of
Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($25,000.00) by certified or bank check will be
required to be paid by the
purchaser at the time and
place of sale.
The balance is to be paid
by certified or bank check
at Hadlock Law Offices,
P.C., Suite 25, 550 Cochituate Road, Framingham, MA
01701 within thirty (30) days
from the date of sale. Deed
will be provided to purchaser
for recording upon receipt in
full of the purchase price. In
the event of an error in this
publication, the description
of the premises contained in
said mortgage shall control.
Other terms, if any, to be announced at the sale.
Urban Vision Ltd. as Trustee
of the 74-76 Berkshire Street
Realty Trust
Present holder of said mortgage.
By Its Attorneys,
Hadlock Law Offices, PC
Suite 25, 550 Cochituate Rd.
Framingham, MA 01701
AT&T Mobility, LLC is proposing to construct nine
new telecommunications
tower facilities in Boston,
MA. Each facility will consist
of a replacement light pole
with a top-mounted antenna. Five facilities will have
an overall height of 30’-2”
above grade located at: 440
Huntington Ave (Node 5),
497 Huntington Ave (Node
8), 600 Massachusetts Ave
(Node 12), 451 Massachusetts Ave (Node 13), and
302 Massachusetts Ave
(Node 16). Node 2 located
at 393 Huntington Ave (MA9) will have an overall height
of 31’-7” above grade. Node
4 located at 325 Huntington Ave (MA-9) will have
an overall height of 30’-1”
above grade. Node 33 located at 82 Symphony Rd
will have an overall height
of 26’-2” above grade. Node
38 located at 129 Huntington Ave will have an overall height of 33’-8” above
grade. Any interested party
wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed
facility may have on any
historic property may do so
by sending comments to:
Project 6118000581-MI c/o
EBI Consulting, 21 B Street,
Burlington, MA 01803 or
via telephone at (203) 2316643.
Experience Globe.com
Top local employers
are looking for people just like you.
Check out great opportunities
in The Boston Sunday Globe’s
Careers Section.
C10
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BLISS by Harry Bliss
“How did people waste time before computers?”
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
Today’s Sudoku Solution
6
5
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9
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2
4
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Today’s Calcudoku Solution
8
9
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5
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ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
4
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ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
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JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
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ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt
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POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
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ADAM@HOME by Rob Harrell
Today’s Crossword Solution
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
C11
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
ZIPPY “Sequitur Surfing” by Bill Griffith
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
You’re a plugger if you had a Reagan bumper sticker
on your truck until the wire broke and the bumper fell
off.
SUDOKU
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday and
Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
I LOVE YOU BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
1 Breakfast fodder
5 Biblical hymn
10 Handy things?
14 Vaccine type
15 Open
courtyards
16 In ___ of
(rather than)
17 Jot down
18 Court conflict
19 North Pole
explorer
20 Golden
parachutes
and such
23 Famous
24 Life of ___
(ease)
25 French caps
28 Prefix with “fall”
30 Latin I word
31 Mind other’s
business
33 Mother of all
36 Vibrant shade
40 Employ
41 No longer
confined
42 Ready, willing
and ___
43 Transmitted
44 Some chamber
compositions
46 Tossed over the
shoulder
49 Life form
51 Brand-new
Mr. and Mrs.
57 Shamu, for one
58 Piano exercise
59 Soothing plant
60 Common ship
wood
61 Farm storage
buildings
62 Old France
63 Notice from afar
64 Smell or
fragrance
65 Boundaries
1
2
3
4
DOWN
Countless years
Enlarge
Concert take
Most
aerodynamic
5 Quality that
evokes pity
6 Scatter about
7 Suffix with
“parliament”
8 Deceiver
9 Liquor type
10 Even though
11 Qatar currency
12 Country legend
Haggard
13 Foamy
21 Noisy
breaker-upper
22 Curtain kin
25 Hindi title
26 Tall Aussie
runners
27 Make a top
10 list
28 Vatican VIP
29 Clark or Rogers
31 One way to
be free
32 Certain Greek
letters
33 German river to
the North Sea
34 Chevy model
35 Sheep
matriarchs
37 Funeral song
38 Ely of “Tarzan”
fame
39 English or Latin
43 Adjective for
Pete?
44 Most pleasant
45 Plastic ___ Band
46 Young pig (var.)
47 Traditional
wisdoms
48 Open an aspirin
bottle
49 Ancient Greek
council
50 ___ a happy
17-Across
52 Slob’s creation
53 Psych finale?
54 Agenda
55 Forte, musically
56 Snakelike fishes
3
4
3 2
9 5
6
9
1
8
1
7 4 8
9 6 3
8
9
1
8
7
2 8
5 4
1
4
C12
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Auto Dealer Directory
Alfa Romeo of Boston*
Kelly Chrysler*
Herb Chambers, 531 Boston Post Road,
Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
alfaromeoofboston.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
Herb Chambers Alfa Romeo*
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
herbchambersfiat.com
Kelly Alfa Romeo*
151 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0006
kellyauto.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Danvers*
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Herb Chambers Dodge of Millbury*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Audi Brookline Herb Chambers*
308 Boylston Street, Rte 9, Brookline
855-889-0843
audibrookline.com
Audi Burlington Herb Chambers*
62 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
audiburlington.com
Audi Shrewsbury
780 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
866-890-0081
wagneraudisales.com
Herb Chambers Lexus of Hingham*
100 Broadway, Rte 99, Everett
617-600-6045
hondacarsofboston.com
141 Derby Street, Hingham
866-237-9636
herbchamberslexusofhingham.com
1172 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-778-1912
herbchambersporscheofboston.com
Honda Village*
Herb Chambers Lexus of Sharon*
Herb Chambers Porsche Burlington*
371 Washington Street
Newton Corner
888-511-5869
hondavillage.com
25 Providence Highway,
Rte 1, “The Automile,” Sharon
877-338-9671
herbchamberslexus.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
FerrariNE.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Danvers*
107 Andover Street, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchambers.com
Herb Chambers Fiat of Millbury*
540 Lynnway, Rte 1A, Lynn
781-595-5252
shopkellyhonda.com
Chambers Motorcars of Natick*
Herb Chambers Lincoln Norwood*
1130 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
855-278-0016
herbchamberslincoln.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-975-6891
BochHyundai.com
Herb Chambers Hyundai of Auburn*
533 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
bentleyboston.com
Mirak Hyundai
Herb Chambers Maserati of Boston*
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston*
Framingham Ford*
1198 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
855-857-4431
herbchambersinfinitiofboston.com
1200 Worcester Rd, Rt 9, Framingham
1-800-626-FORD
framinghamford.com
Herb Chambers Infiniti
Westborough*
1168 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
866-803-9622
herbchambersbmwofboston.com
Herb Chambers BMW of Sudbury*
128 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-483-1828
bmwofsudbury.com
75 Granite Street, Braintree
855-298-1177
herbchambersfordofbraintree.com
Herb Chambers Ford-Westborough*
310 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-6736
herbchambersfordofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers Genesis*
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Lynnfield*
395 Broadway, Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
866-233-8937
herbchamberscadillaclynnfield.com
Herb Chambers Cadillac-Warwick*
1511 Bald Hill Road, Rte 2, Warwick, RI
877-206-0272
herbchamberscadillacofwarwick.com
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
877-287-9139
herbchambersgenesisofauburn.com
Mirak Genesis
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakgenesis.com
128 Derby St, Exit 15 off Rte 3, Hingham
800-649-6781
bestchevyusa.com
Kelly Infiniti*
Mercedes-Benz of Boston*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyinfiniti.com
Jaguar Sudbury Herb Chambers*
83 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Sudbury
866-268-7851
jaguarsudbury.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Danvers*
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
353 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield
781-581-6000
kellyjeepchrysler.net
420 River Street, Haverhill
978-372-2552
onlymercedes.com
smart center Lynnfield
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway,
Rte 1 N, Lynnfield
844-222-6929 smartcenterlynnfield.com
smart center Boston
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-359-6562 smartcenterboston.com
Cityside*
790 Pleasant St, Rte 60, Belmont
781-641-1900
buycitysidesubaru.com
VillageSubaru.com
61 Powdermill Rd, Acton
978-897-1128
sales@villagesubaru.net
Boch Toyota*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-321-6631 BochToyota.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Auburn*
809 Washington Street, Rte 20, Auburn
855-872-6999
herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com
Herb Chambers Toyota of Boston*
32 Brighton Avenue, Boston
877-884-1866
herbchamberstoyotaofboston.com
Toyota of Braintree*
210 Union St, Exit 17 off Rte 3, Braintree
781-848-9300
toyotaofbraintree.com
Toyota of Wellesley*
Rte 9, Wellesley
781-237-2970
wellesleytoyota.com
Toyota of Watertown*
Herb Chambers MINI of Boston*
1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
888-994-1075
herbchambersmini.com
149 Arsenal St, Watertown
617-926-5200
Herb Chambers Kia of Burlington*
Route 110, Westford
978-589-4200 BochHondaWest.com
Lev Kia of Framingham*
Herb Chambers Chevrolet Danvers*
Boch Honda*
90 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-206-9332
herbchamberschevrolet.com
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
888-364-2550 BochHonda.com
Mirak Chevrolet*
33 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
877-842-0555
herbchambershondaofburlington.com
510 Cochituate Rd (Rte 30), Framingham
866-931-3035
levkia.com
Herb Chambers Honda Burlington*
Herb Chambers Honda in Boston*
1186 Commonwealth Ave, Boston
877-205-0986
herbchambershondainboston.com
2 Latti Farm Rd, Rte 20, Millbury
888-293-8449
herbchamberschryslerofmillbury.com
Mercedes-Benz of Shrewsbury*
Smith Motor Sales of Haverhill, Inc.*
Boch Honda West*
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Millbury*
Herb Chambers, 253 North Main St,
Natick
866-266-3870
mercedesbenzofnatick.com
Herb Chambers Jeep of Millbury*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
844-464-3560
BochChevrolet.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-831-2139
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
Mercedes-Benz of Natick*
760 Boston Turnpike Rd, Rte 9,
Shrewsbury
888-551-7134
mercedesbenzofshrewsbury.com
93 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
866-271-6366
herbchamberskiaofburlington.com
Herb Chambers Chrysler-Danvers*
80 Cambridge Street, Rte 3A, Burlington
781-229-1600
mbob.com
107 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
877-904-0800
herbchamberschryslerofdanvers.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
Boch Chevrolet*
1125 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakchevrolet.com
Herb Chambers, 259 McGrath Highway,
Somerville
800-426-8963
mercedes-benzofboston.com
Kelly Jeep*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
Best Chevrolet*
312 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
855-878-9603
herbchambersinfinitiofwestborough.com
Herb Chambers, 385 Broadway, Rte 1 N,
Lynnfield
877-337-2442
flagshipmotorcars.com
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20, Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchambersrollsroyceofnewengland.com
Mercedes-Benz of Burlington*
211 Rantoul Street, Rte 1A, Beverly
978-922-0059
shopkellyford.com
540 Southern Artery, Quincy
617-770-0070
quirkford.com
66 Galen St, Watertown
888-779-1378
buycolonialgm.com
151 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-560-0007
kellymaserati.com
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield*
Kelly Ford*
Quirk Ford*
Colonial Buick-GMC*
531 Boston Post Rd, Rte 20, Wayland
866-622-0180
herbchambersmaserati.com
Kelly Maserati*
Herb Chambers Infiniti of Boston*
Herb Chambers Ford of Braintree*
Boch Maserati*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
781-769-8800
BochMaserati.com
1165 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington
781-643-8000
mirakhyundai.com
157 W Central St, Rte 135, Natick
888-920-3507
chambersmotorcarsofnatick.com
Rolls-Royce Motorcars of New
England, a Herb Chambers Company*
735 Southbridge St, Rte 12 & 20, Auburn
888-318-7927
herbchambershyundaiofauburn.com
2 Latti Farm Road, Rte 20, Millbury
877-875-5491
fiatusaofworcesterma.com
Bentley Boston, a Herb Chambers
Company*
62 Cambridge St, Rte 3A, Burlington
855-845-0576
porscheofburlington.com
Kelly Honda*
Boch Hyundai*
Ferrari Of New England*
Herb Chambers Porsche of Boston*
Honda Cars of Boston*
Herb Chambers Lamborghini Boston*
531 Boston Post Road, Rte 20,
Wayland
855-647-4873
herbchamberslamborghiniboston.com
Herb Chambers Honda of Seekonk*
350 Turnpike Rd, Rte 9, Westborough
877-207-0329
herbchambershondaofwestborough.com
Boch Nissan*
“On The Automile,” Route 1, Norwood
855-996-7751
BochNissan.com
Herb Chambers Nissan
of Westborough*
75 Otis St @ Rte 9, Westborough
508-618-7032
herbchambers.com
Kelly Nissan of Danvers*
155 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-1000
kellyauto.com
340 Mystic Ave, Medford, MA
781-475-5200
vwmedford.com
Kelly Volkswagen*
72 Andover St, Rte 114, Danvers
978-774-8000
kellyvw.net
Minuteman Volkswagen
39 North Road, Bedford
781-275-8000
minutemanvw.com
Wellesley Volkswagen*
231 Linden St, Wellesley
781-237-3553
buywellesleyvw.com
Kelly Nissan of Lynnfield*
185 Taunton Ave, Rte 44, Seekonk
877-851-3362
herbchambershondaofseekonk.com
Herb Chambers Honda
Westborough*
Colonial Volkswagen of Medford*
275 Broadway, Rte 1 North, Lynnfield
781-598-1234
kellynissanoflynnfield.com
Land Rover Sudbury*
Herb Chambers, 83 Boston Post Rd
Rt 20, Sudbury
866-258-0054
landroverofsudbury.com
Kelly Nissan of Woburn*
95 Cedar St, Exit 36 off I93 & I95, Woburn
781-835-3500
kellynissanofwoburn.com
Herb Chambers Volvo Cars Norwood*
1120 Providence Hwy, Rte 1,
“On The Automile,” Norwood
888-920-2902
volvoofnorwood.com
Please call (617) 929-1314 to include your dealership in this directory. *For more information on this dealer, please visit boston.com/cars.
2017 Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz of Boston
C 300
259 McGrath Highway, Somerville, MA 02143
(877) 205-7770
Mercedes-Benz of Natick
4MATIC
®
(855) 879-1262
339
$
Lease
For
253 North Main Street, Route 27, Natick, MA 01760
Flagship Motorcars of Lynnfield
385 Broadway, Route 1 North, Lynnfield, MA 01940
*Per
Mo.
36
Mos.
• Stock #17298083
• MSRP: $43,725
• $3,149 Cap Cost Reduction
• 30,000 Allowed Miles
2017 C 300 4MATIC available only to qualified customers at participating authorized Mercedes-Benz dealers through Mercedes- Benz Financial Services (where applicable to
advertised lease). Advertised lease rate based on a gross capitalized cost of $43,725. Excludes title, taxes, registration, license fees, insurance, and additional options. 30,000
allowed miles. Total monthly payments equal $12,204. Cash due at signing includes $3,149 capitalized cost reduction, $795 acquisition fee, and first month’s lease payment
of $339. Total payments equal $16,148. Subject to credit approval. No security deposit required. Offer valid through 2/28/2018.
(866) 614-4201
The Herb Chambers Companies
Open 24/7 @ HerbChambersMercedesBenz.com
SALES:
Monday-Thursday 8:30am-9:00pm, Friday 8:30am-6:00pm
Saturday 8:30am-5:00pm, Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm
SERVICE: Monday-Friday 7:00am-7:00pm, Saturday 8:00am-5:00pm
G
WednesdayFood
T H E BOS T ON G L OB E W E D N E S DAY, F E B RUARY 14, 2 01 8 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / FO O D
Sebastian
Galvez and
Melissa
Stefanini
of Buenas.
Jenn and Matt
Mason of
Curds & Co.
Brian
Moy and
Chinese
New Year
By Andrew Sessa
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
Diana
Kudayarova
and Tse Wei
Lim.
Chris Hsi and
Jen Scott of
Taste Wine
Bar & Cafe.
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: LANE TURNER, SUZANNE KREITER, AND JONATHAN WIGGS, ALL OF THE GLOBE STAFF; WAYNE CHINNOCK
Let’s quit our jobs
and open a food business
together!
O
As a kid growing up in Boston’s Chinatown, Brian Moy
lived for Chinese New Year. Every winter, he’d dive into the
festivities, beating drums, chasing dragon dancers, and collecting so-called lucky money
cash gifts in red envelopes.
“Back then,” he recalls, “you
could get fireworks, too.” His father’s reaction to seeing his
teenage son dancing in the
street with a thousand-chamber firecracker chain, lit at both
ends, around his neck? “He
wasn’t too pleased.”
But the pyrotechnics
weren’t what made the holiday
most meaningful for Moy. It
was the food. “Originally, much
of China was poor,” he explains,
“so this was when you could
have a grand feast.”
If anyone appreciates that,
it’s Moy, 36, the restaurateur
behind the hot spots Shojo,
NEW YEAR, Page G5
COUPLES SHARE WHAT IT’S LIKE TRYING TO BUILD A COMPANY AND A LIFE TOGETHER
BY D E V RA F I R ST | G LO B E STA F F
n Valentine’s Day, it’s nice to hear a love story. Here’s one you’ve surely heard
before: Two sweethearts, as passionate about food as they are about each
other, quit their jobs to open a restaurant (or an ice cream shop or a wine
bar or . . . ). It’s so romantic!
Isn’t it?
“ When we first opened, we tried to make a rule that we
wouldn’t talk about business when at least one of us was naked,”
says Tse Wei Lim, who ran the now-closed restaurants Journeyman, Ames Street Deli, and Study with wife Diana Kudayarova.
“It didn’t work.”
The truth behind the sweet tales of entrepreneur couples living their foodie dreams is — like love itself — something more
complicated. Starting a business is stressful, and restaurants in
particular have a reputation for being relationship destroyers.
People working in the food preparation and serving industry have
an average divorce rate of about 37.5 percent, according to statistician Nathan Yau, who crunched the numbers from the US Census Bureau’s 5-year American Community Survey from 2015. That’s somewhere
in the midrange — between actuaries, with the lowest rate at 17 percent, and
CONFIDENT COOK
SPECIAL TREAT
COUPLES, Page G7
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
‘Originally, much
of China was poor,
so [New Year]
was when you
could have a
grand feast.’
BRIAN MOY, restaurateur,
whose team has been selected to
prepare a special menu at the
James Beard House, a New York
City foodie mecca, on Saturday
Inside
INSIDER
TURNING OUT
GETTING SALTY
DINER DENIZEN
Breakfast bread pudding
for you and your valentine
Take a hands-on pasta
class in Framingham
Late-night memories,
meals from Solomon Sidell
G2
G2
G3
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Insider
MASLOW TO OPEN
SOUTH END EATERY
Tim Maslow
plans
to offer
Japanese
cuisine.
T
SHERYL JULIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
im Maslow is finally ready to open a new restaurant.
The chef worked his way through the ranks of the Momofuku empire in New York; came home to reinvent his
father’s Watertown sandwich shop, Strip-T’s; and went on
to open Ribelle. But since closing the lauded Brookline
spot in 2016, he has struggled to find his next step, working largely behind the scenes at places like Mida and Tiger Mama.
“It was tough to figure out what I wanted to do for the next 10
years,” he says. “I needed to find something I was inspired by constantly.”
Now he has found that. He is teaming with restaurateur Brian
Lesser to open a Japanese brasserie in the South End, tentatively
named Whaling in Oklahoma.
“We were trying to figure out who we were in this business
concept, and I saw this factoid, that there’s this dated, arbitrary
law that says you can’t catch whales in Oklahoma,” Maslow says.
“It’s funny and irreverent and makes no sense. It seemed a playful
way to say what we might do.”
Maslow says he is not able to reveal the exact location at this
time, but the South End’s Pilot Block Neighborhood Association
recently announced via Twitter that chef Andy Husbands will
close longtime restaurants Tremont 647 and Sister Sorel, to be replaced by a Japanese bistro after renovations. Husbands and
Lesser are partners in the Smoke Shop barbecue restaurants. Another source, who asked not to be named, says Maslow will move
into the Tremont 647 space, although Maslow declined to confirm.
The chef became fascinated with Japanese cuisine on a trip to
the country a few years ago. “I don’t know how to describe the
feelings I got when I was there,” he says. “The sensibility, the precision, the organization, the dedication, everything was just . . . It
started to make sense to me.” Before Ribelle closed, he and his
staff experimented with izakaya-themed evenings. At the new restaurant, he will continue these explorations of Japanese cooking.
This could mean menu items such as onigiri, grilled whole fish,
and “fun bar food,” as well as house-made furikake, pickles, and
miso. He also wants to delve into Japanese specialties that haven’t
received much exposure in this country. The food won’t exactly be
traditional, he says, but it also won’t be flashy.
“I’ve grown up in the last few years. I’ve had a little forced maturity on me,” he says. The Globe reported in February 2016 that
Maslow had been arrested at the Canadian border with more than
20 pounds of marijuana edibles; the charges were later dropped.
He has also since become a father. “We’re going to be humble,” he
says. “I’m super-excited to get a second chance at this.”
The restaurant is currently expected to open in June.
DEVRA FIRST
Making pasta
with a pro
At the Italian restaurant Volturno in Framingham (and another location in Worcester),
garganelli is prepared in-house
from egg yolk-rich pasta dough.
The squares are rolled around a
bastoncino, a thin stick, and
then passed over a wood pettine, the tool that gives the
short tubular pasta its ridges.
On the first Wednesday of each
month, the Framingham restaurant offers a hands-on pastamaking class (6-8:30 p.m.;
$80-$100), and you, too, can
learn to turn out garganelli,
mezzelune (half-moons), cappelletti (little hats), or silky fettuccine. You’ll work at your own
station with a hand-cranked
pasta machine. As you stretch,
roll, and shape dough, wine and
antipasti are served, and when
the cooking is finished, you dine
on the pasta you created. Owner
Greg Califano, 35, often leads
the classes, and there isn’t anything he doesn’t know about
pasta-making. He grew up on
the Jersey Shore in a large Italian family whose roots were in
Naples and Friuli. His first
cooking teacher was his grandmother. Califano trained in restaurants in Bologna and then
honed his skills working in
kitchens under renowned chefs
Marc Vetri and Jeff Michaud in
Philadelphia. In Naples, he
learned to make Neapolitan pizza so authentic he’s earned recognition from the Associazione
Pizzaiuoli Napoletani that certifies pizzerias qualifying as authentically Neapolitan. For Califano, “making handmade pasta
at home is a lost art.” 1 Edgell
Road, Framingham, 508-8757105, www.volturnopizza.com.
ANN TRIEGER KURLAND
Warm up with
polenta at Sulmona
Delio Susi Jr., chef and coowner of Cambridge’s Sulmona
Restaurant and Amelia’s Trattoria, wants you to love polenta.
The Italian cornmeal porridge
(like grits) was originally “a
poor man’s food, to fill the belly,”
he says. “As time went on, it became a tradition.” In Susi’s family, it’s a winter dish served with
tasty toppings, which is exactly
what the chef is offering during
the month of February at his
year-old restaurant Sulmona,
named for the city in the Abruzzo region of Italy where his parents are from.
The centerpiece of the meal
is warm, soft polenta spread on
a wooden board — in an
amount determined by the
number of eaters in your party
— and, per Susi family tradition,
the polenta is divided into three
“flavor” sections, one each with
crumbled sausage, tomato
sauce, and browned sliced garlic
sprinkled on top. Then you
choose one or more “sides” or
toppings, which include baked
pork riblets with melt-in-yourmouth cabbage; veal stew with
wild mushrooms; giambotta (a
chunky vegetable and white
bean stew); and bagna cauda
(fried smelts and calamari with
an anchovy and sardine sauce).
These four are Susi’s favorites,
part of memorable wintry meals
once cooked by his grandmother Palma and continued by his
aunt Maria Pia. Diners simply
scoop a portion of polenta onto
their plate and top it with as
much (or little) of the toppings
as they like.
The Polenta Menu is available a la carte, or buy the whole
feast (polenta board and all four
toppings and two glasses of
wine) for $55 per person. If you
have just a little room left for
dessert, try the cinnamon sugarcoated zeppole (fried dough
balls).
Sulmona Restaurant, 608
Main St., Cambridge, 617-7144 9 9 5 ; w w w. s u l m o n a c a m bridge.com.
LISA ZWIRN
THE CONFIDENT COOK
GOOD FOOD AND KITCHEN KNOW­HOW
Breakfast bread pudding for you and your valentine
Bread pudding should be one of those recipes that you have
up your sleeve, so you can pull it out whenever the occasion
demands. It takes bread, of course, or dinner rolls, like this
recipe calls for. Go ahead and cut them up like croutons. You
also need eggs and milk. Memorize these proportions and
you’ll make bread pudding for the rest of your life without
looking it up: For every egg, you need one-quarter cup milk (or
cream). Add a few spoons of sugar and you’re almost done.
I also like to blend in lemon rind and vanilla. Then add a
little surprise in the layers of bread, like raisins, or, if you love
chocolate, broken bittersweet pieces or chips. Butter two large
custard cups, bowls, or coffee cups, fill with the bread and custard mixture, and send them to the oven. You’ll surely win a
valentine with this beloved, old-fashioned dish. But first you’ll
have captured a heart with your confidence. SHERYL JULIAN
1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Butter 2 large ramekins, heatproof bowls, or
heatproof coffee mugs (1 cup
capacity or more each).
2. Cut the rolls into ½-inch
pieces.
3. In a bowl, lightly whisk the
eggs, milk, granulated sugar,
vanilla, and lemon rind. Add
the bread and use a rubber
spatula to stir the bread in
the liquid until all the cubes
are soaked.
4. Divide half the bread mixture between the baking dishes. Divide the raisins or cranberries between the dishes.
Cover with the remaining
bread mixture, mounding it
in the dishes, if necessary.
Pour any liquid in the bowl
over the tops. Sprinkle the
tops with granulated sugar.
Breakfast bread puddings
Serves 2
Make these just before baking or assemble the dishes the night before
and refrigerate them covered with plastic wrap. Let them come to room
temperature for 30 minutes before baking. You can easily double the recipe to make four.
3
3
¾
3
½
½
Butter (for the dishes)
baby brioche or slider rolls or dinner rolls (3 to 4 inches each)
or 2 larger rolls (5 inches each)
eggs
cup whole milk
tablespoons granulated sugar
teaspoon vanilla extract
Grated rind of ½ lemon
cup golden or dark raisins or dried cranberries
Extra granulated sugar (for sprinkling)
Confectioners’ sugar (for sprinkling)
SHERYL JULIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
5. Set the dishes in a small
baking dish to catch the
drips. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until the puddings
are puffed and browned and
a skewer inserted into the
custard comes out clean.
Sprinkle with confectioners’
sugar.
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G3
GETTING SALTY
SOLOMON SIDELL OF SOUTH STREET DINER
make a meatball with rice inside, garlic, and say, “What are
the ten items inside?” We’d sit
around at family dinners, and it
was always a special moment.
We called it Family Council. He
was an excellent cook.
What’s the worst restaurant
experience you’ve ever had?
Well, I don’t usually have bad
experiences, but on Wednesday
night, a restaurant outside the
city closed, and I had a reservation. Nobody bothered to call
me! They closed due to the
weather being bad, but me and
eight other people were at the
door, so the weather wasn’t that
bad. Artichokes in Wakefield.
How could Boston become a
better food city? A streamlined
system of government where
we pay the bills in one location.
When you go to open a restaurant, you have to go to 50 different locations and hearings in
the process. It would help existing businesses stay in business.
We do a big block party with
face paintings, a cartoonist, ice
cream trucks, every year. That’s
25 hearings in six months! By
the time you’re done, you’re
dizzy.
CHRISTOPHER A. LYONS
Serving up meals,
memories from
a local landmark
L
By Kara Baskin
come to visit me. His son was at
the Floating Hospital for Children. He’d come every night as
his opportunity to wind down.
He made me a tie of Marilyn
Monroe — he painted on it,
this tie, a Marilyn Monroe. He
gave it to me as a gift for the
months he was there with his
child who ended up passing
away. And Reggie Wong, who
owned the Corner Pub on Lincoln Street, was the first Chinese person to welcome me to
the neighborhood. On the night
of his passing, his [family]
could have eaten at any restaurant in Chinatown, but they ate
with me.
BERNET
VIGNON
Robles, California )
ent flavors of plush ripe
ocolate and anise are all
ed by balanced rich
lvety tannins.
If you had to eat your last meal
in Boston, what would it be?
Boston cream pancakes at the
South Street Diner.
Kara Baskin can be reached at
kara.baskin@globe.com.
Big Gre
een Egg + Eggcessories
Available in-store
Name three adjectives for Bos­
ton diners. My customers are
family, supportive, and funny.
Every one of them has a story,
and every one of them brings
their story to the diner. They’re
all regulars, if it’s their first
time or 20 years.
What’s the most overdone
trend right now? Vegan.
What are you reading? I read
five to six magazines, business
magazines, daily. I don’t have
the time to sit down a lot of
times to read a book.
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
ynn native Solomon Sidell started his career in
the sixth grade as a dishwasher in Swampscott to
afford baseball cards. He went on to run hot dog
stands in front of downtown nightclubs and
slush stands in Nahant. Now he works from midnight until 7 a.m. at his landmark South Street Diner, feeding
eggs and good cheer to Boston’s creatures of the evening. The
round-the-clock restaurant has operated since 1947, a hangout
for Leather District factory workers, nightlife denizens, visiting celebrities, and curious tourists. “I bought it in 1997, when
the Big Dig was in full construction. I was young and dumb,”
he says. Some might disagree.
What’s the first restaurant you
ever ate at in Boston? The European, with big giant pizzas
and the tuxedoed hosts, in the
North End. I was probably 8
years old. We’d come to the
North End and go to the library, go to the waterfront, and
then go to the European for
dinner or a late lunch from
Lynn.
What’s one thing you’d like to
fix about the restaurant indus­
try here? There are a million
restaurants in the city. There’s
one popping up every single
day. It’s exciting but a lot of
work to maintain employees in
that environment of 500-seat
restaurants.
How has the restaurant land­
scape changed since you ar­
rived in Boston? The city was
divided. Today it’s gentrified.
There’s any type of food imaginable in any part of the city at
any time. Before, it was segregated: You’d go to Chinatown
for Chinese food, go downtown
for a steak, go to the North End
for Italian. Today, there’s an
Italian grill at Park Plaza.
‘My customers
are family,
supportive, and
funny. Every one
of them has a
story, and every
one of them
brings their story
to the diner.
They’re all
regulars, if it’s
their first time or
20 years.’
SOLOMON SIDELL
How’s your commute? Eleven
minutes! I live in Malden. I go
to work at midnight, and I get
out at 7 a.m. Our primary business is 1 a.m. until 4 a.m. We
serve 800 meals a night in 39
seats.
What’s the one food you never
want to eat again? Kimchi.
What kind of restaurant is
Boston missing right now? You
know, I think we have everything, from high-end restaurants to the South Street Diner
to every type of ethnic food you
can imagine. It’s an incredible
food city. I miss the days of the
Marche [Movenpick], but Eataly does a good job. There’s nothing I can say that the city needs
for restaurants. It just needs
more restaurant employees to
care.
localroot.com
Belmont Center
77 Leonard St
Belmont, MA 02478
The Mill at Newton Lower Falls
2284 Washington St
Newton Lower Falls, MA 02462
Boston Atmosphere with Neighborhood Prices
What’s your most missed Bos­
ton restaurant? Caffe Graffiti.
It was right at the 50-yard line
on Hanover Street, directly
across from Caffe Vittoria. It
was run by a family who knew
everybody’s name. As long as
you weren’t a tourist, you were
family.
Happy Valentine’s Day
Who was your most memora­
ble customer? I have two. One
was a gentleman who would
Course I
BE ONE WITH NATURE
with our Island experience packages.
Three Course Menu
$37.99 per Person
(Tax & Gratuity not included)
(Choice of)
Sea Scallops
pancetta, baby spinach, sun dried tomato,
parmesan risotto, citrus beurre blanc
•
Pear & Baby Kale Salad
goat cheese, dried cranberries, toasted walnuts, balsamic reduction
Course II
(Choice of)
Roasted Beef Tenderloin
What other restaurants do you
visit? I go to the North Street
Grille, owned by my sister, and
I like Kava over in the South
End.
truffle potato purée, roasted brussels sprouts,
onion strings, chianti demi glace
•
Maine Lobster Tail
heart shaped ricotta ravioli, fresh lobster,
asparagus, micro green salad, Newberg sauce
What’s your earliest food
memory that made you think: I
want to work in restaurants?
Family dinners. My father
would make something, and
we’d guess the spices. He’d
Course III
(Choice of)
Raspberry Crème Caramel
raspberry coulis, fresh berries, whipped cream
•
Chocolate Molten Lava Cake
vanilla ice cream, white chocolate dipped strawberry
Executive Chef: Garry Payne
Experience Globe.com
1-888-678-9093
TOURAZORES.COM
full menu available, reservations recommended, seating is limited
CONSUMER ADVISORY WARNING FOR RAW FOODS – IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH, WE ADVISE THAT EATING RAW OR UNCOOKED MEAT,
POULTRY, OR SEAFOOD POSES A RISK TO YOUR HEALTH.
www.exchangestreetbistro.com
Hours: Mon-Thurs 11:30am-10pm • Fri & Sat 11:30-11pm • Sun 11:30am-9pm Lounge Hours: Sun-Wed until 12 Midnight • Thurs-Sat until 1am
67 Exchange Street, Malden • 781.322.0071
T h e
G4
Where T
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Stay
MAINE
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
SEASONAL RECIPES
WHAT TO COOK THIS WEEK
Chicken breasts with dates,
oranges, and olives
SOUTHERN COAST
Serves 2
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Chicken breasts for you and your sweetie are elegant here, served on a bed of pearled couscous.
Sprinkle them with aromatic spices and cook with
dates and green olives to give them flavors of the
Middle East. You never brown the chicken on the
WESTERN LAKES & MOUNTAINS
stovetop, so it skips that messy step; in the oven
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the meat turns golden and the skin crisps.
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Ireland
½
½
¼
2
1
2
1
1
½
1
2
6
2
¼
teaspoon ground cumin
teaspoon ground cinnamon
teaspoon cayenne pepper
Salt and pepper, to taste
bone­in split chicken breasts
large navel orange
tablespoons olive oil
shallot, chopped
cup halved, pitted dates
cup pitted green olives, halved
cup chicken stock
tablespoons white wine vinegar
cups water
cups pearled couscous
Olive oil (for sprinkling)
cup chopped fresh parsley
KAROLINE BOEHM GOODNICK FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
1. Set the oven at 425 degrees.
2. In a small bowl, stir the cumin, cinnamon, and
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Keyword: boston
Experience Globe.com
THEATER
boston university school
oF theatre presents
the first production in the new, cutting-edge
JOAN & EDGAR BOOTH THEATRE
February 21 - 25, 2018
Eugène Ionesco’s incisive and absurd
commentary on humanity & authoritarianism,
RHINOCEROS, directed by Clay Hopper,
showcases the dynamic performance facility.
Tickets now available: $15 general admission,
$10 BU alumni, $7.50 CFA Members
& Brookline residents, Free with BU ID
820 Commonwealth Ave.
BU.EDU/CFA/SEASON
irresistible coMedy —
noW playing!
Meet restaurant manager/shoe connoisseur
Haley Walker in this hilarious & sharp comedy.
“COMIC GOLD! Hannefah Wood sparkles!
BIG LAUGHS!” — THE BOSTON GLOBE
“A GREAT DATE! I WAS DAZZLED!
A fleet & funny evening!” — JOYCE KULHAWIK
“Has both spine and substance!” — WBUR
“Immensely enjoyable!” — EDGE BOSTON
“GO SEE IT!” — THEATER MIRROR
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / Huntington Avenue Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
the interactive
solve-the-criMe coMedy!
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 5 & 8, Sun at 3
Added Show: Wed 2/21 @ 2 pm
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
cayenne to blend them. Sprinkle the spice mixture
Bring the liquid to a boil, cover the pan. and
the water return to a boil. Lower the heat and
and salt on all sides of the chicken breasts.
transfer to the oven.
simmer for 10 to 12 minutes, or until tender.
3. Grate the orange rind; set aside. With a small
5. Cook the chicken for 20 minutes. Remove the
Drain but do not rinse. In a bowl, toss the cous-
paring knife, remove the white pith from the or-
lid from the chicken and continue cooking for 20
cous with olive oil, salt, pepper, and half the pars-
ange and cut the flesh into segments.
to 30 minutes, or until a meat thermometer in-
ley.
4. In a heavy-based flameproof casserole over me-
serted into the thickest part of the breasts regis-
7. Spoon the couscous onto a platter. Place the
dium-high heat, heat the oil. Add the shallot and
ters 165 degrees. (Total cooking time is 40 to 50
chicken on top. Stir the orange rind into the
cook, stirring often, for 3 minutes. Stir in the
minutes.)
chicken cooking juices and spoon them on the
dates, olives, chicken stock, vinegar, and orange
6. Meanwhile, in a saucepan, bring the water to a
breasts. Sprinkle with the remaining parsley.
segments. Set the breasts on top, skin side up.
boil with a pinch of salt. Add the couscous and let
Karoline Boehm Goodnick
Cakey chocolate­chip brownies
Makes 20 large or 40 small bars
Lush with melted chocolate, cocoa powder, chocolate chips, and sour cream, these brownies are
rich and cakey (as opposed to fudgy). Because
they’re sturdy, they make a wonderful gift. Wrap
up a few for your favorite valentine.
Butter (for the pan)
Flour (for the pan)
5
ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped
1¾ cups flour
3
tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
¾ teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
1
cup miniature semisweet­chocolate chips
1
cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room
temperature
2
cups granulated sugar
4
eggs, lightly beaten
1
teaspoon vanilla extract
¼ cup sour cream
Confectioners’ sugar (for sprinkling)
8. Bake the brownies for 40 to 45 minutes, or until the top is set. Transfer the pan to a wire rack;
out the excess.
um-low speed, beat in the eggs, one at a time,
cool completely.
2. In a heatproof bowl over hot but not boiling
blending well after each addition. Blend in the va-
9. Make 3 horizontal cuts and 4 vertical cuts to
water, melt the unsweetened chocolate. Remove
the bowl from the water and wipe the bottom dry;
nilla and sour cream. The batter may look curdled; that’s OK.
form 20 pieces. For smaller brownies, cut each in
half to make 40 bars. Use a small offset spatula to
set aside.
6. With the mixer set on its lowest speed, add the
remove the bars from the pan. Store in an airtight
3. In another bowl, whisk the flour, cocoa powder,
melted chocolate mixture, then the flour mixture,
container. Just before serving, dust the tops with
baking powder, baking soda, and salt to blend.
beating only until blended.
confectioners’ sugar, if you like. Lisa Yockelson
THE
February 25th at 2pM
781-891-5600
Our Tribute to All Things Irish! ~ 781-891-5600
Jerry Walker / Liam Harney
The Massachusetts Harp Ensemble
Comhaltas Musicians - Reagle Singers
Robinson Theatre - 617 Lexington St., Waltham
ReagleMusicTheatre.com - FREE PARKING.
A Celebration of Classic Country Music
Featuring the Music of Hank Williams,
Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, Tammy Wynette,
Merle Haggard and Loretta Lynn.
ReagleMusicTheatre.com
617 Lexington St., Waltham. FREE PARKING!
athol Fugard’s engaging
political draMa
trinity rep
Feb. 15 - Mar. 18
S�EP��N SO�D��IM
BOOK
Shakespeare’s profound tragedy about race,
love, envy, and repentance. This stripped down
retelling is the portrait of an unraveling mind
amid a society engulfing and destroying its very
best. Directed by Whitney White.
TrinityRep.com - (401) 351-4242
“CLEVER! SOMETIMES EVEN
LAUGH-OUT-LOUD FUNNY!” – Arts Fuse
The true boom-and-bust story of two of
the most colorful fortune-seekers in US history.
Now thru Feb 11 Lyric Stage Copley Sq
617.585.5678 lyricstage.com
begins in 1 WeeK!
February 20 - March 4
“WAITRESS is a little slice of heaven!”
- Entertainment Weekly
Boston Opera House
800.982.2787 | BroadwayInBoston.com
Box Office Hours: Mon - Fri 10am-5pm
Groups (10+) Call 617.482.8616
THEATER
riveting neW play –
starts March 2!
Dominique Morisseau’s acclaimed Off
Broadway hit about an auto plant in Detroit.
“Warm-blooded and astute.” – NEW YORK TIMES
A Huntington Theatre Company production
South End / Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
MUSIC
debussy centennial:
beethoven/debussy/Walton
MetaMorphoses
orpheus in oedipus
III
Feb 7 - March 11
harvard square caMbridge
ASP stages the Bard’s stunning portrait of a
Machiavellian genius and the murderous quest
for absolute power in the Swedenborg Chapel.
For tix actorsshakespeareproject.org.
epic adventure spanning
tiMe, place, and gender
“DEPTHS OF SHEER PLEASURE!
DELICIOUSLY FROLICSOME! – NY Times
Orlando the man one day becomes a woman
In a joyful romance spanning 5 centuries!
Starts February 23 Lyric Stage Copley Sq
617.585.5678 lyricstage.com
MerriMacK repertory
theatre
A World Premiere play about Roscoe “Fatty”
Arbuckle with big laughs and shocking truths.
Written by Andy Bayiates and Aaron Muñoz
Directed by Nathan Keepers
Feb 14 - Mar 11 • Lowell, MA
MRT.org/lostlaughs
MUSIC
Richard�
MUSIC
JO�N WE��MA�
stephen sondheiM’s latest
Musical adventure!
in the bowl. Transfer the batter to the baking pan,
spreading it evenly and smoothing the top.
dium-high. Add the granulated sugar in 2 addi-
Country
Jamboree
MUSIC &
LYRICS
5. In an electric mixer on medium speed, cream
the butter for 1 minute. Increase the speed to metions, beating well after each addition. On medi-
A Little Bit of
This remarkable love story set in Apartheid South
Africa stands as a reminder of the intolerance
and cruelty of a not-so-distant past. Co-produced
by New Repertory Theatre & Boston Center for
American Performance. January 29-March 3.
Watertown | 617-923-8487 | newrep.org
7. Remove the bowl from the mixer stand. With a
large metal spoon, stir in the chips and any flour
inch baking pan. Dust the pan with flour, tapping
THEATER
March 17 at 2 & 7pM
March 18 at 2pM.
4. In a small bowl, toss the chocolate chips with 2
teaspoons of the flour mixture.
1. Set the oven at 350 degrees. Butter a 9-by-13-
THEATER
IRELAND
SHERYL JULIAN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Highlighting the quartet and sonatas of Debussy
(1862-1918) in our Winter & Spring concerts.
Sun. 2/18, 3 pm at Sanders Theatre
Beethoven Serenade in D for Flute, Violin & Viola
Debussy Sonata for Flute, Viola & Harp
Walton Piano Quartet in D minor
Guest flutist Paula Robison, harpist Jessica Zhou
& pianist Andrew Armstrong w/ BCMS violinist
Jennifer Frautschi, violist Marcus Thompson,
cellist Raman Ramakrishnan
$25-$62; students: $8; seniors: $4 off
617.349.0086/www.bostonchambermusic.org
handel and haydn society
Aisslinn Nosky and Ian Watson, co-directors
Fri, Feb 16, 7:30PM | Sanders Theatre
Limited Seats Available
Sat, Feb 17, 7:30PM | NEC’S Jordan Hall
New Date Added
MussorgsKy, proKoFiev,
& tchaiKovsKy
An all-Russian program featuring the
great Georgian pianist Alexander Korsantia
MUSSORGSKY: Khovanshchina Prelude
PROKOFIEV: Piano Concerto No. 3
TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 4
THU FEB 22, 7:30pm / SANDERS THEATRE
Guide to the Music throughout the concert
SAT FEB 24, 8:00pm / JORDAN HALL
Conductor’s Talk / 6:45pm
SUN FEB 25, 3:00pm / SANDERS THEATRE
Conductor’s Talk / 1:45pm
617.236.0999 | bostonphil.org
Sun, Feb 18, 3:00PM | NEC’S Jordan Hall
Limited Seats Available
EMMANUEL MUSIC
with the Harvard Glee Club
and Urbanity Dance
Friday, February 23, 2018 | 8PM
Aucoin | The Orphic Moment
Harbison | Symphony No. 5
Stravinsky | Oedipus Rex
Composers’ Forum from 6:30 - 7:15PM
with Matthew Aucoin, John Harbison, John Heiss,
and moderator Christopher Lydon.
Sanders Theatre, Cambridge
emmanuelmusic.org | 617-536-3356
Boston
Globe
Ticket to
the Arts
Order Online through
our Self Serve Order
Entry System.
24/7 from anywhere.
eMManuel Music
lindsey chapel series
Thursdays at noon February 15 - March 22
Original and transcribed works for lute
by Bach and his contemporaries
Emmanuel Church | 15 Newbury Street, Boston
No charge for admission | Reservations at:
emmanuelmusic.org | 617-536-3356
boston.com/tickettothearts
T h e
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
B o s t o n
Moy still
gets blast
out of
New Year
uNEW YEAR
Continued from Page G1
BLR, and Rukus, all in Chinatown, where his family has
lived, worked, and owned eateries for more than five decades. For him and his relatives
— many of them immigrants
from southern China, Hong
Kong, and Taiwan — the celebrations and meals of Lunar
New Year, which begins this
weekend, prove a particularly
poignant time. They offer a
chance to reflect on and rejoice
in the family’s journey across
the years and around the globe.
The holiday will be especially
auspicious this year, as Moy’s
team has been selected to prepare a special menu at the
James Beard House, a New
York City foodie mecca, on Friday, which they’ll re-create in
Boston at BLR on Feb. 21.
In many ways, the Moys represent a changing Chinatown,
demonstrating how the neighborhood increasingly blends
East and West, past and present, traditional and contemporary. Their restaurants, espec i a l l y t h e n e x t - w av e o n e s
launched by the first-generation-American Moy himself,
have evolved to serve a changing clientele: diners who now
make Chinatown a culinary
destination and those who live
in the ever-more gentrified, and
diverse, district.
Every New Year when Moy
was young, people would come
to pay their respects at the
home of his paternal grandmother, who’d helped many
friends and family members
emigrate from China. “She always had a table full of food,”
s ay s Moy — r e m e mb e ri n g
arrowhead stew, dumplings,
and vegetable dishes that honored the Buddha, a vegetarian
— “but she only ate the leftovers.” Her first duty, she felt,
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
From top: Buddha Delight, drunken chicken, and
arrowhead stew at Brian Moy’s BLR.
was to feed others. “ That’s
something I didn’t think about
then,” continues Moy, whose
wife is expecting their second
child next month. “But I do
now.”
Moy ’s father, Ricky, was
born in a small village outside
of Taishan, in southern China,
then moved with his family to
Hong Kong when he was 6 or 7.
Money and food were sometimes scarce, but New Year’s offered a rare opportunity to indulge.
In 1966, when Ricky was 17,
the family came to Boston. As
one of his first jobs, he was a
busboy at China Pearl, on Tyler
Street, later waiting tables
there. He’d go on to start several small businesses in Chinatown, eventually buying the traditional restaurant Ho Yuen
Ting, on Hudson Street, in
1982, and turning it into the
more cutting-edge Best Little
Restaurant. Six years later, he
came full circle, purchasing
China Pearl and reopening it as
the second spot in Boston to offer dim sum, a Hong Kong specialty.
“When I came here, all the
Chinese food was chop-suey
style,” Ricky recalls. “Americans
didn’t know what Chinese cuisine really was.” He traveled to
China often to scout restaurants, meet chefs, and take
G l o b e
G5
cooking classes, bringing back
ideas that expanded the definition of Chinese food in Boston.
“I’d return with new styles, new
methods. We’d mix things from
Szechuan, Hunan, and Shanghai, doing fusion Chinese food.”
Brian Moy remembers the
huge New Year’s parties his dad
threw at China Pearl. “They always ended with lots of friends
and lots of food,” he says. “The
restaurant never shut down,
but it did for this. They’d close
one day for the party, another to
recover, and then a third to
swap stories.”
At the restaurants he’s subsequently opened, Moy has
shown a similarly innovative
streak. With its kung-fu noir
aesthetic and hip-hop-heavy
soundtrack, the six-year-old
Asian speakeasy and small
plates spot Shojo became Chinatown’s first contemporary
craft cocktail specialist, while
his 2016 reboot of Best Little
Restaurant as BLR respectfully,
but playfully, adds modern and
Western accents to his favorite
childhood dishes. With the
launch of the pan-Asian noodle
bar Rukus last July, he expanded to fast-casual, serving
souped-up umami bombs of ramen, udon, and more.
That creativity will come to
roost at the Beard house this
weekend. The restaurants’ executive chef Mike Stark — who
previously cooked at Tiger Mama and Toro — and Moy have
devised imaginative dishes
based on traditional New Year’s
ingredients and recipes.
The significance of many of
these New Year’s staples comes
less from flavor and more from
phonetics, Moy explains: “We
eat boiled lettuce because the
word for ‘lettuce’ sounds like
Chinese for ‘life,’ and then a stir
fry of dried oysters and black
moss because ‘oyster’ sounds
like ‘good new life,’ and ‘black
moss’ like ‘prosperity.’ ” For the
Beard dinner, Stark has turned
that moss into a foam, which
he’ll use with caviar and borage
to top a marinated and smoked
Kumamoto.
This time of year, Chinese
cooks also traditionally make a
starchy soup with the taro-like
tuber arrowhead. The small
root’s bulbous shape, with a
shoot coming off the top, suggests the male anatomy, so it’s
associated with the birth of
sons and the continuation of a
surname — good luck for a family. Rather than a thick stew,
Stark will make a soup, adding
pork trotter, Matsutake mushrooms, and braised lettuce, topping it with an arrowhead
crisp.
Although Moy was born into
a restaurant dynasty, his life in
the industr y wasn’ t preordained. “My dad wanted
something more for me and my
sister,” he says. “He felt he came
here to make something better
for us.” But Moy always wanted
to work with his father: “He
was my idol.”
Eventually, Ricky needed
more help. He asked his son to
run the original China Pearl
and daughter Patricia to look
after the branch he opened in
Quincy. After a while, Moy
wanted to strike out on
his own, serving his kind of fusion food, playing his kind of
music, in a space that looked,
he says, like “you were in my
Happy
y
a
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’
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head.” That became Shojo.
At first, his father didn’t get
the concept. “It was a difficult
thing,” says Ricky. “Shojo was
the first restaurant of its kind in
Chinatown. People weren’t
coming here for fusion, so I
worried it would fail. I realize
now that Chinatown can be for
another kind of customer.”
Moy recently showed his father the Beard House menu.
“He pointed out that it’s very
different than modern Asian
food in China and very different
from modern Asian food in the
States,” says Moy. “It’s a third
way.”
“I think it’s a good try,” Ricky
offers with cautious approval.
“We talked,” he says, smiling,
“and I gave him ideas to make it
better.”
Asked if he’ll go to New York
for the big feast, Ricky demurs,
“I don’t know.” Then, he turns
to his son, perhaps now looking
for his approval, and wonders
aloud, “Will you let me?”
9 ct.
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T h e
G6
WHAT SHE’S HAVING
By Kara Baskin
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
LEXINGTON — You’re driving
home from work. It’s late. It’s raining.
You’re tired. You envision your fridge
and you frown. Pasta? Dull. Chicken
nuggets? Eh. You curse yourself for
not throwing something in the slow
cooker before you left home. You admonish yourself for abandoning your
Instant Pot in the recesses of your
basement. You calculate how long it
would take to rinse it, read the instruction manual, and scrape the
freezer burn from some long-forgotten pork chops.
Find amazing
takeout food
at Lexington’s
Little India
Express
B o s t o n
G l o b e
You abandon this line of thought.
Your child kicks your seat and asks
what’s for dinner.
And then, up ahead in the distance, you see it — a drab strip mall.
But somewhere deep within is the
glint of promise. You fumble for your
phone. Fifteen minutes, they say. Fifteen minutes, and sweet relief awaits.
Lexington’s Little India Express is
in Commuter Dream World: It’s at an
intersection close to Arlington, Burlington, Lexington, Winchester, and
Woburn. Idle in traffic for a bit and
dare yourself not to turn down the radio and call in some vindaloo.
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Many locals get their Indian fix at
Royal India Bistro, a cozy sit-down
spot in Lexington center. It’s very
good, too, though the curries tend to
be richer and thicker. This place is a
naughty, fast little secret. Little India
Express is the takeout version of
Waltham’s Little India, a larger, proper restaurant.
You will not linger at this version,
because the place looks like a cross
between the RMV and a convenience
store. It is perfectly clean and friendly, but the aesthetic focal point is a
cash register.
No matter: It is excellent. Pay the
cashier, take your bags, and tear into
your cartons like a pack of animals.
Start with the cauliflower. Our
family just discovered Gobi Manchurian, and for anyone who considers
cauliflower a wan version of broccoli,
try this and banish thoughts of soggy
vegetables from your mind. Cauliflower florets are dipped in spongy,
white flour batter, deep-fried, and
tossed in a spicy sauce that mixes red
chilies, soy, green and red peppers,
and ketchup. The puffy batter is the
perfect sauce dispenser; our only
complaint is that there are too many
Continued on next page
()
INFO VALID 2/14/18 ONLY
()
G
5
Bargain show times are shown in
parentheses
Restrictions apply/No Passes
Handicapped accessible
8
Stadium Seating
I
DOL
DIG
DSS
Rear Window Captioning
6
K
Hearing Impaired
Dolby Stereo
Digital Sound
Dolby Surround Sound
Descriptive Video Service
The Boston Globe Movie Directory is a paid
advertisement. Listings appear at the sole discretion
of each cinema. Towns may appear out of alphabetical order so that listings will remain unbroken from
column to column
ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachussetts Ave. 781-648-4340
6 I DIG
www.capitoltheatreusa.com
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 5:30, 7:45
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 4:15, 7:15
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 7:30
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 4:00
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 4:45, 7:20
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5:00, 7:40
BELLINGHAM
REGAL BELLINGHAM STADIUM 14
259 Hartford Ave. 844-462-7342-443
5 6 8 DIG
www.REGmovies.com
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
ENCORE (NR) Advance Tickets Available 1:00, 6:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G (12:50, 4:40) 8:00
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) (1:20, 4:30) 7:30, 10:00
PAD MAN (PG-13) (1:35, 4:55) 8:15
WINCHESTER (PG-13) (1:15, 4:20) 7:05, 9:45
PETER RABBIT (PG) (1:30, 5:00) 7:45
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) (12:35,
3:55) 7:20
PADMAAVAT (NR) (1:10, 4:50) 8:30
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) (1:05, 3:40)
12 STRONG (R) (4:05)
THE POST (PG-13) (12:55, 4:00) 7:00, 9:50
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (12:30,
3:20) 6:15, 9:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (1:25, 4:10) 6:50,
9:30
I, TONYA (R) (12:45, 3:50) 6:35, 9:25
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 6:45, 9:35
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) (1:00) 7:15, 9:55
BELMONT
BELMONT STUDIO CINEMA
376 Trapelo Rd. 617-484-1706
www.studiocinema.com
THE POST (PG-13) 5:00, 7:30
BERLIN
REGAL SOLOMON POND STADIUM 15
591 Donald Lynch Blvd. 844-462-7342-448
5 6 8 DIG
REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX
201 Brookline Ave 844-462-7342-1761
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.REGmovies.com
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
ENCORE (NR) Advance Tickets Available 1:00, 6:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G (1:00) 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) (12:50) 4:05, 7:05,
10:05
PETER RABBIT (PG) (12:45) 4:10, 7:10, 9:55
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) RPX G (12:15, 3:15) 6:15,
9:30
WINCHESTER (PG-13) (12:35) 4:20, 7:25, 10:20
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) (11:30,
3:00) 6:35, 10:15
PADMAAVAT (NR) (11:50, 3:50) 8:00
THE POST (PG-13) 6:25, 9:40
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (12:30,
3:40) 6:55, 10:10
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (12:40, 3:45) 7:30,
10:30
I, TONYA (R) (12:20, 3:35) 7:20, 10:35
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 10:25
COCO (PG) (11:40, 3:05) 10:40
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE 10
121 Grandview Rd.
5 6 DIG
www.amctheatres.com
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:15, 4:45, 10:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 1:40
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 11:00,
1:50, 4:00, 7:10, 10:00
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 11:00, 12:00, 1:30,
2:30, 5:00, 5:40, 7:30, 8:10, 9:10, 10:00, 10:40
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:40,
4:30, 10:10
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 11:40, 7:20
PETER RABBIT (PG) G 11:15, 3:00, 4:00, 6:30, 10:40
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent 11:00,
2:10, 5:00, 7:50
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 11:00, 4:35, 7:40, 10:10
THE POST (PG-13) 2:00, 7:40
WINCHESTER (PG-13) G 11:10, 2:10, 5:00, 7:35,
10:20
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) G 11:00, 1:30, 5:00,
7:40, 10:45
BROOKLINE
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
290 Harvard St. 617-734-2500
5 6
www.coolidge.org
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 7:00
PHANTOM THREAD (R) G 1:00, 4:00, 9:45
I, TONYA (R) 11:15, 4:30, 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 4:05, 9:15
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 1:15
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 2:00, 6:45
LADY BIRD (R) 11:00
WHEN HARRY MET SALLY (R) 7:00
2018 OSCAR SHORTS: DOCUMENTARY B (NR) 1:30,
6:30
2018 OSCAR SHORTS: DOCUMENTARY A (NR) 11:05,
3:45, 9:00
BURLINGTON
AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 10
20 South Ave.
www.REGmovies.com
5 6 DIG
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
ENCORE (NR) Advance Tickets Available 1:00, 6:30
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) (1:20) 4:10, 7:00, 9:35
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G (1:30) 4:20, 7:20, 10:10
INTTELLIGENT (NR) 3:00, 9:45
GAYATRI (NR) 12:00, 3:45, 7:30
PAD MAN (PG-13) (12:55) 4:15, 7:45
PETER RABBIT (PG) (1:40) 4:30, 7:15, 9:50
CHALO (NR) 1:10, 4:40, 8:00
TOLI PREMA (NR) 12:10, 6:35
WINCHESTER (PG-13) (1:00, 3:35) 6:30, 9:20
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) (12:00,
3:15) 6:45, 10:00
PADMAAVAT (NR) (12:05, 3:50) 7:35
THE POST (PG-13) (12:30, 3:40) 6:50, 9:40
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13)
(12:50) 4:00, 7:05, 10:05
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (12:20, 3:30) 6:15,
9:05
I, TONYA (R) 6:20, 9:15
LADY BIRD (R) (1:00, 3:40)
www.amctheatres.com
BOSTON
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:05, 1:40, 4:20,
6:55, 9:40
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45,
10:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:10,
1:50, 4:40, 7:20, 10:10
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:30, 4:15, 6:35, 9:05
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 7:05, 10:00
THE POST (PG-13) 11:10, 1:55, 4:40, 7:30, 10:15
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 10:25
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 11:15, 1:50, 4:30
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
ENCORE (NR) G 1:00, 6:30
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 11:45, 2:30, 5:15, 7:55,
10:30
CAMBRIDGE
APPLE CINEMAS CAMBRIDGE
168 Alewife Brook Parkway.
ARTSEMERSON: PARAMOUNT CENTER
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
559 Washington St. 617-824-8000
www.applecinemas.com
5 8 DOL
TOLI PREMA (NR) 9:30
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 3:30,
6:35, 9:30
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 3:30, 9:10
PERMISSION (NR) 2:00, 7:00
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 1:00, 1:15, 4:30
PAD MAN (PG-13) 3:20, 6:15, 9:15
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 1:00, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10,
9:30
PADMAAVAT (NR) 6:00, 9:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:15, 3:30, 6:45, 9:00
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 1:00, 3:05, 5:10, 7:20,
9:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:00,
3:35, 6:10, 8:45
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:30, 4:15, 7:00
www.artsemerson.org
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON 19
175 Tremont St. 617-423-3499
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
COCO (PG) 1:55, 4:25
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 12:05, 2:35, 5:10,
7:45, 10:15
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:10, 3:30
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:50,
4:00, 7:10, 10:20
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 2:30, 5:15, 6:30, 8:00,
9:00, 10:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(R) G 1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 4:30,
10:10
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 1:40, 7:25
PETER RABBIT (PG) G 12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent 2:15, 5:10,
8:00, 10:30
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) AMC Independent 1:20,
4:20, 7:20, 10:15
12 STRONG (R) 9:45
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) AMC Independent 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:15
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent 12:50,
3:40, 6:50, 9:50
THE POST (PG-13) 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30
PHANTOM THREAD (R) AMC Independent 12:30,
3:30, 6:35, 9:30
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 2:00, 4:35, 7:05, 9:40
LADY BIRD (R) AMC Independent 1:45, 4:10, 6:30,
9:00
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent 1:55, 4:45, 7:45,
10:30
HOSTILES (R) AMC Independent 6:55
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) G 12:10, 2:35, 5:00,
7:30, 10:00
TILL THE END OF THE WORLD (NR) AMC Independent
12:00, 2:45
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
New England Aquarium, Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
www.neaq.org
CALL THEATER FOR SHOWTIMES
KENDALL SQUARE CINEMA
1 Kendall Square at 355 Binney St. 617-621-1202
5 6 G DOL DIG DSS
www.landmarktheatres.com
2018 OSCAR NOMINATED SHORT FILMS: ANIMATED (NR) 5 (1:30) 7:15
2018 OSCAR NOMINATED SHORT FILMS: LIVE
ACTION (NR) 5 (4:15) 9:25
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 5 (1:25, 4:05) 7:00, 9:40
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) 5 (1:05, 3:55) 6:45,
9:25
I, TONYA (R) 5 (1:20, 4:10) 7:05, 9:40
LADY BIRD (R) 5 9:50
THE POST (PG-13) 5 (1:15, 3:50) 6:30, 9:45
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 5 (1:10, 4:05) 7:00
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 (1:05, 3:45) 6:35, 9:15
LADY BIRD (R) 5 (12:55, 3:10, 5:20) 7:25
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 5 9:30
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 5 (3:25) 6:40, 9:30
FILM STARS DON'T DIE IN LIVERPOOL (R) 5
(12:55)
CHESTNUT HILL
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX
55 Boylston St.
http://www.showcasecinemas.com/
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:00
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 3:30, 9:30
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 3:30, 9:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:40,
3:00, 6:00, 9:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 11:40,
3:00, 6:00, 9:00
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 1:30, 4:30, 8:00, 10:40
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 1:30, 4:30, 8:00, 10:40
LADY BIRD (R) 6:30
LADY BIRD (R) 6:30
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 11:00, 2:00, 5:30, 8:30
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 11:00, 2:00, 5:30, 8:30
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 11:20, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
10:20
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 11:20, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30,
10:20
DANVERS
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL 20
100 Independence Way
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
www.amctheatres.com
COCO (PG) 11:15, 2:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 10:45, 1:30, 4:15,
7:15, 9:45
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:45, 6:45
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 11:45,
3:00, 6:45, 10:00
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:45
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 5:15, 8:15
FIFTY SHADES FREED: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(R) G 10:30, 1:20, 4:10, 7:00, 9:30
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 10:15,
1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:45
PETER RABBIT (PG) G 10:45, 11:45, 1:15, 2:15,
3:45, 4:45, 6:30, 7:30, 9:00, 10:00
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 10:00, 4:05, 10:05
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent 10:15,
1:15, 4:15, 7:10, 10:00
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) AMC Independent 1:15,
6:45
12 STRONG (R) 11:15, 6:20
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) AMC Independent 12:45, 3:30, 6:30, 9:15
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent 12:15,
3:15, 6:10, 9:00
THE POST (PG-13) 10:00, 12:45, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) AMC Independent 10:30,
4:15, 10:00
PHANTOM THREAD (R) AMC Independent 11:30,
3:00, 6:10, 9:15
WINCHESTER (PG-13) G 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:00,
9:30
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 10:15, 1:00, 3:30
MOLLY'S GAME (R) AMC Independent 10:30, 1:45
LADY BIRD (R) AMC Independent 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent 2:45, 9:45
HOSTILES (R) AMC Independent 6:20, 9:30
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) G 10:30, 1:15, 3:45,
6:30, 9:00
DEDHAM
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE
670 Legacy Place 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
(NR) 1:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:50, 6:25
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 12:55
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:45,
3:35, 6:30, 9:05
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 5:20,
7:40, 8:40, 10:20
HOSTILES (R) 9:35
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:25, 1:55, 4:35,
7:20, 9:40
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 1:00, 3:45, 6:35, 9:20
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 11:40,
3:20, 6:55, 10:00
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:25, 4:10, 7:05, 10:05
THE POST (PG-13) 1:15, 4:05, 6:50, 9:40
12 STRONG (R) 3:55, 7:00, 9:50
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 12:00, 3:00, 6:10, 9:15
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 11:20, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10,
9:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55
I, TONYA (R) 3:25, 10:10
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:15, 11:45, 1:45, 2:15, 4:15,
4:45, 6:45, 7:15, 9:10
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Pl. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG DSS
www.nationalamusements.com
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
(NR) 1:00
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 11:45
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 12:50, 6:50
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:25,
3:20, 6:25, 9:15
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:30, 1:10, 2:10, 3:50,
4:50, 6:40, 7:40, 9:20, 10:20
HOSTILES (R) 10:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 12:45, 3:30, 6:20,
9:00
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 1:30, 4:10, 7:00, 9:40
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:05,
3:25, 6:35, 9:50
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:35, 4:25, 7:15
THE POST (PG-13) 1:40, 4:20, 7:05, 9:55
12 STRONG (R) 12:00, 3:00, 6:10, 9:05
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 3:35, 9:35
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 4:40, 7:10, 9:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:55, 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 10:10
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) 2:05, 4:45, 7:20, 10:05
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:15, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:10
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM 16 WITH DINE-IN
THEATRES
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
www.amctheatres.com
COCO (PG) 12:30, 3:15
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:15, 4:15, 6:50,
9:35
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:00, 6:20
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:10,
3:20, 6:50, 10:00
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G 12:45, 1:30, 4:00, 4:30,
6:45, 7:30, 9:15, 10:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 4:10,
9:55
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE 3D (PG-13)
RealD 3D 1:20, 7:10
PETER RABBIT (PG) G 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:00, 9:30
PETER RABBIT (PG) G 1:00, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) AMC Independent 12:15,
6:20, 9:15
CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) AMC Independent 3:20,
9:50
12 STRONG (R) 9:15
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) AMC Independent 1:10,
4:20, 7:15, 10:05
THE POST (PG-13) 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20
PHANTOM THREAD (R) AMC Independent 12:15,
3:45, 9:45
PHANTOM THREAD (R) AMC Independent G 6:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) G 2:00, 4:45, 7:40, 10:05
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 3:20
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
ENCORE (NR) G 1:00, 6:30
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent 6:15
I, TONYA (R) AMC Independent 10:05
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) G 1:45, 4:30, 7:30,
10:00
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachussetts Ave. 781-861-6161
5 DOL DSS
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 3:30, 6:30
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 6:45
LADY BIRD (R) 4:00
LITTLETON
O'NEIL CINEMAS AT THE POINT
1208 Constitution Ave 978-506-5089
www.oneilcinemas.com
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 4:20
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 5 11:20, 2:20,
5:00, 7:25, 10:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 5
10:40, 1:20, 4:15, 7:00, 9:50
THE POST (PG-13) 5 11:10, 1:50, 4:40, 7:35, 10:20
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 5 1:15,
10:10
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 5 10:30, 7:10
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 5 11:00, 1:45, 4:25, 7:15,
10:00
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 5 11:50, 2:30, 5:10, 7:40,
10:05
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 5 10:50, 1:30, 4:10,
7:45, 10:25
PETER RABBIT (PG) 5 11:30, 2:00, 4:45, 6:50, 9:30
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
32 Reiss Ave 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
(NR) G 12:55
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 7:25
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 5:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:25,
4:35, 7:20, 10:25
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 10:40
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:00, 1:30, 4:20, 7:10,
9:50
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:55, 7:40,
10:20
HOSTILES (R) 9:55
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 12:00, 2:35, 5:10,
7:45, 10:30
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 11:10, 4:50, 7:30
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:05,
3:20, 6:50, 10:10
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 1:20, 4:10, 7:00
THE POST (PG-13) 4:25, 7:05, 10:00
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 11:55, 5:05, 7:35
12 STRONG (R) 1:55, 10:15
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 6:25, 9:40
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 11:20, 1:50, 4:30, 7:15,
9:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 12:25, 2:25, 2:55, 5:25, 7:55,
10:05, 10:35
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:15, 1:15, 1:45, 3:45, 4:15,
6:45, 9:10
MILLBURY
BLACKSTONE VALLEY 14: CINEMA DE LUX
70 Worcester Providence Turnpike 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS
www.showcasecinemas.com
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
ENCORE (NR) 1:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 11:50, 3:10
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:50,
3:45, 6:35, 9:35
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:30, 12:00, 1:45, 2:15,
2:45, 4:25, 4:55, 5:25, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:30, 10:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 11:30, 2:00, 4:30,
7:10, 9:40
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:30,
3:35, 6:55, 10:10
THE POST (PG-13) 1:00, 3:40, 6:30, 9:10
12 STRONG (R) 12:20, 3:20, 6:45, 9:45
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 11:45, 2:10
HOSTILES (R) 9:05
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:50,
10:15
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 12:15, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 6:40
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 6:50, 10:00
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) 4:40, 7:20, 9:50
PETER RABBIT (PG) 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25
NATICK
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - NATICK
1 Underprice Way 508-665-5525
5 8
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:20, 4:05, 6:50,
9:15
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 9:55
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 4:00, 6:55
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:50,
3:55, 7:00, 10:05
THE POST (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 7:20, 10:15
12 STRONG (R) 3:10, 6:05
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 12:45
HOSTILES (R) 9:00
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 11:20, 1:50, 4:30, 7:25,
9:55
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:35, 2:05, 2:35, 4:35, 7:05,
9:30, 10:00
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 12:05, 6:10
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 4:40, 7:45
ENPRESYON (NR) 11:30, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:45
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:15, 11:45, 1:45, 2:15, 4:15,
4:45, 6:45, 7:15, 9:10, 9:40
BILAL: A NEW BREED OF HERO (PG-13) 1:05
READING
SUNBRELLA IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S
FURNITURE - READING
50 Walkers Brook Dr. 781-944-9090
5 8
www.jordansimax.com
FIFTY SHADES FREED: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:00, 9:20
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE
565 Squire Rd. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG
https://www.showcasecinemas.com/
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
ENCORE (NR) 1:00
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) 12:15, 6:05
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 11:05, 1:35
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 4:30,
7:10, 10:10
MOLLY'S GAME (R) 12:20
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:20
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:00, 1:40, 4:20, 7:10,
9:50
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 7:40,
10:20
HOSTILES (R) 9:05
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 12:25, 3:10, 6:15,
8:55
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 3:55, 9:15
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:15,
3:30, 7:00, 10:15
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 12:40, 3:35, 6:30
INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG-13) 9:35
THE POST (PG-13) 12:30, 3:15, 6:10, 9:00
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 3:40, 9:30
12 STRONG (R) 7:20, 10:30
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 3:20, 6:50, 10:05
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 12:00, 2:35, 5:00, 7:30,
10:00
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:20, 11:50, 1:55, 2:25, 4:25,
4:55, 6:55, 7:25, 9:25, 9:55
COLAO (NR) 4:05, 6:20, 8:40
FOREVER MY GIRL (PG) 12:45, 3:30, 6:25
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:20, 3:45
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:15, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:10
LA BODA DE VALENTINA (R) 11:25, 2:05, 4:40, 7:35,
10:25
BILAL: A NEW BREED OF HERO (PG-13) 12:50, 6:35
PETER RABBIT (PG) 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:40
SOMERVILLE
SOMERVILLE THEATRE
55 Davis Square 617-625-5700
5 6 I DIG
http://somervilletheatre.com/
I, TONYA (R) 4:40, 7:15
LADY BIRD (R) 5:00, 7:40
PHANTOM THREAD (R) 4:30, 7:20
SCI-FI FEST PASS (NR) 5:00
THE POST (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30
TAUNTON
REGAL SILVER CITY GALLERIA 10
2 Galleria Mall Dr. Suite 2832 844-462-7342-452
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
www.REGmovies.com
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) (1:30) 4:30, 6:55, 9:30
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) G (1:00, 3:45) 6:30, 9:15
PETER RABBIT (PG) (1:15, 3:50) 6:15, 8:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) (1:20) 4:20, 7:10, 10:00
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) (12:50)
4:00, 6:50, 9:40
12 STRONG (R) (12:55) 4:00, 7:00, 9:55
DEN OF THIEVES (R) (12:45) 4:15, 6:45, 9:45
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) (1:10, 3:55) 7:05, 10:05
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) (1:05)
4:05, 7:15, 10:00
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) (1:25) 4:25, 7:25,
10:05
WALTHAM
www.jordansimax.com
EMBASSY CINEMA
FIFTY SHADES FREED: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE
(R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:00, 9:20
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS NORTH ATTLEBORO
640 South Washington St. 800-315-4000
5 6 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:05,
4:05, 7:15, 10:15
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:30, 1:45, 2:15, 4:25,
4:55, 7:00, 7:30, 10:00, 10:30
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:20, 4:10, 6:50,
9:35
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 12:45, 6:35
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:50,
4:00, 7:10, 10:20
THE POST (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:30
12 STRONG (R) 3:30, 9:20
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 12:00, 2:30
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:45,
10:10
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:45, 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 9:55
THE COMMUTER (PG-13) 5:00, 7:35, 10:25
DEN OF THIEVES (R) 12:30, 3:40, 6:45, 10:05
PETER RABBIT (PG) 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH
73 Mazzeo Dr. 800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: L'ELISIR D'AMORE
ENCORE (NR) 1:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 12:25,
3:30, 6:15, 9:05
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:30, 1:10, 1:30, 2:10,
3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 6:40, 7:10, 7:40, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20
16 Pine St. 781-736-7852
www.landmarktheatres.com
THE FLORIDA PROJECT (R) 5 (1:15, 4:10) 7:10
ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) 5 (1:00, 3:55)
6:55
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 5 (1:25, 4:20) 7:20
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 5 (1:20, 4:15) 7:15
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 5 (1:10, 4:05) 7:05
DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) 5 (1:05, 4:00) 7:00
WESTBOROUGH
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
25 Middlesex Canal Pkwy 800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
www.nationalamusements.com
PADDINGTON 2 (PG) 2:00
JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) 1:05,
3:55, 6:55, 9:35
FIFTY SHADES FREED (R) 11:30, 1:00, 1:40, 2:10,
3:40, 4:10, 4:50, 6:30, 7:00, 7:40, 9:05, 9:40, 10:20
HOSTILES (R) 9:50
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) 1:25, 4:00, 6:35,
9:15
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
(R) 4:40, 7:30, 10:25
MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE (PG-13) 12:00,
3:20, 6:40, 10:00
THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) 12:55, 3:50, 6:50
THE POST (PG-13) 1:35, 4:25, 7:15, 10:05
12 STRONG (R) 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:15
THE 15:17 TO PARIS (PG-13) 11:20, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10,
9:45
WINCHESTER (PG-13) 11:55, 2:20, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10
I, TONYA (R) 12:50, 3:35, 6:20, 9:10
PETER RABBIT (PG) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:10
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
Continued from preceding page
peppers and not enough pieces of cauliflower. The sauce is so good you’ll
slurp it long after the veggies are gone.
Dunk a triangle of naan into the plastic
carton to extract every bit.
Samosas are great, too. So often
leaden, greasy vessels for grayish
spuds, here they’re light and fluffy —
airy little footballs of spicy potatoes
and peas (or ground lamb). Dip them
in a thimble of tangy mint chutney.
My kids get chicken pakora, the Indian version of chicken nuggets, more
or less. The fritters are dipped in a
spicy chickpea batter; again, the batter
T h e
is thin and crispy, not dense and
greasy. There’s actual chicken meat in
there, too, not pulverized mush.
Do you ever feel deceived by your
vindaloo? So often it’s overly buttery,
overloaded with potato chunks, and
short on actual meat. Not here. We go
for the lamb vindaloo, which has generous wedges of tender lamb, burbling
in a thin, reddish, vinegar-heavy sauce.
The other standout is baingan
bhartha, a soft, roasted mashed eggplant dish that looks like baby food.
Don’t let that deter you: This is an aromatic symphony of tomato, ginger,
and garlic, with fresh pops of peas and
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G7
coriander for textural intrigue. Swipe
the mixture across your naan (just the
right blend of flabby and crisp), roll it
up, and bite into it like a sandwich.
Last tip: Order a tub of sweet mango chutney. It’s a condiment, but you’ll
want to eat it solo, with a spoon, like
ice cream — possibly in front of your
fridge at 11 p.m.
There is no atmosphere at Little India Express. But food this good should
be devoured in the privacy of one’s
own home.
Kara Baskin can be reached at
kara.baskin@globe.com.
JOANNE RATHE/GLOBE STAFF
Gobi Manchurian at Little India Express in Lexington.
Trying to build a business and a life together
uCOUPLES
Continued from Page G1
gaming managers, who top the scale at
52.9 percent. (Bartenders beware: The
occupation has the second-highest divorce rate, 52.7 percent.)
Meg Cadoux Hirshberg, author of
“For Better or For Work: A Survival
Guide for Entrepreneurs and Their
Families,” is someone who knows the
challenges well. She is married to Gary
Hirshberg, founder of yogurt company
Stonyfield. “Starting any business puts
stress on the family in ways they can
predict, like finances, travel, the way it
chews up your time, the inevitable setbacks any business has,” she says.
“Then there are also the challenges
they don’t prepare themselves for, because they’re not aware they are going
to happen. A lot involve the personal
relationship and strains on that.”
So is starting a food business together romantic? She laughs. “That’s a
loaded question. I think it’s more romantic in retrospect than it is actually
going through the process.”
When we spoke with local couples
involved in food businesses, what they
had to say was remarkably consistent.
And the lessons they learned in business apply to relationships too.
Communication is key (and constant)
“It is definitely not pretty to start
anything in food, and especially not together,” says Melissa Stefanini, who
with boyfriend Sebastian Galvez is behind empanadas-and-condiments
company Buenas. “It’s not easy, just as
a businessperson, and then you throw
on top that you’re supposed to love
and cherish this other person.”
The two, better known as Nini and
Bass, respectively, started making empanadas, chimichurri, and the spicy
Chilean sauce pebre when they lived in
LA. Then Nini, who was a copywriter
at an ad agency, got a job offer in Boston. “My boyfriend needs a job too,”
she told the company. “If you let us sell
our food in your agency, I’ll come.” Apparently someone in HR liked empanadas.
That was four years ago. Since then,
the business has expanded, with breweries and restaurants hosting pop-ups,
and stores such as Formaggio, Central
Bottle, and American Provisions selling its wares. “Our bigger picture is
trying to build the whole product line
to be the Goya of first-generation kids,”
Nini says. Next up is a Buenas storefront, set to open in May as part of
Somerville’s upcoming Bow Market.
It hasn’ t always been easy. “It
would turn into big blow-up arguments about a sauce, which is dumb,”
Nini says. Now the two are more able
to say, “ ‘I’m not annoyed at you, I’m
annoyed at all this other stuff.’ Communication is so important. You have
to be even better about communicating.”
As Lim says: “You never stop talking about work, so you had better like
your work, and you had better like
talking with your partner about work.
Those are all very different things,
right?”
Respect each other’s strengths
Jenn and Matt Mason had successful careers. She worked in startups; he
is a software engineer. But the plan
was always to do something together.
Enter Curds & Co., the Brookline
cheese shop they opened in August.
He continues in his full-time job while
taking on things like accounting for
Curds & Co., while she devotes herself
to the store. Their daughters, who are
almost 17 and 18, sometimes work
there, too.
“He works from home and holds
down the fort,” Jenn Mason says of
Matt. “He has been the backbone to
this little cheesy dream. In some ways
we are total opposites, and in some
ways we are exactly the same. He’s
very structured; he doesn’t throw
paint on the wall to see if it sticks. I’m
a trained artist and have attention deficit disorder. He can slow me down. He
knows how to be an anchor. What
we’re trying to do here needs a very
creative and chaotic mind to always be
thinking of things, but it needs a solid,
stable person to hold that in check.”
The same is true at Buenas, says Nini. “We both see what we’re good at
and what we bring to the table. If you
LANE TURNER/GLOBE STAFF
‘We both see what
we’re good at and what
we bring to the table.
. . . It gives us an
appreciation of that,
and I guess you could
say that’s the romantic
side.’
MELISSA STEFANINI, who with
boyfriend Sebastian Galvez started the
empanadas-and-condiments company
Buenas
weren’t here and I weren’t here, this
would never work. It gives us an appreciation of that, and I guess you
could say that’s the romantic side.”
Getting rich is not the real goal
When Jen Scott and Chris Hsi started having kids, it made them rethink
their corporate lifestyle. “If I’m taking
time away from my family, is it something I’m super-passionate about?”
Scott wondered.
They were, however, super-passionate about wine. Now they have three
kids and two businesses: Taste Wine
Bar & Cafe and wine store Common
Vines, located across the street from
each other downtown. “I’ve never experienced such extreme ups and
downs, but at the same time it’s the
most rewarding and fulfilling thing
we’ve ever done except having kids,”
Scott says.
And it’s really the kids they did it
for. They wanted a lifestyle that would
embrace the whole family, she says.
They could all go on business trips together. They could pass along the
things they value and appreciate. “It
was that romantic idea about this fam-
ily lifestyle. We’re not trying to be rich.
That’s not what this is about. We want
this to feel like a family for everyone
who works with us. It’s not about
building wealth; it’s about building a
lifestyle and supporting the people
who work with us, too.”
But stability is important
Hsi took a leave from the corporate
world when the businesses were new,
but now he plans to return for a while.
You need “someone who’s stable and
someone who’s building the dream,”
Scott says.
Nini’s copywriting career enabled
her and Bass to launch Buenas; she
continues to work on a freelance basis.
“The corporate job was the thing. If I
didn’t have that, I don’t think we
would have been able to start,” she
says. “It kept us going. When you first
start a business, especially food, it’s
not like you’re making any money. On
top of it, we do wholesale, so it’s even
less until you hit volume and scale. If it
wasn’t for the job, there would have
been no way.”
Aaron Cohen runs Gracie’s Ice
Cream in Somerville, named for his
daughter; he and wife Jessie Ratey also
have a son. Cohen also founded the
long-running Bacon & Beer Festival,
along with a series of popups. While he
dreams up things to do with Marshmallow Fluff and sugar cereal, Ratey is
a senior program officer who works
with a family foundation on educational grantmaking. “The weirdos that
open businesses need a normal to not
open businesses, and the normals
need a weirdo,” Cohen says. “It’s like
the Paula Abdul song.” (That would be
“Opposites Attract.”) “Then someone
will have health insurance and a
steady paycheck, and someone else
can have dreams.”
Flexibility is, too
“Even the irresponsible decisions
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
‘What we’re trying to
do here needs a very
creative and chaotic
mind to always be
thinking of things, but
it needs a solid, stable
person to hold that in
check.’
JENN MASON, speaking about her
husband, Matt, and their Brookline
cheese shop Curds & Co.
I’m making, I’m trying to make pretty
responsibly,” Cohen says. He does worry about money and whether he’s earning enough. On the other hand, he
says, “I do 95 percent of the pickups
and drop-offs for daycare; on Thursdays I stop working at 3:55.”
Deena Jalal and Hin Tang are also
in the scoops business: They founded
FoMu, the plant-based ice cream company. Before that, they both had corporate jobs; the children of entrepreneurs, they had seen how hard their
parents worked, and they wanted a
more traditional schedule for their
family. “But it became really apparent
when we wanted to start a family that
the flexibility we thought we would
have wasn’t there, and the passion
wasn’t there. If you are going to give
up time away from your kids, you want
to be doing it for a good reason, for
something you love and you think is
adding value to yourself, your kids,
your community,” Jalal says. They now
have three sons, the youngest 6 weeks
old.
There are compromises involved
when both members of a couple leave
behind financially stable jobs. From
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
A heart-shaped triple cream cheese from Vermont’s Champlain Valley Creamery, at Curds & Co.
time to time, Jalal and Tang have wondered whether one of them should return to a career that comes with health
care. But every time they thought
about it, they remembered all the
hours they used to work for someone
else, at something they didn’t feel passionate about. “We work 24 hours a
day, but if we need to pick the kids up
at 3, we’re able to make those decisions
for ourselves and feel great about it,”
Jalal says.
Meaning comes in moments
“We still struggle,” says Jenn Mason
of Curds & Co. “I think we just had our
slowest day ever. . . . Then you just
have the sweetest people walk in and
thank you for opening. I work hard not
to cry when people come in and say
nice things. A little kid came in and
saw the display about how cheese is
made, and the monger sat down and
answered all his questions. And I get
to give people cheese every day!”
Entrepreneurial couples often fall
into the trap of tending to business
now and putting off life for later, says
Hirshberg. “That might be travel or
something as serious as having a child.
You delay these life experiences at your
potential peril. It’s really important to
live life and carve out moments together.” In Stonyfield’s early days, sometimes she and Gary Hirshberg were
too busy to do anything but take a
walk down the block and back together. They would leave their cellphones
behind and talk. “It was a small thing,
but it was huge,” she says. “I noticed a
difference when we didn’t do it.”
Challenges can be romantic
Lim and Kudayarova closed their
restaurants. Both are now at startups
— he is consulting and working in advertising, she is working in business
operations. In the annals of stressful
life changes, he says, “closing a business is usually up there, and anything
like that is going to test your relationship. We’re still married. We still have
two dogs. We even did another pop-up
recently. So whatever happened seems
to have been survivable.”
Says Jenn Mason: “If only somebody could tell you that you would
have exactly 20.5 fights or 13 money
breakdowns, but there’s no way you
can do that. You’ll feel guilty; he’ll feel
tired. How it affects your family is never what you planned, so how are you
going to plan for what you haven’t
planned for? We’ve also renovated a
house together, he taught me to drive a
stick and play chess, and we still are
really happily married. Life’s too short
not to follow your dream.”
So yes, says Hirshberg. Starting a
food (or other) business together can
be romantic. “If we interpret the word
‘romance’ to mean [in part] this feeling of deep reward and connection to
your spouse because of this common
enterprise you’re engaged in, I think
that’s very possible.”
Devra First can be reached at
devra.first@globe.com. Follow her on
Twitter @devrafirst.
T h e
G8
B o s t o n
G l o b e
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
W E D N E S D A Y, F E B R U A R Y 1 4 , 2 0 1 8
ASK AMY
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
Parents wonder if drunk gran is fit sitter
NEILSON BARNARD/GETTY IMAGES FOR HILARITY FOR CHARITY
Michelle Wolf to host
her own talk show on Netflix
Netflix is continuing to make efforts to take flight in the talkshow space. Joel McHale and David Letterman are already chatting
for the streamer, and now comes news that Michelle Wolf will be
next.
Wolf, from “The Daily Show With Trevor Noah,” will host her
own half-hour weekly show, which will launch later this year. She
generated excitement for her first stand-up special, the cleverly titled “Nice Lady,” which is available on HBO, and she opened for
pre-scandal Louis C.K. on tour in 2016. My favorite Wolf credit:
She played Ruth Gaydar Ginsburg on “Late Night With Seth Meyers,” where she has done many segments.
What will the still-untitled show be like? Will it be political?
“You can expect the types of jokes my former bosses would tell me
we couldn’t do on TV,” Wolf says in a statement light on details.
Q. My husband and I are new parents of a
5-month-old son. Over a month ago we
left the baby with my in-laws for a few
hours to have a date night. When we returned that night, my mother-in-law, who
was supposed to be the baby’s primary
caretaker for the evening, was drunk (well
past the point of being tipsy).
I have seen my MIL drunk countless
times, but I thought she would refrain
from drinking while taking care of a needy
infant.
I was horrified, as was my husband.
Unfortunately, my husband does not want
to make any “waves” with his mother, and
will not discuss it with her.
Now, they keep asking to watch the baby again. I’m running out of excuses for
why we don’t want to leave him with
them.
My husband wants to give them another chance, and even suggested an overnight visit! The idea of something happening due to their actions is causing me a
tremendous amount of anxiety.
Any suggestions on how to address this
tactfully? Am I being too sensitive in assuming she should not drink around a baby?
SOBER SALLY
A. In my opinion, your baby is too young
for an overnight visit (except in an emergency) with anyone other than his parents.
Given your (valid) concerns, you
should not leave this to your husband to
handle. He is already telling you that he
can’t/won’t confront his mother, or even
ask her about this.
Your son cannot take care of or advo-
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9:00pm
Recent bird sightings on Cape Cod (as
of Feb. 5) as reported to the Massachusetts
Audubon Society.
An extremely late rose-breasted grosbeak appeared at a feeder in North Truro,
one of just three ever recorded for New
England in February.
An Atlantic puffin and a Pacific loon
were seen at Race Point in Provincetown,
where other sightings included 12
dovekies, 22 common murres, 9 thick-
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Easy Yoga: The
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Dateline (CC) HD
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Grantchester (CC): Sidney is
distracted. HD TV-14
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WBPX Law & Order: An ex- Law & Order (CC)
ION con is run over.
HD TV-14
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Deadly Motives HD Dr. G: Med/Exam
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HD TV-14
PREMIUM CABLE
Tim Burton's The Corpse Bride (9:20) Table 19 (CC): Wedding (10:50) Yes Man
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guests party hard. PG-13
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(5:50) Miss
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Encore
Ash vs.
(7:11) ★★ Kiss the Girls (1997): Doctors
(9:09) ★★★★ Psycho (1960): A murder at Ash vs.
Evil Dead Evil Dead
track a serial killer. HD R
an eerie motel. HD TV-PG
★★★ High Fidelity (2000) (CC): A man
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(6:15) ★★★ What
About Bob?
examines his love life. HD TV-14-DLSV
on a protégé. HD PG-13
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HD R
A clerk poses as a fiancée.
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(2016) HD TV-14
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(CC) HD R
Outlander (CC): Jamie and
Claire reunite. HD TV-MA
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The Mist
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Certain Women (2016) (CC): Lawyer
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(9:02) ★★★★ The Lion King (1994) (CC): The 700 Club (CC)
HD TV-G
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Peppa
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5
Q. I am a woman in my mid-60s. I was sexually abused by an older brother from the
ages of about 8 to 11, although it may have
occurred when I was much younger, also.
I’ve pushed it to the back of my mind all
these years; never told anyone except my
gynecologist and a therapist a while ago.
Despite this, I was able to maintain a
reasonable relationship with this brother.
Now he is quite sick and my two younger brothers expect me to join them in taking care of him. Quite simply, I resent being guilted into doing this.
He has three grown children who live
fairly close by, but apparently, they all
think I should step up to the plate alongside them.
I am hesitant to tell anyone in the family because I don’t want to destroy their
perceptions of our brother, but how can I
handle this?
HEARTLESS SISTER
A. Your siblings may lead you to the proverbial guilt buffet, but you are responsible for your own choice. Don’t partake.
Here’s how you respond: “I know that
you want me to do this, but I’m just not
able to.” Don’t say anything more, unless
you want to.
It sounds as if you have managed your
response to your brother’s abuse in a balanced way. If this current change in his
status has shaken loose some worrying
symptoms, you should definitely seek
more professional help.
Q. I was in the same situation as “Baffled
Bride,” who had married a widower, and
his adult children completely rejected her.
This happened to me! Both my husband and I lost our spouses. My children
accepted him, but his children rejected
me. They seemed to hold a perception that
we were fighting for control of their father.
I guess I understand this, but I’ll never
understand my husband allowing it.
SAD
A. This rejection seems fairly common. Acceptance definitely takes time, but it
should not be presented as optional.
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
askamy@amydickinson.com.
BIRD SIGHTINGS
Wednesday February 14, 2018
2
cate for himself. You are his mother. It is
time to step up and be his advocate in this
— and every — way. If you feel the child’s
grandfather is incapable of being completely sober and responsible (to compensate for your mother-in-law’s drinking),
then yes — you should speak with your
mother-in-law directly and respectfully
about this.
You should say to her, “I need to be
honest about my concerns with you babysitting. When we left him with you before
and returned to pick him up, I noticed
that you had been drinking. I understand
that you might want to have a glass of
wine with dinner, but this makes me very
nervous when you have the baby. Are you
willing not to have alcohol while the baby
is with you?”
Don’t state this with judgment or condemnation. You are speaking to her as an
adult, and simply asking if she would be
willing to comply in order to minimize
any risk. Given the circumstances, it is a
perfectly reasonable thing to ask.
billed murres, 850 razorbills, 52 blacklegged kittiwakes, 42 Iceland gulls, and
144 snow buntings.
Sightings in Eastham included a bald
eagle, a Northern harrier, and 6 Eastern
meadowlarks at Fort Hill and a Eurasian
wigeon, 8 ring-necked ducks, and 5 ruddy
ducks at Herring Pond.
Other sightings around the Cape included 2 American pipits at Scusset Beach
in Sandwich, a snow goose in Hyannis, a
marsh wren at Crosby Beach in Brewster,
5 Northern pintail and a snowy owl on
Morris Island in Chatham, a chipping
sparrow elsewhere in Brewster, and a ruby-crowned kinglet in Wellfleet.
For more information about bird
sightings or to report sightings, call
the Massachusetts Audubon Society
at 781-259-8805 or go to
www.massaudubon.org.
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love and betrayal. HD TV-14-DL NEW
HD TV-14-V NEW
Forensic Forensic
Grande Cosmetics
Killing Fields: A DNA
profile. TV-14-LV
★★ Meet the Fockers (2004) (CC): "Meet the
Parents" sequel. HD TV-14-DLSV
★★ Holiday (2006): Two women trade houses. HD TV-PG-DS
Married/Sight
Love to Kill (2008): Gold-digging killer.
Good Marriage (2015) (CC) HD TV-14-DLV
All In/Hayes Live.
Maddow NEW
Last Word Live. HD The 11th Hour Live.
Catfish/TV Show
Catfish/TV Show
Catfish NEW
Catfish/TV Show
Locked Up (CC) HD Locked Up Abroad Locked Up Abroad Locked Up Abroad
TV-14 NEW
HD TV-14 NEW
HD TV-14 NEW
(CC) HD TV-14
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
NCIS (CC) TV-PG
Cops
Cops
(11:06) MythBusters
Criminal Minds (CC)
A murder in Seattle.
★★★ Hitch TV-PG
Love & Hip Hop
Meddler
(9:58) ★★ Jersey Girl TV-PG
Love After Lockup
Love After Lockup
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