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2018-02-14 The Washington Post

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
. $2
FBI chief
rebuts
Porter
timeline
Israeli police
recommend
charges for
Netanyahu
Premier suspected of
doing political favors for
gifts, positive coverage
CONTRADICTS
WHITE HOUSE
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND R UTH E GLASH
Turmoil over aide grows,
with Kelly at the center
jerusalem — Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
should be indicted in two corruption cases on suspicion of accepting bribes, fraud and breach of
trust, police recommended Tuesday, ramping up pressure on the
leader who has served more than
a decade in office.
After more than a year of
investigations, Israeli police
said they believe there is sufficient evidence against the prime
minister to indict him on suspicion of giving political favors for
gifts worth around $280,000 in
total and of cutting a deal with a
newspaper publisher for favorable coverage. Israel’s attorney
general must now decide whether to proceed with charges, a
process that could take months.
The announcement will amplify calls by Netanyahu’s opponents for him to resign and will
probably complicate his ability to
govern at a time when security
officials are warning of an increasing likelihood of war on the
country’s northern border and
impending economic collapse in
the Gaza Strip.
In a televised address to the
nation, Netanyahu said Tuesday
NETANYAHU CONTINUED ON A12
When you get
to DCA early,
but your flight
is at BWI
BY
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
A SHLEY P ARKER,
P HILIP R UCKER
AND J OSH D AWSEY
BY
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly still has the president’s confidence, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said.
Russia is targeting 2018 midterms, top spies warn
BY E LLEN N AKASHIMA
AND S HANE H ARRIS
The nation’s top intelligence
chiefs were united Tuesday in
declaring that Russia is continuing efforts to disrupt the U.S.
political system and is targeting
the 2018 midterm elections, following its successful operation to
sow discord in the most recent
presidential campaign.
Their assessment stands in
contrast to President Trump, who
has repeatedly voiced skepticism
of Russian meddling in the 2016
election.
At a Senate Intelligence Com-
At hearing, united
assessment runs counter
to Trump’s skepticism
mittee hearing on worldwide
threats, Democrats demanded to
know what the intelligence community is doing to counter Russia’s actions and whether Trump
has given explicit directions to do
so.
“We cannot confront this
threat, which is a serious one,
without a whole-of-government
response when the leader of the
government continues to deny
that it exists,” said Sen. Angus
King (I-Maine).
The
disconnect
between
Trump and his senior-most intelligence advisers has raised concerns that the U.S. government
will not be able to mount an
effective plan to beat back Russian influence operations in the
upcoming midterm elections.
And Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats said there is
“no single agency in charge” of
blocking Russian meddling, an
admission that drew the ire of
Democrats.
“The fact that we don’t have
clarity about who’s in charge
means, I believe, we don’t have a
full plan,” said Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.), the vice chairman of
the committee, which is conducting an investigation into Russian
interference in the 2016 election.
He also said that social media
companies, whose platforms
have been fertile turf for Russian
bots seeking to stoke divisions
among Americans, have been
“slow to recognize the threat” and
that “they’ve still got more work
to do.”
Coats said that Russia will
THREATS CONTINUED ON A9
Trade a Lexus for a SIM card? The best digits cost a mint.
S TEVE H ENDRIX
In Iraq, prestige is a phone number away
Amid the usual queries at the
information counter at Reagan
National Airport — Where’s the
bathroom? Where’s the Cinnabon? Where’s my gate? — Leanne
Omland gets a version of this
whopper about once a day:
Where’s my airport?
It often falls to Omland to
break the bad news to someone
who has stumbled into the dark
side of having three major airports serving one city: (1) You are
at the wrong one. (2) You are in
for the taxi ride of your life.
“Their faces just fall,” said
Omland, a Travelers Aid manager at National. “It happens every
single day.”
Having a super-abundance of
airports is considered a big-city
perk in Washington, as in New
York, London and other major
hubs. But with greater choice
comes a greater chance that you
will find yourself at, say, National
Airport while your flight is
boarding at one of the other two,
Washington Dulles International
or Baltimore-Washington International Marshall.
It happens to all kinds of
customers, according to the airport helpers, travel agents and
In Iraq, owning this special
item can grease the skids in
business, get a politician to stand
at attention and even inspire
affection in a sweetheart.
This key that opens so many
doors is a cellphone SIM card.
But not just any SIM card. It
must be “distinguished,” associated with a phone number considered prestigious because it has a
distinctive or beautiful series of
digits. Say, for instance, a string
of sevens or zeros, or a repeating
pattern of numerals.
The marketplace for these
modest pieces of plastic inside
phones, which connect them to a
network, can rival that of gold
and precious stones — with
trades in the thousands and tens
of thousands of dollars.
And
while
this
market emerged about a decade
ago, a newfound optimism in
Iraq’s future after the recent
defeat of the Islamic State in Iraq
AIRPORTS CONTINUED ON A16
PHONES CONTINUED ON A13
The White House struggled
Tuesday to contain a widening
crisis over its handling of domestic violence allegations against a
senior official, as it reeled after
sworn testimony by the FBI chief
directly contradicted what President Trump’s aides had presented
as the official version of events.
FBI Director Christopher A.
Wray told the Senate Intelligence
Committee that the bureau had
completed a background report
on then-staff secretary Rob Porter
last July and closed out the case
entirely last month. Wray’s account is at odds with White
House claims that the investigation required for Porter’s security
clearance was “ongoing” until he
left his job last week, after his two
ex-wives publicly alleged physical
and emotional abuse.
The latest bout of turbulence is
exacerbated by the administration’s reputation, earned over 13
chaotic months, for flouting institutional norms and misrepreKELLY CONTINUED ON A6
2 visions for
health care
collide in
Pittsburgh
Patients feel squeezed as
hospital operator, insurer
enter each other’s realms
BY T AMER E L- G HOBASHY
AND M USTAFA S ALIM
IN BAGHDAD
BY
ALEX POTTER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
An Iraqi man talks on his phone while stuck in traffic in Baghdad. Many Iraqis will pay a premium for
a number with a distinctive series of digits, such as a string of zeros, to project power and influence.
IN THE NEWS
THE WORLD
THE NATION
DAVID RAMOS/GETTY IMAGES
Back on top Shaun White takes gold in the
halfpipe at the PyeongChang Games, his third
Olympic win in the snowboarding event. D1
Palestinian poster child The trial of a teenager
arrested after slapping two Israeli soldiers
could highlight rights concerns in Israel. A10
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
pittsburgh — Two health-care
The faculty at Michigan State University
voted no confidence in
the board of trustees after the sexual-abuse
scandal involving a
sports doctor there. A2
A potentially powerful
new antibiotic has been
discovered in soil rather
than grown in a petri
dish. A2
The obedience title is
the Westminster dog
show’s newest and least
glitzy honor, but it is
one that enthusiasts insist is central to the
show dog world. A3
The Education Department said it is no
longer investigating civil
rights complaints from
transgender students
over school bathrooms. A4
Summer Zervos awaits
a judge’s ruling on
whether her case against
Donald Trump, who she
says sexually assaulted
her, can proceed. A4
Sen. Bob Corker
(R-Tenn.) may not retire after all. Republicans say he is close to
launching a reelection
bid. A8
Democrats’ streak of
victories in special elections continued with a
flipped statehouse seat
in Florida. A8
Secretary of State Rex
Tillerson urged governments and investors to
help rebuild Iraq or risk
seeing a return of the Islamic State. A11
South Africa’s ruling
party called for the resignation of President
Jacob Zuma. A12
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange lost a second bid to quash a British arrest warrant and
end his stay at Ecuador’s
embassy in London. A12
THE ECONOMY
In an annual letter, Bill
and Melinda Gates addressed tough questions
about their foundation’s
work. A14
Workers’ lack of access
to paid sick time is giving the flu an extra
punch in the United
States. A15
juggernauts are locked in a battle
for patients in Western Pennsylvania that could foretell the future of
American health care.
On one side is UPMC, a health
system that built its brand on
cutting-edge research and university-affiliated hospitals. On the
other is Highmark Health, best
known as one of the country’s
biggest health insurers.
They could be mirror images of
each other, flipped upside down.
UPMC started out in the hospital
business, then created its own
health insurance plan and built a
$20 billion-a-year enterprise.
Highmark,
which
reported
$18.2 billion in revenue last year,
announced in 2011 that it would
branch from insurance into hospitals.
In response, UPMC threatened
to stop accepting Highmark insurance. Agreements and state interHEALTH CONTINUED ON A6
Inside
FOOD
THE REGION
Dear to our hearts
Two Red Line stations
will close for 45 days
amid major work that
will affect almost every
line this year, the transit
agency said. B1
Maryland Gov. Larry
Hogan signed a bill allowing rape victims to
sue to terminate the parental rights of their attackers. B1
An overhaul of electricity regulation by the
Virginia House included
an amendment to bar
utilities from charging
ratepayers twice for
costly projects. B1
Waitresses who call you
“hon,” licorice and
individual egg pans. E1
ST YLE
Hot (but not too)
Audiobook actors try to
convey emotions but not
sound like porn stars. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A14
COMICS........................................C7
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 71
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
6 8 4 0
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
A potentially powerful new antibiotic is discovered in dirt
BY
S ARAH K APLAN
The modern medical era began
when an absent-minded British
scientist named Alexander Fleming returned from vacation to find
that one of the petri dishes he
forgot to put away was covered in a
bacteria-killing mold. He had discovered penicillin, the world’s
first antibiotic.
Ninety years later, the world
faces an antibiotic crisis. Superbugs have evolved resistance to
dozens of drugs, leading to infections that are increasingly difficult to treat. Global deaths from
antibiotic-resistant infections are
predicted to hit 10 million a year
by 2050. So in labs around the
world, scientists are racing to cultivate new microbe-destroying
molecules.
With due respect to Fleming,
microbiologist Sean Brady thinks
it’s time to shift tactics. Instead of
growing antibiotics in a petri dish,
he hopes to find them in the
ground.
“Every place you step, there’s
10,000 bacteria, most of which
we’ve never seen,” said Brady, an
associate professor at Rockefeller
University in New York. Many of
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
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U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson presides at a
status conference in U.S. v. Manafort. Last year, former
Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his former
aide Rick Gates were indicted on charges including
conspiracy. Visit washingtonpost.com/politics for more.
12:10 p.m.
Cardinal Donald Wuerl, archbishop of Washington,
celebrates Ash Wednesday Mass at St. Matthew’s
Cathedral to mark the start of Lent. For developments, visit
washingtonpost.com/local.
5:30 p.m.
A ceremony marking the bicentennial of Frederick
Douglass’s birth is hosted at the Capitol Visitor Center by
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.); Rep.
Cedric L. Richmond (D-La.), the chair of the Congressional
Black Caucus; and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.).
Visit washingtonpost.com/politics for details.
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these bacteria produce molecules
that haven’t been studied before.
“Our idea is, there’s this reservoir of antibiotics out in the environment we haven’t accessed yet,”
Brady said.
In a study published Monday in
the journal Nature Microbiology,
he and his colleagues report the
discovery of a new class of antibiotic extracted from unknown microorganisms living in the soil.
This class, which they call malacidins, kills several superbugs —
including the dreaded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) — without making
them develop resistance.
You won’t find this antibiotic at
your pharmacy next week, Brady
cautioned. It takes years for a novel molecule to be developed, tested and approved for human use.
But its discovery is proof of a
powerful principle, he said: A
world of potentially useful biodiversity is still waiting to be discovered.
Most of the drugs that kill bacteria come from other bacteria.
For example, streptomycin, which
has been used to treat the microbes that cause tuberculosis and
plague, is produced by the bacterium Streptomyces griseus. (The
microbe was originally found in
the dirt of a New Jersey farm field,
though the antibiotic research
was conducted using cell cultures.)
Bacteria have been fighting one
another for billions of years — far,
far longer than humans have been
around — so it’s hardly surprising
that they have evolved all the best
weapons. Yet the vast majority of
these microbes don’t grow well
under controlled laboratory conditions, making them difficult to
study.
“Maybe, using that simple culture-based approach, we’ve
missed most of the chemistry that
are produced by bacteria,” Brady
said.
Metagenomics, techniques that
allow all the genetic material in a
sample to be sequenced en masse,
let researchers study microbes
where they live.
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sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
BY S IMON D . S CHUSTER
AND S USAN S VRLUGA
east lansing, mich. — Faculty
at Michigan State University issued an emphatic vote of no confidence in the board of trustees
Tuesday in the wake of a sexual
abuse scandal that rocked the
school.
At an emergency meeting, the
Faculty Senate voted overwhelmingly — 61 to 4 — that it lacked
confidence in the trustees, with
results greeted by loud applause.
The public university has been in
turmoil since scores of young
women accused an MSU sports
medicine doctor of molesting
them.
The faculty cannot force board
members out. But with a vote of
no confidence, the impact is immediate and deep, said Sean
McKinniss, who is co-writing a
book on academic governance: a
loss of legitimacy for both the
board and the interim president
whose appointment triggered the
faculty vote.
“Unless you take a moral stand,
you give tacit agreement by your
silence,” Robert LaDuca, a professor of chemistry who is a faculty
leader, said before the meeting.
“The board has been leading from
behind, in my opinion, in this
whole process.” He compared the
university to a corporation that
has had a catastrophic failure and
needs new leaders to move the
organization forward, “rather
than the entrenched and, to be
honest, myopic leadership that
got us into this crisis and damaged untold numbers of lives.
“Speaking for myself, I don’t
see what moral credibility they
have to lead this university forward.”
It is rare for faculty to vote no
confidence in a board of trustees,
according to two researchers who
CORY MORSE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Larry Nassar, the former Michigan State University sports-medicine and USA Gymnastics
doctor, has been sentenced to decades in prison for sexually abusing patients.
study and track such matters.
The scandal involving Larry
Nassar, who had been an MSU
doctor and team physician with
USA Gymnastics, forced the ouster of longtime university president Lou Anna Simon last month,
with public outrage intensifying
as victims spoke out in court,
many saying their complaints
had been ignored.
Victims continue to come forward: Since mid-January, the
Michigan State police department has gotten more than 60
criminal reports against Nassar.
That brings the total as of Feb. 5 to
more than 190 reports filed since
September 2016, after the Indianapolis Star published an investigative story about Nassar.
The former university physician was sentenced to many decades in prison.
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making malacidins. When applied to cuts in the skin of MRSAinfected rats, the molecule successfully sterilized the wounds.
The bacterium didn’t show signs
of resistance, even after three
weeks of exposure.
According to Brady, malacidins
interfere with bacteria’s ability to
build their cell walls.
He and his colleagues don’t
know what species the molecules
come from, but they don’t need to
— they already have the genetic
blueprint for building it. “The effort now is to scale it,” he said.
Two years ago, Brady launched
a company called Lodo Therapeutics, which aims to accelerate the
discoveries and produce new
medications.
Brady is not the only scientist
with this idea. Researchers elsewhere are using metagenomics to
seek out new antibiotics in ocean
water and insect guts. Meanwhile,
the same technique has been applied to urban sewage and polluted lakes to reveal the vast extent of
antibiotic resistance.
Faculty votes no confidence in trustees at MSU
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For this study, Brady’s team extracted DNA from hundreds of soil
samples contributed by citizen
scientists across the country and
then sorted through the material
in search of interesting sequences.
They were looking specifically
for a gene associated with the
production of calcium-dependent
antibiotics — molecules that attack bacterial cells, but only when
calcium is around. It is thought
that the existence of such an “onoff” switch may make it harder for
microbes to evolve resistance. Because of this, the gene for calcium
dependence might serve as a flag
for a much longer sequence controlling the production of antibiotics — much the same way that
coming across instructions for
making crust might flag for cookbook readers that they’ve found a
recipe for pie.
Having identified a sequence
containing
the
calcium-dependence gene, the researchers injected it into a microbe that can be cultured. Soon
enough, those microbes were
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
official this Friday.”
In January, MSU board memOther faculty, like Vickery and
bers apologized to Nassar’s vicJohn Verboncoeur, a professor in
tims in an emotional meeting,
with some choking out words
the college of engineering, dethrough tears and one saying,
fended the interim president.
“We failed you.”
A small portion of faculty also
John Engler, a former governor
appeared to be in favor of a
of Michigan and a graduate of the
walkout protest to demand more
university, was named interim
changes.
president by the board last
Outside in the hall, people had
month. Engler said that as a longmade signs that read, “No Confitime leader, he would
dence” and “Trustees
move swiftly to correct
Not Trusted.”
problems at the school,
June Youatt, the uniand that as a father of
versity’s provost, said
three daughters he could
she was not surprised by
empathize with the victhe vote.
tims and their families.
“This vote today isn’t
But the choice shocked
so much an outcome as a
many — including faculwindow into how the
ty leaders, whose opin- John Engler
faculty and students of
ions trustees had seemed
this campus have experito solicit the day before news of
enced this these past few weeks,”
the selection became public
Youatt said. “The discussion that
through news reports.
went on today about the hurt, the
At the meeting Tuesday, some
pain, the culture and our collecfaculty members objected to the
tive sense of responsibility — I
idea that Engler’s selection was
hope they hear that.”
the reason for a vote of no confiAn MSU trustee, Dianne Bydence. Shawnee Vickery, a profesrum, said she understood “the
sor in the college of business,
anger and frustration among stucalled a vote on that pretense
dents, faculty and staff, whose
“tone deaf and insensitive,” and
trust and confidence in Michigan
proposed amending the agenda.
State University has been under“The motion of no confidence
standably shaken.
should be because the board was
“For too long, Michigan State
ultimately responsible and acUniversity has failed to be transcountable for what happened to
parent, accountable and compasthese women and did not stop
sionate, and we need to change
what happened to these women,”
that,” Byrum said. “I am commitVickery said of Nassar’s victims.
ted to doing my part to increase
“This should be about the womtransparency, promote accounten, not about anything else.”
ability and improve communicaDuring discussion before the
tion so this tragic situation never
no confidence vote, Glenn Stutzhappens again.”
ky, a professor in the School of
Stutzky said a recall campaign
Social Work, said the Faculty Senshould be mounted to force the
ate must do more to achieve
trustees out. “This is our commuchange.
nity, this is our university and it is
“The trust that has been brotime to reclaim MSU,” he said.
ken cannot be repaired, cannot be
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
recovered — they must be removed,” Stutzky said. “But before
they resign, they must withdraw
Schuster is a graduate student at
their contract with the new interMichigan State University. Svrluga
im president before it becomes
reported from Washington.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
M2
Politics & the Nation
At Westminster’s most-overlooked event, many very good dogs
BY
NEW YORK
K ARIN B RULLIARD
new york — A bichon frise
named Flynn won best in show at
the Westminster Kennel Club Dog
Show on Tuesday night, snagging
what is essentially America’s top
canine beauty prize. Over the
weekend, a border collie called
Fame leaped and wove her way to
dominance in the show’s agility
championship, a feat of canine athletics.
But in between those moments,
away from the rows of breed contenders, at the chilly end of a warehouse, a judge in a tuxedo awarded
a third title to what could be considered the best of all of these very
good dogs: the winner of the Masters Obedience Championship. It
is Westminster’s newest and leastglitzy honor, but it is one that enthusiasts insist is central to the
whole show dog world.
“It’s really the foundation of all
performance events,” said judge
John Cox, who has been involved
in obedience competitions for four
decades. “You’ve got these two species out there, and they’re communicating back and forth.”
The title in the obedience event,
held at Westminster since 2016,
goes to the dog-handler team that
best demonstrates the commands
that many ordinary pet owners
have aspired, and perhaps failed,
to get their pooches to heed: sit,
stay, heel, fetch. Yet it is far more
complicated. Dogs must follow
hand signals, dart away from their
handlers, drop to the ground while
running, soar over jumps to retrieve dumbbells and sit perfectly,
perfectly straight. There is also a
six-minute “freestyle” routine;
many are like skits and have costumes. This year, in an odd coincidence, three of 23 teams chose a
“Wizard of Oz” theme.
Although the freestyle session
was added as a crowd-pleaser, it is
still finding its audience. Only
about 200 people watched Monday.
There was no shortage of
drama, however. Among the
23 contenders were Heart, a laserfocused black Labrador who won
the previous two years; Streak, a
bouncy golden retriever who won
the National Obedience Champi-
D I GE S T
MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ABOVE: Flynn, a bichon frise, won best in show Tuesday at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.
BELOW: Heart, a black Labrador retriever, has enjoyed lots of success at the show’s obedience contest.
onship in 2016; and the clear underdog, Sissy, a gray nine-pounder
whose owner got her at a flea market. She was the competition’s
first-ever mixed-breed, or what
Westminster calls an “all-American” dog.
“She just looks like a scruffy
little mutt that has bedhead hair
every day . . . . I’m sure we’ll be
totally out of place,” her owner,
Donna Hartwig, said before the
two left their house in Big Rock, Ill.,
for the Big Apple. Despite Sissy’s
lack of pedigree, Hartwig expected
she would be up to the task. “She
tries really hard to do what I ask
her to do. That’s just her nature.”
Competitive obedience began in
the United States nearly nine decades ago, when a well-to-do standard poodle breeder, Helen Whitehouse Walker, got tired of people
assuming that her dogs were dimwitted, walking topiaries. She held
an eight-dog trial at her father’s
New York estate in 1933; it was won
by a Lab from New Jersey. The next
year, Walker lobbied for an official
VINCENT TULLO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
event in a letter to an American
Kennel Club publication. “The
judging of dogs in the breed classes
is a mystery to many, but a series of
tests displaying the dog’s brain is
something they can actually see,”
she wrote. The AKC added the
event in 1936.
These days, many handlers on
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the circuit are professional trainers. Among them is Heart’s owner,
Linda Brennan, who works at an
obedience school not far from her
home in Columbia, N.J., and has
been competing for three decades.
But Heart — a 5-year-old purebred
whose registered name is Rhumbline’s Once in a Blue Moon — is
special, Brennan said. Tall and leggy, she is the daughter of a male
obedience champ and loves to
work.
“Obedience develops your relationship the most of any sport I’ve
done with my dogs,” Brennan said.
“In conformation, anybody can
show my dog. In agility, most dogs
can run for somebody else.”
That’s not the case in obedience,
especially at Westminster, where
the event is a sideshow, she noted.
The surroundings are far louder
than at most obedience trials, making hand signals — and a dog’s
focus on its handler — critical. “You
have to be more interesting than
the environment.”
Several of this year’s entrants
were goldens, and there were a few
Labs as well. Each team started
with 400 points — 200 each for the
traditional and freestyle sessions
— and was docked by Cox for any
errors. Those include “forging,”
when the dog goes ahead of the
handler during heeling, and lying
down without elbows fully on the
ground.
“Sit your dogs,” Cox instructed
during a short group event, when
all teams were in the ring.
“Sit,” the handlers said in unison. All the dogs sat.
“Leave your dogs,” Cox said.
“Stay,” the handlers commanded before walking around the ring
twice. The dogs sat still, the pictures of obedience.
Sissy fumbled one command in
her morning session. But she gave
a solid freestyle performance, retrieving a tiny cowboy hat and
sitting still in a miniature wagon.
Spectators gushed over her cuteness.
“She did really well for this environment,” said Hartwig, who, like
the 5-year-old Sissy, was in New
York for the first time and relieved
that the small-town pooch had
found a tree with a patch of mulch
outside their hotel by which to do
her business. “It was good enough.”
As for Heart, she sailed through
her morning session so calmly that
she yawned at one point. Brennan
had said before the competition
that a three-peat might earn her a
special meal of rotisserie chicken.
But Heart’s favorite reward the
previous two years was being petted by hundreds of spectators before the final evening’s session at
Madison Square Garden, where
the obedience champion is hailed
during a commercial break. “She
loves that,” Brennan said.
By midafternoon, Cox had tallied the scores. In third place were
the border collie and its handler. In
second, one of the “Wizard of Oz”
teams, with a black Lab.
And in first place, with
294.5 points: Heart.
Just as in the first U.S. obedience
trials 85 years ago, the winner was
a Lab from New Jersey.
karin.brulliard@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/animalia
Life in prison for man
who set off explosives
The man convicted of setting
off explosives in Manhattan in
2016, injuring dozens and
sparking a sprawling manhunt
that ended with a violent
shootout with police, was
sentenced Tuesday to spend the
rest of his life in prison.
Ahmad Khan Rahimi was
convicted in the fall on all eight
counts he faced for planting
explosives in the Chelsea
neighborhood. One of the bombs
detonated on Sept. 17, 2016,
injuring 31 people, while another
was found on a sidewalk and did
not explode. Rahimi also was
accused of planting or setting off
other explosives in New Jersey in
the hours and days before and
after the Chelsea bombing.
Prosecutors said he was inspired
by the Islamic State and al-Qaeda.
Rahimi, 30, was born in
Afghanistan before his family
moved to the United States in
1995. He became a naturalized
U.S. citizen in 2011.
Police in New Jersey found
Rahimi sleeping in the doorway
of a bar two days after the Chelsea
bombing. He began firing at the
officers who approached him,
causing a shootout in which
Rahimi was badly wounded.
— Mark Berman
Indiana can change execution
drugs, court rules: The Indiana
Supreme Court has ruled that
prison officials can change
execution drugs without going
through a public review. The
Indianapolis Star reported that
the court on Tuesday rejected a
challenge by death row inmate
Roy Ward. The Indiana Court of
Appeals ruled in June that the
Department of Correction didn’t
follow proper procedures in
selecting a new three-drug
combination in 2014. However,
the Supreme Court in a
unanimous nine-page ruling said
the state’s new three-drug
combination is “not subject to the
Administrative Rules and
Procedures Act.”
— Associated Press
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Education Dept.
isn’t investigating
bathroom cases
Transgender students
say decision leaves
them vulnerable
BY
KENA BETANCUR/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Summer Zervos, center right, embraces her attorney Gloria Allred outside a New York courtroom in December.
The Trump accuser who refuses to go away
Summer Zervos awaits
a ruling on whether
her lawsuit can proceed
BY
F RANCES S TEAD S ELLERS
huntington beach, calif. —
As President Trump questions
whether men accused of sexual
misconduct are being denied “due
process,” a restaurant owner here
is awaiting word on whether her
own legal claim against Trump
will be allowed to move forward.
Summer Zervos filed a defamation lawsuit a year ago in which
she claims that Trump groped and
sexually assaulted her. He called
Zervos and other female accusers
“liars.” Trump’s lawyers have
fought to keep the case from going
to trial, dismissing it as “totally
meritless” and arguing that a state
court has no jurisdiction over a
sitting president. A New York
judge is expected to rule any day
on whether it should proceed.
Zervos, a former contestant on
Trump’s reality TV show “The Apprentice,” is the only one of about a
dozen women who accused Trump
of sexual misconduct shortly before the 2016 presidential election
to have brought legal action. Her
complaint details phone calls and
meetings that could be used to
verify — or refute — her allegations, and her attorneys could call
other accusers to the stand to describe Trump’s behavior. Zervos
declined to be interviewed.
Trump has denied Zervos’s account of an alleged December
2007 encounter at the Beverly
Hills Hotel. “To be clear, I never
met her at a hotel or greeted her
inappropriately a decade ago,” he
said after she made her accusation.
The White House referred questions about Trump’s whereabouts
at the time to his private lawyer
Marc Kasowitz, who did not respond to a request for comment.
He has previously dismissed the
claim as politically motivated.
In her complaint, Zervos says
she asked to meet with Trump that
month at Trump Tower in New
York, seeing him as a “potential
employer.” Zervos claims Trump
dubbed her his “OC angel” — referring to her California home county, Orange County — and invited
her to meet him for dinner in Los
Angeles. The suit details phone
calls from Trump to make arrangements.
The complaint says Trump’s security guard escorted Zervos to a
hotel bungalow, where Trump
showed little interest in dining
out: Instead, the complaint alleges, he kissed and groped her,
suggested they watch “telly-telly,”
and led her to the bedroom, where
“he began to press his genitals
against her.”
When Zervos rejected Trump,
he became “all business,” she alleges. She said he ordered a club
sandwich from room service, then
doled out financial advice. He suggested that Zervos let her mortgage “go into default,” the complaint says: “He said that it was a
mini version of what he does.”
They met briefly the next day at
his Rancho Palos Verdes golf
course, the complaint alleges.
Soon after, Zervos claims, the general manager offered her a position at “half the salary” she was
seeking.
A job with the Trump Organization would have been a change
from the challenges of her parents’
restaurant work in a beach town.
Court records show they ran into
financial problems when Zervos
was a teenager.
“They went bankrupt at the
same time that Donald Trump
did,” Zervos told the Orange County Register in a 2006 interview
about her reality TV role. “He
came out a little better than we
did.”
In 2005, Zervos joined her
brother, Shado, in purchasing a
$900,000 house in a new development, according to property records. That same year, on an overcast Saturday morning, Zervos answered NBC’s casting call for the
fifth season of “The Apprentice.”
The first of 17 nationwide tryouts was held five minutes from
Sunny’s, the diner owned by Zervos’s family, where a Trump impersonator cajoled applicants hoping
to compete for a $250,000, oneyear contract with Trump’s company.
Dan Simon, then a data company salesman, said that he met Zervos in line and that they were
interviewed by show producer
Mark Burnett, who asked provocative questions.
“Should prostitution be legalized?” Simon recalled Burnett asking. Burnett seemed to zero in on
Zervos as she gave answers that
Simon remembered being “liberal
as liberal can be.”
Selection for the show did not
guarantee a big payoff. Scott Salyers, the supervising casting producer, said contestants received
modest stipends.
When the show began, on the
tarmac near Trump’s jet, Zervos
joined a team assigned to sell
Sam’s Club memberships.
Trump later turned on her in a
boardroom meeting when Zervos
spoke up to defend her team leader. “Why should you interrupt me
when I’m knocking the hell out of
him?” Trump demanded. “By interrupting me, what are you doing
to yourself?”
“I’m being truthful,” Zervos
said, “and I’ll always be truthful.”
“How stupid is that, right?”
Trump asked.
“It’s not stupid,” she retorted. “If
I stay, I want to stay on the truth,”
she said, prompting Trump’s famous response:
“You know what, Summer?
You’re fired!”
Zervos was the first contestant
banished to a New Jersey apartment complex to wait until shooting ended. She then returned to
Sunny’s, her family’s diner.
According to her complaint,
Zervos contacted Trump again in
2009, 2010 and 2016.
Her suit is not about fame, nor
was her accusation politically motivated, her attorneys have said.
She is asking for $2,914 in economic losses as well as unspecified
emotional damages.
Zervos’s critics point to an email
the Trump campaign posted, in
which a cousin of hers who
worked at Sunny’s speculates that
“Summer’s actions are nothing
more than an attempt to regain
the spotlight at Mr. Trump’s expense.” The cousin, John Barry, did
not return phone calls.
The Zervos family’s struggles
continued, according to public
records. Property records indicate
that Deutsche Bank initiated foreclosure proceedings in 2009
against Zervos and her brother.
Sunny’s moved out of a downtown
location in 2010 to a more modest
mall. Zervos’s father and brother
did not respond to messages.
Her family and close friends
referred inquiries to Gloria Allred,
her attorney. “Summer and her
family are not doing any interviews,” Allred wrote.
Some residents here who have
known or worked with Zervos for
years are following her confrontation with Trump. They say she
often referred to her Trump connection after returning from the
filming to work at Sunny’s.
“She was a small-town girl,
[and] all of a sudden people knew
who she is,” recalled Amanda
Hesser, a former restaurant server.
frances.sellers@washpost.com
Alice Crites and Julie Tate contributed
to this report.
M ORIAH B ALINGIT
The Education Department
confirmed this week that it is no
longer investigating civil rights
complaints from transgender
students barred from school
bathrooms that match their gender identity, a development
those students say leaves them
vulnerable to bullying and violence.
The Obama administration in
2016 directed public schools to
allow students to use bathrooms
that align with their gender
identity, even if that conflicted
with the gender on their birth
certificates. The administration
concluded that barring transgender students from public
school bathrooms was a form of
sex discrimination prohibited
under Title IX.
But shortly after President
Trump took office last year, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos
and Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded the guidance, a
move that was widely decried by
civil rights groups that said it
could endanger the welfare of
transgender students. DeVos
said states and school districts
should be able to determine how
to accommodate transgender
students. She and Sessions argued that Title IX did not obligate schools to allow transgender students to use the bathroom
of their choice.
Transgender students say using the bathroom that feels right
for them is essential for their
safety and well-being and poses
no threat to others. Some other
students and their families see it
as an affront to privacy and
traditional values. It is a battle
that has been waged at school
board meetings, in state legislatures and in the courts. A transgender student from Virginia,
Gavin Grimm, took his fight to
use the boys’ bathroom to the
U.S. Supreme Court in 2016. The
high court declined to hear the
case after DeVos reversed course
on transgender students’ rights.
After the move, it was unclear
how the Education Department
would handle civil rights complaints from transgender students who were barred access to
public school bathrooms. In
June, Candice Jackson, acting
head of the Office for Civil
Rights, told staffers that they
should evaluate civil rights complaints from transgender students on a case-by-case basis but
did not say outright that bathroom complaints should be dismissed. That same month, the
department dismissed a long-
running civil rights complaint
from a transgender girl in Ohio
who had been barred from the
girls’ bathroom at school.
Transgender students held
out hope that the department
would continue to back them
when they raised issues about
bathroom access, even though
the guidance was no longer in
place. Advocates maintain that
Title IX, which bars sex discrimination in schools that receive
federal money, requires schools
to allow transgender students to
use bathrooms that match their
gender identity. Some federal
appeals courts have backed this
view.
But the Education Department interprets the law differently. It confirmed Monday that
it will not investigate civil rights
complaints from transgender
students regarding bathroom access, though it will continue to
scrutinize other forms of discrimination. The development
was first reported by BuzzFeed.
“Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, not
gender identity,” Education Department spokeswoman Elizabeth Hill said in response to
questions from The Washington
Post. “Where students, including
transgender students, are penalized or harassed for failing to
conform to sex-based stereotypes, that is sex discrimination
prohibited by Title IX. In the
case of bathrooms, however,
longstanding regulations provide that separating facilities on
the basis of sex is not a form of
discrimination prohibited by Title IX.”
That aligns with the view held
by some conservative legal
groups, which have sued on
behalf of students made uncomfortable by sharing restrooms
with their transgender classmates, saying it violates student
privacy.
But Catherine Lhamon, who
headed the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights
under President Barack Obama,
called the department’s statement “appalling and deeply dangerous.”
“The federal courts have multiple times made clear that Title
IX protects transgender students,” Lhamon said.
DeVos has emphasized that
her department will not tolerate
bullying or harassment of transgender students, and Jackson’s
memo made clear that the agency will still investigate other
kinds of discrimination against
transgender students.
“Please note that the withdrawal of these guidance documents does not leave students
without protections from discrimination, bullying or harassment,” DeVos wrote last year
after rescinding the Obama-era
protections.
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
ANALYSIS
Trump runs high-risk experiment in latest budget proposal
BY
H EATHER L ONG
President Trump is beginning
his second year in office with a
high-risk strategy: juicing the U.S.
economy at a time when it already
looks pretty healthy. As his latest
budget proposal, released Monday, makes clear, Trump wants
growth of 3 percent — or more — a
year for the next seven years, a feat
that hasn’t happened since Ronald Reagan was president in the
1980s.
Most economists say Trump’s
economic dream is virtually impossible. The latest Survey of Professional Forecasters, for example, doesn’t predict growth will hit
3 percent at all in Trump’s first
term. The United States is in a
different place today than it was
three decades ago, many say. The
population is much older, making
it more difficult to sustain higher
growth, especially without additional immigration or some sort of
technological revolution that
would make American workers
the most productive they have
been since the 1960s.
But Trump doesn’t like being
told no. He’s made a career out of
defying the odds, and his “Trumponomics” recipe of cutting taxes
and hiking spending is meant to
spur so much additional business
investment that productivity
would hit record levels. In theory,
that would then boost growth and
wages further.
His budget predicts the longest
expansion in U.S. history, with
moderate inflation and unemployment falling to 3.7 percent in
2019, the lowest level since 1969.
Some economists, however, say
the more likely outcome is that
growth picks up for a year or so
and then a downturn hits. By then,
the U.S. government would be
even deeper in debt with less money to spend to revive the economy.
“This is a joke,” said Marc Goldwein, senior policy director at the
Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. “I would love if we
had 3 percent growth for two
years, let alone seven years. But
we have an aging population, and
there is no plausible story I can tell
where we’re on a path toward
sustained economic growth at
that level.”
Friction over these contrasting
views of how Trumponomics is
likely to play out is causing some
of the stock market whiplash.
There’s broad agreement that this
year looks good. There’s a lot of
disagreement about what comes
in 2019 and beyond.
“The stock market gyrations
we’re seeing now might be a foreshadowing of some kind of downturn,” said Kristina Hooper, chief
global market strategist at Invesco. “It seems likely before the end
of 2019, we will probably see some
kind of economic slowdown.”
Increasingly, Wall Street banks
and independent economic researchers are starting to flag
doubts about the health of the
Trump economy, further fueling
the concern that a downturn
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump speaks with lawmakers about trade on Tuesday.
His administration’s budget proposal released Monday suggests
beefing up spending with the expectation of years of growth ahead.
could hit in 2019. The thinking is
that the economy is likely to overheat, forcing the Federal Reserve
to have to raise interest rates
quickly to prevent inflation,
where prices rise rapidly on everything from rents to food to gas.
Once the Fed starts pumping up
rates, business and consumers are
likely to slow their spending.
This year “is likely to be as good
as it gets,” said Paul Ashworth,
chief North American economist
at Capital Economics. “The slowdown may not necessarily come in
the first half of 2019, but maybe
the second half, as there’s a bigger
drag from tighter monetary policy
and the fiscal stimulus wears off.”
In a further strike on the Trump
economy, Goldman Sachs said the
president’s deregulation push is
having little to no effect on the
economy. “Overall, our results
suggest that non-financial deregulation has had a limited impact
on the economy to date,” the bank
wrote in a report over the weekend.
Goldman’s research follows on
the heels of a Morgan Stanley
report last week that looked at
what 556 companies are likely to
do with their tax savings. The
survey found 43 percent intend to
fatten dividends and share buy-
backs. The next most popular use
of the tax money is likely to be
mergers (according to 19 percent).
Only 17 percent anticipate more
capital spending, and 13 percent
think higher wages are likely. A
Bank of America survey in August
of over 300 companies found similarly pessimistic expectations for
how the tax savings would probably be used.
Trump is counting on much of
the tax savings going toward business investment. If business
spending doesn’t pick up, there’s
even less likelihood of years of
great growth. Capital spending
did pick up last year, and smallbusiness confidence is at its highest levels since the Reagan era, but
that optimism has to keep fueling
investment.
On the upside for Trump,
growth came in stronger than the
experts anticipated last year.
Americans are feeling the uptick.
The latest Quinnipiac University
poll found 70 percent of Americans rate the economy as “excellent” or “good,” the highest rating
since the poll began asking this
particular question in 2001. And
for the first time in Trump’s presidency, more Americans credit
Trump with driving the economic
gains than former president Barack Obama.
But moods can shift quickly,
especially if bond yields start rising and the stock market sells off
for a prolonged period of time.
Trump’s budget projects a lot
more debt in the coming years,
unusual during a time of healthy
growth, when governments typically try to get their budgets back
in line. Independent groups such
as the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget predict the
deficit will hit $1 trillion by next
year, a record level at a time when
unemployment is so low. The
Trump administration’s number
isn’t quite that high, but even it
anticipates an $873 billion deficit
this fiscal year and $984 billion
in 2019.
Trump has abandoned his
promise to balance the budget in
the next decade. Instead, his latest
budget runs a deficit every year.
“This is a step in the wrong direction,” said Doug Holtz-Eakin,
president of the right-leaning
American Action Forum and an
economic adviser to GOP politicians.
“As long as we’ve got GDP growing fast . . . the deficit will be going
down,” said Mick Mulvaney,
Trump’s budget director, who
used to champion balanced budgets as a congressman.
For now, many economic metrics look good. But the Trump
administration foresees an even
stronger economy for years to
come. Outside economists see a
rising possibility of a downturn.
Trump is hoping for a Reagan-like
economy. He might end up with a
President George H.W. Bush one,
where a slowdown comes just as
he’s campaigning for a second
term.
heather.long@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
We manufacture prescription opioids.
How could we not help fight the
prescription and illicit opioid abuse crisis?
Two doctors founded a company in 1892 now known as Purdue Pharma.
Continuing the strong heritage of a research-driven, science-based
company, another doctor is currently at the helm as CEO. We’re the
pharmaceutical company that manufactures OxyContin®. Patients’ needs
and safety have guided our steps. It’s what led us to research and develop
medications to help patients. Today, it’s what has spurred us to redouble
our efforts in the fight against the prescription and illicit opioid abuse
crisis. It’s why we’re taking action.
We support recommendations in The President’s Commission on
Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis and the FDA’s Opioid
Action Plan. There are too many prescription opioid pills in people’s
medicine cabinets. We support initiatives to limit the length of first opioid
prescriptions. Reducing the number of excess tablets won’t end the
epidemic, but we believe it will help rein in the problem. We believe doctors
should check their state Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP)
databases before writing an opioid prescription, to guard against doctorshopping by those trying to game the system. Information sharing between
state databases must improve.
Our industry and our company have and will continue to take meaningful
action to reduce opioid abuse. We focused our talented research scientists
and applied our innovative thinking to making opioids with abuse-deterrent
properties, making them harder to crush and, therefore, harder to be
abused by snorting or injection. With this investment, we pioneered
the pharmaceutical industry’s movement toward developing opioids
with abuse-deterrent properties when we were the first to receive FDA
approval.1 Developing new formulations is risky and there are never any
guarantees, but we did it anyway. Our company also took the initiative
to distribute the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids to thousands of
prescribers and pharmacists shortly after it was released.
As we continue to fight the prescription opioid and illicit substance abuse
crisis, we are applying our resources and our best scientific minds to
discover and develop new, non-opioid pain medicines for patients.
No one solution will end the crisis, but multiple, overlapping efforts will.
We want everyone engaged to know you have a partner in Purdue Pharma.
This is our fight, too.
1
Opioids with abuse-deterrent properties are not abuse-proof and don’t prevent addiction,
but they are part of a multifaceted approach to addressing the prescription opioid abuse crisis.
A5
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Amid Porter drama, rumors swirl around Kelly’s job
KELLY FROM A1
senting facts to the public — a
culture set by the president himself.
The public relations fallout is
further compounded by Trump’s
own history of alleged sexual
assault and his seeming reluctance to publicly condemn violence against women and give
voice to the national #MeToo
reckoning.
The president has said little
publicly about the Porter issue
other than to praise the former
aide for doing “a very good job.”
But he has privately expressed
frustration with the week-long
fallout, peppering advisers and
confidants with questions about
the media coverage and how the
controversy is playing for him
personally.
The Porter drama has become
all-consuming, creating an atmosphere of chaos and infighting
reminiscent of the “Game of
Thrones” stage early in Trump’s
presidency — and distracting
from the administration’s budget
and infrastructure agenda.
Many aides blame Kelly
Inside the West Wing, a growing number of aides blamed
Trump’s second White House
chief of staff, John F. Kelly, for the
bungled handling of the allegations against Porter. Trump in
recent days has begun musing
about possible replacements, according to people with knowledge of the conversations.
Asked by a reporter to assess
Kelly’s standing with Trump after
a week of troubling revelations,
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that
“the president has confidence in
his chief of staff.”
But Kelly does not enjoy the
confidence of an increasing number of his subordinates, some of
whom said they believe that the
retired four-star Marine Corps
general has misled them.
Kelly is “a big fat liar,” said one
White House official, who spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
share a candid opinion. “To put it
in terms the general would understand, his handling of the Porter scandal amounts to dereliction of duty.”
This portrait of the West Wing
in turmoil is based on interviews
with more than a dozen top White
House officials and outside advisers and confidants, most of whom
spoke on the condition of anonymity because they feared retribution.
Kelly’s attempts at explaining
his role, according to some aides,
have included telling senior staff
members last Friday to communicate a version of events many
believed to be false, as well as
telling at least one confidant that
he has “a good bulls--- detector”
and had long detected troubling
characteristics in Porter.
But Kelly initially defended
Porter last week as “a man of true
integrity and honor.” And in recent weeks, Kelly was even considering giving Porter an expanded role in policy development, a
potential promotion first reported by CNN.
“Credibility is the coin of the
realm for any White House chief
of staff, and it’s especially important in a White House where
truth was the first casualty and
credibility has been the second,”
said Chris Whipple, who wrote a
book about chiefs of staff.
The internal animus is not
limited to Kelly. White House
counsel Donald McGahn and
deputy chief of staff Joe Hagin are
also facing scrutiny over how
Porter managed to work at the
White House — and hold an
interim security clearance — for
more than a year despite the
allegations of abuse during his
two marriages.
Wray disputes account
On Tuesday, Wray contradicted
the White House’s account of
when the bureau informed officials about the status of Porter’s
security clearance investigation.
White House officials had said
that they were first contacted last
summer by the FBI about Porter’s
clearance, and that the investigation as of last week was “ongoing”
when he resigned last week.
“Clearly things happened after
the FBI delivered this information to the White House that
resulted in Porter’s case just
pending for an extended period of
time in the personnel office,” said
Ron Klain, a senior White House
aide in the last two Democratic
administrations. “It was a deliberate decision to let him stay at
the White House with this hanging over his head.”
The fallout has left Kelly with
diminished internal support and
spawned intensified threats from
those who hope to use the controversy to force him from his job.
“Credibility is the coin of the realm for any White
House chief of staff, and it’s especially important in
a White House where truth was the first casualty
and credibility has been the second.”
Chris Whipple, author of a book about chiefs of staff
and had not been completed.
But Wray, testifying before the
Senate Intelligence Committee,
said that the FBI submitted a
partial report on Porter’s clearance last March and that the
investigation was completed last
July. Soon after, he added, the FBI
received a request for a follow-up,
which the bureau completed and
provided last November.
The FBI closed the file in January, and when it received additional information this month,
“we passed it on as well,” Wray
said.
At the White House, Sanders
sought to square the conflicting
timelines, arguing that even after
the FBI closed its investigation,
the presidential personnel office
was still reviewing Porter’s case
Several Kelly antagonists have
sought to fan speculation that his
position may be in imminent
danger, noting that Trump has
been seeking counsel from
friends about who he might bring
on as a new chief of staff. The
president has floated replacing
Kelly with either Gary Cohn, the
director of the National Economic Council, or House Majority
Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.)
— though Trump has often
sounded out friends about personnel changes that he ultimately
does not make.
Nonetheless, one foe described
Kelly as “well done,” while another said he was in “big league”
trouble.
Anthony Scaramucci, who
served as White House communi-
cations director for 10 days last
summer until Kelly fired him,
tweeted, “Kelly must resign.” He
continued: “Domestic abuse is a
red line. Covering up for it is
indefensible.”
White House infighting
Some White House officials,
who until recently spoke of Kelly
with reverence, have found ways
to distance themselves from their
boss, including by refusing to
personally vouch for his credibility.
For the past two days, Sanders
has acknowledged that the White
House could have handled the
Porter situation better, a sentiment first offered last week by her
deputy, Raj Shah, and echoed by
Vice President Pence. But Kelly, in
comments to the Wall Street Journal on Monday, said, “It was all
done right.”
Some of Kelly’s colleagues offered a more innocuous explanation for his missteps; one senior
White House official suggested
that he may simply have been
“forgetful or inartful,” rather than
deliberately mendacious.
On Tuesday, Sanders parried a
number of sharp questions from
reporters, offering only vague responses. She said at one point
that her answers could only be as
complete as the information she
had been provided by her superiors — remarks widely interpreted
as an attempt to distance herself
from Kelly.
“Obviously the press team’s not
going to be as read-in, maybe, as
some other elements at a given
moment on a variety of topics,”
Sanders said. “But we relay the
best and most accurate information that we have, and we get
those from those individuals.”
Inside the building, officials
privately griped that Kelly and
Health-care rivalry roils
the market in Pittsburgh
HEALTH FROM A1
vention smoothed over the divorce, but people have had to pick
sides: Highmark patients with
UPMC doctors have had to switch
plans, or switch doctors. UPMC
health plan members have to pay
out-of-network prices at Highmark’s facilities. In the meantime,
people have been bombarded by
dueling ad campaigns and endless
local news stories about the rift.
The competitive clash has
turned Pittsburgh into a testing
ground for forces that are transforming health care nationally, as
waves of consolidation blur traditional boundaries in the $3.3 trillion health-care system.
Such combinations are advertised as a path to greater efficiencies and more-coordinated care.
But the competition between the
two health systems has brought
abrupt and painful change to
many people in Western Pennsylvania.
“I call it ‘the war,’ ” said Sue Kerr,
47, a Highmark member with a
UPMC doctor who is frustrated by
a transition that she says neither
company has made easy. “You
should consider switching providers, switching insurances —
switch this, switch that. I was like,
‘We paid for this.’ ”
Kerr was aware of the split, but
it was not until she became ill that
it truly hit home. Sick with a virus
in December, Kerr called her
UPMC doctor to ask whether she
should go to the urgent-care center she typically used, only to learn
that it was no longer in her plan’s
network. In pain from tendinitis
last fall, she was referred to UPMC
specialists who were not covered.
It has been a rude awakening for
Kerr, who, like many in Pittsburgh, had hoped that these two
health systems that say they are
patient-focused would find a way
to get along.
Beyond the disruption to patients, simply bringing disparate
health-care players under one roof
does not guarantee better or moreaffordable medical care, health
policy experts caution.
Like other mergers rippling
through health care, the integration of health insurance and hospitals is supposed to cut out waste,
align incentives and contain costs.
But industries that were formerly
enemies do not always mix well:
Hospitals typically want to keep
their beds full, while insurers
want to cut costs.
“We don’t have effective competition in this market; we have
these two huge entities, circling
each other looking for some kind
of opening,” said Martin Gaynor, a
former director of the Bureau of
Economics at the Federal Trade
Commission and a professor at
Carnegie Mellon University.
The experiment is far from over,
but it is unclear whether the combinations have delivered their
promised results.
Pittsburgh’s premiums for employer-sponsored health care are
below the national average, but
that was also true before the headto-head competition began, according to a national survey of
medical expenditures taken by the
federal government.
Meanwhile, medical spending
per person in Pittsburgh grew
20 percent from 2012 to 2016, faster than the 15 percent growth nationally, the Health Care Cost Institute found, in an analysis of
data from national employersponsored insurance plans.
Linda Blumberg, a senior fellow
at the Urban Institute, said that if
the dynamic between the two systems were truly creating efficiencies, she would expect the trend in
Pittsburgh to deviate from the rest
of the country.
“That’s just not the case,” Blumberg said in an email.
The fight broke into the open in
2011, when Highmark, facing a
request for a big rate increase from
UPMC, announced that it would
acquire a financially troubled hospital system, today known as the
Allegheny Health Network, to preserve competition in the region.
UPMC saw Highmark step on
its turf and punched back, announcing that it would shut Highmark’s health plan members out
of its network once their contract
expired.
Under pressure from state officials, an agreement was brokered
postponing the final split of the
two systems until mid-2019. But
the competitive dynamic changed
almost immediately. Instead of insurer vs. hospital, Pittsburgh split
into two distinct health-care silos.
Suddenly, people’s choice of
health plan became far more integral — determining in which system they would give birth, get flu
shots or have surgery.
Highmark and UPMC say they
both represent the logical next
step in the evolution of health
care, but their strategies are very
different.
From his corner office atop the
U.S. Steel Tower, UPMC chief executive Jeffrey Romoff is building an
empire.
“There’s nothing in health care,
that we know of, that UPMC
doesn’t have an entry into that
marketplace,” he said, comparing
UPMC to the tech giant Amazon.
Late last year, Romoff unveiled
plans to invest $2 billion in three
downtown specialty hospitals that
will push the cutting edge of medical research and care in areas such
as cancer treatment, vision restoration and transplants. In Bakery
Square, Pittsburgh’s innovation
district, UPMC employs 200 software engineers, designers, business analysts and others to develop and commercialize health technologies.
Branching from a provider of
care into a health insurer has giv-
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL HENNINGER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: Kim Ralston, a CT technologist, prepares Bob Croft for a neck scan at
the Allegheny Health Network’s health center in Wexford, Pa., this month.
BELOW: UPMC President and chief executive Jeffrey Romoff in his office on
the 62nd floor of the U.S. Steel Tower in Pittsburgh.
en UPMC control of its fate, Romoff says, instead of leaving an
elite hospital system in the vise of
a powerful insurer. Having a large
health plan gives the hospital a
new incentive to avoid expensive
care that is not best for the patient,
since the hospital’s income is the
health plan’s outlay.
Across town at a slightly lower
skyscraper is Highmark, where
chief executive David Holmberg
has a view of the health-care future rooted in his organization’s
main business as an insurer.
While UPMC executives talk
about attracting patients from
around the country to Pittsburgh
for care, Holmberg says he wants
to pay for health care, not research
projects.
“I want to keep people healthy; I
want to keep them out of the hospital. Think of it like a consumer
market,” Holmberg said. “You can
do things differently because
you’re not worried about heads
and beds. You’re not trying to fill
up the hospitals.”
In contrast to UPMC’s emphasis on high-tech medicine, Highmark will spend more than $1 billion to build new facilities, including a suburban hospital, four
small-scale neighborhood hospitals and community cancer centers. It has built partnerships,
such as a cancer-care alliance with
Johns Hopkins Medicine.
The vision of how to shift care
out of expensive hospitals is evident in an expansive “health and
wellness pavilion” in the suburb of
Wexford, where a greeter in the
lobby begins the admission process on an iPad.
From there, patients are directed to primary care, outpatient surgery, cancer or other services.
Highmark is building a hospital
next door and will put the urgent
care next to the emergency department, so that people with less serious problems can be directed to a
lower-cost site of care.
Both executives identify the
same goal — delivering high-quality, affordable care. They say the
competition between their companies has been good for the region.
Holmberg says that if Highmark had not stepped in to save
McGahn could have better managed the crisis by admitting mistakes, promising to overhaul the
security clearance process and
protecting the president.
Instead, these people said, Kelly seemed to shirk blame, grumbling to at least one confidant
that the communications office
should be held partly responsible.
In internal conversations, Kelly
sounded defensive and complained that the media was overhyping the story, according to a
senior White House official who
spoke with him.
But not all of Kelly’s team
shared his view. During Wray’s
testimony, another White House
aide texted a Washington Post
reporter, describing the moment
as “a killer.”
When asked if Kelly could have
been more transparent or truthful, that official wrote: “In this
White House, it’s simply not in
our DNA. Truthful and transparent is great, but we don’t even
have a coherent strategy to obfuscate.”
Several White House aides described themselves as initially
caught off guard by the allegations against Porter, a Rhodes
scholar with two degrees from
Harvard who had established
himself as a professional and
competent force inside the West
Wing.
But as photos emerged showing his first ex-wife with a black
eye — and as they listened to his
explanation, which some found
implausible — some officials said
they became convinced that the
two women were telling the truth.
ashley.parker@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
Ellen Nakashima and Shane Harris
contributed to this report.
Allegheny
Health
Network,
health-care costs would have skyrocketed as UPMC’s dominance
grew.
“In the midst of it, it was disruptive. ‘Oh, they were at each other’s
throats’ — and that’s the way it
appeared,” Romoff said. “But
that’s what disruption is about.
And let’s be clear about this: Without disruption, change is much,
much slower.”
After years of warring ad campaigns and alarming rhetoric
from both sides, the people of
Western Pennsylvania are tired of
the fight.
Some people are switching
health-insurance plans. Others
are switching providers. Still others are finding refuge in national
health plans that give access to
both systems.
Bill McKendree, director of the
Allegheny County Apprise program, which helps seniors choose
Medicare plans, says confusion is
common although people are
finding solutions.
“What we’ve gotten used to as a
community is this luxury of being
able, regardless of who our insurer
was, to tap into this incredible
wealth of health-care services in
Western Pennsylvania,” McKendree said. “We’re starting to become
aware of what other parts of America are also facing: limitations.”
The true test of whether the two
big integrated systems can drive
cost savings will come in 2019,
when the split is final. But the
competitive friction is causing
both to focus on consumer convenience in new ways.
UPMC doctors write prescriptions for community health workers — employed by the insurance
company — who help patients
work to better manage chronic
health conditions, such as diabetes. Highmark has a breathingdisorders clinic to help make a
one-stop visit for the management
of complex lung diseases that once
might have involved a maze of
appointments.
UPMC opened a cancer-specific
emergency room to help patients
whose acute health problems may
be best helped by people familiar
with their underlying disease and
treatment regimen.
Highmark’s Wexford pavilion
has a staffed play area for children
whose parents are seeing doctors
at the center.
“The tension of UPMC versus
Highmark, as difficult as it might
be around the local watering holes
of Pittsburgh, it’s not necessarily a
bad thing,” said Tom Scully, a general partner at Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe, a major healthcare equity investor.
Many patients have yet to be
convinced.
Kerr, recuperating from a hysterectomy, is not sure where she
will land. She is looking for a primary-care doctor at Allegheny
Health Network. She is considering switching to UPMC’s health
plan next year. But she’s unhappy
— she doesn’t feel that either system is on her side.
“I suspect what we have is two
Goliaths,” Kerr said.
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Competing immigration proposals vie for votes
President Trump cast the debate
to overhaul the nation’s immigration laws as the “last chance” for
action as the Senate weighed competing proposals to legalize millions of young undocumented immigrants and fulfill his goal of
bolstering U.S.-Mexico border security.
But another federal court ruling
Tuesday regarding the legality of
an Obama-era program shielding
young foreign-born “dreamers”
from deportation served as a reminder that Trump’s March 5
deadline for congressional action
is mostly moot.
After months of anticipation
sparked by Trump’s decision to end
the Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals (DACA) program, the Senate debate on immigration sputtered at the start, with the chamber mostly dormant Tuesday as top
party leaders negotiated which
proposals might earn a vote.
“This is the debate they said
they wanted,” Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said of
Democrats. “I said we’d have an
open and fair process. We’re trying
to do that, and the sooner we get
started the better because we’ll
need to wrap this up this week.”
Minority Leader Charles E.
Schumer (D-N.Y.) agreed that the
debate should be quick. “The sooner the better,” he said, adding later
that if a bipartisan deal is able to
get the requisite 60 votes to survive
procedural challenges and pass:
“Let it rip. Let’s go.”
McConnell tried to accelerate
the debate by introducing a Republican proposal to punish cities
that refuse to help enforce federal
immigration laws. The move was
blocked by Democrats who said
the proposal would not address
the more urgent legal status of
dreamers.
The feeble launch of the debate
showed yet again how immigration remains an intractable problem for Congress. Bipartisan negotiations — now under their third
president — have failed to garner
significant changes in the legal
status of undocumented immigrants, how visas are granted to
legal immigrants or how the nation protects the southern border.
In an early morning tweet,
Trump said: “Negotiations on
DACA have begun. Republicans
want to make a deal and Democrats say they want to make a deal.
Wouldn’t it be great if we could
finally, after so many years, solve
the DACA puzzle. This will be our
last chance, there will never be
another opportunity! March 5th.”
Winning support from Democrats will be key in the closely
divided Senate, but Republicans
complained that the other party
was needlessly prolonging the debate.
“We’re all a little mystified on
why the Democrats are refusing to
have the debate and the votes they
asked for,” said Sen. Tom Cotton
(R-Ark.).
Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.)
shot back that his party was focused on writing bipartisan proposals instead of partisan plans
destined to fail.
“How many bills would they like
to see, bipartisan bills? I can give
them two that we’ve already written, and there are others,” he said.
Seeking to amplify his concerns
about the immigration showdown, Durbin cited the story of
Chloe Kim, the Olympic snowboarder who won a gold medal
Tuesday, and her father, Jong Jin
Kim, who immigrated to the United States from South Korea.
“He didn’t have a college degree,” Durbin said. “He spoke a
little English, but he carried a Korean-English dictionary with him.
And he had about $300 in his
pocket.”
Durbin added that Kim “might
not have passed some of the meritbased tests that we’re hearing
around here” from Republicans.
Most Republicans on Tuesday
appeared to be rallying behind a
proposal by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) and six other GOP
senators that fulfills Trump’s calls
to legalize 1.8 million dreamers,
immediately authorizes spending
at least $25 billion to bolster defenses along the U.S.-Mexico border, makes changes to familybased legal immigration programs
and ends a diversity lottery system
used by immigrants from smaller
countries.
Schumer said the Grassley plan
unfairly targets family-based immigration and that making such
broad changes as part of a plan to
legalize just a few million people
“makes no sense.”
In a bid to soften Trump’s proposals and win over Democrats,
Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) unveiled a
watered-down version of the GOP
proposal — but had not won support from members of either party
by late Tuesday.
Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.), a longtime proponent of
comprehensive
immigration
changes, said the Grassley propos-
al should be the focus of the Senate’s debate.
“What would make it better? If
you took that bill and you changed
it, how could you get 70 votes?” he
asked. He told reporters that the
“key” to winning over Democrats
would be addressing what the legislation says about family-based
immigration.
Schumer and other Democrats,
meanwhile, voiced support for a
plan by Sens. Christopher A. Coons
(D-Del.) and John McCain (RAriz.) that would grant legal status
“This will be our last
chance, there will never
be another
opportunity!”
President Trump, in a tweet about
DACA negotiations
to dreamers in the country since
2013 but would not immediately
authorize money to build out
southern border walls and fencing.
“It is my hope it’ll get a strong
vote,” Coons said.
A federal judge on Tuesday temporarily blocked moves to end
DACA — though he recognized
that the administration “indisputably” has the authority to do so.
U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis in New York wrote that the
program “simply reflected the
Obama Administration’s determi-
nation that DHS’s limited enforcement resources generally should
not be used to deport individuals
who were brought to the United
States as children, met educational
or military-service requirements,
and lacked meaningful criminal
records.” Thus, he said, the Trump
administration was well within its
rights to change tack. But Garaufis
wrote that administration officials
had not offered legally adequate
reasons for doing so because they
relied on an erroneous legal conclusion that the program was unconstitutional and illegal under
federal law.
“Because that conclusion was
erroneous, the decision to end the
DACA program cannot stand,” Garaufis wrote.
Garaufis issued what is known
as a preliminary injunction, which
would keep DACA alive while the
court case before him proceeded. A
federal judge in California has issued a similar injunction, and the
Supreme Court is expected this
week to consider whether it will
take up the fight over DACA.
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Mike DeBonis contributed to this
report.
Watch a video at http://wapo.st/
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Democrats add Florida to victory ledger as GOP feels the heat
Republicans win in
Georgia and Oklahoma,
but keep their guard up
BY
D AVID W EIGEL
sarasota, fla. — Democrats
continued a streak of special election wins with a victory along the
Gulf Coast of Florida on Tuesday,
the 36th red-to-blue switch in a
state legislative race since the
2016 election.
Democrat Margaret Good triumphed by seven points in the
Sarasota-based 72nd District, defeating Republican candidate
James Buchanan in an area that
backed Donald Trump for president in 2016 by more than four
points.
The upset is likely to reverberate through the two major parties
as they gear up for the midterm
election cycle. Although Republicans have been buoyed in recent
weeks by the sense that their tax
legislation will be popular among
voters, and by new polling showing that Trump’s popularity has
ticked up, Tuesday’s outcome offers yet another data point that
voter enthusiasm lies with Democrats.
“They’re winning elections in
places where they shouldn’t be,”
said Corey Lewandowski, Trump’s
former campaign manager, at a
Sunday afternoon rally for the
Republican candidate. “We’ve
seen them win statehouse seats in
Wisconsin. We’ve seen them win
big mayor’s races in New Hampshire. Fifty seats have already
changed hands, from Republicans
to Democrats, since President
Trump took office. Make no mistake: The Democrats are unified.”
On Tuesday, they faced three
more tests in districts that were
reliably red until last year. While
Democrats won the Florida race
between Buchanan, a Tampa Bayarea real estate agent, and Good,
an attorney, Republican candidates won easily in Georgia and
Oklahoma. But both parties were
more focused on Florida, where
Good’s victory represented a nearly 12-point swing from Donald
Trump’s winning margin in the
district.
“People deserve better and
want to have better and still have
hope that there’s going to be something better than our current administration,” Good said at her
victory party here Tuesday.
Both parties are pumping money into low-turnout races; both
freely admit that they are becoming referendums on the president.
The risks in Florida were clear
long before the results came in.
“This is going to set the tone for
2018, and I’m telling you, it’s going
to come down to a few hundred
votes, if that,” said Buchanan,
shaking hands after Sunday’s rally. “You can’t become complacent.
It’s important that we get a win
here.”
Buchanan, whose father, Vern
Buchanan, has represented the
area in Congress since 2007, was
acutely aware of what had happened in other states. Lewandowski had slightly overstated it;
since January 2017, Democrats
had flipped 35 seats from red to
blue, while Republicans had
flipped four seats in the other
direction.
Some national Republicans say
the trend is overrated. “Twenty of
the 35 special election wins for the
PHOTOS BY DAVID WEIGEL/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: James Buchanan, center, a Republican candidate for the state
House in Florida, mingles at a GOP event in Sarasota. ABOVE:
Democrat Margaret Good, Buchanan’s opponent, campaigns in the
city. Both parties are pumping money into low-turnout races.
Democrats since 2016 were in districts won by Hillary Clinton,” said
David James, a spokesman for the
Republican State Leadership
Committee. “Liberal groups have
been outspending Republicans on
an average of 3 to 1, just to win
back seats they should have never
lost.”
But for years, Democrats had
been spending little, and losing
more — nearly 1,000 state legislative seats, many gerrymandered
further out of reach after the party
was routed in 2010. Starting last
year, they’ve seen money and volunteers flood the sort of local
races where the party had been
wiped out during Barack Obama’s
presidency. In many of the races
they’ve lost, they’ve erased most
of Republicans’ margins, often
with the same pattern — strong
Democratic turnout in suburbs
and a Republican fade in rural
voting. In an average of legislative
races, Democrats have seen a
11.9 percent swing since 2016 results.
The National Democratic Redistricting Committee, helmed by
former attorney general Eric H.
Holder Jr., has reportedly raised
$16 million toward a goal of flipping statehouses ahead of 2020.
On Monday in Minnesota, Democrats held a state Senate seat and
shrank the Republican margin in
a state House election. The NDRC
had plunked down $40,000 there,
and the Democratic Legislative
Campaign Committee had spent
close to $130,000. In Florida, the
rumors of national Democratic
meddling were resonating with
Republicans.
“If George Soros came down to
Sarasota, I don’t think he’d make
it out in one piece,” said Don
Baldauf, a Republican activist
who attended the Sunday rally,
referring to the wealthy Democratic donor.
Holder’s group has stayed out
of the Florida race, but the DLCC
took an early interest in a contest
that could be a model for its 2018
ambitions. The 72nd District, covering much of Sarasota County,
gave Trump a small five-point victory; countywide, Republicans
outnumber Democrats by about
12,000 votes.
But the prosperous, growing
Sarasota area looks like the parts
of the country where Democrats
have gained ground. In 2017, Democrats flipped a state Senate seat
in a part of Miami that had been
trending blue; Good, who was already running in Sarasota, felt an
immediate boost. The DLCC’s regional field director, Michael McCall, and the group’s national field
director, Graham Wilson, pivoted
to help the Good campaign boost
turnout in a district with no recent record of electing Democrats.
In an interview, Buchanan conceded that Good had probably
won the early vote, which ended
Saturday. Joe Gruters, the longtime Republican chairman in
Sarasota County, said that Democrats had piled in to flip the district while underestimating the
GOP’s ability to push back.
“They’ve airdropped 50 guys
and gals in this district to do
get-out-the-vote, so if we beat
them here, then they should be
ashamed of themselves,” Gruters
said. “From a national standpoint,
the end is here for the Democrats.
Some people are afraid of affiliating with Donald Trump right now.
We believe that Donald Trump is
going to lead our people to victory,
both on Tuesday and in November.”
Neither side is coy about the
national implications. A piece of
direct mail from Leadership for
Florida’s Future, a pro-Buchanan
PAC, warned that “Margaret Good
and her liberal pal Nancy Pelosi
want to expand Obamacare in
Florida.” A competing piece of
mail from Good’s campaign told
voters that “she’s running to fight
for our progressive values and
stop Donald Trump.”
On Monday, as Good knocked
on doors, the anti-Trump message
seemed to be sticking. Laura Morris, a doctor and former Republican who volunteered for Good’s
campaign, said that the president’s defense of disgraced exstaffer Rob Porter, facing allegations of spousal abuse, had gotten
her angry all over again.
“He is on the side of wife beaters, and I wouldn’t be at all surprised if he cheated on his current
wife,” Morris said.
Good, who was encouraging
die-hard Democrats to vote, said
that she had focused on issues
vital in Sarasota — environment
crises that the state government
seemed to ignore, education, and
the need to expand Medicaid. But
she thought Trump’s response to
the Porter case also was moving
votes.
“It was part of the culture of
misogyny that this White House is
perpetrating,” Good said. “I won’t
stand for it, and I don’t think the
people of Sarasota will, either.”
david.weigel@washpost.com
Amid thaw with Trump, Corker considers ditching Senate retirement plans
R OBERT C OSTA,
S EAN S ULLIVAN
AND J OSH D AWSEY
BY
It was just a few months ago
that Bob Corker, soon after announcing his retirement from the
Senate, began to blast President
Trump, calling him a childlike
president who was putting the
United States “on the path to
World War III.”
Trump fired back, tweeting that
the Tennessee Republican had
“begged” for his endorsement and
“couldn’t get elected dogcatcher.”
But in recent days the two men
have reconnected, warming their
long-chilly and acrimonious relationship as Corker has moved
closer to shelving his retirement
plans and launching a late reelection bid.
Corker has had several conversations with the president in
which the possibility of a 2018
campaign has been broached, according to five Republicans who
were not authorized to comment
on the discussions.
Corker also has been cultivating his bonds with the Trump
family and top White House staffers, they added — and Monday he
met with Ivanka Trump, the president’s daughter and senior adviser, for coffee.
There was more activity Tuesday as Corker met with Vice President Pence at the Capitol — although aides insisted the meeting
was unrelated to politics — and
Republican colleagues said he was
leaning toward launching a campaign.
“You’d see the Bob Corker who
almost completely supports the
president’s agenda, who has a
common relationship with the
president, but who from time to
time will disagree with the president,” Tom Ingram, a political confidant of the senator, said when
asked to characterize a possible
Corker campaign.
Explaining the easing of past
differences with Trump, Ingram
shrugged. Corker “was compelled
to deal with the White House [after his retirement announcement], and they discovered, ‘Hey,
let’s get over it,’ ” he said.
Ingram and other Corker advisers said he will make a final deci-
sion in the coming weeks, but they
hesitated to offer a firm timeline.
The filing deadline for Tennessee
candidates is April 5.
The president and others have
listened to the senator’s concerns
about the competitive Tennessee
race. But Trump has not made a
decision on whether he would
give his blessing to a comeback, a
White House official said.
A potential Corker reentry into
the race could be complicated for
Trump. Rep. Marsha Blackburn
(R-Tenn.) is the front-runner for
the nomination and a strong ally
of the president. Her campaign
had strong words for the prospect
of a Corker bid.
“Anyone who thinks Marsha
Blackburn can’t win a general
election is just a plain sexist pig,”
Blackburn campaign spokeswoman Andrea Bozek said in a phone
interview with The Washington
Post. “She’s the best fundraiser in
the country and is beating Phil
Bredesen in several polls. We
aren’t worried about these egodriven, tired old men.”
Still, Corker’s thaw with Trump
represents a remarkable turn-
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around for a lawmaker who had
emerged as a razor-sharp critic
inside a party that has largely
been reticent to offer more than
occasional reprimands of the
president.
While many elected Republicans privately grouse about
Trump, it has often only been
those who are safely ensconced in
political winter or are retiring —
such as Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.)
and, until this week, Corker —
who have spoken up. Those who
will face voters this year mostly
remain wary of alienating the
president’s supporters, who they
are counting on to stave off a
potential Democratic wave.
Corker’s moves signal that he is
closer than ever to rejoining the
GOP’s rank and file, where being a
Trump ally is accepted these days
as necessary, especially in a red
state — a far cry from the dramafilled days in October when Corker called the White House an
“adult day care” and a “reality
show.”
Corker’s
reconsideration
sparked tensions in Tennessee on
Tuesday over whether the senator’s flirtation with a return is an
attention-seeking gambit by an
indecisive politician or an effort
by a veteran Republican to help
his party hold on to the seat and
protect its slim Senate majority.
Democrats nationally are hoping to expand their Senate map in
the South after Alabama Democrat Doug Jones’s upset Senate
victory in a December special election. The likely Democratic Senate
nominee in Tennessee, former
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governor Bredesen, is a proven
winner statewide, and his chances
have been rated as competitive by
nonpartisan election analysts.
Corker’s advisers argue that
Blackburn’s hard-line style puts
the Senate seat at risk and say
Corker’s more moderate political
persona could be a better fit in a
traditional Republican state in a
tumultuous election year. Politico
reported Monday that an internal
GOP poll last month showed
Bredesen beating Blackburn in a
hypothetical election — a poll that
has been widely circulated by
Corker’s allies.
Blackburn, 65, raised more
than $2 million in the final quarter of last year, and she had more
than $4.5 million on hand last
month. Her primary rival, former
congressman Stephen Lee Fincher, raised about $1.5 million in the
most recent quarter.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) declined to
comment Tuesday, underscoring
the sensitivities about Corker’s
flirtation with running for reelection and the ongoing talks with
Trump.
Another factor prompting
Corker to rethink retirement, Republicans said, is his high-profile
perch. If he ran and won, he would
continue to chair the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and
would probably be in line to take
over the powerful Senate Banking
Committee in the coming years.
Corker is not the only Republican lawmaker giving indications
of a forthcoming Senate campaign
— part of a rush of activity as the
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midterm elections loom and GOP
nervousness continues to grow.
Republicans are increasingly
confident that Rep. Kevin Cramer
(R-N.D.), a Trump ally, will reverse
course and run for the Senate,
Republicans said, and one senior
GOP official said Cramer has been
telling people this week that he
will run.
“We’re just respectfully reconsidering right now. I’ll have a decision by the end of the weekend,”
Cramer said Tuesday evening. The
congressman cited the sweeping
GOP tax bill that was passed recently as a factor in his thinking
about the Senate run, saying the
“enthusiasm for that has grown in
the last couple of weeks.”
Former North Dakota Republican Party chairman Gary Emineth
announced Tuesday that he was
ending his Senate campaign, predicting that Cramer would run.
Republican state Sen. Tom Campbell is still in the contest. The race
against Sen. Heidi Heitkamp
(D-N.D.) is one of the GOP’s biggest pickup opportunities. North
Dakota is one of 10 states Democrats are defending that the president won in 2016.
Meanwhile, the exact status of
the Trump-Corker relationship remains a subject of debate. Corker’s
orbit describes it as improved to
the point of being friendly, with
invitations to ride on Air Force
One and casual phone calls. And
some Republicans close to the
president say Trump is happy to
have Corker court him and could
eventually be persuaded to support his reelection, should the
senator choose to run for a third
term.
But numerous Republicans
close to Trump were less rosy.
They said Trump may hear out
Corker but warned that he would
never formally throw his support
behind him — even if Republicans
worry that the Tennessee seat is in
jeopardy — because he does not
forgive Corker for calling him a
child.
More likely, they said, was that
Trump would welcome Corker’s
embrace but formally stay out of
the Republican primary race. Or,
he could decide to endorse Blackburn instead.
Corker stayed mum Tuesday.
“I don’t want to talk about anything,” he told reporters.
robert.costa@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
Paul Kane contributed to this report
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
A9
Hearing shows split between intelligence agencies, Trump
THREATS FROM A1
continue using propaganda,
false personas and social media
to undermine the upcoming
election.
“There should be no doubt that
Russia perceives its past efforts”
to disrupt the 2016 presidential
campaign “as successful and
views the 2018 midterm elections
as a potential target for Russian
influence operations,” said Coats,
the leader of the U.S. government’s 17 intelligence agencies.
His assessment was echoed by
all five other intelligence agency
heads present at the hearing,
including CIA Director Mike
Pompeo, who two weeks ago stated publicly that he had “every
expectation” that Russia will try
to influence the coming election.
The intelligence community’s
consensus on Russia’s intentions
led Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.) to
press officials on whether Trump
has directed them to take “specific actions to confront and to
blunt” Russian interference activities.
FBI Director Christopher A.
Wray said the bureau is undertaking “a lot of specific activities” to
counter Russian meddling but
was “not specifically directed by
the president.” And Pompeo added that Trump “has made very
clear we have an obligation” to
make sure policymakers have a
deep understanding of the Russia
threat.
Coats also said the intelligence
agencies “pass onto the policymakers, including the president,”
relevant intelligence.
Reed pressed on his question:
“Passing on relevant intelligence
is not actively disrupting the operations of an opponent. Do you
agree?”
Coats said, “We take all kinds of
steps to disrupt Russian activities.”
Pompeo added: “Senator Reed,
we have a significant effort. I’m
happy to talk about it in closed
session.”
A visibly frustrated Reed responded: “The simple question
I’ve posed is, has the president
directed the intelligence community in a coordinated effort, not
merely to report but to actively
stop this activity, and the answer
seems to be that . . . the reporting
is going on, as reporting [goes on]
about every threat going into the
United States.”
Earlier in the hearing, Pompeo
said that the intelligence community has offensive “capabilities” to
“raise the costs to adversaries”
seeking to hack into election systems to disrupt voting.
He took issue with King’s suggestion that the U.S. government
has not taken actions to deter
adversaries in cyberspace. “Your
statement that we have done
nothing does not reflect the responses that, frankly, some of us
at this table have engaged in —
that the U.S. government has
engaged in — both during and
before this administration,”
Pompeo said.
King, citing the nuclear
doomsday movie “Dr. Strangelove,” said “deterrence doesn’t
work unless the other side
knows” about the weapon.
“It’s true — it’s important that
the adversary knows,” Pompeo
said. “It’s not a requirement that
the world know it.”
Asked whether the adversary
knows about U.S. actions, he said,
“I’d prefer to leave that for another forum.”
In a hearing that ranged over
several subjects, the intelligence
chiefs also said that North Korea’s
presence at the Olympics in
South Korea, which saw a historic
visit by North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un’s sister, had not changed
the intelligence community’s assessment that the regime is trying
to build nuclear weapons to
threaten its neighbors and the
United States.
“The decision time is becoming
ever closer in terms of how we
respond” to North Korea’s weapons development, Coats said.
Pompeo said his agency has
completed an analysis of how
North Korea would respond to a
U.S. military strike, as well as
what it would take to bring the
regime to the negotiating table.
He offered to describe that analysis only in a closed, classified
session.
Pompeo also responded to reporting last week by the New York
Times and the Intercept about an
intelligence operation to retrieve
classified National Security Agency information believed to have
been stolen by Russia. The Times
reported that U.S. spies had been
bilked out of $100,000, paid to a
PHOTOS BY MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
shadowy Russian who claimed to
be able to deliver the secrets as
well as compromising information about Trump.
Pompeo categorically denied
that the intelligence agency had
paid any such money, directly or
indirectly. He claimed that the
newspaper had been duped by
the same person trying to sell the
U.S. government information
that turned out to be bogus.
At the end of the hearing,
Committee Chairman Richard
Burr (R-N.C.) said that the panel
hoped to release publicly the findings of its Russia investigation
“before the primaries begin” in
March. Their probe includes a
review of the intelligence community’s January 2017 assessment on Russian interference, he
said. That assessment concluded
that the Russians wanted to help
get Trump elected.
ellen.nakashima@washpost.com
shane.harris@washpost.com
ABOVE: Heads of U.S. intelligence agencies tell the Senate Intelligence Committee on
Tuesday that Russia is continuing to target the U.S. political system. BELOW: Sen. Mark R.
Warner (D-Va.), left, and Chairman Richard Burr (R-N.C.) confer ahead of the hearing.
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
The World
Trial thrusts Palestinian girl further into spotlight
Israel sees her case as
a chance to deter other
protesters, but it could
have the opposite effect
BY
have drawn attention, it comes at
a time of flagging support for the
Palestinian cause in the Middle
East. Regional protests following
Trump’s Jerusalem decision
lacked zeal.
Meanwhile,
Israel
has
clamped down on access for
pro-Palestinian activists. At a
birthday party held for Ahed
while she was in prison, only a
smattering of international activists were present as candles
spelling out her name were lit in
tear-gas casings.
L OVEDAY M ORRIS
ofer, west bank — Slouching
in her chair and mouthing messages to her friends and family
from under a cascade of strawberry-blond curls, Ahed Tamimi
in many ways appears to be an
everyday teenager.
But the tussle of television
cameras and photographers that
crowded in for a shot of her in
the dock of a small Israeli military court in Ofer for a bail
hearing last month was a reminder that she is far from it.
Ahed, who recently turned 17,
was arrested after a video of her
slapping and kicking two Israeli
soldiers who had entered her
front yard went viral last year.
On Tuesday, after nearly two
months in detention, she went
on trial on 12 charges, including
assault of a soldier and incitement.
Although no one was seriously
hurt, the Israeli military is keen
to make an example of her to
deter other young Palestinians
from fighting back against the
Israeli occupation, her lawyer
says. However, a lengthy public
trial looked set to raise her
profile and highlight human
rights concerns surrounding the
detention of minors in Israel.
In what rights groups and her
lawyer said they suspected was a
deliberate effort to try to prevent
that, the military judge ejected
all journalists and observers
from the first trial hearing on
Tuesday.
The judge ruled that it was in
Ahed’s interests, even though her
lawyer argued that it was not.
“The court decided to close
doors because they said they
don’t think it’s good for Ahed,”
said defense lawyer Gaby
Lasky. “I think the decision of the
court is because the court decided what is good for the
court. They understand that people outside Ofer military court
are interested in Ahed’s case. So
the way to keep it out of everybody’s eyes is to close the doors.”
Already a poster child for the
Palestinian cause, her arrest has
propelled her to new levels of
fame. Images of her standing
hands on hips and staring down
an Israeli soldier were plastered
on London bus stops calling for
her release.
Jim Fitzpatrick, an Irish artist
famed for his iconic two-toned
painting of Che Guevara, painted
her as Wonder Woman. She has
been compared to Rosa Parks
and Joan of Arc. An Israeli musician even likened her to Anne
Frank.
Her family says letters and
messages of support have flooded in from across the region and
the world.
Bassem Tamimi, her father,
says his daughter’s arrest came
just when the Palestinians needed a new source of inspiration.
“It’s the moment of Trump, the
moment that nobody knows
what to do,” he said. “The people
in the Arab countries and the
Palestinians are bored of seeing a
victim all the time. Now they see
ABOVE: EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK; BELOW: MAJDI MOHAMMED/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ABOVE: Ahed Tamimi, 17,
appears before an Israeli
military court. She is on trial
for slapping and kicking two
Israeli soldiers who entered her
family’s yard. She was 15 at the
time. LEFT: Ahed shouts at an
Israeli soldier during a protest
in her West Bank village of
Nabi Saleh when she was 12.
a small child slapping the face of
the occupation.”
Trump’s decision to recognize
Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, and
a White House they see as favoring Israel more than ever, has
fueled frustration among Palestinians. Regular clashes have
broken out in the West Bank
between demonstrators and Israeli forces, which, although not
large after 50 years of occupation, have been persistent.
But also a factor in her international fame, her father says, is
Ahed’s blond hair and blue eyes.
“They don’t like to see a white
girl as a victim,” he said. “They
see their children; they see
themselves.”
Early media attention
For some, it appeared too
convenient to be true. Ahed has
been a regular in Internet videos
for years. Demonstrations take
place in her village of Nabi Saleh,
in the occupied West Bank, every
week, with residents priding
themselves on their peaceful resistance, although they regularly
descend into stone throwing and
clashes. The villagers accuse Israel of stealing their land and
spring for a nearby settlement.
Ahed grabbed media attention
at age 11, when she shouted at
Israeli soldiers after they detained her brother, raising her
fist.
Michael Oren, an Israeli deputy minister and former ambassador to the United States, said that
with the family rising in prominence, a probe was launched by
a parliamentary subcommittee
three years ago, to see whether
they were real or actors picked
for their Western looks. It’s a
phenomenon he describes as
“Pallywood.”
“Pallywood can be a very serious threat to us,” he said. “We
looked at the Tamimis. Among
the questions were: Are all these
children Tamimis? Are they being directed?”
He said the findings were
inconclusive. He says that if
children are being sent out by
their parents to face off against
Israeli soldiers, then it amounts
to “child abuse.” He says if the
trial raises her profile, it’s a price
that needs to be paid. “I think
there is a cost involved, but there
is always a cost,” Oren said.
While Palestinians saw the
video as a child standing up to
her occupiers, many Israelis saw
Ahed as a provocateur attempting to provoke a reaction —
which the soldiers did not give.
Those on the left lauded the
soldiers’ restraint, but rightwingers called for action. Ahed
was arrested in an overnight raid
on her West Bank home on
Dec. 19, with the Israeli military
releasing video of her being led
out of her house in handcuffs.
‘My generation is stronger’
In his home in Nabi Saleh,
Bassem Tamimi said children are
an important part of the Pales-
tinian struggle.
“I’d like it if there was no
occupation and let her to go and
learn dance or ballet,” he said.
“We don’t like to see our children
face danger, but because there is
no safe place, we must give them
the ability to survive, we must
train them to face their enemy in
the future. We need them to be
strong.”
He began organizing regular
protests in the village in 2009.
Above the television sits a portrait of Ahed’s uncle, who Bassem says was shot during a
demonstration in 2012. Her 28year-old cousin died after being
hit by a tear-gas canister a year
earlier, he says. The latest in the
extended family to die was a
17-year-old distant cousin, who
was the first Palestinian to die in
clashes with Israeli forces this
year.
“They see a small child
slapping the face
of the occupation.”
Bassem Tamimi, Ahed’s father
“She was born into an environment of resistance,” he said of
Ahed.
Marah Tamimi, 17, counts
Ahed among her closest friends.
She says her cousin would have
liked to have been a soccer
player, but because of the occupation they both plan to study
law. They are among a generation of media-savvy young Palestinian activists who hope they
can foster change.
“My generation is stronger,”
she said, adding that they realize
the power of a camera.
But although Ahed’s case may
A powerful video
Even though the hearing will
now be held in secret, unless her
lawyer successfully manages to
petition for it to be opened,
rights groups say they hope the
trial will shed light on Israel’s
treatment of minors.
Ahed’s lawyer accuses the military of breaking the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the
Child during her nighttime arrest and interrogation, during
which she says Ahed was threatened. Her trial, like those for all
Palestinians in the West Bank
but not Israeli settlers, is being
held in a military court. She was
denied bail at her hearing last
month, with the prosecution arguing that she was dangerous
and posed a risk of absconding.
“The Israeli military supposes
by arresting Ahed Tamimi they
can silence their activism,” said
Fadi Quran, a senior campaigner
with the activist group Avaaz.
“But although painful, it’s definitely put a spotlight on Palestinian children in detention.”
There were 352 Palestinian
children held in Israeli prisons as
security detainees at the end of
last year, according to B’Tselem,
an Israeli human rights organization. Although many may be
detained for serious offenses, the
group says the conviction rate of
around 99 percent in the military
courts is concerning.
Ahed’s charges date back almost two years, to when she was
15. Earlier that day another relative, 17-year-old Mohammed
Tamimi, had been shot in the
head by a rubber bullet. The
incident left him in a coma, his
family said, and he had part of
his skull removed. Ahed’s family
says that it was shortly after this
that the soldiers entered their
yard. Ahed shouted at them to
leave, later kicking and hitting.
Her 20-year-old cousin Nour
Tamimi and mother, who were
also in the video, were both later
arrested and are also facing
charges.
Education Minister Naftali
Bennett has said Nour and Ahed
should finish their lives in prison. Defense Minister Avigdor
Lieberman, meanwhile, defended the then-16-year-old’s arrest
in the middle of the night.
“Whoever goes wild during the
day, will be arrested at night,”
Lieberman said, describing it as
an “important message.”
Lasky, Ahed’s lawyer, said Palestinians will be getting another
message. “They can see in the
video a child pushing heavily
armed soldiers away from her
house,” she said. “It’s powerful.”
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Ruth Eglash in Jerusalem and Sufian
Taha in Nabi Saleh contributed to
this report.
Former
Guatemala
president
arrested
Oxfam leader, others also
held in corruption case
A SSOCIATED P RESS
guatemala city — Prosecutors
in Guatemala said Tuesday that
they have detained former president Alvaro Colom and almost his
entire former cabinet, including
the current chairman of Oxfam
International, in a corruption
case involving a bus concession.
Colom, who governed from
2008 to 2012, is the latest Guatemalan former president to face
legal problems. He was recently
named by the Organization of
American States as an envoy to
Honduras, in a bid to help sort out
disputed elections there.
Special prosecutor Juan Francisco Sandoval, who said Colom
was arrested Tuesday, is looking
into questionable purchases of
public buses for Guatemala City.
Sandoval said those arrested face
charges of fraud and embezzlement.
Sandoval said the detentions
included the former ministers of
interior, finance, defense, economy, education, labor, environment, health, and sports and culture. The former finance minister,
Alberto Fuentes Knight, is the
chairman of Oxfam International.
The global nonprofit said in a
statement that it did not know the
nature of the formal charges
against Fuentes. “However, he has
been entirely open with his Oxfam board and executive that he
has been among former officials
being investigated as part of a
budgetary transaction made by
the Guatemalan government
while he was finance minister.
“He has assured us that he has
cooperated fully with the investigation in the confidence he did
not knowingly transgress rules or
procedures,” the group added.
The case centers on a public
bus company known as Transurbano. The government auctioned
off 25-year concessions for Guatemala City bus routes, and the
private companies that won the
contracts were later exempted
from taxes.
Prosecutors say the process
was deeply flawed and included
subsidies and other measures
that benefited public servants.
The United Nations anti-corruption mission in Guatemala participated in the investigation.
A customs fraud scandal that
allegedly sent kickbacks to thenPresident Otto Pérez Molina and
Vice President Roxana Baldetti
led both to resign in 2015. They
have been jailed awaiting trial,
but more than 100 defense filings
have delayed the trial.
Alfonso Portillo, Guatemala’s
president from 2000 to 2004, was
extradited to the United States
and pleaded guilty to money laundering conspiracy in 2014.
He
admitted
accepting
$2.5 million in bribes from the
government of Taiwan to continue to recognize the Asian nation
diplomatically.
DIGEST
CHINA
Former political star
charged with bribery
Chinese prosecutors have
charged disgraced senior
politician Sun Zhengcai with
bribery, state media said Tuesday,
the latest development in a
corruption probe into a man once
considered a contender for top
leadership.
The Communist Party also
announced that it would
prosecute the former head of
China’s Internet regulator on
graft charges.
Sun was removed as the party’s
chief in the southwestern
metropolis of Chongqing in July
and replaced by a man close to
President Xi Jinping.
Sun was later accused of
leaking secrets, bribery and
abusing his power. In November,
he was expelled from parliament.
He is accused of “illegally
accepting a huge amount of assets
from others” during his various
posts over the years, the official
Xinhua News Agency said, citing
prosecutors.
In a separate statement, China’s
anti-corruption watchdog said
former Internet chief Lu Wei had
pilots’ speed indicators may have
been a factor that triggered the
special flight situation.”
been expelled from the party and
would be prosecuted on bribery
charges. A probe had found that
Lu had abused his power for
personal gain, the watchdog said.
At the height of his influence,
he was seen as emblematic of
China’s increasingly pervasive
Internet controls.
Xi has presided over a sweeping
corruption crackdown since
coming to power in 2012.
— Associated Press
EGYPT
Former anti-graft chief
arrested ahead of vote
— Reuters
RUSSIA
Error on speed data
may have caused crash
Human error may be to blame
for the Russian plane crash that
killed 71 people this week, Russian
investigators said Tuesday, noting
that the pilots failed to turn on the
heating unit for the plane’s
measuring equipment, resulting
in flawed speed data.
After studying the An-148’s
flight data recorder, the Interstate
Aviation Committee said Sunday’s
crash near Moscow occurred after
the pilots saw conflicting data
on two airspeed indicators.
The readings were flawed
because the pilots had failed to
turn on the heating unit for the
ERGIN YILDIZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Workers with Turkey’s emergency authority carry the body of a
child, one of two found after a migrant boat capsized in the Meric
River, along the Turkish and Greek border. In all, three people died
and four were missing, Turkish officials said. An eighth reportedly
made it into Greece. A rescue effort was continuing, but officials said
cold temperatures and strong currents were impeding operations.
plane’s pressure-measurement
equipment before takeoff, the
committee said.
The pilots had placed the
An-148 on autopilot after takeoff
from Moscow’s Domodedovo
Airport but took its manual
controls back when they heard
alarm signals warning of
conflicting speed data.
The plane plummeted six
minutes after takeoff, killing all
71 people aboard.
The committee said it is
continuing to study the data but
noted that “erroneous data on the
Egypt’s former anti-graft chief
was arrested Tuesday, his attorney
said, the latest development in an
upheaval that has roiled the
country ahead of next month’s
presidential election.
Ali Taha said Hisham Genena
was arrested by police and later
handed over to military
prosecutors for questioning.
The arrest came a day after the
military said it would take action
to safeguard its “honor and
dignity” after Genena claimed in a
television interview that former
military chief of staff Sami Anan
was in possession of documents
incriminating the country’s
“leadership.”
Anan was arrested by the
military last month, days after he
declared his intention to run for
president. The military said he
faced charges of incitement
against the military and forgery.
Genena, who was to be one of
Anan’s two top campaign aides,
led Egypt’s top watchdog agency
until President Abdel Fatah alSissi fired him in 2016.
Genena is the latest casualty in
what seems to be an intensifying
campaign against dissent ahead of
the vote, which Sissi is virtually
certain to win.
— Associated Press
Nigeria reports 450 suspected
cases of Lassa fever: The World
Health Organization said as many
as 450 people may have been
infected with Lassa fever in
Nigeria in less than five weeks.
The WHO said that 43 suspected
deaths from the viral hemorrhagic
fever were reported between Jan. 1
and Feb. 4 and that 37 of them
have been confirmed. The disease
is spread through contact with the
bodily fluids of sick people.
U.S. Embassy employee dies in
Mexico climbing accident: The
U.S. Embassy in Mexico said a
member of the U.S. diplomatic
mission has died after a climbing
accident on the Pico de Orizaba
mountain. A Puebla state official
identified the climber as Freddy
Cahill and said he suffered a fall
and contusions on the mountain.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Tillerson says investment in Iraq is critical to avoid Islamic State’s return
BY
CAROL MORELLO
kuwait city — Secretary of
State Rex Tillerson on Tuesday
declared Iraq open for business
and urged governments and investors to help rebuild the country or risk seeing a return of the
Islamic State.
Tillerson said the U.S. ExportImport Bank would sign a memo
that would facilitate financing
for $3 billion in American goods
and services. He listed several
large U.S. corporations that already have deals with Iraq totaling $2 billion, and he lauded the
investment opportunities.
That is far less than the
$88 billion Iraq needs to restore
basic water and power and rebuild schools destroyed during
the Islamic State’s reign over
vast swaths of Iraq and Syria.
And it is unlikely that the conference will net Iraq anywhere near
that sum.
Tillerson said the conference
was not about donating but
about “understanding” the busi-
ness opportunities available.
Earlier in the day, Tillerson
outlined the consequences of
not stepping up to stabilize territory liberated from the militants.
“The end of major combat
operations does not mean we
have achieved the enduring defeat of ISIS,” Tillerson said at a
meeting of countries that participated militarily and financially
in fighting the Islamic State,
using a common acronym for the
group. “ISIS remains a serious
threat to the stability of the
region, our homelands and other
parts of the globe.”
Tillerson’s attendance at the
conferences in Kuwait underscored the difficulty the administration faces in turning President Trump’s populist rhetoric
into policy.
On Monday, Trump suggested
that the United States had spent
too much in the region and
tweeted, “it is now time to start
investing in OUR Country!”
On Tuesday, Tillerson de-
JON GAMBRELL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the U.S. Export-Import Bank
would sign a memo that would facilitate financing for $3 billion in
American goods and services to help rebuild Iraq.
scribed the fight against the
Islamic State as far from complete and announced $200 million in U.S. aid to stabilize wartorn communities in Syria so
residents can return home.
“In Iraq and Syria, ISIS is
attempting to morph into an
insurgency. In places like Afghanistan, the Philippines, Lib-
U.S. airstrike in Syria
killed Russian fighters
Moscow plays down
mercenaries’ deaths
amid fears of wider war
BY A NTON T ROIANOVSKI
AND A NDREW R OTH
moscow — A group of Russian
military contractors died in a U.S.
airstrike in Syria last week, people who knew two of those killed
said Tuesday, signaling the beginning of a potentially dangerous
phase in the crowded theater of
war in the Middle East.
The incident appears to be the
first publicly known case of
the U.S. military firing on and
killing Russians fighting on behalf of Syrian President Bashar
al-Assad. Neither Washington
nor Moscow officially confirmed
the deaths.
And the Kremlin, rather than
using the incident to fan antiAmerican feelings, sought to play
it down.
The United States described
the Feb. 7 airstrike southeast of
the city of Deir al-Zour as a
counterattack after an unprovoked assault by pro-government
forces on a base where U.S. troops
were operating in support of local
partner units. One U.S. official
said that the American-led coalition was in regular contact with
Russian counterparts “before,
during and after” the attack and
that no regular Russian service
members were believed to have
been killed.
Beyond Russia’s official military engagement in Syria backing
the regime, an unknown number
of Russian mercenaries are fighting as part of Assad’s army. In
recent days, rumors swirled online in Russia that large numbers
of those military contractors had
perished under American fire.
The contractors have been active
in Syria since the Kremlin began
its intervention in September
2015, according to Russian news
reports.
On Tuesday, two Russians told
The Washington Post that people
they knew were among the dead.
Russian news media reported
that the deaths of several other
military contractors have been
confirmed, as well.
“I know he didn’t die alone,”
said Alexander Averin, a spokesman for the far-left Other Russia
party, describing the death in
Syria of party member Kirill
Ananyev. Averin added that it
was “a fact” that other Russians
also died, according to his
sources in Syria.
In the Baltic Sea city of Kaliningrad, a local Cossack conservative group also reported losing
one of its own, Vladimir Loginov,
in the attack. Group leader Maxim Buga said Loginov, a sapper by
training, departed last fall to help
the Syrian army clear mines. He
said Loginov had years of experience in Chechnya and a “humanitarian mission” in eastern
Ukraine under his belt.
“When he was leaving, he said
that he was going to help Syrian
people,” Buga said. “He was in
many hot spots before — that was
his specialty.”
Analysts are increasingly concerned that the conflict in Syria
could spill well beyond its borders, given the number of powers
engaged in the country. Just this
month, Israel, Russia and Turkey
have had aircraft shot down over
Syria.
Briefing reporters by video at
the Pentagon, Lt. Gen. Jeffrey
Harrigian, who heads Air Forces
Central Command, said “deconfliction” conversations between
the U.S. and Russian militaries in
Syria continued on a daily basis.
He described the interactions
as “professional.” But he repeatedly declined to specify who was
killed in the Feb. 7 airstrike.
“It’s not as simple . . . to sort
out exactly who everyone is down
there, and we need to allow that
to work its way through,” Harrigian said.
President Trump and Russian
President Vladimir Putin spoke
by phone Monday, but neither
side publicly mentioned Syria as
a subject of their call.
The United States initially said
that about 100 pro-government
fighters were killed in the Feb. 7
counterattack. In Moscow, officials said none of them were
Russian service members. Russian news media confirmed the
deaths of several mercenaries in
addition to Ananyev and Loginov,
based on interviews with people
who knew them, and speculated
that the number of Russians
killed may have exceeded 100.
That would be more than double
the 44 Russian service members
who the government says have
been killed in action in Syria
since October 2015.
“I’m sure the number of those
confirmed dead is going to increase,” said Alexander Ionov, a
Russian anti-globalization activist who has fought in Syria and is
well connected among former
fighters from eastern Ukraine.
“To some degree, both sides are
guilty because both sides are
staying silent. Neither side wants
the world to know about a direct
clash between Russians and
Americans.”
Alexei Zhuravlev, a nationalist
member of the lower house of
parliament, reacted with outrage: “The tragic day of Feb. 7 can
be seen as the beginning of an
open war of aggression by the
West against the Russian people,”
he said.
But the Kremlin, which has
been quick to play the antiAmerican card in the past, was
more circumspect.
“Let’s be frank: There are rather large numbers of our Russian
countrymen in many countries of
the world, and it is very difficult
in this case to possess detailed
information,” Putin spokesman
Dmitry Peskov told reporters
Tuesday in response to a question
about the Russian deaths.
Vitaly Naumkin, perhaps Russia’s most prominent Syria expert, also urged restraint in a
news conference at the Valdai
Discussion Club.
“There is nothing good in this
situation, but let’s not exaggerate
it,” Naumkin said. “What are we
going to do, go to war with the
Americans or look for a place
where we can blow up 100 Americans?”
Moscow’s reticence on the matter underlines a key Kremlin
balancing act: preventing antiAmerican sentiments stoked daily on Russian state television
from getting out of hand. Vladimir Frolov, an independent Moscow foreign policy analyst, said
Putin was looking for calm ahead
of the presidential election next
month, in which he is expected to
win a fourth term.
“The Kremlin has no desire to
go to war with the U.S. a month
before the election,” Frolov
said. “It wants this story to die
ASAP.”
anton.troianovski@washpost.com
andrew.roth@washpost.com
Missy Ryan in Washington
contributed to this report.
a in
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In pi
CaseDesign.com | 844.831.5966
ya, West Africa and others, it is
trying to carve out and secure
safe havens,” he said. “We have
seen in Iraq and Syria the consequences of an ISIS territorial
presence. History must not be
allowed to repeat itself elsewhere.”
The meetings in Kuwait held
strong resonance rooted in time
and place. The city is awash with
flags and lights leading up to
Liberation Day on Feb. 26, the
27th anniversary of the country’s liberation from Iraq after
the Persian Gulf War. Now Kuwait was welcoming Iraq’s head
of government to a conference
designed to help Iraq.
“Iraq stands united and
strong over the ruins brought by
terrorism,” said Prime Minister
Haider al-Abadi, citing 150,000
units of housing that were damaged or destroyed. “Iraq has
what it takes to stand back on its
feet.”
However, even the rich nations in the gulf are more costconscious today, after years of
low oil prices.
Tillerson is deeply concerned
that regional rivalries and disputes are diverting attention
from the fight against remnants
of the Islamic State, al-Qaeda
and other militant groups. One
flash point is in northwestern
Syria, where Syrian Kurds allied
with the United States are being
attacked by troops from NATO
ally Turkey.
Tillerson travels Friday to Ankara for a visit Turkish officials
have characterized as a make-orbreak moment for the U.S.Turkish relationship.
Some Middle East experts,
and even diplomats inside the
State Department, say the administration’s proposals to cut
foreign aid and the State Department’s budget may carry costs
beyond money.
“If communities in Iraq and
Syria cannot return to normal
life, we risk the return of conditions that allowed ISIS to take
root,” Tillerson said Tuesday.
carol.morello@washpost.com
A12
EZ
Netanyahu
says he’ll
continue
to govern
NETANYAHU FROM A1
night that he would not give up
without a fight, stressing his
security credentials and striking a confident and sometimes
combative tone as he maintained
his innocence.
“I will continue to lead Israel
with responsibility and dedication and loyalty,” he said, pointing out that only half of the police
recommendations end with an
indictment. “I’m sure that the
truth will come to light, and I’m
sure that also in the next elections I will once again win your
loyalty.”
The police recommendations,
however, raise questions about
whether Netanyahu, now in his
fourth term, will be able to
maintain his coalition and cling
to power. Ministers from his
party have rushed to support him
amid the allegations, but a recent
poll by an Israeli television channel said that 60 percent of Israelis thought Netanyahu should
resign if police recommended
bribery charges.
The first case, referred to as
Case 1000, has involved gifts of
cigars and jewelry that the prime
minister and his wife, Sara, are
suspected of receiving from billionaire benefactors such as
Israeli-born Hollywood producer
Arnon Milchan, whose film credits include “Fight Club” and
“Pretty Woman,” and Australian
businessman James Packer. Police said there is also enough
evidence to build a case against
Milchan for bribery. Milchan did
not immediately respond to an
emailed request for comment.
The other case, 2000, involves
deals made between Netanyahu
and Arnon Mozes, publisher of
the popular Israeli daily Yedioth
Ahronoth. According to information leaked to the Israeli media,
the agreement apparently would
have allowed the prime minister
to receive more favorable coverage from the newspaper if he
agreed to weaken the status of
rival daily newspaper Israel
Hayom, owned by U.S. casino
magnate Sheldon Adelson.
“I work for the good of the
nation,” Netanyahu said. “Not for
cigars, not for press coverage, not
for anything, only the good of the
country.”
The announcement came days
after Israel says it shot down an
Iranian drone that had crossed
its border. Netanyahu said Tuesday that he works “around-theclock,” including “when the red
phone rings, and in our country,
that happens quite a lot.”
As the investigations have
circled closer, Netanyahu has
repeatedly attacked the police,
accusing them of being politically motivated and saying his opponents are trying to unseat him
through corruption allegations
because they can’t win at the
ballot box.
His disparaging of the police
and regular criticism of the
media have drawn comparisons
to how President Trump has
handled the investigation into
Russian interference in the 2016
presidential election. Netanyahu
has even borrowed from Trump’s
phrase book, using the term
“fake news” to describe media
coverage. Israel’s president,
Reuven Rivlin, has warned that
the country’s democracy is in
peril because of attacks on the
free press and judiciary by Netanyahu’s right-wing government.
Friction between Netanyahu
and the police has ramped up
over the past week amid leaks
that police were preparing to
recommend an indictment. Opposition lawmaker Yoel Hasson
urged Israeli Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit in a letter
to move quickly, pointing out
that law enforcement authorities
had been subject to “vicious
attacks” and “harassment” from
ministers and lawmakers since
the investigation began.
However, the process could
drag on for months, said Reuven
Hazan, professor of political science at Hebrew University of
Jerusalem. Tuesday’s recommendation was only the beginning
and “definitely not the end,” he
said.
Netanyahu “will find it difficult to govern because as feisty as
he is and even though nobody is
challenging him yet, the political
system will begin to smell blood,”
Hazan said. He said that if Netanyahu’s party is dragged down in
opinion polls, it could oust him,
or the allegations could split his
coalition and force elections.
For the moment, his ministers
are vociferously in support. Tourism Minister Yariv Levin, from
Netanyahu’s Likud party, described the police action on Tuesday as a “despicable move” designed to “carry out a government coup against the will of the
voter.”
Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon, leader of the second-biggest
coalition party, Kulanu, said he
would remain in the coalition
until the attorney general makes
a decision.
As allegations against Netanyahu have grown, so have weekly
demonstrations calling on him to
resign. But so far, they have
drawn only a few thousand participants.
“Someone with such serious
accusations against them, many
of which he does not even deny,
cannot continue to serve as
prime minister with responsibility for the security and well-being
of Israel’s citizens,” said Yair
Lapid, leader of the opposition
Yesh Atid party, which has been
gaining popularity in public
opinion polls.
While Netanyahu, who has
weathered political storms in the
past, may be able to survive the
current allegations, another investigation, dubbed Case 3000,
could have much more serious
ramifications. It centers on a
multibillion-dollar submarine
deal with Germany. Though the
prime minister has not been
named as a suspect, members of
his inner circle have been arrested and questioned.
Netanyahu’s
predecessor,
Ehud Olmert, was forced to resign in 2009 after being plagued
by corruption allegations during
his term. He was indicted shortly
after his resignation and convicted in 2014.
In Case 1000, the prime minister is suspected of promoting an
extension of a tax exemption for
residents returning after 10
years, which would have had
financial benefits for Milchan.
Netanyahu is also accused of
working to help Milchan obtain
his visa to the United States, after
it became difficult to extend it, by
lobbying senior U.S. officials. Police allege that Netanyahu received more than $200,000 in
gifts from Milchan.
In relation to the visa issue,
Netanyahu said that it was his
duty to lobby for a new visa for
Milchan, as someone who had
done so much for Israel, but that
he did not do it in exchange for
cigars.
loveday.morris@washpost.com
ruth.eglash@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
S. Africa’s ruling party demands that Zuma resign
BY KEVIN SIEFF
AND KRISTA MAHR
cape town, south africa —
South Africa’s ruling party called
Tuesday for the resignation of President Jacob Zuma, a remarkable
illustration of the political divisions that continue to widen here
nearly two decades after Nelson
Mandela’s retirement.
So far, Zuma has refused to submit to his own party’s demands,
leaving some to wonder who exactly is at the helm in South Africa at
the moment.
In December, the ruling party,
the African National Congress, selected Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa as its leader, making him
Zuma’s likely successor in the 2019
election. But many South Africans,
including top members of the ANC,
wanted Zuma gone before then.
Zuma’s term had been pockmarked by corruption scandals
and a plummeting approval rating
that drove even Mandela’s acolytes
away from the party that had defeated apartheid.
Over the past week, Ramaphosa
has held several protracted meetings with Zuma, hoping to prompt
his resignation. When Zuma did
not budge, the party’s leaders voted
Tuesday to remove him, a move of
enormous symbolic importance
but without any legal implications
for the presidency.
ANC Secretary General Ace Magashule told reporters that Zuma’s
removal is necessary to provide
“certainty to the people of South
Africa at a time when the economic
and social challenges facing the
country require urgent and resolute response.”
Magashule said that Zuma had
“agreed in principle” to resign but
that he had asked for three to six
months to step down. Magashule
said the party wanted to act sooner
and was expecting a response from
Zuma on Wednesday.
For a party that has long feigned
unity and strength in the face of
embarrassing scandals and highprofile defections, the standoff
with Zuma marks a rare moment
for the ANC, its internal divisions
now unmasked.
For years, Zuma has tried to deflect criticism by drawing on his
associations with Mandela, with
GIANLUIGI GUERCIA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
South Africa’s ANC hopes to boost its reputation before next year’s
election, but President Jacob Zuma is standing in the way.
whom he was imprisoned for
10 years on Robben Island for conspiring to overthrow the apartheid
government. But, as in Robert
Mugabe’s Zimbabwe, South Africans grew tired of lofty speeches
about liberation that were rarely
followed by effective governance or
development. In economic terms,
many black South Africans say they
are no better off now than they
were during the years of white-nationalist rule.
The number of people living in
poverty and extreme poverty both
increased by about 3 million from
2011 to 2015. The unemployment
rate hovers at more than 27 percent. The economy, one of the largest and most sophisticated in Africa, dipped briefly into recession
last year.
“We’ve got university graduates
who can’t get jobs sweeping the
floor,” said Nosandi Kenene, 43, an
unemployed mother of four in
Cape Town’s Gugulethu settlement. “Who else can we blame but
Zuma and his cronies?”
Many here see Ramaphosa, a
successful businessman with roots
in the anti-apartheid struggle, as
the right leader to repair the ANC.
He has expressed a commitment to
rooting out corruption. Already, he
has emerged as the face of a new
South Africa, trying to lure foreign
investors during an appearance in
Davos, Switzerland, his ascent
boosting the strength of the coun-
try’s currency.
If Ramaphosa could come to
power before the 2019 elections,
ANC leaders thought, he could lay
the groundwork for an easy victory,
slowly rebuilding the party’s reputation. For now, Zuma stands in the
way of that plan.
Ironically, it was Zuma who in
2008 successfully pushed to recall
a predecessor, Thabo Mbeki, after a
court ruled that Mbeki had interfered in the work of government
prosecutors. Mbeki’s resignation
paved the way for Zuma’s rise as
head of state.
That ascent marked a fundamental shift for the ANC, away
from Mandela the peacemaker and
Mbeki the technocrat — and
toward Zuma, a traditionalist
whose popularity was concentrated in the populous rural province
of KwaZulu-Natal.
Zuma’s opponents derided his
lack of a formal education, his polygamy, and a flurry of fraud, corruption and money-laundering
charges. But his rural support base
remained strong, even as “Zuma
Must Go” demonstrations were
held in the country’s major cities in
recent years. Zuma’s ex-wife, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, drew on
that same base in a close ANC leadership race against Ramaphosa in
December.
In March 2016, Zuma was found
to have “failed to uphold” the
constitution after ignoring an
order by the government’s anticorruption watchdog to pay back
millions of dollars spent on
nonsecurity upgrades to his private
estate, Nkandla, including a
swimming pool and cattle pen.
Zuma apologized to the nation and
paid back the mandated sum.
In October of that same year, the
watchdog had another instruction
for the president: Appoint a commission of inquiry into allegations
that a wealthy family, the Guptas,
used their proximity to Zuma to
build up their business empire. A
subsequent flood of emails leaked
to the South African media, known
as the “Gupta Leaks,” catalogued
more examples of similar alleged
improprieties and infuriated
South African voters. Zuma and
the Guptas have denied any wrongdoing.
It is Zuma’s rural support that, at
least in part, appears to be driving
Ramaphosa’s delicate political maneuvering with Zuma. In a television interview last month, he said
of the transition: “We should never
do it in a way that is going to
humiliate President Zuma. We
should never do it in a manner that
is also going to divide the nation.”
But with Zuma refusing to step
down, his party is left with few
remaining options. It could allow
Parliament to push Zuma out in a
vote of no confidence. But such a
vote probably would embolden opposition parties who could claim
credit for removing the president.
The refusal also could open
Zuma up to prosecution on corruption charges, a prospect that might
be avoided if Ramaphosa offered
him immunity in exchange for
stepping down. According to local
news reports, Ramaphosa has denied that an immunity deal was on
the table.
Still, some here are optimistic
that once the period of uncertainty
ends and Zuma leaves office, progress will come.
“If you put a man of integrity in
the Union Building, he doesn’t
have to build us a rocket the next
week,” said Ralph Mathekga, an
independent political analyst and
author of “When Zuma Goes,” referring to the seat of government.
“He just needs to close the tap on
corruption.”
kevin.sieff@washpost.com
Assange fails in e≠ort to quash arrest warrant
BY K ARLA A DAM
AND W ILLIAM B OOTH
london — Julian Assange on
Tuesday lost a second bid to quash
a British arrest warrant, another
setback for the WikiLeaks founder, who has spent almost six years
holed up in the Ecuadoran Embassy in London.
Judge Emma Arbuthnot denied
a request by Assange’s lawyers to
lift a British warrant that was
issued after Assange jumped bail
when Swedish authorities sought
him for questioning about sexual
assault allegations.
The Swedish case was dropped
last year, but the arrest warrant
for skipping bail in 2012 by seeking refuge in Ecuador’s embassy
still holds, the judge ruled. Assange has strongly denied the
Swedish accusations.
In London’s Westminster Magistrates’ Court, Assange sought to
have the British warrant lifted,
saying it no longer served the
public interest.
Assange’s lawyers argued that
their client was justified in his
actions because of fears that he
would be extradited to the United
States to face possible charges for
his role in WikiLeaks’ dissemina-
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tion of troves of highly classified
U.S. documents.
They also said the five years
that Assange has spent holed up
in the embassy amounted to “adequate, if not severe, punishment”
for skipping bail. The lawyers cited a U.N. panel on detentions that
described Assange as “arbitrarily
detained.”
But Arbuthnot was withering
in her responses — in writing and
in her courtroom remarks.
“I find arrest is a proportionate
response even though Mr. Assange has restricted his own freedom for a number of years,” the
judge said.
“Defendants on bail up and
down the country, and requested
persons facing extradition, come
to court to face the consequences
of their own choices,” she said. “He
should have the courage to do the
same. It is certainly not against
the public interest to proceed.”
After the ruling, Assange
claimed there were “significant
factual errors in the judgment”
and suggested he might appeal.
“There are 3 months to appeal
judge’s decision,” he wrote in a
tweet.
Assange’s lawyers further
claimed that in his confinement at
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shelved its investigation into sexual assault allegations because it
could not get access to him.
Even if the bail arrest warrant
were lifted, it is unknown whether
Assange would leave the embassy
and where he would go in that
event. It is also unclear whether
he would immediately face extradition requests if he stepped outside the embassy, which is monitored by security cameras.
Assange has long argued that
there is an effort underway in the
United States to charge him for
publishing classified documents.
It is not publicly known whether there is a sealed indictment
against Assange. The Trump administration has reportedly
weighed invoking the 1917 Espionage Act.
Media reports have suggested a
sometimes strained relationship
between Assange and his hosts. At
one point, Ecuador severed Assange’s Internet connection over
concerns that WikiLeaks was
meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election after the anti-secrecy website published hacked
emails from the Democratic National Committee.
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Ecuador’s embassy, the 46-yearold suffers from ailments and lack
of sunshine. The judge replied: “I
do not accept there is no sunlight.
There are a number of photographs of him on a balcony connected to the premises he inhabits. Mr. Assange’s health problems
could be much worse.”
The judge also dismissed his
arguments that Sweden would
have extradited him to the United
States.
“I accept that Mr. Assange had
expressed fears of being returned
to the United States from a very
early stage in the Swedish extradition proceedings but, absent any
evidence from Mr. Assange on
oath, I do not find that Mr. Assange’s fears were reasonable.”
The judge added that she does
“not accept that Sweden would
have rendered Mr. Assange to the
United States” and risk touching
off a diplomatic crisis involving
Britain, Sweden and the United
States.
The judge’s decision came after
Assange lost a separate legal challenge last week.
In that ruling, his lawyers argued that the arrest warrant
should be dropped because it had
“lost its purpose” after Sweden
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Some young Iraqis have spent as much as $300 for a distinguished phone number. Others are saving to get theirs.
Iraq’s prime numbers are priced more like gold and gems
PHONES FROM A1
has increased demand for the
special SIMs among aspiring
business executives, political
neophytes and young people
looking to treat themselves.
They’ve become so popular
that Iraq’s largest telecom companies are formalizing the
trade, introducing offers for
tiered SIM cards from “Silver” to
“Diamond Plus.” A regular SIM
card runs about $3, while a Silver
card carrying a number with
some combination of consecutive
pairs, such as 4455, costs about
$30. A Diamond Plus card —
which features a number whose
last five digits are the same — will
set a seeker back $1,300 to
$1,500.
But it’s on the street and in
Internet chat rooms — where the
trend was born — that the bigmoney cards, also known
as “presidential numbers,” are
found.
The value of the cards is derived not from numerology or
lucky dates but from what the
number conveys to others about
the phone’s owner.
“These numbers are a language,” said Haider Mohamed, a
45-year-old cellphone dealer who
specializes in distinguished
phone numbers. His shop,
“World of Distinction,” located in
a shopping strip in central Baghdad, advertises the special permutations available for sale
on long sheets of paper displayed
in the window.
“A man makes calculations for
what will make him successful in
life or in business,” Mohamed
said. “Among them is what his
phone number says about him.”
And what does a phone number with the right combination of
consecutive zeros and ones say?
“It says he has taste. It also says
he’s loaded,” Mohamed said,
breaking into laughter. “It gives
him optimism. It gives him prestige.”
Mohamed said he once traded
a particularly beautiful number
to a businessman for a $60,000
Lexus, a claim confirmed by Mohamed’s top rival in the prestigenumbers business.
Owners of the numbers and
the merchants who sell them
generally agree that the trend
began sometime in 2007 — a
result of Saddam Hussein’s ouster in 2003 during the Iraq War.
Iraq, long cut off from the world
by punishing sanctions and pariah status, began to open up;
new technology and foreign
products started to pour in. Cellphones were among the most
coveted items, especially in a
country where few people use
landlines.
Iraqis
became
brandconscious in everything from
cars to clothes. Luxury items that
once were within reach of only
the narrow ruling elite flooded
the market. If you had money,
you could express your individuality through what you wore,
what you drove and what you
carried.
The toppling of Hussein also
shattered the tight political and
business class that had surround-
PHOTOS BY ALEX POTTER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT: Special numbers, such as those pasted on cardboard outside the King of Distinguished Numbers shop in Baghdad, range in price
from about $30 from a telecom firm to the tens of thousands in private deals. Iraqi women talk on their cellphones outside Mansour Mall, a place to see and be seen in
Baghdad. Inside the King of Distinguished Numbers shop, customers can browse boards and books of numbers — or request a specific set of digits from the broker.
ed him, creating opportunities
for savvy entrepreneurs and ambitious would-be power brokers.
To project status and sophistication, they needed the right tools.
An impressive phone number
became indispensable.
While the phone number market exists in several other Middle
Eastern countries, nowhere has it
reached the excesses of Iraq.
Rarely do the prices elsewhere
approach $100. That’s because,
for Iraqis, it’s about more than
vanity. It’s a way to stand out in a
society in which political upheaval has opened the door for new
elites to emerge.
Essa Sultan, a 47-year-old contractor, said he paid $1,200 in
2009 for a phone number that
ends with six sevens. He has been
offered $10,000 for the number,
but he refuses to sell it.
“This number gives the impression that I am distinguished,
which helps me get business,
especially among officials in the
state ministries who I am dealing
with,” he said. “If I call them from
a regular number, they wouldn’t
answer my call, but when they
see this number, they can’t ignore
it because they know a VIP is
calling them.”
Sultan said that his phone
number is an essential element of
his studied bling.
“I am always keen on carrying
the latest iPhone and having the
latest Land Cruiser,” he said,
referring to the prized and pricey
Toyota luxury SUV. “The phone
number completes the prestige.”
In a country such as Iraq,
where corruption in the public
sector is so endemic that Prime
Minister Haider al-Abadi has declared rooting out graft to be the
next big fight after defeating the
Islamic State, giving SIM cards
with distinguished numbers to
politicians is a common and
illicit way to curry favor. The
cards help launder the bribes
because they can be traded for
cash.
Dealers said that many of their
regulars are assistants to Iraqi
politicians and military officers
who come to sell the valuable
SIM cards gifted to their bosses.
But for many, the desire for a
distinctive number is less nefarious. Small businesses and startups covet them because the re-
petitive number combinations
make them easy to memorize and
project professionalism, said
Dera Tarek, a 31-year-old who
owns a modest car dealership.
“It helps me with marketing
the company,” he said. “After
getting one for $100, it’s helped
my business grow.”
Hussam al-Zaidi, 29, posted a
notice on a Facebook group dedicated to the buying and selling of
the special digits that he was in
the market for a card that would
set him back no more than $300.
Zaidi was looking for love, and he
believed that his pedestrian
phone number was holding him
back.
“A friend of mine has a distinguished number that helps him
get many girls,” he said. “So I
thought of trying it, but I was
stunned by the prices. Some
numbers are even more expensive than fancy cars.”
Ali Rasheed, a 22-year-old photographer who works part time at
a cellphone shop in Baghdad’s
upscale Mansour district, recoils
at the practice — which he said
many Iraqis who struggle with
poverty would find grotesque.
“It’s all about showing off,
nothing more,” he seethed. “People who do this only care about
shallow appearances and getting
ahead in any way.”
Safa Mohsen has no such
qualms. Indeed, he says he’s the
one personally responsible for
inflating SIM card prices so
much. Mohsen, a wiry 44-yearold, calls himself “the King of
Distinguished Numbers” and
runs a store of the same name.
And he’s recognized among his
fellow dealers as the premier
broker for important people
seeking very specific numbers.
He maintains a stock of about
2,000 distinctive cards — the
most valuable worth $3,000 —
and can be commissioned to
arrange special acquisitions.
His shop bustles with people
hoping to sell him their SIM
cards and make a small fortune.
He rapidly evaluates their worth.
A Washington Post reporter
asked him to appraise several
phone numbers belonging to
prominent Iraqis from the newspaper’s Baghdad bureau contact
index.
Former prime minister Nouri
al-Maliki’s two numbers are
worth more than $10,000 each,
Mohsen concluded. Maj. Gen.
Fadhil Jamil al-Barwari of the
elite, U.S.-trained counterterrorism service had a number that
would fetch at least $38,000 for
the sheer number of consecutive
zeros, Mohsen said.
But even a dealer with Mohsen’s clout has a white whale — a
number so rare and beautiful
that he says he has been commissioned by the owner of an Iraqi
television station to acquire it for
$120,000. The phone number has
seven consecutive zeros and belongs to a policeman in the city of
Kirkuk. But Mohsen said the
officer wouldn’t accept the offer,
and the television baron, whom
Mohsen declined to identify,
couldn’t afford to pay more.
The policeman had bought the
SIM card in 2007 for a mere $125,
according to Mohsen.
Why would a civil servant balk
at the six-figure payout?
“He cherishes it,” Mohsen said.
“Just like wine, the older it gets,
the more valuable it becomes.”
tamer.el-ghobashy@washpost.com
mustafa.salim@washpost.com
Friend of disgraced ex-South Korean leader gets 20 years, $17 million fine
Choi is sentenced for role
in corruption scandal;
Park faces same charges
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — The confidante of
former South Korean president
Park Geun-hye was sentenced
Tuesday to 20 years in prison and
fined almost $17 million for her
role in a huge corruption scandal
that led to Park’s impeachment
and continues to roil the country.
The heavy sentence handed
down to Choi Soon-sil bodes ill
for Park, who is still on trial and
is facing almost the same charges.
Choi took advantage of her
“long-running, private ties” with
Park, Judge Kim Se-yoon said, to
force big South Korean companies such as Samsung to give
donations to two foundations,
which were meant to be used to
encourage sports but were instead slush funds for Park and
Choi.
“In light of the size of material
gains obtained by the accused,
the severe confusion in state
affairs caused by her crimes and
the people’s sense of frustration,
the guilt of the accused is very
heavy,” the judge said, according
to reports from inside the packed
courtroom.
Choi, 62, has been friends with
Park for about four decades.
Choi’s father, a kind of shamanfortune teller, was close to Park’s
father, Park Chung-hee, who
served as South Korea’s strongman president from 1963 until he
was fatally shot by his own spy
chief in 1979.
After Park’s mother was assassinated in 1974, the shaman reportedly began conveying to
Park messages from her mother
in the afterlife. This led U.S.
diplomats in Seoul to call him a
“Korean Rasputin,” according to
a leaked U.S. State Department
cable.
When Choi’s father died in
1994, she apparently took over
his role of providing spiritual
advice to Park, who was estranged from her siblings.
Their relationship grew closer
as Park rose through the political
ranks.
Once Park became president,
Choi — who held no official role
or security clearance — was involved in matters ranging from
the presidential wardrobe to international policy speeches.
All the while, Choi allegedly
sought “donations” for her foundations from the big companies
that form the backbone of South
Korea’s economy and continue to
have cozy ties to government
authorities.
Park’s presidential Blue House
was the “main agent” in setting
up bogus foundations to accept
donations from big businesses,
the court said.
The court found that Choi had
forced about 50 businesses to pay
a total of $71 million to the two
foundations.
Prosecutors had sought a 25year prison sentence and a
$109 million fine. The court gave
Choi, who had pleaded not guilty,
a lighter sentence. But her lawyers complained that it still bordered on “cruelty” and vowed to
appeal.
Choi did not betray any emotion after the sentence was read,
and she left the courtroom quietly, according to media reports.
Samsung, South Korea’s largest conglomerate, was the company most involved in Choi’s
scheme.
Lee Jae-yong, the de facto
head of Samsung, was convicted
in July of paying bribes totaling
$6.4 million to Choi, embezzling
corporate money to fund the
bribes, then lying about it. He
and other Samsung executives
were accused of promising to pay
$30 million more in bribes to
Choi.
Lee was sentenced to five
years in prison, but a South
Korean appeals court last week
freed him only six months into
his term.
Lee’s release last week notwithstanding, others involved in
Choi’s scheme have been sentenced to time behind bars.
Shin Dong-bin, chairman of
Lotte Group, South Korea’s fifthlargest conglomerate, was sentenced Tuesday to 21/2 years in
prison. He was convicted of paying about $7 million to Choi’s
foundations to win approval for a
license for Lotte’s duty-free business.
A senior adviser to Park was
also sentenced to jail Tuesday. An
Chong-bum received a six-year
sentence and a $92,000 fine.
After months of huge protests,
Park was impeached in March
last year. She was arrested soon
afterward and has been in detention ever since, complaining vigorously about the conditions in
her prison cell.
She has continued to profess
her innocence and refused to
attend her trial, saying she is the
victim of “political revenge.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Economy & Business
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Bill and Melinda Gates take on tough questions about their philanthropy
BY
J ENA M C G REGOR
seattle — Ten years ago, Bill
Gates wrote his foundation’s first
annual letter, an optimistic and
candid dispatch that highlighted
the organization’s achievements
and outlined its goals.
Since then, his wife and cochair, Melinda Gates, has added
her signature, and the letter has
taken on themes from innovation
to superpowers to big bets on the
future. But this year, the philanthropic power pair is trying a different format, marking the 10year milestone of when the Microsoft founder began working at the
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
full time with a letter: “The 10
toughest questions we get asked.”
In the letter and in a brief recent
interview with The Washington
Post, the two discussed their effort
to respond to some of the more
frequent — and not always flattering — questions they get from
people scrutinizing their work.
“The questions that we get from
other people — they sharpen our
focus and they help us hone what
we’re doing,” Melinda Gates said
in their office overlooking Lake
Washington outside Seattle.
“When you have to explain to people how you think, we think it
makes the foundation more knowable to people, too.”
With an endowment of more
than $40 billion, the Gates Foundation has a scale and reach that
touches most corners of the globe,
making grants and funding partners who work on a huge spectrum of issues including reducing
tobacco use in China, installing
toilets in Africa and reforming
U.S. public schools. The Gateses’
letter, released Tuesday, includes
responses to questions such as
why they work with corporations,
whether they are imposing their
values on other cultures and why
the foundation does not give more
money in the United States. (The
Gates Foundation spent almost
$500 million on its U.S. program
in 2016, about 11 percent of its
expenditures on grants and direct
charitable contracts.)
In the letter, the Gateses said
they have learned a lot from their
education efforts, “but the challenge has been to replicate the
successes widely.” They also acknowledged that some of their
critics do not speak up out of fear
of losing money, although they
encourage feedback; said concerns about their legacy is not
what drives their giving; and acknowledged that while “it’s not
fair that our wealth opens doors
that are closed to most people . . .
there is nothing secret about our
objectives as a foundation.”
The two say they are looking to
expand their work at home beyond education, noting a recent
trip to the southern United States
made them examine other ways to
help lift people out of poverty.
And Melinda Gates included a
pointed remark for President
Trump, writing that the duty of a
U.S. president is to be a role model
of American values and that she
wishes “our president would treat
people, and especially women,
with more respect when he speaks
and tweets.”
The Gateses have received
praise for their expansive philan-
thropic efforts, and yet their foundation also has faced criticism
over the years from various corners. Academics and global health
researchers have questioned
whether they have too much dominance over research or aid priorities. Some advocates have criticized what they call a traditionally
top-down approach to education
overhauls. And people on both
sides of the political aisle have
questioned the Gates-backed
Common Core State Standards.
While some tough questions
are addressed in the letter, other
critiques are not, potentially opening a Pandora’s box of additional
questions from experts and pundits about why some topics were
or were not chosen.
Experts on leadership and communication said the strategy highlights the importance of being
transparent and open with critics
— but also the risks that go with.
“It’s authentic to take on tough
questions and not use just your
typical P.R. format,” said Bill
George, the former chief executive
of Medtronic and a senior fellow at
Harvard Business School, applauding the approach. Even if it
opens the two up to more tough
questions, George said, that is a
good thing. “That debate is
healthy,” he said.
Yet others said the couple’s
commitment to the approach
could be tested by how they communicate in the future.
“If you appear to be more transparent and more involved and
more of a listener, people are going
to raise their expectations of you,”
said Paul A. Argenti, a professor at
Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business who studies communications
strategy. “It’s like the nail that
sticks up gets beaten down.”
Melinda Gates said that for the
letter, they selected questions they
were hearing often. Bill Gates
writes that in the past year, he has
been asked about Trump and the
administration’s policies “more
often than all the other topics in
this letter combined.” He also
writes that “the America First
worldview concerns me,” noting
that “my view is that engaging
with the world has proven over
time to benefit everyone, including Americans, more often than
withdrawing does.”
In the interview, he said the
Gates Foundation is “working extra hard to articulate the benefits
— even in a U.S.-centric framework — of less need to go out with
hard power” or a show of coercive
or military force.
One of the challenges the Gateses face is not only addressing
questions or concerns about the
wide diversity of intractable global problems they do work on —
including eradicating polio in Nigeria and the Middle East, or reducing homelessness in the Pacific Northwest — but demands
about the problems they do not
fund.
“Even though we’re in so many
different areas — just take global
health and disease areas — people
will ask us all the time to put our
voice yet behind something else,”
Melinda Gates said. “We have to
think very thoughtfully and carefully about where we’re going to
use that voice and that influence.”
jena.mcgregor@washpost.com
In risk-loving Silicon Valley, Uber’s CEO is playing it safe
BY E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
AND P ETER H OLLEY
Settlement with Google’s parent company puts his style in focus
san francisco — For nearly a
year, Uber and Google’s parent
company, Alphabet, clashed over
settling a lawsuit Alphabet filed
against the ride-hailing company,
according to two people familiar
with the discussions.
Uber chose to gamble for a victory in court rather than compromise, a choice that led to a highstakes public trial last week.
Negotiations went right up to
the trial itself. As recently as last
week, Uber’s board had rejected a
settlement offer.
Yet on Friday, just as journalists
were settling into the packed
courtroom after days of bruising
testimony, Uber announced it was
settling the case. The agreement
gave Alphabet’s self-driving car
business, Waymo, a stake worth
$244 million in the world’s most
valuable privately held start-up —
and the right to vet Uber’s selfdriving technology.
The sudden settlement is the
most striking example of Uber’s
new lower-risk approach under
chief executive Dara Khosrowshahi — a reversal from his predecessor, Travis Kalanick, whose brash,
confrontational strategy brought
rapid growth and defined start-up
culture but also triggered years of
conflict with regulators, shareholders, drivers and employees.
Since he became chief executive
last August, Khosrowshahi has
been steadily putting out fires
from the Kalanick era, a strategy
of removing risk from the business
ahead of a public offering in 2019.
He has shuttered or made compromises to end controversial parts of
Uber’s businesses. In December,
Uber said it would sell its money-
SIMON DAWSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Dara Khosrowshahi, chief executive of Uber, speaks in January in Switzerland. His management
method seems to take a dramatically different tack from that of former CEO Travis Kalanick.
losing U.S. auto-leasing business.
This week, it said drivers need to
take six-hour breaks — a concession to taxi commissions, which
have similar rules. In London,
Khosrowshahi is working behind
the scenes to restore Uber’s recently revoked operating license.
In announcing the lawsuit settlement Friday morning, Khosrowshahi
addressed
Uber’s
“friends at Alphabet.” Google’s
parent company, in the lawsuit
filed last February, had accused
Uber of stealing its trade secrets
and using them in its own technology for self-driving cars.
A loss would have been “devastating” for Uber, valued at $72 billion according to its most recent
round, said Shubha Ghosh, director of the Technology Commercialization Law Center at Syracuse
University’s College of Law. Alphabet was seeking damages of $1 billion. Khosrowshahi was not willing to take the risk of losing.
“A settlement leaves matters
more ambiguous for Uber and
gives the company some cover,”
Ghosh
said.
Khosrowshahi
doesn’t want to stay mired in
fights that drag Uber down, say
people who work with him.
“Companies at different phases
need different kinds of leadership,” said Paul Saffo, a futurist
who teaches technology forecasting at Stanford University. “Kalanick’s relentless drive brought Uber
to where it is now, but at some
point that energy can become a
liability. This is a company that
now has adult supervision and
understands that it needs to pay
attention to its shareholders.”
Among themselves, some Uber
employees refer to Khosrowshahi
as “the anti-Kalanick,” according
to two employees. Many respected
Kalanick because he had gotten
Uber to a level that the company
would not have reached otherwise, if only for his sheer willingness to flout local rules that either
prohibited or were vague about
ride-hailing. But in the last year in
particular, many felt that Kalanick
was hurting Uber more than helping and that some of the company’s problems were self-inflicted.
But, Saffo cautioned, Uber faces
a serious challenge as it transitions from a company with startup momentum to one led by professional management. Early on,
Saffo said, employees work exceptionally hard because they know
their management is working
even harder and has more at stake
than they do. An appearance of
rapid growth also attracts workers
looking for a big payday when the
company goes public.
Legal experts said the two parties had little to gain from an ugly
and drawn-out court fight. Both
would come out looking bad, no
matter who won. Uber’s self-driving engineers “had been distracted from your mission” by the case,
Khosrowshahi said.
As the trial went on, exposing
internal communications and
generating headlines, the outcome was a matter of debate. Uber
and Alphabet began court-mandated settlement discussions
shortly after Alphabet filed the
lawsuit in early 2017, according to
a person familiar with the discussions who spoke on the condition
of anonymity because the person
was not authorized to speak.
But the relationship between
Kalanick and Alphabet chief executive Larry Page had soured, Kalanick said at trial. Uber’s board
ousted Kalanick in June, and subsequent leadership vacancies
complicated the situation further.
After Uber poached Khosrowshahi from Expedia.com, one of
his first acts was to introduce a
new set of eight corporate principles, which included owning up to
past mistakes and doing the “right
thing — period.” (Kalanick had
enshrined “toe-stepping” and “always be hustlin’.”) Khosrowshahi
traveled to Europe, where he conducted a listening tour and reassured regulators that the company
was opening a new chapter.
In October, Tony West, a former
Justice Department official, filled
Uber’s vacant general counsel
seat. Soon after, he and Khosrowshahi reached out to Alphabet’s
leadership to say they hoped to
restart negotiations in good faith,
according to a person familiar
with the company’s thinking, who
spoke on the same condition of
anonymity.
Those conversations continued
up until last week, when Uber’s
board rejected a settlement offer
of $500 million that would have
included more equity for Waymo,
according to people familiar with
the discussions.
West and his counterpart at
Waymo kept a back channel open
and ultimately came to an agreement Thursday night for 0.34 percent of Uber’s equity, with Waymo
being allowed some insight,
through a third-party company,
into Uber’s self-driving hardware
and software.
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
DIGEST
ECONOMY
Chipotle taps Taco Bell
head to be new CEO
Chipotle Mexican Grill on
Tuesday said it had hired Brian
Niccol from Yum Brands’ Taco
Bell unit as chief executive to turn
around the formerly red-hot
burrito chain that has been hurt
by several food safety lapses.
Shares of Chipotle were up 11
percent at $279 in extended
trading. They had hit a high of
$742 in 2015, before salescrushing E.coli, salmonella and
norovirus outbreaks sickened
hundreds of U.S. customers.
Niccol, who has headed Taco
Bell since 2015, replaces Chipotle
founder Steve Ells.
Ells said in November that he
would step aside after failing for
two years to rescue the burrito
chain’s sales and reputation.
— Reuters
INTERNET
Court rules on private
Facebook photos
New York’s high court ruled
Tuesday that Facebook users may
be required to turn over photos
and other information relevant to
litigation, even if they are
shielded by “privacy” settings.
By a 7-to-0 vote, the state’s
Court of Appeals reinstated a trial
judge’s ruling requiring a
Manhattan woman who was
disabled in a riding accident to
turn over to the defendant, a
horse owner, photos taken before
and after her injuries.
Noting there is “significant
controversy” over what Facebook
data deserves privacy protection,
Chief Judge Janet DiFiore said it
Outstanding service
is important.
is appropriate to require
disclosure of materials that are
“reasonably calculated” to
contain “material and necessary”
evidence.
— Reuters
ALSO IN BUSINESS
American households’
outstanding debt climbed to an
all-time high of $13.1 trillion in
the October-December period,
according to data released
Tuesday by the Federal Reserve
Bank of New York. It marked the
fourth straight quarter in which
borrowing hit a record. Debt
balances rose from the previous
quarter in nearly all categories,
including a 3.2 percent gain in
credit-card borrowing. The report
said 7.55 percent of credit-card
balances were in serious
delinquency — 90 days or more
past due.
Delta Air Lines wants to be one
of the first to fly a potential new
mid-sized jetliner from Boeing,
Delta chief executive Ed Bastian
told employees Tuesday. That’s a
vote of confidence as Boeing
decides whether to build the jet,
dubbed the 797 by analysts, as a
potential replacement for Delta’s
aging fleet of Boeing 757s and
767s on long domestic routes and
midrange international flights.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases retail sales
data for January.
8:30 a.m.: Labor Department
releases consumer price index for
January.
Our business banking customers helped us win seven Greenwich Excellence Awards.
We’re proud to have earned four national and three regional excellence awards from Greenwich
Associates based on performance surveys from our own business banking customers.* We’ve taken
the time to understand what’s important to them, and we’d love to learn what’s important to you.
Find out everything M&T Bank can do for your business by calling Trevor Garner at 410-244-3720,
or stop by any M&T branch today.
Hear what our customers have to
say about working with M&T at
mtb.com/understandingbusiness.
Equal Housing Lender.
According to statistics released by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) for total approved loans through the SBA’s 7(a) lending program during the federal fiscal year ending 9/30/2017.
*Based on the 2017 Greenwich Excellence Awards in Small Business Banking.
©2018 M&T Bank. Member FDIC.
.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
SU
In light of new tax law, double-check your tax withholding to find the sweet spot
With the new tax
law comes a
homework
assignment.
Remember that
small form you
Michelle
filled out when
Singletary you got your
current job? It’s
THE COLOR
IRS Form W-4.
OF MONEY
This is the form
that your
employer uses to withhold
federal income tax from your
pay.
As a wage earner, you are
required to pay federal income
tax by having it withheld from
your paycheck throughout the
year. This is your withholding,
which you calculate based on the
number of allowances you claim
on your W-4. If your tax situation
changes — you have a child, get
married or purchase a home —
you should fill out a new form,
because it could affect your tax
situation. The goal is to have
your withholding match your
actual tax liability.
Well, with a new tax law in the
land, this means you might need
to do some calculations to see if
your withholding is correct. I
know. You’re preoccupied with
gathering the documents for
your 2017 tax return. But this is
exactly the right time to also
focus on your 2018 return. To get
the withholding right, you’ll
need information from your
current pay stub and your 2017
tax return.
In an ideal world, you don’t
want to owe the federal
government taxes, but neither
should you aim to get a large
refund. To hit the sweet spot —
no taxes owed and maybe a small
refund — you need to focus on
your W-4. Otherwise, with the
new tax changes hitting this year,
you may find your employer is
withholding too much money or
not enough. In the latter case, do
you really want to find out when
you file your 2018 return next
year that you’ve got a big tax bill?
“We suggest that people look
at their withholdings every year,
but most don’t,” said IRS
spokesman Eric Smith. “But if
ever there was a year to look at
your withholdings, this is the
year. Your current return is a
road map of your tax situation.”
Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs
Act, there are now seven new
income tax brackets: 10 percent,
12 percent, 22 percent,
24 percent, 32 percent,
35 percent and 37 percent.
Standard deductions have
increased. For individuals and
married couples filing separately,
deductions increased from
$6,350 to $12,000. The
deductions for heads of
household went from $9,350 to
$18,000, and for married couples
filing jointly, they went from
$12,700 to $24,000.
“It’s important to adjust your
W-4 for any over- or underwithholding to get closer to the
break-even point,” said Eric
Bronnenkant, head of taxes for
the online financial adviser
Betterment.
Your goal should not be to get
a fat check from the federal
government year after year. If
you do, you’ll just be letting
Uncle Sam hold your money
interest-free. Surely you can do a
better job of putting that cash to
good use. Got debt? That’s one
place to start.
The IRS has released the
income-tax withholding tables
for 2018, which take into account
changes made by the tax
legislation. The agency has asked
employers to put the new tables
into effect by Feb. 15. When
you’ll see a change in your pay
depends on when your employer
starts using the new tables and
how often you get paid.
Typically, I would send you to
IRS.gov to use the agency’s
online withholding calculator to
make adjustments to your W-4.
But it’s not available, because it’s
being updated. You can adjust
your withholding by using the
worksheet on the W-4, which
helps you figure out how many
personal allowances to take,
based on what tax deductions or
credits you expect to claim. But
the 2018 W-4 is also not available
yet.
The calculator and new W-4
will probably be out by the end
of February, Smith said. Ideally,
an employee should wait for the
new calculator and W-4. But if
someone is starting a new job or
needs to figure out how to adjust
his or her existing W-4 now, use
the old worksheet, he said. You
can always change it.
Or use the withholding
calculators put online by Turbo
Tax, H&R Block and other taxpreparation companies. In any
case, you’ll need your most
recent pay stub and a copy of
your 2017 tax return. Once you’ve
answered a series of questions —
much easier to understand than
the paper worksheet — the
calculators suggest a number of
allowances you should put down
on your W-4.
If you think you might owe
taxes, you don’t want to wait too
long to redo your W-4.
“The longer you wait, the
shorter time you have to adjust
your withholdings to make sure
enough taxes are taken out,”
Bronnenkant said.
I’m hosting a live online
discussion at noon Eastern on
Thursday at
washingtonpost.com/
discussions. Bronnenkant will
join me to answer your tax
questions.
michelle.singletary@washpost.com
Employers who don’t offer paid sick leave are making flu season worse
BY
C HRISTOPHER I NGRAHAM
This winter’s flu season is
shaping up to be a nasty one,
with flu-related hospitalization
rates outpacing anything seen in
recent years, according to the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention.
This year’s vaccine is less effective against the strain of virus
making the rounds. But there’s
another factor that gives aggressive viruses such as this one an
extra punch in the United States:
lack of access to paid sick time.
According to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, 28 percent of
civilian workers — about 45 million people — don’t have access to
paid sick leave. When these
workers become ill, they have a
choice: go to work sick or stay
home and forgo pay. Because the
lack of paid sick time is concentrated among the lowest-income
employees, millions of workers
opt to work regardless of health.
Studies have shown that workers
without access to paid sick days
are more likely to go to work sick
than those with it.
That’s a problem not just for
those workers, who are sacrificing their health for a day’s wage,
but also for their fellow workers
and commuters whom they expose to their illness.
In recent years, studies have
attempted to quantify the extent
to which sick employees are making influenza outbreaks worse. In
2010, a policy brief published by
the Institute for Women’s Policy
Research used data from the CDC
stay at home when they gain
access to sick leave insurance,”
that report concluded.
More recently, a paper published in PLOS One last year
found that access to paid sick
leave made employees significantly more likely to stay home
when dealing with an influenzalike illness. “We conclude that
access to [paid sick days] is likely
to reduce the spread of disease in
workplaces by increasing the rate
at which sick employees stay
home from work, and reduce the
economic burden of staying
home on minorities, women, and
families,” that report concluded.
Although employers who don’t
offer paid sick leave might balk at
the costs, a substantial body of
research suggests that paid sick
days might effectively pay for
themselves by reducing overall
rates of absenteeism. A study
published last year by researchers at the CDC found that “providing paid sick leave to workers
who lack it might help decrease
the number of workdays lost as a
result of flu and similar illnesses
by nearly 4 to 11 million per year,”
resulting in an overall cost savings of $1 billion to $2 billion.
The CDC’s overall guidance on
what to do if you think you have
the flu is unequivocal: Stay home
while you’re sick, until at least
24 hours after your fever breaks.
Implementing a nationwide paid
sick leave policy — like nearly
every other country in the
wealthy world — would help sick
workers do exactly that.
ROBERT RAY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A doctor and a nurse confer inside a room used for flu patients at Northside Hospital in Cumming, Ga. The Bureau of Labor Statistics
found that 28 percent of civilian workers don’t have access to paid sick leave and must choose between going to work sick or forgoing pay.
and the BLS to estimate that
during the virulent 2009 flu season, about 8 million American
employees went to work while
infected with the influenza virus,
causing an additional 7 million
people to get sick.
Rates of “presenteeism” —
showing up to work sick — were
much lower in the public sector,
where paid sick leave is more
common than in the private
sector. “The public sector results
suggest that the vast majority of
employees infected with H1N1
would have stayed at home if
that were a viable option,” the
report concluded. “Absent paid
sick days legislation in the U.S.,
many private sector employees
faced little choice and attended
work while sick, thereby infecting others.”
Another paper, published in
2016, paired Google’s data on
influenza trends with information on sick-leave mandates (paid
and unpaid) implemented in cities and states in the 2000s. It
found that the introduction of
sick-leave mandates reduced the
incidence of influenza-like illnesses by about 6 percent across
the total population. The implication is that leave policies are
good not just for individual workers but also for everyone with
whom they may come in contact.
“More employees with a contagious disease will call in sick and
christopher.ingraham@washpost.com
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
27,250
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,640.45
+0.2
–0.3
25,500
23,750
22,000
20,250
Nasdaq Composite Index
7700
7013.51
+0.5
+1.6
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Real Estate Mgmt & Dev
Construction Materials
Multiline Retail
Internet & Catalog Retail
Construction & Engineerng
Auto Components
Automobiles
Energy Equipment & Svcs
Leisure Equipment & Prod
0
–4.0%
+4.0%
3.11
2.30
2.14
1.94
1.55
–1.00
–1.18
–1.33
–1.37
–2.75
6700
6200
5700
S&P 500 Index
2662.94
+0.3
–0.4
2900
2700
2500
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
80,898.70
15,216.47
47,869.20
–0.8
–0.2
0.1
370.58
5109.24
12,196.50
7168.01
–0.6
–0.6
–0.7
–0.1
5855.90
3935.63
29,839.53
21,244.68
0.6
1.2
1.3
–0.6
YTD % Chg
–7%
0%
+7%
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
231.36
94.56
164.34
343.16
153.97
113.29
41.23
44.19
70.75
76.30
14.67
255.53
183.72
150.75
44.46
0.9
–0.1
1.0
–0.2
1.1
–0.6
1.6
0.5
–1.5
–0.2
–1.0
0.9
–0.2
–0.4
–0.8
–1.7
–4.8
–2.9
16.4
–2.3
–9.5
7.7
–3.7
–0.7
–8.8
–15.9
0.3
–3.1
–1.7
–3.7
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
129.96
112.43
162.40
54.90
89.83
65.87
81.50
34.94
138.58
125.77
226.64
50.08
118.35
100.98
104.12
–0.2
0.6
–0.9
–1.0
0.8
–0.2
0.2
0.8
0.3
–1.3
0.4
–0.1
–0.1
1.4
0.7
–7.0
5.1
–5.6
–2.4
5.0
5.3
–11.3
–3.5
2.2
–1.4
2.8
–5.4
3.8
2.3
–3.2
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2355
0.0092
1.3893
0.3018
0.7940
0.0536
0.0075
1.1245
0.2452
0.6427
0.0434
149.7970
32.6631
85.6170
5.7790
0.2172
0.5716
0.0386
2.6314
0.1770
0.8094
Japan ¥ per 107.8200
133.2100
Britain £ per
0.7199
0.8893
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.3011
4.0391
0.0307
4.5858
Canada $ per
1.2594
1.5559
0.0116
1.7496
0.3800
Mexico $ per
18.6578
23.0510
0.1730
25.9209
5.6610
Mexico $
0.0675
14.8149
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,486.72
Russell 2000
1494.95
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 551.91
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
24.97
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
0.3
0.3
0.8
–2.5
YTD % Chg
–0.7
–2.6
1.5
126.2
Daily
% Chg
$3.1625
$3.6675
$59.19
$1,330.40
$2.59
+2.5
–0.1
–0.2
+0.3
+1.6
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.4745
$16.53
$10.2225
$0.1344
$4.7375
–0.9
–0.3
+1.0
–1.2
–0.5
day
$800
month
$1200
$1000
0.5
2.4
0.6
–0.7
–1.7
–1.3
0.3
2.0
0.1
Gainers
Under Armour Inc
Under Armour Inc
Veeco Instruments
Innoviva Inc
AmerisourceBergen
AptarGroup Inc
Dun & Bradstreet
Fossil Group Inc
Qualys Inc
Werner Enterprises
LA-Pacific
Greenhill & Co Inc
Heartland Express
Green Dot Corp
TripAdvisor Inc
8x8 Inc
Charles River Labs
Motorcar Parts
QuinStreet Inc
CoreCivic Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$16.70
$15.29
$17.20
$16.99
$97.77
$89.72
$120.50
$9.04
$67.30
$38.80
$30.45
$19.90
$21.35
$59.21
$39.88
$17.75
$107.66
$22.60
$12.77
$21.26
17.4
16.0
13.9
10.0
9.3
8.6
7.9
7.7
7.5
7.2
7.1
7.0
6.1
5.9
5.8
5.7
5.6
5.4
5.3
5.1
Losers
Brighthouse Fin
Aceto Corp
Pioneer Energy Svcs
Diamond Offshore
Cloud Peak Energy
Henry Schein Inc
Mattel Inc
Lumber Liquidators
Regeneron
Patterson Cos Inc
SuperValu
SM Energy Co
Owens & Minor
GulfIslandFabricatn
Dana Inc
Rowan Cos Plc
Murphy Oil Corp
FMC Corp
Winnebago Indst
Nektar Therapeutics
Daily
Close % Chg
$53.56
$7.14
$2.55
$14.09
$4.07
$67.39
$16.36
$23.13
$324.57
$31.21
$14.48
$20.47
$14.94
$12.05
$28.93
$12.27
$26.21
$81.86
$43.55
$75.66
–8.0
–7.3
–7.3
–6.9
–6.7
–6.6
–5.8
–5.6
–5.3
–5.2
–5.0
–5.0
–4.8
–4.4
–4.3
–4.2
–4.0
–3.9
–3.9
–3.9
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7200
2300
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.29
0.52
0.80
1.56
3.37
5.57
4.50%
4.34%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
3.66%
1.83%
LIBOR 3-Month
10-year note
Yield: 2.83
2-year note
Yield: 2.11
5-year note
Yield: 2.55
6-month bill
Yield: 1.79
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.53%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Amazon’s health-care push starts with gloves, glues and syringes
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
Amazon has been expanding
its medical supply business —
selling gloves, syringes and other
health-care sundries to dentists,
doctors and hospitals — in an
early sign of its efforts to enter the
health-care industry.
Unlike its secretive plans to
shake up the prescription drug
industry or its initiative to develop technology tools to rein in
health costs for its own employees, Amazon has not hidden this
effort. In an earnings call in October, an executive mentioned hospitals first on a list of institutions
the company was targeting with
its Amazon Business offering,
along with schools, labs and government agencies.
On Tuesday, stocks for companies that distribute medical supplies tumbled after the Wall
Street Journal reported that
Amazon has been holding meetings with hospital executives to
learn more about the needs of the
industry.
Brian Tanquilut, an equity
analyst at the investment firm
Jefferies, said Amazon’s play to
sell commodity medical supplies,
such as medical gowns and
masks, has been going on for
some time. It is seen as a good
entry point to health care because it does not involve complex
regulatory approvals; many
states do not require a license at
all. Amazon has been particularly aggressive, he said, in courting
dentists, setting up booths at
dental conferences.
“They see health care as a very
big market; it’s one of the growth
markets in the economy that they
do not have a toehold in. They
look at areas where it’s relatively
easy to get into without high-level
government-level scrutiny, and
this is kind of the low-hanging
fruit, in health-care entry,” Tanquilut said.
An Amazon spokeswoman did
not answer questions about how
much of the company’s business
marketplace sales includes medical products, but Amazon Business has 1 million users across
many industries and 85,000 sellers. (Amazon founder and chief
executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns
The Washington Post.)
Phyllis McCready, chief procurement officer at Northwell
Health, a New York-based health
system with 23 hospitals and
more than 650 outpatient facilities, said that Amazon has been in
touch with hospitals like Northwell’s, which is not unusual when
companies are entering a market.
McCready oversees an 850,000-
square-foot medical supply distribution center for a health system
that purchases $650 million in
medical and surgical supplies
each year. She said Northwell contracts directly with manufacturers and, to a lesser extent, distributors. Northwell does not use
Amazon Business to buy medical
supplies.
The big advantage of negotiating directly with manufacturers
is the full visibility McCready gets
into where a product was made
and where it has been — essential
information for tools used in patient care.
“The chain of custody — the
pedigree of where it starts, where
it ends up. Quality is number one.
To have quality products, we have
to make sure they’re coming from
the right places,” McCready said.
That issue may be far less important in Amazon’s consumer
business, where people may be
satisfied with products based
largely on their prices and may
not question where a product was
made or how it arrived.
Tanquilut said that some medical supply distributors, particularly those that do not have a
second line of business distributing drugs, have faced increased
competition. Owens & Minor,
Cardinal Health, McKesson and
Medline Industries are other
competitors in the space. On an
earnings call last year, Owens & Minor chief executive Paul
Cody Phipps described the environment as “pretty challenging . . . where everybody is chasing market share, and that’s put
pressure on margins.”
For physician practices, Amazon might be able to provide
faster turnaround, Tanquilut
said. He said his research sug-
gests that the tech giant was
processing medical supplies at a
facility in Indiana where consumer goods are sent out the same day
they are ordered. But if Amazon
moves into higher-risk medical
devices or even prescription
drugs, which depend on secure
distribution and stable storage
conditions, running medical devices on the same line as diapers
may not make sense.
McCready said she has been
interested in Amazon’s technologyoriented solutions and supplychain expertise, even though she is
not using the company for medical
supplies.
“Amazon is a technology company and a logistics company, and
they do both of those well. One of
the things in health care is I don’t
know if our technology is where it
should be,” McCready said.
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
Having three airports
is great. Until you go
to the wrong one.
AIRPORTS FROM A1
taxi drivers who bear daily witness to these travel apocalypses
— from hardcore business travelers with so many departures they
lose track, to neophyte fliers for
whom “the airport” is just the
airport.
Limo driver Zack Araya recently picked up a client at the
University of Maryland for a run
to National. She climbed into the
back with a fellow conferencegoer, having offered her friend a
lift. What could go wrong?
“She said, ‘Are you going to the
airport? You can ride with me,’ ”
recalled Araya, a longtime driver
for DCAcar. They were well on
their way when he thought to
check what they each meant by
“airport.” He watched their expressions in the rearview mirror
as one said “Reagan” and the
other said “BWI.” He hit the
brakes.
“I got the one back to College
Park, and she took a taxi,” he
said. “I had to drive a little more
faster to get my client to National
on time. They didn’t know there
was more than one.”
At the airport itself, the whathave-I-done grenade tends to go
off in one of two places: at the
ticket counter when passengers
try to check their bags, or at the
information desk if they’ve
brought their own boarding
passes and are looking for gates
that aren’t there.
Omland tries to let them have
it gently. Once the concourse
stops reeling, she sees how much
time they have and assesses the
damage. Some passengers, particularly international travelers,
allow so much lead time that
they can make it to the right
airport with leisure. Most don’t.
“We have to be honest that you
could be an hour and a half in
traffic getting to Dulles,” she
said. When it’s bad, she sends
them up to the airline counter to
begin the salvage work.
She recently had an international group that arrived at National only to find that the outbound flight was from Dulles.
Another twist: Dozens of fans
connected by social media descended on National to greet the
Barcelona soccer team that was
just then arriving at, yes, the
other one.
Online search engines are
making the confusion worse.
Shoppers using the airport code
WAS often get a mix-and-match
low-fare flight that sends them
out via one airport and returns
them to another. Cars get stranded and, sometimes, so do fliers.
“We see people getting deals
on the Internet and having no
idea that DCA and IAD are two
different airports 35 miles apart,”
Omland said.
“You’ve got to pay attention,”
said Scott Masciarelli of Washington’s Connoisseur Travel. “It
might say Washington but it’s
BWI.”
Having so many names for so
many airports doesn’t help. Sorting among IAD, DCA, Reagan,
Dulles, Marshall, BWI, Baltimore
and National makes things more
complicated than in a city such
as Atlanta, where all flights leave
from the Hartsfield-Jackson airport.
Megan Cinquegrani knows
her DCA, BWI and IAD perfectly
well, thank you, but that didn’t
stop her from ending up in a
check-in line at the wrong one
just over a year ago.
She and her husband, living in
the Maryland suburbs, were
ready. They spent the night at a
friend’s house in the District to
be near a Metro station. They got
to National early enough to enjoy
their arrival and have breakfast.
They were all smiles when
Cinquegrani handed their flight
information to the ticket agent.
“She looked up and said, ‘Do
you have the tickets for this
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Travelers move ahead in the security line at Ronald Reagan National Airport in November. If you’ve ever arrived at National only to
discover your flight actually leaves from Washington Dulles or Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport, you are not alone.
flight?’ ”
Cinquegrani
said,
making a half-groaning, halflaughing noise at the memory.
They were supposed to be at
Dulles, and they had 45 minutes
to get there.
Cinquegrani remembers her
response as panicked paralysis.
But her husband, a firefighter,
snapped into action, grabbed the
bags and bolted for the taxi
stand. The first cabbie said no
way. The second said jump in.
Yes, they were the ones heaving aboard that flight to Orlando
at the last minute, gasping, as the
flight attendants looked at their
watches and the other passengers looked away.
Cinquegrani takes full responsibility, makes no excuses and
says her husband was very understanding. “I don’t do the vacation planning anymore, though,”
she said.
D.C. cabdrivers have learned
to quiz their fares carefully before they commit to a route.
Davit Zakaryan now gets the
exact itinerary from his clients
and checks them online. When
passengers mistakenly say, “Take
“We see people getting deals on the Internet
and having no idea that DCA and IAD
are two different airports 35 miles apart.”
Leanne Omland, a Travelers Aid manager
at National Airport
me to National” or “Pick me up at
BWI,” he stops them.
“In the last two or three years,
I’m seeing it more and more,”
said Zakaryan, the owner of
DCAcar. “But half of these mistakes we correct at our end.”
Drivers take the brunt of the
travel anguish that erupts when
passengers find themselves on
the wrong side of the metropolis
as the clock ticks toward takeoff.
Zakaryan trains his staff in resisting wild-eyed riders begging
them to get all fast and furious
on the Dulles Access Road.
“You just explain to them
nicely, ‘For your safety and mine,
I’ll do my best to get you there,’ ”
he said. “But you’re not going to
do 85 miles an hour and get a
ticket that puts four points on
your license and costs you your
insurance.”
Well, sometimes you do. Araya
picked up a traveler last fall at a
D.C. hotel for a pre-dawn trip to
National. As they pulled around
to departures, the man looked up
from his phone and said, “What
are we doing here? I’m flying out
of Dulles,” Araya recalled.
The man was frantic. His business was urgent. He begged Araya to floor it and promised to pay
any tickets he got. It was still
dark, still quiet, and Araya found
his inner Steve McQueen.
“I will only say —”
He paused.
“I never drove like that before
or since.” (Twenty-five minutes
curb to curb. A personal best.)
They screeched, er, pulled up
at Dulles, and the man ran,
literally, into the terminal. He
called from the plane to say he
had made it and how grateful he
was.
Araya caught his breath. And
counted his $400 tip.
steve.hendrix@washpost.com
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Is Trump joking about ‘strengthening the federal workforce’ in his budget?
Federal
Insider
JOE
DAVIDSON
President Trump
and his budget
director, Mick
Mulvaney, must
have been in a
jocular mood
Monday when
they issued their
fiscal 2019 budget
appendix titled
“Strengthening
the Federal
Workforce.”
It could have just as easily
been called “Picking the Pockets
of Federal Employees.”
The section begins benignly
enough, noting many important
services feds provide. Improved
hiring procedures, as the
administration wants, would
strengthen the workforce. But
the central thought in Trump’s
plan to improve an “increasingly
incomprehensible and
unmanageable civil service
system” is firing feds faster.
While his civil service revision
ideas are vague, Trump’s plan on
federal compensation is clear —
cut it.
Compensation cut No. 1:
Freeze federal pay in 2019.
Justifying the administration’s
call for a pay freeze, the budget
document says that “across the
board pay increases have longterm fixed costs, yet fail to
address existing pay disparities,
or target mission critical
recruitment and retention goals.”
It’s true that pay raises cost
money. Yet freezing pay comes
with other costs, including lower
morale and increased hardship
for employees. But how does no
raise for anybody address pay
disparities? And freezing pay
hurts — not helps — recruitment
and retention. As other costs
rise, frozen pay is a reduction in
the real wages of federal workers.
Compensation cut No. 2:
Slow the frequency of “tenurebased ‘step-increase’ promotions
that white-collar workers receive
on a fixed, periodic schedule,”
while increasing pay-forperformance.
Pay-for-performance riles
federal union leaders who recall
the troubled system the Defense
Department employed during
the George W. Bush
administration. It was repealed
by Congress, following a flood of
complaints, including charges of
racial discrimination in pay in
favor of white employees.
Compensation cut No. 3:
Have the government pay less
and federal employees pay more
toward their retirement.
Trump and Mulvaney would
do this in four ways:
decreasing the government’s
share and increasing employees’
payments toward the Federal
Employees Retirement System
(FERS) that covers most feds by
1 percent per year, effectively
cutting their pay by 6 percent;
reducing or eliminating cost-ofliving increases for current and
future retirees; basing annuity
calculations on the highest five
salary years instead of the “highthree”; eliminating the special
supplement for FERS annuitants
who retire before their Social
Security eligibility.
Compensation cut No. 4:
Reduce federal employee sick
days and vacation time.
Trump and Mulvaney say
federal sick time and vacation
days are “disproportionate to the
private sector.” Under the guise
of giving federal employees
“maximum flexibility,” the
administration wants to
combine “all leave into one paidtime-off category.” The budget
acknowledges that “this would
reduce total leave days,” which is
another way to cut
compensation.
Compensation cut No. 5:
Reduce the interest rate on the
“G Fund,” a popular investment
vehicle in the 401(k)-like Thrift
Savings Plan (TSP) for federal
employees.
This would render the fund
“inadequate and ineffective,”
Kim Weaver, a spokeswoman for
the TSP, told my colleague Eric
Yoder.
Ironically, or dastardly, in the
same paragraph outlining the
plan to gut the definedcontribution G Fund, the budget
document says the
administration will study
adopting a defined-contributiononly annuity benefit for new
federal workers. Trump and
Mulvaney think killing pensions
and providing only a diluted TSP
might have a “recruitment
benefit.”
Federal employees rallied
against the administration’s
proposals, as the American
Federation of Government
Employees (AFGE) held its
legislative conference when the
budget plan was released. AFGE
President J. David Cox Sr.
accused the administration of
“trying to suck the life blood” out
of federal workers.
“To that, we don’t say ‘No’; we
say ‘Hell no,’ ” he shouted to
cheers, as he promised to give
the administration “a jar of
whup-ass.”
At an AFGE rally Tuesday
outside the AFL-CIO
headquarters, just across
Lafayette Square from the White
House, Sen. Bernie Sanders (IVt.) warmed the crowd by saying:
“You are here today not only on
behalf of hundreds of thousands
of federal workers who want
decent pay and decent working
conditions, but you are here
today on behalf of 300 million
Americans who understand that
what this country is about is
providing quality care for
veterans, to the elderly, to the
children, to the poor and to the
sick. That’s what you do. Thank
you very much for doing it.”
Amid the cheers for Sanders,
no one spoke about his leading
role in laying the groundwork for
today’s effort to fire feds faster.
When Sanders chaired the
Senate Veterans’ Affairs
Committee in 2014, he pushed
legislation that provided needed
improvements to the scandalplagued Department of Veterans
Affairs but also hit civil service
protections for its senior
executives by significantly
weakening their appeal rights
against adverse personnel
actions. The bill won bipartisan
approval, and President Barack
Obama signed it without a word
of dissent about the employeeoffending provisions. To the
Obama administration’s credit,
in 2016 it told Congress that the
Justice Department would not
defend the section of the law that
prohibited appeals to the
presidentially appointed
members of the Merit Systems
Protection Board.
There was no mention of that
as Cox led the crowd in a chant of
“Bernie, Bernie, Bernie.”
joe.davidson@washpost.com
Budget plan shows how administration would tackle opioid crisis
Many parts of
The
President Trump’s
Health 202 budget are just
pie-in-the-sky
wishes. But the
proposal unveiled
Monday does
contain this: some
strong hints about
how the administration might
tackle the burgeoning opioid
epidemic with $6 billion in new
funding that is already in hand.
The budget proposal the
White House released contains
Trump’s first official request for
more opioid-abuse funding,
which is significant. It’s possible
to glean some clues about how
Health and Human Services
Secretary Alex Azar views the
sweeping problem and where he
might put billions of newly
appropriated dollars provided by
Congress in last week’s budget
agreement.
Congress’s spending bill —
which lays out how the
government will be funded for
two years — contains few
directives for how the opioids
money should be spent, instead
granting broad authority to the
HHS secretary. But Trump’s
proposal, which seeks nearly
$17 billion in opioid-related
spending in 2019, fleshes
out more details about how the
president and his appointees
think the crisis should be tackled.
In other words, even though
Congress doesn’t have to pass
any part of Trump’s budget, the
proposal is still relevant if you
want a better picture of how the
administration expects to
combat opioid abuse. The report
acknowledges the epidemic’s
magnitude, noting that there are
now 2 1/2 times as many overdose
deaths as there were in 1999 and
that fatalities from heroin
overdoses have tripled since
2010.
“This budget is profoundly
significant because the [budget
bill] came before and articulated
priorities very congruent with
the priorities in this budget,” Dan
Mendelson, CEO of Avalere
Health and former associate
health director at the White
House Office of Management and
Budget during the Clinton
administration, told me.
Broadly, the budget says new
opioid funding will “support
efforts to prevent opioid abuse
and help those who abuse
opioids get access to overdose
reversal drugs, treatment and
recovery support services,” and
also bulk up prevention efforts
and disrupt the supply of illicit
drugs. Here are some specific
ways the administration
proposes to spend the money:
Expand grants to states for
prevention, treatment and
recovery support services.
Expand Medicaid coverage of
comprehensive and evidencebased medication-assisted
treatment. The Centers for
Medicare and Medicaid Services
will issue guidance creating
minimum standards for state
“Drug Utilization Reviews” to
reduce overprescribing and will
require states to track and act on
high prescribers and users of
prescription drugs.
Test and expand nationwide
a Medicare bundled payment for
community-based medicationassisted treatment, including
reimbursement for methadone
for the first time. Prevent
prescription drug abuse in
PAIGE
WINFIELD
CUNNINGHAM
LUKE SHARRETT/BLOOMBERG NEWS
An NRG Energy generating station in Texas, which captures and
repurposes carbon emissions, a new emphasis for President Trump.
Trump did more for ‘clean
coal’ in 1 week than in 2017
President Trump
often says he
wants to bolster
“clean coal.” So far,
he has been more
DINO
bluster than
GRANDONI
action. Often the
president doesn’t
even seem to understand what
the term means.
Yet in a few short days, Trump
has taken concrete steps toward
bringing carbon-capture-andstorage technology, often called
“clean coal,” into mainstream use.
The White House managed to do
more work on carbon capture in
one week than in all of 2017.
Carbon capture has caught the
attention of lawmakers because it
offers both parties — and the
president — a way to achieve their
political goals without
compromising on basic beliefs.
Some Democrats concerned
about climate change push the
technology as a way of reducing
the release of greenhouse gases
without imperiling jobs, even if
some environmentalists worry
about prolonging the use of fossil
fuels. Led by Trump, the GOP
has championed a new emphasis
on fossil-fuel extraction, most
prominently coal — and
technologies such as carbon
capture allow such production to
be done in a more
environmentally friendly way. To
boot, Republicans like how
carbon dioxide can be pumped
underground to unlock even
more petroleum in a process
called enhanced oil recovery.
It would seem to be a win-win
for both parties, and Trump’s
budget reflects that logic.
Last Friday, Trump signed a
spending deal that included a
new tax credit for projects
attempting carbon capture — a
process by which carbon dioxide
is caught and stored
underground instead of being
released into the atmosphere
and contributing to climate
change.
Then on Monday, the White
House released a budget proposal
that restored funding to the
Energy Department’s “clean coal”
efforts. The Trump
administration called for
$502 million in funding for a
Fossil Energy Research and
Development program, according
to a summary released by the
department.
That’s still a 20 percent cut
from 2017 funding levels. Yet a
year ago, the Trump
administration was calling for the
office’s budget to be slashed by a
whopping 55 percent.
The
Energy
202
Dan Reicher, former chief of
staff at the Energy Department,
said the administration’s
spending on carbon capture and
storage would reinforce the new
carbon-capture incentives.
It seems “the administration
now realizes carbon capture and
storage is a viable technology,”
Reicher said.
Carbon-capture advocates
hope the one-two punch of a tax
break and a research bump puts
the technology on the same path
as wind and solar energy.
“Combining DOE research that
improves energy technologies
with an incentive to deploy those
technologies is a proven winning
combination demonstrated by
wind and solar power,” said Matt
Lucas, an associate director at
the Center for Carbon Removal.
Energy Secretary Rick Perry
said as much in his briefing to
reporters on the budget.
“I think everybody who is in
touch with reality will tell you
that fossil fuels are going to
continue to play a role in the
future,” Perry said. He noted
that last year his department
signed a deal with Saudi Arabia’s
energy ministry to collaborate on
carbon capture.
It should, of course, be noted
the White House’s budget
proposal is essentially a wish list
of what the Trump
administration wants the federal
government to look like.
Congress needs to consent to any
changes.
Much of the rest of the
proposed budget for the Energy
Department mirrors what the
Trump administration asked for
last year.
The administration wants a
17.5 percent increase for the
department’s National Nuclear
Security Administration, which
maintains the nation’s nuclear
weaponry. It wants to cut funding
to the Office of Energy Efficiency
and Renewable Energy by twothirds from 2017 levels. It wants
to eliminate entirely the tech
incubator Advanced Research
Projects Agency-Energy.
And just like last year, many of
Trump’s wishes for Energy are
unlikely to come true. These
programs are just too popular
among Democrats and enough
Republicans in Congress.
But members of both parties
are willing to support carboncapture efforts, as demonstrated
by the spending deal.
So, on this one issue Trump
may get what he wants from
lawmakers and energy policy.
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
Medicare Part D by requiring
plan participation in a program
to prevent such abuse.
Request $381 million for
the Department of Veterans
Affairs to reduce overreliance on
opioids for pain management,
promote the safe and effective
use of opioid therapy, and treat
addiction.
Request $12 million for the
Justice Department for statebased prescription-drugmonitoring programs.
Request $253 million for
Customs and Border Protection’s
National Targeting Center to
better concentrate on illicit
goods, including illicit drugs.
Request an additional
$31 million for the Drug
Enforcement Administration to
add eight new heroin
enforcement teams and bolster
staffing at field divisions.
Request $500 million for the
National Institutes of Health to
support a public-private
partnership with the
pharmaceutical industry to
develop prevention and
treatments for addiction,
overdose reversal and
nonaddictive pain therapies.
The budget’s mention of
medication-assisted treatment
was especially pleasing to
Medicaid plans and health
advocates, who have long fretted
that drugs proved to be
extremely helpful in treating
addiction aren’t used nearly
often enough by providers or
covered by insurers.
“We are happy to see the White
House and HHS address the
opioids crisis, especially calling
out medication-assisted therapy
as an important tool to help
those who are addicted, and that
they enlist the help of Medicaid
health plans to tackle these
issues at the state level,” said Jeff
Myers, president of Medicaid
Health Plans of America.
But these advocates are still
ambivalent about the budget
proposal. That’s because it also
incorporates a rollback of the
Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid
expansion, as well as suggests
block-granting Medicaid and
placing a per-person spending
cap on it. Those are all moves
that would sharply reduce future
Medicaid spending and almost
certainly reduce health coverage
for many low-income Americans.
paige.cunningham@washpost.com
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The high cost of exclusion
EDITORIALS
Young lives hinge on this Senate debate
And helping 700,000 ‘dreamers’ would help the nation. It shouldn’t be a hard call.
H
(R-Ky.) has set aside the week for the chamber to
devise a solution that has eluded Congress since
2001.
Should Mr. Trump succeed in killing off DACA, as
many expect, the human price would be immediate
and cruel. On the date the program ends — whether
it is March 5, as Mr. Trump wants, or later — roughly
1,000 DACA grantees will lose their protections and
work permits every day. That’s 7,000 each week,
30,000 each month, more than 350,000 in the first
year, nearly as many the following year.
Overnight, they would lose their ability to earn a
living legally, and therefore their jobs, often at
workplaces where they are well-established and,
given the tight labor market, not easily replaced. If
they have health insurance through their employers,
that, too, would lapse.
In many states, though not all, dreamers would
also lose their driver’s licenses when their DACA
permits expired. That would prompt some to continue driving without a license, putting them at
enhanced risk of deportation if they happen to be
Act fast,
Republicans
stopped, and others to sell their vehicles — although
doing so may be complicated in some places by the
fact of their uncertain status.
As for those who are enrolled in public colleges
and universities, most, though not all, would be
likely to continue receiving in-state tuition as residents of states that have extended that benefit
regardless of immigration status to residents who
meet other criteria.
But the broader question is: For what future
would they be preparing themselves with higher
education? And in what way would the United States
gain by depriving hundreds of thousands of people,
most in their late teens, 20s and early 30s, of any
hope of advancement and opportunity? The cruelty
is almost matched by the self-destructive folly.
It’s rare that so many lives may hinge so immediately, and so consequentially, on the outcome of any
congressional debate. Yet those are the stakes in the
Senate’s deliberations this week. It would be good if,
along with the political calculations, lawmakers
kept sight of them.
TOM TOLES
The Democratic memo should
be released as fully and as quickly
as possible.
P
RESIDENT TRUMP overruled his law enforcement team when he approved the release of the Nunes memo, a slanted hit piece
on the Justice Department. But when faced
with a Democratic response that would not help the
president discredit the Russia investigation,
Mr. Trump was suddenly swayed by law enforcement
objections, demanding that the Democratic document be refashioned to protect sensitive information.
The motives of Mr. Trump and his enablers, such as
memo author Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), are clear
enough: to seed doubt about federal law enforcement
among enough Americans that Mr. Trump will be
able to brush off any negative conclusions that
emerge from the Russia probe. As the fate of the
Democratic response is sorted out, the coming days
will test whether that motive is shared — or at least
tacitly encouraged — by House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) and the rest of the House GOP caucus.
We are not suggesting that the Democrats’ response should have been approved for release with
the same cavalier disregard for the opinions of law
enforcement that Mr. Trump showed in releasing the
Nunes memo. Much longer than the Nunes memo,
the Democratic document may contain material
whose disclosure would raise national security concerns. Adam B. Schiff (Calif.), the ranking Democrat
on the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday
that it includes details from a secret surveillance
warrant application. Deputy Attorney General Rod J.
Rosenstein and FBI Director Christopher A. Wray,
who have more credibility than most in the Trump
administration, have identified specific passages
that they want redacted.
Yet if that is the case, it shouldn’t take long to agree
on an edited version. Mr. Rosenstein and Mr. Wray
identified sections that raise high concern and others
Missing an important mark
that are less problematic. Mr. Schiff says he is ready to
work with Justice Department officials to adjust the
document. Both sides should favor as much disclosure as possible, as quickly as possible.
If the administration drags its heels, then the
whole House may have to get involved. Mr. Ryan
should be prepared to force the release of a sensibly
redacted Democratic memo, which would require a
vote of the full House. His GOP colleagues should be
president’s proposal, however, there’s little room for
optimism in the short term. And in the White
House’s $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan, a 55-page
document released Monday, there’s not a word
about upgrading 911 service.
Part of the problem is that 911 is a victim of its own
success. For much of the service’s history, people
who called the emergency number, which was
handled by the single local phone company, could be
all but certain the system would work. Calls were
answered promptly and handled efficiently, and
help would be quickly on the way.
That’s still the case for the vast majority of 911
calls, but glitches have multiplied as technology has
aged and Americans have switched to cellphones,
from which 80 percent of 911 calls are now made. A
six-hour outage in April 2014 left 750,000 wireless
customers in California without access to 911. In
October 2016, a cyberattack via Twitter triggered
nonstop cellphone emergency calls in cities nationwide, flooding 911 call centers. One day last March,
AT&T Wireless customers nationwide couldn’t get
willing to take that vote. If they are not, they will
reveal a lot about their willingness to betray the
American system in service of a wayward president.
Their actions would simultaneously erode trust in
Congress and in independent law enforcement.
All along, Republican leaders, including
Mr. Trump and Mr. Ryan, have insisted that the
memo fiasco is about transparency and evenhanded
oversight. Now is the time to prove it.
through to 911.
“Every call to 911 must go through,” said Ajit Pai,
chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Yes, but that’s not happening. In Maryland,
state Sen. Cheryl Kagan, a Montgomery County
Democrat alarmed at the deaths of constituents in
her district involving 911 breakdowns since 2006,
has introduced legislation to help localities start the
transition to NG911. As things stand, callers can send
text messages to 911 in just one county — Frederick
County, home of the Maryland School for the Deaf.
As the system ages, it will become ever more prone
to pranks, hackers and cyberattacks, and ever less
reliable. It will also be increasingly vulnerable to
collapse in emergencies, unable to reroute calls in
the event of natural disasters and terrorist attacks.
At the heart of NG911 is a shift to Internet,
digital-based routing to replace old-fashioned
phone lines. That will take a large helping of funds
from Congress, plus significant contributions from
state and local governments. So far, there’s little sign
of either.
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FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Join the debate at washingtonpost.com/local-opinions
A mission to serve, not preserve the past
I must protest Jim McGrath’s Feb. 11 Local Opinions
essay, “Requiem for a churchyard,” about the St. Thomas Episcopal Church and residential development.
The original 120-foot-tall church at that site was
destroyed by arson in 1970. The congregation has
made do since then by converting a smaller, 1920s
addition for worship purposes. It was outgrowing the
space in recent years. There was a flat park where the
old church had been with a disintegrating cement
maze, and it will be replaced.
As a way to stay where it was and to pay for a new
and accessibility-compliant church, the parish had to
use part of the property as a residential development,
increasing land use. Would Mr. McGrath have preferred it to be a commercial building? A number of
What is to be done with the unwanted ones, the
men and women who do not fit — because of their
legal status, race, color, creed, national origin or
sexual orientation? Those who civilization believes
must be pruned from the vine to protect its sense of
itself?
Every culture since antiquity survived this way,
defining itself by the things it excludes. As long as
there is progress, there will always be human debris
in its wake, on the outside looking in. Sooner or later
one must answer the question of what becomes of
them. In the United States the solution is to call them
criminals, rapists and illegals, throw them into the
darkness of detention and then kick them out.
But what of the ones who call themselves “dreamers”? They arrived as children, got educated, formed
families and lived for years unmolested. They
adapted to the culture and led simple lives as model
contributing citizens and families. They are threatened with arrest, family breakup and parental
deportation — leaving their legal-citizen children
behind.
I argue that justice demands that we do better than
that. A civilization is judged not by whom it excludes
but whether it humanely treats the excluded.
James M. “Mike” Davis, Burke
Regarding the Feb. 12 PowerPost article “Trump’s
infrastructure plan already faces roadblocks”:
As President Trump turns his attention to infrastructure and transportation spending this week, it
is time to consider raising the federal gasoline tax, a
much-needed funding source. The tax was last
increased in 1993 and has been stuck at 18.4 cents
per gallon since.
The president’s transportation plans are ambitious, and it is not entirely clear how they will be
funded. The advantage of the gas tax is that the
mechanisms are already in place for collecting it.
Gasoline-powered cars and trucks still make up the
vast majority of vehicles on our highways and will
for some time.
If the gas tax is not increased, the Highway Trust
Fund will continue to be underfunded, and transfers will be made into the trust fund from general
revenue. That’s not the way it was supposed to
work.
John A. Boffa, Washington
The revolutionary service needs funding to move to the next generation of emergency telecommunications.
T
Regarding E.J. Dionne Jr.’s Feb. 12 op-ed, “The
agony of the moderate left”:
So far, at least $70 billion has been spent by
communities across the country educating the
“dreamers” whom President Trump is threatening to
deport. If we’re talking about 700,000 dreamers,
people who got here before 2009, it seems safe to
estimate they’ve averaged 10 years in the public
education system. At $10,000 per year for public
school, that’s $70 billion.
How does it make sense to deport individuals in
whom communities have invested now that these
individuals are starting to work and pay taxes? In an
economy that’s near full employment? In a society
that’s aging and needs young workers to help
support retirees?
Why do Democrats need to concede anything to
keep them here? Deporting dreamers is destructive
and self-defeating purely on economic terms.
Paul B. Evans, Lutherville, Md.
How to pay for better roads
Don’t hang up on 911
HIS FRIDAY marks the 50th anniversary of
the first 911 emergency call placed in the
United States. Since then, uncounted lives
have been saved and people helped. It has
been a great accomplishment of government.
But even as an estimated 240 million 911 calls
continue to be placed annually, the systems that
service them have grown obsolete, unable to handle
photos, video, downloads, precise geo-locating and
even, in most places, simple text messages. That’s a
threat not just to public safety but also to national
security.
Worryingly, no one seems quite sure how to pay
for a modernization to what’s known as Next
Generation 911 (“NG911” in industry parlance),
whose cost could exceed $20 billion. This week, as
hundreds of public-safety and industry officials
gather in the District for their annual 911 conference,
many will have one main question on their minds:
Why not prioritize an upgrade as part of the Trump
administration’s national infrastructure project?
Good question. Given the dearth of funding in the
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
ARPER’S MAGAZINE once published a
short story about a small town where
everyone knows the exact date of his death
yet is powerless to avoid it. That feeling of
helplessness, dread and impending doom must be
familiar to nearly 700,000 “dreamers” across the
country, who need only look at a federal form to
ascertain the precise date on which their work
permit, and protection from deportation, will be
null and void.
For now, a federal court has frozen President
Trump’s move to rescind the protections extended to
dreamers under the Obama-era program known as
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).
That court order could be reversed at any time,
however — the Trump administration is doing its
utmost to that end. So a blade of uncertainty hangs
over the necks of all those young immigrants,
brought to this country as children and raised and
educated as Americans.
These are the stakes in the debate underway in the
Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
. WEDNESDAY,
churches in the neighborhood and the District have
used such tactics to follow their mission rather than
abandon the District.
The units in the new residential part of the building will be market-rate, but so is every other unit in
the neighborhood. The District is working hard to
increase accessible housing, but one building can’t
meet the challenge.
Mr. McGrath’s complaint that the new church
won’t look like a church appeals to a mind-set that
historic preservation means everything should look
old. But D.C.’s historic-preservation philosophy is that
new architecture should look new unless there is a
reason otherwise.
Thomas Bower, Washington
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Robert J. Samuelson’s Feb. 12 op-ed, “Let’s not test
the deficit line,” suggested that we don’t know how
much federal debt is too much. In searching for an
answer to that question, it might be useful to
consider the European Union’s fiscal standards for
membership: a maximum of 3 percent of gross
domestic product for the annual deficit and 60 percent of GDP for total debt.
The combination of the recent tax cut and
spending legislation is widely expected to increase
our current $21 trillion total debt to the tune of
$1 trillion per year compared with a current U.S.
GDP of approximately $19 trillion. So we are already
exceeding the E.U.’s total debt standard, and we will
exceed the annual deficit standard in 2018.
Considering how disdainful the United States has
been of Greece and other countries that have been
unable to meet these benchmarks, it is sobering to
realize that we are in this category, too.
Wayne McDaniel, Columbia
An exercise in due process
Regarding the Feb. 11 front-page article “Trump
calls for ‘due process’ in abuse cases”:
President Trump has discovered the Constitution and the existence of due-process rights. Perhaps someone can explain to him that due-process
rights already were exercised by the parties in one
of these cases. Former White House staff secretary
Rob Porter’s second wife went through a dueprocess proceeding in court, invoking both her own
and her husband’s due-process rights. As a result of
that due process, she was awarded a restraining
order against him, to which she was deemed
entitled, pursuant to her due-process rights. The
White House was informed of this months ago by
the FBI.
Lois Shiner, Potomac
Take our dogs, please!
In her Feb. 11 letter, “Next stop: A breeder,” Alice
Seabright indicated she was fed up with the process
to adopt a rescue dog and said she might just go to a
breeder and buy one. Don’t do it, Ms. Seabright. Out
here in Morgan County, W.Va., we’ve got a lot of
great dogs at our Humane Society.
All those highbrows from neighboring counties
in Maryland and Virginia bring their unwanted or
sick animals out here to dump ’em. We’re a “no-kill”
shelter, and we’ve got a lot of great dogs looking for
a human. Every animal adopted out is healthy and
vetted. So, like Bob Barker used to say on the “The
Price Is Right,” come on down.
Paul Murtha, Berkeley Springs, W.Va.
C OR R E C TI ON
The Feb. 12 editorial “A labor lawsuit’s long reach”
incorrectly identified Robert C. Post. He is a professor at Yale Law School.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
KATHLEEN PARKER
DANA MILBANK
The bots are
back in town
Trump’s effort
to keep
America white
I
f you want to know whether Democrats will take back the House
and/or Senate in November, just
ask Russia.
Or rather, ask the Russian trolls who
have triumphed in disseminating real
“fake news” to influence U.S. elections.
They credibly did so in 2016 by creating
a more favorable electoral environment for Donald Trump. And, reportedly, they are determined to make
trouble again in this year’s midterms.
In the meantime, Russian “bots” —
applications that perform an automated task — were helping President
Trump once again by creating momentum for the Feb. 2 release of the “Nunes
memo,” the four-page brief from Devin
Nunes (R-Calif.), the House Intelligence Committee chairman, alleging
surveillance abuses by FBI investigators.
To do this, Russian operatives created a #ReleaseTheMemo campaign on
Twitter and other platforms, which
quickly went viral and created a sense
of urgency and import to the committee’s findings — at least those by
Republican members. Trump, who has
final authority over such things, refused to approve the release of a
Democratic rebuttal. Apparently, the
latter was far more detailed than the
Republican version and, according to
the administration, could be harmful.
Perhaps.
But, also, Trump likely wanted the
Nunes memo released for its value in
casting doubt on the FBI’s investigation into possible collusion between
Russia and the Trump campaign. And,
undoubtedly, Trump and his Republican supporters want to end the investigation as soon as possible, discrediting
the agency in the process. Not that the
agency needed much help. With two
employees exchanging romantic texts
that also included expressions of contempt for Trump, it would be fairly easy
for the predisposed to conclude that
the entire investigation was contaminated.
Thus far, the memo has succeeded
only in damaging trust between the FBI
and Congress, possibly hindering future sharing of classified material. As
Senate Intelligence Committee member Angus King (I-Maine) pointed out
Tuesday on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,”
the Senate and House panels are the
only watchdogs of U.S. intelligence
agencies. If the FBI or the CIA refuse to
share, he said, “then nobody’s watching.”
The extent to which cyberantics by
Russia have manipulated American
thought is of no small concern or
consequence. But when nearly twothirds of U.S. adults get at least some of
their news from social media, the
potential reach of bad actors is incalculable. Facebook and YouTube lead the
pack in sheer numbers of users, according to a 2017 Pew Research Center
study. Sixty-six percent of U.S. adults
use Facebook, with 45 percent getting
news on the site.
YouTube can boast that 58 percent of
U.S. adults watch its clips, but only
18 percent rely on the video emporium
for news. Relatively few adults use
Twitter — about 15 percent — but
nearly all who do (74 percent) get their
news from the little blue bird. Although
its base is far smaller than Facebook’s,
Twitter’s viral capacity is incalculable.
One need only think of the global reach
of the #MeToo movement that spread in
a matter of virtual nanoseconds.
No one has better understood this
infectious power than Trump. Crazy
like a fox, he knows that he can imprint
on the minds of his followers far more
quickly than he could by traditional
means — and without accountability.
While President Barack Obama used
Twitter to raise funds and convey campaign information, Trump uses his
account to advance his opinion, taunt
his enemies, exact revenge and, strategically, to misinform. Sort of the way
Russia does.
No wonder he admires Russian President Vladimir Putin, with whom he
spoke by phone on Monday. What do
you suppose they talked about? The
Russia investigation? Hashtags for future mind-melding ops? Midterm elections?
Those are just around the corner.
Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats, testifying Tuesday before the
Senate
Intelligence
Committee,
warned that Russia considers its efforts
to disrupt the 2016 election a success
and likely sees 2018 as another opportunity. While congressional leaders are
hoping to pressure social media groups
into becoming more responsible, the
burden for making our democratic
election process fail-safe falls to citizens to become more discerning as
news consumers.
Unfortunately, the minds of social
media users are likely becoming more,
not less, malleable. Demographically,
the largest increase in news consumers
on social media has been among older,
nonwhite, less-educated people, according to Pew. Except for the nonwhite part, this would seem a boon to
the GOP, whose constituents, though
whiter than the Democratic National
Committee’s, tend to be older and
slightly less educated than those of
Democrats.
Trump once exclaimed, “I love the
poorly educated!” Doubtless, Russia
does, too.
kathleenparker@washpost.com
T
tionism and nativism instead of global
engagement. Remember how Republicans used to pitch virtue and personal
accountability? They’ve become the party of alleged wife-beaters and hush money to porn stars.
But nothing illustrates the reverse
merger with Trump more clearly than the
Republican-led House of Representatives cheerfully passing tax-cut and
spending bills that together will drive the
annual deficit past $1 trillion, without
the slightest prospect of a balanced budget in their plans. Deficit spending in a
slump can be necessary stimulus. To do it
on this staggering scale in a period of
steady growth and low unemployment is
fiscal malpractice.
Republicans used to run on promises
that they would make government more
efficient by cutting “waste, fraud and
abuse.” Forget that, too. Phase one of the
first-ever audit of Pentagon budgets recently found the Defense Department is
unable to account for some $800 million
in spending — by a single agency! Many
more defense agencies remain to be audited. Yet the GOP insisted on adding
$165 billion over two years in new funding for a department that can’t adequately account for the $700 billion per year it
already receives.
Lack of transparency is business as
usual for Trump, and bankruptcy a familiar harbor. He’s a promoter, a tout, a shill
— not a manager. It’s not at all surprising
that he would funny up some budget
numbers to create an annual fund of
about $200 billion and call it a $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan. Trump doesn’t
compare himself to P.T. Barnum for nothing.
To those of us who value a two-party
system, though, it’s a shame to see the
conservative party sell itself for scrap.
The ticker symbol GOP is now POT: Party
of Trump.
he efforts by President Trump to
keep America white are getting increasingly dark.
Make no mistake: What’s happening on Capitol Hill this week, at Trump’s
behest, is nothing other than an attempt by
Republicans to slow the inexorable march
toward that point at midcentury when the
United States becomes a majority-minority
nation.
In the long run, they are merely putting a
finger in the dike. But in the short term, the
Trump-backed immigration proposal, combined with other recent moves by the
administration and its allies — support for
voter suppression, gerrymandering and various other schemes to disenfranchise minority voters — could extend the white hegemony that brought Trump to power and sustains Republicans.
For ages, Republicans said that their beef
was with illegal immigrants and that legal
immigrants should be embraced and welcomed. No longer. In the immigration fight
on the Hill, there is broad bipartisan consensus to legalize the “dreamers” — illegal
immigrants brought here as children — and
to fortify border security. The dispute is
really about the Trump proposal to rein in
legal immigration by undoing the familybased approach, in which immigrants petition to bring over immediate family, that has
always been at the heart of U.S. immigration.
Though details aren’t yet known, estimates are that the legislation would cut
legal immigration, currently 1.1 million per
year, by 300,000 to 500,000 annually. A
previous version of the “chain migration”
proposal by Sens. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and
David Perdue (R-Ga.) would have cut legal
immigration by half a million a year, by their
own account.
Essentially, Trump and the Republicans
are
threatening
to
make
nearly
700,000 dreamers subject to deportation
unless Democrats agree to close the door to
tens of millions of future legal immigrants.
This won’t stop the loss of a white
majority; the youthful Hispanic population
already here, with its higher fertility rate,
makes that inevitable. “It’s almost impossible to become whiter as a country,” the
Brookings Institution demographer William H. Frey tells me. “It’s like a demographic tsunami. There aren’t enough people in
Norway to migrate here.”
But the GOP might delay by a few years
the point at which the United States becomes majority-minority, now expected in
2044. Minorities vote at lower rates than
whites (52.7 percent in 2016 vs. 65.3 percent
for whites), so, if Republicans can sustain
that disparity, the white voting majority that
the party relies on could last several years
beyond 2044.
Republicans may be acting out of selfinterest rather than any racial animus. But if
one were to devise a diabolical plan to
suppress nonwhite votes, it would look
much like what they are doing.
The administration asked to include a
question about citizenship in the 2020 Census, which will determine the apportionment of House seats. This would suppress
census participation among the 7 percent of
residents who are not citizens — even those
here legally — thus causing Latinos to be
undercounted.
The administration argued last month
before the Supreme Court in favor of an
Ohio practice of purging voters from registration rolls if they fail to vote over two
federal election cycles. Because of minority
voters’ lower participation rates, they would
be purged from the rolls in higher numbers.
The administration has given tacit support to other voter-suppression efforts in the
states, in the form of voter ID laws and
restrictions on early voting. Trump nominated, and the Senate Judiciary Committee
has approved, a district court nominee,
Thomas Farr, who helped draft and defend
the most egregious voter-suppression and
gerrymandering laws in the country. Farr
unsuccessfully argued for North Carolina’s
voter ID law, which was struck down by an
appellate court because it targeted African
Americans “with almost surgical precision.”
The Republican National Committee,
which is under Trump’s authority, also
weighed in on a current Supreme Court case
in favor of political gerrymandering, often
used to dilute minority votes.
Trump’s voter-fraud commission, based
on the fallacy that millions of illegal immigrants voted in 2016, has collapsed, but not
before an ugly attempt at stigmatizing
Latinos. As The Post’s Spencer S. Hsu and
John Wagner reported, documents show
that a commission representative asked for
Texas voter records and requested a “Hispanic surname flag notation.”
Trump himself has continued to stir up
fears, often based on falsehoods, of a crime
wave caused by illegal immigrants, and he
has requested billions of dollars to step up
deportations. (At the same time, he has
proposed a 5 percent cut to federal education funding, much of it for programs
benefiting the urban poor, disproportionately minorities.)
This is, of course, what you would expect
from an administration whose chief law
enforcement official, Attorney General Jeff
Sessions, just hailed “the Anglo-American
heritage of law enforcement.” This phrase —
an ad lib while reading from a prepared text
— would be easier to excuse as an innocent
reference to common law if Sessions didn’t
carry so much racial baggage, and if his boss
hadn’t just referred to “shithole” African
countries.
Republicans can’t keep America white,
but they can stop sullying themselves in the
attempt.
david.vondrehle@washpost.com
Twitter: @Milbank
DELIL SOULEIMAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Syrians walk amid the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern Syrian city of Raqqa on Jan. 11.
DAVID IGNATIUS
Lessons from Raqqa’s rubble
raqqa, syria
H
ell descended on this city
twice: first when it was captured by Islamic State fighters in 2014 and made their
capital, and then when it was liberated last year by U.S.-backed forces in a
campaign that flattened much of the
center of the city.
Photos and videos show the damage here, but they don’t prepare you
for the intensity of the destruction.
Buildings are pulverized into rubble,
block after block. Reconstruction in
some areas is a distant prospect. It
will take years just to clear away the
shattered concrete and jungle of
twisted rebar.
Raqqa experienced a ferocity of
urban combat rarely seen since
World War II. Think of newsreels of
Stalingrad in 1943 or Berlin in 1945.
Those cities are symbols of the fury of
war and the cost of liberation, and
Raqqa should be, too.
Raqqa’s liberators were members
of the Syrian Democratic Forces, a
Kurdish-led militia that captured the
city one building at a time. They
surrounded Raqqa in late June and
then squeezed it, ever tighter, until
October, when resistance finally collapsed. Brave as they were, the SDF
fighters couldn’t have won without
devastating fire support from U.S.
warplanes, armed drones and artillery. It was a brutally effective combination. One of the last redoubts was
the local hospital.
The Islamic State left a farewell
message: The city is laced with IEDs,
which have injured nearly 500 people
since October, including more than
150 children.
Some
unforgettable
images
emerged during a day-long tour of
the city last week with U.S. Special
Operations forces who directed the
campaign: mass graves dug in a
public amphitheater to intimidate
adversaries, the midtown traffic circle where the Islamic State videoed
its grisly executions for the Internet;
the stadium where the jihadists tortured prisoners in underground dungeons. The Islamic State made the
city a theater of death.
People here try to express the
horror of those days, but what’s most
telling is the distant, hollow look in
their eyes. “If you didn’t need something, you didn’t go outside,” says a
weathered man named Abu Basser,
standing in front of the ruined building that was once the Islamic State’s
administrative headquarters. “We
saw the darkest days of our lives.”
On the street in front of him, a few
yellow taxis are flitting by. Bus service has just resumed. Perhaps
50,000 people, a sixth of Raqqa’s
former population, have returned.
We stop in Mishlib, a neighborhood in the eastern district of the city.
Two ladies pull out plastic chairs
from their house, and a little crowd
gathers on the sidewalk. Sajida, a
hauntingly
pretty
10-year-old
dressed in a turtleneck and ripped
jeans, hugs a female U.S. Army officer
in tan camouflage; Ahmed, 20, a
cigarette glowing at his lips, remembers the days when the Islamic State
cut off people’s fingers if they
smoked. He tries a laugh.
“The children were living a nightmare,” says one of the mothers, who’s
still worried enough about the jihadists that she doesn’t want to give her
name. “They were taught how to kill.”
Near her is a little girl in pink
sneakers and a sky-blue sweatshirt
that says “Goofy” and, close by, a boy
in a Gap jacket making funny faces.
Looking at their smiles as they cluster for photographs, you think:
Whatever they lived through, they’re
not frightened now.
What are the lessons of Raqqa?
One is that the United States fulfilled
its commitment of 2014 to “degrade
and ultimately destroy” the Islamic
State. The conquest of its capital,
however chilling, demonstrates the
much-doubted quality of U.S. resolve.
The U.S. military’s strategy here was
“annihilation,” and it meant it. The
next time, adversaries should be
warier of picking a fight.
Another moral is that it’s a mistake
to let a determined adversary like the
Islamic State ever gain control of an
urban center like Raqqa, or Mosul in
Iraq, which was also cratered in its
liberation. Once committed fighters
take over a city, they can be rooted
out only at great human cost.
And finally, Raqqa is a warning to
be careful about destroying the
ruling order, anywhere, without
knowing what will come next. Russian President Vladimir Putin keeps
making this point — the United
States was reckless to encourage the
overthrow of authority in Syria, Iraq,
Yemen and Libya without better
planning for the “day after” — and
he’s probably right. Too often, the
vacuums have been filled by warlords, foreign mercenaries and death
cults.
The United States and its allies
nearly destroyed Raqqa to rescue it
from a caliphate that governed by
torture. It was a just war, but we
should try hard to avoid having to
fight one like it again.
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
DAVID VON DREHLE
Trump’s reverse merger is complete
T
here was a lot of talk in 2016
about Donald Trump’s hostile
takeover of the Republican Party,
but I wrote at the time that in
business terms, the transaction was
more like a reverse merger.
Maybe you’re unfamiliar with this particular bit of legal, yet slightly sketchy,
legerdemain. A privately owned business
wants to sell shares to the public but for
whatever reason wishes to avoid the close
scrutiny of an initial public offering.
So the business owner finds a neardead company that is already public,
buys it for a song, grafts the private
enterprise into the hollow public shell
and — voila! — the deed is done. One of
my favorite examples involved CoolBrands, which once gave the world such
frozen treats as Eskimo Pies and the
Chipwich. After the yummy product lines
were sold to other companies, only the
shell remained on the stock market. A
private maker of cleaning products
snapped it up, and in a twinkling it was
public, selling grill degreasers instead of
ice cream.
The George W. Bush presidency left
the GOP as hollow as CoolBrands minus
the sweets. Botched nation-building
projects in Afghanistan and Iraq shook
the party’s faith in its Reaganesque freedom agenda. The worst economic crisis
since the Great Depression rattled its
self-image as the party of fiscal competence. Republicans found an identity
during the Obama years as the Party of
No, but when something more elaborate
was needed for the 2016 campaign, the
lack of ideas became painfully clear. Sixteen other candidates tried out for the job
of chief sales rep, and none could close
the deal.
Instead, Trump snapped up the shell of
the Republican Party and made it his
public vehicle. This reverse merger has
been finalized in recent days with a
spending bill and proposed budget that
no true conservative could love — or even
tolerate — given the massive debt they
will incur.
But don’t take my word for it. President Trump’s own budget director, the
erstwhile tea party conservative Mick
Mulvaney, allowed on “Face the Nation”
that these Trump-branded debt bombs
don’t square with his mothballed former
principles. He was asked, were he still in
Congress, would he vote in favor?
The George W. Bush
presidency left the GOP
as hollow as CoolBrands
minus the sweets.
“Probably not,” Mulvaney replied.
He could drop the modifier, because
there is not a chance in the world that the
same Mulvaney who used the issue of
President Barack Obama’s deficit spending to become the first Republican elected from South Carolina’s 5th District in
more than a century would vote for
Trump’s trillion-dollar debt debacle.
That Mulvaney is long gone, though, a
casualty of the reverse merger. Gone, too,
is the fiscal discipline once espoused by
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.),
who made a career selling the ice cream
of a balanced budget but now peddles
Trump’s soft soap. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.)
had plenty of partners in denouncing
reckless spending when Obama was
minding the store. Now that Trump owns
the party, however, Paul is a lonely voice
in the night.
Budget discipline is not the only concept Republicans no longer sell. Trump
has replaced the free-trade GOP with a
protectionist outfit. He’s pushing isola-
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
ADVERTISEMENT
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
ADVERTISEMENT
Mr. President,
In anticipation of Presidents’ Day consider
the following words of counsel and caution:
1. Human kindness has never weakened the stamina
or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation
does not have to be cruel in order to be tough.
—President Franklin Delano Roosevelt
2. Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be
our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of
our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts.
—President John Adams
3. Let us not seek the Republican answer or
the Democratic answer, but the right answer.
Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past, let
us accept our own responsibility for the future.
—President John F. Kennedy
4. Patriotism is supporting your country all the
time, and your government when it deserves it.
—Mark Twain
5. The freedom of speech may be taken away —
and dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep
to the slaughter. —President George Washington
6. It’s amazing what you can accomplish
if you do not care who gets the credit.
—President Harry S. Truman
7. I would rather the man who presents something
for my consideration subject me to a zephyr of
truth and a gentle breeze of responsibility rather
than blow me down with a curtain of hot wind.
—President Grover Cleveland
8. To announce that there must be no criticism
of the President…is morally treasonable to the
American public. —President Theodore Roosevelt
9. How can we love our country, and not also love
our countrymen. —President Ronald Reagan
10. We have a tendency to condemn people who
are different from us, to define their sins as
paramount and our own sinfulness as being
insignificant. —President Jimmy Carter
11. No person was ever honored for what he earned.
Honor has been the reward for what he gave.
—President Calvin Coolidge
12. He that is of the opinion money will do
everything may well be suspected of doing
everything for money. —Benjamin Franklin
13. Always vote for principle, though you may
vote alone, and you may cherish the sweetest
reflection that your vote is never lost.
—President John Quincy Adams
14. Never do a wrong thing to make a friend
or keep one. —Robert E. Lee
15. A brave man is a man who dares to look the
Devil in the face and tell him he is a Devil.
—President James A. Garfield
16. I would not be the mere president of a party —
I would endeavor to act independent of party
domination and should feel bound to administer
the government untrammeled by party schemes.
—President Zachary Taylor
17. Power always thinks it has a great soul and vast
views beyond the comprehension of the weak.
—President John Adams
18. I think the first duty of society is justice.
—Alexander Hamilton
19. One cool judgment is worth a thousand
hasty counsels. The thing to do is to supply
light and not heat. —President Woodrow Wilson
20. Unjust attacks on public men do them
more good than unmerited praise.
—President Rutherford B. Hayes
21. Whenever you do a thing, act as if all the world
were watching. —President Thomas Jefferson
22. The president must interpret the conscience
of America. He must guide his conduct by the
idealism of our people. —President Herbert Hoover
23. This country will not be a good place for any of
us to live in if it is not a reasonably good place
for all of us to live in.
—President Theodore Roosevelt
24. The life of the nation is secure only while
the nation is honest, truthful and virtuous.
—Frederick Douglass
25. In times like the present, men should utter
nothing for which they would not willingly be
responsible through time and eternity.
—President Abraham Lincoln
(Twitter users take note.)
26. Too often…we enjoy the comfort of opinion
without the discomfort of thought.
—President John F. Kennedy
27. The government should not be guided by
temporary excitement, but by sober second
thought. —President Martin Van Buren
28. No person connected with me by blood or
marriage will be appointed to office.
—President Rutherford B. Hayes
29. Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than
sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.
—Martin Luther King, Jr.
30. Whoever is careless with the truth in small
matters cannot be trusted with important
matters. —Albert Einstein
31. Motivation is the art of getting people to do
what you want them to do because they want
to do it. —President Dwight D. Eisenhower
32. Every difference of opinion is not a difference
of principle. We have called by different
names brethren of the same principle.
—President Thomas Jefferson
33. The people are the rightful masters of both
congresses, and courts — not to overthrow
the constitution, but to overthrow the men
who pervert it. —President Abraham Lincoln
34. Guard against the impostures of pretended
patriotism. —President George Washington
35. People who boast about their I.Q. are losers.
—Stephen Hawking
36. There is nothing new in the world except
the history you do not know.
—President Harry S. Truman
39. I never considered a difference of opinion in
politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for
withdrawing from a friend.
—President Thomas Jefferson
40. It is a paradox that every dictator has climbed
to power on the ladder of free speech.
Immediately on attaining power each dictator
has suppressed all free speech except his own.
—President Herbert Hoover
41. When you single out any particular group of
people for secondary citizenship status,
that’s a violation of basic human rights.
—President Jimmy Carter
42. It is better to offer no excuse than a bad one.
—President George Washington
43. America is never wholly herself unless she is
engaged in high moral principle. We as a people
have such a purpose. It is to make kinder the face
of the nation and gentler the face of the world.
—President George H. W. Bush
44. The test of our progress is not whether
we add more to the abundance of those
who have much, it is whether we provide
enough for those who have too little.
—President Franklin Delano Roosevelt
45. A people that values its privileges above
its principles soon loses both.
—President Dwight D. Eisenhower
46. I tread in the footsteps of illustrious men…
in receiving from the people the sacred trust
confided to my illustrious predecessors.
—President Martin Van Buren
47. Honesty is the first chapter in the book of
wisdom. —President Thomas Jefferson
48. It is infinitely better to have a few good
men than many indifferent ones.
—President George Washington
49. Democracy is not so much a form of
government as a set of principles.
—President Woodrow Wilson
50. Leave the matter of religion to the family
altar, the church, and the private school.
Keep the church and state forever separate.
—President Ulysses S. Grant
51. Try not to become a man of success, but rather
try to become a man of value. —Albert Einstein
52. No man has a good enough memory to be a
successful liar. —President Abraham Lincoln
53. I not only use all the brains I have, but all
I can borrow. —President Woodrow Wilson
54. You may give a man an Office, but you cannot
give him Discretion. —Benjamin Franklin
55. We don’t want an America that is closed to
the world. What we want is a world that is
open to America. —President George H. W. Bush
37. Character is like a tree and reputation like its
shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the
tree is the real thing. —President Abraham Lincoln
56. America was not built on fear. America was
built on courage, on imagination and an
unbeatable determination to do the job at hand.
—President Harry S. Truman
38. Peace is not the absence of conflict, it is the
ability to handle conflict by peaceful means.
—President Ronald Reagan
57. In the end, we will remember not the words
of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.
—Martin Luther King, Jr.
“No country upon earth ever had it more in its power to attain blessings than United America. Wondrously strange, then,
and much to be regretted indeed would it be, were we to neglect the means and to depart from the road which
Providence has pointed out to us so plainly; I cannot believe it will ever come to pass.”
—President George Washington
“I appeal to you again to constantly bear in mind that with you, and not with politicians, not with Presidents, not with office-seekers,
but with you, is the question, ‘Shall the Union and shall the liberties of this country be preserved?’”
—President Abraham Lincoln
Courtesy of Tom Blair, author of the New York Times bestselling book, What Would Ben Say?
KLMNO
METRO
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
58°
8 p.m.
Precip: 5%
37 49 58 53°
°
°
°
Wind: SSW
6-12 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
RE
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
In 1887, a black lawyer who
was refused service took
on D.C.’s most famous
oyster house: Harvey’s. B3
The House passes a bill to
impose work requirements
for Medicaid, a possible
prelude to expansion. B5
Marty Allen was part of a
popular comedy duo in the
1960s with Steve Rossi, a
singer and straight man. B5
Law boosts
legal rights
of rape
victims
MD. GOVERNOR SIGNS
EMERGENCY ACT
Attackers can be sued
to forfeit parental rights
BY
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
‘we are marines for life’
O VETTA W IGGINS
Women who become pregnant
in Maryland as a result of sexual
assault can now sue to terminate
the parental rights of their attackers, under a law approved this
month in the legislature after
nine failed attempts.
“This is an important day for
the state of Maryland,” said Gov.
Larry Hogan (R), who signed the
emergency bill Tuesday surrounded by a host of advocates
and female lawmakers and with
Senate President Thomas V. Mike
Miller Jr. (D-Calvert) and House
Speaker Michael E. Busch (DAnne Arundel) by his side. “I
know it’s a long time coming.”
Only five other states had no
laws on the books regarding parental rights and sexual assault,
said Lisae C. Jordan, executive
director of the Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault.
In past years, the bill failed in
Annapolis mainly because of a
protracted debate over men’s
rights, the appropriate burden of
proof and whether men whose
parental rights are terminated
should still be required to pay
child support. Miller said Tuesday
RIGHTS CONTINUED ON B2
As the U.S. Marine Corps Women’s Reserve hits 75, three early enlisters — now in their 90s — are honored
Norma Gene Rambow was 18 years old
when Pearl Harbor was bombed by
Japanese planes. The attack left many
Americans scared and confused. Rambow wanted revenge.
“I was very angry,” she said. “To think
they could bomb us, and with all the
death and destruction. It made me
want to fight.”
Rambow didn’t get the chance to do
battle, but she did spend two years
cooking meals and grinding coffee at
Camp Lejeune, N.C.
Rambow was one of three women
honored Tuesday as part of a celebration
of the U.S. Marine Corps Women’s Reserve’s 75th anniversary at the Armed
Forces Retirement home in the District.
Now in their mid-90s, Rambow, Phyllis Bradford and Muriel Kupersmith
were some of the first to enlist in the
BY
L AUREN L UMPKIN
Women’s Reserve. Rambow kept applying until she was old enough to be
accepted. Bradford enlisted because she
thought it would be fun. Kupersmith
wanted to join so badly that she toted a
handkerchief filled with pennies to help
her meet the weight requirement.
“In those days, the slogan was ‘Free a
Man to Fight,’ ” Bradford said. She and
thousands of other women joined the
Marines to replace men taxed by the
demands of World War II.
Rambow, Bradford and Kupersmith
now live at the Armed Forces Retirement
Home, which bills itself as the oldest
continually operating retirement home
for veterans in the United States.
It houses 380 residents. Nearly 40 of
them joined Tuesday’s celebration, with
many donning the colors of the uniforms
MARINES CONTINUED ON B2
TOP: From right, Muriel Kupersmith, Phyllis Bradford and Norma Gene Rambow applaud Tuesday during a ceremony honoring them at
the Armed Forces Retirement Home in the District. ABOVE: Rambow talks with Leila Jackson of the Women Marines Association.
2018 work will a≠ect
nearly all Metro lines
Two Red Line stations
will shut for 45 days for
upkeep, agency says
BY
M ARTINE P OWERS
Metro will conduct several
maintenance projects this summer and fall that will dramatically affect service on almost every
line — including the shutdown of
two Red Line stations for 45
days, the transit agency announced Tuesday.
For a 45-day stretch starting
July 21 and lasting through Labor
Day, Metro will shutter the Rhode
Island Avenue and Brookland stations on the Red Line. Buses will
provide shuttle service from Fort
Totten to NoMa, as there will be
no train travel between those
stations.
Workers will use the shutdown
to tackle the long-term structural
issues on the platform at the
Rhode Island Avenue station. The
problems became glaringly apparent in September 2016, when
the station was closed for several
days after a chunk of ceiling
concrete fell inside the building.
Later that year, the station was
included as part of a SafeTrack
“surge” that targeted the building’s structure and the tracks
between the Fort Totten and
NoMa stations.
“Metro engineers stabilized
the structure and advanced as
much remediation work as possible during a SafeTrack surge in
2016,” Metro said in a statement.
“This 45-day project will allow
crews to complete structural reSHUTDOWN CONTINUED ON B5
D.C. area’s Jewish population grows
to third largest in the country
BY
J ULIE Z AUZMER
The Jewish community in the
Washington region has grown
to nearly 300,000 people, according to a new study of the
region’s Jews, which paints a
complex picture of Jews’ involvement in religious institutions and activities.
The number of Jews in the
District and its Maryland and
Virginia suburbs has grown by
37 percent since 2003, in a time of
significant population growth —
about 22 percent — for the region
as a whole, according to the report by Brandeis University researchers. But only just over a
quarter of Jewish adults belong to
a synagogue or a similar Jewish
community, and only 15 percent
say they feel very connected to the
Jewish community here.
“There are way too many people
who may be engaged Jewishly, but
it’s on their own,” said Gil Preuss,
chief executive of the Jewish Federation of Greater Washington,
which was involved in the study.
“There are some
programs but not
nearly enough given
the population.”
Gil Preuss, Jewish Federation of
Greater Washington, about local
Jewish offerings
The researchers at Brandeis’s
Steinhardt Social Research Institute calculated that 6 percent of
Washington-area residents are
Jewish and that the Jewish com-
munity in the region is the third
largest in the United States — in a
rough tie with Chicago but far
behind the New York area’s
1.2 million or so Jews and more
than 500,000 around Los Angeles, Preuss said.
Since 2003, the Jewish population has shifted, and more Jews
are living in Northern Virginia,
especially in Arlington and Alexandria, the study found. Today,
41 percent of the area’s Jewish
population lives in Virginia,
37 percent lives in Maryland, and
22 percent lives in the District.
Preuss views that finding as a
call for more Jewish offerings in
the area to supplement the local
synagogues and the Jewish Community Center in Fairfax. “There
are some programs but not nearly
enough given the population,” he
said Monday, when the study was
JEWS CONTINUED ON B8
Dominion
bill passes
in Va. with
key change
House legislation with
consumer protection
differs from Senate’s
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — The House of Delegates on Tuesday passed a sweeping overhaul of the way Virginia
regulates its electricity utilities,
with one last-minute change
aimed at fixing what some say is a
significant flaw of the legislation.
An amendment offered by Del.
David J. Toscano (D-Charlottesville) would prohibit utility companies from charging ratepayers
twice for expensive projects to upgrade the grid and for investments
in renewable energy.
The change is intended to prevent what some called a “doubledip” component of the original
legislation, which lets utilities
invest excess profit in new projects instead of returning money
to ratepayers. According to critics, the original bill would let
utilities keep the excess profit
and build the cost of new projects
into base rates.
Dominion Energy, the state’s
biggest utility, helped write the
original bill and denied that it
would have allowed double dipping. Toscano’s amendment
passed despite Dominion’s opposition — a measure of changing
attitudes in the General Assembly
toward the state’s most generous
corporate campaign donor.
DOMINION CONTINUED ON B4
Courtland
Milloy
He is away. His
column will resume
when he returns.
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
VIRGINIA
Senate run
for Trump
campaign
adviser
BY
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Celebrating the commitment of three Marines
TOP: Former Women
Marines Association
president Theresa “Sue”
Malone Sousa, center,
talks with Phyllis
Bradford, as fellow
honorees Muriel
Kupersmith, right, and
Norma Gene Rambow
listen Tuesday at the
Armed Forces
Retirement Home in the
District. The three
women were among the
first to serve during
World War II in the U.S.
Marine Corps Women’s
Reserve, which was
founded in 1943.
RIGHT: Betty Moseley
Brown, national
president of the Women
Marines Association,
speaks at the ceremony.
MARINES FROM B1
they wore decades ago.
Betty Moseley Brown, national president of the Women Marines Association, reminded the
crowd of women and men gathered that once a Marine, always
a Marine.
“We are women, but we are
Marines for life,” Moseley Brown
said in an address. “From the
first moment that we earn our
eagle, globe and anchor, there’s
no difference for a Marine.”
Bradford became a Marine in
1943. She left her home in Detroit to work as a payroll clerk in
San Diego. Her reason for enlisting was simple: She said that she
thought it would be fun.
“I was fortunate to meet many
interesting people,” she said. “I
had the same job for all
25 months [of service].”
When she wasn’t working,
Bradford was on the basketball
court. Some of her coaches were
professional basketball players
drafted for duty.
Bradford, 94, earned the
crowd’s praise when Moseley
Brown revealed that she had won
a gold medal in volleyball at the
National Senior Games.
Women like Bradford, Rambow and Kupersmith forged a
path that helped make it possible
for more women to serve in the
military.
“We stand on their shoulders,”
said JoAnn Fisher, CEO of the
Women Veterans United Committee.
Rambow was a freshman in
teaching school when she knew
she wanted to be a Marine.
“I knew it was meant for me,”
she said. “I was angry [about
“Us girls did not
slack. Everyone
did their part.”
Norma Gene Rambow, who
served in the U.S. Marine
Corps Women’s Reserve
during World War II
Pearl Harbor].”
A family emergency during
her sophomore year prevented
her from enlisting, so she tried
again in 1943, when she was 20.
By November of that year, she
was on a train to Washington.
She can remember women in
uniform chanting: “Fall in!”
After completing basic train-
ing at Camp Lejeune, Rambow
went to cooking school. She
worked her way up to chief cook,
then supply sergeant in one of
the mess halls on base.
“Us girls did not slack,” she
said. “Everyone did their part.”
Rambow was discharged in
1945 and went back to college.
She taught first and second
grade in Battle Creek, Mich., for
27 years.
Rambow took the stage at the
ceremony. A bouquet of brightly
colored paper flowers pinned to
her chest, she read “The WRs
Have a Birthday,” a poem written
in 1945 by an unknown author, to
celebrate the Women’s Reserve’s
second birthday.
Afterward, the honorees
smiled for pictures. Cake and
punch was served.
And Kupersmith bonded over
her Brooklyn roots with another
veteran who called out an approving “Oorah!” — the Marines’
battle cry.
Kupersmith followed in the
footsteps of her fiance and
brother-in-law, both of whom
were Marines.
Back in Arlington, Kupersmith was assigned the grim job
of notifying families of fallen
Marines.
“It was very sad work,” she
said. “Sending all those letters
out — it was sad.”
After her own fiance was
killed, Kupersmith would have
been allowed to leave the service
but remained enlisted until the
end of the war for what she said
was “a good cause.”
Soon after losing her fiance,
Kupersmith learned that her
brother-in-law had been killed at
Iwo Jima.
Kupersmith talks about those
tragedies, but also has another
Marine story she likes to tell.
It is the account of her son’s
birth, when she awoke after a
very lengthy labor and heard the
“Marines’ Hymn” being played.
Her son became a Marine and
served for 26 years.
lauren.lumpkin@washpost.com
J ENNA P ORTNOY
Bert Mizusawa, a retired major
general in the U.S. Army Reserve
and foreign policy adviser to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, has joined the crowded
field seeking the Republican
nomination in Virginia for U.S.
Senate against Sen. Tim Kaine
(D).
Mizusawa is the fifth candidate
to jump into the GOP primary, set
for June.
Republicans running so far include Corey Stewart, the Prince
William Board of County Supervisors chair and Trump acolyte who
almost won the nomination for
governor; outspoken evangelical
preacher E.W. Jackson; a twoterm state lawmaker, Nicholas J.
“Nick” Freitas; and businessman
and political newcomer Ivan Raiklin.
Mizusawa, who lives in
McLean, ran in the 2010 GOP
primary for a House seat in
Hampton Roads won by former
congressman Scott Rigell.
Mizusawa declined an interview request through his campaign manager, Mike Wade, who
said frustration over the recent
three-day government shutdown
helped motivate him to enter the
race.
He already has about $100,000
in commitments from donors and
is planning a campaign kickoff
later this week, Wade said.
Mizusawa has not met with the
National Republican Senatorial
Committee, which previously
tried to recruit former governor
James S. Gilmore III to run.
Wade said Mizusawa is a more
credible threat to Kaine than
Stewart.
“Résumé. Capabilities. Intellect,” he said. “And an ability to
actually go forth and have an
honest shot at being a challenge
to Tim Kaine.”
Mizusawa defended Trump’s
foreign policy and national defense strategy in an October 2016
column in USA Today.
During the campaign, he
served on the same panel of national security advisers that included George Papadopoulos and
Carter Page, who are key figures
in the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential race.
Wade said Mizusawa has never
discussed Papadopoulos or Page
with him.
He graduated first in his class
at the U.S. Military Academy, attended Harvard Law School and
was a MacArthur Fellow in International Security at Harvard’s
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.
“Bert is a longtime friend of the
party and was very active in supporting the president in 2016
which is where I first got to know
him,” John Whitbeck, chair of the
state Republican Party said. “Bert
adds an exceptional record of
service to an already strong field
of candidates.”
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
Rosalind S. Helderman contributed to
this report.
Law allows rape victims to sue to terminate the parental rights of attackers
RIGHTS FROM B1
that those issues still concern him
and that he hopes to see future
legislation that would require
child support from assailants.
The law, which takes effect
immediately, is “a big first step
and we’ll move forward until we
get this thing right,” Miller said.
“We’re going to have to come back
and deal with this issue year after
year to undo some of the wrong.”
The burden of proof issue centered on whether men should
have their rights terminated only
when they are proved to have
committed assault “beyond a reasonable doubt,” the standard used
in criminal court.
Some lawmakers, including
Miller, initially embraced that position.
Others
successfully
pushed for the threshold used in
civil court, “clear and convincing
evidence,” which is the standard
used to terminate parental rights
in child-abuse cases.
Maryland is the 25th state to use
the “clear and convincing evidence” standard, Jordan said, join-
“It’s been a really long
battle; it just seemed
like it didn’t have to be
a battle.”
Mary E. Shine,
Montgomery County social worker
ing Florida, Georgia and Illinois,
among others, according to the
National Conference of State Legislatures. Louisiana, Missouri and
Nebraska are among the states
that require a criminal conviction.
“It’s so important,” said Del.
THE DAILY QUIZ
In which Italian region is the
winery Fratelli Rabino located?
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Food section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
Kathleen Dumais (D-Montgomery), the lead sponsor of the legislation. “Women that find themselves in the position of being
pregnant after a rape need to be
able to have their voice heard and
to protect their children.”
Mary E. Shine, a Montgomery
County social worker who has
pushed for the bill for years, was
moved to tears after watching
Hogan sign it.
Shine contacted her state delegate in 2006 after becoming
involved in a case in which a
12-year-old girl was raped and
impregnated by her stepfather.
Years after the baby was born, a
judge ruled that the stepfather
had the right to weigh in on
decisions involving the child, and
that his rights could not be terminated under state law.
“It’s been a really long battle; it
just seemed like it didn’t have to
be a battle,” Shine said.
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
A Blooming Good Deal: Free Tickets to From the Archive:
Chasing Cherry Blossoms on March 29 at National
Geographic
Pioneering photojournalist Eliza Scidmore was National Geographic magazine’s first
official female writer, photographer and board member. She also led the effort to
bring the now-iconic cherry blossoms from Japan to the District of Columbia. National
Geographic photo archivist Sara Manco will share Eliza’s trailblazing story through
National Geographic archival images and actor-performed readings of her letters.
See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Events & Contests.
BRIAN WITTE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) signs a bill into law Tuesday that
enables women impregnated by rapists to sue to end the parental
rights of their attackers. Hogan was joined at a ceremony in
Annapolis by Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., left;
House Speaker Michael E. Busch, right; and the bill’s leading
sponsors, Sen. Brian J. Feldman and Del. Kathleen M. Dumais,
behind him.
Jordan said her organization
will go to court Wednesday to file
a termination request on behalf
of a 16-year-old who was raped.
“For her, this means a tremendous amount, to go to court and
fight,” Jordan said. “It’s a change in
the way Maryland is treating women and allegations of rape. It says
we respect you enough to allow you
to go to court and prove your case.”
The rights-termination bill
died in the final hours of Maryland’s 90-day General Assembly
session last year after an all-male
panel of lawmakers failed to
reach a compromise on different
versions of the legislation passed
by the state Senate and the House
of Delegates.
The lack of action caused a
backlash, and Miller and Busch
vowed to make the legislation a
priority this session. Hogan
promised to sign it.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
DID YOU KNOW?
Lickety-Split: Win Tickets to Let Me Break You Up:
An Anti-Dating Game on March 3 at Black Cat
Host Carly Ann Filbin invites real couples to her own cheeky version of
The Newlywed Game to see if their relationships are actually up to
snuff. The couple with the fewest points at the end of the evening has
to break up. The comedian/writer/actor performs regularly at New York
City’s Upright Citizen’s Brigade (UCB). Her show, Validate Me, debuted at
The People’s Improv Theatre and was performed at UCB and the Fringe
Festival. See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Events & Contests.
Not a PostPoints member yet?
It’s free. Sign up and get rewarded.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
L O C A L D IG ES T
VIRGINIA
Man is killed in crash;
driver is charged
A 38-year-old man died early
Monday after he was thrown
from the back seat of an SUV in
a crash in Prince William
County, officials said.
The incident happened about
2:42 a.m. near James Madison
Highway and Thoroughfare
Road in Gainesville, according to
police. The man was identified
as Jose Nelvin Romero
Maldonado, of Warrenton.
Officials said the crash
happened when a 2001 Toyota
4Runner was headed north on
James Madison Highway and the
driver lost control. The vehicle
went off the road and rolled.
Maldonado, who was riding in
the back seat, was ejected and
pronounced dead at the scene.
Another man who was in the
front seat of the vehicle
sustained minor injuries.
Police said Monday night that
they had arrested a man they
described as the driver involved
in the crash. They said Vicente
Martir Vides Vasquez, 21, of
Warrenton, was charged with
involuntary manslaughter, hitand-run causing death, and
driving without a license.
— Dana Hedgpeth
I-66 toll tops $46
for a solo driver
The toll on Interstate 66
inside the Capital Beltway
reached $46.50 for a solo driver
during the Tuesday morning
rush, just below the record of
$47.25 set last month.
Heavy traffic created delays
on several highways. The toll
peaked about 8:30 a.m. as a
crash partially blocked inbound
lanes of the Roosevelt Bridge.
Eastbound I-66 backed up to
the Glebe Road interchange.
“Tolls are based on
congestion,” said Michelle
Holland, a spokeswoman for the
Virginia Department of
Transportation. “The more
congested it is, the higher the
toll . . . so people who are on the
lanes have free-flowing traffic.”
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
The late 19th
century was not a
good time to be an
oyster in
Washington. You
were going to get
John
eaten. It was just
a question of
Kelly's
Washington when and how.
Odds were that
you were going to
be steamed or fried and then
consumed at Harvey’s, the
leading oyster house in a city full
of them. In 1866, according to
John DeFerrari’s “Historic
Restaurants of Washington,
D.C.,” Harvey’s was serving 500
wagonloads of the tasty bivalves
a week.
Located at 11th Street and
Pennsylvania Avenue NW,
Harvey’s was an establishment
restaurant, a place for
Washington’s lawyers, politicians
and businessmen to meet and
eat. And it was where Emanuel
Molyneaux Hewlett decided to
go for a meal on Dec. 5, 1887.
E.M. Hewlett was pretty
established himself. He was the
son of the first African American
instructor at Harvard University,
Aaron M. Hewlett, who oversaw
the college’s state-of-the-art
gymnasium. He was the first
black graduate of the Boston
University School of Law and
had a busy D.C. legal practice. He
was a leading citizen in
Uniontown, as Anacostia was
called then, and his sister
Virginia was married to
Frederick Douglass’s son
Frederick Douglass Jr. (with
whom, it must be said, he
feuded).
On the evening in question,
the 36-year-old Hewlett stopped
at Harvey’s to dine with a Dr.
Curtis of the Bureau of Pensions,
who was also black. The pair
chose a table on the first floor,
then sat for about 10 minutes as
several waiters passed them.
Hewlett finally stood and
approached a waiter and ordered
A Virginia man who teamed
up with a former University of
Virginia football player on a
$10 million investment-fraud
scheme has been sentenced to
12 years in prison.
Sherman Carl Vaughn, 46, of
Blackstone, was sentenced
Tuesday in federal court in
Richmond. He pleaded guilty to
cheating more than 50 investors.
— Associated Press
THE REGION
Cars burn, crash
in Montgomery,
Fairfax and D.C.
BY
M ARTIN W EIL
In a day of several unusual
automotive mishaps, one car
crashed into a house in Fairfax
County, and three other cars
burned in separate incidents elsewhere. Four people were injured
in what appeared to be the most
serious of the incidents.
One of the four injured was in
critical condition after a car
crashed and caught fire about
1 p.m.in the 3000 block of South
Dakota Avenue NE, according to
the D.C. fire department. The fire
was relatively small and was
quickly extinguished, the department said.
Another car erupted in flames
about 12:30 p.m. on 18th Street
NW near M Street, just west of
Connecticut Avenue. The cause of
the fire was not immediately
known. No injuries were reported, the fire department said.
A witness said bystanders
helped a street vendor pull his
cart out of harm’s way.
In the third fire incident,
flames engulfed the front of a
vehicle in Montgomery Village
Avenue at N. Frederick Avenue in
the Gaithersburg area, the Montgomery County Fire Department
said.
In the Lorton area of southeastern Fairfax County, a car crashed
into a house on Lorton Station
Boulevard near Pohick Road.
According to a witness, the car
crossed a median and sheared at
least two trees before pushing its
front end partway through a siding wall.
The police said no injuries
were reported. The cause “isn’t
clear,” they said.
martin.weil@washpost.com
fried oysters.
Another 10 oysterless minutes
passed. Finally, Hewlett went up
to William Harvey, nephew of
the restaurant’s owner.
“My God,” Harvey said. “I can’t
stand that. What do you want
here?”
Hewlett replied that he
wanted oysters.
“You can’t get them here. Get
out of here.”
Hewlett filed a complaint
against Harvey’s, claiming it had
violated the Equal Services Acts
of 1872 and 1873, which forbade
racial discrimination in D.C.
restaurants. After hearing the
evidence, Judge William B.
Snell did as he had done in
earlier cases: He imposed a $100
fine against Harvey’s. The
restaurant vowed to appeal.
And it did, choosing to focus
on the section of the civil rights
laws that said restaurants were
compelled to serve “any wellbehaved and respectable person.”
Hewlett, Harvey’s attorney said,
was not well-behaved.
The defense attorney
produced a story from the
Washington Evening Star
recounting a trip Hewlett had
taken two months earlier to
French’s, a lunch room in the
Center Market, located where
the National Archives are now.
Hewlett had ordered three
eggs, a cup of coffee and some
biscuits, for which he was
charged 50 cents. This was three
times what the meal should have
cost. He asked for the price list —
restaurants were required to
post one, to prevent black
patrons from being gouged —
and was told there was none.
Hewlett left, or tried to. John
French had ordered the exit
doors locked. The black attorney
had to climb out a window, then
walk along a balcony before
entering another room that had
access to an elevator.
This proved, Harvey testified,
that Hewlett was a known check-
COLLECTION OF JOHN DEFERRARI
A postcard shows Harvey’s at 11th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue
NW. In the 1880s, the restaurant was taken to court over its refusal
to serve E.M. Hewlett, a black customer, in violation of a D.C. law.
skipper. Knowing that, what
restaurant would serve him?
Harvey’s attorney managed to
strike the lone black member
from the jury, which after
deliberating for seven hours
announced that it was
deadlocked. The case wasn’t
settled until June 1888, when it
was nolle prossed, meaning it
was dropped by the prosecution.
Hewlett tried to find solace in
the fact that at least he had
publicized the laws, but it was
hard to see the outcome as
anything other than a defeat. It
conclusively showed, the blackowned Washington Bee wrote,
“the prejudice of white men
against a colored man.” The
newspaper mused that it was
only a matter of time before
“white people will attempt to
prohibit the colored people from
attending church services.”
The Evening Star editorial
struck a different tone. “The
inexorable Hewlett will not
relent,” it began. If restaurants
were to be integrated, it asked,
what was next? Mixed schools?
(“The Star believes that the mass
of our colored people favor
separate schools.”)
The editorial concluded that
“no self-restrained and selfrespecting man, whether white
or colored, will, merely to
vindicate his legal right to do so,
go where he is not wanted, with
no necessity pressing and
without advantage to himself
except notoriety.”
And that, the paper
concluded, was what Hewlett
was after: notoriety.
Hewlett achieved notoriety’s
more congenial cousin, fame,
carving out for himself the best
career a black attorney could
hope for in 19th-century
Washington. In 1890, he was
confirmed as a justice of the
peace. From 1899 to 1903, he
served as a judge in Municipal
Court. He was involved with 10
cases at the U.S. Supreme Court.
E.M. Hewlett died in 1929 and
is buried at National Memorial
Park Cemetery in Hyattsville,
Md. Long before then, his hopes
for a truly integrated District
must have died. In the end, the
laws of 1872 and 1873 had proved
worthless.
But nearly 70 years later, it
turned out they still had a little
life left in them.
Tomorrow: The Lost Laws are
rediscovered.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/john-kelly.
MARYLAND
Police investigating death of college-bound high school athlete
BY
Sentencing in
investment scheme
B3
M2
From oysters to eggs, one black lawyer’s quest to dine out in D.C.
— Dana Hedgpeth
THE REGION
EZ
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
AND D AN M ORSE
Tyler Terry, a 17-year-old who
attended Quince Orchard High
School and played on its football
team, died Sunday following a
cardiac arrest that left him hospitalized Jan. 29. Terry had been on
life support for close to two weeks
after an altercation that day, and
his parents decided toward the
end of last week to remove him
from life support.
Police are investigating the
death and a fight Terry was involved in before collapsing and
being hospitalized, the Montgomery County Police Department confirmed in a statement
Monday.
Events on Jan. 29, preceding
Terry’s hospitalization, prompted
a police investigation. As of Tuesday, no criminal charges had been
filed. A description of what detectives learned, provided Monday
by police officials, indicated there
may never be charges filed.
Terry had been involved in a
fight several blocks from the
school that produced “minimal
physical contact,” according to
police. He walked away, police
believe, and moments later
collapsed.
Terry was taken to nearby
Adventist HealthCare Shady
Grove Medical Center, then transferred to Children’s National
Medical Center in the District.
Doctors there learned he had a
preexisting medical condition.
No autopsy was performed, the
officials said.
They said their detectives will
consult with prosecutors at the
Montgomery County State’s Attorney’s Office to determine
whether criminal charges are
warranted.
DOUG KAPUSTIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Tyler Terry, center, then a Gaithersburg High School student, plays against Quince Orchard’s John
Fierstein in 2016. Following a fight last week, he collapsed and was hospitalized for almost two weeks.
“This is a tragedy,” said Capt.
Paul Starks, a Montgomery County Police Department spokesman.
“It’s tragic for Tyler and for his
family and for everyone who
loved him.”
Terry was in his senior year at
Quince Orchard in Gaithersburg.
He had signed a letter of intent in
December to play football at
Monmouth University.
In a letter sent to Quince Orchard families Sunday, Principal
Carole A. Working wrote that a
team of psychologists, a counselor and pupil personnel workers
would be available at the school
Monday to “provide counseling
and support to students as
needed.”
The morning of Jan. 29, just
before 8 a.m., paramedics and
police were called about a teenager who appeared to be in cardiac arrest near a community basketball court, several blocks from
Quince Orchard High. Detectives
who conduct death investigations and homicide investiga-
tions also were called to the
scene. They learned that two
groups had come together at the
basketball court with the intention of fighting.
Three fights would occur. Terry, from one group, and a person
from another group fought first.
“The fight between Terry and
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
dan.morse@washpost.com
Samantha Pell contributed to this
report.
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the other male involved minimal
physical contact,” police said in a
statement. “After approximately
two to three minutes of fighting,
Terry stopped fighting and
walked away from his opponent,
appearing as if he were tired.”
The next fights lasted five to
10 minutes, according to police.
During the third fight between
two other individuals, “Terry collapsed on the ground and became
unconscious,” police said. Several
witnesses captured the three
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“Tests were conducted to determine if Terry sustained any
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said. “No injury was detected.”
Medical staff determined Terry
had suffered a “cardiac event”
and confirmed the preexisting
condition. “It was determined
that no autopsy would be conducted as the preexisting condition had been identified,” police
said.
Friends of Terry’s mourned his
death on Twitter, including his
teammates and coaches from
Quince Orchard and Monmouth.
Terry played linebacker and tight
end for Quince Orchard, helping
it to a 12-2 record in 2017.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
VIRGINIA
term of the tax breaks was too
long. Ordinarily, he said, measures with a “sunset clause”
would have a term of three to five
years.
Morefield countered that he
had interviewed multiple companies in preparing the bill and was
told that a 10-year term would be
more likely to attract potential
employers.
Del. R. Steven Landes (R-Augusta) argued that the bill should
be considered “special legislation” and handled differently because it applies to only a few
localities. But House Speaker M.
Kirkland
Cox
(R-Colonial
Heights) ruled that it was not.
The House passed it Tuesday by
a vote of 87 to 12.
The Senate passed its version
the day before. Debate there took
a different turn, with criticism
coming from several Democrats
in wealthy districts.
Sen. William M. Stanley Jr. (RFranklin), who carried the Senate
version, went through a long litany of ways that Southwestern
Virginia and other rural areas are
less fortunate than “the gold crescent” — the area from Northern
Virginia to Richmond and over to
Hampton Roads.
In the Southwest, he said, people have a lower life expectancy,
less health insurance, less education and greater likelihood of opi-
House, Senate pass bills
to aid struggling areas
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — A bipartisan bill
aimed at luring companies to economically distressed parts of Virginia by offering tax breaks to
their employees has advanced in
the General Assembly, passing
the House of Delegates on Tuesday after a similar measure
cleared the Senate the day before.
The measure, dreamed up by
Del. James W. “Will” Morefield
(R-Tazewell) as a Hail Mary attempt to help rural and disadvantaged areas that seem to be forgotten, drew unusual debate in both
chambers. Lawmakers grappled
with an idea that appears extreme
but has drawn passionate support
outside the usual partisan lines.
Morefield prefaced his presentation of the bill in the House by
praising a colleague who has
helped him build support across
the aisle — Del. Lashrecse D. Aird
(D-Petersburg).
While Morefield is from an
area that’s heavily white, Republican and rural, Aird is from a
majority-black city that is a Democratic stronghold. But they have
been allies on the bill, united by
the poverty experienced by people in their home towns.
“If [she] is an example of the
future of this body, we are in good
hands,” Morefield said of Aird,
drawing applause.
The measure would let suffering areas offer corporate and personal income-tax breaks for companies that agree to locate there,
as long as they meet certain criteria. The bill contained a list of
39 counties and six cities and was
modified Monday to add another
county.
Several Democrats spoke in favor of the bill during debate Monday and praised Morefield for his
effort to come up with a creative
way to seek economic development in troubled areas. But he
drew tough questions from some
senior Republicans, including
Del. S. Chris Jones (R-Suffolk), the
chairman of the Appropriations
Committee.
Jones said he felt the 10-year
. WEDNESDAY,
GREGORY S. SCHNEIDER/THE WASHINGTON POST
Del. James W. “Will” Morefield (R-Tazewell) on the House floor
Friday in Richmond. His tax-break bill drew bipartisan support.
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
oid addiction. Stanley quoted
Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, who
said two years ago that “if it were
its own state in educational attainment, the rural areas would
be dead last, dead last in the
nation.” The other parts of Virginia would rank second nationwide, he said.
Senators from wealthier areas
peppered Stanley with questions
and criticisms. Sen. Richard L.
Saslaw (D-Fairfax) pointed out
that someone who already lived
and worked in one of the 39
counties and six cities specified in
the bill could simply switch jobs
to a new company and no longer
have to pay state income tax.
Sen. Jennifer L. McClellan (DRichmond) said that someone
could live in a wealthier area and
commute to a job in one of the
distressed areas to avoid taxes.
Sen. J. Chapman “Chap” Petersen
(D-Fairfax City) suggested the bill
might violate the state constitution by giving special treatment
to one class of people.
Stanley answered the questions patiently before saying: “We
don’t need a handout. We don’t
need more government assistance. We’ve got that. We’re just
asking for a hand and a chance.”
The bill passed the Senate 29 to
11.
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
THE REGION
After Ghaisar killing, Park Police chief declines meeting on body-cam bill
BY
T OM J ACKMAN
After proposing legislation that
would require all uniformed federal police to be equipped with
body cameras and in-car cameras,
Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton
(D-D.C.) and Rep. Don Beyer
(D-Va.) asked for a meeting with
U.S. Park Police Chief Robert
MacLean to get his input on the
idea. Norton was inspired to pursue such a law after seeing the
video of the fatal Park Police
shooting of Bijan Ghaisar in November, which was captured by a
Fairfax County officer but not Park
Police officers because they are
not equipped with cameras.
MacLean agreed to the meeting. But after Norton issued a
news release saying she would
discuss their meeting with the
media, MacLean backed out, Norton said Tuesday. Norton and Bey-
er met with the media anyway “to
express our astonishment” at
MacLean’s absence and at his explanation that he was not allowed
to lobby Congress on such matters. Norton and Beyer said they
had agreed not to discuss the
Ghaisar shooting with MacLean
because it was still under investigation by the FBI.
MacLean and a Park Police
spokesman did not return messages seeking comment Tuesday.
The Park Police is one of 32
federal police agencies charged
with protecting government property in the District, along with the
Capitol Police, the Federal Protective Service and the Amtrak police. The Interior Department has
begun investigating the use of
body cameras, and an inspector
general’s report issued Jan. 30
said that Interior’s proposed policies and practices for use of the
SIMA MARVASTIAN
Bijan Ghaisar, fatally shot by
U.S. Park Police in November
2017, at a picnic in April 2015.
cameras were not consistent with
police industry standards. Beyer
said he and other members of
Congress sent a letter to Interior
urging it to adopt clearer policies.
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke
recently mentioned the Ghaisar
incident at a town hall meeting
with department employees, the
Hill reported. “We’ll get to the
bottom of it if there’s inappropriateness,” Zinke said. “We want to
make sure we’re doing the right
thing. So we want to hold ourselves accountable, and when you
are law enforcement you are held
to a higher standard because you
have a badge.”
Norton and Beyer, who is cosponsoring the bill for police cameras, said they understood that
MacLean could not discuss a
pending investigation. They said
they agreed to focus only on the
proposed legislation and the Park
Police’s policies and procedures.
Norton received a call Tuesday
morning saying that MacLean
could not attend because it would
“constitute a violation of federal
anti-lobbying laws.” Norton and
Beyer wrote a letter to MacLean,
saying that anti-lobbying laws
“expressly allow Park Police to
communicate directly with Members on policies, procedures, and
pending legislation.”
Ghaisar’s family issued a statement saying they were “disappointed, though not surprised,”
that MacLean declined to appear
at the meeting. The statement
said that the family is “committed
to ensuring proper law enforcement equipment, training and
policies to prevent something like
this from happening to other families.”
The incident involving Ghaisar
began Nov. 17 when his Jeep
Grand Cherokee was struck from
behind by an Uber driver at the
wheel of a Toyota Corolla on the
George Washington Memorial
Parkway. Ghaisar drove away
from the accident, then was
chased by a Park Police patrol
cruiser and a Fairfax police cruis-
er, both with lights and sirens on.
Ghaisar pulled over twice, then
drove off, the Fairfax video shows.
He pulled over a third time in the
Fort Hunt area, and when he started to slowly pull away again, two
officers repeatedly shot him at
close range, the video shows. The
officers’ names have not been released. They are on administrative
leave with pay, the Park Police
have said.
“If we had not had the Fairfax
police following with their cameras,” Beyer said, “we would have no
idea what happened.”
Ghaisar lived for 10 days before
being removed from life support
Nov. 27. His family said he was
shot four times in the head and
was unarmed. The Park Police
have not commented on whether
Ghaisar was armed or why he was
shot.
tom.jackman@washpost.com
Va. bill regulating electricity utility falls short for some consumer advocates
DOMINION FROM B1
A slate of new Democrats
erased a wide Republican majority in the House of Delegates in
November, partly on promises to
shake up the legislature’s cozy relationship with Dominion.
On Monday, the Toscano
amendment initially passed on a
55-to-41 vote, with two abstentions. Then Republicans who control the chamber — sensing the
political value of the vote —
brought back the amendment,
and it passed 96 to 1, with two
abstentions.
The amended bill passed the
full House on Tuesday by a vote of
63 to 35 with two abstentions.
Although some environmental
and consumer groups, such as the
Virginia League of Conservation
Voters and the Natural Resources
Defense Council, back the legislation because it makes renewable
energy a priority, others say the
bill remains problematic.
They say it fails to return
enough money to ratepayers,
takes away state oversight and
gives Dominion a blank check for
a host of projects — for instance,
designating a pool of money for
burying power lines around the
state.
“The bill that passed today contains a $50 billion giveaway to
Dominion to bury power lines using our money without government oversight,” said Tom Cormons of Appalachian Voices. “We
commend the delegates who have
sided with ratepayers as they work
to improve this deeply flawed legislation. Barring significant
changes, we hope they will continue to stand firm in opposition as
the process moves forward.”
Despite having amended the
bill Monday, Toscano voted
against it on Tuesday.
“The amendment passed yesterday made the bill much better,
but substantial problems remain
to be fixed,” Toscano said via email.
He added that he remains concerned that the bill removes layers
of state oversight and slows the
ability of consumers to get rebates
for overpayment. “I am hopeful
that these problems will be fixed
during the next step of this process,” he said.
When the state Senate passed
its version last week, it rejected an
amendment to ban double dipping, so the two sides will have to
reconcile their differences before
the session wraps up in midMarch. Gov. Ralph Northam (D)
helped broker the legislation and
had endorsed the version that
passed the Senate.
On Tuesday, Northam released
a statement saying he is “pleased
that the General Assembly continues to work constructively on this
important issue.” He seemed to
suggest the bill could be improved,
saying that “if we can do better by
consumers, we should, and I look
forward to continuing to work
with the General Assembly on getting this right.”
In 2015, the state agreed to
freeze Dominion’s rates after the
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that the House’s overall approval
of the bill is an endorsement of its
basic concept — that the state
should create a $200 million yearly funding stream so that Dominion can invest in an improved grid
and more renewable energy.
“The House has endorsed everything in the bill. The Senate has
endorsed everything in the bill. . . .
We’re arguing now about how to
pay for it,” Wagner said.
House Majority Leader C. Todd
Gilbert (R-Shenandoah) initially
opposed the Toscano amendment
about double dipping but
switched and voted in favor of it
when the matter came up a second
time. “I think it’s a legitimate
enough concern that we should
make sure it’s fixed,” he said.
Dominion was cautious about
the amended bill. “First, we are
pleased to see the bill has passed
the House of Delegates,” spokesman David Botkins said. “We are
still studying the effects of the
Toscano amendment.”
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
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being played by Dominion.
He cited a recent analyst letter
from UBS investment bank that
was upbeat on Dominion stock
because of the expected action
from the Virginia legislature. The
UBS note praised Dominion as
being “adept at navigating VA politics” and added 5 percent to the
expected value of its business in
expectation of the General Assembly’s passing a favorable regulatory overhaul.
What Wall Street is saying, Cuccinelli told the lawmakers, is that
Virginia is easy. “To use a dating
analogy,” Cuccinelli wrote, “if Virginia were dating utilities, her
name and phone number would
be on the boardroom wall of every
utility in the Commonwealth under phrases like ‘for a good time
call . . .’ ”
Sen. Frank W. Wagner (R-Virginia Beach), who sponsored the
Senate version along with Sen.
Richard L. Saslaw (D-Fairfax),
shrugged off the House’s amendment. More significant, he said, is
utility argued that it would face
uncertain new costs under the
Obama administration’s Clean
Power Plan. But the Trump administration killed the plan, the costs
never materialized and Dominion
is estimated to have reaped hundreds of millions in excess profit
during the rate freeze.
Sen. J. Chapman “Chap” Petersen (D-Fairfax City) has been a leading critic of the rate freeze and said
he was surprised the House agreed
to the Toscano amendment, but he
said it does not address a fundamental problem: The bill continues to prevent the State Corporation Commission from overseeing
rates and lets the utility spend its
excess on new projects.
“I congratulate the House for
winning the battle, but if you take
away the SCC’s jurisdiction, you’re
losing the war,” he said.
Former state attorney general
Ken Cuccinelli (R) wrote to members of the General Assembly on
Tuesday urging them to oppose
the legislation, saying they were
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
Metro announces significant maintenance work for the second half of the year
SHUTDOWN FROM B1
pairs at Metro’s oldest outdoor
station, including addressing deteriorating platform conditions
that affect the . . . accessibility of
the station.”
In the midst of the Red Line
project, there also will be disruptions in the downtown core, with
16 days of “significantly reduced
service” on the Blue, Orange and
Silver lines between the McPherson Square and Smithsonian stations. That project is scheduled to
start Aug. 11 and continue
through Aug. 26, and it will entail
several lengthy bouts of continuous single-tracking.
“Working around the clock,
crews will rebuild the track infrastructure, including installation
of new rail, new fasteners, and
repairs to the concrete pads that
support the rails,” Metro said.
“Crews will work on each track
for approximately one week at a
time so that single-track service
can be maintained.”
In addition, Metro is planning
work on the Yellow and Blue lines
on the Virginia side of the Potomac River, which is expected to
affect riders’ access to Reagan
National Airport.
During one project, scheduled
for Nov. 2 to Nov. 5, the Reagan
National Airport and Crystal City
stations will be closed. Buses will
provide access to those stations.
Then, Nov. 26 to Dec. 9, Metro
will conduct extensive trackrehabilitation work on the Yellow
Line, during which there will be
service only between the airport
“The projects . . . are
necessary to ensure
continued safe and
reliable operations.”
Metro announcement
and Huntington station. Riders
seeking to travel from Arlington
and Alexandria into the District
— or from the District to the
airport — will need to rely exclusively on the Blue Line.
“The projects, which are necessary to ensure continued safe and
reliable operations, are being
scheduled during times of the
year when ridership is lighter to
minimize customer inconvenience,” Metro’s statement said.
Commuters may be displeased
to learn of some of the fine print
included in Metro’s plans for late2018 track improvements. During
those four projects, Metro will
adjust some of the qualification
criteria for its “Rush Hour Promise” program, which offers refunds to passengers whose train
or bus trips take significantly
longer than expected.
When Metro announced the
refund program, officials made
sure to specify that planned service disruptions, including previously announced track repair
projects, are not included among
the types of delays for which
passengers can be reimbursed.
Passengers whose commutes
are directly affected by these four
construction projects may not
qualify for refunds, although other commuters who travel on
routes or lines unaffected by the
shutdowns and single-tracking
will still be eligible for refunds.
“Additional details and service
information will be announced in
Summer 2018,” Metro said.
In their summary of the upcoming
shutdowns,
singletracking and rehabilitation projects, Metro officials note there is
no large-scale maintenance work
planned for the spring and early
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
People ride a Red Line train in
the District in October 2016.
The line’s Rhode Island Avenue
and Brookland stations will see
major work starting in July.
summer, when events such as the
National Cherry Blossom Festival, Independence Day and the
Major League Baseball All-Star
Game are expected to bring
droves of visitors to the region.
To that end, Metro said, offi-
cials decided to delay another
maintenance project at the Huntington station on the Yellow Line
originally scheduled to take place
in May. The project has been
rescheduled for 2019.
martine.powers@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Halfway through session, House passes bill to impose Medicaid work rules
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Virginia’s House of
Delegates passed a bill Tuesday to
impose work requirements on
Medicaid recipients, laying the
groundwork for potential expansion of the health-care program
as the legislature reached the
halfway point of its 60-day session.
The measure is one of a flurry
of bills taken up in the Capitol on
a day known as “crossover,” the
deadline for legislation to make it
out of one chamber and move to
the other.
Any bills left behind are dead
for the year, with one exception:
the two-year state spending plan.
Budget bills come out of House
and Senate money committees
Sunday, arriving on the floor next
week.
The legislative session got underway with a new governor, new
House speaker and new lieutenant governor, who presides over
the Senate. House membership
was largely remade by the November election, with an anti-
Trump wave slashing the GOP’s
66-to-34 majority to a 51-to-49
edge.
The election results caused Republicans to focus on “practical”
legislation, but they still killed
Democratic attempts to ease restrictions on abortion, offer instate college tuition rates to certain undocumented immigrants
and outlaw anti-gay discrimination in housing and employment.
Republicans have announced
several deals with Gov. Ralph
Northam (D) on criminal justice
and regulatory reform. And
House Republicans have signaled
a willingness to expand Medicaid
under the Affordable Care Act, a
key priority for Northam and his
Democratic predecessor, Terry
McAuliffe. An additional 400,000
uninsured Virginians could receive health care if the federalstate program is fully expanded.
After years of steadfast opposition — and warnings that Washington could not afford to pick up
most of the $2 billion-a-year cost
— House Republicans have said
they will consider expansion if
work requirements are part of the
deal.
The vote Tuesday imposed the
work requirements on the state’s
1 million existing Medicaid recipients, with exceptions for the
elderly, children, pregnant women and others who are not
deemed “able bodied.” That bill,
sponsored by Del. Jason S. Miyares (R-Virginia Beach), now
heads to the Senate, which so far
has not indicated if it would
accept it.
Any expansion will be part of
the budget. That means the issue,
arguably the most important of
the session, is not likely to be
resolved until the concluding
days, when budget deals are normally finalized.
The status of other issues at the
halfway point:
Student loan debt
The full House and Senate have
passed bills calling for the creation of a “Student Loan Ombudsman,” which would review and
attempt to resolve complaints
from borrowers.
Minimum wage
Democratic bills to boost the
state’s minimum wage beyond
the federally mandated $7.25 an
hour died in House and Senate
committees, in some cases without getting hearings.
Immigration
The House approved a bill that
prohibits any locality from declaring itself a “sanctuary” for
undocumented
immigrants.
Democratic bills to provide instate tuition rates to “dreamers”
— undocumented immigrants
brought to the county as children
— died in House and Senate
committees.
Confederate monuments
Bills to give localities the power to remove or relocate monuments died in House and Senate
committees.
Criminal justice reform
Northam and House Speaker
M. Kirkland Cox (R-Colonial
Heights) announced a plan to
raise the dollar value for what
constitutes felony theft, unchanged since 1980, from $200 to
$500. As part of the deal,
Northam agreed to support Re-
publican efforts to increase collection of restitution on behalf of
crime victims.
Redistricting
The House and Senate have
passed bills to establish certain
standards for congressional and
state legislative districts, requiring compactness and respecting
political boundaries as much as
possible. The Senate also passed a
bill prohibiting the creation of
split precincts for congressional
or legislative districts — an issue
that complicated a tight legislative race last year. It now goes to
the House, which shot down a
similar bill in committee.
Abortion
In a sharp turn from recent
sessions, Republicans did not
propose a single antiabortion bill.
But they killed Democrats’ abortion rights bills in committees.
One would have repealed a law
requiring doctors to do an abdominal ultrasound and offer the
patient a view of the image before
performing an abortion.
Guns
House and Senate Republicans
tabled every gun-control bill
brought by Democrats, including
those intended to limit the size of
magazines. Democrats also
sought to ban “bump stocks” or
other devices designed to allow a
semiautomatic weapon to mimic
the rapid fire of a machine gun.
The devices were used in a shooting that took 58 lives in Las Vegas
in October.
Firefighters and emergency
medical technicians who have
concealed handgun permits
would be allowed to carry weapons while on duty under a bill that
has cleared the Senate.
School discipline
The Senate voted to make it
harder to expel or suspend young
children — preschool through
third grade — for more than three
school days. The measure provides exceptions for offenses that
involve physical harm. Its prospects are dim in the House, which
rejected a similar bill.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
Gregory S. Schneider contributed to
this report.
obituaries
MARTY ALLEN, 95
Funnyman with unruly hair was part of popular 1960s act
BY
M ATT S CHUDEL
Marty Allen, a fuzzy-haired
funnyman who formed part of a
popular comedy duo in the 1960s
with singer and comic straight
man Steve Rossi, appearing on
countless television talk shows
and variety shows, died Feb. 12 in
Las Vegas. He was 95.
The cause was complications
from pneumonia, a spokeswoman, Candi Cazau, told the Associated Press.
Mr. Allen was a short, pudgy
comedian who found his greatest
success from 1957 to 1968, when
he teamed with Rossi, a tall,
handsome singer who set up his
partner’s vaudeville-style, groanworthy gags. They were brought
together by the singer Nat “King”
Cole.
With the bulging eyes and innocence of a Harpo Marx-like
fool, Mr. Allen ambled onstage
with his trademark catchphrase,
“Hello dere,” and quickly waded
into comic quicksand. His unruly
mop of hair was part of his signature look and figured into one of
his most famous moments on
television, when he and Rossi
appeared on “The Ed Sullivan
Show” on Feb. 16, 1964.
A week earlier, the Beatles
made its U.S. television debut on
the popular variety show, and
Sullivan invited the musicians
back the following week for a
repeat performance. Mr. Allen
and Rossi followed the Fab Four
on the program.
“I kept thinking, ‘What could I
possibly say?’ ” Mr. Allen told
California newspaper VallejoTimes Herald in 2012. “We walked
out, I looked at the camera, said,
‘Hello dere, I’m Ringo’s mother,’ ”
referring to the band’s mop-headed drummer, Ringo Starr, “and
the kids started screaming.”
The quip, seen by an estimated
73 million people, helped secure
Allen & Rossi’s place as a top
comedy act — and considerably
boosted their salary. Together,
they made hundreds of TV appearances as well as a forgettable
1966 film, “The Last of the Secret
Agents?”
“Two sows’ ears can be turned
into silk purses more easily than
into a motion-picture comedy
team,” New York Times critic Vincent Canby wrote in a scathing
review of the film. Mr. Allen and
Rossi “certainly don’t belong in
the league that once included
Martin and Lewis and Abbott and
Costello,” he wrote.
Yet they had a flourishing stage
and nightclub career. When they
appeared at Washington’s Shoreham Hotel in 1966, Washington
Post nightlife writer William Rice
wrote that Mr. Allen was “bringing a fine madness. . . . Along with
his partner, Steve Rossi, he is
providing the most merriment
the club has seen this season.”
Mr. Allen’s routine as a staggering, bibulous restaurant wine
taster, Rice added, “sent an already receptive audience into
nearly continuous, uncontrolled
laughter.”
He and Rossi used ethnic
stereotypes that were common at
the time in a steady barrage of
gags. Whether he was portraying
a big-game hunter, an incompetent golfer or an oversized child,
Mr. Allen delivered his rapid-fire
punchlines with a wide-eyed
wonder.
One of his most popular routines was as a washed-up boxer.
Rossi asked the questions, and
Mr. Allen answered with the gags.
“What’s the first thing you
think of when you enter the ring?”
“How to get out.”
“How many fights have you
had?”
“Hundreds.”
“How many did you lose?”
“Hundreds.”
“How do you explain that?”
“You can’t win ’em all.”
DAVID F. SMITH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marty Allen, left, and Steve Rossi in 1965 on the Paramount Pictures lot for the making of “The
Last of the Secret Agents?” in Los Angeles. The film was not received well, but the comedy act
had a flourishing stage and nightclub career, regardless.
Marty Allen “is bringing fine madness. ... Along with his partner, Steve
Rossi, he is providing the most merriment the club has seen this season.”
William Rice, former Washington Post nightlife writer on a 1966 Allen & Rossi performance
Morton David Alpern was born
March 23, 1922, in Pittsburgh. His
father ran a restaurant and bar.
During World War II, Mr. Allen
served in the Army Air Forces and
helped refuel airplanes in Italy.
He was decorated with the Soldier’s Medal for preventing an
explosion by driving a burning
fuel truck away from a fighter
plane and helping put out the fire.
He began his comedy career in
the 1940s and teamed with Mitch
DeWood for a while and opened
for singers including Eydie
Gorme, Sarah Vaughan and Cole.
“He introduced me to Steve
and suggested we try a comedy
act,” Mr. Allen said in 1984 of Cole.
“[Dean] Martin and [Jerry] Lewis
were big at the time, an Italian
singer and a Jewish comic. That
influenced this Jewish comic and
Italian singer to give it a shot.”
The duo broke up in 1968 but
reunited for four years in the
1980s and performed occasionally until the 1990s. They remained
close friends until Rossi’s death in
2014.
Mr. Allen’s first wife, Lorraine
“Frenchy” Trydelle, died in 1976.
Survivors include his wife and
performing partner of 32 years,
singer-comedian Karon Kate
Blackwell of Las Vegas.
Mr. Allen published a memoir
in 2014 and continued performing past his 95th birthday.
In a 2014 interview with the
Las Vegas Review-Journal, he explained how his trademark line,
“Hello dere,” came about by accident during a performance.
“Steve asked me a question,” he
said, “and I blanked out and said,
‘Hello dere.’ I kept repeating it,
and it got a reaction. After the
show, members of the audience
came up and said, ‘Hello dere!’ I
suddenly realized I had found a
catch phrase, and it went national. It was just something I made
up.”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
IN MEMORIAM
obituaries
DEATH NOTICE
WESLA WHITFIELD, 70
Intimate song stylist and
interpreter of classics
It's been 50 years since God called you home.
We love you and we miss you.
Loving Daughter, Juanita Mercer, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, great-greatgrandchildren, family and friends
LUCAS
Wesla Whitfield, who overcame partial paralysis to become
a preeminent vocal stylist, winning acclaim for her interpretations of the Great American Songbook and acquiring a devoted
following that included many celebrated singers, died Feb. 9 at her
home in St. Helena, Calif. She was
70.
The cause was complications
from bladder cancer, said her
husband and longtime pianist,
Mike Greensill.
Ms. Whitfield sang in the chorus of the San Francisco Opera
before turning to the music of
Irving Berlin, George and Ira
Gershwin, Cole Porter, Richard
Rodgers, Lorenz Hart and other
classic songwriters from the first
half of the 20th century.
She recorded more than 20 albums and appeared at the White
House and New York’s Carnegie
Hall, yet she seemed most comfortable in smaller settings better
suited to her intimate style of
musical storytelling.
“In a music world that sometimes seems overrun with out-oftune cabaret crooners, would-be
jazz singers and commercially
driven imitators,” Chicago Tribune jazz critic Howard Reich
wrote in 2005, “Whitfield emerges as the real thing, a vocalist who
has something distinct and personal to say with virtually every
tune she addresses.”
Ms. Whitfield had a reedlike,
instantly recognizable voice and
sang with precise diction, perfect
pitch and almost no vibrato. She
became known for an unadorned
yet emotionally powerful vocal
style that illuminated every
changing mood of a song’s lyrics.
She was sometimes called a
jazz singer, sometimes a cabaret
performer, but she resisted efforts to classify her approach to
music.
“I’m not a jazz singer,” she told
the San Francisco Chronicle in
1995, “and I don’t consider myself
a cabaret singer. I don’t claim to
be anything. I just show up at the
gig.”
Just as adamantly, Ms. Whitfield refused to be limited by her
disability, which left her in a
wheelchair after she was shot in
1977 by would-be robbers during
an attempted holdup.
“It’s got nothing to do with my
music,” she told the Boston Globe
in 1998. “The thing I’ve come to
realize — you can write this down
— is that life is unfair. No matter
how good I get as a singer, it is
always going to be qualified by
my disability, and that’s what’s
unfair. So my way of railing
against it, very gently, is not to
make an issue of it.”
Yet many listeners, including
her husband, believed that Ms.
Whitfield’s
private
ordeal
brought a more concentrated
dramatic focus to her singing.
“I think being in the wheelchair actually defined her artistry,” Greensill said in an interview.
“It forced her to sit there and sing
the song.”
Ms. Whitfield drew most often
on music from the 1920s, ’30s and
’40s — the era of the Great American Songbook — but did not
consider the songs nostalgic.
Their eternal themes of love,
desire and heartache, she said,
remain true in any age.
With most songs, Ms. Whitfield performed the oftenoverlooked introductory verse,
which she used as springboard
into the more familiar melody.
She and Greensill often subtly
reshaped songs by changing time
signatures or slowing down traditionally up-tempo tunes, such as
“Tea for Two,” revealing fresh
dimensions in the lyrics.
She could evoke romantic
longing, rejection and confusion
all at once with a simple line such
as “Hey, you, give me a clue” from
Jimmy McHugh and Harold
Adamson’s “I Just Found Out
About Love.” In Rodgers and
Hart’s “Glad to Be Unhappy,” for
instance, she added a wry twist of
irony to the line “Fools rush in, so
here I am.”
“You have to realize that I’m up
there doing my own personal
therapy every night,” she told O,
the Oprah magazine, in 2005.
“I’m doing that for myself but also
for everybody in the audience,
because we all feel that way.”
Weslia Marie Edwards was
born Sept. 15, 1947, in Santa
Maria, Calif. Her father was an oil
field welder, her mother a bookkeeper and homemaker. (Her
name was pronounced “Wesla,”
despite its original spelling. In
1998, Ms. Whitfield dropped the
“i” from her stage name.)
She sang and played piano in
childhood and studied music and
drama in college, graduating
from San Francisco State University in 1972. She then joined the
San Francisco Opera chorus,
singing behind such stars as Joan
Sutherland and Beverly Sills.
“I’d sneak off after a performance to sing in piano bars,” she
told the Chronicle. “In opera, the
voice was the only thing of importance. The lyric and the story
didn’t count, and that was boring
to me. I’m very interested in the
song and the story that it has to
tell.”
In April 1977, she was accosted
on a San Francisco street by two
boys who appeared to be no older
than 12. She was shot in the back
and paralyzed from the waist
down. Her assailants were never
caught.
During her recovery, Ms. Whitfield later admitted, she attempted suicide, but counseling and
physical rehabilitation led to a
renewed dedication to music. She
worked as a paralegal and computer programmer while singing
at night and slowly emerging as a
featured attraction in San Francisco.
Her first two marriages, to
Richard Whitfield and Wilfred
Berg, ended in divorce.
In 1981, she began working
with Greensill, a British-born jazz
pianist who had settled in San
Francisco. They married in 1986.
Greensill wrote virtually all of his
wife’s musical arrangements.
“Wesla taught me the importance of storytelling in the lyrics,
and I think I taught her to be
looser and swing,” Greensill told
the Chronicle in 2011. “That was
the real marriage of our styles.”
In addition to her husband,
survivors include a sister.
Ms. Whitfield released her first
recording in 1987 and quickly
became a favorite of other singers, including Tony Bennett, Bobby Short, Margaret Whiting and
Michael Feinstein. When she appeared in 1995 at a star-studded
Frank Sinatra tribute concert at
Carnegie Hall, her version of
Berlin’s “How Deep Is the
Ocean?” drew a standing ovation.
She had month-long residences
at New York’s Algonquin Hotel,
appeared at the White House in
1996, sang with symphony orchestras, and appeared on national television and radio broadcasts.
Before her performances, Ms.
Whitfield was carried onstage by
her husband, who placed her on a
stool next to the piano. In recent
years, she performed from her
wheelchair, but she never mentioned her disability from the
stage.
“I haven’t been through any
more than most other people,”
she told People magazine in 1996.
“What happened to me was just
more dramatic. Yes, it ages you;
yes, it molds you; yes, it mooshes
your brain around. That’s what
life does — if you’re lucky.”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
LITTLEJOHN
Hessa Broder, 92, beloved mother and wife of the late Jerome
Broder, passed away at Suburban Hospital on February 12,
2018 surrounded by her children, grandchildren and devoted caregivers Angela Brown and Margaret
Mfugale. Born in Baltimore in 1925, Hessa
married Jerome Broder in 1946 and raised
their growing family together in Bethesda
until Jerry's death in 2008. The Broders
founded Treasure Trove Jewelers in Washington, DC in 1946. Hessa is survived by her
daughter, Harriet Broder (Daniel Robinson);
sons, David Broder (Susan) and Marc Broder
(Jill), all of Potomac, MD; grandchildren,
Erica, Alex, Devin (Ashley), Dana, Max
(Sarah), Derek and Willie; and great-grandchildren, Bobbi and Gemma Broder. Hessa
will be remembered as being forever loyal
to her husband, whom she adored, and
a loving and supportive grandmother and
great-grandmother.
Of Alexandria, VA, passed February 1, 2018.
She is the beloved mother of Heather Grant
(Charles Pope) and Lawrence Grant, and grandmother of Kyra, Kalyn, and Kael. She is preceded in death by her parents Lawrence and
Ethel Carney. Originally from New York, she
spent many years in Florida before relocating
to Virginia. Phyllis was a Deacon and Ordained
Lay Minister at Plantation Presbyterian USA
in Plantation, Florida and greatly enjoyed her
years of service to the church.
A memorial service will be held at Mount
Vernon Presbyterian Church, 2001 Sherwood
Hall Lane, Alexandria, VA, on Saturday, February 17 at 2:30 p.m In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Phyllis' name to
American Veterans at www.Amvets.org.
PATRICIA F. LITTLEJOHN
(nee Tobin) (Age 84)
RICHARD ALBERT BUTLER "Dick"
January 20, 1929 - February 8, 2018
Dick was born in Kansas City, MO and moved
to Painesville Ohio with his family. There he
met his wife of 68 years, Martha. He served
in the US Navy from 1946-1953, and following
his discharge earned a degree in electrical
engineering from Johns Hopkins University in
Baltimore. He retired from IBM after 33 years
of service.
REARDON
Ms. Whitfield sits at the home she shared with her husband and
accompanist, Mike Greensill, in St. Helena, Calif., in 2011. “I’m
very interested in the song and the story that it has to tell,” she said.
M ATT S CHUDEL
GRANT
PHYLLIS C. GRANT
HAGGERTY
Of McLean, Virginia passed away peacefully on
January 30, 2018.
Patricia was born in Manhattan and raised
in the Bronx, New York by Irish immigrant
parents, Patrick Joseph Tobin and Kathleen
Sweetnam Tobin.
She was the beloved mother of Joanne Littlejohn Clarke and Laureen Littlejohn Mathias and
loving grandmother to Sean Michael Clarke.
She is survived by five siblings Kathleen Graves,
J. William Tobin, Mary Rita Sheehan, Peter J.
Tobin and Gail Parmentier. She also had 22
nieces and nephews. She was deeply devoted
to her family throughout her life.
Patricia attended Katharine Gibbs Secretarial
School in Manhattan leading to a career in
bookkeeping which spanned almost 50 years
in New York and Chevy Chase, MD. She was
a very fierce, brave, determined and fun loving
woman who had many friends.
A requiem Mass will be held on Saturday, May
5 at 9:30 a.m. at Our Lady of Good Counsel
Chapel in Vienna, Virginia. A celebration of her
life will follow at a relative’s home in Vienna,
Virginia.
Memorial donations may be made in lieu of
flowers to the ASPCA.
LODEWICK
BUTLER
In loving memory of you
today and every day.
Your Wife, Mildred Lucas;
Your Children, James, Jr. (Patricia),
and Deborah (Foster);
Grandchildren, Jaron (Shauna),
Daryl (Tiffini) and Danielle;
and four Great-Grandchildren
BY
DEATH NOTICE
BRODER
Graveside service will be held on Thursday,
February 15, 11 a.m. at King David Memorial Gardens in Falls Church, VA. Family will
be receiving friends and family Thursday
night at the home of Marc and Jill Broder in
Potomac, MD. In lieu of flowers,donations
may be made to www.womenheart.org.
Services entrusted to Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky Goldberg Funeral Care.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
JAMES IRA LUCAS, SR.
5/23/1927 - 2/14/2004
LAURA MORTON FOR THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
DEATH NOTICE
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
HESSA BRODER
COMFORD
VERONA A. COMFORD
Happy Valentine's Day, Mother
. WEDNESDAY,
Dick was an avid hiker and boating enthusiast
throughout his lifetime. He was a member of
the Potomac River Squadron. Following his
retirement in 1987 he hiked the Grand Canyon
from rim to rim with a group of extended family
and friends.
Dick is survived by his wife, Martha; sons,
Richard Alan (Teresa) and Gregory (Barbara);
daughters, Kathleen and Bonnie; and granddaughters Alexandra (Neal), Jennifer (Daniel),
Lauren and Anna.
At his request no memorial services will be
held.
CHIRIACO
DANIEL FRANCIS REARDON
June 4, 1982 - February 14, 2002
Beloved brother, son, grandson, singer, athlete
and University of Maryland Presidential Scholar.
All those who loved him and knew him reflect
on his tragic loss. Family and friends miss him
greatly and cherish their memories of him. May
people of conscience and leadership at The
University of Maryland and Phi Sigma Kappa
National Fraternity work to ensure his life and
tragic death will not be in vain.
Requiescat In Pace
PAUL LESTER CHIRIACO (Age 93)
Of Frederick, MD died Sunday, February 11,
2018 at Homewood at Crumland Farms. He
was the wife of Shirley (Hunt) Chiriaco for 69
years.
Born April 25, 1924 in Florence, AL, he was the
son of the late Vincenzo and Pauline Petranella
(Fago) Chiriaco.
A funeral service will be held at 1 p.m., on
Friday, February 16, 2018, at Saint Katharine
Drexel Catholic Church, 8428 Opossumtown
Pike, Frederick, MD, 21702. Father Keith
Boisvert will officiate. Interment will be private.
In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the
National Federation of the Blind, 200 East Wells
Street at Jernigan Place, Baltimore, MD 21230.
EILEEN DALTON HAGGERTY (Age 88)
A Washington native and longtime resident of
Arlington, Virginia, who retired as a research
psychologist from the Labor Department in
1979, died on February 10, 2018 in Manassas,
Virginia.
Mrs. Haggerty graduated from Coolidge High
school in 1947 and the George Washington
University with a degree in psychology in
1951. She worked for the CIA before marrying
and raising her family and then worked for
the United States Employment Service in the
Labor Department. She belonged to the Phi
Beta Kappa honorary society, the Sigma Kappa
Sorority, Catholic Daughters of Americas, the
United States Historical Society, and the Young
at Heart senior group at Saint Agnes Church in
Arlington.
She was predeceased by her husband Wilburt,
daughter Helen, son Edward, and one grandson. She is survived by her son Thomas,
daughters-in-law Roberta and Kathie, six
grandchildren and four great grand children.
She thanks the compassionate staff of Caton
Merchant House which she called home for the
past three years.
Family and friends are invited to a visitation
on Friday, February 16 from 5 to 7 p.m. at
Murphy Funeral Home, Arlington, VA. A Mass
of Christian Burial will be held on Saturday,
February 17 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Agnes Catholic
Church in Arlington, VA. Interment: Rock Creek
Cemetery. Online condolences may be made
at
www.murphyfuneralhomes.com
HENDRY
DAMERON
WARREN C. DAMERON
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the February 11, 2018
death of Domenico N. Bonaccorsy.
He was a DET with MPD-CID when
retired on December 1, 1976.
DEATH NOTICE
DUKES
ALEXANDER
JEANETTE F. DUKES
ALICE L. ALEXANDER (Age 80)
Alice L. Alexander of Altoona, PA entered
into eternal rest on Friday, February 2, 2018.
Survivors include her three children, Norita
Alexander, Frank Alexander, Jr and Anna
McClain. She also leaves a host of grandchildren; great-grandchildren; and other relatives
and friends. Visitation will be held on Friday,
February 16, at 10 a.m. at St. Mary's Baptist
Church, 8008 Eastern Ave. NW, Washington,
DC followed by funeral services at 11 a.m.
Interment at Resurrection Cemetery, Clinton,
MD.
BARBER
JOHN ALEXANDER BARBER
On Friday, February 9, 2018. Husband
of Sandra Jowers-Barber; father of Jewel,
Ashley, Dionne, India, Trayon, John, Jr. and
Tron; and a host of other relatives and
friends. Wake 10 a.m. until time of funeral
service 11 a.m. on Thursday, February 15,
2018 at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 9th
St. NW., Washington, DC, pastor, Wallace
Smith, officiating. Interment Glennwood
Cemetery.
BINNS
CHARLES WILLIAM BINNS
It is with great sadness that the family of
Charles William Binns announces his passing
after a prolonged illness, on Sunday, February
11, 2018 at the age of 63 years. Charles is
survived by his wonderful and loving wife of
35 years Mary; five children, Charles, Mary,
Michael, Debra and Christen; 14 grandchildren,
and five great-grandchildren.
The viewing will be Thursday, February 15, 6 to
9 p.m. at Loudoun Funeral Chapel. The Mass
will be Friday, February 16, 11 a.m. at Christ
the Redeemer Church, Sterling, VA and the
burial to follow at Union Cemetery, Leesburg,
VA. Online condolences may be expressed at
www.loudounfuneralchapel.com
On Sunday, February 4, 2018. Survived by her
children, Terri and Anthony Dukes; grandchildren, Tairon Walker and Anthony Dukes Jr.
Visitation, 10 a.m.; service, 11 a.m., Thursday,
February 15 at First Baptist Church of Glenarden, 3600 Brightseat Rd., Landover, MD 20785
FARLEY
EDGAR LEE FARLEY
(Age 75)
Peacefully on Tuesday, February 6, 2018 Edgar Lee Farley
passed away in Washington,
DC. He is survived by his loving
wife, Barbara J. Farley; six children, Pamela and Arnice Farley,
Edgar Farley III, Kim, William
and TaJuan Mickens; and a host
of relatives and friends. Family and friends will
unite of Friday, February 16, 2018 from 10
a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at Evangel
Cathedral, 13901 Central Ave., Upper Marlboro,
MD 20774. Interment will follow at Lakemont
Cemetery in Davidsonville, MD.
www.briscoe-tonicfuneralhome.com
FINEMAN
LESLIE SUE FINEMAN
Born September 20, 1942. Loving
wife and best friend of Aaron
Fineman passed away on February 12, 2018. She is survived
by four loving children and three
grandchildren, Beck Fineman
(Annie and son Levi) of Stamford,
CT, Jeremy Fineman and Sarah Fish of Oklahoma City, OK, Russell Fineman (Rebecca and
son Noah) of Atlanta, GA, and Michael Fineman
(and son Joshua) of Jupiter, FL. She is also
survived by her brother Barry Chefer (Susie and
their children Miriam and Tzvi) of Jacksonville,
FL and Atlanta GA. She was the daughter of
David and Edith Chefer (Deceased).
DEATH NOTICE
BEDRI
and played an integral role in the development of many successful internal initiatives.
He and his wife of more than 23 years settled
in Middletown, creating beautiful memories
with their two amazing children, Madison
and Matthew. Bill was a devoted family man,
an avid golfer, an incredible wood-working
craftsman, a youth lacrosse coach, a diehard Gators and Giants fan, a donor of corny
jokes at just the right time and a holder of the
most incredible heart-warming smile, which
he shared frequently.
WILLIAM BEDRI, III "Bill" (Age 47)
Died at his home in Middletown, MD on
February 8, 2018 after losing his battle to
cancer.
Bill grew up in New Jersey and Olney, MD,
graduating from Sherwood High School. He
earned his bachelor’s degree in Construction
Management from University of Florida.
Bill worked at Balfour Beatty for nearly 24
years, working his way up from a co-op
student to the Vice President of Operations.
He worked on many award-winning projects
LOGAN
JACQUELINE BROWN LLEWELLYN
HENDRY
Howard University Class of 1949
Jacqueline Browne Llewellyn Hendry passed
away on Sunday, February 4, 2018, at Sunrise
on Connecticut Avenue Assisted Living. She
formerly lived in the Kemp Hill section of Silver
Spring, Maryland. Jacqueline was born in New
York City to the late Dr. & Mrs. Hugh Brown.
Following graduation from high school, she
attended Howard University in Washington,
DC, earing Bachelor of Arts and Master of
Social Work Degrees. Motivated and inspired
from an early age to serve others, she was
employed by several social service agencies
in New York and Washington, DC for over 35
years, retiring from the District of Columbia
Public Schools Pupil Personal Services in 1990.
Jacqueline was married to J. Bruce Llewellyn
of New York for 13 years and later to Melvin
Hendry of Washington, DC. Both marriages
ended in divorce.
Always an avid traveler, Jacqueline accompanied her second husband to Liberia for a twoyear assignment with the Harvard University
Advisory - a position that entailed much travel
across Africa, Europe, South Asia, East Asia,
and the West Indies.
Without family, Jacqueline is lovingly mourned
by friends and caretakers. She spent the past
12 plus years limited by Alzheimer's and under
the guardianship of her best friend and Howard
University classmate Anna H. Johnson.
Services will be held Saturday, February 17,
2018 at St. Mary's Episcopal Church, 728 23rd
St., NW, Washington, DC 20037. The viewing
is at 10:30 a.m., followed by the funeral at 11
a.m. Parking Available.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made
to Howard University, William E. Matory, M.D.,
Class of 1949 Endowed Schoarlship Fund,
office of the Vice President, Development and
Alumni Relations, 1851 9th St., NW, 3rd Floor,
Washington, DC 20001.
HENRY
Leslie deeply loved her family and always
brought love, happiness and humor to everyone she knew. She enjoyed traveling, good
dining, cooking, Maj Jong, Scrabble, Theatre,
Music and was an avid Nat’s fan. She also was
an avid political junkie and was always eager
to convince anyone she met to vote for and be
a good Democrat! She loved to read and share
newspaper articles with family and friends; she
made sure we all were kept up to date on
current events.
Leslie will be deeply missed by all who were
fortunate enough to have known her. Funeral
services will be held at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 at Tikvat Israel Congregation, 2200 Old Baltimore Road, Rockville,
MD 20851 and will be followed by interment
at Mount Lebanon Cemetery in Adelphi, MD.
Shiva will be held at the residence of Aaron
Fineman on Wednesday and Thursday at 8 p.m.
Donations may be made in Leslie’s honor to
The Human Rights Campaign. Arrangements
by Hines-Rinaldi FH, LLC under Jewish Funeral
Practices Committee of Greater Washington
Contract.
He is survived by his wife, Michele Oursler
Bedri; children Madison and Matthew Bedri;
father William Bedri, Jr. and wife Margaret,
Brisbane, Australia; sister Tina Rieger and
husband Chuck, Damascus, MD; step-brother David Masterson and wife Susan, Lake
Forest, CA; step-brother Robert Masterson
and wife Jan, Austin, TX; step-sister Valori
Squier and husband John, Edmeston, NY;
step-sister Brenda Rosso and fiancé Richard
Price, High Point, NC; and 12 nieces and
nephews. Bill was predeceased by his mother and stepfather, Delores (Dee) and Frank
Masterson, Clearwater, Florida.
Bill’s life will be celebrated on Saturday,
February 17, 2018 at Musket Ridge Golf Club,
3555 Brethren Church Rd., Myersville, MD
21773. The family will receive friends from
1 p.m. to 2 p.m. The celebration ceremony
will begin at 2 pm. In lieu of flowers please
make donations to the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins
Hospital.
LAWRENCE SHERMAN LODEWICK
LTC U.S. Army (Ret.) 1928 - 2018
Lawrence S. “Larry” Lodewick died February
11, 2018 following a brief but valiant battle
with pancreatic cancer. He was surrounded by
family at home in Alexandria, Virginia.
Larry attended the University of Kentucky prior
to entering West Point in 1946. Upon graduation in 1950, he married childhood sweetheart
Betty Wray Adams. During his 22 years of
service, Larry was twice stationed in Germany,
led Soldiers as a tank company commander in
the 82nd Airborne Division and saw combat in
Vietnam.
LTC Lodewick earned Masters Degrees from
the University of Michigan (MSE) and George
Washington University (MSA). As a Registered
Professional Engineer, he was extremely proud
of his work on the lunar rover, where his name
remains etched in gold on the moon’s surface.
His military awards and decorations include the
Bronze Star, WWII Victory Medal, Army Ranger
tab and the Senior Parachutist badge. Larry
was a brother of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity, a
Benefactor Member of the NRA and active in
the 82nd Airborne Division Association.
In 1987 he founded TLC Enterprises. The
Lodewick Company brought Larry and his
grandsons many years of happiness restoring
antique firearms, travelling across Virginia and
meeting many valued friends along the way.
Survivors include his wife of 68 years Betty
Wray; daughter Valerie Lloyd (husband Bobby);
two grandsons Major Robert Lodewick (USMA
04) and Robert Lloyd, Jr. (Va. Tech 10) and greatgrandchildren Mackenzie and Thomas.
Visitation is at Demaine Funeral Home, Alexandria, on Thursday, February 15, 2018 from 2
to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Burial with full
military honors will occur at Arlington National
Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers,
donations can be made to Disabled American
Veterans or St. Jude’s.
LUTHER C. HENRY, SR.
On Tuesday, January 30, 2018. Beloved
husband of Rosie M. He is also survived by two
children, Luther, Jr. (Veronica) and Cassandra
(Dwight); four grandchildren, Giavanna, Alexis,
Chaleese, and Dwight, Jr.; three sisters; three
aunts, and a host of other relatives and friends.
Friends may call Mt. Moriah Baptist Church,
1636 E. St., NE, Washington, DC 20002 on
Thursday, February 15, 2018 at 930 a.m. until
time of service at 1030 a.m. Interment with
honors Maryland Veterans Cemetery.
SYLVIA D. LOGAN
(Age 65)
Entered into eternal rest on Thursday
February 8, 2018. Beloved mother of three
children, Jerome Logan, Crystal Lawrence
and Richard Lawrence; loving grandmother of five; other love ones and friends. Ms.
Logan may be viewed at Stewart Funeral
Home, 4001 Benning Rd. NW, on Monday,
February 19, from 10 a.m. until service
11 a.m. The Family requests no flowers.
Interment Harmony Memorial Park
MALLUS
MARIA MANDES MALLUS
Maria Mallus passed away peacefully on
Friday, February 9, 2018. She was born on
November 14, 1919 in Washington, DC. She
was pre-deceased by her beloved husband,
Nicholas, of 54 years; sisters Anastasia,
and Cleopatra, and brother James Mandes.
She is survived by four children, Alexandra,
Mark (Mary), Christina, and Gregory (Thalene); and five grandchildren, Sophia,
Nicholas, Zoe, Nicole, and Alexander. Family will receive friends on Tuesday, February
13 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.
at Joseph Gawler’s Sons Funeral Home,
5130 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Washington,
DC 20016. Services will take place at Saint
Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 2815
36th St NW, Washington, DC 20007
Wednesday, February 14, 2018 at 12 Noon.
Interment at Gate of Heaven in Silver
Spring, MD. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to Saint Sophia
Greek Orthodox Cathedral or the National
Children’s Medical Center, 111 Michigan
Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20010.
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
MOLLER
KENNETH J. MOLLER
Kenneth J. Moller, 56. passed on October
24, 2017 in Rochester, NY losing his battle
with cancer. A Memorial will be held on
Saturday, February 17, 2018 at 1 p.m. at
Joseph Gawler's Sons, LLC - Washington,
DC 20016.
ODOM
ROBERT FRANKLIN ODOM
"Bobby/Bob"
Born May 17, 1959 in Sanford, NC took the
last outbound train on February 9, 2018 from
Sterling, VA. He is survived by his wife of 29
years Nancy Odom; his beloved sister Deborah
Hollingsworth; his brothers Russell and James
Odom; and niece, nephews and cousins galore!
Bobby retired April 1, 2016 from Navy Federal
Credit Union with 28 years of faithful service!
He enjoyed model trains, muscle cars, fishing,
rock and roll and target shooting. He embraced
the spirit of each holiday with enthusiasm,
valuing the time with family and friends. As
Bobby starts his next journey, we ask you not
to mourn him but to celebrate life the way
he did. All funeral services will be private.
In lieu of flowers please donate to either
Petsmart Charities or Petco Foundation. E-mail
condolences may be made at
www.adamsgreen.com
PATIN
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
SANTRIZOS
WRIGHT
DOCKERY
McCANTS
WOODS
HELEN DANA SANTRIZOS
JAMES P. WRIGHT
"Jim"
Passed away on February 10, 2018 in
Bethesda, MD. Born in Greenville, SC to
the late Spyros and Marina Manos. She
was the wife of Nicholas P. Santrizos for 63
years. She was preceded in death by her
brothers, Andrew and George Manos. She is
survived by her husband Nicholas, daughter
Christine Marina Chagaris (George) of Stamford, CT, and sister Bes Zourdos of Bethesda, MD. The couple spent over 50 years
in New York City, where Helen worked in
fashion public relations. She was account
executive with the Eleanor Lambert Fashion
Public Relations Firm. The firm’s client list
included designers Oscar de la Renta, Bill
Blass, Anne Klein, among others. Helen
was also a retail executive with Bergdorf
Goodman. She managed the Ms. Berdorf
department in their first ever suburban
store in White Plains, NY. Helen also operated a tot’s and toddler’s children’s boutique in suburban New York called The
Rocking Horse. In addition to her work in
fashion, Helen was a dedicated wife and
mother. Eternal be her memory. Relatives
and friends may gather at Saint Sophia
Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 2815 36th St
NW Washington, DC from 10 a.m. to 11
a.m. on Thursday February 15, 2018. The
Liturgy will follow at 11 a.m. Interment
will take place at Glenwood Cemetery in
Washington, DC.
Of Annandale, VA, passed peacefully on Saturday, February 10, 2018. Jim was the beloved
husband of Barbara A. Wright for 45 years;
loving father of Jennifer S. Wright; dear brother
of Sister Maria Prudens and Joseph Wright
and grandfather to Jennifer’s dog, Charlie. Jim
was also uncle to many Wright and Ziaj nieces
and nephews. Jim was preceded in death by
his brother, Harry Wright, Jr. and sister, Ann
Kline. A memorial mass will be held at Church
of the Nativity, 6400 Nativity Ln., Burke, VA
on Saturday, February 17, 2018 at 10 a.m.
A complete obituary and guestbook may be
viewed at:
www.fmfh.com
YOUNGER
HARVEY A. DOCKERY, JR.
Departed this life on February 9, 2018. Loving
father of Robin Lindsey, Carol (Samuel) Cole,
Cheryl Freeman,Stanley (Carol) Brown and
Melvin Freeman, Jr.
He is also survived by 26 grandchildren, 34
great grandchildren, six great great grandchildren, one sister Jacquelyn Perry, one brother
Donald Dockery, one niece Denise PerryDurham, one nephew Lester (Sonia) Dockery
Jr., and a host of other relatives and friends.
Visitation Thursday, February 15, 2018 from
9:30 a.m. until hour of service 11 a.m. at First
Baptist of Highland Park, 6801 Sheriff Road,
Landover, MD. Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery.
Services by Bianchi.
LARRY JAMES PATIN SR. (Age 77)
PATRICK
GEORGE EDWARD PATRICK
Suddenly on Wednesday
February 7, 2018 at Providence Hospital. Beloved
husband of the late Ethel
Mae Patrick and loving
father of Larry and Wanda
Patrick. He is also survived by a host of
nieces, nephews, extended family, many other
relatives and friends. On Friday, February 16,
2018 a visitation will be held from 10 a.m.
until hour of service 11 a.m. at Peace Baptist
Church, 712-18th St. NE, Washington, DC. Interment Ft. Lincoln Cemetery Condolences to
www.pridgenfuneralservice.com
PAYNE
MARLYN ANITA PAYNE (Age 82)
Peacefully on Thursday, February 8, 2018. Family will receive friends on Friday, February 16
at Spirit of Faith Christian Center, 2261 Oxon
Run Dr., Temple Hills, MD. Visitation 10 a.m.
Celebration of Life Service 11 a.m. Interment
Harmony Memorial Park. Services by FREEMAN
PERRY
WILLIAM E. PERRY
Entered into eternal rest on Saturday, February 3, 2018. Beloved
father of Jacqueline Bellamy
(Anthony). Also survived by four
grandchildren, Jeremy (Shante'),
Jamal (Nicole), Justin (Tia) and
Jamia Maness; six great-grandchildren, Jada,
Julian, Zion, Jayden, Elijah and Jace Maness;
brother, Lawrence E. Perry; sister, Alice Wilkerson; and a host of other relatives and friends.
Friends may visit with the family on Saturday, February 17 from 9:30 a.m. until time
of service, 11 a.m. at Judah Temple AME
Zion Church, 14500 Mt. Oak Rd., Bowie, MD.
Interment private. Services by Hodges &
Edwards.
POINTS
NELIDA J. SOLANO
On Monday, February 5, 2018, Nelida J. Solano
died peacefully with family at her side in
Arlington, VA. She is survived by her sister,
Hilda Mas (Hector) of Peru; loving mother
of Giuliana (Thomas), Italo (Pilar) and Ivan
(Gladys); grandmother of Victor, Giulana, Diego,
Ivan "Max", Julius, Mauricio, Nagore, Jazz and
Alaia; nieces,nephews and a host of other
relatives and friends. She was predeceased by
her loving husband, Victor. Viewing, Wednesday. February 14 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Murphy
Funeral Home, 4510 Wilson Blvd., Arlington,
VA 22203. A Mass of Christian Burial will be
offered at St. Ann Catholic Church, 5300 N.
10th St., Arlington, VA 22205 on Thursday,
Febraury 15 at 11 a.m.
ROBERTS
BETTY G. ROBERTS
Entered into eternal rest on Wednesday,
February 7, 2018. She is survived by
her daughter, Shelley Henderson; two
sons, Ernest Henderson and Nathaniel
Henderson; nine grandchildren; 15 greatgrandchildren and a host of other relatives
and friends. Mrs. Roberts will lie in state
at New Macedonia Baptist Church, 4115
Alabama Ave., SE, on Friday, February 16
from 10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m.
Interment Harmony Memorial Park.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
SAND
JAMES ALAN SAND "Jim" (Age 68)
Of Myersville, MD, passed away Friday, February 9, 2018 at Doey’s House in Hagerstown, MD.
A memorial service will be held Saturday,
March 3, 2018 at 11 a.m. at St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church, 400 Main St., Myersville,
MD, with Pastor David Howell officiating.
The family will receive friends from 10 to 11
a.m., one hour prior to the service.
MARGARET ANN ZIMMERMAN
(Age 94)
Died on December 2, 2017. She was
born in Whitewater, Kansas to Levi and
Hazel Zimmerman on July 18, 1923. She
received a degree in nursing from Kansas
State and the University of Kansas. She
also received a Public Health Nursing
degree from University of Minnesota. Ms.
Zimmerman retired as a child health nursing supervisor from the Montgomery
County Health Dept. She was an avid sailor
and loved skiing, tennis, golf, traveling
and gardening. She volunteered with
the American Cancer Society transporting patients to and from their treatment
centers. She was a diligent worker in
the plant room at Holiday Park Senior
Center. In declining health for the last
five years, she was able to remain in
her home in Riderwood Village in Silver
Spring, Maryland. She was preceded in
death by her sister, Ina Belle Zimmerman
and her dear friend Jean Henke. There are
no family survivors. A private burial will be
in Whitewater, Kansas.”
Dr. PAUL A. IREY, Ph.D. (Age 71)
DEATH NOTICE
Passed away peacefully on
Wednesday, February 7, 2018. He
is survived by his beloved mother,
Diane Miller; three brothers; and a
host of aunts; uncles; family and
friends. Services are Friday, February 16, at the Peoples Congregational United
Church of Christ, 4704 13th St. NW. Viewing at
10 a.m. Reflections 11 a.m. Services 12 noon.
In lieu of flowers donations may be made
to The Peoples Congregational Church Food
Bank. Professional services by R.N. Horton Co.
Morticians Inc.
Dr. Yussef Akbari was born to Ali and Safieh
Akbari on June 5, 1924 in Golpayegan, Iran.
He graduated in 1950 from medical school
at Tehran University, first in his class. After
serving as a military surgeon, Dr. Akbari
entered practice as an anesthesiologist at
Tehran University Hospital. It was there that
he met the great love of his life, Azar, to
whom he was married for 45 years.
Dr. and Mrs. Akbari emigrated to the United
States in 1959. After Dr. Akbari’s arrival in
the United States, he completed internship,
residency, and chief residency in general
surgery. In 1965, he began a long and distinguished career as a general surgeon in
Washington, DC. Dr. Akbari was proud of his
Dr. and Mrs. Akbari became residents of
McLean, Virginia in 1966. It was there that
they raised their four children. His proudest
achievement was passing a love of medicine
to his children, who followed in his footsteps.
His eldest child, Dr. Margie Akbari of McLean,
VA, is an interventional cardiologist. His elder
son, Dr. Homayoon Akbari of Richmond,
VA, is a general and colorectal surgeon.
His younger son, Dr. Cameron Akbari is a
vascular surgeon in Washington, D.C. He is
also survived by his younger daughter, Sherry
Akbari, who lovingly cared for him in his
later years. Dr. Akbari, beloved as “Papa,”
is survived by eight adoring grandchildren,
Yasin, Sara, Camilla, Madeline, Andrew, John,
William, and Alexander. His beautiful wife of
45 years, Azar Akbari, passed away in 2005.
Dr. Akbari’s life revolved around his family
and his career in medicine. In his sparse
free time, he enjoyed swimming, gardening,
backgammon, and rooting for the Redskins.
Dr. Akbari will be remembered for his
warmth, perseverance, generosity, and
humanity. He had a profound impact on the
lives of thousands of patients. He will be
missed deeply but his dedication, his work
ethic, and his spirit will live on in his children
and grandchildren.
A private service will be held. In lieu of
flowers, contributions may be made to the
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.
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WHITE
Elizabeth “Betty” Michaud White, age 80,
passed away on February 7, 2018 in Great Falls,
Virginia, surrounded by her family.
Betty’s husband, John Patrick White, preceded
her in death in September 2017. She is survived
by her four children, Ann Marie Molyneaux
(Robert); Patricia Welch (Neil); John M. White
(Jill Watz) and Timothy White (Rachel); and eight
grandchildren.
Mass of Christian Burial will be held Saturday,
February 17 at 11:30 a.m. at St. John Neumann
Catholic Church, 11898 Lawyers Road, Reston,
VA 20191
Donations in honor of Betty may be sent to
Father Champlin’s Guardian Angel Society of
Syracuse, NY. A family guestbook and complete
obituary may be viewed at
www.fmfh.com
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $566
4" - $609
5" - $744
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $599
4" - $685
5" - $834
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
O'BANNON
service as president of the medical staff,
chief of surgery, and as a longtime member of
the DC Medical Society. He continued to care
for his beloved patients and the community
until his retirement in 2003. Dr. Akbari will be
remembered as a compassionate surgeon,
a superb technician in the operating room,
and a man skilled in the art and science of
medicine.
YUSSEF AKBARI, MD
C0979 2x3
Of Herndon, VA passed February 10, 2018.
Beloved husband of Mona Marie Lindauer Irey.
Devoted father of David Paul Irey. Brother
of Larry David Irey. Sister-in-law Patricia Kay
Clements Irey. Son of Francis Walter Irey and
Marian Marguerite Furney Irey. Also survived
by three grandchildren, Marian Elizabeth Irey,
Joseph Alexander Irey, and Liam David Irey.
Dr. Irey was a Senior Clinical Psychologist for
over 27 years with the Central Intelligence
Agency’s Office of Medical Services. He served
domestically and abroad in over 100 countries,
in Europe, Eurasia, South Asia, Middle East,
East Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Prior to
that he spent eight years in private practice
in Detroit, Michigan - including consulting with
the Detroit Police Department and numerous
crisis intervention and substance abuse treatment centers.
Family will receive guests, Thursday, February
15 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Adams-Green Funeral
Home, 721 Elden St., Herndon, VA. Funeral
service will be held 10:30 a.m. Friday, February
16, at Herndon United Methodist Church, 701
Bennett St., Herndon, VA. Interment to follow
at Chestnut Grove Cemetery in Herndon. For
additional information and condolences visit
www.adamsgreen.com
AKBARI
Of McLean, VA, patriarch of a large family
of physicians and surgeons, passed away
peacefully on February 3, 2018 at the age of
93.
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
GREGORY ANTHONY MILLER
ELIZABETH MICHAUD WHITE
Today we mark ten years that you left
us for your eternal journey.
You will always be in our thoughts and
hearts until we meet again.
Rest in Peace.
NO EXCEPTIONS
PAID DEATH NOTICES
ROGERS
VALENTINE ROGERS
Funeral Home
Self-Service Deadline:
1 p.m.
deathnotices@washpost.com
GLORIA MARGARET OLNEY
February 14, 1925 November 8, 2008
Happy Birthday - Happy Valentine's Day
We Love You,We Miss You
We think of you every day.
Your devoted Husband, Children and Friends
February 14, 1924 - January 29, 2008
Today we celebrate your birthday
Photo Deadline:
1 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 Ext 4-4122
IREY
ROBERT DANIEL WILSON (Age 79)
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
MILLER
11 a.m. - 3 p.m.
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
THERESA ANN HARRIS
Andrew, your seven children,
grandchildren and great-grandchildren
Because your loved one served proudly...
On Wednesday, February 7, 2018. Beloved wife
of the late James Miller and loving mother
of Wanda M. Jones; grandmother of Tyehimba
Jones (Hope) and Tadesse Jones; sister of
Edna Eldridge (Frank); sister-in-law of Tommye
Montgomery; great-grandmother of Marshawn
Buchanan and a host of nieces, nephews,
cousins and friends. A celebration of life will
be held on Friday, February 16, 2018 at Gethsemane United Methodist Church, 910 Addison
Rd. S., Capitol Heights, MD 20743. Visitation
with family from 10 a.m. until time of service
at 11 a.m. Interment will follow at Lincoln
Memorial Cemetery, Suitland, Maryland.
HARRIS
Entered into eternal rest on Tuesday,
February 6, 2018. She is survived by her
husband, Sammie J. Harris, Jr; daughter,
Luciana Harris; and a host of other relatives
and friends. Mrs. Harris will lie in state
at St. Ignatius Church, 2315 Brinkley Rd.
Ft. Washington, MD on Friday, February 16,
from 10 a.m. until service 11 a.m. Interment
Resurrection Cemetery.
www.stewartfuneralhomes.com
WILSON
On February 12, 2018, of Crofton, MD. He
was born on January 3, 1939 to the late
John and Pearl Baker Wilson. Survived by wife,
Helga; children, Susan, Amy, Terry (Celia) and
David (Christine); nine grandchildren; six greatgrandchildren; and siblings, Neil, Carol, Wayne,
and Mark. Predeceased by brothers, Kent,
Jerry, and Charlie, son-in-law, John, and cherished infant son, Tommy. Family will receive
friends at Beall Funeral Home, 6512 NW Crain
Hwy. (Rt. 3 South), Bowie, MD on Thursday,
February 15, 2018 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8
p.m. Services will be held at St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Catholic Church, 1800 Seton Dr., Crofton,
MD, on Friday, February 16, 2018, at 11 a.m.
Interment at Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date. www.beallfuneral.com
Departed this life on Wednesday,
January 31, 2018. She is survived
by two daughters Zorretta (Zola)
Turner and Juanita (Dexter)
Holmes; eight grandchildren; eight
great-grandchildren; a host of
other relatives and friends. Services Thursday,
February 15 viewing 10 a.m. services at 11
a.m. at Greater Mount Calvary Holy Church,
610 Rhode Island Ave. NW, Washington, DC,
Arch Bishop A. Owens, Jr., Pastor Interment
Ft. Lincoln Cemetery. Arrangements by R.N.
Hortons Co. Morticians Inc.
OLNEY
MARI TAKAHASHI
Of Washington, DC died January 31, 2018.
She was born on March 19, 1948 in Richmond, Virginia, the daughter of Virginia
Bower Troland and Charles Edward Troland.
She is survived by her brother, Ted (Ellen)
Troland, and her family of nieces, cousins,
and great nieces and nephews. Mary Bower
graduated from St. Catherine’s School in
Richmond in 1966 (as that year’s June
Scholar), Wellesley College in 1970, and the
University of Montana School of Law in
1975 (again, first in her class). She clerked
for Judge Tamm of the D.C. Circuit and
worked with the Senate Judiciary Committee before moving to the Justice Department, where she served for over 25 years.
She basically wrote the book on asset
forfeiture, traveled all over Latin America,
and demonstrated her badassery to all
whom she met. She even danced with
Manuel Noriega. She served as the Deputy
Director of the Office of International Affairs
and capped her career as the Department
of Justice Attache at the United States
Embassy in her beloved London. Her active
retirement culminated in a cruise to Alaska,
the only one of the 50 states that she had
not before visited. Her friends and relatives
will miss her amazing stories, her strength
and wit, her intellect, her seriously genuine
smile, and, yes, even her fierce feistiness.
In lieu of flowers, do yourself a favor and go
live an amazing adventure. Private services.
LUCILLE EDWARDS
IN MEMORIAM
Mari Takahashi passed away on January
29, 2018 at her home in Pittsboro, North
Carolina, where she had been living for
the past several years. Born in Japan, she
lived in the Washington, DC area as an
embassy worker, public school teacher and
government language instructor for more
than 40 years. She leaves her husband,
Mark Holliday, her sister, Tsutayo Takahashi
of Yokohama, Japan and two daughters
Sarah Kelman (Beliak) and Lisa Kelman,
one grandson and many friends. Memorial
Services will be private.
TROLAND
CHARLES CARRINGTON POINTS
ZIMMERMAN
TAKAHASHI
MARY BOWER TROLAND (Age 69)
Passed away on Friday, February 2, 2018. He
is survived by his daughter, Charlese Points
Jennings; two grandsons, Troy and Trevor Jennings and a host of family and friends. Sevices
will be held on Thursday, February 15, 2018
at Horton Chapel, 600 Kennedy Street NW,
viewing, 10 a.m.; Service, 11 a.m. Interment
Quantico National Cemetery.
Presidents' Day
Monday,
February 19, 2018
KENNETH L. YOUNGER
SOLANO
PAID DEATH NOTICES
FRANCES G. MILLER (Age 92)
Of Hyattsville, MD, passed away peacefully at
home on February 8, 2018. Service on Friday,
February 16, 2018, Viewing 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Service to begin at 11 a.m. at New Dawn
Baptist Church, 5909 Riggs Road, Hyattsville,
MD 20783. Interment at Ft. Lincoln Cemetery.
On Saturday, February 10, 2018,
Milton S. Schuman of Silver Spring,
Maryland, formerly of Boca Raton,
Florida, passed away. He was preceded in death by his wife, Sylvia.
He was the loving and devoted
father of Mona (Neal) Sobel and
Beth Martin; grandfather of Amy Sobel, Scott
Sobel, Michelle (Greg) Pearson and Matt
(Chanel) Martin; great-grandfather of Brianne
(Tyler) Little, Conner Pearson, and Addelyn,
Gavin and Avery Martin; great-greatgrandfather of Benjamin and Ryan Little. Mr. Schuman's final resting place will be Boca Raton,
Florida. Shiva will be observed at the home of
Mona and Neal Sobel on Thursday, February
15, from 5 to 8 p.m.
MILLER
STEPHEN RICHARD WOODS, JR.
Maj. Gen. US Army (Ret.)
Of Alexandria, Virginia, on February 10, 2018.
Beloved husband of 55 years to Mary Helms
Woods; loving father of Sharon Elizabeth
Woods, Stephen Richard Woods, III (Patricia),
and Shawn Patrick Woods; grandfather of Sabrina C. Woods; brother of William C. Woods
(Martha Jane). Relatives and friends may call
Jefferson Funeral Chapel, 5755 Castlewellan
Drive, Alexandria, VA on Friday, February 16
from 5 to 9 p.m. A funeral service will be
at the Old Post Chapel at Ft. Myer with
interment at Arlington National Cemetery at
a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made in General Woods’ name to the
Wounded Warriors Project at www.woundedwarriorsproject.org. Please view and sign the
family guestbook online at
www.jeffersonfuneralchapel.com
HOLIDAY HOURS
YOUNGER
MILTON S. SCHUMAN
1925 - 2018
AUDREY McCANTS
On Sunday, February 4, 2018 at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, Va. She is survived
by her siblings, Diane, Loretta, Michael and
Kevin Greene and a host of nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends. The family will
receive friends at Our Lady Queen of Peace
Catholic Church, 2700 S. 19th St., Arlington,
VA 22204 on Saturday, February 17, 2018 from
2 p.m. until time of Mass at 3 p.m. Interment
in St Mary's Cemetery on Monday, February
19, 2018 at 11 a.m. Arrangements by Greene
Funeral Home.
EDWARDS
GLORIA D. YOUNGER
Transitioned peacefully on Tuesday, February
6, 2018 with her family at her side. Devoted
wife of Joseph L. Younger, Jr.; loving mother
of Tiffany (Cristiano) Da Rocha Lopes, Malaika
Younger and Crystal (Johnny) Brooks. She is
also survived by four grandchildren, two brothers, Earl (Leona) and Michael (Angela) Douglas.
She was preceded in death by one sister,
Jean Duren. Also surviving are a host of other
relatives and friends. On Friday, February 16,
the family will receive friends from 10 a.m.
until Mass of Christain Burial, 11 a.m. at
Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church, 1006
Larch Ave., Takoma Park, MD 20912. Interment
Fort Lincoln Cemetery. Professional services
entrusted to JOHN T. RHINES FUNERAL HOME.
SCHUMAN
Of Huntingtown, MD on February 4, 2018. He is
survived by wife Barbara Mooney Walter; son
Larry Patin, Jr. (Margie); daughters Wendy Patin
and Kimberly Sanchez (Danny); stepdaughters
Jennifer Walter (Billy Brysacz) and Katie Walter
(Jason Balut); eight grandchildren; sisters Carolyn Presley and Mary Lewis (Pat); brother
Robert Patin (Denise) and numerous nieces
and nephews. Preceded in death by sister
Linda Hooks. Friends will be received Saturday
February 17 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, North Beach,
where a Memorial Mass will follow at 1 p.m.
Interment private. In lieu of flowers donations
to Calvert Hospice or St. Jude Children’s
Research Hospital.
www.rauschfuneralhomes.com
B7
RE
issues surrounding the reorganization of
seven bankrupt northeastern railroads into
the congressionally-mandated Consolidated
Rail Corporation, or Conrail. Obie spent the
remainder of his railroad career at the Association of American Railroads, retiring in
2011 as senior vice president of government
affairs. Throughout his railroad career, he
worked on numerous landmark pieces of
legislation, many still positively affecting the
industry.
HUBERT K. O'BANNON
Hubert K. O’Bannon was known to everyone
as Obie. And it often seemed as if everyone
knew Obie. He was that kind of guy. He loved
people and they loved him. He never forgot
a name or a face. He was almost always
the tallest person in the room, so he was
hard to miss. And no matter the reason for
a particular gathering or event, he made it
better. He made people happy. His beloved
wife Ellen recently noted that if a person had
to go someplace they didn’t want to go and
do something they didn’t want to do, they
could have no better companion than Obie.
She was, of course, right.
Obie was born on July 26, 1951 in Washington, DC and grew up in Arlington, VA.
He graduated from Pomona College in Claremont, CA in 1974 and returned to DC where
he found employment on Capitol Hill before
beginning his railroad career with the Penn
Central where he worked on legislative
Obie loved golf. He was an accomplished
player who recorded a lot of rounds at the
Chevy Chase Club and at the Ford Plantation
in Georgia. In addition to playing a lot of golf,
he constantly thought about the game, read
about the game and watched a lot of it on
television. It was not unusual to find Obie on
the couch, intently watching the rerun of a
tournament from Malaysia or Spain. And he
was funny. He loved to laugh and had the
rare ability to guffaw loudly at his own jokes.
Obie was not above reciting a joke’s punch
line an additional time or two for added
effect.
He was a great friend and a dedicated and
proud family man. Obie is survived by Ellen,
the light of his life and wife of 40 years; their
daughter Blakley Burton of Chicago; their
son Philip O’Bannon (Ashley) of New York;
two precious grandchildren, Beckett and Tori
Burton; and two sisters, Dona O’Bannon
of Bethesda, MD and Marsha O’Bannon of
San Francisco. Obie died peacefully on
Saturday, February 10, 2018 after a heroic
battle with gastric cancer. A funeral service
will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, February
16 at Christ Church, Georgetown. In lieu of
flowers, contributions may be made to the
Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastrointestinal Cancer at Georgetown Comprehensive
Cancer Center.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Off-and-on cloudiness
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Partly sunny
64° 32
42° 33
50° 35
57° 50
FEELS: 69°
FEELS: 62°
FEELS: 39°
FEELS: 46°
FEELS: 60°
P: 10%
P: 60%
P: 40%
P: 25%
P: 25%
W: SW 8–16 mph
W: WNW 8–16 mph
W: ESE 6–12 mph
W: SSE 6–12 mph
W: SSW 6–12 mph
Friday
Cloudy,
a shower
58° 51
71° 59
FEELS*: 57°
CHNCE PRECIP: 5%
WIND: SSW 6–12 mph
°
.
Saturday
Rain or snow
possible
Thursday
Mostly cloudy,
warmer
Today
Mostly cloudy
Wednesday should bring a mix of
sun and clouds, although odds are
good for more clouds than sun.
Clouds should break in the morning
and thicken again in the afternoon.
High temperatures should reach the mid-50s.
The evening might bring showers.
.
°
°
°
°
Monday
Mostly
cloudy, mild
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
51/46
Hagerstown
54/48
Davis
54/51
Sa
Su
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
53/46
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
55/48
Dover
54/45
Washington
58/51
FORECAST
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
43° 1:51 p.m.
33° 7:00 a.m.
47°/31°
72° 1951
2° 1917
42° 1:43 p.m.
25° 5:00 a.m.
46°/26°
65° 1974
–8° 1983
39° 2:41 p.m.
29° 7:00 a.m.
44°/26°
72° 1951
1° 1983
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +1.3° yr. to date: +0.1°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 43°
Ocean City
50/46
OCEAN: 39°
Lexington
61/52
Richmond
61/51
Norfolk
60/52
Virginia Beach
58/52
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 39°
Total this month
Normal
Kitty Hawk
56/51
Total this year
Normal
OCEAN: 45°
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
Trace
3.87"
1.22"
4.81"
4.03"
0.0"
3.1"
Trace
3.16"
1.28"
4.95"
3.96"
0.0"
5.1"
0.00"
3.79"
1.33"
4.79"
4.38"
0.0"
6.5"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly cloudy, afternoon rain, mild.
High 51–55. Wind west 8–16 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy,
showery, mild. Low 46–50. Wind southwest 7–14 mph.
Thursday, mostly cloudy, breezy, mild, showers. High 57–61.
Wind west 10–20 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, milder. High 49–60.
Wind southwest 6–12 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy, showery,
mild. Low 44–52. Wind southwest 7–14 mph. Thursday,
mostly cloudy, breezy, mild. High 60–74. Wind southwest
8–16 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly cloudy, breezy,
milder. Wind southwest 8–16 knots. Waves around a foot. Visibility
unrestricted. • Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly
cloudy, breezy, milder. Wind southwest 8–16 knots. Waves around a
foot. Visibility mostly unrestricted.• River Stages: Today, the stage at
Little Falls will be 5.5 feet, falling to 5.1 feet Thursday. Flood stage at
Little Falls is 10 feet.
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
48/45
Annapolis
52/48
Charlottesville
62/53
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
1:51 a.m.
7:14 a.m.
1:52 p.m.
7:28 p.m.
Annapolis
3:48 a.m.
10:08 a.m.
4:51 p.m.
10:57 p.m.
Ocean City
12:07 a.m.
6:31 a.m.
12:52 p.m.
6:41 p.m.
Norfolk
2:13 a.m.
8:40 a.m.
2:51 p.m.
8:51 p.m.
Point Lookout
6:00 a.m.
12:51 p.m.
7:25 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
Stationary Front
90s
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Immokalee, FL 88°
Low: Chinook, MT –33°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
45/34/pc
60/41/c
32/21/sn
67/58/c
63/55/c
55/48/c
38/15/c
67/60/c
43/11/s
43/27/sn
48/37/pc
42/37/pc
41/34/pc
70/55/c
60/57/r
63/56/c
50/26/c
43/37/pc
56/53/sh
48/44/c
65/59/c
58/34/pc
Tomorrow
49/39/c
56/34/sh
29/18/pc
73/61/c
74/53/r
68/57/c
16/0/sn
73/61/sh
12/–7/sn
44/29/s
53/42/c
45/35/c
45/36/c
79/62/c
71/59/r
76/62/c
37/13/c
41/29/r
63/47/r
56/37/r
76/54/c
44/15/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
41/33/pc
40/37/pc
71/54/c
27/20/sn
39/15/pc
47/35/pc
80/66/r
74/62/c
49/47/sh
71/60/c
68/54/c
58/48/pc
63/45/pc
60/56/sh
66/49/pc
60/59/sh
64/59/r
84/69/pc
43/35/pc
40/24/pc
63/61/r
77/64/c
50/44/pc
60/52/c
42/10/c
44/31/r
64/52/sh
25/5/sn
16/–4/sn
53/42/c
79/67/sh
77/61/c
62/35/r
77/58/c
79/58/pc
64/19/c
63/41/pc
72/55/c
68/49/s
68/50/r
71/58/c
83/69/pc
42/24/c
35/4/sn
73/60/c
78/62/pc
61/51/pc
74/61/c
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
70/55/pc
46/28/pc
80/62/pc
53/46/pc
70/56/c
51/47/c
43/31/pc
50/35/r
48/37/pc
62/53/c
49/20/pc
61/51/c
62/37/s
62/53/c
82/73/pc
55/37/pc
66/55/pc
60/45/s
81/71/sh
46/36/sh
37/21/sn
45/34/pc
84/67/pc
70/52/pc
77/33/c
41/11/pc
84/63/c
64/55/c
67/53/sh
63/48/r
44/36/c
50/39/pc
54/44/c
76/63/c
46/19/s
74/63/pc
64/32/s
69/32/r
83/73/pc
46/29/sn
66/52/s
63/44/s
82/72/pc
47/41/pc
34/28/pc
49/35/c
83/66/pc
73/23/pc
World
High: Winton, Australia 113°
Low: Hall Beach, Canada –56°
Feb 15
New
Feb 23
First
Quarter
Mar 1
Full
Mar 9
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:01 a.m.
6:19 a.m.
7:31 a.m.
2:22 a.m.
12:47 a.m.
4:11 a.m.
Set
5:44 p.m.
4:45 p.m.
6:24 p.m.
11:59 a.m.
10:57 a.m.
1:43 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
81/51/s
Amsterdam
42/35/pc
Athens
60/48/c
Auckland
78/64/sh
Baghdad
67/45/c
Bangkok
93/73/pc
Beijing
45/18/pc
Berlin
38/25/s
Bogota
66/48/c
Brussels
42/38/c
Buenos Aires
84/66/s
Cairo
67/53/c
Caracas
70/62/pc
Copenhagen
38/32/pc
Dakar
76/63/s
Dublin
50/35/r
Edinburgh
43/36/r
Frankfurt
40/29/s
Geneva
41/33/c
Ham., Bermuda 69/66/sh
Helsinki
32/22/c
Ho Chi Minh City 92/71/pc
Tomorrow
79/51/s
48/36/r
54/48/r
78/62/s
71/51/pc
95/77/pc
44/24/s
39/31/c
67/46/c
49/33/r
87/68/c
68/52/c
71/63/pc
36/33/c
72/63/c
42/35/pc
42/35/sh
38/32/sn
45/43/r
69/66/pc
24/18/c
93/75/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
69/63/pc
67/49/pc
54/44/c
56/45/pc
78/59/s
43/31/c
85/75/s
83/62/pc
90/80/pc
79/70/pc
58/53/pc
46/41/r
50/42/c
84/76/r
75/47/pc
40/27/pc
18/9/pc
93/78/pc
81/57/pc
74/52/pc
35/27/sn
39/25/s
42/39/r
35/22/pc
71/63/pc
73/48/c
53/46/c
60/44/c
76/60/t
51/27/pc
84/75/pc
84/58/pc
90/81/pc
78/71/pc
61/48/c
50/33/pc
58/43/c
88/76/pc
76/48/pc
41/30/c
18/16/pc
94/77/pc
81/58/pc
77/52/pc
31/28/sn
40/28/i
52/34/c
36/31/c
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
85/75/r
77/56/pc
49/33/pc
89/65/pc
86/57/s
34/20/sf
48/19/pc
66/43/s
86/75/c
35/26/pc
94/70/pc
74/56/pc
56/38/pc
53/47/s
40/32/s
36/26/pc
33/23/sn
84/75/c
80/60/s
53/33/pc
90/65/pc
89/57/s
32/15/pc
37/18/pc
48/39/c
88/76/c
35/27/sf
83/69/s
79/61/pc
57/42/pc
56/39/pc
44/31/c
37/29/c
31/26/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
D.C. area’s Jewish population has grown, but not everyone feels engaged
JEWS FROM B1
released.
The study, which relied on
6,600 surveys of individual respondents and limited phone
sampling in the Washington area,
reported local Jews’ political affiliations (72 percent are Democrats, and 6 percent are Republicans), sexual orientation (7 percent are lesbian, gay, bisexual or
transgender) and race (7 percent
are nonwhite). It estimated that
2,400 Holocaust survivors live in
the Washington area — 1 percent
of the local Jewish population.
The researchers queried Jews
about religious and cultural practices. Holiday celebrations in the
home proved especially popular:
82 percent light Hanukkah candles, and 83 percent attend a
Passover Seder.
As previous studies have indicated, Jews who marry outside
the faith are less likely to be
religiously engaged. The study
found that 72 percent of Jewish
couples attend High Holy Day
services, while 29 percent of intermarried couples do; 52 percent
of Jewish couples send their children to a Jewish educational institution, such as Sunday school,
while 15 percent of intermarried
couples do.
The study pointed to the increasing frequency of intermarriage: 53 percent of Jewish adults
in the Washington area who are
in a relationship have a
non-Jewish spouse or partner.
The younger the couple, the more
likely they are to be in a mixedreligion marriage. While 36 percent of Jews older than 65 in the
study are married to non-Jews,
about 50 percent of Jews in their
30s and 40s have spouses who are
not Jewish, and 61 percent of 18to 29-year-olds who are married
or living with a partner have a
non-Jewish partner.
“There’s still very significant
engagement by intermarried
households in the Jewish community,” Preuss said. “Some of it
may not be the typical historical
ways that we connect. Some of it
we still need to develop as a
community — how do different
households find community,
whether it’s social justice, or
learning, or something else?
What can we make of the data,
and how do we now engage people [in] how they want to be
engaged?”
He said he hopes the region’s
Jewish organizations will use this
study to reflect on that question.
In addition to data, the report
includes quotes from many local
Jews, who share their frustrations with local institutions:
“For those who don’t have much
experience with reading and understanding Hebrew, attending
services can be very intimidating
and turns people away entirely.”
“I have never been inspired by
what I have heard at my temple.
We joined the temple so our two
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Rabbi Jonathan Roos blows a
shofar for nursery school
children at Temple Sinai in the
District in September 2016 for
Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish
New Year.
boys could have bar mitzvahs but
haven’t participated in Jewish affairs per se for the last 40 years.”
“I was raised Jewish but was
never really a part of the Jewish
community. I married out of my
religion and struggle to keep a
connection to my culture.”
“Young people gathering groups
where the vibe is less ‘singles
mixers.’ . . . I’d like something
more substantive that was tied to
a synagogue so I could begin to
form a community rather than
seeing new faces every time.”
“If you don’t have a partner or
children, it’s hard to feel connected to the community. Something
that crosses generations. Something that isn’t designed only for
matures, singles, under 40, with
kids, or without kids. Something
that crosses the various divides.”
Others were quoted praising
many aspects of the local Jewish
programming. “For me, I would
love to be able to have a community where every single member
of the Jewish community feels
they are part of some Jewish
community, some group with others,” Preuss said. “Because Judaism seems to be a religion, to be a
people, that you do with others.
It’s not something on your own.”
The researchers characterized
only 14 percent of the local Jewish
community as “minimally involved,” pointing out that some
people are very engaged with
Jewish culture or Jewish holidays
even if they’re not involved in
religious observances.
One strong theme in the local
community points to the
public-service focus of Washington. The region’s Jews seem to
have particularly picked up on
the Jewish teaching of “tikkun
olam,” the responsibility to repair
the world. In the Washington
area, 81 percent of Jews (compared with 69 percent nationally)
said that “leading a moral and
ethical life” is essential to being
Jewish. And 63 percent (again,
above the national average) said
that “working for justice and
equality” is an essential part of
the faith.
They’re living up to those ideals: In the past year, 87 percent
gave to charity, including 51 percent who gave to a Jewish organization that serves the area. And
41 percent of Jewish adults did
volunteering in the past month.
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Gubernatorial candidate Baker endorses donor running for Congress
BY
J OSH H ICKS
Maryland wine magnate
David Trone, members of his
family and his wine company
have donated $39,000 to the
2018 gubernatorial campaign of
Prince George’s County executive
Rushern L. Baker III (D), according to filings with the State Board
of Elections.
Trone, who is running as a
Democrat in the crowded race for
the state’s 6th Congressional District seat, has used his fortune to
support many Democratic campaigns, including his own. In
2016, he spent $13.4 million on a
failed bid to win the Democratic
primary for the 8th District,
which Rep. Jamie B. Raskin
(D-Md.) ultimately won. He also
contributed nearly $411,000 to
Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign and $272,000 to
the 2018 Democratic Senatorial
and Congressional Campaign
committees.
Among Maryland’s 2018 candidates for governor, only Baker
received contributions from the
Trone family and business.
Filings show that Trone and
three of his family members each
donated $6,000 — the maximum
allowed under state law — to
Baker’s campaign in October and
November of 2017. Three other
family members contributed a
combined $9,000 to Baker’s campaign in November 2017. Contributing family members included Trone’s wife, three daughters and his sister-in law.
Retail Services and Systems,
Trone’s company, made a donation of about $6,000 in January.
Trone also announced that he
was backing Baker for governor
in December. Baker pledged his
support to Trone on Monday.
Alex Koren, Trone’s campaign
spokesman, said there was no
connection between the timing
of Trone’s donation and Baker’s
endorsement.
He added that the relationship
between Baker and Trone dates
back several years and is based in
large part on their shared experience helping loved ones deal
with Alzheimer’s disease. Baker’s
wife has the condition, as did
Trone’s father.
Baker campaign spokeswoman Madeleine Russak said Baker’s endorsement of Trone is
based on the county executive’s
“personal commitment to support a candidate who shares his
passion for finding a cure for
Alzheimer’s.”
The other Democratic candidates for the 6th District are
three-time contestant Andrew
Duck, physician Nadia Hashimi,
aerospace executive Christopher
Hearsey, state Sen. Roger Manno
(Montgomery) and state Del.
Aruna Miller (Montgomery).
Neither Duck, Hashimi nor
Manno donated to Maryland gubernatorial candidates in 2017,
but Miller and Hearsey did. Miller contributed $500 to state Sen.
Richard S. Madaleno Jr. (DMontgomery), and Hearsey gave
$150 to tech entrepreneur Alec
Ross.
The Republican candidates include national security consultant Amie Hoeber, Kurt Elsasser,
Lisa Lloyd and Bradley Rohrs.
Hoeber donated $500 to Gov.
Larry Hogan (R) in 2017. Elsasser,
Lloyd and Rohrs have not filed
campaign-finance reports with
the board of elections.
josh.hicks@washpost.com
Fenit Nirappil contributed to this
report.
KLMNO
Style
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BOOK WORLD
THEATER REVIEWS
ART REVIEW
Omarosa dishes about
how she’ll never vote for
Trump again, unless he’s
up against Mike Pence. C2
At book clubs across
America, people are
wrestling with the big
questions of lit and life. C3
Three more Women’s
Voices Theater Festival
offerings from Olney, Rep
Stage and Rainbow. C5
An exhibition looks at
works created in Hitler’s
Germany and in World
War II’s aftermath. C9
Sanders
disagrees,
but never
respectfully
READY FOR THEIR CLOSE-UPS
With ‘full-beat face’ videos, YouTube gurus draw fans wanting to master the ‘Instagram look’
She dripped
disdain.
She oozed
contempt.
“If you were
paying attention
Margaret
to what I just read
Sullivan
to you . . .” she
huffed, like an
exasperated teacher
reprimanding a classroom
troublemaker.
Sarah Huckabee Sanders was
responding — though not really
— to a reporter’s question that
she claimed to have answered
multiple times already.
Watching the press secretary at
Monday’s briefing, the words that
came to mind were these: A new
low.
Yes, a new rock bottom from
the podium at the Trump White
House press briefing.
And that is really saying
something, given the lying-fromday-one reign of Sean Spicer,
along with Sanders’s own fulsome
history of dissembling, and the
10-day flameout of Anthony
Scaramucci last summer.
But she did it. Time after time
Monday, Sanders stuck to her
pallid script, repeating without
elaboration the words she said
the president had told her to say,
expressing his supposed support
for domestic violence victims,
although just days before he
seemed much more sympathetic
to those accused of abuse,
specifically his deposed aide Rob
Porter.
Support for Porter could be
expressed in Trump’s own words,
colorfully and directly spoken
and tweeted. Support for abused
SULLIVAN CONTINUED ON C4
BOOK WORLD
Romance
narrators
speak from
the heart
BY
R ON C HARLES
This Valentine’s Day, you might
whisper into your lover’s ear for a
few minutes.
Pity the poor audiobook narrator who has to keep that up for
hours.
It’s a challenge, particularly for
the voice actors who record romance novels. Perhaps no group
of people has thought more deeply about the complicated sound of
passion than these narrators who
speak the words that romance
authors set down on paper. They
literally sing the body electric.
JEN BARTEL FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
L AVANYA R AMANATHAN
Watching the YouTube influencer known as Patrick Starrr
smack white powder onto the slight hollows under his eyes, it
might occur to you that you are witnessing a kind of modern
Kabuki. In one 15-minute makeup video, he transforms his
pleasant, brown, freckled face into a brightened blank slate
that’s slimmer, radiant, spellbinding to look at.
Starrr — who in the real world is a 28-year-old Los Angeles
makeup artist named Patrick Simondac — gestures triumphantly at his work. “Now,” he announces, “this is what you call
snatched.” In other words, perfect.
Simondac is one of the Internet’s many, many makeup gurus,
although, with 3.9 million Instagram followers and 3.3 million
YouTube subscribers, he’s among the most recognizable. What
he’s known for, besides his woke understanding of gender
politics and his sassy humor, is what he calls “the full-beat face.”
The full-beat face has become the ubiquitous face of the
Internet, a strange mirror of Kim Kardashian’s visage but also
somehow just like Internet influencer Huda Kattan’s and Kylie
Jenner’s, too.
Instagram is awash in full-beat glory. The indie makeup
brand ColourPop regularly shares gauzy selfies of young women
wearing their popular matte lipsticks, fingers seductively held
up to their mouths. Save for variations in skin color and precise
shade of shimmering eye shadow, the women all look uncannily
the same.
It’s the “Instagram look,” says Christen Irias, another Los
Angeles-based makeup artist and YouTube star better known to
FACE CONTINUED ON C2
NEW YORK FASHION WEEK
“The sure way they touched, so
obviously familiar with each other’s bodies, killed me.”
— “Dirty,” by Kylie Scott
In her final show, Carolina Herrera is elegant to a fare-thee-well
BY
Audiobook narrators are almost all actors or former actors,
working in a field that hovers
somewhere between announcing
the news and performing in a
play. Their full-bodied voices are
as honed and sculpted as the abs
of any romance novel’s cover
model. They court us with the
witty, tragic or suspenseful stories of wicked dukes and troubled
sisters, escaped slaves and young
widows, advertising executives
and horny shape-shifters.
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
R OBIN G IVHAN
new york — The small chamber
on the ground floor at the Museum of Modern Art was nothing
much to look at on its own — no
priceless art, no revelatory architecture. But the glass wall let in the
sparkling light of the city, and the
Cole Porter on the soundtrack
gave Monday evening a kind of
timeless, foot-tapping, champagne-popping glamour.
And sure enough, at the end of
the Carolina Herrera fall 2018
fashion show, waiters shimmied
through the crowd balancing silver trays of bubbly. It was time to
toast a finale and a beginning.
After more than 30 years, Herrera
was stepping down from her
brand to settle into the role of
ambassador. She is passing the
creative reigns to designer Wes
Gordon, an Atlanta native whose
own label tapped into the quiet
formality of modern Southern
gentry.
The final collection under Herrera’s direction was mostly an
homage to a kind of discreet glamour that is often in short supply,
Herrera has always
turned out sensual and
elegant evening wear,
but she has never been
an advocate of plunging
necklines or leavenothing-to-theimagination sheerness.
requiring too much restraint and
good posture to pull off. The show
opened with a group of white
shirts paired with black skirts — a
look that has become Herrera’s
workaday uniform. They were followed by silky day dresses in turquoise and orange, along with
rose-colored dresses emblazoned
with sparkling black panthers.
But the brand is best known for
its cocktail and evening wear, and
this collection was filled with airy
dresses in pink and gray tulle,
evening dresses in layers of tulle
with a bodice of white embroidery
and a particularly sleek tuxedo in
fuchsia and red.
Herrera has always turned out
sensual and elegant evening wear,
but she has never been an advocate of plunging necklines or
leave-nothing-to-the-imagination
sheerness.
Some designers think “it’s so
modern to be naked or almost
naked. They think it’s going to
attract younger people if they do
those dresses,” Herrera told The
Washington Post in 2015. “They’re
trying to get people to pay attenFASHION CONTINUED ON C9
C2
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
SUSAN BIDDLE/THE WASHINGTON POST
MIKE COPPOLA/GETTY IMAGES
Former first lady Laura Bush.
First daughter and Georgetown
Law student Tiffany Trump.
Laura Bush’s
owlish valentine
to George: Who
loves you, baby?
Tiffany Trump
says not even
Fashion Week
is above the law
First couple cuteness alert:
Former first lady Laura Bush is
giving her husband, George W.
Bush, a woodland-themed card
with a super sappy love note.
“I left him a real valentine,”
Bush said during a Tuesday
appearance on the “Today” show,
which her daughter Jenna Bush
Hager was co-hosting with
Kathy Lee Gifford. Bush said
she was spending the holiday
with her grandchildren, Hager’s
two kids, but made sure her “real
valentine” back at their ranch in
Texas knew she’d be thinking of
him. “It had owls on the front of
it, and it said ‘Owl always love
you.’ ”
Her husband, though, isn’t
much of a romantic, she said, so
she didn’t get an equally mushy
card — although it’s possible he’ll
send her flowers, she allowed
(the ex-prez is now on notice).
Laura Bush didn’t imbibe on
the show, though Hager, a
“Today” show correspondent,
and Gifford were sipping on
violet-colored cocktails. But she
still dished, talking about how
she and her husband met at a
barbecue and had their first date
the very next day at a miniature
golf course. “I kind of think it
was love at first sight,” Bush said.
We were awaiting a sighting of
first daughter Tiffany Trump
among the fashionistas in the
front rows of the New York
Fashion Week shows. The
clotheshorse 24-year-old
daughter of President Trump last
year snagged a coveted perch
along several runways, where
social media posts claimed that
fellow audience members
snubbed her.
What a difference a year
makes. It seems that this season,
Trump, now in her first year at
Georgetown Law School, is too
immersed in her studies to ogle
fabulous frocks. The first
daughter posted an Instagram
story Tuesday showing her far
less glamorous doings: One
picture, marked at 7:56 a.m.,
indicated that she’d pulled an allnighter. “Still awake (as usual)
9am class,” she captioned it.
A spy tells us that Saturday
night, Trump was spotted out
partying — but with the legal
eagles at Georgetown’s annual
Barristers’ Ball (or “law prom,” as
it’s affectionately called). Trump
was accompanied by boyfriend
Ross Mechanic, we’re told, as
well as Secret Service agents who
helped enforce a “no photos”
policy around the first daughter.
SONJA FLEMMING/CBS
Marissa Jaret Winokur and Omarosa Manigault on “Celebrity Big Brother.” Omarosa says she’d take President
Trump over Vice President Pence: “He thinks Jesus tells him to say things. I’m like, ‘Jesus ain’t saying that.’ ”
Omarosa on Pence vs. the devil you know
Former reality star-turned White
House aide-turned reality star
Omarosa Manigault is still going
strong — and spilling tea — as a
contestant on “Celebrity Big
Brother.”
Omarosa, who previously declared
on the show that she wouldn’t vote
for President Trump again “in a
million years,” said during Monday
night’s episode that a Mike Pence
administration would actually be
worse.
“As bad as y’all think Trump is,
you would be worried about Pence,”
she said. “So everybody that’s
wishing for impeachment might
want to reconsider their lives. We
would be begging for days of Trump
back if Pence became president.”
Why?
“He’s extreme,” Omarosa said of
the vice president. “I’m Christian. I
love Jesus. But he thinks Jesus tells
him to say things. I’m like, ‘Jesus
ain’t saying that.’ ” (In addition to
being a “reality legend,” Omarosa is
an ordained minister.)
As the “house guests” — a group
of C-list celebrities trapped in a
studio together — sat around to
discuss illegal immigration and the
Obama-era program known as DACA
(as you do on a reality show),
Omarosa chimed in with her expert
two cents.
“No, we’re not okay,” she said. “I’ve
seen the plan. The roundup plan is
getting more and more aggressive.”
Earlier in the show, contestant
Ross Mathews said of Omarosa,
“Every time she opens her mouth,
I’m like, ‘Is she going to drop a
bomb?’ ” And the answer, of course,
is yes. It might be a part of the
former senior White House aide’s
strategy. Who doesn’t want to hang
around and gossip with the woman
willing to spill all the political tea on
her former boss, who just so
happens to be the leader of the free
world?
Omarosa, who was saved from
eviction Monday night, is still a
major contender on the show, which
runs until Feb. 25. The “bombs” she’s
been dropping on the show thus far
have prompted a response from the
White House. During a press
briefing last week, deputy White
House press secretary Raj Shah
dismissed the former senior aide.
“Omarosa was fired three times on
‘The Apprentice,’ and this was the
fourth time we let her go,” Shah said.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
‘It’s extreme in person. But it looks great in pictures.’
FACE FROM C1
her fans as Christen Dominique.
“When you take a picture, you
lose the dimension on your face.
The light will wash it away.” Over
time, savvy ’Grammers realized
that with a small mountain of
makeup — a Patrick Starrr or
NikkieTutorials video will regularly feature as many as 20
products — you could replace the
shadows and the light and then
some.
Dominique, who refers to the
face as “full glam,” ticks off what
it requires: “an elongated eye,
lashes, contouring, bronzing,
highlighting and sculpting,” she
says. A theatrical set of drawn-on
brows. And finally, it almost
always features a matte lip so
overdrawn that it can look like an
allergic reaction, if not a syringe
full of Juvéderm.
Dominique, Simondac and
other YouTube makeup artists
have made minor fortunes posting makeup tutorials. Just one of
Dominique’s “full glam” lessons
has 11 million views.
So now, it’s likely that even you
have seen the face, maybe in your
very own home, where your teenage daughters (or sons) lately are
lingering too long in front of the
bathroom mirror, “bouncing”
foundation onto their crease-less
cheeks, “baking” banana-colored
powder under their eyes, penciling in tiny hair marks above their
eyes so carefully that when
they’re done, their eyebrows are
creations on a par with van
Gogh’s “The Starry Night.”
“It’s extreme in person,” acknowledges Dominique. “But it
looks great in pictures.”
And the pictures, of course, are
what so much of modern life is
about.
W
e all know that the Internet has engendered
strange
subcultures.
Peddlers and readers of made-up
news and inspirational memes.
Women recording themselves
“unboxing” new Chanel handbags. Highly paid comedy bros
such as Logan Paul and the Fat
Jew. A 6-year-old who reportedly
made $11 million from videos
showing him playing with toys.
But it’s hard to find a sect more
curiously influential than the
makeup gurus. Some do nothing
but review cosmetics, “swatching” shades of the latest Urban
Decay eye-shadow palette on
JEN BARTEL FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
their wrists, while others specialize in the YouTube tutorial, chatting amiably as they demonstrate
how to etch the perfect inkyblack cat-eye.
Vloggers, as they’re called,
emerged almost in tandem with
YouTube. Michelle Phan, one of
the genre’s first stars, started
posting tutorials to the then-budding video service in 2007. Her
first was a lesson in natural-looking makeup: She pats concealer
below her eyes with her fingertips and traces her lips with a
tube of rosy Revlon lipstick. It
has been viewed 10 million
times.
By today’s standards, this
fledgling tutorial — the blurry
footage, the natural look, her
homespun technique — is
quaint. Now, such videos are
full-scale productions, with
lighting, editing and a litany of
products, each costing several
times the price of that drugstore
lipstick.
Asked about the rise of the
made-up face, Phan laughs. “I’m
seeing 5-year-olds doing better
smoky eyes than me,” she says.
“Makeup has changed — even the
behavior, how people consume
makeup and learn about makeup
— because of digital. It transformed the market.”
Simondac, who got his start as
a makeup artist doing seasonal
work at Orlando MAC stores,
remembers those old days, when
makeup’s purpose was largely “to
hide,” he says. “Hide a little bit of
this, a little bit of that. You
wanted to make it look like you
had nothing on.”
Now, the goal is to give yourself features you don’t actually
possess: Brighter, bigger eyes. A
narrower, daintier nose. Eyes so
fringed in false lashes that they
look as if they can’t possibly bear
the weight. “We’re a walking
painting,” Simondac says.
But don’t expect to see any of
this strutting down the red carpet at the Oscars, much less
when you’re out to dinner. The
full-beat face was born of the
Internet and remains largely for
the Internet.
It’s like runway fashion, says
David Razzano, a New Yorkbased makeup artist for cosmetics retailer Sephora. “How many
people walk down the street in a
couture gown?” he asks. “Not
many.”
W
ith its dozens of micro-maneuvers and new niche
products, from highlighting powders to mattifying
primers, the face has been a
game-changer for the cosmetics
business.
The current looks are “dramatic,” confirms Catherine Dougherty, senior vice president for
communications for MAC Cosmetics. “It’s something we hadn’t
seen the everyday consumer
wear. But now we’re seeing it.
And that’s because it’s great for
photography.”
“I don’t think anyone can say
they don’t see the effect that
social media is having on the
beauty industry,” Razzano adds.
“It’s changing the clientele.”
When a customer comes in
searching for the perfect brow
powder, they now bring along
“images of YouTube influencers
and beauty bloggers, rather than
celebrities.”
The vloggers interviewed for
this article have several business
ventures. Dominique launched
her own makeup line in January,
while MAC has plastered Simondac’s face onto in-store posters
and an ad campaign to sell its
Patrick Starrr line of lipsticks,
eye shadows and setting powder.
Phan is a co-founder of Ipsy, a
subscription service that boasted
more than 2 million subscribers
last year; now, she has launched
her own line, Em Cosmetics.
Meanwhile, retailers such as Sephora and Ulta are soaring.
“We make these companies a
lot of money,” Simondac says.
“That’s without question.”
But the welcome disruption
comes with uncertainty about
the future.
Before, brands such as MAC,
Dougherty says, “were the ones
dictating what products to use
and what trends to look for.”
Now, it’s as likely to be a young
man shooting a tutorial from his
Orlando bedroom.
None of this accounts for why
makeup, and simply watching it
being applied, has become the
favorite pastime of a generation
of young women and men.
What does explain it is our
increasing obsession with representations of ourselves in the
online world.
“I see young Norwegian girls
posting the same photo of themselves. So it is an international
phenomenon,” says Jill Walker
Rettberg, a professor of digital
culture at the University of Bergen in Norway who has become a
leading researcher in self-representation in social media, including selfie culture.
The selfie, particularly the
glamorous, pouty-lipped fullbeat face, she says, is “becoming
more like a mask. It’s becoming,
‘Who do I want to be?’ There’s a
sense of figuring out ‘Who am I?’
as a sort of cultural expression.”
The face doesn’t need to be
worn out in public to work its
magic. It’s almost as if it’s
enough, Rettberg says, to simply
know you could look like Kim
Kardashian if you wanted to.
She pauses. “You couldn’t do
that before the Internet, could
you?”
lavanya.ramanathan
@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
book world
R OMANC E
BY
S ARAH M AC L EAN
I
t’s February, time for those candy
hearts, doilies and advertisements
for diamonds. Where Valentine’s
Day goes, the rosy-hued promise of
happily-ever-after inevitably follows. Of
course, it’s rarely as easy as
commercials would like us to believe.
This month, I’ve picked three romance
novels that offer a little fantasy and a
little reality.
THE WASHINGTON POST/ISTOCK IMAGES
Tessa Bailey’s new romance, Indecent
Exposure: The Academy, (Avon)
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
But the conditions of the job are
anything but romantic. Andi Arndt, who
won the 2017 Audie Award for Romance,
says, “I sit alone in a little box and read all
day.”
That sounds like the plight of some
Brothers Grimm heroine, but this is no
fairy tale. It’s exacting work that has given
rise to a cottage industry of independent
contractors who are part literary critics,
part actors, part sound engineers. Many
work alone, sometimes in their own
homes. “When I first started,” Arndt says,
“I’d have this existential moment: ‘Will
anybody ever hear this?’ ”
She needn’t worry about that anymore. After recording about 250 books
over the past seven years, Arndt is adored
by legions of listeners, and she keeps
them constantly in mind when she’s
recording. “I don’t want to tire them out,”
she says. “It’s not about me grabbing
them by the lapels. I can’t sustain that for
an eight-hour book. It’s about the author’s words.”
In a sense, the audiobook narrator
participates in a ménage à trois with the
novelist and the listener. If that relationship works, the narrator enhances the
reader’s experience — but never dominates it.
Kat Lambrix, director of Audible Studios (a subsidiary of Amazon, whose
founder, Jeffrey P. Bezos, owns The Washington Post), says she wants voice actors
who can understand each romance novel
on an emotional level. “Are they going to
be true to the ethos of the story?” she
asks. “Are there double-entendres they’re
going to hit just right? Are they going to
be able to embody the writer and the
characters?”
She acknowledges that “there are so
many different ways that people’s voices
can embody sexiness,” but it all comes
down to one powerful but ineffable tone
in the actor’s voice: “When you’re doing
romance, intimate is the most important
quality.” The best narrators “take you
along the journey with them, and you’re
in the room with them and feeling those
emotions along with them.”
Narrators don’t
spell it out for you
“From out of memory, an image came
unto his mind and took his breath away.
It was of a tall slender female.”
— “The Chosen,” by J.R. Ward
When the stories are very intimate,
even erotic, that can get touchy.
Jim Frangione, an actor who narrates
J.R. Ward’s popular Black Dagger Brotherhood novels, says, “You really have to
stay lubricated. I drink a lot of hot tea
when I’m recording.” If you know Ward’s
paranormal romance stories about vampire warriors, you can understand why.
“You have to give it some authenticity. You
have to ‘go there’ with your voice,” Frangione says. “I don’t smoke, but if I did, I’d
share a cigarette with my engineer afterwards.”
“Don’t look through the glass at the
engineer!” warns Amanda Ronconi, who
has recorded about 70 romance novels.
Once you get the giggles, you’re done, she
says. You’ve got to stop, clear your mind,
take a walk. When Ronconi is recording
particularly erotic stories, her only goal is
to stay in the character’s head. “That
helps find that balance,” she says, “so that
it doesn’t become pornographic.” The last
thing she wants in those moments is for
the engineer — invariably a young man —
to stop her and ask, “Can you say that
again?”
As a rule, romance listeners don’t want
to hear a 1-900 voice: No moaning, no
groaning. Keep it subtle. No matter how
explicit the scene may be, some things
need to be left to the imagination. A great
voice evokes shades of grey.
Karen White, who has recorded more
than 350 audiobooks, says the finest
compliment she ever received was from a
reviewer who said that she reads “sex
scenes in a way that doesn’t make a
listener feel like they’re a voyeur or in
that creepy way that makes you feel like
you’re listening to someone’s sex act.”
Instead, White says, “I focus on the
emotions that people are feeling, even if
I’m reading words that are about . . .
specific parts. There are no sound effects.
That would be really strange. When people get too into it, and there’s a lot of
panting, listeners tend not to like that.
Our training is to make the voice connect
with what we’re feeling. That works better than having a breathy, sexy voice. If
you start listening to that, maybe the first
paragraph it’s great, but then you fall
asleep.”
Such emotional sensitivity is exactly
what best-selling romance novelist Emma
Chase is looking for. “You don’t want to be
uncomfortable with those scenes,” she
says. “The audiobook experience — hearing the words outside the book — heightens everything for the listener,” which
makes the voice actor’s job even more
crucial. “The humor is funnier. The romance is more passionate. The sexy moments make you blush a little more.” The
first time she heard the recording of one of
her novels, she admits, “I just kind of
turned beet red. Who wrote that?”
“He’s the perfect combo of boyishly
could-go-to-my-school kind of handsome,
mixed with dangerously hot and tantalizingly mysterious.”
— “Royally Endowed,” by Emma Chase
Chase wrote her upcoming novel,
“Getting Schooled” (Audible Studios),
specifically for the audio format, an
increasingly common approach that subtly changes the conditions of composition. “I had in mind what it would sound
like to the listener,” Chase says. “And I
kept in mind — particularly with love
scenes — the gasping and some of the
words that you use, making sure it would
sound good. A talented narrator will be
able to take that scene and be bold with
it.”
But getting hot and bothered is hardly
the most challenging aspect of recording
romance novels. A year or two may pass
between novels in a popular series, but a
listener might binge-listen to that entire
series in a week, and her favorite character has got to sound consistent from book
to book. Like other narrators, White
records and stores voice samples of every
character she reads so that she can go
back and remind herself exactly how that
doctor or sister or lieutenant sounds.
“There are subtle differences,” she says,
“a lot of different factors you can change:
pitch, tone, accent, pace and other things
that affect the feel of the voice.”
Adenrele Ojo, an actress who narrates
and directs audiobooks, draws an analogy to film. “In a movie, we have the
music and the camera shots,” Ojo says.
But with an audiobook, “we’re framing all
the shots for you. That comes from the
voice — a little sexiness, a little raspy
sometimes. The pacing is always changing depending on what’s happening in
the scene. When you do get in those more
romantic moments, is it clumsy, is it sexy,
is it scintillating? That will tell you how to
tell the story, which will help keep them
enthralled.”
In some ways, the process is no different from romance itself. “Slow it down;
take your time with this,” Ojo tells the
narrators she’s directing. “If you find a
really nice moment, you want that moment to live, to really live for the listener.
Oh, oh, oh — can you just do it again?”
introduces readers to an Olympic goldmedalist in marksmanship, Katie
McCoy. She’s now the new firearms
instructor at the New York Police
Academy. Katie’s competence in all
areas of her life is thrown into chaos
when she meets her newest class of
cadets — one of whom gave her the
smooch of a lifetime the night before.
Jack Garrett is an unexpected romance
hero — an alcoholic consumed by his
past and unmotivated in life. His
decision to become a police officer is
more a search for purpose than passion.
Then he meets Katie. Sexy and deeply
emotional, “Indecent Exposure” is the
story of Jack’s redemption. Bailey
reminds readers again and again that
even if love can be a powerful catalyst
for personal growth, it isn’t enough to
change a person. Bailey excels in telling
the stories of foils, and Katie and Jack’s
romance is an honest, beautiful
example: Though opposites, these two
make perfect partners.
In The Bittersweet Bride
(Entangled), Vanessa Riley explores the
plight of Theodosia Cecil, a widow longago prevented from eloping with her
first love, Ewan Fitzwilliam, by his
aristocratic family. In the wake of their
scandal, Ewan was sent to war, not
knowing that he’d left Theo pregnant
with their child. Having no choice, Theo
married another man and, after his
death, took over the management of his
successful flower farm outside London.
But the challenges of an unmarried,
black business executive in Regency
England were legion, and Theo is no
fool — she and her son need a new
protector. What they do not need is
Ewan, returned from war and eager for
another chance to woo the girl he once
loved. Riley’s novel is as bittersweet as
the title suggests — deftly weaving
issues of class and race into a complex
second-chance love story.
Jasmine Guillory’s debut, The
Wedding Date (Berkley), is literary
confection — a romantic comedy
complete with a stuck-in-an-elevatormeet-cute that’s as sweet as marzipan.
Pediatric surgeon Drew Nichols needs a
date to his ex-girlfriend’s wedding.
When the power goes out, he finds
himself in close quarters with the
brilliant and beautiful Alexa Monroe.
She agrees to attend the wedding as
Drew’s fake girlfriend — the pair’s love
of cheese not being the only thing they
have in common — and the two are
soon lost in the magical romantic
bubble that comes with being far from
home with a delightful partner. But
bubbles pop, and when this one does,
two perfectly matched, career-minded
people have to return to their real lives
in the real world and learn to be with
each other. Guillory’s debut is as
enchanting as her characters — bright,
bold, warm and wonderful. Even better,
there’s a proposal to rival any
commercial that Madison Avenue can
deliver. Happy Valentine’s Day.
bookworld@washpost.com
Sarah MacLean is the author of historical
romance. Her most recent book is “The Day
of the Duchess.”
ron.charles@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book World and
the host of TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
Worried about the future of the novel? Well, join the club.
BY
I
R ON C HARLES
an McEwan once said, “When women stop reading, the novel will be
dead.”
Last week I met some of those
women keeping the novel alive.
They invited me to attend their book
club meeting in Rockville, Md. For a guy
who spends most of his life alone typing
about books, it was a rare pleasure to
listen to other people talk about them.
There were about a dozen of us sitting
around a coffee table laden with chips
and veggies. One of the members
brought her famous whiskey cake. As a
lifelong teetotaler — and cake lover — I
reassured myself that all the alcohol
burned off during baking.
Our subject for the evening was
Jesmyn Ward’s “Salvage the Bones,”
which won the 2011 National Book
Award. It’s a rich, devastating novel
about a poor black family in Mississippi
in the days before and during Hurricane
Katrina.
One of the members, Barbara, began
by asking each of us to describe our
reaction to the novel in 30 seconds. It’s
been a long time since I was an English
teacher, but that struck me as a perfect
opening: Even the shyest members could
feel comfortable talking for just half a
minute, while the most loquacious ones
would be courteously reined in.
Everyone reported enjoying the novel.
Most found it deeply moving. One woman confessed that she hadn’t finished
most of the books they had read together
(“Yes, you’ve told us that before,” someone muttered), but “Salvage the Bones”
drew her in “like a vacuum.”
That sort of consensus about a book
can be deadly for a group discussion;
good conversation often needs to hang
on the barbs of little disagreements. But
consensus didn’t hamper these women.
The conversation moved naturally and
with great enthusiasm from Ward’s poetic style to her powerful characters.
Several members noted that they
found the dogfighting scenes disturbing,
as did I. (One of the siblings in “Salvage
the Bones” is wholly devoted to his pit
bull, who has a litter of valuable puppies.) But what struck me was that, even
though every person in that room
thought dogfighting is repugnant, there
was no hint of condemnation in our
discussion, no whiff of moral superiority.
Instead, the novel challenged us to
expand the circumference of our empathy. How, we wondered aloud, could this
boy love his dog so much and subject her
to such a violent sport? That question
led to heartfelt observations about the
way Ward’s novel illuminates the grinding effects of poverty and the counterbalance of love among these siblings.
It was a heartening reminder of what
some good novels can offer if we’re
willing to read with attention. None of
these well-informed women came to this
book naive — or unconcerned — about
the alarming plight of the poor in
America. But I think they all felt, as I did,
that Ward challenged us to understand
the complexity of lives very different
than our own. Great works of literature
push us in that direction. They flesh out
our compassion.
Too grandiose for a casual meeting in
somebody’s living room? I don’t think so.
In his slim book “On Moral Fiction”
(1978), John Gardner argues that literature should “provide us with the flicker
of lightning that shows us where we are.”
That sort of electrifying insight helps
keep a good life charged. A novel
shouldn’t be a political statement, of
course, but a good one necessarily provokes political reflection. It’s impossible
to read “Salvage the Bones” and maintain the fantasy that what poor people in
Mississippi really need is a cut in the
estate tax or a work requirement to get
medical care.
But we didn’t get into any of that that
night. We just shared our appreciation
for a story set down in gorgeous sentences that made us feel like we knew
some people we hadn’t known before.
Ian McEwan can relax. The novel is
going to be okay.
ron.charles@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book World and
host of TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
Literary Calendar
THURSDAY| 7 P.M. Tayari Jones will read
from her new novel — an Oprah’s Book
Club pick — “An American Marriage,” about
a recently married man imprisoned for a
crime he did not commit, at Politics and
Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW.
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Television
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Sanders propels the ‘brand promise’ of the White House in dealing with media
SULLIVAN FROM C1
women? Robotically, through
Sanders.
“The president supports
victims of domestic violence and
believes everyone should be
treated fairly and with due
process,” was about all she could
muster, no matter how the
question was phrased. (To make
matters worse, by Tuesday
morning, Sanders’s sketchy
depiction of the timeline on how
the White House had dealt with
the Porter allegations was
contradicted by FBI Director
Christopher A. Wray at a
congressional hearing.)
Sanders’s Monday
performance brought to mind a
similar instance from midDecember: Trump had tweeted
about Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (DN.Y.), calling her “a total flunky
for Chuck Schumer and someone
who would come to my office
‘begging’ for campaign
contributions not so long ago
(and would do anything for
them).”
When asked in the briefing
whether that didn’t sound an
awful lot like sexual innuendo,
Sanders turned the tables, telling
the reporter, “Your mind is in the
gutter.”
You might think that as one of
the most visible women in the
Trump administration, Sanders
would bring some credibility —
maybe even sympathy — to bear
on subjects related to respect for
women.
In fact, it seems to bring out
the worst in her.
For Jay Rosen, New York
University journalism professor,
this is another reason to “send the
interns.” The press briefings are
so devoid of substance, so
predictably filled with lies, that
they aren’t a valid use of top
reporters’ time.
Monday’s performance once
again fulfilled what he tweeted
was the “brand promise” of the
Trump administration when
dealing with the press: “Watch:
we will put these people down for
you.”
Sarah Sanders is a
conduit — a tool — for
Trump’s own abusive
relationship with
journalists.
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders holds press
briefings that are “devoid of substance” and “predictably filled with
lies,” says journalism professor Jay Rosen.
The briefing room, as he sees it,
is nothing more than a theater for
the fulfillment of that promise:
“The more the press does the job
[it] has traditionally done, the
better the put-down script
becomes.”
To state the obvious: Holding
powerful people and institutions
accountable is the chief role of
journalism in this country, and a
crucial one.
Even the American citizens
who are most distrustful and
critical of the press want
journalists to carry out this
function, according to every
public opinion poll.
White House press briefings
have never been the best place for
that. They have always been spin
chambers but have served a
limited purpose.
Now, they may be something
much worse.
With her dismissive gestures,
her curled-lip sneers, her ready
insults and guilt-free lies, Sanders
is a conduit — a tool — for
Trump’s own abusive relationship
with journalists.
Does it really make sense to
keep coming back for more?
margaret.sullivan@washpost.com
For more by Margaret Sullivan visit
wapo.st/sullivan
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 5 & 8
This record-breaking interactive solve-the-crime comedy
keeps the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
Tomorrow at 8
Don't miss the cornerstone event of our 2018 Lunar New
Year festivities, as world-renowned artist Tan Dun returns to
lead one of China's most outstanding orchestras.
Bookended by two Stravinsky classics, The Firebird Suite
and Fireworks, this fascinating program features Guan Xia's
One Hundred Birds Flying Towards the Phoenix, and Tan
Dun's own Triple Concerto for Piano, Violin, and
Violoncello: Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Great Group Rates
for 15 or More
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
Shenzhen
Symphony
Orchestra /
Tan Dun, conductor
(part of our 2018 Lunar
New Year Celebration)
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available at
the box
office.
soloists:
Wenwen Liu (suona)
Dan Zhu (violin),
Jiapeng Nie (cello),
and
Yumin Wu (piano).
Kennedy Center
Atrium & Foyers
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
FREE,
No tickets
required
Parking for Family
Day is available to
patrons on a firstcome, first-served
basis at standard
parking rates.
FAMILY EVENTS
KC Chinese New
Year Family Day:
"Panda Chengdu"
(part of our 2018 Lunar
New Year Celebration)
Saturday, February 17,
9 AM - 3 PM
As we celebrate the Year of the Dog, all ages are welcome
to this fun-filled day of activities and entertainment, with
a focus on the arts and culture of China’s Chengdu Plain,
home to most of the world’s giant pandas. Enjoy everything
from paper umbrella coloring to shadow puppetry. For more
info, visit tkc.co/lunarnewyear
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
THEATER REVIEWS
‘Aubergine,’ a.k.a. How you can tell eggplant’s overripe
N ELSON P RESSLEY
Julia Cho’s “Aubergine” takes
the fancy word for “eggplant” as
its title, which tells you a lot
about the play. It’s a drama about
food, but it’s not tangibly about
food. It’s lyrically about food, a
poetic work waxing about loss,
grief, and how the taste and
aroma of given dishes can comfort the afflicted and almost
revive the dead.
“Aubergine” is one of several
slow-cooking
dramas
that
opened over the weekend as
Washington’s second Women’s
Voices Theater Festival nears its
end; by now only two of this
winter’s two dozen shows have
yet to open. International characters and historical excavations
are strong festival currents,
though “Aubergine,” “All She
Must Possess” and “No Word in
Guyanese for Me” are only eddies.
“All She Must Possess” at Rep
Stage takes a local interest in
Baltimore’s Etta and Claribel
Cone, collectors during the early
20th century of pioneering modern art. Susan McCully’s 75-minute drama is like watching paint
dry as she creates a playwright
character who frets about how to
write the play. Technically, that’s
an apt question when dealing
with rule-breaking artists, and it
lets McCully foreground a quest
to uncover hidden sexuality in
the works and in the biographies.
The show seems promising as
the lights rise on Daniel Ettinger’s art gallery set of empty
frames on a gray wall, but then so
very little happens. Henri Matisse (Nigel Reed) strides in
speaking in manifestos about
feeling and expressing, and a
panel slides open to reveal Teresa
Castracane as a painting talking
back. But the art-theory experiment is never so alive as when
Grace Bauer, as the likable, tentative Etta, has a tantalizing
KATIE SIMMONS-BARTH
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
Aubergine, by Julia Cho. Directed
by Vincent Lancisi. Costumes, Ivania
Stack; lights, Harold Burgess II;
sound design, Roc Lee, projections,
Zachary Borovay. With Eunice Bae,
Glenn Kubota and Jefferson A.
Russell. About two hours. Through
March 4 at the Olney Theatre
Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring
Rd. Tickets $47-$74. Call 301-9243400 or visit olneytheatre.org.
STAN BAROUH
flirtation with Valerie Leonard’s
Gertrude Stein. It’s all talk, but
Stein’s pounding repetitive
words circulate in a way that
illustrates what the play is interested in — the mist of expression
and the elusiveness of meaning,
and of people.
The story of Hanna in Wendy
Graf ’s “No Word in Guyanese for
Me,” on the other hand, couldn’t
be more direct. It’s a solo show in
which Ashley K. Nicholas plays
Hanna, a Guyanese Muslim who
is brought to New York City as a
girl. The story flits back and
forth and finds its tension as
Hanna realizes she’s gay, which
of course means she’s ostracized
by her faith community. It’s an
old story, but Graf gives Hanna a
personable voice that Nicholas
plays endearingly in the intimate
District of Columbia Arts Center.
Why do so many recipes call for salt?
Hints
From
Heloise
Dear Heloise:
Why is salt used
in so many
recipes? Even
cake recipes have
salt added. Why?
Rhonda S., Minot, N.D.
before I make cookies, they stay
fluffy and full. I also have two
baking pans, and I let the pans
cool rather than placing the
cookie dough on a warm pan,
because this will flatten the
cookies.
Gail S., Rockville, Md.
Rhonda S.: Salt is used in
recipes to enhance flavors. It
often brings out such flavors as
sweetness, or sometimes is used
to counteract a flavor that’s
bitter. It’s also a nutrient,
because most table salt in the
United States contains iodine,
which prevents goiters. When
salt is used in making bread, it
has an effect on the texture of
the bread, and it also is a color
enhancer for many processed
meats.
Dear Heloise: Need a substitute
for salt? Try fresh lemon juice
instead of sprinkling salt on
your vegetables. The taste is
terrific, and it’s healthy for
those who need to limit their
salt intake.
Kate L., Tiverton, R.I.
Dear Heloise: I’ve found that if
I refrigerate the cookie dough
KATIE SIMMONS-BARTH
Dear Heloise: Why are there
10 hot dogs in a package, but
eight hot dog buns in a pack?
B.T., via email
B.T.: Meatpackers typically deal
in pounds (a hot dog weighs
one-tenth of a pound), so 10 hot
dogs weigh one pound. The
manufacturers of hot dog buns
like to work in the number of
loaves. Since they generally use
pans that bake eight buns at a
time, it makes sense that they
would package their buns in
units of eight. Maybe the
meatpackers and bakers should
get together on this!
Dear Heloise: Here’s a hint for
you: I put a small kitchen
sponge under the end of my
countertop dish drainer tray
away from the sink to improve
drainage of standing water in
the tray.
Mary H., Arlington, Va.
Dear Heloise: I love to chop up
some scallions and mushrooms
and add them to scrambled
eggs. It improves the taste and
texture.
Lonnie R., Holland, Mich.
Dear Readers: A growing trend
is serving popular drinks in a
copper mug. There’s nothing
wrong with that, but those mugs
should be lined with something,
such as stainless steel or nickel,
that will keep the copper from
leaching into the drink
(especially with acidic drinks).
Why? Over a period of time, the
exposure to copper could result
in nausea, dizziness and
irritation of the eyes, mouth and
nose.
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795000, San Antonio, TX 782795000, or email it to
Heloise@Heloise.com.
© 2018, King Features Syndicate
STAN BAROUH
“Aubergine” at the Olney
Theatre Center is an elegiac
affair, directed somberly by Vincent M. Lancici of Baltimore’s
Everyman Theatre. (This co-production moves to Everyman later
in the spring.) Cho uses food as
both the bridge and the gulf
between a talented young Korean American chef named Ray
and his father, a flinty immigrant
who never got along with his
TOP: Valerie Leonard, far
left and far right, and
Grace Bauer in scenes
from Rep Stage’s “All She
Must Possess.”
ABOVE: From left, Glenn
Kubota, Eunice Bae, Tony
Nam and Song Kim in
Olney Theatre Company’s
“Aubergine,” and
Kubota and Nam as
father and son.
My wife has been
a freelance
consultant whose
work has dried
up. I have a goodCarolyn
paying job and I
Hax
figured with her
work having
dried up, she’d
take care of the house, bills,
paperwork, etc. with her time.
Instead, I don’t know what she
does, but things are not put
away, and if she spent as much
time taking care of our house —
for which I just paid for a hefty
remodel, by the way — as she
does defending herself and how
busy she is, then there would be
no problem. (She is busy with
her hobby, when she does it, or
seeing friends during the day.)
She cooks, and on weekends I
do the wash. But it’s becoming
an issue for me and she knows it
but nothing changes. I feel used.
— Used
Used: I’d be angry, too.
Seething. A household involves
a lot of work, and I could not
trust a partner who was
comfortable leaving most of that
work to me.
But that’s not all I find
irksome. I also don’t like it
when someone “figures” I’ll
assume this or that
responsibility without checking
with me first.
And I don’t like it when the
person then gets angry at me for
not doing it.
And I don’t like it when I’ve
always been X, am liked or
accepted for X, embraced as X,
and then because someone’s
needs have changed I’m
expected to be Y.
And I don’t like bean-counted
remodels.
So. Did your wife “know this”
because you discussed divisions
of labor upfront? Or did she
find it out only after you 1. just
assumed she’d parlay
underemployment into more
housework, and 2. got annoyed
when she didn’t?
Has she ever put things
away?
Did you marry her just for
the pleasure of her company?
Or also to share the load a bit,
to have her there for you and
likewise be there for her when
the uphills start to feel steep?
Or was it more transactional
than even you’d like to think?
On this last question I don’t
judge, since there isn’t one right
answer (besides mutuality,
perhaps). But it helps to know
your answer — wants vs. needs
— before deciding how to
respond to not getting either of
these.
It could be your marriage is
suffering from an imbalance in
its ratio of assumptions to
communication. It could, too,
be suffering from something so
simple as a poor delegation of
responsibilities; why divorce a
problem that outsourcing could
solve, except perhaps to selfvindicate.
And of course you could be
right about being used. There
are certainly differences not
worth reconciling.
So: Swap out the topic of
conversation from what you
expect to what you feel, and ask
her to suggest what household
contribution she thinks is fair;
switch up the chores so you
each get more less of what
you’re good bad at; reframe her
presence in your life as
companionship first and gauge
whether it helps.
As in, apply solutions to the
more easily solved problems
and see whether that is enough.
If it doesn’t, then you’re
approaching a crossroads in
your marriage, and she needs to
know that. Should you get
there, all I can advise is to
choose the direction that brings
you peace.
All She Must Possess, by Susan
McCully. Directed by Joseph W.
Ritsch. Costumes, Julie A. Potter;
lights, Conor Mulligan; sound
design, William D’Eugenio;
projections, Sarah Tundermann.
Through Feb. 25 at Rep Stage,
Howard Community College,
10901 Little Patuxent Pkwy.,
Columbia. Tickets $40. Call 443518-1500 or visit repstage.org.
No Word in Guyanese for Me, by
Wendy Graf. Directed by Julia Hurley.
Through March 4 at DC Arts Center,
2438 18th St. NW. Tickets $35. Visit
rainbowtheatreproject.org.
Two suitors, but which one suits you?
Miss
Manners
Dear Miss
Manners: I am
dating a lovely
young gentleman
JUDITH
who is sweet,
MARTIN,
caring and tall.
NICHOLAS
MARTIN AND
Recently,
JACOBINA
however, another
MARTIN
gentleman who is
much more, shall
we say, spicy, has begun paying
unasked-for attentions to me.
I greatly enjoy his company,
but in my current relationship, I
am unwilling to see him as
anything more than a friend. On
the other hand, I cannot help
but become confused in such a
situation. What are your
thoughts on the matter?
Your current problem —
namely, “Tall or Spicy?’’ — is not
one that etiquette can answer.
Once you have made that
decision, Miss Manners would
be happy to address the
etiquette problem that will
inevitably ensue.
Dear Miss Manners: I
connected with an old girlfriend
from way back. She lost her
husband several years ago. We
have been chatting via email for
a while, and things are going
great. She is reserved and quiet,
but very chatty online.
Neither one of us is on social
media. I feel it is time that I
asked that we exchange
pictures. Should be pretty
simple. I guess nerves have got
the best of me. What do I say/
how do I word it? I guess I’m
afraid of scaring her. Silly me.
Not having a social media
presence has not, unfortunately,
inoculated you against some of
the less pleasant expectations
the online world has created
around romance.
It is now often possible to
learn the appearance, financial
situation and other specifics
about a person before actually
meeting. But that does not make
doing so polite — or flattering.
If you want to know if she looks
as good as you remember, you
may have to ask her out for
coffee. You could accompany the
request with “before’’ and
“after’’ photos of yourself,
humorously suggesting that it
will help her recognize you
when she sees you.
Dear Miss Manners: Often at
Freelancer wife with downtime doesn’t vacuum — or read minds
Dear Carolyn:
child.
This father-son heartburn —
another old story — is one-sided.
The father is dying, getting hospice care at home and almost
always asleep. Cho pens monologues, tableau images and realistic exchanges that don’t heat up
as a single harmonious dish.
At least it’s a handsomely
produced
show.
Misha
Kachman’s understated design
has style (kitchen to the side,
evocative projections occasionally taking over the view), and the
cast is compelling, from Megan
Anderson’s opening monologue
as a foodie to Tony Nam’s brooding Ray and Song Kim’s wry turn
as an uncle who only speaks
Korean. But the grief doesn’t run
deep because we see so little of
the life. It’s like seeing a menu
but never getting the food.
lunch, and occasionally at
dinner, fast-casual restaurants
will serve a meal on a plate with
the messiest dish, such as a
stew, in a bowl on that plate.
The plate is already filled with
perhaps salad, beans and rice.
Further, the bowl is already up
against that rice, and some of
the rice has stuck to the bowl.
If I leave the bowl on the
plate, it is awkward to eat the
other foods. If I set the bowl on
the table and use it as a serving
bowl, I get rice on the table.
What is the proper way to eat
such a dinner?
Eat one of the outside items
until you have cleared enough
space that you can then slide
the bowl to the edge of the plate
(without actually dismounting
it). This can be repeated with
the remaining foods and
containers. As each item is
consumed, subsequent
maneuvers will become easier.
New Miss Manners columns are
posted Monday through Saturday on
washingtonpost.com/advice. You can
send questions to Miss Manners at
her website, missmanners.com.
© 2018, by Judith Martin
“A DELICIOUSLY
TWISTED
EROTIC
THRILLER .”
“ DELIRIOUSLY
ENTERTAINING.”
“IRRESISTIBLE!”
“AN
ABSOLUTE GEM .”
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
A F I L M BY
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
FRANÇOIS OZON
STARTS TODAY
ANGELIKA POP-UP AT UNION MARKET
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
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morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
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Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
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BY
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
MARYLAND
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
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AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
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Maze Runner: The Death Cure
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Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 1:304:10-6:45-7:00-7:10-7:15-9:2010:10-10:25-10:30
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Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:00The Shape of Water (R) CC:
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11:25-5:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:00-1:10(PG-13) CC: (!) 1:45-4:30-7:153:30-5:50-8:15
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Den of Thieves (R) CC: 1:15Coco (PG) CC: 4:10
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The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:30-6:00
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Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 2:00-4:30- Three
Missouri (R) CC: 2:20-8:00
7:00-9:30
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 11:05Proud Mary (R) CC: 12:30-2:45- 1:35-4:10-6:40-9:10
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Hostiles (R) CC: 11:30-7:45
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4:45-7:45
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Winchester (PG-13) CC: 12:30ArcLight Bethesda
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The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
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To Space and Back 11:00AM
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Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
(PG-13) CC: 12:40-3:50-7:10-10:05
The Final Year 11:20AM
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:10-3:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00-1:20- Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
3:30-5:40-7:45-8:15
11:50-6:10
The Post (PG-13) 2:00-4:30-7:00 The Shape of Water (R) CC:
3:00-9:05
Avalon Theatre
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:30AM
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 2:50I, Tonya (R) 11:45-2:30-5:15
The Post (PG-13) 2:15-5:00-7:45 6:15-9:50
12 Strong (R) CC: 6:30-9:40
Milada (NR) 8:00
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 11:00Landmark
1:30-4:15-6:50-9:35
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:00-4:25807 V Street, NW
7:20-10:05
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:15
11:45-2:15-4:30-7:15-9:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:00-4:00- 11:20-2:00-4:40-7:20-10:00
7:00-10:00
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:00-2:00- Experience (R) (!) 11:00-1:40-4:102:40-5:10-7:20-7:45-10:10
6:40-9:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
Fifty Shades Freed (R) (!) 12:0011:35-11:50-2:30-4:40-5:00-7:302:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
9:45-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) (!) 11:10-1:30Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 11:30- 2:00-4:00-6:20-9:00
2:10-4:50-7:25-10:05
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:204:20-7:20-9:45
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:45-3:35
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:506:50-9:30
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:109:40
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 1:45-7:15
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 4:30-9:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:10-3:20-5:307:40-9:50
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 1:05-4:05-7:05-9:40
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:553:55
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Center 12
800 Shoppers Way
The Shape of Water (R) 2:157:05-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 4:45-9:40
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-1:50-8:00
Lady Bird (R) 5:15
Phantom Thread (R) 7:10
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
7101 Democracy Boulevard
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:50-1:10-2:15-4:40-7:05-9:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 11:55-1:55-4:55-7:55-9:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:1012:45-3:15-5:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:40-2:20-5:00-8:3510:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:30-4:457:00-9:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:25-1:503:30-4:15-6:35-9:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:55-1:404:30-5:50-7:15-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 3:55-8:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:25-5:25
Winchester (PG-13) 11:00-2:404:50-7:10-10:55
The Post (PG-13) 11:45-1:20-2:255:05-7:30-10:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:30-11:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:30-1:454:00-6:15
Hostiles (R) CC: 2:35-6:45
I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:15-2:55-5:408:15-10:45
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 11:451:35-4:35-8:00-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:459:15-10:10
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
11:35-2:50-5:10-7:20-9:35
Breakfast at Tiffany's (NR) 7:55
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Den of Thieves (R) 7:15-10:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:25-12:551:55-3:30-4:30-6:05-7:00-8:25-9:25
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:50-2:20-4:50
Winchester (PG-13) 11:10-1:404:45-7:20-9:50
Hostiles (R) 1:15-4:10-7:10-10:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:10-3:15-6:30-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:05-1:50-4:40-7:2510:15
12 Strong (R) 12:40-3:45-6:45-9:50
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:152:10-4:55-7:40-10:25
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:00-2:005:00-8:00-10:40; 1:00-4:00-7:059:35
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 1:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:05-1:55-4:35-7:10-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 6:45-10:10
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 12:05-3:30-7:05-10:25
Coco (PG) CC: 1:35-4:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
11:00-1:30-4:05-6:40-8:40-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:50-4:407:30-10:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: (!) 11:302:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:35-2:305:05-7:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
3:15-9:30
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG13) 12:30-6:00
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 11:10-2:45-6:20-9:55
Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13) (!)
12:10-3:20-6:30-9:40
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 10:15
12 Strong (R) CC: 12:00-6:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 3:40-6:50-9:35
Forever My Girl (PG) CC: 4:1510:00
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 2:505:20-7:55-10:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:105:00-7:50-10:40
Hostiles (R) CC: 1:10-6:50
I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:40-3:10
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 1:254:25-7:35-10:35
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:45-2:20-4:50-7:20-9:50
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) CC: (!) 12:15-2:505:25-8:00-10:35
Phantom Thread (R) 9:50-12:503:50-7:00-10:00
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts
- Animation (NR) 12:40-3:005:20-10:20
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 10:00-7:30
The Shape of Water (R) 3:40
The Post (PG-13) 10:30-1:30-4:207:10-10:10
Lady Bird (R) 10:40-6:40
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:00-2:00-4:40-7:40-10:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:20-1:104:00-6:50-9:40
I, Tonya (R) 1:00-9:10
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Fifty Shades Freed (R) XD: 10:551:30-4:05-6:40-9:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:25-2:00-4:357:10-9:45
Happy End (R) CC: 1:15-4:15
Winchester (PG-13) 12:00-2:45In the Fade (Aus dem Nichts) (R)
5:20-8:00
4:30-7:30
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir
The Final Year CC: 1:00
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
To Have and Have Not (NR) 1:30The Greatest Showman (PG)
4:30-7:30-7:35
11:00-1:40-4:20-7:15-10:20
Medal of Honor Theater Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
NMMC
12:05-6:30
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:00(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-7:00-10:15
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:10-2:45Regal Gallery Place
5:20-7:55-10:30
Stadium 14
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
701 Seventh Street NW
(PG-13) 11:15-2:10-5:10-8:15
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir
Coco (PG) 11:40-2:15
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:25-12:30Maze Runner: The Death Cure
2:00-3:15-4:35-5:45-7:10-8:20-9:45
(PG-13) 4:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:4510:20
2:20-5:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:00-3:40-6:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:45(PG-13) 2:30-5:30-8:20
2:25-5:05-7:50-10:25
Peter Rabbit (PG) 3:10-5:30Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
AMC Loews
7:50-10:15
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
(NR) 11:05-3:00-6:45-9:55
Winchester (PG-13) 11:45-2:20
11115 Mall Circle
The Shape of Water (R) 3:30-9:55
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:00- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13) 11:153:20-5:40-8:00-10:25
(PG-13) CC: 11:45-3:15-6:30-9:45 2:50-6:10-9:50
Monster Hunt 2 (Zhuo yao ji 2)
Proud Mary (R) 11:20-4:30-9:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
12:15
10:45-1:30-4:15-6:15-7:00-9:00- Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-3:45The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir 9:45
7:00-10:20
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 6:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 12 Strong (R) 11:00-2:20-5:25-8:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:45-10:20 (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:45Forever My Girl (PG) 10:55-1:35Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00
7:30-10:15
4:10
Coco
(PG)
CC:
11:00-1:30
Winchester (PG-13) 10:55-12:00Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
Peter Rabbit (PG) (!) 11:00-1:30- 2:45-3:50-5:20-8:00
IMAX Theater
4:00-6:30-9:00
601 Independence Avenue SW
The Post (PG-13) 6:45
Lady Bird (R) 1:25-6:20
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR) Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:0012:30
Hostiles (R) 11:50-3:00-6:15-9:25
2:40
Proud Mary (R) CC: 4:00-9:00
I, Tonya (R) 1:40-6:50
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Den
of
Thieves
(R)
CC:
10:15The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:20Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
2:00-4:40-7:20-10:00
Seas 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
12
Strong
(R)
CC:
3:00-6:00
Chalo (NR) 5:00-8:45
Dream Big: Engineering Our
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 9:45Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
10:55-2:30-6:00-9:35
12:25
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25- The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: (!) La boda de Valentina (R) 11:302:15-5:00-7:45-10:25
11:50-2:05-5:15
11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:15
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
Gayatri (Telugu) 9:30
Inttelligent (NR) 9:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:00-4:307:00-9:30
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
Hoyt's West Nursery
(NR) 2:30-6:15-9:45
Cinema 14
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:30-4:001591 West Nursery Road
7:15-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
12 Strong (R) 10:00
1:35-4:05-6:35-9:05
Winchester (PG-13) 12:30-3:00Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:20-6:25-9:35 5:30-8:15-11:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:00- The Post (PG-13) 1:45-4:30-7:3010:30
1:15-2:30-3:45-5:00-6:40-7:40The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:459:20-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3:15-6:00-8:30-11:00
(PG-13) CC: 1:10-4:10-6:55-9:40 The Shape of Water (R) 12:00Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00-2:20- 3:30-6:30-9:30
Inttelligent (NR) 12:00-3:15-6:304:45-7:05-9:25
10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:30
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:00Stadium 14
3:50-6:40-9:30
6505 America Blvd.
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:55-4:00The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:157:00-10:05
12 Strong (R) CC: 4:00-6:55-9:50 3:50-6:30-9:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:30-7:20- (PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:45-1:3010:00
3:30-4:15-6:15-7:00-9:00-9:45
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 12:30Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
2:55-5:20-7:50-10:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:40-3:30- (PG-13) 12:50-3:45-6:45-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:35-3:00-5:256:30-9:10
Hostiles (R) CC: 12:35-4:10-7:10- 7:50-10:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
10:10
9:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:4512:15-2:50-5:15-7:35-9:55
3:30-6:15
Landmark
The Shape of Water (R) 1:00-4:00Bethesda Row Cinema
7:00-10:00
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:50- Proud Mary (R) 1:00-3:15-5:458:15-10:30
4:40-7:25-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:30- Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-3:457:00-10:15
4:20-7:20-10:00
Winchester (PG-13) 1:15-3:45Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
6:15-9:00
1:20-4:10-6:55-9:50
The Post (PG-13) 1:30-4:20-7:10Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:5010:00
3:40-7:00-9:50
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:50-3:20-5:40- I, Tonya (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:357:50-9:55
3:00-5:25-7:55-10:25
The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) 1:10Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
4:00-7:10-9:40
14716 Baltimore Avenue
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:506:50-9:40
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 11:30-2:15-4:45-7:30-10:10
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:30-7:30- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
10:05
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-7:00-10:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:30-1:00Old Greenbelt Theatre
2:15-3:45-5:00-6:30-7:45-8:45129 Centerway
9:20-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 5:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:45-3:00-6:15-9:05
Missouri (R) 2:30-8:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:25-1:45-4:15Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
6:45-9:10
3899 Branch Avenue
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:30Maze Runner: The Death Cure
3:15-7:10-9:50
(PG-13) 1:00
Den of Thieves (R) 12:15-3:30Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:30-3:00- 7:15-10:30
5:30-8:00
The Post (PG-13) 12:00-3:15-6:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Winchester (PG-13) 12:00-2:45(PG-13) 11:45-2:45-5:25-8:15
5:30-8:05-10:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:20The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:454:40-7:00
2:30-5:15-8:00-10:35
Proud Mary (R) 4:10-7:30
The Shape of Water (R) 12:45Winchester (PG-13) 1:15-3:454:00-7:00-10:00
6:15-8:35
Regal Rockville Center
Den of Thieves (R) 1:05-4:05-7:10
Stadium 13
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
Ferdinand (PG) 3:25-6:10-9:10
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:304:30-7:10-9:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 10:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:00-2:504:00-5:25-7:00-8:00-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:10-4:20-7:40-10:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:30-5:007:30-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:00-3:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 6:20-9:00
The Shape of Water (R) 3:306:30-9:30
Proud Mary (R) 1:15-3:45-6:008:20
Den of Thieves (R) 2:00-5:40-9:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:45-4:35-7:20-10:05
Winchester (PG-13) 2:40-5:107:50-10:25
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 3:005:30-8:10
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:00-2:45-5:35-8:10-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
9:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:40-4:00-6:45-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:0012:45-2:35-3:30-5:20-6:20-8:009:20-10:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:45-3:35-6:30-9:30
Coco (PG) 1:00-4:00-6:55
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-1:30-2:553:55-5:25-6:35-7:55-9:25-10:25
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:50-3:40
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG13) 12:40
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 1:30-5:50-10:05
Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13) 12:153:35-6:50-10:05
Den of Thieves (R) 3:50-7:20-10:45
Winchester (PG-13) 12:20-2:555:30-8:20-11:00
I, Tonya (R) 10:45
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:253:00-5:45-8:20-10:55
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) 1:40-4:20-7:00-9:40
La boda de Valentina (R) 1:204:15-7:00-10:05
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 7:35
The Shape of Water (R) 12:153:30-6:30-9:35
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:30-3:20-6:20-9:10
The Post (PG-13) 1:25-4:30-7:3010:30
199 East Montgomery Avenue
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:00-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:00-3:30-6:45-10:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:001:15-2:45-4:15-5:30-7:00-8:159:45-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:15-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-2:45-5:157:45-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 12:303:30-6:30-9:45
Den of Thieves (R) 10:00
Winchester (PG-13) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:45
The Post (PG-13) 12:45-4:006:45-9:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:152:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:00-3:00-6:15-9:15
Phantom Thread (R) 1:00-4:307:30-10:30
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:25-3:40-6:50-10:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:05-2:30-4:557:20-9:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:00-3:50
Den of Thieves (R) 12:40-3:456:50-9:55
12 Strong (R) 6:30-9:25
The Post (PG-13) 12:50-3:356:20-9:00
Winchester (PG-13) 12:20-2:505:20-7:50-10:20
Hostiles (R) 12:35-3:40-6:40-9:40
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:103:30-5:50-8:10-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) 12:00-2:30-5:007:30-10:00
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:15-3:50-7:30-11:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 11:45-3:00-6:15-9:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00-2:455:30-8:15-11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:30-2:30-5:15-8:0011:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-12:451:30-3:15-4:15-6:00-7:00-8:309:30-11:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:15-1:45-4:30
The Shape of Water (R) 11:452:45-6:00-9:00
Regal Germantown
Stadium 14
Den of Thieves (R) 12:30
20000 Century Boulevard
12 Strong (R) 7:15-10:15
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir Winchester (PG-13) 12:00-2:30d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30 5:00-7:30-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 2:30- The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:00-4:457:45-10:45
5:15-8:00-10:45
Hostiles (R) 3:45-7:00-10:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
I, Tonya (R) 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:1512:15-2:30-3:15-5:00-6:00-7:303:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
8:45-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Experience (R) 11:00-1:45-4:307:15-10:00
(PG-13) 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
AMC Potomac Mills 18
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Missouri (R) 3:15-9:15
Lady Bird (R) 12:45-6:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
12:15-3:00-5:50-8:40-11:15
UA Snowden Square
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Stadium 14
CC: 7:20-10:45
9161 Commerce Center Drive
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir Maze Runner: The Death Cure
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30 (PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:30-6:45-10:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:30-2:15The Greatest Showman (PG)
5:00-7:45-10:30
12:45-3:20-6:00-8:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:40-2:40-5:3012:30-3:50-7:10-10:30
8:20-11:10
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Coco (PG) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:30
(PG-13) 1:10-4:20-7:30-10:40
Insidious:
The Last Key (PG-13)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:30CC: 4:40-7:10-10:00
1:30-3:00-4:15-5:30-7:00-8:00Paddington
2 (PG) CC: 11:20-2:10
9:30-10:30
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 1:50Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 4:30-9:50
(PG-13) 1:40-4:30-7:20-10:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:20-4:0011:00-7:00
6:40-9:10
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 11:40Paddington 2 (PG) 1:00-3:30
5:15-11:10
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) Proud Mary (R) CC: 10:00
(NR) 6:15-10:00
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:45-4:10Den of Thieves (R) 10:20
7:25-10:40
Winchester (PG-13) 12:40-3:10- 12 Strong (R) CC: 11:50-3:155:40-8:10-10:40
6:15-9:20
The Post (PG-13) 12:50-3:45Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
6:30-9:20
Missouri (R) CC: 2:35-8:10
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:35- Winchester (PG-13) CC: 12:102:50-5:15-7:50-10:15
2:45-5:20-8:00-10:40
The Shape of Water (R) 12:45The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:10-2:103:40-6:50-9:45
5:10-8:10-11:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:10AM
Missouri (R) 1:50-4:45-7:40-10:25 Hostiles (R) CC: 1:40-4:40-7:5011:00
Xscape Theatres
Brandywine 14
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Experience (R) CC: 12:30-3:00The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 5:45-8:30-11:00
La boda de Valentina (R) 11:5010:20-12:50-3:20-6:20-9:00
2:40-5:15-7:50-10:35
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:20-3:10-3:50- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:00-12:001:30-2:30-4:00-5:10-6:30-7:30-9:00
6:30-7:10-10:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
10:00-12:30-3:00-5:30-8:10-10:40 11:45-2:20-4:45-7:15-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
AMC Shirlington 7
(PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:00-1:40-4:302772 South Randolph St.
7:20-9:20-10:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!) 2:00Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: (!) 9:504:30-7:00-9:30
12:20-2:50-5:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:00Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) 4:00-6:45-9:30
CC: 9:40
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 4:40The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 10:10- 7:30-10:15
12:40-3:25-6:25-9:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Paddington 2 (PG) OC; CC:
Missouri (R) CC: 1:45-4:2510:40-1:10
7:10-9:45
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:55-2:40- The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:205:10-8:00-10:35
7:15-10:00
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 7:40-10:50 Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:15-7:45
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:10- I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:30-4:15-10:15
1:50-4:20-7:00-9:30
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 1:00The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: (!) 4:00-7:00-10:10
11:30-2:10-5:00-7:50-10:20
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
7850e Tysons Corner Center
10:30-11:50-2:20-4:10-4:50-6:50The
Metropolitan
Opera: L'Elisir
7:30-10:00
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) (!) 1:00-6:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: (!) 11:00The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
1:20-3:40-6:10-8:30
11:20-1:55-4:30-7:10-9:50
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:40Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
3:30-6:40-9:50
CC: 11:15-2:40-6:20-9:45
iPic Pike & Rose
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
11830 Grand Park Avenue
(PG-13) CC: 10:20-1:30-4:40Fifty Shades Freed (R) (!) 12:30- 7:50-11:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
1:15-1:45-3:45-4:30-5:00-7:0011:40-2:15-5:00-7:30-10:05
7:45-8:00-10:15-11:00-11:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:45(PG-13) 11:15-2:45-6:15-9:45
7:45-10:35
Den of Thieves (R) 11:30-3:15Coco (PG) CC: 10:35-1:10-3:40
7:15-11:15
Winchester (PG-13) 12:00-3:00- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: (!) 11:0512:20-1:35-2:50-4:15-5:40-6:506:30-9:30
8:05-9:30
The Post (PG-13) 12:15-3:30Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:30-2:256:45-10:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) (!) 1:00- 5:05-7:40
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:254:15-7:30-10:30
4:20-7:25-10:15
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 6:10-10:30
12 Strong (R) CC: 9:20-10:25
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 10:252150 Clarendon Blvd.
12:55-3:25-5:50-8:20-10:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:401:30-2:30-5:00-7:15-7:30-9:004:35-7:20-10:10
10:00-10:15
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:35-4:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Hostiles (R) CC: 1:15-10:00
(PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30 The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: (!)
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:45-4:45- 10:30-1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
6:45-9:45
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
12 Strong (R) CC: 4:15-7:15
Experience (R) CC: (!) 10:20-12:50Winchester (PG-13) CC: 1:30-5:00 3:20-5:55-8:25-11:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:00- Fifty Shades Freed (R) (!) 10:557:30-10:15
1:25-4:00-6:45-9:15
Hostiles (R) CC: 7:00-10:15;
AMC Worldgate 9
1:45-4:15
13025 Worldgate Drive
I, Tonya (R) CC: 2:00-4:15-7:00- The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:00
3:00-5:35-8:05
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
(PG-13) CC: 2:20-5:30-8:00
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!) 2:30d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30 5:00-7:30-8:30-9:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 2:05-4:50-7:35
1:30-4:05-6:35-9:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: (!) 2:004:15-6:30
CC: 7:20-10:40
12 Strong (R) 2:10-5:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 12:10-3:20-6:30-9:40 Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:40Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 8:15- 5:15-7:50
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:15-4:559:00-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 7:40
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: (!)
(PG-13) CC: 10:45-2:00-5:002:00-4:25-6:50
7:45-10:40
Coco (PG) CC: 11:30-2:10-4:45
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:30One Loudoun
11:15-12:00-1:00-2:15-3:45-4:3020575 East Hampton Plaza
6:15-7:15-9:00-10:00
The Birdcage (R) 7:20
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:35The Greatest Showman (PG)
4:25-6:55
11:40-2:40-5:25-9:20
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
13) 11:10-1:45-4:20-7:00-9:35
(PG-13) 11:20-2:55-10:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 6:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:00-1:00The Shape of Water (R) CC: 11:00- 4:00-7:00-10:00
1:50-4:50-7:40-10:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
(PG-13) 10:55-1:55-5:45-9:45
2:05-10:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:00-12:40Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:40-5:10 3:20-6:00-9:20
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:30A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) 10:20-1:20-4:203:50-7:00-10:10
8:20-11:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Winchester (PG-13) 1:15-4:006:20-11:20
Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-5:15
The Post (PG-13) 10:15-6:45
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 12:25The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:003:00-5:30-8:00-10:25
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:15- 3:00-5:10-8:40-11:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:45-1:457:05-9:50
4:45-10:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 4:25-9:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Hostiles (R) CC: 1:25-6:50
Missouri (R) 9:00
I, Tonya (R) CC: 10:35-3:10
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:20- Before Sunrise (R) 8:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:40
3:20-6:20-9:15
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
11:20-2:05-4:35-7:10-9:45
2911 District Ave
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
Experience (R) CC: 11:15-2:00fantastica) (R) (!) 10:10-12:454:45-7:30-10:15
3:15-5:45-8:15-10:40
La boda de Valentina (R) 12:15- Fifty Shades Freed (R) (!) 10:004:40-7:15-10:20
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes 1:40 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:30-1:15- Missouri (R) 10:45-1:35-4:20
4:00-6:45-9:30
From Here to Eternity (1953)
Permission (NR) 2:05-9:25
(NR) 7:00
Becks 2:50-8:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:50-6:45
VIRGINIA
"NO FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?"
FROM
The Shape of Water (R) 10:551:45-4:50-7:30-10:05
Lady Bird (R) 11:00-1:25-3:406:10-8:30-10:45
I, Tonya (R) 10:05-4:00-9:35
Phantom Thread (R) 10:15-1:204:15-7:15-10:15
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) (!)
10:05-12:25-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:00
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Wednesday, February 14, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 1:50-5:40-8:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:00-2:003:35-4:45-6:15-7:30-9:00-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 2:10-5:05-8:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:35-4:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:10-4:057:05-10:00
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX (NR) 2:25-6:30-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) 1:25-4:2511940 Market Street
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00-3:00- 7:25-10:25
Call Me by Your Name (R)
6:00-9:00
6:45-9:45
Call Me by Your Name (R) 3:40
Molly's Game (R) 7:15
Phantom Thread (R) 1:40-4:40Den of Thieves (R) 4:10-10:20
7:30-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:20-1:10-2:50- The Post (PG-13) 1:20-4:007:00-9:40
3:50-5:10-7:40-9:40
The Post (PG-13) 1:00-4:10-7:05- The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:454:55-7:45-10:15
10:10
Hostiles (R) 6:20-9:55
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:2045980 Regal Plaza
4:00-7:00-9:35
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:40-1:30Maze Runner: The Death Cure
4:15-7:00-9:45
(PG-13) 12:05-3:30-6:40-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG-13) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
(PG-13) 12:10-3:10-6:10-9:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:30-2:25-4:50Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 7:35-9:55
Missouri (R) 10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:20-2:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:40-6:50 Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PGThe 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:50- 13) 12:05-3:30-7:05-10:30
3:20-5:40-8:00-10:20
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:50Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:00-4:00- 5:05-10:10
7:00-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:45-2:455:45-8:45
Cinema Arts Theatre
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
9650 Main St
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:40- (NR) 11:35-2:15-3:05-5:55-6:259:30-10:05
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) 1:25-4:25Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
7:30-10:20
1:00-7:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Molly's Game (R) 12:30-3:55Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:15-2:40- 7:10-10:25
Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13) 1:055:10-7:50-10:05
The Post (PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:05- 4:05-7:15-10:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
2:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
I, Tonya (R) CC: 10:00-4:00-9:40 Missouri (R) 1:00-3:50-6:40-9:35
The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) CC: 9:45- The Post (PG-13) 11:50-2:305:25-8:15
12:10-2:35-4:55-7:20-9:35
Forever My Girl (PG) 2:20-7:40
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:10Oru Nalla Naal Paathu Solren (NR)
1:15-4:15-7:10-9:50
12:15-3:20-6:30-9:40
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
Touch Chesi Chudu (NR) 12:251600 Village Market Boulevard
3:35-6:50-9:50
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Chalo (NR) 11:55-3:00-6:15-9:20
12:00-2:30-5:10-7:40
Bhaagamathie (Telugu) (NR)
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
11:25-2:35-5:30-8:30
(PG-13) 12:10-3:20-7:10
3D (Padmavati 3D)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Padmaavat
(Hindi) (NR) 5:20-8:40
(PG-13) 11:35-2:15-5:00-7:45
Tholiprema
(Tholi Prema) (NR)
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:20-1:50-4:35
11:35-2:40-6:00-9:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:30-2:00Inttelligent
(NR)
12:55-4:10-7:254:20-7:00
10:35
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:50-7:20
Regal
Dulles
Town
Center 10
12 Strong (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The
Greatest
Showman
(PG) 3:45Missouri (R) 2:40
Winchester (PG-13) 12:15-2:45- 6:00-8:30-11:00
Maze
Runner:
The
Death
Cure
5:15-7:55
(PG-13) 12:30-4:00-7:15-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 11:25-2:05Fifty
Shades
Freed
(R)
12:00-2:304:45-7:25
5:00-7:30-10:00
Hostiles (R) 7:05
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:15-2:15-5:15-8:00d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00
10:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:30-2:00Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:20-2:00-4:454:20-7:00
7:00-9:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:20Paddington 2 (PG) 4:15
2:50-5:20-7:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:40-2:10- 12 Strong (R) 12:50-2:30-6:15-9:15
The Post (PG-13) 1:30-6:45-9:45
4:45-5:30-7:15-8:00
Winchester (PG-13) 12:10-2:45Manassas 4 Cinemas
5:45-8:15-10:40
8890 Mathis Ave.
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:00Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:453:00-5:30-7:45-10:15
4:00-6:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Shape of Water (R) 12:403:30-6:30-9:50
(PG-13) 1:50-4:10-6:30
Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG4110 West Ox Road
13) 1:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:00-4:00-6:00 The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir
The Shape of Water (R) 4:10-6:30 d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:15-2:50-5:30-8:10-10:45
6201 Multiplex Drive
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:30
11:15-1:45-5:00-7:30-10:20
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 10:10
(PG-13) 10:05-1:15-4:25-7:40Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:0011:00
1:40-2:40-4:15-5:15-6:50-7:50Fifty Shades Freed (R) 10:009:25-10:25
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:05-1:30-2:30(PG-13) 10:35-1:20-4:10-7:05-9:50 4:00-5:00-6:30-7:30-9:00-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:55-3:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:05-12:25Den of Thieves (R) 9:55
2:45-5:05-7:25-9:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-2:00-4:30 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) Missouri (R) 1:00-4:05-7:10
The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:10-7:20
(NR) 11:50-6:50
Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13) 10:20- Hostiles (R) 6:40-10:15
La boda de Valentina (R) 12:001:40-4:45-7:50-10:55
2:40-5:20-8:00-10:40
12 Strong (R) 7:00-10:00
Winchester (PG-13) 11:45-2:10Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
4:50
22875 Brambleton Plaza
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 10:25- The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:45-3:05-5:25-7:45-10:05
12:30-3:00-5:45-8:15
Chalo (NR) 12:00-6:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Bhaagamathie (Telugu) (NR) 6:45 12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Padmaavat 3D (Padmavati 3D)
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(Hindi) (NR) 3:20-10:35
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:30-4:0012:10-3:30-10:45
6:30-9:00
Gayatri (Telugu) 3:15-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:007:30-10:00
11900 Palace Way
Forever My Girl (PG) 12:45-6:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Winchester (PG-13) 1:15-3:4510:55-1:40-4:15-6:55-10:00
6:15-8:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The Post (PG-13) 3:15-8:30
(PG-13) 12:15-3:50-7:25-10:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:00-2:30- Hostiles (R) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:305:00-8:05-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
(PG-13) 11:05-1:50-4:50-7:45Experience (R) 12:15-2:45-5:1510:35
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:40-3:40- 7:45-10:15
Chalo (NR) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
7:55-10:50
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
1:30-4:30-7:45-10:30
(NR) XD: 11:15-2:45-6:15-9:50
Gayatri (Telugu) 12:00-3:15The Shape of Water (R) 10:506:30-9:45
10:20
The Shape of Water (R) 2:00-4:4512 Strong (R) 12:25-3:55-7:057:30-10:15
10:30
Winchester (PG-13) 11:35-2:10- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
4:35-7:15-10:15
The Post (PG-13) 10:45-1:35-4:30Regal Kingstowne
7:20-10:25
Stadium 16 & RPX
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-2:00-4:205910 Kingstowne Towne Center
6:50-9:55
The Greatest Showman (PG)
I, Tonya (R) 1:45-4:40-7:30
12:30-2:55-5:25-8:00-10:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:50- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
2:15-4:55-7:40-10:10
(PG-13) 12:15-3:25-6:35-10:15
Chalo (NR) 11:55-6:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:15-2:45Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
5:15-7:45-10:30
3:05-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Fifty Shades Freed (R) XD: 11:00- (PG-13) 1:20-4:30-7:25-10:05
1:30-4:05-7:00-9:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-1:052:35-3:30-4:55-5:50-7:15-8:10Regal Ballston Common
Stadium 12
9:40-10:30
671 N. Glebe Road
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:45-4:35
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:45-3:356:15-9:05
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
The Greatest Showman (PG)
2:30-5:20-8:15
(NR) 12:10-3:40-7:00-10:20
Den of Thieves (R) 12:35-3:456:50-9:50
12 Strong (R) 7:10-10:00
Winchester (PG-13) 1:15-4:457:30-10:15
Hostiles (R) 12:20-3:20-6:20-9:20
I, Tonya (R) 1:25-4:05-6:45-9:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:152:50-5:15-7:40-10:25
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:00-3:556:30-9:15
The Post (PG-13) 1:35-4:156:55-9:35
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:40-4:00-7:20-9:50
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:20-3:30-6:30-9:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:00-4:307:00-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:40-4:50-7:45-10:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:10-2:30-5:107:30-10:45
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 3:20-6:45-10:10
Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-3:406:40-10:00
12 Strong (R) 7:15-10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:45-5:00-7:40-10:15
Winchester (PG-13) 12:15-2:505:30-8:00-10:30
Hostiles (R) 12:10-3:10-6:15-9:10
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:203:45-6:10-8:30-10:50
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) 12:45-3:15-5:458:15-10:45
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 1:15
The Shape of Water (R) 1:10-4:106:50-9:40
Lady Bird (R) 2:10-4:40
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
The Metropolitan Opera: L'Elisir
d'Amore ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:053:55-6:35-9:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 1:05-4:15-7:25-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:30-2:304:15-5:15-7:00-8:00-9:45-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 2:00-4:55-7:40-10:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:15-2:15-3:504:45-6:25-7:10-9:00-9:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:00-3:40-6:30
Den of Thieves (R) 2:10-6:00-9:20
12 Strong (R) 9:30
Winchester (PG-13) 1:20-3:556:45-9:15
The Post (PG-13) 1:55-4:50-7:4510:30
Hostiles (R) 9:50
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:454:30-7:20-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:35-4:25-7:15-10:05
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:15-4:107:05-10:15
The Shape of Water (R) 1:104:00-6:50
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:50-3:50-6:35-9:40
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:10-3:30-6:50-10:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:3012:00-2:00-2:30-4:30-5:00-7:007:30-9:30-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:20-2:10-5:10-8:0010:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-1:30-4:006:30-9:00
The Shape of Water (R) 1:00-4:207:40-10:40
Den of Thieves (R) 12:20-3:407:10-10:20
12 Strong (R) 11:50-5:50-9:05
The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:206:10-9:20
Winchester (PG-13) 11:40-2:154:50-7:20-9:50
Hostiles (R) 2:50
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:101:40-4:10-6:40-9:10
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:103:45-6:15-9:10
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 1:15-4:45-7:20-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:30-4:006:30-9:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:45-4:30-7:15-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:15-4:357:00-9:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:00-3:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:20-4:107:10-10:10
12 Strong (R) 2:10-5:10-6:45-9:45
Winchester (PG-13) 1:50-4:208:15-10:45
The Post (PG-13) 2:20-5:05-7:5510:35
Hostiles (R) 1:05-4:05-7:05-10:05
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 2:304:50-8:00-10:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:00-5:007:30-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 1:40-4:407:45-10:40
Call Me by Your Name (R)
6:00-9:15
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Seas 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
An IMAX 3D Experience 2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
12:00-4:50
Padmaavat: An IMAX 3D Experience (NR) Please Call
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 12:00-2:20-4:40
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
7:15-9:50
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-2:30-4:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:35
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:05-2:40-4:55
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
7:40-9:45
You know us for shopping, and now
Cars.com is the site for the entire life of your
car. So for every turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 6x3
C6
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C7
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
NEITHER SIDE VULNERABLE
NORTH (D)
10 9 2
Q 10 6 2
10 8 4
AK9
EAST
43
A753
AQ62
J76
WEST
865
98
KJ5
Q 10 5 4 3
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
AKQJ7
KJ4
973
82
The bidding:
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
Pass
Pass
1
2
Dbl
Pass
3
All Pass
Opening lead — 9
WEST
Pass
3
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
T
oday’s deal appeared
in the excellent Daily
Bulletin at the ACBL Fall
Championships. In a pairs
event, North-South bid and
raised spades. Then East
came in with a “pre-balancing” double, and West took
out to three clubs. North
pushed on to three spades,
passed out.
West led the nine of
hearts, and East slipped
by winning and returning a
heart, hoping his partner
would ruff. South drew
trumps and threw a diamond
on dummy’s fourth heart,
making four for plus 170 — a
top score.
East thought he might
have opened one diamond —
much easier in hindsight. He
also thought North should
have doubled three clubs
to show a good defensive
hand, inviting South to play
for a penalty. East observed
that North-South would be
plus 300 against three clubs
doubled.
I doubt that. North-South
would win six tricks on
defense only if North led a
heart — not exactly clear.
Even then, if West took the
ace and led a spade, South
would have to win and lead a
trump, ducked (!) by North.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
43A753
AQ62J76
Your partner opens one
spade, you respond two diamonds, he rebids two spades
and you try 2NT. Partner then
bids three diamonds. What
do you say?
BLONDIE
ANSWER: Your partner
is looking for a place to
play. His bidding suggests
six spades, diamond tolerance and no desire to play
at game or at notrump. Bid
three spades or perhaps
(if you are vulnerable) four
spades. Partner may hold A
K 10 8 5 2, 2, K 10 5, Q 3 2.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C8
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | FEBRUARY 14
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you often
consider your options
carefully. You have a
sense that a lot could
change -- and quite suddenly
at that. An element of the
unexpected keeps your daily
life busy. If you are single, you
discover how important it is to
stay open to others. You will
take your time getting to know
a potential significant other. If
you are attached, the two of
you often take off together for
a spontaneous day off. Try to
understand each other more.
Aquarius is a great sign for a
friend.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
If you have ever wanted to
head in a new direction or
strive for a certain result, the
time is now. Take the plunge,
and you are likely to witness
an immediate success. Revisit
a project that has been on the
back burner for a while.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
One-on-one relating could
become a problem if you are
not careful. Expect an opening
to appear between you and a
significant person in your life.
Remember that others often
look to you as a role model.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You might have the best
intentions to keep the peace
while having an important talk
with a partner; however, the
issue has to do with the other
WEINGARTENS & CLARK party’s intentions, not yours.
Do not make the situation into
something it isn’t.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You could be on the verge of a
dynamic change. You will want
to step up to the plate and fill
in where there is a sudden
upset or change. Be realistic
about your options at the
same time.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You could feel as if you have
to come up with a great idea
or solution. If you encourage
someone in your inner circle
to brainstorm with you until a
solution is found, the results
will be much better.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Your friends are unusually
responsive and want to
become more involved in your
life. A family member could
display some jealousy over not
being the one who resolves an
ongoing issue. Be aware of this
person’s desire and need to
help you.
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You have impact, no matter
what you do or who else is
involved. Others sense your
intensity simply by listening
to the questions you ask. You
might feel overloaded and
need a break.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You will be able to make
a difference by saying the
right thing. A roommate or
family member who feels
somewhat boxed in suddenly
might become rebellious, to
the extent that you could be
shocked.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
The Moon is in your sign, and it
can have a profound effect on
you emotionally, intellectually
and/or physically. You
might want to have an open
discussion about a situation
that ails you with someone
who can help you work through
the matter.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You could be in a frustrating
situation. Be aware of a
tendency to avoid discussing
your feelings. Express some of
your emotions more often. As
a result, you will find that you
also become more in touch
with others’ feelings.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You can be challenging when
you feel the need to be, but
in general you prefer to be
easygoing. Remain sure
of yourself as you attempt
to resolve a problematic
situation. A friend could be
unusually angry and hostile
as well.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Examine the possibilities,
and figure out what seems to
be holding you back. It might
be quite clear that you need
to get away from a certain
person in order to make good
decisions.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C9
RE
ART REVIEW
German art, in the midst of catastrophe — and renewal
BY
S EBASTIAN S MEE
cambridge, mass. — What sort
of art was coming out of Germany
in 1943? What about 1945? Or ’46?
Set against other news coming
out of Germany in those years, the
question feels almost disrespectful. Which is probably why German art made at the end of the war
and in its immediate aftermath
has for so long been cloaked in
silence.
“Inventur — Art in Germany,
1943-55” tries to overturn the idea
that these years were a creative
black hole. Organized by Lynette
Roth and accompanied by a 430page catalogue, the exhibition has
been mounted by Harvard Art
Museums, which is home to the
Busch-Reisinger Museum, North
America’s only public collection
dedicated to the art of Germanspeaking Europe.
Interest in modern German art
has traditionally focused on the
early part of the 20th century —
the heydays of German expressionism and the Bauhaus — and
the long stretch from 1960 to the
present, when artists such as Joseph Beuys, Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke and the Düsseldorf
School of photographers made
German art impossible to ignore.
What happened in between?
“Inventur” is a clear-eyed attempt to come up with an answer.
Roth and her Harvard team have
systematically scoured not only
the Busch-Reisinger’s collection
but museums in Germany, selecting more than 160 works, most of
them small-scale, by nearly 50 artists. With only a few exceptions,
the lenders, both private and public, are German.
Embracing painting, sculpture,
photography, printmaking, drawing and even wallpaper design,
the show makes the case that modern artists who had, under the
Nazis, been stigmatized, sacked,
mocked, blacklisted and worse
nonetheless continued to create.
It is hard to overstate the courage
of their persistence. Adolf Hitler
believed modern art, even when
not made by Jews, was a Jewish
perversion, the contaminated expression of an inferior race. His
own taste, which became official
Nazi taste, was for kitsch, Aryanized nudes in a heroic, neoclassical vein he termed — with no sense
of its absurdity — “Greco-Nordic.”
The show demonstrates that
when the war ended, Germany’s
extant modernists made work
that not only reflected the atmosphere of crisis but also resuscitated ideas that had prevailed earlier
— before Hitler’s anti-modern
agenda did all it could to crush
them.
Although, for instance, the Bauhaus — the influential modern-art
school merging art, craft and design — closed under Nazi pressure
in 1933, its philosophies, which
famously took root in the United
States after many of its key figures
immigrated here, also lived on in
Germany.
The show is arranged chronologically. The first of its three,
rather crowded galleries feels
thick with trauma. Time and
again, the photographs and figu-
PRESIDENT AND FELLOWS OF HARVARD COLLEGE/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY /VG BILD-KUNST
BPK BILDAGENTUR/KUPFERSTICH-KABINETT/STAATLICHE KUNSTSAMMLUNGEN/ART RESOURCE
rative works show cities in ruin.
Alice Lex-Nerlinger’s drawing
“Bombed Out,” Karl Hubbuch’s
drawing “That Was Once His
Home” and Erwin Spuler’s painting “Bombed Out Buildings” all
stand as a bitter corrective — an
almost cosmic comeuppance, you
could say — to Albert Speer’s perverse theory of the “ruin value” of
architecture.
Speer, the Nazis’ chief architect,
sold Hitler on the idea that German architects should anticipate
the way their buildings would appear as ruins, after centuries of
neglect. Just as the Colosseum,
even in its decayed state, expresses the spirit of ancient Rome,
Speer wanted new Nazi buildings
Among the works on
display as part of Harvard
Art Museums’ “Inventur”
exhibition are, top, Willi
Baumeister’s “Growth of
the Crystals II”; above left,
Wilhelm Rudolph’s
“Zöllnerstr.,” from the
series “Dresden
Destroyed”; and, above
right, Otto Piene’s “Flying
People.”
KAREN PHILIPPI/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY/VG BILD-KUNST
to be designed to reveal to later
epochs the greatness of the Third
Reich.
One artist, Wilhelm Rudolph,
started drawing the bombed-out
ruins of Dresden the day after
Allied air raids began razing the
city in February 1945. The bombardment destroyed Rudolph’s
home and his life’s work. In response, he drew the city street by
street, and by year’s end he had
made more than 200 drawings.
Rudolph’s compulsive drawings, later titled “Dresden Destroyed,” can be seen as a kind of
stocktaking, or inventorying. The
show’s title, “Inventur,” is German
for inventory and is borrowed
from a poem by Günter Eich, the
German lyricist and former soldier. In the poem, written in an
American POW camp in 1945,
Eich lists his few humble belongings: “This is my notebook,/ this is
my rain gear,/ this is my towel,/
this is my twine.”
Eich’s plain-spoken list has an
existential quality. It chimes with
Roth’s theory that German art of
this era is not about nationalism —
the search for a new German identity expressed through its art —
but about more basic questions.
For many artists, it was less a case
of “What is the future of Germany?” than “What is the future of
art?” Any answer had to involve a
kind of stocktaking.
When the war ended and Ger-
many started to rebuild, its artists
were often starting from scratch.
In many cases their studios and
earlier work had been destroyed.
But they cherished their restored
independence. They refused to be
pinned down to any single idea or
aesthetic philosophy, and they
didn’t restrict themselves to any
one medium.
The period’s almost aggressive
eclecticism makes sense as a response to the Nazis’ determination to impose a unified aesthetic.
But eclecticism was also, perhaps,
a symptom of dismay. “There is a
lot of confusion,” art critic Will
Grohmann wrote in 1948. “Right
now everything is being tried out
again.” That searching spirit prevailed for at least a decade after
the war’s end.
Who are the artists from this
period whose names we should
remember?
Familiar greats such as Hannah
Höch and Otto Dix have been included, but because their heyday
was earlier, they are more commonly associated with the Weimar period. The dynamic abstract
artist K.O. Götz features prominently. And early work by Otto
Piene, who had a celebrated postwar career in the United States, is
also here.
But Roth has tried hard to draw
attention to less familiar and, often, female artists. One of the most
interesting is Jeanne Mammen,
an illustrator turned avant-gardist who defied Nazi aesthetics and,
after the war, used miscellaneous
materials — discarded wire, cardboard, foil and even doilies — to
make works that are full of invention. “Simply everything has to be
used,” she wrote.
Her somber, semi-abstracted
cityscape “Falling Facades (Berlin
Ruins)” opens the show. Her
sculptures, which she never exhibited, include two abstracted heads
in fired clay, painted gray, adorned
with floral transfers.
Willi Baumeister is another
crucial (and better known) figure.
Four of his paintings had been
exhibited in Hitler’s notorious
1937 “Degenerate Art” exhibition,
which paraded, for public mockery, modernist work deemed out
of step with Nazi aesthetics.
In the early 1940s, Baumeister
met regularly with fellow artists
Oskar Schlemmer and Franz
Krause in a lacquer factory in
Wuppertal. Covertly, they made
abstract panels experimenting
with chance effects on various surfaces. In look and technique, these
works echo the automatic writing
of the surrealists and contemporaneous experiments by Jackson
Pollock.
When the war ended, Baumeister’s output accelerated. He published a defense of modernist aesthetics, “The Unknown in Art,” in
1947, and produced a body of abstract work that is bright, playful
and — given all he had been
through — astonishingly upbeat.
sebastian.smee@washpost.com
Inventur — Art in Germany, 194355 Through June 3 at Harvard Art
Museums, Cambridge, Mass.
harvardartmuseums.org. 617-4959400.
Carolina Herrera saunters o≠ gracefully, of course, into the New York night
FASHION FROM C1
tion to them. In life, there should
be a little mystery.”
And so when she offers a black
dress embroidered with a graceful
cloud of marabou, she is sure that
the woman is tastefully covered.
The dress only hints at what lies
just below the shadow of feathers.
Her tulle is multilayered; it is not
sheer. Her strapless gowns are
properly placed along the torso.
The finale included a parade of
models dressed in crisp white
shirts and a rainbow of long full
skirts paired with a wide belt. It’s a
look that is Herrera’s evening uniform. To say that the designer is
going to become an ambassador
for the collection is a bit like describing what she always has been.
The collection has long reflected
her personal sensibility, the style
of a woman born wealthy in Venezuela and married into Spanish
nobility. She has the posture of a
dancer, a style that shuns distracting frills and a sharp, bawdy wit.
And her clothes, exuding sophistication and propriety, attracted a
range of clients, from Renée Zellweger to Michelle Obama and
Laura Bush.
After the last model made her
final pass to the strains of “I’ll Be
Seeing You,” Herrera emerged to a
standing ovation — dressed, of
course, in a crisp white shirt and
dark trousers. Gordon presented
her with dozens of red roses.
Phone cameras glowed in the dark
salon, and the lights of Manhattan
sparkled in the distance.
Her design sensibility evoked a
PHOTOS BY JONAS GUSTAVSSON/MCV PHOTO FOR
THE WASHINGTON POST
New York of long lunches full of
witticisms, cocktails with bon vivants and formal dinners that
were raucous rather than prim. To
some degree, that version of the
city may always have been a fantasy. But Herrera made a convincing
argument that not only was it real,
it could be yours.
robin.givhan@washpost.com
Carolina Herrera is
stepping down at her
namesake company to
become an envoy of
elegance. She said farewell
with a line of clothes that,
like its predecessors,
focused on good taste with
a touch of mystery.
The finale included a parade of models dressed in crisp white shirts
and a rainbow of long full skirts paired with a wide belt. It’s a look
that is Herrera’s evening uniform.
C10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
Eight finalists are chosen for the Junior
Showmanship award. All of the finalists
go home with some scholarship money —
first place gets $10,000!
It’s going to be warmer than it was
Tuesday, but expect a lot of clouds
— and maybe some rain at night.
Find more photos
from the Westminster
dog show in our
online gallery.
ILLUSTRATION BY ABI SCHUETTLER, 9, BURKE
KAYLA BERTAGNOLI
TANNER CONGLETON
About 100 kids and their pups compete in the Super Bowl of dog shows
BY
A NDREA S ACHS
Every Monday, Fenric Towell
plucks the long hairs that sprout
like weeds on his dog’s neck, ears
and bottom. On Wednesdays, he
pulls the hairs on her back and
sides. Also during the week, he clips
Missy’s toenails, bathes her and
brushes the Lakeland terrier with
coat polish, a conditioner for dogs.
Older brother Cortlund washes
his dog, too, and trims her whiskers.
His English pointer is allergic to
dust, and Icy will break out in hives
if she is not thoroughly scrubbed.
An itchy dog does not make for a
happy pet — or show dog.
Fenric, who is 11, and Cortlund,
who turned 18 on Tuesday, are
junior dog handlers. The siblings
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
1
4
7
14
16
17
18
19
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22
23
28
31
32
34
36
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47
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53
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59
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ACROSS
Drive-thru
device
Org. people line
up for?
Sell under false
pretenses
Tries to scam
online
South Pacific
region
Good thing to
break gently
Bought time
Has no chance
of working
“__ Lisa”
Golf’s “Big
Easy”
“This is a
sure bet”
“Halt and Catch
Fire” network
Writers Patchett
and Brashares
Korea setting
Rhodes of
Rhodesia fame
“__-Man”:
superhero film
Longtime
SeaWorld star
Four-legged
collar wearer
Indigo plant
Rubble-making
stuff
“Hold on a sec”
Storybook
crone
Close at hand
2000s sitcom
starring
Jason Lee
“God willing!”
“We’ve heard
enough”
Accumulates
Cautious
bettors
Mailer’s need
Many promos
Spot for family
game night
DOWN
1 Manhunt
letters
2 Winter warm
spell
3 Skirt style
4 Title role for
Geena
5 Attached,
as a button
live in Oklahoma City with one
sister, five brothers and 10 dogs.
When the boys are not grooming
and exercising their four-legged
pals at home, they are competing
in dog shows across the country.
Last year, they averaged 15 to 20
days a month on the road.
“I do my homework on the car
ride there and back,” said Cortlund, who is home-schooled and
started competing when he was
12. (Five of the Towell children
show dogs; 9-year-old Gideon is
the youngest.)
Fenric and Cortlund capped off
their busy — and successful —
season at the Westminster Kennel
Club dog show. The Super Bowl of
canine competitions is held every
February in New York City, and
only about 100 kids qualify for the
Junior Showmanship event.
“It’s a really big thing for me,”
said Fenric.
To land a spot at Westminster,
you have to be 9 to 18 years old and
have won the title of best junior
handler at least seven times at
American Kennel Club shows
over a 12-month period. The Towells exceeded that magic number.
Fenric took home the ribbon nine
times; Cortlund’s tally is a whopping 44.
“I make sure the dog is happy
and calm,” Cortlund said of his
strategy. “I try not to overthink it.”
Last year, Cortlund took fourth
place at Westminster, an achievement he dedicated to his sister. In
2015, Annessa competed in New
LEFT: Fenric Towell and Cara
compete in the National Beagle
Club of America show October 1
in Aldie, Virginia. RIGHT:
Cortlund Towell and Missy
compete at the Montgomery
County Kennel Club dog show
in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, on
October 8.
York but did not advance to the
Junior Showmanship Finals.
“She didn’t reach the goal she
wanted, and she deserved it,” he
said. “I felt like I had to go and get
something for her.”
At every dog show, Westminster included, the boys follow the
same steps.
First, transform Missy and Icy
into beauty queens. At this point
in the pups’ careers, the 2-yearolds are used to the salon treatment, including a spritz of hair
spray to tamp down flyaway fur.
Second, keep the dogs as still as
statues while a judge checks their
teeth, by peeling back their lips;
muscles, by giving them a squeeze
on the shoulder and back side;
and coats, by running a hand over
their fur like a dust cloth. And
finally, take a lap around the ring,
without dog or person tripping
up.
“My mom gives me a list of
things to remember,” Fenric said.
“Keep eye contact with the judge
and look at the dog to make sure
she isn’t doing something bad.”
Fenric knows that Missy can
get into mischief. She has confused a Pekingese dog and a women’s fur coat for her squeaky toy.
Neither one was interested in
playing along.
At Westminster, Fenric competed Monday morning but didn’t
make the cut. Cortlund showed
the next day and did not advance,
either. However, instead of focusing on the loss, he bounced back
fast. Within minutes, he was back
in the ring for a different event,
still trying for a win.
kidspost@washpost.com
For more information on how to
become a junior handler: akc.org/
events/junior-showmanship.
By Loren Muse Smith and Bruce Haight
PYEONGCHANG 2018
The world is Chloe Kim’s churro
BY
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
6 Give the
go-ahead
7 Something
struck by a
model?
8 One in a
cast
9 Circulars
10 Store
collections
11 The Beach Boys’
“God __ Knows”
12 Quaint “For
shame!”
13 Fidget spinners,
apparently
15 Kate McKinnon
is in its
ensemble,
briefly
20 End of a
question
begun by
part of 19-,
23-, 42- and
48-Across
23 Regatta entry
24 Diamond
situation after a
leadoff double
25 Full-length, as a
film
26 Several CBS
dramas
27
28
29
30
33
Bread grain
Yoga pose
Make like
Sink sealant
Captain
described
as a “grand,
ungodly,
god-like man”
35 Beirut
natives
36 Bubbly prefix
2/14/18
39 Winged
steed of
myth
43 Performer
with many
fans?
44 Secured,
as a gate
45 Tire features
46 Bouncing
off the walls
48 Shape
49 Hairdressing
challenges
50 Uru. neighbor
51 Swamp
thing
52 Angler’s fly, e.g.
53 Pub letters
54 Squirreled
away
56 Bank acct.
info
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
S ONIA R AO
Olympian Chloe Kim has some
sage advice: Churros calm the
nerves.
“Oh and I also had 2 churros
today and they were pretty bomb
so if you ever get nervous go eat a
churro,” the 17-year-old tweeted
on Sunday, two days before she
dominated her way to a gold
medal in the women’s snowboarding halfpipe competition.
Kim is a four-time X Games
champion who speaks three languages and attracted numerous
sponsors for the PyeongChang
Games — but she has risen to
Internet fame in the past few days
for simultaneously seeming both
human and superhuman.
The youngest gold medalist in
the halfpipe event, she might also
be the only one to talk publicly
about wanting ice cream midcompetition. She earned her
near-perfect score of 98.25 while
“hangry,” as she tweeted while
waiting for that momentous third
run Tuesday. T.J. Quinn of ESPN
tweeted that when Kim was asked
why she was using Twitter during
competition, she responded,
“Like, what else are you supposed
to do?”
Teenagers nowadays often receive criticism for their supposed
laziness and tech obsession, but
the Olympics ask us to set aside
our differences — and that includes generational conflict.
Kim’s bubbly personality and
social-media savvy endear her to
viewers of any age. She’s our
Gen-Z hero.
She’s not alone. Kim’s fellow
17-year-old U.S. snowboarder Red
Gerard has also become popular
on social media — in part because
he charmingly fits into teen
stereotypes. On Sunday morning,
he earned the United States its
first gold medal at the 2018 Winter Olympics after oversleeping,
according to Yahoo News, having
“zonked out” the previous night
while watching “Brooklyn NineNine.” After his roommate, Kyle
Mack, prodded him out of bed,
the 17-year-old Gerard grabbed
an egg sandwich, borrowed
Mack’s jacket when he couldn’t
find his own and raced off to the
hill.
He then became the youngest
American man to win a gold
medal at the Winter Olympics in
ANTONIO BAT/EPA--EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
American gold medalist Chloe Kim during the medal ceremony for
the women’s snowboard halfpipe event at the PyeongChang Games.
80 years, and the first born in the
2000s to do so.
These two breakfast-sandwich-loving teenagers captivate
Americans in part because of
their youth. SB Nation writer
Charlotte Wilder tweeted, “We
should rethink the age restrictions on the presidency because if
Chloe Kim and Red Gerard ran on
a ticket together I’d vote for them
tomorrow.” The Cut deemed the
pair “Cool Teens,” and one Twitter
user looked to Kim’s social-media
Kim might be the only
gold medalist to talk
publicly about wanting
ice cream
mid-competition.
presence for personal motivation: “if chloe kim can tweet
about ice cream while casually
doing 90+ olympic runs I can go
to work tomorrow.”
Kim and Gerard aren’t the only
young Winter Olympians to ever
be the center of media attention
— the recently released “I, Tonya”
serves as proof — and they might
not even be the most-interesting
talkers this year. (Adam Rippon,
the 28-year-old American figure
skater notable for his entertain-
ing interviews, gets that prize.)
But they are some of the first to
have grown up in the era of reality
TV, and their personalities shine.
Gerard, more low-key in his
response to Olympic success, told
reporters that he is just beginning
to understand how huge the
Games are. After being asked
what he’ll do once he receives his
gold medal, he deadpanned:
“Look at it for quite some time? I
don’t know.”
But when Kim is on, she’s on.
She continued to discuss her constant hunger after her victory,
tweeting about her love of cookies-and-cream ice cream. Her
charisma is immediately evident,
as it was when she told reporters
that she’d advise aspiring Olympians younger than herself to “do
whatever you want,” and she has
even charmed South Korean publications, which have embraced
the Korean American athlete like
one of their own.
“I think I was so fortunate to
find my passion and the thing
that brought me so much joy at
such a young age,” she said. “I
think, you know, if you’re young
— even if you’re old, it doesn’t
matter how old you are — but if
you find something that you really want to try, just give it a try.
You’re never going to know. The
one thing I learned is, just give
everything a shot. You don’t want
to live in regret.”
sonia.rao@washpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
PRO BASKETBALL
BASEBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NASSAR SCANDAL
Bradley Beal feels more prepared for
the three-point shootout this time. D3
The Nationals’ roster looks strong again,
but upgrades are still possible. D3
Maryland loses seventh straight on road
with frustrating finish at Nebraska. D4
Congress is seeking answers from the
institutions that were involved. D5
PYEONGCHANG
Up to his old tricks
Hunter,
Virginia
play like
top dogs
VIRGINIA 59,
MIAMI 50
BY
GENE WANG
coral gables, fla. — Virginia
played its first game in 36 years
as the top-ranked men’s basketball team in the country.
The Cavaliers will have at least
the next week to enjoy the milestone following a 59-50 win
against Miami on Tuesday night
in which they got a masterful
scoring performance from reserve De’Andre Hunter and another robust defensive effort
overall at Watsco Center.
Hunter, a redshirt freshman
who plays guard and forward,
finished with 22 points, one
short of matching his career
high, and Virginia (24-2, 13-1
ACC) gained enough separation
late in the second half with a 17-4
surge on the way to its 16th
triumph in 17 games.
“We talked about before the
game, can we somehow try to
bring more energy than Miami?’’
Cavaliers Coach Tony Bennett
said. “At least that was the challenge. Be first to the floor, first to
the glass, and that was a challenge, and I thought that ignited
us.”
The Cavaliers became the first
team to secure a double-bye in
CAVALIERS CONTINUED ON D4
Georgia Tech at Virginia
Feb. 21, 7 p.m., ESPN2
Caps bemoan
lapses after
squandering
two-goal lead
CAMERON SPENCER/GETTY IMAGES
JETS 4,
CAPITALS 3 (OT)
Shaun White tosses his board in celebration after winning gold in the halfpipe competition at the PyeongChang Games. He also won the event in 2006 and 2010.
For Davis, poor sportsmanship
and a poor showing
gangneung,
south korea —
The remarkable
and turbulent
athletic career of
Shani Davis had
Jerry
to die like this. It
Brewer
was going to be
slow and lonely
and with one last Olympic-size
fracas. After a lifetime of
fighting — and winning — there
was no chance the aging pioneer
would exit with a rocking chair
tour.
Davis built his legend on
extreme self-confidence and
A scary crash epitomizes a tough
night for U.S. women’s lugers. D9
defiance. He has always
navigated life using his own
GPS, and it has led to petty
controversies, the latest of
which is surprising only because
Davis actually wanted
something more than a medal
from a world that makes him
skeptical. He wanted to be the
U.S. flag bearer during the
Opening Ceremonies. It
basically means the 35-year-old
speedskater wanted a farewell
party.
For all the complexity we’ve
sifted through during Davis’s
BREWER CONTINUED ON D11
Maame Biney is ousted in the
short-track quarterfinals. D11
Boosted by a daring final run,
White wraps up third career gold
BY A DAM K ILGORE
IN BONGPYEONG, SOUTH KOREA
The durability of snowboarding, both as an Olympic event and
a sport capable of lingering on the
edge of the mainstream, can now
be validated by its capacity for
reinvention. It has been around
long enough, and grown embedded enough in cultural consciousness, to facilitate second acts.
Shaun White was 19 and raggedy when he won his first gold
medal, 23 and exultant when he
won his second, 27 and corporate
when he suffered a letdown and
Mikaela Shiffrin’s debut is again
postponed by weather. D13
arrived at a professional fork.
Wednesday afternoon on PyeongChang Halfpipe, White completed his competitive revival at
31 with a reinforcement and a
declaration. He remains the unquestioned greatest snowboarder
ever, and he is once again the
unquestioned greatest snowboarder in the world.
White won the third Olympic
gold medal of his career, clinching
his most rewarding prize with a
final run of extreme daring, towering athleticism and supreme
clutch. He placed himself among
HALFPIPE CONTINUED ON D10
Live updates, more coverage
at washingtonpost.com/sports
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
winnipeg, manitoba — From
the overhead camera angle, it
looked like Mark Scheifele’s shot
went through Braden Holtby, the
goaltender falling forward onto
his stomach in agony as the puck
appeared from in between his legs
and hit the back of the net. There
were 14.4 seconds left in the third
period, and that goal erased what
had once been the Washington
Capitals’ two-goal cushion, forcing overtime. As the Capitals and
Winnipeg Jets waited for the extra
frame to start, opposing fans
cheered “Holt-by.”
As Washington returned to a
losing locker room after Winnipeg’s Tyler Myers scored the
game-winning goal for a 4-3 Jets
win, the Capitals lamented the
seconds preceding Scheifele’s
equalizer, a power play that went
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D7
Capitals at Wild
Tomorrow, 8 p.m., NBCSW
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
SOCCER INSIDER
PRO BASKETBALL
EARLY LEAD
D.C. United
finally,
o∞cially
adds Asad
BY
Young
accuses
opponent
of racism
S TEVEN G OFF
BY M ATT B ONESTEEL
AND K ELYN S OONG
D.C. United officially acquired
Yamil Asad, an Argentine attacker who starred for Atlanta last
season. He will likely make his
debut in Saturday’s preseason
match against the Philadelphia
Union in St. Petersburg, Fla.
The deal had multiple layers:
D.C. needed to reach agreements
with Atlanta (for his MLS rights),
with Velez Sarsfield (the Argentine club that owns his contract
and was willing to loan him for
one year) and with the 23-yearold midfielder (regarding contract terms). Although Asad arrived at training camp in Clearwater, Fla., last Wednesday, the
final paperwork was not completed until this week.
In the trade with Atlanta, D.C.
relinquished $200,000 in general
allocation money (GAM) and
$100,000 in targeted allocation
money (TAM) this year and
$100,000 (GAM) and $100,000
(TAM) in 2019. In addition, Atlanta would receive $100,000 in general allocation money should
Asad appear in any MLS matches
in 2020.
TAM and GAM are financial
benefits used by clubs to acquire
new players or soften the impact
of contracts on the salary cap.
“Yamil is a bright talent in
MLS, who was a major contributor to Atlanta’s successful inaugural campaign,” Dave Kasper, United’s general manager, said in a
written statement. “His pace,
skill and creativity in wide areas
will provide us with an additional
attacking dimension.”
Asad came to MLS on a oneyear loan last year, but Atlanta
was unable to strike an agreement with Velez on an extension
or permanent transfer; Velez had
wanted $1.8 million for an outright sale. D.C. officials, however,
negotiated a deal in which they
could sign Asad after the 2018
season for $700,000. In other
words, if the club likes what it
sees this season, D.C. will almost
certainly acquire him for the long
term.
BEN MARGOT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Golden State Warriors have the NBA’s best record, and Coach Steve Kerr is trying to combat their complacency.
Kerr takes back seat for a night
Facing midseason doldrums,
Warriors coach has players
run the huddles in rout
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
oakland, calif. — The Golden State
Warriors and the casual NBA fan are
now one in the same.
Both can’t wait for the playoffs to
start.
Take Monday night’s game against
the Phoenix Suns, for example. What
otherwise would have been an
unremarkable 129-83 rout of a
horrendous Suns team instead featured
a drastic step Coach Steve Kerr took to
try to get his team’s attention after
several weeks of lagging performances.
“I haven’t been able to reach them the
last month,” Kerr said. “They are tired of
my voice. I’m tired of my voice.”
So Kerr decided that, for a night, the
Warriors wouldn’t hear his voice. Rather
than going through his usual work
coaching the team, he allowed his
players to do the work for him.
While the coaching staff still
managed substitution patterns, the
players did everything else. From
Stephen Curry to Draymond Green to
Andre Iguodala to David West, the
players took turns running the huddles.
Kerr and his assistants, meanwhile,
stood by and watched.
“I don’t know,” Kerr said, when asked
what he thought of the job they did. “I
wasn’t listening.”
This wasn’t about disrespecting an
opponent, or mocking the Phoenix Suns,
the team for which Kerr served as
president and general manager for three
years.
This was simply Kerr’s latest attempt
to find meaning in a season that
increasingly has had none for a team
that has now spent 18 months with few
thinking it has a chance of being beaten.
steven.goff@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/
soccerinsider
QUOTABLE
Contrary to this
broadcast, we’re not
hosting the games.
P.F. CHANG’S TWITTER ACCOUNT,
in response to a Chicago TV station
that mistakenly used a graphic on air
that read “P.F. Chang 2018.”
PyeongChang is where the Olympics
are being hosted; P.F. Chang’s is an
Asian-themed casual dining
restaurant chain. (Via Early Lead)
Notre Dame lashes out
after wins not restored
Notre Dame’s president ripped
the NCAA’s decision to deny the
school’s appeal to restore 21
vacated football victories from an
academic misconduct violation,
saying the association
“perverted” the notion that
universities determine how they
police academics.
The NCAA denied Notre
Dame’s appeal Tuesday, wiping
off the books all 12 wins from the
Fighting Irish’s 2012 national
championship game run under
Coach Brian Kelly.
In a letter to Notre Dame
alumni, University President
John Jenkins says the penalty
was unprecedented considering
who was involved in the
misconduct and the school was
being punished for rigorously
enforcing its honor code. He
called the ruling unfair,
referencing the recent North
Carolina case in which the NCAA
did not punish the school after an
investigation of athletes taking
irregular courses.
The appeals committee upheld
the penalty passed down in
November 2016. . . .
While the Warriors have been waiting
around for the playoffs to start, the rest
of the league has spent the past year
gearing up to take them down. The
Houston Rockets overhauled their
roster this summer — trading for Chris
Paul and signing P.J. Tucker and Luc
Mbah a Moute — before landing Gerald
Green, Joe Johnson and Brandan
Wright during the season. The Cavaliers
just traded six players to shake things up
after a horrific slide over the past month.
The Oklahoma City Thunder traded for
Paul George and Carmelo Anthony. The
Minnesota Timberwolves traded for
Jimmy Butler and signed Jeff Teague.
The Warriors, on the other hand, have
largely stood pat. They have 12 of the
same 15 players as last season. They
haven’t seriously pursued any of the
buyout candidates yet, and it wouldn’t
be surprising if they finish the season
without making a roster move.
That lack of fresh blood has, at times,
led to them feeling stale. But for a team
that has spent this much time worrying
about its current form, and a general
lack of focus, the fact that it has the
NBA’s best record and point differential
is an indication of how strong of a
position the Warriors find themselves
in.
If Golden State stays healthy, it is
going to enter the postseason as an
overwhelming favorite to win a second
straight championship, its third in four
years. The players know that. The
coaches know that. The rest of the
league knows that.
This is why Kerr chose to do
something drastic Monday, attempting
to give his players some reason to care
on a random night in February . . . days
before the all-star break . . . against
arguably the worst team in the NBA.
Now he only has to do so 25 more
times before Golden State’s games
actually matter.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
sports
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
kelyn.soong@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
D I G ES T
COLLEGES
“I think it’s exactly what I expected,”
Kerr said of the challenge of keeping his
team engaged. “Just having had the
experience as a player in Chicago, the
three years in a row [in the NBA Finals]
. . . I’ve talked about it a lot. You lose the
freshness of the first year or two. It’s
emotionally draining for these guys to
play night after night, people coming
after them.
“. . . [From] three years ago to now, it’s
different. You have to account for that.
We’re trying to guide them; we’re trying
to pace them. I think we’re in a good
place. I like where our team is. We
haven’t played well the last few weeks
but we don’t want to be peaking now
anyway.
The past three years, the Warriors
have had something to motivate them
from the jump. Three seasons ago this
team exploded into the national
consciousness and won its first title.
Then came the doubters who said they
only won because Cleveland’s Kevin
Love and Kyrie Irving were hurt —
causing Golden State to come back with
a vengeance in the second season,
winning a record-setting 73 games
before losing to the Cavaliers in the
Finals. That, of course, led to Kevin
Durant joining the Warriors last season
and another 67-win regular season
followed by a 16-1 romp through the
playoffs to a second title in three
seasons.
This year, though? The Warriors
haven’t had that thing to keep them
locked in on a nightly basis, to give them
something to play for during these dog
days of the season. That’s why the
Warriors — while still leading the league
with both a 44-13 record and in
outscoring their opponents by 10.3
points per 100 possessions — have
already come close to matching last
season’s 15 losses with 25 games
remaining on the schedule.
“For whatever reason,” Curry said,
“we obviously haven’t been great, by any
stretch of the imagination, for the last
month.”
Things got heated Monday
night during a tennis match between Americans Donald Young
and Ryan Harrison at the New
York Open, an ATP 250 event in
Uniondale, N.Y. After the match,
which the sixth-seeded Harrison
won, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4), Young accused
Harrison of making a comment
“about me as a black tennis player.”
“I’m shocked and disappointed,
Ryan Harrison, to hear you tell me
how you really feel about me as a
black tennis player,” Young tweeted after the match. “I thought this
was supposed to be an inclusive
gentleman’s sport.”
Harrison denied making such
comments roughly 45 minutes later, tweeting that Young’s accusations were “absolutely untrue.”
“Any video/audio will 100%
clear me and I encourage anyone
with the available resources to
find it,” he added.
Tennis Channel video captured
by one Twitter user showed the
two getting involved in an argument during a break in the firstset action.
In comments made to reporters
after the match, Harrison chalked
up the disagreement to the heat of
the battle.
“At the end of the day, you see
everybody, you like everybody and
you want to be friends or friendly
with everybody but everybody out
here that I compete against —
even the ones that I like — they’re
the ones trying to take away my
livelihood,” he said. “So I’ve got to
do what I can to come through and
I’m just proud of myself for doing
that.”
Asked for comment, a New York
Open spokesman referred all
questions to the ATP World Tour.
“The ATP takes any allegations
of racial prejudice extremely seriously,” an ATP spokesperson said
in an email to The Washington
Post. “A further review of all video
and audio recording from the
match will take place as this matter is investigated further.”
It’s not the first time Harrison
has been involved in an in-match
argument. At the 2015 Cincinnati
Masters, Harrison and Australia’s
Thanasi Kokkinakis had to be separated by tournament officials.
During an April 2016 tournament in Georgia, Russia’s Daniil
Medvedev was disqualified for
making a racist comment after the
umpire ruled in favor of Young.
Medvedev alleged that the umpire
made the call because both she
and Young were black.
“I know that you are friends. I
am sure of it,” Medvedev was
heard saying to the umpire. The
U.S. Tennis Association said in a
statement that it disqualified him
for “question[ing] the impartiality
of the umpire based on her race.”
The NCAA is considering
giving athletes who are doing
well in the classroom the ability
to transfer with immediate
eligibility and permitting
incoming freshmen to get out of a
national letter-of-intent if there is
a head coaching change.
The NCAA’s Division I transfer
working group concluded two
days of meetings Tuesday. The
group will meet again in April
and plans to then have a model it
can present to NCAA
membership for comment. The
goal is to present a proposal for
the Board of Governors to
consider for approval in June. . . .
Jared Bernhardt had five
goals and two assists, and
Connor Kelly had four goals and
four assists to lead top-ranked
Maryland (2-0) to a 13-7 men’s
lacrosse victory over Marist at
Capital One Field. . . .
Jake Carraway had five goals
and an assist as the Georgetown
men’s lacrosse team routed High
Point, 15-5, in its season opener at
Cooper Field.
TENNIS
Kei Nishikori made a winning
return to the ATP Tour, beating
Noah Rubin, 7-5, 6-3, in the first
round of the New York Open in
Uniondale.
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
7:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Washington at New York » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
Los Angeles Clippers at Boston » ESPN
Golden State at Portland » ESPN
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
11 p.m.
11 p.m.
Columbus at Toronto » NHL Network
GOLF
NHL
7 p.m.
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
6 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
TENNIS
South Florida at UCF » ESPNews
Iowa at Michigan » Big Ten Network
Virginia Tech at Duke » ESPN2, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Dayton at George Mason » MASN
Davidson at VCU » CBS Sports Network
Kansas State at Oklahoma State » ESPNU
Villanova at Providence » Fox Sports 1
Mississippi State at Vanderbilt » SEC Network
East Carolina at Tulane » ESPNews
Illinois at Indiana » Big Ten Network
St. John’s at DePaul » CBS Sports Network
Kentucky at Auburn » ESPN2
The No. 5 seed missed the end
of last season and the beginning
of this one with a right wrist
injury. . . .
Stan Wawrinka hit 41
unforced errors as he crashed out
of the first round of the ABN
Amro World Tennis Tournament
in Rotterdam, losing 4-6, 6-3, 6-2
to 259th-ranked Tallon
Griekspoor. . . .
Fernando Verdasco and Gael
Monfils won their first-round
matches in the Argentina Open in
Buenos Aires, and Australian
Open semifinalist Kyle Edmund
withdrew from the tournament
due to illness.
Eighth-seeded Verdasco
advanced with a 6-2, 7-5 victory
against Thiago Monteiro and
next plays Guido Pella. Monfils
beat Pablo Cuevas, 6-1, 6-4, and
next faces Dusan Lajovic.
PRO FOOTBALL
The Baltimore Ravens and
Chicago Bears will launch the
NFL’s 99th season by playing in
the preseason-opening Hall of
Fame Game on Aug. 2 in Canton,
Ohio. Former Ravens linebacker
Ray Lewis and former Bears
linebacker Brian Urlacher will
be inducted into the shrine two
days after the game. . . .
5 a.m.
9 a.m.
1 p.m.
Memphis at SMU » ESPNU
Seton Hall at Xavier » Fox Sports 1
Georgia at Florida » SEC Network
North Carolina at Syracuse » WDCA (Ch. 20)
Wyoming at San Diego State » CBS Sports Network
Nevada at Boise State » ESPNU
LPGA Tour: ISPS Handa Women’s Australian Open, first round » Golf Channel
ATP: ABN Amro World Tennis Tournament, early-round play » Tennis
Channel
WTA: Qatar Open, early-round play » beIN Sports
ATP: New York Open, ABN Amro World Tennis Tournament, early-round
play » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
UEFA Champions League, round of 16, first leg: Paris Saint-Germain at
Real Madrid » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Champions League, round of 16, first leg: Liverpool at Porto » Fox
Sports 2
Linebacker Derrick Johnson’s
tenure with the Kansas City
Chiefs is coming to an end.
The franchise’s career tackles
leader and a four-time Pro Bowl
selection, Johnson, 35, will
become a free agent when his
contract expires at the start of the
new league year March 14. He
intends to keep playing.
SOCCER
Manchester City sent out
another statement to the rest of
Europe by thrashing host Basel,
4-0, in Switzerland in the first leg
of their Champions League last16 match, with Ilkay Gundogan
scoring two of the goals.
The Premier League’s runaway
leaders scored three times
between the 14th and 23 minutes
— through Gundogan, Bernardo
Silva and Sergio Aguero —
before Gundogan added a fourth
goal from long range in the 53rd.
Also, Tottenham recovered
from conceding twice inside the
opening nine minutes to draw,
2-2, at Juventus in Turin, Italy.
Gonzalo Higuain scored twice,
including a penalty, but
Tottenham answered with goals
by Harry Kane and Christian
Eriksen.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Nats loaded, but upgrades still possible
BY
J ORGE C ASTILLO
west palm beach, fla. —
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Inexperience hurt Bradley Beal in 2014, when he said he “got kind of winded” in the overtime round.
Beal’s up to speed this time
After runner-up finish in
first three-point contest,
all-star is better prepared
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at New York Knicks
Today
7:30 NBCSW
at Cleveland Cavaliers
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
In 2014, Bradley Beal had never
competed in an NBA All-Star
Weekend three-point contest, so
he didn’t know the rules.
He ascended from the group of
shooters to represent the Eastern
Conference in the finals against
Marco Belinelli, then with the San
Antonio Spurs and playing for the
West. Belinelli went first. Then
Beal, alone on the big stage in New
Orleans and working his way
around the five racks, found his
rhythm near the end to tie the
score and force overtime. Although viewers at home knew
what would happen next — TNT
displayed a graphic explaining the
next round — Beal had no such
prompt and entered sudden death
breathless and unaware.
“I think the overtime buzzed me
because I thought it was only 30
seconds,” Beal, who finished second to Belinelli, recalled this
week. “I got kind of winded. I
didn’t know I’d have to go the
whole full round again. That was
my fault on that. I’m more knowledgeable of the rules now.”
Consider it a contest-rookie
mistake.
Beal, who is set to participate in
his second three-point contest this
weekend as a first-time all-star,
now knows that if he advances to
the finals and forces overtime,
then he must go around the arc for
another 60 seconds. The experience four years ago taught Beal
other things, too: He plans to practice shooting off the rack more;
he’ll need to come up with a new
Feb. 22
8 TNT
vs. Charlotte Hornets
Feb. 23
7 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
strategy for money balls; and he
must remind himself not to waste
time watching those pretty jumpers swish through the net.
The other lesson: Get that trophy.
“Well, I want to win,” Beal said.
“I think the first time around I
wanted to win but it was more like
getting the experience and feel for
it. I feel like it’s getting more competitive and more competitive every year with some of the best
shooters in the game.”
Though Beal committed early
to the event, he enters the shooting showcase with the lowest
three-point percentage of his sixyear career (.366 through 56
games). The eight-man field features previous winners including
Houston Rockets guard Eric Gordon (2017) and Golden State Warriors star Klay Thompson (2016),
as well as Oklahoma City Thunder
wing Paul George, who is shooting
a career-best 42.8 percent from
deep. But strategy, not so much
percentage, factors significantly
in the contest .
Shooters go around the arc,
hoisting five NBA regulation balls
at each rack — including one multicolored “money” ball that’s
worth two points at the end of a
rack. One special rack consists of
just money balls and can be placed
anywhere on the court. Belinelli,
the 2014 champ, moved his money
ball rack to the fifth and final spot,
making good use of the corner
threes. Beal, however, wanted his
special rack at the second spot on
the court. If he had placed the
money balls in the corner, as Belinelli did, Beal could have won in
regulation because he made his
final six threes.
This year, Beal is thinking about
placing the money balls in the
fourth or fifth spot on the court.
“It probably would’ve helped if I
had it in the last rack,” Beal said of
his 2014 appearance.
Beal recalled practicing once,
maybe twice, ahead of New Orleans. This time around, he
planned on starting as early as
Tuesday so he can get adjusted to
shooting off a rack, which demands a faster and laser-focused
rhythm.
“You’re just on a time limit,”
Beal said. “The biggest thing, you
can’t really look at the ball go in.
You just have to shoot it and allow
it to go from there.
“I think the biggest advice is
you have to actually practice for it
because taking it off the rack is
totally different.”
In New Orleans, Beal had a
special courtside fan in rapper
Nelly. The two hail from St. Louis,
and Beal has shared the story of
how Nelly used to walk him to
school as a child. Who knows if
Nelly will return to sit in the expensive seats inside Staples Center? Beal says the hip-hop artist
lives in California, so it’s a possibility. Even so, Beal does not need
celebrity cheerleaders for this
year’s contest. Although he felt
confident in 2014, Beal said he
believes he is better prepared for
this fresh moment in the spotlight.
“I feel like it’s a good opportunity,” Beal said, “for me to put my
name up on that list.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
NBA ROUNDUP
Harden lifts Houston to ninth straight
ROCKETS 126,
TIMBERWOLVES 108
A SSOCIATED P RESS
James Harden had 34 points, 12
assists and six rebounds, and the
Houston Rockets beat the Minnesota Timberwolves, 126-108, on
Tuesday night in Minneapolis for
their ninth straight victory.
Ryan Anderson scored 21
points off the bench as the Rockets
(43-13) snapped Minnesota’s 13game home winning streak and
pulled within a half-game of the
Golden State Warriors for the best
record in the NBA. Houston has
won 16 of its last 18 games.
The Rockets made 10 threepointers in the fourth quarter,
when they scored 42 points.
Karl-Anthony Towns had 35
points and 12 rebounds in Minnesota’s first home loss since Dec. 16
against Phoenix. Jeff Teague added 25 points and eight assists, and
Jamal Crawford came off the
bench to score 11 points after starting 0 for 6 from the floor.
Houston used three-pointers to
keep Minnesota at bay throughout
the game and then to pull away
late. Anderson scored 12 in the
fourth quarter, all from threepoint range.
CAVALIERS
120, THUN-
DER 112: LeBron James scored 37
points, and new-look Cleveland
got a much different result this
time against host Oklahoma City.
It was Cleveland’s second
straight win since adding George
Hill, Rodney Hood, Jordan Clarkson and Larry Nance Jr. in trades,
and its fourth straight victory
overall.
J.R. Smith added 18 points for
the Cavaliers, who lost to the
Thunder, 148-124, on Jan. 20 with
a very different roster.
Paul George scored 25 points
and Carmelo Anthony 24 for the
Thunder.
RAPTORS 115, HEAT 112:
DeMar DeRozan scored 27 points,
Kyle Lowry had 22 and host Toronto beat Miami for its sixth straight
win.
Toronto (40-16) improved its
NBA-best home record to 24-4 and
ensured it will be the top team in
the Eastern Conference at the allstar break. The Raptors lead Boston (40-18) by 11/2 games. Both
teams play their final game before
the break on Wednesday night.
Goran Dragic scored 28 points
and James Johnson had 16 for the
Heat, which lost for the sixth time
in seven games.
BUCKS 97, HAWKS 92:
Khris Middleton had 21 points to
lead a balanced attack for Milwaukee, and all-star forward Giannis
Antetokounmpo hit two key buckets in the final three-plus minutes
to spark a victory at home.
Tyler Zeller added 14 points on
7-for-9 shooting in his first game
in Milwaukee since joining the
team on the road before the trade
deadline last week. The Bucks improved to 9-2 since Joe Prunty
took over as interim coach following the firing of Jason Kidd.
Dennis Schroder scored 18
points for the Hawks.
When Washington Nationals
pitchers and catchers report to
the Ballpark of the Palm Beaches
on Wednesday to begin the most
important season in team history, they will find a completely
overhauled coaching staff but
familiar teammates.
After dismissing Dusty Baker
and hiring Dave Martinez as
manager, the Nationals didn’t
make
any
earth-shattering
moves this offseason. They didn’t
need to. As currently constructed, the team is projected by most
prognosticators — computer and
human — to claim a third consecutive National League East
crown and earn another shot at
breaking through in October before facing a winter of uncertainty.
The Nationals lost Matt Albers
after a resurgent year but resigned Brandon Kintzler to partner with Ryan Madson and Sean
Doolittle at the back end of the
bullpen. They retained Howie
Kendrick to shore up the bench
and provide insurance if all-star
Daniel Murphy’s surgically repaired knee isn’t ready for the
start of the season. They added
Matt Adams to replace Adam
Lind as their left-handed power
bench option and signed Miguel
Montero to a minor league deal
to compete for the backup catcher spot.
Their biggest addition is probably having Adam Eaton return
from his anterior cruciate ligament tear to replace Jayson
Werth in left field. It will be on
Martinez, a first-year manager,
and his staff to guide the talented
ensemble to unprecedented
heights.
But, as last year demonstrated,
General Manager Mike Rizzo’s
pursuit of improvement doesn’t
conclude with report day. The
unprecedented glut of free
agents still seeking employment
presents possibilities to upgrade
the roster — namely in the
rotation and behind the plate.
Three notable free agent starting pitchers remain on the market: Jake Arrieta, Lance Lynn
and Alex Cobb. But only Arrieta
has been constantly linked to the
Nationals this winter. The reasoning is twofold: Arrieta is a
proven quality starting pitcher
with significant postseason experience who could fill out Washington’s rotation, and his agent is
Scott Boras. The dots connect
themselves.
The Nationals have been in
contact with Boras about Arrieta
— they were one of the teams to
receive a thick binder from Boras
outlining the case to sign the
pitcher at the beginning of the
offseason. Ownership has a relationship with Boras. A chunk of
Washington’s players are Boras
clients, and there’s a history of
Washington swooping in to sign
a few when there weren’t any
glaring holes to fill. It happened
last year when Matt Wieters was
signed a few days into spring
training.
This time, the competitive balance tax presents an additional
obstacle. According to Cot’s Contracts, the Nationals are already
$4.6 million over the $197 million tax threshold set for the 2018
season and stand to pay a 30
percent penalty after eclipsing
the threshold in 2017. Therefore,
signing Arrieta, who turns 32
next month and showed signs of
decline last season two years
after winning the NL Cy Young
Award, would cost an extra 30
percent.
That’s on top of Washington
surrendering its second- and
fifth-highest picks in the upcoming draft and $1 million in international bonus pool money for
signing a player who was given a
qualifying offer because it
crossed the threshold last season.
The other notable possibility
— acquiring catcher J.T. Realmuto from the Miami Marlins to
serve as an upgrade over Wieters, one of baseball’s least productive players last season —
carries a different kind of lofty
price tag. While Realmuto is
under team control on franchisefriendly terms for the next three
years — he will make $2.9 million this season after losing his
arbitration case to the Marlins
this month — Miami wants Victor Robles or Juan Soto, Washington’s top two prospects, as the
centerpiece in a trade package.
The Nationals have refused to
relinquish either outfielder.
Realmuto, who turns 27 next
month, reportedly demanded a
trade in December as the Marlins
dealt their best players, but he
told reporters last weekend he
will report to spring training and
is ready to play in Miami. The
Houston Astros are also reportedly keen on Realmuto, but perhaps he will stay in South Florida.
In the meantime, the Nationals made less explosive transactional moves Tuesday, announcing 21 non-roster invitees to
spring training.
Seventeen were players signed
to minor league deals with invitations to spring training. The
other four are minor leaguers
invited to participate in big
league camp. They will join the
40 players on Washington’s 40man roster to bring the total for
spring training to 61.
Of the 21 non-roster invitees,
12 are pitchers and nine are
position players. The former include left-hander Bryan Harper,
Bryce’s brother; right-hander
Jaron Long, hitting coach Kevin
Long’s son; and right-hander
Edwin Jackson, a journeyman
who will compete for the fifth
spot in the rotation with A.J. Cole
and Erick Fedde. That’s if the
Nationals don’t fill out their
top-flight starting rotation with
another premier arm. The possibility remains.
The other non-roster pitchers
invited: RHP Brady Dragmire,
RHP David Goforth, RHP Roman
Mendez, RHP Chris Smith, RHP
Cesar Vargas, RHP Jimmy Cordero (minor leaguer), LHP Tim
Collins, LHP Ismael Guillon and
LHP Tommy Milone.
The non-roster position players: Montero, C Jhonatan Solano,
C Taylor Gushue (minor leaguer),
C Spencer Kieboom (minor
leaguer), IF Reid Brignac, IF
Chris Dominguez, IF Osvaldo
Abreu (minor leaguer), OF Ryan
Raburn and OF Moises Sierra.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
BASEBALL NOTES
Orioles, Gausman avoid arbitration
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The Baltimore Orioles avoided
an arbitration hearing with righthander Kevin Gausman, agreeing
Tuesday to a $5.6 million, one-year
contract.
Gausman had asked for
$6,225,000 and the Orioles had
submitted $5.3 million when proposed salaries were swapped last
month, making the settlement
$162,500 below the midpoint. He
earned $3.45 million last year.
His deal includes bonuses of
$50,000 each for 25, 30 and 33
starts; $50,000 if he makes the
all-star team; and $50,000 if he
earns a Gold Glove.
With the agreement, Baltimore
avoided arbitration with all seven
arbitration-eligible players.
Gausman, 27, went 11-12 with a
4.68 ERA last season, making a
career-high 34 starts with a personal-best 179 strikeouts. He is
34-43 with a 4.18 ERA in five seasons, all with the Orioles.
ARBITRATION:
Collin
McHugh became the second
pitcher on the World Series champion Astros to go to salary arbitration, and White Sox outfielder Avisail Garcia also went to a hearing.
McHugh asked for a raise from
$3.85 million to $5 million during
Tuesday’s hearing. Houston argued for a $4.55 million salary.
Garcia requested a hike from $3
million to $6.7 million rather than
Chicago’s $5.85 million offer.
Players lead 7-6 with decisions
to be announced Thursday for
McHugh and pitchers Marcus
Stroman, Jake Odorizzi and Trevor Bauer. Four more hearings are
scheduled, and 22 decisions
would be the most since players
won 14 of 24 cases in 1990.
McHugh, a 30-year-old righthander, was 5-2 with a 3.55 ERA in
12 starts last season. Garcia, 26,
was a first-time all-star last year,
when he was second in the American League with a .330 average
and had 18 homers and 80 RBI.
DODGERS: Los Angeles
Manager Dave Roberts announced that Clayton Kershaw
will make his club-record eighth
Opening Day start, against the visiting Giants on March 29.
Roberts made the announcement as pitchers and catchers reported to spring training with the
defending NL champions.
Don Drysdale and Don Sutton
each made seven Opening Day
starts for the Dodgers.
ATHLETICS: Oakland catcher Bruce Maxwell said he no longer will kneel for the national anthem as he did last season as a
rookie, when he became the first
major leaguer to do so following
the lead of many NFL players.
Maxwell, 27, was arrested in
October after a food delivery person alleged he pointed a gun at
her. He hit .237 with three home
runs and 22 RBI last season.
PADRES: San Diego placed
reliever Jose Torres on the restricted list and said he won’t report for
spring training because of a pending court case stemming from his
arrest in December.
Torres pleaded not guilty Jan. 9
to charges including felony aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and misdemeanor recklessly
defacing or damaging property of
another person.
ANGELS: Tuesday was the reporting day for Los Angeles pitchers and catchers in Tempe, Ariz.,
but two-way Japanese standout
Shohei Ohtani already had been
working out at the team’s complex
for a week. He is expected to meet
with reporters Wednesday after
the Angels’ first official workout.
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KINGS 114, MAVERICKS
109: Zach Randolph scored 22
points, and Sacramento used a big
first half to secure a win in Dallas.
Bogdan Bogdanovich added 19
points for the Kings, who have
won four of five in Dallas after
losing 22 in a row there from 2003
to 2016. Seven Kings scored in
double figures.
J.J. Barea led the Mavericks
with 19 points.
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D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Darvish introduction is better late than never for lagging free agent market
BY
D AVE S HEININ
mesa, ariz. — For the Chicago
Cubs, one of those silly-but-great
February traditions — the firstday-of-spring-training news conference with the triumvirate of
Manager Joe Maddon, General
Manager Jed Hoyer and team
President Theo Epstein — found
itself, by necessity, usurped by one
of those silly-but-great traditions
that typically come in December
or January: the unveiling, complete with the ceremonial donning of cap and uniform, of the
team’s shiny, new, high-priced acquisition.
And so, Tuesday afternoon, a
roughly 20-foot-by-30-foot room
set up as workspace for about 15
media members found itself
crammed with nearly 100 people
— dozens of journalists from Chicago and Japan, the Cubs’ brass, a
couple of agents and the person
chiefly responsible for this mashup of winter and spring rites:
right-handed pitcher Yu Darvish.
There is a reason elite free
agents generally are not unveiled
on the first day of spring training.
In almost every previous offseason, players the caliber of Darvish
— whose six-year, $126 million
deal with the Cubs was made official Tuesday — have typically
signed their contracts in December, or January at the latest. They
have traveled to the team’s home
city, met the media there and become familiar enough to the fan
base that their arrival in camp the
following spring is little more than
a footnote.
But this was no typical offseason, and Darvish’s introductory
news conference, which bled over
into the welcome-to-spring media
session with Maddon, Hoyer and
Epstein, contained an uncomfortable underpinning of the sort that
is certain to be one of the biggest
story lines in the game,
leaguewide, this spring — the result of the unprecedented slowmoving nature of this winter’s free
agent market and the labor unrest
it has engendered.
“I’ve always said if there is no
team that meets our requirement,”
Darvish, 31, said through a translator, referring to the contract negotiations over the previous
weeks, “I’m ready to retire.”
Darvish said it with a sly smile,
and it is safe to assume he was
joking. But with dozens of free
agents still unemployed on the
day camps opened in Arizona and
Florida, the slow pace and the
accumulating data points of this
talent marketplace are no laughing matter. While Darvish is the
first player this winter to get either
a six-year or nine-figure contract,
he received less in average annual
value than most thought he would
get back in November.
The Cubs, one of a handful of
large-market teams whose insistence on remaining below the
$197 million luxury-tax threshold
has contributed to the slowdown,
all but acknowledged they got a
massive bargain with Darvish as
his price dropped throughout the
winter. They didn’t even meet formally with his agents until midDecember and didn’t engage fully
until it was clear he would fit
within their defined budget.
“Early in the offseason we
didn’t think it was very realistic”
to sign Darvish, Epstein said. “ . . .
We had a lot of needs to fill in the
pitching staff, and like all teams
we have a budget, and we needed
to figure out a way to add the
talent depth that we needed but
also stay on target with our shortand long-term financial planning
as well.”
But around the second week of
December, Epstein said, “We got
to a point, just in assessing the
market . . . that we might end up at
least being a contender for
Darvish [with] a contract we could
fit into our short-term plan and
our long-term plan.”
Asked if he thought this winter’s slow-moving market would
become the new norm, Hoyer
said: “I hope not. None of us have
ever experienced an offseason
where we signed Darvish on the
first day of spring training and
that’s not a late signing. For a lot of
reasons, it’s a lot better if things
happen quicker.”
Other than the date and the
setting, the Cubs’ unveiling of
their latest acquisition was largely
unremarkable. Darvish spoke of
how much he admired the organization. The Cubs gushed about his
ability and makeup, and they
downplayed concerns over his elbow surgery three years ago and
his twin meltdowns for the Los
Angeles Dodgers in the World Series three months ago.
“He’s a different cat,” Maddon
said. “Not many guys that tall,
with that delivery and that command — not many people combine
all those elements . . . I mean, this
guy’s got so many weapons.”
Elsewhere, across Arizona and
Florida, teams were opening
camps without players who will
eventually become major pieces.
The coming weeks undoubtedly
will feature additional silly-butgreat — and uncomfortable — free
agent unveilings.
Darvish’s signing may have felt
unnaturally late, and by historical
standards it was. But by the standards of fellow big-name free
agents such as Jake Arrieta, J.D.
Martinez and Eric Hosmer, all of
them still unsigned, it was enviously early.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
Terrapins’ skid on road
Derrickson scores 27 points to power the Hoyas
reaches seven games
COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP
NEBRASKA 70,
MARYLAND 66
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
lincoln, neb. — Maryland
guard Kevin Huerter had experienced this so many times this season, but that didn’t leave him looking any less devastated after Tuesday night’s 70-66 loss to Nebraska.
The Terrapins’ seventh straight
road loss followed a similar script,
with Maryland clawing back from
a slow start to the second half,
overcoming heavy foul trouble
and its own limitations to position
itself for a potential win in the
final minutes. It has been played
on a loop. But Tuesday’s game
finished like so many of those
previous losses had — with Maryland unable to get critical stops
down the stretch and muster a
clutch offensive set in the last
minute.
Huerter still had a chance when
he went to the free throw line with
two seconds remaining. His team
trailed by three, and he had two
shots. He needed to connect on the
first and miss the second to give
the Terrapins a chance at a potential offensive rebound and a gametying basket. Only part of that
sequence happened. He made the
first and missed the second, and
after Nebraska corralled the rebound, Huerter was forced to
commit his fifth and final foul. He
staggered back to the bench as
Maryland lost its eighth game by
six points or fewer. He looked to be
in a haze as he walked to Maryland’s bus afterward, when his
coach and teammates did their
best to articulate the frustration.
“We keep competing out here
and losing by three or four,” Maryland Coach Mark Turgeon said.
“We’re just tired of it,” freshman
forward Bruno Fernando said.
“It’s like we can’t get away from
it,” said sophomore guard Anthony Cowan Jr., who finished with
seven points and seven assists on a
night when he was upstaged by his
former teammate at St. John’s College High, James Palmer Jr., who
finished with 26 points and five
assists. That performance was bolstered by the foul trouble of two of
Maryland’s best defenders, Huerter and freshman Darryl Morsell,
both of whom had picked up their
fourth fouls with more than seven
minutes still remaining.
But that Turgeon had to bench
both of those players for long
stretches was far from the only
issue. Maryland collectively struggled again on the defensive end
early in the second half, surrendering a 9-0 run that gave Nebraska a lead it would never relinquish.
And the final minute of the
game encapsulated a season’s
worth of issues. After clawing
back from a seven-point deficit —
mostly on the back of Fernando,
who scored nine points in the final
6:43 alone — Maryland trailed by
just one point and retained pos-
session after Fernando came up
with a block with 1:16 left. Turgeon
called a timeout to draw up a play.
He wanted a back-door feed to
Huerter. Nebraska closed it off.
The ball eventually swung to Cowan, who looked for Fernando in
the post. That, too, wasn’t there.
So Cowan pulled up for three and
had his shot blocked by Nebraska’s Glynn Watson Jr.
Afterward, Turgeon was asked
what he wanted out of that possession:
“Not that, obviously,” he said.
On the next possession, Watson
missed his own three-pointer but
Nebraska came up with an offensive rebound that led to two made
free throws by forward Isaiah
Roby. In a game where the stats
were identical in so many major
categories — Maryland shot 48.3
percent, Nebraska hit 45.5 percent; the Huskers had 10 turnovers, the Terrapins had nine —
that play was symbolic of the difference. Nebraska shot 10 more
free throws (making 13 of 19) and
had four more rebounds, including 10 on the offensive end.
“We’ve been working so hard,”
Fernando said. “Every single game
we’ve been fighting and giving our
best, and we’re just coming up
short.”
Maryland’s 32-30 halftime lead
marked the first time since Jan. 15
it had held a lead on the road — it
blew a 10-point lead to Michigan
that night — and the Terrapins’
body language looked markedly
different as they walked back to
the locker room. This was only a
two-point advantage, but it still
felt different than halftime of the
previous three road losses, when
Maryland had trailed by a combined 20 points at the break.
That optimism immediately
waned early in the second half,
when Huerter picked up his third
foul after just 47 seconds.
Maryland pulled within four on
a finish by Fernando with 6:43 left,
but the Terrapins’ defense continued to struggle closing out on
Nebraska’s shooters down the
stretch. Palmer hit a three-pointer
to push the lead to seven, and after
Fernando answered with another
finish, Palmer responded with another jumper. Then came the fateful final minutes, when so many
series seemed familiar.
“I thought we were going to get
over the hump tonight,” Turgeon
said. “We had the ball with 40
seconds to go, down one. We just
couldn’t get a shot.”
Huerter (12 points) cut the lead
back to one with a layup with 11
seconds left, and Nebraska was
able to burn five seconds before
Watson hit two more free throws
to push the lead back to three.
Huerter brought the ball up and
was fouled near half-court with
two seconds left. His intentions
were clear. They didn’t work out.
The locker room fell into a familiar silence afterward.
“Like it is after every loss. It’s
quiet. Nobody wants to talk,” Cowan said. “All we can do is move on.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
JOHN PETERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maryland’s Bruno Fernando, contested by Nebraska’s Isaiah Roby
(15), finished with 21 points, nine rebounds and five assists.
GEORGETOWN 87,
BUTLER 83
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Marcus Derrickson tied a career high with 27 points, hitting 11
of his 13 shots, for his eighth 20plus point game this season, and
Georgetown beat Butler, 87-83, on
Tuesday night in Indianapolis.
After Georgetown missed two
free throws, Kamar Baldwin made
a scoop shot in the lane and Sean
McDermott stole the inbounds
pass, leading to another Baldwin
basket to pull Butler to 84-81 with
1:29 to go.
Butler had a chance to tie it in
the closing seconds, but Baldwin’s
long three-pointer was short and
Jahvon Blair sealed it at the line
with 4.5 seconds left.
Jessie Govan had his 12th double-double of the season with 17
points and 12 rebounds for
Georgetown (15-10, 5-9 Big East).
Trey Dickerson, a senior averaging
3.5 points per game, set a career
high in the first half with 12 points
and finished with 18.
Kelan Martin had 22 points and
eight rebounds to reach 20 points
for the 17th time this season for
Butler (17-10, 7-7).
RHODE
ISLAND 85, RICH-
MOND 67: Jared Terrell had 17
points, and the No. 16 Rams extended their winning streak to 16
games by beating the Spiders in
Kingston, R.I.
The Rams (21-3, 13-0 Atlantic
10) now have the longest singleseason streak in school history.
Richmond fell to 9-16, 7-6.
Spartans win ninth straight
Jaren Jackson Jr. scored a career-high 27 points on 10-for-14
shooting for second-ranked Michigan State, and the Spartans
cruised to their ninth consecutive
victory by beating Minnesota, 8757, in Minneapolis.
The Spartans (25-3, 13-2 Big
Ten) notched their best 28-game
record under Coach Tom Izzo and
pulled within a half-game of firstplace Ohio State in the conference.
Isaiah Washington scored 18
points for the Gophers (14-14,
3-12), who lost their eighth
straight game.
TEXAS TECH 88, OKLAHOMA 78: In Lubbock, Tex.,
Keenan Evans scored 26 points,
and the No. 7 Red Raiders held off
the No. 23 Sooners in Division I
scoring leader Trae Young’s first
college game in the city where he
was born.
Young, the son of former Texas
Tech player Rayford Young,
missed all nine three-pointers
while finishing with 19 points as
the Sooners (16-9, 6-7 Big 12) lost
their fourth straight.
The Red Raiders (22-4, 10-3)
won their seventh straight game.
KANSAS 83, IOWA STATE
77: Udoka Azubuike scored 19
points, Malik Newman had 17 and
the No. 13 Jayhawks defeated the
Cyclones in Ames, Iowa.
Lagerald Vick added 16 points
for Kansas (20-6, 9-4 Big 12). Iowa
State fell to 13-12, 4-9.
TENNESSEE 70, SOUTH
CAROLINA 67: In Knoxville,
Tenn., Grant Williams scored 22
points and made a big basket in
the closing seconds as the No. 18
Volunteers (19-6, 9-4 Southeastern Conference) handed the
Gamecocks (13-13, 4-9) their sixth
straight loss.
MISSOURI 62, TEXAS
A&M 58: Kassius Robertson
scored 16 points, Jordan Barnett
added 15 and the Tigers (18-8, 8-5
SEC) defeated the No. 21 Aggies
(17-9, 6-7) in Columbia, Mo.
No. 3 Baylor women roll
Kalani Brown scored 20 points
and added 23 rebounds, and Dekeiya Cohen totaled 20 points and
11 boards to help lead No. 3 Baylor
to an 87-45 victory over No. 21
Oklahoma State in Stillwater,
Okla.
The Lady Bears (24-1, 14-0 Big
12) won their 21st straight game.
The Cowgirls fell to 18-7, 9-5.
Newly minted No. 1 Cavaliers hold o≠ Hurricanes
CAVALIERS FROM D1
the ACC tournament and moved
that much closer to a third regular season conference championship under Bennett.
Starting guard Kyle Guy added
13 points, making 5 of 9 shots, in
front of an announced crowd of
7,333. It was a far more efficient
showing than when the sophomore went 5 for 21 in Saturday’s
61-60 overtime loss to visiting
Virginia Tech.
Virginia beat the Hurricanes
for just the second time in nine
meetings on the road, limiting
Miami (18-7, 7-6) to 38 percent
shooting, including 6 for 21 (29
percent) from three-point range.
Freshman guard Chris Lykes
(Gonzaga High) scored 19 points
for Miami in a game the Cavaliers never trailed. No other Miami player had more than eight
points.
“Some of the credit has to go to
Virginia’s defense,” Hurricanes
Coach Jim Larranaga said. “They
have that reputation for a very
good reason. They’re very good at
what they do, and you have to be
patient and very well disciplined.”
An 11-point lead at intermission shrunk to 29-26 when Virginia committed four turnovers
early in the second half. The
Hurricanes capitalized by going
on a 10-2 run, with eight points
coming on the fast break when
Virginia was unable to get its
defense set.
The uncharacteristically sloppy stretch compelled Bennett to
call a timeout with 14:20 left.
Virginia emerged from the stoppage with baskets by Hunter and
Mamadi Diakite to bump the
margin to 33-26.
Hunter also had a four-point
play in the closing minutes that
expanded the lead to 55-38, Virginia’s largest of the game.
A second trip to the Sunshine
State for Virginia in less than a
week after its win over Florida
State on Wednesday marked the
culmination of an emotionally
draining 72 hours as well as a
third road game in its last four
heading into a week off.
Following a loss to their contentious in-state rival in Charlottesville, the Cavaliers, then
ranked second, spoke about how
gratifying it might have been to
take over the No. 1 position, with
Bennett and players figuring it
would go to another top-five
program such as Michigan State
that had escaped a week of
upsets.
Then on Monday afternoon,
ERIC ESPADA/GETTY IMAGES
Redshirt freshman De’Andre Hunter, shooting over Miami’s Dewan Huell, had 22 points for Virginia.
the Associated Press released the
latest rankings with Virginia,
unexpectedly, at No. 1.
Thus the Cavaliers became the
first team since the AP poll began
in 1948-49 to rise to No. 1 after
losing in the previous week. Virginia received 30 first-place
votes, and the No. 2 Spartans got
21.
“I was kind of surprised because we dropped a game Saturday, but I know some other teams
did,” Bennett said. “We beat Florida State early in the week. When
I found out right before practice,
I said to the guys, ‘Congrats.
You’re number one. Do you guys
know that?
“They looked at me like, ‘Of
course.’ ”
The last time Virginia held the
top spot was in late December
1982 behind center Ralph Sampson, a three-time national player
of the year. It began the season
there and won its first eight
games before losing to Chaminade, 77-72, during a Christmas
tournament in Honolulu in what
is regarded as one of the most
improbable upsets in college basketball history.
On the Cavaliers bench at the
time serving as an assistant to
then-coach Terry Holland was
Larranaga, who became Miami’s
head coach in 2011 after 14 seasons at George Mason.
Larranaga spent a significant
portion of the first half Tuesday
pacing in front of his bench as
Virginia opened a double-digit
lead, 26-12, during a 13-0 push
featuring three consecutive
three-pointers.
Hunter contributed seven
straight points in that time while
Virginia held the Hurricanes
scoreless for 7:21 and to just four
points over the final 9:25 of the
first half.
Miami missed 10 field goal
attempts in a row, and the Cavaliers took a 27-16 lead into the
locker room, marking the fewest
points they have allowed in the
first half this season.
“No way we wanted to lose two
in a row,” Hunter said. “So we just
had to fight and get a good win
on the road.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
WCAC BOYS’ BASKETBALL
Stags prevail to pull ahead of Eagles
DEMATHA 57,
GONZAGA 53
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
As the clock inside Gonzaga’s
gym in Northwest Washington
ticked below 20 seconds Tuesday
night, the DeMatha players rarely
dribbled.
They passed and ran. Passed
and ran.
The Stags spaced the floor and
followed one another’s movements so well that Gonzaga’s players, despite shouts for an intentional foul from Coach Steve Turner on the sideline, couldn’t create
contact.
About 15 seconds elapsed before the No. 3 Eagles committed a
foul and stopped the clock, but
with less than 10 seconds left, the
No. 2 Stags soon sealed a 57-53
win.
“We moved the ball, and that’s
one thing when we’re playing our
best basketball, our guys do that
very well,” DeMatha Coach Mike
Jones said. “Honestly, that’s just
guys with a great basketball IQ on
the floor.”
The victory avenged the Stags’
71-62 loss on their Hyattsville
court Jan. 11 and moved them one
game ahead of Gonzaga in the
Washington Catholic Athletic
Conference standings with two
games left in the regular season.
DeMatha will visit No. 1 Paul VI,
undefeated in conference play, on
Friday night.
“We lost on their senior night
last year,” center Hunter Dickinson said of the Panthers. “It’s going
to be their senior night this year, so
we’re going to come in with a lot of
energy and focus and try to ruin
their night.”
Dickinson led the Stags with 14
points Tuesday night, including
the first of the team’s three consecutive three-point-play opportunities during a pivotal second-quarter stretch.
DeMatha trailed 22-21 several
minutes into that period, but with
cohesive ball movement and suffocating defense, the Stags put
together a 16-4 run to enter halftime up by 11 points.
Gonzaga’s senior leader, guard
Myles Dread, who finished with a
game-high 17 points, had picked
up the Eagles’ first two fouls and
was on the bench during that
spurt. And forward Terrance Williams joined him late in the period.
But Jones said the Stags (23-4,
13-3) hadn’t shown that kind of
chemistry, urgency and control on
both ends of the court since the
beginning of the season.
“I was really happy to see that
from our guys,” Jones said. “We
were playing great in the beginning of the season and we kind of
hit a plateau, and now we’re climbing again.”
Jones’s theory for the restored
spirit?
“It’s getting close to the playoffs,” he said. “Our guys know
that’s just a whole different beast,
and if we’re not going to have
energy, you won’t last in the WCAC
playoffs for very long.”
In the fourth quarter, Gonzaga
(23-4, 12-4) outscored the Stags
14-6 and trailed by two with about
22 seconds remaining.
But after consecutive timeouts,
DeMatha spread its possession
around the court, and the Eagles
didn’t catch up in time.
callie.caplan@washpost.com
HOWARD COUNTY GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
Lions keep Lightning from striking
HOWARD 69,
LONG REACH 57
BY
MICHAEL ERRIGO
The longer the possession
went on, the louder the bench
cheered. As Long Reach’s guards
swung the ball around the perimeter, looking for lanes or
shots to no avail, Howard’s
coaches and reserves stood and
screamed.
The Lions’ only loss so far this
season had come against the
Lightning and its collection of
perimeter threats. On Tuesday,
in the long-awaited rematch,
they weren’t going to let Long
Reach beat them from the outside. That’s why the entire bench
stood on that long, ultimately
futile Long Reach possession in
the third quarter. To cheer on
good, solid defense.
“Absolutely zero space, that’s
what we wanted to do,” Coach
Scott Robinson said. “And it’s
easier said than done.”
The visiting No. 11 Lions used
their perimeter game plan and a
10-0 second-half run to pull away
from the No. 12 Lightning in a
69-57 win. The victory moves
them into a tie atop the Howard
County standings, which will
result in the two schools sharing
the regular season title if they
win out this week.
Both teams are expected to
win the rest of the way and claim
their co-share, as they have
emerged as the class of the
county this season. Entering
Tuesday, Howard (22-1, 14-1) had
won its previous three games by
an average of 39 points. For Long
Reach (15-2, 13-1), that number
was 26.
In their first meeting, on Jan.
3, a third-quarter run by Long
Reach broke open what had been
a close game. On Tuesday, senior
guard Madison Burris singlehandedly gave the Lions a similar lift, scoring the first eight
points of the second half. She hit
one deep three and then another.
On the next possession, her hot
hand drew an eager defender, so
Burris pumped and drove right
by her. Her easy floater from the
baseline extended the Lions’ lead
to 10.
“I just wanted to keep the
effort up in the third quarter,”
Burris said. “We really wanted
this one.”
Senior forward Taylor Addison scored 17 of her team-high 22
points in the second half. Long
Reach’s home-court advantage
and three-point shooting made
one last comeback feel inevitable. But Addison got a basket
or a trip to the line whenever her
team needed it, using a quick
first step to get by her defender
in the paint.
“I was trying to do what was
best for our team,” Addison said.
“If we’re making shots from the
outside then I’m going to pass it
out, but Long Reach started
closing out, so if I’m not being
guarded I’m going to take it.”
Junior Lyric Swann led Long
Reach with 19 points. She hit all
three of her three-pointers in the
first quarter, before the Lions
implemented their perimeter defense and brought their bench to
its feet.
“Our bench is amazing,” Addison said. “They had a lot of fans.
But even if they have 100, we
always have our 12. I heard our
bench way more than I heard the
crowd.”
michael.errigo@washpost.com
DCSAA INDOOR TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS
Holman shines, but St. John’s sweeps
BY
M IA O ’ N EILL
Ziyah Holman had a simple
mantra going into Tuesday’s D.C.
State Athletic Association indoor
track championships: “Run as
fast as you can, keep the pace,
bring it home.”
It seems to have worked. The
Georgetown Day sophomore had
an afternoon to remember at
Prince George’s Sports and
Learning Complex in Landover,
setting a pair of meet records in
the girls’ 300 and 500 meters.
Having already smashed the
meet’s previous standard in the
300 with a blistering 39.88, Holman kept close behind St. John’s
junior Alahna Sabbakhan for
much of the 500, then made her
move and pulled away in the final
straightaway to win the event
with a record-setting time of
1:15.00.
“It feels amazing. My team and
I have been working so hard this
season, and it’s finally paying off,
which is great,” said Holman,
who also anchored the Hoppers
to a first-place finish in the girls’
4x400 relay.
Archbishop Carroll senior
Ethan Fogle also had a stellar
outing, winning the boys’ 300
(34.86) and 55 (6.56) and setting
a meet record with a first-place
finish in the 500 (1:05.31).
“I didn’t know I did it at first,”
Fogle said. “I ran so confident
and I ran so relaxed. I didn’t even
know I was that close.”
St. John’s won both the girls’
and boys’ team titles with 119 and
103 points, respectively. Cadets
first-year Coach Desmond Dunham said he thinks a lot of his
team’s success comes from its
depth, and he emphasized how
he has worked to recruit athletes
from other sports.
“I think we quadrupled the
size of our team from last year,”
Dunham said. “We have a lot of
dual-sport athletes that proved to
be very successful. We guarantee
that we’re going to get them
faster and stronger, and it’s a
two-way street — they can help
us.”
St. John’s was bolstered by
strong performances in relays,
winning the boys’ 4x200 and
girls’ 4x800. Sabbakhan won the
girls’ 800 in a meet record time of
2:20.95, while Nicole Taylor and
Brandon Osazuwa were victorious for the Cadets in the high
jump. Cam Goode, a defensive
lineman for the Cadets who will
play football for Virginia Tech
next season, won the shot put.
Carroll finished second in the
girls’ competition with 103
points, followed closely by Wilson (102). On the boys’ side,
Gonzaga was runner-up with 92
points, ahead of Wilson (60).
Gonzaga’s Gavin McElhennon
won the boys’ 3,200 (10:01.75),
while teammate David Giannini
staged a furious comeback in the
final straightaway of the boys’
1,600, finishing first in 4:28.25, a
half-second ahead of secondplace finisher Luke Tewalt. (Giannini also broke a meet record
in the boys’ 800, along with
Wilson’s Isaac Frumkin.)
Wilson sophomore Ava Nicely
also impressed, winning both the
girls’ 1,600 (5:41.49) and 3,200
(12:00.95) ahead of teammate
Allie O’Brien.
“I was really excited, because
we worked really hard this season,” Nicely said. “We weren’t
sure what the competition was
going to be, so I kind of had to
run my own race. But it went
well.”
mia.oneill@washpost.com
D5
M2
Congress seeks answers
for Nassar abuse scandal
USOC, Michigan State,
USA Gymnastics offer
responses on their roles
BY
W ILL H OBSON
A month after the emotional
statements of 156 accusers at the
sentencing hearing for former
Michigan State University and
USA Gymnastics physician Larry
Nassar re-ignited outrage on
Capitol Hill, three congressional
inquiries are underway focused
on how Nassar escaped detection
for so long, with a fourth potentially starting next year.
This week, the first responses
from the institutions through
which Nassar accessed victims —
Michigan State, USA Gymnastics
and the U.S. Olympic Committee
— were made public. They offer
the most complete picture to
date of how these organizations
probably will defend themselves,
in lawsuits and ongoing congressional inquiries, against claims
they ignored or enabled Nassar’s
abuse.
The three letters, which
Sen. Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) of the
Senate Commerce Committee released late Monday, portray Nassar as a particularly insidious
child molester.
For decades, Nassar masked
his abuse as legitimate pain
therapy that gave him a reason to
be touching patients near their
genitals. He finally was brought
down in 2016, when a victim told
her story to a newspaper, resulting in dozens of girls and women
across the country, many of them
realizing for the first time what
they had thought was medical
treatment was actually sexual
assault, contacting law enforcement.
Here’s what these institutions
said to inquiries from Sens. Moran and Richard Blumenthal (DConn.) about what they knew
about Nassar, and when:
Michigan State: The university defended itself against
claims it ignored complaints as
far back as 1997 by stating that,
before 2016, allegations of complaints ignored were made to
people who have said they don’t
remember them or don’t remember them being made as precisely
as some victims claim.
Six women have said they
complained about Nassar to
Michigan State officials between
1997 and 2004; those officials
were a gymnastics coach, a track
coach, three trainers and a professor. Former Michigan State
gymnastics coach Kathie Klages,
accused by two women of ignoring their complaints in 1997, has
denied these allegations through
her attorney. The professor —
Gary Stollak, a psychologist who
heard a girl allege sex abuse as
part of his private practice — has
testified he had a stroke and
doesn’t recall the incident.
As for the other coaches and
trainers, Michigan State wrote:
“past and present MSU employees have said that they do not
remember the alleged reports to
them (some of which would have
taken place as many as 20 years
ago) as they have been described.”
In 2014, a former Michigan
State student’s complaint that
Nassar had touched her in a
sexual manner on her buttocks,
on her breasts and near her
LEE JIN-MAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The USOC told Congress that its chief executive, Scott Blackmun,
was informed of the allegations against Larry Nassar in July 2015.
vagina prompted investigations
by both the university’s Title IX
office and Michigan State police.
In its response to the Senate
Commerce Committee, Michigan
State emphasized that this woman did not allege penetration, as
many other victims later would.
Michigan State’s Title IX office
cleared Nassar, concluding the
woman misinterpreted treatment. Police turned their findings over to the local prosecutor’s
office, which declined to press
charges.
In July 2015, in perhaps an
indication of his brazenness,
Nassar openly discussed with a
colleague that USA Gymnastics
was investigating him over concerns expressed by gymnasts
over his techniques. The colleague, whom the university has
identified in other documents as
former physician Brooke Lemmen, did not tell anyone else at
Michigan State. Lemmen’s attorney has explained she did not
inform others because she was
not aware Nassar was under
investigation for any crimes, just
that the Olympic organization
was reviewing the type of treatment he provided.
In August 2016, another woman filed a complaint with Michigan State police alleging Nassar
digitally penetrated her years
prior during a medical exam. The
woman, Rachael Denhollander,
then contacted the Indianapolis
Star, and a subsequent story
resulted in dozens more girls and
woman contacting law enforcement.
“To date, there has been no
indication that any MSU employee understood at any time
prior to September 2016 that
Nassar engaged in sexual misconduct. As noted earlier, MSU
continues to investigate and may
learn more as part of the litigation discovery process,” the university wrote.
USA Gymnastics: In her letter, USA Gymnastics chief executive Kerry Perry included a timeline that the organization — in
varying levels of detail — has
filled in since Nassar’s arrest in
November 2016.
In June 2015, a coach contacted a top official at USA Gymnastics headquarters in Indianapolis “regarding her athlete being
uncomfortable with treatment
she had received,” Perry wrote.
Over the next five weeks, USA
Gymnastics conducted an internal investigation, identified two
other athletes who expressed
concern about Nassar’s treatment and decided to contact the
FBI.
On July 28, 2015, former chief
executive Steve Penny and two
other USA Gymnastics officials
met with agents in the FBI’s
Indianapolis office.
“USA Gymnastics was assured
by the FBI that it was the
appropriate agency to contact
and that USA Gymnastics had
handled the matter correctly,”
Perry wrote. Agents also asked
USA Gymnastics “not to take any
steps that would interfere with
their investigation,” a directive
the organization has cited as to
why it did not inform officials at
Michigan State.
Initially, USA Gymnastics offered to assist the FBI in contacting more athletes, but in late
August or September 2015, Perry
wrote, agents in Indianapolis
said the investigation had been
transferred to the FBI’s Detroit
office. In April 2016, “concern
arose to the perceived lack of
progress,” Perry wrote, and USA
Gymnastics contacted the Los
Angeles office of the FBI, reporting the exact same information it
had given agents in Indianapolis
the year before.
The FBI has never publicly
explained the pace of its investigation into Nassar.
USOC: In its letter, a lawyer
for the USOC wrote that the
organization is not aware of any
complaints about Nassar to
USOC officials before a July 2015
conversation between Penny, the
former USA Gymnastics CEO,
and Scott Blackmun, chief executive of the USOC. In this discussion, Penny informed Blackmun
that three athletes had made
complaints about Nassar and
that he intended to inform law
enforcement.
“Mr. Blackmun agreed that the
matter needed to be reported
immediately to law enforcement,” wrote Brian D. Smith, an
attorney with Covington law
firm.
Sens.
Jeanne
Shaheen
(D-N.H.) and Joni Ernst (R-Iowa)
have called for Blackmun to
resign for “inaction,” an apparent reference to Blackmun not
following up with Penny to ensure he contacted Michigan
State. The senators are also seeking to launch a select Senate
committee inquiry into the Nassar case some time in 2019.
In addition to the congressional inquiries, the USOC has
launched its own investigation
into Nassar’s abuse, which is
being conducted by two federal
prosecutors who work for Ropes
& Gray law firm, Smith wrote. At
its conclusion, the USOC plans to
make the Ropes & Gray report
public.
will.hobson@washpost.com
D.C.
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
scoreboard
OLY M P I CS
BASKETBALL
H I GH S C HOOLS
HOCKEY
Women's Hockey
Snowboard
NBA
NHL
Results
Prince George’s
PRELIMINARY ROUND
WOMEN'S HALFPIPE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
BOYS' BASKETBALL
OXON HILL 76, CROSSLAND 41
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
SEED 61, Washington Latin 51
MARYLAND
Bethesda-Chevy Chase 74, Sherwood 59
Blake 67, Blair 45
Clarksburg 57, Poolesville 45
Douglass 57, Surrattsville 43
Einstein 60, Damascus 48
Fairmont Heights 74, Gwynn Park 54
Gaithersburg 86, Springbrook 77
Kennedy 75, Quince Orchard 67
Long Reach 59, Howard 52
Oakland Mills 70, River Hill 65
Oakland Mills 70, River Hill 65
Oxon Hill 76, Crossland 41
Paint Branch 90, Magruder 55
Potomac (Md.) 97, Central 58
Richard Montgomery 65, Churchill 55
Rockville 49, Walter Johnson 46
Whitman 57, Seneca Valley 56
Wise 71, DuVal 62
Wootton 76, Northwood 55
VIRGINIA
Herndon 36, Langley 29
Oakton 58, Chantilly 55
Potomac (Va.) 60, Forest Park 59
Edison 60, Stuart 33
Osbourn 65, Stonewall Jackson 62
Madison County 50, George Mason 46
PRIVATE
Carroll 49, Bishop Ireton 46
DeMatha 57, Gonzaga 53
Hebrew Academy 59, Washington Christian 27
Jewish Day 45, Grace Brethren 43
Maret 69, St. Andrew's 59
O'Connell 89, St. John's 82
Paul VI 65, McNamara 32
Potomac School 73, Episcopal 69
OH (12-9) Kane 17, Taylor 12, Polite 11, Stephens 8, Love
8, Bile 4, Gorham 4, Miller 3, Parker 3, Snider 3, Curry 2,
Howerton 1 Totals 25 14-21 76.
C (3-15) Lancaster 10, Jackson 9, Herrod 7, Queen 6,
Holland 5, Squire 4 Totals 10 12-19 41.
Halftime: Oxon Hill, (35-26).
Three-point goals: C 3 (Lancaster 1, Jackson 2); OH 4
(Snider 1, Parker 1, Love 2)
Group A
Group A
W
Canada...........................2
United States................2
Finland ..........................0
OA Russia .....................0
Group B
Group B
W
Sweden......................... 2
Switzerland.................. 2
Japan ............................ 0
Korea ............................ 0
L
0
0
2
2
OTW OTL Pts GF GA
0
0 6 9 1
0
0 6 8 1
0
0 0 2 7
0
0 0 0 10
L
0
0
2
2
OTW OTL Pts GF GA
0
0 6 10 1
0
0 6 11 1
0
0 0 2 5
0
0 0 0 16
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Final Ranking
1. Chloe Kim, United States, (93.75; 41.5; 98.25) 98.25.
2. Liu Jiayu, China, (85.5; 89.75; 49.0) 89.75.
3. Arielle Gold, United States, (10.5; 74.75; 85.75) 85.75.
4. Kelly Clark, United States, (76.25; 81.75; 83.5) 83.5.
5. Cai Xuetong, China, (20.5; 41.25; 76.5) 76.5.
6. Haruna Matsumoto, Japan, (70.0; 46.25; 65.75) 70.0.
7. Queralt Castellet, Spain, (59.75; 67.75; 43.75) 67.75.
8. Sena Tomita, Japan, (65.25; 34.5; 60.5) 65.25.
9. Mirabelle Thovex, France, (59.5; 30.25; 63.0) 63.0.
10. Sophie Rodriguez, France, (50.5; 14.75; 13.75) 50.5.
11. Emily Arthur, Australia, (48.25; 9.25; 25.0) 48.25.
12. Maddie Mastro, United States, (14.0; 7.5; 6.5) 14.0.
MEN'S HALFPIPE
Sweden 2, Japan 1
Switzerland 8, Korea 0
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Final Rankings
(Top 12 qualify for finals)
1. Shaun White, United States, (94.25; 55.0; 97.75)
97.75.
2. Ayumu Hirano, Japan, (35.25; 95.25; 43.25) 95.25.
3. Scott James, Australia, (92.0; 81.75; 40.25) 92.00.
4. Ben Ferguson, United States, (43.0; 83.5; 90.75) 90.75.
5. Patrick Burgener, Switzerland, (84.0; 51.0; 89.75)
89.75.
6. Chase Josey, United States, (87.75; 52.25; 88.0) 88.00.
7. Raibu Katayama, Japan, (85.75; 25.0; 87.0) 87.00.
8. Jake Pates, United States, (47.0; 82.25; 27.0) 82.25.
9. Jan Scherrer, Switzerland, (31.25; 80.5; 70.75) 80.5.
10. Kent Callister, Australia, (20.0; 62.0; 56.75) 62.0.
11. Yuto Totsuka, Japan, (39.25; 7.0; DNS) 39.25.
12. Peetu Piiroinen, Finland, (4.5; 12.75; 13.5) 13.50.
Korea vs. Japan, 2:30 a.m.
United States vs. Canada, 10
Curling
THURSDAY’S GAME
MIXED DOUBLES
OA Russia vs. Finland, 2:30 a.m.
BRONZE MEDAL
OA Russia ...................... 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 — 8
Norway .......................... 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 — 4
Olympic Athlete from Russia
Team Shots: 40, Team Points: 130, Team Percentage: 81.
Aleksandr Krushelnitckii, Shots: 17, Points: 54, Percentage: 79.
Anastasia Bryzgalova, Shots: 23, Points: 76, Percentage:
83.
Norway
Team Shots: 40, Team Points: 103, Team Percentage: 64.
Magnus Nedregotten, Shots: 24, Points: 62, Percentage:
65.
Kristin Skaslien, Shots: 16, Points: 41, Percentage: 64.
GOLD MEDAL
Switzerland .................... 0 2 0 1 0 0 — 3
Canada ............................ 2 0 4 0 2 2 — 10
Switzerland
Team Shots: 30, Team Points: 80, Team Percentage: 67.
Jenny Perret, Shots: 12, Points: 36, Percentage: 75.
Martin Rios, Shots: 18, Points: 44, Percentage: 61.
Canada
Team Shots: 29, Team Points: 92, Team Percentage: 79.
Kaitlyn Lawes, Shots: 11, Points: 32, Percentage: 73.
John Morris, Shots: 18, Points: 60, Percentage: 83.
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
United States 3, Finland 1
Canada 5, OA Russia 0
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Switzerland 3, Japan 1
Sweden 8, Korea 0
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Canada 4, Finland 1
United States 5, OA Russia 0
Sweden vs. Switzerland, 10
United States 5, OA Russia 0
UNITED STATES ...................... 1
OA RUSSIA .............................. 0
3
0
1 —
0 —
5
0
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, United States, Kacey Bellamy (Jocelyne
Lamoureux-Davidson, Gigi Marvin), 8:02. Penalties:
Kendall Coyne, USA (holding), 13:41.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, United States, Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson, 11:46. 3, United States, Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson, 11:52. 3, United States, Gigi Marvin (Amanda
Pelkey, Meghan Duggan), 14:38. Penalties: Nina Pirogova, OAR (cross-checking), 7:32; Maria Batalova, OAR
(slashing), 15:04; Maria Batalova, OAR (high-sticking),
18:44.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, United States, Hannah Brandt (Dani Cameranesi, Megan Keller), 18:23. Penalties: None.
SHOTS ON GOAL
UNITED STATES ...................... 7
24
19
50
OA RUSSIA .............................. 2
7
4
13
Goalies: United States, Nicole Hensley. OA Russia,
Valeria Tarakanova and Nadezhda Morozova.
Canada 4, Finland 1
Canada .................... 2
Finland .................... 0
2
0
0
1
—
—
4
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Canada, Meghan Agosta (Melodie Daoust),
:35. 2, Canada, Marie-Philip Poulin, 17:11. Penalties:
Susanna Tapani, Fin (illegal hit), 3:32; Natalie Spooner,
Can (illegal hit), 5:22; Jennifer Wakefield, Can (slashing), 11:19; Isa Rahunen, Fin (holding), 18:52.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Canada, Melodie Daoust (Laura Fortino,
Meghan Agosta), 8:19. 4, Canada, Jill Saulnier (Rebecca
Johnston), 18:26. Penalties: Canada bench, served by
Jennifer Wakefield (too many on ice), 15:17; Emily
Clarke, Can (slashing), 19:43.
MEN’S CURLING
Country .............................................. W
Sweden ................................................ 1
United States ...................................... 1
Canada ................................................. 0
Japan ................................................... 0
Britain.................................................. 0
Norway ................................................ 0
Italy...................................................... 0
Switzerland ......................................... 0
South Korea......................................... 0
Denmark .............................................. 0
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
United States 11, South Korea 7
Sweden 9, Denmark 5
Canada vs. Italy, Late
Switzerland vs. Britain, Late
Canada vs. Britain, 6:05 a.m.
South Korea vs. Sweden, 6:05 a.m.
Switzerland vs. Italy, 6:05 a.m.
Norway vs. Japan, 6:05 a.m.
THURSDAY’S MATCHES
Scoring: 5, Finland, Riikka Valila (Susanna Tapani,
Michelle Karvinen), 7:17. Penalties: Sara Sakkinin, Fin
(illegal hit), 2:22; Ronja Savolainen, Fin (illegal hit),
8:08; Linda Valimaki, Fin (cross-checking), 10:10.
United States vs. Italy, 12:05 a.m.
Norway vs. Canada, 12:05 a.m.
Britain vs. Japan, 12:05 a.m.
Denmark vs. Switzerland, 12:05 a.m.
Italy vs. Denmark, 7:05
Norway vs. South Korea, 7:05
Sweden vs. United States, 7:05
Canada .................. 14
10
8
32
Finland .................... 5
5
13
23
Goalies: Canada, Shannon Szabados. Finland, Noora
Raty.
Cross-Country Skiing
MEN'S SPRINT CLASSIC SEMIFINALS
Heat 1
1. Johannes Hoesflot Klaebo, Norway, 3:06.01 (Q).
2. Federico Pellegrino, Italy, 3:06.17 (Q).
3. Alexander Bolshunov, OA Russia, 3:06.63 (Q).
4. Paal Golberg, Norway, 3:07.24 (Q).
5. Teodor Peterson, Sweden, 3:11.02.
6. Alexander Panzhinskiy, OA Russia, 3:19.05.
Heat 2
1. Ristomatti Hakola, Finland, 3:09.93 (Q).
2. Oskar Svensson, Sweden, 3:10.61 (Q).
3. Len Valjas, Canada, 3:13.91.
4. Emil Iversen, Norway, 3:14.09.
5. Martti Jylhae, Finland, 3:14.93.
6. Baptiste Gros, France, 3:27.44.
FINAL
1. Johannes Hoesflot Klaebo, Norway, 3:05.75.
2. Federico Pellegrino, Italy, 3:07.09.
3. Alexander Bolshunov, OA Russia, 3:07.11.
4. Paal Golberg, Norway, 3:09.56.
5. Oskar Svensson, Sweden, 3:13.48.
6. Ristomatti Hakola, Finland, 3:26.47.
WOMEN'S SPRINT CLASSIC
SEMIFINALS
Heat 1
1. Stina Nilsson, Sweden, 3:10.52 (Q).
2. Maiken Caspersen Falla, Norway, 3:10.55 (Q).
3. Hanna Falk, Sweden, 3:11.14 (Q).
4. Sophie Caldwell, United States, 3:11.32.
5. Krista Parmakoski, Finland, 3:12.04.
6. Anna Dyvik, Sweden, 3:15.77.
Heat 2
1. Yulia Belorukova, OA Russia, 3:10.12 (Q).
2. Jessica Diggins, United States, 3:10.72 (Q).
3. Natalia Nepryaeva, OA Russia, 3:10.72 (Q).
4. Anamarija Lampic, Slovenia, 3:13.95.
5. Laurien Van der Graaff, Switzerland, 3:15.65.
6. Heidi Weng, Norway, 3:16.22.
FINAL
1. Stina Nilsson, Sweden, 3:03.84.
2. Maiken Caspersen Falla, Norway, 3:06.87.
3. Yulia Belorukova, OA Russia, 3:07.21.
4. Natalia Nepryaeva, OA Russia, 3:12.98.
5. Hanna Falk, Sweden, 3:15.00.
6. Jessica Diggins, United States, 3:15.07.
WOMEN'S SINGLES
Final Ranking
1. Natalie Geisenberger, Germany, 3:05.232.
2. Dajana Eitberger, Germany, 3:05.599.
3. Alex Gough, Canada, 3:05.644.
4. Tatjana Hufner, Germany, 3:05.713.
5. Kimberley McRae, Canada, 3:05.878.
6. Erin Hamlin, United States, 3:05.912.
7. Raluca Stramaturaru, Romania, 3:06.288.
8. Frisch Aileen, South Korea, 3:06.400.
9. Madeleine Egle, Austria, 3:06.609.
10. Andrea Votter, Italy, 3:06.859.
11. Martina Kocher, Switzerland, 3:06.893.
12. Ulla Zirne, Latvia, 3:07.102.
13. Brooke Apshkrum, Canada, 3:07.561.
14. Sandra Robatscher, Italy, 3:07.565.
15. Ekaterina Baturina, OA Russia, 3:07.619.
16. Eliza Cauce, Latvia, 3:07.651.
17. Hannah Prock, Austria, 3:07.804.
18. Sung Eun Ryung, South Korea, 3:08.250.
19. Summer Britcher, United States, 3:08.334.
20. Ewa Kuls-Kusyk, Poland, 2:21.182.
21. Olena Shkhumova, Ukraine, 2:21.545.
22. Kendija Aparjode, Latvia, 2:22.326.
23. Katarina Simonakova, Slovakia, 2:22.572.
24. Veronica Maria Ravenna, Argentina, 2:22.702.
25. Natalia Wojtusciszyn, Poland, 2:23.159.
26. Tereza Noskova, Czech Republic, 2:23.866.
27. Daria Obratov, Croatia, 2:25.553.
28. Olena Stetskiv, Ukraine, 2:26.831.
NR. Emily Sweeney, United States, DNF.
NR. Birgit Platzer, Austria, DNF.
Speedskating
MEN'S 1500
1. Kjeld Nuis, Netherlands, 1:44.01.
2. Patrick Roest, Netherlands, 1:44.86.
3. Kim Min Seok, South Korea, 1:44.93.
4. Haralds Silvos, Latvia, 1:45.25.
5. Takuro Oda, Japan, 1:45.44.
6. Bart Swings, Belgium, 1:45.49.
7. Sindre Henriksen, Norway, 1:45.64.
8. Joey Mantia, United States, 1:45.86.
9. Sverre Lunde Pedersen, Norway, 1:46.12.
10. Shane Williamson, Japan, 1:46.21.
11. Koen Verweij, Netherlands, 1:46.26.
12. Zbigniew Brodka, Poland, 1:46.31.
13. Denny Morrison, Canada, 1:46.36.
14. Peter Michael, New Zealand, 1:46.39.
15. Brian Hansen, United States, 1:46.44.
16. Jan Szymanski, Poland, 1:46.48.
17. Joo Hyung-Joon, South Korea, 1:46.65.
18. Sergey Trofimov, OA Russia, 1:46.69.
19. Shani Davis, United States, 1:46.74.
20. Konrad Niedzwiedzki, Poland, 1:47.07.
21. Vincent De Haitre, Canada, 1:47.32.
22. Alexis Contin, France, 1:47.33.
23. Mathias Voste, Belgium, 1:47.34.
24. Shota Nakamura, Japan, 1:47.38.
25. Livio Wenger, Switzerland, 1:47.76.
26. Reyon Kay, New Zealand, 1:47.81.
27. Andrea Giovannini, Italy, 1:47.82.
28. Fyodor Mezentsev, Kazakhstan, 1:48.23.
29. Konrad Nagy, Hungary, 1:49.01.
30. Denis Kuzin, Kazakhstan, 1:49.14.
31. Benjamin Donnelly, Canada, 1:49.68.
32. Xiakaini Aerchenghazi, China, 1:50.16.
33. Marten Liiv, Estonia, 1:50.23.
34. Tai William, Taiwan, 1:50.63.
NR. Allan Dahl Johansson, Norway, DNF.
GB
—
1
102
182
22
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................32
Miami.........................................30
Charlotte....................................23
Orlando ......................................18
Atlanta.......................................18
L
24
27
33
38
40
Pct
.571
.526
.411
.321
.310
GB
—
21/2
9
14
15
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................34
Milwaukee .................................32
Indiana .......................................32
Detroit .......................................27
Chicago ......................................20
L
22
24
25
29
36
Pct
.607
.571
.561
.482
.357
GB
—
2
21/2
7
14
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................43
x-San Antonio............................35
New Orleans ..............................30
Memphis ....................................18
Dallas .........................................18
L
13
23
26
37
40
Pct
.768
.603
.536
.327
.310
GB
—
9
13
241/2
26
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................35
Oklahoma City ...........................32
Portland .....................................31
x-Denver ....................................30
Utah ...........................................29
L
25
26
26
26
28
Pct
.583
.552
.544
.536
.509
GB
—
2
21/2
3
41/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................44
L.A. Clippers...............................29
L.A. Lakers .................................23
Sacramento ...............................18
Phoenix ......................................18
x-Late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Toronto 115, Miami 112
at Milwaukee 97, Atlanta 92
Cleveland 120, at Oklahoma City 112
Houston 126, at Minnesota 108
Sacramento 114, at Dallas 109
San Antonio at Denver, Late
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Washington at New York, 7:30
Atlanta at Detroit, 7
Charlotte at Orlando, 7
Miami at Philadelphia, 7
Indiana at Brooklyn, 7:30
L.A. Clippers at Boston, 8
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 8
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8
Sacramento at Houston, 8
Toronto at Chicago, 8
Phoenix at Utah, 9
Golden State at Portland, 10:30
L
13
26
32
38
40
Pct
.772
.527
.418
.321
.310
GB
—
14
20
251/2
261/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
MIAMI ................................ 24
TORONTO ........................... 28
31
29
26
41
31 — 112
17 — 115
MIAMI: J.Richardson 3-9 2-2 10, Winslow 2-4 0-0 5,
Whiteside 5-9 0-0 10, Dragic 10-19 5-6 28, T.Johnson 3-8
1-2 7, J.Johnson 7-11 1-2 16, Adebayo 3-6 5-5 11, Wade
4-9 2-2 10, Ellington 5-11 0-0 15. Totals 42-86 16-19 112.
TORONTO: Anunoby 2-3 0-0 6, Ibaka 5-7 4-4 14,
Valanciunas 2-4 2-2 6, Lowry 8-17 2-3 22, DeRozan 11-25
4-6 27, Miles 3-11 3-5 11, Powell 0-0 0-0 0, Siakam 2-8
1-1 5, Poeltl 1-1 2-2 4, Wright 4-6 0-0 10, VanVleet 4-8
0-0 10. Totals 42-90 18-23 115.
33
29
29
30
29 — 120
25 — 112
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 8-19 4-4 25, Anthony 10-22
1-2 24, Adams 8-12 6-10 22, Westbrook 7-19 7-8 21,
Abrines 0-3 0-0 0, Huestis 0-0 0-0 0, Grant 5-9 3-6 14,
Patterson 0-0 0-0 0, Felton 2-6 0-0 6. Totals 40-90 21-30
112.
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
South Korea vs. Britain, 12:05 a.m.
Switzerland vs. Norway, 12:05 a.m.
Canada vs. Sweden, 12:05 a.m.
Japan vs. Italy, 12:05 a.m.
Norway vs. Denmark, 7:05
United States vs. Japan, 7:05
Switzerland vs. Canada, 7:05
WOMEN'S CURLING
L
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
WEDNESDAY’S MATCHES
Japan vs. United States, 12:05 a.m.
OA Russia vs. Britain, 12:05 a.m.
Denmark vs. Sweden, 12:05 a.m.
Switzerland vs. China, 12:05 a.m.
Canada vs. South Korea, 7:05
Denmark vs. Japan, 7:05
China vs. OA Russia, 7:05
Britain vs. United States, 7:05
THURSDAY’S MATCHES
China vs. Britain, 6:05 a.m.
Canada vs. Sweden, 6:05 a.m.
United States vs. Switzerland, 6:05 a.m.
South Korea vs. Japan, 6:05 a.m.
FRIDAY’S MATCHES
Denmark vs. Canada, 12:05 a.m.
South Korea vs. Switzerland, 12:05 a.m.
Sweden vs. OA Russia, 12:05 a.m.
Switzerland vs. Sweden, 7:05
OA Russia vs. United States, 7:05
Japan vs. China, 7:05
Denmark vs. Britain, 7:05
OA Russia vs. Japan, 6:05 a.m.
China vs. Denmark, 6:05 a.m.
South Korea vs. Britain, 6:05 a.m.
United States vs. Canada, 6:05 a.m.
Alpine Skiing
MEN'S COMBINED
Final Ranking
1. Marcel Hirscher, Austria, (12, 1:20.56; 1, 45.96)
2:06.52.
2. Alexis Pinturault, France, (10, 1:20.28; 3, 46.47)
2:06.75.
3. Victor Muffat Jeandet, France, (29, 1:21.57; 2, 45.97)
2:07.54.
4. Marco Schwarz, Austria, (19, 1:20.98; 5, 46.89)
2:07.87.
5. Ted Ligety, United States, (26, 1:21.36; 4, 46.61)
2:07.97.
6. Thomas Mermillod Blondin, France, (17, 1:20.89; 6,
47.13) 2:08.02.
7. Kjetil Jansrud, Norway, (4, 1:19.51; 19, 49.16) 2:08.67.
8. Stefan Hadalin, Slovenia, (21, 1:21.15; 7, 47.79)
2:08.94.
9. Thomas Dressen, Germany, (1, 1:19.24; 24, 49.72)
2:08.96.
10. Klemen Kosi, Slovenia, (16, 1:20.61; 15, 48.76)
2:09.37.
11. Luca Aerni, Switzerland, (25, 1:21.34; 11, 48.18)
2:09.52.
12. Mauro Caviezel, Switzerland, (11, 1:20.47; 18, 49.13)
2:09.60.
12. Filip Zubcic, Croatia, (28, 1:21.54; 8, 48.06) 2:09.60.
14. Christoph Innerhofer, Italy, (5, 1:19.77; 25, 49.98)
2:09.75.
15. Carlo Janka, Switzerland, (14, 1:20.58; 20, 49.22)
2:09.80.
16. Ondrej Berndt, Czech Republic, (34, 1:21.81; 10,
48.10) 2:09.91.
17. Bryce Bennett, United States, (23, 1:21.18; 16, 48.79)
2:09.97.
18. Riccardo Tonetti, Italy, (38, 1:21.99; 12, 48.22)
2:10.21.
19. Natko Zrncicdim, Croatia, (40, 1:22.07; 13, 48.48)
2:10.55.
20. James Crawford, Canada, (37, 1:21.97; 17, 48.80)
2:10.77.
21. Aleksander Aamodt Kilde, Norway, (18, 1:20.92; 26,
50.15) 2:11.07.
22. Adam Zampa, Slovakia, (51, 1:23.02; 9, 48.08)
2:11.10.
23. Broderick Thompson, Canada, (33, 1:21.75; 23, 49.63)
2:11.38.
24. Andreas Romar, Finland, (35, 1:21.94; 22, 49.58)
2:11.52.
25. Marko Vukicevic, Serbia, (24, 1:21.31; 27, 50.43)
2:11.74.
26. Kristaps Zvejnieks, Latvia, (51, 1:23.02; 14, 48.74)
2:11.76.
27. Joan Verdu Sanchez, Andorra, (50, 1:23.01; 21, 49.53)
2:12.54.
28. Olivier Jenot, Monaco, (47, 1:22.71; 28, 50.73)
2:13.44.
29. Marc Oliveras, Andorra, (31, 1:21.67; 30, 52.97)
2:14.64.
30. Christoffer Faarup, Denmark, (20, 1:21.08; 34, 54.13)
2:15.21.
31. Igor Zakurdaev, Kazakhstan, (42, 1:22.29; 32, 53.18)
2:15.47.
32. Dalibor Samsal, Hungary, (60, 1:25.17; 29, 50.77)
2:15.94.
33. Kim Dong Woo, South Korea, (56, 1:24.02; 31, 53.02)
2:17.04.
34. Yuri Danilochkin, Belarus, (48, 1:22.78; 35, 55.94)
2:18.72.
Three-point Goals: Cleveland 16-36 (Smith 6-9, Hood
4-8, James 3-7, Osman 1-2, Clarkson 1-3, Hill 1-4, Korver
0-1, Green 0-2), Oklahoma City 11-35 (George 5-13,
Anthony 3-9, Felton 2-5, Grant 1-2, Abrines 0-3, Westbrook 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Cleveland 41
(Nance Jr. 9), Oklahoma City 51 (Adams 17). Assists:
Cleveland 24 (James 8), Oklahoma City 23 (Westbrook
12). Total Fouls: Cleveland 28, Oklahoma City 20.
Technicals: Westbrook. A: 18,203 (18,203).
Rockets 126, T-Wolves 108
HOUSTON ........................... 23
MINNESOTA ...................... 31
W
32
32
28
28
27
29
27
27
L
17
22
19
20
21
23
25
25
OL PTS. GF GA
7
71 176 165
4
68 182 174
10
66 169 167
8
64 168 174
9
63 158 169
4
62 151 156
6
60 194 214
5
59 166 175
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Detroit ..........................
Florida ...........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
38
35
34
23
24
22
19
17
L
16
12
19
23
23
26
27
30
OL PTS. GF GA
3
79 204 154
8
78 185 133
5
73 192 162
9
55 149 166
6
54 154 172
7
51 144 172
9
47 147 194
10
44 137 188
31
19
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
St. Louis ........................
Dallas ............................
Minnesota .....................
Colorado ........................
x-Chicago ......................
W
34
33
34
33
31
30
24
L
12
15
21
20
19
21
24
OL PTS. GF GA
9
77 173 143
9
75 183 154
4
72 170 151
4
70 175 151
6
68 168 158
4
64 174 163
8
56 158 161
PACIFIC
x-Vegas .........................
x-San Jose ....................
Calgary ..........................
Los Angeles ..................
Anaheim .......................
Edmonton .....................
Vancouver .....................
x-Arizona ......................
W
36
30
29
30
27
23
22
14
L
15
18
20
21
20
28
28
32
OL PTS. GF GA
4
76 187 152
8
68 165 156
8
66 161 164
5
65 162 140
11
65 161 166
4
50 157 184
6
50 147 180
10
38 135 194
x- Late game
MONDAY’S RESULTS
at Toronto 4, Tampa Bay 3
at Arizona 6, Chicago 1
Florida 7, at Edmonton 5
Florida 7, Edmonton 5
Arizona 6, Chicago 1
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Winnipeg 4, Washington 3 (OT)
at Carolina 7, Los Angeles 3
Columbus 4, at N.Y. Islanders 1
at Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 3
at Buffalo 5, Tampa Bay 3
at Boston 5, Calgary 2
New Jersey 5, at Philadelphia 4 (SO)
at Detroit 2, Anaheim 1
at Nashville 4, St. Louis 3 (OT)
at Minnesota 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Chicago at Vegas, Late
Arizona at San Jose, Late
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
CLEVELAND: Osman 2-6 0-0 5, James 14-23 6-10 37,
Thompson 1-2 0-0 2, Hill 3-7 0-0 7, Smith 6-10 0-0 18,
Nance Jr. 5-10 3-6 13, Green 3-7 4-4 10, Hood 5-10 0-0 14,
Clarkson 6-10 1-2 14, Korver 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 45-88
14-22 120.
Japan vs. Switzerland, 6:05 a.m.
Sweden vs. Britain, 6:05 a.m.
Denmark vs. United States, 6:05 a.m.
Canada vs. South Korea, 6:05 a.m.
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
New Jersey ...................
Carolina .........................
Columbus ......................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
N.Y. Rangers .................
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Raptors 115, Heat 112
CLEVELAND ....................... 29
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 28
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Luge Results
Pct
.714
.690
.537
.397
.328
Cavaliers 120, Thunder 112
FRIDAY’S MATCHES
Country .............................................. W
Canada ................................................. 0
Sweden ................................................ 0
Switzerland ......................................... 0
Britain.................................................. 0
Japan ................................................... 0
Denmark .............................................. 0
China.................................................... 0
South Korea......................................... 0
OA Russia ............................................ 0
United States ...................................... 0
L
16
18
25
35
39
Three-point Goals: Miami 12-29 (Ellington 5-11, Dragic
3-5, J.Richardson 2-5, Winslow 1-1, J.Johnson 1-4,
T.Johnson 0-1, Wade 0-2), Toronto 13-35 (Lowry 4-8,
Anunoby 2-2, Wright 2-3, VanVleet 2-3, Miles 2-10,
DeRozan 1-7, Siakam 0-1, Ibaka 0-1). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Miami 51 (Wade 11), Toronto 40 (Valanciunas, Ibaka 10). Assists: Miami 24 (Wade 6), Toronto 24
(Lowry 8). Total Fouls: Miami 18, Toronto 19. A: 19,800
(19,800).
WEDNESDAY’S MATCHES
THIRD PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
L
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
ATLANTIC
W
Toronto ......................................40
Boston........................................40
Philadelphia ...............................29
New York ...................................23
Brooklyn.....................................19
30
30
42 — 126
28 — 108
HOUSTON: Mbah a Moute 3-6 0-0 7, Tucker 3-4 1-2 10,
Capela 5-7 4-6 14, Paul 5-11 2-3 13, Harden 10-20 8-9 34,
Anderson 7-12 1-2 21, Nene 3-7 2-3 8, Green 2-6 0-0 6,
Gordon 3-10 4-4 13. Totals 41-83 22-29 126.
MINNESOTA: Wiggins 2-14 3-4 7, Gibson 5-8 2-2 12,
Towns 12-16 9-9 35, Teague 10-15 3-3 25, Butler 5-13 5-5
15, Bjelica 1-1 0-0 3, Dieng 0-1 0-0 0, Aldrich 0-0 0-0 0,
Brooks 0-0 0-0 0, Jones 0-3 0-0 0, Crawford 5-13 0-0 11.
Totals 40-84 22-23 108.
Three-point Goals: Houston 22-47 (Harden 6-10, Anderson 6-10, Tucker 3-4, Gordon 3-9, Green 2-6, Mbah a
Moute 1-3, Paul 1-5), Minnesota 6-23 (Teague 2-3,
Towns 2-3, Bjelica 1-1, Crawford 1-6, Jones 0-2, Butler
0-3, Wiggins 0-5). Fouled Out: Towns. Rebounds: Houston 37 (Capela 12), Minnesota 40 (Towns 12). Assists:
Houston 25 (Harden 13), Minnesota 22 (Teague 8). Total
Fouls: Houston 23, Minnesota 20. Technicals: Houston
coach Rockets (Defensive three second), Crawford. A:
18,978 (18,798).
NCAA Men
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
James Madison 62, UNC-Wilmington 6
Georgetown 87, Butler 83
Kansas 83, Iowa St. 77
Virginia 59, Miami 50
Missouri 62, Texas A&M 58
Nebraska 70, Maryland 66
Texas Tech 88, Oklahoma 78
No. 1 Virginia 59, Miami 50
Virginia (24-2)
Wilkins 3-8 0-0 6, Salt 1-1 0-0 2, Hall 2-5 0-0 5, Jerome
1-4 4-6 6, Guy 5-9 1-1 13, Diakite 1-2 0-0 2, Hunter 8-16
3-3 22, Johnson 1-3 1-2 3. 22-48 Totals 9-12 59.
Miami (18-7)
Huell 0-1 0-0 0, Lawrence 0-7 2-2 2, Vasiljevic 2-8 0-0 5,
Lykes 6-12 4-5 19, Walker 2-8 2-2 6, Waardenburg 2-3
0-0 6, Izundu 4-6 0-0 8, Newton 2-2 0-2 4. Totals 18-47
8-11 50.
Halftime: Virginia 27-16. Three-point goals: Virginia
6-17 (Hunter 3-6, Guy 2-5, Hall 1-3, Johnson 0-1, Jerome
0-2), Miami 6-21 (Lykes 3-7, Waardenburg 2-2,
Vasiljevic 1-5, Lawrence 0-3, Walker 0-4). Fouled out:
None. Rebounds: Virginia 25 (Salt 7), Miami 20 (Lawrence 7). Assists: Virginia 15 (Jerome 7), Miami 6
(Lawrence, Walker 2). Total fouls: Virginia 15, Miami 13.
A: 7,333 (8,000).
Georgetown 87, Butler 83
Georgetown (15-10)
Derrickson 11-13 2-2 27, Pickett 2-7 4-4 10, Govan 6-11
5-9 17, Mulmore 1-1 3-4 5, Johnson 2-3 2-2 6, Walker 0-0
0-0 0, Blair 0-5 1-2 1, Mosely 1-3 0-0 3, Dickerson 7-8 2-6
18. 30-51 Totals 19-29 87.
Butler (17-10)
Martin 8-23 5-5 22, Wideman 7-9 5-6 19, Thompson 0-1
1-2 1, Baldwin 6-11 4-5 16, Jorgensen 3-9 0-0 6, Fowler
1-1 0-0 2, David 2-2 1-1 7, Baddley 2-5 0-0 5, McDermott
2-5 0-0 5. Totals 31-66 16-19 83.
Halftime: Georgetown 44-39. Three-point goals: Georgetown 8-17 (Derrickson 3-3, Dickerson 2-2, Pickett 2-6,
Mosely 1-2, Johnson 0-1, Blair 0-3), Butler 5-22 (David
2-2, Baddley 1-1, McDermott 1-3, Martin 1-9, Jorgensen
0-3, Baldwin 0-4). Fouled out: Thompson. Rebounds:
Georgetown 29 (Govan 12), Butler 26 (Martin 8).
Assists: Georgetown 20 (Govan, Mulmore 4), Butler 12
(Baldwin 7). Total fouls: Georgetown 18, Butler 20. A:
8,539 (9,100).
Nebraska 70, Maryland 66
Maryland (17-11)
Fernando 9-14 3-5 21, Wiley 3-6 0-0 8, Morsell 5-11 1-2
11, Cowan 3-13 0-0 7, Huerter 5-9 1-2 12, Tomaic 0-0 0-0
0, Obi 0-0 0-0 0, Cekovsky 2-3 0-0 4, Nickens 1-2 0-0 3.
28-58 Totals 5-9 66.
Nebraska (20-8)
Roby 3-5 5-6 11, Copeland 4-9 0-2 9, Watson 2-12 2-2 8,
Palmer 10-19 4-6 26, Gill 3-5 0-0 8, Okeke 1-1 0-1 2,
Tshimanga 1-1 0-0 2, Taylor 1-2 2-2 4, Allen 0-1 0-0 0.
Totals 25-55 13-19 70.
Halftime: Maryland 32-30. Three-point goals: Maryland
5-16 (Wiley 2-3, Nickens 1-2, Huerter 1-4, Cowan 1-7),
Nebraska 7-19 (Gill 2-4, Watson 2-5, Palmer 2-6,
Copeland 1-3, Allen 0-1). Fouled out: Huerter. Rebounds:
Maryland 29 (Fernando 9), Nebraska 35 (Roby 10).
Assists: Maryland 15 (Cowan 7), Nebraska 14 (Palmer
5). Total fouls: Maryland 18, Nebraska 15. A: 15,908
(15,147).
NCAA Women
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Fordham 66, La Salle 45
Princeton 60, Penn 40
High Point 77, Winthrop 40
Radford 52, Liberty 45
UNC Asheville 71, Charleston Southern 69
Ohio St. 88, Illinois 69
Baylor 87, Oklahoma St. 45
Columbus at Toronto, 7
Montreal at Colorado, 9:30
Florida at Vancouver, 10
Devils 5, Flyers 4 (OT)
NEW JERSEY ..................... 0
3
1
0 — 5
PHILADELPHIA .................. 1
3
0
0 — 4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Philadelphia, Konecny 14 (Gostisbehere,
Giroux), 1:54.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, New Jersey, Hall 22 (Vatanen), 4:06. 3,
Philadelphia, Laughton 9 (Raffl, MacDonald), 4:49. 4,
Philadelphia, Gudas 2 (Weise, Filppula), 10:36. 5, New
Jersey, Moore 7 (Zajac, Bratt), 13:17. 6, Philadelphia,
Giroux 19 (Gostisbehere, Voracek), 15:59 (pp). 7, New
Jersey, Hischier 10 (Bratt), 16:09.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 8, New Jersey, Hall 23 (Hischier, Zajac), 18:39.
SHOOTOUT
New Jersey 1 (Palmieri NG, Stafford G), Philadelphia 0
(Weal NG, Konecny NG, Voracek NG).
SHOTS ON GOAL
NEW JERSEY ..................... 9
12
12
3 — 36
PHILADELPHIA ................ 13
13
7
2 — 35
Power-play opportunities: New Jersey 0 of 3; Philadelphia 1 of 5. Goalies: New Jersey, Kinkaid 10-7-2 (35
shots-31 saves). Philadelphia, Neuvirth 7-7-2 (36-32). T:
2:50.
Wild 3, Rangers 2
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 1
1
0 — 2
MINNESOTA ............................ 3
0
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Minnesota, Staal 25, 3:09. 2, Minnesota,
Parise 3, 4:34. 3, Minnesota, Foligno 6 (Eriksson Ek,
Winnik), 6:17. 4, N.Y. Rangers, Gilmour 1 (Hayes,
DeAngelo), 8:50 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5, N.Y. Rangers, Hayes 13 (Pionk, Grabner),
11:46 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
N.Y. RANGERS ....................... 11
19
4 — 34
MINNESOTA .......................... 13
8
8 — 29
Power-play opportunities: N.Y. Rangers 2 of 4; Minnesota 0 of 1. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 23-18-4 (29
shots-26 saves). Minnesota, Dubnyk 23-10-4 (34-32). A:
18,887 (18,064). T: 2:27.
Virginia
OSBOURN 65, STONEWALL JACKSON 62
O (15-8) Withers 26, Breeding 15, Hylton 9, Ojo 6, Hogan
5, Freeman 3, Pearson 1 Totals 15 11-31 65.
SJ (16-6) Gibson 30, Folkes 15, Warner 7, Boxley 7,
Waddy 3 Totals 19 12-20 62.
Halftime: Osbourn, (29-25).
Three-point goals: SJ 4 (Boxley 1, Gibson 3); O 8
(Withers 5, Ojo 1, Breeding 1, Freeman 1)
OAKTON 58, CHANTILLY 55
O (17-5) Johnson 22, Johnson-Parrotte 19, Digby 9,
Smith 4, Jaquette 2, Schulz 2 Totals 18 10-12 58.
C (12-11) McHugh 16, Maison 13, Tammaro 8, Parana 7,
Nesmith 4, Hinz 4, Smith 3 Totals 20 0-0 55.
Halftime: Chantilly, (23-19).
Three-point goals: C 5 (Parana 1, Maison 1, McHugh 2,
Smith 1); O 4 (Johnson-Parrotte 1, Johnson 2, Digby 1)
HERNDON 36, LANGLEY 29
L (8-11) Beckett 15, Thrasher 6, Hoeymans 4, Carton 4
Totals 3 8-12 29.
H (6-15) Varone 12, Snead 10, Rehnstrom 6, Myers 4,
Lewis 2, Hart 2 Totals 9 9-14 36.
Halftime: Herndon, (23-13).
Three-point goals: H 3 (Rehnstrom 2, Snead 1); L 5
(Hoeymans 1, Beckett 1, Carton 1, Thrasher 2)
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
POTOMAC (VA.) 60, FOREST PARK 59
MARYLAND
Blair 50, Blake 32
Damascus 54, Einstein 17
Douglass 69, Surrattsville 23
Gwynn Park 63, Fairmont Heights 20
Howard 69, Long Reach 57
Largo 62, Friendly 26
Oxon Hill 79, Crossland 35
Parkdale 65, Bowie 42
Poolesville 72, Clarksburg 37
Quince Orchard 42, Kennedy 29
Richard Montgomery 58, Churchill 38
Springbrook 56, Gaithersburg 54
Suitland 67, Laurel 28
Walter Johnson 55, Rockville 35
Whitman 53, Seneca Valley 21
Wootton 67, Northwood 26
VIRGINIA
Wakefield 41, Jefferson 29
Yorktown 56, McLean 49
Yorktown 56, McLean 49
CONFERENCE 13 Falls Church 78, Stuart 29
Marshall 57, Lee 38
CONFERENCE 6 Langley 55, Washington-Lee 18
Lake Braddock 51, Fairfax 35
Madison 40, Centreville 27
Oakton 36, Westfield 34
Wakefield 41, Jefferson 29
West Springfield 54, South County 29
VIRGINIA 2A George Mason 59, Clarke County 41
PRIVATE
Bishop Ireton 63, Carroll 33
Elizabeth Seton 53, Holy Cross 42
Good Counsel 79, St. Mary's Ryken 49
Highland 58, Wakefield School 23
Holton-Arms 40, National Cathedral 31
Holy Child 44, Sidwell Friends 41
Madeira 43, Sandy Spring 17
McLean School 50, Washington International 24
McNamara 63, Paul VI 58
Potomac School 52, Maret 24
Riverdale Baptist 87, Three Point Line Christian Academy (Va.) 47
St. John's 80, O'Connell 42
P (16-7) William 26, Jackson 16, White 8, Satchell 4,
Williams 4, Cumba 2 Totals 11 17-22 60.
FP (11-13) Johnson 17, Johnson 12, Collins 10, Crawley
8, Johnson 6, Daniels 6 Totals 15 11-17 59.
Halftime: Forest Park, (33-26).
Three-point goals: FP 6 (Johnson 3, Daniels 2, Crawley
1); P 7 (William 1, White 2, Jackson 4)
GI R LS ' BA S K E TBALL
TOP 20
NO. 2 ST. JOHN'S 80, O'CONNELL 42
SJ (24-2) Fudd 28, Wood 12, Rivera 9, Tshitenge-Mutombo 9, Scott 5, Jenkins 5, Vidauree 3, Dour 3, Cowan 3,
Roldan 2, Roberts 1 Totals 17 7-14 80.
O (17-6) Perpignan 8, Mills 8, Hovis 7, Polise 5, Simmons
5, Lee 4, Woods 2, Leverone 2, Hayashi 1 Totals 17 5-8 42.
Halftime: St. John's, (45-22).
Three-point goals: O 1 (Simmons 1); SJ 13 (Scott 1, Fudd
5, Rivera 3, Cowan 1, Jenkins 1, Dour 1, Vidauree 1).
NO. 4 POOLESVILLE 72, CLARKSBURG 37
C (15-6) Mcinnis 25, Wright 4, Chesley 4, Kerchaert 2,
Howson 2 Totals 9 10-13 37.
P (21-0) Lee 21, Hobbs 16, Green 8, Abrigo 6, Thompson
5, Rohde 5, Hobbs 4, Magaha 4, Mullikin 2, Terragno 1
Totals 30 3-6 72.
Halftime: Poolesville, (42-14).
Three-point goals: P 3 (Lee 1, Thompson 1, Rohde 1); C 3
(Mcinnis 3).
NO. 6 MCNAMARA 63, NO. 1 PAUL VI 58
ICE HOCKEY
BM (19-5) King 15, Matharu 12, Bell 12, Brown-Turner
12, Gibson 4, St. Cyr 3, Evans 3, Scott 2 Totals 18 15-19
63.
PVI (24-2) Owusu 24, Collins 10, Klimkiewicz 10,
Thibodeau 6, Kenefick 4, Gingras 2, Perkins 2 Totals 14
15-15 58.
Halftime: McNamara, (29-16).
Three-point goals: PVI 5 (Thibodeau 2, Owusu 1,
Klimkiewicz 2); BM 4 (Matharu 1, St. Cyr 1, Evans 1,
Brown-Turner 1).
PRIVATE
Georgetown Prep 7, St. Albans 0
NO. 7 RICHARD MONTGOMERY 58,
CHURCHILL 38
B OY S ' B A S K E TB A L L
TOP 20
NO. 1 PAUL VI 65, MCNAMARA 32
PVI (25-2) Freeman 19, Harris 12, Joyner 7, Oduro 7,
Keels 5, Roach 5, Robinson 4, Latimer 4, Ford 2 Totals 14
22-26 65.
BM (10-13) Marshall 10, Cheek 5, Moore 4, Bell 4,
Wilkins 3, Womack 3, Baskin 2, Williams 1 Totals 8 4-11
32.
Halftime: Paul VI, (37-13).
Three-point goals: BM 4 (Marshall 2, Cheek 1, Moore 1);
PVI 5 (Keels 1, Freeman 4).
NO. 2 DEMATHA 57, NO. 3 GONZAGA 53
RM (21-0) Osborne 21, Rashad 15, Tounkara 10, Williams 9, Schuck 3 Totals 14 21-27 58.
C (13-7) Martin 14, Hill 6, Correa 5, Testa 4, Wilson 3,
Beiser 2, Rubino 2, Mazer 2 Totals 13 6-11 38.
Halftime: Richard Montgomery, (31-15).
Three-point goals: C 2 (Martin 1, Wilson 1); RM 3
(Osborne 1, Williams 1, Tounkara 1).
NO. 8 OXON HILL 79, CROSSLAND 35
C (7-12) Bostick 10, Canlas 8, Campbell 7, Canlas 6,
Tolson 2, Staggs 2 Totals 9 8-12 35.
OH (21-0) Wilson 21, Staples 20, Warren 17, Monteiro 6,
Beckett 5, Whitaker 4, Jackson 4, Holland 2 Totals 30
10-19 79.
Halftime: Oxon Hill, (49-19).
Three-point goals: OH 3 (Staples 2, Wilson 1); C 3
(Campbell 1, Canlas 1, Bostick 1).
NO. 11 HOWARD 69, NO. 12 LONG REACH 57
G (23-4) Dread 17, Blunt 15, Williams 7, Gill 4, Stute 4,
Watts 2, Harris 2, Dread 2 Totals 17 4-5 53.
D (23-4) Dickinson 14, Moore 11, Young 10, Timberlake
9, Gielen 6, Kolgenik 3, Smith 2, Wallace 2 Totals 15
12-16 57.
Halftime: DeMatha, (37-26).
Three-point goals: D 5 (Young 1, Gielen 2, Kolgenik 1,
Dickinson 1); G 5 (Dread 3, Williams 1, Blunt 1).
LR (7-0) Swann 19, Briggs-Hall 11, Swann 9, Williams 8,
Streeter 7, Richardson 3 Totals 12 3-6 57.
H (6-1) Addison 21, Furr 12, Sanchez-Henry 10, Jones 10,
Burris 9, Malagar 7 Totals 21 12-17 69.
Halftime: Howard, (29-27).
Three-point goals: H 5 (Furr 2, Burris 2, Malagar 1); LR 10
(Swann 5, Swann 3, Streeter 1, Richardson 1).
Sabres 5, Lightning 3
NO. 6 O'CONNELL 89, NO. 8 ST. JOHN'S 82
NO. 15 PARKDALE 65, BOWIE 42
TAMPA BAY ............................ 1
1
1 — 3
BUFFALO ................................. 1
2
2 — 5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Buffalo, Baptiste 2 (Girgensons), 6:25. 2,
Tampa Bay, Gourde 22 (Hedman, Kucherov), 13:23 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Buffalo, Reinhart 12 (O’Reilly, Rodrigues),
1:16 (pp). 4, Tampa Bay, Namestnikov 19, 13:19. 5,
Buffalo, Wilson 4 (Antipin, Nelson), 15:47.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Buffalo, O’Reilly 18 (Ristolainen, Okposo),
3:41 (pp). 7, Tampa Bay, Callahan 3 (Point, Sergachev),
11:36. 8, Buffalo, Reinhart 13 (O’Reilly), 19:52.
SHOTS ON GOAL
TAMPA BAY .......................... 14
9
6 — 29
BUFFALO ................................. 9
12
12 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 1 of 5; Buffalo 2 of
3. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Domingue 2-8-0 (32 shots-28
saves). Buffalo, C.Johnson 4-9-3 (29-26). A: 16,530
(19,070). T: 2:34.
O (21-6) Johnson 29, Becht 20, Teel 14, Weber 13, Banks
10, Gadsden 3 Totals 19 18-25 89.
SJ (18-9) Morsell 20, Dunn 17, Njoku 15, Leggett 12,
Wood 9, Abbott 5, Hunt 4 Totals 16 5-10 82.
Halftime: St. John's, (34-31).
Three-point goals: SJ 15 (Wood 1, Dunn 5, Leggett 2,
Morsell 6, Abbott 1); O 11 (Johnson 1, Teel 3, Becht 4,
Gadsden 1, Weber 1, Banks 1).
P (15-2) Johnson 20, Calhoun 17, Yancey 12, Indianesia
8, Minnis 6, Beasely 2 Totals 26 4-9 65.
B (10-8)Totals 0 0-0 42.
Halftime: Parkdale, (35-17).
Three-point goals: P 3 (Calhoun 2, Yancey 1).
Hurricanes 7, Kings 3
LOS ANGELES .......................... 0
2
1 — 3
CAROLINA ............................... 3
2
2 — 7
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Carolina, Slavin 5 (Staal, Pesce), 6:40. 2,
Carolina, Faulk 5 (Rask, Williams), 8:56. 3, Carolina,
Faulk 6 (Teravainen, Aho), 17:43 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Carolina, Faulk 7 (Teravainen, Aho), 1:17 (pp).
5, Carolina, Skinner 17 (Williams, Rask), 7:42 (pp). 6, Los
Angeles, Kopitar 23 (Toffoli, Muzzin), 11:49 (pp). 7, Los
Angeles, Toffoli 19 (Pearson, Kopitar), 17:05.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 8, Los Angeles, Mitchell 3 (Doughty, Clifford),
6:43. 9, Carolina, Skinner 18 (Di Giuseppe), 14:15. 10,
Carolina, Aho 21 (Teravainen), 16:32.
SHOTS ON GOAL
LOS ANGELES .......................... 3
14
13 — 30
CAROLINA ............................. 18
16
7 — 41
Power-play opportunities: Los Angeles 1 of 2; Carolina 3
of 5. Goalies: Los Angeles, Kuemper 9-1-3 (21 shots-18
saves), Quick 21-20-2 (20-16). Carolina, Ward 17-7-3
(30-27). A: 12,805 (18,680). T: 2:24.
Red Wings 2, Ducks 1
ANAHEIM ................................ 0
0
1 — 1
DETROIT .................................. 1
1
0 — 2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Larkin 9, 13:32.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Detroit, Nielsen 13 (Mantha, Green), 15:37.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Anaheim, Henrique 17 (Rakell, Bieksa), 16:06.
SHOTS ON GOAL
ANAHEIM .............................. 16
5
12 — 33
DETROIT .................................. 5
8
3 — 16
Power-play opportunities: Anaheim 0 of 4; Detroit 0 of 2.
Goalies: Anaheim, Gibson 19-15-6 (16 shots-14 saves).
Detroit, Howard 16-17-6 (33-32). A: 19,515 (20,000). T:
2:27.
Penguins 6, Senators 3
OTTAWA .................................. 0
2
1 — 3
PITTSBURGH ........................... 1
3
2 — 6
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 17 (Schultz, Malkin),
4:07 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Ottawa, Brassard 15 (Stone, Borowiecki),
4:18. 3, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 18 (Kessel, Letang), 5:10. 4,
Pittsburgh, Malkin 31 (Hagelin, Schultz), 10:01. 5,
Pittsburgh, Aston-Reese 1 (Sheary, Crosby), 11:22. 6,
Ottawa, White 2 (Pyatt, McCormick), 17:19.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 7, Pittsburgh, Letang 4 (Crosby, Dumoulin),
10:09. 8, Ottawa, Duchene 14 (Hoffman, Karlsson),
14:21 (pp). 9, Pittsburgh, Aston-Reese 2 (Crosby,
Dumoulin), 18:55.
SHOTS ON GOAL
OTTAWA ................................ 11
14
8 — 33
PITTSBURGH ........................... 4
7
17 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Ottawa 1 of 2; Pittsburgh 1 of
1. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 15-17-5 (18 shots-17
saves), Condon 4-10-4 (9-5). Pittsburgh, Murray 20-12-2
(33-30). A: 18,448 (18,387). T: 2:36.
NO. 10 WISE 71, DUVAL 62
W (17-4) Crowell 15, Gibbons 12, Corley 12, Johnson 12,
Hicks 10, Arnold 6, Chase 4 Totals 16 15-21 71.
D (10-7) Moore 14, Hobbs 14, Bethea 13, Smith 9, Telli 7,
Crockett 2, Alston 2, Woodson 1 Totals 24 11-17 62.
Halftime: Wise, (37-22).
Three-point goals: D 1 (Bethea 1); W 8 (Crowell 2, Corley
2, Johnson 2, Arnold 2).
NO. 16 POTOMAC (MD.) 97, CENTRAL 58
P (19-2) Newman 21, Mallet 17, Funderburk 12, Dyches
10, Doby 10, Riddick 9, Crawford 8, Jones 4, Grier 4, Cook
2 Totals 28 17-25 97.
C (6-11) Young 13, Frager 11, Mitchell 9, Kirkland 9,
Morton 9, Calloway 5, Exum 2 Totals 10 14-17 58.
Halftime: Potomac (Md.), (41-28).
Three-point goals: C 8 (Frager 3, Mitchell 3, Kirkland 1,
Morton 1); P 8 (Newman 3, Doby 1, Funderburk 4).
Montgomery
PAINT BRANCH 90, MAGRUDER 55
PB (17-4) Dudley 29, Reaves 13, Sume 7, Miller 7,
Alphonso 10, Lawrence 5, Heard 2 Totals 25 22-39 90.
M (10-12) Asamoah Jr 19, Wellek 11, Bannister 7, Myrie
4 Totals 11 15-20 55.
Halftime: Paint Branch, (54-22).
Three-point goals: M 6 (Wellek 3, Asamoah Jr 2, Wellek
1); PB 6 (Sume 1, Miller 1, Dudley 3, Reaves 1)
ROCKVILLE 49, WALTER JOHNSON 46
R (11-10) Sorunke 16, Armwood 9, Bailey 9, McTighe 8,
Mantzouranis 3, McClean 2, Pace 2 Totals 18 10-23 49.
WJ (4-15) Roll 13, Roales 6, Kaleeba 6, Newman 5,
Forburger 5, Carter 4, Mahne 3, Koenick 2, Stubin 2
Totals 7 11-15 46.
Halftime: Rockville, (26-19).
Three-point goals: WJ 7 (Roll 1, Newman 1, Roales 2,
Kaleeba 2, Forburger 1); R 1 (Bailey 1)
WHITMAN 57, SENECA VALLEY 56
W (12-9) Bass 17, Ruiz 15, Sanson 10, Squeri 9, Shaver 3,
Holloway 2, Smith 1 Totals 24 9-18 57.
SV (14-7) Dotson 25, Blake 19, Joaquin 5, Hyson 4,
Goldsberry 2, Trautman 1 Totals 18 5-10 56.
Halftime: Whitman, (32-21).
Three-point goals: SV 5 (Blake 3, Dotson 2).
WOOTTON 76,
NORTHWOOD 55
W (8-13) Warshaw 13, Nannen 13, Levin 11, Vondas 10,
Sato 9, Chinnasamy 7, Koch 6, Lvovsky 4, Alborta 2,
Urovsky 1 Totals 17 15-24 76.
NW (0-15) Davis 14, Boboshko 13, Gaalswyk 9, Slade 6,
Tucker 5, Kari 4, Williams 4 Totals 16 14-22 55.
Halftime: Wootton, (37-21).
Three-point goals: NW 3 (Tucker 1, Davis 1, Gaalswyk 1);
W 9 (Warshaw 3, Sato 3, Vondas 2, Chinnasamy 1)
BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE 74,
SHERWOOD 59
NO. 16 BISHOP IRETON 63, CARROLL 33
AC (6-20)Totals 0 0-0 33.
BI (19-8) Konkwo 32, Jewett 10, Peters 6, Shacklford 4,
Irondi 4, Dixon 3, Franklin 3, Marios 1 Totals 20 5-11 63.
Halftime: Bishop Ireton, (33-17).
Three-point goals: BI 6 (Shacklford 1, Jewett 2, Franklin
1, Peters 2).
HOLY CHILD 44, NO. 19 SIDWELL FRIENDS 41
HC (13-8) Yantsos 15, Dapaa 15, Welbon 8, Strittmatter
4, Sellinger 2 Totals 13 9-16 44.
SF (18-5) Lyde 15, Pickens 10, Willing 8, Boasberg 5,
Penn 3 Totals 12 8-18 41.
Halftime: Holy Child, (19-17).
Three-point goals: SF 3 (Willing 2, Boasberg 1); HC 3
(Welbon 1, Yantsos 2).
ISL A
POTOMAC SCHOOL 52, MARET 24
PS (16-7) Park 24, Caskin 13, Mills 5, Moran 4, McAulliffe
4, Regan 2 Totals 10 5-8 52.
M (4-11) Dowd 12, Brown 5, Lalor 4, Betts 2, CameronRice 1 Totals 7 1-2 24.
Halftime: Potomac School, (31-14).
Three-point goals: M 3 (Dowd 2, Brown 1); PS 9 (Park 6,
Caskin 3)
Virginia
OAKTON 36, WESTFIELD 34
W (14-9) Wardak 12, Johnson 10, Williams 6, Reed 4,
Mackmin 2 Totals 12 10-17 34.
O (13-11) Coleman 14, Perine 11, Kaloi 4, Vietmeyer 3,
Mori 2, McMarlin 2 Totals 11 5-8 36.
Halftime: Westfield, (13-12).
Three-point goals: O 3 (Coleman 3).
FALLS CHURCH 78, STUART 29
FC (15-7) Faust 21, Benhamida 21, Kennard 16, Clay 6,
Shaw 5, Thompson 3, Faloni 2, Kassebaum 2, Roxborough 2 Totals 21 15-23 78.
S (6-15)Totals 0 0-0 29.
Halftime: Falls Church, (46-12).
Three-point goals: FC 7 (Shaw 1, Faust 2, Kennard 4)
MARSHALL 57, LEE 38
M (20-3) Soule 8, Donnellan 8, Grill 2, Ford 12, South 11,
Dirkse 10, Catterton 3 Totals 22 7-9 57.
L (1-16) Pulliam 14, Lacy 7, Pellegrino 2, Quiroga-Paz 2,
Pudleiner 2, Clark 2, Powers 2 Totals 11 6-10 38.
Halftime: Marshall, (34-10).
Three-point goals: L 1 (Pulliam 1); M 2 (Trivisonno 1,
Catterton 1)
WEST SPRINGFIELD 54, SOUTH COUNTY 29
WS (11-7) Sharman 16, Morroni 15, White 13, Laychak 4,
Buckner 2, Meiller 2, Ellsworth 2 Totals 19 7-11 54.
SC (14-9) San Diego 9, Taylor 9, Razo 3, Sy 2, Dizon 2,
DeBrosse 2, Schwab 2 Totals 8 1-5 29.
Halftime: West Springfield, (24-19).
Three-point goals: SC 4 (Razo 1, Taylor 3); WS 3
(Sharman 1, White 2)
S (10-10) Salzar 14, Lacey 13, Riley 9, Long 6, Lacey 5,
Martella 4, Johnson 4, Sherrard 2, Williams 2 Totals 15
8-18 59.
B-CC (18-3) McAuliffe 29, English 21, Baer 18, Robinson
2, Gibson 2, Wood 2 Totals 16 21-27 74.
Halftime: Bethesda-Chevy Chase, (38-22).
Three-point goals: B-CC 7 (Baer 3, McAuliffe 4); S 7
(Lacey 2, Long 2, Salzar 2, Riley 1)
LAKE BRADDOCK 51, FAIRFAX 35
KENNEDY 75,
QUINCE ORCHARD 67
WAKEFIELD 41, JEFFERSON 29
QO (9-11) Dorsey 32, Faroane 18, Brown 10, Garrett 3,
Bikim 2, Raines 2 Totals 18 10-11 67.
K (13-8) Johnson 25, Nyamey 18, Kamden 18, Greewood
6, Ntam 4, Regnis 4 Totals 16 22-26 75.
Halftime: Kennedy, (39-28).
Three-point goals: K 7 (Nyamey 2, Kamden 2, Johnson 3);
QO 7 (Brown 2, Faroane 4, Garrett 1)
Bruins 5, Flames 2
RICHARD MONTGOMERY 65, CHURCHILL 55
CALGARY ................................. 2
0
0 — 2
BOSTON ................................... 1
1
3 — 5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Boston, Nash 9 (Grzelcyk, Backes), 0:28. 2,
Calgary, Bennett 8 (Hathaway), 2:03. 3, Calgary, Gaudreau 19 (Stajan, Giordano), 9:12.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Boston, Nash 10 (McAvoy, Schaller), 16:20.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Boston, Bergeron 26 (Krug), 1:15 (pp). 6,
Boston, Bergeron 27 (Backes, Marchand), 9:19. 7,
Boston, Chara 6, 16:14.
SHOTS ON GOAL
CALGARY ............................... 13
8
9 — 30
BOSTON ................................. 11
16
13 — 40
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 0 of 5; Boston 1 of 4.
Goalies: Calgary, Rittich 5-2-2 (39 shots-35 saves).
Boston, Rask 23-9-4 (30-28). A: 17,565 (17,565). T: 2:36.
KENNEDY 75, QUINCE ORCHARD 67
RM (14-7) Alexander 27, Harris 14, Brown 9, Keung 6,
Cruz 3, Little 2, Bandi 2, Lewis 2 Totals 19 9-16 65.
C (6-12) Moshyedi 16, Mbeng 10, Richardson 9, Rindner
8, Liquorie 3, Geenan 3, Janis 2, Orta 2, Piker 2 Totals 10
5-5 55.
Halftime: Richard Montgomery, (26-24).
Three-point goals: C 10 (Richardson 3, Mbeng 2, Moshyedi 4, Geenan 1); RM 6 (Keung 2, Alexander 4)
QO (9-11) Dorsey 32, Faroane 18, Brown 10, Garrett 3,
Bikim 2, Raines 2 Totals 18 10-11 67.
K (13-8) Johnson 25, Nyamey 18, Kamden 18, Greewood
6, Ntam 4, Regnis 4 Totals 16 22-26 75.
Halftime: Kennedy, (39-28).
Three-point goals: K 7 (Nyamey 2, Kamden 2, Johnson 3);
QO 7 (Brown 2, Faroane 4, Garrett 1)
F (12-11) McNaughton 11, George 10, Johnson 7,
Stanford 4, Heslep 3 Totals 10 3-6 35.
LB (14-8) Joachim 13, Park 12, Boone 10, Galonis 6,
Miller 4, Haynes 4, Park 2 Totals 15 9-12 51.
Halftime: Lake Braddock, (26-19).
Three-point goals: LB 4 (Boone 2, Galonis 2); F 4
(McNaughton 1, Heslep 1, Johnson 2)
W (15-9) Spinner 9, Tham 9, Lopez 8, Foley 6, Thompson
3, Wallace 2, Chambers 2, Freeman 2 Totals 14 7-13 41.
J (7-17)Totals 0 0-0 29.
Halftime: Wakefield, (21-8).
Three-point goals: W 2 (Spinner 1, Thompson 1)
Montgomery
SPRINGBROOK 56, GAITHERSBURG 54
G (13-7) Odom 19, Norman 10, Ashiogwa 7, Green 5,
Kuinazah 4, Brogdon 4, Dixon 2, Ashiogwa 2, Genova 1
Totals 22 10-33 54.
S (4-10) Thomas 16, Desir 10, Charles 9, Mouansie 8,
Ofori 8, Macon 5 Totals 24 2-4 56.
Halftime: Springbrook, (27-22).
Three-point goals: S 2 (Macon 1, Desir 1).
WHITMAN 53, SENECA VALLEY 21
W (23-6) Krush 12, McGloon 10, deBettencourt 5, Knox
5, Shaver 4, Witt 3, Gumataotao 2, Meadows 3 Totals 9
11-16 53.
SV (0-21) Oliver 9, Nwachukwu 8, Jones 4 Totals 9 0-0
21.
Halftime: Whitman, (28-12).
Three-point goals: SV 1 (Oliver 1); W 8 (deBettencourt 1,
Krush 4, McGloon 2, Lowet 1)
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
PYEONGCHANG
All aboard: The sights, the sites, the memories — from a bus
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
5 MILES
pyeongchang, south korea
— There was the bus with a donnybrook billiards match on the TV
screen up front; and a bus with a
scintillating volleyball match;
and a bus with updates on Kim
Jong Un; and a bus with an indecipherable game show; and a bus
with four screens all showing an
animal show where one animal
ate another, uncooked, while all
the cute little animals scurry
around while you worry about
them; and that bus with the Korean soap opera in which the
handsome young doctor tried to
resuscitate the pretty young woman, and he kept thumping her
chest and thumping and thumping, thumping for a good 10 kilometers of bus ride at least, thumping until you might wonder if by
chance he had resuscitated her
and then killed her again.
There are the buses on which
the drivers do seem just a little too
Formula One.
Mostly though, there are buses.
Buses are always an Olympic staple, transporting all manner of
people to all manner of venues
and hubs, but at these PyeongChang Games, the bus, that
human invention with roots in
France and Britain and Germany,
does seem more of a star.
That’s because this Olympics is
a sprawl, from mountains to coast
to in between. It’s such a sprawl
that one can feel, from one place
to another, variations in climate.
It’s such a sprawl that one might
leave a hotel at 11:40 a.m., walk to
a hub, take a 43-minute bus, walk
to a wrong hub, take a five-minute
bus back to the other hub, take a
41-minute bus to a third hub, take
an 11-minute bus and, given all the
waits, reach the speedskating venue at 3:30 p.m.
Is a seven-hour, eight-bus
round trip with a closing 40-minute walk in the snow at midnight
worth the trouble to watch the
herculean Sven Kramer skate for
the Netherlands?
Damned right it is.
But what if, here in South Korea’s delightfully friendly Olympics, which employ occasional
people assigned simply to say hello to passersby, someone attempted to go to as many sports as
possible in a given day? Might that
person wind up leaving the hotel
around 10, and returning 17 hours,
nine minutes, eight buses, eight
Coastal venues
Curling, Ice hockey,
Figure skating,
speedskating events
Phoenix
Snow Park
Snowboard
Freestyle skiing
50 MILES
Giant slalom, slalom, bobsled,
skeleton, luge, ski jumping, biathlon
nordic combined, cross country
JEAN CHUNG/BLOOMBERG
removals of layers for the hot bus
interior, and eight reapplications
of layers for the outdoor frigidity
later, at 3:09 a.m.? Might that
person learn the hard truth, that if
you go about things just incompetently enough, there’s a chance of
botching bus schedules with such
waywardness that one might not
witness any athletic pursuit at all?
Might that person wind up at
11:47 p.m., standing below a
mountain for the women’s normal
hill ski jump, wondering how in
the world anyone would use an
official word like “normal” for
that “hill,” waiting to see if a
Norwegian wisp with blond pigtails might be able to sail through
the 12-degree, minus-5-wind-chill
air, and land far enough away to
get a gold medal?
Might that person wind up exhilarated at 3:09 a.m.?
Let’s see.
Spend 17 such hours and, beyond an ophidiophobic worry
about whether a snake might turn
up in the animal show on that one
bus, and one might see some
things.
Let’s start with the young man
at snowboard on the front edge of
the midday crowd, amid all the
aahs and gasps and cowbell ringing for a Swiss snowboarder. The
young man is dressed in the kind
Jake Guentzel scored twice,
Zach Aston-Reese scored his first
two NHL goals and the Pittsburgh
Penguins beat the visiting Ottawa
Senators, 6-3, on Tuesday night.
Evgeni Malkin scored his 31st
and Kris Letang his fourth for the
Penguins, who have won seven of
nine and 12 of their past 16. Sidney
Crosby, who scored his 400th career goal Sunday, finished with
three assists.
Pittsburgh is riding a ninegame home winning streak, the
longest since a franchise-record
13-game run during the 2013-14
season. The Penguins haven’t lost
at home since a 4-0 defeat to the
Carolina Hurricanes on Jan. 4.
Matt Murray stopped 30 shots
for Pittsburgh.
HURRICANES
7, KINGS 3:
Justin Faulk had his first career
hat trick, and Jeff Skinner scored
twice to boost Carolina in Raleigh,
N.C.
Faulk’s three goals came in a
span of 12:21 as the Hurricanes
raced to a 5-0 lead, and he became
the 10th defenseman in NHL history to score a natural hat trick.
PREDATORS
4, BLUES 3
(OT): Filip Forsberg scored on a
penalty shot at 1:19 of overtime to
complete host Nashville’s comeback. After trailing by three goals
entering the third period, the
Predators scored three goals in
the span of 6:42 to force overtime.
DEVILS
5, FLYERS 4 (SO):
Taylor Hall scored twice in regulation, Drew Stafford had the only
tally in the shootout, and visiting
New Jersey snapped a four-game
losing streak.
John Moore and Nico Hischier
also tallied goals in regulation for
the Devils.
SABRES
5, LIGHTNING 3:
Ryan O’Reilly scored a goal and
added two assists as host Buffalo
topped Eastern Conference-leading Tampa Bay.
Backup Chad Johnson stopped
26 shots to pick up just his fourth
win and first in nine home appearances this season.
WILD 3, RANGERS 2: Devan Dubnyk made 32 saves, and
host Minnesota’s early three-goal
lead held up in St. Paul.
The Wild ran its home point
streak to a franchise-record 13
games (10-0-3).
BRUINS 5, FLAMES 2: Patrice Bergeron and Riley Nash
scored two goals apiece to lead
Boston past visiting Calgary.
BLUE JACKETS 4, ISLANDERS 1: Oliver Bjorkstrand
and Pierre-Luc Dubois scored
power-play goals in the second
period, and visiting Columbus
had a season-high 51 shots.
RED
WINGS 2, DUCKS 1:
Dylan Larkin and Frans Nielsen
scored in the first two periods, and
host Detroit held off Anaheim.
Kings trade for Phaneuf
Dion Phaneuf is on the move
again as the Los Angeles Kings
hope he bolsters their blue line for
a playoff run.
Los Angeles acquired the veteran defenseman and forward
Nate Thompson from Ottawa for
forwards Marian Gaborik and
Nick Shore. The Senators are retaining 25 percent of Phaneuf’s
$7 million salary cap hit.
“Dion brings to our club a great
deal of experience and leadership,” Los Angeles General Manager Rob Blake said. “He also
plays with a physical edge, which
complements our lineup well.”
EXPANSION: The group
looking to bring the NHL to Seattle took the next step in the pursuit of a franchise.
The Oak View Group and its
prospective NHL ownership
group, led by billionaire David
Bonderman and filmmaker Jerry
Bruckheimer, submitted its expansion application with the
league Tuesday.
FLYERS: Goaltender Brian
Elliott had abdominal surgery
and will be out for five to six
weeks, General Manager Ron
Hextall said.
of black fur coat that seems right
out of — warning: prehistoric reference here — “Dr. Zhivago,” and
he’s holding a flag in the red and
white stripes of Austria that reads,
“ANNA GASSER.” He has flown
from the Russian port city of Rostov-on-Don, two hours to Moscow,
then nine hours to Seoul, then the
two-ish-hour ride out here, the
flag in his luggage.
The metal flagpole, he bought
in Korea.
This man, Ilya, explained that,
since his trip to the Sochi Olympics in 2014, “It was clear for me
that she’s an outstanding person.
Yep, and she gave me a sign [autograph]. I was very lucky to get it.
And after this, I watched her on
the Internet and on TV every time
I have a possibility. I am her fan
because she’s open-minded, and
every time in a good mood. She’s
very positive and energetic. It surrounds her.”
A Russian man following an
Austrian snowboarder with an
Austrian flag and a newly bought
Korean flagpole . . .
Yes, that would be the Olympics.
Bus after bus after bus from
there, over to the coast, and here
are three guys in Czech jackets
chatting outside a coffeehouse,
and four guys wearing Dutch or-
ange and riding orange bicycles
even while everyone knows that at
home, they skate across the canals
to work. (Not really.) Nearby
breathes one of the most enchanting places possible, a beach
(Anmok) lined with a renowned
“coffee street,” coffeehouse after
coffeehouse after coffeehouse.
Next, after another bus, here’s
Czech men’s ice hockey practice,
and then across the way, after a
mix-up at security over whether
one needs a special ticket, which
would be sort of attitudinal, is
figure skating practice. Here’s defending gold medalist Yuzuru
Hanyu of Japan, and if you’ve
never seen figure skating from ice
level, there’s a wow coming: the
speed. The speed brings a fresh
realm of dazzle for these athletes
who do things so unusual it actually doesn’t make any sense.
From figure skating, there’s actually a walk, if a big one, to the
curious, loud quiet of curling.
Here, two mixed doubles teams of
compelling interest go at it in a
taut semifinal. The Swiss team
includes Martin Rios and Jenny
Perret, and while he lists his athletic hero as Rafael Nadal, she lists
hers as Roger Federer, and it’s a
testament to the otherworldly
gentility of the Federer-Nadal rivalry that these two curlers can
DMZ
DETAIL
S.KOREA
Sources: PyeongChang Olympics, Maps4News/HERE
Buses are an Olympic staple, particularly at these Games sprawling from mountains to Korean coast.
N. KOREA
Seoul
Jeongseon Alpine Center
Downhill, super giant slalom,
combined ski events
Pittsburgh routs Ottawa
to extend home streak
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Pyongyang
Mountain venues
NHL ROUNDUP
PENGUINS 6,
SENATORS 3
Gangneung
collaborate at all.
On the other side, however, vie
a curling glamour couple if ever
there were one: 25-year-old Aleksandr Krushelnitckii and 25-yearold Anastasia Bryzgalova, both
from St. Petersburg, not the one
near Tampa. They happen to be
married to each other, making
them an extraordinary case of
spouses working together and
competing together without any
apparent horror.
Bryzgalova is becoming a bit of
an Internet sensation for her slip
and tumble Tuesday in the bronze
medal match, but more so because of her physical beauty, while
Krushelnitckii’s own physical
beauty and enviable biceps have
made him less of an Internet sensation, with her Internet advantage over him suggesting that
men are more inclined than women to click out of hapless prurience.
This couple of allure would
lose, 7-5, to the Swiss on Monday
night, but there was no time to
witness that ending for anyone
wishing still to reach ski jumping,
thus needing to get a 40-minute
bus, followed by an eight-minute
bus, followed by a 10-minute uphill walk in 12 degrees at 10:30
p.m. It might seem inhumane to
hold ski jumping near midnight
in 12 degrees with snow spitting
across, but then the silver medalist, Germany’s Katharina Althaus,
said, “We count on bad weather
and we count on windy weather;
that’s part of the game,” and the
bronze medalist, Japan’s Sara Takanashi, said, “This is an outdoor
sport,” which mercifully prevents
anyone from slamming into a ceil-
THE WASHINGTON POST
ing.
Finally, at 11:46, one last jumper stands alone, the last competitor left atop the “normal” “hill.”
Norway’s Maren Lundby, 23, was
up there knowing she crashed in
training the day before and needed some physiotherapy, and
knowing she had not aced her first
jump to her standards even if she
did lead after that round.
Yet, in the thing that astounds
us all about Olympians, she felt
calm.
“I knew what to do, and it was a
normal ski jump, so I’ve done this
since I was 3 years old, so it should
not be that hard, I think,” she said.
Off she launched, her head
soon ducking between her skis,
her body flying, flying down to a
spot indescribably sweet, a spot
she knew had clinched gold, such
that she didn’t even have to check
the scoreboard. Hugs and tears
went around, and squarely at midnight she stood on the podium to
receive her preliminary stuffed
white tiger before the gold medal
that comes later. If you never saw
a slight Norwegian with kid-sister
pigtails ski-jump masterfully near
midnight in 5-degree wind-chill,
then you really ought to do so.
Two buses and: one change later, you might wind up on a bus at 2
a.m. with loud French guys cackling in back, what with Americans
always complaining about the
French always being so notoriously loud, and then an hour more
after that, you might wait for one
last bus, from 2:34 a.m. to 3, waiting more and waiting more, with a
body downtrodden but a mind
uplifted.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
Holtby can only do so much as Caps squander lead
CAPITALS FROM D1
wrong and the vicious slash that
led to that man-advantage. No
matter how the game unraveled
for Washington, squandering a 3-1
lead with less than 13 minutes left
in the game for a second straight
loss left the team with yet another
bitter, disappointed feeling.
The Capitals continue to lead
the Metropolitan Division, but
they are now 4-3-3 in their last 10
games.
“It’s really just a mentality,” forward T.J. Oshie said. “There’s no
X’s and O’s, I don’t think, that’s
going to save it. When you go onto
the ice in the last couple of minutes with a lead, your mentality
has to be, ‘No matter what, they’re
not getting a scoring chance,’ or,
‘No matter what, this puck is getting out,’ or, ‘This guy is not beating me in this battle.’ Hard lesson
we learned tonight.”
With Winnipeg goaltender
Connor Hellebuyck on the bench
in the last two minutes of regulation, Washington had an opportunity to seal the result when Jay
Beagle and Oshie had a two-onone on an open net. But Jets
defenseman Dustin Byfuglien
slashed Beagle on the ribs, impeding the pass from Beagle to Oshie
for a likely empty-net goal. Byfuglien was penalized, and Beagle
hobbled to the bench in distress.
Coach Barry Trotz said he didn’t
have an update on Beagle’s health
yet immediately after the game.
“The second slash on Beagle,
that was not a hockey play,” Trotz
said. “There was no intention of
getting the puck or trying to get
the puck. He was already by him.
At that point, we probably
should’ve put it in an empty net.”
Washington got a power play
with 1:17 left, but it couldn’t maintain possession of the puck. Nicklas Backstrom had a giveaway in
the defensive zone, and then he
blocked Blake Wheeler’s shot. But
Scheifele scored on the rebound
to tie the game.
“I thought in this building —
this is a pretty hostile building —
for 54 minutes we played a pretty
good road game,” Trotz said.
“A 3-1 lead and then a one-goal
lead with 1:17, the power play, it
doesn’t matter what happened in
the game before that,” Holtby said.
TREVOR HAGAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Braden Holtby stopped 40 shots Tuesday vs. the Jets but allowed four goals, two by Mark Scheifele.
C A P I TA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
at Minnesota Wild
Tomorrow
8 NBCSW
at Chicago Blackhawks
Saturday
8:30 NBCSW
at Buffalo Sabres
Monday
3 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
Jets 4, Capitals 3 (OT)
WASHINGTON ................... 1
WINNIPEG ......................... 1
1
0
1
2
0 — 3
1 — 4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Winnipeg, Scheifele 16 (Byfuglien, Perreault), 14:41. 2, Washington, Backstrom 14 (Ovechkin,
Wilson), 19:37. Penalties: Kulikov, WPG, (tripping),
10:49; Carlson, WSH, (slashing), 15:38.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Washington, Burakovsky 5 (Eller, Chiasson),
11:22. Penalties: Bowey, WSH, (interference), 7:11.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Washington, Carlson 10 (Connolly, Kuznetsov), 7:01. 5, Winnipeg, Little 12 (Byfuglien, Roslovic),
11:30. 6, Winnipeg, Scheifele 17 (Perreault, Wheeler),
19:45 (sh). Penalties: Carlson, WSH, (slashing), 7:15;
Byfuglien, WPG, (slashing), 18:43.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 7, Winnipeg, Myers 6 (Scheifele), 2:35. Penalties: None.
“We have a couple opportunities
to put it in the empty net and just
move it around the power play to
kill the time. We got a little arrogant, I guess, and tried to make
fancy plays. It burned us. We deserve that.”
It was Holtby’s voice that had
confronted the Capitals during
their last game. He is typically a
reserved locker room leader, respected as one of the best goaltenders in the NHL, so often covering
for his teammates’ mistakes. But
after being peppered with puck
after puck, abandoned in net
SHOTS ON GOAL
WASHINGTON ................. 13
9
4
1 — 27
WINNIPEG ....................... 13
14
15
2 — 44
Power-play opportunities: Washington 0 of 2; Winnipeg
0 of 3. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 28-10-4 (44 shots-40
saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 29-8-8 (27-24). A: 15,321
(15,294). T: 2:34.
against the Detroit Red Wings
during the second period Sunday,
Holtby had reason to be upset,
and he was the critical, vocal one
at intermission. Washington had
managed just two shots on goal as
the Red Wings scored three goals
in the period. The result was an
eventual overtime loss, same as
Tuesday.
Just two days after Detroit’s
target practice, Holtby was once
again sprawling all over his blue
crease to stop waves of prime
Winnipeg scoring chances. Washington led 2-1 at second intermission after goals from Backstrom
and Andre Burakovsky, but the
Winnipeg barrage was fiercest in
the third period, when the Capitals were outshot 15-4. After
Washington extended its lead to
two goals with a snipe from John
Carlson, Holtby allowed one goal
to Bryan Little and got lucky with
one puck hitting the post. He finished with 40 saves and still lost.
“In terms of the [defensive]
zone, we’re a little too backed off
sometimes,” Carlson said. “We’re
kind of in follow-mode versus attack-mode. It’s tough. We’re giving teams a lot of time in the zone.
When you do that, you try to at
least keep them to the outside and
not give them the middle of the
ice, if you’re going to be doing that.
We haven’t done really either of
those, so that’s why it hasn’t been
great.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Pyeongchang
At Winter Olympics, it’s not who you are but where you’re from in most sports
gangneung,
south korea —
Let’s be clear: We,
the people of the
United States of
America, are not
Barry
good at biathlon.
Svrluga
We are some
323 million
strong. Even if we bicker and
brawl with each other with
increasing and alarming
regularity, it would figure we
could, collectively, find one
strapping young woman or man
who might enjoy not only skiing
across rolling hills with a gun
strapped to her/his back but also
firing that gun at targets such
that she/he might, in one
particular quadrennial, be
among the three best in the
world.
And yet, it has never
happened. There have been 225
Olympic medals issued in
biathlon. Americans have won
none of them.
This, however, is not about
biathlon.
We’re not yet a week into the
PyeongChang Winter Games, and
we know a few things. Americans
are good at strapping a plank to
their feet and flipping over their
heads. Canadians are good at
pushing a stone across a sheet of
ice and using a broom to sweep it
into position. Norwegians are
good at skiing, particularly if the
terrain is flat — or even uphill.
South Koreans are good at
speedskating but really only if the
track is short, not long. The Dutch
are good at speedskating but
really only if the track is long, not
short.
Some of this is natural. (It’s
cold and snowy in Norway.
Canada has lots of ice and beer.
Etc.) But it’s hard to escape the
notion that some of it is
contrived, too. And it leaves you
with the distinct feeling that all
medals are not created equal.
Some disclaimers: We cannot
expect all nations, even all snowy
nations, to be equally good at all
Winter Olympic sports. The Dutch
have a long-standing passion for
speedskating — the traditional,
Eric Heiden-style version — and
so they will bring their bands and
their beers and their orange hats
and clothes to that venue and —
how to put this? — go absolutely
loony for their sport. Even
Tuesday night, Kjeld Nuis and
Patrick Roest went gold-silver for
the Netherlands in the men’s 1,500
meters. And so it goes. There have
been 12 medals issued at these
Olympics across four long-track
speedskating events. Dutch
skaters have won eight of them,
including all four golds.
The list of speedskaters who
qualify as national heroes in
Holland — Sven Kramer, Ireen
DEAN MOUHTAROPOULOS/GETTY IMAGES
Kjeld Nuis, center, continued the Netherlands’ dominance in speedskating as he celebrates winning gold in the 1,500 meters. Countryman Patrick Roest, left, took silver.
Wust, on and on — seems more
than 1,000 meters long. Same for
cross-country skiers in Norway
(Bjorn Daehlie, Marit Bjorgen,
etc.) and short-track speedskaters
in South Korea (Park Seung-hi,
even the former Ahn Hyun-soo,
who left to compete for Russia as
Viktor Ahn).
But here’s where that
contrived feeling seeps in, and
we’ll use Korea to demonstrate,
not to denigrate. Two out of the
three endeavors mentioned
above are of historical
significance and trace back to the
athletic history of a nation. The
medal-winning ways of the
Netherlands in speedskating date
from 1952. Thorlief Haug won
two golds for Norway in crosscountry skiing at the first Winter
Olympics back in 1924.
South Korea, on the other
hand, is a short-track power by
choice, not by tradition —
though, after a quarter of a
century of success, you could
argue its tradition is now
ingrained. But when Kim Kihoon won the 1,000-meter race at
the 1992 Albertville Olympics,
South Korea had no history in
Olympic short-track racing
because short-track racing had
no history in the Olympics.
Before Kim’s victory, South
Korea had never won a single
medal at the Winter Olympics.
Now, the South Koreans have 53
— 42 in short track, by far the
most of any nation.
There’s nothing wrong with
this. It’s their prerogative to
pursue a sport, and the South
Koreans’ pursuit of short-track
speedskating helped the country
land these Olympics that are
being held in the mountains a
couple of hours from Seoul. It’s
not a stretch to think: No success
in short track, no Winter
Olympics for South Korea.
And in a way, that could
connect us to snowboarding and
to Chloe Kim, to snowboarding in
the United States. Much like
short-track speedskating,
snowboarding wasn’t even a fullfledged sport in the 1980s. It had
to be invented, and it was
invented in the United States —
nurtured in Vermont and New
England to start with but then
spreading west to the point
where a California kid such as
Kim could find it cool.
So once snowboarding became
part of the Olympic program in
1998, the United States was far
ahead of other countries, and
remains there still. Not only are
the Americans’ only three golds
thus far in PyeongChang in
snowboarding — from Kim, Red
Gerard and Jamie Anderson —
but the United States has just two
medals in all the other sports
combined, at least as of close of
business Tuesday in South Korea.
Because the snowboarding
fields at the Olympics are limited
to four athletes per country in
each discipline, the strength of
the competition here is hindered,
or worse. The fifth- or sixth-best
American almost certainly would
be a bigger threat to end up on
the podium than, say, the fourthbest from Australia.
When American legend Kelly
Clark sat on the edge of being
eliminated from advancing to the
finals in the halfpipe competition
Monday, the sport’s aficionados
could scan down the rest of the
start list and determine that only
two of the remaining competitors
had even a chance to pass her.
She looked to be in peril. But she
was safe. The field is tilted —
toward the United States.
And this doesn’t even get to,
say, women’s hockey. As I’ve
mentioned before, there have
been 10 gold and silver medals
issued in that sport in Olympic
history. The United States and
Canada have won nine of them.
The two powers are due to meet
Thursday, and each is 2-0 to start
this tournament. The combined
score of their “matches”: 17-2.
At least part of the appeal of the
Olympics — of sports, really — is
unpredictability. We already have
some tales of that here: the silver
medal for American Chris
Mazdzer in luge stands out. But
there is also a complex formula of
tradition, funding, commitment
and history that, at least in some
events, cuts out half the Olympic
field before competition even
begins.
Are all medals created equal?
It certainly doesn’t feel that way.
That American medal in
biathlon, if and when it ever
comes, seems like it would be
worth more.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
SNOWBOARDING
Gold — Kim’s ‘buddy’ — rebounds from Sochi disappointment
BY
A DAM K ILGORE
pyeongchang, south korea
— Chloe Kim walked behind a
dais Tuesday afternoon and sat
down to face the assembled media, beaming a megawatt smile,
trailing behind a relatively anonymous friend and teammate. Kim’s
story is remarkable, but it is also
straightforward. She worked
hard, had extraordinarily dedicated parents supporting her, and
refined supreme athletic gifts until she became, at age 17, the best
snowboarder in the world, a bicontinental superstar and an inspiration to children of immigrants. Her path was blinding, but
it was also straight.
Next to Kim sat Arielle Gold, a
21-year-old from Steamboat
Springs, Colo., obscured by the
mighty shadow Kim had cast on
both the PyeongChang Olympics
and the sport. While the United
States celebrated and venerated
Kim for her magnetic gold medal
performance in the women’s halfpipe that morning, Gold had
seized her own achievement, lesser in prominence but richer in
other qualities, such as resolve
and unlikelihood.
Gold won the bronze medal
with a sizzling third and final run,
barging her way on the podium
one day after stealing the final
qualifying spot and two runs after
falling into last place in the final.
Kim had started to grapple with
international fame. Gold had begun to process a quiet satisfaction. They were doing so side by
side.
“Being on the podium with one
of my good friends is always a
plus,” Kim said. “I’m so happy we
get to go through this together.”
Gold had been to the Olympics
before, but she had not competed
LOIC VENANCE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Halfpipe bronze medalist Arielle Gold, right, and gold medalist Chloe Kim have become close friends.
in them until Monday’s qualification round. On a training run on
Sochi’s criticized halfpipe, she
tumbled and dislocated her
shoulder. Gold had performed
well enough at preceding events
to be considered a medal threat.
But the freak injury, at the worst
time, knocked her out of the
Games.
“Definitively a tough experience,” Gold said. “I think it made
me that much stronger for this
Olympics. It definitely set the bar
low for what I wanted to do here.”
Gold’s PyeongChang Olympics
did not start with disaster but still
included wicked trepidation. In
Monday’s qualifying round, she
spilled early in her first run, leav-
ing her fate entirely up to her
second go. She landed every trick
but received a mediocre 62.75, a
score that sent Ricky Bower,
coach of the U.S. halfpipe team,
into the judges’ trailer looking for
an explanation.
The score put her in 11th place,
and only the top 12 scores advanced. She had to wait and hope
as 10 more riders came down the
pipe. Only one surpassed 62.75,
bumping her to 12th — the final
spot in qualifying.
“I was just excited to have another opportunity to ride that
halfpipe,” Gold said. “Just really
had the goal of laying down a
couple good runs.”
The finish placed Gold in the
unenviable position of going first
in the final. She started the competition in inauspicious fashion:
She fell and earned the worst
score of any rider. She landed
clean in the second trip, moving
up to fourth. Gold started her
final run with a frontside 1080, a
trick she learned just a couple of
months before PyeongChang. The
move propelled her to an 85.75,
thrusting her into third, where
she would remain.
Having won a medal, Gold gave
partial credit to her sour experience in Sochi. It allowed better
mental and physical preparation
for these Games. Even before she
dislocated her shoulder in Sochi,
she said, she didn’t enjoy the ex-
perience, too tense about producing results and focused only on
snowboarding.
“Before I even competed, I had
already had way more fun at this
Olympics than at Sochi,” Gold
said. “That in itself was a victory.
Going home with some hardware
definitely doesn’t hurt, either.”
Gold probably could wear that
bronze medal around her neck in
Times Square with little disruption. Kim, conversely, attained a
new level of celebrity.
“Someone told me congrats on
the gold medal,” Kim said. “I was
like, huh. I don’t really know what
that means.”
She is about to find out. Even
her father, Jong Jin, had acquired
a measure of fame: Clips of him
sipping a beer at the finish line
had circulated on social media.
“My dad always likes drinking a
beer,” Kim said. “Cracking a couple cold ones with the boys.”
When Tuesday evening’s news
conference ended, Kim rose from
the dais and exhaled, “Oh, my
God.” She is in the middle of a
cyclone, but it helps, she said, to
be there with Gold. Kim has
known Gold since she was 12, and
in recent years they have gotten
closer. They lived together in the
Athletes’ Village. Kim illustrated
a typical exchange:
“I’ll walk into her room and be
like, ‘Yo, you want to get pizza?’
‘I’m down.’ It’s nice to have someone. It’s so fun to have a buddy.”
“Having someone to beat her
five times in a row in pool,” Gold
quipped.
“Okay,” Kim replied, “I
scratched every time on the eight
ball. Let’s not go too far.”
Through the initial intensity of
obligations, Kim has maintained
her teenage spunk. Between her
second and third runs in the final,
she famously tweeted that she
wished she had finished her
breakfast sandwich, which had
left her “hangry.” A reporter was
incredulous that she had tweeted
while in competition, which made
Kim regard him as if he had been
transported from prehistory.
“Like, what else am I supposed
to do?” Kim asked. “Watching the
contest just makes me more nervous and anxious. It’s when you’re
just waiting there, when you’re
supposed to go to the theme park
and your parents are taking forever.”
Kim revealed why she did not
finish that breakfast sandwich:
The sandwich was cold. She happily reported that she was, after
pizza and a latte, satiated.
Kim’s run immediately entered
into snowboarding legend, a
98.25 that included consecutive
1080s, a first in the Olympics.
Because she went last, and therefore there was no reason to leave
room for a competitor to improve
upon her run, it opened the possibility for judges to award a perfect
100. But she never considered
aiming for the feat, and in fact,
she believes such a mark would
cut against the ethos of her sport.
“I don’t really care that much
about the score,” Kim said. “Even
when I did get the 100 in Park City,
it wasn’t even that. I was stoked I
landed the back-to-back [1080s]. I
don’t think a perfect score is real. I
don’t think you can do perfect.
There’s always a way to one-up it.”
That might not be possible, but
if it is, the world will be waiting to
find out how. On Tuesday afternoon, at least, when she left the
room and headed toward her next
obligation, Kim had a friend next
to her who had her own story to
tell.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
KLMNO
Pyeongchang
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018
EZ
M2
MARK RALSTON/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Tough sledding for U.S. luge team
Sweeney is ‘fine’ after scary crash; Americans fall short of podium as Germans dominate again
BY C HICO H ARLAN
IN DAEGWALLYEONG, SOUTH KOREA
T
hey walked away from the luge track
one after the next, the three leading
women of American luge, each disappointed and shaken in her own way.
The one who finished in 19th place said her
performance was “incredibly devastating.”
The one who finished in sixth place, the last
Olympic race of her career, said she just
wanted to go to bed and sleep. The one who
crashed, caromed and didn’t finish the race
was the luger most upset of all, evaluated by
doctors who detected neither head trauma
nor broken bones, but crying nonetheless.
Emily Sweeney’s injury cast a pall over this
race, a reminder of what can happen on an ice
track when going 80 mph downhill. Halfway
through the course, near the ninth turn, she
skidded and lost control. Her body pingponged through several more turns. She flew
off her sled and fell backward. Officials rushed
over with a stretcher. But Sweeney hobbled
away on her own.
“I’m fine,” she said 20 minutes later, wiping
tears, telling the half-dozen people around her
that she didn’t want to go to the hospital. A
USA Luge statement said she was taken to a
clinic at the Olympic Village for evaluation. “It
was a heavy crash and she was feeling sore,”
the statement said.
Americans are still only on the fringe of the
women’s luge world, where Germany again
dominated Tuesday night, with Natalie Geisenberger defending her singles Olympic gold
medal. But it is nights like these that U.S.
lugers pinpoint as the best opportunity to
grow the sport — by winning medals, by
grabbing the spotlight. Instead, the evening
was by turns harrowing and somber — no
celebrations, only bruises. Erin Hamlin, the
last U.S. luger of the night, finished with her
slowest of four runs down the track, coming
0.268 seconds shy of the podium.
“This is the end,” Hamlin said not long after.
“I’m ready to sleep. I’m ready for pizza and a
long time of sleep.”
Germany’s Geisenberger won gold in a
fashion that shows why she is the unequalled
star of the sport. The women’s luge singles
event is composed of four runs split over two
days, results accumulating with each run, and
Geisenberger was ahead of the next-best luger
by 0.072 seconds after the first time down the
track, 0.120 seconds after the second. That was
Monday. By the end of Tuesday, after two more
runs, she had more than tripled her lead.
Germany’s Dajana Eitberger grabbed the silver, and Canada’s Alex Gough won bronze.
Hamlin, the flag bearer in the Opening Cer-
Norway
WONG MAYE-E/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Erin Hamlin, the top U.S. luger for nearly a decade, finished shy of the podium after closing with her slowest run of the competition.
ABOVE LEFT: Sue Sweeney, the mother of Emily Sweeney, watches as her daughter loses control on the notorious ninth curve.
emonies, was the highest U.S. finisher at sixth.
Summer Britcher placed 19th.
“We’ll be collectively a little upset after
today,” Britcher said.
Sweeney, 24, was in her first Olympics,
having been on the cusp for years. In 2010, she
lost a race-off for the final spot on the Olympic
team to her sister. Then, injuries kept her from
Sochi. Tuesday, she started with a middle-ofthe-pack run — no problems. But her next
time on the track, she lost control in an area
that has bedeviled lugers this week, right near
the notorious ninth curve. Though that curve
isn’t such a sharp bend, its subtle angles can
throw riders off balance.
“I was just hoping she’s okay,” Britcher said.
“We’re all a family.”
“Emily and I are very close,” Hamlin said.
“At that point, sports and racing don’t matter.”
For nearly a decade, Hamlin, 31, has been
Netherlands
the United States’ top luger, becoming four
years ago in Sochi the first American to win an
Olympic medal in the sport. But several
months ago, she decided on retirement, and
her family members Tuesday said they were
just as excited for everything that would come
after luging: her wedding, some time to relax.
In the past six months, for the sake of luge,
Hamlin had traveled to Norway, Germany,
Latvia, Russia and South Korea. Her fiance,
Jon Hodge, is a teacher with an 8-to-4 job.
They’ve been together for four years, having
fallen for each other when Hodge had flown in
for his cousin’s high school graduation ceremony. Hamlin, fresh off the bronze medal in
Russia, was the commencement speaker.
“Next thing you know I’m canceling my
flight home,” Hodge said. “And it’s been longdistance ever since.”
After finishing her final Olympic race,
Canada
GOLD
SILVER
BRONZE
TOTAL
GOLD
SILVER
BRONZE
TOTAL
GOLD
SILVER
BRONZE
TOTAL
3
5
3
11
4
4
2
10
3
4
3
10
Hamlin said she was disappointed but still
fulfilled. She’d anticipated that she might feel
nostalgic or emotional this week. But she
hadn’t. It was probably a sign that retirement
was the right move, she said. “I think I’m ready
for it,” she said.
As she walks away, she leaves the sport
much as she found it: with Germans at the top.
Of the past 30 Olympic medals given out to
women’s singles lugers, Germans have won 22.
Austrians have won another five. Hamlin is
one of just three lugers from beyond those two
countries since 1984 to stand on an Olympic
podium.
“If I knew what was making them superfast, I’d be doing it, too,” Hamlin said of
Germany. “They have more of a pipeline for
athletes. Whereas [in the U.S.], we’re just
trying to convince kids to do it.”
chico.harlan@washpost.com
Live updates: For analysis and
results throughout the Games,
visit washingtonpost.com/sports
D10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Pyeongchang
SKIING
Hirscher earns his first gold, silencing 9 million Austrians
All-time great masters
difficult slalom course
for Alpine combined win
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
bukpyeong, south korea —
What happened here Tuesday afternoon at Jeongseon Alpine Centre figures to linger for good in
some corridor of memory, the
mind’s eye casting it as a rampage,
a fury, a vivid strand of mastery
and maybe even as some sort of
futurist painting.
Here down a slalom course that
sneered with an unusual ration of
pure hell came one of the best
skiers in the history of mountains,
yet also a man who hadn’t yet
found an Olympic gold medal in
28 years and 11 months of life.
Twenty-five of the entries would
not finish the course. A wind gust
showed up partway through and
decided that for 15 seconds or so,
this Marcel Hirscher from the
Austrian Alps couldn’t see the
floor.
All of that only deepened the
memory of the 45.96-second slalom that ratified not only a champion in the two-pronged Alpine
combined event but a champion
of a caliber beyond most champions. Asked later whether his wait
for a gold medal had enhanced
the value of its arrival, Hirscher
paused and said, “Not really. I
mean, I’m just 28 years old, and
sure, these are my third Olympic
Games, but I think I’m” — he tried
to find words, maybe even seemed
to seek modesty — “but maybe in
the best shape I’ve ever been.”
The wait had stretched long
enough to come to seem senseless
and unjust the way those waits
sometimes do.
Hirscher placed fifth in the slalom and fourth in the giant slalom
at Vancouver 2010, then fourth in
the giant slalom and second in the
slalom at Sochi 2014. In between
and after those two, he had won
six consecutive World Cup titles
and passed his storied countryman Hermann Maier just last
month to access second place all
time with an unrealistic 55 World
Cup wins. From 5-foot-8, he long
since had towered.
Now he had vaulted from a
sturdy 12th after the downhill to
first, at a combined 2:06.52,
ahead of French silver medalist
Alexis Pinturault by 0.23 seconds
and French bronze medalist Victor Muffat-Jeandet by 1.02, with
the American Olympic champion
from Turin in 2006, Ted Ligety, in
fifth place at 33, pronouncing it
“good to feel happy with my performance, you know, just not super-psyched on not ending with a
medal.” Another American, the
personality-rich 6-7, 25-year-old
PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN BRUNA/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Bryce Bennett, placed 17th, while
two others, Ryan Cochran-Siegle
and Jared Goldberg, coped with
spills.
Yet a noontime and afternoon
of performances pretty much distilled to one. It shouted a reminder that these are the Olympics,
where sometimes the stakes and
the quadrennial rarity do intersect with a level of excellence
almost inexplicable. Hirscher had
begun with a worthy downhill
run of 1:20.56, within 1.32 seconds
of the leader, the onrushing 24year-old German Thomas Dressen, who ended up ninth. He had
felt “really proud of myself, because the last time I put on downhill skis before the first downhill
training day here was exactly one
year ago in St. Moritz during the
world championships.”
In response to the much-asked
Austrian question of, “Was it the
right decision to start the combined? Yes or no,” he concluded
that, “‘Okay, I’m in the top 30, and
we made the right decision.”
He had stood well within three
seconds of the lead, which had
Marcel Hirscher, who has 55 World Cup wins, picked up his first in
the Olympics with a sensational finish in the combined event.
been his downhill goal.
He had sensed the time coming.
Contenders abounded, with
Pinturault in a threatening 10th
place, and with the Norwegians
Aksel Lund Svindal and Kjetil
Jansrud in second and fourth, but
Hirscher and the ski intellectuals
on the course knew the dynamic,
dynastic truth. All that remained
was the inconvenient fact of a
course Hirscher described as
“very aggressive” and “hard to
gain speed and to find the right
line” and, generally, unlike any-
thing he had seen all his slaloming life.
“The conditions there are very
interesting,” he said of the mountain, once down it. “I’ve never
skied on this conditions before
because minus-20 here in night
hours is something that is unusual. But with 110 kilometers per
hour, wind, it is so dry snow,
unbelievable. Really hard, as well,
for a slalom specialist to let the
skis go in the slalom.”
So: “Well, trying to find solutions and trying to find references
we made from years before on
conditions that are nearly similar
to this. Mostly, all the experiences
I made before were held in America. This is more like here, for
example, and it is completely different to European or Austrian
snow.”
So the level of fight and want
and skill within him had been
even greater than it looked, when
it already had looked like something else. It had looked like many
things, maybe even like someone
who had no further interest in
hearing the chatter from among
roughly 9 million Austrians about
lacking a gold medal.
“I mean, every day,” he said
cheerily of the questions, “but
now it’s over and this is the positive thing.”
What’s not over are the two
more slalom races in which the
man is favored and just might
have become favored more, owing
simply to whatever relief that
might have just alighted within.
“For sure,” he said. “Well, you
know, I mean, no worries, I’m not
traveling home tomorrow. But if I
wished for, because I have my
gold, I reached it, especially in
Austria and everyone was expecting that I was going to win the
gold medal at least once, so it is
here. I’m super, super happy, to be
very honest with you, because we
were not expecting that I was
going to be able to win this in the
combined, so for me it is . . .”
Then the man who made a
memory even for strangers
paused and said, “I can’t grab it in
this moment. But it will come
later, hopefully.”
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
White, 31, brings home third Olympic halfpipe gold medal against loaded field
HALFPIPE FROM D1
America’s greatest winter Olympians and defeated a loaded field by
making the final run of the contest
the best run — not only of the
contest, but perhaps in the history
of the sport.
“I knew I did it,” White said. “I
knew I put it down.”
In his earlier Olympic triumphs,
White could be assured none of his
competitors had the ability to approach his best runs. That wasn’t
the case Wednesday, not against
19-year-old Japanese sensation
Ayumu Hirano, Australian Scotty
James and even fellow American
Ben Ferguson. So, before his third
and final run, White decided he had
to execute a run he never had before in competition.
White stood on the top of the
pipe trailing Hirano, who had posted a 95.25 in his second run, then
fallen in his third. White was the
last man on the mountain. When
the announcer bellowed his name,
the crowd below erupted.
“I just saw him fist-pumping,
and I felt it, too,” Team USA Coach
J.J. Thomas said. “He needs this
energy. This is his stage. He’s a
performer, and this is his stage.”
He adjusted his goggles and
dropped in. He hit consecutive
1440s and back-to-back 1260s, one
of those with a flair called the Tomahawk. When he crossed the line,
White raised both arms in the air.
He watched and waited. White
tried to stare at the judge’s trailer.
Silence replaced mayhem. The
score flashed: 97.75.
White flipped his board in the
air, letting it spin just like its owner.
He dropped to his knees and
dabbed at his face. Shaun White, a
goofy hell-raiser when America
DAVID RAMOS/GETTY IMAGES
Shaun White hit consecutive 1440s and back-to-back 1260s to score a 97.75 in his gold-clinching run.
first fell for him, had been reduced
to tears.
“It was like, ‘Oh my gosh,’ ” said
his father, Roger. “It’s almost like
he’s not even believing it.”
White posed for pictures at the
bottom of the track, stretching an
American flag across his back. He
walked past red-white-and-blueclad supporters, imploring them to
cheer with his arms. “You’re an
animal!” one shouted. He found his
family and hugged his father.
“I just told him I loved him,”
Roger said. “He said, ‘I love you,
too.’ We can’t believe it.”
There was a time when, for
White, disbelief and victory had a
polar relationship. He entered
Sochi in 2014 as the favorite to
defend his two gold medals, to continue his rise as both a halfpipe
wizard and a marketable brand. He
was the Flying Tomato, the carefree
dude who flew the highest and
spun the most. Then, Sochi happened.
“Sochi was so crushing because I
physically had the tricks,” White
said. “I emotionally wasn’t there.”
Really, Sochi just revealed
cracks. White had become a target
for other snowboarders, maybe out
of jealousy and maybe because his
success had placed him on a plane
above the entire sport. Some believed he specialized in contests
and received too much acclaim for
never making backcountry films.
White stretched himself thin. He
stopped having fun.
“He’s so much older now,” Roger
White said. “He went through a
really hard time for a while. There
was a period when he was younger
and at the top for so long. Things
were pretty hard for him. There
was some unpopularity. It’s just
been a roller coaster for a while.”
His renaissance from earlier this
calendar year may have been more
remarkable than his rebound from
disappointment in Sochi. While
training in New Zealand in October, White split his face open attempting a double-flip 1440, a
crash that required 62 stitches.
The injury provided proper context for White’s consecutive 1440s
in the final run. Halfpipe snowboarding is pushing against its limits, with pipes rising in height and
tricks growing more risky. Earlier
in the finals, Japan’s Yuto Totsuka
had to be dragged off in a stretcher
after landing on the lip, falling 22
feet and landing square on his
back. White’s gold medal run in
Torin, through the prism of today,
looks like a halfhearted warmup.
“The moves are so dangerous
now, it’s not like you can practice
them like you used to,” Thomas
said. “These moves are different.
The consequences are so high. We
just had to wait until it was game
time.”
And when the time came, White
delivered. With the gold medal assured, all that remained was sorting out the place the run would take
in the sport’s annals.
“I think, personally, it’s the best
run in the history of the sport,”
Thomas said. “It’s the coolest thing
I’ve ever seen.”
“Gosh, man, I think that’s the
best run that’s ever going to be
done,” said Swiss rider Patrick
Burgener, who finished fifth. “It’s
going to be hard to do better.”
There was not consensus. Hirano, the silver medalist, also threw
consecutive 1440s. James, who
won bronze, hinted cryptically
about a glitch in White’s run.
“There were some details I was
expressing to the judges before the
last score,” James said. “But that is
what it is. Shaun and Hirano both
had amazing runs. It could have
gone either way.”
White took on all comers and
beat them, raising the bar yet again
in a sport he has owned for a dozen
years. White revealed the seriousness of his intent Tuesday in the
qualifying round, when he unleashed a 98.5-point masterpiece in
his final run, even though his first
run had been plenty to push him
into the field. Riders typically play
it safe in such situations, saving
their best tricks for the final, careful
to only whet the appetite of the
judges. Still, White threw down the
best run of the day. “I’m here to put
it down,” White proclaimed.
In the final, White stood atop the
pipe for his first run immediately
after watching James, the feisty
Aussie who wears red mittens in
the shape boxing gloves, put down
the best run of the day to that point,
a 92.00. White responded with a
monstrous 94.25, which he punctuated by ripping off his helmet and
chucking it into the sky.
“He’s a psycho,” said Ferguson,
who took fourth.
Hirano, who posted a 99.00 in
competition earlier this year, took
over the top spot with his second
run, executing consecutive 1440s
en route to a 95.25. So, when White
stood at the top of the pipe a second
time, he was chasing.
White responded with a furious
beginning to his run, leading off
with a 1440 and then landing another. But then, trying to land one
of his trademark moves — the Tomahawk — White fell on his backside.
His third run would be no victory lap. It would be only victory,
genius in nature, the latest and
maybe sweetest triumph of a career
exploding into a second act.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
SU
D11
K
Pyeongchang
SPEEDSKATING
Biney is ousted in 500-meter quarters, bumping back her Olympic dreams
BY
R ICK M AESE
gangneung, south korea —
In a race that’s frenzied and frantic, equally fast and curious, all it
takes is a bump sometimes.
Short-track speedskating can be
rewarding and unforgiving, and
Maame Biney will have years to
explore the depths of those
truths.
First skater across the line?
Bump.
Gold medal dreams? Bump.
Years of hard work? Bump.
Incidental contact early in
Tuesday’s
500-meter
race
bumped back Biney’s Olympic
dreams by four years as the 18year-old from Reston, Va., finished fourth in her four-person
quarterfinal heat with a time of
44.77 seconds, 1.28 seconds away
from advancing into the semifinals.
When it was over, tears welled
in Biney’s eyes, and her cheeks
soon glistened. In a short race, it’s
not always easy to take the long
view, but she tried.
“It’s okay. I’ll be fine,” she said,
wiping a hand across her face. “I
just have to wait four more years
to be able to get back into this big
stage. I can’t wait till those four
years.”
Biney’s Olympics are not over
— she will compete in the 1,500,
which begins Saturday — but she
knew the 500 likely represented
her best chance at a PyeongChang
RICHARD HEATHCOTE/GETTY IMAGES
At middle, Maame Biney of Reston couldn’t recover from a slow start and finished last in her quarterfinal.
podium. She won bronze at the
junior world championships this
year and nearly swept her 500
heats at the U.S. Olympic trials in
December.
Even reaching this stage put
Biney’s name in the record books.
A Ghana native who moved to the
Washington area when she was 5,
Biney is the first African American woman to qualify for an
American Olympic speedskating
team. She was just 17 when she
did it.
“I’m still young,” said Biney,
who turned 18 last month. “I’ve
learned that I just can’t afford to
underestimate anyone, and I just
have to go out there and do my
best.”
The days leading up to the
quarterfinals were fine, she said.
She had nerves in her opening
race of these Olympics, but her
second-place finish in Saturday’s
heats was good enough to advance into Tuesday’s round of 16.
“I was so ready to go out there
and kill it,” she said, “but it’s okay.”
Reliving those 45 seconds, Biney can’t help but think a more
experienced skater would have
known what to do, would have
bounced back from a tiny bump.
As the four skaters sprinted off
the line, Biney felt contact from
the woman next to her, Sofia
Prosvirnova, an Olympic Athlete
from Russia.
“I don’t usually get bumped in
the start, so it was a big shock to
me,” she said.
Prosvirnova
never
broke
stride, but Biney fell behind right
away, clearly out of rhythm at the
first turn and slow to regain her
balance and composure on the
ice. The race is all of 41/2 laps,
which gives even the fastest skater little opportunity to make up a
deficit.
“I feel like for more experienced racers, they get back in the
rhythm very quickly,” she said.
“But since I’m so young and don’t
have that much experience, I’ve
got to figure out how to get into
that rhythm quickly.”
Starts are usually Biney’s forte.
She shoots off the line and accelerates like few others. Losing the
race in the opening strides is
especially frustrating, and she
was bracing herself for an earful
from Anthony Barthell, head
coach of the U.S. short-track
team, who is always encouraging
Biney to simply skate her race.
“He would rather me be myself
and get dead last than get dead
last and not be myself,” Biney
said.
She couldn’t remember the last
time she had a start quite like
Tuesday’s, one she’s certain never
to forget — a stinging memory
that she hopes will propel her
back into the Olympic 500-meter
race four years down the road.
“It’s just been so long, but I
think it’s good for me,” Biney said
of her poor start, “because that
means I have things to work on.
It’s been a good experience, and I
can’t wait for World Cups and the
next Olympics to do well.”
The U.S. men’s 5,000-meter relay team also had a disappointing
night Tuesday. Just four months
after setting a world record, the
American squad failed to qualify
for the Olympic finals. The United
States finished third in a fourteam heat with a time of 6:36.867
— 2.001 seconds away from qualifying for the finals and almost
eight seconds off the team’s world-record time.
“We had some good moments
in there,” said Thomas Hong, a
20-year-old skater from Laurel,
Md. “We were in the mix for a very
long time, I think. . . . We gave it
our best shot. Our best was not
good enough today.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
SPEEDSKATING
Food for thought: In 1,500, Dutch get another gold while Americans struggle
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
gangneung, south korea —
Brian Hansen ate too much. Plain
and simple. He didn’t eat junk,
down a bag of candy or anything
like that — just too much of his
usual pre-race meal. Hansen
wasn’t expected to medal in the
men’s 1,500-meter speedskating
final Tuesday, but he thought he
could have done better than the
15th-place finish he earned, if
only he hadn’t been quite so full.
“I’ve eaten too little too often,
then I bonk. But I felt like I just
had Thanksgiving out there,”
Hansen said. “It sounds so stupid
and it is so stupid, but I misgauged it. That’s how racing goes.
You make mistakes like that. It’s
hard to get it perfect every time.”
His teammate, Joey Mantia,
admitted no problems with his
caloric intake but nevertheless
struggled, too. He entered the
race as a legitimate medal threat,
ranked third in the world over
1,500 meters. He came into the
race thinking he could medal. But
he felt off from the start. He never
found his way, never challenged
Dutchmen Kjeld Nuis and Patrick
Roest for gold and silver, respectively, or South Korean Kim Minseok for bronze in finishing
eighth. Neither did his teammate,
former silver medalist Shani Davis, who finished 19th.
“For me, it’s rolling the dice,”
Mantia said. “And when it is
[there], I’m capable of winning.
And when it’s not there, I’m top
10, with the best. As stupid as it
sounds, I just don’t know exactly
what it takes to make a perfect
race for long track — and I think a
lot of people don’t. You see, the
results are all over the place.”
Mantia had a point. The three
men who climbed the podium
after Tuesday’s race entered it
ranked 15th, 30th, and 14th in the
world, respectively. But the
Dutch, who have already won
three of the six men’s long-track
medals issued at these Olympics,
seem immune to ups and downs.
Between the men’s and women’s
races, they won 23 speedskating
medals in Sochi in 2014. Through
two men’s races and two women’s
races here, they have already won
eight medals out of a possible 12.
“I mean, they’re definitely beatable,” Hansen said. “We beat them
at the World Cups all the time. But
they put it together at the Olympics. I think it’s that simple.”
Simple on paper, yes. But as
Hansen’s finicky fueling proves,
dominance like that is anything
but simple. From legend Sven
Kramer, who won the 5,000meter race a few days ago, to Nuis
and Roest, both first-time Olympians, Dutch skaters never seem
to give an inch on this stage. Many
of the Dutch skaters say their
ability to perform here is because
they can’t afford to give an inch to
get here.
“We get that question all the
time — what’s the deal with the
people for the Netherlands winning all the medals?” Nuis said. “I
think even getting here for us is a
really big thing. We have to be
PETR DAVID JOSEK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kjeld Nuis prevailed for the Netherlands, which has won eight speedskating medals at these Games.
100 percent to even qualify.”
The Americans, like skaters
from every other country in the
world, have fewer skaters competing for the same number of
spots — and therefore more mar-
gin for error in getting to the
Games. Until Sochi, they had
been able to keep up, to pepper
themselves around Olympic podiums.
But they did not win a single
long-track medal four years ago,
something team members have
called “a disaster” and chalked up
to uncomfortable suits and ill-fitted training plans. They entered
these Olympics confident they
could break the drought, optimistic they would once again perform to their abilities. In two
men’s and two women’s longtrack races so far, they have yet to
come close. Brittany Bowe’s fifthplace finish in the women’s 1,500
meters is their best finish yet.
“It’s very pressuring to put it all
on the Olympic stage,” Hansen
said. “The truth is there are so
many races throughout the last
four years to say, hey, Brittany is a
multi-time world champion.
Heather [Bergsma]. Look what
Joey’s done. Shani in years past,
and me, too, I think. Everybody’s
staying positive.”
Davis admitted he is more focused on the 1,000-meter race
anyway. Mantia is more focused
on the mass start event, more
comfortable in chaos than he is in
time-trial formats. Hansen already has an Olympic medal in
team pursuit and will be a part of
that event again here. The medals
could still come. Or one mistake
could undo a race for any of them
— meaning the difference between ending that medal drought
and prolonging it could be as
simple as portion control, a good
first step or two, or something
similar.
“The Olympics are tough like
that,” said the 27-year-old Hansen, who plans to retire after these
Olympics and will therefore have
to chew on this result for quite
some time. “You’ve only got one
shot to prove it on such a big
stage.”
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
JERRY BREWER
Davis should have carried the flag. Instead, he carries a symbol for selfishness.
BREWER FROM D1
five Olympics, this may be the
most intricate and confounding
Shani-ism of all: the man
obsessed with standing alone —
the barrier-breaking first black
athlete to win an individual
Winter Games gold medal —
needed to be appreciated, for
once. When he wasn’t, when
Team USA chose luger Erin
Hamlin by breaking a tie with a
coin flip, Davis turned colder
than ever.
He wrote on Twitter last week:
“I am an American and when I
won the 1000m in 2010 I became
the first American to 2-peat in
that event. @TeamUSA
dishonorably tossed a coin to
decide its 2018 flag bearer. No
problem. I can wait until 2022.
#BlackHistoryMonth2018
#PyeongChang2018.”
Davis arrived at PyeongChang
as a four-time Olympic medalist
who could have garnered welldeserved admiration in this
twilight of his career. Instead, he’s
a symbol for selfishness and poor
sportsmanship, all because of a
stupid and emotional tweet. It’s
just the kind of dumb spat that
Davis would create to mar his
swan Games.
He’s an old man by athletic
standards. He’s more likely to win
a Nobel Peace Prize than to
participate in the 2022 Olympics.
He finished 19th in the 1,500
meters Tuesday night at
Gangneung Oval. This is it for
Davis, and he’s still fighting
perceived slights instead of
basking and taking a victory lap
in Korea this month.
Davis used to be able to combat
any criticism with fast and
graceful performances on the ice.
But on this night, he bowed to
time.
“The ice is super fast,” he said.
“Unfortunately, I wasn’t.”
In his first interview with
American reporters since
tweeting his frustration, Davis
barely addressed the controversy.
Before the three-minute
interview, U.S. speedskating
communications director Matt
Whewell said Davis would take
questions only about skating.
Davis wound up getting three
questions about the flag bearer
flap. He shot down the first, and
Whewell ended the session after
the last. But he entertained the
second question, which was
about whether he created a
distraction.
“Well, I’ve been through a lot
worse than what’s been going on
the past few weeks, so this didn’t
disturb me whatsoever,” Davis
said. “I’m okay. Nothing really
distracted me from anything.
There’s no excuses for how I
performed on the ice, except for
that I just wasn’t strong enough
to compete with the high, toplevel guys here.”
It wouldn’t be an Olympics
without a Davis incident. In
retrospect, the others seem so
silly. There was the quarrel with
Chad Hedrick after Davis pulled
out of the team pursuit in 2006,
the year Davis won his historic
first gold medal. In 2014, when
Davis and the entire U.S.
speedskating team bombed, tight
and uncomfortable uniforms
became a problem. Throughout
his career, Davis has been a critic
of the U.S. Olympic Committee.
He mostly trains on his own with
limited assistance from coaches.
Even the start of Davis’s career
was controversial. After he made
the 2002 Olympic team as a shorttrack speedskater, Apolo Ohno
and Rusty Smith were alleged to
have thrown the race so that their
friend could earn a spot. For an
athlete with a clean record off the
ice and intelligent insights during
most interviews, Davis has never
been able to enjoy fame. Some of
that is his fault. Some of it is ours.
The result is a polarizing legend
who is likely to stomp out of his
sport rather than float away.
Although Davis has written
blog entries about enjoying this
Olympics experience, he talked
about being too focused on the
moment Tuesday.
“You know, that probably
comes to me more after the
Olympics are done, once I kind of
sit back and just kind of go
through everything in my mind,”
he said when asked what he
wants to get out of his fifth
Olympics. “But I’m just happy to
be here, man. The Olympics is a
beautiful rink. The ice is super
fast, and I feel good.”
Davis hoped for a better result
in the 1,500, but he knew winning
a medal would be a long shot. His
best event is still the 1,000 meters.
He won Olympic gold in 2006 and
2010 in that event. He thinks he
has one more good race in him.
“I felt good,” Davis said. “It’s
just that I didn’t have the snap
and drive. I really feel that I’m
more geared toward a 1,000 now.
I really hope that this got all the
cobwebs out, and I can refocus.
I’ve got 10 days to figure it out,
how to get on the podium for the
1,000.”
Triumph is the only way he can
exit properly. He won’t walk away
on rose petals. He can’t. He’s not
that guy. Kobe Bryant was able to
restrain the Black Mamba and
leave the NBA in a sappy way.
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar had a
farewell tour. Roger Clemens, an
intense competitor, turned into a
warm and cuddly tale before the
steroid accusations. Even Ray
Lewis, the fearsome linebacker
who pleaded guilty to obstruction
of justice in connection with a
double homicide, skipped out of
the NFL.
But Davis isn’t a team sports
star with a career of constant
attention. And no fault of his own,
we still live in an idealistic fantasy
world with Olympians. We want
them to be darlings. We want
them to represent purity, no
matter how ugly the Olympic
movement becomes. We project
onto them what we cannot onto
mega-million athletes.
And then Davis comes along
and complicates everything. He’s
an amazing figure in Olympic
history, and his impact on
aspiring African American winter
Olympians is only beginning to be
felt. He’s also an unapologetic
competitor who is out to take
everything he thinks he deserves.
Based on success alone, Davis was
a better flag bearer candidate.
And the United States shouldn’t
award such a distinction by
flipping a coin. That’s a
preposterous way to break a tie.
But it’s classless to throw a fit on
Twitter and then refuse to explain
yourself in greater detail.
This time, Davis probably isn’t
good enough to answer the
criticism with greatness.
“It’s hard to stay on top
forever,” said Belgium
speedskater Bart Swings, who
was paired with Davis in the 1,500
and beat him by more than a
second.
Davis can start a fight with
Father Time if he wishes. He
seems to know better, though. It’s
almost over, and though some
might miss him when he’s gone,
they won’t be inspired to wave
goodbye.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
Pyeongchang
WOMEN’S HOCKEY
In lopsided fashion, U.S.-Russian hostilities put on ice
UNITED STATES 5,
OAR 0
BY
A DAM K ILGORE
gangneung, south korea —
The clash Tuesday night between
Russia and the United States was
lopsided on the ice, convivial in
the stands and never really happened in the eyes of the International Olympic Committee.
The hockey was breathtaking
at times, especially when the
puck found the stick of American
forward Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson. The mixed zone — the
area where the athletes meet the
media — was awkward at times,
especially when the name Sergei
Lavrov surfaced. U.S. goaltender
Nicole Hensley produced a shutout, but everyone wanted to know
about the images on her mask.
The PyeongChang Olympics
can be confusing, and the factors
at play outside the Games hovered over this hockey game. The
United States bulldozed the overmatched Olympic Athletes from
Russia, 5-0, moving to 2-0 in the
tournament before its showdown
with rival Canada, the team preventing the Americans from
claiming superiority in the sport.
Team USA has legitimate gold
medal aspirations, and it submitted a dominant performance.
Lamoureux-Davidson assisted on
Team USA’s first goal and later, in
a feat previously resigned to fantasy, scored the next two in six
seconds, the shortest span between goals by one player in
Olympic history.
“Don’t think I’ve ever done that
before,”
Lamoureux-Davidson
said.
The entire enterprise carried
an unprecedented air. The OAR
women’s hockey team boasts 23
of the 168 Olympic Athletes from
Russia, the cohort of Russian
athletes the IOC allowed to compete. After the IOC and the World
Anti-Doping Agency busted Russia for running a sophisticated,
widespread,
state-sponsored
doping program at the 2014 Sochi
Games, the IOC banned six women’s hockey players from the
Olympics for life.
“Obviously,” Lamoureux-Da-
SRDJAN SUKI/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Gigi Marvin had the Americans’ final tally during a three-goal second period that carried them past the Olympic Athletes from Russia.
vidson said, “we’re aware of
what’s been going on with Team
Russia.”
That would complicate the
game no matter what. A contest
between the United States and
Russian athletes further muddles
matters. The Russian government, aside from its non-Olympic
interfaces with America, has repeatedly labeled the evidence cited by the IOC as fabricated, part
of a conspiracy driven by the
United States to prevent Russia
from its rightful dominance.
“It’s a form of competition
without scruples because the U.S.
team, obviously, are not capable
of beating us fairly at sport,”
Lavrov, the Russian foreign minister, said last week.
Afterward, Russian team press
manager Evgenii Kurgurian
agreed to translate an interview
with Coach Alexei Chistyakov
into English. One question concerned whether Lavrov’s comments had changed the tenor of
the meeting.
“I’m not really sure about that,”
Kurgurian said. “What did he
say?”
A reporter apprised him of the
comments.
“Actually,” Kurgurian said, “we
not follow this news about our
minister. So it’s really hard to
comment.”
“We think about games,”
Chistyakov said. “We prepare for
these games. We can talk about
Olympic Games and sport. Our
goal is to be strong like the
Canadian and American teams.
We think about this, focus on this
only.”
The Americans had to handle a
brushfire Tuesday afternoon,
hours before the game. A report
surfaced that the IOC and Team
USA were discussing whether
Hensley would be permitted to
wear a mask with the Statue of
Liberty painted on it, or whether
it would be deemed a political
statement. As the uproar coalesced, USA Hockey spokesman
Dave Fischer and IOC spokesman
Mark Adams called the back-andforth a “misunderstanding.” Hensley wore her usual mask.
“We’re all good,” Hensley said.
“I’m really not sure what happened. I’m just focused on playing the games. Our equipment
guys take care of the equipment,
and we take care of what’s going
on on the ice.”
As for the Statue of Liberty, “I
think it’s just a great representation of our country,” Hensley said.
“Like I said, we’re just focused on
a win tonight. We’re moving on
from there.”
Lamoureux-Davidson provided the United States breathing
room with a preposterous spasm
of offense. First, she banged a
rebound into the back of the net
to push Team USA’s lead to 2-0.
She proceeded to corral the puck
off the ensuing faceoff, break free
down the ice, fool the Russian
goaltender with a deke from hell
and flip a backhand into the cage.
A lesser effort could have defeated OAR, but what the Russians lacked in skill they made up
for in fan support. The Russian
cheering section featured a fourwoman dance team, clad in
matching red jogging suits with
the words “Red Machine”
stitched on the chest. Other fans
wore stocking caps with a patch
reading, “#Russia In My Heart” in
the front. They waved Russian
flags — which athletes are not
permitted to display in any fashion — and chanted what is becoming a ubiquitous sound at
rinks: “Russ-i-a! Russ-i-a!”
The majority of Russian supporters sat together in front of a
section of American fans. The
groups coexisted with no apparent animosity or controversy,
save for some dueling chants.
During the first intermission, a
female Team USA fan with an
American flag draped around her
shoulders and a beer in her hand
posed for a picture with three
female Russian fans.
“I’m USA; they’re Russia,” said
the American woman, who declined to share her name. “It’s a
friendly rivalry, right?”
Uh, sure? The Olympics plead
for athletes and spectators to
place geopolitical conflicts and
concerns to the side. Among
Tuesday night’s participants, one
country was investigating whether the other played a role in
influencing and/or sabotaging its
freely held presidential election.
That tends to muddy the waters,
even if those waters are frozen,
smoothed over with a Zamboni
and emblazoned with Olympic
rings.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
Meyers Taylor, one of world’s top women’s bobsledders, is looking for next one
BY ADAM KILGORE
Elana Meyers Taylor played softball at George Washington University before becoming one of the
world’s top bobsledders and a decorated Olympian. Every year, she
still watches the Women’s College
World Series, but not as a former
player enjoying the games. She’s
looking to spot a potential teammate.
In recent years, Meyers Taylor
has headed up one of the most
crucial components of the U.S.
women’s bobsled team: the identification and recruitment of potential bobsledders, most of whom
have never competed in the sport
or even considered it.
In the United States, not enough
athletes grow up bobsledding to
field a competitive national team,
so the federation must seek out
athletes and convince them that
their path to the Olympics will
come inside a sled, careening down
a giant, icy track.
“It’s the most important thing,”
USA women’s bobsled Coach Sepp
Plozza said. “You never can have
enough people and athletes coming in to try out. That’s what we live
for.”
If recruiting is the lifeblood of
USA Bobsled, then Meyers Taylor
might be the sport’s John Calipari.
Plozza estimated that Meyers Taylor has recruited 70 percent of the
current national team. The squad
has been settled for the past year or
so, but before that, Meyers Taylor
said, she would contact more than
100 women per year, reaching out
to coaches, administrators or directly to athletes.
“I’m not shy,” Meyers Taylor said.
“I am willing to take a thousand
[answers of no] if it leads to one
more Aja Evans, if it leads to one
more Kehri Jones. I’ll do whatever I
need to do to bring more athletes to
the sport.”
Track and field is fertile ground
because the speed and power demanded in those sports make good
bobsledders, too. Evans, for example, sprinted and threw the shot
put, an ideal combination of speed
and strength.
“If you’re not coming from track
and field, usually you’re missing
speed, and that’s really hard to
gain,” Plozza said. “Strength, you
can always get. Speed, that’s what
we’re looking for.”
Still, Meyers Taylor scans other
sports with equal vigor because
bobsled has attracted all manner of
athletes. Lauren Gibbs, who won
two silver medals with Meyers Taylor this season in World Cup events,
played volleyball at Brown and
started a career in sales before trying bobsled. She said if she could
convince any athlete in the world to
try bobsled, it would be tennis
champion Serena Williams.
“Bobsled is such a unique sport
because there really isn’t one ideal
body type,” said 2014 Olympic
bronze medalist Jamie Greubel
Poser, who competed in the heptathlon and pentathlon at Cornell.
“We all come from such diverse
backgrounds.”
“It doesn’t matter where you
come from, what sport,” Plozza
said. “If you get some strength and
some speed, we can get it done.”
Meyers Taylor’s most high-profile recruit came from track and
field. She started trying to entice
hurdler Lolo Jones to try bobsled in
2010, but Jones rebuffed her. Once,
they shared a limo to a Women’s
Sports Foundation event, and
Jones started toying with her
phone in order to avoid Meyers
Taylor’s insistence. But Meyers Taylor wouldn’t quit asking and finally,
after the London 2012 Olympics,
Jones agreed. In the 2016-17 season,
Jones and Meyers Taylor won two
World Cup silvers together.
“She was a hard one to get,”
Meyers Taylor said, “but we got
her.”
Meyers Taylor’s relentlessness
helps make her an effective recruiter, but her pitches are more persuasive than annoying because she’s so
easy to like.
“It’s just the way she is,” Plozza
said. “She’s really approachable
and really nice. She’s one of the
greatest in the sport of women’s
bobsled in history, and she’s still so
down to Earth. She talks to people
and she’s able to motivate people to
try out.”
Poaching athletes from other
sports requires a deft touch. An
invitation to try bobsled could
come with an indelicate implication: that the athlete in question
needs a secondary route to the
Olympics because she couldn’t
make it in her chosen sport.
Meyers Taylor, though, is quick
to assuage those concerns. She ensures prospective bobsledders that
trying a new sport doesn’t mean
giving up on an old one. She is
living proof: Meyers Taylor trained
with the U.S. rugby sevens team
until concussions forced her to
choose between sports.
“I don’t put limits on anybody,”
Meyers Taylor said. “The athletes
we recruited, we’re not recruiting
just people who are not good
enough in track and field. We’re
trying to go after the top athletes in
the world.”
The search for athletes in other
sports, particularly track and field,
has created a team with remarkable diversity compared with other
winter sports. While the U.S. Winter Olympic team is overwhelmingly white, seven of nine athletes on
the current women’s national bobsled team are minorities. That,
though, is only an accident.
“I’ve made an effort to recruit
fast,” Meyers Taylor said. “I don’t
care what you look like. I just want
fast. Most of the time, I go off NCAA
track and field lists. I’ve also
reached out to strength and conditioning coaches. It just so happens
most of the athletes are of color. I
really do not care what you look
like. I’m just going for speed.”
Said Evans: “We’re all trying to
shed a light on the sport and the
potential of the sport. It’s a lack of
knowledge. People don’t know. I
didn’t know myself. I think the
world is finally catching up. They’re
realizing there’s so much opportunity in a lot of these winter sports.”
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
FIGURE SKATING
American pair won’t earn another medal, but they have already won big
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
gangneung, south korea —
Not a year and a half before Alexa
Scimeca-Knierim slid onto the ice
at Gangneung Ice Arena on
Wednesday, she was wasting away.
Pound by pound, week by week,
one half of the best American pairs
figure skating team withered to
somewhere around 80 pounds.
The question of whether she
would skate was preempted by
that of whether she would live to
see these PyeongChang Games.
So when she and her husband,
Chris Knierim, stood at skating
attention near the Olympic Rings
at center ice Wednesday morning
— Valentine’s Day — they didn’t
care about the medals. Knierim
cut out a red construction paper
heart with “Will you (still) be
mine” written on it, and he stashed
it away to give her after their skate,
no matter what happened. He put
an American flag sticker on it, too.
The Knierims are not expected
to medal here. American pairs
teams never are these days — they
haven’t won an Olympic medal
since 1988. But in some cases, the
medals just don’t matter much at
all. In this case, on Valentine’s Day
a world away from home and 15
months after Alexa battled
through a gastrointestinal problem that threatened her life, what
mattered was a love story.
“I think what a lot of people
have a hard time grasping is this
journey is really between Chris
and I,” Scimeca-Knierim said. “It’s
not about our score. It’s not about
the other teams being better than
us. It’s deeper than that.”
The Knierims helped the United States to a bronze medal in the
team competition earlier this
week. If there had been pressure,
they said, it left them when they
did their part there. Wednesday,
they could skate together, consumed by a program soaked with
meaning, set — deliberately — to
“Come What May” from “Moulin
Rouge.” Suddenly the world seems
such a perfect place. Suddenly it
moves with such a perfect grace.
“[We] said to each other before
we skated, enjoy everything out
there — even the mistakes,” Scimeca-Knierim said. “Let’s be proud of
the mistakes. We’re here, and
that’s an accomplishment.”
When Scimeca-Knierim, 26,
first got sick in the spring of 2016,
no one could figure out what was
wrong. She was plagued by vomiting and stomach trouble all of that
summer, which included the duo’s
wedding, before finally being diagnosed with a gastrointestinal
condition in August. She had two
abdominal surgeries, tried to resume training and couldn’t do it.
By the time she had a third surgery
in November of that year — about
15 months before these Games —
she and her husband had no idea
what skating would look like when
she returned.
The stories of those first days
back explain their gratitude. They
talk about the times Chris had to
hold Alexa’s hands to guide her
around the ice when she couldn’t
make it alone, about cutting training sessions short because she
couldn’t last — about struggles to
stand, let alone skate. By then, the
Games were a year away. By then,
Wednesday’s skate — in which Knierim threw his wife high into the
air and watched her spin safely to
the ice, or sent her twirling into
the air before catching her and
setting her back down — seemed
unthinkable.
“It’s just a blessing for us to even
be at this position, so we’re soaking it all in,” Knierim said. “We’re
skating for ourselves. Not for anyone else.”
Until Scimeca-Knierim’s illness, the Knierims had posted the
highest pairs score in the history
of Americans competing interna-
tionally. They had honed the
vaunted quad twist — one of the
most difficult, and therefore highest-scoring, elements in any pairs
program.
They did not do one in their
short program, which included a
triple twist — one Scimeca-Knierim over-rotated, an unusual problem considering many skaters are
more prone to under-rotate a challenging move like that.
The Knierims, of course, are not
alone in overcoming trials of various degrees to get here. The favorites, for example, are German pair
Aljona Savchenko and Bruno Massot. Savchenko has gone through
three partners, two nationalities
and five Olympic Games in pursuit
of a gold medal — and now, at 32, is
finally getting her chance.
She and Massot are fourth after
their short program, and they will
chase their medal in the free skate
Thursday. Ryom Tae Ok and Kim
Ju Sik, the North Korean pair who
turned in a clean, crowd-pleasing
skate, will enter the free skate in
11th place. Wenjing Sui and Cong
Han of China will enter the free
skate in the lead. Canada’s Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford
are in third.
The Knierims were the lone
American representatives in the
field, and they likely could have
placed higher than their 14th position after the short program had
they skated like they did in the
team competition. The best U.S.
pairs finish of the last 20 years
came in 1998, when Kyoko Ina and
John Zimmerman finished fourth
overall.
The Knierims will not approach
that fourth-place finish. They will
need a surpassing performance
Thursday to finish in the top 10.
But after all it took to get here, the
Knierims will be celebrating
Thursday, no matter what happens — come what may.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Pyeongchang
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
Kaitlyn Lawes lets go of a shot during the mixed doubles curling gold medal match Tuesday in Gangneung, South Korea. She and teammate John Morris swept past defending world champion Switzerland, 10-3.
OLYMPICS NOTES
Shi≠rin’s
debut gets
delayed
once again
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
High winds again wreaked havoc with the Alpine skiing competition, causing a postponement of
Wednesday’s women’s slalom —
scheduled to be Mikaela Shiffrin’s
first action at the PyeongChang
Olympics.
Officials from the International
Ski Federation (FIS) delayed the
scheduled 10:15 a.m. start of the
first run three times before calling
it for the day around 11:15. The
event, in which Shiffrin is a heavy
favorite to defend the gold medal
she won four years ago in Sochi,
will now be contested Friday.
By the end of Wednesday, Shiffrin was supposed to have already
completed her two best events.
But the giant slalom, which was
scheduled for Monday, was
pushed to Thursday by the winds
that have chilled athletes and created unsafe conditions at the two
Alpine venues.
“The No. 1 thing is safety, and
the next thing is to have a good,
fair race,” said Paul Kristofic, the
women’s Alpine coach for the U.S.
Ski and Snowboard Association.
“And neither of those were really
achievable today.”
In addition to the wind, snow
fell on the slalom course at the
Yongpyong Alpine Centre on
Wednesday morning, creating visibility problems. Kristofic said FIS
forecasts showed the wind was set
to increase in the afternoon, when
the second of the two slalom runs
was slated to be staged.
So, five days into the Olympics,
the women have yet to ski.
“It’s challenging — there’s no
doubt about it,” Kristofic said.
“You’ve got to get ready physically
for a race like this. It starts early in
the morning. And then the psychological aspect of getting ready
to perform at the biggest event of
the year — all that takes time and
energy. Everyone’s a little
bummed out when a day like this
happens.”
The schedule for the Alpine
events is now compressed, with
two events Thursday (women’s
giant slalom and men’s downhill,
which was originally scheduled
for Sunday) and two more Friday
(women’s slalom and men’s super-G).
Shiffrin, 22, said before the
Games that she would definitely
ski the slalom and giant slalom,
her best events, but would evaluate several factors — her energy
level, physical and mental state as
well as course conditions — before determining whether she
would compete in the speed
events: the downhill and super-G.
The super-G, which will be Lindsey Vonn’s first competitive appearance at these Games, is set for
Saturday, with the downhill
scheduled for Feb. 21.
Should Shiffrin take on the super-G — the only discipline in
which she has neither a World
Cup win nor a podium finish —
she would ski three straight days.
— Barry Svrluga
MIXED DOUBLES CURLING
WOMEN’S HOCKEY
Canadians secure debut gold
With U.S. up next, Canada cruises
With a triumphant hug and fist pump, Canada won the first
Olympic gold medal in curling mixed doubles, beating Switzerland, 10-3, on Tuesday in front of a roaring crowd of jubilant
Canadians in Gangneung, South Korea.
The win over the defending world champions marked a
historic moment for mixed doubles, which is making its
Olympic debut. The Swiss players conceded the match early
after falling too far behind, reaching out to shake their
opponents’ hands and prompting John Morris to hoist Canadian teammate Kaitlyn Lawes into the air with glee.
Mixed doubles, the livelier cousin to traditional single-gender curling, has proved popular with players and fans. The
matches last only 90 minutes, as opposed to three hours in
standard curling, and there are only two players on each team
instead of four, meaning both curlers must always be ready.
“If someone’s going to try curling for the first time, this mixed
doubles is where it’s at,” Morris said. “It’s quick, it’s fast-paced,
it’s very athletic, and it’s so much fun to play — and you don’t
need four players. I’m really proud of us for coming here and
helping put mixed doubles on the map.”
Olympic Athletes from Russia beat Norway, 8-4, for bronze.
The Canadians are playing on their favorite stage, and their
top line of Marie-Philip Poulin, Megan Agosta and Melodie
Daoust is peaking at just the right time.
Agosta and Daoust each had a goal and an assist, and Canada
beat Finland, 4-1, on Tuesday in Gangneung, South Korea, as the
team continues its pursuit of its fifth straight Olympic gold
medal. Poulin added a goal as the line combined for five points
on the night.
“The three of them together obviously can create some magic
for us, and they sure have done that for us in the last two games,”
Canada Coach Laura Schuler said.
The Canadians have outscored opponents 9-1 entering their
preliminary-round showdown Thursday (10 p.m. Eastern time
Wednesday) with their biggest rivals, the United States.
Jillian Saulnier also scored, and Shannon Szabados made 22
saves for the win. Szabados just missed the shutout when she
couldn’t get her right leg out in time to stop a rebound.
“I think the ‘W’ is a little more important,” she said.
The Finns upset Canada in pool play of the world championships in the spring and then lost the rematch in the semifinals.
They hope to flip that scenario this time around.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
ADAM PRETTY/GETTY IMAGES
TOD AY ’ S TV
JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
MEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY SPRINT
WOMEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY SPRINT
Norway’s Klaebo can sleep easy
Nilsson turns bronze into gold
Sleep is something Johannes Hoesflot Klaebo of Norway said
he was struggling with ahead of Tuesday’s sprint race. But he
leaned on his family for help, and it worked like a charm — and
ended with Klaebo wearing gold.
“It will be great to have a good night sleep,” Klaebo said with a
laugh. “Now I can sleep with a big smile on my mouth.”
Klaebo pulled away midway through the race and won by
1.34 seconds while coasting to the finish line. Beyond trying to
get his rest, Klaebo was feeling the pressure from those in his
Olympics-mad country. The world’s top-ranked cross-country
sprinter showed he was up to the task.
“It’s been a lot of pressure, and I had good help from my mom
and dad to try to focus on what we were going to do,” he said. “ To
be able to win today and deal with pressure, it’s a big victory in
both ways.”
Frederico Pellegrino of Italy edged Russian rival Alexander
Bolshunov in a photo finish to take silver. Bolshunov took the
bronze.
“Klaebo was just too young and too strong for me,” said
Pellegrino, who credited eating Italian food the night before for
his medal-winning performance.
Sweden’s Stina Nilsson found a golden way to handle the
stress of the Olympics.
On Tuesday, Nilsson won the sprint ahead of Maiken
Caspersen Falla of Norway and Yulia Belorukova of the
Olympics Athletes from Russia. It was Nilsson’s second career
medal; she scored bronze in Sochi four years ago.
Nilsson said she turned off her social media accounts and
stayed off the Internet as the Olympics approached.
“It wasn’t so much the last couple weeks, because I wasn’t on
the Internet and wasn’t on Instagram,” she said. “The most
pressure came from myself — that is the pressure I had to deal
with. I managed to control those feelings and ski as fast as I can.”
Yet again, there was no medal for an American woman:
Jessica Diggins failed to become the first U.S. woman to win an
Olympic medal in cross-country, placing sixth.
Diggins reached the finals after beating Natalia Nepryaeva,
an Olympic Athlete from Russia, in a photo finish in the second
semifinal heat. Diggins had the fourth-fastest time in the
semifinals, but she was more than 11 seconds behind Nilsson in
the finals. “It’s a huge step forward for me just to make finals,”
Diggins said.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
SPEEDSKATING:
Choi
Min-jeong skated around waving
to the South Korean fans who
chanted her name. Arianna Fontana grabbed the Italian flag in
celebration.
This being wild and woolly
short-track speedskating, the result of the women’s 500 meters
waited on the judges’ decision.
Fans chanted Choi’s name, as if
willing her to win the only Olympic short-track event that has
eluded the South Koreans.
But soon Choi was leaning over
the rinkside padding listening to
consoling words from her coach
Tuesday night in Gangneung,
South Korea.
It was Fontana who was celebrating, jumping up and down in
her skates and shaking her fists in
triumph. The Italian earned her
sixth career Olympic medal,
equaling Wang Meng of China for
most by a short-track skater. It
was her first gold.
The outcome hung in the balance for several minutes while the
referees sorted out a photo finish
between Choi and Fontana. The
photo showed Fontana’s skate
blade crossed barely in front of
Choi’s.
“When I saw I was first, I was
just yelling and started crying,”
Fontana said. “I worked for four
years, and the last four months
were really hard for me. I was
really focused on getting here in
the best shape ever.”
That meant sacrificing, espe-
cially at the dinner table.
“I was on a strict diet,” she said.
“I like to eat — I’m Italian, so I like
to eat a lot of carbs. I had to cut
that off.”
MEN’S HOCKEY: Ryan
Zapolski will start in goal for the
U.S. men in their Olympics opener
against Slovenia.
Zapolski was the first player
late general manager Jim Johannson brought up to Coach Tony
Granato last summer, and the
31-year-old from Erie, Pa., has
been one of the best players in the
Kontinental Hockey League so far
this season.
CURLING:
The United
States men scored early and often
on their way to an 11-7 win over
South Korea to open the round-
robin competition Wednesday in
Gangneung, South Korea.
The Americans, led by skip
John Shuster, scored two points in
the first end, three in the third and
three more in the fifth to take an
8-3 lead. After a three-point sixth
end for the South Koreans, the
Americans added two in the seventh and held on from there.
The U.S. squad next faces Italy
on Thursday. In other action, Sweden beat Denmark, 9-5; Canada
handled Italy, 5-3; and Great Britain edged Switzerland, 6-5.
The women’s curling also began Wednesday; the United States
faced Japan in its opener.
ON THE AIR: Katie Couric
apologized for saying that the
Dutch are so successful in speed-
What to watch: World champion
Heather Bergsma goes for gold in
speedskating. The U.S. women’s
hockey team takes on archrival
Canada. The U.S. men’s hockey
team, largely unknown players,
plays its first game, against
Slovenia. The free skate in figure
skating pairs will determine the
medalists; three of the top pairs
are from Russia.
NBC
3-5 p.m. Luge, doubles gold; men’s
Nordic combined, normal hill/
10-km gold
8-11:30 p.m. Figure skating, pairs
gold (LIVE); men’s skiing, super-G
gold (LIVE); men’s skeleton (LIVE);
women’s speedskating,
1,000-meter gold
12:05-1:30 a.m. Men’s snowboard
cross gold (LIVE); men’s skeleton
NBCSN
2:30-6:30 a.m. Women’s
speedskating, 1,000 gold (LIVE);
men’s Nordic combined, normal
hill/10-km gold (LIVE); women’s
skeleton training
6:30-9:30 a.m. Men’s hockey,
U.S.-Slovenia (LIVE)
9:30-11:30 a.m. Luge, doubles
gold; women’s skeleton training
11:30 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Women’s
biathlon, 15-km gold
1:15-5 p.m. Women’s curling,
Denmark-Sweden
8:30-10:10 p.m. Figure skating,
pairs gold (LIVE)
10:10 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Women’s
hockey, U.S.-Canada (LIVE)
12:30-2:40 a.m. Women’s curling,
U.S.-Britain
USA
2:30-5 a.m. Women’s hockey,
Korea-Japan (LIVE)
5-7:10 a.m. Women’s curling,
Britain-OAR
7:10-9:30 a.m. Men’s hockey,
OAR-Slovakia (LIVE)
CNBC
5-8 p.m. Women’s curling,
U.S.-Japan
10 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Men’s hockey,
Finland-Germany (LIVE)
Live updates online
For analysis and results
throughout the Games, visit
washingtonpost.com/sports
skating because skates have been
used as a form of transportation
when canals freeze over in the
Netherlands.
Her remark during the Olympics’ Opening Ceremonies invited
some mockery on social media
from people who said the idea was
outdated. The Netherlands embassy to the United States invited
Couric to visit the country to see
all of the innovative ways the
Dutch get around.
Late Monday, Couric tweeted:
“My apologies for being on thin
ice for my comments re: skating
on canals. I was trying to salute
your historical passion for the
sport but it didn’t come out that
way.”
— Associated Press
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018
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851
Prince Georges County
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 23rd
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip
S. Shriver, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 17106 Birch
Leaf Terrace, Bowie, MD 20716, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 23rd day of February,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 23rd day of February,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $395,035.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018 12158601
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-37277
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 22nd
day of January 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 847 Nalley
Road, Cheverly, MD 20785, will be
ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 22nd day
of February, 2018, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
22nd day of February, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$136,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018 12158491
The Air Force decided to utilize the interim Taxiway C site for the
Hazardous Cargo Pad during the Hangar complex construction, and
identified Southeast Option 1 (or a variant thereof) as its preferred
alternative for the permanent siting of the Hazardous Cargo Pad and
Explosive Ordnance Disposal Proficiency Range. The final decision for
the permanent siting of Hazardous Cargo Pad/Explosive Ordnance
Disposal Proficiency Range may be made in a subsequent Record of
Decision.
Inquiries regarding this Notice or the Record of Decision can be made
through the project website at www.parprogrameis.com, or by mail
to: Ms. Jean Reynolds, EIS Project Manager, AFCEC/CZN, 2261 Hughes
Ave., Ste. 155. JBSA Lackland, TX 78326-9853
825
Bids & Proposals
825
Bids & Proposals
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018
12158496
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $172,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
12158496
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
SF
v.
ESTATE OF CLIFTON V. THACKER
THOMAS KOKOLIS, ESQ.,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-22470
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 23rd
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip
Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip S.
Shriver, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 15701 Blackburn Street, Accokeek, MD 20607,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 23rd day of February,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 23rd day of February,
2018.
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
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SF
SF
SF
SF
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Interested firms should register with DC Water's Vendor
Portal at www.dcwater.com/procurement with at least
one of the commodity codes associated with this RFI in
order to receive automatic notification of updates and
addenda. Instructions for responding to this RFI and the
expected solicitation timeline are in the RFI document. Read
them carefully.
For questions, contact Joel Grosser, Manager of Category
Management,
preferably
by
email
at
joel.grosser@dcwater.com, or 202-787-2028 by phone.
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
ESTATE OF SHIRLEY S. KELLAR
LAURA MASCORRO,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-21494
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 22nd
day of January 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 122 Cree
Drive, Oxon Hill, MD 20745, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 22nd day
of February, 2018, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
22nd day of February, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$243,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018 12158485
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $30,000.00.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Prince Georges County
Civil Action No. CAEF1700115
NOTICE
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-22452
NOTICE
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-20077
NOTICE
851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
PAMELA K. WATERS
Defendant(s)
vs.
MARY M BRINKLEY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
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KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
VINCENT L PARKER, II A/K/A
VINCENT L PARKER II
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
The Record of Decision documents only the decision of the Air Force
with respect to proposed actions analyzed in the Final Environmental
Impact Statement. The Record of Decision was signed on December
27, 2017. By the Decision, the Air Force will construct and operate
a two-bay Presidential Aircraft Recapitalization Hangar Complex
(hereafter referred to as “the Hangar Complex”) facility on Joint
Base Andrews at a location known as Alternative 4 to house two
separately acquired Boeing 747-8 aircraft. The Record of Decision
includes decisions on other mission activities necessitated by the
Hangar Complex siting.
Firms that respond to this RFI with, in DC Water’s sole
judgement, the best solutions for the opportunities
described in the RFI will be invited to present to DC Water.
DC Water will then issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) to the
firm(s) demonstrating the best proposal. However, DC Water
may choose to incorporate the presentation in to the RFP
process. Therefore, only firms responding to this RFI will
receive the RFP.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
vs.
JAMIE C WILKINS PARKER A/K/A
JAMIE C WILKINS PARKER A/K/A
JAMIE WILKINS A/K/A JAMIE
PARKER
Official Notices
We already have an award winning sales team
(Most with past leadership experience)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 23rd
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 6607 Greig
Street, Capitol Heights, MD 20743,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 23rd day of February,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 23rd day of February,
2018.
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018 12158499
820
This Request for Information, RFI # 18-PR-DIT-26, is to identify
potential Cloud-Based Call Center firms and solutions for
a Cloud-Based Contact Center Application.
Critical
capabilities include telecommunication integration with
Microsoft Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams and SAP
Vertex one that will assist DC Water meeting its business
objectives.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 23rd
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip
S. Shriver, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 2303 Seton
Way, District Heights, MD 20747,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 23rd day of February,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 23rd day of February,
2018.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Official Notices
The United States Air Force is issuing this notice to inform the public
of the availability of a Record of Decision for the Presidential Aircraft
Recapitalization Program Final Environmental Impact Statement. The
Final Environmental Impact Statement was made available to the
public on October 17, 2017 through a Notice of Availability in the
Federal Register (Volume 82, Number 199, Page 48227) with a wait
period that ended on November 15, 2017.
We also work hugely populated events like :
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KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
CARROLL C POGE
RITA L POGE
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
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KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
SHERRI QUEEN
MARK QUEEN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-21409
NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
for the following
areas:
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $167,200.00.
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Prince Georges County
820
JOBS
Personality = Paycheck!
Training in Time for Event Season!
Lynnwood B Andrews PhD is closing
her practice. To obtain your records
you must contact Dr. Andrews at
(802) 649-7073, before retrieving
them at 6270 Montrose Rd Rockville
MD between 1-4PM on 3/21/18. All
medical records will be destroyed
after 3/21/18.
851
S
JOBS
Official Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Newspaper Delivery
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to deliver
S
Donald Wheeler Young II.Pls contact
Charmain Sweat at 3013052089.
830
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job period. Return transport
provided or paid to same wkrs
if wkr completes job period
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work hrs each 12-wk period.
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820
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Notice is hereby given this 23rd
day of January 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 13512 Livingston Road, Clinton, MD 20735,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 23rd
day of February, 2018, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 23rd day of February, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$140,995.10.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018
12158492
vs.
SARAH JANE KOLBE
MARGARET KOLBE
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-37211
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 23rd
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip
Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 15747 Livingston
Rd, Accokeek, MD 20607, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 23rd day of February,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 23rd day of February,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $191,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ONNIE ANDERSON
FELECIA ANDERSON
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-24894
NOTICE
12158495
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
ESTATE OF BILL C. MCKEON
FRANCIS X. BORGERDING, JR,
Personal Representative
LINDA D. DUMIRE,
Successor Trustee,
BILL C. MCKEON LIVING TRUST
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-16732
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 22nd
day of January 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9107 Live
Oak Lane, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 22nd day of February,
2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 22nd day of February, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$219,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018 12158488
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JOYCE A. MURRAY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-21410
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 23rd
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip
S. Shriver, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 713 Yarrow
Court, Accokeek, MD 20607, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 23rd day of February,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 23rd day of February,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $331,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018 12158499
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
vs.
DARREN MAKOTO SMITH
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-12493
NOTICE
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 23rd
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip
Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 8401 Cahill Court,
Clinton, MD 20735, and reported
in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 23rd
day of February, 2018 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 23rd
day of February, 2018.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 24th
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip
Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 5467 Woodland
Blvd, Oxon Hill, MD 20745, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 26th day of February,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 26th day of February,
2018.
v.
Soo C. Park
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-33872
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $261,000.00.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $201,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14 2018 12158494
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018 12158604
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 24th day of January 2018, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at 701
Accokeek Road, Accokeek, Maryland 20607, made and reported
by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Hugh J. Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel, and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 26th day
of February, 2018, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 26th day of February, 2018.
840
Trustees Sale - DC
FREE UNDER $250
840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
SALE OF 19 DANBURY STREET SW, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
Pursuant to the November 27, 2017 Court Order in Danbury
Station Homeowners Association v. Thompson; 2016 CA 007040
R(RP) (District of Columbia Superior Court), the Notice of
Foreclosure Sale for Unpaid HOA Assessments dated January
23, 2018, and at the request of the Attorney for the Danbury
Station Homeowners Association, Inc. (the “Association”), we
shall sell at public auction on the 1st day of March 2018, at
11:15 A.M., within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers, Inc.
at 4910 Massachusetts Ave., NW #100, Washington, DC 20016,
the following described premises situated in the District of
Columbia and designated as and being:
PART of Lot numbered 29 in Square numbered 6201 in a
subdivision made by Danbury Street LLC as per plat recorded
in Liber 198 at Folio 58 among the Records of the Office of the
Surveyor for the District of Columbia.
NOTE: At the date hereof the above described land is known
for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot numbered 864 in
Square numbered 6201
Parcel ID: Square 6201, Lot 0864.
TOGETHER WITH all the appurtenances incident to said Unit, as
contained in said Declaration of the Association.
SUBJECT, HOWEVER, to all the provisions, restrictions, easements liens, and conditions of record, including but not limited
to those contained in prior deeds, said Declaration of Association and the Bylaws relating thereto, or in law or equity.
TERMS OF SALE: Sold subject to a deed of trust of approximately
$178,861.00 (balance as of June 30, 2011) and real estate taxes,
if any. Also sold subject to any other prior liens, encumbrances
and municipal assessments if any, further particulars of which
may be announced at time of sale. Property is sold “as-is, whereis”, without warranty. A deposit of $10,000.00 will be required
at time of sale, such deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in
such other form as Danbury Station Homeowners Association in
its sole discretion may determine. All conveyances, recordings,
recordation tax, transfer tax, etc. shall be at purchaser’s cost.
All adjustments made as of date of sale. The balance of the
purchase price, together with interest at the rate of 10% per
annum from date of sale to date of receipt of the balance of
the purchase price, must be paid in cash or by cashier’s or
certified check and all other terms to be complied with within
30 days, otherwise deposit is forfeited and the property may
be re-advertised and resold at the discretion of the Association
and at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. In the
event of failure on the part of the Danbury Station Homeowners
Association to convey such deed purchaser’s sole remedy shall
be a return of the deposit. The Association shall convey a deed
pursuant to the November 27, 2017 Order in Danbury Station
Homeowners Association, Inc. v. Thompson; 2016 CA 007040
R(RP) (District of Columbia Superior Court), and makes no further
representations or warranties as to title. The Association does
not guarantee clear title or the purchaser’s ability to obtain title
insurance. For this reason, the purchase may not be able to
obtain financing and must be able to pay the purchase balance
in any case within 30 days.
Contact Attorney for Danbury Station Homeowners Association,
Inc.:
Aaron Sokolow 202-269-3333/Aaron@SokolowLaw.com
Washington Post
Feb. 14, 21, 28, 2018
12164109
TIDEWATER AUCTIONS, LLC
5335 WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW
SUITE 440
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20015
410-825-2900
www.tidewaterauctions.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF REAL PROPERTY LOCATED AT:
1028 D STREET, NE
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20002
By virtue of a certain Deed of Trust and Security Agreement recorded
September 23, 2014 as Instrument No. 2014087130 (the "Deed of Trust")
among the Land Records of the District of Columbia, and in accordance
with Public Law 90-566 notice recorded January 16, 2018 (an Affidavit
of Non-Residential Mortgage Foreclosure being recorded immediately
prior thereto), a default having occurred under the Deed of Trust and
at the request of the party secured thereby (the "Noteholder"), the
undersigned Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction, within the
offices of TIDEWATER AUCTIONS, LLC, 5335 WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW,
SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20015, on
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2018 AT 11:10 AM
all that certain land located in the District of Columbia, together with the
improvements thereon, described as follows and being more particularly
described in the Deed of Trust (the “Property”):
LOT 68 IN JAMES F. SCAGGS AND WILLIAM D. HOOVER, TRUSTEES'
SUBDIVISION OF LOTS IN SQUARE 962, AS PER PLAT RECORDED AMONG
THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE SURVEYOR OF THE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA IN LIBER 21 AT FOLIO 84. NOTE: DESIGNATED FOR PURPOSES
OF ASSESSMENT AND TAXATION AS LOT 801 IN SQUARE 962.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $50,000.00, in the form of cashier’s check
or certified check, will be required of the purchaser at the time and place
of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with interest thereon at the
interest rate set forth in the note secured by the Deed of Trust from
the date of sale through the date of settlement, shall be due in cash or
certified funds at settlement within 30 days from day of sale, TIME BEING
OF THE ESSENCE. Neither the Noteholder nor any related party shall be
required to post a deposit or pay interest as aforesaid. If Purchaser shall
be in default with respect to the terms of sale herein, the deposit shall be
forfeited to the Substitute Trustees and the Property shall be resold at the
risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale
of the Property.
The Property is sold subject to the rights, if any, of parties in possession,
if such rights have priority over the Deed of Trust, and to any and
all covenants, conditions, restrictions, easements, rights of way, and
limitations of record. The Property will be sold in an "AS IS" condition
without warranty, express or implied, of any kind, without representation
as to any matter and subject to all housing, building, zoning and other
code violations that may exist. The successful purchaser recognizes that
any investigation, examination or inspection of the Property is within the
control of the owner or other parties in possession of the Property and not
within the control of the Substitute Trustees or the Noteholder. Purchase
shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the Property
following settlement.
The risk of loss or damage by fire or other casualty to the Property
from and after the date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser.
Purchaser shall pay all settlement costs, including all recordation taxes
and transfer taxes. Real estate taxes, water and sewer charges and
other public charges shall be adjusted to the date of settlement. The
Substitute Trustees and Noteholder assume no liability for any utility
charges accrued before or after the sale and such charges shall be the
sole responsibility of purchaser from the date of sale. If the Substitute
Trustees cannot convey title, the Purchaser's sole remedy at law and in
equity shall be limited to a return of deposit and the sale shall be shall be
considered null and void and of no effect whatsoever.
The Substitute Trustees reserve the right, in their sole discretion, to
require all potential bidders required to post a deposit to show their
deposit before any bidding begins, to reject any and all bids, to postpone
and/or cancel the sale at any time before or at the auction, to extend
the time to receive bids, to waive or modify the deposit requirement or
the requirement that interest be paid on the unpaid purchase money, and
to extend the period of time for settlement. Further particulars may be
announced at the sale. For further information, please contact Ronald J.
Marshall at 301-986-0100.
Ronald J. Marshall
Kevin R. Sebastian,
Substitute Trustees
2/10, 2/12, 2/14, 2/16, 2/19/2018
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
LEONIE BOND
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-01366
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 23rd
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip
Stone, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 16306 Ayrwood
Lane, Bowie, MD 20716, and reported in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 23rd
day of February, 2018 next; provided a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 23rd
day of February, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $218,880.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018
12164206
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
PAUL TAYLOR
TY CLARK
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-10158
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 22nd
day of January 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 4115 Clark
Street, Capitol Heights, MD 20743,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 22nd
day of February, 2018, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 22nd day of February, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$141,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Jan. 29, Feb. 5, 12, 2018 12158606
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
840
Trustees Sale - DC
FEBRUARY 14, 16, 20, 22, 26, 2018
852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Versus
Versus
Cheryl A. Rudd
Defendant
Samuel E. Walker, Jr., et al.
Defendants
No. C-02-CV-16-003125
No. C-02-CV-17-002471
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, January 30, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Thomas W Hodge, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 1st
day of March 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 1st day of March 2018 next. The
report states that the amount of
sale of the property at 602 Moonglow Road, Unit 302, Odenton, MD
21113 to be $144,000.00.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, January 30, 2018 that the sale
of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Thomas W Hodge, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 1st
day of March 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 1st day of March 2018 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 7199
Somerton Court, Hanover, MD 21076
to be $568,678.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Feb 7, 14, 21,2018
12163725
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Feb 7, 14, 21,2018
12163728
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
12158889
Anne Arundel County
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
852
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Substitute Trustees
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Trustees Sale - DC
PARDO & DRAZIN, LLC
Jason A. Pardo, Attorney
4400 Jenifer Street, NW, Suite 2
Washington, DC 20015
202-223-7900
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY
4626 Brooks Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20019
(Lot 887 in Square 5134)
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Purchase
Money Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of
$145,000.00 dated January 27, 2015 and recorded on January
30, 2015 as Instrument No. 2015008932 among the Land
Records of the District of Columbia from Rogue Construction,
LLC, as Grantor, to Lawrence Tucker of Tucker & Associates,
PLLC, as Trustee, for the benefit of F&N Enterprises, LLC as
Beneficiary (“Deed of Trust”), default having occurred in the
terms and conditions thereof, and following the mailing and
recordation in the Land Records of a Deed of Appointment of
Substitute Trustee appointing Farzad Ghassemi as Substitute
Trustee under the Deed of Trust (“Substitute Trustee”), an
Affidavit of Non-Residential Mortgage Foreclosure, and a Notice
of Foreclosure Sale of Real Property or Condominium Unit, at
the request of the current noteholder, the Substitute Trustee will
sell at public auction at the office of Harvey West Auctioneers,
Inc., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC
20015, on
February 27, 2018 at 2:45 PM
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in the City of Washington, District of Columbia, known as 4626 Brooks Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20019
(Lot 0887 in Square 5134), and more fully described in the
Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition, with no
warranty of any kind, and subject to conditions, restrictions,
agreements, liens, and encumbrances of record affecting the
same – except those encumbrances of record that are released by
operation of District of Columbia law by virtue of the foreclosure
of the Deed of Trust.
Purchaser will take title to the property subject to all taxes, water
and sewer charges, and other utility charges, if any. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the
date of sale forward. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $15,000.00 by cash or by
cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser at the time and
place of sale. Purchaser shall settle within thirty (30) days of
sale. TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO
SETTLEMENT BY PURCHASER. Balance of the purchase price
to be paid in cash or certified funds at settlement. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money from the date of sale to
the date of settlement at the interest rate of 25% per annum as
set forth in the debt instrument secured by the Deed of Trust.
Purchaser shall be responsible for payment of all settlement
costs.
The noteholder and its affiliates, if a bidder, shall not be required
to post a deposit or to pay interest.
In the event that purchaser does not settle as required for any
reason, purchaser shall be in default. Upon such default, the
deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute Trustee and all of
the expenses of this sale (including attorneys’ fees and full
commission on the gross sale price) shall be charged against and
paid out of the forfeited deposit. Substitute Trustee may resell
the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.
The defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus
proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property.
If the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey title as required
herein, the sole remedy of the purchaser in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute
Trustee.
The Substitute Trustee reserves the right, in his sole discretion,
to reject any and all bids, to withdraw the property from sale
at any time before or at the auction, to extend the time to
receive bids, to waive or modify the deposit requirement, to
waive or modify the requirement that interest be paid on the
unpaid purchase money, and/or to extend the period of time for
settlement.
Additional terms may be announced at the sale. The successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute
Trustee a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion
of bidding.
Farzad Ghassemi, Substitute Trustee
12158696
12158603
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $87,000.00.
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washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
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ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC.
4910 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., NW #100
WASHINGTON, DC 20016 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
851
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018
850
Montgomery County
850
OPQRS
EZ
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
ORLANS PC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
22400 Dickerson Road & 22328 Dickerson Road
17 HOMECREST COURT
Dickerson, MD 20842
Silver Spring, MD 20906
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
a certain Deed of Trust to KIRK SMITH, Trustee(s), dated KYRA WINTHROP-ST. GERY, dated July 18, 2007 and recorded
October 19, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of in Liber 34630, folio 521 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32226, folio MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred there728, RERECORDED:OCTOBER 4, 2013 IN LIBER 47757, under (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.439911V; Tax
FOLIO 452 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this ID No.03-00040426 & 03-00040437 ) the Sub. Trustees
Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
MARCH 5, 2018 at 9:30 AM
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
MARCH 2, 2018 at 10:00AM
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
as follows:
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-FOUR (24) IN THE SUBDIVISION time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
KNOWN AS "BEL PRE FARMS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 113 AT PLAT 13332, AMONG of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND. final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
without either express or implied warranty or representation, purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $43,000.00 payable in certified Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 558987)
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
JAMES E. CLARKE,
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
HUGH J. GREEN,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
SHANNON MENAPACE,
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
CHRISTINE
M. DREXEL,
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
BRIAN THOMAS,
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-25481)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
www.hwestauctions.com
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
FEBRUARY 14, 21, 28, 2018
12164216
Substitute Trustees
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
www.hwestauctions.com
703-777-7101
FEBRUARY 14, 21, 28, 2018
12164666
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
18409 GUILDBERRY DRIVE #203
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from ANNE
ORLANS PC
M. DORSEY, dated April 22, 2005 and recorded in Liber 29790,
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
folio 439 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
LEESBURG, VA 20175
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
703-777-7101
docketed as Case No.439513V; Tax ID No.09-02934905 ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
1204 Caddington Avenue
MARCH 5, 2018 at 9:30 AM
Silver Spring, MD 20901
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
JASON PASSPORT AND SOPHAY PRES AND VIRA LEE, dated thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
January 11, 2008 and recorded in Liber 35277, folio 106 described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
as Case No.434556V; Tax ID No.13-01348545 ) the Sub. same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY Terms of Sale: A deposit $12,000.00 will be required at the
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
MARCH 5, 2018 at 9:30 AM
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
Terms of Sale: A deposit $26,900.00 will be required at the of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578927)
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
JAMES E. CLARKE,
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
HUGH J. GREEN,
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
SHANNON MENAPACE,
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
BRIAN THOMAS,
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 577417)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
www.hwestauctions.com
RENEE DYSON,
FEBRUARY 14, 21, 28, 2018
12164209
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
IS YOUR CAR
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FEBRUARY 14, 21, 28, 2018
12164218
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
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850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
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Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
941 NORWOOD ROAD
11716 TROPHY COURT
Silver Spring, MD 20902
Germantown, MD 20876
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
certain Deed of Trust to HERBERT A. CALLAIHAN AND Deed of Trust to DEBORAH CURRAN OR LAURA OSULLIVAN,
PATRICIA A. HESS, Trustee(s), dated December 17, 1999, and Trustee(s), dated August 16, 2006, and recorded among the
recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
MARYLAND in Liber 0017835, folio 209, the holder of the 33137, folio 520, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
public auction at THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
ON,
FEBRUARY 16, 2018 at 10:00 AM
MARCH 2, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described as follows:
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOURTEEN (14), IN BLOCK NUMBERED
All that lot or parcel of property located, lying and being THREE (3), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT FOURwithin the Fifth (5th) Election District of Montgomery County, TEEN, FOX CHAPEL NORTH", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
Maryland, being more particularly described by metes and RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 92, AT PLAT 9977, AMONG
bounds, course and distances, as follows: BEGINNING at a point THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND.
in the Eastern edge of the Bladensburg Road (now Norwood The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
Road), the said formerly being a corner of the lands of James without either express or implied warranty or representation,
M. and Martha A. Holland and of Wm. Lycurgus Cashell, and including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
being seven (7) feet South seventy-two (72) degrees West from a particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condistone now planted, and running along the Eastern edge of said tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateBladensburg Road North twenty-four (24) and one-half (1/2) rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
degrees West, four hundred and fifty¬ five (455) feet to a merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
point opposite a very large white oak tree; then through the other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
Southern side of the trunk of said White Oak Tree North seventy- and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
two (72) degrees East, one hundred and ninety-three (193) feet which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
to a stone; then parallel and reversely with the first course of subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
this deed South twenty-four (24) and one-half(l/2) degrees East, record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
four hundred and fifty-five (4550 feet to a stone on a line of assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
the land of said Wm. L. Cashell, then with the said line and
parallel and reversely with the second course of this Deed South TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $14,500.00 payable in certified
seventy-two (72) degrees West, one hundred and ninety-three check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
(193) feet to the beginning; containing two (2) acres of land, at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
more or less, saving and excepting, however, the portion of that final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
parcel, that portion being described as follows: Beginning for COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.8963%
the same at the beginning point of said conveyance of James on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
M. Holland and Martha A. Holland to Susan Stockett Stewart, settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
thence running along the Eastern edge of Bladensburg Road, required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
and with the first line of said conveyance, North twenty-four (24) secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
and one-half (1/2) degrees West, a distance of Seventy (70) feet; the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
thence leaving said road and on a line parallel to the fourth line of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
of said conveyance from Holland to Stewart, North seventy-two purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
(72) degrees East, One hundred and Ninety-three 193) feet, to resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
intersect the third line of said conveyance at a point seventy All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
(70) feet from the end of said line; thence with the said third including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
line of said conveyance South twenty-four (24) and one-half adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
(1/2) degrees East a distance of seventy (70) feet to a stone at transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
the end of the third line of said conveyance; thence with the shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
fourth line of said conveyance South seventy-two (72) degrees and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
West, one hundred and ninety-three (193) feet, to the place adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
of beginning. Being the same property conveyed unto William any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Edward Stewart and Susan Stockett Stewart by Leo Bender, by Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
Deed dated February 7, 1938 and recorded among the Land take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
Records of Montgomery County, Maryland, in Liber 693, folio or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
85, saving and excepting the portion of property conveyed unto deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
Leslie I. Gaines and Lottie Bernice Gaines by William Edward the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
Stewart and Susan Stockett Stewart, by deed dated February provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
7, 1938, and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records in this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
Liber 693, folio 85. BEING also the same lot of ground which shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
by Deed dated June 30, 1995, recorded August 1, 1995, in The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
Liber 13535, folio 559, was granted and conveyed to the within loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
Grantor from Sandy spring National Bank of Maryland. Propery into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
address: 941 Norwood Road, Silver Spring, MD 20905. Tax ID is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
05-00279100
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-10962)
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of Redemption.
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
Substitute Trustees
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
www.hwestauctions.com
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
12155254
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold JANUARY 31, FEBRUARY 7, 14, 2018
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $114,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
KNOWN AS
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 0.83% on
10407 SWEETBRIAR PARKWAY
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
Silver Spring, MD 20903
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the Deed of Trust to JEFF KRIDER, Trustee(s), dated December 19,
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33664, folio 634, MODIFIED
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be DECEMBER 31, 2010, IN LIBER 41219, FOLIO 106 the
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
FEBRUARY 16, 2018 at 10:00 AM
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon
situated
in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against as follows:
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These THE LAND REFERRED IS LOCATED IN THE CITY OF SILVER
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, SPRINGS, COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, STATE OF MARYLAND
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT NUMBERED EIGHshall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. TEEN (18) IN BLOCK NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18) IN THE
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "HILLANDALE", AS PER PLAT
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 74 AT
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without PLAT NO. 7173. ADDRESS: 10407 SWEETBRIAR PARKWAY;
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe SILVER SPRINGS, MD 209031526 TAX MAP OR PARCEL ID
NO.: #00284573
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-16646)
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
Gene Jung
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
Substitute Trustees
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 14, 21, 28 2018
12159739 which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $46,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.125%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
Membership is rewarding.
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07986)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert
M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
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JANUARY 31, FEBRUARY 7, 14, 2018
12155253
850
Montgomery County
850
D15
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
12821 Kitchen House Way
Germantown, MD 20874
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JACKIE MILLER, Trustee(s), dated October 23,
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33392, folio 504, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
FEBRUARY 16, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE (223) IN
BLOCK LETTERED 'A' IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS,
"SECTION TWO, PLEASANT FIELDS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 95 AT PLAT
10542.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $25,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-17974)
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Jason L. Hamlin, Gene Jung, Glen H. Tschirgi,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 31, FEBRUARY 7, 14, 2018
12153889
LEGAL
NOTICES
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
202-334-7007
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x4
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OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Jerry L.
Morgan dated June 22, 2007 and recorded in Liber 28294, folio 697 and
re-recorded in Liber 30505, folio 217 among the Land Records of Prince
George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing
entrance, located on Main St.), on
MARCH 6, 2018 AT 10:44 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD
and described as Unit Numbered Seventy-Five (75) in the "Kettering
Condominium" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Tax ID #07-0785865.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66599.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 14, Feb 21 & Feb 28
12163839
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9504 SAINT ANNES CT.
LANHAM, MD 20706
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Pierre
Auguste and Lunise Nicolas Auguste dated March 7, 2008 and recorded in
Liber 29459, folio 216 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
MARCH 6, 2018 AT 10:45 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #14-1642990 and Tax
ID #14-1642982.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $25,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67732.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
12163840
851
Prince Georges County
8101 BARLOWE RD.
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20785
MARCH 6, 2018 AT 10:42 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-1421452.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65184.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12163837
LEGAL
NOTICES
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
202-334-7007
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x4
Prince Georges County
851
WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 4 20 8
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12500 BREDON CT.
BRANDYWINE, MD 20613
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Melvin
D. Bostic and Deborah A. Bostic dated March 26, 2008 and recorded in
Liber 29623, folio 697 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 AT 10:33 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Henry W.
Ward, III and Mary Ward dated April 25, 2012 and recorded in Liber 33839,
folio 365 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 AT 10:38 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Deborah
Burrell dated August 15, 2007 and recorded in Liber 29050, folio 157
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #11-1180439.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 42092.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #18-1991231.
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 31, Feb 7 & Feb 14
12155944
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Amel
Anderson and Reynaldo Stephonne Anderson, Remainderman dated
August 15, 2007 and recorded in Liber 29152, folio 285 among the Land
Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD,
20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-0156778.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $30,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 70028.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 7, Feb 14 & Feb 21
12159126
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #15-3335429.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $34,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69140.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 7, Feb 14 & Feb 21
12159125
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 43921.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 31, Feb 7 & Feb 14
12155283
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1409 ARAGONA BLVD.
FORT WASHINGTON, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Alphonzo
W. Johns a/k/a Alphonzo Wilford Johns and Eloise K. Johns dated February
1, 2008 and recorded in Liber 29841, folio 28 among the Land Records
of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772
(Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 AT 10:52 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-0269886.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit numbered 6705, in Building numbered 3, in a Horizontal
or Condominium regime entitled "Master Plat, Building No. 3, Phase 4,
The Towns at Walker Mill" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed
of Trust. Tax ID #06-0502492.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68732.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 31, Feb 7 & Feb 14
12155286
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 7, Feb 14 & Feb 21
12159124
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $46,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68917.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 31, Feb 7 & Feb 14
12155282
P
G
C
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1606 COLUMBIA AVE.
LANDOVER, MD 20785
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 AT 10:37 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit No. Five Hundred Two (502), Phase 7, Building 5, in
the horizontal property regime known as "The Vistas at Bowie New Town
Center Condominium" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of
Trust. Tax ID #07-0787358.
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Gloria
Randall dated February 22, 2011 and recorded in Liber 33307, folio 418
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 AT 10:36 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-1537711.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $6,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 47365.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Herbert
Castro and Esperanza Castro dated April 25, 2005 and recorded in Liber
22205, folio 636 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 AT 10:34 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-0513861.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 63172.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
12155658
Membership is rewarding.
PostPoints takes you
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6100 WESTCHESTER PARK DR., UNIT #919
COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Barry D.
Smith and Roxanne C. Smith dated May 20, 2009 and recorded in Liber
30956, folio 449 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 AT 10:35 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-0675967.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $73,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 60048.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
852
Anne Arundel County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Thomas
C. Mullen dated October 16, 2007 and recorded in Liber 29150, folio 291
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as Unit numbered 919 in Tier numbered 19 in a Condominium
known as "The Towers in Westchester Park Condominium, the 6100
Building" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID
#21-2392355.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68021.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12155280
852
Anne Arundel County
Feb 7, Feb 14 & Feb 21
852
12159129
Anne Arundel County
607 OAKWOOD RD.
GLEN BURNIE, MD 21061
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Roland G.
Poist dated August 24, 2005 and recorded in Liber 16934, folio 463 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
MARCH 6, 2018 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #03-655-13113815.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Khalil
Ahmad dated September 27, 2013 and recorded in Liber 26717, folio 449
among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
MARCH 6, 2018 AT 9:29 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #04-064-90232853.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $56,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the
w
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68755.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Feb 14, Feb 21 & Feb 28
12164114
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C
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2302 SYCAMORE PL.
HANOVER, MD 21076
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
kes you
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12155281
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
15100 JOHNSTONE LA.
BOWIE, MD 20721
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 31, Feb 7 & Feb 14
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3217 SYCAMORE LA.
SUITLAND, MD 20746
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $65,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 55530.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Prince Georges County
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 31, Feb 7 & Feb 14
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Eugene
D. Townsend dated December 17, 2010 and recorded in Liber 32466,
folio 123 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 AT 10:39 AM
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 31, Feb 7 & Feb 14
851
15774 EASTHAVEN CT.
BOWIE, MD 20716
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6705 MILLTOWN CT.
DISTRICT HEIGHTS, MD 20747
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6504 MAUREEN CT.
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20785
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Cleo
B. Cherry dated January 16, 2009 and recorded in Liber 30351, folio 190
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 AT 10:53 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Barbara
B. Igori dated November 1, 2007 and recorded in Liber 28951, folio 628
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
851
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1204 KAYAK AVE.
CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743
10010 TIMBERWOOD CT.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Feb 14, Feb 21 & Feb 28
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
46 OLD ENTERPRISE RD., UNIT #75
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 14, Feb 21 & Feb 28
851
S2929 2x4
D16
851
Prince Georges County
202 334 6200
wash ng onpos com/c ass fied
Open 24/7
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018
Anne Arundel County
852
OPQRS
EZ
Anne Arundel County
855
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3485 SOUTH RIVER TERR.
EDGEWATER, MD 21037
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-480-00033600.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $35,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66951.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Feb 7, 14, 21, 2018
12158472
6361 S. LAKE CT.
BRYANS ROAD, MD 20616
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Larry
W. Johnson dated March 26, 2008 and recorded in Liber 6604, folio 139
among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale
will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court and the District
Court), on
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 AT 1:08 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-053568.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $45,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67912.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 7, Feb 14 & Feb 21
857
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1605 HAVRE DE GRACE DR.
EDGEWATER, MD 21037
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Danny
Laster dated November 14, 2006 and recorded in Liber 18563, folio 646
among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
MARCH 6, 2018 AT 9:28 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-904-90003036.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $36,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68837.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Feb 14, Feb 21 & Feb 28
Calvert County
12163893
853
857
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from John E.
Codd, III dated April 24, 2006 and recorded in Liber 17765, folio 254 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 AT 9:30 AM
853
855
Charles County
Calvert County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11523 ROPEKNOT RD.
LUSBY, MD 20657
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Darrell M.
Savoy and Anne V. Savoy dated July 11, 2016 and recorded in Liber 4803,
folio 384 among the Land Records of Calvert County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Calvert County, at the Court House Door,
175 Main St., Prince Frederick, MD 20678, on
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 AT 2:27 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Calvert County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-182625.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Calvert County. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the
Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68789.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 7, Feb 14 & Feb 21
12159119
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Howard County
12159123
857
Howard County
Howard County
857
D17
Howard County
857
Howard County
857
Howard County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9642 Glendower Court
Laurel, MD 20723
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAURA ROSECRANS, Trustee(s), dated March
21, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 14798, folio 029, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
FEBRUARY 16, 2018 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 175, IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "BOWLING BROOK, SECTION 1,
AREA 2," AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT
BOOK 7883. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN
AS NO. 9642 GLENDOWER COURT. BEING THE SAME LOT
OF GROUND WHICH BY DEED DATED SEPTEMBER 16,2008
AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD
COUNTY, MARYLAND IN LIBER 11380, FOLIO 643, WAS
GRANTED AND CONVEYED BY BANK OF NEW YORK ET AL.
UNTO ROBERT MIGLIACCIO, JR.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.7% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
12164204 be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-12912)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
10013 Old Frederick Road
Ellicott City, MD 21042
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from DAVE
L. DIXON AND JULIANA K. DIXON, dated August 31, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 10254, folio 106 among the Land Records
of HOWARD COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.13C17112628; Tax ID
No.02-402750 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
located at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
MARCH 5, 2018 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 571369)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
13610 Meadow Glenn Drive
Clarksville, MD 21029
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to REBECCA A. SHAIA, Trustee(s), dated October
30, 2003, and recorded among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 08153, folio 114, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
MARCH 2, 2018 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18) IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "DUNFRETTEN ESTATES" AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED AS C.M.P. NO. 5403 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
www.hwestauctions.com
OF HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND AND BEING IN THE 5TH FEBRUARY 14, 21, 28, 2018
ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 13610 N.W. MEADOW GLENN,
CLARKSVILLE, MARYLAND 21029.
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
KNOWN AS
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer11882 BLUE FEBRUARY WAY
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
Columbia, MD 21044
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold certain Deed of Trust to MICHAEL L. RIDDLE, Trustee(s), dated
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of December 12, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 10044, folio 522, the
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $31,000.00 payable in certified appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY, secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on unpaid sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
MARCH 2, 2018 at 12:00PM
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's follows:
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other ALL THAT CERTAIN PROPERTY SITUATED IN TOWNSHIP
public charges and private charges or assessments, including OF COLUMBIA IN THE COUNTY OF HOWARD AND STATE
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to OF MARYLAND AND BEING DESCRIBED IN A DEED DATED
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes 11/23/2001 AND RECORDED 12/21/2001 IN BOOK 5871,
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by PAGE 105 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF THE COUNTY AND
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner STATE SET FORTH ABOVE AND REFERENCED AS FOLLOWS:
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of LOT 1-25, SECTION 3, COLUMBIA VILLIAGE OF HICKORY
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason, RIDGE, AREA 6, LOTS 1-110 THRU 1-166, RESUBDIVISION
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are OF LOT 1*50, SHEETT 1 OF 1, PLAY BOOK 5993, PARCEL
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for ID 15-072067. BEING THE SAME LOT OF GROUND WHICH,
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall BY DEED DATED NOVEMBER 23, 2001, AND RECORDED
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The DECEMBER 21, 2001 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF THE
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute COUNTY OF HOWARD, STATE OF MARYLAND, IN LIBER NO.
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall 5871, FOLIO 105, WAS GRANTED AND CONVEYED BY JOSEPH
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be P. CONNORS AND ROSEMARIE CONNORS UNTO GINA NICOLE
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further BEST.
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to post- The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to without either express or implied warranty or representation,
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merNo. (17-14139)
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
Substitute Trustees
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $32,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 14, 21, 28, 2018
12163753 MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
Membership is rewarding.
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (15-18573)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
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Robert M. Oliveri, Keith M. Yacko,
and synth pop, discover great ways to save
Substitute Trustees
kes you
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www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 31, FEBRUARY 7, 14, 2018
12151348
GREENSPOONMARDER, P.A.
1125 West Street, Suite 265
Annapolis, MD 21401
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10676 SCAGGSVILLE ROAD
LAUREL, MD 20723
MARCH 5, 2018 AT 11:30 AM
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
SANDRA R. THORNE, dated FEBRUARY 5, 2015, and recorded
in the Land Records of Howard County, Maryland, at Liber
16352, Folio 027, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell at public auction located
at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD 21045. All that FEE SIMPLE lot of ground and
the improvements thereon, situated in Howard County and being
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 3, AS SHOWN
ON A PLAT ENTITLED “LOTS 3-6, RESUBDIVISION OF LOT
2, THE ROMBACH PROPERTY, SHEET 1 OF 1” WHICH PLAT
IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD
COUNTY, MARYLAND AS PLAT NO. 10770.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the loan
and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered into by
the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale is void
and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without interest.
Purchaser must obtain possession and assumes risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of the auction forward.
The property will be sold in an “as is” condition, without express
or implied warranty as to the nature and description of the
improvements as contained herein, and subject to conditions
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, but
omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, if any,
and with no warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $26,000.00 by cash, certified
check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser, if
other than the note holder, at time and place of sale, balance
in immediately available funds upon final ratification of sale
by the Circuit Court for Howard County, Maryland, interest to
be paid at the rate of 5% on unpaid purchase money from
date of sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if
a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party
purchaser (excluding the secured party) will be required to
complete full settlement of the purchase of the property within
TWENTY (20) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale
by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser’s deposit shall be
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense
of the defaulting purchaser. All other public charges and private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground
rent, taxes, if any, to be adjusted to date of sale. Cost of
all documentary stamps and transfer taxes and all other costs
incident to the settlement shall be borne by the purchaser. If
applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues
and assessments due pursuant to Md. Real Property Article
11-110 and those that may become due after the time of
sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Purchaser must
obtain possession and assumes the risk of loss or damage to
the property from the date of sale forward. If the sale is
rescinded or not ratified for any reason, including post sale
lender audit, or the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good
and marketable title, or a resale is to take place for any reason,
the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a
refund of the aforementioned deposit. The purchaser waives all
rights and claims against the Substitute Trustee whether known
or unknown. These provisions shall survive settlement. Upon
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect,
and the purchaser shall have no further claim against Substitute
Trustee. The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of
the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, may be
announced at the time and date of sale. (File #44377.0075 /
13C17113172)
Erin M. Shaffer,
Substitute Trustee
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
S2931 2x4
S2929 2x4
852
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 14, 21, 28, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
12163752 FEBRUARY 14, 21, 28, 2018
12159410
872
872
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE,
12994 WYCKLAND DRIVE, CLIFTON, VIRGINIA, 20124,
TAX MAP REFERENCE NUMBER 085-4-04-0024
Per the terms of a Deed of Trust dated November 29, 2005, and recorded
in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court for Fairfax County, Virginia on
November 30, 2005 in Deed Book 17999 at Page 1884 and Instrument
No. 2005049198.013 (the “Deed of Trust”), executed by Marvcus Patton,
who along with Ina D. Patton are the “Owners,” REO Solutions, LLC (the
“Substitute Trustee”) having been substituted as trustee pursuant to a
Deed of Appointment of Substitute Trustee recorded in the Clerk’s Office
of the Circuit Court for Fairfax County, Virginia, on February 23, 2016, in
Deed Book 24462 at Page 0366 and Instrument No. 2016009146.001, the
undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the
main entrance of the Fairfax County Courthouse, 4110 Chain Bridge Rd.,
Fairfax, Virginia at:
9:30 A.M. PREVAILING LOCAL TIME ON MARCH 7, 2018 (THE “SALE DATE”)
the following real property, together with any improvements or any
fixtures thereon, situate, lying and being in Fairfax County, Commonwealth of Virginia, located at 12994 Wyckland Drive, Clifton, Virginia
20124, having Tax Map No. 085-4-04-0024, and more particularly
described as follows:
Lot 24, Section 7, WYCKLAND, as set forth in the Plats of Subdivision
duly recorded in Deed Book 7016 at Page 1543, among the land
records of Fairfax County, Virginia (hereinafter, the “Property”).
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. To bid on the Property, a bidder’s deposit
of $50,000.00 must be delivered by each bidder other than The Freedom
Bank of Virginia (the “Lender”) or an affiliate of the Lender to the Substitute
Trustee prior to the commencement of the sale. The deposit shall be by
certified or cashier’s check drawn on a financial institution acceptable to
the Substitute Trustee and the Lender. The high bidder will be required
to increase the deposit in an amount necessary to equal ten percent
(10%) of the highest winning bid within five (5) calendar days of the Sale
Date. The deposit, without interest, will be applied to the purchase
price at settlement or returned to the unsuccessful bidders, as applicable.
The balance of the purchase price will be due by certified check or
immediately available funds at settlement. Settlement in full shall be
made within thirty (30) calendar days from the date of the Sale Date.
This sale is further subject to all conditions, rights-of-way, easements,
and reservations contained in the deeds forming the chain of title to the
Property, and subject to any and all liens, including, but not limited to, the
Deed of Trust from Marvcus Patton recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the
Circuit Court for Fairfax County, Virginia on March 12, 2004 in Deed Book
15774 at Page 138 (the “First Deed of Trust”), the Notice of Assignment
of the First Deed of Trust recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit
Court for Fairfax County, Virginia on August 6, 2014 in Deed Book 23753 at
Page 503, the Appointment of Substitute Trustees recorded in the Clerk’s
Office of the Circuit Court for Fairfax County, Virginia on April 2, 2015 in
Deed Book 24047 at Page 1647, any Federal tax liens, and any right of
redemption of the Internal Revenue Service, filed and unfiled mechanics’
and materialmens’ liens, to the extent that any of the foregoing may
lawfully apply to the Property or any part thereof and take priority over
the liens and security interests of the Deed of Trust.
The Substitute Trustee reserves the right to amend or supplement the
terms of the sale by verbal announcements during the sale, to modify the
requirements for bidders’ deposits, to withdraw all or part of
the Property from the sale prior to the commencement of bidding and to
conduct such other sales as the Substitute Trustee may determine in its
discretion.
ADDITIONAL TERMS OF SALE WILL BE ANNOUNCED ON THE SALE DATE.
REO SOLUTIONS LLC
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Bradley D. Jones
Counsel to the Lender
Odin Feldman & Pittleman, P.C.
1775 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 400
Reston, Virginia 20190
703-218-2176
February 7, February 14, February 21, February 28, 2018
873
Prince William County
873
12159453
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2888 Seminole Road
Woodbridge, VA 22192
In execution of the Deed of Trust dated May 8, 2008, and recorded as
Instrument Number 200805150046324, of the Prince William County land
records the undersigned Substitute Trustees, will offer for sale at public
auction on February 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM at the front of the Prince
William County Circuit Court (9311 Lee Avenue) at Manassas, Virginia, the
following property:
LOT 55A, SECTION 11-D, LAKE RIDGE, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DEDICATION IN DEED BOOK 766 AT
PAGE 339, RESUBDIVISION AND DEDICATION RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 767
AT PAGE 333, AND RESUBDIVIDED IN DEED BOOK 993 AT PAGE 320, AND
DEEDS OF CORRECTION RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 1039 AT PAGE 68, AND
IN DEED BOOK 1042 AT PAGE 24 (ERRONEOUSLY REFERRED TO AS 42).
Tax No.: 8293-54-9899
The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit in the amount of ten
percent (10%) of the successful bid payable by cashier's/certified check
required at time of sale except for the party secured by the Deed of Trust.
Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. Balance of the
purchase price must be paid by cashier's check within 14 days from sale
date. Except for Virginia Grantor tax, all settlement costs and expenses
are purchaser's responsibility. Real estate taxes will be pro-rated to the
date of sale. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining possession of the
property. If purchaser defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property
resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser who shall be
liable for any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs, expenses
and attorney’s fees of both sales. If Trustees do not convey title for any
reason, purchaser's sole remedy is return of deposit without interest. This
sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan secured by the
Deed of Trust including, but not limited to, determining whether prior to
sale a bankruptcy was filed; a forbearance, repayment or other agreement
was entered into; or the loan was reinstated or paid off. In any such event
this sale shall be null and void and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return
of deposit without interest. This communication is from a debt collector.
Old Dominion Trustees, Inc., Substitute Trustees
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
BUONASSISSI, HENNING & LASH, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 796-1723
File No. 8207.81524
February 7, 14, 2018
872
Fairfax County
872
12159349
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
8421 HUNT VALLEY DR,
VIENNA, VA 22182
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6618 CUSTER STREET,
SPRINGFIELD, VA 22150
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $564,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
December 14, 2004, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the County of
Fairfax as Deed Book 16831, Page
1519, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the County of
Fairfax, on the courthouse steps
at the front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of Fairfax
located at 4110 Chain Bridge
Road, Fairfax, Virginia on March
14, 2018 at 2:30 PM, the property
with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 039 1 22 0003
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $323,815.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
June 19, 2012, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 22377, Page 0417,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on March 14, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0804-05140022
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-256073.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: VA. Reference Number 17270227.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 7, 14, 2018
12163751
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 7, 14, 2018
12157527
873
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5906 COVE LANDING ROAD
UNIT #203,
BURKE, VA 22015
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $224,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
December 15, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18994,
Page 2086, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on March 14, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 077-2-16-14-0203-B
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-269213.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 7, 14, 2018
12163750
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
14304 FALLBROOK LANE,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22193
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $262,400.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.125000% dated
January 29, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200701300013580,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on March 20, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8191-89-2422
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 18-271925.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 14, 21, 2018
12164839
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
7282 HILLARY ST,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22315
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $256,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.125000% dated
April 21, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the County of Fairfax
as Deed Book 18396, Page 0472,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the County of Fairfax,
on the courthouse steps at the
front of the Circuit Court building
for the County of Fairfax located
at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on March 7, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 091-3-10-00048
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-271198.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 7, 14, 2018
12163495
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
OPQRS
876
877
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
18334 BUCCANEER TERRACE,
LEESBURG, VA 20176
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$216,015.00, dated December 15,
2014, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on December 17, 2014, as Instrument Number 201412170091083, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on March 16,
2018 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot Five Hundred Thirty Nine (539), Section
Three (3), Point of Woods at Manassas, as the same is duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed
Book 561 at page 750, among
the land records of Prince William
County, Virginia. Tax ID: 112-43-00539.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $11,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
(Trustee # 579107)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $612,850.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.625000% dated
September 30, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the County of
Loudoun as Deed Instrument
Number 20051004-0112579, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the County of Loudoun,
on the courthouse steps in front
of the Circuit Court building for
the County of Loudoun located at
18 East Market Street, Leesburg
Virginia on March 21, 2018 at 9:30
AM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 079-15-9652
Towne #: 5000.0820
February 7, 14, 2018
12158803
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
11102 LIGHT GUARD LOOP,
MANASSAS, VA 20109
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $233,916.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.250000% dated
January 28, 2011, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 201101310008371,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on March 13, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 7697-01-0236
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
14-244648.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 7, 14, 2018
12153823
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
23266 WATSON ROAD,
LEESBURG, VA 20175
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$76,000.00, with an annual interest rate of 4.400000% dated July
31, 2007, recorded among the
land records of the Circuit Court
for the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN as
Deed
Instrument
Number
200708210061540, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN, on
the courthouse steps in front of
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Loudoun located at 18
East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on March 14, 2018 at 9:30
AM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 323-49-8031-000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-270207.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 2018
12164668
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 14, 21, 2018
12164461
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
13601 KALMBACKS MILL DRIVE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated February 16, 2016,
in the original principal amount
of $385,923.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 160002528 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Spotsylvania County,
9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on March 8, 2018 ,
at 4:00 PM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL
THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF
LAND SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF
SPOTSYLVANIA, COMMONWEALTH
OF VIRGINIA, AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: ALL THAT CERTAIN TRACT
OF REAL ESTATE LYING AND BEING
IN CHANCELLOR MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS LOT 14,
SECTION ONE, MINERAL SPRINGS
PLANTATION, AS SHOWN ON A
PLAT OF SURVEY BY COMMONWEALTH ENGINEERING AND PLANNING, DATED AUGUST 11, 1988,
AND RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA
IN PLAT FILE 1 AT PAGES 636
THROUGH 643. THERE IS RESERVED
ALONG KALMBACKS MILL DRIVE A
NINETY (90) FOOT LONG BY THIRTY
(30) FOOD WIDE SIGNAGE EASEMENT BEGINNING 402 FEET FROM
THE SOUTH SIDE PROPERTY LINE
AND ENDING 376 FEET FROM THE
NORTH SIDE PROPERTY LINE BY
PLANK ROAD COMPANY, IN FAVOR
OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR, U.S. PARK SERVICE. THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
PROPERTY IS EXPRESSLY CONVEYED SUBJECT TO THE DEED OF
DEDICATION AND COVENANTS OF
MINERAL SPRINGS PLANTATION
DATED OCTOBER 14, 1988 AND
RECORDED IN SAID CLERK‘S
OFFICE IN DEED BOOK 914, PAGE
738, WHICH IN ITS ENTIRETY IS
INCORPORATED IN AND MADE A
PART OF THIS DEED.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3248691.
Feb. 7, 14, 2018
12163735
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
43262 BROWNSTONE CT,
ASHBURN, VA 20147
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $490,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.382000% dated
June 25, 2004, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 200407270076866, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
March 21, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 117-17-7075-000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-271334.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 14, 21, 2018
12165125
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Default having been made in the
terms of a certain Deed of Trust
dated March 6, 2015, in the original
principal amount of $262,000.00
and recorded in the Clerk's Office
of the Circuit Court of the County
of Spotsylvania, Virginia as Instrument No. 150003690, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will sell
at public auction on March 1, 2018,
at 10:00 a.m., in front of the building housing the Spotsylvania County Circuit Court, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, at the Circuit Court
entrance, Spotsylvania, VA 22553,
the property designated as Lot
288, Section 6, Kingswood, as the
same appears duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book
1271 at Page 600, among the land
records of Spotsylvania County,
Virginia. Sale is subject to all prior
liens, easements, restrictions,
covenants, and conditions, if any,
of record, or other matters which
would be disclosed by an accurate
survey or inspection of the premises.
TERMS: CASH. A deposit of
$26,000.00 or 10% of the sale
price, whichever is lower, will be
required of the successful bidder
at time of sale. Prior to the sale,
interested bidders will be required
to register with and must present
a bid deposit which may be held
during the sale by the trustee.
The bid deposit must be certified
funds and/or cash, but no more
than $9,900.00 of cash will be
accepted. The successful bidder’s
deposit will be retained at the sale
and applied to the sale price. If
held by the trustee, all other bid
deposits will be returned to the
unsuccessful bidders. Settlement
is to be made within 15 days. The
successful bidder will be responsible for obtaining possession of the
property, and for all costs and fees
related to recording the Trustee’s
Deed, including the grantors tax.
The successful bidder will be
required to execute a Memorandum of Trustee's Sale, available for
review on the Foreclosure Sales
page of www.glasserlaw.com, outlining additional terms of sale and
settlement. A Trustee’s Deed will
be prepared by Trustee’s attorney
at high bidder’s expense. This is
a communication from a debt collector.
Glasser and Glasser, P.L.C. on behalf
of Atlantic Trustee Services, L.L.C.,
and/or REO Solutions, LLC, Substitute Trustees, Crown Center Building, Suite 600, 580 East Main
Street, Norfolk, VA 23510, File No.
207630-09, Tel: (757) 321-6465,
between 10:00 a.m. & 12:00 noon
only.
Feb. 14, 21, 2018
12164144
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 15, 2009, in
the original principal amount of
$164,730.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. LR 200900011080.
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on March 22,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PARCEL OR TRACT OF LAND WITH ALL
RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES THERETO
APPURTENANT AND ALL IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING IN COURTLAND MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, KNOWN AND
DESCRIBED AS LOT 1, SECTION
1, SOUTH OAKS SUBDIVISION, AS
SHOWN ON PLAT THEREOF MADE
BY JULES L. ELLIOTT, C.P.E., DATED
JANUARY 23, 1995 AND DULY
RECORDED IN PLAT FILE 5 AT
PAGES 96 THROUGH 99 IN CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1620751.
Feb. 14, 21, 2018
12164833
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated March 18, 2008,
in the original principal amount
of $180,918.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200800006553 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on March 22,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: LOT ONE HUNDRED EIGHT
(108), MILL GARDEN SOUTH, SECTION TWO (2), AS THE SAME
APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN DEED BOOK 519,
PAGE 595 AND AT PLAT BOOK 14,
PAGE 39A.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated May 19, 2016, in
the original principal amount of
$466,290.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 160011720 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
March 22, 2018 , at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: LOT 577,
SECTION 7B, LEELAND STATION,
AS DULY DEDICATED IN INSTRUMENT NUMBER LR140010354 AS
SHOWN ON A PLAT PM140000107
RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT
COURT
CLERK
OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
Wake up
to home
delivery.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1615251.
Feb. 14, 21, 2018
12163934
878
Stafford County
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 26, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$456,200.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR060021379 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on March 8, 2018, at 2:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF
LAND, WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND ALL APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING,
LOCATED AND BEING IN THE
COUNTY OF STAFFORD, COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, AND BEING
DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: LOT
126, SECTION 4B, LEELAND STATION, AS THE SAME IS DULY DEDICATED IN INSTRUMENT NUMBER
050029036, AND AS SHOWN ON
A CORRESPONDING PLAT AT PLAT
BOOK INSTRUMENT NUMBER
050000171, BOTH RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1069671.
Feb. 14, 21, 2018
12159184
Feb. 14, 21, 2018
879
Roommates
SILVER SPRING - Furnished, gorgeous 5 level home. Near metro &
shopping. Cable, internet, utilities
inc. Use of kitchen, living room,
patio, fireplace, W/D & rec room.
Avail now. $750/mo. 240-273-8547
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
102
Happy Days
610
Happy Days
WWWWWWWWWWWW
COULDN'T FIND A WAY TO TELL
YOU, SO I DECIDED TO LET YOU
READ IT! I LOVE YOU BABY!!!
WWWWRD Loves DSWWWW
225
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
Merchandise Wanted
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified buyer
will pick up, pay CASH for cylinders
and cases of cans. 312-291-9169
RefrigerantFinders.com
610
Dogs for Sale
AKC Irish Setter—Puppies. $1200,
802-684-1163, Lovingly raised in our
home underfoot. Ready mid March
www.greenbankhollowfarm.com
GOMD – I can't believe it's been 19
years since you emailed your way
into my heart. I've loved everyday
we've had together, with morning
coffee & What's My Line to evening
coffee & The Big Bang Theory. I'm
not sick of you yet, & I'm beginning
to think I never will be.
Love, M.
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD CKC PUPS
Genetic verf. parents, wormed,
$850. Ready 02/17.
Call 540-828-3373
Sally D RN,
Our 49th year. Love you.
KenW
Dogs for Sale
610
German Shepherd Pups- AKC, Traditional saddle back black & tan. Shots
& checked for worms. Parents &
grandparents on site, so you know
what you are getting. Good quality
G.S. puppy from local breeder. We
are not a puppy mill and we do
not ship. $900. Call 804-691-6717
German Shepherd-AKC reg. European
World Chmp. Lines, V-rated conform,
black, vacc, dewormed 9 wks, Fam.
& protection. $1800. 571-643-1213
Shi-A-Pap, T-Cup Yorkies—Adorable
puppies. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC,
Easy Finance, www.wvpuppy.com,
59 East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit 16E
1-800-753-POST
SF
SHIH TZU PUPS - 9 weeks old, 1st
shots/wormed, parents on premises. $550. Call 540-743-5906
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
LAB/GOLDEN RETRIEVER MIX- Born
Christmas Day, 5 males, 5 females,
yellow and black, adorable,
dewormed. $500. 540-820-2716
1-800-753-POST
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
COTON DE TULEAR Puppies
2 Males 2wks old www.amourdecotons.comgrandmamadg@aol.com. 540-347-5318
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
ShihTzu Bichon—ShiChon Teddy
Bear puppies. Super cute bundles of
fluff from our home to yours. 9wks
$750-850, 703-577-1069
www.DCDogfinders.com
Golden
Retriever—WVALENTINES
DAYS SPECIAL WAKC Wormed first
shots $700, male/female, will be 8
wks old- ready now 443-404-6968
Lab Puppies—AKC. Chocolate, Yellow
and Black Lab Puppies, Parents on
site, First Vaccines and Dewormed,
Cane Corso—$800/OBO, Females, Family Raised. $800, 434-509-8373
6mos old, Vet Health Check, Tails
Docked, Dewormed, Up to date
shots Larnell Johnson, 202-207-7410
DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
boned, family raised, great temperament, parents on premises. 8 weeks
old. some have Ears done. All colors
available. $500/$900. 240-674-2844
or 240-674-3994
Dogs for Sale
MINI AUSSIE/BLUE HEELER PUPSBeautiful, bouncy, personable puppies, handled w/care, vt checkd, tails
GERMAN SHEPARD PUPS- AKC reg. docked, 1st shots & worming. $495.
2 Females. Ready 2/18. Parents on 8 weeks old. Call 540-422-1625
site. Vet check & microchip incl.
Call for info & pricing 703-953-8404
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
Dear Sherry
roses are red, violets blue
you took my heart in 82.
Across the years, beyond all time
my love is yours dear Valentine.
Love, KeithW
LJ: Roses are red, violets are blue.
My heart still skips when I think of
you.
To Duncan, the Vineyard, the
Prado we’ve been.
Next off to Grand Cay with our
snorkel and fin.
But on top of it all, on 2 things we
agree,
I love you and you love me!
Marty S
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018
EZ
102
1-800-753-POST
Labrador Retriever farm raised puppies,AKC, 3/4 english, black, yellow,
chocolate 1st shots, vet checked
and dewormed. Ready 1-17-18.
$800 cash only. 1-540-879-2713
Mini pinscher—$800, M/F, 8 weeks,
very small, purebred pet only homes.
Parents on site 10-15lbs full grown
text for best response 240-626-9749
SF
1-800-753-POST
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
12163941
Culpeper County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
1120 OAKMONT COURT,
CULPEPER, VA 22701.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated December 9, 2015,
in the original principal amount
of $322,201.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Culpeper County, Virginia as Instrument No. 150007002 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Culpeper County, at the corner
of West Davis Street and North
West Street in the Town of
Culpeper on March 22, 2018 , at
11:00 AM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL
THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PACEL OF
LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING
IN THE TOWN OF CULPEPER,
CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA, AND
MORE PARTICULARLY DECSRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: LOT 47, PHASE 2,
CARDINAL VIEW, AS THE SAME
APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED BY DEED OF
CONSOLIDATION,
SUBDIVISION,
DEDICATION AND EASEMENT
RECORDED AT INSTRUMENT NO.
130007305, WITH PLAT RECORDED
IN PLAT FOLDER3, AT PAGE 797,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
1. Coffee
2. Paper
3. Bills
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3219411.
Feb. 14, 21, 2018
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Roommates
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$650 +utilities. 301-502-2395
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3238101.
MARYLAND
BELTSVILLE- 1 room w/ separate BA.
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TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
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Stafford County
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THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-258752.
11909 Kingswood Boulevard,
Fredericksburg, Virginia 22408
(Parcel ID: 23P-7-288- )
878
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
412 PLEASANTS DRIVE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407
Trustee's Sale
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
9157 Laurelwood Court
Manassas, VA 20110
877
877
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D18
873
Prince William County
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E1
EE
KLMNO
Food
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2018
.
SECTION E
MG VA PG
EE
ILLUSTRATIONS BY LENA VARGAS AFANASIEVA FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Why a certain kind
of ‘Hon’ melts my heart
BY
Licorice is an acquired taste.
I got it.
T IM C ARMAN
BY
For a good egg,
I like to cook cute
M AURA J UDKIS
BY
M ATT B ROOKS
Maybe I wasn’t loved enough as a child. Maybe I
romanticize a strain of mid-20th-century Baltimore culture that I first encountered in Barry Levinson movies.
Whatever the reason, I love it when a waitress calls me by a
pet name, a form of sweet punctuation to an otherwise
transactional question:
“You want a splash more coffee, hon?”
I’m fully aware that such provincial friendliness is
frowned upon by polite society. The record is filled with
diners who fairly faint at the sound of a server injecting a
familiar “sweetie” into a formal interaction. To these souls,
terms of endearment are practically weapons of mirth
destruction when spoken outside the confines of an
intimate relationship.
To such sticklers, a casually dropped “sweetheart” is not
a sign of affection, but a suggestion of insolence. A server
may be trying to assert her dominance. She may be
expressing contempt by treating adults as children. She
may be using pet names as code words for “old,” “senile” or
“please don’t die before my shift ends.”
Miss Manners has advised, straight up, that “terms of
endearment . . . are not suitable for commercial transac-
Love is complicated and uncontrollable and easily
misunderstood. You never know when it will strike. You
probably thought it was yucky when you were a kid — but
then a few years later, maybe you found yourself head over
heels, swooning. You have to nurture it, grow it, explore the
world with your love! Love is grand and difficult, all at
once.
My love, in this particular case, is for black licorice.
It is not a flavor for which many people harbor any
affection. Children do not even consider it to be candy.
There is not much data to measure the popularity of
licorice, but anecdotally, it seems to be one of the most
polarizing flavors. Some have called it “The devil . . . in
candy form.” BuzzFeed once published a quiz called “We
know if you like black licorice with just one question,” and
it was a yes-or-no question: “Are you 80 years old?”
I didn’t grow up loving the flavor. According to a survey
by the National Confectioners Association, only 3 percent
of people said that licorice was a favorite candy when they
were a child. It always makes the lists of most-hated
Halloween treats: On a FiveThirtyEight ranking of 86
candies, Good & Plenty — those pink-and-white licorice
My parents have never accused me of being a morning
person. The Nickelodeon alarm clock that rattled me out of
my elementary- and middle-school slumbers was strategically placed just out of reach from my bed, so it required a
foot to hit the floor before I could silence its cartoonish
honking. I would capitalize on any and all opportunities to
snooze just a few minutes longer.
But breakfast was my siren call — especially when it
involved eggs or bacon, or better yet, both, nestled between
two pieces of toast, an English muffin or a bagel. A
homemade, hot breakfast sandwich was the trick to getting
me going in the morning.
These days, as I’m rushing out the door for work,
breakfast could easily just be an afterthought. I’m a
journalist! Don’t we all just run on coffee? Not all of us. And
one Smurf-size kitchen tool has become my tiny savior: the
individual egg pan.
It looks like decorative wall art for a doll house or a relic
from the set of an ill-fated fourth “Honey, I Shrunk the
Kids” movie. But this 4¾-inch runt of a frying pan
possesses all the qualities of its bigger siblings, and it
makes the simple task of frying an egg even easier.
PET NAMES CONTINUED ON E4
LICORICE CONTINUED ON E4
EGG PAN CONTINUED ON E4
MORE LOVES / Page E6
For Joe Yonan, there’s only one brand of mayo. Why Mary Beth Albright craves Carvel. Kara Elder crushes on leftover bits in jars. Bonnie S. Benwick digs quarter sheet pans.
TOM SIETSEMA
RECIPES
WINE
With A Rake’s Progress in Adams Morgan,
chef Spike Gjerde makes his District debut,
and already has people talking. E3
Stove Top Mac and Cheese With Hummus E2 Cannellini Toasts With Radicchio
and Lemon-Parsley Relish E2 Chocolate Haystacks With Crushed Strawberries E3
CHAT At noon: live.washingtonpost.com
The vocabulary of a wine critic can seem
esoteric and maybe even a little strange.
But it makes sense if you think about it. E7
E2
MG
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
Beans on
toast is
basic. This
is special.
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
With a tweak, comfort
becomes more complete
Americans love
their macaroni
and cheese and
continue to find
ways to tweak
recipes for it.
Bonnie S. We’re blowing a
Benwick
timely kiss at this
variation for
DINNER IN
several reasons: It
25 MINUTES
is quick, its
saucemaking has
been simplified, and, by adding
another beloved food to it, it
offers more protein and less fat
than a typical rendition.
Its half-cup of hummus can be
almost undetectable when the
pureed chickpea dip is plain. But
we found in testing that a red
pepper hummus lifted the flavor
and enriched the cheesy color as
well. Stirred in right at the end,
the hummus adds body without
disrupting the creaminess we
crave. If you’re skeptical about
Believe it or not,
toast can be
topped with
other-thanavocado foods.
Take beans, for
Joe Yonan example. The
Brits have long
WEEKNIGHT
VEGETARIAN
been obsessed
with their classic
beans on toast,
but their preferred method
involves canned baked beans and
a thin slice of sandwich bread.
No offense, but when I put
beans on toast (or crostini or
bruschetta, if you’re feeling
Italian) I like to think it through
a little bit more and try a little
harder. Of course, the bread is
important: Choose something
rustic and chewy, and broil it
carefully after a brush of olive
oil.
Even more important, make
the beans delicious. When
they’re left over from another
use, or even canned, infuse them
with garlic or other beanfriendly flavorings (oregano,
perhaps thyme, even smoked
paprika or ground chiles), and
season them well. I often make
this on the fly, topping the bean
mixture with crunchy and/or tart
things I find in my fridge. I’ve
never written down the
approach, which is why I was
glad to see that Athena
Calderone had done the work for
me in “Cook Beautiful” (Adams,
2017).
On top of her garlicky white
beans on toast goes a quick
radicchio slaw, adding a little
bitterness to the earthy, creamy
beans. And on top of that goes a
finely chopped mixture of
parsley, lemon and garlic — the
classic Italian gremolata. This
punchy condiment/garnish acts
as a counterpoint, and as I sliced
and ate forkfuls of the layers, I
knew: This is just what any dish
of beans on toast needs.
this, start with a quarter-cup of
it, and taste as you add more.
Its sauce promises to be
smooth, because the cheese is
gradually melted into a pan of
warm milk. A small mixture of
flour and milk (a slurry, in
culinary terms) adds just enough
thickening velvet to coat the
cooked pasta.
Choose a pepper Jack instead
of a simple Colby cheese for a
further flavor boost. Then share
the love.
bonnie.benwick@washpost.com
Bonnie S. Benwick tested this
recipe. Questions? Email her:
food@washpost.com. Have a quick
dinner recipe that works for you?
Send it along, too.
Find other quick meals with The
Post’s Recipe Finder:
washingtonpost.com/recipes
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
joe.yonan@washpost.com
Cannellini Toasts With Radicchio and Lemon-Parsley Relish
4 servings
Serve with a salad or soup.
Adapted from “Cook Beautiful,” by Athena Calderone (Adams, 2017).
Ingredients
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive
oil, plus more for drizzling
2 cloves garlic, coarsely
chopped
One 15-ounce can no-saltadded cannellini beans,
drained and rinsed
1/4 cup water
3/4 teaspoon sea salt, or more as
needed
4 slices country bread (about 1/2
. WEDNESDAY,
inch thick)
1 lemon, halved and seeded
1/ cup fresh parsley leaves,
2
coarsely chopped
1 small head radicchio or
treviso (about 6 ounces),
halved lengthwise, cored and
thinly sliced
Steps
Pour 1 tablespoon of the oil into
a medium saucepan over medi-
um heat. Once the oil shimmers, add half the garlic and
cook, stirring, until fragrant, 30
seconds. Add the beans, water
and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt; cook
until warmed through, 3 to 5
minutes. Use the back of a
wooden spoon to mash about a
quarter of the beans, just
enough to thicken the mixture.
Taste, and add more salt, as
needed.
Learn about senior living
at Riderwood.
Position an oven rack to 4 to 6
inches from the broiler; preheat
to broil. Use a brush and another 2 teaspoons of the oil to
lightly coat the bread on each
side. Arrange on a baking sheet
and broil just until the bread is
golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes
per side, watching closely to
avoid burning.
Thinly slice half the lemon, then
coarsely chop the slices (peel
included). Gather the parsley,
chopped lemon and the remaining chopped garlic on your cutting board and sprinkle with
another 1/4 teaspoon salt. Finely
chop everything together to create a loose relish.
Toss the radicchio in a medium
bowl with the remaining 1 teaspoon oil and the remaining 1/4
teaspoon salt. Squeeze the juice
from the remaining lemon half
in, and toss to combine.
Spread the beans on each piece
of toast. Top with the radicchio
and the relish. Drizzle with a
little oil and serve.
Nutrition | Per serving: 220 calories, 8 g
protein, 31 g carbohydrates, 8 g fat, 1 g
saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 600 mg
sodium, 6 g dietary fiber, 1 g sugar
Recipe tested by Joe Yonan; email questions
to food@washpost.com
FOOD
Stove Top Mac and Cheese With Hummus
4 to 6 servings
Serve with peas or a green salad, or roasted tomato halves.
Adapted from a 2015 recipe on TheKitchn.com.
Ingredients
Kosher salt
12 ounces dried elbow
macaroni or other short pasta
11/2 cups low-fat milk, or more
as needed
2 tablespoons flour
2 to 3 cups shredded mild or
sharp cheddar, Colby or
Monterey Jack cheese (see
headnote)
1/4 teaspoon powdered mustard
1/2 cup plain or red-pepper
hummus (homemade or storebought)
Steps
Bring a large pot of water
(about 4 quarts) to a boil over
high heat. Add a generous
pinch or two of salt, then the
pasta. Cook according to the
package directions, just until al
dente.
Meanwhile, warm 1 cup of the
milk in a medium saucepan
over medium heat. Combine
the remaining 1/2 cup of milk
and the flour in a liquid mea
suring cup, whisking away any
lumps. As soon as you begin to
see a little steam rising from
the heated milk, whisk in the
milk-flour mixture. Cook for 3
or 4 minutes, to form a slightly
thickened sauce that has the
consistency of heavy cream.
Reduce the heat to low; begin
stirring in the cheese (to taste),
a cup at a time, letting each
addition melt before adding
the next. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt
and the powdered mustard,
stirring to form a creamy,
smooth sauce. Remove from
the heat.
Drain the pasta and place in a
mixing bowl. Pour in the warm
sauce, then add the hummus
and stir to thoroughly incorporate. If the mac and cheese
consistency seems too thick,
stir in up to 1/4 cup more milk.
Serve warm.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 6): 440
calories, 19 g protein, 52 g carbohydrates,
17 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 45 mg
cholesterol, 550 mg sodium, 3 g dietary
fiber, 6 g sugar
To contact us: E-mail: food@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-7575 Mail: The Washington Post,
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E3
EE
A Rake’s Progress is a D.C. evolution for an award-winning Baltimore chef
For a change of
pace, let’s start at
the end: Few
Washington
FIRST BITE
restaurants do
leftovers better
than A Rake’s Progress in the
Line hotel. It’s not so much the
food I’m talking about, although
some of it is very good, but the
way any remains from dinner are
bundled.
Instead of dropping leftovers
at the table, a server passes them
off near the coat check when you
exit. The packaging is of the sort
you see when your most stylish,
eco-conscious friend arrives with
a host gift. Which is to say
compostable butcher paper and
black twine are a delightful way
to send you into the night with
the feast you couldn’t finish.
Surely you’ve heard of the
Line hotel. Food lovers have been
flocking there since it opened in
what used to be a church in
Adams Morgan. A Rake’s
Progress unfolds on the second
story, above the ground-floor
Brothers and Sisters, and marks
the debut Washington restaurant
of Baltimore chef-restaurateur
Spike Gjerde, whose work at the
rustic, regionally focused
Woodberry Kitchen earned him
a James Beard award for best
chef in the Mid-Atlantic region
three years ago.
Diners’ senses go on high alert
when they segue from entrance
to handsome bar and dining
room, where the perfume of oak
smoke and the good bones of the
church reveal this to be one of
the most ambitious restaurants
of the new year. Eyes are drawn
to the center of the mezzanine, a
vast hole that looks down on the
lobby and is dressed with a spiky
chandelier composed of organ
pipes. Staff members positioned
around the perimeter of the
dining room suggest a Secret
Service fleet, only more
engaging. (Did you hear? The
Obamas dropped by for dinner
last month, before A Rake’s
Progress officially opened.)
The cocktail list, created by
beverage director Corey Polyoka,
ought to be perused online
before dinner; it’s basically an
essay exploring the region’s
sipping sensibilities and it
highlights rum, rye and bourbon.
Enlist a server as a guide and you
might be the recipient of a twist
on a rickey using elderflower
vinegar, lemon thyme and local
Ivy City gin. Finer still is a
sipping rum, served with cane
sorghum that’s pressed to order
and makes for a drink similar to
a daiquiri. Should you ask for
anything typically made using
lemon, the request might be met
with a little cup of subtly sour
verjus, the pressed juice of
unripened grapes. Early on, at
least, the restaurant is sticking to
a buy-local philosophy. Gjerde
enlisted two Maryland wineries
to make 900 gallons of verjus,
which the restaurant uses in
place of citrus.
Game, cooked in an open
kitchen using an oak-fired
hearth fitted with a smoker and a
spit, is the theme at A Rake’s
Progress. But first, there are
small plates and salads-for-two
to consider. A server might steer
you to rockfish chowder
accompanied by a toast rack. “I
have a toast obsession,” says
Gjerde, who’s also passionate
about supporting local farmers
and growers. The sliced bread for
the chowder, which also floats
crisp scallops and salt pork in
Tom
Sietsema
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Executive chef Opie Crooks plates an order in the window of the open
kitchen — with a chandelier made from the pipes of a church organ, saved from the building’s earlier
incarnation — at A Rake’s Progress in the Line hotel in Adams Morgan. Rockfish chowder is one of
several small plates on the menu, and arrives with a toast rack in tow. A miniature version of
Maryland’s signature Smith Island cake is an adorable dessert.
hot cream, relies on locally
sourced grains — white spelt and
whole wheat — and comes prebuttered and salted. (The cream
gets its savor from fish bones
that have been steeped in the
liquid, says Opie Crooks, the 32year-old executive chef.) The
vegetable mille feuille is
something of a tease, since the
promised pastry comes not in
expected layers but in the form
of tiny buttery leaf shapes amid
free-form parsnips, carrots, beets
and other vegetables that pick up
their smokiness from time
beside the fire. The one small
plate I could live without is a
halved head of savoy cabbage,
charred from the heat, carpeted
with benne seeds and zapped
with a ginger dressing. “It tastes
like . . . soap,” my dining
companion said, reading my
mind as we both put our forks
down.
Entrees tend to be introduced
at the table, then returned to the
kitchen to be carved. Chicken,
dry-brined with oregano, garlic
and fish pepper, emerges from
the hearth as rousing as any
around right now. Escorts of
buttery whipped potatoes and
creamed greens are simple
pleasures. True to its title, “trout
on a log” finds the fish on a plateshaped slice of wood, with brown
butter hollandaise for
enrichment. “Rabbit-stuffed
rabbit” delivers sausage inside
saddle. Lamb shoulder comes
with a clever plate-mate of
tender dumplings, green with
fresh mint.
A Rake’s Progress benefits
from a staff every bit as fun and
knowledgeable as at Woodberry
Kitchen, but with more finesse.
Set your briefcase on the floor,
and it’s quickly reassigned to a
stool.
Pastry mavens Amanda Cook
(who helped open Kinship and
Métier) and Beth Bosmeny
(previously with Craftsman and
Wolves in San Francisco)
encourage you to stay for dessert.
Their inaugural list reads like a
draft, and that’s by design, to
give diners a look at the creative
process. The description
following “souffle,” for instance,
includes “Need oven!” which is
another way of luring guests
back for one once the restaurant
acquires the right equipment.
For now, there is an adorable
miniature Smith Island cake
flanked with ramekins of apple
balls, whipped cream and apple
sherbet, and a baked Alaska
whose rum finish is warmed over
a candle before being poured
over a dome of honey meringue.
Cook says her new job finds
her following her father’s
lifelong advice. Working at A
Rake’s Progress, she jokes, “I go
to church every day.”
tom.sietsema@washpost.com
1770 Euclid St. NW. 202-588-0525.
thelinehotel.com/dc/venues. Entrees,
$32 to $154 (rib-eye for sharing).
This chocolaty Valentine’s Day treat makes hay with just three ingredients
I have been
making some
variation of these
chocolate
haystacks for
years now, and
Ellie
whenever I do, I
Krieger
feel a little sly
because they are
NOURISH
unexpectedly
simple — and
more healthful than they let
on.
A melt-in-your-mouth
chocolate confection with a
cookielike crunch, the haystack
comes across as exacting to
make, yet all that’s involved is
coating shredded wheat cereal
in melted chocolate and
mounding the mixture into
small piles on a tray.
The haystacks also register as
completely indulgent, but they
are pretty healthful as candy
goes. I sometimes add chewy
dried fruit and/or toasted
chopped nuts to the mix — I
particularly like them with
dried cherries. Here, I took a
more blatant Valentine’s Day
approach by sprinkling the tops
with a pink shock of crushed,
freeze-dried strawberries.
Wrap these festive haystacks
in a cute box and gift them to
Chocolate Haystacks With Crushed Strawberries
8 servings (makes 16 pieces), Healthy
Freeze-dried strawberries are typically located in the dry-goods
section of a grocery store produce department.
MAKE AHEAD: The stacks need to be refrigerated for about 20
minutes, to set up.
From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.
Ingredients
1/3 cup freeze-dried
strawberries (see headnote)
3 large shredded wheat cereal
biscuits (about 21/2 ounces
total)
6 ounces dark chocolate (60 to
70 percent cocoa solids),
chopped
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
someone you love. When you get
raves about how good they taste,
you can divulge how easy and
good-for-you they really are, or
you can keep quiet and relish
that feeling of being just a tad
sneaky.
food@washpost.com
Krieger is a registered dietitian,
nutritionist and author who hosts
public television’s “Ellie’s Real Good
Food.” She blogs and offers a weekly
newsletter at www.elliekrieger.com.
Steps
Place the freeze-dried strawberries in a resealable plastic bag
and use a mallet or rolling pin to
crush them until they are mostly pulverized with some small
pieces remaining.
Line a baking sheet with wax
paper. Use your hands to crush
the shredded wheat into threadlike pieces over a medium bowl.
Place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl set over a pan filled
with a few inches of barely bub-
bling water (medium heat).
Make sure the bottom of the
bowl does not touch the water.
Melt the chocolate, stirring frequently, for about 1 minute,
then remove the bowl from the
pan. Add the crushed shredded
wheat to the chocolate and stir
until well coated.
Use your fingers and/or a large
spoon to transfer 16 tablespoonsize stacks of the cerealchocolate mixture onto the wax
paper. Sprinkle some of the
crushed strawberries on top of
each stack. Refrigerate for
about 20 minutes, or until set.
Store and serve at room temperature.
Nutrition | Per piece: 80 calories, 1 g protein,
9 g carbohydrates, 4 g fat, 2 g saturated fat,
0 mg cholesterol, 0 mg sodium, 1 g dietary
fiber, 4 g sugar
Recipe tested by Miriam Albert; email
questions to food@washpost.com
E4
MG
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
When a server calls me ‘sweetie,’ I savor it
PET NAMES FROM E1
tions.”
I’m here to tell you that they’re
suitable for my commercial transactions. Most of my transactions,
anyway. It would just be weird,
and sort of surreal, if a server
started calling me “dear” at Minibar by José Andrés: a dose of
gum-smacking sweetness in a
xanthan gum world. So, yes, context can be important.
Most of the time, when a waitress serves me up a heaping helping of “hon” at a diner, I take it for
what it is: an expression of culture. She may have lived in an
area where such pleasantries
were a routine part of daily life, as
unconscious as breathing. I
might even ask about her home
town, if she’s not too busy wiping
down laminated menus or refilling cups of mud.
But, to be honest, it’s a rarer
BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
Miss Manners advises to be judicious with terms of endearment.
Here’s to the waitresses who never got that memo.
form of this server-diner interaction that moves me. I’ll be sitting
at a counter, just one of seven or
eight diners under a server’s
watch. In between bites of shortorder eggs, I’ll notice that, no
matter how frantic she gets, the
waitress keeps an eye on me,
occasionally circling back to
make sure I’m still a happy little
blip on her radar.
“Everything okay here, dear?”
she’ll ask.
It’s said in a tone that I can’t
fully define, but it’s an intricate
weave of tenderness, professionalism and fatigue, never manipulation. It melts me. It’s like, for a
brief second, I’ve encountered a
person who has acquired wisdom
beyond my comprehension. She
can shoulder the demands of a
brutal lunch hour and still have
room in her heart to offer a kind
word to a stranger.
tim.carman@washpost.com
The perfect pan is exactly big enough for one egg
EGG PAN FROM E1
This little feller will fry an egg
evenly in minutes — perfectly
shaped to fit on a bagel, or toast,
or in the palm of my hand if I’m
really in a hurry to get out the
door. Scrambled eggs? It can handle ’em. Two, to be exact, and as a
bonus, you get to practice your
surgeonlike precision while trying to avoid sloshing onto the
stove top.
“It’s so cute!” You’re saying
with that tone you use when your
friend foists a photo of her notall-that-cute baby niece on you.
“It’ll fit right in with my handmade, pinkie-length honey dipper and the spatula keychain my
aunt put in my stocking!”
Yes, it is cute! And because it’s
nonstick, it also takes about five
seconds to clean, which is five
more seconds I get to spend making sure I don’t forget my umbrella or my ID badge or my socks.
The name might ring a little
sad: “individual egg pan.” Like a
“microwaveable mug cake for
one” or a “lovely cheese pizza, just
for me.” But I like to think of it as a
miniature canvas for personalized, made-to-order eggs. Because really, who has room for a
griddle?
A fried egg makes just about
everything better, from a bowl of
pasta to a burger. But for me, it all
comes back to the breakfast sandwich, and friends, the individual
egg pan makes it all possible.
(Tiny spatula not required.)
matt.brooks@washpost.com
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
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RODMAN’S FOOD &
DRUG STORE
Licorice is a treat that can
make your heart flutter
LICORICE FROM E1
pills — come in dead last. Chiclets, the world’s worst gum,
ranked three spots higher.
Maybe I was primed to love it
because my mom liked to make
brownies with a splash of sambuca when I was a kid and bought
Italian pizzelles every Christmas.
Or maybe my taste buds just grew
up. But when I stopped picking
the black jelly beans out of the
bowl and learned to love licorice,
I discovered a whole range of
flavors that most people don’t
even try to understand.
Of course, there are black Twizzlers and Good & Plenty and Jelly
Belly, whose spokeswoman tells
me that licorice is actually the
brand’s third-most-popular flavor, according to customer polling. But some of the best licorice
comes from Northern Europe and
Australia. (Where some brands
call it “eating liquorice.” As opposed to . . . non-eating licorice?
Huh.) I like my licorice pillowysoft, like the Finnish Panda brand
— which notes that “Liquorice
has in the past been used to
protect against evil spirits.” And
the German Haribo brand has a
number of gummy-licorice hybrid treats in all kinds of whimsical shapes, like cats or vampire
bats. There’s a type of super-salty
licorice that’s popular in Nordic
countries, but it’s only for the
toughest among us — I can barely
handle one piece of it.
And it’s not just candy, either.
Real licorice comes from the licorice plant, but it has flavor compounds in common with fennel
and anise. I love a bulb of fennel,
the star of a simple salad with
some butter lettuce, radish and
green goddess dressing. Jägermeister, the subject of many a
frat-guy joke, is delicious with
tonic water. (Seriously. If you like
licorice, try it.) You can settle your
stomach after a big meal with
Underberg, the tiny bottles of
anise-flavored digestif from Germany that have garnered a cult
following. And there’s the memory of the ancient, cozy ouzo bar I
visited in Athens, or the summery
sips of cloudy pastis. On a recent
trip to India, one of the highlights
of a meal was the sugared fennel
that restaurants would bring out
afterward, as a breath-freshener.
The flavor of licorice can transport you around the world.
But chances are, you’re one of
the people who think licorice is
disgusting. I’d say you’re missing
out, but I’m just as happy for
licorice to stay the way it is:
misunderstood by many, and
loved by only a few. Licorice lovers don’t need external validation. But they do need to be
careful: A recent FDA warning
said that eating too much licorice
can cause heart palpitations.
Kind of like love.
maura.judkis@washpost.com
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2 ways to keep cilantro
fresh in the fridge
Wednesdays at noon, we field
questions about all things food for
one hour at live.washingtonpost.
com. Last week’s guests included
food writer Julia Turshen. Here
are edited excerpts from that chat.
Recipes whose names are capitalized can be found in our Recipe
Finder at washingtonpost.com/
recipes.
Q: I love the Pot Roast With
Kimchi + Sweet Potatoes recipe. I
have a giant butternut squash
sitting on the counter. If I used
that instead of the sweet potato, is
there much of a time adjustment?
A: So glad! I haven’t tried it with
butternut squash, but I bet it will
be delicious. I think adding it in
large pieces for the last hour will
be perfect.
Q: No matter how vibrant it is
when I buy it or how I store it,
cilantro goes bad within two to
three days. What’s the best way,
short of growing it, to keep it
green and tasty, and neither wilted nor slimy?
A: Trim the cilantro stems, make
sure the bunch is dry, and stick it
(cut-stem-side down) in a jar with
a few inches of water in it. Put a
zip-top bag over the top of it, and
put it in the refrigerator.
— Julia Turshen
Q: I made the Triple Chocolate
Bypass, and it is delicious — it’s
like eating soft fudge. I would like
to make it with a raspberry flavor.
Any advice?
A: I wonder if dollops or swirls of
raspberry jam would do the trick.
(Taking a cue from Julia Turshen’s
Brownies With Raspberry Jam
Swirl.)
— Kara Elder
— Joe Yonan
A: I’ve found that when the stems
are particularly slender or delicate (homegrown is often that
way), it’s good to wrap the cilantro loosely in a slightly damp
paper towel and stash in an unsealed zip-top bag.
— Bonnie S. Benwick
Q: What is the best way to clean a
cheese grater? They tear up my
sponges and my fingertips.
A: Use a toothbrush!
— J.Y.
A: Start with a kettle full of
boiling water, poured on the surface. That loosens things up.
— B.S.B.
MARYLAND
WINE & BEER
SPECIALS
BLOCKBUSTERS
WINES ARE 750ML UNLESS NOTED
WINE & CHEESE TASTING EVERY
SATURDAY 1- 4 PM AT ALL STORES
SALES DATES 02-14-18 THRU 02-27-18
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
BEER SALE
Franzia 5.0L Box Chillable Red, Blush, Sangria.... $12.99 Miller Lite Suitcase....$19.99
Chablis & Burg......................................... $14.99 Coors Original & Light
30 PK ................. $24.99
Cupcake SB ...................................................$7.99
Apothic Red & White.......................................$9.59 Budweiser Reg & Light
Sutter Home White Zinf & Moscato...................$5.55
18 PK Can ........... $14.99
Stella Artois
AMERICAN WINE SALE
12 PK Bottle ........ $15.99
Barefoot 1.5L Chard, Cab, Merlot, PG ............. $11.99
Corona Extra & Light
Fetzer Chard, Cab, Merlot................................$6.99
12 PK Bottle ........ $15.49
BV Coastal Chard, Cab, Merlot .........................$7.99
Mirassou Chard, Cab, Merlot, PN .....................$8.99 Heineken
18 PK Bottle ........ $20.99
Cline Viognier, Zinf, Syrah............................. $10.99
Sterling “Vintners Collection” Chard.................$9.99 Presidente
12 PK Bottle ........ $14.59
Cab & Merlot ........................................... $10.99
Tecate 30 PK Can ..... $23.99
FRENCH WINE SALE
Pabst & National Bohemian
La Vieille Ferme Red, White, Rose ....................$8.59
30 PK ................. $18.99
Col Des Vents Corbieres ..................................$8.99 Strong Bow Cider
Charles Thomas CDR Red & White.....................$8.99
6 PK Asst Types......$7.49
Dom. Bellevue Touraine SB & Rose ................. $11.59
CRAFT BEER 6PK & 12PK SALE
Jadot Beaujolais Villages.............................. $11.49
Macon Villages ........................................ $12.49 Yuengling Lager, Light,
Black & Tan
SOUTH AMERICAN WINE SALE
12 PK Bottle ........ $10.99
Tilia Malbec & Cab .........................................$7.99 Flying Dog Blood Line,
Alamos Chard & Malbec..................................$8.99
The Truth, Raging IPA
Gascon Malbec ............................................ $10.99
6 PK Bottle............$9.49
Concha y Toro 1.5L Asst Types..........................$7.99
Kona Asst Types
6 PK Bottle............$7.99
Our Maryland Locations
• 4301 Randolph Rd, Wheaton MD, 301-946-3100 Shock Top Asst Types
6
PK Bottle .............$7.49
• 5148 Nicholson Ln, Kensington MD, 301-881-6253
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MG
E5
EE
BUY 2,
SAVE $10
By mail
Bacardi Superior
Tanqueray Gin
Tito’s Handmade
Vodka
1.75L
18.99
1.75L
29.99
1.75L
28.99
Baileys Irish
Cream
1.75L
39.99
Jack Daniel’s
Black
1.75L
33.99
Jameson
Crown Royal
1.75L
1.75L
41.99
46.99
Johnnie Walker
Black
1.75L
59.99
Final Price After Mail-in
Rebate When You Buy 2.
39 99
39.99
Bubblies for your boo
Armani Prosecco
DOC
ReLusso Rosso
Frizzante
Italy. 750ml
Italy. 750ml
14.44
w/coupon
11.04
w/coupon
16 99
16.99
Korbel Brut
California. 750ml
10.97
La Vostra
Prosecco
La Marca
Prosecco
Chandon Brut
Classic
Moet & Chandon
Imperial Brut
Veuve Clicquot
Brut NV
Italy. 750ml
Italy. 750ml
California. 750ml
France. 750ml
France. 750ml
11.97
15.97
43.97
46.97
Blue Moon
Belgian
g
White
Samuel Adams
Boston Lager
g
8.49
p
w/coupon
9.99
9
99
12 99
12.99
Say “love” with lagers and ales
Heavy
y Seas Loose
Cannon Hop3
p Ale
6-12oz btls
8.99
Guinness Extra Stout
12-11.2oz btls
10.99
Heineken,
Heineken Light
g
Corona Extra,
g
Corona Light
12-12oz btls or cans
12-12oz btls or cans
12.99
13.99
Fat Tire Amber
12-12oz btls or cans
13.99
Sierra Nevada
Pale Ale, Torpedo
Extra IPA
12-12oz btls
13.99
12-12oz btls or cans
12-12oz btls or cans
14.99
14.99
WINE SAVING
GS COU
UPON
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ONLINE CODE 6970
15% OFFWINE
Save on your purchase of 750ml and/or 1.5L bottles of WINE
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responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Products while supplies last. We reserve
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. WEDNESDAY,
FEBRUARY 14 , 2018
MORE THINGS WE LOVE
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST; ILLUSTRATIONS BY LENA VARGAS AFANASIEVA FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Everything can be good to the
last drop when you’re resourceful
BY
K ARA E LDER
“I saved this in case you want to use it for
something,” my husband, Braeden, says multiple times a week. Sometimes he’s holding a jar
of honey, empty save for the sticky bits
clinging to the sides. Other days it’s a bottle of
barbecue sauce with an infuriating amount
left at the bottom that refuses to squeeze out.
Sure, we could rinse and recycle the jars
and bottles, like normal people, but
instead I’ll add a dab of mustard, a
little oil and so