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The i Newspaper – December 28, 2017

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THE
PAPER – BRITAIN’S FIRST AND ONLY CONCISE QUALITY TITLE
Snow brings
road chaos
REVIEW
OF THE
YEAR
PART 2
Thousands
left without
power
World news, science and tech
P22
P4
EXCLUSIVE
THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
Number 2,214
News.co.uk
SPORT
World chess
champion
checks out of
Saudi Arabia
tournament
Brisk walk
can hold back
dementia
I’m here
for the
long haul
P7
P6
Royal scoop
Obama’s
warning for
Prince Harry
» Jeremy Corbyn tells i that he is ready to fight
an election at any time, and will wait until 2022
if the Government survives for a full term
How a warm
year messed
up our
seasons P15
» Labour leader believes ‘unstable’ Tories could
be forced to go to the country next year
» Second EU referendum demand dismissed
INTERVIEW P10 & 11
SIOBHÁN NORTON
Admit it
viewers, you
love a festive
TV turkey
P20
P48
Dangerous
truth about
quick-fix
dieting pills
P31
i@inews.co.uk
@theipaper
theipaper theipaper
LAURA PITEL ON SYRIA
P29
I TV
P32
I PROFITABLE YEAR FOR THE SUPER-RICH
P42
I PUZZLES
P44
The
News
Matrix
CRIME
Why has
time stopped
for no one
in 2017?
See p.34
The day at
a glance
THURSDAY
28
DECEMBER
Quote of the day
The true measure of
a man is how he treats
someone who can do him
absolutely no good
SAMUEL JOHNSON
POLICE
SOCIETY
SOCIETY
WEATHER
Recruits shun spy
HQ for tech giants
Car insurance up
£200 in five years
Heavy snow makes
roads hazardous
The Metropolitan Police chief
Cressida Dick has warned police
cuts will make it harder to tackle
violent crime. The commissioner
said she knew “exactly” where she
would deploy increased resources.
She added that moped-related crime
in London was falling due to police
efforts. PAGE 6
The next generation of spies and
codebreakers are being lured
away from jobs at GCHQ to tech
companies and banks, leading to a
staff shortage. Graduates joining
GCHQ can expect a salary starting
at £17,000, while an entry-level
software expert at Amazon is paid
£75,000 with a £15,000 bonus.
Average motor insurance
premiums have increased by nearly
£200 over the past five years,
Comparethemarket.com has found.
In 2012, the average premium stood
at £559, but premiums in a similar
period in 2017 reached an average of
£758. Insurance premium tax rises
are a factor.
Police have warned drivers of
continuing hazardous conditions
on roads. Thousands of homes in
the UK were also without power
as heavy snow hit parts of the UK.
Drivers were at a standstill on the
A14 in Northamptonshire for several
hours, while a lorry crash on the M1
blocked the motorway. PAGE 5
PEOPLE
NATURE
CRIME
RUSSIA
Rihanna’s cousin
killed in shooting
‘Shy’ molluscs found
at bottom of loch
Pensioner on
scooter robbed
St Petersburg bomb
attack injures 10
Rihanna has called for an end to gun
violence after the death of a young
man she named as her cousin. The
singer posted pictures of herself
with Tavon Kaiseen Alleynewas, 21,
taken in Barbados on Christmas Day.
He was killed in a shooting incident
on Boxing Day. Gun crime has been
increasing on the island. PAGE 21
The world’s largest known colony
of a “brilliant but shy” species of
shellfish has been discovered at
the bottom of a loch. Around 250
million flame shells were found
during a survey at Loch Carron
in the Highlands. It follows a 2012
discovery in Loch Alsh of more than
100 million of the molluscs.
An 89-year-old man using a mobility
scooter was robbed by youths on
Christmas Day. The pensioner had
just taken cash out of a machine
near a Sainsbury’s store in Hull,
Humberside Police said. They
grabbed the money from him before
riding off on bicycles. The pensioner
was not injured.
Ten people were injured yesterday
after a bomb detonated in a
supermarket in St Petersburg.
Explosives went off at a storage area
for customers’ bags. No one had
claimed responsibility for the attack
last night. Russia, with US help,
thwarted a series of bombings in St
Petersburg earlier this month.
Saturday 28 Dec 1895
The first commercial
movie screening takes
place at the Grand Café in
Paris. The film was made
by Louis and Auguste
Lumière, two French
brothers who developed a
camera-projector called
the Cinématographe.
The List
Family interaction
by text message
1 I love you
2 Dinner is ready
3 Can you bring me a cup of tea?
4 Can you turn the TV down?
5 What is for dinner?
6 Night night
7 Turn the heating up
8 Are you coming to bed?
9 Are you ready yet?
10 I’m tired – going to sleep now
Children are
dear to us
Average monthly cost of
a child aged up to 11 years
split into categories
£38.75
Schooling
£60.69
Holidays
Clothes
Toys
Leisure and
hobbies
£448.41
£86.85
Food
£46.97
Average spend a month per child of parents
who have children aged up to age 11.
£33.18
£45.31
This equates to
Furniture
Personal
care
Other educational
activities
index
Childcare
£5,380.92
per year per child
SOURCE: BROADBANDCHOICES.CO.UK
Subscribe to i at
i-subscription.co.uk
Crossword.............12
TV & Radio...........32
Arts..............................38
Business..................42
Puzzles.....................44
Weather...................46
It’s no secret having children is a huge financial commitment that can
eat into parents disposable income, particularly for those with larger
families. A study by Halifax has calculated the costs of a child, per month
and year, and the percentage of an average annual salary, giving an
accurate idea of the typical expense for current and expectant parents.
SOCIETY
British people send more than
10,000 messages a year to others
within the confines of their
own homes. Here are the most
common texts sent.
Anniversaries
A woman has died after being hit
by a car during a police pursuit.
The 47-year-old pedestrian was hit
by a blue Vauxhall Corsa on High
Street in Rishton, near Blackburn,
on Boxing Day. Lancashire Police
said the driver of the pursued Corsa
failed to stop at the scene.
Met chief warns
against cutbacks
Birthdays
Sienna Miller (below),
actress, 36; John Legend,
singer, 39; Stan Lee,
comic-book author, 95;
Dame Maggie Smith,
actress, 83; Max Hastings,
historian, 72; Denzel
Washington, actor, 63
Car chased by police
kills pedestrian
18.5%
£19.93
of the average British UK annual
salary, at £29,009.
£23.98
£35.17
£57.58
47%
of UK parents cut back on going out
and socialising since having children.
44%
over two-fifths cut back on meals out
in restaurants to cope with costs.
WORDS: VALERIE BROWNE
SOURCE: HALIFAX
Newspapers support recycling
The recycled content of UK
newspapers in 2015 was 71%
©Published by Johnston Publications Limited, 2 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0PU, and printed at Trinity
Mirror Printing, St Albans Road, Watford; Hollinwood Avenue, Oldham; and Cardonald Park, Glasgow. Also
printed at Carn Web, Carn Industrial Estate, Portadown. Back issues available from Historic Newspapers,
0844 770 7684. Thursday 28 December 2017. Registered as a newspaper with the Post Office.
Select journalism in i is copyright
independent.co.uk and copyright
Evening Standard, beyond those
accredited as such.
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
3
ThePage3Profile
UNITED STATES
LUCILLE ROWAN, POWERLIFTER
Sermon inspires
huge restaurant tip
Nigel Morris
Employees of a restaurant in
Ohio have received a tip of $3,500
(£2,600) from churchgoers
whose pastor preached about
generosity. Congregants from a
United Methodist church in Celina
delivered the cash after a Christmas
Eve service. Five women split the
money, amounting to $700 each.
Could new year be
Corbyn’s best yet?
CHINA
£62m skyscraper has
unfinished business
An unfinished Chinese skyscraper
in being auctioned online. The 156mtall skyscraper in northern Shanxi
province has an asking price of 553m
yuan (£62m), according to Taobao,
China’s largest e-commerce website.
Construction on the building
began in 2006 and it was due to be
completed by 2011.
PEOPLE
Brains and brawn?
Yes. Maths teacher Lucille Rowan, 50,
started weightlifting last year. To her
surprise, she was a natural and before
she knew it, she was competing at a
Commonwealth event.
When did she discover she
had such strength?
She decided to start weekly
weightlifting sessions to improve her
strength and tone up. She went to a
small gym near St Malachy’s
High School in rural
Co Down, where she
teaches. “The weights
just went up and up,”
she said.
Who noticed she was
a champion?
Ms Rowan’s lifting
efforts caught the
attention of gym staff.
One of the coaches
was impressed by her
rapid progression. He entered her
in a powerlifting competition, with
only seven weightlifting sessions
as training. His instincts were right
and she set her personal best, giving
her the confidence to go on to break
Northern Ireland records in February.
Lucille Rowan, a mathematics
teacher at St Malachy’s High School
in Castlewellan, with pupils Caitlin
Boyle (left) and Leah Mills PA
And then the Commonwealth event?
In September she joined world-class
athletes from 11 countries who took
part in the week-long event in South
Africa. “There were a lot of impressive
lifters, very inspirational lifters,” Ms
Rowan said.
She competed in the under-72kg
class, winning two silver medals
and a bronze and finishing third
overall. “It has been one of the
highlights of my life.” She added: “I
would never have been considered to
be a sports person before.”
What do her pupils think?
Ms Rowan said it
has changed the
schoolgirls’
perceptions about the
capabilities of women
in powerlifting.
“They did not know
girls went to the gym
or did weights.”
And the boys?
“They they have a
bit more respect for
weights than they do
for academics.”
Valerie Browne
Lifelong friends find
out they are brothers
Two men who grew up as best
friends have found out that they are
brothers and revealed the surprise
as a Christmas message. Alan
Robinson and Walter Macfarlane
have been friends for 60 years.
Born in Hawaii 15 months apart, Mr
Macfarlane never knew his father,
and Mr Robinson had been adopted.
UNITED STATES
$284bn bill was a
real electric shock
An electricity bill for more than
$284bn (£212bn) left a woman
in Pennsylvania stunned. Mary
Horomanski said: “My eyes just
about popped out of my head. We
had put up Christmas lights and I
wondered if we had put them up
wrong.” The bill was a mistake: the
actual amount due was $284.46.
Letter from the
Political Editor
i@inews.co.uk
New Years just keep getting better
for Jeremy Corbyn.
On 1 January 2015, he was
a well-liked and long-serving
backbench MP out of tune with his
party leadership. His ambitions –
once that year’s general election
was out of the way – lay with
securing a seat on a Commons
select committee.
Twelve months later, after one
of the most stunning upsets of
recent political history, he was
party leader, but faced constant
sniping from the vast majority of
his own MPs.
By last New Year’s Day, his
leadership was secure following a
second convincing endorsement
from the swollen ranks of the
Labour rank and file.
However, the party faced dismal
opinion poll ratings and Labour
MPs dreaded an all-powerful
Theresa May exploiting the
party’s weakness and calling a
snap election.
That is just what she did and, in
another bizarre twist of political
fate, her miscalculation means
that Mr Corbyn will be entitled
to raise an extra-special glass of
apple juice to 2018 this New Year.
He was relaxed and goodhumoured when I interviewed
him in his Westminster office.
With undisputed control over his
party, increased parliamentary
strength and Labour levelpegging with the Tories in the
polls, he could allow himself a
smile of quiet satisfaction.
But, unlike some enthusiastic
followers, he acknowledged
that he did not win in June and
conceded the party could face a
long slog to the next election.
I left with little doubt of his
appetite for the struggles ahead.
Who knows where he – or Mrs
May – will be when Big Ben rings
in 2019?
4
NEWS
SOCIETY
Auld Lang Syne: aquaintance the young don’t know
By Conor Riordan
The future of “Auld Lang Syne”
being sung at the turn of the new
year has been thrown into doubt,
with just 3 per cent of people in the
UK knowing the words, according to
a study.
Research by Sainsbury’s shows
the majority can belt out the chorus
and first few lines at best, but 42 per
cent of millennials do not know a
single word. It also found that more
than half do not know Scottish
bard Robert Burns wrote
the words, with 3 per
cent even believing Mariah Carey (inset) was
the author.
Sainsbury’s has now
put together a songsheet online in an effort
to revive the tradition.
“Auld Lang Syne” is sung as
a way to bid farewell to the old year
in many English-speaking countries. People will usually cross
arms to hold hands in circle
during the song.
In Scotland, the tradition is to hold hands with
the person next to you and
only cross arms over your
breast from the final verse,
before all rushing inwards
when it is finished.
A family takes advantage of the thick snow in the
Cotswolds; below, lorries became stuck on the A14
BEN BIRCHALL/SIMON TALBOT/PA WIRE
WEATHER
Big freeze brings
road closures
and power cuts
By Sally Guyoncourt
Wintry weather brought parts of
Britain an Northern Ireland to a
standstill yesterday, with snow and
ice creating travel chaos and leaving
thousands without power.
Many areas woke up to scenes of
a winter wonderland but the big
freeze also meant tailbacks on motorways, flights cancelled and homes
without electricity.
A lorry crash on the M1 near Lutterworth in Leicestershire closed all
three southbound lanes for several
hours, causing severe disruption.
In Gloucestershire, an HGV
jack-knifed after heavy snowfall on
the M5.
Highways England warned drivers
in Northamptonshire to avoid “severe conditions” in both directions on
the A14 near Kettering while it tried
to clear snow from the carriageway.
The authority tweeted that traffic officers were facing numerous
stranded vehicles on the A14. “Police
are also conducting welfare checks
for those caught in the traffic,” it said.
The RAC said it had seen a 15-20
per cent increase in callouts compared with this time last year.
Spokesman Pete Williams said they
expected to attend more than 9,000
breakdowns by the end of the day.
He said the snow and ice were
causing treacherous driving conditions, resulting in minor accidents.
“We are also seeing a significant
increase in pothole-related damage,
so punctures, wheel damage, steering and suspension problems. RAC
patrols attended a dozen vehicles
alone on the M25, where a large pothole opened up, causing a punctures
and wheel damage and big delays for
many motorists.”
The ice and wet played havoc with
electric vehicles, the RAC said.
Stansted airport in Essex was
forced to close its runway twice
for safety checks because of ice.
Passengers at Luton airport in Bedfordshire were told to expect delays
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
5
A stag looks at home in the freezing conditions; above, a farmer drives his
sheep to another field in Gloucestershire; below, children with sledges enjoy
the snow at Broadway Tower in the Cotswold Hills; below right, a stranded
car lies in a ditch in Stanford on Avon, Northamptonshire. BEN BIRCHALL/PA
WIRE/ REUTERS/DARREN STAPLES
caused by sleet and snow as crews
de-iced aircraft.
An airport spokesman said: “The
airport is open and the runway operational but air-traffic-control restrictions are in place.
Thousands of homes were left
without electricity as a number of
power lines were hit by heavy snowfall and ice.
Western Power Distribution said
around 8,800 homes remained without power last night. Most of those
hit were in the West Midlands, although the East Midlands, south
-west of England and Wales were also
affected.
Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks said it had restored
power to 12,500 customers but a further 5,500 remained without power.
Areas affected included Hampshire,
Wiltshire and Oxfordshire.
Up to 7cm of snow was recorded
over Exmoor, south Wales and the
Cotswolds, while strong winds battered parts of Cornwall.
Last night the Met Office issued
a warning about ice on the roads,
and wintry showers heading for the
North and the West.
The Met Office’s Simon
Partridge said: “We had
some quickly changing weather
overnight, with a band of heavy
rain and hill snow that started
in the South-west and gradually
moved north and eastwards.”
UNITED STATES
TRAVEL
Heavy snowfall halts traffic for hours
By Sally Guyoncourt
Frustrated travellers were
trapped on the A14 for hours after
heavy snowfall and a lorry crash.
Simon Talbot, a lorry driver
who was stuck for more than three
hours, told BBC News: “I’ve been
stationary since about 2.20am
westbound on the A14, there is
approximately 5ins of snow we’ve
had and I’m just stationary.
“I’m on an incline and there are
lorries and vans in front that are
unable to get up the hill because
of the snow. So it is just a waiting
game at the moment.”
Many other drivers took
to social media to vent their
frustration. Sean Byrne
tweeted: “Stuck A14 West
Bound between junctions 2-3
in Northamptonshire. Haven’t
moved for over 3 hours!” While
Jon Beaumont wrote: “2 hours
in standstill traffic on #A14
eastbound. 4am start was worth
it. Apparently multiple collisions.
Can’t believe cars were passing at
70+mph earlier when snow was
heavy and settling.”
Joshua Agdomar, 30, from
Moulton, Lincolnshire, said he
had been stuck on the road since
just before 6am, and had not
moved since shortly after that.
“[There are] rows and rows of
cars. I was driving up at about
quarter to six. And one of the
lanes must have had about 3in of
snow,” he said.
RAILWAYS
Strikes over staffing and
rotas hit two train operators
By Sally Guyoncourt
Rail services across the UK were affected by industrial action yesterday.
CrossCountry Trains, which offers
many inter-city and long-distance
services, had a reduced service due to
strikes. A spokesman said: “We will be
operating a reduced service but using
some longer trains.” The action is
over staff rotas and Sunday working.
Guards on the Greater Anglia service, covering Cambridgeshire, Essex,
Norfolk and Suffolk, took part in a 24hour strike in a dispute over driveronly trains. Mick Cash, of the Mail,
Maritime and Transport Union, said:
“Our members are standing firm and
united again in their strike action for
rail safety.”
Greater Anglia said its services had
not been affected by the action and
had no plans for job losses. Richard
Dean, a director, said: “We are keeping our conductors on our trains. In
fact we will be recruiting more when
we get our new trains. We have guaranteed their jobs right until the end of
the franchise, in October 2025.”
Nation on alert
as city is buried
in 5ft of snow
By Sally Guyoncourt
Forecasters in the US were yesterday warning of exceptionally
cold conditions across much of the
country as snow continued to pile
up in one city which already has
nearly 63 inches on the ground.
A storm in Erie, Pennsylvania,
brought 34 inches of snow on
Christmas Day, an all-time daily
snowfall record, and another 24.5
inches by Tuesday night.
Since 23 December, 62.9 inches
of snow has fallen on the city and
the final total could be more than
70 inches, said forecasters.
The city issued a snow emergency, citing “dangerous and
impassable” roads, and asked residents to stay off the streets.
Wind chill warnings are in effect for all of North Dakota and
Wisconsin, as well as large areas
of South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa,
Michigan and Indiana. Those
warnings were also in effect for
parts of Maine, Vermont, New
Hampshire and New York.
In such conditions, frostbite is
possible with as little as 30 minutes of exposure. AP
6
NEWS
RADIO
Beware social
media, Obama
tells his royal
interviewer
By Richard Vaughan
Barack Obama warned that social
media can distort people’s views
of reality as he appeared to take a
veiled swipe at Donald Trump, during an interview with Prince Harry.
The former US President said
political leaders have a duty to
unite society, providing them with
a “common space online” in
a bid to prevent them from
becoming entrenched in
their views.
Mr Obama raised his
concerns about social
media during a rare interview with the young
royal as part of Harry’s
guest editorship of BBC
Radio 4’s Today programme.
In a recorded interview conducted in Toronto in September, when
Meghanand‘thein-laws’
Prince Harry has said his fiancée
Meghan Markle had a “fantastic”
time with the Queen and his family
over Christmas.
Asked on Today how Ms Markle
coped with meeting “the in-laws”,
he replied: “It was fantastic – she
really enjoyed it.”
The Prince revealed they had
stayed with the Duke and Duchess
of Cambridge, in Norfolk, while
visiting the Queen at her nearby
Sandringham estate.
He added: “There’s always that
family part of Christmas [where]
there’s always that work element
there as well, and I think together
we had an amazing time.”
both were at the Invictus Games
(inset) the former President said:
“The question, I think, really has
to do with, how do we harness this
technology in a way that allows a
multiplicity of voices, allows a diversity of views, but doesn’t lead to
a Balkanisation of our society, but
rather continues to promote ways
of finding common ground?
“And I’m not sure government can legislate that,
but what I do believe is
that all of us in leadership have to find ways
in which we can recreate a common space on
the internet. One of the
dangers of the internet is
that people can have entirely different realities. They can
be just cocooned in information that
reinforces their current biases.”
While Mr Obama was careful not
to mention his successor by name,
his comments may be interpreted
as a rebuke aimed at Mr Trump,
who is a frequent user of Twitter.
And in a less coded barb, Mr
Obama warned that a leader cannot
do their job if they do not have the
capacity to “feel deeply about the
people that they are serving”.
Mr Trump has been accused of
being insensitive when it comes to
dealing with the bereaved families
of service personnel killed in action.
Mr Obama said it was important
that when dealing with wounded
soldiers or families who had lost a
loved one that he recognised the
sacrifice they had made. “If you
don’t understand that what you do
has a profound impact on somebody
else then you shouldn’t be there.”
Prince Harry and
world heavyweight
boxing champion
Anthony Joshua, who
was also interviewed
JEFF OVERS /BBC/PA
POLICE
Funds needed to fight knife crime
By Shaun Connolly
More resources would be put into
combating knife crime if extra funds
were available, the Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Cressida Dick,
has said.
Ms Dick said she understood all
public services were stretched, but
knew “exactly” where she would deploy any increased resources.
The commissioner (inset) said
knife crime was beginning to stabilise
in London, and that moped-related
crime was falling. However, asked
about police numbers, Ms Dick told
BBC Radio 4’s Today: “All the
public services are stretched.
We are stretched.
“But I think we need to
focus on what matters
most, and at the moment
violence on our streets is
a big issue for Londoners.
“If you ask any police
chief, they will always want
more resources, of course they
will. And I know exactly where I’d put
them if I had more resources. And it
would be into this issue.”
The Met chief said that police actions were making an
impact, adding: “We have
taken thousands and
thousands of knives off
the streets.
“We are doing stop and
search. We are doing it in
an intelligent way, and we
are stopping and searching
those people we know are prolific knife carriers.”
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
7
HEALTH
A walk in the park may help slow dementia
By Rhiannon Williams
Regular exercise may be a good way
of preventing the onset of dementia,
research has found.
A brisk walk could be particularly
beneficial for older people who are
between the “expected cognitive decline of normal ageing and the more
serious decline of dementia”, known
as mild cognitive impairment (MCI),
according to The American Academy of Neurology.
Symptoms of MCI include issues
with memory, language, thinking
and judgement, and can increase
the risk of dementia caused by
Alzheimer’s disease or other
neurological conditions.
The results, published in the journal Neurology, show that the cognitive functions of some people with
MCI did not significantly worsen
while others actually improved after
they exercised.
More than six per cent of people in
their 60s experience MCI, which increases to 37 per cent in people aged
85 and older.
Dr Ronald Petersen, lead author of
the study and director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centre at
the Mayo Clinic in Florida, recommends people complete 30 minutes
of aerobic exercise five times a week
or 50 minutes, three times a week.
The exercise he recommends is
either a brisk walk or mild jogging.
Dr Petersen said: “Regular physical exercise has long been shown to
have health benefits, but now we can
say exercise may also help improve
memory for people with MCI.
“Exercising may also slow down
the rate at which you would progress
from MCI to dementia.
“We need not look at ageing as a
passive process; we can do something about the course of our ageing,” he added. “So if I’m destined to
become cognitively impaired at age
EGYPT
British drug smuggler
moved to ‘notorious’ jail
By Dave Higgens
A British woman sentenced to three
years in prison after painkillers were
discovered in her luggage in Egypt
has already been transferred to a
notorious jail, leaving her mother
no chance to say goodbye, her family
has said.
Laura Plummer, a 33-year-old
shop worker from Hull, was
given the sentence by judges on Boxing Day, nearly
three months after she
was found to be carrying
290 tablets of tramadol,
a painkiller which is legal
in the UK but banned in
Egypt, in her suitcase.
The court was told Plummer (inset) was taking the tablets for her Egyptian partner, Omar
Caboo, who suffers from severe back
pain, and had no idea what she was
doing was wrong.
Plummer’s sister, Rachel, said
their mother, Roberta Synclair,
was in court for the “devastating”
judgment and had to watch as her
daughter was taken away sobbing
in a “cage”. Rachel said her mother
had been told Plummer would be
held in police cells so she could visit
her and take vital supplies. Ms Synclair travelled to the cells yesterday
only to find her daughter had already
been transferred to a prison in Qena.
Rachel Plummer said: “Mum was
told that she was going to stay in
the Safaga holding cell, the police holding cell, for the rest
of the week so she can visit
her, take her things that
she needs, food and stuff.
“So she travelled in a
taxi today all the way to
Safaga, which is an hour
away from where she is, to
be told that Laura had gone.
She went to Qena yesterday. Obviously that’s even more devastating for
my mum because she’s not got to say
goodbye to Laura. She’s not been able
to give her her food and her things.”
Rachel said the prison in Qena is
known to be a very difficult place to
be but reports her sister had already
been attacked were not true.
It’s 1484 again
at the Tower
Historical interpreters playing
Richard III and Queen Anne at the
Tower of London in a Medieval
Christmas event held daily until
31 December. The event shows a
royal Christmas in 1484. PA
72, I can exercise and push that back
to 75 or 78. That’s a big deal.”
The findings are based on sixmonth studies which found twiceweekly workouts could improve
memory function.
The findings are also endorsed
by the Alzheimer’s Association and
build upon previous studies.
Taking a brisk walk five times a week
could slow the onset of dementia
The Alzheimer’s
Association also
recommends brain training
exercises for people with MCI –
both online and in person.
8
NEWS
HEALTH
Getting in
the swim
of things
Hospitals make
£174m from
parking charges
By Jane Kirby
Hospitals in England made more than
£174m in the last financial year from
charging patients, visitors and staff
for car parking, research suggests.
The figure was up 6 per cent on the
year before, when £164m was raised.
A total of 120 NHS trusts were
asked by the Press Association to
give figures on parking charges and
fines under the Freedom of Information Act, of which 111 responded.
NHS trusts in England continue to
charge for parking, but in Scotland
and Wales it remains largely free.
A total of 40 trusts provided data
on parking fines, showing they made
more than £947,000 in 2016/17, up 32
per cent on the £716,000 taken the
year before.
Half (56) of trusts also charge disabled people for parking in some or all
of their disabled spaces, with more
trusts now saying they charge disabled visitors compared with last year.
The Heart of England NHS Foun-
dation Trust came out top when it
came to parking income, making
£4,865,000 across the year. Next was
Frimley Health, which raised nearly
£4m, including about £1,525,000 from
staff and £2,421,500 from patients
and visitors.
Six other trusts made more than
£3m, and two-thirds of trusts made
more than £1m. The most expensive
trust for a one-hour stay is the Royal
Surrey in Guildford, at £4.
The Liberal Democrats have
branded the charges as a “tax on
sickness”. Health spokesman Norman Lamb said: “The vast sums of
money hospitals are making from
parking charges reveal the hidden
cost of healthcare.”
Hospitals have been told
that sugary drinks will be
banned from canteens, shops and
vending machines if they fail to
take action to reduce sales.
More than 50,000
children in Scotland
have taken part in
a learn-to-swim
programme since its
launch six months
ago. Run by Scottish
Water and Scottish
Swimming, the
programme for
under-11s has been
picked up by more than
17 leisure trusts and
local authorities.
IAN MACNICOL/PA
BANGLADESH
NHS staff tackle Rohingya disease crisis
By Arj Singh
British medical staff are flying
to Bangladesh to help Rohingya
refugees forced to flee Myanmar,
marking “another proud moment
for the NHS”, the Government has
announced.
More than 40 doctors, nurses and
firefighters from the UK are travelling to the fishing port Cox’s Bazar,
where many Rohingya are living in
camps after fleeing persecution by
the military in their home country.
They will help tackle a diptheria
outbreak which currently has 1,470
suspected cases and 20 reported
deaths, following a request from the
World Health Organisation and the
Bangladeshi government.
Health minister Steve Brine
said: “Today marks another proud
moment in the history of the NHS
as selfless clinical staff once again
show their skill, commitment and
passion for helping people around
the world.”
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
9
PEOPLE
CRIME
Murray’s brother-in-law breaks
record with solo trek to South Pole
Stalking
victims
‘need better
protection’
By Scott D’Arcy
An
ta
rc
t
i
cC
Ronne
Ice Shelf
irc
le
Scott Sears – Sir Andy Murray’s
brother-in-law – has become the
youngest person to reach the South
Pole solo after enduring temperatures of -60C and winds of more than
100mph.
Lieutenant Sears, of the First Battalion Royal Gurkha Rifles, completed the 702-mile trek to the Antarctic
pole in 38 days, beating his goal of
completing the journey in between
40 to 50 days. By successfully navigating the route unassisted and unsupported, the 27-year-old, who lives
in London, became the youngest to do
so by two years.
Lt Sears, whose older sister, Kim,
married double Wimbledon champion Murray in 2015, arrived at the
South Pole in time for Christmas Day.
Judy Murray congratulated him
saying: “Well done Scott Sears.” In a
blog post on Boxing Day, he posted a
picture of himself at the pole and said:
“Merry Christmas from the South
Pole. Absolutely chuffed to pieces.”
Referring to the sledge which held
his tent and rations, he added: “After
38 days, Bessie and I have made it
to the pole and officially broken the
world record as the youngest person
to have reached the south pole solo,
unsupported and unassisted.
“Solo is incredibly misleading in
regards to the people behind this expedition. Absolutely could not have
done this without the help of my co-
A NTA RCTI CA
Start
Hercules
Inlet
South Pole
800 miles
Lieutenant Scott Sears at the South Pole and before his expedition, inset
presenting sponsors The Shackleton
Company and Juice Plus. Both have
been instrumental in equipping and
preparing me for this expedition.”
On the penultimate day, Lt Sears
said only snacks and music on his
iPod kept him going.
He wrote: “I couldn’t have asked
for better weather but I well and
truly hit a wall midway through
the day. At 38km left to go I
hit the wall, I’ve never experienced anything like it,
I would take a couple of
steps and just stop.”
Lt Sears has raised
more than £33,500 for
the Gurkha Welfare Trust
to help rebuild schools in
Gorkha, Nepal, destroyed in
the 2015 earthquake.
H i s f u n d ra i s i n g p a ge c a n
b e fo u n d at j u s t g i v i n g.co m /
fundraising/ scottsears.
ENERGY
Wind power beats coal three days in four as renewables surge
By Emily Beament
British wind farms generated more
electricity than coal plants on more
than 75 per cent of days this year, figures show.
Solar power also outperformed
coal half the time, as renewable energy continued its rise and the most
polluting fossil fuel declined, accord-
FINANCE
ing to data from analysis website
MyGridGB.
Overall, renewables provided more
power than coal plants on 315 days in
2017, or more than 90 per cent of the
year, figures up to 12 December show.
Coal was beaten by wind on 263 days
and by solar on 180 days.
The figures reflect a year in which
a number of “green” records have
been set for the power sector, including the first full day without any coal
power on the system and tumbling
prices for new offshore wind farms.
The year is being hailed by campaigners as the “greenest year ever”,
with an even cleaner power sector
expected to emerge next year.
Gareth Redmond-King, from conservation charity WWF, said: “2017
HMRC released the latest figures
as it launched a new campaign to
remind the UK’s 11.4 million selfassessment customers not to ignore
the “niggle” about completing their
tax returns.
The campaign, which features
reindeer, others were sorting out ducks on billboards and online
their finances, with 92 self-asquacking “tax”, urges peosessment tax returns subple: “Don’t let your tax
mitted to HMRC.
return peck away
Across the whole of
at you.”
Christmas Eve, 6,033
It aims to prompt
returns were subpeople who need to
The number of
mitted. The number
complete and submit
self-assessment
of tax returns being
online self-assessreturns submitted
submitted this
ment
returns to do so
on Christmas Day
ye a r was s l i gh t l y
before the deadline on
31 January.
down year-on-year for
Christmas Eve, but up
The deadline for paper
returns to be submitted was
year-on-year for Christmas
Day and Boxing Day.
in October.
has been an amazing year for renewable electricity in Britain: we have
never been cleaner or greener, and
we are on course for an even better
year in 2018.
“Climate change is wreaking havoc
on nature and wildlife, but we are at
last facing up to the challenge, turning our backs on polluting fossil fuels
and embracing a new clean future.”
More than 10,000 tax returns
were submitted online over
Christmas Day and Boxing Day,
figures show.
On Christmas Day, 2,590 self-assessment returns were submitted
– with a further 7,655 submitted on
Boxing Day, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) said.
While many people were wrapping last-minute gifts between 11pm
and midnight on Christmas Eve or
putting out food for Santa and his
2,590
Tougher powers to curb stalking
and harassment that blight the
lives of thousands are being proposed by a Conservative MP.
Sarah Wollaston (inset), who
chairs the Commons Health Committee, is advocating a Bill to tackle gaps in stalking laws that can
leave victims vulnerable to abuse
while police build a case against
the suspected perpetrator.
Stalking is a difficult crime to
prosecute, despite being made
a criminal offence in 2012, as the
term is not legally defined, leaving
space for differences in interpretation over persistent calls, unwanted gifts or unexpected visits.
Victims are often let down by
under-recording, inconsistent
services and poor understanding in the
criminal justice
system, with
“worrying failings at every
stage”, according to a report
by the police
and prosecution
service watchdogs.
Amber Rudd, the
Home Secretary, announced
plans for civil protection orders in
December last year, but no date
has been set for their implementation, prompting fears the idea had
been dropped.
Under new proposals, understood to have government
backing, police would apply for a
stalking protection order through
a magistrate, which would restrict
tormentors from contacting or approaching their victims while police gather evidence.
Perpetrators could also be ordered to seek mental health treatment or attend rehabilitation
during this time to stop them from
reoffending. Breaches of the order
would carry a prison sentence of
up to five years. THE INDEPENDENT
Across
Over 10,000 tax returns
submitted over Christmas
By Vicky Shaw
By Lizzy Buchan
1
Humble character in
Civil Service tweets
(6)
3
Remember to
reorganise cellar (6)
4
Tot was first
confused (6)
Down
No 2213
Solution, page 49
1
Job has one getting a
nervous disorder (6)
2
Edged along,
following Mr
Vicious? (6)
10
NEWS
COVER STORY
‘Unstable’ May will not
be able to see out next
year, insists Corbyn
By Nigel Morris
POLITICAL EDITOR
Jeremy Corbyn is avoiding alcohol
and eating energy bars to ensure he
is fit enough to lead Labour and be
Prime Minister well into his seventies, he has revealed.
The Labour leader, 68, told i he intends to be ready to fight an election at
any time and is pursuing a healthy lifestyle – including porridge for breakfast – to keep himself in good shape.
He claimed Theresa May’s position is so “unstable” that she could
be forced to call an election within
12 months – but said he is ready for
the long haul if the minority Tory
Government remains in office until
mid-2022.
The Labour leader said he and the
party were determined to build on
its advances since the June general
election when it defied predictions to
make steady gains.
Asked whether he could sustain that momentum for another
four years, he replied: “We’ve got
lots of energy. I’ve got loads of energy,
I’m fine.
“I eat porridge every morning –
porridge and energy bars – and I keep
off alcohol and meat.”
He stood by an earlier forecast
that he could become Prime Minister
during 2018: “The scenarios are that
the Conservatives implode to some
degree or their position becomes
untenable and they decide to call another election, and we’ll take the battle out there.”
Mr Corbyn’s immediate challenge
is to translate Labour’s healthy
opinion poll ratings into gains in
The scenarios are that
the Conservatives implode...
and call another election, and
we’ll take the battle out there
May when local elections are held
in London, Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Newcastle and other
major cities.
He said the party would campaign
on the impact of austerity on council
services, adding: “I am hoping we do
very, very well, but I’m not putting a
figure on it.”
The Labour leader said he planned
to combine continued campaigning
nationwide with developing existing
manifesto policies on education, care,
the environment and housing.
And he disclosed that he wanted
to involve local parties in designing
policies tailored to individual regions,
such as boosting rail connections in
the North of England and improving
rural bus services.
“For example, the party in Cornwall is looking at how our policies on
investments would affect Cornwall,
what the industrial opportunities
needs are, what the social needs are,
Mr Corbyn said the
strength of the party
machinery was demonstrated
last month when activists were
able to arrange 600 events on a
national day of campaigning.
what the housing needs are,” he said.
As 2017 dawned, Labour was flatlining in the polls and its support only
began to pick up about a month before the election.
Reflecting on the extraordinary
turnaround, Mr Corbyn said: “The
key factors were the registration of
a lot of new voters, the production of
our manifesto, which was transformational, and an exciting campaign
that was a combination of the very
old-fashioned public rallies on the
streets and parks and so on around
the country, and very hi-tech social
media campaigning and brilliant social media team.”
He added: “I did 100 events myself
during the general election campaign
and travelled the length and breadth
of the land on it. We didn’t quite win –
that’s my great regret.
“But we did have the biggest vote
for Labour in England since 1970 and
the biggest swing for Labour since
the Second World War.”
Mr Corbyn said he sensed the tide
was turning when 500 people turned
up at two hours’ notice for a meeting
in a Croydon street and huge numbers came to small canvassing events
in Warrington and Crewe.
Labour leader
Jeremy Corbyn
says he is ready for
Downing Street
JANE BARLOW/PA
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
Well read
i has been praised by the
Labour leader as an informed
read that comes in a small,
concise package but speaks
with authority.
Picking up a copy of the paper
from his desk and confirming
himself to be among i’s loyal
readership, Mr Corbyn said:
“I buy it pretty well every
morning. I come out from my
house and buy it from the shop
on the corner.
“I like the size of it because
it’s easy to hold and read and I
think it was a very clever idea
of producing it in a sort of
tabloid size – but it’s clearly not
a tabloid.
“I like it because it has
informed, quick-read articles
and it suits somebody in my
position and with my lifestyle. I
also like the sport.”
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
11
CONSERVATIVES
Angry Tories
call for Heseltine
to be expelled
By Sally Guyoncourt
A conservative think-tank is calling
for the whip to be withdrawn from
Tory grandee Lord Heseltine following his “sniping” about Brexit.
Members of the right-wing Bow
Group have accused the former deputy prime minister of “sabotage” and
want him expelled from the Tories’
Lords group. It comes after he suggested a Labour government would
be preferable to the “long-term disaster” of Brexit.
Lord Heseltine said: “We’ve survived Labour governments before.
Their damage tends to be short-term
and capable of rectification. Brexit is
not short-term and is not easily capable of rectification.”
Bow group chairman, Ben HarrisQuinney, said: “Heseltine has made
clear it is his aim to prevent Brexit at
all costs, including the sabotage of his
own party and nation. The Conservative Party must therefore withdraw
the whip and end the inevitable continuation of his sniping from inside
the tent.”
HOUSING
PEOPLE
‘Fun? Life is
fun. I love
meeting
people’
By Nigel Morris
Carving out time for
family, friends and simple
relaxation is not easy if you
are among the country’s
highest-profile politicians.
But Jeremy Corbyn stressed
that he is determined not to
be swamped by the endless
demands on his time.
He generally devotes Monday
to Wednesday to Parliament,
before heading off on campaign
visits around the UK and
spending a day in his Islington
North constituency.
Part of his weekend is set
aside for tending his allotment,
reading, “talking to other people
in a sort of fairly non-political
way” and taking in the
occasional Arsenal home fixture.
Asked what he does for fun, he
replied: “Fun? Life is fun. I love
meeting people and I love the
sense of community.”
He said he and his wife, Laura,
enjoyed occasional outings to
the theatre. Most recently he
saw a play about the Minotaur
legend by Angel Shed, a company
which involves disadvantaged
young people from Islington
in productions.
His main festive celebrations
– toasted with apple juice – took
place on Christmas Eve in line
with the tradition followed by
his Mexican wife. The couple
will also set aside 6 January to
commemorate Three Kings Day,
the Mexican holiday marking
Epiphany. And what gift had he
hoped for? He replied instantly:
“A day off.”
In Saturday’s
More in-depth news features
PLUS 7 Days, the essential
review of the week
BREXIT
‘We are not calling for
a second referendum’
By Nigel Morris
The prospect of Labour supporting
a second referendum on European
Union membership has been categorically dismissed by Jeremy Corbyn.
Some of his MPs have backed holding a vote on the eventual Brexit deal
and his deputy, Tom Watson, has said
nothing should be ruled out.
“He did say that, but our position is
that we are not advocating a second
referendum,” Mr Corbyn said.
Councillors in London added to the
calls yesterday arguing that Labour
should “be committed to providing
the opportunity for people to change
their mind”.
But Mr Corbyn told i the party
needed to accept the result of last
year’s vote and press for a Brexit deal
which prioritised protecting jobs:
“We have had a referendum. The negotiations are ongoing and we’ve set
out the kind of relationship we want
to have with Europe in the future.”
The party has been consistently
accused of conveying an ambiguous
message on Europe in an effort to
hold together a coalition of anti-EU
voters in some of its Northern strongholds and anti-Brexit activists.
“I don’t think it’s confusing,” he
said. “What we are saying is… we are
formally leaving the European Union
of course – that is the position.”
The Labour leader, who is a Eurosceptic, hit back at charges that
he only campaigned half-heartedly
ahead of the referendum.
Labour will curb
eviction powers,
pledges Corbyn
By Ashley Cowburn
Labour’s next manifesto will
include a pledge to reduce
landlords’ eviction powers and
tip housing rules back in favour
of renters, Jeremy Corbyn has
announced.
The Labour leader said his
party would scrap laws that allow
landlords to kick out tenants
under “no fault” evictions.
It is claimed that the
contentious practice has
contributed to the rise in
homelessness since the creation of
the Coalition government in 2010.
Asked whether abolishing “no
fault” evictions would be in the
manifesto, he said: “Absolutely… I
am very committed to housing and
dealing with homelessness.”
12
NEWS
1
CRYPTIC CROSSWORD
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450ml (£2.23 per 1L).
Uniformed
police patrols
prove elusive
for public
from 41 per cent in 2016 and 36 per
cent in 2015.
The survey of 12,662 people was
carried out by Ipsos Mori for HM Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire
& Rescue Services to gauge perceptions of crime, safety and local policing. The inspectorate has previously
raised concerns over the impacts of an
“erosion” of neighbourhood policing.
By Hayden Smith
Elsewhere, the research noted an
increase in confidence in the police to
Nearly half of people in England provide protection during a terrorist
and Wales have not seen a uniattack.
formed police or community
Over half (55 per cent)
support officer on foot in
said that they would be
their area in the last year,
confident in police dealresearch suggests.
ing with such an inciOf people surveyed
dent, compared with 46
A large-scale survey
said
they
had
not
indicates that the bobby
per cent in 2016. Three
seen a uniformed
on the beat is a rare sight
in 10 people (30 per
cent) considered crime
for a rising percentage of officer in their area
to be a big problem in their
the population. While fourlocal area – a five-percentage
fifths of participants felt it
point increase since 2015.
was important to have a regular
Andy Fittes, general secretary of
uniformed police presence, only 17
per cent believed they had this locally. the Police Federation of England and
The proportion who said they had Wales, said: “The findings of the surnot seen a uniformed officer in their vey are disappointing but come as
area was 44 per cent this year – up no surprise.”
44%
CHRISTMAS APPEAL
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
CHARITY
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
13
‘The children’s
behaviour is
much improved’
Janice Godbehere, 50, runs the
breakfast club at The Priory
“They call me the Bagel Lady. I am
there whatever the weather,” said
Ms Godbehere. “If it’s snowing, I have
my umbrella.
“When we started off, a lot of pupils hadn’t seen bagels so we started
with a slice of toast,” she added. “I
still take out a loaf, but that is being
left more and more as most kids go
for the bagels.”
She has worked at the school for
30 years and believes the bagel trolley in the playground has helped the
school enormously. In particular, she
has noticed a marked improvement
in the behaviour of pupils.
“Behaviour has improved,” she
said. “A hungry child can’t concentrate, so they misbehave. Also, it has
had an impact on attendance.”
By Richard Vaughan
EDUCATION CORRESPONDENT
A headteacher at a primary school
serving a tough West Midlands district said handing out bagels from
a trolley in the playground each
morning has boosted attendance
and behaviour.
Jill Craig, head of The Priory
primary school in Dudley, said the
simple tweak to how they provided
their Magic Breakfast club has
meant parents and pupils are on
time at the school gate every day.
“We often had children who
would say they hadn’t had breakfast. They would ask how long it
was until break because they were
hungry,” Ms Craig said.
When the charity Magic Breakfast began offering food, parents
were often “too proud” to go into
the school. But that all changed
when it began offering breakfast in
the playground.
“The biggest thing for me is the
bagels in the playground,” she
said. “The kids can just grab one
before they go into class. It means
they’re not sitting in that first lesson hungry.”
The Priory, which serves a disadvantaged community deep in
the Black Country, is supported by
Magic Breakfast, the charity that is
being backed this Christmas by i in
an effort to raise £100,000 to provide 500,000 breakfasts. The school
2017 Christmas Appeal
is considering using the breakfasts
to coax parents into adult learning
classes to educate them on healthy
eating, literacy and numeracy.
According to Ms Craig, the school
aims to address the “bigger need”
in the area, which is to help provide
parents with the skills to gain more
confidence and to find work.
“It always comes back to the
kids,” she said. “The parents want
to know what to do. We have to
help them in a way that they can
access comfortably.
“If you get them into work you
can break down that poverty gap
that they are stuck in. If they can
go out and be a teaching assistant,
they can earn more money and help
their child – and improve their opportunities too.”
According to Karen Jones,
Magic Breakfast’s regional lead for
the Midlands & South West, some
headteachers are reluctant to offer
free breakfasts because parents
will start to rely on it.
But Ms Craig said having parents
rely on the breakfast was a small
price to pay for having children who
were not hungry in class.
“The responsibility of schools has
become far wider. I think parents
think it is our responsibility to feed
[the children], to look after them,”
she said.
“If they haven’t had breakfast,
they will often say, ‘We didn’t have
The kids can just grab a
time for breakfast, can you get them
bagel before class – it means something?’ Yes, I realise I am crethey’re not sitting in that
ating a crutch, but if I don’t create it
first lesson hungry
there just won’t be one.”
NO CHILD
TOO HUNGRY
TO LEARN
Christmas
Appeal
22p provides a hungry schoolchild with a healthy Magic Breakfast so
they can concentrate in their important morning lessons and do well at school.
£25 provides over 100 breakfasts, £50 provides over 220 breakfasts
£100 provides over 450 breakfasts. Thank you for your support.
Pleasemakeyourcheque/postalorderpayableto MagicBreakfast
£50
£100
Iprefertogive£
£25
IencloseachequemadepayabletoMagicBreakfast
IwouldliketopaybyVisa/CAFCard/MaestroCard/Switch/Maestro
Cardnumber:
(CVV)
/
Expirydate:
/
Issueno.(Maestroonly):
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The i Christmas Appeal is
aiming to raise £100,000 to
help the charity Magic Breakfast
provide hungry pupils in
schools across the UK with a
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For just £1, you would give a
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i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
15
NATURE
CULTURE
Good year for the
roses, butterflies
and rare fungi
Hull to build
on its City of
Culture legacy
By Dave Higgens
Kingston upon Hull’s year as UK
City of Culture has been described
as an “unmitigated rip-roaring, aweinspiring, life-enhancing success”
by Arts Council England as organisers and civic leaders vow to build on
its legacy in 2018.
The UK’s second City of Culture
tenure has been widely praised, especially for including so many local
people, and is estimated to have provided an economic boost for Hull set
to exceed the bid’s forecast of £60m.
Arts Council England chief
executive Darren Henley said:
“Hull’s year in the spotlight has been
an unmitigated rip-roaring success.
Thanks to the power of sustained
strategic investment in art and
culture, the next chapter in Hull’s
rich story is now filled with optimism, creativity, excitement and
economic growth.”
Hull City Council leader Stephen
Brady said: “The confidence in the
city is at an all-time high. 2017 was
a catalyst for change and our ambitious plans will carry on with Hull
Venue opening in June 2018 and
plans for the Yorkshire Cruise Terminal are progressing very well.”
By Tom Bawden
ENVIRONMENT CORRESPONDENT
Topsy-turvy weather brought a
succession of surprises in the countryside in 2017, including spring
flowers blooming in autumn, unprecedented numbers of hawfinches and an invasion by Portuguese
men o’ war.
Naturalist Matthew Oates, unveiling the National Trust’s review
of the year, said it had been one of
the hottest years. “At times, it feels
like the seasons are becoming less
distinctive, and that makes it extremely difficult to predict how nature will react.”
A dry and mild 2016-17 winter
caused a low spawn count among
Unusual year for nature
January Bumblebees started
to appear in the mild
conditions
February The ninthwarmest since 1910
March Spring flowers
bloomed early
April Bluebells peaked
over Easter
May High number
of breeding buzzards in
Gloucestershire
June The earliest appearance
since 1893 of the purple emperor
butterfly, in Surrey
August The UK has not had a really
sunny August for over a decade
September A diamond spider not
seen in the UK for half a century was
found in Nottinghamshire
October A bumper harvest of seeds,
fruits and nuts after warm spring
November Storms brought an influx
of Portuguese men o’ war to beaches
Purple hairstreaks,
white-letter hairstreaks
and other butterflies that live
in the tree tops emerged amid
warm conditions in large
numbers but most were killed
off by a thunderstorm on 18 July.
natterjack toads and other amphibians, while premature spring weather prompted many flowers to arrive
earlier than usual. Wild daffodils
appeared in Devon’s Teign Valley
in February, while elder and dog
rose, which usually flower in June,
were blooming by April. It wasn’t,
however, much of a year for orchids,
which had done well in recent years,
the National Trust noted.
Balmy weather in May led to
a good nesting season for birds
– the little tern doing well at Blakeney Point in Norfolk – and
a positive flight period
for insects. The heather
colletes bee thrived on
the Purbeck heaths in
Dorset, while the elusive purple emperor,
the UK’s second-largest
butterfly, was spotted at
Bookham Common in Surrey, on 11 June – its earliest appearance for over 120 years.
A colony of emperors was also
discovered at the Trust’s Sheringham Park – they haven’t been seen
in Norfolk for 40 years.
The late summer rains contributed to a prolific year for fungi. The
nationally rare powdercap stranger
was found at Clumber Park in Nottinghamshire in October, while
rangers on the Malham estate in
Yorkshire discovered an array of
extremely rare waxcaps.
Zolst Balogh’s installation ‘We Are Hull’ marked the start of City of Culture year
Darren Henley, page 20
TECHNOLOGY
Rise of robots ‘could lead to more inequality’
By Gavin Cordon
Ministers are being urged to intervene to ensure the spreading use of
robots in the workplace does not result in rising levels of inequality.
A report by the Institute for the
Public Policy Research said increasing automation had the potential
to deliver a powerful boost to the
productivity of UK business. But it
warned there was a danger the benefits would be “narrowly” concentrated in the hands of investors and small
numbers of highly skilled workers.
The report estimates that jobs generating wages of £290bn a year have
the potential to be automated.
But it rejects the idea that the
country is heading for a “post-hu-
man” economy, arguing that most
jobs are likely to be “reallocated”
rather than eliminated.
As a result, it said, the biggest
challenge for ministers would be to
ensure that the rewards of automation were fairly distributed. “Without effective management from the
Government, inequality is likely to
increase,” it said.
16
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COMMENT FROM HOME & ABROAD
IRELAND AND
BREXIT
LAURA
PLUMMER
TRUMP IN
2018
OUTRAGE
CULTURE
DENNIS (THE
MENACE )
THE
MINIATURIST
The child in
this divorce
saga…
She was
naive, but
needs help
Many more
challenges
lie ahead
Let’s break
out of the
cycle
Times have
changed, and
so should he
A true and
elegant
adaptation
Irish Times
The Independent
WashingtonPost
The Guardian
The Times
Radio Times
Ireland’s EU operation
seems to be smooth
and effective but
more will need to be
done in Westminster
in 2018. We cannot
afford to pick sides,
because if Britain and
the EU cannot agree a
worthwhile trade deal,
it will be the island of
Ireland that pays the
heaviest price. A bitter
divorce never ends
well for the children.
(Shane Fitzgerald)
Cairo is quietly furious
with the two-year ban
on British airlines
using Sharm El Sheikh
airport, which has cost
tens of thousands of
jobs. It is unsurprising
that there is no great
enthusiasm to show
mercy to someone
who, in the words of
her MP, is “a decent
woman who has made
a terrible mistake”.
(Simon Calder)
My New Year’s wish
for the president is to
lead by example when
it comes to respecting
those who oppose
him. Whether that
respect is returned
is not important. He
is president of every
American of all
races, creeds and
sexual orientations.
(Gary Abernathy)
Rage is contagious.
It spreads from one
digital crevice to the
next, like a fungal
infection. It itches like
one too. When sitting
at the keyboard, it is
difficult to perceive
wrongness without
wanting to scratch it
with a retort. But that
provides no sustained
relief. One side’s
scratch is the other’s
itch. (Rafael Behr)
Nostalgists will deride
the apparent spread of
political correctness
even to children’s
comics, but there is
nothing wrong in
Dennis’s evolution.
On the contrary, a
gentler Dennis is an
appropriate figure
for the times. Every
generation has its
idiosyncrasies, and the
publishers of comics
are right to reflect
them. (Editorial)
There always the
danger that a botched
screen adaptation will
take a sledgehammer
to all those beautiful
images the author has
constructed in your
head, and replace them
with something ugly.
BBC1’s adaptation of
The Miniaturist does
neither. It’s wonderful.
(Eleanor Bley Griffiths)
Daily Mirror
TheDaily Telegraph
I fail to see how the
provisions made for
UK/Irish passport
holders can only apply
to those living in
Northern Ireland; they
must apply to anyone
with dual citizenship
living in Britain, too.
(Philip Johnston)
While it was
Ms Plummer’s
responsibility to
check the laws, she
and her family must
be going through hell.
All avenues must be
explored so she is
not in a cell for any
longer than necessary.
(Editorial)
Quote of
the day
CBS
Next year, even with a
unified government,
won’t necessarily
be easy. Lawmakers
will be focused on
re-election, which will
make passing some
legislation trickier.
Midterm election
years are almost
always tough for
the president.
(Rebecca Shabad)
CNN
We’ve lived through
an anger-inducing
year, where many of us
have found ourselves
screaming and cursing
at screens, feeling
embattled. We live in
an era of outrage. This
coming year, I’d like
to amplify our peace.
(Tess Taylor)
Lad Bible
Dennis will no longer
be referred to as
a Menace. What a
schoolboy redemption.
Nope, no more attacks
with peashooters and
catapults. To be honest,
Dennis the Menace
was risking an Asbo.
(Chris Ogden)
Daily Express
Romola Garai is
magnificent as the
half-icy, half-fiery
Marin, and the elegant
camerawork makes
every shot look like a
painting. No ghosts, no
murder plots, as far as
I can see, but it’s still
one of those shows that
makes you draw a little
closer to the fire.
(Matt Baylis)
LifeInBrief
BRUCE McCANDLESS ASTRONAUT
I haven’t
written a
book before.
Sometimes I
think I should
leave that
up to the
clever people
Amber Rudd
The Home Secretary
is considering
writing a novel
Nasa astronaut Bruce McCandless, the
first person to fly freely and untethered
in space, has died at the age of 80. The
announcement, by Nasa’s Johnson
Space Centre, did not give a cause
of death
McCandless was photographed in
1984 flying with a hefty spacewalker’s
nitrogen-propelled backpack, alone
in the cosmic blackness above a blue
Earth. He travelled more than 300 feet
away from the space shuttle Challenger
during the spacewalk.
Born in Boston in 1937, McCandless
graduated from the Naval Academy and
earned a Masters degree in electrical
engineering from Stanford University
and a Masters degree in business
administration from the University
of Houston at Clear Lake in 1987. He
married Bernice Doyle, and the pair
were married for 53 years until her
death in 2014.
In 1966, he was the youngest of 19
astronauts chosen by Nasa to join the
space programme.
When Neil Armstrong walked on
the Moon in 1969 during the Apollo
11 Moon landing, McCandless was
serving as the Mission Control capsule
communicator in Houston , and
received Armstrong’s message: “That’s
one small step for [a] man, one giant
leap for mankind.”
He was 46 when he took his own first
trip to space on board the Challenger.
His untethered spacewalk saw him
propelled away from and then back to
the space shuttle using the backpack,
which he had helped to design.
After the flight, McCandless joked:
“That may have been one small step for
Neil [Armstrong], but it’s a heck of a big
leap for me.”
He later said he was not nervous
about the historic spacewalk, despite
being completely separated from the
space shuttle during the flight.
“I was grossly over-trained. I was
just anxious to get out there and fly.
I felt very comfortable. It got so cold
my teeth were chattering and I was
shivering, but that was a very minor
thing,” he said in 2006.
In 1990, he returned to space as part
of the team that deployed the Hubble
Space Telescope into orbit. In the
course of his life, he spent at least 312
hours – 13 full days – in space.
Senator John McCain was
McCandless’s classmate at the Naval
Academy, and said in a statement
after his death: “The iconic photo of
Bruce soaring effortlessly in space has
inspired generations of Americans
to believe that there is no limit to the
human potential.” Beyond spaceflight,
McCandless enjoyed scuba diving,
electronics, and photography.
McCandless died at home in
California, and is survived by his
second wife, Ellen Shields McCandless,
two children and two grandchildren.
Born 8 June 1937
Died 21 December 2017
Barbara Speed
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
17
MyView
DavidGoodhart
All aboard to Somewhere, or Anywhere
Split in British society is as much cultural now as it is economic
T
his has been a
confusing political
year. The fallout from
the unexpected Brexit
vote, and then an
equally unexpected
general election result, have
underlined how the main divides
in British politics are now as
much cultural and generational
as economic.
The political parties, rooted
in socio-economic conflict, are
struggling to adapt.
The new divide, as much within
as between the parties, is about
values. I would argue that the
main divide is now between people
who view themselves as being
from Anywhere, the educated
and mobile, and those who
view themselves as being from
Somewhere, the more rooted and
small-c conservative.
The Anywheres only make up
around a quarter, or less, of the
population but their progressive
individualist politics, which
prioritise openness, autonomy
and cognitive ability, have
dominated policy for more than a
generation and promoted, among
other things, the two “masses”
– mass immigration and mass
higher education.
Brexit was the backlash of the
less influential Somewheres,
who make up around half of the
population. These are people who
value stability, familiarity and
more parochial group and national
attachments, and have experienced
the declining status of so many
non-graduate jobs.
The Anywheres then reasserted
themselves during the June
election. Their new political
heartland, the seats with a
significant university and young
graduate presence, played a
decisive role in the outcome.
So, where are we now? Partly as a
result of the election we seem to be
edging from a Somewhere Brexit,
prioritising lower immigration
and full sovereignty, to a more
Anywhere Brexit focusing on a
good trade deal.
But there is no Corbynite lurch to
the left in public opinion (indeed the
Tories narrowly lead in the latest
opinion polls) – though it is true that
there is some austerity fatigue. Nor
has there been a collapse in support
for Brexit.
The establishment, such as it is,
has been repeatedly on the backfoot
in recent months, from the fallout
of the Grenfell tragedy to the
sexual harassment scandals. But
Economic cycle: improving
young people’s technical
skills would benefit all areas
of the country following
Brexit GETTY
this is a function of the old cliché
that the right won the economic
argument and the left won the
cultural one, especially on race and
gender issues. Anything that can
be presented as an example of elite
indifference or abuse quickly turns
into a narrative of outrage.
But we need to remember that
the left won the cultural argument
most decisively among the
Anywhere classes, who embrace
social fluidity and dominate in
higher education and many of our
cultural and media institutions.
Outside these institutions, the left
is not always winning. Brexit, after
all, was a cry of pain from those
who felt national social contracts
were threatened by free movement
from the EU. Even most under-40s,
especially those with young
families, value stable communities
and well-managed borders, think
national citizens’ rights trump
global ones, and want better options
for non-graduate school leavers.
The key thing to realise is that
both Anywhere and Somewhere
worldviews, in all their variety, are
decent and legitimate. It is the task
of politics to find a settlement in
which both groups feel that their
core interests are respected. As
Outside of
higher education
and many of
our cultural
institutions, the
left is not winning
the children’s author David Lucas
has written, we need the Anywhere
values of diversity and freedom, but
these are centrifugal virtues that do
nothing to stop the fragmentation
of society. The virtues of duty,
loyalty, respect for authority, and
responsibility for one’s own patch,
are largely left to Somewheres.
Finding a settlement is harder
in Britain than in some other rich
democracies because Somewhere
and Anywhere personal networks
diverge so sharply. Anywheres
seldom know Somewheres because
aged 18 they depart to residential
universities, and those pursuing
professional careers rarely return.
The mutual incomprehension this
creates leaves our politics in a state
of instability. We simply don’t agree
on enough of the fundamentals—as
the Brexit vote revealed. We are
in a kind of stalemate, a values
version of that between organised
labour and the middle classes of the
mid-1970s that was only resolved by
the arrival of Margaret Thatcher.
What we need is a common
project to bind together the
interests of the two value groups.
The possibility of “rebooting”
policy after Brexit could perhaps
provide that, with a new emphasis
on basic education and technical
skills for the people and areas left
behind by our London-oriented
economy. In the meantime expect
more political surprises until we
find a new settlement to narrow our
great divide.
David Goodhart is the author
of ‘The Road to Somewhere:
The New Tribes Shaping British
Politics’ (Penguin)
i@inews.co.uk
18
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@
A little light
hypocrisy
Katy Balls’ contention
(i, 27 December) that
Theresa May cannot be
privately for fox hunting
and publicly against it
clearly underestimates
the degree of
inconsistency of which
the PM is capable.
May voted to remain
in the EU yet is the
cheerleader for the
Leavers. If she can be as
inconsistent on the most
critical issue affecting
the UK for decades, this
is a very mild hypocrisy
by comparison.
DAVID BRACEY
CHESHAM BOIS
Your
View
TEXTS, TWEETS
AND EMAILS
Singing choirs’
praises
Can I be so bold as to
suggest that it is not
only children that
benefit from singing
(i, 26 December) but
adults too? I sing in four
different choirs across
South Yorkshire.
Singing helps with
cognitive memory,
breathing, and
pronouncing words
clearly. Then there is the
camaraderie aspect..One
of the choirs I sing with
also does tours every
two years. Such travel
has seen me sing with
my fellow choristers at
Montserrat Monastery
in Spain to a packed
church, and in St Peter’s
at the Vatican.
MAL BRIGGS
DONCASTER, SOUTH
YORKSHIRE
Working over
Christmas
My sympathies to the
i team for having to
work on Christmas
Day (Editor’s Letter,
26 December). I
immediately thought of
the stoic RAC mechanic
who changed my car
battery after it gave up
the ghost on Christmas
Eve. He told me he’d
be back at work on
Christmas Day too. I once
had to work Christmas
Eve, Christmas Day,
Boxing Day, New Year’s
Eve (my birthday) and
New Year’s Day.
With hindsight it
wasn’t as bad as all
that, and I still had
human interaction and
camaraderie at work.
Perhaps if we celebrated
Christmas as an
extended period lasting
into early January things
would be easier for those
who have to work during
this period.
WILL GOBLE
RAYLEIGH, ESSEX
What’s in a
name?
I am baffled about this
notion of trademarking
your name, as Sean
Connery has done. I
wonder whether Tom
Jones has considered it?
TOM (KNOWN AS
ROWLAND) JONES
CBEs for
Remainers
Nigel Farage bemoans
he has not been knighted:
“I am not a Remainer.
Every one of them got
CBEs” (i, 26 December).
I do not have access to
the resources available
to Mr Farage so will take
him at his word. The
creation of more than 16
million CBEs will surely
have devalued their
worth and the worth of
other honours. I suspect
that me, along with all of
the other 16 million-plus
citizens who have been
Praise be: singing
is good for people
of all ages
to scrounge a lift, or be
forced to pay premium
taxi rates.
TIM MICKLEBURGH
GRIMSBY
Green ideas,
lavish lifestyle
awarded the CBE (mostly
without our knowledge)
would gladly give them
back if we could stop
this ridiculous slide
into Brexit.
FRANK MASKELL
BEDFORD
A very poor
outfit
In 1959 our Prime
Minister Harold
Macmillan met Nikita
Khrushchev in Moscow
wearing a superb white
astrakhan fur hat and
equally elegant overcoat
with astrakhan collar for
a 10-day state visit.
Compare this with
Boris Johnson’s pitiful
outfit on his recent
fleeting visit to Russia,
consisting of knitted hat
with logo and woollen
gloves. Do we need a
more forceful symbol
of our reduced world
status than when we do
not care how we send
our politicians abroad
dressed like this?
NICK LEADER
CANTERBURY
Prince Harry’s interview
with his father on the
Today programme made
good listening, and
reminds us what decent
people they both are. No
monarch in our history
was more thoughtful
or caring than we can
expect a future King
Charles to be. But, when
he worries about waste,
bearing in mind his
ecological but still fairly
lavish lifestyle, well,
that’s a bit rich.
JOHN GEMMELL
Female Doctor,
not female spy
Christmas
travel chaos
It’s daft to imply James
Bond can be a woman
because Doctor Who
can be (i, 27 December) .
The character of Doctor
Who regenerates bodies,
which is why audiences
seem willing to give
the new female Doctor
a chance, but although
different actors have
portrayed 007, one thing
remains the same: Ian
Fleming’s character is a
male heterosexual spy.
Changing his gender
would be like changing
Louise May Alcotts’s
Little Women into
Little Men.
EMILIE LAMPLOUGH
TROWBRIDGE
If we are serious about
getting people out of
their cars, then we must
do something about
the paucity of public
transport over the
Christmas period. Where
I live in Grimsby, a town
of approximately 90,000
people, there were no
buses from 6.30pm on
Christmas Eve until the
morning of 27 December.
And even then there
was just an inferior
Saturday service.
Yet many still had
to work on Christmas
Day, and even more on
Boxing Day when the
shops were open for
the sales. So people had
It’s just not
funny
I am as irritated by Mrs
Brown’s Boys as Andrew
Johnson (i, 27 December)
claims he is by the
sarcasm about it from
the “chattering classes”,
whoever they are. This
programme is full of
predictable dialogue,
plotlines and buffoonery
that you can see coming
a mile off. For me good
comedy, by definition,
is not predictable or
stereotyped. Dislike of
Mrs Brown’s Boys is not
necessarily a class thing.
It’s just not funny.
ROB BARRATT
LAUNCESTON
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TOMORROW
2018 Preview
Your guide to the
best films, books,
television and more
for the year ahead
ARTS
Rosamund
Pike interview:
‘I am drawn to
courageous
women’
NEWS
2-31
People
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
By Jessica Barrett
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
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i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
19
i@inews.co.uk
Twitter: @jess_barrett
It’s official:
Stormzy is pop’s
nicest man
Davina has
mastered the
art of not caring
There’s a case building for Stormzy
to be officially recognised as the
nicest man in music.
The grime star recently
performed at the funeral of one of
his fan’s fathers after Nasir Bockarie
contacted him, telling him that the
pair had enjoyed his single
“Blinded By Your Grace”
together before he died.
In July Stormzy,
real name Michael
Omari, appeared on
the Jeremy Kyle Show
to show support to
a young fan called
Matilda, who has
suffered a lifetime of
illness. In June 2017 he was
one of many celebrities to tweet a
young boy who was being bullied.
In May he donated £9,000 to an
Oxford student’s crowdfunding
campaign so she could study at
America’s Harvard University.
He deserves all his success.
It’s an attitude that most women
wish they could adopt: not caring
whether the way they look appeals to
anyone but themselves.
Davina McCall has mastered
it at the age of 50. “We as women
get to a point where we get to the
menopause, and it’s far from being
a time where everything falls apart.
It’s like a rebirth, the menopause,”
McCall says.
“Women think: ‘I don’t care if I
appeal to men any more, I want to
feel amazing in myself, and I want
to be the version of myself I can be.
Whereas guys think: ‘Am I losing my
allure? Where am I going, what’s my
job? That’s a mid-life crisis for a guy.”
The former Big Brother presenter
announced last month that she had
split from her husband, Matthew
Robertson, after 17 years of marriage.
She wrote on Twitter: “I am very sad
to say Matthew and I have separated.
Our [three] amazing children are our
number one priority.”
Round Up
Strictlycomeranting
“I’m not low rent, Craig. We’ve
all got to start somewhere and it’s
a shame to just knock someone
out of giving them a chance
because you don’t think I’m high
calibre enough.”
“The Only Way is Essex” star
Gemma Collins retorts to a Craig
Revel Horwood comment, in
which he claimed that Collins was
too naff to appear on “Strictly
Come Dancing”.
Brexitblues
“My heart is broken,
if I’m honest, about
what is happening in
this country. It feels
like we are spiralling
out of control and no
one is willing to put the
brakes on.” The “McMafia” star
James Norton about Brexit.
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20
@theipaper
facebook.com/theipaper
i@inews.co.uk
Please include a contact address with all correspondence
Christmas TV is rubbish? Nah, we love a festive turkey
TELEVISION
Siobhán
Norton
“C
hristmas telly is so
rubbish this year!” It’s
been the refrain on social
media the past few days,
as a frustrated nation channelhopped in unison.
I thought the very same, on
Christmas Eve, as I settled in with a
mince pie for a bit of festive slothery.
I was annoyed to find myself sitting
mindlessly in front of an episode of
Celebrity Christmas Come Dine With
Me, watching some former Brookside
actress screeching every time she
opened a door/was presented with
a plate of food/heard a Christmas
carol. I switched over in irritation,
pausing momentarily on Charlie and
the Chocolate Factory (oh no! The
new one! Quick, quick, turn over!),
and the Child Genius celebrity special
(smug celebrities AND smug kids?
No thanks). I settled on the Father
Ted Christmas Special, but only
because I know it so well I could take
to social media and swap favourite
quotes with my family. “I hear it’s
Ireland’s biggest lingerie section” is
a surprisingly common catchphrase
in the Norton household at this time
of year.
Perhaps terrestrial
channels have stopped
bothering to try to lure
the Netflix generation,
instead saving a few
quid by sticking on
the repeats. Why shell
out for pyrotechnics
and special effects
when you’ve got The Two
Ronnies in your archives?
After all, this is the era
where one of the most popular
shows on TV features a bunch
of other people lounging around
watching TV.
Still, we had Victoria (inset),
Little Women, and The Miniaturist
on offer if we needed something
a little highbrow. It’s a Wonderful
Life, Miracle on 34th Street and Die
Hard (which, the screenwriter has
confirmed, IS a Christmas movie)
were there for those wanting
traditional festive fare.
And don’t we moan about the
Christmas viewing options every
year? Sorry, dear viewers, but it’s
your own fault – it turns out that
deep down we love a bit of crap telly.
Mrs Brown’s Boys topped the pile
again this year, only pipped to the
post by The Queen’s Speech, while
A Christmas Prince – a paint-bynumbers schmaltz-fest for Prince
Harry groupies – was the surprise
hit of the year on Netflix. The
streaming service even threw shade
at the movie’s biggest fans with the
tweet: “To the 53 people who’ve
watched A Christmas Prince
every day for the past 18
days: Who hurt you?”
EastEnders drew
one of the biggest
reactions of the year,
with some hailing it as
the best thing they’d
seen over Christmas.
Other viewers, however,
switched off in outrage –
not because of the mounting
death toll (come on, if someone
doesn’t kick the bucket in Albert
Square on 25 December, is it even
Christmas?) but because of Stacey
Fowler’s tea-making shocker. She
put the milk in first, the monster.
Rubbish TV is what Christmas
is all about. We know Love Actually
is twee, but by now it’s a tradition
in many households. The Vicar of
Dibley, Only Fools and Horses, Dad’s
Army – we’ve seen the Christmas
specials umpteen times, but they
are harmless and heartwarming and
safe and silly. And, let’s be honest,
when we’ve had a few days of overexcited children and overheated
houses and over-filled plates, can we
really handle any more than that?
CULTURE
perceived lack of culture. Rather
than engaging in a war of words,
people living there set out to prove
the naysayers wrong with creativity,
innovation and a good deal of wry
humour – not least on the weekend
when thousands of them took off all
their clothes in the city centre and
painted their naked bodies blue for
a new commission by the American
photographer Spencer Tunick.
I first came to Hull in 1991 and
spent three happy years studying
at the university. For those of us
who have always loved the place,
it’s sometimes been hard to explain
its inner beauty, but I knew for
certain that Hull’s year in the artistic
spotlight would be a success from
the moment on New Year’s Day
when I joined a crowd of thousands
outside the City Hall to celebrate the
beginning of the year of culture.
Being the UK City of Culture has
changed Hull for the better – and
it’s changed the lives of the people
who live here. Last week, Coventry
was announced as the next UK City
of Culture in 2021. As the spotlight
moves on from Hull, together, we
will ensure that the next chapter in
Hull’s rich story will be filled with
optimism, creativity, excitement and
economic growth. That’s the power
of sustained, strategic investment in
culture. In every sense, it enriches
lives and it enriches places. And in
these times when hard economic
decisions have to be made, that’s got
to be money well spent.
Darren
Henley
Lives are
changed by
Hull of a year
T
hings are a bit different
in Hull these days. So, it
didn’t seem the slightest bit
unusual to see the cream
of the visual arts world tucking
into full English breakfasts in the
Holiday Inn Express in Hull this
month. They were in the city for
the announcement of the winner of
the Turner Prize. The four finalists’
work has been on show in Hull’s
Ferens Gallery since September,
with thousands of art lovers flocking
to see the exhibition.
As 2017 draws to a close, it’s a
struggle to find any significant
cultural commentator who doesn’t
agree that Hull’s year has been an
unmitigated success. But four years
ago, when the announcement was
made that Hull was to be the UK
City of Culture, it quickly became
fashionable, mainly among those
who had never visited the place,
to crack jokes about the city’s
Darren Henley is chief executive of
Arts Council England
NEWS
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21
SYRIA
Patients moved from rebel area during truce
By Tom Miles
IN BEIRUT
Critically ill patients are finally being
evacuated from a rebel-held part of
Damascus after a temporary truce
enabled the Red Crescent to begin
rescuing them.
Months of deadlock over medical
evacuations from Syria’s biggest
remaining siege broke late on
Tuesday thanks to a deal between
Damascus and a rebel faction.
Four patients were evacuated
from eastern Ghouta, where almost
400,000 people have been under
siege by President Bashar al-Assad’s
forces since 2013, the non-profit
organisation Syrian American
Medical Society (Sams) said.
The enclave is a densely populated
pocket of satellite towns and farms
and the only major rebel stronghold
near the capital, Damascus. The
military has steadily defeated
pockets of armed rebellion in western
Syria over the past year, with the help
of Russian air power and Iranianbacked militias.
The Jaish al-Islam rebel group
in Eastern Ghouta said it was
releasing 29 detainees. In return,
the government is allowing the
evacuation of 29 of the most critical
cases. However, one person on the
list, a six-month-old baby girl, died
before she could be evacuated, said
Mohamad Katoub, an advocacy
manager for Sams.
The International Committee of
the Red Cross said it had facilitated
the deal, which came two months
after the United Nations asked Mr
Assad to allow the urgent evacuation
of the 29 patients. The operation was
still in a very early phase, it said.
“Happy that our negotiations
reached this important goal. This is
a signal of hope for the future Syria,”
Francesco Rocca, president of the
The United Nations has
pleaded for the Syrian
government to allow the
evacuation of around 500 patients,
including children with cancer,
from the conflict zones.
International Federation of the Red
Cross, tweeted.
Although Eastern Ghouta is
officially a “de-escalation zone”
under Russian-led ceasefire deals
for rebel territory, fighting there has
continued. The population, including
130,000 children, is suffering the
worst malnutrition seen in the almost
seven-year war, the UN has said.
The remainder of the 29 patients
included in the deal would be
evacuated over the coming days, said
Sams. REUTERS
A young patient is evacuated from Ghouta on Boxing Day GETTY
World Focus, page 29
BARBADOS
Rihanna’s cousin shot dead in street
By Jacob Stolworthy
A cousin of the pop star Rihanna
has been shot dead just hours after
they spent Christmas Day together
in Barbados.
Tavon Kaiseen Alleyne died on
Boxing Day, according to Nation
News. He was 21.
The eight-times Grammy awardwinning singer paid tribute to Mr
Alleyne on social media, posting a
series of photos of her cousin and
calling for an end to gun crime in
the Caribbean island nation.
It is believed that Mr Alleyne
was walking along a track near
his house in St Michael, Barbados,
when he was approached by a man
who shot him multiple times before
fleeing. Police appealed for anyone
with information to come foirward.
Rihanna spent Christmas Day with
her cousin Tavon Alleyne, who was
murdered on Boxing Day
“RIP cousin,” Rihanna wrote.
“Can’t believe it was just last night
that I held you in my arms! Never
thought that would be the last time
I felt the warmth in your body!!!
Love you always, man!”
The singer captioned the photos
with the hashtag #endgunviolence.
Gun crime is said to have been rife
in Barbados recently, with police
confirming a significant increase.
Recent figures show that 22 of 28
murders in Barbados this year have
been gun-related.
Mr Alleyne was close to Rihanna;
for the singer’s 29th birthday in
February, he posted a photo online
and wrote: “Every day we are happy
to have you in our lives. Happy
birthday cousin, we really love you.
“Your presence in my life is a
source of joy and happiness. To
my favourite cousin, may all your
dreams and wishes come true.”
THE INDEPENDENT
CHINA
UNITED STATES
US and Germany urge
Beijing to release activist
Trump avoids
work to play
golf… twice
By Ben Blanchard
IN BEIJING
The US and Germany have
called on China to release
a prominent human rights
activist who was jailed for
eight years for subversion – the
harshest sentence passed in a
recent crackdown on activism.
Wu Gan, a blogger better
known by his online name
“Super Vulgar Butcher”,
regularly championed sensitive
cases of government abuses
of power, online and in street
protests. He was detained in
May 2015 and charged with
subversion. The sarcastic Mr
Wu struck an irreverent note
to the very end. In his remarks
following his sentencing
on Tuesday, he said he was
“grateful to the party for
granting me this lofty honour”.
Mr Wu’s sentence was
the most severe in what
rights groups have called an
unprecedented attack on rights
activists and lawyers, known as
the 709 crackdown, which began
in full force on 9 July 2015.
The hardline approach has
shown no sign of softening as
President Xi Jinping enters his
second five-year term in office,
and has drawn widespread
concern in the West. REUTERS
By Chelsea Ritschel
As millions returned to work after
Christmas, Donald Trump had
different plans despite having said
it would be business as usual.
The US President played golf for
a second day in a row yesterday,
arriving at his Trump International
Golf Club in West Palm Beach,
Florida, at 9am to play a round
with David Perdue, a Republican
Senator from Georgia, the PGA
golfer Bryson DeChambeau and
former pro Dana Quigley.
NBC News said Boxing Day was
Mr Trump’s 86th day at a golf club
since becoming president.
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22
NEWS
WORLD FLASHPOINTS
REVIEW
OF THE
YEAR
PART 2
US
Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th US President on
20 January, and the rest of the year was dominated by his
bellicose rhetoric on North Korea and his divisive populist
policies on everything from tax cuts to the environment.
But will the special counsel, Robert Mueller, come up
with enough dirt on the Trump administration’s dubious
links with Moscow to have the former reality TV star and
property mogul impeached? This will be one of the big
questions in the year to come.
From sabre-rattling in North Korea to regime-change
in Zimbabwe, the world witnessed a tumultuous year
A
NORTH KOREA
s the US and North
Korea cranked up their
bombastic rhetoric
about obliterating
each other, the world
seemed to edge closer to nuclear
conflict this year than at any time
since the Cuban missile crisis
of 1962. But although tempers
have cooled between the North
Korean leader, Kim Jong-un, and
President Donald Trump, their
dangerous game of chicken is still
pushing them ever closer towards
military confrontation.
Some sort of clash was inevitable.
In January, Mr Trump taunted
the Pyongyang regime over its
intention to develop a nuclear
weapon capable of reaching parts
of the US. “It won’t happen!” he
wrote on social media. Since then,
North Korea has demonstrated
that missile capability on three
occasions, while continuing to
test nuclear technology. There
is no longer any question that it
possesses a rudimentary nuclear
strike capacity in addition to its
existing stockpile of chemical and
biological weapons.
In November, North Korea
tested what appeared to be its
most powerful rocket yet, an
intercontinental ballistic missile
Mexico
A 7.1-magnitude earthquake devastated parts of Mexico
on 19 September. It killed over 360 people, injured
thousands and caused extensive damage in the Mexican
states of Puebla and Morelos and in the Greater Mexico
City area. Emergency services, including an elite team,
“The Moles”, were looking for survivors under the rubble
for days afterwards. Rescuers communicated by hand
signals after a call for silence so they could hear survivors.
MYANMAR
capable, in theory, of reaching
anywhere in the continental US.
The launch showed that the Trump
administration’s approach – a
combination of threats, sanctions,
and isolation – had failed to stall the
weapons programme.
The US Secretary of State, Rex
Tillerson, and other senior officials
have stressed the importance of
diplomacy, and even Mr Trump
has in the past offered to talk to Mr
Kim. But the President has also
disparaged Mr Tillerson, suggesting
that “our wonderful Secretary of
State… is wasting his time trying to
negotiate with Little Rocket Man”.
Mr Trump went on to describe
Mr Kim as “obviously a madman
who doesn’t mind starving or killing
his people”. Mr Kim, in turn, called
his rival “an old lunatic”.
With few foreign policy options,
world powers have continued to rely
on economic and financial sanctions
to punish and isolate the Kim
regime, but they have so far failed to
bring Pyongyang back into talks.
And the United Nations’
sanctions against North Korea
are diluted by the need to secure
Chinese and Russian backing:
neither wants to see it collapse or
turn it into a permanent enemy.
Leo Cendrowicz
North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-Un, celebrates the successful test-firing of the
Hwasong-14 ballistic missile, which he called a gift to ‘American bastards’ AFP
M
ore than 6,700
Rohingya Muslims,
including hundreds of
children, were killed
in a single month
this year as they fled Myanmar,
according to one aid agency. But
Aung San Suu Kyi, the country’s de
facto leader, alleged that there was
a “huge iceberg of disinformation”
about the conflict.
Amid evidence that hundreds
of thousands of members of the
stateless Muslim
minority had fled
their homes in
what the UN
called a “textbook
example of ethnic
cleansing”,
the reputation
of Ms Suu Kyi
has plunged.
The Nobel Peace
Prize winner’s refusal
directly to condemn the actions of
Myanmar’s military as it set about
clearing what it called “terrorists”
from Rakhine state – home to the
vast majority of Rohingya – drew
condemnation throughout an
international community that once
heaped praise upon her.
The Rohingya say they are the
descendants of Muslim traders
who have inhabited the region
of Buddhist-majority Myanmar
for centuries. For decades, the
government has insisted they are
illegal immigrants and denied them
citizenship. More than 600,000
fled into Bangladesh in the face of
reports of villages being burned
and the use of rape as a weapon by
Myanmar security forces.
Ms Suu Kyi has said that she
condemns “all human rights
violations” in Rakhine, but the
chorus of condemnation against
her continues to grow. Last week,
the authors of a popular book
highlighting female role models –
Good Night Stories for Popular Girls –
said they did not exclude removing
Ms Suu Kyi from future editions.
Cahal Milmo
Venezuela
Huge protests broke out as
the government of President
Nicolás Maduro moved
ever closer to becoming a
dictatorship. Inflation and
crime soared while desperate
Venezuelans trudged over
the border to Colombia
seeking handouts of food and
medicine. By December, the
far-left regime was banning
opposition candidates
from next year’s election,
and presiding over the
destruction of the formerly
lucrative state-owned
oil company.
I
DRC
With millions of people on
the brink of a humanitarian
catastrophe and civilians of
all ages facing unspeakable
violence, the Democratic
Republic of Congo was voted
the most neglected crisis in
2017, in a poll of aid agencies.
An insurrection against the
government in the Greater
Kasai region has displaced
more than a million people.
SPAIN
n several tumultuous months,
Catalonia has declared
independence from Spain, lost
its autonomy as Madrid took
over the regional government,
and held snap elections. But in a
sense, not a lot has changed.
Elections last week brought
in a new parliament with an
almost identical political hue to
the previous one, equally split on
independence. However, in another
sense, Catalonia’s relationship with
the rest of Spain is permanently
altered: its leaders have defied
Madrid – and been punished for it
– leaving a lingering bitterness.
In January, Carles Puigdemont,
the Catalan president, promised an
independence referendum. But the
poll in October met with resistance
from Madrid, and police tried to
stop the vote, often using violence.
Some 92 per cent of the votes cast
were for independence, but on a 43
per cent turnout, as many Catalans
boycotted it. No country recognised
the vote, and Mr Puigdemont was
rebuffed by the European Union.
The Catalan parliament
declared independence and Spain
suspended its self-government. Mr
Puigdemont fled to Brussels.
At last week’s elections, the
separatist vote was 47.6 per
cent, down slightly on 2015, yet
the electoral system gave the
separatist parties 70 of the 135
seats in the Catalan parliament.
Mr Puigdemont is now eyeing a
triumphant return to Barcelona.
Leo Cendrowicz
NEWS
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France
Germany
Syria
China
Russia
The fresh-faced Emmanuel
Macron, then 39, appeared to
come from nowhere to win
the presidential election and
carry the flag for centrist
politics and EU integration.
With the UK departing,
he seems determined to
reassume French-German
leadership of the European
project – and lead western
dissent to the excesses of the
Trump administration.
Angela Merkel secured her
fourth term as Chancellor,
winning 33 per cent of the
vote, but her victory was
overshadowed by the radical
right-wing Alternative for
Germany party entering
parliament as the thirdlargest group. There had not
been an overtly nationalist
party in a German parliament
in 60 years. Jewish groups
expressed alarm.
The humanitarian disaster in
Syria continued to worsen
as the civil war entered its
seventh year. The Assad
regime, backed by Iran
and Russia, continued to
consolidate territorial gains
while enforcing crippling
sieges on areas held by the
opposition. The country is
still a tangled mess, with
violent sectarian conflict
likely to continue.
President Xi Jinping now
has more power over China
than anyone since Chairman
Mao, after cementing his
dominance at the Communist
Party congress in October,
crushing dissent and
expanding Chinese influence
in the South China Sea. But
even a dictator of Mr Xi’s
enormous power can’t make
a problem like North Korea go
away very easily.
Vladimir Putin raised Russia’s
global influence after the Red
Army kept Bashar al-Assad’s
regime in power in Syria.
When he runs for a fourth
term as president in March,
he should win easily – but
not handsomely. With Alexei
Navalny, an anti-corruption
activist, barred from standing
and fears of a boycott of the
polls, Russia’s reputation as a
mafia state looks secure.
23
Spain
Separatists regained power
in Catalonia after voters
rejected Spanish Prime
Minister Mariano Rajoy’s
attempt to neuter its
independence movement. The
referendum in October made
headlines after attempts by
the government in Madrid to
stop voters turned violent.
Myanmar
More than 600,000 Rohingya refugees fled violence
in the northern state of Rakhine in just three months,
prompting senior figures at the United Nations to warn
that events in Myanmar might constitute a genocide.
Human rights agencies have pointed to evidence of a
campaign of ethnic cleansing in the province. Survivors
said entire villages were wiped out by the army.
Yemen
It is 1,000 days since the Saudi-led bombardment of
Yemen began. In that time, 10,000 people have been
killed as a direct consequence of the war, with many
more being killed in the resulting humanitarian
catastrophe resulting from this, another proxy war
between regional giants Iran and Saudi Arabia. And the
scale of the disaster in Yemen has accelerated in 2017.
Zimbabwe
Robert Mugabe was forced
to resign after 37 years as
President, during which
Zimbabwe was reduced from
Africa’s bread basket to an
economic basket case. Will his
former henchman Emmerson
Mnangagwa fix the country’s
economy, or will Zanu-PF
party cronies continue to
kill off Zimbabwe’s chances
of renewal?
L
South Africa
Saudi Arabia
Australia
After attempts to prosecute President
Jacob Zuma over alleged abuses of
power, Cyril Ramaphosa was elected
head of the ANC party. He is likely to
take over as President after elections in
2019, and will have to tackle corruption
without rupturing the party.
Mohammad bin Salman, the Crown
Prince, became his father’s successor
in June, and his ambition and
ruthlessness soon became apparent.
He has since waged war in Yemen,
blockaded Qatar and arrested dozens as
part of an anti-corruption campaign.
Australia’s stance on same-sex marriage had long
seemed incongruous given its reputation as a
progressive young nation. Finally, marriage equality
entered the statute books on 7 December after a historic
vote where 61.6 per cent of voters said yes; 12.7 million
Australians took part in the plebiscite – nearly 80 per
cent of eligible voters.
ZIMBABWE
ike his reign over the
country he helped to
liberate and then brought
to ruin, Robert Mugabe’s
final departure was painful
and lingering. The 93-year-old
President’s 37-year grip on power
was finally relinquished over 15
tumultuous days in November after
he tried to sack the man who would
eventually replace him – Emmerson
Mnangagwa – as vice president and
ease his wife, Grace, into position as
his anointed successor.
It was a final miscalculation by
a ruler who had left Zimbabwe
with massive debts, a debased
currency and one of the lowest
life expectancy rates in the world.
Mrs Mugabe was hated by the old
guard of the ruling Zanu-PF party
and by the population at
large for her reputation
for extravagance and
greed. Nine days after
the sacking of Mr
Mnangagwa (right),
the army placed Mr
Mugabe under house
arrest in a crackdown
on “criminals” in his
inner circle.
Six days later, the President
stepped down as impeachment
proceedings against him began. Mr
Mnangagwa was appointed in his
place, promising elections next year.
According to reports, the former
president will receive a “golden
handshake” of up to $10m and be
given immunity from prosecution.
Cahal Milmo
T
EUROPE
welve months ago,
the European Union
seemed at its lowest ebb:
refugee and eurozone
crises, wounded by
the Brexit vote, mired in
recession and threatened
by the same populism
that swept Donald
Trump to power in the
US. Now it is enjoying a
quiet resurgence.
The centrist
Emmanuel Macron (inset)
was elected President of
France, Angela Merkel was
re-elected in Germany and the farright’s Geert Wilders was defeated
in the Netherlands.
Brexit has served as a cautionary
tale: Britain’s flailing has shown
Europeans the value of sticking
with the club. Support for the EU
is at its highest in a decade. It helps
that the economy has turned, finally.
There have been setbacks,
however. The far right
came second in French
and Dutch elections,
third in Germany
and their third place
in Austrian polls
led to their joining
the ruling coalition.
Populist governments
in Hungary and Poland
chipped away at their
constitutional checks and balances.
Italy seems headed for more
instability. But the overall direction
was one of recovery.
Leo Cendrowicz
24
NEWS
It was a tumultuous year in US politics, dominated by President
Donald Trump, his controversial policies and clashes on Capitol Hill
CLIMATE
DIPLOMACY
D
onald Trump denounced
climate change as
a hoax, rolled back
regulations introduced
by Barack Obama, his
predecessor, and withdrew America
from the Paris Accord designed to
tackle the problem. America was
then hit by a series of storms and
hurricanes, which failed to change
the President’s mind.
Hurricane Harvey, which struck
Texas in August, and Hurricane
Irma, which arrived in Florida
in September, caused billions of
dollars of damage. To date, large
parts of Puerto Rico are still
without power after Hurricane
Maria destroyed much of the
island’s infrastructure in the
same month.
Meanwhile, wildfires destroyed
more than 8,000 homes in
California’s famed wine country and
killed 42 people, the deadliest blazes
in the state’s history.
A report in October by the US
Government Accountability Office
suggested that extreme weather
had accounted for $350bn (£260bn)
of damage.
Mr Trump scored his
administration “10 out of 10” for the
way that it handled the disasters,
even though he was widely
criticised for the way he appeared
to attach less importance to the
plight of Puerto Ricans than those
living on the US mainland, despite
the fact that all 3.5 million islanders
are US citizens.
Critics pointed out that the man
who condemned President Obama
on the few occasions that he took to
the links found time himself to play
golf – invariably at one of his own
courses – a minimum of 82 times.
Andrew Buncombe
THE INDEPENDENT
Residents of Houston, Texas, wade
down a flooded motorway during
Tropical Storm Harvey in August AP
I
Mourners visit a memorial to the 58 victims of a mass shooting by Stephen
Paddock at a country music festival in Las Vegas in October AFP/GETTY
A
GUN CONTROL
merica was struck,
repeatedly, by another
problem that just seems
to get worse: masscasualty shootings.
On 1 October, Stephen Paddock
opened fired from a hotel room in
Las Vegas, killing 58 people and
injuring more than 500 others
attending a music festival.
Police said that Paddock, a
divorced accountant who lived in
Mesquite, 80 miles from America’s
gambling capital, had checked into
a room on the 32nd floor of the
Mandalay Bay casino resort six
days before the shooting.
Over the next few days, staff
entered his room several times in
the normal course of their duties
and saw nothing untoward. At
10.06pm that Sunday, he started
shooting at the country and western
music festival, where 22,000 people
had gathered.
At the moment Paddock began
shooting, Jason Aldean, a singer
from Nashville, was performing.
Video footage posted online showed
him running for cover as the sound
of automatic fire sounded out across
the open-air festival, nicknamed the
“neon sleepover” and located on the
Las Vegas Strip. It was the deadliest
mass killing by a single gunman in
US history.
Donald Trump, who received
millions of dollars for his election
campaign from the National
Rifle Association, the gun-rights
lobbying group, did not mention
the issue of gun control when he
spoke to the nation. Later, a White
House spokeswoman, Sarah
Huckabee Sanders, claimed that
it was “too soon” to begin a debate
on the issue. “There’s a time and
place for a political debate but now
is the time to unite as a country,”
she said. “There’s currently an
open and ongoing law enforcement
investigation, a motive has yet to
be determined, and it would be
premature for us to discuss policy
when we don’t know all the facts or
what took place last night.”
In November, Devin Patrick
Kelley, a former member of the
US air force with a record of
domestic violence, opened fired
in a church in Sutherland, Texas,
killing 26 people and injuring 20
in what investigators said was a
domestically motivated event.
The gunman walked into the
white-steepled First Baptist Church
carrying a Ruger AR-556 assault
rifle and wearing a black bulletproof
vest, then opened fire during prayer
service. Those killed ranged from
17 months old to 77. One victim was
Annabelle Pomeroy, the 14-yearold daughter of the pastor, Frank
Pomeroy, and his wife, Sherry.
Kelley was, according to police,
sending threatening texts to his
mother-in-law, whose mother was
killed in the attack. The information
led Freeman Martin, of the Texas
public safety department, to state
that the massacre was “not racially
motivated. It wasn’t over religious
beliefs” but a “domestic situation”.
It seems that America is no
closer to further regulating access
to firearms after these two events
than it was following the killing of 26
children and staff at an elementary
school in Sandy Hook, Connecticut,
in December 2012.
Andrew Buncombe
THE INDEPENDENT
n the first few weeks of Donald
Trump’s presidency, the socalled “special relationship”
between the US and the UK
looked to have been briefly
strengthened. In a joint press
conference, Mr Trump described
the two countries as “one of the
great forces in history for justice
and for peace”. And the President
also reiterated his support for
Brexit which he described a
“wonderful thing” for Britain.
He added: “Today the United
States renews our deep bond
with Britain – military, financial,
cultural and political. We pledge
our lasting support to this most
special relationship.”
But by the end of the year, the
alliance between the two countries
was at its lowest ebb in recent
memory. Despite Mr Trump’s
repeated campaign pledge to put
“America first”, Theresa May
was quick to try to bolster the
bond across the Atlantic following
his election.
In a further bid to “re-energise”
the Anglo-American relationship,
she promised Mr Trump a state
visit, in a move that sparked outrage
across the UK. Since then, the
relationship has deteriorated.
Mrs May was forced to condemn
President Trump after he
retweeted racist propaganda from
the far-right group Britain First. He
then took to Twitter to rebuke her,
opening up a rarely seen diplomatic
spat between the two nations.
Tensions were then heightened
further by Mr Trump’s hugely
controversial decision to recognise
Jerusalem as Israel’s capital,
something the Prime Minister
described as “unhelpful”.
Mr Trump’s state visit has
been significantly downgraded to
a two-day working visit expected
in February.
Richard Vaughan
Donald Trump and Theresa May
met in Washington soon after his
inauguration last January GETTY
POLITICS
O
n New Year’s Eve 2016,
Donald Trump spent
the evening at his Mara-Lago resort in Florida,
where members were
charged $525 to attend. Three
weeks later, the former host of The
Apprentice, a man who had bragged
about sexually assaulting women,
would take the oath of office and
enter the White House.
From the start, Trump
governed as he had campaigned –
aggressively, spontaneously, and
with a constant eye on a handful of
television shows. He was petulant,
ill-mannered and unable to admit to
an error. Within days, Trump was
seeking to do what he had promised
his supporters, in the form of a
Muslim travel ban and a suspension
of America’s refugee system.
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
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28 DECEMBER 2017
25
Top Trump
tweets
29 NOVEMBER
UK AS TERRORISM HOTBED
@Theresa_May, don’t focus on
me, focus on the destructive
Radical Islamic Terrorism
that is taking place within the
United Kingdom. We are doing
just fine!
12 NOVEMBER
NORTH KOREA
Why would Kim Jong-un insult
me by calling me “old,” when I
would NEVER call him “short
and fat?” Oh well, I try so hard
to be his friend – and maybe
someday that will happen!
27 AUGUST
THE WALL AGAIN
With Mexico being one of the
highest crime Nations in the
world, we must have THE
WALL. Mexico will pay for it...
6 JUNE IMMIGRATION
That’s right, we need a TRAVEL
BAN for certain DANGEROUS
countries, not some politically
correct term that won’t help us
protect our people!
A Ku Klux Klan member
shouts at counter-protesters
at a rally in Charlottesville,
Virginia, in July AFP/GETTY
There was chaos and heartbreak
at airports across the country and
around the globe, but the President
seemed to care little.
He went to Washington
thinking he could govern as he had
campaigned, without the need for
expert advice or the usual norms
associated with seeking to be
president of an entire nation, rather
than just those who voted for you.
His travel ban was blocked by
the courts, and four days after
he took office his national
security adviser, Michael
Flynn (right), was lying
to FBI agents about his
contact with Russian officials
during the transition. On 13
February, Mr Flynn was
forced to resign as his
dishonesty became
public knowledge.
In April, Neil
Gorsuch was
confirmed to the Supreme Court,
something that will stand, along
with the recent Republican tax
bill, as Trump’s most significant
achievement this year.
At the same time, he continued
to be angered by the ongoing
FBI probe into Russia’s alleged
meddling in the election –
something he repeatedly denied.
At the beginning of May, a
disgruntled Trump fired the FBI
Director, James Comey (inset
right). His decision led to the
appointment of special counsel
Robert Mueller, who has
since taken up the reins of the
investigation and to date has
charged four members
of Trump’s team
with various
crimes.
Steve Bannon,
the right-wing
nationalist
who helped Trump win the election
and was himself later fired,
described Comey’s ousting as one
of “the worst mistakes in modern
political history”.
Trump failed to denounce white
supremacist and neo-Nazi-led
violence that ended with the
death of a young woman in
Charlottesville in August.
Heather Heyer, who
worked as a legal
assistant, died after
activists turned out to
oppose what was among
the largest gatherings
of white nationalists in a
decade.
Scores of neo-Nazis and members
of the Ku Klux Klan rallied to
protest against the decision to
remove a statue of Robert E Lee,
the Confederate general. Ms Heyer
was killed after she was struck by a
car that was driven into protesters
by 20-year-old James Alex Fields Jr
from Ohio.
At the end of 2017, America feels
more anxious, more worried. People
of colour and Muslims, or people
who may be assumed to be Muslims,
talk of a spike in hate crimes and
abuse. The President continues
to rail against Muslims and
immigrants as he always
has, still seemingly blind
to the fact that he leads a
nation consisting almost
entirely of immigrants.
Many dream of Trump
being impeached, but that
may never happen. So far, he
has avoided most of the fallout
from the Russia probe. And while his
approval rating is at an historic low,
his support among those who voted
for him, and Republicans in general,
remains solid.
Andrew Buncombe
THE INDEPENDENT
26 JULY
ON TRANSGENDER TROOPS
Please be advised that the
United States Government
will not accept or allow...
Transgender individuals to
serve in any capacity in the US
Military. Our military must be
focused on decisive... victory
and cannot be burdened with
the tremendous medical
costs... that transgender in the
military would entail.
4 MARCH
TWEAKING OBAMA’S NOSE
How low has President
Obama gone to tapp my
phones during the very sacred
election process. This is Nixon/
Watergate. Bad (or sick) guy!
17 FEBRUARY
LYING MEDIA
The FAKE NEWS media (failing
@nytimes, @NBCNews, @
ABC, @CBS, @CNN) is not my
enemy, it is the enemy of the
American People!
26
NEWS
DESIGNER
BABIES
I
SPACE
T
he discovery of the
violent collision of two
neutron stars was
hailed the top scientific
breakthrough of 2017 by
the journal Science.
The collision was detected first by
the US-based Laser Interferometer
Gravitational-Wave Observatory
(Ligo) in August this year.
The event, which happened
130 million light years away, was
picked up by the gravitational
waves which were given off during
the collision.
After an alert was sent out to
astronomers around the world,
at least 70 space and ground
telescopes had their sights set on it
and were able to see the red afterglow of the collision.
It became the first cosmic event
to be “seen” by both gravitational
waves and light.
Professor Dave Reitze, of Ligo,
said: “What is amazing about this
discovery is it is the first time we’ve
got a full picture of one of the most
violent, cataclysmic events in
the universe.”
Neutron stars are small, dense
stars, about 12 miles wide, with a
core made up of a soup of neutrons
and a solid, smooth crust 10-billiontimes stronger than steel.
The collision and resulting effects
have gone on to have huge scientific
consequences. As the stars collided,
an intense beam of gamma rays was
emitted and the sky was showered
with neutron-rich heavy elements,
resolving a long-held debate about
how heavy elements such as gold
and uranium are created.
Professor Reitze said: “The
wedding band on your finger was
most likely produced a billion years
ago by two neutron stars colliding.”
Watching the collision, scientists
were also able to confirm Albert
Einstein’s prediction that
gravitational waves travel at the
speed of light – allowing researchers
to take a new measurement of how
fast the universe is expanding.
Two Ligo scientists, Barry Barish
and Kip Thorne, were awarded the
Nobel Prize for Physics for “the
observation of gravitational waves”.
Sally Guyoncourt
n July, a brave new world of
genetically modified “designer”
babies came a step closer with
the publication of the first indepth study showing that it
is technically possible to alter the
genes of human IVF embryos safely.
The story was exclusively
revealed in i before being followed
up by media around the world.
Scientists in the US for the first
time convincingly demonstrated
how inherited diseases caused by
defective genes can be corrected
in the earliest stage of life using
the revolutionary gene-editing
technology Crispr-Cas9.
But it also means that the
same technology could be used to
enhance the genes that children
inherit from their parents; stronger
muscles, perhaps, or keener
eyesight. It opens the door to the
future of designer babies genetically
engineered with desirable traits.
This aspect of the research is
highly controversial and will be
opposed by many religious and
ethical organisations.
The study was carried out on
spare human eggs and donated
sperm collected for research by a
fertility clinic at the Oregon Health
and Science University in Portland.
It was led by Dr Shoukhrat
Mitalipov, a world authority on
embryo research.
The next stage will be to carry
out further experiments testing
the safety and efficiency of CrisprCas9. Ultimately there will be a
desire to carry out a clinical trial, in
other words to create a genetically
modified embryo that is implanted
into a woman’s womb and allowed to
develop into a full-term “GM baby”.
As things stand, laws will have to be
changed in both the United States
and Britain to allow this.
Tom Bawden
M
ental health was
also high on the
agenda – and is likely
to carry on rising
as the population
continues to age. A landmark trial
for Huntington’s disease was hailed
as a “game changer” in December
after the defect that causes
the disease was corrected in
patients for the first time.
Researchers at University
College London (UCL)
injected an experimental
drug into spinal fluid
which safely lowered
levels of toxic proteins
in the brain. Experts
said it could be the
biggest breakthrough
Professor
Jean-Jacques
Hublin at
Jebel Irhoud
in Morocco,
pointing to
the crushed
human skull
dating back
315,000
years
H
Dreams of
life on Mars
– and beyond
Space continued to excite the
imagination, with Tesla founder
Elon Musk and the US and the
Chinese governments continuing
to talk about plans to put a person
on Mars.
However, that dream could
be dashed after researchers
said in October that exposing
ARCHAEOLOGY
umans were found
to have been around
100,000 years longer
than first thought after
the discovery of a skull
in North Africa. The fossil remains
of a partial skull and lower jaw from
a Homo sapiens, found at a site in
Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, were dated
back to around 315,000 years.
This was 100,000 years older
than any previous fossil
Homo sapiens ever found
and falls outside of the
East African region
from which our
species is thought
to have originated.
The discovery,
reported in the
science journal Nature
in June, changed the face
of human history – not only
pushing back in time the origin of
our species but also suggesting
they evolved across the entire
continent of Africa
Jean-Jacques Hublin, one of the
authors of the study and a director
at the Max Planck Institute for
Evolutionary Anthropology in
Leipzig, Germany, told Nature:
“Until now, the common wisdom
was that our species emerged
probably rather quickly somewhere
in a ‘Garden of Eden’ that was
located most likely in sub-Saharan
Africa – and it’s a big, big garden.”
Professor Hublin began
excavating the area in 2004 and
found 20 new bones relating to five
individuals including a remarkably
complete jaw and skull fragments.
These were dated to between
280,000 and 350,000 years old.
The professor said the teeth
found, although bigger than
today’s human teeth,
more closely resembled
Homo sapiens than
Neanderthals or other
archaic humans.
And he said the facial
features would not
stand out as being
particularly different from
those in modern-day humans.
He told Nature: “It’s a face you could
cross in the street today.”
Chris Stringer, a
palaeoanthropologist at the Natural
History Museum in London, thinks
the Jebel Irhoud bones are Homo
sapiens. He told Nature: “They
shift Morocco from a supposed
backwater in the evolution of our
species to a prominent position.”
Sally Guyoncourt
MEDICINE
in neurodegenerative diseases for
50 years, offering hope the deadly
disease can be stopped.
About 12 people in 100,000
are affected by Huntington’s, a
devastating disease described
by sufferers as Parkinson’s,
Alzheimer’s and motor neurone
disease all rolled into one.
The UCL trial at the National
Hospital for Neurology and
Neurosurgery in London
involved 46 men and
women with early-stage
Huntington’s disease.
They were given four
spinal injections one
month apart, with a
quarter of patients
given a placebo.
The first in-human trial showed
the drug – called Ionis-HTTRx –
reduced the levels of the harmful
protein, huntingtin, in the brain.
Scientists said the same approach
might be possible in other
neurodegenerative diseases, such as
Alzheimer’s, that feature the buildup of toxic proteins in the brain.
Professor John Hardy (inset), who
was awarded the Breakthrough
Prize for his work on Alzheimer’s,
said: “I really think this is,
potentially, the biggest breakthrough
in neurodegenerative disease in
the past 50 years. That sounds like
hyperbole – in a year I might be
embarrassed by saying that – but
that’s how I feel at the moment.”
Tom Bawden
An artist’s impression of
an imagined view from
the surface of a planet
orbiting a dwarf star 40
light years from Earth AP
NEWS
2-31
astronauts to low levels of gravity
for prolonged periods may give
them serious brain damage.
Scientists in the US discovered that
“microgravity” causes pressure
changes in the brain and spinal fluid,
impairing the function of neurons
that control movement of the body
and key mental processes such as
reasoning and solving problems.
As a Mars round trip is likely to
take at least three years, scientists
are now questioning whether such a
mission would be desirable, or even
possible, in that case.
Meanwhile seven planets around
the same size as the Earth have been
discovered that could potentially
harbour life, offering the first
realistic opportunity to search
for signs of alien life outside the
solar system.
The planets orbit a dwarf star
named Trappist-1, about 40 lightyears (235 trillion miles) from
Earth. That is quite close in cosmic
terms, and astronomers say one or
more of these “exoplanets” could
be at the right temperature to be
awash in oceans of water, based on
VOICES
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27
the distance of the planets from the
dwarf star.
Finally, after 13 years flying
around Saturn and its 60-plus
moons – bringing stunning images
and fascinating new information
to the masses – the Cassini space
probe ended its mission with a
controlled collision into the gas
giant in September.
The mission, launched in 1997,
took seven years to travel to Saturn
and has transformed our knowledge
of the ringed giant.
Tom Bawden
Apple’s Phil Schiller introduced the iPhone X in November and the success of
its £999 phone could result in Apple becoming a $1trn company REUTERS
S
TECHNOLOGY
ilicon Valley’s political
tussles with the Donald
Trump administration
cast a shadow over
2017, as the traditionally
liberal industry railed against the
President. Key figures from Apple,
Amazon, Microsoft and Google met
Mr Trump shortly after his election,
but relations quickly deteriorated.
There was further friction when
Mr Trump decided to withdraw
the US from the Paris agreement
on climate change – with Elon
Musk resigning from his position
on the presidential advisory
council in protest.
Samsung turned its fortunes
around this year following a
disastrous 2016 marred by its Note
7 smartphone catching fire. The
South Korean company roared back
with the hugely popular Galaxy S8
and Note 8 handsets, and record
profits to boot.
Meanwhile, the Finnish company
Nokia relaunched the iconic and
reimagined 3310 handset as a basic
feature phone, for those fed up with
all smartphone mod cons.
On the other end of the phone
spectrum, the success of Apple’s
£999 iPhone X looks likely to push
the Californian firm towards
becoming the world’s first trilliondollar company following its
release in November. Apple is also
increasingly turning its attention
to making money through its
streaming services Apple Music
and Apple TV, following its
successful recent poaching of
three high-profile executives from
Amazon’s original programming
department. Expect further films
and programmes next year.
Netflix was the key driving force
causing the traditional media giants
to up their game following a year
of blisteringly popular original
content, including Glow and Dear
White People.
Despite having dominated the
news headlines of 2016, the past 12
months have been pretty quiet for
virtual reality, with no significant
headset releases and only a
handful of notable games. Instead,
augmented reality captured its
place in the public imagination on
smartphones rather than a headset.
It will also be remembered as
the year bitcoin emerged from the
darkest shadows of the internet to
become a financial phenomenon.
Rhiannon Williams
REVIEW OF THE YEAR PART 3
Those we lost; culture, tech and
media... fakes and curiosities
IN TOMORROW’S i
28
NEWS
Panorama
Around the
world in
10 stories
SOUTH KOREA
NEW ZEALAND
Israel extends
olive branch
to Lorde
By Charlotte Greenfield
IN WELLINGTON
Israel’s ambassador to New
Zealand has appealed to the
pop star Lorde to meet him
after she cancelled a show in
Tel Aviv following activists’
appeals for her to shun Israel as
Postcard
From...
Bangladesh
Rohingya refugees from
Myanmar can still look back
at their lives before they were
forced to flee to Bangladesh,
simply by using their mobile
phones. Abdul Hasan can
spend hours watching old
videos he shot before his
enforced departure.
“My heart aches for my
village, my home,” the
16-year-old said in a camp for
the displaced. “That’s why we
have brought these memories,
this video, from Myanmar.”
Since late August, hundreds
of thousands of Rohingya
Muslims have fled to
Bangladesh to escape attacks
Appointments raise fears
over military’s influence
By Farai Mutsaka
IN HARARE
GERMANY
War brothel deal Tourist hurt as
‘failed victims’
ship hits bridge
A 2015 agreement with Japan
over South Korean women who
were forced to work in Japan’s
wartime military brothels
failed to meet the needs of
victims, South Korea’s foreign
minister said yesterday.
Kang Kyung-wha apologised
for the controversial deal as a
panel revealed its judgement.
The investigation concluded
that the dispute over the
“comfort women”, could not
be “fundamentally resolved”
because the victims’ demands
for compensation from Japan
had not been met.
ZIMBABWE
Twenty-seven people were hurt when
a tourist ship struck a road bridge on
the River Rhine in western Germany.
The Swiss Crystal, which was
en route to the Netherlands, hit a
pillar of the motorway bridge near
Duisburg on Tuesday evening.
Another ship took the 103 passengers
and 26 crew members to Duisburg.
Police said four people with more
serious injuries were released from
hospitals yesterday morning. These
passengers were mainly nationals
from Belgium, the Netherlands and
Luxembourg. The bridge was closed
as a precaution ahead of checks by
structural engineers. AP
a protest against its treatment
of Palestinians.
Itzhak Gerberg said in a public
letter that it was “regrettable”
that the concert was called off
and the boycott of his country
represented “hostility and
intolerance”. “I invite you to
meet me in person to discuss
Israel, its achievements and its
role as the only democracy in the
Middle East,” Mr Gerberg wrote
on the embassy’s Facebook page.
The 21-year-old singer’s
publicists did not immediately
respond to a request for
comment. REUTERS
by Myanmar security forces.
They poured across the border
into Bangladesh, bringing with
them little more than horror
stories of marauding forces
and memories of terrifying
treks through the forests.
But if they are lucky, some of
those memories are stored on
the mobile phones that many
refugees managed to bring
with them. It is the closest
Hasan gets to experiencing his
old life and country. One video
shows him having what he calls
a “coconut party”.
A song hailing the bravery of
a Rohingya rebel leader plays
in the background as Hasan
and his friends eat coconuts,
and laugh as they throw
them at each other. “When I
watch this video, I think of my
country. It really breaks my
heart so much,” he said.
Alice Hearing
The new President of Zimbabwe,
E m m e r s o n M n a n ga gw a , h a s
appointed the country’s former
military commander as one of his two
Vice Presidents.
The move deepens concerns
about the military’s influence
after its ousting of Robert Mugabe
last month. The appointment of
Constantino Chiwenga was widely
expected following his retirement
this month. He had to step down from
the military to take up the position,
according to the constitution.
Mr Mnangagwa took power after
President Emmerson Mnangagwa
(right) with Gen Constatino Chiwenga
at a farewell parade earlier this month
Mr Chiwenga led a military takeover
in the southern African nation that
forced Mr Mugabe, then the world’s
oldest head of state at 93, to resign
amid impeachment proceedings
after 37 years in charge.
Mr Mnangagwa has appointed
the former state security minister,
Kembo Mohadi, as his other vice
president, Zimbabwe’s Herald
newspaper reported, saying they
were expected to be sworn in this
morning.
Over the weekend, Mr Mnangagwa
appointed Mr Chiwenga and Mr
Mohadi as vice-presidents of the
ruling Zanu-PF party, signalling
yesterday’s move.
Two former army generals
already hold powerful posts in Mr
Mnangagwa’s cabinet, and another
is Zanu-PF’s party commissar. AP
Pope’s
polar
excess
Performers taking
part in the 32nd Golden
Circus Festival of Liana
Orfei stage a routine
during the Pope’s
weekly audience in the
Vatican yesterday.
The festival, with
more than 30 acts from
circus schools and
festivals around the
world, is in Rome until
11 January. GETTY
ARABIAN PENINSULA
Saudis and UAE to impose sales tax after oil slump
Saudi Arabia and the United Arab
Emirates, which have long lured
foreign workers with the promise of
a tax-free lifestyle, plan to impose a 5
per cent tax next year on most goods
and services to boost revenue after
oil prices collapsed three years ago.
The tax will apply to items such as
food, clothes, electronics and petrol,
as well as phone, water and electricity
bills, and hotel reservations.
EldaNgombe,23,acollegegraduate
looking for a job in Dubai, said there is
one specific purchase she is planning
before next year’s price rise: “Makeup, because I can’t live without make-
up. I am scared because everything is
expensive already in Dubai. The fact
that it’s adding 5 per cent is crazy.”
There will be some exemptions for
big-ticket costs such as rent, property
sales, certain medications, airline
tickets and school tuition, although
higher education will be taxed in the
UAE. AP
SOMALIA
UNITED STATES
IRAN
By Aya Batrawy
US air strike kills Nuclear fallout
13 Islamist fighters signs removed
Earthquake near
Tehran kills one
Members of the al-Shabaab
extremist group were killed in an
air strike in southern Somalia.
The US Africa Command said
the strike was carried out on
Sunday morning and 13 Islamist
fighters died in the attack about
31 miles north-west of the town
of Kismayo. No civilians were
killed. Al-Shabaab was blamed for
a vehicle bombing in the capital,
Mogadishu, in October, which
killed 512 people. AP
One person died of a heart attack
and at least 56 people were
slightly hurt when an earthquake
of 4.2 magnitude shook an area 31
miles west of Tehran yesterday.
Most of the injured were
hurt while trying to run out of
buildings and were released
from hospital after treatment,
officials said. The tremor was an
aftershock from a 5.2-magnitude
earthquake that killed two people
on 20 December. REUTERS
New York City has quietly begun
removing some of the corroding
yellow nuclear fallout shelter signs
that were appended to thousands of
buildings in the 1960s, because many
are misleading Cold War relics that
no longer denote functional shelters.
The small metal signs are a
remnant of the anxieties over the
nuclear arms race between the US
and the former Soviet Union which
prompted the shelter programme in
1961 across the nation. REUTERS
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
WORLD FOCUS
Syrian refugees attend a
sexual health workshop held in
the living room of a volunteer
with the charity Zenobia in
Gaziantep MARY TURNER
Syrian women are fighting the
regime and gender injustice
In her third and final article about the challenges facing Syrian refugee
women, Laura Pitel meets a teacher breaking barriers with sex education
S
itting cross-legged around
the edge of the bright and
airy living room in an old
Turkish stone house, the
group of assembled women
is transfixed. Ghazwa al-Milaji is
making elaborate hand gestures.
“You have two ovaries,” she says,
twiddling her hands mid-air. “And
two fallopian tubes,” she adds,
drawing arcs. Then she cups her
palms together to depict a womb.
The women sitting around her
whisper to each other and nod.
They have come to a small,
informal gathering organised by
Zenobia, a tiny charity based in
Gaziantep, a Turkish city of two
million people that is now home to
320,000 refugees. The organisation
was founded two years ago by
al-Milaji’s sister, Ahlam. Her aim
is to empower women across
the social spectrum by teaching
them everything from female
reproductive and health matters to
constitutional politics.
Almost seven years on from
the start of the uprising against
President Bashar al-Assad, 5.3
million Syrians are in exile. More
than three million of them are in
Turkey. While most of Turkey’s
refugee families have a roof over
their heads and some basic food,
life is tough. Women, in particular,
In this Saturday’s
The detox myth
Can a new year purge cleanse
your body... or just your wallet?
often suffer from isolation, having
been separated from family and
friends and cut off from Turkish
society by the language barrier.
One of the goals of Zenobia’s
living-room coffee meetings,
held in the homes of volunteers,
is to get women out of the house.
Participants can come alone or with
their children to chat, make friends
and to discuss contraception,
healthcare and their rights and
responsibilities under Turkish law.
Each of today’s 16 attendees
are from one of the 75 struggling
refugee families that the charity
supports with monthly donations
of food and cash. Most are illiterate
and have never received any
kind of instruction about sex and
contraception, or even periods
and childbirth. The tone is raucous
and often funny. When Ahlam asks
her sister the best way to prevent
pregnancy, she quips back: “Don’t
get married!” Then comes the
serious explanation.
There are also moments of
sadness. During a discussion of
the damage of underage marriage,
an older woman breaks down in
tears as she reveals the impending
wedding of her 16-year-old
daughter. “Oh no!” shouts Ahlam.
She offers a stern warning about
the risk of prosecution, but it
29
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
doesn’t seem to sink in. After
the session, Ahlam admits her
frustrations that she keeps
encountering these problems even
among families receiving support.
“Sometimes I feel like we are
making no progress,” she says. But
deeply patriarchal structures are
internalised by both men as well as
women, and can take years to break
down. “It is bad cultural baggage,”
she says. “We have to change it.”
When she arrives back at
Zenobia’s modest office on the other
side of the city, the main room is a
flurry of bright-coloured paper and
scribbling pens. Groups of Syrian
women and men of mixed ages are
brainstorming ideas for a future
constitution, based on democratic
principles and equal rights for
all. They are being led by Somaya
Sheikh Hasan and Mona al-Frij,
an energetic pair of civil society
activists. They shout “yeah” and
“that’s right” as the participants
share their ideas.
This is a workshop for what
Ahlam calls “the top of the
pyramid”, the other end of the
charity’s plan to improve the lives
of women at all levels of society. She
rejects the idea that planning a new
constitution is hopelessly optimistic
when Bashar al-Assad seems to be
going nowhere. “I am always being
asked this question,” she says. “I
always respond that all women –
not only Syrian women – are always
fighting a revolution to defend
their rights. And now the Syrian
women are fighting two revolutions:
against the regime and also against
gender injustice.”
Zenobia is run on a shoestring.
Ahlam, an engineer by training, first
worked as a dishwasher and then
sold her gold to get the charity up
and running. Their income comes
from donations strong-armed out of
local Syrian businessmen.
Her strength and determination
comes from her own story as a
survivor. She was married at 19,
gave birth to four children, and then
endured breast cancer, divorce,
war, and exile. “I know how women
feel and know their suffering,” she
says. “But I refuse to be weak.”
She chose the name Zenobia
after a third century Syrian
empress, because, she says, every
woman has an inner queen inside
her wanting to get out. “I really
believe in the power of women,” she
says. “When the woman is strong,
the whole family will be strong, too.”
Laura Pitel and her colleague Mary
Turner reported from Gaziantep on
a fellowship from the International
Reporting Project
One-minute Wijuko
How to play Place 1 – 9 once
in the grid, obeying the sums
between pairs of squares
6
5
16
15
8
5
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
NEWS
2-31
30
NEWS
HISTORY
Step inside
the oldest
house in the
Square Mile
Visitors expect it to be more
palatial inside – but for owner
Matthew Bell it’s perfect
I
am the proud owner of the
oldest inhabited house in
the City of London. However,
I’m glad to say that No 41-42
Cloth Fair has been updated
for modern life since it was
built in 1614. These days, we
have hot and cold running water,
as well as electricity, and we no
longer have to throw human waste
out on to the people below
– though it can, at times, feel
rather tempting when one listens
to the same routines time after
time from the many tour guides
who come this way.
You cannot blame them for
coming here. The building is
fascinating – the only home in the
city to have escaped the Great
Fire of London in 1666 – but so,
too, is the surrounding area of
Farringdon. Looking over to
John Betjeman’s old flat, with its
trompe l’œil window of the sailor’s
homecoming, difficult to see from
the street because of the grimeencrusted plastic covering it, is
the bell of the oldest church in the
City, St Bart’s (which thankfully
does not keep us awake as it is
“turned off” from midnight).
There is an extraordinary amount
of important history in this area
– so much so that parts of it have
been overlooked.
This was the case with the Great
(Peasants’) Revolt of 1381. Given
that it was in west Smithfield
where the dramatic climax of
the revolt took place and where
Wat Tyler was murdered, I was
surprised to find nothing in the
way of a memorial to this event. I
spent more than a year talking to
the City, English Heritage and St
Bart’s Hospital trying to get
agreement to instate one.
When it was agreed,
I commissioned the
memorial, which is
now on the corner of
St Bart’s Hospital, just
by the entrance to St
Bart’s the Great.
When people come
into the house, they are
surprised, perhaps even
disappointed, that it is not more
palatial. The rooms, while a
good size, are not as huge as
the front of the house might
suggest, though it is something
of a maze and takes people a little
time to get used to. These were
merchants’ houses and, as such,
appear from the outside perhaps
rather more baronial from our
21st-century perspective. One
only need look at pictures from
the early 1900s to see other
Eleanor Doughty
IT’S NOT COOL
BUT I LOVE...
Chequebooks
The oldest homes
in the country
At more than four centuries
old, No 41-42 Cloth Fair may
be the oldest house in the
capital, but Britain’s oldest
continuously occupied home
is thought to be Saltford
Manor House, near Bristol.
The Somerset property
was built in Norman times,
dating back to at least 1150. It
was recognised for its place
in history in 2003 when the
historian Dr John Goodall
carried out a survey in
conjunction with Country Life
magazine to find the oldest
house that was still lived in,
excluding royal palaces and
former church buildings.
If unoccupied homes
are included, then the
title belongs to a circular
structure near Scarborough,
North Yorkshire, which was
uncovered in 2010 and is
believed to have been built by
hunter gatherers in 8,500BC.
Rob Hastings
similar merchants’ houses up
and down Cloth Fair before the
City of London Corporation tore
them down because of early
concerns about health and safety.
Isn’t it fascinating how our views
regarding history change? It is
perhaps fitting that Betjeman
was a neighbour, given the poet’s
tireless protection of important
historical buildings. I wonder
how much his friendship with two
former residents, the celebrated
architects John Seely and
Paul Paget, and his
frequent visits to this
house added to his
conviction that
such beautiful and
historic buildings
must be protected.
We were visited by
the stepdaughter of
Paget, who told us that in
what is now a wardrobe were
two bathtubs side by side, where
Seely and Paget would relax and
talk about their various plans for
the city. Following Seely’s death,
Betjeman apparently took over his
bath for a time.
Paget’s stepdaughter told me
how much the place has changed.
It has been sympathetically and
beautifully modernised by Andrea
and Penny Cenci di Bello, whose
work is recognised by the blue
plaque next to the front door. It
“I
s that a… chequebook
you’re carrying?” My
colleague looked stunned.
“Have you heard of
internet banking?”
I am considered to be a bit of a
fogey, but this took the biscuit.
Few things are more pleasing
to me than a chequebook – and,
by logical extension, cheques,
too. Receiving them, writing
them, depositing them – the
whole shebang. A fresh, clean
chequebook is akin to a new diary:
so pleasing, so full of promise.
Receiving cheques is the
greatest joy of all, of course. It
generally means that post has
remains very much a home rather
than a museum, however.
The house, visited by the likes
of poet William Blake and the
founder of Methodism, John
Wesley (inset left), was on the
market for more than two years
before we found it. Perhaps it was
thought a 20th-century house
would be easier to live in than
41–42, but for my money there
is none better, no matter what
century. There is not a right angle
in the place; getting curtains made
and hung was a nightmare for
those who measured and cut them
so carefully – some “pool” nicely
on the floor, others not so much.
Throughout their time here,
Seely and Paget had about 400
guests sign some of the windows
plopped down on your doorstep,
probably from someone you are
happy to hear from: a relation,
friend or neighbour.
Maybe the cheque you are
receiving is from someone who
owes you money. I was, for a time,
paid exclusively in cheques by a
national publisher – an alternative
experience of renumeration. Or
perhaps it’s from the bloke who
scuffed your car in the street and
with whom you’ve decided not to
press insurance claims. Maybe it’s
Virgin Trains, writing to apologise
for the delay to your service two
months ago and, despite your only
mild inconvenience of being stuck
NEWS
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VOICES
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TV
32-33
IQ
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BUSINESS SPORT
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i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
31
HEALTH
Don’t swallow the
one about ‘quick
fix’ slimming pills
Adopting a healthy diet and lifestyle is the
best way to lose weight, writes Lisa Salmon
A
Clockwise
from main:
41-42 Cloth
Fair today; part
of the interior;
an original
banister
from 1614
THE HISTORY
PRESS
with a diamond-nibbed pen. On a
sunny morning, those windows are
white with signatures of the likes of
Viscount Montgomery of Alamein,
JB Priestley, John Betjeman
(several times) and Joyce Grenfell.
During a recent visit by two
descendants of Seely, they told me
that they were too young to recall
ever having visited the house, but
were moved to find the signature
by their brother, who had recently
died, which he had made when
he was a child. I suggested that
they add their early 21st-century
signatures below that of their
mid-20th-century brother’s, which
they were keen to do.
I decided that this was a
tradition which should be carried
on, though perhaps rather more
sparingly than it had been in the
past; the former Irish president
Mary Robinson, Tony Benn, John
Pilger and Ken Loach are some
of the new-era signatories. The
former mayor of London, Ken
Livingstone, accidentally locked
himself in the loo when he visited
a couple of years ago (I had a small
blue plaque made up).
We are now at a significant
crossroads in the history of this
little pocket of London, with the
advent of Crossrail and part of
St Bart’s Hospital having been
knocked down to make way for
many new “luxury flats”. There
needs to remain the desirability
for keeping quirky corners of a
city in the face of the modern drive
to make everything bland and
between Glasgow and Euston, have
decided to refund you the princely
sum of £74.50.
In turn, the writing of cheques is a
delightfully vintage experience in a
world where it’s possible to pay for a
coffee using a mobile. As I am yet to
have children (or grandchildren), my
scope for writing cheques is limited.
Apart from my physiotherapist,
who seems to delight in receiving
a cheque from me every Thursday,
cheque-writing is reserved for the
fantastically niche literary groups to
which I belong. It seems fitting that
these august institutions – such as
the PG Wodehouse Society – should
be paid in such a way.
functional. Where there is money,
there will always be pressure to
demolish and start again (Henry
VIII wanted to knock down
Hampton Court and rebuild it, lest
we forget).
There is a value to putting these
little irritants in the path of the
relentless drive for redevelopment.
It leaves us a cityscape peppered
with clues that illuminate the past,
explain the present and inspire for
the future.
This is an edited
excerpt from ‘The
Oldest House in
London’ by Fiona
Rule (£20, The
History Press),
which is out now
But the most niche of benefits of
chequebooking is depositing. Only
at lunchtime last week did I wander
down the road to my local building
society to deposit a cheque from my
grandparents. When one spends
the majority of one’s day at a desk
staring a computer screen, getting
outside to go on a short, satisfying
mission is a jolly nice thing indeed. If
nothing else, the chequebook gives
one an excuse to go out into the
world, which these days is nothing to
be sniffed at.
There is, by my estimation, almost
nothing more fantastically uncool
as the chequebook, and that is why
I love it.
fter the indulgence of
Christmas, many of us
want to shed the pounds
that we may have gained,
but are sadly lacking
the willpower needed to hit the gym
and cut out fatty foods. Many people
turn to slimming pills as a quick
fix. A recent government survey
found one-third of people trying to
lose weight have tried weight-loss
capsules purchased online. But
taking substances bought through
unregulated websites can be
dangerous, experts say.
The Medicines and Healthcare
Products Regulatory Agency
(MHRA) is warning in its new
#FakeMeds campaign that weightloss pills may potentially contain
withdrawn pharmaceutical
ingredients, which can cause nasty
side effects and sometimes even
heart attacks or death.
The only clinically proven, safe
and effective weight-loss drug
is called Orlistat, also known as
Xenical or Alli. It is available on
prescription or over the counter
in the UK. Orlistat is a “fat binder”
which prevents fat from being
absorbed by the body, but it is only
prescribed and sold to clinically
obese people who are following
low-fat diets – not those who just
need to lose a few pounds.
Online vendors offer a discreet
way for people who do not need
to lose huge amounts of weight to
purchase alternatives to Orlistat,
without having to consult a medical
professional. But the lack of
regulation on the web means that
these can have side effects which
aren’t labelled on the packaging.
In a poll conducted by the MHRA
and Slimming World magazine, 63
per cent of people who had taken
slimming pills bought online said they
had experienced diarrhoea, bleeding,
blurred vision and heart problems.
Sarah-Jayne Walker became
“obsessed” with slimming pills
bought online, before quitting them
and eventually losing two stone
through sensible dieting.
“I used to spend hours searching
the web for what I thought were
the right diet pills, ones that said
they’d work straight away and that
had the best reviews. My mind
became consumed with those pills,”
she says. “However, after suffering
heart palpitations, IBS, sickness,
light-headedness and even fainting,
I knew I had to get a grip and sort
my mind out.”
I used to spend hours
searching the web for diet
pills… my mind became
consumed with those pills
More than half of all medicines bought
over the internet are fake AFP/GETTY
She joined a slimming club
instead, and now admits: “I don’t
have to punish myself or feel guilty
for eating any more and I’ve lost just
over two stone. I can’t tell you how
proud I feel of myself.”
More than half of all medicines
bought online are fake, and since
2013 the MHRA has seized nearly
£4m of fake weight-loss pills, which
can cost anything from £30 to £60
a bottle. “Quick fixes for losing
weight may have serious health
consequences in the short or long
term, including organ failure and
death,” says the MHRA’s senior
policy manager, Lynda Scammell.
“It is essential that you know
what you are buying online and
what the risks are. If you don’t, your
weight could end up being the least
of your worries.”
People can check if sellers are
registered by using the MHRA
online checking system #FakeMeds.
The agency also suggests that
people speak to their doctor about
safe weight loss options.
The best way to lose weight
remains making healthy changes to
your diet and lifestyle.
“It’s easy to see how quick-fix
promises made by the sellers
of online slimming pills could
seem tempting to people who are
desperately struggling with their
weight,” says Jenny Caven, of
Slimming World. “Buying slimming
pills online can be incredibly risky.
The sellers are often unregulated,
and taking the pills puts people at
risk of dangerous side effects.
“Learning to make changes to
the way you shop, cook and eat,
and getting support to develop new
healthy habits really is the best way
to lose weight. Not only is it safer, it’s
also far more satisfying.”
fakemeds.campaign.gov.uk
Television Thursday 28 December
CRITIC’S
CHOICE
Daytime
GERARD GILBERT
6pm
6.00 Breakfast (S). 9.00
FILM: The Pirates! In
An Adventure With
Scientists! (Peter Lord,
Jeff Newitt 2012) (S).
10.20 FILM: Kung Fu
Panda (Mark Osborne,
John Stevenson 2008) (S).
11.45 Bargain Hunt (R) (S).
12.45 BBC News At One;
Weather (S). 1.00 BBC
Regional News; Weather
(S). 1.05 Father Brown (R)
(S). 1.50 Revolting Rhymes
(R) (S). 2.20 FILM: Shrek The
Third (Chris Miller, Raman
Hui 2007) (S). 3.45 The
Gruffalo’s Child (R) (S). 4.10
FILM: How To Train Your
Dragon 2 (Dean DeBlois
2014) Animated adventure
sequel (S). 5.45 Pointless
(R) (S).
PICK OF THE DAY
===
===
9.30pm, BBC2
Ants are not telegenic or critters
we can easily identify with (how,
for example, can you mark them
out as individuals?), but David
Attenborough believes there are
echoes of human nature in their
societies as he visits the Jura
mountains between France and
Switzerland to look at an
extraordinary set of wood-ant
colonies. Such colonies usually
contain one queen and wage war
with each other, but here they each
have hundreds of queens and the
colonies coexist peacefully. “Their
existence conflicts with some of the
laws of evolution as we currently
know them,” says Attenborough, a
man not given to exaggeration.
7pm, Channel 4
Parents’ love/hate relationship with
Michael Rosen’s picture-book was
cleverly exploited by the authors of
the spoof version, We’re Going On A
Bar Hunt. Anyway, this is Rosen’s
original story animated for the
young ’uns, with Olivia Colman and
Pam Ferris providing voices.
8.30pm, BBC2
The concluding half of this intriguing
experiment introduces Kaspar, a
robot designed to help a young
autistic boy connect with other
people, the ultra-efficient Shopbot
and the self-explanatory (and less
successful) Carebot, who struggles
when left alone in charge of
a patient.
Natural World
6.45 Sign Zone:
MasterChef: The
Professionals (R) (S). 7.45
FILM: Ray Harryhausen:
Special Effects Titan
(Gilles Penso 2011) (S). 9.15
The Big Family Cooking
Showdown (R) (S). 10.15
Nadiya’s British Food
Adventure (R) (S). 11.15
The Sweet Makers: A
Victorian Treat (R) (S).
12.15 FILM: Love Is A
Many Splendored Thing
(Henry King 1955) (S). 1.55
Supercharged Otters:
Natural World (R) (S).
2.55 The World’s Most
Extraordinary Homes
(R) (S). 3.55 Inside The
Factory (R) (S). 4.55 FILM:
The Heroes Of Telemark
(Anthony Mann 1965) (S).
6.30 BBC News (S).
6.45 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
We’re Going On A Bear Hunt
===
Still Open All Hours
7.30pm, BBC1
The corner shop where it’s forever
1973 returns with a seasonal episode
in which Granville tries to dissuade
his customers from going away for
the holidays while fighting off the
amorous advances of Mrs
Featherstone (Stephanie Cole).
Six Robots & Us
===
The Secret Life Of 5 Year
Olds On Holiday
8.30pm, Channel 4
We’re Going On A Bear Hunt author
Michael Rosen (see above) is a critic
of this show, finding it unethically
manipulative, so presumably he
won’t be tuning in as the pre-
6.00 Good Morning
Britain (S). 8.30 Lorraine
(S). 9.25 FILM: Babe (Chris
Noonan 1995) Family
comedy, starring James
Cromwell (S). 11.05
FILM: Black Beauty
(Caroline Thompson
1994) Family drama,
starring Sean Bean (S).
12.45 ITV News; Weather
(S). 12.55 ITV Regional
News; Weather (S). 1.00
Midsomer Murders (R) (S).
3.00 Tenable (R) (S). 4.00
Tipping Point (R) (S). 5.00
The Chase (R) (S).
7.20 FILM: The SpongeBob
SquarePants Movie
(Stephen Hillenburg 2004)
Comedy, with the voice of
Tom Kenny (S). 8.55 Lego
Masters (R) (S). 10.00 The
Simpsons (R) (S). 10.30
The Simpsons (R) (S).
11.00 FILM: Spy Kids 4:
All The Time In The World
(Robert Rodriguez 2011)
Adventure, with Jessica
Alba (S). 12.45 FILM: The
Net (Irwin Winkler 1995)
Thriller, with Sandra
Bullock (S). 3.00 Four
Rooms With Sarah Beeny
(S). 4.00 Channel 4 News
(S). 4.20 FILM: Back To The
Future Part III (Robert
Zemeckis 1990) Sci-fi
comedy, starring Michael
J Fox (S).
6.00 Milkshake! 9.15
Cruising With Jane
McDonald (R) (S). 9.30 The
Gadget Show (R) (S). 10.25
FILM: The 7th Voyage Of
Sinbad (Nathan Juran
1958) Fantasy adventure,
with Kerwin Mathews (S).
12.15 FILM: The Vikings
(Richard Fleischer 1958)
Historical adventure,
starring Kirk Douglas
and Tony Curtis (S). 2.30
FILM: Jason And The
Argonauts (Don Chaffey
1963) Fantasy adventure,
starring Todd Armstrong
(S). 4.30 André Rieu: My
Life In Music (R) (S).
6.00 Paul O’Grady:
For The Love Of
Dogs (R) (S).
6.30 ITV Regional
News; Weather
(S).
6.45 ITV News (S).
6.30 Hollyoaks Joel
confides in
Sienna about
his feelings for
Cleo (S).
6.00 Andre Rieu:
Christmas
In London A
festive concert
by the Dutch
violinist (R) (S).
===
What Britain Bought In 2017
9pm, Channel 4
“By their consumer habits ye shall
know them” seems to be the subtext
here as Mary Portas explores our
seemingly undiminished spending
habits in a year beset with political
uncertainty. So what to make of the
craze for unicorns or artisan gins
(Portas positing the interesting
suggestion that the return of gin
actually means we’re drinking less)
and big knickers?
Family fun in ‘We’re
Going On A Bear Hunt’
7pm, Channel 4
Mary Portas talks shop
as she presents a rundown of ‘What Britain
Bought In 2017’
9pm, Channel 4
7pm
7.00 Celebrity
Mastermind
With Philip
Serrell (S).
7.30 Still Open All
Hours New
series (S).
7.00 Thailand:
Earth’s Tropical
Paradise
Exploring
the culture
of Central
Thailand (R) (S).
7.00 Emmerdale
Rebecca
confesses her
plans (S).
7.00 We’re Going
On A Bear
Hunt Animated
adventure (R).
7.30 The Secret Life
Of The Zoo At
Christmas (R).
7.00 Winter
In Alaska
Documentary
following four
seasons in the
north American
state (R) (S).
7.00 Sound Of
Musicals With
Neil Brand Last
in the series (R)
(S).
8pm
8.00 EastEnders (S).
8.30 Little Women
Jo flees to New
York to pursue
her career. Last
in the series (S).
8.00 Christmas
University
Challenge 2017
(S).
8.30 Six Robots & Us
Part two of two
(S).
8.00 FILM: Harry
Potter And
The Order Of
The Phoenix
(David Yates
2007) Fantasy
adventure (S).
8.30 The Secret Life
Of 5 Year Olds
On Holiday
Familiar faces
from the series
go on holiday to
Cyprus (S).
8.00 World’s
Strongest Man
2017 Action
from the
second heat in
Botswana (S).
8.00 Royal
Institution
Christmas
Lectures 2017:
The Language Of
Life Last in the
series (S).
9pm
9.30 EastEnders Fi
is sickened to
discover how
low her family
have sunk (S).
9.30 Natural World
The story
of how ants
survive in the
Swiss Alps (S).
9.00 What Britain
Bought In
2017 Britain’s
spending habits
over the past 12
months (S).
9.00 FILM: Flight
(Robert
Zemeckis 2012)
Premiere.
Drama,
starring Denzel
Washington (S).
9.00 Francis Bacon:
A Brush With
Violence (R) (S).
10pm
10.00BBC News (S).
10.15 BBC Regional
News; Weather
(S).
10.25 Bruno Mars:
Live In Harlem
(S).
10.30 Romesh
Ranganathan:
Irrational Live
The comedian’s
first-ever live
stand-up show
(S).
10.35 ITV News;
Weather (S).
10.54 ITV Regional
Weather (S).
10.55 Tina & Bobby
(R) (S).
10.00The Undateables
At Christmas
Familiar faces
share their
plans for the
festive season
(R) (S).
11pm
11.10 U2 At The BBC:
Special Edition
The band
perform some
of their biggest
hits (S).
11.30 FILM: Alan
Partridge:
Alpha Papa
(Declan Lowney
2013) Comedy,
starring Steve
Coogan (S).
11.55 Stuck On You:
The Football
Sticker Story
Documentary
(R) (S).
11.05 FILM: About A
Boy (Paul Weitz,
Chris Weitz
2002) Romantic
comedy,
starring Hugh
Grant (S).
11.45 FILM: The
Taking Of
Pelham 123
(Tony Scott
2009) Thriller,
starring Denzel
Washington (S).
12.30 BBC News (S).
12.55 FILM: Oasis:
Supersonic (Mat
Whitecross 2016) (S). 2.55
Sign Zone: Employable Me
(R) (S). 3.55 Sign Zone: Blitz:
The Bombs That Changed
Britain (R) (S). 4.55 This Is
BBC Two (S).
12.45 Jackpot247 3.00
Tenable (R) (S). 3.50 ITV
Nightscreen 5.05 The
Jeremy Kyle Show (R) (S).
12.55 Alan Carr’s
Christmas Chatty Man (R)
(S). 2.50 Paul O’Grady’s 100
Years Of Movie Musicals
(R) (S). 4.10 Location,
Location, Location (R)
(S). 5.05 Jamie’s Cracking
Christmas (R) (S).
1.45 SuperCasino 3.05
Love/Hate (R) (S). 4.00
Cruising With Jane
McDonald (R) (S). 4.45
House Doctor (R) (S). 5.10
House Busters (R) (S). 5.35
Wildlife SOS (R) (S).
Late
schoolers have their bags packed and
head for Cyprus. Joining them as
usual will be psychologists Paul
Howard-Jones and Dr Alison Pike
as the cute nippers sample the
excitement of flying and the
first taste of exotic delicacies.
Leroy and Granville in
‘Still Open All Hours’
7.30pm, BBC1
6.00 Totally Bonkers
Guinness World Records
(R) (S). 6.50 Totally
Bonkers Guinness World
Records (R) (S). 7.10 Mr
Bean (R). 7.40 Mr Bean (R).
8.15 Britain’s Got Talent:
Top 10 Child Stars (R) (S).
9.15 Planet’s Got Talent (R)
(S). 9.45 Emmerdale (R) (S).
10.15 Coronation Street
(R) (S). 10.45 FILM: Space
Chimps (Kirk De Micco
2008) (S). 12.25 Totally
You’ve Been Framed! Gold
(R) (S). 1.10 Emmerdale
(R) (S). 1.40 Coronation
Street (R) (S). 2.10 FILM:
Ella Enchanted (Tommy
O’Haver 2004) (S). 4.15
FILM: Clash Of The Titans
(Louis Leterrier 2010) (S).
6.20 FILM: The
Amazing
Spider-Man
2 (Marc Webb
2014) Adventure,
with Andrew
Garfield (S).
7.05 FILM: Men In
Black II (Barry
Sonnenfeld
2002) Sci-fi
comedy sequel,
starring Will
Smith (S).
9.00 FILM:
Terminator
Genisys (Alan
Taylor 2015)
Sci-fi adventure
(S).
9.00 FILM: Casino
Royale (Martin
Campbell 2006)
James Bond spy
thriller, starring
Daniel Craig (S).
11.50 The World’s
Most Expensive
Stolen
Paintings (R) (S).
11.25 FILM: Slow
West (John
Maclean 2015)
Western,
starring Kodi
Smit-McPhee
(S).
11.50 Family Guy
Lois’s parents
hire a nanny to
help with the
children (R) (S).
12.50 Sound Of Musicals
With Neil Brand (R) (S).
1.50 Royal Institution
Christmas Lectures 2017:
The Language Of Life (R)
(S). 2.50 Peaky Blinders (R)
(S). 3.50 Close
1.05 FILM: Police Story:
Lockdown (Ding Sheng
2013) Action adventure
sequel, starring Jackie
Chan (S). 3.25 Close
12.25 Family Guy (R) (S).
1.45 American Dad! (R)
(S). 2.40 The Keith Lemon
Sketch Show (R) (S). 3.05
Through The Keyhole (R)
(S). 3.55 Viral Tap (R) (S).
4.30 Educating Joey Essex:
Supermodel Student (R).
10.20 Jonas
Kaufmann:
Tenor For
The Ages
Documentary
about the opera
singer (R) (S).
NEWS
2-31
===
Francis Bacon: A Brush
With Violence
9pm, BBC4
This Christmas is disappointingly
devoid of new arts documentaries,
but here is a repeat well worth
catching as painter Francis Bacon’s
tortured (often much to his
masochistic satisfaction) life is
peppered with colourful insights:
how his racehorse trainer father
used to order his stable boys to beat
the young Francis, how his nanny
would later supply cannabis for his
gambling parties, his sexual
relationship with an associate of the
Krays and so forth. An impressive
array of critics, artists and friends
complete a picture of this complex
man whose art shocked and now
often fetches £40m at auction.
FILM
CHOICE
LAURENCE PHELAN
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
FILM OF THE DAY
===
9pm, Channel 5
(Robert Zemeckis, 2012)
Whip Whitaker (Denzel Washington)
wakes up at 7.30am after a hard
night’s partying with an air hostess,
has a few more swigs of beer, some
puffs on a joint, and then – so as to
clear his head before piloting a 9am
commercial airline flight – a stiff line
of coke. When the plane develops a
fault he is able to crash-land with the
minimum loss of life and he is hailed
a hero… but then his toxicology report
comes back. Washington (left) plays
him with movie-star swagger and the
scenes in which we see him at work –
particularly during the flight, but also
on the ground, frantically dissembling
– are fascinating, and full of the
clammy thrill of impending disaster.
2.30pm, Channel 5
(Don Chaffey, 1963)
Greek myth by way of US special
effects artist Ray Harryhausen (who
considered it his best work), most
remembered for the magical fourminute sequence in which an army
of sword-wielding skeletons are
spawned from the teeth of the Hydra.
Flight
Jason And The Argonauts
===
The ’Burbs
3.05pm, 5Star
(Joe Dante, 1989)
Underappreciated on its release
but with cult status now, The ’Burbs
is a family-friendly black comedy
starring Tom Hanks as one of a trio
of suburbanites suspicious that their
neighbours are murderous Satanists.
Radio
BBC Radio 1
6.00 You’re Only Young
Twice (R) (S). 6.25 Agatha
Christie’s Marple (R) (S).
8.15 Bertie And Elizabeth
(R) (S). 10.20 Goodbye Mr
Chips (R) (S). 12.25 FILM:
Carry On Don’t Lose Your
Head (Gerald Thomas
1966) Comedy, starring Sid
James (S). 2.15 FILM: Carry
On Loving (Gerald Thomas
1970) Comedy, starring Sid
James (S). 4.10 FILM: Carry
On Behind (Gerald Thomas
1975) Comedy, starring
Kenneth Williams (S).
6.00 Hollyoaks (R) (S).
6.30 Charmed (R) (S). 7.25
Rude(ish) Tube (R) (S).
7.50 Ice Age: A Mammoth
Christmas (R) (S). 8.15
FILM: Postman Pat: The
Movie (Mike Disa 2014)
(S). 10.00 FILM: Animals
United (Reinhard Klooss,
Holger Tappe 2010)
Animated comedy with
the voices of James
Corden and Stephen Fry
(S). 12.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S). 2.00 How
I Met Your Mother (R)
(S). 2.30 How I Met Your
Mother (R) (S). 3.00 The Big
Bang Theory: Big Bang A-Z
(R) (S). 5.00 The Goldbergs
(R) (S). 5.30 The Goldbergs
(R) (S).
8.55 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (R) (S). 10.00
FILM: Carry On Regardless
(Gerald Thomas 1961)
Slapstick comedy, starring
Sid James (S). 11.50 A
Place In The Sun (R) (S).
12.20 A Place In The Sun:
Winter Sun (R) (S). 1.25
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 2.00
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 2.30
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 3.00
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 3.35
Four In A Bed (R) (S). 4.05
Come Dine With Me (R)
(S). 4.40 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S). 5.10 Come Dine
With Me (R) (S). 5.45 Come
Dine With Me (R) (S).
6.00 Futurama (R) (S).
6.30 Futurama (R) (S).
7.00 Futurama (R) (S).
7.30 The Simpsons (R) (S).
8.00 The Simpsons (R) (S).
8.30 The Simpsons (R) (S).
9.00 The Simpsons (R) (S).
9.30 Modern Family (R)
(S). 10.00 Modern Family
(R) (S). 10.30 Modern
Family (R) (S). 11.00 David
Attenborough’s Galapagos
(R) (S). 12.00 Hawaii Five-0
(R) (S). 1.00 Fungus The
Bogeyman (R) (S). 2.30
The Simpsons (R) (S). 3.00
The Simpsons (R) (S). 3.30
Modern Family (R) (S). 4.00
Modern Family (R) (S).
4.30 Futurama (R) (S). 5.00
Futurama (R) (S). 5.30 The
Simpsons (R) (S).
6.00 David Attenborough’s
Kingdom Of Plants (R) (S).
7.00 David Attenborough’s
Kingdom Of Plants (R) (S).
8.00 David Attenborough’s
Kingdom Of Plants (R)
(S). 9.00 Making Of David
Attenborough’s Kingdom
Of Plants (R) (S). 10.00 San
Francisco 2.0 (R) (S). 11.00
Blue Bloods (R) (S). 12.00
Blue Bloods (R) (S). 1.00
Blue Bloods (R) (S). 2.00
Blue Bloods (R) (S). 3.00
Blue Bloods (R) (S). 4.00
Blue Bloods (R) (S). 5.00
Blue Bloods (R) (S).
6.00 Agatha
Christie’s
Marple Murder
mystery,
starring Julia
McKenzie (R) (S).
6.00 The Big Bang
Theory Leonard
meets up with
the woman he
kissed (R) (S).
6.30 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
6.20 Come Dine With
Me (R) (S).
6.55 Beatrix Potter
With Patricia
Routledge
Documentary
(R) (S).
6.00 The Simpsons
Featuring the
voice of Sting
(R) (S).
6.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
6.00 FILM: Dinosaur
13 (Todd
Douglas Miller
2014) History’s
greatest
dinosaur
discoveries (R).
6.30am The Radio 1 Breakfast
Show With Scott And Chris
10.00 Adele Roberts 1pm
Dev 4.00 Jordan North 7.00
Annie Mac 9.00 BBC Radio
1 & 1Xtra’s Stories – Heroes
With Annie Nightingale
10.00 BBC Radio 1 & 1Xtra’s
Stories – Music By Numbers:
Craig David 11.00 BBC Radio
1’s Residency – Dub Phizix &
Strategy 1am Toddla T 3.00
Radio 1’s Artist Takeover With
Tom Odell 4.00 Early Breakfast
BBC Radio 1Xtra
6am The 1Xtra Breakfast Show
With A.Dot 10.00 Seani B 1pm
Reece Parkinson 4.00 Sian
Anderson 7.00 DJ Target 9.00
UKG Takeover 11.00 Seani B
1am Toddla T 3.00 1Xtra Mixes
4.00 Seani B
BBC Radio 2
7.00 Hollyoaks Tom
celebrates his
birthday at The
Loft (S).
8.00 Endeavour
Morse
investigates
a hospital’s
mysterious past
(R) (S).
10.00Lewis A killer
targets a
religious group
(R) (S).
12.05 FILM: Carry On
Cowboy (Gerald Thomas
1966) Comedy Western,
starring Sid James (S).
2.05 Goodbye Mr Chips
(R) (S). 3.50 Bertie And
Elizabeth (R) (S). 5.35 ITV3
Nightscreen
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
7.00 The Simpsons
An accident
at work leaves
Homer in a cast
(R) (S).
7.30 The Simpsons
(R) (S).
8.00 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
8.30 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
8.00 The World’s
Most Expensive
Presents
Craftsmen
and women
producing
lavish gifts (R).
8.00 Carpool
Karaoke Special
With Katy Perry
and Jennifer
Lopez (R) (S).
8.00 David
Attenborough’s
Conquest Of
The Skies The
making of the
documentary
series (R) (S).
9.00 2 Broke Girls (S).
9.30 2 Broke Girls
The girls stow
away on a
riverboat to
New Orleans (S).
9.00 FILM: Last
Vegas (Jon
Turteltaub
2013) Comedy,
starring Michael
Douglas (S).
9.00 FILM: XXx2: The
Next Level (Lee
Tamahori 2005)
Action sequel,
starring Ice
Cube (S).
9.00 The Tunnel:
Vengeance
Winnie is sent a
live rat in a box
(S).
10.00Game Of
Thrones Joffrey
stands up to his
grandfather (R)
(S).
10.00The
Inbetweeners
(R) (S).
10.30 The
Inbetweeners
Will finds a
girlfriend (R) (S).
11.05 The Big Bang
Theory (R) (S).
11.35 The Big Bang
Theory Howard
is torn between
Bernadette and
his mother (R).
11.05 Greg Davies:
The Back Of
My Mum’s
Head Stand-up
comedy with
the Man Down
star (R) (S).
11.00 A League Of
Their Own: US
Road Trip 2.0 (R)
(S).
11.25 Game Of
Thrones Jon
Snow finds
himself on trial
at Castle Black
(R) (S).
12.00 Gogglebox (R) (S).
1.05 Alan Carr Live: Spexy
Beast (R) (S). 2.10 Tattoo
Fixers At Christmas (R) (S).
3.05 The Inbetweeners (R)
(S). 3.35 2 Broke Girls (R)
(S). 4.20 Rude(ish) Tube (R)
(S). 4.40 Charmed (R) (S).
12.15 24 Hours In A&E
(R) (S). 1.15 Very British
Problems At Christmas
(R) (S). 2.20 Ramsay’s
Kitchen Nightmares USA
(R) (S). 3.15 8 Out Of 10 Cats
Uncut (R) (S). 3.55 Close
12.00 The Russell Howard
Hour (R). 1.00 A League
Of Their Own: Unseen (R)
(S). 2.00 A League Of Their
Own (R) (S). 3.00 The Force:
Manchester (R) (S). 4.00
Monkeys: An Amazing
Animal Family (R) (S).
12.40 Big Little Lies
(R) (S). 1.45 The Tunnel:
Vengeance (R). 2.45 FILM:
Nightingale (Elliott Lester
2015) (S). 4.20 Richard E
Grant’s Hotel Secrets (R).
5.10 Richard E Grant’s
Hotel Secrets (R) (S).
6.30am Sara Cox 9.30 Trevor
Nelson 12noon Jeremy Vine
2.00 Radio 2 In Concert 3.00
Craig Charles 5.00 Johnnie
Walker Meets Alice Cooper
6.00 Johnnie Walker Meets
Blondie 7.00 Bob Harris
Country 8.00 Ana Matronic
10.00 The Summer Of I Feel
Love 11.00 Stanley Baxter’s
Musical World 12mdn’t The
Craig Charles House Party 2.00
Radio 2’s Tracks Of My Years
Playlist 3.00 Radio 2 Playlist:
Have A Great Weekend 4.00
Radio 2 Playlist: Feelgood
Friday 5.00 Nicki Chapman
BBC Radio 3
6.30am Breakfast. 9.00
Essential Classics. 12noon
Composer Of The Week: Cole
Porter. The late 1940s bring
Porter his greatest success
with Kiss Me Kate. 1.00 News
1.02 Radio 3 Lunchtime
Concert. 2.00 Afternoon
Concert. 5.00 Words And
Music. 6.15 New Generation
Artists. The Calidore Quartet
Play Mendelssohn. 7.30 BBC
Proms 2017. 9.35 BBC Proms
2017. Kevin John Edusei
conducts the UK’s first BME
orchestra in their Proms debut.
11.00 Exposure. 11.30 Late
Junction Mixtape. 12.30am
Through The Night.
BBC Radio 4
6am Today 9.00 In Our Time
9.45 Book Of The Week:
Adventures Of A Young
Naturalist 10.00 Woman’s
Hour 11.00 Crossing
Continents 11.30 Thinking
Outside The Boxset: How
Technology Changed The
Story 12noon News 12.04
Home Front 12.15 You And
Yours 12.57 Weather 1.00 The
World At One 1.45 Radio 4’s
Pen Pals 2.00 The Archers 2.15
Drama: Long Time Coming
3.00 Open Country 3.27 Radio
4 Appeal 3.30 Open Book 4.00
The Film Programme 4.30
BBC Inside Science 5.00 PM
5.57 Weather 6.00 Six O’Clock
News 6.15 Dr John Cooper
Clarke At The BBC. The Bard of
Salford performs classic and
new poems at the BBC’s Radio
33
ONDEMAND
False Flag
Now TV/Sky Box Sets
Israeli thriller about five
ordinary-seeming citizens
exposed as Mossad agents.
The Miniaturist
BBC iPlayer
Lavish adaptation of Jessie
Burton’s novel set in
Amsterdam in the 1680s.
A303: Highway To The Sun
BBC iPlayer
Tom Fort’s idiosyncratic Morris
Minor journey along the route
to Devon and Cornwall.
Theatre. 6.30 Keep Calman
Carry On. Susan Calman
goes birdwatching. Last in the
series. 7.00 The Archers. Brian
sets out his vision. 7.15 Front
Row. Arts programme. 7.45
Incredible Women. With Barry
Cryer. 8.00 The Briefing Room.
David Aaronovitch discusses
big issues in the news. 8.30
In Business. David Baker
reports on how employers
are managing mental health
at the workplace. 9.00 BBC
Inside Science. Presented
by Adam Rutherford. 9.30 In
Our Time. Melvyn Bragg and
guests discuss Hamlet. 10.00
The World Tonight. With James
Coomarasamy. 10.45 Book At
Bedtime: How To Stop Time.
By Matt Haig. 11.00 The Brig
Society. Marcus Brigstocke
becomes a football manager.
11.30 Anansi Boys. By Neil
Gaiman. 12mdn’t News And
Weather 12.15 Bone Stories
12.30 Book Of The Week:
Adventures Of A Young
Naturalist 12.48 Shipping
Forecast 1.00 As BBC World
Service 5.20 Shipping Forecast
5.30 News Briefing 5.43 Prayer
For The Day 5.45 Farming
Today 5.58 Tweet Of The Day
BBC Radio 4 LW
7.30am Today 9.45 Daily
Service 12.01pm Shipping
Forecast 5.54 Shipping
Forecast 11.00 Test Match
Special 1am Test Match Special
5.30 Test Match Special
BBC Radio 4 Extra
6am A Case For Paul Temple
6.30 Strictly Come Brucie
7.00 Double Income, No Kids
Yet 7.30 Keep Calman Carry
On 8.00 Not In Front Of The
Children 8.30 The Goon Show
9.00 Counterpoint 9.30 King
Street Junior 10.00 Night
And Day 11.00 Ballet Stories
11.15 The Further Adventures
Of Sherlock Holmes 12noon
Not In Front Of The Children
12.30 The Goon Show 1.00
A Case For Paul Temple 1.30
Strictly Come Brucie 2.00 The
Diary Of A Provincial Lady
2.15 Five Hundred Years Of
Friendship 2.30 Dombey And
Pick
ofthe
day
The Film
Programme
4pm, BBC Radio 4
Incredible to think
that The West Wing
and A Few Good
Men creator Aaron
Sorkin (above) is
only now releasing
his directorial
debut. He talks to
Francine Stock
about Molly’s Game.
Son 2.45 The Pantomime Life
Of Joseph Grimaldi 3.00 Night
And Day 4.00 Counterpoint
4.30 King Street Junior 5.00
Double Income, No Kids Yet
5.30 Keep Calman Carry On
6.00 Good Omens 6.30 Great
Lives 7.00 Not In Front Of The
Children 7.30 The Goon Show
8.00 A Case For Paul Temple
8.30 Strictly Come Brucie 9.00
Ballet Stories 9.15 The Further
Adventures Of Sherlock
Holmes 10.00 Comedy Club:
Keep Calman Carry On 10.30
Comedy Club: Sean Lock – 15
Storeys High 11.00 Comedy
Club: Sarah Millican’s Support
Group 11.30 Comedy Club: The
Show What You Wrote 12mdn’t
Good Omens 12.30 Great Lives
1.00 A Case For Paul Temple
1.30 Strictly Come Brucie 2.00
The Diary Of A Provincial Lady
2.15 Five Hundred Years Of
Friendship 2.30 Dombey And
Son 2.45 The Pantomime Life
Of Joseph Grimaldi 3.00 Night
And Day 4.00 Counterpoint
4.30 King Street Junior 5.00
Double Income, No Kids Yet
5.30 Keep Calman Carry On
BBC 5 Live
7am Ashes Breakfast 10.00
5 Live Daily With Chris
Warburton 1pm Afternoon
Edition 4.00 5 Live Drive 7.00
5 Live Sport 8.00 5 Live Sport:
Premier League Football 201718 10.00 Sam Walker 11.30
The Ashes
BBC 6 Music
7am Nemone 10.00 Mary Anne
Hobbs 1pm Stuart Maconie
4.00 Huey Morgan 7.00 6
Music Celebrates Scott Walker
9.00 Gideon Coe 12mdn’t 6
Music Recommends With
Steve Lamacq 1.00 Chuck
Berry: 40 Years On 2.00 The
Evolution Of John Peel – 2000s
Evolution 2.30 6 Music Live
Hour 3.30 6 Music’s Jukebox
5.00 Chris Hawkins
Classic FM
6am More Music Breakfast
10.00 John Brunning 2pm Jane
Jones 5.00 Sam Pittis 8.00 Full
Works Concert 10.00 Smooth
Classics 1am Bob Jones
Absolute Radio
6am Ben Burrell 10.00 Claire
Sturgess 2pm Andy Bush
6.00 Danielle Perry 10.00
The Sound Of Protest With
Danielle Perry 11.00 The Best
Of Live Music Thursday With
Pete Donaldson 1am Chris
Martin
Heart
6am Jamie And Emma
9.00 Toby Anstis 1pm Matt
Wilkinson 4.00 JK And Lucy
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Page 37
Arts
Behind ‘Black Mirror’
Annabel Jones on how the
unique show is conceived
Page 38
his year, like every year,
has flown by. Spring
and summer came and
went, and now the new
year is almost upon
us. With some quick maths, you
can count all the previous Januarys in which you reflected on
the year that just raced by – five,
10, so many that you’ve lost their
details and now lump them into
some broad category: “my twenties”, “the years when we lived in
that house”, “back before our kids
were born”. Then it seems that
your youth has flown, too – or if it
hasn’t flown just yet, you can easily imagine a future point in time
when you’ll feel that it fled long
ago.
How time flies: we all remark
on it and have done so for centuries. “Fugit irreparabile tempus,”
the Roman poet Virgil wrote: time
flees irretrievably. “Time flies, and
for no man will it abide,” Chaucer
noted in the late 14th century in
The Canterbury Tales. Time and
tide have waited for no man since
before English was born.
Shortly after my wife, Susan,
and I were married, my father-inlaw took to saying with a snap of
his fingers and a bittersweet tone:
“The first 20 years, they go like
that!” A dozen years later, I think I
know what he means.
One day my son Joshua exclaimed, with a grand sigh: “Remember the good old days?” and
he wasn’t yet five. (For him the
good old days involved a chocolate
cupcake he remembered having
eaten a few months earlier.)
I surprise myself lately with how
often I’m struck by this fleetingness. It seems as though there was
a time not long ago when I rarely
remarked: “How time flies!” Yet
when I reflect back on that period
of my life and compare it to the
current one, I realise with shock
that actual years have passed, and
then I say it again. Where did the
time go?
Of course, it isn’t only years
that fly. Days, hours, minutes, and
seconds all fly by too, but not necessarily on the same wings. The
brain processes a passage of time
that lasts from minutes to hours
differently than it treats an interval that lasts from a few seconds to
maybe a minute or two.
When you think back to estimate how long your trip to the
supermarket took or you ask
yourself whether the hour-long
TV show you just watched went
by more slowly or more quickly
than usual, you invoke a different
mental process than you do when
the traffic light seems to be taking
too long to change.
Exactly why time flies “depends
on what kind of time you’re talking about”, John Wearden, a
psychologist at Keele University
told me. He has spent the past 30
years trying to define and unravel
the human relationship to time. I
caught up with him by phone one
Where
did that
year go?
The past 12 months have been
just as long as any others, so
why might you feel like 2017
has raced by? It’s the way we
perceive time that’s to blame,
explains AlanBurdick
evening as he was about to watch
a football match on TV at home. I
apologised for interrupting. “Not
a problem,” he replied. “My time
isn’t that precious, to be honest.
I’d like to pretend I was terribly
busy but I’m just waiting for the
football to start.”
Wearden reminded me that
we don’t perceive time directly,
as we do with light or sound. We
perceive light by means of special
cells in the retina which, when
struck by photons, trigger neural signals that quickly reach the
brain. Sound waves are detected
with tiny hairs in the ear; their vibrations translate into electrical
signals that the brain grasps as
audio. But we don’t have special
receptors for time. “The problem
of the organ for time has haunted psychology for many years,”
Wearden said.
Time comes to us indirectly, typically by way of what it contains.
In 1973, psychologist JJ Gibson
wrote that “events are perceivable
but time is not”, a statement that
has become foundational for many
temporal researchers. What he
meant, roughly, was that time is
not a thing but a passage through
things – not a noun but a verb.
I can describe a holiday to Walt
Disney World – there’s Mickey,
there’s Space Mountain, there
are the clouds far below my airliner window – and I can be conscious of the trip even as I take it.
But I can’t experience or relate a
“trip” devoid of sights, activities,
or thoughts. What is “reading”
without words and your progress
through them? Time is merely our
word for the movement of events
and sensations through us.
We don’t experience “time”,
only time passing. To acknowledge and mark the passage of
time is to acknowledge change –
in your surroundings, your situation, or even, as the psychologist
and philosopher William James
noted, the interior landscape of
your thoughts. Things aren’t as
they were before.
Into the sense of now seeps an
awareness of then. And performing that comparison requires
memory. Time can only fly – or
crawl, or leap – if you recall its
previous speed: “That movie felt
much longer than others I’ve
watched,” or, “The dinner party
flew by; I remember noticing the
clock two hours ago but I haven’t
noticed it since.”
Indeed, very often when we
remark: “How did time fly by so
quickly?” what’s actually meant
is some version of “I don’t remem-
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
35
Dark nights?
No problem.
“ For reading, this
light is better than
daylight.”
Mrs Watkins London
Our perception of time passing depends, to some
degree, on how often we look at a clock, or whether
we are enjoying what we are doing PA; GETTY
ber where the time went” or “I
lost track of the time.” What we’re
typically saying is that we weren’t
tracking the time to begin with.
Wearden conducted a study
that bears this out. He gave 200
undergraduate students a questionnaire asking them to describe
an occasion in which time seemed
to have elapsed faster or slower
than normal. He also asked them
to describe what they were doing
at the time; to recall whether they
noticed in the moment that time
was moving faster or slower; and
to note if they had taken any drugs.
The students responded with
statements such as: “Alcohol consumption seems to lead to time
speeding up – possibly due to the
fact that I am socialising at the
same time and therefore having
fun.” Overall, Wearden found, the
students reported that the experience of time passing faster than
normal was more common than
the experience of time passing
slowly. Distortions of either kind
were two-thirds more likely to
Whether or not a
stretch of time flies
by depends on when
you think about it
occur if the subject was somehow
intoxicated; alcohol and cocaine
seemed to contribute to time’s
flying, whereas marijuana and
ecstasy seemed equally likely to
make time speed up or slow down.
Strikingly, many said that they
felt no sense of time flying until
they were nudged by some external marker of real time – sunrise,
a glance at a clock, the bartender’s
last call. Before that, they often
had no sense of time at all.
The reason that time flies, at
least on the scale of minutes to
hours, is straightforward: you
aren’t regularly looking at the
clock. Afterwards you notice that,
say, two hours have gone by since
you last thought about the time;
you’re aware that two hours is
a fairly long time, but since you
didn’t tabulate and remember
each minute of it, you infer that
the time passed quickly.
It’s no different from what we
experience when daydreaming.
This explains why many people
find monotonous tasks actually
go by quickly: when you’re bored
you’re thinking about time, but if
you can take your mind off your
dull task and begin daydreaming
while doing it, then you aren’t.
Wearden also noticed that
whether or not a stretch of time
flies by depends on when you think
about it – retrospectively or as the
experience is unfolding. Time
can crawl in either the past tense
or the present tense. But time
rarely seems to fly in the moment,
Wearden said. That’s virtually by
definition: time flies because you
aren’t currently tracking it. What
was the last movie you sat through
thinking: “This movie is flying by!”
Either you’re bored and glancing
at your watch or you’re immersed
in the film and unaware of time.
At meetings and conferences,
Wearden likes to ask fellow psychologists whether they’ve ever
experienced time moving quickly
or if they know anyone who has.
The answer is always no. “The
consensus among psychologists,
after a few beers, is that the experience of fast time is so rare as
to be nonexistent,” Wearden said.
“You can’t fast-forward time while
you’re still in it.” Time doesn’t fly
when you’re having fun: it’s found
to have flown once the fun is over.
This is an edited excerpt from ‘Why
Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific
Investigation’ by Alan Burdick
(£12.99, Text Publishing)
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i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
The10Best...
Lifestyle
Bedside tables
Chic and traditional, made of plastic, metal or
wood, this handy item of furniture comes in a
bewildering array of styles. Picked by Riya Patel
{1} KARTELL COMPONIBILI
TWO-COMPARTMENT STORAGE
This well-priced design classic
comes in a huge range of colours,
and a choice of two or three
compartments. Plastic specialist
Kartell has used ABS plastic for the
cylindrical body and sliding doors –
there’s nothing fiddly to assemble or
fix over time.
From £72, houseology.com
{2} LA REDOUTE NOTTINGHAM
TWO-TIER BEDSIDE TABLE
The black metal frame on this
double-level bedside table gives it
a clean, modern look. The top shelf
is made of tempered glass, and the
bottom shelf is metal with an epoxy
finish. It’s fairly compact, making it
better suited to smaller bedrooms.
£85, laredoute.co.uk
{3} BLOOMINGVILLE ALBA
SIDE TABLE
Nicely formed with hidden storage.
The top can be lifted off via a discreet
finger slot to reveal a compartment
for books and other items. The body
and three legs are made of MDF
painted in either soft grey or pink.
The drawback of using Alba as a
nightstand, however, is that you have
to clear the surface every time you
want to get inside.
£129, amara.com
{4} VERSAILLES BLACK MANGO
2-DRAWER BEDSIDE TABLE
The Versailles bedside table has the
charm of French period furniture.
The natural wood top contrasts with
a sculpted front and drawers painted
in black. Visible brushwork and aged
brass handles and keyholes are all
designed for an antique effect. It is
made in mango wood and needs a
wax finish for protection.
£209, maisonsdumonde.com
{5} DEBENHAMS WHITE BUCA
BEDSIDE CABINET
The Buca range from Debenhams
aims to be simple, stylish and useful.
The bedside cabinet has two goodsized drawers for hiding essentials,
and is made of MDF with a whitelacquered finish. The solid pine legs
make a nice contrast.
£71.40, debenhams.com
Best
Buy
{6} FRENCH CONNECTION MARBLE
LAPTOP TABLE
If you like to use your laptop in bed,
French Connection’s chic stand is
designed to overlap the bed (or sofa)
and make a level place to perch your
tech. Like all the brand’s homeware,
it has an industrial feel, made of
weighty grey marble on a steel frame.
£95, frenchconnection.com
{7} IKEA GLADOM TRAY TABLE
Built-in drawers make bedside
tables expensive, so if your budget
is tight and you can cope without
the storage, a simple side table such
as Ikea’s does the job well. It has a
removable tray top that is 45cm in
diameter, giving plenty of surface. It
is made of strong but light steel, and
comes powder-coated in a choice of
white, dark green or light yellow.
£20, ikea.com
{8} HABITAT MAX BEDSIDE TABLE
This robust bedside table is made
using durable solid oak and oak
veneer. The Max unit includes an
open shelf and a slatted one with a
push-close mechanism that keeps the
whole design clean and minimal. The
oiled finish and base plinth are nice
touches that raise the quality and
look of the table.
£180, habitat.co.uk
{9} VERY BELLAGIO BEDSIDE TABLE
For some bedside bling, Very’s
Bellagio table has a polished mirrorfront and jewel-effect handles.
The two drawers are handy, a good
size, and fitted with easy-glide
runners. The veneer finish on the
particleboard isn’t the best, but
decent for the price.
£69, very.co.uk
{10} ERCOL TERAMO
BEDSIDE TABLE
The most expensive table on the
list is also the best crafted – British
firm Ercol has been making wood
furniture since 1920. The Teramo is
simple but has a beautiful natural
finish to the solid oak and veneer
panels. The tapered legs, curved
underside to the top, and oval handles
are details that feel great to touch.
£330, barkerandstonehouse.co.uk
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37
Arts
‘Nothing
Charlie
says can
appal me’
Without Annabel Jones, ‘Black
Mirror’ wouldn’t exist. She talks to
Gerard Gilbert about the joy of tech
If you’re
staying
in...
BOOKS
Happiness for
Humans
BY P Z REIZIN
Aiden is an AI,
supposed to
reside solely in
a set of servers
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and improve his
conversation
skills with Jen, a
journalist. But Aiden
has escaped to the internet.
The recipe for a disturbing,
dystopian sci-fi novel?
Not a bit of it. This novel
is utterly charming and
funny, part farce, part love
story, part light-hearted
social commentary.
DVD/BLU-RAY
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A sweatdrenched
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a group of
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fatal journey into Bolivia’s
lush wilderness. Daniel
Radcliffe stars.
K
idnappers demand that the
British prime minister do
something unmentionable
with a pig live on television
or a beloved princess will
die. Thus began Charlie
Brooker’s Channel 4 anthology drama
Black Mirror in December 2011 – and
aside from anticipating by four years the
allegation that, as an undergraduate, PM
David Cameron had indeed had porcine
relations, the opening episode was as
attention-grabbing as a punch in the face.
“That was probably the most extreme
one we’ve done, and we started with it,”
chuckles Annabel Jones, Black Mirror’s
executive producer.
“In America the episode is a lot
more divisive because here people had
a perception of Charlie as a satirical
writer. In America, people couldn’t quite
understand what this series could be. And
who could blame them?”
Now, three seasons in, and with a fourth
about to drop on Netflix, which took over
the show in 2015, the true nature of Black
Mirror is much clearer.
“A Twilight Zone for the contemporary
age,” is how Jones puts it. “So whereas The
Twilight Zone [the American anthology
series that ran between 1959 and 1964]
took on the themes of McCarthyism and
psychoanalysis and the space race, we
decided on one of the things that people
are worried about but don’t perhaps
know yet, which is our relationship
with technology.”
And so past episodes have featured
unsettling extrapolations of the subtle
tyranny of online approval ratings,
blackmailing hackers, augmented reality
video games, drones, Twitter trolls and
the habit of filming everything on mobile
phones. “We’ve always tried to hide the
technology so that they don’t feel too scifi,” says Jones. “It was just an opportunity
to have films that were ideas-driven.”
Jones is unusual for a producer in that
she has only ever worked with Brooker,
first on Dead Set, about a zombie outbreak
during the filming of Big Brother, and then
on the various incarnations of Brooker’s
topical Wipe satires and the Brookerscripted Philomena Cunk comedies.
They were brought together 17 years
ago when she was working for Endemol
(now Endemol Shine), the independent
production behemoth responsible for Big
Brother and DealorNoDeal. “I was charged
with finding groups of talent who wanted
to set up their own little company under
the Endemol mother ship, and Charlie had
been working as a comedy writer on The
10 O’Clock Show, the Channel 4 late-night
thing that spawned Ricky Gervais and Ali
G,” she says. “We met and there wasn’t
a violent reaction and I ended up sort of
helping run the company.
“We don’t do many shows. We’re both
control freaks, and we want to do them all
ourselves and enjoy them.
“We challenge each other to come up
with the most harrowing stories, and
I think that comes from growing up in
comedy writers’ rooms where the person
who comes up with the worst imaginable
idea is lauded rather than sectioned.
Nothing he can say can appal me.”
Brooker, in turn, has this to say about
Jones: “As anyone who’s spent even five
minutes working on the show will attest,
there’s no way Black Mirror would or could
exist without Annabel. She’s across every
aspect of the show, creatively, practically,
financially, diplomatically, you name it –
super-sharp both creatively and in terms
of the nuts and bolts and everyday politics
of production. And she’s really funny.”
Jones would probably blush at the
compliment. When she gushes about
Brooker’s unquenchable wellspring of
ideas, she adds that she can only say that
because he’s not present.
The creative side of her job, she says,
Annabel Jones
says making each
film different
is ‘liberating’;
below, Arkangel
JONATHAN
PRIME; CHRISTOS
KALOHORIDIS;
NETFLIX
involves a lot of “chat”. “It’s just me and
Charlie either just sitting in a room or on
set or waiting for a Tube and just having a
chat about an observation. And before you
know it, we’re spinning it into ‘What if this
or that happened?’ and we’re just trying to
out-gross each other.
But she and Brooker have their
differences. “Charlie was into a lot more
sci-fi than I was when we took on Black
Mirror, and for me sci-fi felt alien and
aloof. For me our best stories are ones
that rattle around in your brain for days
afterwards – you just can’t shake them.”
It’s a brilliant concept that would be
impossible without an anthology format
– six films with new casts, directors
and locations.
“If you’re watching six films they have to
feel different,” says Jones. “In this series,
we have our first space romp, a love story,
a Scandi-noir thriller, a romcom, and a
survivalist horror … When you are a series
of six films you do need to give them their
own visual identity.”
Which is why the new season was
filmed in starkly different locations,
including America, Britain and Iceland,
and one (Metalhead, in which Maxine
NEWS
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VOICES
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TV
32-33
Black Mirror Season 4
Ones to watch
ARKANGEL
After nearly losing her daughter, a
mother invests in an implant that
allows her to keep track of the child.
But what happens when the girl hits
adolescence? “A device that tracks your
child is surely a good thing,” says Jones.
“We take what’s initially a good idea
and then extrapolate and see where it
might lead to.”
HANG THE DJ
Georgina Campbell plays a singleton
who joins a new dating app that preordains the length the of any relationship it brokers. “Charlie and I were on
set and talking like old people. ‘What
must it be like to date today?... It must
be horrible’,” says Jones. “With apps
like Tinder you can have immediate
numerous dates and you can see who
else is available – how do you ever
settle down?”
CROCODILE (below)
Filmed in Iceland, Andrea Riseborough
plays a successful architect with a
criminal past. Will a memory machine
catch her out? “The unforgiving
Icelandic terrain lent itself to that film,”
says Jones. “We were looking for somewhere that would emphasise her isolation and the sense that she was being
hunted down.”
BLACK MUSEUM
Douglas Hodge plays the curator of
a museum whose artefacts all tell a
different criminal story. “It’s a classic
portmanteau movie from the 1940s
and 50s,” explains Jones. “A popcorn
story, and we were slightly indulging
ourselves but also an opportunity to
rebuild on other ideas we’d explored.”
For me,
our best
stories
are ones
that rattle
around in
your brain
for days
afterwards
Peake is chased by a robot dog) is in black
and white.
“There’s a good reason why people
don’t do anthologies, and that’s because
they’re absolutely crushing logistically,”
says Jones. “And the scale of some of the
films we’re talking about – they are British
movies and we’re trying to do six of these
in one go, and it’s just me and Charlie.”
The budget, she adds, is generous
though less munificent than The Crown’s,
but the crazy logistics of making Black
Mirror have their payoff artistically.
“It’s very liberating,” she says.
“Sometimes when you’re doing a longrunning series you have to abandon a lot of
ideas, whereas we can take that idea and
embrace it and then blow it up within one
hour of TV. On the other hand, it means
you get through lots of ideas.”
And unlike a conventional, five-season
drama there is no pressure to build the
production around a big-name actor,
Black Mirror employing a wonderfully
diverse array of talented actors, many
of them up-and-coming. The new season
includes Chewing Gum’s Michaela Coel
and Georgina Campbell (Murdered by My
Boyfriend), along with the internationally
established Douglas Hodge and Andrea
Riseborough. In fact, the starriest name
in season 4 is Jodie Foster – except she’s
behind the camera, directing an episode
called Arkangel.
“Jodie has directed a few things for
Netflix… episodes of House of Cards and
Orange Is the New Black… and she has a
very good relationship with them,” says
Jones. “She’s very selective in her work
because she has a family and doesn’t want
to be away from home and she said she
was looking for something different.”
Arkangel is different but almost
archetypal Black Mirror, with its tale of
over-protective parenting and technology
going wrong.”
Watching Black Mirror, it might be
tempting to conclude that Jones and
Brooker are technophobic. “It would
be impossible to make the show if we
were technophobes,” replies Jones.
“The technology we use is nearly always
enabling. What we explore is what can
go wrong when human frailty comes into
the equation.”
Season 4 of ‘Black Mirror’ is on Netflix
from tomorrow
IQ
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BUSINESS SPORT
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28 DECEMBER 2017
39
Last night’s
g
television
BERNADETTE MCNULTY
Seriously, why has
nobody ever killed
Alan Partridge?
» Alan Partridge: Why, When, Where, How and Whom?BBC2, 9pm
» Miranda Does Christmas Channel 4, 9pm
I
f you are feeling as overstuffed on seasonal jollity as
you are on pigs in blankets
then, surprisingly, this Alan
Partridge documentary might be
just in order. The fictional comedy
character first appeared in 1991
on the Radio 4 satirical news show
On the Hour. This year, the Radio
Norwich presenter will return
to the BBC where he first broke
through as a solo star on 1994’s
Knowing Me, Knowing You.
For a comedy character not just
to survive but indeed thrive and
grow in popularity over more than
a quarter of a century is quite an
achievement. Rowan Atkinson’s Mr
Bean, which started in 1991, only
lasted five years. Basil Fawlty’s
entire reputation rests upon six
hours of Fawlty Towers. David
Brent lasted two series of The Office
before Ricky Gervais needed to
take a 10-year break, and Ali G, who
lasted four years, is unlikely to be
seen again. All these characters
have outlasted their dramatic
existence. More so, they have
often loomed over their creator’s
careers, leading to most of them
having to be “killed off”.
It’s hard to know what Steve
Coogan actually makes of the
Frankenstein’s monster he, along
with Armando Iannucci, Patrick
Marber, Rebecca Front, David
Schneider and Chris Morris
conjured up to fill their sketch
Partridge taps
into everything from
Brexit Britain to the
rise of narcissism
show. All appear on the rather
serious consideration of the
phenomenon Alan Partridge: Why,
When, Where, How and Whom?
While all these names have
become comedy heavyweights,
you feel there is some measure of
revenge for Coogan, who felt like
an outsider among the group of
Oxbridge insiders. They were all
at the vanguard of shaping a new
comedy that parodied the media,
pushed irony to the forefront, and
created a humour of discomfort
and alienation.
Partridge was the desperate
man stuck in an old-fashioned
world of catchphrases and
casual sexism. But even while it
mocked the old school, it was the
old-fashioned catchphrases like
“A-ha” and “back of the net” that
elevated Partridge to the position
of alternative national treasure.
‘Alternative national treasure’:
Steve Coogan as Alan Partridge
The key to Partridge’s survival,
Coogan reveals, is how extensively
he continues to think through his
biography; how consistent he has
been to this fiction; but also, and
probably most critically, his ability
to adapt and change the character,
and the writing team behind him.
Partridge in 1991 started off
as caricature of a media figure;
in 2017, he taps into everything
from Brexit Britain to the rise
of narcissism in the age of social
media. You can’t imagine he’d
have survived 2017 without
being implicated in a few sexual
harassment cases.
Sadly, Coogan doesn’t really open
up that much, especially not about
his own excesses when Partridge
made him into a household name in
the 1990s. It would also have been
fascinating to see him discuss what
it is like to not be able to escape
your own comic monster with the
likes of Gervais or Sacha Baron
Cohen. It’s hard to know whose ego
stopped that.
By contrast, Miranda Hart’s
success over the past 10 years has
been built on her apparent lack of
ego and old-fashioned willingness
to make a bit of a prat of herself.
The lines have always been blurred,
Seinfeld-like, between the writer
and her sitcom character, which
is perhaps why Hart has spent the
last few years portraying other
characters on stage and on screen.
She might need a longer break
though if her one-off chat show,
Miranda does Christmas, is
anything to go by. Relocated to
Channel 4, the jolliness with guests
like Prue Leith and Sam Smith felt
as tired as an old cracker joke.
Twitter: @little_aloha
40
Laura Main as Princess
Fiona and Steffan Harri
as Shrek in a near-perfect
panto for our time
Arts
HELEN MAYBANKS
Arts
reviews
THEATRE
Shrek the Musical
PLAYHOUSE, EDINBURGH
HHHHH
If you’re in search of a good family
pantomime – one that offers a few
hours of fairytale festive fun for
both children and adults – then
this is a delicious touring version
of the story of Shrek, first seen
on screen in 2001, in one of the
best-loved animated movies of the
century so far.
Shrek, as all his fans know,
is a grumpy green ogre with a
Scottish accent who lives in a
swamp and generally prefers
his own company. He’s therefore
not your typical fairytale prince;
and when he sets off with his best
friend, a camp talking donkey, to
collect a bride for the nasty, short
and bossy Lord Farquaad, he soon
discovers that Farquaad’s chosen
bride, Fiona, is also not quite
the conventional, wasp-waisted
Disney princess.
Cue a merry and surprisingly
romantic subversion of
stereotypes about love and
beauty, driven by two fine central
performances from Steffan Harri
as Shrek and Laura Main (of Call
The Midwife) as Fiona. Shrek is a
story full of echoes of other great
legends, from the relationship
between Lancelot and Guinevere
that springs up when he is sent to
escort her to King Arthur, to the
division between court and forest
(or court and swamp) that runs
through Shakespeare’s comedies.
Designer Tim Hatley has
created a cartoon-style grey
castle for Samuel Holmes’s pintsized, hilariously self-satirising
Lord Farquaad, staffed by clonelike marching pages in militant
red, white, blue and yellow, while
Shrek and Fiona’s world is all soft
greens and browns, with leaves
twirling everywhere.
Many of the songs – by David
Lindsay-Abaire and Jeanine
Tesori – are hilarious, particularly
when Farquaad gets round
to confessing his short-arsed
parentage; the big numbers seem
less self-indulgent and more
tightly linked to the narrative than
when this show first played in
Scotland three years ago.
Add a spectacular singing
dragon, a dramatic stop-thewedding final scene, and a heroine
who finally finds happiness as a
chubby ogress with Shrek ears,
and you have a near-perfect panto
for our time.
It sends up the overmighty,
sings and dances up a storm, has
plenty of fun and, in the end, it
believes in love – even for those
of us who are a touch green, and a
little overweight.
To 7 January (0844 871 3014);
then touring to 6 January 2019
(shrekthemusical.co.uk)
JOYCE MCMILLAN
VISUAL ARTS
Turner Prize
FERENS GALLERY, HULL
A free exhibition of the four
shortlisted artists for the
£25,000 prize. This is the first
year that older artists have been
considered, with a list including
two over the age of 50: British
painter Hurvin Anderson is 52,
while Lubaina Himid, this year’s
winner, who was born in Zanzibar,
is 62. Andrea Buttner and
Rosalind Nashashibi are in their
forties. (01482 300 300) to 7 Jan
Impressionists In London,
French Artists in Exile
(1870-1904)
TATE BRITAIN, LONDON SW1
The first exhibition to map the
connections between French
and British artists, patrons and
art dealers during the FrancoPrussian war and afterwards.
The experience of artists such as
Monet, Tissot, Pissarro, Dalou,
Sisley and Legros in London and
the friendships that developed
influenced their own work but
also contributed to the British art
scene. (020 7887 8888) to 7 May
Soutine’s Portraits: Cooks,
Waiters and Bellboys
COURTAULD GALLERY, LONDON WC2
This show brings together an
outstanding group of pieces by
Chaïm Soutine, one of the leading
painters in interwar Paris. In
the early 1920s, Soutine became
fascinated by the cooks and
waiting staff of French hotels
and restaurants, attired in boldly
coloured uniforms, who sat for
him in Paris and the south of
France. (020 7848 1194) to 21 Jan
FILM
Star Wars: the Last Jedi
COMEDY
Nine Lessons
and Carols for
Godless People
CONWAY HALL, LONDON
HHHHH
Put comedy and science in a test
tube and you get this. Comedian
Robin Ince’s annual celebration
of ideas is eclectic, enjoyable and
truly epic.
Physicist Helen Czerski
introduced the first course
of mind-boggling professors,
doctors and entertainers,
including mathematician Katie
Steckles revealing how images of
snowflakes are often incorrect.
Assorted stand-ups offered
palate-cleansing laughs. John-Luke
Roberts improvised opposites
to Smiths songs, Arnold Brown
confirmed his offbeat modesty: “I
enjoy using the comedy technique
of self-deprecation. But I’m not
very good at it.”
Ince eventually arrived and
explained that an electrode
experiment had momentarily
removed his inner monologue. As
the marathon show approached
four hours one did wonder
if it could limit his exterior
monologue too.
BRUCE DESSAU
EVENING STANDARD
12A, RIAN JOHNSON, 152 MINS
POP
Writer-director Rian Johnson, a
new recruit to the franchise, has
a monumental task with Episode
VIII, and he has risen to the
challenge, having great fun with
the hardware in the George Lucas
toybox and also handling a multistranded narrative with dexterity.
It’s a bit overblown, cheesy and
cod-mystical, but like all the best
Star Wars films, it has a sense
of fun, energy and fantastical
creation. Nationwide release
The Prodigy
ACADEMY, GLASGOW
HHHHH
There is a pumped-up aggression
coursing through a Prodigy show,
which can be a blessing and a
curse. The charged energy which
circulates between band and
audience makes them the ideal
band to blow off steam to – the
capacity crowd at this sweaty
show were with them all the way.
But the relentless son et
lumiere barrage from their
bruising marriage of hardcore
techno and punk rock can wear
thin, like a repeated sock in the
jaw. And there is no truck with
ballads or acoustic interludes
during which to catch your breath.
The Prodigy’s development
over the last three decades is not
unlike the trajectory of their gigs.
They started out in a rave frenzy –
as exemplified here by “Everybody
In the Place” with its jabbering
electro hook and crashing drums,
and a frenetic tooled-up encore
rendition of “No Good (Start
the Dance)”, which was at times
closer to speed metal than happy
hardcore – then simply ramped
up the rock influence and dug in
their heels for the long haul.
New track “Resonate” stuck to
the trusty formula – hysterical
Mountains May Depart
12A, JIA ZHANGKE, 123 MINS
Keith Flint flexed
his muscles all over
‘Firestarter’ and
other mid-90s rave
rock classics
CHUNG SUNG-JUN/
GETTY IMAGES
Jia Zhangke’s film might best be
described as an intimate epic,
combining family melodrama with
a probing analysis of changing
times in contemporary China and
unfolding over three decades. It
opens in 1999 and centres on a
dance instructor (played by the
director’s partner, Zhao Tao) – a
seemingly carefree young woman
living in a fast-changing provincial
town. Limited release
Menashe
U, JOSHUA Z WEINSTEIN, 82 MINS
techno backdrop, propulsive
skittering beat, speeded-up vocal
samples and blaring interjections
from Maxim.
Meanwhile, fellow frontman
Keith Flint flexed his muscles
all over “Firestarter” and other
mid-90s rave rock classics,
keeping something in reserve for
mighty metallic encore number
“Their Law”, which generated the
biggest mosh pit of an already
wild night.
FIONA SHEPHERD
Menashe is a rough gem of a
film, a small-scale but delicately
observed and quietly funny
Yiddish-language drama about
the tribulations of a Hasidic
Jewish widower in Brooklyn.
The film is reportedly inspired
by the real life of its Hasidic star,
NEWS
2-31
Arts
ROYAL ALBERT HALL, LONDON SW7
Birmingham Royal Ballet’s
much-loved production comes
to London, with shiny new stage
magic to fill the Royal Albert
Hall. 59 Productions add new
projections, while Simon
Callow voices the narration.
(020 7589 8212) to Sun
THE CULTURAL HIGHLIGHTS
YOU HAVE TO SEE
The Disaster Artist
15, JAMES FRANCO, 103 MINS
It’s a nice irony that the making
of one of the worst movies in
recent history has enabled James
Franco to make one of the best
films in his own chequered career.
Franco directs and also stars as
Tommy Wiseau, the auteur behind
the sublimely awful The Room
(2003). Tommy’s performance is
ludicrous. He can’t remember the
lines he himself wrote – and yet, in
his own warped way, as an artist
who doesn’t give up, he does have
integrity. Nationwide release
COMEDY
Spencer Jones
SOHO THEATRE, LONDON W1
The Audition is ostensibly about
Spencer Jones trying out for a
Steven Spielberg robot movie,
but expect something a little
more off-beam than that – namely,
supremely dorky clowning and
brilliantly daft prop comedy.
(020 7478 0100) to Sat
The Showstoppers’
Christmas Kids Show
LEICESTER SQUARE, LONDON WC2
The Showstoppers are an insanely
talented improv gang who knock
JAZZ
together new musicals based
purely on audience suggestions.
Here, in a whopping great
spiegeltent in the heart of the
West End, the kids are in charge.
(christmasinleicestersquare.com)
to Sat
Natalie Palamides
SOHO THEATRE, LONDON W1
This year’s Edinburgh
Best Newcomer brings her
extraordinary Laid – in which
countless eggs are messily
sacrificed on stage in a clownish,
surrealist show about parenthood
– to Soho. (020 7478 0100) to Sat
Jeff Garlin
SOHO THEATRE, LONDON W1
Jeff Garlin takes a break from
being hectored as Larry David’s
manager in Curb Your Enthusiasm
by hopping across the pond for
some crowd-pleasing stand-up.
(020 7478 0100) to Sat
DANCE
Cinderella
SADLER’S WELLS, LONDON EC1
Matthew Bourne reimagines
the fairy tale as a wartime
romance. The prince becomes
a dashing pilot searching for
Cinderella through the rubble of
the Blitz, with swirling fantasy
from Prokofiev’s score and Lez
Brotherston’s brilliant designs.
(020 7863 8000) to 27 Jan
TV
32-33
The Nutcracker
agenda
Menashe Lustig, who gives a
wonderful performance as the
well-intentioned but bumbling and
chaotic father. Limited release
VOICES
16-20
Vimala Rowe and
John Etheridge
THE VORTEX, LONDON N16
The virtuosic fusion guitarist John
Etheridge first teamed up with
young singer Vimala Rowe for
their 2016 album, Out of the Sky.
They bring its mix of Aramaic
prayers and east African ballads,
as well as cuts from the likes of
Ellington and Bird, to the Vortex.
(020 7254 4097) tonight
THEATRE
An American in Paris
DOMINION THEATRE, LONDON W1
Christopher Wheeldon’s staging
is a whirl of colour and imagery, a
fantasy Paris rooted to a specific
historical moment. Based on
the 1951 film, the stage musical
reframes the romance as a dream
of post-war optimism, while
dancing through the wonders
of the Gershwin back catalogue.
Wheeldon, a ballet choreographer
who made his Broadway directing
debut with this production, puts
dance at the heart of the staging.
(0845 200 7982) to 6 Jan
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
his Roman duty. Byrne makes
him a no-nonsense warrior and
pleasure-seeker, beguiled by
Josette Simon’s magnificent,
mercurial Cleopatra. Add to
this the constant, gripping
quality of a political thriller
and the RSC has a palpable hit.
(020 7638 8891) to 20 Jan
The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe
WEST YORKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE, LEEDS
CS Lewis’s muscular Christian
symbolism and brooding Norse
imagery jostle with the occasional
moment of pantomime in Sally
Cookson’s in-the-round staging,
which uses puppets, aerial
performers and live music to
create a convincing snowbound
Narnia. (0113 213 770) to 27 Jan
Mamma Mia!
THEATRE ROYAL, GLASGOW
The latest touring version of
Phyllida Lloyd’s production of
the great Abba tribute musical
looks as fast-moving and brilliant
as ever. As scripted by Catherine
Johnson, it’s the absolute queen of
jukebox shows, and the one that
demonstrates just how it should
be done. (atgtickets.com) to Sat
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
41
First
Chance
Opening
next month
THEATRE
Mary Stuart
DUKE OF YORK’S, LONDON WC2
A transfer of Robert Icke’s cracking
Almeida production of Schiller.
(0845 505 8500) opens 13 Jan
VISUAL ARTS
William Blake in Sussex:
Visions of Albion
PETWORTH HOUSE AND PARK
Work from the artist’s three years
living in Sussex between 1800 and
1803. (nationaltrust.org.uk) opens 13 Jan
FOLK & ROOTS
Celtic Connections
VARIOUS VENUES, GLASGOW
The festival kicks off with a 25th
anniversary concert featuring Sharon
Shannon. (0141 353 8000) opens 18 Jan
IPA_2017-12-25_Thei-South-Thu_20x3 (1)_Omega RT
Travel Offer
8 Days
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MadeiraPearloftheAtlantic
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Antony and Cleopatra
from
714pp
BARBICAN THEATRE, LONDON EC2
Iqbal Khan offers a fluid and
confident reading that takes
its time to establish, crucially,
the luxury and opulence of
Cleopatra’s court that has lured
Antony (Antony Byrne) from
If you only see
one thing today
VISUAL ARTS
Tove Jansson
(1914-2001)
DULWICH PICTURE GALLERY, LONDON SE21
See the Moomin creator Tove
Jansson in a different light, with
a survey of her work as a painter.
Her legacy as an illustrator and
author is formidable, but her true
passion was fine art and she created
some astonishing paintings. Her
self-portraits are regal and poised,
and her landscape paintings are
an evocative portrayal of her home
country of Finland. The exhibition
includes Lynx Boa (Self-Portrait) from
1942 (left). (020 8693 5254) to 28 Jan
Madeira
Pearl of the Atlantic
Departing Monday 19 Mar
from Gatwick (LGW)
Price Includes...
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7 nights all inclusive at the Hotel Raga, Funchal (breakfast,
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Business
Quote of
the day
Managers are
battening down
the hatches,
prioritising
controlling costs
over investing
in development,
particularly in
their staff
Petra Wilton
The Chartered
Management Institute’s
director of strategy
Business Editor Elizabeth Anderson
+4420 7361 5718
business@inews.co.uk
WEALTH
Bezos is top
answer to the
billion-dollar
question in 2017
By Josie Cox
The richest people on the planet
have added $1trn (£746bn) to their
collective wealth in 2017 – more than
four times the previous year’s gains
– thanks to a surge in stock markets.
The Bloomberg Billionaires
Index showed the 500 wealthiest
individuals increased their fortunes
by 23 per cent over the past year,
helped by a near-20 per cent rise in
the benchmark MSCI World Index
and the S&P 500.
The Amazon boss, Jeff Bezos,
enjoyed the greatest jump as his
wealth surged by $34.2bn (£25.5bn),
acco rd i n g t o B l o o m b e rg, a n
achievement that in the autumn
helped him to leapfrog Microsoft’s
co-founder, Bill Gates, to become the
world’s richest person.
Mr Bezos’s wealth is now estimated
to be a fraction below $100bn.
Shares in Amazon, of which Mr
Bezos still owns a large chunk, have
surged by around 50 per cent over
the past 12 months, to well over
$1,000 apiece.
Bloomberg said that by the time
stock markets closed in the US on
26 December, the world’s 500 richest
people controlled a total of $5.3trn,
which was up from around $4.4trn at
the same point in 2016.
Mr Gates, in second place, has
been donating a significant chunk of
his fortune in the past few years. In
August he made a $4.6bn pledge to
the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
Veteran financier Warren Buffett
is listed by Bloomberg as the world’s
third-richest person, with an
estimated wealth of around $85bn,
ahead of Spanish business tycoon
Amancio Ortega, at $75.5bn, and the
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg
at $72.6bn.
“It’s part of the second-most robust
and second-longest bull market
in history,” said Mike Ryan, chief
investment officer for the Americas
at UBS Wealth Management.
“Of all the guidance we gave
people over the course of this year,
the most important advice was
staying invested.”
By country, Bloomberg said
that Chinese billionaires made the
greatest gains in 2017.
Among the greatest losers this year
was the French telecommunications
billionaire Patrick Drahi, whose
wealth fell by $4.1bn to $6.3bn – a
39 per cent drop, according to the
published figures.
Bloomberg’s Billionaires Index is
a ranking of the world’s 500 richest
people, and the list is updated daily.
There are 159 billionaires on the
index who are based in the US.
Their collective fortune has risen
by 18 per cent this year to $2trn.
THE INDEPENDENT
The number of Asian
billionaires has overtaken
those in the US for the first time,
according to a report by UBS last
month. A new Asian billionaire
was created every two days
in 2016.
Business in brief
RETAILING
ENERGY
SERVICES
BANKING
Boxing Day quieter
for shops than 2016
Forties Pipeline
partially reopens
Office space group
rises on buyout talk
’Tis the season to
apply for a mortgage
Footfall in shops on
Boxing Day was 4.5
per cent lower than the
same day a year ago,
figures show. Market
research firm Springboard said it
was the most challenging Boxing
Day that bricks-and-mortar stores
have seen since 2012, when it started
compiling the figures. High streets
and shopping centres suffered
more than retail parks. The weaker
footfall was probably the result of
extensive discounting that took
place on Black Friday at the end
of November. The figures are in
contrast to a report yesterday that
predicted record takings on the high
street on Boxing Day.
The Forties Pipeline, which
carries 40 per cent of North Sea oil
and gas, has partially reopened.
A hairline crack was found
during a routine inspection south
of Aberdeen in early December,
leading to the shutdown.
Operator Ineos said the repair
is complete and the pipeline is
expected to fully reopen in the
new year. The 235-mile Forties
Pipeline System links 85
North Sea oil and gas fields to
the UK mainland and the Ineos
site in Grangemouth.
In 2016, the pipeline’s average
daily throughput was 445,000
barrels of oil and some 3,500
tonnes of raw gas a day.
Shares in International Workplace
Group (IWG) soared by 27 per
cent after the office space group
confirmed a takeover approach.
IWG, which operates brands
including Regus and Open
Office, has been approached by
Brookfield Asset Management
and Canadian private equity
firm Onex with a “possible
cash offer”.
The amount was not disclosed.
Brookfield and Onex have until
20 January to put forward a firm
offer. IWG stressed “there can be no
certainty that any offer will be made
for the company”.
Shares rose 27.1 per cent, or 54p,
to 254.4p.
One in 20 online
banking customers
with Santander
UK logged in on
Christmas Day.
Around 5 per cent of the
bank’s online customers logged
into their accounts, with activity
peaking between 10am and noon
– with some perhaps checking
the impact of their Christmas
shopping on their balances.
Meanwhile, 13 people applied
for a mortgage with Santander
on either Christmas Day or
Boxing Day. The bank said while
most applications were for
re-mortgages, there were also a
couple from first-time buyers.
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
GETTY
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
43
OIL
INTERNET
Royal Dutch
Shell’s boost
from Trump
tax reforms
SMEs set to benefit
from e-commerce
By Holly Williams
Amazon’s Jeff
Bezos is now
worth $34.2bn
IQ
34-41
Royal Dutch Shell has said President
Donald Trump’s US tax reforms will
boost the business.
The oil company said the changes
from 1 January – which include plans
to slash US corporation tax from 35
per cent to 21 per cent – are expected
to be “favourable” for the group but
will affect its fourth-quarter results.
It will announce the full impact as
part of its fourth-quarter and fullyear results on 1 February.
But it said that, based on its
third-quarter earnings, the tax reforms will mean it takes a charge of
$2bn (£1.5bn) to $2.5bn due to a remeasurement of its deferred tax position to reflect the lower corporate
tax rate.
Barclays also announced its expected impact from the new tax laws,
saying it is set to take a £1bn charge to
its 2017 accounts.
However, like Shell, it said the
overall tax cut is likely to “positively
impact” its future earnings, although
it added that the ultimate impact will
also depend on the “effect of other
complex provisions in the Act”.
President Trump signed the
$1.5trn tax overhaul into law on 22
December, cutting tax rates for businesses and also offering some temporary cuts for some individuals and
families. He has said his sweeping reforms will act as an economic rejuvenator and claimed that the steep cuts
in the corporate tax rate will invigorate the economy.
Hopes of a boost from the US tax
reforms act as a further fillip for Shell
after it recently announced it was restoring its cash dividends after more
than two years.
Brent crude prices continue to
hold above $60 a barrel, having fallen
as low as $27.26 in January.
By Kalyeena Makortoff
Britain’s small and medium-sized
businesses could see higher sales
next year if they follow through with
plans to expand online in 2018, a report has claimed.
The number of small and
medium-sized enterprises
(SMEs) trading online is
set to rise to 88 per cent
over the next 12 months,
compared to the 64 per
cent that currently take
advantage of e-commerce,
according to a report by
Capital Economics and commissioned by Amazon.
A growing number plan to offer
online sales via their own websites
next year, up from 50 per cent this
year to 68 per cent by the end of 2018,
while a growing number of SMEs
plan to increase the use of their own
mobile apps to boost trade, up from
13 per cent to 24 per cent.
Meanwhile, the number of firms
looking to sell through third-party
platforms is set to increase from
21 per cent to 27 per cent.
Firms that embrace ecommerce expect faster
revenue and jobs growth
over 2018, with online retail adopters expecting a
1.9 per cent rise in sales
compared to 0.6 per cent
among firms that do not.
However, challenges remain for all retailers. “Our
thermometer of SME confidence
remains below zero, with owners
still seeing a lot of headwinds in
the economy,” said Mark Pragnell
(pictured), chief economist at Capital Economics.
IPA_2017-12-25_Thei-South-Thu_20x3 (2)_Omega RT
Travel Offer
4 Days
Self-Drive
£
only
279pp
Matilda
Evening Show
ECONOMY
Buoyant end to year, but
slow start to 2018 likely
By Kalyeena Makortoff
Growth across the private sector
picked up in the final months of the
year, but businesses are expected
to suffer a slowdown at the start of
the new year.
A survey of manufacturing, service and distribution sector firms by
the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) showed a notable rise in
the number of businesses reporting higher output over the three
months to December, at a balance
of 19 per cent.
That is compared with a balance
of 6 per cent for the three months
to November.
The CBI survey, which gath-
ered views from 642 respondents,
said growth over the period was
“broad-based”, with participants
in all sectors reporting “robust” output volume
growth at a pace that
was above their longrun averages.
Total order books
in the manufacturing
sector were among the
strongest since August
1988, while the distribution sector reported accelerated growth in wholesale.
Services benefited from a pickup in the professional and business services industry after three
months of no growth, as well as a
recovery in consumer services volumes following a sharp drop in the
three months to November.
But the CBI said all three sectors
are unlikely to keep up the pace
into 2018. Private-sector growth
is expected to return to a “more
moribund pace” over the coming
three months, with a balance of just
4 per cent of firms forecasting higher output.
Anna Leach (inset),
head of economic intelligence at the CBI,
said: “Private sector
firms are enjoying
healthy activity levels
as we approach the
year end, but mediocre
expectations for growth
underline the ongoing challenges facing companies.
“Persistent cost pressures will
ensure that inflation remains at a
high level.”
Departing Friday 26 Jan
Price Includes...
3 nights B&B at the Tower Hotel, London
Matilda theatre ticket – Upper Circle (evening performance)
Free time in London
Omega Holidays cannot be held responsible for the non-appearance of a particular actor/actress; no refunds will be given
in this event. Whilst we always try to ensure that parties are seated together, very occasionally, it may be necessary for
parties to be split. Couples are always seated together. Tours offered subject to availability. Errors and omissions
excepted. Prices shown are per person, based on two people sharing a dbl/twin room. Single supplements apply.
For more information or to book, please call:
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Quote
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otherwise standard rates apply.
ieat
Games&Puzzles
daily recipe
Crisp tikka fish with
crushed minty peas
Kakuro
Zygolex® In i every day
How to play Fill the white squares so that the total in each
across or down run of cells matches the total at the start
of that run. You must use the numbers from 1-9 only and
cannot repeat a number in a run. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
Find the missing words by following the RHYME, LETTERS and MEANING links
– eg, a word that rhymes with ‘cheek’, has one letter different from ‘pear’ and
has the same meaning as mountain, would be ‘peak’. Full rules at zygolex.com.
Solution, page 49
RHYME LETTERS
16
26
16
30
11
HEAT
8
9
24
12
BEAN
31
4
10
UT
ES
16
4
PORE
4
4
M
IN
4
20
14
26
25
19
31
5
BLOG
14
17
16
24
4
16
5
1 4
8
7
3
8 2
7
1
5
6
Killer Sudoku No 1170
How to play Each row, column and 3 by 3 box must contain
each number (1 to 9) only once. The sum of all numbers
contained in a dotted area must match the number printed
in its top-left corner. No number can appear more than
once in a dotted area. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
15
13
8
8
5
12
12
15
7
11
7
10
6
10
15
1
0
1 2
0
9
11
17
11
7
7
1
2
3 3
4
8
17
7
11
2
>
∨
1
0
0
3
3
3
3
2
5 4
3
4
2 2 2
0
0 1
3
2
9
4
∧
2 <
∧
> 3
4
∨
∧
>
>
∧
∧
∧
1
13
12
>
How to play Find all the mines in the grid. Numbers in certain squares indicate how
many mines there are in the neighbouring squares, including diagonally touching
squares. Mines cannot be placed in squares with numbers. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
6
4
17
16
✂
12
MEANING
Minesweeper
11
7
11
14
BOUNTY
LETTERS
Futoshiki
4
2
LASS
How to play
Place the numbers
from 1-5 exactly
once in each row
and column. The
greater than and
less than signs
(‘>’ and ‘<’) indicate
where one cell is
greater/less than
the adjacent
cell indicated.
Solution:
minurl.co.uk/i
LEASE
COUNTS
RHYME
3
10
6
GILL
4
Tomorrow
One-pot cod with peppers,
tomatoes and potatoes
HARE
4
4
How to play Place the numbers 1-9 once in each row, column
and bold-lined jigsaw region. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
5
5
4
Jigsawdoku
9
5
4
DIRT
ACHE
Recipe from waitrose.com
SNORT
4
5
11
8
Cook’s tip
Wrap the remaining mint in damp
kitchen paper, pop into a freezer bag and
place in the fridge. It will help it keep
for longer.
4
16
18
SERVES 4
Put the peas into a pan with four
tablespoons of water. Set over a high
heat, cover and cook for five minutes or
until defrosted and tender. Meanwhile,
in a processor, whizz the bread with two
teaspoons of curry paste to make even
crumbs. Spread over a plate. On another
plate, mix together the yogurt and
remaining curry paste.
Dust each fish fillet with flour. Coat in
the yogurt, then the crumbs.
Heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan
then cook for two minutes on each side,
pressing the fish down occasionally with
the fish slice as it fries.
Add the mint and a squeeze of lemon
to the peas, mash to make a chunky
purée, then season. Serve with the fish,
a spoonful of yogurt and more lemon
for squeezing.
DRIES
LUMP
7
600g frozen garden peas
1 submarine roll, roughly torn
1 tbsp tikka masala curry paste
75g Greek-style yogurt, plus extra
to serve
4 frozen pollock fillets, defrosted
and patted dry
2 tbsp plain flour
1 tbsp vegetable or sunflower oil
¼ x 25g pack mint, leaves only, shredded
1 lemon, cut into wedges
CLEVER
3
23
17
MEANING
14
3
2 3 2
1
2
3 3
2
1
2
2
1
0
4
1 1
2
4
2
2
3
2
4 2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
Maths Puzzle
Codeword No 1891
How to play Fill the empty squares with
numbers that will make the across and
down calculations produce the results
shown in the grey squares. Each numeral
from 1 to 9 must only appear once. The
calculations should be performed from
left to right and top to bottom, rather than
in strict mathematical order.
How to play The numbers in the grid correspond to the letters of the alphabet.
Solve the puzzle and fill in the letters in the key as you discover them.
Three letters are provided to give you a start. The solution will be printed in
tomorrow’s paper, the solution to yesterday’s codeword is on page 49.
21
17
Easier
+
x
1
+
+
+
x
+
144
20
5
5
6
21
16
21
x
-
-9
-10
x
-
x
-
-
21
24
19
17
19
2
23
19
9
1
8
22
26
21
14
22
19
8
7
19
9
4
26
20
26
2
12
14
4
6
10
21
23
9
23
20
1
7
14
20
9
7
26
14
13
5
24
4
4
10
26
3
4
TWIN
16
4
9
20
9
17
8
24
26
4
26
26
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
4
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
64
V
19
SHAM
RUBY
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
x
Need a little help getting started? Then call for up to four extra clue letters on
0901 292 5204. Calls cost £1 plus your telephone company’s network access charge
(if you are having trouble with the phone service, call the helpline: 0333 202 3390).
Or text THEI CLUE to 85100 to receive your clues. Texts cost £1 plus your
standard network charge (if you are having trouble with the text service, call the
helpline: 0333 335 3351). Clues change each day at midnight.
-1
9
DOWN
1 Two-faced (12)
2 Choosy
(Informal) (5)
3 Attractive person
(Informal) (6)
4 Box (5)
5 Zodiac sign (7)
6 Hat (6)
7 Violation (12)
12 Corpse (7)
14 Scottish dish (6)
15 Airless (6)
17 Relations
(Informal) (5)
18 Beast (5)
1
2
ALL NEW PUZZLES
The i Book of Puzzles Vol 2
Our second book of
mixed puzzles, including
codewords, word wheels,
crosswords, bridges, wijukos
and minesweepers, is
available now on Amazon for
£4.99. See inews.co.uk/puzzle2
Other i books include:
Codewords (inews.co.uk/codeword),
Crosswords (inews.co.uk/crossword)
and Sudokus (inews.co.uk/sudoku)
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
GOES
11
Maths Puzzle,
Word Ladder, Word
Wheel, Kakuro,
Minesweeper,
ABC Logic, Killer
Sudoku, Futoshiki,
Codeword,
Jigsawduko and
Wijuko created by
Clarity Media.
For more
puzzles,
see clarity-media.
co.uk
12
13
14
Terms &
Conditions
15
16
Stuck on the concise crossword?
For today’s solutions, call 0905 789 3590.
Calls cost 80p per minute plus your network
access charge. If you are having trouble
accessing this number, please call our helpdesk
on 0333 202 3390.
3
17
19
18
20
21
22
Solution to yesterday’s Concise Crossword
ACROSS 1 Great, 4 Full (Grateful), 8 Treason, 9 Orate, 10 Gill, 11 Pedestal,
13 Man of the cloth, 15 Overleaf, 17 T-bar, 20 Issue, 21 Twin tub, 22 Text, 23 Defer.
DOWN 1 Gremlin, 2 Easy, 3 Tenderhearted, 4 Florence, 5 Least, 6 Stag, 7 Health,
12 Affluent, 13 Myopia, 14 Orbiter, 16 Ensue, 18 Ruby, 19 Tiff.
Today’s other puzzles Cryptic Crossword, page 12;
Five-Clue Cryptic, page 9; One-Minute Wijuko, page 29
Puzzle solutions See page 49 and minurl.co.uk/i
7
3
9 4
5
1 6
7 5
6 7
9 2
8
5 8
9
9
3
7
4
6 5
7
1 6
9
3
9 8
8
3
7
9
1
2 6
1
4
4 8
2
5
2 6
7 1 9
Tomorrow: Harder
Concise Crossword No 2213
ACROSS
1 Intensive
publicity (4)
3 Shoestrings (5)
8 Wind instrument
(7)
9 Decorate (5)
10 Very hot
condiment (7,6)
11 Provoke to
action (6)
13 Cast (6)
16 Unflagging (13)
19 Smithy’s block (5)
20 Flop (7)
21 Hazardous (5)
22 Liability (4)
4
2
8
26
Q
How to play Each numeral from 1 to 9 must
appear (once only) in the squares forming the
red letter i. Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
3 8 4
19
20
idoku Exclusive to i
Sudoku Easier
23
8
G
How to play
Convert the word
at the top of the
ladder into the
word at the bottom
of it, using only
the four rungs
in between. On
each rung, you
must put a valid
four-letter word
that is identical
to the word above
it, apart from a
one-letter change.
There may be more
than one way of
achieving this.
7
15
61
14
20
4
4
4
20
15
9
22
26
22
21
18
7
20
20
4
21
24
20
+
13
8
14
9
17
4
+
x
4
23
4
x
20
21
18
Harder
-3
25
8
-
10
11
25
-
-
8
24
14
Word
Ladder
45
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
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Services, EC1M
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ABC Logic
How to play Place the letters
A, B and C exactly once in each row and
column. Each row and column has two
blank cells. The letters at the edge of a row/
column indicate which of the letters is the
first/last to appear in that row/column.
Solution: minurl.co.uk/i
C
C
A
B
C
A
B
A
B
C
A
B
C
B
Word Wheel
This is an open-ended puzzle. How many
words of three or more letters, each
including the letter at centre of the wheel,
can you make from this diagram? We’ve
found 45, including one nine-letter word.
Can you do better?
O
R
T
E
M
E
E
T
I
46
Weather
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
i racing
top
tips
Ned and Whiskey
Sour capitalise
on others’ errors
By Jon Freeman
RACING EDITOR
Reputations tarnished, pride
wounded and fingers burned. It was
all happening on an afternoon of high
drama at Leopardstown yesterday.
The two Grade One events were
supposed to be stress-free workouts
for Min and Mengli Khan on the way
to sterner tests at the spring festivals, but it didn’t pan out anything
like that way.
It was bad enough for punters
when Willie Mullins’ long odds-on
Min crossed the line first in the
Paddy’s Rewards Club Chase, only
to be thrown out for badly impeding
16-1 outsider Simply Ned, who was
awarded the race after an inquiry.
But that was just the Terry and
June warm-up for the Pulp Fiction
thriller of spills and twists that unfolded in the final reel of the Future
Champion Novice Hurdle.
Mengli Khan, regarded as
potential Irish banker material at
Cheltenham, had not been jumping
with much fluency beforehand,
but nobody was prepared for him
suddenly ducking violently left and
crashing through the wing at the second last, least of all his unfortunate
rider, Jack Kennedy.
That was just the start of the
mayhem. Real Steel and Sharjah, both trained by Mullins, now
raced on, well ahead of the rest,
but both fell in what seemed like
choreographed slow-motion unison
at the last hurdle.
It left another from the stable,
Whiskey Sour, who had been detached from the field for much of the
BEST OF LEICESTER
2.30
REGINALD STRETTON HANDICAP CHASE (CLASS 3)
£10,000 added 2m
BEST BET
Cultivator
(3.05pm, Leicester)
Getting the hang of chasing and
looks another winner for trainer
Nicky Henderson.
NEXT BEST
Supasundae
(1.20pm, Leopardstown)
Stayed on strongly behind
Apple’s Jade and Nichols Canyon
at Fairyhouse and might surprise
them this time.
Simply Ned (right) was awarded the Paddy’s Rewards Club Chase after he was
impeded by Min (left), the horse who crossed the line first PA
race, to sneak through, Foinavonlike, and pick up the pieces.
“I’ve never seen anything like
it,” said Mullins, still smarting
from Min’s disqualification. “It was
extraordinary stuff and I was just
waiting for the two fallers to bring
down our third runner and really
cap our day!”
Mengli Khan clearly has a
problem, while there are question
marks, too, though less serious, over
the festival prospects of Min, who,
TAP ‘N’ SHOWER NOVICES’ HURDLE (CLASS 3) £10,000
added 1m 7f 113yds
ARTHINGTON (CD) J W Mullins 4 11 8.........Kevin Jones (5)
DESTRIER (CD) D Skelton 4 11 4.........................................H Skelton
HAREFIELD (D) A King 4 11 4.....................................W Hutchinson
1
2-P465 MASTER OF VERSE (D) Miss V Williams 8 11 12......C Deutsch (3) H
CLASH OF D TITANS W Greatrex 4 10 12............... G Sheehan
2
3-1496 ACCORD D Bridgwater 7 11 12 .....................................T Scudamore
JOHNNY YUMA Katy Price 4 10 12.......................................... B Poste
3
119-P4 GREGARIOUS (D) Mrs L Wadham 4 11 1 .............L Aspell H,T
VOODOO DOLL E Williams 4 10 12 .....................................A Wedge
4
/1123- MYROUNDORURS (D) R Dickin 7 10 13 ........................C Poste H
WAHWONAISA D Bridgwater 5 10 12 ..................... T Cannon C
- 4 declared - 7 declared BETTING: 2-1 Master Of Verse, 5-2 Gregarious, 11-4 Myroundorurs,
BETTING:
7-4
Harefield, 2-1 Arthington, 11-4 Destrier, 7-1 Clash Of D
4-1 Accord.
Titans, 33-1 Voodoo Doll, 50-1 Wahwonaisa, 66-1 Johnny Yuma.
12.55
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-11221
0-1
24-41
2-5
3-1898
77
U
FORM VERDICT
GREGARIOUS (fourth) got the better of Accord (sixth) at Sandown last
time out and looks to have the most scope for improvement at the age
of four. He stayed on nicely on that occasion and has been dropped 1lb
for that latest run. Myroundorurs has done most of his racing on better
ground than this and hasn’t been seen in 521 days, but Master Of Verse
is interesting on stable bow for Venetia Williams.
1.25
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
JULIE & SEAN O’CONNOR MAIDEN HURDLE (CLASS 4)
£6,000 added 2m 4f 110yds
587
3227-2
4-50
86
421/
3-64
P2-97
63-63
48
3-63
5421-07
31/P
BRONZALLURE Oliver Greenall 4 11 0..................H Skelton T
CRIQ ROCK (BF) A King 6 11 0...................................W Hutchinson
DASSETT GOLD P Webber 4 11 0 ..................................... G Sheehan
EURATO S Gollings 7 11 0............................................T Scudamore C
KILFILUM CROSS K Bailey 6 11 0....................................C O’Farrell
LESKINFERE Oliver Greenall 4 11 0................................I Popham
LISSYCASEY Sheila Lewis 4 11 0 .....................Rob Williams (3)
MON ELDORADO Christian Williams 5 11 0....Sean Bowen H
PANDINUS IMPERATOR Martin Smith 4 11 0......N Scholfield
THE SWEENEY Miss E Lavelle 5 11 0................................. L Aspell
VICTARION P Hobbs 5 11 0.....................................................T J O’Brien
WESTERN MORNING Oliver Greenall 4 11 0.D England T
HAYLEY BELLE M Bradstock 6 10 7 ..... Nico De Boinville T
- 13 declared BETTING: 5-2 Criq Rock, 7-2 Victarion, 4-1 The Sweeney, 9-2 Mon
Eldorado, 13-2 Kilfilum Cross, 12-1 Leskinfere, 25-1 Eurato, 33-1 Hayley
Belle, Pandinus Imperator, 50-1 others.
1.55
LEICESTERSHIRE SILVER FOX HANDICAP CHASE
(QUALIFIER) (CLASS 3) £20,000 added 2m 4f
FORM VERDICT
HAREFIELD built upon a solid hurdles debut at Exeter when winning
nicely at Warwick last time and he looks open to further improvement
over timber. Arthington has been very consistent over timber with
three wins out of five and has to warrant consideration, despite giving
weight all round, along with Destrier, a winner over C&D last month
on his hurdling bow.
3.05
1
2
3
4
5
GREAT GLEN NOVICES’ CHASE (CLASS 3) £12,000 added
2m 4f
KNOCKADERRY FLYER F O’Brien 8 11 5................ P Brennan
CULTIVATOR N Henderson 6 11 0.............. Nico De Boinville
MILITARIAN (D) Andrew Martin 7 11 0 ........ Mr J Martin (7)
SILVERHOW C Tizzard 6 11 0 .................................................H Cobden
THREE WAYS J Snowden 6 11 0..............................G Sheehan C,T
- 5 declared BETTING: 13-8 Cultivator, 7-4 Three Ways, 5-1 Silverhow, 11-2
Knockaderry Flyer, 25-1 Militarian.
P/12-1
618-P2
/97441216-F
418-22
FORM VERDICT
THREE WAYS has struck the crossbar in both starts over fences thus far
and it might be a case of third time lucky for Jamie Snowden’s charge.
Cultivator ran well behind the 146-rated Tommy Silver over 2m here
last time and he should give another good account, while Cheltenham
hunter chase winner Knockaderry Flyer adds further spice to the race.
3.40
LEICESTERSHIRE BRONZE FOX HANDICAP HURDLE
(CLASS 3) £15,000 added 1m 7f 113yds
CHIEFTAIN’S CHOICE (D) Kevin Frost 8 11 12......M Bastyan (5)
DARTAGNAN LE DUN A Hales 4 11 7 ...................... H Bannister
LITTLE JON (D) N Twiston-Davies 9 11 12......S Twiston-Davies C
MORIANOUR E Williams 6 11 1 ..............................................A Wedge
BEKKENSFIRTH (CD) D Skelton 8 11 12......................H Skelton
BILLY HICKS (D) S Drinkwater 6 11 1 ......................D England H
VOLT FACE C Longsdon 8 11 12..................... Paul O’Brien (5) T
WIND
PLACE AND SHO J Eustace 5 10 12.................J Quinlan
ALLEE BLEUE (CD) P Hobbs 7 11 11...............................T J O’Brien
CATCHIN TIME (CD) Miss L Hurley 9 10 11..... C Hammond (7) T
CROWN HILL (C)(D) J Farrelly 7 11 8.............................B J Powell
ALPHA INDI H Evans 6 10 7............................................................ B Poste
FERGAL MAEL DUIN C Tizzard 9 11 5................H Cobden B,T
CAVIAR D’ALLEN Christian Williams 5 10 4..... A P Heskin
GO WEST YOUNG MAN H Daly 9 11 4....Mr H F Nugent (7)
- 8 declared JARLATH (D) J W Mullins 6 11 2...........................Kevin Jones (5)
BETTING: 9-4 Wind Place And Sho, 4-1 Billy Hicks, 5-1 Chieftain’s Choice,
- 8 declared BETTING: 7-2 Jarlath, 9-2 Crown Hill, 5-1 Little Jon, 13-2 Bekkensfirth, 6-1 Morianour, 13-2 Dartagnan Le Dun, 12-1 Catchin Time, 14-1 Alpha
7-1 Volt Face, Fergal Mael Duin, 8-1 Allee Bleue, Go West Young Man.
Indi, Caviar D’allen.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
35P-55
3912/6
2-234P
2P0-77
15-244
5P7-65
2-47UP
323-61
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
2-2323
8-4056
/212-6
/9611367-42
1143-5
72-349
-84640
47
though jumping impeccably, may
well have been unable to hold off
the journeyman Simply Ned even
if he hadn’t bounced him off the
rails on the run to the line, suffering
predictable consequences in the
stewards’ room.
The victory was a most welcome
boost for the north of England, a
region once used to mopping up the
big jumps prizes but rarely getting a
look-in these days, and most gratefully received by Nicky Richards,
BEST OF LEOPARDSTOWN
3.00
ONE TO WATCH
Sizing John
(3pm, Leopardstown)
How will the Cheltenham
Gold Cup winner respond to
Might Bite’s success?
whose late father, Gordon, was a huge
player in that golden era.
The Cumbria trainer was, perhaps, enjoying a second slice of luck
following Guitar Pete’s fortunate win
at Cheltenham recently, but nobody
can begrudge Simply Ned his big day
after finishing placed in the three
previous editions of this race, last
year behind Douvan and Sizing John.
LEOPARDSTOWN CHRISTMAS CHASE (GRADE 1)
(CLASS 1) €128,205 added 3m
SQUARED FINANCIAL CHRISTMAS HURDLE (GRADE 1)
(CLASS 1) €72,650 added 3m
1
6-2414 ALPHA DES OBEAUX (D) M F Morris 7 11 10 ..B J Cooper C,T
2
F3-123 BALKO DES FLOS (C)(BF) H de Bromhead 6 11 10.....D O’Regan
3
44-7U5 CARLINGFORD LOUGH (CD) J E Kiely 11 11 10......B J Geraghty T
1
285-12 JEZKI (C)(D) Mrs J Harrington 9 11 10..................B J Geraghty
4
1342-2 DJAKADAM (C)(BF) W P Mullins 8 11 10..............D J Mullins
2
P57-34 LIEUTENANT COLONEL (CD) G Elliott 8 11 10 ..D N Russell T
5
21F1PEDWULF Joseph P O’Brien 8 11 10 ...............Mr D O’Connor T
3
2F12-2 NICHOLS CANYON (C)(D) W P Mullins 7 11 10P Townend
4
2412-3 SUPASUNDAE (C) Mrs J Harrington 7 11 10.......R M Power 6 FU2-4P MINELLA ROCCO (D) Jonjo O’Neill (UK) 7 11 10......M P Walsh C
0P-613 OUTLANDER (CD) G Elliott 9 11 10 ..................Jack Kennedy C
5
1231-2 BAPAUME (C) W P Mullins 4 11 5......................................... N Fehily 7
211-12 ROAD TO RESPECT (D) N Meade 6 11 10..S W Flanagan H
6
211-11 APPLE’S JADE (C) G Elliott 5 11 3 ......................Jack Kennedy T 8
1111-1 SIZING JOHN (CD) Mrs J Harrington 7 11 10......R M Power
7
F615-6 AUGUSTA KATE W P Mullins 6 11 3...........................D J Mullins 9
10
22/14- VALSEUR LIDO (D) H de Bromhead 8 11 10............... N Fehily
- 7 declared 11
41112YORKHILL (C)(D)(BF) W P Mullins 7 11 10..........P Townend
BETTING: Evens Apple’s Jade, 2-1 Nichols Canyon, 6-1 Supasundae, 8-1
12
417-53
ZABANA (C) A Lynch 8 11 10..........................................D N Russell T
Jezki, 33-1 Bapaume, Lieutenant Colonel, Augusta Kate.
- 12 declared FORM VERDICT
BETTING: 6-4 Sizing John, 5-2 Yorkhill, 8-1 Djakadam, 12-1 Valseur Lido,
APPLE’S JADE is one of the standout mares of recent years and arrives Outlander, Road To Respect, 20-1 Alpha Des Obeaux, 25-1 Carlingford
having posted a stunning performance when winning her second Lough, Minella Rocco, 33-1 others.
Hatton’s Grace at Fairyhouse when disposing of Nichols Canyon by
FORM VERDICT
nine lengths and there could be an argument made that she may
improve for going 3m. Nichols Canyon steps back up to 3m but the What a treat racing fans have in store with all 12 declared runners rated
obvious concern is his ability to handle the track having made a mistake 152 or higher. Sizing John mopped up at the very highest level last
at the second last more often than not so the main danger could be season and showed no ill effects when returning with a facile victory
Supasundae as he looked in need of the outing on that occasion and in the John Durkan (Djakadam second and Carlingford Lough fifth).
is unexposed at the trip. Bapaume is interesting on his first try at 3m He is very much the one to beat but a chance is taken on YORKHILL,
having proven consistent in juvenile hurdles.
undoubtedly one of the most talented NH horses in training. The form
of his impressive success in last season’s JLT Novices’ Chase is rock
IRISH DAILY STAR CHRISTMAS NOVICE HANDICAP
solid with the second, third, fourth and sixth all winning in graded
HURDLE (CLASS ) €14,957 added 2m
company since and he would have won at Fairyhouse last time but for
1 44U-30 JACK DILLINGER E P Harty 6 11 12.................................N Fehily T running down the last fence (a tendency he had throughout). Back going
2
/1F349 HARDBACK (D) Joseph P O’Brien 6 11 10 ...S Shortall (3) T left-handed and expected to relish the step up to 3m, he is fancied to
3
32-155 ARVICO BLEU H de Bromhead 5 11 9.Dylan Robinson (5) play a leading role. Outlander, Djakadam and Valseur Lido - first, third
4
165916 ALL’S QUIET (D) A McGuinness 6 11 7 .....Mr Luke John McGuinness (7) T and fourth respectively in this race 12 months ago - add further spice
5
14 LOW SUN (BF) W P Mullins 4 11 4......................... P Townend C to the race.
6
445131 LIKE AN OPEN BOOK (D) J M Burke 7 11 3....M P Burke (5)
MIDLAND LEGAL SOLICITORS BEGINNERS CHASE
7
F-444 WIGS ON THE GREEN M F Morris 5 11 1.....B J Geraghty T
(CLASS ) €12,821 added 2m 5f
8
25-444 STOWAWAY FOREVER J P Dempsey 5 11 0....L P Dempsey C,T
9
27-226 ARTFUL ARTIST A J Martin 8 10 12..............E O’Connell (7) T 1
11P1-3 BACARDYS (C)(BF) W P Mullins 6 11 12................P Townend
10 1-4435 CELEBRITY STATUS C O’Dwyer 5 10 8............... R A Doyle (5)
2
37-444 CHAIN GANG (C) A Fleming 6 11 12 ................................D O’Regan
11 70-052 ALE AMBROSIO Mrs J Harrington 5 10 7.........M P Walsh H
8/0-07 GOLAN LODGE (C) Paul Nolan 8 11 12Dylan Robinson (5)
12 053770 BRONTIDE C O’Dwyer 4 10 3 .......................Rachael Blackmore 3
538-23 SNOW FALCON (D) N Meade 7 11 12....................S W Flanagan
13 6/030- SWEET COMPANY (BF) A J Martin 6 10 2....D O’Regan C,T 4
1/11P- SUTTON PLACE (D) G Elliott 6 11 12..................B J Geraghty T
14 00-639 CREEPING IVY (BF) A J Martin 5 10 0........................D Meyler T 5
6
615-53
WISHMOOR (C) M F Morris 7 11 12.......................D N Russell T
- 14 declared - 6 declared BETTING: 7-2 Wigs On The Green, 5-1 Low Sun, 6-1 Like An Open Book,
7-1 Ale Ambrosio, 10-1 Creeping Ivy, Arvico Bleu, Jack Dillinger, 12-1 BETTING: 6-4 Sutton Place, 7-4 Bacardys, 2-1 Snow Falcon, 20-1
Wishmoor, 50-1 Chain Gang, Golan Lodge.
Artful Artist, 14-1 others.
1.20
1.50
3.35
FORM VERDICT
WIGS ON THE GREEN has shown promise in maiden company and
looks to have a fair opening mark of 114 under Barry Geraghty for
just the second time. The five-year-old can account for Low Sun, who
took a backwards step in his development last time but has first-time
cheekpieces today. Ale Ambrosio ran her most encouraging race for
quite some time at Fairyhouse a fortnight ago and deserves respect,
while Like An Open Book could prove best of the remainder.
FORM VERDICT
Snow Falcon sets the standard on what we have seen over fences thus
far while it’s great to see Sutton Place back on the track after pulling
up lame at Punchestown during the spring. The one to beat, however,
could be Willie Mullins’ BACARDYS. The six-year-old is unbeaten in
three previous visits here, including when landing the Grade 1 Deloitte
Novice Hurdle last season, and he is likely to improve for his chasing
debut third at Naas last month.
Results service
CHEPSTOW Abandoned due to Rain and Snow.
KEMPTON Going: Soft-heavy in places
12.45 1. REDICEAN (W Hutchinson) 11-8 fav; 2. Haulani
7-2; 3. King Cnut 50-1. 6 ran. 10l, 57l. (A King).
1.20 1. CYRNAME (Sean Bowen) 7-4; 2. Shantou Rock
6-4 fav; 3. Tommy Silver 9-4. 4 ran. 7l, 1/2l. (P Nicholls).
1.55 1. MIDNIGHT TUNE (A Coleman) 2-1 fav; 2. Rons
Dream 5-1; 3. Loves Destination 16-1. 6 ran. 4l, 7l. (A
Honeyball).
2.30 1. POLITOLOGUE (S Twiston-Davies) 8-15 fav;
2. Vaniteux 25-1; 3. Forest Bihan 6-1. 4 ran. 13l, 14l.
(P Nicholls).
3.05 1. TINTERN THEATRE (S Twiston-Davies) 7-2; 2.
Pilgrims Bay 9-2; 3. Brandon Hill 9-4 fav. 7 ran. 23/4l,
1
/2l. (N Twiston-Davies).
3.40 1. KAYF GRACE (Nico De Boinville) 11-4 fav; 2.
Eddiemaurice 7-1; 3. Azzerti 5-1. 10 ran. 11/2l, 8l. (N
Henderson).
Placepot: £142.40. Quadpot: £16.50.
Place 6: £57.48. Place 5: £38.37.
WOLVERHAMPTON Going: Standard
1.45 1. SWENDAB (Rossa Ryan) 9-2; 2. Run With
Pride 7-2 jt-fav; 3. Everkyllachy 13-2. 10 ran. 7-2 jt-fav
Eternalist (5th). nk, 1/2l. (J G O’Shea).
2.15 1. HELLO BRIGETTE (D Costello) 7-2; 2. Sugar
Coating 13-8 jt-fav; 3. Ghepardo 13-8 jt-fav. 7 ran. 4l,
13/4l. (M O’Callaghan (IRE) ).
2.45 1. ANGEL OF THE SOUTH (R Winston) 9-2; 2. I
Was Only Joking 6-1; 3. Vodka Pigeon 20-1. 8 ran. 4-7
fav Rizzle Dizzle (4th). 21/4l, 8l. (D Ivory).
3.25 1. ANTONIAN (R Havlin) 6-5 fav; 2. Danzay 11-4; 3.
Father Ailbe 33-1. 10 ran. 21/2l, 1l. (J Gosden).
3.55 1. STELLAR SURPRISE (P J McDonald) 5-2 fav;
2. Star Quality 11-2; 3. Carolinae 9-2. 6 ran. shd, 11/2l.
(S C Williams).
4.25 1. MARATHA (P J McDonald) 9-4 fav; 2. Perfect
Soldier 7-2; 3. First Up 16-1. 7 ran. 2l, hd. (S C Williams).
Tote: £2.70; £1.50, £2.30. Exacta: £11.40. Tricast: £95.02.
Trifecta: £72.60. CSF: £9.95. NR: Cricklewood Green.
4.55 1. JORVIK PRINCE (Gemma Tutty) 13-8 fav;
2. Tasaaboq 9-2; 3. Jessie Allan 9-2. 11 ran. 11/2l, shd.
(Mrs K Tutty).
5.25 1. WILLYEGOLASSIEGO (D Costello) 18-1; 2.
Bamako Du Chatelet 6-4 fav; 3. Raashdy 4-1. 11 ran.
11/2l, 33/4l. (N Mulholland).
Placepot: £137.40. Quadpot: £16.20.
Place 6: £35.24. Place 5: £19.57.
48
SPORT
CHESS
Muzychuk says ‘no’ to Saudi riches
in protest at oppression of women
Countdown to 2018 World Cup
World champion tells Ed Malyon why she won’t go to Riyadh
I
t takes years of work, days of
two titles and was about the hapstaring at a board and hours
piest person in the chess world,
of agonising over individual
but this time I feel really bad. I
moves en route to becoming a
am ready to stand for my princiworld champion in chess.
ples and skip the event, where in
And it takes only a short-sighted
five days I was expected to earn
decision from its governing body to more than I do in a dozen events
ensure you lose that crown.
combined.”
“In a few days I am going to lose
Therein lies the problem. Saudi
two world champion titles
Arabia are understood to
one by one,” says Anna
have paid in the region of
Muzychuk. “Just
$1.5m (£1.12m) to host
because I decided
the tournament, which
not to go to Saudi
will be called the King
Arabia.”
Salman World Rapid
Prize money in
Muzychuk is the
and Blitz Chess
Riyadh is $1.5m
world champion in
Championships.
That
for the men’s
two disciplines of
is four times what the
competitions but
speed chess – rapid
host usually pays and
only $0.5m for the
and blitz. In rapid,
the prize money at this
women’s
each player gets 15
week’s event is many mulminutes to complete all of
tiples of what players would
their moves and in blitz it is just 10
usually expect to receive – parminutes.
ticularly championship contenders
The 27-year-old Ukrainian had
such as Anna.
been looking forward to defending
Women are, according to local
her championships won in Doha,
reports, being allowed to wear
Qatar, in 2016 but this year’s comdark blue or black formal trousers
petition, taking place in Riyadh this and high-necked blouses, avoiding
week, has already faced far more
Saudi rules of dress that require
opposition than any chess competi- female residents and most visitors
tion ever should.
to wear loose-fitting, long robes
For Muzychuk and her sister
known as abayas. Most Saudi
Mariya, another chess pro, their
women also cover their hair and
refusal is on the grounds that Saudi face with veils.
Arabia do not treat women with
But it is not just women who
anything even approaching equalhave had problems with the Saudiity and the sisters would not be
hosted event.
allowed outside unless escorted by
The very fact that this country is
a man.
hosting a world chess tournament
“[I decided] not to play by somefor the first time is controversial
one’s rules, not to wear abaya, not
domestically as it comes two years
to be accompanied getting outside,
after the country’s top cleric issued
and altogether not to feel myself a
a religious edict against playing
secondary creature,” says Anna.
the board game. Saudi Arabia’s
“Exactly one year ago I won these Grand Mufti, Sheikh Abdul-Aziz
$2m
I decided not to play by
someone’s rules, not to
wear abaya... not to feel a
secondary creature
ash-Sheikh, said in early 2016 that
chess is forbidden in Islam because
it wastes time and can lead to
rivalry among players.
Similarly, top Iranian clerics have
also decried the game, saying it
can lead to gambling, which is also
banned in Islam.
Then there are the political
issues, with countries that are
currently political rivals of Saudi
Arabia complaining they have not
received visas to enter the country
and compete.
Israel say Saudi Arabia ignored
requests by their players to obtain
visas to participate in the tournament, perhaps unsurprising given
that Israel and Saudi Arabia do
not have diplomatic relations.
But Qatar and Iran have reported
similar grievances. While the top
three male players are all travelling
for the tournament, many will be
missing and the women’s competition is still reeling from Muzychuk’s
withdrawal.
“All that other stuff is annoying,
but the most upsetting thing is that
almost nobody really cares,” Muzychuk added in her Facebook post.
“That is a really bitter feeling,
still not the one to change my opinion and my principles. The same
goes for my sister Mariya – and I
am really happy that we share this
point of view. And yes, for those
few who care – we’ll be back!” THE
INDEPENDENT
Football and
politics have
never mixed on
this scale before
Russia 2018 will totally redefine the
World Cup, writes Miguel Delaney
O
Anna Muzychuk
during the 2016
World Chess
Championships in
Doha GETTY
n an early December
evening in the Kremlin’s
State Palace, it was not
just the groups and path
to the final of the 2018
World Cup that were set, but also the
stage for something far bigger – the
game around the game.
The very location of the draw
proclaimed in bombastic fashion what
we already knew – this is about more
than kicking a ball around. Next year,
we will witness the most political and
politicised World Cup ever.
That Russian president Vladimir
Putin (right) doesn’t really like
football – his spokesman, Dmitry
Peskov, couldn’t guarantee even
days before the draw that the
president would attend – only
emphasises the power of the game
and its political influence.
It isn’t too long ago that German
politician Michael Fuchs argued that
the only real punishment for Russia
following the controversy of the
Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash in
July 2014, would be removing them
as hosts of a football tournament.
Alarming, really, in that Russia
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
49
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
Results Service
in Russia
PREMIER LEAGUE
Newcastle (0)....................0
P
Man City
20
Man Utd
20
Chelsea
20
Liverpool
20
Tottenham
20
Arsenal
19
Burnley
20
Leicester
20
Everton
20
Watford
20
Huddersfield 20
Brighton
20
Stoke
20
Southampton 20
Newcastle
20
Crystal Palace 19
West Ham
20
Bournemouth 20
West Brom
20
Swansea
20
Man City (1)............................... 1
Sterling 31
Att 52,311
D
L
F
A Pts
1
0
61 12 58
4
3
43 16 43
3
4
34 14 42
8
2
46 23 38
4
5
39 20 37
4
5
34 23 34
6
5
18 17 33
6
7
30 30 27
6
7
24 30 27
4
9
29 35 25
5
9
18 32 23
6
9
15 25 21
5
10 23 41 20
7
9
20 30 19
3
12 19 30 18
6
9
16 29 18
6
10 22 38 18
5
11 18 31 17
9
9
14 27 15
4
13 11 31 13
W
19
13
13
10
11
10
9
7
7
7
6
5
5
4
5
4
4
4
2
3
LADBROKES SCOTTISH PREMIERSHIP
Aberdeen (0).......................1 Partick (0) ..................................0
Rooney 62
Att 14,830
Hamilton ............................P Kilmarnock .............................P
Postponed - due to frozen pitch.
Hearts (0) .............................0 Hibernian (0)...........................0
Att 19,316
Rangers (0)..........................2 Motherwell (0).......................0
Wilson 56
Att 49,273
Morelos 76
Ross County (0)...............1 St Johnstone (1) .................... 1
Schalk 54 (pen)
Johnstone 2
Att 3,636
P
W
D
L
F
A Pts
Celtic
21 15
5
1
48 15 50
Aberdeen
21 13
3
5
33 24 42
Rangers
21 12
3
6
41 25 39
Hibernian
21
9
7
5
30 26 34
Hearts
21
7
8
6
21 19 29
St Johnstone 20
7
5
8
21 28 26
Kilmarnock
20
6
7
7
24 27 25
Motherwell
20
7
3
10 25 29 24
Hamilton
20
5
5
10 27 33 20
Dundee
21
5
4
12 21 32 19
Ross County 21
4
5
12 21 34 17
Partick
21
4
5
12 17 37 17
BOSTIK PREMIER DIVISION
Met Police 1 Leatherhead 2.
BASKETBALL
NBA: Dallas 98 Toronto 93; Denver 107 Utah 83;
Detroit 107 Indiana 83; LA Clippers 122 Sacramento 95; Miami Heat 107 Orlando 89; Milwaukee
106 Chicago 115; Phoenix 99 Memphis 97; San
Antonio 109 Brooklyn 97.
CRICKET
FIRST TEST MATCH
South Africa v Zimbabwe, Port Elizabeth: South
Africa 309-9dec. (78.3 overs; A K Markram 120, A B
de Villiers 53). Zimbabwe 68 (30.1 overs; M Morkel
5-21) & 121 (42.3 overs; K A Maharaj 5-59). South
Africa beat Zimbabwe by an innings and 120 runs.
The Luzhniki
Stadium in
Moscow, where
seven matches –
including the final
– will be held next
summer GETTY
DARTS
PDC WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS, ALEXANDRA
PALACE, LONDON: 3rd rd: R van Barneveld (Neth)
bt V van der Voort (Neth) 4-1. 2nd rd: D Webster
(GB) bt S Whitlock (Aus) 4-1; J Richardson (GB) bt
A Norris (GB) 4-1; A Alcinas (Sp) bt K Munch (Ger)
4-1; J Lewis (GB) bt P Wright (GB) 4-1.
FIXTURES:
FOOTBALL
PREMIER LEAGUE
Crystal Palace v Arsenal (8)................................................................
BASKETBALL
BBL CHAMPIONSHIP: Plymouth v Worcester.
appears to be almost unpunishable
explicitly and disgracefully used for
in political terms while we must ask
the nefarious purposes of a political
if the sporting authorities really
regime, didn’t have the multiple
want to be involved – given the feetangles of this; the various tangents
dragging over the state-sponsored
and complicated questions of this.
doping that has been discovered
That World Cup 40 years ago was
across multiple Russian sports.
more about the country’s internal
The country’s authorities initially
strife and the brutal junta, even
wanted to stage the World Cup to
if it did bleed outwards – in some
serve as a crowning moment in a
cases, literally. Argentina ’78 still
long-term plan to reposition and
didn’t have this competition’s more
reshape its image to the globe.
globally significant issues.
That image has certainly changed
Russia’s internal problems only
in the time since the
intensify the politicisation
controversial awarding
of this one. There are
of the tournament in
the crucial ethical
December 2010.
questions about racism,
Now, what is
homophobia, LGBT
undeniably the
rights and human
Years since the
world’s biggest
rights within the
World
Cup’s
last
global event will
country, the economic
hosting
controversy
take place in what
downslide as well as
– with Argentina
is arguably the most
regional politics that
and its military
politically influential
have
led to internationally
junta
country on the planet,
criticised military
at a time when the
action. Away from the
international political landscape
stadiums, even the way fans
is at its most delicate since the end
will be handled will add to the
of the Cold War.
intrigue. Much attention will be
The phrase that is commonly
paid to the “atmosphere”.
heard in the final stages of the
One irony is that it has been
build-up to a World Cup, that all
reported in the Financial Times
eyes will be on the hosts, will carry
that Russia’s internal politics
multiple meanings this time.
and economic issues have led
There really hasn’t been a World
to a certain ennui about the
Cup like this. Even Argentina 1978,
tournament, a sense of “let’s just get
the tournament that was most
this over with”.
40
That Vladimir
Putin doesn’t really
like football only
emphasises the
power of the game
and its political
influence
In that sense, it no longer quite
feels like there is the same fervour
for the great international arrival
party that was initially intended
in 2010, and that Qatar so greatly
desires for the 2022 World Cup.
The simultaneous awarding of
that tournament only adds to the
politicisation of this event.
The alpha-male in Putin is still
said to see this World Cup as an
opportunity to promote a fitter way
of life in the country, to get the next
generation physically active.
However the tournament is
viewed, it makes an utter mockery
of the platitudes that so many
involved will spout at times such
as this: that it’s not the moment to
discuss politics, that politics and
sport should just never mix. That is
something instantly rendered inane
the first moment a politician gets
involved in a tournament bid,
the very first time public
funds are involved.
It’s just that, by the
summer of 2018, sport and
politics – or, at the very
least, football and politics
– will never have quite
mixed like this, on a scale
like this. There is no global
event like the World Cup,
and there has never been a
World Cup like Russia 2018.
THE INDEPENDENT
Puzzle solutions
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1
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+
4
+
8
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x
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6
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7
x
x
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9
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TWIN
RUBY
RUBS
SWIG
ROBS
SWAG
RODS
SWAM
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9
ZYGOLEX
LEFT TO RIGHT:
beat; wise; blob;
port; throb; wine;
throw; glow;
shine; hurl; shire;
hurt; hire; girl;
county
5-CLUE CROSSWORD
Across: 1 C-Heep-s, 3 Recall*, 4 Add-led
Down: 1 Chore-a, 2 Sid-led
WORD WHEEL
NINE-LETTER WORD meteorite
OTHER WORDS eerie, emir, emit, emitter, ire, item, meet,
mere, merit, met, meteor, meter, metier, metre, mire, mite,
mitre, more, motet, ore, otter, remit, remote, rime, rite, roe,
rote, tee, teem, teeter, term, termite, tie, tier, time, timer, tire,
titre, toe, tome, tore, totem, tree, trite
YESTERDAY’S CODEWORD 1890
1
I
14
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3
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5
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16
17
18
Q F D
J
6
7
8
9
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11
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R Z
Y
T B K G N
O L W M U P E A H X S C V
50
SPORT
CRICKET
Cook and Broad show they
still have desire for the fight
327 Melbourne scoreboard
AUSTRALIA
Smith 76
Broad 4-51
ENGLAND
Cook 104 no,
Root 49no
192-2
By Jonathan Liew
AT THE MELBOURNE CRICKET GROUND
They walk among us. They talk
like us. They may even look like us.
But deep down, underneath their
breathable apparel and questionable tattoos, professional athletes are
not really the same as you and me.
And day two of the Melbourne Test
was one of those days that proved it.
Alastair Cook is definitely not
like you and me. He is one of those
cricketers who has been part of
the England furniture for so long
that you occasionally fall into the
trap of thinking you know him. In
fact, the cleavage between what we
think we know about Cook and what
we actually do is probably as wide
as it has been with any celebrated
England player.
The common assumption on this
tour has been that it may be his last.
Not just his last Ashes tour; his last,
full stop. The runs have dried up.
The body language has been curiously inert. Captain Joe Root seems
to talk tactics far more with Stuart
Broad and James Anderson
than with him. We all think
we know how this tale
ends.
And yet, remember:
you may think you know
Cook, but unless you are
his wife, a member of his
family or one of his very
tight circle of friends, you
probably don’t.
After a while, you learn to stop
being surprised by him. Even this
century, his first against Australia
in seven years and 36 innings, was
heavily trailed by the simple fact that
he had done very little in quite some
(Day 2 of 5): England are trailing Australia by 135 runs
with 8 first-innings wickets in hand
Australia won toss
AUSTRALIA — First Innings 244-3 (Warner 103)
First Innings Contd
Runs 6s 4s Bls Min
*S P D Smith b Curran
76 0 8 156 207
S E Marsh lbw b Broad
61 0 8 148 225
M R Marsh b Woakes
9 0
1 18 17
†T D Paine b Anderson
24 0 4 36 52
P J Cummins c Cook b Broad
4 0 0 18 26
J M Bird lbw b Broad
4 0
1 6
7
J R Hazlewood not out
1 0 0 12 21
N M Lyon lbw b Anderson
0 0 0 10 14
Extras (lb1 nb1)
2
Total(119 overs)
327
Fall: 1-122, 2-135, 3-160, 4-260, 5-278, 6-314, 7-318, 8-325,
9-326.
Bowling: J M Anderson 29-11-61-3, S C J Broad 28-10-514, C R Woakes 22-4-72-2, M M Ali 12-0-57-0, T K Curran
21-5-65-1, D J Malan 7-1-20-0.
ENGLAND — First Innings
Runs 6s 4s Bls Min
104 0 15 166 241
A N Cook not out
15 0
1 37 47
M D Stoneman c & b Lyon
17 0 3 37 49
J M Vince lbw b Hazlewood
49 0 6 105 141
*J E Root not out
Extras (b4 nb3)
7
Total(for 2, 57 overs)
192
Fall: 1-35, 2-80.
To Bat: D J Malan, †J M Bairstow, M M Ali, C R Woakes, T
K Curran, S C J Broad, J M Anderson.
Bowling: J R Hazlewood 12-2-39-1, J M Bird 12-2-38-0, N
M Lyon 17-2-44-1, P J Cummins 11-0-39-0, M R Marsh
4-0-17-0, S P D Smith 1-0-11-0.
Umpires: H D P K Dharmasena and S Ravi.
time. Cook is like one of those giant
marine mammals that only needs to
eat a few times a year, and so spends
most of his time in hibernation, before emerging ominously and menacingly from his lair in search of his
next gargantuan meal.
“He’s always had these periods
in his career when he might
not have scored the runs he
wants, then he gets a really big score,” Broad said
afterwards. “He doesn’t
deal in little hundreds.
He seems to go big. You
saw the celebrations in
the changing room when
he got that hundred. They
were huge. That’s testament to
the bloke he is.
“I don’t think you play this amount
of international sport without some
sort of deep, inner self-confidence
you can find when things are very
low. You have something there that
Two Tests – different
balls, duration and
rules. Only in cricket
Tim
Wigmore
AT THE MELBOURNE
CRICKET GROUND
A
little before 10.30am on
Tuesday, anthems are
sung as Australia and
England ready themselves for a Test match
at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.
This is the Boxing Day Test match
as it has always been.
Six thousand miles away, in Port
Elizabeth, another Test begins 10
hours later. Only this Boxing Day
game has a twist: it is a four-day
Test, the first since 1973, and, to
boot, is a day-night game played
with a pink ball. So, two Test matches – yet two games played over different lengths, with different balls
and different rules.
Test cricket’s image as a game
that has been unchanged since
its birth in 1877 is its foundational
myth, the game’s comfort blanket.
Yet this belies the truth: that Test
cricket has always evolved, with
matches scheduled over three, four,
you can clutch onto when things
get tough, that hopefully brings you
back to performing.”
Broad was talking about
himself as well. This has been
a tough tour too for Broad,
who came in for especially
severe punishment after the
mauling in Perth. But he went
back to the drawing board and, as
James Anderson put it, “worked as
hard as I’ve ever seen anyone work
at their game”. His reward was four
Australian wickets.
Last week, Michael Vaughan, a
friend of his, was particularly critical, writing that England should
consider dropping him for this Test
or the forthcoming tour of New
Zealand.
Broad brushed it off, as you can
do after taking four wickets: “Two
weeks ago I was on holiday with
him, so I don’t know what he’s been
saying,” he joshed, and everybody
laughed. “I’ve had one of those
weeks where you get your tin hat on,
duck down and don’t see much.
“You can get yourself in a bit of a
dark place if you read everything.
People are just doing their jobs.
“You’ve got to say your opinion,
you’ve got to be critical, and I deserved criticism after the Perth defeat, for sure. I’m not going to hold
any grudges if people slag me off,
because in 15 years’ time I might be
doing the same.”
Broad (left) is a different character again to Cook: public-facing,
social-media-savvy and with designs on a career in broadcasting when he finally hangs up his
boots. But one thing links them:
the ability to withstand the sort of
strife that would derail plenty, and
return stronger.
Perhaps there’s a lesson there. Ultimately the body might fail you, the
eyes might go. But when you have
made sport your life, it is the desire
that is often the last thing to leave
the room. THE INDEPENDENT
five, six and unlimited days – the
pre-Second World War “timeless
Tests” – and overs of four, six and
even eight balls.
A future in which playing conditions vary from match to match is
really just a return to Test cricket’s
past. Even beyond the most obvious
one – the length of the games – there
are significant differences in the
rules of the Tests taking place now
in Australia and South Africa.
The four-day Test in South Africa
comprises 98 overs a day, rather
than 90 – the equivalent playing
time of four days and one session of
a five-day Test – which means that
sessions are longer, while a team
needs a lead of only 150 runs, rather
than 200, to be given the option of
enforcing the follow-on.
Perhaps these all sound like
trifling changes, the sort to be absorbed only by those who devour
the minutiae of the laws of cricket.
Yet they could add up to some
profound differences in the way that
four-day Tests are played out on the
field. Most obviously, a combination of fewer days and more overs
per day threatens to impose an
overwhelming burden on four-man
bowling attacks; so all-rounders,
and five-man attacks, will be even
more valuable in four-day Tests.
Fewer overs will also encourage
Kagiso Rabada celebrates the dismissal of Zimbabwe’s Chamu Chibhabha
during the day-night, four-day Test at Port Elizabeth AFP/GETTY
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51
FOOTBALL
Ashes briefing: Day two
Alastair Cook completed his century
in the last over before stumps at the
MCG, as he and fellow Ashes heavyweight Stuart Broad belatedly kickstarted their campaigns this winter to
put Australia under pressure at last.
Mixed feelings inevitably prevailed
as, with the urn already gone, Broad
burst into life first, taking 4 for 51 as
Australia lost their last seven wickets
for 67, to be bowled out for 327. Cook
(104no) steered England to 192 for 2
on day two.
Bit late, though, chaps?
Broad and Cook have made a tardy
arrival at what was supposed to be
their own party. The poppers are
popped and the urn is, of course,
long gone. Neither Test great is done
with yet, it turns out, but they did not
produce the goods this winter when
England truly needed them to.
Shot of the day
Alastair Cook greeted the return of
Jackson Bird with a back-foot force
straight past the bowler for four, to
move to 25. Unlike on previous occasions on this curiously unproductive
tour for Cook, this proved to be the
shot of an in-form batsman.
Off-colour Aussies
The injury-enforced absence here
of the series’ leading wicket-taker,
Mitchell Starc, has given England
a window of opportunity. With Pat
Cummins was ailing as well, periodically out of the attack and off the
field with a stomach upset, it seemed
that perhaps the effort expended
by the hosts as they surged into an
unassailable 3-0 lead was beginning
to take a toll.
Stat of the day
7-67
There was an
England-esque
ring to Australia’s
collapse as the tourists returned fire
at last in a previously all too onesided series.
Alastair Cook scored an unbeaten 104
off 166 balls at the MCG yesterday
AFP/GETTY
more enterprising cricket. That
uneasily. Multiple formats of the
much was evident in the way the
same sport are common; multiple
opening days ended in the two Boxforms of the same format are not,
ing Day Tests. Australia batted
because they are confusing for fans
almost funereally in the final session and risk undermining the integrity
of day one – reflecting how, when
of the sport. Imagine the incredulity
batting first in five-day Tests, teams
at some Premier League games
traditionally aim to bat
being 72 minutes long
for almost two days. They
while the rest remained 90.
I
m
agine
cannot afford to do so in
Five-day matches will
the
incredulity
four-day matches.
be standard in the new
if some games league structure for the top
And so, an hour before
the close of the opening day in the Premier nine Test nations, which
in Port Elizabeth, South
begins in 2019. But outside
League were
Africa declared against
it – when the other three
72
minutes
Zimbabwe – partly because
Test nations, Afghanistan,
long while
of the match being four
Ireland and Zimbabwe, play
the others
days, and partly because,
either each other or against
in day-night Tests, batting remained 90
the top nine nations – fouris notoriously difficult in
day Tests will become more
the closing stages of a day.
common, even the norm.
So the different conditions of the
Such Tests are cheaper – most lose
two Tests meant they were played at
about £400,000, and shaving off a day
completely different rhythms.
reduces these costs by about a fifth.
The future points to four- and
In a schedule overcrowded by interfive-day Tests coexisting, if a little
national and domestic T20 cricket,
shorter games are easier to fit in –
and, crucially, they can be arranged
to maximise the amount of playing
time over the weekend, making them
more attractive for broadcasters and
easier for fans to attend.
Strolling around the crowd during
the Boxing Day Test in Melbourne
can feel a little like eavesdropping on
a group of old friends; many return
here every year, sitting in the same
seats. Melbourne attracted over
150,000 in the first two days, and thus
does not need to change. Yet gauging
the overall health of Test cricket by
just visiting here is as deceptive as
measuring the popularity of a banana
republic by an opinion poll.
The sport’s administrators believe
that Tests need to adapt to survive.
And so, almost surreptitiously, Test
cricket is moving into a new era –
one in which, in the name of fighting
for the attention of fickle sporting
fans, it embraces multiple formats of
the same game.
Wilson puts Rangers
in better heart for
Old Firm clash
to rouse his side from their uncertain start. The Croatian playmaker
created their first opening with a
well weighted through ball to pick
MOTHERWELL
out James Tavernier’s run and the
0
right-back drove a shot just over.
Motherwell suffered a setback
By Stephen Halliday
when their captain Carl McHugh
AT IBROX
had to leave the action with a head
knock after just 20 minutes, the
Danny Wilson continued his ren- combative midfielder replaced by
aissance as a Rangers player of Allan Campbell.
genuine influence in the post-Pedro
Rangers sustained an injury
Caixinha era as he celebrated his blow just before the interval when
26th birthday with the goal which Ryan Jack went down under a late
earned his side a desperately need- challenge from Cedric Kipre which
ed boost ahead of Saturday’s Old went unpunished by referee John
Firm assignment at Celtic Park.
Beaton. After lengthy treatment, a
Having been restored to the clearly distressed Jack was carried
first team picture by new manager off on a stretcher and replaced by
Graeme Murty since Caixinha’s dis- teenager Jamie Barjonas.
missal, the defender has now
Rangers tried to increase
scored three times in his
the tempo but when they
last six appearances.
made their 56th minute
Wilson’s contribubreakthrough, it came
tion was crucial last
from a corner neednight, breaking the
lessly conceded by
Goals
scored
by
deadlock against a
goalkeeper Trevor
Rangers striker
stuffy Motherwell
Carson.
Alfredo Morelos
outfit in a match
K ra n j c a r ’s s e t
this season
where Rangers were
piece was not adtoiling to shake themequately cleared and
selves from the lethargy
Alves laid it off to Wilson,
which had seen them slump
who steadied himself before
to defeats against St Johnstone and rifling a superb left-foot shot high
Kilmarnock in their two previous into the net from a difficult angle.
outings.
Carson then made smart saves
Alfredo Morelos made sure of all to deny Morelos and Barjonas but
three points for Murty’s side on a Motherwell’s hopes were effectively
bitterly cold evening when the re- killed off when Morelos made it 2-0.
sult was far more important than Wilson’s long through ball left the
the performance.
Motherwell defence appealing in
Neither side came into the match vain for offside decision as Morelos
on the back of anything resembling drove the ball home.
optimum form but the visitors
squandered a glorious chance to
put a significant dent in the already
An Adam Rooney strike
earned second-placed
fragile confidence of the RangAberdeen a hard fought 1-0
ers players inside the opening 40
seconds.
win over bottom club Partick
Thistle last night, cutting Celtic’s
Hesitancy in the home defence
allowed Alex Fisher to beat Bruno
lead at the top to eight points.
The Edinburgh derby finished
Alves and flick the ball into the path
goalless at Tynecastle, after
of Craig Tanner, who outmuscled
Wilson inside the penalty area but
Hibs striker Oli Shaw’s seventhminute effort crossed the goalshot straight at Wes Foderingham.
line via the bar, but was not
Niko Kranjcar, making his first
awarded by the officials.
starting appearance for Rangers
since early September, attempted
RANGERS
Wilson 56, Morelos 76
2
13
Danny Wilson scores Rangers’ opening goal at Ibrox last night PA
52
SPORT
PREMIER LEAGUE
FOOTBALL
TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR
Wilshere’s
debt to
Hodgson
2
1
By Jack Pitt-Brooke
Jack Wilshere is looking
forward to facing Crystal
Palace tonight, given the
opportunities Roy Hodgson
gave him as England manager.
Hodgson picked Wilshere
almost every time he was
fit from 2012 to 2016. Now,
Wilshere is aiming to prove his
fitness to Gareth Southgate for
the World Cup in Russia.
Having broken back into
Arsenal’s Premier League
team, he will get another
chance to make his case at
Selhurst Park tonight.
Wilshere’s England career
started under Fabio Capello
but he had an ankle injury
when Hodgson replaced
Capello just before Euro 2012.
However, he is grateful that
Hodgson picked him when he
was ready.
“He was great for me,”
Wilshere said. “I owe him a lot,
because when he first became
England manager I was injured
for a year. I missed Euro 2012
and he put me straight back in
the squad.”
Wilshere was also grateful
for Hodgson taking him to
Euro 2016 in France, when he
had missed most of the 2015-16
season. “He was good for me,”
Wilshere said. “I missed eight
months of football and he took
me to the Euros, so I owe him.
“I’ve nothing but respect for
him. He’s a good manager in my
eyes and I am looking forward
to seeing him. But I won’t be
doing him any favours.”
Hodgson even planned to
play Wilshere as the deepest
of his midfielders, a role that
Wilshere was settling into well
in 2015 before breaking his leg.
Wilshere thanked Hodgson
for his foresight in picking him
in that role.
“He was massive for me,”
he said. “He was the first one
who tried me as a defensive
midfielder for England and I
relished that.” THE INDEPENDENT
7
9
4
Harry Kane’s top 10 goals of 2017 – by
the man who has watched them all
Jack Pitt-Brooke picks the best strikes in Tottenham forward’s historic year
1
30 September, Huddersfield Town
away (second)
Kane’s favourite goal of the lot was
his second at Huddersfield in a 4-0
win early this season. Receiving the
ball from a throw-in 20 yards from
goal, he held off one defender and
burst right past Mathias Jorgensen.
Taking half a glance up, he curled
a left-footed finish into the far
top corner.
2
25 February, Stoke City (second)
Jack Wilshere keeps wrapped up
during training yesterday
6
5
Arguably Kane’s technically best
goal of the year, the second of what
was his third hat-trick in nine days.
Christian Eriksen pulled a corner
back to Kane, loitering 20 yards
from goal. He got his body over the
ball with immaculate balance and
struck the ball perfectly on the halfvolley with his left boot, sending it
whistling into the net.
3
23 December, Burnley away
(third)
Kane completed his seventh – but
not final – hat-trick of the year with
some brilliant work at Turf Moor.
It was classic Spurs, as he won the
ball back with a powerful tackle, ran
forwards and then received a flick
from Dele Alli. Shuffling fast from
his right foot to his left, Kane buried
the ball in the bottom corner. “It
summed up how I play,” Kane said,
“winning the ball back then scoring.”
2017 is the first time in
nine years that neither
Cristiano Ronaldo or Lionel
Messi have topped the charts.
Harry Kane said: “I’ve still got a
long way to go before I can be
compared to them but it’s a start.”
4
26 December, Southampton
(third)
and turned to face goal, still almost
30 yards out. His right-footed shot
towards the near top corner
was far too early and too
strong for Joel Robles and
Spurs were ahead.
Most known for driving
precise finishes, usually
into the bottom corners,
Kane’s third on Boxing
Day was a very
different goal, and
14 January, West
he was very proud
Bromwich Albion
Number of goals
in 2017 that Harry
of it. Out-muscling
(third)
Kane scored at
Maya Yoshida on the
Kane’s first hat-trick
White Hart Lane
edge of the box, he
of the year. Up against
bore down on goal and
a static defence, he
deftly dinked the ball
gleefully ran onto Dele
over Fraser Forster with
Alli’s genius scooped pass
his left foot, to earn himself yet
over the top to finish powerfully.
another match ball.
12
5
5 March, Everton (first)
Another goal that summed up
Kane’s tenacity and power: he won
a 50-50 with Idrissa Gueye in the
middle of the pitch, held him off
6
7
14 May, Manchester United
Suitably enough, as Spurs’
greatest player of the modern era,
Kane scored the last goal at White
Hart Lane, completing a 2-0 defeat
of Manchester United.
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53
MANCHESTER UNITED
3
Lingard: We were only a
few minutes from winning
By Rory Dollard
8
10
Jesse Lingard believes Manchester United were only a matter of
minutes away from turning a battling draw against Burnley into a
rousing victory.
Lingard was United’s star turn
on Boxing Day, netting a classy
back-heeled flick and an injurytime equaliser as they came from
two goals down to salvage a point at
Old Trafford.
Despite only joining the fray as part
of a half-time reshuffle by Jose Mourinho, the England winger should
probably have been walking away
with the match ball after Clarets
keeper Nick Pope deflected his pointblank effort against the crossbar.
Regardless of the stirring finale,
United really needed a victory to
keep any pretence of a title challenge
alive and Lingard feels three points
were within touching distance.
“If we had played for another five
or 10 minutes, we would have won the
game,” he told MUTV.
“I thought we could nick it towards
the end, but obviously time ran out
and now we look forward to the next
game [against Southampton].
“We always have that fighting spirit, that never-give-up attitude and
we’ll see where it gets us.”
Lingard may have had to wait until
Jesse Lingard scored twice for Manchester United against Burnley REUTERS
the second half to influence the game
on this occasion, but he is enjoying a
productive time of late.
The England international has
matched last season’s tally of five
goals in December alone, with nine in
all competitions this season.
And the 25-year-old’s explanation
for that return is simple. “This role,
further inside, allows me to be closer
to the striker, to get in the box, create
more things and obviously have more
shots at goal,” he said.
As for Mourinho’s half-time words
of advice, he added: “[It] was always
believe. Never give up.
“We knew we had another 45
minutes to play, so we had to be patient – keep moving the ball, moving
Burnley about, and eventually we
created two clear-cut chances which
we scored from.
“As soon as that [first goal] went
in, the crowd went up and it gave
us that extra buzz to go and get another. It dropped to me very quickly
and it was instinctive again to shoot
straight away.”
Juventus say
Dybala move
is non-starter
By Ed Malyon
Juventus have no intention
of selling Paulo Dybala to
Manchester United or anyone
else in January, and privately
have made suitors aware
that any negotiations for the
Argentina international would
need to start north of €150m
(£140m).
United have been linked
with a £60m move for Dybala
this week, since when Jose
Mourinho has come out and
insisted that his club must
spend more money to catch
up with cross-town rivals
Manchester City.
However, the reports were
met with derision in Turin,
where there is agreement
that Dybala won’t be leaving
the club any time soon – and
certainly not for such a low fee.
While the former
Palermo forward has had a
disappointing season with
Juve, he is still considered
one of the top young attacking
players in the world.
They would expect a fee
approaching the £200m which
Paris Saint-Germain paid for
Neymar should more than one
club enter a bidding war for the
24 year-old. THE INDEPENDENT
Comment
Mourinho shows he is willing to throw the dice
8
22 April, Chelsea
This FA Cup semi-final was not a
happy day for Spurs but they played
well in the first half, as Kane drew
them level with a clever header.
After a corner was cleared, Eriksen
curled in a cross from the right,
seemingly too low to head. But Kane
stooped at the near post to flick the
ball into the far corner of the net,
surprising everyone.
9
13 September, Borussia
Dortmund (first)
Could Kane do it in the Champions
League, people asked before this
season. When Borussia Dortmund
came to Wembley in September,
he scored twice, and the first
was a classic. Charging down the
inside-left channel, he shrugged off
Sokratis and thumped the ball in at
the near post with his left.
10
22 October, Liverpool (first)
A goal of audacity and
awareness: as Dejan Lovren got
underneath Kieran Trippier’s pass,
Kane raced onto it and, with a touch
of his right foot, took the ball away
from Simon Mignolet and Joel
Matip. He steadied himself to put
the ball into the near bottom corner
with his left foot. THE INDEPENDENT
Kevin
Garside
CHIEF SPORTS
CORRESPONDENT
T
his was vintage Jose
Mourinho, a mixture of
honesty and dissembling,
heat and cold, loaded
barbs and emotion. Has
there ever been a greater Svengali
figure in the English game, a sense of
otherness and mystery set against
a blackened backdrop softened only
by his salt and pepper hair?
As ever with Mourinho in
propaganda mode, truth and fiction
rubbed alongside each other like
old friends, one taking prominence
over the other as the line of questioning decreed. Here, Mourinho
was reasoning away consecutive
disappointments, the home draw
with Burnley compounding the
anxiety brewing after the away
draw at Leicester, matches that
should, on paper at least, have returned six points .
In other circumstances, they
might have done. United should
have been out of sight at Leicester
before the late equaliser in the
fourth minute of added time and,
against Burnley, found themselves
two down at half-time to a bobbled
opener and a brilliant free-kick.
Into this footballing theatre
wandered Mourinho and few in the
history of management have made
drama out of anomalous plot shifts
like this fella. Mourinho (below) is
melodramatic after a routine win,
when things get complicated the
headlines flow.
It is, of course, absurd to plead
poverty when the club you manage
is – on the balance sheet at least –
the richest in the world, or when
you are the coach who made
Paul Pogba the world’s
most expensive player
and Romelu Lukaku a
£75m footballer.
Though Pep Guardiola’s net outlay at
Manchester City is
greater by £50m in
the same period, he
has yet to match in a
single splosh the sums
Mourinho paid for his
two signature buys. So
excuse us, Jose, if we
don’t quite feel your pain.
Yet Mourinho is also
right to point out that
the terms of engagement have been warped
by the state-backed
interventions of Manchester City and
Paris Saint-Germain,
neither of whom are
constrained by conventional
accounting mechanisms.
The capacity to buy without
reference to the balance sheet has
knocked football’s traditional powers out of their privileged strides.
United, Real Madrid and Barcelona
no longer control the environment as they once did.
Paris Saint-Germain can
plunder Neymar from the
Nou Camp and divert Kylian
Mbappé from the clutches
of the Bernabeu in the
same summer window,
and City can splash
£95m on a pair of fullbacks as if they were
shopping at TK Maxx.
Never in the history of
peacock purchases have
the Spanish blue chips
been kicked about the
playground like this.
In this new reality,
Mourinho is not doing
so bad. His team is still
the second best in the
Premier League at the
halfway stage, if only by a
point. Indeed, City apart,
every team in the top-six
has suffered the odd rum
result, because, beyond
City, the Premier League
retains its capacity to
shock. What a contest it
would be were City not so brilliantly
and powerfully evolved.
Away from Mourinho’s more
histrionic references in his postBurnley address, there were in fact
some signs of encouragement for
United fans, particularly his remarks about rolling the dice in the
second half.
He commended the players for
“accepting risk to play the way they
did. I need my players to believe in
them and in me; to accept the risk
not to be afraid to lose three or four;
not to be afraid of the possible negative reaction from the supporters.”
This from a coach who parked the
bus at Liverpool and surrendered
75 per cent possession to City at Old
Trafford. If he has understood the
offensive nature of that approach,
then the supporters will suffer the
odd unusual result.
United did not play badly at
Leicester and Mourinho quickly
recognised his mistake in pairing
the terminally slow Zlatan Ibrahimovic with the labouring Lukaku
by making changes at half-time
that had a positive impact against
Burnley. That’s good coaching.
Mourinho still needs a No 10 he
can trust and to bolster his midfield options but, on the whole, he
remains the right man in the right
place. With patience, it might also
be the right time.
54
SPORT
FOOTBALL
PREMIER LEAGUE
City underline
gulf in class
with passing
exhibition
NEWCASTLE UNITED
MANCHESTER CITY
Sterling 31
0
Newcastle United
Elliot
1
By Martin Hardy
Mbemba Lascelles Dummett
Manquillo
Yedlin
AT ST JAMES’ PARK
The run is now 18 wins. Imperious
Manchester City and their manager,
Pep Guardiola, are within 90 minutes of emulating a record he set
when in charge of Bayern Munich.
Newcastle, meanwhile, can ready
themselves for the bigger challenge
of staying in the Premier League
with a home game against Brighton.
But there was much more to consider in the TV studios on a night when
the very nature of the world’s richest
football league was called into question, such was the gulf exposed on
the pitch.
The first half began in extraordinary circumstances. Newcastle, with
the kick-off, allowed Jonjo Shelvey to
ping the ball straight at Ederson in
the Manchester City goal. It counted
for a shot on target. It was as clear a
sign as you liked that Newcastle had
no desire for possession.
It drew an incredulous reaction.
By the close of the first half, Newcastle had mustered 17 per cent possession. That dropped to 10 per cent
at times. A graphic after 30 minutes
showed five touches in the City half.
Another stat showed Newcastle, as
a team, had made 24 passes; Nicolas
Otamendi had made 53.
At half-time, Jamie Carragher
called the game “embarrassing”. Fellow pundit Gary Neville was equally
damning. “It’s the most negative 30
minutes I’ve seen in the Premier
League,” he said.
For 30 minutes, Newcastle defended the Gallowgate End so deep
they were in danger of stepping into
The
Sport
Matrix
The stories you
need to know
Aarons
Diame
Shelvey
Murphy
Joselu
Sterling
Aguero
B Silva
Gundogan Fernandinho De Bruyne
Danilo
Otamendi Kompany
Walker
Ederson
Manchester City
Substitutions: Newcastle Gayle (Joselu, 62), Atsu
(Aarons, 71), Merino (Mbemba, 77); Man City Jesus
(Kompany, 11), Mangala (Aguero, 77), Sané (B Silva, 83).
Booked: Newcastle Gayle; Man City xxxxx.
Man of the match Sterling.
Match rating 7/10.
Possession: Newcastle 28% Man City 72%.
Attempts on target: Newcastle 2 Man City 6.
Referee A Marriner (W Midlands).
Attendance 52,311.
the Strawberry Public house at the
corner of the stadium, but there
was a pressing argument ignored of
what they were supposed to do. Rafa
Benitez’s starring XI cost £48million. Add that to the value of the
club Mike Ashley is trying to sell for
£300m and you still do not reach the
£370m Guardiola’s team has cost to
assemble.
Despite the attempt to stifle the
life out of them, City still had plenty
of chances. Sergio Aguero clipped
the outside of the near post in the
seventh minute. Kevin De Bruyne
fired over from the edge of the pen-
RUGBY UNION
May escapes ban for
Saracens red card
Jonny May will not face a suspension
for his red card in Leicester’s 29-17
Premiership loss to Saracens at
Welford Road on Christmas Eve.
The England wing was dismissed
for two yellow cards for deliberate
interceptions, and Leicester coach
Matt O’Connor was frustrated
by both decisions. A disciplinary
hearing has deemed May’s red card
sufficient punishment and he is free
to play in Leicester’s New Year’s Eve
trip to Exeter Chiefs.
alty area and, in the 18th minute, Rob
Elliot excelled with a fine save to tip
over Aguero’s glancing header.
Substitute Gabriel Jesus was denied by Elliot and De Bruyne shot
over with his leg foot.
And yet, for all that, and the feeling of inevitability when City scored,
there was a mistake in its inception
as Chancel Mbemba, the right- sided
of the three Newcastle central defenders, failed to track the run of
Raheem Sterling.
That meant the Newcastle captain, Jamaal Lascelles, watched
by the England manager Gareth
Southgate, had to attempt to block
the pass. He could not get there
in time but it was still the finest of
touches from Sterling to finally open
the scoring, touching the ball into
the Newcastle net with the sole of
his boot.
Sterling said: “They soaked up
Raheem Sterling (above) looks up
after scoring the winning goal for
City; Sergio Aguero (below) fails to
find the target REUTERS/AFP/GETTY
TENNIS
Murray: I just want to play again
Andy Murray has admitted he has
been forced to readjust his aims
for the coming season after
struggling with injury for
the last 12 months.
After the highs
of 2016, the former
world No 1 endured
a difficult 2017 as his
form deteriorated due
to a hip injury.
His last appearance
came in a five-set defeat to
Sam Querrey in the Wimbledon
quarter-finals in July. The
30-year-old Scot has been
undergoing an intensive
programme of rehabilitation
to prepare him for the new
season. Murray (left) said:
“The goals change and I
remember now how much
I just loved playing tennis
– it isn’t about winning
every match that I play in the
future or winning more slams.
“I want to be fit and healthy and
that is what is driving me just now.”
the pressure really well and tried
to counter-attack, but we put press
on ourselves at times and it did not
make it easy. We showed team spirit,
stayed calm and got the win.
“We have got quite a few that can
find the pass. These players can see
a pass, you just have to make the
run. It was a great team performance today and a great ball from
Kevin De Bruyne for the goal.”
A third of the game had gone
when Sterling scored. Newcastle,
the city and the team, stirred in the
34th minute. A right-wing cross
from DeAndre Yedlin was missed as
Kyle Walker slipped. Rolando Aarons dinked a chip over Ederson and
it needed a saving clearance on the
line from Otamendi to stop the most
unlikely of equalisers.
The pattern soon returned, however. Paul Dummett blocked an effort from Aguero on his own line and
FOOTBALL
Flanagan charged
with assault
Liverpool defender Jon Flanagan
has been charged with common
assault, police have said. Merseyside
Police said the 24-year-old full-back
had been charged following an
incident in Liverpool city centre on
Friday. Flanagan has been released
on conditional police bail and
will appear before Liverpool City
Magistrates’ Court on 2 January.
The football club said they will
not be commenting while the case
is ongoing.
NEWS
2-31
VOICES
16-20
TV
32-33
IQ
34-41
BUSINESS SPORT
42-43
47-56
i THURSDAY
28 DECEMBER 2017
55
Van Dijk finally seals his dream
move after months of wrangling
» continued from back page
at different stages over the past
six months, but the defender has
long had his heart set on a move
to Anfield.
The agreement completes
months of protracted negotiations
between the two clubs, with Van
Dijk first handing in a transfer request in August.
“I have been left frustrated by the
club’s position that I am not for sale
and am disappointed that enquiries
from multiple top clubs have been
consistently rebuffed,” he complained at the time.
However, a move fell through
when Liverpool apologised for mak- New record buy Virgil van Dijk pictured with a Liverpool shirt yesterday
ing an alleged illegal approach,
after Southampton made
He has made just 12 ap- £90m purchase of Paul Pogba, in
an official complaint to
pearances in all compe- August 2016.
the Premier League.
titions this season and
Van Dijk’s former club Celtic will
Van Dijk remained
was left out of recent benefit from the record transfer fee,
on the south coast
games against Chel- with the Scottish champions underbut missed the start
sea, Huddersfield stood to have had a 10 per cent sellLeague goals
conceded by
of the season amid
Town and Totten- on agreement on any future transfer.
Liverpool this
concerns over his
ham Hotspur.
Though Van Dijk will join the
season – the most of
focus and mentality,
Van Dijk’s fee of club on 1 January, he will not be
any
club
currently
before being slowly re£75m is level with able to register as a player until
in the top five
integrated into the firstManchester United 2 January, so will not be available for
team under new manager
striker Romelu Lukaku Liverpool’s trip to Burnley on MonMauricio Pellegrino.
and behind only the club’s day. THE INDEPENDENT
23
Elliot did well to deny Sterling’s shot
from the edge of the penalty area.
And then came a second half that
ended with a Dwight Gayle glancing
header going narrowly wide of the
Manchester City upright.
Gayle also received a yellow card
for simulation in the 75th minute
when he looked better placed to
shoot. By then, Guardiola’s exaggerated touchline demeanour told you
that Newcastle had somehow stayed
in the fight until the final bell, even
though De Bruyne had hit a post,
Ilkay Gundogan had watched an effort tipped away by Elliot and Aguero
had had a goal disallowed for offside.
It was City’s day, however, it is their
run, and it will, barring the most
unlikely of capitulations, be their
title. But Benitez had at least raised
a question about what is acceptable in the attempt to stop them. THE
INDEPENDENT
RUGBY UNION
Bath fined £60k for
releasing Faletau
Bath have been fined £60,000 for
allowing Taulupe Faletau to feature
in Wales’ autumn international
clash with South Africa. Wales’
fourth autumn Test fell outside
World Rugby’s official window, but
Bath released Faletau for the 24-22
victory earlier this month. Bath
admitted breaching regulations and
an initial £90,000 fine was reduced
by £30,000. Premiership Rugby say
Bath’s co-operation in the process
meant that the fine was reduced.
Premier League table
Man City
Man United
Chelsea
Liverpool
Tottenham
Arsenal
Burnley
Leicester
Everton
Watford
Hudd’field
Brighton
Stoke
So’ton
Newcastle
C Palace
West Ham
B’mouth
West Brom
Swansea
P
20
20
20
20
20
19
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
19
20
20
20
20
W
19
13
13
10
11
10
9
7
7
7
6
5
5
4
5
4
4
4
2
3
D
1
4
3
8
4
4
6
6
6
4
5
6
5
7
3
6
6
5
9
4
L
0
3
4
2
5
5
5
7
7
9
9
9
10
9
12
9
10
11
9
13
F
61
43
34
46
39
34
18
30
24
29
18
15
23
20
19
16
22
18
14
11
A Pts
12 58
16 43
14 42
23 38
20 37
23 34
17 33
30 27
30 27
35 25
32 23
25 21
41 20
30 19
30 18
29 18
38 18
31 17
27 15
31 13
Southampton have
gone backwards under
Pellegrino, says Yoshida
By Tom Allnutt
Maya Yoshida has admitted that
Southampton have got worse
under Mauricio Pellegrino this
season but has advised against
another managerial change.
After their Boxing Day
thrashing at the hands of
Tottenham, Yoshida said
the players remain behind
Pellegrino, while also appearing
to question the decision to sack
Claude Puel in the summer.
Saints finished eighth under
the Frenchman last season, 12
points clear of the relegation
CRICKET
Proteas win first four-day Test
The first four-day Test failed to
make it past the half-way mark
yesterday as South Africa
trounced Zimbabwe by
an innings and 120 runs
at Port Elizabeth.
The home side
took 16 wickets on
day two as Zimbabwe
crumbled to 68 in the
first innings and then 121
in the second, replying to
South Africa’s 309-9 declared.
Aiden Markram’s 125 off 204 balls
(including two sixes and 14 fours)
put the Proteas in control of the
one-off match.
Morne Morkel (left) took
5 for 21 in the tourists’
first innings, where only
Ryan Burl (16) and Kyle
Jarvis (23) reached
double figures.
Spinner Kashav Mahaaj’s
then took 5 for 59 in the
second innings, with Craig
Ervine top scoring with 23.
» Tim Wigmore, p50
zone, but they now sit 14th in
the table and are just two points
above the bottom three.
They are also winless in
seven Premier League
matches and never
looked like ending
that run at Wembley,
where Spurs ran out
5-2 winners thanks to a
Harry Kane hat-trick.
Asked if Saints
players still have faith
in Pellegrino, Yoshida
(right) said: “Yes, we can’t pass on
responsibility to anyone else – to
the manager, team-mates, the
RUGBY UNION
France sack Novès
and appoint Brunel
Guy Novès has been sacked as
France coach and replaced by
Jacques Brunel. Noves endured
a torrid two-year spell in charge,
managing just seven wins from 21
matches. That led French Rugby
Federation president Bernard
Laporte to act, with Novès, 63,
becoming the first Les Bleus coach
in history to be axed. Brunel, also 63,
will officially take charge next week,
and his contract runs until the 2019
World Cup in Japan.
club. That’s easy. Everyone has to
take responsibility. Claude Puel
was fired last season because
the club wasn’t satisfied. But the
situation is even worse now.
“So just sacking the manager
is clearly not always the best
choice. But it is not my decision,
it is a club decision.”
Pellegrino criticised the
commitment of some of his
players earlier this month and
there was little evidence of any
rally for the Argentine against
Tottenham.
“Does the attitude
need to improve?
I would say yes,”
Yoshida said. “It is
a difficult situation
for Southampton, we
cannot play like this. The
game became too open. We
need to get organised.”
On Kane’s treble, Yoshida
added: “I think for him it was
very easy today.”
Sport on tv
T20 Cricket: Sydney v Adelaide
BT Sport 2, 8am
Skiing: World Cup
Eurosport, 9.15am
Tennis: World Championships
Eurosport 2, 1pm
Darts: PDC World Championships
Sky Sports Arena, 7pm
Football: Crystal Palace v Arsenal
Sky Sports Premier Lge, 7.30pm
Cricket: The Ashes
BT Sport 1, 11pm
Basketball: Celtics v Rockets
BT Sport 1, 1am (Fri)
City too slick Sterling strike makes it Mutko quits
18 wins in row for runaway leaders his role as
chairman
of Russia
World Cup
» Match report, p54-55
By Sam Lovett
Sport
Russia’s deputy prime minister,
Vitaly Mutko, has resigned from
his role as the 2018 World Cup organising committee’s chairman,
less than six months before the
tournament begins.
Having confirmed he had temporarily vacated his position as the
Russian Football Union president
on Monday, Mutko has now left his
post as part of the team preparing
next summer’s tournament, with
Alexey Sorokin taking on the job.
The resignation of Mutko comes
in the same month the former
minister of sport received a lifetime ban from the International
Olympic Committee, following an
investigation into allegations of
state-sponsored doping.
The local organising committee for the World Cup stressed
that Mutko’s departure would
“not affect the preparation” for
the competition, which begins on
14 June when the hosts face Saudi
Arabia in Moscow.
“Given his ongoing duties as a
member of the federal government
of Russia, deputy prime minister
Mutko will continue to oversee the
preparations of the regions as well
as coordinate the construction of
the necessary infrastructure,” the
committee added in a statement.
“Our goal remains unchanged –
to host the tournament at its best
organisational level for the fans
and participants.”
That view was echoed by Mutko,
who told R-Sport: “I will concentrate on working in the government. Sorokin will carry out the
functions of both the chairman of
the organising committee and our
representative in Fifa. There is
still a lot of work, but I am absolutely sure that everything will be
ready on time.”
“Fifa thanks Mr Mutko for his
invaluable contribution to the preparations for the competition so far,”
the world governing body said in a
statement. THE INDEPENDENT
28.12.17
P52
FOOTBALL
Kane’s 10 best
goals of his
record-breaking
12 months
P50
Raheem Sterling
celebrates scoring
Manchester City’s
winner at Newcastle
last night GETTY
» Countdown to 2018, p48
CRICKET
Cook rolls back
the years with
Melbourne
century
Van Dijk agrees £75m deal
to join Liverpool in January
By Luke Brown
P48
CHESS
World champ
takes ethical
stand over
Saudi Arabia
Liverpool will sign Virgil van Dijk
when the transfer window reopens in January after agreeing
a world-record deal to sign the
Southampton defender.
The Dutch centre-back will move
to Anfield in a transfer that is worth
£75m, eclipsing the previous worldrecord fee for a defensive player
set when Manchester City signed
Kyle Walker for £53m. Liverpool
announced last night: “Liverpool
Football Club can confirm they
have reached an agreement with
Southampton for the transfer of
Virgil van Dijk.
“The Reds have agreed a deal
with the south coast club, and
the player himself, that will see
the 26-year-old defender
move to Anfield when
the transfer window
re-opens on 1 January,
2018.” Van Dijk (right),
who will be assigned the squad
number four, commented that he
was “delighted and honoured”
to join the Merseyside club,
who currently sit fourth in the
Premier League table.
Writing on his Instagram
page, Van Dijk said: “Today is
a proud day for me and
my family as I join one
of the biggest clubs in
world football.
“I cannot wait to
pull on the famous red shirt for the
first time in front of the Kop and will
give everything I have to try and
help this great club achieve something special in the years to come.”
Personal terms of around
£180,000-a-week have been agreed
between Van Dijk and the club.
Both Manchester City and Chelsea were also interested and had
made inquiries with Southampton
» Continued on p55
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